九廣鐵路年報 Kowloon Canton Railway Annual Departmental Report 1956-1957

ANNUAL

DEPARTMENTAL

REPORTS

1956-57

HONG KONG

COUCATION

PRICE: $3

LIBRARY

KONG

GENERAL MANAGER

RAILWAY

香港公共圖

HONG KONG

PUBLIC LIBRAR

BRARIES

HONG KONG

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORT

BY THE

GENERAL MANAGER, RAILWAY

 

KII

FOR THE

FINANCIAL YEAR 1956-57

IGKONG PUBLIC

IBNARIES

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY S. YOUNG, ACTING GOVERNMENT PRINTER.

AT THE GOVERNMENT PRESS,

JAVA ROAD, HONG KONG

CONTENTS

GENERAL SURVEY

TRAFFIC

Paragraphs

1

-

6

7 - 37

ACCOUNTS

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

共 圖

38 41

42 - 52

WAY AND STRUCTURES

53 - 67

STORES

68 - 73

STAFF

74

STAFF WELFARE

APPENDICES

75 80

-

. I - XXIII

2.

Note: H.K. $16.00 £1:0:0 sterling. Note:-H.K.

GENERAL SURVEY

      THE year has been one of unusual incidents. Almost at the commencement, on April 27th, 1956 there occurred a serious explosion of the boiler in locomotive No. 22 causing the tragic deaths of six members of the staff scalded by live steam. There were unfortunately no mechanical histories of any of these "austerity" locomotives when supplied at the end of the war and other boilers when dismantled had given no reason for alarm. Only after the accident, when two boilers were delivered to a local dockyard for repair, did a detailed examination dis- close faults which necessitated complete reconstruction of the two boilers concerned, and the withdrawal from service of 6 locomotives.

       2. Negotiations for a through train service with Canton which had opened in the previous November, carried on until August when they were broken off.

       It was found impossible to reach agreement on immigration control into Hong Kong. There was however complete accord on railway matters and the British Section have repeatedly made it clear that negotiation could be resumed at any time if fresh proposals are forthcoming for resolving the immigration difficulties.

       3. During the course of the negotiations for a through service of trains between Kowloon and Canton, the British Section pointed out that it was less optimistic that a regular flow of passengers between the two cities would result unless the Chinese Government were prepared to sanction a return, although perhaps in a modified form, of the travelling-traders' activities which formed the raison d'etre for the continuous going and coming between the two cities in former years. Not- withstanding re-introduction of the quota system on September 3rd, 1956 this is in effect what has taken place in respect of travellers with Hong Kong re-entry permits.

         While the year's revenue is the highest since the financial year 1950/51 at $7,915,938.79, still better results would have been attained but for the serious riots which broke out in the

1

  Colony on October 10th two days prior to the date of the Chung Yeung festival causing the Railway a loss estimated at $80,000. Special train arrangements to handle the big crowds who normally travel to Wo Hop Shek and Sandy Ridge cemetries to visit their ancestral graves, had to be cancelled, and only a shuttle service north of the urban area and four non-stop trains bringing residents of the Colony back from China were per- mitted to run until the 14th.

   5. Following on the accident of November 12th, 1955 at a level crossing at Mile 171, between a train and an Army tank causing the loss of two lives and serious material damage, pro- longed discussions took place with the Military Authorities towards rendering the crossing safe. A satisfactory outcome was reached almost a year later on November 8th, 1956.

   6. The two diesel electric locomotives were fully employed in operating all local passenger trains except when withdrawal for routine inspection or minor failure necessitated relief by steam engine. Steam locomotives, except as stated, were con- fined to goods trains. Total kilometrage run during the year was 374,883.44 at a cost of $347,568.28. The striking savings effected are shown in diagrammatic form in Appendix XXI. Economies have been maintained despite the fact that since the units were put into service the price of dieseline fuel has risen from $228 to $267 per ton.

   With the arrival of a further 3 of these locomotives during the coming year further economies are certain and the Railway is expected to continue to play its part profitably in the economic life of the Colony.

TRAFFIC

7. Traffic earnings for the financial year ended 31.3.57 showed a marked improvement. The surplus over the previous year is $1,990,817, but is still $2,802,775 less than the record of $9,913,642 which was created in the year 1950/51.

1956/57. $7,110,867

1955/56. $5,120,050

Increase.

$1,990,817 or 38.88%

8. Passenger Bookings. Passenger journeys, both local and non-local, have increased, the local by 10.63% and non-local by 142.82%.

2

       9. Local Passenger Traffic. people are using the railway.

The increase shows that more It also shows that the villages alongside the railway are becoming increasingly popular and fast developing into larger residential areas owing to the shortage of cheap houses in the urban areas.

       10. On April 5th, 1956, the Ching Ming Festival, 61,110 passengers were carried, a figure which surpasses the previous record on the same day in 1955 by 6,295. Most of the passengers went to Sandy Ridge near Lowu and Wo Hop Shek near Fanling to visit the cemeteries. Twenty-two special trains were run in addition to the normal service on that day.

11. The figures for passenger traffic, showing number of journeys and revenue, appear in Appendix VI.

12. Goods Traffic. Goods traffic improved upon that of the previous year by 46,269 tons in weight and $371,924 in revenue, percentage increases being 26.29 and 27.10 respectively.

       13. The increase in foreign goods traffic in the up direction was mainly due to the larger volume of personal effects brought back to China by Overseas Chinese from Indonesia and Malaya.

       14. The development of light industry in China and the exportation of its output was responsible for the increase of the downward foreign goods traffic.

       15. Lighters and junks towed by launches using firewood as fuel are conveying goods at very low cost between Canton and Hong Kong. Transit goods for the mainland stored in the Colony are conveyed to Canton by this cheap means of transport which affects railway goods traffic to some extent. The rates are so low that both sections of the railway are unable to compete with them. Their delivery time is however extremely slow.

       16. The principal commodities imported by rail into the Colony during the period under review are shown below:

Eggs

Newsprinting paper

Potatoes

Cotton piece goods

Fresh vegetables

Beans

Timber

Glass sheets

Cardboard

16,969 metric tons

16,498 11,827 11,530

"

"

""

"

""

10,314

""

"

9,989

9,893

"

99

9,556 5,463

"

99

*

3

Chinese medicine Apples

Iron nails

Caustic soda

Pears

Fresh fruits

Soda

Iron wire

Garlic (dried)

Tiles

Bran

Beer

Pressed wood

Tomatoes

Bean noodle (pressed)

Water melons

4,955 metric tons

4,946 4,322

++

19

29

4,020

,

3,991

15

"

3,829

""

2,877

11

2,152

2,042

""

1,539

""

1,535

"

""

1,526 1,417

""

""

1,148

"

""

1,107

"

1,034

   17. The number of livestock arriving in like manner for the same period is as follows:

Pigs

Goats

Cows

163,539 head

3,687 69

"

""

36

Buffaloes

""

   18. The Chinese section of the railway continues to send cold storage wagons to the British section. During the 12 months, 165 wagons conveying 999 tons of frozen poultry, 918 tons of frozen prawns and shrimps, 816 tons of fresh fruits and vegetables, 213 tons of frozen meat, 85 tons of frozen fish and 41 tons of eggs were received.

   19. In view of the increased volume of goods traffic, goods handling charges collected increased by 40.77% or $184,110 over last year. The total figure was $635,676.

20. Applications from three transportation firms for the conveyance of cattle in two tiers, similar to the method used for conveying pigs from the border to Yaumati Station, in wagons supplied by the Chinese section of the railway were rejected in view of the curvature, the gradient and the speed of goods trains over this line. The cattle in question were conveyed by road but the numbers were not large.

