九廣鐵路年報 Kowloon Canton Railway Annual Departmental Report 1948-1949

HONG KONG

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

GENERAL MANAGER,

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY

FOR THE PERIOD

KI

1ST APRIL, 1948 TO 31ST MARCH, 1949.

NG KONG PUBLIC LIBRARI

1

香港公共圖書館

ONG KONG

LIBRARIES

FONG PUBLIC

PUBLIC LIBRA

ANNUAL REPORT General Survey.

 

The Railway Financial Year 1948-1949 has not been without its incidents and surprises. These vary from typhoon damage and attacks on through trains by bandits in Chinese territory to a breach of a long-standing agreement with the Chinese Customs over not stopping the expresses at the border in exchange for facilities afforded at Kowloon and, on the other hand, a concession by the Provincial Government at Canton to the running of a non-stop train in each direction between Canton and the Colony.

2. Gross receipts reached a record figure of $7,075,991.75 with nett revenue $3,595,901.05 as compared with $6,431,252.29 and $3,128,786.87 for the previous year.

   The only important item of revenue which did not come up to expectations was that from foreign goods traffic which fell to $238,768.58 from $586,385.17. There had been rumours in the early part of the year that some relief would be afforded regarding import restrictions. These did not materialize; and the long-term effect on trading became more marked, hence the falling off in

revenue.

3. It is pleasant to be able to report that at the close of this financial year the position was such as to make it possible to wipe out all accumulated deficits incurred since the opening of the Line in October 1910. It has also been possible to set aside a sum representing 3% interest on the new Rehabilitation Loan of $19,400,000 and to make a first amortization payment of $776,000 based on repayment over 25 years against this same loan.

The continued prosperity of the Line depends on peaceful conditions in the neighbouring province of Kwangtung, but given tranquillity, the contention previously held that the British Section could never pay its way but must merely be considered as an instrument of economic policy for the Colony as a whole, has now been definitely disproved.

4. General rehabilitation to works and property has continued in proportion to the speed with which outstanding indents on the Crown Agents have been fulfilled. All too frequently those items which were most urgently needed were subjected to the most delay. A serious setback to the Administration was the cancel- lation in July 1947 of the valuable services towards procurement afforded by the London Office of the Hong Kong Government. The arrangement has, however, been restored at the date of writing this report after a break of two years.

   5. The through passenger traffic handled was again heavier than the previous year, and the Ching Ming festival accounted for 267,064 between the dates March 26th and April 21st, 1948, necessitating ninety-five extra trains. All coaches were run continuously, throwing great strain on maintenance crews. The total available British passenger stock amounts to 34 coaches of

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all types, and of them no less than 20 are over 30 years old. The most ancient are 7 of 39 years, 7 of 38, and 6 of 35 years; 2 are 29 years, and 6 are 27 years old. It is not surprising, therefore, that maintenance costs are heavier than they should be and that the need for new rolling stock is urgent. The serious accident at Pu Kut in Chinese Territory on September 3rd, 1948 referred to later in the report, resulted in the total destruction of a second class coach, for which compensation was received at its book value. The loss was offset by the purchase of two Wagons-Lits underframes and their reconstruction as second class coaches for an inclusive cost of $137,245.61.

At

From

6. The running costs with fuel oil gave some concern. the beginning of the year the cost was $141.90 per ton. this figure it increased to $154.30 in July, dropping again in the same month by $8.00 to $146.30. Again in August the cost rose by $5.00 and descended to $141.90 in January 1949, and finally to $133.90 at the close. Under these fluctuating price conditions, it would have been more economical to have used coal for the through express work; but unfortunately this was not possible since the Hulson grates, rocking bars and ash pans for the coal- burning 2-8-0 Austerity locomotives had not arrived from the United Kingdom. However, the greater experience gained by the locomotive crews in oil-firing enabled economies to be effected and the final results were not unsatisfactory.

7. Relations with the Chinese Section have been cordial, but have contributed little towards any improvement in operating, because the Canton-Hankow Railway's system is centralised at Hengyang, and there is no one at Canton with power to take decisions on matters of importance to the British and Chinese Sections.

8. The local passenger traffic exceeded the revenue estimate by some 5 lakhs brought about, as explained elsewhere in the report, by intensive short journey travel across the border and back. The figures constitute a new record.

9. The formation of a Railway Police Unit recruited, trained and selected from the Colony's Police has justified itself from every point of view. Not only has Railway property been effectively safeguarded and good order maintained, but increased revenue has been secured as a result of its assistance on surprise train checks in the company of the ticket inspection staff. The unit is in charge of a Chinese Senior Inspector who, since his appointment in October 1948, has been responsible for no less than 152 convictions up to the end of the financial year.

10. The credit figure for locomotive haulage by British Section engines was reduced from that of the former year's sum of $150,674.94 to $2,525.25 since the Chinese Section had requested that the ratio be kept as near 4 to 1 as possible. They were the better able to carry out this programme due to their obtaining an improved quality of coal. Another consideration was their desire to incur as little expenditure as possible in Hong Kong dollars.

The difference has been almost entirely offset by credits from the hire of wagons and coaches at $144,650.00.

   11. The work of lowering the coupler heights on all British rolling stock from 43" to 35" to conform to the American standard now universal throughout China, was commenced in June and completed in July. The operation has also involved altering the heights of loading platforms and ramps which is being undertaken gradually on a priority programme.

12. The two trainees at present in England, one taking a Traffic Course under a Colonial & Welfare Development Scholar- ship, and the other an engineering training at Railway expense, continue to give satisfaction and have fully justified the hopes placed in them.

   13. A great deal has been done in the way of restoration, and while there is still more to do, the end of the road is in sight. Meanwhile the takings of the Line have never been higher. Such results could not have been achieved without a

                                          sense of keenness and enthusiasm, coupled with cheerfulness, displayed by every member of the staff. This team spirit has been con- sistently in evidence in overcoming many difficulties for which I am profoundly grateful. I am therefore encouraged to think that whatever the future has in store this spirit will remain.

TRANSPORTATION.

   14. General. A serious accident occurred on September 3rd, 1948. The afternoon express from Canton was travelling between Pu Kut and Li Long, about 9 miles north of Shum Chun, when the locomotive and the first six coaches left the rails. Approximately 100 persons were killed. No official report as to the cause has been supplied, but sabotage was suspected.

15. The British Section staff rendered all possible assistance. Their first-aid training, which is part of Railway routine, was amply justified and many of the wounded had their injuries attended to promptly and efficiently by members of the staff. Altogether, 94 injured persons were brought to Kowloon by a special relief train supplied by this Section. They were then sent to Kowloon Hospital for further treatment. A letter of appreciation and thanks was received from the Minister of Com- munications, China.

16. Passenger traffic throughout the year has been very heavy. Last year was a record for the Railway for foreign traffic, yet this year's figures show a further increase in the number of passengers travelling to and from Chinese Territory. The Railway lost a whole month's traffic last year caused by a strike, but even after taking this into consideration and basing traffic on eleven months only, it is still possible to show an increase of 15.5% in the number of passenger travelling between the Colony and the Chinese Section. Full details are as follows:-

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Terminal Traffic between Kowloon and Canton.

1947/48

1948/49

No. of Passengers Revenue

No. of Passengers

Revenue

Up

765,282

Down

788,157

$1,876,686 1,713,238

Up

910,345

$1,935,307

Down

884,590

1,844,306

Total

1,553,439 $3,589,924

Total

1,794,935 $3,779,613

Sectional Through Traffic.

1947/48

1948/49

No. of Passengers Revenue

No. of Passengers Revenue

Up

Down

214,657 $ 355,039 140,320

227,444

Up Down

488,341

Total

354,977

$ 582,483

Total

324,990 $ 503,631 281,379

606,369 $ 991,972

17. The figures for Terminal Traffic include 18,159 passengers up and 16,537 passengers down by the non-stop trains. This service of one train in each direction was inaugurated on January 24th, 1949, and this Section's share of revenue earned up to the end of the financial year reached $126,339.05.

18. However, the year's increases are to be found mainly in the Sectional Through Traffic. Whereas Terminal Traffic shows an increase of only 15% on last year, foreign bookings other than to Canton are up 70%. This increase is due to the number of travelling traders, runners and smugglers who are eking out a living by travelling to and fro between British Section Stations and stations over the border. The up and down Through Slow Trains have been particularly popular despite the long delays to these trains caused by Customs and Revenue searches.

19. The number of local passengers carried this year shows an increase of 53% compared with last year, and the total of 1,477,602 is a record for the Railway. Receipts are up by $275,762-a 28.8% increase. The small percentage increase in revenue as compared with the much higher percentage increase in the number of passengers is explained by the large number of passengers travelling between Sheung Shui and Shum Chun during the last few months of the year. The third class fare between these two stations is only 20 cents, and travelling traders have found Sheung Shui Station an ideal starting point for their trips across the border.

