Hong Kong Directory 1900





CHRONICLE

AND

DIRECTORY

CHINA

JAPAN

HONGKONG

TONKIN

MACAO

C

ANNAM

900.

COREA

EASTERN

SIBERIA

COCHIN CHINA

NETHERLANDS INDIA

BRITISH NORTH

BORNEO

SARAWAK

SIAM

STRAITS

SETTLEMENTS

MALAY STATES

PHILIPPINES

PLANS AND DESCRIPTIONS

HOUSE FLAGS

 

+

ARNHOLD.KARBERG ICO

F. BLACKHEAD CO

BORNEO C9

Hong Kong

BOUSTEAD & C Strats

BOYD ZCO

Amoy

BRADLEY & C?

J.J.B.

BROWNE & C

Japan

BUCHHEISTER & C

Shanghai

BUTTERFIELD & SWIRE

CANADIAN PACIFIC

LINE

CARLOWITZ=C!

BRANDAO & C Hong Kong

MUTUAL

X

+

CHINA MERCHANT

S.N.C.

C&J. TRADING CO

CHINA MUTUAL

S.N.CO

CLARKSON & CO

Vladivostock

CORNABE, ECKFORD & CO

Chefbo

ALFRED DENT & C

DODWELL. & C°

FERGUSSON=C

Chefoo

GIBB, LIVINGSTON ZC?

GILMAN & CO LAVERS & CO

JOHN GITTINS & CO Poochow

HALL&HOLTZ L

K&A

HOLLIDAY, WISE &C

'JARDINE,MATHESON #G(r)

JEBSEN & C

KUNST & ALBERS Vladivostock sc.

TB

LINSTEAD & DAVIS LLOYD, KHOO TIONG PON&C

Hong-bong

Amoy

MACLEOD & CO

Manilla &c.

MAITLAND & C9

M

+

M

+

D. LAPRAIK LC?

LAUTS & HAESLOOP LAUTS,WEGENER & C

M

M'ALISTER & C?

Straits

MM

MALCAMPO &C?

Amoy

Á MARKWALD & CO

Siam

A.R.MARTY

MARTY&C?

G.M? BAIN

MELCHERS & C

MESSAGERIES MARITIMES

MEYER & C

MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHIA

MORRIS &C

Shanghai

MOURILYAN, HEIMANN & CO

Japor

NILS MOLLERI SONS

Shanghai

NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA

NORDDEUTSCHER LLOYD

H. B. & M.

OCCIDENTAL & ORIENTAL.C

OSTASIATISCHE HANDELS GES.

P.M.S.8.C

PASEDAG & CO Amay

P&O.S.N.CO

H.A.PETERSEN&C

Amgy

REUTER, BRÖCKELMANN&C SANDER,WIELER & CO

FD.SAS800N,SONS&CT

ME

A.SCHOMBERG & C SCOTTISH ORIENTAL S.S.CO

Hothow

SHEWAN.TOMES & CO

S

X

SIEMSSEN & C

M. SKÖTT & C°

SMITH,BELL & C

Manillo

GEO.R.STEVENS &C STRAITS STEAMSHIP C

Hong trong

TAIT & C

kmay

J G.Bartholomew. Lohn?

THE

CHRONICLE & DIRECTORY

FOR

CHINA, JAPAN, COREA, INDO-CHINA, STRAITS SETTLEMENTS, MALAY STATES, SIAM, NETHERLANDS INDIA, BORNEO. THE PHILIPPINES, &C.

(WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED "THE CHINA DIRECTORY'

"THE HONGKONG DIRECTORY AND HONG LIST FOR THE FAR EAST")¦

AND

FOR THE YEAR

1900 17,461

BIBLIO

"Abgegeben v. d. Bibliothek d. Auswärtigen Amts.

THIRTY-EIGHTH YEAR OF PUBLICATION

Preußische Staatsbibliothek) Berlin

HONGKONG

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED AT THE "DAILY PRESS" OFFICE

WYNDHAM AND D'AGUILAR STRØETS

MCM.

Uk 6923

LONDON

Do.

AGENTS

.Mr. F. Algar, 11, Clement's Lane, Lombard St., E.C. .Messrs. Street & Co., 30, Cornhill, E.C.

PARIS ......................Messrs. G.-E. Puel de Lobel & Cie., 53, Rue Lafayette GERMANY

          ..Messrs. Mahlau & Waldschmidt, Frankfort a/M. UNITED STATES, EAST Mr. A. J. Hart, 826, N Carey Street, Baltimore, Md. SAN FRANCISCO.........Mr. L. P. Fisher, 20 and 21, Merchants' Exchange SOUTH AFRICA .........Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Long Street, Cape Town

.............................Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, 123, Pitt Street

SYDNEY

MELBOURNE

BRISBANE

CALCUTTA

BOMBAY

COLOMBO.

BATAVIA.. PENANG SINGAPORE. BANGKOK

SAIGON

TONKIN

MANILA

YOKOHAMA

KOBE

NAGASAKI

FORMOSA

COREA......

VLADIVOSTOCK

SHANGHAI, &C.

TIENTSIN

PORT ARTHUR

Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, 124 and 126, Queen Street ...Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Queen Street

Messrs. W. Newman & Co., 4, Dalhousie Square "Times of India" Office, Elphinstone Circle

Messrs. A. M. & J. Ferguson

..Messrs. H. M. Van Dorp & Co.

.Messrs. Graham & Co., Ld., Beach St., George Town .Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 32, Raffles Place .Messrs. A. Berli & Co.

Messrs. Kloss & Co., 9, Quay de l'Arroyo Chinois Mr. W. Paulus, Rue Jean Dupuis, Hanoi Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., 14, Escolta

.Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 60, Main Stre-t ..."Kobe Chronicle" Office

The "Nagasaki Press"

...Mr A W. Gillinghamı, Tamsui

.The "Nagasaki Press," Nagasaki

.......The "Nagasaki Press " Nagasaki

Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, The Bund .Messrs. H. Blow & Co.

.......Messrs. Sietas, Block & Co.

CHEFOO & WEIHAIWEI Messrs. H. Sietas & Co.

TSINTAU (KIAOCHAU) Me-srs. Sietas, Plambeck & Co.

FOOCHOW

ΑΜΟΥ

SWATOW

MACAO

.Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., Ld.

....Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Kulangsoo

Yun Cheong Book Store

...........Mr. A. A. da Cruz

724.412

#

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1402.

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Artistic Lithographers. Printers & Binders.

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A SPECIALTY.

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WIRE CABLES.

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6

31⁄2 IN

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LEISTON WORKS, LEISTON, SUFFOLK.

TO REACH CHINESE BUYERS

ADVERTISE IN CHINESE

THE

IN

香港中

CHUNG NGOI SON PO, Đ

THE OLDEST CHINESE NEWSPAPER.

Published Daily in Hongkong, and circulated wherever Chinese

are to be found, that is in every part of the World.

Translations Free.

Blocks Accepted.

PAGK

House Flags, Plate of

.Frontispiece

Amoy, Descriptive and Statistical

INDEX-DIRECTORY

Kobe (Hyogo) Directory.

PAGE

.265

Amoy Directory

..266

Amoy Ladies' Directory

Kobe (Hyogo), Insurance Offices. Kowloon (British), Plan of .

64

78

.271

Annam, Descriptive...

407-409

Annan, Provinces Directory

.410

Anpang, Descriptive..

Kowloon (Chinese) Directory

Kowloon (Chinese), Descriptive

Kowloon New Territory, Map of

.369

.308

..285

91

Auping Directo, y

Kunsan Directory

.285

94

Bangkok, Descriptive and Statistical.

kwanchauwan, Descriptive

.108

438

Bangkok Directory

Labuan, Descriptive and Statistical

.290

.439

Batavia, Descriptive

Labuan Directory

608

and Statistical

.554

Batavia Directory

Lappa, Descriptive

.609

..555

Lappa Directory

286

Batavia, Plan of..

.554

Borneo, Descriptive and Statistical

Lungchow, Descriptive and Statistical

286

.604

Borneo, British North, Descriptive and Statistical

Lungchow Directory

.293

293

.608

Borneo, British North, Directory

609

Borneo, British North, Estates Directory

Macao Directory

Macao, Descriptive and Statistical

375

613

Buitenzorg, Descriptive

Macao Ladies' Directory

.376

.555

Cambodia, Descriptive and Statistical

Macassar, Descriptive.

384

433

Cambodia Directory.

Canton, Descriptive and Statistical

Canton Directory

Canton Ladies' Directory

Cebu, Descriptive and Statistical

Cebu Directory

Chefoo, Descriptive and Statistical

Chefoo Directory

Macassar Directory

573

434

275

Malacca Directory

Malacca, Descriptive and Statistical

573

496

277

284

601

Manila, Descriptive and Statistical..

Malay States (Federated) Directory

Malay States (Federated), Descriptive.

.497

617

517

602

Manila Directory

578

580

145

Manila, Insurance Offices

596

146

China, Descriptive and Statistical

Manila, Plan of ..........

576

109

China, Map of..

Mengtzu, Descriptive and Statistical.

291

Chinkiang, Descriptive and Statistical

.Facing Directory

Mengtzu Directory

294

223

      Chungking, Descriptive and Statistical Chungking Directory

Corea, Descriptive and Statistical

Foochow, Descriptive and Statistical

Chunkiang Directory

Corean Ports, Descriptive and Statistical

Corean Ports Directories

Cochin China, Descriptive

Far East, Map of

Foochow Directory

Foocnow Ladies' Directory

Military Forces (British) in China

343

..224 .97-108

Missionaries in Japan, Protestant

84

.98-103

Nagasaki Directory

Nagasaki, Descriptive and Statistical

78

247

Nanking, Descriptive

79

226

247

Nanking Directory

.227

.413

Naval Squadron, British

96

Naval Squadron, French

615

. Facing Directory

Naval Squadron, German

.622

257

258

Naval Squadron, Russian

Naval Squadron, Japanese.

.628

630

261

Naval Squadron, United States

.622

Formosa, Descriptive

Foreign Residents, Alphabetical list of.

641

90

Formosa Directory

Negri Sembilan Directory

Negri Sembilan, Descriptive and Statistical

.621

.520

91

Haiphong, Descriptive and Statistical

396

Haiphong Directory.

Netherlands India Directory

Netherlands India, Descriptive and Statistical

.521

542

.546

396

Hakodate, Descriptive and Statistical

Newchwang, Descriptive and Statistical

.139

58

Hakodate Directory

Newchwang Directory..

.140

58

Hangchow, Descriptive and Statistical

Ningpo, Descriptive and Statistical

250

Haugehow Directory

Ningpo Directory.

252

.253

251

Haukow Directory

Hankow, Descriptive and Statistical

Osaka, Descriptive and Statistical

60

233

Osaka Directory

GO

234

Padang, Descriptive

Hanoi Directory

Hanoi, Descriptive and Statistical

.571

387

Padang Directory

.571

338

Hanoi, Plan of

Pahang, Descriptive and Statistical

..517

388

Paliang Directory.

518

Hoihow Directory.

Hollow, Descriptive and Statistical

291

Pakhoi, Descriptive and Statistical

..290

292

Pakhoi Directory

291

OKоw, Descriptive

295

Peitaiho, Descriptive

Honow Directory

.137

295

Hongkong, Descriptive and Statistical

Peitaiho Directory

.138

297

Peking, Descriptive and Statistical

Hongkong Directory

114

310

Peking Directory

Hongkong, Insurance Offices

115

359

Penang, Descriptive and Statistical

Hongkong Ladies' Directory

.500

363

Penang Directory

Hongkong, Peak Directory

.501

368

Penang, Plan of

Hoagkong, Plan of Peak District

500

363

Perak, Descriptive and Statistical

..532

Hongkong, Plan of Victoria

297

Perak Directory..

Hongkong Streets Directory.

533

370

Hue, Descriptive and Statistical

407

Port Arthur, Descriptive

Philippines, Descriptive and Statistical

576

Hue, Directory

407

Port Arthur Directory.

143

Ichang, Descriptive and Statistical.

113

245

Saigon, Descriptive and Statistical.

414

Ienang Directory

246

Saigon Directory

Indo-China, French, Descriptive

414

386

Saigon, Plan of

416

Horo, Descriptive and Statistical

598

lionio Directory

Samshui, Descriptive

.287

599

Samshui Directory

287

Japan, Descriptive and Statistical

11

Jelebu, Descriptive

Santu (Funing-fu), Descriptive.

.256

520

Jelebu Directory

Santu (Funing-fu) Directory.

250

523

Sarawak, Descriptive and Statistical

Johore, Descriptive and Statistical.

.604

514

Sarawak Directory

.605

Jonore Directory

.515

Selangor, Descriptive and Statistical,

523

Kelung, Descriptive and Statistical

91

Selangor Directory

.524

Ketung Directory

92

Selangor Estates Directory

..530

Kewkiang, Descriptive and Statistical

.230

Semarang, Descriptive

..568

Kewkiang Directory .

231

Semarang Directory

...568

Kiaochau, Descriptive..

.153

Seoul, Descriptive..........

97

Kiaocnau Directory

.153

Seoul Directory

08

Kobe (Hyogo), Descriptive and Statistical

63

Shanghai, Descriptive and Statistical

157

Kobe and Hyogo, Plan of

64

Shanghai Directory

172

PAGE

Shanghai, Insurance Offices

217

Shanghai, Roads in the Settlements

.220

Shanghai, Plan of Foreign Settlements

.160

!

Shanghai, Plan of Hongkew and Settlement Extension .168

hasi, Descriptive

.244

Chasi Directory

.245

ingapore Directory.

giam, Descriptive and Statistical..

Singapore, Descriptive and Statistical

ingapore, Insurance Offices

ingapore, Plan of

oochow, Descriptive

oochow Directory

ourabaia, Descriptive

ourabaia Directory

437

.455

Tokyo Directory

.459

INDEX

DIRECTORY, Continued

Tamsui, Descriptive and Statistical Tamsui Directory.

Tientsin, Descriptive and Statistical Tientsin Directory

Tientsin Insurance Offices..

Tientsin, Plan of Foreign Settlements Tokyo, Descriptive and Statistical

493 Tonkin, Provinces Directory

Tsiutau (Kiaochau), Descriptive. Tsintau (Kiaochau Directory

Vladivostock, Descriptive

Tonkin, Descriptive

V

PAGE

91

92

.120

.122

.135

120

16

18

.387

.403

450

.153

222

.153

222

8

.563

Vladivostock Directory

4

.564

Weihaiwei, Descriptive

.151

teamers, Coasting and River

.631

Weihaiwei Directory

161

traits Settlements, Descriptive

455

Weihaiwei Ladies' Directory

.153

umatra (East Coast), Descriptive

574

umatra (East Coast) Directory

Wenchow, Descriptive and Statistical

255

575

ungei Ujong, Descriptive and Statistical

Wenchow Directory

256

520

Whampoa, Descriptive and Statistical

284

ungei Ujong Directory

522

watow, Descriptive and Statistical

Whampoa Directory

285

272

watow Directory.

273

watow Ladies' Directory

Wuchow-fu, Descriptive and Statistical Wuchow-fu Directory

237

289

275

Szemao, Descriptive

Wuhu, Descriptive and Statistical

228

295

Wuhu Directory .

229

zemao Directory

296

Takow and Tainanfoo, Descriptive and Statistical

Yochow, Descriptive

243

94

Takow and Tainanfoo Directory

Yochow Directory

.241

94

Taku, Descriptive and Statistical

Yokohama, Descriptive and Statistical

36

.136

Yokohama Directory

37

Taku Directory.

137

Yokohama, Insurance Offices.

55

Talienwan, Descriptive

.143

Yokohama, Plan of

36

Talienwan Directory

.143

TREATIES, CODES, AND GENERAL

PAGE

Admiralty, Rules of Procedure in Supreme Court

283

Germany, Peking, 1850 ....

Advertisers, Index to

vi

Germany, Kiaocha a Convention, 1598

PACK

75

$0

Agents

II

Calendar and Chronology

ΧΙ

Germany, Railway and Mining Concession, 1898.. 81 Great Britain, Nanking, 1842

3

Calendar, Anglo-Chinese

1X

Great Britain, Tientsin, 1858

5

Chair, Boat and Coolie Hire, Hongkong

390

Great Britain, Peking Convention, 1880

12

Chinese Festivals and Observances

Chambers of Commerce, Scale of Commissions, &c.

.332

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, 1876

33

ΧΧΕΙΣ

Chinese Passenger Act.

Consular Fees, Table of .

..304

229

Customs Seizure, China, Articles relative to

Court of Consuls at Shanghai, Rules of Procedure

.236

31

Customs Tariff, China.

15

Customs Tariff, China, Rules.

28

Customs Tariff, Japan, Conventional

.153

Customs Tariff, Japan, Statutory

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, Additional Great Britain, Opium Convention, 1856 Great Britain, Chungking Convention, 1890 Great Britain, Thibet-Sikkim Convention, 1890 Great Britain, Burmah Convention, 1897.. Great Britain, Kowloon Extension, 1893 Great Britain, Weihaiwei Convention, 1899 Japan, Shimonoseki, 1895.

87

39

40

41

41

43

44

114

..156

Customs Tariff, Siam

Japan, Liaotung Convention, 1895.

118

.163

Customs Tariff, Corea..

Japan, Commercial, Peking, 1896

119

.133

Foreign Jurisdiction Act, 1890..

Japan, New Ports, Peking, 1896

122

179

Portugal, 1883

.106

Foreign Companies in Japan, Regulation for

.381

Russia, St. Petersburg, 1881

83

Harbour Regulations, Japan,

..378

Russia, Regulations for Land Trade

88

Hongkong, Charter of the Colony

297

Hongkong, Code of Civil Procedure

.307

United States of Americ, Tientsin, 1858

Russia, Port Arthur & Talienwan Agreement, 1898 91

93

Hongkong, Code of Civil Procedure Ordinance amended.358

United States of America, Additional, 1863

99

Hongkong, Constitution of Councils,

.299

United States of America, Peking, 1880

.101

Hongkong, Legislative Council, Rules of.

.302

Hongkong, Port Regulations

.363

With Corea:-

United States of America, Immigration, 1894

104

Hongkong, Supreme Court Fees.

.360

Great Britain, 1883

125

Letters Patent Fees, Hongkong

.389

Great Britain, Trade Regulations

.130

Licences, Fees, Hongkong..

.389

Japan, 1876

110

Malay States Federation Agreement, 1896

178

Japan, Supplementary, 1876.

143

Money, Weights and Measures

391

United States, 1882.

.136

Port Regulations for H.B.M. Consulates in China. 375

Orders in Council, II.B.M., China, Japan, Corea ..185-228

With Japan :---

Great Britain, 1894

Postal Guide, Hongkong

146

XXV

Signal, Fire, Storm, &c., Hongkong.

Great Britain, Duties Convention, 1895

..152

.390

Stamp Duties, Hongkong

..385

Supreme and other Courts in China II. B, M., Rules of ..232

Russia. Agreements as to Corea, 1896 and 1898 114-145 United States, 1886, Extradition Treaty

.160

With Siam:-

Trade Marks, Fees, Hongkong.

Supreme Court in China and Japan, H.B.M., Fees....230

Great Britain, 1856

.162

.389

Treaties :-

Great Britain, Trade Regulations with.

.165

France, 1893

With China:-

..168

Japan, 1898

170

France, Tientsin, 1858..

45

Russia, 1899

.174

France, Convention of Peace, 1860.

France, Tientsin, 1885.

France, Trade Regins. for Tonkiu Frontier, 1880

54

56

EQ

...

France, Convention, 1887

France, Convention, 1895

Germany, Tientsin, 1861..

Great Britain and France, Siamese Frontier, 1896 .177 Great Britain and Russia Railway Convention, 1899 175 United States Consular Courts in China, Regulations..287

64

United States Consular and Court Fees

.293

66

Weights and Measures, Money

.301

63

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS.

ADVERTISING AGENTS:-

F. Algar, London

L. P. Fisher, San Francisco

AERATED WATERS MAKERS:-

A. S. Watson & Co. ...

AGENTS AND ATTORNIES :-~~

PAGE

...Back Cover

937

977

Humphreys Estate and Finance Co....

R. C. Wilcox, Hongkong

ANTI-FOULING COMPOSITION:-

Peacock & Buchan, Southampton, England 989 BAKERS :-

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

BANKS:-

965

Chartered Bank of India, A. and China 934 Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corpn. 935 Mon Soon Yuen Bank, Hongkong Mitsu Bishi Goshi-Kwaisha

962

932

Savings Bank, Hongkong and Shanghai 936 Sumitomo Bank, Osaka

Yokohama Specie Bank

...

BELTING MANUFACTURERS :-

Gandy's

DOCKS:-

S. C. Farnham & Co., Shanghai Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. Tanjong Pagar Dock Co., Singapore Yok hama Dock Co. DRAPERS:-

***

Sincere & Co., Honkong ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS:

C. T. Robinson, Hongkong ENGINEERS AND MACHINIST :-

Day, Summers & Co., S uthampton.......... Douglas & Grant, Kirkcaldy, Scotland S. C. Farnham & Co., Shanghai Fenwick & Co., Geo, Hongkong

...

...

...

PAGE

93

950-1

954

55

969

956

viii

992

953

955

R. Garrett & Sons, Ld., Leiston, England... iii Golden State Iron Works, San Francisco... 986 Edward Hayes, Wolverton, England Hongkong & Whampo: Dock Co. Marty & d'Abbadie, Haiphong...

...

Messageries Fluviales de Cochin-chine,

Saigon

992 950-1

952

955

Patent Shaft and Axletree Co., Wednesbury 993 C. A. Peterson, Yokohama

Tanjong Pagar Dock Co, Singapore..... Yokohama Does Co....

936

933

968

BOOKBINDERS :-

51

...

<<

Hongko g Daily Press " Office

997

954

BOOKSELLERS, PUBLISHERS & STATIONERS:-

55

W. Brewer & Co., Shanghai and Hongkong 962 Brewer & Co., Shanghai

ESTATE AGENTS:-

175

BREWERS:

A. M. & J. Ferguson, Colombo...

Yebi u Beer

995

Humphreys Estate and Finance Co. R. C. Wi.cox, Hongkong

9:7

977

FLOUR MERCHANTS:-

977

Sperry Flour Company

...

... Front Fly Leaf

FURNITURE DEALERS:-

BUILDING CONTRACTOR :-

Kan: On, Hongkong...

CANNED GOODS :-

Ca if rnia Fut Canners' Association Field Mercantile Co., San Francisco S. Foster & Co., San Francisco

CANVAS:-

David Corsar & Son

CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS :- The Pharmacy, Hongkong... CIGAR FACTORIES:- Alhambra, Manila Compañia General, Manila.... Carlos Gsell, Manila . La Insular, Manila

W. Kennedy & Co, Manila

963

987

988

A Chee & Co, Hongkong ...

Lawrie Smith & o., Shanghai

GAS WORKS :-

Shanghai Gas Company

967

211

...

189

...

GUNMAKERS :-

988

...

Jeffery & Co., W. J.,

London

:

:..

:

:

991

HOTELS:-

:

:

966

Canton New Victoria

959

Java: Gezonheid, Paroercean

+

958

963

980

...

:

...

982

::

...

981 978-9

981

965

...

...

CIGAR MERCHANTS:-

Kruse & Co., Hongkong

COAL MERCHANTS :---

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong & Port Arthur 965

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong

Hug Lee, Hongkong

...

...

...

964

...

466

***

Hokkaido Colliery and Railway Co. ... 974

K. Ishino & Co., N: gasaki Mitsui Bussan Kaisha

Wing Kee & Co., Hongkong

...

...

...

Macao: Boavista

Nikko, Japan: Kanaya Hotel

Shanghai: Hotel des Colonies Singapore: Rafiles

Tientsin: Astor flouse

Yokohama: Wrights ...

HULLING MACHINERY :-

...

Euge burg Huler Co., New York INSURANCES, FIRE:-

Liverpool and London and Globe Meji Fire Insurance Co.,

...

Phoenix Fire Insurance Co.

INSURANCES, LIFE:-

...

:

:

989

940

...

...

941

940

Equ table Society of United States Back Board Scottish Metrop litan Assurance Co Sun Assurance Company of Canada...

76

971

...

969

INSURANCES, MARINE:-

968

...

Nippon Marine Insurance......

...

968

***

Nippon Sea and Land, Osaka

...

...

...

969

Tokyo Marine Insurance

CURIOS AND FINE ART OBJECTS:-

Kwong Man Shing, Hongkong...

    Kwong Ty Cheong, Hongkong... Sun Shing, Hongkong

...

941

640

Imperial Marine Insurance Co., Tokyo ... 938

...

...

940

939

941

...

959

958

...

...

193

957

959

...

55

...

PAGE

Shanghai, Insurance Offices

217

Shanghai, Roads in the Settlements

.220

Shanghai, Plan of Foreign Settlements

.160

!

Shanghai, Plan of Hongkew and Settlement Extension .168

hasi, Descriptive

.244

Chasi Directory

.245

ingapore Directory.

giam, Descriptive and Statistical..

Singapore, Descriptive and Statistical

ingapore, Insurance Offices

ingapore, Plan of

oochow, Descriptive

oochow Directory

ourabaia, Descriptive

ourabaia Directory

437

.455

Tokyo Directory

.459

INDEX

DIRECTORY, Continued

Tamsui, Descriptive and Statistical Tamsui Directory.

Tientsin, Descriptive and Statistical Tientsin Directory

Tientsin Insurance Offices..

Tientsin, Plan of Foreign Settlements Tokyo, Descriptive and Statistical

493 Tonkin, Provinces Directory

Tsiutau (Kiaochau), Descriptive. Tsintau (Kiaochau Directory

Vladivostock, Descriptive

Tonkin, Descriptive

V

PAGE

91

92

.120

.122

.135

120

16

18

.387

.403

450

.153

222

.153

222

8

.563

Vladivostock Directory

4

.564

Weihaiwei, Descriptive

.151

teamers, Coasting and River

.631

Weihaiwei Directory

161

traits Settlements, Descriptive

455

Weihaiwei Ladies' Directory

.153

umatra (East Coast), Descriptive

574

umatra (East Coast) Directory

Wenchow, Descriptive and Statistical

255

575

ungei Ujong, Descriptive and Statistical

Wenchow Directory

256

520

Whampoa, Descriptive and Statistical

284

ungei Ujong Directory

522

watow, Descriptive and Statistical

Whampoa Directory

285

272

watow Directory.

273

watow Ladies' Directory

Wuchow-fu, Descriptive and Statistical Wuchow-fu Directory

237

289

275

Szemao, Descriptive

Wuhu, Descriptive and Statistical

228

295

Wuhu Directory .

229

zemao Directory

296

Takow and Tainanfoo, Descriptive and Statistical

Yochow, Descriptive

243

94

Takow and Tainanfoo Directory

Yochow Directory

.241

94

Taku, Descriptive and Statistical

Yokohama, Descriptive and Statistical

36

.136

Yokohama Directory

37

Taku Directory.

137

Yokohama, Insurance Offices.

55

Talienwan, Descriptive

.143

Yokohama, Plan of

36

Talienwan Directory

.143

TREATIES, CODES, AND GENERAL

PAGE

Admiralty, Rules of Procedure in Supreme Court

283

Germany, Peking, 1850 ....

Advertisers, Index to

vi

Germany, Kiaocha a Convention, 1598

PACK

75

$0

Agents

II

Calendar and Chronology

ΧΙ

Germany, Railway and Mining Concession, 1898.. 81 Great Britain, Nanking, 1842

3

Calendar, Anglo-Chinese

1X

Great Britain, Tientsin, 1858

5

Chair, Boat and Coolie Hire, Hongkong

390

Great Britain, Peking Convention, 1880

12

Chinese Festivals and Observances

Chambers of Commerce, Scale of Commissions, &c.

.332

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, 1876

33

ΧΧΕΙΣ

Chinese Passenger Act.

Consular Fees, Table of .

..304

229

Customs Seizure, China, Articles relative to

Court of Consuls at Shanghai, Rules of Procedure

.236

31

Customs Tariff, China.

15

Customs Tariff, China, Rules.

28

Customs Tariff, Japan, Conventional

.153

Customs Tariff, Japan, Statutory

Great Britain, Chefoo Convention, Additional Great Britain, Opium Convention, 1856 Great Britain, Chungking Convention, 1890 Great Britain, Thibet-Sikkim Convention, 1890 Great Britain, Burmah Convention, 1897.. Great Britain, Kowloon Extension, 1893 Great Britain, Weihaiwei Convention, 1899 Japan, Shimonoseki, 1895.

87

39

40

41

41

43

44

114

..156

Customs Tariff, Siam

Japan, Liaotung Convention, 1895.

118

.163

Customs Tariff, Corea..

Japan, Commercial, Peking, 1896

119

.133

Foreign Jurisdiction Act, 1890..

Japan, New Ports, Peking, 1896

122

179

Portugal, 1883

.106

Foreign Companies in Japan, Regulation for

.381

Russia, St. Petersburg, 1881

83

Harbour Regulations, Japan,

..378

Russia, Regulations for Land Trade

88

Hongkong, Charter of the Colony

297

Hongkong, Code of Civil Procedure

.307

United States of Americ, Tientsin, 1858

Russia, Port Arthur & Talienwan Agreement, 1898 91

93

Hongkong, Code of Civil Procedure Ordinance amended.358

United States of America, Additional, 1863

99

Hongkong, Constitution of Councils,

.299

United States of America, Peking, 1880

.101

Hongkong, Legislative Council, Rules of.

.302

Hongkong, Port Regulations

.363

With Corea:-

United States of America, Immigration, 1894

104

Hongkong, Supreme Court Fees.

.360

Great Britain, 1883

125

Letters Patent Fees, Hongkong

.389

Great Britain, Trade Regulations

.130

Licences, Fees, Hongkong..

.389

Japan, 1876

110

Malay States Federation Agreement, 1896

178

Japan, Supplementary, 1876.

143

Money, Weights and Measures

391

United States, 1882.

.136

Port Regulations for H.B.M. Consulates in China. 375

Orders in Council, II.B.M., China, Japan, Corea ..185-228

With Japan :---

Great Britain, 1894

Postal Guide, Hongkong

146

XXV

Signal, Fire, Storm, &c., Hongkong.

Great Britain, Duties Convention, 1895

..152

.390

Stamp Duties, Hongkong

..385

Supreme and other Courts in China II. B, M., Rules of ..232

Russia. Agreements as to Corea, 1896 and 1898 114-145 United States, 1886, Extradition Treaty

.160

With Siam:-

Trade Marks, Fees, Hongkong.

Supreme Court in China and Japan, H.B.M., Fees....230

Great Britain, 1856

.162

.389

Treaties :-

Great Britain, Trade Regulations with.

.165

France, 1893

With China:-

..168

Japan, 1898

170

France, Tientsin, 1858..

45

Russia, 1899

.174

France, Convention of Peace, 1860.

France, Tientsin, 1885.

France, Trade Regins. for Tonkiu Frontier, 1880

54

56

EQ

...

France, Convention, 1887

France, Convention, 1895

Germany, Tientsin, 1861..

Great Britain and France, Siamese Frontier, 1896 .177 Great Britain and Russia Railway Convention, 1899 175 United States Consular Courts in China, Regulations..287

64

United States Consular and Court Fees

.293

66

Weights and Measures, Money

.301

63

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS.

ADVERTISING AGENTS:-

F. Algar, London

L. P. Fisher, San Francisco

AERATED WATERS MAKERS:-

A. S. Watson & Co. ...

AGENTS AND ATTORNIES :-~~

PAGE

...Back Cover

937

977

Humphreys Estate and Finance Co....

R. C. Wilcox, Hongkong

ANTI-FOULING COMPOSITION:-

Peacock & Buchan, Southampton, England 989 BAKERS :-

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong

BANKS:-

965

Chartered Bank of India, A. and China 934 Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corpn. 935 Mon Soon Yuen Bank, Hongkong Mitsu Bishi Goshi-Kwaisha

962

932

Savings Bank, Hongkong and Shanghai 936 Sumitomo Bank, Osaka

Yokohama Specie Bank

...

BELTING MANUFACTURERS :-

Gandy's

DOCKS:-

S. C. Farnham & Co., Shanghai Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. Tanjong Pagar Dock Co., Singapore Yok hama Dock Co. DRAPERS:-

***

Sincere & Co., Honkong ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS:

C. T. Robinson, Hongkong ENGINEERS AND MACHINIST :-

Day, Summers & Co., S uthampton.......... Douglas & Grant, Kirkcaldy, Scotland S. C. Farnham & Co., Shanghai Fenwick & Co., Geo, Hongkong

...

...

...

PAGE

93

950-1

954

55

969

956

viii

992

953

955

R. Garrett & Sons, Ld., Leiston, England... iii Golden State Iron Works, San Francisco... 986 Edward Hayes, Wolverton, England Hongkong & Whampo: Dock Co. Marty & d'Abbadie, Haiphong...

...

Messageries Fluviales de Cochin-chine,

Saigon

992 950-1

952

955

Patent Shaft and Axletree Co., Wednesbury 993 C. A. Peterson, Yokohama

Tanjong Pagar Dock Co, Singapore..... Yokohama Does Co....

936

933

968

BOOKBINDERS :-

51

...

<<

Hongko g Daily Press " Office

997

954

BOOKSELLERS, PUBLISHERS & STATIONERS:-

55

W. Brewer & Co., Shanghai and Hongkong 962 Brewer & Co., Shanghai

ESTATE AGENTS:-

175

BREWERS:

A. M. & J. Ferguson, Colombo...

Yebi u Beer

995

Humphreys Estate and Finance Co. R. C. Wi.cox, Hongkong

9:7

977

FLOUR MERCHANTS:-

977

Sperry Flour Company

...

... Front Fly Leaf

FURNITURE DEALERS:-

BUILDING CONTRACTOR :-

Kan: On, Hongkong...

CANNED GOODS :-

Ca if rnia Fut Canners' Association Field Mercantile Co., San Francisco S. Foster & Co., San Francisco

CANVAS:-

David Corsar & Son

CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS :- The Pharmacy, Hongkong... CIGAR FACTORIES:- Alhambra, Manila Compañia General, Manila.... Carlos Gsell, Manila . La Insular, Manila

W. Kennedy & Co, Manila

963

987

988

A Chee & Co, Hongkong ...

Lawrie Smith & o., Shanghai

GAS WORKS :-

Shanghai Gas Company

967

211

...

189

...

GUNMAKERS :-

988

...

Jeffery & Co., W. J.,

London

:

:..

:

:

991

HOTELS:-

:

:

966

Canton New Victoria

959

Java: Gezonheid, Paroercean

+

958

963

980

...

:

...

982

::

...

981 978-9

981

965

...

...

CIGAR MERCHANTS:-

Kruse & Co., Hongkong

COAL MERCHANTS :---

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong & Port Arthur 965

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong

Hug Lee, Hongkong

...

...

...

964

...

466

***

Hokkaido Colliery and Railway Co. ... 974

K. Ishino & Co., N: gasaki Mitsui Bussan Kaisha

Wing Kee & Co., Hongkong

...

...

...

Macao: Boavista

Nikko, Japan: Kanaya Hotel

Shanghai: Hotel des Colonies Singapore: Rafiles

Tientsin: Astor flouse

Yokohama: Wrights ...

HULLING MACHINERY :-

...

Euge burg Huler Co., New York INSURANCES, FIRE:-

Liverpool and London and Globe Meji Fire Insurance Co.,

...

Phoenix Fire Insurance Co.

INSURANCES, LIFE:-

...

:

:

989

940

...

...

941

940

Equ table Society of United States Back Board Scottish Metrop litan Assurance Co Sun Assurance Company of Canada...

76

971

...

969

INSURANCES, MARINE:-

968

...

Nippon Marine Insurance......

...

968

***

Nippon Sea and Land, Osaka

...

...

...

969

Tokyo Marine Insurance

CURIOS AND FINE ART OBJECTS:-

Kwong Man Shing, Hongkong...

    Kwong Ty Cheong, Hongkong... Sun Shing, Hongkong

...

941

640

Imperial Marine Insurance Co., Tokyo ... 938

...

...

940

939

941

...

959

958

...

...

193

957

959

...

55

...

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS, Continued

PAGE

JEWELLERS, &c:-

Ismail & Raheem, Singapore

976

Kwong Man Shing, Hongkong

968

Sun Shing, Hongkong

969

LACE MANUFACTURERS :-

Fr. Blunck, Hongkong

***

967

xxiv

LITHOGRAPHY:-

Union Lith graph Co, San Francisco Victoria Lithographic Works, Hongkong 961

MAP MAKERS:-

...

W. & A. K. Johnston, Edinburgh MERCHANTS, COMMISSION AGENTS, &C:-

Butterfield & Swire

Canton Trading Co., Cant n

SEEDSMEN

H E. Amoore, Kobe... SHIPBUILDERS :-

...

Day, Summers & Co., Southampton S. C Farnham & Co., Shangh ti Geo. Fenwick & Co., Hongkong Ed. II yes, Wolverton, Engla d Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Co.... Marty & d'Abbadie, Haiphong... Mes ageries Fluviales. Saigon C. A Peterson, Yokohama

vii

PAGE

975

viii

953

...

955

...

992

950-1

952

955

962

51

Tanjong Pagar Dock Co., Singapore

954

...

937

Yokoh ma Dock Cc:

55

970

SHIPCHANDLERS :-

982

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong

964

988

...

...

966

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong and Port Arthur 965 Carmichael & Co., Hongkong

963

962

Hoo Cheong Wo & Co, Hongkong

970

...

971

Wing Kee & Co., Hongkong

969

975

SHIPPING AGENCY:-

975

962

955

...

947

...

941

968

944

***

948

A. M Cappen's Sons, New York Field Mercantile Co.. San Francisco Fun: Tang, Hongkong

...

Man Cheong Yuen, Hongkong Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Nakamura & Co., Tokyo Nosawa & Co., Tokyo METAL MERCHANTS:

Eing, Hongkong MONUMENTS:-

-

---

+

Quan Wan & Co., Hongkong

NEWSPAPERS :-

Ceylon Observer.

Chung Ngoi San Po Hongkong Daily Press Hongkong Weekly Press Manila Times

"El Progreso," Man la Tropical Agriculturist

PAINTS:-

Carbolineum-Avenarius

...

...

Paraffine Paint Co., San Francisco Peacock & Buchan, Southampton Torbay Paint Co., London

PAPER MAKERS:-

John Dickinson & Co., London PAVEMENTS:-

:

:

...

995 ...1000

Yuen Wo Company, Hongkong STEAMSHIP LINES:-

Austrian Lloyd's Steam Navigation Co. China Navigation Co...

Compañia Trasatlantica

...

Eastern and Australian Steamship Co.

II'kong, Canton & Macao S. B. Co. Back Fly Leaf Koninklijike Paketvaart Maatschappij

...

...

Scottish Oriental Steamship Co.

Service des Corres Fluviales du Tonkin... 949 STEEL AND WIRE PRODUCTS :-

American Steel & Wire Co., San Fr n isco xXV STEVEDORES:-

946

997

Nippon Yusen Kaisha

...

943

981

Norddeutscher Lloyd...

945

983

Ocean Steamship Company

946

982

Osaka Shosen Kaisha.........

...

942

...

...

995

Peninsular & Oriental S. N. Co.

917

***

948

968

989

989

X

Wingkee & Co., Hongkong

969

990

STOREKEEPERS, SHIPCHANDLERS, &C.:-

F. Blackhead & Co., Hongkong...

964

994

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong and Port Arthur 965 Carmichael & Co., Hongkong

...

963

iii

Kruse & Co., Hongkong

965

Meidi-ya, Tokyo, Yokohama, &c.

973

989

TEA DEALER:-

Yn-Chong, Hongkong

968

...

...

970

TIMBER DEALERS :-

970

L. Mallory, Hongkong

963

960

972

984

Company at Paray le Monial, France

PEN MAKERS:-

J. Gillott & Sons, Birmingham PHONOGRAPHS :-

Peter Bacigalupi, San Francisco PHOTOGRAPHERS :-

Mee Cheung, Hongkong ... H. Yera, Hongkong PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTICLES:-

A Chee & Co., Hongkong PICTURE FRAME MAKER :-

Wo Sun, Hongkong

PORTLAND CEMENT:-

:

:

:

:

TRAMWAY:

961 Peak Tramway, Hongkong

TYPEFOUNDERS:-

909 Tokyo Tsukiji Type Foundry

TYPEWRITERS:

Green Island Cement Co., H'kong & Macao 956

PRINTERS :-

Hongkong Daily Press Office

PRINTERS' FURNISHERS:-

John Dickinson & Co.

PROVISION DEALERS :-

:

The Blicken.derfer The Yost

WATCHMAKERS :--

...

American Waltham Watch Co. Sin Kee, Amoy

Caldbeck, Macgregor & Co., China J. W. Gand- & C..

997

......

990

WINES AND SPIRITS :-

987

...

988

992

...

966

California Fruit Cancers' Association S. Foster & Co., San Francisco... RICE MACHINERY :-

Douglas & Grant, Kirkcaldy, Scotland ROPE MANUFACTURERS: -

Hongkong Rope Manufacturing Co.

:

The Pharmacy, Hongkong

:

::

: :

...

985

975

970

959

189

...

963

964

...

967

...Front Cover

II. Price & Co. Hongkong and Manila Ruinart, pè e et fils, Reims

A. S. Watson & Co.

DAY, SUMMERS & CO.,

Engineers, Boiler-makers, Ship & Yacht Builders,

ESTABLISHED 1834.

Northam Ironworks, Southampton.

LAND SHEERS.

Contractors to the English Admiralty and War Office, The Imperial Russian Gov- ernment, The Royal Spanish Government, The Egyptian Government, Crown Agents to the Colonies, etc, etc.

FLOATING SHELRS.

These Works, which cover 10 acres, are situated on the River Itchen, close to Northam Station, on the London and South- Western Main Line.

There are two Steam Hauling-up Slips and two sets of Steam Sheers on the premises, with extensive Wharf accommodation, and the firm manufacture their own Castings and Forgings.

The workshops are fitted with the best and newest type of machines and tools and powerful overhead travelling cranes.

Inventors and Patentees of STEAM TRIPOD TRAVERSING SHEEKS & NON-FLEETING WIRE-ROPE HAULING-UP SLIP MACHINERY.

Repairs to Vessels and Machinery undertaken with Despatch.

Anglo-Chinese Calendar for 1900.

BEING LXIII. & LXIV. OF QUEEN VICTORIA,

XXV. of Kwang-sü, being Ki-hai, or the 36th Year of the Cycle, and XXVI. of Kwang-së, being Kang-chee, or the 37th Year of the Cycle.

子庚次歲年六十二緒光至亥己次歲年五十二緒光

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER

(31 Days)

(28 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

(31 Days)

(30 Daya)

(31 Days)

(30 Days)

(31 Days)

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22 S.

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26 Thur. 26

27 Fri.

29 Sat.

Fri.

!30

Sat. 31

1

28 Tues. 27 29 Wed. 28 ¡Thur. [29

29 3. 29 IV

30 Mon. 30|

22 Mon. 21 23:Tues. 22: 24 Wed. [23: 25 Thur. 24 26'Fri. 25

27(Sat.

28 S. 127 29 Mon. 23 1Tues. 29 2 Wed. 30

21 Tues. 19 22 Wed. 201

Thur. 21

24 Fri.

25 Sat. 23

26 S. 27 Mon. 25

19 Fri.

20 Sat.

211 S.

18

20 Mon. (18)

19

21 Tues. 17 22 Wed. 18' Thur. '19 24/Fri. 20

25 Sat.

21

$.

22

21 Fri.

22 Sat.

23 S. 19 24 Mon. 201 25 Tues. 21 26 Wed, 22,

17

23 Mon.

24 Wed. 17

24 Sat.

17

26 Mon. 17

18

24 Tues.

25 Thur. 18

S.

18

27 Tues. 18

25 Wed.

26 Fri.

on. 19

28 Wed. 19

26 Thu

27 Sat.

27 Tues. 20

29/Thur. [20]

Mon. 23

Tues. 24

27 Thur. 23 Fri. 24

27 Fri. 21 28;Sat. 22 29 S. 23.

28

29 Mon. 22

S.

21

28 Wed. 21

30, Fri.

21

Thur. 22 X

1 Sat.

[22] XI

30 Tues. 23 IX

1 Fri.

[23]

2 S.

[23]

29 Wed. 25

29 Sat.

26

28 Tues. 26

20 Wed. [27] vi

30 Thur. 26 vi 1Fri. 27

S.

Mon.

261

V

Thur. 28

Fri. [29]

2 Sat.

28

3 Tues. 28

S.

29.

Wed. 29,

Sat. 30

Thur. 81

Mon. 80

Thur. 30

25 vm

30 Mon. 24 v Tues. 25

2 Wed.

Thur.

4| Fri.

5]Sat.

S.

2 Thur. 25

1 Wed. |24|

2 Sat.

24]

3 Mon. 24

S.

Тцев.

3 Fri.

Mon.

4 Sat.

Б

S. 28

|31|

Fri. 31

:

6 Mon.

7 Tues. (80 Wed. [31]

6 Tues.

Wed.

7Thur.

& Fri.

30

:

I

ENGLISH FIRM

TORBAY PAINT.

EXTENSIVELY USED BY

THE BRITISH NAVY, WAR OFFICE,

Imperial Japanese and Chinese Railways, British and Foreign Railway Companies, Gas Cos., and Engineering Cos. for BRIDGES, STATION ROOFS,

LOCOMOTIVES, GAS WORKS, WAGONS,

AND FOR THE FINEST DECORATIVE PURPOSES.

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Extraordinary Preservative Qualities.

RESISTS THE EXTREMES OF HEAT AND COLD, DAMP AND MOISTURE.

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Sole Manufacturers-

THE TORBAY PAINT COMPANY,

26,27,& 28, BILLITER STREET,

LONDON, ENGLAND.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

JANUARY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

     1st 15th....

............6h. 42m.

5h. 26m.

.6h. 44m.

5h. 35m.

MOON'S PHASES

d. h.

in. sec.

New Moon

.

1 9 27 49 P.M.

First Quarter

8

1

15

49

P.M.

Full Moon

16

2

43

46

A.M.

Last Quarter 24

7

28

49

A.M.

New Moon

31

8 58 46 A.M.

11.47 hours, P.M. 11.47 hours, P.M.

PERIGEE, 3 days, APOGEE, 19 days,

DAYS OF DAYS OF 12 & 1

WEBK

Mon,

MONTH

A

MOONS

1

2

Tues.

Wed.

3

3

Thur. 4

4

Frid.

5

5

Sat.

6

Sun.

Mon.

78

678

9

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1898 1899

Maximum

..74.3 72.6

Minimum

..46.1 43.6

Mean

.60.1

59.0

BAROMETER, 1899.

Mean........

..30.19

1898

RAINFALL

1899

1.160 inches

0.185 inches

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKable Events

Kobe and Osaka opened, 1868. Overland Telegraph through Russia opened, 1872.

First election by the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884.

First election by the Hongkong Justices of the Peace of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884.

Decree of Emperor Tao-kwang prohibiting trade with England, 1840. Commissiones

Yeh captured, 1858.

EPIPHANY. Fearful fire at Tientsin, 1,400 famine refugees burnt to death, 1878.

1st after EpiphHANY. Forts at Chuenpi taken with great slaughter, 1841.

Ice one-fourth inch thick at Canton, 1852. British str. "Namehow" sank off Cup Chi, near

Swatow; about 350 lives lost, 1892

Murder of Mr. Holworthy at the Peak, Hongkong, 1869. Marriage of the Mikado of

Japan, 1869.

Seamen's Church, West Point, opened, 1872. New Union Church, Hongkong, opened,

Tung-chi, Emperor of China, died, in the nineteenth year of his age, 1875. Ki-ying, Viceroy of Two Kwang, issues a proclamation intimating the intention of

opening up Canton according to the Treaties, 1846.

2nd after EpipHANY. Secretary of American Legation murdered at Tokyo, 1871.

Tues.

9

Wed. 10

10

Thur.

11

11

1891.

Frid. 12

12

Sat.

13

13

Sun.

Mon.

15

Tues.

16

Wed. 17 17

Thur. 18

Frid. 19

Sat.

20

Sun.

21

Mon. Tues.

22

23

Wed.

24

Thur. 25

142 22 2 2 2* * * *** 2

142 702 2 2 2* * * * * ≈♫

15

Bread poisoning in Hongkong by Chinese baker Alum, 1857.

16

Severe frost in Hongkong, 1893.

The Tai-wo gate at the Palace, Peking, destroyed, 1889.

18

Great Gunpowder explosion in Hongkong harbour, 1867.

19

22

23

24

Frid. 26 26

Sat.

27

27

Sun.

28

28

4TH AFTER EPIPHANY.

Mon. 29

29

Christian faith in China, 1733.

Tues. 30

30

Lord Saltoun left China with $3,000,000 ransom money, 1846.

Wed. 31

H.Y. 1

Outer forts of Wei-hai-wei captured by Japanese, 1895.

20

21

25

Elliot and Kishen treaty, ceding Hongkong, 1841. Sailors' Home at Hongkong formally

opened, 1863.

Attempt to set fire to the C N. Co.'s steamer "Pekin" at Shanghai, 1891.

3RD AFTER EPIPHANY. Collision near Woosung between P. & O. steamer "Nepau!"

and Chinese transport "Wan-nien-ching; Celebration of Hongkong's Jubilee, 1891.

The first Chinese Ambassadors arrived in London, 1877. P. & 0). steamer "Niphon" lost off Amoy, 1868. Matheus Ricci, the Jesuit Missionary, enters Peking, 1601.

lost through collision with P. & O. steamer "Bombay," near Yokohama, 1870.

Hongkong taken possession of, 1841.

U.S. corvette

"Oneida '

           St. Paul's Church at Macao burnt, 1835. Terrific fire at Tokyo; 10,000 houses destroyed and many lives lost, 1881.

Decree from Yung-ching forbidding, under pain of death, the propagation of the

"latter sunk and eighty lives lost, 1887.

C.

xii

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

FEBRUARY-28 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st ............6h. 41m.

5h. 47m.

1898 1899

15th

.........6h. 33m. 5h. 56m.

MOON'S PHASES

Maximum

.77.2

72.8

Minimum

..50.1

47.6

Mean

..62.7

59.6

d.

h.

m.

sec.

First Quarter 6 Full Moon Last Quarter 23

11 59

41

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

14

9 26

43

P.M.

Mean..........

..30.10 ·

0 20

42

A.M.

1898

RAINFALL

1899

2.520 inches

2.205 inches

   PERIGEE, 1 day, APOGEE, 16 days,

Days of Days of 1 & 2 WERK MONTH MOONS

Thur. 1

Frid.

Sat. Sun.

Mon.

234 15

Tues. 6

78

2

3

44 4

5

Co

7

Wed.

7

8

Thur. 8

9

Frid. 9

10

Sat.

10

11

Sun. 11

12

Mon.

12

13

Tues.

13

14

Wed. 14

15

Thur. 15

16

Frid. 16

17

Bat.

17

18

Sun. 18

19

18

20

Mon.

19

Tues. 20 Wedl. 21

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

22

21

2 22 * *

2 22 2 * *

23

23

24

25

7.39 hours, P.M. 8.37 hours, A.M.

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Inhabitants of Hongkong declared British subjects, 1841. The Additional Article to Chefoo Convention came into force, 1887. Mrs. Carew sentenced to death at Yoko- hama for the murder of her husband; sentence commuted to penal servitude, 1897. The new German Club at Hongkong opened, 1872. Weihaiwei citadel captured by

Japanese, 1895,

5TH AFTER EPIPHANY. Great robbery in the Central Bank, Hongkong, discovered, 1865.

Agreement opening West River signed, 1897. Anti-Foreign riot at Chinkiang, foreign houses burned and looted, 1889.

The Spanish Envoy Halcon arrived at Macao to demand satisfaction from the Chinese for

the burning of the Spanish brig "Bilbaino," 1840.

The Spanish fleet leaves the port of Cavite, by order of the Governor of Manila, for the

purpose of taking Formosa, 1626.

The Henrietta Maria" was found drifting about in the Palawan Passage, captain,

crew, and 250 coolies missing, 1857.

Septuagesima SUNDAY. The Japanese constitution granting representative government

proclaimed by the Emperor in person at Tokyo, 1889.

Outbreak of Convicts in Singapore Gaol, 1875. Surrender of Liukungtau Island

forts and remainder of the Chipese fleet to the Japanese, 1895.

St. Valentine's Day. Tung Wah'Hospital, Hongkong, opened by Sir R. G. MacDonnell,

1872.

Ports of Hongkong and Tinghai declared free, 1841. The Chinese frigate "Yu-yuen" and

corvette "Chin-cheng" sunk by the French in Sheipoo harbour, 1885.

Insurgents evacuated Shanghai, 1855. Stewart scholarship at Central School, Hong-

kong, founded, 1884. Alice Memorial Hospital, Hongkong, opened, 1887.

SEXAGESIMA SUNDAY. The U.S. paddle man-of-war "Ashuelot" wrecked on the East

Lammock Rock, near Swatow, 1883.

Lord Amherst's Embassy, returning from China, was shipwrecked in the Java Sea,

1817.

Mr. A. R. Margary, of H.B.M.'s Consular Service, was murdered at Manwyne, Yunnan,

by Chinese, 1875.

The Emperor Tao-kwang died, 1850 (reigned 30 years).

Hostilities between England and China recommenced, 1841. Steamer "Queen" captured

and burnt by pirates, 1857. First stone of the Hongkong City Hall laid, 1867. Chusan evacuated by the British troops, 1841. Explosion of boiler of the str. "Yotsai" between Hongkong and Macao; six Europeans and thirteen Chinese killed and vessel destroyed, 1884.

QUINQUAGESIMA SUNDAY. Captain Da Costa and Lieut. Dwyer murdered at Wong-ma.

kok, in Hongkong, 1849.

24

Sun.

25

26

Mon.

26

27

Tues. 27

28

1876.

Wed. 28

29

SHROVE TUESDAY. Treaty of peace between Japan and Korea signed at Kokwa.

Evacuation of Port Hamilton by the British forces, 1887. ASH WEDNESDAY. Capture of the Sulu capital by the Spaniards, 1876.

Bogue Forts (Canton) destroyed by Sir Gordon Bremer, 1841. Hongkong police chop

burnt, 1884. Marriage of the Emperor, Kwang-su, 1889.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

MARCH-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

........6h. 23m.

6h. 02m.

15th

........6h. 10m.

1898

1899

6h. 08m.

Maximum

.....79.8

80.1

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

......53.2

52.8

d. h. m.

sec.

New Moon

Mean

7 1

.......64.3 64.9

42

P.M.

First Quarter 8 0

10

44

P.M.

Full Moon

16

3

47

BAROMETER, 1899.

48

P.M.

      Last Quarter 24 New Moon

1

12 45

P.M.

Mean.........

...........30.08

31

4

6 45 A.M.

PERIGEE, 1 day, APOGEE, 15 days, PERIGEE 30 days, DAYS OF DAYS OF | 2 and 3

WEEK

Thur.

Frid. Sat.

MONTH

123

MOONS

1

2

7.37 hours, P.M. 8.39 hours, a.m. 6.40 hours, A.M.

1898

RAINFALL

1899

0.170 inches

0.315 inches

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

St. David's Day. Bombardment of the Chinhai forts by French men-of-war, 1885. First Dutch Embassy left China, 1657.

Foreign Ministers received in audience by the Emperor at the Tax Kuang

Po, 1891.

lor IN LENT. Emperor Kwang-su assumes the government, 1889.

Sun.

4

Mon.

5

5

Expulsion of Chinese Custom House from Macao by Governor Amaral, 1849.

Tues. 6

6

Wed. 7

7

Hostilities at Canton recommenced. Fort Napier taken by the English, 1841. Departure of Governor Sir J. P. Hennessy from Hongkong, 1882.

Thur. 8

8

Arrival in Hongkong of Prince Henry of Prussia, 1899.

Frid. 9 Sat. 10

9

Attack on Messrs. Farnham and Rohl at Shanghai, 1872.

10

Sun.

11

11

Mon. 12

12

Tues. 13

Wed. 14

Thur. 15 Frid.

16

Sat.

17

Sun.

18

Mon. 19

Tues.

20

Wed.

21

Thur. 22

Frid.

Sat.

24

Sun. 25

23

** DOF- 2222* * * *N*2.

POT 28 *** ** ** **87

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

Wreck of the steamer "Nanzing," near Hongkong, 1891.

21

Lin arrived in Canton, 1839. 12,000 Chinese troops attacked the English in Ningpo'and

Chinhai and were repulsed with great slaughter, 1842.

2ND IN LENT. Governor Sir R. G. MacDonnell arrived in Hongkong, 1866.

Imperial Commissioner Ki-chen, degraded by the Emperor, left Canton as a prisoner, 1841.

Capture of Bacninh, Tonkin, by the French, 1884.

Chinese Custom House closed at Macao, 1849.

8,000 Chinese troops routed by the English at Tze-hi with great slaughter, 1842. Now

Law Courts at Yokohama opened, 1890.

Governor Sir H. Robinson left Hongkong for Ceylon, 1805.

Chinese Envoy Ping and suite left Shanghai for Europe, 1866.

St. Patrick's Day. Lord Macartney's Embassy left China, 1794.

3RD IN LENT. Edict of Commissioner Lin to surrender all opium In Canton, 1832

Chungking declared open to foreign trade, 1891.

Governor Sir G. Bonham landed at Hongkong, 1848.

British ship "Sarah," first free-trader, sailed from Whampoa, 1834.

23

Death, at Peking, of Sir Harry Parkes, H.B.M. Minister to China, 1885. Captain Elliot forced his way to Canton, 1830.

24

25

First Section of Manila-Dagupan railway opened, 1891. Attempted assassination of Li

Hung chang at Shimonoseki, 1895.

4TH IN LENT. Captain Elliot demands passports for himself and all the British subjects

imprisoned in Canton, 1839.

Hon. 26

26

Great Flood at Foochow, 1874.

Tues.

27

27

Death of the widow of the Emperor Tung-chi, 1875. Protocol of Convention between

China and Portugal signed at Lisbon, 1887.

Wed.

Thur.

28

28

20,289 chests of opium burned by Lin, 1839,

29

29

Seizure and occupation of the Pescadores by the French fleet, 1886.

Frid.

30

30

Sat.

31

Arrival of Governor Sir George Bowen, G.C.M.G., in Hongkong, 1883. Abolition of the coolie trade at Macao, 1874.

Arrival of the Duke and Duchem of

Connaught in Hongkong, 1890.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

APRIL-30 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEemperature

1st

.......................5h. 55m.

6h. 14m.

1898 1899

15th

.5h. 41m.

6h. 19m.

Maximum

.86.3 83.0

Minimum

.57.9 59.2

MOON'S PHASES

Mean

.69.3

69.9

d. h. in. sec.

First Quarter 7

4

30 47

A.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

Full Moon

15

8

38

Last Quarter 22 New Moon

29

41 9 44 0 59 43 P.M.

A.M.

Mean........

..29.96

P.M.

5.38 hours, P.M. 0.37 hours, P.M.

1898 3.440 inches

RAINFALL

1899

3.140 inches

WEHK

Sun.

1

2

Mon.

3

Tues.

4

Wed.

4

5

Thur. 5

6

Frid. 6

7

Sat.

7

8

Sun.

8

9

APOGEE, 11 days, PERIGEE, 27 days,

DAYS OF DAYS OF ❘ 3 and 4 MONTH MOONS

23

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

5TH IN LENT. The port of Hoihow, Hainan, opened, 1876. The ports of Pakhoi, Wen-

chow, Wuhn, and Ichang opened, 1877.

French Flag hoisted at Kwangchauwan, 1808.

Protocol arranging the preliminaries of peace between France and China signed

Paris, 1885. The Czarewitch and Prince George of Greece arrive in Hongkong, 1891. Bogue Forts destroyed by General D'Aguilar, 1847. Wheelbarrow Riot at Shanghai, 1897. Convention between Sir John Francis Davis and the Viceroy Ki-ying for the admission of

Europeans into the city of Canton within two months, 1842.

Hongkong Mint opened, 1866. Indignation Meeting at Shanghai respecting Wheel-

barrow Riot, 1897.

PALM SUNDAY. Arrival of M. Paul Bert at Hanoi, 1886.

Mon.

9

10

Tues. 10

11

Wed. 11

12

Terrific tornado in Canton; 2,000 houses destroyed and 10,000 lives lost, 1878.

Thur. 12

13

37,000 Christians butchered in Japan, 1738. Death at Peking of Marquis Tseng,

1890.

Frid. 13

14

GOOD FRIDAY. Presentation of colours to Hongkong Regiment, 1895.

Sat.

14

15

Sun. 15

16

Mon.

16

17

Tues. 17

Wed.

18

Thur. 19

18

EASTER DAY. St. Francis Xavier left Goa for China, 1552. British Flag hoisted at Taipohu, Kowloon New Territory, 1899.

Kennedy arrived in Hongkong, 1872. Telegraph to Shanghai opened, 1871. (including "Namoa" pirates), 1891. at Shimonoseki, 1895.

Governor Sir Arthur

Execution at Kowloon city of nineteen pirates Treaty of Peace between China and Japan signed

Convention between China and Japan settling Corean differences signed at Tientsin, 1885.

The O. & O. steamer "San Pablo" wrecked near Turnabout, 1888.

Frid. 20

Sat.

21

Sun.

22

Mon.

23

24

19

2 2 22 * * ***

223

* * 2* * * * * * 285

888

20

The "Sir Charles Forbes," the first steamer in China waters, arrived, 1830.

Czarewitch arrived at Hankow, 1891.

The

21

Resignation of Shanghai Municipal Council, 1897.

23

1ST AFTER EASTER. East India Company ceased trade with Chins, 1834.

Governor J. Pope Henness☛ in Hongkong, 1877.

Arrival of

24

St. George's Day.

25

26

27

28

Tues.

Wed.

Thur. 26

Frid. 27

Sat.

Sun. 29

29 Ratifications of Corean Treaty with England exchanged, 1984. Privy Council for Jagaci

constituted by Imperial decree, 1888.

2ND AFTER Easter.

Capture of the citadel at Hanoi, Tonkin, by the French forces, 1882.

Sir William Marsh, acting Governor of Hongkong, 1887. Foundation stone of Queen's College, Hongkong, laid, 1884.

Departure of

Mon. 30

2

Arrival of General Grant in Hongkong, 1879.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

MAY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG Temperature

1st 15th

.5h. 29m.

6h. 25m.

1898

1899

.5h. 21m.

6h. 31m.

Maximum

.91.5

88.5

Minimum

MOON'S PHASES

...64.9

67.6

Mean

.78.4

77.6

d. h. m.

sec.

First Quarter 6

9

15

40 P.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

Full Moon

14

11

12

46

P.M.

Last Quarter 22 4

Mean.......

.29.86

6

49

A.M.

New Moon

28

10

25 48

P.M.

W

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Tues.

1

3

Wed.

4

Thur.

5

6

Sat

7

Sun.

8

Mon.

7

9

APOGEE, 9 days, 9.40 hours, A.M. PERIGEE, 25 days, 1.37 hours, A.M.

Dath or Days of 4 and 5

Frid.

234

*

1898

RAINFALL

1899

5.700 inches

7.165 inches

CHRONOLOGy of Ramarkabl■ EvanTS

First number of 'Hongkong Gazette" published, 1841. Telegraphic communication established between Hongkong and the Philippines, 1880. Spanish fleet destroyed by U.S. fleet at Cavite, 1898.

Ratification at Tientsin of the Treaty between Portugal and China, 1888.

Suspension of Oriental Bank, 1884.

Riot in French Concession at Shanghai, 1874. Roman Catholic Cathedral at Poking

inaugurated, 1884.

British troops evacuated Ningpo, 1842.

3RD AFTHE EASTER. Attack on Mr. Wood at the British Legation at Tokyo, 1874. Departure of Governor Sir William Des Vœux from Hongkong, 1891.

Tues.

8

10

Wed. 9

11

New Town Hall at Tientsin opened, 1890. Waglan Lighthouse opened, 1893.

Thur. 10

12

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Thur. 17

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon. 21

Tues,

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sum

Mon.

Tues.

28

29

Wed.

Thur.

31

CARLO OF 2 - 22**** * * * 28 ♬

11

13

12

14

13 :

15

14

16

15

17

16

18

19

18

20

19

21

20

22

23

24

23

25

24

26

25

27

26

28

27

29

1

2

30

3

4

Hongkong declared infected with plague, 1894.

captured Chang-chow, the rebel city, 1864. British Squadron, 1885.

Colonel Gordon with the Imperial troops Occupation of Port Hamilton by the

Attempted assassination of the Czarewitch by a Japanese at Otsu, Japan 1891. Execution

of fifteen pirates (including leader of "Namoa" pirates) at Kowloon, 1891. East India Company's garden at Canton destroyed by the Mandarins, 1831.

4TH AFTER Easter. A corporal of the British Legation murdered by Chinese soldiers at

Peking, 1864. Anti-Foreign riot at Wuhu, 1891.

Arrival of Sir John Walsham, Bart., in Hongkong, on his way to Peking to assume

the functions of British Minister, 1886.

Ratification at Peking of the amended Treaty between Russia and China, 1881. Anti-

foreign riot in the Hochow district, 1891.

Kowloon walled city occupied, 1899.

Loss off Amoy of the French war steamer Izere, ** 1880. Arrival of General Grant in

Shanghai, 1879.

The city of Chapu taken by the British troops, 1842. Anti-foreign riot at Ngankin, 1891.

Disastrous surprise of a French sortie in Tonkin led by Commandant Riviere and death

of the latter, 1883.

ROGATION SUNDAY. Forts at mouth of Peiho captured by British and French forces, 1858.

The Canton Mint commenced striking silver coins, 1890.

Loss of M.M. str. "Menzaleh" while on her passage from Hongkong to Yokohama,

1887. Imperial Edict respecting anti-Christian literature, 1892. Foreign factories at Canton pillaged, 1841.

U.S. Legation at Tokyo burned down, 1863.

ASCENSION DAY. Queen Victoria born, 1819. Captain Elliot and all the British subjects

left Canton for|Macao, 1839. British flag hoisted at Wei-hai-wei, 1898.

The city of Canton invested by British troops, 1841. Anti-foreign riot at Nanking, 1891.

Formosa Republic declared, 1895.

Death of Grand Secretary Wen-siang, 1876.

AFTER ASCENSION. Canton ransomed for $6,000,000, 1841.

Queen's Statue, Hongkong, unveiled, 1896. Great rain storm in Hongkong, serious

damage, 1889. Anti-foreign riots in Szechuen, 1895.

H.B.M. screw sloop "Reynard" lost on the Pratas shoal in trying to rescue remainder

of crew of "Velocipede," 1851. Opening of the Peak Tramway, Hongkong, 1888. Typhoon at Hongkong and Macao; loss of the " Poyang," with 100 lives, near Maono,

1875.

:

zvi

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

JUNE-30 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG Temperature

1st.......... ..5h. 16m.

6h. 38m.

1898 1899

15th..

...5h. 16m.

6h. 44m.

Maximumn

.91.1 88.0

MOON'S PHASES

d. h. m. sec.

Minimum Mean

...73.6

68.9

..81.6 79.7

First Quarter

Full Moon Last Quarter 20 New Moon

5 2 13 11

27

34 48 P.M. 14 45 A.M. 33 44 A.M. 9 3 44 A.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

Mean........

.29.80

3.46 hours, A.M. 9.38 hours, A.M.

1898

RAINFALL

1899

14.250 inches

18.975 inches

APOGEE, 6 days, PERIGEE, 19 days,

DAYS OF DAYS OF 5 and 6

WEEK

Frid.

Sat.

MONTH

12

&

MOONS

5

6

Sun.

3

Mon.

8

Tues.

9

Wed. 6

10

Thur. 7

11

Frid.

8

12

Sat.

9

13

Sun. 10 Mon. 11

14

15

Tues.

12

Wed. 13

17

Thur. 14

18

15

Sat.

16

20

21

22

Frid.

Sun.

Mon. 18

Tues.

16

19

DALE LEON 00 2 72 *** ** * 8

CH23 40 170 2 2 2 2 * * * * * * 2 8

19

Wed. 20

Thur.

      Frid. Sat.

Sun.

:

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Attempt to blow up the Hongkong Hotel, 1868. New Opium Agreement between

Hongkong and China came into force, 1887. Anti-foreign riot at Tanyang, 1891. Hongkong connected with London by wire, 1871. Formal transfer of Formosa from

China to Japan, 1895.

WHIT SUNDAY. Earthquake at Manila, killing more than 2,000 persons, 1863. Death of Sir Arthur Kennedy, 1883. Russell & Co. suspend payment, 1891. Kelung taken possession of by Japanese, 1895

Treaty between France and Corea signed at Seoul, 1886. West River opened, 1897. Departure of the first O. & 0. steamer from Hongkong to San Francisco, 1875. Messrs.

Årgent and Green murdered in an anti-foreign riot at Wuhsueh, 1891.

Heavy rains in Hongkong, property to the value of $500,000 destroyed, and many lives

lost, 1864.

Attempted anti-foreign riot at Kiukiang, 1891.

Destruction of Mission premises at Wusieh by anti-foreign mob, 1891.

Suspension of New Oriental Bank, 1892. The P. & O. steamer "Aden" wrecked of

Socotra 78 lives lost, 1897.

TRINITY SUNDAY. Typhoon at Formosa ; loss of several vessels, 1876. Portuguese prohibited trading at Canton, 1640.

Opening of the first Railway in Japan, 1872.

British steamer "Carisbrooke" fired into and captured by Chinese Customs cruiser,

1875. Imperial Edict condemning attacks on Foreigners, 1891.

Russian and Chinese Treaty, 1728.

Tidal Wave, Japan, 28,000 lives lost, 1896. British barque "Cæsar" and Danish schooner "Carl" taken by pirates off Pedro Blanca 1866. Hope Dock opened at Aberdeen, 1867. Woosung taken, 1842.

197 after TrinITY. First foreign-owned junk leaves ('hungking, 1891.

Explosion of the "Union Star" at Shanghai, 17 persons killed and 10 wounded, 1862.

Disastrous inundation at Foochow, 2,000 lives lost, 1877.

23 Shanghai occupied by British forces, 1842.

24

25

Queen's Accession, 1837. Macartney's embassy arrived in China, 1793. Attack on inls.

sion premises at Haimen city, 1891.

Massacre at Tientsin, 1870.

Canton blockaded by English forces, 1840. Diamond Jubilee celebration, 1897.

21

22

26

23

27

Ki-ying visits Hongkong, 1843. Shock of Earthquake in Hongkong, 1974. French troops

surprised by Chinese near Langson, 1884.

28

24

Mon. 25

Tues.

Wed.

26

29

2ND AFTER TRINITY. Assassination of M. Carnot, President of the French Republic, 1894. Treaty of Nanking exchanged, 1843. Attack on British Legation at Tokyo, 1862.

30 Treaty between England and China signed at Tientsin, 1858. Additional Convention

between France and China signed at Peking, 1887.

27

1

Confiscation of the str. " Prince Albert " Treaty between France and China signed, 1858.

by the British Consul and Customs at Canton, 1886. Queen's Coronation, 1838.

H

Thur. 28

Frid.

Sat.

!

29

30

The Foreign Ministers admitted to an audience of the Emperor of China at Peking, 1878.

Indian Mints closed to silver, 1893.

British expedition to China arrived, 1840. Opening of a section of the Shanghai and

Woosung Railway, 1876. Flooding of the Takasima coal mines, 1801.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

JULY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

Hongkong TEMPERATURE

      1st 15th

........5h. 20m.

6h. 47m.

....5h. 25m. 6h. 45m.

1898

1899

Maximum

..88.7

91.5

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

.76.3

74.7

d. h. ml.

sec.

Mean

...81.7 82.9

First Quarter

5

7

49

46 A.M.

Full Moon

12

8

57

49

P.M.

Last Quarter

19

7

44

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

New Moon

26 9 18 49

P.M.

xvii

APOGEE, 3 days, 10.41 hours, P.M.

   PERIGEE, 15 days, 8.43 hours, P.M. APOGEE, 31 days,

DAYS OF WEEK

DAYS OF MONTH

3.44 hours, P.M.

14

17

6 and 7 MOONS

Sun.

1

5

Mon. 2

6

Tues.

3

7

Wed. 4

8

Thur.

5

9

Frid.

6

10

Sat.

11

Sun.

12

Mon.

9

13

Tues.

10

14

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

Werl.

Thur.

123 4 0 1 0 0 2 2 * * * * * * * *

11

15

16

15

16

17

18

* 22 *** *222

18

19

20

21.

Mean........

...29.65

1898

RAINFALL

1899

7.055 inches

10.125 inches

Chronology of Remarkable Events

3D AFTER TRINITY. Hakodate, Kanagawa, and Nagasaki (Japan) opened to trade, 1857.

Two Swedish missionaries murdered at Sungpu, 1893.

Amoy forts and many junks destroyed by H.M.S. " Blode," 1840. French Expedition

from the Hoongkiang arrived in Hongkong, 1873.

Steamer "Don Juan" burnt at sea near Philippines; 145 persons perished, 1893.

Declaration American Independence, 1776. Telegraph cable laid between Hongkong

and Macao, 1884.

Tinghai first taken, 1840. Attack on British Embassy at Tokyo, 1861.

Order of nobility instituted in Japan, 1884.

4TH AFTER TRINITY. Canton factories attacked by Chinese, 1846.

First Dutch embassy arrived at Tientsin, 1656.

Portuguese fleet left Malacca for China, 1522. The Yangtsze blockaded by British

fleet, 1840.

Engagement between the American Naval Forces and the Coreans; the Expedition

leave to await instructions, 1871. Amherst's embassy arrived in China, 1816.

Foreign Inspectorate of Customs established in Shanghai, 1854. Suspension of Hongkong

Police Officers for accepting bribes, 1897.

First English ship reached China, 1635. French gunboats fired on by Siamese at

Paknam, 1893.

Statue of Paul Bert unveiled at Hanoi, 1890.

5th After TRINITY.

squadrons, 1873.

Shimonoseki forts bombarded by the English, French, and American

   Eruption of Bandai-san volcano, Japan; 500 persons killed, 1888. British trade with China re-opened, 1842. The King of Cambodia arrived on a visit to

Hongkong, 1872.

Ningpo Joss-house Riots, Shanghai ; 15 killed and many wounded, 1898.

Frid.

Sat.

20

Terrible earthquake at Manila, 1880.

Additional Article to Chefoo Convention signed In

London, 1885.

19

23

Nanking captured by the Imperialists, 1863.

24

25

26

23

27

21

22 Sun.

Mon.

24 Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

Wreck of the C. M. 8. N. Co.'s str. "Pautah on Shantung Promontory, 1887.

6TI AFTER TRINITY. Yellow River burst its banks at Chang-kiu, Shantung; great

inundation, 1889.

Armed attack on Japanese Legation at Seoul, Corea, and eight inmates killed, 1882.

28 British trade prohibited at Canton, 1834. Anglo-Chinese Burmah Convention signed.

at Peking, 1886.

"Kowshing," British steamer, carrying Chinese troops, sunk by Japanese, with loss of

about 1,000 lives, 1894. Defeat of British forces at Taku, Admiral Hope wounded, 1859.

Canton opened to British trade, 1943. Terrific typhoon at Canton, Macao, Hongkong, and

Whampoa : loss of life estimated at 40,000 persons, 1882.

Nanking re-taken by Imperialists, 1864.

25

29

26

1

Frid. 27

2

28

3

29

4

Mon. 30

5

7th Apter TriNITY. German Gunboat. "Iltis" wrecked off Shantung Promontory; all

but eleven of the crew perished, 1896. Outbreak of rebellion at Manila, 1896.

Severe typhoon at Macao, 1836.

Tues. 31

6

Sat.

Sun.

xviii

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

AUGUST-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

1st

15th

.........5h. 33m. ..5h. 38m.

SUNSET 6h. 39m.

HONGKONG Temperaturk

1898 1899

6h. 31.

Maximum

..90.4 92.9

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

..74.7 75.0

d. h. m.

sec.

Mean

...81.5

80.9

First Quarter 4 0

21

46 A.M.

Full Moon

11

5

5

49

A.M.

BAROMETER, 1899,

  Last Quarter 17 7 New Moon

22

43

P.M.

Mean..........

.29.71

25

11

28

46 A.M.

 PERIGEE, 12 days, APOGEE, 28 days,

DAYS OF DAYS OF 7 and 8

1898

RAINFALL

1899

6.38 hours, P.M. 5.42 hours, a.m.

9.900 inches

19.980 inches

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Chronology of Remarkable EventS

Wed.

7

Both China and Japan declare war, 1894. Kucheng massacre, 1895.

Thur.

8

Frid. 3

9

Victims of Massacre at Tientsin buried, 1870.

Sat.

10

Sun.

11

British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842.

8th Artek TrinITY, Macartney's Embassy entered Peiho, 1796. Bombardment of Kelung

by French, 1884.

Mon.

12

Serious Flood at Tientsin, 1871.

Tues.

13

British Squadron arrived off the Peiho, 1840.

Wed.

14

Thur.

9

15

Frid. 10

16

Sat.

11

17

Sun.

12

18

Mon. 13

19

Tues. 14

20

Wed.

15

21

Tues.

Wed.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

16

17

18

* * 22 N

Sun. 19

Mon. 20

24

25

26

21

27

22

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

sion.

27

Tues.

Wed.

29

Thur. 30

Frid.

31

སྨཱཊྛཧྨབྷ*ཧྨ ཧྨ

23

24

30

25

1

British Chamber of Commerce established at Canton, 1834

and Japan signed, 1958,

Treaty between Great Britain

26

2

11TH AFTER TRINITY. British left Macao, 1839.

28

3 Amoy taken by the English, 296 guns captured, 1841.

567

Lord Amherst's Embassy left for Yuen-ming-yuen, 1816.

possessions, 1933. Kimpai forts silenced by French, 1334. Treaty of Nanking signed, 1842.

Severe typhoon on coast of China, many lives lost, and much damage done to shipping

at Hongkong, Macao, and Whampos, 1845.

Slavery abolished in British

22

23

* * * * *

32333

28

29

Assassination of Mr. Haber, German Consul, at Hakolate, 1874.

British troops landed at Nanking, 1842.

Sir H. Pottinger arrived at Hongkong, 1841. Destructive typhoon at Foochow, 1888.

First public meeting of British ́merchants in Canton, called by Lord Napier, who

suggested the establishment of a Chamber of Commerce, 1834.

OTII AFTER TRINITY.

174 British prisoners executed in Formosa, 1842. Manila occupied by U.S. Troops

1898.

Tong-ur-ku taken, 1860.

Great Fire on French Concession, Shanghai; 991 houses destroyed; loss Tls. 1,500,000

1879. Total loss of the E. & A. steamer " Catterthun" near Sydney, 1895.

British trade at Canton stopped by Hong merchants, 1834. French Treaty with Siam

signed, 1856.

Lord Napier ordered by the Viceroy to leave Canton, 1834. Great fire in Hongkong, 1868.

10TH AFTER TRINITY.

First conference between Sir Henry Pottinger and Ki-ying on board the "Cornwallis, "

at Nanking, 1842. Taku forts taken by the Allied forces, 1860. Emperor Hien Fung died, 1961. Palace Revolution at Peking, Empress Dowager again

assumes the Regency, 1898.

Governor Amaral (Macao) assassinated, 1849. Ma, Viceroy of Nanking, stabbed, 1870. Seizure of steamer "Spark" by pirates between Canton and Macao, 1874. Telegraph line to Peking opened, 1884.

Large meeting in Hongkong to protest against the military contribution, 1864. Chinese

fleet at Pagoda Anchorage destroyed by French, 1884. Wreck of the C. N. Co's. str. "Tientsin near Swatow, 1887.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

SEPTEMBER-30 DAYS

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

xix

SUNRISE

1st 15th

.5h. 44m.

SUNSET 6h. 16m.

1898 1899

.5h. 48m.

6h. 02m.

Maximum.

...90.0 89.8

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum Mean

.....

..74.0 71.6

..80.9

80.3

તા. h. m. sec.

First Quarter 2

3

31

48

P.M.

Full Moon

9

0.

42

42

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

New Moon

Last Quarter 16 4 33

24

42

A.M.

Mean......

.29.89

3 33 41 A.M.

    PERIGEE, 10 days, APOGEE, 24 days,

1.41 hours, A.M. 11.38 hours, A.M.

1898 5.295 inches

RAINFALL

1899

6.305 inches

Days or |DayS OF

WEEK MONTH

8 and 8 MOONS

Sat.

1

8

Sun.

-

9

Mon.

3

10

Tues.

4

11

Wed.

12

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKable EventS

Ma, Viceroy of Nanking, died of the wounds inflicted by an assassin, 1870. Foundation

stone of Gap Rock lighthouse, near Hongkong, laid, 1890.

19TH AFTER TRINITY. Arrival of the "Vega" at Yokohama, after having discovered the

North-East Passage, 1879. Kiaochau declared a free port, 1898.

Hongkong Plague proclamation revoked, 1894.

Attack on the forts at Shimonoseki, Japan, by the allied fleets under Admiral Kuper, 1864-

Death of Two Tsung-tang at Foochow, 1885.

Thur.

Frid.

Sat.

Sun.

Mon. 10

67890

13

H.R.H. Prince Alfred received by the Mikado of Japan, 1869.

14

Attack on Dr. Greig, near Kirin, by soldiers, 1891.

15

Great typhoon in Hongkong, 1867.

16

17

Tues. 11

Wed. 12

Thur. 13

Frid. 14

Sat.

15

Sun.

16

Mon. 17

Tues.

18

Wed. 19

Thur. 20

Frid.

21

Sat.

Sun.

23

Mon.

24

12272*** ***28-

23

24

25

26

27

30

Tues.

Wed.

Thur. 27 Frid.

Sat.

28

29

Sun. 30

7

UNNNNN

25

2

26

18

19

20

13th after TrinITY. Sir Hercules Robinson assumed the government of Hongkong, 1850. Riot by Chinese mob at Canton; great destruction of houses and property on Shameen, 1883. British gunboat "Wasp' left Singapore for Hongkong and seen no more,

1887.

Public meeting of foreign residents at Yokohama to protest against proposed new

Treaty with Japan, 1890.

Convention signed at Chefoo by Sir Thomas Wade and Li Hung-chang, 1878.

Public Meeting in Hongkong, with reference to the blockade of the port by the Chinese

Customs' cruisers, 1874. Severe typhoon in Southern Japan, 1891.

Chinese transport "Waylee" driven ashore on Pescadores; upwards of 370 lives lost, 1887,

Pingyang captured by the Japanese, 1894.

14TH AFTER TRINITY. New Convention between Germany and China ratified at Peking, 1881. The battle of the Yalu, in which the Chinese were defeated by the Japanese, losing five

vessels, 1894,

Loss in Kii Channel, near

Destruction by fire of the Temple of Heaven, Peking, 1889.

Kobe, of the Turkish frigate Ertogrul," with 567 lives, 1890.

64

29

4

33 3

Typhoon at Swatow, 1891.

15TH AFTER TRINITY. Am. brig "Lubra" taken by pirates, 1866. Terrific typhoon In

Hongkong and Macao, many thousands of lives lost, 1874.

H.M.S. "Rattler" lost off Japan, 1863. Piratical attack on the German barque "Apenrade," near Macao, 1869. The Satsuma rebels in Japan routed with great slaughter, their leader, Saigo, killed, and the insurrection suppressed, 1877.

Daring attack upon a Chinese shop in Wing Lok street, Hongkong, by armed robbers,

1878. Arrival of Sir Henry A. Blake, G.C.M.G., Governor of Hongkong, 1898. Lord Napier arrived at Macao dangerously ill, 1834.

Commissioner Lin degraded, 1840.

Yellow River burst its banks in Honan; calamitous inundation, 18887. Death of Hon.

Stewart, Colonial Secretary, at Hongkong, 1889.

Michaelmas Day. Hurricane at Manila, causing immense damage to shipping, 1865

16TH AFTER TRINITY. All the Bogue forta destroyed by the British fleet, 1841.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

OCTOBER-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

   1st 15th

.................5h. 53m.

5h. 47m.

1898

1899

...5h. 58m.

5h. 34m.

Maximum

.88.5

86.4

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

...65.3

65.9

d. h. m.

sec.

Mean

First Quarter 2

.....74.9

74.8

4

46 47

A.M.

Full Moon

8

8

54

42

P.M.

Last Quarter 15

5

26 49

P.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

New Moon First Quarter 31 3

 PERIGEE, 8 days, APOGEE, 21 days,

23

9

3

43

P.M.

Mean.....

..30.06

53 45 P.M.

0.44 hours, P.M.

1898 RAINFALL

1899

1.43 hours, P.M.

6.720 inches

0.875 inches

DAYS OF DAYS or 8 and 9

Chronology OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

WAAK

MONTHL

MOONB

Mon.

1

8

The "Hongkong Daily Press" started,

1857.

W 19

9

10

11

12

    Tues. Wed.

Thur. Frid.

Sat

Sun.

Mon.

Tues.

co

9

Wed. 10

Thur. 11

Frid. 12

Sat.

Sun.

Mon.

.

13

234

14

15

16

17

18

21

19

13

20

14

15

22

23

24

Tues. 16

Wed.

Thur.

17

18

Inauguration of Hongkong College

of Medicine. 1887. Hyogo declared an open port, 1892. Gold Standard adopted in Japan, 1897.

Confucius born, B.C. 562. Tamsui bombarded by French, 1884.

Serious riot at Hongkong, 1884. Treaty between France and Siam signed at Bangkok,

1893.

Attack on foreigners at Wenchow, 1884. Typhoon at Hongkong, 1894.

17TH AFTER TRINITY.

French expedition left Chefoo for Corea, 1866. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir

William Des Vшux, K.C.M.G., 1887.

H.R.H. Prince Alfred visited Peking, but not received by the Emperor, 1869. Great public meeting at Hongkong to consider increase of crime in Colony, 1878. Supplementary Treaty signed at the Bogue, 1848. French landing party at Tamsui

repulsed, 1884. Death of Lady Robinson, wife of the Governor of Hongkong, 1894. Shanghai captured, 1841. Chinhai taken, 1841. Official inspection of Tientsin-Kaiping Railway, 1888, Wreck off the Pescadores of the Norwegian str."Normand," with logg Lord Napier died at Macao, 1834. Wreck off the Pescadores of the P. & O. str." Bokhara ̧"

of all on board except two, 1892.

with loss of 125 lives, 1892.

The first Chinese merchant steamer (the "Meifoo") left Hongkong for London with

passengers to establish a Chinese firm there, 1881.

Revolt in the Philippines, 1872.

Ningpo occupied by British forces, 1841. First railway in Japan officially opened by the

Mikado, 1872.

18TH AFTER TRINITY.

coolies on board, 1859.

Flora Temple" lost in the China Sea, with upwards of soo

Explosion on the Chinese trooper "Kungpai," loss of 500 lives, 1895

Khanghoa, in Corea, taken by the French, 1866.

St. John's Cathedral, Hongkong, dedicated, 1842. Daring piracy on board the British

str. "Greyhound," 1885.

At a meeting of the Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London and China a

of reconstruction was approved, 1892.

scheme

Government, 1977.

H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Shanghai, 1869. Cosmopolitan Dock opened, 1875.

Death, at Saigon, of M. Filippini, Governor of Cochin-China, 1887.

58 piratical vessels destroyed by Captains Hay and Wilcox, H.M. ships "Columbine ·

and "Fury," 1849.

·

Treaty of Whampoa between France and China signed, 1844. Kahding recaptured by

the Allies, 1862.

Chin-lien-cheng taken by the Japanese, 1894.

TH

AFTER TRINITY. Serious earthquake in Central Japan, 7,500 persons killed, Attempted insurrection at Canton, 1895,

Portuguese frigate ** D. Maria II." blown up at Macao, 1850.

Great fire in Hongkong, 1866. Fenghuang taken by the Japanese, 1894.

1801.

H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Hongkong, 1869. Ta-lien-wan and Kinchow taken by

the Japanese, 1894.

25

Frid. 19

26

Sat.

20

27

Great fire in Hongkong, 1859. Great typhoon at Formosa, 1861. Terrific typhoon at Manila; enormous damage to property, 1882.

Sun.

21

28

19TH AF ER TRINITY.

The Shanghai and Woosung railway closed by the Chinese

Mon.

Tues.

22

29

* 22 * *** * *NG &

23

Wed. 24 Thur. 25

2

The Japanese cross the Yalu, 1894.

3

23 4 DOE - 282 2 * ** ** 287

27

    Frid. 26 Sat. Sun. 28

Mon. 29

7

30

8

Tues.

Wed.

31

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

xxi

NOVEMBER-30 DAYS

SUNRISE

SUNSET

HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st

....6h.

6m. 5h. 22m.

1898

1899

15th..

..6h. 14m. 5h. 16m.

Maximum..

.82.8

80.5

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

.50.6

50.7

d. h.

m. sec.

Mean

.69.4.

67.8

Full Moon

7 6 35

48 A.M.

Last Quarter New Moon First Quarter 30

14 10

13

45

A.M.

BAROMETER, 1899

22 2

53

42

P.M.

1

1]

41

Meau..........

.30.11

A.M.

PERIGEE, 5 days, APOGEE, 18 days,

11.40 hours, P.M. 1.43 hours, A.M.

1898

RAINFALL

1899

0.790 inches

16.40 inches

DAYS or DAYS OF

WEEK

MONTII

9 and 10 MOONS

Thur.