21. In order to continue assistance in the development of agriculture by the improvement of communication between the villages along the line, the railway provided free transport of cement contributed by the Kadoorie Agricultural Aid Associa- tion. A total of 19,120 bags amounting to $4,258.00 in freight

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charges was conveyed free during the year under review, as compared to 16,901 bags, amounting to $3,965.25, last year.

22.

VII.

Details relating to goods traffic are shown in Appendix

      23. Operation. An electric token instrument of Chinese manufacture for the despatch and receipt of trains was installed at Lowu in April 1956 in anticipation of a through train service. This instrument links up with another instrument installed at Shum Chun station across the border in Chinese territory.

       24. In May 1956, a private telephone connexion was also installed at the Headquarters of the two sections, but is not yet being used.

      25. Owing to the absence of platforms adjoining the main line at Hung Hom signal cabin, a token delivery apparatus was built there in July which is a modification of a type used by the Chinese section. It is no longer necessary for an employee to stand close to the running train in order to deliver the token to the engine crew.

26. On 23rd July, 1956, His Excellency the Officer Adminis- tering the Government, Mr. E. B. David, inspected the Depart- ment.

27. A new station was built on a spot about mid-way between Shatin and Taipo. It has been named Ma Liu Shui and was put into operation on 24th September, 1956. It serves Chung Chi College which is built in the valley to the west of the station.

      28. On 10th October, 1956, two days prior to the Chung Yeung Festival, riots broke out in the Sham Shui Po urban area. Soon, Mong Kok, Yaumati and Tsim Sha Tsui areas were also affected as well as at other points further afield. Only a very attenuated train service was run during the riots.

29. On 8th January, 1957, at the request of the Canton Hankow Railway Administration, the standard loading gauge of the line was slightly modified in order to accept wider loads from them.

30. Two diesel electric locomotives supplied by the Clyde Engineering Co. Pty. Ltd. of Sydney, Australia, have been employed almost continuously working the local passenger train

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service during the year.

Train punctuality has shown improve-

ment and is now considered satisfactory.

Trains on time

Trains delayed for less than 5 minutes .. Trains delayed for 5 minutes and over

Total No. of passenger trains run..

No. of scheduled

passenger trains.

Percentage.

5,698

70.19

1,752

21.58

668

8.23

8,118

100.00

   31. In addition the number and types of special trains run during the 12 months were as under: --

Up.

Down.

Total.

Goods (loaded)

5

547

552

Goods (empty)

324

324

Passenger

157

129

286

Military

15

15

30

Shuttle trains

9

9

18

Ballast trains

64

64

128

574

764

1,338

   32. With effect from May 20th, 1956, the train services in the morning were slightly amended. The train leaving Lowu at 7.33 hours and arriving at Kowloon terminus at 8.30 hours was cancelled. This was both a safety and an economy measure arising out of the policy of replacing the austerity steam loco- motives by the new diesel-electric locomotives for all passenger services.

   33. Fares and Rates. There was no revision of fares and rates except for the introduction on March 1st, 1957, of a new series of scholar tickets at $48 per period of 6 months. This ticket allows travel on all scheduled trains and during school holidays. The previous scholars ticket costing $36 and valid only for certain specified trains and only during school terms, continued to be issued.

34. Accidents. Two major accidents happened this year. The first was the boiler explosion on April 27th.

   35. The second occurred at Kowloon station yard on the evening of December 15th, 1956 when a second class coach No. 200 became derailed pushing down a signal gantry which, in falling, damaged the body work of the coach. The approximate cost of repairs amounted to $141,650. There were no casualties.

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      36. A temporary post supporting three important signals was erected on the site to carry these 3 signals on 6th January, 1957, pending complete renewal.

37. The following accidents also occurred during the year: -

38.

Trespassers killed by trains

Trespassers injured by trains.

Passenger killed by train Passengers injured by trains

Army vehicle colliding with level crossing gate Point split by ballast train

Shunting engine colliding with stabling wagons Derailment of coaches while shunting

ACCOUNTS

7

3

1

9

1

1

1

1

The Operating Account for the year under review shows a surplus of $3,995,655.02, which is the highest for the past six years and represents an increase of $1,905,667.79 over the previous year. Operating revenue reached a figure of $7,915,938.79, bettering the previous year's figure by $2,101,073.12, while operating expenditure at $3,920,283.77 was up by $195,405.33 over the same period. Percentage of expenditure to revenue indicates a drop from 64.06 the previous year to 49.52.

39.

Passenger revenue yielded $4,814,770.27, an increase of $1,451,633.81 over the previous year, while revenue from goods traffic also improved from previous year $1,367,563.25 to $1,751,571.55.

       40. It is gratifying that the Profit & Loss Account records once again a net profit, which, amounting to $2,020,015.36 as against $248,458.13 the previous year, brings the total surplus carried forward in the Balance Sheet to $4,422,051.08.

       41. Capital expenditure during the year amounted to $2,601,513.63 which comprised mainly the cost of 19 new carriages and part cost of 3 new diesel-electric locomotives.

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

42. Locomotives. A serious and most distressing accident occurred at about 3.30 p.m. on April 27th when the firebox crown sheet of locomotive No. 22 caved in at the locomotive shed causing an explosion and leakage of steam, which resulted in fatal injuries to six workers.

7

The tragic death of these workers made a speed-up in conver- sion to diesel traction imperative with a view to withdrawing from service all but two or three of these war-time built Austerity 2-8-0 type steam locomotives, which are of poor design and have been a constant source of trouble.

    An order for a further three diesel locomotives was accord- ingly placed with the Clyde Engineering Co., Australia, on 1st June, 1956.

43. Locomotives Nos. 26, 29 and 32 were given a major overhaul and locomotive No. 23 was given a medium repair. Boilers of locomotives No. 26 and No. 29 were completely over- hauled by Taikoo Dock & Engineering Company with tell-tale holes drilled in stays so that broken stays could be discovered. 44. The performance of the two diesel electric locomotives has been highly satisfactory. Statistics show that the availabi- lity of these locomotives was 95.95% for the year under review. This figure could have been much higher had the governor of the "Lady Maurine" not failed. When the governor of this locomotive failed, it was replaced by the new spare governor. However, this spare governor was not in working order due to the driving spindle being broken, probably in transit, necessita- ting the ordering of another one from Australia which took nearly 3 weeks to arrive. Altogether this locomotive was out of service for 23 days. But for this incident, the availability

would have been 99.1%.

   45. The heaviest repair done to the two diesel locomotives during the year was the turning of their wheels at the 100,000 mile period in the latter part of this financial year.

   46. The total mileage performed by each of the two diesel electric locomotives up to the end of the financial year from the time they were put into service on 5th September, 1955 is 123,516 miles for the "Sir Alexander" and 132,777 miles for the "Lady Maurine". There were very few troubles experienced in their operation, and the workshop staff have become increas- ingly proficient in locating and correcting faults.

47. Two straight-through absorption type silencers were designed and installed on each of the diesel electric locomotives in order to reduce exhaust noises, which had caused some public comment. They have given satisfaction.

8

       48. There was little change in the repair cost of diesel locomotives per km. which was $0.159 per loco. kilometre as against $0.157 per loco. kilometre of the previous year.

       49. The repair cost of coal and oil-burning locomotives was abnormally high this year. The considerable increase in repair cost was partly due to an additional expenditure of $180,000 for complete reconstruction of two boilers by Messrs. Taikoo Dock & Engineering Company and partly due to less mileage being operated by these locomotives.

