九廣鐵路年報 Kowloon Canton Railway Annual Departmental Report 1950-1951

SESSIONAL PAPER NO. OF

OF

HONG KONG

ANNUAL REPORTS 1950-1

EDUCATION

DEPAR MENT

HONG

KONG

BRITISH SECTION

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY

香港公

共圖

HONG KONG PUBLIC LIBRARIES

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY

 

Education Dist.

Annual Report

ERRATA

(a) The word "BRITSH" on TITLE PAGE should read "BRITISH".

(b) The figure $10,336,796.75 in first paragraph of the report should

read $10,366,796.75.

mis in chan

Please amend

ow defy

ANNUAL

DEPARTMENTAL

MANA

BY THE

REPORT

GENERAL MANAGER

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY

OON

(BRITSH SECTION)

FOR THE

FINANCIAL

HONG

NG KON

PRINTED

EDUCATIO

*

YEAR 1950-1.

LIBRARIES

& PUBLISHED BY NORONHA & COMPANY, LIMITED

GOVERNMENT PRINTERS & PUBLISHERS

OLD BAILEY STREET, HONG KONG

C

CONTENTS.

GENERAL SURVEY

TRANSPORT

OPERATING

ACCOUNTS-GENERAL

Operating Receipts

Operating Expenditure

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS

WAY AND STRUCTURES

STORES

STAFF

Paragraphs

1 19

20

-

-

27

28 39

-

40 - 46

41

47

-

-

41

46

54

55 - 76

77

-

84

85 - 86

GENERAL SURVEY.

         The financial results for the year ending March 1951 have once again provided a record for this short line of 224 miles, but unfortunately it is a record which is likely to stand for some years to come if present trends are any criteria. Gross income was $10,336,796.75 and nett revenue $6,122,364.57.

      2. The year commenced well, with the 637,634 passengers carried in the month of April exceeding by 128,177 the previous highest total in February 1950 for any one month. The above figure was again beaten during the month of February 1951, the Chinese New Year holiday period, with 665,610, though it was of the nature of a "nunc dimittis" since the Chinese Government had pronounced that stringent new immigration and emigration regulations would be brought into force on February 15th. Many passengers who delayed their return to the Colony beyond a week were therefore caught and had to obtain two sureties before they could effect an exit from China.

3. During the months of March and April 1950, the adverse balance of passengers into the Colony over those leaving, had been steadily mount- ing until the disparity for one week in mid-April by rail alone had risen to 15,656. A similar state of affairs obtained on the Macao steamboats and certain ferries affecting the Chinese mainland. On May 1st 1950, therefore, a system of control was introduced whereby outward bookings were limited to the number of arrivals on the previous day. All forms of transport including passenger-carrying junks were included in the arrangement.

      4. The success of the scheme lay in its essential simplicity since there was no discrimination; numbers and not personalities were the only consideration. Later, a certain discretion was exercised by the Police as to types. The measures are still in force.

       5. The arrangements above described became the subject of a protest by the Chinese Government.

       6. It is of interest, therefore, to compare the effects of the stringent regulations introduced later by the Chinese Government itself, in February 1951, on passenger travel by rail in April/June 1950 and in January/March 1951, i.e., the months immediately before and after the respective controls had been introduced:-

April 1950 January 1951

Totals In & Out. 386,642 June 1950-326,214

""

""

""

""

354,896 March 1951- 74,000

1

     Railway activities declined by approximately 12,000 passengers and $10,000 per day as a result of the Chinese measures.

Another effect of these travel restrictions has been the virtual extinction of the small travelling trader and the greater economic strain imposed on the Chinese resident of the Colony by the inability of his relatives to move freely back and forth between the Colony and their villages in South China.

   8. With the introduction of a new timetable on June 1st, it became somewhat easier to deal with the hordes of passengers concentrated at the improvised border station Lowu, since the train schedules on the Chinese Section had become stabilized and an intensive passenger service on the British Section cleared those arriving from China rapidly when once on British Territory. Passengers for China were not so fortunate.

9. An opportunity occurred in June in connexion with the removal of 9,330 tons of Chinese railway material which had been stored for a long period on railway land to test the 2-8-0 austerity locomotives' capacity to haul goods trains of 700 tons up a grade of 1 in 100 through the Beacon Hill tunnel. It was found that no difficulty need be experienced in hauling such trains in fine weather.

10. Three meetings took place with officials of the Chinese Section during the year. The first one was held at Shum Chun on April 9th, 1950, and the other two were held at Canton on May 22nd and 23rd, and November 9th and 11th.

     Very full discussions took place concerning the running of passenger and goods trains. A large measure of agreement was reached but certain vital differences could not be resolved. No finality was achieved at the close of the year.

11. One major improvement arising out of these meetings, however, was the working of all goods wagons through to Canton. Previously only cargo carried on Chinese Government account went through, the rest having to be transhipped at the border.

12. The first 5 covered wagons out of a total of 192 of different classes ordered in 1946 arrived in June. By the end of the year 130 covered wagons and 5 tank cars had been received and assembled.

13. Four cemetery buildings erected by the department on railway premises for the Urban Council at a cost of $310,000 were opened by the Acting Colonial Secretary, Mr. R. R. Todd, on 29th September, 1950. The funeral scheme provides for the remains of the Chinese dead

2

previously buried in the Colony's urban area being removed to a new cemetery in the New Territories in specially-fitted railway wagons. In addition, new burials are conveyed daily by rail, a distance of 18 miles.

       14. The department is greatly indebted to the Thai Government and its Forestry Industry Organization for the provision of 22,727 Mai Yang sleepers and 3,322 bridge and crossing timbers. Without their valuable assistance the 6-year re-railing programme could not have been continued. There is good reason to hope that further supplies will be made available.

       15. In the workshops, with the arrival of the 18′ planer in February, 1951, the rehabilitation of the shops, except for lighting, may be con- sidered as complete.

       16. The austerity 2-8-0 locomotives have been found expensive to maintain and but for the fact that they were obtained from War Office surplus at a book figure, such expenditure would have been a matter for greater concern. But apart from locomotive maintenance costs, the standing-in-steam time has unavoidably always been considerable on this short line: hitherto it has been justified by a combination of local and through running. If there is to be no resumption of through running in future then consideration must needs be given to the eventual retirement of steam locomotives for local traffic and the adoption of either diesel- electric or diesel mechanical forms of traction.

       17. During a visit by the General Manager of the North Borneo Railway in March, it was found possible to assist him with some much- needed bridge material, old rails and fishplates. Prices were agreed on and the sum of HK.$201,649.36 was duly received, but too late to be reflected in the current accounts. Further assistance is being afforded in the manufacture either in our shops or under our supervision of urgently needed parts when procurement from the United Kingdom would take too long.

       18. In December, at the request of the Police Department, which provided the necessary funds, the Railway Border Bridge was totally enclosed with steel plates in order to afford protection to foot passengers who were robbed by gangs operating from Chinese Territory. The thieves climbed up on to the under-girders of the bridge and slashed baggage with razor blades while others snatched wrist watches and jewellery openly. On one occasion when the British Police endeavoured to stop them they were pelted with stones, bottles and nightsoil.

       19. All members of the staff have worked well. In particular, the large increase in traffic threw consierable extra work on all stations and operating staff and they are to be commended for the efficiency and

3

willingness with which they carried out their duties. A special word of praise is due to the older members. The railway suffered severely from loss of trained personnel during the war, only 40% of the present traffic staff being pre-war employees. They have therefore had to shoulder additional responsibilities caused by the continuous increase in traffic since the reoccupation, and at the same time assist in training and supervising new employees.

TRANSPORT.

20. Traffic revenue for the year amounting to $9,913,642 was once again a record for the railway being an increase of 37% over the previous

year.

   21. The increase was due to the same reasons as in the previous year, namely, the partial blockade of the Pearl River and China coast by the Nationalists during the earlier part of the year, and difficulties experienced by shipping companies in their negotiations with the Chinese Government. In consequence, shipping activities were restricted, and the railway became for the time being the principal means of communication with Kwangtung and areas further north. Considerable quantities of goods which normally would have been carried direct to and from Chinese ports were diverted to the Colony, and many passengers who normally travelled by ship were conveyed by the railway.

   22. As stated in last year's report, prior to 15th October 1949, all British Section local trains terminated at the frontier station of Shum Chun in Chinese Territory, and all through trains operating between the Colony and the interior at either Kowloon or Canton. Passengers holding through tickets were included in the statistical returns under the heading of Terminal or Sectional Through Traffic and passengers booked to Shum Chun, the border station, were accounted for as local passengers. From 15th October 1949, all British Section trains have terminated at Lowu, a former overnight locomotive depôt, in British Territory, and all bookings have been included in the figures for local passengers. It will therefore be realized that although the figures given in para. 23 of this report show there was no through traffic during the year, it is estimated that over 95% of passengers using Lowu Station were travelling to and from China.

4

-

23. A summary of passenger traffic for the past two years illustrat- ing the features referred to in para. 22 is given below:-

Terminal

1949/50

1950/51

Pass. Up. Revenue

Pass. Dn. Revenue

Pass. Up.

Revenue

Pass. Dn. Revenue

thro' traffic

between

Kowloow &

Canton

332,796 $ 753,379

377,814 $ 878,483

Sectional

Thro' traffic

147,649

224,549

93,771

163,677

Total (foreign)

480,445

$ 977,928

471,585

$1,042,160

Local Passgrs.

Carried.

