Sessional Papers - 1886

PAPERS LAID BEFORE THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG OCTOBER 1885 to MAY 1886

Table of Contents

1. Assets & Liabilities

Statement of assets & Liabilities on the 31st December 1885

2. Births and Deaths

Returns of Births and Deaths for the Year 1885

3. Blue Book (Missing)

Report of the Chief Clerk on the Blue Book for 1885

4. Botanical and afforestation Department

Report of the acting Superintendent of the Botanical and afforestation Department for 1885

5. Courts

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts for 1885

6. Defences

Despatch Respecting the New Heavy Guns for Defences

7. Defence Works

Despatch Respecting the Proposed Defence Works

8. Educational Department (Missing)

Report of the inspector of Schools for 1885

9. Expenditure

Comparative Statement of Expenditure During the Last Ten Years 1876 to 1885

10. Gaol

Report of the Superintendent of the Gaol for 1885

11. Harbour Department

Report of the Harbour Master for 1885

12. Legislative Council

Address of the Legislative Council in Reply to the Speech of His Excellency the Governor

13. Legislative Council

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the Opening of the Session of the Legislative Council

14. Legislative Council

Speech of His Excellency the officer administering the Government at the Prorogation of the Session of the Legislative Council

15. Legislative Council

Proceedings of the Legislative Council

16. Loan

Despatch Respecting the Proposed Loan

17. Loan

Despatch Respecting the Postponement of the Proposed Loan

18. Loan

Despatch Respecting the Proposed Loan

19. Medical Department

Report of the Colonial Surgeon for 1885

20. Municipal Taxation

Despatch Respecting the Submission of the Municipal Taxation to the Legislative Council

21. Municipal Taxes

Report By the Colonial Treasurer on the assessment of Municipal Taxes for 1885-1886 and the increase of the Police Rate

22. Observatory

Application for an additional Chinese Clerk for the Observatory

23. Observatory

Report of the Director of the Observatory for 1885

24. Observatory

Annual Weather Report for 1885

25. Observatory

Report on Five-Day Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements for 1885

26. Police

Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police for 1885

27. Post office

Report of the Postmaster General for 1885

28. Quarantine

Correspondence Respecting Quarantine

29. Receipts and Payments 1885

Statement Showing the total Receipts and Payments 1885

30. Revenues

Comparative Statement of Revenues During the Last Ten Years 1876 to 1885

31. South-Western Provinces of China

Correspondence Respecting the Opening to Trade of the South-Western Provinces of China

32. Spirit Farm

Despatch Respecting the Proposed Establishment of a Spirit Farm

33. Stamp Duty

Minute By the Collector on a Proposed increase of the Duties By 50%

34. Telegraphic Communication

Despatch Respecting Direct Telegraphic Communication Between Hongkong and Singapore

35. Tytam Water-Works

Surveyor General's Report on the Tytam Water-Works

 

77

No. 1.

SPEECH OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR AT THE OPENING OF THE

SESSION OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG,

7TH OCTOBER, 1885.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have summoned you to meet at a somewhat earlier period of the year than on previous occasions, because, in addition to the Estimates for 1886, and to several important Legislative measures, I desire to submit for your consideration a Loan Bill, and a Bill to establish a Spirit Farm, similar to that successfully established in the neighbouring Colony of the Straits Settlements.

2. It will be remembered that, in opening the Session for 1884, I addressed you as follows:-

"Hongkong is probably the only State or Colony of importance, which at the present day is not only without a Public Debt, but which possesses assets nearly equal to its annual revenue. However, the existing balances will not be sufficient to carry out several Public Works, which are urgently required by this community, in addition to those 'strong and complete measures of sanitation,' which Mr. CHADWICK, (the Civil Engineer recently sent out from England), has reported to be absolutely necessary for the immediate benefit of the public health." Under these circumstances, I concur with the Executive Council in what appears to be the general opinion of the Colony, viz. that the present generation of Colonists ought not to be deprived of the advantages referred to, while it cannot, of course, be expected to defray the entire cost of works of a permanent and reproductive character; so that, consequently, it will be expedient to raise, on the exhaustion of the existing assets, a moderate loan not much exceeding the revenue of a single year. This question will not have to be decided in its details during the present Session; but, I desire to elicit the opinion of the Council on the principle involved."

3. In your address in reply, the Council said: "We agree with your Excel- lency in the opinion that, in justice to the present generation of tax-payers in Hongkong, a moderate loan should be raised on the exhaustion of the existing assets, to defray a portion of the cost of those Sanitary and other Public Works, which are recognised as of permanent importance for the security of the general health and well-being of our population."

4. You have, therefore, Honourable Gentlemen, already sanctioned the prin- ciple of a loan; and there will now be laid before you Bills (already approved by Her Majesty's Government), for raising One million of Dollars, (that is, less than one year's income of this Colony,);-and to establish a Spirit Farm, the produce of which will be required to provide for the interest and Sinking Fund of the Loan.

5. From the Report of the Acting Colonial Secretary and Auditor General, it will be seen that the state of our Finances is briefly as follows:-In consequence of the exercise of rigorous economy in the general administration, while considerable progress has been made in the chief Public Works, there will still remain in the Treasury on the 31st of next December a balance of $190,000. Now, the Extra- ordinary Public Works, that is, those to be defrayed out of Balances and Loan, including among others, the Tytam Water-Works; the completion of the Victoria College, and of the permanent Lazaretto; the Defence Works, and the Sanitary Works; are estimated to cost $579,800; consequently, it will become necessary to raise by loan during the ensuing year not less than about $400,000.

6. The Estimates for 1886 show a surplus (in round numbers) of $122,500, if we include the increase expected from the proposed Spirit Farm, which is estimated at about $63,500, and which will be devoted to the payment of interest and Sinking Fund on the Loan. Consequently, there will remain only a nett surplus of $59,000, not more than is required to meet unforeseen expenses.

78

7. At the present time, the taxation of this Colony, both general and municipal, does not exceed £1.1.0 per head of the population. With the increase from the Spirit Farm, it will not exceed £1.3.6 per head. It will be recollected that the aggregate taxation, general and municipal, per head of the people of England, and of the Australasian Colonies, exceeds £3.0.0 per head.

8. Under the circumstances stated in a Report of the Colonial Treasurer which will be laid before you, it has been found necessary to increase the Police rate by 1 per cent. As the law of this Colony has hitherto stood, the power of assessing the Municipal rates is vested solely in the Governor in Executive Council. I think that this anomaly, for which there is probably no precedent in any other part of the British Empire, should be removed; and that, for the future, the municipal, like the general taxation should be imposed, after full consideration, by a vote of the Legislative Council. I have recommended to Her Majesty's Govern- ment that I should receive authority to carry out this reform.

9. And here I will take the opportunity of observing that I have always advocated the creation in all British and homogeneous communities of Municipalities freely elected by the Rate-payers, as in England. I took an active part in encourag- ing the extension of such Municipalities during the twenty years that I was Governor successively of three of the principal Colonies in Australasia. But, I recognise the fact that it is practically impossible to create here an elective Munici- pality; for probably not a single Englishman would be elected to it. From an Official report, it appears that there are:-

(1). English Rate-payers,

(2). Chinese,..

(3). Others (chiefly Portuguese),

83

.947

98.

As the constant policy and action of my Government abundantly prove, I feel much sympathy with the Chinese who have settled in this British Colony. I will never sanction any unnecessary interference with their national customs or national feelings; I have always given favourable attention to the petitions addressed to me by them; and I have appointed one of the most respected members of the Chinese Community to represent his countrymen in this Council. At the same time, it is obvious that neither the Colonial nor the Imperial Government can leave to an elective Municipality which would be composed entirely of Chinese, or in which the Chinese element would be largely predominant, the arrangements necessary for the health, water supply, good order, and general administration of one of the principal Naval and Military Stations, and Marts of Commerce in the British Empire. In addition to the European Civil residents and to the crews of the Merchant Shipping annually visiting this harbour, (the tonnage of which exceeds to 5 millions of tons, that is, it exceeds the tonnage entering all other British Ports except London and Liver- pool), it will be remembered that we have to take into account some three thousand of Her Majesty's seamen and soldiers.

10. On the other hand, the existing Legislative Council is practically also a Municipal Council. More than two-thirds of the business transacted by it is of a purely Municipal character; and it can no longer be reasonably alleged in any quarter that it does not fairly represent the community at large. It is true that on my assumption of this Government in 1883, I found that the Council consisted of nine members, of whom seven were official, and only two unofficial and independent members; all appointed absolutely by the Crown. In consequence of my urgent recommendation, I received authority to increase the unofficial members from two to five; one of whom will always be a Chinese; while I have given the privilege of freely nominating their own representatives to the two principal Public Bodies, viz. the Bench of Magistrates and the Chamber of Commerce, which comprise the chief payers of rates and taxes of every nationality resident here, British, American, German, Jewish, Chinese, Parsee, and Armenian. Thus the property, intelligence, and education of the entire community are now directly represented in this Council. Moreover, so long as I retain my present post, the official majority will not over- rule, especially in financial questions, an united unofficial minority, except, of course, in extreme cases of necessity, and in which Imperial interests may be involved.

11. I know that you, Honourable Gentlemen, agree with the principles stated above. I know that you also rejoice with me at the steady prosecution by the Military Authorities, (as is shown by reports from the Colonel Commanding the Royal Engineers,) of the system of Defence Works, undertaken after my strong

79

representations to the Imperial Government of the previously unprotected state of this Port and Colony. You will also be glad to learn that my application for a flotilla of Torpedo Boats has now been granted; and that six first-class Torpedo Boats will shortly re-inforce those already supplied by the Admiralty.

It is morally certain that our defences by land and sea will be completed long before there will be any occasion to test them; and, as you are already aware, the highest Naval and Military Authorities in the Empire consider that, when com- pleted, they will place Hongkong in safety against foreign attack.

12. In connexion with the subject of Defence, I have to inform you that I have again pressed on the attention of the Imperial Government the importance of securing direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore.

13. With regard to Legislation;-in addition to the financial measures already mentioned, the principal Bills to be submitted to you during the Session will be Bills to consolidate and amend the existing law relating to Prisons; to provide for the Preservation of the Peace; to amend the Municipal Rates Ordinance;

also a new Building Ordinance. The Commission for the revision of the Laws is now making satisfactory progress; and, it is hoped, will soon be able to submit some revised Ordinances for your consideration.

14. You will learn with satisfaction that the action of my Government through- out the difficult and delicate crisis of the Franco-Chinese hostilities has met with the approval, on every point, of the Imperial Government. While enforcing British neutrality, I preserved throughout friendly relations with the Belligerent Powers.

A

15. Some time ago, I directed the attention of the Imperial Authorities to the importance to the Mercantile Community of Hongkong, of opening to commerce the great South-western Provinces of China with their rich resources and popu- lation of above 100 millions; and especially the affluents of the Canton River. lengthy correspondence ensued between the Foreign Office and the British Legation at Peking; and I have now been informed officially that representations have been made on the subject to the Chinese Government; and that a prominent Agent of the British Government will be despatched to investigate and report on the manifold advantages to trade offered by the South-western portion of the neighbouring Empire. Valuable results may be expected from this mission.

16. It is believed that the Commission appointed for that purpose will secure an adequate representation of Hongkong at the approaching Colonial and Indian Exhibition. A preliminary exhibition will be held here before the despatch of the

exhibits to London.

17. During the course of the Session there will be presented to you reports and other documents showing the condition of the several Departments of the Colonial Service, and the state of the Tytam Water-Works, and of the other Public Works in progress. I invite you to ask at all times for any further public papers, the production of which you may consider necessary or desirable for the full elucidation of the position of the Colony as to financial and all other affairs.

18. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I desire to express my full confidence that I may continue, as heretofore, to rely on your loyal co-operation in all matters calculated to promote the public interests. I would repeat also my confident hope that the progressive development of our commerce, now relieved from the depression caused by the recent hostilities in this part of the world; the most rigid economy in our finances that is compatible with the efficiency of the public service, and with the prosecution of the necessary Public Works; together with constant firmness and justice, not dry but sympathetic justice, on the part of the Government and Legislature to all races in our mixed population, will, under the blessing of Providence, promote the general welfare and happiness of this community.

81

No. 2.

ADDRESS OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG IN REPLY TO THE

SPEECH OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR AT THE OPENING

OF THE SESSION ON THE 7TH OF OCTOBER, 1885.

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

1. We, the Members of the Legislative Council of Hongkong. in Council assembled, desire to thank your Excellency for the Speech with which you have opened the present Session.

2. We repeat that we agree with your Excellency in the opinion that, in justice to the present generation of tax-payers in Hongkong, a moderate loan should be raised on the exhaustion of the existing assets, to defray a portion of the cost of those Sanitary and other Public Works, which are recognised as of permanent importance for the security of the general health and well-being of our population.

8. Agreeing in the principle, we shall give our careful consideration to the details of the proposed Loan Bill and of the proposed Bill to establish a Spirit Farm, the produce of which will be devoted to pay the interest and Sinking Fund of the Loan.

4. We thank your Excellency for the intention to submit to this Council the Municipal as well as the general taxation of the Colony.

5. We agree with your Excellency that it would be practically impossible, under the circumstances of this Colony, to create here an elective Municipal Council, in which an alien element would be predominant.

6. We concur with the views stated by your Excellency on the above subjects. 7. We are glad to learn that the Military Authorities are steadily prosecuting the system of Defence Works undertaken upon your Excellency's representation of the previously unprotected state of this Port and Colony. We also learn with pleasure that your Excellency's application for a flotilla of Torpedo Boats has been granted. We desire to express our thanks for the constant exertions of your Excellency to secure the defence of this Port and Colony by sea and land.

8. We think direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singa- pore of great practical importance to both Imperial and Colonial interests; and we hope that your Excellency's renewed application to the Home Government on this subject will prove successful.

9. We shall give due attention to the Legislative measures which will be submitted to us; and we are glad to learn that the Commission for the revision of the Laws is now making satisfactory progress.

10. We are glad that the action taken by your Excellency during the crisis of the Franco-Chinese complications has met, on every point, with the approval of Her Majesty's Government.

11. We concur with your Excellency as to the importance of opening to commerce the great South-western Provinces of China; and we trust that the efforts made in this direction will be crowned with success.

12. We trust with your Excellency that the Commission appointed for the purpose will secure an adequate representation of Hongkong at the approaching Colonial and Indian Exhibition in London.

13. We shall examine with care the reports to be laid before us on the condition of the Public Departments, and on the state of the Taitam Water-Works and of the Sanitary and other Public Works in progress.

14. In conclusion, we beg to assure your Excellency that you may always rely on our loyal co-operation with the Representative of our QUEEN in all matters tending to further the public interests; and that we share your hope that the progressive development of our commerce; rigid economy in our finances; and constant firmness and justice to all races and classes in our population, will, under the Divine blessing, promote the general well-being and contentment of this entire community.

:

83

No. 3.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE PROPOSED LOAN.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

The Earl of Derby, K.G. to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

HONGKONG

No. 49.

3rd March, 1885.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

6th March, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 9 of the 5th of January respecting the loan of one million dollars ($1,000,000) proposed to be raised by the Hongkong Government, and I have to convey to you for your information and guidance in the matter a copy of a letter from the Crown Agents for the Colonies, enclosing the draft of an Ordinance for raising the sum in question.

2. This Ordinance will, I trust, be found suitable to the circumstances of the case, but I shall be glad if it is eventually found unnecessary to borrow up to the

full amount authorised; and have noted with satisfaction that the Colonial balances

will suffice for the requirements of the present year.

3. I have to convey to you my approval of the revised Estimates for 1885, enclosed in your despatch No. 11 of the 6th of January, and of the Estimate of extraordinary works to be defrayed from accumulated balances in 1885, which is contained in your despatch No. 8 of the 5th of January.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient humble Servant,

Governor Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

DERBY.

(2.)

Crown Agents to Colonial Office.

DOWNING STREET, LONDON, 3rd March, 1885.

SIR,

Referring to Despatch No. 9 of the 5th January last from the Governor of Hongkong, I transmit herewith a draft Ordinance for raising a sum not exceeding £200,000 for the completion of certain Public Works in that Colony.

84

With a view to meeting the present requirements of the Money Market, and of the Investors in Colonial Covernment Securities this draft provides that the loan may be raised by the sale of Debentures or of Inscribed Stock, or partly of one and partly of the other.

The provisions when the borrowing shall be upon Debentures are contained

in Sections 4 to 21 and are such as experience has proved the most suitable for the London Money Market.

The draft Ordinance provides that the Debentures shall bear interest at a rate not exceeding 5 per cent, we do not propose to exceed 4 or perhaps 4 per cent, still it would appear advisable to leave a margin to provide against an unpropitious

market.

In Secs. 22 to 29 provision is made for borrowing on Inscribed Stock. It is not only advantageous but almost necessary when inviting tenders for loans to give the lender the option of Debentures or Inscribed Stock; in a recent case we disposed of the unallotted balance of a Colonial Government loan, only on condition

that the Debentures should be hereafter convertible into Inscribed Stock.

I transmit also a draft of an Order which should be signed by the Governor under the Seal of the Colony appointing Agents to make the declaration required by the provisions of the "Imperial Colonial Stock Act 1877."

Imperial Colonial Stock Act 1877." Should the draft. Ordinance I have prepared become law, that portion of it which provides for an Inscribed Stock would be inoperative without such an Order of the Governor.

As they may be useful to the Governor, when considering this matter, I transmit also copies of the Colonial Stock Act 1877, 40 and 41 Vic. Cap. 59 and of the further Act of 1880 (Part V) increasing the commuted Stamp duty from 7/6 to 12/6 per cent. on the par value of the Stock.

I will send to the Colony by the next Mail spare copies of the draft Ordinance.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

Honourable R. H. MEADE,

Colonial Office.

(Signed),

W. C. SARGEANT.

.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT

OF A SPIRIT FARM.

85

No. 4.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

The Right Honourable Fred. Stanley, M.P., to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

HONGKONG.

No. 28.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

6th August, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch, No. 253, of the 3rd of June, proposing the establishment of a Spirit Farm in order to raise the taxation which will be required to meet the charge for interest and Sinking Fund of the new Public Works Loan which it is proposed to raise next year, and enclosing a report upon the subject by the Colonial Treasurer, together with a Draft Ordinance which had been prepared on the model of the similar Straits Settlements' Ordinance, the opportunity being taken at the same time to consolidate the existing laws relating to distilleries and to the sale of intoxicating liquors.

2. I observe that the duty proposed to be leviable on Spirits is left blank in Clause VI of the draft Ordinance, but I assume that Mr. LISTER'S calculations are based upon the rate of duty of 75 cents per gallon inserted in the draft Ordinance, submitted by Sir J. HENNESSY, and which I conclude would be the rate to be adopted in the present Ordinance.

3. Assuming, as appears to be the case, that fresh taxation is necessary, I concur with you in thinking that the establishment of a Spirit Farm would be the most convenient method of raising it, and I see nothing in the details of the pro- posed measure which appears open to objection, you have my sanction, accordingly for submitting the proposed legislation for the consideration of the Legislative Council.

I have, &c.,

(Signed),

FRED. STANLEY,

Governor

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

F

-87

No. 5.

HONGKONG.

REPORT BY THE COLONIAL TREASURER ON THE ASSESSMENT OF MUNICIPAL TAXES IN HONGKONG FOR THE YEAR 1885-86, AND THE INCREASE OF THE POLICE RATE.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

The system of entrusting the valuation of house property to two officers who have other duties to perform has been abandoned, and replaced by that of appoint- ing a trained valuer sent out from home, who, when not engaged in valuing, is a Clerk of Works in the Public Works Department. This change has effected an increase in the total valuation of property in the Colony of about seven per cent., which, however, includes new buildings and improvements.

The total for 1885-86, is

""

""

1884, was

Increase,......

$2,565,544 2,404,302

$ 161,242

Of this, however, it is possible that an amount not exceeding $20,000 may be struck off on appeals which are still pending.

The year for rating purposes has been made July 1st to June 30th, so as to allow of the valuation being carried out in the cool season, instead of, as heretofore, being made at the very hottest season of the year.

It was found that the charge of 73 per cent. as a Police Rate did not meet the mere current charges of the Police Force, without allowing anything for pensions, rent, and up-keep of Stations, or for the new Stations which are so urgently needed. The expenditure on the Police Force during 1884, was

whilst the collection of Police Rates, was

Deficiency,.

$216,562

172,617

..$ 43,945

It was therefore decided to increase the Police Rate in Victoria, from 72 to per cent., and in the villages, from 5 to 6 per cent. This increase should yield. an additional Revenue, as follows:-

In Victoria, of...

In the Villages, of......................

Total,....

$39,385 3,541

$42,926

A copy of the Notification by which this was effected is attached.

Hongkong, September 1st, 1885.

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

88

(2.)

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.-No. 253.

In pursuance of The Rating Ordinance 1875, the Governor in Council has fixed the Municipal Rates for the year ending June 30th, 1886, as follows:-

(I.) In the City of Victoria,-

83 per cent.

Police Rate,...

Lighting Rate.....

11

>>

Fire Brigade Rate,

Water Rate,

3310104 2

W

""

Municipal Rates,

13 per cent.

(II.) At Victoria Peak,-

Municipal Rates,

83 per cent.

(III.) In British Kaulung and other outlying Districts of the Colony,—

Municipal Rates,....

6

per cent.

Municipal Rates will be payable quarterly in advance at the Treasury during the first month in each Quarter, and shall be charged on and recoverable from the owners of the Tenements in respect of which the above Assessments have been

made.

By Command,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

Colonial Secretary's Office, Hongkong, 20th June, 1885.

No. 1321.

89

No. 6.

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING THE OPENING TO TRADE OF THE SOUTH- WESTERN PROVINCES OF CHINA.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

(1.)

Acting Colonial Secretary to the Chairman Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, September 23rd, 1885.

SIR,

I am directed to acquaint you, for the information of the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce, that, so far back as in a despatch of the 21st May, 1884, His Excellency the Governor addressed the Imperial Government on the importance of opening up to commerce the neighbouring South-western Provinces of China, and especially the affluents of the Chiukiang,-the Pearl, or Canton river.

2. In that and in subsequent despatches, Sir GEORGE BOWEN further expressed a hope, in the interest of the Mercantile Community of Hongkong, that the British Minister at Peking, when conducting the negotiations for the com- pletion of the Chefoo Convention between England and China, would be empowered to urge the Chinese Government to grant this concession.

3. The Governor's representations were forwarded to the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs; and there ensued a long correspondence between the Foreign Office and the British Legation at Peking, of which the substance was communi- cated to His Excellency by the last Mail from England. The interests of English commerce in this quarter are engaging the careful attention of Her Majesty's Government ;-fresh representations on this subject have been made to the Chinese Government; and Mr. BABER, the Chinese Secretary of the English Legation at Peking, has been sent to investigate and report upon the trade of the South- western Provinces.

4. The Governor will be, at all times, glad to receive representations from the Chamber of Commerce on this and on other subjects, and to promote the success both at London and at Peking of all measures calculated to benefit the trade and general interests of this Colony.

The Chairman

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

I have, &c.,

FREDERICK STEWART, Acting Colonial Secretary.

SIR,

(2.).

Vice-Chairman Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce to the Acting Colonial Secretary.

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 2nd October, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge receipt of your letter of the 23rd ultimo, informing this Chamber of the action taken by His Excellency the Governor, with regard to the important subject of opening up to commerce of the South-western Provinces of China.

On behalf of the Committee, I beg to request that you would convey the thanks of the Chamber to His Excellency for the action he has taken in this matter which so nearly concerns the commercial interests of this Colony.

The Committee will be glad to make such representations to His Excellency as may appear to be called for by the future development of events relative to this question.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

I have, &c.,

P. RYRIE,

Vice-Chairman.

No. 7

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S REPORT ON THE TYTAM WATER-WORKS.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT,

HONGKONG, 1st November, 1885.

SIR,

I have the honour to address you the customary Sessional report on the progress of the Tytam Works. I preface this report by a few remarks on the previous history of the water-supply question and on the measures which the Executive Government has taken in order to meet the wants of the people in this respect. I make no apology for travelling back to the past, on this occasion as I apprehend the fullest information touching the whole question will be of interest to the Colony at a time when the Legislature is deliberating on the project of a loan for the purpose of defraying, among other large undertakings, the completion of the works at Tytam.

On looking over my first official report on this subject dated the 1st of November, 1873, and now out of print, I find recorded, in regard to the expedients that had been adopted by previous administrations, several interesting historical facts, which I venture to recapitulate here very briefly, as an illustration, if any, were needed, of the false economy of dealing with large public questions like the colonial water-supply, by ignoring the inexorable behests of the future and pro- viding only for the exigencies of the moment.

"

I find that in July, 1860, the new Governor, Sir HERCULES ROBINSON, writing to the DUKE OF NEWCASTLE then Secretary of State for the Colonies, stated that the population of Victoria had suffered very keenly during the previous winter from the scarcity of water, and that the Colonial Government was consequently considering the important question of the most practicable way of obtaining a new and more generous provision for the people. Subsequently the same Governor reported to the Colonial Office that the project of a Mr. RAWLING had been recom- mended to him by a Royal Commission whom he had specially appointed to look into the whole question of the water-supply, and that he had accordingly, subject to Imperial sanction, adopted the recommendations of the Commission.

The project of Mr. RAWLING which involved an outlay of $170,000, was destined to satisfy only actual necessities. It comprised the erection of a masonry dam fifteen feet high, across the Pokfoolum stream, for the purpose of stopping the waters of that stream at a spot a little above where now stands Douglas Castle, and the laying of a ten-inch cast iron pipe from the pond thus formed, along the Pokfoolum carriage road into town. This small masonry dam and pond may still be seen below the Pokfoolum reservoir; they do not appear to have been utilized in any way in the larger works that afterwards superseded them, so that Mr. RAWLING'S Outlay on the dam, became as it were a dead loss on the subsequent construction of a reservoir higher up the valley.

The new water-works having been sanctioned by the DUKE OF NEWCASTLE were carried out and completed by Mr. RAWLING in a very substantial manner, their cost being met by a water rate of two per cent. on the value of house rentals, a tax that was cheerfully acquiesced in by a people able to indulge for the first time in what appeared to be comparatively an abundance of pure water.

But the influx of immigration from the mainland had continued unceasingly during the progress of these works, and already one year after their completion the number of water-consumers had increased so largely, that complaints began to be heard among the poorer classes as in former times, of the insufficiency of water.

Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

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The winter of 1865 which was one of great drought, precipitated matters and the new water-works which only a few years previously had been generally hailed as a boon were now as universally condemned for their smallness and insufficiency, great pressure being at the same time brought to bear upon the temporary administration of Mr. MERCER to provide a supply more adequate to the public necessities.

No steps however appear to have been taken during the Government of Mr. MERCER who in the natural course of things would leave so large a question to his successor Sir RICHARD MACDONNELL, and the latter did not arrive in the Colony until the following year.

Sir RICHARD MACDONNELL was not long before he took up the question of the water-supply. There are several minutes from his able pen on the necessity of an ample and complete provision of water for the people. These minutes would seem to have given rise to considerable discussion between the Governor and his professional advisers who represented to him the difficulty of any provision so large as that which he demanded, and finally the Governor was fain to content himself with a scheme for a small reservoir of about 74 million gallons in the Pokfoolum Valley to be finished in four years at a cost of $230,000. When this estimate of the cost became known, a temporary reaction appears to have set in among those who were unaware of the cost of water-works nor of the sums paid by European cities as a rule for their supplies. Indeed many of the Colonists thought that this time the Government was going too far in the opposite direction, and that the Pokfoolum reservoir scheme was not only unnecessarily large and ambitious but far too costly for so small a Colony. Eventually however the scheme was adopted, and within the four years the larger reservoir took the place of the small pond and though inadequate as a storage source, proved of no small relief in the then great straits to which the Colony had been reduced.

grown

But again, for the second time, during the construction of new water-works in Hongkong, the population on whose estimated numbers the calculation for the new supply had been based had largely increased. New requirements had up. Water was wanted for industrial as well as for domestic uses. The culture of trees and plants entailing irrigation was spreading and asserting its demand. For the purposes of fire extinction this demand was no less loud, and above all the flushing and lequefaction of house-sewage, and other sanitary exigencies required a more generous provision than it now appeared could be procured from the new reservoir, so that the first doubts and disillusions as to the sufficiency of the volume impounded at Pokfoolum seem to date back from the very first year of the existence of the reservoir, and from that time to the present the complaints of the insufficiency of water have increased and become more aggravated every year with the increase of the population.

In 1872 Sir ARTHUR KENNEDY was appointed Governor and upon landing in the Colony found among other important matters awaiting settlement by him, that of the water-supply. This same unfortunate question had in a similar manner, six and twelve years previously, confronted his two immediate predecessors upon their assumption of the Government of Hongkong, and it appeared to be one fated never to be set at rest. The new Governor however profiting by the lessons of the past, and realizing the certainty that the necessities of the young and growing town of Victoria would attain enormously increased proportions in the course of time, declared himself against any partial expedients however alluring on the score of economy of cost, or against any schemes that would not bear subsequent expansion.

Accordingly upon my joining the Hongkong Civil Service in 1873, I was instructed to submit for the consideration of the Governor in Council, such recom- mendations as would secure not only an adequate provision for the present, but one capable of extension to meet prospective wants. These instructions involved a large question exacting careful study, so that it was not until the close of the year that I was able to submit any definite report on the result of my investigations.

Before touching however on the recommendations which ensued, it may be as well that I should explain on the one hand what was the actual allowance per head of population afforded by the Pokfoolum reservoir, and on the other hand what were the real water requirements of the people of Hongkong guaged on the most moderate basis. I will take the last point first.

The quantity of water used by civilized communities for domestic, sanitary, industrial, and other purposes has been the subject of so much observation in Europe that experience now enables very approximate estimations to be made of

י

the just requirements of manufacturing and non-manufacturing towns. In England, due regard being had to waste, the minimum daily allowance per head of inhabitant is estimated as follows:-

Gallons per day.

7

For domestic uses,

For street-watering, fire-extinction, and irrigation, 3 Trades and Sanitary purposes,

Waste,

Total,

7

2

.....19

London and most of the larger towns of the United Kingdom have supplies considerably in excess of the above figures, but the latter may be taken, under careful regulation as to waste, as sufficing for a European town not exclusively of a manufacturing character. As regards this Colony we have to consider the constant risk to the Public Health from the habits and prejudices of the race who constitute the bulk of our population, the exigencies of our tropical climate, the densely overcrowded condition of our native town, the danger of epidemics from without no less than from within, the certainty of the continued growth and developement of the city and increase of the population, the possible spread in our midst though of course only to a limited extent, of factories and industrial establish- ments, the need of ample facilities for prompt fire extinction, the extreme desirability of water for the irrigation of plants, and last not least the necessity in spite of the utmost vigilance, of providing a large margin for undue waste especially in native tenements. These varied claims cannot but convince even the most sceptical that the water requirements of Victoria are not any less than those of a European city. No new project of supply would be satisfactory to the Colony unless it afforded in conjunction with existing sources, a daily allowance per inhabitant of not less than from 15 to 20 gallons.

So much for our requirements. Let us now see how much water we had when the Pokfoolum reservoir was completed and what allowance we have now. In 1873 Victoria contained about 95,000 inhabitants of which however, excluding garrison and the shipping, only 92,000 may be included in these calculations as water consumers, and the daily allowance was 52 gallons per head made up as follows:-

From Pokfoolum,

4.40 gallons.

""

Wong-nei-Chung Dam,

0.50

""

29

Mint Dam,

0.25

""

19

Glenealy Nullah,

0.10

""

";

Wells, Springs and other sources,

0.50

Total,

5.75

In 1885 the number of water consumers has increased to over 110,000, but the winter allowance of 1873 remains the same for no new sources have been tapped. The same volume of 1873 therefore has now to be divided among 18,000 or 20,000 additional consumers and this has reduced the allowance per head of population to something over four gallons. Against this reduction however there must be recorded a saving of about half a gallon due to increased supervision against waste.

The difference therefore between the actual volume daily distributed throughout the town, and that required in order, according to European ideas, to satisfy the bare demands of health and comfort, was so wide, that as far back as 1873 it became obvious that any new supplementary works to be of real utility to the population, must yield at least about three times as much water as all existing sources put together. From all the latter we knew we possessed already an aggregate of 53 gallons and the question then was whence to obtain the remaining 131 gallons in order to make up the 19 gallons desiderated. This was the problem to which I was called upon to find a solution in 1873.

Our island is so small that we cannot boast of any rivers or lakes, or of

any stream or group of streams sufficiently large to be tapped, filtered, and absorbed into our street mains. In this respect we are less fortunate than English towns most of which derive their supplies from rivers in their immediate neibourhood. Circumstanced as we are, our only recourse is to obtain our supply, by storing descended rain in catchwater reservoirs for use during the long dry season when all streams and natural sources are dried up.

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Our annual rainfall is large. It exceeds by many times the volume that the wildest demand could aspire to in connection with any water-supply to the city, and there has therefore never been any doubt whatsoever as to our having enough water on the island. The difficulty has been to find the best and most eco- nomical place where to build a dam across some valley so as to make a reservoir that would catch and hold enough rain to last the town the whole of the dry season, and which would at the same time be situated at an elevation above sea level suffi- ciently high to admit of the water flowing into Victoria by gravitation and subserving the higher or European districts of the town as well as the lower. Two further conditions no less important in the search for such a reservoir-site were that it should be situated on the same side of the mountain range as the town itself, so as to avoid the expense of a communication tunnel or of steam pumping works in order to lift the water over the mountain range, and that it should also be situated in as narrow and contracted a defile or gorge as possible, in order to curtail to the shortest possible proportions the length of the dam, the dam being always the most expensive feature in works of this nature.

A detailed exploration of the entire topography of Hongkong was therefore commenced in quest of such a site. The surveys extended over several months, and brought to light two important and indisputable facts: (i) that there did not exist in the whole island a single site for a reservoir fulfilling the whole of the preceding conditions, and (ii) that there were only three valleys whence alone any winter supply could be caught and impounded in quantities sufficient to entitle such valleys even to consideration as possible sites for sources of supply. These were the Pokfoolum, Aberdeen, and Tytam Valleys.

Before dilating on the works actually in progress at Tytam it will not be amiss to review the facilities for water-works presented at Aberdeen and Pokfoolum. I think the elucidation of this matter the more desirable, that I am given to under- stand there still exist misconceptions as to the selection of Tytam having been made without due consideration of the rival claims of other possible sources of supply which it is thought might have been utilized at less cost.

In the Pokfoolum Valley supplementary water-works appeared to me at first not unfeasible by the creation of a second reservoir higher up the valley, about fifty yards above the present one, and of a third reservoir below the level of the present one, at a point near Mr. MACKINTOSH's property, and accordingly a detailed survey of the upper hill districts was effected with a view to ascertaining their ability to fill this system of lakes. A closer investigation did not, however, confirm my hopes and eventually I was forced to abandon the project. The following few extracts from my official report of that period throw some light on the chief features of this particular scheme. I may add that the cost of carrying out these works would have been £201,500.

"There is a site a little higher up in the same valley (Pokfoolum) for a smaller basin, which according to the recent survey is capable of containing 50 million gallons. This would necessitate a dam 350 feet long and 90 feet high in the deepest part, and if the substratum turns out to be rock as appears from outward indications, such a dam might be built of masonry. The enormous expense of building a 90 foot dam to impound so small a quantity as 50 million gallons is altogether out of proportion; it is a measure therefore that could by no means be recommended until every possible means of obtaining a supply by other methods had been first enquired into.

The site a little below the present reservoir has also been surveyed and found capable of holding a considerable sheet of water by the formation of a dam 55 feet high and 250 feet long, containing thirty-four thousand cubic yards of material. This reservoir would unfortunately be very shallow, and it would be spread out over a great area, and therefore the loss of water by evaporation would be excessive. All water contained in ponds and reservoirs loses its purity relatively with its subsidence towards the bottom. The bottom layers are generally laden with vegetation and the lower forms of organic life either living or decomposed. In a shallow reservoir, this is particularly the case, because the temperature of the water is increased by the rays of the sun which are able to penetrate to its bottom. I have calculated that one-sixth of the bulk of water of a low level reservoir at Pokfoolum would scarcely be wholesome.

This capital defect, together with the equally serious one of loss by evaporation, must therefore be considered in forming an opinion as to

¡

the advisability of so shallow a basin. A reservoir on this site would further have to be surrounded on its south and west side by long low embankments to protect from submersion the Aberdeen carriage road which for nearly an eighth of a mile would be below the top water level of the reservoir. The outlet culvert through which the supply for the town would be drawn would be at an elevation of not more than 457 feet above the level of the sea.

The Pokfoolum scheme therefore provides for an upper and lower reservoir in addition to the middle or existing one.

The total storage of water in the three basins would be as follows:

Upper,.....

Middle (actual reservoir),

Lower,

50 millions.

74

""

60

>>

Total gallons,......... 184

The next question to consider is whether the drainage of the valley above is sufficient to fill the three compartments during seasons of small rainfall. The Pokfoolum water-shed comprises 400 statute acres, the rainfall of the dryest year in Hongkong may be taken at 50 inches; by the ordinary computation it results that the least drainage will be 450 million gallons.

In estimating the proportion of rainfall which may be depended upon for storage, a considerable reduction must be made for losses by evaporation and absorption by the soil. These losses vary in all countries according to the climate and geological nature of the ground. In Hongkong, they may be safely averaged at 60 per cent., for although evaporation is excessive, absorption is commensurately small, owing to the granite formation of the island. Upon this basis, the Pokfoolum drainage available for storage will be 180 million gallons, a volume barely sufficient to fill the triple reservoir during seasons of small rainfall. It would therefore be necessary to increase the drainage of the valley so as to place it beyond the possibility of failure. This could easily be done by making catchwater channels along the hill sides to the north and south of the valley and diverting the drainage of the neighbouring hills into any one of the three reservoirs.

The water connections between the three basins would be simple. The upper dam if it can be constructed of masonry would contain its own bye-wash. The upper basin would empty its contents into the middle one along the channel of the present stream by the ordinary method of a valve well, and the present middle basin would discharge itself into the lower one by means of the outlet from which the present supply to the town is drawn. Thus a regular and uniform subsidence of level could be at all times maintained in the waters of the three compartments.

In the lower dam, all the appendages of a store reservoir such as bye-wash, valve well, and outlet culvert would have to be for a third time repeated, and a conduit of brick or stone laid in cement covered with granite slabs would have to be built along the hill-sides to convey the water by gravitation from the outlet-mouth into Victoria. This conduit would be three and a half miles long and it should have an inclination or fall of four feet per mile, or a total fall of fourteen feet. It should terminate in a tank or service reservoir at a convenient site in town with sufficient elevation to maintain due pressure in the mains and distributing apparatus.

It must be borne in mind that the Pokfoolum project necessarily transfers the supply from the middle or actual reservoir to the lower one and that this transfer entails a loss of 43 feet in elevation in the delivery. This is unfortunate, as there are houses in Victoria which from their position would be too high to avail themselves of the new supply. The only way to remedy the evil would be to leave the ten inch main pipe in its present position and utilize it to supply directly from the middle reservoir all that portion of the town which would be above the reach of the new conduit and service tank. It would not compensate to repeat a second masonry conduit at a higher level for so small a service.

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The leading features of the Pokfoolum project having been cursorily described, its merits and defects may be summed up in a very few words. While the necessities of the city during long droughts exact a minimum of 330 million gallons, the triple reservoir could only yield 184 millions.

This quantity, divided among the population, would afford an allowance only of eight gallons per day. This allowance could however be increased to nine gallons by the absorption of the nullahs between Pokfoolum and Victoria which the conduit would intercept.

The project is incapable of further enlargement or extension, owing to the steep slope of the valley, which does not admit of a repetition of reservoirs in steps higher up and to the inability of its drainage area to fill more basins.

The upper basin could only be formed by a height of dam entailing an outlay totally disproportionate to the small number of gallons to be impounded by it.

The lower basin, containing 60 million gallons, would be very shallow, accordingly the loss by evaporation would be excessive. The constant temperature of the water would be high, and its purity towards the end of the dry season questionable. The lowest layer of ten feet containing 10 million gallons would scarcely be available.

""

The idea of an increased water supply from the Pokfoolum Valley having thus had to be dismissed, the examination of the ground passed on to the East, but it is unnecessary to refer here to the country eastward of Pokfoolum, searched without avail, until the Aberdeen Valley was reached. At the Aberdeen Valley however I pause for a moment as it also became the subject of a subsequent somewhat detailed investigation. Again I quote from a former official report of mine on the subject of this valley as a possible site for supplementary water-works.

"A little above the village of Aberdeen to the right of the bridle path which leads over the mountains to Victoria, there is a large valley possessing an area of nearly 600 statute acres. This valley is flanked by precipitous hills narrowing towards a gorge 500 feet wide, in which is an admirable site for a dam.

Nearly every condition for the formation of a store reservoir which had been so fruitlessly sought for in the narrow and contracted valley of Pokfoolum, would appear at first sight to be here fulfilled. Its great natural basin seemed as it were expressly shaped to afford every facility for the easy realization of an abundant water provision, and the con- figuration of the upper valley appeared equally favourable for a small subsidiary reservoir had such been required. At the back of this again, were hills stretching out to a height of nearly 1,500 feet, promising a rain drainage in excess of the requirements of Victoria. Issuing fresh from the difficulties which had beset the preceding surveys at Pokfoolum, and the questionable expedient of a triple reservoir, which had to be resorted to in order to devise a water-supply however scant, the marked contrast presented by the generous dimensions of the Aberdeen Valley could not but be a gratifying sight.

On closer examination however, the bed of the valley scarcely appeared to have a sufficiently high elevation to provide water to the higher portions of the town. The subsequent surveys were productive of the most disappointing results, for although it was proved that the formation of an inland lake of twenty-two acres was perfectly feasible, it was also discovered that the exit of the water could not be effected at a greater elevation than 240 feet above mean sea level. Aberdeen water, if brought by gravitation into town, could therefore only serve those districts below that level.

A dam at Aberdeen 90 feet high in its deepest part and 520 feet long would form an impounding reservoir of 213 million gallons. This quantity gives 9 gallons per day and together with the present Pokfoo- lum supply, would make a total storage of 287 million gallons, or a total daily allowance of 14 gallons per head of population.

The area of the gathering ground above the reservoir site is 600 acres yielding in years of the smallest rainfall, say 50 inches, a drainage of 680 million gallons, which after a deduction of sixty per cent. for percolation into the ground and evaporation would leave a balance of

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270 million gallons, or more than enough by 57 millions to fill the reser- voir. A stream giving approximately 100,000 gallons per day flows down the valley all the year round, and there are likewise two small perrennial nullahs which would be of some help in replenishing the volume of stored water after all rain drainage had ceased.

Owing to the very low site of its outlet culvert and its consequent inability to accommodate the upper town, the Aberdeen project, if adop- ted, would necessitate two distinct sets of water-works. Those parts of Victoria lying above the outlet level would have to be fed from Pok- foolum by a high level conduit, while the lower town would have to be provided for by a low level conduit from Aberdeen leading into a low level service reservoir to be built at some convenient site on the 200 feet level in the centre of the city. The line of demarcation between the two water services would be a little below the level of the Bonham and Caine Roads and Government House grounds.

The conveyance of the last mile and a quarter of the Aberdeen supply would have to be made in cast iron 24 inch mains as it would be injudicious to expose it to the chances of pollution by the percolation of town drainage, and indeed, at intervals along its whole length struc- tural precautions would have to be taken to make the cover of the conduit impervious to the filtration of sewage irrigation and other impurities, for its low level would compel it to pass through many frequented places and occasionally below the level of cultivated patches of land.

But it is mainly the inadequate height of delivery which so seriously detracts from any advantage that a water supply from Aberdeen might possess. It makes the project like the Pokfoolum triple reservoir scheme rank as an alternative plan, to be reverted to only when anything better has been found impracticable."

The cost of gravitation works at Aberdeen was found to come to £250,000. The inability of this project to deliver water at as high a level and in the quantity that was needed, led to the conception of an alternative Aberdeen scheme for the creation of a reservoir as described, without any conduit but with steam pumping-works to pass the water over the Aberdeen Hills into the present Pok- foolum reservoir, but this alternative scheme when brought to the test of figures had also finally to be dismissed and I need not therefore dwell on it here.

The topographical examination of the island having exhausted the Southern districts, now passed along the northern slope from the valley above Causeway Bay as far as Mount Parker without any satisfactory results, and was finally brought to'a close in the Tytam Valley, where the nearest approximation to the required conditions was found. The main objection to gravitation works in the Tytam Valley lay obviously in the fact that the latter was on the wrong side of the island and that in order to bring the water into town it would be necessary to pierce the dividing ridge of mountains by means of a short direct tunnel or to adopt the alternative of following the hill contours along the surface by an unduly long and circuitous route passing round the hill-spurs overlooking Deep Water Bay and Repulse Bay with short tunnels. For the rest, the topography of the valley was favourable beyond measure to the construction of large works capable of expansion in the future if desired. The Tytam gorge was found to be so narrow as to admit of the formation of a deep lake over 28 acres in extent, impounding nearly 300 millions of gallons by means of a dam only about 400 feet long. The gathering ground above comprised 700 statute acres yielding under a minimum rainfall of 50 inches, 316 million gallons of surface drainage, by far the largest water yield in the Colony, and the point of delivery could be kept up as high as 400 feet above the level of the sea, an elevation sufficiently high to serve nine tenths of the houses in Victoria. The valley was also found to contain tributary streams amounting collectively to nearly 150,000 gallons a day and promising to make together with the impounded water an aggregate storage of considerably over 300 million gallons for the long dry season between October and March. The closer the capabilities of the site were compared with those of the other places that had been surveyed, the clearer and the more obvious it became in spite of the intervening ridge of mountains, that it was the only locality to which the Colony could look for the supply of the future, and in this conviction, when there remained no other sources to explore, plans for gravitation works at Tytam including an earth and puddled clay dam, were elaborated and submitted to the Colonial Government together with the estimate of the cost which amounted to £259,000.

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This original estimate of £259,000 submitted as far back as 1873, has since passed through many and very considerable changes, figuring at a much smaller sum and then rising again, according to the curtailments or the extensions which at one time and another the original design has undergone between the years 1873 and 1883.

In 1875, a year of unprecedented commercial depression in the Colony, not- withstanding that in addition to a comparatively empty Treasury, the Government had before it the heavy prospective outlay of a new Praya wall to replace that destroyed in the memorable typhoon of the previous year, the Legislative Council felt that it could no longer postpone action in respect of the defective water-supply of the town. Looking however to the Colonial resources as they then stood, the Government were only able to agree to the expedient of adopting the Tytam project in a very reduced and modified form. The proposed dam was not to be so high, and the volume of water to be impounded was to be less. The larger conduit was to be substituted by a smaller iron pipe; the service reservoir in town was to be dispensed with, the subsidiary supply from wayside feeders was to be relinquished, and many other minor adjuncts considered in the first scheme indispensable to an efficient water-supply, and since revived, were to be given up, for the time, the intention being to revert to them and add them to the scheme later, as means allowed. The reduced cost of this very extensive and unsparing abridgement of the original project was approximately calculated at £122,600, of which amount £72,600 represented the reduced dam and reservoir, and £50,000 the cost of making the tunnel and laying the pipes in order to conduct the water as far as the town mains at Bowrington. We have here therefore a contraction of the estimate from £259,000 to £122,600, or less than half. I should not omit to mention however, that the £122,600 underwent a slight revision almost imme- diately afterwards in connection with some small matters of detail which brought it up to £124,000.

At this time it was also conceived that while it would be of material help in augmenting the supply, it would avert any undue straining of the slender resources of the Colony, if for the present the Tytam stream only were diverted and brought to Victoria, leaving the more important and expensive undertaking of building the dam and making a storage reservoir to some future period when the new Praya wall having been finished and paid for, the Government would be in a better position to meet new liabilities, and this view of the matter having been put before the Secretary of State in 1876, by Mr. GARDINER AUSTIN, then administering the Government, the EARL OF CARNARVON who at that time held the Seals of the Colonial Department, assented to this arrangement of dividing the work into two separate instalments and in the following year sanctioned the expenditure of £50,000 for bringing the Tytam stream to Bowrington. At this point the dam and reservoir works having been indefinitely postponed the estimate shed another £74,000 and stood at the £50,000 sanctioned by the Secretary of State.

After 1877 however, no action was taken in respect of the proposed new water-works until 1882. In 1882 the urgent requirements of the Chinese population and the no less urgent demands of the Public Health caused the Government seriously to consider the wisdom of reverting, not to the abridgement, but to the original project in its integrity, a course now rendered feasible by the improved financial position of the Colony and by its consequently improved credit, in the event of its electing to carry out the work, with borrowed money and throwing on successive relays of future colonists the burthen of the payment. At this stage also matters were quickened by the official report addressed to Her Majesty's Government by the Sanitary Commissioner Mr. CHADWICK, on the subject of the deplorable water famine which prevailed among the poorer classes of Hongkong every successive winter, and of the grave sanitary dangers involved in such a condition of things.

The attention of the Colonial Office being now fully directed to the sanitary state of Hongkong and to the inadequacy of its water-supply, the EARL OF KIMBERLEY at once approved of the Tytam project being carried into execution in its original completeness, and happening to be at that time in England, I was called upon to place myself in communication with Sir ROBERT RAWLINSON the Consulting Engineer to the Imperial Government, with a view to a revision of the plans of 1873, and to the completion of such arrangements as would give early effect to the decision of the Secretary of State.

In the conferences which ensued with Sir ROBERT RAWLINSON in this connec- tion, the first and most notable change made in the earlier designs was one which at once very seriously increased the estimate of cost by £34,000, and this was the

substitution of the earth dam formerly proposed, by one of granite masonry and concrete. It is very necessary, even though at the risk of prolixity, to follow and recapitulate all the changes and improvements which have followed the original design for these water-works. It is to these structural amendments and improve- ments that we owe those marked increases in the estimate of cost which have caused surprise and which but for this explanation might be unjustly ascribed solely to miscalculation or extravagance.

The subject of masonry versus earth reservoir-dams is one which has greatly occupied the attention of the engineering profession during the last fifteen years.

Within this period a consensus of scientific opinion appears to have declared in favour of masonry notwithstanding the greatly increased cost, as against earthen and puddled clay dams, for heights of 100 feet or exceeding 100 feet. Lofty earthen structures of this type are known only in England. The French and other Con- tinental engineers have always rejected them as things of chance, and with us, I apprehend their allurement has been only their comparative economy of cost. They are not of ancient origin in the United Kingdom, having been borrowed only since our conquest of India, from the practice of the Hindoos, with whom however bunds of earth for the creation of artificial lakes and tanks have seldom as a rule exceeded a height of 100 feet. No doubt the bursting of the Bradfield reservoir dam near Sheffield in 1864, did much to modify previous opinions as to the efficacy of lofty dams of clay and earth. In this case a leak had crept into the heart of the bank by following the outside surface of the large iron supply-pipes that traversed the structure, and this leak having succeeded in penetrating across the clay heart on to the other side, the final bursting of the dam became simply a matter of moments. Unfortunately this happened in the night, and the Bradfield reservoir suddenly liberated, was hurled down the valley sweeping before it with irresistible force-villages, mills and houses and causing a loss of life and property that has made the catastrophe historical. But however deeply to be deplored, it has been asserted that this calamity has been productive indirectly of much good, for it caused many municipal and other water authorities throughout the country, to look to the condition and stability of such of their own reservoir dams as were made of earth and clay. At the present time many of the deeper reservoirs of England are never filled to their proper height for fear of accidents. In order to prevent rupture, the greatest caution is exercised in the management of these dams, the water being kept 20 or 30 feet below the level originally designed. It would seem also that in addition to these experiences, the construction of lofty earthen dams received shortly before his death, the condemnation of Professor MACQUORN RANKINE who then stood at the head of the civil engineering profession of England in its theore- tical branch. In a paper which he wrote in connection with the then proposed water-supply of Bombay, Professor RANKINE laid it down, that it was doubtful whether any earthen dam was to be relied on where the depth of water exceeded 100 or 120 feet.

In these circumstances, when in 1882 the old proposition of 1873 for an earthen embankment at Tytam came again under review, the flood of new light that had been shed on this particular branch of reservoir construction during the long intervening sleep of nine years, decided me to recommend a masonry dam in spite of the increased cost. It is true that I had to deal only with a height of ninety feet and might still therefore have adhered to an earthen fabric without incurring danger, but I conceived that in future years, as the necessities of the Colony increased with the growth of Victoria and the increase of the population, my successors in office would be called upon to raise the height of the bank in order to impound more water, and that consequently, the structure should be designed ab initio as one that must eventually be carried up over the 100 feet in height. A leak through the Tytam dam if built of earth and puddled clay, would mean the destruction and total sweeping away of the entire structure and the con- sequent loss of the capital sunk in its construction. A leak through the same dam if made of masonry or cement-concrete, means only so much loss of water and does not in any way affect its safety. In Colonial works, unavoidably subject to inter- rupted or to imperfect supervision and to the many other risks and difficulties affecting ultimate stability unknown to engineers at home, it is unquestionably truer economy,

if there is to be any venturing of capital, to adopt the safest methods of construction even though involving increased cost. These also would appear to have been the views of Mr. CHADWICK Who in his preliminary report to the Imperial Government, written from Hongkong, on the subject of the water-supply advocated independently of anything I had advanced, a masonry dam in lieu of the

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100

earthen embankment proposed in 1873, and the point raised by Mr. CHADWICK having been referred by the EARL OF KIMBERLEY to the Consulting Engineer, Sir ROBERT RAWLINSON replied that as far as he was concerned, it would not be possi- ble for him to recommend to the Government any embankment for the Tytam Valley that was not a stone or cement concrete one.

This point finally decided in favour of masonry, and absolute security thus guaranteed, the following natural question arose out of the decision. "If the proposed new dam is now to be of masonry and therefore capable of being increased to any height without jeopardy to its stability, why not raise it at once by another twenty feet, and thus enable it to impound an increased volume of water, one sufficiently large to yield 19 gallons a day for a population of 125,000, to which number the increasing water consumers of Victoria are rapidly attaining?" This proposition was to be commended not alone on the ground of public sanitation and convenience, but on the score of economy, since it would cost less to superpose the extra height of twenty feet now that a working establishment was to be opened on the spot, than later when all the expense of obtaining mechanics from England and other expenses of installation would have to be gone through over again. Accordingly after due consideration of the matter, it was resolved to increase the height of the dam to 110 feet. These increased dimensions coupled with the radical change in the style of structure sent up the estimate for the dam from its original figure submitted in 1875 i.e., £64,800 to the larger sum of £99,000.

It is obvious however that if the Colony cannot afford a dam of this height at £99,000, a lower and less expensive one--one in fact not exceeding the original £64.800-can be adopted always provided that the top of the structure is left sufficiently wide to admit of its being increased in height hereafter, if it should be decided to relegate to the future the realization of a complete water supply. This precaution as regards a sufficiency of width has of course been taken in respect of the fabric at present in course of erection at Tytam.

There have been other departures from the former abridged project which explain other minor additions to the aggregate estimate of cost. The most important of these changes is the reversion to the original scheme of a surface conduit running along the contours of the hills overlooking the Happy Valley and Wantsai, in lieu of the cheaper, but less desirable expedient of an underground pipe down the Wong-nei-Chung Valley and under the Race Course meadows, to which recourse was had in 1875 only in order to avoid initial expense.

The superiority of a surface conduit over an iron pipe is obvious. An iron pipe would rust and perish in the course of a few years while there is no reason why the conduit should not endure for many generations. An iron pipe buried in the earth is incapable of augmenting the town supply in any way, while a conduit winding along the surface of the ground is able to convert into tributaries all the mountain streams that cross its path, and thus to augment the supply by wayside feeders. There is an additional advantage special to the conduit, which is that in case of a breakdown at the outlet works in Tytam, or in the event of any tem- porary stoppage for repairs-a most serious thing for a town-the supply can be continued for a day or two from the conduit. The conduit is not being built in an even or gradual incline or fall from the tunnel mouth to the town, like the bed of a flowing stream, but in a series of flats or level steps resembling a concatenation of narrow elongated tanks, each tank about a quarter of a mile long, and each lower than its neighbour by about one foot. These water-compartments may therefore in case of emergency, be converted into temporary sources of supply and their contents retained or eked out at will by means of stop-planks or water-gates, until the main supply is re-opened from the fountain head.

The foregoing modifications of design all tending to the ultimate efficiency of these water-works when completed, account in the main for the increased cost, but there have been also, though of course to an infinitely less extent, certain other contributory factors and causes of excess of actual over estimated expenditure not due to any modifications in the design, but which it is none the less necessary to set forth in these pages without reserve.

The preliminary estimate for the construction of the Tytam tunnel was an approximate estimate which allowed a margin for the uncertainties and difficulties that attend, more or less, all undertakings of this class, but that estimate did not allow any margin for an unexpected source of expense that has arisen in the ever constant presence of sickness on the works. Almost from the beginning, the disease known as Hongkong fever has haunted both tunnels with unremitting

L

persistence. It has exercised a most baneful influence upon the cost of the work, in the loss of men's time, in the enforced absence of foremen constantly and for prolonged periods, in the continual changing of hands, and in the raising of wages to standards sufficiently high to induce miners to continue at their posts. It has caused grave anxiety and embarrassment in providing for the continuous prose- cution of the work, and has tended to retard in no small measure the final completion of the tunnel.

The health of the men has of course been the object of due care and attention on the part of the Government, and every precaution has been taken that could be taken for the mitigation of the evil. The latter, however, I now fear to be one inseparable from exposure to the influences of freshly opened granite. To these influences the men must needs be daily exposed, and there is nothing for it there- fore but to endure them and make the best of them with that fortitude which both officers and men have shewn themselves so eminently to possess. It is the least tribute that I can pay to their mettle, to record here my own recognition of the undaunted courage and perseverance, and cheerful patience with which, though wasted and physically depressed by sickness, they have toiled on night and day, in the fulfilment of their arduous task, and I should hope that upon the com- pletion of the work, the Colony would recognize these services as they deserve.

In connection with the tunnel there has also been another item of expense amounting to about £4,000, due to no modification of design nor in any way pre- viously calculated upon. This unforeseen outlay was brought about by the neces- sity to procure new and heavier drilling machinery. The machines sent out from England with which the work was begun, proved after a year's trial, of insufficient calibre to traverse the extremely unfavourable texture of granite met with. The progress made did not average more than twenty-eight feet of tunnel per week, and as day by day the headings advanced and the work receded further from the pneumatic engines at the tunnel mouths, so marked a diminution was observed in the compressed air supplied, as to make it evident that before many months the motive power must fail. But the subsequent arrangements made and new machines imported now enable a steady progress of forty feet of tunnel to be made per week, and there is no reason why this rate of speed should not be maintained until the completion of the work.

101

Tunnel boring by machinery is a branch of science that can scarcely yet be said to have emerged from its rudimentary stage. It was with great difficulty that I was able to obtain any practical information at all on this class of work when I was in England three years ago, and the meagre statistics finally procured were not so satisfactory as to relieve from doubt the question as to the best type of machine to be used and its attendant cost in boring through different classes of rock. I am satisfied however that the type of percussive machine finally selected for Tytam was a wise selection, but the point on which experience was wanting at the moment--the whole subject being new to the profession-was whether the differ- ent sizes of this type of machine were fully up to their advertized capabilities. In practice it subsequently turned out that the smaller-sized and less expensive machine selected was not strong enough to cope with the work, and that the larger size of machine since procured, was exactly what was required.

With these remarks I now close this brief review of the history of the ups and downs of the original estimate of cost of the Tytam water-works which began with £259,000 and now stands at £166,440, provided the whole scheme is carried out, that is to say, provided it is elected to carry up the dam to its full height of one hundred and ten feet.

In connection with all estimates of works of any considerable magnitude, subject to alterations and vicissitudes as difficulties present themselves, it is not possible to pin the engineer down to a definite and fixed sum. Preliminary estimates can be taken subject only to certain limits of deviation in order to allow for unforeseen contingencies. In engineering works this margin is usually fixed at ten per cent. of the final estimated cost and this is the least limit that should be allowed for the Tytam works, always provided that we have no more organic changes of design.

At this late stage I had thought we had reached a period of the works when modifications of design would no longer play any part in altering our figures, but quite recently, a valuable letter of advice has been received from the Consulting Engineer in England, counselling a more generous use of Portland cement than Ĭ had contemplated in the construction of the dam. This recommendation Sir ROBERT

102

RAWLINSON bases on his own wide personal experience of similar works in England, and he points out that the course he prescribes will be in the end the truest economy in securing more solid and lasting work. A more liberal use of Portland cement implies of course a larger expenditure under this head, but it has not been possible in the time, to complete the calculations of the cost of the increased cement involved in the proposition, so that I am compelled to defer my report on this point to a future opportunity. I may however briefly state here that as far as I am able to see, the additional cost would not be so great as to make it prohibitive, but that additional cost would of course be less or greater in accordance with the height to which the dam is carried up.

Before finally leaving the question of Tytam accounts, the disbursements under which service amount so far to $428,000, it is only right to state that these works have been prosecuted up to date with due regard to the most stringent economy in every branch and detail. The work may be rough, but it is solid and it will be lasting. In spite of climatic and other adverse conditions, its cost continues to compare most favourably with that of similar works in England, where facilities are much greater for the realization of undertakings of this kind than in Hongkong. It is said that comparisons are odious. I do not find them so in this instance. On the contrary, I consider it satisfactory that we should have been able to keep below English estimates at all, and the more satisfactory that we should be so far below them. If the cost of this important enterprise in which the Colony has embarked be large, it is because the adequate provision of water for an urban population is necessarily a most serious and costly affair if done properly. Other Govern- ments and communities have had to make the same sacrifices, and it is to be questioned whether any public aim is more worthy of a sacrifice or whether any greater boon can be conferred on a people than a generous supply of water. I apprehend that no person in this Colony who has cared to gratify his curiosity as to the keenness of the privations which the humbler classes have been silently under- going all these years for want of water, or the discomfort which the middle classes have equally suffered, can deny that more water is our first want, or that its earliest attainment is the more desirable if it can be procured at a less cost than has gene- rally been paid by communities in England poorer than ourselves, and perhaps in less straits for it.

In Europe the cost of carrying out water-works for the supply of towns differs very much with the local conditions in each particular case. In towns situated in the immediate neighbourhood of rivers or lakes, pumping arrangements may be feasible at far less cost than gravitation works, but as a general rule pumping works though less in their initial cost, greatly exceed gravitation works in their subsequent* annual expense, for they involve the consumption of coal, the constant wear and tear of steam machinery, and the employment of skilled mechanical labour at high wages, from all of which charges gravitation works are free. The statistics collected appear to prove that gravitation projects average from about £2.10.0 to £3.10.0 and pumping projects from £2.0.0 to £3.0.0 per head of the population.

The following is a list of the costs of some English water-supplies.--

POPULATION.

GALLONS

PER HEAD

PER DIEM.

Cost

PER HEAD.

London,

3,500,000

30

£4. 2.0

Cambridge,

30,000

15

2. 8.0

Tunbridge Wells,

80,000

35

4.

0.0

Wolverhampton,

100,000

18

2. 10. 0

Southport,

22,000

22

3. 0. 0

Ryde,

2,350

45

3. 7. 0

Rotherham,

22,000

19

2. 10. 0

Newark,..

12,000

Aylesbury,.

20,000

Swansea,

60,000

29 20

20

4. 3. 0

16

2. 12. 0

22

2. 11. O

But the information contained in the foregoing figures has been supplemented by some very valuable returns obtained from the Secretary of State for the Colonies whom His Excellency the Governor had addressed on the subject of the Tytam water-works, asking to be enlightened as to how the latest estimate of the cost 66,440 compared with the cost of completed water-works of the same character and description in England. In response to this question, Her Majesty's Govern- ment having called upon their Consulting Engineer to supply the requisite information for the Government of Hongkong, Sir ROBERT RAWLINSON was after a time able to furnish a return of the more modern water supplies to English towns and their attendant cost, and in transmitting this return he calls attention to the fact that the Tytam estimate of cost is lower than the average cost of English water-supplies. He writes as follows:

"The Governor of Hongkong desires to have my opinion as to whether the estimate of the Surveyor General of the cost of the water-works at £166,440, is excessive or otherwise as compared with the average cost of works for water- supply to European cities. In reply I quote from a Table giving the capacities and cost of water-works consisting of impounding reservoirs and conduits in Great Britain.

The Tytam works are estimated to supply 19 gallons per head daily, to a population of 125,000 at a cost of £1.6.7, per head. The Table gives the particu- lars of towns in which the population supplied, or the gallons per head, bears some comparison with Hongkong.

COST OF WATER-WORKS.

103

NAME OF Town.

GALLONS

POPULATION

SUPPLIED.

PER HEAD

PER DAY.

COST OF WORKS.

COST

PER HEAD.

Ashton under Lyne,

130,000

23.08

£640,556

£4.18. 6

Dundee,

167,000

40.30

751,815

4.10. 0

Preston,

100,000

31.00

332,000

3. 6. 4

Halifax,

141,212

21.74

647,166

4.11. 7

Huddersfield,

118,065

25.41

750,000

6. 7. 0

Blackburn,

105,000

21.43

622,769

5.18.71

Weardale and Shildon,.

150,000

13.10

592,959

3.19.0

Rochdale,

106,834

13.10

798,698

7. 9. 61

Manchester,

900,000

21.11 3,397,215

3.15. 5

Liverpool,....

717,019

22.31

2,854,099

3.19. 71

Bradford,

364,000

24.18

1,869,737

5. 2. 82

....

Leeds,

334,354

23.92

1,463,133

4. 7. 61

Sheffield,.

300,000-

16.19

1,693,000

5.12.101

Oldham,

179,000

22.35

585,706

3. 5. 5

Cardiff,

88,984

24.72

322,327

3.12. 51

Heywood,.

44,770

20.10

297,558

6.12. 11

Of the existing works of 32 towns in England and Scotland with a com- bined population of 7,749,026 I find that an average supply of 27.64 gallons per head per day has been obtained at an average cost per head of £3.15.7. Tytam costs £1.6.7.

It appears therefore that the estimated expenditure of £1.6.7 upon the Tytam works in order to obtain a daily supply per head of 19 gallons is considerably below the average cost namely, £3.15.7 as obtained from actual experience."

ROBERT RAWLINSON.

(Signed)

104

A kindred work of scarcely less importance than the capture, storage, and conveyance of water in adequate quantities for the people, will be the reorganization later on, of the system of its distribution among the people. The streets and houses of the town will have to be divided into three parallel level zones or belts: high-level, middle-level, and low-level, and each zone will have to be fed from its own central main. Much of the present distributing apparatus may be utilized and expense kept down, but a large proportion of new mains will be required, if efficiency is to be attained and waste prevented. I do not know that any outlay under this head is chargeable to the Tytam water-works, but that it is a service which will before long-with a large supply in prospect-require the close atten- tion of the Government is indubitable. The matter, however, is too large a one to be dealt with here, and must form the subject of a special report which will shortly be submitted.

PROGRESS OF THE WORKS.

Dam.-The design for the dam shows a wide pedestal or table of cement concrete twenty feet high, stretching across the bottom of the gorge and going down deep into the rock in search of good foundations. Upon this pedestal a masonry and cement concrete wall over sixty feet thick at its base, will be built to a height of ninety feet, tapering upward as it rises, and divided into nine successive steps or stories each ten feet high. Of these stories two have already been built in addition to the concrete pedestal, there remain therefore the seven yet to finish, provided the wall is carried up to its full height. The latter is being made with exterior faces of granite masonry, the hearting or interior being entirely of cement concrete, with large blocks of rubble stone packed into the mass in order to economize the use of cement. The progress of the concrete work is slow and tedious and exacts much careful supervision. It is not, however, without advantage that the process should be a slow one, for this will admit of the thorough setting and hardening of the entire heart before the dam is called into use. There have been instances of work of this description in England pushed forward with undue expedition, where the superposition of large masses of concrete over equally large masses of the same, has had the effect of impeding or retarding the induration of the whole. There will, however, be no need to await the attainment of its final height before utilizing the dam to form a lake. I have said before that this work may be stopped short at any height that money considerations may impose. With a wall only sixty feet high, a volume of water over twice that of the Pokfoolum reservoir can already be impounded, and, if it is decided to raise it higher as the wall continues to be carried up from month to month, and the work dries and hardens, the top water- level of the new lake may also be gradually raised and its contents increased until the ultimate volume desired to be impounded is attained.

In former Departmental reports to the Government I have expressed the opinion that the reservoir would be finished before the tunnel, but latterly, due to the efficiency of the new and heavier drilling machinery, the boring has gone ahead so rapidly, that in the race towards completion between these two works, it is now problematical whether after all, the tunnel will not reach the winning post first. Should this be the case Tytam reservoir water may be used in town earlier in 1887, than I had allowed myself to anticipate.

Tunnel. The tunnel in course of construction from Tytam to Wong-nei-Chung for the passage of the waters from the new reservoir to the northern side of the island will be when completed, about 7,300 feet long or roughly speaking, a little under a mile and a third. It is six feet wide and seven feet high from the floor to the crown of the arch, these being the least admissible dimensions consistent with convenience of working. The excavation has been driven so far entirely through a hard, solid and fissured granite formation, that has proved most adverse to progress and there is now no reasonable hope left that the character of the rock will change to anything more favourable.

The mountain is being pierced from both sides in the same straight line and on the same level, and the two headings are now each advancing towards one another at the rate of twenty feet per week and therefore lessening the distance between them by forty feet every week. The Tytam heading has been carried in to a distance of 2,132 feet, and the Wong-nei-Chung heading 1,868 feet, making a total of tunnel finished of 4,000 feet, or over one half of the whole work. There remain therefore about 3,300 feet of tunnel to drive, and at the rate of actual progress which I have mentioned, i.e. forty feet per week, a progress which there is no reason to doubt will be maintained-it will take eighty-two weeks to

105

perforate the rest of the mountain and to connect Tytam reservoir-water with the conduit on this side. Eighty-two weeks are equivalent to one year and eight months, so that the completion of the tunnel may be looked for on or about July 1887.

Conduit. The masonry surface-conduit which winds along the mountain contours from Wong-nei-Chung to the Albany is intended to convey the water by gravitation from the tunnel mouth to a proposed terminal tank and filter-bed to be built on the hill-side in the Albany Valley. I have already in a preceding page, described the manner in which this water-channel is being built, with a view in case of emergency, to the utilization of its successive compartments as tanks whence to derive relief pending any temporary stoppage of the water at the dam. The conduit is a square red brick culvert 3 feet wide, rendered inside with cement to prevent leakage, and covered with granite slabs to protect the purity of the supply and to keep down the temperature of the water. With the exception of the Wantsai Valley which it is intended to cross with a syphon of iron pipes, the water will be carried over all streams by aquæducts of arched masonry, and these aquæ- ducts will be so paved and concreted over as to enable them and the entire length of conduit to be used as a continuous level road for pedestrians. With reference to the progress of this particular branch of the work, it may be briefly mentioned that it has been divided into two sections, the first extending from the tunnel mouth at Wong-nei-Chung as far as the Wantsai Valley, and the second from the Wantsai Valley to the Albany. The first section now rapidly approaching completion will be finished or very nearly so, by the end of the present year, whereupon the Wantsai syphon works and the second section will be commenced and terminated by the end of 1886.

In conclusion, I avail myself of this opportunity of bringing to the notice of His Excellency the Governor, the highly satisfactory manner in which Mr. G. Cook, in direct charge of the tunnelling operations, and the rest of the English officers engaged in the supervision of the various branches of this work are carrying out their duties, but especially I desire to record my appreciation of the valuable public services continued to be rendered by the Resident Engineer, Mr. JAMES ORANGE, to whose marked professional abilities and efficient general management these works when completed, will have in no small measure owed their successful realization.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

J. M. PRICE,

Surveyor General.

107

No. 8.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE SUBMISSION IN FUTURE OF THE MUNICIPAL

TAXATION TO THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG,

No. 71.

SIR.

DOWNING STREET,

26th October, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 348, reporting the increase by one per cent of the municipal rating in consequence of the failure of the present police rate to meet the current charges of the force.

2. I approve of the change which you propose to introduce, by which the municipal taxation will in future be submitted to the Colonial Legislature, the rating act of 1875 being amended accordingly; and my approval has already been conveyed to you by telegraph.

3. I have also to acknowledge your despatch No. 349, on the subject of the necessity for maintaining a strong police force in the Colony.

I have, &c.,

Governor

Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G.,

&c.,

&c.,

&.c.

(Signed)

FRED. STANLEY.

109

HONGKONG.

THE POSTMASTER GENERAL'S REPORT FOR 1885,

No. 9.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

1885.

GENERAL POST OFFICE, HONGKONG, January 1st, 1886.

SIR,---I have the honour to report on the British Postal service in Hongkong and China during

2. For several years past the Annual Report of this Department has been commenced with a remark on the absence of anything of importance to record. The year under review has, however, been somewhat eventful.

3. The Money Order relations of this Colony have undergone a very marked extension. In the Postal Report for 1878 the following passage will be found:-

<

Applications are not infrequently received for Money Orders on Continental Countries, the United States, &c., and though it would certainly not be worth while to keep accounts with those countries for the sake of, perhaps, one order every three months exchanged with each, yet such applications are always refused with regret. If there were a sort of International clearing-house, say at Berne, and it were understood that each Post Office should keep accounts with that clearing-house, and with that only, it would then be not only possible, but also easy for every Union country to exchange Money Orders with every other Union country."

4. To a very great extent the above suggestion has been realised. The International clearing- house, however, is not at Berne, but in London, and the system of Through Money Orders (as they are called) adopted there has admitted this Colony to money order relations with nearly the whole of the Continent of Europe, the United States, Canada, Bermuda, the South and West African Colonies, Cyprus, Egypt, the Falkland Islands, Honduras, the West Indies, Iceland, Madeira, Mauritius, New- foundland, S. Helena, the Seychelles, and New Zealand. Chinese in New Zealand send money orders here through London rather than not send them at all. A money order exchange with France has been arranged by way of India, and the same means has been adopted for the exchange of money orders with Goa. In addition to these, conventions for the direct exchange of orders have been entered into with Hawaii and North Borneo.

5. The following table shews the number of Through Money Orders which have been forwarded by way of London since the system was commenced a year ago. It will be seen how impracticable it would be to maintain a separate system with each country whilst the amount of business is so small, and yet that the total amount remitted is not inconsiderable.

Country.

Belgium,

Canada,

Denmark,

Egypt,

Germany,

Holland,

Italy.....

Mauritius,

Natal,.

New Brunswick,

Norway,

Portugal,

Sweden,

Number of Orders drawn

Total amount of Orders.

3

£15. 11.

5

6

29. 1.

7

6

27.

0.

3

1

2.

0.

0

46

176.

1. 9

ลล

2

8.

17. 11

2

1.

19. 11

1

4.

0. 3

1

2.

17. 1

1

5.

0.

0

2

7

2. 10. 0

9. 18. 0

5

24.

13. 3

22

27

83. 14.

1

5.

0. 0

£ 398.

5. 5

United States of America,

West Indies (British),

TOTAL,......... 106

6. The sale of Postal Notes has kept up during the year. They are a great convenience at the smaller Ports, where Money Orders are not to be had. The steady decline in the value of silver has, however, introduced some difficulty into the system. It is absolutely necessary to offer these notes for sale at a fixed rate of exchange, which of course must not be more than a trifle above the rate of the day.

But, whatever rate has been fixed, exchange has always slipped down lower, thus necessitating frequent re-adjustment of accounts and leading to much trouble.

7. Siam has entered the Postal Union, and a properly organised Post Office has been opened at Bangkok under the direction of H. R. H. Somdet Phra Chow Nong Ya Tho Chow Fa Bhanurangse Swangwongse Krom Hluang Bhanuphanduwongse Woradej, Minister of Posts and Telegraphs. A kind of unrecognised agency of the Hongkong Post Office used to be maintained in the Consulate General

110

at Bangkok, where Hongkong stamps were sold, and where a letter could be registered. The new service is in every way an improvement, and completes the chain of Post Offices which may now be said to encircle Asia, at least from Aden to Hakodate. The gradual opening of Corea has of course led to a considerable increase of correspondence for that country.

8. Perhaps the event of the year most interesting to the public has been the establishment of a Parcel Post with the United Kingdom and several West Indian islands. This service is as yet in its infancy, but the following figures will show that it is likely to be largely availed of:-

Outward Parcels.

Date of Mail. Number of Parcels.

Net weight.

Total declared value.

Postage accruing to Colony.

October

13,

42

74 lb.

£54. 3. 0.

$ 9.00

27.

46

92

91.19. 5.

10.90

November 10,*

150

219

292. 2. 6.

28.90

"2

24,

109

156

105. 7.10.

21.60

وو

December 8,

88

158

108.16. 6.

19.10

27

22

68

128

102 .9.11.

15.90

"9

TOTAL,....

503

827 b.

£754.19. 2.

$105.40

* Christmas and New Year Mail.

Inward Parcels.

London Date. Number of Parcels.

Net weight.

Total declared value.

Postage accruing to Colony.

October

6,

102

208 lb.

£ 92. 0. 0.

$25.50

20

106

176

104. 2. 2.

21.90

November 3

102

206

184. 9. 7.

24.70

17 *

192

346

141. 5. 7.

43.30

>>

39

TOTAL,....

502

936 tb.

£521.17. 4

$115.40

*Christmas and New Year Mail.

9. The contents of the parcels sent home have chiefly been these:-Bamboo-ware, beads, bronzes, cards, carvings, chinese ink, cigars, clothing, curios, drapery, dolls, d'Oyleys, fans, ferns, fruit, handkerchiefs, insects, jewellery, lace, lacquered-ware, manuscript, mats, needlework, patterns, pepper- mint oil, photographs, pictures, pipes, porcelain, rugs, seeds, shells, silks and gauze, silver, skins, sticks, tea, toys, watches.

The contents of parcels sent from home have been:-Accoutrements, arms, books, cake, cards, clothing, cosmetics, cutlery, electro-plate, feathers, flags, flowers, fruit, haberdashery, instruments, jewellery, labels, lace, lamps, lamp-wick, leather, medals, medicine, millinery, music, needlework, patterns, perfumery, photographs, pictures, price lists, silk and velvet, stationery, table linen, teles- copes, tops, watches.

10. The following table shows the number of Parcels despatched to and from the various ports of China, all the rest were to and from Hongkong:-

A

Inward Parcels.

192

Outward Parcels.

Shanghai,

Hoihow,

Canton,....

Macao,

99

29

...

22

Swatow,

8

3

Amoy,

Ningpo,

15

11

Foochow,

15

7

6

8

Hankow,

10

11

H. M. Fleet,..

26

Total,.......

182

280

111

11. This opportunity may perhaps be taken of explaining that a parcel for China can be posted at any Post Office in the United Kingdom, at the rate of 10d. a lb, and that it will be conveyed under Registration to, and delivered free at any of the Ports named in the last paragraph, or that it can be forwarded, at the sender's risk, to any other place in China to which there is communication.

12. It is already evident that the inward Parcel system will lead to a number of those false alarms about losses which are always being raised from time to time about every kind of correspond- ence. The Parcel mail leaves London only fortnightly, and even then comes out by way of Gibraltar. It is quite possible therefore that a letter may arrive here nearly three weeks before a parcel posted about the same time. The addressee meanwhile is convinced his parcel is lost. Except however by some casualty, such as fire or shipwreck, there is no probability that any parcel will be lost.

13. The Money Order extensions and the Parcel Post system reviewed above have of course added very considerably to the work of this Department. On the other hand a proposal has been submitted been_submitted to the Imperial Post Office to lighten that work by the abolition of the present complicated system of accounts kept between this Office and London. The Postal Union regulations have practically swept away all Postal Accounts with other countries, but the old-fashioned system of accounts with London has been retained. It has been pointed out that the difference between the total balances for one year and another, even taking extreme cases, does not amount to £150, and that it would be cheaper for the Colony to pay that sum annually than to keep elaborate accounts of a charge of twopence-half- penny on this letter and sixpence on that. The question will, it is hoped, be settled by the entire adoption of Union principles between the two offices.

14. The series of Postage Stamps in use has been re-arranged so as to consist entirely of decimal values. The desirability of having only one issue of Stamps for both Postal and Revenue purposes has not been lost sight of, but certain difficulties must be overcome before this can be brought about.

15. Mr. LEIRIA, the senior clerk in this Office, retired on pension after thirty-two years good service. Mr. HUTCHISON, Acting Assistant Postmaster General, obtained an appointment in Corea before the return from leave of absence of Mr. TRAVERS, whom he had replaced, and the Department was again left without Assistant. It is impossible to speak too highly of the way in which the work was carried on during the interim by Messrs. ROCHA and MACHADO, who were entrusted with the duty of supervising the routine of the service. During this time a period of International Statistics occurred (the month of May) the complicated details of which were dealt with satisfactorily.

16. An International Congress assembled at Lisbon in February last for the purpose of revising, extending and perfecting what are now practically the postal arrangements of the world. It is impossi- ble to lay down the two ponderous volumes which record the proceedings of this conference, or even the revised Convention which formed its principal work, without a feeling of disappointment. Regula- tions are left that would have been better abolished, whilst, of the few changes that have been made, some are of questionable utility. The entry of the Australian and South African Colonies into the Union seems little nearer than it was five years ago. The vexatious and needless distinction between Printed and Commercial Papers is retained, as is a frivolous regulation for a compulsory exchange of specimen Postage Stamps. The period of Statistics has been made to recur every three instead of two years, and this is a real boon. Moreover the rational system of multiplication advocated from the first by this Office has been adopted. The results of 28 days' observations are to be multiplied by 13, instead of multiplying a month's totals by 12. When five mails leave within the month it is obvious that on the latter system this Colony would pay as for sixty mails in the year, whereas there are but fifty-two.

A

17. The fee for Registry of Local correspondence has been reduced to 5 cents, which, at present rates of exchange, is the same as the fee of 2d. charged at home for Registration.

It is hoped that this increased facility will tend to check the habit of forwarding bank notes in unregistered letters. Some years ago the Postal system of the United Kingdom was seriously deranged on account of the thousands of letters which arrived in London every morning containing Postage Stamps. People advertised, Send thirteen stamps for this; Send five shillings' worth of stamps for that. sorter or postman who stole a bundle of letters at random was certain to find several of them containing stamps. This Office has had to struggle hard not to suffer in the same way from the persistence with which residents at the Ports, chiefly Canton and Swatow, will, in spite of all remonstrances, pay their small bills here by means of bank notes sent in unregistered covers. do not steal bundles of letters at haphazard, they select those that feel tempting, and unfortunately it is not only or even chiefly the people that enclose bank notes in letters who suffer, the correspon- dence of others is taken. At one time it seemed to be rapidly becoming the rule that even a sample of calico or cloth put into a letter marked it for immediate theft.

Chinese

18. The whole work of a Post Office is organised on the supposition that ordinary letters will contain nothing of intrinsic or immediately convertible value. If it were certain that every letter would contain a bank note, each letter as posted would have to be entered on a list, and to be recorded. throughout its entire transit, just as a registered article is. The number of officers employed would grow to that of a standing army. If therefore a portion of the public will persist in throwing on the Post Office a responsibility which it notifies on every opportunity its organisation does not enable it to accept, they must be left to take the consequences.

112

19. An endeavour has been made to establish three regular deliveries, at 9, 12, and 3. As steamers arrive here at any hours, a system of this kind cannot be carried out very strictly, at least without a greatly increased staff, but it answers fairly well for the slacker days when no contract mails arrive. It is unfortunate that, as a general rule, the postmen have to leave for their afternoon rounds before the Canton steamer is in. They are not back till late, and the half-dozen letters from Canton may not be distributed till after dark. It is really impossible to make the whole arrangements of the Office depend on this tiny handful of correspondence. Those who may have felt aggrieved about Canton letters will perhaps accept this explanation. During the war the inconvenience was particularly marked, as it was never known whether the steamer was to be expected or not.

20. The Franco-chinese war was not a happy period in Postal matters. The regular packet service to Shanghai was suspended, the mails being carried by private ships which often started after a very short interval. On one occasion the Shanghai mail had to be sent up unsorted. Correspondence for Formosa was forwarded with difficulty, and for considerable periods not at all. Pakhoi suffered from the same difficulties, but only for a short while. The alarm of a blockade was raised at Swatow, and arrangements were in readiness to transport the mails overland. Fortunately they were not called into requisition. Ningpo was blockaded during several weeks.

21. The French packets now call at Kobé both on their upward and downward passages, which much simplifies the conveyance of mails to that Port. The mails for Japan were sent on with fair regularity throughout the year, no serious detention for want of connecting steamers having taken place.

22. The attention of both the British and French Post Offices has been called to the inconvenience caused by the English and French mails arriving, as they did during all the first half of the year, almost together. The remedy lay in the hands of the French Post Office. As the representation to it was made by its own Agents, not by this office, it is not known what view has been taken of the subject, but the evil has for the present disappeared.

23. Perhaps a more serious inconvenience to the community is the frequent departure of the American mail on the same day as the mail for Europe. This is a most unfortunate arrangement, and one that surely cannot be absolutely necessary. In the Post Office its results are very trying. The verandahs and the windows are blocked up with Chinese purchasing stamps and posting their letters, Europeans find it almost impossible to get what they want, and, two days' work being compressed into one, neither mail can be despatched with the desirable care and accuracy.

24. The trans-Pacific steamers ceased for some weeks to bring mails from San Francisco. The effect on the outward mails to that port was very marked; as far as the Chinese community is concerned correspondence almost ceased to be posted. It would seem to be certain that Chinese have again discovered some way of smuggling their correspondence into the United States, or else the vigilance of the Customs Officers has been relaxed. The outward mails for San Francisco are nothing like what they were a year ago.

No doubt the same number of letters are sent, but they are sent otherwise than through the Post Office. The inward mails from San Francisco are at present being brought by the steamers of the O. & O. Co. only, the Pacific Mail steamer not bringing any.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your obedient Servant,

ALFRED LISTER,

Postmaster General.

The Honourable FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

&c.,

Acting Colonial Secretary, &c.,

&c.

APPENDIX.

APPROXIMATE STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 1885. Supplied to the International Bureau of the Postal Union, Berne.

DESCRIPTION OF CORRESPONDENCE.

INTERNATIONAL,

LOCAL.

COMPARISON WITH 1884.

TOTAL.

De- spatched.

Received.

De- spatched.

Received.

Total in 1884.

Increase. Decrease.

Ordinary paid letters,

576,000 406,000 62,000

51,000 1,095,000

1,095,000

Unpaid and short paid Articles,.

13,000 16,000

6,000

11,000

Letters on Postal Business,

1,150

900

1,400

900

Post Cards,

7,700

2,700

1,600

1,000

46,000 4,350 13,000 18,200

45,500 4,100

500 250

5,200

Do. with prepaid reply,.

Newspapers and Periodicals,

140,000

328,000 32,000

10,000

510,000

471,000

39,000

Books, Circulars, Prices Current, &c.,

200,000

190,000 13,000

8,000

410,000

340,000

70,000

Patterns,

5,000

2,900 4,000

4,260

16,160

15,460

700

Commercial Papers,

6,000

3,000 2,834

9,000

5,980

3,020

Registered Articles,

24,700

28,000

2,340

57,874

54,800

3,074

Letters with value declared,

Registered Articles with Return Receipt,.

312

1,872

52

26

2,262

2,280

18

Parcels,

548

736

130

156

1,570

890

680

113

No. 10.

.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

No. 12.

POLICE OFFICE, HONGKONG, 9th January, 1886.

SIR, I have the honour to forward, for the information of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, details of the Police Establishment, the list of Pensioners, and the Criminal Statistics for 1885.

2. The Criminal Statistics show that 6,775 cases were reported to the Police during 1885, being a decrease of 3,428 cases or 34.18 per cent. on the returns of 1884. In the subdivision of these cases into Serious Crimes (so-called) and Minor Offences, a decrease of 186 cases or 7.01 per cent. is found in Serious Crimes, and of 3,242 cases or 42.93 per cent. in Minor Offences.