Carriages and Wagons.

50.

In addition to routine mainte- nance, the following items were the more important work done on carriages and wagons:-

(a) Carriage No. 316 was given a major overhaul. Seven carriages Nos. 203, 100, 310, 205, 305, 308 and 319 received a medium repair.

(b) The floor width of two further flat wagons were widened to facilitate the transportation of tanks for Land Forces. (c) Sixteen carriages Nos. 319, 308, 305, 316, 205, 310, 100, 203, 327, 207, 328, 208, 329, 330, 331 and 302, two covered wagons Nos. 45444 and 45474 and one brake van No. 20450 were repainted (The number of carriages repainted amounted to one third of the total passenger rolling stock).

    (d) The roofs of 43 covered wagons were repainted. (e) Carriages Nos. 317 and 106 were rebuilt to second class. carriages by contractors and renumbered 207 and 208 respectively.

(f) A cattle wagon No. 45150 was constructed under special

expenditure for the transportation of horses.

       51. Work Done for Other Government Departments. A great amount of work was done for other departments of Government:-

(a) The manufacture of 500 gallon hot water cylinders; one 1,500 gallon petrol storage tank, pulley sets, gear wheels and pinions; the machining of cast iron branches, bends, cylinders and roller bearings; and the painting of 26 dropside lorries for the Public Works Department. (b) Repair of 125 wheel barrows and 75 pickaxes for the

Resettlement Department.

9

(c) Manufacture of 100 manhole covers, 20 C.I. hatch boxes and various cast iron, aluminium, brass, bronze castings for the Stores Department.

(d) Manufacture of pump shafts, adaptors, rollers, retainers and towing brackets for Land-Rovers for the Fire Brigade.

(e) Building of 2 stores trolleys for the Prisons Department. (f) Repair of sprayers for the Malaria Bureau.

(g) Repair of equipment for the Kowloon and Lai Chi Kok

Hospitals.

(h) Charging of batteries for the Royal Observatory.

Statistics.

52.

            The average diesel fuel consumption for the year under review was 2.68 kgs. per km. as against 2.40 kgs. per km. of the previous year. The slight increase in consump- tion was not unexpected as train loads had increased.

Coal consumption was 18.25 kgs. per train km. as against 15.22 kgs. per train km. of the previous year. Furnace oil consumption was 11.45 kgs. per train km. as against 9.78 kgs. per train km. last year. The increase in coal and furnace oil consumption was due to more train mileage operated by diesel locomotives during the year so that the periods of standing in steam by steam locomotives waiting for duties were increased. The total kilometrage operated by the steam locomotives was 167,757.86 km. as against 286,235.47 km. operated by the diesel electric locomotives.

   Statistical statements relating to analysis of trains and loco- motive kilometrage; coal and fuel oil running expenses, and repairs to locomotives, carriages and wagons will be found at the end of this report as appendices X, XI, XII, XIII and XV.

WAY AND STRUCTURES

   53. Maintenance. Way and Structures were maintained in good order during the year.

54. Track. The main line track was maintained to a good standard. Seven lengths of cracked rails due to defective material were replaced between Mile and Mile 1. Three sets of switch tongues and two crossings were renewed. All the fishplates in the main line were carefully inspected and greased.

10

The renewal of the old tracks at Kowloon Station, which was deferred from 1953 pending a decision as to the removal of the Station to Hung Hom, was commenced in November 1956 after a sufficient number of sleepers had been received. The material used for this work was as follows:----

95 lb. rails

95 lb. switches

95 lb. crossings

Ordinary hardwood sleepers

Crossing sleepers

Stone ballast

386 lengths.

9 sets.

6 sets.

2,598

216

1,540 tons.

      A new siding, 287 ft. effective length, was constructed at Lowu with good old 85 lb. section rails.

The Praya Road and No. 1 Road at Kowloon were re-aligned and the curvature of the track flattened. Road No. 9 at Hung Hom was shifted for the construction of an approach road to the Chatham Road police camp.

Due to excessive rail wear being evident on

                 rail wear being evident on the sharp curves, 8 rail-flange lubricators were ordered through the Crown Agents. Two arrived before the end of the year and were installed at Mile 10.

      Expansion gaps over a distance of mile of the main line. were adjusted with the addition of 950 anchors. The maximum rail creep recorded was only 1 inches.

Some 2,876 hardwood sleepers were renewed during the year. The ballast over one mile of track was cleaned and 383 tons of new ballast were used.

55. Signalling. The work for the installation of new signalling at Ma Liu Shui Station was completed with the exception of the facing point layouts which had not yet arrived from the Crown Agents.

All signal bridges, posts, bracket arms, point indicators and fouling points in all stations were overhauled and painted.

56. Kilometre and Gradient Post. The kilometre and gradient posts along the whole of the main line were repaired and painted.

11

57. Tunnels. All tunnels were inspected and maintained in as good order as funds permitted during the year. A length of 607 linear yards of No. 2 Tunnel (Beacon Hill) was thoroughly cleaned with high pressure jets of a mixture of "Wyandotte" Kreelon C.G. detergent and water and sprayed with inch cement mortar by the "Aerocem" process to combat moisture. 58. Bridges. Major repairs were done to Bridge No. 4 at Waterloo Road, Bridge No. 22 near Taipo and Bridge No. 28 near Cha Hang between Taipo Market and Fanling. Bridges Nos. 10 and 12 near Shatin were overhauled and painted.

The foundation of Bridge No. 11, which was found to be partly scoured, was underpinned with 40 cu. yds. of cement concrete. The cement pointing of the stone arches was also repaired.

The sleepers of Bridges Nos. 12, 24 and 36 were renewed. The longitudinal sleepers on Bridge No. 22 were replaced with cross ties.

59. Cutting and Embankments. There were no landslips during the year. Work on the protection of No. 1 Cutting was carried out with the addition of cement concrete retaining walls. Minor repairs were also done to the existing channels.

Some 2,903 cu. yds. of earth were used for bringing up the levels of the shoulders of the railway embankments.

60. Road Level Crossings. The road crossing at Mile 18 and the Military Crossing at Mile 171 were widened. The crossing at Mile 13 was repaired, and the gates of all the crossings were painted.

Five crossings of the old approach road to Chatham Road police camp were removed. These crossings as well as the old approach road became obsolete with the construction of the new approach road along the side of the police camp.

61. Approach Road and Station Yard. The approach roads to Taipo Market Station, Sheung Shui Station and Blackheads Yard were re-surfaced.

The platforms of Taipo Market Station were re-surfaced.

A concrete footpath leading from the Border bridge to the Immigration Office at Lowu was constructed for the convenience of passengers.

12

1

      62. Station Buildings. Station buildings, including shelters and latrines, at Yaumati and Sheung Shui were repaired and decorated.

       The platform awning of Kowloon Station was completely overhauled and painted.

      63. Staff Quarters. Major repairs were carried out to 'B' Block of staff quarters at Gascoigne Road and the staff quarters at Yaumati Station and Fanling. The staff quarters at Black- heads were overhauled with the addition of heat insulated ceilings to the top floor.

64. Workshop. All the buildings inside the Railway Work- shops at Hung Hom were overhauled and painted.

65. Railway Land. The following areas of Railway Land were under lease for various purposes:

Description.

Area

Annual

Sq. Ft.

Rental

Military Camps, etc.

435,858

2.00

Bible Auditorium (Seventh Day

Adventists)

6,000

8,640.00

Club House and Sports Ground..