The question may be asked as to why these passengers are classed as local passengers. It has always been the policy of the Railway to include all passengers travelling on local trains as local passengers despite the fact that Shum Chun Station, the terminus for local trains, is in Chinese territory. The present traffic to Shum Chun, however, is abnormal and will probably only last as long as the present unsettled conditions remain in South China.

   21. There is very little to report on goods traffic. Chinese Government restrictions have continued throughout the year and importers have experienced exceptional difficulties in obtaining permits for entry of goods into China. The result has been only small infrequent consignments. Railway material for the Canton- Hankow Line has also declined.

22.

     Revenue from parcels traffic conveyed by the through expresses totalled $55,307.79.

23. Local goods traffic shows little change from last year, tonnage and revenue are only slightly less and the type of goods. carried-farm produce, pigs and poultry etc.-is very much the same as last year.

24. Details of local and foreign goods traffic are as follows:-

FOREIGN.

1947/48

1948/49

 Up Down

104,160 Tons

14,051

Up Down

""

67,844 Tons

8,795

21

118,211 Tons

76,639 Tons

Revenue

$586,385

Revenue

$238,768

LOCAL.

1947/48

1948/49

Tons

Revenue

4,008 $32,249

Tons

Revenue

3,457

$30,846

RATES AND FARES.

   25. Local rates and fares and up rates and fares to the Chinese Section have remained unchanged. With the introduc- tion of the non-stop train in January, a new "Special Class" fare was fixed at $18.50 for single journeys between Hong Kong and Canton.

26. The Chinese National Currency continued to fall and in an attempt to get some kind of stability the Chinese Govern- ment introduced a new currency, Gold Yuan, as from August 26th, 1948. The rate of exchange was fixed at one Gold Yuan to HK$1.25, but this exchange rate was very short-lived for in October the Gold Yuan had dropped to HK$0.50.

The new currency continued its decline until the end of the year. following details give some idea of the trend of Chinese currency in respect of passenger fares from Canton :

The

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Fares from Canton to Kowloon.

1st

2nd

3rd

April 1st, 1948

CNC$ 1,851,000

1,482,000

741,000

August 25th, 1948 ... CNC$27,500,000

22,000,000

11,000,000

August 26th, 1948

...

GY$19.80

13.20

6.60

March 31st, 1949

...

GY $56,100.

45,000

22,500

OPERATING.

 27. A new timetable was introduced on September 1st, the chief feature being the reduction in travelling time between the Colony and Canton from 4 hours to 4 hours. However, the accident at Pu Kut on September 3rd resulted in the Chinese Section reverting to their previous timings, and another new time- table had to be arranged which commenced on September 15th, 1948.

28. On November 4th bandits de-railed train No. 18 near Nam Kong, about 18 miles from Canton, robbing the passengers and causing considerable damage to the track. This led the Chinese Section authorities to ask for another timetable in order that the last train to Canton would arrive before dark and thereby The new reduce the possibility of further attacks by bandits. timetable commenced on November 20th, 1948, and continued until January.

 29. About this time, the Chinese Section were negotiating for an extra set of rolling stock in order to run a non-stop train between Canton and Kowloon, and on January 24th, 1949, the first non-stop train between the two cities was inaugurated. The train obtained from the Kiang-Nan Line was composed of all-steel open-car American mono-class coaches-running time 3 hours 55 minutes. This train is still in operation.

30. A further speeding up of express trains took place on March 25th, 1949, the fastest time now, apart from the non-stop, being 4 hours 21 minutes.

 31. All speed restrictions over the British Section have been removed during the year and trains are now operating between Kowloon and Shum Chun at the same speeds as pre-war.

32.

Signal lamps have also been installed at all stations, but the double-wire signalling equipment has yet to come from the United Kingdom.

 33. There are still a considerable number of passengers joining trains without first obtaining tickets. This is particularly the case with inward passengers from Shum Chun. Nevertheless, these passengers have very little chance of avoiding payment of fare due to the vigilance and supervision of Ticket Inspectors and Ticket Collectors on trains. On the other hand, the percentage of missing tickets in an outward direction increased during the last few months of the year. Collecting of tickets at Shum Chun

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is most difficult as there is little law and order over the border. The pre-war practice of collecting Shum Chun tickets at Sheung Shui, the last station but one, has therefore been reverted to, and although the number of missing tickets is still high, it is considered that more excess fares are collected at Sheung Shui than would be possible at Shum Chun.

   34. The Railway Police have been a valuable asset to the traffic staff. Black-marketing of tickets is now practically non- existent and collection of excess fares has been made easier by the presence on trains of the Railway Police.

   35. Local trains on the whole have run fairly well to schedule. The Down Through Slow has been bad, the Chinese Section appearing to have little control over its running or the collection of passenger fares. It has, however, been a very good revenue-earner for country produce; consequently, endeavours have been made to get the train through to Kowloon on all possible occasions in spite of its frequent late arrival at Shum Chun.

   36. One hundred and six special trains were run during the year, most of them at Ching Ming. In addition, an extra trip to Shatin had to be run on Sundays in order to bring back picnic parties.

37. Goods trains totalled only 347 throughout the year. Ballast trains numbered 74 in each direction.

38. Accidents were as follows:

Personal:

Trespassers killed by trains Trespassers injured by trains Passengers killed by trains

Passengers injured by trains

Other:

વર્ષ ૨ ૦

2

6

Engine failure

Derailment

3

1

Level crossing gates damaged by motor traffic. Fencing damaged by motor traffic

ACCOUNTS GENERAL,

   39. There is still no written working agreement between the British Section and the Canton-Hankow Railway for the accounts offices. The method and procedure for the settlement of accounts continued to be the results of meetings between Executives, and by correspondence between the accounts offices of each Section.

40. The Imprest Account which was opened on behalf of the C.H.R. Section in November 1946 has continued as a satisfactory arrangement. The total value for the year for the C.H.R. Section for stores supplied to

to them and for through running, is $1,876,376.27.

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 41. The exchange of accounts and supporting documents between the two Sections, has been reasonably prompt throughout the year.

42. Currencies and rates of exchange for the C.H.R. Section have changed at various times during the year, but dues to the British Section have been correctly claimed in Hong Kong dollars. 43. The working results for the past three years are as

under:

Year

Gross

Operating

Receipts

Expenses

1946/47

4,431,700.03

2,226,388.73

1947/48

6,431,252.29

3,302,465.42

1948/49

Nett Operating Revenue

7,075,991.75 3,480,090.70

2,205,311.30

3,128,786.87

3,595,901.05

 44. Receipts and Expenditure under the most important heads during the past three years are as follows:-

Operating Receipts.

Heads

1946/47

1947/48

1948/49

Passenger Service,

Passengers

$3,028,095.17

$5,129,206.43

$6,076,999.98

Other

293,799.51

167,485.47

118,438.56

Goods Service, Goods

738,732.78

618,634.42

269,614.73

Goods Service, Other

11,706.00

15,206.60

40,554.66

Profit on Central

Mechanical Works

131,951.74

50,276.19

56,327.87

Rents

89,651.67

137,768.87

141,616.87

Incidental Revenue.

137,763.16

149,139.37

225,263.83

Auxiliary Operation

Foreign Haulage.

150,674.94

2,525.25

Interchange of

Rolling Stock

12,860.00

144,650.00

Operating Expenditure.

Heads

1946/47

1947/48

1948/49 $ 298,771.35

General Expenses $ 186,766.48 $ 305,316.90

Running Expenses . 719,707.20

Traffic Expenses

Maintenance of

Equipment

Maintenance of

326,345.94 466,677.06

1,346,110.62

537,697.44

658,678.24

495.590.71 1,210,917.91

821,550.63

Way & Structures... 455,871.67 525,682.60 653,260.10

45. Services rendered by the Workshops for other than the Department's own requirements were as follows:-

Canton-Hankow Railway

Government Departments Outside firms

1947/48

1948/49

$148,745

$108,347

31,534

51,290

24,405

21,068

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   46. The accounts show that a deficit of $1,722,523.93 brought forward from previous financial years has been cleared. This is the first year during the existence of the Railway in which out- standing deficits have been cleared.

   47. A sum of $19,400,000 was allocated to the Railway from the Hong Kong Government's Rehabilitation Loan. Expenditure against this Loan commenced in 1947. The period of the Loan is 1973-1978, with a life of about 26 years. Repayment of the Loan over a period of 25 years has now commenced, and the first instalment, a sum of $776,000 has been included in this year's accounts. The Loan Expenditure at the end of the year is $3,424,486.07, but there are outstanding orders with the Crown Agents to the value of $8,768,738.

