九廣鐵路年報 Kowloon Canton Railway Annual Departmental Report 1952-1953

HONG KONG

ANNUAL

DEPARTMENTAL

REPORTS

1952-53

PRICE: $ 2

LIBRARIES

BLIC LIBR

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY

(BRITISH SECTION)

香港

FONG KONG

共圖書

PUBLIC LIBRAR

LIBRARIES

HONG KONG

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORT

BY THE

GENERAL MANAGER, RAILWAY

 

FOR THE

FINANCIAL YEAR 1952-3

کیریر

!

PRARIES

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY THE GOVERNMENT PRINTER,

HONG KONG.

香港公共圖書及

HON

URBAN COUNCIL PUBLIC LIBRARIES

Acc. No. Not A

Class.

Author

LIC

BRARIES

CONTENTS

GENERAL SURVEY

TRAFFIC

ACCOUNTS

.....

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

WAY & STRUCTURES

STORES

STAFF

Paragraphs

1

-

8

9 25

day

26 - 30

31 - 35

36 - 52

53 59

60

Note: H.K.$16.00 £1:0:0: sterling."

LIC LIBRA

:

:

GENERAL SURVEY

        1. Once again the Railway's activities for the year 1952- 53 have been affected by the various controls imposed on normal trading. The import and export tonnages with China present a clear picture of the state of affairs for whereas imports from China amounted to 220,822 tons, exports were only 43,780 tons resulting in a large return empty wagon mileage.

2. Very early on in the year, the import traffic started to fall off, and it appeared doubtful as to whether it would be possible to complete the financial year with a working balance. Fortunately, conditions improved in the month of July, and the year closed with a surplus of revenue over expenditure of some $1,360,000.

        3. This result has not been accomplished without vigilance over expenditure by all Sections of the Department. Economies. have been made both in staff and equipment, and the Estimates bear witness to vacancies not filled, waiting for better days. Certain expenditure, which otherwise would have fallen in an easier financial year, was unavoidable owing to the inordinate delay of the materials from England.

4. The Railway continues to suffer disappointment and a loss in revenue through the delay in supplying the new pas- senger coaches ordered in 1947. They were promised for the first quarter of 1953, but it now seems doubtful whether they I will be available at the earliest before 1954.

5. It will be noted that sales of old materials during the year amounted to $609,257.99. They may well be described as clearance sales after the work of rehabilitation has been carried out.

1

6. The supply of sleepers continued to be a source of anxiety and expense. The Thai Government was unable to supply as was hoped. Finally,

        Finally, semi-hardwood sleepers were obtained from Malaya, and after creosoting the cost reached $44.02 per sleeper.

7. The cost of coal has been more modest, due to a reduc- tion in shipping freight charges. Indian, South African and Chinese Tatung coals have all been used with prices varying from $120.10 to $145.40 a ton.

8. The boilers of the 2-8-0 austerity locomotives have been giving trouble. The fireboxes are stayed with both copper and steel stays, the steel stays being fitted with a nut on the side nearest the fire. The steel stays, the root diameter of which is 9/16" have rusted and commenced to break, but since they have no tell-tale holes, it is difficult to detect which have broken. Engine No. 28 recently failed in traffic and a bulging plate was found on both the inside and the outside of the firebox plates.

      Three locomotives have already been fitted with copper stays of " thickness in between the engine frame, an expensive business, and more will be converted as quickly as possible. Meanwhile, it will be necessary to submit all boilers to a hydro- static test every six months instead of annually.

      Steam locomotives are, however, uneconomic for this Line, and the continuous heavy cost of maintenance must force the pace of a conversion to diesel electric traction.

TRAFFIC

9. Traffic revenue for the current year amounted to $5,254,583 and showed an increase of 4.95% over the previous year.

10. The increase was due to quantities of goods exported from China. The freight receipts so derived were $1,340,910 being an increase of 103.21% over those of last year.

2

11. The total import tonnage for the year from China was 220,287 metric tons and the weight of the principal imports appear below:

Beans of various descriptions

49,467 metric tons

Bran

41,909

""

19

Vegetable oils of various kinds

26,077

??

Eggs

18,267

"

""

Sesame

15,215

"

"1

Rice

5,148

Native medicine

3,268

""

Poultry

3,065

""

""

Bean noodle

2,764

99

Ground nuts

2,718

"

""

Cotton waste

2,376

"

"

Ground nut cakes

2,364

"

"

Fresh vegetables

1,434

"1

17

Melon seeds

1,419

""

""

Hemp

1,327

""

Cotton seed cakes

1,229

>>

""

Maize

1,125

"

??

Nutgall

1,121

"}

""

12. In all, 165,215 head of live pigs were also received into the Colony. This made the receipts from animal traffic better than last year's by $70,947.

        13. Goods tonnage in the reverse direction amounted to 33,728 metric tons and again declined by 63.55% due to the embargo. The monetary value was $394,863, a drop of 46.10%.

14. Handling receipts have increased from $258,375 to $390,467, an increase commensurate with the increase in goods traffic tonnage. The transport contracts which are of two years' duration provide that the contractor shall offer a fixed percent- age to the Railway for each station's coolie labour. The Rail- way collects all charges which are brought to account on invoices or miscellaneous way-bills, and the balance after deducting the The appropriate percentage is returned to the contractor. system works extremely well since it affords an equality of gain or sacrifice both to the Railway Administration and the con- tractor.

3

15. Owing to the increased number of foreigners being sent out of China via Shum Chun, baggage receipts at the junction station of the Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) and the Canton-Hankow Railway (Chinese Section), were up by 52.21%.

16. PASSENGER BOOKINGS. Local passenger traffic was better during this financial year. The increase was partly due to more picnickers and partly due to the fact that many refugees living on their capital found urban costs more than they could afford and so were driven to the villages along the railway. Both the passenger journeys and receipts were up by 11.55% and 2.92% respectively.

     Non-local passenger traffic was poor. The regulations controlling emigrants and immigrants on both sides of the boundary forced the figure down by 68.99% for passenger journeys and 89.71% in receipts.

      The figures both for purely local traffic and border passengers will be found summarized in Statement No. 7.

   17. OPERATION. No major changes have been made in the timetable since 1st May, 1951, when it was reduced as far as possible without causing inconvenience to the travelling public. It appears to satisfy reasonable needs while being economic and flexible in operation.

