Government Gazette Supplementary | 政府憲報副刊 | 1908

No. 1.

-

M

S

DIEU

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 14th of FEBRUARY, 1908.

Published by Authority;

REPORT ON THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG, 31st January, 1908.

The amount to the Credit of the Fund on the 31st December last, was $17,475.92 including $17,088.55 for interest as per statement appended.

The average monthly contributions amount now to $2,900.

On the 31st December, 1906, the number of Contributors on the books was 551 and of the 31st December, 1907, 596, of whom 215 are bachelors, 368 are married men and 13 ar widowers.

During the year 104 joined the Fund, 44 left and 9 died.

The total number of children on the books is 526.

Of that who loft 32 resigned the Government Service and 12 were dismissed. The 9bs iber who died were 5 bachelors, 3 married men and 1 widower.

The uses of death were as under:

 




1 Portuguese

1 Indian.

1 Chinese

1 European

1 Portuguese 1 European 1 Portuguese

1 European 1 Portuguese

(66) Bright's Disease.

38) Uræmia.

(19) Typhoid Fever. (47) Chronic Nephritis. (22) Pericarditis. (48) Heart Disease. (27) Typhoid Fever. (...) Heart Disease.

24) Phthisis.

""

Moore.

""

21

Chan Tai,

   There are now in the list 37 pensioners whose pensions in dollars aggregate $4,220.58 per annum as follows:-

Mrs. Beavin,

Moosdeen,

$ 14.45

63.67

239.85

54.85

27

2)

Alarakia's Child,

Chu Tsau,

Wong Yau Lui,

Chow Hung Shi's Child,

Lo Lai Shi,

48.89

81.62

5.12

23.26

113.26

""

Madar's Daughter,.

30.91

""

Wildey,

247.63

17

Ho Yow Tsoi,

187.51

Gutierrez,

236.19

"}

Robertson,

163.78

""

Cheung Hon Shi,

17.86

Freire,

41.99

"

Duncan,

215.68

Hood,

45.04

3

Leung Wong Shi,

34.08

17

Sun Au Yung Shi,

99.46

35

Ku Yiu Kyau,

94.03

;)

Wong Fung Shi,

99.40

Dixon,

249.00

Rocha.

181.02

,, Gidley,

Williamson,

213.80

192.74

Luk Man Shi,

115.81

2

White,

114.54

Collaço,

185.46

59.

Tsoi So,

Chan Lui Ying,

Wong Li Shi,.....

Leong Shi,

Mitchell,

Covk's Daughter,"

U Li Shi; Alves,

31.77

64.18

15.53

90.07

285.50

49.08

90.23

183.32

Total,.

$4,220.58

In addition there is one pensioner in Sterling Mrs. Barnes Law.ene £71. 3s. 5d. per annum.

who draws

A. M. THOMSON, Chairman.

FRANCIS CLARK, E. H. D'AQUINO, R. H. CROFTON, S. B. C. Ross,

Directors.

2

3

STATEMENT OF THE WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' FUND

UP TO 31st DECEMBER, 1907.

To Balance 1st January, 1907,

Contributions,

""

Less Refunds,

Interest,....

$272,960.20

.$35,984.96

By Pensions paid to Widows, Commuted Pensions,

$

4.228.64

50.00

95

305.75

Pensions paid to Orphans,

69.16

35,679.21 17,088.55

Sums paid on the cancelment of

19

memberships,

1.927.69

....

Expenses of Management,

Printing,

Auditor's Fee,

Balance,

600.00

11.00

120.00

318,721.47

$ 325,727.96

$ 325,727.96

To Unclaimed Pensions :-

Mrs. Beavin,.

Moore, ....

Alarakia's Child,

Chu Tsau......

CA

14.45

By Balance deposited with the

Government,

$318,721.47

119.92

126.30

54.42

"

Wong Yau Lin,

3.41

Chung Hung Chi's Child-

ren,

3.88

Madar's Child,

30.91

"

Wildey,

82.53

Robertson,

30.03

""

Freire,

7.00

**

Hood,

22.52

25

Ku Yui Kyau,.

7.83

"

Wong Fung Shi,.......

82.80

Dixon,

40.83

"

**

Gidley,

106.90

Chan Lui Ying,

26.70

23

35

Leong Shi,

30.04

Mitchell,

95.16

??

Coyle's Child.

4.09

""

889.72

Mrs. Barnes Lawrence £35.11.8

at 2-

355.83

To Amount of the Fund,....

317,475.92

$ 318,721.47

$318,721.47

Examined and found correct.

E. A. CARVALHO,

Auditor.

Hongkong, 28th January, 1908.

A

No. 2.

DIEU

ET

IS

PEN

MON DROIT

1

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 6th of MARCH, 1908.

Published by Authority.

JURORS LIST FOR 1908.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor.

HONGKONG

TO WIT.

NAME IN FULL.

I.-SPECIAL JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

---་

Anton, Charles Edward.

Arculli, Abdoolla Fuckecra Arima, Tadaichi.................. Armstrong, John

Babington, Anthony Barrett, Edgar George Barton, John

Beattie, Andrew.

Becker, Arthur Wilhelm

Arth Bérindoague, Lou,

Bird, Herbert William Bolles, John Walker

Bonnar, John Whyte Cooper. Bryer, Alfred

Carter, William Leonard Chan A Fook.....

Chau Siu Ki

Clark, Duncan

Cousland, Alexander Stark

      Dalglish Craddock, Douglas William...

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

Army & Navy Contractor, Manager, Osaka Shosen Kaisha, Bank Manager,

Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Sub-Mgr., Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Manager, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Merchant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Manager, Banque de l'Indo-Chine,. Architect, Palmer & Turner, General Manager, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Gibb, Livingston & Co..... Architect, Leigh & Orange... Manager, China & Japan Telephone Co., Director, Watkins, Ltd.,

Secty., Chun On Fire Insur. Co., Ld., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Manager, Ross & Co., General Traffic Agent, Canadian Pacific

Railway Co.,

Cruickshank, William Arthur

Carruthers

                  Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., ...... Cumming, Alexander........... Merchant, Butterfield & Swire,

Red Hill, Peak.

20 Yee Wo Street.

On premises.

Charter House, Queen's Gardens. 63 Robinson Road.

3 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Red Hill, Peak.

Stoke's Bungalow West, Peak.

The Peak.

Chater Road.

No. 6 The Peak. Hongkong Club. St. George's Building. Tanderagee, 119в Peak. Hongkong Hotel. Queen's Road.

2 & 8 Queen's Road West. On premises.

Dunedin, Barker Road, Peak.

10 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

East Point.

1 Connaught Road.

NAME IN FULL.

6

SPECIAL JURORS,-Continuel.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

 Dann, George Harry David, Abraham Jacob

Davis, William IIerbert Tren-

chard

Denison, Albert Douglas, James Tory Dowley, Walter Arthur. Ede, Charles Montague Ehmer, Hermanu Forbes, Andrew Fung Wa Chin Gibbs, Lawrence Göetz, Ernst

  Gok, Carl Gottfried Gordon, Alexauder Grant.. Gourdiu, Allston O'Driscoll Grace, Charles Henry Graham, Walter Douglas Gubbay, Charles Sassoon Hancock, Sidney Haskell, David

  Hinds, Edward Harvey Ho Fook

Hooper, Augustus Shelton....

Họ Tung...

Hough, Thomas Frederick......

  Howard, Albert Hughes, Edward Jones.

Humphreys, Henry.... Jessen, Johann Heinrich Jupp, John Ambrose..

   Lafrentz, Charles Julius Lammert, George Philip Lan Chu Pak Lauts, Johanu Theodor Law, Donaldson Riddell, Layton, Bendyshe,... Leiria, João Joaquim... Lenzmann, Carl Robert. Lowe, Arthur Rylands Mackay, Edward Fairbairn Mackenzie, Alexander Maitland, Francis Marten, Richard..... May, Charles William Medhurst, George Harold Melchers, Friedrich Wilhelm... Michael, Joseph Rahamin...... Mitchell, Robert.... Moxon, Geoffrey Charles.... Northcote, Mowbray Stafford.

Orange, James

   Ormiston, Evan Ough, Arthur Henry Pemberton, George William

Cyril.

Peter, John Charles Pinckney, Herbert... Ram, Edward Albert.. Raymond, Abraham Jacob Remnic, Alfred Herbert Rodger, Alexander Rose, Thomas Isaac, Ross, Charles Henderson Rumjahn, Ahmet

Sassoon, Moses Silas. Scott, John Gray Scott, William Murray

Merchant, H. Wicking & Co.,....... Merchant, S. J. David & Co.,

Manager, Commercial Union Assurance

Co., Ltd.,

Civil Engineer, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,... Marine Surveyor, Goddard & Douglas,.. General Manager, Vacuum Oil Co.,... Underwriter,

Merchant, Grossmann & Co., Merchant, Bradley & Co., Compradore, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs, Merchant, Aruhold, Karberg & Co., Manager, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., ....... Assistant Secretary, Hongkong Club, Secretary, Hongkong Club,.....

104 Peak.

2 & 3 Gough Hill.

Wolverton, Peak. Craigieburn Hotel.

Tantallon, Barker Road, Peak. Hongkong Hotel. King Edward IIotel. Glenshiel Bungalow, Peak Road. Eilandonan, Peak. On premises.

107 Peak.

Luginsland, Peak Road. Ian Mor, Peak Road. Tor Crest, Peak.

... 61 Robinson Road.

.. Hongkong Club.

Alexandra Building.

Manager, Wilkinson, Heywood& Clark, Ld.. Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,.... Exchange Broker,.... Merchant,

Agent, Glen Line of Steamers, Compradore, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,... Secretary, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld.,

Merchant,

Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Broker, & Govt. Auctioneer, Hughes &

Hough,

Merchaut, J. D. Humphreys & Son, Merchant, Jebsen & Co.,

General Manager & Agent, Accountant,

J. D. Humphreys & Son,

Merchant, Auctioneer,

Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Merchant, Lauts, Wegener & Co., Merchant, Butterfield & Swire, Exchange Broker, Merchant, J. J.

Remedios & Co., Merchant, Carlowitz & Co........ Chartered Accountant,. Merchant, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant, Arthur & Co., Merchant, Linstead & Davis, Merchant, Rädecker & Co., . Chief-Acet., HK. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Broker,

Naval Architect, Dock Co.,.......... Banker,

Secretary, Hongkong Land Reclamation

Co, L,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, Banker,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange,

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., Sub-Manager, IIK. & S'hai Bank,.. Exchange Broker,

Architect, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,. Merchant, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,... Merchant, A. H. Rennie & Co., Sugar Refiner, China Sugar Refinery, Secretary, Dock Co.,......

Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Merchant, Rumjahn & Co., Exchange Broker,

Manager, Tramway Co.,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

9 Macdonnell Road.

10 Queen's Gardens, Peak Road. Des Voeux Road Central. Dunnottar, Peak. Caine Road.

Rougemont, 1 Macdonnell Road. Caine Road.

8 Des Voeux Road. David Sassoon & Co., Ld.

Meirion, Peak. Abertholwyn, Peak Road. King's Building.

Ian Mor, Peak Road. 6 Peak Road. Elliott Crescent. Queen's Road Central. 21 Conduit Road.

1 Connaught Road.

1 Prince's Building, Des Voeux Road.

Duart, 15 Arbuthnot Road.

2 Connaught Road.

St. George's Building, Chater Road.

1 Connaught Road.

Dunedin, Barker Road.

Nettlewood, 55 Robinson Road.

Peak Hotel,

On premises.

Hazledine, Robinson Road.

Strathallan, Robinson Road.

4 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road.

. Peak Hotel.

Hongkong.

5 Macdonnell Road.

Red Hill East, Peak.

6 Queen's Gardens, Peak Roa Prince's Building

57 The Peak.

St. John's Place.

6 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Lyeemun, Barker Road, Peak. Devonia, 11 Peak Road. The Firs, Bowen Road. East Point.

Goolistan, Conduit Road. East Point.

64 Queen's Road Central. 4 Des Vœux Road. Clovelly, Peak Road. Quarry Bay.

!

NAME IN FULL.

7

SPECIAL JURORS,-Continued.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Shellim, Edward Shewan, Robert Silverstone, Sholom Skelton, Alfred Holland Slade, Henry Warre Smith, Alexander Findlay Stewart, Murray. Tam Tsz Kong,

Tomkins, Herbert Edmund Tomlin, George Lomer Turner, Arthur

Walker, William Bradley Watson, William Malcolm... Wendt, Friedrich August White, Henry Percy Whittall, James Bowyer Kid-

man

   Wickham, William Henry Wilford, Francis Cumming Williams, Arthur John Wilson, William........

Merchant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Merchant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Agent, P. M. S. S. Co.,............ Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Merchant, Gilman & Co., Merchant,

Exchange Broker,

General Manager, Hip On Insurance

Exchange and Loan Co., Ld., Merchant, Reiss & Co., Secretary, China Fire Insurance Co.,................ Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Asst. Gen. Manager, Standard Oil Co., Merchant, John D. Hutchison & Co., Merchant, Wendt & Co., Merchant, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Secretary, China Traders' Ins. Co., Manager, Electric Iht Co., Storekeeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Acting Chief Manager, Dock Co.,

Kurrahjeen, 7 Peak Road. St. George's Building. King Edward Hotel. Craigends, Barker Road, Peak. Taiping, Mount Gough, Peak. Peak Hotel.

113, Plantation Road, Peak.

6, 7 & 8 Wa In Fong East. Queen's Building. Earnsfoot, 30 Robinson Road. Eggesford, Peak.

21 Robinson Road.

Abergeldie, Plantation Road, Peak. 2 Hillside, Ponk. 32 Robinson Road.

Red Hill, Peak. 23 Conduit Road. On premises. Hongkong Club. Kowloon Docks.

NAME IN FULL.

II. COMMON JURORS.

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Ї

A

   Aagaard, Bjarne.... Abraham, Albert

Abraham, Ezekiel Stooker

Abraham, Ezra

Abraham, Reuben Abraham, Saul D.

Adams, Francis Robert John. Aftalian, Aaron Lemtoff, Ahmed, Aboo.................

   Ahrendt, Carl Max Heinrich... Aitken, Robert

Allen, Frank Stanley.. Allen, William Stanley Alvares, Luiz Maria Jacques Alves, Antonio Luiz Alves, José Miguel Andel, Alexander Willem van Anderson, William...... Anderson, William Marshall... Andrew, John Ingram Augelbeck, Erngt

Apcar, Anatoon Vertannes Arculli, Adul Kader el Arculli, Osmar el

Armstrong, John Henry

William

Arnold, Charles Edward Arnold, John

Arnott, Thomas

....

Asger, Asadullah Ebrahim

Asger, Mehdi Ebrahim Aucott, Ernest Frank Audap, Roger....... Auld, James Durran Austin, Anthony Roy Austin, Frank....

Steamship Agent, Aagaard Thoreson & Co., 1 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

Clerk, Gas Co.,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co.,

Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., ì.......... Clerk, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.,........ Foreman, Hongkong Electric Co., Ld., Civil Engineer, Quarry Bay Shipyard,... Assistant, Levy Hermanos, Assistant, HK. Milling Co., Ld.,. Assistant, Melchers & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

26 Staunton Street. Hotel Mansions. 3 Ripon Terrace.

3 Ripon Terrace. 12 Elgin Street. Craigieburn, Peak. Hongkong Hotel.

1 Lower Ladder Street Terrace. On premises. Quarry Bay.

Sub-Acet., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., On premises.

Manager, Sperry Flour Company, Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,.... Clerk, Chartered Bank of L A. & C., Merchant, L. M. Alvares & Co.,............... Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Pianoforte Tuner, Lane, Crawford & Co., Banker, International Banking Corp., Engineer, Geo. Fenwick & Co., Assistant, Grossmann & Co., Merchant, A. V. Apear & Co., Merchant,

Army & Navy Contractor,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Foreman,

Acct., HK., C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld.,... Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld.,

Asst., HK. Land Investment & Agency

Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co.,

Chief Accountant, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

6 Conduit Road..

Selbourne Villa East, 10 Kennedy Rd.

40 High Street.

24 Robinson Road.

On premises.

| On premises.

On premises.

4 The Albany.

2 Conduit Road.

45 Wyndham Street.

20 Yee Wo Street.

20 Yee Wo Street.

I Connaught Road.

16 Shaukiwan Road. 3 Albany, Peak Road.

3 Canton Villas, Kowloon.

46 Elgin Street.

49 Wyndham Street.

Glenshiel, Plantation Road, Peak. On premises.

Craigmin West, Magazine Gap. 1 Connaught Road.