3. During the past year two attempts at rioting were frustrated, and whilst only three murders occurred in the Colony (one in Lyndhurst Terrace and two in sampans off Tai Kok Tsui) yet there were several cases of manslaughter, and the reports of cutting and wounding were numerous; as also at one time were the cases of people being hustled and robbed by a party of five or six men. The assailants have gradually been arrested, and, it is thought that this branch of crime will be checked for the present. The Police have also been successful in forestalling several intended raids on houses for

purposes of robbery.

the

4. Another proof of combination was shown in the piratical seizure of the S. S. Greyhound on the High Seas and the murder of the Master. The pirates embarked as passengers, an old device of the Chinese, whose soldiers resorted to a similar practice in the war thirty years ago. The opening of telegraphic communication with Macao and Canton enabled me, as the circumstances led me to expect that the Pirates would go to the former place, to speedily inform the Local Authorities, and owing to their willing exertions and hearty co-operation two junks and ten of the pirates were subsequently seized.

5. The Detectives, both European and Chinese, attach great importance to the growing power of the Secret Triad Society. It is alleged that its influence is being largely used to screen criminal offenders and to make the procuring of evidence difficult. My recommendation made in letter No. 262 of the 24th August, 1885, that this Society should be registered and brought under control is, I am informed, under consideration. In view of the recent attempts at riot, it is expedient that Guilds should be similarly registered. From the statements of the Detectives it would appear that all the lower criminal classes of the Colony have joined the Triad Society, and look to the heads of it for assistance when they are arrested. Hence it would appear probable that unless deterrent measures are promptly carried out, the Government will find that it has eventually to stamp out an Association whose ramifications certainly even now embrace nearly all the Hakka population, and are being strengthened by the enrolment of the thieves and rowdies of the lowest Chinese classes.

6. At the end of June a system was introduced under which numerous Chinese convicts were banished on the expiration of their terms of imprisonment. From papers that subsequently came before my notice, it would appear that the leading idea was that all non-British subjects who had been twice convicted of felony should be banished. As in several of the cases sent down to me for report it appeared that many of the prisoners had only been dealt with by the Magistrates, I pointed out that the powers given to the Supreme Court in Criminal Jurisdiction, of sentencing an offender after one conviction for felony to Penal Servitude for any term not exceeding 10 years, and after two summary convictions for any of the offences punishable summarily a term not exceeding 7 years Penal Srevitude for offences under the Larceny Ordinance, had not in these cases been exercised. It appears that since the 24th June, 1885, 64 old offenders have been banished, of whom 18 have been arrested for returning to the Colony, for each of whom the sum of fifty dollars has been paid. The maximum penalty for returning from banishment is one year's imprisonment with hard labour. In the face of the fact that so many deportees have returned, I must respectfully submit the question, whether, as was done in former years, the additional penalty of personal correction is not desirable. I estimate that this system will cost the Government about $3,000 for the first year. Whether it will be successful will probably depend on the experience of prisoners in Gaol. It is undoubted but that to many Chinese the Gaol with its ample diet, and its numerous provisions for the comforts of prisoners, has been a palpable improve- ments on their experiences outside. The present Superintendent has done a great deal towards the enforcement of salutary discipline, and the new regulations which come into force this year will probably strengthen his hands. But in the absence of any system of personal correction for offenders returning from banishment, it will become necessary, if the system is to have any success, that their gaol life should be more irksome than it has hitherto been.

114

7. The returns of gambling show 254 cases against 104 in 1884, and 86 in 1883. This amount would be larger, were not cases of Lotteries now dealt with by Summons instead of by Warrant on summary arrest; they therefore appear in the Magistrates' and not in the Police Returns. The smallness of the numbers in 1883 and 1884, is probably due to the Government Order 1071 of 1883 directing, "The simplest plan would be to let the Chinese alone and to let them gamble in peace, prosecuting only in those cases when the surrounding circumstances and notoriety left no doubt as to the nature of any particular house."

8. In connection with the riots just before my return to the Colony in 1884, I observe that it was considered expedient to seize the arms stored in various Chinese shops. The repeal by Ordinance 8 of 1882 of the unrepealed sections of Ordinance 9 of 1857 appears to have resulted in the probably unintended result of also repealing Ordinance 1 of 1855 which contained some valuable clauses con- cerning the sale of arms and the manufacture of explosives which might well have been enforced in cases of emergency. I have had during the past year to call attention to the want of any preventive measures against the storage of fire crackers and other dangerous commodities in buildings in the populated portion of the Colony.

9. There is a point which has arisen during the past year to which I desire to draw attention. In this Colony so few matters connected with Police work are dealt with otherwise than by Ordinances, that there is a want of that elasticity which can be obtained in England by the exercise of a power to pass by-laws. A notable instance arose in the constant necessity in a commercial Colony like this, of vessels desiring to discharge or take in cargo at night. For over forty years the local law has prohibited it, but, from precedents dating back in my own experience to nearly twenty years, this obvious.necessity has been recognised by the Chief of Police granting permits when necessary. During the past year the applications, formerly made by well known firms connected with the principal lines of steamers, increased fifty per cent., and were becoming so numerous that it was clear that, unless some system was inaugurated, every firm that occasionally shipped goods would be in possession of a permit. Now each permit practically represents some six cargo boats. The wisdom of our pre- decessors recognised that in these waters, so liable to piratical attacks, it was expedient that there should at night time be a clear belt of water between the shipping and the water frontage. Inci- dentally I may point out that in one respect the status of this Colony is almost exceptional: it is one of the very few civilised places in the world where the trade of the Port is absolutely free from all Customs' dues. Hence in other harbours goods can only be landed at certain recognised points or under certain well known restrictions. Here cargo boats can come alongside any portion of the four miles frontage of the City. Being desirous of reducing the practice of the issue of Permits to a system, I, with the permission of the Government, inserted an advertisement in the newspapers requesting the expression of views either for or against the landing or shipping of cargo at night i.e., between 9 P.M. and 6 A.M.

The result for a Commercial Colony was somewhat surprising; not a single letter in favour of the practice was received, whilst objections to the course were sent in. It was therefore proposed to do away with the system of granting general permits available at all times, and to sub- stitute special permits to be granted when circumstances demanded that the dispatch of any particular vessel should be accelerated, and for this purpose every facility was given. When this was made known, the Chamber of Commerce for the first time took up the question and argued that, as Hongkong was a free port, the consignees of vessels were at liberty to land or discharge cargo as they pleased. The matter having been referred to the law officers, the opinion was that there was no authority of law for the granting of permits. An impression appeared to prevail that this implied that boats could discharge cargo at night. The result of a test case, that was taken before a Magistrate, whose decision was not appealed against, would seem to show that this prevalent impression is erroneous, and that the law distinctly prohibits boats from being within one hundred yards of the shore at night except. at certain specified public or at all private wharves. Being fully aware that the prosperity of this. Colony is solely dependent on its trade, I have taken on myself the responsibility of not carrying out the law to its full extent, but I trust that the matter may soon be placed on a sound basis, and that the two equally vital points of protecting the facilities of the trade of the Colony, and of protecting the City from sudden piratical raids, may meet with due consideration.

10. The same legal dictum of the absence of any authority of law equally applies to other matters. on which the Chief of Police for the time being has heretofore endeavoured to assist the industries or necessities of the Colony, viz.: the granting of permits (a.) for the temporary obstruction of a roadway by the transit of heavy goods, (b.) for allowing boats to lie near certain wharves at night for the accommodation of the officers and men of the various men-of-war in Harbour, (c.) for the removal by the Chinese of the bones of the dead to the mainland. In none of these cases is there any authority of law for granting permits, but it is clearly desirable that such power should exist.

11. Another matter wherein the practice of the Colony existing for many years has been upset, is the granting of permits for (a.) Chinese Religious Ceremonies, Theatricals, and (b.) Religious Processions. and Festivals. The power to grant permits for the former (a.) was vested in the Governor or Registrar General by Ordinance 6 of 1857, but by the amended Ordinance 8 of 1858, the power was vested in the Governor only. The matters referred to in (b.) were by Ordinance 14 of 1845 in the hands of the Chief Magistrate of Police, and by proclamation this was changed to the Chief of the

115

Police Force. This proclamation is held, and obviously rightly so, to be ultra vires. Now applica- tions are sent to the Registrar General who endorses his recommendation or otherwise, then to the Colonial Secretary, who sends them to the Surveyor General as to structural matters, and to the Magistrates, (who are not in a position to obtain information), for a report. The document is then returned to the Colonial Secretary who submits it for the Governor's decision; he again receives it and sends the permit to the Registrar General, who returns the application to the Colonial Secretary, who sends notice to me as Head of the Police Force, and in numerous cases I receive the document after the expiry of the date on which the event took place. I must submit that it is time a less cumbrous process was adopted, and probably the simplest course would be for the Chief of Police to deal with such matters when outside and the Registrar General when inside buildings, subject always to the decision of the Surveyor General on structural matters. The right of appeal to the Governor being paramount, no special allusion need be made to it. The late Mr. MAY, when Chief of Police, gave this opinion on the subject of Licences for Religious or Theatrical entertainments. "I am of opinion that the granting of such permission should be in the hands of the executive Police. This power was by Ordinance 14 of 1845 vested in the hands of the Chief Magistrate, but practically it devolved upon the Superintendent of Police, because the Chief Magistrate invariably made reference to that Officer. As a fact there are few Religious entertainments, although Religion is often advanced as a plea; firing off crackers, musical parties, &c., are all called "Chin-chin joss," but these bear as much relation to the religion of the Chinese as the institution of "Greenwich Fair" does to the religion of the inhabitants of London. The proper person to judge of the policy of granting or recom- mending such indulgence, or minor invasions of the letter of the law, must be the Officer having the responsibility of preventing disorder and annoyance to the public and ready power of preventing the abuse of the indulgence if granted."

12. The various Police Stations suffered a great deal from the lowness of the Colonial Funds. The guard house at Hunghòm has however been rebuilt and the out houses are a vast improvement from a sanitary point of view to those attached to most of the Stations. Stanley Station, having, through want of money, been for nearly two years unavailable, was in July last handed back to the Police, but the summer rains soon showed the upper floor to be comparatively uninhabitable from leakage. Subsequent defects have been developed, which plainly show that the building of the upper story many years ago was not carried out efficiently, with the probable result that it must be taken down and rebuilt before the building is really habitable. At the Water Police Basin, davits and a flight of steps are still wanting, which want contributes to the deterioration of the boats, and the endangering of the men when embarking. The scarcity of married quarters is greatly felt, and the high rates of rent now charged render it difficult for men to obtain rooms with the allowance granted by Government. The health of the Water Police has improved since the removal of the men from the Hulk to the Station at Kaulung Point, but Whitfield Station has from the number of cases off ever proved very unhealthy to the occupants. The drains are now being thoroughly repaired and the undergrowth around cut away.

If after this no improvement is shown, the cause must be attributable either to the recent earth cutting in connection with the neighbouring fort, or to the rapid silting up of the foreshore.

13. The heavy fall in the value of the dollar, which is now quoted at 3/3ğ, is a matter which must tend to the increase of the cost of the maintenance of the Police Force. It is beyond dispute that the cost of all commodities has considerably increased.

14. I am happy to be able to report that the general conduct of the Force, as witnessed by the diminished amount of fines and punishments inflicted during the year for breaches of descipline, has been very satisfactory; and that I have received the faithful support of the officers and men in the discharge of their respective duties under circumstances that on more than one occasion might have tended to dishearten them.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

The Honourable FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&Co,

SC

&c.

W. M. DEANE, Captain Superintendent of Police.

1885.

TABLE A.

RETURN of SERIOUS and MINOR OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1885, with the Results of such Reports.

Robberies

with Violence Burglaries.

from

the Person.

Larcenies in Dwelling

Houses

Assaults

with Intent

at Night.

to Rob.

Larcenies.

Felonies

not

already

Assaults

and

Disorderly

given.

Conduct.

Unlawful

11

Gambling. Kidnapping. Possession.

Piracy.

Euro-

Miscellaneous

Offences.

peans

and

Ameri-

Indians.

Chinese.

cans.

T

Total.

:

9

6

13

9

..

:

:

:

83 32 28 91 10

25 8 1156 67 19 39 109 5 1

17 10

7 3 1

SA

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

No Pass or Light.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

TOTAL

OF

ALL

CASES.

January,

10

February,

С

4

2

March,

6 2 6

April,

May,

June,

July,.

6

4 2

2 1

7 11 1 4

8

9

7

1

5 4 4 3

5

5

:

G

:

2

3 2

2

4 3

1 2

10 5 1 4 2

August,

September,

11

October,

9

10 7 7

8.

1

4

:

2 1 3

102

39

2 10 64

51.. 9

6

18 55 67 204

186

91

21|

8

3

602

626

654

73

..

:

:

:

..

..

2 9

..

38 42 81 178

160

48

50 1 ૩

లు

534

587

165

81

24 1

18 75

85 36 13 17 ..

L

4

6 20 16 6

:

35 116 38 146

147

87 64 10 3 2

475

542

154

81

19

+

3 1

48

53 18 17 22 2

3

N

4

16 10 10 3

..

1 23 80 18

96

107

407

23 32 2

2..

411

79

:

..

170

10

88

40 7

5

..

75

94 23 17 48 15

9

5

5 17 12

5 4

23 98 23 167

229

20

28

38

Co

8 6

2

265 633 131

:

..

161 70 25 7 4 2

64

88 22 16 30|..

4

2

9

18 10 11

2

..

1

117

26 50 12 117

19 36 1 2

2

12

477 172 415 87

490

..

:

T

1

..

:

1

2..

-

November,

10

7 3 6 3

1

3 1

..

1 1

..

December,.......

10

9

1 5

1

..

1

...

..

..

181 91

32

..

145

64 13

..

1659

27 7

140 82

18

8

:

143

56

18

..

163

78

20

H

1. 54 66 18 22 33 6

2

2

2

15 8

-

4 | 10

15

18 36 6❘ 118

129

20

25 30

5

3

366

:

800

102 409

107

000

N

2 .... 58

81 13 13 14 1

2 2

20 14

8

3

..

:

:

21 43 16 120

116

16 411

5

2

337 47

888e

380 62

98

8

3 76 101 28 13 24..

4

2

2

38 23 20

2*

:

..

..

34 48 20 149

148

29

41 1 3

4963

116

507 117

676

2 53

71 15 22 130 1

4

4

4

14 11 4

1

**

:

43 48 44 218

231

51

59 14 1 1

618 82

678 96

ན་

4 6 B 60

80 22 28 168 10

5 2 5

19 21

..

9

:

:

16 86 44 204

31

35 9 7

7

632

85

674

101

-

..

02

104 27 27 50 910..15 81 23 10

**

:

..

28 38 18 184

28

39 1

-

R

503

108

543 110

TOTAL,...... | 96

70

35 G7

28

-

7❘ 20

8

1

3

1

..1,927

952 300 48 36

42 | 753

713

273 273 255 736 58 53 25

13 20 60 229 165 96 17 13 20 328 600 387 1,901 1,998

420

486 65 36 15 5,978 2,082 | 6,405 1,318 6,775

Police Department, Ilongkong, 9th January, 1886.

* 10 men tried at Canton.

7,723

W, M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

116

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

N

21

Cases reported. No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Mendicants.

Unlicensed

Hawking.

Street Cries.

Breach of Spirits

Ordinances. and Opiun

Breach of

Registration Ordinance.

1 32 33

17

15

1

4

3

16 16

1

5

2 1

<

4 2 40 36

..

:

15 15 3 3

10

83 2

13 18.. 2 1

14417

146 147

37

178

180

160

8F

CYO

N

204

186

91

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported. No. of

Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported. No.

of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

TABLE B.

RETURN of MISCELLANEOUS OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1885, with the Results of such Reports.

Desertion, Refusal and Neglect of

Rogues, Vagabonds

and

Breach of

Public

Vehicles

Duty.

Suspicious Ordinance.

Characters.

Breach of Merchant

Shipping

Consolidation

Ordinances.

Breach of

Police,

Gaol

and

Deportation

Ordinances.

Breach of Pawnbrokers,

Markets and

Weights and

Measures

Ordinances.

Intimidation,

Extortion, Bribery and

Conspiracy.

Cutting

Trees

or

Earth.

Obtaining Goods and

Money

by False

Pretences.

Trespass.

Spurious Coins.

Damage to Property.

Attempt to

commit Suicide.

Cruelty to Animals.

Contempt of Court, Perjury or False Charge.

Breach of

Dangerous Goods

Ordinances.

Totals.

1885.

7

15

H

ការ

January,... 18 6 60 22 23 3 1. 4

..

11 13 1 36 37

6

1 .. 1

3

N

February,..

13

4 | 13

34 33 2 27 30

3

3

..

38 33 17

4 2

3

4

++

6

:

:

*

N

Է

..

March, . . . . .

3

M

32 31 2 5

5

..

8

16

27

30 12 3

2

19

16

9

April, ..................

10: 1

CO

8

10 10 ...

1

1

..

2

3 ..

12

12

LA

5

20

10

2 8 26

8

00

co

4 3 1 11 10 1

LA

5

4

зарда

2

G

10 1 3; 5; 1

3

5

ca

-

:

11

12..

4 1

Q

H

Q

I

May,....... 201

21

27

25

3 7

6

K

00

8 13

H

18 23

-

**

..

26 84

6

co

8

10

June, ......

11

11

18

18

..

4

4

..

3

3

**

..

16

17

6

5

را

1

2

4

10 ย

a

July, ..............

20 22

3 26 27 4

3 3

..

11

10 1 10 16- 1 2 2 1

14 24

9

~1

August, ..........

13

14..

13 14

:

:

..

8

4.

3 26 25 8 2 1 2

00

00

3

3

6

6

1!

2

3

1

23 24

5 2

6

5

2

16

16 · 1

3

4.

12

12 1

1 1

7

2

1

8

00

8

:

..

6

61 4

1

1

24 24

N

12

14 1

w

2

Է-Չ

CO

السمار

IT

H

:

N

N

Q

**

September,. 10|

13!

Co

37 30 1 12

12

1

8

9

ست

26 23

13

..

7

7

..

October,.... 13 15 1 95 | 100

13

15

..

5

2

9

17

12 11 2

2

6

November,

December,..

6

5 1

56

59

2 2

:

9

20

Jand

51

#2 2

+

6

9

++

2

4 5

..

16 18 14 2

4

18 21 10 5

..

3

5 17

..

..

9

7

2

6

1

18

5 22

-

21

46

I 1

11..

7

7

63 63

2

2'.

4

LA

6 6 7..

3

..

**

v

2

2

عالم

..

47 46 G

3 3 3 14 18 21

00

N

4

..

22.

1.1

TOTAL,... 148123 96 424 431 | 23 | 81

$8

273 84 14 260 267 113 31 24 20 121 261 26116 114 11 6 4 2 55

266

47 14290 286 19 12,114 19 22 21 188 149 33) 25 || 17

22

T

11

9 21144104|6| 13

5 31 201

11

3

1 16 17

..

4

3

1 31

31

1

8

10.. 5

G

N

:

H

A

LA

Police Department, Hongkong, 9th January, 1886.

96

23

167

28

117 117 19

118

129

129 25

4220

120

116

16

149

148 29

218 281 51

204 233

14

31

184 195 28

1,901 1,998 126

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

117

TABLE C.

COMPARATIVE RETURN of OFFENCES coming under the notice of the POLICE, during the Years 1883, 1884, and 1885.

SERIOUS.

NUMBER OF PERSONS.

NUMBER OF CASES.

DESCRIPTION.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1883. | 1884. | 1885, 1883. 1884. 1885. 1883. 1884. 1885.

MINOR.

NUMBER OF PERSONS.

NUMBER OF CASES.

DESCRIPTION.

Convicted.

Discharged.

1883. 1884. 1885. 1883. 1884. 1885. | 1883. | 1884. 1885.

118

Murder,

2

4

3

26

2

Assault,

Robbery with Violence from the Person, Burglary or Larceny from Dwelling,

30

52

96

17

18

70

15

8

35

Gambling,

81

47

93

21

15

36

4

8

Miscellaneous,

Assault with Intent to Rob,

1

2

3

1

1

1

་་ ་

Drunkenness,...........................

Kidnapping,

80

32

53

7

4

25

42

39

60

Nuisance,

Piracy,

13

9

17

4

16

13

8

28

20

No Pass or Light,

104

730 1,118 753 852 1,513 86

973 299 397 255 358 594 736 124

166

559 581

2,629 2,4411,901 2,804 | 2,636 |1,998

273

58

426

.158

202

323

...

527

790

690

No analysis of Convictions & Discharges.

1,135 2,896

387

Unlawful Possession,

254

298 229

217

262

165

81

109

96

Larcenics,

Felonies not already given,

1,980 2,153|1,927 887 949 952 312

322

300

32

55

45

25

32

36

22

19

40

Total,..

2,4232,652 | 2,466 1,178 1,2971,298

485

560

561

Total,..

5,265 7,5514,3094,014 4,743 3,707 1,024 | 1,102

757

Decrease 186 Cases or 7.01 per cent.

Decrease 3,242 Cases or 42.93 per cent.

Total Decrease--3,428 Cases or 34.18 per cent.

Police Department, Hongkong, 9th January, 1886.

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

TABLE D.

1.-RETURN of SERIOUS OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1885, showing the Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged.

Murder.

Robbery with Violence

from

the Person.

Burglary

and

Larceny in

Assault with

Intent to Rob.

Dwelling House.

Kidnapping.

Piracy.

Unlawful Possession.

Felonies

Larceny.

not already given.

YEAR

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported,

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Total No. arrested.

1876,

1877,

1878,..

1879,

1880,

5 2

-1

4

2 3 24 6 4 10 90 23

2

21 17

2 19 79 12

14 131

49

1 5 35 12 2

-

:

сл

12 1

...

5 54

30 1 1

2

55

31 32 63

2

...

H

4

1

5

39 10

20

30101 44 9 53 1

51

...

***

:

1

...

25 16 3

19

38333

53 31 10

41 2 1

20 2

53 31 69100 | 8

28 8

10

9

4

13 239

230

59

289 1,059

671

851

73

35 36

71

9

...

:

309 291

105

396

1,437 813

1

CO

6 7 470 410

166

38 40 78

7

6

1 65 68 43 111 11 12

59

62

122

1 7 333 302

50

226 .181

576 1,888 1,037 105 407 1,850 972 70 251 1,662 898

180

192 1,005 32 26

304 1,341 19 10

302 1,274 11

239 1,137

2

7

9

4

30

18

28

7

12

1

15

16

Total,.

21 11 4 15144 61

31

| 92 454 159 81 190 5 2 2 4

4 297 203 | 220 | 423 40 28

61

891,577 1,414

505 1,919 7,896| 4,391 1,217 | 5,608

7644 51 95

423

1881,

2 1 ... 119 15

8 23 60 31 8 42...

:

50 35 63

98

1882,

2

1

1

30 21

6

Co

1883,

*2

:

2

76 1 30 17 15 32 81 21 4 25 1

27 91 49 27

2 2 55 29

7 12 9 2 303 59 88 53 3 11 14 275

307

239

:

1

1 30

7

42 49 13 4 8 12 254

217

81

298

1884,

4

26

26

1885,

3

:

2

2

52 18

96 70

8 26 47 15 9 24 2 1 35 105 67 28 7 35 3 1

1 32

4

39 43 9

1

16

1

53

253

25

60

85 17 13 20

8828

44 298

262

109

33.229 165

53 360 1,879 979 76 315 2,104 1,053

1,980 887

371 2,153 949

96 261 1,927

260 1,239

9 7.5

12

344 1,397

312 1,199

322 1,271

82

8813

33 10 36

46

25

22

47

55 32

2

19 51

952

300 1,252 45| 36

40

76

Total,..

13

2 28

32 227 141

72 213 346 147 55202

2 3

5220 | 100 | 263|363 | 51 48 76|| 105 1,359 1,190

415 | 1,605 10,043 4,820 | 1,538|6,358|224|110|122 | 232

Average of 1st period,

Average of 2nd period,.

4.2 2.2 0.8 3.0 28.8 12.2 6.2 18.4 90.8 31.8 6.2 38.0 1.0 0.4 0.4 0.8 59.4 40.6 44.0 54.6 8.0 5.6 12.2 17.8 315,4 282.8 | 101,0 383.8 1599.2 878.2 243.4 1121.6 15.2 80.8 10.2 19.0 2.6 0.4 5.6 6.4 15.4 28.2 14.4 42.6 69.2 29.4 11.0 40.4 1.4 0.4 0.6 1.0 44.0 20.0 52.6 72.6 10.2 9.6 15.2 21.01271.8238.0 83.0 321.0 [2008.6, 961.0 307.61271.6 44.8 22.0 24.4 16.4

* In one case the Murderer committed Suicide.

119

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

Total,

YEAR.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons

discharged.

D.

2.-RETURN of MINOR OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1885, showing Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged.

ASSAULT.

GAMBLING.

MISCELLANEOUS.

DRUNKEN-

NESS.

NO LIGHT

NUISANCES.

OR PASS.

Total No. arrested.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons

discharged.

1876,

786

1,298

267 1,565

159

323

26

349 2,438

2,889

299 3,188

523.

306

849

1877,

841 1,282

281 1,563

282

497

146

643

2,073

2,012

275

2,287

464

611

1,151

1878,

875 1,289

318 1,607

353

585

125

710

1,794

1,965

332

2,297

512

355

385

1879,

838 1,134

376

1,510

157

499

185

684

1,442 1,717

837

2,054

301

232

762

1880,

746

965

310

1,275

358

814

191

1,005

1,815

1,769

374

2,143

276

329

840

*

Total,

4,086

5,968

1,552 7,520

1,309

2,718

673

3,391

9,562 10,352 1,617 11,969 2,076

1,833

3,937

904

1,430

227 1,657

397

1,046

108

1,154

751

1,089

317 1,406

261

693

147

840

1,879

1.750 1,820

1,983

367 2,350

337

281

566

382 2,202

276

263

424

730

852

299 1,151

86

358

166

524

2,629

2,804

559 3,363

158

527

1,135

1,118

1,513

397

1,910

104

594

124

718

2,441 2,636

581 3,217

202

790

2,896

753

973

273

1,246

255

736

58

794

1,901 1,998

426

2,421

323

690

387

4,259

5,857

1,513 7,370

1,103

3,427

603

4,030

10,600 11,241

2,315

13,556

1,296

2,554

5,408

Average of 1st period,

817.2 1,193.6

310.4 1,504.0

261.8

543.6

134.6

Average of 2nd period,.

851.8 1,171.4

302.6 1,474.0

220.6

685.4 120.6

678.2

806.0 2,120.0

1,912.4 | 2,070.4

323.4 | 2,393.8

415.2

366.6

787.4

2,120.0 2,248.2

463.0 2,711.2.

259.2

510.8

1,081.6

Cases

reported.

120

In 1876,

29

1877, ,, 1878,

""

59

1879, 1880,

D.

3.-CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

..1,485 cases.

..

.1,966

..2,611

.2,397

"

.2,051

52

10,510 cases.

In 1881,

1882,

1883,

وو

1884,

1885,

MINOR OFFENCES.

""

In 1876, 1877,

.5,061 cases.

In 1881,

.5,422

1882,

1878,

.4,224

"

""

1883,

1879,

وو

1880,

..3,732 .4,864

272

""

1884,

,, 1885,

22,803 cases.

Altogether.

In 1876,

.6,546 cases.

In 1881,

""

1877,

.7,388

1882,

**

1878,

.6,835

""

25

1883,

,, 1879,

1880,

.6,129 .6,415

20

"

1884,

1885,

"

33,313 cases.

1. Murder,

.2,329 cases. .2,596 .2,423

33

23

.2,652 ..2,466

29

27

12,466 cases.

Increase of 18.61 per cent. in 2ud period.

.4,367 cases.

.3,728

"J

.5,265 .7,551 4,309

""

25

"

25,220 cases.

Increase of 10.59 per cent. in 2nd period.

.6,696 cases.

.6,324

وو

.7.688

وو

.10,203

.6,775

33

37,686 cases.

Increase of 13.12 per cent. in 2nd period.

4.-DETAIL OF CASES REPORTED TO POLICE.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

2. Robbery with Violence,

3. Burglaries & Larcenies in Dwellings,.

4. Assault with Intent to Rob,

5. Kidnapping,...

6. Piracy,

7. Unlawful Possession,

8. Larcenies,

9. Felonies not already given,

10. Assault,

11. Gambling,

12. Miscellaneous,.

13. Drunkenness,:

14. Nuisances,

15. No Pass or Light,.

In 1876,

>>

1877,

>>

"

1878, 1879, 1880,

In 1876, ,, 1877,

""

1878,

""

1879,

39

1880.

1876 to 1880.

Yearly Average.

1881 to 1885.

Yearly Average.

21

4.2

13

2.6

144

28.8

227

15.4

454

90.8

372

74.4

:

5

1.0

7

1.4

297

59.4

220

44.0

40

8.0

51

10.2

.1,025

205.0

.7,896

1,579.2

76

15.2

1359 10,043 174

271.8 2,008.6

34.8

MINOR OFFENCES.

1876 to 1880.

Yearly Average.

1881 to 1885.

Yearly Average.

.4,086

817.2

4,259

851.8

.1,309

261.8

1,103

220.6

.9,562

1,912.4

10,600

2,120.0

.2,076

415.2

1,296

259.2

.1,833

366.6

2,554

510.8

..3,937

787.4

5,408

1,081.6

5.-NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED BY POLICE.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

.1,269 persons.

In 1881,

..1,537 .2,125 .1,866 .1,638

دو

""

1882,

1883,

"J

1884,

33

""

1885,

8,435 persons.

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

Excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15 (See Table 2) of which no details are given.

.5,102 persons.

In 1881,

4,493 .4,614 .4,248 .4,423

1882,

25

22

1883,

>>

1884,

"2

>>

27

1885,

22,880 persons.

121

.1,796 persons. .1,966 .1,663 .1,857 .1,859

""

**

33

9,141 persons.

.5,161 persons.

4,448

59

.5,038

""

5,845 4,464

>>

24,956 persons.

122

""

In 1876, 1877,

Altogether excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15.

.6,371 persons.

دو

In 1881,

.6,030

1882,

""

*1

1878, ", 1879,

.6,739

1883,

29

1880,

.6,114 .6,061

1884,

""

"

""

27

1885,

31,315 persons.

6.-DETAILS OF NUMBER OF PRISONERS ARRESTED.

FOR SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1. Murder,

2. Robbery with Violence from Person,

3. Burglaries and Larcenies from Dwellings,.

4. Assault with Intent to Rob,

5. Kidnapping,...

6. Piracy,....

7. Unlawful Possession,

8. Larcenies,

9. Felonies not given,

10. Assault,

11. Gambling,

12. Miscellaneous,

13. Drunkenness,

14. Nuisances,

15. No Pass or Light,

..6,957 persons.

.6,414 .6,701 .7,702 ..6,323

22

""

29

وو

34,097 persons.

1876 to 1880.

1881 to 1885.

15

32

92

213

190

211

4

5

423

363

89

105

1,919

1,605

5,606

6,358

95

232

8,433

9,124

FOR MINOR OFFENCES.

1876 to 1880.

1881 to 1885.

7.420

7,370

3,391

4,030

.11,969

13,556

2,076

1,296

1,833

2,554

3,937

5,408

30,626

34,214

7.—NUMBER OF PERSONS CONVICTED AND DISCHARGED.

FOR SERIOUS Offences.

99

In 1876,.

1877,

Convicted.

974

Discharged

Convicted.

Discharged.

295

In 1881,.

.1,390

406

....

.1,196

341

""

1882,

.1,405

561

» 1878,.

.1,554

571

"3

1883,.

.1,178

485

دو

1879,.

..1,381

485

>>

1884,.

.1,297

560

» 1880,.

.1,208

430

"2

1885,.

.1,298

561

6,313

2,122

6,568

2,573

FOR MINOR Offences.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1876,.

..4,510

592

In 1881,.

.4,459

702

1877,.

.3,791

702

22

1882,

.3,602

846

1878,

29

..3,839

775

1883,.

.4,014

1,024

"

"

1879,.

.3,350

898

99

1884,.

.4,743

1,102

"

1880,.

.3,548

875

1885,

"2

.3,707

757

19,038

3,842

20,525

4,431

Altogether excepting Nos. 13, 14 and 15.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Convicted.

Discharged.

In 1876,.

.5,484

887

In 1881,.

..5,849

1,108

1877,.

4,987

1,043

""

1882,

.5,007

1,407

1878,

.5,393

1,346

"

رو

1883,.....

.5,192

1,509

99

1879,.

.4,731

1,383

29

1884,.

...6,040

1,662

1880,.

.4,756

1,305

25

""

1885,.

..5,005

1,318

25,351

5,964

27,093

7,004

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police.

123

Resignations

Enlistments. Deaths.

through sickness,

TABLE E.

RETURN shewing the ENLISTMENTS and CASUALTIES in the Police Force during 1885.

Total number of casualties.

Resignations through expiry of term of service

Dismissals.

Desertions.

or otherwise.

Europeans,

21

3

2

1

4

2

12

Indians,

43

1

or

5

36

4

46

Chinese,

6383

65

10

5

4

38

15

:

:

62

TOTAL,......

129

9

11

75

23

2

120

Police Office, Hongkong, 9th January, 1886.

:

W. M. DEANE,

Captain Superintendent of Police,

:

125

No. 11.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE PROPOSED DEFENCE WORKS AT HONGKONG.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

HONGKONG,

Colonel The Right Honourable Fred. Stanley, M.P., to the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong.

DOWNING STREET,

5th January, 1886.

No. 2.

SIR,

With reference to Sir G. BowEN'S despatch No. 259, of the 4th of June last, and to my despatch No. 63, of the 20th of March last, I have the honour to forward, for your information and guidance, copy of a letter from the War Office, relative to the cost of the proposed Defence Works at Hongkong.

2. I wish to express my regret that, owing to an accident, the transmission of this letter has been delayed."

3. I have now to instruct you to take the earliest suitable opportunity of asking the Legislative Council to vote the further sum required for these Defence Works. You will observe that the increase in the cost is partly due to increase of the power of the armaments, a change common to all other defended Ports of the Empire, owing to the introduction of an improved type of breechloading artillery, which involves a corresponding change in the works; and the cost is further increased by the extension of the Defences to the Eastward, on the representation of the local authorities, to take up the defence of the Ly-ee-moon Pass and more thoroughly secure the City and shipping of Victoria from more distant bombard-

ment.

4. I doubt not that the Council will loyally consent to vote the amount necessary for completing the Defences in an efficient manner.

5. In regard to the latter part of the enclosed letter, I have to inform you that I concur in the opinion of the Secretary of State for War that, for the reasons stated in the War Office letter, it will not be desirable to form a local Defence Committee, as proposed in Sir G. BOWEN's despatch under acknowledgment.

6. With reference to the 12th paragraph of that despatch, I have to refer you to my despatch No. 68, of 21st October last, from which you will learn that I am unable to hold out any hope of the Imperial Government giving any exceptional assistance, by way of guarantee or otherwise, to the Hongkong Government towards raising the Loan required for that portion of the Works which will be undertaken by the Colony.

7. I have referred to the War Office Sir G. BOWEN's despatch No. 415, of the 2nd of November last, enquiring when the new heavy guns may be expected, and I will communicate with you, as soon as I receive a reply from the department on the subject.

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

I have, &c.,

FRED. STANLEY.

126

SIR,

Extract from letter from the War Office to Colonial Office.

WAR OFFICE, 19th September, 1885.

In acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 4th ultimo, Mr. Secretary SMITH would draw attention to the concluding paragraphs of War Office letter of the 14th March last, (Hongkong 5, 1993,) which indicated that as the Imperial Government had recognised the necessity of providing a much more powerful and expensive Armament for Hongkong than was originally intended, so it would doubtless become necessary for the Colonial Government to increase correspondingly the vote for the works.

The moderate measure of defence originally made for the harbour of Hongkong by the Inspector General of Fortifications in his memorandum of 6th June, 1883, has, by the force of circumstances, and the urgent reiterated representations from the Colony, been developed into a very much larger scheme, which must result in a larger outlay.

Since the date of the War Office letter above referred to, the designs for the new works have been so far developed that it has become possible to arrive at an approximate estimate of their cost.

The original scheme of defence provided only for three new works, and for remounting eleven medium and three heavy guns in existing works, and the approximate estimate was :--

باشتره

Stone Cutter West,

Belcher's Point,.

Quarry Point,

Remodelling gun emplacements in existing works for

new armaments,

.£13,400

15,000

15,800

11,425

£55,625

The new scheme of defence includes four new works and three new sites for single heavy guns, and, while omitting the works originally proposed at Quarry Point, it substitutes a complete defence of the Ly-ee-moon Channel. As before noted, the weight and power of the guns is so greatly increased that much more massive and costly foundations and emplacements have to be provided for them. The approximate estimate for the new works stands as follows:-

Raw and

Stone Cutter West,

Stone Cutter West Central,

Belcher's Point,

Ly-ee-moon Defences,.

New Site for ten-inch gun Fly Point,

New Site for 9.2-inch. gun

New Site above Victoria,

....

Kowloon Dock.

Remodelling existing works for new armaments, Battery for defence of Minefield at Stone Cutter,

.£20,000

11,000

20,000

25,000

7,000

4,000

4,000

20,000

5,000

£116,000

Mr. Secretary SMITH wishes it, however, to be understood that this estimate is only approximate. Until the designs are all completed, and their cost worked out in detail at the Station, it will be impossible to give an exact estimate. No time will, however, be lost in obtaining this estimate; and the designs will be prepared with the strictest attention to economy of construction, as far as it may be com- patible with efficiency. In the meantime it is hoped that the Colony will con- tinue to provide such funds as may be necessary for carrying on the works.

I have, &c.,

RALPH THOMPSON.

The Under Secretary of State,

Colonial Office.

127

No. 12.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING DIRECT TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION BETWEEN HONGKONG AND SINGAPORE.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering

the Government.

Colonel The Right Honourable Fred. Stanley, M.P., to the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong.

HONGKONG,

No. 5.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

13th January, 1886.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Sir G. Bowen's despatch No. 366, of the 23rd of September last, urging that the desirability of providing direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore should not be lost sight of by Her Majesty's Government.

2. My predecessor, in his despatch No. 115 of 1st May last, stated that the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury were not prepared to recommend Parliament to grant any subsidy for the purpose, and while, after careful consideration, I fully recognise the advantage, in a great degree political and commercial as well as military, of a direct cable to Hongkong, and am willing that the proposal should be further considered, I am not satisfied that the Imperial interests involved would justify the large annual outlay from Imperial funds necessary to provide even the half of the subsidy, amounting to twenty thousand pounds (£20,000), which the Eastern Extension Telegraph Company would require for laying and maintaining the proposed cable.

3. I am not aware whether more favourable terms can be secured from this or any other Telegraph Company, but before inviting the Departments of Her Majesty's Government to consider the scheme afresh, I desire to learn whether the Hongkong Government would be prepared to contribute a substantial portion, say one-fourth, or one-third of the required subsidy.

4. I am communicating with the Governor of the Straits Settlements, and also with the India Office, in order to ascertain whether the Straits Government and the Government of India would be prepared to contribute a proportion of the subsidy.

:

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

I have, &c.,

FRED. STANLEY.

129

No. 13.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE PROPOSED LOAN.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

Colonel The Right Honourable Fred. Stanley, M.P., to the Officer Administering the Government of Hongkong.

HONGKONG,

No. 21.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

2nd February, 1886.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Sir GEORGE BOWEN'S despatch No. 417, of the 7th November, enclosing certain resolutions of the Finance Com- mittee, which were adopted by the Council, to the effect that any loan which may be required by the local Government to carry on its extraordinary public works should be raised not in England but in the Colony.

2. You will have learnt from my telegram of this day's date that I am unable to consent to the course proposed, for, on purely financial grounds, on which alone the point must be decided, it is clear to me that it will be more advantageous to borrow in this country than in Hongkong. At the same time I much regret that I have not felt myself able to accept the views of the Council on the subject.

3. The first resolution of the Finance Committee is to the effect that the probable further depreciation of silver makes it dangerous and inexpedient to borrow in gold.

4. It is of course not improbable that the price of silver will fall still lower than it is at present, but it would hardly be wise, in order to avoid a possible loss in the future, to borrow on what appear to be very disadvantageous terms at the present time.

5. The Committee notice in their report that the effect of borrowing in silver in the Colony will be a loss on exchange in keeping the Crown Agents supplied with funds, but this would not be the only loss to the Colony, and, in order to arrive at a sound conclusion, the unquestionable advantages of borrowing in this country must also be allowed full weight.

6. The relative advantages of the two methods of borrowing can, it appears to me, be most conveniently compared by the use of actual figures rather than by attempting to lay down abstract principles.

7. Hongkong desires to borrow £200,000, and the Colonial Government proposes to do so by means of a local 5 per cent. issue, the annual charge for interest on which would be £10,000. I am informed that a Hongkong Loan of £200,000 could, under present conditions of the money market, be placed here as a 4

per cent. issue, at so inconsiderable a discount below par, as to be inappreciable in the comparison. For interest on this Loan the Colony would have to pay £8,000 a year, and assuming, for reasons to which I shall hereafter refer, that the Loan has a currency of 20 years, the annual remittance for sinking fund would be £7,000, making a total annual remittance of £15,000.

8. The effect of the anticipated depreciation of silver on a transaction of this nature, can only be estimated by giving to that depreciation some definite value.

The Officer Administering the Government of

HONGKONG.

130

I propose to assume that, at an early date, the exchange value of the Dollar will have fallen a further three pence; this is of course an arbitrary figure, and the depre- ciation may stop far short of this limit, but it is, in my opinion, sufficient to satisfy all prudent requirements.

9. Such a fall of three pence means a cost to the Colony, on the annual remittance of £15,000, of £1,065.

10. On the other hand, the local borrowing involves an annual charge of interest of £10,000, against £8,000, the interest charge on borrowing here, giving an excess on this account against the local borrowing of £2,000 a year.

11. It will be perceived, therefore, that even supposing the Dollar should depreciate immediately to the full extent which I have assumed, and should experience no recovery during the whole currency of the loan, the Colony will save £935 a year by borrowing in this country; and it is obvious that the annual saving would be greater in proportion as the conditions fall short of the unfavourable standard I have adopted.

12. The objection raised by the Legislative Council to borrowing in this country, so far as it is based on a possible depreciation of silver, appears to me to be untenable.

13. So far as the present low rate of exchange affects the question of remit- tances between the Colony and England, the only effect of borrowing here will be to relieve the Colony of that form of remittance which is disadvantageous to it, viz., the transfer of money to England to meet the Crown Agents' requirements, which pro tanto will become available for local expenditure in the Colony on account of the purposes of the Loan.

14. In their 2nd resolution, the Committee recommend the issue of 5 per cent. debentures from time to time from the local Treasury, "thus avoiding costs and commissions of every kind as well as the risk of loss on exchange," but my despatch of the 30th of June last pointed out that a loan could be raised in England at 41, possibly at 4 per cent. per annum interest, and that the commission on its issue would be per cent. with an additional cost for printing bonds and similar expenses, which would be incurred whether the loan were issued in London or Hongkong, and it therefore appears that, in order to avoid paying a commission of a per cent. together with possible loss on exchange hereafter, it is proposed that the Colony shall pay at least and possibly 1 per cent. per annum on the whole amount and during the whole currency of the loan.

15. As regards the 3rd resolution of the Committee, I do not understand how the stamp revenue of the Colony will be increased by the local issue of the loan; for, as the borrower in this country, and I conclude in Hongkong also, pays the stamp duty, the duty must be paid by Government, before it can be received as

revenue.

16. With reference to the redemption of debentures, the time within which they shall be redeemed must be governed by the amount which the Colony is prepared to pay, and the Draft Ordinance which was enclosed in Lord DERBY'S Despatch of the 6th of March last could, with very slight alteration, have been adapted to a higher sinking fund; but in the absence of special information on the subject as to the views of the Colonial Government, the usual course was followed of making the sinking fund 1 per cent. I observe that the Finance Committee con- sider that 38 years is too long a period, and that the legislature will be in favour of a larger contribution than I per cent, for a sinking fund; and it further considers that 10 years may be taken as a generation in Hongkong. I need hardly remark that annual contributions of 2 per cent., which the Legislative Council appears to contemplate, would not repay the loan in 10 years, neither would it do so in 20

years.

1

17. The point which the Legislative Council has to consider is, how much the Colony can safely pledge itself to provide annually for interest and sinking fund; but I much doubt whether it can prudently commit the Colonial Treasury to a heavier liability in this respect than £15,000 a year, which would repay the loan in 20 years, a period which on general grounds, and looking to the purposes to which the capital expenditure is to be devoted, does not appear to me to be other than reasonable.

:

131

18. I do not, however, propose that the Colony should be committed abso- lutely even to this currency of 20 years, because, by making the issue a 5/20 loan, the Colony would be able to pay off its whole debt any time after five years, by giving the necessary six months' notice of its intention to do so, or could postpone the repayment at its option for 20 years. I transmit a Draft Ordinance which I have caused to be prepared, authorizing such a loan, from which you will perceive that a 20 years' currency involves, as I have already stated, the annual charge for interest and sinking fund of £15,000. I may add that for 15 and 10 years' cur- rency respectively, the corresponding annual charges would be about £18,000 and £25,000.

pro-

19. The reason given by the Chief Justice for raising the loan locally, viz., the desirability of thereby giving trustees and executors the means of safe invest- ment, is one which would have weight, provided the object could be secured without additional cost to the revenue; but, in any case, the advantage would bably be lost after a short time, owing to the debentures being absorbed by the various public companies; and, even if they were not so absorbed, the early repayment of the loan, which was an essential condition of the scheme to which the Chief Justice referred, would make this form of investment of little use for the purpose in question.

20. For the reasons which I have stated, and which I trust, will have the concurrence of the Legislative Council, to whose consideration I request you to submit this despatch, I am of opinion that the interests of the Colony will be best consulted by raising the loan in this country, and if only small sums will be required from time to time, it will be possible for the Crown Agents to adopt the course specified in the concluding words of my Despatch of the 30th June, until the aggregate of the sums borrowed reaches an amount which can conveni- ently be provided by the actual sale of debentures.

I have, &c.,

FRED. STANLEY.

133

No. 14.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE POSTPONEMENT OF THE PROPOSED LOAN.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

Colonel The Right Honourable Fred. Stanley, M.P., to Governor Sir G. F. Bowen, G.C.M.G.

HONGKONG,

No. 5.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

30th June, 1885.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Despatch No. 187, of the 24th of April, enclosing, and favourably recommending, a memorandum by Mr. MARSH, in which it is suggested that the raising of the proposed Loan should be postponed, and temporary advances procured from the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank.

2. I am quite of opinion that money should not be borrowed, until it is abso- lutely necessary, but I find myself unable to accept Mr. MARSH's proposals for the following reasons:-

(a.) The system of temporary advances from the Bank, which Mr. MARSH recommends, has been adopted by the Crown Agents in the case of some of the Colonies on more than one occasion; but whereas the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank, would lend money at 6 per cent., the Crown Agents can at the present time obtain it at 2 per cent. provided only that an Ordinance has been passed, authorising the issue of Debentures.

I have not lost sight of the fact that Mr. MARSH wrote during a period of finan- cial panic, when rates were exceptionally high, and I have not failed to observe that the Directors of the Bank were prepared to make some reduction in their charge to meet falling rates, but, unless rates have fallen sufficiently to induce the Bank to take 2 instead of 6 per cent. for its advances, it would clearly be more advantageous to obtain temporary advances in London rather than in Hongkong.

(b.) The grounds on which Mr. MARSH advocates a system of temporary advances are, that the time is unfavourable for the issue of a Loan; but I am informed by the Crown Agents that the circumstances which, in April last (the date at which the Colonial Secretary drew up his memorandum), would have militated against the success of a Loan, now no longer exist; and that at the present moment a Loan could be raised at 4 per cent., possibly at 4 per cent.; nor is it to be expected that 12 months hence it will be possible to borrow on more reasonable terms than can now be obtained.

(e.) In paragraph 8 of the memorandum, Mr. MARSH states:-"I do not take into consideration the loss that the Colony would sustain by the sale of its Debentures considerably below par if arrangements were made for a Loan at an unfavourable moment, nor the loss on exchange on the remittances to pay the interest, nor the commission that would be payable and the other attendant expenses."

Governor, Sir G. F. BOWEN, G.C.M.G..

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

134

I have, however, to observe that a sale much below par has never been con- templated to provide against an unfavourable market. The Draft Ordinance autho- rises a rate of interest not exceeding 5 per cent. and, as in all other cases, the Crown Agents would use their discretion as to the moment of issuing the Loan.

Attention is rightly drawn to the loss on exchange on remittances to pay interest, but on the other hand the advantage of the reverse operation has been lost sight of; in the event of money being borrowed in this country, the Colonial Treasurer would draw on the Crown Agents, and in that case the low rate of ex- change would increase the number of Dollars at his disposal; nor should it be forgotten that the remittances for payment of interest would be insignificant in amount, as compared with the drafts against the capital.

With regard to commission and other attendant expenses, the rate of com- mission is laid down in the Secretary of State's Circular Despatch of the 30th of December, 1863, at per cent.; and in Loans hitherto issued by the Crown Agents the attendant expenses viz:-printing, advertising, stamps, etc., have not hitherto amounted to another per cent.; so that the total charge for commission and atten- dant expenses would hardly amount to 1 per cent. a rate which cannot be compared with the ordinary charges made by bankers on this account.

3. For these reasons, while fully appreciating Mr. MARSH's desire to postpone the necessity of having recourse to a Loan, I consider that it will be most advan- tageous to the Colony,-

(1) that a Loan Ordinance should be passed at once, debentures not being

issued under it, until it becomes necessary to provide for carrying on these works, the prosecution of which cannot be delayed; and (2) that if it is thought advisable to procure temporary advances, they should be obtained by the Crown Agents in the ordinary way, by hypothecation of debentures in anticipation of the Loan authorized by the Ordinance.

I have, &c.,

FRED. STANLEY.

:

135

No. 15.

HONGKONG.

DESPATCH RESPECTING THE NEW HEAVY GUNS FOR DEFENSIVE PURPOSES.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering

the Government.

HONGKONG,

No. 16.

SIR,

DOWNING STREET,

23rd January, 1886.

I am directed by the Secretary of State to transmit to you, for your informa- tion, in answer to Sir G. BowEN'S Despatch No. 415, of the 2nd of November, the document specified in the annexed Schedule.

The Officer Administering the Government of

DATE.

HONGKONG.

I have, &c.,

ROBERT G. W. HERBERT.

DESCRIPTION OF DOCUMENT.

20th January, 1886.

Copy of Letter from the War Office as to the date at which the heavy Guns

will be delivered.

Copy. HONGKONG, 5/2302.

SIR.

The War Office to the Colonial Office.

WAR OFFICE,

20th January, 1886.

I am directed by the Secretary of State for War to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 5th instant, forwarding copy of a despatch from the Governor of Hongkong regarding the progress of the new Defence Works of that Colony, and making inquiry as to the probable date of delivery of the new heavy guns.

In reply I am to acquaint you, for the information of Colonel STANLEY, that Mr. Secretary SMITH hopes that the greater part of the armament will be consigned to Hongkong during the current year.

The mountings of the Breech-loading Guns are of new pattern, and require to be specially tested, and this, of course, to some extent retards supply.

I am,

&c.,

The Under-Secretary of State,

Colonial Office, S.W.

GUY C. DAWNAY.

}

1:37.

No. 16.

HONGKONG.

CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING QUARANTINE REGULATIONS.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

(1.)

Chairman, Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce, to Acting Colonial Secretary»

SIR,

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, HONGKONG, 25th January, 1886.

Adverting to your letter of the 28th ultimo informing this Chamber that Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies was not prepared to overrule the decision of the Colonial Government to retain, for the present, the modified system of quarantine embodied in the existing regulations, I am desired by the Committee to urge upon His Excellency the Administrator the reconsideration of this important question by the Colonial Government.

Whatever opinions may have been held in former times when less was known of the nature and causes of the disease than now, as to the supposed power of quarantine to act as an effectual barrier against the intrusion of cholera, increased experience and deeper research into the origin, spread, and propagation of the disease has brought about a consensus of opinion amongst medical and scientific men of the highest eminence, who have made it the subject of their most careful study, that the system of quarantine is distinctly dangerous and injurious.

This is clearly pointed out by the Committee recently convened by the Secre- tary of State for India for the purpose of considering a report by Drs. E. KLEIN and HENEAGE GIBBES entitled "An Inquiry into the Etiology of Asiatic Cholera," which concludes its report with the following observations :-

"Although the precise cause of cholera has not been ascertained, sufficient is known of the general character of the disease to serve as a trustworthy basis for practical action; and the Committee feel that they ought not to separate without expressing their conviction that sanitary measures in their true sense and sanitary measures alone, are the only trustworthy means to prevent outbreaks of the disease and to restrain its spread and mitigate its severity when it is prevalent."

(C

Experience in Europe and in the East has shown that sanitary cordons and quarantine restrictions (under whatsoever form) are not only useless as means for arresting the progress of cholera but positively injurious; and this not merely because of the many unavoidable hardships which their enforcement involves, but also because they tend to create alarm during periods of epidemics of the disease, and to divert public attention at other times from the necessity which constantly exists for the prosecution of sanitary matters of assured value-measures which, moreover, tend to mitigate the incidence of all forms of disease."

After such an expression of authoritative opinion, it is difficult to conceive what argument can be adduced in favour of the retention of the system of quarantine.

The objections of the Colonial Government to the abolition of the present system, as the Committee understand them from previous correspondence, and from the letter of the Secretary of State, arise from the alleged insanitary condition of Hongkong and other local circumstances, which, the Committee observe, are not particularised, and, also, from the difficulty that would be experienced by the Executive in exercising an effective inspection of vessels and tenements in the Colony.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

138

The allusion to an insanitary state of tenements, in the opinion of the Com- mittee, presents the danger of cholera from within, not from external sources, which quarantine is supposed to guard against; while the inability of the Executive to carry out an effective inspection of all vessels, native or foreign, renders the present system not only futile but dangerous, inasmuch as it engenders a sense of security which does not exist, an ineffectual quarantine being, as is well recognised, worse than useless.

In the above objections no argument is to be found in support of, or proving the necessity for, or desirability of quarantine, nor can they detract from the weight of the fact, now generally recognised, that quarantine is powerless to prevent the invasion of cholera.

That this must especially be the case in Hongkong, owing to the natural situation and surroundings of the Colony, has already been pointed out by the Committee.

The only safeguard for this Colony consists of effective sanitary measures, among which is to be included the completion of the necessary buildings for the reception of patients arriving in the waters of this Colony infected with cholera, in the absence of which the alternative regulations, intended to take the place of those at present in force, must necessarily be delayed.

The Committee would also call special attention to the reference made by the Secretary of State to the insanitary condition of Hongkong, a statement in which the Committee do not concur; but if from official information communicated to him the Secretary of State has just cause to refer to the Colony in such manner, the Committee cannot urge too strongly, apart from considerations bearing upon quarantine, the necessity for the immediate adoption by the Colonial Government of such measures as may lead to the speedy removal of the stigma from the Colony. How vexatious and oppressive a burden to shipping interests the present system of quarantine has been in the past, and. will continue to be so long as the present restrictions are maintained, has been forcibly represented by this Chamber in previous correspondence.

Quarantine is but a superfluous and ineffectual measure, a burden of no practical utility. Having regard to the serious inconvenience and loss entailed upon shipping by the present system, and to the fact that no argument in its favour has yet been advanced, but that, on the contrary, the whole weight of eminent scientific opinion is adverse to it, the Committee earnestly trust that the Colonial Government may yet give this question their reconsideration, and adopt such alternative regulations as were recommended by this Chamber in April, 1885.— I have, &c.,

(2.)

W. KESWICK, Chairman.

Acting Colonial Secretary, to Chairman, Hongkong General Chamber of Commerce.

No. 331.

Sir,

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 4th March, 1886.

I am directed by His Excellecy the Officer Administering the Government to inform you that your letter of 25th January last, asking the Colonial Government to modify the present quarantine regulations, has been very carefully considered by the Sanitary Board, by the Naval and Military Authorities, who are equally in- terested with the Colonial Govenment in averting the introduction of epidemic disease, and finally by the Executive Council at a meeting at which Commodore MORANT, R.N., was invited to assist, in order that he might, as Senior Naval Officer, be able to express his views, as well as the Major-General Commanding the Troops, on this important subject.

2. The unanimous decision which has been arrived at is that, whilst it is necessary to maintain the provisions subjecting vessels arriving from ports or places proclaimed as infected to strict inspection by the Health Officer before they are admitted to pratique, the period of quarantine or observation may, as regards cho- lera, be reduced from five days to three. The regulations have been amended accordingly, and I enclose a copy for your information. (Govt. Not. No. 77 of 1886.)

3. The building at Stone Cutters' Island for the reception of persons affected with contagious or infectious diseases will be completed as soon as possible.

139

4. The Government has, whilst deliberating on the question raised in your letter, had under its consideration the report of a discussion on the subject before the British Medical Association at its last annual meeting, also the correspondence laid before Parliament respecting the International Sanitary Conference held at Rome last year. These documents do not bear out your assertion that there is a consensus of opinion amongst medical men of the highest eminence that the system of quarantine is distinctly dangerous and injurious.

5. In a very able paper read before the British Medical Association by Sur- geon Major PRINGLE, who has for a long series of years studied cholera in India, he speaks, it is true, of sanitary cordons as useless in practice. But his opinion as to quarantine is as follows:-

"Quarantine, however, with reference to sea-ports is quite a different preven- tive measure, and it would be as unreasonable, if nothing more serious, to admit a ship into harbour with cases of true cholera on board, and then to permit passen- gers and crew to land and disperse, as it would be to detain the ship in an open roadstead for a period of time out of all proportion to that which may be called the period of choleraic incubation."

6. Dr. PRINGLE goes on to say-"In the preventive measures therefore which I would recommend in the case of a seaport like that connected with the town of Cardiff, first I would urge the great importance of independent medical inspection of all ships arriving from what I may term "cholerized ports"; secondly, that cases of cholera should (if able to be moved) be placed in a hospital ship, and suspicious cases should be kept under observation. As regards the remainder of the passengers and crew, if cases of cholera were present in the ship on her arrival off the port, then the passengers and crew not under treatment or observation should be taken to a quarantine ship, and if no cases of cholera appeared amongst them within forty-eight hours they should be permitted to land or disperse."

7. One of the speakers at the meeting of the British Medical Association referring to the paper by Dr. PRINGLE, which had just been read, said "he thought power ought to be given to detain the passengers and crew for forty-eight hours or three days to guard against the possibility of danger."

8. At the conference held recently at Rome a proposition imposing the deten- tion of passengers and crew for a definite period of five days, quite irrespective of their being either affected with or even suspected of suffering from cholera, was, although opposed by the British Delegates, carried by a majority of one vote; but with a subsequent qualification to the effect that if it were medically certified that there had been no case of cholera on board for ten days the period of observation should be limited to twenty-four hours.

9. The British delegation, however, voted in favour of the following proposi- tion which, apart from three absentions, was unanimously agreed to:--

"Steamships intended for the transport of passengers coming from countries where cholera prevails are required to carry on board a medical man nominated either by the Government to whom the vessel belongs or by the sanitary authority completely independent of the Navigation Companies, and of the ship owners." None of the vessels coming here with Chinese passengers carry a medical man nominated by the Government.

22

10. I am also to add that the reference to the insanitary condition of Hong- kong, made by the Secretary of State for the Colonies, to which you have referred in your communication under acknowledgment, and in which you state you do not concur, is based upon the report made by Mr. CHADWICK in 1881, of which a copy has been supplied to the Chamber. The remedies indicated by him have been taken in hand by Government since 1882, but they are so extensive and costly, that it will require some years to carry them out thoroughly.

I have, &c.,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

The Honourable W. KESWICK, Chairman,

HONGKONG GENERAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,

So.

&c.,

&c.

S

141

No. 17.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY, FOR 1885,

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY, 4th February, 1886.

SIR,--For the information of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for 1885.

2. The first volume of observations and researches was published in July. In this publication there is seldom any reference made to the storms, that so frequently cross the north of China, passing from West to East. These storms are considered to lie outside the field of my researches, but I have endeavoured to thoroughly investigate the typhoons. The available observations were, however, very inaccurate, were not made according to a uniform system and their discussion was found to consume unduly great time, as no isobars could be drawn. In the course of the past year observations with in- struments verified here have been commenced at a greater part of the stations belonging to the Imperial Maritime Customs of China. The lighthouses outside of Shanghai were, in 1884, furnished with barometers, which had been compared in the Custom House. I expect to make use of these observations in the investigation of the typhoons of 1885.

3. As there exists in Japan an extensive meteorological service conducted on approved principles, it is unnecessary to investigate typhoons in their course across that empire. With reference to this part of their track, the results published in the weather-maps issued from the Imperial Meteorological Observatory, Tokio, are simply quoted. A similar service in the Philippine Archipelago is urgently required. As it is, the labour of following typhoons in their transit across these islands is thrown upon this Observatory, and the work has to be done on insufficient data. Through the courtesy of the Superintendent of the Eastern Extension, Australasia and China Telegraph Company I receive observations from Bolinao. At 10 a. and 4 p. daily, a telegram containing observations made at the Observatory of the Jesuit Fathers at Manila is also transmitted, and I receive occasionally registers kept on board ships and by private individuals on shore. I do not find any meteorological register in the newspapers published in Manila. In fact they do not usually publish any information useful for such investigations.-I was informed by Dr. BORIUS, that it was the intention of the French authorities to establish a meteorological observatory in Haiphong, but since the lamented death of this distinguished meteorologist, I have had no further news about this project.

The

4. It does not appear to have been originally intended to immediately start daily weather-reports and storm-warnings in connection with the Observatory, and no provision was made for such; but immediately on my arrival in the Colony I was instructed to take steps to organise the issue of daily weather-intelligence, for which however no provision was subsequently made in the estimates. department was thus saddled with a great deal of extraneous work, although the staff was arranged for simply carrying on scientific observations and calculations in the Observatory. The staff is suffi- cient to carry on the work as originally intended, but is of course insufficient for such a material extension. I understand, that the storm-warnings etc., have been of great advantage to the mercantile community, and hope therefore, that funds to enable me to continue them may be forthcoming from some source. If the public is to have the full benefit of the observations and researches, an additional clerk and a messenger must be appointed.

5. With reference to the Meteorological Signals I submitted, that my Notice of the 25th May, 1885, (substantially the same as the two first paragraphs of my Notice of the 11th August, 1884. Compare Obs. and Res. 1884, App. F.) should be published daily in the local newspapers during the typhoon season, so that the shipping community might be made aware of the meaning of those signals, and was informed, that it would appear weekly in the Government Gazette, which has been carried out.

6. The gun placed at Tsim-shat-súi for announcing the approach of a typhoon, was, during the year, also fired for announcing the arrival of the mails. On these occasions the sampans and other small craft sought positions of shelter. After the issue of the Post Office Notice I was informed, that this arrangement might be altered when any serious inconvenience was felt, and I would now venture to submit for His Excellency's consideration, whether it is advisable to have the gun fired for both purposes, and if not, what signal should cease.

142

7. The most important improvement effected during the past year consists in the introduction on the 10th June of the rotating (dry and damp bulb) thermometers for regularly registering temperature and humidity at the Observatory. The figures exhibited in the respective tables during the previous months of 1885 were as far as possible reduced to the same standard by aid of observations made in different screens.

8. By aid of this apparatus the true temperature and humidity of the air round the Observatory is determined and not the temperature in any particular screen, which depends to such a great extent upon the position and form chosen for the latter. A perusal of the forthcoming volume for 1885 will show the advantage of adopting this apparatus at observatories within the tropics, and as it is adapted for use in the arctic regions as well as elsewhere, we are now enabled to make accurate and strictly comparable observations of temperature and humidity over the surface of the entire globe.

9. The thermometers are rotated day and night at as many hours as possible, the intermediate hours being derived from the thermograms using the rotating thermometers as standards.-At the same time tridiurnal eye-observations of thermometers exposed in a Stevenson's screen are made, by aid of which the errors committed by adopting this screen will be determined. This investigation besides its general interest will have its local importance, as a great number of meteorological stations in China have, at my suggestion, been furnished with wooden screens of a nearly similar pattern.—-- My experience so far shews, that the results obtained with Stevenson's screen are reliable when the screen is freely exposed to the wind, that the accuracy generally increases together with the force of the wind, and that the results are more or less erroneous when the screen is at all sheltered by any object even at a great distance. It would be advisable to adopt the rotating thermometer in making astronomical observations for the determination of the constant of refraction.

10. On the 1st of April the use of Morgan and Kidd's argento-bromide paper was introduced and was found a great improvement.-The sunshine-cards were from the 10th September to the 21st December changed at 10 h. 30 m. a. instead of at 10 h. 30 m. p. as was the case before and after those dates. The observations of clouds and particularly of the upper clouds being of so great importance for the physic of the globe, have been extended and are now made every three hours.

11. The time-service, which began on the 1st January 1885, will form the subject of a separate report. The Lee Equatorial, which was transferred to this Observatory by the Astronomer Royal, was erected early in the year in a separate building, the cost of which was charged to Office Contin- gencies. Observations were made of Jupiter and his Satellites, Saturn and his Rings, and of a few Double Stars.

12. A new Observatory Standard Barometer was received in good order from Casella in London, and apparatus for investigating the temperature and induction-coefficients of magnets from Elliott Brothers, the latter being arranged so that either vertical or horizontal induction can be observed.

13. I attach some importance to the facility thus offered for re-determining the induction- coefficient, as it is known to sometimes change, and more especially in view of Chambers's comparison between two magnetometers, which gave different values for the force at Bombay Observatory. As the magnetometers give identical results when tested at Kew Observatory, the difference might be explained by changes in the induction-coefficients, which were not re-determined.

14. Notwithstanding the acknowledged superiority of Elliott's magnetometers, improvements could easily be introduced. The thermometers are not graduated on the stem, and it is so difficult to remove the one in the vibration box, that a reliable thermometer might with advantage be screwed into the roof of the box as was formerly done. The small telescope should be clamped on the stand and not left merely resting on the Y's, and much finer and stronger screws for adjusting the collima- tion could be cut in chilled bell metal.

15. As stated in the "instructions for making meteorological observations, &c.," meteorological instruments forwarded by observers, who regularly send their registers to the Observatory, are verified here free of cost. During the past year the following number of instruments has been verified and certificates issued:

Barometers: 16

Thermometers: 40

16. At the end of 1884 the Swedish man-of-war Vanadis visited Hongkong and a party of the scientific staff under the direction of Captain RUDOLF NISSEN spent some days in making magnetic. observations at the Observatory, which they chose as one of their principal observing stations, and their meteorological instruments were verified here.

17. Mr. HARDING, Assistant Engineer of the Imperial Maritime Customs of China, spent a week at the Observatory in April and received instruction in the erection of meteorological instruments and similar subjects.

18. A party of Officers under the command of Captain USBORNE MOORE made sextant observations of stars for time at the end of the year and compared with the standard clock. They also chose the anemometer-turret as the centre in their survey of the harbour.

143

19. Enquiries from officers belonging to the Civil Service, the Army and the Navy as well as from Masters of Merchant Vessels were answered at considerable inconvenience. If the Observatory were connected directly with the Telegraph Offices in Hongkong and a telegraph clerk appointed here, it would be easy to answer any enquiries concerning atmospheric disturbances, made by the public at large, who might be charged a small fee to cover cost of transmission, the same as in England.

20. My thanks are due to Mr. WHIPPLE, Superintendent of the Kew Observatory, for superin- tending the construction and comparison in London of instruments destined for this Observatory, which has thus had the benefit of his great experience. My thanks are also due to Commander RUMSEY R.N., Acting Harbour Master, for his energetic co-operation.

21. The hill on which the magnetic hut is placed was early last year planted with firs that will when they grow up, contribute to the healthiness of the locality. The southern side of this hill was smoothed and the grass stripped in 1883 by order of the Surveyor General, with the view of having it returfed, but so far this has not been effected.-The summer rains in 1884 shewed the building to be suffering from leakage. Several attempts to repair this were unsuccessful, but I am informed, that the roof will be thoroughly repaired before the coming wet season. My private quarters are very draughty in the winter during the height of the NE monsoon, which is so trying to the health. This cannot of course be helped, as the Observatory should be exposed to the full force of the wind. The growth of rice in the extensive paddy fields north of this was prohibited in 1884, but the ground has not been drained and was during the heavy rains last summer converted into an extensive swamp, to the malaria emanating from which the intermittent and remittent fevers, from which we all suffered, may be ascribed.

From the

22. Mr. FIGG, First Assistant, took charge of the apparatus in the time-ball tower. 1st January to the 22nd November, when a new electric lock arrived, the ball had to be dropped by hand, which he effected with no measureable loss of accuracy. Mr. FIGG attended during the year to the self-recording instruments and the tabulations except the thermograms. The latter were tabulated by Mr. MAHOMET ALARAKIA, who has also charge of the galvanic batteries, and during the latter part of the year changed the sheets on the instruments and took charge of the photographic laboratory. Mr. LAU-SHAU, Clerk, has charge of the correspondence, all business transactions and accounts, acts as telegraph clerk, writes out daily weather reports, collects meteorological observations and is respon- sible for the issue of information concerning typhoons and storm-warnings. I make myself all the astronomical observations and take charge of the horological apparatus.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

W. DOBERCK, Government Astronomer.

The Honourable THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

145

No. 18.

HONGKONG.

APPLICATION FOR AN ADDITIONAL CHINESE CLERK FOR THE OBSERVATORY.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering

the Government, on the 24th March, 1886.

H. K. O. (Urgent.)

No. 25.

SIR,

OBSERVATORY DEPARTMENT, 9th March, 1886.

Having been requested by you to explain, for the information of the Officer Administering the Government, why a second Chinese Clerk should be necessary in order to carry on this year the same amount of work, which you supposed had been done last year with the present staff, I have the honour to inform you that arrears of work have accumulated for want of such an official.

2. The Annual Weather Report, Five-Day Means and Time Service Reports for 1885, are not nearly completed. The tabulation of the meteorological observa- tions made since the 1st January is in arrear, The investigation of the Typhoons in 1885 has not yet been commenced, and the investigation of those in 1884 has not been finished. Nothing or next to nothing has been done towards a discussion of the meteorological observations, which were started at the suggestion of the Colonial Government by the Imperial Maritime Customs at the expense of the Chinese Government and forwarded to this Observatory. No tidal observations are made, and magnetic observations are made only once a month.

3. The Typhoons of 1885 were few in number and exceptionally unim- portant. Otherwise the meteorological service here would very likely have broken down in the midst of the Typhoon season. A portion of the work was stopped in September, when our healths failed owing partly to overwork.

4. If ordered by His Excellency to continue after the 1st April, the daily issue of the China Coast Meteorological Register, of storm-warnings and of inform- ation of value to the enormous shipping frequenting the Eastern Seas,-the arrears of work will necessary accumulate at an ever increasing rate.

5. The Colonial Government is responsible, that the Annual Weather Reports, Five-Day Means and Monthly Reports of the Hongkong Observatory, Investi- gations of Typhoons and other information that can be extracted from the obser- vations collected here are at my disposal before issuing storm-warnings and meteorological intelligence, which should be based on the entire and properly arranged collection of observations and researches up to or as nearly as possible up to date, and no branch of the British Government would issue such information officially except on the latest and best data available.

6. For these reasons I submit, that if His Excellency is not inclined to approve of any extension of the staff, the extension of the work ordered in 1883, the China Coast Register, Meteorological Signals, &c. should cease from the end of the present month.

7. If a second Chinese Clerk is immediately appointed, it will be possible to continue the issue of this information, and if messengers are appointed it will be possible to distribute the registers. No messengers have hitherto been permanently appointed.

8. In the event of the continuation of the daily weather reports, signals, &c. in question and the appointment of the Clerk having His Excellency's approval, I would venture to suggest, that with the view. of preventing any discontinuation or break down of any portion of the work, the Clerk should be appointed provisionally from the 1st April, and that the approval of the Secretary of State should be obtained subsequently.

I have, &c.,

W. DOBERCK,

Government Astronomer.

The Honourable THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETÁRŸ,

&c., &c.,

&c.

147

No. 19.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF VICTORIA GAOL, FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 31st March, 1886.

No. 38.

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

GAOL SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 27th January, 1886.

In forwarding the prescribed Annual Statistical Return of Victoria Gaol, I beg to submit at the same time, for the information of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, a few observations regarding the Gaol and its administration, which are but little adverted to in the Official Return.

2. I assumed charge of the Victoria Gaol in the beginning of May last. My personal experience therefore only extends to eight months of the past year; and, if I venture to offer opinions and make suggestions as to desirable changes and reforms, I do so with diffidence, conscious of my limited ex- perience of the criminal classes and Prison Administration in the Far East.

3. In directing the administration of the Gaol in this Colony, it will hardly be disputed that Government cannot do better than to be guided in its general principles by English Prison experience, and to endeavour to attain the results arrived at in England. These results have of late years been marvellous, and are briefly but graphically described in Sir E. DU CANE's account of Penal Servitude (London 1882.) A combination of deterrent and reformatory Prison discipline, matured by the ex- perience of many years, has, in England, resulted in a diminution of crime truly astonishing. During the five years ending in 1859, the yearly average of sentenced Prisoners, in England and Wales, was

Sentenced to Penal Servitude Sentenced to imprisonment

TOTAL,........

2,589 12,536

.15,125

out of a population of over 19 millions. This number was year by year reduced till in 1881 it amounted to

Sentenced to Penal Servitude Sentenced to imprisonment

...1,525 .9,266

TOTAL,............10,791

while the population had increased from 19 millions to nearly 26 millions.

4. Such splendid results can hardly be hoped for in this Colony; but Government can at least strive to approximate them. There are many causes operating in Hongkong which make both the deterrent and reformatory results of Prison discipline less efficacious than they are at home. Some are inherent in the situation and conditions of the Colony; but some are removeable. The wealth and prosperity of Hongkong induces a large influx of Chinese and other foreign population amongst whom must be expected a fair proportion of the criminal classes. These latter, probably accustomed to the severity of the Canton and other Eastern Prisons, must be agreably surprised, and can hardly be deterred by the humane and gentle treatment, which, as a civilized and Christian nation, we extend to our Prisoners.

5. In this Gaol, as far as my observation goes, Chinese Convicts are better fed, better clothed, and better lodged than free coolie labourers, and the labour exacted from them is less. The deterrent effects of imprisonment are therefore almost limited to loss of liberty and its accompanying pleasures—a loss far more acutely felt by Western races than those we have to deal with here. Reformatory elements are greatly wanting here. Scholastic and religious instruction there is none for the Chinese Prisoners (if we except a Voluntary Christian Service in the Chinese language on Sundays). Instruction in trades can, owing to limited accommodation, be extended to only a limited number, and the compulsory living in association is only likely to result in the moral corruption of many of the Prisoners.

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SUBORDINATE STAFF.

6. The Gaol staff, besides the Warden and Head Turnkeys, consist of 1st and 2nd class Turnkeys. (all Europeans) and 1st and 2nd class Assistant Turnkeys (Europeans, colored men and natives). None of these have had previous training in Prison discipline. They have all been trained in this Gaol. The European Officers are zealous, painstaking and conscientious. The maintenance of Prison discipline has altogether depended upon them, and, although it would be better to have a proportion of Officers trained to the careful discipline of an English Prison, the services of the European Staff deserve in my opinion the acknowledgment of Government.

7. I regret I cannot, with one or two notable exceptions, say the same for the colored and native staff. At one time friendly and familiar with Prisoners, at other times harsh and exacting, almost always wanting in judgment and discretion, they are in my opinion responsible for much Prison crime. Many of them also have proved to be dishonest in so far as they have trafficked with Prisoners in tobacco, opium, etc., and have been open to bribery in conveying communications between Prisoners and outside friends. In fact at the time I took over the Gaol, any prisoner, whose friends would provide the money, could procure tobacco, opium, letters or anything he wanted, through the instrumentality of colored Turnkeys. Of these Turnkeys during the year 6 were invalided, 5 resigned and 10 were dismissed; most of the latter for illicit dealings with Prisoners, one of them having been tried and convicted in the Magistrates' Court. The vacancies so caused were mostly replaced by soldiers, His Excellency, the Major General Commanding the Troops, having kindly permitted soldiers from the Garrison to join the Prison staff on probation. These men, if found suitable purchased their discharge and permanently joined the Prison staff. They proved most valuable. Their habits of discipline raised the tone of the subordinate staff. Instead of quarrelling and arguing with Prisoners, like so many of the colored staff, they gave their orders quietly and reported breaches of discipline without noise or altercation, and gradually improved the subordination and discipline of the convicts. The soldier Turnkeys moreover are absolutely free from the slightest suspicion of trafficking with Prisoners. Their presence in Gaol I consider a great gain to Government.

PRISON BUILDINGS.

8. The Official Return shows that this Gaol contains 150 cells or wards, of which 49 only are separate cells. Last

Last year there were only 46 separate cells, but 3 have been added during the year. The Prison is greatly overcrowded. During the year the Government sanctioned the removal of the Female prisoners to a house outside Victoria Gaol. This was carried into effect in October last, and placed at my disposal the late Female ward with 8 large cells and a separate yard, which relieved to some extent the overcrowding. Yet this is but a very small relief. Long experience at home has proved that, to make Prison punishments deterrent and reformatory, it is essential that Prisoners should be kept in separate confinement. The established principle is that Prisoners on conviction should for a fixed period be kept in separate confinement both day and night. This penal stage lasts in England for nine months. In the second stage convicts are employed at labor in association, but sleep and have their meals in a separate cell. It is quite impossible to carry out such a system in Victoria Gaol, with the very limited and unsuitable accommodation of the buildings, and I believe it has never been even approximately attempted, confinement in separate cells having in past times been chiefly used for punishment. I have however endeavoured, as far as the limited accommodation allowed, to follow the established principles, which I have carried out in the following manner. Prisoners sentenced to less than six months, I have, except in rare and special cases, entirely exempted from separate confinement, placing them at once in associated wards. Every Prisoner sentenced to six months or more I cause to undergo a limited period of separate confinement. Such Prisoners come in almost daily. Whenever the separate cells therefore are full, I examine the records of those occupying them, and transfer the best conducted amongst them to associated wards to make room for new comers. This has to be done about once a week. Since I have had the Female ward at my disposal I have used it as a sort of inter- mediate place of semi-separate confinement; four or five long sentence prisoners being confined in each cell there, and kept at work in separation from all other Prisoners, having their own separate yard for exercise. Long sentence Prisoners, on removal from separate cells, are now transferred to the late Female ward, but these on their turn must in a short time be removed to the ordinary associated wards to make room for others. By this system I am able to give every Prisoner, sentenced to six months or more, from two to three weeks separate confinement at the beginning of his sentence. A very poor result, but it is all that can be done, unless separate confinement were entirely reserved for convicts sentenced to Penal Servitude.

:

9. The limited space of the Gaol tells equally hardly on industrial labor. Mat making, chair and basket making, carpentering, and even most of the oakum picking have to be carried out in narrow and limited verandahs. There is only space for a single loom of coir mat-making aud a single loom of grass mat-making; tailoring is carried out in a dark hall, shoe making is carried out in an ordinary cell. In fact there is no suitable work shop in the Gaol, nor space for one, except for the single in- dustry of washing clothes. Were the Prison provided with suitable workshops, it would be easy to discharge every long sentence Prisoner a trained and skilled workman at a remunerative trade; and

149

there would be every hope that a large precentage of convicts would by these means be reclaimed from a life of crime. As it is, we can barely employ at and train to trades about one hundred Prisoners.

10. In short the Victoria Gaol is unsuited to the demands of modern civilization, or even huma- nity; for it seems hardly humane to fail in adopting those measures which experience has shown to operate as deterrents to criminals and as encouragements to reform of life; it seems hardly humane to continue a Prison system in which the enforced association of criminals is well known as tending to make the better class bad and the bad worse.

PRISONERS AND THEIR DISCIPLINE.

11. After a short experience of eight months in charge of this Gaol, I venture to hazard an opinion that the Chinese convicts under my charge are as amenable to discipline, and disposed to be as well conducted, as those of any race I am acquanted ith. This view, I must admit is in appearance not supported by the statistics given in the Annual Return. It will be observed that in the year 1884, with a daily average number of 552 Prisoners, 4,784 Prison offences were reported. In 1885 with an average of 530 Prisoners 6,473 Prison offences were reported; giving an average of 12 Prison offences a year for each Prisoner; nor was the great bulk of these offences committed by a small number of habitual offenders, as is the case in England, where only about half the number of Prisoners are annually punished for Prison offences. On the last day of the year it was found that there were only 78 Pri- soners in Gaol who had been free of punishment for three months. If we compare this with the statistics of English Prisons, where in 1880-81 with an average number of 10,297 Prisoners, only 5,861 Prisoners were punished, committing 18,003 offences or less than two per annum per Prisoner confined, we can hardly fail to draw the conclusion that the convicts of Hongkong are à peculiarly turbulent and insubordinate class. But this conclusion would be erroneous.

The large number of Prison offences in Victoria Gaol appear to be due to special conditions, the chief of which are:-

1. The enforced association and crowding together of the Prisoners at night, for want of

separate sleeping cells for each Prisoner.

2. The enforced crowding together of Prisoners by day, when at work and at meals, for want

of space in the workshops and yards.

3. The want of training and general inefficiency of a number of the Turnkeys, whose_igno- rance, misconduct and want of judgment have been the cause of much avoidable Prison crime.

""

12. An explanation will naturally be expected of the large increase of Prison offences in 1885 as compared with 1884 from 4,784 to 6,473 or over 30 per cent. The number of Prison offences reported during the past year have actually decreased all round with the exception of two kinds, viz. "talking, and "task of oakum short picked." The explanation of the increase in these two offences is as follows. On taking charge of the Prison I found that the Regulation requiring silence to be maintained was not strictly enforced, only very noisy talkers at work being reported. In fact after the Prisoners were locked up for the night, the buz of conversation from the associated wards was perfectly audible in the neighbouring streets. I enforced the Regulation, detailing for some time extra Turnkeys on night duty to enforce silence. This raised the number of reports for "talking" from 519 in 1884 to 2,132 in 1885, a number which more than accounts for the total increase of reports in the year. I append a tabulated statement (A) showing the monthly offences under this head during the last two years. It is curious to note that silence appears more difficult to the Prisoners in the summer months. During 1885 there were reported 945 offences for short oakum picked and petty oakum thefts; the Prisoners, crowded together in the working yard, frequently stealing each others picked oakum. No offences were recorded under this head in 1884. The practice had been for the officer charged with weighing the oakum to report deficiencies on a separate paper and these offences and their punishments were not recorded in the offence book. As these papers were not preserved, I am unable to make comparisons with the previous year. The practice appeared to me to be irregular. I directed all these offences to be entered in the offence book, thus increasing the offences by 945. The offences under these two heads account for nearly half the Prison offences of the year 1885 and for more than double the increase over previous year.

13. The remaining Prison offences consist of assaults and acts of insubordination, idleness and refusing to work, having tobacco or opium, quarrelling and fighting, stealing food, disorderly conduct and other miscellaneous offences. In all these there has, as compared with the previous year, been a diminution in 1885. The number however is a very large as compared with English Prisons, owing chiefly to the great opportunities and temptations of imprisonment in association.

14. During the year 11 cases of insubordination towards and assaults on officers of the Gaol, were tried by the Superintendent and a visiting Justice. Of these cases 8 offenders were awarded corporal punishinent, and 3 solitary confinement.

150

15. The cases of Prisoners assaulting and fighting with each other were much more numerous. In 1884, 270 such offences were reported, in 1885, 204 were reported. Finding these offences very numerous, I caused it to be signified to the Prisoners that aggravated assaults on each other would be tried. 13 such cases were accordingly brought to trial before the Superintendent and a visiting Justice. In 9 cases corporal punishment was inflicted; in 3 cases solitary imprisonment; one case broke down for want of evidence. The result was satisfactory in diminishing this class of offence. I append a table (B) showing the number of these offences during each month for the last two years. It will be observed that the monthly average during the first nine months of 1885 was 21 offences, which was reduced in the last quarter to a monthly average of 11.

16. The most serious offence during the year was an assault made on the Superintendent on the 27th June, with a bludgeon by a Prisoner under sentence of 18 months' imprisonment. He was tried and received corporal punishment. A careful and lengthened enquiry into the causes of this assault elicited the fact that it was the result of a conspiracy, in which upwards of 50 of the worst convicts in Gaol (nearly all Members of the Triad Society) were concerned. A considerable sum of money had been collected or promised to reward the man who committed the assault. The cause was stated to be the general discontent of the Prisoners at the somewhat increased severity with which the Prison regu- lations were enforced by the new Superintendent. A special grievance being his enforcing the pre- scribed punishment diet of 1 lb. of rice a day; the practice having previously been to allow Prisoners sentenced to punishment diet to receive the "Penal diet" of 1 lb. 8 oz. of rice, a punishment but little felt; 1 lb. 8 oz. of rice when boiled giving a Prisoner somewhat over 3 lbs. of food.

17. The great risk of possible conspiracies is very obvious in a Prison like this, where most of the Prisoners live in association, and where silence has been very imperfectly enforced even at work, under. the immediate eye of the Turnkeys. It was necessary therefore to be well informed of everything going on in the Gaol. After some trouble and through the valuable assistance of Mr. MACHADO, the late Gaol clerk, an able and intelligent official, thoroughly conversant with the Chinese language, several informers were found to give information of what was going on among the Prisoners. Slight remissions of sentences were granted by Government at my recommendation for such services. The advantage of this arrrangement became speedily apparent. A plot was revealed for the escape of a number of convicts, chiefly Pirates, from the Chain-gang. These men had procured (by means never ascertained) a duplicate of the key which opened the padlocks of their chains. A letter was intercepted (and sent to the Police) asking friends outside to have a junk in readiness for them at a named spot; the key was carefully concealed, and the convicts were only waiting for a wet day, when, huddled up in a shed for shelter, they could pass the key along and loosen their chains unobserved by the Warders. After a careful search the key was found sown into one of the Chain-gang men's hats and the persons intending to escape were removed from the Chain-gang. For this service the Prisoner who gave the information was allowed by Government a remission of 18 months of his sentence.

18. The offence of having Tobacco or Opium in Prison has been a very common one. In 1884 there were 719 cases reported, in 1885 there were 709 cases reported. This, in its effects is a very serious matter. With the moderate work and liberal diet of this Gaol, as compared to that of ordinary coolies, and with the comfort of living in association, it only requires easy opportunities for indulgence in narcotics, to render the Gaol quite a pleasant place of residence for criminals. The deprivation of narcotics acts as a deterrent to this class and should be strictly enforced. There have been many difficulties to contend with in Victoria Gaol on this score. The corruption of colored Gaol officials, who dealt with Prisoners in tobacco, has been referred to. Prisoners were allowed to act as cooks and servants to Turnkeys residing in the Gaol and these, coming more or less in contact with the outside public had many opportunities of smuggling in tobacco &c. The Prison walls in parts are low, and when convicts were crowded at work in the yards, tobacco was frequently thrown over the walls from the adjoining Street and falling among the Prisoners was secreted by them before it could be observed by the Turnkeys in charge, even if the latter did not wilfully turn their eyes away. It was introduced in provision baskets and in dry earth baskets. In fact every ingenuity is exercised by Prisoners and their friends outside to have this coveted article secretly introduced into the Gaol. The following steps have been adopted. Every officer proved to have been engaged in traffic with Prisoners has been dismissed; several persons found attempting to pass tobacco into Gaol have been prosecuted. Nets have been suspended over parts where tobacco had been thrown over the walls. The employment of Prisoners as cooks and servants to Turnkeys has been stopped by Government, and constant and vigilant inspec- tions and searches are continually made all over the Gaol premises. These measures have met with some success. It will be seen from the Return of these offences (C) annexed hereto, that in the first six months of the year 534 cases of having tobacco were reported; an average of 88 per month. In the last six months 175 cases were reported; an average of 29 per month; or, if we take the last 4 months, 76 cases or an average of 19 cases per month. A progressively satisfactory result, which will appear still more so when it is added that in the earlier part of the year and summer, the tobacco found in possession of Prisoners often consisted of large sticks or plugs, and the opium of neat and well filled boxes, while during the last 3 or 4 months the quantities found were infinitesimal.