18. Train punctuality has not been altogether satisfactory. Unavoidable delays have been caused by the Police Authorities holding up trains at Fanling Station in order to carry out searches for unauthorized persons trying to get into the pro- hibited border area.

No. of passenger

trains

Percentage

No. of trains on time

No. of trains delayed for less than

5 mins.

3,898

52.50

2,774

37.52

No. of trains delayed for 5 mins.

and over.

733

9.98

Total number of passenger trains

run:

7,405

100.00

19. Numbers and types of special trains run during the

year were as follows:

Up

Down

Total

Goods (loaded)

75

529

604

""

(empty)

Passenger

Military

28

32

75

50

125

29

20

49

Test train

Ballast train

2

2

4

161

152

313

346

781

1,127

         20. RATES AND FARES. There were no alterations to the basic rates and fares.

Military personnel were continual offenders by travel- ling without having first obtained proper tickets. On December 5th, 1952, a new rule was introduced whereby a 50% surcharge was imposed on all Military personnel travelling without tickets. Beneficial results have been obtained.

        21. ACCIDENTS. In the early morning of April 26th, 1952, a permanent-way coolie lost both legs in an accident at Kowloon Station yard. He was just about to finish his night work when a train of empty coaches propelling into the Station knocked him down. On recovery and after having been fitted with artificial legs, he was given a light job at Kowloon Station as an attendant.

         22. On the afternoon of December 10th, 1952, at Mile 171 Military Occupation Crossing, an army gun carriage towing a gun collided with a local train. All the seven passengers in the vehicle were thrown out into a field and sustained injuries.

        23. On the night of December 20th, 1952, a goods train ran into the rear of a rake of empty coaches just outside Kowloon Station's distant signal. The cost of repair to the damaged rolling stock amounted to $98,903.15. Fortunately there were no casualties.

5

24. The following accidents happened during the year: -

Trespassers killed by trains

Trespassers injured by trains

Passengers injured by trains

Staff injured by trains

Train collision

Derailment shunting

Level crossing gates damaged by Military motor vehicles

19

19

"

private vehicle

Railway pier & pier fixtures damaged by launch

Other Railway property damaged by Military motor vehicles

private vehicle

}}

*

1,

Military armoured car towing a field gun collided with train Fires on goods trains

2

3

3

1

1

1

3

1

1

3

1

1

2

25. CONVICTIONS. The Railway Police have carried out their patrols efficiently. The number of convictions for the year was 15 as against 53 last year.

ACCOUNTS

26. The complete set of accounts and statements for the year will be found at the end of this report. The audited accounts of the Railway shown in the Colony's Annual Accounts are on the Revenue and Expenditure basis common for other Government departments. The supplementary final accounts presented with this report are prepared to provide the further accounting and operating information which is thought to be of public interest in view of the nature of the activities carried on by the Railway. Despite the short distance over which this section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway operates, this additional information indicates clearly that the Railway is an important component in the economic life of the Colony.

    27. CAPITAL ACCOUNT. Total investment assets at the close of the year amounted to $37,881,310.30 which is an increase over the previous year of a little under two million. Further rehabilitation of the track accounted for $1,216,099.56 whilst additional rolling stock received during the year accounted for another half million. A block of new flats completed during the year for staff required to be "on call" cost $140,855.99.

6

28. OPERATING ACCOUNT. As recorded earlier in the report, total revenue exceeded expenditure for the year by ap- proximately $1,360,000 which is an increase of over five lakhs on the previous year. This increase, in view of the various trade restrictions may be regarded as a considerable achieve- ment. Operating expenditure for the year was almost equal to that for 1951/52 as although running expenses were up, due to the fluctuating prices in coal and fuel oil, it proved possible to reduce expenses under other items.

Owing to large

           29. PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT. Government loans interest payable by the Railway is high, and after making a provision of $500,000 for Depreciation Reserves, a nett loss is recorded for the year of $155,553.59. But for the fact that the sale of Capital assets and surplus stores realized $609,257.99 an even greater loss would have been recorded. As the sum of five million is being transferred from the Surplus Appropriation Account to amortize Special Expenditure Loans incurred since 1939, interest payable next year will be corres- pondingly less.

30. RAILWAY UNALLOCATED STORES ACCOUNT. The dividing of the Unallocated Stores physical and financial records, of which the latter are now under the direct supervi- sion of the Senior Accountant, produced tangible results. The Unallocated Stores tabular summary has, for the first time since the war, been balanced without having to declare any unaccount- able difference.

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

31. LOCOMOTIVES. Austerity 2-8-0 locomotives Nos. 27, 29 and 32 were given a general overhaul. These overhauls. included the addition of an adjustable type of axle box guides and the alteration of valve pistons from the multi-ring type to the two-ring type. The advantage of the adjustable guides was mentioned in the previous Annual Report. Of the twelve 2-8-0 locomotives, ten of them are now equipped with adjustable guides; only Nos. 22 and 24 are without them. Experience has shown that the multi-ring type valve pistons are very difficult

7

to withdraw. Rings and pistons often break in the process of withdrawal. The two ring type is much better in this respect, and hence the conversion.

The following alterations were done on locomotives: - (a) Steel stays concealed between locomotive frames of locomotives Nos. 26, 28 and 30 were changed to " copper stays.

(b) The washout plugs of locomotive No. 27 were changed to the Housley type. A Housley washout plug was added to the barrel of the boiler of this locomotive also, to clean out accumulated mud and scale in this part of the boiler.

(c) The hydrostatic lubricators of four austerity 2-8-0 locomotives were changed to Wakefield mechanical lubricators.

    32. CARRIAGES AND WAGONS. Composite 3rd class and Guard Van Carriage No. 310 damaged in the accident outside Kowloon Station on December 20th, 1952, was rebuilt from a wood body to a steel body. The two side sills of this carriage were replaced with new channels and the rest of the under- frame was reinforced and repaired. The floor was surfaced with Durastic cold lay flooring composition reinforced with chicken wire in the passenger compartment and expanded metal in the luggage compartment.

      Nine carriages were overhauled. The floors of three of these carriages were surfaced with Durastic cold lay flooring composition, four with asphalt tiles and three with red porcelain. tiles.

Two 30-ton wagons were overhauled.