1 Connaught Road.

NAME IN FULL.

8

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

B

Bailey, William Seybourne.

Bain, Alexander.

Barbey, Henri....

Barnett, Thomas

Barretto, Alberto Demée Barretto, Frederico Demée Barretto, Frederico Francisco. Barretto, Octavio Demée... Bassford, William Faulkner Batalha, Joe Xavier ....

Baxter, Robert Hall Beattie, Matthew Poole Beck, George Benjamin, Joseph

Bent, Henry Aubrey Wak Berblinger, Albrecht Berry, Francis James Beuzeville, James Bevan, Herbert Staton Bevington, Francis Bird, Cyril Frederick.. Bird, Lennox Godfrey Bisschop, Philip John Blackburn, Leslie James Blackledge, Harold Blake, Anthony Robert.. Blake, John

Blason, Chas. Henry

Bliefernicht, Heinrich ....

Block, Kurt Diedrich Carl Blood, Guy....

Boetje, Johan

Bolden, Samuel George Boolsen, George....

Borner, Hermann Frederich

Georg

...

Bosch, Hendrik Joan van den. Botelho, Augusto Cezar

Boulton, Sydney

Boyce, William Bensley

Boyes, John Ridley

Bramley, Harry

Braudes, Karl

Brayfield, Thomas

Henry

Gordon

Brewer, Walter Fred..

Bridger, Herbert Ben

Bridger, Richard Leslie... Brodersen, Harold Carl Hein-

rich

Brooke, Charles Albert

Bannerman

Brooks, Robert George

Brown, Frederick Archibald...

Brown, Neilafe Sharp

Brown, Theodore

 Brown, William Samuel Brown, Wilson

Browne, Percy Edward.

 Bryson, Alexander......... Buchanan, John..... Buckle, Percy...... Bumann, Johannes....

 Bune, Thos. Friedrich Andreas Bunje, Emil Theodour Burjor, Dhunjibboy Sorabjeo

Dady

Burn, Andrew

Bussierre, Jean Saint Clair

Renouard de

Engineer, Bailey & Co., Engineer, China Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Overseer,

Clerk, Cruz, Basto & Co., Merchant, Barretto & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Barretto & Co.,

Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Corresponding Clerk, Yokohama Specie

Bank,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Merchant, W. R. Loxley & Co.,

Foreman Boilermaker,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Banker,

Merchant,

Brewery Manager,

Manager, Cottam & Co.,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Mercantile Assistant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner, Genl. Agt., Java-China-Japan Lijn, Gas Engineer,

Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

20 Connaught Road. East Point Refinery.

No. 13 Robinson Road, Kowloon,

8 Cross Street, Wanchai.

Larkspur, Robinson Road.

1 Castle Road.

18 Wyndham Street. 44 Caine Road. Quarry Bay.

17 Mosque Junction. Kowloon Docks. On premises. Kowloon Docks. 54 Peel Street.

8 Queen's Road.

Hongkong Hotel.

Connaught Hotel.

6 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

1 Leighton Hill Road.

Kingsclere.

1 Connaught Road.

2 Cameron Villas, Peak. York Building.

Gas Works, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay.

Quarry Bay.

Chartered Accountant, Butterfield

&

Swire,

Foreman Carpenter, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co., Architect, &c., Palmer & Turner,

Manager, Neth. India Commercial Bank, Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Hamburg Amerika Linie,

Merchant, Meyer & Co.,

Sub-manager, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Fumigating and Disinfecting

Bureau, Ltd.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Chief Assistant, Thomas Cook & Son, Assistant, Grossmann & Co.,

Consulting Engineer, Bookseller....

Electrical Engineer,

Grocer, Lane Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Meyer & Co.,

Assistant, Vacuum Oil Co.,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Berthing-master, HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., Ltd.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Sugar Foreman,

1 Connaught Road.

Kowloon Docks.

29 Conduit Road.

On premises.

16 Des Voeux Road Central. Carlton House, Ice House Street. Victoria Lodge, Peak Road.

Derrington, Peak Road.

5 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

10 Belilios Terrace. Quarry Bay.

1 Connaught Road. On premises.

King Edward Hotel. 9 Robinson Road.

Hongkong Hotel. Braeside.

13 Caine Road. On premises.

Okements, 25 Conduit Rond.

Hotel Mansions. Aberdeen Docks.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon.

1 Cennaaght Road.

142 Praya East.

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 3 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Foreman Joiner,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Bradley & Co.,

Foreman Mason, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, P. & O. Co., Merchant, Ship Broker,

Manager, Asiatic Petroleum Co.,....

Merchant and Commission Agent, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Messagaries Maritimes, .... Buyers, Charles Badenoch...... Supt. Engineer, Tramway Co.,

4 Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

6 Park View, West Point.

3 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Craig Ryrie, Peak.

7 Caine Road.

3 Conduit Road. Shaukiwan Road.

28 Des Voeux Road. 3 Quarry Point.

Carlton House. Peak.

1

NAME IN FULE.

9

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

C

Caine, Charles Henry Caldwell, George Arthur

Callaço, Vicente Alexandre de

Paulo

Campbell, Francis Campbell, Hugh Frank.. Campbell, John Sidney

Denison

Campbell, La Clair Fusilier Carmichael, Hugh Cameron ... Carroll, Francis George..... Carroll, William Joseph

Clerk,

Chief Clerk, Dock Co.,...

Bank Assistant,.

Crane Driver, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Accountant,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.. Consulting Engineer, Banker's Clerk,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

Carvalho, Charles Francisco de Assistant, HK. S'hai Bank,.

Castro, Bonifacio Maria

Castro, Joaquim Telles

d'Almada e

Catchick, Gregorius George... Chalmers, James Hynd. Chapman, Edward John Chapple, Frederick Thomas Chard, Henry Frank Chater, Chater Paul Chinchen, Sydney John... Choy Sek Chuen Christiani, George Max

Albrecht Theodor Chunnutt, Frederick George........ Chunnutt, Oscar Rowan Clark, Ernest Sidney.

Clark, Jasper....

Clark, Milton Ona

Clarke, Wm. Edward

Clarke, Wm. Gray....

Claxton, Archibald Arthur

Clelland, Joseph..... Cobden, Alfred Sydney. Cobley, Augustus Otto

Fresenius Cochrane, John

Colahan, Henry James Collett, Charles

Collins, James

Comar, Alexander

Condon, Harry Lestro Cooke, Charles John Cooper, Albert George Warner

Inerd

Coppin, Alan Griffiths Cordeiro, Albano Antonio Corse, Grey Henry.

Coughtrie, Roger

Coulthart, John

Course, Arthur

Craddock, Henry Edwin

Craik, James

Crapneli, Albert Edward Crawford, Alexander Crawford, Frank

Lane •

Malcolm

 Crawford, William Joseph Crispin, Charles Robert Crosbie, James

...

 Cruickshank, Geo. Seymour..... Cruickshank, John........... Curreem, Vahab..... Currie, Alexander Scort Curry, George Percy

Clerk,

37 Caine Road. Craigieburn, Peak.

1 Woodlands Terrace.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. ilongkong.

Arnhold, Karberg & Co. Hongkong.

China Sugar Refinery. Cloudlands, The Peak.

3 Pedder's Hill.

14 Arbuthnot Road.

1 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon.

Assistant, International Banking Corp.,... 8 East Terrace, Kowloon.

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Clerk, Linstead and Davis, Assistant, W. Powell, Ld.,

Assistant Manager, K. Milling Co., Ld. Secretary, HK. Iron Mining Co., Ld. Marine Insurance Assistant, Secretary, China Commercial S.S. Co.,

Exchange Broker,....

Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,

Secretary, HK., C. & M. Steamboat

Co., Ld.,

Engineer,

Assistant,

Shipwright, Dock Co.,....

6 Moreton Terrace.

1 Connaught Road,

Co. Linstead & Davis. 28 Queen's Road Central. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. Conduit Road. Kingsclere.

73 Wing Lok Street.

Hongkong Club.

24 Bonham Road. 24 Bonham Road,

On premises. Peak Hotel.

21 Robinson Road.

Duraford, Peak.

Hongkong Club,

Beauregard, Bonham Road.

Cosmopolitan Docks.

Chartered Accountant, Butterfield & Swire,] I Connaught Road.

Civil Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Cashier, Russo-Chinese Bank,.......... Manager, Wallem & Co., ...

Foreman Mechanic, Punchard, Lowther

& Co.,

Clerk,

Stenographer and File Clerk, Draughtsman, Dock Co.,...

Civil Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Bradley & Co., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Assistant, Pacific Mail S.S. Co.,... Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Traffic Supt., Electric Tramway, Sanitary Overseer, HK. & K. W. &

Godown Co.,

Assistant Steward, Hongkong Club, Book-keeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk,

Clerk, Lane, Crawford & Co., Clerk,....

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Mechanical Engineer, Jeweller, Falconer & Co.,....... Merchant,

Assistant,

Local Secretary, Gas Co.,....

Butterfield & Swire.

1 Connaught Road.

155 Rock View, Wanchai Road. Hongkong Club Annexe.

Naval Yard Extension. 65 Des Voeux Road. 2 Kennedy Road. Barker Road, Peak.

On premises. On premises.

4 Rose Terrace, Robinson Road. King Edward Hotel.

On premises.

Westley, 6 Babington Path. 12 Queen's Road Central.

33 Praya East. Hongkong Club. Royal Buildings.

2 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

On premises. Kowloon Do ks. Kowloon Docks.

Quarry Bay. Kingsclere.

Hotel Baltimore.

22 Leighton Hill Road.

3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Ou premises.

D

Daniel, Walter

Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co., Chater's Bungalow, Kowloon.

Danielsen, Friederich Julius ... Assistant, Siemsson & Cc..

On premises.

NAME IN FULL.

10

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

D-Continued.

Danielsen, Julius Emil Dansfield, Albert Darton, Thomas Harwood David, Evelyn David, Ramésh

Davidson, Henry Bertram Davidson, Horace Davidson, Peter

Davies, Arthur Frederick Davison, William Day, Frank Oswald Desebrock, Hermann Dickie, James.. Dickie, John

Dickson, David Dickson, Robert..... Diercks, Alfred Chihli Dinning, Hugh .... Diss, Arthur Charles.. Diss, George Ambrose Dixon, Walter Edward Dizon, Arsenio

  Dizon, Francisco Santos Dodd, John Valentine, Douglas, John Phillips Drew, Walter Clement Drude, Fritz

.....

Dumerin, Pierre .

Duncan, George

Duncan, George Leopold Dunlop, Gustaaf Abram Dunne, Michael

Dunrich, Arthur Ellis Willian Dutton, Sydney Hardy

E

East, Edward Charles Clayton Edger, John Andrew Edwards, George Richard.. Edwards, Gilbert Hamilton Eggert, Otto Karl Friederich, Eldridge, William James, Ellis, Albert

Ellis, Emmanuel Ezekie',

Ellis, Ezekiel Isaac

Ellis, Frederick

Ellis, Obadiah Isaac

Engel, Gustav Christoph

Esrom, Frank...........

Eyre, Harry

Ezekiel, Reuben Marcus

Ezra, Edward.

Ezra, Reuben

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant,

Assistant Manager, Kowloon Iel, Shipping Clerk,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

St. George's Building. Joss House, Quarry Bay.

1 Connaught Rond.

104 Peak.

On premises.

Y. M. C. A., Alex. Building. Quarry Bay.

Sub. Acct., National Bank of China, Ld., | 6 Mountain View, Peak.

Manager, HK. Hotel,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Clerk, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,................ Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler,......

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, W. R. Loxley & Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Master Tailor, Diss Bros., Master Tailor, Diss Bros., Engineer, Dock Co..................... Assistant,

Commission Agent, Clerk,.........

Engr., G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Merchant, H. Wicking & Co., Office Assistant,

Cashier, Banque de l'Indo-Chine, Foreman Plumber, Dock Co., Assistant, MacEwen, Frickel & Co., Accountant, Neth.-India Com. Bank, Diver,.......

Clerk, Gas Co., Salesman,

Clerk, IIK. & S'hai Bank, Clerk,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., L., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,.............. Storekeeper,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant,

Clerk, E. D. Sasscon & Co., Broker,

Merchant,

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co.,

On premises.

Kowloon Docks,

Tang Yuen, Macdonnell Road. 2 Connaught Road.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Bowrington Refinery.

Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Hotel Mansions.

2 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Oriental Hotel.

36 Caine Road.

Kowloon Docks.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

40 Elgin Street.

3 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

St. George's Building.

4 Humphreys' Aveune, Kowloon. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

3 Duddell Street.

16 Des Voeux Road Central.

Quarry Bay Shipyard.

5 Arsenal Street.

Westley, Babington Path.

On premises.

6 Hillside Terrace.

2 Victoria View, Kowloon.

5 Lycemoon Villas, Kowloon.

2 Connaught Road.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Peak Hotel.

8 Pedder's Hill.

8 Pedder's Hill.

4 Queen's Road Central.

1 Pedder's Hill.

On premises.

Book-keeper, East Asiatic Trading Co.,... Connaught Hotel.

Manager, W. Powell, Ld.,

Broker,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Connaught Hotel, Connaught Hotel. 14 Robinson Road. College Chambers.

F

  Fairnic, Robert Falconer, Percy James Farrell, Peter Thomson Farwell, Judge Lorraine Fenton, Sydney George..... Ferguson, Robert Alexander... Ferry, Wallace Vincent....... Figueiredo, Francisco Maria

     Xavier de Finke, Hermaun....... Fischer, Rudolf

Fisher, Jolin

Fittock, Charles, Jr.

Fletcher, Harold Lewthwaite.

Forbes, John .*. Forbes, Joseph Malcolm

Banker, Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer,

Accountant,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Clerk, Waverley Hotel,

Clerk, Vernon & Smyth, Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Merchant,

Engineer, Dock Co.,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co., Consulting Engineer,

Sugar-boiler, China Sngar Refinery, Pianoforte Tuner,

On premises.

1 Commanght Road.

3 Taikoo Te race, Quarry Bay.

1 East Avenue, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road.

2 Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. Carlton House.

9 Caine Road.

King's Building.

3 Duddell Street.

Cosmopolitan Docks.

Aberdeen Docks. Glenshiel, Barker Road. 159 Praya East. 161 Wanchai Road.

M

NAME IN FULL.

11

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

F-Continued.

Ford, Edward Stephen Ford, William Falconer.. Forde, Frank Herbert Forrest, Thomas Shaw Forsyth, George Granville

Sutherland

Franklin, George Gould Fraser, Alan Stuart Frerichs, Charles Edward Freund, Karl

G

Galloway, Alfred Donglas.. Galloway, Robert Dryden Gardner, William

Gaster, Ernest

Gätjens, Walther Emil

Gee, Archibald

Gegg, George William

..

Georg, Friederich Erich Carl....... Gibson, Ivie Sloan... Gibson, Joe Ernest

Gibson, William Charles Ernest Ginkel, Alexander van Gittins, Arthur

Gittins, Henry

Glendinning, Walter Scott Glover, Campbell

Gloyn, John Wakeham Goggin, William George Gomes, Francis

Gomes, João Eduardo Gordon, Alexander George

Grant,

Gorrell, Oscar..

Gow, David

Gow, John Cowper Graff, Reginald Charles. Graham, Frank

Graham, James William Grant, John Kintrea,. Gray, Thomas Charles Greenhill, Leslie Solbé Gregory, Alfred

Gregory, Tigran Matthews Grey, Cosby French Griffin, Albert Edwin Grimble, Charles Frederick

    George Grimshaw, Thomas Groskamp, Willem Hendik Gubbay, Aaron Sassoon

Gubbay, David Sassoon..

Gubbay, Joseph Sassoon

Gubbay, Raphael Aaron

Guimarães, Marcellino da Silva Gutierrez, Augusto Aureliano. Gug, James

-H

Haigh, Fred. Dunwell

Hall, Frederick Charles..

Hall, Jonathan

Hall, Thomas Philip Halton, Frederick Joseph Hamet, Abdool Hoosen.... Hance, Cyril Eugene Agathon Hancock, Herbert Richard

Budd Hand, John............. Hansen, James Ernest Hansen, Theodor Friedrich

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co.,...... Harbour Foreman Engineer, Dock Co., Sub-Acct., International Banking Corp., . Merchant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, HIK. & S'hai Bank, Marine Insurance Assistant, Clerk, K. & S'hai Bank, Manager, Oriental Hotel,.... Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, HK. Rope Manufacturing Co.,

Ld.,

Asst., China Fire Insurance Co., Ld.,. Clerk, Siemssen & Co.,

Asst., W. Powell, Ld.,

Manager, Horse Repository, Broker, Erich Georg & Co., Storekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Hotel Agent,..

|

43 Caine Road.

House 32, Kowloon Docks.

