九廣鐵路年報 Kowloon Canton Railway Annual Departmental Report 1955-1956

General Manager,

Railway

Mon

DROIC

mong Kong

Price: $3

公共食

CATION DEPART

HONG

KONG.

香港公共圖

HONG KONG

PUBLIC

書館

LIBRARIES

HONG KONG

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORT

BY THE

GENERAL MANAGER, RAILWAY

 

FOR THE

FINANCIAL YEAR 1955-56

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY W. F. C. JENNER,

AT THE GOVERNMENT PRESS,

JAVA ROAD, HONG KONG.

GOVERNMENT PRINTER,

S

GENERAL SURVEY

TRAFFIC

ACCOUNTS

CONTENTS

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

WAY & STRUCTURES

STORES

STAFF

STAFF WELFARE

APPENDICES

共圖

Paragraphs

1 - 6

Note: H.K.$16.00

=

£1:0:0 sterling.

7 26

27

-

32

33

-

42

43

61

62 - 69

70

71

I-XXII

GENERAL SURVEY

         1. It is pleasant to be able to report that the hope recorded in last year's report, that the use of Diesel Electric Locomotives would result in further economies has been realized, although the units have only been in operation for 7 months.

The results are reflected in the accounts where the Profit and Loss Statement shows a profit instead of a deficit for the first time since the year ending March 31st, 1951.

The surplus of operating revenue over expenditure is also the highest for the last five years at $2,089,987.23 while the figure for operating expenditure is also the lowest for the same period at $3,724,878.44.

         2. The Railway suffered a set-back on November 12th, 1955 through a collision at a level crossing at Mile 171 between a "Comet" tank and a local passenger train. The crossing is a private military one and the tank commander failed to prevent the tank from crossing in face of the oncoming train. A rail- way guard was killed, a new diesel locomotive damaged and derailed, a 40 ton steel wagon telescoped and two coaches, a first class and a 3rd class and brake-van suffered damage, both of which needed complete re-building. The locomotive was out of commission for two months but fortunately it proved possible to fly many urgent replacements up from Australia so cutting down the period under repair. One complete new locomotive bogie was called for. The tank had to be written off.

         3. The movement of passengers to and from the Colony varied considerably during the year. The announcement of various Exhibitions to be held in Canton during the latter part of the year together with the approach of the Chinese New Year and Ching Ming Festivals was responsible for an increase in travel.

1

4. Negotiations for a through passenger train service between the two Sections of the Line commenced with a request in writing by the Chinese in November, 1955. Various meet- ings have been held on Chinese and British territory and at the close of the year negotiations were still proceeding.

    5. Live pigs, the entry of which ceased in October, 1954 commenced to enter the Colony again by train on 1st July, 1955. The total imported by the end of the year was 64,887 head. The ban on export of cattle imposed by the Chinese Authorities on December 5th, 1955 continued to the close of the year.

    6. The last of the 19 coaches originally indented for in 1946 was put into traffic on December 2nd, 1955. This must be almost a record for delivery delays from the United Kingdom.

      Similar trouble has been experienced in the bringing into use of a new station at Ma Liu Shui in the New Territories. The signalling equipment ordered in ample time has still not arrived although the station was finished in August 1955.

      Owing to this delay the building of Chung Chi College on an area adjacent is likely to be completed before the station can be opened.

TRAFFIC

7. Traffic revenue for the year under review amounted to $5,120,050 showing an increase of 19.65% over that of the previous year: -

1955/56

$5,120,050

1954/55

$4,279,276

Increase

$840,774 or 19.65%

   8. Passenger Bookings. Local passenger journeys de- creased by 1.28%. This was caused by bad weather which kept potential picnickers at home during week-ends and on public holidays. On the other hand, revenue increased by 6.65%. This was brought about by the introduction of the

2

zoning of the local fare system as distinct from the station to station system in the past. The new system is explained in detail under the heading of "Fares and Rates" in paragraph 25.

         9. Non-local traffic was better this year. Persons visiting a Russian Exhibition in Canton took the opportunity to visit. their homes in the country.

The figures of passenger journeys and revenue are

shown below:-

Passenger journeys

Revenue

1955/56

1954/55

Increase

508,108

$727,912

342,284

165,824 or 48.45%

$462,147

$265,765 or 57.51%

         10. A record of the greatest number of local passengers carried on any single day was made on Ching Ming Festival, April 5th, 1955. The figure was 54,815 which betters the previous record on January 26th, 1955, by 7,578. The majority of the passengers went to the cemeteries at Wo Hop Shek and Sandy Ridge.

         11. Goods Traffic. The receipts from local goods traffic increased by $33,810.00 as a result of raising the minimum charge for the sole use of a wagon. The figures, tonnage and receipts appear in Appendix VII.

         12. Foreign goods traffic decreased in the up direction but increased in the down. The upward reduction was attributed to the embargo while the downward improvement was due to an increasing variety of exports from China. Figures of comparison can be seen in Appendix VII.

The principal commodities imported into the Colony

by rail during these twelve months were as follows:-

Eggs

Paper (common)

Timber

Beans

Cotton piece goods

Potatoes

16,788 metric tons

14,332

"

11,209

""

9,876

"

""

8,703

25

"

8,304

"

3

Fresh vegetables

Iron nails

Wood oil

Cardboards

8,165 metric tons

"

6,205

2,862

""

>>

2,776

""

""

Pears (fresh)

2,719

""

""

Apples (fresh)

2,390

"

""

Chinese medicine

2,032

""

""

Rape seeds

1,951

""

"

Caustic soda

1,773

Iron wire

1,638

"

Lychees (fresh)

1,607

""

"5

Bamboo poles

1,362

""

Umbrellas (oiled paper)

1,146

>"

"}

Garlic (dried)

1,118 ""

""

    13. The number of livestock arriving in like manner for the same period are shown below:

Pigs

Cows

Buffaloes

Goats

64,887 head

6,614

"

6,249

""

2,624

""

14. Cold storage wagons from the Chinese Railways con- tinued to arrive. During the year, 33 wagons, conveying 52 tons of frozen fruits and vegetables, 179 tons of frozen meat. and 395 tons of frozen prawns, were received.

15. Goods handling receipts materially increased during the year. There was an increase of $174,117 or 62.76% over last year's figures due to the increased volume of traffic.

16. Operation. Train punctuality improved considerably after the two diesel electric locomotives supplied by the Clyde Engineering Co. Pty. Ltd., of Sydney, Australia, were put in service. These two locomotives arrived on August 5th, 1955, per s.s. "Eastern".

4

17. On November 6th, 1955, the day on which summer time ceased to be observed in the Colony, a new timetable was brought into force. As the running cost of the diesel electric locomotives is very low, nearly all the local passenger trains were designed to be operated by these two locomotives.

No. of passenger

Percentages

trains

Trains on time

Trains delayed for less than 5 minutes Trains delayed for 5 minutes and over

5,628

68.99

2,127

26.07

403

4.94

Total number of passenger trains run

8,158

100.00

18. Number and types of special trains run during the

year were as follows:

Goods (loaded)

Goods (empty)

Passenger

Military

Trial trains

Ballast trains

Up

Down

Total

3

293

296

81

81

159

117

276

23

27

250

2

2

4

87

87

174

355

526

881

         19. A naming ceremony of the two diesel electric locomo- tives by His Excellency the Governor and Lady Grantham was held on Nos. 3 and 4 platforms of Kowloon Station on Septem- ber 5th, 1955. The first locomotive was named "Sir Alexander" and the second "Lady Maurine".