      Thirteen carriages and two wagons were painted. Ninety-two all-steel 453 metric ton wagons were repainted on the outside from gray to black colour.

      Five goods brake vans were received from the United Kingdom in February, 1953. They were assembled and put into service in March 1953.

8

           All carriage springs, with the exception of those of carriages Nos. 205, 206, 103 and 104, are semi-elliptic solid eye back plate type. Quite a number of these springs break every month. The breakage is on the back plate just in front of the solid eye. A number of methods of reducing this breakage has been tried. The only method that gave any success was the discarding of the solid eye back plate and the use in its place of the loose washer type of back plate. Six carriage springs to this type of back plate have been altered and after nearly a year in service, not one has broken. It has therefore been decided that when the present stock of solid eye back plate semi-elliptic springs are exhausted, they will be replaced with the loose washer back plate type of semi-elliptic springs.

33. FOUNDRY BUILDING. The new foundry building completed in March 1952 was made ready for use at the end of June 1952.

34. WORK FOR GOVERNMENT DEPARTMĒNTS. A considerable amount of work was done for other Hong Kong Government Departments. The most important items were the building of the bodies of two armoured cars and five bullet deflectors for the Police revolver ranges.

         35. STATISTICS. Statistical statements Nos. 9, 10, 11 and 13 relating to analysis of train and locomotive kilometrage; coal and fuel oil running expenses, and repairs to locomotives, carriages and wagons will be found at the end of this report.

WAY & STRUCTURES

        36. MAINTENANCE. Way and structures were main- tained in good order during the year.

        37. TRACK. The programme of re-railing the main line commencing in 1947-48 was completed in February, 1953. Approximately 44 miles of main line track were renewed during the year. The renewal of Loop Line at Taipo Station was also completed in March, 1953.

9

    The work done in the renewal of main line and loop line during the year was as follows:-

95-lb. rails

95-lb. switches

95-lb. crossing

Ordinary hardwood sleepers

Crossing sleepers

Bridge sleepers

Stone ballast

| || | || || ||

1,410 lengths

6 sets

6 sets 8,075 pcs.

236

63

"

3,770 tons

The work done in other spot renewals was as follows:

Using good old material.

85-lb. rails

85-lb. switches

85-lb. crossing

Using new material.

Ordinary timber sleepers

Crossing sleepers

11 || ||

24 lengths

4 sets

1 set

3,641 pcs.

395

Bridge sleepers

174

    Various new minor works, the most important being the looping up of roads in Hung Hom Station, the installation of a new crossover at Lowu, new siding at Fanling, new rail lubricators on curves from Mile 93 to 101, etc., were carried out during the year.

38. RAIL CREEP. Rail creep along the whole line has been carefully watched. Additional anchors were added where The necessary in order to keep this creep under control. maximum rail creep recorded during the year was only 3 inches.

39. KILOMETER AND GRADIENT POSTS. All Kilo- meter and Gradient Posts were repaired or replaced and painted.

   40. TUNNELS. All tunnels were inspected and main- tained in good condition. A new side channel was constructed inside No. 5 Tunnel to improve the drainage system, and the whole of the side drains inside No. 2 Tunnel were completely cleaned during the year.

10

        41. BRIDGES. Bridge No. 24 which had been dropped into sea water during the last war was thoroughly inspected in July, 1952. It was found that the bridge was in a very bad state of repair. Practically all the bottom and portions of the web stiffeners and more than 6,000 rivets were corroded. Many anchor bolts were missing while the ends of the spans were resting on deteriorated timber packings. The whole bridge was completely strengthened, repaired and painted in December, 1952.

           Some other major bridges including the foundations of their abutments and piers were also inspected and repairs to foundations which had been undermined by scour were carried out where necessary.

、 /

42. CUTTING AND EMBANKMENTS. There were no major landslips nor wash-outs during the year. Only minor repairs to certain portions of the stone embankment at Mile 12, which were loosened or scoured away by sea water were carried out.

43.

          DRAINAGE. Considerable attention was paid to drainage improvement along the track, the most important being the installation of new sub-soil drains between the main and loop lines at Taipo Market Station and the new open side channels near Mile 16 where floods usually occurred during rainy seasons. The side channels inside Gill's Cutting were also repaired and cleaned.

1

44. ROAD LEVEL CROSSINGS. One new road level crossing 10 ft. wide was laid at Mile 161 for the use of the Mili- tary Authorities.

The following road level crossings were renewed:-

(a) Road crossing at Mile 7.

(b)

29

"

Mile 9.

(c)

*

3"

""

(d)

די

-1

5

(e)

19

11

Mile 19.

Sheung Shui Station.

for approach road to Rice Godown,

Blackheads.

11

    45. ROADS. The approach road to Yaumati Station and sidings from Argyle Street was re-surfaced. The road in front of "B" Class Quarters, Hung Hom, was also widened and sur- faced.

46. STATION BUILDINGS AND PLATFORMS.

A new station building, composed of a "Lothian" shed 100' X 34' and Two a booking office 36' x 16' was erected at Lowu Station. low platforms each 550 ft. long were also constructed in this new station. These additions provide good shelter and better com- fort to passengers using this locality which has now become the terminus for the British Section of the Line.

The station buildings of Yaumati Station including the signal cabin and the shelter were completely overhauled. A length of about 100 ft. of platform on the south-western end of this station was surfaced with pre-cast cement concrete blocks to avoid the formation of muddy swamps during the wet season. The main station building and the shelter at Shatin Station were repaired and decorated. All the exterior surfaces of this old brick building were plastered, and all windows were renewed with metal windows. Approximately 210 ft. of queue railings were erected together with the addition of 2 new booking windows so as to improve the booking system of this small but busy station.

47. STAFF QUARTERS. A block of new quarters con- sisting of 8 flats was completed in June, 1952. "Aerocrete" blocks (light cellular cement mortar blocks weighing about 14 lbs. per cubic foot) were tried on the roof for heat insulation and have proved very satisfactory.

      New parquet flooring was laid on the ground floors of "A" Class Quarters at Hung Hom. The staircases and wooden floors on the first floor of these quarters were also reconditioned by sand papering and polishing.

      The old ceilings inside the bedrooms of the Police Quarters were renewed with fibre boards and well decorated.

      The two blocks of old quarters at Blackheads were completely overhauled and decorated. Considerable minor repairs were necessary before they could be made reasonably habitable.