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. East Point,

On premises.

1 Morrison Hill.

Clondlands, The Peak.

34 Queen's Road Central. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road.

1 Connaught Rond. Quarry Bay.

Villa Maria, Glenealy No. 11. Kingsclere.

On premises.

C/o. W. Powell, Ld. Causeway Bay.

3 Goolistan, Conduit Road. Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. King Edward Hotel. Hongkong Club.

Accountaut, Chartered Bank, Book-keeper, Holland China Trading Co. On premises. Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Accountant, Cotton Mills,

Chief Inspector, Electric Traction Co., Acct., Puuchard, Lowther & Co., Assistant, China Sugar Refinery,. Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Clerk, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Clerk, Douglas, Lapraik & Co.,

Engineer, A. G. Gordon & Co., Asst. Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Clerk,

Foreman Blacksmith, Dock Co., Assistant, P. & O. Co.,... Electrical Engineer,

Supt. Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Reiss & Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Merion, The Peak. Cotton Mills. On premises. Hongkong Club.

4 George Street, East Point. 3 Belilios Terrace.

27 Des Voeux Road Central. 29 Caine Road.

Tor Crest, Peak.

.' Room 29, Hotel Mansions.

Kowloon Docks.

22 Terrace, Kowloon Docks. 11 Mountain View, Peak.

17 College Chambers, Wyndham St. Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

On premises.

1 Connaught Road.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.! Mount Kellett, Peak.

Assistant, A. V. Apear & Co., Storekeeper, Dock Co.,

Civil Engineer, Butterfield & Swire,

General Broker,

Asst. Chief Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Assistant, Neth. Trading Society, Broker, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael,

Asst. Book-keeper, Arnhold,Karberg &Co., Clerk,.....

Foreman Engineer,

Assistant, Kelly & Walsh, LA.,

45 Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks.

129 Barker Road, Peak.

Bisnee Villa, Pokfulum.

8 Stanicy Terrace, Quarry Bay. 77 Mount Kellett Road, Peak. 7 Queen's Road Central.

9 Macdonnell Road.

9 Macdonnell Road.

Ravenshill.

2 Rose Terrace, Kowloon. 14 Mosque Street. Kowloon Docks.

Pelham House, Wyndham Street.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., | East Point.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Marine Surveyor,

Chief Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co., Assistant, H. Price & Co., Clerk, Macdonald & Co.,

Merchant,

Superintendent, Dock Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,...... Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

1 Connaught Road.

2 Connaught Road.

6 Macdonnell Road.

10 Leighton Hill Road. 7 Seymour Terrace.

Chettondale, The Peak. Kowloon Docks. Cosmopolitan Docks. St. George's Building.

ޕ

NAME IN FULL.

12

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

H-Continued.

Hansen, Wallace John

Hardwick, William

Harms, Nicolaus Friedrich

Seigfried.... Harrison, Alfred..

Harrison, Tom Lloyd, Harron, Henry Love Harrop, Charles Edward

Vincent Harvey, David Harvie, John

Haskell, Ernest David Hassan, Hosin..... Haxton, George Kay. Hayes, George Vincent. Hayward, Charles Burdon. Hayward, Ernest Malcolm Hazeland, Ernest Manning Hechtel, Otto Peter

Heermann, Paul Emil Heldt, Franz Max Johu Hell, Paul Edward Heinrich

Wilhelm

Helmers, Johann Christian Helms, Wilhelm

...

Hemmings, Robert Edwin...... Henderson, John Mentiplay Henderson, Robert Hendry, Hugh Stevenson Hendy, Harold Edward

Hermann, Carl Friedrich

Hertslet, Henry Reginald

Herzog, René Hewitt, Alfred Herbert Heyde, Oscar Von der Hickie, Sidney Douglas....... Hickling, Clement Chinery Hickman, Harry Frank..... Hill, Ebenezur Erskine Hill, Walter Joseph Hintze, Hans

Hobbs, William James

Hoggard, Fred.

Ho Kam Tong

Hollings, Alfred Edward'

Holmes, Herbert Skenitte...... Holyoak, Perey Hobson

Hooper, Joseph

Hope, Greig

Hoskins, John Thomas

Hottrich, Paul

Ho U-ming

Houten, Jan Lubertus van

Howard, Edward

Howarth, Henry. Hughes, Ernest Leonard Hughes, John Owen Humphreys, Cecii Humphreys, Ernest

Humphreys, William Meyrick Hunter, George. Hunter, Robert

Hunter, Tobias

Hüpeden, Hans Ferdinand Hurley, Frederick Charlés. Hurley, Robert Crisp... Hutchison, William Hynd, Robert Robertson Hyndinau, Alberto Herculano Hyndman, Francisco Henrique Hynes, Arthur Cecil

Assistant, H. Skott & Co., Storekeeper,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,........ Actg. Depôt Manager, British-American

Tobacco Co.,

Asst., Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Marine Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Clerk, H. Price & Co.,........... Asst. Manager, HK. Ice Co., Ld., Manager, Sperry Flour Co.,........ Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Book-keeper, Lane, Crawford & Co., Civil Engineer,

Assistant, Wendt & Co.,

Jeweller, Gaupp & Co., Assistant, East Asiatic Trading Co.,

Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

Insurance Clerk, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Assistant, Leigh & Orange,.... Boilermaker, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Assistant Engineer, Flour Mills, Assistaut,

Mercantile Assistant,

Clerk,

Civil Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Broker,

Merchant, China Express Co.,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

...

151 Magazine Gap.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay.

2 Connaught Road.

20 Macdonnell Road.

Room 17, Hotel Mansions.

3 Lycemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay.

1 Connaught Road. 13 Austin Avenue. Quarry Bay.

2 Seymour Terrace. On premises.

Ice House, East Point. Room 4, Hotel Mansions.

7 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. 7 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Coombe, 152 Magazine Gap. 3 Ormsby Villas, Granville Road,

Kowloon.

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. 11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon.

Hotel Mansions. On premises.

On premises.

29 Wyndham Street. Kowloon Docks.

6 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. 3 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Connaught Hotel.

Smith Villas, Magazine Gap. 1 Park View, West Point.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Hok-ün, Kowloou.

52 Peak.

26 Belilios Terrace.

1 Connaught Road.

Assistant, China Fire Insurance Co., Ld., : 1 Des Voeux Villas, The Peak.

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Jebsen & Co.,

Clerk, B. & S.'s Shipyard,

Overseer, B. & S.'s Shipyard,..

Assistant Compradore, Jardine, Matheson

& Co., Accountant,

Merchant, H. S. Holmes & Co., Salesman and Assistant, Reiss & Co., Clerk, K. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Chief Foreman, Quarry Bay Shipyard, Clerk, Merchant,

Manager, Netherlands Trading Society,... Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,................. Storekeeper, C. P. Railway Co.... Clerk, Perey Smith & Sethi, Merchant, Harry Wicking & Co., Assistant, W. G. Humphreys & Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Clerk, W. G. Humphreys & Co................... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Engineer,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Hughes & Hough, Accountant,

Foreman, Dock Co.,... Assistant, HIK. & Sbai Bank, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Book-keeper, King Edward Hotel,... Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

1 Connaught Road,

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay.

King's Building.

1 Ormsby Villas, Granville Rd.,

Kowloon.

2 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Caine Road.

1 Ice House Road.

Rochvale, Kowloon. Queen's Building.

| 3 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

I Connaught Road.

1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Co. Arnhold, Karberg & Co.

81 Queen's Road Central.

65 Mt. Kellett Road.

Hotel Mansious.

5 Arsenal Street.

5 Queen's Road Central.

St. George's Building.

4 Queen's Gardens.

1 Connaught Road.

No. 6 Room, 4th floor, Alex. B'ding.

4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

4 Victoria View, Kowloon.

4 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

On premises.

1 Meirion, Peak.

5 Beaconsfield Arcade.

26 Kowloon Docks.

On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

8 Granville Road, Kowloon. On premises.

ري

1

NAME IN FULL.

13

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

E

Ilmer, Paul

Innes, Robert Ironside, William

Irving, John Mark.

Ismail, Sheik Ramjahm

J

Jack, William Charles Jabrand, Alfred

Jameson, Philip Sutherland

Jebsen, Jacob.....

Jebsen, Michael..

Jenkins, Anthony

  Jenkins, John Ventris Jephson, David Solomon Jertrum, Hans Peter ..... Jesnitzer, Alexander Albrecht

Erdmann

Jesus, Franciso Xavier

Montalto

Jillings, Harry Frederick

Bannet...

Johnson, John

Johnston, Benjamin Charles

Maturin

Jonckheer, Philippus

Hendrikus Jacobus Gerard Jordan, Ernest Granville .... Jorge, Francisco José Vicente Joseph, Ezra Solomon Joseph, Joseph Edgar Joseph, Raymond Menasseh... Judah, James Jacob..... Judah, Raphael Solomon

K

Kadoorie, Eleazer Silas. Kadoorie, Ellis Kaily, William Charles, Kapteyn, Barend Dirk Kellinghusen, Franz Otto

     Hermann Kendall, Frederick Carr Kennedy, Edward Arnold...... Kennett, Henry William

Bulmer....

Kent, Herbert Wade

Kenny, Herbert William

Kew, Charles Herbert Whiteley

King, Walter

Kinnaird, John Daniel

Kitazawat, Naona

Kitzmantl, John Charles

Klimanek, Philipp Harding ... Knott, Thomas Macfarlane Knox, Lefferts

Knyyett, Paul Karl

Koch, Carl Sudwig, George

Korten, Hanns Leonhard

Werner

Köster, Ernst Angust

Kraentler, Albert

Kraft, William Dana

Krauss, Edward Leo

Kullmann, John

.....

...

Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank, Marine Supt., China Navigation Co.,... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Hongkong Ice Co., Ld., Clerk,

Consulting Engineer, Wilks & Jack, Assistant, Jebsen & Co., ...... Assistant, Jardine, Mathieson & Co., Ld., Merchant, Jebsen & Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Book-keeper, Hongkong Hotel, Timekeeper, Clerk, Tobacconist,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Book-keeper,

Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Engineer,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Assistant, Java-Japan-China Lijn, Secretary, Phoenix Club, Wyndham Street, Merchant, Jorge & Co., Broker,

Exchange Broker,... Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,............. Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co.,............. Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Asst., Holland China Trading Co.,'.

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Timekeeper,

Manager, China Borneo Co., Ld., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Banker,

Deutsch Asiatische Bank.

1 Connaught Road. 1 Connaught Road. East Point.

12 Leighton Hill Road.

4 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon. 11 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. | East Point.

King's Building. King's Building. Hotel Mansions. Hotel Mansions.

3 Beaconsfield Arcade.

5 Caine Road.

On premises.

3 Chico Terrace.

Alexandra Building. Quarry Bay.

On premises.

37 Robinson Road. 2 Wyndham Street.

Villa D'Alva, Kennedy Road. Hotel Mansions. King Edward Hotel. Hotel Mansions. Zetland House. College Chambers.

Modreenagh, Peak. Modreenagh, Peak. Lai-chi-kok. Alexandra Building.

Queen's Building.

11 Mountain View, Peak. Kowloon Docks.

2 Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

1 Connaught Road.

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road.

1 Magdalen Terrace, (149 The Peak).

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 43 Caine Road. Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,. Panman, China Sugar Refinery, Clerk,.

Merchant, Grossmann & Co.,

Assistant, Holland China Trading Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

District Manager, China Mutual Insurance

Co.,

Local Manager, Vacuum Oil Co., Ship Broker, Lamke & Rogge,

Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,.....

Accountant, Russo Chinese Bank,

Assistant Manager & Attorney, Standard

Oil Co.,

Marine Insurance Agent,. Banker,

Kunze, Paul Adolf Adalbert... Mercantile Representative,

159 Praya East.

C/o. Ataka & Co.

Exmoor, 15 Conduit Road.

On premises. On premises.

Villa Lucia, Pokfulum Road. Mercantile Bank of India. 2 Connaught Road.

On premises.

Queen's Building.

13 Macdonnell Road.

Hotel Mansions.

A 6 Hongkong Club Annexe.

Club Germania.

6 Victoria View, Kowloon.

L

Lambert, John

Surveyer to Lloyd's Register,

Lambert, John James Bain ... Civil Engineer, Wm. Dauby & Co.,......

Alexandra Building.

4 Ormsby Vlas, Kowloon.

NAME IN FULL.

14

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

L-Continued.

Lammert, Frank...............

Lammert, Herbert Alexander Lammert, Lionel Eugene .... Lamperski, Albert Wilhelm Lane, Edward Courtenay Langborg, Hugo Wilhelm Langstein, Ludwig Victor.... Langtry, William Lapsley, Robert Laurenz, Rudolf.

Lau Wan Kai.....

 Leask, William Loughton Le Breton, André Lee, Corinth Henry Leefe, Lawrence Noël Leeham, James Lehmann, Hans Lemm, John Lester, Hugh William Leung Fee Cooke Leuz, Rudolph Harold Levy, Silas Simon Lieb, Fritz

Lightfoot, Sidney Little, James

Li Wai Lam Lochead, James Logan, James Douglas Logan, William Clements Long, Edward Arthur Longuet, Carl Wilhelm... Losseus, Jacob Johan Loureiro, Edward José da

Silva

Loureiro, Peter

Wine Merchant, Caldbeck, MacGregor &

Co.,

Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Auctioneer, Assistant, G. P. Lammert, Assistant, Melchers & Co.,

Asst., Union Ince. Society of Canton, Ld., Chief Accountant, Vacuum Oil Co., Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Foreman Erector, Clerk, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Carlowitz & Co.,...

Assistant Secty., Tung On Fire Insurance

Co., L.,

Civil Engineer, Leigh & Orange, First Assistant, Messageries Maritimes, Office Assistant,

1 Seymour Terrace. 1 Seymour Terrace. 1 Seymour Terrace. On premises.

3 Des Voeux Road, Peak. 6 Mountain View, The Peak. On premises.

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

2 Connaught Road.

2 Bonham Strand West. On premises.

13A Macdonnell Road. 80 Staunton Street.

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., 117 Plantation Road, Peak.

Foreman,

Assistant, Schuldt & Co.,

Architect,

Asst., Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Coal Merchant, &c.,.

Clerk. Sander, Wieler & Co.,

Book-keeper, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Electrician, Dock Co.,

Quarry Bay Shipyard.

Club Germania.

7 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon.

1 Park View, Lyttleton Road.

53 Connaught Road.

Prince's Building.

7 Barrow Terrace, Kowloon. On premises.

Kowloon Docks.

Furnishing Asst., Lane, Crawford & Co.,....... On premises.

Chief Clerk, Flour Mills,.

Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co., Acct., D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,.......... Stenographer, Standard Oil Co.,. Merchant, Kruse & Co.,

67 Wyndham Street. Quarry Bay.

Kowloon Docks. Hongkong Hotel.

1 West End Terrace. Hotel Mansions.

Assistant Superintendent, P. M. S.S. Co., 3 Leighton Hill Road.

Chief Clerk, Rope Works,

Acet., National Bank of China, Ld.,

Lüders, Eduard Carl Ferdinand Accountant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Lühring, Edward

Lysaught, John

Lyson, Cecil Hynes

M

Assistant, Sander, Wieler & Co.,.... Engineer, W. Lysaught & Son, Clerk,....

4 Belilios Terrace.

2 The Albany.

Windsor Lodge, Kingsclere Road,

Kowloon.

9 Kennedy Road.

131 Wanchai Road.

6 Shelley Street.

MacAskill, Kenneth Roderick.. Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Macdonald, Donald

Macfarlane, Alexauder ....

Macgowan, Robert John

Mackenzie, Alexander

Mackintosh, Frederick

Alexander

Maclennan, Kenneth Mackenzie Macqueen, Alexander Rees Maguire, Thomas Bernard Makeham, Charles Makin, Henry Reginald.. Malden, George Fletcher Manners, John Manuk, Malcolm Marcenaro, Ettore Tomaso

Michell Marshall, George Marston, Lionel

Martin, James

Mast, Edward..

Matsda, Kichita

Maucher, Felix

May, Ernest Alfred George McBryde, William Gray McCorquodale, John McCubbin, John

McDougall, Alex.

McGillivray, James Paterson...

Engineer,

Engineer,

6 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Braeside.

Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay.

Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., 68 Mount Kellett, Peak. Clerk,..

Outfitter, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

3 Rippon Terrace.

On premises. Cloudlands, Peak.

Sub-Acet., Chartered Bank of I. A. & C., On premises. Butcher,................