1

10

Frid.

11

Sat.

3

12

Sun.

13

21ST AFTER TRINITY. Hongkong Jockey Club formed, 1884.

Mon.

5

14

Tues.

Wed.

67

15

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

The port of Quinhon, Annam, opened to foreign trade, 1876. Death of Alexander III,

Czar of Russia, 1894.

"

Wreck of the U.S. cruiser "Charleston off North Luzon. Great Britain commenced the first war with China by the Naval action of Chuen-pee, 1839.

Great fire at Macao, 500 houses burnt, 1834. Peking evacuated by the Allies, 1880.

English and French Treaties promulgated in the "Peking Gazette," 1860.

Thur.

Frid.

9

Sat.

10

Sun.

11

Mon.

12

Tues.

13

Wed.

14

Thur.

15

Frid. 16

Sat. 17

28

29

Wed.

21

30

Thur. 22

1

Fri.

23

2

Sat.

24

3

OF 18 2 2 * * ******

16

17

18

Prince of Wales born, 1841.. The French repulsed in Corea, 1866.

Queen's Jubilee in Hongkong, 1887.

Celebration of the

19

20

25

26

21

22

23

24

Sun. 18 27

Mon.

19

Tues. 20

* * 2 * 2 * ** ** *28

Sun. 25

Mon.

26

Tues. 27

Wed. Thur.

Frid.

29

30

5678

Statue of Sir Arthur Kennedy unveiled in the Botanic Gardens, Hongkong, 1887. 22ND AFTER TRINITY. H.M.S. ** Racehorse " wrecked off Chefoo, out of a crew of 1089

saved, 1864. Death of M. Paul Bert, Resident General of Annam and Tonkin, 1886. Hongkong first lighted by gas, 1864. The Foreign Ministers had audience within

the Palace, Peking, 1894.

Earthquake at Shanghai, 1847.

Convention signed between Russia and China, 1860. Celebration of Shanghai Jubilee,

1893. Germans took possession of Kiaochau Bay, 1897.

II.M. gunboat "Gnat" lost on the Palawan, 1863. Destruction of the str. "Wah Yeung"

by fire in the Canton river; upwards of 400 lives lost, 1887.

Shanghai opened to foreign commerce, 1943. Celebration of Shanghai Jubilee, 1893.

23RD AFTER TRINITY. Great Fire in Hongkong, 1867.

Terrific gunpowder texplosion at Amoy; upwards of 800 houses destroyed and

several hundred lives lost, 1887.

Portuguese Custom House at Macao closed, 1845. Lord Elgin died, 1863.

Major Baldwin and Lieut. Bird, of H.M.'s 20th Regt., murdered in Japan, 1864. Port

Arthur taken by the Japanese, 1894.

Terrible boiler explosion on board the steamer "Yesso" in Hongkong harbour, 86 lives

lost, 1877.

Arrival of the Princes Albert Victor and George of Wales in the "Bacchante" at Woosung

1881.

24TH AFTER TRINITY. Capture of Anping, Formosa, 1963. Treaty between Portugal

and China signed, 1887, and Imperial Diet of Japan met for the first time, 1890. Edict issued by the Viceroy of Canton forbidding trade with British ships, 1339.

M. Thiers accepts the apology of Ch'ung How, the Chinese Ambassador, for the murde

of the French at Tientsin (June 21st, 1370), 1971.

Foreign factories burnt at Canton, 1856. Great fire in Hongkong, 1867.

Murder of captain and four men of the British barque "Crofton, near Ku-lan, 1800.

Opening of the Japanese Diet at Tokyo by the Emperor in person, 1890.

St. Andrew's Day. St. Joseph's Church, Hongkong, consecrated, 1372. The Japanese

cruiser "Chishima Kan" sunt in collision with the P. & O. steamer "Rave nna" in the Inland Sea, 61 lives lost, 1892.

xxii

THE CALENDAR FOR 1900

DECEMBER-31 DAYS

SUNRISE

1st

....6h. 25m.

SUNSET 5h. 13m.

HONGKONG Temperature

1897

1898

15th

...6h. 34m.

5h. 17m.

Maximum.

.76.4

79.7

MOON'S PHASES

Minimum

.47.9

51.3

d.

h.

m. sec.

Mean

.60.6 62.1

Full Moon

6

6

14 43

P.M.

Last Quarter 14

6

18 42

A.M.

New Moon

22

7

37 43

BAROMETER, 1898

A.M.

First Quarter 29 9 24 40 A.M.

 PERIGEE, 4 days, 2.45 hours, A.M. APOGEE, 15 days, 8.41 hours, P.M. PERIGER, 30 days,10.46 hours, P.M.

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Mean.............

..30.16

1897

RAINFALL

0.480 inches

1898

0.025 inches

First census of Hongkong taken, population 15,000, 1841.

DAYS OF DAYS OF 10

and 11

WEEK

MONTH

MOONS

Sat.

1

10

Sun.

11

1ST IN ADVENT. St. Francis Xavier died on Sanchoan, 1552.

Mon.

12

Tues.

4

13

Wed.

5

14

Thur.

Frid.

67

15

16

    Sat. Sun.

17

9

18

Mon. 10

19

Tues. 11

20

2 2 ***** 78

Wed. 12

21

Thur. 13

22

Frid.

14

23

Sat.

15

24

Sun. 16

25

Mon. 17

26

27

28

29

Tues. 18 Wed. 19

Thur. 20

Frid. 21

Sat.

Sun.

30

22

1

23

Mon. 24 Tues. 25

72 *** 2 7 228

Wed. 26

Thur. 27

Frid.

Sat.

29

Sun. 30

Mon. 31

2134

5

6

1-89 e

Six foreigners killed at Wang-chuh-ki, 1847. Soochow re-taken by the Imperialiate

under General Gordon, 1863. The Japanese warship

"Unebi-kan" left Singapore and not heard of again, 1886.

Confucius died, B.C. 490.

European factories at Canton destroyed by a mob, 1842.

2ND IN ADVENT. Ningpo captured by the Taipings, 1861.

Cathedral, Peking, 1888.

Consecration of new Pei-tang

Piracy on board the Douglas str. "Namoa," five hours after leaving Hongkong; Captain Pocock and three others murdered and several seriously wounded, 1890. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir William Robinson, 1891.

Indemnity paid by Prince Satsuma, 1863. Admiral Bell, U.S.N., drowned at Osaka,

1867.

Imperial Decree stating that the Foreign Ministers at Peking are to be received in

audience every New Year, 1890.

French flag hauled down from the Consulate at Canton by Chinese, 1832. Reception of

Foreign ladies by the Empress Dowager of China, 1898.

All Catholic Priests (not Portuguese) expelled from Macao, 1838. 3RD IN ADVENT.

The P. M. S. S. Co.'s steamer "Japan" burnt, 1 European passenger, the cook, and 389

Chinese drowned, 1874.

Sir Hugh Gough and the Eastern Expedition left China, 1842.

Arrival of Princes Albert Victor and George of Wales at Hongkong in the "Bacchante," 1881. Two cotton mills destroyed by fire at Osaka, 120 persons burnt to death, 1893.

Steam navigation first attempted, 1736.

Two Mandarins arrived at Macao with secret orders to watch the movements of

Plenipotentiary Elliot, 1836.

4TH IN ADVENT. British Consulate at Shanghai destroyed by fire, 1870.

CHRISTMAS DAY. Great Fire in Hongkong; 368 houses destroyed, immense destruction

of property, 1878.

Great fire at Tokyo, 11,000 houses destroyed, 263 lives lost, 1897. The C. N. Company's

steamer Shanghai" destroyed by fire on the Yangtze, over 300 lives lost.

04

Dedication of Hongkong Masonic Hall, 1885.

Canton bombarded by Allied forces of Great Britain and France, 1857.

10

1ST AFTER CHRISTMAS.

HONGKONG

POSTAL GUIDE.

PARS.

Offices

Business Hours

1

2-3

Registration

Articles not allowed to be

PARS. 91-102

PARS.

Holiday's

4

sent by post

103-104 |

Exceptional Conditions

Letters, etc., irrgularly mark-

ed value

156

157

Deliveries

6-7

!

Redirectio

ad Interception 105-109

Letters to or from Soldiers,

Pillar Boxes

8

Poste Restante

110-114

etc.

158

Private Boxes

9-13

Undelivered Correspondence 115-119

Post Cards

161-163

Postage Stamps

14-16

Articles of value

120

Printed and

Commercial

Despatch

17-27

MiscellaneoLIN

121-122

Papers

164-174

Local Postage Rates

28

Local Money

Orders and

Patterns and Samples

175-183

Letters

29-37

Postal Rates

129-139

Prohibited Articles

184

Printed matter-newspapers

38-45

Postal Notes

140-151

Registration

185-195

Book Packets

46.53

Countries comprised in Postal

Insurance of letters

196

Commercial Papers

54-63

Union..

152

General Regulations

197-234

Patterns

64-72

Foreign Postage Rates..

153

General

235-236

Prices Current and Circulars

73-76

Unpaid aid Partially Paid

Foreign Money Orders

237-245

Post Cards

77-81

Letters

154

Imperial Postal Notes

246

Local Parcel Post

82-90

Letters for Russia ..

155

General

252

OFFICES.

        1.--The Head Office for British Postal business in China is in the city of Victoria, Hongkong, with branch offices at West Point, Hongkong and Kowloon. There is a Post Office also at Shanghai, and Agencies at the following places, viz :--

Canton, Hoihow, Swatow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, Hankow and Liu Kung-tau.

BUSINESS HOURS.

        2.-The General Post Office is open for the transaction of public business on week days from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Sundays and Holidays from 8 to 9 a.m. In the event of a contract mail arriving after the ordinary business hours, the office is opened for the delivery of correspondence as soon as possible after the mails have been landed and sorted, and will be kept open for one hour thereafter.

        3.-The Branch Offices are open from 7.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. on ordinary days, and from 8 to 9 a.m. on Sundays and Holidays.

HOLIDAYS.

        4.-Sundays and all Public and Government Holidays are observed as Post Office Holidays, except as notified in the foregoing paragraph, and except the departure of a contract mail happens to be fixed for a Public or Government Holiday, when the Office will be kept open for the purpose of despatching the mails.

5.-[Division of Postal' Districts.]

DELIVERIES.

        6. In districts Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13 and 15 deliveries will be made at 8 .m., 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m., 4 p.m., and 6 p.m. on ordinary days.

In districts Nos. 11 (Albany and Peak Road) and 12 (Ship Street to Cancanery Bay Road) at 9 a.m., noon and 5 p.m., and in district No. 14 (Peak) at noon and 4 p.m., the Postmen leaving the Office for the two last named districts at 11.30 a.m. and 3.30 p.m.

On Sundays and Holidays deliveries will be made in all districts at 9 a.m. only. Contract mails are, however, delivered as soon as possible after arrival. The ordinary deliveries may be retarded by such mails.

The last delivery of Registered Correspondence is at 4 p.m. There are no deliveries on Chinese New Year's Day.

To Shipping.

7.--As a general rule correspondence for shipping in harbour is delivered to the agents, but if desired it will be delivered on board at noon and 4 p.m. on week days.

PILLAR BOXES.

        8.-Pillar Letter Boxes are cleared daily except on Sundays and holidays. Letters containing any article of value should not be posted in a pillar box, but should be registered at the General Post Office.

Persons posting in these boxes may cancel their stamps by writing the date across them. The time of clearing these boxes may sometimes be later than is stated, and, as the postman has to finish his delivery before taking any letters he finds in the boxes to the Post Office, it is in most cases about an hour or more after the box is cleared before such letters reach the General Post Office.

c

xxvi

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

PRIVATE BOXES.

     9.-Private boxes may be rented in the General Post Office, Hongkong, and in the Post Office Shanghai. The fee is $10 a year, payable in advance.

10. Each boxholder is supplied with an account book free, but must himself provide at least two stout bags (Shanghai firms require four), marked with his name in English and Chinese on both sides. Chinese nankin makes the best bags for this purpose. They should be without strings, but have a couple of iron rings at the mouth for suspending. Boxholders should insist on their coolies returning these bags to the Post Office as soon as emptied, or at any rate not later than next morning. The only safe way to empty a bag is to turn it inside out.

11. Each boxholder's coolie must be provided with a stout ticket or badge of wood, metal, or pasteboard, bearing his employer's name in English and Chinese. This will enable him to obtain letters whenever a mail arrives.

12. The advantages of renting a box are many. It secures a quicker and more accurate delivery of correspondence. Unpaid letters are delivered to boxholders with- out the delay of demanding payment, change, &c., as they are charged to his account. The boxholders of Hongkong and Shanghai send bags down in the mail steamer to be filled-Hongkong correspondence by the marine officer.-Shanghai correspondence at the General Post Office, Hongkong. Boxholders are allowed to post their letters in sealed boxes* and to mark their Postage Stamps. They receive free copies of all notices issued by the Post Office, Tables of Rates, &c. Many inconveniences are saved to them by the facility for charging their accounts with small deficiencies of postage when there is no time to return a short-paid letter. This, however, is only done as an exception when the letter cannot go on unpaid, no boxholder being allowed to make a practice of sending short-paid correspondence or letters to be stamped. Boxholders are also allowed certain privileges as to posting local correspondence unstamped (see paragraph 59).

13.-Boxholders' books are sent out for settlement on the first day of each month, and should be returned promptly. As a general rule no information can be given as to the correspondence charged in these accounts, where it came from, &c. There is only one way to obtain such information, and that is to file the covers of all unpaid corres- pondence received. Entries On Board are for unpaid correspondence dealt with by the marine officer on his way up from Singapore.

POSTAGE STAMPS.

14. Hongkong Postage Stamps of the following values can be purchased and are available at any British Post Office or Agency in Hongkong or China:-

2 cents.

4

5

10

12

20

"

""

""

""

30 cents. 50

1 dollar.

2 dollars.

3

""

5

""

Post Cards-

1 cent.

2 cents(with reply paid).

4 cents.

8 cents (with reply paid).

     15.--Boxholders are at liberty to mark their Postage Stamps on the back or face or by perforation, so as to prevent their being stolen. If the mark be on the face, it must be such as not to interfere with the clean appearance of the stamps.

     16.-Correspondence will not be stamped at the Post Office and charged to a boxholder's account, except as provided by paragraph 59.

DESPATCH.

17.-Tables showing the dates of the departure of the contract mails and the dates when replies to letters are due in Hongkong are published separately. The dates and hours of closing all mails in the General Post Office are also published twice daily in a Special Mail Notice, except on Sundays and Holidays.

     18. As a general rule the Mails for Europe by English and French Contract Packets are closed as follows when the steamer leaves at noon, viz:-

Circulars Registration Papers

8 a.m. 10 a.m. .10.30 a.m.

Registration with Late Fee of 10 cents ......10.45 a.m. Letters

11 a.m.

Late Letters with Late Fee of 10 cents. 11.10 a.m. to 11.30 a.m.

      • The boxes should be closed with some recognizable seal. Locked boxes cannot be allowed. A receipt book should be sent with each box, but as the receiving officer cannot undertake to count the correspondence sent he only gives a receipt for One Box. No attention is promised to anything written in the book-To be Registered for instance

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xxvii

19.-When two or more contract packets are leaving at the same hour the mails are closed a quarter of an hour earlier than usual.

        20.-Mails by American, Canadian, Indian or Australian packets and by private steamers for Coast and other Ports are closed one hour before the advertised time of departure, except when such steamers leave at daylight, when such mails are closed the evening previous at 5 p.m. When private steamers leave at noon of the days of departure of Contract Packets mails by such steamers are closed at 10 a.m.

          21.-The_mails for Shanghai, &c., by English and French Contract Packets from Europe are closed one hour before time of departure, as for example:-

If leaving at 5 p.m.

Registration closes at

Letters and Papers

Registration with Late Fee

Late Letters, &c.

..3 p.m.

.3.30 p.m.

.3.45 p.m.

.3.40 p.m. to 4 p.m.

If leaving at night or at daylight the following day:-

Registration closes at

   Registration with Late Fee Letters and Papers

Late Letters with Late Fee

.4.30 p.m. ..4.45 p.m.

.4.30 p.m.

.4.40 p.m. to 5 p.m.

22. All ordinary correspondence is sent on by the best opportunity of which the prepayment admits, unless especially directed or apparently prepaid for some other

route.

         23. Correspondence specially directed for any particular steamer is sent by her (failing any request to the contrary), however many times her departure may be postponed. If it is postponed sine die the correspondence is sent on by the next opportunity.

24.-Correspondence from the Coast marked via Brindisi or viâ Marseilles will be KEPT FOR THE ROUTE INDICATED even though that may involve a fortnight's detention. Unless this is intended, therefore, the safest direction is "By first mail."

25.--It is sometimes possible to overtake the French packet at Singapore by means of a direct private steamer. When this can be done Coast correspondence which has been received at the General Post Office "Too Late" will sent on.

         26.-Mails may also be forwarded to London and ports of call by the tea steamers leaving China, either direct, or to catch the next contract mail at Singapore or Suez. Except by special request, only letters are sent in these mails.

27.-There are two routes to Australia, viz., vid Torres Straits and via Colombo. For Eastern Australia as far as Sydney, for New Zealand, Tasmania and Fiji the former route is the best and for Western and Southern Australia the latter route is the best. All correspondence for these places is thus sent unless otherwise directed.

LOCAL POSTAGE RATES.

         28.-The terms "Local" used in these rules shall mean and include all correspond- ence posted in Hongkong and the adjacent territories belonging to Hongkong, as well as extending to the following places in China at which there are British Postal Agencies, viz., Hoihow, Canton, Swatow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, Shanghai, Hankow and Liu Kung Tau.

It shall also be taken to include and apply to correspondence sent to the Imperial Chinese Post Offices in China, to the Portuguese possession of Macao and to Kiaochow.

LETTERS.

        29.-In Hongkong and its dependencies and from Hongkong) and its dependencies to Canton or Macao.

(Not exceeding oz. in weight, 2 cents. For every addi- tional oz., 2 cents

To all other places mentioned in paragraph 27, 5 cents. per oz. 39.-A letter posted unpaid is chargeable on delivery with double postage; if insufficiently paid with double the deficiency,

        31.-No letter may exceed 2 feet in length, 1 foot in width or 1 fcot in depth, unless it be sent to or from a Government Office.

        32.--No letter is entitled to pass without prepayment of postage unless it is sent exclusively upon public business. Letters upon public business must be franked by the official sending them, with his name and office on the lower left-hand corner of the cover.

C 2

xxviii

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

Address to be complete.

      33.-Addresses should be as complete as possible in order to facilitate delivery, and in order that, in the event of the letter becoming from any cause undeliverable, it may be returned to the writer unopened, it is recommended that the sender's name and address be also superscribed on the cover.

Unpaid Letters; Loose Letters.

34.-The general rule as to insufficiently paid letters is to double the deficient postage. If the despatching office has not indicated how much the deficiency is it is taken to be 10 cents per half ounce, and the letter is consequently charged 20 cents per half ounce. Nothing can be sent wholly unpaid except letters. The prepayment of postage on local letters is compulsory.

35.-Consignees' letters, being privileged by law, need not be sent to the Post Office at all, but if they are sent they are liable to ordinary rates of postage.

     36. In the event of an unpaid letter becoming a dead letter the sender is liable, according to international rules, to pay the deficient postage and the fine.

37.- As a general rule Late Letters are received up to the times indicated in para- graphs 18 and 21 on prepayment of same in stamps of a Late Fee of 10 cents and are forwarded by the mail then preparing to be despatched.

PRINTED MATTER-NEWSPAPERS.

38.-The Prepaid rate is as follows:-

Every registered newspaper posted singly and not exceeding

4 ozs. in weight

For each additional 4 ozs..

2 cents. 2 cents.

39.-A bundle of newspapers may be prepaid at so much each (and each one must count, however small), or the whole may be paid at book rate.

    40.-Two newspapers must not be folded together as one, nor must anything whatever be inserted except bond file supplements of the same paper and same date. Printed matter may, however, be enclosed if the whole be paid at book rate.

41.-A newspaper or a packet of newspapers posted insufficiently paid will on delivery be charged with double the deficiency. Unpaid papers received from the Post Offices at the Coast Ports are returned to the sender if their names appear thereon charged with the amount of short postage.

42.-A newspaper is a printed paper containing news.

     43.-Every newspaper should be so folded and covered (if posted in a cover) permit the title to be readily inspected, and must be open at both ends.

as to

    44.-No newspaper and no cover of a newspaper may bear anything (not being part of the newspaper) except the names and addresses of the sender and the addressee, a request for return in case of non-delivery or the title of the newspaper. If it contains any written communication whatever it will be charged as a letter.

     45.-A packet of newspapers must not weigh above 5 lbs. or exceed 2 feet in length by I foot in width or depth.

BOOK PACKETS.

46. The prepaid rate of postage on a book packet is 2 cents for each 2 ounces.

     47.-The term "book packet" includes almost all kinds of printed or written matter not of the nature of an actual or personal correspondence, with whatever is necessary for its illustration or safe transmission, as maps, rollers, binding, &c., but a book must contain no communication whatever of the nature of a letter. Stamps of any kind, whether obliterated or not, or any papers representing monetary value, such as coupons, drafts, lottery tickets, &c., must be sent at letter rates.

    48.-A book may contain an inscription presenting it, notes or marks referring to the text, or such writing as With the author's compliments, &c. Compliments not exceeding five words may be written on visiting cards. In travellers' announcements the place of the intended visit, as well as the date and the traveller's name, may be indicated in writing, Christmas and New Year's cards may bear a written dedication. Titles of books may be written in forms of subscription to libraries, as well as in orders to booksellers; and on newspaper cuttings the addition in manuscript or by a mechanical process, of the title, date, number and address of the publication from which the article is extracted, is permitted.

type.

49.-Mechanical reproductions (not less than twenty) of a manuscript or written original may pass as printed papers if handed in at the Post Office window.

50.-Albums containing photographs may pass as printed papers.

51. The packet must be open at the ends and the contents visible, or easily to be rendered visible. Packets which are sealed or forwarded in closed covers with the

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xxix

corners cut off or with notched ends are returned to the senders. Packets may be tied with string to protect the contents, but in such a way that the string can be easily untied.

52.-The weight of a book packet is limited as follows:---

To British offices, 5 lbs.

|

To other offices, 4 lbs.

          53.-Book Packets for non-British offices must not exceed 18 inches measurement in any one direction, but such objects as maps, pictures, plans, photographs, &c., if made up into rolls of no great thickness and not exceeding 31 inches in length, may be so forwarded to any country.

COMMERCIAL PAPERS.

       54. The distinction between is, that whilst Book Packets are to wholly or partly written by hana. personal correspondence.

Books and Commercial Papers (papiers d'affaires) consist of printed matter, Commercial Papers are They must not be of the nature of an actual or

55.--Commercial Papers are such papers as the following:-Printers' copy; authors' manuscript; press copies of any documents not letters; law papers; deeds bills of lading; invoices; insurance papers; copied music, &c. The rate is the same as for books, but no packet. of commercial papers, whatever its weight, is charged less than 10 cents. Stamps of any kind, whether obliterated or not, or any papers representing monetary value, such as coupons, drafts, lottery tickets, &c., must be sent at letter rates.

        56.-Any one Commercial Paper in a Book Packet exposes the whole packet to the above rule as to minimum charge; with this exception all kinds of printed matter and patterns may be enclosed in one packet and forwarded at book,

rates.

        57.-Commercial Papers are subjected to all the conditions of Book Post as to the ends of the packet being open, liability to examination, hours of closing, late fees, &c.

       58.-Packets of commercial papers, printed papers and samples, when they do not accord with the regulations, are returned to the senders.

       59.-Circulars, Dividend Warrants, Invitations, Cards, Patterns, Bills, Almanacs, &c., for addressees in Hongkong or the Ports of China only, but not for Macao or elsewhere, in batches of not less than ten of uniform size and weight (such weight not to exceed 2 ounces), may be sent through the Post Office at the rate of 1 cent each, the same being paid in cash or, in the case of boxholders, charged to the sender's

account.

       60.-Such covers when addressed to places other than Hongkong or China must be prepaid 2 cents each in stamps.

       61.-Addresses must be complete, that is to say, on such covers as are not addressed to heads of houses, the addressee's residence or place of business must be added. Incom- pletely addressed covers are returned to the sender for address.

       62.-Book Packets posted from or to the Banks with the words "Pass Book" printed on the cover and open at both ends are allowed to pass as printed matter. Savings Bank Pass Books are free.

       63. The rules applicable to unpaid or insufficiently paid newspapers are equally applicable to book packets and commercial papers.

PATTERNS.

       64.-Samples of merchandise must possess no saleable value, nor bear any writing or printing on or in the packet except the name of the sender or that of his firm, the address of the addressee, a manufacturers' or trade mark, numbers, prices, and indi- cations relative to weight or size, or to the quantity to be disposed of, or such as are necessary to determine the origin and the nature of the goods.

        65. Type samples of unmanufactured tobacco are admitted by post into the United Kingdom provided that such samples are sent for trade purposes, that they do not exceed 4 ounces in gross weight, and that they comply with the general regulations of Sample Post. Upon the lelivery of such samples there is levied from the addressee a charge of 8d. for Customs duty.

Liquids.

       66.-Liquids, oils and fatty substances easily liquified must be enclosed in glass bottles hermetically sealed. Each bottle must be placed in a wooden box adequately furnished with sawdust, cotton, or spongy material in sufficient quantity to absorb the liquid in case the bottle be broken, and the box itself must be enclosed in a case of metal, of wood with a screw-top, or of strong and thick leather.

XXX

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

Ointments, &c.

      67.-Fatty substances which are not easily liquified, such as ointments, soft soap, resin, &c., must be enclosed in an inner cover (box, linen bag, parchment, &c.), which itself must be placed in a second box of wood, metal, or strong and thick leather.

68.-Articles of glass must be securely packed (boxes of metal, wood, leather, or card- board) in a way to prevent all danger to the correspondence and postal officers.

Dry Powders.

69.-Dry powders, whether dyes or not, must be placed in cardboard boxes, which themselves are enclosed in a bag of linen or parchment.

Patterns and Samples.

70.-Packets of patterns and samples must be so packed as to admit of easy inspection; any such found to be insecurely packed will be stopped.

      71.-Such packets for places in the Postal Union must not exceed 12 inches in length, 8 inches in width and 4 inches in depth.

      72.-The maximum weight for packets of patterns or samples of merchandise posted in Hongkong or its agencies for places in the Postal Union is 12 ounces (350 grammes). To British Offices the limit is 5 lbs.

PRICES CURRENT AND CIRCULARS,

      73.-A circular is a communication of which copies are addressed in identical terms, or nearly so, to a number of persons. It may be either written or printed, or partly written and partly printed. A price current or circular may be paid as a newspaper or as a book.

     74.-A bundle of prices current or circulars may be paid as so many newspapers (each one counting), or the whole may be paid at book rate. The Union rate of postage is 2 cents each.

75.-Prices Current or Circulars in closed envelopes with the corners cut off, or with notched ends, will not be forwarded, as they are not really open to inspection. 76.--Prices Current and Circulars arriving in such large quantities as to retard the delivery of the mails are allowed to stand over till there is time to deal with them.

POST CARDS, OFFICIAL AND PRIVATE.

77.-Official_Post Cards impressed with a 1 cent stamp and official Reply Post Cards impressed with a 1 cent stamp on each portion of them can be bought at every Post Office.

78.-Nothing whatever may be attached, except adhesive stamps in payment of additional postage or stamp duty and a gummed label (not to exceed 2 inches long and 3 inch wide) bearing the address at which the card is to be delivered; the card may not be folded nor may it be cut or altered in such a way as to reduce the size below 31 by 21 inches. The postage stamp also must be left intact. If any of these rules be infringed the card is treated as a letter liable on delivery to the usual charges, The front or stamped side of the post card shall have nothing but the address written upon it.

      79. Private Cards prepaid 1 cent each (the value being affixed thereto by means of the "Paid" chop) can also be used as post cards. They must be composed of ordinary cardboard not thicker than the material used for the official post card. The maximum size must correspond as nearly as may be to the size of the Inland Official card, and the minimum size must not be less than 34 by 24 inches. They must have the words "Post Card" printed on the address side. The rules in the preceding paragraph also apply to Private Cards. A Private Card posted unpaid is chargeable on delivery with double postage.

80.-Nothing may be written, printed or engraved on the address side of any Private or Official Post Card which tends in any way to embarrass the officers of the Department in the easy and prompt dealing with it. Any such will be liable to be withheld from delivery.

     81.-It is forbidden to forward by post any Post Card having thereon any words, marks or designs of an indecent, obscene or grossly offensive character. Any such shall be stopped and dealt with by the Postmaster-General as the circumstances of the case may require.

LOCAL PARCEL POST. Directions as to Posting.

      82.---In order that a packet may be sent by Parcel Post it must be presented at the counter of a Post Office for transmission as a parcel and must bear the words "Parcel Post" written conspicuously on the upper left hand corner. It must also bear the name

and address of the sender on the bottom left-hand corner of the face of the cover.

The

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xxxi

parcel should not be left until the weight, size and postage have been tested by the officer who accepts it and a receipt of its posting obtained.

If a

as well.

tie on

"label is used, the address must nevertheless be written on the cover

LIMITS OF SIZE AND WEIGHT.

83. The size allowed for a local parcel is: Greatest length,3 feet 6 inches; greatest length and girth combined, 6 feet, and the greatest weight, 11 lbs.

84.-The rates of postage are :-

For a parcel not exceeding one pound in weight, 10 cents. For each subsequent pound, 5 cents.

MODE OF PREPAYMENT.

85.--No packet can be accepted by an officer of the Department for transmission by Parcel Post unless the postage at the above rates is paid. The postage stamps should be affixel by the sender to the cover of the parcel at the right-hand upper corner on the face.

PARCELS POSTED OUT OF Course.

       86.-If a packet, which either bears the words " Parcel Post," or from its appearance seems to be intended for transmission as a parcel, is not posted in accordance with these regulations, it is treated as a letter, if it is fully prepaid at the letter rate, and is other- wise in accordance with the Letter Post regulations.

If such parcel is not fully prepaid at the Letter rate it will be returned to the sender.

DIRECTIONS AS TO PACKING.

       87.-Parcels containing any fragile or perishable article must be so packed as to ensure their safe handling and their causing no injury or damage to the mails.

       88.-Parcels generally must be so packed and enclosed in a reasonably strong case, wrapper or cover, fastened in a manner calculated to preserve the contents from loss or damage in the post and to prevent any tampering therewith. The packing of a parcel must also be such as to protect other postal packets from being damaged in any way by it. Any parcel not so packed will, if tendered for transmission, be refused, and if discovered in transit will be liable to be detained.

PARCELS ADDRESSED TO POST OFFICES.

89.--Parcels may be addressed "to be called for" to any Post Office at which letters similarly addressed may be received and under the same general regulations, and will be detained at such offices for a period of three weeks. If not then claimed such parcels will be returned to the Returned Branch of the General Post Office and notice of the fact will be forwarded to the senders, to whom delivery will be made on payment of the postage due for the return of the parcels.

90.--In default of proper application and payment of the charges due undelivered parcels are liable to be finally disposed of three months after the date of their return to the General Post Office. If, however, during this period or during the period of retention at a Post Office the contents of a parcel become or are likely to become worthless through natural decay, or are found to be offensive or injurious, they are liable to be disposed of forthwith.

REGISTRATION AND COMPENSATION.

91.- The ordinary registration fee for each local letter or other postal packet is 10

cents.

       92. Every description of paid correspondence may be registered, except such as is addressed in pencil, or is addressed to initials or fictitious names, or is not properly fastened and secured.

       93. The sender of any registered article may obtain an acknowledgment of its delivery to the addressee by paying in advance at the time of posting a fee of 10 cents.

In addition to the postage and registration fee, the sender must enter in the form provided for the purpose both his own name and address and the name and address of the person to whom the packet is sent, and he must also affix to the form a stamp or stamps of the value of 10 cents in payment of the fee.

94.-Letters are accepted for registration at the General Post Office at the Praya West and Kowloon branch offices, as well as the Postal agencies.

       95.-Every article to be registered must be given to an officer or agent of the Post Office and a receipt obtained for it. It must bear the name and address of the sender on the lower left-hand corner of the face of the cover.

       The packet must on no account be dropped into a Letter Box. If contrary to this rule a packet bearing the word "Registered" or any other word, phrase or mark to the like effect be dropped into the Letter Box it will be liable to a fine of 20 cents.

xxxii

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

96.-All registered letters or packets on being redirected must be taken back to the Registration Department to be dealt with as registered, and must not be dropped into a letter-box as ordinary letters or packets. If brought later than the day (Sundays and public holidays not being counted) after delivery, a fresh registration fee as well as fresh postage will be required.

      97.-The Postmaster-General is not legally responsible for the safe delivery of regis tered correspondence, but will be prepared to make good the value of such correspondence if lost while passing through the Post, to the extent of $10, in certain cases, provided :-

(a) That the sender duly observed all the conditions of registration. (b) That the correspondence was secured in a reasonably strong envelope. (e) That application was made to the Postmaster-General immediately the loss was discovered, and within a year at the most from the date of posting such correspondence.

(d) That the Postmaster-General is satisfied the loss occurred whilst the correspondence was in the custody of the British Postal administration in China; that it was not caused by any fault on the part of the sender; by destruction by fire, or shipwreck; nor by the dishonesty or negligence of any person not in the employment of the Hongkong Post Office.

98.-No compensation can be paid for mere damage to fragile articles such as portraits, watches, handsomely bound books, &c., which reach their destination, although in a broken or deteriorated condition, nor on account of alleged losses of the contents of registered covers which safely reached their destinations, nor on account of any article for which the addressee has signed a receipt.

99.-The Post Office declines all responsibility for unregistered letters containing bank notes, or jewellery, and where registration has been neglected will make no enquiries into alleged losses of such letters.

     100.-A postcard enclosed in a packet of correspondence, for return to the sender by way of receipt, will not under any circumstances be admitted as evidence that any particular article reached the Post Office.

      101.--Enquiry as to the disposal of a registered article will be made free of charge when the sender produces prima facie evidence that it has failed to reach the addressee, When, however, no such evidence is produced, a fee of 10 cents. for an acknowledgment of delivery will be required before enquiry is instituted. No fee will be charged for enquiry when the sender has already paid for an acknowledgment of delivery.

102.-Officers employed in the Registration Department are forbidden to address registered mail matter, to enclose it in the envelope, seal it, or affix the stamps.

ARTICLES NOT ALLOWED TO BE SENT BY POST.

103.-The following articles cannot be sent through the post :-

(a) Samples of merchandise having a saleable value.

(b) Samples and other articles which, from their nature, may expose the postal

officials to danger, or soil or damage the correspondence.

(c) Explosive, inflammable, or dangerous substances.

(d) Animals or insects, living or dead.*

(e) Any indecent or obscene print, painting, photograph, lithograph, engrav

ing, book, or card, or any other indecent or obscene article, or any letter, newspaper, or publication, packet or card, having thereon any words, marks, or designs, of an indecent, obscene, libellous or grossly offensive character. 104.-It is forbidden to insert in ordinary or registered correspondence consigned to. the post:-

(a) Current coin.

(b) Articles liable to Customs duty.

(c) Gold or silver bullion, precious stones, jewellery and other precious. articles, but only in case their insertion or transmission is forbidden by the legislation of the countries concerned.

REDIRECTION AND INTERCEPTION.

105.-Letters, book packets, post cards, newspaper and book packets are not liable to additional postage for re-direction whether re-directed by an officer of the Post Office or by an agent of the addressees after delivery, provided in the latter case that the letters, &c., are re-posted not later than the day (Sundays and public holidays not being counted) after delivery, and that they do not appear to have been opened or tam-

* Live bees may be sent if enclosed in boxes so constructed as to avoid all danger and allow the contents to be ascertained.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xxxii

pered with. Re-directed registered letters must not be dropped into a letter box but must be handed to an officer of the Post Office to be dealt with as registered.

106.-Re-directed letters, &c., which are re-posted later than the day after delivery will be liable to charge at the prepaid rate. Any which appear to have been opened or tampered with will be chargeable as freshly posted unpaid letters or packets.

107.-Parcels are when re-directed liable to additional postage at the prepaid rate for each re-direction except when the original and corrected addresses are both within a delivery of the same Post Office.

108.-Letters and all other postal packets may, on payment of the following fees (to be paid by means of Postage stamps affixed to the request for interception), he intercepted and delivered to the addressee at such place as he shall request, viz :---

By any particular contract mail steamer from

Europe

By any vessel from any port during the course

of one calendar month

$ 1.00

$ 5.00

109.-Interceptions shall be made when practicable, but the fees so paid shall not entitle the persons applying to have their mail matter intercepted to claim as of right the interception of all or any particular postal packet addressed to them.

       110.-The Postmaster-General shall not be bound to entertain any request for interception unless such request is accompanied by the above prescribed fees. Corres- pondence directed to care of boxholders in Hongkong must, without exception, be delivered as addressed.

46

POSTE RESTante.

111.-All letters and other Postal packets superscribed "To be kept till called for," "To await arrival," or in any similar way, and also those addressed "Post Office," or 'Hongkong" without any other address are held to fall under the head "Poste Restante." 112.-The Poste Restante being intended solely for the accommodation of strangers and travellers who have no permanent abode in the town, letters or other postal packets for residents must not be addressed to the Post Office to be called for, nor will such letters or postal packets be kept in the Poste Restante longer than the following periods, viz.:-

Local letters are kept for 1 month International

""

""

2 months

Letters for steamers are kept for 3 months

sailing vessels

""

4

""

113.-Letters or other postal packets addressed to initials or to fictitious names or to a christian name without a surname are not taken in at the Poste Restante but are at once sent to the Returned Letter Branch for disposal.

114.-All persons applying for Poste Restante letters or other postal packets must furnish the necessary and required particulars to prevent mistakes and to ensure the delivery of the same to the persons to whom they properly belong and sign the register. If the addressee does not apply for same in person the messenger must be furnished with the required information and must have a written authority to receive them. If the applicant be a foreigner he must produce his passport or other evidence of identity. DISPOSAL OF UNDELIVERED CORRESPONDENCE.

115.-Every letter or other postal article should bear the full name and address of the sender in order to ensure its return in case of non-delivery.

       116.-An undelivered local or foreign letter or post card bearing the full name and address of the sender printed or written upon the outside is returned direct to the sender. Other undelivered local letters and post cards are sent to the Returned Letter Branch where, after having been advertised, they will at the expiration of ten days be opened and returned, if possible, to the senders; if they contain neither sender's name or address nor any enclosure of importance they will be destroyed. Letters found to contain value are recorded and if returned are registered. Letters from abroad are returned unopened to the country of origin after having been advertised.

117.-Book packets and newspapers which cannot be delivered and which bear the name and address of the sender with a request for their return in case of non-delivery are returned direct to the sender on payment of a second postage. Those bearing no name nor request for return are sent to the Returned Letter Branch, where, after having been advertised, they will, at the expiration of ten days thereafter, if not pre- viously claimed and a second postage paid, be disposed of.

119.-The name and address of the sender and the request for return should be written or printed in small type at the upper left-hand corner of the packet.

118.-All unpaid undelivered letters or post cards shall be delivered to the senders

only on the payment of the amount charged thereon.

xxxiv

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

ARTICLES OF VALUE.

     120.--Neither money nor any another article of value ought to be sent by post except in a registered postal packet and in the case of money by means of a Post Office Money Order or of a Postal Order duly filled up with the name of the payee. Any person who sends money or any other articles of value otherwise runs the risk of losing his property and the Post Office declines all responsibility for such and will make no enquires into alleged losses of such letters.

MISCELLANEOUS.

121.-Contrary to general usage, the Hongkong Post Office will give a receipt of the kind given for a boxholder's box for an ordinary letter, to assure the sender his corre- spondence has not been stolen on the way to the Post. But this receipt is not intended to be used against the Post Office in case the correspondence goes astray. If that is intended the correspondence should be registered.

      122.-It is no part of the duties of the Post Office to affix stamps to correspondence, or to see that servants purchase or affix the proper amounts, nor can the officers of the Department, under any circumstances, undertake to do this.

      123. Any article of correspondence duly prepaid and posted becomes the property of the addressee, and cannot be returned to the sender, nor can it be detained, without the written authority of the Governor of Hongkong or of Her Majesty's Consul at the Port, on an application tating fully the reasons for the request.

      124.-Postal officials are not bound to give change, nor are they authorized to demand it; and when money is paid at a Post Office, whether as change or otherwise, no question as to its right amount, goodness or weight can be entertained after it has been removed from the counter.

125.-Postal officials are not bound to weigh for the public letters, books, packets or newspapers brought for the post, but they may do so if their duty be not thereby impeded. This rule does not apply to parcels, which are tested both as to weight and size before being accepted.

     126. No information can be given respecting letters or any other postal packets except to the persons to whom they are addressed, and in no other way is official information of a private character allowed to be made public.

     127.-Circulars should be tied in bundles, with all the addresses in one direction, and should be posted as early as possible before the hour fixed for closing, so as to secure due despatch.

     128.-The Post Office is not legally liable for any loss or inconvenience which may arise from the damage, delay, non-delivery, mis-sending, or mis-delivery of any letter or other postal packet, but liability for actual loss or damage is accepted on certain condi- tions in the case of parcels and registered packets.

LOCAL MONEY ORDERS AND POSTAL NOTES.

     129.--The hours of business at the General Post Office, Hongkong, daily, excepting Saturdays, are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. On the working day next before any contract mail for Europe leaving at noon the Office is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Money orders are not sold before noon on Saturdays when the contract mail for Europe leaves at that hour.

      130.-Single Money Orders are issued at the General Post Office, Hongkong, and at the British Post Office, Shanghai, at the current rates of exchange for any sum not ex- ceeding $100.

130a.-Money Orders are paid at the abovenamed offices and at the several British Postal Agencies in China.

131.--Applications for Money Orders must be made on the printed forms provided for the purpose at the Money Order Offices. The full name and address of both appli- cant and payee should always be given.

      132.-Parties procuring Money Orders should examine them carefully to see they are properly filled up and stamped.

that

      133. When a Money Order is presented for payment at the office upon which it is drawn the Postmaster will use all proper means to assure himself that the applicant is the person named and intended in the advice or is the endorsee of the letter, and upon payment of the order care must be taken to obtain the signature of the payee or of the. person authorized by him to receive payment to the receipt on the face of the order.

134.--When a Money Order has been lost by either remitter or payee a duplicate thereof will be issued by the paying office on payment of a second commission; and

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

XXXV

     when a remitter desires to correct any error in an order obtained by him such correc- tion may be made on payment of a second commission. Application for either of the above purposes

should be made in writing to the Postmaster-General. 135.-The remitter of a local order may request at the time of issue or subsequently that the order be crossed like a cheque, thus, & Co." in order that it may be paid only through a bank. In the case of crossed orders the remitter may at his pleasure give or withhold the payee's name or description.

       136.-If the payee is unable to write he must sign the receipt by making his mark, to be witnessed in writing by some one known to the Postmaster but unconnected with the Post Office. The witness should sign his name with his address in the presence of the Postmaster, and the latter will then certify the payment by adding his own initials. In no case should the Postmaster act as witness himself. It is not necessary that the witness should be personally acquainted with the payee.

137.-After once paying a Money Order, by whomsoever presented, provided the required information has been given by the party who presented it, the Department will not hold itself liable to any further claim.

138.-The following rates of commission will be charged on Money Orders:-

up to $

10,

$

25,

""

$

35,

""

50,

60,

""

$ 75,

19

85, $ 100,

""

20

$

40

$

60

$ 80

$ 1.00

$ 1.20

$ 1.40

$1.60

       139.-An order remaining unpaid after one year from date of issue-(i.e., issued in January, but unpaid at the end of the following January)-is considered as void and lapsed to Government and will not be paid unless satisfactory explanation as to the cause of delay in presenting it for payment can be furnished to the Postmaster-General, who alone can authorize such payment. A second commission will be payable on any such payment.

POSTAL NOTES.

       140.- Local Postal Notes shall be for one of the following amounts, payable within six months, issued and paid at the General Post Office, Hongkong, and at the several British Postal Agencies, and in respect thereof the Commission payable shall be:--

Amount.

25 cents

50

$1.00

$2.00

Commission. 1 cent

Commission.

6 cents

Amount.

$ 3.00

1

$ 4.00

8

""

""

2

"3

4

$5.00 $10.00

10

""

20

39

99

        141. In addition to the above commission on Postal Orders issued at the General Post Office, Hongkong, Hoihow, Canton, Swatow, Amoy and Foochow payable at Shanghai, Ningpo, or Hankow, a further charge at current rates is made to cover the difference between chopped and clean dollars.

        142.-Broken amounts, but not less than two cents, may be made up by the use of Hongkong postage stamps not exceeding 10 cents in value affixed to the face of any one Postal Order. Perforated stamps cannot be accepted for this purpose.

143.-The office issuing any Postal Note shall fill in the name of the port where it is payable. The purchaser may, before parting with the order, fill in the name of the Payee. 144-Every person to whom a Postal Order is issued should keep a record of the number, date and name of office of issue, to facilitate enquiry if the Order should be lost, and should register the letter in which it is forwarded.

145.-If a Postal Note be lost or destroyed no duplicate thereof can be issued. This regulation cannot be departed from in any case whatever, for the reason that every Postal Note is payable to bearer and that no specified person can therefore satisfactorily establish the fact of his ownership in a lost Order which is not filled in, and which, if found at any time, would be payable to bearer.

146.-If a Postal Order be crossed

& Co. payment will only be made through a Banker, and if the name of a Banker is added payment will only be made through that Banker.

147.-After a Postal Order has once been paid, to whomsoever it is paid, the Government will not be liable for any further claim.

xxxvi

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

148.-If any erasure or alteration be made, or if the Order is cut, defaced or mutilated, payment may be refused.

149.-Any officer in charge of a Post Office may delay or refuse the payment of a Postal Order, but he must at once report his reasons for so doing to the Postmaster-General.

150. After the expiration of six months from the last day of the month of issue a Postal Order will be payable only on payment of a commission equal to the amount of the original commission, but after twelve months it will become invalid and not payable. 151.-It shall be within the discretion of the Postmaster-General to suspend at any time the issue of Local Postal Order.

152.-LIST OF COUNTRIES WHICH, IN ADDITION TO THE UNITED KINGDOM, ARE COMPRISED IN THE POSTAL UNION.

* Aden

* Antigua

* Argentine Republic

Ascension

† Australia

*

Austria-Hungary

* Azores

* Bahamas

* Barbados

*

Belgium Bermuda

* Bolivia * Bosnia

* Brazil

British North Borneo British East Africa

* British Guiana

* British Honduras

        British New Guinea * Bulgaria

Cape Colony (including

Basutoland, British Be- chuanaland, Pondoland, Griqualand East, Gri qualand West, Nama- qualand (Little), John's River Territory, Transkel, Tembuland, Walwich Bay)

Cameroons

* Canada (Dominion of)

Ceylon

*

Chili

St.

* Columbia, Republic of * Congo, including Black Point, Majumba and Nyanza Costa Rica Cuba

*

Cyprus

* Danish Colonies; viz.- Greenland, St. Croiz, St. John, and St. Thomas

* Denmark (including Faroe Islands and Iceland)

* Dominica

* Dominican Republic (San

Domingo)

* Ecuador

* Egypt

Falkland Islands,

Fiji Islands

* France

* French Colonies; viz.-

Guade-

loupe and dependen.

* Hawaiian (or Sandwich)

Islands * Hayti

Herzegovina

Gaboon, Grand Bassam, Half Jack and Wydah (also Sette Cama and Assinie) Comoro Mayotte and depen- dencies, Madagascar, New Caledonia and

* Reunion, Islands,

dependencies,

the

French portion of the Low Archipelago, and the French Esta- blishments in India, Pondichery, Chan-

dernagor, Karikal, Mahé, and (Yanoan), Annam, Cambodge, Tonkin, and in Cochin China, French Estab- lishments in Morocco, viz.-Casabianca, Ei- Ksar-el-Khir

Fez

Laraiche, Mazagan, Mogador, Rabat, Saffi, and Tangier, and Society Islands

Gambia

Germany

German Colonies; viz. --Marshall Islands, New Guinea (portion of), Samoa (Apia), Togo Tertitory, in- cluding Bageida,

Little Popo, Lome, and Porto Seguro, and territory in South West Africa, viz.. Grand Namaqua, the Damaras Country. and Southern portion of Chambo, also_Baga- moyo, and Dar-es- Salaam, Lindi Tanga in East Africa and Marian Islands Gibraltar (including the British Post Offices at Tangier, Tetuan, Fez Laraiche. Rabat Casabianca,

Saff, Mazagan, and Mogador)

* Gold Const

* Greece

Grenada

Grenadines

Martinique,

cies, French

Guiana

(Cayenne), Senegal and

dependencies. Ahgwey,

* Guatemala

* Honduras (Republic of)

Hongkong

* India

* Italy

* Jamaica

Japan

Labuan Lagos

Liberia

Luxemberg

*

Madeira

Malta

*

Marquesas Islands

* Mauritius and dependen-

eier

* Mexico

Montenegro

Montserrat

Natal (including Zulu-

land

* Netherlands

* Netherlands Colonies, viz.-Dutch Guiana (Su- rinam), Curacoa and dependencies, viz.-Bo- naire, Araba, the Ne- therlands portion of St. Martin, St. Eustache, Saba, Java, Madura, Sumatra, Celebes, Bor- neo (except North-west part), Billiton, Archi- pelago of Banca, Archi- pelago of Riouw, Sunda Islands (Bali, Lombok, Sumbawa, Floris, and the south-west part of Timor), the Archipelago of the Moluccas, and the north-west part of New Guinea (Papua)

* Necis

Newfoundland

New Zealand

*

Nicaragua

* Norway

*

Orange Free State

Paraguay

* Patagonia * Persia

* Peru

* Philippine Islands * Porto Rico * Portugal

PortugueseColonies, viz. Goa and its dependen- cies (Damoa and Diu), Macao, Timor, Cape Verd Islands and de- pendencies (Bissau and Cachen), Cabenda, Mu- culla, Mussera and Is- lands of St. Thomas and Prince (in Africa), with the Establishment of Ajuda, Angola, Dela- goa Bay, and Mozam- bique

• Roumania

• Russia

St. Helena

* St. Kitta

St. Lucia

* St. Pierre-et-Miquelon

St. Vincent. West Indies * Salvador

* Sandwich (or Hawaiian)

Islands

* Sarawak * Servia

Seychellen

* Siam

*

Sierra Leone

South African Republic

(Transvaal)

Spain (including Balean- ric and Canary Islands) * Spanish Colonies; viz.-

Fernando Po, Annobon and dependencies Straits Settlements

* Sweden * Switzerland

* Tahiti

* Tobago * Tortola

• Trinidad * Turkey

* Turk's Islands

* United States

* Uruguay

* Venezuela

Zanzibar

* The transmission by Letter Post of coin, silver, precious stones, jewellery, &c., is prohibited in those countries

marked thus. *

 + In some of the Australian Colonies gold and silver jewellery is not transmissable, or is subject to Customs duties. NOTE.-The names of British Colonies and Possessions are printed in italics.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

FOREIGN POSTAGE RATES.

xxxvii

       153. The Rate of Postage to be prepaid in Hongkong and at the several British Postal Agencies in China on letters for all Foreign countries and other British possessions is as follows:-

ΤΟ

LETTERS

PER OZ.

SINGLE KEPLY

POST

POST CARDS, EACH,

CARDS,

EACH.

BOOKS NEWSP'S P'TERNS

ETC. PER 2 07.

RETURN

[COMMER-

REGIS- RECEIPT FOR |TRATION, REGISTERED

ARTICLE.

CIAL PAPERS

cents.

10

centr.

cents.

cents.

4

8

2 $

cents, 10

cents.

10

UNION COUNTRIES (except as below)

United Kingdom

Aden, Ascension, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, British Central Africa, Britishi East Africa, British Guiana, British Honduras, British North Borneo, Canada. Cape Colony, Ceylon, Cyprus, Falkland Islands, Fiji Islands, Gambia, Gibraltar, Gold Coast Colony, India, including Chandernagore, Karikal, Mahé, Pondi cherry, Yanam, Jamaica, Johore, Labuan, Lagos, Leeward Islands, viz. :-Antigua, Dominica, Montserret, Nevis, St. Chris topher, Virgin Islands, Malay States (Federated), viz.:-Negri Sembilan, Pa. hang, Perak, Selangor, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, Newfoundland, Niger Coast Pro- tectorate, Niger Territory, St. Helena, Sarawak, Seychelles, Sierra Leone,

Straits Settlements, Tobago, Trinidad, Turk's Island, Uganda, Windward Islands, viz.:-Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vicent, Zanzibar

Macao

NON-UNION Countries :-

Abyssinia.

Afghanistan

Africa (West Coast, Native Possessions). Arabia

Bechuanaland Protectorate, including- Kanye, Lake Ngami, Macloutsie, Mole- polole, Palachwe (Khamas Town), Rhode- sia (comprising Mashonaland, Matabele- land, and Northern Zambesia), Shoshong, and Tati River,

China (or from China to Hongkong) Friendly Islands (Tonga Islands), Morocco (except Casablanca, Él-ksar-el-

kbir, Fez, Laraiche, Mazagan, Mogador, Rabat, Saffi, Tangier and Tetuan, at each of which places the Gibraltar Post Office or French Post Office maintains an agen- cy under the Postal Union regulations)...... Samoa (Navigators' Islands) Other parts

4

10

2

10(e) 10 (ca)

4

4

10 (ca) 10 (c)

5 (c) 10

11

2 &

10❘

10

2

|2 (4 oz.)

10

10

8

22521

00 00 00 00

10 (in)

10 (in)

10 fin,

10 (in)

1 1 1 1

00

8

2

10

|2 (4 oz.)||| 10 (b)

2

10

10 (c)

8

2

10

I

10

10(e)

00 00

8

NN

10

8

BETWEEN HONGKONG AND CANTON, AND CHANG

CHOW, AND FOR LOCAL DELIVERY

10 (in)

4

2

2 (4 oz.) 10

10

(a) An additional charge is made on delivery,

Same as for Books, except that the lowest charge is 10 cents.

       (b) Registration_in China through British Offices extends to Hoihow, Canton, Swatow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo Shanghai, Liu Kung Tau and Hankow only.

(c) Prepayment is compulsory.

(in) Registration is incomplete, not extending beyond Port of Arrival.

• Letters for these places posted at any Office other than in the Colony (viz., at any British Postal Agency in China or any Imperial Chinese Post Office using Hongkong Stamps) are subject to the rate of 10 cents

half ounce.

per § Newspapers to the following British Possessions and foreign countries are accepted at the special rate of 2 cents per 4 ounces or fraction thereof, viz.:-

Australia,

     Annam, China, Ceylon,

Cochin China, Corea,

Formosa,

India,

Japan, Macao,

Siam,

Netherlands India, Philippines,

Straits Settlements, Timor,

Tonkin.

UNPAID AND PARTIALLY PAID LETTERS.

      154.-Letters posted unpaid or insufficiently prepaid, for any country to which prepayment is compulsory, are returned to the writers.

LETTERS FOR RUSSIA.

155.-The addresses of letters for Russia should be very plainly written; the name of the town and of the province in which it is situated should also be added in English. EXCEPTIONAL CONDITIONS.

      156.-The countries in which exceptional conditions apply, such as compulsory pre- payment of postage, the collection of an additional charge on delivery, or the absence

xxxviii

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

    of arrangement for the complete or even partial registration of letters, will be found in the footnotes to the Table of Rates of Postage.

LETTERS, &c., IRREGULARLY MARKED WITH DECLARATIon of Value. 157.-Letters, &c., bearing on the outside a declaration of the value of the contents cannot be transmitted by post to places abroad unless they are insured (see rule 196).

     LETTERS TO OR FROM SAILORS, SOLDIERS, &C. IN HER MAJESTY'S SERVICE. 158.-Non-commissioned officers, schoolmasters, schoolmistresses, private soldiers or sailors, whether serving at sea or on land, can send or receive prepaid letters not exceeding half an ounce in weight at the rate of 4 cents.

      159. If the letter be from a sailor or soldier, or from a civilian to a sailor or soldier, the class, rank or description of the sailor or soldier shall appear on the address, and in the former case the officer having the command shall sign his name on the cover.

160. If the letter be posted for a place abroad unpaid or insufficiently paid, or if the class or description of the sailor or soldier be not written in the address, it will be liable to be detained and returned to the writer for payment of the postage.

POST CARDS.

      161.-Official post cards, single and reply, are transmissible to all parts of the world. Single cards are issued with impressed stamps of 4 cents and reply cards bearing stamps of the value of 4 cents in each half. Local post cards are also transmissible abroad if the additional postage required is supplied by means of postage stamps affixed to the cards.

162.-Private post cards bearing adhesive stamps of the value of 4 cents, and private reply cards with adhesive stamps of the value of 4 cents on each half, may be sent as post cards to places abroad, provided that they are in conformity with the official post cards in respect of size, substance and other requirements and comply with the local rules (see rules 78-80).

     163.-Unpaid post cards from places abroad are charged 8 cents each and partially paid cards are charged double the deficient postage.

PRINTED PAPERS AND COMMERCIAL PAPERS.

164.-The articles which are entitled to be sent at the rate applicable to printed papers are mostly impressions or copies obtained upon paper, parchment or cardboard, by means of printing, lithography, engraving, photographing, or any other mechanical process easy to recognize.

165. This description includes the undermentioned articles wholly printed :- Newspapers, books (stitched or bound), periodical works, pamphlets, sheets of music, visiting cards, address cards, proofs of printing, plans, maps, catalogues, prospectuses, announcements, circulars, notices, engravings, photographs and designs. Anything not being of glass, usually attached or appurtenant to any of the abovementioned articles, in the way of binding, mounting or otherwise, and anything convenient for their safe transmission by post, may also pass at the rate applicable to such articles provided it is contained in the same packet.

      166.-Besides these articles there are some others which are admitted, though not really printed matter, as, for instance, manuscript intended for the press (when sent with the proofs of the same), papers impressed for the use of the blind, albums con- taining photographs, and cardboard drawing models stamped in relief.

167.-Postage stamps, whether obliterated or not, and in general all printed articles constituting the sign of a monetary value, are excluded from transmission at the reduced rate of postage to countries of the Postal Union.

      168. The products of the copying press and typewriter are not admitted at the rate for printed papers nor, as a rule, are printed papers, the text of which has been modified after printing, either by hand or by means of a mechanical process, so as to constitute a conventional language. But the following exceptions are allowed:-

(a) Printed circulars may be dated in manuscript or by a mechanical process, and the signature of the sender, his trade or profession, and his address may be added.

(b) On printed visiting cards the address or title of the sender, or conventional initials, such as "p.p.c.," may be written, and also good wishes, congratu- lations, thanks, condolences, or other formulas of courtesy, expressed in not more than five words.

(c) On printed circulars corrections and insertions may be made in manu- script or by a mechanical process in regard to names of commercial travellers, dates of their journey, and the places they intend to visit, dates of departure of ships, names of persons invited to meetings, and the place date and object of the meetings.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xxxix

(d) Printers' proofs may be corrected in manuscript; additions which relate to accuracy, form and printing may be made, and in case of want of space additional sheets may be used; the author's manuscript may be enclosed; printers' errors in other printed documents may also be corrected, and figures may be inserted or corrected in prices current, tenders for adver- tisements, trade circulars, prospectuses and stock and share lists.

(e) Books, papers, music, photographs, engravings, and Christmas and New Year's cards may have a dedication inscribed on them, and the invoice relating to them may be enclosed.

(ƒ) In forms of order or subscription for books printed on cards the works

required or offered may be indicated in manuscript.

() To cuttings from newspapers and periodical publications may be added in manuscript or by a mechanical process the title, date, number and address of the publication from which the article is extracted.

       169.---Circulars which are in other respects admissible but which are printed or lithographed in characters resembling those of the typewriter, or are produced by means of any mechanical process from type-written originals, will be admitted to the privilege of the Book rate, provided that they are posted by being handed in at the window of the Post Office and that special attention is called to their nature, and that at least twenty copies precisely identical are posted at the same time.

170.--" Commercial Papers" comprise all papers or documents written or drawn wholly or partly by hand (except letters or communications in the nature of letters, or other papers or documents having the character of an actual and personal corres- pondence), documents of legal procedure, deeds drawn up by public functionaries, copies of or extracts from deeds under private seal written on stamped or unstamped paper, way bills, bills of lading, invoices, and other documents of a mercantile character, documents of insurance and other public companies, all kinds of manuscript music, the manuscript of books and other literary works, and pupils' exercises with corrections but without any comment on the work, and other papers of a similar description.

RATE OF POSTAGE,

       171. The rate of postage to be prepaid in Hongkong and at the British Postal Agen- cies in China on printed papers and commercial papers for all places abroad is 2 cents for each two ounces except to those places named in the footnote to rule 153.

in

N.B.--For commercial papers the lowest charge is 10 cents, for which sum, however, a weight of 10 oz. may be sent. If there be any mixture of commercial and other papers the same packet the whole is treated as commercial papers.

LIMITS OF SIZE AND Weight.

       172. The limits of size for packets addressed to the United Kingdom, British colonies or possessions or to non-Union countries or colonies are 2 feet in length by 1 foot in width or depth; but to foreign countries in the Postal Union the length is limited to 18 inches. If in the form of a roll the limits of size in either case are 30 inches in length and 4 inches in diameter. The limits of weight are 5 lb. for the United Kingdom, Bri- tish colonies or possessions, and for non-union countries or colonies, and 4 lb. for foreign countries in the postal union.

173.-Printed papers and commercial papers may be posted either without a cover (in which case they must not be fastened, whether by means of gum, wafer, sealing wax, postage stamp or otherwise) or in any ordinary letter envelope left wholly unfastened, or in any other cover or upon rollers entirely open at both ends, or between boards, so as to admit of the contents being easily withdrawn for examination. For the greater security of the contents, however, the packets may be tied at the ends with string, but the string must be easy to unfasten.

EXCEPTIONAL TREATMENT Of Printed MaTTER IN CERTAIN COUNTRIES. 174.-The following countries accord exceptional treatment to certain articles of printed matter:-

Country. Austro-Hungary..

Canada

Belgium

Italy

Description of Article and Treatment. Foreign newspapers received from)

other counties.

.Advertising pamphlets and circulars.

.Certain printed papers.

..Books if sent to any one person or

any considerable extent.

Tax of 2 Kreuzer on the delivery. Liable to Cus-

toms duty. Subject to Cus-

toms duty.

xl

Country.

Portugal India

Spain

    Republic of Columbia Uruguay

United States

Venezuela.

Victoria......

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

Description of Article and Treatment. .Bound books.

.All articles under this head with the】

exception of printed books and

newspapers.

.All articles under this head.

""

""

Except those for the personal use of the addressees all articles under this head.

""

""

Subject to Cus- toms duty.

""

""

""

""

99

Except newspapers and periodicals, photographs and printed papers other than books intended for personal use and not for sale; or books, &c., more than 20 years old. .All books except unbound books re-`

lating to service, art or drafts. Advertising pamphlets and circulars. {toms duty.

PATTERNS AND SAMPLES.

Prohibited.

Liable to Cus-

175. The Pattern and Sample Post to the United Kingdom, foreign countries and the colonies generally is restricted to bond fide trade patterns or samples of merchandize. Packets containing goods for sale, or in execution of an order (however small the quantity), or any articles from one private individual to another, which are not actually patterns or samples, cannot be forwarded by Pattern Post. Natural history specimens, dried or preserved animals and plants and geological specimens, may be forwarded at the sample rate when sent for no commercial purpose and packed in accordance with the Sample Post regulations.

RATE OF POSTAGE.

      176. The rate of postage to be prepaid in Hongkong and the British Postal Agencies in China is 2 cents per 2 oz., except that the lowest charge is 4 cents, for which sum, how- ever, a weight of 4 oz. may be sent. If not fully prepaid, double the deficiency will be charged on delivery. On insufficiently paid packets of samples from places abroad charge will be levied not exceeding 8 cents up to 4 oz. and 4 cents per 2 oz. for heavier weights. Insufficiently paid packets of samples from places abroad are charged double the deficiency.

LIMITS OF SIZE AND WEIGHT.

a

      177.-The limit of weight for packets of patterns or samples for the Under Kingdom, British colonies or possessions or for non-union countries is 5 lb., but for foreign coun tries in the Postal Union the limit is 12 oz.

      178.-A packet of patterns or samples sent to the United Kingdom or any British colony or possession or non-union country must not exceed 2 feet in length by 1 foot in width or depth, but to any foreign place comprised in the Postal Union a packet must not exceed 12 inches in length, 8 in width, or 4 in depth, unless it be in the form of a roll, in which case the limit of size is 12 inches in length and 6 inches in diameter

TRANSMISSION OF LIQUIDS, GLASS, &c.

      179.-Packets containing liquids, glass, greasy substances, colouring powders and live bees can be sent by sample post from Hongkong and the British Post Agencies in China to countries in the Postal Union.

                  MODE OF PACKING AND ADDRESSING. 180.-Patterns or samples must be sent in such a manner as to be easy of examina- tion, and, when practicable, must be sent in covers open at the end.

But samples of seeds, drugs and such like articles, which cannot be sent in covers of this kind, may be posted enclosed in boxes, or in bags of linen, or other material, fastened in such a manner that they may be readily opened. Packets containing liquids, glass, greasy substances, colouring powders and live bees, must conform to the conditions as to packing, &c., applicable to those articles when intended for local transmission (see paras. 66-69) but they must also be made up so that they can be easily opened for pur- poses of inspection, with the exception of packets containing live bees, which must be inclosed in boxes so constructed as to allow the contents to be ascertained without open- ing. In order to secure the return of packets which cannot be delivered the names and addresses of the senders should be printed or written outsile; thus, "From-of-

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xli

      181.-There must be no writing or printing upon or in any sample packet for non- Union countries except the address of the person for whom it is intended, the address of the sender, a trade mark or number, the price of the articles, the weight or size, and the quantity to be disposed of, or such as may be necessary to indicate the place of origin or the nature of the merchandize. A sample packet for a country in the postal Union may contain, besides these particulars, any Printed Papers and, if the rate applicable to Commercial Papers be paid, it may also contain Commercial Papers.

MUST NOT BE of Saleable Value.

182.-Samples of saleable value must not be sent to the United Kingdom or any foreign country, or to any of the British Possessions which are comprised in the Postal Union. Packets of samples of eider down, raw or thread silk, woollen or goats' hair thread, vanilla, or isinglass, are considered to fall under this rule if they weigh more than three ounces, and packets of tea if they weigh more than eight ounces. When addressed to France sample packets of tea must not contain more than twenty grammes (a little less than three-quarters of an ounce) of that article.

DANGEROUS AND PROHIBITED ARTICLES.

       183.-Such articles as scissors, knives, razors, forks, steel pens, nails, keys, watch machinery, metal tubing, pieces of metal or ore, provided that they are bona fide samples and are packed and guarded in so secure a manner as to afford complete protection to the contents of the mail bag and to the officers of the Post Office, while at the same time they may be easily examined, may be sent by the Sample Post to places abroad. Explosives are absolutely prohibited.

No article liable to Customs duty can be sent as a pattern or sample.

PROHIBITED ARTICLES.

       184. The transmission by Letter Post of coin, gold, silver, precious stones, jewellery, &c., is prohibited in these countries of the postal Union marked thus * in rule 152. Such articles may, however, be sent by Parcel Post except in cases in which they are specially prohibited (see rule 228).

      The following restrictions and requirements apply to the undermentioned countries of the Postal Union, viz. :-

(a.) In Luxemburg the registration of such packets is compulsory, and every-

thing of value, except coin or bullion, is liable to duty.

(b.) In the undermentioned Colonies, viz. :-

Ceylon,

Falkland Islands,

Gambia,

Gibraltar,

Hongkong, Labuan, Lagos,

Malta, Montserrat, Newfoundland,

St Vincent, Sierra Leone,

and

Straits Settlements.

articles of value are transmissible, and, with the exception of jewellery addressed to Ceylon, Newfoundland and St. Vincent, are exempt from Customs duty. Their trans- mission is also permitted in

Bermuda and Cyprus,

but they are liable to Customs duty, with the exception of bullion, coin and diamonds, in Bermuda; gold, bullion and specie in Cyprus; gold, silver and diamonds in Grenada. (c) In France engravings, prints, drawings and chromo-lithographs are liable to Customs Duty, and cannot be sent by post to that country in quantities sufficiently large to have a saleable value, but small quantities can be sent as bond fide specimens.

(d) In the Dutch East Indies articles of value are admissible, except wrought

   gold and silver, but the packets containing them must be registered. (e) Special prohibitions in Bulgaria, the Cape of Good Hope, Dutch East Indies, Italy, Norway, Queensland, Servia, South African Republic (Transvaal) and United States of America-anything relating to foreign lotteries, and in Roumania bound books.

In Belgium.-Bronze, copper and nickel coin.

In Bermuda.-Jewellery, being dutiable.

(ƒ) In Grenada.-Current coin and articles liable to Customs duty.

(4) In Liberia.-Gold and silver articles

(h.) In New South Wales.-Opium and tobacco are prohibited.

(2) In the South African Republic (Transvaal) Gold, silver, jewellery, &c., are

liable to Customs duty.

(j) In New Zealand.-Cuttings of grape vines.

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HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

(k) In the Cape of Good Hope, Natal, New Zealand and Queensland.-Jewellery and precious articles, if dutiable, are liable to detention until the duty is paid. (1) In Victoria.-Tobacco and cuttings of grape vines, also jewellery, which is

dutiable and liable to confiscation.

(m) In Spain the transmission by Letter Post of all dutiable articles is prohi- bited, and any such articles sent contrary to this prohibition are liable to a fine of from five to ten times the duty. (n) Russia.-Printed matter in the Russian language is prohibited, and even such trifling articles as photographs and Christmas cards are liable to duty, though a single photograph may be sent to Russia by post. All letters or packets containing prohibited or dutiables articles of any kind, however small the value, are confiscated in that country.

REGISTRATION. Fee charged.

185.-The fee chargeable for registration to places abroad is 10 cents. There are a few countries where no arrangements for registration exist, as shown on the table in rule 153. To some countries, as shown in that table, an article can be registered only to the port of arrival, it being left in those cases to the Postal authorities of the country to which that port belongs to continue the registration or not as they may think proper.

ARTICLES WHICH MAY BE REGISTERED.

186.-Registration is applicable equally to letters, post cards, newspapers, book packets and patterns addressed to places abroad, except in the cases specially mentioned in rules 92 and 188. (As to parcels, see rule No. 222)

ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF DELIVERY.

      187. The sender of a registered article addressed to the United Kingdom, any foreign country or British colony in the postal union (see table in rule 153), may obtain an acknowledgment of its delivery on paying a fee of 10 cents as well as the registration fee, in advance. Le can also obtain an acknowledgment if he applies after posting and pays 10 cents, The name and address of the sender must be left at the Post Office at which the article is registered. For enquiries as to the delivery of registered articles a fee of 10 cents must be paid, unless it can be shown that there is, reason to suppose the article has been lost.

CONDITIONS OF REGISTRATION.

188. No article addressed to initials or to a fictitious name can be registered. The prohibition, however, does not extend to articles addressed to the care of a person or firm.

189.-Every letter presented for registration must be enclosed in a strong envelope, securely fastened.

      190.-It is prohibited to send to a country of the postal union any registered article marked on the outside with the declared value of the contents unless it is insured (see rule 196), and Postmasters are instructed to refuse to receive articles which are so marked.

191. Registered articles must be prepaid as regards both postage and registration fee.

192-Articles to be registered must be given to an agent of the Post Office and receipt obtained for them; they should on no account be dropped into a letter box.

a

      193.-As it is forbidden to send coin, jewellery, or precious articles through the post to those countries of the postal union the names of which are marked with an as- terisk in rule 152, no letters or packets addressed to those countries and containing such articles can be accepted for registration.

      194.-Letters or packets containing coin for any of the British colonies not in the postal union can be registered, and if they are posted without being registered they are treated in the same manner as local letters under similar circumstances.

INDEMNITY FOR Loss.

      195.-Except in cases beyond control (ie., fire, tempest, shipwreck, earthquake, war. &c.) the Hongkong Postal Administration will, as provided for in local Rule No. 97, grant compensation for the loss of a registered letter if lost whilst in its custody up to a maximum of $10. No compensation will, however, be paid for the loss of anything- enclosed in an uninsured registered letter, provided the letter itself is delivered, or for the damage of anything enclosed in such letter, or for any expense arising. directly or indirectly from delay in transit.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

INSURANCE OF LETTERS.

xliii

196.-Letters containing paper money, &c., on which a value has been declared may be sent from Hongkong to any of the following places, insured to the amount of the declared value:-

[America.

     Great Britain. Greater Republic of Central Argentine Republic.

British Guiana.

Brazil.

Chile.

Dominican Republic.

Falkland Islands.

Gambia.

Bosnia Herzegovina.[lonies., Portugal. Denmark and Danish Co- Norway and Sweden.

| Belgium.

Bulgaria. Jamaica. India. Egypt. Turkey.

Portuguese Colonies. Trinidad.

Tunis.

Lagos.

Germany.

German Protectorate.

Spain.

France.

French Colonies.

Roumania. Austria-Hungary.

Russia.

St. Helena.

Newfoundland. Servia. Switzerland. Italy.

(a) The maximum amount for which a letter packet may be insured is $1,200. (b) The rates of insurance are:-

$120

(The dollar being taken at 1/11d.) ..fee 25 cents.

$720

...fee 75 cents.

$240

35

$840

85

""

""

""

""

$360

45

$960

$1.00

""

""

19

$480

$600

55 65

$1,080

$1.10

""

""

""

$1,200

$1.20

19

"

""

(c) The fee for insurance is in addition to postage and fee for registration. (d) Insurance to an amount greater than the real value of the contents of a

letter is prohibited.

(e) The infringement of the above rule with intent to defraud deprives the

sender of any right to compensation.

(ƒ) It is forbidden to enclose in insured letters:-

(a) Coin;

Articles subject to Customs' duty, except paper money;

(c) Articles of gold or silver, precious stones, jewellery, and other articles

of a similar nature.

(7) The sender of a letter containing insured articles receives gratis at the time

of posting a summary receipt for his letter.

(h) The sender of a letter containing insured articles can have sent to him an acknowledgment of the delivery of the packet to the addressee, or can, subsequent to posting of a packet, ask for information as to its disposal, under the same conditions as for registered articles.

(2) An application for an indemnity for loss of an insured letter is only enter-

tained if made within a year of the posting of the insured letter.

(j) Letters containing insured articles can only be accepted if enclosed in a strong envelope fastened by means of seals in fine wax, with spaces be- tween, reproducing a private mark, and affixed in sufficient number to hold down all the folds of the envelope. The employment of envelopes with coloured borders is forbidden.

(*) The condition of every letter must be such that its contents cannot be got

at without external and visible damage to the envelope or the seals. (1) Space must be left between the postage stamps used for the prepayment, so that they cannot serve to hide injuries to the envelope. They must not be folded over the two sides of the envelope so as to cover the edge. (m) Letters containing insured articles addressed to initials or directed in pencil

are not accepted.

(n) The amount of the value insured must be expressed in francs and centimes, or in dollars and cents, and must be written by the sender on the cover of the packet in words and in figures, without erasure or correction, even if certified on the left and upper corner.

(2) The sender's name and address must be endorsed on the left-hand lower

corner on the face of the cover.

FOREIGN PARCEL POST.

      Between Hongkong and the United Kingdom, and between Hongkong and certain Foreign countries, British countries and colonies, through the United Kingdom, and between Hongkong and certain Foreign countries, British countries and colonies.

xliv

etc.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

GENERAL REGULATIONS. Postage, Dimensions and Weight.

197.-For postage, maximum dimensions and weight, see Table of Rates of Postage,

      PREPAYMENT, ADDRESS, METHOD OF POSTING, CERTIFICATE OF Posting. 198.-The rules as to the method of address, as to the method of posting, and as to certificates of posting, are similar to the rules for local parcels given in Rule 82 respec- tively.

CUSTOMS DECLARATION AND DESPATCH NOTE.

199.--Parcels are subject to Customs regulations, and the sender of each parcel is required to make for Customs purposes-upon a special form or forms, which can be obtained at any l'ost Office-an accurate statement of the nature and value of the contents and other particulars, except for those places the names of which are printed in italics. Undervaluing the contents or failure to describe them fully may result in seizure of the parcels. The net weight or quantity of the various articles contained in a parcel should, if possible, be stated, and any other particulars which would facilitate the assessment of Customs duty; such as, in the case of clothing, the material of which it is composed, and whether it is new or has been worn. In the case of articles returned to the country where they originated the fact should be stated. The forms for Foreign parcels should, when possible, be filled up in both English and French.

202.

CUSTOMS DUTY AND CHARGES ON DELIVERY.

200.--All parcels are liable to be opened for Customs examination, and their con- tents are subject to Customs duty according to the laws of the country or colony of destination. Such duty cannot be prepaid, but is collected from the addressee on delivery, except in the case of parcels sent under the arrangements explained in rule In most Foreign countries and British colonies the articles which are not subject to Customs duty on importation are comparatively few. The Post Office can give no information as to the Customs tariff or procedure of particular countries, nor does it accept any responsibility for loss, delay or charges arising from the Customs or sanitary regulations to which the contents of parcels are subject.

201. In addition to Customs duty, a charge of 6d. per parcel for stamp duty, clearance, &c., is levied on all dutiable parcels entering Cape Colony and Natal. This charge is increased to 18. 6d. in the case of parcels for Rhodesia, the Orange Free- State and Transvaal. In most European countries and some others a fee not exceeding 2. per parcel is leviable for delivery and Customs formalities. In Honduras and Sal- vador the fee is 1 centavo for each 4 oz., with a minimum of 5 centavos. As to the charge on parcels for the Congo Free State, see footnote in Table of Postage.

      202.-Arrangements have been made whereby persons sending parcels to the under- mentioned countries and places can take upon themselves the payment of the Customs. and other charges ordinarily payable by the addressees :--

Dahomey.

Denmark.

Austria-Hungary. Egypt.

FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

Germany.

Montenegro. New Caledonia. Obock. Réunion.

Senegal.

Algeria.

Annam.

French Guiana. French Guines.

Ivory Coast. Italy.

Luxemburg.

Belgium.

France.

Gua:leloupe.

Madagascar.

Cochin China.

French Congo.

Holland.

Martinique.

Comoro Islands.

BRITISH

POSSESSIONS.

Antigua.

Dominica.

Lagos.

Barbados.

Falkland Islands.

Cape Colony.

Gambia. Grenada.

Malta. Mauritius. Montserrat.

St. Kitts St. Lucia.

Sweden. Switzerland. Tahiti. Tonquin. Tunis.

Cyprus.

Natal. Nevis. Seychelles. Sierra Leone.

Tobago. Tortoda..

St. Vincent (West Indies).

The United Kingdom.

The sender must pay a fee of 25 cents, must sign an undertaking to pay on demand the amount due, and must make a deposit on account of the charges at the rate of 25 per cent. of the value of the parcel. A final settlement will take place as soon as the amount of the charges due has been ascertained from the country of destination. Parcels intended to be sent under these arrangements must be handed in at the General Post Office.

FORBIDDEN ARTICLES, ENCLOSURES, &C.

     203.--No article which is inadmissible by the Local Parcel Post (see Rule 87). may

       be sent by the Foreign Parcel Post, nor any enclosure which bears an address different from that placed on the cover of the parcel.

204.-No letter, even if addressed in the same way as the parcel in which it is enclosed, may be sent in a parcel addressed to any Foreign Country or to Australia, British Central Africa, Cape Colony, Natal and other parts of South Africa, Fiji, Ja maica, Mauritius, New Zealand, Seychelles, Straits Settlements and Trinidad. Parcels

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xlv

for other British possessions may contain a letter for the addressee, but packets of letters must not be sent by Parcel Post to any place abroad. An invoice in an open envelope, giving simply particulars of the goods contained in the parcel, may be enclosed in any parcel.

       205. Further, no parcel is admissible which contains base or counterfeit coin, articles infringing trademark or copyright laws, any article or substance liable to become offensive or injurious through natural decay during the time ordinarily occupied in transmission (for example, butter, &c., addressed to a tropical or subtropical country, or having to pass through the tropics in course of transmission, unless enclosed in a hermetically sealed tin), or any article or substance specially prohibited from im- portation into the country or colony to which the parcel is addressed. For a list of such special prohibitions, see Table of Postage, &c. (Rule 197). The Post Office can accept no responsibility for the correctness and completeness of this list, although efforts are made to secure accuracy

206.-It is pointed out that many perishable articles, even though in good condition at the time of posting, may become offensive and worthless owing to the length of the journey, although delivered in proper course of post.

       207.- Parcels for Ascension, St. Helena, South and Central Africa, and uninsured parcels for Egypt and Zanzibar, may not exceed £50 in value, and parcels for Straits Settlements exceeding the value of $50 must be insured.

       208.-Parcels containing coin, watches, jewellery, any article of gold or silver, or any article of value, cannot be sent by Parcel Post to the United Kingdom, any Foreign country or British possession included in the insurance system (for list of such places see Rule 220), unless they are insured for at least part of their value, and are packed and sealed in accord ance with the special regulations given in Rules 224-226,

PACKING AND SEALING.

209.-The rules as regards articles which require to be packed with special care (see Rules 87 and 88) must be observed in the case of Foreign and Colonial parcels. More careful and substantial packing is necessary for such parcels than for local parcels, owing to the much greater distance over which, as a rule, the former have to be conveyed, the very different conditions of transit, and the influences of climate. This is a consideration which must necessarily be taken into account in dealing with claims for compensation. Parcels for Greece, Persia, Roumania and Russia must be packed in some material stronger than paper or cardboard.

      210. For parcels containing liquids and substances which easily liquefy the following method should be adopted-Two receptacles should be used, and between the inner one, which contains the liquid, and the outer one, which should be of wood or metal, space should be left all round, and this space should be filled with bran, sawdust, or other absorbent material.

       211. Further, a parcel for a Foreign Country must be so sealed by the sender that it cannot be opened without breaking the seals or leaving an obvious trace of violation, The seals must bear the impression of a private mark of the sender.

212.-As to the packing and sealing of insured parcels, see Rule 224.

DELIVERY OF PARCELS.

213.-In Hongkong parcels are not, like letters, delivered at the residences of the addressees. Notice of the arrival of a parcel is sent to the addressee, who must then claim the parcel at the Post Office where it is lying.

214.-In Belgium, France and Spain parcels are delivered by the Railway Com- panies and not by the Post Office, and parcels intended to be called for should be addressed, not to a Poste Restante in those countries, but to a Railway Station (en gare). RE-DIRECTION AND RETURN OF PARCELS.

       215.-Parcels arriving in this Colony and re-directed from one address to another in the Colony are treated and charged under the regulations which govern the treatment and charge of re-directed parcels by the Local Parcel Post. (See Rule 107.)

216. A parcel which is returned or re-directed from one country to another is charged the full postage.

COMPENSATION FOR LOSS OR DAMAGE.

217.-The Postmaster-General will (not in consequence of any legal liability, but voluntarily, as an act of grace) give compensation for the loss or damage of uninsured parcels sent by Parcels Post between Hongkong and the United Kingdom and the undermentioned British Possessions and Foreign Countries, when such loss or damage takes place while the parcels are in his custody, and does not arise from any fault or neglect of the senders or the nature of the contents :-

xlvi

Ascension

Bahamas Barbados

British Guiana

British Honduras

Ceylon

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

BRITISH POSSESSIONS.

Falkland Islands

Gambia

Gibraltar

Gold Coast Colony Grenada

Labuan

Lagos

FOREIGN

Cyprus

Argentine Republic

Austria-Hungary

Azores

Congo Free State Costa Rica

Danish West Indies Denmark

Dutch Possessions

Egypt

Belgium

Beyrout

Bosnia

Bulgaria

France

Cameroons

French Possessions

Chili

Germany

Colombia, Republic of

German Possessions

Constantinople

Greece

Leeward Islands Mauritius Newfoundland North Borneo St. Helena St. Lucia St. Vincent COUNTRIES.

Herzegovina Holland

Italy

Japan

Liberia

Luxemburg

Madeira

Norway

Portugal

Roumania

Salvador

Seychelles Sierra Leone South Australia

Tobago Trinidad

Samoa (viâ Germany) Servia

Smyrna Spain Sweden

Switzerland

Tangier

Tripoli

Tunis

Turkey

                                            Uruguay 218.--The compensation paid will in no case exceed $10.00. The compensation payable in the case of parcels not weighing more than 7 tb, is limited to $5.00.

      219.-No. compensation is payable for the loss or damage of an uninsured parcel sent to or from any British possession or Foreign country other than those mentioned above.

The compensation payable will be in accordance with the Rules contained in Rule 97, and with the General Regulations of the local Parcel Post, so far as these are applicable.

As regards insured parcels see next Rules.

INSURANCE OF PARCELS.

      220.---Parcels for the United Kingdom and the undermentioned Foreign countries and British possessions can be insured :-

FOREIGN Countries.

Name.

Limit of Insured

Name.

Limit of Insured

Limit of

Name.

Insured

Value.

Value.

Value.

£

£

£

Algeria

20

Egpyt

120

Roumania

20

Austria-Hungary

120

Finland

20

Russia

120

Azores (by sea to Lisbon)

20

France (including Corsica)|

20

Servia

20

Belgium

120

Germany

120

Smyrna

20

Beyrout

20

Holland

40

Sweden

120

Cameroons*

120

Italy (cia France)

20

Switzerland (via Belgium)

120

Chile

50

Luxemburg

120

Tunis

20

China +

120

Madeira

20

Constantinople

20

Montenegro

40

Danish West Indies

120

Norway

120

Denmark

120

Portugal (by sea)

20

UNITED KINgdom and BRITISH POSSESSIONS.

| Limit of

Name.

Insured

Name.

Value.

Limit of Insured Value.

Name.

Limit of Insured

Value.

£

£

Aden Antigua

Ascension

120

India

120

120

Labuan

50

Lagos

588

Sierra Leone

50

Straits Settlements ||

50

Tobago

120

Bahamas

50

Mauritius (ria Colombo

Tortola

Barbados

50

only)

50

Trinidad

Bermuda

120

Mombasa

120

British East Africa

150

Montserrat

130

United Kingdom Zanzibar

120

120

*8888888

50

50

50

50

British Guiana

120

Nevis

130

British North Borneo*

120

Newfoundland

120

Cyprust

50

Niger Coast Protectorate

120

Dominica

120

St. Helena

50

Falkland Islands

50

St. Kitts

120

Gambia

120

St. Lucia

120

Grenada

60

St. Vincent (West Indies)

50

      The insured parcels have all the safeguards of the registration system, and, subject to the following Regulations, compensation will be paid if they are lost or damaged in

the Post.

The sums payable for insurance are as follows:-

To Great Britain, Luxemburg (vid London), Aden and India :--

To secure compensation up to $ 120 Fee 20 cents.

""

240

30

""

""

""

360

40

""

"

""

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xlvii

To secure compensation up to $ 480 Fee

50 cents.

600

60

""

99

""

720

70

""

11

"

""

840

80

19

"1

"

""

960

90

99

""

99

""

"

""

""

$1.00 1.10

""

1,080 1,200

For Belgium, Bermuda, British Guiana, Egypt, Gambia, Germany, Labuan, Leeward Islands (Antigua, St. Kitts, Dominica, Montserrat, Nevis and Tortola), Mombasa, New- foundland, Niger Coast Protectorate, Norway, St. Lucia, Tobago and Zanzibar (við London) :-

To secure compensation up to $ 120 Fee

25 cents.

240

40

""

360

65

""

""

""

480

90

""

600

""

""

""

$1.15

720

1.40

""

99

· 840

1.65

""

""

960

1.90

"

99

""

""

""

1,080

2.15

""

1,200

2.40

For Austria-Hungary, British North Borneo, Denmark and Switzerland (vid

London) :-

To secure compensation up to $ 120 Fee 30 cents.

240

50

"

""

""

360

80

""

""

""

480

$1.10

99

""

""

600

1.40

""

"

""

720

1.70

"

37

""

840

2.00

99

"

960

2.30

""

""

""

99

"

1,080

2.60

"

For Cameroons and Russia (vid London):-

"

1,200

2.90

""

To secure compensation up to $

120

Fee

35 cents.

240

60

"

""

""

""

360

95

""

"

""

99

480

$1.30

"}

""

600

1.65

"

""

""

720

2.00

""

""

840

2.35

""

""

""

960

2.70

""

"

"

1,080 1,200

3.05

"

3.40

""

""

For Ascension, Bahamas, Barbados, Cyprus, Falkland Isles, Grenada, Lagos, St

Helena, St. Vincent and Trinidad (vid London):

To secure compensation up to $ 120 Fee 25 cents.

""

""

""

For Azores, Beyrout, France, Italy, Madeira, Portugal and Servia (við London):-

To secure compensation up to $

For Holland (vid London):-

Fee 30 cents.

240

40

""

""

""

360

65

""

""

500

90

"

"

200

120

25 cents.

240

40

""

""

400

70

50 cents.

""

To secure compensation up to $

""

For Finland and Roumania (vid London):-

To secure compensation up to $ 200

For Montenegro (vid London):-

To secure compensation up to $ 120

99

""

35 cents.

""

240

""

400

""

60 $1.00

For Constantinople and Smyrna (vid London):-

To secure compensation up to $ 200

""

70 cents.