12

           All other staff quarters were maintained in good order and improved where necessary as funds permitted during the

year.

         48. LAND. The following areas of Railway land were leased for various purposes:-

435,858 sq. ft. for Military camps, etc.

19

  6,000 11,324

19

>>

19

2,856

"

""

"}

"

""

"

""

"

"

a Bible Auditorium (Seventh Day Adventists) motor car service.

storage.

film-titling studio.

cultivation and gardening.

various other purposes.

3,000

62,913 101,262

Total: 623,213 sq. ft.

共产

            Revenue collected from the lease of the above areas of Railway land during the year amounted to $64,941.88. Military land is held on a permit at $1.00 per annum.

The

           An area of about 231,500 sq. ft. of Railway land at Hung Hom was also utilized by other Government Departments for rice godowns, a cemetery depot and a police camp.

49. ADVERTISING SPACE. during the year was 7,051 sq. ft. amounted to $94,991.50.

Advertising space let out Revenue from this source

         50. OLD SURPLUS AND UNSERVICEABLE MATERI- ALS. Approximately 1,471 tons of old rails and 24 tons of steel sleepers were sold by public tenders for a total sum of $456,771.

51. INDENTS. During the year the following materials requisitioned through the Crown Agents arrived from the United Kingdom: -

For Indent No. 72/51.

(a) Junction fishplate 85/95 lb. (b) "Ramapo" switch stand (c) Steel rails 95 lb., 36' (d) Steel rails 95 lb., 27′ & 33′ (e) Fishplate for 95 lb. rails

13

...

-

- 100 sets of 4

21 sets 1,364 lengths

108

""

1,598 pairs

For Indent No. 44/52. Rail flange lubricator For Indent No. 732/52. (a) Dog spikes (b) Rail anchors

For Indent No. 309/51.

Lothian shed for Lowu

For Indent No. 61/52. (a) Gauge tie bars

(b) Drill bits for ratchet drills

4 Nos.

171 bags 10,000 Nos.

1 complete set.

48 Nos.

24 Pcs.

52. CONTRACTS. During the year 15 tenders were gazetted and 15 contracts were signed.

STORES

    53. The stores section was reorganized during the year by the transfer of the stores accounting to the direct control of the Senior Accountant. The change has resulted in greater efficiency both in accounting and store-keeping.

54. Stores were completely surveyed by the annual boards in February, 1953. All items were checked with the balances of ledgers and were found to be correct.

    55. Details of stores purchased in 1951/52 and 1952/53 are as follows:

Coal

Furnace Oil

Lubricating Oil

$1,026,670.00

34,267.39

1951/52

$ 966,976.95

1952/53

134,139.72

28,880.31

27,517.05

Petrol

4,607.20

4,284.00

Government Stores (General)

112,605.95

158,388.96

Other Government Depart-

ments

418.44

887.65

Local Purchase

181,589.83

150,485.59

Crown Agents

2,245,125.23

1,846,996.29

$3,674,343.63

$3,249,496.93

14

·

        56. COAL. The total quantity of coal purchased during 1952/53 was 8,030 tons. This, compared with 6,847 tons in 1951/52 showed an increase of 1,183 tons. The average price of coal was $133.62 per ton delivered to Railway bunkers.

57. FURNACE OIL. The consumption of oil for 1952/53 was only 181 tons as compared with 785 tons for the previous year. This reduction arose from greater use of coal instead of oil on account of the much lower cost of coal.

                                         The average price of oil was $189.31 per ton.

58. General stores which could not be supplied by Govern- ment Stores were purchased locally. Oils and gases were pro- cured under Government contract.

59. The total amount realized from the sale of old unser- viceable stores during the year was $609,257.99. ✈

STAFF

         60. The establishment of the Railway at the end of the year consisted of the following staff-

Permanent and Pensionable

106

277

Non-Pensionable

333

Daily Paid

716

LIBRAR

This was a reduction of 66 over the previous year.

          The staff in general are to be congratulated on the high standard of work displayed during the year.

           The fullest encouragement has been given to the staff to take leave which they have earned under the leave regulations. It is thought that the leave taken as shown below has prevented much sickness through over-fatigue:

876 days vacation leave

3,737 days casual leave

15

URBAN COUNCIL PUBLIC LIBRARIES

As a result of the annual mass miniature x-ray examinations, 19 members of the staff are now undergoing treat- ment or are under observation for tuberculosis. A further 8 members of the staff who were sent to hospital during the year have now had the disease arrested. Total sick leave for the year for all kinds of sickness amounted to 2,198 days, or 3 days per person. Maternity leave of 249 days was also approved.

      Mr. J. K. Wong, who had held the appointment of Mechanical Engineer since 1945, retired on February 11th, 1953. Fifteen other officers retired during the year having served the Railway for periods varying from 6 to 41 years.

The death is reported with regret of Mr. Ho Chi Sing, Assistant Land Surveyor, who died suddenly in Kowloon Hos- pital on 14th January, 1953.

In the field of welfare, plans are afoot to provide the staff with a fully equipped Club House.

16

I. B. TREVOR,

General Manager, Railway.

17

Head No.

Summary of financial results for the past three years.

List of heads

1950/51

1951/52

1952/53

1.

Route Kilometrage-Operated

36

36

36

2.

Gross Railway Receipts..

$10,366,797

5,509,916

6,124,162

3.

Railway Operating Revenue.

$10,366,797

5,509,916

5,514,904

4.

Railway Operating Expenditure

$ 4,244,433

4,659,784

4,153,935

5.

Net Operating Revenue...

$ 6,122,364

850,132

1,360,969

6.

Percentage of Railway Operating Expenditure to Railway

Operating Revenue.

40.94

84.57

75.32

7.

Capital Investment.

$33,597,444

36,070,356

37,881,310

8.

9.

11.

Percentage of Net Operating Revenue to Capital Investment Railway Operating Revenue per Route Kilometre Operated. 10. Railway Operating Expenditure per Route Kilometre Operated Passenger Receipts

18.22

2.36

3.59

$

$

287,967

153,060

153,192

117,901

129,438

115,387

$ 7,158,207

3,286,350

3,031,140

12.

13.

Percentage of Passenger Receipt to Gross Railway Receipts Number of Passenger Journeys

69.05

59.64

49.49

6,055,398

3,512,835

3,613,593

14.