48. As shown in the balance sheet the surplus is $814,618.40; this is satisfactory when it is taken into consideration that a deficit of $1,722,523.93 from previous years has been cleared and the first annual loan repayment of $776,000 has been included in the accounts.

MECHANICAL WORKSHOPS.

   49. Locomotives. Three tank engines which were beyond repair have been sold. Two tank engines Nos. 12 and 13 were given major repairs. Ten 2-8-0 Austerity engines have been given. medium repairs including the fitting of limpet mattresses to save heat loss, so that all the 12 Austerity engines are now provided with limpet mattresses.

50.

Two 4-6-2 Skoda engines returned from India by the British Military Authorities who requisitioned them in 1941, were re-erected under our supervision for return to the Canton-Hankow Railway.

   51. Six sets of Hulson rocking grates were received from the United Kingdom, and three sets have been installed in Austerity engines Nos. 27, 29 and 32 to replace the fixed grates which are not suitable for long distance runs with the kind of coal available.

   52. The 65 ton locomotive crane was given a light overhaul except for the boiler which has been given a general heavy over- haul. A complete set of cables has also been ordered to replace the original supplied with the crane in 1924.

   53. The Austerity locomotives are proving expensive to maintain. Built for the special purpose of restoring the shattered railways of Europe, they were intended as stop-gaps with apparently a short expectation of life. Many spare parts supplied with these locomotives have become useless owing to wear that has taken place to the locomotives. A particularly costly item is the horn-block lining. This was originally provided with babbit metal and no means of taking up slack. The wear is rapid and all wheels have to be dropped for re-lining. A re-designed guide of adjustable type is undergoing tests.

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 54. Carriages and Wagons. Nineteen carriages have been given a general repair and painting during the year. Two all steel old carriages were bought from Wagons-Lits and rebuilt to second class standard, being numbered 205 and 206. One second class carriage was totally damaged in the Pu Kut accident and compensation was recovered at its book value. The Department carried out the reconstruction of two third class passenger coaches for the Canton-Hankow Line.

 55. The couplers of 20 carriages have been replaced by a stronger type, namely, the A.A.R. type D. Coaches so fitted were exchanged as rapidly as possible and used on the express trains thus increasing the safety factor. The remaining 14 carriages will have their old type couplers all replaced by A.A.R. type D next year.

All carriages are now provided with batteries supplied from the United Kingdom, and the old generators have been overhauled, with the exception of 6 carriages waiting for electric generators from the United Kingdom. All passenger and nearly all goods stock are once again fitted with air brakes in proper working condition.

 56. Repairs have been effected to 21 wagons, and 6 have been. converted to temporary third class passenger carrying stock.

 57. One 50 ton well-wagon was received from the United Kingdom. The vacuum brakes and screw couplings were replaced locally by air brakes and automatic couplers.

Considerable

58. Hong Kong Government Departments. repair work as well as the manufacture of spare parts was carried out for other Government Departments such as the Public Works Department, General Post Office, Land Transport, Royal Observa- tory, Medical Department and the Fire Brigade.

59. Motor Vehicles. There are 7 railway trolleys, 3 motor cars and 1 lorry maintained for departmental use. These have all received attention as required. One Plymouth sedan is due for scrapping and sanction is awaited to purchase an Austin duly approved in the Estimates for 1949/1950.

60. Accident and Casualty. During the last 12 months there have been only 7 very minor derailments due entirely to personal negligence and two engine failures also of a minor nature.

61. Machines and Hand Tools. Up to the end of the year, machines and hand tools indented for in the United Kingdom in 1946 have been received in the proportion of 100% hand tools and 50% machine tools.

62. In conclusion, the Railway plant, locomotives, carriages, wagons, tools and equipment have been maintained up to a better standard than before, and in so far as it has been possible with the delivery of supplies and equipment from the United Kingdom. Maintenance expenditures have been higher than in the previous year due to the fact that material for betterments was not available earlier.

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WAY AND STRUCTURES.

63. Maintenance. Way and Structures have been main- tained in a satisfactory condition although sufficient engineering supplies were not forthcoming.

64. Tracks. 912 tons of 95-lb. rails arrived from the United Kingdom in June, and the fastenings in September. The cardinal importance of supplying fastenings with rails cannot be too strongly stressed.

The

   The replacing of old 85-lb. rails with new 95-lb. in the Main Line at Mile 5 to 5 and 9 to 13 was started in October and completed in January. Four and a half miles of track were renewed. 1245 rails and 2305 sleepers were replaced. relaying time was 75 nights, and work was done without inter- ference to normal traffic. The long term speed restriction of 30 m.p.h. over section Mile 9 to 13 was removed on 22.1.49.

Other renewals in the Main Line were as follows:

(a) Timber sleepers

Bridge & Crossing timbers Concrete sleepers (second hand)

(b) Ballast stone 2′′

(c) Rails 85-lb. (second hand)

Rail 110-lb.

(d) Crossing

Switches

2,993 pcs.

666

""

133

1,510 cu. yds.

88 lengths. 1 length.

Nil.

1 no.

65. Sidings. In anticipation of the arrival of 50 heavy locomotives on their way to China, an U.N.R.R.A. supply from Australia, a siding 1,164 ft. long leading to the 100 ton crane of the Hong Kong &. Whampoa Dock Co. Ltd. was re-laid in November. The locomotives so far have failed to materialize.

   Seven sidings at Hung Hom Station, totalling 6,874 feet long were re-laid in January, but were incomplete at the close of the financial year owing to short supply of switches and crossings.

   The second loop line at Shatin Station, 1,365 feet long was re-laid in March.

   All the above sidings were removed by the Japanese during the War.

A new siding 866 feet long, 'Y' shape, was laid in the Hung Hom Loco Yard for connection to the future 100 feet turntable.

66. Bridges. Sidewalks were provided for Bridges Nos. 31, 34 and 35 at Fanling and Sheung Shui to prevent pedestrians from walking on the railway track.

At the request of fishermen in Taipo, old piers in Bridge No. 20 were removed to enable junks to get shelter during typhoons.

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 Constructional piers, erected by the Japanese during the War, in the inverts of the big Bridge No. 24 at Taipo Market, were removed.

1,550 tons of silt were cleared from the inverts of Bridge No. 19 at Cheung Shu Tan.

."

The stone floors in the inverts of Bridge No. 17 at Ma Niu Shui were re-laid.

67. Central Mechanical Works. Roofing materials worth. $46,352 have been indented for through the Crown Agents, and $20,930 worth through the Government Stores Department, for repairing the Workshops next year.

The Paint Shop, Machine Shop, Blacksmith's Shop, Tools and Stores Shop were repaired; the Erection Shop, Wagon Shop, Locomotive and Carriages Shed remain to be done.

A new stores building, 80′ x 80′ × 15', purchased from the Pacific Iron & Steel Co., U.S.A., was erected inside the Hung Hom Loco Yard. This permitted the old stores building to be converted into a Light Machine Shop.

Tall pale fencing 7' 6" high and amounting to 3,488 linear feet were erected around the Hung Hom Loco Yard to replace the low type fence. The object was to effect greater security against thefts which had become frequent.

68. Station Buildings. All offices in the Kowloon Station Building were overhauled and the steelwork in the platform awnings painted. The large skylights over the concourse which were boarded up by the Japanese during the occupation period were re-glazed. A new teakwood counter was erected in the Station Master's office to replace the old partition to afford greater privacy. The massive wooden staircase leading to the Head Offices were repaired and polished.

Two new permanent passenger-shelters 42' x 8' were erected at Shatin and Taipo Market Stations. All outstations (with the exception of Sheung Shui) now have shelters for their passengers on the platforms opposite the booking office and waiting room.

Three pit-type latrines were erected at Fanling, Sheung Shui and Lowu Stations to replace the old bucket-type. This completed the 3-year programme of improving the sanitary conditions of all outstations.

A small office was built inside the Produce Shelter at Taipo Pier for use of the Marine Department engaged in checking junk licences.

69. Staff Quarters. A two-storey building was erected at Shatin Station for housing the Station Master, Booking Clerk and Ticket Collector.

 "B" Class quarter No. 5 at IIung Hom was converted to accommodate two families. A locomotive department staff quarter was converted to accommodate the Railway Police..

15

    Four Keyman's quarters were built at Yaumati, Ma Niu Shui and Lowu. The 2-year programme of providing Keymen with proper quarters has now been completed.

    All traffic staff quarters in the New Territories have been mosquito-proofed.

   70. Signals. As from 7.10.48, semaphore signals in all stations were provided with proper signal lamps.

    All keys and ward-plates for the point and signal locks at outstations from Yaumati to Fanling were renewed.

71. Roads and Platforms. The Public Works Department repaired the road leading to Lowu Station to serve as an approach to the future Urn-Cemetery at Sandy Ridge. Persons accompany- ing burials are expected to use both road and rail to this site.