19. Prison discipline, during the year, has therefore been so far satisfactory, that, with the excep- tion of the offences of talking and short oakum picking, there has been a gradual but steady diminution

151

of reported Prison offences; and, of the numbers reported; it seems probable that at least three fourths are owing to the living in association, necessitated by the limited Prison accommodation.

20. In concluding my observations on Gaol discipline, I desire to call attention to the large number of Prisoners who are old offenders. I annex a return (D) showing the number of convictions recorded against Prisoners in Gaol on 31st December 1885. It will be seen that out of a total of 573 Prisoners 198 or 35 per cent. have been previously convicted. This is probably to some extent attri- butable to light sentences passed on habitual criminals. Many of these return to Gaol, over and over again, a few weeks after discharge. It seems likely that if such criminals were sent to penal servitude for their second offence, such punishment would probably act as a deterrent (which short sentences do not), it would cost the Colony no more, and would save the community from many thefts and much vexation.

21. That short sentences passed in associated wards are not very deterrent, I have fair evidence. There are generally in Gaol from 20 to 30 Prisoners of the criminal class, confined for short periods for want of finding security (generally only a few dollars) for good behaviour. These persons are placed in associated wards, comfortably lodged and fed, and have no work to do. As a rule they declare themselves unable to find the required security, and remain in Gaol the appointed time. But, having some idea that many of these "Security Prisoners" could find security if they wished, indeed knowing that some of them had more money in their possession than the amount of security demanded, I tried the experiment of sending several of them to separate cells, the result being that very few stood more than 3 or 4 days of separate confinement but found the security required and left the Gaol. Had these men been allowed to remain together in an associated ward, it seems probable they would have pre- ferred a rest of a few months in Gaol at the cost of the Colony.

LABOR ON PUBLIC WORKS AND INDUSTRIAL LABOR.

22. A Chain-gang of Prisoners has been working during the year, under the orders of the Surveyor General on Public Works, and has generally consisted of about 90 men; though this number has lately been much reduced. The work of this Gang has not given satisfaction. The officers in charge of the Gangs receive an extra allowance for this duty. The Prisoners on Chain-gang receive extra allowances of rice, shinned beef for congee and tea, besides being credited. and on discharge paid one cent a day as earnings. The cost of these extras is charged to the Surveyor General's Department. The Surveyor General considers the work done by these Prisoners to be barely, if at all, worth the extra cost to his Department. I consider the extra food given to the Chain-gang to be excessive, but as this subject is now being considered by a special Committee ordered by Government, it appears unnecessary to enter into any details. I have every confidence that in re-organising Chain-gang labor, means will be found to carry out Public Works by Prison labor, in a manner more satisfactory to the Surveyor General and myself and more conducive to the interest of the Public than has hitherto been the case. But I should neglect my duty if I failed to bring to the notice of Government that in my opinion the Prison Authorities have in past times abused the powers given them of levying costs from the Surveyor General's Department. It bears the appearance as if it was wished to coax or bribe the Prisoners to go on Public Works without grumbling; for not only was an amount of extra food passed to them, which in the opinion of the present Medical Officer of the Prison is much in excess of the requirements of nature, but this extra food has from the beginning been given to them, not only on wet days, when they did not go out to work, but also on Sundays, in direct contradiction to the orders of Government (see Note to Diet Scale.) The cent per diem sanctioned as earnings, was also passed to these Prisoners on wet days and on Sundays. I did not interfere with the diet, as I had referred that question to Government, but I at once stopped crediting Prisoners with earnings paid by the Surveyor General, for days on which they did not work for his Department.

23. The other industrial work carried out in the Gaol during the year has been more satisfactory. I annex an Abstract (E) showing the actual profits or savings to Government in nine different indus- tries carried out in the Gaol, showing altogether a profit of $1,990. 74 cents during the year. Such abstracts have now been prepared for the first time; they do not quite accurately show the transactions of the year because,-no industrial stock having been taken at the end of 1884.-I am dependent, for the account of stock on hand on 1st January 1885, on the statements of officers, who could only refer to their private note books, or to their memory. But in most cases, such as that of oakum, no person in the Gaol could tell me what stock of oakum or junk if any, was on hand on 1st January 1885. Some of the profits shown in 1885 may therefore be partly due to 1884. The practice in past years was somewhat unbusinesslike. All the money realised by sale of Prison labor was shewn as Prison earnings, while the cost of materials etc. remained concealed in the obscurity of incidental expenses. In future these accounts will be better kept.

24. The chief advantage of industrial labour is that an opportunity is afforded of instructing criminals in trades; the profits realised are incidental and of secondary importance. Reforming cri- minals to habits of industry is the main object. Industrial labour in Victoria Gaol would be capable of great expansion, were space for suitable workshops available. Each convict might be taught a trade before discharge and the profits might be increased so as greatly to reduce the cost of the Prison.

152

25. A very few remarks will suffice as to the Prison industries of the past year.

Oakum picking, hitherto not very remunerative, has paid well this year, as, instead of, as previously paying $70 a ton for the raw material or paper stuff, it has since June last been procured for $45, while oakum has been sold for the same price as before.

Rattan chair and basket making is a new industry, started in October last. The work is easily taught, convicts take much interest in it, and are anxious to be taught. It seems likely to be remu- nerative, and could be greatly extended were space available.

Coir Yarn. An old industry and a remunerative one, can only be worked with one loom for want of space.

Net making, for the same reason cannot be extended.

Grass mat-making, shoe-making, carpentering and tailoring are almost entirely confined to work for Gaol purposes, making up Gaol clothing, shoes and bed mats, and executing repairs etc. Printing is done for most of the Public offices. No expense is connected with it; the offices sending the stationery used for their printing.

Labor on Public works has not been put down as remunerative for reasons already explained. $360 were paid by the Civil Hospital and Asylum during the year for washing done in the Gaol. This has now been discontinued; the Hospital washing being done elsewhere. As far as can be ascer- tained, no profit has been realizedby this industry, the cost of fuel, soap, etc., having, it is believed, eaten up the money received, but no accurate account appears ever to have been kept. The Prison washing was mixed up with that for Hospital and Asylum. No permanent record was kept of the number of Prison clothes washed. The washing for Prison officers was likewise mixed up with the other washing, and, to add to all, the fuel used for kitchen and washhouse was not accounted for separately. The officer in charge of the washhouse on my arrival could barely read and write, and kept his notes in pencil hieroglyphics. I had therefore to give up as hopeless the attempt to make out an account of the washing industry for the past year.

A proper account is now kept.

GENERAL OBSERVATIONS.

26. Having now reported on those points of Prison discipline and administration which appear

of more prominent interest, all the further observations or suggestions I would desire to offer centre round the one theme, the urgent necessity of no longer delaying the building of a new Gaol, on the recognised principle of separate sleeping accommodation for every prisoner and ample space for work- shops and industrial labour. No deterrent or reformatory efforts can meet with appreciable success, the absence of these necessary conditions. But, these conditions once granted, there would be every prospect of diminishing crime in, and consequent expense to, the Colony.

in

27. I have visited the neighbouring Prisons of Canton and Macao. In the former the Prisoners are treated with a harshness and severity which we could not imitate, but which proves deterrent. In Macao I found the Prison far less overcrowded than this Gaol. A portion of the convicts there were employed on Public works but received no extra rations. The diet and clothing etc., supplied to Prisoners there, appeared less liberal than in Victoria Gaol, though I think more in correspondence with the ordinary living of Chinese coolies. But we cannot, as a civilized and Christian people, treat · our convicts otherwise than with humane attention to their health and comfort in food and clothing But at the same time it seems due to the community and to the Prisoners themselves that, bound as we feel ourselves to treat convicts with a consideration and humanity which to the natives of these parts appears luxurious ease, we whould also adopt those means which the experience of England has shewn to suffice, for taming and reforming the worst of our own criminal population; and imprison- ment on the separate system is the first and mightiest of these agencies.

etc.

28. I have recently had an opportunity of visiting the Prison at Singapore, and could not fail to observe how far Singapore is in advance of Hongkong in its treatment of criminals. In that Prison there is separate accommodation for 800 criminals (in Hongkong 49.) The greater part of the Gaol staff consists of warders trained in English Prisons, and liberally paid. The results, I understand, have equalled the expectations of that Government in building their new Prison. From the Singapore Prison report of 1884 it appears that for the last three years there has been a steady decrease in the number of convictions for graver offences, and it is specially noted that during the year "four men only have been reconvicted, who had ever undergone a sentence of three years and upwards.'

""

29. In the event of the building of a new Gaol being further delayed, I would request Govern- ment to take into consideration the advisability of reserving the Victoria Gaol for convicts and long sentence Prisoners only, removing the short sentence Prisoners to some other building. The Victoria Gaol could be made to accommodate the former class in separation at no very great expense for altera- tions.

30 It would also, I think, tend to the repression of crime in Hongkong, if Prisoners who have earned a remission of sentence were, as in England, placed by legislative enactment under the Super- vision of the Police, so that, if found returning to a criminal career, they might at once be sent back by the Magistrates to Prison, to complete their original sentence.

A. GORDON. Superintendent, Victoria Gaol,

January,

February, March..

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

(A.)

VICTORIA GAOL.

Return of Reports for talking, &c., in the years 1884 and 1885.

MONTH.

Total,..

(B.)

1884.

1885.

14

55

17

25

32

44

24

23

31

252

70

362

777

289

72

344

50

254

64

174

35

148

43

162

519

153

2,132

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other, for the years 1884 and 1885.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October, November, December,

MONTH.

Total,.......

(C.)

1884.

1885.

22

2922

28

16

18

23

18

26

29

29

6

24

22

19

27

24

13

30

12

14

13

21

8

22

10

270

204

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

Return of Offences reported of Prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1884 and 1885.

MONTH.

1884.

1885.

***KON:88418

65

74

76

78

47

82

52

133

66

106

60

61

72

52

69

47

82

17

50

23

15

39

21

719

709

Total,..

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

154

(D.)

Return of Prisoners confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December, 1885, from 1st to 12th Convictions.

1st Conviction,

2nd

25

3rd

"

4th

J

5th

6th

"J

7th

8th

27

9th

""

10th

"

11th 12th

375

41

29

30

28

23

20

16.

4.

2

4

Total,..

573

A. GORDON,

(E.)

Superintendent.

ABSTRACT OF ACCOUNT oF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR, VICTORIA GAOL, FOR THE YEAR 1885.

Dr.

OAKUM.

Cr.

1885.

Stock on hand, 1st January, 1885,

not known,...

1885.

Cost of Paper Stuff purchased during

the year,..

$1,630.47

By Oakum sold during the year,

Stock on hand, 31st Dec., 1885,—

Paper Stuff,.. Oakum,

$2,686.91

11.05

Profit during the year,

Total,.......... .$

1,067.49

2,697.96

Total,...........$

2,697.96

RATTAN WORK.

1885.

Stock on hand, 1st January, 1885, Material purchased during the year,

Profit,.....

1885.

By Chairs, &c., sold during the year,

$ 79.29 110.56

Fenders and Swabs sold,

""

Material on hand,

17

Chairs, &c., on hand,

$ 31.15

16.00

48.20

Fenders and Swabs on hand,

94.50

Total,......... $

189.85

1885.

1885. May.

Total,......... .$

189.85

COIR YARN.

Stock on hand, 1st January, 1885, Į

not known,....

Yarn purchased during the year,.

1885.

"

Profit,..

$289.80 249.69

By Matting sold during the year,

Stock on hand, Material, 198 lbs.,

manufactured,

$483.63

13.86

">

19

42.00

(350 lbs.),

Total,.........................

539.49

Total,..........

539.49

GRASS MATTING.

Stock on hand, 1st January, 1885, Material purchased,—

Hemp,..... .$8.14 Grass,

32.05

1885.

By Issue, for prison use during the year, 324 yards, market price, 13 cents per yard,

$42.12

22

Profit,.

Total,.......

$40.19 16.27

Stock on hand, 31st December, 1885, (11 yards),

1.44

22

Material,

12.90

56.46

Total,........

56.46

1885. Jan. 1

1885.

Stock on hand, 31st December, 1884,. Material purchased during the year,

$ 88.25

SHOEMAKERS' SHOP.

By Estimated value of Repairs, &c., )

to European Prisoners' Boots

$ 50.00

Profit,..

32.10

during 1885,

Sale to Prison Officers,.

8.00

99

93

Stock on hand, Material and Shoes, new Shoes made (included

62.35

in above, $24),

Total,..

.$

120.35

Total......

120.35

NET MAKING.

1885.

1885.

Jan. 1 Twine on hand,

5.60

Wax,

3.00

Dec. 31 Material purchased during the year,

69.24

Profit,.......

76.25

Total,....

154.09

1885.

Jan.

1

Value of Stock on hand,

Material purchased during the year,

Profit,........

!

By Value of Net sold during the year,

made for Gaol use, Stock on hand,

39

>>

Total,....

CARPENTERS' SHOP.

1885.

$ 3.95

164.65 29.26

By Value of Work done and Articles

155

$125.65 28.44

154.09

made for Gaol use,

$189.92

""

Work done for Officers and charged,

3.39

وو

Stock on hand, Material,

4.55

Total,...

197.86

Total,..........

197.86

TAILORS' SHOP.

1885. Jan. 1

1885.

Material on hand from last year, Canvas purchased during the year,

$ 53.00

544.00

By Value of Canvas Suits made up

during the year,

$773.39

Flannel

39

405.00

33

(2 bales),

Value of Drill Suits made upl during the year,

22.40

Needles, Twine, Thread, Buttons,

Work done for Officers & charged,.

4.40

176.39

&c.,

"

"

for Police, &c.,

44.87

Profit,.....

71.67

"

Stock remaining on hand, (2 bales Flannel),

405.00

Total,........

1,250.06

PRINTING PRESS.

1885. Jan. 1

1885.

Stock on hand from last year, (Print-

ing Ink),

Profit,

$ 1.50

337.45

??

Total,......

338.95

Oakum, Rattan,

Coir Yarn, Grass Mats,.. Shoemakers,. Net Making, Carpenters,

Tailoring, Printing,

PROFITS.

Total,.........

1,250.06

By Work done for Public Offices

during the year,.

Cash received for private work, Stock remaining on hand,

Total,.......

.$1,067.49

110.56

249.69

16.27

32.10

76.25

29.26

71.67

337.45

TOTAL,.....

.$1,990.74

$325.25

12.70

1.00

338.95

A. GORDON,

Superintendent.

:

* །

157

No. 20.

HONGKONG.

MINUTE BY THE COLLECTOR OF STAMP DUTY ON A PROPOSED INCREASE OF THE DUTIES BY 50 PER CENT,

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on the 31st March, 1886.

HONOURABLE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

With reference to your note of February 26th, enquiring the effect of an increase of Stamp Duty of 50 per cent., I beg to report that the total collected by this Office in 1885 (the lowest collection for five years past) was,

.$145,581.81

Deduct Court Fees, &c.,

14,259.74

$131,322.07

An increase of fifty per cent. on the above would of course amount to about $65,000 a year, but there are some duties which really could not be increased. A Receipt Stamp, for instance, could hardly

be more than three cents.

On the other hand there are duties which would bear an increase of more than fifty per cent. Our duties on Bills of Exchange and Promissory Notes, for instance, might be doubled without rendering them excessive. They will still be below those charged at Singapore, which they should never exceed. I enclose a Table shewing roughly the increases I should propose, to give a general increase of 50 per cent. to the Stamp Revenue. The result may be taken as about $71,000 a year.

I should propose a special treatment of the duty on Transfers of Shares. I had meant to submit a suggestion for this on the first opportunity. The duty on uncompleted Transfers at Singapore is just three times what it is here, and is so arranged as either to prevent the defrauding of the Revenue which goes on by means of what are called Blank Transfers, or to compensate for it. The result would be to treble the amount collected.

If the Community would prefer increased taxation to take the shape of Stamp Duties rather than that of a Spirit Farm (the only other feasible proposal so far) it would be very convenient, as all the machinery is in existence, and there would be no buildings, salaries, allowances, or new appointments required. The very careful redistribution of the duties effected last year has proved satisfactory in nearly every way, and it puts the Colony in the best possible position for either raising or lowering them, which can be carried out, and the law on the subject brought up to date, by means of little more than a few clerical alterations.

I may perhaps add a few words as to the evasion of Stamp Duties by Chinese. Rather exaggerated ideas are current about this. The only Stamp Duties Chinese can evade are those on documents passing entirely amongst themselves and which they can succeed in keeping out of the Courts. These, naturally, are mainly Agreements, Promissory Notes, Receipts, and Native Drafts. But in all business which is not purely native the Chinese must pay Stamp Duty, they cannot help it; and Chinese business is conducted more and more on the western model every year. I am bound to say moreover that since the Promissory Note duties were re-arranged on a more equitable scale they have been largely paid on purely Chinese Notes, the lenders preferring a cheap security to the risk of not being able to recover.

STAMP OFFICE,

29th March, 1886.

A. LISTER, Collector of Stamp Revenue.

COLONY OF HONGKONG.

No. 21,

STATEMENT SHOWING THE TOTAL RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS IN THE YEAR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on the 31st March, 1886.

REVENUE.

Amount Estimated.

Amount received in the Colony.

Amount received by the Crown Agents in England.

Total Receipts.

More than Less than Estimated. Estimated.

EXPENDITURE,

Amount Estimated.

Amount paid in the Colony,

$

C.

LAND REVENUE:-

Leased Lands,

145,000

$ C.

144,720.85

$ C.

$

C.

0.

Quarries,

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS:-

Lands not Leased, including Stone

Fees on Grant of Leases,

Markets,

Buildings,..

Piers,...

J

20,000

300

18,915.05

144,720.85

18,915.05

220.00

220.00

$ C.

279.15

1,084.95 80.00

$ C.

$ C.

Amount paid by Crown Agents in England.

$ C.

Total Payments.

More than Less than Estimated. Estimatod.

$ c.

$ C. $ C.

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:-

The Governor,.......

33,958

Colonial Secretary,..

24,016

Auditor,

5,958

60,000 3,000

68,318.88 5,921.50

68,318.88

8,318.88

185.00

5,921.50 185.00

2,921.50

Treasurer,.......

13,366

185.00

Clerk of Councils,

LICENCES:-

Spirit Retailers, ....

26,000

30,695.00

Pawnbrokers,

11,550

13,650.00

Auctioneers,.

2,400

2,100.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

150

Emigration Brokers,

1,600

Billiard Tables,

750

1,400.00 950.00

10.00

30,695.00 4,695.00 13,650.00

2,100.00

10.00 1,400.00 950.00

Surveyor General,

2,100.00

300.00

Postmaster General,.

::

140.00

200.00

Registrar General,

200,00

...

Opium,

159,000

153,751.64

153,751.64

5,248.36

Harbour Master,....

Boarding Houses,

175

200.00

200.00

25.00

Marriage,.

300

368.00

368.00

68.00

Lighthouses,

Chinese Undertakers,

100

100.00

100.00

Money Changers,

750

785.00

785.00

35.00

Observatory,

Marine Store Dealers,

1,000

Spirit Distillers,

310

1,050.00 400.00

1,050.00

50.00

400.00

90.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

TAXES:-

Government Gardens & Plantations,

17,786

Stamps,...

Municipal Rates,

POSTAGE,

136,000 130,725.82 261,000 285,764.75 118,000 117,333.68

130,725.82 285,764.75 24,764.75 117,333.68

5,274.18

Judicial Departments,..

666,32

Ecclesiastical Department,

FINES, FORFEITURES & FEES OF COURTS:

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fees,....

9,000 600 10,000

12,341.28

12,341.28

1,799.97 11,228.04

3,341.28 1,799.97 1,199.97 11,228.04 1,228.04

Educational

Medical

do.,

do.,

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Police Magistrates' do.,

Burials,

500

817.50

Licences for Junks, &c.,

19,000

19,196.00

817.50 19,196.00

317.50

196.00

Police

do.,

Registry of Boats,

3,000

2,097.52

33,889.82 701.75 34,591.57 633.57

20,988,66 2,829.19 23,817.85

5,952.51

5,952.51

14,639.95

14,645.12 1,279.12

1,160 1,159.04

1,159.04

56,791 53,099.63 2,695.72 55,795.35

102,100 48,480,36 70,834.58 119,314.94 17,211.94

23,897 21,763,86 1,582.85

45,398 40,961.61 4,134.92

7,508 4,860.54 581.57

5,820 5,592,30 1,039.04

7,322 4,621.09 2,102.20

17,101.95 1,689.01

61,585 55,697.75 5,874.03

6,218 6,218.00

47,227 41,780,13 1,863.72 43,643.85

33,998 34,375.10 2,634.88 37,009,98

19,969 19,828.24 22.83

19,851.07

196,732 171,757.58 21,010.95 192,768.53

198.15

...

5.49

5.17

0.96

...

995,65

23,346.71

550.29

45,096.53

301.47

5,442.11

2,065.89

6,631.34

6,723,29

18,790.96 1,004.96

61,571.78

811.34

...

598.71

13.22

6,218.00

3,583.15

3,011.98

117.93

3,963.47

3,097.52

97.52

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

3,300

4,214.43

4,214.43

914.43

Gaol

do.,

48,564

Do.

of Hawkers,...

3,700

3,763.50

3,763.50

63.50

Cargo Boat Certificates,

600

791.00

791.00

191.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

15,466

Registration of Householders,

2,000

1,346.75

1,346.75

653.25

Do. of Servants, &c.,

80

49.50

49.50

30.50 Pensions, Retired Allowances & Gratuities

Official Signatures,..

28,000

80

102.00

102.00

22.00

Registration of Deeds,

3,000

2,764.00

2,764.00

Shipping Seamen,...

9,000

8,328.00

8,328.00

236.00 Charitable Allowances, . 672.00

4,000

...

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,500

1,372.50

1,372.50

127.50 Transport,

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,...

9,000

9,872.68

9,872.68 872.68

Colonial Registers,..

5

Registry Fees, &c., (Mer. Shipping Act),

600

Do., of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

4,180

461.00 3,146.60

Registration of Companies,

Examination of Emigrants,

Registration of Births, &c.,....

600 10,000 40

1,037.72

461.00 3,146.60 1,037.72

16,122.25

16,122.25

63.20

Light Dues,

25,000

26,032.67

Licences for Steam Launches,.

Surveyor's Cert. for Steam Launches,...

200 500

335.00

63.20 26,032.67 335.00

437.72 6,122.25 23.20

5.00 Works and Buildings, 139.00

1,033.40 Roads, Streets and Bridges,

Miscellaneous Services,

1,032.67

Military Expenditure,...

47,402.13 1,178.71 48,580.84

12,531.84 1,232.00 13,763.84

14,346.61 21,906,32 36,252.93

3,783.10

3,783.10

4,500 2,691.46 179.65 2,871.11

70,100 70,253.99 3,119.22 73,373,21 3,273.21

38,500 41,596.65 166.43 41,763.08 3,263.08

59,697 77,783.14 8,224.37 86,007.51 26,310.51

113,345 117,209.52 127.48 117,337.00 3,992.00

16.84

1,702.16

8,252,93

216.90

1,628.89

135.00

795.00

795.00

295.00

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c.,...

2,500

3,100.03

3,100.03

600.03

Registration of Trade Marks,

50

82.00

247.95

329.95

279.95

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

500

540.00

540.00

40.00

Medical Registration Fees,

30.00

30.00

30.00

Extraordinary Public Works,.....

1,092,081

594,700

990,366.56 155,736,59 1,146,103.15 69,064.48

428,088.72 47,058.52 475,147.24

15,942.33

119,552.76

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY:-

Condemned Stores, &c.,......

500

1,531.63

1,531.63 1,031.63

REIMBURSEMENTS:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

600

691.39

Subsistence of Seamen, &c., in Gaol, ...

300

538.83

691.39 538.83

91.39 238.83

Treatment of Seamen, &c., in Hospital.

8,000

6,234.49

6,234.19

1,765.51

Convict labour and other items,

2,000

2,364.78

2,364.78

364.78

Sale of Printed Forms,

...

1,200

1,139.75

1,139.75

60.25

Gaol Expenses recovered,.

800

941.04

941.04

141.04

Contribution from Imperial Post Office,

3,888

3,888.00

Sale of Chinese Gazette,

50.00

Interest on Furniture at Govt. House,.

250

645.30

3,888.00 50.00 645.30

50.00

395.30

Fees from Scholars at Central School,

4.100

5,273.00

5,273.00

1,173.00

INTEREST,

15,000

7,531.83 12,557,01

20,088.84

5,088.84

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Storage of Gunpowder,..

10,000 20,190.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

25,000 77,669.39

20,190.00 77,669,39 52,669.39

10,190.00

TOTAL Revenue,......$ 1,137,558 1,239,084,74 12,804.96 1,251,889.70 132,327,07 17,995,37

RECEIPTS.

Deposits Available, Premia on Land Sales,.....

Other Deposits,

$ 66,658.50 522,200.00

Deposits not available,

Advance Account,

588,858.50

8,687.44 4,358.44

2,245.62 151.36

588,858.50

10,933.06

4,509.80

Family Remittances,

35,418.12

Subsidiary Coins,

370,000.00

Money Order Account,

Exchange Account,

46,994.93 5,805.71

35,418.12 370,000.00 46,994,93

Investments by Crown Agents...

Crown Agents,

Balance, 1st January, 1885,

TOTAL,...

180,932.03

2,480,139.91 1,072.281.21 3,552,421.12

5,805.71 368,719.10 368,719.10 688,360,17 688,360,17 180,932.03

TOTAL Expenditure,...$

1,687,681 1,418,455.28 202,795.11 1,621,250.39 69,064.48 135,495.09

PAYMENTS.

Deposits Available,

Deposits not Available,...

Advance Account,

Family Remittances,

Subsidiary Coins,

Money Order Account,

Kaulung Sea Wall,

Crown Agents,

Balance, 31st December, 1885,

470,000.00 50,656.75

470,000.00 50,556.75

10,648.72

89.00

1,252.67 40,889.38 33,464.87 382,196.18

11,901.39

40,978.38

415,661.05 60,849.50 60,849.50

2,080.76 354,043.48 384,298.37

2,080.76

738,341.85

140,701.05

140,701.05

TOTAL,..........$ 2,480,139.91 1,072,281.21 3,552,421.12

A. F. ALVES,

Examined

FREDERICK STEWART,

Accountant.

Acting Auditor General.

Treasury, Hongkong, 20th March, 1886.

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG IN 1884 & 1885.

REVENUE.

1884.

1885.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

EXPENDITURE.

1884.

1885.

INCREASE.

DECREASE.

$

0.

C.

$

C.

LAND REVENUE:-

Leased Lands,

156,136.75

Lands not leased, including Stone Quarries,

Fees on Grant of Leases,

21,549.05

115.00

144,720.85

18,915,05

220.00

$ 0.

11.415.90

2,634.00

$

c.

$

C.

$

C.

$

0.

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS:

The Governor,...

33,320.37

34,591.57

1,271.20

105.00

RENTS EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS:-

Markets,

62,444.54

Buildings,

4,647.33

Piers,

68,318.88

5,921.50

185.00

5,874.34

1,274.17

185.00

Colonial Secretary,.

Auditor,..

Treasurer,.

Clerk of Councils, Surveyor General,. Postmaster General, Registrar General,.

25,302.36

23,817.85

1,484.51

5,918.72

5,952.51

33.79

18,836.75

14,645.12

4,191.63

1,087.41

1,159.04

54,617,84

55,795.35

71.63

1,177.51

132,820.99

119,314.94

13,506.05

21,804,27

23,346.71

1,542.44

LICENCES:

Harbour Master,....

50,972.47

45,096.53

5,875.94

Spirit Retailers,

28,812,50

30,695.00

1,882.50

Lighthouses,..

5,247.20

5,442.11

194.91

Pawnbrokers,

12,950.00

13,650.00

700.00

Observatory,.

5,684.69

6,631.34

946.65

Auctioneers,

2,750.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

178.30

Emigration Brokers,

Billiard Tables,

1,400.00

750,00

2,100.00

10.00

1,400.00

950.00

650.00

Collector of Stamp Revenue,

4,877.03

6,723.29

1,846.26

168.30

Government Gardens and Plantations,

21,736.44

18,790.96

2,945.48

Judicial

Department,

63,193,52

61,571.78

1,621.74

200.00

Ecclesiastical

do.,

6,214.75

6,218.00

3.25

Opium,

113,826.13

153,751,64

39,925,51

Educational

do.,

41,597.76

43,643.85

2,046.09

Boarding Houses,

220.83

200.00

20.83

Medical

do.,

31,633.36

37,009.98

5,376.62

Marriage,

319.00

368.00

49.00

Police Magistrates' do.,

18,933.32

19,851.07

917.75

Chinese Undertakers,..

100.00

100.00

Police

do..

216,562.55

192,768.53

23,794.02

Money Changers,....

720.00

785.00

65.00

Gaol

do.,

47,590.07

48,580.84

990.77

Marine Store Dealers,.

1,095.00

1,050.00

45.00

Fire Brigade

do.,

14,868.15 13,763.84

1,104.31

Spirit Distillers,

300,00

400.00

100.00

Pensions, Retired Allowances and Gratuities,

33,932.46

36,252.93

2,320.47

TAXES:-

Charitable Allowances,

2,855.18

3,783.10

927.92

Stamps,

136,393.14

130,725.82

5,667,32 Transport,..

5,198,49

2,871,11

2,327.38

Municipal Rates,

263,988.56

POSTAGE,

117,352.01

285,764.75 21,776.19 117,333.68

Works and Buildings,

137,473.75

73,373.21

64,100.54

18.33

Roads, Streets and Bridges,

54,300.87

41,763.08

12,537.79

FINES, FORFEITURES AND FEES OF COURTS:-

Miscellaneous Services,

84,420.96 86,007.51

1,586.55

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fees,

13,774.97 12,341.28 1,370.83

10,392.14

1,799.97

11,228.04

429.14

1,433.69 Land and Houses Purchased,..

Military Expenditure,

2,598.90

2,598.90

111,034.14 117,337.00

6,302.86

835.90

FEES OF OFFICE:-

Burials,

755.75

817.50

61.75

Licences for Junks, &c.,.

19,397.25

19,196.00

201.25

Extraordinary Public Works,.

1,254,634.771,146,103.15

340,763.62 475,147.24 134,383,62

27,556.67 136,088.29

Registry of Boats,.

3,011.41

3,097.52

86.11

Do. of Cargo Boats and Crews,

3,467.48

4,214.43

746.95

Do.

of Hawkers,

3,710.00

3,763.50

53.50

Cargo Boat Certificates,.

625.00

791.00

166.00

Registration of Householders,

1,354.75

1,346.75

8.00

Do. of Servants, &c.,

Official Signatures,

65.50

178.00

49.50

16.00

102.00

76.00

Registration of Deeds,

4,134.50

2,764,00

1,370,50

Shipping Seamen,.

9,253.00

$,328.00

925.00

Examination of Masters, &c.,

1,620.00

1,372.50

247.50

Survey of Steam-ships, &c.,....

9,590.00

9,872.68

282.68

Registry Fees, &c., (Merchant Shipping Act),

620.00

461.00

159.00

Registry of Carriages, Chairs, &c.,

4,013.72

3,146.60

867.12

Registration of Companies,..

427.44

1,037.72

610.28

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,

14,574.75

16,122.25

1,547.50

Registration of Births, &c.,...

63.30

63.20

.10

Light Dues,

24,356.17

26,032.67

1,676.50

Licences, &c., for Steam-launches,

772.50

1,130.00

357.50

Official Administrator, Assignee, &c., Commission,

2,710.58

8,100.03

389.45

Registration of Trade Marks,.

897.39

329.95

567.44

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

445.00

540.00

95.00

Medical Registration Fees,.

90.00

30.00

Sale of Government Property,.

2,470.85

1,531.63

60.00

939.22

Reimbursements,

Interest,

Miscellaneous Receipts,

20,406.90

21,766.58

1,359.68

36,962.43

20,088.84 55,511.73 97,859.39 42,347.66

16,873.59

$1,173,071.48 1,251,889.70 123,182.31

44,364.09

Deduct Decrease,

44,364.09

Nett Increase,

78,818.22

Nett Increase,

Treasury, Hongkong, 20th March, 1886.

A. F. ALVES,

Examined,

FREDERICK STEWART,

Accountant.

Aoting Auditor General.

$1,595,398.39 1,621,250,39

161,940.29

136,088.29

Deduct Decrease,

136,088.29

25,852.00

A. LISTER,

Treasurer.

164

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE

LAND REVENUE :-

REVENUE.

Rents of Leased Lands,

Lands not Leased, including Stone Quarries, .

Fees on Grant of Leases,

*9

1876.

1877.

1878.

117,962.55

121,142.54

120,363.67

4,235.15

16,791.99

17,126.96

215.00

320.00

315.00

RENTS, EXCLUSIVE OF LANDS :-

Markets, (including Slaughter House and Cattle Shed),......................

56,395.50

53,863.26

55,676.05

Buildings,

5,050.60

4,715.40

4,631.40

LICENCES:-

Spirit Licences,

Pawnbrokers,

Auctioneers,..

28,085.44

28,395.00

26,740.00

8,750.00

9,450.00

9,800.00

3,425.00

3,300.00

2,700.00

Tenements for Emigrants,

'66.45

47.40

146.65

Emigration Brokers,

1,800.00

1,600.00

2,000.00

Billiard Tables, and Bowling Alleys,

852.09

1,025.00

1,175.00

Opium Monopoly,

133,000.00

132,000.00

132,000.00

Boarding-houses,

192.00

224.00

192.00

Marriage,......

204.00

273.00

281.00

Chinese Undertakers,

80.00

70.00

70.00

Money Changers,........

755.00

770.00

825.00

Marine Store Dealers,

2,070.00

1,875.00

1,545.00

Spirit Distillers,......

110.00

310.00

210.00

Carried forward,...

363,248.78

376,172.59 375,797.73

HONGKONG.

163

No. 22.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUES RECEIVED DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS, 1876 TO 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government, on 31st March, 1886.

RECEIVED DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS.

165

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

.1883.

1884.

1885.

130,437.10

125,167.36

123,115.59

140,467.25

143,817.46

156,136.75

144,720.85

12,057.58

15,265.39

15,945.44

17,415.50

26,194.91

21,549.05

18,915.05

380.00

330.00

310.00

534.00

450.00

115.00

220.00

54,376.83

54,441.01

53,368.77

57,950.85

59,024.35

62,444.54

68,318.88

5,118.00

5,227.80

5,746.40

6,388.00

7,253.00

4,647.33

6,106.50

24,779.40

25,446.51

26,538.94

28,270.00

28,660.00

28,812.50

30,695.00

9,100.00

10,500.00

13,650.00

11,550.00

11,725.00

12,950.00

13,650.00

2,400.00

2,700.00

3,000.00

3,300.00

3,000.00

2,750.00

2,100.00

93.60

131.10

128.75

125.00

140.00

178.30

10.00

2,317.00

2,200.00

2,400.00

2,600.00

1,600.00

1,400.00

1,400.00

1,075.00

875.00

775.00

700.00

710.00

750.00

950.00

209,916.63

205,000.01

187,916.67

209,005.71

246,449.95

113,826.13

153,751.64

192.00

192.00

192.00

175.00

150.00

220.83

200.00

231.00

347.00

233.00

331.00

369.00

319.00

368.00

:

80.00

100.00

90.00

90.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

835.00

755.00

780.00

895.00

750.00

720.00

785.00

930.00

1,185.00

1,140.00

1,065.00

960.00

1,095.00

1,050.00

110.00

2,064.75

310.00

415.00

210.00

300.00

400.00

154,429.14

451,927.93

435,640.56

481,277.31

531,563.67

408,314.43

143,740.92

166

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE

REVENUE.

1876.

1877.

1878.

Brought forward,..........

$ 363,248.78 376,172.59

375,797.73

TAXES:-

Stamps,

103,845.69

118,488.93

127,073.31

Police Assessment,

Water Rate,.

Lighting Rate,.......

Fire Brigade Rate,

184,509.25

190,864.58

197,925.44

POSTAGE,

53,760.01

62,675.78

83,325.70

FINES, FORFEITURES, & FEES OF COURT:-

Fines,

12,464.64

13,594.10

3,361.26

Forfeitures,

290.77

4,056.86

1,104.37

Fees,

3,787.68

3,166.95

4,223.74

FEES OF OFFICE:-

On Cemetery Burial,

555.50

792.50

1,020.50

Licences for Junks, &c.,-Ordinance 8 of 1879,...................

18,073.00

19,051.50

20,156.25

Registry of Boats,

3,410.90

3,438.76

3,146.57

Do.

of Cargo Boats and Crews,.....

2,026.46

2,347.29

2,554.85

Do.

of Hawkers,.....

2,882.00

3,165.50

2,645.00

Cargo Boat Certificates, -Ordinance 8 of 1879,

362.00

397.00

398.00

Registration of Householders,-Ordinance 7 of 1866,

1,337,50

1,441.25

1,435.75

Do.

of Servants, &c.,

do.

198.00

168.50

135.00

Official Signatures,

66.00

78.00

76.00

Carried forward,..

...$

750,818.18

799,900.09 824,379.47

2

167

RECEIVED DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS,--Continued.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

454,429.14

451,927.93

435,640:56

481.277.31

531,563.67 408,314.43

443,740.92

114,765.35

120,678.96 165,340.91

146,980.59

153,329.88 136,398.14

130,725.82

171,342.05 230,557.31

221,796.23

252,937.71

258,613.84

263,988.56

285,764.75

55,397.07

92,615.57

98,822.56

100,793.94

107,275.91

117,352.01

117,333.68

14,385.21

7,449.08

10,648:03

7.140.38

10,247:35

13,774.97

12,341.28

825.48

905.98

710.20

1,309.25

1,109.54

1,370.83

1,799.97

4,735.81

4,594.76

5,539.34

9,744.83

13,847.17

10,392.14

11,228.04

727.50

364.00

968.25

575.50

613.75

755.75

$17.50

19,363.50

18,807.50

19,839.50

19,966.50

18,768.25

19,397.25

19,196.00

3,334.10

3,066.70

3,053.68

2,961.17

3,050.27

3,011.41

3,097.52

2,495.95

2,473.75

2,843.53

3,297.16

3,409.99

3,467.18

4,214.43

2,933.50

2,837.25

3,696.25

3,755.50

3,715.50

3,710.00

3,763.50

400.00

385.00

487.00

601.00

612.00

625.00

791.00

1,590.50

1,748.25

1,813.00

2,203.50

1,925.25

1,354.75

1,346.75

101.75

89.00

91.00

86.25

75.50

65.50

49.50

96.00

80.00

88.00

372.50

175.50

178.00

102.00

846,922.91

938,581.04

971,378.04 1,034,003.09 1,108,333.37

984,151.22

1,036,312.66

168

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE

REVENUE.

1876.

1877.

1878.

Brought forward,........

$ 750,818.18 799,900.09

824,379.47

FEES OF OFFICE,—Continued.

Registration of Deeds,

Shipping Seamen,

Examination of Masters, &c.,-Ordinance 8 of 1879,.................

Survey of Steam Ships, &c.,

do.,

Colonial Registers,

Registry Fees, &c., (Merchant Shipping Act),

Registry of Carriages, &c.,--Ordinance 6 of 1863,

2,456.75

3,153.00

3,329.00

7,141.00

7,358.00

7,802.00

690.00

430.00

610.00

......

50.00

25.00

30.00

65.00

95.00

335.00

321.00

372.00

1,619.00

1,599.50

1,693.80

Registration of Companies,.........

66.00

546.00

583.50

Medical Fees on Examination of Emigrants,

14,385.25

11,969.00

11,739.25

Registration of Births and Deaths, &c.,

44.60

38.00

41.20

Light Dues,

15,741.18

14,984.33

17,494.28

Licences for Steam Launches,

105.00

122.50

130.00

Surveyor's Certificate for Steam Launches,

.....

Official Administrator and Assignee,......

Registration of Trade Marks,

Licences for Chinese Passenger Ships,

Medical Registration Fees,.........

SALE OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY :—

Condemned Stores, &c.,

636.67

603.41

1,140.68

25.00

375.50

400.00

3,761.69

2,305.06

481.96

Carried forward,............ .$

797,830.32

843,820.39

870,342.14

169

RECEIVED DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS,-Continued.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

846,922.91

938,581.04

971,378.04 1,034,003.09 1,108,333.37

984,151.22

1,036,312.66

3,622.50

3,759.50

9,369.62

8,050.06

4,093.75

4,134.50

2,764.00

6,438.00

6,392.00

6,940.00

9,794.00

9,223.00

9,253.00

8,328.00

720.00

1,890.00

2,090.00

1,370.00

1,280.00

1,620.00

1,372.50

50.00

4,151.00

7,231.17

9,222.50

9,316.50

9,590.00

9,872.68

85.00

70.00

45.00

6.00

1.00

245.00

242.75

317.00

463.00

640.00

620.00

461.00

1,715.80

1,972.40

2,891.90

4,005.60

4,909.02

4,013.72

3,146.60

96.00

890.00

849.50

627.50

1,481.25

427.44

1,037.72

10,119.25

13,965.00

18,919.25

21,013.25

15,691.00

14,574.75

16,122.25

55.10

42.30

35.10

57.38

49.20

63.30

63.20

15,438.31

18,095.07

20,755.14

23,371.33

24,714.32

24,356.17

26,032.67

150.00

135.00

112.50

177.50

225.00

242.50

335.00

110.00

......

270.00

420.00

495.00

530.00

795.00

1,475.01

1,530.36

550.93

6,503.07

3,016.32

2,710.58

3,100.03

107.73

141.20

66.80

137.15

897.39

329.95

340.00

440.00

520.00

650.00

525.00

445.00

540.00

90.00

30.00

257.49

1,302.21

1,891.17

228.20

888.26

2,470.85

1,531.63

887,838.10

993,568.63 1,044,307.52 1,120,029.28

1,185,019.14

1,060,190.42 1,112,174.89

170

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE

REVENUE.

Brought forward,................

REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID OF EXPENSES INCURRED BY GOVERNMENT:-

Sick Stoppages from Police Force,

1876.

1877.

1878.

$ 797,830.32 843,820.39

870,342.14

645.21

589.06

672.11

Subsistence Money of Seamen and others in Victoria Gaol,

177.95

169.94

...

129.44

Medical Treatment of Sick Seamen, and others, from Civil |

Hospital,.

7,472.10

5,111.11

7,131.95

Convict Labour and other items,

1,179.18

1,057.83

1,728.22

Sale of Printed Forms, ·

800.50

843.50

1,031.00*

Recovery from Diplomatic, Naval and Military Departments

on account of Gaol Expenses,

936.46

1,710.16

945.77

Contribution from Imperial Post Office,

6,096.00

6,096.00

6,096.00

Sale of Chinese Gazette,

21.47

19.90

19.23

Interest from Governor for use of Furniture at Government

House,

197.67

225.91

Fees from Scholars at Central School,

INTEREST,................

2,688.25

2,927.25

2,926.25

5,995.85

9,802.36

16,685.96

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS :-

Storage of Gunpowder,.

9,349.48

4,743.74

7,554.21

Night Soil Contract,

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

11,393.03

20,176.44

151.70

Grant from Admiralty to Lock Hospital, Interest from Special Fund, &c., and Special Receipt under Ordinance 10 of 1867,

26,524.37

23,616.25

21,192.05

Premia on Land Sales,

TOTAL,........

AUDIT OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 18th March, 1886.

871,307.84

920,909.84

936,606.03

14,000.70

84,402.19

11,031.70

!

171

RECEIVED DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS,-Continued

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

887,838.10

993,568.63 1,044,307.52 1,120,029.28 1,185,019.14 1,060,190.42

1,112,174.89

675.63

1,349.50

1,113.48

823.79

1,098.62

837.24

691.39

177.74

85.76

161.04

131.90

343.11

370.84

538.83

3,371.28

6,075.99

7,482.85

8,934.63

9,137.02

6,130.53

6,234.49

1,242.81

3,339.15

3,202.29

3,272.46

3,120.17

2,086.31

2,364.78

747.50

828.50

875.50

1,080.50

1,277.75

1,330.25

1,139.75

761.13

995.69

1,516.00

1,288.31

1,025.64

677.73

941.04

6,096.00

3,888.00

3,888.00

3,888.00

3,888.00

3,888.00

3,888.00

31.38

8.72

93.46

105.00

50.00

555.42

814.41

426.12

645.30

2,636.00

3,916.50

4,051.00

4,084.00

4,126.80

4,981.00

5,273.00

19,083.57

21,287.66

22,316.22

31,282.47

52,194.89

36,962.43

20,088.84

9,773.82

6,578.92

15,887.35

19,937.49

6,108.69

12,539.77

20,190.00

5,810.00

17,323.00

12,095.00

12,123.36

7,979.86

9,016.28

4,729.36

15,872.34

25,648.96

65,574.39

17,573.66

14,046.41

6,979.24

9,127.02

962,687.40 1,063,949.29 1,120,796.77 1,209,517.08 1,289,448.29 1,173,071.48 1,251,889.70

1,407.59

5,998.35

203,659.20 * 18,330.77

25,718.65

19,695.00

66,658.50

*

Since 1882 the Premia on Land Sales have been kept in a separate account.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Auditor General,

173

No. 23.

HONGKONG.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS, 1876 TO 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Officer Administering the

Government, on 31st March, 1886.

174

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE,

EXPENDITURE.

ESTABLISHMENTS:

1876.

1877.

* 1878.

GOVERNOR,

COLONIAL SECRETARY,

CA

$

27,907.83

27,666.19

27,895.08

17,802.86

17,757.43

19,045.13

AUDITOR GENERAL,.

14,046.77

18,083.56

19,160.23

COLONIAL TREASURER,

9,083.99

9,099.50

9,448.16

CLERK OF COUNCILS,.....

1,003.62

973.00

1,012.10

SURVEYOR GENERAL,

30,674.12

35,114.08

35,950.97

POSTMASTER GENERAL,..

38,675.40

39,598.21

59,621.72

REGISTRAR GENERAL,

16,891.50

15,883.42

16,262.75

HARBOUR MASTER,

32,464.63

32,366.60

32,860.34

LIGHTHOUSES,

6,138.78

5,277.37

6,934.05

OBSERVATORY,

COLLECTOR OF STAMP REVENUE,

3,925.27

4,205.37

4,164.34

GOVERNMENT GARDENS AND PLANTATIONS,

4,299.18

4,150.57

4,384.95

JUDICIAL,

43,018.94

44,711.57

46,733.23

ECCLESIASTICAL,

5,136.00

5,010.11

5,070.72

EDUCATIONAL,..

20,572.31

19,766.71

26,021,48

MEDICAL,.....

34,934.31

32,381.33

38,625.91

POLICE MAGISTRATES,

18,108.73

17,395.64

18,027.26

POLICE,......

176,628.61

181,066.28

159,815.62

GAOL,.......

31,770.31

31,478.14

41,529.15

Carried foward,........

533,083.16

541,985.08

572,563,19

DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

175

31,302.24

32,796.43

33,072.78

33,845.24

33,828.32

33,320.37

34,591.57

20,957.08

21,813.45

22,411.77

24,149.94

23,045.84

25,302.36

23,817.85

22,076.44

19,058.55

23,626.13

25,025.55

29,565.73

5,918.72

5,952.51

9,613.00

9,994.68

10,017.84

9,960.80

16,550.76

18,836.75

14,645.12

994.50

1,054.69

1,058.78

1,055.96

1,062.03

1,087.41

1,159.04

37,599.05

37,893.25

37,499.09

39,590.90

44,261.96

54,617.84

55,795.35

56,898.91

92,042.30

75,947.51

63,373.81

78,649.72

132,820.99

119,314.94

13,286.98

15,968.86

18,357.16

21,205.00

22,921.55

21,804.27

23,346.71

34,137.62

37,407.53

40,513.69

45,419.23

45,085.36

50,972.47

45,096.53

8,021.47

7,619.95

7,465.90

7,315.38

5,293.21

5,247.20

5,442.11

a

2,739.50

5,684.69

6,631.34

4,064.78

4,672.57

4,539.22

4,697.30

4,478.76

4,877.03

6,723.29

4,022.80

13,985.44

19,125.87

20,380.29

22,091.70

21,736.44

18,790.96

50,684.89

48,989.36

47,958.20

53,718.22

57,553.52

63,193.52

61,571.78

4,358.00

4,679.71

5,498.00

5,500.00

5,496.50

6,214.75

6,218.00

30,077.13

31,696.84

33,265.18

39,078.40

47,346.72

41,597.76

43,643.85

38,552.13

37,308.38

34,405.54

37,444.21

39,883.37

31,633.36

37,009.98

17,486.22

18,631.70

19,258.26

19,364.58

18,190.25

18,933.32

19,851.07

170,655.27

176,312.30

183,332.33

185,871.01

185,951.47

216,562.55

192,768.53

41,973.08

45,729.19

47,298.92

49,064.96

46,067.48

47,590.07

48,580.84

2

599,761.59

657,655.18

664,652.17

686,060.78

730,063.75

807,951.87

770,951.37

176

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE,

FIRE BRIGADE,

EXPENDITURE.

1876.

1877.

1878.

Brought forward,...........

533,083.16

541,985.08

572,563.19

CHARITABLE ALLOWANCES,

TRANSPORT,

WORKS AND BUILDINGS,.

15,299.29

9,694.53

13,546.51

3,588.76

5,605.58

3,235.00

1,248.33

4,291.60

4,341.66

136,400.55

83,409.54

68,633.13

ROADS, STREETS, AND BRIDGES,

54,554.02

73,045.42

73,388.67

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES,

MILITARY EXPENDITURE,

LANDS AND HOUSES PURCHASED,

PENSIONS, &c.,

TOTAL,

EXTRAORDINARY PUBLIC WORKS,.......................

AUDIT OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 18th March, 1886.

38,181.71

39,256.37

44,468.26

105,855.53

101,183.15

104,679.36

1,005.00

14,288.86

13,731.59

25,667.54

902,500.21

873,207.86

910,523.32

DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS,-Continued.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

596,761.59

657,655.18

664,652.17

686,060.78

730,063.75

807,951.87

770,951.37

177

16,383.47

11,662.90

14,032.93

17,210.40

21,068.05

14,868.15

13,763.84

3,825.00

3,994.00

3,970.00

2,882.37

3,229.99

2,855.18

3,783.10

4,684.35

3,004.63

3,407.45

4,254.88

3,503.79

5,198.49

2,871.11

62,571.22

51,395.61

60,281.00

124,024.57

101,263.33

137,473.75

73,373.21

57,504.08

44,192.58

40,136.07

46,774.87

69,695.22

54,300.87

41,763.08

49,576.07

45,235.08

57,236.36

62,861.60

54,492.76

84,420.96

86,007.51

109,754.95

105,355.14

108,605.17

109,372.52

111,962.09

111,034.14

117,337.00

80.00

2,600.00

38,000.00

2,598.90

25,727.13

25,519.21

29,260.90

38,762.93

28,968.16

33,932.46

36,252.93

926,867.86

948,014.33

981,582.10 1,094,804.92 1,162,247.14 1,254,634.77 1,146,103.15

180,052.10

340,763.62

475,147.24

$1,342,299.24 1,595,398.39 1,621,250.39

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Auditor General.

HONGKONG.

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1885.

179

No. 24.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on 31st March, 1886.

ASSETS.

£

C.

$$3

LIABILITIES.

Moneys deposited in Banks at interest,...

100,000.00 Deposits not available,.

3,593.50

Silver Currency,..

99,800.00 Refund of Taxes, for unoccupied Houses,

1,321.06

Copper Currency,

K

Post Offices, London, Italy, &c.,

22,064.59

Balance in Bank at Current Account,

140,701.05 Pensions due to Civil Officers,

3,916.70

Do. to ex-Police Constables,......

5,000.00

340,501.05

Investment in England :-

Officers' Remittances, not yet paid,

5,426.32

Victoria Govt 4% Debentures of £ 2,100,

11,168.97 Military Contribution,.

30,000.00

Balance due to Crown Agents...

7,407.00

Balance of Money Order,

351,670.02

6,242.04

Subsidiary Coins in transit,..

130,630.34

Balance due by Government of India,........

1,246.22

Do. Kaulung Sea Wall,.

4,088.61

Total Liabilities,.

.$

78,792.17

Advances and other sums to be recovered,

12,544.36

Balance to the Credit of the Colony,*....$

427,692.42

TOTAL ASSETS,..... ..$ 506,421.59

TOTAL,....

* Including the sum of $130,411.92, Balance of Premia on Land Sales.

AUDITOR GENERAL'S OFFICE,

HONGKONG, 15th March, 1886.

506,421.59

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Auditor Gener al.

181

No. 25.

HONGKONG.

ANNUAL WEATHER REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY, FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on 14th April, 1886.

ANNUAL WEATHER REPORT FOR 1885.

The year 1885 presented some unusual features here, which were caused by the exceptional strength of the S monsoon last summer. The SW monsoon in India was also unusually strong, while the summer in England was extremely hot and dry. These features will be better understood, when the isobars over the world for last summer are constructed, but there is not much doubt, that the area of high pressure over the Pacific did not stretch so far westward as usual, in consequence of which, gradients for SW winds were steeper than usual and most of the typhoons passed east of Formosa, the most important exception being furnished by the typhoon that passed through the Formosa Channel on the 24th August, but this typhoon had apparently been deflected from the usual path and attracted by the small typhoon that passed northwards between Hongkong and Macao on the 17th of that month. And the typhoons appear to have originated farther East of Luzon than in 1884.

During the summer the amount of cloud over this place was excessive and they were unusually low. There was little sunshine, much rain, and the thunderstorms were severe and protracted. The effect of the S monsoon is very striking on comparing the monthly rainfall at Stone Cutters' Island with the mean of eight years' rainfall (1878-1885 incl.):

www.y

Month.

Rainfall.

Mean.

1885.

Excess

above mean.

January,

0.64

0.71

+

0.07

February,.

1.75

2.54

+

0.79

March,

3.95

2.16

1.79

April,

6.99

13.72

+

6.73

May,.

11.67

5.64

6.03

June,

14.12

26.74

+ 12.62

July,.

15.36

16.01

+

0.65

August,

18.67

28.81

+ 10.14

September,

10.54

5.97

4.57

October,

5.74

2.59

3.15

November,

1.24

0.45

0.79

December,

0.34

1.03

+ 0.69

Year..

91.01

106.37

+ 15.36

At the Observatory the cisterns of the barograph and the standard barometer are placed 110 feet above Mean Sea Level. The bulbs of the thermometers are placed 109 feet above Mean Sea Level and 4 feet above the ground except the terrestrial radiation thermometer, which is about one inch above the ground. The rim of the pluviograph, which is 114 inches in diameter, is placed 106 feet above Mean Sea Level and 21 inches above the ground. The cups of the anemograph are 150 feet above Mean Sea Level and 45 feet above the ground.

At Victoria Peak the instruments, except the radiation thermometers and the rain-gauge, are placed in the look-out. The cistern of the barometer is 1819 feet above Mean Sea Level. The bulbs of the thermometers are about 4 feet above the floor, except the maximum thermometer, which is a few inches higher. The radiation thermometers are placed at the same height above the ground as at the Obser- vatory. The rim of the rain-gauge is 8 inches in diameter and is one foot above the ground.

182

At Stone Cutters' Island the rim of the rain-gauge is 8 inches in diameter and is placed 2 feet 4 inches above the ground and about 15 feet above Sea Level.

The Monthly Weather Reports are arranged as follows:-

Table I exhibits the hourly readings of the barometer reduced to 32°.0 Fahrenheit, but not to sea level, as measured (at two minutes to the hour named) from the barograms.

Table II exhibits the hourly readings of the temperature of the air round the Observatory as determined by aid of the rotating dry bulb thermometer and the thermograms (at two minutes past the hour named), and also the extreme temperatures during the day.

Table III exhibits the hourly readings of the temperature of evaporation round the observatory as determined by aid of the rotating damp bulb thermometer and the thermograms (at two minutes past the hour named), and also the solar radiation maximum (black bulb) and terrestrial radiation (grass- minimum) temperatures, read at 10 p. and entered for the same day.

The thermometers are rotated round a nearly horizontal axis (which is kept about 4 feet above the ground) the observer generally walking along facing the wind, so that the bulbs describe screws of small pitch. The diameter of the screw described by the damp is larger than that described by the dry bulb.

Table IV exhibits the mean relative humidity in percentage of saturation (the humidity of air saturated with moisture being 100) and mean tension of aqueous vapour present in the air expressed in inches of mercury, for every hour in the day and for every day in the month, calculated by aid of Blanford's tables from the data exhibited in Tables II and III.

Table V exhibits the duration of sun-shine expressed in hours as registered by aid of the sun-shine recorder from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour (true time) named.

Table VI exhibits the amount of rain expressed in inches registered from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named.

Table VII exhibits, for every hour in the day, the velocity of the wind and its direction in numbers (8-E, 16-S, 24-W, 32-N) as measured from the anemograms. The velocity is the number of miles traversed by the wind, from half an hour before to half an hour after the hour named. The direction is read off at the hour, except when the wind is very light and changeable, when the average direction during the hour is estimated, taking into account the velocity from different quarters. The direction is not noted when the velocity is below 1.5 miles an hour.

Table VIII exhibits, for every hour in the day, the mean velocity of the wind reduced to 4 and also to 2 directions, as well as the mean direction of the wind

The number of miles traversed by winds from directions 31, 32 and 1 and half the number of miles from 30 and 2 are termed (N). The number of miles from 3, 4 and 5 and half the number of miles from 2 and 6 are termed (NE), etc. We have then:

N=(N)+(NE) cos 45° + (NW) cos 45°. E=(E)+(NE) cos 45° + (SE) cos 45°.

which are the components exhibited in this table.

etc.

Table IX exhibits the direction (to two points) and force (0-12) of the wind at Victoria Peak, and sea disturbance (0-9) at Cape d'Aguilar.

Table X exhibits the readings of the barometer reduced to 32°.0 Fahrenheit, but not to sea level, and of the thermometers at Victoria Peak.

Table XI exhibits the relative humidity and tension of vapour at 10 a, 4 p. and 10 p. daily at the Observatory and at Victoria Peak.

Table XII exhibits the amount (0-10), name and direction whence coming, of the clouds. Where the names of upper and lower clouds are given, but only one direction, this refers to the lower clouds. Table XIII exhibits the amount of rain measured at 10 a. and entered to preceding day at different stations and the duration of precipitation at the Observatory.

The following Annual Report is arranged as follows:-

Table I exhibits the mean height of the barometer at the Observatory and at the Peak expressed in inches, the latter being the mean of the 10 a., 4 p. and 10 p. observations, and the excess of the hourly values at the Observatory above the mean.

At 4 a. the barometer begins to rise. It is at the time comparatively lower in spring, when the atmosphere is nearly saturated with moisture, than later in the year. It attains its mean height about 6 a., perhaps a little later in spring than in autumn and winter. At 10 a. the height attains its forenoon

183

maximum, which is the absolute maximum. The barometer stands comparatively highest at 10 a. in mid-winter. It then begins to fall and attains again its average value about 1 p., but later in summer than in winter. It reaches its second minimum between 4p. and 5 p. in summer, but already about 3 p. in winter. At all seasons of the year this is the absolute minimum but comparatively lowest in Thereafter it rises and reaches its third average shortly before 8 p. in winter and shortly after 8 p. in summer. The second maximum occurs about 10 p. This was comparatively highest in August. Then the barometer falls, attains its average value about 1 a. and a minimum about 4 a.

winter.

The diurnal range in the different months came out as follows: January, 0.100, February, 0.098, March, 0.095, April, 0.097, May, 0.087, June, 0.070, July, 0.065, August, 0.067, September, 0.074, October, 0.087, November, 0.105, December, 0.108. The average range was 0.088, exactly the same as in the previous year..

The height of the rock on which the look-out at Victoria Peak is placed has been calculated from the mean of the barometric observations made in 1885 to be 1814 feet, and from the mean of those made in 1884 and 1885 to be 1816 feet.

The first column of the following table shows the mean height of the barometer reduced to Mean Sea Level at the Hongkong Observatory. The second column shows the mean excess of the barometer in Shanghai over that in Hongkong, the distance between these stations being about 670 miles. The third column shows the mean excess of the barometer in Hongkong over that in Manila, the distance being about 600 miles. The data in the two last columns have been derived from the telegraphic reports issued at 10 a. from the Harbour Master's Office, Shanghai, and from the Missionary Observa- tory, Manila, respectively :

·

1885.-January,

February,.

March,

April,

May,.

June,

July,

August,

.....

September,

October,

November,

December,

Year,

30.223

+ 0.094

+ 0.160

.153

+ .122

+

.150

.107

+ .031

+

.093

29.954

+

.013

+

.021

.877

.040

.039

.784

.041

.069

.736

.042

..122

.727

.011

.092

.864

.006

.038

30.023

+

.017

+

.089

.175

+ .050

+

.196

.154

+ 0.055

+ 0.169

29.981

+ 0,020 + 0.043

L

The comparison of this with the corresponding table in last year's report illustrates the comparative steepness of gradients for SW winds, which evidently was the cause of the typhoons nearly all passing East of Formosa.

In order to reduce the barometric readings to the gravity of latitude 45°, using Colonel Clarke's figures, the following corrections should be applied: Manila: -0.068, Hongkong: -0.055, Shanghai: -0.036 and in consequence + 0.019 should be added to the numbers in the second column and + 0.013 to those in the third.

Table II exhibits the mean temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at the Observatory and at the Peak, the latter being the mean of the 10 a, 10 p, maximum and minimum temperatures, and the excess of the hourly values at the Observatory above the mean. The daily variation is smaller in summer than in winter. The hottest part of the day is between 1 p. and 2 p. and the coldest about 6 a, but the lowest temperature occurs earlier in summer than in winter.

The diurnal ranges of temperature are exhibited in Table XVIII. The daily range of temperature is diminished by the circumstance that the force of the wind is smaller at night. It is on an average greater at the Observatory than at the Peak, the air at the former station having been somewhat longer in contact with the ground, which is heated during the day and cooled during the night through radiation. For this reason the daily range of temperature is greater in low places than in those exposed on prominences, a circumstance of some importance in selecting sites for camps, etc.

The monthly extremes of temperature are exhibited in Tables XVI and XVII. The ranges are much greater in winter than in summer.

Table III exhibits the relative humidity in percentage of saturation at the Observatory and at the Peak, the latter being the mean of the 10 a. 4 p. and 10 p. values, and the excess of the hourly values above the mean at the Observatory. The air is farthest from saturation and therefore feels driest between 1 p. and 2 p. and nearest saturation about 4 a., when it feels dampest. The average relative humidity is registered about 8a. and 6 p.

184

Table IV exhibits the tension of vapour expressed in inches of mercury at the Observatory and at the Peak, the latter being the mean of observations made at 10 a,, 4 p. and 10 p., and the excess of the hourly values above the mean at the Observatory. The daily variation, as was to be expected from a coast station, is small, but there is less vapour in the air in the morning than in the evening. In summer the daily variation is nearly insensible.

The monthly extreme ranges in vapour tension (at 10 a, 4 p. and 10 p.) are exhibited in Tables XVI and XVII. They were greatest in November.

The

The annual variation of the vapour tension was about the same as in the previous year. maximum monthly mean occurred in June at the Observatory and in July at the Peak, the minimum in February at both stations. The mean relative humidity was greatest in April at the Observatory and in May at the Peak and was least in November at both stations.

The

Table V exhibits the total number of hours of bright sun-shine. The daily maximum fell about 11 a. and there was a little more sun-shine in the forenoon than in the afternoon,-just the opposite of the previous year. The monthly minimum occurred in February and the maximum in October. minimum in percentage of possible duration occurred in February and the maximum in December. The record on days on which the sun shone without interruption from sunrise to sunset having been compared with the time during which the sun was above the horizon, it was found that the sun is not strong enough to make a trace till 0.4 hours after its time of rising or before setting, calculated without taking refraction or diameter into account, and the total possible durations shown in the last but one column have been calculated by taking this into account. It was owing to the uncertainty of this quantity, that the percentage of possible duration was not exhibited in last year's report. It would obviously have been wrong to calculate on the supposition, that the sun was strong enough to mark the card from sunrise to sunset.

Table VI exhibits the total hourly rainfall. It appears, that there is a regular daily variation, the maximum falling about 9 a. and the minimum about 5 p. June was the wettest month and November the driest. The greatest falls of rain are exhibited in Table XVI. It will be remarked that 12.63 inches of rain fell on the 12th June at the Observatory and 14.50 at the Peak.

Table VII exhibits the number of hours, during portion of which, it rained. The data in this table should be used only for comparison, the correct total duration of rain being exhibited in Table XI. It appears from this table, that it rains more often about sunrise than about sunset.

These tables were omitted in last year's report, as conclusions concerning the fall of rain are occasionally drawn on insufficient data. They are exhibited below and confirm the remarks made above.

Total Hourly Rainfall during ten months of the year 1884.

Month.

1 3.

2 a. 3 a.

4 a. 5 a. 6 a. 7 a.

8 a. 9 a.

10 a. 11 a. Noon. 1 p. 2 p. 3 p. 4 p. 5 p. 6 p. 7 p. 8 p. 9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt. Sum.

March,.

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,.

October,

November,

December,

.050 .010 .025 .065 .015 .025 .040 .005 .075 .125 .135 .135 .210 .055 .015 .010

0,132 0.070 1.375 0.268 0.092 0.123 0.099 0.015 0.345 0.009

0.065 0.093 0.842 0.250 0.005 0.625 0.386 0.085 0.495 0.443 5.827

.250 .290 .390 .225 .235 .117 .185 .182 1.278 .220 0.895 0.065 0.030 0.015 .030 .064 $35 .055 .010 .030 .: .025 .185 .150 5.261

.035 .075 .025 .135 .240 .505 .795 .080 .020 .084 .800 1.215 .045 .340 .810 .520 .675 1.265 .715 .280 .180 .010 .145 .045 9.089

.145 .280 .230 .870 .315 2.145 .790 .940 .160 .230 .235 .315 355 1.515 1.005 .115 .145 ,225 .805 .345 .155 .065 .050 .100 11,035

.075 .185 .210 .510 1.295 1.020 .920 2.085 1.145 .160 .560 .740 .790 .720 ,255 .310 .175 .115 .305 .830 .400 .115 .015 .140 13.075

.630 .565 1.390 .615 1.005 .€25 .400 .250 .265 .725 .250 .455 .020

.155 .265 .905 .250 .170 1.070 .435 .015 .355 10.815

1.105 1.280 1.070 .700 .340 .220 .250 .445 .420 .125 .040 .475 .080 .315 .325 .690 .470 ,975 1.195 .520 .100 .190 .380 .660 12.370

.110 .335 .150 .070 .030 .010 .005 .250 .070

.730 .285 .145 .015 .090 .100 .100 .105 .010

.015 .120 .175 .165 3.085

.100 .170 .050 .040 .140 1.495

Sums,..... 1.902 3.155 4.040 3.733 3.177 5.170 3.700 4.402 3.163 1.218 4.120 3.480 2.110 2.995 2.595 2.057 3.007 3.895 3.295 2.900 2.486 1.095 1,500 2.198| 72.002

Month.

Number of Hours, during portion of which it rained, during ten months of the year 1884.

1 a. 2 a. 3 a. 4 a. 5 a. 6 a. 7 a. 8 a. 9 a. 10a. 11 a. Noon. 1 p. 2p. 3p. 4p. 5 p. 6p. 7p. 8p. 9p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt. Sum.

2

12

3

77

86

102

2

129

1

85

2

69

2

37

2

38

0

221243221 :

01 00 01 00 01 —~~~:

4 3

3

2

4 4

8

6

5

...

2

2

2

1

3319462:

2 2

1 1

6 8 4

4

3

6

4

1 2 2

2

2 2

1

12 HM 10 ~ ~~::

Y

2

3

5

6

1

1

1 2

-~~+ :-~~ :

12+022-2:

*~***~~- :

⠀ # 2 10 00 10 00 M OD

1

4

3

- ca

IT 1 ∞ ∞ ::

2+91-∞ONNN

5

12046 10 10 2~~:

3

5

210 4 5 6 12 12

TO CO 10 43 00 20 00 HH

6

8

5

3 3

2 1

1 1

3

5 4

4

14200 200 100 200 20:

244456642

61 00 TH 00 10 H10 H

Sums,......... 28 31 37 35 34 35 33 32 35 34 26 31 23 19 20 27 23 23 20 24 27 19 19 30

March,

April,

May,

3

5

3

3

June,

July,

August,

September,

5

October,

November,.

2 1

December,

665

185

The approximate hourly intensity of rainfall i. e. the hourly rainfall divided with the number of hours, during portion of which it rained, or heavy dew fell, was calculated for the mean of 1884 and 1885 and indicates, that the rain is heaviest in the middle of the day and lightest about midnight;

1 a. 0.103

7 a. 0.127

2

.154

8

.175

1 p. 2

0.165

7

P. 0.127

.120

8

.112

77

27

27

3

.143

9

.184

3

.107

9

.080

""

""

""

4

.109

10

.116

4

.080

10

.091

22

27

""

""

5

.118

6

.134

11 Noon

.202

5

.098

11

.087

27

>>

""

.140

6

.141

Midt.

.070

""

">

The true mean hourly intensity came out as follows in 1884 :--

January, 0.000; February, 0.037; March, 0.117; April, 0.072; May, 0.116; June, 0.148; July, 0.150; August, 0.155; September, 0.252; October, 0.119; November, 0.045; December, 0000; Year, 0.101.

and in 1885 :-

January, 0.029; February, 0.028; March, 0.035; April, 0.179; May, 0.085; June, 0.373; July, 0.175; August, 0.218; September, 0.104; October, 0.100; November, 0.063; December, 0.039; Year, 0.119.

This was obtained by dividing the monthly rainfalls in Table XI with the duration. The intensity is a maximum in June, a minimumn in January and was greater in 1885 than in 1884.

Table VIII exhibits the velocity of the wind expressed in miles per hour and the excess of the hourly values above the mean at the Observatory. The velocity at the Peak has been computed from the force estimated there at 10 a., 4 p. and 10 p. The usual daily variation (maximum at 11 a. and minimum at 10 p.) is seen to be greater in summer than in mid-winter during the months when the velocity was greatest, while it was least in September. The velocity is much greater at the Peak than near sea level even taking into account that it is observed principally during the day, and the annual variation is scarcely seen, though there appears to be a maximum in June. The daily variation is probably also small. The increase in wind-force with the height above sea level being small in winter and great in summer agrees with the circumstance that the SW monsoon extends so much higher up than the NE monsoon, which in consequence is subject to a certain amount of friction at its upper surface where the direction of the wind is veering.

In order to throw light on the maximum of wind-force mentioned in the monthly reports of January and February, 1884, as occurring in the early morning hours, and which is often noticed during strong East winds early in the year, the mean force of the wind at South Cape (Formosa) was computed from the three-hourly observations made from the 1st of August, 1884 till the 31st July, 1885 inclusive. These observations are made carefully by the staff of the lighthouse. feet above sea level, but as they are occasionally guided in their estimations by the amount of sail carried by such sailing vessels as happen to be visible, the figures may be taken' to represent the force of the wind at a lower level.

The observers stand about 150

Mean Force of Wind at South Cape (Formosa).

Year. 1884. August,

Month.

3 a. 6 a.

9 a. Noon.

3 p.

6 p.

9 p. Midt. Mean.

3.4 3.0

2.9

2.9

3.2

3.0

2.9

3.0

3.0

>>

September,.

3.7 3.2

3.1

3.2

3.1

3.1

3.2

3.6

3.3

October,

4.2 3.8

3.8

3.8

3.2

3.5

4.1

4.3

3.8

""

November,

4.8 4.6

4.3

4.3

3.8

4.0

4.4

4.6

4.4

December,

4.1 4.0

4.0

4.1

3.8

3.4

3.7

4.2

3.9

22

1885. January,

3.1 3.2

3.0

2.9

2.6

2.6

2.7

3.0

2.9

""

February, March,. April, May,

4.0 4.0

4.0

3.7

3.4

3.3

3.4

3.7

3.7

3.1 3.2

3.0

2.8

2.8

2.7

2.8

3.1

2.9

2.8 2.5

2.6

2.5

2.2

2.3

2.3

2.6

2.5

....

2.6 2.6

2.7

2.8

2.6

2.5

2.1

2.5

2.6

""

,,

June, July,

Mean:

2.3 2.4

2.2

2.2

2.5

2.1

2.0

2.2

2.2

2.8 2.9

2.8

2.8

2.9

3.0

2.7

2.8

2.8

3.4 3.3 3.2

3.2

3.0 3.0

3.0

3.3

3.2

It is seen, that the maximum force of the wind occurs at 3 a. and the minimum at 6 p. which no doubt closely correspond with the epochs of extreme force over the open sea, the effects of which during strong Easterly wind were traced in our records.

Table IX exhibits the mean direction of the wind at the Observatory and at the Peak. The direction at the Peak is to an ebserver facing the wind about a point to the right in winter and over two points in the same direction in summer. The excess of the hourly direction above the mean, at the Observatory expressed in degrees, is counted from North through East towards South. The veering of the wind during the day is small but greater during the southerly monsoon, It was greatest in September.

186

Table X exhibits the total distance traversed by, as well as the duration and average velocity of winds from bi-quadrantal points. The velocity is a maximum for E winds and the average direction is straight E, but there is a secondary maximum for SW winds, whose duration is however small. Both with regard to frequency and velocity the S and SW winds in 1885 were greater than in 1884.

Table XI shows particulars concerning the rainfall, (as measured at 10 a.) which in the summer was considerably greater at the Peak than at a lower level. Each day on which not less than 0.01 inches of rain fell, is counted. It is plain, that the observers neglect to measure the rain every day at the Peak. and at Stone Cutters' Island.

Table XII contains particulars concerning different phenomena. Fog occurred frequently in March. At times when gradients are slight and clouds come from between SE and SW fog may be expected. Electric phenomena are most frequent in August, but as many thunderstorms passed over the Colony in April, as in August. The storms were severer and lasted about twice as long as in the previous year. Some damage to property was caused by them, but not so much as would be caused by an equal number of storms of equal severity in the United Kingdom. They have a well marked daily period, being most frequent at 7 p. Their direction was generally from W towards E up to the end of April and subsequently from SW towards NE. Unusual visibility of distant objects was most frequent in June, when the air was moist and fog absent. Halos were frequent in July.

Table XIII shows the frequency of clouds of different forms from observations made 8 times a day. During January, cum. prevailed, during February and March, cum-nim. In April cum. again prevails and holds the ground till the end of the year.-C, c-str. and c-cum. have their maxima in the typhoon season, the latter forms already in July. Sm-cum. are common during the last half of the year, when the weather is fine. Cum-str., the thunderclouds, had their maximum in July, R-cum in winter, cum-nim, the threatening cloud, in spring, and nim, the rain cloud, in the rainy season.

The number of days on which clouds were observed to be below 2000 feet was as follows January, 14, February, 19, March, 19, April, 24, May, 20, June, 14, July, 18, August, 14, September, 10, October, 2, November, 2, December, 12-The number of days on which they were observed to be below 1000 feet was as follows:-January, 2, February, 10, March, 8, April, 5, May, 6, June, 0, July, 2, August, 1, September, 1, October, 0, November, 0, December, 3.

The mean direction of clouds (whence coming) was as follows :—

1885.

January, February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

....

November,

December,...

Lower.

E by S

Upper.

Cirrus.

W

W

E by N

W

W

ESE

W by S

W

SE

W

W

S

WNW

WNW

S

NNW

N

SSW

NNE

N

S

NNE

NNE

SSE

NNW

NE

ENE

W

NNE

ENE

W

E by S

W

W

In computing the direction of the upper clouds, cirri were included, and in computing the direction of cirrus the observations made in 1884 were also included. From June to October inclusive cirri come from two different directions, from about NE while a typhoon is in existence somewhere, their direction often backing from E to N while the typhoon is yet over 700 miles away; and from about W, when there are no signs of a typhoon. But cirrus is rarely seen in summer except before typhoons, through whose agency vapour is evidently brought up to the higher regions of the atmosphere.

The c-str. radiate most frequently from NE, and so far I have not succeeded in connecting the direction of the strice with the position of typhoons.

It is possible, that the direction whence coming of the clouds has a slight diurnal variation. The direction appears to back one or two points during the day. This is just the reverse of the diurnal variation in the direction of the wind, which would agree well with the hypothesis advocated by Espy and Köppen.

The direction whence coming, of the lower clouds is to the right of the wind to an observer facing the wind, especially in summer. In September, the direction of the wind changed most quickly with the elevation, the mean direction of the wind at the Observatory being E by N, at the Peak ESE, at the level of the lower clouds SSE, at the level of the upper clouds NNW, and at the level of cirrus, perhaps 6 or 8 miles up, NE.

187

Table XIV exhibits the amount of cloud, which is greatest in the morning and least in the evening. It reached its maximum in February, during which the sky was almost continuously over- cast, and decreased then slowly till December, when it reached its minimum.

Table XV exhibits the sea-disturbance, which was greatest in January and February, when the force of the wind was highest and least in September, together with the wind force.

Table XVI and Table XVII exhibit the extremes of the principal meteorological elements at the Observatory and at the Peak respectively.

Table XVIII exhibits the mean readings of the black bulb thermometers at the Observatory and at the Peak. The readings published in the Observations and Researches for 1884 and in the monthly reports for 1885 were reduced to the standard kept at Kew by applying a constant correction. In 1885 however comparisons were made at different parts of the scale by the intermediary of a black bulb ther- mometer whose corrections were investigated at both Observatories, and it was ascertained, that the readings as published for the Peak should be increased by 2°.0, the correction being sensibly constant, and that the following corrections should be applied to the readings as published for the Observatory

At 90°

>>

100°

110°

20.4

0°.8

At · 120°

130°

""

+ 0°.5

140°

""

+ 1°.5

+2°.3

+ 2°.9

These corrections have been applied to the data published in this, the annual report for 1885, and corrections to readings above 140° have been extrapolated.-It should be remembered that these cor- rections do not by any means improve the accuracy of the observations but simply render them comparable with those made at Kew and at Observatories, whose black bulb thermometers have been compared there. A great number of readings of black bulb thermometers have lately been published from Ceylon. These would be comparable with those published elsewhere, if the thermometers were compared. The thermometers distributed among the Imperial Maritime Customs' stations have been compared here and observations were started last year at a great number of stations. But of course records of black bulb thermometers are not very important.

The highest mean of black bulb temperature occurred in September, at both stations. The greatest mean excess above mean maximum air temperature in September, at the Observatory and in October, at the Peak. When the clouds are low this excess is greatest at the Peak, when they are high it is greatest at the Observatory.

The same table shows the mean excess of minimum air temperature above the minimum on grass. In March, the grass minimum at the Peak did not register lower than the minimum owing no doubt to the fog. The greatest difference was registered in November, at both stations.

But those figures do not exhibit a measure of the terrestrial radiation, as the grass minimum gets wet from fog and rain, and it is most probable that its temperature is depressed more from this cause than by radiation. The greatest radiation is registered in November, which coincides with the greatest dryness of the air, as might be expected, but just at that time the least trace of dampness on the ground would lower the readings enormously, and it is remarked that the lowest readings of the grass minimum are obtained when the sky clears with a dry northerly wind just after a slight fall of rain. For these reasons I feel inclined to doubt, whether the grass minimum is of any value at all for registering terrestrial radiation. But it indicates roughly the lowest temperature on the grass.

The same table shows the average weight of aqueous vapour in Troy grains in each cubic foot of air at the Observatory and at the Peak.

The same table exhibits the mean diurnal range of temperature at the Observatory and at the Peak, which is of course greater than the range that follows from the hourly readings.

The same table shows the height to which one must ascend in order to have the mean temperature lowered one degree, the figures having been calculated from the data in Table II. This is greatest when the clouds are low.

From a return furnished by the Registrar General it is seen that the mean monthly death-rate per thousand among the Chinese in Hongkong from Zymotic diseases was 1.067 in 1884 and 1.384 in 1885, and from diseases of the Digestive Organs 0.059 in 1884 and 0.081 in 1885. The maximum monthly death-rate from the former diseases occurred in September, 1884, (1.413) and in July, 1885, (2.966) and the minimum in February, 1884, (0.749) and in January, 1885, (0.670). The maximum monthly death-rate from the latter diseases occurred in October, 1884, (0.099) and in July and October, 1885, (0.112) and the minimum in December, 1884, (0.026) and in February, 1885, (0.046).-The mean monthly death-rate per thousand from diseases of the Skin was 0.065 in 1884 and 0.043 in 1885 and from diseases of the Respiratory Organs 0.213 in 1884 and 0.237 in 1885.

The effects of the increased strength of the S monsoon in 1885 appear thus in the increased death-rate from various diseases.

TABLE I.

Mean Height of the Barometer at the Observatory and at the Peak for each month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory.

Mean.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

Ýä,

4 a.

5 a.

6 &. 7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon.

1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p 8 p.

9 p. 10 p.

11

1 p. Midt.

Observ-

atory.

Peak.

188

January,.

+.005

February,

+.009

-.003 -.014 -.018 -.002 -.013 ..019

March,

+.005

.006 -.021 -.026

April,

+.005

-.013

-.017 -.005.010 +.032 -.018 -.004 .014 +.031 .020 -.004 +.015 +.035 .026 .030 -.022 -.007 +.013 +.034

+.047 +.049

May,

-.001

.013

..021 ..022 -.016

-.002

+.016 +.030

+.039 +.044

June,

+.005

.006

July,

+.002 .008

-.012 ..012 -.010 ..017 .016 -.014

+.010 +.022

+.030 +.034

.024

.000

-.003

+.007 +.018

+.026 +.030

August,

+.005

September,.

-.001

---

October,

November,

December,

.006 015 017 -.015 .011 .019 ..018 -.013 -.001 .01.1 .017 .021 -+.002 .006 -.013 014 +.004 -.003 -.011 ..014

+.013 +.029

-.006 +.007 +.019 +.028 +.030 -.002

+.048 +.052 +.037 +.011 -.021 -.039 +.048 +.053 +.042 +.020 -.005 -.027 +.046 +.051 +.043 +.026 -.004 -.026 +.044 +.031 +.040 +.029 +.031 +.020 +.027 +018 +.025 +.015

-.048.045 .045 -.044

.043 -.044

..036 -.024 ..037 ..030 -.041 ..032

-.009 +.009 -.018 .002 -.018 .001

+.016 +.019 +.007 +.012

+.020 +.018 | 30.104

28.303

+.011 +.008 | 30.033

28.214

+.015 +.021

+.019 +.013 | 29.988

28.205

+.002 -.021

+.008

+.004 —.012 +.005 −.012 -.002 -.017

.037 -.045

-.013

.031 ..043

-.034

-.033

.048 -.038 -.024 -.043

-.036 -.031

.005

+.014 +.025

+.026 +.014| 29.838

28.109

-.022

.005

+.007 +.019

+.022 +.011| 29.763

28.056

-.021

.007

+.005 +.020

+.020 +.010 29.671

27.991

.024 -.034

.035

-.031

-.019

.003

+.014 +.027

+.027 +.018] 29.623

27.942

.030 -.035

.037 -.027

+.036 +.036

+.028 +.012

-.013.028

.036 -.038

.015 .000

+.016 +.035

+.044 +.044

+.032 +.012

-.015 -.034

.043 ..040

009 +.005

+.024 +.039

+.051 +.048

+.032 +.006

-.009 .002

+.018 +.036

+.053 +.054

+.038 +.007

-.026 -.047 -.026 -.045

.054 -.051 -.054 -.049

.035 -.024 .032 -.023 .040 -.026

.038 ..026

-.017 +.001 +.017 +.029 -.010.008 +.024 +.029 -.008 +.011 +.020+.021 -.009 +.009 +.020 +.024 -.009 +.007 +.016 +.019

.028 +.019 | 29.614 +.025 +.018 | 29.751 +.017 +.011 29.909 28.182 +.021 +.015 | 30.058 28.299 +.016 +.010] 30,036 28.265

27.933

28.053

Means,

+.003 −.007-017-019 -015-002 +.014 +.030 +.041 +.044. +.035 +.017

-.008 -.027

-.039-.042 -.038 .029 .015 +.002 +.015 +.022 +.021 +.014 29.866 28.129

TABLE II.

Mean Temperature at the Observatory and at the Peak for each Month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory.

Mean.

Month.

1 a. 2 a.

3 a. 4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p. 2 p. 3 p. 4 p. 5 p. 6 p.

7 p. 8 p. 9 p. 10p. 11 p. Midt.

Observ-

Peak.

atory.

January,

February,

March,

-1,2 -1,3 -1.6 -1.8 1.9 -2.0-2.1 -0.9 -1.2 1.4 -1.6 -1.7 -1.8 1.7 1.5 1.8 1.8 -2.1 -2.2 -2.4 -2.1

April,

-1.4

1.7

1.8 1.9

May,

1.5

1.7

1.8 -2.1

-2.1

1.9 1.9 1.4 1.9 -1.1

June,

1.4

1.5 -1.6 1.8

1.9

1.5 -0.9

July,

1.3

1.5 -1.7 -1.7

1.8

August,

1.2

1.3 -1.4 -1.6

1.7

September,

1.3

1,3 -1.6 -1.8

1.8

October,

1.0

1.3 -1.5 -1.6 1.8

November,

December,

1.5 1.8 1.9 -1.3 1.4 1.6

- 1.9 - 1.3

- 2.0 - 1.5 2.2 -2.4 -2.5 -2.2

1.9

-2.1 -2.3 -2.1

−1.5 −0.5 +0.6 +1.7 +2.6 +3.3 +3.3 +3.0 +2.3 +1.5 +0.2 -0.1 -0.3 -0.5 -0.7 -0.8 -1.1 1.2 -0.6 +0.2 +1.0 +1.8 +2.3 +2.2 +2.1 +1.3 +0.9 +0.5 +0.4 +0.2 +0.2 +0.2 -0.1 -0.5 1.3 -0.1 1.1 +1.9 +2.4 +3.2 +3.4 +3.4 +2.9 +1.9 +0.5 -0.1 -0.5 -0.8 -0.9 1.0 0.7 +0.3 +1.1 +1.5 +2.1 +2.8 +3.1 +2.9 +1.8 +1.1 -0.1 -0.6 -0.7 -0.7 -0.8 -0.8 -0.4 +0.1 +1.0 +1.6 +1.7 +2.3 +2.8 +2.4 +1.9 +1.2 +0.5 -0.2 -0.4 0.6 -0.6 1.0 0.0 +0.7 +1.6 +2.1 +2.3 +2.6 +2.6 +2.4 +1.4 +0.8 0.0 0.7 -0.9 1.0 -1.1 -1.7 -1.0 -0.4 0.0 +0.7 +1.5 +1.9 +2.1 +2.3 +2.7 +2.0 +1.6 +0.7 −0.1 -0.5 1.8 1.0 -0.3 +0.5 +1.3 +1.7 +2.0 +1.9 +2.0 +2.1 +1.9 +1.3 +0.3 -0.4 -0.7 -0.2 +0.7 +1.4 +2.1 +2.2 +2.8 +2.6 +2.1 +1.8 +0.9 · 0.0 -0.5 -0.8 -0.9 -0.9 0.4 +0.7 +1.4 +1.8 +2.1 +2.3 +2.2 +1.9 +1.3 +0.8 -0.1 -0.2 -0.4 -0.4 -0.4 -0.6 1.1 +0.3 +1.5 +2,3 +2.8 +3.2 +3.2 +2.9 +2.2 +1.3 +0.3 0.2 -0.4 -0.7 1.0 -1.2 -1.2 −0.1 +1.3 +1.9 +2.4 +2.9 +2.8 +2.6 +1.9 +1.2 +0.5 +0.1 -0.2 -0.4 -0.7 -0.9

:

58.7

51.1

54.9

48.1

1.2

60.6

56.3

1.0

70.4

66.3

0.9

77.6

71.4

-1.2

1.3

80.6

74.4

0.9 1.1

1.0 -0.8

1.3 1.4

80.9

75.1

-0.9

1.0

80.0

74.8

1.0

1.1

78.7

73.2

0.9

75.1

69.3

- 1.4

68.0

62.0

- 1.4

63.6

58.3

-

Means,.