Asst., Dairy Farm Co.,.... Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Engineer, Electric Traction Co.,. Asst., Siemssen & Co.,.................... Acct., Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Asst., Carlowitz & Co.,

Exchange Bank Accountant,

Belle View Hotel. Pokfulum.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises. On premises.

6 Moreton Terrace.

2 Connaught Road.

Mercantile Bank of India.

Manager, China Light & Power Co., Ld.,... Kingsclere.

Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Clerk, C. P. Railway Co.,

Manager, Toyo Kisen Kaisha,

Merchant,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Draughtsman, Dock Co.,

Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co.,

Mercantile Assistant, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.

Peak Hotel.

York Building, Chater Road. 13 Macdonnell Road.

1 Park View, Lyttleton Road. Hongkong & Whampon Dock Co. 2 Great George St., East Point. Gas Works, West Point.

3 Arbuthnot Road.

On premises.

Y

&

NAME IN FULL.

15

OCCUPATION.

Abode.

'

M-Continued.

McGlashan, James...... McHugh, Francis Edwards McHutchon, James Maitland McIlraith, George Duncan McIntyre, John

McIntyre, Wilson

McKirdy, Archibald

McNeill, Duncan

McRobie, Frank...

   Mead, James Henry Meek, Thomas

Mehta, Byramjce Kaikhusbroo

Melvin, James Dewar Menzies, John Mercado, Atilano

Metzenthin, Hermann Carl

Adolf

   Meyer, Carl Martin Meyer, Constantin Adolf Ed-

ward......

Meyer, Harry Albert... Meyer, Johannes Emil Meyer, Oscar

Michael, Sassoon Hai

Michael, Solomon Jacob Millar, Andrew William Miller, John Finlay Miller, Robert... Millet, Jean

Milroy, Anthony Alex. Heron Mistry, Khurshedji Dhunjibhoy Mitchell, John Moffatt, George Moir, Alexander.. Möller, Johannes Joachim

Heinrich

Molson, William Ernest Monk, Albert Victor Moon, Herbert Ernest Mooney, John Mortimer Moosa, Omar Cassam More, Charles Andrew Morfey, Alan

Morphew, George Morrison, John Dugal Moses, Elias Joseph Moss, Dennis Kebir

Moulder, Augustus Bourno-

ville...

Muhle, Heinrich Ludwig Muir, John Greig

Munro, Roland George

Murphy, Edward Owen...

Murray, Douglas Bennett

Murray, James Smith

Murray, Malcolm Alexander Musso, Ferdinando...................... Musso, Luigi

Musso, Salvadoře.

Shipwright, Dock Co.,

Chief Accountant, Standard Oil Co., Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Insurance Assistant, Reiss & Co., Sugar Boiler, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Asst., Taikoo Sugar Refinery,. Boiler Maker, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, B. & S.'s Shipyard,... Bookseller, Kelly & Walsh, Ld.,. Jeweller,

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,.............. Clerk,

Inspector of Hamburg Amerika Linie, Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank,

Assistant, Meyer & Co., Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co., Assistant, Meyer & Co., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Stock Broker,

Stock Broker, Gubbay & Michael,. Timekeeper, Dock Co., Engineer, Bradley & Co., Sugar Boiler,....

Agent, Messageries Maritimes Superintendent, Sailors' Home, Assistant, S. J. David & Co....... Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, Peak Hotel,

Clerk, Carlowitz & Co., Wharfinger, ....

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Oriental Hotel,

Merchant,

Chief Clerk, China Sugar Refinery,

Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld., Foreman, Butterfield & Swire,

Harbour Engineer,

Broker, J. R. Michael & Co., Assistant, Ross & Co.,......

Merchant,

Assistant, Siemssen & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld Engineer, W. S. Bailey & Co.,

Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld.,

Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Hok-ün

Cement Works, .............

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Merchant,

Merchant,

Marine Engineer,

Cosmopolitan Docks. Hotel Mansions. 1 Connaught Road. Queen's Building.

2 Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. 3 Sea View Terrace, Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay. Quarry Bay.

6 Lyeemoon Villas, Kowloon. 6 Beaconsfield Arcade.

Room No. 11, College Chambers,

Wyndham Street.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Kowloon Docks.

5 Ashley Road, Kowloon.

Hongkong Hotel. Club Germania.

3 Queen's Gardens. The Den, Castle Steps. King's Building. Queen's Building. 1 Prince's Building. 2 Chancery Lane. Cosmopolitan Docks.

Stoke's Bungalow West, Peak. 2 Great George Street. Hongkong Club. On premises.

Prince's Building.

Taikoo Terrace, Quarry Bay. 4 Queen's Gardens.

On premises.

2 Connaught Road.

72 Praya East.

1 Connaught Road.

On premises.

177 Wanchai Road.

1 and 3 D'Aguilar Street.

3 Morrison Hill.

East Point.

Quarry Bay. Kowloon Dock. Belilios Terrace.

3 Alexandra Building.

King Edward Hotel.

On premises. Quarry Bay. East Point.

Highlands, Kimberley Road,

Kowloon.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

On premises.

Cloudlands, Peak.

12 Bonham Road.

Stowford, 12 Bonham Road. 46 Morrison Hill Road.

N

Nakagawa, Yorimoto.... Naumann, Carl Wilhelm Lud-

    wig Quintus Walter Neave, Elvine Hugh Neave, Thomas

Neidt, Arthur Carl Wilhelm...] Neilson, Donald McLaren... Neville, Samuel Arthur.....

Accountant, Osaka Soshen Kaisha,

17 Kennedy Road.

9 Robinson Road.

Mercantile Assistant,

Assistant, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., 11 Robinson Road, K'loon.

Dock Co., Merchant,

Foreman Boiler Maker, Dock Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Kowloon Docks.

C/o. Wm. Meyerink & Co. Cosmopolitan Docks. Quarry Bay.

CO

NAME IN FULL.

16

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

N-Continued.

Newman, Kenneth Charles

Horton.......

Newson, Clement Charles Nicholls, William Nicholson, Philip Forster

Nicholson, Reginald Nicholson, Robert Alfred Nicholson, William..... Nilsson, Arthur Gustav

Vilhelm

Nye, Percival Herbert

O

Obrembski, Marian..

Ogihie, Alexander

Ohme, Alfred

Olson, Gustaf Olsson. Olson, John

Ortlepp, Heinrich Friedrich Osborne, Cyrus Clarke Osborne, John....................... Osmund, James Daniel Otten, Gerhardus

Owen, Edward

Owen, Owen Elias..

P

Packham, Ralph

Page, Harry William

  Paine, Albert Edward Palmer, Henry Thomas.

. Parker, Albert Eruest

Paterson, John

Paterson, Reginald Alexander

Elliot

Pattenden, Walter Leshe, Peacock, John

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co.,

Ld., Accountant,

Clerk, Dock Co.,

Manager, Taikoo Dockyard & Engineer-

ing Co.,

Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank, Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,..... Electrical Engineer,

Chemist, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,' Piano Tuner,..

Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Assistant,

Building Contractor, C. E. Warren & Co., Assistant, Reuter, Brockelmann & Co.,... Assistant, Standard Oil Co., Engine Driver, Tramway Co.,.. Clerk, China Sugar Refinery, Book-keeper, Java-China-Japan Lijn. Broker, ...

Proprieter, Kowloon Hotel,.

Cargo Supt., HK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., Ind.,

Assistant, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,

Manager, S Moutrie & Co., Ld.,. Spinning Master, .....

Manager, Singer Machine Co., Exchange Broker,

Chartered Accountant, Assistant, Gilman & Co.,

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Pearce, Edward John Thomas Submarine Engineer,

Pearce, Thomas Ernest......

Pearson, James

Pearson, John Henry..

Peche, Ivanhoe

Peel, Charles Alfred

Penster, Paul Oshar,

Assistant, J. D. Hutchison & Co.,.............. Iron Moulder, Dock Co.,

Manager, Robinson Piano Co., Ld., Timekeeper, B. & S.'s Shipyard, Mercantile Assistant,

Hotel Agent,.....

Pereira, Alfredo Maria Roza | Supt., China Commercial S. S. Co., Ld.,

Perrie, Robert

Perry, Isaac Samuel

Pestonji, Rustom

Pettey, Harold Wallace.

Pickering, George

Piens, Charles....

Piercy, Richard Smalles

  Piper, Johann Christian Rudolf Plage, Philip

  Plummer, John Archibald.. Plummer, Lewis

Polley, John David

Potts, Patrick Cumming Priedemann, Herrmann Georg Prien, Peter George Friedrich Pugh, Alfred John Pumfrett, Arthur John Powys Puncheon, James

  Purcell, William Harris. Purves, David Aitkinson Putley, Arthur Charles

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Stenographer, International Bankg. Corp., Electrical Engineer,

Foreman, China Sugar Refinery, Clerk, HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld., Assistaut, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,. Clerk, Sander, Wieler & Co., Foreman, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Bradley & Co.,.... Chief Clerk, P. & O. Co., Gunner, P. & O. Co., Broker, E. S. Kadoorie & Co., Merchant, Hamburg Amerika Linie, Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Assistant, Denison, Ram & Gibbs,..

| Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Ld.,.

Iron Shipbuilder, Dock Co.,.... Accountant, Kelly & Walsh, Ld., Foreman Engineer, Clerk, IIK. & S'hai Bank,

Wanchai HK. Electric Co., Ld., Wan- King Edward Hotel. 2 Kowloon Docks.

Peak Hotel. Cloudlands, Peak. Cosmopolitan Docks. 1 Connaught Road.

2 Quarry Point, Quarry Bay. 14 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

Quarry Bay.

2 Pedder's Hill. Club Germania.

110 Macdonnell Road, K'loon.

30 Des Vœux Road Central.

6 Morrison Hill.

21 Robinson Road.

30 Queen's Road East.

[chai.

6 Rednaxella Terrace, Peel Street. 2 Babington Path. Hongkong Club.

On premises.

Wharf Co.'s Office, Kowloon. Dairy Farm Depôt, 10 Robinson Road,

Kowloon,

7 Robinson Road. Cotton Mills.

74 Caine Road.

1, Prince's Building.

Kingsclere.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak.

3 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Punchard, Lowther & Co., Naval

Yard Extension.

Beauregard, Bonham Road. Kowloon Docks.

Parkside, Robinson Road, Kowloon. Quarry Bay.

Eden Hall, Lyttleton Road West. 66 Caine Road.

Garden Road, Kowloon.

1 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. Des Voeux Road.

| 5 Seymour Terrace.

Electric Light Works Mess. On premises.

13 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Diocesan School, On premises. Bowrington.

2 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon, 11 Mountain View, Peak. 3 Duddell Street. Kingsclere, Kennedy Road. 132 Magazine Gap. F. Blackhead & Co. Hongkong Hotel. East Point.

Kowloon Docks.

149 Magazine Gap, The Peak. Kowloon Docks,

On premises.

e

$

NAME IN FULL.

17

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

Quinn, John

Q

Steward, Hongkong Club,

R

Radburn, William David Rahfeek, Mahomed Kam, Harry

Ramsay, James

Ramsay, Joseph Marshall..

Rapp, Fritz....

Ramsay, Thomas

Rapp, Gustav.

Rapp, Herman

Rattey, William James

Ray, Edward Henry

Raven, Arthur Robert Fenton.

Raymond, Albert..

Diver,.

Clerk, Osaka Soshen Kaisha, Assistant, John Lemm, Architect, Foreman Turner, Dock Co.,...... Foreman Shipbuilder, Dock Co., Ship Draughtsman,

Asst., A. S. Watson & Co, Ld.,. Clerk, J. D. Humphreys & Son,. Assistant, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Architect,

Broker,

Assistant, S. J. David & Co.,

Raymond, Edward Benjamin . Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

Raymond, Edward Maurice

Raymond, Ellis

Razack, Moosa Abdool

Reeves, Henry

Reich, Charles

Reiners, Walter Edward

Reutter, Robert Henry

Emanuel

Richards, Thomas James Richardson, Hedley Thomas... Riecken, Julins Ritchie, Archibald.. Ritchie, Archibald.

Roberts, Arthur Griffith .... Robertson, Arthur Walter

Lennox Robertson, John

Robertson, Thomas Watson

Robinson, Albert Edward Robson, John James Roby, Ernest,.

Rodger, John

Rogers, Charles

Rombach, Josef Albert Rosario, José Maria da Silva Rose, Louis Augustus Rose, William Edward

Ross, William Walker Gibson Rouse, Athol Bernard

Rowan, Robert Thomas Rumjahn, Dawood

Rutter, Robert Vart Ruttonjee, Hormusjce Ruttonjee, Jehangir Hormusjee,

Assistant

Clerk, E. D. Sassoon & Co.,

General Broker,

Assistant, Lane, Crawford & Co.,

Assistant, Robinson Piano Co., Ld.,. Clerk, P. M. S. S. Co.,

Assistant,

Assistant, Brick Works,

Supt. Engineer, C. P. Railway Co., Assistant, Jebsen & Co., Merchant,

Supt., United Asbestos Oriental Agency

Ld.,

Civil Engineer, Punchard, Lowther & Co.,

Assistant. Butterfield & Swire,

Clerk, HK. & K. W. Godown Co., Ld.,... Supt. Engineer, HK. & K. W. Godown

C. Lưu

Manager, II. Price & Co., Engineer, Dock Co.,..

Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Sugar Boiler, China Sugar Refinery, Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Merchant,

Assistant, Bradley & Co., Assistant, E. M. Hazeland, Architect. Asst., China Mutual Life Ince. Co., Ld.,... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Assistant, Union Insurance Society of

Canton, Ld.,

Tailor's Curter, Cashier,

Foreman, Dock Co.,

Storekeeper, II. Ruttonjer & Co., Merchant, H. Ruttonjee & Co.,

Hongkong Club.

9 Arsenal Street. 118 Hollywood Road. 3 Shing Wong Street. Cosmopolitan Docks.

Kowloon Docks. Highlands, Kowloon. Alexandra Building.

4 East Avenue, Kowloon, A. S. Watson & Co., Ld. Cosmopolitan Docks. Junk Bay.

St. George's Building. 56 Caine Road.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon. 56 Caine Road.

5 Victoria View, Kowloon.

18A Stanley Street.

On premises.

2 Belilios Terrace.

11 Morrison Hill Road.

3 Ormsby Villas, Kowloon. Deep Water Bay.

3 Observatory Villas, Kowloou. 6 Morrison Hill. 236 Mongkok North.

Holyrood, Kowloon. Deacon's Bungalow, Pokfulum.

1 Connaught Road. Missionary Bungalow, Peak.

Kimberley Villas, Kowloon.

2 Century Crescent, Kennedy Road. Kowloon Docks.

2 Lyeemoon Terrace, Quarry Bay. 159 Praya East.

1 Connaught Roa:, Club Germania.

17 Mosque Street. 10 Robinson Road. 42 Elgin Street, East Point.

4 Cameron Villas, Peak. Lane, Crawford & Co. H. Price & Co., Ld. Kowloon Docks.

5 D'Aguilar Street. 5 D'Aguilar Street.

Samy, Arthur Poonoo Sandford, Henry Chamberlain. Saunders, George Haward Sayer, George John Budds... Sayer, Heury William Sayle, Robert Theophilus

    Dalton Schellhass, Albrecht Wilhelm. Schierenberg, Hermann Wil-

hem

Schindewolf, Friedrich

Wilhelm Max

Schlüter, Carl........ Schlüter, Hakon Axel Schmidt, Carl Julius

Architect, John Lemm, Clerk, K. & S'hai Bank, Clerk, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,.. Civil Engineer,

Draughtsman, Civil Engineer's Office,

28 Bonham Road.

On premises.

3 Taikoo Terruce, Quarry Bay. Tang Yuen, 18 Macdonnell Road. Butterfield & Swire.

Asst., HK. & K. W. & Godown Co., Ld.,. 3 Stewart Terrace, Peak. Exchange Broker,

Assistant, Ferd. Bornemann,

Acet., Deutsch Asiatische Bank, Merchami,

Assistant, Renter, Bröckelmann & Co.,

Asst., China Export Import & Bank Cie.,

21 Conduit Road.

16 Des Voeux Road.

13c Macdonnell Road.

21 Connaught Road Central.

7 Queen's Gardens.

2 Connaught Road,

NAME IN FULL.

18

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

S-Continued.

Schmidt, Wilhelm

Schoenemann, Andreas Flein-

rich A Tai,

Schröter, Carl Christian

Hermann

Schwandes, Ernest Hermann

Bernhard

Schwarzkopf, Frederick

John Rudolph.....