Bkgs. to

& from

Shum Chun

572,530

$ 450,548 465,028

$ 450,723

Bkgs. to &

from Lowu

708,860

963,382 753,737

971,520 1,749,123

$2,588,720 1,579,472 $2,205,119

       Local Bkgs. (other)

894,150

693,541 918,031

690,745 1,315,390

1,012,676 1,411,413 1,104,853

Total (local) 2,175,540

$2,107,471 2,136,796 $2,112,988 3,064,513

$3,601,396 2,990,885 $3,309,972

Total passgrs.

Up2,655,985 Revenue-$3,085,399

(thro' and Local)

Dn. 2,608,381

5,264,366

3,155,148

Up 3,064,513 Revenue $3,601,396

Dn. 2,990,885

3,309,972

-

25

$6,240,547

6,055,398

$6,911,368

24. A feature brought out in the above figures is the rise in local bookings (other) from 1,812,181 in 1949/50 to 2,726,803 in 1950/51. The causes were the growth in population, picnic parties at weekends and the conveyance of Military personnel. There was also an increase of 156,266 in passenger bookings to and from Sheung Shui, the close proximity of this station to the frontier making it a convenient collecting centre and base of operations for travelling traders.

25. The very great increase in goods traffic was caused by the buying and selling of raw materials in the Colony by the Chinese Government, and restricted shipping round the China coast. In consequence, a large proportion of goods traffic by rail has been cargo to and from Shanghai and points further north which normally would have been conveyed by

sea.

5 --

   26. As in the case of passenger traffic, statistics given below show there was no through invoiced traffic, but in fact practically all traffic booked to and from Lowu were either imports or exports from China:-

1949/50

1950/51

!

Tons Up

Revenue Tons Dn. Revenue

Tons Up

Revenue Tons Dn. Revenue

 Thro' goods carried

3,825

$ 20,866

3,196 $ 23,074

Local goods

carried

invoiced to

& from

Shum Chun

5,358

$ 36,347

4,165

$ 35,025

Invoiced to &

from Lowu

60,250

422,553

12,296

76,266

211,946 $1,432,484 107,915 $630,667

Local invoices (other)

13,247

24,143

1,960

20,161

6,323

134,424

45,604 252,879

78,855

$483,043

18,421 $131,452

218,269 $1,566,908 153,519 $883,546

Total (Thro' and Local)

Up- 82,680 Revenue $503,909

Dn. 21,617

154,526

Up

Dn.-

218,269 Revenue-$1,566,908

153,519

883,546

22

104,297

$658,435

371,788

$2,450,454

27. There were certain alterations to the railway goods-handling contracts which resulted in the railway receiving an increased percentage of the handling charges from contractors. Revenue from this source amounted to $385,933 as against $95,868 the previous year. This was an average of $1.04 per ton of goods handled compared with $0.92 per ton for 1949/50. Revenue from the use of railway cranes amounted to $28,228.

OPERATING.

28. The year was difficult owing to the shortage of passenger rolling stock and the necessity of using Lowu as a terminal station, a function for which it was never intended. The difficulties were surmounted from an operational point of view, but passengers suffered great discomfort. from overcrowding on trains, and the lack of shelter from sun and rain.

6

29. The frontier was open only for passengers from 7.00 a.m. to 7.00 p.m. daily, and it was therefore necessary to work passenger trains so as to arrive and depart from Lowu within these times. One up and one down train were worked later for New Territories residents and the last arrivals from over the frontier, but it became evident early in the year that the service would have to be increased within the hours referred to by a more intensive use of existing rolling stock. This was achieved by shortening the turn-round time between trains and carrying out all cleaning and minor repairs while a train was standing in Kowloon Station. Coaches were only taken out of service when major repairs or matters affecting their safe running was obligatory. The time available was not always sufficient for the work to be completed efficiently, especially during peak periods when trains were very overcrowded, and the turn-round time too short for anything more than a cursory examina- tion and cleansing to be carried out. It was, however, the best that could be done under the circumstances, and by these means, the average daily train service was increased from twenty to thirty.

       30. The difficulty at Lowu was, as has been previously stated, the absence of any facilities for dealing with passengers and goods traffic except in small quantities. Since October 1949, it has become the British Section terminal and the transhipment point for all passengers entering or leaving the Colony by train. All goods traffic to and from China by rail passes through this point, considerable shunting and rebooking of down goods being carried out there. The terrain in the area did not permit of any large scale extensions without heavy capital expenditure and this was out of the question in view of the uncertainty of the period. during which the station would be a terminal point. It was therefore. necessary to make the best of the limited facilities available, and effect minor improvements where possible.

       31. A fence was erected round the area in April. This enabled all ticket checking and collection to be carried out there, and reduced the long delay to up trains at Sheung Shui which had previously been neces- sary owing to ticket collection. Train punctuality was thus improved and train turn-rounds speeded up. Minor structural alterations were then made to old quarters which were used as a booking office; a refresh- ment shed was erected and small improvements were made to siding accommodation to increase the facilities for shunting and receipt of trains. Even so, it was impossible to add to the siding accommodation to any extent, and shunting had to be carried out in a restricted space often with hundreds of passengers standing in queues across the tracks waiting to cross the frontier into China.

7

   32. During the year, 3,328,595 passengers and 319,861 tons of goods were dealt with at this improvised station. Revenue collected amounted to $2,835,786, and on average, 30 trains a day were received and despatched.

33. With tight turn-rounds, train punctuality was essential since on a congested single line such as this, small delays naturally affected several other trains. For the first few months after the suspension of through traffic, punctuality was bad brought about by the uncertainty of arrival of Chinese Section trains at the frontier owing to Nationalist bombing and the necessity of collecting all up tickets at Sheung Shui owing to absence of fencing at Lowu. The completion of the fencing at the end of April, however, coincided with a resumption of normal daylight services on the Chinese Section, and a new timetable was brought into operation on June 1st. With the introduction of this timetable, train punctuality was greatly improved by the elimination of the long stop at Sheung Shui, a non-crossing station, and the speeding up of the service by the operation of express trains between Kowloon and the frontier for passengers destined for China. A surcharge of 20% was levied on passengers travelling on these trains and additional revenue accruing from this source amounted to $412,008.

34. Another new timetable was introduced on October 29th. This was drawn up based on traffic experience of the previous four months, as the position had gradually changed through alterations to train schedules and new regulations introduced on the Chinese Section. Passenger services to and from Canton had settled down so that trains left the frontier during the morning and arrived through the afternoon. Trains were operated to connect as far as possible with these services. The average number of trains per day in this timetable was 32 with additional trains at week-ends for picnickers etc.

35. Three hundred and eighty eight special trains were run during the year for various purposes, many of them being at week ends when traffic was heavy. On Sunday, December 3rd a festival at Shatin, 7 miles from Kowloon, which attracted large crowds necessitated the running of 44 trains. It is thought this is a record for any one day for the line. This number would probably have been exceeded but for an unfortunate engine derailment caused by misguided but enthusiastic efforts by train staff to speed up movements at this station. Ballast trains operating at night for the Engineering Department numbered two hundred and six.

8

Accidents were as follows:--

Trespassers killed by trains

29

injured by trains

Passengers killed by trains

4

2

2

injured by trains

15

Engine failures

6

collision

1

""

Train parting

1

Derailments

6

Level crossing gates damaged by motor

traffic

6

Railway pier and pier fixtures damaged

by launch

2

Other railway properties damaged by

motor traffic

4

      36. The most serious of these accidents occurred on the morning of January 24th when the 7.45 a.m. passenger train for Lowu entered the wrong track when passing Hung Hom Block Station. Considerable damage occurred to locomotives and railway property, but fortunately there was no loss of life or serious injury. The accident was caused by a signalman omitting to set the points for the main line after having given "line clear". A new signal box was in the course of erection here when the year ended and when completed all points and signals at this busy locality will be interlocked-an arrangement which should prevent a similar type of accident occuring in future.

      37. There were no alterations to basic rates and fares during the year.

      38. The Police are deserving of the highest praise for their co-operation and help especially at Lowu. This area attracted a large number of undesirables of all descriptions, many of the racketeers who had previously operated at Kowloon transferring their activities to Lowu where the possibility of gain was greater. The Police had these people to contend with in addition to the ordinary immigration control, and the activities of the Yellow Ox gang-a collection of ruffians who preyed continuously on the travelling public and went out of their way to embarrass the Police.

39. There were 446 convictions for various offences against the rail- way during the year.

9

ACCOUNTS-GENERAL.

40. The working results of the past three years are as follows:-

Year

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

Gross Receipts

Operating Nett Operating Expenses

Revenue $ 3,595,901.05

$ 7,075,991.75

$ 3,480,090.70

3,554,899.47 4,244,432.92

7,783,348.81 10,366,796.75

4,228.449.34

6,122,363.83

   41. Receipts and expenditure under the most important heads in the operating account for the past three years are as follows:-

OPERATING RECEIPTS.

Heads

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

Passenger Service,

Passenger

Other

$ 6,076,999.98 118,438.56

$ 6,344,845.16

$ 7,025,945.80

116,588.36

132,260.70

Goods service,

Goods

269,614.73

658,436.05

2,450,454.20

Other

40,554.66

102,618.95

420,761.18

Profit on Central

Mechanical Works

56,327.87

18,392.16

17,538.61

Rents

141,616.87

$52,179.97*

118,705.21

Incidental Revenue

225,263.83

141,869.14

201,131.05

Auxiliary Operation

Foreign Haulage

2,525.25

23,569.52

Interchange of Rolling Stock

144,650.00

24,849.50

** Includes $175,817.26

Military rental written off.