−1.3 −1,5 −1.6 1.8 1.9 2.0 1.5 -0.7 +0.2 +1.1 +1.8. +2.2 +2.6 +2.7 +2.5 +1.9 +1.2 +0.3 −0.2 -0.5 -0.6 -0.7 -0.9 -1.1

70.8

65.0

TABLE III.

Mean Humidity at the Observatory and at the Peak for each Month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7. a. 8 a.

9 a. 10 a. 11 a. Noon. 1 p. 2 p. 3 p. 4 p. 5 p. 6 p. 7 p. 8 p. 9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Mean.

Observ-

Peak.

atory.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

·

+3 +3

September,

October,

November,

December,

+5 +5 +5

+5 +5 +3

+3 +4 +5 +4 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +6 +6 +3 +3 1 +3 +3 +4 +3

+4 +3 +4 +4 +3 +4 +5 +2 +1 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +2 +1 +3 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +3 +3 +5 +4 +4 +3 +3 +2 +1 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +2 1 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +4 +-2

3

1

4

4425

6

مجدد

7

7

6

4

4

4

2

6

7

8

7

4

1

4

6

7 6

6

1

0

2

+1

+2

0

3

1

3

0

3

4

+2 0

CI CO Co

WONW0

-5

4

6

4

4

4

6

9

8

6

4

5

-6

6

7

6

6

5

5

7

8

6

7 6

3

1

8

8

7

4

5

4

-6

7 6

6

4

♡ IHONHO 00 00 – 0 N

-2

+2

OONNO

+2

+2

+3 +3 +3 +4

77

89

0

+1

+1

0

0 +2

81

94

+1

+2 4

+1

+ 4

+4

85

88

+3

+3 +3

+3

+3 +3

89

94

+2

+3 +3 +2 +3 +3

87

96

1

+

3

0

3

+1

+2 +2 +3 +4 +1 +2 +3 +3 + +2 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3

+4

85

94

84

94

+3 +4

85

94

+4 +3

81

91

+1 +2

1 +1

+2

+3 +3 +3 +3

70-

85

+3 +2

ON

+1 +3 +4 +4

61

80

+2 +4 +4 +6

70

86

Means,...

+4 +4 +4

+4 +4 +4 +3 +1

~-2 — 4 - 5

-6

-7 -7

-6

- 4

3 – 1 +1 +-2

+3

+3 +3

+4

80

90

TABLE IV.

Mean Tension of Aqueous Vapour at the Observatory and at the Peak for each Month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory,

Mean.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a. 6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a. 10 a.

11 a. Noon.

1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

10 p.

11 p. Midt.

Observ-

atory.

Peak.

January,

J'ebruary,

March,

+.003

April,

May,

June,

+.000 +.007

+.004 +.003

July,

.000 -.003

August,

September,.

October,

November, December,

.009 .000 +.002 -.004 .000 -.003 ..001 -.007 -.006 -.009 +.016 +.012 +.003 .002 -.002 .005 +.012 +.005 +.001 +.002 -.003 -.004 +.016 +.014 +.008 +.012 +.009 -.011 +.008 .003 -.007 —.009 -.012 -.012

-.001 -.003 -.005 -.010 .009 -.010 -.002 -.006 .000 -.004 ..004 -.004 -.005 .009 ..008 .007 -.006 -.003 .007 -.006 -.009 -.014 -.015 .019 -.014 ..004 -.002 -.002 .007 -.006 .012 -.015 -.018 .018 -.018 .016 -.007 ..003 .006 .012 -.015 -.015 -.015 -.013 ..012 ..017 -.015 -.019

+.004 -.001 +.003 +.005

-.000

.000 +.005

.005 +.010

+.004 -.001

.000 +.006 .000 +.001 +.003 +.005

-.009 -.002

+.002 +.001 +.008 +.001 -.007.001

+.006 +.002 +.004 +.001 +.008 +.006 4.005 +.004 +.010 +.011

+.007 +.007 +.002 +.005

+.007 +.011

+.004 +.003

+.008 +.019

+.006 +.010

+.022 +.025 +.026 +.016

-.012 —.008

+.003 -.005

.003 .007 -.005 +.001 +.001 4.001 .005 -.008 ..002 -.012 -.017 -.010 .001 ..003 -.011 ..024 .029 .026 ..013 -.018 -.018 -.915 -.013 .013 -.012-.009 -.005 -.006 -.001 -.002

-.005 -.014 +.003 −.001 +.003 -003 +.009 .003 -.006 -.012 —.009 —,010 -.017 —.008 +.003 -.001 -.012 —.005 ~.002 +.008 -.006 .002 -.005 +.005

+.002 +.002 +.004 +.004 +.012.+.003 .023 +.013 +.008 +.006 +.020 +.013 +.010 +.008 -.011 -004 .007 .000 -.004 .001 .000 +.006 +.006 —,011 -.006 +.002 -.005 -.002 +.005 +.009 +.003 +.008 +.009 +.015 +.004 +.001 +.008 +.001 +.005 +.016 +.008 -008 +.014 +.008 +.010 +.012

+.006 .005

+.004 +.002

0.383

0.353

+.005 +.002

—.005 −.002

.352

.323

+.008 +.009

+.004 +.004

.457

.420

.006 +.003

+.003 +.002

.668

.618

+.011 +.006 +.004 +.000

.821

.748

.000 +.006 +.003 +.001 +011 +.012 +.015+.015 .019 .019

+.008 +.009

.882

.806

.000 .000

.878

.821

.009 .011

.866

.816

+.016 +.009

.792

.755

+.014 +.011

.617

.617

+.015 +.012

424

463

+.008 +.011

.424

.440

Means,

4-.003

.000 -.004 -.005-006-009-007.007 —.006 —.007 -.005 −.003 −.001 +.001 +.005 +.004 +.005 +.002 +.004 +.006 +.008 +.009 +.007 +.006 0.630

0.598

189

TABLE V.

Total Hourly Duration of Sunshine for each Month in the Year 1885, and Total Monthly Duration of Sunshine.

190

11 a.

Noon.

1 P.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 P、

6 p.

Total

Record.

Total

Percentage

Possible. of Possible.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

Month.

January,

February,

1.5

10.7

13.2

14.1

13.3

14.5

13.8

11.8

11.9

11.6

2,6

119,0

311

38

:

:

0.6

2.4

2.9

3.7

3.3

3,3

2.0

1,9

1,2

1,0

:

:

22.3

294

00

8

March,

April,...

:.

4.1.

9.8

11.5

12.5

13.3

14.2

14.5

13.9

13.6

12.1

4.9

124.4

344

36

3.8

8.1

10.6

15.1

14,1

16.1

16.7

17.0

14.9

13.4

6,9

0.4

137.1

353

39

May,

3.2

10.1

12.6

15.0

15.7

16.8

17.2

18.7

16.7

15.2

12.5

9.5

2.6

165,8

380

44

June,

4.3

13.0

13.7

· 15.7

14.8

15,3

14.7

14.6

14.5

12.5

9.8

10.7

2.8

156.4

376

42

July,

5.3

13.1

16.8

16.2

17.3

18.4

15.3

15.1

16,7

16.2

15.3

12.3

3.1

181.1

384

47

August,

2.9

11.2

15.0

15.5

14.7

13.2

14.2

14.1

15.2

13,3

11.3

9.3

1.9

151.8

370

41

September,

0.2

9.0

12.1

18.0

21.6

20.5

18.7

19.7

14.5

12.6

12,9

9.0

168.8

340

50

October,..

0.1

11.5

20.1

23,7

25.2

24.9

24.3

24.1

23.7

21,2

18.4

10.7

227.9

331

69

November,

10.2

16.9

19.0

22.6

24.3

23.4

22.3

21.8

20.2

20.1

6.5

207.3

306

68

:..

December,

6.3

21.2

23.4

23.9

24.5

24.1

24.0

24.2

22,6

18.9

5.1

218.2

307

71

Sums,.

16.0

94.4

159.4 184.7

201.2

201.9

200.0

199.6

191.9

175.4

157.3

87.5

10.8

1880.1

4096

46

}

TABLE 'VI.

Total Hourly Rainfall for each Month in the Year 1885.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a. 10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p.

5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Sum.

0.100 0.045 0.070 0.030 0.180 0.250

0.145

0.870

...

...

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Mean,..

...

2.700

2.470

0.010

0.035 0.005 0.120 0.230 0.215 0.210 0.230 0.125 0.220 0.110 0.225 0.065 0.035 0.140 0.125 0.120 0.085 0.055 0.035 0.025 0.010 0.045 0.085 0.020 0.060 0.110 0.055 0.175 0.140 0.060 0.120 0.165 0.045 0.110 0.135 0.050 0.260 0.505 0.210 0.010 0.135 0.015 0.050 0.010 0.005 0.150 0.065 0.805 0.970 0.585 0.190 0.145 0.280 0.430 0.760 0.800 0.600 2.520 1.695 1.610 0.310 0.400 0.080 0.115 0.080 0.095 0.140 0.655 0.660 0.395 0.570 14.890 0.305 1.135 0.025 0.065 0.010 0.165 0.090 0.050 0.610 0.905 0.035 0.305 0.050 0.010 0.015 0.065 0.130 0.060 0.035 0.010 0.155 0.305 0.090 0.235 4.860 0.465 0.615 1.495 0.435 1.405 0.985 1.620 2.450 3.250 2.385 1.435 0.965 1.890 0.245 0.805 1.200 0.800 1.545 0.550 2.215 1.105 1.655 1.370 0.475 31.360 0.265 0.440 0.220 0.980 0.385 0.160 0.470 1.825 3.195 2.340 0.850 0.170 0.610 0.325 0.180 0.120 0.025 0.150 0.065 0.060 0.130 0.195 0.130 0.255 13.545 2.250 3.710 2.665 0.920 1.445 1.950 1.840 3.095 1.165 0.820 0.665 0.735 2.120 0.390 0.570 0.750 0.175 0.705 1.105 0.275 0.295 0.070 0.100 0.050| 27.865 0.625 0.360 0.670 0.655 0.760 0.355 0.230 0.225 0.320 0.175 0.310 0.050 0.040 0.110 0.255 0.215 0.015 0.045 0.185 0.145 0.010 0.050 0.005 0.035 | 5.845 0.005 0.020 0.040 0.155 0.280 0.140 0.080 0.130 0.120 0.025 0.145 0.125 0.295 0.200 0.260 0.150 0.200 0.060 0.015 0.065 0.005 0.005

0.015 0.405 0.090 0.145 0.045 0.020 0.010 0.020

0.040 0.015 0.035 0.010 0.010 0.015 0.110 0.005 0.010

0.010 0.010 0.090 0.340 0.350 0.100 0.100

...

...

...

2.510

0.760

1.250

0.415 0.673 0.512 0.306 0.392 0.377 0.425 0.726 0.819 0.622 0.512 0.393 0.572 0.179 0.239 0.248 0.130 0.247 0.180 0.249 0.212 0.271 0.215 0.163 9.077

TABLE VII.

Number of Hours, during portion of which it rained, for each Month in the Year 1885.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 p. 4 p.

5 p. 6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9 p.

10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Total.

2

January,

1

February,

3

March,

3

April,

May,

3

June,

July,.

6

August,

September,

6

1542NTO LO CO

1

:

4

1

4

6

4

October,

1

November,

2

2

December,

1

1

~~75 :~:

ة

2

42 2 2 0 20 1- ENN

3

3

4

1

3

1

3.

5

2

4

3

1

4 33:

4

4

4

4

3

3

2

2

1

2

3

1

...

4

1

:

Total,.....

36

39

35

33

33

38

36

41

38 38

62 ::

888

4

7

6

or or co-co: co

3

1

3

5

3

2

1

4

4

1

1

1

1.

1

1

64274621

261734

2

4.

3

5

5

2

1

1

1

...

:

...

1

1

1

1

1

1

2~1422~O~~~

3

5

CO LO

1

1

2

2

3

Ni anaon∞:

3

4

4

2

3

- 30 IN 00 00 01 00 Ŋ þad

1

5

3

3

3

1

II LO CO GO HI E CO 2 -

15

83

59

75

60

4

105

102

132

1

71

28

:

1

1

16

1

1

2

21

25

28

29

26

34

35

24

26

24

29

38

27

26

29 767

191

TABLE VIII.

Mean Hourly Velocity of the Wind at the Observatory and at the Peak for each Month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory.

192

Mean.

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

ટી.

8 a.

9 a. 10 a. 11 a. Noon. 1 p.

2 p.

3 P.

4 p.

5 p. 6 p.

7 p. 8 p. 9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Observ-

Peak.

atory.

January,

February,

0.9

March,

1.1

April,

1,0

-0.7 -0.6

May,

0.3

-1.2 -0.5 -1.4

June,

1.5

1.3 -0.7

-1.4

1.2

2.0

July,

1.4 -0.6 -1.6

-1.7

-1.7

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

0.7 -0.6 -0.9 2.7 -2.5-2.0 -2.6 0.4 -0.3 -0.1 -0.3 1.2 1.0 2.5 1.9

-2.0 -2.1 -0.4

1.2

1.5

-0.4 -0.1 -0.8 -0.5 -0.2 +0.1 +0.2 +0.9 +0.9 +1.7 +1.6 +1.9 +1.7 +2.0 +1.5 +1.0 -0.4 -1.3 -2.4 -2.3 -1.5 -1.5 -1.4 -1.0 -0.4 1.4 -0.1 +0.5 +1.4 +0.5 -0.2 +0.5 +1.3 +2.4 +1.8 +1.4 +2.0 +1.6 -0.3 1.3. 1.6 1.4 2.0 2.0 -1.0 +0.6 +0.9 +1.2 +1.5 +1.8 +2.1 +1.9 +2.1 +1.5 +1.2 +1.5 +0.8 +0.2 -0.8 -1.3 -1.6 −2.0 0.0 +0.6 +2.6 +3.2 +2.6 +1.4 +1.3. +1.0 +1.8 +1.2 +0.3

0.5 -1.0 -0.8 -0.8 0.0 +0.2 +1.2 +2.0 +2.2 +2.7 +2.3 +1.9 +1.6 +1.1 +0.3 -0.5 -1.4

1.2 2.4 -2.8 2.5

2.2 -1.4 +0.2 +1.6 +3.1 +3.8 +3.6 +4.2 +3,0 +2.6 +1.1 +0.4 -0.7 -1.6 1.0 0.9 0.7 +1.9 +2.2 +2.6 +3.4 +2.3 +2.2 +1.9 +1.3 0.0 -0.5 -1.1 -1.2

1.9 -0.1 +1.6 +2.1 +2.5 +4.1 +4.0 +2.5 +1.9 +1.7 -0.4 -1.8 -2.0 1.8 1.1 -1.6 -2.2 -0.3 -1.6 -0.1 +1.1 +4.2 +4.7 +4.9 +5.1 +4.1 +3.7 +1.9 +1.1 +0.1 -1.6 -2.1 -2.6 -2.5

-3.0 -2.9 -3.1 -3.3 -2.9 -2.3 1.0 -0.5 -21 1.5 -1.4 -1.2 -0.1 +1.0 +1.7 +4.3 +2.9 +2.7 +2.6 +2.2 +1.5 -0.2 -2.2 -2.1 -1.5 -2.4 -2.4 1.9 +0.2 0.1 +0.3 +1.5 +2.6 +3.6 +3.3 +2.4 +2.9 +3.3 +1.7 +0.9 -0.7 0.4 -0.3 -1.5 -0.8 +0.3 +2.1 +2.8 +2.6 +3.0 +4.0 +3.1 +2.4 +0.4 -0.7 -1.0

16.8

24

-1,5 -0.6 -0.9

16.8

25

-1.9 -2.1

-2.4 -2.5 1.4

16 3

24

1.4

1.3

1.9

-0.8 -1.2

2.2 -2.0

1.2

16.7

25

-1.1 -2.2

1.4

14.4

25

2.0

2.0

13.6

26

-1.5

1.6

1.7

11.1

25

2.2

2.0

1.5

12.1

26

1.9

9.1

23

0.5

14.6

25

C

2.1

12.2

23

2.1

-1.4 ́ ́ -1.7 -2.7 -2.5

14.0

25

K

Mean,.

-1.1 -1.0 -1.0 -1.0 -1.0 -0.8 -0.7 0.0 +0.8 +2.0 +2.8 +2.7 +2.7 +2.7 +2.2 +1.4 +0.4 -0.7 -1.6 -1.8-1.8-2.0 -1.8

- 1.5

14.0

25

TABLE IX.

Mean Direction of the Wind at the Observatory and at the Peak for each Month in the Year 1885, and Mean Diurnal Variation at the Observatory.

Mean.

Month.

l'a.

2 3,

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

8.

8 a.

9 a. 10 a. 11 a. Noon. 1 p. 2 p. 3 p. 4 p.

5 p.

6 p. 7 p.

8 p. 9 p. 10 p. 11 p. Midt.

Observ-

atery.

Peak.

January,

February,

March,

2o

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,

Mean,.

!!! | + | | |+||

10

6

| | | | | | |

6

22-00-

+ 1

+ 2 2 + 2 + 3 + 3

ANNO

29

1o

2o

+ 2

0 + 2 + 2

4.

1

4

AA 2 CO 30

2 + 3

+ 3 + 4 +

0

3 + 1

4 + 6 4 +12

1 +

+15 +19 +11

+ 6 +19

+ 5 +21

+20 +33 +17 + 1 +

-

+15

24

5

9

13

40 32

14

26 34 25

1 + + 1 + 1 + | |

1120

2° +

+ 3° + 2o + 6°

80 +

1

+ 6 + 6 + 4

+ 3

70 + 4°

0 + 2

+ 4

4 + 1

+ 4 +

+ 2 + 1

9

3

1

+ 2 +

1

+ 1

+*4

+ 6

+ 5

+ 6

1

3 + 4

0 +

+ 5 + 7 + 4

+ 5

+

+ 4

2

0

0

6

+ 3 +12

+22

+16 + 8

++11

+17

+22

+18 +27 +13

3 + 7

+ 4

7

+ 9

15

3 36

0

3

+ 5

3 + 4

+10

+20

+18

6

·10

6

12

15 16

♡ 땅

✪∞ co

1

1

0

1

3

A

4 8 + 2

17

10

охо отколоно

2o

E 9° N

E 4° N

Ap.com

8

E 13° NE 18° N

+ 1

2

E 6° N

E

E 15° S

E 39° S

E 37° S

S 22° E

16 E 41° S

S 16° E

F

-13

-18 -24

31

21

13S 11° W

S 22° W

+ 5

15

14

9

+19 +14

+15 +10 +18 +23

14 -18

-18

14

5

3

+ 7

+ 8

+27 +19 +19 +13 +18 +14 +13 +10 +10 + 8

+22

-37

+17 + 7

31 17

18

S 42° E

S 16° E

10

5

E 13° N

E 24° S

+ 2

2 + 3

+ 5

1

E 14° N

E 5° N

15

21

11

11

14

15

16

23

12

▬▬

8

F

22

5

18

12

9 + 5 +15

+25 +27 +25 +29 +24 +16 + 6 +

6

-

6

0

0 + 6 +10 +14 +15 +12 +10 +11 + 6 + 3

+ 2

1

74

11

-

4

3

9

8E 36° N

E 20° N

6 E 17° N

E 8° N

4

4

3

5

6

1

2

4 + 3 + 8 +10 + 8 +8 +10 + 9 + 6 + 2

0.

W

3

8

7

6

E

E 27° S

193

TABLE X.

Total Distance traversed by, as well as Total Duration and Average Velocity of Winds from eight different points of the Compass during the Year 1885.

WIND.

Total Distance.

Duration.

Velocity.

Miles.

Hours.

Miles per Hour.

N,.

8078

765

10.6

NE,

11608

887

13.1

E,

74439

4195

17.7

SE,

4026

402

10.0

S,

9729

771

12.6

SW,

7105

501

14.2

W..

5115

594

8.6

NW.

Calm,

1977

297

6.7

228

348

0.7

Sums and Mean,......

122305

8760

14.0

TABLE XI.

Total Rainfall, Duration of Rain, and Number of Days on which Rain was collected, at the Observatory, Stone Cutters' Island and the Peak for each month of the Year 1885.

OBSERVATORY.

STONE CUTTERS' ISLAND.

VICTORIA PEAK.

Month.

Amount. ins.

Duration. hrs.

Days.

Amount. ins.

Amount.

Days.

ins.

Days.

January,.

0.870

30

3

0.71

4

0.75

1

February,

2.700

95

13

2.54

9

4.04

11

March,.....

2.470

70

12

2.16

9

1.72

5

April,.

14.890

May,

4.860

08

83

11

13.72

10

18.52

7

57

18

5.64

9

6.63

12

June,

31.360

84

20

26.74

17

33.58

15

July,

13.640

78

19

16.01

15

18.13

16

August,

28.115

129

20

28.81

21

33.37

19

September,

5:500

53

13

5.97

9

6.74

10

October,

2.510

25

6

CO

2.59

4

2.49

4

November,

0.760

12

3

0.45

2

1.62

3

December,

1.250

32

6

1.03

2

1.36

1

Year,......

108.925

748

144

106.37

111

128.95

104

194

TABLE XII.

Total Number of Days on which Different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and Total Number of

Thunderstorms during each Month of the Year, 1885.

Month.

Fog.

Electric Pheno-

mena.

Light- Thunder.

ning.

Thunder-

storms.

Unusual Visibili- Dew.

ty.

Lunar

Solar

Rain- Lunar bows. Halo.

Solar

Coro-

Coro-

Halo.

na.

na.

January,

1

0

0

0

3

0

0

February,

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

March,........

11

4

4

3

1

9

0

April,

15

14

12

5

1

11

0

May,

13

10

10

1

10

3

1

0

0

1

0

June,

14

14

5

7

6

4

ลง

July,

1

13

13

10

1

10

5

August,

3

21

21

11

5

7

4

7

3

работат

September,

5

9

9

N

0

October,

1

4

4

1

November,

1

0

4

10

5

1

3

December,

3

0

0

3

LO

5

1

Sums,......

29

55

95

91

50

19

44

68

Co

23

10

16

1

TABLE XIII.

Total Number of Times that Clouds of different forms were observed in each Month of the Year, 1885.

Month.

C.

c-str. c-cum. sm-cum.

cum. cum-str. str.

R-cum. cum-nim. nim.

January,

1

1

со

8

28

90

17

25

54

16

February,

0

6

13

32

0

56

19

92

33

March,

1

4

10

7

66

0

19

14

70

32

April,

4

23

20

97

3

16

18

55

40

May,

6

19

11

5

10

122

10

9

24

70

35

June,

10

41

24

20

126

2

29

Co

35

42

July,

6

43

27

15

99

20

22

17

41

40

August,

12

32

23

24

92

7

36

Co

55

56

September,

2

12

14

42

120

15

17

16

33

23

October,

2

4

9

54

114

4

12

25

15

15

November,

15

00

60

73

16

20

8

6

December,

2

18

13

18

77

2

6

25

23

16

Sums,.

45

193

176

306

1108

66

66

255

212

551

354

TABLE XIV.

Mean Percentage of Clouded Sky and Mean Diurnal Variation in each Month of the Year 1885.

195

10 a.

1 p.

4 p.

7 P.

10 p.

Mean.

4 a.

7 a.

Month.

1 a.

January,...

+

+ 5

+7

1

+1

4

in

2

69

February,

+ 1

+ 3

+ 4

0

94

March,

+ 1

+ 5

+ 9

+ 2

I

7

4

+ 1

April,.

+ 5

10

5

+8

0

0

0

~

22

70

76

May,.

+ 8

10

5

+9

0

+ 3

4

- 10

74

June,

0

4

1

3

+ 3

+7

+ 5

74

July,..

+ 5

0.

0

0

+ 8

3

74

August,

-

-J

7

0

+ 3

+1

I

+ 3

+ 6

7

September,...

0

+ 5

+10

+ 5

0

-11

325

75

65

October,......

+ 2

+11

+ 5

I

1

4

6

50

November,...

+ 5

+ 8

+12

3

8

- 13

0

46

December,

+ 5

+ 4

0

2

+1

43

Mean,

+0.8

+1.2

+5.7

-1.4

-0.7

0.0

-1.8

- 4.2

67.

Month.

TABLE XV.

Mean Sea Disturbance in each Month of the Year 1885.

Mean.

10 a.

4 p.

10 p.

4 a.

January,

4.2

4.3

4.3

4.4

4.3

February,

4.3

4.4

4.1

4.3

4.3

March,

2.8

2.8

2.8

2.8

2.8

April,

2.7

2.8

2.7

2.6

2.7

May,

2.8

3.1

2.8

2.8

2.9

June,

2.2

2.1

2.2

1.9

2.1

July,

1.8

1.7

1.7

2.0

1.8

August,

1.5

1.7

1.8

1.7

1.7

September,

0.9

1.4

1.3

1.7

1.3

October,

2.7

2.8

2.3

2.6

2.6

November,

2.1

2.4

2.0

2.2

2.2

December,.....

2.1

2.3

2.2

2.0

2.2

Mean,

2.5

2.65

2.5

2.6

2.6

196

TABLE XVI.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements Registered at the Observatory during the Year 1885.

Humi-

Barometer.

Temperature.

dity.

Vapour Tension.

Rain.

Wind Velo-

Radiation.

city.

Month.

Max.

Min.

Min. Max.

Min.

Max.

Min.

Daily Hourly Max. Max. Max.

Sun Terr. Max. Min.

1885.

January,

30.270 29.919 71.1 45.6

58

0.531

0.251

0.705 0.250 35

136.1 38.0

February,

30.293 29.756 69.4 45.0

57

0.633

0.256

1.050

0.130 39

129.9

43.5

March...

30.244

29.726 77.1

48.8 56

April,..

30.021

29.634 83.1

61.7 60

88888

0.697

0.257

0.710

0.335 40

138.8 43.5

0.834

0,524

5.210 2.420 38

150.0 60.4

May,

29.962

29.478 87.4

66.5 69

0.949

0.618

1.450 1.130

June,

29.864

29.437 89.3 71.3 49

1.001

0.598 12.630

July,

August,

September,

29.882

29.801 29.271 88.2 73.5

29.984 29.517 88.3 73.1 40

October,...... 30.025 29.752 85.9 64.3 41

29.463 88.6 73.8 56

0.969

0.664

2.200 38

4.250 1.430 39

88 888

38

149.5 65.2

159.8

69.8

158.7 71.5

62

22

0.957

0.729

6.555 2.140 53

152.5 68.8

0.924

0.432

2.270 0.690 32

0.848

0.306

2.120

0.295

November,..

December,

30.311 29.743 79.7 55.0 23

0.740

0.149

0.535

0.400

ོ་་་ ོ

34

157.4

151.9 55.8

!

68.7

30

143.2 49.0

30.290 29.757 76.3

50.8

29

0.637

· 0.136

1.025

0.350 33

142.9 42.8

Year,

30.311 29.271 89.3

45.0

23

1.001 0.136 12.630

2.420

53

159.8 38.0

TABLE XVII.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements Registered at Victoria Peak during the Year 1885.

Barometer.

Temperature.

Humi- dity.

Vapour Tension.

Wind

Rain.

Radiation.

Force.

Month.

Max. Min. Max. Min.

Min.

Max. Min.

Daily Max.

Sun

Max.

Terr. Max. Min.

1885.

January,

28.419 28.142

65.8

40.0

71

0.522 0.220

0.75 6

128.0

34.5

February,

28.445 28.016

67.8

39.0

69

0.550

0.222

1.65 6

123.0

38.5

March,

28.388 28.019

71.7

42.0

49

0.633 0.235

0.75 6

138.0

41.5

April,

28.252 27.950

75.3

56.4

82

0.776 0.481

8.40 7

139.4

55.7

May,

28.225 27.806

76.5

62.0

81

0.852

0.529

1.80

6

140.2

61.5

June,

28.135 27.809

81.3

69.0

63

0.934 0.563 14.50

151.0

66.5

July,

28.170 27.805

83.3

70.8

71

0.919

0.622

4.42

149.0

69.1

August,...

28.088 27.675

81.3

71.0

74

0.921

0.631

9.20

150.0

68.7

September,

28.248 27.855

79.6

66.0

69

0.860

0.529

2.56

6

152.8

63.7

October,

28.266 28.079

78.1

60.0

60

0.791

0.356

1.36

6

149.0

54.5

November,

28.479 28.048

74.3

52.2

34

0.726 0.185

1.20

138.0

44.7

December,

28.459 28.050

68.8

47.0

55

0.611

0.209

1.36

6

137.0

44.5

Year,.....

28.479 27.675

83.3

39.0

34

0.934

0.185

14.50 8

152.8

34.5

·

197

TABLE XVIII.

Average Readings of Solar Radiation Thermometers and Excess over Maximum Thermometers as well as Excess of Minimum over Terrestrial Radiation Thermometers, Mean Weight of Aqueous Vapour in Troy Grains

in each cubic foot of air and Diurnal Range of Temperature at the Observatory and at the Peak, and average height in feet at which the Temperature of the air was 1o lower during 1885.

Solar Radiation Thermometer.

Solar Radiation. Excess over Maximum.

Terrestrial Radia- tion.

Weight of Aque- ous Vapour.

Diurnal Range.

Month.

Height of 1° Decrease.

Observa- tory.

Peak.

Observa- tory.

Peak.

Observa- tory.

Peak.

Observa- tory.

Peek.

Observa- tory.

Peak.

1885.

January,

112.8 107.2

49.8

51.8 +2.5 +1.0

4.24

3.96

7.6

8.7

225

February,

91.4

90.0

33.0

39.0

+2.0

+0.2

3.91

3.64

6.1

5.7

251

March,

113.2 109.5

47.8

48.6

+2.4

-0.1

5.03

4.67

8.3

9.2

397

April,

126.7

121.1

51.7

51.3

+1.3

+1.1

7.23

6.73

8.0

6.9

417

May,

136.5

122.7

55.2

48.9

+2.2

+0.8

8.75

8.08

6.9

4.7

275

June,....

139.0.

127.3

54.2

50.6

+2.9 +0.9

9.36

8.64

7.3

4.5

275

July,

140.3

126.9

55.8

49.1

+2.4

+0.1

9.31

8.80

6.8

4.8

294

August,.

135.6

126.4

52.0

48.9

+2.3

+0.7

9.19.

8.75

7.2

5.0

328

September, 144.3

....

137.3

61.8

61.0

+2.7

+0.7

8.43

8.12

6.5

5.7

311

October,

139.8

135.6

61.7

62.4

+3.3

+1.3

6.61

6.69

5.7

7.2

294

November,

132.0 127.2

60.2

61.9 +4.6

+2.8

4.60

5.08

7.5

6.3

285

December,...... 124.8 122.3

57.6

61.2

+4.1

+2.5

4.64

4.87

6.9

5.6

322

Mean,

128.0 121.1

53.4

52.9 +2.7 +1.0

6.77

6.50

*7.1

6.2

306

H kong Observatory, 16th March, 1886.

W. DOBERCK,

Government Astronomer.

199

No. 26.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE OBSERVATORY ON FIVE-DAY MEANS OF THE PRINCIPAL METEOROLOGICAL ELEMENTS, FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on 14th April, 1886.

FIVE-DAY MEANS OF THE PRINCIPAL METEOROLOGICAL

ELEMENTS FOR 1885.

The following five-day means have been constructed according to the recommendations of the International Meteorological Congress.

Hongkong Observatory: The first column exhibits the height of the barometer in inches reduced to 32° Fahrenheit but not to sea level. The cistern is 110 feet above mean sea level. The means have been derived from the hourly readings.

The second column exhibits the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit as derived from the hourly readings.

The third and fourth columns exhibit the relative humidity in percentage of saturation and the vapour tension in inches of mercury as derived from the means of the hourly readings of the dry and damp bulb thermometers.

The fifth column exhibits the velocity of the wind in miles per hour derived from the hourly readings.

The sixth column exhibits the percentage of the whole sky, that was covered by clouds, from observations made every three hours.

The seventh column exhibits the average daily number of hours during which the sun shone brightly enough to mark the cards.

The eighth column exhibits the average amount of rain in inches that fell in one day, from mid- night to mid-night as derived from the hourly readings.

Victoria Peak: The first column exhibits the height of the barometer in inches reduced to 32° Fahrenheit but not to sea level as derived from tri-diurnal observations. The cistern is 1819 feet above mean sea level.

The second column exhibits the temperature as derived from observations made at 10 a. and 10 p. The third and fourth columns exhihit the relative humidity and tension of vapour as derived from tri-diurnal observations.

The fifth column exhibits the force of the wind (0-12) as derived from tri-diurnal observations.

The sixth column exhibits the average amount of rain in inches, that fell in one day as measured at 10 a. and entered to preceeding day.

200

HONGKONG OBSERVATORY.

Five-Day Period. Barometer.

Temper-

Humidity.

ature.

Vapour Wind Tension. Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

January...

1-5

30.125

61.2

6-10

.051

62.1

11-15

.067

58.6

16-20

.085

55.8

>

21-25

.107

61.7

26-30

.165

54.0

دو

February

31- 4

.158

55.6

5- 9

29.885

59.4

10-14

30.013

55.8

"

15-19

.054

53.0

FERR@ERAZR

77

0.421

17.6

33

7.5

0.000

77

.432

20.9

56

5.2

0.000

73

.366

14.8

81

3.0

0.000

76

.344

16.2

86

2.1

0.016

82

.455

17.7

83

2.5

0.000

.323

14.0

83

2.0

0.158

73

.323

14.2

ΤΟ

4.3

0.006

87

.446

19.1

94

1.0

0.043

81

.363

21.8

98

0.6

0.007

79

.320.

16.9

100

0.0

0.010

"

20-24

.041

53.3

83

.339

16.9

91

0.1

0.248

35

25- 1

.091

52.7

76

.303

11.8

91

1.5

0.226

"

March

2- 6

29.974

61.3

82

.449

12.4

22

8.9

0.000

7-11

30.080

57.0

81

.378

22.5

85

2.1

0.011

55

12-16

30.107

54.9

81

.353

15.8

82

2.1

0.236

"

17-21

29.997

59.8

85

.440

13.3

71

3.3

0.024

"

22-26

.826

67.6

90

.610

11.4

78

4.0

0.040

""

27-31

.930

63.8

91

.541

21.4

87

3.1

0.183

April

1- 5

.876

68.5

92

.639

17.4

77

5.7

0.000

6-10

.863

70.4

91

.682

16.8

69

4.6

0.050

"

11-15

.858

71.9

86

.680

16.4

72

6.5

0.000

""

16-20

.797

69.9

93

.683

17.9

93

1.3

1.134

5

21-25

"

.875.

68.0

87

.600

19.3

78

2.9

0.817

26-30

.757

73.5

88

.727

12.5

65

6.4

0.977

May

1- 5

.885

71.6

91

.709

17.9

83

3.1

0.322

6-10

.832

76.1

88

.790

12.4

60

7.4

0.013

"

11-15

.625

76.5

89

.812

18.9

96

2.1

0.223

>>

16-20

.719

76.9

88

.810

15.0

88

3.9

0.007

""

21-25

.752

81.7

83

.895

13.5

75

6.9

0.116

""

26-30

.764

81.8

82

.885

10.3

45

8.7

0.118

""

June

31- 4

.759

81.2

81

.863

8.8

51

9.0

0.174

5- 9

.710

78.4

81

.791

14.9

76

5.0

1.987

10-14

707

78.6

86

.846

13.9

93

1.6

3.601

15-19

.668

81.8

82

.895

16.4

96

0.7

0.083

20-24

.661

80.6

88

.923

19.8

77

5.1

0.571

27

25-29

.579

82.4

86

.957

7.9

49

10.6

0.027

وو

30- 4

.526

81.8

86

.936

13.6

96

0.6

0.636

July

5- 9

.667

81.5

83

.890

19.5

90

4.7

0.633

وو

10-14

.779

80.9

83

.873

13.8

76

7.3

0.128

15-19

.597

81.4

78

.839

6.6

25

11.8

0.000

"3

20-24

.584

82.4

779

.880

8.0

70

8.1

0.010

>>

25-29

.597

79.1

88

.878

5.4

80

3.4

0.996

39

August

30- 3

.514

78.8

90

.882

10.2

96

1.9

1.363

4- 8

.639

79.9

86

.877

7.6

55

7.7

0.434

9-13

.622

79.3

83

.835

10.9

69

6.6

0.276

""

14-18

.628

80.2

82

.848

21.9

83

5.0

0.521

39

19-23.

.690

80.9

83

.873

9.5

54

6.6

0.282

"

24-28

.517

81.1

82

.873

15.3

90

2.2

2.023

23

September

29- 2

.662

78.8

89

.880

4.8

93

2.6

1.086

3- 7

.613

80.2

85

.878

5.1

وو

68

5.8

0.510

8-12

.603

77.9

88

.844

7.3

94

2.0

0.445

13-17

.780

77.9

72

.687

12.3

73

5.1

0.031

18-22

.849

78.0

79

.758

13.0

40

9.2

0.008

23-27

.838

79.5

81

.810

7.3

44

7.0

0.022

""

October..

28- 2

.943

77.8

76

.727

11.6

48

6.9

0.047

3- 7

.849

78.6

72

.706

9.5

41

8.3

0.012

8-12

.899

74.4

76

.646

16.2

58

5.2

0.424

13-17

.876

76.8

70

.650

15.0

47

8.2

0.061

18-22

.931

75.2

73

.638

17.5

53

7.6

0.005

23-27

'.944

71.0

54

.417

13.1

55

6.6

0.000

November.

28- 1

.946

73.3

74

.607

18.2

50

7.8

0.000

2- 6

.968

70.8

61

.480

13.7

32

8.3

0.108

7-11

.916

71.9

67

.521

8.4

32

8.6

0.008

"

12-16

30.178

65.7

59

.385

15.0

35

7.8

0.000

17-21

.082

69.2

58

.425

12.8

69

5.7

0.000

22-26

.098

64.6

58

.352

11.0

87

2.4

0.036

December

27- 1

.138

64.3

56

.349

13.1

20

8.6

0.000

2- 6

.075

68.0

80

.549

13.7

43

7.2

0.000

"

7-11

29.984

66.5

79

.519

14.0

49

7.0

0.031

"

12-16

30.077

60.5

51

.274

9.7

22

9.6

0.000

"

17-21

29.998

63.4

67

.396

16.5

51

6.0

0.000

22

22-26

29.892

65.7

83

.537

13.6

80

3.1

0.219

""

27-31

30.181

56.8

54

.253

15.9

13

9.0

0.000

"

A

VICTORIA PEAK.

201

January

Five-Day Period.

Barometer. Temperature. Humidity.

Vapour Tension.

Wind Force.

Rain.

1- 5

28.332

55.8

81

0.376

4.1

0,00

6-10

"

275

55.4

89

.407

4.5

0.00

.11-15

..262

39

49.5

90

.329

4.1

0.00

.16-20

.271

47.1

>>

90

.308

4.5

0.00

.21-25

.324

54.9

95

.423

3.9

0.00

.26-30

"

.338

45.9

90

.292

4.1

0.15

February

.31- 4

.337

48.4

86

.301

3.9

0.00

5- 9

.099

""

54.4

95

.417

4.5

0.08

.10-14

.200

ܕ,

48.9

94

.332

4.4

0.05

.15-19

.223

>>

44.9

94

.285

4.7

0.03

.20-24

.206

"

46.2

97

.309

4.5

0.56

..25–1

.262

45.6

""

88

.275

4.1

0.09

March

2- 6

.213

59.5

79

.419

3.4

0.00

7-11

.263

"

50.2

89

.335

4.9

0.00

.12-16

.276

48.8

95

.332

4.5

0.25

..17-21

.221

56.5

85

.397

3.8

0.04

.22-26

.085

64.2

92

.565

4.2

0.02

.27-31

.159

59.9

94

.501

4.3

0.03

April

1- 5

.140

64.8

91

.578

4.3

0.00

6-10

""

.148

66.6

95

.629

4.9

0.04

...11-15

.127

67.2

91

.627

3.9

0.00

.16-20

""

.078

67.0

97

.648

4.4

1.81

.21-25

.124

62.9

25

94

.549

4.5

0.31

.26-30

29

.040

69.1

94

.678

4.4

1.55

May

1- 5

.141

66.1

95

.619

4.1

0.42

6-10

.116

وو

70.6

96

.729

4.2

0.00

..11-15

27.925

71.3

97

.744

4.9

0.43

.16-20

دو

28.006

71.7

95

.748

3.9

0.00

3

.21-25

.069

74.1

97

.821

4.6

0.14

.26-30

.077

74.3

95

.811

4.5

0.34

June

.31- 4

.073

74.4

92

.790

4.1

0.03

5- 9

""

.007

71.9

91

.725

4.5

1.56

.10-14

.018

73.1

"

94

.769

4.9

4.46

15-19

""

27.992

74.8

98

.844

5.3

0.16

.20-24

:

.982

د,

74.8

96

.829

4.6

0.42

.25-29

.921

""

76.7

92

.854

3.6

0.09

.30- 4

.850

76.0

96

.872

4.7

1.40

July

5- 9

.987

74.7

97

.844

5.4

0.29

.10-14

12

28.080

74.6

94

.815

4.4

0.21

.15-19

27.922

وو

74.4

91

.790

3.6

0.00

.20-24

.903

25

76.2

90

.829

4.1

0.13

.25-29

.923

74,7

95

.815

4.5

1.09

August

.30- 3

.837

74.2

96

.811

4.7

2.20

4- 8

.964

"

74.8

95

.822

3.6

0.13

9-13

.946

29

75.2

91

.807

3.9

0.17

.14-18

12

..937

74.3

93

.794

5.6

0.87

.19-23

.999

وو

75.0

93

.820

4.0

0.24

.24-28

.853

75.0

95

.835

5.5

2.76

September

.29- 2

.970

73.8

97

.813

4.1

0.84

3- 7

.938

74.9

92

.810

3.3

0.54

8-12

.925

72.8

95

.774

4.1

0.60

13-17

28.063

71.6

""

86

.677

4.7

0.10

.18-22

.141

71.8

90

.720

3.6

0.00

.23-27

.139

>>

74.3

93

.799

4.3

0.07

October

.28- 2

.213

72.1

88

.703

4.3

0.00

3- 7

.143

22

73.2

84

.700

3.9

0.19

8-12

.176

68.2

89

وو

.622

4.9

0.31

13-17

.163

""

70.1

86

.651

4.4

0.00

.18-22

.201

""

68.6

88

.627

4.5

0.00

.23-27

.195

وو

65.0

75

.473

4.4

0.00

November

.28- 1

.205

67.1

88

.595

4.9

0.00

2- 6

""

.217

65.0

77

.505

4.3

0.24

7-11

.188

66.1

84

.557

3.3

""

0.02

.12-16

.396

""

59.9

81

.432

4.6

0.00

.17-21

.332

62.1

82

.476

4.1

""

0.00

.22-26

.322

58.9

39

77

.388

4.2

0.06

December

..27- I

.360

57.7

79

.393

3.8

0.00

2- 6

.317

63.5

89

.535

>>

4.0

0.00

7-11

.234

>

61.2

91

.506

4.1

0.00

.12-16 ·

.295

55.1

80

.360

4.2

33

0.00

.17-21

.222

56.6

86

.404

4.7

>

0.00

.22-26

.143

61.8

93

.523

4.7

0.27

""

.27-31

.369

50.8

79

.300

4.9

0.00

Hongkong Observatory, 17th March, 1886.

W. DOBERCK,

Government Astronomer,

203

No. 27.

HONGKONG.

REPORT OF THE ACTING SUPERINTENDENT OF THE BOTANICAL AND AFFORESTATION DEPARTMENT, FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on 14th April, 1886.

1

No. 2.

BOTANIC GARDENS, 12th February, 1886.

SIR, I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Department for the year 1885. 2. Botanic Gardens. Apart from the general work of maintenance, few improvements or altera- tions have been attempted this year. The only alteration of note is the conversion of the grass plot on the west of the Fountain Terrace into beds, with the ultimate intention of making it a rose-garden. The natural soil has been taken out and replaced with a compost suitable for growing foreign roses, which we hope to grow, either on their own roots, or budded or grafted on native stocks.

The roses in the New Garden have been failing for some years back owing to the unfavourable nature of the soil, and from natural exhaustion. When the new plants are thoroughly established, it is intended to clear the old rose ground and plant it with palms. We have received many additional species of this highly ornamental and interesting class of plants within the last few years, sufficient I think to enable us to extend the Palm Plot over the old rose ground till it joins the Conifer Plot. Palms and Conifers will then be the special features of the New Garden.

3. Our immunity from typhoons this year has heen favourable to the vegetation of the Gardens. These storms periodically destroy many of the new introductions before they gain sufficient strength to become inured to their new position. The Gardens still suffer, however, from a limited water supply; our means being hardly sufficient to enable us to employ the required number of water carriers. This want has been strongly felt for the last two years, owing to the extension of the New Garden and the large increase of nursery plants that are propagated for sale.

4. The exceptionally heavy rain-storm of the 12th and 13th of June last, was severely felt in the Gardens. Several land-slips took place in the most picturesque parts of the New Garden where many tons of earth, together with the surface vegetation, were precipitated from the faces of the steep banks that bound the northern sides of the upper and lower walks which lead to the Glenealy Ravine. Several large Pine trees were carried down with the soil, and large gaps were made in the parapet walls both on the upper and lower walks.

A large quantity of soil and rock fell upon the Camellia Bed on the lower walk, crushing most of the plants beyond recovery.

It will be years before the yellow unsightly gaps can be again clothed with the luxuriant mass of ferns and other plants that contributed so much to the beauty of this part of the Garden. The same storm did more than usual damage to the walks in both Gardens and at Government House. The yearly expenditure in repairing walks is large in proportion to the extent of the ground. This is partly owing to the steep gradients and to the non-adhesive nature of the gravel at our dis- posal; and I am afraid that retrenchment in this matter cannot be effected to any appreciable extent, till funds are available to concrete the walks that ramify the steep parts of the Garden.

5. Many interesting plants have been added to our collection during the past year: notably a number of Succulents and Bromeliads from Kew; Cape bulbs and Ferns from the Botanic Gardens, Natal; Indian plants and named varieties of Crotons from the Botanic Gardens, Calcutta; Seeds of important economic plants from the Botanic Gardens, Jamaica; and a number of Orchids from Manila.

A detailed list of contributors and recipients is cited farther on.

6. The new plant houses enable us to give more satisfactory results than was previously the case in growing sub-tropical plants and plants requiring shade, but the want of a properly constructed house with a heating apparatus, is greatly felt for growing many of the beautiful plants which we receive from time to time from strictly tropical regions. The unsatisfactory condition of our Orchids shows this defect very clearly; most Orchids, as is generally known, require to be dealt with in a special manner, and must, as a rule, be subjected to conditions that necessitate a special house or compart- ment for their cultivation. It is to be hoped that the time is not far distant when we shall have an Orchid House worthy of the Gardens, and of the Colony.

:

204

6

7. Nearly all the shrubs and trees that were planted on the ground that has been recently added to the New Garden have made vigorous growth. Many of them yield valuable economic products, and deserve special mention, being new introductions to Hongkong that seem to be well adapted for cultivation here. The most important are: Styrax Benzoin, which yields the resin called ' Benzoin'; Bassia butyracea, the indian butter tree or Phulwara'; Caesalpinia coriaria, Diva Diva,' the pods of which are used for tanning purposes; Musa textilis, Manila Hemp; Manihot glaiziovi, a rubber producing plant; Chrysobalnus Icaco, the Cocoa plum, the oil from the kernels of this fruit being used in medicine; Brya Ebenus, West Indian Ebony; Bursera gummifera, which produces gum mastic; Brosopus juliflora, the pods of which are used in Jamaica for feeding cattle; Pavetta indica, the leaves and roots of which are used in medicine, and the root is also used for making knife handles.

8. A number of the 'Tree Tomatoe,' Cyphomandra betacea, were planted this year in the Vegetable Garden. This plant seems likely to do well in Hongkong; its worst enemy is a species of red ant which burrows under the ground and attacks the plant at the junction of the root and stem. The first lot of this plant that was raised last year was killed by the ants. An additional lot of seeds, however, was sent by the Director of the Botanic Gardens, Jamaica, and extra precautions were taken to protect the plants. We have now a number of strong plants from five to seven feet high, which I expect will yield a crop this summer. We have also a reserve stock of the plant for sale, and distri- bution. Respecting the merits of the Tree Tomatoe' Mr. MORRIS, Director of the Botanic Gardens, Jamaica, writes, "The fruit should be eaten when ripe only; then it is most refreshing. For cooking take out all the seeds, remove the skin, cut in half and stew as nectarines or peaches.

6

9. Another plant of considerable interest, Vitis Martinii, a new tuberous rooted vine from Cochin- China, fruited this year in Hongkong for the first time. The seeds were procured from the Botanic Gardens, Saigon, in 1883. The seedlings were planted out the same summer and made several shoots, each of which died down in the winter. They began to make fresh shoots about the middle of April, 1884, and grew well during the summer, but showed no inclination to flower; and again died down in the winter. Last summer they started vigorously and showed flower about the end of May. Many of the bunches however failed to develope fruit, owing apparently to imperfect fertilization, but there was a good average crop of bunches on the canes irrespective of the failures. The fruit was ripe in October; many of the bunches weighing a pound each. The berries, when ripe, are jet black, and rather under the average size of ordinary grapes. The seeds are large in proportion to the size of the berry. The flavour is a peculiar blending of sweetness and acidity, very pleasant, but tending, in my case, to leave a curious smarting sensation on the tongue; others might not find this peculiarity at all objectionable. The flavour might be altered as is well known, by varying the mode of cultivation, but the size of the seeds is likely to prevent the grape becoming popular as a table fruit; it may, however be very well adapted for a wine producer. A number of seedlings of this vine were distributed amongst residents of the Colony, but I learn that none of these plants have fruited. A few remarks as to the mode of cultivation may therefore be useful. The tubers should be planted at a distance of twelve feet apart in well manured soil, taking care to keep the manure near the surface, as the tubers take a horizontal direction and do not penetrate the soil to any great depth. When the shoots appear in the spring, it is well to cut off all the weak ones, leaving only four strong canes; these should be trained along a trellis or a wall, as the case might be, leaving a width of three feet between the canes. All the lateral branches should be pruned back to within one bud of the main rod, except those laterals that show bunches; but it will be found that very few bunches will be developed on the lateral shoots, most of the bunches springing directly from the main rods; but in the case of a bunch springing from a lateral branch, the branch should be stopped at the second bud above the bunch. The laterals might be allowed to grow till they are two feet long. It will then be seen if they are likely to throw out bunches or not. If not, prune them back as described, and also pinch back all subsequent growth as it appears. It may be found necessary to thin out the leaves to allow the sun to get at the bunches, but in doing this great care should be taken not to break or otherwise injure the leaf directly above the bunch. If this leaf happens to be accidentedly removed, the bunch below it will ripen immaturely and soon shrivel up. It is an advantage to thin out the bunches, leaving a space of fifteen or eighteen inches between them. It is also advantageous to thin the berries, leaving hardly one half of the original quantity on each bunch; but I am afraid this process would prove impracticable if the vine were extensively grown, owing to the labour it would entail. After the fruit is gathered, the vines require no farther attention till spring. By way of experiment one lot of plants was allowed to grow at will. Some of them threw up as many as a dozen suckers and produced laterals in profusion, but they all failed to flower. Another lot was transplanted into well-manured ground just as the crowns began to push in the spring; they too failed to flower, and presented rather a sickly appearance during the summer.

The Horticultural Press has already suggested that this vine should receive the attention of vine growers in the wine producing countries of Europe where the phylloxera has denuded the vineyards of the old class of vines. There being no phylloxera in Hongkong, I cannot say whether the dreaded insect would spare this vine; but in view of the wonderful improvements that have been and can be brought about by skilful and persistant cultivation, it is not unreasonable to surmise that this new vine may ultimately become a wine producer. It is easily cultivated, and seems to be well adapted for a tropical climate, or a climate in which the resting season is comparatively cold and the growing season hot.

205

10. The plant which yields the Chinese Star-anise is still growing well in the garden, but has not yet flowered; when it does so, specimens will be submitted to the authorities at Kew for the determina- tion of an interesting scientific question that has not yet been settled.

11. The vote placed at the disposal of this department to enable journeys of botanical research to be made in China has not been used this year; as in the first half of the financial year the hostilities between France and China greatly enhanced the danger of travelling in the interior, and Mr. FORD'S absence on leave during the latter half of the year precluded the possibility of any lengthened journey being made while there was only one European left to attend to the duties of the department. But in view of the understanding that it is one of the chief duties of the department to constantly endeavour to add to our knowledge of the flora of China, I have, in my spare time, made frequent journeys to the hills on the mainland adjacent to Hongkong, and have been fortunate in finding several plants new to science. In reference to these plants Mr. W. T. THISELTON DYER, C.M.G. the Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew writes to say, 'Some of the plants you have collected prove to be of extraordinary interest and quite new; Mr. HEMSLEY has described some of the novelties in the Journal of Botany; one of the Aristolochias has been named after you.'

12. China is unquestionably a rich field for botanical research, and it is to be regretted that the Chinese Authorities have no organized means, in the way of a National Botanic Garden, of cultivating and distributing their innumerable vegetable products. Botanic Gardens of other countries would gratefully exchange the valuable economic plants at their disposal for Chinese novelties, and the benefit would be mutual. We have not received one plant from a Chinese source this year. Hongkong would be a convenient station for reciprocating favours from Chinese who might be disposed to intro- duce some of the resources of foreign horticulture, or agriculture, into China. We are gradually accumulating a large variety of plants of commercial value, a portion of which we would gladly dis- tribute amongst any of our Chinese friends who might be inclined to favour us with some of the interesting vegetable novelties of the Celestial Empire.

6

13. The Rhea' or 'China Grass,' Boehmeria nevia, seems to be exciting considerable interest amongst planters as a textile, and enquiries as to its cultivation and the means of procuring it have recently been made by local agents and by correspondents at a distance.

Living plants can be procured in quantity from squatters on the island and from adjacent villages on the mainland. The Chinese cultivate it on patches of the richest soil they can find, and supply it with strong manure water from their cesspools, from the time the shoots appear till they are nearly ripe.

Several correspondents have asked for seeds of the plant, but I may here mention that none of the squatters whom I have consulted on the subject have ever raised it, or seen it raised from seed, though it is possible to raise it in this way. The favourite Chinese method is to divide the roots into small clumps about four or five inches square and plant them out in prepared ground at a foot apart. In this way a crop can be got off the plants the first year. Seedlings would probably take several years before they reached a yielding condition. The plants are usually divided and planted out in February, but this can be done in a climate like that of Hongkong, at any season, if the plants are duly watered.

'

14. The sale of plants has been continued throughout the year. The total number sold being 2,169. The demand is not so large as might be anticipated, owing, no doubt, to a considerable number of the residents in the Colony being unaware that plants can be bought at the Gardens.

15. An interesting Amaryllidaceous plant, Agave Geminiflora, flowered during the year. The spike was twenty-five feet high and produced about two thousand flowers, but all the ovaries dropped off before the seed ripened. The plant still looks healthy and it will be interesting to find whether it will survive the strain of flowering, seeing that its attempt at reproduction has proved abortive.

16. The collection of animals has this year been augmented by two additional species of deer. The male and female deer which we have had for some time mated this year, and the doe gave birth to a young one which has grown well, and looks in healthy condition.

One of the Silver Pheasants and a Mandarin Duck were stolen, and one of the large Owls which has been in the Garden for many years was found dead in the cage; it was wounded in several places, having evidently been killed by some person of barbarous disposition who had poked it to death through the bars of the cage with a stick, or some sharp pointed instrument.

The Officers of H.B.M.S. "Flying Fish" have quite recently presented us with a fine young specimen of the Cassowary, Cassuarius becaurunculatus, a bird belonging to the Struthionideae or Ostrich family. It was procured I believe from the Moluccas.

17. The arrangement of the Herbarium being now complete, the work in this branch of the department has been confined to keeping the specimens in good condition, and augmenting the collection with new discoveries, and duplicates for exchange. The collection is accessible to the public, and any one who is studying the flora of South China will find the Herbarium of great assistance.

18. Correspondence has been dilligently carried on with kindred establishments, and with private persons who are interested in matters upon which it is in our power to give information.

206

19. The names of the principal contributors to the Gardens are as follow:-

Anderson, Lieut.-Colonel D. G.; seeds.

Armstrong, J. M.; plants.

Blackhead Smith, Mrs. ; seeds.

Boehmer, Louis, Yokohama; plants.

Botanic Gardens, Brisbane, J. Pink, Director; plants.

"

و"

""

""

Jamaica, D. Morris, M.A., Director; seeds. Calcutta, Dr. G. King, LL.D., Director;

plants.

Durban Natal, J. M. Wood, Curator;

seeds, plants, &c.

Townsville, A. M. Anderson, Superin-

tendent; plants.

Royal Kew, Sir J. D. Hooker, K.C.S.I.,

&c., Director; plants and seeds. Bunting, Isaac, Yokohama; plants. Cooper, W. M. Ningpo; seeds and plants. Coxon, Mrs. A.; plants and seeds.

Curtis, C. Penang, Forest Department; plants and seeds. 20. The following are the chief recipients :

Acclimatization Society Queensland; seeds. Adams & Son, Messrs. New Zealand; seeds. Bell Irving, Mrs. ; plants.

Blackhead Smith, Mrs. ; plants.

Botanic Gardens, Adelaide; seeds.

وو

39.

37

""

>>

وو

>>

Brisbane; seeds and plants. Calcutta; seeds and plants. Ceylon; seeds.

Jamaica: seeds.

Melbourne; seeds.

Natal; seeds and plants.

Singapore; seeds and plants.

Sydney; seeds.

Townsville; seeds.

Trinidad; seeds.

Royal Kew; seeds, plants and herbarium

specimens.

Cameron, Mrs. ; plants.

Crawford, Mrs. ; plants.

Crow, W. E.; plants.

Cundall, C. H. Manila; plants.

Curtis, C.; plants and seeds.

21. During the year we received :---

789 Plants.

291 Packets of seeds.

IC Wardian Cases.

Cundall, C. H., Manila; plants and seeds. Dehra Dun, Forest School, India; seeds. Franco, P. M.; seeds.

Hance, Dr. H. F., Canton; seeds.

Hughes, J. I.; one deer.

Indian Forest Department; seeds. Macgowan, Dr. F. Wenchow; plants. Nicholl, Mrs. Amoy; seeds. Pickford, C. R. B., Cebu; plants. Piercy, Mrs.; plants.

Police Department; one Pheasant. Queensland Acclimatation Society; seeds. Romano, A. G.; plants.

Swalemen, Van Der, Ghent Belgium; seeds. Whitehead, F. H.; one Deer.

Wing Kee; one Owl and two Storks. Woodin, E. L.; plants and seeds,

Faber, Rev. E.; plants. Franco, P. M.; plants. Gordon, Major-General, Grossman, Č. F.; plants.

A.H.A.; plants.

Hance, Dr. H. F. Canton; plants and herb, specimens. Hargreaves, Rev. G. Canton; plants.

Ladies Recreation Club, plants.

Maries, C. C. India; seeds.

Moin, E. M. A. India; seeds.

Piercy, Mrs.; plants.

Police Department; plants. Romano, A. G.; plants.

Silva, J. M. A.; plants.

The Governor of Macao, seeds.

The Maharaja of Durbingah; seeds. The Spanish Consul; seeds.

Thomson, Dr. J. C. Canton, plants. Tripp, H. J. H.; plants. Vyvyan, C. B.; seeds.

Wing Kee; plants.

Woodin, E. L.; seeds and plants.

4 Animals.

60 Herbarium specimens.

22. Irrespective of the plants that were sold during the year we sent out:-

2,202 Plants.

221 Packets of seeds.

14 Wardian Cases.

22 Herbarium specimens.

:-

23. The Library has been increased by the following additions :-

A journey of Exploration through Western Ssu Ch'un.

Botanical Magazine for part of 1885,

Decandolle's Monographiae Phanerogamarum, 4 vols. Franchet's Plantae Davidianæ, first part. Gardeners Chronicle for 1885.

Journal of Botany for part of 1885.

Loureiro's Flora Cochinchinensis.

New Commercial Plants and Drugs by Thomas Christy,

F.L.S., F.S.C.L. presented by the Author. Report of the Acclimatization Society Queensland for 1884. Report on the Arboriculture of the assigned districts, India

for 1884.

Report on the Botanic Gardens Adelaide for 1884.

""

"

"

""

"

""

"

Calcutta Ceylon

1884-85.

1884.

Natal

1884.

"

>>

"

"

"

""

""

Singapore,, Trinidad

1884.

1883.

"

""

""

"

"

22

""

39

32

A

وو

>>

Royal Botanic Gardens Kew for 1883. Horticultural Gardens Lucknow for 1884-85. Public Gardens and Plantations, Jamaica,

for 1884.

Establishment of a Botanic Garden and

Arboretum at Montreal.

by Mr. Hosie on a journey through Central Ssu Ch'un.

of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

on the Experimental Garden, Silam, North Borneo

for 1884.

First Annual Report on the Forest Department, Straits

Settlements, 1885.

Progress Report of Forest Administration in Ajmere-Merwara

་་

"

>>

35

95

332

29

"

23

22

A

""

35

39

29

"

""

""

""

""

29

22

""

""

""

"

""

33

""

"

1883-84-85.

in Assam for 1883-84. in British Burma for

1883-84.

in British India for

1883-84.

in the Central Pro- vinces for 1884-85. in Coorag for 1883-84. in Hyderabad Assigned Districts for 1884-85. in the Punjab for

1884-85.

Progress Report of Forest Administration in the North-

Western Provinces and Oudh for 1883-84.

Annual Administration Reports of the Forest Department,

Madras Presidency for 1883-84.

Progress Report of the Forest Survey Branch for 1883-84. Siebold's Flora Japonica, 2 vols.

Succinct Notes on some plants from New Guinea and a description of hitherto unrecorded Paupin Orchids, by Baron von Muller, K.C.M.G. &c.

207

I

24. The Garden staff has worked fairly well throughout the year, but a high standard of efficiency is not to be expected. The ordinary Chinese Gardener has no knowledge of the physical laws that govern the actions of vegetable life, although they cultivate many of the plants of their native country with wonderful success; but in dealing with foreign plants that require to be carefully studied till the conditions necessary for their acclimatization are understood, they show little interest. They in fact frequently neglect such plants, unless a rule of thumb practice can be laid down for their guidance. It is a hard matter to interest a Chinese Gardener in an experimental attempt to propagate or cultivate a plant which must be subjected to a process different to that which he has been accustomed to practise. This class of men could hardly be expected to understand an explanation of the physical laws that bear upon horticulture as a science; but Mr. FORD has endeavoured for some years back to pro- cure a better class of workmen by training up boys as apprentices, and educating them upon a broader principle than that usually followed in China; -but although this system has been fairly satisfactory in one or two cases, it has not been wholly successful. The training which the boys receive sharpens their intelligence and gives them educational advantages that make them aspire to a position more lucrative and, from their point of view, more dignified than that of a "fa-wong." Several promising lads have left in this way just as they were begining to be useful. This of course is very disappointing, and I am afraid that no other result can be anticipated in future, unless the intelligence of the trained appren- tices is remunerated at its market value.

>>

25. Government House. A number of plants, chiefly Palms and Arvids, were planted out on the bank below the northern side of Government House. The fence which supports the creepers on the top of the bank has been extended for seventy yards farther on the walk, and the plants on the older portion have all been cut back and replaced with a view to more uniformity. Were the necessary funds available, great improvements could be effected on the ground just within the wall at the eastern bend of Upper Albert Road. The appearance of this part is a constant eye-sore, owing to the rough nature of the ground and the constant litter of bamboo leaves. The bamboo is very effective in isolated clumps, but its predominance in a garden or pleasure-ground is objectionable from an artistic point of view and injurious to the developement of the other trees and shrubs that were planted with the intention of contributing to and improving the general effect.

AFFORESTATION.

26. The planting of China Pines was commenced on December 3rd, 1884, and completed on the 16th of May, 1885. They were planted in the following localities:-Kowloon, North of Butts; Obser- vatory; Black Mountain; Aberdeen Hills; Mount Kellet; and below Mount Gough Road. The total number planted is 342,302.

27. A number of seedling Pines were raised in sites in the following localities:-Mount Davis, Mount Kellet, the New Military Sanitarium, and Saiwan, 204,837 plants being successfully raised. A large number of sites, probably one fifth of those made on the southern side of Mount Kellet, were unproductive. The soil in this locality is rather variable, and the failures chiefly occur on the steep slopes where the grass is scanty. Where the ground is covered with a fibrous carpet of grass roots, the rain, as it rushes down the slopes, is absorbed in sufficient quantities to saturate the soil and render it suitable for the reception and subsequent developement of the young tree; but where the ground has been denuded of its herbage by the irrepressible grass cutter with his blunt sickle, which does not cut but uproots the grass, the young tree is sorely handicapped in the struggle for existence.

28. 150 Catties of Pine seeds were sown broadcast on the hill south of the Little Hongkong estuary. A large number of seedlings have sprung up, but in rather irregular patches. It would be premature however, to pronounce upon the issue of this experiment at present. The result will be more apparent next year.

29. Some Bischoffias and Camphors were planted on Mount Davis. Camphors and Cork Oaks were also planted on the hills above the Powder Magazine. These have all done well.

30. Fourteen species of Eucalyptus were raised in various quantities and planted out in the following localities:-New Military Sanitarium; above Powder Magazine; and at Sokonpò. The total number planted being 16,398. Each species was planted in a clump, and marked with a ticket to enable us to identify the different kinds, and note their relative adaptability to the soil and climate of Hongkong. This comparison has been very interesting, and will be valuable in enabling us to select the most suitable kinds in future. The three species that are conspicuously superior to the others, and which may be considered an unqualified success, are E. robusta, citriodora, and tereticornus. The next in order are:-marginata, platyphylla, corymbosa, resinifera, and haemastoma. These five kinds have not done so well on the exposed hills near the Military Sanitarium as the three first mentioned kinds, but they have succeeded very well at Sòkonpò where the position is more sheltered; and I have no doubt that they will succeed in many of the unexposed parts of the island. Other four species, namely: Stuartiana; siderophloia; Microcorys; and maculata have grown moderately well. The per- centage of deaths is small, but the growth is slow and weakly. They evidently required a richer soil than the above mentioned sorts. The two species that have been least successful are pilularis, and hemephloia. A large proportion of both kinds have died, and those that have survived have not a pro- mising appearance.

6

31. The plantations of Cassia Lignea' that were made on the hills north of Aberdeen would probably have been in a thriving condition by this time but for the persistence of the Chinese in breaking

e

208

off the leaves and branches of the plants. They appear to attach some importance to the plant as a medicine, and despite the vigilance of the Forest Guards, they succeed in keeping the plants in an almost leafless condition. Even in the Botanic Garden, where the plants are protected by iron tree-guards and wire netting, they have killed several plants by persistently defoliating them and wrenching off the branches.

32. 10,000 young Camphor trees were raised during the season in Kowloon nursery, and will be planted out as soon as the weather is suitable.

33. Preparations were made in the nursery at Sòkonpò for raising a similar quantity of Camphors next summer, but Camphor seeds are very scarce this year, and the price has risen four hundred per cent. I have therefore decided to sow the ground with Pine seeds instead.

34. Upwards of one thousand young trees have this year been destroyed by grass fires. We have not been able in any of the cases to ascertain the cause of the fires.

35. The Forest Guards made twenty-two arrests during the year; twenty of the offenders were fined or sentenced by the Magistrates to terms of imprisonment. The fines varied from five dollars to fifty cents and the terms of imprisonment from three days to three weeks.

36. The number of arrests is very inconsiderable in proportion to the actual damage done to the plantations. The Forest Guards have frequently complained of being intimidated by bands of wood- cutters. The villagers at Aberdeen are notorious for their wood stealing propensities and the Forest Guards dread having to enforce their authority in that quarter. A few months ago one of the guards, while trying to arrest three men who were stealing trees from the enclosed plantation at Aberdeen, was attacked and severely cut about the hands with a knife. The men escaped.

The area of planted land is yearly becoming more extensive, and the trees, as they increase in size, are becoming more valuable, and consequently more liable to be stolen. If wood stealing is not already a profession in the Colony it is likely to become one. This consideration points to the advisableness of repressing the destroyers of our incipient forests with a strong hand. A coolie who is fined a small sum for having cut down a bundle of small trees has no reason to consider himself harshly dealt with. He may have been cutting trees with impunity for six months, and in this case he will probably have philosophy enough to look upon the fine as a kind of tax, and simply return to his wood- cutting vocation with a resolution to be more careful in avoiding the Forest Guards in future.

But the loss to the Government will not be compensated by a trifling fine, if the Colony has been ruthlessly deprived of what might have become valuable forest trees at some future date.

Considering the extent of the ground now planted, and the difficulty of walking over it, it is not surprising that two Forest Guards find it difficult to repress tree cutting. Both the men are Chinese and are consequently more likely to be intimidated, or induced to connive at an offence which it is their duty to repress than,-for instance, Indian watchmen.

If it is agreed that the plantations should be more effectively protected, I think it would be well to increase the number of Forest Guards, and endeavour, as far as possible, to modify the danger of the men being improperly influenced in the discharge of their duty by employing Indians instead of Chinese as Forest Guards.

37. The planting operations for the year are tabulated as follow:--

Pinus sinensis, Aleurites vernicia,.. Bamboos,..

Bischoffia javanica,. Camphor trees, Cedrela Tuna,

australis,

Cork Oaks,

Eucalyptus, 14 species,

TREES PLANTED.

.342,302

40

30

i

1,069

847

55

21

190

16,408

4 2,354

18

204,838 5,000

TOTAL,

..... 573,176

Ficus retusa,

Melia Azedarach,

Jambosa vulgaris,

SOWN IN SITES.

Pinus sinensis, Aleurites vernicia,.

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

A. B. WESTLAND, Acting Superintendent Botanical and Afforestation Department.

The Honourable THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

&c.,

&C.

&c.

219

No. 29.

:

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF SUPERIOR AND SUBORDINATE COURTS, FOR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

No. 39.

on 4th May, 1886.

REGISTRY SUPREME COURT, HONGKONG, 30th January, 1886.

SIR,I have the honor to forward herewith the following Returns:-

1. Return of Establishment for the Blue Book for 1885.

2. Return of Criminal Cases, &c.

3. Return of Civil Cases, commenced and tried in 1885,--

In Original Jurisdiction.

Summary Jurisdiction.

Appeals.

Bankruptcy.

Admiralty.

4. Return of all Probates and Letters of Administration granted in 1885.

5. Land Office Return,

6. Revenue Returns.

With respect to the Criminal Returns I beg to state that

The total number of cases in 1885 was.

In 1884

1883 1882

The total number of Prisoners tried in 1885 was....

In 1884

In 1883

In 1882

91

68

91

124

147

101

126

187

Compared with 1884 the number of cases in 1885 shew an increase of 34 per cent., whilst in the number of prisoners there is an increase of 45 per cent. due principally to the fact that in two cases of Piracy 24 prisoners were concerned.

Of the numbers tried in 1885, there were-

Convicted,

In 1884

1883 1882

""

In 1885 the acquittals amounted to.....

In 1884

1883

""

1882

""

Charges abandoned.

In 1885

1884

1883

""

1882

....

...103

65

70

...124

22

20

26

38

22

16

26

21

Three cases of Murder were tried in 1885, in two cases a verdict of not guilty was returned and the 3rd case was abandoned.

In 6 cases of manslaughter a verdict for the prosecution was obtained in... 3

For the prisoner in

Abandoned...

2 1

There were 15 cases of other offences against the person including one case of Shooting with intent to murder.

12 cases of Robbery with violence and 83 cases of other offences against property.

These last figures compare unfavorably with those for 1884 and 1883 when the numbers were as

follows:-

Robbery with violence...

Other Offences.

1884

1883

7.

24

1 52

+

:

T

220

On reference to the Land Office Returns it will be seen that the total of the

Rent Roll of the Colony on the 25th December, 1884, was....

Same date 1885 it was.......

Increase

....

.$153,923.62 .$155,490.86

$1,567.23

The increase is really larger, as some lots have been re-entered by Government, the rent of which does not appear in our Roll of the 25th December.

The new Leases in these cases are not yet ready, the arrears of Rent will be recovered from the tenants who are still in possession, as soon as the leases are ready for issue.

In 1885, 27 Leases were surrendered to Government or re-entry took place.

The rent on property resumed for Government purposes amounted to

The rent on land leased for the first time amounted to...

In 1884, 34 New Leases were granted.

In 1885, 159.

$ 513.14

+

$2,670.31

The increase is chiefly accounted for by the issue of a large number of Leases at Hunghòm and Kaulung for Inland Lots.

The fees in 1884 were.

In 1885 they were ....

The decrease is due to the fact that in 1884 there were registered

Sales.... Mortgages

In 1885, Sales

Mortgages

$4,321,50

$3,059.00

...243

.129

176

........119

The decrease occurred wholly during the months of May, June, and July, and is due to the absence of forced sales by Mortgagees, which I consider to be a favourable sign, for though this decrease in forced sales diminishes in one respect the Revenue of the Colony, yet it shows an amount of prosperity in that important class, namely the Lease holders of the Colony.

The premia on Lands sold in 1885 were.............. In 1884 ...

$66,658.50 $19,695.00

From the Revenue Returns it will be seen that for the Supreme Court proper there was in the year 1885 an increase of $2,179.94 as compared with 1884, but for the whole establishment, including the Land Office, the increase was only $917.44 as there was in the Land Office fees a decrease of $1,262.50.

The principal increase is in Court fees, fees received by the Official Trustee, Official Assignee and Registrar of Companies. The increase in Court fees occurred in the fees received in Summary Jurisdiction. The increase on the sum received by the Official Trustee arose from a new Estate being handed over to the Court on which the fee was $820. $52.88 were received under Ordinance No. 5 of 1885.

6 Companies were registered in 1885, the fees on which were

In 1885, Probates or Letters of Administration were granted in 99 Estates,

value sworn under

In 1884, the number was.....

In 1885, the number of Original suits entered was In 1884, the number of suits entered was In 1885, in Summary Jurisdiction, the number

of suits entered was

In 1884, the figures were...

104, and value.....

$1,037.72

$688.248.49 $1,496,222.00

77, the amount claimed was $712,257.05 74,

1,476,

31

>>

>>

$1,140,789.71

$ 183,079.01

22

>>

.1,407, and

The Bankruptcy and Admiralty Returns do not call for any special remark.

$ 169,051.16

From the Return of Intestate Estates paid into the Treasury it will be seen that the unclaimed balances in 36 Estates amounting in all to $374.67 were paid in, against 12 balances in 1884 amounting to $115.56.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

!

To the Honourable

THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY,.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

Your most obedient Servant,

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

i

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES that have been brought under the COGNIZANCE of the SUPREME COURT, during the last Ten Years.

221

Charges Abandoned.

Postponed.

Number Number

YEAR.

of

of

Convicted. Acquitted.

Cases.

Persons.

No. of

Cases.

No. of Persons.

No. of Cases.

No. of Persons.

(a.) 1876,.

64

109

76

24

8

9

(a.) 1877,.

127

179

135

39

1978,.

157

216

163

45

6

(b.) 1879,

148

202

135

54

11

13

1880,.

91

160

120

34

6

Total,...

587

866

629

196

38

41

:

1881,.

105

154

111

39

1

(c.) 1882,

124

187

124

38

15

21

(d.) 1883,.

91

126

70

26

14

1884,.

68

101

65

20

8

1885,.

91

147

103

22

16

428025

28(d.)

2

1

3

2

16

Total,.

479

715

473

145

54

91

5

Average of 1st Period,.

117%

1734

125

391

8/12/2

95$

143

94%

29

10%

181

Average of 2nd Period,

35

1

(a.) In these years the "Charges Abandoned" and "Postponed" are not included in the Grand Total in the published Returns; but

they are added here to make the figures tally. (b.) 1. Under Offence of "Breaking into a Dwelling House" out of 9 prisoners, 6 only are accounted for, the remaining 3 must have

been acquitted, and have been posted accordingly.

2. Under Murder" out of 3 prisoners, 2 only have been accounted for, the 3rd was probably acquitted.

3. Under Unlawfully giving false Statement to Registrar General" the prisoner although convicted does not appear under the

heading, but the facts appear in a foot note on the Return.

(c.) In one case the recognizance was estreated, this case is included in the total, but not in any other of the above headings. (d.) In one case the recognizance estreated, and one prisoner committed suicide in the Gaol.

INDICTMENTS and INFORMATIONS in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, for the

year

1885.

Including Attempts and Conspiracies to commit the several offences.

Showing how the cases tried in

the Superior Courts ended.

(Each prisoner tried, counted as a separate case; where a large number of Prisoners have been convicted together, the fact is mentioned in a note.)

Total.

Jndgment for the crown,

103

Judgment for the Prisoner...

22

Prisoner found Insane,

Cases which fell through for want of prosecution or ab- sence of accused, and cases thrown out by the Grand Jury (Attorney General),....,

Cases Postponed,.......

Murder, other than wife or child murder.

Manslaughter.

Attempt at Murder.

Murder of wife, Reputed] wife, or Concubine.

Child Murder.

Concealment of Birth.

:

00

3

1

2

2

...

:

:

23

22

1

1

:

Abortion.

Rape.

Unnatural Crimes.

Other offences against the Person.

Malicious Injuries to Property. Robbery with violence.

Prædial Larceny.

Other offences against Property.

Miscellaneous offences.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

10

1

:

00

8

2

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

61

20

20

6 3

:

16

1

:

147

3 6

CO

1

Note-In one case 14 Prisoners were concerned and in another 10,

1 15 2 12

83 24

222

RETURN of CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG, during the

SENTENCE.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

CRIMES.

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death Recorded.

Penal Servitude.

Hard Labour over one Year.

Hard Labour one

Year & under,

Solitary Confinement, Number of Persons.

Number of Persons. Privately Flogged,

Number of Cases.

Number of Per-

sons.

Number of Cases.

Number of Per-

sons.

year 1885.

CHARGES CASES

ÁBAX-

POST-

DONED.

PONED.

2

-:

1

3

2 : 2-

Assault with intent to rob.............

~~ :+

2

Arson,

2

Being in possession of goods taken by pirates..

14 Being found feloniously on board a junk equipped 14

for the purpose of Piracy.......

2

~ :*

i 1

Burglary,.

Conspiracy..

Cutting and wounding with intent to do grievous bo-

dily harm,

Detaining a boy for the purpose of selling him, Embezzlement,

Entering a dwelling house in the night with intent

to commit a felony therein,

Extortion by Police Constables,.

Feloniously demanding money with menaces,

Inciting to commit buggery,

2

1

1

3

2

1

1

3

4

Larceny,

1

3

Larceny in a boat in harbour,

3

3

3 3

Larceny on board ship,.

Larceny by a servant,

Larceny from the person,

Larceny and previous conviction,

Larceny in a dwelling house,

1: 10

~::

2

2

14

Ni N

3

1

3

3

6

4

14

17

15

12

5

5

Manslaughter,

3

2

2

Murder,

2

1

1

Obtaining goods under false pretences,

1

1

1

Perjury,

1

3

15

Piracy and Receiving goods piratically stolen,

13

13

a.1

Printing and Publishing an obscene libel,

1

227

1

1

1

5.1

26012N-

2 Receiving stolen goods,

2

1

Robbery from the person,

10 Robbery with violence,

2

2

2

Shooting with intent to murder,

Unlawfully detaining a child under the age of 14 years,. Unlawful detention for the purpose of emigration,.......... Unlawfully and maliciously wounding................

ta

75125

a. In this case the Prisoner was find $100.

103 22

:

1195

65 30

6

10

16

22

w::

3

b. In this case Prisoner discharged on his own recognizance. Arrangements having been made with Prosecutor with approval of Judge for compensation.

Number tried,

Convicted... Acquitted...

Charges abandoned,....

Total.......

Registry Supreme Court, Hongkong, 30th January, 1886.

...125 Persons.

.103

22

125 Persons.

22

13

.147

21

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

1

:

"

CASES COMMENCED.

JUDGMENT.

Settled or

No.

Debt and

withdrawn

Jurisdiction.

of

Damages.

before

Cases.

Defend-

Trial. Plaintiff.

ant.

Non- Suit.

Struck out, Dismissed

and Lapsed Writs.

In Dependency.

223

TOTAL CASES TRIED.

Cases.

Debt and Damages recovered.

1885.

Original,

$712,257.05

2

2

Summary,

1,476 183,079.01

462

633

14

16

265

888

55

13

$165,809.93

86 928

75,400.14

CASES TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Jurisdiction.

No. of Cases.

Debt and Damages.

Plaintiff. Defendant. Non-Suit.

Struck out & Dismissed.

1885.

Original,

Summary,

23a

9556

$650,735.59

15a

4a

108,598.14

655

15

16

a. 10 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1884.

Registry Supreme Court, 30th January, 1886.

Debt and Damages.

4a

$319,809.93

269

78,469.88

b. 51 of these cases were pending on 31st December, 1884.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

APPEALS COMMENCED.

Judgment.

No. of Cases.

Pending.

Appellant.

Respondent.

1885.

6

2

2

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

No. of Cases.

Pending.

Appellant.

Respondent.

1885.

4

2.

2

Registry Supreme Court, 30th January, 1886.

RETURN of ADMIRALTY CASES for 1885.

Year.

Entered.

Amount claimed.

Tried.

Judgment for Plaintiff.

Amount recovered.

Judgment for Defendant.

1885,

12

$1,138,500.00 7*

Not yet settled.

* On 31st December, 1885, 2 cases were still under consideration.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

Pending

or not continued.

Settled out of Court.

5

Eow. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

224

RETURN of all BANKRUPTCIES filed in the Supreme Court of Hongkong during the year 1885.

Name.

Date of Adjudication.

Petitioner.

Official or Creditor Assignee.

Debt in Schedule.

Assets.

Amount re- ceived by

Total amount of

the Official

debts

Assignee.

proved.

Au Kan, Au Nang and Au Li,...

George Holmes, .........

Lu Wai and Lum Yan Nang, Cheang Fung Kong alias Į

Cheang Yik Sheong, Maria Antonia Durand,.

José Maria Jesus,

Creditors

Official

Petition not proceeded with

16 Oct., 1885 Bankrupt

*58,463.45 54,749.00

8,153.60

17 Nov., 1885 | Bankrupts

,,

12,975.89 12,568.83

5,275.00 12,354.07

16 Dec., 1885 | Creditors

No Schedule filed

2,500.00

f

4 Jan., 1886 Bankrupt

""

1,078.00

1,037.20

28 Dec., 1885

"

10,828.18

5,855.00

Henry Smith Bidwell,.....................

7 Jan., 1886

>>

2,017.00

5,090.00

85,362.52 78,262.83 5,275.00 24,044.87

*Plus a certain number of Chinese creditors whose names and amount of debts are unknown to Bankrupt.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar

RETURN of INTESTATE and BANKRUPT ESTATES and of all JUDICIAL DEPOSITS paid into the Colonial Treasury by the Registrar of the Supreme Court during the half year ending 31st December, 1885,

DATE.

ESTATE, CAUSE OR ACCOUNT.

JUDICIAL DEPOSITS.

INTESTATE ESTATE.

BANKRUPT ESTATE.

TOTAL.

1885. December 29

Gee Whoy,.

""

""

Wah Ah Chiu,

29

38.57

38.57

13.78

13.78

>>

A

A

"

39

""

29

""

29

59

Ah Fung,

"

""

""

Lam Choon Lok,

Ah Man,

Cheung Chun,...

Osaki (Japanese woman),

George Edmunds Doorly,

Sew Show,

John Hohne,

Thomas Allen,

12.12

12.12

6.22

6.22

5.00

5.00

19.99

19.99

49.31

49.31

18.34

18.34

5.50

5.50

1.79

1.79

8.40

8.40

37

"

Ling On Loong,

1.75

1.75

Pow Yin,

1.00

1.00

"

""

13

>>

Low Lum,

2.50

2.50

A

Ah Hee,

5.44

5.44

""

25

"

Lee Ah Aik,

7.50

7.50

>>

"

Ong Chin,

15.66

15.66

23

Ah Kee,

15.16

15.16

Chinaman unknown No. 37,

1.00

1.00

33

A

A

"

"2

"

No. 38,

24.00

24.00

"

35

No. 39,

49.98

49.98

39

وو

33

وو

رو

No. 40,

3.83

3.83

No. 41,

3.48

3.48

وو

"

Wong Yau,

2.75

2.75

"

Eng Ah Chong,

31.20

31.20

""

Samuel Peters,

3.50

3.50

>>

دو

Igriano Soel,

1.50

1.50

">

"J

Hang Kee,

2.25

2.25

A

>>

Mathias Roquest,

1.75

1.75

35

G. McNulty,

0.50

0.50

""

Caetano Carvalho,

0.50

0.50

">

Heb Yew,..

H. McNeill,

0.10

0.10

4.25

4.25

""

"

Ah Sing,.

6.25

6.25

22

..

Ah Woo,

6.80

6.80

37

Chinaman unknown No. 1,

3.00

3.00

Total,.........$

374.67

374.67

I hereby certify that the above is a true and correct account, to the best of my knowledge and belief.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

*

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS granted by the Supreme Court of Hongkong, during the year 1885.

Date

of Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Place and Time of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

225

Value of the

Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1885.

Jan. 12 Maria Izabel da Silveira Boulle,. H'kong,

"

15 Lo Kum Woon alias Lo To Hon,.

H'kong,

.

3rd Dec., 1884,

28th Dec., 1884, | Administration,

Probate,

José Philippe da Costa, son-in-law of

the deceased,...