         20. In order to attract picnickers to the island of Tapmun at the mouth of Tolo Harbour a rail-bus was run on Sundays on and after May 15th, 1955, to convey passengers to Taipo where a ferry service is operated by the Hongkong and Yaumati Ferry Co. Ltd. From the introduction of the winter timetable on November 6th, it was replaced by a full sized train.

5

21. His Excellency the Governor and Lady Grantham left the Colony by rail on October 4th, 1955, for Peking via Canton and returned on October 12th. On both journeys, a British Section coach was provided between Kowloon and Canton.

    22. Lady Sugden, wife of the Commander British Forces, visited the Railway on May 26th, 1955. She was accompanied by the General Manager in a special coach attached to the local trains to the border and back. When stopping at a local hostelry for tea she had an opportunity of meeting Military personnel.

    23. On May 30th, 1955, 44 free parcels from the American Red Cross Society to the American internees in China were transported free of charge by rail to the border where the parcels were handed to the Chinese Red Cross Society. This occasion was the first of a number during the year.

    24. In order to assist the Immigration Branch of the Police Department, an office at Kowloon Station was on loan to them from July 26th, 1955, for the issue of frontier passes for passengers going to China. Later on when the demand for such passes became greater additional godown space and plat- form area were made available to them as a temporary measure.

    25. Fares and Rates. A revision of railway fares was brought into operation on July 1st, 1955. The revised fares were worked on a zonal system as distinct from the old station to station system. A major reason for this revision was economy in the cost of tickets since the number of ticket categories was thereby reduced.

      Local goods rates were partly revised on October 1st, 1955. In order not to disturb goods rates as a whole the ordinary basic rates and goods classifications remained un- changed. Only the minimum charge for the sole use of a wagon was raised from $50 to $100 on ordinary goods, $50 to $75 on military goods conveyed in ordinary wagons and $50 to $105 on military rations conveyed in specially constructed wagons. The Railway spent $40,219.89 in the construction of such wagons in order to meet the demand.

6

26. Accidents. There were two major accidents this year. The first occurred on November 12th, 1955 at Mile 171 where No. 14 up local train hauled by diesel electric locomotive "Sir Alexander" collided with an Army tank. The guard of the train and one of the tank crew were killed.

           The other accident occurred at the north point of Yaumati Station on July 4th, 1955. Two mischievous children placed small stones between the switch tongue and the rail thus interrupting the point movement. As a result the locomotive and the first 3 passenger coaches of No. 17 down local train were derailed.

the year:

The following are the statistics of accidents during

Trespassers killed by trains

8

Trespasser injured other than by train

1

Staff killed in execution of duty

1

Staff injured in execution of duty

2

Derailment of engine and coaches

Derailment of railbus

1

1

1

Point split by train

Collision--train with an Army tank

Collision a light engine with an Army lorry

Collision an empty stock train with a police van

1

1

ACCOUNTS

27. Operating revenue totalled $5,814,865.67, an increase of $1,070,360.33 over the previous year. The profit of $2,089,987.23 is the highest over the last five years while the operating expenditure of $3,724,878.44 is the lowest over the same period, percentage of expenditure to revenue being 64.06 in comparison with 80.71 the previous year.

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28. The entry into service of the two new diesel electric locomotives about half way through the year contributed largely to the reduced operating expenditure, but the full effect of the great economies expected of these locomotives will not be felt until next year when figures for a full year's working will be included in the accounts.

    29. Prices of imported raw materials, spare parts, equip- ment and fuel continue to rise and it is only by exercising the strictest vigilance that it is possible to keep expenditure as commendably low at it is.

    30. Passenger revenue shows an increase of $435,817.30, due mainly to the relaxation of controls over the number of persons entering and leaving China, while additional revenue from goods traffic accounts for an increase of $398,035.80 over the previous year.

    31. For the first time since the year ending 31st March, 1951, the Profit and Loss Account records a net profit instead of a deficit, the amount being $248,458.13 which is included in the total surplus of $2,402,035.72 carried forward in the Balance Sheet.

32. Total investment assets on 31st March, 1956, amounted to $46,428,093.34 an increase over the previous year of $3,783,615.86 which is accounted for mainly by further pay- ments for rolling stock received during the year including payments on the diesel electric locomotives.

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

33. Locomotives. With the arrival of two G.M. diesel electric locomotives in August, repair work on steam locomotives was reduced as these two new locomotives worked about 75% of the mainline mileage of the Railway. During the year under review the only repairs done were medium repairs on locomo- tives Nos. 22, 28, 30 and shunting locomotive No. 3; locomotive No. 21 was given a heavy overhaul.

8

34. The water space stays of boilers of locomotives No. 21 and No. 29 were changed to copper stays to prevent boiler failures caused by the rupture of the rather small water space stays of the 2-8-0 Austerity Locomotives as mentioned in previous annual reports.

35. At the same time as fewer steam locomotives were needed six of the 12 2-8-0 Austerity Locomotives were put into storage.

        36. The average fuel consumption for 8 months was 2.40 kgs. of diesel fuel per kilometre or 1.01 imperial gallons per mile. This compares very favourably with the fuel consump- tion of coal and furnace oil steam locomotives. For coal and furnace oil burning locomotives the best consumption obtained in 1954/55 on Austerity 2-8-0 locomotives was 14.34 kgs. per train km. and 9.69 kgs. per train km. respectively. The cost for diesel fuel was $0.51 per km. while the cost for coal and furnace oil for the above mentioned period were $1.63 and $1.14 respectively. These figures indicate a very considerable saving as was forecast before the diesel electric locomotives were ordered.

37. The locomotive in the accident of November 12th, 1955 sustained a good deal of damage but it stood up well. At the time of collision the speed of the locomotive was about 42 miles per hour. There was no damage done to the engine, generator 1 or motors, but a complete new bogie was required.

38. Before putting the diesel electric locomotives in the f hands of our engine crews, they were given training in small groups by a Service Engineer, from the makers of the locomo- tives, on the proper handling of this type of motive power. All drivers were checked and re-checked on the knowledge they had acquired after training to make certain that they had a good working knowledge of the locomotives.

         39. The repair cost per steam locomotive km. was about the same as the previous year. The repair cost per locomotive km. for diesel locomotive was very low, $0.157 per locomotive

9

km. as against an average of $0.62 per locomotive km. for furnace oil and coal burning steam locomotives. The two diesel electric locomotives are still new and it is hard to say at this juncture whether their repairs costs will be lower.

40. Carriages and Wagons. Apart from routine running repairs the following items were the more important work done on carriages and wagons:

(i) Nine carriages received a medium repair.

were

(ii) The floor widths of eight flat wagons

increased to facilitate the transportation of tanks for Land Forces.

(iii) Eleven carriages, one covered wagon and three oil

tanks were repainted.

(iv) The roofs of 22 carriages and 28 wagons were

repainted.

(v) Carriage No. 318 was converted from a third to a

second class carriage and renumbered 204.