OPERATING EXPENDITURE.

Heads

General Expenses

Traffic Expenses

Running Expenses

Maintenance of Equipment

Maintenance of Way and

Structures

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

$

298,771.35

365,127.62

435,982.17

495,590.71

530,432.97

541,993.10

1,210,917.91

1,176,973.85

1,625,869.44

821,550.63

932,727.94

980,243.46

653,260.10

549,637.09

660,344.75

   42. Services rendered by the workshops for other than the depart- ment's own requirements, were of the following order: -

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

Canton Hankow Railway

$

108,347.00

35,006.00

1,252.22

Government Departments

51,290.00

68,346.00

46,367.48

Outside concerns

21,068.00

15,666.00

36,538.79

10

          The work done for the Chinese Section of the Canton Hankow Railway by the Central Mechanical Works amounted to only $1,252.22, which is only 1.15% of the work done for the Chinese Section in 1948/49 when through running was on a full scale.

43. Although the operating expenses reached their highest level, the profit on operating is 44.79% higher than in the previous financial year.

44. The annual repayment of $776,000 as refund of this department's allocation of the Rehabilitation Loan, has been included in the accounts. A sum of $19,400,000 was allocated from the Loan Fund to this depart- ment and of this sum a total of $11,405,840.88 was expended by the end of the year, but outstanding orders with the Crown Agents approximate $7,988,762.00.

45. Under Statement 1-Capital Expenditure, the decrease of the sum of $29,449.60 under Telegraphs and Telephones, represents the value of installations taken over by the Hong Kong Telephone Co. Ltd. from the Hong Kong Government, for which no compensation was received by the Kowloon Canton Railway. B.1.3. Permanent Government Investments under Capital Liabilities in the General Balance Sheet has been reduced by a like amount.

46. As shown in the balance sheet the surplus for the year is $8,989,285.12 which includes the sum of $3,989,418.04 brought forward as surplus from the previous year.

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS.

47. Locomotives. There has been one austerity 2-8-0 locomotive No. 23 given heavy repairs which included a change of boiler.

         There have been four austerity 2-8-0 locomotives Nos. 21, 27, 29 and 32 given medium repairs which included the usual work of having wheel tyres turned, rod bushings and piston and valve rings renewed, some driving brasses re-metalled, a certain number of tubes renewed, etc. Among these four 2-8-0 locomotives, three of them Nos. 27, 29 and 32 have had Hulson rocking grates installed to replace the fixed grates which are useless with the high ash content of the coal in the Far East. There are now seven of the total of twelve austerity 2-8-0 locomotives equipped with rocking grates for coal burning and five remain for oil burning.

11

     The adjustable type of driving axle box guides designed and built locally for the "austerities" as mentioned in last year's report have been so successful that two more locomotives Nos. 21 and 25 of the same type were equipped with them in 1950, and the remaining nine austerity locomotives are now equipped with the adjustable type. The saving in maintenance costs by the use of adjustable guides in axle boxes has been considerable.

      Consumption of coal and fuel oil in locomotives was higher than the previous year due to the use of inferior coal and fuel oil, while train loads were heavier than before. Lubricating oil was higher than the previous year due to more engines Leing in use and heavier train loads.

Average cost of repair per engine during the year was higher than the previous year due to an engine having received heavy repairs including a change of boiler, but the cost of repairs per engine-kilometre in the same period was a little lower due to more kilometrage having been operated. Maintenance costs have also been affected by the increased local price of materials since the outbreak of the war in Korea.

   48. Carriages and Wagons. There have been seven carriages given general repairs and painting, and sixteen carriages given light repairs and painting.

     Armstrong asphalt tile flooring has been applied to first and second class carriages Nos. 103, 104, 105, 205, 206 and 313. Durastic flooring compound has been applied to third class carriage No. 312. If tests prove satisfactory it is hoped to standardize with these materials.

painted.

Third class wooden coach No. 304 was reconstructed of teak and

Third class wooden coaches Nos. 312 and 313 were reconstructed as all-steel vehicles.

Ten 30-ton wagons were given general repairs and painted.

      There have been 130 steel 443 metric ton covered wagons and five 45 metric ton oil tank wagons (10,000 gallons of water) received from the United Kingdom and assembled for traffic. These wagons are of modern design with cast steel bogies, 33′′ x 5′′ rolled steel wheels and 51′′ × 10′′ journals, Westinghouse automatic air brakes, AAR Type E automatic couplers, friction type central draft gears and Iracier type journal boxes. Principal dimensions of the covered wagons are:-floor height 3′ 7′′, height from underframe to underside of roof-sheets at centre

12

-

inside 8' 9", width 9' 0" inside, length between head stocks 40′ 0′′ inside, coupler centre from rail 35", length between outer face of couplers is 43' 8".

49. Work for Hong Kong Government Departments: Considerable repair work as well as the manufacture of spare parts was carried out in the Hung Hom Workshops for other Government departments such as the Public Works Department, Royal Observatory, Medical Department, Fire Brigade, Crown Lands and Surveys Office and the Police Department.

         There has been one fire appliance built for the Fire Brigade on an old chassis supplied.

50. Motor Vehicles: There are 2 rail buses and 2 inspection rail trolleys, 3 motor cars and 1 truck which have received normal main- tenance.

51. Machine and Hand Tools: At the close of the year the balance of 43 modern machine tools indented for in the United Kingdom in 1946 had been received and erected for use; also a great assortment of hand tools and measuring instruments, testing apparatus, wood-working machinery, portable pneumatic and electric tools have been delivered. The scope of the Hung Hom Workshops may now be said to conform to modern practice and employs an average of 400 workmen. There are 62 motorized machine tools and 54 various kinds of mechanical tools and equipment including pneumatic plant, oxy-acetylene cutting and welding, electric arc welding equipment, an electric tool hardening furnace, a simple machine for the testing of steel tension, compression and hardness, and 11 hoists from 1 to 5 ton capacity. There are 128 electric motors aggregating 1,025 rated H.P.

52. Lighting: There remains to be done the re-wiring and lighting of the workshops and the yard.

53. Locomotive Cranes: One 10-ton and one old 65-ton steam locomotive cranes have been maintained in working condition for wreck. clearance purposes in addition to a considerable amount of heavy lifting done for customers using railway transport.

54. In conclusion, the railway plant, locomotives, carriages, wagons, tools and equipment have bpeen maintained to a satisfactory standard for safety and service.

13

WAY AND STRUCTURES.

55. Maintenance. Way and Structures have been maintained in good order during the year.

56. Track Renewal. The original programme of re-railing the main line was as follows:

13 miles

1947/48

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

1951/52

1952/53

10

5

10

5

4

"

""

"

3

">

3

""

22 miles

Due to late arrival of fastenings and the short supply of sleepers, the progress in 1948/49/50 was 6 miles. Up to date, the total mileage re- railed is as follows:-

1947/48

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

13 miles

41

2

11

31

""

11

miles

Eleven miles have still to be re-railed. In order to catch up

 on the time lag of the 6-year programme, forty additional temporary plate- layers were engaged for a period of 6 months from March 1951.

The renewals in the main line were as follows:

95-lb rails

95-lb switches

95-lb crossings

1,006 lengths

16 sets

16 sets

M

14

follows:

Hardwood sleepers

Bridge and crossing timbers ...

Stone ballast 2"

9,428 pcs.

905 pcs.

1,508 cu. yds.

Other spot renewals with good second hand materials were as

Old 85-lb rails

Old 85-lb switches

Old 85-lb crossings

104 lengths

2 sets

2 sets

      57. Rail Creep. At Mile 11, the rail creep amounted to as much as 60 inches. All rail-joints between Miles 9 and 13 were adjusted, and 3,440 rail-anchors inserted.

      58. Permanent Way materials. During the year, 650 tons of 95-lb B.S.R. rails and 66 sets of switches and crossings arrived from the United Kingdom. The last batch of permanent-way materials arrived in April 1950.

      59. Indents. The following indents were placed on the Crown Agents:-

(a) 750 tons of rails and accessories for the 1951/52 programme

of renewal of track.

(b) A steel building 80'0 x 40'0 for a foundry shop.

(c) A Lothian open shed 100' x 34′ for Lowu Station.

60. Junction Fishplates. 208 pairs of junction fishplates were supplied by the Crown Agents. Within one year (26.4.50 to 26.4.51) forty-three pairs were reported cracked or broken. All breakages occurred in the main line, and none on sidings or secondary lines. In order to cope with this dangerous situation, one hundred pairs of junction fishplates of more robust design (4′′ thicker than those supplied by the Crown Agents) had to be manufactured locally under contract. Since January 1951, twenty eight pairs of the locally made fishplates were placed in the line, and so far no fractures have occurred.

61. Sleepers. In all, 22,727 Mai Yang sleepers and 3,322 bridge and crossing timbers were purchased from the Forest Industry Organization, Bangkok, through the Siam Rice Agency Ltd., acting as shipping agents.

15

T

The Forestry Officer, Hong Kong, recommended that the Mai Yang sleepers should be treated with 50% creosote and 50% diesel oil mixture by the open tank process, and therefore a pre-war plant for treating Kempas sleepers was reconditioned and used for this purpose.