Goods Receipts

$2,871,215

1,720,555

2,223,443

15.

16.

Tons of Goods Hauled

17.

Revenue from Other Sources

Percentage of Goods Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts.

Rentals

Incidentals

Advertising

Profit on Central Mechanical Works

50/51 51/52 52/53 .$118,705 $100,425 $136,200

118,903 6,510 8,013 82,228 98,738 94,991

27.70

31.23

36.31

371,789

236,878

264,602

17,539

Sale of Surplus & Condemned Stores

32,883 21,117

264,455 609,258

337,375

503,011

869,579

18.

Percentage of Revenue from other sources to Gross Railway Receipts

3.25

9.13

14.20

18

Statement No. 1

At the

beginning of

the year

1-4-52

Capital Expenditure

During the year

New Lines

Additions and

& Exten-

sions

betterments

Property Abandoned

Nett Capital Expenditure

At the end of the year 31-3-53

Part 1 Construction Accounts

C-1 General Expenditure

C-2 Preliminary Expenditure....

770,814.12

80,045.23

C-3

Land

C-4

Formation

C-5

Tunnels

C-6 Bridgework

5,210,696.83

770,814.12

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

2,718,367.24

2,718.367.24

3,599,937.42

3,599,937.42

1,327,901.17

1,327,901.17

C-7 Line Protection

C-8 Telegraph & Telephones.....

C-9 Track.

C-10 Signals & Switches

C-11 Stations & Buildings

C-12 Central Mechanical Works

C-14 Plant

C-15 Rolling Stock

C-17 Docks, Harbour & Wharves

12,850,717.72 65,171.06

Total Cost....| 36,070,356.20

(A) Book value of 1,216.79768 tons old rails sold during the year.

90,074.47

90,074.47

10,000.00

10.000.00

4,578,351.01

1,216,099.56 (A) 97,343.81 1,118,755.75

5,697,106.76

193,251.16

25,245.99

25,245.99

218,497.15

2,072,746.48

158,224.73

568,220.69

1,934,061.60

99,690.27

158,224.73 2,230,971.21

99,690.27 2,033,751.87

561,133.40 (B)152,096.04| 409,037.36 13,259,755.08

(C)2,060,393.95

T

65,171.06 249,439.85 1,810,954.10 37,881,310.30

568,220.69

(B)

13 30-ton wagons Nos. 30100, 30104, 30106, 30309, 30310, 30300, 30301, 30306, 30312, 30419, 30430, 30421, & 30429 sold by public tender

$ 80,765.62

14

15-ton wagons Nos. 15301, 15404, 15406, 15411, 15413, 15414, 15415, 15417, 15418, 15419, 15422, 15403, 15407 & 15408 sold by public tender

59,853.72

2

15-ton wagons Nos. 15300 & 15420 transferred to P. W. D.

7,476.70

1 Railway Trolley No. RT-1 sold by public tender

4,000.00

$152,096.04

(C)

Special Expenditure 1952/53

Expenditure from Loan Funds

Less portion of Special Expenditure charged to Operating Expenditure not due for inclusion in Capital A/C.

793,005.26

1,366,991.84

$2,159,997.10

99,603.15

$2,060,393.95

19

Percentage on total Operating Expenditure

Previous Year

Amount

Operating

Expenses

Current Year

Amount

- །】ir ཀ

Previous Year

Percentage on

total Operating| Revenue

total Operating Percentage on Expenditure

Current Year

Amount

Operating

Revenue

Amount

Percentage on

total Operating Revenue

Main Line

Local Service

384,850.18 E-1 General

Expenses...

5.80

270,420.51

Administra-

2.16 114,429.67 13.02

tion

Special

248,070.84

2,403.44

250,474.28

5.97

55 91 3,080,711.97

.06 3.73 205,637.55

R-1 Passenger

Service,

Passenger 2,750,795.84

49.88

R-2 Passenger

606,540.15 E-2 Traffic

Expenses.

1,965,062.78|E-3 Running

Expenses...

637,417.08

1,597,616.35|

15.35

Service,

Other.

280,344.40

5.08

25.64 1,412,775.75|

R-3 Goods

Service,

7.73

31.24 1.455.737,81 360,277.62

Locomotives |1,337,715,14|

32.201

Carriages &

Goods |1,773,550.95|

32.16

.88 48,139.60

Terminal

Wagons

19,871,60

.48

Charge

59,425.20

1.08

.48

22,169.63

Motor

Vehicles

17,708.07

.43

4.71 259,639.59

R-4 Goods

2.72

19.74

126,877.72

Traffic

222,321.54

5.35

Service,

Other....

390,466.73

7.08

920,048.70 E-4 Main. of

.60

32,883.21

R-7 Profit on

Equipment

932,752.25 22.45

C.M.

Locomotive

Depart-

ment

783,282.65 E-5 Main. of

BL

Works

21,116.96

.38

1.82

.12

100,424.84

6,510.13

R-8 Rents

136,199.83

2.47

R-9 Incidental

Revenue

8,012.79

.15

Way &

Structure

16.74]

779,912.21

.07]

3,370.44

100

Engineering

Depart-

ment

Other De-

partments..

Total Operating Expenditure

17.59

.12

735,675.17

730,833.85

4,841.32

4,659,784.46

,153,935.13 100

Balance, Profit

100

850,131.86

on Operating..

1,360,969.07

'5,509,916.32|

5,514,904.20

1. Operating Expenditure

Sk

2.

3.

Portion of Special Expenditure chargeable to Revenue Services rendered by Government etc.

$3,860,024.89 99,603.15

6,710.55

-1.

Pensions & Gratuities

184,376.54

5.

Staff passage

3,220.00

$4,153,935.13

5,509,916.32

1. Nett Revenue'

2.

Government transportation

(a) Passenger

(b) Goods

3.

Government Rental

* This includes a sum of $15,075.33 being outstanding revenue for 1951/52 collected in 1952/53 but excludes a sum $10,970.65 being outstanding operating revenue for 1952/53 collected in 1953/54.

5,514,904.20

$5,422,885.28

91,556.92

270.00

192.00

$5,514,904.20

1.79

4.80

98,738.48

R-10 Advertising

94,991.50

1.72

264,455.20 5,509,916.32 R-11 Sale of

Surplus

& Con-

demned

Stores

5,514,904.20

Total Operating

5,509,916.32 Revenue

[5,514,904.20100

20

20

Statement No.