(vi) Four 45 ton wagons were modified in accordance with the requirement of Land Forces to facilitate transportation of Army Rations. These wagons were insulated with fibre glass on roofs and sides.

    41. Work Done for Hong Kong Government Departments. A great amount of work was done for the other departments of Government, which is reflected in the increase in local purchases and in stores supplied by the Controller of Stores referred to in para. 68.

42. Statistics. Coal and furnace oil consumption increased slightly. Coal consumption was 15.22 kgs. per train km., as against 14.34 kgs. per train km. of the previous year; and furnace oil consumption was 9.78 kgs. per train km., as against 9.69 kgs. per train km. last year. The increase in coal and furnace oil consumption per locomotive was due to the long periods of standing in steam awaiting minor duties after the

10

introduction of the diesel electric locomotives. This is unavoid- able during the transition period from steam to complete diesel- electric traction.

           Statistical statements relating to analysis of train and locomotive kilometrage; coal and fuel oil running expenses, and repairs to locomotives, carriages and wagons will be found at the end of this report as appendices X, XI, XII, XIII and XV.

WAY AND STRUCTURES

         43. Maintenance. Way and Structures were maintained in good order during the year. The old tracks at Kowloon Station the renewal of which was deferred from 1953 pending a decision as to the removal of the Station to Hung Hom proved difficult to maintain and their renewal was included in the next year's estimates.

         44. Track. The main line track was maintained to a good standard in spite of the shortage of hardwood sleepers due to late arrival from Australia. There was only one length of cracked rail due to defective material, which was detected during routine inspection and replaced. All the fishplates in the main line track were carefully inspected and greased.

         45. Expansion gaps over a distance of 4 miles of the main line track were adjusted and 5,290 rail anchors were used for the prevention of rail creep. The maximum rail creep recorded

inches.

during the year was only 1

         46. In order to increase the running speed of trains, the super-elevations in the railyway curves from Yaumati to Mile 9 (except the curves from Mile 5 to Mile 5) and from Mile 14 to Lowu were adjusted for a maximum running speed of 45 miles per hour on these curves. The gradient of the section of main line track from Mile 19 to Mile 19 was also eased by raising the level of the track.

47. Some 2,493 hardwood sleepers on the main line track were renewed this year and 906 tons of stone ballast were used.

11

    48. Signalling. All signalling equipment was maintained in good order; this included the periodic adjustment and re- alignment of signal wires so as to afford maximum efficiency in their operation. All signal posts, brackets, arms, point indicators and fouling points were overhauled and painted.

49. Kilometre and Gradient Posts. The kilometre and gradient posts along the whole main line were repaired and painted.

50. Tunnels. All tunnels were inspected and maintained in as good order as funds permitted during the year. A length of 277 linear yards of No. 2 Tunnel (Beacon Hill) was thoroughly cleansed with high pressure jets of a mixture of "Wyandotte" Kreelon CG Detergent and water and sprayed with inch cement mortar by the "Aerocem" process to combat moisture. 51. Bridges. Major repairs were done to Railway Bridge No. 7 at Boundary Street and Bridge No. 20 at Taipo.

The hardwood sleepers on Bridges No. 22, No. 28 and

Wo Hop Shek Bridge were renewed.

52. Cutting and Embankments.

There were no landslips

during the year and only one minor washout at Mile 18 caused by a heavy rain-storm, which had to be back-filled.

      Works for protection of the two high cuttings, No. 1 Cutting and Gill's Cutting, were also carried out. Improve- ments were made to the existing drainage and the construction of cement concrete walls to support dangerous boulders.

53. Road Level Crossings. The military crossing for the Tractor Path at Mile 174 damaged during the military tank accident on 12th November, 1955, was reconstructed. Other road level crossings repaired during the year were the Level Crossing for the approach road to the rice godown at Black- heads, a Tank Diversion Crossing at Mile 8 and the military jeep crossing at Mile 174.

54. Approach Road and Station Yards. The approach roads to the Goods Yard at Kowloon, to Taipo Station, and the Station Yard at Fanling were resurfaced.

12

55. Station Buildings. Station buildings, including shelters and latrines at Taipo, Taipo Market and Fanling were repaired and decorated. The French tiled roof of the main building at Kowloon Station was surfaced with cement mortar and asphalt to prevent leakage.

56. Staff Quarters.

Major repairs were carried out to "A" Block of Senior Staff Quarters at Gascoigne Road including the fitting of burglar-proof bars on the metal windows.

           The Station Masters' Quarters at Shatin, Fanling and Lowu Stations, and the Ganghuts at Mile 3, Taipo, Fanling and Lowu were also overhauled and decorated.

           All other staff quarters were maintained in good order and improved as funds permitted during the year.

         57. New Works and Improvements. The new crossing station at Ma Liu Shui comprising a single storeyed station building, a flush latrine, 1,250 linear feet of platforms and a loop line of 1,900 linear feet was completed in August, 1955. The new station could not be opened due to lack of proper railway signalling equipment the supply of which was delayed by the manufacturers.

Various new minor works were carried out during the year, the most important being the Injector Room for the diesel electric locomotives and the Sand Blasting Compound in the Locomotive Yard at Hung Hom. A Parcel and Baggage Store and a new entrance gate to the Goods Yard at Kowloon Station were also completed.

Among the improvement works were the re-alignment of the old queue railing and the addition of further railings at Shatin Station Yard for the safety of passengers in booking their tickets; the alterations in the Station offices at Taipo Market and the separation of Platforms Nos. 3 and 4 at Kow- loon with movable iron chain railings for better operation of train movements on festival days.

13

    58. Railway Land. The following areas of Railway land were leased for various purposes:

Area

Annual

Description

Sq. Ft.

Rental

$

Military Camps, etc.

519,858

3.00

Bible Auditorium

6,000

8,640.00

Club House and Sports Ground

84,800

20.00

Boy Scouts Hut

3,735

10.00

Motor Car Garage

17,794

21,348.19

Film Titling Studio

3,000

2,448.72

Storage

26,845

18,162.82

Cultivation and Gardening

1,101,459

4,123.98

Various Other Purposes

53,264

38,774.90

Total

1,816,755 $93,531.61

59. Advertising Space. Advertising space rented during the year was 7,187 sq. ft. to a total value of $100,298.67.

    60. Indents. During the year the following materials requisitioned through the Crown Agents arrived from the United Kingdom:

"Sonirail" rail flaw detector

"Hencol" rail flange lubricator

"Matisa" safety track jack

"Henggi" rail anchor

Permanent way gauge tie bar

1 set

2

2

5,000

30

"Destrol" fulflush closet

1 set

    61. Australian Sleepers. A total of 2,789 hardwood sleepers were ordered from Australia this year through Messrs. Swire & Maclaine Ltd. but only 2,033 pieces arrived. Some 1,796 hard-f wood sleepers which were ordered but not delivered last year:: were also received this year.

14

STORES

62. All railway stores were completely checked by the Annual Board of Survey in early March 1956; both the physical stock and ledger balances were found to be correct and in order.