Work was started on 3.10.50. Owing to the intermittent short-supply of creosote from the United Kingdom due to shortage of drums, only 2,874 sleepers were treated in the first six months. An arrangement with a local firm of repute would have resulted in a regular supply admittedly at higher cost, but the Chairman of the Tender Board advised purchase through the Crown Agents. The final cost of the cheaper creosote will, in due course, be reflected in the earlier replacement of non-creosoted sleepers which are very difficult to obtain.

62. Permanent Way Stores. To comply with an audit requirement, a new office was set up in the permanent-way store yard at Blackhead's Point, and new bins and racks erected. Altogether 122 items of unservice- able permanent-way stores were disposed of by a Board of Survey on 15.9.50, the amount realized being $22,811.00.

     Some 1,121 very rotten timber sleepers lying alongside the track in the New Territories were sold as they lay; 5,500 were given to the Social Welfare Office for the use of a refugee camp, and 1,521 were brought back to Kowloon and sold to railway staff as firewood.

Following the visit of the General Manager of the North Borneo Railways on 8.3.51. arrangements were made to sell to the above- mentioned railway the following surplus materials:-

600 lengths 85-lb rails (old)

600 pairs

fishplates (old)

1 set

100' span Callender Hamilton bridge.

1 set

60'

span U.C. railway bridge.

3 sets

40'

span U.C. railway bridge

1 set

60′ launching nose, erection equipment, tools

and parts.

63. Bridges. The 100 ft. girders of the Shum Chun River bridge were entirely enclosed with steel plate in order to ward off robbers from stealing from passengers.

The double 10 ft. sluice gates under arch bridge No. 18 were repaired. Eight bearing plates of the bridge No. 22 at Taipo were replaced.

16

The following major bridges were scraped and tarred:-

Bridge No. 2 Gascoigne Road

4

39

12

Waterloo Road

"

5

Argyle Street

6

""

Prince Edward Road

7

""

"

Boundary Street

""

20 Taipo Kau

      64. Embankment. 4,747 cubic yards of earth were taken from the cutting behind the platform at Yaumati Station to strengthen the railway embankment at Fanling and Wo Hop Shek. By the removal of this earth, the platform of the former station was widened by 30 feet.

65. Land. A Chinese Government organization dealing mainly in tung oil and known as the China Vegetable Oil Corporation, which had occupied a portion of land at Hung Hom Reclamation since prewar days, but after reoccupation had asked for extensions, was requested to remove its property and cleared the site on 20.5.50 in order to make room for the erection of a police camp, approximately 1,000' x 110' in area.

The following areas of railway land at Kowloon and Hung Hom were leased for various purposes:

435,858 s.f. for military purposes-Rental $1.00 per annum.

6,000 s.f. for Bible Auditorium

10,779 s.f. for motor car service

4,282 s.f. for storage purpose

3,000 s.f. for a film-titling studio

700 s.f. for distributing newspapers and teleprinting

140 s.f. for signwriting advertising boards.

    Approximately 231,500 s.f. of railway land at Hung Hom were occupied by other Government departments for the following purposes:-

Rice godown

Cemetery depot

Police camp

No rental

No rental

No rental

An agreement was reached whereby a piece of railway land, 41,300 s.f. at Sai Yee Street was surrendered to the Public Works

17

Department for normal development, and a piece of Crown Land, 97,700 s.f. at Yaumati Station yard was added to the Railway Reserve for future extension.

66. Advertising Space. The following spaces were let to local advertising companies:-

Inside Kowloon Station

519 s.f.

Outside Kowloon Station

1,279 s.f.

Along Salisbury Road

1,933 s.f.

Waterloo Road Bridge

1,207 s.f.

Argyle Street Bridge

1,224 s.f.

Prince Edward Road Bridge

732 s.f.

Miscellaneous

71 s.f.

67. Roads. A tarmac road, 2,130 feet long, was laid from Salisbury Road to the Government rice godown at Blackhead's Point. Another road, 428 feet long, was constructed along the praya of Kowloon Station to facilitate the loading and unloading of cargoes on to and from motor lorries.

   68. Road Level Crossings. The sleepers and ballast under all road- level-crossings in the New Territories were renewed. The R.C.C. slabs which had been damaged by heavy vehicles, were recast. All broken reflex road signs were replaced when 12 new ones arrived from the Crown Agents on 9.2.51.

      Strong barriers and warning boards were erected at five unauthorized road-crossings in the New Territories. The Railway Department accepts no responsibility for accidents at these crossings and would like them closed. After consultation with the District Com- missioner, New Territories they are to remain. The action taken is with

a view to strengthening the department's legal position.

Five track-crossings were laid at Hung Hom to enable motor vehicles to enter and leave the Chatham Road Police camp. This is a most dangerous approach. Funds for a northern approach road ensuring complete safety were not forthcoming.

69. Signals. Double wire signals were re-installed at Yaumati, Taipo Market and Fanling Stations. These installations were removed by the Japanese during the war. Since the war, the old single wire system, which was worked by pointsmen at each end of the loop line, has been

18

utilized as a temporary measure. An indent was placed on the Crown Agents in April, 1947 for the supply of missing parts, and the materials arrived in Hong Kong in December, 1949. Similar signalling systems were installed at Shatin and Taipo Stations. On completion, the services of the pointsmen at all stations in the New Territories (with the exception of Lowu) were dispensed with.

The colours of the point indicators (which were not considered as signals under paragraph 4, Chapter II of the Staff Rules) were changed from white/green to white/amber following a minor accident on 1.8.50 when an engine driver entered Yaumati Station limit against the sema- phore signal; his excuse was that he mistook the indicator light as a green signal.

At Hung Hom Block Station, a 25-lever cabin with mechanical signalling was erected in order to control the train movements between Kowloon-Yaumati and Kowloon-Hung Hom Loco Yard, as well as entrance to sidings in the locality.

70. Station Buildings. The Station buildings and waiting shelters. at Taipo and Taipo Market Stations were repaired and decorated.

        At Kowloon Station the goods examination shed and the goods clerks Office were renovated. Counters, iron grilles and steel doors were fitted to the latter for better security. Two water-closets were added and six automatic locks (for two 10-cent coins) were fitted to the 1st class. lavatories.

      71. Staff Quarters. The General Manager's quarters were repaired. Practically all doors and windows were renewed.

A building at Hung Hom was converted into traffic staff quarters for two families.

A signal-fitter's house was built at Blackhead's Point with old materials at a cost of $1,450.00.

72. Central Mechanical Works. The 32,000-gallon water tank and tower at Hung Hom Loco Yard was cleaned and tarred.

Ten motor garages were overhauled; the tile-roofs were com- pletely renewed.

Carriage-sheds, 503′ × 60′ were thoroughly repaired.

Damage of $4,570 was done to a workshop building when express train No. 14 hit a stationary locomotive in front of the Hung Hom Work- shops on 24.1.51 due to a switch point having been wrongly set.

19

73. Tunnel. The steel arch-ribs in Taipo Tunnel were encased with reinforced cement concrete.

74. Tenders and Contracts. During the year, 19 tenders were gazetted and 21 contracts were signed.

   75. Weed-killer. A weed-killing experiment was carried out by a representative of the Imperial Chemical Industries (China) Ltd. on a portion of the railway track at Blackhead's Point on 10.10.50. Pure fernoxone was used. An inspection after three weeks showed no marked result. Other chemicals are being tested.

   76. Staff. In compliance with an audit request a new storekeeper/ clerk was employed on 1.8.50 to record permanent-way stores.

STORES.

77. There has been a general improvement in the rate at which indented stores have been received, but as seen in the Colony there is a tendency still to accept any facile excuse offered by the manufacturers without a threat of financial penalty. The Hong Kong Government regularly collects penalties for contract delays, but no single instance has been experienced of any such action having been taken by the Crown Agents so far as this department is concerned.

   78. Coal. Throughout the year coal has been obtained from the Kailan Mining Administration. The cost of the No. 1 lump coal was approximately $80.00 per ton delivered to bunkers. This type of coal was used for the first nine months of the year, but as the quality appeared to be gradually deteriorating it was decided to purchase their special lump at a cost of $102.40 per ton. This coal was being used at the end of the year and gave satisfaction.

The total amount of coal purchased was 5,550 tons, an increase of 150 tons on the previous year.

   79. Oils. The cost of fuel oil increased slightly during the year, the average cost being $140.00 per ton whilst the actual cost at the end of the year was $150.81 per ton. Purchases show a big reduction on last year, 2,423 tons as compared with 5,076 tons; a saving of over $300,000 in actual cost.

20

Approximately 100 tons of confiscated diesel oil was received free of charge from Government Stores. It was frequently mixed with water.

Petrol and lubricating oils show an increase of about $9,000 on last year, due to increased costs.

80. Local purchases. These show a decrease of over $100,000 on last year despite big increases in prices during the last six months. In view of these price increases it was necessary to reduce local purchases to a minimum and stocks had to be reduced until such time as authority was received to increase the maximum balance of unallocated stores. This authority was received from the Secretary of State towards the end of the year.

But apart from these considerations, the purchase of stores locally continued with extreme caution in view of the unstable prices in the local market.

Steel, block tin, brass, zinc and copper were in big demand in the Colony and price increases ranged from 100 to 200%, whilst items of a general nature, e.g., cotton waste, electrical equipment, workshop small stores, etc., all took an upward trend. Timber was one of the few items to retain its level throughout the year.

81. Motor car. A new Austin A.40 car was purchased in April.

82. Government Stores. Purchases were about the same as last year. Stores have been obtained from this source whenever possible, subject to the price being cheaper than the department's price lists. It should be stressed that the department often receives a better discount by effecting payment within seven days.