1,000,00

22 Li Ping Sau...

H'kong,

6th Jan., 1885,

Do.,

Lo Chun Shee, the Executrix, according

to the tenor of the Will, Wong Kiu, the Executrix, according to

the tenor of the Will,

8,000.00

600.00

23

""

Ü Man Chau,

H'kong,

"

29

Johannes Friedrich Cordes,

20th Dec., 1884, Hamburg, 28th July, 1883,

Do.,

5,000.00

Adm. with the Will annexed,

3,000,00

29 Carl Ferdinand Friedrich Emil

Herrmann,

Feb. 20 Ku Kam Yau,

""

H'kong,

At Sea, off Amoy, at Hu Toi | Administration,

Point,

26th Sept., 1884, Adm. de bonis non, 19th Jan., 1881, | Administration,

Double Island,

Adm. with the Swatow, 17th Oct., 1883,

Will annexed,

20 Vicencia Christina dos Remedios. H'kong,

""

27 Henry Ramsey.

27 Lau Fan,

"

27 Ali Mahomet Rehemally.

Mar. 10 Don José de Aguilar,

""

10 Patrick Doyle,..........

10 Charles Henry Haldane Wilsone,

10 John Mortimer Thomas (com- monly called John Thomas),.

"

20 Lam Yau,

""

25 James Banks Taylor,

25 Yeong A-pat,

31 Jacob Wolfs,

Fung Kan Village,

11th Aug., 1882, H'kong:

6th Feb., 1885,

Madrid, 20th May, 1880,

H'kong, 27th Feb., 1885,

Scotland, 19th Dec., 1882,

Pagoda Anchorage, near Foochow, 23rd Aug., 1884,

Mang Chung Village,

7th Oct., 1884, New York, 31st Jan., 1884,

Macao, 18th Feb., 1885,

Probate,

Administration,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Probate,

Administration,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

Probate,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

Probate,

Ü Lai Ün, the elder son,

Herrmann Christian Otte, Attorney for Rudolph Theodor Cordes and John Joachim Cordes. Power reserved to the Executors to come in hereafter and prove, Nicolaus August Siebs, Attorney for

Clara Julia Herrmann, Ku Tsang She, the Administratrix... José Antonio dos Remedios, the Admi-Į

nistrator,

Henry William Hambling, Attorney for Phillip Williams and Frederick William Focken,

Lam Chi Sang, the Executor, according

to the tenor of the Will, Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-

nistrator,

Don Alfonso de Aguilar, the heir,

Herbert George Fincham and William

Johnson, the Executors, Henry Foss, Attorney for George Hal-

dane Wilsone, the eldest son....

| Edmund Evers Dear, one of the Attor- nies for Mary Annie Thomas. Power reserved to Alfred Bulmer Johnson and Alfred Parker Stokes, Chan Lo and Chau Sam Lung, the Exe-

cutors.... William Wotton, Attorney for John Banks Taylor, Alexander Rose John- ston, and Henry Tod, the younger, Yeong Sze Ching, Lum Yee Chun, and How Chu Ping, the Executor and Executrixes,

Yokohama, 10th July, 1882, Administration, William Wotton, Attorney for Heinrich

Wolfs, Wilhelm Wolfs, Jean Hubert, Wolfs, Catherine Josephine Alden- bruch Nee Wolfs, and Carl Alden- bruch,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator, Henry William Davis, one of the Exe- cutors. Power reserved to Eliza Caldwell and Eliza Juliet Caldwell, the Executrixes named in the Will,, Cheuk To, the eldest son of deceased, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

Alfred Parker Stokes, one of the Exe- cutors. Power reserved to Alfred

10,000.00

2,000.00

200.00

3,000.00

900.00

900.00

9,000.00

200.00

2,000.00

7,000.00

10,000.00

800.00

70,000.00

900.00

April 10 Tam Tung,

10 Henry Charles Caldwell,

Sun Ooi, 26th Aug., 1882,

England, 28th June, 1883,

Do.,

Probate,

2,000.00

101,600.00

31

15 Cheuk Lung,

""

16 Chan Tsoi....

33

20 William Mostyn Morgan,

H'kong,

Heung Shan, 10th Sept., 1884, Il'kong, 22nd Dec., 1884,

2nd April, 1885,

Administration, Do.,

Do.,

1,000.00

150.00

1,000.00

22

22 Chan Tsoi,

1)

27 Chan Kwan,...

H'kong, 22nd Dec., 1884,

H'kong,

Do.,

J. Easton, the other Executor, Chau Wong Shi, the first lawful wife of

the deceased.....

150.00

23rd April, 1885,

Do..

""

28

Antonio Felippe Lobo,

Goa,

28

29

Li Sik Sam,

H'kong,

21

30 Ng Ming Heong,.....

12

30 Maria Borgia Xavier...

May 4 Barnett Samuel Barnett,

H'kong,

:

4 John Woone,

H'kong,

9th Oct., 1884,

8th April, 1885, Sau Ning, 8th Mar., 1875, Macao, 26th Sept., 1876,

9th Feb., 1885,

16th Mar., 1885,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration, Do.,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration,

Effects handed over to Chan A-hop, the

younger brother, by order of the Honourable the Chief Justice, Avelino Caetano d'Athaide, the Admi-.

nistrator,

Ho Lai Yan, the lawful widow. Au Shi, the first lawful wife,

Francisco Victor Freire and Capitolina

Maria Freire,..

25.00

7,000.00

100.00

600.00

4,000.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

30.00

nistrator,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

300.00

7 Sir Harry Smith Parkes, G.C.M.G.,

and K.C.B.,

Peking,

22nd Mar., 1885,

Probate,

15 Leong Ming Foon,

"3

21 Mok Yung,

26 Wong Kwai...

June

1 Frederick Augustus Johnston,

H'kong, 20th April, 1885,

Kowloon, 13th Mar., 1885, H'kong, 26th April, 1885,

H'kong, 29th May, 1885,

Administration,

Probate, Administration,

William Keswick, one of the Executors, and Sir Thomas Douglas Forsyth, C.B., K.C.S.G., and Hall Rokeby Price, the other Executors,... Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

170,000.00

600.00

Li Ying Tak, the sole Executor.

500.00

Alfred Gascoyne wise, Official Admi-

130.00

nistrator.

4 Lan Mun,

H'kong,

6 Koovarjee Hormusjee Bhabha,... Bombay,

19th April, 1885, 13th Jan., 1877.

Probate,

Administration, Adm. with the Will annexed,

Maud Alice Johnston, the widow and

200.00

sole Executrix,

Wat A-fun, the first lawful wife, Sorabjee Byramjee Bhabha, Attorney for Cowasjee Cooverjee Bhabha, Cur- setjee Byramjee Bhabha, and Now- rojec Jehanjeer Gamadia.

200.00

Power

800.00

reserved to Byramjee Cooverjee Bhabha and Dorabjee Bomanjee

Divecha,

226

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Grant.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,- Continued.

Place and Time of Death.

Probate, Administration with Will annexed, or Administration.

1885.

June 15 James Matheson Grigor,

Brighton, 10th Jan., 1885,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

22 Henry Auguste Pelégrin,

Haiti, (Grandes Antilles),

26th Dec., 1882,

K

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

Herbert Maurice Bevis, one of the At- tornies of Georgina Maria Grigor. Power reserved to Henry Richard Coombs, the other Attorney. Administration, Thomas Jackson, Attorney for Emile Louis, Sebastien Waton, and Maria Therése Emma, his wife. Louis Sylvestre Vernet, and Maria Claire Louise. his wife. Charles Bajolet, and Marie Poline Leonie, his wife. Marie Gabriel Bonifacy, and Marie Albine Blanche, his wife, Herbert Maurice Bevis, Attorney for Henry Bowsher Webb. Power re- served to Thomas Jackson and Henry Richard Coombs, the other two Attornies,

22 Edwards George Cole Webb,

Shanghai, 25th Oct., 1884.

Do..

29 Andrew Cook,

July 1 Yip Lun Kee,

2 Dwarkadass Dharsibhoy,

Guilhermina Pamella Gonzaga de Mello,

the widow,.

Money paid over to Chau Man Wa, by order of the Acting Puisne Judge, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-¡

nistrator,

Yip Chow Ming and Yip Chow Lum,)

the Executors,

Value of the Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis- {sion of Ap- praisement.

$

500.00

15,000.00

2,500.00

"

22 Antonio Alexandrino de Mello,... Macao,

27th May, 1885,

Do.,

4,900.00

22 Chau Chiu Ping,

9 Thomas Morris Irvine,

!!

11

9 Ah Kow alias Yik A-kau,

At Sea,

H'kong, 4th April, 1885,

Tung Koon, 21st July, 1861,

Bombay, 29th Sept., 1882,

At Sea,

21st Sept., 1884,

At Sea, 1st May, 1885,

21st May, 1885,

Do.,

2.01

Do.,

100.00

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration,

5,000.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

200.00

Do.,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

200.00

Effects handed over to Yeung A-yun,

་་

9

Kwok Yu alias Kwok Chiu Fat,. Shaukiwan, 11th June, 1885,

13 Li Nung,

H'kong,

13

»

Charles Smith,...

";

17

Tsang Ho Yung:

5th July, 1885,

H'kong, 27th June, 1885, Shaukiwan, 18th June, 1885,

Probate, Do.,

Administration, Probate,

the first lawful wife, by order of the Acting Puisne Judge,

Kwok Sing and Kwok Kow, the Executors, Chiu Shi and Chiu Ying, the Executrix (

and Executor,

Max Grote, the Administrator,

Tsang Lam Shee, the Executrix, accord-

ing to the tenor of the Will. Power reserved to A-yee,

5.00

1,600.00

500.00

300.00

1,500.00

11

17 Mordecai Simeon Gubbay,

France,

5th Dec., 1883,

Adm. with the Will annexed,

Frederick David Sassoon as Attorney for Arthur David Sassoon and Aaron Moses Gubbay, until they shall duly apply for and obtain Probate of the said Will,

77,000.00

13

20 Sebastião Ignacio de Barros,.......

Timor,

59

23 Wong Fuk Mui,

H'kong,

25

23 Chun Ngan aliás Chun On,

H'kong,

39

23 Tam Mo Sun alias Tam Chew San.

H'kong,

99

24 Tsin Man,

H'kong,

""

24 José Phelippe da Costa,........

H'kong,

""

30 Wong Hoy,

1st Jan., 1884,

Sth July, 1885, 9th Jan., 1885, 10th July, 1885, 1st July, 1885, 9th July, 1885,

H'kong, 28th June, 1885,

Administration,

Probate, Do., Administration,

Vicente Victor Rodrigues, guardian of

1,300.00

the deceased's children,

Low Kwei Kum, the Executrix,

1,100.00 .

Chan A-po, the Executor,

3,500.00

Yau Mi Ho, the lawful widow,

17,000.00

Do.,

Tsin Yau,

50.00

Aug. 5 Pavel Andreevich Ponomareff,...

12 Carl Wassenius,

12 Antonio Carlos Brandão,

Do.,

Probate,

Administration,

"

14 John McNamara Fleming,...........

Melbourne, 7th Dec., 1884,

Macao, 28th June, 1885,

At Sea,

23rd Oct., 1884,

Do.,

*

19 Chan Ki.

H'kong,

"J

27 Henry Reeves..

27 Tan Kow,

Sept. 14 Maurice Fitz Gibbon...

"?

14 Wan Cho.

H'kong, 10th Aug., 1885,

At Sea, 11th Aug., 1885, Ireland, 25th Feb., 1881,

Tung Koon, 27th July, 1885,

Adm. with the Will annexed, Adm. and Codicils] annexed,

4th Aug., 1885, Administration,

Do.,

Do.. Adm., Will and Codicil annexed, Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

Li Lin Ying and Wong Ting Lok, the

Executrix and Executor.

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi- nistrator and Attorney for Simeon Wassiliwitch Litrinoff,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

Francisco d'Assis Gomes and João Bap-

tista Gomes, Jr., the Executors,..... Honourable Edward Loughlin O'Malley

as Attorney and Agent of Bridget Mary Fleming, Effects handed over to Lo A-Ng, the first lawful wife, by order of the Honourable the Chief Justice. Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

1,100.00

600.00

3,400.00

142.00

30,500.00

2,000.00

20.00

60.00

Tan Chai, nephew of the deceased,... Thomas Jackson. Attorney for Mary

100.00

7,000.00

24 Lan lo

28 Tse Hing Tsung:

H'kong, 10th Sept., 1885, H'kong, 17th Sept., 1885,

Do., Do..

"

30 Pang Heung,

Oct.

2 Tam Yam Yin,..

"

Lo Toong Choi,

H'kong, 9th Aug., 1885, Shun Ooi, 13th April, 1876, | Administration,

H'kong. 2nd Jan., 1880, Adm. de bonis non,

Probate,

Fitz Gibbon, Effects handed over to Chun A-kang. the first lawful wife, by order of the Honourable the Chief Justice, Leung A-mui, the first lawful wife,. Effects handed over to Wong Acheong, the first lawful wife, by order of the Honourable the Chief Justice, Pang Ping Shai, the Executor accord-

ing to the tenor of the Will. Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

25.00

70.00

20.00

3,050.00

20,000.00

15

Ho Kook.

19

""

19 Lindoro do Rozario,

22 William Steven,

""

Wantow, 6th Sept., 1885, H'kong,

21st Sept.. 1885,

London, 17th Mar., 1879,

Administration, Do.,

Leung A-yau as guardian of Yu Po King, durante minore ætate of the said Yu Po King, Ho Wu, the eldest brother of deceased, Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

2.500.00

600.00

150.00

nistrator,

Do.,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

600.00

nistrator.

23

Chan Kwai.

**

**

23 Ramon Moran,

"

26 Gilbert Gabriel de Trengualye.... Paris,

U Shek Koo, 28th Sept.,1885, H'kong, 11th Oct., 1885, 16th Dec., 1870,

Do., Probate, Adm. with the Will annexed.

Lau Fuk Fai, the first lawful wife,

$40.00

Mariana Pereira Moran, the widow,

3,400.00

Herbert Mainwaring Baily, Attorney for

Comte Ernest de Sampigni,

2,400.00

1

CALENDAR of PROBATES and ADMINISTRATIONS,—Continued.

Probate, Administration

Date of

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Place and Time of Death.

Grant.

with Will annexed, or Administration.

Name and Description of the Executor or Administrator.

227

Value of the Effects as sworn to, or set forth in the Commis- sion of Ap- praisement.

1885.

Oct. 26

30

"}

John Jamieson Winton,..... Theodor Wilhelm Lichtwark

Holm. 30 Chang Chiew alias Chang Sing

Hop,

At Sea,

H'kong,

At Sea,

"

30 U Sui Nu alias U Sing Loi,

H'kong,

Nov.

6 Chan Kam Fai,

Sooloo,

6 Chan Shau,.

11 Chinaman, No. 39,

12 Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee,

14th Aug., 1885,

24th Aug., 1885,

18th Sept., 1885,

10th July, 1885,

H'kong, 1st Sept., 1885, At Sea,

5th Aug., 1885,

H'kong, 22nd Sept., 1885,

tion and Settlement annexed, Probate,

21st May, 1883, Adm. and Trust Dieposi- Thomas Jackson, Attorney for Willian

Fanny Gram, the Executrix,

3,000.00

300.00

Alexander,..

Administration,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi- Į

nistrator,

125.00

Probate,

U Kam Sham, the Executor, according

to the tenor of the Will,

35,000.00

Adm. with the Will annexed, Administration, Do.,

Tong Chak Po,..............

1,000.00

Chan A-kau, the first lawful wife,

100.00

.Probate,

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-Į

nistrator,

Jamsetjee Ruttunjee Bisnee and Hor-

60.00

musjee Cooverjee Setna, the Exe- cutors,....

2,000.00

13 William Catherall Syder,

At Sea,

AAA

17 Lau Tin Ho,

18 Ho Ui Shang,

H'kong, H'kong,

17th Oct., 1885, 7th Nov., 1885, 7th Nov., 1885,

""

18 Chan Ching Shi,

At Sea,

23

H. C. W. Timm,

""

H'kong,

23

Ah Kiu alias Lo Ku,

At Sea,

Administration, Do., Probate,

24th Oct., 1885, Administration, 14th Nov., 1885, 31st Oct., 1885,

Mary Syder, the widow,

800.00

Lau Cheung Shi, the first lawful wife, Ho Tsoi Shi, the Executrix, according

2,000.00

3,500.00

to the tenor of the Will, Chan Kam Chun, the husband,

1,500.00

Do.,

Gustav Adolph Wieler,

300.00

Do.,

Money handed over to Lo Nü, the pater-

""

Dec.

4

João da Roza,

7

George Isambert Bayly,.

7 Lau Tin Ho,.

23 William Nicholas Deville,.......

H'kong,

H'kong,

H'kong, 14th Nov., 1885, Probate, Shanghai, 7th Aug., 1884, Adm. with the

Will annexed, 1st Nov., 1885, | Administration,

26th Nov., 1885,

Do.,

nal uncle, to be given to the de- ceased's widow Ng A-yun, Adelia Apollonia da Roza, the Executrix,. Clement Francis Romilly Allen,

14.48

200.00

630.00

Alfred Gascoyne Wise, Official Admi-

nistrator,

Edward James Ackroyd, Official Admi-]

nistrator,

100.00

2,000,00

Land Office Return for 1885.

The total of the Rent Roll of the Colony, on the 25th December, 1883, amounted to,

For the year 1884,

And for the year 1885,

159 Leases with a rental of,

In 1885, 27 Leases, the Crown Rent on which amounted to,

Were surrendered to or re-entered by Government.

were granted during the same period.

They were on the 25th December:-

276 Marine Lots with a Rental of,

940 Inland Lots, Rental,

1 Quarry Bay, Marine Lot,

46 Farm Lots, Rental,

30 Rural Building Lots,

5 Marine Lots, Aberdeen,....

56 Inland Lots, Aberdeen,

19 Marine Lots, Aplichau,

19 Inland Lots, Aplichau,

91 Shaukiwán Lots,

1 Stanley Inland Lot,

15 Kaulung Marine Lots, 95 Kaulung Inland Lots, 9 Farm Lots, Kaulung,.

72 Garden Lots, Kaulung, 121 Inland Lots, Hunghòm,..

Fees 1884,

In 1885,

Registry Supreme Court, 30th January, 1886.

EDW. J. ACKROYD, Registrar.

$ 60,927.82 70,585.76

2,534.44

1,163.28

1,586.99

579.16

329.36

142.26

186.84

1,087.50

1.00

11,006.69

2,072.29

240.37 2,084.10

963.00

Total,.....

$155,490.86

$4,321.50 3,059.00

$153,109.56

153,923.02

155,490.86

2,824.16

4,392.00

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

228

RETURN of all sums received as REVENUE in the Registry of the Supreme Court during the year, 1885.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Jurisdiction,

Bankruptcy Jurisdiction,

Probate Jurisdiction,.......

Official Administrator's Commission,

$4,040.24

3,709.55

375.11

745.34

847.88

Official Assignee's Commission,

1,135.43

Official Trustee's Commission,

935.11

Appraiser's Fees,

181.61

Sheriff's Fees,

184.50

Bailiff's Fees,......

1,157.00

Interest on Deposit of surplus cash,

4,583.15

Fees on Distraints,

959.00

Registrar of Companies,

1,037.72

Fine and Forfeitures,

100.00

$19,991.64

Land Office Fees,

3,059.00

Total,......

.$23,050.64

Registry Supreme Court, 30th January, 1886.

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

RETURN of all sums collected in the Registry of the Supreme Court for the year 1885, and paid into the Treasury.

1885.

1884.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by stamps,

OFFICIAL ASSIGNEE.-5 per cent. on amounts encashed paid into the Treasury, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR,

$ 9,134.84

832.81

$ 9,829.24 1,135.43

1,270.70

847.88

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2 per cent. on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000; above $10,000 commission, 1 per cent. on further amount, 1 per cent. commission on income,... APPRAISER OF INTESTATE ESTATES.-2 per cent. on Houses, Land, Goods, Furniture, &c.,

1 per cent. on cash, Banking Account or Shares,

BAILIFF,

SHERIFF,

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

INTEREST on Registrar's balance at the Bank,

FINE AND FORFEITURES,.

45.77

935.11

561.30

181.61

1,000.50

1,157.00

252.50

184.50

427.44

1,037.72

4,260.84

4,583.15

25.00

100.00

LAND OFFICE FEES,

Total,........

$17,811.70 4,321.50

$22,133.20

$19,991.64

3,059.00

$23,050.64

DEPOSITS UNAVAILABLE.-Intestate Estates not claimed,

$ 115.56

374.67

Registry Supreme Court, 30th January, 1886:

EDW. J. ACKROYD,

Registrar.

TOTAL

NUMBER TOTAL NUMBER

OF

OF

PRISON-

CASES.

ERS.

Convicted

and

Punished.

Discharged.

Committed

for Trial at

the

Supreme

Court.

Committed

to Frison, or

Detained

pending Orders

of H. E. the

Governor.

To keep

the

Peace.

Ordered to find Security.

*

M.

F. M.

F.

M. F.

M. F. M.

F.

M.

F.

10,281

11,901 | 7,951|

849 2,188

258 159

2

11

**

134

69

221

27

KIS

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M. F.

2

3

co

6

18

:

10,690 1,211| 3,902

223

108

118

18

130

128

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,.

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

...........11,90

Punished for

preferring

false Charge

or giving

wilful false

Testimony.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNIZANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT DURING THE YEAR 1885.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1885.

Undecided.

229

HHH

Notices

of

Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

:

Warrants.

4,627

TOTAL.

230

OFFENCE.

THE CASES CONSISTED OF

No. OF CASES.

No. of PRI-

SONERS.

Abduction and sale of Women and female Children, Absent from Ship without Leave (see Seamen). Abusive Language (see Breach of the Peace). Accessory after the Fact to Felony (see Felony).

"

before

21

Accusing of Crimc--Conspiracy for (see Conspiracy). Aiding and Abetting in Felony (see Felony). Alms-soliciting (see Mendicancy).

Animals--Cruelty to,..

Arms--Chinese not Holders of Night Passes found car-

rying,

Army & Navy-Desertion from H.M.'s (see Descrtion). Arson.

Artificers and Artizans-Misconduct as (see Workmen). Assault--At or in connection with riotous Assemblages,.. --Accompanied with Damage to Property, -Causing grievous bodily harm,. -Common,.

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,..

NO. OF

CASES.

NO. OF

PRI- SONERS.

1,0751,306

3

4 Clothes-Hanging to dry over Public Ways, wet, (see

3

19

Nuisances).

-Purchasing or Receiving Regimental (see Mi-

litary Law).

Coin-Offences relating to,

Common Assault (see Assault).

Conditional Pardon-Breach of,

Confederating with Pirates (see Piracy).

""

Larceny (see Larceny).

32

32

9

Conspiracy to accuse of Crime,

""

to commit Felony,.

$+

to defeat the ends of Justice,

5

7

to defraud,

1

1

422

583

-Indecent,

5

5

JJ

"

-On Females, and Boys under 14 years of age,. -On person to prevent lawful apprehension, -On Police in the Execution of their Duty, and

obstructing and resisting Police,

I

1

111

145

~ - W

3

413

""

""

-With intent to rob,....

to commit an unnatural Offence,

With wounding,

Attempting to commit Felony (see Felony).

"

19

"

""

other Offences (indictable),

to extort by Threats, Menaces, &c., (see

Threats. &c.).

to bribe Police Constables (see Bribery).

Auctioneer-Unlicensed (see Unlicensed).

Banishment-Returning after (see also Conditionalį

Parlon),.

Bankrupt-Fraud by,

Begging (see Mendicancy).

Bestiality (see Unnatural Offences).

Bills-Posting (see Posting Bills).

Birds-Breach of Ordinance for Preservation of,

14

15

Constables of Police-Assault, &c., on (see Assault ).

22

"

-Assuming name and designation of

(see Police).

-Attempt to bribe (see Bribery ).

-Misconduct as (see Police).

Contagious Diseases' Ordinance-Offences against. Contempt of Court,

Coolic Lodging Houses-Unlicensed (see Unlicensed, &c.). Coroner's Summonses to attend Inquests-Disobedience

of by Juror (see Jurors ).

Crackers-Making Bonfires or Firing (see Bonfires, &c.). Crime-Conspiracy to accuse of (see Conspiracy). Crimes and Offences committed in Chinese Territory (see

Chinese).

Crown Land-Trespass on (see Trespass).

Cruelty to Animals (see Animals).

1

1

4

42

42

11

13

Cutting and Wounding with intent, &c....

28

34

Damage to Property, (see Malicious Injuries). Dangerous and Offensive Trades-Carrying on,

11

11

20

20

Weapons-Found by Night with,

with intent to break into a Dwelling House, (see Night).

1

1

3

3

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-Breach of,

Deaths and Births-Breach of Ordinance for, (see

Births, &c.).

Decoying Persons into or away from the Colony, Deportation from Canton to the Colony under H. M.'s

w

10

14

Order in Council, 1865, (

22

**

>>

""

99

""

"

Japan Shanghai

2

2

Returning from (see Banishment, &c ).'

Deported Persons-Harbouring,. Desertion from Foreign Ships..

23

23

30

30

10

10

8

:

22382838

:

Co

8

323

22

>>

H. M.'s Army and Navy, British Merchant Ships.

bonds, &c.).

Destitutes-(see Vagrants, under Rogues and Vaga-

Diseased Cattle-Bringing into the Colony, (see Un-

wholesome Provisions).

Disorderly Behaviour-Accompanied with damage to

"

"

Property,..

-Drunkenness, Fighting, &c., -Wasting Water at Public Hydrants,

7741,261

37 Disorderly House-Keeping a,

Distilling-Illicit,

Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled ferocious, to be at large, &c.,

Domestic Servants-Misconduct as,

14

-Stealing,

1

27

:སྐ-

10

12

1

1

Dredging in the Harbour at Anchorage for Ships of War,

(see Harbour).

Driving furiously-(see Furious driving).

Drugs-Administering,

2

Drunkenness (see Disorderly Behaviour).

Breach of).

Births & Deaths-Breach of Ordinance for Registration

of,

Boarding Houses for Seamen--Unlicensed (see Unlicen-

sed).

Boarding House Rules-Breach of,

Boats-Breach of Ordinance for Cargo (see Cargo Boats).

-Exposing Night Soil along the Praya in open (see

25

17

2:

>>

""

""

""

Nuisances).

-Larceny in the Harbour on board (see Larceny). -Leaving Harbour without a Clearance,

-Obstruction of Wharves by (see Obstruction).

- Refusing to accept Hire when unemployed,...

-Refusing to pay Hire of,.

-Unlicensed Plying of (see Unlicensed).

Bodily Injuries-Cutting and wounding and inflicting (see

Cutting, &c.).

Bonfires-Firing Crackers or making,

Breach of the Peace,

Bribery,

British Merchant Seamen-Refusal of Duty by (see

Scamen).

Buildings-Breach of Ordinance for,

Burglary,

Burial of Chinese Corpse elsewhere than in a Cemetery,.. Canton-Deportation to this Colony from (see Deporta-

tion, &c.).

Cargo Boats-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Cattle-Bringing into the Colony diseased (see Un-

wholesome Provisions).

Diseases Ordinance-Breach of,

Ducks-Selling in the Streets, (see Markets' Ordinance,

Dust Bins-Neglecting to clean out, (see Nuisances).

Raking (see Nuisances ).

Dwelling Houses-Found by Night with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons with Intent to break into, (see Night).

-Found by Night in-with Intent to

commit Felony, (see Night).

-Larceny in a, (see Larceny).

Earth-Cutting from prohibited Places, (see Tresspass

on Crown Land).

Embezzlement,

Embracery,.

Enclosed Places and Gardens-Larceny of Vegetables

and Fruits from, (see Larceny).

Encroachment on Crown Land, (see Tresspass).

Escape of Prisoners from Gaol,

from Custody of Police,

Negligently allowing,

Evidence-Giving wilful false, (see False Charge, &c.). ExplosiveSubstances-Breach of Ordinance for Storage of,

1

>>

-Stealing,

-Turned loose on Public Ways,......

5

Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for Street,.. Chair Coolies-Obstruction of Public Ways by (see Obs-

57

70

truction).

Chair Hire-Refusing to pay Vehicle or (see Chairs and

Vehicles).

(see Night).

Child Stealing,

18

25

1

1

Chai Mui-Night Noises by playing at the Game called

Child-Desertion of,

Chinese Corpse-Burial of, elsewhere than in a Cemetery

(see Burial).

Chinese Emigration Ordinance, Breach of,..

""

>>

-not Holder of Night Passes found carrying

Arms (see Arms).

-Offenders found in the Colony after Banishment under Ordinance 9 of 1857, and in Breach of Conditional Pardon under Ordinance of 1860, (see Banishment and Conditional Pardon). -l'assengers' Act 1855. Breach of,...... -Territory-Crimes and Offences committed in,...

Carried forward,...

:

1,075 1,306

1

1

:

10 2

917

Fi

10:21

Extortion,

??

by Colour of Office,..

1

""

by Menaces,

Carried forward...

2,097 2,834

231

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,...

Extortion by Threats. (see Threats).

or Attempt to extort,

False Charge-Preferring-or giving wilful false evidence,

Declaration-making a,

::

Imprisonment,

..

""

Prétences-obtaining Goods and Money by,

Statements-Scamen presenting false Characters and

making, (see Seamen).

Trade Marks and Labels-Fraudulently using, (see

Trade Marks).

Felony Accessory before the Fact to,

"

**

-Accessory after the Fact to,

-Attempting to commit,

-Conspiracy

(see Conspiracy).

-Found by Night in Dwelling Houses with Intent

to commit, (see Night, &c.).

Ferocious Dogs-Allowing unmuzzled, to be at large. (ser

Dogs).

Fighting, (see Disorderly Behaviour).

Filth and Rubbish-Allowing Accumulation in House, or

immediate Vicinity thereof, of, (see Nuisances).

Fire Arms-Discharging.

""

-Exporting of,

Fish-Selling in the Streets, (see Markets' Ordinance,

Breach of ).

Forgery,

Forcible Entry.

Foreign Ships-Desertion from, (see Desertion).

Man-of-War Stragglers from, (see Desertion). Fowls-Selling in the Street, (see Markets' Ordinance,

Breach of).

Fraud, by Bankrupt, (see Bankrupt).

-Conspiracy to commit, (see Conspiracy).

Fruit and Vegetables in Gardens and enclosed Places-

Larceny of, (see Larceny).

Furious Driving,

Gambling-Breach of Ordinance for Suppression of,

in the Streets, treated as Obstruction of)

Public Ways,.

-Registered Householder permitting in a House,

(see Householders, &c.).

Gaols-Breach of Ordinance for,

Gaol-Escape of Prisoners from (see Escape).

Gardens and enclosed Places-Larceny of Vegetables and

Fruits from (see Larceny).

Geese-Selling in the Streets (see Markets Ordinance,

Breach of).

Girls-Abduction of (see Abduction).

Goods and Money-Obtaining by false Pretences (ser

False Pretence).

Gunpowder-Breach of Ordinance for Storage of, Harbour and Coasts Ordinance-Breach of,..

"?

??

*

Dredging at Anchorage for Ships of War in the, Larceny on board Boat or Ship in the (see Lar-

ceny).

Regulations-Breach of..............

Throwing Rubbish on the Beach or into the (see

Nuisances).

Hawkers calling out in the Sale of their Wares (see Street

!!

Noises).

Obstruction of Public Ways by (see Obstruc-

tion).

Unlicensed (see Unlicensed).

Highway Robbery with Arms or with Violence (see Rob-

bery).

House-Allowing Filth and Rubbish to accumulate in, or

in immediate Vicinity of (see Nuisances).

House Breaking.

Householder, Registered, permitting Gambling in a House

Householders and Servants-Breach of Ordinance, for |

(see Gambling).

Registration of,.

House Found by Night in a-with Intent to commit Fe-

lony therein (see Night).

-Found by Night with Dangerous and offensive Weapons with Intent to break into a Dwel-

ling (see Night, &c.).

-Larceny in a (see Larceny).

-Registered Householder permitting Gambling in

a (see Gambling).

-Setting Fire to (see Arson).

-Unlicensed Coolie Lodging (see Unlicensed).

-Unlicensed Seamen's Boarding (see Unlicensed).

Hydrant-Wasting Water at a public (see Disorderly

Conduct).

Inciting a Person to commit a Misdemeanor (see Misde-

meanor).

Indecent Assaults (sée Assault).

Indecent Exposure of Person by Bathing or otherwise,

and Lewdness..

Indecent Prints.

Injury to Property-Malicious (see Malicious Injury, &c.), Inquests-Jurors disobeying Coroner's Summonses for

Attendance at. (see Jurors).

Japan-Deportation to this Colony from (see Deporta-

tion).

Carried forward.....

No. of

No. of

PRI-

CASES.

SONERS.

2,097 | 2,834

10

10

2

28

29

OFFENCE.

Brought forward..

Jurors-Neglecting to answer Coroner's Summonses to Į

attend Inquests,

Kidnapping (see Child Stealing, Abduction and Sale of Women and Female Children, and Women and Children)-Breach of Ord. for protection of. Labels and Trade Marks-Fraudulently using false, (see

Trade Marks, &c.).

Larceny as a Bailee,

-Cattle (see Cattle Stealing).

No. of CASES.

No. or

PRI- SONERS.

2,664 3,852

1

-Children (see Child Stealing).

"

-Common,

897

994

28

1 29

ས·

-Dogs (see Dog Stealing).

29

-from Ships or Boats in the Harbour,

22

29

-from the Person,

176

216

**

-from the Person with Violence,

1

3

"

**

-in a Dwelling House,

29

39

of Beasts or Birds, not the subject of Larceny

at Common Law,

13

16

-of Vegetables and Fruits from Gardens and

enclosed places....

13

13

Lewdness, (see Indecent Exposure, &c.).

2

2

Libel,

Lights-Chinese not carrying at night,

3

3

Lodging Houses-Unlicensed Coolie, (see Unlicensed). Mails-Detention of H. M.'s (see Post Office). Malicious Injury to Property,

46

46

Manslaughter,

15

Marine Store Dealers-Breach of Ordinance for,. Markets Ordinance-Breach of,........ Menaces-Demanding Money by,

5

5

344

344

10

24

Mendicancy,

212

212

•"

Men-of-War Anchorage-Dredging at, (see Harbour). Merchant Seamen-Desertion of, (see Desertion).

-Refusal of Duty by British, (see Sea-

men).

Misdemeanor-Aiding and Abetting in,

--Piracy with, (see Piracy).

Navy and Army-Desertion from Her Majesty's (see De-

6

Military Law-Breach of...

155

594

1

265

265

11

**

-Attempting to commit, ---Inciting a Person to commit a,

2

2

Money Changer-Unlicensed, (see Unlicensed).

Murder,

7

16

10

10

""

-Attempting to commit,

1

1

Naval Yard Constable-Neglect of duty by,

1

1

sertion).

Newspapers-Non declaration of,.

1

1

Night-being out without Lights at (see Light).

-Found at, armed with Dangerous and Offensive Weapons, with Intent to break into Dwel- ling Houses,...

1

1

-Found in Dwelling Houses by-with Intent to

24

27

7

7

commit Felony therein,.

-Noises, by playing at the Game called Chai-Mui, -Noises by Watchmen, &c.,

1

1

14

14

**

-Passes-being out without (see Passes).

-Passes, Chinese carrying Arms, not being Holders

:

:

of (see Arms).

-Soil-Exposing in the Streets in uncovered Buc- kets, and in open Boats along the Praya (see Nuisances).

Nuisances-Allowing Dirt and Filth to remain on Pre- į

27

mises or in immediate Vicinity thereof, --Blasting Stones to the danger of Persons

and Property,

222 222

5

10

5

"

--Blowing Whistles,..

6

6

-Buildings being in a Ruinous condition,

2

10

20

-Exposing Night Soil in the Streets in

uncovered Buckets, and in open Boats

316

316

along the Praya.

19

19

-Hanging wet Clothes, &c., to dry over

Public Ways...

34

34

-Keeping Pigs, without a Licence,..

176

176

-Neglecting to clean out Dust Bins, and

586

throwing Rubbish, &c., into the Streets,

586

-Neglecting to provide Dust Boxes,

87

87

-Obeying Calls of Nature in the Streets,

29

29

-Regulations-Breach of,

84

84

-Rough Dressing, &c. of Granite in or near

a Public place,

2

6272

-Throwing Rubbish into the Harbour or on

the Beach,

107

107

Obstruction of Navigation...

56

56

1,502 1,618

212

212

23.

23

1

2,664 3,852

gerous).

or Resisting Police (see Police).

of Roads and Streets, &c., by Hawkers,

Chair Coolies and Shopkeepers............................ of Wharves by Boat People,

Offensive Trades-Carrying on Dangerous and (see Dan-

Weapons-Found at Night with Dangerous and-with Intent to break into a Dwelling House (see Night).

Offensive Weapons-Having Possession of,.. Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation and Sale

of prepared,

Carried forward............

10

10

143 148

8,0739,577

NO. OF

NO. OF

CASES.

PRI-

SONERS.

9,093 10,662

3

3

1

1

1

1

1

·

25

25

:

232

OFFENCE.

Brought forward,..

Passage-Obtaining surepticiously a,

Passage Broker-Unlicensed, (see Unlicensed). Passengers' Act of 1855-Breach of Chinese (see Chinese,

&c.)

Passengers-Carrying in Excess of that allowed by Licence, Passes Chinese carrying Arms, not being Holders of

Night, (see Arms),

*

-Chinese out at Night without,

Pawnbrokers-Breach of Ordinance for,.

Pawning-Illegally,...

Peace Preservation Ordinance-Breach of,..........

Perjury, (see also Preferring false Charge and giving (

wilful false Testimony),

Pigs--Unlicensed Keeping of, (see Nuisances, &c.).

Piracy,

"

*

with Murder,

Confederating with Pirates,

Police-Assaulting, obstructing or resisting, (see Assault). -Assuming Name, Designation, &c., of Constable of, -Escape of Prisoners from Custody of (see Escape,

17

&c.).

-Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of,.....

Police Constables-Bribery, or attempting to bribe, (see

""

Bribery, &c.). -Misconduct as,

Police Uniform, &c.-Police Constables neglect to deliver

up on leaving the Force,

Posting Bills on Walls, &c.,

Post Office-Breach of Ordinance for, Poultry-Selling in the Streets, (see Markets' Ordinance,

Breach of).

Praya-Exposing Night Soil in open Boats along the (see

Nuisances, &c.).

Prepared Opium-Breach of Ordinance for Preparation

and Sale of, (see Opium). Preservation of Birds-Breach of Ordinance for, (see

Birds, &c.).

Printing Presses-Non declaration of,.... Prisoners-Escape from Custody of Police of (see Escape).

-Escape from Gaol of (see Escape).

21

""

-Negligently allowing the Escape of (see Escape). -Rescuing from Custody of Police (see Police). Provisions-Exposing for Sale or bringing into the

Colony unwholesome, (see Unwholesome Provisions, &c.).

Public Ways-Hanging wet Clothes, &c. to dry over (see

"

Nuisances, &c. ).

-Obstruction of (see Obstruction).

Quarantine Regulations-Breach of,

Rape,

Receiving Stolen Goods,

Recognisances-Breach of,...

Regimental Clothes, &c., Purchasing or receiving (see Mi-

litary Law).

Registration of Births and Deaths-Breach of Ordinance

**

for (see Births and Deaths).

of Householders & Servants-Breach of Or-

dinance for (see House).

Religious Ceremonies-Chinese carrying on without

Authority,

Rendition of Chinese (see Crimes, &c. ).

Rescuing Prisoners from Custody of Police (see Police). Resisting Police-Assaulting, obstructing, or (see Police,

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI-

SONERS.

8,073 9,577

9

10

5

OFFENCE.

Brought forward....

9 Seamen's Boarding House, Unlicensed (see Unlicensed,

10

5

&c.).

Seamen's Effects, Detention of,

Servants-Breach of Ordinance for Registration of House-

holders and (sec House).

-Misconduct as Domestic (see Domestic Ser-

vants).

Shanghai-Deportation to this Colony from (sec Depor-

tation, &c.).

Ships-Neglecting to have a riding light on board. Ship or Boat in the Harbour-Larceny on board (see

369 1

369

1

2

2

51

51

1

8

50

25

**

to

1

2

4

Larceny).

Shopkeepers-Obstruction of Roads by (see Obstruction). Shooting with intend to do Grievous Bodily Harm,

""

to Murder....

"3

59

to prevent lawful apprehension,

Shrubs, Trees, &c.—Cutting and Injuring (see Trees).

-Unlawful Possession of (see Unlaw-

ful Possession).

**

**

Sodomy (see Unnatural Offence).

Soldiers Assisting in the Desertion of (see Desertion).

-Disposing of Uniform, &c. (sec Military Law). Spirituous and fermented Liquors-Breach of Ordinance

for retail of,

1 Stamp Ordinance-Breach of,...

Stealing Cattle (see Cattle Stealing).

Children (see Child Stealing).

Dogs (see Dog Stealing).

Stolen Goods-Receiving (see Receiving, &c.).

Stones and other Missiles-Discharging to Danger of

Persons and Property,.

Stragglers from Foreign Ships (see Desertion). Streams-Defiling,..........

Street Chairs and Vehicles-Breach of Ordinance for,

(see Chairs and Vehicles).

Streets-Gamblers and Watchmen to Gamblers, (see

"

"

">

Rogues and Vagabonds).

-Gambling, treated as Obstruction of Public Ways

(see Gambling).

-Noises by Hawkers,

-Obstruction of Roads and (see Obstruction).

Suspicious Characters, (see Rogues and Vagabonds). Threats-Attempting to extort by Menaces, and.

-Of Violence to the Person,

With Intent to extort Money,

Trade Marks and Labels-Fraudulently using false. Trees, &c.-Cutting and destroying,

"

7

13

21

27

-Unlawful Possession of Shrubs, &c.. (see

Unlawful Possession).

Turf-Cutting from Crown Land without Permit, (see

Trespass on Crown Land).

27 Trespass on Crown Land,....

Uniform, &c.-Soldiers disposing of, (see Military Law). Unlawful Possession of Property,

#

Unlicensed-Auctioneer,

of Trees, Shrubs, &c..

-Coolie Lodging Houses..

-Hawkers,

"

**

-Money Changer,

--Passage Broker,

""

-Plying of Boats for Hire,

-Seamen's Boarding Houses,

Unmuzzled Ferocious Dogs-Allowing to be at large, &c..

121

42

42

19

65

65

64

88888888

234 268

20

20

ཝཱ ཝུསིཾ;!

446 446

54

(see Dogs).

Unnatural Offence,.

:

"

-Assault with Intent to commit an,

(see Assaults).

16

16

&c.).

Riotous Assemblages,.

Assault at, or in connection with (see

Assaults, &c.).

Roads and Streets-Injury to...

42

"

93

-Obstruction of (see Obstruction, &c.).

&c.).

-From the Person,.

Robbery Assault with Intent to commit (see Assault,

">

-From the Person with Wounding,..

--On the Highways with Arms or with Violence,

Rogues and Vagabonds-As Street Gamblers and Watch- į

14

16

5

7

10

"

95

95

men to Gamblers,.....

**

>>

-As suspicious Characters,

178

178

?

-As Vagrants,Europeans & Indians,] -Wandering abroad and lodging

36

36

**

in the open air,

58

58

77

77

42 Unwholesome Provisions-Exposing for Sale, or bring-

ing into the Colony,......

Vehicles and Chairs-Breach of Ordinance for. (see

Chairs, &c.)

Watchmen-Misconduct as Private,

-Night Noises by, (see Night).

to Gamblers, (see Rogues and Vagabonds). Weapons-Found by Night with dangerous and offensive, with Intent to break into Dwelling Houses, (see Night).

-Having Possession of Offensive, (see Offen-

sive").

Weights and Measures-Breach of Ordinance for, Wharves-Obstruction by Boat People of, (see Obstruc-

tion).

Witnesses-Intimidating, (see Embracery).

Women and Female Children-Breach of Ordinance for

protection of,......................

Workmen-Intimidating,.

"

-Misconduct as,.

Wounding-Assault with, (see Assault).

-Cutting and, and inflicting bodily injuries.

(see Cutting, &c.).

-Robbery from the Person with. (see Rob-

bery).

2 Wreck-Larceny from, (see Larceny).

Rubbish and Filth--Allowing Accumulation in house, or

#

""

#

immediate Vicinity thereof, of (sce Nuisances).

-Throwing into the Streets. (see Nui-

sances).

-Throwing into the Harbour or on the

Beach (see Nuisances).

Sailors-Assisting in the Desertion of (see Desertion).

Scavenging Contract-Breach of,

Seamen-Desertion of Merchant (see Desertion).

19

-Forcing to leave the Ship,

71

71

>>

Ι

1

2

Carried forward..............

9,093 10,662

-Harbouring deserted, (see Deserters). -Offences by,......

Magistracy, Hongkong, 7th January, 1886.

24

41

***

1

TOTAL,...

10,281 11,901

ALFRED G.

WISE,

Police Magistrate,

for the Police Magistrates.

ABSTRACT OF CASES brought under COGNIZANCE at the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Ten Years, from 1st January, 1876, to 31st December, 1885, inclusive.

Total Number

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH Head.

Committed to Prison

Ordered to find Security.

233

Years.

of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial at Supreme Court.

Punished for Preferring

Total

or detained pending Orders of His Excellency the Governor.

To keep the Peace,

to be of Good

False Charge Undecided.

Number

Behaviour, and to answer any

or giving

Charge.

False Testimony.

of Defendants.

2

M.

F.

སྱཱ「c。

4

5

6

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M. F.

M.

F.

1876.

9,103

7,315 683

1,744

300

118

11

1877,

1878,

9,100

1879,

1880,

7,098

9,283 7,336 572

7,166 7,009 5,758 361 5,892 252

1,966

364

209

15

628

2,126

251

200

1,900

189

145

1,775

187

170

27

13832

16

11

18

15

∞ ∞ 100 10

174

192

98

230

204

24224

23

25

17

14

10

32

18

48

37

15

I GO GO GOLD

20

3

220**

9,402 | 1,024

12

9,745 972

19

9,630 922

34

8,103 602

33

41,593

33,467 2,496

9,511 1,291

842

84

1881.

8,203

7,049 333

1,678 173

192

48

1882,

7,567 6,049 394

1,922 255

259

17

1883,

10,653

8,127 670

2,398 349

121

1884,

14.065

11,748 1,088

2,294 268

101

1885,

10,281

7,951 849

2,188 258

159

87822

9178882

66

1

898

142

104

31

118

CO

4

369

65

34

6

53

36

37

35

11

∞ co-w

3

263

100

13

154

62

228

53

357

99

3666

4

80

160

8,126 531

45,006❘ 4,051

9,379 630 8,622 780 11,003 1,101

105

14,517 1,418

18

***

10,690 1,211

50,769 40,9243,334 10,480 1,303

832

77

123

10

1,371

379

65

12 416

25

54,211 | 5,140

Average of 1st

period,.

8,318.6

:

:

:..

7,192.6

2,160.4

185.2

13.4

208.

27.

24.8

9,811.4

Average of 2nd

period,

10,153.8

8,851.6

2,356.6

181.8

26.6

350.

15.4

88.2

11,870.2

Magistracy, Hongkong, 7th January, 1886.

CORONER'S INQUESTS.

TABLE A.-Return of all Coroner's Cases, 1885.

ALFRED G. WISE, Police Magistrate.

for the Police Magistrates.

Inquests Held.

Buried without Inquest.

Nationality.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total. Men. Women. Boys. Girls.

Very much decom- posed; sex not ascertainable.

Europeans and Americans,....

15

:

Total.

Portuguese,

Chinese,

:

Indians,....

51

Co

3

1

16

1

1

1

:

1

16

6

-J

80

46

3

52

58

6

165

:

:

3

5

10

:

5

Total,........

69

16

7

8

100

56

3

52

58

6

175

Total for 1884,................

54

17

5

6

82

55

4

34

41

10

144

234

TABLE B.-Return of Inquests, 1885.

European and

Portu-

Americans.

guese.

VERDICTS.

Men. Women. Girls. Boy.

Men.

Chinese.

Indians.

Women. Boys. Girls. Men.' Women.

1

4

1

1

31

6

6

1

Ι

Alcoholic poisoning,

Accidental death,

Death occurred from narcotic poisoning self administered while in an unsound state of mind,

Death from injuries received from the falling of star- board anchor there being no sufficient evidence to show how the anchor came to fall,...

Death resulted from injuries sustained to the brain by a fall or a blow,

Death from misadventure, Felo de Se....

Found dead,....

Found drowned,

Manslaughter,

Murder,

:

1

3

1

:

:

5

:

2

1

1

:

:

:

Total.

1

:

I

53

:

:

I

1

1

6

Total,.....

15

1

51

16

6

3

100

Natural causes,

do.

in Gaol,

Overdose of opium,

Suicide in a fit of temporary

insanity,

Reason why no Inquest

was held.

Found on shore. Found in Harbour

Total.

Known.

Un- known.

Known.

Un- known.

TABLE C-Return of Burials without Inquest, 1885.

European and Americans.

Men. Women.

Portuguese.

Chinese.

Men. Women. Boys. Girls,

Indians.

Very much de-

not ascertain-{

composed sex

able.

No suspicious circumstances,...

No evidence and/or decom-

posed State of Body,

Post mortem satisfactory,

1

34

2

30

36

10

22

20

2

:

to

Total,.....

4

1

46

52 58

Coroner's Office, Hongkong, 6th January, 1886.

10

10

111

24

44

10

33

60

1

22

37

4

...

175

27

66

10

72

N. G. MITCHELL-INNES,

Coroner.

235

No.

29a.

HONGKONG.

RETURNS OF BIRTHS AND DEATHS FOR THE YEAR 1885.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, on 21st May, 1886.

DISTRICTS.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN COMMUNITY. (including every Nationality, except Chinese.)

DEATHS.

BRITISH &

CHINESE.

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

BIRTHS.

DEATHS.

British and Foreign, 50

Portuguese,

.49

Boys.

Girls. Males. Females. Boys. Girls. Males. Females.

Indians, &c., Non-Residents, Unknown,

.34

.69

1

Victoria,

86

69

148

43

675

487

2,193

1,858

Kaulung,

4

1

9

2

28

17

235

162

203

Shaukiwán,

57

49

154

105

Aberdeen,

27

25

138

97

Stanley,

19

11

19

21

Sex Unknown, Victoria, 4

Kaulung, 3

Total Deaths of}

TOTAL,..

90

70

157

46

806

589

2,739

2,243

Chinese,......S

4,989

GRAND TOTAL.

ANNUAL DEATH-RATE, PER 1,000, CALCULATED ON THE CENSUS OF 1881.

Averages for

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

the 5 years

Averages for the 5 years

ending 1880.

ending 1885.

Whole Population,

24.07

26.11

30.04

26.91

32.36

25.08

27.89

Births,....1,555 | British & Foreign Community,

18.22

15.75

17.60 16.37

20.90

19.21

17.76

Deaths,... 5,192 Do. deducting non-Residents,

13.44

12.47

13.93

14.65 16.11

16.34

14.12

Chinese,

24.45

26.78

30.84

27.59

33.10

29.76

28.55

J. H. STEWART LOCKART,

Acting Registrar General.

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 18th January, 1886.

DEATH-RATES in different Groups of Ages for the Year 1885.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN.

AGES.

CHINESE.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Deaths.

Per cent. of whole.

Under one year, One year to five,

20

9.85

1,558

31.23

13

6.41

523

10.48

Total under five years..........

33

16.26

2,081

41.71

From

5 to 10 years,

00

3

1.48

145

2.90

10 20

9

4.43

211

4.23

دو

وو

20 25

29

14.29

239

4.79

دو

""

59

25 35

48

23.65

588

11.79

""

22

35 45

28

13.79

638

12.79

">

53

"

15 55

32

15.76

391

7.84

"

23

""

55 65

14

6.90

352

7.06

**

65 75

5

2.46

216

4.33

33

33

"5

75

85

1

0.49

95

1.90

29

"3

19

85 95

19

38

27

""

"

25

95 and upwards,

Unknown,

1

0.49

14

28

Total,..

203

100.00

4,989

100.00

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong, 18th January, 1886.

J. H. STEWArt Lockhart, Acting Registrar General.

HONGKONG.

THE HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT, FOR 1885.

237

No. 30.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

on 14th May, 1886.

No. 11.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

HONGKONG, 29th January, 1886.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Returns of this Department for the year ending the 31st December. 1885.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

V. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port. VI. Total Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port. VII. Return of Junks entered from Macao.

VIII. Return of Junks cleared for Macao.

IX. Return of Junks entered at each Port from China and Formosa.

X. Return of Junks cleared at each Port for China and Formosa.

XI. Gross Total Number of Junks entered at cach Port.

XII. Gross Total Number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) entered.

XIV. Return of Junks (Local Trade) cleared.

XV. Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all vessels, and of all Chinese Passengers. XVI. Return of Vessels registered.

XVII. Return of Vessels struck off the Register.

XVIII. Amount of Fees received under Section 3 of Ordinance No. 8 of 1879,

XIX. Return of Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer.

XX. Return of Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from Places out of China. XXI. Return of Marine Cases tried.

XXII, Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

SHIPPING.

2. There has been an increase under this heading over the previous year amounting in the aggre- gate to 339 vessels, representing 496,700 tons; this is shown by the following Table :-

Years. Junks.

Tons. Steamers.

Tons.

Sailing Vessels.

Tons.

1884, 1885,

28,473 1,687,594 2,976 3,259,234 314 220,403 23,674 1,797,222 3,084 3,632,051 344 234,658

Increase,... 201 109,628

108 372,817

30

14,255

238

3. There has been a slight decrease in the total number of vessels and the amount of tonnage arriving from United Kingdom, though there has been an increase of British vessels under this heading.

British.

Foreign.

Total.

Years.

Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tons. Vessels. Tous.

1884,

1885,

148 213,617 42

155 223,898

52,937 190 266,554

26 33,351 181 256,749

Increase,

Decrease,........

9,781

:

16

19,586

9

9,805

4. In the following Table, the total amount of tonnage arriving from Ports other than United Kingdom is compared for the two years 1884 and 1885.

Ports.

1884.

1885. Inercase. Decrease.

Tous.

Tons.

Tous.

Tons.

Australia and New Zealand,

92,845

107,347 : 15,002

British Columbia,.........................

2,913

2,913

British North America,

884

3,133

2,219

British North Borneo,

3,891

3,933

42

Cape of Good Hope,

1,418

162

1,256

Coast of China and Formosa,

3,357,805

3,490,112

132,307

...

Cochin China,

170,948

259,820 88,372

Continent of Europe,

179515

193,582 14,067

India and Singapore,

150,670

170,831 20,161

Japan,

211,067

233,529 19,462

Java and other Islands in the

23,329

23.805

476

Indian Archipelago,

Macao,

354,110

542,982

188.872

Mauritius,

North Pacific,

2,013 545

Philippine Islands,

78,748

1,635 351 70,323

378

194

8,425

Ports in Hainan, and the Gulf }

82,001

98,101 16,397

of Tonquin,

Puget Sound,

1,193

1,193

Russia in Asia,

4,682

1,682

Sandwich Islands,

5,718

4,965

753

Siam,

84,789

94,559

9,770

South America,...

United States,

461 91,542

801 101,198

340 12,956

Total,.....

4,900,677 5,107,182 523,386

16,881

Increase,

Deduet Decrease,

Total Inercase,

.523,386 16,881

.506.505

5. There was a daily average arrival (leaving out decimals) of 65 Junks measuring 4,924 tons, 8 Steamers measuring 9,950 tons, and 1 Sailing vessel of 643 tons.

JUNKS.

6. In arrivals and departures of Junks compared with 1884, there is an increase of 371 Junks and 218,055 tons.

STEAM-LAUNCHES.

7. On 31st December 1885, there were 78 steam-launches with an approximate gross tonnage of 1,896 employed within the Harbour Limits. These figures include private launches owned by indivi- duals or Firms, as well as the Government launches and licensed ferry boats.

EMIGRATION.

239

8. 57,517 Chinese Emigrants left Hongkong during the year. This is an increase of 6,270 on the previous year. The total number of ships employed in this trade was 194, with a total tonnage of 304,068.

9. The average number of ships per week leaving with Chinese Emigrants was 3.73. The greatest number of ships in any one week was 7. The average number of passengers in each ship was 296.47. The greatest number of passengers in any one ship was 1,204.

REGISTRY OF SHIPPING.

10. 10 vessels were registered during the year, and 16 Certificates of Registry were cancelled.

MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT.

11. 111 Cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court. Refusal of duty and assault being the chief Offences.

EXAMINATIONS FOR THE POSTS, OF MASTERS, MATES, AND ENGINEERS, UNDER SECTION 15 OF ORDINANCE 8 OF 1879.

12. The following Table will show the number of Candidates who passed, and who failed in ob- taining Certificates of Competency.

Masters, First Mates, Only Mates,

Second Mates,

First Class Engineers,

Secoud Class Engineers,

RANK.

PASSED.

FAILED.

10

7

10

1

3

10

1

33

12

22

20

12

00

MARINE COURTS, UNDER SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE 8 OF 1879.

13. The following Courts have been held during the year :-

1. On the 2nd March, 1885,-Inquiry as to the loss of the British Steam-ship Castello, Official No. 77,042 of London, on Flat Island, in the Tathong Channel near Hongkong, on the 16th February, 1885. The Master's (JOHN EDWIN CHANDLER) Certificate of Competency was suspended for six months.

2. On the 22nd April, 1885,-Inquiry into certain charges of Drunkenness and Refusal of Duty which JOSEPH JOHN LEE, Master of the British Steam-ship De Bay, Official No. 82,900 of London, preferred against WILLIAM COWENS, First Engineer and HENRY CRAVEN, Second Engineer of the said ship. The Certificate of Competency of WILLIAM COWENS was supended for six months and that of HENRY CRAVEN was suspended for three months.

3. On the 11th June, 1885,-Inquiry into certain charges of Insolence, Insubordination and Misconduct preferred against WILLIAM DICK, First Engineer of the British Steam-ship Welcombe, Official No. 89,524 of London, by WILLIAM REGINALD CORFIELD, the Master of said ship. The Certificate of Competency of WILLIAM DICK, was suspended for three months. 4. On the 25th June, 1885,-Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steam-ship, Zafiro, Official No. 88,829 of Hongkong, on Simplicia Rock, Rees Island, on the 5th April, 1885. The Master's (ROBERT TALBOT) Certificate of Competency was returned to him. 5. On the 17th July, 1885,-Inquiry as to the stranding of the British Steam-ship Welcombe, Official No. 89,524 of London, on a rock near Fisher Islands, Pescadores, on the 1st May, 1885. The Master's (WILLIAM REGINALD CORFIELD) Certificate of Competency

was returned to him.

6. On the 12th November, 1885,-Inquiry into the assassination of WILLIAM CATHERALL SYDER, the Master, and plundering by Pirates, of the British Steam-ship Greyhound, Official No. 81,647 of London, while on a voyage from Hongkong to Hoihow, on the 17th October, 1885. No blame was attributable to any of the Officers of the ship.

SEAMEN.

14. 8,328 Seamen were shipped at the Shipping Office during the year, and 8,910 discharged.

I have the honour to be.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

R. MURRAY RUMSEY, Ret. Com., R.N.,

Acting Harbour Master, &c.

The Honourable F. STEWART, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

$e..

SP.2

ge.

I.---NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1885.

FOREIGN.

240

BRITISH.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

IN BALLAST.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels. Ton s. Crews. Vessela. Tons, Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,..

British North America,

British North Borneo,..

Cape of Good Hope,

Coast of China and Formosa,.

Cochin China.

Continent of Europe,

Great Britain,

India and Singapore,

1:

70 76,521 2,765 1,388

208

701

76,521) 2,765, 33

26

17

1,388 26

80,276

1,525 25

522

550

34

30,826 5331 103) 106,797; 3,287

550

11} 104 107,847 8,298

Japan,

Java and other Islands in the Indian Archi-

31 1,645) 51 1 162, 9 1,1661,512,869 53,272)

139 177,985 4,977| 44: 79,823|| 4,240 155 223,898; 6,183 115 141,000 6,639 117 160,228 5,7301

203

1,645

162

17

51

9

2,030 38

2,288; 64

1,525 25 2,930 38 2,288 64

3:

B

1

2,913; 51

8,138; 55 3,983 115

162

2,918

51

3,133

56

3,933

115

9

162

9

64

2,634 118

3,704 65

pelago,

51 6,096

204

:

:

116 143,634 6,757| 119 168,932 5,795)

51 6,096

321 27,197 954

59

65,168 3,982]

4,429 157

62

201

10:

17,709 953)

15:

64 114,259 5,778 26 33,351 619 82; 27,197 954 69,597; 4,089

17,709 958

Масло,

318). 898,485 14,185|

468

41

820) 398,948 14.226)

823

129,497 21,504)

138)

14,587; 1.809

961

144,084 28,313 1,141)

108 198,582, 10,018 181 266,749 6,802) 147 168,197: 7,598 176|| 225,396 9,662)

20 29,805 1,157

527,982: 35,689)

181 256,749 6,802

2,634 118 8,183 222

140

Mauritius,

1,635

54

1,688) 54]

1,635; 541

148 170,831, 7.711 181| 233,529: 9,884 201 23,805 1,157 15,000 1,850 1,281|| 542.982 37,589 1,635

5-4

North Pacific,

276

12

76

&

351; 201

1-

276

12

75

851

20

Philippine Islands,

61

34,193 2,547

61

34,193) 2,547)

61;

32,223 2,304}

3,907

135)

66

$6,130, 2,439]

122*

66,416 4,851

8.907

1271

70.328; 4,986

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,

108

36,964 2,896||

7291

46

111

37,693|| 2,942}

143

60,079 2,976}

629

48

46

60,708) 3,019)

251

97,043, 5,872

1.358

89

267:

98,401| 5,961

Sandwich Islands,

21

912 201

2

9121 20

3,485 66

568

G

1,058 75

4,397 86

568

4,965| 95

Siam,

93

75,500 3,091

93

75,506| 3,091

37

19,058) 638

37;

19,053 038

180

94,559 3,729

130

94,559 3,729

South America,.

United States of Amerien,

20 38,115 1,267

20

38,115 1,267 35

801

06,383 2,411]

19

801

19

2

801: 198

TOTAL.

2,419,2,964,998 108,119||

35 66,883 2,411 55 104,498 8,678)

61,551| 2,059 2,491|3,026,544 110,178 15,555 1,998,097 235,889,056 644,220 115,877 24,611 24,611 2,087,967 461,738 17,974 4.858,000

2 8011 19

55 104,498 3,678

9,128 705,841| 117,936|| 27,102 5 ̧¢€;

461,913

99 81,335 2,651| 238 259,320 7,628]

238 259,320, 7,628 108 193,582, 10,018

54,021 1,789 1.2301,566,890 55,061 14,1101,808,627190,358 8,904 619,595 113,705 23,014 1,928,222 301,043 15,276 2,816,496; 243,610 8,968 €73,016 115,481 24,2448,490,112 359,104 139 177,985 4,977|| 991 81,835 2,651 44 79,828 4,240) 64 114,259 5,778 155 223,898 6.183] 261 38,851 619

ጄን

II-NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of Vessels CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from each Country, in the Year 1885.

BRITISH,

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

WITH CARGOES,

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels. Tons. Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels, Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons. Crews Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Yessels.

Tons. Crews.

Australia and New Zealand,

British Columbia,

British North Borneo,

17:

22,346! 903

1,688 128

197

24,033 1,026;

22.345, 903

41 2,860) 71

594 15

2,954

864

998 201

998

201

4.871

2,288 53

1,189

5,510, 97

2,288, 53

6,781 1461 3,28; 73

1,688 128

1,788

19.

24,038) 1,026

371

10:

8,461

183

Cape of Good Hope......

2

9561

26]

2

9561 261

956 26

6. 3,286

2

78

956

26

Coast of China and Formosa,

1,818 1,656,317, 59,722;

Cochin China,

35

41,682 1,203]

83 66,793 2,095 89 119,165 3,261|

1,306 1,723,110 61,817 16,908 1,596,478 238,856 5,700 124 160,847 4,464) 64 | 56,027| 2,274)

41

Continent of Europe,

18

31,427 2,157

18

Great Britain,

12

24,438 1,555

12

India and Singapore.

Japan,

Java & other Islds. in the Indian Archipelago,

222 299,001 11,075

17

19,424 4091

89 189,1455,464]

47

54,098 1,370j

81,427 2,157 24,438 1,555 239 318,425 11,484) 136 198,243 6,834)

86! 78,674 4,075

833,670 61,578 22,614 1,930,148 300,434 18,2218,252,795 208,578 5,789 33,355 1,090 106 89,382 3,364. 99! 97,709 3.477) 180

400,403 63,678 24,0103,053,258 362,251

152,520, 4,851

229 250,229 7,828

4 8,451 GDI

861

4 3,451 65

78,674 4,575

54 105,101 6,732)

47; 56,830 1,829)

10,586

323

56

67,422! 2,152)

16

269

27,889 1,6203 355,837 12,904)

70 103,423 5,752

1417:

144

76 107,570 5,896

159; 242,568) 11,216]

80,010, 7521 58,245 1,514)

1,611 32

1

Macao,

17 897,204 14,135

317

1,611] 82 397,204 14,135;

1

370

12

4

2,436

631

5:

2,806 75

912 139,115|22,568||

42

6,204

718

954

145,819 23,281

1,229;

870 12) 586,319| 36,703]

4,047 95

North Pacific,

1,060 39)

1,060 39

41 5901 47

3,531

721

Philippine Islands,

28

12,579 9351

21

Ports in Hainan and the Gulf of Tonquin,.

108:

40,065 2,919

23,839 484 4.1 108

4,1211 119:

4.

590 47

4,591 1111

36,418 1,419

82

16,707 1,008]

501

50.007

942)

82

67,814 2,005,

55

29,286 1,998)

71!

40,065 2,919)

154

65,857 3,245|

96

32 156

65,453; 8,277 262)

105,422 6,164

4,446

961

,126

821

54 105,101 6,732

16 27,889 1,620 295 885,847 13,636

212

300,813 12,730 6: * 4,417

107

6,204 713 1,271 542,528 37,416

126; 108,782 3,424 264) 105,518 6,196

8 5,181; 158

Russia in Asia..

401

13

401

131

4

3,470 155

F

3,475 155

8,876! 168

Sandwich Islands,

Siam,.......

211

912 30)

16,899

9121

30

4: 2,169 601

4

2,109; 60

6/

3,081 90

745

1,576 831 261

18,475

828

219,446 6891

185

27

14,500 474

45

26,845 1,084]

6,690

218

581

3,876: 168

8,081

38,035 1,302

90

South America.

United States of America,

928

9,818.

ᏗᏴ

028

13

}

662) 14

652

14

180

2,009

34

10 11,822

214

28 88,639

858

28,

33,639

858

86

1,580; 27 42,952 1,088

2:

1,580 27

2,009!

38

44,961 1,072

TOTAL.

2,1982,696,970 101,166

266 291,857 7,945 2,4642,988,827 109,111

18,298 2,168,068 281,810 5,870 450,885 65,114 24,168 2,618,953 346,954 20,496 4,865,038 283,006 6,136 742,742 73,050 26,6325,607,780 456,065

241

242

III.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

in the Year 1885.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tous.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

159

198,209

6,310

9

4,677

144

168

202,886

6,454

Annamese,

.......

1

136

4

1

136

4

Austrian,

12

British,.

2,419

23,764 2,964,993 108,119

735

12

...

23,764

72

61,551

2,059

2,491

3,026,544

735 110,178

Chinese,

31

39,842 1,525

2

444

48

33

40,286

1,573

Chinese Junks,

14,680

1,190,596 | 201,763

8,994

606,626

114,554

23,674

1,797,222 316,317

|

Danish,.

15

5,090

393

3

804

57

18

5,894

450

Dutch,

30

35,645

1,856

Ι

370

11

31

36,015

1,867

French,.

84

138,443

10,036

2

850

46

86

139,293

10,082

German,

453

312,813

10,490

39

24,678

790

492

337,491

11,280

Hawaiian,

680

21

680

21

Honduras,

177

9

1

177

9

Japanese,

3

3,152

135

Johorian,

1

993

50

:

Jand

1,179

:

Norwegian,

4

2,931

58

1,026

Russian,

8

7,105

189

I

2,224

Siamese,

19

8,142

311

Spanish,.

52

25,040

1,905

2

1,276

8 AN 8

86

4

4,331

221

993

50

25

5

3,957

83

46

9

9,329

235

19

8,142

311

66

54

26,316

2,031

Swedish,

1

475

12

1

475

12

TOTAL,......

17,974 4,958,090 343,977

9,128

705,841117,936 27,102 5,663,931 461,913

IV.-NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong,

NATIONALITY OF VESSELS.

in the Year 1885.

CLEARED.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tous.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

American,

124

Annamese,

1

Austrian,

12

157,414 136 23,764

5,909

56

58,658

1,161

180 216,072

7,070

16

1

766

British,

2,198

2,696,970

101,166

266

Chinese,

30

Chinese Junks,

17,522

38,334 1,458,193 249,131

1,481

5,711

291,857 7,945

317,197 61,632

12 2,464 30 23,233

136 23,764

16

766

2,988,827 109,111

38,334 1,481

1,775,390 | 310,763

Danish,.

19

6,489

466

19

6,489

466

Dutch,

30

34,724 1,795

30

34,724

1,795

French,.

86

142,935 10,404

3

German,

404

269,415

9,528

80

1,578 59,992

43

89

144,513

10,447

1,673

484

329,407

11,201

Hawaiian, Japanese, Johorian, Norwegian,

2

680

25

2

680

25

...

2,510

105

1,821

116

4

4,331

221

:

993

50

1

993

50

Russian, Siamese,

Spanish,

Swedish,

42

210691.

938

23

1,228

27

4

2,166

50

4,965

228

2.907

118

7

7,872

346

6,672

276

904

35

18

7,576

311

20,424 475

1,674

11

5,607

259

53

26,031

1,933

13

1

475

13

TOTAL,...

20,496 4,865,038 383,006

6,136

742,742

73,059

26,632 5,607,780 456,065

V.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS ENTERED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1885.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

OF PORTS.

Vis. Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. VIS. Tons. Crews.

Vls.

Tons. ¡Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews. VIS.

Tous. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews. Vis.

Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

651

42,116 8,521) .454

30,504 6,289 1,105

Shaukiwán,.

Stanley,

345

14,776 3,607 669

196

10,480, 1,859 230

Victoria,

Yaumáti,.

2,419|2,964,993|108,119||

Total,.

2,4192.964,993 108,119

72

...

61,551 2,059 2,491 3,026,544 110,178 13,888 1,855,319 215,195 3,908 475

41,631 6,470 1,014 16,336 2,246 426 377,792 50,539 17,796

72,620 14,810 051 42,116 8,521| 454 56,407|10,077|| 345 14,776 3,607| 669 26,816 4,105| 196 10,480 1,859 2301 2,233,111 265,734 16,307 4,820,312 323,314 3,980 70,406 6,676 3,795 178,027|50,338 4,270 248,433 57,009 475 70,406 0,676 3,795

30,504 6,289 1,105

72,620 14,810

41,631 6,470 1,014

16,336 2,246 426

56,407 10,077 26,816 4.105

439,343 52,598 20,287 5,259,655 375,912 178,027 50,333 4,270 248,433 57,009

61,551| 2,059| 2,491 3,026,544 110,178 15,555 1,993,097 235,858 9,056|| 644,290115,877 24,611 2,637,387 351,735 17,974 4,958,090|343,977 9,128 705,841117,936 27,102 5,663,931 461,913

VI.-TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS OF VESSELS CLEARED AT EACH PORT IN THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, IN THE YEAR 1885.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

NAMES

OF PORTS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

ΤΟΥΛΙ.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vls.

Crews.

Tons.

Vls.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,

Stanley,.

Victoria,

2,198 2,696,970|101,166|

Yaumáti,

...

Total,

Tons. ¡Crews. Vis.

168 10,612 1,693| 934 5611 34,549 4,633 427 200 10,450 1,861| 220 266 201,857 7,045 2,4042,988,827 109,111 15,336 2,013,882 246,449 2,179 2,027 98,625 27,204 2,110 2,198 2,696,970|101,166|| 266| 291,857| 7,945| 2,464|2,988,827|109,111|18,298 2,168,068281,810 5,870

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews.

Vis.

426

Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. Vls. Tons. Crews. 61,710 13,104 1,102|| 72,322 14,797|| 168 10,612 1,6983|| 934 20,864 4,258) 9881 55,413 8,891| 561 34,549 4,633) 427 16,366| 2,258| 26,816 4,119) 206 10,450 1,861 220 296,540 17,89317,515 2,220,372 264,842 17,534 4,710,802 347,615 2,445 145,405 27,601 4,137 244,030 54,805 2,027| 98,625 27,204 2,110

Vls.

Tons. ¡Crews. Vls.

Tons. Crews.

72,322|14,797 55,413| 8,89 1 4261 26,816 4,119 498,397 25,858 19,979 5,209,199 373,458 145,405 27,601 4,137 244,030 54,805

450,885 65,114|24,168 2,618,958|346,951|20,496| 4,865,038|383,006|| 6,130| 742,742|73,059|26,032) 5,007,780456,065

61,710 13,104| 1,102 20,864 4,258| 988 16,366 2,258

243

244

VII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews und Passengers of Junks ENTERED from Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Victoria,

809 122,771 -21,197 1,733

136

14.009 1,782

298

945

136,780 22,979 2,031

Total,... 809 122,771 21,197 1,733

136 14,009 1,782

298

945

186,780 22,979 2,031

VIII.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED for Macao, during the Year

ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Victoria,

Passen-

gers.

895 131,234 22,199 2,741

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

41

5,812

690

370

936

Passen-

gers.

137,046 22,889 3,111

Total,... 895

131,234 22,199 2,741

41

5,812

690

370

936

137,046 22.889 3,111

IX.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO,

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Vessels. Tons.

Crews.

gers..

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,...

651

42,116 8,521

37

454

30,504

6,289

128

1,105

72,620

14.810

165

345

14,776

3,607

94

669

41,631

6,470

117

1,014

56,407

10,077

211

Stanley,

196

10,480

1,859

176

230

16,336 2,246

144

426

26,816 4,105

320

Victoria,

12,204

Yaumáti,...

475

930,047 159,903 | 119,709

70,406 6,676

3,710

65

3,795

326,119 47,434 178,027 50,333

32,779 72

15,914 4,270

1,256,166 207,337 | 152,488

248,433

57,009

137

Total,... 13,871 | 1,067,825 180,566 120,081

8,858

592,617 112,772 33,240

22,729 1,660,442 293,338 | 153,321

X.-Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Pussengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, for Ports on the Coast of China and Formosa, during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

Cargo.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Aberdeen,

168

10,612

1,693

62

Shaukiwán,..

561

34,549

4,633

134

934 427

Stanley,.

206

10,450

1,861

184

220

Victoria,

13,665 | 1,172,723 | 191,541

131,008

1,979

61,710 13,104 20,864 4,258 16,366 2,258 67,040 13,721

Passen- gers.

147 66 123

Passen-

Vessels. Tous.

Crews.

gers.

1,102

988

72,322 55,413

14,797

209

8.891

200

426 7,328 15,644 1,239,763 205,262 138,336

26.816

4,119

307

Yaumáti..

2,027 98,625 27,204

41

2,110

145,405 27,601

222

4,137

244,030 54,805

263

Total,... 16,627 1,326,959 226,932 131,429

5,670

311,385 60.942

7,886 22,297 1,638,344 287,874 | 139,315

XI.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

245

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen, Shaukiwán,...

651 42,116 8,521

37

454

30,504 6,289

128 1,105

72,620

14,810

165

345

14,776 3,607

94

669

41,631

6,470

117

1,014

56,407

10,077

211

Stanley,

196

Victoria,

13,013

Yaumáti,

175

10,480 1,052,818 70,406

1,859

176

230

16,336

2,246

144

426

26,816 4,105

320

181,100 121,442

6,676

3,846

340,128 49,216

33,077

16,859

1,392,946 230,316

154,519

65

3,795

Total,...

14,680 1,190,596201,763 | 121,814° 8,99-1

178,027 50,333

606,626 114,554

72

4,270

248,433 57,009

33,538 23.674 1,797,222 | | 316,317

137

155,352

XII.-Gross Total Number, Tonnage, Créns and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong, (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Shaukiwán,..

...

168 10,612 1,693 561 34,549 4,633

62

934

61,710 13,104

147

1,102

134

427

20,864 4,258

66

988

Stanley,

Victoria,

Yaumáti,..

2,027

Total,... 17,522

10,450

206 14,560 | 1,303,957 213,740 133,749

1,861

184

220

16,366 2,258

123

426

72.322 14.797 55,413 26,816 4,119

209

8,891

200

307

2,020

98,625

27,204

41

2,110

72,852 14,411 145,405 27,601

7,698

222

16,580 4,137

1,376,809 228,151

141,447

244,030 54,805

263

1.458.193249,131

134,170

5,711

317,197

61,632

8,256

23,233 1,775,390310.763

142,426

XIII. Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at the Port of Victoria from the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Victoria,

3,684 127,922 39,650 4,690

1,274 35,017 9,844 6,588 4,958

162,939 49.194 11,278

Total,... 3,684

127,922 | 39,650 4,690 1,274

35,017

9,844 6,588

4,958

162.939 19,494 11,278

XIV.-Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED from the Port of Victoria for the Out-stations of the Island and the Villages in British Kaulung, during the Year ending 31st December, 1885.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Tous. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Passen- gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen. gers.

Victoria,

2,029

55,484 16,680 9,384 3,006

113,877 33,400 1,544 5,035

169,361

50,080 |

10,928

Total,... 2,029

55,484

16,680 9,384 3,006

113,877 33,400 1,544 5,035

169,361 50,080 10,928

246

XV.-SUMMARY.

FOREIGN TRADE.

No OF VESSELS.

ΤΟΥΣ.

CREWS.

Do.

British Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

do. in Ballast,...

2,419

2,964,993

108,119

72

61,551

2,059

Total,.

2,491

3,026,544

110,178

British Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

2,198

2,696,970

101,166

Do.

do. in Ballast,..

266

291,857

7,945

Total,...

2,464

2,988,827

109,111

Total of all British Vessels entered and cleared,.

4,955

6,015,371

219,289

Foreign Vessels entered with Cargoes,.

15,555

1,993.097

235,858

Do.

do. in Ballast,.....

9,056

644,290

115,877

Total,.....

24,611

2,637,387

351,735

Foreign Vessels cleared with Cargoes,.

18,298

2,168,068

281,840

Do.

do. in Ballast,

5,870

450,885

65,114

Total,........

24,168

2,618,953

346,954

Total of all Foreign Vessels entered and cleared,...

48,779

5,256,340

698,689

Total of all Vessels entered with Cargoes,

17,974

4,958.090

343,977

Do.

do. in Ballast,

9,128

705,841

117,936

+

Total of all Vessels entered,

27,102

5,663,931

461,913

Total of all Vessels cleared with Cargoes,

20,496

4,855,038

383,006

Do.

do.

in Ballast,

6,136

742,742

73,059

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

26,632

5,607,780

456,065

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared with Cargoes,

38,470

9,823,128

726,983

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

15,264

1,448,583

190,995

+

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,.

53,781

11,271,711

917,978

LOCAL TRADE.

Total of all Vessels entered,

4,958

162,939

49,494

Do.

cleared,"

5,035

169,361

50,080

Total of all Vessels engaged in Local Trade only, entered and cleared,....

9,993

332,300

99,574

Total of all Vessels engaged in Foreign Trade only, entered and cleared,.

Do.

do. in Local Trade only,

53,731

11,271,711

917,978

do.

9,993

332,300

99,574

Grand Total of all Vessels entered and cleared,.

63,727

12,004,011

.1,017,552

SUMMARY OF ALL CHINESE PASSENGERS.

NAMES OF PLACES.

From Ports other than in China or Japan,

Do.

in China and Japan,

Do.

in Macao,

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

80,773

495,794

61,892

11,278

Total Arrivals,...

649,737

Left for Ports other than in China or Japan,

57,517

Do.

in China and Japan,

476,574

Do.

in Macao,

53,053

...

10.928

Do.

in Villages of the Colony,

Total Departures,

598,072

Excess of Arrivals over Departures,

51,665

Crand Total of Arrivals and Departures,

1,247,809

XVI.—RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1885.

247

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

Regis Horse

tered

Power. Tonnage.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Remarks, &c.

Wah Yeung, str.........

Cauton, str., Hongkong, str., Pilot Fish, str., Soochow, str.,..

88,834 313.36 55 81,640 1,110.00 250

Schooner

Wood

Hongkong, 1884.

Schooner

Iron

Newcastle on Tyne, 1880.

88,835 10.67

None

Wood

Hongkong, 1884.

88,836 116.33

62

None

Iron

Hongkong, 1885.

Wandering Minstrel, Victoria, str., Haiphong, str.,

Amity,..

62,522

Zafiro, str.,

48,331 326.59 95 65,363 361.71 88,837

16.94 88,838 1,121.95 519.02 88,829 675.44 184

Schooner

Irou

Cork, 1858.

Barque

Wood

Peterhead, 1875.

16 170

Schooner

Wood

Hongkong, 1885.

Schooner

Iron

Newcastle on Tyne, 1885.

Barque Iron Schooner Steel

Sunderland, 1869.

Aberdeen, Scotland, 1884.

Foreign name "Emuy" since sold to Foreign- ers at Canton.

XVII. RETURN of REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1885.

Name of Vessel.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of

Where built and when.

Reason of Cancellation,

Auguste,

64,119

210.35,

Loiterer,

78,444

Raven,

47,684

1875 37.76 1880 343.51 1882

Scbr. Schr.

Wood Vündam, Holland, 1869. Wood Hongkong, 1869.

Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885.

Ruby,

73,458

13.71 1883

Yawl

Kwang Tung, str.,

77,441 674.50

1883 160

Schr.

Iron

Rory, str.,.

Chi Yuen, str.,.

84,143 | 1,261.98 1883 180 73,460 1,211.37

Sclir.

Iron

1883 300 Schr.

Song Tai, str.,

88,826

Zephyr, str.,.

88,828

43.48 278.31 1884 65

1884 10

Schr.

Schr.

Iron

Zafiro, str.,

88,829

675.44 1884 184

Schr.

Steel

Carisbrooke, str.,

65,463

973.07 1884 140

Schr.

Iron

Saltee, str.,............

50,372

259.83 1884 | 90

Schr.

Iron

Nam-Vian, str.,

88,830

172.31| 1884 | 94

Sehr.

Iron

Pithan, str.,

88,831

Koussia, str., Soochow,

88,832

48,331

64.92 1884 15 Schr. 25.66 1884 12 Schr. 326.59 1885 95 Schr.

Barque Wood Sunderland, Durham,1864. Transferred to Newcastle, N.S.W. 1885.

Wood Hongkong, 1883.

Aberdeen, Scotland, 1877. Newcastle on Tyne, 1881. Iron Renfrew, Scotland, 1881. Wood Hongkong, 1878.

Hongkong, 1878. Aberdeen, Scotland, 1884. Sunderland, Durham, 1873.

Glasgow, 1864. La Seyne near Marseilles,

France, 1876. Wood Hongkong, 1884. Wood Hongkong, 1884. Iron Cork, Ireland, 1858.

Wrecked, 1885. Lost, 1885.

Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Registered anew at Penang, Stranded, 1885. [1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885.

Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885. Sold to Foreigners, 1885.

XVIII. AMOUNT of FEES received under the Merchant Shipping Act, 1855, and Section III of Ordinance No. 8

of 1879 in the Harbour Department, during the Year 1885.

Matter or Duty in respect of which Fee taken.

Number.

Fec.

Amount.

Remarks, &c.

Alteration in Agreement with Seamen,................

Certifying Desertion, ...

Copy from Registry Book,

Endorsement of change of Master,.

Declaration of Ownership,

Endorsement of change of Ownership,

Endorsement of change in tonnage,

Examining Provision,

1

1

167

1

167

2

5

10

14

28

ཿ༣

30

30

2

1

1

5

Granting Certificate of Imperial Registry,

10

15

150

Inspection of Registry,

5

Recording Mortgage of Ship,

4

Recording Discharge of Mortgage,

3

Recording Sale of Ship,

1

Registering Certificate of Sale,.

2

= 10 10 10 or

1

5

5

20

5

15

20

4

Total,.......

461

248

XIX.-RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1885.

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

Toxs.

NATION-

ALITY

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND,

TOTAL.

OF SHIP.

M.

F.

M. P.

1834

1 January 6

Sutlej, str.

2,156 British

""

6

Amigo, str.

771 German

A. H. Johnson F. Thiesen

Straits Settlements

215

:

215

508

37:

12

1

558

"

10

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

وو

12 Zainbesi, str......................

1,540 British

W. B. Cobb S. Bason

San Francisco

157

13

177

Straits Settlements

692

19

632

Port Darwin

Townsville

5

14 Airlie, str...

1,492

W. Ellis

Rockhampton

45

"

Sydney

Melbourne

Adelaide

6789

""

17 | Taisang, str....................

1,505

T. L. Davies

Straits Settlements

427

484

دو

17 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

366

12

17

470

20 Peshawur, str.

2,130

J. C. Babot

186

186

33

""

21 Rory, str.

1,202

R. C. Marsden

58

59

Port Darwin

25

Cooktown

3

:

Townsville

10

>>

23 De Bay, str......................

1,083

J. J. Lee

""

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

63

27

*R*588

28

29

27

1,304

13

Melbourne

11.

11

""

24 Hector, str.

1,590

H. E. Batt

Straits Settlements

159

**

198

27

12

13

14 February 2 Bangalore, str...

26 Whampoa, str.

1,109

J. E. Williams

Sydney

101

:

Melbourne

8

28 Berenice, str.

1,707 Austro-Hung. G. B. Verona

Straits Settlements

344

1,310 British

P. W. Case

274

>>

15

2)

5 Ajax, str.

1,525

J. Riley

210

وو

Cooktown

Townsville

16

7 Guthrie, str.

1,493

""

R. Craig

Sydney

23

Melbourne

Adelaide

1 199

17

18

19

189

"

10

Kashgar, str.

1,515

F. Speck

Straits Settlements

113

17

>"

10

City of New York, str.

18

Japan, str.

1,964 American 1,865 British

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

430

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

54

19

808

6

;)

20

""

21 Catterthun, str.

1,406

دو

223332

21

""

21

""

24 Khiva, str.

23 March

24

""

25

"

20

City of Peking, str.

2 Elektra, str.

2 Gleninorven, str.

3 Bokhara, str.

3 San Pablo, str...

Iolani, str.

6 Stentor, str.

3,129 American 1,419 British

W. E. Clement

2,095 Austro-Hung. G. Cattich 1,826 British 1,699 2,113 American

"

981 British

E. Allason

Port Darwin Sydney

Melbourne

San Francisco

Straits Settlements

H. Craig

G. G. Berry

وو

159

226

69

14

436

297

210

32

323

24

174

100

110

J. Thompson

58

7911

H. T. Weighell

50

E. C. Reed

San Francisco

165.

143

454

78

30

190

107

123

68

50

172

Straits Settlements

7

Townsville

Rockhampton

31

Brisbane

Sydney

11

Melbourne

T. T. Edwards

Straits Settlements

138

""

11 Sarpedon, str.

1,592

J. Ward

311

""

13 Oceanic, str..

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

316

29

""

17 Surat, str.......

1,677

C. R. Edwards

Straits Settlements

166

..

:

32

""

18 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

"

33

"J

18 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

A. B. Mactavish T. L. Davies

665

"

780

>

>>

39

138

311

332

166

45

13

731

39!

12

9:

790

:

Port Darwin

19:

Thursday Island

Cooktown

Townsville

18

31

18 Woosung, str.

1,109

A. Hunt

2

Rockhampton

94

12

Brisbane

Sydney

14

11

Melbourne

11

335889

36

37

40

RAKRAA

21 Telemachus, str.

24 Arabic, str.

1,421 2,788

H. Jones

Straits Settlements

118

118

""

W. G. Pearne

San Francisco

330

336

"2

26 Kennett, str.

1,156

J. T. Sanderson

Straits Settlements

513

>>

11

531

27 Euripides, str.

1,153

J. Herd

571

584

""

"

رو

27 Mobile, str. ................... 30 Medusa, str.

917

"J

C. Doert 1,776 Austro-Hung. G. Ragusin

201

216

>>

536

583

""

Port Darwin

13

Cooktown

41

""

31 Airlie, str..................................

1,492 British

W. Ellis

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

61

Melbourne

42 April

4 King Arthur, str.

43

>>

44

13

11 Kashgar, str.

7 City of Rio de Jauciro, str. 2,275 American

1,515 British

1,047

F. J. Raffin

Straits Settlements

ཝཱ,

527

21

12

564

W. B. Cobb F. Speck

San Francisco

740

Straits Settlements

381

121

58

750

405

Port Darwin

Cooktown

45

11 Canton, str.

1,110

Carried forward,...

72,021

Townsville

C. R. Balbernie

Brisbane

51

Sydney

12

Melbourne

Dunedin, N.Z.

Carried forward,.

11,622

549 188 97 12,456

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,~(Continued).

CHILDREN.

249

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

Toxs.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F. M.

F.

Brought forward,.

72,021

Brought forward, 11,622

540 188 97. 12,456

46 April 14 | Malwa, str.

1,697 British

G. W. Atkinson

Straits Settlements

169

169

Port Darwin

14

Thursday Island

Cooktown

47

15 Tannadice, str...................

1,408

""

S. G. Green

Townsville

5

52

Rockhampton

Sydney

25.

Melbourne

3

* 985283

48

"

16

Wingsang, str..

49

16

22

Japan, str.

1,017 1,865

d'A. de Ste. Croix

Straits Settlements

6451

54

**

18

وو

City of Tokio, str.