63. A comparative statement of purchases for the year 1954/55 and 1955/56 is given below:

Coal

Furnace Oil

1955/56

$ 206,518,55 246,144.07

1954/55

$ 417,494.35

216,307.03

Light Fuel Diesel Oil

69,480.00

Lubricating Oil

27,976.82

26,028.33

Petrol

4,754.50

2,602.00

From Government Stores

105,803.92

179,716.76

From other Government

Departments

1,577.00

263.45

By local purchase

161,017.39

235,594.68

From Crown Agents

4,387,097.03

3,854,366.32

$5,322,028.04

$4,820,714.16

        64. Coal. The local purchase of coal decreased owing to the continued substitution of furnace oil for coal and the introduction of light fuel diesel oil commencing in August, 1955.

The total quantity of coal purchased during 1955/56 was only 1,991.5 tons compared with 3,892.5 tons in 1954/55, a reduction of 1,901 tons or 48.84%. Supplies were obtained from a local firm at the price of $103.70 per long ton delivered 4 to Railway bunkers.

65. Light Fuel Diesel Oil. This oil is only used by the two newly-imported diesel electric locomotives. The total amount purchased between August 1955 and March 1956 was 320 tons at the average contract price of $217.13 per long ton delivered to Railway tanks. Increases in cost may be expected.

66. Furnace Oil. As in the case of light fuel diesel, furnace oil was also obtained under Government contract at the average rate of $131.73 per long ton. The price rose by $11.64 per ton compared with last year.

15

URBAN COUNCIL PUBLIC LIBRARIES

    67. Petrol. Consumption of petrol dropped considerably for the year under review, principally due to the withdrawal of the petrol-driven electric generator in Lowu Station after the mains supply was extended to the border.

68. Local Purchase and Government Stores. The cost of purchases from local sources rose to $235,594.68 as compared with last year's total of $161,017.39, an increase of $74,577.29 or 31.65%. Similarly, the cost of purchase through the Govern- ment Stores Department showed an increase of $73,912.84 or 41.13% over 1954/55.

The increase can be attributed to the additional major works undertaken by the mechanical workshop, the most important of which are listed as below:---

Description

1. Construction of 43 lorry bodies

2.

Construction of 3 light clothing vans 3. Supply of 12 prs. runners for hydraulic ram; 12 distance pieces and 12 prs. guides

4. Construction of 5 hot water cylinders

5. Construction of 3 oil storage tanks 6. Construction of 3 garbage trucks

7. Construction of 50 steel wheel barrows 8. Rebuilding of 2 armoured car bodies 9. Repainting of 10 coffin wagons 10. Converting of 4 wagons for military use 11. Major repair to coaches Nos. 206, 302,

316

12. Repair to diesel electric locomotive and carriages after accident at Mile 171 13. Major repairs arising out of accident at Fanling and derailment at Yaumati 14. Assembly of 4 bogie second class

coaches

15. Construction of 1 galvanized iron queue

railing at Shatin Station

Department

Public Works (Electrical & Mechanical Office).

do

do

Public Works (Architec-

tural Office).

Marine.

Medical for Kowloon

Hospital.

Resettlement.

Police.

Urban Services.

Kowloon-Canton Railway.

1

do

do

do

do

do

16

           An electric sewing machine costing $1,410 and a public address calling system at a total cost of $2,260 were obtained for the mechanical workshops.

        69. Crown Agents. Two diesel electric locomotives, model G. 12 Clyde cost $1,040,000 each, but this may not be a final figure as there are still some outstanding debits.

           Towards the end of the year, a large quantity of spare parts and service tools for the two diesel electric locomotives were also received.

           Four second class coaches at an average cost of $324,486 each and three third class luggage carriages at $261,280 each, being the balance of the rolling stock order placed in 1946, were received during the year.

Revenue from the sale of unserviceable stores and old stores considered to be surplus to requirements during the year amounted to $90,231.52.

STAFF

70. The establishment of the Railway on 31st March, 1956 was as follows:

117 Pensionable Officers

446 Non-pensionable Officers

108 Daily Rated Staff

671

This is an increase of 5 over the previous year.

           The following change in executive staff took place during the year:-

Mr. A. A. Whitney was appointed Senior Accountant on 1st May, 1955, in place of Mr. K. W. Catton who went on vacation leave.

           A total of twelve officers retired during the year after serving the Railway for periods ranging from 8 to 37 years.

17

       Transfer of certain categories of daily rated staff to monthly rates of pay as they became eligible continued, a total of 78 such transfers taking place during the year.

The staff English language evening classes, commenced in 1954, continued through the year 1955/56. The students number 24 both in the elementary and intermediate standard. Attendance at the classes is voluntary and junior staff take advantage of this opportunity to improve their English and so enable them to carry out their duties more efficiently, thereby enhancing their chances of promotion to posts where a fluent knowledge of the language is required.

The staff in general are to be congratulated on the high standard of efficiency displayed during the year.

STAFF WELFARE

71. The earned leave granted to officers during the year amounted to:-

1,127 days vacation leave

6,089 days casual leave

for a total staff of 671.

Total sick leave for the year for all kinds of sickness on full and half pay amounted to 3,057 days and a further 473 days no-pay leave was also approved. Maternity leave totalling 273 days was also granted.

The Railway Club had repaid up to 31st March, 1956 a total of $16,216 to Government on the loan of $43,000. The payment was made purely from the membership subscriptions. Very little was available for the club's social and welfare activities after making the repayment to Government. Never- theless, every endeavour was made to use the club house to its fullest extent.

      Film Shows. Film shows were organized by the Railway Club once a week throughout the year for members

18

and their families at the expense of the club. These were so well attended that sometimes two shows had to be arranged in one night.

Sport. During the year the Club entered a team in each of the Inter-Departmental miniature football and table tennis competitions organized by the Hong Kong Chinese Civil Servants' Association. Both the competitions were completed in a spirit of good sportsmanship and the Club also won the championship in the miniature football competition.

Education. The Railway Club School continues to flourish. It is hoped that the school can be extended to Primary 6 in the near future when funds are available. Periodic visits to the school were paid by the club committee and the work shown both by the school masters and by the pupils was most encouraging.

Canteen Facilities.

                     The canteen organized in the Rail- way Club House was re-opened during the later part of the year and run by a new caterer at minimum expense. Cheap meals were offered to the lower paid members but were not taken advantage of to the extent expected. Light refreshments and soft drinks proved more popular.

Other Social Activities. A children's party for the children of members of the club and for the students of the Railway Club School was held on 26th January, 1956 after the school prize-giving ceremony in the Club House. Some 400 children attended this party and a very entertaining programme was performed by the school children under the guidance of the Head Master and other masters of the Railway Club School.

28th June, 1956.

I. B. TREVOR, General Manager, Railway.

19

20

Head No.

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS FOR THE PAST THREE YEARS

Appendix I

List of Heads

1953/54

1954/55

1955/56

3.

4.

6.

நூல்...அமம்

1.

Route Kilometrage-Operated

2. Gross Railway Receipts...

Railway Operating Revenue..

5.

Railway Operating Expenditure Nett Operating Revenue

Percentage of Railway Operating Expenditure to Railway Operating Revenue..