83. Crown Agents. The year 1950/51 saw the arrival of 130 covered goods wagons and 5 bogie oil tank wagons from the United Kingdom. These items were mainly responsible for the increase in purchases from the Crown Agents. The principal items received and their approximate cost were as follows:

Rolling Stock.

Wagons, covered goods 44 met. ton 130 nos.

Wagons, bogie oil tank 45 met. ton 5 nos.

Mechanical Engineer's Department.

Accumulators

Air Compressors

$5,277,000.00

280,317.67

$

19,100.00

27,400.00

21

Cupper Ingot

Couplings

SA

$

14,900.00

6,100.00

Lathe 81" x 9'

12,000.00

Lathe 91 X 10′ (2 nos.)

31,200.00

Paint

13,400.00

Planing Machine

115,200.00

Springs (various)

42,800.00

Super-heater Returns Bends

9,800.00

Wheels, Carriage

6,900.00

Permanent Way Materials.

Dogspikes

$

14,200.00

Fishplates, Bolts and Nuts

43,800.00

Rail Anchors

7,600.00

Rails (1,282 lengths)

281,600.00

Shims, switch clips and tie bars .

3,300.00

Safety switches

4,600.00

Switches and crossings

106,500.00

Track Gauges and Coach screws

3,700.00

Miscellaneous.

Tickets

$

17,200.00

84. A comparative statement of purchases compared with the year 1949/50 is given below:-

1949/50

1950/51

Coal

420,380.00 481,470.15

Furnace Oil

630,456.67 329,710.06

Petrol, Lubricating Oil, etc.

40,020.29

49,627.80

Local Purchases

365,967.68

260,674.57

22

Government Stores

89,181.52 94,207.20

Crown Agents (incl. Rolling Stock) ... 2,945,395.57 5,937,327.77

Sleepers (Unallocated Stores)

Rolling Stock (Wagons, bogie oil

tanks)

71,949.54

208,317.67

        The difference in coal is explained by a greater use for local services and its being cheaper than fuel oil.

        The difference in oil and petrol expenditures is due to the fact that while through running was in progress, bunkering for a return trip for Chinese locomotives took place in Kowloon.

        The increase in purchase through Government Central Stores was due to adequate liaison whereby it was possible to ascertain more readily what was available and thereby to reduce the central stores stocks.

STAFF.

85. The following Executive Officers were on duty during the financial year:

Mr. I. B. Trevor, M.C.

Mr. A. E. Perry

Mr. K. W. Forrow

Mr. L. Sykes

Mr. NGAN Chung Hon

Mr. Hu Kwok Leung

Mr. WONG Jee Kwan ...

General Manager.

Traffic Manager.

Senior Accountant.

(Acting 1.9.50-31.3.51).

Traffic Assistant (Stores Officer).

Traffic Assistant

(9.8.50-31.3.51).

Engineer Way & Works.

Mechanical Engineer.

In the Accounts Office the duties of Executive Assistant to the

Senior Accountant, were carried out by:

Mr. T. W. Carr

From 1.11.50.-19.2.51.

(transferred to District Com- missioner's Office).

23

P

Mr. H. CHIN Cheong Ming... 19.2.51.-31.3.51. Mr. KUNG Chi Ping (Acting) 10.6.49.-31.3.51.

The establishment at the end of the year consisted of the follow- ing staff:-

81

Permanent and pensionable.

313

Monthly Paid.

464

Daily Paid.

Total:

858

This is an increase of 82 over the previous year.

Mr. C. E. Davis, the late Senior Accountant went on leave prior to retirement on the 16.8.50., but unfortunately he died on the 17.1.51.

86. The health of the staff generally has been good and there were no major injuries caused by accidents. There were 25 minor injuries.

The most common complaints have been pulmonary tuberculosis, influenza, common colds and naso-pharyngitis.

į

24

I. B. TREVOR, General Manager, Railway.

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

2,703,100.42

Part I Construction Accounts

C- 1 General Expenditure 2 Preliminary

Expenditure

3 Land

4 Formation

Statement No. 1-Capital Expenditure.

At the beginning of

the year

1.4.50.

$

760,592.08

During the Year

New Lines & Extentions

Additions & Property Betterments

Abandoned

$

10,222.04

Nett Capital Expenditure

At the end of the year

31.3.51.

$

10,222.04

$

770,814.12

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

14,510.20

14,510.20

2,717,610.62

5 Tunnels

3,574,383.84

9,784.35

9,784.35

3,584,168.19

C-

6 Bridgework

1,327,901.17

1,327,901.17

7 Line Protection

90,074.47

90,074.47

8 Telegraph &

Telephones

9 Track

39,449.60

(A) 29,449.60

29,449.60

10,000.00

3,365,482.50

953,178.66

953,178.66

4,318,661.16

C-10 Signals & Switches

103,098.58

83,886.12

83,886.12

186,984.70

C-11 Stations & Buildings

C-12 Central Mechanical

Works

C-14 Plant

C-15 Rolling Stock

1,744,566.45

142,912.99

142,912.99

1,887,479.44

537.390.62

1,556,871.94

5,283,675.57

C-17 Docks, Harbour &

Wharves

65,171.06

Total Cost

26,442,500.36 |

15,843.53

266,821.08 5,710,643.04

15,843.53

553,234.15

266,821.08

1,823,693.02

(B) 23,408.50

5,687,234.54 10,970,910.11

65,171.06

(C)7,207,802.01

52,858,10

7,154,943.91

33,597,444.27

$ 2,000.00 21,408.50

25

-

(A) Telegraphs & Telephones sold to The Hong Kong Telephone Co., Ltd. (B) One "Plymouth" Sedan sold by auction 5-15 ton wagons written off

(C) Special Expenditure 1950/51

Add Special Expenditure adjusted by internal transfer

Expenditure from Loan Funds

Less portion of Special Expenditure Charged to Operating Expenditure not due for inclusion in Capital Account

23,408.50

$1,153,406.95

314.17

$1,153,721.12

$6,096,629.10

$7,250,350.22

42,548.21

$7,207,802.01

Percentage

on total Operating Expenditure

Previous Year

Statement No. 2

Current Year

Operating Expenses

Amount

Amount

Main Line

Percentage on total Operating Expenses

E-1 General

365,127.62

Expenses

435,982.17

Administra-

7.37

262,030.04

tion

289,847.85

6.83

2.90

103,097.58

Special

146,134.32

3.44

E-2 Traffic

14.92

530,432.97

Expenses

541,993.10

12.77

E-3 Running

1,176,973.85

Expenses

1,625,869.44

28.18

1,001,810.44

Locomotives. 1,193,061.75|

28.11

Carriages &

1.27

44,986.75

Wagons

288,020.91

6.79

Motor

.80

28,473.55

Vehicles

29,240.75

.69

2.86

101,703.11

Traffic

115,546.03

2.72

E-4 Main. of

Equipment

Locomotives

26.24

932,727.94

Dept.

980,243.46

23.09

E-5 Main. of

549,637.09 W. & S.

660,344.75

Engineering

15.37

.09

546,326.21 3,310.88

Dept.

649,797.37

15.31

Other Depts.

10,547.38

.25

100.00

3,554,899.47

4,228,449.34 Balance, Profit

Total Operating

Expenses

on Operating

7,783,348.81

(1) Operating Expenditure

(2) Portion of Special Expenditure Chargeable to Revenue

(3)

Depreciation on Rolling Stock

(4) Cost of living allowance

(5) Services rendered by Government etc.

(6)

Pensions & Gratuities

(7) Staff passage

26

4,244,432.92 6,122,363.83

100.00

10,366,796.75

$3,031,023,64

42,548.21

346,345.71

659,237.14

33,037.35

132,082.36

158.51

$4,244,432.92

Operating Account.

Previous Year

Percentage on total

Operating

Revenue

Amount

Operating Revenue

Local Service

Current Year

Amount

CA

Percentage

on total Operating Revenue

R-1 Passenger

$

Service,

55.56

4,324,495.45

Passengers... 7,025,945.80

67.77

R-2 Passenger

Service,

.88

68,291.15

Other

132,260.70

1.28

R-3 Goods

7.86

611,538.70

Service, Goods

2,381,101.70

22.97

Terminal

.04

2,957.20

Charge

69,352.50

.67

R-4 Goods

Service,

1.31

101,869.50

Other

420,761.18

4.06

R-7 Profit on

Cent. Mech.

.24

18,392.16

Works

17,538.61

.17

4.52

352,179.97

R-8 Rent

118,705.21

1.14

R-9 Incidental

1.80

139,938.49 5,619,662.62

Revenue

201,131.05 10,366,796.75

1.94

Through

Service

R-1 Passenger

Service,

25.96

2,020,349.71

Passenger...

R-2 Passenger

Service,

.62

48,297.21

.56

43,940.15

.01

749.45

.02

1,930.65

.30

23,569.52

Other

R-3 Goods

Service, Goods

R-4 Goods

Service,

Other

R-9 Incidental

Revenue

R-10 Auxiliary

Operation

Foreign

Haulage

R-11 Inter-

change of

7

Rolling

.32

24,849.50 2,163,686.19

Stock

100.00

7,783,348.81

Total Operating

Revenue

10,366,796.75

100.00

7,783,348.81

10,366,796.75

(1) Net Revenue

(2) Government Transportation-

(a) Passengers

(b) Goods

(3) Government Rental

27

$10,250,826.55

115,778.20

192.00

$10,366,796.75

Previous Year

28

Statement No. 3-Income.