3

Profit and Loss Account.

Dr.

To Interest on Government Investment (A) Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan (B) Depreciation Reserves

Total

$669,901.60

776,000,00

500,000.00

$1,945,901.60

By Balance, nett Operating Revenue Sale of Capital Assets, Surplus Stores and Scrap

Total

Balance

$1,945,901.60

Cr.

$1,360,969.07

429,378.94

$1,790,348.01

155,553.59

$1,945,901.60

(A) Interest on Rehabilitation Loan up to 1951/1952

Less Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan up to 1951/1952

$13,435,416.45

3,104,000.00

$10,331,416.45 @ 31% $361,599,58

$669,901.60

$ 8,808,629.18 @ 31% $308,302.02,

765,090.49

Interest on Special Expenditure up to 1951/1952

(1939-51

1951-52

$8,043,538,69)

(B) Fifth installment of the K. C. R. repayment over twenty five years of Rehabilitation Loan $19,400,000.00† This sum was reduced to $18,257,440.88 for the 1952/53 financial yeor.

Surplus Appropriation

Account.

Dr.

To Deficit for the year

Amortization of Special Expenditure Loan 5,000,000.00

Cr.

$ 155,553.59

By Surplus for the year

Total

$5,155,553.59

""

Surplus carried forward to Balance Sheet

3,303,551,30

$8,459,104.89

Surplus from previous year Total

$8,459,104.89

$8,459,104.89

$8,459.104.89

21

127

Statement No. 4-General Balance Sheet.

Asset or Debit Balance

Liabilities or Credit Balance

Balance at beginning of

year

Heads of classification

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

Balance at beginning of

Heads of classification

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

year

B-6 Investment Assets :-

36,070,356.20 B-6-1 Cost of Road

& Equipment

36,070,356.20 Total Investment

Assets

B-7 Working Assets:-

10,352,33 B-7-1-1 Cash 23,010.75 B-7-4-2 Sundry

Debtors

23,891.00 B-7-4-3 Advance

Account

615,742.99 B-7-5 Stores

4,995.44| B-7-5-1 Workshop

Suspense

17,619.00

549,012.79

2,054.49

677,992.51 Total Working Assets 588,193.59

D-8 Deferred Debit

Items :-

9,120,159.11 D-8-1 Temporary

Advances to Government

4,669,022.72

37,881.310.30] 1,810,954.10|

B-1 Capita Liabilit-

ies :-

B-1-1 Railway

Investment

8.880,000.00|

8,880,000.00|

36,070,356.20 B-1-3 Perm. Govt.

Investment

29,250,750.15

6,819,606.05

37,881,310.30 1,810,954.10|

36,070,356.20 Total Capital Liabi-

lities

38,130.750.15

8,880,000.00

6,819,606.05

19,507.31

9,120,159.11

4,669,022.72

45,868,507.82,

B-9 Balance of accumulated

Deficit

PUBLIC LIBE

9,154.98

B-2 Working Liabi-

23,010.75

lities:-

6,272.00

85,306.61 B-2-2 Traffic Balance

66,730.20

Payable (Foreign

Railway)

31,261.62

54,044.99

2,940.95

23,010.75 B-2-4-2 Sundry

Creditors

23,010,75

9,154.98)

98,953.90

108,317.36 Total Working Liabi lities

31,261.62

77,055.74

B-3 Deferred Credit] Items :-

43,138,526.61

4,451,136.39

1,214,796.89 B-3-3 Depreciation

Reserves

1,645,236.09)

430,439.20

15,932.48 B-3-5 Misc. Deferred,

4,451,136.39

Credits

27,727.45

1,230,729.37

1,672,963.54

11,794.97

442,234.17

ARIE

8,459,104.89 B-4 Appropriation

from Surpluses...... 3,303,551.30

1,820,109.08

4,550,090.29 45,868,507.82

43,138,526.61 9,322,234.17 12,052,215.38

5,155,553.59

=

Statement No. 5 Analysis of Passenger Service

-

Part 1 - Passenger Service (R- 1 Passenger)

Current Year

Previous Year

Percentage of

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

[Number of

Pas-

Pas-

Origina-

Number

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

ting

of Units

Home

Carried

sengers

Kilo-

metres

Number

senger Reve-

Revenue

Carried Kilo- nue

metres

Line

Ordinary :-

128,762.30

First

56,700

56,700

1,126,913

89,930.35

1.57

1.59

2.97

509,551.80 1,930,513.62|

Second

Third

276,128 276,128

2,274,932 2,274,932 45,214,271

5,488,044

352,979.35

7.64

7.74

11.66

1,673,428.80]

62.95

63.78

55.27

Government :-

6,204.80

First

7,075.10

Second

22

222

16,265.50

Third

4,060 4,060 9,149 9,149 181,836 22,255

80,693

6,956.15!

.11

.11

.23

11,547.50

,25

.26

.38

22,255 442,318

17,570.07

.62

.63

.58

Excursion :-

43,196.25

First

41,578

110,180.85

Second

41,578 149,799 149,799

826,363

53,481.85

1.15

1.17

1.77

2,977,255

149,313.35

4.15

4.20

4.93

15,863.30

Third

45,760 45,760

909,480

31,489.85'

1.27

1.28

1.04

3,366.60

Platform Tickets.

46,620

46,620

9,324.00 1.29

.30

41,329.55

Excess Fare

35,446.35

1.17

Season & Monthly Tickets :-

9,146.00

60,510.00|

First

Second

6,560

6,560

130,380

6,548.00

.18

.18

.21

82,440

82,440

1,638,495

66,027.65

2.28

2.31

2.18

114,944.05

Third

277,360

277,360

5,512,530

144,174.20

7.68

7.78

4.76

80,523.25

Scholar Tickets

316,531 316,531

6,291,054

92,235.75

8.76

8.87

3.05

3,279.00

Golfing Tickets

3,721

3,721

73,955

7,206.00 .10

.10

.24

$3,004,748.82

75,963.15

(A)3,080,711.97

(A) Home Line. Foreign

Government

Total Part 1 |3,613,593 |3,613,593 |70,893,590 (B)2,747,659.22| 100.00

Foreign

Government

100.00

90.74

(B) Home Line..