7. Capital Investment.

Percentage of Nett Operating Revenue to Capital Investment. Railway Operating Revenue per Route Kilometre Operated... Railway Operating Expenditure per Route Kilometre Operated Passenger Receipts

36

36

36 $ 5,477,846 $ 4,832,466 $ 5,905,097 $ 5,403,068 $ 4,744,505 $ 3,962,531 $ 3,829,248

$

$ 5,814,866

$ 3,724,879

1,440,537

915,257

$ 2,089,987

73.34

$38,299,702

80.71

$42,644,477

64.06

$46,428,093

3.76

2.15

4.50

150,085 $ 131,792

$ 161,524

$

$

69 69 69

110,070 $ 106,368

$ 3,585,311

$ 3,181,756

65.45

4,113,604

65.84

3,867,509

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

Percentage of Passenger Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts Number of Passenger Journeys

14.

Goods Receipts

15.

Percentage of Goods Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts..

16.

Tons of Goods Hauled

17.

Revenue from Other Sources

28.35

174,720

1953/54 1954/55 1955/56

1,552,906 $ 1,250,737

25.88

128,753

$

103,469

$ 3,609,837

61.13

3,988,244

$ 1,820,589

30.83

175,997

18.

Rentals

Incidentals

.$145,598 $182,187 $202,852 8,616 6,989 7,260

Central Mechanical Workshop Services...

17,355 23,333 74,082

Advertising

93,282

99,503 100,245

Sale of Surplus & Condemned

Stores

74,778

87,961 90,232

Percentage of Revenue from Other Sources to Gross Railway

Receipts

$

339,629

399,973

474,671

6.20

8.28

8.04

21

177

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE

During the year

At the

beginning of

New Lines

the year

1.4.55

Additions and

& Exten-

sions

Betterments

Property Abandoned

Nett Capital

Expenditure

Part 1 Construction Accounts

C- 1 General Expenditure

C- 2 Preliminary Expenditure..

C- 3 Land

C. 4 Formation.

C- 5 Tunnels

C- 6 Bridgework

C- 7 Line Protection

C- 8 Telegraph & Telephones. C- 9 Track.

C-10 Signals & Switches

C-11 Stations & Buildings C-12 Central Mechanical Works

C-14 Plant

C-15 Rolling Stock

C-17 Docks, Harbour & Wharves

770,814.12

80,045.23

10,000.00

6,177,843.39 257,156.75

2,413,921.30

568,220.69 2,084,053.44 17,245,932.23

Total Cost

Appendix II

At the end of the year

31.3.56

770,814.12

5,210,696.83

2,742,709.38

3,599,937.42

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

2,742,709.38

3,599,937.42

1,327,901.17

27,217.89

27,217.89 1,355,119.06

90,074.47

90,074.47

10,000.00

26,198.44|| (A)

96.00

112,726.19

26,102.44 6,203,945.83 257,156.75 112,726.19 2,526,647.49

568,220.69

(B) 295.46

3,617,864.80|

295.46 2,083,757.98 3,617,864.80| 20,863,797.03

65,171.06

65,171.06

42,644,477.48

3,784,007.32

391.46 3,783,615.86 46,428,093.34

(A) Book value of 1.2 tons old rail sold during the year.

(B) Book value of 4 diamond glass cutters and 1 set mortise gear sold by public auction.

(C) Special Expenditure 1955/56

Less portion of Special Expenditure charged to Operating Expenditure not due for inclusion in Capital Account

$3,813,507.76

29,500.44

$3,784,007.32

N

222

total Operating

Percentage on

Expenditure

Previous Year

Amount

Operating

Expenses

OPERATING ACCOUNT

Current Year

Previous Year

Amount

Percentage on total Operating Expenditure

total Operating Revenue

Percentage on

Amount

Operating Revenue

Appendix III

Current Year

Amount

total Operating Revenue

Percentage on

%

%

%

$

325,701.62

8.39

.11

321,488.02

4,213.60

Main Line

E-1 General

Expenses... Administra-

tion

Special

Local Service

317,372.64

R-1 Passenger Service,

309,816.25

7,556.39

8.32

.20

61.70 2,927,319..

Passenger 3,363,136.46|

57.84

R-2 Passenger

E-2 Traffic

Service,

18.78

719,139.22

Expenses.

E-3 Running

1,031,576.14

Expenses...

720,267.07 19.34 5.36 254,437.10 851,790.52

Other...

246,700.85

4.24

R-3 Goods

Service,

22.66

867,703.10

Locomotives

675,825.57|

18.14

19.77 938,019.25

Goods

1,327,207.05

22.83

Carriages &

.50

19,027.87

Wagons

23,770.73!

.64

.66 31,508.20

Terminal

Charge

40,356.20

.69

Motor

R-4 Goods

.41

15,582.79

Vehicles

13,433.16

.36

3.38

129,262.38

Traffic

138,761.06

3.72

5.93

281,209.02

Service,

Other...

453,025.69

7.79

26.16

1,001,826.71

751,004.29

19.50

.11

746,808.09

4,196.20

100.00

3,829,247.98

Total Operating Expenditure

Balance, Profit

915,257.36

on Operating..

4,744,505.34 |

E-4 Main, of

Equipment Locomotive

Depart.

ment

E-5 Main. of

Way &

Structures Engineering

Depart-

ment

Other De-

partments..

R-5 Central

Mech.

Workshop

.49]

1,069,005.19 28.70 3.84

23,333.39

182,186.93

Services...

74,082.18

1.27

R-6

Rents

202,852.41

3.49

R-7

Incidental

766,443.02

.15

2.10

6,989.04 Revenue 99,503.25 4,744,505.34 R-8 Advertising

7,259.70

.13

100,245.13 5,814,865.67 1.72

761,711.84

20.45

4,731.18

.13

3,724,878.44 100.00 100.00

4,744,505.34

Total Operating Revenue

5,814,865.67 100.00

2,089,987.23

5,814,865.67

4,744,505.34

2.

3.

Services rendered by Government

4.

Pensions & Gratuities

5.

Staff passage...

1. Operating Expenditure

Portion of Special Expenditure chargeable to Revenue...

$3,445,275.71

1.

Nett Revenue*

29,500.44

2.

14,150.77

228,398.24

(b) Goods

7,553.28

3.

Government transportation (a) Passenger...

Government Rental..

5,814,865.67|

$5,501,918.42

307,298.60

5,456.65

192.00

$3,724,878.44

$5,814,865.67

Dr.

Previous Year

PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

$ 530,320.87 To Interest on Govt. Investments (A) 776,000.00 To Amortization of Rehab. Loan (B) 500,000.00 To Depreciation Reserves

136.44 To Losses on Stores

$1,806,457.31

Total.

Balance.

Current Year

$ 657,003.45 776,000.00

500,000,00

182.37

$1,933,185.82

248,458.13

Previous Year

Appendix IV

Cr.

Current Year

$ 915,257.36 By Balance, Nett Operating Revenue $2,089,987.23 By Sale of Capital Assets, Surplus Stores and Scrap

61,055.77 12,297.56 By Profit on Stores

$ 988,610.69

817,846.62

$1,806,457.31

Total.

Balance

89,840.06

1,816.66

$2,181,643.95

$2,181,643.95

$1,806,457.31

$2,181,643.95

(4) Interest on Rehabilitation Loan up to 1953/54. Less Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan up to 1954/55...

$14,775,402.10 5,432,000.00

Interest on Special Expenditure up to 1954/55

1939-54 $10,032,622.90

83

1954-55

4,395,502.16

$14,428,125.06

Less Amortization in 1952/53.