Part I-Income Account.

Current Year Previous Year

Current Year

I-12

293,332.57

Interest on Government Investments

4,228,449.34 I-1

Balance, net revenue...

6,122,363.83

(A) 372,657.02

I-14

776,000.00

Amortization of Re- habilitation Loan

I-3

(C) 776,000.00

15,682.87

Interest on Deprecia- tion Reserves

(B) 27,804.97

1,069,332.57

3,174,799.64

Total

1,148,657.02

4,244,132.21

Total

6,150,168.80

Balance

5,001,511.78

4,244,132.21

Total

(A) Interest on Rehabilitation Loan up to 1949/50

6,150,168.80

4,244,132.21

Total

6,150,168.80

$5,309,211,78 $1,552,000.00

$3,757,211.78 @ 33% $131,502.41) $6,890,131.74 @ 31% $241,154.61 [

$372,657.02

Less Amortization of Rehabilitation Loan up to 1949/50

Interest on Special Expenditure up to 1949/50

(1939-47 $4,534,122.49)

(1948-49

$1,198,322.12)

(1949-50 $1,157,687.13)

(B) Interest on Depreciation Reserves up to 1950/51 31% on $794,427.71.

(C) Third instalment of the K.C.R. repayment over twenty five years of Rehabilitation Loan $19,400,000.00.*

*

This sum was reduced to $18,920,000.00 for the $1950/51 financial year.

Previous Year

29

Part II-Profit and Loss Account.

Current Year Previous Year

Current Year

PL-5

PL-6

Balance of the year

3,174,799.64 PL-1 Balance of the year

5,001,511.78

Loss on Property

retired

(D)

Total

1,644.70

1,644.70

3,174,799.64

Total

5,001,511.78

Balance

Total

4,999,867.08

5,001,511.78

3,174,799.64

Total

5,001,511.78

3,174,799.64

3,174,799.64

(D)

Loss on one "Plymouth" Sedan motor car sold by auction estimated value Actual amount realized by sale

Net loss

Part III-Surplus Appropriation Account.

$2,000.00

355.30

$1,644.70

Previous Year

Current Year Previous Year

Current Year

CA

$

$

S-4

Deficit for the year

S-5

Deficit from previous year

3,174,799.64 S-1 814,618.49 S-2

Surplus for the year... Surplus from previous year

4,999,867.08

3,989,418.04

Total

3,989,418.04

Total

8,989,285.12

3,989,418.04

Surplus carried to

Deficit carried to

Balance Sheet

8,989,285.12

Balance Sheet

3,989,418.04

Total

8,989,285.12

3,989,418.04

Total

8,989,285.12

Balance at beginning of year

Assets or Debit Balance

Heads of classification

Statement No. 4-General

Balance at close of year

Increase Decrease

B-6 Investment Assets:-

26,442,500.36

B-6-1 Cost of Road and

Equipment

33,597,444.27

7,154,943.91

26,442,500.36

Total Investment Assets!

33,597,444.27

7,154,943.91

B-7 Working Assets:-

www

B-7-1-1 Cash

17,831.95

17,831.95

222,514.45 B-7-3-3 Home Line

222,514.45

42,024.15 B-7-4-2 Sundry Debtors

37,539.00

4,485.15

1,600.00 B-7-4-3 Advance Account

3,500.00

1,900.00

995,533.51 | B-7-5 Stores

562,096.43

433,437.08

841.32 B-7-5-1 Workshop Suspense

817.80

23.52

1,262,513.43

Total Working Assets

621,785.18

19,731.95 660,460.20

3,350,055.58

D-8 Deferred Debit Items:-

D-8-1 Temporary Advances

to Government

9,325,499.53 5,975,443.95

3,350,055.58

Total Deferred Debits

9,325,499.53 5,975,443.95

31,055,069.37

B-9 Balance of Accumulated

Deficit

30

43,544,728.98 13,150,119.81 660,460.20

Balance Sheet.

Liabilities or Credit Balance

Balance at beginning

Heads of classification

of year

Balance at close of year

Increase Decrease

B-1 Capital Liabilities:-

26,442,500.36

B-1-3 Permanent Govern-

ment Investment

33,597,444.27

7,154,943.91

26,442,500.36

Total Capital Liabilities

33,597,444.27| 7,154,943.91

B-2 Working Liabilities:-

173,573.42 B-2-2 Traffic Balance payable

(Foreign Rly.)

93,373.42

80,200.00

B-2-2-1 Traffic Balance pay-

30,144.39

30,144.39

able (Home line)

B-2-4-2 Sundry Creditors

37,539.00

37,539.00

173,573.42

!

Total working Liabilities

161,056.81

67,683.39

80,200.00

B-3 Deferred Credit Items:-

448,082.00 B-3-3 Depreciation Reserves

1,495.55 B-3-5 Misc. Deferred Credits

794,427.71 (x) 2,515.07

346,345.71

1,019.52

449,577.55

Total Deferred Credits

796,942.78

347,365.23

B-4 Appropriation from 3,989,418.04 Surpluses

8,989,285.12

4,999,867.08

31,055,069.37

43,544,728.98 12,569,859.61| 80,200.00

(x) Includes Deposit

Fines

$1,693.37

821.70

$2,515.07

31

Statement No. 4a-Rehabilitation Loan.

Item 10-Railway.

Expended

Sub

Head

Funds

Allocated

up to

31.3.47.

Expended up to 31.3.48.

Expended

up to

31.3.49.

Expended

up to

31.3.50.

Expendi-

ture

during

1950/51.

Total

Expenditure

up to 31.3.51.

Balance.

$

$

$

1

Building

573,500.00

8,193.50

177,328.27 378,595.15

511,981.85

37,832.26 549,814.11

23,685.89

2

Equipment and

tools

3

General Repairs..

4

Motor Transport.

5

6

LO

Permanent way..

Rolling Stock

2,428,300.00|

747,000.00 258,672.74| 31,900.00 31,829.75 2,494,200.00 662,488.81 1,273,447.98 1,302,346.46' 1,757,590.03 127,667.21 12,645,100.00 63,311.72 525,370.33 525,400.86 5,547,628.06

615,105.99 643,142.74 668,100.37| 39,765.98 31,829.75 31,829.75 31,829.75

124,497.11 543,201.64 1,814,308.92 343,735.59 2,158,044.51 270,255.49

707,866.35 39,133.65

31,829.75

70.25

1,885,257.24 608,942.76 6,073,028.92 6,572,071.08

18,920,000.00 961,184.80 2,285,520.82 3,424,486.07 5,309,211.78 6,096,629.10 11,405,840.88 7,514,159.12

32

33

Current Year

Previous Year

Statement No. 5--Analysis of Passenger Service. Part I-Passenger Service (R-I Passenger)

(April 1950-March 1951)

No. of

No. of

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used Originating Home Line

Units

Passengers Kilometres

Revenue

Carried

Percentage of

Number Passenger

Carried Kilometres Revenue

$

Ordinary:-

$

160,913.25 First

106,643

106,643

2,730,338

272,612.65

1.76]

1.79

3.81

688,985.64 Second

571,962

571,962

4,543,557.57 Third

4,821,762

4,821,762

15,327,518 118,211,253

1,083,510.10

9.45 10.05

15.13

5,161,005.40

79.63

77,51

72.10

519,569.86 Non-Stop

Government:-

Civil:-

6,239.90 First

3,778

3,778

103,686

6,199.95

.06

.07

.08

7,075.70 Second

6,216

6,216

152,342

7,278.70

.10

.10

.10

19,038.70 Third

30,997

30,997

858,947

26,386.85

.51

.56

.37

Excursion:-

14,795.00 | First

27,659

27,659

804,021

37,734.20

.46

.53

.53

29,640.25 Second

13,205.60 Third

58,445

58,445

1,706,926

59,149.35

.97

1.12

.83

17,891

17,891

526,300

14,961.80

.30

.35

.21

118,802.40

1.66

Privilege

147,805.44 Excess Fare

Sleeper Charges

Special Charges

Monthly & Season

Tickets:-

3,615.50 First

6,960

6,960

205,320

7,845.25

.11.

.13

.11

31,891.00 Second

67,570

67,570

1,993,315

64,130.85

1.12

1.31

.90

75,986.75 Third

132,910

132,910

3,920,845

81,935.00

2.19

2.57

1.14

81,316.00 Scholar Tickets

201,980

201,980

5,958,410

83,164.25

3.33

3.90

1.16

Golfing Tickets

1,209.00 First

625

625

18,438

1,229.05

.01

.01

.02

(A) 6,344,845.16 Total Part I

6,055,398 i 6,055,398

152,517,659 | (B) 7,025,945.80|

100.00

100.00

98.15

(A) Home Line

$4,220,514.90

(B)

Home Line

Foreign

Government

2,020,088.54

Foreign

104,241.72

$6,344,845.16

Government

$6,911,370.10

114,575.70

$7,025,945.80

34

Previous Year

Statement No. 5-Analysis of Passenger Service

Part II-Passenger Service (R-2 Other)

Current Year (April 1950-March 1951)

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets Used

Baggage & Specie:-

370.27

Public

Government

Parcels:-

42,925.46

Public

Railway Service

73,131.77

Carriage & Animals:-

Public

Special Train:-

Public

Government

Postal:-

160.86

Miscellaneous

(C)

116,588.36

Total Part II

6,461,433.52

Total Part I & II...