Scriven, Henry Eruest

Seggie, Thomas

Sequeira, Pedro Nolasco,

Seth, Enos....

  Seth, John Hennessey Seth, Seth Arathoon

Seydler, Richard Albert Benno

Curt

Shand, Thomas

Sharpin, Harry Douglas

Shaw, Alfred

Shaw, Ernest

Shaw, James Totten

Shea, James Jerry

Sheffield, Alfred............

Shennan, Herbert Bromfield... Shepherd, Edgar Bruce

Sheppard, John Oram, Shewan, William Thomson Shroff, Framroze Pestonji Sibbit, John James Siebler, Hugo Oskar

Siebs, Haus August

Silas, Charles David

  Silas, David Hai.... Silbermann, Isydor.............. Silva, Francisco Filomeno

Eça da

Silva, Porphyrio Maria

     Nolasco da Simcock, Philip Simms, Henry George Sinclair, Angus Skinner, Thomas

Skött, Christian

Skött, Hans

Slade, Thomas

  Slaney, Albert Edward Smith, Arthur William Smith, Erie Grant Smith, Francis Harland.. Smith, George Morton Smith, Horace Percy,

Smith, Samuel

Smyth, Frank...

  Soares, Adão Maria de Lourdes Soares, Alfredo Francisco de

Jesus

Soares, Francisco Paulo de

Vasconcellos

Sorby, Vincent

Souza, Miguel Angelo Antonio Spafford, Thomas Spalekhaver, Wilhelm Otto

Christian

Squair, Alexander Cook Stalmaun, Robert Johannes

Ludwig

Stebbing, William Thomas Steel, David Thomson

Stein, Alexis Low

Steinhoff, Ferdinand Julius, Stevens, Harry Jabez

Clerk, Jebsen & Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Merchant, Meyer & Co., ....

Assistant, Deutsch Asiatische Bank

Storekeeper, F. Blackhead & Co., Furnishing Salesman, Lane, Crawford

& Co.,

Bank Clerk,

Asst., Standard Oil Co.,

Secretary, Humphreys Estate & Finance

Co., Ld.,

Acet., &c., Percy Smith & Seth,. Secretary, Dairy Farm Co., Ld.,..

On premises.

F. Blackhead & Co.

Shorncliffe, Garden Road.

Magdalene Terrace, 150 Magazine

[Gap. Smith Villas, Magazine Gap.

On premises.

Tang Yuen, 18 Macdonnell Road. 7 Mosque Terrace.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road. Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Norman Cottage, Peak Road.

Manager, China Export Import & Bk. Cie., 1 Queen's Gardens.

Engineer, Taikoo Sugar Refinery,

Asst., HK. & S'hai Bank,

Manager, Cotton Mills,

Assistant, Cotton Mills,

Cutter,

Assistant, Standard Oil Co.,.

Assistant Supt., Fitting Dept., Gas Co., Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Hongkong Land Investment &

Agency Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Merchant,

Clerk, S. J. David & Co., Head Timekeeper, Dock Co., Manager, Soap Works,.... Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Assistant, Dock Co.,

Assistant, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld., Hotel Keeper, "Globe Hotel ",

Clerk, D. Sassoon & Co., Ld.,

Printer, Guedes & Co.,.... Engineer, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Ins. Agent, North China Ins. Co., Engineer, Indo-China S. N. Co..... Consulting Engineer, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Assistant, Skött & Co., Merchant, Skött & Co., Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,

Overseer, Punchard, Lowther & Co. Assistant, Alex. Ross & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Clerk, Butterfield & Swire,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld.,

Chartered Acct., Perey Smith & Seth,. Boatswain,.....

Broker, Vernon & Smyth, Merchant,

Merchant,

Assistant, P. & 0). Co.,

Electrical Engineer, HK. Electric Co., Ld... Secretary, Campbell, Moore & Co. Storekeeper, Punchard, Lowther & Co.,...

Assistant, Siemssen & Co., Book-keeper & Cashier, Dock Co.,

Asst., Ferd. Bornemann, Printer, Kelly & Walsh, L., Assistant,

Quarry Bay. On premises. East Point. Cotton Mills. 71 Peak.

Hongkong Hotel,

1 Bonham Road.

Ou premises.

14 Knutsford Terrace.

Albany Terrace, Caine Road. SA Des Voeux Road. 57 Queen's Road. On premises. Shaukiwan Road. On premises. College Chambers. College Chambers. Queen's Road Central.

3 Robinson Road, Kowloon.

4 Seymour Terrace.

On premises.

2 Lycemoon Villus, Kowloon. Peak Hotel.

2 Canton Villas, Kowloon. Hongkong Club.

10 Des Voeux Road. Quarry Bay.

Naval Yard Extension.

127 Barker Road, The Peak. Craigieburn, Peak.

3 Pedder's Hill.

4 Queen's Gardens.

The Summer House, Mount Kellett. Kowloon Docks.

Victoria Building, 5 Queen's Road. 24 Robinson Road.

24 Robinson Road,

6 Caine Road.

HIK. Electric Co., Ld., Wanchai. 4A Upper Mosque Terrace. 12 Sau Wa Fong.

On premises.

7 Ormsby Terrace, Kowloon.

6 Queen's Road Central. Hongkong Hotel. Fernside, Peak.

Manager, Sun Life Asce. Co. of Canada, 6 Alexandra Building.

Asst., Melchers & Co.,.......

Assistant,

On premises.

6 Mountain View, The Peak.

i

NAME IN FULL.

19

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

:

S--Continued.

Stevenson, Allan

Stockhausen, Curt Gottlob

Gustav...

Stoltz, Olav

Stone, Paul Emil Frederic Stoneham, Herbert Frederick. Stopani, John Andrew

Stoppa, William Christain Paul Stubbings, John James................ Sullivan, Charles Daniel Summers, Edwin Henry Spark

Sutherland, Percy Duffus Sutherland, Robert

Sutton, Arthur Leslie

Assistant Manager, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Pokfulum.

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co., Ship Broker.

Assistant, Standard Oil Co., (Shipping)... Sub-Acet., International Banking Corp., Assistant Superintendent, Rope Manufac-

turing Co.,

Broker,

Electrical Engineer, IK. Electric Co., Ld., Assistant, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Storekeeper, IIK. & K. W. & Godown

Co., Ltd.,

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,.... Assistant, Jardine, Matheson & Co., Engineer,

Swan, William Frederick Foote Mercantile Assistant,

Swart, Schelto

T

Partner, Schuldt & Co.,

2 Bay View, East Road, Kowloon. 3 Victoria View, Kowloon. Kowloon Hotel.

Tang Yuen, 18в Macdonnell Road.

Peak Hotel.

7 & 8 Hotel Mansions.

Tesla, HK. Electric Co., Ld. Joss House, Quarry Bay.

6 Ashley Road, Kowloon. 21 Robinson Road. 106 Peak.

11 Robinson Road, Kowloon. Kowloon Hotel.

2 Victoria Lodge, Peak.

Taggart,

mes Harper.....

Tata, Fariborze Kaikaoos

Tatam, John

Tayler, Henry Herbert Taylor, Alexander Taylor, Joseph William Taylor, William Taylor, William Templeton, David

Terry, Edgar William Tester, Perey

     Thiel, Carl Heinrich Thiel, Eugene II. Thiessen, Adolf Johannes

Martin

     Thomas, Francis Henry Thomas, George Harold Thomas, Harry Philip Thompson, Myron Lewis,. Thomson, John Dick Wylie Thorne, Stanley Moritz.....

Thun, Carl Heinrich Johannes Tiefenbecher, Hans Tillmann, Henry

Tohdow, Daizo

Tong Tze-sau

Toppin, James

Towne, Dana Winters

Tricker, Charles Henry

Tulip, Wilfred

Tully, John ....

     Turnbull, Thomas Guthrie Turner, Richard Rennie Turner, William Cecil Dutton Tuxford, Alfred Stanley

U

Uldall, Sofus Vilhelm August Ulderuy, Johannes P. Underwood, Joseph Harry Unsworth, Richard

V

Vollbrecht, Ernst Oscar Rudolf Voort, Reinhard Theodoor

Frederik van der

Vorster, Julius Otto

Sub-Manager, Hongkong Hotel, Commission Agent,

Butcher, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Engineer,

Assistant, Butterfield & Swire, Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Pattern Maker,

Sugar Refiner, Taikoo Sugar Refinery, Engineer, Gas Co.,

Assistant, Commercial Union Assurance

Co., L,

On premises.

4 Queen's Building.

166 Queen's Road East.

5 Ripon Terrace.

1 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 1 Connaught Road.

East Point.

15 The Terrace, Kowloon Docks. Corn Hill, Quarry Bay. Gas Works, West Point.

53 The Peak.

Merchant, Reuter, Brockelmann & Co.,... 31 Robinson Rond.

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Clerk, W. S. Bailey & Co., Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,

St. George's Building.

St. George's Building.

On premises.

56B Peel Street.

21 Robinson Road.

Supt. of Construction, Standard Oil Co., .ị Hongkong Hotel. Engineer,

Sub-Accountant, Chartered Bank of

I. A. & C.,

Merchant,

Merchant, Wm. Meyerink & Co., Foreman,

Manager, Bank of Taiwan,

Secretary, Tung On Fire In'ce Co., Ld.,

Assistant, Showan, Tomes & Co.,

Assistant, C. P. Railway Co.,

13 Praya East.

3 Queen's Road Central. Rombach & Co.

On premises.

20 Shankiwan Road, Prince's Building.

2 Bonham Strand West.

7 Lochiel Terrace, Kowloon. Clairmount, 2 Kennedy Road.

Actg. Supt. Engineer, Butterfield & Swire, 1 Connaught Road,

Draughtsman, Dock Co., ..... Engineer, Dock Co.,..... Assistant, C. P. Railway Co., Clerk, Shewan, Tomes & Co.,

| Assistant, HK. & S'hai Bank,

Opthalmic Optician,.....

Manager, G. I. Cement Co., Ld., Engineer,

Chemist, China Sugar Refinery, Berthing Master, HK. & K. W. &

Godown Co., L‹l.,

Assistant, F. Blackhead & Co.,

Book-keeper, Java-China-Japan Lijn, Assistant, Meyer & Co.,

1 Knutsford Terrace, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks. Alexandra Building. Kowloon.

On premises. 74 Caine Road.

Kowloon City Road, Kowloon.

21 Connaught Road.

156 Praya East.

3 Victoria View, Kowloon.

9 Kennedy Road.

37 Robinson Road. King's Building.

NAME IN FULL.

20

OCCUPATION.

ABODE.

}

W

Walker, James Walker, Richard Corker Ward, Arthur Jacob Ward, John Edward Wardigan, Arthur William Warnes, Charles Aspinall Warnsloh, Hugo Peter Gerald Warrack, Alexander Fehrsen. Warre, Felix Walter Warren, Charles Edward Waterhouse, Wilfrid Watson, Ernest George Watt, Albert William Jack Watt, Robert Downie Weall, Thomas Graham... Weaser, William Lionel Wreford Webb, George Stanley Webber, William James Weill, Albert

Weinberg, Samuel

Weis, Adam F.

Welter Emil

Foreman, Dairy Farm Co., Ld., Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Electrical Engineer, Dock Co., Assistant, P. M. S. S. Co., Ganger,

Asst., Lane, Crawford & Co., Assistant, Melchers & Co., Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank, Assistant, Gilman & Co..... Architect, &c., C. E. Warren & Co., Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Engine-driver, Peak Tramway, Clerk, HK. & S'hai Bank,. Marine Engineer,

Assistant, Dodwell & Co., Ld., Architect,

Chief Storekeeper, Dock Co.,... Diver,...

Manager, Levy Hermanos,

T

Godown Supt., Standard Oil Co., Chemist, Imperial Brewery Co., La.,. Manager,

West, Johannes Jacobus van Assistant, Neth. Trading Society, Westerburger, Charles Adolphe

Chi

Westhoff, Adolft Jean

Philip Hubert Désiré...... Weston, William MacGregor .. Wheeley, John Thomas Martin White, Edmund William White, George White, Hedley G.

Wiesinger, Otto

Wilkie, John

Wilkinson, Harrie Vaughan Wilson, William Webb

Winter, Frank Vernor

Witchell, Job ..........

Wolf, Erich Theodor Reinhold Wolff, Philip Robert Wong, Nathaniel

Wo

ong

Po Chun

Wood, Gerald George

Wood, Robert Bryden

Worby, George

Worcester, William Gilbert

Gray

Wright, James Francis

Wright, John Laird

Assistant, Arnhold, Karberg & Co.,

Asst., Java-China-Japan Lijn,..... Clerk, HK. S'hai Bank, Manager, China Borneo Co., Ltd., Assistant, W. Powell, Ld., Builder and Diver, Dock Co., Representative for Suter Hartmann &

Rahijen's Composition Co., Ld.,

Asst., China Export Import & Bank Cie., Engineer and Contractor,.

Assistant, P. & O. Co.,

Merchant,

Steward,

Supt. Brick Works,

Asst., Arnhold, Karberg & Co., Clerk, Dock Co.,

Accountant,

Sassoon's Villa, Pokfulum. Kowloon.

Kowloon Docks.

6 Macdonnell Road.

4 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. Wong-nei-chong Road.

On premises.

On premises.

4 Cameron Villa, Peak.

30 Des Vœux Road Central.

1 Park View, West Point.

Engine House, Peak. On premises. Quarry Bay.

6 Park View. Alexandra Building. Kowloon Docks.

7 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay, 13 Seymour Road.

34 Morrison Hill Road.

9 & 11 Wong-nei-chong Road. Pelham House.

On premises.

33 Conduit Road.

2 Babington Path, Peak. On premises.

23 Conduit Road.

On premises.

31 Kowloon Docks.

Hongkong Hotel.

1 Queen's Gardens.

1 Observatory Villas, Kowloon.

11 Mountain View, Peak.

6 Humphreys' Road, Kowloon.

King Edward Hotel.

Deep Water Bay.

9 Robinson Road.

3 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

Mutual Stores.

Agent, China Mutual Life Insurance Co., Alexandra Building.

Civil Engineer,

Manager, Steam Laundry Co......

Clerk, British American Tobacco Co.,

Assistant, P. & O. Co.,.... Broker,

Engineer,

Foreman Shipwright, Dock Co.,.

Hongkong Hotel,

On premises.

4 Kennedy Road.

11 Mountain View, The Peak.

4 Stewart Terrace, Peak.

1 Observatory Villas, Kowloon. Kowloon Docks.

Wynne, Hugh Smith

Y

Yamada, Noriaki

Yamada, Teizo

Young, Alexander

Young, Charles Henry Young, David...

Young, James Traill Young, Jesse Ashton. Yuetpo, Cheng

Chief Clerk, Toyo Kisen Kaisha, Clerk,.......

Bar Manager,

Asst, China Commercial S.S. Co., Ld.,.. Overseer,

Foreman, B. & S.'s Shipyard,. Assistant, Shewan, Tomes & Co., Manager, Bismarck & Co.,

Z

.

York Building, Chater Road. Ataka & Co.

King Edward Hotel.

7 Chiu Loong Street.

4 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 6 Stanley Terrace, Quarry Bay. 4 Queen's Gardens.

19 Stanley Street, 2nd- floor.

Zuylen, Hendrik van............ Superintendent, Java-China-Japan Lijn, 37 Robinson Road.

ARATHOON SETH, Registrar.

Registry, Supreme Court, Hongkong, 30th January, 1908.

+

No. 3.

DIEU

MON DROITU

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 13th of MARCH, 1908.

Published by Authority,

REPORT ON QUEEN'S COLLEGE, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

    1. During the year 1907, 645 boys applied for admission, of whom 396 secured seats. On the other hand 347 boys left in the course of the year. The total attendance for the year was 1,401.

    2. In the former half of the year, the total attendances were reduced owing to two causes, viz.: the premature attempt to abolish Class VII, and the depletion of the Upper School in 1906 on account of the abnormal number of boys obtaining situations in that year. The result is a reduction in Daily Average Attendance from 1,005 to 991. In the latter half of the year, the numbers recovered their usual figures, and we have this month an exceptionally high attendance, 1,049, i.e., 64 more than in January 1907.

    3. There were 228 school-days, three being lost on the occasion of the Commercial Processions, when most schools in the Colony were closed as Chinese Masters and boys had relatives from the mainland whom they wished to entertain.

    4. The total gross expenditure was $60,995, or $4,863 more than in 1906, the increase being due to the 2/- rate for Exchange Compensation ordered by the Secretary of State. The public paid one half of the year's expenses of the college, and the cost of each boy to the public was $30.82 The statistics in this paragraph merely show a reversion to the conditions of 1905.