$ 9,343,402.10 @ 34% $327,019.07) $ 9,428,125.06 @ 34% $329,984.38

$657,003.45

5,000,000.00

$9,428,125.06

(B) Eighth instalment of the K. C. R. repayment over twenty five years of Rehabilitation Loan $19,400,000.00* * Actual amount spent on Loan Funds $14,775,402,10

SURPLUS APPROPRIATION ACCOUNT

Dr.

Previous Year

817,846.62

To Deficit for the year

$ 817,846.62

Total.

Current Year

Previous Year

$2,153,577.59 Surplus carried forward to Balance Sht. $2,402,035.72

$2,971,424.21

By Surplus for the Year. $2,971,424.21 By Surplus from previous year... $2,971,424.21 Total.

$2,402,035.72

$2,971,424.21

Cr.

Current Year

$ 248,458.13 $2,153,577.59

$2,402,035.72

$2,402,035.72

24

Balance at beginning of

year

Assets or Debit Balance

Heads of Classification

GENERAL BALANCE SHEET

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

Balance at beginning of

year

Liabilities or Credit Balance

Heads of Classification

Appendix V

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

B-6 Investment Assets :-

B-1 Capital Liabili-

42,644,477.48

B-6-1 Cost of Road & Equipment

ties :-

B-1-1 Railway

46,428,093.34 3,783,615.86

10,432,000.00 Investment

11,208,000.00

776,000.00

32,578,793.70

B-1-3 Perm. Govt. Investment

35,616,301.46| 3,037,507.76

42,644,477.48|

Total Investment Assets

46,428,093.34 3,783,615.86

43,010,793.70

Total Capital Liabilities

46,824,301.46

3,813,507.76

B-7 Working

Assets :-

17,876.17 B-7-1-1 Cash

B-7-4-3 Advance

2,203.00 Account

338.52

509,303.67 B-7-5 Stores

B-7-5-1 Workshop Suspense

81,779.45 63,903.28 169,099.18 166,896.18 743,907.05 234,603.38

B-2 Working Liabi- lities:-

B-2-2 Traffic

1,462.74

1,124.22|

Balance (Foreign

31,261.62

Railway)

31,261.62

529,721.36 Total Working Assets

996,248.42

466,527.06

31,261.62

Total Working Liabilities

31,261.62

B-8 Deferred Debit Items :-

B-8-1 Temporary

B-3 Deferred Credit

Items :-

4,615,999.73

Advances to Government

4,930,846.95

314,847.22

B-3-3 Depreciation

2,586,243.75|

Reserves

3,086,243.75

500,000.00

4,615,999.73

4,930,846.95 314,847.22

8,321.91

B-3-5 Misc. Deferred Credits

11,346.16

3,024.25

2,594,565.66

3,097,589.91

503,024,25

B-9 Balance of

Accumulated Deficit

B-4 Appropriation

2,153,577.59

from Surpluses.......

2,402,035.72| 248,458.13|

47,790,198.57

52,355,188.71|

4,564,990.14

47,790,198.57

52,355,188.71 4,564,990.14

25

25

Previous Year

ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER SERVICE

-

Part I Passenger Service (R-1 Passenger)

Current Year (April 1955 - March 1956)

Number of

Origina-

Number

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

ting

of Units

Passengers Kilometres

Revenue

Home

Carried

Line

Appendix VI

Percentage of

Pas-

Reve-

Number senger Carried Kilo- nue

metres

Ordinary :-

98,130.45

First

310,236.45

Second

1,816,021.51|

Third

74,079 1,496,914 225,107 225,107 4,548,737 2,511,311 2,511,311 | 51,638,146

74,079

135,627.05 1.86

1.85 3.76

279,611.95 5.64

5.65 7.75

2,133,431.11 62.97

64.07 59.15

Government :-

6,480.75

First

3,879 3,879

78,382

8,214.25 .10

.10

.23

20,942.15

Second

36,258.50

Third

23,129 23,129 467,367 50,544 50,544 1,021,342

37,548.85 .58

.59

1.04

56,325.45 1.27

1.26

1.56

Excursion:-

55,745.95

First

41,851 41,851

945,683

58,637.65 1.05

1.17

1.63

170,084.55

Second

137,056 137,056 2,869,490

155,462.35 3.44

3.56

4.31

13,547.95

Third

31,125 31,125

628,942

23,231.75

.78

.79

.65

14,432.80

Platform Tickets

56,214 56,214

26,235.60 1.40

.73

23,680.05

Excess Fares

24,944.95

.69

Season & Monthly Tickets:-

7,509.00

71,880.75

First

Second

10,440

10,440

210,961

88,440

88,440

1,787,107

9,654.00

70,263.40

.26

.25

.27

2.22

2.20

1.95

164,619.20

Third

411,400

411,400

8,313,159

192,388.60 10.31

10.33

5.33

109,858.25

Scholar Tickets

319,720

319,720

6,460,582

137,074.25 8.02

7.99

3.80

11,416.40

Golfing Tickets

3,949

3,949

126,368

12,155.40 .10

.19

.34

(A)2,930,844.71

|3,988,244 3,988,244

80,593,180 (B)3,360,806.61| 100.00

100.00

93.19

(A) Home Line.

$2,794,779.51

(B) Home Line.

$3,165,191.41

Foreign

Foreign

Government

136,065.20

Government

195,615.20

$2,930,844.71

$3,360,806.61

26

ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER SERVICE

Part II - Passenger Service (R 2 Other)

Appendix VI-Contd.

Current Year

Previous Year

(April 1955

March 1956)

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

Revenue

Percentage of

Revenue

Baggage & Specie:-

5,451.25

Public

4,892.60

.13

Government

Parcels:-

1,732.95

Public

1,500.90

.04

Railway Service

Carriage & Animals:-

245,894.05

Public

238,240.30

6.60

Special Train :-

Public

Government

Postal:-

1,602.00

Miscellaneous

(C) 254,680.25

Total - Part II

3,185,524.96

Total -

Parts I & II

(C) Home Line Foreign

Government

1,695.50

.04

IBRARIES

$235,394.75

19,285.50

$254,680.25

(D) 246,329.30

3,607,135.91

(D) Home Line

Foreign

Government

$134,645.90

111,683.40

$246,329.30

6.81

100.00

27

22

ANALYSIS OF GOODS SERVICE

Part I - Goods Service (R-3 Goods)

Appendix VII

Previous Year

Current Year (April 1955

March 1956)

Percentage of

Kilo-

Kinds of Goods

Kilo-

Revenue

Number of Kilograms Carried

Kilogram Kilometres

Revenue

grams

Carried

gram Reve- Kilo- nue

metres

General Merchandise

709,504.90

Inward 160,351,720 5,615,224,860]

1,105,465.10

91.11

91.59 60.55

172,333.50

Invoiced to and from Lowu|

6,191.75) Invoiced to and from

81,003.30

Stations other than Lowu

Outward

Inward

Outward

7,229,890

258,693,910

497,590 7,917,680 237,453,630

19,023,700

90,946.10 4.10

28,514.85

147,717.20 4.50

4.22 4.98

.29

.32

3.87 8.09

1.56

(A)969,033.45

(4) Home Line. Foreign Government

Total Part I

175,996,880 6,130,396,100 (B) 1,372,643.25 100.00 100.00 75.18

372,643.