126,936

30.00

Boy Scouts Hut

3,735

10.00

Motor Car Garage

17,794

22,538.76

Film Titling Studio

3,000

2,680.02

Storage

31,389

24,669.35

Cultivation and Gardening

1,140,521

3,687.44

Various Other Purposes

117,941

93,103.03

Total

1,883,174

$155,360.60

66.

Advertising Space. Advertising space rented during the year was 8,751 sq. ft. to a total value of $110,784.83.

67. Australian Sleepers. A total of 7,866 Australian sleepers arrived during the year.

STORES

68. All railway stores were completely surveyed by the Annual Board in March, 1957. No discrepancy was found and the Board reported satisfactorily on the survey generally.

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A comparative statement of purchases for the year 1955/56 and 1956/57 is given below:

Coal

Furnace Oil

Light Fuel Diesel Oil

Lubricating Oil Petrol

From Government Stores

From other Government

1955/56.

1956/57.

$ 206,518.55 $ 49,500.00

246,144.07

111,622.83

69,480.00

186,391.64

26,028.33

24,166.16

2,602.00

2,627.00

179,716.76

107,262.16

263.45

11.00

By local purchase

235,594.68

181,738.48

From Crown Agents

3,854,366.32

1,115,042.13

From Australia

1,846,244.54

From Japan

12,394.44

$4,820,714.16

$3,637,000.38

Departments

    69. Coal. The local purchase of coal continued to decrease and the total quantity of coal purchased during the year was 450 tons, a decrease of 1,541.5 tons. The contract price of coal was $110.00 per long ton delivered to Railway bunkers.

70.

      Light Fuel Diesel Oil. There was an abnormal increase in the cost of diesel oil, due to the Suez Canal crisis. This oil which cost $228.00 per ton at the beginning of the financial year has risen to $267.00 per ton and the consumption for the year was 765.06 tons.

71. Furnace Oil. The cost of furnace oil also increased from $139.00 to $177.00 per ton during the year. Purchases for the year were 751.544 tons with a decrease of 1,117.196 tons compared with the previous year.

The decrease in consumption of coal and furnace oil is shown. in Appendices XI and XII.

    72. Local Purchase and Government Stores. No major works were undertaken by the mechanical workshop and as a result local purchase of stores and stores obtained from Govern- ment Stores and other Government Departments decreased by $53,856.20 and $72,707.05 respectively compared with the previous year.

73. Indents. During 1956/57 a total of 54 indents was for- warded to the Crown Agents through the Government Stores Department for materials at an estimated cost of £7,200.

14

       An order for 3 diesel electric locomotives Model G 12 Clyde costing £A.240,000 was placed direct with the Clyde Engineering Co. Pty. Ltd., Australia, on 1st June, 1956. First and second progress claims amounting to £A.144,000 were paid before the end of the financial year.

In addition spare parts for the existing diesel electric loco- motives were ordered direct from Australia.

A trial order of 30 tons of foundry coke was placed in Japan but it was found that the quality of the coke was not very good and it was proposed to revert to ordering from the United Kingdom in future.

       The total revenue realized from the sale of old locomotives, carriages, wagons, serviceable and unserviceable stores was $273,880.85.

74.

STAFF

         The establishment of the Railway as at 31st March, 1957, was as follows: --

115 Pensionable Officers.

467 Non-pensionable Officers

78 Daily Rated Staff

660

This is a reduction of 11 from the previous year.

A total of nine officers retired during the year after serving the Railway for periods ranging from 6 to 30 years.

Transfer of certain categories of daily rated staff to monthly rates of pay as they became eligible continued, a total of 23 such transfers taking place during the year.

       The staff English language evening classes, which were formed in 1954 in order to provide the junior staff with an opportunity to improve their English, continued to function satisfactorily throughout the year 1956/57 with a total enrolment of 37, viz:

  Elementary standard Intermediate standard

20 students

17 students

The staff in general are to be congratulated on the high standard of efficiency displayed during the year.

15

URBAN COUNCIL PUBLIC LIBRARIES

STAFF WELFARE

75. The earned leave granted to officers during the year amounted to:

1,554 days vacation leave

6,323

for a total staff of 660.

days casual leave

Total sick leave for the year for all kinds of sickness on full and half pay amounted to 2,773 days and a further 441 days no-pay leave was also approved. Maternity leave totalling 148. days was also granted.

The Railway Club had repaid up to 31st March, 1957 a total of $21,290.50 to Government on the loan of $43,000. Owing to the kind assistance of Government in easing the burden of the Club by allowing repayments of the loan to be made at half the previous monthly rate from July, 1956 the financial situation of the Club has improved slightly.

76. Film Shows. Film shows were run at the expense of the Railway Club once a week throughout the year for members and their families. These shows were always well attended.

77.

      Sport. During the year the Club entered a team in each of the miniature football competitions organized by the Hong Kong Chinese Civil Servants Association and the Kowloon Miniature Football Association. The Club were the runners-up

in the Hong Kong Chinese Civil Servants Association Competi- tion.

   78. Education. The Railway Club School continues to func- tion with marked success and its classes were extended to Primary 5 as from September 1956. It is intended to add, in the very near future, a special class for children of standard below Primary 1, and further to extend the classes to Primary 6 in September 1957.

The major activities of the School during 1956/57 were as follows:-

(a) Parents' Day Party. In addition to the routine school functions such as a sports meeting, school open day, prize-giving, etc., a dinner party for all the parents was held on 9th January, 1957 for the purpose of fostering greater co-operation and mutual understanding between the school management and the parents. Included in

16

the programme for the occasion was an open discussion at which information and suggestions were exchanged concerning the students' progress in studies and behaviour at home and in school. This party was a complete suc-

cess and will be repeated.

(b) Wolf Cub Pack. A wolf Cub Pack was established in October 1956 to instil the scouting spirit among the children. Initial progress was somewhat retarded owing to the fact that a great many, though anxious to join the Pack, cannot afford the little extra expense involved. It is hoped, however, that voluntary contributions will be secured to overcome these difficulties.

(c) Projects. A vegetable and flower garden was planned to cultivate the students' interest in nature studies and respect for manual labour. They thoroughly enjoyed themselves in this project. Their pride and satisfaction when they shared the fruits of their labour among relatives and friends was delightful to witness.

                                  An open air concrete aquarium measuring 6 ft. X 15 ft. X 2 ft. deep was constructed in the garden by the students and teachers of the School. The students themselves eagerly supplied and fed the many gold fish, now breeding con- tentedly in the pond.

79. Canteen Facilities. The Club's canteen continues to operate and although it was not as fully patronized by members as expected the cheap meals provided were welcomed by the lower-paid staff members.

       80. Other Social Activities. As a wind-up to the prize giving ceremony a childrens' party was held on 1st January, 1957 attended by some 400 children of staff members as well as the students of the school which consist of a proportion who are not from railway workers' families. A most entertaining programme of short plays performed by students was provided as well as conjuring acts and sword play. Eatables and soft drinks were donated through the kindness of local firms.

I. B. TREVOR, General Manager, Railway.

18th June, 1957.

17

18

Head No.

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS

Appendix I

List of Heads

1954/55

1955/56

1956/57

Percentage of Railway Operating Expenditure to Railway

1.

Route Kilometrage-Operated..

2.

Gross Railway Receipts........

3.

Railway Operating Revenue..

4.

Railway Operating Expenditure..

5.

Nett Operating Revenue...

6.

Operating Revenue

7.

Capital Investment

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

Goods Receipts

15.

16.

Tons of Goods Hauled

17.

18.