22

5. The following changes on the Staff took place during the year:-

Mr. LAI PUI-YAN appointed Articled Pupil Teacher, 1st April. Mr. TSANG KUN-WA, Clerk, resigned, 30th April.

Mr. WONG WAI-SHU, appointed Clerk, 1st May.

Mr. R. E. O. BIRD, Senior Assistant Master, went on leave, 4th May.

Mr. B. TANNER returned from leave, 20th September.

   6. The drainage of the entire premises has been relaid, and a new Masters' Latrine provided. The roofs of two class-rooms have been repaired, and the cubic content of the rooms considerably increased by the exposure of the rafters. It does not appear possible for the Public Works Department to effect alterations of such magnitude in our short vacations (one month each, in February and August). The consequent dislocation of school work is considerable, as we have no spare room into which to transfer the disturbed class. We are obliged to use the Grand Entrance Lobby, which is entirely unsuited for educational purposes. In the case of classes of 60 boys, some two dozen have to be distributed among other sections which are thereby overcrowded.

7. On the 13th of September a panic occurred in the East Wing of the college, two or three hundred boys rushing downstairs, on account of a cry in the streets that Queen's College was falling. The origin of the scare was simple enough. A piece of plaster fell from the ceiling in a class-room, whereupon all the boys in that room bolted. The wind blew the dust into the adjoining room, where the boys mistaking it for smoke shouted "Fire!" and ran. The people in the street added to the excitement. In five minutes, order was restored and work resumed. It was discovered however that one boy in alarm for his own safety had jumped over the verandah, a distance of 25 feet. He was conveyed to hospital and returned to school a month later. To prevent the recurrence of such a panic, all plaster ceilings in class-rooms and verandahs should be removed. This is the more necessary when we remember that these ceilings have been in situ fully twenty years and in many places are covered with patches.

8. The health of the college has been very good. The chief causes of absence from sickness were Beri-beri, from which Chinese appear to recover with astonishing ease, and Scabies, which often necessitates an absence of two or three months from school. Dr. JORDAN and Dr. GRÖNE were appointed by the Government to report on the condition of the eyes of the pupils of the college, they discovered a very large proportion of the boys suffer- ing from Trachoma in various stages.

9. I am pleased to be able to report a very marked improvement in the success of our candidates at the Oxford Local Examinations, which were held last July for the twentieth time at this centre. The occasion was signalised by Mok Kai-fook's taking Third Class Junior Honours. This is the first time that a Queen's College boy has obtained Honours. This year I am happy to say that all our Juniors took Mathematics, passing 100 p.c. in Arithmetic, 90 p.c. in Algebra, 80 p.c. in Geometry and 90 p.c. in Mensuration, also 4 out of 5 or 80 p.c. in Trigonometry. All the Preliminary took Higher Arithmetic and Algebra, passing 100 p.c. in Arithmetic, 78 in Algebra and 56 in Higher Arithmetic. The mark Good, next to Distinction, was awarded 19 instead of 11 times as last year. Senior, I in Scripture. Junior, 3 in Arithmetic, 1 in Scripture, 1 in Algebra, 2 in Geometry and 2 in Mensuration. Preli- minary, 4 in Arithmetic, 2 in History, 2 in Geometry and 1 in Freehand Drawing.

  10. The results of the Annual Examination for Prizes and Promotions, held by me under Standing Orders from the Governing Body are as follows :-

Upper School,

.295 boys examined, 279 or

94 % passed.

Lower School,

Preparatory School,

...622 ..127

577

:"

11

93 %

"1

124

:)

""

""

98 %

""

Total,..........

.1.044

980

;

""

94 %

99

The two previous annual percentages of passes are 81 in 1906, and 88 in 1905.

Table I shows the percentage of passes in each subject.

44

+

23

11. I have not the slightest hesitation in assessing the work of 1907 as excellent. I have invariably found the results of the Oxford Local Examinations to provide a safe cri- terion of the work to be expected in the Upper School and this year is no exception. It will always happen, in Oxford and all other examinations, that some particular questions may appear easier in one year than another. It is also worthy of notice that such apparently easy questions frequently act as pitfalls to the unwary.

It

may however safely be premised, and I fear no contradiction from my masters and boys, that the questions set by me in 1907 were as searching, and as severe tests of intelligence as in previous years. The head-boys of most classes achieved the same aggregate as last year: but the following particular instances de- serve notice, II.A. 1,270 instead of 1,124, III.A. 1,152 instead of 942, III.B. 1,017 instead of 790, IV.B. 1,004 instead of 858, V.A. 948 instead of 843 and V.B. 952 instead of 814.

12. I desire to invite particular attention to the following points. Owing to the deple- tion of the Upper School in 1906 referred to above (para. 2) it was necessary for me in September to form a fourth section of Class III. Mr. TANNER, on his return from England, took charge of this section III.D. which was composed of the boys in the various sections of Class IV, that obtained highest aggregates at my Half-yearly Examination in July. Not a single boy failed and the general tone of the work was excellent. The promotion of boys from Class IV to III entailed promotions in all classes below. Reference to the figures in the preceding paragraph will show that while no class came out worse than last year, three IV.B., V.A. and V.B. attained a much higher figure. Class I.B. that for many years has borne the unenviable reputation of being composed of dull, slow boys was observed by the class-masters and myself throughout the year to possess better material than usual, and to be working in a satisfactory manner. The opinion thus formed was amply justified by the final result of the examination when 84 per cent. passed instead of 53. Non-Chinese boys throughout the college have acquitted themselves above the average: the head-boy of V.A. is a Japanese and of V.B. a Philippino.

13. I have addressed the classes on the weak points observable in their papers through- out the examination and therefore do not propose to dwell on matters, which in view of the general excellence of the results, appear comparatively trifling. For the first time in my ex- perience the Graphs in Classes I, II and III were excellently well done, and Logarithms successfully employed by boys in Class I.A. Mathematics generally and Arithmetic in parti- cular showed great improvement. The important subjects of English Grammar, Reading, Conversation, Dictation, Composition and History, and the allied subjects of Translations were of a high order of merit. The map-drawing from memory in Classes III, IV, V and VI were astonishing feats. A few boys in II.A. drew the Southern counties of England well, but the map of Ireland proved too much for I.A.B. Hygiene was well taught to 736 boys, Mr. SUTHERLAND being specially successful in teaching' this subject to the boys of so low a standard as Class V.

   14. With regard to Special Subjects, I find that the papers on Physiology and Natural Science taught by Mr. CROOK to non-Chinese boys of the Upper School in lieu of Transla- tions, were better done than for many years past, notably so in the case! of Physiology. Trigonometry, taught by myself to a class that had dwindled down to 14 boys at time of examination also had made progress, the Seniors doing very well and the Juniors creditably. The Morrison Scholar Mok Kai-fook floored every question of the Senior paper losing a few marks on matters of method. Model and Freehand Drawing, taken by the Second Master Mr. DEALY to a larger class than usual, gave evidence of talent and application.

15. When I arrived in the Colony 22nd of January, 1882, I immediately proceeded to hold the Annual Examination of the Central School, 367 boys, 1,875 papers. This year I have examined 1,044 boys and personally corrected 8,888 papers. The fact that I mark all the papers myself is not in any sense whatever a reflection on my staff, whose ability to hold examinations carefully is amply attested twice a year at the Mid-Term examinations: I am actuated by the very simple and to me excellent reason, the maintenance of one standard in apprising the excellence and intelligence of the answers throughout this large college. It is not because I lay any foolish claim to omniscience or to infallibility but because I believe the gain to the whole college incalculable, and the loss to the individual (in the event of a slip) infinitesimal. A very good illustration of the wide divergence of views in assess- ing the same paper is afforded by the Table of Marks awarded by six masters (including myself) on the subject of Composition in the First Class. We none of us know the writer of a paper, there is nothing but an Index Number provided for the occasion. The five P.

24

T.s and all the boys in both sections of the Class are thrown into hopeless disorder, a key being kept by Head Master. The marks awarded to one paper were 52, 70, 90, 90, 50, 63 and to another 70, 85, 96, 95, 64, 60. The following Table may be of interest showing how the number of papers under review is arrived at :

Class I

II

32 boys. 83

15 subjects. 13

480 papers.

1,079

III

180

11

1,980

IV

233

11

2,563

V

208

9

1,872

VI

181

5

905

VII

127

3

381

1,044

Total,

Marked subjects of boys partially examined,

Not Drawing. Special Subjects,

9,260

250

114

9,624

Deduct E. to C. Marks by Second Master,

736

Total marked by Head Master,

8.888

  16. We have a most excellent English Staff. What is needed is for each master to specialise in some distinct branch. When I approached them by Circular for the expression of their views in this direction, they showed a remarkable unanimity in their desire to specialise on Natural Science: but as the Governing Body is opposed to the introduc- tion of Elementary Science into the curriculum, it behoves the English Masters to seek other channels for the vent of their energies. Mr. GRANT has for years been practically Mathematical Master in Class I also taking the subject of Bookkeeping in Class II. propose next month to make Mr. CROOK quasi Professor of Geography a subject in which he has distinguished himself. The great need of the college is a man who will so devote himself to the subjects of English Grammar and Composition as to be an authority on these important subjects. Since the death of Mr. FALCONER (Second Master) twenty years ago, we have had no master prominent for ability in this direction, and the want of such a man is urgently felt in a college teaching the English language to students. nearly all Chinese.

  17. As regards the Chinese Staff, we may also congratulate the public on service faith- fully and energetically performed. Of these eleven' Chinese Assistants, the four at the head of the list may without hesitation be at once classified as excellent, and there are two or three promising young masters below them. The great desideratum among the remainder is an awakening to the fact that it is only by hard private study that they can equip them- selves for the annually increasing demands made upon their store of knowledge, as teachers of a language foreign to them. Year after year by the abolition of lower classes they are promoted to the charge of higher classes, and in many instances it would appear that they are hardly equal to the strain. In this connection, it must be remembered that in spite of the fact that the Government has very greatly increased the scale of salaries attached to these posts, we do not find the better educated class of boys in the college electing education as a profession. In the old days the highest boys in the First Class were eager to be monitors at $4 a month now with $20 to $35 a month we have during the past eight years drawn our future masters from bare passes in Class I and even from Class II.

:

  18. The Normal Master, Mr. RALPHS, speaks very highly of the work done by the five Pupil Teachers in their five respective classes. My observation throughout the year enables me to endorse his statement which is supported by the excellent results in Classes VI and VII at the Annual Examination. On the other hand, the result of the Pupil Teachers' examination in a Theoretical Paper and in Practical Demonstration in front of a class, together with the subjects Arithmetic, Dictation, Grammar, Geography, Composition and Translations from and into Chinese can only be described as a very qualified success.

  19. Vernacular School.-707 boys were examined and 641 or 91 per cent. passed. 308 or 43 per cent. of the Vernacular School are now in the highest class, Class 5. As only a dozen newly admitted boys are fit for this class, it is evident that great credit is due to the Vernacular Masters for the high standard to which they have raised the native school in three

years.

25

20. The Reading and Cricket Clubs flourish. Gymnastic instruction under Bombardier WADE, R.G.A., is very successful to small squads of 17 making a total of 85. Our Football Team has distinguished itself this year, by winning the Hongkong Schools Football League Shield, and fighting a well contested game with the Empress of India Football Team, (winner of the Empress Competition Cup). Visits interchanged between the Queen's College and Christian College (Canton) Football Teams are a distinctly new departure, as there is no precedent on record of a Chinese Football Team leaving the mainland to play upon foreign shores. Queen's College was too strong for them but it is hoped that better matches may take place in the future.

21. During the year 1907, 93 boys from Queen's College obtained situations: 9 in the Hongkong Government Service, 25 in local firms, 8 under the Chinese Government and 51 in various parts of the Far East. The above figures represent only those boys whose careers on leaving school are known to us. Many boys are employed in Government and other offices without our knowledge, and it is impossible to say how many of the 89 boys who did not return after vacations last year and were marked Left, are so employed.

   22. I have once again to express our most fervent sense of gratitude for the generosity of the public in supplementing the Government Grant of $200 for Prizes. Without their aid we would be unable to provide 48 prizes for 24 English, and 15 prizes for 15 Vernacular Classes: while Special Prizes for History, Composition and Special Translations would be hopelessly impossible. We have no space for their names here, but they are annually posted at the College Entrance, and are published in the Yellow Dragon, the monthly organ of the College.

   23. Queen's College is hindered in an ambitious upward course by the following con- siderations. It is a Day-school, so that all attempts to teach English Conversation are necessarily confined to school-hours and no supervision can be given to preparation of work. Again fully one third of the boys change annually, and this has always been the case from time immemorial: 400 boys leaving and 400 new boys being admitted each year is a very serious obstacle in the way of obtaining a large and efficient Upper School. In this connection it must be observed that there is no external system for feeding the Upper School of Queen's College such as exists in England: for the half-dozen boys from the Government District Schools are lost sight of when the number of seats available (400) is borne in mind. The Table below should succeed in illustrating the slow but steady progress of Queen's College. Gradually the number of subjects has increased, and the increase in the number of scholars taking these subjects is enormous.

*

Subject.

1881

1885

1889

1907

Translation, E. to C.

301

379

676

736

C. to E.

301

379

676

736

Grammar,

172

312

547

1,044

Geography,

144

253

477

1,044

Composition,

83

127

360

736

History,.

30

75

143

295

Geometry,

75

143

528

Algebra,.......

75

143

528

Mensuration,

25

24

115

Latin,

117

General Intelligence,

83

32

Shakespeare,

Trigonometry,

24

32

17

...

14

Hygiene, Bookkeeping,

736

...

...

115

20th January, 1908.

GEO. H. BATESON WRIGHT, D.D., (Oxon.),

Head Master.

:

26

Table I.

PERCENTAGE OF PASSES.

CLASS.

I,

A.....

13

62

69 92 85

B..

19 84 100 87 100

68

32 89

84

II,

A.

51 98 84 98 98

59

84: 90

III,

རསུ་

ན"

32 78 46

89 97

56

89 63

75

A,....

95 98

98 100

58

91 95

86

55

100 95

93 100

59

89 86

91

C....

34 94 88

91 97

29

88.91 76

D,

34 100 100 100 100

50

91 91 97

drawing.

Map

100 100 100 160

Number of boys

Examined.

Percentage of Passes.

Chin.-Eng.

Eng.-Chin.

Reading.

Conversation.

Dictation.

Arithmetic.

Grammar.

Geography.

Composition.

History.

Algebra.

Geometry.

Mensuration.

⠀⠀⠀5282 Bookkeeping.

10

Intelligence.

Shakespeare.

General

Hygiene.

38 100 100

38 77

62

85 46 100

47 84 95

53

74

53 47

37 94

86 76 94 94

62

64

92

78

88

40

69

56

82

91

88

96

89

96

71 95

*8

96

58

96

94

88 79

68

76 50

97

IV,

A,.

62

96

92 100

98

50

84 76 87

92

66 100

94

B,.

61 95

97 92 98

62

92 72 85

95 26 97

95

C,.

37 95 78

89 100

54

81: 70

89

89

68

87 49 97

95

D,

35 94 94

94 97

29

80 80

97

94

49

91 57

97

80

E..

38 64

74 97

32

80 79

71 58

39

74 18 95

50

V,

A..

52 96

93 98

90 83

98 94

100

94

B,.

59 100

86

100 59

100 91

89

94 71

95

83

C....... 32 85

63 91: 50

94 87

63 66

94

50

D.

33 90

53

97 100 66

93 84

84 93 48

90

75

E,.

32 97 56

88 100 69

9781

84 91 38

97

38

VI.

A,.

63 98

100 75

100 73 8 89

86

B... 57 93

100 42

100 67

86 86

81

C....... 61 90

VII, A,

98 59

96 57

69 82

93

33 100

B,

60 95

C,

34 100

93 45

100 76

90 93

97 57 100 83 80 88

100 62 100 94 100 44

Table II.

ATTENDANCES IN 1907.

MONTH.

Number of Scholars.

Number

of

Number of

Average Daily

Remarks.

Attendances. School Days. Attendance.

January,

985

23,411

26

900

February,.

880

2,597

3

865

March,

1,095

20,603

20

1,030 *

April,

1,072

15,882

16

993

May,

1,058

24,768

25

991

June,

1,032

23,353

24

973

July,

1,011

21,248

22

966

August,

979

6,351

7

907

September,

1,127

16,914

16

1.057

October,

1,116

25,849

25

1,034

November

1,086

25,546

25

1,022

December,

1,072

19,327

19

1,017

225.849

228

Total Number of Attendances during 1907,

225,849

Number of School Days during 1907,

228

Average Daily Attendance during 1907,

991

Total Number of Scholars at this School during 1907,

1,401

R

27

Table III.