"

xlviii

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

For Straits Settlements:-

To secure compensation up to $ 120

""

20 cents. (vid London)

240

30

""

""

99

""

360

40

""

""

29

""

480

50

"

""

500

""

"

(limit) 60

""

For Chile (vid London) :--

To secure compensation up to $ 120

Fee

25 cents.

240

40

""

"9

""

480

90

""

""

500

""

""

"}

8.100

99

"

For Danish West Indies (vid London):-

25 cents.

"

"1

200

35

""

99

To secure compensation up to $ 120

REGULATIONS.

      221. The fee (which is for insurance and registration) must be prepaid by means of postage stamps, which the sender must hand in at the same time with the parcel to be affixed to the certificate of posting; they must not be placed on the cover or label of the parcel. A certificate of posting must always be obtained by the sender of an insured parcel.

222.-No parcel can be insured for more than the sum set in the list given on the preceding page against the name of the country or colony to which it is addressed, or for a sum above the real value of the contents. A parcel of which the contents have no saleable value may, however, be insured for a nominal sum in order to obtain the safeguards of the registration system. Over-insurance is a bar to compensation.

8.

      223.-The sun for which a parcel is to be insured must be entered on the cover, thus:-"Insured for £

                   d." It must also be inscribed in the place pro- vided on the despatch note if one is used. The number of pounds should be entered in words. No alteration or erasure of the entry is permitted.

      224. Every insured parcel must be packed carefully and substantially, with due regard to the nature of the contents and the length of the journey, and must be sealed with way or lead in such a way that it cannot be opened without either breaking the seal or leaving obvious traces of violation. For instance, seals must be placed over each join or loose flap of the covering of a parcel, and if string be used in packing a seal must be placed on the ends of the string where they are tied.

225.-All the seals on a parcel must be of the same kind of wax or lead and must bear distinct impressions of some device, and this device must be the same on each seal and must not consist merely of straight, curved, or crossed lines. Coins must not be used for sealing, and it is strongly recommended that, when possible, an impression of the seal used on the parcel should be made on the counterfoil of the despatch note.

      226.-Parcels containing coin, watches, jewellery, any article of gold or silver, or any article of value, must be enclosed in strong boxes or cases, which must be sewn up, or otherwise fastened, in wrappers of linen, canvas, strong paper, or other substantial material. In such cases the seals must be placed along the edges of each join or loose flap at distances not more than three inches apart. The address of such parcels must be written on their actual covering.

       227.-If a parcel tendered for insurance does not, in the opinion of the, officer to whom it is tendered, fulfil the foregoing conditions as to packing and sealing it is his duty to refuse to insure it; but the onus of properly packing and fastening the parcel lies upon the sender, and the Post Office assumes no liability for loss or damage arising from defects of packing or fastening which may not be observed at the time of posting.

      228.-Unless parcels containing coin, watches, jewellery, any article of gold or sil- ver, or any article of value, are insured for at least part of their value, they cannot be sent by Parcel Post to the places mentioned in Rule 220. Any such parcel posted unin- sured will generally be returned to the sender. A compulsory registration fee of 20 cents will be collected on the delivery of every uninsured parcel received from the places abovementioned and found to contain coin, watches, jewellery, any article of gold or silver, or any article of value.

229. When an insured parcel is re-directed from one country to another a fresh insurance fee becomes payable for each transmission. If this fee is not prepaid it is collected from the addressee on delivery. Insured parcels can only be re-directed to countries which have adopted the insurance system.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

xlix

      230.-Compensation for a parcel lost or damaged in the Post will not exceed the amount of the actual loss or damage, and no compensation at all will be paid for a parcel containing any prohibited article, or for a parcel which has been delivered with- out external trace of injury and has been accepted without remarks by the addressee; nor does it follow as a matter of course that compensation will be given when loss or damage arises from tempest, shipwreck, earthquake, war, or other causes beyond control. No claim for compensation will be admitted if made more than a year after the parcel was posted. The sender has the first claim to any compensation which may be payable, but he may waive his claim in favour of the addressee.

      231.-No legal liability to give compensation in respect of any parcel for which an insurance fee has been paid attaches to the Postmaster-General, either personally or in his official capacity. The final decision upon all questions of compensation rests with the Postal Administration of the country in which the loss or damage has taken place.

       232. The insurance system also applies to parcels from the places mentioned in Rule 220, but parcels to or from other places abroad cannot be insured.

233.-Any insurance effected contrary to the foregoing Regulations is invalid.

GENERAL.

234.-Where not repugnant to the foregoing Rules, the General Regulations of the Local Parcel Post apply to Foreign Parcels.

       235.-Parcels must be posted before 3 p.m. on the working day next before the departure of the packet.

236.-To the United Kingdom and British Colonies, &c. :-

TO

POSTAGE.

LIMIT OF

WEIGHT

First

Each subse-

LIMIT OF SIZE.

PROHIBITED CONTENTS.

lb.

quent

lb.

1.b. is c.

cents.

11

10

5

2 ft. hv 1 ft., by 1 ft.

5

20

20

11

10

5

Do.

Do.

Opium. Letters are prohi- bited in H'kong & China,

Do.

Explosive matter, letters, li- quids,opium, gold, silver.

Not over 3 lb....

50

Over 3 lb. but

not over 7 lb... $1.00

do.

Letters, opium

Over 7 lb. but $1.50

not over 11 lb...

11

25

25

Hongkong, China, Siam

Japan, Corea

Cochin-China, Cambodge, Tonkin, An- ?

nam

Straits Settlements

India, Ceylon,* Burmah,* Aden,* Zanzibar,* Indian Post Offices on Persian Gulf and in Turkish Arabia‡ Insurance not available..

British North Borneo, Labuan (viâ Sing-

apore)

Not over 8 lb....

Do., and not smaller than 3 in. by 2 in., by 2 in.

3 ft. 6 in. long, or

ft. in greatest length and girth combined

Do.

Over 8 lb. but

not over 7 lb....

Over 7 lb. but|

not over il Ib...

Malta

Gibraltar

do. do.

11

30

25

11

30

25

Do

Not over 8 lb....

50

Over 3 lb. but]

United Kingdom,* vid Gibraltar only

not over 7 lb. $1.00

Do.

Over 7 lb. but $1.50

not over II b...

Ascension*

.(vià London)

11

50

Do.

Bahamas*

do.

11

55

Do.

Bechuanaland, British

do.

11

60

55

Do.

Bechuanaland Protectorate do.

Bermuda

FA

=73

Es

.1.60 11.50

Do.

989

482

do.

11

60

55

Do.

British Central Africa

do.

7 1.00

90

Do.

British Guiana*

do.

11

65

50

Do.

British Honduras

do.

British New Guinea

do.

Canida...

.(viâ Vancouver)

*Parcels to these countries may be insured.

==

83

60

50

Do.

1.10

50

Do.

|(2lbs.)

11

40

25 2 ft. by 1 ft., by 1 ft.

Opium.

Explosive matter, letters,

liquids, opium.

Arms.

T'bacco, except for personal use, copyright books. Specie, ostrich feathers.

Letters, specie, bullion,gold dust, nuggets, ostrich

feathers, tobacco stalks, essences of tobacco, tea, coffee, orchicory, parts of vine, plants, bulbs, roots. Letters, specie, bullion,gold dust, nuggets, ostrich feathers, tobacco stalks, essences of tobacco, tea, coffee, or chicory, parts of vine, plants, bulbs, roots.

Letters.

Dutiable articles, spirits, opium, ganje, charas, bhang, cannabis indica,

Letters, liquids (unless se- curely packed), tobacco, spirits, opium, Oleomargarine, butterine.

*Bagdad, Bahrain, Bander Abas, Busrah, Bushire, Guadur, Jask, Linga, Mohanımerah, Muscat.

1

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

236.-To the United Kingdom and British Colonies, &c. . -Continued.

TO

LIMIT OF

WEIGHT.

POSTAGE.

Each

First subse-

lb.

LIMIT OF SIZE.

PROHIBITED CONTENTS

quent Ib.

2. 3 60 cents.

Cape Colony

....(viâ London)

11

55

Cyprus*

Falkland Islands*

do. do.

Fiji

. (viâ Ceylon and Sydney

===

11

11

11

Gambia,* Gold Coast Co-

lony, Lagos,* Sierra Leone

viâ London)

11

Hawaiian Islands.

do.

Jamaica, Turks' Islands

do.

Mashonaland, Matabeleland

do.

EET

11 11

7

#Zs & s>

1.50

JAN * 278

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3 ft. 6 in. long, or 6) ft. in greatest length and girth combined.)

Do.

Letters, specie, bullion,gold| dust, nuggets, ostrich feathers, tobacco stalks, essences of tobacco, tea, coffee, or chicory, parts of vine, plants, bulbs, roots.. Coins, tobacco.

Letters.

Mexico..

do.

11

60

(British East Africa)

&c.}

do.

11

75

Natal, Zululand

do.

11 75

65

New Hebrides

do.

11

1.35

(2lbs.)

New Zealand

(via Ceylon)

11

90

Newfoundland

Do.*

.(viâ Vancouver) 11

(viâ London)

11

(New South Wales..

(via Ceylon)

11

Niger Coast Protectorate*

(viâ London)

11

Orange Free State

do.

11

383932

60

60

40

60

75

Rattay 2 &gg

50

girth

combined.

50

Do.

60

Do.

2 ft. long, or 4 ft.

in length and

3 ft. 6 in. long, or 6ft. in greatest length and girth combined. )

Letters, opium. Letters.

Letters, specie, bullion,gold,

dust, nuggets, ostrich feathers, tobacco stalks, essences of tobacco, tea, coffee, or chicory, parts of vine, plants, bulbs, roots. Letters, liquids, money, precious stones, lottery tickets, circulars.

Poisonous drugs.

Letters, gold, silver, ostrich

feathers, firearms.

Letters, tobacco, opium,

50

Do.

Letters, tobacco.

45

Do.

40

Do.

40

Do.

55

Do.

Do.

Samoa, Raratonga (viâ Ceylon & Sydney)

+

2.40 50

ེའ

2 ft. long, or 4 ft. in) length and girth combined.

3 ft. 6 in. long, or 6 ft. in greatest length and girth combined..

Persia (except Indian P. O.

Persian Gulf)

do.

Port Darwin

..(direct)....

11

30

30

Queensland

.(viâ Ceylon)

11

1.00 (2 lbs.)

50

Do.

11

80

75

Do.

South Australia

(via Ceylon)

11

1.00

50

Do,

(2 lbs.)

St. Helena, Tristan d'A-

(viâ London)

11

60

50

Do.

cunha

Tangier

do.

11

40

Do.

(via Ceylon)

11

90

50

Do.

(2lbs.)

75

65

Do.

Tasmania

Transvaal

==

(via London) 11

129 89 83

888 3 822

Trinidad*

do.

11

60

50

238

Uruguay

do.

11 2.40

20

Victoria (Australia)

. (via Ceylon)

11 1.00

50

Western Australia

do.

11

|(2lbs.)}

1.00

50

11

(2lbs) 60

50

Islands*+, Barbados".

* Parcels to these countries may be insured.

Windward and Leeward } (viâ London)

Do.

2 ft. long, or 4 ft. in length and girth combined.

3 ft. 6 in. long, or 6) ft. in greatest length and girth combined.)

Do.

Do.

Letters, tobacco, opium. Breech-loading guns. Letters, specie, bullion,gold dust, nuggets, ostrich feathers, tobacco stalks, essences of tobacco, tea, coffee, or chicory, parts of vine, plants, bulbs, roots.

Letters.

Letters.

Letters, liquids (unless se curely packed), tobacco spirits, opium.

Letters.

Letters.

Gold (unless manufactur- ed), ostrich feathers, spi-

rits

Letters, arms, ammunition,

opium.

Letters, tobacco (except for

personal use).

Letters, money, precious stones, articles of gold, in addition to the articles inadmissible to Cape Co- lony and Natal. Letters, dutiable articles,

spirits, gunga, bhang, cannabis indica, opium, Letters, liquids,lottery tic

kets, orchilla, litinus, plants.

Letters, coins, plants, opium,

spirits, tobacco.

Letters, coins, gold, silver,|

✦ Antigua. Montserrat, St. Kitts, Nevis, Dominica, Virgin Islands,

Grenada, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Tobago, Tortoal Windward Islands.

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

236.-To the Continent of Europe and Foreign Countries:-

GERMAN PACKET. vid Bremen

li

BRITISHI PACK ET, vid London.

Το

PROHIBITED CONTENTS.

0 to 2 mb.

2 to 7 lb.

7 to 11 h. 0 to 7 lb. 0 to 11 th.

$ c.

$ c.

$ c.

C.

Argentine Republic §

2.10

3.30

4.50

Austro-Hungary *

1.70

2.50

3.30

2.00

Azores Islands*

2.20

3.00

3.80

Belgium*

1.50

2.40

3.30

2.00

Beyrout* + (direct to Egypt)|

1.30

2.30

3.30

Bosnia, Herzegovina, and

2.00

2.90

3.80

Novi-Bazar

Bulgaria

2.20

3.00

....

Cameroons,* Little Popo,

2.50

3.30

4.10

Lome, Togo

Cape Verd Islands:

St.

2.20

3.00

3.80

Vincent and Santiago §

Chili §

2.80

3.60

4.40

Colombia +

2.10

3.40

5.10

Congo Free State §

1.60

2.40

3.00

Constantinople * †

1.00

1.90

2.80

Costa Rica f

2.00

3.10

4.80

Danish West Indies t

1.80

3.00

4.20

Denmark *

1.70

2.50

3.40

2.00

Dutch East Indies §

2.50

3.30

4.10

Dutch Guiana

Dutch West Indies §

} 2.70

3.60

4.40

Egypt (direct)

0.80

1.50

2.10

Eritrea §

2.40

3.20

4.00

Finland*

1.80

2.70

Letters, vine plants, gold,'

silver, jewellery.

Letters, lottery tickets. Letters, coins, tobacco,

vines, plants.

Letters, plants, arms, coins.

Letters, firearms, tobacco

(except cigars and snuff), plants.

Letters, lottery tickets,

plants.

Letters.

Letters, liquids.

Letters, dangerous articles, liquids, (unless securely packed!,

Letters, plants, arms and implements of war, arti- cles injurious to health. Letters, arms, ammunition. Letters.

Firearms, tobacco, salt. Letters, arms, ammunition. Letters.

Letters, lottery tickets, pro-

spectuses, almanacks. Letters, opium, arms, salt,

coffee, plants, or seeds.

Letters.

Letters, arms, ammunition,

liquids.

Letters, tobacco, plants, arms,|

chemical compounds. Letters, arms, spirits, coins,

skin and fur of sea-otters.

France*

1.60

2.40

3.20

2.00

FRENCH COLONIES :-$

Algeria,* Corsica, Tripoli

1.80

2.70

3.50

French Congo, West Coast

1.90

2.70

3.40

of Africa

French Guiana,

Guade-

loupe, Madagascar, Mar-

2.50

3.30

4.10

tinique, Mayotte, Réunion

Letters, arms, ammuni- tion, medicines, tobacco, foreign bronze coins, plants, jewellery, lace, gold, silver.

Obock, Senegal, Tunis*

2.10

2.90

3.70

New Caledonia

2.80

3.60

4.40

Tahiti

3.10

3.90

4.60

St. Pierre and Miquelon

2.00

2.80

3.60

German East Africa §.

3.00

3.80

4.60

German New Guinea §

2.80

3.70

4.50

Letters.

Germany

1.50

2.30

3.20

1.80

Greece &

1.60

2.40

Holland*

1.40

2.40

3.20

2.00

Italy (via Belgium)*

2.10

2.90

3.70

Do. (via France)*

1.80

2.60

3.40

Jeddah +

1.60

2.80

3.80

Liberia.

1.30

2.90

4.30

Luxemburg*

1.50

2.40

3.20

1.90

Letters.

Madeira*

2.00

2.80

3.60

Mauritius t

1.90

2.80

3.60

Mexico (viâ London)§.

0.65

1.40

1.90

Letters, dangerous articles,

liquids unless securely] packed). Letters.

Letters, plants with roots, ! vines or parts of vines, socialistic books. Letters, tobacco, plants, salt. Letters.

Letters, tobacco, plants, arms, chemical com- pounds, saccharine and its products, and copper

coins

Letters,arms, tobacco,plants,

hachish.

Letters.

Letters, coins, tobacco, vines,

plants.

Letters.

Letters, liquids,

money,

precious stones, lottery

tickets, circulars.

Montenegro*

2.10

3.00

3.80

Morocco

1.50

2.30

3.00

Norway*

1.40

2.30

3.20

Letters, tobacco.

Letters.

2.40

Letters.

⚫ Parcels to these countries may be insured. § Parcels must not exceed 2 ft. in length, or 4 ft. in length and girth combined. + Parcels must not exceed 3 feet 6 inches in length, or 6 feet in greatest length and girth combined.

lii

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

236.-To the Continent of Europe and Foreign Countries:-Continued.

BRITISHI PACKET,

GERMAN PACKET.

Direct.

Letters, gold, silver, jewel-

lery, corrosive fluids.

rid London.

Το

PROHIBITED Contents.

0 to 2 lb.

2 to 7 lb.

7 to 11 lb.

to 7 lb. 0 to 11lb.

& c.

* c.

c.

<

Paraguays

2.30

3.50

Portugal

1.80

2.60

3.40

2.50

Portuguese West Africa :--

Bolaina, in Guinea,

2.20

3.00

3.80

Ambriz, Benguela, Caben-

da, Loanda, Mossamedes,

2.60

3.40

4.20

and St. Thomas..

Roumania*

2.00

2.80

3.60

Russia (European) includ-

ing Finland

1.80

2.60

3.40

Salvador +

2.70

4.10

5.00

Servia*

2.00

2.80

3.60

Seychelles +

1.35

2.60

3.60

Smyrna*+

1.00

1.90

2.80

Spain §..

1.80

2.60

2.30

Sweden*

1.60

2.70

3.60

2.40

Switzerland (viâ France)*

1.70

2.50

3.40

2.00

Do. (via Belgium)*..

1.90

2.70

3.60

Turkey (French PostOffices)§

2.10

2.90

3.70

Venezeulağ

2.80

3.60

¡

Letters, coins, tobacco, vines,

plants.

Letters, dangerous articles, liquids (unless securely

packed).

Letters, tobacco, plants (ex- cept seeds and dried roots), | arins, ammunition, bronze coins, patent medicines. Letters, plants, objects from' which liquid or fat exudes, Russian coins of small! value, gold or silver arti cles not up to the proper standard, lottery tickets,! wooden pipe-stems. Letters.

Letters, vines.

Letters, gold, silver, jewel-

lery.

Letters, materials for gun- powder, plants, arms, to-

bacco.

Letters arms, ammunition, maps, missals, plants, rosa- ries, relics, gold, silver, jewellery.

Letters, gold, silver, drugs.

I

Letters, plants, alcohol. Letters, tobacco, firearms. Letters, dangerous articles, liquids (unless securely, packed), cocoanut oil,' brandy, cotton, starch, in- digo, sugar, cocoa, coffee, syrup of sugar or honey, salt meat,match-sticks, salt, sarsaparilla, coins,

dies for making coins, arms, lead, saltpetre.

     (1.)-To the United Kingdom and Places Beyond.--Parcels are forwarded by P. & O. packet only, and arrive in London about eight days later than the mail. No further charge is made on delivery except for Customs dues.

Cigars...

Duties in the United Kingdom. ..50 per lb.

Tea...

..4d. per lb.

(2.) Any person sending a parcel to either of the places named below (viâ London) may relieve the addressee of the payment of Customs and other charges :-

The United Kingdom, Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Denmark (including the Faroe Islands and Iceland), Egypt, Switzerland, Germany, Holland, Italy (viâ Belgium, Ger- many and Switzerland only), Luzemburg, Montenegro, Barbados, Cyprus, Cape Colony, Falkland Islands, Gambia, Grenada, Lagos, Malta, Mauritius, Natal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, St. Lucia, St. Vincent, Sweden, Tobago.

Any person wishing to defray the above charges must endorse the parcel "to be delivered free of all charge." He must sign a declaration that he will pay the amount due on such parcel as soon as it has been ascertained. He may, if necessary, be called upon to pay a deposit in addition to signing the declaration. Such deposit to be paid by means of postage stamps to be affixed to the declaration.

In addition to the postage and insurance fee, if any, a fee of 25 cents will be charged on every parcel for which the sender desires these facilities. This fee will be paid by means of postage stamps to be affixed to the declaration.

    (3.)-To India. By P. & O. and Indian Mail packets only. Insured Parcels by Indian Mail packets only.

      • Parcels to these countries may be insured. § Parcels must not exceed 2 ft. in length, or 4 ft. in length and girth combined. + Parcels must not exceed 3 ft. 6 inches in length, or 6 feet in greatest length and girth combined,

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

lili

Parcels for the United Kingdom and the undermentioned foreign countries, British possessions and protectorates (viâ London) may be insured at the following

rates :-

Up to

$120.

240.

360..

480..

600.

fee 20 cents

$720..

30

840.

""

40

960.

50

多想

*

60

"

19

1,080. 1,200..

fee

.70 cents

"

.80

""

.90

"

1.00

"

""

110

Norway

Russia

Sweden

Switzerland

British Possessions and Protectorates.

Leeward Islands Bermuda

Cyprus

British Guiana

British North Borneo Gambia

Newfoundland

Niger Coast Protectorate St. Lucia Tobago

Trinidad

Zanzibar

Falkland Islands

List of places :-

Foreign Countries. Austria-Hungary Belgium

Cameroons

Denmark

Egypt Germany Luxemburg

For

India (direct)

viâ India

Burmah

Lagos..

Aden

Mombasa

Ascension Bahamas

***} viâ London

St. Helena

Windward Islands

...

Up to

viâ London

$120. 240. 360..

fee 20 cents

31

30 40

11

$480..

500.

fee

50 cents

60

19

"

       To the Straits Settlements, China and Burmah by private steamers only. To the Straits Settlement limit of insured value, $500. Limit of value allowed for uninsured parcels, $50.

Parcels addressed to Holland, Italy (via Belgium) or Montenegro cannot be insured for more than $400, or to the Azores, Algeria or Tunis, Beyrout, Constantinople, Finland, France, Italy (via France), Madeira, Portugal, Roumania, Servia, Smyrna, for more than $200.

       Parcels must not exceed 2 feet in length, breadth, or depth. Those intended for the German packet must be so directed.

       Each parcel must be sealed in such a way as to render it impossible that it should be opened without detection. The sender must supply a declaration of the nature and net weight of the contents and of the gross weight of the parcel.

       A small charge, not exceeding 6 cents, may be made for Custom House purposes on the delivery of the parcel. Except Customs dues, this is the only charge the addressee will have to pay.

       Parcels containing coin, watches, jewellery, any article of gold or silver, or any article of value, cannot be sent to the United Kingdom or to any foreign country or British posses- sion included in the insurance system, unless they are insured for at least part of their value.

FOREIGN MONEY Orders. Application for Money Orders.

237.-When applying for Money Orders payable abroad the public should use the special Requisition Forms, which are supplied gratuitously at the General Post Office, Hongkong, and British Postal Agency at Shanghai.

       238. The applicant must furnish, in full, the surname and, at least, the initial of one christian name both of the remitter and the payee and the remitter's address. In the case of orders through the United Kingdom the full address of the payee must be given, and if the order be payable to a native in British India the tribe or caste and the father's name should also be furnished.

       239.-In any case in which the name of the payee is not known the remitter must make a note to the effect on the front of the Requisition Form, and give such descrip- tion of the payee as will be sufficient to identify him or her to the Paying Officer. The order will then be issued at the remitter's risk.

liv

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

       240.-In the case of orders drawn on the countries and places through the London Office a receipt of the issue of such order only will be given to the remitter, an order in the currency of the country of payment being issued by the London Office, subject to discount on such order at the following rates:

For sums not exceeding £2...

3d.

""

"

exceeding £2 and not exceeding £6 ... 6d.

£6

£10... 9d.

       All such orders must be expressed in British currency and, if so desired, the remitter must allow for the above discount.

241.--The commission charged is as follows:-

Orders on the United Kingdom and on Countries through the London Office.

For each £ or fraction of a £.

For each £ or fraction of a £

8 cents.

12 cents.

Orders on the Australian Colonies..

Orders on India and Ceylon. For a sum not exceeding

20 rupees 20 cents.

50

40

""

""

""

70

60

""

"}

""

100

""

""

""

150

80 $1.00

""

""

"

""

""

Orders on other places.

For a sum not exceeding $ 10

20 cents.

$ 25

40

">

99

19

$ 35

60

50

80

""

""

""

$ 60

$1.00

""

""

}}

$ 75

1.20

""

""

"

$ 85

1.40

""

""

""

$100

1.60

"

       242. No order (except in the case of those drawn on India, for which the limit is 150 rupees, and those on Japan, Borneo and Siam, for which the limit is $100) must exceed £10 or $50.

       243.-A foreign order remaining unpaid in Hongkong after one year from the date of issue will be considered void and returned to the office of issue.

244.-Where not repugnant to the foregoing Rules the General Regulations for the

issue of the Local Money Orders will apply to Foreign Money Orders.

       245.--The following is the list of countries and places upon which Money Orders are drawn, viz. :-

                            DRAWN DIRECT. British India (including Burmah and the Agencies of the Indian Post Office in the Persian Gulf and Seychelles) and Portu- guese India Canada

Ceylon (including orders on Mauritius and

Egypt)

     Hawaii (Sandwich Islands) Japan, the following offices, viz. :-Nagasa-

ki, Kobe, Osaka, Kioto, Yokohama, Tokio, Akamagaseki (Shimonoseki), Aomori, Hiroshima, Kagoshima, Kana- zawa, Kumamoto, Nagano, Nagoya, Niigaata, Sappora, Sendai, Tadotsu and Utsunomiya; and in Formosa, Anping, Keelung, Taichu, Tainan, Taipeh, Taito-

Antigua Bahamas

Barbados

tai, Takaw and Tamsui; and in Corea, Fusan, Chemulpo, Seoul, Yuensan and Mukho

New South Wales

New Zealand

British North Borneo (Sandakan, Kudat

and Labuan)

Queensland

Siam (Bangkok and Chiengmai only) South Australia

Straits Settlements (Singapore, Penang

and Malacca)

Tasmania

United Kingdom

United States of America Victoria

DRAWN THROUGH THE LONDON OFFICE

British Colonies

Matabeleland

Mombassa and Lamu Montserrat

Bermuda

       British Bechuanaland British Guiana

British Honduras

Malta

Natal

Nevis Newfoundland

Cape Colony

Cyprus

Dominica

Falkland Islands

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

British Colonies

Niger Coast Protectorate Prince Edward Island St. Kitts

St. Lucia

Gambia

Gibraltar

Gold Coast

Grenada

St. Vincent

Sierra Leone

Tobago

Trinidad

ly

Jamaica

Lagos

Mashonaland

Austria

Bosnia

Bulgaria

Cameroons and Togo

Chili

Turk's Island

Western Australia

Zululand

Foreign Countries

Hungary

Congo Free State (Banana, Boma & Matadi)

Denmark, with Faroe Islands

Danish West Indies

Dutch East Indies

Egypt

France, with Algeria

German Empire

German East African Protectorate

German South Western African Protec-

Iceland

Italy, with offices on the Red Sea and

at Tripoly

Luxemburg

New Guinea (German Protectorate of) Norway

Orange Free State

Portugal (including Madeira & the Azores) Roumania

Salvador

Servia

Sweden Switzerland Transvaal Tunis

torate

Herzegovina

Holland

Uraguay

Foreign Cities and Towns.

Adrianople

Salonica

Beyrout

Symrna

Constantinople

Tangier

Panama

Asia Minor and Levant.

Candia

   Canea (Khania La Canée) Chios (Khios)

Dardanelles

Dédé-Agatch (Dédé-Aghadj)

Durazzo

Galeppoli

Ineboli

Jaffa

Janina

Jerusalem

Kaifa (Caiffa)

Kavala (Cavalla)

Kerassonde (Kéressoun) Lagos (Turkey)

Mitylene

Prevesa

Retimo

Rhodes

Samsoun

Santi Quaranta (Serandoz) Trebizond (Trapezunt) Valona Vathy-Samos

Imperial Postal Orders.

        246.-Imperial Postal Orders of the values named below, payable within three months at any Post Office in the United Kingdom, or at Constantinople, can be obtained at the General Post Office, Hongkong, or at any of the British Postal Agencies in China, at prices which include commission and which vary with the rate of exchange, viz. :-

1/-, 1/6, 5/-, 10/-, 20/-.

        The prices are published from time to time in the Government Gazette and can be obtained on application.

       247.-The purchaser of any Postal Order must fill in the payee's name before parting with it. He may also fill in the name of the office where payment is to be made. If this is not done the order is payable (within three months) anywhere in the United Kingdom or at Constantinople.

248.-Any Postal Order may be crossed to a Bank, and in such case payment will only be made through a Banker.

lvi

HONGKONG POSTAL GUIDE

      249.-Postal Orders should always be forwarded in registered covers. If this precau- tion is not taken no enquiries whatever will be made as to the loss or alleged loss of any such order.

      250.-Postal Orders issued in the United Kingdom are not payable in Hongkong or at any of the British Postal Agencies in China.

251. Any regulation in force in the United Kingdom governing the issue and pay- ment of Postal Orders there should to taken to apply to the Imperial Postal Orders issued in Hongkong and at the British Postal Agencies in China.

GENERAL.

      252.-As full information regarding articles that can and that cannot be sent by Post is published, under the proper heads, in the Postal Guide, no application will be entertained for the refund of the value of postage stamps on correspondence which is dis- covered, after the postage labels have been obliterated, to contain any prohibited article, or which exceeds the limit of weight, or which for any other reason cannot be for- warded and has consequently to be returned to the sender, and any loss resulting from a non-observance of the Rules by the sender of an article must be borne by him.

TREATIES, CODES, &c.

TREATIES WITH CHINA.

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT Nanking,

29TH AUGUST, 1842

Ratifications Exchanged at Hongkong, 26th June, 1843

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous of putting an end to the misunderstandings and consequent hostilities which have arisen between the two countries, Lave resolved to conclude a treaty for that purpose, and have therefore named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say: Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart., a Major-General in the Service of the East India Company, &c.; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, the High Commissioners Ke-ying, a Member of the Imperial House, a Guardian of the Crown Prince, and General of the Garrison of Canton: and Ilipoo, of the Imperial Kindred, graciously permitted to wear the insignia of the first rank, and the distinc tion of a peacock's feather, lately Minister and Governor-General, &c., and now Lieut.-General commanding at Chapoo-Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:--

Art. I.--There shall henceforward be peace and friendship between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britam and Ireland and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between their respective subjects, who shall enjoy full security and protection for their persons and property within the dominions of the other.

       Art. II. His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees that British subjects, with their families and establishments, shall be allowed to reside, for the purpose of carry- ing on their mercantile pursuits, without molestation or restraint, at the cities and towns of Canton, Amoy, Foochow-foo, Ningpo, and Shanghai; and Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, &c., will appoint superintendents, or consular officers, to reside at each of the above-named cities or towns, to be the medium of communication between the Chinese authorities and the said merchants, and to see that the just duties and other dues of the Chinese Government, as hereinafter provided for, are duly discharged by Her Britannic Majesty's subjects.

       Art. III.-It being obviously necessary and desirable that British subjects should have some port whereat they may careen and refit their ships when required, and keep stores for that purpose, His Majesty the Emperor of China cedes to Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, &c., the Island of Hongkong to be possessed in perpetuity by Her Britannic Majesty, her heirs, and successors, and to be governed by such laws and regulations as Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, &c., shall see fit to direct.

       Art. IV. The Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of six millions of dollars, as the value of the opiuin which was delivered up at Canton in the month of March, 1839, as a ransom for the lives of Her Britannic Majesty's Superintendent and suv- jects who had been imprisoned and threatened with death by the Chinese high officers.

Art. V. The Government of China having compelled the British merchants trading at Canton to deal exclusively with certain Chinese merchants, called Hong merchants (or Co-Hong), who had been licensed by the Chinese Government for this purpose, the Emperor of China agrees to abolish that practice in future at all ports where British merchants may reside, and to permit them to carry on their mercantile transactions with whatever persons they please; and His Imperial Majesty further agrees to pay to the British Government the sum of three millions of dollars, on account of debts due

1*

NANKING TREATY, 1842

to British subjects by some of the said Hong merchants, or Co-Hong, who have become insolvent, and who owe very large sums of money to subjects of Her Britannic Majesty.

Art. VI.-The Government of Her Britannic Majesty having been obliged to send out an expedition to demand and obtain redress for the violent and unjust proceedings of the Chinese high authorities towards Her Britannic Majesty's officers and subjects, the Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of twelve millions of dollars, on account of expenses incurred; and Her Britannic Majesty's plenipotentiary voluntarily agrees, on behalf of Her Majesty, to deduct from the said amount of twelve millions of dollars, any sums which may have been received by Her Majesty's combined forces, as ransom for cities and towns in China, subsequent to the 1st day of August, 1841.

      Art. VII.-It is agreed that the total amount of twenty-one millions of dollars, described in the three preceding articles, shall be paid as follows:-

Six millions inmediately.

Six millions in 1843; that is, three millions on or before the 30th June, and

three millions on or before 31st of December.

Five millions in 1844; that is, two millions and a half on or before the 30th of

June, and two millions and a half on or before the 31st of December.

Four millions in 1845; that is, two millions on or before 30th of June, and

two millions on or before the 31st of December.

      And it is further stipulated, that interest, at the rate of 5 per cent. per annum, shall be paid by the Government of China on any portion of the above sums that are not punctually discharged at the periods fixed.

      Art. VIII.-The Emperor of China agrees to release, unconditionally, all subjects of Her Britannic Majesty (whether natives of Europe or India), who may be in con- finement at this moment in any part of the Chinese Empire.

Art. IX.-The Emperor of China agrees to publish and promulgate, under his imperial sign manual and seal, a full and entire amnesty and act of indemnity to all subjects of China, on account of their having resided under, or having had dealings and intercourse with, or having entered the service of Her Britannic Majesty, or of Her Majesty's officers; and His Imperial Majesty further engages to release all Chinese subjects who may be at this moment in confinement for similar reasons.

      Art. X.-His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to establish at all the ports which are, by Article II. of this treaty, to be thrown open for the resort of British merchants, a fair and regular tariff of export and import customs and other dues, which tariff shall be publicly notified and promulgated for general information; and the Emperor further engages that, when British merchandise shall have once paid at any of the said ports the regulated customs and dues, agreeable of the tariff to be hereafter fixed, such merchandise may be conveyed by Chinese merchants to any province or city in the interior of the empire of China, on paying a further amount as transit duties, which shall not exceed

per cent. on the tariff value of

such goods.

      Art. XI. It is agreed that Her Britannic Majesty's chief high officer in China shall correspond with the Chinese high officers, both at the capital and in the provinces, under the term "communication;" the subordinate British officers and Chinese high officers in the provinces under the term "statement," on the part of the former, and on the part of the latter, "declaration," and the subordinates of both countries on a footing of perfect equality; merchants and others not holding official situations, and therefore not included in the above, on both sides for use the term " representation " in all papers addressed to, or intended for, the notice of the respective Govern.

ments.

      Art. XII.-On the assent of the Emperor of China to this treaty being received, and the discharge of the first instalment of money, Her Britannic Majesty's forces will retire from Nanking and the Grand Canal, and will no longer molest or stop the trade of China. The military post at Chinhae will also be withdrawn ; but the island of Koolangsoo, and that of Chusan, will continue to be held by Her Majesty's forces until the money payments, and the arrangements for opening the ports to British merchants, be completed.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. XIII.-The ratifications of this treaty by Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, &c., and His Majesty the Emperor of China, shall be exchanged as soon as the great distance which separates England from China will admit; but, in the meantime, counterpart copies of it, signed and sealed by the plenipotentiaries on behalf of their respective sovereigns, shall be mutually delivered, and all its provisions and arrangements shall take effect.

Done at Nanking, and signed and sealed by the plenipotentiaries on board Her Britannic Majesty's ship Cornwallis, this 29th day of August, 1842; corresponding with the Chinese date, twenty-fourth day of the seventh month, in the twenty-second year of Taou Kwang.

HENRY POTTINGER,

euเออเง

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary

And signed by the seals of four Chinese Commissioners.

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT TIENTSIN, 26TH June, 1858 Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 24th October, 1860

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two countries and to place their relations on a more satisfactory footing in future, have resolved to proceed to a revision and improvement of the Treaties existing between them; and, for that purpose, have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, the Right Honourable the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, a Peer of the United Kingdom, and Knight of the Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the High Commissioner Kweiliang, a Senior Chief Secretary of State, styled of the East Cabinet, Captain-General of the Plain White Banner of the Manchu Banner Force, Superintendent-General of the Administration of Criminal Law; and Hwashana, one of His Imperial Majesty's Expositors of the Classics, Manchu President of the office for the regulation of the Civil Establishment, Captain-General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, and Visitor of the Office of Interpretation:

Who after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:-

Art. I. The treaty of Peace and Amity between the two nations signed at Nanking on the twenty-ninth day of August, in the year eighteen hundred and forty- two, is hereby renewed and confirmed.

       The Supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade having been amended and improved, and the substance of their provisions having been incor- porated in this Treaty, the said Supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade are hereby abrogated.

        Art. II. For the better preservation of harmony in future, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and His Majesty the Emperor of China mutually agree that, in accordance with the universal practice of great and friendly nations, Her Majesty the Queen may, if she see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents to the Court of Peking; and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like manner, if he see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents to the Court of St. James.

6

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

He

Art. III.-His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent, so appointed by Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, may reside, with his family and establishment, permanently at the capital, or may visit it occasionally at the option of the British Government. shall not be called upon to perform any ceremony derogatory to him as representing the Sovereign of an independent nation on a footing of equality with that of China. On the other hand, he shall use the same forms of ceremony and respect to His Majesty the Emperor as are employed by the Ambassadors, Ministers, or Diplomatic Agents of Her Majesty towards the Sovereigns of independent and equal European

nations.

It is further agreed, that Her Majesty's Government may acquire at Peking a site for building, or may hire houses for the accommodation of Her Majesty's Mission, and the Chinese Government will assist it in so doing.

Her Majesty's Representative shall be at liberty to choose his own servants and attendants, who shall not be subject to any kind of molestation whatever.

Any person guilty of disrespect or violence to Her Majesty's Representative, or to any member of his family or establishment, in deed or word, shall be severely punished. Art. IV. It is further agreed that no obstacle or difficulty shall be made to the free movements of Her Majesty's Representative, and that he and the persons of his suite may come and go, and travel at their pleasure. He shall, moreover, have full liberty to send and receive his correspondence to and from any point on the sea-ccast that he may select, and his letters and effects shall be hel sacred and inviolable. He may employ, for their transmission, special couriers, who shall meet with the same protection and facilities for travelling as the persous employed in carrying despatches for the Imperial Government; and, generally, he shall enjoy the same privileges as are accorded to officers of the same rank by the usage and consent of Western nations. All expenses attending the Diplomatic Mission of Great Britain shall be borne by the British Government.

Art. V. His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to nominate one of the Secretaries of State, or a President of one of the Boards, as the high officer with whom the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent of Her Majesty the Queen shall transact business, either personally or in writing, on a footing of perfect equality.

      Art. VI. Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain agrees that the privileges hereby secured shall be enjoyed in her dominions by the Ambassador, Minister, or Diplomatic Agent of the Emperor of China, accredited to the Court of Her Majesty.

liberty

Art. VII.-Her Majesty the Queen may appoint one or more Consuls in the dominions of the Emperor of China; and such Consul or Consuls shall be at to reside in any of the open ports or cities of China as Her Majesty the Queen may consider most expedient for the interests of British commerce. They shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consular Officers of the most favoured nation.

Consuls and Vice-Consuls in charge shall rank with intendants of Circuit; Vice- Consuls, Acting Vice-Consuls, and Interpreters, with Prefects. They shall have access to the official residences of these officers, and communicate with them, either personally or in writing, on a footing of equality, as the interests of the public service may require. Art. VIII.-The Christian religion, as professed by Protestants or Roman Catholics, inculcates the practice of virtue, and teaches man to do as he would be done by. Persons teaching it or professing it, therefore, shall alike be entitled to the protection of the Chinese authorities, nor shall any such, peaceably pursuing their calling and not offending against the laws, be persecuted or interfered with.

or

Art. IX.-British subjects are hereby authorised to travel, for their pleasure for purposes of trade, to all parts of the interior under passports which will be issued by their Consuls, and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passport be not irregular, the bearer will be allowed to proceed, and no opposition shall be offered to his hiring persons, or hiring vessels for the carriage of his baggage or merchandise. If he be without a passport, or if he commit any offence against the

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment, but he must not be subject to any ill-usage in excess of necessary restraint. No passport need be applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding 100 li, and for a period not exceeding five days.

The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

        To Nanking, and other cities, disturbed by persons in arms against the Govern- ment, no pass shall be given, until they shall have been recaptured.

       Art. X.-British merchant ships shall have authority to trade upon the Great River (Yangtsze). The Upper and Lower Valley of the river being, however, disturbed by outlaws, no port shall be for the present opened to trade, with the exception of Chinkiang, which shall be opened in a year from the date of the signing of this Treaty.

        So soon as peace shall have been restored, British vessels shall also be admitted to trade at such ports as far as Hankow, not exceeding three in number, as the British Minister, after consultation with the Chinese Secretary of State, may determine shall be ports of entry and discharge.

        Art. XI. In addition to the cities and towns of Canton, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, and Shanghai, opened by the Treaty of Nanking, it is agreed that British subjects may frequent the cities and ports of Newchwang, Tangchow (Chefoo), Taiwan (Formosa), Chao-chow (Swatow), and Kiung-chow (Hainan).

They are permitted to carry on trade with whomsoever they please, and to proceed

to and fro at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise.

        They shall enjoy the same privileges, advantages, and immunities at the said towns and ports as they enjoy at the ports already opened to trade, including the right of residence, buying or renting houses, of leasing land therein, and of building churches, hospitals, and cemeteries.

        Art. XII.-British subjects, whether at the ports or at other places, desiring to build or open houses, warehouses, churches, hospitals, or burial grounds, shall make their agreement for the land or buildings they require, at the rates prevailing among the people, equitably and without exaction on either side.

        Art. XIII.-The Chinese Government will place no restrictions whatever upon the employment, by British subjects, of Chinese subjects, in any lawful capacity

        Art. XIV.-British subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the transport of goods or passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government. The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying the goods be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will, of course, be punished according to law.

Art. XV. All questions in regard to rights whether of property or person, arising between British subjects, shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the British authorities. Art. XVI.-Chinese subjects who may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

        British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished by the Consul, or other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws of Great Britain.

Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

       Art. XVII-A British subject, having reason to complain of Chinese, must proceed to the Consulate, and state his grievance. The Consul will inquire into the merits of the case, and do his utmost to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a Chinese have reason to complain of a British subject, the Consul shall no less listen to his complaint, and endeavour to settle it in a friendly manner. If disputes take place of such a nature that the Consul cannot arrange them amicably, then he shall request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may together examine into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

8

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. XVIII.-The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest protection to the persons and property of British subjects, whenever these shall have been subjected to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism or robbery, the local authorities shall at once take the necessary steps for the recovery of the stolen property, the suppression of disorder, and the arrest of the guilty parties, whom they will punish according to law.

Art. XIX. If any British inerchant-vessel, while within Chinese waters, be plundered by robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover the stolen property, that it may be handed over to the Consul for restoration to the

owner.

Art. XX.-If any British vessel be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coast of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any port within the dominions of the Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities, on being apprised of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment and shall be furnished, if necessary, with the means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

Art. XXI.--If criminals, subjects of China, shall take refuge in Hongkong or on board the British ships there, they shall, upon due requisition by the Chinese authorities, be searched for, and, on proof of their guilt, be delivered up.

In like manuer, if Chinese offenders take refuge in the houses or on board the vessels of British subjects at the open ports, they shail not be harboured or concealed, but shall be delivered up, on due requisition by the Chinese authorities, addressed to the British Consul.

Art. XXII. Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a British subject, or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their utmost to effect his arrest and enforce recovery of the debts.

The British authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any British subject fraudulently absconding or failing to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

Art. XXIII.-Should natives of China who may repair to Hongkong to trade incur debts there, the recovery of such debts must be arranged for by the English Court of Justice on the spot; but should the Chinese debtor abscond, and be known to have property real or personal within the Chinese territory, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities, on application by, and in concert with, the British Consul, to do their utmost to see justice done between the parties.

Art. XXIV. It is agreed that British subjects shall pay, on all merchandise imported or exported by them, the duties prescribed by the tariff; but in no case shall they be called upon to pay other or higher duties than are required of the subjects of any other foreign nation.

Art. XXV.-Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the goods, and duties of export on the shipment of the same.

Art. XXVI. Whereas the tariff fixed by Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking, and which was estimated so as to impose on imports and exports a duty of about the rate of five per cent. ad valorem, has been found, by reason of the fall in value of various articles of merchandise therein enumerated, to impose a duty upon these considerably in excess of the rate originally assumed, as above, to be a fair rate, it is agreed that the said tariff shall be revised, and that as soon as the Treaty shall have been signed, application shall be made to the Emperor of China to depute a high officer of the Board of Revenue to meet, at Shanghai, officers to be deputed on behalf of the British Government, to consider its revision together, so that the tariff, as revised, may come into operation immediately after the ratification of this Treaty.

Art. XXVII.-It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this Treaty may demand a further revision of the tariff, and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive ten years.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

9

        Art. XXVIII. Whereas it was agreed in Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking that British import, having paid the tariff duties, should be conveyed into the interior, free of all further charges, except a transit duty, the amount whereof was not to exceed a certain percentage on tariff value; and whereas, no accurate information having been furnished of the amount of such duty, British merchants have onstantly complained that charges are suddenly and arbitrarily imposed by the provincial authorities as transit duties upon produce on its way to the foreign market, and on imports on their way into the interior, to the detriment of trade; it is agreed that within four months from the signing of this Treaty, at all ports now open to British trade, and within a similar period at all ports that may hereafter be opened, the authority appointed to superintend the collection of duties shall be obliged, upon application of the Consul, to declare the amount of duties leviable on produce between the place of production and the port of shipment, upon imports between the Consular port in question aud the inland markets named by the Consul; and that a notification thereof shall be published in English and Chinese for general information.

But it shall be at the option of any British subject desiring to convey produce purchased inland to a port, or to convey imports from a port to an inland market, to clear his goods of all transit duties, by payment of a single charge. The amount of this charge shall be leviable on exports at the first barrier they may have to pass, or, on imports, at the port at which they are landed; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued, which shall exempt the goods from all further inla:.d charges whatsoever.

       It is further agreed that the amount of the charge shall be calculated, as nearly as possible, at the rate of two and a half per cent. ad valorem, and that it shall be fixed for each article at the conference to be held at Shanghai for the revision of the tariff.

       It is distinctly understood that the payment of transit dues, by commutation or otherwise, shall in no way affect the tariff duties on imports or exports, which will continue to be levied separately and in full.

       Art. XXIX.-British merchant vessels, of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden, shall be charged tonnage-dues at the rate of four mace per ton; if of one hundred and fifty tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton,

       Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open ports, or for Hongkong, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special certificate from the Customs, on exhibition of which she shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage dues in any open ports of Chi..a, for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the port-clearance.

       Art. XXX. The master of any British merchant-vessel may, within forty-eight hours after the arrival of his vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking bulk, in which case he will not be subject to pay tonn ge-dues. But tonnage-dues shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. No other fees or charges upon entry or departure shall be levied.

       Art. XXXI.-No tonnage-dues shall be payable on boats employed by British subjects in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provision, or other articles not subject to duty, between any of the open ports. All cargo-boats, however, conveying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage-dues once in six months, at the rate of four mace per register ton.

       Art. XXXII.-The Consuls and Superintendents of Customs shall consult together regarding the erection of beacons or lighthouses and the distribution of buoys and lightships, as occasion may demand.

Art. XXXIII.-Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorised by the Chinese Government to receive the same in its behalf, either in sycee or in foreign money, according to the assay made at Canton on the thirteenth of July, one thousand eight hundred and forty-three.

        Art. XXXIV.-Sets of standard weights and measures, prepared according to the standard issued to the Canton Custom-house by the Board of Revenue, shall be delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port to secure uniformity and prevent confusion.

10

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

      Art. XXXV.-Any British merchant vessel arriving at one of the open ports shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her departure, she shall be allowed to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XXXVI.-Whenever a British merchant vessel shall arrive off one of the open ports, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or more Customs officers to guard the ship. They shall either live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their food and expenses shall be supplied them from the Custom-house, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever from the master or consignee. Should they violate this regulation, they shall be punished proportionately to the amount exacted.

Art. XXXVII. Within twenty-four hours after arrival, the ship's papers, bills of lading, &c., shall be lodged in the hands of the Consul, who will within a further period of twenty-four hours report to the Superintendent of Customs the name of the ship, her register tonnage, and the nature of her cargo. If, owing to neglect on the part of the master, the above rule is not complied with within forty-eight hours after the ship's arrival, he shall be liable to a fine of fifty taels for every day's delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred taels.

For

The master will be responsible for the correctness of the manifest, which shall contain a full and true account of the particulars of the cargo on board. presenting a false manifest, he will subject himself to a fine of five hundred taels; but he will be allowed to correct, within twenty-four hours after deliveryf it to the customs officers, any mistake he may discover in his manifest without incurring this penalty.

Art. XXXVIII.-After receiving from the Consul the report in due form, the Superintendent of Customs shall grant the vessel a permit to open hatches. If the master shall open hatches, and begin to discharge any goods without such permission, be shall be fined five hundred taels, and the goods discharged shall be confiscated wholly.

     Art. XXXIX.-Any British merchant who has cargo to land or ship must apply to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Cargo landed or shipped without such permit will be liable to confiscation.

Art. XL. No transhipment from one vessel to another can be made without special permission, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped.

Art. XLI.-When all dues and duties shail have been paid, the Superintendent of Customs shall give a port-clearance, and the Consul shall then return the ships' papers, so that she may depart on her voyage.

     Art. XLII. With respect to articles subject, according to the tariff, to an ad valorem duty, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer in affixing its value, then each party shall call two or three merchants to look at the goods, and the highest price at which any of these merchants would be willing to purchase them shalle assumed as the value of the goods.

     Art. XLIII.-Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each article, making a deduction for the tare, weight of congee, &c.

To fix the tare of any articles, such as tea, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Custom-house officer, then each party shall choose so many chests out of every hundrel, which being first weighed in gross, shall afterwards be tared, and the average tare upon these chests shall be assumed as the tare upon the whole; and upon this principle shall the tare be fixed upon other goods and packages. If there should be any other points in dispute which cannot be settled, the British merch int may appeal to his Consul, who will communicate the particulars of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, that it may be equitably arranged. But the appeal must be made within twenty-four hours or it will not be attended to. While such points are still unsettled, the Superintendent of Customs shall postpone the insertion of the same in his books.

Art. XLIV. Upon all damaged goods a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed, proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in the manner pointed out in the clause of this Treaty having reference to articles which pay duty ad valorem.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

11

Art. XLV. British merchants who may have imported merchandise into any of the open ports, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made by suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods, as entered in the Custom-house books, correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with their original marks une: anged. He shall then make a memorandum of the port-clearance of the goods, and of the amount of duties paid, and deliver the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs of the other ports. All which being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, every- thing being found on examination there to correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods, without being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to con- fiscation by the Chinese Government,

        British merchants desiring to re-export duty-paid imports to a foreign country shall be entitled, on complying with the same conditions as in the case of re-exporta- tion to another port in China, to a drawback certificate, which shall be a valid tender to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Foreign grain brought into any port of China in a British ship, if no part thereof has been landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

        Art. XLVI.-The Chinese authorities at each port shall adopt the means they may judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

          Art. XLVII.-British merchant-vessels are not entitled to resort to other than the ports of tra e declared open by this Treaty; they are not unlawfully to enter other ports in China. or to carry on clandestine trade along the coast thereof. Any vessel violating this provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

       Art. XLVIII.-If any British merchant vessel be concerned in smuggling, the goods, whatever their value or nature, shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese authorities, and the ship may be prohibited from trading further, and sent away as soon as her account shall have been adjusted and paid.

       Art. XLIX. All penalties enforced, or confiscations made, under tis Treaty shall belong and be appropriated to the public service of the Government of China.

        Art. L.-All official communications, addressed by the Diplomatic and Consular Agent of Her Majesty the Queen to the Chinese Authorities, shall henceforth, be writ- ten in English. They will for the present be accompanied by a Chinese v. rsion, but it is understood that, in the event of there being any difference of meaning between the English and Chinese text, the English Government will hold the sense as expressed in the English text to be the correct sense. This provision is to apply to the Treaty now negotiated, the Chinese text of which has been carefully corrected by the English original.

       Art. LI.--It is agreed that henceforward the character "I" (barbarian) shall not be applied to the Government or subjects of Her Britannic Majesty in any Chinese official document issued by the Chinese authorities, either in the capital or in the provinces.

       Art. LII.-British ships of war coming for no hostile purpose, or being engaged in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit all ports within the dominions of the Emperor of China, and shall receive every facility for the purchase of provisions procuring water, and, if occasion require, for the making of repairs. The commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on terms of equality and courtesy.

Art. LIII.-In consideration of the injury sustained by native and foreign commerce from the prevalence of piracy in the seas of China, the high contracting parties agree to concert measures for its suppression.

Art. LIV.-The British Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all privileges, immunities, and advantages conferred on them by previous Treaties: and it is hereby expressly stipulated that the British Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that

12

PEKING CONVENTION, 1860

may have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or subjects of any other nation.

       Art. LV.-In evidence of her desire for the continuance of a friendly under- standing, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain contents to include in a Separate Article, which shall be in every respect of equal validity with the Articles of this Treaty, the condition affecting indemnity for expenses incurred and losses sustained in the matter of the Canton question.

Art. LVI.-The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and of His Majesty the Emperor of China, respec- tively, shall be exchanged at Peking, within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this Treaty. Done at Tientsin, this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight; corresponding with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(L.S.)

ELGIN AND KINCARDINE

SIGNATURE Of 1st ChineSE PLENIPOTENTIARY

Signature of 2nd Chinese PLENIPOTENTIARY

Separate Article annexed to the Treaty concluded between Great Britain and China on the twenty-sixth day of June, in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-eight.

It is hereby agreed that a sum of two millions of taels, on account of the losses sus- tained by British subjects through the misconduct of the Chinese authorities at Canton, and a further sum of two millions of taels ou account of the Military expenses of the ex- pedition which Her Majesty the Queen has been compelled to send out for the purpose of obtaining redress, and of enforcing the observance of Treaty provisions, shall be paid to Her Majesty's Representatives in China by the authorities of the Kwangtung Province. The necessary arrangements with respect to the time and mode of effecting these payments shall be determined by Her Majesty's Representative, in concert with the Chinese authorities of Kwangtung.

When the above amounts shall have been discharged in full, the British forces will be withdrawn from the city of Canton. Done at Tientsin this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung (L.S.) ELGIN AND KINCARDINE

SIGNATURE OF 1ST CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY

SIGNATURE OF 2ND CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY

CONVENTION OF PEACE BETWEEN HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 24TH OCTOBER, 1860

Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, being alike desirous to bring to au end the misunderstanding at present existing between their respective Governments, and to secure their relations against further interruption, have for this purpose appointed Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

      Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, His Imperial Highness the Prince of Kung; who having met and communicated to each other their full powers, and finding these to e in proper form, have agreed upon the following Convention, in Nine Articles :-

Art. I.-A breach of friendly relations having been occasioned by the act of the Garrison of Taku, which obstructed Her Britannic Majesty's Representative when on his way to Peking, for the purpose of exchanging the ratifications of the Treaty of Peace concluded at Tientsin in the month of June, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China expresses his deep regret at the misunderstanding so occasione.

PEKING CONVENTION, 1860

13

        Art. II.-It is further expressly declared, that the arrangement entered into at Shanghai, in the month of October, one thousand eight hundred an fifty-eight, between Her Britannic Majesty's Ambassador, the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, and His Imperial Majesty's Commissioners Kweiliaug and Hwashana, regarding the residence of Her Britannic Majesty's Representative in China, is hereby cancelled, and that, in accordance with Article III. of the Treaty of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, Her Britannic Majesty's Representative will henceforward reside, permanently or occasionally, at Peking, as Her Britannic Majesty shall be pleased to decide.

        Art. III.-It is agreed that the separate Article of the Treaty of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight is hereby annulle, and that in lieu of the amount of indemnity therein specified, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China shall pay the sum of eight millions of taels, in the following proportions or instalments, namely -at Tientsin, on or before the 30th day of November, the sum of five hundred thousand taels; at Carton, on or before the first day of December, one thousand eight hundred and sixty, three hundred and thirty-three thousand and thirty-three taels, less the sum which shall have been advanced by the Canton authorities toward the completion of the British Factory site of Shameen; and the remainder at the ports open to foreign tra le, in quarterly payments, which shall consist of one-fifth of the gross revenue from Customs there collected; the first of the said payments being due on the thirty-first day of December, one thousand eight hundred and sixty, for the quarter terminating on that day.

        It is further agreed that these moneys shal. be paid into the hands of an officer whom Her Britannic Majesty's Representative shall specially appoint to receive them, and that the accuracy of the amount shall, before payment, be duly ascertained by British and Chinese officers appointed to discharge this duty.

In order to prevent future discussion, it is moreover declared that of the eight millions of taels herein guaranteed, two millions will be appropriated to the indemnification of the British Merchantile Community at Canton for losses sustained by them; and the remaining six millions to the liquidation of war expenses.

Art. IV.--It is agreed that on the day on which this Convention is signed, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China shall open the port of Tientsin to trade, and that it shall be thereafter competent to British subjects to reside and trade there, under the same conditions as at any other port of China by treaty open to trade.

        Art. V. As soon as the ratifications of the Treaty of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight shall have been exchanged, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China will, by decree, command the high authorities of every province to proclaim throughout their jurisdictions that Chinese, in choosing to take service a British Colonies or other parts beyond sea, are at perfect liberty to enter into engagements with British subjects for that purpose, and to ship themselves and their families on board any British vessels at the open ports of China; also, that the high authorities aforesaid shall, in concert with Her Britannic Majesty's Representative in China, frame such regulations for the protection of Chinese emigrating as above as the circumstances of the different open ports may demand.

Art. VI. With a view to the maintenance of law and order in and about the harbour of Hongkong, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to cede to Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, Her heirs and successors, to have and to hold as a dependency of Her Britannic Majesty's Colony of Hongkong, that portion of the township of Kowloon, in the province of Kwangtung, of which a lease was granted in perpetuity to Harry Smith Parkes, Esquire, Companion of the Bath, a Member of the Allied Commission at Canton, on behalf of Her Britannic Majesty's Government by Lau Tsung-kwang, Governor-General of the Two Kwang.

It is further declared that the lease in question is hereby cancelled, that the claims of any Chinese to property on the said portion of Kowloon shall be duly investigated by a mixed Commission of British and Chinese officers, and that compensation shall be awarded by the British Government to any Chinese whose

14

TARIFF AGREEMENT

claim shall be by that said Commission established, should his removal be deemed necessary by the British Government.

       Art. VII. It is agreed that the provisions of the Treaty of one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, except in so far as they are modified by the present Convention, shall without delay come into operation as soon as the ratifications of the Treaty aforesaid shall have been exchanged. It is further agreed, that no separate ratification of the present Convention shall be necessary, but that it shall take effect from the date of its signature, and be equally binding with the Treaty above men- tioned on the high contracting parties.

Art. VIII. It is agreed that, as soon as the ratifications of the Treaty of the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight shall have been exchanged, His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China shall, by decree, command the high autho- rities in the capital, and in the provinces, to print and publish the aforesaid Treaty and the present Convention for general information.

      Art. IX. It is agreed that, as soon as the Convention shall have been signed, the ratifications of the Treaty of the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight shall have been exchanged, and an Imperial Decree respecting the publication of the said Convention and Treaty shall have been promulgated, as provided for by Article VIII. of the Convention, Chusan shall be evacuated by Her Britannic Majesty's troops there stationed, and Her Britannic Majesty's force now before Peking shall commence its march towards the city of Tientsin, the forts of Taku, the north coast of Shantung, and the city of Canton, at each or all of which places it shall be at the option of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland to retain a force until the indemnity of eight millions of taels, guaranteed in Article III., shall have been paid.

      Done at Peking, in the Court of the Board of Ceremonies, on the twenty-fourth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty.

(L.S.)

SEAL OF CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY

ELGIN AND KINCARDINE

SIGNATURE OF CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARY

AGREEMENT IN PURSUANCE OF ARTICLES XXVI. AND XXVIII. OF

THE TREATY OF TIENTSIN

SIGNED AT SHANGHAI, 8TH NOVEMBER, 1858

      Whereas it was provided, by the Treaty of Tientsin, that a conference should be held at Shanghai between Officers deputed by the British Government on the one part and by the Chinese Government on the other part, for the purpose of determining the amount of tariff duties and transit due to be henceforth levied, a conference has been held accordingly; and its proceedings having been submitted to the Right Honourable the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, High Commissioner and Plenipotentiary of Her Majesty the Queen on the one part; and to Kweiliang, Hwashana, Ho Kwei-tsing, Ming-shen, and Twan Ching-shih, High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor, on the other part, these High Officers have agreed and determined upon the revised Tariff hereto appended, the rate of transit dues therewith declared, together with other Rules and Regulations for the better explana tion of the Treaty aforesaid; and do hereby agree that the said Tariff and Rules the latter being in ten Articles, thereto appended-shall be equally binding on the Governments and subjects to both countries with the Treaty itself.

In witness whereof they hereto affix their Seals and Signatures.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiangsu, this eighth day of November in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

(L.S.)

SEAL OF CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES

ELGIN AND KINCARDINE

SIGNATURES OF THE FIVE CHINESE PLENIPOTENTIARIES

CUSTOMS TARIFF

        1.-In the present reprint of the Chinese Tariff for the trade under the cognizance of the Foreign Customs Inspectorate, the Import and Export divisions of the original Tariff of 1858 and the Lists of Duty-free, of Exceptional, and of Contraband Goods, based on Rules 2, 3, and 5 of the "Rules appended to the Tariff," have been amalgamated and arranged alphabetically.

        2. The decisions of the Chinese Government affecting the original Tariff which have come into operation since it was first published have been entered in their proper order.

3. The following typographical arrangement has been adopted in this reprint

1. Dutiable articles taken over from the original Tariff are printed in ordinary type. 2. Duty-free articles are printed in italics.

3. Exceptional and contraband articles specified in the "Rules appended to the Tariff"

are printed in black type.

4. Entries based on decisions given since the publication of the original Tariff are

printed in SMALL CAPITALS.

4. Of the decisions given since the issue of the original Tariff, the present list comprises only those which affect Customs practice at all the Treaty Ports; local rulings not having been included.

N.B.-Customs Permits are necessary for the shipment and discharge of whatever is not allowed to accompany passengers as Personal Baggage, e.g., Duty-free Goods, Treasure, Parcels, etc., and all such articles must be entered on the manifest of the vessel concerned.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Agar-agar...

Agaric. See Fungus.

Almonds.

See Apricot

Seeds.

Alum.................

Alum, Green, or Copperas

Aniseed, Broken....

Aniseed Oil.......................

Aniseed, Star

ticles de Tapisserie.

Antimacassars.

See Ar-

Antiques. See Curiosi-

ties.

Apricot Seeds, or Almonds Armlets, Glass. See Ban-

gles.

Arrow-root. See Sago. Arsenic..... Articles de Ménage

Including Drawing-room, Lin- ing-room, Bedroom, Bath- room, Kitchen, Pantry, and| Counting House Furniture; Furniture for Billiard Room, Bowling Alley, and| Racket Court; Safes, Stoves, Grates, Cooking Ranges, Fire-irons, Fenders, Coal- scuttles, etc.; Cornices and Curtains, etc.; Gas Fittings, Belle, etc.; Books, Music, Musical Instruments, Scien- tific Instruments and Ap-| paratus, etc.; Saddlery, Harness, and Carriages; Foreign Carpeting Druggeting, etc. [Exclu- ding Clocks, Musical Boxes, Pictures, Paintings, Look- ing-glasses, Mirrors, Curio- sities, Lampwicks, Mats, Quilts, Blankets, Rugs of Hair or Skin, Chinese Car- pets and Druggets, Leather Trunks, Native Chinaware, Pottery, and Earthenware.] Articles de Tapisserie

and

Including Berlin Wool Work,

Antimacassars, etc.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

Per T. m. c. c. 100 catties] 0 1 5 0

0045

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Artificial Flowers Asafoetida

Bambooware

Bangles or Armlets, Glass Bar Iron. See Metals. Beams. See Timber. Beancake.......

"

0 1 0 0

0 2 5

"J

500

0500

Bean Oil.

Beans and Peas

"

دو

Free.

0 4 5 0

0 4 5 0

INCLUDING GUANO.*

See Oil.

Beaver Skins. See Skins,

Beaver.

Bed Quilts, Cotton. See

Palampore.

Beef and Pork. See Meats. Beer. See Wines Beeswax, Yellow

Bells. See Articles de Mé-

nage.

Berlin Wool Work. Seel

Articles de Tapisserie. Betel-nuts

Betel-nut Husk

Bezoar, Cow. See Cow

Bezoar.

Bicho de Mar, Black...... Bicho de Mar, White Birds' Nests, 1st Quality. Birds' Nests, 2nd Quality Birds' Nests, 3rd Quality,

or Uncleaned

Biscuit, all kinds, Plain|

and Fancy....

Bitters.

See Wines. Blankets. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Blotting Paper. See Sta-

tionery.

Bombazettes. See Wool-

len Manufactures.

Bonbons. See Confection-

ery.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per \T. m. c.c. 100 catties 1 5 0 0

0 6 5 0

"

33

0 7 5 0

0500

Free.

0035

0 0 6 0

100 catties 1 0 0 0

0150

39

"

0 0 7 5

1 5 0 0

"

0 350

"

Catty

"

0 5 5 0 0450

0 1 5 0

"

Free.

Boneware and Hornware. 100 catties 1500

GUANO is allowed to pay 5 per cent. ad valorem at importer's option.

16

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT and Duty.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

T. m. c. c.

Books, CHINESE. See

Paper, 1st Quality.

Books, Foreign. See Ar-|

ticles de Ménage.

Boots, Chinese. See Shoes

and Boots.

Boots Foreign. See Cloth-

ing, Foreign

Bracelets, Foreign.

Jewellery, Foreign.

See

Brass Buttons [EXPORT

TARIFF]

100 catties 3 0 0 0

Brass Buttons [IMPORT

TARIFF]

Brass-foil.

Gross 100 catties

0 0 5 5

1 5 0 0

Brassware

1 0 0 0

35

1 150

"

0 200

""

Cannon

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Cantharides.... Canvas and Cotton Duck,

not exceeding 50 yards] long

Capoor Cutchery Caps, Felt. See Felt Caps. Caps, Silk. See Silk. Cardamoms, Superior Cardamoms, Inferior, or

Grains of Paradise Carpeting, Foreign

.........

Including Oil Floor-cloth. [Excluding Chinese Car- pets.]

Carpeting, Foreign.

See

---

Articles de Ménage. Carpets and Druggets

Not including Foreign Car-

peting and Druggeting. Carriages. See Articles de

Ménage.

Cash. See Copper Cash. Cassia Buds

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per \T. m. c. c.

100 catties 2000

Piece 0400 100 catties] 0 3 0 0

"J

Free.

100

0 500

Hundred 3500

Brass Wire

Brick Tea. See Tea, Brick.

Brimstone and Sulphur.

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Broadcloth. See Wool-

len Manufactures. Brocades. See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Brooches. See Jewellery,|

Foreign.

Buffalo Hides. See Hides,

Buffalo.

Buffalo Horns. See Horns,|

Buffalo.

Buffalo Sinews. See Si-

news.

BUILDING MATERIALS NOT

Cassia Lignea

Cassia Oil

Cassia Twigs

Cassimeres. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Castor Oil

Excluding Foreign Castor Oil,ļ if arriving in quantities of less than 100 catties weight:| Free.

Caviare. See Meats.

Ceruse. See Lead, White.

100 catties 0 8 0 0

"

བ བ བ

0600 9

""

00 0150

""

0 200

SPECIFIED IN TARIFF,

IMPORTED FOR OTHER

THAN OFFICIAL PUR-5 per cent.

POSES...

Building Materials import-

ed for official residences

or offices.......

Bullion, Gold and Silver....

[ad valorem]

Free

""

Bunting.

See Woollen

Manufactures.

Butter

.......

Including Condensed and De-

siccated Milk.

Buttons, Brass. See Brass

Buttons.

    Cakes. See Confectionery. Camagon-wood.

Wood, Camagon.

See

Cambrics. See Cotton

Pice Goods.

CAMELS' HAIR. See HAIR,|

CAMELS'.

CAMELS' WOOL. See

WOOL, CAMELS'.

Camlets. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Camphor

Camphor, Baroos, Clean. Camphor, Baroos, Refuse. Candles, Foreign

Canes

"

100 catties 0 7 5 0

Catty

Charcoal

Free.

Charms,

Foreign. See

Jewellery, Foreign.

Cheese

"

Chestnuts

China-root

Chinaware, Coarse.....

INCLUDING Swatow NATIVE| CHINAWARE; NOT INCLUD- ING COARSE CHINAWARE OF THE VALUE OF TLS. 1 TO TLS. 1.50 PER PICUL EX- PORTED FROM PAKHOI, WHICH PAYS AS POTTERY, EARTHENWARE.

China ware, Fine......... Chinaware, Foreign. See

Glassware.

Chintzes. See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Chocolate. See Confec-

tionery.

Chutneys. See Vegetables. Cigar-cases. See Cigars. Cigar-holders. See Cigars. Cigars, Foreign

Including Cigar-cases, Cigar-

holders, and Pipes.

Cinnabar

Cinnamon

CITRONS, See Vegetables.

1 3 0 0 0720

Clocks

Thousand 0 5 0 0

Free.

100 catties 0 1 0 0 01 30 045

33

وو

"

0 9 0 0

Free.

100 catties 0 7 5 0 1500

"

{

5 per cent.

ad valorem

CUSTOMS TARIFF

17

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Clothing, Cotton Clothing, Foreign

.....

Including Ready-made Cloth- ing of all kinds for Head, Person, or Foot, or First Materials for Foreign Cloth- ing, male and female (if im- ported in reasonable quanti- ties by Foreign Retail Dea lers, Tailors, and Milliners, for Foreign use); Foreign Boots and Shoes, Hosiery, Haberdashery, and Milli- nery [Excluding Umbrel las, Cotton Iland erchiefs, Silk Ribbons. Silk Thread, Silk Shawls, Silk Scarves, Sil Tassels, Silk Caps, Chinese Felt Caps, Chinese Boots and Shoes.]

Clothing, Silk.... Cloves

Cloves, Mother

Coal, Foreign *

COAL, NATIVE: FORMO- 8A, HUPEH, ANHWEI, KWANGSI, AND

P'ING

COAL, NATIVE,

SORTS

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

\T. m. c. c.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per \T. m. c. c. 100 catties] 1 5 0 0

Free.

Per

Copper, in Sheets.

See

Metals

100 catties 10 0 0 0

"

0500

0 18 0

"

'Ton

0 0 5 0

K'AI-

0 1 0 0

"

OTHER

0 3 0 0

29

Coal shipped by Yachts for

their own use Coal-scuttles. See Articles

de Ménage. Cochineal.....

Cocoa. See Confectionery. COCOA-NUTS. See Vegetables Cocoons. See Silk. COCOONS, REFUSE

{

COCOON SKINS (SHELLB).. Coffee. See Confectionery. Coins, Foreign

Coir

СОКЕ..

See Preserves.

Comfits. Confectionery

Including Pastry, Cakes, Bon- bons, Coffee, Chocolate, Co- coa, Spices, Sauces, Season- ings, Flavouring Essences, Foreign Pepper, Mustard, Table Salt in small jars, Ketchup, Vinegar, and Oil; Anchovy, Tomato, and Wor cestershire Sauces. [Ex- cluding Cinnamou, Cloves, Mace, Nutmegs, Honey, Liquorice, Sugar Candy, Chinese Preserves, Comfits, and Sweetmeats.] Cooking Ranges. See Ar-

ticles de Ménage. Copper. See Metals. Copper Cash

Can only be exported

under Bond to a Chi-| nese Treaty Port.

COPPER CASH, JAPANESE,

MAY BE IMPORTED.

Free.

100 catties] 5 0 0 0

5 per cent. ad valorem

99

Free.

[100 catties 0 1 0 0

'Ton

Free.

0 1 5

Copper, in Slabs. See

Metals.

Copper Nails. See Metals. Copper Rods. See Metals. Copperware and Pewter-

ware

INCLUDING WHITE METAL

PIPES (INFERIOR).

100 catties 1 1 5 0

"

0 500 0500

"

See Alum,

Copper, Old, Sheathing...

Copper Ore

Copperas.

Green.

Copying Presses. See Sta-

tionery.

Coral....

Corals, False

Cordage, Manila

Cordials. Sec Wines. Cornelian Beads. Cornelians

Corn-flour. See Sago. Cornices. See Articles de

Ménage.

Cotton Cloth, Native. See

Nankeen,

Cotton Duck. See Can-

vas.

Cotton Piece Goods :-

Grey, White, Plain and

Twilled:

exceeding 34 ins. wide and not exceeding 40 yds. long..

INCLUDING T-CLOTHS 36 INCHES WIDE AND 24 YARDS LONG.

exceeding 34 ins.

wide and exceed-

Drills and Jeans:

not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 10 yds.long| not exceeding 30 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 30 yds. long| T-Cloths:

not exceeding 34 ins.

wide and not ex- ceeding 48 yds. long| not exceeding 34 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 24 yds. long Dyed, Figured ad Plain, not exceeding 36 ins. wide ana not exceeding 40 yds. long

EXCLUDING FOREIGN COT- TONS DYED IN CHINA. See Nankeen and Native. Cotton Cloth.

Catty

0100

100 catties

0 3 5 0

03 50

7 0 0 0

100 stones 0 3 0 0

Piece

0 0 8 0

Every 10 yards.

0 0 20

Piece

*

"

0 1 0 0

0075

0 0 8 0

0 0 4 0

0 1 5 0

"

* On re-shipment, no matter whether for export or consumption on board the vessel in question, a Drawback

(or Exemption Certificate, if applied for) is granted.

18

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

| TABIFF UNIT and Duty.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Cotton Piece Goods--cont.] Fancy White Brocades and White Spotted Shirtings, not ex- ceeding 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 40 yds. long..... Printed Chintzes and Furnitures, not ex- ceeding 31 ins. wide and not exceeding 30 yds. long.....

Cambrics:

not exceeding 46 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 24 yds. long not exceeding 46 ins. wide and not ex- ceeding 12 yds, long Muslins :

not exceeding 46 ins.

wide and not ex-| ceeding 24 yds. long not exceeding 46 ins.

wide and not ex- ceeding 12 yds. long Damasks, not exceeding] 36 ins. wide and not exceeding 40 yds. long

Dimities or Quiltings, not exceeding 40 ins. wide and not exceed- ing 12 yds. long... Ginghams, not exceed-

ing 28 ins. wide and not exceeding 30 yds. long Handkerchiefs, not ex- ceeding 1 yd. square. Fustians, not exceeding

35 yds. long... Velveteens, not exceed.

ing 34 yds. long.

Cotton Rags

Cotton, Raw

...

Cotton Seed Oil. See Oil.

Cotton Thread

Piece

0 1 0 0

39

دو

0 0 7 0

0 0 7 0

0 0 3 5

0075

"

0035

"

0 2 0 0

وو

53

Dozen

0 0 6 5

0.

0025

Piece 0200

0150

10 catties] 0 0 4 5

03 50

Curiosities, Antiques...

Excluding Curios, Presents, etc., when forming part of e traveller's Personal Bag. gage and not being carried in such quantity as to sug- gest a trading" operation : Free. Curtains.

Ménage.

See Articles de

Cutch Cutlery CUTTLE-FISH.

Salt. Damasks.

See Fish,

See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Dates, Black Dates, Red Deer Horns.

Deer.

See Horns,

See Sinews.

Despatch Boxes.

See Sta-

Deer Sinews.

tionery.

Dimities. See Cotton Piece

Goods.

Dock Stores (under Special

Regulations).....

NOT

INCLUDING SHIPS' SIDE LIGHTS, NOT IM- PORTED FOR SPECIFIED VESSELS.

Doe Skins. See Skins,

Doe.

Dragon's

Blond. Seel

Gum, Dragon's Blood. Drills. See Cotton Piece

Goods.

Druggeting, Foreign

Excluding Chinese Druggets. Druggets. See Carpets. Duck, Cotton. See Can-

vas.

Dye, Green [Native: Lü-

kiao] Dyed Cottons.

See Cot-

ton Piece Goods.

Ear-rings, Foreign. See

Jewellery, Foreign.

Earthenware. See Pot-

tery.

TARIFF UNIT and Duty.

\T.m. c. c.

Per

5 per cent. [ad valorem

100 catties 0 18 0

Free.

100 catties 0 1 5 0 0090

"

Free.

Catty

0 8 0 0

07 20 0700

Ebony. See Wood, Ebony.

Eggs, Preserved..............

Thousand

Cotton Yarn

Cow Bezoar

TARIFF]

"

[EXPORT

Cow Bezoar, Indian [IM-

PORT TARIFF]..

Cow Hides. See Hides,

Buffalo

     Crackers, Fireworks Crape, Silk. See Silk

Piece Goods.

Crockery, Foreign.

Glassware.

See

Catty 0360

1500

03 50

Elephants' Teeth, Broken 100 catties 3 0 0

Elephants' Teeth, Whole.

Embroideries, Silk.

Silk Piece Goods.

See

Essences, Flavouring. See

Confectionery.

4 0

100 catties 0 5 0 0

False Pearls.

See Pearls.

Fancy Cottons. See Cot-

ton Piece Goods.

Fans, Feather....

Hundred

0750

Fans, Palin-leaf, Trim-

med

Thousand

0360

1 5 0 0

Fans, Palm-leaf, Untrim-

med

See Vege

0200

tables.

Fans, Paper

Hundred

0045

Crystalware. See Glass-

ware and Crystalware.

Cubebs

CUMQUATS.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

19

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

T. m. c. c.

Feathers,

Peacocks' Felt Caps......

Kingfishers',

Hundred

0 4 0 0 1 250

Felt Cuttings

100 catties 010

Fenders.

See Articles de

Ménage.

Fire-irons.

See Articles

de Ménage.

Firewood

Free.

Fireworks. See Crackers. Fish, Dried. See Stock

Fish.

Fish, Salt...

INCLUDING CUTTLE-FISH

Fish Maws

Not including Sharks' Skins.

100 catties 0 1 8 0

"

1 0 0 0 0200

Fish Skins

Flannel,

See Woollen

Manufactures.

Flints

Floss Silk. See Silk.

Flour..

Free.

Flowers, Artificial.

See

Artificial Flowers.

Fowling-pieces

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Fox Skins. See Skins,

Fox.

Fragrant-wood.

See

See Vege-

Wood, Fragrant.

Fruits, Foreign.

tables.

Fruits, Fresh and Preser-

ved. See Vegetables. Fungus, er Agaric..... Furniture of all kinds. See

Articles de Ménage.

Furnitures, Cotton.

Cotton Piece Goods.

See

Fustians. See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Galangal

Gambier

Gamboge

Game, Tinned.

Garlic

0 0 3 0

100 catties 0 6 0 0

100 0 15 0

31

1 0 0 0

"

See Meats,

Preserved, Foreign.

Garoo-wood. See Wood,

Garoo.

Gas Fittings.

de Ménage.

See Articles

Gauze, Silk. See Silk

Piece Goods.

GEAR,SHIPS': OLD ROPES, OLD SAILS, OLD SPARS -landed UNDER PER-

MIT

GEAR, SHIPS': ANCHORS,'

CHAINS, AND OLD

METAL, WHEN RE-

MOVED FROM A VES-

SEL NOT INTENDED TO BE BROKEN UP

Ginghams. See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Free.

5 per cent. |ad valorem

0 0 3 5

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Ginseng, American, Clari-

fied GINSENG, RE-CLARIFIED,

i.e., CRUDE GINSENGİ

IMPORTED AND CLARI- FIED AT A TREATY PORTİ AND SHIPPED COAST- WISE. TO PAY EXPORT AND COAST Trade Duty

AS THOUGH IT WERE NATIVE PRoduce. Ginseng, American, Crude Ginseng, Corean or Japan, 1st Quality.i.e., VALUED AT Tls. 5 AND OVER A

CATTY

Ginseng, Corean or Ja- pan, 2nd Quality, i.e.,

.....

VALUED AT MORE THAN Tls. 1 AND LESS THAN TIs. 5 A CATTY GINSENG, Corean or Ja- PAN, UNCLASSED, i.e., VALUED AT Tls. 1 AND

LESS A CATTY

TO INCLUDE COREAN OR JAPAN GINSENG CUT-

TINGS AND BEARD.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

T. m. c. c.

100 catties 80 00

""

Catty

5 per cent.

Ginseng, Native........ { ad valorem]

Glass Bangles, or Arm-100 catties

lets

Glass Beads

Glass, or Vitrified Ware. Glassware and Crystal-

ware

Including Foreign Crockery and Foreign Chinaware and| Porcelain. [Excluding Na- tive Chinaware, Native Pot- tery, and Native Earthen- ware; Window Glass, Tele- scopes, Spy and Opera Glas- ses, Looking-glasses and Mirrors; also Chinese Glass Beads and Glassware of all Linds].

Glass, Window

6 0 0 0

0 5 0 0

0 3 5 0

0 0 5 0

0500 0 500

15

0 500

52

Free.

{

Box 100 sq. ft.

0 15 0

100 catties 0 15 0

GLASS IMPORTED FOR THE USE OF CHURCHES 18 LIABLE TO DUTY.

Glue

Goats' Hair. See Hair,

Goats'.

Gold and Silver Bullion.

See Bullion.

Gold Thread, Imitation...

TO COMPREHEND FOREIGN IMITATION GOLD THREAD MADE OF COPPER AND SILVER AND AFTERWARDS GILT.

Gold Thread, Real........ Goldware. See Silver- ware and Goldware. Grain of all kinds [See

Rice]

Grains of Paradise.

Cardamoms.

Catty

0 0 3 0

1 6 0 0

100 catties 0 1 0 0 See

20

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF Article.

TARIFF UNit and DutY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per {T. m. c. c.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

(T. m. c. c.

See Bone-

See Clothing.

Articles not named in the

Grasscloth, Coarse (HAV-]

ING 40 OR LESS

THREADS IN THE WARP

       TO AN INCH). Grasscloth, Fine (HAVING)

OVER 40 THREADS IN THE WARP TO AN INCH) Grates. See Articles de

Ménage.

Green.

100 catties 0 7 5 0

2 5 0 0

Hornware.

ware.

Hosiery.

Foreign.

Household Stores, etc.

0 0 3 0

Tariff as dutiable, nor being| articles, or one or more of a class of articles, specifically mentioned in the Duty free List, if imported or exported for the special and personal use of specified Individuals, Hongs, Companies, or Ships, and in reasonable quanti- ties, may, when declared to be Household Stores, Ships' Stores, or Personal Baggage be passed free. Turiff

Green Alumn. See Alum,

Green Dye. See Dye,

Green.

Green Paint. See Paint.

Ground-nut Cake

""

Ground-nuts

0 1 0 0

GUANO. See Beancake.

Gum. See Stationery.

Gum Benjamin

0 600

"

Gum Benjamin, Oil of

0600

Gum, Dragon's Blood Gum Myrrh......

0450

""

0450

"

Gum Olibanum

0450

"

Ink, Foreign.

tionery.

named articles declared as Household Stores are duti- able. See also Dock Stores.. Implements of War..

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Indigo, Dry.....

Indigo, Liquid

Free.

100 catties 1 0 0 0

1

Gunpowder

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Gypsum, Ground, or Plas-

ter of Paris........ Haberdashery. See Cloth-

ing, Foreign.

Habit Cloth. See Wool-

len Manufactures.

HAIR, CAMELS'

Hair, Goats'

Hair-pins, Foreign.

Jewellery, Foreign. Hair Rugs. See Rugs. Hams

Seel

|100 catties 0 0 3 0

ad valorem

Ink, India

zee Sta-

Insect Wax. See Wax,

White.

Iron Bars.

tals.

See Metals.

Me-

Iron Hoops. See

IRON HOOPS, OLD. Seel

Metals.

Iron, in Pigs. See Me-

{

5 per cent.

tals.

100 catties 0 18 0

Iron, in Sheets.

See Me-

tals.

IRON NAILS.

See Metals.

0 550

IRON PANS.

See Metals.

"

Iron Rods.

See Metals.

Iron Wire.

See Metals.

Isinglass

Ivoryware

Goods.

03 50

Jewellery, Foreign

03 50

Handkerchiefs, Cotton.

See Cotton Piece Goods. Hare Skins. See Skins,

Hare.

Harness. See Articles de

Ménage.

Hartall, or Orpiment..................

Hemp

"

**

HEMP, RAW, OR CHINA 5 per cent.

GRASS (RHEA).........) ad valorem

Hemp Seed Oil.

See Oil.

Hemp Twine. See Twine.

Hides, Buffalo and Cow.. 100 catties 0 5 0 0

Hides, Rhinoceros

Honey

Το COMPREHEND WILD

UNCLEANED HONEY.

Hoop Iron.

Horns, Buffalo

See Metals.

Horns, Deer [IMPORT TA-

RIFF]

··

Horns, Deer, Young [Ex-

PORT TARIFF]

Horus, Deer, Old [Ex-

PORT TARIFF]

Horns, Rhinoceros

04 20

"

0 900

""

"

025 0

0 25 0

**

0900

Pair

100 catties 1 3 5 0 2000

"

Jeans. See Cotton Piece

Including Foreign Shirt Studs, Sleeve Links, Watch Chains,

Rings, Charms,

Pencil

Cases, Earrings, Necklets,| Brooches, Bracelets, Lockets, Hair-pins, Scent Bottles. [Excluding Coral, Corne- hans, Bangles, Glass Beads, False Pearls, Goldware and Silverware.j Joists. See Timber. Joss-sticks JUTE

Kentledge. See Metals. Ketchup. See Confection-

ery.

Feathers.

Kingfishers'

See Feathers. Kittysols, or Paper Un-

brellas

Kranjee-wood. See Wood.j

Kranjee.

0180

4 0 0

""

"

Catty

0650 0150

Free.

100 catties 0 2 0 0

""

0200

Hundred 0 5 0 0

Lampwicks

Lastinge. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Lead, in Pigs. See Me-

tals.

Lead, in Sheets. See

Metals.

Lead, Red (Minium)............. Lead, White (Ceruse) Lead, Yellow (Massicot). Leather

Leather Articles,

Pouches, Purses....

Leather, Green

as

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per T. m. c. c.

Lacquer, Crude.

Varnish. Lacquered Ware

See

100 catties 1 0 0 0

Laka-wood.

Laka.

See Wood,

0 6 0 0

"

OF ARRIVAL, i.e., ORI- GINAL PRICE plus EX- PENSES FOR COMMISSION, FREIGHT, AND OTHER CHARGES. IF THE EX- PENSES CANNOT BE AS- CERTAINED, 10 PER CENT. OF THE INVOICE PRICE

ADDED TO THE LATTER CONSTITUTE THE VALUE

ON WHICH DUTY IS TO BE

CHARGED.

Maizena. See Sago.

Mangrove Bark

Manure-cakes, or Pou-

drette

Marble Slabs

Marten Skins. See Skins,

21

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

0 3 5 0 0350

100 catties 0 0 3 0

"

0090 0200

0 350 4 20

Marten.

Massicot.

See

Lead,

1 5 0 0

Yellow.

1 8 0 0

Masts. See Timber.

19

LEATHER, STRIPS

Ass

OF 5 per cent. ad valorem

Hundred 0 200

Roll of

Matting

40 yds.

0 200

Trunks.

Maws.

Free.

Leather Trunks. See

Lemonade. See Wines.

Skins. See

Leopard

Skins, Leopard.

Lichees...

LIGHTS, SHIPS' SIDE,

NOT IMPORTED FOR SPECIFIED VESSELS

}

Lily Flowers, Dried Lily Seeds, or Lotus Nuts. Linen and Cotton Mix-

tures. See Linen. Linen, Coarse, as Linen and Cotton or Silk and Linen Mixtures, not exceeding 50 yds. long. Linen, Fine, as Irish or Scotch, not exceeding 50 yds. long. Liqueurs. See Wines. Liquorice..

Lockets. See Jewellery,|

Foreign.

Long Ells. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Looking-glasses. See Te-

lescopes.

Lotus-nuts. See Lily

Lung-ngans

100 catties 0 2 0 0

5 per cent.

[ad valorem

100 catties 0 2 7 0 0 5 0 0

12

Piece

"

0 200

0500

100 catties 0 1 3 5

Seeds.

Lucraban Seed

0 0 3 5

5

"J

0 250

Lung-ngans without the

Stone

0 3 5 0

"

Lustres,

See Woollen

1 0 0 0

{

5 per cent. [ad valorem

and Cotton Mixtures.

Mace.........