    6,590 sq. yds. of platform surfaces at outstations have been patched and tarred.

72. Land. At Hung Hom Reclamation, the following areas of land were leased for various purposes:

190,246 s.f. for storage purposes.

6,000 s.f. for a Bible Auditorium.

3,000 s.f. for a film titling studio.

   73. Advertising space. The following spaces were let to local advertising companies: --

Inside Kowloon Station

Outside Kowloon Station

Opposite Nathan Road

Waterloo Road Bridge

Argyle Street Bridge

Prince Edward Road Bridge

Miscellaneous

519 s.f.

1,220 s.f.

1,069 s.f.

1,207 s.f.

732 s.f.

1,093 s.f.

116 s.f.

    74. Contracts. During the year 29 tenders were gazetted, and 41 contracts were signed. Two contractors were fined for failing to complete the work in time while another one was penalized for failing to perform the contract.

75. Typhoon damage. The typhoon of 28.7.48 did consider- able damage to the bank at Mile 5 and the cutting at Mile 16. Traffic was interrupted for 3 days. All available Engineering staffs were shifted from other important jobs to supervise and carry out the repairs, and consequently the programme of work for this financial year was delayed for one month.

76. New Sleepers. During the year, the following quantities of hardwood sleepers were purchased:-

2,369 Siamese Hardwood Sleepers.

301 Siamese Hardwood Crossing Timbers.

4,000 Borneo Hardwood Sleepers.

URBAN COUNCIL PUBLIC LIBRARIES

16

A local trading company failed to carry out the contract for the supply of 1,000 bridge and crossing timbers owing to the sudden imposition of a 10% export tax by the Siamese Government.

77. Concrete Sleepers. Up to 31.3.49 there were

19,935 concrete sleepers on the Main Line

8,565 3,785

29

""

on sidings

lying in yard (not on track)

32,285 concrete sleepers against an approximate total of

35,000 manufactured between 1920 and 1934.

It is worthy of note that after an average period of 22 years, 90% of Baker's concrete sleepers are still in existence. Unfor- tunately it was necessary, however, when replacing 85-lb. rails with 95-lb., to remove the concrete sleepers from the curves in the Main Line due to the wider bottom of the new rail and the insufficient spread allowed by the concrete sleepers. The concrete sleepers thus removed were re-used in other places.

78. Kempas Sleepers. The majority of the timber sleepers removed from the track after the war (i.e. 1946 to 1948) were Singapore Kempas sleepers obtained as an experiment in 1938. These sleepers were creosote-treated. They started to rot from the core, and this was not easily detected from the outside until they were in an advanced state of decay.

79. Australian Sleepers. With the exception of the 2,000 pieces put in the track during Autumn 1946, all Australian hard- wood sleepers found in this Railway are over 15 years old and are still serviceable. No hardwood sleepers in these latitudes so far handled can compare with Australian Eucalypts.

80. Siamese Sleepers. Some Siamese sleepers were purchased six months ago, but it is yet too early to comment as to the probability of their useful life.

81. Borneo Sleepers. Borneo timber sleepers were received in the Colony in January 1949, and were first put in the track in April. Here again, it is too early to comment.

82. We are indebted to the Forestry Officer for the advice and assistance afforded to the Department on sample timbers, and the inspection of sleepers imported for Railway use.

STORES.

83. Details of stores purchased during the period April 1st, 1948 to March 31st, 1949 are as follows:

Coal

Oil, Petrol, etc.

Sleepers

Local Purchase

Government Stores

Other Departments

Crown Agents

$ 533,712.14

998,538.03 56,783.32 364,875.40

117,431.12 235.98

1,300,133.40

17

84. The price of coal has been slightly cheaper than the previous year, averaging about $103.00 per ton. Fuel oil has averaged approximately the same as last year, about $145.23.

    85. Stores purchased from local contractors have been on the whole dearer; copper, tin, brass, iron piping, Douglas fir all show increases of from 5% to 30%; mild steel has remained the same, whilst glass, paint, hardwood have been about 10% cheaper.

    86. Total purchases from Government Stores have increased from $26,855.16 last year to $117,431.12 this year. This is mainly attributable to a three monthly trial period when all stores were purchased from Government Stores. The experiment, as expected, was not a success chiefly because of the inordinate delay in obtaining debits and the consequent impossibility of assessing the cost of jobs performed by the Mechanical Engineer's Depart- ment.

    87. A summary is given below of the main items received. from Crown Agents and their approximate cost:-

Boring and Turning Machine

$ 49,500

Capstan Lathe

18,300

Drilling Machine ...

18,300

Dogspikes (49,055 nos.)

14,700

Fishplates (3,102 sets)

31,600

Fishbolts and Nuts (11,680 nos.)

11,600

Hung Hom Signalling Apparatus (part)

22,000

Hulson grates and ashpans (6 sets)

34,000

Lathe 10" × 12′

24,300

Punching Machine

51,300

Rails (1,920 pieces)

369,200

Radial Drilling Machine

15,300

Screwing Machine

12,400

Shaping Machine

25,500

Superheater elements (7 sets)

26,500

Sleeper Fastenings (4,000 sets)

31,900

Switchboard (part)

1,800

Slotting Machine

44,000

Testing Machine

10,200

Toolroom Lathe

28,500

Turret Lathe

44,000

Well-wagon (50 ton)

17,000

Welding Plant

8,000

18

STAFF.

88. Mr. I. B. Trevor, General Manager, returned from long leave on September 16th, 1948, and resumed duty from that date.

89. Mr. A. E. Perry, Traffic Manager, resumed the duties of his substantive post on September 16th, 1948, following the return of the General Manager, in whose post he had acted. IIe proceeded on long leave on January 21st, 1949, from which date Mr. L. Sykes, Traffic Assistant, was acting Traffic Manager and Stores Officer in addition.

90. During the year, the position of Senior Accountant has been held by the following, Mr. To King Shun (Acting) from 1.4.48 to 14.8.48, Mr. S. J. Walton (Acting) from 15.8.48 to 3.9.48, and Mr. T. G. Stokes from 4.9.48 to 31.3.49, Mr. C. E. Davis was attached to the Department prior to taking over this post, on 24.3.49, upon his return from long leave.

91. The duties of Senior Executive in the Accounts Office were carried out by Mr. Kung Chi Ping (Acting) from 1.4.48 to 8.11.48, and Mr. L. C. Strange from 9.11.48.

92. For economic reasons the services of the Assistant Engineer, Mr. Cheung Kit Lam, were dispensed with as from 1.11.48. A junior surveyor was taken on.

93. Mr. Hu Kwok Leung, the Acting Engineer of Way & Works, was promoted to the post of Engineer with effect from the 1st January, 1947.

94. Throughout the year, the position of Mechanical Engi- neer was held by Mr. J. K. Wong.

95. Staff strength at the end of the year was 856, comprising 381 monthly paid staff and 475 daily paid employees.

96. The general health of the staff on the whole has been good. The most common complaints have been malaria, fevers, influenza, common colds and stomach complaints.

I. B. TREVOR,

General Manager.

19

Statement No. 1-CAPITAL EXPENDITURE.

At the beginning

of the year 1.4.1948

During the Year

New Lines and Extentions

Additions and Betterments

Property Abandoned

Nett Capital Expenditure

At the end of

the year

31.3.49

Part I Construction Accounts

C- 1 General Expenditure

C 2 Preliminary Expenditure C- 3 Land

753,619.68

80,045.23

(A) 1,129.75 3,207.46

4,337.21

757,956.89

80,045.23

5,210,696.83

5,210,696.83

C- 4 Formation

C

5 Tunnels

C

6 Bridgework

2,703,100.42

2,703,100.42

3,564,854.89

1,309,811.62

C 7 Line Protection

-

-

C 8 Telegraphs & Telephones

C 9 Track

90,074.47 30,619.10

1,122,382.92

9.528.95 17,282.23

2,895.90 796,583.06

9,528.95

3,574,383.84

17,282.23

1,327,093.85

90,074.47

2,895.90

33,515.00

796,583.06

1,918,965.98

C-10 Signals & Switches

44,078.86

27,068.36

27,068.36

71,147.22

C-11 Stations & Buildings

961.733.47

492,928.92

492,928.92

1,454,662.39

C-12 Central Mechanical Works C-14 Plant

289,993.21

289,993.21

221,442.56

(B)

11,780.00

(D) 7,636.90

393,660.79

615,103.35

389,517.69

C 15 Rolling Stock

4,850,446.17

(C)

5,836.90

(E) 134,031.57

408,233.86

5,258,680.03

536,428.53

C-16 Maintenance

C-17 Docks, Harbours & Wharves

1,129.75 64,051.42

(A) 1,129.75

1,119.64

- 1,129.75 1,119.64

65,171.06

Total cost Property

21,298,080.60

(F) 2,295,307.39

142,798.22

2,152,509.17

23,450,589.77

(A) Amount transferred from C-16 Maintenance

$ 1,129.75

(B) Machines taken on charge during the year:-

Lathe returned by C.H.R.