$2,656,996,42

90,662.20

$3,080,711.97

$2,747,659.22

23

Previous Year

Revenue

Statement No. 5 Analysis Of Passenger Service

Part 2 - Passenger Service (R - 2 Other)

Current Year

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

Kinds of Tickets Used

Revenue

Percentage Of

Revenue

Baggage & Specie: -

5,535.20

Public

8,425.35

.28

Government

Parcels :-

2,231.90

Public

2,933.85

.10

Railway Service

196,862.45

Carriage & Animals :- Public

268,045.20

8.85

Special Train :-

Public

Government

Postal

1,008.00

(C) 205,637,55

3,286,349.52

(C) Home Line

Foreign

Miscellaneous

Total - Part 2

Total - Parts & 2

Government

940.00

.03

,344.40

3,028,003.62

$204,629.55

1,008.00

S

(D) Home Line Foreign

Government

$279,404.40

940,00

$205,637.55

$280,344.40

9.26

100.00

24

Statement

No. 6 Analysis Of Goods Service

Part 1

-

Goods Service (R-3 Goods)

Previous Year

Current Year (April, 1952- March, 1953)

Percentage of

Kilo-

Kilo-

Revenue

Kind of Goods

Number of Kilograms Carried

Kilograms

Kilometres

grams Reve-

Revenue

grams

Carried

Kilo- nue

metres

General Merchandise

659,871.40 Invoiced to and from Lowu 732,602.40

Inward

220,286,770 4,378,199,554

Outward

6,327.10 Invoiced to and from 62,114.45

Inward

stations other than Lowu

Outward

1,340,910.10 83.25 83.25 33,728,210 670,348,174 395,133,10 12.75 12.75 535,430 10,641,671 3,872.95 .20 10,051,940 199,782,308 93,051.90 3.80

60.31

17.77

.20

.17

3.80

4.19

1,460,915.35 Total Part 1

264,602,350 5,258,971,707 1,832,968.05 100.00 100.00

82.44

1,265.00 Shunting

258,374.59 Handling Receipts

Part 2 Goods Service (R-4 Other)

Demurrage

259,639.59 Total Part 2

1,720,554.94 Total Parts 1 & 2

1,460.00|

.07

389,006.73

17.49

390,466,73

17.56

2,223,434.78

100.00

25

25

Previous

Year

Statement No. 7 Summary of Local and Non Local

Passenger Traffic

Revenue

Passenger Traffic

Current Year

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

Percentage of

Pas-

Inward

Number of

or

Passenger

Passenger Kilometres

Revenue

Outward

Carried

Number senger Carried Kilo-

metres

Reve-

nue

KON

Passenger Service

443,998.35

Inward

163,481 3,249,186

230,769.15 4.52

4.58

8.40

Bookings to and from Lowu

431,313.95

Outward

181,211

3,601,569 230,545.25 5.01

5.08 8.39

1,065,038,25

Inward

1,605,356

31,906,451 1,115,125.79; 44.43 45.01 40.58

Bookings to and from sta- tions other than Lowu

1,140,361.42

Outward

1,663,545 32,136,384 1,171,219.03 46.04 45.33 42.63

3,080,711.97

Total

LIBRA

3,613,593 70,893,590 2,747,659.22 100.00 100.00 100.00

Statement No. 8

Tabular Summary of Unallocated Stores

1. Stock on hand as at 1st April, 1952

2.

Add purchases, returns & charges

$ 556,515.45

832,210.67

1,388,726.12

3. Deduct issues to votes & services as credited to

expenditure sub-head

909,144.94

479,581.18

4. Deduct proceeds of sale of stores as credited to revenue

321.27

479,259.91

5. Transfers between stores

479,259.91

6. Adjustments

Add stores received in 1952/53 but paid for in 1951/52

59,239.82

538,499.73

Deduct stores received in 1951/52 but paid for in

1952/53

7. Deduct losses & deficiencies written off

8. Add over estimate in Prime Cost Ledger

15.25

538,484.48

6,051.04

532,433.44

52.30

532,485.74

Add taken on charge in Prime Cost Ledger

9. Stock on hand as at 31st March, 1953

6.37

$ 532,492.11

26

27

22

}

Statement 9

6

Analysis of Train & Locomotives Kilometrage

(April, 1952-March, 1953)

Train

1951/52 1952/53

Oil Engine Kilometrage

Coal Engine Kilometrage

Total Kilometrage

Rail Bus

Kilometrage

Classification

1951/52 1952/53 1951/52 1952/53

1951/52 1952/53

Passenger by B.S. Engine

Mixed Slow by B.S. Engine

Kilometrage Goods by B.S. Engine

49,508.49| 6,622.09 284,325.70 325,287.04 333,834.19|331,909.13|| 26,695.00 24,360.00

5,823.47 1,920.18| 26,538.76 32,979.89| 32,362.23| 34,900,07|

Military Special by B.S. Engine Ballast Train by B.S. Engine

733.51

391.33

892.33

857.01 1,625.84 1,248.34 133.00

632.34

143.67 18,573.48 15,173.03 19,205.82 15,316.70 3,782.00 2,735.60

Total Train Kilometrage by B.S.Engine

56,697.81 9,077.27 330,330.27 374,296.97 387,028.08|383,374.24 30,610.00 27,095.60

Loco.

Kilometrage

Loco. by B.S. Engine 60,197.72 9,632.27 350,152.77 396,789.47 410,350.49 406,421,74| Light Engine by B.S.| Engine

Shunting Engine by B.S. Engine

Total Loco. Kilometrage by B.S. Engine

Note: B.S.-British Section.

50.49 406,42

1,844.50 470,83 8,425.34| 16,114.84 10,269.84 16,585.67|

54,900.00 54,750.00 54,900.00| 54,750.00|

62,042.22 10,103.10 413,478.11 467,654.31 475,520.33 477,757.41

Statement 10 Cost for Running Coal Burning Locomotives

Previous Year 1951/52 $758,163.15

129.595

2.30 5,850.25

(April, 1952-March, 1953)

1 Total Cost of Coal for Main Line Running

2 Average Cost per ton

3 Cost per Train Kilometrage

4 Total Weight of Coal for Main Line Running

(ton).