Percentage of Nett Operating Revenue to Capital Investment Railway Operating Revenue per Route Kilometre Operated Railway Operating Expenditure per Route Kilometre Operated Passenger Receipts

Percentage of Passenger Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts.. Number of Passenger Journeys

Percentage of Goods Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts

Revenue from Other Sources

Rentals

Incidentals.

Central Mechanical Workshop Services

Advertising.

Sale of Surplus & Condemned Stores

1954/55 1955/56 1956/57 $182,187 $202,852 $267,381 $ 6,989 $ 7,260 $9,176

$ 23,333 $ 74,082 $ 24,255 99,503 $100,245 $110,838

$ 87,961 $ 90,232 $273,881

Percentage of Revenue from Other Sources to Gross Railway Receipts

36

36

36

$ 4,832,466 $ 5,905,097 $ 8,189,820 $ 4,744,505 $ 5,814,866 $ 7,915,939 $ 3,724,879 $ 3,920,284 $ 2,089,987 $ 3,995,655

$ 3,829,248

915,257

80.71

$42,644,477

2.15

64.06

$46,428,093

4.50

49.52

$49,029,607

8.15

131,792 $ 161,524 $ 219,887

$ 106,368 $ 103,469 $ 3,181,756

65.84

3,867,509)

$ 1,250,737

25.88

128,753

$ 3,609,837

61.13

3,988,244

$ 1,820,589

30.83

175,997

$ 108,897

$ 5,117,041

62.48

5,083,873

$ 2,387,248

29.15

222,266

399,973 $ 474,671 $ 685,531

8.28

8.04

8.37

19

At the

beginning of

the year 1.4.1956

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

During the year

New Lines

& Exten-

Additions &

Betterments

sions

Property Abandoned

Appendix II

Nett Capital Expenditure

At the end of the year 31.3.1957

Part 1 Construction Accounts

C- 1 General Expenditure..

C- 2 Preliminary Expenditure C- 3 Land

C- 4 Formation..

770,814.12

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

2,742,709.38

C- 5 Tunnels

3,599,937.42

C- 6 Bridgework...

1,355,119.06

64,975.13

C- 7 Line Protection..

90,074.47

C- 8 Telegraph & Telephones C- 9 Track

10,000.00

6,203,945.83

243,579.66

C-10 Signals & Switches..

257,156.75

144,557.09

C-11 Stations & Buildings C-12 Central Mechanical Works

C-14 Plant...

C-15 Rolling Stock..

C-17 Docks, Harbour & Wharves..

Total Cost

2,526,647.49

568,220.69 2,083,757.98

20,863,797.03

65,171.06

46,428,093.34

(A) Book value of 1 hollow square chisel & bits = $97.27 (B) Book value of 2 locomotives sold by public tender $117,204.53 Book value of 4 carriages Nos. 103, 104, 306 and 311 sold by public tender

180,990.16

Book value of 12 wagons Nos. 30101, 30107, 30402, 30406, 30407, 30408, 30409, 30412, 30413, 30423, 30424 and 30426

85,398.76

Book value of motor car No. 8301 transferred to

C.E.M.E. as scrap

9,800.00

$393,393.45

770,814.12

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

2,742,709.38

3,599,937.42

64,975.13

1,420,094.19

90,074.47

10,000.00

243,579.66

6,447,525.49

257,156.75

144,557.09

2,671,204.58

568,220.69

97.27

-97.27

2,083,660.71

2,148,499.02

23,012,296.05

65,171.06

393,490.72

2,601,513.63

49,029,606.97

(A) 2,541,892.47 | (B) 393,393.45

|(C)2,995,004.35

(C) Special Expenditure 1956/57..

Less portion of Special Expenditure charged to Operating Expenditure not due for inclusion in Capital Account...

$3,246,124.96

$ 251,120.61

$2,995,004.35

20

Percentage on Expenditure

total Operating

Previous Year

OPERATING ACCOUNT

Current Year

Previous Year

Operating

Amount

Expenses

Amount

Percentage on

total Operating Expenditure

Percentage on total Operating Revenue

Amount

Operating

Revenue

Appendix III

Current Year

Amount

Percentage on

total Operating

Revenue

*

$

$

$

Main Line

E-1 General

317,372.64

Expenses

313,024.78

$

Local Services

R-1 Passenger Service,

$

%

Administra-

57.84 3,363,136.46

.20

19.34

8.32 309,816.25 7,556.39

tion.

Special

310,337.21

2,687.57

7.92

.071

Passenger... 4,814,770.27

R-2 Passenger

Service,

60.82

E-2 Traffic

4.24 246,700.85

Other..

302,270.45

3.82

720,267.07

Expenses.

E-3 Running

851,790.52

Expenses

718,409.00 18.33

1,017,569.63

R-3 Goods

Service,

18.14

675,825.57

Locomotives

824,723.39

21.04

Carriages &

22.83 1,327,207.05

.69 40,356.20

Goods

1,700,957.35

21.49

Terminal

Charge

50,614.20

.64

.64

23,770.73

Wagons

26,125.38

.67

R-4 Goods

Motor

.36

13,433.16

Vehicles..

13,698,79

3.72

138,761.06

Traffic

153,022.07

.35 7.79

3.90

453,025.69

Service,

Other..

635,676.17

8.03

R-5 Central

E-4 Main, of

Mechanical

Equipment

Workshop

28.70

1,069,005.19

Locomotive Department.

1.27

1,054,818.40 26.91 3.49

74,082,18

202,852.41

Services

R-6 Rents

24,255.42

267,380.69

.30

3.38

E-5 Maintenance

R-7 Incidental

of Way &

766,443.02

Structures..

816,461,96

.13

1.72

7,259.70

Revenue

9,175.87

.12

100,245.13 5,814,865.67 R-8 Advertising

110,838.377,915,938.79

1.40

Engineering

20.45 761,711.84

.13

4,731.18

Department.

Other

Departments..

812,391.96

20.71

4,070.00

.10

100.00

3,724,878.44

Total Operating Expenditure Balances, Profit

3,920,283.77 100.00 100.00

5,814,865.67

Total Operating Revenue

7,915,938.79 100.00

2,089,987.23

on Operating......

3,995,655.02 |

5,814,865.67|

7,915,938.79

5,814,865.67

(1) Operating Expenditure..

(2) Portion of Special Expenditure chargeable to Revenue

(3) Services rendered by Government

(4) Pensions & Gratuities...

(5) Staff Passage

$3,470,231.47 251,120.61

2,877.74

196,053.95

$3,920,283.77

(1) Nett Revenue*

(2) Government Transportation (a) Passenger

(b) Goods....

(3) Government Rental

7,915,938.79

$7,529,872,54

380,611.60

5,262.65

192.00

$7,915,938.79

127

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

Previous Year

$2,089,987.23

89,840.06

1,816,66

$2,181,643.95

$4,060,485.08 $2,181,643.95

By Balance, Nett Operating Revenue. By Sale of Capital Assets, Surplus Stores and Scraps By Profit on Stores

Total

Balance

Appendix IV

Cr..

Current Year

$3,995,655.02

64,712.58

117.48

$4,060,485.08

$4,060,485.08

Dr.

Previous Year

$ 657,003.45 To Interest on Government Investment (A) 776,000.00 To Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan (B)

500,000.00

To Depreciation Reserves 182.37 To Losses on Stores....

$1,933,185.82 248,458.13

$2,181,643.95

Total

Balance

(A) Interest on Rehabilitation Loan up to 1953/54.

Current Year

$ 763,316.22

776,000.00

500,000,00

1,153.50

$2,040,469.72

2,020,015.36

Dr.