MACHINERY

INCLUDING MACHINERY FOR GOVERNMENT Docks, ARSENALS, ETC. DUTY IS LEVIABLE ON THE COST OF THE MACHINERY AS

LAID DOWN AT ITS PORT

Mats, of all kinds

Maws, Fish. See Fish

Meal, Indian and Oat

Meats,

eign

Preserved, For-

Including Fish, Flesh, Fowl, Tinned Game of all kinds, Shell-fish, Patties, Sansages, Caviare, Beef and Pork in casks for Ships. [Ex cluding Hams and Salt Fish.]

MEDICATED WINES......

Medicines, Foreign

Including Surgical Instru-) ments, Photographic Chemi cals and Apparatus; also Medicines of Foreign origin made up for Chinese use* [Excluding Castor Oil, if arriving in quantities of more than 100 catties weight at a time.]

Medium Cloth. See Wool-

len Manufactures. Melon Seeds Metals:-

Copper, Manufactured,

as in Sheets, Rods, Nails

Copper,

Unmanufac

tured, as in Slabs. ... Copper, Yellow Metal, Sheathing, and Nails

Copper, Japan..

Iron, Manufactured, as in Sheets, Rods, Bars, Hoops

Iron, Unmanufactured,

as in Pigs..

Iron, Kentledge.

Iron Wire

INCLUDING

TRUSSES

ΤΟ

BIND SILK BALES, MANU-

FACTURED WHOLLY FROM

IRON WIRE.

"

ad valorem 5 per cent.

Free.

100 catties 0 1 0 0

1 5 0 0

1 0 0 0

"2

""

0900 0600

93

دو

If in reasonable quantities, when declared to be for the personal use of the applicant, and not for sale.

0 1 2 5

0 0 7 5 0 0 10

0 2 5 0

22

323

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY,

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Musk Muskets.

Per Catty

\T. m. c. c.

0900

Cannot

be imported

Metals-cont.

IRON PANS OF FOR- EIGN ORIGIN OR OF CHINESE ORIGIN

AND MANUFACTUR- ED BY CHINESE

...

Iron Pans manufactur- ed by Foreigners at Chinese Treaty Ports cannot be imported or exported. IRON NAILS

IRON HOOPS, Old

WHEN SHIPPED COASTWISE

TO BE EXEMPT AT THE PORT OF SHIPMENT AND TO BE CHARGED 5 PER CENT. ad valorem COAST TRADE DUTY AT THE

PORT OF DISCHARGE.

Lead, in Pigs

Lead, in Sheets

Quicksilver

Spelter

Cannot be imported or exported except| under Special Autho- rity.

Steel

Tin

YUNNAN

TIN MAY BE PASSED COASTWISE AT HALF THE TARIFF RATE ON BEING PROVED TO BE PROPERTY OF PRIVILEGED MINING ASSOCIATION.

Tinplates...

TRUSSES, METAL, TO BIND SILK BALES, NOT OF IRON WIRE

TRUSSES,

METAL,

5 per cent. [ad_valorem

100 catties 0 2 5 0

"

"

"

19

5 per cent.

ad valorem.*

OF

IRON WIRE See Iron

WIRE.

Milk, Condensed and Desic-

cated. See Butter.

Millet. See Rice.

Millinery. See Clothing,

Foreign.

Mineral Water. See Wines. Minium. See Lead, Red. Mirrors. See Telescopes. Mother-o'-pearl Shell Mother-o'-pearl Ware Munitions of War.

Cannot be imported or exported except under Special Autho- rity.

Mushrooms

Music. See Articles de

Ménage.

Musical Boxes...

Musical Instruments.

Articles de Ménage.

* Ad interim.

0 5 5 0 2000

0 250 1 2 5 0

0400

100 catties 0 2 0 0

Catty

0100

100 catties

1 5 0 0

{

5 per cent.

ad valorem

See

or exported except under Special Autho- rity.

Muslins. See Cottons.

Mussels, Dried

Mustard. See Confec-

tionery.

Musters. See Samples. Myrrh. See Gum.

Nails, Copper. See Metals. NAILS, IRON. See Metals. Nankeen and Native Cot-

ton Cloths

INCLUDING COTTONS DYED

IN CHINA.

Narrow Cloth. See Wool-

lens.

Necklets. See Jewellery,

Foreign.

Newspapers, Chinese Nutgalls

Nutmegs

Oil, as Bean, Tea, Wood, Cotton, and Hemp Seed Up to 10 piculs, if reported to

be for Steamer's use: Free. Oil Floor-cloth. See Car-

peting, Foreign.

Oil, Salad. See Confec-

tionery.

Oiled Paper

Olibanum. See Gum Oli-

banum.

Olive Seeds

Olives. Unpickled, Salted,

or Pickled.

Opera Glasses. See Teles-

copes.

OгIUM, FOREIGNT

Under Special Regula-

tions.

OPIUM, BOILED OR PRE-

PARED

Under Special Regula-

tions.

Orange Peel. See Peel,

Orange.

ORANGES. See Vegetables.

Orleans. See Woollen

Manufactures.

Orpiment. See Hartall. Otter Skins. See Skins,

Otter.

100 catties 0 2 0 0

Free.

1 5 0 0

100 catties 0 5 0 0 2500

"

0300

J

0 45 0

""

0300

018 0

Tls. 110.00

**

137.50§

Oyster Shell, Sea Shells.

""

0 0 9 0

Packing Twine. See Sta-

tionery.

Paddy. See Rice.

Paintings. See Pictures.

Paint, Green

0450

       +According to the United States Commercial Treaty of November, 1880, citizens of the United States are not allowed to deal in Opium, nor are vessels owned by them, whether employed by themselves or others, nor vessels owned by others but employed by them, allowed to carry Opium.

Tls. 30.0.0.0 Tariff Duty, Tls. 80.0.0.0 Likin.

Tls. 37.5.0.0 Tariff Duty, Tls. 100.0.0.0. Likin.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

223

23

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

Palampore, or Cotton Bed

Quilts

Per

Hundred

\T'. m. c. c.

27 5 0

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Palm-leaf Fans. See Fans,

Palmleaf.

PANS, IRON. See Metals. Paper. See Stationery. Paper, 1st Quality

INCLUDING WEISING LOT- TERY BOOKS AND ALL CHINESE BOOKS, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF Books EITHER OFFICIALLY PRO- VIDED OR PURCHASED FOR CHINESE PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS. Books CIRCULATED BY MISSION- ARIES OR DEALT IN ORDINARY

BOOKSELLERS

BY

CHINESE

ARE ΤΟ

      PAY DUTY. Chinese News- papers: Free.

Paper, 2nd Quality

PAPER, BLACK TINSEL. {

Paper, Oiled. See Oiled

Paper.

Paper Umbrellas.

Kittysols.

See

Pastry. See Confectionery.

Patties. See Meats.

Peacocks' Feathers. See

Feathers.

PEARL BARLEY

Pearls, False

100 catties 0 7 0 0

15 per cent.

ad valorem

0400

39

100 catties 2000

Peas.

See Beans.

Peel, Orange

"

0300

Peel, Pumelo, 1st Quality

Peel, Pumelo, 2nd Quality

"

0450

0150

Pencil Cases.

See Jewel-

"

lery, Foreign.

Pencils, Foreign. See Sta-

tionery.

tionery.

Pens, Foreign. See Sta-

Pepper, Black.....

Pepper, White

Pepper, Foreign. See Con-

fectionery.

Peppermint Leaf

PIPES, WHITE METAL

INFERIOR).

See Cop-

perware and Pewter-

ware.

Pistols.

Cannot be imported) or exported except under Special Autho- rity.

Pith Pictures. See Pic-

tures.

Planks. See Timber.

Plaster of Paris.

Gypsum.

Plated Ware, Foreign

Poles. See Timber.

Pongees, Silk.

Piece Goods.

See

Free.

See Silk

Seel

Porcelain, Foreign.

Glassware.

Pork. See Meats, Pre-

served, Foreign. Portfolios. See Stationery. Pottery, Earthenware

INCLUDING COARSE CHINA- WARE OF THE VALUE OF Tl. 1 TO Tls. 1.50 PER PICUL EXPORTED FROM PAKHOI ; BUT

NOT IN-

CLUDING SWATOW NATIVE CHINA-WARE.

Pouches, Leather. See

Leather Articles.

Poudrette. See Manure-

cakes.

Prawns, Dried

Presents. See Curiosities. Preserves, Comfits, and

Sweetmeats

Printed Cottons. See Cot-

ton Piece Goods. Printing Presses. See Sta-

tionery.

0360 0500

Pumelo Peel. See Peel,

Pumelo.

100 catties 0 0 5 0

"

0 3 6 0

"

0500

••

Peppermint Oil

0 0 3500

Purses, Leather.

Perfumery...

Free.

Excluding Musk.

Personal Baggage.

See

PUMELOES. See Vegetables

Leather Articles.

Putchuck

Quicksilver. See Metals.

Piece Goods.

See

0 6 0 0

Quiltings.

See Cotton

Quilts, Cotton.

See Pa-

"

Household Stores

Pewterware. See Copper-

ware.

Photographic

Apparatus.

See Medicines.

Photographic

See Medicines.

Chemicals.

Pickled Olives. See Olives. Pickles. See Fegetables.

lampore.

Rabbit Skins. See Skins,

Rabbit.

Racoon Skins. See Skins,

Racoon.

Rags, Cotton. See Cot-

ton Rags.

Raspberry Vinegar.

Pictures and Paintings... Pictures on Pith or Rice]

Paper

Each

0100

Raisins. See Vegetables.

See

Hundred 0100

Pig Iron. See Metals.

Piles. See Timber. PINEAPPLES. See Vege

tables.

Pipes. See Cigars.

Wines.

Rattans

Rattans, Split..........................

Rattanware.

Red Tape. See Stationery. Red-wood. See Wood, Red.

""

0150

"

0250

0300

24

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

\T. m. c .c.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Rhinoceros Hides. See

Hides, Rhinoceros. Rhinoceros Horns. See

Horns, Rhinoceros. Rhubarb

Ribbons, Silk. See Silk.

RIBBONS, SILK, INTER-

    WOVEN WITH IMITA- TION GOLD OR SIL-' VER THREAD ...:

Rice or Paddy, Wheat,

100 catties 1 2 5 0

100 catties 18 0 0 0

or

5 per cent.

ad valorem optional.

Millet, & other Grains.100 catties 0 1 0 0

Duty free on importa- tion from abroad. Can only be exported un- der Bond to Chinese Ports. Native Grain is to pay Export Duty at port of shipment and Coast Trade Duty at port of discharge, and leaving Yangtsze, Ports by river stea- mers, Coast Trade Duty is to be deposited in advance. Foreign Grain not landed may be re-exported to Fo- reign Countries. Fo- reign Grain re-export- ed to Chinese Ports must pay Export Duty. Rice Paper Pictures. See

Pictures.

Rifles

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority.

Rings, Foreign. See Jewel-

lery, Foreign.

SATINET, OR FRENCH

SATEEN, WITH A COT- TON WARP AND A SILK WEFT. Sauces. See Confectionery. Sausages. See Meats. Scarves. See Silk Piece

Goods.

Scent Bottles. See Jewel-

lery, Foreign.

Scientific Instruments. See

Articles de Ménage.

Sea Otter Skins. See

Skins, Sea Otter.

Sea Shells. See Oyster

Shell.

Seahorse Teeth........

Per

5 per cent. ad valorem

|T. m. c. c.

100 catties 200

Sealing Wax.

See Sta-

tionery.

Seasonings.

See Confec

tionery.

Seaweed

SEAWEED, RUSSIAN, SU-

PERIOR...

SEAWEED, RUSSIAN, IN-

FERIOR......

Seltzer Water. See Wines. Sesamum Seed........ Sharks' Fins, Black...

"

""

0 150

0 1 5 0

0100

0135

0500

ad valorem

""

""

SHARKS' FINS, CLARI-5 per cent.

FIED

Sharks' Fins, White....... 100 catties 1500

Sharks' Skins...

Shawls, Silk. See Silk

Hundred

2000

Meats.

Ships' Stores. See House-

See Cotton

Piece Goods.

Rose Maloes

1 0 0 0

Shell-fish,

Tinned. Seel

Rugs, of Hair or Skin

Each

0 0 90

Saddlery. See Articles de

hold Stores......

Ménage.

Free.

Safes. See Articles de

Ménage.

Sago

Free.

Including Arrow-root, Corn-

flour, Maizena.

Salt.

Trade in, prohibited.

Salt Fish. See Fish, Salt.

Salted Olives. See Olives. See Confec-

Salt, Table.

tionery.

Saltpetre.......

Cannot be imported or- exported except un. der Special Authority Samples and Musters of Goods for sale, in reason- able quantities

EXCESS OF REASONABLE QUANTITY To pay TariFF DUTY.

Samshu

INCLUDING JAPANESE WINE. See Wines, Fo- reign.

100 catties 0 5 0 0

Free.

Shirtings.

Piece Goods.

SHIRTINGS DYED IN CHINA.

See Nankeen and Native Cotton Cloths.

Shirtings, Spotted. See

Cotton Piece Goods. Shoes and Boots, Leather

or Satin

Shoes, Foreign. See Cloth-

ing, Foreign. Shoes, Straw Shot.

Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. SIDE LIGHTS, SHIPS', NOT IMPORTED FOR

SPECIFIED VESSELS..........

100 catties 0 1 5 0

Silk:-

Sandalwood...

Sandalwoodware......

Sapanwood

Catty 100 catties

0400 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0

Satin.See Silk Piece Goods

100 pairs

3 0 0 0

0 180

وو

5 per cent.

ad valorem

Raw and Thrown........100 catties 10 0 0 0

Yellow, froin Szechuen Reeled from Dupions... Wild Raw....................................... Refuse.................................................. Cocoons ...............................

93

7000

"

"

5 0 0 0 250

"

1000

"

3 0 0

Silk:-continued.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per T. m. c. c.

5 per cent.

ad valorem

1

COCOONS, REFUSE....

       COCOON SKINS (SH E Floss, Canton..... Floss, from other pro-

vinces..

Ribbons and Thread.... RIBBONS, INTERWOVEN WITH IMITATION GOLD OR SILVER THREAD. See RIB- BONS, SILK, etc. Fiece Goods, viz., Pon- gees, Shawls, Scarves, Crape, Satin, Gauze,

Velvet, and Embroi-

dered Goods......

Piece Goods--Szechuen,}

Shantung...

Tassels

Caps..

100 catties 4 3 0 0

10 0 0

10 0 0 0

"

وو

12 0 0

4500

10 0 0 0

"

Hundred

090

5 5 0

Silk and Cotton Mixtures 100 catties

NOT INCLUDING FRENCH

SATEEN OR SATINET.

Silk and Linen Mixtures.

Presses. Printing Presses, Type, Despatch Boxes, Red Tape, Portfolios, Packing Twine. [Excluding Chinese Paper, Indian Ink, and CHINESE BOOKS.] Steel, See Metals. Sticklac...

Stock-fish

Including Dried Fish. Stoves. See Articles de

Ménage.

Straw Braid...

Straw Shoes. See Shoes,]

Straw.

Studs. See Jewellery, Fo-

reign.

Sugar, Brown (Nos. 1 To| 10 INCLUSIVE, DUTCH STANDARD)

Sugar Candy

Sugar, White (Nos. 11 AND UPWARDS, DUTCH STANDARD)..........................

Sulphur and Brimstone. Cannot be imported or exported except un- der Special Authority. Surgical Instruments.

Medicines. Sweetmeats.

serves.

Tallow, Animal..

See

See Pre-

Tallow, Vegetable....

25

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

\T. m. c. c.

Per

Free.

|100 catties 0 3 0 0

99

0 5 0 0

0 7 0 0

0 1 2 0

"

"

0 250

0200

"

0 200

""

Hundred

Each

Hundred

Tassels.

"

99

0 200 0 3 0 0

See Silk

T-Cloths. See Cotton Piece

Goods.

Tea, Black and Green.......

TEA, BRICK.

See Linen.

Silver Thread, Imitation.

Catty

0030

Silver Thread, Real.........

1 3 0

"

Silverware and Goldware. 100 catties 10 0 0

Sinews, Buffalo and Deer.

""

0 5 5 0

Skin Rugs. See Rugs.

Skins, Beaver...

Hundred

5 0 U O

Tassels, Silk.

Skins, Doe. Hare, and

Rabbit...

0 5 0 0

Skins, Fox, Large.

Each

0 1 5 0

Skins, Fox, Small

"

Skins, Land Otter...

0 0 7 5 2000

Skins, Marten.....

Skins, Racoon

Skins, Sea Otter..

Each

Skins, Squirrel.....

Hundred

Skins, Tiger and Leopard

Each

0 500 0150

Sleeve Links.

See Jewel-

lery, Foreign.

Smalt.

Snuff, Native

Snuff, Foreign..

Soap, Foreign..

SOAP, CHINESE

Free.

5 per cent.

ad valorem

100 catties 0 4 0 0

Soda-water. See Wines. Soy...

Spanish Stripes. See Wool-

len Manufactures.

Spars. See Timber.

Spelter. See Metals.

Spices. See Confectionery. Spirits. See Wine.

Spy Glasses. See Teles-

copes.

Squirrel Skins. See Skins,

Squirrel.

Stationery, Foreign..

Including Pens, Pencils, Ink, Paper, Blotting Paper, Gum,

Sealing Wax, Copying

1 5 2000 1 5 0 0

100 catties 1 5 0 0 0800 7200

""

""

Free.

NO TRANSIT DUES ARE TO BE LEVIED ON BRICK TEA MADE FROM Hua- hsiang-ch'a-mo, BOUGHT IN HANKOW, AT TIME OF EXPORT FROM HANKOW. TEA DUST, NOT EXCEED- ING Hk. Tls. 10 PER PICUL IN VALUE AND SHIPPED FOR A CHINESE PORT; TEA DUST SHIP- PED FOR A FOREIGN PORT, OR FOR A CHINESE PORT IF EXCEEDING Hk. Tls 10 PER PICUL IN VA- LUE, TO PAY AS TEA. TEA, LOG; VARIETIES:

CHIEN LIANG.............. PAI-LIANG KUNG-CHIEN PAI-LIANG T'IEN-CHIEN PAI-LIANG CHING-CHIEN TEA-CHESTS, ok MATE-

RIALS FOR MAKING TEA-CHESTS............... Tea-chests, or Materials for making Tea-chests, ex- ported to another Treaty. Port for use in packing

Free.

Tea

"

2500

"}

0 6 0 0

"

1 2 5 0

0500

"

0800

1000

1 2 5 0

"

"

5 per cent. ad valorem

Free.

26

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT and Duty.

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

T. m. c.

Per

T. m. c. c.

BOARDS. Seel

Timber-cont.

Piles, Poles, and Joists. To COMPREHEND SOFT- WOOD POLES OF ANY LENGTH.

Tin. See Metals.

Each

0 0 3 0

TEA-BOX

WOOD BOARDS, TEA-

Box.

Tea Oil. See Oil.

Teak-wood. See Timber.

Telegraph Material for Chi-

nese Government

graphs.....

EXCLUDING

MATERIAL

Tele-

TELEGRAPH

FOR OTHER

THAN CHINESE GOVERN- MENT TELEGRAPHS.

Telescopes, Spy and

Opera Glasses, Look-

1 2 5 0

Tinder.

100 catties 0 3 5 0

Tin-foil

22

Free.

Tinned Meats.

See Meats.

Tinplates. See Metals.

5 per cent.

ing-glasses and Mir-Sad valorem

rors..

Thread, Cotton.

ton Thread.

See Cot-

Thread, Gold. See Gold

Thread.

Thread, Silk. See Silk

Thread.

Tiger Skins.

See Skins,

Tiger.

Tigers' Bones...........

Timber :-

Masts and Spars, Hard-

wood, not exceeding

40 ft...........

Masts and Spars, Hard-]

wood, not exceeding

60 ft........

Masts and Spars, Hard- wood, exceeding 60 ft. Masts and Spars, Soft- wood, not exceeding 40 ft.

Masts and Spars, Soft- wood, not exceeding 60 ft....

Masts and Spars, Soft- wood, exceeding 60 ft. Beams, Hard-wood, not exceeding 26 ft. long and under 12 ins.

square

BEAMS OTHER THAN

SQUARE.....

BEAMS, SOFT-WOOD, i.e., PLANKS OVER 6 INS. IN THICKNESS Planks, Hard-wood, not|

exceeding 24 ft. long. 12ins. wide, and 3 ins.] thick........

Planks, Hard-wood, not exceeding 16 ft. long, 12 ins. wide, and 3 ins. thick..........

100 catties 1 5 5 0

Each

4000

6000

""

10 0 0 0

>>

2000

"

4 5 0 0

"

6 5 0 0

"

0 1 5 0

""

5 per cent. [ad valorem]

or Tariff

Duty, optional.

5 per cent. ad valorem|

Hundred 3500

39

PLANKS, SOFT-WOOD.5 per cent.

Planks, Teak..

.....

2000

ad valorem Cubic foot' 0 0 3 5

TINSEL PAPER, BLACK..{5 per cent.

Tobacco, Foreign......

EXCLUDING JAPANESE To- BACCO. See Tobacco, Prepared. Tobacco, Leaf.. Tobacco, Prepared..

Excluding Foreign_Tobacco, BUT INCLUDING JAPANESE TOBACCO, except when im- ported by Japanese officials| or merchants, for private use, up to 40 catties at a time. Tortoise-shell

Tortoise-shell, Broken Tortoiseshellware Trunks, Leather

TRUSSES, METAL. See

Metals, Iron

Metals, TRUSSES.

Turmeric...

Turnips, Salted

Wire;

Twine, Hemp, Canton Twine, Hemp, Soochow... Type. See Stationery. Umbrellas

Umbrellas, Paper. See

Kittysols.

UNION CLOTH. See Wool-

len Manufactures :] Spanish Stripes, In- ferior.

Free.

100 catties] 0 1 5 0 0450

Catty

5 0

0072

0200

100 catties 1 5 0

"

100 0180

"

0150

050

Each

0 0 3 5

"

Varnish, or Crude Lacquer 100 catties 0 5 0 0 Vegetables, Preserved, Fo-

reign

Including Foreign Fruits, Fresh and Preserved, Pick- les, Chutneys, Raisins, Chi- nese Fresh Vegetables and Fresh Fruits.[Excluding Olives, Dates, Almonds, Chestnuts, Ground-nuts, Lichees, Lung-ngans. Gar- lic, Melon seeds, Mush- rooms, Fungus, Salted Tur- nips, ORANGES, CUMQUATS, CITRONS, PUMELONS, COCOA-NUTS, AND PINT- APPLES.]

Velvets. See Silk.

Velveteens. See Cottons. Velvets, not exceeding 84

yds. long Vermicelli Vermillion.

Vessels broken up in port,

Materials from*

Must be certified by Consul to be condemned and sold in port.

* See also Guar, Ships'.

Free.

Piece

0180

100 catties 0 1 8

"

Free.

250

CUSTOMS TARIFF

NAME OF ARTICLE.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY

NAME OF ARTICLE.

Per

\T. m. c. c.

Sad valorem

VESSELS WRECKED, MA- 5 per cent.

TERIALS FROM

If wrecked in port: Free of Import Duty, but liable to Export and Coast Trade| Duty.

Vessels wrecked within the harbour limits, export cargo relanded

       Vinegar. See Confectionery.| Vitrified Ware. See Glass-

ware.

Watch Chains, Foreign. See

Jewellery, Foreign.

WATCHES

Free.

Watches...

Watches, émaillées à

perles

Wax, Bees'. See Bees-

wax.

       Wax, Japan..... Wax, White, or Insect WEISING LOTTERY BOOKS.

See Paper, 1st Quality. Wheat. See Rice.

White Wax. See Wax,

White.

Window Glass. See Glass,

Window.

Wines, Foreign.

Including Beer, Spirits, Fo- reign Bitters, Liqueurs, Cor- dials, Raspberry Vinegar, Soda, Seltzer, and Mineral Waters, Lemonade, etc. [Excluding Samshu and

Chinese Wine; ALSO JA- PANESE WINE, except when| imported by Japanese offi- cials or merchants, for pri- vate use, up to 200 catties at a time.]

WINES, MEDICATED.....

Wood, Camagon.....

Wood, Ebony..

Wood, Fragrant..

Wood, Garoo..

{

Wood, Kranjee, 35 ft. long,

1 ft. 8 ins. wide, and

1 ft. thick....

27

Wood, Laka....... Wood, Red...

WOOD BOARDS, TEA-

BOX, IF EXPORTED TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY. Wood, Oil. See Oil.

Wood, Piles, Poles, and Joists. See Timber,

Piles, etc.

TARIFF UNIT AND DUTY.

Per

m.c.c.

100 catties 0 1 4 5

ور

5 per cent.

ad valorem

0 1 1 5

Woodware.

100 catties 1 1 5 0

Wool.

0 350

WOOL, CAMELS'.

5 per cent.

ad valorem

5 per cent.

Woollen and Cotton Mix-

ad valorem

tures, viz., Lustres,

or Tariff

Duty,

optional.

Pair

1 0 0 0

Piece

0 2 0 0

Pair

0 200

"

4 5 0 0

|100 catties 0 6 5 0 1 5 0 0

""

Free.

5 per cent.

ad valorem

100 catties 0 0 3 0 0 1 5 0 0450 2000

"

""

"

Each

0 8 0 0

Plain and Brocaded, not exceeding 31 yds. long......

Woollen Manufactures*

Blankets..

Broadcloth and Spanish Stripes, Habit and Medium Cloth, 51 to 64 ins. wide Long Ells, 31 ins. wide Camlets, English, 31

ins. wide.... Camlets, Dutch, 33 ins.

wide.

Camlets, Imitation, and

Bombazettes.

Cassimeres, Flannel, & Narrow Cloth...................... Lastings, 31 ins. wide.. Lastings, Imitation, & Orleans, 34 ins. wide. Bunting, not exceeding 24 ins. wide and 40) yds. long...

Spanish Stripes, Infe-

rior..

INCLUDING UNION CLOTH, Woollen, Yarn.................... WRECKS, MATERIALS FROM. See VESSELS

WRECKED, ETC.

Yarn, Cotton. See Cottons Yarn, Woollen. See Wool-

len Yarn.

Yellow Metal. See Me-

tals, Copper, etc.

99

Chang

0 1 2 0 0 0 4 5

""

0050

0 1 0 0

0 0 3 5

>>

0 0 4 0 0050

"

0 0 3 5

Piece

0 200

Chang

0 1 0 0

100 catties 3000

* PROPORTIONATE DUTY IS TO BB charged ON EXTRA WIDTH IN WOOLLENS.

RULES

      RULE I.-Unenumerated Goods.-Articles not enumerated in the list of exports, but enumerated in the list of imports, when exported, will pay the amount of duty set against them in the list of imports; and, similarly, articles not enumerated in the list of imports, but enumerated in the list of exports, when imported, will pay the amount of duty set against them in the list of exports.

Articles not enumerated in either list, nor in the list of duty-free goods, will pay an ad valorem duty of 5 per cent., calculated on their market value.

      RULE II.-Duty free Goods.-Gold and silver bullion, foreign coins, flour, Indian meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated-ware, perfumery, soap of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco (foreign), cigars (foreign), wine, beer, spirits, household stores, ship's stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, druggeting, cutlery, foreign medicines, glass, and crystal ware.

      The above pay no import or export duty, but if transported into the interior will, with the exception of personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins, pay a transit duty at the rate of 2 per cent. ad valorem.

A freight or part freight of duty-free commodities (personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins excepted) will render the vessel carrying them, though no other cargo be on board, liable to tonnage dues.

      RULE III. Contraband Goods.-Import and export trade is alike prohibited in the following articles: Gunpowder, shot, cannon, fowling-pieces, rifles, muskets, pistols, and all other munitions and implements of war; and salt.

RULE IV.-Weights and Measures.-In the calculation of the Tariff, the weight of a picul of one hundred catties is held to be equal to one hundred and thirty-three and one-third pounds avoirdupois; and the length of a chang of ten Chinese feet, to be equal to one hundred and forty-one English inches.

One Chinese chih is held to be equal to fourteen and one-tenth inches English; and four yards English, less three inches, to equal one chang.

RULE V.-Regarding certain Commodities heretofore Contraband. The restrictions affecting trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, sulphur, brimstone, saltpetre, and spelter are relaxed, under the following conditions:-

     1.-*Opium will henceforth pay thirty taels per picul import duty. The importer will sell it only at the port. It will be carried into the interior by Chinese only, and only as Chinese property; the foreign trader will not be allowed to accompany it. The provisions of Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin, by which British subjects are authorized to proceed into the interior with passports to trade, will not extend to it, nor will those of Article XXVIII. of the same treaty, by which the transit-dues are regulated. The transit-dues on it will be arranged as the Chinese Government see fit; nor in future revisions of the Tariff is the same rule of revision to be applied to opium as to other goods.

2.-Copper Cash.-The export of cash to any foreign port is prohibited; but it shall be lawful for British subjects to ship it at one of the open ports of China to another, on compliance with the following regulation :-The shipper shall give notice of the amount of cash he desires to ship, and the port of its destination, and shall bind himself, either by a bond with two sufficient sureties, or by depositing such other

* For duty onOpium see Convention signed in 1885.

CHINESE CUSTOMS TARIFF-RULES

29

      security as may be deemed by the Customs satisfactory, to return, within six months from the date of clearance, to the collector at the port of shipment, the certificate, issued by him, with an acknowledgment thereon of the receipt of the cash at the port of destination by the collector at that port, who shall thereto affix his seal; or, failing the production of the certificate, to forfeit a sum equal in value to the cash shipped. Cash will pay no duty inwards or outwards; but a freight or part freight of cash, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel carrying it liable to pay tonnage dues.

        3. The export of rice and all other grain whatsoever, native or foreign, no matter where grown or whence imported, to any foreign port, is prohibited; but these commodities may be carried by British merchants from one of the open ports of China to another, under the same conditions in respect of security as cash, on payment at the port of shipment of the duty specified in the Tariff.

No import duty will be leviable on rice or grain; but a freight or part freight of rice or grain, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel importing it liable to tonnage dues.

        4.- * The export of pulse and beancake from Tung-chau and Newchwang, under the British flag, is prohibited. From any other of the ports they may be shipped, on payment of the tariff duty, to other ports of China, or to foreign countries.

        5.-Saltpetre, sulphur, brimstone, and spelter, being munitions of war, shall not be imported by British subjects, save at the requisition of the Chinese Government, or for sale to Chinese duly authorized to purchase them. No permit to land them will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority has been given to the purchaser. It shall not be lawful for British subjects to carry these commodities up the Yang-tsze-kiang, or into any port other than those open on the seaboard, nor to accompany them into the interior on behalf of Chinese. They must be sold at the ports only, and, except at the ports, they will be regarded as Chinese property.

        Infractions of the conditions, as above set forth, under which trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, saltpetre, brimstone, sulphur, and spelter may be henceforward carried on, will be punishable by confiscation of all goods concerned.

        RULE VI.-Liability of Vessels entering Ports. To the prevention of misunder- standing, it is agreed that the term of twenty-four hours, within which British vessels must be reported to the Consul under Article XXXVII of the Treaty of Tientsin shall be understood to commence from the time a British vessel comes within the limits of the port; as also the term of forty-eight hours allowed her by Article XXX of the same Treaty to remain in port without payment of tonnage dues.

The limits of the ports shall be defined by the Customs, with all consideration for the convenience of trade compatible with due protection of the revenue; also the limits of the anchorages within which lading and discharging is permitted by the Customs; and the same shall be notified to the Consul for public information.

        RULE VII.-Transit Dues.-It is agreed that Article XXVIII of the Treaty of Tientsin shall be interpreted to declare the amounts of transit-dues legally leviable upon merchandise imported or exported by British subjects, to be one-half of the tariff duties, except in the case of the duty-free goods liable to a transit duty of 21 per cent. ad valorem, as provided in Article II of these Rules. Merchandise shall be cleared of its transit dues under the following conditions:-

In the case of Imports.-Notice being given at the port of entry, from which the Imports are to be forwarded inland, of the nature and quantity of the goods, the ship from which they have been landed, and the place inland to which they are bound,

* NOTIFICATION

BRITISH CONSulate, ShangHAI, 24th March, 1862.

Article IV. of Rule No. 5 appended to the Tariff of 1858 is rescinded.

Pulse and bean-cake may be henceforth exported from Tungchow and Newchwang, and from all other ports in China open by Treaty, on the same terms and conditions as are applied to other Native produce by the Regulations bearing date the 5th December last; that is to say, they may be shipped on payment of Tariff duty at the port of shipment, and dis. charged at any Chinese port on payment of half-duty, with power to claim drawback of the half-duty if re-exported.

By order, WALTER H. MEDHURST, Consul,

30

CHINESE CUSTOMS TARIFF-RULES

with all other necessary particulars, the Collector of Customs will, on due inspection made, and on receipt of the transit-duty due issue a transit-duty certificate. This must be produced at every barrier station, and viséd. No further duty will be leviable upon imports so certificated, no matter how distant the place of their destination.

In the case of Exports.-Produce purchased by a British subject in the interior will be inspected, and taken account of, at the first barrier it passes on its way to the port of shipment. A memorandum showing the amount of the produce and the port at which it is to be shipped will be deposited there by the person in charge of the produce; he will then receive a certificate, which must be exhibited and viséd at every barrier on his way to the port of shipment. On the arrival of the produce at the barrier nearest the port, notice must be given to the Customs at the port, and the transit-dues due thereon being paid, it will be passed. On exportation the producer

will pay the tariff-duty.*

Any attempt to pass goods inwards or outwards otherwise than in compliance with rule here laid down will render them liable to confiscation.

Unauthorised sale, in transitu, of goods that have been entered as above for a part will render them liable to confiscation. Any attempt to pass goods in excess of the quantity specified in the certificate will render all the goods of the same denomination, named in the certificate, liable to confiscation. Permission to export produce, which cannot be proved to have paid its transit-dues, will be refused by the Customs until the transit-dues shall have been paid. The above being the arrange- ment agreed to regarding the transit-dues, which will thus be levied once and for all, the notification required under Article XXVIII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, for the information of British and Chinese subjects, is hereby dispensed with.

     RULE VIII.-Peking not open to Trade.-It is agreed that Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin shall not be interpreted as authorising British subjects to enter the capital city of Peking for purposes of trade.

      RULE IX. Abolition of the Meltage Fee.-It is agreed that the percentage of one tael two mace, hitherto charged in excess of duty payment to defray the expenses of me ting by the Chinese Government, shall be no longer levied on British subjects.

RULE X.-Collection of Duties under one System at all Ports.-It being by Treaty at the option of the Chinese Government, to adopt what means appear to it best suited to protect its revenue accruing on British trade, it is agreed that one uniform system shall be enforced at every port.

     The high officer appointed by the Chinese Government to superintend foreign trade will, accordingly, from time to time, either himself visit, or will send a deputy to visit the different ports. The said high officer will be at liberty, of his own choice, and independently of the suggestion or nomination of any British anthority, to select any British supject he may see fit to aid him in the administration of the Customs revenue, in the prevention of smuggling, in the definition of port boundaries, or in discharging the duties of harbour master; also in the distribution of 'lights, buoys. beacons, and the like, the maintenance of which shall be provided for out of the tonnage-dues,

     The Chinese Government will adopt what measures it shall find requisite to prevent smuggling upou the Yang-tsze-kiang, when that river shall be opened to trade.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiang-su, this eighth day of November, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

(L.S.)

(L.S.)

ELGIN AND KINCARDINE.

SIGNATURES OF FIVE CHINESE PLENPOTENTIARIES.

* See Chefoo Convention, Section III., Article IV.

RULES FOR JOINT INVESTIGATION IN CASES OF CONFISCATION

AND FINE BY THE CUSTOM HOUSE AUTHORITIES *

Agreed to and Promulgated by the British Minister at Peking, 31st May, 1868

          RULE I.-It shall be the Rule for all business connected with the Custom House Department to be in the first instance transacted between the Commissioner of Customs and the Consul, personally or by letter; and procedure in deciding cases shall be taken in accordance with the following Regulations.

RULE II. Whenever a ship or goods belonging to a foreign merchant is seized in a port in China by the Custom House officers, the seizure shall be reported without delay to the Kien-tuh, or Chinese Superintendent of Customs. If he considers the seizure justifiable, he will depute the Shwui-wu-sze, or foreign Commissioner of Customs, to give notice to the party to whom the ship or goods are declared to belong that they have been seized because such or such an irregularity has been committed, and that they will be confiscated, unless, before noon on a certain day being the sixth day from the delivery of the notice, the Custom House authorities receive from the Consul an official application to have the case fully investigated.

The merchant to whom the ship or goods belong, if prepared to maintain that the alleged irregularity has not been committed, is free to appeal, within the limited time, directly to the Commissioner, who is to inform the Superintendent. If satisfied with his explanation, the Superintendent will direct the release of the ship or goods; otherwise, if the merchant elect not to appeal to the Customs, or if after receiving his explanation the Superintendent still declines to release the ship or goods, he may appeal to his Consul, who will inform the Superintendent of the particulars of this appeal, and request him to name a day for them both to investigate and try the case publicly.

RULE III.-The Superintendent, on receipt of the Consul's communication, will name a day for meeting at the Custom House; and the Consul will direct the merchant to appear with his witnesses there on the day named and will himself on that day proceed to the Custom House. The Superintendent will invite the Consul to take his seat with him on the bench; the Commissioner of Customs will also be seated to assist the Superintendent.

Proceedings will be opened by the Superintendent, who will call on the Customs employés who seized the ship or goods to state the circumstances which occasioned the seizure, and will question them as to their evidence. Whatever the merchant may have to advance in contradiction of their evidence he will state to the Consul who will cross-examine them for him. Such will be the proceedings in the interest of truth and equity. The Consul and Superintendent may, if they see fit, appoint deputies to meet at the Custom House in their stead, in which case the order of proceeding will be the same as if they were present in person.

RULE IV.-Notes will be taken of the statements of all parties examined, a copy of which will be signed and sealed by the Consul and Superintendent. The room will then be cleared, and the Superintendent will inform the Consul of the course he proposes to pursue. If he proposes to confiscate the vessel or goods, and the Consul dissents, the merchant may appeal, and the Consul having given notice of the appeal to the Superintendent, they will forward certified copies of the above notes to Peking, -the former to his Minister, and the latter to the Foreign Office-for their decision.

If the Consul agrees with the Superintendent that the ship or goods ought to be confiscated, the merchant will not have the right of appeal; and in no case will the release of ship or goods entitle him to claim indemnity for their seizure, whether they be released after the investigation at the Custom House, or after the appeal to the high authorities of both nations at Peking.

RULE V.-The case having been referred to superior authority, the merchant interested shall be at liberty to give a bond, binding himself to pay the full value of

* Substituted for the Rules agreed upon in 1865 between the Chinese Government and Her Britannic

Majesty's Plenipotentiary.

32

RULES FOR JOINT INVESTIGATION

the ship or goods attached should the ultimate decision be against him; which bond being sealed with the Consular seal and deposited at the Custom House, the Super- intendent will restore to the merchant the ship or goods attached; and when the superior authorities shall have decided whether so much money is to be paid, or the whole of the property seized be confiscated, the merchant will be called on to accordingly. If he decline to give the necessary security, the ship or merchandise attached will be detained. But whether the decision of the superior authorities be favourable or not, the appellant will not be allowed to claim indemnity.

pay

      RULE VI. When the act of which a merchant at any port is accused is not one involving the confiscation of ship or cargo, but is one which, by Treaty or Regulation, is punished by fine, the Commissioner will report the case to the Superintendent, and at the same time cause a plaint to be entered in the Consular Court. The Consul will fix the day of the trial, and inform the Cominissioner that he may then appear with the evidence and the witnesses in the case. And the Commissioner, either personally or by deputy, shall take his seat on the bench, and conduct the case on behalf of the prosecution.

When the Treaty or Regulations affix a specific fine for the offence, the Consul shall on conviction give judgment for that amount, the power of mitigating the sentence resting with the Superintendent and Commissioner. If the defendant is

acquitted, and the Commissioner does not demur to the decision, the ship or goods, if any be under seizure, shalı at once be released, and the circumstances of the case be communicated to the Superintendent. The merchant shall not be put to any expense by delay, but he shall have no claim for compensation on account of hindrance in his business, for loss of interest, or for demurrage. If a difference of opinion exist between the Commissioner and Consul, notice to that effect shall be given to the Superintendent, and copies of the whole proceedings forwarded to Peking for the consideration of their respective high authorities. Pending their decision, the owner of the property must file a bond in the Consular Court to the full value of the pro- posed fine, which will be sent to the Custom House authorities by the Consul,

and the goods or ship will be released.

RULE VII. If the Custom House authorities and Consul cannot agree as to whether certain duties are leviable or not, action must be taken as Rule V. directs, and the merchant must sign a bond for the value of the duties in question.

                                                      The Consul will affix his seal to this document, and send it to the Custom House autho- rities, when the Superintendent will release the goods without receiving the duty; and these two functionaries will respectively send statements of the case to Peking, one to his Minister, the other to the Foreign Office.

If it shall be decided there that no duty shall be levied, the Custom House authorities will return the merchant's bond to the Consul to be cancelled; but if it be decided that a certain amount of duty is leviable, the Consul shall require the merchant to pay it in at the Custom House.

RULE VIII.-If the Consul and the Custom House authorities cannot agree as to whether confiscation of a ship, or a cargo, or both of them together, being the property of a foreign merchant, shall take place, the case must be referred to Peking for the decision of the Foreign Office and the Minister of his nation. Pending their decision, the merchant must, in accordance with Rule V., sign a bond for the amount, to which the Consul will affix his seal, and send it for deposit to the Custom House. As difference of opinion as to the value [of ship or goods] may arise, the valuation of the merchant will be decisive; and the Custom House authorities if they see fit, take over either at the price aforesaid,

may,

     If after such purchase it be decided that the property seized ought to be confiscated, the merchant inust redeem his bond by paying in at the Custom House the original amount of the purchase-money. If the decision be against confiscation, the bond will be returned to the Consul for transmission to the merchant, and the case then be closed. The sum paid by the Custom House authorities or

ship or goods being regarded as their proper price, it will not be in the merchant's power by a tender of the purchase-money, to recover them.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION;

WITH ADDITIONAL ARTICLE THERETO FOR REGULATING THE

TRAFFIC IN OPIUM

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, at Chefoo, 13TH SEPTEMBER, 1876

Ratifications exchanged at London, 6th May, 1886

        Agreement negotiated between Sir Thomas Waie, K.C.B., Her Britannic Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of China and Li, Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Grand Secretary, Governor-General of the Province of Chill, of the First Clas of the Third Order of Nobility.

        The negotiation between the Ministers above named has its origin in a despatch received by Sir Thomas Wade, in the Spring of the present year, from the Earl of Derby. principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, dated 1st January, 1876. This contained instructions regarding the disposal of three questions: first, a satis- factory settlement of the Yunnan affair; secondly, a faithful fulfilment of engagements of last year respecting intercourse between the high officers of the two Goveri ments; thirdly, the adoption of a uniform system in satisiaction of the understanding arrived at in the month of September, 1875 (8th moon of the 1st year of the reign Kwang Su), on the subject of rectification of conditions of trade. It is to this despatch that Sir Thomas Wade has referred himself in discussions on these questions with the Tsung-li Yamên, further reference to which is here omitted as superfluous. The conditions now agreed to between Sir Thomas Wade and the Grand Se-retary are as follow:-

:-

SECTION I.-Settlement of the Yünnan Case.

        1.-A Memorial is to be presented to the Throne, whether by the Tsung-li Yamên or by the Grand Secretary Li is immaterial, in the sense of the memorandum prepared by Sir Thomas Wade. Before presentation the Chinese text of the Memorial is to be shown to Sir Thomas Wade.

         2. The Memorial having been presented to the Throne, and the Imperial Decree in reply received, the Tsun-li Yamên will communicate copies of the Memorial and Imperial decree of Sir Thomas Wade, together with copy of a letter from the Tsung-li Yamên to the Provincial Governments, instructing them to issue a proclama- tion that shall embody at length the above Memorial and Decree. Sir Thomas Wade will thereon reply to the effect that for two years to come officers will be sent by the British Minister to different places in the provinces to see that the proclamation is posted. On application from the British Minister or the Consul of any port instructed by him to make application, the bigh officers of the provinces will depute competent officers to accompany those so sent to the places which they go to observe.

        3.-In order to the framing of such regulations as will be needed for the conduct of the frontier trade between Burmah and Yünnan, the Memorial submitting the proposed settlement of the Yünnan affair will contain a request that an Imperial Decree be issued directing the Governor-General and Governor, whenever the British Government shall send officers to Yünnan, to select a competent officer of rank to confer with them and to conclude a satisfactory arrangement.

2

34

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION

     4. Te British Government will be free for five years, from the 1st January next, being the 17th day of the 11th moon of the 2nd year of the reign of Kwang Su, to station officers at Ta-li Fu, or at some other suitable pla e in Yüunan, to observe the conditions of trade; to the end that they may have information upon which to base the regulations of trade when these have to be discussed. For the consideration and adjustment of any matter affecting British officers or subjec:s, these officers will be free to address themselves to the authorities of the province. The opening of the trade may be proposed by the British Government as it may find best at any time within the term of five years, or upon expiry of the term of five years.

     Passports having been obtained last year for a Mission from India into Yünnan, it is open to the Viceroy of India to send such Mission at any time ho may see fit.

5. The amount of indemnity to be paid on account of the families of the officers and others killed in Yünnan, on account of the expenses which the Yünnan case has occasione, and on account of claims of British merchants arising out of the action of officers of the Chinese Government up to the commencement of the present year, Sir Thomas Wade takes upon himself to fix at two hundred thousand taels, payable on demand.

     6.-When the case is closed an Imperial letter will be written expressing regret for what has occurred in Yünnan. The Mission bearing the Imperial letter will proceed to England immediately. Sir Thomas Wade is to be informed of the constitution of this Mission for the information of this Government. The text of the Imperial letter is also to be communicated to Sir Thomas Wade by the Tsung-li Yamên.

SECTION II.-Official Intercourse.

     Under this heading are included the conditions of intercourse between high officers in the capital and the provinces, and between Consular officers and Chinese officials at the ports; also the conduct of judicial proceedings in mixed cases.

1. In the Tsung-li Yamên's Memorial of the 28th September, 1875, the Prince of Kung and the Ministers stated that their object in presenting it had not been simply the transaction of business in which Chinese and Foreigners might be concerned'; missions abroad and the question of diplomatic intercourse lay equally within their prayer.

To the prevention of further misunderstanding upon the subject of intercourse and correspondence, the present conditions of both having caused complaint in the capital and in the provinces, it is agreed that the Tsung-li Yamén shall address a circular to the Legations, inviting Foreign Representatives to consider with them a code of etiquette, to the end that foreign officials in China, whether at the ports or elsewhere, may be treated with the same regard as is shown them when serving abroad in other countries and as would be shown to Chinese agents so serving abroad. The fact that China is about to establish Missions and Consulates abroad renders an understanding on these points essential.

who

..

2. The British Treaty of 1858, Article XVI., lays down that "Chinese subjects b guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and punished by Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

may

     "British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished by the Consul, or any other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws of Great Britain.

"Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides."

     The words "functionary authorised thereto" are translated in the Chinese text "British Government."

      In order to the fulfilment of its Treaty obligation, the British Government has established a Supreme Court at Shanghai, with a special code of rules, which it is now about to revise... The Chinese.Government has established at Shanghai a Mixed Court; but the officer presiding over it, either from lack of power or dread of unpopularity, constantly fails to enforce his judgments.

It is now understood that the Tsung-li Yamên will write a circular to the Lega- tion, inviting Foreign Representatives at once to consider with the Tsung-li Yamên

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION

35

the ..easures needed for the more effective administration of justice at the Ports open to Trade.

        3.-It is agreed that, whenever a crime is committed affecting the person or property of a British subject, whether in the interior or at the open ports, the British Minister shall be free to send officers to the spot to be present at the investigation.

         To the prevention of misunderstanding on this point, Sir Thomas Wade will write a Note to the above effect, to which the Tsung-li Yamên will reply, affirming that this is the course of proceeding to be adhered to for the time to come.

          It is further understood that so long as the laws of the two countries differ from each other, there can be but one principle to guide judicial proceedings in mixed cases In China, namely, that the case is tried by the official of the defendant's nationality; the official of the plaintiff's nationality merely attending to watch the proceedings in the interest of justice. If the officer so attending be dissatisfied with the proceedings, it will be in his power to protest against them in detail. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case. This is the meaning of the words hui t'ung, indicating combined action in judicial proceedings, in Article XVI. of the Treaty of Tientsin; and this is the course to be respectively followed by the officers of either nationality.

SECTION III.-Trade.

         1.-With reference to the area within which, according to the treaties in force, lekin ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, Sir Thomas Wade agrees to move his Government to allow the ground rented by foreigners (the so-called Concessions) at the different ports, to be regarded as the area of exemption from lekin; and the Government of China will thereupon allow I-ch'ang, in the province of Hu-pi; Wu-hu, in An-hui; Wên-chow, in Che-kiang; and Pei-hai (Pak-hoi), in Kwang-tung to be added to the number of ports open to trade and to become Consular stations. The British Government, will farther, be free to send officers to reside at Ch'ung-k'ing to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuen; British merchants will not be allowed to reside at Ch'ung-k'ing, or to open establish- ments or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port. When steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be taken into consideration.

It is further proposed as a measure of compromise that at certain points on the shore of the Great River, namely, Ta-t'ung and Ngan-Ching in the province of An- hui; Ho-Kou, in Kiang-si; Wu-such, Lu-chi kou, and Sha-shih in Hu-Kwang; these being all places of trade in the interior, at which, as they are not open ports, foreign merchants are not legally authorised to land or ship goods, steamers shall be allowed to touch for tue purpose of landing or shipping passengers or goods; but in all instances by means of native boats only, and subject to the regulations in force affecting native trade.

Produce accompanied by a half-duty certificate may be shipped at such points by the steamers, but may not be landed by them for sale. And at all such points, except in the case of imports accompanied by a transit duty certificate or exports similarly certificated, which will be severally passed free of lekin on exhibition of such certificates, lekin will be duly collected on all goods whatever by the native authorities. Foreign merchants will not be authorised to reside or open houses of business or warehouses at the places enumerated as ports of call.

2. At all ports open to trade, whether by earlier or later agreement, at which no settlement area has been previously defined, it will be the duty of the British Consul, acting in concert with his colleagues, the Consuls of other Powers, to come to an understanding with the local authorities regarding the definition of the foreign settlement area.

3.-On Opium, Sir Thomas Wade will move his Government to sanction an arrangement different from that affecting other imports. British merchants, when opium is brought into port, will be obliged to have it taken cognisance of by the Customs, and deposited in bond, either in a warehouse or a receiving hulk, until such time as there is a sale for it. The importer will then pay the tariff duty upon it,

2*

36

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION

and the purchasers the lekin, in order to the prevention of evasion of the treaty. The amount of lekin to be collected will be decided by the different Provincial Govern- ments according to the circumstances of each.

4. The Chinese Government agree that Transit Duty Certificates shall be framed under one rule at all ports, no difference being made in the conditions set forth therein; and that, so far as imports are concerned, the nationality of the person possessing and carrying these is immaterial. Native produce carried from an inland centre to a port of shipment, if bona fide intend d for shipment to a foreign port, may be, by treaty, certified by the British subject interested, and exempted by payment of the half duty from all charges demanded upon it en route. If produce be not the property of a British subject, or is being carried to a port not for exportation, it is not entitled to the exemption that would be secured it by the exhibition of a transit duty certificate. The British Minister is prepared to agree with the Tsung-li Yamên upon rules that will secure the Chinese Government against abus of the privilege as affecting produce.

The words nei-ti, inland, in the clause of Article VII. of the Rules appended to the Tariff, regarding carriage of imports inland, and of native produce purchased inland, apply as much to places on the sea coasts and river shores, as to places in the interior not open to foreign trade; the Chinese Government having the right to make arrangements for the prevention of abuses thereat.

       5.-Article XLV. of the Treaty of 1858 prescribed no limit to the term within which a drawback may be claimed upon duty paid imports. The British Minister agrees to a term of three years, after expiry of which no drawback shall be claimed.

6. The foregoing stipulation, that certain ports are to be opened to foreign tra le, and that landing and shipping of goods at six places on the Great River is to be sanctioned, shall be given effect to within six months after receipt of the Imperial Decree approving the memorial of the Grand Secretary Li. The date for giving effect to the stipulations affecting exemption of imports from lekin taxation within the foreign settlements and the collection of lekin upon opium by the Customs Inspec- torate at the same time as the Tariff Duty upon it, will be fixed as soon as the British Government has arrived at an understanding on the subject with other foreign Governments.

7.-The Governor of Hongkong having long complained of the interference of the Canton Customs Revenue Cruisers with the junk trade of that Colony, the Chinese Government agrees to the appointment of a Commission, to consist of a British Consul, an officer of the Hongkong Government, and a Chinese official of equal rank, in order to the establishment of some system that shall enable the Chinese Government to protect its revenue without prejudice to the interests of the Colony.

Separate Article.

Her Majesty's Government having it in contemplation to send a Mission of Exploration next year by way of Peking through Kan-su and Koko-Nor, or by way of Ssu-chuen, to Thibet, and thence to India, the Tsung-li Yamên, having due regard to the circumstances, will, when the time arrives, issue the necessary passports, and will address letters to the high provincial authorities and to the Resident in Thibet. If the Mission should not be sent by these routes, but should be proceeding across the Indian frontier to Thibet, the Tsung-li Yamên, on receipt of a communication to the above effect from the British Minister, will write to the Chinese Resident in Thibet, and the Resident, with due regard to the circumstances, will send officers to take due care of the Mission; and passports for the Mission will be issued by the Tsung-li Yamên, that its passage be not obstructed.

Done at Chefoo, in the province of San-tung, this Thirteenth Day of September, in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-six.

[L.8.]

THOMAS FRANCIS WADE.

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION

Additional Articles to the Agreement between Great Britain and China

Signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876

SIGNED AT LONDON, 18TH JULY, 1885

$7

       The Governments of Great Britain and of China, considering that the arrange ments proposed in clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Agreement between Great Britain and China, signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876 (hereinafter referred to as the "Chefoo Agreement "), in relation to the area within which li-kin ough not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, and to the definition of the Foreign Settlement area, require further consideration; also that the terms of clause 3 of the same section are not sufficiently explicit to serve as an efficient regula- tion for the traffic in opium, and recognizing the desirability of placing restrictions. on the consumption of opium, have agreed to the present Additional Article.

       1.-As regards the arrangements above referred to and proposel in clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that they shall be reserved for further consideration between the two Governments.

       2. In lieu of the arrangement respecting opium proposed in clause 3 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agred that foreign opium, when imported into China, shall be taken cognizance of by the Imperial Maritime Customs, and shall be deposited in bond, either in warehouses or receiving-hulks which have been approved of by the Customs, and that it shall not be removed thence until there shall have been paid to the Custoins the Tariff duty of 30 taels per chest of 100 catties, and also a sum not exceeding 80 taels per like chest as li-kin.

      3.It is agreed that the aforesaid import and li-kin duties having been paid, the owner shall be allowed to have the opium repacked in bond under the supervision of the Customs, and put into packages of such assorte sizes as he may select from such sizes as shall have been agreed upon by the Customs authorities and British Consul at the port of entry.

       The Customs shall then, if required, issue gratuitously to the owner a transit cer- tificate for each such package, or one for any number of packages, at option of the owner.

       Such certificate shall free the opium to which it applies from the imposition of any further tax or duty whilst in transport in the interior, provided that the package has not been opened, and that the Customs seals, marks, and numbers on the packages have not been effaced or tampered with.

       Such certificates shall have validity only in the hands of Chinese subjects, and shall not entitle foreigners to convey or accompany any opium in which they may be interested into the interior.

4. It is agreed that the Regulations under which the said certificates are to be issued shall be the same for all the ports, and that the form: shall be as follows:-

"Opium Transit Certificate.

This is to certify that Tariff and li-kin duties at the rate of taels per chest of 100 catties have been paid on the opium marked and numbered as under; and that, in conformity with the Additional Article signed at London the 18th July, 1885, and appended to the Agreement between Great Britain and China signed at Chefoo the 13th September, 1876, and approved by the Imperial Decree printed on the back thereof, the production of this certificate will exempt the opium to which it refers, wherever it may be found, from the imposition of any further tax or duty whatever, provided that the packages are unbroken, and the Customs seals, marks, and numbers have not been effaced or tampered with.

"Mark,

X

No.

00 packages

"Port of entry,

"Date

"Signature of Commissioner of Customs."

5. The Chinese Government undertakes that when the packages shall have been opened at the place of consumption, the opium shall not be subjected to any tax oi

38

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION

contribution, direct or indirect, other than or in excess of such tax or contribution as is or may hereafter be levied on native opium.

In the event of such tax or contribution being calculated ad valorem, the same rate, value for value, shall be assessed on foreign and native opium, and in ascertaining for this purpose the value of foreign opium the amount paid on it for li-kin at the port of entry shall be deducted from its market value.

6. It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be considered as forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and that it shall have the same force and validity as if it were inserted therein word for word.

It shall come into operation six months after its signature, provided the ratifica- tions have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then on the date at which such exchange takes place.

        7. The arrangement respecting opium contained in the present Additional Article shall remain binding for four years, after the expiration of which period either Government may at any time give twelve months' notice of its desire to determine it, and such notice being given, it shall terminate accordingly.

It is, however, agreed that the Government of Great Britain shall have the right to terminate the same at any time should the transit certificate be found not to confer on the opium complete exemption from all taxation whatsoever whilst being carried from the port of entry to the place of consumption in the interior.

In the event of the termination of the present Additional Article the arrange- ment with regard to opium now in force the regulations attached to the Treaty of Tientsin shall revive.

8.-The High Contracting Parties may, by common consent, adopt any modifica- tions of the provisions of the present Additional Article which experience may show to be desirable.

9.-It is understood that the Commission provided for in clause 7 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement to inquire into the question of prevention of smuggling into China from Hongkong shall be appointed as soon as possible.

10.-The Chefoo Agreement, together with, and as modified by, the present Additional Article, shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at London as soon possible.

In witness whereof the Undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective Governments, have signed the present Additional Article, and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London, in quadruplicate (two in English and two in Chinese), this 18th day of July, 1885, being the seventh day of the sixth moon in the eleventh year of the reign of Kwang-su.

(L.S.) SALISBURY.

(L.S.)

The Marquis Tseng to the Marquis of Salisbury.

TSENG.

Chinese Legation, London, 18th July, 1885. My Lord-In reply to your Lordship's note of this date, I have the honour to state that the Imperial Government accept the following as the expression of the understanding which has been come to between the Governments of Great Britain and China in regard to the Additional Article to the Chefoo Agreement relative to opium, which has been signed this day :-

1.-It is understood that it shall be competent for Her Majesty's Government at once to withdraw from this new arrangement, and to revert to the system of taxation for opium at present in operation in China, in case the Chinese Government shall fail to bring the other Treaty Powers to comform to the provisions of the said Additional Article.

        2.-It is further understood that, in the event of the termination of the said Additional Article, the Chefoo Agreement, with the exception of clause 3 of Section III., and with the modifications stipulated in clause 1 of the said Additional Article, shall nevertheless remain in force.

THE OPIUM CONVENTION

Memorandum of the basis of Agreement arrived at after discussion between Mr. James Russell, Puisne Judge of Hongkong; Sir Robert Hart, K.C.M.G., Iuspector- General of Customs, and Shao Taotai, Joint Commissioners for China; and Mr. Byron Brenan, Her Majesty's Consul at Tientsin, in pursuance of Article 7 Section III. of the Agreement between Great Britain and China, signed at Chefo on the 15th September, 1876, and of Section 9 of the Additional Article to the said Agreement, signed at London on the 18th July, 1885.

Mr. Russell undertakes that the Government of Hongkong shall submit to the Legislative Council an Ordinance* for the regulation of the trade of the Colony in Raw Opium subject to conditions hereinafter set forth and providing :-

     1. For the prohibition to the import and export of Opium in quantities less than 1 chest. † 2. For rendering illegal the possession of Raw Opium, its custody or control, in quan-

tities less than one chest, except by the Opium Farmer.

3. That all Opium arriving in the Colony be reported to the Harbour Master, and that no Opium shall be transhipped, landed, stored or moved from one store to another, or re- exported without a permit from the Harbour Master, and notice to the Opium Farmer. 4.-For the keeping by Importers, Exporters, and Godown Owners, in such form as

the Governor may require, books shewing the movements of Opium.

5. For taking stock of quantities in the stores, and search for deficiencies by the

Opium Farmer, and for furnishing to the Harbour Master returns of stocks. 6. For amendment of Harbour Regulations, as to the night clearances of junks,

The conditions on which it is agreed to submit the Ordinance are :- 1.-That China arranges with Macao for the adoption of equivalent measures.

2.

That the Hongkong Government shall be entitled to repeal the Ordinance if it be found to be injurious to the Revenue or to the legitimate trade of the Colony. 3.-That an Office under the Foreign Inspectorate shall be established on Chinese Territory at a convenient spot on the Kowloon side for sale of Chinese Opium Duty Certificates, which shall be freely sold to all comers, and for such quantities of Opium as they may require.

4.That Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than Tls. 110 per picul, shall be free from all further imposts of every sort, and have all the benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article on behalf of Opium on which duty has been paid at one of the ports of China, and that it may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser.

5. That junks trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong and their cargoes shall not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and that no dues whatsoever shall be demanded from junks coming to Hongkong from ports in China, or pro- ceeding from Hongkong to ports in China, over and above the dues paid or payable at the ports of clearance or destination.

6.--That the Officer of the Foreign Inspectorate, who will be responsible for the management of the Kowloon Office, shall investigate and settle any complaints made by the junks trading with Hongkong against the Native Customs Revenue Stations or Crui-ers in the neighbourhood, and that the Governor of Hongkong, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send a Hongkong Officer to be present at and assist in the investigation and decision.

       If, however, they do not agree a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for joint decision.

        Sir Robert Hart undertakes on behalf of himself and Shao Taotai (who was com- pelled by unavoidable circumstances to leave before the sittings of the Commission were terminated) that he Chinese Government shall agree to the above conditions.

The undersigned are of opinion that if these arrangements are fully carried out, a fairly satisfactory solution of the questions connected with the so-called "Hong- kong Blockade" will have been arrived at.

Signed in triplicate at Hongkong, this 11th day of September, 1886.

* See Ordinance 22 of 1887.

† A modification allowing export in smaller quantities than one chest was subsequently agreed.

THE CHUNGKING AGREEMENT

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TO THE AGREEMENT BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND CHINA OF SEPTEMBER 13тн, 1876

SIGNED AT PEKING, 31ST MARCH, 1890

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 18th January, 1891

The Governments of Great Britain and China, being desirous of settling in an amicable spirit the divergence of opinion which has arisen with respect to the first clause of the third section of the Agreement concluded at Chefoo in 1876, which stipulates that "The British Government will be free to send officers to reside at Chungking to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuan, that British mer- chants will not be allowed to reside at Chungking, or to open establishments or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port, and that when steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be taken into consideration," have agreed upon the following Additional Article :-

I.--Chungking shall forthwith be declared open to trade on the same footing as any other Treaty port. British subjects shall be at liberty either to charter Chinese vessels or to provide vessels of the Chinese type for the traffic between Ichang and Chungking.

II. Merchan ise conveyed between Ichang and Chungking by the above class of vessls shall be place on the same footing as merchandise carried by steamer between Shanghai and Ichang, and shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty, Tariff Rules, and the Yangtsze Regulations.

      III.-All regulations as to the papers and flags to be carried by vessels of the above description, as to the repackage of goods for the voyage beyond Ichang, aud as to the general procedure to be observed by those engaged in the traffic between Ichang and Chungking with a view to insuring convenience and security, shall be drawn up by the Superintendent of Customs at Ichaug, the Taotai of the Ch'uan Tung Circuit, who is now stationed at Chungking, and the Commissioners of Customs in consultaion with the British Consul, and shall be liable to any modifications that may hereafter prove to be desirable and may be agreed upon by common consent.

      IV.-Chartered junks shall pay port dues at lehang and Chungking in accor- dance with the Yangtze Regulations; vessels of Chinese type, if and when entitled to carry the British flag, shall pay tonnage dues in accordance with Treaty Regulations. It is obligatory on both chartered junks and also vessels of Chinese type even when the latter may be entitled to carry the British flag, to take, out at the Maritime Custom-house special papers and a special flag when intended to be employed by British subjects in the transport of goods between Ichang and Chungking, and without such papers and flag no vessels of either class shall be allowed the privileges and immunities granted under this Additional Article. Provided with special papers and flag, vessels of both classes shall be allowed to ply between the two ports, and they and their cargoes shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty Rules and the Yangtsze Regulations All other vessels shall be dealt with by the Native Customs. The special papers and flag issued by the Maritime Customs must alone be used by the particular vessel for which they were originally issued, and are not transferable from one vessel to another. The use of the British flag by vessels the property of Chinese is strictly prohibited. Infringement of these Regulations will, in the first instance, render the offender liable to the penalties in force at the ports hitherto opened under Treaty, and should the offence be subsequently repeated, the vessel's special papers and flag will be withdrawn, and the vessel herself refused permission thenceforward to trade between Ichang and Chungking.

Art. V.-When once Chinese steamers carrying cargo run to Chungking, British steamers shall in like manner have access to the said port.

Art. VI.-It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be considered as forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and as having the same force and validity as

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION

41

      if it were inserted therein word for word. It shall be ratified, and the ratifications exchanged at Peking, and it shall come into operation six months after its signature, provi·led the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then ou the date at which such exchange takes place.

Done at Peking in triplicate (three in English and three in Chinese), this thirty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety, being the eleventh day of the Second Intercalary Moon of the sixteenth yer of Kuang Hsü.

(L.S.)

JOHN WALSHAM.

(L.S.) SIGNATURE OF CHINESE

PLENIPOTENTIARY.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION

SIGNED AT CALCUTTA, 17TH MARCH, 1890 Ratified at London, 17th August, 1890

Art. I.-The boundary of Sikkim and Thibet shall be the crest of the mountain range separating the waters flowing into the Sikkim Teesta and its affluents from the waters flowing into the Thibetan Machu and northwards into other rivers of Thibet. The line commences at Mount Gipmochi on the Bhutan frontier, and follows the above-mentioned water-parting to the point where it meets Nepaul territory.

Art. II. It is admitted that the British Government, whose protectorate over the Sikkim State is hereby recognised, has direct and exclusive control over the internal administration and foreign relations of that State, and except through and with the permission of the British Government neither the ruler of the State nor any of its officers shall have official relations of any kind, formal or informal, with any other country.

Art. III.--The Government of Great Britain and Ireland and the Government of China engage reciprocally to respect the boundary as defined in Article I. and to prevent acts of aggression from their respective sides of the frontier.

Art. IV. The question of providing increased facilities for trade across the Sikkim-Thibet frontier wil hereafter be discussed with a view to a mutually satisfactory arrangement by the high contracting powers.

Art. V.-The question of pasturage on the Sikkim side of the frontier is reserved for further examination and future adjustment.

        Art. VI.-The high contracting powers reserve for discussion and arrangement, the method in which official communications between the British authorities in India and the authorities in Thibet shall be conducted.

          Art. VII-Two Joint Commissioners shall within six months from the ratifica- tion of this Convention be appointed, one by the British Government in India, the other by the Chinese Resident in Thibet. The said Commissioners shall meet and discuss the questions which by the last three preceding articles have been reserved.

       Art. VIII.-The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London, as soon as possible after the late of the signature thereof.

THE BURMAH CONVENTION

SIGNED AT PEKING, 4TH FEBRUARY, 1897

In consideration of the Government of Great Britain consenting to waive its objections to the alienation by China, by the Convention with France of June 20th, 1895, of territory forming a portion of Kiang Hung, in derogation of the provisions

42

THE BURMAH CONVENTION

of the Convention between Great Britain and China of March 1st, 1894, it has been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the following additions and alterations shall be made in the last named Convention, hereinafter referred to as the Original Convention.

(Articles 1. to XI. refer to the Burmah Frontier.)

Art. XII.-Add as follows:-The Chinese Government agree hereafter to consider whether the conditions of trade justify the construction of railways in Yunnan, and in the event of their construction, agrees to connect them with the Burmes lines.

       Art. XIII. Whereas by the Original Convention it was agreed that China might appoint a Consul in Burma to reside at Rangoon, and that Great Britain might appoint a Consul to reside at Manwyne, and that the Consul of the two Governments should each within the territories of the other enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consuls of the most favoured nation, and further that in proportion as the commerce between Burma and China increased, additional Consuls might be appointed by mutual consent to reside at such places in Burma and Yunnan as the requirements of trade might seem to demand.

       It has now been agreed that the Government of Great Britain may station a Consul at Momein or Shunning Fu as the Government of Great Britain may prefer, instead of at Manwyne as stipulated in the Original Convention, and also to station a Consul at Szumao.

       British subjects an: persons under British protection may establish themselves and trade at these places under the same conditions as at the Treaty Ports in China.

       The Consuls appointed as above shall be on the same footing as regards correspondence and intercourse with Chinese officials as the British Consuls at the Treaty Ports.

Årt XIV. Instead of "Her Britannic Majesty's Consul at Manwyne" in the Original Convention read "Her Britannic Majesty's Consul at Shunning or Momein," in accordance with the change made in article XIII.

Art. XV.-No addition to Original Convention. Art. XVI.-No addition to Original Convention. Art. XVII.-No addition to Original Convention. Art. XVIII.-No addition to Original Convention.

       Art. XIX. Add as follows:--Failing agreement as to the terms of revision, the present arrangement shall remain in force.

SPECIAL ARTICLE.

       Whereas on the twentieth day of January one thousand eight hundred and ninety-six the Tsung-li Yamén addressed an official despatch to Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaire at Peking, informing him that on the thirtieth day of December one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five they had submitted a Memorial respecting the opening of ports on the West River to foreign trade, and had received an Imperial Decree in approval of which they officially communicated a copy.

       It has now been agreed that the following places, namely, Wuchow Fu in Kwangsi, and Samshui city and Bongkun Market in Kwangtung, shall be opened as Treaty Ports and Consular Stations with freedon of navigation for steamers between Samshui and Wuchow and Hongkong and Canton by a route from each of these latter places to be selected and notified in advance by the Maritime Customs, and that the following four places shall be established as ports of call for goods and passengers under the same regulations as the ports of call on the Yangtze River, namely, Kongmoon, Komchuk, Shiuhing and Takhing.

It is agreed that the present Agreement together with the Special Article shall come into force within four months of the date of signature, and that the ratification. thereof shall be exchanged at Peking as soon as possible.

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT

43

In witness where of the undersigned duly authorised thereto by their respective Governments have signed the present agreement.

       Done at Peking in triplicate (three copies in English and three in Chinese) the fourth day of February in the Year of Our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-seven.

(Sd.) CLAUDE M. MACDONALD. (Hieroglyphic) LI HUNG-CHANG.

(Seal) (Seal)

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT

Whereas it has for many years past been recognised that an extension of Hong- kong territory is necessary for the proper defence and protection of the colony.

       It has now been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the limits of British territory shall be enlarged under lease to the extent indicated generally on the annexed map.

        The exact boundaries shall be hereafter fixed when proper surveys have been made by officials appointed by the two Governments. The term of this lease shall be ninety-nine years.

       It is at the same time agreed that within the City of Kowloon the Chinese officials now stationed there shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with the military requirements for the defence of Hongkong. Within the remainder of the newly-leased territory Great Britain shall have sole jurisdiction. Chinese officials and people shall be alloweì, as heretofore, to use the road from Kowloon to Hsinan.

       It is further agreed that the existing landing-place near Kowloon city shall be reserved for the convenience of Chinese men-of-war, merchant and passengers vessels, which may come and go and lie there at their pleasure; and for the convenience of movement of the officials and people within the city.

        When, hereafter, China constructs a railway to the boundary of the Kowloon territory under British control, arrangements shall be discussed.

       It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the inhabitants of the district included within the extension, and that if land is required for public offices, fortifications, or the like official purposes, is shall be bought at a fair price.

If cases of extradition of criminals occur they shall be dealt with in accordance with the existing treaties between Great Britain and China and the Hongkong Regulations.

       The area leased by Great Britain, as shown on the annexed map, includes the waters of Mirs Bay and Deep Bay, but it is agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise, shall retain the right to use those waters.

This Convention shall come into force on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kwang Hsü. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective Governments; have signed the present agreement.

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and in Chinese) the ninth day of June, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being the twenty-first day of the fourth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü.

CLAUDE M. MACDONALD,

LI HUNG-CHANG,

Members of HSU TING K'UEI, Tsung-li Yamên.

THE WEIHAIWEI CONVENTION.

SIGNED, IN THE English and Chinese LanguAGES, AT PEKING, 1st July, 1898 Ratifications exchanged at London, 5th October, 1898

       In order to provide Great Britain with a suitable naval harbour in North China, and for the better protection of British commerce in the neighbouring seas, the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to lease to the Government of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain an Ireland, Weihaiwei, n the province of Shantung, and the adjacent waters for so long a period as Port Arthur shall remain in the occupation of Russia.

L

       The territory leased shall comprise the island of Liukung and all other islands in the Bas of Weihaiwei, and a belt of land ten English miles wide along the entire coast line of the Bay of Weihaiwei. Within the above-mentioned erritory leased Great Britain shall have sole jurisdiction.

        Great Britain shali have, in addition, the right to erect fortifications, station troops, or take any other measures necessary for defensive purposes, at any points on o near the coast of the region east of the meridian 121 degrees 40 mi... E. of Green- wich, and to acquire on equitable compensation within that territory such sites as may be necessary for water supply, communications, and hospitals. Within that zone Chinese administration will not be interfered with, but no troops other than Chinese or British shall be allowed therein.

       It is also agreed that within the walled city of Weihaiwei Chinese officials shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with naval and military requirements for the defence of the territory leased.

It is further agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise, shall retain the right to use the waters herein leased to Great Britain.

       It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or explusion of the inhabitants of the territory herein specified, and that if land is required for forti- fications, public offices, or any official or public purpose, it shall be bought at a fair price.

This Convention shall come into force on signature. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

       In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective Governments have signed the present agreement.

CLAUDE M. MACDONALD.

PRINCE CHING, Senior Member of the Tsung-li Yamên, LIAO SHOU HENG, Presid. nt of Board of Punishments. Done of Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and four in Chinese) the first day of July in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang-hsü.

2

FRANCE

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION

BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE FRENCH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT TIEN18IN, 27TH JUNE, 1858

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 25th October, 1860

        His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two Empires, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship, com- merce, and navigation between the two powers, have resolved to conclude a new treaty based on the common interest of the two countries, and for that purpose have named as their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

       His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Baron Gros, Grand Officer of the Legion of Honour, Grand Cross of the Order of the Saviour of Greece, Commander of the Order of the Conception of Portugal, &c., &c., &c.

        And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, Imperial High Commis- sioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, Grand Minister of the East Palace, Director-General of the Council of Justice, &c., &c., &c.; and Hwashana, Imperial High Commissioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, President of the Board of Finance, General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, &c., &c., &c.;

        Who, having exchanged their full powers, which they have found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:-

       Art. 1. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between the subjects of the two Empires, who shall enjoy equally in the respective states of the high contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

         Art. II. In order to maintain the peace so happily re-established between the two empires it has been agreed between the high contracting parties that, following in this respect the practice amongst Western nations, the duly accredited diplomatic agents of His Majesty the Emperor of the French of His Majesty the Emperor of China shall have the right of resorting to the capital of the empire when important affairs call them there. It is agreed between the high contracting parties that if any one of the powers having a treaty with China obtains for its diplomatic agents the right of permanently residing at Peking, France shall immediately enjoy the same right.

        The diplomatic agents shall reciprocally enjoy, in the place of their residence, the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international la, that is to say, that their persons, their families, their houses, and their correspondence, shall be inviolable, that they may take into their service such employés, couriers, interpreters, servants, &c., &c., as shall be necessary to them.

        The expense of every kind occasioned by the diplomatic mission of France in China shall be defrayed by the French Government. The diplomatic agents whom

46

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

it shall please the Emperor of China to accredit to His Majesty the Emperor of the French, shall be received in France with all the honours and prerogatives which the diplomatic agents of other nations accredited to the court of His Majesty the Emperor of the French enjoy.

Art. III. The official communications of the French diplomatic and consular agents with the Chinese authorities shall be written in French, but shall be accom- panied, to facilitate the service, by a Chines- translation, as exact as possible, until such time as the Imperial Government at Peking, having interpreters speaking and writing French correctly, diplomatic correspondence shall be conducted in this language by the French agents and in Chinese by the officers of the empire. It is agreed that until then, and in case of difference in the interpretation, in reference to the French text and Chinese text of the clauses heretofore agreed upon in the conventions made by common accord, it shall always be the original text and not the translation which shall be held correct. This provision applies to the present treaty, and in the communications between the authorities of the two countries it shall always be the original text, not the translation, which shall be held correct.

      Art. IV.-Henceforth he official correspondence between the authorities and the officers of the two countries shall be regulated according to their respective ranks and conditions and upon the basis of the most absolute reciprocity. This correspondence shall take place between the high French officers and high Chinese officers, in the capital or elsewhere, by dispatch or communication; between the French sub- ordinate officers and the high authorities in the provinces, on the part of the former by statement, and on the part of the latter by declaration.

      Between the officers of lower rank of the two nations, as above provided, on the footing of a perfect equality.

      Merchants and generally all persons not having an official character shall on both sides use the form of representation in all documents addressed to or intended for the notice of the respective authorities.

Whenever a French subject shall have recourse to the Chinese authority, his representation shall first be submitted to the Consul, who, if it appears to him reasonable and properly addressed, shall forward it; if it be otherwise, the Consul shall cause the tenour to be modified or refuse to transmit it. The Chinese, on their part, when they have to address a Consulate, shall follow a similar course towards the Chinese authority, who shall act in the same manner.

Art. V. His Majesty the Emperor of the French may appoint Consuls or Con- sular Agents in the coast and river ports of the Chinese empire named in Article VI. of the present treaty to conduct the business between the Chinese authorities and French merchants and subjects and to see to the strict observance of the stipulated rules. These officers shall be treated with the consideration and regard which are due to them. Their relations with the authorities of the place of their residence shall be established on the footing of the most perfect equality. If they shall have to complain of the proceedings of the said authorities, they may address the superior authority of the province direct, and shall immediately advise the Minister Plenipo- tentiary of the Emperor thereof.

In case of the absence of the French Consul, captains and merchants shall be at liberty to have recourse to the intervention of the Consul of a friendly power, or, if this be impossible, they shall have recourse to the chief of the Customs, who shall advise as to the means of assuring to the said captains and merchants the benefits of the present treaty.

Art. VI. Experience having demonstrated that the opening of new ports to foreign commerce is one of the necessities of the age, it has been agreed that the ports of Kiung.chow and Chao-chow in the province of Kwangtung, Taiwan and Tamsui in the island of Formosa (province of Fohkien), Tang-chow in the pro- vince of Shantung, an Nanking in the province of Kiangsu, shall enjoy the same With regard to privileges as Canton, Shanghai, Ningpo, Amoy, and Foochow.

TREATY BETWEEN 1 RANCE AND CHINA

47

      Nanking, the French agents in hina shall not deliver passports to their nationals for this city until the rebels have been expelled by the Imperial troops.

        Art. VII.-French subjects and their families may establish themselves and trade or pursue their avocations in all security, and without hindrance of any kind, in the ports and cities enumerated in the preceding article.

They may travel freely between them if they are provided with passports, but it is expressly forbidden to them to trade elsewhere on the coast in search of clandestine markets, under pain of confiscation of both the ships and goods used in such operations, and this confiscation shall be for the benefit of the Chinese Govern- ment, who, however, before the seizure and confiscation can be legally pronounced, must advise the French Consul at the nearest port.

        Art. VIII.-French subjects who wish to go to interior towns, or ports not open to foreign vessels, may do so in all security, on the express condition that they are provided with passports written in French and Chinese, legally delivered by the diplomatic agents or consuls of France in China and vised by the Chinese authorities.

        In case of the loss of hs passport, the French subject who cannot present it w.en it is legally required of him, shall, if the Chinese authorities of the place refuse him permission to remain a sufficient time to obtain another passport from the Consul, le conducted to the nearest consulate and shall not be maltreated or insulted in any way.

        As is stipulated in the former treaties, French subjects resident or sojourning in the ports open to foreign trade may travel without passports in their immediate neighbourhood and there pursue their occupations as freely as the natives, but they must not pass certain limits w..ich shall be agreed upon between the Consul and the local authority. The French agents in China shall deliver assports to their nationals only for the places where the rebels are not established at the time the passport shall be demanded.

       These passports shall be delivered by the French authorities only to persons who offer every desirable guarantee.

         Art. IX. All changes made by common consent with one of the signatory powers of the treaties with China on the subject of amelioration of the tariff now in orce, or which may hereafter be in force, as also all rights of customs, tonnage. importation, transit, and exportation, shall be immediately applicable to French trade and mer- chants by the in re fact o. their being placed in execution.

onses.

        Art. X.-Any French subject who, conformably to the stipulations of Article VI. of the present treaty, shall arrive at one of the ports open to foreign trade, may, whatever may be the length of his sojourn, rent houses and warehouses for the disposal of his merchandise, or lease land and himself build houses and war- Frenc subjects may, in the same manner, establish churches, hospitals, religious houses, schools, and cemeteries. To this end the local authority, after having agreed with the Consul, shall designate the quarters most suitable for the residence of the French and the sites on which the above mentioned structures may have place.

The terms of rents and leases shall be freely discussed between the interested parties and regulated, as far as possible, according to the average local rates.

        The Chinese authorities shall prevent their nationals from exacting or requiring exorbitant prices, and the Consul on his side shall see that French subjects use no violence or constraint to force the consent of the proprietors. It is further under- stood that the number of houses and the extent of the ground to be assigned to French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade shall not be limited, and that they shall be determined according to the needs and convenience of the partics. If Chinese subjects injure or destroy French churches or cemeteries, the guilty parties shall be punished with all the rigour of the laws of the country.

       Art. XI.---French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade may freely engage, on the terms agreed upon between the parties, or by the sole intervention of the Consul, compradores, interpreters, clerks, workmen, watermen, and servants. They shall also have the right of engaging teachers in order to learn to speak and write

48

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

    the Chinese language and any other language or dialect used in the empire, as also to secure their aid in scientific or literary works. Equally they may teach to Chinese subjects their own or foreign languages and sell without obstacle French books or themselves purchase Chinese books of all descriptions.

      Art. XII. Property of any kind appertaining to French subjects in the Chinese empire shall be considered by the Chinese inviolable and shall always be respecte i by them. The Chinese authorities shall not, under any circumstances whatever, place French vessels under embargo nor put them under requisition for any service, be it public or private.

      Art. XIII. The Christian religion having for its essential object the leading of men to virtue, the members of all Christian communities shall enjoy entire security for their persons and property and the free exercise of their religion, and efficient protection shall be given the missionaries who travel peaceably in the interior furnished with passports as provided for in Article VIII.

      No hindrance shall be offered by the authorities of the Chinese Empire to the recognised right of every individual in China to embrace, if he so pleases, Chris- tianity and to follow its practices without being liable to any punishment therefor.

All that has previously been written, proclaimed, or published in China by order of the Government against the Christian religion is completely abrogated and remains null and void in all provinces of the empire.

      Art. XIV. No privileged commercial society shall henceforward be established in China, and the same shall apply to any organised coalition having for its end the exercise of a monopoly of trade. In case of the contravention of the present article the Chinese Authorities, on the representation of the Consul or Consular Agent, shall advise as to the means of dissolving such associations, of which they are also bound to prevent the existe ce by the preceding prohibitions, so as to remove all that may stand in the way of fr e competition.

Art. XV.-When French vessel arrives in the waters of one of the ports open to foreign trade she shall be at liberty to engage any pilot to take her immediately into the port, and, in the same manner, when, having discharged all legal charges she shall be ready to put to sea, she shall not be refused pilots to enable her to leave the port without hindrance or delay

Any individual who wishes to exercise the profession of pilot for French vessels may, on the presentation of three certificates from captains of ships, be commissioned by the French Consul in the same manner as shall be in use with other nations,

The remuneration payable to pilots shall be equitably regulated for each parti cular port by the Consul or Consular Agent, who shall fix it having regard to the distance and circumstances of the navigation.

Art. XVI.-After the pilot has brought a French trading ship into the port, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or two officers to guard the ship and prevent fraud. These officers may, according to their convenience, remain in their own boat or stay on board the ship.

      Their pay, food, and expenses shall be a charge on the Chinese Customs, and they shall not demand any fee or remuneration whatever from the captain or consignee. Every contravention of this provision shall entail a punishment proportionate to the amount exacted, which also shall be returned in full.

Art. XVII. Within the twenty-four hours following the arrival of a French merchant vessel in one of the ports open to foreign trade, the captain, if he be not unavoidably prevented, and in his default the supercargo or consignee, shall

report at the French Consulate and place in the hands of the Consul the ship's papers, the bills of lading, and the manifest. Within the twenty-four hour next following the Consul shall send to the Superintendent of Customs a detailed note indicating the name of the vessel, the articles, the tonnage, and the nature of the cargo; if, in consequence of the negligence of the captain this cannot be accomplished within the forty-eight hours following the arrival of the vessel, the captain shall be liable to a penalty of 50 dollars for each day's delay, to the profit of the Chinese Government, but the said penalty shall in no case exceel the sum of 200 dollars.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

49

Immediately after the reception of the consular note the Superintendent of Customs shall give a permit to open hatches. If the captain, before having received the said permit, shall have opened hatches and commenced to discharge, he may be fined 500 dollars, and the goods discharged may be seized, the whole to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XVIII.-French captains and merchants may hire whatever boats and lighters they please for the transport of goods and passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the intervention of the Chinese authority, and consequently without its guarantee in case of accident, fraud, or disappearance of the said boats. The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the carriage of merchandise by porters be granted to any one.

Art. XIX.-Whenever a French merchant shall have merchandise to load or discharge he shall first remit a detailed note of it to the Consul or Consular Agent, who will immediately charge a recognised interpreter to the Consulate to communicate it to the Superintendent of Customs. The latter shall at once deliver a permit for shipping or landing the goods. He will then proceed to the verification of the goods in such manner that there shall be no chance of loss to any party.

The French merchant must cause himself to be represented (if he does not prefer to attend himself) at the place of the verification by a person possessing the requisite knowledge to protect his interest at the time when the verification for the liquida- tion of the dues is made; otherwise any after claim will be null and of no effect.

With respect to goods subject to an ad valorem duts, if the merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or three merchants to examine the goods, and the highest price which shall be offered by any of them shall be assumed as the value of the sail goods.

Duties shall be charged on the net weight; the tare will therefore be deducted. If the French merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer on the amount of tare, each party shall choose a certain number of chests and bales from among the goods respecting which there is a dispute; these shall be first weighed gross, then tared and the average tare of these shall be taken as the tare for all the others.

If during the course of verification any difficulty arises which cannot be settled, the French merchant my claim the intervention of the Consul, who will immediately bring the subject of dispute to the notice of the Superintendent of Customs, and both will endeavour to arrive at an amicable arrangement, but the claim must be made within twenty-four hours; otherwise it will not receive att ution. So long as the result of the dispute remains pending, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter the matter in his books, thus leaving every latitude for the examination and solution. of the difficulty.

On goods imported which have sustained damage reduction of duties propor- tionate to their depreciation shall be made. This shall be equitably determined, and if necessary, in the manner above stipulated for the fixing of ad valorem duties.

       Art. XX. Any vessel having entered one of the ports of China, an which has not yet used the permit to open hatches mentioned in Article XIX., may within two days of arrival quit that port and proceed to another without having to pay either tonnage dues or customs duties, but will discharge the ultimately in the port where sale of the goods is effected.

A t. XXI.-It is e tablished by common consent that import duties shall be discharged by the captains or French merchants after the landing and verification of the goods. Export duties shall in the same manner be paid on the shipment of the goods. When all toon ge dues and Customs duties shall hav. been paid in full by a French vessel the Superintendent of Customs shall give a general quittance, on the exhibition of which the Consul shall return the ship's papers to the captain and permit him to depart on his voyage. The Superintendent of Customs shall name one or several banks, which shall be authorised to receive the sum due by French merchants on account of the Government, and the receipts of these banks for all payments which have been made to them shall be considered as receipts of the

50

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Chinese Government. These payments may be made in ingots or foreign money, the relative value of which to sycee shall be determined by agreement between the Consul or Consular Agent and the Superintendent of Customs in the different ports, according to time, place, and circumstances.

Art. XXII. *After the expiration of the two days named in Art. XX., and before proceeding to discharge her cargo, every vessel shall pay tonnage-dues accord- ing to the following scale :-Vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and upwards at the rate of four mace per ton; vessels of less than one hundred and fifty tons mea- surement at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open ports, or trading between China and such ports in Cochin-China as belong to France, or any port in Japan, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special certificate from the Superintendent of Customs, on exhibition of which the said vessel shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in ny open port of China for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of her port-clearance; but after the expiration of four months she shall be required to pay tonnage-dues again.

      Small French vessels and boats of every class, whether wi h or without sails, shall be reckoned as coming within the category of vessels of one hundred and fifty tous and nuder, and shall pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per ton once in every four months.