(C) Home Line

Foreign

Government

Revenue

$

Percentage of

Revenue

7,758.45

.11

11,038.10

.15

112,261.65|

1.57

1,202.50

.02

(D)

132,260.70

1.85

$ 68,095.65

(D) Home Line

48,249.10

243.61

$116,588.36

Foreign

Government

7,158,206.50

100.00

$131,058.20

1,202.50

$132,260.70

35

Statement No. 6-Analysis of Goods Service. Part I-Goods Service (R-3 Goods).

(April 1950-March 1951)

Current Year

Previous Year

No. of

Kilograms

No. of

Revenue

Kinds of Goods

Originating Kilograms

on

Carried

Home Line

(A)

658,436.05

Percentage of

Kilogs.

Kilograms Kilometres

Revenue

Kilogs.

Carried

Kilo- Revenue metres

General Merchandise:--

Public

Government Military

371,789,620 | 371,789,620 | 12,885,417,936 2,450,454.20 100.00 100.00 85.35

658,436.05

(A) Home Line

Foreign Government

(B)

Total Part I

371,789,620 | 371,789,620 | 12,885,417,936 2,450,454.20 100.00 100.00

85.35

$ 614,495.90 43,940.15

(B) Home Line Foreign Government

$2,450,454.20

$ 658,436.05

$2,450,454.20

Part II-Goods Service (R-4 Other).

4,271.40 Shunting

6,400.00

.22

95,867.55 Handling Receipts

414,161.18

14.42

2,480.00 Demurrage

200.00

.01

(C)

(D)

102,618.95

Total Part II

761,055.00

Total Part I & II.

420,761.18

2,871,215.38

14.65

(C)

Home Line

$ 101,869.50

(D)

Foreign

749.45

Home Line Foreign

102,618.95

100.00

$420,761.18

$ 420,761.18

Previous Year

Percentage

Total Revenue

- 36

Statement No. 7-Operating Revenue.

Operating Revenue

Current Year

(April 1950-March 1951)

Total Revenue

CA

Percentage

7,025,945,80|

132,260.70

67.77

1.28

2,450,454.20|

23.64

420,761.18

4.06

17,538.61

.17

118,705.21

1.15

82,227.96

.79

7.36

16,624.14

102,271.59

.16

.98

10,366,796.75

55.56

4,324,495.45

R-1

From Home Line

Passenger Service-Passengers

.88

68,291.15

R-2

"

7.90

614,495.90

R-3 Goods Service

1.31

101,869.50

R-4

-Other

-Goods

-Other

.24

4.52

18,392.16

352,179.97

R-7 Profits on Central Mechanical Works

R-8

Rents

R-9

Incidental Revenue

.97

75,623.56

(1) Advertising

.09

7,000.14

(2) Station and Train Privileges

(3) Sales of Unclaimed & Confiscated

.01

324.08

Goods

.43

33,750.85

.30

23,239.86

(4) Profits on Stores Transactions (5) Miscellaneous

5,619,662.62

Total Home Line

R-1

R-2

From Foreign

Passenger Service-Passengers -Other

";

R-3 Goods Service' -Goods

R-4

R-9

-Other

Incidental Revenue

R-10 Auxiliary Operation (Foreign Haulage) R-11 Interchange of Rolling Stock

25.96

.62

2,020,349.71| 48,297.21

.56

43,940,15

.01

749.45

.02

1,930.65

.30

23,569.52

.32

24,849.50

2,163,686.19

100.00

Total Foreign

7,783,348.81

Total Operating Revenue

10,366,796.75

100.00

Statement No. 8.

Tabular Summary of Unallocated Stores.

1. Stock on hand at 1st April, 1950

$ 506,445.35

2. Add purchases returns & charges

7,233,291.16

7,739,736.51

3. Deduct issues to votes & services as credited to

expenditure subhead

7,634,699.01

105,037.50

4. Deduct proceeds of sale of stores as credited to

Revenue

25,452.48

79,585.02

5. Transfer between stores

...

79,585.02

6. Adjustments

Add stores received in 1950/51 but paid for

in 1949/50 ....

489,082.21

568,667.23

Less stores paid for in 1950/51 but not received.

5,478.59

563,188.64

Less stores received in 1949/50 but paid for

in 1950/51

563,188.64

7. Deduct losses & deficiency written off

6,570.80

556,617.84

8. Add unaccountable difference

*63.11

9. Stock on hand at 31st March, 1951

$556,680.95

Estimated value of stores and stationery without

debits

Add unaccountable difference

Estimated value of stock without debits on hand at

31st March, 1951 ....

* Of the unoccountable difference of $63.11, shown under item 8, an amount of $60.48

is in respect of a misallocation found too late for adjustment.

$ 37,539.00

34.00

$ 37,573.00

-

37

-

38

Statement 9-Analysis of Train and Locomotives kilometrage

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Oil Engine Kilometrage

Coal Engine Kilometrage

Classification

Total

Kilometrage

Rail Bus Kilometrage

1949/50 1950/51

1949/50 1950/51

1949/50 1950/51

1949/50 1950/51

Passenger

Train Kilometrage

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine Mixed Slow By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

192,275.59 120,815.30

21,324.61 11,731.85

28,261.71

21,391.64

127,835.52 | 271,572.04 | 320,111.11 42,480.00

49,586.32 33.123.49

392,387.34

9,462.60 7.981.00

Goods

By B.S. Engine

12,226.67 23,863.64 2,663.83

27.192.26 14,890.50 51,055.90

Military

Special

Ballast

Train

Total Train Kilometrage

By C.S. Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

7.712.42

6,332.33 8,214.19 3,153.82 15,926.61 9,486.15

65.00

4,487.44

562.84 7,658.50 6,568.92 12,145.94 42.50

7,131.76

1.340.80 2,949.00

238,026.73

163,305.96 | 174,633.75 329,878.68

412,660.48 42,522.50

493,184.64 10,868.40 10,930.00

Total Locomotive Kilometrage

Loco.

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

248,056.73

172,518.71 183,531.25 5 348,052.18

431,587.98 | 520,570.89 45,475.00

Light

Engine

Shunting

Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

By B.S. Engine By C.S. Engine

7,457.51

19,643.18

27,100.69

1,850.00

54,670.00 54,750.00

56,520.00

54,750.00

249,906.73

179.976.22 | 238,201.25 422,445.36

488.107.98 | 602,421.58 45.475.00

Note:-B.S. British Section

C.S. Chinese Section

Statement 10-Analysis of Through Traffic & Local Traffic Kilometrage

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Through Traffic

By B.S. Locos.

Classification

over B.S. & C.S.

By C.S. Locos. over B.S.

Total

Local Traffic

By B.S. Locos.

over B.S.

1949/50

1950/51

1949/50

1950/51

1949/50

1950/51

1949/50

1950/51

Passenger Train Km.

71,992.02

42,480.00

114,472.02

248,119.09

392,387.34

Mixed Slow

34,589.62

34,589.62

14,996.70

33,123.49

>>

Goods

14,890.50

51,055.90

Military

15,926.61

9,486.15

Service

42.50

42.50

12,145.94

7,131.76

"1

Total:

106,581.64

S

42,522.50

149,104.14

306,078.84 493,184.64

Total Train Km. performed by B.S. Locos. over C.H.R.

58,312.02

Statement 11-Cost for Running Coal Burning Locomotives. (April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Statement 12-Cost for Running Furnance Oil Burning Locos. (April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Previous

Year

Current

Year

Previous

1949/50

1950/51

Year

1949/50

1.61

$281,360.98 1 Total Cost of Coal 93.552 Average Cost per ton

3 Cost per Train Kilometrage

$500,244.10

83.792

1.52

1.52

3,007.60 4 Total Weight of Coal (ton)

/ 5,970.07

5 Weight per Train Km.

2,894.05

17.50 in Kg.

18.39

669.00

6 Total weight of Coal for Shunting (ton)

12.35

842.48

7 Weight per Shunting Km.

22.10

12.43

in Kg.

15.63

12.14

$362,421.88

1 Total Cost of Furnace Oil 125.23 2 Average Cost per ton 3 Cost per Train Kilometrage

4 Total Weight of Furnace Oil (ton)

5 Weight per Train Km. in Kg.

6 Total weight of Furnace Oil for Shunting (ton)

7 Weight per Shunting Km. in Kg.

Current

Year

1950/51

$339,877.34

136.475

2.08

2,490.40

15.49

39

Statement 13-Consumption for Lubricants for Locomotives.

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Previous

Year 1949/50

Current Year

1950/51

3,128.32

.725

1 Total Weight of Engine Oil (Gals)

2 Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Gals

4,513.53

.824

1,386.10

3 Total Weight of S.H. Cylinder Oil (Gals)

1,839.62

.321

4 Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Gals.

.336

1

2

Statement 15-Classification of

4

5

(April, 1950-

Steam

CO

6

7

Engine No.

Wheel Distribu- tion

Diameter

of Cylinder

Stroke

Diameter of Driving

Tank or Tender

Wheel

Gross Weight of Engine & Tender

in tons in working

order

12

4-6-4

22"

28"

611"

Side Tank

106.00

13

2-6-4

19"

26"

61"

90.35

>>

S-15 & S-16

2-6-0

171"

24"

42"

Saddle,.