(E) Two Tank Locomotives sold by Auction:-

Original book value of No. 11 4-6-4 Tank

$ 5,000.00

""

11

31

11

Reclaimed from scrap left by Japanese:-

Circular Saw Bench

500.00

for $20,000.00:-

Wing Pump No. 7

50.00

Centrifugal Pump 3 H.P.

300.00

One 19 H.P. Motor 350V 3 phase 50 cycle A.C.

1,140.00

No. 14 2-6-4 Tank

to One 2-6-4 Tank Locomotive sold

Original book value

Compensation received for one S.P. 204 second

class carriage wrecked on C.H.R.

One 16 H.P. Motor

do

960.00

$

33,922.57

25,000.00

C.H.R.

25,000.00

50,109.00

$ 134.031.57

One 2 H.P. Motor

do

200.00

One 25 H.P. Motor

do

3,430.00

One 2 H.P. Motor 220/200V 3 phase 50 cycle

A.C.

One 4 H.P. Motor 350V 3 phase 50 cycle A.C.

160.00 40.00

$11,780.00

(C) Amount erroneously included in C-14-Plant in 1947/48 account, now included in C-15 Rolling Stock

Value of one No. 30305 30 ton H.S. Wagon brought

to account, previously omitted

$ 1,836.90

4,000.00

$ 5,836.90

(D) One Milling Machine returned to owner approved claim by Custodian of Property (Ref. S.63) Sold by Auction following Board of Survey 1948

Cupolaton

$ 5,000.00

Furnace, 50 lbs. oil fired

Amount erroneously included in C-14 Plant in 1947/48 account now transferred to C-15 Rolling Stock

500.00 300.00

1,836.90

$ 7,636.90

(F) Special Expenditure 1948/49

Expenditure from Rehabilitation Funds 1948/49 Amount transferred from C-16 Maintenance as

per (A)

Machines reclaimed from scrap and Machines as

per (B)

Cost of one 30 ton wagon as per (C) Estimated cost of stores received from Controller of Stores without debits (debited internally to C-9, C-11 and C-14)

Less portion of Rehabilitation Loan charged to Operating Expenditure not due for inclusion in Capital Account

$1,198,322.12 1,138,965.25

1,129.75

11,780.00 5,836.90

407.36

$2,356,441.38

61,133.99

$2,295,307.39

Previous Year

20

Statement No. 2-OPERATING ACCOUNT.

Current Year

Previous Year

Current Year

Percentage

on Total

Operating Expenses

Operating Expenses

Amount

Amount

Percentage Percentage

on Total on Total

Operating Revenue

Amount

Amount

Operating

Operating

Expenses

Revenue

Percentage on Total Operating Revenue

%

%

%

$

BA

%

305.316.90

E-1 General Expenses

9.08 .17

299,735.68 5.581.22

14.13

466.677.06 1,346.110.62

33.20

1,096.448.00

2.54

83.832.41

2.56

84.496.50

2.46

81.333.71

Main Line

Administration

Special

E-2 Traffic Expenses E-3 Running Expenses

Locomotives

Carriages & Wagons Motor Vehicles Traffic

298.771.35

274,177.75

24,593.60

7.88 .71

14.88

956,798.85

-

Local Service

R- 1 Passengers Service,

-Passengers

R 2 Passengers Service,

1,304.607.90

18.44

495,590.71 1,210.917.91

.14.24

.20

13.051.29

-Other

20.779.10

.29

994.729.69

28.58

.50

65,644.82

1.89

.02

32.249.25 856.60

R

3 Goods Service, Goods

R.

4 Goods Service, Other

30.846.15 17.088.31

.44

.24

49.781.75

1.43

R

7 Profit on Central

100.761.65

2.89

.78

19.94

658,678.24 525.682.60

E-4 Main. of Equipment

Locomotives Dept.

2.14

E-5 Main. of W. & S.

821,550.63 653,260.10

23.61

1.62

50.276.19 137.768.87 104.373.53

Mechanical Works

56,327.87

.80

R

8 Rent

141.616.87

2.00

1.295.374.58 R

-

9 Incidental Revenue

219.985.94

1,791,252.14

3.11

15.53 .39

512,707.92 12,974.68

Engineering Dept. Other Depts.

646.305.74 6.954.36

18.57

.20

R

64.88 2.40

4.172.407.58

154.434.18

9.12

586,385.17

.22

14,350.00

.70

44.765.84

RRRR

2.34

150,674.94

.20

12,860.00 5,135.877.71

Through Service

1 Passenger Service. -Passengers

R- 2 Passenger Service, -Other

3 Goods Service, Goods 4 Goods Service, Other

9 Incidental Revenue R-10 Auxiliary Operation

-Foreign Haulage R-11 Interchange of

Rolling Stock

$6.431.252.29 Total Operating Revenue

4,772,392.08

97,659.46

67.44

1.38

238.768.58

3.38

23,466.35

.33

5,277.89

.07

2.525.25

.04

144.650.00 5,284,739.61

2.04

$7,075,991.75

100.00

100.00

$3,302,465.42

3,128,786.87

Total Operating Expenses

Balance, Profit on Operating

$3,480,090.70

3,595.901.05

$7,075,991.75

100.00

100.00

$6,431.252.29

$6,431,252.29

(1) Operating Expenditure

$2,589,833.57

(1)

Nett Revenue

(2) Portion of Special Expenditure chargeable to Revenue

61,133.99

(2)

(3) Depreciation on Rolling Stock

130,920.39

(4) H.C.L. & Rehabilitation Allowance

539,343.66

(5) Services rendered by Government

48,074.67

(6) Pensions & Gratuities

(7) Staff Passages

102,113.62

Government Transportation:~

(a) Passengers

(b) Goods

(3) Government rentals

(4) Incidental Revenue

8,670.80

Total Operating Expenses

$3,480,090.70

$7,075.991.75

$7,000,943.70

72,869.74

1,698.31

480.00

$7,075,991.75

Previous Year

1

21

Statement No. 3-INCOME.

PART I-INCOME ACCOUNT

Current Year Previous Year

$

1

2

EA

Current Year

2

I - 8

Balance, net loss

3,128,786.87

I-1

Balance, net revenue

3,595,901.05

202,889.65

I-12

Interest on Government Invest-

I - 14

ments

Amortization Loan

(A) 238,687.52

6,710.04

I-3

Interest on Depreciation Reserves (B)

11,292.25

of Rehabilitation

(C) 776,000.00

$ 202,889.65

2,932,607.26

$3,135,496.91

Total

Balance

$1,014,687.52

2,592,505.78

$3,135,496.91

Total

Total

$3,607,193.30

$3,135,496.91

Total

(A) Interest on Rehabilitation Loan up to 1947/48

1939

$3,367,205.48

Special Expenditure up to 1947/48

138,936.47 1,027,980.54

(B) Interest on Depreciation Reserves up to 1948/49 34% on $322,635.70. (C) First instalment of the K.C.R. repayment over twenty five years of Rehabilitation Loan $19,400,000.

1945/46 1946/47

$2,285,520.82 @ 31% $ 79,993.23

$4,534,122.49 @ 34% $158,694.29

$238,687.52.

$3,607,193.30

$3,607,193.30

Previous Year

22

Statement No. 3-INCOME-Continued.

PL-5

Balance of the year

9.546.50

PL-6

Loss on property retired (A)

$ 9,546.50

2,923,060.76

Total

Balance

$2,932,607.26

Total

Previous Year

PART II-PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT

Current Year Previous Year

GA

Current Year

2,932,607.26

PL-1

Balance of the year

2,592,505.78

55,363.45

$

55,363.45

2,537,142.33

$2,932,607.26

$2,592,505.78

$2,932,607.26

PART ĮĮI-SURPLUS APPROPRIATION ACCOUNT

Current Year Previous Year

EA

Total

$2,592,505.78

Total

$2,592,505.78

Current Year

S-4

Deficit for the year

2,923,060.76

S-1

Surplus for the year

2,537,142.33

4,645,584.69

S-5

Deficit from previous years

1,722,523.93

S-2

Surplus from previous years

$4,645,584.69

$4,645,584.69

Total

$1,722,523.93

Surplus carried to Balance Sheet

814,618.40

$2,923,060.76

1,722,523.93

Total

$2,537,142.33

$4,645,584.69

(A) No. 11 4-6-4 Tank and No. 14 2-6-4 Tank

Locomotives sold by Auction

Estimated value

Actual amount realized by sale

One 2-6-4 Tank Locomotive sold to C.H.R.