      Native craft chartered by French merchants shall in like manter pay tonnage- dues once in every four months.

Art. XXIII-All French goods, after having discharged the Customs duties according to the tariff in one of the ports of China, may be transported into the interior without being subjected to any further charge except the transit dues according to the amended scale now in force, which dues shall not be augmented in the future.

      If the Chinese Customs Agents, contrary to the enor of the present Treaty, make illegal exactions or levy higher dues, they shall be punished according to the laws of the empire.

Art. XXIV.--Any French vessel entered at one of the ports open to foreign trade and wishing to discharge only a part of its goods there, shall pay Customs dues only for the part discharged; it may transport the remainder of its cargo to another port and sell it there. The duty shall then be paid.

      French subjects having paid in one port the duties on their goods, wishing to re-export them and send them for sale to an ther port, shall notify the Consul or Consular Agent. The latter shall inform the Superintendent of Customs, who, after having verified the identity of the goods and the perfect integrity of the packages, shallsend to the claimants a declaration attesting that the duties on the said goods have been paid. Provided with this declaration, the French merchants on their arrival at the other port shall only have to present it through the medium of the Consul or Superintendent of Customs, who will deliver for this part of the

                                                      cargo, without deduction or charge, a permit for discharge free of duty; but if the autho- rities discover fraud or anything contraband amongst the goods re-exported, these shall be, after verification, confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XXV.-Transhipment of goods shall take place only by special permission and in case of urgency; if it be indispensable to effect this operation, the Consul shall be referred to, who will deliver a certificate, on view of which the transhipment shall be authorised by the Superintendent of Customs. The latter may always delegate an employé of his administration to be present.

      Every unauthorised transhipment, except in case of peril by delay, will entail the confiscation, to the profit of the Chinese Government, of the whole of the goods illicitly transhipped.

Art. XXVI. In each of the por's open to foreign trade the superintendent of Customs shall receive for himself, and shall deposit at the French Consulate, legal

* Substituted for the original article in 1863.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

51

scales for goods and silver, the weights and measures agreeing exactly with the weights and measures in use at the Canton Custom-house, and bearing a stamp and seal certifying this authority. These scales shall be the base of all liquidations of duties and of all payments to be made to the Chinese Government. They shall be referred to in case of dispute as to the weights and measures of goods, and the decree shall be according to the results they show.

       Art. XXVII.-Import and export duties levied in China on French commerce shall be regulated according to the tariff annexed to the present treaty under the seal and signature of the respective plenipotentiaries. This tariff may be revised every seven years in order to be in harmony with the changes brought about by time in the value of the products of the soil or industry of the two empires.

By the payment of these duties, the amount of which it is expressly provided shall not be increased nor augmented by any kind of charge or surtax whatever, French subjects shall be free to import into China, from French or foreign ports, and equally to export from China, to any destination, all goods which shall not be, at the date of the signing of the present treaty and according to the classification of the annexed tariff, the object of a special prohibition or of a special monopoly. The Chinese Government renouncing therefore the right of augmenting the number of articles reputed contraband or subjects of a monopoly, any modification of the tariff shall be made only after an understanding has been come to with the French Government and with it full and entire consent.

        With regard to the tariff, as well as every stipulation introduced or to be in- troduced in the existing treaties, or those which may hereafter be concluded, it remains well and duly established that merchants and in general all French subjects in China shall always have the same rights and be treated in the same way as the most favoured nation.

       Art. XXVIII.--- The publication of the regular tariff doing away henceforth with all pretext for smuggling, it is not to be presumed that any act of this nature may be committed by French vessels in the ports of China. If it should be otherwise, all contraband goods introduced into these ports by French vessels or merchants whatever their value or nature, as also all prohibited goods fraudulently discharged, shall be seized by the local authority and confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government. Further, the latter may, if it see fit, interdict the re-entry to China of the vessel taken in contravention and compel it to leave immediately after the settle- ment of its accounts.

       If any foreign vessel fraudulently makes use of the French flag the French Government shall take the necessary measures for the repression of this abuse.

       Art. XXIX.-His Majesty the Emperor of the French may station a vessel of war in any principal port of the empire where its presence may be considered necessary to maintain good order and discipline amongst the crews of merchant vessels and to facilitate the exercise of the Consular authority; all necessary measures shall be taken to provide that the presence of these vessels of war shall entail no inconvenience, and their commanders shall receive orders to cause to be executed the provisions of Article XXXIII. in respect of the communications with the land and the policing of the crews. Vessels of war shall be subject to no duty.

Art. XXX.-Every French vessel of war cruising for the protection of commerce shall be received as a friend and treated as such in all the ports of China which it shall enter. These ves els may there procure the divers articles of refitting and victualling of which they shall have need, and, if they have suffered damage, may repair there and purchase the materials necessary for such repair, the whole without the least opposition.

The same shall apply to French trading ships which in consequence of great damage or any other reason may be compelled to seek refuge in any port whatsoever of China.

        If a vessel be wrecked on the coast of China, the nearest Chinese authority, on being informed of the occurrence, shall immediately send assistance to the crew; provide for their present necessities, and take the measures immediately necessary

52

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

for the salvage of the ship and the preservation of the cargo. The whole shall then be brought to the knowledge of the nearest Consul or Consular Agent, in order that the latter, in concert with the competent authority, may provide means for the relief of the crew and the salvage of the débris of the ship and cargo.

Art. XXXI.-Should China be at war with another power, this circumstance shall not in any way interfere with the free trade of French with China or with the opposing nation. French vessels may always, except in the case of effective blockade, sail without obstacle from the ports of the one to the ports of the other, trade in the ordinary manner, and import and export every kind of merchandise not prohibited.

Art. XXXII.--Should sailors or other persons desert from French ships-of-war, or leave French trading vessels, the Chinese authority, on the requisition of the Consul, or failing the Consul that of the captain, shall at once use every means to discover and restore the aforesaid fugitives into the hands of one or the other of them. In the same manner, if Chinese deserters or persons accused of any crime take refuge in French houses or on board of French vessels, the local authority shall address the Consul, who, ou proof of the guilt of the accuse:1, shall immediately take the measures necessary for their extradition. Each party hall car fully avoid concealment and connivance.

      Art. XXXIII.-When sailors come ou shore they shall be under special dis- ciplinary regulations framed by the Consul and communicated to the local authority, in order to prevent as far as possible all occasion of quarrel between French sailors and the people of the country.

Art. XXXIV.--In case of French trading vessels being attacked or pillaged by pirates within Chinese waters, the civil and military authorities of the nearest place, upon learning of the occurrence, shall actively pursue the authors of the crime and shall neglect nothing to secure their arrest and punishment, according to low. The pirated goods, in whatever place or state they may be found, shall be placed in the hands of the Consul, who shall restore them to the owners. If the criminals cannot be seized, or the whole of the stolen property cannot be recovered, the Chinese officials shall suffer the penalty inflicted by the law in such circumstances, but they shall not be held pecuniarily responsible.

      Art. XXXV. When a French subject shall have a complaint to make or claim to bring against a Chinese, he shall first state his case to the Consul, who, after having examined the affair, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In the same manner, when a Chinese has to complain of a French subject, the Consul shall attentively hear his claim and endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement. But if in either case this be impossible, the Consul shall invoke the assistance of a competent Chinese official, and these two, after having conjointly examine the affair, shall decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI.--If hereafter French subjects sufier damage, or are subjected to any insult or vexation by Chinese subjects, the latter shall be pursued by the local authority, who shall take the necessary measures for the defence and pro- tection of French subjects; if ill oers or any vagrant part of the population com- mence to pillage, destroy, or burn the houses or warehouses of French subjects or any other of their establishments, the same authority, either on the requisition of the Consul or of its own motion, shall send as speedily as possible an armed force to disperse the riot and to arrest the criminals, and shall deliver the latter up to the severity of the law; the whole without prejudice of the claims of the French subjects to be indemnified for proved losses.

      Art. XXXVII.--If Chinese become, in future, indebted t› French captains or merchants and involve them in loss by fraud or in an other manner, the latter shall no longer avail themselves of the combination which existed under the former state of things; they may address themselves only through the medium of their Consul to the local authority, who shall neglect nothing after having examined the affair to compel the defaulters to satisfy their engagements according to the laws of the country. But, if the debtor cannot be found, if he be dead, or bankrupt, and is not able to pay, the French merchants cannot claim against the Chinese authority.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

53

         In case of fraud or non-payment on the part of French merchants, the Consul shall, in the same manner, affo:d every assistance to the claimants, but neither he nor his Government shall in any manner be held responsible.

        Art. XXXVIII.-If unfortunately any fight or quarrel occurs between French and Chinese subjects, as also if during the course of such quarrel one or more persons be killed or wounded, by firearms or otherwise, the Chinese shall be arrested by the Chinese authority, who will be responsible, if the charge be proved, for their punish- ment according to the laws of the country. With regard to the French, they shall be arrested at the instance of the Consul, who shall take the necessary mea ures that they may be dealt with in the ordinary course of French law in accordance with the forins and practice which shall be afterwards decided by the French Government.

          The same course shall be observed in all sim.lar circumstances not enumerated in the present convention, the principle being that for the repression of crin es and offences committed by them in China French subjects shall be dealt with according to the laws of France.

        Art_XXXIX.-Disputes or differences arising between French subjects in China shall, equally, be settled by the French authorities. It is also stipulated that the Chinese authorities shall not in any manner interfere in any dispute between French subjects and other foreigners. In the same way they shall not exercise any authority over French vessels; these are responsible nly to the French authorities and the captain.

C

         Art. XL.-If the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French shall consider it desirable to modify any of the clauses of the present treaty it shall be at liberty to open negotiations to this effect with the Chinese Government after an interval of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It is also understood that no obligation not expressed in the present convention shall be imposed on the Consuls or Consular Agents, nor on their nationals, but, as is stipulated, French subjects shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, immunities. and guarantees whatsoever which have been or shall be accorded by the Chinese Govern- ment to other powers.

        Art. XLI. His Majesty the Emperor of the French, wishing to give to His Majesty the Emperor of China a proof of his friendly sentiments, agrees to stipulate in separate articles, having the same force and effect as if they were inserted in the present treaty, the arrangements come to between the two governments on the mat ers antecedent to the events: Canton and the ex: ense caused by them to the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French.

        Art. XLII.-The ratificatious of the present treaty of friendship, coa merce, and navigation shall be exchanged at Peking within one year after the date of signature, or sooner if possible.

        After the exchange of ratifications, the treaty shall be brought to the knowledge of all the superior authorities of the Empire in the provinces and in the capital, in order that its publication may be well established.

       In token whereof the respective plenipotentiaries have signed the present treaty and affixed their seals thereto.

        Done at Tientsin, in four copies, this twenty-seventh day of June, in the year of grace one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding to the seventeenth day of the fifth moon of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

BARON GROS.

29

[L.S.]

KWEI-LIANG.

99

[L.S.]

HWASHANA.

CONVENTION BETWEEN THE EMPEROR OF THE FRENCH

AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 25TH OCTOBER, 1860

     His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the difference which has arisen between the two Empires, and to re-establish and assure for ever the relations of peace and amity which before existed and which regrettable events have interrupted, have named as their respective Plenipotentiaries:-

     His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Sieur Jean Baptiste Louis, Baron Gros, Senator of the Empire, Ambassador and High Commissioner of France in China, Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Legion of Honour, Knight Grand Cross of several Orders, etc., etc., etc.;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Prince Kung, a member of the Imperial Family and High Commissioner;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles :-

Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of China has regarded with pain the conduct of the Chinese military authorities at the mouth of the Tientsin river, in the month of June last year, when the Ministers Plenipotentiary of France and England arrived there on their way to Peking to exchange the ratifications of the Treaties of Tientsin.

     Art. II. When the Ambassador, the High Commissioner of His Majesty the Emperor of the French, shall be in Peking for the purpose of exchanging the ratifica ti us of the Treaty of Tientsin, he shall be treated during his stay in the capital with the honours due to his rank, and all possible facilities shall be given him by the Chinese Authorities in order that he may without obstacle fulfil the high mission confided to him.

     Art. III. The treaty signed at Tientsin on the 27th June, 1858, shall be faith- fully placed in execution in all its clauses immediately after the exchange of the ratifications referred to in the preceding article, subject to the modifications introduced by the present Convention.

Art. IV. Article IV. of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin, by which His Majesty the Emperor of China undertook to pay to the French Government an indemnity of two million taels, is aunulled and replaced by the present Article, which increases the amount of the indemnity to eight million taels.

It is agreed that the sum already paid by the Canton Customs on account of the sum of two million taels stipulated by the Treaty of Tientsin shall be considered as having been paid in advance and on account of the eight million taels referred to in the present article.

gross

      The provisions of the Article of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin as to the mode of payment of the two million taels are annulled. Payment of the remainder of the sum of eight million taels to be paid by the Chinese Government as provided by the present Convention shall be made in quarterly instalments consisting of one-fifth of the Customs revenues at the ports open to foreign trade, the first term commencing on the 1st October of the present year, and finishing on the 31st December following. This sum, specially reserved for the payment of the indemnity due to France, shall be paid into the hands of the Minister for France or of his delegates in Mexican dollars or in bar silver at the rate of the day of payment.

      A sum of five hundred thousand taels shall, however, he paid on account in advance at one time, and at Tientsin, on the 36th November next, or sooner if the Chinese Government judges it convenient.

A Mixed Commission, appointed by the Minister of France and by the Chinese Authorities, shall determine the rules to be followed in effecting the payment of the whole of the indemnity, the verification of the amount, the giving of receipts, and in short fulfilling all the formalities required in such case.

Art. V. The sum of eight million taels is allowed to the French Government to liquidate the expenses of its armament against China, as also for the indemnification of French subjects and protégés of France who sustained loss by the burning of the

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

55

factories at Canton, and also to compensate the Catholic missionaries who have suffered in their persons or property. The French Government will divide this sum between the parties interested, after their claims shall have been legally established, in satisfaction of such claims, and it is understood between the contracting parties that one million of taels shall be appropriated to the indemnification of French subjects or protégés of France for the losses they have sustained or the treatment to which they have been subjected, and that the remaining seven million taels shall be applied t, the liquidation of the expenses occasioned by the war.

Art. VI.-In conformity with the Imperial edict issued on the 20th March, 1856 by the August Emperor Tao Kwang, the religious and charitable establishments which have been confiscated during the persecutions of the Christians shall be restored to their proprietors through the Minister of France in China, to whom the Imperial Government will deliver them, with the cemeteries and edifices appertaining to them.

Art. VII.-The town and port of Tientsin, in the province of Pechili, shall be opened to foreign trade on the same conditions as the other towns and ports of the Empire where such trade is permitted, and this from the date of the signature of the present Convention, which shall be obligatory on the two nations without its being necessary to exchange ratifications, and which shall have the same force as if it were inserted word for word in the Treaty of Tientsin.

The French troops now occupying this town shall, on the payment of the five hundred thousand taels provided by Article IV. of the present Convention, evacuate it and proceed to occupy Taku and the north-east coast of Shantung, whence they shall retire on the same conditions as govern the vacuation of the other points occupied on the shores of the Empire. The Commanders-in-Chief of the French force shall, however, have the right to winter their troops of all arms at Tientsin, if they judge it convenient, and to withdraw them only when the indemnities due by the Chinese Government shall have been entirely paid, unless the Commanders-in-Chief shall think it convenient to withdraw them before that time.

       Art. VIII.--It is further agreed that when the present Convention shall have been signed and the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin exchanged, the French forces which occupy Chusan shall evacuate that island, and that the forces before Peking shall retire to Tientsin, to Taku, to the north coast of Shantung, or to the town of Canton, and that in all these places or in any of them th French Government may, if it thinks fit, leave troops until such time as the total sum of eight million taels shall have een fully paid.

-

Art. IX. It is agreed between the high contracting parties that when the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin shall have been exchanged an Imperial edict shall order the high authorities of all the provinces to p rmit any Chinese who wish s to go to countries beyond the sea to establish himself there or to s-ek his fortune, to embark, himself and his family, if he so wishes, on French ships in the ports of the empire open to foreign trade. It is also agreed, in the interest of the emigrants, to ensure their entire freedom of action and to safeguard their rights, that the competent Chinese authorities shall confer with the Minister of France in China for the making of regulations to assure for these engagements, always voluntary, the guarantees of morality and security which ought to govern them.

Art. X. It is well understood between the contracting parties that the tonnage dues which by error were fixed in the French Treaty of Tientsin at five mace per ton for vessels of 150 tons and over, and which in the treaties with England and the United States signed in 1858 were fixed at four mace only, shall not exceed this same sum of four mace, and this without the invocation of the last paragraph of Art. XXXII., of the Treaty of Tientsin, which gives to France the formal right to claim the same treatment as the most favoured nation.

The present Convention of Peace has been made at Peking, in four copies, on the 25th October, 1860, and has been signed by the respective plenipotentiaries, who have thereto affixed their seals and their arıns.

[L.S.]

(Sd.)

BARON GROS.

[L.S.]

(Sa.)

KUNG.

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND COMMERCE BETWEEN

FRANCE AND CHINA

Signed at TIENTSIN, 9TH June, 1885

The President of the French Republic and His Majesty the Emperor of China each animated by an equal desire to bring to an end the difficulties which have given rise to their simultaneous intervention in the affairs of Annam, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship and commerce which previously existed between France and China, have resolved to conclude a new treaty to further the common interest of both nations on the basis of the preliminary Convention signed at Tentsin on the 11th May, 1834, and ratified by an Imperial decree of the 13th April, 1885.

For that purpose the two high contracting parties have appointed as their pleni- potentiaries the following, that is to say :-

     The President of the French Republic, M. Jules Patenôtre, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary for France in China, Officer of the L-gion of Honouř, Grand Crois of the Swedish Örder of the Pole Star, &c., &c.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Imperial Commissioner, Senior Gan Secretary of State, Grand Honorary Preceptor of the Heir Presumptive; Superintendent of Trade for the Norther. Ports, Governor-General of the Province of Chihli, of the First degree of the Third Order of Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi; Assi-ted by Hsi Chen, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsu g-li Yamên, President of the Board of Punishments, Administrator of the Treasury at the Ministry of Finance, Director of Scho Is for the Education of Hereditary Officers of the Left Wing of the Yellow Bordered Banner;

     And Teng Chang-su, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamên, Director of the Board of Ceremonies ;

Who having communicated their full powers, which have been found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :-

Art. I.-France engages to re-establish and maintain order in those provinces of Annam which border upon the Chinese empire. For this purpose she will take the necessary measures to disperse or expel the bands of pirates and vagabonds who endanger the public safety, and to prevent their collecting together again. Nevertheless the French troops shall not, under any circumstances, cross the frontier which separates Tonkin from China, which frontier France promises both to respect herself and to guarantee against any aggression whatsoever.

On her part China undertakes to disperse or expel such bands as may take refuge in her provinces bordering on Tonkin and to disperse those which it may be attempted to form there for the purpose of causing disturbances amongst the populations placed under the protection of France; and, in consideration of the guarantees which have been given as to the security of the frontier, she likewise engages not to send troops

into Tonkin.

The high contracting parties will fix, by a special convention, the conditions under which the extradition of malefactors between China and Annam shall be carried out. The Chinese, whether colonists or disbanded soldiers, who reside peaceably in Annam, supporting themselves by agriculture industry, or trade, and whose conduct shall give no cause of complaint, shall enjoy the same security for their persons and property as French protégés.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

57

Art. II.-China, being resolved to do nothing which may imperil the work of pacification undertaken by France, engages to respect, both in the present and in the future, the treaties, conventions, and arrangements concluded directly between France and Annam, or which may hereafter be concluded.

As regards the relations between China and Annam, it is understood they shall be of such a nature as shall in no way injure the dignity of the Chinese empire or give rise to any violation of the present treaty.

Art. III. Within a period of six months from the signature of the present treaty commissioners appointed by the high contracting parties shall proceed to the spot in order to define the frontier between China and Tonkin. They shall place landmarks wherever necessary to render the line of demarcation clear. In those cases where they may not be able to agree as to the location of these landmarks or on such rectifications of detail as it may be desirable to make, in the interest of the two natious, in the existing frontier of Tonkin, they shall refer the difficulty to their respective Governments.

Art. IV. When the frontier shall have been agreed upon, French or French protégés and foreign residents of Tonkin who may wish to cross it in order to enter China shall not be allowed to do so unless they shall have previously provided them- selves with passports issued by the Chinese frontier authorities on the requisition of the French authorities. For Chinese subjects an authorisation given by the Imperial frontier authorities shall be sufficient.

Chinese subjects wishing to proceed from China to Tonkin by the land route shall be obliged to provide themselves with regular passports, issued by the French authorities on the requisition of the Imperial authorities.

Art. V.-Import and export trade shall be permitted to French or French- protected traders and to Chinese traders across the land froutier between China and Tonkin. It shall, however, be carried on through certain spots which shall be settled later, and both the selection and number of which shall correspond with the direction and importance of the traffic between the two countries. In this respect the Regulations in force in the interior of the Chinese Empire shall be taken into

account.

In any case, two of the said spots shall be marked out on the Chinese frontier, the one above Lao-kai, the other beyond Lang-son. French traders shall be at liberty to settle there under the same conditions, and with the same advantages, as in the ports open to foreign trade. The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China shall establish custom houses there, and the Government of the French Republic shall be at liberty to maintain Consuls there whose powers and privileges shall be identical with those of Agents of the same rank in the open ports.

On his part, His Majesty the Emperor of China shall be at liberty, with the concurrence of the French Government, to appoint Consuls in the principal towns of Tonkin.

Art. VI.-A special code of Regulations, annexed to the present Treaty, shall define the conditions under which trade shall be carried on by land between Tonkin and the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, of Kwang-si, and of Kwang-tung. Such Regulations shall be drawn up by Commissioners, who shall be appointed by the High Contracting Parties, within three months from the signature of the present Treaty.

All goods dealt with by such trade shall be subject, on import and export between Tonkin and the provinces of Yünnan and Kwang-si, to duties lower than those laid down by the present Tariff for foreign trade. The reduced Tariff shall not, however, be applied to gods transported by way of the land frontier between Tonkin and Kwang-tung, and shall not be euforced within the ports already open by Treaty.

Trade in arms, engines, supplies, and munitions of war of any kind whatsoever shall be subject to the Laws and Regulations issued by each of the Contracting States within its own territory.

58

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

     The export and import of opium shall be governed by special arrangements to be inserted in the above-mentioned code of Regulations.

Trade by sea between China and Annam shall likewise be dealt with by a separate code of Regulations. In the meanwhile, the present practice shall remain unaltered.

     Art. VII.With a view to develop under the most advantageous conditions the relations of commerce and of good neighbourship, which it is the object of the present Treaty to re-establish between France and China, the Government of the Republic shall construct roads in Tonkin, and shall encourage the construction of railways there.

     When China, on her part, shall have decided to construct railways, it is agreed that she shall have recourse to French industry, and the Government of the Republic shall afford every facility for procuring in France the staff that may be required. It is, moreover, understood that this clause shall not be looked upon as constituting an exclusive privilege in favour of France.

     Art. VIII. The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty and the Regula tions to be agreed upon shall be liable to revision after an interval of ten complete years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. But in case six months before it expires neither one nor other of the High Contracting Parties shall have expressed a wish to proceed to a revision, the commercial stipula- tions shall remain in force for a fresh period of ten years, and so further in like

manner.

     Art. IX. As soon as the present Treaty shall have been signed, the French forces shall receive orders to retire from Kelung and to cease search, &c., on the high seas. Within one month from the signature of the present Treaty the Island of Formosa and Pescadores shall be entirely evacuated by the French troops.

     Art. X.-All stipulations of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions between France and China, which are not modified by the present Treaty, remai... in full force.

     The present Treaty shall be ratified at once by His Majesty the Emperor of China, and after it shall have been ratified by the President of the French Republic, the exchange of ratifications shall take place at Peking with the least possible delay.

     Done in quadruplicate at Tientsin, this ninth June, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-five corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the fourth moon of the eleventh year of Kwang-su.

PATENOTRE.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

"

[L.S.]

HSI CHEN.

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

29

[L.S.]

TENG CHANG-SU.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER JOINTLY

DETERMINED ON BY FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 25TH APRIL, 1886

[Translated from the French Text]

        Whereas in Article VI. of the Treaty between the President of the French Re- public and His Majesty the Emperor of China, signed the 9th day of June, 1865, it is stated that "

Regulations for the conduct of overland trade between Tonkin and the Chinese provinces of Yünnan, Kwang-si, and Kwang-tung shall be jointly discussed and concluded by Commissioners appointed by the two Powers, and will form a supple- ment to the present Treaty;" and whereas in the tenth article of that agreement it is set forth that "provisions of former Treaties and Regulations agreed to by France and China, except in so far as they are modified by the present agreement, will continue to retain their original validity," the two High Contracting Parties have for this purpose named as their plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

        The President of the French Republic, G. Cogordan, Minister Plenipotentiary of France to China, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Knight of the Order of the Crown of Italy, &c., &c., together with E. Bruwaert, Consul of the first class, Assistant Commissioner for Treaty negotiations, Knight of the Order of Gustav of Sweden, and of the Order of Leopold of Belgium;

        And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li, Grand Preceptor of the Heir Ap- parent, Grand Secretary of State, Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Seaboard, Joint Commissioner of Admiralty, Governor of Chihli, and a member of the first degree of the third order of the hereditary nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Who after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found them to be in due form, have concluded the following Articles :-

         Art. I.-In accordance with the terms of Article V. of the Treaty of the 19th June, 1885, the high contracting parties agree that for the present two places shall be opened to trade, one to the north of Langson and the other above Lao-kai. China will establish Custom Houses there, and France shall have the right to appoint Consuls, who shall enjoy all rights and privileges conceded in China to the Consuls of the most favoured nation.

         The work of the Commission charged with the delimitation of the two countries not being completed at the time of the signature of the present Convention, the place to be opened to trade north of Langson shall be selected and determined in the course of the present year by arrangement between the Imperial Government and the representative of France at Peking. As to the place to be opened to trade above. Lao-kai, this will also be determined by common accord when the frontier between the two countries shall have been defined.

        Art. II. The Imperial Government may appoint Consuls at Hanoi and at Haiphong. Chinese Consuls may also be sent later on to other large towns in Tonkin by arrangement with the French Government.

        The agents shall be treated in the same manner and have the same rights and privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation in France. They shall maintain official relations with the French authorities charged with the Protectorate.

60

TRADE KEGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

      Art. III.-It is agreed, on the one side and the ot er, that in the places where Consuls are appointed the respective authorities will facilitate the installation of these agents in suitable residences.

Frenchmen may establish themselves in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China under the conditions set forth in the Articles VII., X., XI., XII., and others of the treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Annamites st all enjoy in these places the same privileged treatment.

     Art. IV. Chinese shall have the right of possessing land, erecting buildings, opening commercial houses, and having warehouses throughout Annam.

They shall receive for their persons, their families, and their goods the same protection as the most favoured European nation, and, like the latter, may not be made the object of any ill-treatment. The official and private correspondence and telegrams of Chinese officials and merchants shall be freely transmitted through the French postal and telegraphic administrations.

Frenchmen will receive from China the same privileged treatment.

Art. V.-Frenchmen, French protégés, and foreigners residing in Tonkin may cross the frontiers and enter China on condition of being furnished with passports. These passports will be given by the Chinese authorities at the frontier, on the requisition of the French authorities, who will ask for them only for respectable persons; they will be surrendered to be cancelled on the holder's return. In the case

of those who have to pass any place occupied by aborigines or savages, it will le mentioned in the passport that there are no Chinese officials there who can protect them.

Chinese who wish to come from China to Tonkin by land must in the same way he furnished with passports granted by the French authorities on the requisition of the Chinese authorities, who will ask for them only on behalf of respectable persons.

      The passports so granted on the one side or the other shall serve only as titles to travel and shall not be considered as certificates of exemption from taxes for the transport of inerchandise.

      Chinese authorities on Chinese soil and French authorities in Tonkin shall have the right to arrest persons who have crossed the frontier without passports and send them back to their respective authorities to be tried and punished if necessary.

Chinese residing in Annam may return from Tonkin to China on simply obtaining from the Imperial authorities a pass permitting them to cross the frontier.

      Frenchmen and other persons established in the open places on the frontier may travel without passports to a distance of 50 li (578 metres to the li) around such places.

Art. VI. Merchandise imported into the places opened to trade on the frontier of China by French merchants and French protézés may, after payment of the import duties, be conveyed to the interior markets of China under the conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, and by the general rules of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs with regard to import transit passes.

When foreign merchandise is imported into these places a declaration shall be made at the Custom House of the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as of the name of the person by whom it is accompanied. The Custom authorities will proceed to verification, and will collect the duty according to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs, diminished by one-fifth. Articles not mentioned in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem. Until this duty has been paid the goods may not be taken out of the warehouses to be sent away and sold.

A merchant wishing to send foreign merchandise into the interior shall make a i fresh declaration at the Custom House, and pay, without reduction, the transit due fixed by the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

After this payment the Customs will deliver a transit pass which will enable the carriers to go to the localities mentioned in the pass for the purpose of disposing of the said merchandise.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

61

          Under these conditions, no new duties will be levied at the interior barriers or lekin stations.

         Merchandise for which transit passes have not been obtained will be liable to all the barrier and lekir. duties imposed upon indigenous products in the interior of the country.

Art. VII-Merchandise bought by Frenchmen and persons under French protection in the interior markets of China may be brought into the open places on the frontier, for the purpose of being from thence exported to Tonkin, under the conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, with regard to the transit of merchandise for export.

        When Chinese merchandise for export arrives at these places, declaration. shall be made at the Custom House as to the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as the name of the person accompanying it.

The Customs authorities will proceed to verification.

         Such of this merchandise as shall have been bought in the interior by a merchant furnished with a transit pass, and which consequently has not paid any lekin or barrier duty, shall in the first place pay the transit duty fixed by the general tariff of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

        It shall then pay the export duty diminished by one-third. Articles not named in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem.

After payment of these duties the merchandise will be allowed to pass free, and to be sent beyond the frontier.

        The merchant who, not being furnished with a transit pass, has bought goods in the interior, shall pay the duties levied at the barriers and lekin stations; receipts shall be delivered to him, and on arriving at the Custom House he shall be exempted from payment of the transit dues on presentation of these receipts.

        French merchants and persons under French protection importing or exporting merchandise through the Customs offices on the frontiers of Yunnan and Kwangsi, and Chinese merchants importing or exporting mercandise to or from Tonkin, will not have to pay any toll on their carriages or beasts of burden. On the navigable water-courses on the frontier, vessels may, on the one side and the other, be subjected to the payment of tonnage-dues, conformably to the rules of the Maritime Customs of the two countries.

        As regards the provisions of the present article and the preceding one, it is agreed by the high contracting parties that if a new customs tariff should be established by common accord between China and a third Power, for trade by land on the south-western frontiers of the Chinese Empire, France shall obtain the application of it.

         Art. VIII.-Foreign merchandise which, not having been sold within a period of thirty-six months after having paid the import duty at one of the Chinese frontier Cu-tons stations, is forwarded to the other frontier Customs station, shall be examined at the first of these stations, and if the wrappings are found intact, and if nothing has been disturbed or changed, a certificate of exemption for the amount of the first duty collected will be given. The bearer of this certificate will deliver it to the other frontier station, in payment of the new duty which he will have to pay. The Customs may in like manner give bonds which will be available for payment of duties at the Custom House by which they are issued any time with three years. Money will never be returned.

        If the same merchandise is re-despatched to one of the open ports of China, it will there, conformably to the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs, be subjected to payment of the import duties, and the certificates or bonds given at the frontier Customs shall not there be made use of. Neither will it be allowed to present there, in payment of duties, the quittances delivered by the frontier Customs on the first payment. As to transit dues, conformably to the rules in force at the open ports, when once they have been paid, bonds or exemption certificates will never be given in respect of these.

62

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

Art. IX.--Chinese merchandise which, after having paid transit and export dues at one of the frontier Customs stations, may be sent to the other frontier Customis station to be sold, shall be subjected on its arrival at the second station only to a payment--called a re-importation duty-of one-half the export duty already collected. The merchandise conformably to the rules established in the open ports may not be transported into the interior by foreign merchants.

     If this Chinese merchandise be transported to one of the open ports of China, it will be assimilated to foreign merchandise, and shall pay a new import duty in full, conformably to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs.

      This merchandise will be allowed to pay transit duty on being sent into the in- terior. Chinese merchandise imported from a Chinese seaport into an Annamite port in order to be transported to the land frontier and then to re-enter Chinese territory, will be treated as foreign merchandise and will pay the local import dues. This merchandise will be allowed to pay the transit duty on being sent into the interior.

      Art. X-Declarations to the Chinese Customs must be made within thirty-six hours of the arrival of the goods under a penalty of Tls. 50 for each day's delay; but the fine shall not exceed Tls. 200. Au inexact declaration of the quantity of the goods, if it is proved that it has been made with the intention of evading payment of the duties, will entail upon the merchant confiscation of his goods. Goods not provided with a permit from the chief of the Customs, which are clandestinely introduced by by-ways, and unpacked or sold, or which are intentionally smuggled, shall be entirely confiscated. In every case of false declaration or attempt to deceive the Customs as regards the quality or the real origin or real destination of goods for which transit passes have been applied the goods shall be liable to con- fiscation. The penalties shall be adjudged according to the conditions and proce- dure fixed by the Rules of 31st May, 1868. In all cases where confiscation shall have been declared, the merchant shall be at liberty to recover his goods on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, to be duly settled by arrangement with the Chinese authorities. The Chinese authorities shall have every liberty to devise measures to be taken in China, along the frontier, to prevent smuggling.

Merchandise descending or ascending navigable rivers in French, Annamite, or Chinese vessels will not necessarily have to be landed at the frontier, unless there is an appearance of fraud, or a divergence between the nature of the cargo and the declaration of the manifest. The Customs will only send on board the said vessels agents to visit them.

Art. XI.-Produces of Chinese origin imported into Toukin by the land frontier shall pay the import duty of the Franco-Annamite tariff. They will pay no export duty on leaving Tonkin. The Imperial Government will be notified of the new tariff which France will establish in Tonkin. If taxes of excise, of consumption, or of guarantee be established in Tonkin on any articles of indigenous production, similar Chinese productions will be subjected, on importation, to equivalent taxes.

      Art. XII. Chinese merchandise transported across Tonkin from one of the two frontier Customs stations to the other, or to an Annamite port to be from thence exported to China, shall be subjected to a specific transit duty which shall not exceed two per cent. of the value. At the point where it leaves Chinese territory this merchandise will be examined by the French Customs authorities on the frontier, who will specify its nature, quantity, and destination in a certificate which shall be produced whenever required by the French authorities during its transport across Tonkin, as well as at the port of shipment.

In order to guarantee the Franco-Annamite Customs against any possible fraud, such Chinese produces, on entering Tonkin, shall pay the import duty.

A transit permit will accompany the goods to the place of leaving the country whether this be the port of transhipment or the land frontier, and the sum paid by the proprietor of the merchandise will, after deducting the transit dues, be then restored to him in exchange for the receipt delivered to him by the Tonkin Customs. Every false declaration or act evidently intended to deceive the French admin- istration as to th quality, quantity, real origin, or real destination of merchandise

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

63

for which the special treatment applicable to Chinese products traversing Tonkin in transit is asked, will entail the confiscation of such merchandise. In every case where confiscation has been declared, the merchant shall be free to recover his goods on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, which shall be duly determined by an arrangement with the French authorities.

The same rules and the same transit duty will be applicable in Annam to Chinese merchandise despatched from a Chinese port to an Annamite port in order to get to the Chinese frontier Customs by crossing Tonkin.

Art. XIII.-The following articles, that is to say, gold and silver ingots, foreign money, flour, Indian eal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated ware, perfumery, soaps of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco, wine, beer, spirits, household stores, ship's stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, cutlery, drugs, foreign medicines, and glass ware, shall be verified by the Chinese Customs on their entry and clearance; if they are really of foreign origin and intended for the personal use of foreigners, and if they arrive in moderate quantity, a duty exemption certificate will be given which will pass them free at the frontier. If these articles are withheld from declaration or the formality of an exemption certificate, their clandestine intro- duction will render them subject to the same penalty as smuggled goods.

With the exception of gold, silver, money, and luggage, which will remain exempt from duty, the above-mentioned articles destined for the personal use of foreigners and imported in moderate quantity, will pay, when they are transported into the interior of China, a duty of 23 per cent. on their value.

The Franco-Annamite frontier Customs shall collect no duty on the following articles of personal use which Chinese carry with them, either on entering or leaving Tonkin, that is to say, money, luggage, clothes, women's head ornaments, paper, hair pencils, Chinese ink, furniture, or food, or on articles ordered by the Chinese Consuls in Tonkin for their personal consumption.

       Art. XIV. The high contracting parties agree to prohibit trade in and trans- port of opium of whatsoever origin by the land frontier between Tonkin on the one side and Yunnan, Kwang-si, and Kwangtung on the other side.

       Art. XV.-The export of rice and of cereals from China is forbidden. The import of these articles shall be free of duty.

The import of the following articles into China is forbidden :-Gunpowder, pro- jectiles, rifles and guns, saltpetre, sulphur, lead, spelter, arms, salt, and immoral publications.

In case of contravention these articles shall be entirely confiscated.

        If the Chinese authorities have arms or munitions bought or if merchants receive express authority to buy them, the importation will be permitted under the special surveillance of the Chinese Customs. The Chinese authorities may, further- more, by arrangement with the French Consuls, obtain for the arms and munitions which they wish to have conveyed to China through Tonkin exemption from all the Franco-Annamite duties.

        The introduction into Tonkin of arms, munitions of war, and immoral publica- tions is also prohibited.

Art. XVI.-Chinese residing in Annam shall be placed under the same condi- tions, with regard to criminal, fiscal, or other jurisdiction, as the subjects of the most favoured nation. Law-suits which may arise in China, in the open markets on the frontier, between Chinese subjects and Frenchmen or Annamites shall be decided in a Mixed Court by Chinese and French officers.

With reference to crimes or offences committed by Frenchmen or persons under French protection in China, in the places opened to trade, the procedure shall be in conformity with the stipulations of Articles XXXIII. and XXXIV. of the treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Art. XVII. If in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China Chinese deserters or persons accused of crimes against the Chinese law shall take refuge in the houses or on board the vessels of Frenchmen or persons under French protection

64

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA-1887

the local authority shall apply to the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused, shall immediately take the necessary measures in order that they may be given up and delivered to the regular course of the law.

Chinese guilty or accused of crimes or offences who seek refuge in Annam shall, on the request of the Chinese authorities and on proof of their guilt, be sought for, arrested, and extradited in all cases where the subjects of the countries enjoying the most liberal treatment in the matter of extradition might be extradited from France. Frenchmen guilty or accused of crimes or offences, who seek refuge in China, shall, at the request of the French authorities and on proof of their guilt, be arrested and delivered up to the said authorities to be tried according to the regular process of law.

On both sides all concealment and connivance shall be avoided.

Art. XVIII.-In any difficulty not provided for in the preceding provisions, recourse shall be had to the rules of the Maritime Cust ms, which, in conformity with existing treaties, are now applied in the open towns or ports.

      In case these rules are insullicient the representatives of the two countries shall refer the matter to their respective Governments.

      In accordance with the terms of Article VIII. of the treaty of the 9th June, 1885, the present stipulations may be revised ten years after the exchange of the ratifications.

     Art. XIX.-The present Convention of Trade, after having been ratified by the Governments, shall be promulgated in France, in China, and in Annam.

     the exchange of the rat fications shall take place at Peking within one year from the date of the signature of the C nvention, or earlier if possible.

Done at Tientsin, in four copies, the 25th April, 1886, corresponding to the 22nd day of the third moon of the twelfth year of Kwang-Su.

(Signed)

"}

[L.S.] [L.S.]

G. Cogordan.

E. BRUWAERKT.

99

[L.S.]

LI HUNG-CHANG.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

[Translated from the Chinese Text]

H.I.M.

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and the President of the French Republic, desiring to strengthen the commercial relations between the two countries and also to ratify and give effect to the Treaty signed at Tientsin on tue 25th April, 1886, have appointed Pleni; otentiaris to take the necessary steps thereto. the Emperor of China has specially appointed HIH. Prince Ching and H.E. Sun Yu-wen, member of the Tsung-li Yamen and Vice-President of the Board of Works. Tue President of the R public has appointed His Excellency Constans, Deputy, ex-Minister of the Interior, and Minister Plenipotentiary in China. Who, having exci.anged their full powers and established their authenticity in due form, have agreed on the following Articles :-

Art. I. Such articles of the Treaty signed at Tientsin as are not affected by this Convention shall on the exchange of the ratifications be put in force at once.

Art. II. Whereas it was agreed by the Treaty of 1886 that Lung how in Kwangsi and Mengtzu in Yunnan should be opened to trade, and whereas Manghao, which lies between Paosheng and Mengtzu, is in the direct road between the two places by water, it is agreed that this also shall be opened to trade on the same conditions as the other ports, and that a deputy of the Consul at Mengtzu shall be allowed to reside there.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA-1887

65

Art. III.-In order to develop the trade between China and Tonkin as rapidly as possible the tariff rules laid down in Articles VI. and VII. of the Treaty of 1886 are temporarily altered, and it is agreed that foreign goods imported to Yunnan and Kwangsi from Tonkin shall pay 70 per cent. of the import duties collected by the Customs at the Coast Ports in China, and that produce exported from China to Ton- kin, shall pay 60 per cent. of the export duties in force at the Treaty Ports.

Art. IV. Chinese produce which has paid import duties under Art. XI. of the Treaty of 1886, and is transported through Tonkin to a port of shipment in Cochin- China, shall if exported thence to any other place than Chiua pay export duties accord- ing to the Franco-Annamite tariff.

Art. V. Trade in Chinese native opium by land is alle wed on payment of an export duty of Tls. 20 per picul, but French merchants or persons under French pro- tection may only purchase it at Lungchow, Meugtzu, and Manghao, but no more than Tls. 20 per picul shall be exacted from the Chinese merchants as inland dues. When opium is sold the seller shall give the buyer a receipt showing that the inland ques have been paid, which the exporter will hand to the Customs when paying export duty. It is agreed that opium re-imported to China by the Coast Ports cannot claim the privileges accorded other re-imports of goods of native origin.

Art. VI. French and Tonkinese vessels other than men-of-war and vessels carrying troops aud Government stores plying on the Songkat and Caobang Rivers between Langshan and Caobang shall pay a tonnage due of 5 candareens per ton at Lungchow, but all goods on board shall pass free. Goods may be imported 10 China by the Songkat and Caobang Rivers or overland by the Government road, but until the Chine-e Government establishes Custom-houses on the frontier goods taken overland must not e sold at Lung how until they have paid duty there.

        Art. VII.-It is agreed that should Ch.na enter into treat es with regard to com- mercial rela ions on her southern and south-western frontiers all privileges accorded by her to the most favoured nation are at once without further formality accorded to France.

         Art. VIII.-The above Articles having been agreed to and translated into Chinese, H.I.H. the Prince on behalf of China and H.E. the Minister on behalf of France have signed duplicate copies and affixed their seals h reto.

Art. IX. When the ratifications of this Con ention and of the Treaty of 1886 shall have been exchanged they shall be put in force as if they were one Treaty.

Art. X.-The ratifi at ns of the Convention shall be exchanged at Pking when the asseut of His Imperia! Majesty the Emperor of China and of His Excellency the President of the French Repub.ic shall have been signified.

Signed at Peking on the 26th June, 1887.

E. CONSTANS. PRINCE CHIʼNG.

SUN YU-WEN.

3

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, 20TH JUNE, 1895

      Art. I. It is agreed, to assure the policing of the frontier, that the French Government will have the right of maintaining an agent of the Consular order at Tonghing opposite Monkay on the frontier of Kwantung. A further regulation will determine the conditions under which these should be exercised in accordance with the French and Chinese authorities and the communal police of the Sino- Annamite frontier.

     Art. II.-Article 2 of the Additional Convention, signed at Peking, June 26th, 1887, is modified and completed as follows:-It is agreed between the high contracting parties that the town of Lungchow in Kwangsi and that of Mêngtse in Yunnan are open to French-Annamite commerce. It is intended besides that the post open to commerce on the river route of Laokay to Mêngtse will no longer be Manhao, but Hokow, and that the French Government have the right of maintaining at Hokow an agent under the Consul at Mêngtse, at the same time the Chinese Government can maintain a customs agent.

The

      Art. III. It is agreed that the town of Ssumao in Yunnan shall be open to French-Annamite commerce, like Lungchow and Mêngtse, and that the French Government will have the right as in the other open ports of maintaining a Consul at the same time that the Chinese Government can maintain a customs agent. local authorities will employ themselves to facilitate the installation of the French Consul in the proper residence. Frenchmen and protected French subjects may establish themselves at Ssumao under conditions of the Articles 7, 10, 11, 12, and others of the treaty of June 27th, 1858; also by Article 3 of the Convention of April 25th, 1886. Goods destined for China can be transported by the rivers, particularly the Loso and the Mekong as well as by land routes, and particularly by the Mandarin-road which leads either from Monglê or Ipang to Ssumao and Puerh, the duties which these goods will be subject to being paid at Ssumao.

     Art. IV. Article 9 of the Commercial Convention of April 25th, 1886, is modified as follows :-(1) Chinese goods in transit from one of the other four towns open to commerce on the frontier, Lungchow, Mengtse, Ssumao, and Hokow, in passing by Annam, will pay on leaving the reduced duties of four-tenths.' A special certificate will be delivered stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they have come to another town they shall be exempt from payment and import duty. (2) Chinese goods which shall be exported from the four above named localities and transported to Chinese ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, shall be freed on leaving the frontier by payment of the reduced export duty of four-tenths. A special certificate will be delivered stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they shall arrive at one of the ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, they shall be freed the half-duty of ro-importation in conformity with the general rule for all such goods in the maritime or fluvial ports open to commerce. (3) Chinese goods which shall be transported from Chinese ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, by way of Annam, towards the four above named localities, shall be freed on leaving of all duty. A special certificate will be delivered, stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When they shall have arrived at one of the frontier customs they shall be freed on entry by half duty of re-importation based on the reduction of four-tenths (4) The Chinese goods above mentioned, accompanied by the special certificate.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA-1895

67

above mentioned, shall be, before passing the export customs, or after passing customs re-importation, submitted to the regulations governing native Chinese goods.

        Art. V.-It is understood that China, for the exploitation of its mines in the provinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi, and Kwangtung, will address itself, in the first instance, to French commerce and engineers, the exploitation remaining otherwise subject to the rules and the edicts by the Imperial Government which affects national industry. It is understood that railways already in existence or projected. in Annam can, after mutual agreement, and under conditions to be defined, be prolonged on Chinese territory.

       Art. VI.-Article 2 of the Telegraphic Convention between France and China, signed at Chefoo, December 1, 1888, is completed as follows:-D.-A union shall be established between the secondary prefecture of Ssumao and Annam by two stations, which shall be Ssumao in China and Muang Hahin in Annam, midway between Laichow and Luang Prabang. The tariff shall be fixed in conformity with Article 6 of the Telegraphic Convention of Chefoo.

       Art. VII. It is agreed that the commercial stipulations contained in the present Convention being of a special nature, and the result of mutual concessions deter- mined by the necessities of the relations between Lungchow, Hokow, Mêngtse, Ssumao, and Annam, the advantages which result therefrom cannot be invoked by the subjects and protected subjects of the two high contracting parties but on these points as well as on the fluvial and land ways here determined of the frontier.

Art. VIII.-The present stipulations shall be put in force as if they were in- serted in the text of the additional convention of June 26th, 1887.

        Art. IX. The terms of former treaties, agreements, and conventions between France and China not modified by the present treaty remain in full force. The pre- sent complementary convention shall be ratified immediately by His Majesty the Emperor of China, and after it has been ratified by the President of the French Republic the exchange of ratifications shall be made at Peking with the least delay possible.

       Done at Peking in four copies June twentieth, one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, corresponding to the twenty-eight day of the fifth moon of the twenty- first year Kwang Su.

(Signed)

A. GERARD. CHING.

SIU.

3*

GERMANY

TREATY OF AMITY, COMMERCE, AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN

PRUSSIA AND CHINA

SIGNED IN THE GERMAN, FRENCH, AND CHINESE LANGUAGES AT TIENTSIN, 2ND SEPTEMBER, 1861

Ratifications Exchanged at Shanghai, 14th January, 1863

Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, between the States of the German Customs Union, the Gran Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg- Strelitz, and the free Hanseatic Towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one pat, and Cina on the ot er part.

His Majesty te King of Pussia, for himself, as also on behalf of the other members of the German Zo Iverein. that is to say:-The Crown of Bavaria, the Crown of Sax ny, the Crown of Hanover, the Crown of Wurtemburg, he Grand Duchy of Baden, th Electorate of Hesse, the Grand Duchy of Hesse, the Duchy of Brunswick, the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, the Gran Duchy of Saxony, the Duchies of Saxe Meiningen, Saxe Altenburg, Saxe Coburg Gotha, the Dichy of Nassau, the Principalities Waldeck and Pyrmont, the Duc ies Anhalt, Dessau, Koethen, and Anhalt Bernburg, the Principalities Lippe, the Principalities Schwarzburg Sondershausen and Schwarzburg Rudolfstadt, Reuss ti e Elder Line, and Reuss the Younger L ne, the Free City of Frankfort, the Gran Balesick Meisenheim of the Landgravate Hes e, the Baillewick Hamburg of the Landgravate Hesse also the Grand Duchies Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Senates of the Hanseatic Towns. Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg, of the one part, and His Majesty the Emperor of China of the other part being sincerely desirous to establish friendly relatious between the said States and China, have resolved to confirm the same by a Treaty of Friendship and Commerce, mu ually advantageous to the subjects of both High Contracting Parties, and for that purpose have named for their Plenipotentiaries, that is to ay :-

is Majesty te King of Prussia, Frederick Albert Count of Eulenburg, Chamberlain, His Maje ty's Envoy Entraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Knight of the Red Eagle, Knigh of St. John, &c., &c., &c.; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Cheng-meen, a member of the Imperial Mini try of Foreign Affairs at Peking, Director-General of Public Supplies, and Im erial Commissioner: and Chong-hee, Honorary Under-Secretary of State, Superintendent of the three Northern Ports, and Deputy Imperial Commissioner, who after laving communicated to each other their respective full powers, and found the same in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles:

      Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and unchanging friendship between the contracting States. The subjects of both Stues shall enjoy full protection of and property.

person

Art. II-His Majesty the King of Prussia may, if he see fit, accredit a diplomatic agent to the Court of Peking, and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like manner, if he see fit, nominate a diplomatic agent to the Court of Berlin.

The diplomatic agent nominated by His Majesty the King of Prussia shall also represent the other contracting German States, who shall not be permitted to be represented at the Court of Peking by diplomatic agents of their own. His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the diplomatic agent, so appointed by His Majesty the King of Prussia, may, with his family and establishment, permanently reside at the capital, or may visit it occasionally, at the option of the Prussian Government.

Art. III. The diplomatic agents of Prussia and China shall, at their respective residences, enjoy the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international law.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

69

Their persons, their families, their residence, and their correspondence shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and ttendants without any kind of molestation.

      All expenses occasioned by the diplomatic missions shall be borne by the respective Governments.

       The Chinese Government agrees to assist His Prussian Majesty's diplomatic agent, upon his arrival at the capital, in selecting and renting a suitable house and other buildings.

Art. IV. The contracting German States may appoint a Consul-General, and for each port or city opened to foreign commerce a Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Age .t. as their interests may require

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consular officers of the most favoured na.ions.

In the event of the absence of a German Consular Officer, the subjects of the contracting German States shule at liberty to apply to the Consul of a friendly Power, or in case of need to the Superinten lent of Customs, who shall use all efforts to secure to them the privileges of this treat‹.

Art. V.-All official communications addressed by the diplomatic agents of His Majesty the King of Prussia, or by the Consular officers of the contracting German Stites, t, the hine e authorities, shall be written in German. At present and until otherwise a reed, they shall be accompanied y a Chinese translation; but it is hereby mutually agree I that, in the event of a difference of meaning appearing between the German and Chine e texts, the German Government shall be guided by the sense expre-se in the German text.

In like manner shall all official communications addressed by the Chinese autho- rities to the Ambassadors of Prussia. or to the Consuls of the contracting German States, be written in Chinese, and the Chine e authorities shall be gui ed by this text. I 18 further agreed that the translations may not be adduced as a proof in deciding difference.

In order to avoid fu ure differences, and in consi·lertion that all diplomatists cf Europe are acquai te with the French lan uage, the present treaty has been executed in the Ge min, the Chinese, and the French languages. All these vers ons have the same sen e and siguification; but the Fre ch text shall be c nsidered the original text of the treaty, and shall decide wherever the German and Chinese versions differ.

Art. VI. The subject of the contracting German States nay, with their families, reside, fr quent, and carry on trade or industry in the ports, cities, and towns of Canton, Swatow or Cho chow, Amoy, Foocho, Ningpo, Shanghai, Tangehow or Chefoo, Tientsin, Newchwang, Chinkiang, Kiukiang; Hankow, Kiungchow (lainan), and at Taiwan and Tamsi in the Island of Formosa. They are permitted to proceed to and from the e places with their vessels and merchandise, and within these 1. carit es to purchase, rent, or let houses or land, build, or open churches, churchyards, and hospitals.

A t. VII.-Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States may not enter other ports than those declared open in this treaty. They must not, contrary to law, enter other ports, or carry on ilicit trade along the coast. All vessels, detected in violating this stipulation shall, together with their cargo, be subject to, confi cation by the Chinese Government.

Art. VIII.-Subjects of the contracting German States may make excursions in the neighbourhood of the open ports to a distance of one hundred li, and for a time not exceeding five days.

Those desirous of proceeding into the interior of the country must be provided with a passport, issued by their respective Diplomatic or Consular authorities, and countersigned by the local Chinese authorities. These passports must upon demand be exhibited.

       The Chinese authorities shall be at liberty to detain merchants and travellers subjects of any of the contracting German States, who may have lost their passports

70

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

until they have procured new ones, or to convey them to the next Consulate, but they shall not be perimitted to subject them to ill-usage or allow them to be ill-used.

It is, however, distinctly understood that no passport may be given to places at present occupied by the rebels until peace has been restored.

Art. IX. The subjects of the contracting German States shall be permitted to engage compradores, interpreters, writers, workmen, sailors, and servants from any part of China, upon a remuneration agreed to by both parties, as also to hire boats for the transport of persons and merchandise. They shall also be permitted to engage Chinese for acquiring the Chinese language or dialects, or to instruct them in foreign languages. There shall be no restriction in the purchasing of German or Chinese books. Art. X.-Persons professing or teaching the Christian religion shall enjoy full protection of their persons and property, and be allowed free exercise of their religion.

       Art. XI. Any merchant-vessel of any of the contracting German States arriving at any of the open ports shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her to port. In like manuer, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties, and is ready to take her departure, she shall be permitted to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XII.-Whenever a vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States has entered a harbour, the Superintendent of Customs may, if he see fit, depute one or more Customs officers to guard the ship, and to see that no merchandise is smuggled. These officers shall live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their salaries, food, and expenses shall be defrayed by the Chinese Customs authorities, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever from the master or consiguee. Every violation of this regulation shall be punished proportionally to the amount exacted, which shall be returned in full.

      Art. XIII.-Within twenty-four (24) hours after the arrival of the ship, the master, unless he be prevented by lawful causes, or in his stead the supercargo or the consignee, shall lodge in the hands of the Consul the ship's papers and copy of the manifest.

       Within a further period of twenty-four (24) hours the Consul will report to the Superintendent of Customs the name of the ship, the number of the crew, her registered tonnage, and the nature of the cargo.

      If owing to neglect on the part of the master the above rule be not complied with within forty-eight hours after the ship's arrival he shall be liable to a fiue of fifty (50) dollars for every day's delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred (200) dollars.

       Immediately after the receipt of the report, the Superintendent of Customs shall issue a permit to open hatches.

       If the master shall open hatches and begin to discharge the cargo without said permit, he shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred (500) dollars, and the goods so discharged without permit shall be liable to confiscation.

       Art. XIV. Whenever a merchant, a subject of any of the contracting Gerinan States, has cargo to land or ship, he must apply to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Merchandise landed or shipped without such permit shall be subject to forfeiture.

Art. XV. The subjects of the contracting German States shall pay duties on all goods imported or exported by them at the ports open to foreign trade according to the tariff appended to this treaty; but in no case shall they be taxed with higher duties than, at present or in future, subjects of the most favoured nations are liable to. The commercial stipulations appended to this treaty shall constitute an integral part of the same, and shall therefore be considered binding upon both the high con- tracting parties.

       Art. XVI. With respect to articles subject to an ad valorem duty, if the German merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or three merchants to examine and appraise the goods, and the highest price at which any of these merchants may declare himself willing to purchase them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

71

Art. XVII. Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each article; tare therefore to be deducted. If the German merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers on the exact amount of tare, then each party shall choose from among the goods respecting which there is a difference a certain number of chests or bales, which being first weighted gross, shall afterwards be tared and the tare fixed accord- ingly. The average tare upon these chests or bales shall constitute the tare upon the whole lot of packages.

       Art. XVIII. If in the course of verification there arise other points of dispute, which cannot be settled, the German merchant may appeal to his Consul, who will communicate the particulars of the differences of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, and both will endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement. But the appeal to the Consul must be made within twenty-four hours, or it will not be attended to.

As long as no settlement be come to, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter the matter at issue in his books, in order that a thorough investigation and the final settlement of the difference be not prejudiced.

Art. XIX. Should imported goods prove to be damaged, a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed, in proportion to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in the same manner as agreed upon in Art. XVI. of this treaty having reference to articles which pay duty ad valorem.

Art. XX. Any merchant vessel belonging to one of the contracting German States having entered any of the open ports, and not yet opened hatches, may quit the same within forty-eight hours after her arrival, and proceed to another port, without being subject to the payment of tonnage-dues, duties, or any other fees or charges; but tonnage-dues must be paid after the expiration of the said forty-eight

hours.

Art. XXI.-Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the goods, and ducies of export on the shipping of the same. When all tonnage-dues and duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent of Customs shall give a receipt in full (port-clearance), which being produced at the Consulate, the Consular officer shall then return to the captain the ship's papers and permit him to depart on the voyage.

Årt. XXII.-The Superintendent of Customs will point out one or more bankers authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the duties on his behalf. The receipts of these bankers shall be looked upon as given by the Chinese Government itself. Payment may be made in bars or in foreign coin, whose relative value to the Chinese Sycee silver shall be fixed by special agreement, according to circumstances, between the Consular Officers and the Superintendent of Customs.

Art. XXIII.-Merchant-vessels belonging to the contracting German States of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden shall be charged four mace per ton; merchant-vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and under shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton.

The captain or consignee having paid the tonnage-dues the Superintendent of Customs shall give them a special certificate, on exhibition of which the ship shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in any open port of China which the captain may visit for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of the port clearance mentioned in Art. XXI.

Boats employed by subjects of the contracting German States in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provisions, or articles not subject to duties shall not be liable to tonnage dues. Any boat of this kind, however, conveying merchandise subject to duty, shall come under the category of vessels under one hundred and fifty tons, and pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per register ton.

Art. XXIV.-Goods on which duties have been paid in any of the ports open to foreign trade, upon being sent into the interior of the country shall not be subject to any but transit duty. The same shall be paid according to the tariff now existing, and may not be raised in future. This also applies to goods sent from the interior of the country to any of the open ports.

72

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

All transit duties on produce brought from the interior to any of the open ports or importations sent from any of the open ports into the interior of China may be paid once for all.

       If any of the Chinese officers violate the stipulations of this article by demanding illegal or higher duties than allowed by law, they shall be punished according to Chinese law.

Art. XXV.-If the master of a merchant vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States, having entered any of the pen ports, should wish to land only a portion of his cargo, he shall only pay duties for the portion so landed.

tie my take the rest of the cargo to another port, pay duties there, and dispose of the

same.

Art. XXVI.-Merchants of any of the contracting German States, who may have imported merchandise into any of the open ports and paid duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall cause exam nation to be made to satisfy himself of the identity of the goods and of their having remained unchanged.

      On such duty-paid goods the Superintendent of Customs shall, on application of the merchant wishing to export them to any other open port, issue a certificate, testifying the payment of all legal duties t! ereon.

      The Superintendent of Customs of the port to which such goods are brought, shall, upon presentation of said certificate, issue a permit for the discharge and landing of them free of all duty, without any additional exactions whatever.

                                          But if, on comparing the goods with the certificate, any fraud on the revenue be detected, then the goods shall be subject to confiscation.

But if the goods are to be exported to a foreign port, the Superintendent of Customs of the port from which they are exported shall issue a certificate stating that the merchant who exports the goods has a claim on the Customs equal to the amount of duty paid on the goods. The certificate shall be a valid tender to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

       Art. XXVII.-No transhipment from one vessel to another can be made without special permission of the Superintendent of Customs, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped, unless it be proved that there was danger in delaying the transh pinent.

Art. XXVIII. Sets of standard weights and measures, such as are in use at the Canton Custom House, shall be delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port open to foreign tra le. These measures, weights, and balances shall represent the ruling standard on which all demands and payments of duties are made and in case of any dispute they shall be referred to.

Art. XXIX.-Penalties enforced or confiscations made for violation of this Treaty, or of the appended regulations, shall belong to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXX.-Ships-of-war belonging to the contracting German States cruising about for the protection of trade, or being engaged in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit, without distinction, all ports within the dominions of the Emperor of China. They shall receive every facility for the purchase of provisions, the procuring of water, and for making repairs. The commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on terms of equality and courtesy. Such ships shall not be liable to payment of duties of any kind."

       Art. XXXI.-Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States, from injury sustained, or from other causes, compelled to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any port within the dominions of the Emperor of China without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties on the goods, if only landed for the purpose of making the necessary repairs of the vessel, and remaining under the supervision of the Superintendent of Customs. Should any such vessel be wrecked or stranded on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities shall immediately adopt measures for rescuing the crew and for securing the vessel and cargo. The crew thus saved shall receive friendly treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

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73

Art. XXXII.-If sailors or other individuals of ships-of-war or merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States desert their ships and take refuge in the dominions of the Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities shall, upon due requisition by the Consular Officer, or by the captain, take the necessary steps for the detention of tae deserter, and hand him over to the Consular Officer or to the captain. In like manner, if Chinese deserters or criminals take refuge in the houses or on board ships belonging to subjects of the contracting German States, the local Chinese authorities shall apply to the German Consular Officer, who will take the necessary measures for apprehending the said deserter or criminal, and deliver him up to the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXXIII.-If any vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States, while with n Chinese waters, be plundere by pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every means to capture and punish the said pirates, to recover the stolen property where and in whatever condition it may be, and to hand the same over to the Consul for restoration to the owner. If the robbers or pirates cannot be apprebended, or the property taken cannot be entirely recovered, the Chinese authorities shall then be punished in accordance with the Chinese law, but they shall not be held pecuniarily responsible.

Art. XXXIV.-If subjects of any of the contracting German States have any occasion to address a communication to the Chinese authorities, they must submit the same to their Consular Officer, determine if the matter be just, and the lan- guage be proper and respectful, in which event he shall transmit the same to the proper authorities, or return the same for alterations. If Chinese subjects have occasion to address a Consul of one of the contracting German States, they must adopt the same course, and submit their communication to the Chinese authorities, who will act in like manner.

Art. XXXV.-Any subjects of any of the contracting German States having reason to complain of a Chinese, must first proceed to the Consular Officer and state his grievance. The Consular Officer, having inquired into the merits of the case, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a Chinese have reason to complain of a subject of any of the contacting German States, the Consular Officer shall listen to his complaint and endeavour to bring about a friendly settlement. If the dispute, however, is of such a nature that the Consul cannot settle the same amicably, he shall then request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may conjointly examine into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI-The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest

protection to the subjects of the contracting German States, especially when they are exposed to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism, robbery, or demolition, the local authorities shall at once dispatch an armed force to disperse the mob, to apprehend the guilty, and to panish them with the rigour of the law. Those rotbed or whose property has been demolished shall have a claim upon the despoilers of their property for indemnification, proportioned to the injury sustained.

       Art. XXXVII.-Whenever a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China fails to discharge the debts due to a subject of one of the contracting German States, or fraudulently absconds, the Chinese authorities, upon application by the creditor, will do their utmost to effect his arrest and to enforce payment of the debt. In like manner the authorities of the contracting German States shall do their utmost to enforce the payment of debts of their subjects towards Chinese subjects, and to bring to justice any who fraudulently abscot.d. But in no case shall either the Chinese Government or the Government of the contracting German States be held responsible for the debts incurred by their respective subjects.

Art. XXXVIII.-Any subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China having committed a crime against a subject of one of the contracting German States, shall be apprehended by the Chinese authorities and punished according to the laws of China.

       In like manner, if a subject of the contracting German States is guilty of a crime against a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Consular Officer shall arrest him and punish him according to the laws of the State to which he belongs.

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TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

       Art. XXXIX.-All questions arising between subjects of the contracting German States in reference to the rights of property or person shall be submitted to the jurisdiction of the authorities of their respective States. In like manner will the Chinese authorities abstain from interfering in differences that may arise between subjects of one of the contracting German States and foreigners.

       Art. XL. The contracting parties agree that the German States and their subjects shall fully and equally participate in all privileges, immunities, and ad- vantages that have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the government or subjects of any other nation. All changes made in favour of any nation in the tariff, in the customs duties, in tonnage and harbour dues, in import, export, or transit duties, shall as soon as they take effect, imme- diately and without a new treaty, be equally applied to the contracting German States and to their merchants, shipowners, and navigators.

        Art. XLI.-If in future the contracting German States desire a modification of any stipulation contained in this treaty, they shall be at liberty, after the lapse of ten years, dated from the day of the ratification of this treaty, to open negotiations to that effect. Six months before the expiration of the ten years it must be officially notified to the Chinese Government that modifications of the treaty are desired, and in what these consist. If no such notification is made, the treaty remains in force for another ten years.

       Art. XLII. The present treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications be exchanged within one year, dated from the day of signature, the exchange of the ratifications to take place at Shanghai or Tientsin, at the option of the Prussian Government. mediately after the exchange of ratifications has taken place, the treaty shall be brought to the knowledge of the Chinese authorities, and be promulgated in the capital and throughout the provinces of the Chinese Empire, for the guidance of the authorities. In faith wheroof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of the high contracting powers, have signed and sealed the present treaty.

       Done in four copies, at Tientsin, this second day of Septemer, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding with the Chinese date the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

""

[L.S.] [L.S.]

L.S.

COUNT EULenburg. CHONG MEEN. CHONG HEE.

Separate Article

In addition to a treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation concluded this day between Prussia, the other states of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the Hanseatic towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg of the one part, and China of the other part, which treaty shall take effect after exchange of the ratifications within twelve months from its signature, and which stipulates that His Majesty the King of Prussia may nominate a diplomatic agent at the Court of Peking with a permanent residence at that capital, it has been convenanted between the respective Plenipotentiaries of these States, that, owing to and in consideration of the disturbances now prevailing in China, His Majesty the King of Prussia shall wait the expiration of five years after the exchange of ratifications of this treaty before he deputes a diplomatic agent to take his fixed residence at Peking.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have hereunto set their signa- tures and affixed their seals.

Done in four copies at Tientsin, this second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

COUNT EULENBURG. CHONG MEEN.

[L.S.]

[L.S.]

IL.8.1

CHONG HEE.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

Separate Article

75

In addition to a treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation, concluded between Prussia, the other States of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Hanseatic towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one part, and China on the other part.

       It has been separately agreed that the Senates of the Hanseatic towns shall have the right to nominate for themselves a Consul of their own at each of the Chinese ports open for commerce and navigation.

This separate article shall have the same force and validity as if included word for word in the above-mentioned treaty.

       In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this present separate article and affixed their seals.

       Done in four copies at Tientsin, the second day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed)

[L.S.]

L.S.

""

[L.S.]

COUNT EULENBURG. CHONG MEEN. CHONG HEE.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING IN THE GERMAN AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, ON THE 31ST MARCH, 1880

Ratified 16th September, 1881

[Translated from the German Text]

       His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, &c., in the name of the German Empire, and his Majesty the Emperor of China, wishing to secure the more perfect execution of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, have, in conformity with Article XLI. of that Treaty, according to the terms of which the High Contracting German States are entitled, after a period of ten years, to demand a revision of the Treaty, decided to conclude a Supplementary Convention.

       With this view they have appointed their Plenipotentiaries-viz., His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, &c., his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Max August Scipio von Brandt; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen, the Secretary of State, &c., Shen Kue-fen; and the Secretary of State, &c., Chin Lien;

       Who, after communicating to each other their full powers, and finding them in due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :-

       Art. I.-Chinese concession.-The harbours of Ichang, in Hupei; Wuhu, in Anhui; Wenchow, in Chekiang; and Pakhao, in Kwangtung, and the landing-places Tat'ung and Anking in Anhui; Huk'ow, in Kiangsi; Wusueh, Luchikow, and Shah- shih, in Hukuang, having already been opened, German ships are in future also to be permitted to touch at the harbour of Woosung, in the province of Kiangsu, to take in or discharge merchandise. The necessary Regulations are to be drawn up by the Taotai of Shanghai and the competent authorities.

       German concession. In the event of special regulations for the execution of concessions which the Chinese Government may make to foreign Governments being attached to such concessions, Germany, while claiming these concessions for herself and for her subjects, will equally assent to the regulations attached to them.

       Art. XI. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, is not affected by this regulation, and is hereby expressly coufirmed.

76

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN GERMANY AND China

Should German subjects, on the strength to this article, claim privi eges, immu- nities, or advantages which the Chinese Government may further concede to another Power, or the subject of such Power, they will also submit to the regulations which have been agreed upon in connection with such concession.

Art. II.-Chinese concession.-German ships, which have already paid tonnage dues in China, may visit all other open ports in China, as well as all ports not Chi se, without exception, without being again obliged to pay tonnage dues, within the given period of four months.

       German sailing-vessels which remain in the same Chinese harbour for a longer period than fourteen days shall only pay for time over and aove this period half of the tonnage dues stipulated by Treaty.

       German concession.-The Chinese Government shall have the right of appointing Consuls to all towns of Germany in which the Consuls of other States are admitt d and they shall enjoy the same rights and privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation.

        Art. III.-Chinese concession.--The Chinese Commissioner of Customs, and the other competent authorities, shall, after agreeing upon the necessary regulations, themselves take measures for the establishment of bonded warehouses in all the open ports of China in which they are required in the interests of fore gu com erce, and where local circumstances would admit of such an arrangement being made.

        German concession.-German ships, visiting the open ports of Chita, shall deliver a manifest containing an exact statement as to the quality and quantity of their cargoes. Mistakes which may have occurred in the manifests can be rectified in the course of twenty-four hours (Sundays and holidays excepted). False state- ments as to the quantity and quality of cargo are punishable by confiscation of the goods and also by a fine, to be imposed upon the captain, but not to exceed the sum of Tls. 500.

Art. IV. Chinese concession.-The export duty on Chinese coal, exported by German merchants from the open ports, is reduced to 3 mace per ton.

                                               In tho-e ports in which a lower duty on the export of coal has already been fixed upon, the lower duty remains in force.

      German concession.-Any one acting as pilot for any kind of craft whatever, without being furnished with the regulation certificate, is liable to a fine not to exceed Tls. 100 for each separate case.

       Regulations with a view to exercising a proper control over sailors are to be introduced with the least possible delay.

      Art. V.-Chinese concession.-German ships in want of repairs in consequence of damages sustained within or without the port are not required to pay tonnage dues during the period necessary for repairs, which is to be fixed by the Inspectorate of Customs.

       German concession.-Shi; s belonging to Chinese may not make use of the German flag, nor may German ships make use of the Chinese flag.

      Art. VI.-Chinese concession.-In the event of German ships, no longer fit for sea, being broken up in any open port of China, the material may be sld without any import duty being levied upon it. But if the materials are to be brought ashore a "permit of discharge must first be obtained for them from the Cutsoms Inspec torate, in the same manner as in the case of merchandise.

       German concession.-If German subjects travel into the nterior for their own pleasure without being in possession of a passport issued by the Consul and stamped by the proper Chinese authority, the local authorities concerned are entitled to have them taken back to the nearest Gerinan Consulate, in order that the requisite supervision may be exercised over them. The offender is, in addition to this, liable to a fine up to 300 taels.

     Art. VII. Chinese concession.--Materials for German docks are free of duty. A list of articles which may be imported free of duty in conformity with this stipulation is to be drawn up and published by the Inspector-General of Customs.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

77

      German concession.-Passes issued to German subjects for conveying foreign merchandise into the interior, as well as passports for the purpose of travelling issued to German subjects, are only to remain in force for a period of thirteen Chinese months from the day on which they were issued.

Art. VIII.--The settlement of the question relating to judicial proceedings in mixed cases, the taxation of foreign merchandise in the interior, the taxation of Chinese goods in the possession of foreign merchants in the nterior, and int r ourse between foreign and Chinese officials are to become the subject of special negotiation, which both Governments hereby declare themselves ready to enter upon.

      Art. IX.-All the provisions of the former Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, which have not been altered by this agreement, are hereby confirmed anew, as both parties now expressly declare.

In the cases of those articles, on the other hand, which are affe ted by the present treaty, the new interpretation of them is to be considered as binding.

Art. X.-The present Supplementary Convention shall be rat fied by their Majesties, and the ratifications exchanged at Peking, within a year from the date of its signature.

The provisions of the agreement come into force on the day of the exchange of the ratifications.

In witness whereof the plenipotentiaries of both the High Contracting Powers have sigued and sealed with their seals the above agreement in four copies, in the German and Chinese texts, which bave been compared and found to correspond.

       Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and eighty, corresponding to the twenty-first day of the second month of the sixth year Kwang Su.

(Signed) [L.S.]

[L.S.]

[L.S.]

M. VON BRandt. SHEN KUE-FEN. CHING LIEN.

SPECIAL STIPULATIONS TO THE SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION

       For the sake of greater clearness and completeness, it has seemed fitting to append a number of special stipulations to the Supplementary Convention.

      The following stipulations must be observed by the subjects of both the Contracting Parties, in the same way as the stipulations of the Treaty itself. In proof whereof the plenipotentiaries of the two States have thereto set their seals and signatures:-

       1.-In accordance with the newly granted privileges for the port of Woosung, in the province of Kiangsu, German ships shall be at liberty to take in and to unload there merchandise which is either intended for Shanghai or comes from Shanghai; and for this purpose the competent aut orities there shall have the right of devising regulations in order to prevent frauds on the taxes and irregularities of every kind; which regulations shall be binding for the merchants of bot countries, German merchants are not at liberty to construct landing-places for ships, merchants' houses, or warehouses at the said place.

2.-An experiment to ascertain whether bonded warehouses can be established in the Chinese open ports shall first be male at Shanghai.

                                     For this purpose the Customs Director at the said place, with the Customs Inspector-General, shall forthwith draw up regulations suitable to the local conditi ns, and then the said Customs Director and his colleagues shall proceed to the establishment of such bonded warehouse.

      3.-If any goods found on board a German ship, for the discharge whereof a written permit from the Customs Office is required, and not entered in the manifest, this shall be taken as proof of a false manifest, no matter whe her a certificate of the reception of such goods on board, bearing the captain's signature, be produced

or not.

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SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

4.-If a German ship, in consequence of damages received in one of the open Chinese ports, or outside thereof, needs repair, the time required for such repair shall be reckoned in addition to the term after the lapse of which tonnage-dues are to be paid. The Chinese authorities have the right to make the necessary arrange- ments for this purpose. But if it appears therefrom that this is only a pretext and a design to evade the legal payments to the Customs chest, the ship therein concerned shall be fined in double the amount of the tonnage-dues whereof it has tried to evade the payment.

       5.-No ships of any kind which belong to Chinese subjects are allowed to make use of the German flag. If there are definite grounds for suspicion that this has nevertheless been done, the Chinese authority concerned is to address an official communication thereon to the German Consul, and if it should be shown, in con- sequence of the investigation instituted by him, that the ship was really not entitled to bear the German flag, the ship as well as the goods found therein, so far as they belong to Chinese merchants, shall be immediately delivered over to the Chinese authorities for further disposal. If it be ascertained that German subjects were aware of the circumstances, and took part in the commission of the irregularity, the whole of the goods belonging to them found in the ship are liable to confiscation, and the people themselves to punishment according to law.

       In case a German ship carries the Chinese flag without authority to do so, then, if it be ascertained through the investigation made by the Chinese authorities that the ship was really not entitled to bear the Chinese flag, the ship, as well as the goods found therein, so far as they belong to German merchants, shall be imme- diately delivered over to the German Consul for further disposal and the punishment of the guilty. If it be shown that German owners of goods were aware of the cir- cumstance and took part in the commission of this irregularity, all the goods belong- ing to them found in the ship shall incur the penalty of confiscation by the Chinese authorities. The goods belonging to Chinese may be immediately sized by the Chinese authorities.

       6.-If, on the sale of the materials of a German ship which, from unseaworthi- ness, has been broken up in one of the open Chinese ports, an attempt be made to mix up with them goods belonging to the cargo, these goods shall be liable to con- fiscation, and, moreover, to a fine equal to double the amount of the import duty which they would otherwise have had to pay.

7.-If German subjects go into the interior with foreign goods, or travel there, the passes or certificates issued to them shall only be valid for thirteen Chinese months, reckoned from the day of their issue, and after the lapse of that term must no longer be used. The expired passes and certificates must be returned to the Customs authorities in whose official district they were issued in order to be cancelled.

       N.B.-If a pleasure excursion be undertaken into regions so distant that the term of a year appears insufficient, this must be noted on the pass by reason of an understanding between the Consul and the Chinese authority at the time it is issued.

       If the return of the passport be omitted, no further pass shall be issued to the person concerned until it has taken place. If the pass be lost, no matter whether within the term or after its expiration, the person concerned must forthwith make a formal declaration of the fact before the nearest Chinese authority. The Chinese official applied to will then do what else may be necessary for the invalidation of the pass.

If the recorded declaration prove to be untrue, in case the transport of goods be concerned, they will be confiscated; if the matter relate to travelling, the traveller will be taken to the nearest Consul, and be delivered up to him for punishment.

8.-Materials for German docks only enjoy, in so far as they are actually employed for the repair of ships, the favour of duty-free importation, in open ports. The Customs authority has the right to send inspectors to the dock to convince themselves on the spot as to the manner and way in which the materials are being used. If the construction of a new ship be concerned, the materials employed for bis, in so far as they are specially entered in the import or export tariff, will be

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

79

reckoned at the tariff duty, and those not entered in the tariff at a duty of 5 per cent. ad valorem, and the merchant concerned will be bound to pay this duty subsequently.

       Auy one who wishes to lay out a dock is t› get from the Customs Office a gratis Concession certificate, and to sign a written undertaking, the purport and wording whereof is to be settled in due form by the Customs office concerned.

       9.-Art. XXIX. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, shall be applicable to the fines established by this present Supplementary Convention.

       Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and eighty corresponding with the twenty-first day of the second month of the sixth year Kwang Sü.

(Signed)

[L.S.] M. VON BRandt.

""

[L.S.]

SHEN KUE-FEN.

""

[L.S.]

CHING LIen.

THE PRINCE OF KUNG AND THE MINISTERS OF the Tsung-LI YAMEN

TO HERR Von Brandt.

Kwang Sü, 6th year, 2nd mouth, 21st day. (Peking, March 31st, 1880.)

       With regard to the stipulation contained in the second Article of the Supple- mentary Convention concluded on occasion of the Treaty revision, that German sailing-ships which lie for a longer time than fourteen days in Chinese ports shall only pay for the time beyond that term the moiety of the tonnage dues settled by Treaty, the Plenipotentiaries of the two contracting parties have agreed and declared that the said stipulation shall first of all be introduced by way of trial, and that in case on carrying it out practical difficulties should arise, another stipula- tion may be put in its place on the basis of a renewed joint discussion by both parties.

(PRINCE KUNG AND THE MINISTERS OF THE TSUNG-LI Yamen).

PROTOCOL.

       The undersigned, who have been expressly empowered by their Government to make the following arrangements, have agreed that the term settled by the Pleni- potentiaries of the German Empire and of China in the Supplementary Convention concluded at Peking on the 31st March this year, for the exchange of the Ratifica- tion of the Convention, shall be prolonged till the 1st December, 1881.

       The other stipulations of the Supplementary Convention of the 31st March, this year, are not affected by this alteration.

       In witness whereof the undersigned have subscribed with their own hands and affixed their seals to this Agreement, in two copies of each of the German and Chinese texts, which have been compared with each other and found to correspond.

       Done at Peking the twenty-first August, one thousand eight hundred and eighty, corresponding with the sixteenth day of the seventh month of the sixth year Kwang Sü.

M. VON BRANDt.

(Signed)

""

[L.S.] [L.S.]

SHEN KUE-FEN.

[L.S]

"9

[L.S.]

19

[L.S.]

LIN SHU.

[L.8.]

CHING LIEN.

WANG NEen-Shou.

CHUNG LI.

THE KIAOCHOW CONVENTION

I.-His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous of preserving the existing good relations with His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, and of promoting an increase of German power and influence in the Far East, sanctions the acquirement under lease by Germany of the land extending for 100 li, at high tide (at Kiaochow).

His Majesty the Emperor of China is willing that German troops should take possession of the above-mentioned territory at any time the Emperor of Germany chooses. China retains her sovereignty over this territory, and should she at any time wish to enact laws or carry out plans within the leased area, she shall be at liberty to enter into negociations with Germany with reference thereto; provided always that such laws or plans shall not be prejudicial to German interests. Germany may engage in works for the public benefit, such as water-works, within the territory covered by the lease, without reference to China. Should China wish to march troops or establish garrisons therein she can only do so after negociating with and obtaining the express permission of Germany.

II.-His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, being desirous like the rulers of certain other countries, of establishing a naval and coaling station and constructing dockyards on the coast of China, the Emperor of China agrees to lease to him for the purpose all the land on the southern and northern sides of Kiaochow Bay for a term of ninety-nine years. Germany is to be at liberty to erect forts on this land for the defence of her possessions therein.

III. During the continuance of the lease China shall have no voice in the government or administration of the leased territory. It will be governed and administered during the whole term of ninety-nine years solely by Germany, so that the possibility of friction between the two Powers may be reduced to the smallest magnitude. The lease covers the following dist icts:-

(a)-All the land in the north-east of Lienhan, adjacent to the north-eastern mouth of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from the north-eastern corner of Yintao to Laoshan-wan.

(b.)-All the land in the south-west of Lienhan, adjacent to the southern mouth of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from a point on the shore of the Bay bearing south-west by south from Tsi-pe-san-to.

(c.)-Tsi-pe-shan-to and Yintao.

purpose

(d.)-The whole area of the Bay of Kiaochow covered at high-water. (e.)-Certain islands at the entrance of the Bay which are ceded for the of erecting forts for the defence of the German possessions. The boundaries of the leased territory shall hereafter be more exactly defined by a commission appointed jointly by the Chinese and German Governments, and consisting of Chinese and German subjects. Chinese ships of war and merchant-ships, and ships of war and merchant ships of countries having treaties and in a state of amity with China shall receive equal treatment with German ships of war and merchant ships in Kiaochow Bay during the continuance of the lease. Germany is at liberty to enact any regula- tions she desires for the government of the territory and harbour, provided such regulations apply impartially to the ships of all nations, Germany and China included.

IV. Germany shall be at liberty to erect whatever lighthouse, beacons, and other aids to navigation she chooses within the territory leased, and along the islands and coasts approaching the entrance to the harbour. Vessels of China and vessels of other countries entering the harbour shall be liable to special duties for the repair and maintenance of all light-houses, beacons and other aids to navigation which Germany may erect and establish. Chinese vessels shall be exempt from other special duties.

THE KIAOCHOW CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

81

V.--Should Germany desire to give up her interest in the leased territory before the expiration of ninety-nine years, China shall take over the whole area, and pay Germany for whatever German property may at the times of surrender be there situated. In cases of such surrender taking place Germany shall be at liberty to lease some other point along the coast. Germany shall not cede the territory leased to any other Power than China. Chinese subjects shall be allowed to live in the territory leased, under the protection of the German authorities, and there carry on their avoca- tions and business as long as they conduct themselves as peaceable and law-abiding citizens. Germany shall pay a reasonable price to the native proprietors for whatever lands her Goverument or subjects require. Fugitive Chinese criminals taking refuge in the leased teritory shall be arrested and surrendered to the Chinese authorities for trial and punishment, upon application to the German authorities, but the Chine-e authorities, shall not be at lirty to s nd agents into the leased territory to make arrests. The German authorities shall not interfere with the likin stations outside but adjacent to the territory.

THE RAILWAY AND MINING CONCESSION

I.-The Chinese Government sanctions the construction by Germany of two lines of railway in Shantung. The first will run from Kiaoch w and Tsinan-fu to the boundary of Shantung province via Wei-hsien, Tsinchow, Pashan, Tsechuen and Suiping. The second line will connect Kiaochow with Chinchow, wh. rce an extension will be constructed to Tsinan through Laiwu-hsien. The construction of this extension shall not be begun until the first part of the line, the main line, is completed, in order to give the Chinese an opportunity of connecting this line in the most advan- tageous manner with their own railway system. What places the line from Tsinan-fu to the provincial boundary shall take in en route is to be determined hereaftor.

II.-In order to carry out the above mentioned railway work a Chino-German shall be formed, with branches at whatever places may be necessary, and company in this Company both German and Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to invest money if they so choose, and appoint directors for the management of the undertaking.

        III. All arrangements in connection with the works specified shall be determined by a future conference of German and Chinese representatives. The Chinese Govern- ment shall afford every facility and protection and extend every welcome to represent- atives of the German Railway Company operating in Chines territory. Profits derived from the working of these railways shall be justly divided pro rata between the shareholders without regard to nationality. The object of contructing these lines is solely the development of commerce. In inaugurating a railway system in Shantung Germany entertains no treacherous intention towards China, and under- takes not to unlawfully seize any land in the province.

        IV. The Chinese Government shall allow German subjects to hold and develope mining property for a distance of 30 li from each side of these railways and along the whole extent of the lines. The following places where mining operations may be carried on are particularly specified along the northern railway from Kiaochow to Tsinan, Weihsien, Pa-shan-hsien and various other points; an along the Southern Kiaochow-Tsinan-Chinchow line, Chinchow-fu, Luiwuhsien, etc. Chinese capital may be investe in these operations and arrangements for carrying on the work shall hereafter be made by a joint conference of Chinese and German representat ves. All German subjects engaged in such works in Chinese territory shall be properly protected and welcomed by the Chinese authorities and all profits derived shall be fairly divided between Chinese and German shareholders according to the extent of the interest they hold in the undertakings. In trying to develope mining property in China, Germany is actuated by no treacherous motives against this country, but seeks alone to increase commerce and improve the relations between the two countries.

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THE KIAOCHOW CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

If at any time the Chinese should form schemes for the development of Shantung, for the execution of which it is necessary to obtain foreign capital, the Chinese Government, or whatever Chinese may be interested in such schemes, shall, in the first instance, apply to German capitalists. Application shall also be made to German manufacturers for the necessary machinery and materials before the manu- facturers of any other Power are approached. Should German capitalists or manu- facturers decline to take up the business the Chinese shall then be at liberty to obtain money and materials from sources of other nationality than German.

This convention requires the sanction of His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Germany. When the sanction of His Majesty the Emperor of China reaches Berlin the agreement approved by His Majesty the Emperor of Germany shall be handed to the Chinese Ambassador. When the final draft is agreed to by both parties four clean copies of it shall be made, two in Chinese and two in German, which shall be duly signed by the Chinese and German Minister at Berlin and Peking. Each Power shall retain one Chinese copy and one German copy, and the agreement shall be faithfully observed on either side.

Dated, the fourteenth day of the second moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu. (March 6th, 1898).

RUSSIA

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

SIGNED, IN THE RUSSIAN, CHINESE, AND FRENCH LANGUAGES,

AT ST. PETERSBURG, 12TH FEBRUARY, 1881

Ratifications exchanged at St. Petersburg, 19th August, 1881

[Translated from the French Text]

His Majesty the Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias and His Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to regulate some questions of frontier and trade touching the interests of the two Empires, in order to cement the relations of friendship between the two countries, have named for their plenipotentiaries, to the effect of establishing an agreement on these questions:--

His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias: His Secretary of State Nicholas de Giers, senator, actual privy councillor, directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and his envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China, Eugène de Buzow, actual councillor of state.

       And His Majesty the Emperor of China: Tseng, Marquess of Neyong, vice- president of the high court of justice, his envoy extraordinary and minister plenipo tenitary to His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, furnished with special powers to sign the present Treaty.in quality of ambassador extraordinary.

The above named plenipotentiaries, furnished with full powers, which have been found sufficient have agreed upon the following stipulations:-

       Art. I. His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias consents to the re- establishment of the Chinese Government in the country of Ili, temporarily occupied since 1871 by the Russian Armies. Russia remains in possession of this country, within the limits indicated by Article VII. of the present Treaty.

Art. II. His Majesty the Emperor of China engages to decree the proper measures to shelter the inhabitants of the country of Ili, of whatever race and to whatever religion they belong, from all prosecution, in their goods or in their persons, for acts committed during or after the troubles that have taken place in that country. A proclamation in conformity with this engagement will be addressed by the Chinese authorities, in the name of His Majesty the Emperor of China, to the popula tion of the country of Ili, before the restoration of this country to the said authorities.