AVERAGE EXPENSE OF EACH SCHOLAR AT QUEEN'S COLLEGE DURING 1907.

Expenditure:-

Cash Book as per Estimates,

Exchange Compensation,.

Do.

Do. Crown Agents,

....

.$45,053.15

13,341.08

+

Deduct:-

School Fees,

Refund of Salaries,.

Total Expense of College,......

2,601.18

Total,

.$60,995.41

$30,442.50 15.00

30,457.50

$30,537.91

Average Expense of each Schoolar :-

Per Number on Roll,

Per Average Daily Attendance,

.$21.80

30.82

}

7

No. 4.

DIEU

QUI

DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

TO

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 3rd of APRIL, 1908.

Published by Authority

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor,

1. Shipping.

2. Trade.

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

4. Steam-launches.

5. Emigration and Immigration. 6. Registry of Shipping.

7. Marine Magistrate's Court. 8. Marine Court.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

REPORT.

9. Examination of Masters, Mates and

Engineers.

10. Examination of Pilots.

11. Sunday Working Cargo.

12. New Territories.

13. Commercial Intelligence, Board of

Trade. 14. General.

TABLES.

I. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered.

II. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared.

III. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels entered at each Port.

IV. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels cleared at each Port.

30

V. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation entered. VI. Number, Tonnage and Crews of Vessels of each Nation cleared.

VII. Junks entered from China and Macao.

VIII. Junks cleared for China and Macao.

IX. Total number of Junks entered at each Port.

X. Total number of Junks cleared at each Port.

XI. Junks (local trade) entered.

XII. Junks (local trade) cleared.

XIII. Summary of arrivals and departures of all vessels.

XIV. Statement of Revenue.

XV. Licensed Steam-launches entered.

XVI. Licensed Steam-launches cleared.

XVII. Number of Boat Licences issued.

XVIII. Chinese Passenger Ships cleared by the Emigration Officer, (Summary).

XIX. Return of Emigration for twenty years.

XX. Vessels bringing Chinese Passengers to Hongkong from places out of China,

(Summary).

XXI. Return of Immigration for twenty years.

XXII. Vessels registered.

XXIII. Vessels struck off the Register.

XXIV. Marine Magistrate's Court.

XXV. Diagram of Tonnage of Vessels entered.

APPENDICES.

4. Report on Mercantile Marine Office.

B. Report on Import and Export Office. C. Report on Marine Surveyor's Office. D. Report on Gunpowder Depôt. E. Report on Lighthouses.

1. Shipping.

1. The total of the Shipping entering and clearing at Ports in the Colony during the year 1907 shows an increase of 77,908 vessels of 3,281,042 tons when compared with the corresponding figures for 1906. The greater part of this is due to internal traffic-" steam- ships not exceeding 60 tons plying within the waters of the Colony". If local trade be eliminated, it is found that the remaining figures show the respectable increase of 3,110 vessels of 579,814 tons.

This increase is distributed as follows:-

British Ocean-going vessels 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels 334 ships of 627,380 tons.

British River steamers 364 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 212,137 tons.

Foreign River steamers 239 ships of 76,075 tons.

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons 703 ships of 29,739 tons.

Junks in foreign trade, 1,411 vessels of 32,059 tons.

The actual figures of arrivals and departures are as follows :-

Of British Ocean-going,......

Of Foreign Ocean-going,

Of British River steamers,

Of Foreign River steamers,

FOREIGN TRADE.

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons,

1.876 arrivals 1,880 departures,,

2,306 arrivals

of 3,605,941 tons.

3,610,228

""

3,861,570

2,315 departures 3,859,305

3,412 arrivals

19

2,316,889

""

3,416 departures 2,313,475

655 arrivals

655 departures

791 arrivals

""

""

371,996

371,996

:"

3,015

Of Junks in Foreign Trade,

27

790 departures 14,782 arrivals 14,782 departures

3,006

Making a total in Foreign Trade of, 23,822 arrivals

""

23,838 departures

1,320,892 1,530,578 11,512,303 11,520,588

""

and

""

19

LOCAL TRADE.

Of Steamships not exceeding 60 tons, 209,601 arrivals

of 5,608,266 tons.

Of Junks in Local Trade,

209,601 departures

20,820 arrivals 19,952 departures

Making a total in Local Trade of,...230,421 arrivals

5,608,266 892,818

or a grand total of,

""

586,069

6,501,084

229,553 departures. 6,494,335 254,243 arrivals

:)

""

18,013,387

and

""

Thus in Foreign Trade :-

253,391 departures,, 18,014,923

British Ocean-going vessels represented,

31.4%

Foreign Ocean-going vessels represented,.

33.5%

British River steamers represented,

20.1%

Foreign River steamers represented,

3.2%

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented,

0.3%

Junks, represented,

11.5%

100.0%

While in Local Trade :-

Steamships not exceeding 60 tons represented, Junks represented,.

86.3%

13.7%

100.0%

The movements of the "Star" Co.'s vessels, of private Steam-launchies and of Fishing Junks do not appear in the above figures.

2. Eight thousand two hundred and thirty-nine (8,239) steamers, 10 sailing ships and 791 steamships not exceeding 60 tons, in foreign trade, entered during the year, giving an average daily entry of 24.77 European constructed foreign-going ships, as compared with

22.5 in 1906.

32

3. The average tonnage of Ocean-going vessels entered has increased slightly, from 1,784.9 to 1,785.6 tons, while that of River steamers has declined from 734 to 661 tons. The British Ocean average has decreased from 1,945 to 1,921 tons. The Foreign Ocean average has increased from 1,654 to 1,670 tons. The British River steamer average has declined from 749 to 678 tons and the Foreign River steamer average has declined from 623 to 567 tons.

4. A comparison between the years 1906 and 1907 is given in the following table :--

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Ships. | Tonnage. ships. Toumage. Ships. Tonnage. Ships. Tonnage.

British Orean-

going. Foreign Occan-

going.

3.697

4.287

7,189 471 3.756 7,216,169 59 26,698

7.093,195 4.621 7,720,875 334 627,380

British River

6.461

4.812,501 6.828

Steamers,

Foreign River

1.071

667,917 1,310

4,630,361. 364

743.992 239

212.137

76,075!

Steamers.

Steamships un-

der 60tons(Fo-

40,282 1,581

70,021 703 29,739

reign Trade).

Junks in Foreign

28.153

Trade,

2.619,411 29,564 2,651.170 1.411

82,059

Total.

Steam-launches

plying in waters

44.550 | 22,455,077 -17,660 | 23,032,891 3,110 701851

308,569

212.137

8,251,536 419,202|11,216,532,85,642 -2,964,996

of the Colony,

Junks in Local

*

*

51,616 2,042,655

Trade,

1

10,772 1,778.887

Grand Total.... 429,726 32,747,268 | 607,604|36,028,310 88.752 8,756.947 10,844

10.844

258,763

475,905

NETT,

77.908 3,281,042

**

Including 23,430 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 858,746 tons.

† Including 18,090 Conservancy and Dust Boats of 820,958 tons.

5. For Ocean vessels under the British flag, this table shows an increase of 59 ships of 26,698 tons.

In British River steamers there is an increase of 364 ships with a decreased tonnage of 212,137 tons, which is mainly due to the withdrawal of the large sized steamer Hankow and the addition of the two small Macao steamers Sui Tai and Sui An.

For Foreign Ocean vessels an increase of 334 ships of 627,380 tons is shown, which is wholly due to the Japanese firms increasing their carrying trade. Under this flag, an increase of 455 ships of 976,450 tons is found, with a general falling off under other flags.

For Foreign River steamers an increase of 238 ships of 76,075 tons is shown, which can be accounted for, by vessels under the German, Chinese and Portuguese flags making more trips in 1907 than in 1906.

Junks in foreign trade show a legitimate increase of 1,411 vessels of 32,059 tons.

The decrease in local Junk trade, 10,844 vessels of 263,768 tons may be ascribed to the cessation of the Naval extension work and to the falling off in Conservancy boats.

6. The actual number of individual Ocean-going ships of European construction enter- ing during the year was 800, being 362 British and 438 Foreign.

A

4.

-

1

33

These 800 ships aggregated 1,860,245 tons. They entered 4,182 times and gave a collective tonnage of 7,467,511 tons. Thus, compared with 1905, 70 less ships of 73,514 less tons, entered 170 more times and gave a collective tonnage increased by 306,183 tons.

No. of Times

Steamers.

entered.

Total Tonnage.

Flag.

1906.

1907.

1906. 1907.

1906. 1907.

British,

413

355

1.846

1,867 3,580,5083,586,510

Austrian,

10

9

27

30

100,929 106,523

Belgian,

1

1

2,903

Chinese,

20

203

214

251,400 267,789

Corean,

2

15

30,798

21,298

Danish,

9

9

18

21

40,734 41,122

Dutch,

18

18

64

69

130,864 142,100

French,

41

33

218

202

324,668 294,461

German,

143

137

846

790

1,343,420 1,246,053

Italian,..

2

3

12

12

33,012 31,704

Japanese,..

68

111

298

534

640,715 1,126,517

Norwegian,

80

59

279

290

289,857 265,728

Portuguese,

2:

74

59

13,181

19,128

Russian,

10

13

13

31.129

30.912

Swedish,

3

27

11

24,800

12,970

United States,

28

20

57

45

299,079 251,590

No Flag,

1

178

Total,

858

792 3.998 4,172 7.135,2727,448,008

Sailing No. of Times Vessels.

Total Tonnage.

entered.

Flag.

1906. 1907. 1906. 1907.

1906.

1907.

British,

German,

United States,....

No Flag,

Total,...

12

..

7

9

1

6

1

1.

15.371 1.880 8,333 172

19,431

...

72

14

10

26.056

19,503

31

OCEAN SHIPPING 1907: 1ST JANUARY TO 31ST DECEMBER.

a

No. of En-

British.

Foreign.

Total.

tries. No. Voyages.

Tons. Total Tons. No.

Voyages.

Tons.

Total Tons. No. Voyages.

Tons.

Total Tons.

1 98

77

98 272,856 154 222,384

272,856 119 119 444,768 81 162

228,744

198,370

228,744 217 217 396,740 158

501,600

501,600

316

420,754 841,508

50

150

156,968

470,904 32

96

75,044

225,132 82

246

232,012

696,036

19

76

62,831

249.324 49

196

171,126

684,504 68

272

5

12

60

26,772

133,860 28

140

80,687

6

9

54

20,746

124,476 22 132

52,419

403,435 40 314,514 31 186

200

233,457 933,828 107,459

537,295

73,165 438,990

7

15 105

26,394

184,758 11

77

19,147

134,029 26 182

14 112

24,418

195,344 13 104

45,541 318,787

24.969

199,752 27 216

49,387 395,096

9

16

144

37.958

341,622 15

135

20,207

181.863 31 279

58,165 523,485

10

60

9,821

98,210 12

120

12,547

125,470 18 180

22,368 223,680

11

44

5,954

65,494 16

176

16,563

182,193 20 220

12

60

6,125

78,500 3

36

3,364

40.368

13

13

1,424

18,512

13

997

12,961

22,517 247,687 96 9,489 113,868 26 2,421

31,473

14

14

1,562

21,868

56

5,077

71,078

70 6,639

92,946

15

30

2,163

32,445

30

2,163

32,445

16

96

6,811

108.976

48

2,560,

40,960

144

9,371

149,936

17

17

...

838

14,246

17

838

14,246

18

18

1,044

18,792

18

999

17,982

36

2,043

36,774

19

19

1,047 19,893

57

2,250

42,750

76

3,297

62,643

20

20

1,143

22,860

40

2,097

41,940

60

3,240

64,800

21

1

21

891

18,711

21

891

18,711

23

46

1,588

36,524

46

1,588

36,524

24

24 1,199

28,776

3

72

2,374

56,976

96 3,573

85,752

25

25

1,350

33,750

75

1,864

46,600

100 3,214

80,350

26

27

62

156

8,021

208,546

52

1,441

37,466

208

9,462

246,012

54

2,471

66,717

1

27

1,090

29,430

81

3,561

96,147

28

29

88

28

739

20,692

28

739

20,692

29

377

10,933

29

377

10,933

32

64

2,780

88,960

64

2,780

88,960

33

66

2,450

80,850

66

2,450

80,850

34

34

1,428

48,552

34

217

7,378

68

1,645

55,930

36

36 1,307

47,052

72

2,807

101,052

3

108

4,114

148,104

37

111

3,170 117,290

3

111

3,170 117,290

38

1

38

1,177

39

39

44,726 I 1,536 59,904

38

1,177 44,726

39

1,536 59,904

355 1,867 936,269|3,861,498

909,934 3,586,510 437 2,305 936,269 3,861,498 792 4,172 1,846,203 7,448,008

10 2

1

- 2

SAILING VESSELS.

72

CO 63

6 8,581

4

8,581 5,461 10,922

72

72

10

14,042

19,503

5

8,509

8,509

1

72

1223

4

5,461 10,922

9 13,970 19.431

Total, 362 1,876 923,904 3,605,941 438 2,306 936,341 3,861,570 800 4,182 1,860,245 7,467,511

   7. The 362 British vessels carried 3,244 British Officers and 14 Foreign Officers, as follows:-

British,

.3,244

Danish,

2

Dutch,

2

Norwegian,

4

United States,

6

Total,

3,258

35

Thus, the proportion of Foreign Officers serving in British vessels was 0.44%, com- prising 4 nationalities. A decrease of 0.41 % with a decrease in number of Officers and ships.

The 438 Foreign vessels carried 3,304 Officers, of whom 152 were British, as follows:-

In Chinese vessels,

Dutch

;"

17

French

1)

German

""

Japanese

United States vessels,

Total,

64

6

3

58

18

..152

Thus, 4.6% of the Officers serving in Foreign vessels visiting the Port were of British nationality. A decrease of 0.43 % with a decrease in number of ships and of Officers therein.

8. The 362 British vessels carried, as Crews, 22,976 British, 638 other Europeans and Americans and 115,308 Asiatics; while the 438 Foreign vessels carried 1,699 British, 29,721 other Europeans and Americans and 115,474 Asiaties.

Hence in Britsh vessels:-

16.5% of the crews were British.

0.5% of the crews were Other

Europeans.

83.0% of the crews were Asiatics.

And in Foreign vessels:-

1.2% of the crews were British.

20.2% of the crews were Other

Europeans.

78.6% of the crews were Asiatics.

2.-Trade.

   9. The figures given in previous years under this heading have, as pointed out annually been based upon information which can only be characterised as unsatisfactory and the result as erroneus and misleading. As it is obvious that such returns have no, value, it has been decided to discontinue them in the form they have hitherto taken, but the aggregates of the reports received are shown, for purposes of comparison, in round numbers. These include imports of Sugar and imports and exports of Opium, of which accurate returns are rendered under the heading "Import and Export Office".

10. The returns in this form show increase of about 360,000 tons in Imports, of about 191,000 tons in Exports and of about 518,000 tons in Transit Cargo.

36

11. The total reported Import and Transit trade of the Port for 1907 amounted to 23,819 vessels of 11,512,223 tons carrying about 8,237,000 tons of Cargo of which about 4,841,000 tons were discharged at Hongkong.

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS.

TONS.

IMPORT.

TRANSIT.

CLASS I.

Canada,

22

67,311

10,000

3,000

Continent of Europe,

163

551,819

113,000

548,000

Great Britain,

185

630,855

225,000

746,000

Mauritius,.

2

2,120

2,000

North America,

8,239

South Africa,

5,841

South America,

23,226

1,000

United States of America,

160

667,441

250,000

234,000

552

1,956,852

601,000 1,531,000

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,.

81

173,471

128,000

40,000

India and Straits Settlements,

216

547,750

366,000

415,000

Japan,

588

1,572,162

934,000

664,000

Java and Indian Archipelago,

129

215,906

192,000

138,000

North Pacific,

Russia-in-Asia,.......

769 16,617

6,000

9,000

1,023

2,526,675

1,626,000

1,266.000

CLASS III.

North Borneo,

38

Coast of China,

1,212

55,492 1,568,197

89,000

3.000

292,000

437,000

Cochin-China,

298

351,040

539,000

58,000

Formosa,

86

78,473

21,000

7,000

Philippine Islands,

215

271,824

104,000

4,000

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,

391

333,054

307,000

75,000

Siam,

251

267,198

419,000

3,000

Kwong-chow-wan,

65

24,315

4,000

Macao,

33

16,030

1,000

Port Arthur,

15

15,614

9,000

12,000

Tsingtau,

2,747

2,000

CLASS IV.