3,129 American

J.

T. S. Gardner

Maury

660 84

San Francisco

1,109

15

51

22

Adowa, str.

1,112 British

W. F. Caborne

Straits Settlements

586

34

བ༠༤།

24

731

15

14

773

1,135

649

ان

24 Verona, str.

"

54

55

24 Fidelio, str.

25 Alden Besse,. 28 Madras, str.

1,862

13

852 Gerinan 812 American 1,097 British

A. C. Loggin

186

:

186

H. Brock

3961

201

420

J. A. O'Brien H. Plenge

Victoria, V. I.

366

371

Straits Settlements

335

16

361

Singapore

99

Port Darwin

47.

Thursday Island

2

Cooktown

E

56

20 Whampoa, str....

1,109

J. E. Williams

Townsville

9.

2)

210

Rockamptou Brisbane Sydney

13

8

11:

Melbourne

11

68835 & %

57

""

30

Amphitrite, str.

**

30

Anchises, str.

2,481 Austro-Hung. C. Lazarich 1,304 British

Straits Settlements

476

R

20

580

C. Jackson

292

JJ

59 May

1

Wm. H. Besse...

1,025 American

S. B. Gibbs

Victoria, V. I,

428

::

:

292

436

60

2

City of New York, str..

61

>>

7

Venetia, str....

62

22

11

Olympia, str.

63

15

12 Carisbrooke, str.

1,964 1,608 British

783 German 973 American

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

517

3

522

""

A. B. Daniel

Straits Settlements

160

160

53

E. Christianson

R. Cass

279

Mauritius

215

11

Straits Settlements

G55

47

20

729

Singapore

64

Cooktown

64

12 Guthrie, str.

1,403 British

J. W. B. Darke -

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney

Melbourne

Singapore

11.

Port Darwin

Cooktown

65

15 De Bay, str.

Townsville

1,083

>>

J. J. Lee

28858

70

66

AAAAA

114

16 City of Peking, str.

16 Arratoon Apear, str. 16 Tai Sang, str.

3,129 | American 1,302 British

G. G. Berry

Rockhampton Sydney

Melbourne

Dunedin, N.Z.

San Francisco

431

10

1

1,115

201

1,146

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

303 66 16:

6

391

1,505

T. L. Davies

437

72

10

10

**

>

529

21 Teheran, str.

1,670

W. J. Nantes

1671

#

*

:

167

21 Menelaus, str.

1,300

R. Nelson

3641

17

12

"

396

Port Darwin

16

Cooktown

Townsville

71

26 Catterthun, str.

1,406

H. Craig

72

73

77

78

79

80

81

84

85

86

ROZARK 2 2 3 = 2883

27 San Pablo, str.

2,113 American

މ

27 Rhosina, str....

1,774 British

E. C. Reed W. Curtis

Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

San Francisco

95

24

769

Straits Settlements

497

74

.30 Titania, str.

2,011 Austro-Hung. G. Doncich

514

255

12

791

37

12

9

555

87

17

>>

638

75 Junc

5 Laertes, str.

1,391 British

R. F. Scalc

195

29

2

197

76

=>

6. Bengloe, str.

1,198

وو

""

9 Oceanic, str..

2,4-10

A

A. Webster

J. Metcalfe

512

553

San Francisco

1,028

1,060

>>

9 Taiwan, str.

1,109

33

T. H. Clegg

Sydney

217

Melbourne

181

::

398

11 Arago, str.

1,061

+3

W. H. Sutherland

Straits Settlements

200

20

249

12

11 Patroclus, str.

1,386

A

A. Thompson

85

85

16 Airlie, str.

1,492

W. Ellis

Sydney

15

**

Melbourne

15

30

* * * * *

17 Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

102

64 13

13

23

192

"}

17 Wingsang, str..

1,517

d'A de Ste. Croix

203

49

10

12

"

974

27

18

18 Nestor, str.

Egean, str.

1,269

II. Nish

Straits Settlements

SO

"J

80

750

T. Thomas

139!

23

12

139

22 Gleurath, str.

1,109

22

W. T. Story

129

10

**

144

Port Darwin

87

23 Woosung, str.

1,100

A. Hunt

Cooktown

Townsville Rockhampton

Brisbane

69809

9:

201

67

29:

88

24 Arabic, str.

2,788

W. G. Pearue

San Francisco

1,155

251

1,204

Singapore

147

13

Port Darwin

20

Cooktown

89

25 Suez, str.

1,890

W. M. Dodd

Towsville

231

Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

17

Carried forward,.................

139,369

Carried forward................. 28,454 1,464]

500 249 30,067

250

:

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

Toxs.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...... 139,369

Brought forward, 28,454 1,464° 500!

249

30,667

90 June

27

Adowa, str.

1,112 British

W. F. Caborne

Straits Settlements

75

91

30

Berenice, str.

1,707 Austro-Hung. G. B. Verona

268

92 July

8

Zambesi, str......

1,540 British

S. Bason

498

10 C 20

8

91

501

335

27

19

549

Port Darwin

Cooktown

93

3335

""

8 Tannadice, str..........

1,408

S. G. Green

""

Townsville Brisbane Sydney

12

6:

57

3

24

Melbourne

3.

2885

94

11

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

95

"J

18

Khiva, str.

2,275 American 1,410 | British

W. B. Cobb

San Francisco

654

14

W. E. Clement

Straits Settlements

272

96

97

29

>>

18

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

T. L. Davies

500!

521

12

21

18

Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

247

47

00 1999 19

673

293

572

304

"

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

98

"

21

Venice, str.

1,271

J. B. Peters

34

Rockhampton

Sydney

Melbourne

99

100 101

24

Mobile, str.

"J

29

City of New York, str.

30

Ferntower, str..

917 1,964 American 700 British

C. Doert

Straits Settlements

235

31

284

>>

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

509

9

522

J. Kelly

Straits Settlements

313

10

326

102 August 1

Benledi, str.

1,000

R. Farquhar

211

28

247

""

103

">

5

Vortigern, str.

876

J. Brown

274

31

314

27

""

Port Darwin

Cooktown

104

"

105

་,

8

106

10

7 Timor, str.

City of Peking, str. Elektra, str.

3,129 | American

2,095 Austro-Hung. G. Mahorcich

1,421

G. Willis

Rockhampton

71

Sydney

19

Melbourne

Adelaide

D. E. Friele

San Francisco

876

Straits Settlements

206

50

107

15 Wingsang, str..

1,517 British

108

15 Japan, str.

1,865

d'A. de Ste. Croix T. S. Gardner

179

21

240

FARE

17

10

907

273

29

9

221

66

15:

828

27

109

دو

22 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

T. W. Freeman

139

"

:

139

110

22

Welcombe, str..

1,323

W. R. Corfield

85

12

22

23

111

San Pablo, str........

2,113 American

E. C. Reed

San Francisco

232

པོ

0919

99

249

Port Darwin

Cooktown

112

وو

24 Catterthun,

str.

1,406 British

H. Craig

Townsville Rockhampton Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

Straits Settlements

32

113 114

29 Medusa, str.

31 Sarpedon, str.

1,776 Austro-Hung. R. Deperis 1,592 British

H. Chrimes

115 Sept.

1 Glenfinlas, str.

116

2 Adowa, str.

1,409 1,112

A. J. Jacobs

27

W. F. Caborne

22

3891

63

80

>>

82

"J

196

"1

6395

15

17:

484

80

82

206

Singapore

Port Darwin

Cooktown

117

""

2 Mount Lebanon, str.

1,555

D. Maxwell

127

دو

Townsville

Sydney Melbourne

118 119

""

5 Telemachus, str.

1,412

H. Jones

Straits Settlements

58

58

8 Oceanic, str.

2,440

J. Metcalfe

San Francisco

319

24

355

32

120

8 Tannadice, str........

1,408

S. G. Green

Port Darwin

Cooktown

Townsville

Rockhampton

Brisbane Sydney

.

35

16

Melbourne

121

121

"

9 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

Straits Settlements

273

20

313

122

;;

9 Bangalore, str.

1,309

P. W. Case

62

>>

"J

:

69

123

"

9 Noushera, str.

1,938

A. Sanders

274

26

310

27

124

""

16

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

T. L. Davies

372

70

14

459

27

125

27

16 Sumatra, str.

1,406

W. D. Worcester

473

18

497

22

Port Darwin

Cooktown

126

>>

A

19 Suez, str.

1,388

W. M. Dodd

Rockhampton

Brisbane

Syducy

333

16

Melbourne

127

21

Priam, str.

1,402

S. H. Butler

Straits Settlements

140

140

"

128

>>

22 Lorne, str.

1,035

W. Hunter

349

26

دو

"

385

Singapore

40

....

Brisbane

129

15

23 Airlie, str..

1,492

W. Ellis

27

Sydney

201

130

22

131

22

26 Ulysses, str.

132

""

26 Zambesi, str...

133

>>

26 Glengarry, str.

1,540 1,056

1

1

134

""

29 | Orion, str..

135 Oct.

1 Cousins Arbib, str.

1,231 British

24 City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American 1,301 British

W. B. Seabury

A. W. Bremner S. Bason

A. Taylor

1,833 Austro-Hung. S. Mersa

J. Hollis

Melbourne

San Francisco

182

པ་

شیبا

71

196

Straits Settlements

G6

239

19:

17

195

27

:

314

50

157

3.

136

2 Anchises, str.

1,304

137

3 Gaelic, str.

2,691

22

138

22

5 Altnacraig, str.

1,872

W. P. Lapage W. G. Pearne W. Buyers

130

27

San Francisco

132

Straits Settlements

270

8.

66

270

195

10:

377

165

130

138

283

Carried forward,..

216,295

Carried forward,..

39,671 2,333 682 425 43,111

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-(Continued).

251

No.

DATE CLEARED.

• SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHITHER BOUND.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,...... 216,295

Brought forward,.....39,671|| 2,333

682

425 43,111

Singapore

604

13

3

Port Darwin

25

Cooktown

139 Oct.

10 Hampshire, str.

1,700 British

A. Child

Townsville

694

Rockhampton

Sydney

26

Melbourne

.140

"

13, City of New York, str.

1,064 American

R. R. Scarle

San Francisco

174

187

Port Darwin

Cooktown

141

27

14 Menmuir, str.

1,247 British

P. Helms

Townsville

38

Rockhampton

Sydney

18

Melbourne

142 143

72

15: Japan, str.

1,865

T. S. Gardner

Straits Settlements

273

321

15 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

d'A. de Ste. Croix

295

08

382

"

144

20

"

Khiva, str.

1,419

W. E. Clement

271

11

294

22

>>

145

""

22

Iolani, str.

981

E. Allason

342

11

$62

""

146

""

27

Ingraban, str.

147

27

27

Rohilla, str.

148

""

30

Pandora, str.

149

30

Cyclops, str.

1,403 British

894 German

2,252 British

1,781 Austro-Hung. G. Mettel

R. Jago

J. R. Massmann W. Barratt

549

225

10

18

543

136

136

150 Nov.

3

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

G. G. Berry

San Francisco

382

151

4 Laju, str.

1,246 British

C. Mann

Straits Settlements Port Darwin

181

133

417

188

Cooktown

152

13

4 Guthrie, str..

1,493

S. G. Green

Townsville Brisbane Sydney Melbourne

60

!

11

297

:

:

Singapore

Port Darwin

Cooktown

153-

A

Kildare, str.

2,277

J. Johnson

Townsville

Sydney

34

Melbourne

7

154

6 Bangalore, str.

1,310

F. Cole

Straits Settlements

162

155

"

7 Laertes, str.

1,391

R. F. Scale

150

"

>>

156

10 Hydaspes, str.

1,890

G. Scrivener

153

"

""

157

11

Cousins Arbib, str.

1,231

J. Hollis

247

>>

27

158

"

12

Carisbrooke, str.

159

14

San Pablo, str....

160

"

14 Nestor, str.

978 American

2,113

1,269 British

R. Cass

Singapore

27

Mauritius

123:

E. C. Reed H. Nish

San Francisco

127

Straits Settlements

40

:

161

2:

14

:

Taisang, str. ......

1,505

T. L. Davies

279

64

162

14

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

A. B. Mactavish

268

94.

"

163

18 Kennett, str.

1,156

J. T. Sanderson

81

"

164

"

18 Olympia, str.

165

19

Bracadaile, str.

1,416

782 German

British

E. G. Christiansen E. Weddall

>"

J

166

21

Killarney, str.

1,060

H. O'Neill

549

24

"

167

29

168

26

169

22

170

24 Ancona, str.

Oceanic, str.

27 Kashgar, str.

30 Ampliitrite, str.

1,874

R. G. Murray

187

19

2,440

1,515

J. Metcalfe F. Speck

San Francisco

107

Straits Settlements

374

2,481 Austro-Hung C. Lazarich

356

"2

Straits Settlements

3371

1446

21.

47

Port Darwin

10

Cooktown

1

171

Duc.

1 Timor, str.

1,421 British

G. Willis

Townsville Brisbane

Sydney

16

Melbourne

10

Adelaide

2:

Straits Settlements

36

Port Darwin

Townsville

180

150

153

257

107

185

40

10:

361

19

385

81

48

101

582

187

122

· O

402

417

396

172

Tannadice, str....

1,408

W. McArthur

78

Brisbane

Sydney Melbourne

173

Amigo, str.

174

7 Benlarig, str.

175

8 Ravenna, str.

176

""

City of Rio de Janeiro, str..

177

11

Ingraban, str.

178

11

Wing Sang, str.

771 German 1,482 British 2,035 2,275 American

$2

894 German 1,017 British

F. Thiesen J. H. Clark W. J. Nantes W. B. Cobb

Straits Settlements

347 11

362

226

226

""

174

174

San Francisco

63

70

179

12 Sumatra, str.

180

""

14 Venice, str.

1,406 1,271

>>

J. R. Massmann d'A de St. Croix W. D. Worcester J. B. Peters

Straits Settlements

94

104

391

431

1

294

250

392

13

409

"

171

»

181

2:

16 Taiwan, str.

1,100

A

>>

T. H. Clegg

Sydney Melbourne

191

182

*

18 Laju, str.

1,246

183

>*

10 Japan, str.

1.865

184

19 Gaelic, str.

2,691

C. Manu

T. S. Gardner. W. G. Pearne

Straits Settlements

31

A

"J

San Francisco

པདྨ་ མ ཏྠ

451

269 97

185

19 Catterthun, str.

1,406

186

22 Afghan, str. .....

J. W. B. Darke

Port Darwin Townsville Rockhampton Sydney

Sydney

29

Carried forward............. 291,497

14

Melbourne

7:

120

1,430

G. Roy

299

2

Melbourne

176

2

Carried forward,.....

50,979 3,040

835

544 55,398

252

RETURN of CHINESE PASSENGER SHIPS cleared by the Emigration Officer, Hongkong,-( Continued).

No.

DATE CLEARED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WITHER BOUND.

¡ TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Brought forward,.............. 291,497

Brought forward,... 50,979, 3,040 835

44 55,398

187 Dec.

22

Malwa, str.

1,697 British

G. W. Atkinson

Straits Settlements

169

169

188

23 Anjer Head, str.

1,300

W. Macey

294

10

311

189

23 Glencoe, str...

1,901

W. E. Duke

160;

190

28 Titan, str.

1,554

R. J. Brown

254

::

160

254

191

""

29

City of New York, str.

1,964 American

R. R. Searle

San Francisco

104

115

192

29

""

Lorne, str......

1,035 British

W. Hunter

Straits Settlements

479

12

495

193

30

""

Titania, str.

2,011 Austro-Hung. G. Mahorcich

407

73

16

505

931

194

""

30

Woosung, str.

1,109 British

J. D. C. Arthur

110

Brisbane

17

TOTAL TONS,....

304,068

To Adelaide, South Australia,

,, Brisbane, Queensland,

"

Cooktown,

Do.,

,, Dunedin, New Zealand,

""

">

Mauritius,

Melbourne,..

Port Darwin, South Australia,

,, Rockhampton, Queensland,.. San Francisco, U.S.A.,...................... "" Straits Settlements,

""

Sydney,

Thursday Island, Queensland,. Townsville, Queenstand,..

,, Victoria, Vancouver's Island,

SUMMARY.

TOTAL PASSENGERS,.

52,956 3,144

852

505

57,517

1

11

11

111

111

140

140

5

338

675

368

*****

18

356

3

581

14

382

62

62

11,961

290

137

64

12,452

37,537 2,851

666

501

41,555

923

924

6

6

125

125

704

13

807

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

|52,956 3,144

52,956

852

565 57,517

XX. RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong, from Places out of the Chinese Empire, during the Year ending the 31st day of December, 1885.

253

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

M.

F.

M.

F

1 January 3

Tasmania, str.

2,649 British

Perrins

Straits Settlements

47

47

2

3

.་

3

Zambesi, str.

1,540

Bason

162

162

"

5

Taisang. str. ....

1,505

Davies

258

258

"

5

Nestor, str.

1,269

Nish

213

213

"

5

Mongkut, str.

859

Loff

Bangkok

70

70

5

Abbie Carver

934 American

Pendleton

Honolulu

183) 2

192

5 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392 British

Mactavish

Straits Settlemcuts

260

260

8 Whampoa, str.

1,109

Williams

Australian Ports

161

14

175

9

Wm. H. Besse,

1,025 American

Gibbs

Portland, Oregon

409

409

10 11

9

City of Tokio, str.

3,129

Maury

San Francisco

974

974

9

Rory, str.

1,262 British

Marsden

Straits Settlements

370 12

388

12

9 Breconshire, str..

1,241

Rickard

33

33

13

10 Castello, str.

1.483

Chandler

146

150

་་

*

14

10 | Achilles, str.

1.529

Anderson

901

90

15

12 Glenlyon, str.

1,373

McKinlay

183

11

16

12

Duburg, str.

921 German

Schultz

218

"

17

12

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

85

htt

188

232

87

18

13

Nagato Maru, str.

1,160 Japanese

Periam

Straits Settlements

186

190

19

16 Hydaspes, str...

1.891 British

Scrivener

28

28

"

20

""

17

Catterthun, str.

1,406

Craig

Australian Ports

260

260

21

22

93

19

Picciola, str.

19

Coloma..........

874 German 852 American

Nissen

Straits Settlements

150

150

Noyes

Portland, Oregon

350

350

23

24

25

22 Berenice, str.

26

23 Diomed, str.

27

28

29

23

30

::

31

32

33

"

34

35

36

37

38

39

20 Claymore, str.....

21 | Phra Chula Chom Klao.s.

1,658 British

Gulland

Straits Settlements

28

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

138

1,707 Aust.-Hung.

Verona

Straits Settlements.

510

10

1,471 British

Guthrie

217

2208

30

140

520

225

41

42

43

40 Feb.

24 Glenearn, str.

24 Antenor, str. 26 Bangalore, str. 26 Glucksburg, str. 26 Feronia, str.

26 Taichiow, str.

26 Iphigenia, str.

27 Guthrie, str.

30 Bokhara, str.

30 Stentor, str.................

30 Chi Yuen, str.....

30 Radnorshire, str.

30 ! Phra Chom Khao, str.

2 City of New York, str.

2 Bengloc, str.

3 Oopack, str..

3 Sardonix, str.

1,059 German

1,494 British

1,964 American

1.198 British

Searle

1,410

Parke

216

220

1,376

*

Bragg

150

150

1,310

Case

80

87

1.093 German

Bertelsen

281

281

1,115

Paulsen

228

237

19

"

862 British

Jordan

Bangkok

43

49

Ahrens

91

91

Craig

Australian Poris

213

213

1,700

Weighell

Straits Settlements

50

50

1.304

Edwards

281

4

285

27

1.211 1,201 1,012

McCaslin

464

10

480

"

Rickard

120

120

"

Stratton

*

Bangkok

41

41

San Francisco

470

470

Webster

Straits Settlements

30

30

1,730

**

Thompson

200

200

203

Buchnam

Victoria, V.I.

204

204

44

Mongkut, str.

$59

"

45

4 Kashgar, str.

1,515

Loff Speck

Bangkok

57

3

60

Straits Settlements

1201

120

46

4 Glenfinlas, str.

1,409

Jacobs

2301

230

:2

47

6 Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburn

111

112

48

7 Agamemnon, str.

1.523

:

Wilding

227

3

230

**

49

9 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

300

30

"

50

9 Japan, str.

1.865

Gardner

286

330

288

51

9 Taiwan, str...

1.109

Arthur

Australian Ports

137

137

52

11 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

Bangkok

38

40

53

11

Rory, str.

1.262

Marsden

Straits Settlements

310

316

54

12

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Berry

San Francisco

230

230

55

14

San Pablo, str.

2,113

Reed

672

672

"

56

14 Surat, str.

1,677 British

Edwards

Straits Settlements

67

67

57

14 Telemachus, str.

1,421

Jones

150

150

58

17 Khiva, str.

1,419

Clements

48

51

"

59

17 Tannadice, str.

1,408

Green

Australian Ports

76

76

60

19 Glenorchy, str.

1.775

Gedye

Straits Settlements

123

126

61

23 Sarpedon, str.

1,592

Ward

89

90

62

23 Elektra, str.

2,095 Aust.-Hung. Cattich

701

70

63

26 Fidelio, str.

$52 German

Brock

Mauritius

60

60

64

27 Chusan, str.

2,651 British

65

28 Oceanic, str.

2,440

17

Wyatt Metcalfe

Straits Settlements

36

36

San Francisco

143

143

66 March 2 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

.་

67

4 Sumatra, str.

1,406

Freeman Worcester

Straits Settlements

319

319

32

32

""

68

4 Yorkshire, str.

1,426

**

69

5 Glenroy, str.

1,411

70

""

5 Mongkut, str.

859

71

:

6 Woosung, str.

1,109

72

7 Arabic, str.

2,788

Arnold Geake Newton

Hunt

Pearne

70

73

"1

66

66

Bangkok

30

30

Australian Ports

90

90

:

San Francisco

118

118

73

7 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

Straits Settlements

654

654

74

7 Tai Sang, str.

1,505

75

9 Rockhampton, str...

1,391

9 Glaucus, str.

1,382

Davies Sanderson Jackson

258

12

214

WN

276

3

217

40

40

77

9 Priam, str.

1,402

Butler

387

389

**

"

78

9 Wm. Phillips,

568 American

Potter

Honolulu

141

161

79

14 Verona, str.

1,862 British

Loggin

Straits Settlements

191

191

80

16 Airlie, str..

1,492

Ellis

Australian Ports

80

81

18

Glengarry, str.

1.956

:

Taylor

Straits Settlements

925

82

18 Orestes, str..

1,323

Webster

418

:

to do

80

953

(20

12

83

19

Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Lightwood

84

20 Mobile, str.

917

Deort

Bangkok Straits Settlements

43

13

26

85

23 Benalder, str.

1.331

$6

23 Bothwell Castle, str.

1,653

Ross

Tod

60

87

23 Medusa, str.

1,776 Aust.-Hung. Raguson

450! 30 225

88

24 Ulysses, str..

1,560 British

89

25 Taichiow, str.

862

90

26 King Arthur, str.

1,047

Bremner Jordon Rappin

121

2-88

:

28

66

10

495

26

251

121

Carried forward..............

27,480

Bangkok Straits Settlements

Carried forward..

20 93

26

7

100

17,542 276 61

23

17,902

+

254

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

J.

F.

M. I

Brought forward..

127,480

96

97

98

99

100

3 3 3 4 8 3 P3 32

91 March 26

Malwa, str.

1,697 British

Atkinson

Brought forward... 17,542 276 61 Straits Settlements

23

17,902

180

180

92

27

Glenfalloch, str.

1,419

Webster

31

1

32

*

95 94

R

28

Teucer, str.

1,324

Power

308

14

331

31 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

377 11

13

408

"

95 April

1 Glamorganshire, str.

1.843

Williams

185

190

1

Jason, str.

1,412

Milligan

348

351

>>

1

Mongkut, str.

859

Loff

Bangkok

120.

120

:

1

City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Cobb

San Francisco

78

75

"

4

Kasligar, str.

1.515 British

Speck

: Straits Settlements

118

124

7

Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

872

50

422

101

7

Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Ste. Croix

5301

530

102

*

8

Glenfruin, str.

1,936

Norman

91

100

103

"J

9

Venetia, str.

1,608

Daniell

42

42

104

11

9

Chi Yuen, str..

1,211

McCaslin

221

10

241

105

**

9 Whampoa, str.

1,109

Williams

Australian Ports

67

70

106

"

11

Anchises, str.

1,304

Jackson

Straits Settlements

10

125

107

"

13

Polyphymnia, str.

1,053 German

Bahme

135

140

108

13

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

83

$5

109

#7

14 Glenogle, str.

2,000

Hogg

Straits Settlements

128

130

**

110

19

14

Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Bertelsen

280,

291

"

111

16 Deucalion, str.

1,374 British

Purdy

153

156

112

""

16

Phra Chula Chom Klao, s.

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

78

84

113

17

De Bay,

·1.083

Lee

Australian Ports

86;

86

"

114

17

Adowa, str.

1,112

Caborne

Straits Settlements

135

140

"

115

21 Diamond, str.

993 Jahore

116

وو

21 | Afghan, str.

1.439 British

Geary Roy

235

15

250

350

14

364

::

117

:

21

City of New York, str.

1,964 American Searle

San Francisco

396

396

118

22 Amphitrite, str.

2,486 Aust.-Hung. Lazarich

Straits Settlements

385

385

119

24

:

Lord of the Isles, str.

1,586 British

Felgate

114

120

24 Rosetta, str....

2,136

Brady

116

121

25 Gleneagles, str.

1.838

Garson

.-

:1

100

122

27 Cyclops, str.

1.403

Jago

300

123

11

27 | Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

Bangkok

48.

-

M

120

116

100

300

51

**

124

"

27 Guthrie, str.

1,494

Darke

Australian Ports

137

137

125

28 Hesperia, str.

1,136 German

Wagner

Straits Settlements

250.

250

126

""

30 Kashgar, str.

127

"

30

Mongkut, str.

859

1,515 British

*

Speck

102:

2

104

11

Loff

Bangkok

125

10

135

128 May

1

City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Berry

San Francisco

311

18

10

342

129

""

2

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956 British

Webb

Straits Settlements

214

10

229

130

2

Denbighshire, str.

1,663

Rickard

74

74

131

4 Benledi, str.

1,000

132

4

Tai Sang, str.

1,505

133

4 Menelaus, str.

1,300

Farquhar Davies Nelson

116

116

138

10

171

::

167:

171

134

5 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

450

150

#!

135

5 Glenavon, str.....

1,936

Donaldson

61

63

136

5

Tokio Maru, str.

1,350 Japanese

Burdis

200.

10

210

29

137

138

"

139

140

141

142

143

14

144

6 Duburg, str...

11

Kong Beng, str.

12 Laertes, str....... 13 San Pablo, str. 14 Chi Yuen, str. 14 Catterthun, str. Iolani, str.

15 Glucksburg, str.

1,391

921 German 862 British

Schultz

162

4

166

Jones

Bangkok

95:

10

117

Scale

Straits Settlements

458

458

2.113 American 1,211 British 1,406

Reed

San Francisco

91

McCaslin

Straits Settlements

122

18

21.00

93

453

"

981

916 German

Craig Alason Bertelsen

Australian Ports

60

60

30

30

Straits Settlements

176

186

145

16 Kennett, str.

1,156 | British

Sanderson

345

19

.383

146

"

18 Rhosina, str.

1,774

Curtis

285

15

300

147

19 Fidelio, str.

852 Germau

Brock

90

100

148

20 Gordon Castle, str.

1,320 British

Rowell

176

176

:

149

21 Brindisi, str.

2,142

Reeves

112

112

150

22 Titania, str...........

2,011 Aust.-Hung.

Doncich

216

267

151

22 Patroclus, str.

1,386 British

Thompson

2001

206

152

22 Suez, str.

1,388

Dodd

51

53

153

22 Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

Bangkok

36:

39

154

26 | Oceanic, str.

2.440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

210

215

155

"

26 Electra, str

1,162 German

Nagel

Straits Settlements

155.

155

156

28 Mongkut, str.....

859 British

Loff

Bangkok

377

200

157

29 | Benclutha, str.

1,339

Lunt

Straits Settlements

563

12

16

595

158

159 Junc

29 Menmuir, str.

Nestor, str.

1,247

Helms

Australian Ports

57

57

1,269

Nish

Straits Settlements

155

160

160

>>

Oxfordshire, str..

998

Jones

290

290

161

2 Arago, str.

1,061

Sutherland

50

52

*

162

2 Glenartney, str.

1,400

Mackinlay

30:

30

163

"

3 Flintshire, str.

1,017

Doncaster

145

150

164

3 Kong Beng, str.

862 i

Jones

Bangkok

Soi

10

92

165

3 Cheang Hock Kian, str..

956

Webb

Straits Settlements

137

25

15

482

166

5 Woosung, str.

1,109

Hunt

Australian Ports

71

78

167

6 Arabic, str.

2,788

Pearne

San Francisco

127

131

168

"

6 Wing Sang, str.

1,517

Stc. Croix

Straits Settlements

420

495

*

169

**

6 Duburg, str.

921

German

Schultz

184

200

170

"

8 Japan, str.

171

13

8 Achilles, str.

1,528

172

8 Cascapedia, str.

1,924

*

173

>>

10 Telamon, str.

1,555

174

*

11 Cardiganshire, str.

1.623

::

175

11 Canton, str.

**

1,110

176

13 | Phra Chula Chom Khao, s. 1,012

"

177

13 King Arthur, str.

1.047

1.865 British

Fraser

Jackson

Courtney Balburnie Lightwood

Raftin

Gardner

332

332

Anderson

142.

150

230

252

"

*

116.

119

33.

BB

Australian Ports

65

65

Bangkok

185

15

200

Straits Settlements

158

162

178

15 Benarty, str.

1.119

Le Boutillier

197

200

*

179

15 Ajax, str..

1,524

180

18 Ravenna, str.

2,035

Riley Stewart

140 10

150

24

24

Carried forward..... 254,963

Curried forward.............................

34,015 873 184

:15

35,152

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

255

i

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

• SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

JL.

I'

J.

F

Brought forward....

254,963

181

June

18: Ascalon, str.

1,523 British

182

19 Kutsang, str.

1,495

Morris Brass

Brought forward... 34,015|| $73 Straits Settlements

18+

80

35,152

1

95

95' 10

105

#

183

19 Adowa, str.

1.112

Caborne

280

283

184

19. Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

1

Bangkok

99

104

185

20: Chi Yuen, str....

1.211

McCaslin

Straits Settlements

436

20

15

474

"

186

22 | City of Rio de Janeiro, str.

2,275 American

Cobb

San Francisco

241

241

187

22 Taunadice, str.

1,408 British

Green

Australian Ports

132

::

132

188

25 : Mongkut, str.

859

Loft

.:

Bangkok

92

אז:

189

26 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Duke

Suraits Settlements

174

178

190

29 Antenor, str.

1.376

Bragg

**

214,

250

191

29 Zambesi, str.

1,540

Bason

209

216

192

29 Feronia, str.

1.115 German

Paulsen

89.

93

193

30 Allie Rowe

340 Hawaii

Holland

Honolulu

61

63

194 July

1. Kaisar-i-Hind, str.

2,400 | British

Sicad

Straits Settlements

69.

69

195

Taichiow, str.

862

Jordan

Bangkok

19: 3

52

196

4

Taisang, str.

1.505

Davies

Straits Settlements

312 18

15

15

360

27

197

4 Benclutha. str.

1.339

Lunt

598: 8

10

618

198

6

Arratoon Apcar, str.

1.392

Mactavish

170 12

182

199

7 Titan, str.

1,554

Brown

196

198

200

18. Khiva, str.

1,419

Clement

137

1483

201

14 Diomed, str.

1,471

Guthrie

340

10

350

202

14

City of New York, str.

3,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

472

472

203

15

Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956 | Britishı

Webb

Straits Settlements

355

11

15

385

204

16 Whampoa, str.

1,109

Williams

Australian Ports

106

LOS

205

18

Mirzapore, str.

2,164

Harvey

Straits Settlements

199

199

206

20

Ching Wo, str.

1.556

Machugh

2520

260

207

20 Hector, str...

1.590

Bath

249

250

:

208

20

Phra (hula Chon Klao,s.

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

185

190

209

21

Guthrie, str.

1.493

:

210

22

Glencarn, str.

1410

Darke Park

Australian Ports

94

94

Straits Settlements

110

10

120

211

23 Olympia, str.

783 German

Christiansen

Mauritius

173

C

176

212

24 Phra Chom Klao, str..

1,012 British

Stratton

Bangkok

107

110

213

24 Glenfinlas, str.

1.409

Jacobs

Straits Settlements

119:

124

214

27 | Glucksburg, str.

215

27 Hampshire, str.

916 | German 1.700 British

Bertelsen

165

179

"

Child

240.

245

216

27 City of Peking, str.

3,129 American

Friele

San Francisco

364:

16

398

217

27 Mongkut, str.

859 British

Loff

Bangkok

40

42

218

28 Westmeath, str.

2.095

Stonehouse

Straits Settlements

112

118

**

219

29 Nepaul, str.

1,988

Alderton

71

71

>

220

**

29 Bellerophon, str.

1,397

Freeman

317.

320

221

August 4 Sarpedon, sir.

1,592

Chrimes

350

10

360

222

4 Elektra, str.

2,095 | Aust.-Hung.

Mahorcich

201

19

220

223

4

Kong Beng, str.

862 British

Jones

Bangkok

748

2

$6

224

5 Wingsang, str.

1.517

St. Croix

Straits Settlements

170,

15

185

225

5 Japan, str.

1,865

Gardner

531

19

550

226

7

Rhosina, str.

1.7741

Curtis

160

17

177

227

7 San Pablo, str.

2,113, American

Reed

San Francisco

208!

218

228

229

230

10 Lydia, str.

8 Altnacraig, str.

10 Telemachus, str..

1,872 British

1,421

1.170 German

Buyers

Straits Settlements

30.

30

Jones

266:

270

Voss

150

150

231

"

12 Glaucus, str.

1,382 | British

Jackson

212

23

240

232

15 Catterthun, str.

1,406

Craig

Australian Ports

155

160

233

17 De Bay, str...

1,083

Lec

281

28

234

17 Cheang Hock Kian, sir..

956

Webb

Straits Settlements

£36

· 10

466

235

17 · Taichiow, str.

862

Jordan

Bangkok

37

38

236

18 Orestes, str.

1.323

Webster

Straits Settlements

99

100

237

19 Serapis, str..

1.271

North

170

170

238

::

239

240

19 Centaur

20. Medusa, str.

22 Adowa. str.

468 German

Offersen

Honolulu

92

94

1,776 Aust.-Hung. Ragusin

Straits Settlements

322

852

1,112 British

Caborne

300

327

241:

22 Oceanic, str.

2.440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

296

300

242

26 | Mongkut. str.

859

243

26 Cousins Arbib, str..

1,231

Loff Hollis

Bangkok

65

65

Straits Settlements

106

w

3

112

244

27 Verona, str.

1,862

De Horne

115

:

115

245

Glengarry, str.

1,956

Taylor

408

$14

246

| Priam, str.

1,402

Butler

191

రా

200

247

29 Arabic, str.

2,788

Pearne

San Francisco

132

132

248

31 Arratoon Apear, str.

1,392

Mactavish

Straits Settlements

238

15

253

249

31 Ulysses, str..

1,300

Bremner

40.

42

250

31 Bracadaile, str.

1.416

Weddall

**

**

250

256

251

31 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

Bertelsen

168:

171

252 | Sept.

1 Tai Sang. str.

1,506 British

253

Oopack, str.......................

1,730

Davies Thomson

307:

14

BBB

254

3 Claymore, str....

1,658

Gulland

128. 15 165

:

146

170

255

7 Anchises, str.

1,304

Lapage

225

225

256

7 Suez, str.

1.388

Dodd

Australian Poris

72

72

237

8 Woosung, str.

1,109

Arthur

94

94

258

9

Altonower, str.

1,611

Barnet

Straits Settlements

108

110

259

9. Lomme, str.

1.035

Hunter

69

74

**

260

9 Euphrates. str.

1.300

Mitchell

245

250

*

261

11

Teheran, str.

1.670

Nantes

119

119

262

11

Glenfruin, str.

1.986

Norman

147

154

263

11 Atholl. str.

923

Thomson

345

357

264

11 Deucalion, str.

1.374

265

12 Ashington, str.

809

266

15 Airlie. str.

1,492

Purdy Hepworth Ellis

100

100

51

51

Australian Poris

52

32

267

16 City of Rio de Janeiro. str.

2,275 American

Seabury

San Francisco

162

462

268

17. Zambesi, str.

1.540 British

269

17 Mount Lebanon

580

Bason Nelsou

Straits Settlements

109

13

Honolulu

140

142

"

270

**

19 Taichioy, str.

862

Jordan

Bangkok

113

115

Carried forward.......

384,148

Carried forward..

50,913 1,397

290

132

52,782

256

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,-(Continued).

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME.

TONS.

NATION- ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM,

TOTAL.

M.

F

M. F.

Brought forward.....

384,148

271 Sept. 21

Orion, str.

1,833 Aust.-Hung. Mersa

Brought forward..... 59,913 1,397 Straits Settlements

290 132

52,732

589 15

604

272

22

Rohilla, str...

2,252 British.

Barrett

134

134

#

273

22 Jason, str.

1,411

Milligan

398

12

410

274

24 Camelot, str.

1,049

Daily

415

420

}!

275

24 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

427

451

">

276

25 Pembrokeshire, str.

1,717

Davies

95

100

*

:1

277

28

Menelaus, str.

1,300

Nelson

3361

340

::

278

::

28 Glenroy, str.

1.411

Geake

276

281

279 280

28

Tamsui, str.

919

Varden

Australian Ports

36

36

:)

""

";

29

Serapis, str.

1,271

North

Straits Settlements

2911

296

281 October 1

City of New York, str.

1,964 American

Searle

San Francisco

490

490

282

"

3

Japan, str.

1,865 British

Gardner

Straits Settlements

286!

286

283

B Wingsang, str.

284

5 Cyclops, str.

1,517 1.403

St. Croix

370

30

100

:)

Jago

67:

?!

285

286

C Kildare, str.

5 Glucksburg, str.

916 German

2,277 British

Bertelsen

248

13

287

7 Mongkut, str.

859

Johnson Loff

173

Bangkok

41

288

8 Menmuir, str.

1.247

Helms

Australian Ports

87

**

312

70

269 176

42

89

289

8 Hydaspes, str.

1.891

Scrivener

Straits Settlements

133

133

"

290

9 Harter, str.

1,196

**

Grandin

265

275

291

*

12

Khiva, str.

1,119

Clements

120

125

292

27

12

Laertes, str..

1,391

Scale

184

16

200

:

293

"

14

Atholl, str.

923

Thomson

422

425

294

295

296

297

298

16

Nestor, str.

1,269

Nish

310

320

"

"}

11

17

Taichiow, str.

862

Newton

Bangkok

63

70

19

""

Venice, str.

1,271

Peters

Australian Poris

36

36

**

20

Laju, str.

1,246

Manu

Straits Settlements

568

19

20

Patroclus, str...

1,386

Thompson

168

299

21 Moray, str.

1.427

Duncan

233

300

"

301

302

21 City of Peking, str.

22 | Phra Chom Klao, str..

22 Ancona, str......

3,129 American

Berry

San Francisco

1,011

:2323 3⪜ €

580

170

240

10

1,080

1,012 British

Stratton

Bangkok

52

1,873

Murray

Straits Settlements

62

303

>>

22 Gleneagles, str.

1,838

Gasson

71

"

304

23 Ningchow, str.

1,785

Castle

43

"

305

>>>

306

307

"

308

*

27

309

310

311

23 Pandora, str.

26 Germania, str.....

26 Cousins Arbib, str..

Guthrie, str.

28 Achilles, str.

28 Camelot. str.

29 San Pablo, str.

1,781 Aust.-Hung.

Mettel

15

226

::

1,964 British

Thomas

65

3

68

1,231

Hollis

211

214

1,494

Green

Australian Ports

113,

113

1.529

Anderson

Straits Settlements

270

7

277

1,049

Daily

390:

390

2,113 American

Reed

San Francisco

783

:༡༣

795

312

30 Bangalore, str.

1,310 British

Cole

Straits Settlements

74

79

313

31 Arratoon Apcar, str.

1,392

Mactavish

295

295

314

:)

31 Taisang, str.

1,505

Davies

176

180

"

315

;;

31 Cheang Hock Kian, str.

956

Webb

290

10

310

316 Nov.

2

Kennett, str.

1,156

Sanderson

242

246

22

317

2 Bothwell Castle, str.

1,653

Tod

220

220

"

318

"1

2 Kong Beng, str.

862

Jones

"

Bangkok

985

110

319

J:

5 Ravenna, str.

2,035

Seymour

Straits Settlements

102

102

320

6 Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

78

со

86

321

9 Timor, str.

1,421

322

10 Whampoa, str.

1,109

Willis Williams

Australian Ports

96

96

64

65

323

11 Gulf of Papua, str.

1,316

Ligertwood

Straits Settlements

185

200

324

11 Glucksburg, str.

325

11 Denbighshire, str.

326

12 Glenavon, str..

327

328

>>

12 Ajax, str.

14 Oceanic, str.

1,936 1,525

916 German

1,663 British

Cuming

Riley

Bertelsen

368

380

**

147

150

Donaldson

174

124

14

10

2,440

Metcalfe

San Francisco

1,032

20

+23

186

450 1,062

329

16 Jolani, str.

982

330

16 Thibet, str.

1,671

Allason Mudie

Straits Settlements

2401

12

252

144

150

331

17 Taichiow, str.

332

20 | Malwa, str.

333

20 Beugloe, str.

862 1,697 1,198

Newton

Bangkok

12

42

""

Atkinson

Straits Settlements

114

114

""

Webster

38

40

;;

334

20 Prinz Georg, str.

1,906 German

Plett

230

250

335

21 Antenor, str.

1,376 British

Bragg

116

120

>>

336

23 Amphitrite, str.

2.486 Aust.-Hung. Lazarich

372

422

::

337

23 Ingraban, str.

894 German

Massmann

428

430

338

23 Titan, str.

1,554 British

Brown

146

150

339

23 Phra Chom Klao, str.

1,012

Stratton

**

Bangkok

51

32

340

23 Tannadice, str.

341

25 Glenlyon, str.

1.408 1,410

McArthur

Australian Ports

146

146

>!

342

25 Glencoe, str.

1,901

Somers Duke

Straits Settlements

262

266

149

158

;"

343

::

26 Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburn

59

59

23

344

345 Dec.

30 Atholl, str.

923

Thomson

277

282

::

2 Woosung, str.

1,109

Arthur

Australian Ports

66

66

346

2 City of Rio de Janciro, str.

2,275 American

Cobb

San Francisco

895

895

347

2 Laju, str.

1,246 British

Mann

Straits Settlements

332

334

348

2 Cheang Hock Kian, str....

956

Webb

367

19

393

349

3 Hector, str.

1,590

Batt

237

238

"

"

350

3 Wingsang, str.

1517

St. Croix

410

90

500

351

>>

3 Sumatra, str.

1,406

352

Mirzapore, str.

2.164

353

8 Japan, str.

1,865

354

8 Mongkut, str.

859

355

9 Gaelic. str.

2,691

Worcester

Harvey Gardner Loff

Pearne

57

57

45

45

་་

425

425

"

Bangkok

180

185

San Francisco

760

772

356

10 Lady Harewood

382

357

10 Suez, str.

1,388

Williams Dodd

Honolulu

291

300

Australian Ports

86

$6

"

358

11 Alden Besse..

812 American

O'Brien

Victoria, B. C.

391

392

359

11, Benalder, str.

1,335 British

Waring

Straits Settlements

168

168

360

11 Camelot str.

1,049

Daily

120

125

::

Carried forward.....

514,280

Carried forward.....

73,198 1,988 360 179: 75,725

I

RETURN of VESSELS bringing CHINESE PASSENGERS to the Port of Victoria, Hongkong,—(Continued).

257

No.

DATE ARRIVED.

SHIP'S NAME,

TONS.

NATION-

ALITY OF SHIP.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN,

MASTER'S NAME.

WHERE FROM.

TOTAL.

P.

J.

I

Brought forward...... 514,280

361

Dec. 11

Catterthun, str.

1,406 British

Brought forward... 73,198 1.9ss Straits Settlements

360

179

75.725

143

16

}

Darke

280

Australian Ports

362

"

15

Corinth, str...

1,660

Anderson

Straits Settlements

31

34

**

363

1

16 Agamemnon, str.

1,522

Wilding

244

G

250

364

**

16 Ceylon,..

646 American

Calhoun

Honolulu

200

306

365

"

17 Taichiow, str.

862 British

Newton

Bangkok

121

125

366

18 Vortigern, str.

876

Brown

116

120

367

"

368

"

369

19

18 Lee Sang, str.

19 Glucksburg, str.

19 Coloma,

1,092

Quartly

Straits Settlements

39,

39

916 German

Bertelsen

219

229

852 American

Noyes

Portland, Oregon

359

360

370

"

21 Spartan,..

713

Carson

Victoria, V. I.

326

826

#

371

"

21 | City of New York, str.

1.964

Scarle

San Francisco

445

445

372

"

21 Cathay, str.

1,884 British

Hassall

Straits Settlements

142'

142

373

31

21

Ching Woo, str.

1,556

Machugh

245

233

374

"

22

Electra, str..

1,162 German

Nagel

GF

68

375

"

22

Airlie, str.

1,492 British

Ellis

Australian Ports

206

206

376

23 Titania, str...

2,011 Aust.-Hung. Mahorcich

Straits Settlements

264

15

289

377

"

28 Zambesi, str.

1.540 British

Cole

47

17

*

378

"

28

Nanshan, str.

805

Blackburu

122

122

379

"

28

Glenartney, str.

1.400

Mackinlay

606

320

380

""

28 Belgic, str.

2.695

Walker

San Francisco

463

463

381

»

29. Amigo, str.

771 German

Thiesen

Straits Settlements

2481

255

382

30 Diomed, str.

1,471 British

Guthric

283

290

383

30 | Phra Chula Chom Klao, S.

TOTAL TONS..

1,012

Lightwood

Bangkok

110:

121

544,588

TOTAL PASSENGERS

78,104 2,076 896 197

$0.778

From Australian Ports,

"

Bangkok,

>

Honolulu, Sandwich Islands,

19

Mauritius,

17

Portland, Oregon, U.S.A.,

";

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

>>

Straits Settlements,

**

Victoria, Vancouver's Island..

SUMMARY.

ADULTS.

CHILDREN.

TOTAL.

VALLE

or TREASURE

J

M.

P.

BROUGHT,

3.320 11

3,499 164

1.207 18

283

FAR?

1

3.3.10 19 8.705

$ 850,160

13 1.258

236

1.118

11,899 122 BS

1,119

20: 12.079 9.103.077

55,907 1,758

921

296

MA

58.105 922

TOTAL PASSENGERS,

78,101 2,076 296

197

80,773 | 89.2961,237

XXI-RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE`S COURT, during the Year 1885.

DEFENDANTS, HOW DISPOSED OF.

No. of

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of CASES.

DE- Impri- Impri- FEND- soned soned

ANTS.

with in Hard default Labour. of Finc.

Fined.

Forfci- fure

Repri- manded.

of Pay.

Sent back to Duty.

To be dis- charged from Ship.

Dis- missed.

Com- .mitted

for Trial.

Absent from Ship without Leave............... Assault,

B

4

32

4.

1

11

Desertion,

Disorderly Conduct,

Drunkenness,

False Particulars, Giving (Junk),

Found stowed away,

Harbouring Deserter,

Harbour Regulations, Breach of,

Insubordination,

Leaving without Clearance (Junk),

Neglect of duty.

Obstruction of fairways,

Refusal of Duty,

Refuse to join ship.....

Throwing Ballast, &c. into Harbour, Wilfully remaining behind,

༣༤༧=23 —21༦ :: 71

4

110

3

11

AMOUNT OF

FINES,

$31.36

8,00 1.00

62.00

10.00

30.00

9.00

28.00

TOTAL.

111

221

136

-17

14

21

$159.36

:

I1,500,000

I1,300,000

I1,200,000

I1,000,000

10,000,000

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000

9,600,000

9,500,000

9,400,000

9,300,000

9,200,000

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,000,000

8,800,000

8,700,000

8,000,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,500,000

TONS.

1867.

1868.

1869.

1870.

1871.

1872.

1873.

DIAGRAM of Tonnage entered at Hor

RED LINE represents British Shipping DOTTED BLACK LINE represents Gern DOTTED RED LINE represents Japanes BLUE LINE represents Foreign Shippir GREEN LINE represents British and F YELLOW LINE represents Junk Tonnag VIOLET LINE represents Steam-launch

THICK BLACK LINE represents entire

1874.

1875.

1876.

1877.

1878.

1879.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1880.

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

*8381

}

Table XXV.

tered at Hongkong, from 1867 to 1907 inclusive

itish Shipping Tonnage orily.

represents German Shipping Tonnage only,

resents Japanese Shipping Tonnage only.

Foreign Shipping Tonnage only.

British and Foreign. Shipping Tonnage.

ts Junk Tonnage only, excluding Local Trade.

: Steam-launch Tonnoge ority excluding Local Trade.

: Steam-launch Tonnage önt

presents entire Trade in British and Foreign Ships, Junis and Steam-launches.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1กก.

*TOOT

1892.

Trade.

ily.

1907 inclusivi

Local Trade.

reign Ships, Junis and Steam-launches.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

TONS.

11,500,000

I1,300,000

I1,200,000

11,000,000

|10,000,000.

9,900,000

9,800,000

9,700,000.

9,600,000...

9,500,000.

9,400,000

9,300,000-

9,100,000

9,000,000

8,800,000.

8,700,000-

8,600,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000.

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

8,500,000

8,400,000

8,300,000

8,200,000

8,100,000

8,000,000

7,900,000

7,800,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7,400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000

6,500,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6,600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

--5,800,000.

5,400,000

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

4,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

+3,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

7,000,000

7,700,000

7,600,000

7,500,000

7:400,000

7,300,000

7,200,000

7,100,000

7,000,000!

6,900,000

6,800,000

6,700,000

6.600,000

6,500,000

6,400,000

6,300,000

6,200,000:

6,100,000

6,000,000

5,900,000

5,800,000

5,700,000

5,600

5,400,

5,300,000

5,200,000

5,100,000

5,000,000

4,900,000

4,800,000

+,700,000

4,600,000

4,500,000

4,400,000

4,300 or

4,1

Jo

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800.000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3:200 000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900.000

2,800.000

2,700,000

2.600,000

BLACK

T130,000

4,200,000

4,100,000

4,000,000

3,900,000

3,800,000

3,700,000

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,000

2,900,000

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,000

2,500,000

2,400,000

2,300,000

2,200,000

2,100,000.

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

YELLOW 1,300,000

GREEN 1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

RED

800,000

700,000

600,000

BLUE

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

DOTTED

100,000

BLACK

LINE

90,000

VIOLET

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

DOTTED

RED

20,000

LINE

4,000,000

3,900,000 3,800.00p

3,700,00,0

3,600,000

3,500,000

3,400,000

3,300,000

3,200,000

3,100,000

3,000,csó

2,900,cbo

2,800,000

2,700,000

2,600,900

2,500,000

2,400,000

4,300,000.

2,200/000

2,100, bao

2,000,000

1,900,000

1,800,000

1,700,000

1,600,000

1,500,000

1,400,000

1,300,000

1,200,000

1,100,000

1,000,000

900,000

800,000

700,000

600,000

500,000

400,000

300,000

200,000

100,000

90,000

80,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

SEGBERANE SPESE

}

4

HONGKONG.

THE COLONIAL SURGEON'S REPORT, FOR 1885.

281

No. 32.

Presented to the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government,

*

on 14th May, 1886.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 10th May, 1886.

SIR, I have the honour to forward my Annual Report for the year 1885, together with the Tables showing the work done in the different Establishments in my Department I also forward reports from the Superintendent of the Government Civil Hospital, the Superintendent of the Lock Hospital, and the Government Analyst.

POLICE.

The admissions from the Police Force to Hospital show the slight increase of nine in 1885 as compared with the admissions in 1884. For the last five years the number of admissions to Hospital have been as follows:-1881, 498; 1882, 549; 1883, 599; 1884, 486; and 1885, 495; so that the impro- vement in the health of the whole Force taken as a total, when the strength of the different years is taken into consideration, still continues. The average strength of the Force in the last five years has been as follows:-1881, 624; 1882, 582; 1883, 658; 1884, 666; and 1885, 674.

There were nine deaths in the Force this year, viz., three Europeans, one Indian and five Chinese. Two Europeans died in Hospital, one from cellulitis and one from heat apoplexy. The other died in his own quarters from apoplexy. The Indian died while in India on leave. Of the Chinese, three died in Hospital, one of these of cholera, the rest away in China on leave.

the

Table I shows the admissions of each section of the Force to Hospital in the different months of year, the largest numbers being as usual during the summer months.

Table II gives the average strength of the different sections of the Force, the deaths, rate of sickness and mortality to strength.

Table III shows the admissions to Hospital from the different stations and districts of the several sections of the Force during each month of the year.

The Central District Stations, as usual, show up worst, but this year worse than ever in the Euro- pean portion of the Force, for while the Indian and Chinese sections in this district show a decrease respectively of 14 and 7 admissions, the European section shows an increase of 36. The admissions from this portion of the Force in this district in 1884 were 41, whereas in 1885 they numbered 77.

Whitfeild Station still holds its, own as the worst of the outstations, sending on the worst type of malarial fever cases, and this is entirely due to the great amount of earth cutting in virgin soil going on in the neighbourhood.

The other stations were about the same average as last year. The only station that has been improved is that of the Water Police, on being removed from a Hulk to a large and airy building on shore.

The admissions to Hospital from the various sections of the Force for the last five years are as follows:-

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Admissions to Hospital, 1881.

88

212

198

Do.,

1882...

92

230

227

Do.,

1883.

.113

246

239

Do.,

1884..

$7

224

175

Do.,

1885.

..124

208

163

1

282

This shews that the past year was worse than all the previous years amongst the Europeans, but shows a steady improvement amongst the Indians and Chinese; indeed for these two sections it has been the best year of the five.

The admissions to Hospital and deaths from the Police Force for the past ten years are given below.

Admissions.

1876, 1877.

.410

Deaths. 7

..418

6

1878,

...566

6

1879,

....566

8

>

1880,

....588

13

1881

...498

10

1882.

.549

8

1883,

..599

10

1884,.

..486

7

1885,.

....495

9

TROOPS.

There is a large increase both in sickness and mortality among the Troops, while there is but a slight increase of 60 in their strength, both sickness and mortality having exceeded any year in the previous ten years.

Table IV gives the average strength of the Force the admissions to Hospital, deaths with their percentage to strength for 1885. I give the number of admissions and deaths for the past ten years

below.

"

1876.. 1877,

....

1878,.... 1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,...

1883.

Admissions.

Deaths.

563

2

973

9

944

10

.1,035

8

1,075

13

..1,116

4

..1,019

9

..1,105

10

.1,097

12

..1,190

24

1884, 1885,..

The sickness therefore exceeds any of the previous years, by over seventy admissions, and the deaths by eleven more than any previous year.

There was an outbreak of cholera among the Troops, and of eighteen cases admitted to Hospital, twelve died. This accounts in a great measure for the increase in the mortality but not for the increase in sickness. The cause of this outbreak amongst the Troops I cannot account for. No cases occurred amongst the Police in the Colony. The one Chinese Constable that was admitted with choleraic symptoms contracted the disease in the Chinese City of Kowloon, and was sent in to Hospital immediately on his return to the Colony. No case was admitted to or occurred in the Gaol. In both cases the quarters are inferior for the most part to those occupied by Troops both as regards ventilation and over- crowding, and in the case of the Police some of the Stations are very greatly inferior in the unwholesome- ness of their surroundings. I shall have more to say on this subject when referring to the sanitation of the Colony.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

This Establishment remains in the same condition as in my last Annual Report. The founda- tions with their sustaining walls for the new wards, &c. have taken the whole year in construction, and I hope this year will see their completion.

The house for the Superintendent is now finished and occupied.

The admissions to Hospital this year have exceeded all former years, but are only slightly in excess of those in 1883. The following table shews the number and position brought to Hospital during the past five years.

Police,

1881.

1882.

1883.

1884.

1885.

...498

549

599

486

495

Board of Trade,

...117

116

110

60

100

Private paying Patients,

...193

268

260

259

283

Government Servants,

67

88

105

96

124

Police Cases,

Destitutes,....

.139

207

227

231

238

.....222

230

201

222

270

1,236

1,458 1,502

1.354

1,510

1

The increase is pretty evenly distributed over all classes but chiefly noticeable on Private Paying Patients, Government Servants, and Destitutes. The increase in the number of Government Servants is chiefly caused by those employed on the Táit'ámtuk excavations and tunnel which has proved very unhealthy work, and the patients suffer severely from malarial fever and its sequelæ.

years.

Table V shews the character of the diseases admitted to Hospital.

Table VI shews the rate of mortality of the different classes admitted to Hospital for the past ten

Table VII shews the admissions and deaths of the different classes in each month of the The number of admissions was as usual largest in the summer months.

The numbers of admissions and deaths in Hospital for the past ten years are as follows:-

year.

283

1876,. 1877,.

.....

1678,

1879,.

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,.

Admissions. 1,000

Deaths.

36

950

49

.1,289

50

..1,071

55

.1,055

44

..1,236

49

..1,458

68

.1,502

70

.1,354

50

.1,510

76

years.

1884.. 1885,

The percentage of deaths to admissions was 5.03, the highest percentage but two in the last ten

Sixteen of these deaths were from injuries. There were fourteen cases of gunshot wounds; of these two died. There was a larger number of severe injuries than usual, as will be seen by reference to Table No. V, those of contused wounds, many of them of great severity, being more than double; the number being 40 in 1884 as compared with 83 in 1885.

In the last few years the number of surgical cases have been greatly on the increase, and this is to be expected with the greater increase of manufactories having complicated machinery.

This year the Superintendent was absent on sick leave for five months. During his absence Drs. DODD, PIKE, and THOMPSON of the Army Medical Department acted alternately in his place; but as their services could only be spared from their Military duties during the day, Dr. MARQUES performed the duties at night, or in his absence I was called upon.

The services of another European wardmaster were required, and a temporary one has been appointed with a strong recommendation from myself that the appointment shall be made permanent for next year.

Mr. CROW, the Apothecary and Analyst, was on the sick list for some time, and considerable diffi- culty was experienced during his temporary absence, but this was less than it might have been, had there not been a Chinese Student Apothecary of considerable experience. His services we have unfor- tunately lost, and this year there is a new Student Apothecary whom it will take a considerable time to instruct, before he can be of much service.

SMALL POX HOSPITAL.

Fourteen cases of Small Pox were admitted to this Hospital, of whom only one died. Most of them were of a mild type.

Table VIIa shews the number and nationality of the patients admitted and the number of deaths. In the summer months, when no small pox cases are received, this building was used as a Cholera Hospital; nine cases were received, of whom six died. There were three Europeans, one colored man and five Chinese; of these, three Europeans and three Chinese died.

PUBLIC MORTUARY.

Table VIII gives the list of dead bodies brought in during the year, and these are yearly on the increase, (this list does not include bodies brought from the Government Civil Hospital for examina- tion, after death by the Coroner's order), Coroner's Inquests being very frequent. Dr. MARQUES has per- formed the duties of the Medical Department of this new Establishment, and been assisted by a Chinese Wardmaster from the Hospital. This I think is very objectionable, for not only does it take up à great deal of this man's time when he can ill be spared at the Hospital, but in view of the many and serious injuries in which he has to see to the dressing of wounds, his employment as Post Mortem attendant is most objectionable, and might add to the danger of the patients. I have therefore strongly recommended that instead of a watchman at this place, a resident well paid Post Mortem attendant should be appointed, which I hope will be sanctioned.

284

VICTORIA GAOL.

The following figures give the number of admissions and the daily average number of prisoners for the past ten years. There is a considerable decrease in both cases this

year. Daily average No.

1876,

1877,

1878,

1879,

1880,

1881,

1882,

1883,

1884,

1885,

Total No, admitted

to Gaol.

of Prisoners.

4,062

432.60

.3,964

395.22

3,803

519.22

.3,665

576.13

.3,530

575.25

..4,150

666.00

.3,498

622.00

..3,486

542.15

4,023

552.00

...

3,610

530.00

The above figures show a decrease in the number of admissions of nearly 400 as compared with 1884, with a decrease in the daily average of 22; but at times during the year the daily average was very high.

Table IX shews the number of admissions to the Gaol Hospital, the nationality, disease, and deaths. The number of cases admitted were sixty two less than in 1884, and the number of deaths two as compared with three in 1884.

Table X shews the number of cases of any importance treated in the cells. Every day there are numbers of petty complaints attended to that are not registered, also a number of malingerers and others that come up for examination or to be reported on as to their fitness for punishment.

Table XI shews the rate of sickness and deaths with the percentage to total admissions and daily average number of prisoners. In both cases this is very small, especially when the overcrowded state of the Gaol is taken into consideration, on which subject a Committee of Inquiry is now sitting to suggest a remedy if possible.

Table XIa shews the number of admissions to Hospital direct from the Courts; Europeans suffering chiefly from alcoholia, Chinese from debility or venereal disease.

Table XIb shews the number of opium smokers consuming one mace and upwards during the year; eighty altogether; of these twelve only were admitted to Hospital, seven of whom were suffering from debility but with no particular symptoms from the effects of opium; one from gonorrhoea, one from bubo and two from sprains; none had to be admitted owing to any effects from the deprivation of opium. Those suffering from debility were admitted as soon as received. No deaths occurred among the smokers of opium. The oldest opium smoker was 70 years of age and had been an opium smoker 52 years; his daily consumption being three mace; his weight on admission was 99 lbs. which increased to 105 lbs., by the end of his first month in Gaol, showing that 52 years of opium smoking had not much impaired his digestive powers.

One of greatest opium smokers who consumed 5 mace, was 56 years of age, and had been an opium smoker 36 years; his weight was 115 lbs. on admission, and 117 lbs. at the end of the first month of his sentence.

The only other smoker of 5 mace was 64 years of age, had been addicted to this troublesome vice 32 years, weighed 100 lbs. on admission, was only in Gaol two weeks, and left with the same weight he came in.

last

The lightest weight on admission was 80 lbs., 5 lbs. heavier than the lightest weight admitted year; he was 32 years of age, had only been a smoker 4 years; his consumption being only 1 mace a day; he increased in weight 1 tb. in the first month, and was never under treatment for any cause. These are a few queer facts for the anti-opium smoking Society to digest. That a man 70 years old, 52 years an opium smoker, consuming daily 3 mace (equivalent to 3 drams), increased his weight 6 lbs. in a month, shews that his digestive powers at any rate were not much affected by this terrible vicc. His daily consumption of opium by smoking was enough to kill twenty four men if eaten; allowing the liberal dose of 10 grains to each, whereas 4 grains is given as a dose that would kill most men unaccustomed to its use in toxological works. Half a pint of gin is given as the smallest dose ever known to kill an adult;-fancy a man consuming 12 pints of gin a day for 52 years.

It is curious how small has been the success of Europeans in introducing drunkeness amongst the Chinese, compared with their success amongst nearly every other race. Perhaps it is as well that the Chinese have chosen the lesser vice of opium smoking. Of 32 Europeans admitted to the Govern- ment Hospital, 6 were admitted suffering more or less from symptoms of Delirium Tremens. Of 221 Chinese admitted to Hospital 7 were suffering from debility, who were opium smokers: this is the

i

285

-

only disease among the opium smokers that could be put down to opium. At the same time I am not of opinion the debility is directly so caused, as their powers of digestion are not impaired and the result of their treament is as follows:---

No.

1,

2,

3,

4,

5,

6,

7,

Consumption per diem.

Weight on admission.

Weight at end of first month.

94 tbs.

Age

No. of years

years.

as smokers.

.40

5

3 mace

91 lbs.

.32

10

1 mace

99 lbs.

101 lbs.

..64

32

5 mace

100 lbs.

* 100 lbs.

.70

52

3 mace

99 lbs.

105 lbs.

..35

5

2 mace

100 lbs.

102 tbs.

..63

10

2 mace

98 lbs.

102 lbs.

.70

40

3 mace

90 lbs.

94 lbs.

The sole treatment these prisoners received was Quinine mixture with low diet for the first few days, and then the full ordinary diet of the Gaol. They all but the one marked with * increased in weight and that one was only in Gaol two weeks; he lost no weight.

The lightest weight of these 7 was 90 lbs. on admission, whereas the lightest weight among the opium smokers admitted into Gaol was 80 and he was never under treatment at all. The average weight of the opium smokers was about 105, and 28 of them were up to or over the average weight of Chinamen admitted into Gaol which is about 110 lbs., that is giving a very liberal average from calculations made. My strongest chair coolie who is a giant compared with 99 out of every hundred in the Gaol, only turns the scale just under 130 lbs. It takes a great deal of fat and muscle to make up for the smallness of bone in Chinamen. Again I have to state that I find no special symptom as the result of opium smoking or its immediate stoppage. On the list of opium smokers the men range from 18 to 70 years of age, having been smokers from 1 to 52 years, and consuming from 1 to 5 mace. As I have stated a Committee of Inquiry is at present sitting on the subject of overcrowding in the Gaol. The question is whether the system can be rendered according to European ideas sufficiently deterrent to prevent overcrowding or whether we shall be compelled to increase the accommodation for the increasing number of scoundrels coming from China proper, for not one in a hundred is born and bred in Hongkong, or been a resident for as much as ten years.

I recommend a further reduction of diet, which years ago was reduced to what it is now on my recommendation, and I still think, as I said years ago, the system of giving, from 10 to 20 strokes of the rattan for petty thefts, &c., instead of from a fortnight to three months' better entertainment in board and lodging with lighter work than any coolie has outside, would do some good as a deterrent. That is the system pursued in India, and if the Indians can bear the rattan, I don't see why the

Chinese cannot.

GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM.

Table XId shews the number of admissions, nativity, sex and disease of patients received into this Institution. The number of admissions have been larger than usual and have in the majority of cases been received from ships in harbour, Coast Ports and Japan. It is a question whether this Colony should be saddled with the keep and expense of sending to their own country of destitute insane patients from the Coast Ports, and the matter has been referred to the Secretary of State. Of course in all cases in which their nationality can be proved, the Consuls pay their expenses. The building, which has been now in use a year, has proved all that can be desired in the accommodation it affords. Three remained at the end of the year. Most have been sent to their native countries incurable.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL.

The total number of patients treated in this Hospital which is entirely managed by Chinese Directors and Doctors was 1,967. Of these 1,006 died. The number of out patients treated was 111,878.

The number of moribund cases admitted was 283.

The number that remained in Hospital at the end of the year was 99.

The number of Patients, admitted to the Small Pox wards was 36; of these eighteen died. The majority of these patients were children.

The number of Vaccinations performed in Hongkong and Kowloon was 2,120. The chief reason for the great mortality in this Hospital is that most of the patients, when admitted, are hopeless cases, the Chinese having a great antipathy to going into Hospital at all except in the last extremity, or in cases of utter destitution.

TEMPORARY LOCK HOSPITAL.

The new Lock Hospital being still occupied as a portion of the Civil Hospital, the private houses mentioned in my previous reports are still occupied for this purpose and are barely sufficient to meet the requirements. I hope, as I said in my last report, to be able to state next year that the patients are transferred to the new Buildings.

Table XVa gives the number of patients admitted for the past 28 years and the average number of days detention which is 15,6, showing that the majority of cases are of a mild type.

Fevers

286

Table XVc shews the number of men treated for venereal disease in the Military Naval Police and Civil Hospitals and the average number of men in Garrison and Port of different classes per month.

Table XVd shews the character of disease found amongst the women.

Table XVe 2 shews the number of Naval Seamen who have contracted constitutional disease in Hongkong, which is only one.

Table XVe shews the number of Military that have contracted constitutional disease in Hong- kong which is 14.

The difference between the Naval and Military men is explained by the Seamen in most cases going to the registered houses, whilst the Military have more opportunities of becoming acquainted with sly prostitutes.

In 1884 no Naval Seamen contracted constitutional disease in Hongkong, but among the Military there were 28 cases, which this year have been reduced to one half.

1

Two members of the Police Force, both Europeans, contracted constitutional syphilis. In one of these cases, however, it was contracted in the execution of his duty. The constable, a man of very good character, while defending himself in a scuffle with a number of seamen, hit one man on the mouth inflicting a slight wound on his own knuckle from contact with the man's teeth. The man struck must have been suffering from syphilitic sores in the mouth, for the wound received by the Constable developed into a chancre and ultimately secondary symptoms of a very severe form showed themselves. The Government, I am happy to say, has compensated the Constable for his injury as far as lies in its power. Only one case of secondary Syphilis was received into the Civil Hospital from among the Seamen in Port. The working of the Contagious Diseases Ordinance, both among the men and women, may be considered as very satisfactory.

HEALTH OF THE COLONY.

Table XVI shews the rate of mortality amongst the European and American Residents in Hong- kong. The percentage to the number of residents for 1885, is 3.25, the highest percentage for the last ten years. It would have been less than 2 per cent but for the deaths from cholera among the Military.

I give below the Tables of the death rates for the past thirteen years I have been in the Colony among the Europeans and Chinese, as registered in Hongkong, from diseases which may arise from filth poison.

DEATHS AMONG EUROPEANS. (BRITISH AND FOREIGN.)

1

1873. 1874. 1875. 1876. | 1877. | 1878. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 1885.

Fevers

YEAR.

Enteric,

1

1

1

5

3

3

1

2

10

1

Simple Continued, .

6

10

O

15

21

12

17

13

9

4

11

Typhus,..

2

4

ير

:

2

:

:

Diarrhoea,

17

17

18

14

10

14

10

10

13

9

12

9

Cholera,...........

:

19

Totals,.........

25

26

24

24

27 29

38

24

29

37

19

23

46

YEAR.

DEATHS AMONG CHINESE.

1873. 1874. | 1875. | 1876. | 1877. 1878. 1879. 1880. 1881. 1882. 1883. 1884. 1885.

Enteric,

Simple Continued,

Typhus,.......

Diarrhoea,

Cholera,.........

Vomiting & Purging

:

Totals,............ 319

94

12

125

31

96

46

291 343

145

370

89

116 309 438 679 262 132 105

481 733 373 168

71 571 600

755

16

N

33

21

38

3

2

195

231 288 259

311

701 608 348

435

465

660

301

561

:

:

:

:

176

402 612

696

1,304 1,478 1,030 1,079 1,215

1496 1,035|1,604

287

The figures in the European Table vary but slightly from the figures in former years, with the exception of cholera of which disease no case has been recorded until this year.

The figures in the Chinese table vary very considerably both as regards the different classes of disease and the totals.

For Enteric fevers the number of deaths recorded in the Chinese table vary from the lowest in 1873, 12, to the highest in 1882, 679; this year 1885 the number was 105.

In the European table this disease had the lowest death rate; in 1883 none, the highest 1882, 10, this year 1885 the number is 7.

For simple continued fever the number of deaths recorded among the Chinese is lowest in 1882, 71, highest this year 1885, 755; the nearest to this year is 1879 when 733 deaths are recorded from this cause.

For Typhus fever the lowest record among the Chinese is in the five years 1874, 1876, 1880, 1882 and 1885 none. The highest number is in 1881, 38.

For Diarrhoea the lowest record amongst the Chinese is in 1873, 195, the highest record 1878, 701, this year 1885 it is 561 deaths. To these diseases on the Chinese table are added this year cholera 7 deaths and a number of cases registered as vomiting and purging in which death occurred in most cases within 24 hours, 176 deaths.

For Diarrhoea the lowest record among the Europeans was in 1878, 1883, 1885 the same number 9, the highest record was in 1875, 18 deaths.

This year 1885, for the first time in the past thirteen years, deaths from cholera are recorded, numbering 19.

From all these causes the lowest total among Europeans was in 1883, 19 deaths, the highest total was in 1882, 37 deaths. Amongst the Chinese the lowest total from all causes mentioned in these tables was in 1873, 319, the highest, total this year 1885, 1,534.

The greatest number of deaths recorded among the Chinese as from vomiting and purging occurred in July, when 98 died; in August, 56 died, the few remaining cases occurred in June, September, October and November.

The deaths from cholera among the Military were 2 at the end of June, 9 from the 1st to the 16th of July and one in October; the latter had been in Hospital three days for other reasons and on the fourth morning was seized with cholera and died in six hours. All were Europeans.

·

The cause of the outbreak cannot be traced by the Military Authorities. There are some theories about it, but nothing definite is known.

Of the cases that were received into the Civil Hospital, the Europeans were destitute seamen as also was the colored man. The Chinese also were destitutes with the exception of the Lokang. In nearly all these cases the attack began with a preliminary diarrhoea some days before the choleraic symptoms begun.

A curious thing among the Military cases was that the greatest number of deaths from this cause occurred among the temperance men. No deaths from this cause occurred among the Indian portion of the Military Force.

No deaths occurred among the European or Indian portions of the Police Force and only one amongst the Chinese portion of the Force and this man, as I have already stated, was sent into Hospital immediately on his return from the mainland.

No cases occurred in the Gaol, though Chinese were brought in from all parts of the Colony and many destitute European beachcombers also daily.

The cases that did occur registered as cholera or vomiting and purging were widely separated all over the Colony and among the boat population. No particular district was specially attacked. Of course all precautions were taken to disinfect all the places where such cases were recorded as having died.

The only deaths that occurred, except in the case of the Military, were amongst the poorest of the European and Chinese community. No cases occurred among the well to do classes of either portion of the communities.

288

There certainly was nothing epidemic in the character of the disease. All the cases occurred at the time the stone fruit comes into the Colony, none of it being grown here. Mangoes, peaches, plums, laichees, &c., &c., all brought from a distance, all plucked in an unripe condition, a great deal of it sold in an unwholesome condition of unripeness or putrefaction. Then the small number of cases regis- tered compared with the whole community and those only of the poorest class is to be taken into. account and the majority of the Military who died being temperance men. I think this out-break may be attributed to unwholesome fruit more than anything else, which in the case of the Military might have been rendered more innocuous if a small amount of stimulants had been taken.

The largest number of deaths from diarrhoea among the Chinese was in 1878, 701; there was not the slightest suspicion of cholera then. This year the diarrhoea, cholera, and vomiting and purging cases, all included, amounted to 744. The population in 1878 was estimated at 139,144 and in 1885 at 175,995.

Nevertheless, epidemic or not, there is no doubt at all that many cases of diarrhoea have shewn as a very bad type, terminating in a discharge of choleraic character, and so it behoves us to take all the precautions we can to render the City of Victoria and the surrounding villages fitter to resist diseases of this character by better sanitation.

The totals on these Tables show that the Colony has been pretty steadily going from bad to worse as far as the Chinese are concerned.

Since 1873 any number of wells have been closed that, though in the heart of the town, had fair water in them that year. Now year after year more have to be closed showing that the subsoil is steadily being poisoned by sewage. It is very little use the Government laying down proper main drains if proper house drains are not connected with them, and house sewage is allowed to drain into the subsoil. It is not surprising that it takes a good deal of trouble to make Chinese house owners under- stand this, but it is surprising the amount of trouble it takes European house owners to understand it, or if they do, to make them act upon the knowledge.

So we may annually expect worse and worse scares as each summer season approaches, till these matters are remedied. An immense deal of fuss has been made about Quarantine. What we have got to do is to look at home, and not prepare a hotbed for the reception of disease, as a gardener does for mushrooms.

Quarantine has been reduced to three days at this Port, the Military and Naval Authorities object- ing to the Home practice. For myself I consider that it is impossible for Quarantine to be of the slightest service to us, and it cannot in any case be properly enforced. Enforced on the

Enforced on the very strictest principles, it did no good for Mauritius, for an epidemic of cholera carried off a third of the Island. It has not done any good for the Philippines, and if these places, with a Quarantine of 21 days, isolated as they are by wide oceans from the cholera districts of the mainland, derive so little benefit from Quarantine, what good can we expect from it? The only thing we can do is to segregate the patients brought in, and disinfect the vessels.

Quarantine Hospital accommodation is being got ready on Stone Cutters' Island but there is some- thing else that the Government must take into consideration. To be of any use, a Surgeon will have to be provided. Every Medical Officer on the Civil Medical Staff has his hands full and sometimes more than full during the summer or cholera season. Military Surgeons are not always to be had, and no provision is made in case any of the is staff sick. We are all of us in the same boat, and the case of the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital is not an exception to the general rule. As far as the Medical Staff is concerned, no man in the service can relieve one of us and we cannot relieve one another as formerly. The work now being done by each is fully one man's work and at times a little more.

I have the honour to be.

To the Honourable

F. STEWARD, LL.D.,

Acting Colonial Secretary,

&C..

&c..

&c.

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant,

PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon,

POLICE.

I. TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL

during each Month of the Year 1885.

289

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

MONTHS.

TOTAL TOTAL Admissions. Deaths.

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions.

Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Deaths.

Remaining on the 1st Jan.,

1885,

4

3

11

January,

13

25

...

February,

9

2

19

March,

11

14

30

April,

20

14

40

May,

6

13

8

27

June,

20

19

13

52

2

July,

22

19

17

1

58

1

August,

11

23

13

47

September,

9

26

11

1

46

1

October,.

8

25

18

1

51

1

November,

10

17

26

53

December,

12

10

14

36

Total.....

124

208

163

3

495

C: J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

II.-TABLE shening the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in the POLICE FORCE during the Year 1885.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

TOTAL SICKNESS.

TOTAL DEATHS. RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTALITY.

European, Indian.

Chinese.

Total. European. Indian, Chinese. European, Indian.

Chinese.

European. Indian. Chinese.

European. Indian.

Chinese.

115

179

*380 674 124 208 163

3

1

5 107.82 116.20 42.89 2.60

0.55

1.32

* Includes 52 Coolies,

Remaining on

1st Jan., 1885,

January, February, March,

III.-POLICE RETURN of ADMISSIONS to HOSPITAL from each District during the Year 1885.

GOVERNMENT HOUSE

CENTRAL

No. 5

8

"

No. 2

3

No. 1 STONE CUTTERS'

ISLAND.

No. 6

WATER POLICE STATIONS, TSIMSHATSUI,

WHITFIELD.

SHAUKIWAN.

POKFULAM.

ABERDEEN.

STANLET.

No. 7

European.

Indian.

to က

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

4

April,

3

15

May,

4 11

1

June,

12 11

July,...

96

13

August,

4 17

September, 7 16

October,

17

November, December,..

4

નફ

Total,

77 139

39

8 19 6

:

:

:

::::::

YAUMATI,

HUNG HOM.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

2

715

::: HA NINCO LO

2

17 7

::::

::::::

::::::::::

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

Indian.

Chinese.

European.

TOTAL.

Indian.

Chinese.

::::

25

19

30

40

2 27

H

52

58

1

47

46

1 51

1

133 36

1

18 1 S9

4 4 3 1

1

2 1

5

2 12 2 2 18 7 7 9

8 495

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

IV.—TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY of the TROOPS serving in HONGKONG

during the Year 1885.

AVERAGE STRENGTH.

ADMISSIONS INTO HOSPITAL.

DEATHS.

White. Black. Total. White. Black. Total. White. Black.

1,114 173

1,287

987

203

1,190

17

AVERAGE DAILY RATE OF SICKNESS.

RATE OF MORTA- LITY PER 1,000 OF THE STRENGTH.

Total.

White. Black. White. Black.

24

41.70

6.10

15.27 40.46

R. HUNGERFORD, Denuty Surgeon General.

PMO. China Station,

290

V.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Enteric Fever,

Febricula,

Remittent Fever,

39

38

15 23 46 39 116

Intermittent Fever,

33

31 30 94

Beri-Beri.

7

Cholera...

Rheumatism, Acute,.

Do.,

Chronic,

Do.,

Muscular,

Lumbago,

Sciatica,

Syphilis, Primary,—

Hard Chancre...

16

Soft Sores,

18

43

Sloughing Phagedona,

22

26

Secondary,-

Roseola,

7

Local Affections,-

Pharyngitis,

2

21

Laryngitis,

Iritis,

Psoriasis,

Rupia,

Acne,

Periostitis,

Ulcers of Pharynx,

Brought forward,

Tape-worm,

5 Lumbrici,

Dracunculus,

297 187 173 657 12

2

Dysentery,

22

Do.,

Chronic,

8

Hernia, Inguinal,

1

Diarrhoea.

36

21

65

Colic,

Do., Chronic,

Constipation,

Obstruction of Bowels,

Hæmorrhoids,.

Rectal Abscess,

Prolapsus Ani,

Hepatitis,

Abscess of Liver,

1

3

7

15

12:

1

2

1

1

1

1

Congestion of Liver,

Cirrhosis of Liver,.

1 Jaundice,

Enlarged Spleen,

Bright's Disease,

Renal Abscess,

Cystitis,

11

2

28

NN

Total.

-~-⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Europeans.

>>

Coloured,

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Chinese.

i Ni Ni

2

3

13 34

7

Retention of Urine,

1

Gonorrhoea,

46

Do. of Arm,.

Warts,

Do. of Leg,

2

Hoematuria,

Rheumatism,

Balanitis,

Tumour of Face,

2

Rupture of Urethra,

Cancer of Face,

1

2

1

1

Stricture of Urethra,

1

Leprosy,

Scurvy,

13

13

Diabetes,

Scrofula,

1

Phthisis,

13

27

3

Homoptysis,

Anoemia,

11

Anasarca,

Ulcers of Cornea,

Iritis,.

Leucoma,

Hordeolum,

Ascites,

Softening of Brain,.

Hydrocephalus,

Spinal Meningitis,

Alcoholic Paralysis,

Muscular Paralysis of Extremities

Hemiplegia,

2

Apoplexy,

Epilepsy,

1

Sun Stroke,

2

2221N-ANON~

: 0 :

12

1

7

1

Headache,

Vertigo (Aneurism?),

Neuralgia,..

3

4

Delirium Tremens,

Do.

do. of Hand,

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Alcoholism,

13

13

Do.

do.

of Arm,

Imbecility,

1

1

Contracted Fingers,

...

Dementia,

4

Mania,

1

Conjunctivitis,

13

Pterygium,

1

Keratitis,

Abscess,

Herpes Circinatus.. Urticaria,..

Pemphigus, Scabies, Pruritus, Eczema,

Acne, Ulcer, Bunion,

Bubo,

16

10

11 37

Sloughing of Perineum & Nates.

Sinuses of Perineum and Nates,

Sloughing of Scrotum.

Lacerated Wound of Scrotum,. Hydrocele Testis,

Prostatic Abscess,

Orchitis,

Oophoritis,

Menorrhagia,

Dysmenorrhoea,

Ovarian Cyst,

Parturition,

Angular Curvature of Spine,

Necrosis of Lower Jaw,

Do. of Tibia,

Do.

Bursitis,

of Temporal Bone..

Synovitis, Knee,...

Do., Elbow,

Chronic Abscess of Thigh, Diffuse Cellulitis of Leg,

6

1

3

Rupture of Eye-ball,

Valve Disease,-

Aortic,

Mitral,

Palpitation,

Varicose Veins,

Angina Pectoris,

Tussis,

Bronchial Catarrh,

Bronchitis, Acute,

Do.. Chronic, Pneumonia, Acute,

Do.,

1

10

GN: Hi Ni

6

10 H

3

10

1

1 Boils,

2

Burns and Scalds,

2

Debility,

17

Poisoning, Opium,.

1

Do.,

Belladonna..

Do., Alcohol,

36

Do., Lead,

14

Do.,

Datura,

Immersion in Water, Suicidal,

11

Chronic,

Asthma...

Pleurisy,

4

1

Cerumen in Ear,

1

Otitis,

3

Epistaxis,

Gumboil,

4

Parotitis,

2

Laryngitis,

Tonsillitis,

Pharyngitis,

Pharyngeal Ulceration,

1

Gastric Catarrb,

Dyspepsia,

14 8

2 24

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

Carried forward....................

297 187 173 657

12

13

34

32

1 1

2

il

I

12

1

3

2

1

17

1

Privation,

Gangrene of Toes,

...

Inebrietas,

Moribund,

2

2

Observation,

30

26 22

78

Attempted Strangulation, Sui-

1

cidal,

Cut-throat,

do.,

Dog-bite, Snake-bite,

Centipede-bite, Contusions,

Sprain of Ankle, Wounds. Contused,

Do..

Carried forward...........

11

1

18

34

42

62

$3

of Scalp,.

31

41

632 346 413 1391 22

13

26

61

...

TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS and MORTALITY, &c.,-(Continued).

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

Do., do.. of Abdomen,

Compression of Brain,

Concussion of Brain,

Do. of Spine.

Fracture Simple,-

1

3

1

Brought forward..........

632 346 413 1391 22

Wounds, Incised,

3 27

31

Do.,

Lacerated,

5

4

11

Do.,

Gun-shot of Forehead,.

Do..

do. of Popliteal

Space,

Do.,

do.

of Upper Arm,

Do.,

do.

of Abdomen,.

Do.,

do.

of Pelvis...

Do.,

do.

of Sacrum,

Do.,

do.

of Groin,

Do.,

do. of Thigh,

Wounds, Punctured,

Do.,

do.. of Lung,

.:

:

N:

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ 2 Total.

61

ADMISSIONS.

DEATHS.

291

Do.

of Tibia,

Do.

of Femur,

Do.

of Neck of Femur,

Do.

of Ribs,

Do.

of Spine,

Do.

of Skull,

1000

Brought forward..............

Fracture of Metatarsal Bones...

Do. of Fibula,

656 356 461 1476; 27

13 29 69

DISEASES.

Europeans.

Coloured.

Chinese.

Total.

Europeans.

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Coloured.

~~⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Chinese.

Do.

Fracture Compound,-

of Humerus,

Do.

of Skull,

1

Do.

of Radius and Ulna,...

Do.

of Tarsus,

Do.

of Metatarsal Bones....

Do.

of Finger,

Do.

of Femur,

Do. of Tibia,

Dislocation of Clavicle,

Do. of Ulna Carpal end, Old Dislocation of Arm,

Compound Dislocation of As-

tragalus,

1 Compound Dislocation of Ankle,

Do. of Nasal Bones,

1

Do.

of Clavicle,

Do.

of Radius,

Do.

of Radius and Ulna,

Do.

of Humerus,

Carried forward.....

656 356 464 1476 27: 13 29

69

Reduction of Dislocations,--

Clavicle,

Ulna, Carpal end,

Astragalus,

Ankle,

Partial Excision for Necrosis,-

Lower Jaw,

Tibia,.

Amputations Primary,--

Upper Arm,

HN

TOTAL....

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

2 ...

1

1

1

666 359 485 1510 29

13

.76

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

1

Brought forward,.

4 2 10 16

1

1

2

Removal of Bullets,-

From Forehead,

From Abdomen,

From Nates,

Of Needle from Forearm, Hæmorrhoids,

1

1

Incisions for Phimosis,

:00 10

3

5

1 Perineal Section,

1

Paracentesis, Abdominal,

1

1 Ovarian,

Hydrocele Testis.

Fingers,

Leg,

Foot,

Toes,

Penis,.

Removal of Tumours from

.:

1

1

2

Face,

Carried forward,...

1

2 10 16

1

1 2

Obstetric Operations,-

Long and Short Forceps, &c.,

TOTAL..

18

3

20 41

3

3

C. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

Co

VI. TABLE shewing the RATE of MORTALITY in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during the last 10 Years.

Rate to Total Number of Rate to Number of Europeans Rate to Number of Coloured Rate to Number of Chinese

Admissions.

Admitted.

Persons Admitted.

Admitted.

Per cent.

1876,

4.49 1876,

Per cent.

3.42

Per cent.

Per cent.

1876,

3.28

1876,

3.91

+

1877,

5.15 1877,

4.16

1877,

3.25

1877.

8.12

"

1878,

3.88 1878,

3.46 1878,

3.08

1878,

5.76

1879,

5.13 1879,

3.12

1879,

8.39

1879,

4.72

1880,

4.17 1880,

3.73 1880,

2.66

1880,

5.80

1881,

3.96

1881,

3.87 1881.