        Art. III.-The inhabitants of the country of Ili will be free to remain in the places of their actual residence as Chinese subjects, or to emigrate to Russia and to adopt Russian dependence. They will be called to pronounce themselves on this subject before the re-establishment of Chinese authority in the country of Ili, and a delay of one year, from the late of the restoration of the country to the Chinese authorities, will be accorded to those who show a desire to emigrate to Russia. The Chinese will oppose no impediment to their emigration or to the transportation of their moveable property.

Art. IV.-Russian subjects possessing land in the country of Ili will keep their rights of property, even after the re-establishment of the authority of the Chinese Government in that country.

       This provision is not applicable to the inhabitants of the country of Ili who shall adopt Russian nationality upon the re-establishment of Chinese authority in this country.

Russian subjects whose lands are situated without places appropriated to Russian factories, in virtue of Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851, ought to discharge the same taxes and contributions as Chinese subjects.

       Art. V. The two governments will appoint commissioners of Kuldja, who will proceed to the restoration on the one part, to the resumption on the other, of

84

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

the administration of the province of Ili, and who will be charged, in general, with the execution of the stipulations of the present Treaty relating to the re-establish- ment, in this country, of the Chinese Government.

      The said commissioners will fulfil their commission, in conforming to the understanding w ich will be establi hed as to the mode of restoration on the one part and on resumption on the other, of the administration of the country of Ili, between the Governor-General of Turkestan and the Governor-General of Shansi and Kansuh, charged by the two governments with the high direction of the affair.

     The r suption of the country of Ili should be finished within a delay of three months or so.ner, if it can be done, dating from the day of the arrival at Tashkend of the functionary who will be delegated by the Governor-General of Shansi and Kansuh to the Governor-General of Turkestan to notify to him the ratification and the promulgation of the pr sent Treaty by His Majesty the Emperor of China.

     Art. VI.-The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China will pay to the Russian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover the expen es occasioned by the occupation of the country of Ili by the Russian troops since 1871, to satisfy all the pecuniary claims arising from, up to the present day, the losses which Russian subjects have suffered in their goods pillaged on Chinese territories, and to furnish relief to the families of Russian subjects killed in armed attacks of which they have been victims on Chinese territory.

The above mentioned sum of nine millions of metallic roubles will be paid within the term of two years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty, according to the order and the conditions agreed upon between the two governments in the special Protocol annexed to the present Treaty.

Art. VII.-The western portion of the country of Ili is incorporated with Russia, in order to serve as a place of establishment for the inhabitants of this country who shall adopt the Russian dependence and who, by this action, will have had to abandon the lands which they possessed there.

     The rontier between the possessions of Russia and the Chinese province of Ili will follow, starting from the mountains Bedjin-taou, the course of the river Khorgos, as far as the place where this river falls into the river Ili, and, crossing the latter, will take a direction to the south, towards the mountains Ouzoun-taou, leaving to the west the village of Koldjat. Proceeding from this point it will follow, whilst being directed to the south, the delineation fixed by the protocol signed at Tchugtu-

chack in 1864.

Art. VIII-A part of the frontier line, fixed by the protocol signed at Tchugtu- chack in 1864, at the east of the Lake Zaisan, having been found defective, the two governments will name commissioners who will modify, by a common agreement, the ancient delineation in such a manner as to remove the defects pointed out and to establish an effective separation between the Kirghiz tribes submitted to the two Empires.

T the new delineation will be given, as much as possible, an intermediate direc- tion between the old frontier and a straight line leading from the Kouitoun hill towards the Saour hills, crossing the Tcherny-Irtysh.

Art. IX. The commissioners to be named by the two contracting parties will proceed to place posts of demarcation, as well on the delineation fixed by the preceding Articles VII. and VIII., as on the parts of the frontier where posts have not yet been placed. The time and the place of meeting of these commissioners shall be fixed by an understanding between the two governments.

The two Goveri.ments will also name commissioners to examine the frontier and to place posts of demarcation between the Russian province of Ferganah and the western art of the Chinese province of Kashgar. The commissioners will take for the base of their work the existing frontier.

Art. X.-The right recognised by the treaties of the Russian Government to nominate Consuls to Ili, to Tarbagatai, to Kashgar, and to Ourga is extended, from the present time, to the towns of Soutcheon (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. In the following towns: Kobdo, Uliassoutai, Khami, Urumtsi, and Goutchen, the Russian

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

85

Government will establish consulates in proportion to the development of commerce, and after an understanding with the Chinese Government.

The Consul of Soutcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan will exercise consular functions in the neighbouring districts, where the interests of Russian subjects demand the presence.

       The dispositions contained in Articles V. and VI. of the Treaty concluded at Peking in 1860, and relative to the concession ot land for the houses for the con- sulates, for cemeteries, and for pasturage, will apply equally to the towns of Sout- cheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. The local authorities will aid the Consul to find provisional habitations until the time when the houses of the consulates shall be built.

       The Russian Consuls in Mongolia and in the districts situated on the two slopes of the Tien-shan will make use of, for their journeys and for their correspondence, the postal institutions of the government, conformably to the stipulations of Article XI. of the Treaty of Tientsin and of Article XII. of the Treaty of Peking. The Chinese authorities, to whom they will address themselves for this purpose, will lend them aid and assistance.

The town of Turfan not being a locality open to foreign trade, the right of establishing a consulate will not be invoked as a precedent to obtain a right analogous to the ports of China for the provinces of the interior and for Manchuria.

Art. XI.-Russian Consuls will communicate, for affairs of service, either with the local authorities of the town of their residence, or with the superior authorities of the circuit or of the province, according as the interests which are respectively confided to them, the importance of the affairs to be treated of, and their prompt expedition shall require. As to the rules of etiquette to be observed at the time of their interviews and, in general, in their relations, they will be based upon the respect which the functionaries of two friendly powers reciprocally owe each other.

All the affairs which may arise on Chinese territory, on the subject of commer. cial or other transactions, between those under the jurisdiction of the two states, will be examined and regulated, by a common agreement, by the consuls and the Chinese authorities.

        In lawsuits on commercial matters, the two parties will terminate their difference amicably by means of arbitrators chosen by one side and the other. If agreement is not established in this way, the affair will be examined and regulated by the authorities of the two states.

Engagements contracted in writing, between Russian and Chinese subjects, relative to orders for merchandise, to the transport of it, to the location of shops, of houses, and of other places, or relating to other transactions of the same kind, may be presented for legalisation by the consulates and by the superior local administrations, who are bound to legalize the documents which are presented to them. In case of non-execution of the engagements contracted, the consul and the Chinese authorities will consult as to the measures necessary to secure the execution of these obligations.

       Art. XII.-Russian subjects are authorized to carry on, as in the past, trade free of duties in Mongolia subject to China, as well in places and aimaks where there is a Chinese administration as in those where there is none.

       Russian subjects will equally enjoy the right of carrying on trade free of duties in the towns and other localities of the provinces of Ili, of Tarbagatai, of Kashgar, of Urumtsi, and others situated on the slopes north and south of the chain of the Tien-shan as far as the Great Wall. This immunity will be abrogated when the development of the trade necessitates the establishment of a customs tariff, conform- able to an understanding to be come to by the two Governments.

       Russian subjects can import into the above-named provinces of China aud export from them every description of produce, of whatever origin they way be. They may make purchases and sales, whether in cash, or by way of exchange; they will have the right to make their payments in merchandise of every description.

36

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. XIII.-In the places where the Russian Government will have the right to establish consulates, as well as in the town of Kalgan, Russian subjects may construct houses, shops, warehouses, and other buildings, on the lands which they will acquire by means of purchase, or which may be conceded to them by the local authorities, conformably to that which has been established for Ili and Tarbagatai, by Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851.

     The privileges granted to Russian subjects, in the town of Kalgan, where there will not be a consulate, constitute an exception which cannot be extended to any other locality of the interior provinces.

     Art. XIV.-Russian merchants who may wish to dispatch merchandise from Russia, by land, into the interior provinces of China, can, as formerly, direct it by the towns of Kalgan and Tungchow, to the port of Tientsin, and from there, to the other ports and interior markets, and sell it in those different places.

     Merchants will use this same route to export to Russia the merchandise purchased, as well in the towns and ports above named as in the interior markets.

     They will equally have the right to repair, for matters of trade, to Soutcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), the terminal point of the Russian caravans, and they will enjoy there all the rights granted to Russian trade at Tientsin.

     Art. XV.-Trade by land, exercised by Russian subjects in the interior and exterior provinces of China, will be governed by the Regulations annexed to the present Treaty.

The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty, as well as the Regulations which serve as a supplement to it, can be revised after an interval of ten years has elapsed from the date of the exchange of ratifications of the Treaty; but if, in the course of six months before the expiration of this term, neither of the contracting parties manifest a desire to proceed to the revision, the trade stipulations as well as the Regulations will remain in force for a new term of ten years.

     Trade by sea route of Russian subjects in China will be subject to the general regulations established for foreign maritime commerce in China. If it becomes necessary to make modifications in these regulations, the two Governments will establish an understanding on this subject.

     Art. XVI. If the development of Russian overland trade provokes the necessity of the establishment, for goods of export and import in China, of a Customs tariff, more in relation than the tariffs actually in force, to the necessities of that trade, the Russian and Chinese Governments will proceed to an understanding on this subject, by adopting as a base for settling the duties of entry and exit the rate of five per cent. of the value of the goods.

Until the establishment of this tariff, the export duties on some kinds of teas of inferior quality, actually imposed at the rates established for the tea of superior qualily, will be diminished proportionately to their value. The settling of these duties will be proceeded with, for each kind of tea, by an understanding between the Chinese Government and the envoy of Russia to Peking, within the term of one year, at the latest, from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. Art. XVII. Some divergencies of opinion having arisen hitherto as to the application of Article X. of the treaty concluded at Peking, in 1860, it is established by these presents, that the stipulations of the above-named article, relative to the recoveries to be effected, in case of theft and the harbouring of cattle beyond the frontier, will be for the future interpreted in this sense, that at the time of the discovery of the individuals guilty of theft or the harbouring of cattle, they will be condemned to pay the real value of the cattle which ther have not restored. It is understood that in case of the insolvency of the individuals guilty of theft of cattle, the indemnity to be paid cannot be placed to the charge of the local authorities.

The frontier authorities of the two States will prosecute, with all the rigour of the laws of their country, the individuals guilty of the harbouring of or theft of cattle, and should take the measures in their power for the restitution to whom they belong of cattle diverted, or which may have passed the frontier.

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

87

may be

        The traces of cattle turned aside or which may have passed the frontier indicated, not only to the guards of the frontier posts, but also to the elders of the nearest villages.

        Art. XVIII.-The stipulations of the treaty concluded at Aigoun the 16th May, 1858, concerning the rights of the subjects of the two Empires to navigate the Amoor, the Sungari, and the Oussouri, and to carry on trade with the populations of the riverine localities, are and remain confirmed.

The two Governments will proceed to the establishment of an understanding concerning the mode of application of the said stipulations.

        Art. XIX-The stipulations of the old treaties between Russia and China, not modified by the present Treaty, remain in full vigour.

       Art. XX. The present Treaty, after having been ratified by the two Emperors, will be promulgated in each Empire, for the knowledge and Governance of each one. The exchange of ratifications will take place at St. Petersburg, within a period of six months counting from the day of the signature of the Treaty.

       Having concluded the above Article, plenipotentiaries of the two contract- ing parties have signed and sealed two copies of the present Treaty, in the Russian, Chinese, and French languages. Of the three texts, duly compared and found in agreement, the French text will be evidence for the interpretation of the present Treaty.

one.

Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, eighteen hundred and eighty-

(Signed)

[L.S.] [L.S.

NICOLAS DE Giers. EUGENE BUrzow.

[L.S.]

TSENG.

19

PROTOCOL

In virtue of Article VI. of the Treaty signed to-day by the plenipotentiaries of the Russian and Chinese Governments, the Chinese Government will pay to the Russian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover the expenses of the occupation of the country of Ili by the Russian troops and to satisfy divers pecuniary claims of Russian subjects. This sum shall be paid within a period of two years counting from the day of the exchange of the ratifica- tions of the Treaty.

Desiring to fix the mode of payment of the aforementioned sum the undersigned have agreed as follows:-

་་

The Chinese Government will pay the equivalent of the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles in pounds sterling, say one million four hundred and thirty-one thousand six hundred and sixty-four pounds sterling two shillings to Messrs. Baring Brothers & Co. in London, in six equal parts, of two hundred and thirty- eight thousand six hundred and ten pounds sterling thirteen shillings and eight pence each, less the customary bank charges which may be occasioned by the transfer of these payments to London.

The payments shall be scheduled at four months' distance the one from the other; the first shall be made four months after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty signed to-day, and the last two years after that exchange.

The present protocol will have the same force and value as if it had been inserted word for word in the Treaty signed to-day.

In faith of which the plenipotentiaries of the two Governments have signed the present protocol and have placed their seals to it.

Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-one.

(Signed) [L.8.]

L.S.

""

[L.S.]

NICOLAS De Giers. EUGENE BUTZOW. TSENG.

88

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

REGULATIONS FOR THE LAND TRADE

Art. I.-A trade by free exchange and free of duty (free trade) between Russian and Chinese subjects is authorised within a zone extending for fifty versts (100 li) on either side the frontier. The supervision of this trade will rest with the two Governments, in accordance with their respective frontier regulations.

      Art. II.-Russian subjects proceeding on business to Mongolia and to the districts situated on the northern and southern slopes of the Tian-shan mountains may only cross the frontier at certain points specified in the list annexed to those regulations. They must procure from the Russian authorities permits in the Russian and Chinese languages, with Mongolian and Tartar translation. The name of the owner of the goods, or that of the leader of the caravan, a specification of the goods, the number of packages, and the number of heads of cattle may be indicated in the Mongolian or Tartar languages, in the Chinese text of these permits. Merchants on entering Chinese territory, are bound to produce their permits at the Chines, pos: nearest to the frontier, where, after examiuation, the permit is to be counter- signed by the chief of the post. The Chinese authorities are entitled to arrest merchants who have crossed the frontier without permit, and to deliver them. over to the Russian authorities nearest to the frontier, or to the competent Russian Consul, for the infliction of a severe penalty. In case of the permit being lost, the owner is bound to give notice to the Russian Consul, in order that a fresh one may be issued to, him, and inform the local authorities, in order to obtain a temporary certificate which will enable him to pursue his journey. Merchandise introduced into Mongolia and the districts situated on the slopes of the Tian-shan, but which have found no sale there, may be forwarded to the towns of Tientsin and Sou- tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), to be sold or to be sent farther into China. With regard to the duties on such merchandise, to the issue of permits for its carriage, and to other Customs formalities, proceedings shall be taken in accordance with the following provisions.

Art. III.-Russian merchants forwarding goods from Kiachta and the Nertchinsk country to Tientsin must send them by way of Kalgan, Dounba, and Toun-tcheou. Merchandise forwarded to Tientsin from the Russian frontier by Kobdo and Kouihoua tchen is to follow the same route. Merchants must be provided with transport permits issued by the Russian authorities, and duly visè by the competent Chinese authorities, which must give, in the Chinese and Russian languages, the name of the owner of the goods, the number of packages, and a description of the goods they contain. The officials of the Chinese Custom houses situated on the road by which merchandise is forwarded will proceed, without delay, to verify the number of the packages, and to examine the goods, which they will allow to pass onwards, after fixing a visa to the permit. Packages opened in the course of the Customs examinations will be closed again at the Custom-house, the number of packages opened being noted on the permit. The Customs examination is not to last more than two hours. The permits are t be presented within a term of six months at the Tientsin Custom-house to be cancelled. If the owner of the goods finds this term insufficient, he must at the proper time and place give notice to the Chinese authorities. In case of the permit being lost the merchant must give notice to the authorities who delivered it to him to obtain a duplicate and must for that

                                              purpose make known the number and date of the missing permit. The nearest Custom- house on his road, after having ascertained the accuracy of the merchant's declara- tions, will give him a provisional certificate, accompanied by which his goods may proceed on their journey. An inaccurate declaration of the quantity of the goods, if it be proved that it was intended to conceal sales effected on the road, or to escape payment of duty, will render the merchant liable to the infliction of the penalties laid down by Art. VIII. of the present regulations.

      Art. IV. Russian merchants who may wish to sell at Kalgan any portion of the goods brought from Russia must make a declaration to that effect to the local authorities within the space of five days. Those authorities, after the merchant has

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

89

paid the whole of the entrance duties, will furnish him with a permit for the sale of the goods.

Art. V.-Goods brought by Russian merchants by land from Russia to Tientsin will pay an entrance duty equivalent to two-thirds of the rate established by the tariff. Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay in that town the same duties and be subject to the same regulations as at Tientsin.

Art. VI.-if the goods left at Kalgan, having paid the entrance duties, are not sold there, their owner may send them on to Toun-tcheou, or to Tientsin, and the Customs authorities, without levying fresh duties, will repay to the merchant one-third of the entrance duty paid at Kalgan, a note to that effect being made on the permit issued by the Kalgan Custom-house. Russian merchants, after paying transit dues, i.e., on-alf of t..e duty specified in the tariff, may forward to the internal markets goods left a Kalgau which have paid the entrance dues, subject only to the general regulatans estabushed for foreign trade in China. A transport permit, which is to be produced at all the Custom-houses and barriers on the road, will be delivered for these goous. Goods not accompanied by such permit will have to pay duty at the Custom-houses they pass, and lekin at the barriers.

Art. VII.- Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) may be forwarded to the internal markets un er the conditions stipulated by Art. IX. of these negulations for goods forwarded from Tientsin destined for the internal market.

Art. VIII. If it be ascertained, when the Customs examination of goods brought from Russia to Tientsin takes place, that the goods specified in the permit have been withdrawn from the packages and replaced by other, or that their quantity (after deducting what has been left at Kalgan) is smaller than that inc'icated in the permit, the whole of the goods included in the examination will be confiscated by the Customs authorities. It is understood that packages damaged on the road, and which, con- Bequently, have been repacked, shall not be liable to confiscation, provided always that such damage has been duly declared at the nearest Custom-house, and that a note to such effect has been made by the office after it has ascertained the untouched condition of the goods as at first sen' off. Goods concerning which it is ascertained that a portion has been soid on the road will be liable to confi-cation. If goods have been taken by by-ways in order to evade their examination at the Custom houses established on the routes indicated in Art. III., the owner will be liable to a fine equal in amount to the whole entrance duty. If a breach of the aforesaid regulations has been committed by the carriers, without the knowledge or connivance of the owner of the goods, the Customs authorities will take this circumstance into consideration in determining the amount of the fine. This provision only applies to localities through which the Russian land trade passes, and is not ap licable to similar cases arising at the ports and in the interior of the provinces. When goods are confiscated the merchant is entitled to release them by paying the equivalent of their value, duly arrived at by an understanding with the Chinese authorities.

Art. 1X.-Ou the exportation by sea from Tientsin to some other Chinese port opened to foreign trade by treaty of goods brought from Russia Ly land, the Tientsin Customs will levy on such goods one-third of the tariff duty, in addition to the two-thirds already paid. No duty shall be levied on these goods in other ports. Goods sent from Tientsin or the other ports to the internal markets are subject 10 transit dues (i.e., half of the tariff duty) according to the general provisions laid down for foreign trade.

Art. X.-Chinese goods sent from Tientsin to Russia by Russian merchants must be forwarded to Kalgan by the route indicated under Art. III. The entire export duty will be levied on these goods when they leave the country. Nevertheless, re-imported goods bought at Tientsin, as well as those bought in another port and forwarded in transitu to Tientsin to be exported to Russia, if accompanied by a Customs receipt for the export duty, shall not pay a second time, and the half re-importation duty (coasting duty) paid at Tientsin will be repaid to the merchant if the goods upon which it has been paid are exported to Russia a year from

90

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

the time of such payment. For the transport of goods in Russia the Russian Consul will issue a permit indicating in the Russian and Chinese languages the name of the owner of the goods, the number of packages, and the nature of the goods they contain. These permits will be visé by the Port Custom authorities, and must accompany the goods for production when they are examined at the Custom houses on the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. will be observed as to the term within which the permit is to be presented to the Custom house to be cancelled, and as to the proceedings in case of the permit being lost. Goods will follow the route indicated by Article III., and are not to be sold on the road; a breach of this rule will render the merchant liable to the penalties provided for under Article VIII. Goods will be examined at the Custom houses on the road in accordance with the rules laid down under Article III. Chinese goods bought by Russian merchants at Son-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), or brought by them from the internal markets to be forwarded to Russia, on leaving Sou-tcheou for Russia will have to pay the duty leviable upon goods exported from Tientsin, and will be subject to the regulations established for that port.

Art. XI.-Goods bought at Toun-tcheou, on leaving that place for Russia by land, will have to pay the full export duty laid down by the tariff. Goods bought at Kalgan will pay in that town, on leaving for Russia, a duty equivalent to half the tariff rate. Goods bought by Russian merchauts in the internal markets, and brought to Toun-tcheou and Kalgan to be forwarded to Russia, will moreover be subject to transit dues, according to the general rules established for foreign trade in the internal markets. The local Custom houses of the aforesaid towns after levying the duties will give the merchant a transport permit for the goods. For goods leaving Toun-tcheou this permit will be issued by the Dounba Customs authorities, to whom application is to be made for it, accompanied by payment of the duties to which the goods are liable. The permit will mention the prohibition to sell goods on the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. relative to permits, the examination of goods, &c., will apply in like manner to goods exported from the places mentioned in this Article.

Art. XII.-Goods of foreign origin sent to Russia by land from Tientsin, Toun- tcheou, Kalgan, and Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay no duty if the merchant produces a Customs receipt acknowledging payment of the import and transit duties on those goods. If they have only paid entrance duties the competent Custom house will call upon the merchant for the payment of the transit dues fixed by the tariff.

     Art. XIII.-Goods imported into China by Russian merchants, or exported by them, will pay Custom duties according to the general tariff for foreign trade with China, and according to the additional tariff drawn up for Russian trade in 1862,

Goods not enumerated in either of those tariffs will be subject to a 5 per cent. ad valorem duty.

Art. XIV. The following articles will be admitted free of export and import duty: Gold and silver ingots, foreign coins, flour of all kinds, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothes, jewellery and silver plate, perfumery and soaps of all kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles of foreign manufacture, foreign tobacco and cigars, wine, beer, spirits, household stores and utensils to be used in houses and on board ship, travellers' luggage, official stationery, tapestries, cutlery, foreign medicines, glassware, and ornaments. The above-mentioned articles will pass free of duty on entering and on leaving by land; but if they are sent from the towns and ports mentioned in these regulations to the internal markets they will pay a transit duty of 24 per cent. ad valorem. Travellers' luggage, gold and silver ingots, and foreign coins will, however, not pay this duty.

Art. XV.-The exportation and importation of the following articles is prohibited, under penalty of confiscation in case of smuggling: -Gunpowder, artillery ammuni- tion, cannon, muskets, rifles, pistols, and all firearms, engines, and ammunition of war, salt, and opium. Russian subjects going to China may, for their personal defence, have one musket or one pistol each, of which mention will be made in the

AGREEMENT BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

91

permit they are provided with. The importation by Russian subjects of saltpetre, sulphur, and lead is allowed only under special licence from the Chinese authorities, and those articles may only be sold to Chinese subjects who hold a special purchase- permit. The exportation of rice and of Chinese copper coin is forbidden. On the other hand, the importation of rice and of all cereals may take place duty free.

Art. XVI.-The transport of goods belonging to Chinese merchants is forbidden to Russian merchants attempting to pass them off as their own property.

Art. XVII.-The Chinese authorities are entitled to take the necessary measures against smuggling.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 12th-24th February, 1881.

(Signed)

[L.S.] [L.S.

NICOLAS DE GIERS. EUGENE BUrzow.

""

""

L.S.]

TSENG.

PROTOCOL

        The undersigned Nicolas de Giers, secretary of state, actual privy councillor, directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Tseng, Marquess of Neyong, vice-president of the high court of justice, envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China to His Majesty the Emperor of Russia, have met at the hotel of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to proceed to the exchange of the acts of ratification of the Treaty between Russia and China, signed at St. Petersburg, the 12/24 February, 1881.

        After perusal of the respective instruments, which have been acknowledged tex- tually conformable to the original act, the exchange of the act ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of Russia the 4/16 August, 1881, against the act ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China the 3/15 May, 1881, has taken place according to custom.

In faith of which the undersigned have drawn up the present procés-verbal, and have affixed to it the seal of their arms.

one.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 7th August, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-

(Signed)

19

[L.S.] [L.S.]

NICOLAS DE Giers. TSENG.

PORT ARTHUR AND TALIENWAN AGREEMENT.

His Majesty the Emperor of China, on the sixth day of the third moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsü (March 27, 1898), appointed the Grand Secretary, Li Hung Chang, and the Senior Vice-President of the Board of Revenue, Chang Yin-huan, as Plenipotentiaries to arrange with M. Pavloff, Chargé d'Affaires and Plenipotentiary for Russia, all matters connected with the leasing and use by Russia of Port Arthur and Ta-lien-wan.

The treaty arranged between them in this condition is as follows

Art. I.-It being necessary for the due protection of her navy in the waters of North China that Russia should possess a station she can defend, the Emperor of China agrees to lease to Russia Port Arthur and Ta-lien-wan, together with the adjacent seas, but on the understanding that such lease shall not prejudice China's sovereignty over this territory.

        Art. II-The limits of the territory thus leased, for the reasons above stated, as well as the extent of territory north of Ta-lien-wan necessary for the defence of that now leased, and what shall be allowed to be leased shall be strictly defined and all details necessary to the carrying out of this treaty be arranged at St. Petersburg.

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AGREEMENT BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

with Hsu Tajên so soon as possible after the signature of the present treaty, and embodied in a separate treaty. Once these limits have been determined, all land held by Chinese within such limits, as well as the adjacent waters, shall be held by Russia alone on lease.

Art. III.-The duration of the lease shall be 25 years from the day this treaty is signed, but may be extended by mutual agreement between Russia and China.

Art. IV. The control of all military forces in the territory leased by Russia and of all naval forces in the adjacent seas, as well as of the civil officials in it, shall be vested in one high Russian official, who s' all, however, he designated by some title other than Governor-General (Tsung-tu) or Governor (H-ün-fu). All Chinese military forces shall, without exception, be withdrawn from the territory, but it shall remain optional with the ordinary Chinese inhabitants either to remain or to go, and no coercion shall be used towards them in this matter. Should they remain, any Chines charged with a criminal offenc" shall be harded over to the nearest Chinese offical to be dealt with according to Art. VIII. of the Russo-Chi..ese tr. aty

of 1860

Ait. V. -To the north of the territory leased shall be a zone, the extent of which shall be arrange at St. Petersburg between Hsi Ta-iên and the Russian Foreign Office Jurisdicti n over this zone shall be vested in China, but China may not quarter troops in it xcent with the previons consent of Russia.

I

As

     Art. VI.-The two nations agree that Port Arthur shall be a naval port for the sole use of Russian and Chinese men-of-war, and be considered as an unopened port so far as the naval and mercar tile vessels of other nations are concerned. regards Ta-lien-wan, one portion of the harbour shall be reservel exclusively for Russian and Chines men-of-war, just like Port Arthur, but the remainder shall be a commercial port freely open to the merchant vessels of all countries.

Art. VII.-Port Arthur and Ta-lien- wan are the points in the territory leased most important for Russian military purposes. Russia shall, ther fore, he at liberti to erect, at her own expense, forts and build barracks and provide defences at such places as she desires.

Art. VIII.-China agrees that the procedure sanctioned in 1896 regarding the construction of railroads by the boardf the Eastern China Railway shall, from the date of the signature of this treaty, be extended so as to include the construction of a branch line to Ta-lien-wan, or if necessary, in view of the interests involved, of a branch line to the most suitable point on the coast between New hwang and the Yalu River. Further, the agreement entered into in September, 1896, between the Chinese Government and the Russo-Chinese Bank shall apply with equal strength to this branch line. The direction of this branch line and the places it shall touch shall be arranged between Hsü Ta-jên and the board of the Eastern Railroads. construction of this line shall never, however, be made a ground for encroaching on the sovereignty or integrity of China.

The

      Art. IX. Th's treaty shall take full force and effect from the date it is signed, but the ratifications shall be exchanged in St. Petersburg.

Signed March 27, 1898.

UNITED STATES.

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CHINA

3

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH And Chinese Languages, at Tientsin, 18TH JUNE, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Pehtang, 16th August, 1859

The United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire desiring to maintain firm, lasting, and sincere fri ·ndship, have resolved to renew, in a manner clear and positive, by means of a Treaty or general Civ ntion of peace, a nity, al connerce, the rules which shall in future be mutually observel in the intercours of their respective countries; for which most desirable object the Presi lent of the Uitel State and the August Swereign of the Ta-Ts ng Enpire have na ned for thir Plenipotentiaries, to wit: the President of the Utel Sites of America, William B. Reed, Eavy Extra rlinary and Mniser Plenipotentiary to China; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kvailiang, a meuber f h Privy Council and Superinten lent of the Board of Punishments, ani wa hana, President of the Boar of Civil Ofice and Major-General of the Border d Blue Bann r Divis on of the Chinese Bannerinen, both of them bein: Im erial C miss oners an1 Plenipot ntia ries: And the said Ministers, in virtue of the respective full powers they have received from their governments, have agreed upon th following articles :-

·

Art. I. There shall be, as there has always been, peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Ta-l'sing Empire, and between their people respectively. They shall not insult or of press each other for a y trifling cause, 8 as to produce an estrangement between them; and if any other nation should act unjustly or oppressively, the United States will exert their good offices, n being informed of the case, to bring about an amicable arrangement of the question, thus showing their friendly feelings.

Art. II. In order to perpetuate friend-hip, on th exchange f ratifications by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and by His Majesty the Emperor of China, this Tr aty sha 1 be kept and sacredly guarded in this way, viz.: The original Treaty, as rat fiel by the President of the Unitel States, shall be deposited at Peking, the capital of His Majesty t e Emperor of China, in charge of the Privy Council; and, as ratified by His Majesty he Emperor of China, shall be deposited at Washington, the capital of the United States, in charge of the Secretary of State.

        Art. III.-In order that the people of the two countries may know and obey the provisions of this Treaty, the United States of America agree, immediat ly on the exchange of ratifications, to proclaim the same and publish it be proclamation in the Gazettes where the laws of the United States of America are pub'i hel by authority; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, on the exchange of ratifications, agrees immediately to direct the publication of the same at the capital and by the Governors of all the provinces.

        Art. ÎV.-In order further to perpetuate friendship, the Minister or Commis- sioner, or the highest diplomatic representative of the United States of America in China, shall at all times have the right to corre-pond on terms of perfect equality and confidence with the officers of the Privy Council at the capital, or with the Governor- General of the Two Kwang, of Fohkien and Chekiang, or of the Two Kiang; and whenever he desires to have such correspondence with the Privy Council at the capital he shall have the right to send it through either of the said Gover ors-General, or by general post; and all such communications shall be most carefully respected. The Privy Council and Governors-General, as the case may be, shall in all cases consider and acknowledge such communications promptly and respectfully.

        Art. V.-The Minister of the United States of America in China, whenever he has business, shall have the right to visit and sojourn at the capital of His Majesty the

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TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

Emperor of China and there confer with a member of the Privy Council or any other high officer of equal rank deputed for that purpose, on matters of common interest and advantage. His visits shall not exceed one in each year, and he shall complete his business without unnecessary delay. He shall be allowed to go by land or come to the mouth of the Pei-ho, in which he shall not bring ships-of-war, and he shall inform the authorities of that place in order that boats may be provided for him to go on his journey. He is not to take advantage of this stipulation to request visits to the capital on trivial occasions. Whenever he means to proceed to the capital he shall communicate in writing his intention to the Board of Rites at the capital, and thereupon the said Board shall give the necessary direction to facilitate his journey, and give him necessary protection and respect on his way. On his arrival at the capital he shall be furnished with a suitable residence prepared for him, and he shall defray his own expenses; and his entire suite shall not exceed twenty persons exclusive of his Chinese attendants, none of whom shall be engaged in trade.

     Art. VI. If at any time His Majesty the Emperor of China shall, by treaty voluntarily made, or for any other reason, permit the representative of any friendly nation to reside at his capital for a long or short time, then, without any further consultation or express permission, the representative of the United States in China shall have the same privilege.

Art. VII.-The superior authorities of the United States and of China in corresponding together shall do so on terms of equality and in form of mutual communication (chau-hwui). The Consuls and the local officers, civil and military, in corresponding together shall likewise employ the style and form of mutual communication (chau-hwui). When inferior officers of the one government address the superior officers of the other they shall do so in the style and form of memorial (shin-chin). Private individuals, in addressing superior officers, shal! employ the style of petition (pin-ching). In no case shall any terms or style be used or suffered which shall be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed that no present, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demanded of the United States by China, or of China by the United States.

Art. VIII. In all future personal intercourse between the representative of the United States of America and the Governors-General or Governors the interviews shall be had at the official residence of the said officers, or at their temporary resi dence, or at the residence of the representative of the United States of America. whichever may be agreed upon between them; nor shall they make any pretext for declining these interviews. Current matters shall be discussed by correspondence, so as not to give the trouble of a personal meeting.

     Art. IX-Whenever national vessels of the United States of America, in cruising along the coast and among the ports opened for trade for the protection of the com. merce of their country, or the advancement of science, shall arrive at or near any of the ports of China, the commanders of said ships and the superior local authorities of government shall, if it be necessary, hold intercourse on terms of equality and courtesy, in token of the friendly relations of their respective nations; and the said vessels shall enjoy all suitable facilities on the part of the Chinese Government in procuring provisions or other supplies, and making necessary repairs. And the United States of America agree that in case of the shipwreck of any American vessel and its being pillaged by pirates, or in case any American vessel shall be pillaged or captured by pirates on the seas adjacent to the coast, without being shipwrecked, the national vessels of the United States shall pursue the said pirates, and if captured deliver them over for trial and punishment.

Art. X.-The United States of America shall have the right to appoint Consuls and other commercial agents for the protection of trade, to reside at such places in the dominions of China as shall be agreed to be opened, who shall hold official intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese Government (a Consul or a Vice Consul in charge taking rank with an intendant of circuit or a prefect), either personally or in writing, as occasion may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal respect. And the Consuls and local officers shall employ the style of mutual

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95

communication. If the officers of either nation are disrespectfully treated, or aggrieved in any way by the other authorities, they have the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of their respective Governments, who shall see that full inquiry and strict justice shall be had in the premises. And the said Consuls and agents shall carefully avoid all acts of offence to the officers and people of China. On the arrival of a Consul duly accredited at any port in China, 'it shall be the duty of the Minister of the United States to notify the same to the Governor-General of the province where such port is, who shall forthwith recognize the said Consul and grant him authority to act.

Art. XI.-All citizens of the United States of America in China, peaceably attending to their affairs, being placed on a common footing of amity and good- will with subjects of China, shall receive and enjoy for themselves and everything appertaining to them the protection of the local authorities of Government, who shall defend them from all insult or injury of any sort. If their dwellings or property be threatened or attacked by mobs, incendiaries, or other violent or lawless persons, the local officers, on requisition of the Consul, shall immediately despatch a military force to disperse the rioters, apprehend the guilty individuals, and punish them with the utmost rigour of the law. Subjects of China guilty of any criminal act towards citizens of the United States shall be punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China, and citizens of the United States, either on shore or in any merchant vessel, who may insult, trouble, or wound the persons or injure the property of Chinese, or commit any other improper act in China, shall be punished only by the Consul or other public functionary thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States. Ar- rests in order to trial may be made by either the Chinese or United States authorities. Art. XII.-Citizens of the United States, residing or sojourning at any of the ports open to foreign commerce, shall be permitted to rent houses and places of business or hire sites on which they can themselves build houses or hospitals. churches, and cemeteries. The parties interested can fix the rents by mutual and equitable agreement; the proprietors shall not demand an exorbitant price, nor shall the local authorities interfere, unless there be some objections offered on the part of the inhabitants respecting the place. The legal fees to the officers for applying their seal shall be paid. The citizens of the United States shall not unreasonably insist on particular spots, but each party shall conduct themselves with justice and moderation. Any desecration of the cemeteries by natives of China shall he severely punished according to law. At the places where the ships of the United State anchor, or their citizens reside, the merchants, seamen, or others can freely pass and repress in the immediate neighbourhood; but in order to the preservation of the public peace, they shall not go into the country to the villages and marts to sell their goods unlawfully, in fraud of the revenue.

Art. XIII. If any vessel of the United States be wrecked or stranded on the coast of China and be subjected to plunder or other damage, the proper officers of the Government, on receiving information of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment, and be enabled to repair at once to the nearest port, and shall enjov all facilities for obtaining supplies of provisions and water. If the merchant vessels of the United States, while within the waters over which the Chinese Government exercises jurisdiction, be plundered by robbers or pirates, then the Chinese local authorities, civil and military, on receiving information thereof, shall arrest the said robbers or pirates, and punish them according to law, and shall cause all the property which can be recovered to be restored to the owners, or placed in the hands of the Consul. If by reason of the extent of territory and numerous population of China, it shall in any case happen that the robbers cannot be apprehended, and the property only in part recovered the Chinese Government shall not make indemnity for the goods lost; but if it shall be proved that the local authorities have been in collusion with the robbers, the same shall be communicated to the superior authorities for memorializing the Throne, and these officers shall be severely punished and their property be confiscated to repay the losses.

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      Art. XIV. The citizens of the United States are permitted to frequent the ports and cities of Canton and Chan-chau, or Swatow, in the province of Kwangtung; Amoy, Foochow, and Tai-wan in Formosa, in the province of Fuhkien; Niugpo in the province of Chekiang; and Shanghai in the province of Kiangsu, and any other port or place hereafter by treaty with other powers or with the United States opened to commerce; and to reside with their families and trade there, and to proceed at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise from any of these ports to any other of them. But said vessels shall not carry on a clandestine or fraudulent trade at other ports of China, not declared to be legal, or along the coasts thereof; and any vessel under the American flag violating this provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation to the Chinese Govern- ment; and any citizen of the United States who shall trade in any contraband article of merchandise shall be subject to be dealt with by the Chinese Government, without being entitled to any countenance or protection from that of the United States; and the United States will take measures to prevent their flag from being abused by the subjects of other nations as a cover for the violation of the laws of the Empire.

      Art. XV.-At each of the ports open to commerce, citizens of the United States shall be permitted to import from abroad, and sell, purchase, and export all mer han- dise of wh ch the importation or exportation is not prohibited by the laws of the Empire. The tariff of duties to be paid by the citizens of the United States, on the export and import of goods from and into China, shall be the same as was agreed upon at the Treaty of Wanghia, except so far as it may be modified by treaties with other nations, it being expressly agreed that citizens of the United States shall never pay higher duties than those paid by the most favoured nation.

Art. XVI.-Tonnage duties shall be paid on every merchant vessel belonging to the United States ent ring either of the open ports at the rate of four mace per ton of forty cubic feet, if she be over one hundred and fifty tons burden; and one mace per ton of forty cubic feet if she be of the burden of one hundred and fifty tons or under. according to tue ton. age specified in the register; which, with her other papers, shall, on her arrival, be lodged with the Consul, who shall report the same to the Commis- sioner of Customs. And if any ve-sel, having paid tonnage duty at one port, shall go to any other port t. complete the disposal of her cargo, or beng in ballast, to purchase an entire or fill up an incompl te cargo, the Consul shall report the same to the Commissioner of Custom, who shall note on the port-clearance that the tonnage duties have been paid, and report the circumstance to the collectors at the other Custom-houses; in which case, the said vessel shall only pay duty on her cargo, and not be charged with tonnage duty a second time. The collectors of Customs at the open ports shall consult with the Consuls about the erection of beacons or light- houses, and where buoys and light ships should be placed.

      Art. XVII.--Citizens of the United States shall be allowed to engage pilots to take their vessels into port, and, when the lawiul duties have all been paid, take them out of port. It shall be lawful for them to hire at pleasure servants, compradores, lingui-ts, writers, labourers, scamen, and persons for whatever necessary service, with passage or cargo-boats, for a reasonable compensation, to be agreed upon by the parties or determined by the Consul.

     Art. XVIII. Whenever merchant vessels of the United State shall enter a port, the Collector of Customs shall, if he see fit, appoint Custom-house officers to guard said vessels, who may live on board the ship or their own boats,at their convenience. The local authorities of the Chinese Government shall cause to be apprehended all mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China on being informed by the Consul, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officers for punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the houses, or on board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall not be harboured, but shall be delivered up to justice on due requisition by the Chinese local officers, addressed to those of the United States. The merchants, seamen, and other citizens of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate officers of their government. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence or disorder. use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances endangering life, the officers of

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the two governments will exert themselves to enforce order and to maintain the public peace, by doing impartial justice in the premises.

        Art. XIX. Whenever a merchant vessel belonging to the United States shall cast anchor in either of the said ports, the supercargo, master, or consignee, sball, within forty-eight hours, deposit the ship's papers in the hands of the Consul or person charged with his functions, who shall cause to be communicated to the Super- intendent of Customs a true report of the name and tonnage of such vessel, the number of her crew, and the nature of her cargo, which being done, he shall give a permit for her discharge. And the master, supercargo, or consignee, if he proceed to discharge the cargo without such permit, shall incur a fine of five hundred dollars, and the goods so discharged without permit shall be subject to forfeiture to the Chinese Government. But if a master of any vessel in port desire to discharge a part only of the cargo, it shall be lawful for him to do so, paying duty on such part only, and to proceed with the remainder to any other ports. Or if the master so desire, he may within forty- eight hours after the arrival of the vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking bulk; in which case he shall not be subject to pay tonnage or other duties or charges, until, on his arrival at another port, he shall proceed to discharge cargo when he shall pay the duties on vessel and cargo, according to law. And the tonnage duties shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. In case of the absence of the Consul or person charged with his functions, the captain or supercargo of the vessel may have recourse to the consul of a friendly power; or, if he please, directly to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall do all that is required to conduct the ship's business.

        Art. XX.-The Superintendent of Customs, in order to the collection of the proper duties, shall, on application made to him through the Consul, appoint suitable officers, who shall proceed, in the presence of the captain, supercargo, or consignee. to make a just and fair examination of all goods in the act of being discharged for importation, or laten for exportation, on board any merchant vessel of the United States. And if disputs occur in regard to the value of goods subject to ad valorem duty, or in regard to the amount of tare, and the same cannot be satisfactorily arranged by the parties, the question may, within twenty-four hours, and not after- wards, be referred to the said Consul to adjust with the Superintendent of Customs.

         Art. XXI.-Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise into any of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same in part or in whole to any other of the said ports, shall be entitled to make application, through their Consul, to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made, by suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods as are entered on the Custom- house books correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain with their original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum in the port-clearance of the goods and the amount of duties paid on the same, and deliver the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs at the other ports; all which being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, and everything being found, on examination there, to correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods without being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and confiscation to the Chinese Government. Foreign grain or rice brought into any port of China in a ship of the United States, and not landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

       Art. XXII. The tonnage duty on vessels of the United States shall be paid on their being admitted to entry. Duties of import shall be paid on the discharge of the goods, and duties of export on the lading of the same. When all such duties shall have been paid, and not before, the Collector of Customs shall give a port-clearance, and the Consul shall return the ship's papers. The duties shall be paid to the shroffs anthorized by the Chinese Government to receive the same. Duties shall be paid and received either in sycee silver or in foreign money, at the rate of the day. If the

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Consul permits a ship to leave the port before the duties and tonnage dues are paid, he shall be held responsible therefor.

      Art. XXIII.-When goods on board any merchant vessel of the United States in port require to be transhipped to another vessel application shall be made to the Consul, who shall certify what is the occasion therefor to the Superintendent of Customs, who may appoint officers to examine into the facts and permit the transhipment. And if any goods be transhipped without written permits, they shall be subject to be forfeited to the Chinese Government.

      Art. XXIV. Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the United States, the latter may seek redress in law; and on suitable representation being made to the local authorities through the Consul, they will cause due examination in the premises, and take proper steps to compel satisfaction. And if citizens of the United States be indebted to subjects of China, the latter may seek redress by representation through the Cousul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither government will hold itself responsible for such debts.

Art. XXV.-It shall be lawful for the officers or citizens of the United States to employ scholars and people of any part of China, without distinction of persons, to teach any of the languages of the Empire, and assist in literary labours, and the persons so employed shall not for that cause be subject to any injury on the part either of the Government or individuals; and it shall in like manner be lawful for citizens of the United States to purchase all manner of books in China.

Art. XXVI.-Relations of peace and amity between the United States and China being established by this treaty, and the vessels of the United States being admitted to trade freely to and from the ports of China opeu to foreign commerce, it is further agreed that, in case at any time hereafter China should be at war with any foreign nation whatever, and should for that cause exclude such nation from entering ber ports, still the vessels of the United States shall not the less continue to pursue their commerce in freedom and security, and to transport goods to and from the ports of the belligerent powers, full respect being paid to the neutrality of the flag of the United States, provided that the said flag shall not protect vessels engaged in the transportation of officers or soldiers in the enemy's service, nor shall said flag be fraudulently used to enable the enemy's ships, with their cargoes, to enter the ports of China; but all such vessels so offending shall be subject to forfeiture and confisca tion to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXVII.-All questions in regard to rights whether of property or person, arising between citizens of the United States in China, shall be subject to the jurisdiction and be regulated by the authorities of their own government; and all controversies occurring in China between citizens of the United States and the subjects of any other government shall be regulated by the treaties existing between the United States and such governments respectively, without interference on the part of China.

Art. XXVIII.-If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address any communication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they shall submit the same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and respectful, and the matter just and right, in which event be shall transmit the same to the appropriate authorities for their consideration and action in the premises. If subjects of China have occasion to address the Consul of the United States they may address him directly, at the same time they inform their own officers, representing the case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if controversies arise between citizens of the United States and subjects of China, which cannot be amicably settled otherwise, the same shall be examined and decided conformably 10 justice and equity by the public officers of the two nations, acting in conjunction. The extortion of illegal fees is expressly prohibited. Any peaceable persons are allowed to enter the Court in order to interpret, lest injustice be done.

     Art. XXIX.-The principles of the Christian Religion, as professed by the Protestant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good. and to do to others as they would have others to do to them.

Hereafter those who

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 59

quietly profess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on account of their faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese convert, who, according to those tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles of Christianity, shall in no case be interfered with or molested.

Art. XXX. The contracting parties hereby agree that should at any time the Ta-Tsing Empire grant to any nation, or the merchants or citizens of any nation, any right, privilege, or favour, connected either with navigation, commerce, political or other intercourse, which is not conferred by this Treaty, such right, privilege, and favour shall at once freely enure to the benefit of the United States, its public officers, merchants, and citizens.

The present Treaty of peace, amity, and commerce shall be ratified by the President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, within one year, or sooner, if possible, and by the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire forthwith; and the ratifications shall be exchanged within one year from the date of the signature thereof.

In faith whereof we, the respective plenipotentiaries of the United States of America and of the Ta-Tsing Empire, as aforesaid, have signed and sealed these presents.

Done at Tientsin, this eighteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, and the Independence of the United States of America the eighty-second, and in the eighth year of Hien Fung, fifth moon, and eighth day.

[L.S.] [L.S.

[L.S.]

WILLIAM B. Reed. KWEILIANG.

HWASHANA.

[Appended to the foregoing Treaty are Tariff and Rules identical with annexed to the British Treaty of Tientsin.]

Preusiche Smats briethek)

Berlin

ADDITIONAL ARTICLES TO THE TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CHINA OF 18TH JUNE, 1858

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LAnguages, at WASHINGTON, 28TH JULY, 1868

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 23rd November, 1869

         Whereas, since the conclusion of the Treaty between the United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire (China) of the 18th June, 1858, circumstances have arisen showing the necessity of additional articles thereto: the President of the United States and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for their Plenipotentiaries: to wit, the President of the United States of America, William R. Seward, Secretary of State; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Anson Burlingame, accredited as his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo- tentiary, and Chih-kang and Sun-chia-ku, cf the second Chinese rank, associated high Envoys and Ministers of his said Majesty; and the said Plenipotentiaries, after having exchanged their full powers, found to be in due and proper form, have agreed upon the following articles:-

Art. I.-His Majesty the Emperor of China, being of the opinion that in making concessions to the citizens or subjects of foreign powers, of the privilege of residing on certain tracts of land, or resorting to certain waters of that Empire, for purposes of trade, he has by no means relinquished his right of eminent domain or dominion over the said lands and waters, hereby agrees that no such concession or grant shall be construed to give to any power or party which may be at war with or hostile to

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100 ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

the United States, the right to attack the citizens of the United States, or their property, within the said lands or waters: And the United States, for themselves, hereby agree to abstain from offensively attacking the citizens or subjects of any power or party, or their property, with which they may be at war, on any such tract of land or water of the said Empire. But nothing in this article shall be construed to prevent the United States from resisting an attack by any hostile power or party upon their citizens or their property.

     It is further agreed that if any right or interest in any tract of land in China, has been, or shall hereafter be, granted by the Government of China to the United States or their citizens for purposes of trade or commerce, that grant shall in no event be construed to divest the Chinese Authorities of their right of jurisdiction over persons and property within said tract of land except so far as the right may have been expressly relinquished by treaty.

Art. II. The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China, believing that the safety and prosperity of commerce will thereby best be promoted, agree that any privilege or immunity in respect to trade or navigation within the Chinese dominions which may not have been stipulated for by treaty, shall be subject to the discretion of the Chinese Government, and may be regulated by it accordingly, but not in a manner or spirit incompatible with the Treaty stipulations of the parties. Art. III.-The Emperor of China shall have the right to appoint Consuls at ports of the United States, who shall enjoy the same privileges and immunities as those which are enjoyed by public law and treaty in the United States by the Consuls of Great Britain and Russia or either of them.

     Art. IV. The 29th article of the Treaty of the 18th June, 1858, having stipulated for the exemption of the Christian citizens of the United States and Chinese converts from persecution in China on account of their faith; it is further agreed that citizens of the United States in China of every religious persuasion, and Chinese subjects in the United States, shall enjoy entire liberty of conscience, and shall be exempt from all disability or persecution on account of their religious faith or worship in either country. Cemeteries for sepulture of the dead, of whatever nativity or nationality, shall be held in respect and free from disturbance or profanation.

     Art. V. The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance, and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens and subjects respectively from the one country to the other for the purposes of curiosity, of trade, or as permanent residents. The High Contracting Parties, therefore, join in reprobating any other than an entirely voluntary emigration for these purposes. They consequently agree to pass laws, making it a penal offence for a citizen of the United States, or a Chinese subject, to take Chinese subjects either to the United States or to any other foreign country; or for a Chinese subject or citizen of the United States to take citizens of the United States to China, or to any other foreign country, without their free and voluntary consent respectively.

Art. VI.-Citizens of the United States visiting or residing in China shall enjoy the same privileges, immunities, or exemptions, in respect to travel or residence as a there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

And reciprocally, Chinese subjects visiting or residing in the United States shall enjoy the sam privileges, immunities, and exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. But nothing herein contained shall be held to confer naturalization upon citizens of the United States in China, nor upon the subjects of China in the United States.

     Art. VII. Citizens of the United States shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational institutions under the control of the Government of China; and reciprocally Chinese subjects shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational institutions under the control of the Government of the United States, which are enjoyed in the respective countries by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. The citizens of the United States may freely establish and maintain school, within the Empire of China at those places where foreigners are by treaty permitted

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 101

to reside; and reciprocally, Chinese subjects may enjoy the same privileges and immunities in the United States.

Art. VIII. The United States, always disclaiming and discouraging all prac tices of unnecessary dictation and intervention by one nation in the affairs or domestic administration of another, do hereby freely disclaim and disavow any intention or right to intervene in the domestic administration of China in regard to the construc tion of railroads, telegraphs, or other material internal improvements. On the other hand, His Majesty the Emperor of China reserves to himself the right to decide the time and manner and circumstances of introducing such improvements within his dominions. With this mutual understanding it is agreed by the contracting parties that, if at any time hereafter his Imperial Majesty shall determine to construct, or cause to be constructed, works of the character mentioned within the Empire, and shall make application to the United States or any other Western Power for facilities to carry out that policy, the United States will in that case designate or authorize suitable engineers to be employed by the Chinese Government, and will recommend to other nations an equal compliance with such applications; the Chinese Government in that case protecting such engineers in their persons and property, and paying them a reasonable compensation for their services.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this treaty and thereto affixed the seals of their arms.

        Done at Washington, the twenty-eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

[L.S.] (Signed)

L.S.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD. ANSON BURLINGAME. CHIH KANG.

[L.S.]

"J

[L.S.]

SUN CHIA-KU.

""

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

SIGNED AT PEKING, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES ON THE 17TH NOVEMBER, 1880

The Immigration Treaty.

Whereas, in the eighth year of Hien Fung, Anno Domini 1858, a treaty of peace and friendship was concluded between the United States of America and China, and to which were added in the seventh year of Tung Chi, Anno Domini 1868, certain supplementary articles to the advantage of both parties, which supplementary articles were to be perpetually observed and obeyed; and

Whereas the Government of the United States, because of the constantly in- creasing immigration of Chinese labourers to the territory of the United States, and the ein barrassments consequent upon such immigration, now desires to negotiate a modification of the existing treaties which will not be in direct contravention of their spirit; now, therefore, the President of the United States of America appoints James B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council and Superintendent of the Board of Civil Office, and Li Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipo- tentiary; and the said Commissioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having discussed the points of possible modifications in existing treaties, have agreed upon the following articles in modification:-

Art. I.-Whenever, in the opinion of the Government of the United States, the coming of Chinese labourers to the United States, or their residence therein, affects,

102 IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA

or threatens to affect, the interests of that country, or to endanger the good order of any locality within the territory thereof, the Government of China agrees that the Government of the United States may regulate, limit, or suspend such coming or residence, but may not absolutely prohibit it. The limitation or suspension shall be reasonable, and shall apply only to Chinese who may go to the United States as labourers, other classes not being included in the limitation. Legislation in regard to Chinese labourers will be of such a character only as is necessary to enforce the regulation, limitation, or suspension, of immigration, and immigrants shall not be subject to personal maltreatment or abuse.

      Art. II.-Chinese subjects, whether proceeding to the United States as traders or students, merchants, or from curiosity, together with their body and household servants, and Chinese labourers who are now in the United States, shall be allowed to go and come of their own free will and accord and shall be accorded all the rights, privileges, immunities, and exemptions which are accorded to the citizens and subjects of the most favoured nations.

Art. III.-If Chinese labourers, or Chinese of any other class, now either permanently or temporarily residing in the territory of the United States, meet with ill-treatment at the hands of any other persons, the Government of the United States will exert all its power to devise measuers for their protection, and secure to them the same rights, privileges, immunities, and exemptions as may be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation, and to which they are entitled by treaty.

     Art. IV. The high contracting Powers, having agreed upon the foregoing Articles, whenever the Government of the United States shall adopt legislative measures in accordance therewith, such measures will be communicated to the Government of China, and if the measures, as effected, are found to work hardship upon the subjects of China, the Chinese Minister at Washington may bring the matter to the notice of the Secretary of State of the United States, who will consider the subject with him, and the Chinese Foreign Office may also bring the matter to the notice of the U.S. Minister at Peking and consider the subject with him, to the end that mutual and unqualified benefit may result. In faith whereof, the Plenipo- tentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking, in English and Chinese, there being three originals of each text of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

     Done at Peking, this 17th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Sü sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day. Signed and sealed by the abovenamed Commissioners of both Governments.

The Commercial Treaty

The following is the text of the commercial treaty signed at the same place and time :--

     The President of the United States of America and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, because of certain points of incompleteness in the existing treaties between the two Governments, have named as their Commissioners Plenipotentiary : The President of the United States of America, James B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Com- missioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council and Super- intendent of the Board of Civil Office; and Di Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial Majesty's Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and the said Com- missioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having discussed the points of possible modification in existing treaties, have agreed upon the following additional articles :-

      Art. I.-The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order to still further promote such relations between the citizens and subjects of the two Powers, mutually agree to give the most careful and favourable attention to the representations of either as to such special extension of commercial intercourse as either may desire.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U S. & CHINA 103

Art. II.-The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not b. permitted to import opium in any of the ports of the United States, and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China, or transport from one open port to any other open port, or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports of China. This absolute prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of China and the United States, and the benefits of the favoured nation clauses in existing treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens r subjects of either Power as against the provisions of this article.

       Art. III.-His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports or ex- ports or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States, or upon the produce, manu- factures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States or from any foreign country, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the same to the United States, or any foreign country, or transported in the same from one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes of any other nation, or on those of Chinese subjects. The United States hereby pro- mises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage duties and dues for imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels wholly belonging to the subjects of his Imperial Majesty, coming either directly or by way of any foreign port from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign trade to the ports of the United States, or returning therefrom either directly or by way of

        any foreign port to any of the open ports of China, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China, or from any foreign country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of any other nations which make no discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports, exports, or coastwise trade, or than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of citizens of the United States.

      Art. IV. When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of the United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined and decided by the public officer of the two nations, it is agreed between the Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trial, and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilities for watching the proceedings in the interest of justice, and if he so desire, he shall have the right to be present and to examine and to cross-examine witnesses. If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall be permitted to protest against them in debate. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing, at Peking, in English and Chinese, there being three originals of each text, of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Sü sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

(Signed) JAMES B. ANGELL.

""

""

""

JOHN F. SWIFT.

WILLIAM H. TRESCOTT.

PAO CHUN.

LI HUNG-TSAO.

:

104

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND CHINA, 1894

RATIFICATIONS EXCHANGED AT WASHINGTON, 7TH DECEMBER, 1894

Whereas, on the 17th of November, A. D. 1880, and of Kwanhsui, the sixth year, the tenth month, and the 15th day, a treaty was concluded between the United States and China for the purpose of regulating, limiting, or suspending the coming of Chinese labourers to and their residence in the United States, and, whereas, the Government of China, in view of the antagonism and much depreciated and serious disorders to which the presence of Chinese labourers has given rise in certain parts of the United States, desires to prohibit the emigration of such labourers from China to the United States; and, whereas, the two Governments desire to co-operate in prohibiting such emigration and to strengthen in many other ways the bounds of relationship between the two countries; and, whereas, the two Governments are desirous of adopting reciprocal measures for the better protection of the citizens or subjects of each within the jurisdiction of the other; now, therefore, the President of the United States has appointed Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State, as his Plenipotentiary, and his Imperial Majesty, the Emperor of China, has appointed Yang Yui, Officer of the Second Rank, Sub-director of the Court of Sacrificial Worship and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and the said Plenipotentiaries having exhibited their respective full powers, found to be in due form and good faith, have agreed upon the following articles :-

     Art. I. The high contracting parties agree that for a period of ten years, beginning with the date of the ratifications of this convention, the coming, except under the conditions hereinafter specified, of Chinese labourers to the United States shall be absolutely prohibited.

Art. II. The preceding article shall not apply to the return to the United States of any registered Chinese labourer who has a lawful wife, child, or parent in the United States or property therein of the value of $1,000, or debts of like amount due to him and pending settlement. Nevertheless, every such Chinese labourer shall, before leaving the United States, deposit, as a condition of his return, with the collector of customs of the district from which he departs, a full description in writing of his family or property or debts as aforesaid, and shall be furnished br the said collector with such certificate of his right to return under this treaty as the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe, and not inconsistent with the provisions of the treaty; and, should the written description aforesaid be proved to be false, the rights of return thereunder, or of continued residence after return, shall in each case be forfeited. And such right of return to the United States shall be exercised within one year from the date of leaving the United States; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an additional period, not to exceed one year, in cases where, by reason of sickness or other course of disability beyond his control, such Chinese labourer shall be rendered unable sooner to return, which facts shall be fully reported to the Chinese Consul at the port of departure, and by him certified to the satisfaction of the collector of the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no such Chinese labourer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea without producing to the proper officer of the Customs the return certificate herein required.

Art. III. The provisions of the convention shall not affect the right at present enjoyed of Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants, or travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not labourers, of coming to the United States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese subjects as are above described to admission into the United States they may produce a certificate either from their Government or from the Government of the country where they last resided, visód by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the country or

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 105

port whence they depart. It is also agreed that Chinese labourers s all continue to enjoy the privilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the course of their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations by the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent the said privilege of transit from being abused.

        Art. IV.-lu pursuance of Article 3 of the Immigration Treaty between the United States and China, sigued at Peking on the 17th day of November, 1880, it is hereby understood and agreed, that Chines labourers or Chinese of any other class, either permanently or temporarily residing in the United States, shall have for the protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the United States to citizens of the more favoured nations, excepting the right to become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms its obligations, as stated in the said Article 3, to exert all its power to secure the protection to the person and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

        Art. V. The Government of the United States having, by an Act of Congress, approved May 5th, 1892, as amended and approved November 3rd, 1893, required all Chinese labourers lawfully within the United States, before the passage of the first-named Act, to be registered, as in the said Acts provided, with a view of affording them better protection, the Chinese Government will not object to the enforcement of the said Acts, and reciprocally the Government of the United States recognises the right of the Government of China to enact and enforce similar laws and regulations, for the registration, free of charge, of all labourers, skilled or unskilled (not merchants, as defined by the said Acts of Congress), citizens of the United States in China whether residing within or without the treaty ports. And the Government of the United States agrees that within twelve months from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this convention, and annually thereafter, it will furnish to the Government of China registers or reports showing the full name, age, occupation, and number or place of residence of all other citizens of the United States, including missionaries residing both within and without the treaty ports of China, not including, however, diplomatic and other officers of the United States residing or travelling in China upon official business, together with their body and household servants.

        Art. VI. This convention shall remain in force for a period of ten years, beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications, and, it six months before the expiration of the said period of ten years neither Government shall have formally given notice of its final termination to the other, it shall remain in full force for another like period of ten years.

        In faith whereof, we, the respective plenipotentiaries, have signed this Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done, in duplicate, at Washington, the 17th day of March, A.D. 1894.

WALTER Q. GRESHAM,

YANG YUI,

Secretary of State.

Chinese Minister to the United States.

PORTUGAL

PROTOCOL, TREATY, CONVENTION, AND AGREEMENT BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

PROTOCOL

      Art. 1st.-A Treaty of friendship and commerce with the most favoured nation clause will be concluded and signed at Peking.

Art. 2nd.--China confirms perpetual occupation and government of Macao and its dependencies by Portugal, as any other Portuguese possession.

      Art. 3rd.-Portugal engages never to alienate Macao and its dependencies without agreement with China.

Art. 4th.-Portugal engages to co-operate in opium revenue work at Macao in the same way as England in Hongkong.

Done at Lisbon, the 26th March, 1887.

HENRIQUE DE BARROS GOMES. JAMES DUNCAN CAMPBell.

THE TREATY

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking 28th April, 1888

      His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to draw closer and to consolidate the ties of friendship which have subsisted for more than three hundred years between Portugal and China, and having agreed in Lisbon on the 26th day of March, 1887, 2nd day of 3rd moon of the 13th year of the reign of the Emperor Kwang-sü, through their representatives, on a Protocol of four Articles, have now resolved to conclude a Treaty of Amity and Commerce to regulate the relations between the two States; for this end they have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:-

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, Thomas de Souza Roza, His Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary in special mission to the Court of Peking, Knight of the Order of Nossa Senhora de Conceicao de Villa Vicosa, Grand Cross of the Order of the Rising Sun of Japan and of the Crown of Siam, Commander of the Order of Charles III. and of Isabella the Catholic of Spain, and Knight of the Iron Crown of Austria :

      His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, His Highness Prince Ch'ing, Pre- sident of the Tsung-li Yamén, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamên and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works s;

      Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :

Art. I. There shall continue to exist constant peace and amity between His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, whose respective subjects shall equally enjoy in the dominions of the High Contracting Parties the most complete and decided protection for their persons and property.

Art. II. China confirms in its entirety the second article of the protocol of Lisbon, relating to the perpetual occupation and government of Macao by Portugal.

It is stipulated that Commissioners appointed by both Governments shall proceed, to the delimitation of the boundaries, which shall be determined by a special con- vention; but so long as the delimitation of the boundaries is not concluded, every- thing in respect to them shall continue as at present, without addition, diminution, or alteration by either of the parties.

Art. III.-Portugal confirms, in its entirety, the third article of the protocol of Lisbon, relating to the engagement never to alienate Macao without previous agree- ment with China.

Art. IV. Portugal agrees to co-operate with China in the collection of duties on opium exported from Macao into China ports, in the same way, and as long as, England co-operates with China in the collection of duties on opium exported from Hongkong into Chinese ports.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

107

The basis of this co-operation will be established by a convention appended to th.s treaty, which shall be as valid and binding to both the High Contracting Parties as the present treaty.

Art. V.-His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves may appoint an Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to the Court of His Im- perial Majesty the Emperor of China, and this agent, as well as the persons of his suite and their families, will be permitted, at the option of the Portuguese Govern- ment, to reside permanently in Peking, to visit that Court, or to reside at any other place where such residence is equally accorded to the diplomatic representative of other nations. The Chinese Governnent may also, if it thinks fit, appoint an Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to reside at Lisbon, or to visit that Court when his Government shall order.

      Art. VI.-The diplomatic agents of Portugal and China shall reciprocally enjoy in the place of their residence all the prerogatives and immunities accorded by the laws of nations; their persons, families, and houses, as well as their correspondence shall be inviolate.

Art. VII. The official correspondence addressed by Portuguese authorities to the Chinese authorities shall be written in. the Portuguese language accompanied by a translation in Chinese, and each nation shall regard as authorita:ive the document written in its own language.

Art. VIII. The form of correspondence between the Portuguese and the Chi- nese authorities will be regulated by their respective rank and position, based upon complete reciprocity. Between the high Portuguese and Chinese functionaries at the capital or elsewhere, such correspondence will take the form of dispatch (Chau-hoei); between the subordinate functionaries of Portugal and the chief authorities of the provinces, the former shall make use of the form of exposition (Xen-chen) and the latter that of declaration (Cha-hsing); and the subordinate officers of both nations shall correspond together on terms of perfect equality. Merchants and generally all others who are not invested with an official character shall adopt, in addressing the authorities, the form of representation or petition (Pin-ching).

Art. IX. His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves may appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular agents in the ports or other places where it is allowed to other nations to have them. These functionaries will have powers and attributes similar to those of the Consuls of other nations, and will enjoy all the exemptions, privileges, and immunities which at any time the consular functionaries of the most favoured nation may enjoy.

       The Consuls and the local authorities will show to each other reciprocal civilities and correspond with each other on terms of perfect equality.

The

       The Consuls and acting Consuls will rank with Tao-tais, Vice-Consuls, acting Vice-Consuls, Consular agents and interpreters-translators, with Prefects.

The Consuls must be officials of the Portuguese Government and not merchants. Chinese Government will make no objection in case the Portuguese Government should deem it unnecessary to appoint an official Consul at any port and choose to entrust a Consul of some other nation, for the time being, with the duties of Portu- guese Consul at that port.

       Art. X.-All the immunities and privileges, as well as all the advantages con- cerning commerce and navigation, such as any reduction in the duties of navigation, importation, exportation, transit or any other, which may have been or may be here- after granted by China to any other State or to its subjects, will be immediately extended to Portugal and its subjects. If any concession is granted by the Chinese Government to any foreign Government under special conditions, Portugal, on claim- ing the same concession for herself and for her own subjects, will equally assent to the conditions attached to it.

       Art XI.-Portuguese subjects are allowed to reside at, or frequent, the ports of China opened to foreign commerce and there carry on trade or employ themselves. freely. Their boats may navigate without hindrance between the ports open to foreign

108

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

commerce, and they may import and export their merchandise, enjoying all the rights and privileges enjoyed by the subjects of the most favoured nation.

     Art. XII.-Portuguese subjects shall pay import and export duties on all mer- chandise according to the rates specified in the tariff of 1858, adopted for all the other nations; and in no instance shall higher duties be exacted from them than those paid by the subjects of any other foreign nation.

      Art. XIII.-Portuguese subjects are permitted to hire any descri. tion of boats they may require for the conveyance of cargo or passengers, and the price of said hire will be fixed by the contracting parties alone, without interference of the Chinese Government. No limit shall be put to the number of boats, neither will it be

per- mitted to any one to establish a monopoly of such boats or of the service of coolies employed in the carriage of merchandise.

Should contraband articles be on board any such boats, the guilty parties shall immediately be unished according to law.

     Art. XIV.-Portuguese subjects residing in the open ports may take into their service Chinese subjects, and employ them in any lawful capacity in China, without restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government; but shall not engage them for foreign countries in contravention of the laws of China.

     Art. XV.-The Chinese authorities are bound to grant the fullest protection to the persons and to the property of Portuguese subjects in China, whenever they may be exposed to insult or wrong. In case of robbers or incendiarism, the local autho rities will immediately take the necessary measures to recover the stolen property, to terminate the disorder, to seize the guilty, and punish them according to the law. Similar protection will be given by Portuguese authorities to Chinese subjects in the possession of Portugal.

     Art. XVI.-Whenever a Portuguese subject intends to build or open houses, shops or warehouses, churches, hospitals, or cemeteries, at the Treaty ports or at other places, the purchase, rent, or lease of these properties shall be made out accord. ing to the current terms of the place, with equity, with ut exaction on either side, without offending against the usages of the people, and atter due notice given by the proprietors to the local authority. It is understood, however, that the shops or ware houses above mentioned shall only be allowed at the ports open to trade, and not in any place in the interior.

Art. XVII.-Portuguese subjects conveying merchandise between open ports shall be required to take certificates from the Superintendent of the Customs house. such as are specified in the regulations in force with reference to other nationalities.

But Portuguese subjects, who, without carrying merchandise, would like to go to the interior of China, must have passports issued by their Consuls and counter. signed by the local anthorities. The bearer of the passport must produce the same when demanded, and the pass; ort not being irregular, he will be al owed to proceed and no oposition shall be offered, especially to his hiring persons or vessels for the carriage of his baggage or inerchandise.

     If he be without a passport, or if he commits any offence against the law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul of Portugal to be punished, but he must not be subjected to an oppressive measure. No passport need be applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding 100 li and for a period not exceeding five days.

The provisions of this article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

     Art. XVIII. In the event of a Portuguese merchant vessel being plundered by pirates or thieves within Chinese waters, the Chinese authorities are to emplo their utmost exertions to seize and punish the said robbers and to recover the stolen goods, which, through the Consul, shall be restored to whom they belong.

Art. XIX.-If a Portuguese vessel be shipwrecked on the coast of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any of the ports of the Empire, the Chinese authorities, on receiving notice of the fact, shall provide the necessary protection, affording

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

109

     prompt assistance and kind treatment to the crews and, if necessary, furnishing them the means to reach the nearest Consulate.

Art. XX.-Portuguese merchant vessels of more than one hundred and fifty tons burden will pay tonnage dues at the rate of four mace per ton; if of one hundred and fifty tons and under they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton. Superintendent of Customs shall grant a certificate declaring that the tonnage dues have been paid.

The

Art. XXI.-Import duties shall be paid on the landing of goods; and export duties upon the shipment of the same.

Art. XXII.-The captain of a Portuguese ship may, when he deems convenient, land only a part of his cargo at one of the open ports, paying the duties due on the portion lauded, the duties on the remainder not being payable until they are landed at some other port.

Art. XXIII.-The master of a Portuguese ship has the option, within forty- eight hours of his arrival at any of the open ports of China, but not later, to decide whether he will leave port without opening the hatches, and in such case he will not have to pay tonnage dues. He is bound, however, to give notice of his arrival for the legal registering as soon as he comes into port, under penalty of being fined in case of non-compliance within the term of two days.

       The ship will be subject to tonnage dues forty-eight hours after her arrival in port, but neither then nor at her departure shall any other impost whatsoever be

exact. d.

Art. XXIV.-All small vessels employed by Portuguese subjects in carrying passengers, baggage, letters, provisions or any other cargo which is free of duty, between the open ports of China, shall be free from tonuage dues; but all such vessels carrying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage dues every four months at the rate of one mace per ton.

Art. XXV.-Portuguese merchant vessels approaching any of the open ports will be at liberty to take a pilot to reach the harbour; and likewise to take a pilot to leave it, in case the said ship shall have paid all the duties due by her.

Art. XXVI.-Whenever a Portuguese merchant ship shall arrive at any of the open ports of China, the Superintendent of Customs will send off one or more Custom house officers, who may stay on board of their boat or on board of the ship as best suits their convenience. These officers will get their food and all necessaries from the Custom house, and will not be allowed to accept any fee from the captain of the ship or from the consignee, being liable to a penalty proportionate to the amount received by them.

Art. XXVII. Twenty-four hours after the arrival of a Portuguese merchant ship at any of the open ports, the papers of the ship, manifest, and other documents, sball be handed over to the Consul, whose duty it will be also to report to the Superintendent of Customs within twenty-four hours, the name, the registered tonnage, and the cargo brought by the said vessel. If, through negligence or for any other motive, this stipulation be not complied with within forty-eight hours after the arrival of the ship, the captain shall be subject to a fine of fifty taels for each day's delay over and above that period, but the total amount of the fine shall not exceed two hundred taels.

The captain of the ship is responsible for the correctness of the manifest, in which the cargo shall be minutely and truthfully described, subject to a fine of five hundred taels as penalty in case the manifest should be found incorrect. This fine, however, will not be incurred if, within twenty-four hours after the delivery of the manifest to the Custom house officers, the captain expressed the wish to rectify any

                  have been discovered in the said manifest. error which may

Art. XXVIII.--The Superintendent of Customs will permit the discharging of the slip as soon as he shall have received from the Consul the report drawn in due form. If the captain of the ship should take upo: himself to commence discharging without permission, he shall be fined five hundred taels, and the goods so discharged shall be confiscated.

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TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

Art. XXIX.-Portuguese merchants having goods to ship or to land will have to obtain a special permission from the Superintendent of Customs to that effect, without which all goods shipped or landed shall be liable to confiscation.

Art. XXX.-No transhipment of goods is allowed from ship to ship without special permission, under penalty of confiscation of all the goods so transhipped.

Art. XXXI.-When a ship shall have paid all her duties, the Superintendent of Customs will grant her a certificate and the Consul will return the papers, in order that she may proceed on her voyage.

Art. XXXII.-When any doubt may arise as to the value of goods which by the tariff are liable to an ad valorem duty, and the Portuguese merchant disagrees with the Custom house officers as regards the value of said goods, both parties will call two or three merchants to examine them, and the highest offer made by any of the said merchants to buy the goods will be considered as their just value.

     Art. XXXIII.-Duties will be paid on the net weight of every kind of merchandise. Should there be any difference of opinion between the Portuguese merchant and the Custom-house officer as to the mode by which the tare is to be fixed, each party will choose a certain number of boxes or bales from among every hundred packages of the goods in question, taking the gross weight of said packages, then the tare of each of the packages separately, and the average tare resulting there from will be adopted for the whole parcel.

In case of any doubt or dispute not mentioned herein, the Portuguese merchant may appeal to the Consul, who will refer the case to the Superintendent of Customs; this officer will act in such a manner as to settle the question amicably. The appeal, however, will only be entertained if made within the term of twenty-four hours; and in such a case no entry is to be made in the Custom-house books in relation to the said goods until the question shall have been settled.

Art. XXXIV.-Damaged goods will pay a reduced duty proportionate to their deterioration; any doubt on this point will be solved in the way indicated in the clause of this Treaty with respect to duties payable on merchandise ad valorem.

     Art. XXXV.--Any Portuguese merchant who, having imported foreign goods into one of the open ports of China and paid the proper duties thereon, may wish to re-export them to another of the said ports, will have to send to the Superintendent of Customs an account of them, who, to avoid fraud, will direct his officers to examine whether or not the duties have been paid, whether the same have been entered on the books of the Customs, whether they retain their original markets, and whether the en- tries agree with the account sent in. Should everything be found correct, the same will be stated in the export permit together with the total amount of duties paid, and all these particulars will be communicated to the Custom house officers at other ports.

Upon arrival of the ship at the port to which the goods are carried, permission will be granted to land without any new payment of duties whatsoever if, upon examination, they are found to be the identical goods; but if during the ex- amination any

fraud be detecte 1, the goods may be confiscated by the Chinese Govern

ment.

     Should any Portuguese merchant wish to re-export to a foreign country any goods imported, and upon which duties have been already paid, he will have to make his application in the same form as required for the re-exportation of goods to another port in China, in which case a certificate of drawback or of restitution of duties will be granted, which will be accepted by any of the Chinese Custom-houses in payment of import or export duties.

     Foreign cereals imported by Portuguese ships into the ports of China may be re-exported without hindrance, if no portion of them has been discharged.

Art. XXXVI.-The Chinese authorities will adopt at the ports the measures which they may deem the most convenient to avoid fraud or smuggling.

Art. XXXVII. The proceeds of fines and confiscations inflicted on Portuguese subjects, in conformity to this Treaty, shall belong exclusively to the Chinese Government.

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111

Art. XXXVIII.-Portuguese subjects carrying goods to a market in the interior of the country, on which the lawful import duties have already been paid at any of the open ports, or those who buy native produce in interior to bring to the ports on the Yang-sze-kiang, or to send to foreign ports, shall follow the regulations adopted towards the other nations.

Custom house officers who do not comply with the regulations, or who may exact more duties than are due, shall be punished according to the Chinese law.

Art. XXXIX. The Consuls and local authorities shall consult together, when necessary, as to the construction of Light-houses and the placing of Buoys and Light- ships.

Art. XL.-Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorized by the Chinese Govern- ment to receive them in sycee or in foreign coin, according to the official assay made at Canton on the 15th July, 1843.

Art. XLI.-In order to secure the regularity of weights and measures and to avoid confusion, the Superintendent of Customs will hand over to the Portuguese Consul at each of the open ports standards similar to those given by the Treasury Department for collection of public dues to the Customs at Canton.

Art. XLII.-Portuguese merchant ships may resort only to those ports of China which are declared open to commerce. It is forbidden to them, except in the case of force majeure provided for in Article XIX., to enter into other ports, or to carry on a clandestine trade on the coast of China, and the transgressor of this order shall be subject to confiscation of his ship and cargo by the Chinese Government.

Art. XLIII.--All Portuguese vessels despatched from one of the open ports of China to another, or to Macao, are entitled to a certificate of the Custom-house, which will exempt them from paying new tonnage dues, during the period of four months reckoned from the date of clearance.

Art. XLIV.-If any Portuguese merchant ship is found smuggling, the goods smuggled, no matter of what nature or value, will be subject to confiscation by the Chinese authorities, who may send the ships away from the port, after settlement of all her accounts, and prohibit her to continue to trade.

Art. XLV.-As regards the delivery of Portuguese and Chinese criminals, with the exception of the Chinese criminals who take refuge in Macao, and for whose extradition the Governor of Macao will continue to follow the existing practice, after the receipt of a due requisition from the Viceroy of the Kwangs, it is agreed that, in the Chinese ports open to foreign trade, the Chinese criminals who take refuge at the houses or on board ships of Portuguese subjects, shall be arrested and delivered to the Chinese authorities on their applying to the Portuguese Consul; and likewise the Portuguese criminals who take refuge in China shall be arrested and delivered to the Portuguese authorities on their applying to the Chinese authorities; and by neither of the parties shall the crininals be harboured nor shall there be delay in delivering them.

       Art. XLVI. It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties to this Treaty may demand a revision of the Tariff, and of the commercial articles of this Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years; and so it shall be, at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XLVII.-All disputes arising between Portuguese subjects in China, with regard to rights, either of property or person, shall be submitted to the jurisdiction of the Portuguese authorities.

       Art. XLVIII.-Whenever Chinese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Portuguese subjects, the Portuguese authorities must report such acts to the Chinese authorities in order that the guilty be tried according to the laws of China.

If Portuguese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Chinese subjects, the Chinese authorities must report such acts to the Portuguese Consul in order that the guilty may be tried according to the laws of Portugal.

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TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

      Art. XLIX. If any Chinese subject shall have become indebte i to a Portuguese subject and withholds payment, or fraudulently absconds from his creditors, the Chinese authorities shall use all their efforts to apprehend him and to compel him to pay, the debt being previously proved and the possibility of its payment ascertained. The Portuguese authorities will likewise use their efforts to enforce the payment of any debt due by any Portuguese subject to a Chinese subject.

      But in no case will the Portuguese Government or the Chinese Government be considered responsible for the debts of their subjects.

Art. L.-Whenever any Portuguese subject shall have to petition the Chinese authority of a district, he is to submit his statement beforehand to the Consul, who will cause the same to be forwarded should he see no impropriety in so doing, otherwise he will have it written out in other terms, or decline to forward it. Likewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to petition the Portuguese Consul he will only be allowed to do so through the Chinese authority, who shall proceed in the same manner.

      Art. LI.-Portuguese subjects who may have any complaint or claim against any Chinese subject, shall lay the same before the Consul, who will take due cognizance of the case and will use all his efforts to settle it amicably. Likewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to complain of a Portuguese subject, the Consul will listen to his complaint and will do what he possibly can to re-establish harmony between the two parties.

If, however, the dispute be of such a nature that it cannot be settled in that conciliatory way, the Portuguese Consul and Chinese authorities will hold a joint investigation of the case, and decide it with equity, applying each the laws of his own country according to the nationality of the defendant."

Art. LII. The Catholic religion has for its essential object the leading of men Persons teaching it and professing it shall alike be entitled to efficacious protection from the Chinese authorities; nor shall such persons pursuing peaceably their calling and not offending against the laws be prosecuted or interfered with.

      Art. LIII.-In order to prevent. for the future any discussion, and considering that the English language, among all foreign languages, is the most generally known in China, tais Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, is written in Por- tuguese, Chinese, and English, and signed in six copies, two in each language. All these versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen to be any divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions, the English text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. LIV. The present Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, shall be ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China. The exchange of the ratifications shall be made, within the shortest possible time, at Tientsin, after which the Treaty, with the Convention appended, shall be printed and published in order that the functionaries and subjects of the two countries may have full knowledge of their stipulations and may fulfil them.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty and have affixed their seals thereto.

      Done in Peking, this first day of the month of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang-Sü.

[L.S.] (Signed) [Chinese Seal]

Signatures of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

THOMAS DE SOUZA Roza,

Prince CH'ING.

SUN-IU-UEN.

CONVENTION

It having been stipulated in the Art. IV. of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between Portugal and China on the 1st day of the month of December,

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA.

113

1887, that a Convention shall be arranged between the two High Contracting Parties in order to establish a basis of co-operation in collecting the revenue on opium ex- ported from Macao to Chinese ports, the undersigned Thomas de Souza Roza, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, in special mission to the Court of Peking, and His Highness the Prince Ching, President of the Tsung-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, Min- isters Plenipotentiaries of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, have agreed on the following Convention in three articles:-

Art. I.-Portugal will enact a law subjecting the opium trade of Macao to the following provisions

1.-No opium shall be imported into Macao in quantities less than one chest. 2. All opium imported into Macao must, forthwith on arrival, be reported to the competent department under a public functionary appointed by the Portuguese Government, to superintend the importation and exportation of opium in Macao.

3.--No opium imported into Macao shall be transhipped, landed, stored, removed from one store to another, or exported, without a permit issued by the Superintendent. 4. The importers and exporters of opium in Macao must keep a register, accord- ing to the form furnished by the Government, showing with exactness and clearness the quantity of opium they have imported, the number of chests they have sold, to whom and to what place they were disposed of, and the quantity in stock.

5.-Only the Macao opium farmer, and persons licensed to sell opium at retail, will be permitted to keep in their custody raw opium in quantities inferior to one chest. 6. Regulations framed to enforce in Macao the execution of this law will be equivalent to those adopted in Hongkong for similar purposes.

Art. II.-Permits for the exportation of opium from Macao into Chinese ports, after being issued, shall be communicated by the Superintendent of Opium to the Commissioner of Customs at Kung-pac-uan.

Art. III. By mutual consent of both the High Contracting Parties the stipula- tions of this Convention may be altered at any time.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this Convention.

Done in Peking this first day of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang-Sü.

[L.S.] (Signed) THOMAS DE SOUZA Roza. [Chinese Seal

Signature of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

Prince CH'ING.

SUN-IU-UEN.

AGREEMENT

The basis of the co-operation to be given to China by Portugal in the collection of duties on opium conveved from Macao to Chinese ports, having been fixed by a Convention appended to the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between China and Portugal on the 1st December, 1887, and it being now convenient to come to an understanding upon some points relating to the said co-operation as well as to fired rules for the treatment of Chinese junks trading with Macao, Bernardo Pinheiro Correa de Mello, Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty in Peking, duly authorized by His Excellency Thomas de Souza Roza, Chief of the said Mission, and Sir Robert Hart, K.C.M G., Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, provided with the necessary instructions from the Chinese Government, have agreed on the following:

        1. An office under a Commissioner appointed by the Foreign Inspectorate of the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs, shall be established at a convenient spot on Chinese territory, for the sale of opium duty certificates, to be freely sold to merchants

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TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA.

and for such quantities of opium as they may require. The said Commissioner will also administer the Customs stations near Macao.

2. Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than 110 Taels per picul, shall be free from all other imposts of every sort, and have all the benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article of the Chefoo Convention between China and Great Britain on behalf of opium on which duty has been paid at one of the ports of China, and may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser. 3.-The Commissioner of Customs responsible for the management of the Customs stations shall investigate and settle any complaint made by Chinese merchants of Macao against the Customs stations or revenue cruisers.

       The Governor of Macao, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send an officer of Macao to be present and assist in the investigation and decision. If, how- ever, they do not agree a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for a point decision.

4.-Junks trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and their cargoes, shall not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of unose leviable on junks and their cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong, and no dues whatsoever shall be de- manded from junks proceeding to Macao from ports of China, or coming from Macao to ports in China, over and above the dues paid, or payable, at the ports of clearance or destination. Chinese produce which has paid Customs duties and Likin tax before entering Macac may be re-exported from Macao to Chinese ports without paying Customs duties and Likin tax again, and will be only subject to the payment of the tax named Siao-hao.

In witness whereof, this agreement has been written in Portuguese and English and signed in duplicate at Peking this the first day of December, 1887.

(Signed)

(Signed)

BERNARDO PINHEIRO CORREA DE Mello.

Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty

SIR ROBERT HART,

Inspector-General of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

JAPAN

TREATY OF PEACE BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

SIGNED AT SHIMONOSEKI (BAKAN), JAPAN, ON THE 17TH APRIL, 1895 Ratifications Exchanged at Chefoo, China on the 8th May, 1895

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to restore the blessings of peace to their countries, and subjects, and to remove all cause for future complications, have named as their Plenipotentiaries for the purpose of concluding a Treaty of Peace, that is to say:-

      His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of Paulownia, Minister-Presi·lent of State, and Viscount Mutsu Munemitsu, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs;

      And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Senior Tutor to the Heir Apparent, Senior Grand Secretary of State, Minister Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Ports of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the First Rank, and Li Ching fong, ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service of the Second Official Rank;

      Who, after having exchange their full powers, which were found to be in good and proper form, have agreed to the following Articles:-

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115

Art. I.-China recognizes definitely the full and complete independence and autonomy of Corea, and, in consequence, the payment of tribute and the perform - ance of ceremonies and formalities by Corea to China in derogation of such independ- ence and autonomy shall wholly cease for the future.

Art. II.-China cedes to Japan in perpetuity and full sovereignty the follow- ing territories, together with all fortifications, arsenals, and public prop rty thereon:- (a.) The southern portion of the Province of Fêng-tien, within the following boundaries

The line of demarcation begins at the mouth of the River Yalu, and ascends that stream to the mouth of the River An-ping; foin thence the line runs to Fêng Huang; from thence to Haicheng; from thence to Ying Kow, forming a line which describes; the southern portion of the territory. The places above named are included in the ceded territory. When the line reaches the River Liao at Ying Kow it follows the course of that stream to its mouth, where it terminates. The mid-channel of the River Liao shall be taken as the line of demarcation.

This cession also includes all islands appertaining or belonging to the Province of Fêng Tien situated in the eastern portion of the Bay of Liao Tung, and in the northern part of the Yellow Sea.

      (b.) The Island of Formosa, together with all islands appertaining or belonging to the said Island of Forinosa.

      (c.) The Pescadores Group, that is to say, all islands lying between the 119th and 120th degrees of longitude east of Greenwich and the 23rd and 24th degrees of

north latitude.

Art. III. The alignments of the frontiers described in the preceding Article, and shown on the annexed map, shall be subject to verification and demarcation on the spot by a Joint Commission of Delimitation, consisting of two or more Japanese and two or more Chinese Delegates, to be appointed immediately after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. In case the boundaries laid down in this Act are found to be defective at any point, either on account of topography or in consideration of good administration, it shall also be the duty of the Delimitation Commission to rectify the same.

The Delimitation Commission will enter upon its duties as soon as possible, and will bring its labours to a conclusion within the period of one year after appointment. The alignments laid down in this Act shall, however, be maintained until the rectifications of the Delimitation Commission, if any are made, shall have received the approval of the Governments of Japan and China.