Less Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan up to 1955/56..

$14,775,402.10 6,208,000.00

$ 8,567,402.10 @ 3% $13,241,632.82 @3%

99/859.07

,457.15

}$763,316.22

Interest on Special Expenditure up to 1955/56

1939-55

1955-56..............

Less Amortization in 1952/53

$14,428,125.06

3,813,507.76

$18,241,632.82

5,000,000.00 $13,241,632.82

(B) Ninth instalment of the K.C.R. repayment over twenty five years of Rehabilitation Loan $19,400,000.00* * Actual amount spent on Loan Funds $14,775,402.10.

SURPLUS APPROPRIATION ACCOUNT

Previous Year

To Deficit for the year.

IBR

Current Year

Previous Year

$ 248,458.13

$2,402,035.72

$2,402,035.72 Surplus carried forward to Balance Sheet..

Total

$4,422,051.08

By Surplus for the Year..

$2,153,577.59 By Surplus from Previous Year $2,402,035.72

Total

$4,422,051.08

$2,402,035.72

Cr.

Current Year

$2,020,015.36

$2,402,035.72

$4,422,051.08

$4,422,051.08

Assets or Debit Balance'

GENERAL BALANCE SHEET

Liabilities or Credit Balance

Balance at

beginning of

Heads of Classification

year

$

B-6 Investment

Assets :-

Appendix V

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

Balance at

beginning of

year

Heads of Classification

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

$

$

$

$

$

$

B-1 Capital Liabilities:-

B-6-1 Cost of Road

46,428,093.34 & Equipment.

49,029,606,97

2,601,513.63

46,428,093.34

Total Investment Assets

49,029,606.97 2,601,513.63

11,208,000.00

35,616,301.46

B-1-1 Railway

Investment... B-1-3 Permanent Government Investment.

11,984,000.00 776,000.00

B-7 Working Assets :-

46,824,301.46

38,086,426.42 2,470,124.96

Total Capital Liabilities.

50,070,426.42

3,246,124,96

81,779.45 B-7-1-1 Cash..

60,387.70

21,391.75

B-7-4-3 Advance

169,099.18 Account

743,907.05 B-7-5 Stores

531,431.34

730,968.20

362,332,16

B-2 Working

· 12,938.85

Liabilities |--

22

223

B-7-5-1 Workshop

1,462.74

Suspense

56.13

1,406.61

B-2-2 Traffic

996,248.42

Total Working Assets

31,261.62

Balance (Foreign Railway)

31,261.62

1,322,843.37

362,332.16

35,737.21

B-8 Deferred Debit Items :-

31,261.62

Total Working Liabilities...

31,261.62

B-8-1 Temporary

4,930,846.95

4,930,846.95

Advances to Government.

B-3 Deferred Credit Items :-

7,604,814.20 2,673,967.25

7,604,814.20 2,673,967.25

3,086,243.75

B-3-3 Depreciation Reserves....

3,401,921.30

315,677,55

11,346,16

3,097,589.91

B-3-5 Miscellaneous Deferred Credits....

31,604.12

3,433,525.42

20,257.96

335,935.51

B-9 Balance of Accumulated

Deficit

B-4 Appropriation

52,355,188.71

57,957,264.54

5,637,813.04

35,737.21

2,402,035.72

52,355,188.71

from Surplus

4,422,051.08 2,020,015,36

57,957,264.54 5,602,075.83

ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER SERVICE Part I-Passenger Service (R-1 Passenger)

Appendix VI

Previous Year

Current Year (April, 1956

March, 1957)

Number of

Percentage of

Pas-

Origina-

Number

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

ting

Home

of Units

Carried

Passengers Kilometres

Revenue

Number senger | Reve- Carried Kilo-

nue

metres

Line

23

Ordinary :-

135,627.05

First

94,363

94,363

2,003,326

279,611.95

Second

2,133,431.11

Third..

295,223 295,223 6,267,584 3,281,518 3,281,518 72,319,282

201,760.30 443,307.25 5.81 3,195,989.72 64.54

1.85 1.84

3.94

5.76 8.66 66.48 62.46

Government :-

8,214.25

37,548.85

56,325.45

First

4,411

4,411

93,645

Second

31,747

31,747

673,989

Third

77,969

77,969

1,655,282

9,865.60 .09 54,313.60 .63 87,529.95

.09

.19

.62 1.06

1.53 1.52

1.71

Excursion:--

58,637.65

First

40,080

40,080

1,050,072

57,985.65

.79

.97

1.13

155,462.35

Second

109,201

109,201

2,860,080

132,880.65

2.15

2.63

2.60

23,231.75

Third.

20,091

20,091

526,145

16,697.60

.40

.48

.33

26,235.60

Platform Tickets.

126,250

126,250

63,125.00 2.48

1.23

24,944.95

Excess Fares

30,798.15

.60

Season & Monthly Tickets :-

9,654.00

First

13,120

13,120

278,538

13,110.00

.26

.26 .26

70,263.40

Second

99,360

99,360

2,109,413

80,833.75 1.95

1.94 1.58

192,388.60

Third..

449,560

449,560

9,544,159

231,594.90

137,074.25

Scholar Tickets..

436,000

436,000

9,239,900

12,155.40

Golfing Tickets

4,980

4,980

159,360

179,701.35 13,522,50 .10. .15

8.84 8.58 8.49 3.51

8.77 4.53

(A)3,360,806.61

Total-Part I....

5,083,873

5,083,873

108,780,775

.26

(B)4,813,015.97 100.00 100.00 94.05

(A) Home Line

$3,165,191.41

(B)

Home Line

$4,547,224.72

Foreign

Government..

Foreign

195,615.20

Government.

$3,360,806.61

265,791,25

$4,813,015.97

24

Previous Year

ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER SERVICE Part II-Passenger Service (R-2 Other)

Appendix VI - (Contd.)

Current Year

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

Revenue

Percentage of

Revenue

Baggage & Specie:-

4,892.60

Public

11,414.15

.23

Government.

Parcels :-

1,500.90

Public

1,897.75

.04

Railway Service..

Carriage & Animals :-

238,240.30

Public

287,917.55

5.63

Special Train :-

Public

Government.

Postal:-

1,695.50

Miscellaneous

2,253.00

.05

(C) 246,329.30

Total Part II.

(D) 303,482.45

5.95

3,607,135.91

-

Total Parts I & II .

100.00

(C) Home Line

Foreign

Government.

5,116,498.42

$134,645.90

111,683.40

$246,329.30

(D) Home Line Foreign Government.

$188,662.10

114,820.35

$303,482.45

25

15

Previous Year

Revenue

ANALYSIS OF GOODS SERVICE

Part I-Goods Service (R-3 Goods)

Kinds of Goods

Appendix VII

Current Year (April, 1956.

March, 1957)

Percentage of

Kilo-

Kilo-

Number of Kilograms Carried

Kilogram

Kilometres

Revenue

gram Reve-

grams

Carried

Kilo-

nue

metres

General Merchandise

1,105,465.10

(Inward

200,147,850|7,086,343,420|

Invoiced to and from Lowu

90,946.10

Outward 13,772,400

494,878,230

1,387,009.10 90.05 90.51 58.27 147,410.15 6.20 6.32 6.19

28,514.85

Invoiced to and from

147,717.20

Stations other than Lowu

Inward

Outward

615,860

7,729,890

15,753,990

232,498,860

27,383.75 .28 .20 1.15 182,763.55 3.47 2.97 7.68

(A) 1,372,643.25

Total Part I..