$967,893.15

1,140.30

(B) Home Line. Foreign

Government

$969,033.45

$1,367,186.60

5,456.65

$1,372,643,25

Part II

Goods Service (R - 4 Other)

3,760.00 | Shunting 277,449.02|| Handling

Demurrage

1,460.00

451,565.69

.09

24.73

24.82

281,209.02

Total - Part II

RIES

453,025.69

100.00

1,825,668.94

1,250,242.47

Total Parts I & II.

28

Previous

Year

SUMMARY OF LOCAL AND NON-LOCAL PASSENGER TRAFFIC

Appendix VIII

Current Year

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Percentage of

Pas-

Inward

Number of

Revenue

Passenger Traffic

or

Passenger

Passenger Kilometres

Revenue

Outward

Carried

Number senger Reve- Carried Kilo- nue metres

Passenger Service

244,161.25

Inward

225,403

7,029,777 315,816.80

5.65

8.72 9.40

Bookings to and from Lowu

217,986.00

Outward

282,705 8,886,137 412,094.70 7.09

11.03 12.26

1,177,044.48

Inward

Bookings to and from Stations other than Lowu

1,684,318

31,319,409 1,258,679.71 42.23

38.86 37.45

1,291,652.98

Outward

1,795,818 33,357,857 1,374,215.40 45.03

41.39

40.89

2,930,844.71

Total

3,988,244 80,593,180 3,360,806.61 100.00

100.00 | 100.00

Appendix IX

TABULAR SUMMARY OF UNALLOCATED STORES

Stock on hand as at 1st April, 1955

Add

Purchases, Returns and Charges

487.543.60

463,361.55

950,905.15

Deduct

Issues to Votes and Services as credited to Expenditure

Sub-head....

223,035.76

727,869.39

Deduct

Proceeds of sale of stores as credited to Revenue

4,488.51

723,380.88

Deduct

Adjustment for stores received in 1954/55, but paid for

1955/56

674.76

722,706.12

Add

Adjustment for stores received in 1955/56, but paid for

1954/55

2,497.87

725,203.99

Deduct

Adjustment for stores received in 1956/57, but paid for

1955/56

10,669.58

714,534.41

Add

Adjustment for stores received in 1955/56, but paid for

1956/57

473.58

715,007.99

Losses and Deficiencies written off

Nil

715,007.99

Add

Value of stores overpriced

217.84

715,225.83

181.93

Deduct

Value of stores underpriced

Stock on hand as at 31st March, 1956

$715,043.90

29

30

ANALYSIS OF TRAIN & LOCOMOTIVE KILOMETRAGE

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Appendix X

Oil Engine Kilometrage

Coal Engine Kilometrage

Diesel Electric Kilometrage

Total Kilometrage

Rail-Bus Kilometrage

Classification

1954/55 1955/56 1954/55 1955/56

1954/55 1955/56

1954/55 1955/56

1954/55 1955/56

Passenger

Mixed Slow

167,736.08 152,521.95 184,374.05 66,161.15

123,745.43 352,110.13 342,428.53| 2,692.00 2,904.00

1,603.38 22,912.02 32,852.98

Train

Goods

Kilo-

8,059.15 27,554.60 14,852.87 3,695.00

metrage Military

Special..

Ballast Train..

85.00 668.67 228.51 1,421.31 1,925.50 6,903,81 5,434.17 4,100.36

313.51 2,089.98

74.82| 7,359.67 11,078.99 2,136.00

824.00

Total Train

Kilometrage.

177,805.73 187,649.03| 204,889.60] 75,377.82

125,423.63 382,695.33 388,450.48| 4,828.00 3,728.00

Locomotive

188,618.98| 199,164.03 217,229.10| 79,865.32

Loco.

Kilo-

metrage

Light Engine.....

Shunting

Engine..

3,464.91 9,049.16 3,673.83 2,984.32

40.00 11,590.00 54,710.00 43,310.00

125,423.63| 405,848.08| 404,452.98|

803.69 7,138.74 12,837.17

54,750.00 54,900.00

Total Loco.

Kilometrage,

192,123.89 219,803.19 275,612.93 126,159.64

126,227.32 467,736.82 472,190.15

Appendix XI

COST FOR RUNNING COAL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES

Previous Year 1954/55

(April 1955- March 1956)

Current Year 1955/56

$333,845.98

1.

Total Cost of Coal for Main Line Running.....

$126,318.01

115.46

2.

Average Cost per Ton

111.88

1.63

3.

Cost per Train Kilometre..

1.68

2,891.45

4. Total Weight of Coal for Main Line

Running (Ton)

1,129.05

14.34

5.

Weight per Train Km. in Kg.

15.22

617.30

11.46

6.

Total Weight of Coal for Shunting (Ton)..............

598.65

7.

Weight per Shunting Km. in Kg.

14.04

Appendix XII

COST FOR RUNNING FURNACE OIL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Previous Year

1954/55

$203,516.53 1. Total Cost of Furnace Oil for Main Line

Current Year 1955/56

Running

120.045

2. Average Cost per Ton

1.14

3.

Cost per Train Kilometre

$237,069.86

131.29

1.26

4.

1,695.332

Total Weight of Furnace Oil for Main

Line Running (Ton)

1,805.75

9.69

5. Weight per Train Km. in Kg.

9.78

6.

Total Weight of Furnace Oil for Shunting (Ton)

126.85

7. Weight per Shunting Km, in Kg.

11.12

31

Appendix XIII

COST FOR RUNNING DIESEL ELECTRIC LOCOMOTIVES

Previous Year 1954/55

(August 1955- March 1956)

-

Current Year 1955/56

1

1. Total Cost of Diesel Oil

$64,884.32

2. Average Cost per Ton

3. Cost per Engine Kilometre

4. Total Weight of Diesel Oil (Ton)

217.38

0.51

298.489

5. Weight per Engine Km. in Kg.

2.40

Appendix XIV

CONSUMPTION OF LUBRICANTS FOR LOCOMOTIVES

Previous Year 1954/55

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Current Year 1955/56

3,008.25 1.

Total Weight of Engine Oil (Gals.)

2,265.125

0.728

2. Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Gals.

0.778

1,094.63

3.

Total Weight of S.H. Cylinder Oil (Gals.) ...

864.75

0.265

4. Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Gals.

0.297

5.

Total Weight of Crank Case Oil (Gals.)

791.00

6. Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Gals.

0.627

32

33

Previous Year

1954/55

COST ASSIGNMENT AND STATISTICS (April 1955 - March 1956)

Appendix XV

Current Year

1955/56

22,303.40

1. Average Cost of Repair per Loco. per annum

16,924.77

0.4842

2. Average Cost of Furnace Oil Burning Loco. Repairs per Engine Km. (Labour and Material only)

0.56

0.6927

3. Average Cost of Coal Burning Loco. Repairs per Engine Km. (Labour and Material only)

0.68

4. Average Cost of Diesel Electric Loco. Repairs per Engine Km. (Labour and Material only)

0.157

9,483.68

5.