3.09

1881,

4.80

>

1882.

4.66

1882.

4.35

1882,

4.38

1882,

1883.

4.66 1883,

4.37 1883,

3.01

1883,

5.24 608

*

1884,

3.69

1884,

3.15 1884,

1.24

1884.

6.08

1885,.

5.03

1885,

4.65 1885,

3.06

1885,

7.01

('. J. WHARRY, M.D.,

Superintendent.

:

292

VII.-TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into and DEATHS in the GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL during each Month of the Year 1885.

MONTHS.

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

Remaining on the 1st

Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths. Admissions. Deaths.

January, 1885,

January,

February,

March,

April,.

May, June,. July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,.

TOTAL Admissions.

TOTAL

Deaths.

37

1

8

1

9

54

2

31

1

18

31

80

1

41

4

16

15

34

18

37

42

27

31

52

79

71

57

68

49

68

Sept૭૭૭૭

25

38

38

52

36

41

43

52

35

45

34

1

52

20

39

· — — ∞ HID Q CI HCO OD

72

3

89

8

1

100

3

100

5

142

10

164

*

10

147

152

148

135

3

127

2010100000 LO

5

Total,

666

31

359

11

485

34

1,510

76

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

VIIC.-TABLE of ADMISSIONS INTO and DEATHS in SMALL Pox HOSPITAL, 1885.

DESCRIPTION

No.

SEX.

NATIONALITY. AGE.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

No. OF DAYS IN HOSPITAL.

OF PATIENT.

RESULT.

1

Male

Chinese

29

12th January

15th Feb.

34

Govt. Servant

Recovered.

Do.

German

31

12th

2nd

21

Board of Trade

Do.

>>

Do.

German

30

14th

5th March

50

Private Paying

Do.

Do.

Scotch

21

21st

3rd Feb.

13

Board of Trade

Do.

""

Do.

Norwegian

42

22nd

15th

24

Private Paying

Do.

>>

Do.

English

18

18th February 25th

7

Destitute

Do.

""

Do.

Scotch

42

18th

1st March

11

Do.

Died.

>>

Female

Japanese

20

18th

"

11th April

51

Do.

Recovered.

Male

Scotch

26

8th March

11th

34

Private Paying

Do.

10

Do.

German

19

12th

28th March

16

Do.

Do.

وو

11

Do.

German

24

25th Feb.

15th

18

Do.

Do.

""

12

Do.

Malay

37

20th March

13

Do.

English

50

20th Nov.

12th May 8th Dec.

53

Do.

Do.

18

Board of Trade

Do.

14

Do.

English

42

25th Dec.

31st

Do.

Do.

"

January, February, March, April,.

May, June, July, August,

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Medical Officer in charge.

VIII.-LIST of DEAD BODIES brought by the POLICE to the PUBLIC MORTUARY during each Month of the Year 1885.

MONTHS.

1

1

EUROPEANS.

COLOURED.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Adults.

Children. Adults.

Children. Adults.

Children.

6

9

13 00 00

12

13

18

6

14

22

12

36

12

20

4

13

13

17

1

7

15

1

12

8

نار

4

94

76

184

September,

October,

November,

December,

Total,.

10

L. P. MARQUES, M.K.Q.Q.P.1.

in charge of Medico-legal duties.

.

DEATHS,

IX.—TABLE shewing the ADMISSIONS into HOSPITAL in Victoria GAOL, and MORTALITY, during the Year 1885.

DISEASES.

ADMISSIONS.

293

Euro-

peans.

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. TOTAL.

Euro-

peans:

Coloured Persons.

Chinese. ToTAL.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1885,

Febricula,

I.

Fever,

II.

Fever and Diarrhoea,

Intermittent Fever,

Rheumatism,

Syphilis, (Secondary),

III.

Paralysis,

Conjunctivitis,

Epilepsy,..

Ophthalmia,

IV.

Anæmia,

Cardialgia,

Morbus Cordis,

Palpitation,

V.-VI.

VII.

Bronchitis,

***

Chronic Bronchitis, Pneumonia,

VIII.

Apthæ,

Constipation,

Diarrhoea,.

Dysentery,

Hæmorrhoids,.

Hernia,

Jaundice, Stomatitis, ... Tonsillitis,

IX.-X.

Albuminuria,

Balanatis,

Gonorrhea,

Orchitis,

Stricture,.

Urethritis,

Bubo,

...

7

9

1

1

00 0 — Co

...

1

1

Chancre,

Chancre and Bubo,

Gonorrhoea and Ophthalmia,

Hæmaturia,

Orchitis,

XI.

Periostitis,

XII.

Abscess,

2

1

1

I

4

5

1

1

5

1

...

1

1

1

8

1

11'

20

I

1

1

1

1

Boil, Erysipelas, Ulcer, Unclassed:

Alcoholia,

Debility,

Wounds and Injuries:-

Contusions,

Contused Wound,

Contused Wound, (Flogging), Scald,

Sprain,

Unkown or Unrecognized:-

Observation..

-

5

:

6

:

2

212

212

1

2.

12422 – 10 NON-

2

9.

14

1

2

2

1

1

1

52

52

- NÒ – 11 – 10 Q QI -l a ponent

:

::

28+0

6

:

28

28

6

5

4

14

3

3

31

14

17

TOTAL......

32

221

255

:

7

:

...

:

~

:

294

X.—TABLE shewing the CASES not ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, treated by the COLONIAL SURGEON, during the Year 1885.

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1885,

I.

Fever,

II.

Rheumatism,

Secondary Syphilis,

III.

Epilepsy,

IV.

Anæmia,

Cardialgia,

VIII.

X.

Diarrhoea,

Apthæ,

Bubo,

Gonorrhoea,

XII.

Abscess,...

Dyspepsia,

Unclassed:-

Debility,

Contused Wound (Flogging),

Unknown or Unrecognized:-

Observation,

Europeans.

Coloured Persons.

2

1

2

:

1

1

:

:

:

:

Chinese.

TOTAL.

2

2

1

2

1

*

3

I'

1

5

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1

TOTAL,.........

14

:

:

10

14

1

1.

1

28

42

XI.-TABLE shewing the RATE of SICKNESS and MORTALITY in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1885.

Total No. of Prisoners admitted to Gaol.

Daily Total Average Sick

No. of Prisoners.

Total

Serious

Rate of Sickness.

Rate of Mortality.

Sick, Total Sickness in Trifling Deaths. Hospital. Cases.

to Total.

To Total. To Average. To Total. To Average.

3,610

530

255

42

7.065

8.227

3.185

.554

.377

TABLE XIɑ.—CASES ADMITTED to VICTORIA GAOL HOSPITAL at the First Medical Examination by the COLONIAL SURGEON during the Year 1885.

Number.

SENTENCE.

Years, Mos. Days.

DISEASES.

DATE OF ADMISSION.

DATE OF DISCHARGE.

REMARKS.

295

123 LO

21

Contusion,

6

4

5

Synovitis, Observation, Bubo,

Observation, Alcoholia,

12

15

CO CO 2 10 40

3 Jan.

14 Jan.

3

12

""

""

16

""

""

5 Feb.

16 Feb.

6

On Remand.

""

27

5 March.

On Remand.

7

Wound,

20 March.

23

23

Contusion,

26

1 April.

On Remand.

9

21

Abscess,

3 April.

15

10

14

Bronchitis,.

18

30

""

""

11

7

Sprain,

23

25

"

12

14

Diarrhoea,

9 May.

13

Genorrhoea,

19 June.

22 May. 27 June.

14

Debility,

22

15

Scald,

23

""

16

42

Contusion,

23

23

""

6 Aug.

29 June.

On Remand.

17

21

Abscess,

29

>>

18

14

Debility,

4 July.

3 July. 10 ""

19

42

Gonorrhoea,

4 Aug.

14 Aug.

On Remand.

20

Cystitis,

by

10

""

21

Alcoholia,

11

دو

وو

17

22

21

Debility,

11

23

4

Debility,

14

18 17

Sent to Tung Wa Hospital.

24

14

Gonorrhoea,.

22

29

"

""

25

42

Debility,

17 Sep.

21 Sep.

26

1

Debility,

18

27

Gonorrhoea,.

26

وو

28

42

Diarrhoea,

29

28

30

5 Oct.

35

""

29

7

Debility,

8 Oct.

14

""

30

28

Debility,

9

16

""

""

31

Ulcers,

12

17

On Remand.

""

32

Alcoholia,

14

16

A

""

33

Jaundice,.

20

24.

On Remand.

"

34

6

Debility,

2 Nov.

9 Nov.

35

Observation,

2

J

36

3

Ulcer,

14

16

46

4.

On Remand.

وو

嘭嘭

"3

37

3

Gonorrhoea,

16

24

""

38

1

Debility,

16

28

""

39

14

Debility,

16

24

وو

""

40

14

Sprain,

23

""

41

14

Sprain,

23

42

Gonorrhoea,

26

43

42

Debility,

8 Dec.

CR :

10 10 10

5 Dec.

5

5

On Remand.

دو

44

Debility,

9

45

Observation,

14

15

وو

296

XIb. TABLE shewing the WEIGHTS of PRISONERS (OPIUM SMOKERS) for the First Four Weeks' Confinement

in VICTORIA GAOL during the Year 1885.

No.

NUMBER OF

SMOKER.

AGE. YEARS OPIUM

CONSUMPTION PER DIEM.

WEIGHT WHEN ADMITTED.

WEIGHT FIRST FOUR WEEKS.

REMARKS,

<123 + 10 30 1 00✪

39

30

828785

10 Years.

3 Mace.

94

Ibs.

91

94

95 951

22

4

1

119

112 1121

114

114

3

1

108

109 110

112

114

"2

2

117

116

116

117

117

6 Months.

101

99

100.

106

106

"

20

Years.

103

98

101

102

102

93

10

97

95

95

Paid his Fine.

"

#1

6

110

107

106

110

114

31

10

100

99

101.

101

>>

??

10

34

3

113

111

112.

114

116

"

17

11

63

20

83

781

82

83

85

11

"

12

50

20

125

124

127

130

131

13

34

10

118

112

114

115

"

14

34

10

118

116

117 118

"

15

31

1

108

109 109

110.

16

37

118

116 116

116

116

"

17

24

122

》ཏྟཱ།

9

9

122 119

122

122

18

32

12

101

101

102

106.

106

"

::

19

27

3

120

"

118

119

121

::

20

36

2

90

91

91

92..

94

"

19

"

21

62

30

116

117

116

117

**

"}

22

30

3

94

:3

921

92

93

19

23

38

12

105

101

104

104

104

""

"

24

46

30

108

108

109

112

112

"

19

"

25 56

36

115

116

117

117

117

>>

*

13

26

36

4

120

120

121

122

27

37

3

1

105

105

108

110

1

27

28

27

4

1

94

90

91

93

11

29

20

6

Months.

3

82

82

83

82

82

30

27

Years.

103

109

108

109

31

50

107

106

106

104

106

**

32

40

91

92

93

93

93

>>

33

31

11

110

110

112

114.

117

"

34

26

1

105

104

105

108

107

>>

35

34

3

113

112 1.12. 114

116

"

36

37

10

101

102 102

98

.98

**

"

37

31

1

108

109 109

1091

38

50

20

125

121 127

.

130

130

39

42

18

93

96

96.

96

96

>>

92

40

32

10

94

90

3

17

92

93

93

41

29

10

100

96

Paid his Fine.

ลง

#+

1

42

18

1

85

86

87

87.

87

17

>>

43

28

98

103

""

**

103

105

110

44 30

10

99

97 106

109

109

>>

45

41

12

107

"

99 100

106

107

46

43

20

105

Paid his Fine.

13

""

*

47

26

4

114

114

})

>>

29

113 113

113

48

28

119

119

JJ

"}

"

116 114

114

49

31

97

96

97

97

21

;>

50

25

94

99

92

100.

?>

51

24

96

95

98

95

95

"

52

40

91

91

93

94.

95

53

32

98

94

96

96

96

"1

"

54 32

80

80

80

SO

81

91

13

55 48

7

88

9.0

.91

93

93

11

};

>>

56

28

10

115

112

"1

2.

*

113 113.

113

57

32

10

99

98 100 101

101

1

"

58

32

100

>>

22

»

98 100

59

10

100

103

106

Paid his Fine. Paid his Fine.

"

60

27

111

114

112 113

113

"

61

35

89

>>

15

$9 91

94

96

62

36

129

125

120

122

119

19

"

63

32

98

98

100 100

98

""

92

64 32

11

117

117

117

117

116

**

>>

65

70

52

99

100

105 105

105

*9

"

66

32

12

102

99

102 102

104

፡፡

"

:)

67

35

100

99

102

102

102

"

"

68

47

10

120

100

103 102

*

69

56

24

86

86

88

88

$8

""

**

"

70

29

4

105

99

99

99

100

J1

"

71

40

20

110

117

116 116

118

*

72

63

10

98

102

103 103

102

>>

"

73

48

1

119

122 124

124

124

74

25

1

113

108 112 112

111

;}

75

27

1

134

133 135 112

111

A

#

76

24

107

105

107

112

111

33

3

77 40 20

95

91

89

92

94

37

78

36

111

108

108

107

110

29

79

31

4

102

100

100 100

101

"

SO

70

40

90

93

92

92

94

"

3:

Y

f

XIC.-TABLE shewing OPIUM SMOKERS ADMITTED to HOSPITAL, and treated by the COLONIAL SURGEON during the Year 1885.

297

DISEASES.

Remaining under treatment 1st January, 1885,

Gonorrhoea, No. 35,

Bubo,

2,

وو

Debility,

Scald,

52, 57, 58, 65, 67, 72, 80,

>>

3S,

Sprain,

75, 76,

39

TOTAL,

Europeans.

Coloured Fersons.

Chinese.

Total.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

I

I

7

7

1

1

2

19

12

12

XId.—TABLE shewing the NUMBER and DESCRIPTION of PATIENTS treated in the GOVERNMENT LUNATIC ASYLUM during the Year 1885.

No.

Native of

Sex. Age.

Diseases.

Date of Admission.

Date of Discharge.

No..of Days in Asylum.

Description of Patients.

1 India,

M. 25

Dementia,

1st Jan.

9th Sept.

251

Destitute.

31 40 H 10 10 1-

2

India,.

M.

30

Dementia,

17th Jan.

17

*

3

Scotland,

M. 33

Amentia,

3rd

17th Feb.

46

::

Private Paying.

England,

M.

25

Observation, ....

3rd

Sth Jan.

5

China,

M.

26

Dementia,

11th Feb.

5th Mar.

22

Destitute.

6

Britain,

M.

30

Dementia,

Bagdad,

M. 50

Dementia,

Mauritian,.

M.

26

Mania,

England,

M. 30

Monomania,

10

England,

F.

14

Dementia,

11th 29th Mar. 19th 24th

8th June

19th Mar.

31

:

278

"J

#

11th May

54

13th April

19

4th July

26

11

Germany,

F.

23

Dementia,

15th Sept.

108

12

Portugal,

F.

70

Depsomanice,

11th Oct.

19th Oct.

S

Private Paying.

Destitute.

13

Austria,

M.

42

Depsomanice,

14

Hongkong,

M. 24

Idiotcy,

15

China,

R.

16

Idiotcy.

16

France,

M.

21

Acute Mania,

31st 11th 16th Nov. 10th Dec.

15th Dec.

45

29

82

"

31st Dec.

46

31st Dec.

22

Private Paying.

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec., 1885.

XII. TABLE of STATISTICS relating to the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

Admitted during the year 1885.

No. of Cases Treated in the Hospital, 1885.

No. of Patients Discharged during the year 1885.

Died during 1885.

No. of Out-Patients Treated during 1885.

Moribund Cases,

1885.

Remaining in Hospital 31st Dec.,

1885.

Males.

87 12 99 1,605

278 1,883 1,679 288 1,967 766 96862 826

180 1,006 88,963 | 22,915 111,878

205

78

283 ❘ 87

XIII.-CASES of SMALL POX treated at the TUNG WA HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

Remaining in Hospital Admitted during 1885.

31st December, 1884.

Discharged.

Died.

Females.

Total.

12 99

Remaining in Hospital 31st December, 1885.

Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total. Male. Female. Total.

32

36

19

2

21

14

18

XIV.—VACCINATIONS performed during the Year 1885 by TRAVELLING VACCINATORS of the TUNG Wa Hospital.

In the City of Victoria.

1,951

In Out-Districts.

169

Total.

2,120

298

XV.-LOCK HOSPITAL.

TABLE A

SHEWING the ADMISSIONS into the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the 28 Years of its Existence, with the Number of DIETS issued and the AVERAGE LENGTH of TREATMENT.

ADMISSIONS.

NUMBER OF DIETS ISSUED.

AVERAGE NUMBER OF DAYS TREATED.

1858,

124

1858,

4,797

1858,

43.8

1859,

162

1859,

5,389 1859,

30.8

1860,

361

1860,

9,107

1860,.

23.7

1861,

442

1861.

10,778 1861,

23.4

1862,

485

1862,

12,193 1862.

22.0

1863.

420

1863,

11,707 1863,

23.7

1864,

442

1864,.

11,940

1864,.

27.0

1865,

390 1865,

11,303

1865

28.0

1866,

406

1866.

13,060

1866,

28.6

1867, .....

434 1867

13,120

1867.

25.5

1868,

579

1868.

16,462

1868,

23.6

24.8

1869,

546

1869,

16,799

1869,

1870.

722

1870,

18,382

1870,

23.1

1871,

593

1871,

12,308

1871,.

18.5

1872,

656

1872,

15,103

1872,

20.9

1873,

500

1873,

11,219

1873,

19.5

1874,

345

1874,

6,814

1874,

18.6

18.7

1875,

134

1875,

2,916

1875,

1876,

168

1876,

2,780

1876,

14.3

1877,

177

1877,

3,069

1877,

16.6

1878,

105

1878,.

2,242

1878,

19.0

1879,

129

1879,

2,199

1879,

13.6

1880,

57

1880,

1,300

1880,

14.7

1881,

44

1881,

1,330

1881.

21.7

1882,

99

1882.

1,831 1882,

15.5

1883,

273

1883.

3,451

1883,

12.0

13.1

1884,

325

1884,.

5,174 1884,

1885,

411

1885,.

6,161

1885,

15.6

TABLE B.

Daily Average, 17. Longest day, 100.

KETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 10 during the Year 1885.

Number admitted

1

Number of Beds in

into Hospital

on 'ertificates of

Lock Hospital.

Visiting Surgeon.

Number who submitted voluntarily.

32

411

272

Number against whom it was necessary to proceed by Information before the Registrar General.

107

Total Number brought under

the Provisions of the Ordinance.

379

Total Number of

Examinations! made during the Year.

13,532

Total Number of Examinations made when no Disease was found.

13,121

Total Number Discharged

from Hospital.

416

TABLE C.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1885.

Total No. of Females

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEN DISEASED ADMITTED INTO

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEN IN GARRISON AND PORT (per Month).

admitted

into Lock Military Naval Police Civil

Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital. Hospital.

Total No. of Men Diseased.

Average No. of Men in

of Men Mer- Garrison

Diseased Soldiers. Seamen. Police. chant and Port

Seamen. (per month), (per month).

Average Percentage

REMARKS.

411

162

200

27

130

519

1,286

1,101 674

14,688 17,744

0.24

TABLE D.

RETURN OF WOMEN examined and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

26

13,532

411

13,121

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated, Gonorrhoea,

do.,

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Secondary Syphilis,

TOTAL,.........

TABLE D 2.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1884..

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Cured.

No. remaining in

Hospital, 31st December, 1885.

47

52

51

1

245

252

113

119

242 119

10

6

18

411

429

416

13

Shewing the Number of UNLICENSED PROSTITUTES apprehended under Ordinance No. 10 of 1867, during the Year 1885.

In Houses,

No. OF WOMEN.

185

CONVICTED.

DISCHARGED.

155

30

FOUND DISEASED.

44

TABLE E.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES RETURN for the Year 1885.

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated,

Gonorrhoea, uncomplicated,

Do., and Primary Syphilis, combined, Primary and Secondary Syphilis, combined,

Gonorrhoea and

do.,

do.,

Primary and Secondary Syphilis and Gonorrhoea,

Gleet,

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July,

August,

September,

October,

November,

December,..

January, February, March, April, May, June,.. July,

....

Military Hospital.

Naval Hospital.

Police Hospital.

Civil Hospital.

** |

23

57

4

93

18

61

120

14

11

13

12

26

R5418:

25

3

TOTAL,..

..1885,.

145

200

27

130

TOTAL,...

.1884,.

159

149

41

94

TOTAL,...

.1883,.......

153

225

42

98

TABLE E 2.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

TABLE shewing the number of NAVAL MEN admitted into NAVAL HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Months.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted

Total.

elsewhere.

1

1

1

1

...

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

1

2

3

...

Total Number,........

TABLE E 3.

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ORDINANCE.

12

TABLE shewing the number of MILITARY MEN admitted into MILITARY HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

Months.

SECONDARY SYPHILIS.

Contracted in Hongkong.

Contracted elsewhere.

Total.

August,.

September,

October,

November,

December,

3

1

1

1

..

2

1

3

2

1

1

1

1

3

299

Total Number,.....

14

XVI.—TABLE shewing the rate of MORTALITY among the FOREIGN RESIDENTS in Hongkong during the last 10 Years.

Percentage of Deaths to

Number of European and

Years.

Deaths.

American Residents.

Number of Residents.

1876,

2,520

74

2.93

1877,

2,767

84

3.03

1878,

2,767

67

2.42

1879,

2,767

55

1.98

1880,

2,767

69

2.49

1881,

3,040

64

2.10

1882,

3,040

55

1.80

1883,

3,040

81

2.06

1884.

3,040

94

3.09

1885,

3,040

99

3.25

Average of 10 Years......

2,878.8

7.42

2.515

300

Enclosure 1.

Report from the Superintendent of the Civil Hospital.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 21st March, 1886.

SIR, I have the honour to forward Statistical tables for 1885, with a report on the working of the Hospital during the past year.

2. I was absent for five months on sick leave, which will account for sundry deficiencies in the report.

3. Surgeon J. R. DonD of the Army Medical Staff was in charge of the Hospital from 28th April to 31st July, when he was ordered home. Dr. PIKE, A.M.S. then took charge, and when Dr. PIKE went on leave, September 20th, Dr. THOMPSON, A.M.S. relieved him.

4. All three surgeons found that they required regular assistance in carrying on the Hospital duties, and Dr. MARQUES was good enough to share the work with them.

5. The Colony was fortunate in obtaining the services of the Army Surgeons.

6. It is evident, however, that the Colonial Medical Staff is insufficient, since outside help must be sought whenever one of the Colonial Surgeons falls sick.

7. It has happened before now that the Navy and Army were shorthanded when applied to for assistance, and no private practitioner was available to stop a gap in the Civil service, and this may easily happen again.

8. The policy of trusting to chance for the maintenance of the Medical Staff is unsatisfactory in many ways, and it is by no means economical.

9. It is well known in the Audit Office that the Hospital expenses are considerably increased when the Establishment is temporarily placed in charge of a medical officer unconnected with the service, and it is probable that the Colony would actually save money by placing a second medical officer permanently on the Hospital Staff.

10. This is altogether apart from the question of the efficiency of the Hospital service, and the consideration whether the Establishment is doing the maximum of good in the Colony, or only a

minimum.

11. At present its usefulness is very much restricted, because there is only one medical officer to do all the work, and with the best intentions one man cannot possibly accomplish all the Hospital work of a Colony like Hongkong.

12. Governor HENNESSY understood this, and appointed a second surgeon to the Hospital in 1880, but in 1883 Governor BowEN removed him, and since then the patients have had to be content with what I could do for them unaided.

13. If I happen to be out when an urgent case is brought to the Hospital, Dr. AYRES or Dr. MARQUES is sent for, and if neither can be found, the sick man must take his chance.

14. To give an idea of the position occupied in the Colony by the Civil Hospital I may enumerate the different classes of patients received.

1. Police: Europeans, Indians and Chinese: and police servants.

1a. Civil Servants and their families.

2. Officers and seamen of all nationalities from the Merchant shipping.

3. Officers and seamen from foreign Ships of War.

4. Employés, mostly European, of the Chinese Customs and Revenue services.

5.

Private Residents in Hongkong, and visitors passing through.

6. Destitute sick of all nationalities.

7. Police cases: assaults, accidents and poisonings, &c.

8. Parturient women (Chinese.)

15. The Police Force consists of 614 men: 111 Europeans, 178 Indians, and 325 Chinese: (some of them with wives and families): and there are 52 station servants.

16. The Crews of the Chinese Junks which entered the Port in 1884 numbered 290,846 and those of other vessels, British and foreign 140,583.

17. The Chinese passengers brought into the Port numbered 649,231: the European and coloured passengers are not recorded.

Y

301

18. The Civil population of the Colony amounts to 3,000 white, 1,000 coloured, and 150,000 Chinese.

19. The Tung Wa Hospital ought to attend to the wants of most of these hundreds of thousands, as it was established for the relief of sick Chinese, especially destitutes, but it is little more than a poor house of limited dimensions, into which the sick poor are by no means readily admitted.

20. The Tung Wa authorities decline to receive persons suffering from leprosy, venereal disease, any disease which they think is incurable, and any case in which they suspect the person to be addicted to opium.

21. All these they refuse to treat, and others they send away because they are unable to deal with them, having no surgical knowledge.

22. Only the other day, a Chinese Seaman was taken there with his lower jaw smashed, and refused admittance.

23. In fact the Establishment is an anachronism, and it is difficult to understand how, in a British Colony, a Hospital can continue to exist in which the physicians and surgeons know nothing of anatomy, physiology, chemistry, surgery, medicine or midwifery.

24. Such an institution, partly established, maintained and controlled by the Government, must exercise great influence in the Colony, and be a considerable bar to the enlightenment of the Chinese

mind.

25. I understand that a certain amount of vaccination is performed in the Tung Wa Hospital, and that a few persons, who would otherwise die in the Street, find there a shelter in their last moments.

26. Beyond this all the regular Hospital work of the Colony falls upon the Civil Hospital.

27. In the beginning of 1885 the Civil Hospital work was carried on in the old Lock Hospital, then in course of reconstruction, and in the female Lock Hospital, while the Medical officer in charge was lodged some distance off in Richmond Terrace.

28. The Hospital is still housed in the same two buildings, but a commodious four-roomed residence adjoining, has been built for, and is now occupied by the Superintendent.

29. The conversion of the old Lock Hospital into a portion of the New Civil Hospital is now completed, and the reconstructed block contains :--

Four general wards holding,

Four small private rooms for men,

One women's ward,

.48 patients.

4

6

;)

Two small private rooms for women,

2

>>

Y

on the ground floor are the waiting room, Colonial Surgeon's Office, Superintendent's Office, Apothe- cary's quarters, Dispensary and drug store, Stewards' quarters, and store rooms, and ward masters' quarters, and the basement also is used for stores.

30. This comprises about two thirds of the accommodation required by the Civil Hospital, and there still remain to be built wards for about 35 patients, quarters for the Chinese attendants, coolies, &c., 30 in number, a laboratory for chemical manipulations, and a laundry.

31. In the meantime the Female Lock Hospital is used for these purposes as far as possible, the Lock Hospital Staff and patients being housed in some private residences hired for them.

32. The rent of these private houses is $1,080 a year, which will be saved to the Treasury when the Civil Hospital is completed and the Lock Hospital returned to its proper occupants.

33. The construction of the New Civil Hospital as far as it has proceeded is open to adverse criticism.

34. It has a number of the faults to be expected in old buildings adapted to Hospital use, but for some of its defects there is no excuse.

35. The latrines and lavatories are entirely new from roof to basement, and while it would have been so easy to arrange them well, considerable ingenuity seems to have been expended in making them as defective as possible.

36. There is moreover no hot water laid on anywhere, and when the top floor is occupied by 32 patients, the labour of carrying up hot water for baths and dressings is a very heavy addition to the proper duties of the nurses.

37. In these days when mechanical appliances for saving labour are carried to perfection, and when their value in Hospitals is especially recognized, the almost entire absence of them in the New Civil Hospital is remarkable.

38. It is to be hoped that the rest of the Civil Hospital will be built with more regard to the teaching of experience, and the recognized principles of hospital construction.

302.

39. Mr. ROGERS the Steward and storekeeper has proved himself a valuable assistant, and of his vigilant unremitting industry I cannot speak too highly. I regret that his health has suffered some- what of late.

40. Mr. WATSON the European wardmaster has taken considerable pains to learn his duties, and he is now exceedingly useful. His position is a trying one and his work very harassing.

41. The appointment of a second European on the nursing staff has been sanctioned temporarily, and I trust it will be made permanent.

42. There will then be two Europeans to supervise the Chinese nurses, each taking twelve hours duty out every twenty four.

43. Hitherto the patients have been a good deal left to the sole care of Chinese attendants, as Mr. WATSON could not always be on duty.

44. The principal Chinese dresser combines with his duty at the Civil Hospital the work of dissecting dead bodies at the Public Mortuary, for Dr. MARQUES, who is in charge of Medico-legal duties. This is a very objectionable combination, and one fraught with great danger to the wounded men in Hospital. It is also inconvenient, as the man's presence is sometimes urgently required at the Mortuary, when he cannot be spared in the Hospital, and the Coroner has to wait.

45. Some trouble having been experienced latterly with the clerical work, the clerk last appointed has been placed under the direction of the Steward, who will supervise his doings.

46. The changes in the Chinese nurses and coolies have not been more numerous than usual.

47. I anticipate that when they are properly housed, with facilities for keeping themselves and

their clothing clean, changes will be less frequent.

48. The maximum number of beds in the Hospital is 98, including 9 for women.

49. The Hospital register contains 1,569 cases, of which 59 were not admitted.

The latter comprising surgical injuries of different kinds and various degrees of severity, were treated in the surgery and dismissed. A number of others were attended to of whom no record was kept.

50. The remaining 1,510 treated in Hospital included 50 who remained at the end of 1884; of this number 495 were Police, and the remaining 1,015 consisted of officers and seamen from merchant ships of all nations, and from foreign ships of war, private residents, destitutes, prisoners, and members of the Chinese Customs and Revenue services.

51. The Police admissions were nine more than in 1884: 37 more Europeans were admitted, but 16 fewer Indians, and 12 fewer Chinese.

52. Table III shows the numbers from each station.

53. Whitfield Station is still conspicuous for the number and severity of its cases of Malarial fever. The foul swampy ground and the number of squatters in this neighbourhood render it very unwhole-

some.

54. The Police suffered principally from malarial diseases, fevers and bowel complaints, bronchial affections and surgical injuries.

55. The total number of days spent in Hospital in 1885 by members of the Force was 4,574: in 1884 it was 5,157: about half as many more days were spent off duty on sick leave.

56. Hence it appears that the average health of the Police was better in 1885 than in the two preceding years.

57. Still further improvement may be looked for when the Public Works' Department are able to take some of the old stations in hand.

58. Several Invalids from the French naval and military forces were sent to the Civil Hospital in the beginning of the year, and the question was raised whether relieving a belligerent force of the care of its sick was a breach of neutrality. The Secretary of State decided that it was not.

59. Table V shows the varieties of disease among the patients generally, with the mortality from each.

60. Malarial diseases, fevers and bowel complaints, are prominent in the list, and though not many were fatal, in a large number of cases there ensued severe anæmia and serious deterioration of health.

61. A number of cases were complicated with paralysis of the extremities, from which recovery was slow, and not always complete when the patients were discharged.

62. Some of these cases appear to have been registered as Beri-beri: the majority of them came from the water Police.

63. Nine cases of cholera were recorded, of which six were fatal.

64. It is reasonable to expect that the Colony will every year become more liable to an epidemic of cholera, while so little control is exercised over the construction of Chinese houses.

65. A more plentiful supply of water may do something to retard the evil day, but nothing short

fa general conflagration in China town is likely to avert it.

1

Y

303

66. Seven Chinese women in labour were brought to the Hospital for assistance: they had all been in labour for several days and required instrumental aid. Three of them died.

67. Some of these cases are hopeless when they arrive, from having delayed too long, and there is, moreover, considerable risk to the patients in treating such cases in a General Hospital. Their only alternative however is to remain at home in the hands of their wise women, which means certain death to them and their offspring.

68. The Tung Wa Hospital might be expected to render assistance in such cases but the so-called doctors there know no more than the sages-femmes.

69. Thirteen seamen were treated for scurvy; some of them being severely affected. They were mostly from American ships which had made a long passage round the Horn. Eleven cases were

admitted in 1884.

70. Thirty-seven patients were admitted with abscesses in various parts of the body. 71. Thirty-two cases of debility were received in which no special symptoms were observed. 72. Seventeen admissions were set down to privation as the exciting cause of the mischief present. 73. Twenty-five cases of alcoholism and alcoholic poisoning were recorded and six of delirium

tremens.

74. In the present Hospital buildings, permanent and temporary, there is no accommodation for these cases, and not only do they disturb the other patients, but there is always a risk of their breaking away from their attendants and throwing themselves over the verandahs.

75. Cardiac, bronchial, and pulmonary complaints contributed their usual percentage.

76. Among the last was an interesting case of quinine blindness. The chief engineer of a steamer lying at Shanghai fell into the water (temperature of air below 32° F.), and had an attack of

pneumo- nia. His fever was treated on board with large doses of quinine and he became deaf for a short time; his hearing then returned and he suddenly lost his sight entirely. His pneumonia passed away and he made a good recovery, but there was little change in his eyes up to the time of his leaving for England, eighteen days after his admission to Hospital.

77. The usual quota of hepatic affections underwent treatment.

78. The poisoning cases comprised 4 of opium, 1 of Belladonna, 1 of lead, and 3 of datura. All recovered except the Belladonna case.

79. Dogbites were numerous, no fewer than 11 persons bitten were treated in Hospital, and others had their wounds dressed in the surgery.

80. Wounds of all kinds and fractures figure largely in the list as usual.

81. Seventy-six deaths occurred in Hospital during the year. Some of the hopeless cases among

the Chinese are removed by relatives to die at home.

82. The receipts from patients in 1885 amounted to $6,653.74: of this $1,618.50 was derived from the Board of Trade, and $690.87 from the Police.

.

83. In 1884 the receipts were $7,144.45: of which $1,675.75 was from the Board of Trade, and $837.42 from the Police.

84. The visitation of the Hospital by Justices of the Peace, in abeyance for some years past, was resumed in June, 1885.

85. It is a great advantage to the Staff to know that some interest is taken in their work and the Buildings are now kept in a much better state of repair.

86. The washing of the bedding and clothing formerly done at the Gaol is now done at the Steam- Laundry, with much better results.

87. When the remainder of the Hospital is built, it will perhaps contain a disinfecting chamber; nothing of the sort exists at present.

88. It is sufficiently obvious that the foregoing report is almost entirely administrative, the merest glimpse being given of the Medical work of the Establishment.

89. The 1,510 patients treated in Hospital necessarily included many cases, medical and surgical, well worthy of the most careful observation and record.

90. With only one medical officer, however for day and night duty, Sunday and week day, all the year round, nothing more can be attempted than the diagnosis and treatment of disease, and the absence of any conspicuous failure is very satisfactory.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,

Your most obedient Servant.

C. J. WHARRY, M.D., Superintendent.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES,

Colonial Surgeon.

:

304

Enclosure 2.

Report on the Lock Hospital.

GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 17th January, 1886.

SIR,-I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the work done under the Contagious Diseases Ordinances in 1885.

2. During the past year, 417 examinations were made at Wántsai, and 12,561 at this hospital; and 411 women were detained for treatment.

3. The cases most commonly met were leucorrhoea, ulceration and abrasion of the os uteri; next in frequency were gonorrhoea and soft sores; and lastly, a few cases of secondary syphilis, and one of hard chancre.

4. The following are the maximum and the minimum number of registered women examined at this Establishment and at Wántsai for the last three years:

1883,. 1884,

.256 in October; 235 in

February,

.261 in November; 227

in

in

in

August. December.

1885,

.265 in April; 233

5. Compared with 1884, there were more admissions this year, as shown in the subjoined table:

Number of examinations.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sores.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard (Chancre

And Cutane-

ous

Erup- tion.

Secondary.

Labial Abscess.

Ulceration & abrasion

of os Uteri.

Warts.

women admitted. No. of registered

Free from disease.

1884.

12,522

100

72 65

1

1

4

41

2

286 12,236

1885.

12,454

67 168

38

0

1

93 40* 867 12,087

* These were all extirpated, and the women were not detained.

6. The increase, however, was not of a serious character; on the contrary there have been less gonorrhoea and soft sores, and a diminution of complaints.

7. A good many cases of warts were observed, and all were extirpated immediately without necessitating the confinement in the hospital of the women so affected.

8. The disproportion in the number of those alleged to have conveyed infection and in those found actually to be diseased, is again very striking (as shown in Table I), and well worthy of consideration.

9. Excluding, as in the previous report, all the less serious cases such as gonorrhoea, under which is included also simple urethritis, which after all cannot be taken as a sure criterion of the amount of disease existing in a place, as it is often caused more by men's own fault, and reckoning only soft sores and syphilis, as is done in Table II, we arrive at this result; of the 37 women accused, 8 were found to be diseased.

10. It is obvious that the majority of the men did not keep company with those who were under medical inspection.

11. An instance corroborating this assertion occurred last August to a sailor from one of Her Majesty's Ships, who was infected in a registered brothel, but, on investigation, it was proved that he got the disease from a woman who was a stranger there, and had no right to frequent the house. For this reason, the mistress of the brothel was prosecuted and punished by a fine.

12. The amount of venereal disease in a Colony like Hongkong with a large but variable floating

population, composed of people from different parts of the world, must necessarily vary.

13. I have heard of men, who although they were diseased, did not hesitate to frequent brothels. 14. It would conduce to the better preservation of the public health, if it were widely known that by Ordinance 10 of 1867, a heavy penalty may be inflicted by the Magistrate on men who behave in such a disgraceful manner.

15. The Officers of Her Majesty's Navy, of the French and, I believe, of all other foreign men-of- war, have been unremitting in helping to check the spread of disease. Their crews are regularly inspected by the Surgeons, previously to leave being granted to them to come on shore.

16. I regret that their praise-worthy efforts were not fully rewarded by having none of the Sailors diseased.

17. I do not see why, with the assistance of the various authorities, and with hygienic laws better understood and practised by the women, disease should not be reduced to a mere fraction.

18. Some of the women presented themselves at the hospital of their own free will, the moment they perceived they were infected.

19. Soon after I took charge of this Establishment, it became manifest to me, as it must have been to all physicians, that the adoption of the same form of the return as is in use in the army and navy, leads to omissions, inaccuracy, and confusion.

Y

{

Y

*

305

20. As the maladies in the two sexes are not invariably identical it follows that, in view of insuring uniformity in the returns, it is necessary to call things by their wrong names.

In the old form, no distinction is drawn between hunterian chancre, chancroid, ulceration and abrasion of the os uteri. All these cases were put down as "primary syphilis"; and leucorrhoea invariably as gonorrhoea. If a woman happens to be suffering from leucorrhoea and abrasion of the os uteri, this is classified as gonorrhea and primary syphilis combined.

21. In the face of all these shortcomings, and in consequence of the alterations in the examination days, I proposed a new form of return (form D) which would show in a few columns the daily and monthly number of the women examined, and those that are detained or discharged from the hospital, and the nature of their disease.

Two other similar returns (G. & F.) were proposed for the women from unregistered brothels, and for those examined weekly at Wántsai.

I thought that it would be equally advantageous to have a special return (form E) for recording the complaints against the registered women.

22. As we are not authorized to dispense altogether with the old style of classification, the columns of the forms A and C have been filled up accordingly by the Apothecary of this hospital, Mr. De Souza, to whom this task has always been entrusted.

23. For daily admissions and other purposes, there is no other alternative but to use the new forms.

The old one, C, as you are aware, is almost invariably misleading.

24. From the Registrar General's Department 107 women charged with carrying on clandestine prostitution were sent here for examination.

This testifies to the continued activity on the part of the Inspectors. Disease in its various stages and complications was detected in 44 of those women, and on this account they had generally to be kept longer in the hospital than the other patients.

25. Notwithstanding that they were fed and treated gratis, they did not appear to be thankful for it. One of them was induced by a male friend, who made signs to her from outside, to run away, just when she was on the point of being cured. Many of them, on being discharge, change their residence, and continue pursuing their old and dangerous career, until convicted again.

26. The necessity of controlling prostitution is forcibly seen in the women who lead this kind of life. To imagine that by ignoring this evil in large cities it will cease to exist, is to allow the dissemination of a worse one, and to entertain an error which has been confuted in all ages and in every country. The fact of the non-enforcement of the law has no deterrent effect on the bulk of men, nor does it keep them away from brothels.

It is generally the stranger, the inexperienced, and those with their reason temporarily disturbed by alcohol, who suffer by it, by becoming often invalided for life, and a burden to others. And if they do get married, they have an enfeebled and sickly offspring.

27. I understand that the Chinese in this Colony recognise the benefit derived from the Ordinance. The particular care with which the brothels for the well-to-do class are looked after, renders inspection amongst them not so pressing. But it is notorious that venereal diseases prevail to a frightful extent amongst the lower section of prostitutes.

28. Till lately, European patients were absolutely free from any charge whatever; but this anomaly has been done away with. They and the Japanese will now have to pay 25 cents daily, and the rate for the Chinese has been raised from 10 to 12 cents.

29. Medicines are also dispensed to them for various other ailments, when applied for. So that if the Government, to curtail the expenses incurred in enforcing the observance of this branch of Sanitary Science, were to make every registered woman pay one dollar monthly, as is done in Singa- pore, instead of charging four dollars for each house, no objection, I think, is to be apprehended from the change.

30. Some Justices of the Peace recommended in the Visiting Book, what I suggested some time ago, the employment and payment of those patients who are willing to do needle work required for this Establishment, instead of ordering it from outside. The Matron is ready to teach them. In this way, their time will pass agreeably and profitably.

31. The longest period of detention was 100 days; the shortest period 1 day, in two cases of leucorrhoea. The highest number of patients admitted on any single day, was 6; the lowest number 1. The greatest number treated in one day amounted to 32, the smallest to 5. There were remaining on the last day of December 1884, 18; and in 1885, 13 patients.

32. It is gratifying to be able once more to record no death. One patient who had contracted variola had to be removed to the other hospital, and she eventually made a good recovery.

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Dr. Pn. B. C. AYRES.

Colonial Surgeon.

Your most obedient Servant,

L. P. MARQUES.... Medical Officer in charge of the Hospital,

Secondary.

Ulceration & Abra- sion of os Uteri.

Total Discharged.

Remaining in Hospital.

D. RETURN showing the NUMBER of TIMES in which WOMEN were examined and treated in the Lock HOSPITAL during the Year 1885.

FOUND DISEASED.

Discharged Cured,

Number

1885.

of

Examin-

ation.

Secondary.

Ulceration & Abra-

sion of os Uteri.

Warts.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

Hard

Chanere.

And

Cutaneous

Eruption.

:.

:.

F:.

:.

:

:

Free from Disease.

Remained.

Admitted.

Total Treated.

Gonorrhoea.

Leucorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

Chancre.

And

Cutaneous

Eruption.

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1,063

18 26 44 4

13

10

~

955

19

14

33 6

00

11

1,104

10

2323

42

7

7

10

2 a

1

:

:

9

928 26 27 53 3

ll d

9

1

17

CO

6

1,007 21 46 67

~

15

LO

.20

2

1,036 31

13

1,074 | 15

5 0

47

78

5

22

45

8

.00

:

:

:

:

974

15 39

1988

60

6

CO

20

54

20

2 2 2

Է:

تبر

2 a1

1

6

990

13

32

45

9

14

3

10

1,018

7

27

34

LO

34

6

N

4.

969 9 31

40 5

10

11

4

:

1,032

17

45 62 8

25

7

:

:

:

:

:

January,

1,089

6

13 2

February,

969

3

6 2

March,

1,136

7 c

10

-I

7

April,

955

12

3

May,

1,053

19

3

June,

1,083

18

2

July,

1,119

21

4

حير

Angust,

1,013

6

22

September,

1,022

. 00

8 13

October,

1,045

10

8

November,

1,000

7 12 6

December,

1,077

9

2 255

6

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total,...

12,561

73

179 46

1

6

to

106

40*

12,150

18411 429

72

1242

>

16

:

171

49

306

REMARKS.

25 19

23 10

16] 26

9

32 21

36 31

34

63 15

15

451 15

9

41 13

12

38

9

25

3

23 17

* Immediately extirpat- ed, these women were not detained in the hospital.

a 1 of them had also go- norrhoea.

b Condyloma & gonor- rhoea.

c 1 of them was also suffering from bubo.

d1 of them had also warts.

e I of them had also ul. of os uteri.

ƒ 3 of them had also ul. of os uteri.

g1 of them ran away from the hospital, the other had on her ad- mission hard chancre. 7h in this were included also a few cases of abrasion of os

9

00 13 03 7

49 13

uteri.

which, on the admis- sion were returned as leucorrhoea.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2g

10

119 h 416 13

L. P. MARQUES,-Resident Surgeon,

TABLE 1.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against the REGISTERED WOMEN during the Year 1885.

1885.

COMPLAINTS FROM

Gonorrhoea.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

Soft Sore.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

And

Chancre. Cutaneous, Eruptions.

January,

Different Quarters,

11

3a

1

9

16

February,

Do.,

13

5c

:

:

March,

Do.,

9

2d

April,

Do.,

17

3e

1

May,

Do..

6

4d

June,

Do.,

July,

Do.,

14

3d

8

2

August,

Do,

September,

Do.,

:.

9

3c

October,

Do.,

9

November,

Do.,

4g

15

10

:

:

:

:.

:

:

December,

Do.,

Total,...

127

35

: :

Secondary.

POINTED OUT.

No. OF WOMEN

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

A:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

RESIDENCE.

RESULT OF

EXAMINATION.

Free from Disease.

Found Diseased

Detained.

REMARKS.

15

Various Streets,

12

3

11

Do.,

11

a. Of these 3 cases, 1 was reported as "Primary Syphilis," and 1 as

sore with gonorrhoea.'

>>

"Soft

14

4

b. Reported as venereal ulcer.

18

Do.,

10

1

11

Do.,

c. Of these, 2 were returned as Syphilis," 2 as doubtful.

"Primary

12

9

21

Do.,

d. Reported as "Primary Syphilis.'

10

Do.,

со

2

17

Do.,

10

Do.,

Q

10

7

Do.,

6

8

e. Of these cases, 2 were classified as "Primary

Syphilis.'

"

f. 1 of these cases reported as balanitis.

g. Of these cases, 2 were returned as "Primary Syphilis," 2 as sore on penis.

12

13

2*

Do.,

10

Do.,

7

6

9

11

20

Do.,

165

111

54

L. P. MARQUES,—Resident Surgeon.

307

TABLE II.-Showing the RESULT of the EXAMINATIONS of the REGISTERED WOMEN stated to have infected men from II. M. Army, Navy, and others with Venerial Sores. NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

1885.

COMPLAINTS FROM

Soft Sore.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

Chancre.

And

Cutaneous]

Eruptions.

Secondary.

POINTED Out.

NO. OF WOMEM

RESIDENCE.

RESULT OF

EXAMINATION,

Free from

Disease.

Found diseased Detained.

REMARKS.

308

January 21st, February 19th,

H. M. Army,.

la

1

Ship Street,

Do.,

le

March 25th,

Do.

3d

April 4th, 6th,

Do.,

2a

May 11th, 29th, ·

Do..

2a

June 8th, 16th,

Do..

2a

July 5th, 23rd,

Do.,

2a

1

Th

August 5th, 20th,

Do.,

2a

1

Ship Street,

1

November 11th,

Do.

1

1

1

1

Do.,

1

Do.,

3

e. Reported as vencrial ulcer.

Ship and Cochrane Street,

1

1

Do.,

1

1

Ship Street,

Do.,

Cochrane Street,

Do.,

a. "Primary Syphilis "in the report.

66

d. 2 of these cases were reported as Primary Syphilis," one with a query (?)

h. This woman has already been in the hospital on the 5th, and discharged on the 18th of the same month.

December 8th.

Do.,

1

14

3

17.

17

:

1

East Street,

}

June 15th,

H. M. Navy,..

1

1

Do.,

19

July 7th,.....

Do.,

la

* 3 cases reported as Primary Syphilis, and I as Primary Syphilis and bubo.

O

East and Ladder Street,

1

1

October 18th, 14th,

Do.,

2 a

November 28th,

Do.,

la

1

Graham Street,....

1

Dec. 5th, 10th, 20th, 28th,

Do.,

4*

4

Graham and East Street,.

2

2

4

5

10

9

9

1

1

East Street,

January 30th,.

Miscellaneous,

March 26th,

May 28th,

January 27th,. February 14th, March 21st,. June 30th,

U. S. Man-of-War,

1

Stanley Street,

1

Spanish Man-of-War,

1

Do.,

1

1

...

2

1

3

2

East Street,

20

Government Civil Hospital,... |

26

Id

Ladder Street,

Do.,

Do.,

le

1

East Street,

1.

Ladder Street,

1

Do.,

1

October 2nd,

Do.,

1

November 12th, 20th,

Do.,

NEH

East Street,

1

b. and gonorrhea.

c. One man pointed out 2 women of having one of them probably conveyed him infection.

d. Roscola.

...

ลง

2

2

2

Do.,

e. Reported in this way "sore syphilitic

8

...

-J

8

7

Total,

35

1

:

:

1

87

>

28

9

L. P. MARQUES,-Resident Surgeon.

::

1885.

COMPLAINTS FROM

E.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against the REGISTERED WOMEN during the Year 1885.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

RESULT OF

EXAMINATION.

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard

Chanere.

And

Cutaneous

Eruptions.

Secondary.

POINTED OUT.

NO. OF WOMEN

RESIDENCE.

Free fron Disease.

Found

Diseasd

Detained.

January,

February,

H.M. Navy,

2

24

Do.,

4

East and Ladder Streets,.. Graham, East, & Ladder Sts.,... Cochrane, Graham & Ladder Sts.,

1

March,.

Do.,

April,

Do.,

1

1

East Street,.

1

#

Peel, Ladder, and East Streets,.

2

2a

May,

Do.,

June,

· Do.,

16

4

East and Graham Streets,

1

16

2

East Street,.

1

1

July,

Do.,

August,

Do.,

1

1

Stanley Street,

le

September,

Do.,

1

1

Hollywood Road, ......

1

October,

November,

Do.,

2

26

4

East, Ladder, and Graham Sts.,

2

2

Do.,

1

16

2

Cochrane and Graham Streets,

2d

December,

Do.,

8

4

12

East, Graham, Ladder, & Stanley

5

7

[Streets,

22

18

31

9

:

40

January,

H.M. Army,

6

16

February,

Do.,

5

le

...

March,.

Do.,

6

36

...

26

7699

Stanley and Ship Streets, Ship Street,

April,.

Do.,

May,

Do.,

9

June,

Do.,

2

26

26

Ship and Ladder Streets, hip Street, ....

Stanley, Cochrane, & Ship Sts., Ship Street,

Do.,

July,

Do.,

August,

Do.,

September,

Do.,

October,

Do.,

November,

Do.,

464050

26

...

...

1.

1

...

...

December,

Do.,

69 17

Carried forward,.

100

26

:.

:

:

...

11

4

11

6

Ship and Cochrane Streets,...

6

hip, Graham, & Cochrane Sts.,

1

Chip Street,

4.

Ship and Cochrane Streets,......

4

3

6

Ship and Cochrane Streets,.

2

4

86

126

63

85

3133

23

41

1-30 00 00 TO 00 00 GIO DEN

:

6

8

I

1

5d

1

4.

ྐ 63 : =

A co

:.

>

REMARKS,

a. 1 of these women was detained in the Hos- pital some days previously.

b. Reported as "Primary Syphilis.”

This woman was an intruder, found in a registered brothel.

d. Already detained in the Hospital.

<

e. Reported as venerial ulcer."

f. 1 of these cases was reported “Primary Syphilis (?)."

309

E.,--Continued.

RETURN of the NUMBER of COMPLAINTS against the REGISTERED WOMEN during the Year 1885.

Gonorrhoea.

NATURE OF COMPLAINTS.

SYPHILIS.

Soft Sore.

Primary.

Hard

And

Cutaneous

Chancre. Eruptions.

Secondary.

POINTED OUT.

No. OF WOMEN

RESIDENCE,

100

26

126

184

1

2

East Street,

3

1

4

Stanley, Cochrane & Ladder Streets,

le

If

6

Graham, Cochrane & Stanley Streets,

1

Stanley Street,

22

Ladder Street,

2

East Street,

RESULT OF

EXAMINATION.

NANH| Free from Disease.

2

85

41

1

1

2

2

4

2

2:

Detained.

Found Diseased

1885.

COMPLAINTS FROM

January,

Brought forward,...

Miscellaneous,

U.S. Man-of-War, Spanish Man-of-War,

March,

May,

July,

Merchant Vessel,

August,

Miscellaneous,

December,

French Man-of-War,

· REMARKS.

310

e. And gonorrhoea.

f. Syphilis in the report.

g. 2 women were pointed out by a same man as having one of them probably conveyed infection to him.

h. Roscola in the report.

i. Reported in this way "sore syphilitic (?) on prepuce.'

j. Reported as "sore on the penis.'

77

January,

Government Civil Hospital,

2

26

4

Graham and East Streets,

3

1

1h

1

Ladder Street,

1

February,

Do.,

.1

1

2

East Street,

March,..

Do.,

1

1i

1

Cochrane Street,

April,

June,

Do.,

1

Do.,

1

July,

Do.,

:ཌ:

2

East and Ladder Streets,.

3

Cochrane and East Streets,.

2

122

1

1

1

Ladder Street,

August,

Do.,

October,

Do.,

November,

Do.,

:

Total,

127

1

2j

35

...

4g

East, Graham and Ladder Streets,

4

4

East Street,

3

1

...

111

54

2

1

165

:

*

>

L. P. MARQUES,--Resident. Surgeon.

311

F'.

RETURN showing the NUMBER of TIMES in which the WOMEN were examined in WÁNTSAI during the Year 1885.

1885.

Number of Examin- ation.

Free from

Disease.

Found Diseased

and sent to the Lock Hospital.

Gonorrhoea.

Soft Sore.

Leucorrhoea.

NATURE OF DISEASE.

SYPHILIS.

Primary.

Hard Chancre.

And Cutaneous Eruptions.

Secondary.

Ulceration of os

Uteri.

Warts.

January,

46

46

February,

36

36

March,.

38

38

April,

37

36

1

May,

49

49

June,

36

36

July,

38

37

1

1

August,

42

41

1

September,

35

34

October,

45

45

November,

31

31

December,

44

44

Total,...... 477

473

4

1

2 1

G.

:

:

:

NATURE OF DISEASE.

SYPHILIS.

Primary. Secondary.

LOCK HOSPITAL.

RETURN of the RESULT of EXAMINATIONS of WOMEN from UNREGISTERED BROTHELS during the Year 1885.

1885.

No. of Women.

Place of Residence.

Hard

And Cuta-

neous

Chan- Erup-

cre.

tions.

:

1:

16

:

:

:

:

:

÷

:

:

:

LO

5

:

:

:

:

:

:

January,

February,... 5

March,

23

15 First Street, Tung Man Lane, Man Hing

Lane, and Hollywood Road,

Tung Saw Street East, Webster Bazaar

and Hollywood Road,

Shawkiwan, José's Lane, Queen's Road West, Gough, Central, and Second Streets, and Gilman's Bazaar,

N

11

4

3

lc

N

la

10 13

5d 2 1

April,

7

Tsz Mi, Heung, Tsun, and Wing Lanes

and Wing Shing Street,..

6

1

:

:

1

May,

6

Gage, Market, and Gough Streets and Gil-

man's Bazaar,

N

June,

5

July,

8

Peel Street, and Queen's Road West,..... Queen's Road, Tung Man Lane, Peel Street,

and Station Street (Yaumáti),

:

3

10

5

1

If

2

-

August,

12

Stanley Street, Lascar Row, Queen's Road,

and Shaukiwan,

September,... 3

Mi Lun Lane, and Queen's Road West,

October, November, December,

5

Queen's Road, and Wing Kat Street,.....

5

13

Tsz Mi West Alley, and Hong Ü Hong Street, Market, Wing Wo, Wellington, and First

Streets, and Ton Lane,

723-

2

1 2 1

1

1

1

10

3

1 1

Total,... 107

a. and labeal abscess.

h. Condylomata,and gonorrhoea.

c. and warts.

d. 1 of them was suffering from chronic ulceration of os uteri.

e. Condylomata aud warts.

63

44

10 14 6

1

:

:

:

le:

:

1g

1h

la

2i

1

:

00

8

1

:

:

:

5

:

f. and Condylomata (?).

g. Condylomata and ulceration of os uteri.

\h. and gonorrhoea.

. 1 had condyloma and ulceration of os uteri: another ulcera-

tion of vagina and of legs.

312

Number of Beris

in Lock

Hospital.

TABLE A.

RETURN of the NUMBER of PROSTITUTES, brought under the Provisions of Ordinance No. 19, during the Year 1885. -

Number admitted into

Hospital

on Certificates of Resident Surgeon.

Number who submitted

Voluntarily.

Number against whom it was necessary to

proceed by Information before the Registrar General.

Total Number

brought under the Provisions of the Ordinance.

Total Number of Examina-

Total Number of Examina- tions made during the Year.

tions made when no Disease was found.

Totul Number Discharged

from Hospital.

REMARKS.

32

411

272

107

379

13,532

13,121

416

In this table are included also the women examined at Wántsai and those examined by the Colonial Surgeon.

TABLE U

RETURN of WOMEN examined, and treated in the GOVERNMENT LOCK HOSPITAL, during the Year 1885.

EXAMINATION.

HOSPITAL.

DISCHARGED.

Average No. of

days per Month on which Examinations were held.

Total Number of Examinations

made during the Year.

Number admitted

into Hospital.

Total Number of Examinations

made when no

Disease was found.

26

13,332

411

13,191

DISEASES.

Primary Syphilis, uncomplicated Gonorrhea

do.

Do. and P. Syphilis combined. Secondary Syphilis,..

TOTAL.

18

مین

Number remain-

ing in Hospital,

31st Dec., 1881.

Enclosure 3.

Admitted.

Total treated.

Cured.

Number remain.

ing in Hospital,

31st Dec., 1885.

47

52

51

1

245

252

249.

10

113

119

119

6

6

4

2

411

429

418

15

Report of the Government Analyst.

ANALYTICAL DEPARTMENT.

L. P. MARQUES,

Resident Surgeon.

REMARKS.

In this table are included also the women examined at Wántsai and those examined by the Colonial Surgeon.

1. P. MARQUES.

Resident Surgeon.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL,

HONGKONG, 15th April, 1886.

SIR,—I have the honour to submit the following remarks on the analytical work conducted in the temporary laboratory of this Hospital during the year 1885.

Toxicological.-In five cases of suspected poisoning where fifteen articles were examined, poison was detected in two instances. In both cases a mydriatic alkaloid was the poisonous substance.

Water. Twenty-six samples of water have been analyzed and specially reported on to the Sani- tary Board.

In July when some of the troops were removed to Stanley a sample of water drawn from a well near the barracks was analyzed at the request of Deputy Surgeon-General Hungerford.

General.-Seven samples of Opium were referred to me by the Police Magistrate for examination with the object of ascertaining whether or not they were prepared or raw specimens.

The remaining articles examined are enumerated below and do not call for any special remarks. One garment supposed to have had some irritating powder dusted on it. Twelve bottles of lemonade from a native factory.

Three samples of milk.

Several cuttle fish, said to be poisonous, from a supply shipped from Japan. One tin of butter.

Several specimens of urine and other articles of minor interest.

Dr. PH. B. C. AYRES.

Colonial Surgeon,

Sc.,

Se..

6.

I have the honour to be,

Sir.

Your most obedient Servant,

WM. EDWARD CROW,

Government Analyst and Apothecary to the Civil Medical Department.

H

313

No. 33.

*

SPEECH OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERN- MENT AT THE PROROGATION OF THE SESSION OF THE

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL OF HONGKONG,

21ST MAY, 1886.

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

1. The time has now arrived for closing the Session of 1885-86, during which a considerable amount of useful legislation and other public business has been dealt with by you.

2. I believe it will be necessary to summon a special meeting in the month of September next, in order to consider the Estimates for the ensuing year; but the opening of the next annual Session will not take place until October or November, in accordance with the practice of the two past years.

3. The financial position of the Colony at the beginning of the present year was better than had been anticipated. The Revenue of 1885, which had been estimated at $1,137,558 yielded $1,251,890, besides $66,659 for premia on sales of land. The only year when the Revenue has been larger was 1883 when, owing to exceptional circumstances, a very large amount was received from licences for boil- ing opium for exportation. The marked increase of receipts over 1884 is due no doubt to the termination of the hostilities recently carried on in this part of the

world.

4. In consequence of this improvement in the Revenue of 1885, the balance of assets at the commencement of the present year was $427,692 instead of $190,088 as estimated in October last.

5. I am happy to inform you that the receipts during the first quarter of the present year have been about $17,000 in excess of the Estimates, and $27,642 in excess of the receipts during the first quarter of 1885, thus exhibiting a continued healthy development of commerce.

6. In consequence of this satisfactory condition of the finances, it will probably not be necessary for the Colony to borrow any money until towards the end of the year, and I do not anticipate that a larger amount than $300,000 will be required this year.

7. Before this satisfactory condition of the finances had been ascertained by the closing of the accounts of the past year, it was thought that it would be necessary to raise extra Revenue for the purpose of defraying the interest and sinking fund on the loan, which will amount to about £15,000 a year, when the whole £200,000 has been borrowed; and the Council, being consulted on the means to be devised for providing more funds, unanimously recommended "that the best means of doing so would be chiefly by an increase of the stamp duty."

S. A Special Committee of this Council, to whom the question of details of extra stamp dues was referred for consideration, reported after careful investigation that no urgency exists for extra taxation at the present time, and recommended that the consideration of increase to Revenue should be postponed. I accordingly announced to the Council that I would not proceed any further this session with the measure proposed for this purpose. . It does not seem probable that any extra taxation will be necessary until the whole amount of £200,000 has been borrowed. One of the Un-official Members has even expressed the opinion that the ordinary Revenue which we shall receive will, through the progressive development of our commerce, be sufficient to meet all calls made upon it. I should be glad if this forecast were to prove correct.

9. I thank you in the name of Her Majesty's Government for your loyal vote of a further sum of £60,000 for the completion of the Military Defences of the Colony. These works are proceeding as fast as is possible, and I have been in- formed by the Secretary of State for the Colonies that the greater part of the armament will probably be consigned to Hongkong during the current year. The mountings of the breech-loading guns are of new pattern, and require to be specially tested, and this of course to some extent retards the supply.

314

10. The small though powerful ironclad Wivern, two first class and two second class torpedo boats are already stationed here, and four more first class torpedo boats are to be sent out, two of which I am informed are now on their way. When the forts have been completed, and they are being pushed forward by General CAMERON as vigorously as the nature of the work will allow,-the Colony need be under no serious apprehension of foreign attack.

11. I informed the Council on the 17th March last that Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking had made strong representations to the Ministers of the Tsungli Yamên on the unwarrantable action of Chinese Officials in seizing a Chinese subject, accused of piracy, who had taken refuge in this Colony. The Ministers, as I have already stated, expressed their regret for what had occurred, and satisfactory excuses have been made by the Viceroys of Fokien and of the Two Kwang.

12. The Commission provided for under Article 7 Section 3 of the Chefoo Convention for the purpose of considering the establishment of some system that shall enable the Chinese Government to protect its revenue without interfering with the junk trade of this Colony, has at length been appointed. Mr. JUSTICE RUSSELL has been selected by me to represent the Hongkong Government on this Commission. The other Commissioners are Mr. BRENAN, Consul at Tientsin, and Shao, Taotai of Shanghai.

13. The Law Revision Commission has been very diligent in the performance of the important duties with which it has been entrusted. Ten Ordinances pre- pared by this Commission, have been passed by the Council since the beginning of the year, and a number of other Draft Bills will be ready for the next Session of Council.

14. I have appointed a Commission to inquire into the system of land-tenure and into the disposal of Crown Lands, with a view to the adoption of such improve- ments as may facilitate the transfer of allotments held from the Crown; an inquiry which I believe will, when completed, be of great practical utility both to the Government and to the community.

15. With regard to Public Works, satisfactory progress continues to be made with the works for the extension of the public water-supply, and it is estimated- at the present rate of progress-that the tunnel intended to convey the waters from Tytam to this side of the Island, will be completed before the end of next year; whereupon the new supply will be made available for public use, and an important measure of relief obtained, without having to await the completion of the Reservoir in the following year.

16. A further large instalment of useful sanitary work has been effected during the past season in the reconstruction and extension of the main drainage and sewerage system of the town, principally in the Chinese quarters. Contracts have been entered into also, for the completion of the new Victoria College within eighteen months from the present date, and arrangements have been made for the further development of the western suburb of Kennedy Town by the formation of new streets and thoroughfares and the erection of an adequate Police Station for the protection of the growing interests of that rising locality. The new permanent Lazaretto Buildings at Stone Cutters' Island which were contracted to be finished by the 1st of July will be completed by that date, and will become available for occupation should occasion arise.

17. Among other measures for the better prevention of Cattle epidemics in the Colony, to which subject your attention was directed during last session, I have approved a large extension to the present Cattle market buildings at Kennedy Town, by which means all livestock imported into the Colony and intended for our markets, will be brought under close and continuous inspection, thus rendering feasible a more effective protection of the food supplies of the public.

18. I propose to construct, as soon as the hot season has terminated, a per- manent Police Station at Mount Gough for the protection of the residents at the Peak, whose number is likely to be considerably extended.

19. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I desire to convey to you my acknowledgements for the loyal and valuable co-operation which you have afforded my Government during the labours of the session and for the supplies which you have so liberally voted for the Public service.

I now prorogue this Council to the 15th day of September next.

>

PAPERS

LAID BEFORE THE

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL

OF

HONGKONG.

OCTOBER, 1885 To MAY, 1886.

DIE 77

DR

HONGKONG:

PRINTED BY NORONHA & Co., GOVERNMENT PRINTERS.

1886.

26 5

2814

July

$430

26 MAY 1981

CONTENTS.

PAGE.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

Proceedings of the -,

1-76

*

1

2

Do.

Do.

3

LOAN.

4 SPIRIT FARM.

Speech of His Excellency the Governor at the opening of the Session of the —, Address of the in reply to the Speech of His Excellency the Governor,

77

81

Despatch respecting the proposed

83

Despatch respecting the proposed establishment of a

85

10

5

MUNICIPAL TAXES.

6/ SOUTH-WESTERN PRO-

VINCES OF CHINA.

....

Report by the Colonial Treasurer on the Assessment of

for 1885-1886,

+

and the increase of the Police Rate,

Correspondence respecting the opening to trade of the

888998

87

7

TYTAM WATER-WORKS.

Surveyor General's Report on the

91.

"

8

MUNICIPAL TAXATION.

9

POST OFFICE.

Despatch respecting the submission of the to the Legislative Council, Report of the Postmaster General for 1885,

107

109

10

POLICE.

Report of the Captain Superintendent of, for 1885,

113

......

:

11

DEFENCE WORKs.

Despatch respecting the proposed

125

TELEGRAPHIC COMMU-

Despatch respecting direct Despatch respecting direct between Hongkong and Singapore,

127

NICATION,

13

LOAN.

Despatch respecting the proposed,

129

14

Do.

Despatch respecting the postponement of the proposed ——;

133

15

DEFENCES.

18

21

2223

16 QUARANTINE.

17 OBSERVATORY.

19 GAOL.

Do.

20 STAMP DUTY.

Despatch respecting the new heavy guns for ———,

Correspondence respecting

my

Report of the Director of the for 1885,

>

Application for an additional Chinese Clerk for the Report of the Superintendent of the, for 1885,

135

137

141

145

147

RECEIPTS AND

PAY-

Minute by the Collector on a proposed increase of the Duties by 50% Statement showing the total

157

161

MENTS, 1885;

22

REVENUES,

23

EXPENDITURE.

24

ASSETS & LIABILITIES.

Comparative Statement of, during the last ten years, 1876 to 1885, Comparative Statement of ―, during the last ten years, 1876 to 1885, Statement of - on the 31st December, 1885,

163

.

173

.

179

25

OBSERVATORY.

Annual Weather Report, for 1885,.......

181

26

Do.

27 BOTANICAL AND. AF- FORESTATION DE-

Report on Five-day Means of the principal Meteorological Elements, for 1885, Report of the Acting Superintendent of the for 1885,.

199

203

PARTMENT.

28

BLUE BOOK,

29

COURTS.

30

31

29a BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT. EDUCATIONAL DEPARTY

MENT.

Report of the Chief Clerk on the Returns of Superior and Subordinate Returns of for the year 1885,.. Report of the Harbour Master, for 1885,..... Report of the Inspector of Schools, for 1885,

و

for 1885,

209

for 1885,.......

219

?

235

237

261

32

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT.

Report of the Colonial Surgeon, for 1885.

281

33

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

Speech of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government at the

Prorogation of the Session of the

313

83

-

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 1.

WEDNESDAY, 7TH OCTOBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

14

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

"}

THOMAS JACKSON.

2.2

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

""

1

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

Pursuant to Proclamation, the Council met. The chair was taken by the Chief Justice as Senior

Member.

At 5 o'clock P.M., the Clerk of Councils read the Proclamation convening the Council, as follows:-

No. 11.

[L.S.] G. F. BOWEN.

PROCLAMATION.

By His Excellency Sir GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony of Hong- kong and its Dependencies, and Vice-Admiral of the same.

Whereas the Legislative Council of Hongkong stands prorogued to Tuesday, the 15th day of September instant, now I, Sir GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, in exercise of the powers in me vested as Governor aforesaid, do hereby proclaim that the said Legislative Council is further prorogued to Wednesday, the 7th October, 1885, on which day it shall meet for the despatch of business at the hour of 5 o'clock in the afternoon in the Council Chamber, in the City of Victoria in the said Colony; and the Members of the Legislative Council are hereby required to give their attendance at the said time and place accordingly.

Given under my Hand and the public Seal of the Colony, this 5th day of September, 1885.

By Command,

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

FREDERICK STEWART,

Acting Colonial Secretary.

L

His Excellency the Governor came into the Council Chamber, and having desired the Honourable Members to be seated, was pleased to speak as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I have summoned you to meet at a somewhat earlier period of the year than on previous occasions, because, in addition to the Estimates for 1886, and to several important Legislative measures, I desire to submit for your consideration a Loan Bill, and a Bill to establish a Spirit Farm, similar to that successfully established in the neighbouring Colony of the Straits Settlements.

2. It will be remembered that, in opening the Session for 1884, I addressed you as follows :—

Hongkong is probably the only State or Colony of importance, which at the present day is not only without a Public Debt, but which possesses assets nearly equal to its annual revenue. However, the existing balances will not be sufficient to carry out several Public Works, which are urgently required by this community, in addition to those 'strong and complete measures of sanitation,' which Mr. CHADWICK, (the Civil Engineer recently sent out from England), has reported to be absolutely

2

necessary for the immediate benefit of the public health. Under these circumstances, I concur with the Executive Council in what appears to be the general opinion of the Colony, viz. that the present generation of Colonists ought not to be deprived of the advantages referred to, while it cannot, of course, be expected to defray the entire cost of works of a permanent and reproductive character; so that, consequently, it will be expedient to raise, on the exhaustion of the existing assets, a moderate loan not much exceeding the revenue of a single year. This question will not have to be decided in its details during the present Session; but, I desire to elicit the opinion of the Council on the principle involved."

3. In

your address in reply, the Council said: "We agree with your Excellency in the opinion that, in justice to the present generation of tax-payers in Hongkong, a moderate loan should be raised on the exhaustion of the existing assets, to defray a portion of the cost of those Sanitary and other Public Works, which are recognised as of permanent importance for the security of the general health and well-being of our population."

4. You have, therefore, Honourable Gentlemen, already sanctioned the principle of a loan; and there will now be laid before you Bills (already approved by Her Majesty's Government), for raising One million of Dollars, (that is, less than one year's income of this Colony,);—and to establish a Spirit Farm, the produce of which will be required to provide for the interest and Sinking Fund of the Loan.

5. From the Report of the Acting Colonial Secretary and Auditor General, it will be seen that the state of our Finances is briefly as follows:-In consequence of the exercise of rigorous economy in the general administration, while considerable progress has been made in the chief Public Works, there will still remain in the Treasury on the 31st of next December a balance of $190,000. Now, the Extraordinary Public Works, that is, those to be defrayed out of Balances and Loan, including among others, the Tytam Water-Works; the completion of the Victoria College, and of the pernament Lazaretto; the Defence Works, and the Sanitary Works; are estimated to cost $579,800; consequently, it will become necessary to raise by loan during the ensuing year not less than about $400,000.

6. The Estimates for 1886 show a surplus (in round numbers) of $122,500, if we include the increase expected from the proposed Spirit Farm, which is estimated at about $63,500, and which will be devoted to the payment of interest and Sinking Fund on the Loan. Consequently, there will remain only a nett surplus of $59,000, not more than is required to meet unforeseen expenses.

7. At the present time, the taxation of this Colony, both general and municipal, does not exceed £1.1.0 per head of the population. With the increase from the Spirit Farm, it will not exceed £1.3.6 per head. It will be recollected that the aggregate taxation, general and municipal, per head of the people of England, and of the Australasian Colonies, exceeds £3.0.0 per head.

8.. Under the circumstances stated in a Report of the Colonial Treasurer which will be laid before you, it has been found necessary to increase the Police rate by 1 per cent. As the law of this Colony has hitherto stood, the power of assessing the Municipal rates is vested solely in the Governor in Executive Council. I think that this anomaly, for which there is probably no precedent in any other part of the British Empire, should be removed; and that, for the future, the municipal, like the general taxation should be imposed, after full consideration, by a vote of the Legislative Council. I have recommended to Her Majesty's Government that I should receive authority to carry out this reform.

9. And here I will take the opportunity of observing that I have always advocated the creation in all British and homogeneous communities of Municipalities freely elected by the Rate-payers, as in England. I took an active part in encouraging the extension of such Municipalities during the twenty years that I was Governor successively of three of the principal Colonies in Australasia. But, I recognise the fact that it is practically impossible to create here an elective Municipality; for probably not a single Englishman would be elected to it. From an Official report, it appears that there are :----

(1). English Rate-payers,

(2). Chinese,

(3). Others (chiefly Portuguese),

83

.....947

98.

As the constant policy and action of my Government abundantly prove, I feel much sympathy with the Chinese who have settled in this British Colony. I will never sanction any unnecessary interference with their national customs or national feelings; I have always given favourable attention to the petitions addressed to me by them; and I have appointed one of the most respected members of the Chinese Community to represent his countrymen in this Council. At the same time, it is obvious that neither the Colonial nor the Imperial Government can leave to an elective Municipality which would be composed entirely of Chinese, or in which the Chinese element would be largely predominant, the arrangements necessary for the health, water supply, good order, and general administration of one of the principal Naval and Military Stations, and Marts of Commerce in the British Empire. In addition to the European Civil residents and to the crews of the Merchant Shipping annually visiting this harbour, (the tonnage of which exceeds to 5 millions of tons, that is, it exceeds the tonnage entering all other British Ports except London and Liverpool), it will be remembered that we have to take into account some three thousand of Her Majesty's seamen and soldiers.

}

3.

10. On the other hand, the existing Legislative Council is practically also a Municipal Council. More than two-thirds of the business transacted by it is of a purely Municipal character; and it can no longer be reasonably alleged in any quarter that it does not fairly represent the community at large. It is true that on my assumption of this Government in 1883, I found that the Council consisted of nine members, of whom seven were official, and only two unofficial and independent members; all appointed absolutely by the Crown. In consequence of my urgent recommendation, I received authority to increase the unofficial members from two to five; one of whom will always be a Chinese; while I have given the privilege of freely nominating their own representatives to the two principal, Public Bodies, viz.. the Bench of Magistrates and the Chamber of Commerce, which comprise the chief payers of rates and taxes of every nationality resident here, British, American, German, Jewish, Chinese, Parsee, and Armenian. Thus the property, intelligence, and education of the entire community are now directly represented in this Council. Moreover, so long as I retain my present post, the official majority will not over-rule, especially in financial questions, an united unofficial minority except, of course, in extreme cases of necessity, and in which Imperial interests may be involved.

11. I know that you, Honourable Gentlemen, agree with the principles stated above. I know that you also rejoice with me at the steady prosecution by the Military Authorities, (as is shown by reports from the Colonel Commanding the Royal Engineers,) of the system of Defence Works, under- taken after my strong representations to the Imperial Government of the previously unprotected state of this Port and Colony. You will also be glad to learn that my application for a flotilla of Torpedo Boats has now been granted; and that six first-class Torpedo Boats will shortly re-inforce those already supplied by the Admiralty. It is morally certain that our defences by land and sea will be completed long before there will be any occasion to test them; and, as you are already aware, the highest Naval and Military Authorities in the Empire consider that, when completed, they will place Hongkong in safety against foreign attack.

12. In connexion with the subject of Defence, I have to inform you that I have again pressed on the attention of the Imperial Government the importance of securing direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore.

13. With regard to Legislation;-in addition to the financial measures already mentioned, the principal Bills to be submitted to you during the Session will be Bills to consolidate and amend the existing law relating to Prisons; to provide for the Preservation of the Peace; to amend the Municipal Rates Ordinance; also a new Building Ordinance. The Commission for the revision of the Laws is now making satisfactory progress; and, it is hoped, will soon be able to submit some revised Ordinances for your consideration.

14. You will learn with satisfaction that the action of my Government throughout the difficult and delicate crisis of the Franco-Chinese hostilities has met with the approval, on every point, of the Imperial Government. While enforcing British neutrality, I preserved throughout friendly relations

with the Belligerent Powers.

15. Some time ago, I directed the attention of the Imperial Authorities to the importance to the Mercantile Community of Hongkong, of opening to commerce the great South-western Provinces of China with their rich resources and population of above 100 millions; and especially the affluents of the Canton River. A lengthy correspondence ensued between the Foreign Office and the British Legation at Peking; and I have now been informed officially that representations have been made on the subject to the Chinese Government; and that a prominent Agent of the British Government will be despatched to investigate and report on the manifold advantages to trade offered by the South-western portion of the neighbouring Empire. Valuable results may be expected from this mission.

16. It is believed that the Commission appointed for that purpose will secure an adequate representation of Hongkong at the approaching Colonial and Indian Exhibition.

A preliminary exhibition will be held here before the despatch of the exhibits to London.

17. During the course of the Session there will be presented to you reports and other documents showing the condition of the several Departments of the Colonial Service, and the state of the Tytam Water-Works, and of the other Public Works in progress. I invite you to ask at all times for any further public papers, the production of which you may consider necessary or desirable for the full elucidation of the position of the Colony as to financial and all other affairs.

18. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I desire to express my full confidence that I may continue, as heretofore, to rely on your loyal co-operation in all matters calculated to promote the public interests. I would repeat also my confident hope that the progressive development of our commerce, now relieved from the depression caused by the recent hostilities in this part of the world; the most rigid economy in our finances that is compatible with the efficiency of the public service, and with the prosecution of the necessary Public Works; together with constant firmness and justice,— not dry but sympathetic justice, on the part of the Government and Legislature to all races in our mixed population, will, under the blessing of Providence, promote the general welfare and happiness of this community.

· 4

.

His Excellency the Governor having left the Council Chamber, the chair was taken by the Chief Justice, as Senior Member.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the following gentlemen be appointed a Committee to prepare the address in reply to His Excellency's Speech :-

The Honourable THE ACTING COLONIAL SECRETARY.

The Honourable THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

The Honourable THE COLONIAL TREASURER.

The Honourable P. RYRIE.

and The Honourable T. JACKSON.

The Treasurer stated that, owing to the arrival of the Mail, he regretted his inability to serve on the Committee.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON'S name was then substituted.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the following papers :-

(1.) The Estimates for 1886.

(2.) The Supplementary Estimates for 1884.

(3.) Papers respecting the proposed Loan (No. 3).

(4.) Papers respecting the proposed Spirit Farm (No. 4).

(5.) Papers respecting the increase of 1% in the Municipal Rates (No. 5).

(6.) Papers respecting the opening to trade of the South-western Provinces of China (No. 6). The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the Council adjourn till 6 P.M. to enable the Address of the Legislative Council in reply to the Speech of His Excellency the Governor to be prepared.

The Treasurer moved that, as the Mail had come just in, it would be more convenient to adjourn until 20 minutes to 6 P.M.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded.

The Acting Colonial Secretary then withdrew his motion.

Question-put and passed.

The Council re-assembled at 5-40 P.M.

The Chief Justice took the Chair.

The Clerk of Councils read at the table the following Address to be presented to His Excellency the Governor, in reply to the Speech he had been pleased to deliver to the Council:-

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY,

1. We, the Members of the Legislative Council of Hongkong, in Council assembled, desire to thank your Excellency for the Speech with which you have opened the present Session.

2. We repeat that we agree with your Excellency in the opinion that, in justice to the present generation of tax-payers in Hongkong, a moderate loan should be raised on the exhaustion of the existing assets, to defray a portion of the cost of those Sanitary and other Public Works, which are recognised as of permanent importance for the security of the general health and well-being of our population.

3. Agreeing in the principle, we shall give our careful consideration to the details of the proposed Loan Bill and of the proposed Bill to establish a Spirit Farm, the produce of which will be devoted to pay the interest and Sinking Fund of the Loan.

4. We thank your Excellency for the intention to submit to this Council the Municipal as well as the general taxation of the Colony.

5. We agree with your Excellency that it would be practically impossible, under the circumstances of this Colony, to create here an elective Municipal Council, in which an alien element would be pre- dominant.

6. We concur with the views stated by your Excellency on the above subjects.

7. We are glad to learn that the Military Authorities are steadily prosecuting the system of Defence Works undertaken upon your Excellency's representation of the previously unprotected state of this Port and Colony. We also learn with pleasure that your Excellency's application for a flotilla of Torpedo Boats has been granted. We desire to express our thanks for the constant exertions of your Excellency to secure the defence of this Port and Colony by sea and land.

:

8. We think direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore of great practical importance to both Imperial and Colonial interests; and we hope that your Excellency's renewed application to the Home Government on this subject will prove successful.

9. We shall give due attention to the Legislative measures which will be submitted to us; and we are glad to learn that the Commission for the revision of the Laws is now making satisfactory

progress.

10. We are glad that the action taken by your Excellency during the crisis of the Franco-Chinese complications has met, on every point, with the approval of Her Majesty's Government.

11. We concur with your Excellency as to the importance of opening to commerce the great South-western Provinces of China; and we trust that the efforts made in this direction will be crowned with success.

12. We trust with your Excellency that the Commission appointed for the purpose will secure an adequate representation of Hongkong at the approaching Colonial and Indian Exhibition in London.

13. We shall examine with care the reports to be laid before us on the condition of the Public Departments, and on the state of the Taitam Water-Works and of the Sanitary and other Public Works in progress.

14. In conclusion, we beg to assure your Excellency that you may always rely on our loyal co-operation with the Representative of our QUEEN in all matters tending to further the public interests; and that we share your hope that the progressive development of our commerce; rigid economy in our finances; and constant firmness and justice to all races and classes in our population, will, under the Divine blessing, promote the general well-being and contentment of this entire com- munity.

The Honourable P. RYRIE moved that the Address as read be adopted, and addressed the Council, drawing attention to certain Public Works for which votes had been taken from the Council, and no commencement had apparently been made for carrying them out. The Honourable Member referred

particularly to the repairs to Murray Pier taking precedence to the extension of Pedder's Wharf.

The Surveyor General replied, and explained with reference to Pedder's Wharf, that it had been found necessary to dredge the foreshore for some distance around it before any new work could be com- menced. The Dredger, which had been engaged at Causeway Bay doing good sanitary work, would soon be brought over to work at Pedder's Wharf.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON seconded the motion, and addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved,-That the Address in reply be presented to the Governor by the Honourable P. RYRIE and the Honourable F. D. SASSOON at Government House to-morrow, at Noon, it having been ascertained that that hour would be convenient to His Excellency.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned at 6 P.M. until Wednesday, the 14th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of October, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

5

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 2.

WEDNESDAY, 14TH OCTOBER, 1885.

7.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

"}

""

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave..

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the Meeting held on the 1st June last, and of the Meeting held on the 7th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor:-

C.8.0.

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

2021 of 1885.

(1.) For general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche. $ 210.00

Hire of Steam-launch while the above repairs are being executed, 10 days,

at $5 per day,.

50.00

$

260.00

C.S.O.

2090 of 1885.

(2.) For converting house No. 47, Wyndham Street, into a Gaol for female

prisoners, .

$

500.00

C.9.0.

2421 of 1885.

(3.) For rent of a house in Wyndham Street to be used as a female prison, at $40

per month, for 2 months, (October and November),

80.00

Mis. Doc

692 of 1885.

(4.) For converting a portion of the east wing of the old Gaol at Stone Cutters'

Island into a temporary Magazine for Gunpowder,

$ 1,300.00

C.S.O.

1691 of 1885.

(5.) For fitting up the Hunghòm Police Station with guard-beds, shelves, pegs,

baths, &c.,

$ 245.00

3

C.S.O.

2012 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1255 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1665 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1795 of 1885.

(6.) For compensation to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, for removal of their pier in 1878, when constructing the Praya-wall. (Re-vote, see Legislative Council, 20th July, 1883),

$ 800.00

(7.) For cost of 7,680 rounds of Ammunition for the Nordenfeldt Gun on board

the Charles May,

....£378.16.11 @ 3/8=$ 2,066.44

(8.) For fitting Nordenfeldt Guns into the boats of the Hongkong Auxiliary

Flotilla Corps,

..£165.5.0 @ 3/63=$ 941.48

..$

120.00

(9.) For making 3 Trollies for the conveyance of Nordenfeldt Guns from Steam-

launches to store,

EXTRAORDINARY WORKS.

C.S.O.

1874 of 1885.

C.S.0.

2369 of 1985.

C.S.O.

1725 of 1885.

(10.) For repairs to damages caused by the Rainstorms of the 8th and 12th

June, 1885,.

(11.) For building of a Retaining wall to prevent landslip at the rear of Inland

Lot, 696, East of the Government Civil Hospital,

$ 9,695.35

945.00

(12.) For resumption by the Crown of Marine Lots 192, 230, and Sections A and

B of Lot 193, in connection with the proposed New Central Market, ...$37,000.00

Government House, October 14th, 1885.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the appointment of the following Committees to be empowered to sit during any prorogation or adjournment of Council:-

1. Finance, to consist of the whole of the Members of the Legislative Council, with the

Colonial Secretary as Chairman.

2. Law, to consist of the Honourable the Attorney General, (Chairman), the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, the Honourable P. RYRIE, the Honourable F. D. SASSOON, and the Honourable WONG SHING.

3. Public Works, to consist of the Honourable the Surveyor General, (Chairman), the Honourable the Colonial Secretary, the Honourable the Registrar General, the Honourable W. KESWICK, and the Honourable T. JACKSON.

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, the following Bills were read a first time :-

(1.) The Supplementary Appropriation Bill for 1884.

(2.) The Appropriation Bill for 1886.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time :--

(1.) A Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1885.

(2.)

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}}

The Spirits Ordinance, 1885.

(3.)

(4.)

The Prison Ordinance, 1885.

12

>>

""

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The Merchant Shipping Ordinance, Amendment Ordinance, 1885.

(5.)

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An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1860.

NOTICES OF SECOND READING.-The Acting Colonial Secretary gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the Second reading of the two Bills proposed by him.

The Attorney General likewise gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of some of the Bills proposed by him.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 21st instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of October, 1885,

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

i

.

Y

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 3.

WEDNESDAY, 21ST OCTOBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

• HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STewart, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.) the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

>>

17

27

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th instant, were read and confirmed. VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor:-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum :-

C.S.05. For contribution towards the expenses connected with the Indian and Colonial

2525 of 1885.