Art. IV.-China agrees to pay to Japan as a war indemnity the sum 200,000,000 Kuping taels. The said sum to be paid in eight instalments. The first instalment of 50,000,000 taels to be paid within six months, and the second instalment of 50,000,000 taels to be paid within twelve months after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. The remaining sun to be paid in six equal annual instalments as follows: the first of such equal annual instalments to be paid within two years, the second with- in three years, the third within four years, the fourth within five years, the fifth within six vears, and the sixth within seven years after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act. Interest at the rate of 5 per cent. per annum shall begin to run on all unpaid portions of the said indemnity from the date the first instalment falls due.

       China shall, however, have the right to pay by anticipation at any time any or all of said instalments. In case the whole amount of the said indemnity is paid within three years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, all interest shall be waived, and the interest for two years and a-half, or for any less period if then already paid, shall be included as a part of the principal amount of the indemnity.

Art. V. The inhabitants of the territories ceded to Japan who wish to take up their residence outside the ceded districts shall be at liberty to sell their real property and retire. For this purpose a period of two years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act shall be granted. At the expiration of that

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TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

period those of the inhabitants who shall not have left such territories shall, at the option of Japan, be deemed to be Japanese subjects.

      Each of the two Governments shall, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, send one or more Commissioners to Formosa to effect a final transfer of that province, and within the space of two months after the exchange of the ratifications of this Act such transfer shall be completed.

Art. VI.All Treaties between Japan and China having come to an end in consequence of war, China engages, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifica- tions of this Act, to appoint Plenipotentiaries to conclude with the Japanese Pleni- potentiaries a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and a Convention to regulate frontier intercourse and trade. The Treaties, Conventions, and Regulatious, now subsisting between China and European Powers shall serve as a basis for the said Treaty and Convention between Japan and China. From the date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Act until the said Treaty and Convention are brought into actual operation the Japanese Government, its officials, commerce, navigation, frontier intercourse and trade, industries, ships and subjects, shall in every respect be accorded by China most favoured-nation treatment.

China makes, in addition, the following concessions, to take effect six months after the date of the present Act:-

      1. The following cities, towns, and ports, in addition to those already opened shall be opened to the trade, residence, industries, and manufactures of Japanese subjects under the same conditions, and with the same privileges and facilities as exist at the present open cities, towns, and ports of China.

(1.) Shashih, in the Province of Hupeh.

  (2.) Chung King, in the Province of Szechuan, (3.) Suchow, in the Province of Kiang Su. (4.) Hangchow, in the Province of Chekiang.

The Japanese Government shall have the right to station Consuls at any or all of the above-named places.

2. Steam navigation for vessels under the Japanese flag for the conveyance of passengers and cargo shall be extended to the following places:-

(1.) On the Upper Yangtsze River, from Ichang to Chung King.

(2.) On the Woosung River, and the Cana!, from Shanghai to Suchow and Hangchow.

      The Rules and Regulations which now govern the navigation of the inland waters of China by foreign vessels, shall, so far as applicable, be enforced in respect of the above-named routes, until n-w Rules and Regulations are conjointly agreed to.

      3. Japanese subjects purchasing goods or produce in the interior of China or transporting imported merchandise into the interior of China, shall have the right temporarily to rent or hire warehouses for the storage of the articles so purchased or transported, without the payment of any taxes or exactions whatever.

     4. Japanese subjects shall be free to engage in all kinds of manufacturing industries in all the open cities, towns, and ports of China, and shall be at liberty to import into China all kinds of machinery, paying only the stipulated import duties thereon.

All articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China, shall in respect of inland transit and internal taxes, duties, charges, and exactions of all kinds and also in respect of warehousing and storage facilities in the interior of China, stand upon the same footing and enjoy the same privileges and exemptions as merchandise imported by Japanese subjects into China.

      In the event additional Rules and Regulations are necessary in connection with these concessions, they shall be embodied in the Treaty of Commerce and Naviga- tion provided for by this Article.

Art. VII.-Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding Article, the evacua tion of China by the armies of Japan, shall be completely effected within three months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act.

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117

Art. VIII.-As a guarantee of the faithful performance of the stipulations of this Act, China consents to the temporary occupation by the military forces of Japan, of Wei-hai-wei, in the Province of Shantung.

        Upon the payment of the first two instalments of the war indemnity herein stipulated for and the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, the said place shall be evacuated by the Japanese forces, provided the Chinese Government consents to pledge, under suitable and sufficient arrangements, the Customs Revenue of China as security for the payment of the principal and interest of the remaining instalments of said indemnity. In the event no such arrangements are concluded, such evacuation shall only take place upon the payment of the final instalment of said indemnity.

It is, however, expressly understood that no such evacuation shall take place until after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation.

Art. IX.-Immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act, all prisoners of war then held shall be restored, and China undertakes not to ill-treat or punish prisoners of war so restored to her by Japan. China also engages to at once release all Japanese subjects accused of being military spies or charged with any other military offences. China further engages not to punish in any manner, nor to allow to be punished, those Chinese subjects who have in any manner been compromised in their relations with the Japanese army during the war.

        Art. X.-All offensive military operations shall cease upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act.

Art. XI.-The present Act shall be ratified by their Majesties the Emperor of Japan and the Emperor of China, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Chefoo on the eighth day of the fifth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding to fourteenth day of the fourth month of twenty-first year of Kuang Hsü.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have aaffixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Shimonoseki, in duplicate, this seventeenth day of the fourth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding to twenty-third of the third month of the twenty-first year of Kuang Hsu.

(L.S.) Count ITO HIROBUMI, Junii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of Paullownia, Minister-President of state, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

(L.S.)

(L.S.)

(L.S.)

Viscount

MUTSU MUNEMITSU, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

LI HUNG-CHANG, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Tutor to the Heir Ap- parent, Senior Grand Secretary of Northern Ports of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the First Rank.

LI CHING-FONG, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service, of the Second Official Kank.

THE LIAOTUNG CONVENTION

SIGNED AT PEKING, 8TH NOVEMBER, 1895

His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, desiring to conclude a Convention for the retrocession by Japan of all of the Southern portion of the province of Feng-ien to the Sovereignty of China, have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

     His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Minister Plenipotentiary, Senior Tator of the Heir Apparent, Senior Grand Secretary of State and Earl of the First Rank, and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Shoshü Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary; who, after having communicated to each other their Full Powers, which were found to be in good and proper form, have agreed upon the following Articles :-

     Art. I.-Japan retrocedes to China in perpetuity and full sovereignty the Southern portion of the province of Feng-tien, which was ceded to Japan under Article II. of the Treaty of Shimonoseki on the 23rd day of the 3rd month of the 21st year of Kuang Hsü, corresponding to the 17th day of the 4th month of the 28th year of Meiji, together with all fortifications, arsenals, and public property thereon at the time the retroceded territory is completely evacuated by the Japanese forces in accordance with the provisions of Article III. of this Convention, that is to say, the Southern portion of the province of Feng-tien from the mouth of the River Yilu to the mouth of the River An-ping, thence to Feng Huang Ch'en, thence to Hai Cheng and thence to Ying K'ou; also all cities and towns to the south of this boundary and all islands appertaining or belonging to the province of Feng Tien situated in the Eastern portion of the Bay of Liao Tung and in the Northern part

of the Yellow Sea.

Article III. of the said Treaty of Shimonoseki is in consequence suppressed, as are also the provisions in the same Treaty with reference to the conclusion of a Convention to regulate frontier intercourse and trade.

Art. II. As compensation for the retrocession of the Southern portion of the province of Feng Tien, the Chinese Government engage to pay to the Japanese Government 30,000,000 Kupidg Taels on or before the 30th day of the 9th month of the 21st year of Kuang Hsü, corresponding to the 16th day of the 11th month of the 28th year of Meiji (November 16th, 1895).

Art. III. Within three months from the day on which China shall have paid to Japan the compensatory indemnity of 30,000,000 Kuping Taels provided for in Article II. of this Convention, the retroceded territory shall be empletely evacuated by the Japanese forces.

Art. IV.-China engages not to punish in any manner nor to allow to be punished those Chinese subjects who have in any manner been compromised in connection with the occupation by the Japanese forces of the retroceded territory.

     Art. V. The present Convention is signed in duplicate in the Chinese, Japanese, and English languages. All these texts have the same meaning and intention, but in case of any differences of interpretation between the Chinese and Japanese texts, such differences shall be decided by reference to the English text.

Art. VI. The present Convention shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Peking within twenty-one days from the present date.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seals of their arms.

     Doue at Peking this twenty-second day of the ninth month of the twenty-first year of Kuang Hsü, corresponding to the eighth day of the eleventh mouth of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji (November 8th, 1895).

[L.S.] LI HUNG-CHANG [L.S.] BARON HAYASHI TADASU

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION

MADE AT PEKING, JULY 21st, 1896

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, having resolved, in pursuance of the provisions of Article V1. of the Treaty signed at Shimonoseki on the 17th day of the 4th month of the 28th year of Meiji, corresponding to the 23rd day of the 3rd month of the 21st year of Kwang-hsü, to conclude a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, have for that purpose, named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

His Majesty the Emperor of Japar, Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Shoshii, Grand Cross of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary; and His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Yin-hoon, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamên, holding the rank of the President of a Board and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Revenue.

         Who, after having communicated to each other their Full Powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles.

Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between their respective subjects who shall enjoy equally in the respective countries of the High Contracting Parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

        Art. II.-It is agreed by the High Contracting Parties that His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatic Agent to the Court, of Peking and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatic Agent to the Court. of Tokyo.

The Diplomatic Agents thus accredited shall respectively enjoy all the pre- rogatives, privileges and immunities accorded by international law to such Agents and they shall also in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar Agents of the most favoured nation.

Their persons, families, suites, establishments, residences and correspondence shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and attenants without any kind of molestation.

Art. III. His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at such of the ports, cities, and towns of China which are now or may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade, as the interests of the Empire of Japan may require.

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese Authorities, and they shall enjoy all the attributes, authority, jurisdiction, privileges and immunities which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation most favoured in these respects.

His Majesty the Emperor of China may likewise appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at any or all of those places in Japan where Consular Officers of other nations are now or may hereafter be admitted, and, saving in the matter of jurisdiction in respect of Chinese subjects and property in Japan which is reserved to the Japanese Judicial Courts, they shall enjoy the rights and privileges that are usually accorded to such officers.

Art. IV. Japanese subjects may, with their families, employés and servants, frequent, reside and carry on trade, industries and manufactures or pursue any other lawful avocations, in all the ports, cities and towns of China, which are now or may

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·

hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They are at liberty to proceed to or from any of the open ports with their inerchandise and ffects, and within the localities at those places which have already been or may hereafter be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners, they are allowed to rent or purchase houses, rent or lease land and to build churches, cemeteries and hospitals, enjoying in all respects the same privileges and immunities as are now or may hereafter be granted to the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

Art. V.-Japanese vessels may touch or the purpose of landing and shipping passengers and merchandise, in accordance with the existing Rules and Regulations concerning foreign trade there, at all those places in Chica which are now ports of call, namely, Ngan-ching, Ta-tung, Hu-kow, Wu-such, Lu-chi-kow and Woosung and such other places as may hereafter be made ports of call also. If any vessel should unlawfully enter ports other than open ports and ports of call in China or carry on clandestine trade along the coast or rivers, the vessel with her cargo shail be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

Art. VI. Japanese subjects may travel, for their pleasure or for purposes of trade, to all parts of the interior of China, under passports issued by Japanese Consuls and countersigned by the Local Authorities. These passports, if deman ed, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passports be not irregular, the bearers will be allowed to proceed and no opposition shall be offered to their hiring of persons, animals, carts or vessels for their own conveyance or for the carrige of their personal effects or merchandise. If they be without passports or if they commit any offence against the law, they shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment but they shall only be subject to necessary restraint and in no case to ill-usage. Such passptors shall remain in force for a period of 13 Chinese months from the date of issue. Any Japanese subject travelling in the interior without a passport shall be liable to a fine not exceeding 300 Taels. Japanese sub- jects may, however, without passports go on excursions from any of the ports open to trade, to a distance not exceeding 100 Chinese li and for a period not exceeding five days. The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships.

      Art. VII. Japanese subjects residing in the open ports of China may take into their service Chinese subjects and employ them in any lawful capacity without restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government or Authorities.

      Art. VIII.-Japanese subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the conveyance of cargo or passengers and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government or Officers. No limit shall be put upon the number of boats, neither shall a monoply, in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying goods, be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will of course be punished according to law.

Art. IX. The Tariffs and Tariff Rules now in force between China and the Western Powers shall be applicable to all articles upon importation into China by Japanese subjects or from Japan, or upon exportation from China by Japanese subjects or to Japan. It is clearly understood that all articles, the importation or exportation of which is not expressly limited or prohibited by the Tariffs and Tariff Rules existing between China and the Western Powers, may be freely imported into aud exported from China, subject only to the payment of the stipulated import or export duties. But in no case shall Japanese subjects be called upon to pay in China other or higher import or export duties than are or may be paid by the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation; nor shall article imported into China from Japan or exported from China to Japan, be charged upon such importation or exportation, other or higher duties than are now or may hereafter be imposed in China on the like article when imported from or exported to the nation most favoured in those respects.

any

Art. X.-All articles duly imported into China by Japanese subjects or from Japan shall while being transported, subject to the existing Regulations, from one open port to another, be wholly exempt from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges

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121

and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, irrespective of the nationality of the owner or possessor of the articles, or the nationality of the conveyance or vessel in which the transportation is made.

Art. XI. It shall be at the option of any Japanese subject desiring to convey duly imported articles to an inland market, to clear his goods of all transit duties by payment of a commutation transit tax or duty, equal to one-half of the import duty in respect of dutiable articles, and two and half per cent. upon the value in respect of duty free articles; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued which shall exempt the goods from all further inland charges whatsoever.

It is understood that this Article does not apply to imported Opium.

Art. XII.-All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects in China elsewhere than at an open port thereof and intended for export abroad, shall in every part of China be freed from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties when exported, upon the payment of a commutation transit tax or duty calculated at the rate mentioned in the last preceding Article, substituting export duty for import duty, provided such goods and produce are actually exported to a foreign country within the period of 12 months from the date of the payment of the transit tax. All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects at the open ports of China and of which export to foreign countries is not prohibited, shall be exempt from all internal taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties upon exportation, and all articles purchased by Japanese subjects in any part of China, may also, for the purposes of export abroad, be transported from open port to open port subject to the existing Rules and Regulations.

Art. XIII.-Merchandise of a bona fide foreign origin, in respect of which full import duty shall have been paid, may at any time within three years from the date of importation, be re-exported from China by Japanese subjects to any foreign country, without the payment of any export duty, and the re-exporters shall, in addition, be entitled forthwith to receive from the Chinese Customs drawback certi- ficates for the amount of import duty paid thereon, provided that the merchandise remains intact and unchanged in its original packages. Such drawback certificates shall be immediately redeemable in ready money by the Chinese Customs Authorities at the option of the holders thereof.

Art. XIV. The Chinese Government consents to the establishment of Bonded Warehouses at the several open ports of China. Regulations on the subject shall be made hereafter,

Art. XV.--Japanese merchant vessels of more than 150 tons burden, entering the open ports of China, shall be charged tonnage dues at the rate of 4 mace per registered ton; if of 150 tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of 1 mace per registered ton. But any such vessel taking its departure within 48 hours after arrival, without breaking bulk, shall be exempt from the payment of tonnage dues.

Japanese vessels having paid the above specified tonnage dues shall thereafter be exempt from all tonuage dues in all the open ports and ports of call of China, for the period of four months from the date of clearance from the port where the pay- ment of such tonnage dues is made. Japanese vessels shall not, however, be required to pay tonnage dues for the period during which they are actually undergoing repairs in China.

       No tonnage dues shall be payable on small vessels and boats employed by Japanese subjects in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, or duty-free articles between any of the open ports of China. All small vessels and cargo boats, however, conveying merchandise which is, at the time of such conveying, subject to duty, shall pay tonnage dues once in four months at the rate of 1 mace per ton.

No fee or charges, other than tonnage dues, shall be levied upon Japanese vessels and boats, and it is also understood that such vessels and boats shall not be required to pay other or higher tonnage ducs than the vessels and boats of the most favoured nation.

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     Art. XVI.-Any Japanese merchant vessel arriving at an open port of China shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her departure, she shall be allowed to employ a pilot to take her out of port.

or

Art. XVII.-Japanese merchant vessels compelled on account of injury sustained any other cause, to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any nearest port of China, without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties upon goods landed in order that repairs to the vessel may be effected, provided the goods so landed remain under the supervision of the Customs authorities. Should any such vessel be stranded or wrecked on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities shall immediately adopt measures for rescuing the passengers and crew and for securing the vessel and cargo. The persons thus saved shall receive friendly treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station. Should any Chinese merchant vessel be compelled on account of injury sustained or any other cause to seek a place of refuge in the nearest port of Japan, she shall likewise be treated in the same way by the Japanese authorities.

Art. XVI!I.-The Chinese authorities at the several open ports shall adopt such means as they judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

Art. XIX.-If any Japanese vessel be plundered by Chinese robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover and restore the stolen property.

     Art. XX.-Jurisdiction over the persons and property of Japanese subjects in China is reserved exclusively to the duly authorized Japanese authorities, who shall hear and determine all cases brought against Japanese subjects or property by Jap anese subjects or by the subjects or citizens of any other Power, without the interven tion of the Chinese authorities.

     Art. XXI.-If the Chinese authorities or a Chinese subject make any charge or complaint of a civil nature against Japanese subjects or in respect of Japanese property in China, the case shall be heard and decided by the Japanese authorities. In like manner all charges and complaints of a civil nature brought by Japanese authorities or subjects in China against Chinese subjects or in respect of Chinese property, shall be heard and determined by the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXII.-Japanese subjects, charged with the commission of any crimes or offences in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Japanese authorities according to the laws of Japan.

In like manner Chinese subjects charged with the commission of any crimes of offences against Japanese subjects in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

Art. XXIII. Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to s Japanese subject or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their utmost to effect his arrest, and enforce recovery of the debts. The Japanese Authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any Japanese subject who fraudulently absconds or fails to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

      Art. XXIV.-If Japanese subjects in China who have committed offences or have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond, should flee to the interior of China or take refuge in houses occupied by Chinese subjects or on board of Chinese ships, the Chinese authorities shall, at the request of the Japanese Consul, deliver them to the Japanese authorities.

In like manner if Chinese subjects in China who have committed offences of have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond, should take refuge in houses occupied by Japanese subjects in China or on board of Japanese ships in Chinese waters, they shall be delivered up at the request of the Chinese authorities made to the Japanese authorities.

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

123

Art. XXV.-The Japanese Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all privileges, immunities and advantages conferred on them by the Treaty stipulations between Japan and China which are now in force; and it is hereby expressly stipu lated that the Japanese Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that may have been or may be hereafter granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the government or subjects of any other natiou.

        Art. XXVI.-It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties may demand a revision of the Tariffs and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty at the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications; but if no such demand be made on either side and no such revision be effected within six months after the end of the first ten years then the Treaty and Tariffs, in their present form, shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive period of ten years.

        Art. XXVII.-The High Contracting Parties will agree upon Rules and Regulations necessary to give full effect to this Treaty. Until such Rules and Regulations are brought into actual operation the Arrangements, Rules and Regulations subsisting etween China and the Western Powers, so far as they are applicable and not inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty, shall be binding between the Contracting Parties.

        Art. XXVIII. The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and English languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Pleni- potentiaries of the High Contracting Parties have agreed upon that in case of any divergencies in the interpretation between the Japanese and Chinese Texts of the Treaty, the difference shall be settled by reference to the English Text.

        Art. XXIX. The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the ratification thereof shall be exchanged at Peking not later than three months from the present date.

        In Witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

        Done at Peking this twenty-first day of the seventh month of the twenty- ninth year of Meiji, corresponding to the eleventh day of the sixth month of the twenty-second year of Kuang Hsu (July 21st, 1896).

[L.S.] [L.S.]

CHANG YIN-HOON.'

HAYASHI TADASU.

PROTOCOL REGARDING NEW PORTS

MADE AT PEKING, 19TH OCTOBER, 1896

        Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of His Majesty the Emperor of China have agreed upon the following stipulations supple- mentary to the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation:-

        Art. I. It is hereby agreed that special Japanese settlements shall be formed at the places newly opened to commerce, and that affairs relating to roads and police shall be under the control of the Japanese Consul.

Art. II. Regulations with respect to steamers or ships owned or chartered by Japanese subjects at Suchow, Hangchow, and Shanghai shall be determined after conference with Japan, on the basis of the Provisional Regulations for the conduct of business by foreign merchants at those places, issued by the Shanghai Customs on August third of the twenty-second year of Kwang Hsü.

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TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

Art. III.-The Government of Japan concedes the right of the Chinese Govern- ment to impose upon articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China such a tax as may seem expedient, provided that the said tax shall not differ from, or exceed, the tax paid by Chinese subjects; and provided that the Chinese Govern- ment shall, when the Japanese Government so desires, immediately provide sites for the formation of special Japanese Settlements in Shanghai, Tientsin, Amoy, and Hankow.

Art. IV. Instructions shall be issued in Sunfu, in Shantung, that no Chinese troops shall approach, or take possession of any position, within 5 Japanese ri, that is to say, about 40 Chinese li, of the limits of any positions held by Japanese forces in accordance with treaty stipulations.

     The above Protocol shall be drawn up in the Chinese and Japanese languages and after comparison, the two copies shall be signed and sealed, each side taking one of the copies.

[Signed]

HAYASHI TADASU.

PRINCE KING.

YIN LU.

"

CHANG YIN-WHAN.

Nineteenth day, tenth month, twenty-ninth, year of Meiji; thirteenth day, ninth month, twenty-second year of Kuang Hsü.

TREATIES WITH COREA

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

SIGNED, IN THE ENGLISH AND CHINESE LANGUAGES, AT HANYANG (SEOUL) ON THE 26TH NOVEMBER, 1883

Ratifications exchanged at Hanyang on the 28th April, 1884

       Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland Empress of India, and His Majesty the King of Corea, being sincerely desirous of establishing permanent relations of Friendship and Commerce between their re- spective dominions, have resolved to conclude a Treaty for that purpose, and have therefore named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:

       Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, Sir Harry Smith Parkes, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of St. Michael and St. George, Knight Commander of the Most Honourable Order of The Bath, Her Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China;

His Majesty the King of Corea, Min Yöng-mok, President of His Majesty's Foreign Office, a Dignitary of the First Rank, Senior Vice-President of the Council of State, Member of His Majesty's Privy Council, Junior Guardian of the Crown Prince ;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :--

Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, her heirs and successors, and His Majesty the King of Corea, his heirs and succes- sors, and between their respective dominions and subjects, who shall enjoy full security and protections for their persons and property within the dominions of the other.

       2.-In case of difference arising between one of the High Contracting Parties and a third Power, the other High Contracting Party, if requested to do so, shall exert its good offices to bring about an amicable arrangement.

Art. II.-The High Contracting Parties may each appoint a Diplomatic Re- presentative to reside permanently or temporarily at the Capital of the other, and may appoint a Consul-General, Consuls or Vice-Consuls, to reside at any or all of the ports or places of the other which are open to foreign commerce. The Diplo matic Representatives and Consular functionaries of both countries shall freely enjoy the same facilities for communication personally or in writing with the authorities of the country where they respectively reside, together with all other privileges and immunities, as are enjoyed by Diplomatic or Consular functionaries in other countries.

2.-The Diplomatic Representative and the Consular functionaries of each Power and the members of their official establishments shall have the right to travel freely in any part of the dominions of the other, and the Corean authorities shall furnish passports to such British officers travelling in Corea, and shall provide such escort for their protection as may be necessary.

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3. The Consular officers of both countries shall exercise their functions on receipt of due authorisation from the Sovereign or Government of the country in which they respectively reside, and shall not be permitted to engage in trade.

      Art. III. Jurisdiction over the persons and property of British subjects in Corea snall be vested exclusively in the duly authorised British Judicial authorities, who shall hear and determine all cases brought against British subjects by any British or other foreign subject or citizen without the intervention of the Corean authorities.

      2.-If the Corean authorities or a Corean subject make any charge or complaint against a British subject in Corea the case shall be heard and decided by the British Judicial authorities.

      3.-If the British authorities or a British subject make any charge or complaint against a Coreau subject in Corea, the case shall be heard and decided by the Corean authorities.

      4. A British subject who commits any offence in Corea shall be tried and punished by the British Judicial authorities according to the laws of Great Britain.

      5.-A Corean subject who commits in Corea any offence against a British sub- ject shall be tried and punished by the Corean authorities according to the laws of Corea.

      6. Any complaint against a British subject involving a penalty or confiscation, by reason of any breach either of this Treaty or of any Regulation annexed thereto, or of any Regulation that may hereafter be made in virtue of its provisions, shall be brought before the British Judicial authorities for decision, and any penalty imposed, and all property confiscated in such cases, shall belong to the Corean Government.

      7.-British goods, when seized by the Corean authorities at an open port, shall be put under the seals of the Corean and the British Consular authorities and shall be detained by the former until the British Judicial authorities shall have given their decision. If this decision is in favour of the owner of the goods, they shall be imme- diately placed at the Consul's disposal. But the owner shall be allowed to receive them at once on depositing their value with the Corean Authorities pending the decision of the British Judicial authorities.

       8. In all cases, whether civil or criminal, tried either in Corean or British Courts in Corea, a properly authorised official of the nationality of the plaintiff or prosecutor shall be allowed to attend the hearing, and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be allowed, whenever he thinks it necessary, to call, examine, and cross-examine witnesses, and to protest against the proceedings or decision.

9. If a Corean subject who is charged with an offence against the laws of his country takes refuge on premises occupied by a British subject or on board a British merchant vessel, the British Consular authorities, on receiving an application from the Corean authorities, shall take steps to have such person arrested and handed over to the latter for trial. But without the consent of the proper British Consular authority no Corean officer shall enter the premises of any British subject without his consent, or go ou board any British ship without the consent of the officer in charge.

10. On the demand of auy competent British Consular authority, the Corean authorities shall arrest and deliver to the former any British subject charged with a criminal offence, and any deserter from a British ship of war or merchant vessel.

Art. IV. The port of Chemulpo (Jenchuan), Wonsan (Gensan), and Pusan (Fusan), or, if the latter port should not be approved, then such other port as may be selected in its neighbourhood, together with the city of Hanyang and the town of Yanghwa Chin, or such other place in that neighbourhood as may be deemed desirable. shall, from the day on which this Treaty comes into operation, be opened to British

commerce.

      2.-At the above-named places British subjects shall have the right to rent or to purchase land or houses, and to erect dwellings, warehouses, and factories. They shall be allowed the free exercise of their religion. All arrangements for the selection, determination of the limits, and laying out of the sites of the Foreign settlements,

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

127

and for the sale of land at the various ports and places in Corea open to foreign trade, shall be made by the Corean authorities in conjunction with the competent Foreign authorities.

3. These sites shall be purchased from the owners and prepared for occupation by the Corean Government, and the expenses thus incurred shall be a first charge on the proceeds of the sale of the land. The yearly rental agreed upon by the Corean authorities in conjunction with the Foreign authorities sha.l be paid to the former, who shall retain a fixed amount thereof as a fair equivalent for the land tax, and the remainder, together with any balance left from the proceeds of land sales, shall belong to a Municipal fund to be administered by a Council, the constitution of which shall be determined hereafter by the Corean authorities in conjunction with the . competent Foreign authorities.

4.-British subjects may rent or purchase land or houses beyond the limits of the foreign settlements, and within a distance of ten Corean li from the same. But all land so occupied shall be subject to such conditions as to the observance of Corean local regulations and payment of land tax as the Corean authorities may see fit to impose.

       5. The Corean authorities will set apart, free of cost, at each of the places open to trade, a suitable piece of ground as a foreign cemetery, upon which no rent, land tax, or other charges shall be payable, and the management of which shall be left to the Municipal Council above mentioned.

       6.-British subjects shall be allowed to go where they please without passports within a distance of one hundred Corean li from any of the ports and places open to trade, or within such limits as may be agreed upon between the competent authorities of both countries. British subjects are also authorised to travel in Corea for pleasure or for purposes of trade, to transport and sell goods of all kinds, except books and other printed matter disapproved of by the Corean Government, and to purchase native produce in all parts of the country, under passports which will be issued by their Consuls and countersigned or sealed by the Corean local authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be produced for examination in the districts passed through. If the passport be not irregular, the bearer will be allowed to proceed, and be shall be at liberty to procure such means of transport as he may require. Any British subject travelling beyond the limits above named without a passport, or com- mitting when in the interior any offence, shall be arrested and handed over to the nearest British Consul for punishment Travelling without a passport beyond the said limits will ender the offender liable to a fine not exceeding one hundred Mexican dollars, with or without imprisonment for a term not exceeding one month.

       7.-British subjects in Corea shall be amenable to such municipal, police, and other regulations for the maintenance of peace, order, and good government as may be agreed upon by the competent authorties of the two countries.

       Art. V.-At each of the ports or places open to Foreign trade, British subjects shall be at full liberty to import from any Foreign port or from any Corean open port, to sell or to buy from any Corean subjects or others, and to export to any Foreign or Corean open port, all kinds of merchandise not prohibited by the Treaty, on paying the duties of the Tariff annexed thereto. They may freely transact their business with Corean subjects or others without the intervention of Corean officials or other persons, and they may freely engage in any industrial occupation.

2. The owners or consignees of all goods imported from any Foreign port upon. which the duty of the aforesaid Tariff shall have been paid shall be entitled on re-exporting the same to any foreign port at any time within thirteen Corean months from the date of importation, to receive a drawback certificate for the amount of such import duty, provided that the original packages containing such goods remain intact. These drawback certificates shall either be redeemed by the Corean Customs on demand, or they shall be received in payment of duty at any Corean open port.

       3. The duty paid on Corean goods, when carried from one Corean open port to another, shall be refunded at the port of shipment on production of a Customs

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TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

    certificate shewing that the goods have arrived at the port of destination, or on satisfactory proof being produced of the loss of the goods by shipwreck.

4. All gods imported into Corea by British subjects, and on which the duty of the Tariff annexed to this Treaty shall have been paid, may be conveyed to any Corean open port free of duty, and, when transported into the interior, shall not be subject to any additional tax, excise, or transit duty whatsoever in any part of the country. In like manner, freedom shall be allowed for the transport to the open ports of all Corean commodities intended for exportation, and such commodities shall not, either at the place of production, or when being conveyed from any part of Corea to any of the open ports, be subject to the payment of any tax, excise, or transit duty whatsoever.

       5. The Corean Government may charter British merchant vessels for the con- veyance of goods or passengers to unopened ports in Corea, and Corean subjects shall have the same right, subject to the approval of their own authorities.

6.-Whenever the Government of Corea shall have reason to apprehend a scarcity of food within the kingdom, His Majesty the King of Corea may, by Decree, temporarily prohibit the export of grain to foreign countries from any or all of the Corean open ports, and such prohibition shall become binding on British subjects in Coren on the expiration of one month from the date on which it shall have beeu officially communicated by the Corean Authorities to the British Consul at the port concerned, but shall not remain longer in force than is absolutely necessary.

      7.-All British ships shall pay tonnage dues at the rate of thirty cents (Mexican) per register ton. One such payment will entitle a vessel to visit any or all of the open ports in Corea during a period of four months without further charge. All tonnage dues shall be appropriated for the purposes of erecting lighthouses and beacons and placing buoys on the Corean coast, more especially at the approaches to the open ports, and in deepening or otherwise improving the anchorages. tonnage dues shall be charged on boats employed at the open ports in landing or shipping cargo.

No

8.-In order to carry into effect and secure the observance of the provisions of this Treaty, it is hereby agreed that the Tariff and Trade Regulations hereto annexed shall come into operation simultaneously with this Treaty. The competent authorities of the two countries may, from time to time, revise the said Regulations with a view to the insertion therein, by mutual consent, of such modifications or additions as experience shall prove to be expedient.

      Art. VI. Any British subject who smuggles, or attempts to smuggle, goods into any Corean port or place not open to foreign trade shall forfeit twice the value of such goods, and the goods shall be confiscated. The Corean local authorities may seize such goods, and may arrest any British subject concerned in such smuggling or attempt to smuggle. They shall immediately forward any person so arrested to the nearest British Consul for trial by the proper British Judicial authority, and may detain such goods until the case shall have been finally adjudicated.

      Art. VII.-If a British ship be wrecked or stranded on the coast of Corea, the local authorities shall immediately take such steps to protect the ship and her cargo from plunder, and all the persons belonging to her from ill-treatment, and to render such other assistance as may be required. They shall at once inform the nearest British Consul of the occurrence, and shall furnish the shipwrecked persons,

if neces- sary, with means of conveyance to the nearest open port.

2.-All expenses incurred by the Government of Corea for the rescue, clothing, maintenance, and travelling of shipwrecked British subjects, for the recovery of the bodies of the drowned, for the medical treatment of the sick and injured, and for the burial of the dead, shall be repaid by the British Government to that of Corea.

3. The British Government shall not be responsible for the repayment of the expenses incurred in recovery or preservation of a wrecked vessel, or the property belonging to her. All such expenses shall be a charge upon the property saved, and shall be paid by the parties interested therein upon receiving delivery of the

same.

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

129

4. No charge shall be made by the Government of Coren for the expenses of the Government officers, local functionaries, or police who shall proceed to the wreck for the travelling expenses of officers escorting the shipwrecked men, nor for the expenses of official correspondence. Such expenses shall be borne by the Corea Government.

5.-Any British merchant ship compelled by stress of weather or by want of fuel or provisions to enter an unopened port in Corca shall be allowed to execute repairs, and to obtain necessary supplies. All such expenses shall be defrayed by the master of the vessel.

Art. VIII. The ships of war of each country shall be at liberty to visit all the ports of the other. They shall enjoy every facility for procuring supplies of all kinds or for making repairs, and shall not be subject to trade or harbour regulations, nor be liable to the payment of duties or port charges of any kind.

2. When British ships of war visit unopened ports in Corea, the officers and men may land, but shall not proceed into the interior unless they are provided with passports.

        3.-Supplies of all kinds for the use of the British Navy may be landed at the open ports of Corea, and stored in the custody of a British officer, wit: out the pay- ment of any duty. But if any such supplies are sold, the purchaser shall pay the proper duty to the Corean authorities

4. The Corean Government will afford all the facilities in their power to ships belonging to the British Government which may be engaged in making surveys in Corean waters.

Art. IX.-The British authorities and British subjects in Corea shall be allowed to employ Corean subjects as teachers, interpreters, servants, or in any other lawful capacity, without any restriction on the part of the Corean Authorities; and, in like manner, no restrictions shall be placed upon the employment of British subjects by Corean Authorities and subjects in any lawful capacity.

        2.- Subjects of either nationality who may proceed to the country of the other to study its language, literature, laws, arts, or industries, or for the purpose of scien- tific research, shall be afforded every reasonable facility for doing so.

        Art. X.-It is hereby stipulated that the Government, public officers, and subjects of Her Britannic Majesty shall, from the day on which this Treaty comes into operation, participate in all privileges, immunities, and advantages, especially in relation to import or export duties on goods and manufactures, which shall then have been granted or may thereafter be granted by His Majesty the King of Corea or the Government, public officers, or subjects of any other power.

        Art. XI.-Ten years from the date on which this Treaty shall come into opera- tion, either of the High Contracting Parties may, on giving one year's previous notice to the other, demand a revision of the Treaty or of the Tariff annexed thereto, with a view to the insertion therein, by mutual consent, of such modifications as experience shall prove to be desirable.

         Art. XII. This Treaty is drawn up in the English and Chinese languages, both of which versions have the same meaning, but it is hereby agreed that any difference which may arise as to interpretation shall be determined by reference to the English

text.

        2. For the present all official communications addressed by the British Autho- rities to those of Corea shall be accompanied by a translation into Chinese.

Art. XIII.-The present Treaty shall be ratified by Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, and by His Majesty the King of Corea, under their hands and seals; the ratifications shall be exchanged at Hanyang (Söul) as soon as possible, or at latest within one year from the date of signature, and the Treaty, which shall be published by both Governments, shall come into operation on the day on which the ratifications are exchanged.

        In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries above named have signed the present Treaty, and have thereto affixed their seals.

5

130

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

     Done in triplicate at Hanyang, this twenty-sixth day of November, in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-three, corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the tenth month of the four hundred and ninety-second year of the Čorean era, being the ninth year of the Chinese reign Kuang Hsü.

[L.S.] [L.8.]

HARRY S. PARKES.

MIN YONG-MOK.

REGULATIONS UNDER WHICH BRITISH TRADE IS TO BE CONDUCTED IN COREA

I.-Entrance and Clearance of Vessels

1.-Within forty-eight hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) after the arrival of a British ship in a Corean port, the master shall deliver to the Corean Customs authorities the receipt of the British Consul showing that he has deposited the ship's papers at the British Consulate, and he shall then make an entry of this ship by handing in a written paper stating the name of the ship, of the port from which she comes, of her master, the number, and, if required, the names of her passengers, her tonnage, and the number of her crew, which paper shall be certified by the master to be a true statement, and shall be signed by him. He shall, at the same time, deposit a written manifest of his cargo, setting forth the marks and numbers of the packages and their contents as they are described in the bills of lading, with the names of the persons to whom they are consigned. The master shall certify that this description is correct, and shall sign his name to the same.

                                                      When a vessel has been duly entered, the Customs authorities will issue a permit to open hatches, which shall be exhibited to the Customs officer on board. Breaking bulk without having obtained such permission will render the master liable to a fine no: exceeding one hundred Mexican dollars.

     2.-If any error is discovered in the manifest, it may be corrected within twenty- four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) of its being handed in, without the payment of any fee, but for alteration or post entry to the manifest made after that time a fee of five Mexican dollars shall be paid.

3.-Any master who shall neglect to enter his vessel at the Corean Custom house within the time fixed by this Regulation shall pay a penalty not exceeding fifty Mexican dollars for every twenty-four hours that he shall so neglect to enter his ship.

4. Any British vessel which remains in port for less than forty-eight hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) and does not open her hatches, also any vessel driven into port by stress of weather, or only in want of supplies, shall not be required to enter or pay tonnage dues so long as such vessel does not engage in trade.

       When the master of a vessel wishes to clear, he shall hand in to the Customs authorities an export manifest containing similar particulars to those given in the import manifest. The Customs authorities will then issue a clearance certificate and return the Consul's receipt for the ship's papers.

These documents must be handed into the Consulate before the ship's papers are returned to the master.

6. Should any ship leave the port without clearing outwards in the manner above prescribed, the master shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding two hundred

Mexican dollars.

7.-British steamers may enter and clear on the same day, and they shall not be required to hand in a manifest except for such goods as are to be landed or transhipped at the port of entry.

II.-Landing and Shipping Cargo and Payment of Duties

     1.--The importer of any goods who desires to land them shall make and sign a application to that effect at the Custom house, stating his own name, the name of the ship in which the goods have been imported, the marks, numbers, and contents of the packages and their values, and declaring that this statement is correct.

                                       The Custom authorities may demand the production of the invoice of each consignment of

mer.

REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH TRADE WITH COREA

131

chandise. If it is not produced, or if its absence is not satisfactorily accounted for, the owner shall be allowed to land his goods on payment of double the Tariff duty, but the surplus duty so levied shall be refunded on the production of the invoice.

2. All goods so entered may be examined by the Customs officers of the places appointed for the purpose. Such examination shall be made without delay or injury to the merchandise, and the packages shall be at once resorted by the Customs authorities to their original condition, in so far as may be practicable.

3.--Should the Customs authorities consider the value of any goods paying an ud valorem duty as declared by the importer or exporter insufficient, they shall call upon him to pay duty on the value determined by an appraisement to be made by the Customs appraiser. But should the importer or exporter te dissatisfied with that appraisement, he shall within twenty-four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) state his reasons for such dissatisfaction to the Commissioner of Customs, and shall appoint an appraiser of his own to make a re-appraisement. He shall then declare the value of the goods as determined by such re-appraisement. The Commissioner of Customs will thereupon, at his option, either assess the duty on the value deter- mined by this re-appraisement, or will purchase the goods from the importer or exporter at the price thus determined, with the addition of five per cent. In the latter case the purchase money shall be paid to the importer or exporter within five days from the date on which he has declared the value determined by his own appraiser.

4.-Upon all goods damaged on the voyage of importation a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed, proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise as to the amount of such reduction, they shall be settled in the manner pointed out in the preceding clause.

5.-All goods intended to be exported shall be entered at the Corean Custom. house before they are shipped. The application to ship shall be made in writing, and shall state the name of the vessel by which the goods are to be exported, the marks and number of the packages, and the quantity, description, and value of the contents. The exporter shall certify in writing that the application gives a true account of all the goods contained herein, and shall sign his name hereto.

       6.-No goods shall be landed or shipped at other places than those fixed by the Corean Customs authorities, or between the hours of sunset and sunrise, or on Sundays or holidays, without the special permission of the Customs authorities, who will be entitled to reasonable fees for the extra duty thus performed.

7.-Claims by importers or exporters for duties paid in excess, or by the Customs authorities for duties which have not been fully paid, shall be entertained only when made within thirty days from the date of payment.

8. No entry will be required in the case of provisions for the use of British ships, their crews and passengers, nor for the baggage of the latter which may be landed or shipped at any time after examination by the Customs officers.

9.-Vessels needing repairs may land their cargo for that purpose without the payment of duty. All goods so landed shall remain in charge of the Corean Autho rities and all just charges for storage, labour, and supervision shall be paid by the master. But if any portion of such cargo be sold, the duties of the Tariff shall be paid on the portion so disposed of.

10. Any person desiring to tranship cargo shall obtain a permit from the Customs authorities before doing so.

III.-Protection of the Revenue

1.-The Customs authorities shall have the right to place Customs officers ou board any British merchant vessel in their ports. All such Customs officers shall have access to all parts of the ship in which cargo is stowed. They shall be treated with civility, and such reasonable accommodation shall be allowed to them as the ship affords.

2.-The hatches and all other places of entrance into that part of the ship where cargo

is stowed may be secured by the Corean Customs officers between the hours of sunset and sunrise, and on Sundays and holidays, by affixing seals, locks, or other

5*

132

PROTOCOL TO TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND COREA

fastenings, and if any person shall, without due permission, wilfully open any entrance that has been so secured, or break any seal, lock, or other fastening that has been affixed by the Corean Customs officers, not only the person so offending, but the master of the ship also, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding one hundred Mexican dollars.

      3.-Any British subject who ships, or attempts to ship, or discharges, or attempts to discharge, goods which have not been duly entered at the Custom house in the manner above provided, or packages containing goods different from those described in the import or export permit application, or prohibited goods, shall forfeit twice the value of such goods, and the goods shall be confiscated.

4. Any person signing a false declaration or certificate with the intent to defraud the revenue of Corea shall be liable to a fine not exceeding two hundred Mexican dollars.

5-Any violation of any provision of these Regulations, to which no penalty is specially attached therein, may be punished by a fine not exceeding one hundred Mexican dollars.

Note. All documents required by these Regulations, and all other communications addressed to the Corean Customs authorities, may be written in the English language.

[L.S.] [L.S.]

HARRY S. PARKES.

MIN YONG-MOK.

PROTOCOL

      The above-named Plenipotentiaries hereby make and append to this Treaty the following three Declarations:-

       I. With reference to Article III. of this Treaty, it is hereby declared that the right of extra-territorial jurisdiction over British subjects in Corea granted by this Treaty shall be relinquished when, in the judgment of the British Government, the laws and legal procedure of Corea shall have been so far modified and reformed us to remove the objections which now exist to British subjects being placed under Corean jurisdiction, and Corean Judges shall have attained similar legal qualifications and a similar independent position to those of British Judges.

       II.-With reference to Article IV. of this Treaty, it is hereby declared that if the Chinese Government shall hereafter surrender the right of opening commercial establishments in the city of Hanyang, which was granted last year to Chinese subjects, the same right shall not be claimed for British subjects, provided that it be not granted by the Corean Government to the subjects of any other Power.

      III. It is hereby declared that the provisions of this Treaty shall apply to all British Colonies, unless any exception shall be notified by Her Majesty's Government to that of Corea within one year from the date on which the Ratifications of this Treaty shall be exchanged.

      And it is hereby further stipulated that this Protocol shall be laid before the High Contracting Parties simultaneously with this Treaty, and that the ratification of this Treaty shall include the confirmation of the above three declarations, for which, therefore, no separate act of ratification will be required.

      In faith of which the above-named Plenipotentiaries have this day signed this Protocol, and have hereto affixed their seals.

Done at Hanyang this twenty-sixth day of November, in the year eighteen hundred and eighty-three, corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the tenth month of the four hundred and ninety-second year of the Corean era, being the ninth year of the Chinese reign Kuang Hsü.

[L.S.]

[L.S.]

HARRY S. PARKES. MIN YONG-MOK.

COREAN TARIFF

IMPORTS

Ad valorem

No.

ARTICLE.

Rate of Duty. Per cent.

No.

ARTICLE.

1 Agricultural implements

Free

52

Fans, all kinds

2

Alum

3

Amber

4

Anchors and chains

5

5

53

Feathers, all kinds

20

54 Felt

5

55

Fire engines

56

Fireworks

133

Ad valorem Rate of Duty. Per cent.

74

7}

74

:

...

:

...

Free

20

5

7}

5

LO LO

:

:

:

:

Arms, ammunition, fire-arms, fowling. pieces, or sidearms imported under special permit of the Corean Govern- ment for sporting purposes or for self- defence

Artificial flowers

...

Bamboo, split or not

6

7

8

Bark for tanning

9

Beaus, peas, and pulse, all kinds

10

...

57 Fish, fresh

58

59

20 60

20 61

5 62

5 63

dried and salted

Flax, hemp, and jute.....

Flints

Floor rugs, all kinds

10

20

samme foregoifoffo f

Flour and meal, all kinds

Foil, gold and silver

5

64

65

66

74 67

71

...

Free

7 72

5

10

774 Glue

***

:

7

75

Grain and corn, all kinds

10

76

68

5 69 Free 70 5 71

...

tin, copper, and all other kinds...

Fruit, fresh, all kinds

dried, sa'ted, or preserved

Furniture of all kinds

...

...

Furs, superior, as sable, sea otter, seal,

otter, beaver, &c.

Gamboge

...

Ginseng, red, white, crude, and clarified Glass, window, plain and coloured, all

qualities

...

Glass, plate, silvered or unsilvered,

framed or unframed...

73 Glassware, all kinds.......

Beer, porter, and cider

11 Beverages, such as lemonade, ginger

beer, soda and mineral waters

Birds' nests

...

Blankets and rugs

12

13

14

Bones

...

15 Books, maps, and charts

16

Bricks and tiles

17 Bullion, being gold or silver refined

18

...

...

Buttons, buckles, hooks and eyes, &c.

19 Camphor, crude

20

21 Candles

22 Canvas

refined

:

:

23 Carmine

***

...

24 Carpets of jute, hemp, or felt, patent

tapestry

25 Carpets, superior quality, as Brussels, Kidderminster, and other kinds not

enumerated

26 Carpets, velvet

27

Carriages...

28 Cement, as Portland and other kinds

29

Charcoal...

30 Chemicals, all kinds......

31 Clocks and parts thereof

:

32 Clothing and wearing apparel, all kinds,

hats, boots and shoes, &c.

33 Clothing and wearing apparel made

wholly of silk.....

34 Coal and coke

35

Cochineal

36

Cocoons

37

Coins, gold and silver

38

...

...

Grasscloth, and all textiles in hemp,

jute, &c.

7 77 Guano and manures, all kinds

78 Hair, all kinds except human

human...

...

END ONGNONG

71

7}

74

74

71

400

...

7}

ornaments, gold and silver

Hides and skins, raw and undressed tanned and dressed

""

Szoba začõga aa55

7+

Horns and hoofs all kinds not otherwise

provided for

79

"

80

81

82

7 83

784

85

86

7 87

88

Incense sticks

...

...

India-rubber, manufactured or not Isinglass, all kinds

Ivory, manufactured or not Jade-ware

89 Jewellery, real or imitation

90

7 91

Free 92

BENN NNNNÜNöööö 2 öggg985

Confectioneries and sweetmeats, all kinds 10 93

39 Coral, manufactured or not

40 Cordage and rope, all kinds and sizes...

41 Cottor, raw ...

...

42 Cotton manufacture, all kinds... 43 Cotton and woollen mixtures, all kinds 44 Cotton and silk mixtures, all kinds 45 Cutlery, all kinds...

46 Drugs, all kinds

...

47 Dyes, colours, and paints, paint oils,

48

      and materials used for mixing paints Earthenware

...

49 Embroideries in gold, silver, or silk

50

Enamel-ware

51 Explosives used for mining, &c., and

imported under special permit

...

:

...

Kerosine, or petroleum, and other

mineral oils Lacquered-ware, common ...

superior Lamps, all kinds

"

91 Lanterns, paper...

:

:

Leather, all ordinary kinds, plain...

superior kinds, and stamped,

""

figured, or coloured...

7 95

96

7 97

7

98

Leather manufactures, all kinds Lime ...

...

7 99

7100

7101

10

...

Linen, linen and cotton, linen and wool- len mixtures, linen and silk mixtures, all kinds

Matches

...

...

...

Matting, floor, Chinese, Japanese, coir,

&c., common qualities

102 Matting, superior qualities, Japanese

tatamis," &c.

103 Meat, fresh...

...

2220

aõõ gagồɔ̃a

20

7+

25

19

...

71

:

134

COREAN TARIFF

105 Medicines, all kinds not otherwise

provided for

...

106 Metals, all kinds, in pig, block, ingot, slab, bar, rod, plate, sheet, hoop, strip, band and flat, T and angle-iron, old and scrap iron... 107 Metals, all kinds, pipe or tube, cor- rugated or galvanized, wire, steel, tin- plates. quicksilver, nickel, platina, German silver, yellow metal, tuten- agne, or white copper, unrefined gold and silver

108 Metal manufactures, all kinds, as nails, screws, tools, machinery, railway plant, and hardware...

109

Models of inventions

110 Mosquito netting, not made of silk...

111

""

""

112 Musical boxes ...

113

114

made of silk

Musical instruments, all kinds

Musk

115 Needles and pins

116

Oil-cake

117 Oils, vegetable, all kinds

:

:

No.

ARTICLE.

Ad valorem Rate of Duty. Per cent.

No.

104

Meat, dried and salted...

7}

5

5

154

...

155

157 Soy, Chinese and Japanese

158

Spectacles

159

Spices, all kinds

7+

160

Spirits, in jars

161

Spirits and liqueurs, in wood or bottle,

all kinds

7}

162

Free

7}

163

10

164

10

...

Stationery and writing materials, all

kinds, blank books, &c.

Stones and slate, cut and dressed...

Sugar, brown and white, all qualities,

molasses, and syrups...

ARTICLE.

Ad valorem Rate of Duty.

Per cent.

152 Silk manufactures, as gauze, crape, Japanese amber lustrings, satius, satin damasks, figured satins, Japanese white silk ("habutai")

153 Silk manufactures not otherwise pro-

vided for

...

Silk thread and floss silk in skein...

Soap, common qualities

156 Soap, superior qualities

10

ིི མགཙ་ཚ་

:

7}

7

10

165

Sugar candy

10

20

166

Sulphur

7

167

Table stores, all kinds, and preserved

provisions

7}

68

Tallow

:

118 Oil, wood (Tung-yu)...

5

169

Tea

...

119 Oil, and floor-cloth, all kinds...

7}

170

Telescopes and binocular glasses

10

120 Packing bags, packing matting, tea-

lead, and ropes for packing goods Free

171

Tobacco, all kinds and forms...

...

20

172

Tortoise shell, manufactured or not

20

121 Paper, commone qualities

5

...

173

Tooth powder...

10

122

all kinds, not otherwise provided

174

Travellers' baggage...

دو

:

Free

for

7}

175

Trunks and portmanteaux

10

T_T_Tressas

71

71

123 Paper, coloured, fancy, wall and hanging

124 Pearls

...

125 Pepper, unground...

10

176

Twine and thread, all kinds, excepting

20

in silk

...

5

177

Types, new and old

...

126

Perfumes and scents

20

178

Umbrellas, paper

127 Photographic apparatus

10

179

cotton

128 Pictures, prints, photographs, engrav-

ings, all kinds framed or unframed

180

silk

"

10

181

Umbrella frames

...

129 Pitch and tar

5 182

Varnish

...

130 Planks, soft

7층

183

131

hard

10

184

,,

132 Plants, trees and shrubs, all kinds

Free

185

Vermicelli

133 Plate, gold and silver

20

186

Vermilion

134 Plated-ware, all kinds

10

187

Vegetables, fresh, dried, and salted Velvet, silk...

Watches, and parts thereof in common

...

7

...

...

135 Porcelain, common qualities

7}

metal, nickel, or silver

136

"

superior qualities

10 188

137 Precious stones, all kinds, set or unset 20

189

Watches, in gold or gilt Wax, bees' or vegetable

...

...

138 Rattans, split or not

5

190

...

"

139 Rhinoceros horns

20

191

140 Rosin

71 192

148 Seals, materials for...

&c.

141 Saddlery and harness

142 Salt

143 Samples in reasonable quantities

144 Sapanwood

145 Scales and balances...

146

Scented wood, all kinds

***

147 Scientific instruments, as physical, ma- thematical, meteorological, and sur- gical, and their appliances

149 Sea products, as seaweed, bêche-de-mer,

150 Seeds, all kinds

10

193

"

71

194

Free

195

...

7+ 196

5

20

...

198

Free

...

10

...

7+

5

151

Silk, raw, reeled, thrown, floss or waste

cloth...

Wines in wood or bottle, all kinds Wood or timber, soft

""

Wool, sheep's, raw...

Woollen manufactures, all kinds Woollen and silk mixtures, all

kinds

197 Works of art

...

Yarns, all kinds, in cotton, wool hemp,

&c.

...

...

All unenumerated articles, raw or un-

manufactured...

All uneuumerated articles, partly manu-

factured

All unenumerated articles, completely

manufactured...

...

...

hard...

:

5šཙ ཙསྡུསྶ-ཨT

Free

7

:

7

71

::

...

...

...

10

COREAN TARIFF

          Foreign ships, when sold in Corea, will pay a duty of 25 cents per ton on sailing vessels, and 50 cents per ton on steamers.

Prohibited Goods.

Adulterated drugs or medicines.

          Arms, munitions, and implements of war, as ordnance or cannon, shot and shell, firearms of all kinds, cartridges, side-arms, spears or pikes,

135

saltpetre, gunpowder, guucotton, dynamite, and other explosive substances.

The Corean authorities will grant special permits for the importation of arms, firearms, and ammunition for purposes of sport or self-defence on satisfactory proof being furnished to them of the bona fide character of the application.

Counterfeit coins, all kinds.

Opium, except medicinal opium.

EXPORTS.

CLASS I.

Duty-Free Export Goods.

Bullion, being gold and silver refined. Coins, gold and silver, all kinds. Plants, trees, and shrubs, all kinds. Samples, in reasonable quantity. Travellers' baggage.

CLASS II.

All other native goods or productions not enumerated in Class I. will pay an ad valorem duty of five per cent.

bited.

The exportation of red ginseng is prohi-

RULES.

         I.-In the case of imported articles the ad valorem duties of this Tariff will be calculated on the actual cost of the goods at the place of production or fabrication, with the addition of freight, insurance, etc. In the case of export articles the ad valorem duties will be calculated on market values in Corea.

II. Duties may be paid in Mexican dollars or Japanese silver yen.

       III.-The above Tariff of import and export duties shall be converted, as soon as possible and as far as may be deemed desirable, into specific rates by agreement between the competent authorities of the

two countries.

[L.8.] (L.S.]

HARRY S. PARKES. MIN YONG-MOK.

UNITED STATES

TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND THE KINGDOM OF COREA (CHOSEN)

SIGNED AT RENSAN, 22ND MAY, 1882

Ratifications Exchanged at Hanyang, 19th May, 1883

       Art. I.-There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between the President of the United States and the King of Chiosen and the citizens and subjects of their respective Governments. If other Powers deal unjustly or oppressively with either government the other will exert their good offices, on being informed of the case, to bring about an amicable arrangement, thus showing their friendly feelings.

Art. II.-After the conclusion of this treaty of amity and commerce the high contracting Powers may each appoint diplomatic representatives to reside at the Court of the other, and may each appoint consular representatives at the ports of the other which are open to foreign commerce, at their own convenience.

       The officials shall have relations with the corresponding local authorities of equal rank upon a basis of mutual equality. The Diplomatic and Consular repre- sentatives of the two Governments shall receive mutually all the privileges, rights, and immunities, without discrimination, which are accorded to the same classes of repre- sentatives from the most favoured nations.

       Consuls shall exercise their functions only on receipt of an exequatur from the Government to which they are accredited. Consular authorities shall be bond fide officials. No merchants shall be permitted to exercise the duties of the office, nor shall consular officers be allowed to engage in trade.

       At ports to which no consular representatives have been appointed the consuls of other Powers may be invited to act, provided that no merchant shall be allowed to assume consular functions, or the provisions of this treaty may be, in such case. enforced by the local authorities.

       If consular representatives of the United States in Chosen conduct their business in an improper manner their exequaturs may be revoked, subject to the approval, previously obtained, of the diplomatic representative of the United States.

       Art. III.-Whenever United States vessels, either because of weather or by want of fuel or provisions, cannot reach the nearest open port in Chosen, they may enter any port or harbour either to take refuge therein or to get wood, coal, and other necessaries or to make repairs; the expenses incurred thereby being defrayed by the ship's master. In such event the officers and people of the locality shall display their sympathy by rendering full assistance, and their liberality by furnishing the necessities required.

       If a United States vessel carries on a clandestine trade at a port not open to foreign commerce, such vessel with her cargo shall be seized and confiscated.

      If a United States vessel be wrecked on the coast of Chosen, the coast authorities, on being informed of the occurrence, shall immediately render assistance to the crew, provide for their present necessities, and take the measures necessary for the salvage of the ship and the preservation of the cargo. They shall also bring the matter to the knowledge of the nearest consular representative of the United States, in order

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND COREA

137

that steps may be taken to send the crew home and save the ship and cargo. The necessary expenses shall be defrayed either by the ship's master or by the United States.

Art. IV. -All citizens of the United States of America in Chosen, peaceably attending to their own affairs, shall receive and enjoy for themselves and everything appertaining to them the protection of the local authorities of the Government of Chosen, who shall defend them from all insult and injury of any sort. If their dwellings or property be threatened or attacked by mobs, incendiaries, or other violent or lawless persons, the local officers, on requisition of the Consul, shall immediately dispatch a military force to disperse the rioters, apprehend the guilty individuals, and punish them with the utmost rigour of the law.

Subjects of Chosen, guilty of any criminal act towards citizens of the United States, shall be punished by the authorities of Chosen according to the laws of Chosen; and citizens of the United States, either on shore or in any merchant vessel, who may insult, trouble, or wound the persons or injure the property of the people of Chosen shall be arrested and punished only by tue Consul or other public functionary of the United States thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States.

        When controversies arise in the kingdom of Chosen, betw en citizens of the United States and subjects of His Majesty, which need to be examined and decided by the public officers of the two nations, it is agreed between the two governments of the United States and Chosen that such case shall be tried by the proper official of the nationality of the defendant according to the law of that nation.

                                    The properly authorized official of the plaintiff's nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trial and shall be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper facilities for watching the proceedings in the interests of justice. If he so desire he shall have the right to be present, to examine and cross-examine witnesses. If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings he shall be permitted to protest against them in detail.

It is, however, mutually agreed and understood between the high contracting Powers that whenever the King of Chosen shall have so far modified and reformed the statutes and the judicial procedure of his kingdom that, in the judgment of the United States, they conform to the laws and course of justice in the United States, the right of exterritorial jurisdiction over United States citizens in Chosen shall be abandoned, and thereafter United States citizens, when within the limits of the kingdom of Chosen, shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the native authorities.

        Art. V.-Merchants and merchant vessels of Chosen visiting the United States for the purpose of traffic shall pay duties and tonnage dues and fees according to the customs regulations of the United States, but no higher or other rates of duties and tonnage dues shall be exacted of them than are levied upon citizens of the United States or upon citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Merchants and merchant vessels of the United States visiting Chosen for purposes of traffic shall pay duties upon all merchandise imported and exported. The authority to levy duties is of rig t vested in the Government of Chosen. The tariff of duties upon exports and imports, together with the customs regulations for the prevention of smuggling and other irregularities, will be fixed by the authorities of Chosen and communicated to the proper officials of the United States, to be by the latter notified to their citizens and duly observed.

It is, however, agreed in the first instance, as a general measure, that the tariff upon such imports as are articles of daily use shall not exceed an ad valorem duty or ten per cent; that the tariff upon such imports as are luxuries-

                                    -as for instance foreign wines, foreign tobacco, clocks and watches-shall not exceed an ad valorem duty of thirty per cent., and that native produce exported shall pay a duty out to exceed fives per cent. ad valorem. And it is further agreed that the duty upon foreign imports shall be paid once for all at the port of entry, and that no other dues, duties, fees taxes, or charges of any sort shall be levied upon such imports either in the interior, of Chosen or at the ports.

138

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND COREA

      United States merchant vessels entering the ports of Chosen shall pay tonnage dues at the rate of five mace per ton, payable once in three months on each vessel, according to the Chinese calendar.

      Art. VI.-Subjects of Chosen who may visit the United States shall be per- mitted to reside and to rent premises, purchase land, or to construct residences or warehouses in all parts of the country. They shall be freely permitted to pursue their various callings and avocations, and to traffic in all merchandise, raw and manufactured, that is not declared contraband by law. Citizens of the United States who may resort to the ports of Chosen which are open to foreign commerce shall be permitted to reside at such open ports within the limits of the concession and to lease buildings or land, or to construct residences or warehouses therein. They shall be freely permitted to pursue their various callings and avocations within the limits of the ports and to traffic in all merchandise, raw and manufactured, that is not declared contraband by law.

      No coercion or intimidation in the acquisition of land or buildings shall be permitted, and the land rent as fixed by the authorities of Chosen shall be paid. And it is expressly agreed that land so acquired in the open ports of Chosen still remains an integral part of the kingdom, and that all rights of jurisdiction over persons and property within such areas remain vested in the authorities of Chosen, except in so far as such rights have been expressly relinquished by this treaty.

American citizens are not permitted either to transport foreign imports to the interior for sale or to proceed thither to purchase native produce, nor are they per- mitted to transport native produce from one open port to another open port.

      Violation of this rule will subject such merchandise to confiscation, and the merchants offending will be handed over to the consular authorities to be dealt with.

Art. VII. The Governments of the United States and of Chosen mutually agree and undertake that subjects of Chosen shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the ports of the United States, and citizens of the United States shall not be permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of Chosen, to transport it from one open port to another open port, or traffic in it in Chosen. This absolute prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, and to vessels owned by the citizens or subjects of either Power and employed by other persons for the transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of the United States and of Chosen, and offenders against it shall be severely punished.

Art. VII. Whenever the Government of Chosen shall have reason to appre- hend a scarcity of food within the limits of the kingdom, His Majesty may by decree temporarily prohibit the export of all breadstuffs, and such decree shall be binding upon all citizens of the United States in Chosen upon due notice having been given them by the authorities of Chosen through the proper officers of the United States; but it is to be understood that the exportation of rice and breadstuffs of every description is prohibited from the open port of Yin-Chuen.

      Chosen having of old prohibited the exportation of red ginseng, if citizens of the United States clandestinely purchase it for export it shall be confiscated and the offenders punished.

      Art. IX. Purchase of cannon, small arms, swords, gunpowder, shot, and all munitions of war is permitted only to officials of the Government of Chosen, and they may be imported by citizens of the United States only under written permit from the authorities of Chosen. If these articles are clandestinely imported they shall be confiscated and the offending party shall be punished.

      Art. X.-The officers and people of either nation residing in the other shall have the right to employ natives for all kinds of lawful work.

Should, however, subjects of Chosen, guilty of violation of the laws of the king- dom, or against whom any action has been brought, conceal themselves in the residences or warehouses of United States citizens or on board United States merchant vessels, the Consular authorities of the United States, on being notified of the fact by the local authorities, will either permit the latter to despatch constables to make

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139

the arrests, or the persons will be arrested by the Consular authorities and handed over to the local constables.

Officials or citizens of the United States shall not harbour such persons.

        Art. XI.-Students of either nationality who may proceed to the country of the other in order to study the language, literature, laws, or arts, shall be given all possible protection and assistance, in evidence of cordial goodwill.

        Art. XII.-This being the first treaty negotiated by Chosen, and hence being general and incomplete in its provisions, shall, in the first instance, be put into opera- tion in all things stipulated herein. As to stipulations not contained herein, after an interval of five years, when the officers and people of the two Powers shall have become more familiar with each other's language, a further negotiation of commercial provisions and regulations in detail, in conformity with international law and without unequal discriminations on either part, shall be had.

        Art. XIII.-This Treaty and future official correspondence between the two contracting governments shall be made on the part of Chosen in the Chinese language.

The United States shall either use the Chinese language, or if English be used It shall be accompanied with a Chinese version in order to avoid misunderstanding. Art. XIV. The high contracting Powers hereby agree that should at any time the King of Chosen grant to any nation or to the merchants or citizens of any nation any right, privilege, or favour connected either with navigation, commerce, political or other intercourse, which is not conferred by this treaty, such right, privilege, and favour shall freely enure to the benefit of the United States, its public officers, merchants, and citizens; provided always, that whenever such right, privilege, or favour is accompanied by any condition or equivalent concession granted by the other nation interested, the United States, its officers and people, shall only be entitled to the benefit of such right, privilege, or favour upon complying with the conditions or concessions connected therewith.

        In faith whereof the respective Commissioners Plenipotentiary have signed and sealed the foregoing at Yin-Cauen, in English and Chinese, being three originals of each text of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Yin-Chuen within one year from the date of its execution, and immediately hereafter this treaty shall be, in all its provisions, publicly proclaimed and made known by both governments in their respective countries in order that it may be obeyed by their citizens and subjects respectively.

R. W. SHUFELDT,

Commodore United States Navy, Envoy of the United States to Chosen.

SHIN CHEN,

CHIN HONG CHI,

Members of the Royal Cabinet of Chosen.

JAPAN

TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN THE EMPIRE OF

JAPAN AND THE KINGDOM OF COREA (CHOSEN)

Signed at Koкwa, 26th February, 1876

      The Governments of Japan and Chosen being desirous to resume the amicable relations that of yore existed between them and to promote the friendly feelings of both nations to a still firmer basis have, for this purpose, appointed their Pleni- potentiaries, that is to say :-The Government of Japan, Kuroda Kiyotaka, High Commissioner Extraordinary to Chosen, Lieutenant-General and Member of the Privy Council, Minister of the Colonization Department, and Inouyè Kaoru, Associate High Commissioner Extraordinary to Chosen, Member of the Genrô In; and the Government of Chosen, Shin Ken, Han-Choo-Su-Fu, and In-Jishô, Fu-So-Fu, Fuku-so-Kwan, who, according to the powers received from their respective Govern- ments, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :-

      Art. I.-Chosen being an independent state enjoys the same sovereign rights as does Japan.

      In order to prove the sincerity of the friendship existing between the two nations, their intercourse shall henceforward be carried on in terms of equality and courtesy, each avoiding the giving of offence by arrogance or manifestations of suspicion.

In the first instance, all rules and precedents that are apt to obstruct friendly intercourse shall be totally abrogated, and, in their stead, rules, liberal and in general usage fit to secure a firm and perpetual peace, shall be established.

Art. II.-The Government of Japan, at any time within fifteen months from the date of signature of this Treaty, shall have the right to send an Envoy to the capital of Chosen, where he shall be admitted to confer with the Rei-sohan-sho on matters of a diplomatic nature. He may either reside at the capital or return to his country on the completion of his mission.

The Government of Chosen in like manner shall have the right to send an Envoy to Tokyo, Japan, where he shall be admitted to confer with the Minister for Foreign Affairs on matters of a diplomatic nature. He may either reside at Tokyo or return home on the completion of his mission.

     Art. III.--All official communications addressed by the Government of Japan to that of Chosen shall be written in the Japanese language, and for a period of ten years from the present date they shall be accompanied by a Chinese translation. Government of Chosen will use the Chinese language.

The

Art. IV.--Sorio in Fusan, Chosen, where an official establishment of Japan is situated, is a place originally opened for commercial intercourse with Japan, and trade shall henceforward be carried on at that place in accordance with the provisions of this Treaty, whereby are abolished all former usages, such as the practice of Sai- ken-sen (junk annually sent to Chosen by the late Prince of Tsushima to exchange a certain quantity of articles between each other).

     In addition to the above place, the Government of Chosen agrees to open two ports, as mentioned in Article V. of this Treaty, for commercial intercourse with Japanese subjects

     In the foregoing places Japanese subjects shall be free to lease land and to erect buildings thereon, and to rent buildings the property of subjects of Chosen.

Art. V. On the coast of five provinces, viz.: Keikin, Chiusei, Jenra Keisha and Kankio, two ports, suitable for commercial purposes, shall be selected, and the time for opening these two ports shall be in the twentieth month from the second month of the ninth year of Meiji, corresponding with the date of Chosen, the first moon of the year Hei-shi.

Art. VI. Whenever Japanese vessels either by stress of weather or by want fuel and provisions cannot reach one or the other of the open ports in Chosen, ther may enter any port or harbour either to take refuge therein, or to get supplies of

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND COREA

141

     wood, coal, and other necessaries, or to make repairs; the expenses incurred thereby are to be defrayed by the ship's master. In such events both the officers and the people of the locality shall display their sympathy by rendering full assistance, and their liberality in supplying the necessaries required.

       If any vessel of either country be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coasts of Japan or of Chosen, the people of the vicinity shall immediately use every exertion to rescue her crew, and shall inform the local authorities of the disaster, who will either send the wrecked persons to their native country or band them over to the officer of their country residing at the nearest port.

       Art. VII.-The coasts of Chosen, having hitherto been left unsurveyed, are very dangerous for vessels approaching them, and in order to prepare charts showing the positions of islands, rocks, and reefs, as well as the depth of water, whereby all navigators may be enabled safely to pass between the two countries, any Japanese mariners may freely survey said coasts.

       Art. VIII. There shall be appointed by the Government of Japan an officer to reside at the open ports in Chosen for the protection of Japanese merchants resorting there, provided that such arrangement be deemed necessary. Should any question interesting both nations arise, the said officer shall confer with the local authorities of Chosen and settle it.

        Art. IX.-Friendly relations having been established between the two contract- ing parties, their respective subjects may freely carry on their business without any interference from the officers of either Government, and neither limitation nor pro- hibition shall be made on trade.

       In case any fraud be committed, or payment of debt be refused by any merchant of either country, the officer of either one or of the other Government shall do their utmost to bring the delinquent to justice and to enforce recovery of the debt.

Neither the Japanese nor the Chosen Government shall be held responsible for the payment of such debt.

       Art. X. Should a Japanese subject residing at either of the open ports of Chosen commit any offence against a subject of Chosen, he shall be tried by the Japanese authorities. Should a subject of Chosen commit any offence against a Japanese subject, he shall be tried by the authorities of Chosen. The offenders shall be punished according to the laws of their respective countries. Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

Art. XI.-Friendly relations having been established between the two contract- ing parties, it is necessary to prescribe trade relations for the benefit of the merchants of the respective countries.

       Such trade regulations, together with detailed provisions, to be added to the Articles of the present Treaty, to develop its meaning, and facilitate its observance, shall be agreed upon at the capital of Chosen or at Kokwa Fu in the country, within six months from the present date, by Special Commissioners appointed by the two countries.

        Art. XII. The foregoing eleven articles are binding from the date of the signing hereof, and shall be observed by the two contracting parties, faithfully and invariably, whereby perpetual friendship shall be secured to the two countries.

       The present Treaty is executed in duplicate and copies will be exchanged between the two contracting parties.

       In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of Japan and Chosen, have affixed our seals hereunto this twenty-sixth day of the second month of the ninth year of Meiji, and the two thousand five hundred and thirty-sixth since the accession of Jimmu Tenno; and, in the era of Chosen, the second day of the second moon of the year Heishi, and of the founding of Chosen the four hundred and eighty-fifth.

(Signed)

KURODA KIYOTAKA. INOUYE KAoru. SHIN KEN. IN JI-SHO.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND COREA

Whereas, on the twenty-sixth day of the second month of the ninth year Meiji, corresponding with the Corean date of the second day of the second month of the year Heishi, a treaty of Amity and Friendship was signed and concluded between Kuroda Kiyotaka, High Commissioner Extraordinary, Lieutenant-General of H.I.J.M. Army, Member of the Privy Council, and Minister of the Colonization Department, and Inouyé Kaoru, Associate High Commissioner Extraordinary and Member of the Genrô-In, both of whom had been directed to proceed to the city of Kokwa in Corea by the Government of Japan; and Shin Ken, Dai Kwan, Han-Choo-Su-Fu, and In- jishô, Fu-So-Fu, Fuku-sc-Kwan, both of whom had been duly commissioned for that purpose by the Government of Corea:

      Now therefore, in pursuance of Article XI. of the above Treaty, Miyamoto Okadzu, Commissioner despatched to the capital of Corea, Daijô of the Foreign Department, and duly empowered thereto by the Government of Japan, and Chio Inki, Kôshoo Kwan, Gisheifudôshô, duly empowered thereto by the Government of Corea, have negotiated and concluded the following articles:-

Art. I.-Agents of the Japanese Government stationed at any of the open ports shall hereafter, whenever a Japanese vessel has been stranded on the Corean coasts and has need of their presence at the spot, have the right to proceed there on their informing the local authorities of the facts.

Art. II.-Envoys or Agents of the Japanese Government shall hereafter be at full liberty to despatch letters or other communications to any place or places in Corea, either by post at their own expense, or by hiring inhabitants of the locality wherein they reside as special couriers.

      Art. III.-Japanese subjects may, at the ports of Corea open to them, lease land for the purpose of erecting residences thereon, the rent to be fixed by mutual agreement between the lessee and the owner.

      Any lands belonging to the Corean Government may be rented by a Japanese on his paying the same rent thereon as a Corean subject would pay to his Government.

It is agreed that the Shumon (watch-gate) and the Shotsumon (barrier) erected by the Corean Government near the Kokwa (Japanese official establishment) in Sorioko, Fusan, shall be entirely removed, and that a new boundary line shall be established according to the limits hereinafter provided.

In the other two open ports the same steps shall be taken.

      Art. IV. The limits within which Japanese subjects may travel from the port of Fusan shall be comprised within a radius of ten ri, Coreau measurement, the landing place in that port being taken as a centre.

Japanese subjects shall be free to go where they please within the above limits, and shall be therein at full liberty either to buy articles of local production or t› sell articles of Japanese production.

      The town of Torai lies outside of the above limits, but Japanese shall have the same privileges as in those places within them.

     Art. V.-Japanese subjects shall at each of the open ports of Corea be at liberty to employ Corean subjects.

      Corean subjects, on obtaining permission from their Government, may visit the Japanese Empire.

open

Art. VI.In case of the death of any Japanese subject residing at the ports of Corea, a suitable spot of ground shall be selected wherein to inter his remains. As to the localities to be selected for cemeteries in the two open ports other than the port of Fusan, in determining them regard shall be had as to the distance there is to the cemetery already established at Fusau.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND COREA

143

Art. VII.-Japanese subjects shall be at liberty to traffic in any article owned by Corean subjects, paying therefore in Japanese coin. Corean subjects, for purposes of trade, may freely circulate among themselves at the open ports of Corea such Japanese coin as they may have possession of in business transactions.

Japanese subjects shall be at liberty to use in trade or to carry away with them

coin of Corea.

the copper

In case any subject of either of the two countries counterfeit the coin of either of them, he shall be punished according to the laws of his own country.

Art. VIII.-Corean subjects shall have the full fruition of all and every article which they have become possessed of either by purchase or gift from Japanese subjects.

Art. IX.-In case a boat despatched by a Japanese surveying vessel to take soundings along the Corean coasts, as provided for in article VII. of the Treaty of Amity and Friendship, should be prevented from returning to the vessel, on account either of bad weather or the ebb tide, the headman of the locality shall accommodate the boat party in a suitable house in the neighbourhood. Articles required by them for their comfort shall be furnished to them by the local authorities, and the outlay thus incurred shall afterwards be refunded to the latter.

Art. X.-Although no relations as yet exist between Corea and foreign countries, yet Japan has for many years back maintained friendly relations with them; it is therefore natural that in case a vessel of any of the countries of which Japan thus cultivates the friendship should be stranded by stress of weather or otherwise on the coasts of Corea, those on board shall be treated with kindness by Corean subjects, and should such persons ask to be sent back to their homes they shall be delivered over by the Corean Government to an Agent of the Japanese Government residing at one of the open ports of Corea, requesting him to send them back to their native countries, which request the Agent shall never fail to comply with.

Art. XI. The foregoing ten articles, t gether with the Regulations for Trade annexed hereto, shall be of equal effect with the Treaty of Amity and Friendship, and therefore shall be faithfully observed by the Governments of the two countries. Should it, however, be found that any of the above articles actually cause embarrass- ment to the commercial intercourse of the two nations and that it is necessary to modify them, then either Government, submitting its propositions to the other, shall negotiate the modification of such articles on giving one year's previous notice of

their intention.

Signed and sealed this twenty-fourth day of the eighth month of the ninth year Meiji, and two thousand five hundred and thirty-sixth since the accession o H. M. Jimmu Tenno; and of the Corean era, the sixth day of the seventh mouth of the year Heishi, and the founding of Corea the four hundred and eighty-fifth.

(Signed)

MIYAMOTO OKADZU,

Commissioner and Dajiô of the

Foreign Department.

(Signed)

CHO INKI,

Koshoo Kwan, Gisheifudosho.

RUSSO-JAPANESE AGREEMENT REGARDING COREA.

AGREEMENT AS TO COREA.

PROTOCOL.

[Translation]

       The Secretary of State, Prince Lobanow Rostovsky, Minister of Foreign Affairs for Russia, and the Marshal Marquis Yamagata, Ambassador Extraordinary of his Majesty the Emperor of Japan, having exchanged views on the situation of Corea, have concluded the following articles:

Art. I.-The Russian and Japanese Goverments, with the view of remedying the financial embarrassment of Corea, will advise the Corean Government to suppress all useless expenditure and to establish an equilibrium between the expenses and the revenue. If, as the result of admittedly indispensable reforms, it should become necessary to have recourse to foreigu loans, the two Governments will lend by mutual accord their assistance to Corea.

      Art. II. The Russian and Japanese Governments will endeavour to leave to Corea, as soon as the financial and economical situation of that country will permit them to do so, the creation and maintenance of an armed force and of a native police in sufficient proportions to maintain internal order without foreign aid.

      Art. III.-With the view of facilitating communications with Corea the Japanese Government will continue to administer the telegraph lines, which are at the present moment in its hands. Russia reserves the right to establish a telegraph line from Seoul to her own frontier. The different lines may be bought back by the Corean Government as soon as it has the means of doing so.

Art. IV. In the event of any of the principles herein set forth requiring a more precise and more detailed definition, or if other points should arise on which it would be necessary for the two Governments to agree, their representatives shall be charged to consider the matter in a friendly sense.

Done at Moscow, May 28th (June 9th), 1896.

LOBANOW. YAMAGATA.

The following Memorandum, drawn up in English, is attached to the Moscow Convention :-

MEMORANDUM.

      The Representatives of Russia and Japan at Seoul, having conferred under the identical instructions from their respective Governments, have arrived at the follow- ing conclusions :

Art. I. While leaving the matter of his Majesty the King of Corea's return to the palace eutirely to his own discretion and judgment, the Representatives of Russia and Japan will friendly advise his Majesty to return to that place, when no doubts concerning his safety could be entertained.

The Japanese Representative on his part gives the assurance that the most complete and effective measures will be taken for the control of Japanese soshi.

Art. II.--The present Cabinet Ministers have been appointed by his Majesty from his own free will, and most of them held Ministerial or other high offices during the The two Representa- last two years, and are known to be liberal and moderate men. tives will always aim at recommending to his Majesty to appoint liberal and moderate men as Ministers and to show clemency to his subjects.

145

AGREEMENT BETWEEN RUSSIA AND JAPAN RE COREA

Art. III.-The Representative of Russia quite agrees with the Representative of Japan that at the present state of affairs in Corea it may be necessary to have Japan se guards stationed at some places for the protection of the Japanese telegraph line between Fusan and Seoul, and that these guards, now consisting of three com- panies of soldiers, should be withdrawn as soon as possible and replaced by gendarmes, who will be distributed as follows:-Fifty men at Taiku, fifty men at Kaheung, and ten men each at ten intermediate posts between Fusan and Seoul. This distribution may be liable to some changes, but the total number of the gendarmes force shall never exceed 200 men, who will afterwards gradually be with- drawn from such places where peace and order have been restored by the Corean Government.

Art. IV. For the protection of the Japanese settlements at Seoul and the open ports against possible attacks by the Corean populace two companies of Japanese troops may be stationed at Seoul, one company at Fusan and one at Gensan, each company not to exceed 200 men. These troops will be quartered near the settle- ments, and shall be withdrawn as soon as no apprehensions of such attack could be entertained.

For the protection of the Russian Legation and Consulates the Russian Govern- ment may also keep guards not exceeding the number of Japanese troops at those places, and which will be withdrawn as soon as tranquillity in the interior is completely restored.

Seoul, May 14th, 1896.

C. WAEBER, Representative of Russia. J. KOMURA, Representative of Japan.

RUSSO-JAPANESE AGREEMENT REGARDING COREA

PROTOCOL.

       Baron Rosen, State Councillor, Chamberlain, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Emperor of Russia, and Baron Nissi, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Emperor of Japan, in order to give effect to Article IV. of the Protocol signed at Moscow on June 9, 1896, between Prince Lobanoff and the Marquis Yamagata, being duly authorised to that effect, have agreed to the following Articles:-

       Art. I.-The Imperial Governments of Russia and Japan recognise definitely the Sovereignty and entire independence of Corea, and pledge themselves mutually to abstain from all direct interference in the internal affairs of that country.

       Art. II.-Desiring to remove all possible cause of misunderstanding in the future, the Imperial Governments of Russia and Japan pledge themselves mutually, in the event of Corea having recourse to the advice and assistance either of Russia or of Japan, to take no measure in respect to the appointment of Military Instructors or Financial Advisers without arriving beforehand at a mutual agreement on this subject.

Art. III.-In view of the wide development taken by the commercial and industrial enterprise of Japan in Corea, as well as the large number of Japanese subjects residing in that country, the Russian Government will not hinder in any way the development of commercial and industrial relations between Japan and

Corea.

Done at Tokyo in duplicate the 13/25 April, 1898.

ROSEN.

NISSI.

TREATIES WITH JAPAN

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY OF COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

SIGNED AT LONDON, 16тн JULY, 1894

Ratifications Exchanged at Tokyo, 25th August, 1894

      Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, being equally desirous of maintaining the relations of good understanding which happily exist between them, by extending and increasing the intercourse between their respective States, and being convinced that this object cannot better be accomplished than by revising the Treaties hitherto existing between the two countries, have resolved to complete such a revision, based upon principles of equity and mutual benefit, and, for that purpose, have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :--

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India, the Right Honourable John, Earl of Kimberley, Knight of the Most Noble Order of the Garter, &c., &c., Her Britannic Majesty's Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs;

And His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Viscount Aoki Siuzo, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Majesty's Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of St. James';

Who, after having communicated to each other their Full Powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :-

Article I. The subjects of each of the two High Contracting Parties shall have full liberty to enter, travel, or reside in any part of the dominions and possessions of the other Contracting Party, and shall enjoy full and perfect protection for their persons and property.

      They shall have free and easy access to the Courts of Justice in pursuit and defence of their rights; they shall be at liberty equally with native subjects to choose and employ lawyers, advocates, and representatives to pursue and defend their rights before such Courts, and in all other matters connected with the administration of justice they shall enjoy all the rights and privileges enjoyed by native subjects.

      In whatever relates to rights of residence and travel; to the possession of goods and effects of any kind; to the succession to personal estate, by will or otherwise. and the disposal of property of any sort in any manner whatsoever which they may lawfully acquire, the subjects of each Contracting Party shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other the same privileges, liberties, and rights, and shall be subject to no higher imposts, or charges in these respects than native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation. The subjects of each of the Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other entire liberty of conscience, and, subject to the Law. Ordinances, and Regulations, shall enjoy the right of private or public exercise of their worship, and also the right of burying their respective countrymen, according to their religious customs, in such suitable and convenient places as may be established and maintained for that purpose.

      They shall not be compelled, under any pretext whatsoever, to pay any charges or taxes other or higher than those that are, or may be, paid by native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

      Article II. The subjects of either of the Contracting Parties residing in the dominions and possessions of the other shall be exempted from all compulsory military service whatsoever, whether in the army, navy, National Guards, or militia;

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN.

147

from all contributions imposed in lieu of personal service; and from all forced loans or military exactions or contributions.

Article III. There shall be reciprocal freedom of commerce and navigation between the dominions and possessions of the two High Contracting Parties.

       The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties may trade in any part of the dominions and possessious of the other by wholesale or retail in all kinds of produce, manufactures, and merchandize of lawful commerce, either in person or by agnts, singly, or in partnerships with foreigners or native subjects: and they may there own or hire and occupy the houses, manufactories, warehouses, shops, and premises which may be necessary for them, and lease land for residential and commercial purposes, conforming themselves to the Laws, Police, and Customs Regulations of the country like native subjects.

They shall have liberty to come with their ships and cargoes to all places, ports, and rivers in the dominions and possessions of the other which are or may be opened to foreign commerce, and shall enjoy, respectively, the same treatment, in matters of cominerce an 1 navigation as native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, without having to pay taxes, imposts, or duties, of whatever nature or under whatever denomination levied in the name or for the profit of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, Corporations, or establish- ments of any kind, other or greater than those paid by native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, subject always to the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of each country.

       Article IV.---The dwellings, manufactories, warehouses, and shops of the subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties in the dominions and possessions of the other, and all premises appertaining thereto destined for purposes of residence of commerce, shall be respected.

        It shall not be allowable to proceed to make a search of, or a domiciliary visit to such dwellings and premises, or to examine or inspect books, papers, or accounts except under the conditions and with the forms prescribed by the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations for subjects of the country.

       Article V.-No other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty of any article, the produce or manufacture of dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, from whatever place arriving; and no other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, from whatever place arriving than on the like article produced or manufactured in any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be maintained or imposed on the importation of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties, into the dominions and possessions of the other, from whatever place arriving, which shall not equally extend to the importation of the like article, being the produce manufacture of any other country. This last provision is not applicable to the sanitary and other prohibitions occasioned by the necessity of protecting the safety of persons, or of cattle, or of plants useful to agriculture.

Article VI.-No other or higher duties or charges shall be imposed in the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties on the exporta tion of any article to the dominions and possessions of the other than such as are, or may be, payable on the exportation of the like article to any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation of any article from the dominions and possessions of either of the two Contracting Parties to the dominions and possessions of the other which shall not equally extend to the exportation of the like article to any other country.

Article VII. The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other exemption from all transit duties and a perfect equality of treatment with native subjects in all that relates to warehousing, bounties, facilities, and drawbacks.

148

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

      Article VIII.-All articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan in Japanese vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in British vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in Japanese vessels; and, reciprocally, all articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty in British vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in Japanese vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination thair if such articles were imported in British vessels. Such reciprocal equality of treatment shall take effect without distinction, whether such articles come directly from the place of origin or from any other places.

      In the same manner there shall be perfect equality of treatment in regard to exportation, so that the same export duties shall be paid and the same bounties and drawbacks allowed in the dominious and possessions of either of the High Contract- ing Parties on the exportation of any article which is or may be legally exported therefrom, whether such exportation shall take place in Japanese or in British vessels, and whatever may be the place of destination, whether a port of either of the Contracting Parties or of any third Power.

      Article IX-No duties of tonnage, harbour, pilotage, lighthouse, quarantine, or other similar or corresponding duties of whatever nature or under whatever denomination, levied in the name or for the profits of the Government, public functionaries, private individuals, Corporations, or establishments of any kind, shall be imposed in the ports of the dominions and possessions of either country upon the vessels of the other country which shall not equally and under the same conditions be imposed in the like cases on national vessels in general or vessels of the most favoured nation. Such equality of treatment shall apply reciprocally to the respective vessels, from whatever port or place they may arrive, and whatever may be their place of destination.

      Article X. In all that regards the stationing, loading, and unloading of vessels in the ports, basins, docks, roadsteads, harbours, or rivers of the dominions and possessions of the two countries, no privilege shall be granted to national vessels which shall not be equally granted to vessels of the other country; the intention of the High Contracting Parties being that in this respect also the respective vessels shall be treated on the footing of perfect equality.

-

Article XI. The coasting trade of both the High Contracting Parties is excepted from the provisions of the present Treaty, and shall be regulated according to the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Japan and of Great Britain respec- tively. It is, however, understood that Japanese subjects in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, and British subjects in the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, shall enjoy in this respect the rights which are or may be granted under such Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations to the subjects or citizens of any other country.

A Japanese vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or more ports in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, and a British vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or more ports in the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, may discharge a portion of her cargo at one port, and continue her voyage to the other port or ports of destination where foreign trade is permitted, for the purpose of landing the remainder of her original cargo there, subject always to the Laws and Custom House Regulations of the two countries.