Estimated value

Actual amount realized

Total Net loss

Net Loss

$58,922.57 8,559.12

$50,363.45

$25,000.00

20,000.00 5,000.00

$55,363.45

Total

Deficit carried to Balance Sheet

Total

$2,537,142.33

$2,537,142.33

Balance at beginning

of year

23

Statement No. 4-GENERAL BALANCE SHEET 1948/49.

Assets or Debit Balance

Heads, of Classification

Balance at close of

year

Increase

Decrease

B-6

Investment Assets:-

21,298.080.60 B-6-1

Cost of road & equipment

23.450,589.77 2,152,509.17

$21,298,080.60

Total Investments Assets

$23,450,589.77 $2,152,509.17

B-7

Working Assets

47,596.31

B-7-3-2 Foreign Railways

47,596.31

20.014.55

B-7-3-3 Home Line

26.484.46

2.099.30

B-7-4-2 Sundry Debtors

(A)

44.539.30

6.469.91

42.440.00

377.811.46

3,033.55

B-7-4-3 Advance Account

B-7-5 Stores

4.000.00

4,000.00

403,025.01

25,213.55

B-7-5-1 Workshop Suspense

1,446.79

1,586.76

$

450,555.17

Total Working Assets

$ 479,495.56 $ 78.123.46 $ 49.183.07

D-8

J-8-1

Deferred Debit Items:-

Temporary Advances to

Govt.

(B) 704,786.49

704.786.49

Total deferred Debits

$ 704,786.49

$ 704,786.49

B-9

1.722,523.93

Balance of Accumulated

Deficit

$23,471,159.70

Grand Total

$24,634,871.82

1,722.523.93

Balance at beginning of year

Liabilities or Credit Balance

Heads of Classification

Balance at close of year

Increase

Decrease

B-1

21.298,080.60

Capital Liabilities:-

B-1-3 Permanent

ment

Govt. Invest-

23,450,589.77 2,152.509.17

$21,298,080.60

$23,450,589.77 $2,152.509.17

B-2 Working Liabilities

Total Working Liabilities

B-3 Deferred Credit Items:-

1,758,765.26.

B-3-1 Temporary Advances from

Govt.

1,758.765.26

191,715.31 B-3-3 Depreciation Reserves

222,598.53 B-3-5 Misc. deferred Credits

322,635.70

130.920.39

(C) 47,027.95

175,570.58

$ 2,173,079.10

Total deferred Credits

$ 369,663.65

$ 130,920.39 $1,934,335.84

B-4 Appropriation from Surpluses

Grand Total

$2,935,419.12 $1,771.707.00 $23,471,159.70

(C) Includes Deposit

(A) Estimated value of stores etc. without debits.

(B) Treasury Advances.

Fines

814.618.40

814.618.40

$24,634,871.82

$3,098,047.96 $1,934,335.84

$46,466.73 561.22

$47,027.95

香港公共圖書館

HONG KO

G KONG PUBLIC LIBRAR

Sub-head

tatement No. 4A-REHABILITATION LOAN.

Item 10-Railway.

Funds

Allocated

Expended

up to

31.3.47

Expended up to 31.3.48

Expenditure

during

1948/49

Total

Expenditure

up to

31.3.49

Balance

1

Buildings

2

Equipment & Tools

573,500.00

2,428.300.00

8.193.50

177,328.27

201.266.88

378,595.15

194,904.85

124.497.11

418,704.53

543.201.64

1,885,098.36

3

General Repairs

747,000.00 258.672.74

615.105.99

28.036.75

643,142.74

103,857.26

Motor Transport

Permanent Way

32,000.00

2,494,200.00

31,829.75

662,488.81

31.829.75

31,829.75

170.25

1,273,447.98

6

Rolling Stock

13.125,000.00

63.311.72

28,898.48

462,058.61

1,302,346.46

525.370.33

1.191,853.54

12,599,629.67

19,400,000.00

961.184.80 2,285,520.82 1,138,965.25 3,424,486.07

15,975,513.93

25

香港公共圖書館

NG KONG PUBLIC LIBRAR

Previous Year

27

Statement No. 5-ANALYSIS OF PASSENGER SERVICE.

Part I-Passenger Service.

Current Year

(April 1948-March 1949)

(R-1 Passengers).

Percentage of

Revenue

Kinds of Tickets used

Number Number of Originating Units

Passenger Kilometres

Revenue

Number Passenger Carried Kilometres

Revenue

Home Line

Carried

%

%

%

Ordinary:-

460.116.73

First

61.063

796,771.85

Second

187.773

104,931

288.440

3,440,361

408,404.92

2.71

2.96

6.59

9,370,513

851.972.70

7.44

8.06

13.75

3,681,635.53

Third

2,191.754

3,196,651

Non-stop

18.159

34.696

96,094.475 1,231,708

4,455,584.54

82.41

82.66

71.92

126.339.05

.89

1.06

2.04

Government:-

Civil:

1,293.95

5,979.15

First Second

16.835.92

Third

885 7.465 26.005

885 7,465 26,005

20,290 159,494 759,085

1,490.80

.02

.02

.03

9,051.95

.19

.14

.15

19,491.43

.67

.65

.31

Military

Privilege

Excursion

101,939.05

Excess Fare

Sleeper Charges

Special Charges

93,556.99

1.51

Monthly & Season Tickets:

1,063.50 First

1.960

1,960

4,138

1,753.50

.05

.03

4,594.35

Second

8.200

8,200

16.254.55 Third

81,160

81,160

39.489.25 Scholar Tickets

127,485

127,485

224.844

1,634,562

3,278,950

9.409.75

.21

.19

.15

41,603.50

2.09

1.41

.67

56,336.25

3.29

2.82

.91

Golfing Tickets

3.232.60 First

1.028

1,028

30,644

(A)$5,129,206.43

Total Part I

2,712.937 3,878,906 116,249,064 (B)$6,076,999.98

(A) Home Line

Foreign

Government

$ 897,331.13

4,172,407.58

59,467.72

$5,129,206.43

2,004.60

.03

.03

.03

100.00

100.00

98.09

(B) Home Line

Foreign

Government

$1,232,561.25

4,771,585.25

72,853.48

$6,076,999.98

Part II-Passenger Service. (R-2 Others).

Baggage & Specie:-

11,752.79

Public

3,152.77

.05

Government

Parcels:-

79,823.69

Public

67,142.65

1.08

Railway Service

Carriage & Animals:-

75,824.19

Public

48,079.22

.78

Government

Special Trains:-

Public

Government

Postal:-

84.80

Miscellaneous

(C)

167,485.47

Total Part II

$5,296,691.90

Total Parts I & II

(C) Home Line

Foreign

Government

(D)

63.92

118,438.56

$6,195,438.54

1.91

100.00

$ 13,027.97

154,434.18

(D) Home Line

$ 20,779.10

23.32

Foreign

Government

97,643.20

16.26

$ 167,485.47

$ 118,438.56

Previous Year

Revenue

$

28

Statement No. 6-ANALYSIS OF GOODS SERVICE.

Part -Goods Service.

Current Year

(April 1948-March 1949)

No. of Kilograms

Kinds of Goods

Originating on Home Line

No. of Kilograms Carried

(R-3 Goods).

Percentage of

Kilograms Kilometres

Revenue

Kilograms Kilograms

Carried Kilometres

Revenue

General Merchandise:-

618,634.42

Public

Government

(A) $618,634.42

Total Part I

(A) Home Line

856.60

Foreign

Government

Shunting

Handling Receipts

14,350.00 Demurrage

(C)

15,206.60

Total Part II

$633,841.02

Total Parts I & II

(C) Home Line

Foreign

%

%

71,301,900

80.097.510

2,813,627,998

269,614.73

100

100

71,301,900

80,097.510

2,813,627,998

(B) $269,614.73

100

100

86.92

$ 32,249.25

586,385.17

(B) Home Line

Foreign

Government

$ 30,846.15

238,768.58

$618,634.42

Part II-Goods Service. (R-4 Others).

856.60

14,350.00

$ 15,206.60

606.80

38,187.86

1,760.00

(D)

40,554.66

$310,169.39

(D) Home Line

Foreign

$269,614.73

$ 17,088.31

23,466.35

$ 40,554.66

13.08

100.00

Previous Year

Percentage

Total Revenue

Statement No. 7-OPERATING REVENUE.