Exhibition,.

Government House, October 21st, 1885.

.£500 @ 3/5-$2,926.82

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Colonial Secretary, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, the following Bills were read a second time:-

(1.) The Supplementary Appropriation Bill for 1884. (2.) The Appropriation Bill for 1886.

Bills were read a second time:-

Seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary. Seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary.

On the motion of the Attorney General, the following

(1.) A Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1885. (2.) A Bill entitled The Prison Ordinance, 1885. (3.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1860. Seconded by the Chief Justice. Question-put and passed.

BILLS REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that the two Bills proposed by him be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Attorney General moved, and the Colonial Treasurer seconded, that the Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1885, be referred to the Finance Committee.

Question-put and passed.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Council

go into Committee on the following Bills:-

A Bill entitled The Prison Ordinance, 1885.

A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance 8 of 1860. The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 28th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of October, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

9

Y

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 4.

WEDNESDAY, 28TH OCTOBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWart, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

>>

""

27

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

""

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor:-

C.S.O.

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums:-

2400 of 1885.

C.S.O.

2400 of 1885.

(1.) For fitting machine gun to Police Steam-launch, No. 2, £72.0.6 @ 3/55-$ 415.28

(2.) For flags supplied by the Naval Yard, for the Auxiliary Flotilla, £8.0.6

@ 3/53=$

46.27

C.S.O.

2500 of 1885.

(3.) For alterations in the Post Office building to provide rooms for the Parcel

Post service,

$ 504.00

C.S.O.

2582 of 1885.

$ 8,000.00

(4.) For re-building the retaining wall below the Civil Hospital, damaged by the

recent fire,

Government House, October 28th, 1885.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Governor then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. Before proceeding to the order of the day, I desire to make a brief statement. In the speech with which I opened the present session, I addressed you as follows:-"Under the circumstances stated in a report of the Colonial Treasurer which will be laid before you, it has been found necessary to increase the Police rate by 1 per cent. As the law of this Colony has hitherto stood, the power of assessing the municipal rates is vested solely in the Governor in Executive Council. I think that this anomaly, for which there is probably no precedent in any other part of the British Empire, should be removed; and that, for the future, the Municipal, like the general taxation should be imposed, after full consideration, by a vote of the Legislative Council. have recommended to Her Majesty's Government that I should receive authority to carry out this reform." I have now much pleasure in informing you that I have received the approval of the Imperial Government to my recommendation. Accordingly, a new Municipal Rating Ordinance will be introduced, which will carry out the proposed reform, and so place the entire taxation of the Colony under the control of the Council.

I

11 .

12

THE SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION BILL, 1884.-REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE.-COM- MITTED AND PASSED.-The Acting Colonial Secretary stated that the Finance Committee reported this Bill without amendment, and moved that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

THE APPROPRIATION BILL, 1886.-REPORT OF FINANCE COMMITTEE.-COMMITTED AND PASSED.— The Acting Colonial Secretary stated that the Finance Committee reported this Bill without amend- ment, and moved that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill reported without amendment.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

The Honourable P. RYRIE invited attention to the fact that the Minutes of the Finance Committee were not now read at the meetings of the Legislative Council which caused some discontent with the public.

The Honourable Member also addressed the Council on the subject of excessive charges by the Cargo-boat people.

The Honourable the Attorney General replied.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE MUNICIPAL RATES ORDINANCE, 1885.-FIRST READING.-The Attorney General moved the first reading of this Bill.

The Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

Bill read a first time.

NOTICE OF MOTION.-The Honourable P. RYRIE gave notice that at the next meeting he would move--"That an enquiry be made into the overcharges recently made by the owners of Cargo-boats to the detriment of shipping interests, and that the Registrar General's department be empowered to deal with all such grievances.'

77

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 4th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of November, 1885,

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 5.

WEDNESDAY, 4TH NOVEMBER, 1885.

13.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

* * * * * *

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

""

,,

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE), by leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee:-

(Finance Committee, 30th October, 1885.)

C.S.O.

2021 of 1885.

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES OF 1885.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Medical.

(1.) For general overhaul and repairs to Health Officer's Steam-launch Blanche, $

Hire of Steam-launch while the above repairs are being executed, 10 days,

at $5 per day,

$

210.00

50.00

260.00

Gaol.

C.S.O. 2421 of 1885.

Mis. Doc

692 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1691 of 1885.

(2.) For rent of a house in Wyndham Street to be used as a Prison for females, at

$40 per month, for 2 months, (October and November),.......

Works and Buildings.

(3.) For converting a portion of the east wing of the old Gaol at Stone Cutters'

Island into a temporary Magazine for Gunpowder,

(4.) For fitting up the Hunghòm Police Station with guard-beds, shelves, pegs,

baths, &c.,

$

80.00

$ 1,300.00

245.00

C.S.O.

2090 of 1885.

(5.) For converting house No. 47, Wyndham Street, into a Gaol for female

prisoners,

$

500.00

C.S.O,

2582 of 1885.

(5.) For re-building the retaining wall below the Civil Hospital, damaged by the

recent fire,.

$ 8,000.00

C.S.O.

2509 of 1885.

(6.) For alterations in the Post Office building, to provide rooms for the Parcel

Post service,

$

504.00

14.

C.S.O.

2012 of 1887.

C.S.O.

2525 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1255 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1665 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1795 of 1885.

C.S.O.

2400 of 1885.

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

(8.) For compensation to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, for removal of their pier in 1878, when constructing the Praya-wall. (Re-vote, see Legislative Council, 20th July, 1883),

Miscellaneous Services.

(9.) For contribution towards the expenses connected with the Indian and

Colonial Exhibition,

Colonial Defences.

$

800.00

.£500 @ 3/5=$ 2,926.82

(10.) For cost of 7,680 rounds of Ammunition for the Nordenfeldt Gun on board

the Charles May,

£378.16.11 @ 3/8=$ 2,066.44

(11.) For fitting Nordenfeldt Guns into the boats of the Hongkong Auxiliary

Flotilla Corps,

£165.5.0 @ 3/61=$

(12.) For making 3 Trollies for the conveyance of Nordenfeldt Guns from Steam-

launches to store,

941.48

.$ 120.00

415.28

(13.) For fitting machine gun to Police Steam-launch, No. 2, £72.0.6 @ 3/5ğ=$

C.S.O.

2400 of 1885.

C.S.O. 1874 of 1885.

C.S.O.

2369 of 1885.

C.S.O.

1725 of 1885.

(14.) For flags supplied by the Naval Yard, for the Auxiliary Flotilla, £8.0.6

@ 3/53=$

46.27

EXTRAORDINARY WORKS.

(15.) For repairs to damages caused by the Rainstorms of the 8th and 12th

June, 1885,.

(16.) For building of a retaining wall to prevent landslip at the rear of Inland

Lot 696, East of the Government Civil Hospital,

.$ 9,695.35

945.00

(17.) For resumption by the Crown of Marine Lots 192, 230, and Sections A and

B of Lot 193, in connection with the proposed New Central Market, ...$37,000.00

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE ON THE BILL ENTITLED THE LOAN ORDINANCE, 1885.-The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following report of the Finance Committee on this Bill :--

The Committee reports-

That, considering the present unsettled value of silver, and more especially the steady depreciation of it which has taken place during the last twenty-five years, it is highly danger- ous and inexpedient for this silver-using Colony to contract any debt re-payable in gold, in connection with which, judging from the experience of the past, a heavy loss in exchange is

almost sure to be sustained.

That instead of adopting such a course, it is desirable that the Government should raise money for its requirements by issuing, from time to time, from the Treasury in Hongkong, Debentures bearing interest at the annual rate of five per cent., thus avoiding costs and commissions of every kind, as well as the risk of loss on exchange.

That the raising of a loan in Hongkong, besides being free from all the expenses connected with the issue of Debentures or Stock at home, except for printing and stationery, will add to the Revenue of the Colony in Stamp Duty and in other ways; and moreover the Government will be in a position, from time to time, to redeem its own Debentures in any number, and to fix a much shorter period for the ultimate redemption of the loan than would be possible under the proposed Ordinance. The charge for interest will also be minimised; as the Debentures will be issued only as funds may be required.

The Committee therefore resolve that it is undesirable to proceed further with the Loan Bill in its present shape.'

""

HONGKONG, 4th November, 1885.

MOTION.-The Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, moved "That an enquiry be made into the over-charges recently made by the owners of cargo-boats to the detriment of shipping interests, and that the Registrar General's Department be empowered to deal with all such grievances," and addressed the Council.

The Honourable T. JACKSON Seconded, and addressed the Council.

The Attorney General replied.

15

The Honourable P. RYRIE then moved-That a select Committee of this Council consisting of the Honourable the Attorney General, the Honourable the Colonial Treasurer, the Honourable P. RYRIE, and the Honourable F. D. SASSOON, with the mover as Chairman, be appointed to enquire into this

matter.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE LOAN ORDINANCE, 1885.--DISCHARGED.--The Honourable the Attorney General stated that in face of the resolution of the Finance Committee, which had been communicated to the Council, it was not intended to proceed with this Bill, and asked that the order for going into Committee on it might be discharged.

Question-put and passed.

The Governor then addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.-I think it right to inform you that I have always concurred with the principle of the resolution adopted by the Finance Committee, viz., that it is expedient to raise the small proposed loan locally. As most of you already know, I transmitted a proposal in this direction so far back as in last April. I will now forward by next mail the Resolution adopted by the Finance Committee, and recommend it to the early and favourable consideration of Her Majesty's Government, with a request that I may be informed by telegraph of its decision.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRISON ORDINANCE, 1885.--COMMITTED.--On the motion of the Attorney General the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment and the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of the Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 11th instant, at 4 P.M.

G. F. BOWEN,

Read and confirmed, this 11th day of November, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

"

܃

Governor.

है

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 6.

WEDNESDAY, 11TH NOVEMBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWart, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

17.

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

"1

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

>>

WONG SHING.

>>

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

>>

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor:-

C.S.O.

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sum:-

2699 of 1885.

For expenses in connection with the Law Revision Commission,.........

Government House, November 11th, 1885.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

165.00

BILL ENTITLED THE MUNICIPAL RATES ORDINANCE, 1885.-SECOND READING.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Treasurer, this Bill was read a second time.

The Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council on the subject of this Bill, and read the follow- ing letter from the Leaseholders, and Occupiers of land on Kowloon Point (Tsimshat‘sui) :-

To the Honourable P. RYRIE,

Member of the Legislative Council.

HONGKONG, 11th November, 1885.

SIR,--We, the undersigned, leaseholders or occupiers of land on what is now called Kowloon Point (lately Tsimshatsui) beg to call your attention to the following facts, whereby we trust that you will be able to do something for our interest at the meeting of the Legislative Council this afternoon when the second reading of the Municipal Rates Ordinance, 1885, Bill takes place.

Up to the 30th June last the rate on all British Kowloon was 5 per cent. After that time it was raised to 6 per cent. per annum, and it is now proposed by the new Ordinance to raise the rate on that part of British Kowloon now called Kowloon Point to 8 per cent. per annum, the rate on Yaumáti to be apparently only five per cent. We are not aware that it has become necessary to increase the Police force on Kowloon Point and we fail to see why Yaumáti (where there is a Police Station) which contains a large number, no doubt, of turbulent people, salt smugglers amongst the number, should only be rated at five per cent. per annum. We respectfully submit that if it has become necessary to augment the Police force at Kowloon Point it must be in consequence of the increase of Chinese at Yaumáti and not of any larger number of foreign residents at Kowloon Point, and that therefore it is not the Kowloon Point leaseholders who should be called upon to pay increased Municipal rates, but that the rate on Yaumáti should be raised if necessary, and that on Kowloon Point kept at its present figure of 6 per cent. per annum.

18

We further submit for consideration that as a great distinction is made between the rates levied on Foreign occupied houses in the British, American and French Settlements in Shanghai, and those occupied by Natives, the rates in the two former Settlements being in 1883 (and probably in 1884 and 1885 the same distinction was and has been made) 8 per cent. on foreign occupied houses, and 10 per cent. on houses occupied by natives and in the French Settlement the rate was 4 per cent. on foreign,. and 8 per cent. on native occupied houses. Such distinction should also now be made in Hongkong and Kowloon, as there can be no doubt that a much larger Police force is required to keep the peace amongst the Chinese inhabitants, than amongst the Foreign community.

The men at the Water Police Station on Kowloon Point may at any time be all wanted on the water, and they should not therefore be considered as part of the force for the protection of Kowloon Point.

Trusting that you will kindly give us your assistance in Council on the above subject, we remain, Sir, your obedient servants,

JAMES H. Cox.

DORABJEE NOWROJEE. E. L. WOODIN.

A. WOOLLEY.

M. D'AZEVEDO.

H. E. DENSON.

JNO. D. HUMPHREYS.

W. G. HUMPHREYS.

C. P. CHATER.

A. R. MADAR. HENRY J. HOLMES.

The Attorney General replied, and gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Council go into Committee on the Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRISON ORDINANCE, 1885.-PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put--that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

POSTPONEMENT of the other Orders OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 18th instant, at 4 P.M.

7.

Read and confirmed, this, 18th day of November, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 7.

WEDNESDAY, 18TH NOVEMBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

"

"}

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

""

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 11th instant, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper:—

Surveyor General's Report on the Tytam Water Works. (No. 7).

THE SPIRITS BILL,-POSTPONEMENT OF-The Governor informed the Council that it had been decided not to proceed further with this Bill until the beginning of 1886, and addressed the Council as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN,-Before proceeding to the Order of the day, I desire to acquaint the Council with the course of proceeding that has been decided upon by my Government with respect to the proposed Spirits Ordinance. This Bill, as you are aware, has already been read a first time, and published in the Gazette for general information. As I stated in the Speech with which I opened this Session, the additional revenue to be raised by this measure was intended to cover the interest and sinking fund of the Loan proposed for certain extraordinary public works, chiefly of Water Supply, Sanitation, and Defence. As the Council already knows, it is not intended to borrow during the year 1886 more than $400,000, the charge for which sum would be about $20,000. Now I have much pleasure in announcing that a new arrangement has been made by which the Opium Farm will realise next year an increase over the current year of $24,000, which will more than cover the first year's charge for interest. Under these altered circumstances, it has been decided not to proceed further with the Spirits Ordinance before the beginning of 1886, when the accounts for the current year will have been laid on the table; and the Council will be in a position to judge more accurately than is possible at present of the future financial position of the Colony. It is confidently hoped that the progressive development of our commerce, now relieved from the depression caused by the recent hostilities in this part of the world, will of itself lead to a growing extension of the public revenue.

The following Members also addressed the Council, in rotation, on this subject :-

The Honourable T. JACKSON.

A.

P. RYRIE.

"1

F. D. SASSOON.

29

>>

THE COLONIAL TREASURER.

WONG SHING.

20

BILL ENTITLED THE CATTLE DISEASE ORDINANCE.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a first time.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Orders.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill was read a second time.

The Council then went into committee on the Bill.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments, and the addition of a clause.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER Orders of the DAY.-The Attorney General moved the postpone- ment of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 25th instant, at 4. P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 25th day of November, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

1

G. F. BOWEN,

Governor.

**

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 8.

WEDNESDAY, 25TH NOVEMBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

27

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

""

WONG SHING.

+

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

The Council met in pursuance of adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 18th instant, were read and confirmed. VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Governor:-

G. F. BOWEN.

The Governor recommends the Council to vote the following sums :-

C.S.O. 1838 of 1885.

For Salaries of Servants for the Gaol Officers, instead of Servants from among

the prisoners:-

From 1st December, 1885, to 30th November, 1886,-

1st Cook at $9 per month,

2nd

at $8

Three Servants at $7 each, per month,

$ 108.00

96.00

252.00

$

456.00

..£2,767 @ 3/5-$16,197.07

2712 of 1885.

C.S.O. For Balance due by the Colony up to 31st January, 1883, for Colonial share

of expenses for Postal Convention,

Government House, 25th November, 1885.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer, seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE 8 OF 1860.--COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with a few verbal amendments.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next Meeting of Council he would move the third reading of the Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Order of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 2nd proximo, at 4 P.M.

G. F. BOWEN,

Read and confirmed, this 2nd day of December, 1885.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

Governor.

21

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 10.

WEDNESDAY, 9TH DECEMBER, 1885.

PRESENT:

.HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR

(SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

""

""

35

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

25

""

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Colonial Secretary, (WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.), on leave.

""

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 2nd instant, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Governor, laid on the table the following paper :-

Despatch respecting the submission in future of the Municipal taxation to the Legislative

Council. (No. 8).

BILL ENTITLED THE MUNICIPAL RATES ORDINANCE, 1885.-IN COMMITTEE.-The Council resumed consideration, in Committee, of this Bill.

The Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council at length on clause 20, pointing out that Quarry Bay should not be rated the same as Victoria.

The Attorney General replied.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments, and the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General moved the suspension of the Standing Orders.

The Acting Colonial Secretary seconded.

Question-put and passed.

On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do Bill passed,

pass.

His Excellency the Governor then said :-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN,-I desire to state that it is highly satisfactory to me that I should have now passed an Ordinance which, for the first time in the history of this Colony, places the entire taxation under the control of this Council.

FAREWELL ADDRESS OF HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR.-His Excellency the Governor was pleased to speak as follows:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,

I desire to announce officially to you that I intend to proceed from this Colony to India, on my way to England, on the 19th of this month. As you are already aware, I had obtained leave of absence on medical certificate at the beginning of this year, but I then felt that it was my duty to remain at my post during the protracted crisis of the Franco-Chinese hostilities, and of the threatened war with Russia. Her Majesty's Government have expressed "their high appreciation of the public spirit which led me to this decision." Now that peace has been restored, the permission to return to England has been renewed. After twenty-six years' continuous service as the Representative of the Queen in five Colonies successively, it will be agreed that I have fully earned a period of rest.

2. One of the most eminent of the Governors of Crown Colonies, in bidding farewell to his Council, remarked: "I think it very useful that the last Address of a Governor should be exhaustive; that it should touch on all subjects of public interest; that it should be a standard of comparison by which the progress of the Colony may be measured at different epochs." Accordingly, in pursuance of the custom established elsewhere, I will take advantage of this opportunity to place on record a

4

26

brief review of the principal acts of my administration here, which has lasted for nearly three years. These years have been very critical and eventful both as regards this Colony, the centre of British power, influence and commerce in the Far East, and also as regards European interests generally in this quarter of the globe, which contains one-fourth of the human race, and which must yet fill a great place in the history of the world.

3. Soon after my assumption of this Government in the early part of the year 1883, I satisfied myself, after careful study of the position of your affairs, that there were three subjects of pressing importance to which I should first direct my special attention. These were:-

(a.) The reconstitution of the Legislative Council.

(b.) The commencement of the much-needed Works of Water-supply and Sanitation. (c.) The Defence of the Colony.

gave

4. To the reconstitution of this Council, so as to make it representative of the Colony generally, I attached primary importance; for when an energetic English community like that of Hongkong has acquired an adequate voice and control in the management of its own local and municipal affairs, all necessary and well-considered internal reforms should follow. Accordingly, I procured the assent of the Imperial Government to a large increase in the number of the un-official members, while I the privilege of freely nominating their own representatives to the two principal Public Bodies, viz. the Bench of Magistrates and the Chamber of Commerce, which comprise the chief residents of every nationality. Thus the property, intelligence, and education of the Colony are now directly repre- sented in this Council. I observed in a previous address: "it will always be one of the most satisfactory reminiscences of my long public career that I have been able to procure a more adequate representation in this Council of the community at large.'

""

5. Again, when I found that under the former law of this Colony, the power of assessing the Municipal taxation was vested solely in the Governor, I procured the consent of Her Majesty's Government to the removal of this anomaly, which was probably without precedent in any other part of the British Empire. Thus, here as elsewhere, the entire taxation of the Colony will henceforth be under the control of the Colonial Legislature.

6. Moreover, in opening the Session for 1884, I addressed you as follows: "For obvious reasons, it is in the highest degree important that this Council should adhere to the constitutional forms followed by the Legislatures of the other principal Crown Colonies. The address of the Governor at the opening of each annual Session will contain, here as elsewhere, a general view of the Financial and Social condition of the Colony, and a statement of the Legislative and other measures, and of the public works proposed. So the Address of the Council in reply will afford the members of the Legislature the usual constitutional opportunity of expressing their opinion of the conduct and proposals of the Government." To these observations you replied as follows: "We concur in the advisability of assimilating the proceedings of this Legislature to the constitutional forms established in the other principal Crown Colonies."

7. Simultaneously with the steps taken towards the reconstitution of this Council, I gave authority, with your consent, for the commencement of those large measures of Water-supply and Sanitation, which Mr. CHADWICK, the Commissioner sent out from England, had reported to be absolutely necessary "for the immediate benefit of the public health;" but which were in abeyance on my arrival. Among the more prominent of these public works have been the very extensive improvements and additions to the main drainage of the City; and to the roadways and pavements, more especially in the Chinese quarters; together with the organization of a complete system of practical sanitation and daily removal of waste products; the reclamation and embanking of noxious foreshores at Kennedy Town, Hung- hòm, and Yaumáti, and their conversion into healthy and remunerative building land; the extension of the City to the westward, and the opening out of new areas to the commercial and industrial enterprise of the Colony; the construction of mountain roads for the health and recreation of the community, and the utilization of mountain sites for the erection of summer residences; the continued spread of tree-planting in the hitherto arid hill districts of the island, to the eventual amelioration of the climate; these, and many other kindred works of scarcely less interest to the health and well- being of the people, have been inaugurated with your assistance and by your votes, during my adminis-

tration.

8. You are already aware that, while authorising the works required for the internal health and progress of the Colony, I took early and effective measures for its external defence. On May 12th, 1883, only six weeks after my assumption of this Government, I opened the question of the Defences in an elaborate despatch to the Secretary of State, in which, after entering fully into detailed statements and arguments, I added: "It has been frequently shown that Hongkong commands our trade routes in the Far East; that shipping to the amount of above five millions of tons (a larger tonnage than that which entered the Port of London forty years ago), yearly enters this Port; and that it is of paramount importance not to suffer any nation, or possible confederacy of nations, to destroy or lessen the prestige and influence of Great Britain with China and Japan, those rich and vast countries which have in all human probability a great future before them." I concluded in the following terms :— "I submit that your Lordship should move the War Office to prepare a full and final plan for the

f

defences of Hongkong, and that such plan should be transmitted to both the Governor and the General Commanding the Troops, with instructions to use all the authority and influence of their respective offices to assist in carrying it into execution." I followed up this opening by a long series of official despatches and of private letters to English Statesmen, and to the chief Authorities at the War Office. My persistent representations, aided by those of the Naval and Military Authorities at this Station, and by the energetic support of this Council, have led to the undertaking of that system of Defence Works which is now being vigorously pushed forward by General CAMERON. Moreover, my application, also su pported by this Council, for a flotilla of torpedo boats was granted by Her Majesty's Government. As I said in a recent address: "It is morally certain that our defences by land and sea will be com- pleted before there will be any occasion to test them; and, as you already know, the highest Naval and Military Authorities in the Empire consider that, when completed, they will place Hongkong in safety against foreign attack."

9. I may next remind you that the action of my Government throughout the difficult and delicate crisis of the Franco-Chinese hostilities met with the entire approval of the Imperial Government. With the support of Admiral Sir W. DOWELL, with whom I was in constant communication, I main- tained British rights and British neutrality, and, at the same time, I preserved friendly relations with the Belligerent Powers. Socially, I made the Government House a neutral ground on which English, French, American, German, Russian, Italian, Chinese, and Japanese Ministers, Admirals, Generals, and other high Officers, on visiting this Port, frequently met, and so learned to be in good humour with England, and to some extent with each other.

10. I have never failed to direct, from time to time, the attention of the Imperial Government, and of the British Legation at Peking, to measures calculated to advance the interests of the mercantile community, such as the opening to commerce of the great South-Western Provinces of China. The cordial co-operation of the Chamber of Commerce has never failed me.

11. Throughout my administration, I have devoted much care to the improvement of the public institutions and establishments; and, above all, to public education. I have elsewhere expressed my belief that the new Victoria College, with its scholarships enabling some of the most promising students to complete their education in England, will render an important service not only to this Colony, but also ultimately to the neighbouring Empire of China; and that this will prove a powerful and honourable method of extending British influence. Already indeed several men in high office under the Chinese Government owe their education to the schools established at Hongkong under British auspices.

12. In connection with our public establishments, I desire to place on record my high appreciation of the ability, diligence, and public spirit of the Heads of the chief Departments of Government who form the Executive Council; and of the faithful and efficient discharge of their duty by the Civil Service generally.

13. With regard to Legislation, there have been passed during my administration fifty-five Ordinances; many of which are additions of permanent value to the Statute-Book.

14. To sum up :-The reconstitution of this Council, with increased control over the management of the local affairs and taxation of the Colony ;--the extensive Works of Water-supply, Sanitation, and Defence ;--the new Victoria College; the new Public Park; the reclamation of Causeway Bay; together with many other important Public Works; a large amount of useful and practical legislation; these must ever remain permanent monuments alike of my administration, and of your support. Whatever measure of success may have been gained by my Government, it could not have been achieved without your able, experienced, and hearty assistance. As I remarked once before, "Governors and Legislatures should speak by their actions;" and it is confidently hoped that our united efforts will be found hereafter to have promoted the general welfare of all races and classes in this Colony.

Finally, in bidding you Farewell, I pray that you, Honourable Gentlemen, and the long line of your successors in this Council, may exercise your important functions through years of growing prosperity and happiness. During the brief period of forty-three years which have elapsed since this island, then barren and desolate, was erected into a British Colony, it has risen, by the blessing of Providence on the enterprise and energy of our race, to the proud position of the third greatest Mart of shipping in the British Empire, ranking next after London and Liverpool. If this city cannot boast the ancient historical associations of the great cities of the Mother-Country, it will be remembered that (as it has been truly observed), the lot cannot be considered otherwise than fortunate of those who have to make, instead of inheriting history.

The Honourable P. RYRIE then addressed His Excellency as follows:-

Your Excellency, I rise to move an address in reply to the eloquent address you have just given us. It gives me much pleasure to record that since you have been President of this Council your management of the public business of the colony has been such as I have never seen equalled in this chamber. I think that since we have had these regular meetings the business has gone on much more smoothly, and if anything happens we always meet again very soon and can put the matter straight.

27

• 28

The Council has, during the whole of your time here, been a most harmonious one. Now and then there have been discussions; perhaps I myself have been the greatest disturber of the peace-but the other members of Council have taken my ebullitions very good naturedly, your Excellency especially. With these remarks, if your Excellency will allow me, I will read the address in reply :--

MAY IT PLEASE YOUR EXCELLENCY.

We, the Members of the Legislative Council, have listened with great interest to your Excellency's review of the history and progress of public affairs during the term of your administration of this Government. This period, though shorter than a Governor's usual tenure of office, has been marked by events of the greatest interest to the communities in the Far East, and more especially to the com- munity of this Colony. We agree with your Excellency as to the undoubted usefulness of a glance at the past, which is too apt, under the continuous pressure of business, to be forgotten in the absorbing interests of the present.

2. Your Excellency's administration will always be associated in our minds with much personal kindness, consideration, and hospitality, as well as with the memory of a constant and assiduous attention to facilitating the course of public business.

3. We are glad of this opportunity of acknowledging the great services your Excellency has rendered to the cause of good government in this Colony by your successful efforts towards a larger and fairer representation of its community, and a more effective control of our finances. We have lately learned with pleasure the progress made in our greatest public work, the extensive scheme for improving the water-supply of the city. We cannot but regard with satisfaction the rapid and indeed wonderful development of this Colony, both during the past forty years and as it is proceeding at present; and we are happy to think that the day is not far distant when the defences of Hongkong may be considered commensurate with the magnitude of the interests to be protected. We join with your Excellency in the fervent hope that the public works commenced, and the changes inaugurated during your administration will bear ample fruit in the future to the permanent benefit of the Colony.

4. We rejoice that a tedious and desolating war has been brought to a close, and the difficult questions raised by it happily terminated. We congratulate your Excellency on the success with which you maintained the difficult attitude of neutrality during the serious crisis forced on this Colony by conflicting interests of international importance.

5. In cordially reciprocating your Excellency's kind expressions, we can only hope that every administration of the Government of Hongkong will be marked by an observance of the same sound constitutional rules which have invariably guided you, by the same healthful freedom of speech and abundant opportunity for debate, and by the same avoidance of any tendency to infuse private views and individual fancies into the legitimate current of public business.

6. With these words we respectfully bid your Excellency Farewell, hoping that you may long enjoy the rest earned by more than a quarter of a century's service, and that your unequalled experience may be found of service in the Councils of the Empire.

His Excellency replied as follows :—

I can only say a few words in thanking my Honourable Friend, the Senior Un-official Member, for the extremely kind terms in which he has spoken of me; and I thank the Council for this most gratifying reply to my address. I shall always as long as I live treasure it as one of the most precious heirlooms of my family.

There being no other business on the Order of the Day, the Council adjourned until Wednesday, the 6th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 6th day of January, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 11.

WEDNESDAY, 6TH JANUARY, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

(WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

"

THOMAS JACKSON.

""

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

29

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Governor, (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.), on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 9th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following paper:-

The Postmaster General's Report for 1885. (No. 9).

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time :-

1. A Bill to repeal the Usury Laws and to fix a legal Rate of Interest.

2. A Bill to regulate the printing of Newspapers and Books and the keeping of Printing Presses

within the Colony.

3. A Bill to empower the Colonial Treasurer to pay otherwise than to Executors or Administrators

small Sums due on account of Pay or Allowances to Persons deceased.

4. A Bill for the better Apportionment of Rents and other periodical Payments.

5. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Larceny and Embezzlement.

6. A Bill to amend the Law relating to the Custody of Infants.

7. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Sales of Reversions.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of these Bills.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 13th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed; this 13th day of January, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

}

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 12.

WEDNESDAY, 13TH JANUARY, 1886.

31

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

21

">

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

>>

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

"?

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Governor, (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.), on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 6th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a second time:-

1. A Bill to repeal the Usury Laws and to fix a legal Rate of Interest.

2. A Bill to regulate the printing of Newspapers and Books and the keeping of Printing Presses

within the Colony.

3. A Bill to empower the Colonial Treasurer to pay otherwise than to Executors or Administrators

small Sums due on account of Pay or Allowances to Persons deceased.

4. A Bill for the better Apportionment of Rents and other periodical Payments.

5. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Larceny and Embezzlement.

6. A Bill to amend the Law relating to the Custody of Infants.

7. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Sales of Reversions.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Council

go into Committee on these Bills.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 20th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 20th day of January, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 13.

WEDNESDAY, 20TH JANUARY, 1886.

33

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY THE OFFICER ADMINISTERING THE GOVERNMENT

ELLENCY

(WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.)

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED Lister.)

3)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

"}

WONG SHING.

"}

ABSENT:

His Excellency the Governor, (SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.), on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 13th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

2421 of 1885.

C.S.O.

14 of 1886.

C.O. Circular Despatch of

W. H. MARSH.

(1.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sum:-

For rent of a house in Wyndham Street, to be used as a prison for females, at $40

per month,

Government House, Hongkong, 19th January, 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

$ 480.00

(2.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $23,000 for the erection of a Sea-wall and embankment at Tsimshatsui, to prevent the further eating away by the sea of the valuable marine building sites in that locality.

The Government is pledged to undertake this work, and as it is estimated that the reclaimed area, which will be rendered available for sale when the work is completed, will realize a sum of at least $35,000, the Council will no doubt see no difficulty in voting this extra expenditure.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th January, 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

(3.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to 13th Nov., vote the small sum of £10.10.0 for an annual subscription to the Strangers' Home

for Asiatics, Africans, and South Sea Islanders, say £10.10.0 @ 3/4,.

1885.

$ 63.00

The Secretary of State for the Colonies has called attention to this Home, which is situated in West India Dock Road, Limehouse, London, and is represented to have done considerable service to the Colonies in taking charge of natives in distress. The amount contributed annually by some other Colonies is the same as that now asked for.

Government House, Hongkong, 19th January, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

34

BILLS COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the following Bills :---

1. A Bill to empower the Colonial Treasurer to pay otherwise than to Executors or Administrators

small Sums due on account of Pay or Allowances to Persons deceased.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment, and the addition of a clause.

2. A Bill for the better Apportionment of Rents and other periodical Payments.

Bill reported with some verbal amendments.

3. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Larceny and Embezzlement.

Bill reported with a verbal amendment.

4. A Bill to amend the Law relating to the Custody of Infants.

Bill reported without amendment.

5. A Bill to amend the Law relating to Sales of Reversions. Bill reported without amendment.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of these Bills.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 27th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 27th day of January, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH,

Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 14.

WEDNESDAY, 27TH JANUARY, 1886.

35

!

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

""

""

""

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

"}

"}

"

WONG SHING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 20th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

2985 of 1885.

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the sum of $5,000 which was not expended last year on the re-construction of Pedder's Wharf.

The Surveyor General has recommended that the pier should be constructed of Aranga wood which is much more durable than the ordinary hard wood. This would raise the original estimate from $10,000 to $14,300. It therefore becomes necessary to provide the additional sum of $4,300 which, with the $5,000 in this year's estimates, and the $5,000 to be re-voted, will meet the revised estimate of the cost of the pier.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote this additional sum of $4,300.

Government House, Hongkong, 25th January, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following votes passed by the Finance Committee :---

2421 of 1885.

PAYMENTS AUTHORIZED IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES OF 1886.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Gaol.

For rent of a house in Wyndham Street, to be used as a prison for females, at $40

per month,......

Roads, Streets and Bridges.

C.S. Erection of a Sea-wall and embankment at Kowloon Point,

14 of 1886.

C.O.

Miscellaneous Services.

.$ 480.00

.$23,000.00

Co. Circular Subscription to the Strangers' Home for Asiatics, Africans, and South Sea Islanders,

of

13 Nov., 1885.

say,...

Seconded by the Colonial Treasurer.

Question-put and passed.

..£10.10.0 @ 3/4-$ 63.00

:

36

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following paper :-

Report of the Captain Superintendent of Police, for 1885. (No. 10).

QUESTION.--The Honourable W. KESWICK, pursuant to notice, asked the following question: A difference in interpretation having been given to the law regulating the survey of coppered vessels since April, 1884, and a practice having been introduced since that date, which is at variance with that which was followed for at least as far back as 1879, will His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government state why the change has been made, and a new, and, it is believed, unnecessary procedure adopted?

The Honourable the Attorney General replied.

The Honourable W. KESWICK gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move a resolution on this subject.

BILL ENTITLED THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS ORDINANCE, 1886.-FIRST READING.- On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move the second reading of this Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS ORDINANCE, 1886,-COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported.

BILLS READ A THIRD TIME, AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a third time, and passed :-

1. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to empower the Colonial Treasurer to pay otherwise than to Executors or Administrators small Sums due on account of Pay or Allow- ances to Persons deceased.

2. A Bill entitled An Ordinance for the better Apportionment of Rents and other periodical

Payments.

3. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Larceny and Embezzlement.

4. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to the Custody of Infants.

5. A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Sales of Reversions. POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Orders of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 3rd February, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of February, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 15.

WEDNESDAY, 3RD FEBRUARY, 1886.

37

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

""

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

""

"

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 27th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read, the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O. 66 of 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government lays before the Council an application which he bas received from the Chairman of the Commission appointed by Sir GEORGE BOWEN in January, 1885, to arrange for the proper representation of Hongkong at the Colonial and Indian Exhi- bition to be held in London this year. The Chairman on behalf of the Commission asks for a further grant by Government of £2,000 to meet the expenditure on account of the exhibits forwarded by this Colony, the sum of £500 which was voted by this Council on 4th November, last, having proved wholly inadequate for that object.

Part of the exhibits have already gone forward, and the remainder are nearly ready to be shipped. His Excellency recommends the Council to vote the further sum now asked for, by the Commission, to enable the Colony to be worthily represented at the Colonial and Indian Exhibition.

Government House, Hongkong, 28th January, 1886.

By direction of His Excellency, the Acting Colonial Secretary laid on the table the correspondence on the subject of the above Minute (C.S.O. 66 of 1886).

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved, and the Colonial Treasurer seconded, that the above Minute be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Honourable W. KESWICK moved, as an amendment, that the proposed vote be taken into consideration now without being referred to the Finance Committee.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Honourable W. KESWICK, pursuant to notice, moved the following resolution, and addressed the Council:-

That it is desirable to amend the Merchant Shipping Consolidation Ordinance, 1879, by adding immediately after the words (1) That the hull of the ship is sufficient for the service intended and in good condition (section V sub-section 8 clause (a) paragraph 1.), the words following, that is to say, provided that such Government Surveyor shall declare that the hull of any wooden paddle-wheeled river steamer is sufficient for the service intended and in good condi- tion without requiring such river steamer to be docked, if it be reasonably proved to him that such river steamer has been re-metalled within the three years immediately preceding the date of survey and that she has not grounded since the last survey.

The Honourable P. RYRIE, seconded and addressed the Council.

38

The Honourable the Attorney General addressed the Council, suggesting a reference of the ques- tion for the consideration of the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

The Honourable T. JACKSON addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council in support of the Attorney General's suggestion.

The Honourable W. KESWICK then withdrew his motion, promising to state a case for the con- sideration of the Secretary of State.

BILL ENTITLED THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS ORDINANCE, 1886.—SECOND READING. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a second time.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move that the Council go

into Committee on this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Honourable P. RYRIE moved, and the Honourable T. JACKSON Seconded, that the other Orders of the Day be postponed.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 10th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of February, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH,

Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 16.

WEDNESDAY, 10TH FEBRUARY, 1886.

39

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'Malley.)

29

29

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

"}

A

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

";

WONG SHING.

".

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL TO REGULATE THE PRINTING OF NEWSPAPERS AND BOOKS, AND THE KEEPING OF PRINTING PRESSES WITHIN THE COLONY.-IN COMMITTEE.--The Council resumed consideration in Committee of this Bill.

After some discussion, the Bill was reported with amendments.

The Attorney General gave notice that, at the next meeting of Council, he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILL TO REPEAL THE USURY LAWS AND TO FIX A LEGAL RATE OF INTEREST.---COMMITTED.-Ön the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendments, and the addition of a clause.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCES AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-The Attorney General moved the post- ponement of the other Order of the Day.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned until Wednesday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of February, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 17.

WEDNESDAY, 17TH FEBRUARY, 1886.

41

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

2)

""

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED Lister.)

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

"}}

WONG SHING.

??

!

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

W. H. MARSH.

(1.) The Officer Administering the Government lays before the Council a despatch which he has just received from the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject of the defences of Hongkong.

It will be remembered that the original proposals sanctioned by the War Office embraced works the estimated cost of which was £55,625, whilst the corresponding armament was to cost only £37,500.

It was stated in the despatch of Lord DERBY of the 17th September, 1884, which was laid before the Council, that Her Majesty's Government had arrived at the decision that the Colony of Hongkong should defray only the cost of the necessary works, the Imperial Government contributing the armament. The Council was accordingly asked by Sir GEORGE BOWEN, on the 10th December, 1884, to vote the sum of £55,625 required for the construction of these works.

Before agreeing to vote the sum required for the construction of the works there was considerable discussion in the Finance Committee, owing to an impression that the armament which was to be sent out was altogether inadequate, and the vote was passed with the understanding "that the armament to be provided by the Imperial Government would be of the best and latest pattern of breech-loading ordnance and capable of resisting attacks by the heaviest modern ironclads.'

7%

Sir GEORGE BOWEN did not fail to represent strongly on several occasions the wish of the community that Hongkong should be properly defended, and Generals SARGENT and CAMERON have supported his recommandations with all the weight of their long professional experience.

The result of these recommendations has been that the scheme of defence has been very carefully re-considered. Instead of three new works and remounting guns in existing works, the new scheme of defence includes four new works and three new sites for single heavy guns, and, whilst omitting the works originally proposed at Quarry Bay, it substitutes a complete defence of the Ly-ee Mun Channel. The weight and power of guns have been so greatly increased that much more massive and costly foundations and emplacements have to be provided for them. An idea of the difference in the guns now proposed from those originally contemplated may be gathered from the revised estimate of cost of the armaments, which, instead of being £37,500, will now amount to £118,500.

the

42

In June, 1885, the Major-General Commanding represented to the Governor the necessity of a large increase in the amount contributed by the Colony, in order to meet the cost of the improved and extended works of defence, and, in accordance with the Colonial Regulations, the Governor referred the question to the Secretary of State before asking the Council to vote the necessary sum. The Despatch now laid before the Council conveys the sanction of Her Majesty's Government to the application for such vote. It will be seen from this Despatch and its enclosure that the revised estimate of the cost of constructing the Defence Works is £116,000 instead of £55,625.

.

The Secretary of State for the Colonies has no doubt that the Council will loyally consent to vote the necessary amount for completing the Defences of Hongkong in an efficient manner. The Officer Administering the Government therefore asks the Council to vote the additional sum of £60,375. It appears doubtful whether any part will be spent before 1887, but it is necessary that a vote should be passed to enable the Royal Engineers' Department to enter into contracts for the execution of the works.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th February, 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

(2.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the following

C.S.O.

sums:

353 of 1886. Amount due to the late Contractor for the Scavenging of the City during

the first 6 days of November, 1885,

Government House, Hongkong, 16th February, 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

296.00

(3.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to re-vote the following

sums:

C.S.O. 2582 of 1885.

C.S.O.

For re-building the retaining wall below the Civil Hospital, damaged by

the recent fire,

2569 of 1885. For building a retaining wall to prevent landslips at the rear of Inland

Lot 696, East of the Government Civil Hospital,

$ 8,000.00

.$ 945.00

Owing to the late period of the year at which these votes were passed (November, 1885), it was not possible to complete the works.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th February, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Votes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

THE LATE HONOURABLE F. B. JOHNSON.-The Honourable P. RYRIE, referring to the news just received of the death of the Honourable F. B. JOHNSON, formerly a Member of this Council, moved a vote of condolence with the widow and family of the deceased.

The Honourable T. JACKSON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

BILLS PASSED. On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secre- tary, the following Bills were read a third time and passed :-

(a.) Bill to regulate the printing of Newspapers and Books and the keeping of Printing Presses

within the Colony.

(b.) Bill to repeal the Usury Laws and to fix a legal Rate of Interest.

BILL ENTITLED THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCE, AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1886.-FIRST READING. -On the motion of the Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Ordinance was read a first time.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of this Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS ORDINANCE, 1886.-The Attorney General moved, and the Acting Colonial Secretary seconded that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

The Honourable W. KESWICK moved, as an amendment, that the Bill be referred to a Special Committee consisting of the following Members.

The Honourable THE ATTORNEY GENERAL.

THE TREASURER.

THE SURVEYOR GENERAL.

"}

P. RYRIE.

""

T. JACKSON.

""

""

WONG SHING, and

THE MOVER.

The Honourable F. D. SASSOON seconded.

Question-put and passed.

The Council then adjourned until Tuesday, the 23rd instant, at 4 P.M., to consider the Jury List for the year.

Read and confirmed, this 3rd day of March, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

43

45

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 18.

WEDNESDAY, 3RD MARCH, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY.)

>>

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

"

THOMAS JACKSON.

>>

"

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

WONG SHING.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following votes passed by the Finance Committee :---

C.S.O.

(Finance Committee, 17th February, 1886.)

,

2582 of 1885, and

377 of 1886.

C.S.O.

353 of 1886.

PAYMENTS AUTHORIZED IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

For re-building the retaining wall below the Civil Hospital, damaged by the recent

fire, re-vote,

Miscellaneous Services.

Amount due to the late Contractor for the scavenging of the City during the first

6 days of November, 1885, re-vote,....

.$ 8,000.00

.......S

296.00

EXTRAORDINARY WORKS.

2360 of 1885.

Coss. For building of a retaining wall to prevent landslips at the rear of Inland Lot 696,

East of the Government Civil Hospital, re-vote....

and

377 of 1886.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

.$ 945.00

BILL ENTITLED THE TRADE MARKS ORDINANCE, AMENDMENT ORDINANCE, 1886.-READ A SECOND TIME.--COMMITTED AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Attorney General. seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a second time.

The Attorney General then moved that the Council go into Committee on the Bill. Question-put and passed.

Bill reported without amendment.

Bill read a third time and passed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 10th instant, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 10th day of March, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

:

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 19.

WEDNESDAY, 10TH MARCH, 1886.

47

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

"}

>>

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

"}

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

"}

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON. `

11

WONG SHING.

,,

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 3rd instant, were read and confirmed. PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers, and moved that they be printed and referred to the Finance Committee:---

1. Despatch respecting Direct Telegraphic Communication between Hongkong and Singa-

pore. (No. 12.)

2. Despatch respecting the proposed Loan. (No. 13.)

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.--On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time :-

(a.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Vagrants.

(b.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law as to Sales of Land by Public Auction. (c.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Relief of Widows and Children of Intestates where

the personal estate is of small value.

(d.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Law for preventing Frauds

upon Creditors by Secret Bills of Sale of Personal Chattels.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 17th instant, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 17th day of March, 1886,

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

49

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 20.

WEDNESDAY, 17TH MARCH, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G..

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G,

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

>?

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.) the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON.

>>

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 10th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:---

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sum, viz.:-$450 to enable the Sanitary Board to carry out the special cleansing of tenements within the city.

The Board, with the approval of the Government, has decided that the Chinese community should be invited to give their dwellings a thorough special cleansing three times a year, such cleansings to take place as near to the 1st February, 1st June, and 1st October, as their festivals will permit; the Government rendering assistance in the way of supplying additional water, and providing additional facilities for the removal of refuse.

The Board estimate that each of these cleansings will cost $150, and the sum now recommended is to enable the Board to defray the expenses incurred under this heading during 1886.

During the last special cleansing, 180 tons above the average daily quantity of refuse were removed in this way.

Government House, Hongkong, 16th March, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

MINUTE.-INVASION OF TERRITORIAL RIGHTS OF THE COLONY.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:--

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government informs the Council that he has received a communication from Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking stating that he had made strong representations to the Ministers of the Tsungli Yamên on the unwarrantable action of the Chinese Officials in seizing a Chinese subject accused of piracy who had taken refuge in this Colony.

The Ministers have expressed their regret for what had occurred, and assured Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires that the Governor-General of Fuhkien would be directed to make suitable excuses to the Hongkong Government, and that instructions would be sent to the High Local Officials that Hongkong was British Territory, and that any invasion of its rights or territory must be very carefully guarded against in future.

Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires expresses the belief that the representations which he has made will effectually put a stop to such occurrences in future.

The British Consul at Foochow was some time ago informed by the Governor-General of Fuhkien that the Naval Officer in charge of the Ngai San had for his irregular conduct at Hongkong been deprived of his command and had had his button taken from him.

The status of Chinese Cruisers and their interference with the Junk trade of Hongkong will, it is hoped, be finally settled by the Commission to be appointed before long for the con- sideration of this question under the 7th Article of the 3rd Section of the Chefoo Convention.

Government House, Hongkong, 15th March, 1886.

50

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers:-

(a.) Despatch respecting the postponement of the proposed Loan. (No. 14.)

(b.) Despatch respecting the new Heavy Guns for Defensive purposes. (No. 15.)

(c.) Correspondence respecting Quarantine Regulations. (No. 16.)

VOTE OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following report of the Finance Committee :-

(Finance Committee, 12th March, 1886.)

Additional vote of £60,375 for Defences.

The Committee unanimously recommend the payment of the additional sum of £60,375 now asked for, but they do so on the distinct understanding that this vote shall be final for. the military and defensive purposes of the Colony.

To pay this sum and complete the essential public works in progress, the Colony must borrow; and the result will be, that interest and the provision of a sinking fund will so cripple the resources of the Colony, that urgently needed sanitary works must, for the present, be left in abeyance. The Colony, being merely a depôt, without natural products, is unable to increase its revenue to any appreciable extent, and it will be impossible for any further contribution to be made for military purposes.

The Committee next proceed to the consideration of the means to be devised for meeting the interest and the sinking fund in connection with the Loan which must be raised.

The Committee unanimously consider that the best means of doing so would chiefly be by an increase of Stamp Duty.

The Acting Colonial Secretary added that the Committee afterwards proceeded to consider the Loan Bill, the result of which will be brought up later, as His Excellency, the Officer Administering the Government was in communication with the Secretary of State for the Colonies on the subject.

The Honourable W. KESWICK moved that, as the subject treated in the above report was of vast importance to the Colony, the consideration of the report should be postponed to this day week.

The Honourable P. RYRIE seconded.

Question-put and passed.

THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS BILL.-REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE.---The Honourable W. KESWICK, Chairman of the Special Committee appointed to consider this Bill, presented the report of the Committee in the form of a revised Bill, and gave notice that when the Council went into Committee on the Bill he would move the addition of a clause.

QUESTION.-The Honourable W. KESWICK, pursuant to notice, asked the following question:-

When will the Lazaretto on Stone Cutters' Island be completed, and pending its con- struction, what provision will there be ready to meet any outbreak of infectious or contagious diseases?

The Surveyor General replied that the permanent buildings for the Lazaretto were contracted to be ready on the 1st of July next; and that, pending the completion of the permanent buildings, suitable accommodation was being provided for the reception of the sick, should occasion require it, in temporary and provisional matsheds.

WITHDRAWAL OF THE ECCLESIASTICAL GRANT.-The Honourable T. JACKSON gave notice that at the next meeting he would move the following resolutions, and introduce a Cathedral Bill:-

1.—That the Secretary of State for the Colonies be invited to reconsider the decision which has been arrived at as to the withdrawal of ecclesiastical grants in this Colony, with a view to the continuance of such grants, as in Singapore and in Mauritius.

2.-That the only expenditure which could be retrenched under the instructions received is a small salary, nominally of £800, but really of £640, paid to the Colonial Chaplain, and representing little more than remuneration for the necessary services of burying the dead, attendance at the gaol, at hospitals, &c.

3.-That if this salary be withdrawn, the Colony will have to pay nearly if not quite as much in allowances for these services, thus substituting a precarious and unsatisfactory arrangement for one which works to the satisfaction of all concerned.

4. That the instructions to disestablish the Church on the first opportunity were not called for by any public demand, and that no public feeling exists in the Colony on the subject except such as is adverse to the course proposed.

..

51

5.-That the policy of disestablishment, still far from being generally accepted at home, has been, as far as the information of this Council goes, distasteful to every Colony on which it has been imposed; that it has been reversed in two Colonies, and in at least one more continues to be an offence and a public grievance to the Community.

6.—That a doubtful policy of this kind should not be, in ignorance of many of the essential circumstances of the case, needlessly forced upon an unwilling community which, administering its own revenue, is more interested in guarding against the misappropriation of that revenue than any external authority can be.

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a second time:-

(a.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Vagrants.

(b.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law as to Sales of Land by Public Auction. (c) A Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Relief of Widows and Children of Intestates where

the personal estate is of small value.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Council go into Committee on these Bills.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Acting Attorney General moved that the other Orders of the Day be postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 24th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 24th day of March, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

:

4

ཏ ས

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 21.

WEDNESDAY, 24TH MARCH, 1886.

53

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

>>

23

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

11

the Surveyor, General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

THOMAS JACKSON.

WONG SHING.

29

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

>>

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 17th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minutes by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O. 649 of 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

(1.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $950, to enable the Sanitary Board to pay the expenses incurred in suppressing the recent Cattle Epidemic.

The sum asked for is thus made up:-

Disinfection and burial of carcases,

Disinfection of Cow-houses,

Destruction of suspected fodder,

..$ 80.00

150.00

130.00

Removal and destruction of suspected manure and litter. .84.00

Matsheds for segregation of Cattle,.

Miscellaneous,..

470.00

36.00

$950.00

C.S.Ó. 546 of 1886.

C.S.O.

666 of 1886.

(2.) The Officer Administering the Government lays before the Council for their con- sideration a letter (Paper No. 18) from Dr. DOBERCK, Director of the Observatory, representing that unless he has a second Chinese Clerk allowed to him it will be impossible for him to continue furnishing the weather forecasts and storm-warnings.

(3.) The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the. sum of $90 to provide a Chinese Teacher to give instruction in Chinese colloquial to Officers of the Gaol. (From 1st April to 31st December, 9 months, at $10 per month.)

Government House, Hongkong, 24th March, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these Minutes be referred to the Finance Committee.

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers:-

(a.) Report of the Director of the Observatory, for 1885. (No. 17.)

(b.) Application for an additional Chinese Clerk for the Observatory. (No. 18.)

:

54

DIRECT TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION BETWEEN HONGKONG AND SINGAPORE.---The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following report of the Finance Committee on this subject :-

The Committee, having read and duly considered the recent despatch of the Secretary of State regarding direct telegraphic communication between Hongkong and Singapore, are unanimously of opinion that, having regard to the demands now made on the resources of the Colony for defences and extraordinary public works, the Colony is not in a position, at present, to contribute to the subsidy required for the cable between the two Colonies. STEAM LAUNCH WHISTLES.-The Honourable P. RYRIE laid on the table the following Petition, addressed to the Council, and moved that the same be read:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL,-We, the undersigned, residents of Hongkong, beg most respectfully to bring to your notice, the great and increasing nuisance, caused by unnecessary steam launch whistling in this harbour, as embodied in the following facts:-

The Ferry Launches which ply to and fro between Victoria, Aberdeen, Yaumáti, &c., and rendezvous along the Praya, habitually keep their whistles going when moored alongside the Praya wall.

This noise constitutes a nuisance of the gravest possible description to all persons who live near, whether on the Praya or upper levels, on board vessels in the vicinity, or who have to transact business in their neighbourhood.

The nuisance is indirectly the cause of the continuous screaming which goes on in other parts of the harbour, when launches are in motion, for the simple reason, that the boating population are so accustomed to the abuse of steam-whistles generally, that no heed is paid to their warning, when put to their only legitimate use as danger signals.

Complaints have been laid before the Police and the Magistracy but we are informed that according to the present law bearing upon the subject, the matter is one that must be proved to be a public nuisance by several householders who must combine to prosecute, and this cumbrous form practically tends to encourage the evil, by permitting it to develop and flourish unchecked.

We therefore humbly beg, that a short Ordinance may be passed, giving the Police the necessary powers to deal summarily with offences of this nature, as public nuisance, by the imposition of fines, and/or the cancelling of licence.

We venture to think that an amendment of Ordinance 10 of 1872, or 8 of 1879, Section 7, Sub-Section 4 would suffice.

Hongkong, 24th March, 1886..

[Here follow the signatures.]

The Honourable W. KESWICK Seconded the motion, and addressed the Council.

Petition read.

DEFENCES. ADDITIONAL VOTE OF £60,375.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the adoption of the following recommendations of the Finance Committee in connection with this vote :—

The Committee unanimously recommend the payment of the additional sum of £60,375, now asked for; but they do so on the distinct understanding that this vote shall be final for the military and defensive purposes of the Colony.

To pay this sum and complete the essential public works in progress, the Colony must borrow; and the result will be that interest and the provision of a sinking fund will so cripple the resources of the Colony that urgently needed sanitary works must, for the present, be left in abeyance. The Colony being merely a depôt, without natural products, is unable to. increase its revenue to any appreciable extent, and it will be impossible for any further con- tribution to be made for military purposes.

The Honourable W. KESWICK seconded, and addressed the Council.

The Honourable P. RYRIE addressed the Council.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government also addressed the Council. Question-put and passed.

PROPOSED LOAN.-MEANS FOR REPAYING.-In connection with the above resolution, the Acting Colonial Secretary moved further that the following recommendation of the Finance Committee be adopted as a resolution of this Council :-

The Committee next proceeded to the consideration of the means to be devised for meeting the interest and the sinking fund in connection with the Loan which must be raised. The Committee unanimously consider that the best means of doing so would chiefly be by an increase of Stamp Duty.

The Honourable W. KESWICK seconded.

Question-put and passed.

55

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government said that an Ordinance would be laid before the Council in due course.

ECCLESIASTICAL GRANTS.-The Honourable T. JACKSON, pursuant to notice moved the following resolutions, and addressed the Council :--

1. That the Secretary of State for the Colonies be invited to reconsider the decision which has been arrived at as to the withdrawal of ecclesiastical grants in this Colony, with a view to the continuance of such grants, as in Singapore and in Mauritius.

2.—That the only expenditure which could be retrenched under the instructions received is a small salary, nominally of £800, but really of £640, paid to the Colonial Chaplain, and representing little more than remuneration for the necessary services of burying the dead, attendance at the gaol, at hospitals, &c.

3. That if this salary be withdrawn, the Colony will have to pay nearly if not quite as much in allowances for these services, thus substituting a precarious and unsatisfactory arrangement for one which works to the satisfaction of all concerned.

4.That the instructions to disestablish the Church on the first opportunity were not called for by any public demand, and that no public feeling exists in the Colony on the subject except such as is adverse to the course proposed.

5.-That the policy of disestablishment, still far from being generally accepted at home, has been, as far as the information of this Council goes, distasteful to every Colony on which it has been imposed; that it has been reversed in two Colonies, and in at least one more continues to be an offence and a public grievance to the Community.

6. That a doubtful policy of this kind should not be, in ignorance of many of the essential circumstances of the case, needlessly forced upon an unwilling community which, administering its own revenue, is more interested in guarding against the misappropriation of that revenue than any external authority can be.

The Honourable W. KESWICK seconded the motion, and addressed the Council.

Question-put and passed.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council and said that he would have much pleasure in transmitting these Resolutions to the Secretary of State.

BILL ENTITLED THE CATHEDRAL ORDINANCE, 1886.-FIRST READING.-On the motion of the Honourable T. JACKSON, seconded by the Treasurer, this Bill was read a first time.

BILL ENTITLED THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS Ordinance, 1886.---COMMITTED.- On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move that the Bill be read a third time.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO Vagrants.-COMMITTED.- On the motion of the Attorney General the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Progress reported.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE FOR THE INCORPORATION OF THE PROCURATOR OF THE DOMINICAN MISSIONS IN THE FAR EAST, IN HONGKONG.-The Surveyor General gave notice that at the next meet- ing of Council he would move the first reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Acting Attorney General moved that the other Orders of the Day be postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 31st instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 31st day of March, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH, Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

57

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 22.

WEDNESDAY, 31ST MARCH, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD. }

ASKARRA

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON (on leave).

17

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 24th instant, were read and confirmed. VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O. 678 of 1886.

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $1,386 for general repairs to Mountain Lodge at Victoria Peak.

This building, which for eight months in the year is submerged in fog, was, as far back as 1884, reported as shewing traces of decay from wet-rot, and again in 1885 the floors were reported as having still further decayed. Nothing has however been done in the shape of reconstruction during the last 2 years.

The Surveyor General reports that it is not prudent to defer any longer the work of restoration, the structure having now become positively unsafe.

Government House, Hongkong, 30th March, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee :---

.C.S.O.

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

(Finance Committee, 22nd March, 1886.)

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Sanitary.

168 of 1886. Special periódical cleansing of the City of Victoria, during the year,.

(Finance Committee, 24th March, 1886.)

C.S.O.

666 of 1886.

C.S.O.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Gaol.

....$ 450.00

Allowance :-To provide a Chinese Teacher to give instruction in Chinese colloquial

to Officers of the Gaol.

From 1st April to 31st December, 1886, 9 months, at $10 per month.................$ 90.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS. Sanitary.

649 of 1986. Expenses incurred in suppressing the recent Cattle Epidemic,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

....$ 950.00

1

58

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers :-

(a.) Report of the Superintendent of Victoria Gaol, for 1885. (No. 19.)

(b.) Minute by the Collector of Stamp Duty on a proposed increase of the duties by 50 per

cent. (No. 20.)

(c.) Statement showing the Total Receipts and Payments in the year 1885. (No. 21.) (d.) Comparative Statement of Revenues received during the last 10 years, 1876 to 1885.

(No. 22.)

(e.) Comparative Statement of Expenditure, during the last 10 years, 1876 to 1885. (No. 23.) (f.) Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1885. (No. 24.)

BILL ENTITLED THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.-FIRST READING.-REFERENCE TO SPECIAL COMMITTEE. On the motion of the Colonial Treasurer, seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE, this Bill was read a first time.

The Honourable T. JACKSON, and the Honourable W. KESWICK, respectively, addressed the Council. The Treasurer then addressed the Council, and moved that the Bill be referred to a Special Committee consisting of:-

The Honourable THE ACTING ATTORNEY GENERAL.

P. RYRIE.

>>

W. KESWICK.

";

T. JACKSON.

;"

29

WONG SHING, and THE MOVER.

His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council. Question-put and passed.

BILL ENTITLED THE SPIRIT LICENCE ORDINANCE, 1886.-FIRST READING.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, this Bill was read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of this Bill.

PRIVATE BILL.-On the motion of the Surveyor General, seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE, a Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Procurator for the Dominican Missions in the Far East, in Hongkong, was read a first time.

The Surveyor General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of this Bill.

BILL ENTITLED THE CATHEDRAL ORDINANCE, 1886.--MOTION FOR SECOND READING WITHDRAWN.—- The Honourable T. JACKSON withdrew the motion for the second reading of this Bill, pending its reference to the Secretary of State for the Colonies.

BILL ENTITLED THE RELIGIOUS CEREMONIES AND FESTIVALS ORDINANCE, 1886.-THIRD READING. --PASSED.On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Honourable W. KESWICK, this Bill was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND THE LAW RELATING TO VAGRANTS.—ÅDDITIONAL CLAUSE. The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move an additional clause to this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-The Acting Attorney General moved that the other Orders of the Day be postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 7th proximo, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of April, 1886.

ARATHOON SETHI,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

59

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 23.

WEDNESDAY, 7TH APRIL, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

""

""

"}

>>

""

??

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

THOMAS JACKSON. WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 31st ultimo, were read and confirmed. THE PROPOSED LOAN.-REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary read the following Report of the Finance Committee :-----

The Committee, although still thinking that, for many reasons, it would be preferable to raise the money locally, especially as there is now reason to believe that funds could be obtained here at 4 per cent., thus avoiding all risk of loss on Exchange, nevertheless unani- mously, assent to the proposal of the Secretary of State that the Loan should be issued in London, provided that a 4 per cent. Loan can be issued not below

par.

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time:—

(a.) A Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1886.

(b.) A Bill entitled The Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1886.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of these Bills.

BILL ENTITLED THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886. The Colonial Treasurer stated that the Report of the Special Committee on this Bill was not yet ready.

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Spirits Ordinance, 1886, was read a second time.

On the motion of the Surveyor General, seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE, the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Procurator for the Dominicun Missions in the Far East, in Hongkong, was read a second time.

The Acting Attorney General, and the Surveyor General respectively gave notice that at the next meeting of Council they would move that the Council go into Committee on these Bills.

BILL COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the Council went into Com- mittee on the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Relief of Widows and Children of Intestates where the personal estate is of small value.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILL IN COMMITTEE.-The Acting Attorney General moved the addition of a clause to the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law relating to Vagrants.

After deliberation the Acting Attorney General moved that the consideration of the new clause be postponed sine die.

Question-put and passed.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Orders of the Day were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 14th instant, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of April, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

61

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 24.

WEDNESDAY, 14TH APRIL, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

>>

>>

>>

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

";

WONG SHING.

"?

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON (on leave).

""

"

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON (on leave).

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th instant, were read and confirmed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid on the table the following papers:-

(a.) Annual Weather Report of the Director of the Observatory, for 1885. (No. 25.) (b.) Report of the Director of the Observatory on Five-day Means of the principal Meteoro-

logical Elements, for 1885. (No. 26.)

(c.) Report of the Acting Superintendent of the Botanical and Afforestation Department,

for 1885. (No. 27.)

VOTES PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee, and laid upon the table, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, the Minutes of Proceedings of the Committee in connection therewith:-

(Finance Committee, 7th April, 1886.)

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

ESTABLISHMENTS. Observatory.

740 1986. Salary of an additional Chinese Clerk, at $40 per month, 8 months,........

of

$ 320.00

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

C.S.O.

678 of 1886. General repairs to Mountain Lodge at Victoria Peak,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and passed.

.$1,386.00

BILL ENTITLED THE STAMP ORDINANCE, 1886.-REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE.-The Colonial Treasurer read the following Report of the Special Committee on this Bill:-.

Report of the Special Committee of the Legislative Council appointed to consider a Bill

entitled the Stamp Ordinance, 1886.

The Special Committee appointed to report on the draft amended Stamp Ordinance, on going carefully into the probable expenditure of the Colony, are of opinion that no urgency exists for additional taxation at this time, and they recommend that the consideration of increase to the Revenue be postponed until funds are actually needed, when, should unfore- seen claims be made upon the Treasury on account of Typhoons or other local causes, the Legislative Council might be called upon to sanction an increase in the Stamp Duties, of which in principle it has approved.

Council Chamber, Hongkong, 7th April, 1886.

The Treasurer then addressed the Council and concluded by stating that he proposed that the Bill should be proceeded with, the duties being kept practically as they are in the present Ordinances with some amendments of detail and consolidation.

62

The Officer Administering the Government addressed the Council as follows:-

After hearing the report of the Special Committee on the proposed increase of the Stamp Duties and the explanation given by the Treasurer, I beg to announce to the Council that it is not my intention to proceed with this Ordinance as a measure for increasing the taxation, at least during the present Session.

It will be convenient perhaps if I recapitulate for the information of the Council what has been done with respect to this question of the imposition of additional Stamp duties.

I laid on this table as far back as the 17th February last a Despatch from the Secretary of State together with a Minute of my own asking the Council to vote an additional sum of £60,000 for the Military defences of the Colony. The despatch and minute were referred in due course to the Finance Committee who had to consider at the same time what means were to be devised for meeting the interest and sinking fund on the loan which it was necessary to raise to provide for this as well as other extraordinary expenditure. The resolution of the Finance Committee which was afterwards adopted unanimously by the Council was to the effect that "the best means of doing so would chiefly be by an increase of Stamp duty.” A Special Committee of Council was then appointed to consider in detail what increases should be made in a draft Stamp Bill which was introduced and read a first time.

Since, however, the question was first raised the accounts of Revenue and Expenditure of the past year have been closed and laid before the Council. The accounts of receipts during the first quarter of the present year have also been made up. The Special Committee to which the Draft Stamp Bill had been referred has, after carefully considering the financial statements submitted to it, come to the conclusion that in view of the prospects of expanding trade and Revenue there is no immediate necessity for imposing additional taxation, and as it is clear to me that the surplus revenue of the present year will be more than sufficient to meet the interest and sinking fund on the portion of the loan which it will be necessary to borrow this year, I beg to announce to the Council that I do not intend to proceed any further this Session with the Stamp Bill as a measure for imposing additional taxation. There are however a few small amendments to the Stamp Ordinance passed last year which experience has shown to be necessary and advantage will be taken of the circumstance that a draft Stamp Act is now before the Council to introduce these amendments.

When Sir GEORGE BOWEN announced to this Council on 18th November last that he did not intend to proceed further at that moment with the Spirit Farm Bill he stated that it "was confidently hoped that the progressive development of our commerce now relieved from the depression caused by the recent hostilities in this part of the world will of itself lead to a growing extension of the public Revenue." It is most satisfactory to see signs that this anticipation will in all probability be realized. An opinion was expressed on the same occasion by one of the unofficial members "that the ordinary Revenue which we shall receive will be sufficient to meet all calls made upon it." Whether this opinion will prove a correct one it is of course impossible at present to foresee. I believe myself that at some future date extra taxation will become absolutely necessary. The Treasurer then gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of this Bill, the Schedule to be substituted by the one now in force.

it."

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a second time :-

(a.) A Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1886.

b.) A Bill entitled The Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1886.

BILL READ A THIRD TIME, AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Relief of Widows and Children of Intestates where the personal estate is of small value, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

BILL ENTITLED AN ORDINANCE TO CONSOLIDATE AND AMEND THE LAW FOR PREVENTING FRAUDS UPON CREDITORS BY SECRET BILLS OF SALE OF PERSONAL CHATTELS.-COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on this Bill.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Orders of the Day were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 21st instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of April, 1886.

ARATHOON SETHI,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 25.

WEDNESDAY, 21ST APRIL, 1886.

63

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

""

""

""

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

""

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

"}

WONG SHING.

"!

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

"}

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th instant, were read and confirmed. VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the sum of $700 for the erection of a matshed as a temporary Police Station at the Peak.

The Military Authorities having now withdrawn the objection raised in 1883 to the building of a permanent Station at this spot, it is in contemplation to construct a Station later in the year; but, as it is necessary to provide Police protection during the summer months, a matshed will have to be erected at once.

Government House, Hongkong, 21st April, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this Minute be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid upon the table the Blue Book for 1885, together with a Report thereon by the Chief Clerk. (No. 28).

}

BILL READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Colonial Treasurer, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Stamp Ordinance, 1886, was read a second time.

The Colonial Treasurer gave notice that at the next meeting he would move that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

BILLS COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law as to Sales of Land by Public Auction.

Bill reported without amendment.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

On the motion of the Surveyor General, seconded by the Honourable P. RYRIE, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Procurator for the Domi- nicun Missions in the Far East, in Hongkong.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Surveyor General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Colonial Treasurer, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled The Loan Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported without amendment.

64

BILLS READ A THIRD TIME, AND PASSED.-The Acting Attorney General then moved, and the Colonial Treasurer seconded, that the last mentioned Bill (The Loan Ordinance, 1886) be read a third

time.

Bill read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled An Ordinance to consolidate and amend the Law for preventing Frauds upon Creditors by Secret Bills of Sale of Personal Chattels, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

NOTICE OF NEW BILLS.-The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of the following Bills:-

(a.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend Ordinance No. 1 of 1884 entitled The Opium

Ordinance, 1884.

(b.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance for preventing the sale or taking on board Ship of Spirituous or Fermented Liquors, and for punishing persons hovering about Ships for the purpose of selling such Liquors, or of conveying them on board.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Orders of the Day were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Wednesday, the 28th instant, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 28th day of April, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

65

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 26.

WEDNESDAY, 28TH APRIL, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

""

""

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK.

""

""

WONG SHING.

""

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

""

""

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 21st instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Vote passed by the Finance Committee :—

1001 of

(Finance Committee, 21st April, 1886.)

PAYMENT IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Works and Buildings.

1888. Erection of a mat-shed as a temporary Police Station at the Peak,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

700.00

BILLS READ A FIRST TIME. On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a first time :-

(a.) A Bill entitled The Opium Ordinance, 1886.

(b.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance for preventing the sale or taking on board Ship of Spirituous or Fermented Liquors, and for punishing persons hovering about Ships for the purpose

of selling such Liquors, or of conveying them on board.

(c.) A Bill entitled The Vagrancy Ordinance, 1886.

(d.) A Bill entitled The Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886.

BILLS READ A THIRD TIME AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a third time:—

(a.) A Bill entitled An Ordinance to amend the Law as to Sales of Land by Public Auction. (b) A Bill entitled An Ordinance for the Incorporation of the Procurator, in Hongkong, for the

Dominican Missions in the Far East.

Question put-that these Bills do pass.

Bills passed.

NOTICE OF FIRST READING OF A BILL.-The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the first reading of a Bill entitled The Harbour Regulations Ordinance, 1886.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Orders of the Day were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 30th instant, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 30th day of April, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

This 17

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 27.

FRIDAY, 30TH APRIL, 1886.

67

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

""

1

27

""

>>

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WILLIAM KESWICK. WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

""

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 28th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL READ A FIRST TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, a Bill entitled The Harbour Regulations Ordinance, 1886, was read a first time.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the second reading of this Bill.

BILL READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Opium Ordinance, 1886, was read a second time.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting he would move that the Council go into Committee on this Bill.

BILLS COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled The Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

On the motion of the Colonial Treasurer, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into committee on the Bill entitled The Stamp Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Colonial Treasurer gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

POSTPONEMENT OF THE OTHER ORDERS OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Orders of the Day were postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Tuesday, the 4th proximo, at 4 P.M.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

Read and confirmed, this 4th day of May, 1886.

ARATHOON SETHI,

Clerk of Councils.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 28.

TUESDAY, 4TH MAY, 1886.

69

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G,

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.I.)

>>

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

"3

*

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

>>

WILLIAM KESWICK.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

PHINEAS RYRIE.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 30th ultimo, were read and confirmed.

VOTES OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sums:

W. H. MARSH.

For an Assistant in the Money Order Office at a salary of $40 per month,

from 1st June,

Increase to the salary of two Chinese Postmen at Amoy at $1 each per

month, from 1st June,

$ 240.00

12.00

$ 252.00

On these two points the Postmaster General reports as follows:--

"It is my duty again to submit the item of $480 per annum for an Assistant in the Money Order Office, and to say that this is indispensably necessary in the present state of the Department. The only result of the rejection of this vote last year has been that the work has been performed gratuitously, but performed it has to be, and of course it will not be done gratis for ever.

"We are now carrying on Money Order relations practically with all the world. The work has enormously increased, and is more than one Officer can reasonably be expected to attend to. I have recently had my attention unpleasantly called by other Offices to arrears in our Money Order work, but I am satisfied that the Superintendent of the Office has been working even beyond his strength to keep everything up to date. Should his health break down there is absolutely nobody to carry on the duties. He cannot go away for a single day, hardly for an hour. This state of things will lead to a discreditable block and an outcry from the public unless proper assistance can be provided.

"The only other increase I have to suggest is that of $1 a month to each of two deserv- ing Chinese at Amoy. Their present pay is only $6 a month and they are long-service men who cannot be done without. I know that the Agent at Amoy has been supplementing their salaries from bis own funds, a state of things which speaks for itself."

Government House, Hongkong, 4th May, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that these votes be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

:

70

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid upon the table the following paper :-

Returns of Superior and Subordinate Courts, for 1885. (No. 29).

BILLS READ A SECOND TIME.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a second time:-

(a.) A Bill entitled The Board of Ship Liquor Sale Ordinance, 1886. (b.) A Bill entitled The Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886. (c.) A Bill entitled The Harbour Regulations Ordinance, 1886.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting he would move that the Council go into, Committee on these Bills.

BILLS COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled The Spirits Licence Ordinance,

1886.

Progress reported.

On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the Bill entitled The Opium Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendment.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILLS READ A THIRD TIME AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Peace Preservation Ordinance, 1886, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

On the motion of the Colonial Treasurer, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Stamp Ordinance, 1886, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass.

Bill passed.

ADJOURNMENT.—The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 7th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 7th day of May, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH,

Administering the Government.

-

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 29.

FRIDAY, 7TH MAY, 1886.

71

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G,

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice, (JAMES RUSSELL.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

"}

the Acting Attorney. General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.) ·

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

>>

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.,) on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

>>

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

:

**

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 4th instant, were read and confirmed.

INDIAN AND COLONIAL EXHIBITION, 1886.-His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern- ment, referring to the Telegram in the Gazette Extraordinary published yesterday, read the following telegram since received by him :-

From PRINCE OF WALES

LONDON, 6th May, 1886.

To the GOVERNORS of

Straits Settlements, Hongkong,

South Australia, Western Australia, Victoria,

New South Wales, Queensland,

New Zealand, Fiji.

At a meeting of the Royal Commission for the Colonial and Indian Exhibition, third May, the following resolution was unanimously adopted :-That an early opportunity be taken for conveying to the Colonial Governments the sincere thanks of the Royal Commission for having so thoroughly realised our views as to the form this Exhibition should take, and that our warmest acknowledgments are also due to the Executive Commissioners and to the Colonial Commissions.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:--

C.S.O.

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sum:—

For expenses in connection with the Law Revision Commission, being salaries of the Secretary and Copying Clerk, and Contingencies, to be paid during the year 1886,

3122 of 1885.

..$ 2,500.00

The expenditure on this account, during 1885, has already been sanctioned by the Council. Government House, Hongkong, 7th May, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

}

Question-put and passed.

72

VOTES OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Votes passed by the Finance Committee :—

(Finance Committee, 4th May, 1886.)

PAYMENTS IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

ESTABLISHMENTS.

Postmaster General.

1027 of 1886. Salary of an Assistant in the Money Order Office at $40 per month, from 1st June,

Six months,

Increase to the salary of two Chinese postmen at Amoy at $1 each per month.

from 1st June, 6 months,.

..S 240.00

12.00

$ 252.00

}

The Colonial Treasurer seconded. Question-put and passed.

QUESTION.-The Honourable P. RYRIE, pursuant to notice, asked the following question

What steps the Government intend to take respecting a person of the name of CHEONG A-HI, otherwise called CHEONG A-CHI, who has been detained in the Victoria Gaol since January last, and whether after consideration of the circumstances of his case he should not be released?

The Acting Attorney General replied as follows:---

Before the Executive Council was seized with the consideration of the charge of murder and piracy under which CHEONG CHI was detained, the Governor received from the Viceroy of Canton a communication stating that the said CHEONG CHI had committed other murders and acts of piracy, no less than 16 different acts of murder and piracy being mentioned, and asking that he be further detained until these cases be inquired into. The Viceroy was informed that if he wished to proceed against the said CHEONG CHI, a formal application should be made for his rendition. The evidence in the first case not having been deemed satisfactory the Governor ordered the release of the said CHEONG CHI, but a formal application, received since notice of this question was given, having been made by the Viceroy for his rendition on other charges of murder and piracy, the Governor has authorised a warrant to issue, in order that the matter be investigated as required by section 1 of Ordinance 2 of 1850. BILLS COMMITTED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council went into Committee on the following Bills:-

(a.) A Bill entitled The Board of Ship Liquor Sale Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported without amendment.

(b.) A Bill entitled The Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendment, and the addition of some clauses to Section 12.

(c.) A Bill entitled The Harbour Regulations Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of these Bills.

BILL READ A THIRD TIME AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Opium Ordinance, 1886, was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do

Bill passed.

pass.

ADJOURNMENT OF THE OTHER ORDER OF THE DAY.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, the other Order of the Day was postponed.

ADJOURNMENT.-The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 14th instant, at 4 P.M.

Read and confirmed, this 14th day of May, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH, Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 30.

FRIDAY, 14TH MAY, 1886.

73

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice, (JAMES RUSSELL.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General. (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JoHN MACNEILE PRICE.)

PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.,) on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave

>>

"

WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 7th instant, were read and confirmed.

VOTE OF MONEY REFERRED TO THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.-Read the following Minute by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government:-

C.S.O.

W. H. MARSH.

The Officer Administering the Government recommends the Council to vote the following sum:-

Allowance to Passed Cadet, Mr. MAY, for a Chinese Teacher conversant with Mandarin, at $15 per month, 7 months,...

998 of 1886.

$ 105.00

It is very desirable that Mr. MAY should continue his study of the Mandarin dialect, and keep up the knowledge which he has acquired of the Official language of China, and that a competent person should be provided to assist him in writing Proclamations and other Official Correspondence.

Government House, Hongkong, 14th May, 1886.

The Acting Colonial Secretary moved that this vote be referred to the Finance Committee. The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question--put and passed.

VOTE OF MONEY PASSED BY THE FINANCE COMMITTEE.--The Acting Colonial Secretary moved the following Vote passed by the Finance Committee :---

(Finance Committee, 7th May, 1886.)

C.S.O.

3122 of 1885.

PAYMENT IN EXCESS OF THE ESTIMATES FOR 1886.

SERVICES EXCLUSIVE OF ESTABLISHMENTS.

Miscellaneous Services.

For expenses in connection with the Law Revision Commission, being salaries of the Secretary and Copying Clerk, and Contingencies, to be paid during the year 1886,

The Colonial Treasurer seconded.

Question-put and passed.

........$ 2,500.00 -

:

3

3

74

PAPERS.-The Acting Colonial Secretary, by direction of His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government, laid upon the table the following papers :-

(a.) The Harbour Master's Report, for 1885. (No. 30.)

(b.) The Educational Reports, for 1885. (No. 31.)

(c.) The Colonial Surgeon's Report, for 1885. (No. 32.)

BILL IN COMMITTEE.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Council resumed consideration, in Committee, of the Bill entitled The Spirits Licence Ordinance, 1886.

Bill reported with amendments.

The Acting Attorney General gave notice that at the next meeting of Council he would move the third reading of this Bill.

BILLS READ A THIRD TIME AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the following Bills were read a third time :---

(a.) The Board of Ship Liquor Sale Ordinance, 1886.

(b.) The Reformatory Schools Ordinance, 1886.

(c.) The Harbour Regulations Ordinance, 1886.

Question put-that these Bills do pass.

Bills passed.

ADJOURNMENT.---The Council then adjourned to Friday, the 21st instant, at 4 P.M.

:

Read and confirmed, this 21st day of May, 1886.

ARATHOON SETH,

Clerk of Councils.

W. H. MARSH,

Administering the Government.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL No. 31.

FRIDAY, 21ST MAY, 1886.

PRESENT:

HIS EXCELLENCY WILLIAM HENRY MARSH, C.M.G.,

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Administering the Government in the absence of His Excellency SIR GEORGE FERGUSON BOWEN, G.C.M.G.

His Honour the Acting Chief Justice, (JAMES RUSSELL.)

The Honourable the Acting Colonial Secretary, (FREDERICK STEWART, LL.D.)

the Acting Attorney General, (EDWARD JAMES ACKROYD.)

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the Colonial Treasurer, (ALFRED LISTER.)

the Surveyor General, (JOHN MACNEILE PRICE.) PHINEAS RYRIE.

WONG SHING.

ABSENT:

His Honour the Chief Justice, (SIR GEORGE PHILLIPPO, Knt.,) on leave.

The Honourable the Attorney General, (EDWARD LOUGHLIN O'MALLEY,) on leave.

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WILLIAM KESWICK, on leave.

THOMAS JACKSON, on leave.

FREDERICK DAVID SASSOON, on leave.

The Council met pursuant to adjournment.

The Minutes of the last Meeting, held on the 14th instant, were read and confirmed.

BILL READ A THIRD TIME AND PASSED.-On the motion of the Acting Attorney General, seconded by the Acting Colonial Secretary, the Bill entitled The Spirit Licences Ordinance, 1886 was read a third time.

Question put-that this Bill do pass. Bill passed.

CLOSING OF THE SESSION.-His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government closed the Session with the following speech:-

HONOURABLE GENTLEMEN OF THE LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

1. The time has now arrived for closing the Session of 1885-86, during which a con- siderable amount of useful legislation and other public business has been dealt with by you.

2. I believe it will be necessary to summon a special meeting in the month of September next, in order to consider the Estimates for the ensuing year; but the opening of the next annual Session will not take place until October or November, in accordance with the practice of the two past years.

3. The financial position of the Colony at the beginning of the present year was better than had been anticipated. The Revenue of 1885, which had been estimated at $1,137,558 yielded $1,251,890, besides $66,659 for premia on sales of land. The only year when the Revenue has been larger was 1883 when, owing to exceptional circumstances, a very large amount was received from licences for boiling opium for exportation. The marked increase of receipts over 1884 is due no doubt to the termination of the hostilities recently carried on in this part of the world.

4. In consequence of this improvement in the Revenue of 1885, the balance of assets at the commencement of the present year was $427,692 instead of $190,088 as estimated in October last.

5. I am happy to inform you that the receipts during the first quarter of the present year have been about $17,000 in excess of the Estimates, and $27,642 in excess of the receipts during the first quarter of 1885, thus exhibiting a continued healthy development of commerce.

6. In consequence of this satisfactory condition of the finances, it will probably not be necessary for the Colony to borrow any money until towards the end of the year, and I do not anticipate that a larger amount than $300,000 will be required this year.

7. Before this satisfactory condition of the finances had been ascertained by the closing of the accounts of the past year, it was thought that it would be necessary to raise extra Revenue for the purpose of defraying the interest and sinking fund on the loan, which will amount to about £15,000 a year, when the whole £200,000 has been borrowed; and the Council, being consulted on the means to be devised for providing more funds, unanimously recommended "that the best means of doing so would be chiefly by an increase of the stamp duty."

8. A Special Committee of this Council, to whom the question of details of extra stamp dues was referred for consideration, reported after careful investigation that no urgency exists for extra taxation at the present time, and recommended that the consideration of increase to Revenue should be postponed. I accordingly announced to the Council that I would not proceed any further this session with the measure proposed for this purpose. It does not

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seem probable that any extra taxation will be necessary until the whole amount of £200,000 has been borrowed. One of the Un-official Members has even expressed the opinion that the ordinary Revenue which we shall receive will, through the progressive development of our commerce, be sufficient to meet all calls made upon it. I should be glad if this forecast were to prove correct.

9. I thank you in the name of Her Majesty's Government for your loyal vote of a further sum of £60,000 for the completion of the Military Defences of the Colony. These works are proceeding as fast as is possible, and I have been informed by the Secretary of State for the Colonies that the greater part of the armament will probably be consigned to Hongkong during the current year. The mountings of the breech-loading guns are of new pattern, and require to be specially tested, and this of course to some extent retards the supply.

10. The small though powerful ironclad Wivern, two first class and two second class torpedo boats are already stationed here, and four more first class torpedo boats are to be sent out, two of which I am informed are now on their way. When the forts have been completed, and they are being pushed forward by General CAMERON as vigorously as the nature of the work will allow,-the Colony need be under no serious apprehension of foreign attack.

11. I informed the Council on the 17th March last that Her Majesty's Chargé d'Affaires at Peking had made strong representations to the Ministers of the Tsungli Yamên on the unwarrantable action of Chinese Officials in seizing a Chinese subject, accused of piracy, who had taken refuge in this Colony. The Ministers, as I have already stated, expressed their regret for what had occurred, and satisfactory excuses have been made by the Viceroys of Fokien and of the Two Kwang.

12. The Commission provided for under Article 7 Section 3 of the Chefoo Convention for the purpose of considering the establishment of some system that shall enable the Chinese Government to protect its revenue without interfering with the junk trade of this Colony, has at length been appointed. Mr. JUSTICE RUSSELL has been selected by me to represent the Hongkong Government on this Commission. The other Commissioners are Mr. BRENAN, Consul at Tientsin, and Shao, Taotai of Shanghai,

13. The Law Revision Commission has been very diligent in the performance of the important duties with which it has been entrusted. Ten Ordinances prepared by this Commission, have been passed by the Council since the beginning of the year, and a number of other Draft Bills will be ready for the next Session of Council.

14. I have appointed a Commission to inquire into the system of land-tenure and into the disposal of Crown Lands, with a view to the adoption of such improvements as may faci- litate the transfer of allotments held from the Crown; an inquiry which I believe will, when completed, be of great practical utility both to the Government and to the community.

15. With regard to Public Works, satisfactory progress continues to be made with the works for the extension of the public water-supply, and it is estimated-at the present rate of progress-that the tunnel intended to convey the waters from Tytam to this side of the Island, will be completed before the end of next year; whereupon the new supply will be made available for public use, and an important measure of relief obtained, without having to await the completion of the Reservoir in the following year.

16. A further large instalment of useful sanitary work has been effected during the past season in the reconstruction and extension of the main drainage and sewerage system of the town, principally in the Chinese quarters. Contracts have been entered into also, for the completion of the new Victoria College within eighteen months from the present date, and arrangements have been made for the further development of the western suburb of Kennedy Town by the formation of new streets and thoroughfares and the erection of an adequate Police Station for the protection of the growing interests of that rising locality. The new permanent Lazaretto Buildings at Stone Cutters' Island which were contracted to be finished by the 1st of July will be completed by that date, and will become available for occupation should occasion arise.

17. Among other measures for the better prevention of Cattle epidemies in the Colony, to which subject your attention was directed during last session, I have approved a large extension to the present Cattle market buildings at Kennedy Town, by which means all livestock imported into the Colony and intended for our markets, will be brought under close and continuous inspection, thus rendering feasible a more effective protection of the food supplies of the public.

18. I propose to construct, as soon as the hot season has terminated, a permanent Police Station at Mount Gough for the protection of the residents at the Peak, whose number is likely to be considerably extended.

19. In conclusion, Honourable Gentlemen, I desire to convey to you my acknowledge- ments for the loyal and valuable co-operation which you have afforded my Government during the labours of the session and for the supplies which you have so liberally voted for

the Public service.

I now prorogue this Council to the 15th day of September next.