222,266,000 7,829,474,500 (B)1,744,566.55 100.00 100.00 73.29

(A) Home Line

$1,367,186.60

Foreign

Government.

5,456.65

(B) Home Line Foreign

Government.

$1,739,303.90

$1,372,643.25

5,262.65

$1,744,566.55

Part II-Goods Service (R-4 Other)

1,460.00 Shunting

451,565.69

Handling Receipts

Demurrage

453,025.69

Total Part II.

1,825,668.94

Total

Parts I & II...

635,676.17

26.71

635,676.17

26.71

2,380,242.72

100.00

26

Previous

Year

SUMMARY OF LOCAL AND NON-LOCAL PASSENGER TRAFFIC

Appendix VIII

Current Year

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Percentage of

Pas-

Inward

Number of

Revenue

Passenger Traffic

or

Passenger

Passenger Kilometres

Revenue

Outward

Carried

Number senger] Reve- Carried Kilo- nue metres

Passenger Service

315,816.80

Inward

628,350

19,153,381

918,498.95 12.36 17.61 19.08

Bookings to and from Lowu

412,094.70

Outward

605,462

19,470,167 910,190.10 11.91 17.90 18.91

1,258,679.71

Bookings to and from Stations other than Lowu

Inward

1,841,358

36.22 34,401,340 | 1,423,155.36

31.62

29.57

1,374,215.40

Outward

2,008,703

35,755,887 1,561,171.56 39.51 32.87 32.44

3,360,806.61

Total.

5,083,873 108,780,775 4,813,015.97 100.00 100.00 100.00

Appendix IX

TABULAR SUMMARY OF UNALLOCATED STORES

Stock on hand as at 1st April, 1956

Add

Purchases, Returns & Charges

715,043.90

274,364.15

989,408.05

Deduct

Issues to Votes & Services as credited to Expenditure

Sub-head........

283,681.59

705,726.46

Deduct

-

Proceeds of sale of stores as credited to Revenue

579.95

705,146.51

Deduct

Losses and Deficiencies written off

765.10

704,381.41

Deduct

Adjustment for stores received in 1955/56, but paid for

1956/57

473.58

703,907.83

Add

Adjustment for stores received in 1956/57, but paid for

1955/56

10,669.58

714,577.41

Deduct

Adjustment for stores received in 1957/58, but paid for

1956/57

5,202.20

709,375.21

Add

Adjustment for stores received in 1956/57, but paid for

1957/58

16.46

709,391.67

Add

Value of stores overpriced.

117.48

709,509.15

Deduct

Value of stores underpriced

Deduct

Unaccountable difference...

Stock on hand as at 31st March, 1957...

27

138.69

709,370.46

2.26

$709,368.20

28

ANALYSIS OF TRAIN & LOCOMOTIVE KILOMETRAGE

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Appendix X

Oil Engine Kilometrage

Coal Engine Kilometrage

Diesel Electric Kilometrage

Total Kilometrage

Rail-Bus

Kilometrage

Classification

1955/56 1956/57

1955/56 1956/57

1955/56 1956/57

1955/56 1956/57

1955/56 1956/57

Passenger

152,521.95 18,307.45

66,161.15

8,726.33 | 123,745.43 | 284,827.59 | 342,428.53 311,861.37

2,904.00

207.00

Mixed Slow

Train

Kilo-

Goods

27,554.60 34,673.21

3,695.00 19,838.56 1,603.38

270.33 32,852.98 54,782.10

metrage

Military

Special

668.67

938.66 1,421.31

116.83

2,089.98 1,055.49

Ballast Train

6,903.81 5,301.48

4,100.36

1,883,00

74.82

11,078.99 7,184.48

824.00

661.00

Total Train

Kilometrage

187,649.03

59,220.80 75,377.82

30,564.72 125,423.63 285,097.92 388,450.48 374,883.44 3,728.00

868.00

Locomotive.

199,164.03 62,485.80 79,865.32

32,329,39 | 125,423,63 | 285,097.92 | 404,452.98 | 379,913.11

Loco.

Kilo-

metrage

Light Engine

Shunting

Engine..

9,049,16 11,773.00 2,984.32

6,419.67

803.69 1,137.55

12,837.17 19,330.22

11,590.00 11,025.00 43,310.00

43,725.00

54,900.00 54,750.00

Total Loco.

Kilometrage

219,803.19

85,283.80 126,159.64 82,474.06 126,227.32 | 286,235.47 472,190.15 453,993,33

Appendix XI

COST FOR RUNNING COAL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Previous Year 1955/56

Current Year 1956/57

$126,318.01

1. Total cost of coal for main line running...

$65,293.79

111.88

2. Average cost per ton

118.93

1.68

3. Cost per train kilometre

2.14

1,129.05

4. Total weight of coal for main line

running (ton).........

549.00

15.22

5. Weight per train km. in kg.......

18.25

598.65

6. Total weight of coal for shunting (ton)...

605.10

14.04

7. Weight per shunting km. in kg.

14.06

Appendix XII

COST FOR RUNNING FURNACE OIL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Previous Year 1955/56

Current Year 1956/57

1. Total cost of furnace oil for main line

$237,06 9.86

running

$98,837.21

131.29

2. Average cost per ton...

148.10

1.26

3. Cost per train kilometre

1.67

1,805.75

4. Total weight of furnace oil for main

line running (ton)...........

667.35

9.78

5. Weight per train km. in kg..

11.45

126.85

6. Total weight of furnace oil for shunting (ton)....

112.75

11.12

7. Weight per shunting km. in kg.

10.39

29

Appendix XIII

COST FOR RUNNING DIESEL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Previous Year

1955/56

Current Year 1956/57

$64,884.32 1. Total cost of diesel oil...

$183,437.28

217.38

2. Average cost per ton.

242.80

0.51

3. Cost per engine kilometre..

0.64

298.489

4. Total weight of diesel oil (ton)....

755.517

2.40

5. Weight per engine km. in kg.

2.68

Appendix XIV

CONSUMPTION OF LUBRICANTS FOR LOCOMOTIVES

Previous Year

1955/56

(April, 1956- March, 1957)

Current Year 1956/57

2,265.125 1. Total weight of engine oil (gals.).

0.778 2. Weight per 100 engine km. in gals.

864.75 3. Total weight of S.H. cylinder oil (gals.)

0.297 4. Weight per 100 engine km. in gals.

1,016.75

0.90

465.125

0.412

791.00

5. Total weight of crank case oil (gals.)

2,330,50

0.627 6. Weight per 100 engine km. in gals..

0.814

30

31

Previous Year

1955/56

$

COST ASSIGNMENT AND STATISTICS (April, 1956-March, 1957)

Appendix XV

Current Year

1956/57

$

16,924.77

1. Average cost of repair per loco. per annum.

19,594.78

0.56

2. Average cost of furnace oil burning loco. repairs per engine km. (labour and material only)

2.436

0.68

3. Average cost of coal burning loco, repairs per engine km. (labour and material only)

2.312

0.157

4. Average cost of diesel electric loco. repairs per engine km. (labour and material only)

0.159

9,069.54

5. Average cost of repairs per passenger car per annum

7,682.19

151.26

6. Average cost of repairs per goods wagon per annum

313.36

0.0279

7. Average cost of engine oil per engine km. for steam locomotives

0.0315

0.0122

8. Average cost of S.H. cylinder oil per engine km. for steam locomotives

0.0159

3.73

9. Average cost of lubricants for steam loco. per gal.

3.61

0.0263

10. Average cost of crank case oil per engine km. for diesel electric locomotives.

0.0403

4.19

11. Average cost of crank case oil for diesel electric loco, per gal.

4.95

32

32

Engine Number

Engine

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK - MOTIVE POWER

(April, 1956 - March, 1957)

Appendix XVI

Main Generator

Approximate Weight (Fully Loaded)

Number of Drivers

Fuel Oil

Lubricating Oil Cooling Water

Sand

Sir Alexander (51) General Motors

G12-1125 H.P. |D15 71

8 770 138 170

tons

I.G. I.G. I.G.