715.88

Average Cost of Repairs per Passenger Car per annum. 6. Average Cost of Repairs per Goods Wagon per annum

9,069.54

151.26

0.0279

7. Average Cost of Engine Oil per Engine Km. for Steam Locomotives

0.0279

0.0132

8. Average Cost of S.H. Cylinder Oil per Engine Km. for Steam Locomotives

0.0122

4.14

9. Average Cost of Lubricants for Steam Loco. per Gal.

3.73

10. Average Cost of Crank Case Oil per Engine Km. for Diesel Electric Locomotives

11. Average Cost of Crank Case Oil for Diesel Electric Loco. per Gal.

0.0263

4.19

34

Engine Number

Engine

2

3

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK - MOTIVE POWER

(April 1955-March 1956)

Appendix XVI

Diesel Electric Locomotives

70

20

Main Generator

Approximate Weight (Fully Loaded)

Number of Drivers

Fuel Oil

Lubricating Oil

Cooling Water

Sand

Сл

5 b

8

6

10 11 12 13

14

Bogie Centres

Driving Wheel Diameter

Bogie Rigid Wheel Base

Length over Head Stocks

Height over Rail Level

Width over Handrails

Gear Ratio

Sir Alexander (51) | General Motors D15 71

G12-1125 H.P.

Lady Maurine (52)

12-567C.

tons

8 770 138 170 12 cub.| 26′6′′ 40′′ | 8′0′′ 44′6′′ 12′2′′ 9′2′′ 63/14

I. G. I. G. I. G. feet

NOTE: (A) - Received from Crown Agents.

15 16

17

18

19 | 20 | 21

22

Maximum Permissible Speed

Total Stock at the Beginning of the year

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

Total Stock at the end of the year

Average Age of Class

62

|2(4)|

2

M.P.H.

8

months

35

2

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK · MOTIVE POWER

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Steam Locomotives

Appendix XVII

3

4

5

6

Engine No.

Distribution

Wheel

Diameter of

Cylinder

Stroke

Driving Wheel

Diameter of

Tank or Tender

3 4-6-4 22"

28" 61" Side Tank

2-6-4 19" 26" 611"

7

8

6

10

11

12

13

14

15

Gross Weight of Engine and Tender in tons

in working order

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Additions during the year

during the year

Reductions

Total Stock at the end of the

year

Average Age of

Class

Each Eng. (tons)

Maximum Axle Load

(ton)

Weight on

Driving Wheel

Tractive Effort

at 85% Boiler

Pressure

106.00

1

90.35

1 & 2 2-6-0 171⁄2′′

24"

42" Saddle

53.25

"

21-32 2-8-0 19"

28"

561* Tender

125.75

12

""

RB-1 Railbus

6 Cyl. Bedford 3-5/16′′ 31′′

31"

16

Petrol Railcars

!

-

1

32

09

20

33714

1

44

51

17

23350

2

15

46.05 15.35 26775

12

12

61.25 15.31 34215

16

20

RAC & SAE Rating

26. 33 H.P. 55 Passengers

RB-2 Railbus

SAE 25.35 H. P.

6 Cyl. Dodge 31"

45"

31"

1

1

10

55 Passengers

36

Classification

Average Tare of each Class (ton)

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK · CARRIAGE

(April 1955 - March 1956)

-

Appendix XVIII

Ton

Cwt.

Seating Capacity

(Passenger)

Total Stock

at the

beginning of

the year

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

Total Stock

at the end of the year

First Class Carriage

38

0

48

First Class Carriage

33 11

52

First Class Carriage

35

8

54

First Class Carriage

47

13

64

112 -

48

52

108

1

1 (A)

128

First Class Compartment Carriage

49

5

64

3 (A)

3

192

First & Second Composite Carriage

30

First & Second Composite Carriage

30

66

45

45

52

1

52

First & Second Composite Carriage

33 11

56

1

1

56

Second Class Carriage

33

11

64

4.

256

Second Class Carriage

45

5

78

2

2

156

Third Class Carriage..

33

19

128

16

16

2,048

Third Class Carriage..

44

13

120

11

11

1,320

Third Class & Brake Composite

Carriage

Third Class & Brake Composite

Carriage

223453

18

58

5

5

LA

290

18

67

3 (A)

3

201

NOTE: (A)

Received from Crown Agents.

46

7

53

4,952

Total Seating

(Passenger)

Capacity

37

1

Classification

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK - GOODS WAGONS

2

(April 1955- March 1956)

3

4

Appendix XIX

5

6

7

8

9

Overall

Length of

Wagon

Average Tare of each Class

Carrying Capacity

Total Stock

at the

beginning of

the year

Additions during the

year

Reductions during the

year

Total Stock at the end of the year

Total Carrying

Capacity

Ton

Cwt.

Ton

Ton

Tank, oil (10,000 gals. of Water)...

Flat 30 ton

Flat 40 ton

Flat 452 metric ton.

41′1′′

21 19

44

311

35'0"

12

8

30

4

4

120

37′10′′

14

6

40

5

5

200

45'0"

17 12

45

10

10

450

Flat 80 ton

32′0′′

27

13

80

2

2

160

Low sided open 461 metric ton

45'0"

18 12

45

10

10

---

4534

20

High sided open 45 metric ton...

45'0"

19

12

442

25

25

1,110

Covered 30 ton

35'0"

15

7

30

19(B)

19

570

Covered (cattle truck) 30 ton.

35'0"

15

7

30

3

3

90

Covered 40 ton

37'10" 18 14

40

1

1

40

Covered 44 metric ton

40'0"

20

0

44

130(D)

130

5,720

Well 50 ton

32′0′′

25 12

50

1

50

Cattle Wagon

45'0"

44

5

220

Brake Van 10 metric ton.

35'0"

19 3

10

50

227

NOTE: (B) 5 converted to temporary 3rd class passenger cars.

(D) 3 converted to mail wagons and 4 to Army ration wagons.

227

9,545

Appendix XX

CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK-SERVICE EQUIPMENT

(April 1955 - March 1956)

Classification

65 ton Break-down Crane........

10 ton Locomotive Crane

RT-2 Motor Trolley

RT-3 Motor Trolley

38

888

Average Tare of each class

Ton

Cwt.

87

1

2

1

1

1

CLIBRA

2

3

Total Stock at the beginning

of the year

Additions

during the year

Reductions during the year

1

1

1

1

422

6

Total Stock at the end of

the year

NU

Out

In

STATEMENT OF LOWU PASSENGERS (In and Out)

APPENDIX XXI

Thousand Passengers - 1,800

- 1,600

共圖書

- 1,400

- 1,200

- 1,000

PUBLIC LIBRARIES

800

KONG

1949/50

1950/51 1951/52

1952/53 1953/54 1954/55

1955/56

39

600

400

200

40

16.71%

22.26%

Expenses

Running

APPENDIX XXII

K. C. R. STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 1955/56

Operating Expenditure

($3,724,878.44)

Traffic

Expenses

Maintenance of Equipment

7.87%

General

Expenses

Pensions &

Gratuities

6.13%

Maintenance

of Way &

Structures

19.74%

26.93%

0.36% Motor Vehicle

Running Expenses

57.70%

Operating Revenue ($5,824,905.71)

4.23%

Passenger

Goods

3.61%

Rents

7.78%

23.56%

Excess Luggage, C. & A., Parcel & Mail

Handling Charges, Shunting & Demurrage Charges

1.27% Central Mechanical Workshop Services

1.72% Advertising

0.13% Incidental Revenue