Operating Revenue

Current Year

(April 1948-March 1949)

Total Revenue

Percentage

%

$

69

%

FROM HOME LINE

14.88

956,798.85

R

1

1 Passenger Service-Passengers

1,304,607.90

18.44

.20

13.051.29

R- 2

-Other

20.779.10

.29

.50

32,249.25

R- 3 Goods Service

-Goods

30.846.15

.44

.01

.78

856.60

50,276.19

-

R 4

-Other

17,088.31

.24

"

"

2.14

137.768.87

R- 7 Profits of Central Mechanical Works

R- 8 Rents

56,327.87

.80

141,616.87

2.00

R 9 Incidental Revenue

.76

48.787.99

.06

4,115.52

(1) (2)

Advertising

60,054.22

.85

Station and Train Privileges

3,000.60

.04

.04

2,138.30

(3)

.18

11.374.02

Sales of Unclaimed and Confiscated Goods (4) Profits on Stores Transactions

38.071.59

.54

97.777.43

1.38

.59

37,957.70

(5)

Miscellaneous

21.082.10

.30

1,295.374.58

Total Home Line

1,791,252.14}

FROM FOREIGN

64.88

4,172,407.58

R- 1 Passenger Service Passengers

4,772,392.08

67.44

2.40

154.434.18

R 2

--Other

37

97.659.46

1.38

9.12

586,385.17

-

R 3

Goods Service

-Goods

238,768.58

3.37

.22

14,350.00

R- 4

-Other

"

29

23.466.35

.33

.70

44,765.84

R

-

9

2.34

150.674.94

Incidental Revenue

R-10 Auxiliary Operation (Foreign Haulage)

5,277.89

.08

2,525.25

.04

.20

12.860.00

R-11 Interchange of Rolling Stock

144,650.00

2.04

5.135.877.71

Total Foreign

5,284.739.61

100.00

$6.431.252.29

Total Operating Revenue

$7,075.991.75

100.00

.

1

香港

共圖書

書館

:

ONG KONG PUBLIC LIBRAR

31

Statement No. 8-UNALLOCATED STORES ACCOUNT.

1. Stock in hand at commencement of financial year

(1.4.48)

2. Add Purchases, returns and charges as charged to

Expenditure sub-head

3. Deduct issues to votes and services as

credited to Expenditure sub-head $3,252,100.64

4. Deduct proceeds of stores sold and

credited to Revenue

821.25

5. Transfers between stores (+ or -)

6. Adjustment for stores not paid for in year in which

received (+ or -)

7. Deduct losses and deficiencies written off

8. Add unaccountable balance

9. Stock in hand at close of financial year 31.3.49

Stock in hand at close of financial year as per Treasury

Return

Plus stock in hand as at 1st April, 1948

Less stores shortlanded but paid in 1947/48

Less stores not received but paid for in

1948/49

$52,994.14

Plus stores received in 1948/49 but paid for

in 1949/50

50,716.49

Add unaccountable balance

$ 377,811.46

3,170,250.58

$3,548.062.04

3,252,921.89

$ 295.140.15

+111,981.83

2,277.65

4,096.97

+

.18

$ 400,747.54

26,034.80

+377,811.46

821.25

2,277.65

++-

.18

$ 400,747.54

Estimated value of stores and stationery without debits $44,539.30.

香港公共圖書館

NG KONG PUBLIC LIBRARI

33

Statement No. 9-ANALYSIS OF TRAIN AND LOCOMOTIVES KILOMETRAGE.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Classification

Oil Engine Kilometrage

Coal Engine Kilometrage

Total Kilometrage

Rail Bus Kilometrage

47/48

48/49

47/48

48/49

47/48

48/49

47/48

48/49

Ordinary

By B.S. Engine

C.S.

195,090.63 167,260.22

86,590.13 145,875.81

281,680.76 313.136.03 75.429.00 76,584.00

24.437.42

5.616.00

Passenger

Special

11

B.S. C.S.

5.361.69

3.141.65

25.44

238.26

5.387.13

3,379.91

1.244.00

108.00

19

1,036.00

1,802.50

""

Train

Kilometrage

Mixed

Goods

41,807.93

4,105.18

Ballast Train

B.S. C.S.

Service

19

B.S. C.S.

194.64

194.64

99

""

B.S. C.S.

1.096.76

1,516.74

1,046.70

6.123.46

2,143.46

7,640.20

..

**

M

2,784.00

4.139.23

44,591.93

8.244.41

14,282.00

7.990.00

4,036.40

Total Train Kilometrage

B.S. C.S.

243,551.65 176,023.79

90.446.27

156.376.76

99

333,997.92 332,400.55 90.747.00 86.376.50

25,681.42

9,760.40

Assisting

By B.S. Engine

C.S.

486.72

75.93

54.80

541.52

75.93

"

Loco. Km.

B.S.

"

"

248,886.65 180,994.29 92,403.28

165.054.86

C.S.

341,289.93 99.159.00

346.049.15 92,172.50

26.859.42 10,595.40

11

Loco.

Kilometrage

Light

B.S. C.S.

5.627.02

4,301.88

76.96

3.171.18

5.703.98 1.128.00

7.473.06

680.00

"

"1

Shunting & standing in steam at the rate of 8 km. per hour.

Total Loco. Kilometrage

99

B.S. C.S.

1,872.08

75,344.00

45,120.00

77,216.08

45,120.00

**

"

**

B.S. C.S.

11

256,872.47 185,372.10

167,879.04

213,346.04

398.718.14 424.751.51 100,287.00 92,852.50

26,859.42

10,595.40

Note: B.S. = British Section Engines.

C.S.

=

Chinese Section Engines.

34

Statement No. 10-ANALYSIS OF THROUGH TRAFFIC & LOCAL TRAFFIC KILOMETRAGE.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Through Traffic

Local Traffic

By B.S. Locos. over B.S. & C.S.

By C.S. Locos. over B.S.

Total

By B.S. Locos. over B.S.

Passenger : Ordinary

Train Kilometrage

Special

"

Goods

Service

:

""

137,105.13

2,445.31

8,244.41

76,584.00

1,802.50

7,990.00

213,689.13

176,030.90

4,247.81

16,234.41

934.60

7,640.20

Total Train Kilometrage

147,794.85

86,376.50

234,171.35

184,605.70

Light Engine: Loco Kilometrage

Total Train Kilometrage performed by B.S. Locos, over C.H.R.

2,218.14

680.00

2,898.14

5,330.85

Statement No. 11-COST FOR RUNNING COAL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Previous

Year

1947/48

191,135.30 1. Total cost of coal

121.01 2. Average cost per ton

2.11 3. Cost per Train Kilometrage

1,579.50 4. Total weight of coal (Ton)

17.74 5. Weight per Train Km. in Kg.

753.50 6. Total weight of coal for Shunting

Current Year 1948/49

294,116.48

109.51

1.88

2.685.75

17.45

710.25

Statement No. 12-COST FOR RUNNING furnace OIL BURNING LOCOMOTIVES.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Previous Year

1947/48

528,049.45 1. Total cost of Furnace Oil

143.48 2. Average cost per ton

Current Year 1948/49

369,515.82

145.43

19

2.15

3. Cost per Train Kilometrage

2.10

3,680.30

4. Total weight of Furnace Oil (Ton)

2,540.85

15.23 5. Weight per Train Km, in Kg.

$14.67

G

Statement No. 13-CONSUMPTION OF LUBRICANTS FOR LOCOMOTIVES.

Previous Year 1947/48

(April 1948-March 1949).

3,344.75 1. Total weight of Engine Oil (gals.)

3.32 2. Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Kg.

2,152.75 3. Total weight of S.H. Cylinder Oil (gals.)

2.14 4. Weight per 100 Engine Km. in Kg.

Current Year 1948/49

3,361.25

3.56

2,062.25

2.18

92,630.63

35

Statement No. 14-COST ASSIGNMENT AND STATISTICS.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Previous Year

1947/48

Current Year 1948/49

$16.371.51

1. Average cost of repairs per Locomotive

per annum

$17,223.60

.54

2. Average cost of Locomotive repairs per

Engine Km.

.73

6.945.49

3. Average cost of repairs per passenger

car p.a.

8.372.57

726.85

4. Average cost of repairs per goods wagon

per annum

1,383.74

5. Average cost of Lubricants per Engine .043

Km, for locomotives

.048

Statement No. 15-CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLing stock-MOTIVE POWER.

(April 1948-March 1949).

1

2

3

4

5

6

STEAM LOCOMOTIVES

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

Gross weight

Total stock

Engine No.

Wheel Distribu- tion

Diameter of Cylinder

Stroke

Diameter of Driving Wheel

Tank of Tender

of Engine & Tender in tons in working order

at the beginning

of the

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

Total stock at the end of the year

Weight on Driving Wheels

Average age of class

Each

Maximum

Engine

Axle Load

year

(Tons)

(Tons)

Tractive effort

@ 85% Boiler Pressure

7 & 8

2-6-4

19"

26"

61

Side Tank

11 & 12

4-6-4

22"

28"

13

2-6-4

19"

26"

611 611"

89.75 T. 106.00 T.

89.75 T.

S-15 & S-16

2-6-0

21 to 32

2-8-0

19"

28"

56"

Saddle

Tender

125T, 15cwt.