Lady Maurine (52)

12-567C.

Diesel Electric Locomotives

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

Bogie Centres

Driving Wheel Diameter

Bogie Rigid Wheel Base

Length over Head Stocks

Height over Rail Level

Width over Handrails

Gear Ratio

12 cub. 26'6" 40" 8′0′′ 44′6′′ 12′2′′ | 9′2′′ 63/14 |

feet

M.P.H. 62

18 19 20 21

Maximum Permissible Speed

Total Stock at the Beginning of the year

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

Total Stock at the end of the year

Average Age of Class

N

N

2223

Maximum Tractive Effort-25% adhesion

20

months

36,000 28,000

Continuous Tractive Effort

23

24

33

1

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK-MOTIVE POWER

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

Steam Locomotives

Appendix XVII

2

3

4

5

Engine No.

Distribution

Wheel

Diameter of

Cylinder

Stroke

Driving Wheel

Diameter of

6

Tank or Tender

1

1(A)

|

Gross Weight

of Engine and

Tender in tons

in working order

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Additions during

the year

during the year

Reductions

Total stock at

the end of the year

Average Age of Class

Each Eng.

(ton)

Maximum Axle Load

(ton)

Weight on

Driving Wheel

Tractive Effort

at 85% Boiler

Pressure

~

8

a

10

11

12

13

14

15

3 4-6-4 22"

28* 61% Side Tank

106.00

2-6-4

19" 26* 611⁄2"

90.35

1

1 & 2 2-6-0 17%1⁄2′′ 24"

42"

Saddle,,

53.25

2

21-32 2-8-0 19′′

28"

562*

Tender,,

125.75

12

RB-1 Railbus

6 Cyl. Bedford 3-5/16" 33⁄4".

31*

RB-2 Railbus

6 Cyl. Dodge

31⁄4* 4%* 31*

16

Petrol Railcars

LIBRARIES

I

NOTE: (A) Sold by auction.

60

20

33714

1(A)

51

17

23350

2

16

46.05 15.35 26775

12

13 61.25 15.31 34215

2

14

RAC & SAE Rating

1

21

26.33 H.P. 55 Passengers

SAE 25.35 H.P.

1

11

55 Passengers

2

34

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK -- CARRIAGE

(April, 1956 - March, 1957)

Classification

Appendix XVIII

Ton Cwt.

First Class Carriage.

38

48

First Class Carriage.

33

11

52

First Class Carriage..

35

54

First Class Carriage..

47

13

64

1122

1

48

1

52

2

108

2

128

First Class Compartment Carriage

49

64

3

192

First & Second Composite Carriage

30

45

1(A)

First & Second Composite Carriage

30

52

1

1(A)

First & Second Composite Carriage

33

11

56

1

1 (B)

Second Class Carriage.

35

64

4

3 (C)

448

Second Class Carriage.

45

5

78

2

2

156

Third Class Carriage

33

19

128

16

3 (D)

13

1,664

Third Class Carriage

44

13

120

11

11

1,320

Third Class & Brake Composite Carriage

32

Third Class & Brake Composite Carriage

45

245

18

58

5

1 (B)

232

18

67

3

201

53

7

49

4,549

Converted to 2nd class carriage.

NOTE: (A).

3000

Sold by auction.

(B).

(C)

(D).

Converted from (B) and part of (D).

2 sold by auction and I converted to 2nd class carriage.

35

Classification

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK GOODS WAGONS

1

2

·

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

3

5

Appendix XIX

6

7

8

9

Overall

Length of

Wagon

Average Tare of

each Class

Carrying Capacity

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Additions during the

year

Reductions during the

year

Total Stock at the end of the year

Capacity

Total Carrying

Ton Cwt.|

Ton

Tank, oil (10,000 gals. of Water)...

Flat 30 ton

Flat 40 ton

Flat 45% metric ton

41′

1′′

21

19

442

7

Ton

311/2

35' 0'

12

30

4

2 (A)

2

60

37'10'

14

6

40

200

45' 0"

17

12

45

10

10

450

Flat 80 ton

32' 0"

27

13

80

2

2

160

Low sided open 460 metric ton

45' 0*

18

12

..

4520

10

10

453%2

High sided open 45% metric ton....

45′ 0′′

19

12

445

25

25

1,110

Covered 30 ton

35'0*

15

7

30

19 (B)

9 (A)

10

300

Covered (cattle truck) 30 ton

35' 0"

15

7

30

3

1 (A)

2

60

Covered 40 ton

37'10"

18

14

40

1

1

40

Covered 44% metric ton..

40'0"

20

0

44

130 (D)|

130

5,720

Well 50 ton

32′ 0*

25

12

50

1

Cattle Wagon..

45' 0"

44

5

Brake Van 10% metric ton...

35' 0'

19

10

155

50

220

50

227

NOTE: (A) Sold by auction.

(B) 5 converted to temporary 3rd class passenger cars. (D) 3 converted to mail wagons and 4 to Army ration wagons.

12

215

9,185

Appendix XX

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK - SERVICE EQUIPMENT

(April, 1956-March, 1957)

1

Classification

Average Tare

of each class

N

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Additions

during the year

5

6

Reductions during the year

Total Stock at the end of

the year

Ton

Cwt.

65 ton Break-down Crane........

87

1

1

10 ton Locomotive Crane

1

1

RT-2 Motor Trolley

2

1

1

RT-3 Motor Trolley

1

1

36

4

800,000

[700,000

600,000

500,000

APPENDIX XXI

(DIESELINE, COAL AND FURNACE FUEL) FUEL CONSUMPTION COSTS 1956/57

香港公

HONG F

400,000

300,000

347,568

$200,000

:100,000

0

1

COST OF DIESELINE FUEL USED. COAL AND FURNACE FUEL USED.

241,069

ACTUAL EXPENDITURE ON FUEL DURING THE YEAR.

784,980

COST INCURRED IF COAL ALONE HAD BEEN USED.

654,493

RIES

COST INCURRED IF FURNACE FUEL ALONE HAD BEEN USED.

NU

Out

In

STATEMENT OF LOWU PASSENGERS (In and Out)

1951/52

1952/53 1953/54 1954/55 1955/56

1956/57

APPENDIX XXII!

Thousand Passengers

- 1,800

- 1,600

- 1,400

- 1,200

- 1,000

800

600

400

200

16.77%

25.20%

Expenses

Running

APPENDIX XXIII

K. C. R. STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 1956/57

Operating Expenditure

($3,920,283.77) -

25.23%

Traffic

Expenses

Maintenance

of Equipment

General

Expenses

Pensions &

Gratuities

Maintenance

of Way &

Structures

20.08%

7.37%

5.00%

0.35% Motor Vehicle Running Expenses

60.86%

Passenger

Operating Revenue ($7,908,167.11)

CO

3.38%

Rents

3.84%

Goods

8.04%

Excess Luggage, C. & A., Parcel & Mail

22.06%

Handling Charges, Shunting &

Demurrage Charges

0.30% Central Mechanical Workshop Services

1.40% Advertising

0.12% Incidental Revenue