53.25

21 to 32

2-8-0

19′′

28"

561"

Tender

125.75

RB-1 Railbus 6 Cyl. Bedford

3-5/16"

31"

31"

RB-2 Railbus 6 Cyl. Dodge

31′′

4ğ"

31"

40

Petrol

Previous Year 1949/50

Statement 14-Cost Assignment & Statistics (April, 1950-March, 1951.)

Current

$18,415.27

.64

11,791.51

1,414.45

QAWNE

2

*

""

""

""

4

""

""

.0217

.0112 3.15

1 Average cost of repair per Locos. per annum

Locos. repairs per Engine Km. repairs per passenger car per annum repairs per goods wagon per annum Engine Oil per Eng. Km. for

5 Average cost of

Locomotives

6 Average cost of S.H. Cylinder Oil per Eng. Km. for

Locomotives

7 Average cost of Lubricants per gal.

Rolling Stock-Motive Power

March, 1951.)

Locomotives

Year

1950/51

$21,645.16

.61

10,360.25

1,287.86

.0303

.0141

3.65

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Total Stock at the beginning

of the year

Weight on Driving Wheel

Tractive

Addition during the year

Reduction Total Stock Average

effect

during

the year

of the year

at the end Age of

Class

Each

Max.

@ 85%

Eng.

Axle

Boiler

Load

Pressure

(Tons)

(Tons)

1

1

26

60

20

33714

1

1

38

51

17

23350

2

2

9

46.05

15.35

26775

12

26

12

6

61.25

15.31

34215

16

16

Railcars

1

1

14

1

1

4

2

2

41

RAC & SAE Rating 26.33 H.P. 55 Passengers.

SAE 25.35 H.P. 55 Passengers

Statement 16-Classification of Rolling Stock-Carriage.

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

1

2

3

4

Average

Seating

Classification

Tare of each Class

Capacity

(tons)

(Passenger)

Total Stock

at the

beginning

of the year

5

6

Additions

during

the year

Reductions

during

the year

Total Stock

at the end

of the year

7

8

Total

Seating

Capacity (Passenger)

Ton Cwt.

First Class Carriage

35 10

48

2

35

8

54

2

2

96

2

108

59

19

First & Second Class Composite

Carriage

30

6

45

2

2

90

First & Second Class Composite Carriage

33

11

56

1

1

56

Second Class Carriage

33 18

64

4

4

256

45

5

78

2

2

156

""

Third Class Carriage

33333

19

128

17

1 (B)

16

2,048

Third Class & Brake Composite

32

222

18

58

4

1 (A)

5

LO

290

- 42

34

1

1

34

3,100

Note: (A) Converted from Third Class Carriage.

(B) Converted to Third Class & Brake Composite indicated by (A)

Statement 17-Classification of Rolling Stock-Goods Wagons.

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Total Stock

Overall

Average

Classification

Length of

Wagon

Tare of each Class

Carrying

Capacity

Additions

Reductions Total Stock

at the

beginning of the year

during

the year

during at the end

Total

Carrying

the year of the year Capacity

Ton

Cwt.

80 Ton Flat

27

50 Ton Well

32'-0"

25

44 Metric ton Covered

wagon

43'-0"

20

Oil Tank Wagon (10,000

gals. of Water)

41'-1"

21

40 Ton Covered Goods

37'-10"

18

40 Ton Flat

37'-10"

14

30 Ton Covered Goods

35'-0"

15

30 Ton Covered Goods

(Cattle Truck)

35'-0"

15

30 Ton Flat

35'-0"

12

30 Ton Open Goods (H.S.)

35'-0"

14

20 Ton Covered (Tank)

31'-0"

20

15 Ton Covered Goods

19'-0"

15 Ton Open Goods (H.S. Tank)

19'-0"

15 Ton Open Goods (H.S.)

19'-0"

-∞

1467

22 2 2 2

78230 40

13

12

32

80

50

0

44

19

442

40

40

30

30

30

30

8 19

15

19

15

15

15 Ton Brake Van

19′-0′′

15

200 200NN HOD

20 100 20000 200

2

1

21

160

50

|

130 (A)

130

5720

5 (A)

5

29 (B)

29

13

13

13

DND* ***NN TE

2221

80

200

870

90

240

390

40

30

1

195

5

5 (C)

1955

- 43 -

86

135

Note:-(A) Received from Crown Agents.

(B) 6 Nos. converted to temporary 3rd class passenger car, (C) 5 Nos. scrapped.

10

5

216

83021

44

1

Statement 18-Classification of Rolling Stock-Service Equipment

(April, 1950-March, 1951.)

2

Classification

Average Tare of each class

Ton

Cwt.

3

4

5

6

Total Stock at the beginning of the year

Additions

during

the year

Reductions

during

the year

Total Stock at the end of the year

65 Ton Break-down Crane

87

1

1

10

Locomotive Crane

1

1

5

31

10

1

1

RT-1

Motor Trolley

2

1

1

1

RT-2

2

1

17

19

1

1

:

5

Summary of Financial Results of the Past three Years.

Head

List of Heads

1948/49

1949/50

1950/51

No.

1

Route Kilometrage-Operated

36

36

36

2

Gross Railway Receipts

7,075,992

7,783,349

10,366,797

Railway Operating Expenditure

$

3,480,091

3,554,900

4,244,433

4

Net Operating Revenue

3,595,901

4,228,449

6,122,364

Percentage of Railway Operating Expenditure to Gross Operating Revenue

49.18

45.67

40.94

Capital Expenditure

$

23,450,590

26,442,500

33,597,444

7

8

9

10

Percentage of Net Operating Revenue to Capital Expenditure Gross Railway Receipts per route kilometre operated Railway Operating Expenditure per route kilometre operated Passenger Receipts:-

15.33

15.99

18.22

11

12

(a) Local Traffic

(b) Through Traffic

(c) Total Traffic

Percentage of Passenger Receipt to Gross Railway Receipts

Number of Passenger Journeys:

(a) Local Traffic

(b) Through Traffic

(c) Total Traffic

es es

es es es

∞s es es

196,555

216,204

287,967

96,669

98,747

117,901

1,326,210

4,392,786 7,158,207

4,869,228

6,195,438

87.56

1,477,602

2.068,647

6,461,433

7,158,207

83.02

69.05

4,312,400

6,055,398

2,401,304

3,878,906

952,030

5.264,430

6,055,398

13

Goods Receipts:-

(a) Local Traffic

47,934

716,365

2,871,215

(b) Through Traffic

262,235

44,690

(c) Total Traffic

310,169

761,055

2,871,215

14

15

16

+126

Percentage of Goods Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts

Tons of Goods Hauled

Revenue from Other Sources:

48/49

49/50

150/51

4.38

80,097

9.78

104,297

27.70

371,789

Rentals

$141,617

$352,180

$118,705

Haulage Receipts

2,525

23,570

Incidentals

165,210

66,245

118,903

Advertising

60,054

75,624

82,228

Profit on Central Mechanical Works

56,328

18,392

17,539

Interchange of Rolling Stock

144,650

24,849

17

Percentage of Revenue from Other Sources to Gross Railway Receipts

570,384

8.06

560,860

7.20

337,375

3.25

45 -

46 -

25.64%

K.C.R. STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE. 1950/51.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS,

REFERENCE NO. G. 169/314.

OPERATING EXPENDITURE.

($4,244,432.92)

19.33%

Maintenance

of

Equipment

Running Expenses.

Mein. of

Structure

Cost of

Living

Allowance

11.92%

0.44% Motor

Car and Lorry Running

Expenses.

1.00% Special ← Expenditure Revenue.

1.26%

passengers Service,

Other

6.75%

Traffic

Exp.

General

EXP

15.53%

3.11% Pensions and

Gratuities.

6.44%

8.16%

Depreciation

~0.78% Miscellaneous.

on Rolling Stook.

OPERATING REVENUE.

($10,366,796.75)

4.06%

Goods Service,

Other.

0.17% Profit on

23.64%

Goods Service, Goods.

Passengers Service,

Passenger.

Central Mech. Works.

/1.14% Rents.

1.94% Incidental

Revenue.

-1.12%

Services

Rendered to Govt.

66.67%

COMPARISON OF PERCENTAGE RELATIONSHIP OF PASSENGERS CARRIED AND REVENUE

RECEIVED BY THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY DURING APRIL 1950

TO MARCH 1951.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS,

REFERENCE NO. G. 169/313.

TOTAL PASSENGERS CARRIED (6,055,398)

(Number Originating Homeline)

Monthly,Season &

Golfing Tickets (3.44%)

Civil Govt. (0.68%)

Scholar

Tickets

Excursion (1.72%)

3.34%

1st Class (1.76%)

9.44%

2nd ClasB

TOTAL REVENUE ($7,025,945,80)

(Revenue Originating Homeline)

Monthly,Season & Golfing Ticketв (2.20%)

Excursion Scholar (1.59%)

Govt.

Tickets

(1.18%)

1st Class

3.88%

2nd

Class

(15.42%)

- 47 -

ORDINARY

3rd Class (79.62%)

ORDINARY

3rd Class (75.15%),

ANALYSES OF PASSENGERS SERVICE AND GOODS SERVICE,

1949/50 AND 1950/51.

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS, REFERENCE NO. G. 169/312.

$MILLION.

Homeline =

8

7

6

5

3

~

1

1949/50

1950/51

Foreign =

Government - 824

1950/51

1949/50

1950/51

1949/50 1950/51

1949/50

PASSENGERS SERVICE

GOODS SERVICE

(Passengers)

(Others)

(Goods)

(Others).

48