17.99

5 Weight per Train Km in Kg.

712.10

13.18

6 Total Weight of Coal for Shunting (ton).

7 Weight per Shunting Km in Kg.

Current Year 1952/53 $920,962.68

135.398

2.46

6,801.90

18.46

820.05

15.22

Statement 11 - Cost for Running Furnace Oil Burning Locos.

Previous Year

1951/52 $139,782.95

167.706

2.47

833.50

(April, 1952-March, 1953)

1 Total Cost of Furnace Oil

2 Average Cost per ton

3 Cost per Train Kilometrage

4 Total Weight of Furnace Oil (ton).

14.94 5 Weight per Train Km in Kg.

Statement 12

Current Year 1952/53 $28,534.18

181.457

3.14

157.25

17.60

Consumption of Lubricants for Locomotives.

(April, 1952-March, 1953)

Previous Year 1951/52

$3,023.67

Current Year 1952/53

 .719 1,103.86

.262

1 Total Weight of Engine Oil (gals.) 2 Weight per 100 Engine Km in gals. 3 Total Weight of S.H. Cylinder Oil (gals.) 4 Weight per 100 Engine Km in gals.

$3,082,51

.728

1,112.765

.263

0.74 9,686.06

523.10

Statement 13 - Cost Assignment and Statistics. (April, 1952-March, 1953)

Previous Year 1951/52 $20,618.76

I Average cost of repair per Locos. per annum 2 Average cost of Locos repairs per Engine Km. 3 Average cost of repairs per Passenger car per

annum

4 Average cost of repairs per goods wagon per

Current Year 1952/53 $23,578.50

0.84

10,540.70

annum..

538.38

0.0291

5 Average cost of Engine Oil per Engine Km for

Locomotives

0.0352

0.0120

6 Average cost of S.H. Cyliner Oil per Engine

Km for Locomotives

0.0131

4.18

7 Average cost of Lubricants per gal.

4.87

28

29

#JUST(4-KLIGHET •

·

001

VLOGM

Statement 14 - Classification of Rolling Stock Motive Power

LA

1

3

5

6

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

Steam Locomotives

7

Co

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Engine No.

Distribution

Wheel

Diameter of Cylinder

Stroke

Driving Wheel

Diameter of

Tank or Tender

Gross Weight of

Engine and

in working order

Tender in tons

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Addition during

the year

during the year Total Stock at the end of the

Reduction

year

Weight on

Driving Wheel

4

3 4--6--1 22"

28"

614" Side Tank

2-6-4 19" 26" 611"

106.00

1-

27

60

20

33714

90.35

I

39

51

17

23350

1 & 2 2-6-0 | 171"

24"

42" Saddle

53.25

ลง

2

2

10

46 05 15.35

26775

2132 2-8-0 19"

28"

561" Tender

125.75

12

12

7

61.25 15.31

34215

""

RB-1 Railbus

6 Cyl. Bedford 3-5/16′′ 33′′

31"

RB-2 Railbus

6 Cyl. Dodge 31"

42"

31"

16

16

Petrol Railcars

LIBRARIES

1

1

1

15

2

=

5

RAC & SAE Rating 26. 33. H. P. 55 Passengers

SAE 25. 35 H. P.

55 Passengers.

30

Classification

Statement 15 - Classification of Rolling Stock - Carriage

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

2

Average Tare

of each Class

(ton)

5

6

7

Seating Capacity

(passenger)

Total Stock at the

beginning of

the year

Additions during

the year

Reductions during the

year

co

Total Stock at the end of the year

Total Seating

Capacity (passenger)

Ton

Cwt.

First Class Carriage

35

10

48

2

96

108

First Class Carriage

35

8

54

2

First & Second Class Composite

HO

90

Carriage

30

45

First & Second Class Composite

1

56

Carriage

33

11

56

256

Second Class Carriage

33

18

64

Second Class Carriage

45

5

78

2

2

156

Third Class Carriage.

33

19

128

16

16

2048

Third Class & Brake Composite.

32

18

58

5

5

290

34

3100

34

31

1

Classification

Statement 16

Q

Overall

Length of

Wagon

Classification of Rolling Stock Goods Wagons

(April, 1952 - March, 1953)

3

4

5

6

Average Tare

of each Class

8

9

Carrying Capacity

Total Stock

qî an | G

Ton

beginning af the year

Additions during the

year

Reductions during the

year

Total stock at the end of the year

Carrying

Total

Capacity

Ton

Cwt. Ton

Tank (in Covered Wagon) 20 ton

35'-0"

20

Tank, Oil, (10,000 gals. of Water)

41'-1"

21 19

Flat 30 ton

35'-0"

12

Flat 40 ton

Flat 45 metric ton

37'-10" 14

45'-0"

17 12

Flat 80 ton

32′-0′′

27 13

1

Lowsided

open 46. metric ton

45'-0"

18 12

10

Highsided open 15 ton

19'-0"

7

Highsided open 30 ton

35'-0"

14

Highsided open 45 metric ton

45'-0"

Covered 15 ton

19′-0′′

8 19

Covered 30 ton

35'-0"

15

Covered (Cattle Truck) 30 ton

35'-0"

15

Covered 40 ton

37'-10" 18 14

Covered 442 metric ton

40′-0′′

20

Well 50 ton

32'-0"

25 12

Cattle Wagon (New)

45'-0"

398023 2 -220402 |

20

441

30

6

40

45

10

80

45.7/20

10

15

14

30

13

19 12 44.2/5

25

15

7

30

29

ONEER O NOGONN

7

30

40

44

130

50

44

5(A);

Brake Van 10 metric ton

35′-0′′

19

3

19.3/20

5 (A)

Note: (A) Received from Crown Agents

ARIES

262

10

29

33

40

311

3 (C).

5

150

5

200

10

450

2

160

10

4531

14 (C)

6 (C)

210

25

1110

25

750

3

90

1

40

130

5720

50

5

220

96

243

10051

(B) 6 Nos. converted to temporary 3rd class passenger cars

(C) Scrapped by Board of Survey

Statement 17 - Classification of Rolling Stock - Service Equipment

(April, 1952 - March,'1953)

1

65 ton Break-down Crane... 10 ton Locomotive Crane

RT-1 Motor Trolley

RT-2 Motor Trolley

RT-3 Motor Trolley

2

3

Ton

Cwt.

87

1

2

1

1/

5

(C) Scrapped by Board of Survey.

32

5

6

| | | |

1

1

1 (C)

1

1

4