*

22122

2

1

11122

37

25

37

ออง

51

17

23350

60

20

33720

51

17

23350

61T. 5cwt. |15T. 12cwt.

29083

RB-1 Rail Bus

RB-2 Rail Bus

6 cyl. Bedford

6 cyl. Dodge

3.5/16"

33"

31"

31′′

45"

31"

19

+3

16

PETROL RAILCARS

1

1

2

+ Engine Nos. 7, 8 and 11 sold.

RAC & SAE Rating 26.33 H.P.

55 Passengers.

1

13

1

3

SAE 25.35 H.P. 55 Passengers.

ลง

36

Statement No. 16-CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK-CARRIAGES.

(April 1948-March 1949).

1

2

3

4

5

6

8

Average

Total Stock

Tare

Classification

of each

class (Tons)

Seating Capacity (Passengers)

at the

beginning of the

year

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

Total Stock at the end

Total Seating

of the

Capacity (Passengers)

year

First class carriage

36

56

1

1

56

36

40

1

1

40

14

**

36

48

1

1

48

"

36

54

1

1

54.

*"

"

First and second class composite carriage

35

45

2

2

90

...

35

56

1

1

56

Second class carriage

34

64

3

3

192

31

56

1

1

56

78

2

156

Second and Third class composite carriage

31

91

1

1

91

Third class carriage

32

128

16

16

2.048

Third class and Brake carriage

35

70

1

1

70

35

60

2

2

120

*

"

34

116

1

1

116

11

Third class carriage

34

92

1

1

92

33

2

1

34

3,229

1

Statement No. 17-CLASSIFICATION OF ROLling stock-GOODS WAGONS.

(April 1948-March 1949).

Classification

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Total Stock

Total Stock

Overall

Length of wagon

Average Tare of each class

Carrying Capacity

at the beginning

of the

year

Additions during the year

Reductions during the year

at the end of the

year

Total carrying capacity

Goods Vehicles 4'-8" Gauge

80 Ton Flat

Ton

cwt.

Ton

Ton

32'

29

12

2

80

2

160

50

Well

50

1

1

50

40

Covered Goods

39′03′′

19

8

40

N

ลง

2

80

40

30

30

30

77

""

Flat

39′03′′

19

8

40

2

2

80

11

Covered Goods

35'

15

LO

5

30

29 (A)

29

870

19

34

(Cattle Truck)

35'

15

LO

5

30

3

3

90

Flat

35'

13

Co

8

30

8

8

240

30

99

Open Goods (H.S.)

35'

14

co

8

30

13

1

1

13

390

20

20

15

2 2 4 5

1t

Covered (Tank Car)

35'

??

Flat

39'03"

19

8

Covered Goods

19'

8

10

22-

20

2

2

40

20

3

3

60

15

21

19 (B)

ลง

2

30

15

97

Open Goods (Tanks)

19'

15

1

1

15

15

(H.S.)

19'

8 10

15

13 (C)

13

195

**

"

15

Brake Van

19'

15

10

15

4

1 (C)

5

75

90

16

20

20

86

2.375

Notes:

(A) 6 Numbers converted to 3rd class Passenger Car.

(B) 13

"

1

5

""

(C)

,,

Open Goods (H.S.)

Brake Van,

sold by auction by approval of Board of Survey. Converted from Covered Goods as indicated by Mark (B).

Statement No. 18-CLASSIFICATION OF ROLLING STOCK-SERVICE EQUIPMENT.

(April 1948-March 1949).

1

2

3

6

Classification

Average

Tare

of each

Total stock at the

beginning

class

of the

Additions

during

the year

year

Reductions

during

the year

Total stock at the end

of the

year

Ton

cwt.

87

1

1

1

1

31

10

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

دی

5

5

LO

65 Ton Breakdown Crane

10

5

99

Locomotive crane

79

RT - 1

Motor Trolley

ᎡᎢ - 2

LIBRARI

37

香港公共圖書館

NG KONG PUBLIC LIBRARI

HONGKON

ין

Head

No.

39

SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS OF THE PAST THREE YEARS.

List of Heads

1946/47

1947/48

1948/49

1.

Gauge

4' 8"

4' 8"

4' 8"

2.

Route Kilometrage Operated

36

36

36

3.

Gross Railway Receipts

$

4,431,700

6,431,252

7,075,992

4.

Railway Operating Expenditure

$

2,226,389

3,302,465

3.480,091

5.

Net Operating Revenue

2,205,311

3,128,787

3,595,901

6.

Percentage of Railway Operating Expenditure to Gross Operating

Revenue

50.23

51.35

49.18

7.

Capital Expenditure

$

18,962,523

21,298,081

23,450,590

8.

Percentage of Net Operating Revenue to Capital Expenditure

12.11

14.69

15.33

9.

Gross Railway Receipts per route kilometre operated

$

125.025

178.646

196,555

10.

Railway Operating Expenditure per route kilometre operated

$

61,242

91.735

96,669

11.

Passenger Receipts:

(a) Local Traffic

(b) Through Traffic

(c) Total Traffic

EA CA EA

12.

Percentage of Passenger Receipts to gross Railway Receipts

536.949 2,784,946

3,321,895

969.850 4,326,842 5,296,692

1,326,210

4,869,228

6,195,438

74.95

82.36

87.56

13.

Number of Passenger Journeys:

(a) Local Traffic

(b) Through Traffic

(c) Total Traffic

596,292

1,258,258

967,574 1,908,416

1,477,602

2,401,304

1,854,550

2.875.990

3,878,906

14.

Goods Receipts:

(a) Local Traffic

(b) Through Traffic

15.

(c) Total Traffic

Percentage of Goods Receipts to Gross Railway Receipts

16.

Tons of Goods Hauled

17.

Revenue from other Sources:

Rentals

Haulage Receipts

Incidentals

46/47 47/48 89,652 137,769 150,675 113,825 113,211

48/49 141,617

2,525

165,210

Advertising

23,938

48,788

60,054

Profit on Central Mechanical Works

131,952

50,276

56,328

Interchange of Rolling Stock

144,650

359,367

500.719

570.384

18.

Percentage of Revenue from Other Sources to Gross Railway Receipts

8.10

7.18

8.06

60,190

33,106

690.249

600,735

47.934 262,235

750,439

633.841

310.169

16.93

191.496

9.86

4.38

122,219

80.097

香港公共圖書本

NG KONG PUBLIC LIBRARY

4.

J

COMPARISON OF PERCENTAGE RELATIONSHIP OF PASSENGERS CARRIED & REVENUE RECEIVED BY THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAYS DURING APRIL, 1948 TO MARCH, 1949

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS REFERENCE_NO. G 89/218

2.7/2,937

1.165.969

TOTAL PASSENGERS CARRIED:

-

NUMBER ORKINATING HOMELINE NUMBER ORICINATING ELSEWHERE = TOTAL PASSENGERS

CARRIED

3,878,906

SPECIAL CLASS(0·89%)

1ST CLASS (2·70%%%)

SCHOLAR TICKETS (3·29%)

JEASON & MONTHL! (2:38)

! GOLFING

CIVIL GOVERNMENT (0) T

2ND CLASS

(7·44%)

41 --

TOTAL REVENUE.

REVENUE ORIGINATING HOMELINE = 1.305,414 13 REVENUE ORIGINATING ELSEWHERE = 4.771.585 25 TOTAL REVENUE-$6,076,999.98

SEASON & MONTHET

ĮGOLFING TICKETS (~90%)

PCLASS

(672%)

SPECIAL CLASS (2·CE %)|

SCHOLAR TICKETS ((c)93%)

IL GOVERNMENT CRAJAT

2ND CLASS ( 14:02%)

ORDINARY

香港公共圖

NG

PUBLIC

NARY

3RD CLASS (82·41%)

BRARIES

LIBE

SPECIAL CLASS FARES ARI FOR A DAILY NON STOP TRAIN UP

3RD CLASS (74.86%

06 DOWN.

KOWLOON CANTOH, IN FORCE FROM 211-49 ONIJ

42

ANALYSES OF PASSENGERS SERVICE

AND GOODS SERVICE, 1947/48 AND 1948)49.

GOVERNMENT = WWW

HOMELINE =

FOREIGN

=

PASSENGERS SERVICE. PASSENGERS. OTHERS.

6.500,000-

1948/49

6,000,000.

5,500,000-

1947/48

5,000,000-

4,500,000.

4,000,000.

3.500.000.

3,000,000.

2,500,00

2,000,000

1,500,000.

1,000,000.

www

500,000-

Wwww

1947/48

194849

1947/48

GOODS SERVICE

GOODS.

OTHERS.

1947/48

DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICS_

REFERENCE NO. G 89/183.