The Japanese Government, however, agrees to allow British vessels to continue, as heretofore, for the period of the duration of the present Treaty, to carry cargo between the existing open ports of the Empire, excepting to or from the ports of Osaka, Niigata, and Ebisu minato.

     Article XII.-Any ship of war or merchant vessel of either of the High Contracting Parties which may be compelled by stress of weather, or by reason of any other distress, to take shelter in a port of the other, shall be at liberty to refit

1

any

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

149

therein, to procure all necessary supplies, and to put to sea again, without paying dues other than such as would be payable by national vessels. In case, how- ever, the master of a merchant vessel should be under the necessity of disposing of a part of his cargo in order to defray the expenses, he shall be bound to conform to the Regulations and Tariffs of the place to which he may have come.

       If any ship of war or merchant vessel of one of the Contracting Parties should run aground or be wrecked upon the coast of the other, the local authorities shall inform the Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the district of the occurrence, or if there be no such Consular officer, they shall inform the Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the nearest district.

       All proceedings relative to the salvage of Japanese vessels wrecked or cast on shore in the territorial waters of Her Britannic Majesty shall take place in accordance with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Great Britain, and, reciprocally, all measures of

           salvage relative to British vessels wrecked or cast on shore in the territorial waters of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan shall take place in accordance with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Japan.

       Such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, and all parts thereof, and all furniture, and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise saved therefrom, including those which may have been cast into the sea, or the proceeds thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, shall be given up to the owners or their agents, when claimed by them. If such owners or agents are not on the spot, the same shall be delivered to the respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular Agents upon being claimed by them within the period fixed by the laws of the country, and such Consular officers, owners, or agents shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the case of a wreck of a national vessel.

       The goods and merchandise saved from the wreck shall be exempt from all the duties of Customs unless cleared for consumption, in which case they shall pay the ordinary duties.

When a ship or vessel belonging to the subjects of one of the Contracting Parties is stranded or wrecked in the territories of the other, the respective Consuls- General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents shall be authorized, in case :he owner or master, or other agent of the owner, is not present, to lend their official assistance in order to afford the necessary assistance to the subjects of the respective states.

The same rule shall apply in case the owner, master, or other agent is present, but requires such assistance to be given.

       Article XIII.-All vessels which, according to Japanese law, are to be deemed Japanese vessels, and all vessels which, according to British law, are to be deemed British vessels, shall, for the purposes of this Treaty, he deemed Japanese and British vessels respectively.

Article XIV.--The Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents of each of the Contracting Parties, residing in the dominions and possessions of the other, shall receive from the local authorities such assistance as can by law be given to them for the recovery of deserters from the vessels of their respective countries. It is understood that this stipulation shall not apply to the subjects of the country where the desertion takes place.

Article XV.-The High Contracting Parties agree that, in all that concerus commerce and navigation, any privilege, favour, or immunity which either Contract- ing Party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant to the Government, ships, subjects, or citizens of any other State, shall be extended immediately and uncondi- tionally to the Government, ships, subjects, or citizens of the other Contracting Party, it being their intention that the trade and navigation of each country shall be placed, in all respects, by the other on the footing of the most favoured nation.

Article XVI.-Each of the High Contracting Parties may appoint Consuls- General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Pro-Consuls, and Consular Agents in all the ports,

150

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

cities, and places of the other, except in those where it may not be convenient to recognize such officers.

This exception, however, shall not be made in regard to one of the Contracting Parties without being made likewise in regard to every other Power.

The Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, Pro-Consuls, and Consular Agents may exercise all functions, and shall enjoy all privileges, exemptions, and immunities which are or may hereafter be granted to Consular officers of the most favoured uation. Article XVII.The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other the same protection as native subjects in regard to patents, trade marks, and designs, upon fulfilment of the formalities prescribed by law.

Article XVIII.-Her Britannic Majesty's Government, so far as they are concerned, give their consent to the following arrangement :--

The several foreign Settlements in Japan shall be incorporated with the respective Japanese Communes, and shall thenceforth form part of the general municipal system of Japan.

The competent Japanese authorities shall thereupon assume all municipal obligations and duties in respect thereof, and the common funds and property, if

any, belonging to such Settlements, shall at the same time be transferred to the said Japanese authorities.

      When such incorporation takes place existing leases in perpetuity under which property is now held in the said Settlements shall be confirmed, and no conditions whatsoever other than those contained in such existing leases shall be imposed in respect of such property. It is, however, understood that the Consular authorities mentioned in the same are in all cases to be replaced by the Japanese authorities.

      All lan is which may previously have been granted by the Japanese Government free of rent for the public purposes of the said Settlements shall, subject to the right of eminent domain, be permanently reserved free of all taxes and charges for the public purposes for which they were originally set apart.

Article XIX.--The stipulations of the present Treaty shall be applicable, so far as the laws permit, to all the Colonies and foreigu possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, excepting to those hereinafter named, that is to say, except to-

India.

Newfoundland.

Natal.

Victoria.

Tasmania.

Western Australia.

The Dominion of Canada.

The Cape.

>."

New South Wales.

Queensland.

South Australia. New Zealand.

      Provided always that the stipulations of the present Treaty shall be made applicable to any of the above-named Colonies or foreign possessions on whose behalf notice to that effect shall have been given to the Japanese Government by Her Britannic Majesty's Representative at Tokyo within two years from the date of the exchange of ratifications of the present Treaty.

      Article XX. The present Treaty shall, from the date it comes into force, be substituted in place of the Conventions respectively of the 23rd day of the 8th month of the 7th year of Kayai, corresponding to the 14th day of October, 1854 and of the 13th day of the 5th month of the 2nd year of Keiou, corresponding to the 25th day of June, 1866, the Treaty of the 18th day of the 7th month of the 5th year of Ansei, corresponding to the 26th day of August, 1858, and all Arrangements and Agreements subsidiary thereto concluded or existing between the High Con- tracting Parties; and from the same date such Conventions, Treaty, Arrangements, and Agreements shall cease to be binding, and, in consequence, the jurisdiction then exercised by British Courts in Japan, and all the exceptional privileges, exemp tions, and immunities then enjoyed by British subjects, as a part of or appurtenant to such jurisdiction, shall absolutely and without notice cease and determine, and thereafter all such jurisdiction shall be assumed and exercised by Japanese Courts.

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

151

Article XXI. The present Treaty shall not take effect until at least five years after its signature. It shall come into force one year after His Imperial Japanese Majesty's Government shall have given notice to Her Britannic Majesty's Govern- ment of its wish to have the same brought into operation. Such notice may be given at any time after the expiration of four years from the date hereof. The Treaty shall remain in force for the period of twelve years from the date it goes into operation.

Either High Contracting Party shall have the right, at any time after eleven years shall have elapsed from the date this Treaty takes effect, to give notice to the other of its intention to terminate the same, and at the expiration of twelve months after such notice is given this Treaty shall wholly cease and determine.

        Article XXII.-The present Treaty shall be ratified, and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Tokyo as soon as possible, and not later than six months from the present date.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

        Done at London, in duplicate, this sixteenth day of the seventh month of the twenty-seventh year of Meiji.

PROTOCOL

[L.S.] [L.S.]

KIMBERLEY

AOKI.

        The Government of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland and Empress of India and the Governinent of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, deeming it advisable in the interests of both countries to regulate certain special matters of mutual concern, apart from the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day have, through their respective Plenipotentiaries, agreed upon the following stipula-

tions :-

But

1.-It is agreed by the Contracting Parties that one month after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, the Import Tariff hereunto annexed shall, subject to the provisions of Article XXIII. of the Treaty of 1858 at present subsisting between the Contracting l'arties, as long as the said Treaty remains in force and thereafter, subject to the provisions of Articles V. and XV. of the Treaty signed this day, be applicable to the articles therein enumerated, being the growth, produce, or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty, upon importation into Japan. nothing contained in this Protocol, or the Tariff hereunto annexed, shall be held to limit or qualify the right of the Japanese Government to restrict or to prohibit the importation of adulterated drugs, medicines, food, or beverages; indecent or obscene prints; paintings, books, cards, lithographic or other engravings, photographs, or any other indecent or obscene articles; articles in violation of patent, trade-mark, or copy-right laws of Japan; or any other article which for sanitary reasons, or in view of public security or morals, might offer any danger.

        The ad valorem duties established by the said Tariff shall, so far as may be deemed practicable, be converted into specific duties by a supplementary Convention, which shall be concluded between the two Governments within six months from the date of this Protocol; the medium prices, as shown by the Japanese Customs Returns during the six calendar months preceding the date of the present Protocol, with the addition of the cost of insurance and transportation from the place of purchase, production or fabrication, to the port of discharge, as well as commission, if any, shall be taken as the basis for such conversion. In the event of the Supplementary Convention not having come into force at the expiration of the period for the said Tariff to take effect, ad valorem duties in conformity with the rule recited at the end of the said Tariff shall, in the meantime, be levied.

In respect of articles tot enumerated in the said Tariff, the General Statutory Tariff of Japan for the time being in force shall, from the same time, apply, subject, as aforesaid, to the provisions of Article XXIII. of the Treaty of 1858 and Articles V. and XV. of the Treaty signed this day respectively.

152

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

      From the date the Tariffs aforesaid take effect, the Import tariff now in opera- tion in Japan in respect of goods and merchandise imported into Japan by British subjects shall cease to be binding.

      In all other respects the stipulations of the existing Treaties and Conventions shall be maintained unconditionally until the time when the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day comes into force.

      2.-The Japanese Government, pending the opening of the country to British subjects, agrees to extend the existing passport system in such a manner as to allow British subjects, on the production of a certificate of recommendation from the British Representative in Tokyo, or from any of Her Majesty's Consuls at the open ports in Japan, to obtain upon application passports available for any part of the country, and for any period not exceeding twelve months, from the Imperial Japanese Foreign Office in Tokyo, or from the chief authorities in the Prefecture in which an open port is situated; it being understood that the existing Rules and Regulations governing British subjects who visit the interior of the Empire are to be maintained.

      3.-The Japanese Government undertakes, before the cessation of British Consular jurisdiction in Japan, to join the International Conventions for the Pro- tection of Industrial Property and Copyright.

4. It is understood between the two High Contracting Parties that, if Japan thinks it necessary at any time to levy an additional duty on the production or manufacture of refined sugar in Japan, an increased customs duty equivalent in aunount may be levied on British refined sugar when imported into Japan, so long as such additional excise tax or inland duty continues to be raised.

Provided always that British refined sugar shall in this respect be entitled to the treatment accorded to refined sugar being the produce or manufacture of the most favoured nation.

      5. The undersigned Plenipotentiaries have agreed that this Protocol shall be submitted to the two High Contracting Parties at the same time as the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation signed this day, and that when the said Treaty is ratified the agreements contained in the Protocol shall also equally be considered as approved, without the necessity of a further formal ratification.

It is agreed that this Protocol shall terminate at the same time the said Treaty ceases to be binding.

      In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same, and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at London, in duplicate, this sixteenth day of July, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and ninety-four.

[L.S.]

L.S.

KIMBERLEY. AOKI.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION_BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN RESPECTING THE DUTIES TO BE CHARGED ON BRITISH GOODS IMPORTED INTO JAPAN

SIGNED AT TOKYO, 16TH JULY, 1895

Ratifications exchanged at Tokyo, 21st November, 1895

Whereas, by the Protocol signed at London on the 16th of July, 1894, it was agreed between the Government of Her Britannic Majesty and the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan that the ad valorem duties of the Tariff annexed to the aforesaid Protocol should, so far as might be deemed practicable, be converted into specific duties by means of a Supplementary Convention, to be concluded between the two Governments within six months from the date of that Protocol; and

Whereas this period was extended by subsequent arrangement:

      The High Contracting Parties have appointed as their Plenipotentaries to conclude a Convention for this purpose, that is to say:

JAPANESE CONVENTIONAL TARIFF

153

        Her Britannic Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of Irdia, Gerard Augustus Lowther, Her Britannic Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires ;

        And His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Marquis Saionzi Kimmochi, Junii, first class of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Imperial Majesty's Minister of State for Education, and Acting Minister of State for Foreign Affairs;

        Who, having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and que form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:-

          1. The Tariff annexed to this Convention shall be substituted for the ad valorem Tariff annexed to the aforesaiu Protocol of the 16th of July, 1894; it shall be subject to all the stipulations contained in Article I. of the Protocol, in so far as these are applicable, and it shall come into force one month after the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention.

        2. The specific duties established by this Convention shall be subject to triennial readjustment. Such readjustment shall be based on the difference between the average of the two quarterly rates of exchange adopted by the Japanese Customs during the six months ending June 30th, 1894, and the average of the rates of exchange adopted by the Japanese Customs for the four quarters preceding that in which each successive period of three years expires.

The Schedule of readjusted duties shall be published by the Japanese Govern- ment three months in advance, and shall take effect immediately upon the expiration of the said period.

It is understood between the High Contracting Parties that the operation of this stipulation shall be subject to the acceptance of a similar arrangement by the other Powers with whom Conventional Tariffs are now being negotiated by Japan.

       3. The quarterly rates of exchange mentioned in the preceding Article are the rates determining the comparative values, as entered in the quarterly Tables published by the Japanese Department of Finance, of the present Japanese silver yen on the one and, and of the English pound sterling on the other.

4. The present Convention shall have the same duration as the Treaty and Protocol concluded on the 16th of July, 1894, of which it is a complement.

5. Tue present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchang ed at Tokyo as soon as possible, and not later than six months from the present date

Done at Tokyo, in duplicate, this 16th day of July, 1895.

(Signed) [L.S.] GERARD AUGUSTUS LOWTHER.

[L.S.] MARQUIS SAIONZI.

TARIFF.

No.

123

00 -10. C

Caoutchouc, manufactures of..... Cement, Portland

...

Cotton yarns, plain or dyed

Cotton tissues-

Dr.lls

Duck

Handkerchiefs in the piece

Prints

Articles.

Sateens, plain, figured or printed, Brocades,

Italians and figured shirtings

Shirtings, dyed

10

grey

11

twilled

12

white or bleached

13

14

15

16

T-cloths

Turkey Red Cambrics...

Velvets or Velveteens...............................................................

Victoria Lawns

Duty.

Yen.

ad valorem 100 catties

10 per cent.

C*065

4.180

square yard

0.016

('053

0.011

0.012

"

97

0.017

0 013

0.006

0.011

*2

0.010

0.009

0.012

"

0.041

"

0.006

"

154

No.

JAPANESE CONVENTIONAL TARIFF

Articles.

Cotton Tissues (Continued)-

17

All other sorts of pure cotton tissues, and all tissues of cotton mixed with flax, hemp, or other fibre, including wool, the cotton, however, predominating in weight, not specially provided for in this Tariff

NOTE. It is expressly understood that ready-made clothing and other made-up articles are not included under the heading of Cotton Tissues.

Glass window, ordinary-

(a.) Uncoloured and unstained

ad valorem

Duty.

Yen,

10 per cent.

18

(b.) Coloured, stained, and ground

20

21

22 223

19

Hats, including also hats of felt

Indigo, dry

Iron and Mild Steel-

Pig and Ingot

Bar and Rod exceeding 4-inch in diameter...

Nails, including spikes, sprigs, tacks, and brads :-

(a.) Plain

(b.) Galvanized..

*39533

24

Pipes and Tubes

25

Plate and Sheet....

26

Rails....

27

28

Sheet, galvanized. both plain and corrugated........

29

385

30

31

Screws, Bolts, and Nuts, plain and galvanized

Tinned plates-

(a.) Ordinary..

(b.) Crystallized

Wire, and Small Rod not exceeding 4-inch in diameter Wire, telegraph or galvanized...

NOTE. By the term "mild steel' as used in this Tariff is understood mild steel manufactured by the Siemens, Bes. semer, Bassic, or similar processes, and approximating in value to iron of the same class in this Tariff.

Lead, pig, ingot, and slab

Leather-

(a.) Sole

(b.) Other kinds

2838

33

34

Linen yarns, plain or dyed

Linen Tissues-

39

35

Canvas...

36

All other sorts

100 sq. ft. ad valorem

0*302 10 per cent.

10

100 catties

12.953

0.083

94

0.261

31

0.573

11

ad valorem

10 per cent.

10

"

0'296 0.129

100 catties

ad valorem 100 catties

ad valorem 100 catties

"

"

""

ad valorem 100 catties

10 per cent.

0.740

0.691

10 per cent.

0.503

0.256

0.316

5.690

10 per cent. 6.527

square yard ad valorem

0.017 10 per cent.

37

88888

NOTE. It is expressly understood that ready.inade clothing and other made-up articles are not included under the heading of Linen Tissues.

Mercury or quicksilver

38 Milk, ondensed or desiccated

39

Oil, paraffin.

40

Paint in oil

41

Paper, priuting

42

83433

$495

Saltpetre (nitrate of potash)..

Silk-faced cotton satins

100 catties doz. 1 lb. tins.

and proportionately for tins of other weights

ad valorem 100 catties

NOTE. It is expressly understood that all other mixed tissues of cotton and silk, and of wool and silk, where the cotton

or wool predominates in weight, are to be classed for duty under Nos. 17 and 61 of this Tariff respectively.

Steel (other than mild steel)-

Ingot

Bar, rod, plate, and sheet

Wire, and small rod not exceeding 4-inch in diameter Sugar, refined --

(a.) No. 15 to No. 20, inclusive, Dutch standard in colour (b.) Above No. 20 Dutch standard in colour

Tin-

9935

48

Block, Pig, and Slab

49

50

Plates

Wax, paraffin

31

Woollen and Worsted Yarns, plain or dyed

"

19

ad valorem

"

5.048 0.123

10 per cent.

1.304

1.163

0.490

15 per cent.

10 N

5

73

100 catties

1.819

0.748

0.827

1.992

*

ad valorem 100 catties

10 per cent.

0.544

9.169

""

No.

JANPANESE CONVENTIONAL TARIFF

Articles.

155

Duty.

Alpacas

Woollen and Worsted f'issues, pure or mixe I with other ma-

erial --

Yen.

2873

52

aquare yard

0:075

53

100 catties

7.458

51

square yard

0.031

55

Blanketing and whipped blankets in plain weave Buntings Cloth--

(a.) Wholly of woollen or worsted yarn, or of woollen and worsted yarns, such as broad, narrow, and army cloth, cassimeres, tweeds and 'worste 1 coat. ings

(b.) In part of woollen or worsted yarn and in part of cotton yarn, such as pilot, president, and union cloth

0*0:3

35832

نان

Flannels.....

57

Italian cloth

Long ells

59

60

Mousseline de laine

Serces-

 (a.) Where the warp is worsted and the weft woollen (b.) All other kinds

61

62

81

63

61

All other sorts, pure or nivel with other material, the wool, however, predominating in weight, not specially provided for in this Tariff

NOTE. It is expressly understood that ready-made clothing and other made-up articles are not included under the heading of Woollen and Worsted Tissues.

Yarns, all sorts, not specially provided for in this Tariff

Zinc

Block, pig, and slab Sheet

ad valorem

0.039

0.044

0.029

0.036

0.021

0:056

10 per cent.

10

"

10

100 catties

0:451

(*928

The catty mentioned in this Tariff is the Japanese weight. It is equal to 600 grammes of the metric system of weight, or 1-32277 lbs. English avoirdupois weight.

The pound is the English avoirdupois weight.

The square yard and square foot ar the English Imperial surface measures.

Import duties payable ad valorem under this Tariff shall be calculated on the actual cost of the articles at the place of purchase, production, or fabrication, with the addition of the cost of insurance and transportation from the place of purchas, production, or fabrication, to the port of discharge, as well as commission, if any exists.

In de ermining the dutiable width of any tissues the Customs shall discard all fractions of an inch not exceeding half-au-inch, and shall count as a full inch all fractions exceeding half-an-inch

NOTE. It is understood that selvedges shall not be included in the measurement of tissues.

IMPERIAL ORDINANCE No. 385.

Art. I.-When the Conventional Tariffs come into force, goods imported into the Empire shall be accompanied by a certificate verifying the place of origin.

       Art. II.-On the certificate of the place of origin shall be given the mark, number, and class, the number of packages, quantity or weight of the goods, the name of the place of manufacture or production, the port and date of shipments. The certificate must be endorsed by the Japanese Consul or Commercial Agent at the port of shipment (or, at ports where there is no consulate, by the Customs or other authorities concerned). The certificate shall be valid for one year from its date.

Art. III.-In cases where the goods are not accompanied by a certificate of the place of origin, or if the particulars in a certificate are incomplete or do not correspond with the goods themselves, or if the certificate is considered improper by the Customs authorities, the duty will be imposed on the goods according to the Japanese Statutory Tariff. If a proper certificate is produced within six months after importation of the goods, the duty paid thereon shall be reduced to the rates of the Conventional Tariff.

JAPANESE STATUTORY TARIFF.

IMPERIAL ORDINANCE.

     We hereby sanction the rates of specific duties to be levied on articles of import, and order the same to be promulgated.

IMPERIAL SIGN MANUAL AND SEAL

September 24th, 1898.

MATSUDA MASAHISA,

Minister of Finance.

IMPERIAL DECREE No. 220.

      In accordance with Art. III of the Revised Customs Law specific duties will be levied on the following articles of import at the rates therein mentioned, on and after the 1st January, 1899:-

ARTICLES OF IMPORT ON WHICH SPECIFIC DUTIES WILL BE LEVIED.

45

46

neum)

48 Tea

63

a. Of Cotton

b. Of Wool

...

b. Refined...

Saltfish

Saltmeat (Beef or Pork

in casks)

47 Sekikwasai (gelidium cor-

    CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES. Undershirts and Drawers, knit:-

BEVERAGES AND COMESTIBLES.

No. in the Statutory Tariff.

33 Butter

34 Cheese

...

35 Coffee (seed)...

37 Eggs, fresh

38 Wheat-flour...

40 Hams and Bacon

41 Meat, fresh (mutton)...

42 Milk, condensed or

dessicated

...

44 Salt (sea or rock):

a. Crude

...

...

12 tins contain-" ing Ib. each. Tins having dif- ferent weights in proportion to this rate.

100 kin... 100 kin... 1.370

Per

Specific

Duty. |

Yen.

No. in the Statutory

Tariff.

69 Alcohol...

Specific

Per

Duty.

Yen.

kin...

.036

kin... .086

70 Alum

100 kin..

.198

kin... .054

74 Biakujutsu (radix a-

. 1,000

...

kin... .084 1.115 100 kin... .465 kin... .065 100 kin... 1.849

tractylis ovata or alta)

100 kin...

.877

75

Bismuth subnitrate

kin...

.206

77

Borax (Sodii biboras)...

100 kin...

1.238

73

Camphor, Borneo, and

Blumea or Ngai

kin...

.377

79

Cassia, or cinnamon bark

100 kin...

.728

80

Cassia, or cinnamon oil

kin...

.202

.371

81

Cataria, lead of

100 kin...

.539

82

Cinchona bark

100 kin... 1.732

83

Cinchonine (muriate or

sulphate of)

kin...

.200

.083

84 Cinnabar

(hydrargyri

sulphuretum rubrum)

kin...

.096

100 kin...

.876

...

85

Cloves (caryophyllus)...

100 kin... 1.385

86

Cocaine hydrochloride...

kin... 12.983

100 kin... 1.292

89

Colombo (radix calumba)

100 kin...

.517

91

Cutch and Gambier (ex-

100 kin... .513

tractum catechu nigrum

100 kin...

.062

and extractum terra Ja-

ponica or catechu palli-

dum)

100 kin...

.927

...

12 pieces.. 1.410

92

Gentian (radix gentiana)

100 kin... 1.364

12 pieces.. 2.543

94

Glycerine

kin...

.056

...

c. Of Wool and Cotton

12 pieces.. 1.812

95

Gum Arabic, or acacia...

100 kin... 1.307

DRUGS, CHEMICALS, AND MEDICINES.

96

Gum benzoin, or benzoi-

186 Boracic acid...

100 kin... 2.038

num

100 kin... 1.194

60 Acidium Carbolicum (in

crystals)

67 Acidium salicylicum (in

crystals and powdered) 68 Acidium Tartaricum .....

99

Gum olibanum

100 kin

.560

kin... .036

100

Hops

kin...

.05$

101 Iodoform

...

kin...

.511

kin... .157 kin... .073

102 Ipecac (radix ipecacu-

anha)

100 kin... 36.620

JAPANESE STATUTORY TARIFF

No. in the

Statutory

Per

Specific Duty.

No. in the Statutory

Per

157

Specific Duty.

Tariff.

Yen.

Tarift.

Yen.

103 Jalap (radix jalapa)

100 kin

4.581

GRAINS AND SEEDS.

104

Lead, aceiate, or sagar of 100 kin... 1.282

173 Barley

100 kin...

.101

...

105 Liquorice (radix gly-

174

Beans and Peas

100 kin...

...

.129

cyrrhiza)

100 kin...

.933

177

Sesume, or Sesamum

100 kin...

.197

108

106 Mawo (epedora vulgaris) Morphine, hydrochlor-

100 kin...

.353

178

Wheat

100 kin...

.153

179 Cotton seed

100 kin...

.044

136

115

!

ate or sulphate of mor- phia hydrochloras or sulphas)

...

111 Nard or spikenard 112 Phosphorus, amorphus..

Phosphorus yellow

114 Potash, bromide of

(Potassii bromidum)

Potash chlorate of

(Potassii chloras)...

HORNS, IVORY, SKINS, HAIR SHELLS, ETC.

184 Hair, human

100 kin... 5.641

100 kin...

kin... 4.043 1.52) kin... .165 100 kin... 12.353

185

Hides or Skins, bull, ox,

cow, and buffalo (raw, dried, salted, or pickled, and undressed)

100 kin...

.962

186 Hides or Skins,

deer

kin... .093

117

Putchuk

119

Rosin

100 kin... 2.321 100 kin... 1.410 100 kin... .298

187

(raw, dried, salted, or

pickled, and undressed) 100 kin... 1.588 Hides or Skins, samba

(cerous elephus) (raw,

...

126

121 Saffron (crocus) 122 Saltpetre(potassii nitras) 123 Sant nine (santonium). 124 Sarsaparilla (radix sarsa) 125 Semen cygnæ, or worm seed (-emen santonica).. Shellac

120 Rhubarb, in lump or ground (radix rheur.)..

dried, salted. or pickled, and undressed)

100 kin...

.661

...

100 kin...

1.387

188

Hoofs

100 kin...

.414

kin... 1.177

189

Horns, bull, ox, cow,

100 kin...

.980

and buffalo

100 kin...

.504

kin...

.380

190

Horns, deer.

100 kin...

.654

100 kin...

1.681

192

Ivory or Tusks, elephant

kin...

.298

195

100 kin...

1.522

Ivory or Tusks, walrus sea horse

kin...

.102

kin... .055

106 Leather, sole

100 kin... 7.441

147 Indigo, dry

127 Soda ash

128 Soda bicarbonate (or

sodii bicarbona)

129 Soda caustic (sodii

caustica...

130 Soda crystals (washing

soda)

38 Nit rate of soda

131 Soda, salicylate (or sodii

salicylas)

132 Sojutsu (radix attractylis

laneca)

133 Sticklac...

134 Vaseline

135 Wogon (radix scutel- laria lancesharia)

DYES, COLOURS AND

139 Blue, mineral (dry or

liquid)

141 Cobbalt, oxide of .....

144 Galls of all kinds 145 Gamboge

150 Lead (all colours)

152 Logwood, extract of 153 Mangrove bark 154 Paint in oil

...

100 kin...

.351

METALS ANd Metal

MANUFACTURES.

Brass:-

100 kin...

.457

203 Bar and rod ...

203 Plate and sheet

100 kin...

.454

...

...

:00 kin... 100 kin... .471

.227

208 Bar and rod...

...

208

Plate and sheet

kin... .142

209

Nails

211

Wire

100 kin... .462 100 kin... 1.870 100 kin...

...

1.642

...

100 kin... PAINTS.

.499

214

206 Old (only fit for re-

manufacturing)

Copper :-

213 Old (only fit for re-

manufacturing

German Silver :-

214 Plate and sheet

Wire

Iron and Mild Steel:-

215 Pig and ingot

100 kin... 3.070 100 kin... 3.086

100 kin...

.915

100 kin... 3.464 100 kin... 3.488 100 kin... 3.956 100 kin... 7.496

...

:

...

...

100 kin... .799

100 kin... 6.020 100 kin... 6.257

100 kin...

.083

217

...

UDO

***

100 kin... 6.690 100 kin... 34.629 100 kin... 1.715 100 kin... 6.802

217

218

100 kin... 12.953

Bar and rod (of diameter notexceeding of an in.) Hoop and Band T angle, and other wrought iron and mild steel

100 kin...

.356

100 kin...

.427

...

100 kin...

.313

...

100 kin... 1.070

219 Rails

100 kin...

.297

...

100 kin... 2.397 100 kin... .119

220

Sheet and plate (corru- gated excepted)

100 kin...

...

.394

100 kin

1.304

221

Galvanized sheet and

156 Sapan-wood

...

...

100 kin...

...

100 kin...

...

163

...

100 kin... 1.230

158 Turmeric

159 Ultramarine.....

161 Varnish, Chinese...

162 Verdigris

Vermillion

...

164 Wansho, or Gosu...

165 White Zinc

...

100 kin... 1.749 100 kin... 3.272 100 kin... 2.297 kin... .120 100 kin... 5.423

GLASS AND GLASS MANUFACTURES.

167 Glass, window, uncol-

224 Nails (dog-spikes, bolts

.235

.384

plate (plain or corru- gated)

100 kin...

...

.345

222 Plate, diagonal or

checkered

100 kin...

.345

and nuts, galvanized)

226

227

oured or unstained

***

100 sq. ft. .400

Tinned plates (plain)... Wire and small rod not exceeding in. diameter (tinned)

...

etc., not

...

100 kin...

.575

100 kin...

.691

100 kin...

.665

158

JAPANESE STATUTORY TARIFF

No. in the

Statutory

Tariff.

228 Telegraph wire (galvan-

ized)

Per

Duty.

Specific No, in the

Statutory

Yen.

Tariff.

Per

Specific

Duty.

Yen.

TISSUES, YARNS, THREADS AND MATERIAL

100 kin...

.591

THEREOF. PART I.

229 Wire-rope (galvanized)

100 kin...

1.367

230 Wire-rope, old (galva- nized or otherwise)

100 kin...

.109

304 Cotton yarn (plain and dyed) for weaving pur-

poses

231 Old hoops

100 kin... 6.066

100 kin...

...

232 Lead Pig, ingot and slab 100 kin...

.103 .368

308 Cotton drills (plain and

bleached)

233 Lead, sheet

100 kin... .753

sq. yd.

.029

309

Cotton ducks

235 Mercury

100 kin... 5.689

sq. yd

...

.080

310

236

Nickel ...

Cotton prints and chintz

100 kin... 3.529

sq, yd.

.020

311

Cotton satins, Brocades,

243 Steel (not mild) Wire

Italians and figured

and small rod not exceed-

Shirtings

ing inch in diameter.. 100 kin... 1.819

sq. yd. ...

.029

244 Steel (not mild) Wire

(for umbrella

312

Cotton velvets, or Vel·

veteens

ribs

trough-shaped)

245 Steel (not mild) Wire- rope (plain or galva- nized)

246 Steel (not mild) old wire rope (only fit for re- manufacturing)...

247 Tin, pig and slab...

314 Shirtings, grey

sq. yd.

...

.062

...

100 kin.. 2.145

sq. yd.

...

.010

...

315

Shirtings, white or ble-

ached

sq. yd.

.015

316

Shirtings, twilled

100 kin

1.687

sq. yd.

.017

...

317

Shirtings, dyed

sq. yd.

.020

319

T. Cloth (shirtings of

narrow width)

..

100 kin... 100 kin..

.117

sq. yd. ...

.015

320

Turkey-red cambrics

1.992

sq. yd.

.018

321

Victoria-lawns

sq. yd.

.009

Yellow Metal or Muntz

Metal:-

PART II.

250 Sheet and Plate

100 kin... 2.876

323

Woollen and worsted

251 Rod and Bar.....

255 Zinc, block, pig and slab 100 kin...

100 kin... 2,581

yarns (all kinds, plain

.453

and dyed)

...

100 kin... 12.308

256 Zinc, sheet

100 kin... 1.307

324

Alpaca ...

257 Zinc, old sheet

100 kin...

.239

326

sq. yd.

.113

Buntings

sq. yd.

...

.058

264 Bronze powder

100 kin... 11,282

330

Flannel:

...

272 Candles, all kinds of

100 kin ..

3.527

a. (of wool)

...

274 Oil, beans and peas

275 Oil, castor

casks and jars)

276 Oil, cocoa-nut

277 Oil, ground-nut

278 Oil, kerosene :-

100 kin...

.747

331

(in tins,

Italian cloth...

...

100 kin... 1,060 100 kin... 1.181 100 kin... 1.122

332

Long ells

333

b. (of wool) and cotton sq. yd.

Mousseline de laine (wholly of wool):

a. (Plain or white)

sq. yd.

.068

.062

...

sq. yd. sq. yd

.058

...

.061

sq. yd.

***

.633

b. (Dyed or printed)... sq. yd. .035

...

335 Serges (woven by worsted

a.

In tins ...

b. In casks

gallon gallon

.016

337

warp and woollen woof) Woollen cloth:

sq. yd.

.097

.010

...

279 Oil, linseed (in tins and

a. (Of wool)

sq. yd.

.141

...

casks)

10 kin... 1.724

casks)

280 Oil, olive (in tins and

283 Spirit of Turpentine (in

tins or casks)...

285 Wax, paraffine 292 Paper, printing

299 Sugar (up to No. 14

standard of colour in- dicated in Dutch speci-

men colours)

300 Sugar refined:

a. (From No. 15 to No. 20 as indicated in Dutch specimen colours)...

...

b. (Of wool and cotton) PART III.

sq. yd. .071

...

341

100 kin... 2.929

Silk, raw

...

341

gallon

317

.076

Raw silk of wild cocoons Silk satins, Chinese

...

100 kin... 1.757 1.757 100 kin

...

100 kin... 8.159 sq. yd.

.071

100 kin... .204

...

PART V. 385 Blankets and blankets trimmed with threads (flatwoven)

100 kin... 13.984

359 Carpets or carpeting,

Brussels

sq. yd....

100 kin... 1.523

360

Carpets or carpeting, felt sq.

yd....

.06%

361

b. (Upwards of No. 20

Carpets or carpeting,

standard colour as

hemp or jule

8q. yd....

.047

362

indicated in Dutch

Carpets or carpeting,

specimen colours)... 100 kin... 1.828

patent tapestry

...

sq. yd....

.265

364

Chikufu

sq. yd....

.027

301

Sugar, rock candy

302

Molasses

100 kin...

100 kin... 2.213 .157

368

Handkerchiefs, cotton in

piece

...

...

8q. yd....

•170

...

PART IV. 352 Flax yarn (plain and dyed) for weaving pur-

poses

354 Hemp canvas

100 kin... 55 133 100 kin... 23.846 sq. yd.

.270

JAPANESE STATUTORY TARIFF

159

No in the Statutory

Tarifi

370 Leather-cloths for fur-

niture, etc.)

371 Oil cloths and Linoleum

cloths (for floors)...

TOBACCO.

Per

Specific Duty. Yen.

No, in the

Specif

Statutory

Per

Duty.

Tariff

Yen.

MISCELLANEOUS.

sq. yd.... .043

400 Alosewood

100 kin... 8.688

418

Celluloid (in sheet or

sq. yd.... .071

rod)

kin...

...

.169

419

Portland Cement...

100 kin...

.089

379 Cigars and cigarettes

***

kin... .772

423

Coal

...

...

...

ton...

.879

880 Cigarettes rolled

in

424

Coke

ion...

.789

paper

1,000

1.153

426

Cordage and Ropes of

382 Tobacco, cut...

...

kin...

.444

Beer, Ale, Porter, and Stout:

Beer, Ale, Porter and Stout:

WINES LIQUORS AND SPIRITS.

In bottles containing not more than half a litre..

In bottles containing not more than one litre

387 Champagne and other effervescent liquors re- sembling champagne (in cases):

In 24 bottles not containing more than half a litre...

In 12 bottles containing not

more than one litre

flax, hemp, jute, Manila

hemp, or China grass

(for rigging and other

purposes)

...

100 kin...

1.954

12 bottles .388

430

Dynamite

...

kin...

.100

436 Fishing-guts (tegusu)

...

100 kin... 16.976

440

Funori (gleopeltis intri-

12 bottles .515

cata)

100 kin...

2.58

443

Glue (comnion)

100 kin...

.972

445 Gun powder (smoke-less

powder excepted)...

100 kin... 2.617

446 Gypsum

...

100 kin...

.055

455

Malt

...

100 kin... .544

case...

5.425

457

Mattings, China (in rolls

of 40 yards)...

roll

...

...

:

.610

case...

5.425

...

458

Mattings, cocoa

...

sq. yd.

.058

391

894

Wines, of all kinds:

397

399

461

Oakum...

100 kin...

.710

464 Pitch

464 Wood tar

465 Plaster of Paris

100 kin...

.187

100 kin...

.322

100 kin...

.174

Not containing more than 16 degrees of alcohol:

a (in casks)

      b in cases) of 24 bottles containing not more than half a litre

       In 12 bottles not containing more than one litre

Not containing more than 24 degrees or less than 16 degrees of alcohol:

a. (in casks)

b. (in cases), of 24 bot- tles not contg. more than half a litre Of 12 bottles not contg.

more than one litre

...

467 Plumbago, or black lead

100 kin...

.730

471

Pulp (for making paper)

100 kin...

.297

10 litres... .435

472

Putty

100 kin...

.234

...

...

473

Rattans (split or other-

wise)

100 kin...

.393

case... 2.660

475

Sandal wood...

...

100 kin... 1.434

478

Soap (for washing)

100 kin...

1.085

case... 2.660

479

Soap-stone (in lump or

powder)...

100 kin...

.089

...

484

485

Timber, santalum (shitan) Timber, Teak

100 kin...

.175

100 cub. ft. 7.628

...

10 litres... 2.774

case... 2.380

case... 2.380

Note. The word "kin" in the above table means the Japanese weight. The words "yard, foot and inch" are English measures. The words "pounds and tons English weights in avoirdupois. The word gallon is American standard gallon. The word "litre" is French

measure.

are

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

EXTRADITION TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND JAPAN

SIGNED AT TOKYO, ON THE 29TH APRIL, 1886

Ratified at Tokyo, on the 27th September, 1886

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and the President of the United States of America having judged it expedient, with a view to the better administration of justice, and to the prevention of crime within the two countries and their jurisdictious, that persons charged with or convicted of the crimes or offences hereinafter named. and being fugitives from justice, should, under certain circumstances, be reciprocally delivered up, they have named as their Plenipotentiaries to conclude a Treaty for this purpose, that is to say:

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Count Inouye Kaoru, Jiusammi, His Imperial Majesty's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, First Class of the Order of the Rising Sun, &c., &c., &c, and the President of the United States of America, Richard B. Hubbard, their Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary near His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Japan, who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:

       Art. I.-The High Contracting Parties engage to deliver up to each other, under the circumstances and conditions stated in the present Treaty, all persons who, being accused or convicted of one of the crimes or offences named below in Article II. and committed within the jurisdiction of the one party, shall be found within the jurisdic- tion of the other party.

Art. II.-1.-Murder and assault with intent to commit murder.

       2.-Counterfeiting or altering money, or uttering or bringing into circulation counterfeit or altered money, counterfeiting certificates or coupons of public indet ted- ness, bank notes, or other instruments of public credit of either of the parties, and the utterance or circulation of the same.

3.-Forgery, or altering, and uttering what is forged or altered.

4.-Embezzlement or criminal malversation of the public funds committed within the jurisdiction of either party, by the public officers or depositaries.

5.-Robbery.

      6.-Burglary, defined to be the breaking and entering by night-time into the house of another person with the intent to commit a felony therein; and the act of breaking and entering the house of another, whether in the day or night time, with the intent to commit a felony therein.

       7.-The act of entering, or of breaking and entering, the offices of the Govern- ment and public authorities, or the offices of banks, banking-houses, savings-banks, trust companies, insurance or other companies, with the intent to commit a felony therein.

8.- Perjury or the subornation of perjury. 9.-Rape.

10.-Arson.

11.-Piracy by the law of nations.

EXTRADITION TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND JAPAN

161

       12. Murder, assault with intent to kill, and manslaughter committed on the high seas, on board a ship bearing the flag of the demanding country.

       13. Malicious destruction of, or attempt to destroy, railways, trams, vessels, bridges, dwellings, public edifices, or other buildings, when the act endangers human

life.

       Art. III.-If the person demanded be held for trial in the country on which the demand is made, it shall be optional with the latter to grant extradition or to proceed with the trial: Provided that, unless the trial shall be for the crime for which the fugitive is claimed, the delay shall not prevent ultimate extradition.

       Art. IV. If it be made to appear that extradition is sought with a view to try or punish the person demanded for an offence of a political character, surrender shall not take place, nor shall any person surrendered be tried or punished for any political offence committed previously to his extradition, or for any offence other than that in respect of which the extradition is granted.

       Art. V. The requisition for extradition shall be made through the diplomatic agents of the contracting parties, or in the event of the absence of these from the country or its seat of Government, by superior consular officers.

      If the person whose extradition is requested shall have been convicted of a crime, a copy of the sentence of the Court in which he was convicted, authenticated under its seal, and an attestation of the official character of the judge by the proper ‹xecutive authority, and of the latter by the Minister or Consul of Japan or of the United States, as the case may be, shall accompany the requisition

When the fugitive is merely charged with crime, a duly authenticated copy of the warrant of arrest in the country making the demand and of depositions on which such warrant may have been issued, must accompany the requisition.

       The fugitive shall be surrendered only on such evidence of criminality as according to the laws of the place where the fugitive or person so charged shall be found, would justify his apprehension and commitment for trial if the crime had been

there committed.

Art. VI.-On being informed by telegraph, or other written communication, through the diplomatic channel that a lawful warrant has been issued by competent authority upon probable cause, for the arrest of a fugitive criminal charged with any of the crimes enumerated in Article II. of this Treaty, and on being assured from the same source that a request for the surrender of such criminal is about to be made in accordance with the provisions of this Treaty, each Government will endeavour to procure, so far as it lawfully may, the provisional arrrest of such criminal, and keep him in safe custody for a reasonable time, not exceeding two months, to await the production of the documents upon which claim for extradition is founded.

its

       Art. VII.-Neither of the contracting parties shall be bound to deliver up own subjects or citizens under the stipulations of this convention, but they shall have the power to deliver them up if in their discretion it be deemed proper to do so.

       Art. VIII.-The expenses of the arrest, detention, examination, and transporta- tion of the accused shall be paid by the Government which has requested the extradi-

tion.

       Art. IX. The present treaty shall come into force sixty days after the exchange of the ratifications thereof. It may be terminated by either of them but shall remain in force for six months after notice has been given of its termination.

      The treaty shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Washington as soon as possible.

      In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty in duplicate and have thereunto affixed their seals.

      Done at the city of Tokyo, the twenty-ninth day of the fourth month of the nineteenth year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-ninth day of April in the eighteen hundred and eighty-sixth year of the Christian era.

(Signed) )

[L.S.] [L.S.]

INOUYE KAOur. RICHARD B. HUBBARD.

6

TREATIES WITH SIA M

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY OF FRIENDSHIP AND COMMERCE BETWEEN HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN OF THE UNITED KINGDOM AND THE KINGS OF SIAM

Ratifications Exchanged at Bangkok, 15th April, 1856

      Art. I.-There shall henceforward be perpetual peace and friendship between Her Majesty and her successors, and Their Majesties the Kings of Siam and their successors. All British subjects coming to Siam shall receive from the Siamese Government full protection and assistance to enable them to reside in Siam in all security, and trade with every facility, free from oppression or injury on the part of the Siamese, and all Siamese subjects going to an English country shall receive from the British Government the same complete protection and assistance that shall be granted to British subjects by the Government of Siam.

      Art. II. The interests of all British subjects coming to Siam shall be placed under the regulation and control of a Consul, who will be appointed to reside at Bangkok: he will himself conform to, and will enforce the observance by British subjects of all the provisions of this treaty, and such portions of the former treaty negotiated by Cap- tain Burney, in 1826, as shall still remain in operation. He shall also give effect to all rules or regulations that are now or may hereafter be enacted for the government of British subjects in Siam, and conduct of their trade, and for the prevention of viola- tions of the laws of Siam. Any disputes arising between British and Siamese subjects shall be heard and determined by the Consul, in conjunction with the proper Siamese officers; and criminal offences will be punished, in the case

                                        of English offenders, by their own laws, through the Siamese authorities. But the Consul shall not interfere in any matters referring solely to Siamese, neither will the Siamese authorities interfere in questions which only concern the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty.

It is understood, however, that the arrival of the British Consul at Bangkok shall not take place before the ratification of this treaty, nor until ten vessels owned by British subjects sailing under British colours and with British papers shall have entered the port of Bangkok for the purposes of trade, subsequent to the signing of this treaty.

      Art. III.-If Siamese in the employ of British subjects offend against the law of their country, or if any Siamese having so offended, or desiring to desert, take refuge with a British subject in Siam, they shall be searched for, and upon proof of their guilt or desertion, shall be delivered up by the Consul to the Siamese authorities. In like manner any British offenders resident or trading in Siam, who may desert, escape to, or hide themselves in Siamese territory, shall be apprehended and delivered over to the British Consul on his requisition. Chinese not able to prove themselves to be British subjects, shall not be considered as such by the British Consul, uor be entitled to his protection.

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND SIAM

163

       Art. IV.-British subjects are permitted to trade freely in all the seaports of Siam' but may reside permanently only at Bangkok, or within the limits assigned by this Treaty. British subjects coming to reside at Bangkok may rent land, buy or build houses, but cannot purchase land within a circuit of 200 sen (not more than 4 miles English) from the city walls, until they shall have lived in Siam for ten years, or shall obtain special authority from the Siamese Government to enable them to do so. But with the exception of this limitation, British residents in Siam may at any time buy or rent houses, lands, or plantations, situated anywhere within a distance of twenty-four hours' journey from the city of Bangkok, to be computed by the rate at which boats of the country can travel. In order to obtain possession of such land or houses, it will be necessary that the British subject shall, in the first place, make application through the Consul to the proper Siamese officers; and the Cousul having satisfied himself of the honest intention of the applicant, will assist him in settling, upon equitable terms, the amount of the purchase money, will mark out and fix the boundaries of the property, and will convey the same to the British purchaser under sealed deeds. Whereupon he and his property shall be placed under the protection of the Governor of the district and that of the particular local authorities; he shall conform, in ordinary matters, to any just directions given him by them, and will be subject to the same taxation that is levied on Siamese subjects. But if through negligence and want of capital or other cause, a British subject should fail to commence the cultiva ion or improvement of the land so acquired within a term of three years from the date of receiving possession thereof, the Siamese Government shall have the power of resuming the property, upon returning to the British subject the purchase-money paid by him for the same.

Art. V.-All British subjects intending to reside in Siam shall be registered at the British Consulate. They shall not go out to sea, nor proceed beyond the limits assigned by this treaty for the residence of British subjects, without a passport from the Siamese authorities, to be applied for by the British Consul; nor shall they leave Siam, if the Siamese authorities show to the British Consul that legitimate objections exist to their quitting the country. But within the limits appointed under the preceding article, British subjects are at liberty to travel to and fro under protection of a pass, to be furnished them by the British Consul and counter-sealed by the proper Siamese officer, stating, in the Siamese character, their names, calling, and description. The Siamese officers of the Government stations in the interior may, at any time, call for the production of this pass, and immediately on its being exhibited, they must allow the parties to proceed; but it will be their duty to detain those persons who, by travelling without a pass from the Consul, render themselves liable to the suspicion of their being deserters; and such detention shall be immediately reported to the Consul. Art. VI.-All British subjects visiting or residing in Siam shall be allowed the free exercise of the Christian religion and liberty to build churches in such localities as shall be consented to by the Siamese authorities. The Siamese Government will place no restriction upon the employment by the English of Siamese subjects as servants, or in any other capacity. But whenever a Siamese subject belongs to or owes service to some particular master, the servant who engages himself to a British subject without the consent of his master may be reclaimed by him; and the Siamese Government will not enforce an agreement between a British subject and any Siamese in his employ, unless made with the knowledge and consent of the master who has a right to dispose of the services of the person engaged.

       Art. VII.-British ships of war may enter the river and anchor at Paknam but they shall not proceed above Paknam, unless with the consent of the Siamese authorities, which shall be given when it is necessary that a ship shall go into dock for repairs. Any British ship of war conveying to Siam a public functionary accredited by Her Majesty's Government to the Court of Bangkok shall be allowed to come up to Bangkok, but shall not pass the forts called Pong Phrachamit and Pit-patch-nuck, unless expressly permitted to do so by the Siamese Government; but in the absence of a British ship of war, the Siamese authorities engage to furnish the Consul with a force sufficient to enable him to give effect to his authority over British subjects, and to enforce discipline among British shipping.

6*

164

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND SIAM

       Art. VIII. The measurement duty hitherto paid by British v. ssels trading to Bangkok under the Treaty of 1826 shall be abolished from the date of this Treaty coming into operation, and British shipping and trade will henceforth be only subject to the payment of import and export duties on the goods landed or shipped. On all articles of import the duties shall be three per cent., payable at the option of the importer, either in kiud or money, calculated upon the market value of the goods. Drawback of the full amount of duty shall be allowed upon goods found unsaleable and re-exported. Should the British merchant and the Custom house officers dis- agree as to the value to be set upon imported articles, such disputes shall be referred to the Consul and proper Siamese officer, who shall each have the power to call in an equal number of merchants as assessors, not exceeding two on either side, to assist them in coming to an equitable decision.

       Opium may be imported free of duty, but can only be sold to the opium farmer or his agents. In the event of no arrangement being effected with them for the sale of the opium, it shall be re-exported, and no impost or duty shall be levied thereon. Any infringement of this regulation shall subject the opium to seizure and confisca-

tion.

Articles of export from the time of production to the date of shipment shall pay one import duty, whether this be levied under the name of inlan I tax, transit duty, or duty on exportation. The tax or duty to be paid on each article of Siamese produce previous to or upon exportation is specified in the tariff attached to this Treaty; and it is distinctly agreed that goods or produce which pay any description of tax in the interior shall be exempted from any further payment of the duty on exportation.

      English merchants are to be allowed to purchase directly from the producer the articles in which they trade, and in like manner to sell their goods directly to the parties wishing to purchase the same, without the interference, in either case, of any other person.

       The rates of duty laid down in the tariff attached to this Treaty are those that are now paid upon goods or produce shipped in Siamese or Chinese vess. Is or junks; and it is agreed that British shipping shall enjoy all the privileges now exercised by, or which hereafter may be granted to, Siamese or Chinese vessels or junks.

      British subjects will be allowed to build ships in Siam, on obtaining permission to do so from the Siamese authorities.

Whenever a scarcity may be apprehended of salt, rice, or fish, the Siamese Government reserve to themselves the right of prohibiting, by public proclamation, the exportation of these articles.

Bullion or personal effects may be imported free of charge.

Art. IX. The code of regulations appended to this Treaty shall be enforced by the Consul, with the co-operation of the Siamese authorities; and they, the said authorities and Consul, shall be enabled to introduce any further regulations which may be necessary in order to give effect to the objects of this Treaty.

All fines and penalties inflicted for infraction of the provisions and regulations

of this Treaty shall be paid to the Siamese Government.

Until the British Consul shall arrive at Bangkok, and enter upon his functions, the consignees of British vessels shall be at liberty to settle with the Siamese authorities all questions relating to their trade.

Art. X.-The British Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal participation in any privileges that may have been, or may hereafter be, granted by the Siamese Government to the government or subject of any other nation.

Art. XI. After the lapse of ten years from the date of the ratification of this Treaty, upon the desire of either the British or Siamese Government, and on twelve months' notice being given by either party, the present and such portions of the Treaty of 1826 as remain unrevoked by this Treaty, together with the Tariff and the Regulations hereunto annexed, or those that may hereafter be introduced, shall be subject to revision by Commissioners appointed on both sides for this purpose, who will be empowered to decide on and insert therein such amendments as experience shall prove to be desirable.

GENERAL REGULATIONS UNDER WHICH BRITISH TRADE

IS TO BE CONDUCTED IN SIAM

Art. I.-The master of any English ship coming to Bangkok to trade must, either before or after entering the river, as may be found convenient, report the arrival of his vessel at the Custom-house at Paknam, together with the number of his crew and guns, and the port from whence he comes. Upon anchoring his vessel at Paknam, he will deliver into the custody of the Custom-house officers all his guns and ammunition; and a Custom-house officer will then be appointed to the vessel, and will proceed in her to Bangkok.

Art. II. A vessel passing Paknam without discharging her guns and ammuni- tion as directed in the foregoing regulation will be sent back to Paknam to comply with its provisions, and will be fined eight hundred ticals for having so disobeyed. After delivery of her guns and ammunition she will be permitted to return to Bangkok to trade.

Art. III.-When a British vessel shall have cast anchor at Bangkok, the master, unless a Sunday should intervene, will within four and twenty hours after arrival proceed to the British Consulate, and deposit there his ship's papers, bills of lading, &c., together with a true manifest of his import cargo; and upon the Consul's reporting these particulars to the Custom-house, permission to break bulk will at once be given by the latter.

For neglecting so to report his arrival or for presenting a false inanifest, the master will subject himself, in each instance, to a penalty of four hundred ticals; but he will be allowed to correct, within twenty-four hours after delivery of it to the Consul, any mistake he may discover in his manifest, without incurring the above- mentioned penalty.

Art. IV.-A British vessel breaking bulk, and commencing to discharge, before due permission shall be obtained, or smuggling, either when in the river or outside the bar, shall be subject to the penalty of eight hundred ticals and confiscation of the goods so smuggled or discharged."

Art. V.-As soon as a British vessel shall have discharged her cargo, and completed her outward lading, paid all her duties and delivered a true manifest of her outward cargo to the British Consul, a Siamese port-clearance shall be granted her on application from the Consul, who in the absence of any legal impediment to her departure, will then return to the master his ship's papers, and allow the vessel to leave. A Custom-house officer will accompany the vessel to Paknam; and on arriving there she will be inspected by the Custom-house officers of that station, and will receive from them the guns and ammunition previously delivered into their charge. The above regulations, numbered from 1 to 5, are obligatory under the treaty concluded between Great Britain and Siam; those which follow, numbered from 6 to 14, are equally to be observed by masters of British vessels and their crews.

Art. VI.-Masters of British vessels, when reporting their arrival at Her Majesty's Consulate at the port of Bangkok, as directed by the fourth regulation above quoted, shall notify in writing the names of all passengers and persons not forming part of the registered crew.

Notice must likewise be given of the number and names of persons, who, as passengers or in any other capacity (seamen borne on the muster-roll excepted), in- tend to leave Siam in a British vessel.

Art. VII.--Seamen, lascars, and others belonging to British vessels in the port are strictly prohibited to wear side knives and other weapons while on shore.

Art. VIII.-Should any seaman or apprentice absent himself without leave, the master will report his absence, if such exceeds twenty-four hours, at the Consulate

offices.

Art. IX.-Any British subject who entices a seaman or apprentice to desert, incurs, according to the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, paragraph 257, a penalty not exceeding ten pounds; or any such subject who wilfully harbours or secretes a person deserted from his ship incurs a penalty not exceeding twenty pounds, if it be proved that he had knowledge of his being a deserter.

166

TARIFF OF DUTIES---SIAM

In default of the payment of such fines, the offender is to be imprisoned in the Consular gaol for any term not exceeding three months, with or without hard labour,

Art. X-All cases of death, and especially of sudden death, occurring on board of British vessels in the port of Bangkok must be immediately reported at the Consulate.

Art. XI.-The discharge of guns from vessels anchored in the port of Bangkok, without notice having been previously given, and permission obtained through H.M. Consul from the proper Siamese authority, is forbidden, under a penalty not exceed- ing ten pounds.

Act. XII. It is strictly prohibited to shoot birds within the precincts of the Wats or Temples, either in Bangkok or elsewhere within the Siamese dominions, or to injure or damage any of the statues or figures, the trees or shrubs in such localities of Siamese worship; any British subject or seaman of a British vessel guilty of such an act renders himself liable to a penalty not exceeding twenty pounds, or in default thereof to an imprisonment in the Consular gaol for a period of not more than one month.

Art. XIII.-When a vessel under the British flag is ready to leave the port of Bangkok, the master will give notice at the Consulate office, and hoist a blue peter twenty-four hours before departure, which is to fly until she breaks anchorage.

       Art. XIV. Should any vessel take in or discharge cargo subsequent to the issue of the Siamese port clearance, as directed by the fifth regulation above quoted, the master, as in a case of smuggling, subjects himself to a penalty of 600 tícals (equal to £100), and goods so taken or discharged will be liable to confiscation.

      Art. XV. Every fine or penalty levied under these regulations is (if not paid in sterling money) at the rate of eight ticals Siamese currency for one pound.

      Tariff of Export and Inland Duties to be levied on Articles of Trade I.--The undermentioned Articles shall be entirely free from Inland or other taxes, on production of transit pass, and shall pay Export Duty as follows:

TICAL SALUNG FUANG HUN

1 Ivory

2 Gamboge

     3 Rhinoceros' horns 4 Cardamons, best.... 3 Cardamons, bastard

6 Dried mussels

7

R

Pelicans' quills Betel nut, dried

9 Krachi wood..

10 Sharks' fins, white..

11 Sharks' fins, black.

12 Lukkraban seed

13

Peacocks' tails

14 Buffalo and cow bones

15

Rhinoceros' hides

16 Hide cuttings

17 Turtle shell

18 Soft ditto

19

Beche-de-mer

20 Fish maws

21

Birds' nests, uncleaned

22 Kingfishers' feathers.

23 Cutch

24 Boyche seed (Nux Vomica)

25 Pungtarai seed

28 Gum Benjamin

27 Angrai bark

28 Agilla wood

29 Ray skins

30 Old deers' horns

31 Soft, or young ditto

32 Deer hides, fine

33 Deer hides, common

34 Deer sinews

35 Buffalo and cow hides

10

6

50

14

N=NO-NO DN-0000

3

3

20 per cent.

6

0

ŠOWNORCOcaŏww--Oc

10 per cent

8

3

1

OOOO

per picul

93

"

"

"

19

per 100 tails

per picul

"

34

per 100 per picul

"

0 per 100 hides

"

0 per picul

TARIFF OF DUTIES-SIAM

TICAL SALUNG FUANG

HUN

36 Elephants' bones

per picul

37 Tigers' bones

33 Buffalo horns

39 Elephants' hides.......................... .................. .........................................................

40 Tigers' skin

Armadillo skins

41

42

Sticklac

43 Hemp

44 Dried Fish, Plaheng

45 Dried Fish, Plusalit 46 Sapanwood

47 Salt meat

    48 Mangrove bark 49 Rosowood

1

1220NO-N−→

4

"

167

per skin

per picul

"

99

"

99

50 Ebony

51 Rice

4

0 per koyan

II.-The undermentioned Articles being subject to the Inland or Transit duties herein named, and which shall not be increased, shall be exempt from export duty.

TICAL SALUNG FUANG HUN

52 Sugar, White

53 Sugar, Red

54 Cotton, clean and uncleaned

55 Paper

56

Salt fish, Plat

57

Beans and Peas

68 Dried Prawns

59 Tilseed

60 Silk, raw

31 Bees' wax

62 Tawool

63 Salt

64 Tobacco

2

C

10 per cent

1

1

1

one twelfth

one twelfth

one twelfth

one twelfth

one fifteenth

0

6

1

2

O per picul

22

0 p. 1,000 fish

0 per picul

per koyan 0 p. 1,000 bdloa

III.-All goods or produce unenumerated in this Tariff shall be free of Export Duty, and shall only be subject to one Inland Tax or Transit Duty, not exceeding the rate now paid.

L

FRANCE

TREATY AND CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND SIAM

SIGNED AT Bangkok, 3rd OCTOBER, 1893

Treaty

       Art. I.--The Siamese Government renounces all pretension to the whole on the territories on the left bank of the Mekong and to the islands in the river.

Art. II. The Siamese Government undertakes not to place or navigate any armed boats or vessels on the waters of the great Tonle-Sap Lake, the Mekong, or their tributaries situated in the territory indicated in the next article.

      Art. III.-The Siamese Government will construct no fortified post or military establishment in the provinces of Battambang and Siem-Reap or within a radius of 15 miles from the right bank of the Mekong.

Art. IV.-In the zones mentioned in Article 3 the police service will be car- ried on as usual by the local authorities with the contingent forces that are strictly necessary. No regular or irregular armed force is to be maintained.

       Art. V. The Siamese Government binds itself to open negotiations with the French Government, within six months, with a view to regulating the customs and commercial system of the territories mentioned in Article 3, and to the revision of the Treaty of 1865. Until the conclusion of that agreement no customs duties will be established in the zone referred to in Article 3. Reciprocity will continue to be granted by the French Government to the products of the said zone.

Art. VI. As the development of the navigation of the Mekong may render necessary certain works on the right bank or the establishment of relay stations for boats for wood and coal depôts, the Siamese Government binds itself to give, on the request of the French Government, all the necessary facilities for this purpose.

Art. VII.-French citizens, whether actual subjects or political dependents, may travel about freely and carry on their business in the territories mentioned in Article 3, on being provided with a pass from the French authorities. Reciprocity will be accorded to the inhabitants of the said zone.

Art. VIII. The French Government reserves the right of establishing Con- sulates where it shall think proper in the interest of its citizeus, subjects, or depen- dents, and particularly at Khorat and at Muang Nam. The Siamese Government will grant the sites necessary for the erection of the said Consulates.

Art. IX.-In case of difficulties, the French text will be the sole authority. Art. X.-The present treaty must be ratified within four months from the date of its signature.

Convention

The Siamese military posts established on the left bank of the Mekong and on the islands in the river must be evacuated within a month from the date of the signing of the present Convention. Those situated in the province of Angkor and Battambang, or ou the right bank of the river within 15 miles thereof, must be evacuated at the same time and the fortifications razed.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND SIAM

169

The authors of the incidents of Tong-Kieng-Khan and Cammon will be judged by the Siamese authorities. A representative of France will be present at the trial, and will see that the sentences pronounced are carried out. The French Govern- ment reserves the right of judging whether the penalties are sufficient, and, if necessary, of demanding a fresh trial before a mixed tribunal, the composition of which it will itself determine.

The Siamese Government will deliver up to the French Minister at Bangkok or to the French authorities on the frontier all French subjects, whether Annamites, Cambodians, or Loatians of the left bank, now detained for any cause whatever. It will throw no obstacle in the way of the return to the left bank of the former inhabit- ants of that region.

The Bang-Bien of Tong-Kieng-Khan and his suite will be taken by a delegate of the Minister of Foreign Affairs to the French Legation, and also the arms and the French flag seized by the Siamese authorities.

The French Government will continue to occupy Chantaboon until the execп- tion of the stipulations of the present Convention, and particularly until the complete and pacific evacuation of the Siamese posts established both on the left bank of the Mekong and on the islands in the river, as well as those in the provinces of Battam- bong and Siem-Reap, and within 15 miles of the right bank of the Mekong.

JAPAN

TREATY OF FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN JAPAN AND SIAM.

SIGNED AT Bangkok, 25th FEBRUARY, 1898.

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the King of Siam, being equally animated by a desire to promote the relations of Friendship, Commerce and Navigation which happily exist between their respective states and subjects, have resolved to conclude a Treaty for that purpose, and have named as their Plenipo- tentiaries, that is to say:

     His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Manjiro Inagaki, Shogoi, His Majesty's Minister Resident at the Court of His Majesty the King of Siam, and His Majesty the King of Siam, His Royal Highness Prince Krom Luang Devawongse Varoprakar, Knight of the Order of Chakrakri, First Class of the Order of Rising Sun, &c., Minister for Foreign Affairs of His Majesty the King of Siam.

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following

articles.

Art. I. There shall be constant peace and perpetual friendship between Japan and Siam and the subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other, full and the entire protection for their persons and property according to the established law of the country.

      Art. II. It shall be free to each of the Contracting Parties to appoint Consuls- General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls and Consular Agents to reside in the towns and ports of the dominions and possessions of the other, where similar officers of other Powers are permitted to reside. Such Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls and Consular Agents, however, shall not enter upon their functions until after they shall have been approved and admitted in the usual form by the Government to which they are sent. They shall enjoy all the honours, privileges, exemptions and iminunities of every kind which are or may be granted to Consuls of the most favoured nation.

Art. III. The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties may enter, remain and reside in any part of the dominions and possessions of the other, where the subjects and citizens of the nation most favoured in these respects are permitted to enter, remain and reside; they may there hire and occupy houses, manufactories, shops and warehouses, and they may there engage in trade by wholesale and retail in all kinds of produce, manufactures and merchandise, paying no other or higher taxes, imposts, charges or exactions of any kind than are now or may hereafter be paid by the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

      In all that relates to travel, trade and residence; to the acquisition, possession and disposal of property of all kinds and to the right to engage in all kinds of busi ness, occupation and enterprise, the subjects of each of the Contracting Parties in the dominions and possessions of the other, shall at all times enjoy the treatment accorded to the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nations.

Art. IV. There shall be reciprocally full and entire freedom of commerce aud navigation between the dominions and possessions of the two High Contracting Parties. The subjects of each of the Contracting Parties shall have liberty freely and securely to come and go with their ships and cargoes to and from all places, ports and rivers in the dominions and possessions of the other, which are now or may hereafter be opened to foreign commerce and navigation.

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND SIAM

171

Art. V. The subjects of each of the High Contracting Parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other, a perfect equality of treatment with the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation in all that relates to transit duties, warehousing, bounties, the examination and appraisement of merchandise and draw- backs.

Art. VI. No other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions, and possessions of His Majesty the King of Siam of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Em- peror

       of Japan, from whatever place arriving, and no other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan or any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the King of Siam, from whatever place arriving, than on the like article produced or manufactured in any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be maintained or imposed on the importation of any article, the pro- duce or manufactures of the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties into the dominions and possessions of the other from whatever place arriving, which shall not equally extend to the importation of the like article being the produce or manufacture of any other country. This last provision is not applicable to the sanitary and other prohibitions occasioned by the necessity of pro- tecting the safety of persons, or of cattle, or of plants useful to agriculture.

Art. VII.-No other or higher duties, taxes, or charges of any kind shall be imposed in the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties in respect of any article exported to the dominions and possessions of either of the other than such as are or may be payable in respect of the like article exported to any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation of any article from the dominions and possessions of either of the two Contracting Parties to the dominions and possessions of the other, which shall not equally extend to the exportation of the like article to any other country.

       Art. VIII.-All articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan in Japanese vessels or vessels of the most favoured nation, may likewise be imported into those ports in Siamese vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in Japanese vessels or vessels of the most favoured nation and reciprocally, all articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the King of Siam in Siamese vessels or in vessels of the most favoured nation, may like- wise be imported into those ports in Japanese vessels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in Siamese vessels or vessels of the most favoured nation. Such reciprocal equality of treatment shall take effect without distinction, whether such articles come directly from the place of origin or from any other place.

In the same manner there shall be perfect equality of treatment in regard to exportation, so that the same internal and export duties shall be paid and the same bounties and drawbacks allowed in the dominions and possessions of either of the High Contracting Parties on the exportation of any article which is or may be legally exported therefrom whether such exportation shall take place in Japanese or Siamese vessels or in vessels of a third Power ani white may be the place of destination, whether a port of either of the Contracting Parties or of any third Power.

Art. IX.-No other higher duties or charges on account of tonnage, light or harbour dues, pilotage, quarantine, salvage in case of damage or shipwreck or any other local charges, shall be imposed in any ports of Japan on Siamese vessels nor in any of the ports of Siam on Japanese vessels than are now or may hereafter be payable in the like cases in the same ports on national vessels in general or vessels of the most favoured nation. Such equality of treatment shall apply reciprocally to the respective vessels from whatever port or place they may arrive and whatever may be their place of destination.

172

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND SIAM

Art. X.-In all that concerns the entering, clearing, stationing, loading and unloading of vessels in the ports, basins, docks, roadsteads, harbours, or rivers of the dominions and possessions of the two countries no privilege shall be granted by one country to national vessels or vessels of any third Power, which shall not be equally granted in similar cases to vessels of the other country.

Art. XI.-Any ship of war or merchant vessel of either of the High Contracting Parties which may be compelled by stress of weather, or by reason of any other dis- tress, to take shelter in a port of the other, shall be at liberty to refit therein, to pro- cure all necessary supplies, and to put to sea again, without paying any duties other than such as would be payable by national vessels. In case, however, the master of a merchant vessel should be under the necessity of disposing of a part of his cargo in order to defray the expenses, he shall be bound to conform to the regulations and tariffs of the place to which he may come.

If any ship of war or merchant vessel of one of the Contracting Parties should run aground or be wrecked upon the coasts of the other, such ship or vessel, and all parts thereof, and all furnitures and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise saved therefrom, including those which may have been cast into the sea, or the proceeds thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, shall be given up to the owners, master or their agents, when claimed by them. If such owners, master or agents are not on the spot, the same shall be delivered to the respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls or Consular Agents upon being claimed by them within the period fixed by the laws of the country, and such consular officers, owners, master or agents shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the case of a wreck of a national vessel.

The goods and merchandise saved from the wreck shall be exempt from all the duties of the customs unless cleared for consumption, in which case they shall pay the ordinary duties.

In the case of a ship or vessel belonging to the subjects of either of the Con- tracting Parties being driven in by stress of weather, run aground or wrecked in the dominions and possessions of the other, the respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls and Consular Agents shall, if the owner or master or other agent of the owner is not present, or is present but requires it, be authorized to interpose in order to afford the necessary assistance to the subjects of the respective States.

Art. XII.--The vessel of war of each of the High Contracting Parties may enter, remain, and make repairs in those ports and places of the other, to which the vessels of war of the most favoured nation are accorded access; they shall there submit to the same regulations and enjoy the same honours, advantages, privileges and exemptions as are now or may hereafter be conceded to vessels of war of the most

favoured nation.

Art. XIII.-The High Contracting Parties agree that in all that concerns com- merce, industry and navigation, any privilege, favour, or immunity which either Contracting Party has actually granted, or may hereafter grant, to the Government, subjects, citizens, ships or merchandise of any other State shall be extended immedi ately and unconditionally to the Government, subjects, ships or merchandise of the other Contracting Party; it being their intention that the trade, industry and naviga- tion of each country shall be placed, in all respects, by the other on the footing of

the most favoured nation.

Art. XIV. The present Treaty shall come into force immediately after the exchange of ratifications, and shall remain in force for ten years, and thereafter until the expiration of a year from the day on which one or the other of the Contracting Parties shall have repudiated it.

Art. XV.-The present Treaty is signed in duplicate in the Japanese, Siamese and English languages and in case there should be found any discrepancy between the Japanese and Siamese texts, such discrepancy shall be decided in conformity with the English text.

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND SIAM

173

       Art. XVI.-The present Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Bangkok as soon as possible.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the the same and have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

       Done at Bangkok in sextuplicate, this twenty-fifth day of the second month of the thirty-first year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-fifth day of February, of the one hundred and sixteenth year of Ratanakosindr Sok and the eighteen hun- dred and ninety-eighth year of the Christian era.

(L.S.)

MANJIRO INAGASI DevAWONGSE VAROPRAKAR (L.S.)

PROTOCOL.

At the moment of proceeding this day to the signature of the treaty of Friend- ship, Commerce and Navigation between Japan and Siam, the Plenipotentiaries of the two High Contracting Parties have declared as follows:

I. The Siames" Government consent that Japanese Consular officers shall exercise jurisdiction over Japanese subjects in Siam until the judicial reforms of Siam shall have been completed; that is, until a Criminal Code, a Code of Criminal Procedure, a Civil Code (with exception of Law of Marriage and Succession), a Code of Civil Procedure and a Law of Constitution of the Courts of Justice will come into force.

II. The Jpanese Government accept as bin ling upon Japanese subjects and vessels resorting to Siam the Trade Regulations and Customs Tariffs now in force. in Siam in respect of the subjects, citizens and vessels of the Powers having Treaties. with Siam.

Such Regulations and Tariffs shall be subject to revision at any time upon twelve months' previous notice, on demand of either Japan or Siam.

All fines and penalties imposed for infractions of the said Regulations or of the Treaty signed this day, shall be paid to the Siamese Government.

III. Any controversies which may arise respecting the interpretation or the execution of the Treaty signed this day or the consequences of any violation thereof, shall be submitted, when the means of setting them directly y amicable agreement are exhausted, to the decision of Commissions of Arbitration, and that the result of such arbitration shall be binding upon both Governments.

      The members of such Commissions shall be selected by two Governments by common consent, failing which each of the Parties shall nominate an Arbitrator or an equal number of Arbitrators and the Arbitrators thus appointed shall select an Umpire.

The procedure of the Arbit. ation shall in each case be determined by the Con- tracting Parties, failing which the Commission of Arbitration shall be itself entitled to determine it beforehand.

The undersigned Plenipotentiaries have agreed that this Protocol shall be sub- mitted to the High Contracting Parties at the same time as the Treaty, and that when the Treaty is ratified, the agreements contained in this Protocol shall also equally be considered as approved, without the necessity of a further formal ratification. In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Protocol and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at Bangkok in sextuplicate, this twenty-fifth day of the second month of the thirty-first year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-fifth day of February of the one hundred and sixteenth year of Ratanakosindr Sok and the eighteen hundred and ninety-eighth year of the Christian era.

(L.S.)

MANJIRO INAGASI. DEVAWONGSE VAROPRAKAR. (L.S.)

RUSSIA.

DECLARATION EXCHANGED BETWEEN RUSSIA AND SIAM.

SIGNED AT BANGKOK, 23RD JUNE, 1899.

      The Imperial Government of Russia and the Royal Government of Siam, being desirous to facilitate the relations between the two countries, have, awaiting the conclusion of a Treaty of commerce and amity, agreed as follows:-

That for everything relating to jurisdiction commerce, and navigation, Russian subjects on Siamese territory and Siamese subjects on Russian térritory shall hence- forth enjoy, till the expiration of the present arrangement, all the rights and privileges granted to the subjects of other nations respectively in Siam and in Russia by the Treaties now in existence and by Treaties that may be concluded in the future.

      This arrangement shall be applie 1 by the two contracting parties from the day of its signature and till the expiration of six months after the day on which the one or the other of the high contracting parties shall have denounced it.

The present declaration having been drawn up in the Russian, Siamese, and French languages, and th three versions having the same scope and the same meaning, the French text shall be regarded as official and legal in all respects.

up

    In faith of which the undersigned, duly authoris d for that purpose, have drawn the present declaration, to w ich they have affixed their signatures and s als.

Done at Bangkok, the 1st June, (Russian style, equivalent to June 23, 188, the Siamese era).

GREAT BRITAIN AND RUSSIA.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND RUSSIA WITH REGARD TO THEIR RESPECTIVE RAILWAY INTERESTS IN CHINA.

No. 1.

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff.

The Undersigned, British Ambassador, duly authorized to that effect, has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Count Mouravieff, Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs:

Great Britain and Russia, animated by a sincere desire to avoid in China all cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera- tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have agreed as follows:

1. Great Britain engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway Concessions to the north of the Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway Concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.

2.-Russia, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of Russian subjects or of others, any railway Concessions in the basin of the Yang- tze and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway Concessions in that region supported by the British Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the sovereign rights of China or existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause of com- plications between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

St. Petersburg, April 28, 1899.

(Signed) CHARLES S. SCOTT.

The Undersigned, Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized to that effect, has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Sir Charles Scott, British Ambassador :-

Russia and Great Britain, animated by the sincere desire to avoid in China all cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera- tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have agreed as follows:-

       1.-Russia engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of Russian subjects or of others, any railway Concessions in the basin of the Yangtze, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway Concessions in that region supported by the British Government.

2.-Great Britain, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway Concessions to the north of the Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway Concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the sovereign rights of China or of existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause of complication between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

The Undersigned, etc.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

No. 3.

(signed) Count MOURAVIEF

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff.

      In order to complete the notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of spheres for Concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it

176 EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND RUSSIA

has been agreed to record in the present additional note the arrangement arrived at with regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwanr, for the construction of which a loan has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai- Hongkong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned notes is not to infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the Chinese Government may appoint both an English engineer and an European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question, and the expenditure of the money appropriated to it.

       But it remains understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to remain a Chin se line, under the control of the Chinese Government, an 1 cannot be mortgaged orfalienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaoheichan to Sinminting, in addition to the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China her- self, who may permit European-not necessarily British-engineers to periodically inspect it, and to verify and certify that the work is being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with the right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian subjects or establishments for Concessions for railways, which, starting from the main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region in which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be constructed.

(Signed) CHARLES S. SCOTT.

St Petersburg, April 28th, 1899.

No. 4.

Count Mouravieff to Sir C. Scott.

      In order to complete the notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of spheres for Concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it has been agreed to record in the present additional note the Agreement arrived at with regard to the line Shanghaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which a loan has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-Hong- Kong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

      The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned notes is not to infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the Chinese Government is at liberty to appoint both an English engineer and a European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question and the expenditure of the money appropriated to it. But it remains well understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to remain a Chinese line, subject to the control of the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged or alienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaoheïchan to Siuminting, in addition to the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China herself, who may permit European-not necessarily British-engineers to periodi cally inspect it, and to verify and certify that the works are being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with the right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian subjects or establishments for Concessions for railways, which, starting from the main Manchurian line in a south westerly direction, would traverse the region in which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be constructed.

The Undersigned, etc.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

(Signed) Count MOURAVIEFF.

GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE

DECLARATION SIGNED BY GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE RESPECTING SPHERES OF INFLUENCE

SIGNED AT LONDON, 15TH January, 1896

The undersigned, duly authorised by their respective Governments, have signed the following Declaration :-

       I.-The Governments of Great Britain and France engage to one another that neither of them will, without the consent of the other, in any case, or under any pretext, advance their armed forces into the region which is comprised in the basins of the Petcha Bouri, Meik long, Menam, and Bang Pa Kong (Petricu) rivers and their respective tributaries, together with the extent of coast from Muong Bang Tapan to Muong Pase, the basins of the rivers on which those two places are situated, and the basins of the other rivers, the estuaries of which are included in that coast; and including also the territory lying to the north of the basin of the Menam and situated between the Anglo-Siamese frontier, the Mekong River, and the Eastern watershed of the Me Ing. They further engage not to acquire within this region any special privilege or advantage which shall not be enjoyed in common by, or equally open to, Great Britain and France and their nationals and dependents.e These stipulations, how ver, shall not be interpreted as derogating from the special clauses which, in virtue of the Treaty concluded on Oct. 3, 1893, between France and Siam, apply to a zone of 25 kilom. on the right bank of the Mekong and to the navigation of that river.

       II.-Nothing in the foregoing clause shall hinder any action on which the two Powers may agree, and which they shall think necessary in order to uphold the independence of the Kingdom of Siam. But they engage not to enter into any separate agreement permitting a third Power to take any action from which they are bound by the present declaration themselves to abstain.

        III. From the mouth of the Nam Huok northwards as far as the Chinese frontier the thalweg of the Mekong shall form the limit of the possessions or spheres of influence of Great Britain and France. It is agreed that the nationals and dependents of each of the two countries shall not exercise any jurisdiction or authority within the possessions or sphere of influence of the other.

The police of the islands in this part of the river, which are separated from the British shore by a branch of the river, shall, so long as they are thus separated, be entrusted to the French authorities. The fishery shall be open to the inhabitants of both banks.

       IV. The two Goveruments agree that all commercial and other privileges and advantages conceded in the two Chinese provinces of Yunnan and Szechuen either to Great Britain or France, in virtue of their respective Conventions with China of March 1, 1894, and June 20, 1895, and all privileges and advantages of any nature which may in the future be conceded in these two Chinese provinces, either to Great Britain or France, shall, as far as rests with them, be extended and rendered common to both Powers and to their nationals and dependents, and they engage to use their influence and good offices with the Chinese Government for this purpose.

*

Done at London 15th January, 1896.

SALISBURY. ALPH. DE COURCEL.

THE MALAY STATES FEDERATION AGREEMENT, 1896

Agreement between the Governor of the Straits Settlements, acting on

behalf of the Government of Her Majesty the Queen, Empress of India, and the Rulers o the following Malay States, that is to say, Perak, Selangor, Pahang, and Negr1 Sembilan.

    Art. I.-In confirmation of various previous Agreements, the Sultan of Perak, the Sultan of Selangor, the Sultan of Pahang, and the Chiefs of the States which form the territory known as the Negri Sembilan, hereby severally place themselves and their States under the protection of the British Government.

Art. II.-The above-named Rulers and Chiefs of the respective States hereby agree to constitute their countries a Federation, to be known as the Protected Malay States, to be administered under the advice of the British Government.

    Art. III. It is to be understood that the arrangement hereby agreed upon does not imply that any one Ruler or Chief shall exercise any power or authority in respect of any State other than that which he now possesses in the State of which he is the recognised Ruler or Chief.

Art. IV.-The above-named Rulers agree to accept a British Officer, to be styled the Resident-General, as the agent and representative of the British Government under the Governor of the Straits Settlements. They undertake to provide him with suitable accommodation, with such salary as is determined by Her Majesty's Government, and to follow his advice in all matters of administration other than those touching the Mohammedan religion. The appointment of the Resident-General will not affect the obligations of the Malay Rulers towards the British Residents now existing or to be hereafter appointed to offices in the above- mentioned Protected States.

    Art. V. The above-named Rulers also agree to give to those States in the Federation which require it such assistance in men, money, or other respects as the British Government, through its duly appointed officers, may advise; and they further undertake, should war break out between Her Majesty's Government and that of any other Power, to send, on the requisition of the Governor, a body of armed and equipped Indian troops for service in the Straits Settlements.

    Art. VI. Nothing in this Agreement is intended to curtail any of the powers or authority now held by any of the above-named Rulers in their respective States, nor does it alter the relations now existing between any of the States named and the British Empire.

THE FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACT, 1890

53 AND 54 VICTORIA, CHAPTER 37

AN ACT TO CONSOLIDATE THE FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACTS

[4th AUGUST, 1890]

     WHEREAS by treaty, capitulation, grant, usage, sufferance, and other lawful means, Her Majesty the Queen has jurisdiction within divers foreign countries, and it is expedient to consolidate the Acts relating to the exercise of Her Majesty's jurisdiction out of Her dominions :

       Be it therefore enacted by the Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, as follows:

jurisdiction in

       1. It is and shall be lawful for Her Majesty the Queen to hold, Exercise of exercise, and enjoy any jurisdiction which Her Majesty now has or may foreign country. at any time hereafter have within a foreign country in the same and as ample a manner as if Her Majesty had acquired that jurisdiction by the cession or conquest of territory.

jurisdiction over

out regular go-

       2.-Where a foreign country is not subject to any government from Exercise of whom Her Majesty the Queen might obtain jurisdiction in the manner British subjects recited by this Act, Her Majesty shall by virtue of this Act have jurisdic- in countries with- tion over Her Majesty's subjects for the time being resident in or resort- vernments. in to that country, and that jurisdiction shall be jurisdiction of Her Majesty in a foreign country within the meaning of the other provisions of this Act.

       3.-Every act and thing done in pursuance of any jurisdiction of Her Validity of seta Majesty in foreign country shall be as valid as if it had been done done in pursuance according to the local law then in force in that country.

of jurisdiction.

existence or ex-

country.

4.-(1.) If in any proceeding, civil or criminal, in a court in Her Evidence as to Majesty's dominions or held under the authority of Her Majesty, any tent of juris- question arises as to the existence or extent of any jurisdiction of Her diction in foreign Majesty in a foreign country, a Secretary of State shall, on the application of the court, send to the court within a reasonable time his decision on the question, and his decision shall for the purposes of the proceeding he final.

(2.) The court shall send to the Secretary of State, in a document under the seal of the court, or signed by a judge of the court, questions framed so as properly to raise the question, and sufficient answers to those questions shall be returned by the Secretary of State to the court, and those answers shall, on production thereof, be conclusive evidence of the matters therein contained.

enactments in

        5.-(1.) It shall be lawful for Her Majesty the Queen in Council, Power to extend if She thinks fit, by Order to direct that all or any of the enactments First Schedule. described in the First Schedule to this Act, or any enactments for the time being in force amending or substituted for the same, shall extend, with or without any exceptions, adaptations, or modifications in the Order mentioned, to any foreign country in which for the time being Her Majesty has jurisdiction.

       (2.) Thereupon those enactments shall, to the extent of that jurisdiction, operate as if that country were a British possession, and as if Her Majesty in Council were the Legislature of that possession.

Power to send

with offences for

ossession.

180

FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACT, 1890

6.-(1.) Where a person is charged with an offence cognizable by persons charged a British court in a foreign country, any person having authority derived trial to a British from Her Majesty in that behalf may, by warrant, cause the person so charged to be sent for trial to any British possession for the time being appointed in that behalf by Order in Council, and upon the arrival of the person so charged in that British possession, such criminal court of that possession as is authorised in that behalf by Order in Council, or, if no court is so authorised, the supreme criminal court of that possession may cause him to be kept in safe and proper custody, and so soon as con- veniently may be may inquire of, try, and determine the offence, and on conviction punish the offender according to the laws in force in that behalf within that possession in the same manner as if the offence had been committed within the jurisdiction of that criminal court.

Provision as to

ment of persons convicted.

Provided that-

(a.) A person so charged may, before being so sent for trial, tender for examination to a British court in the foreign country where the off nce is alleged to have been committed any competent witness whose evidence he deems material for his defence and whom he alleges himself unable to produce at the trial in the British possession:

(b.) In such case the British court in the foreign country shall proceed in the examination and cross-examination of the witness as though he had been tendered at a trial before that court, and shall cause the evidence so taken to be reduced into writing, and shall trausmit to the criminal court of the British possession by which the person charged is to be tried a copy of the evidence, certified as correct under the seal of the court before which the evidence was taken, or the signature of a judge of that court: (c.) Thereupon the court of the British possession before which the trial takes place shall allow so much of the evidence so taken as would have been admissible according to the law and practice of that court, had the witness been produced and examined at the trial, to be read and received as legal evidence at the trial: (7.) The court of the British possession shall admit and give effect to the law by which the alleged offender would have been tried by the British court in the foreign country in which his offence is alleged to have been committed, as far as that law relates to the criminality of the act alleged to have been committed, or the nature or degree of the offence, or the punishment thereof, if the law differs in those respects from the law in force in that British possession.

 (2.) Nothing in this section shall alter or repeal any law, statute, or usage by virtue of which any offence committed out of Her Majesty's dominions may, irrespectively of this Act, be inquired of, tried, determined and punished within Her Majesty's dominious, or any part thereof.

or be

7. Where an offender convicted before a British court in a foreign place of punish country has been sentenced by that court to suffer death, penal servitude, imprisonment, or any other punishment, the sentence shall be carried into effect in such place as may be directed by Order in Council determined in accordance with directions given by Order in Council, and the conviction and sentence shall be of the same force in the place in which the s ntence is so carried into effect as if the conviction had been made and the sentence passed by a competent court in that place.

Validity of acts

in Council.

8. Where, by Order in Council made in pursuance of this Act, any done under Order British court in a foreign country is authorised to order the removal or deportation of any person from that country, that removal or deportation, and any detention for the purposes thereof, according to the provisions

FOREIGN JURISDICTION ACT, 1890

181

of the Order in Council, shall be as lawful as if the order of the

ourt were to have effect wholly within that country.

jurisdiction to

Foreign

9. It shall be lawful for Her Majesty the Queen in Council, by Power to assign Order, to assign to or confer on any court in any British possession, or British courts in held under the authority of Her Majesty, any jurisdiction, civil or criminal, cases within original or appellate, which may lawfully by Order in Council be assigned Jurisdiction Act to or conferred on any British court in any foreign country, and to make such provisions and regulations as to Her Majesty in Council seem meet respecting the exercise of the jurisdiction so assigned or conferred, and respecting the enforcement and execution of the judgments, decrees, orders, and sentences of any such court, and respecting appeals therefrom.

10. It shall be lawful for Her Majesty the Queen in Council to revoke Power to amend or vary any Order in Council made in pursuance of this Act.

Orders in Council.

and effect of

       11. Every Order in Council made in pursuance of this Act shall be Laying before laid before both Houses of Parliament forthwith after it is made, if Parliament, Parliament be then in session, and if not, forthwith after the commence- Orders in ment of the then next session of Parliament, and shall have effect as if it Council. were enacted in this Act.

Orders in

       12.-(1.) If any Order in Council made in pursuance of this Act as In what cases respects any foreign country is in any respect repugnant to the provisions council void fo of any Act of Parliament extending to Her Majesty's subjects in that repugnancy. country, or repugnant to any order or regulation made under the authority of any such Act of Parliament, or having in that country the force and effect of any such Act, it shall be read subject to that Act, order, or regulation, and shall, to the extent of such repugnancy, but not otherwise,

be void.

(2.) An Order in Council made in pursuance of this Act shall not be or be deemed to have been, void on the ground of repugnancy to the law of England unless it is repugnant to the provisions of some such Act of Parliament, order, or regulation as aforesaid.

persons

Acts.

       13.-(1.) An action, suit, prosecution, or proceeding against any Provisions for person for any act done in pursuance or execution or intended protection of execution of this Act, or of any enactment repealed by this Act, or of any actin