2,607 2,983,984 1,787,000

599,000

River Steamers,

4,067 2,688,885 352,000

CLASS V.

Steamships under 60 tons, ...

788

34,935

2,000

CLASS VI.

Junks,

TOTAL,

14,782 1,320,892

23,819 11,512,223

473,000

4,841,000 3,396,000:

O

די

37

12. Similarly, the Export trade of the Port was represented by 23,841 vessels of 11,520,668 tons, carrying about 3,049,000 tons of Cargo, and shipping about 729,000 tons of Bunker Coal.

CARGO.

COUNTRY.

SHIPS.

TONS.

Export.

Bunker Coal.

CLASS I.

Canada,

37

115,961

21,000

1,000

Continent of Europe,

99

484,078 i

44,000

26,000

Great Britain,

104

330,852

66,000

3,000

Mauritius,

1,943

1,000

2,000

North America,

South Africa,

9

18,856

4,000

1,000

South America,

10

United States of America,

75

21

19,386

9,000

1,000

360,355

102,000

4,000

336

1,331,431

247,000

38,000

CLASS II.

Australia and New Zealand,.|

61

168,166

19,000

15,000

India and Straits Settlements,

402

524,356

220,000

46,000

Japan......

321

819,227

179,000

35,000

Java and Indian Archipelago,

81

172,020

29,000

27,000

North Pacific,

Russia-in-Asia,

8

16,844

5,000

1,000

South Pacific,

873

1,700,613

452,000

124,000

CLASS III.

Kwong-chow-wan,

122

54,003

15,000

18,000

North Borneo,

30

44,368

4,000

6,000

Coast of China,.

1,706

2,861,527

996,000

264,000

Cochin-China,

357

457,881

51,000

84,000

Formosa,

24

71,686

22,000

3,000

Hainan and Gulf of Tonkin,.......

435

421,705

80,000

57,000

Kiaochow,......

Macao,

4,109

1,000

1,000

Philippine Islands,

227

340,410

153,000

54,000

Siam,

74

76,182

27,000

22,000

Weihaiwei,

Port Arthur,

5,618

...

1,000

CLASS IV.

2,986 4,337,489 1,349,000 510,000

River Steamers,

CLASS V. Steamships under 60 tons,

CLASS VI.

Junks,

TOTAL,...

4,071 2,685,471 307,000 53,000

793

35,086 63,000 4,000

14,782 1,430,578 691,000

23,841 11,520,668 | 3,049,000

729,000

13. During the year 1907, 16,515 vessels of European and American construction of 20,311,400 tons (net register), reported having carried about 10,842,000 tons of Cargo, as follows:

Import Cargo,

Export Cargo,

Transit Cargo,

Bunker Coal shipped,

4,366,000 tons. 2,355,000

""

3,396,000

21

725,000

""

10,842,000 tons.

ì

38

    14. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels importing cargo as tabulated and in transit compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

Steamers,

River Steamers,.

Sailing Vessels,

14

   7,448,008 3,998 | 7,135,272 4,172

3,774 2,759,792 4,067 2,688,885

19,503

312,736 174

293

**

70,907

10 26,056

4

6,553

Total,..... 7,786 9,921,1208,249 10,156,396

467

312,736

4

77,460

Nett,

463

235,276

Imported tous,

4,029,177

4,366,000

15. The number and tonnage of European and American constructed vessels exporting cargo as shown and Bunker Coal compared with the previous year was as follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage.

Steamers,

3,961

River Steamers,

3,761

7,101,179 4,183 7,444,856 2,750,626 4,071 2,685,471

222

343,677

310

65,155

Sailing Vessels,..... 11

20,459 12

24,677

1

4,218

Total, ......7,733 9,872,264 8,266 10,155,004

533 347,895

65,155

Nett,....

533

282,740

Exported tons,

2,163,344

3,355,000

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Strs.

Bunker Coal.

Steamers,

3,961

635,611

River Steamers,

3,761

4,183 53,1564,071

672,000 53,000

222 310

36,389

156

Total,...... 7,722

688,767 8,254

532 725,000

36,389

:

156

Nett,..

532 36,233

:

39

16. The River trade in Imports, Exports and Passengers compared with the previous year was as follows:

1906,

1907,

Year.

Imports.

Exports.

Passengers.

284,890

223,070

2,561,972

351,000

370,000

2,225,982

17. The following shows the Junk trade of the Colony for the

year:

IMPORTS.

Foreign Trade, Local Trade,

14,782 junks measuring .20,820

.1,320,892 tons.

892,818

92

Total,

...35,602

.2,213,710

"

Imported,

..665,000 tons.

EXPORTS.

Foreign Trade,

Local Trade,

14,782 junks measuring

19,952

""

1,330,578 tons.

886,069

99

Total,

34,734

..2,216,647

99

Exported,

..897,000 tons.

   18. The All Classes Passenger and Emigrant returns show the figures as below which are compared with those of the previous year :-

PASSENGERS.

1906.

1907. Increase. Decrease.

Do.,

British Vessels, arrivals 169,889 171,374

departures,. 100,701 96,887

1,485

3,814

Do.,

emigrants,. 63,830 78,576

14,746

Total,...... 334,420 346,837

16,231

3,814

Nett,

12,417

Foreign Vessels, arrivals,.... 102,738

104,769

2,031

Do.,

departures,. 100,811

102,443

1,632

Do.,

emigrants,

12,895

27,391

14,496

Total,...... 216,444

234,603

18,159

Nett,

18,159

River Steamers, arrivals,... 1,281,365 1,119,056

Do.,

departures,. 1,280,607 1,106,926

Total,...... 2,561,972 2,225,982

Nett,

:

162,309

173,681

335,990

335,990

40

PASSENGERS,

Continued.

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Junks, Foreign Trade,

ཨཐ

arrivals,... S

38,725

55,199

16,474

Do.,

departures,.

36,482

48,634

12,152

Total.......

75,207 103,833

28,626

Nett,

28,626

Total Arrivals,

1,592,717 1,450,398

142,319

""

Departures,...

1,518,601 1,354,890

163,711

}

3,111,318 2,805,288

306,030

Emigrants,

76,725 105,967

29,242

J

Total, 3,188,043 2,911,255 Total,........

29,242 306,030

Nett,.......

276,788

Diff. of Arrivals and Dep.,

74,116

95,508

Emigrants,...........

76,725 105,967

Remainder+or-

2,609

10,459

Nett,...

Junks, Local Trade,

56,119

64,071

7,952

Do.,

arrivals,...) departures,... 61,004

62,103

1,099

Total,.

117,123 126,174

9,051

Nett.....

9,051

:

19. The following table summarises the foregoing information with regard to the trade of the Ports of Hongkong for the year 1907-

TONS.

Passengers.

No. of Ships.

Emi-

Dis- charged.

Shipped.

Int Transit.

Bunker Coal shipped.

Registered Total.

Tonnage.

grants.

Arrived. Departed.

British Occan-going, Foreign Ocean-going, British River Steamers, Foreign River Steamers,...

Total......

Steam-ships under 60

tons. ForeignTrade,

Junks, Foreign Trade,...........

Total Foreign Trade,

3,756 1.764,000 1,154.000 1.839,000 4.621

2,250,000 894.000 1,557,000 6,828 259.000 222,000 1,310 93,000

16,515 | 4,366,000 - 2,355,000 3,396,000

42.000 523.000

$5,000

11.000 189,000

725,000 10,842,000 20.311,400

250,000 5,007.000 7,216,169 171,374 422.000 5.123.000 7,720,875 104,769 4,630,364 1,031,118 877938

1,895,199

96,887 78,576 102,443 1,017,553

27,391

748,992

89,373

1,306,256 | 105,967

!

1,581

2,000

3,000

29,564 473,000 691,000

47,660 4,841,000 3,049,000 3,396,000

4.000

9,000

70,021

11.477

11.432

1,164,000 2,651,470

55,199

48,634

729,000 12,015,000 | 23,032,891 1.461,875 1,366,322 105,967

Steam-Launches, Local

Trade,

Junks, Local Trade..............................

Total Local Trade,

* 419,202

40.772 192,000

459,971 192,000

1,000

206,000

30.000

207,000

Grand Total,..

་ ་

507,634 5,033,000 || 3,256,000 3,396,000

759,000 12,144,000 | 36,028,310

31.000 11.216,532 4,531,923 3,871,318

398,000 1,778,887 64,071

62,103

30,000 429.000 12,995,419 4.595.994 3,933,421

6,057,869

5,299,743 105,967

*Not including Star Ferry" Company's Craft.

·

3.-Revenue and Expenditure.

  20. The total Revenue collected by the Harbour Department during the year was $348,300.10 as against $258,106.88 (including $24,098.10 collected by the Registrar General's Department for Boat Licences, the issuing of which was transferred to this Depart- ment from the 1st Jananry, 1907), collected in the previous year, showing an increase of $50,193.22 :-

1. Light Dues,

2. Licences and Internal Revenue, 3. Fees of Court and Office,

4. Miscellaneous Receipts,

Total,.

..$ 8,389.00

116,122.40

151,746.30

42.40

$348,300.10

  The principal increases are under Junk Licences, $18,704.12; Boat Licences, $9,407.60; Sunday Cargo-working Permits, $9,852.50; Medical examination of emigrants, $7,323.00; Light Dues, $2,666.96; Fines, $1,980 50; Survey of Steamships, $1,947.01; Steam- launch Licences, &c., $662.75; Survey of Steam-launches, $525.00; Fees for Storage of Gunpowder, &c., $499.53; and Chinese Passenger Ships Licences, $345.00. The falling off in Revenue comes under the headings: Fishing Stake and Station Licences, $719.00; Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, $28.20; Sale of Printed Forms. $173.25; and Pilots' Licences, $105.00. Fecs for Cargo-boat Certificates amounting to $2,951.00 in 1906 have been merged in Fees for Cargo-boat Licences since 1st January, 1907.

  21. The expenditure of the Harbour Department for 1907 was $160,383.08 including $3,715.60 specially expended on Fairway Buoys and Lights but not including Crown Agents' December Account paid this year.

4. Steam-launches.

22. On the 31st December, there were 285 Steam-launches employed in the Harbour, of these, 137 were licensed for conveyance of passengers, &c., 129 were privately owned, 15 were the property of the Government and 4 belonged to the Imperial Government in charge of Military Authorities.

  Fourteen Master's Certificates were suspended, 1 for 6 months, 2 for 3 months, 5 for 2 months, 5 for 1 month and 1 for 2 weeks; 2 Certificates were cancelled, 1 Master and 1 Engineer; 1 Master was cautioned and 5 discharged.

  Five hundred and seventy-four (574) engagements and four hundred and sixty-one (461) discharges of Masters and Engineers were made from 1st January to 31st December.

Seven ) Steam-launches were permitted to carry Arms, &c., for their protection against pirates, of these 6 were previously permitted and one during the year.

5.-Emigration and Immigration.

23. One hundred and five thousand nine hundred and sixty-seven (105,967) emigrants left Hongkong for various places, during the year, of these 78,576 were carried in British ships and 27,391 in Foreign ships. The year 1907 has been proved to be the record year in the history of Colony for the numbers of emigrants shipped, as the annexed table shows.

One hundred and forty-five thousand eight hundred and twenty-two (145,822) immigrants were reported as having been brought to Hongkong from the several places to which they had emigrated, either from this Colony or from Coast Ports. This includes 905 returning from South Africa. Of the total number 112,742 arrived in British ships and 33,080 in Foreign ships.

6.-Registry, &c., of Shipping.

24. During the year, 36 ships were registered under the provisions of the Imperial Merchant Shipping Act, and 12 Certificates of Registry were cancelled.

Number of Certificates of Registry cancelled,

Number of copies from Register Book,.. Number of Declarations of Ownership,....

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of change of

Owners,

Number of endorsements on Certificates of Registry of change of

Masters,

42

     The documents, &c., dealt with in connection with the Imperial Shipping Act were as follows:-

Number of Certificates of Registry granted,..

36

12

*22*

36

68

2

Number of Mortgages recorded,

5

Number of Discharge of Mortgages recorded,

Number of endorsements on Register of change in Rig or Tonnage, Number of Sales of ships recorded,

Number of Desertions certified,

4

2

5

86

Number of inspections of Registry,

13

271

Total Number of Documents, &c.,

The fees collected on these Documents, &c., amounted to $1,309.

7.-Marine Magistrate's Court.

     25. One hundred and forty-five (145) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court, breach of Harbour Regulations, Disobeying lawful orders of the Harbour Master, Neglecting to exhibit lights, Using steam-whistles for other purposes than that of navigation and Carrying excess of passengers were the principal offences.

8.--Marine Court.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

26. The following Court has been held during the year :---

On the 8th and 10th July, inquiry into the circumstances attending the Collision between the British Steamship Ieung Shan, Official No. 95,855 of Hongkong, REGINALD DOWSETT THOMAS, number of whose Certificate of Competency is 1,010, Master, and the Licensed Steam-launch Fook On, LI MUK, Certificate No. 1,758, Master. The Officers of the Heung Shan were acquitted from all blame and the Master of the Fook On was found guilty of an error of judgment.

9.-Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers.

27. The following Tables show number of Candidates examined for Certificates of Competency, distinguishing those who were successful and those who failed:-

(Under Section 4 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

18

6

Master, River Steamer,...

:

First Mate,

13

Only Mate,

Second Mate,

Total,

38

14

First Class Engineer,

33

7

47

9

Second Class Engineer,..

Total,

80

16

C

3.

I

T

L

43

(Under Section 37 s.s. (7) of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

Candidates.

For Master,.....

For Engineer,

Total,

Passed.

Failed.

55

9

76

6

131

15

10.-Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

28. No examinations for Pilots' Certificates were held during the

No Pilots' Licences were issued, 16 Licences were renewed.

11. Sunday Cargo Working.

(Ordinance No. 1 of 1891.)

year.

29. During the year, 348 permits were issued, under the provisions of the Ordinance. Of these, 106 were not availed of owing to its being found unnecessary for the ship to work cargo on Sunday and the fee paid for the permit was refunded in cach case.

The Revenue cellected each year since the Ordinance came into force is as follows:-----

1892,

1893,

1894,

1895,

1896,

1897,

1898,

1899,

1900,

1901,

1902,

1903,

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907,

$ 4,800

7,900

13,375

11,600

7,575

11,850

25,925

21,825

43,550

44,800

44,175

34.800

37,625

43.475

31,397.50 41,250

12.-New Territories.

(Ninth year of British Administration.)

30. The Station at the Island of Cheung Chau was opened in September, the one at Tai O in the Island of Lantau, in October of 1899, that at Tai Po in Mirs Bay, on board the Police steam-launch, in January 1900, that in Deep Bay, on board the Police steam- launch, in November, 1901, that at Sai Kung in April, 1902, and that at Long Ket, on board the Police steam-launch, in April 1905.

From 1st January to 31st December, 1907, 7,200 Licences, Port Clearances, Permits, &c., were issued at Cheung Chau, 3,622 at Tai O, 6,365 at Tai Po, 5,255 at Deep Bay, 2,413 at Sai Kung and 4,101 at Long Ket.

   The Revenue collected by this Department from the New Territories during 1907, was $20,910.00 or $1,965.75 more than in 1906.

44

13.-Commercial Intelligence, Board of Trade.

  31. Fifty-two (52) letters were received during the year from firms, principally in Great Britain, requesting information upon various points connected with their respective businesses, asking to be placed in communication with local firms, or submitting samples or price lists. The replies to the several queries have been as full as the information, &c., at my disposal permitted, and, wherever necessary, the name of the firm concerned, and the particular branch of trade indicated, have been published, from time to time, in the Govern- ment Gazette.

HARBOUR OFFICE,

18th February, 1908.

BASIL TAYLOR, Commander, R.N., Harbour Master, &c.

47

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1907.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY

OF

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

VESSELS.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

British,

5,050

5,588,545 | 257,192

238

American,

42

248,668

7,798

334,285 2,194

14,098 138

5,288 | 5,922,830 |271,290

46

251,662

7,936

Austrian,

30

106,523

1,814

30

106,523

1,814

Belgian,

1

2,903

51

1

2,903

51

Corean

13

21,189

519

809

Chinese,

337

275,731

18,299

28

24,583

29 1,534

14

21,998

548

365

300,314

19,833

Chinese Junks,

9,536

786,906 104,463

5,246

533,986

63,880

14,782

1,320,892

168,343

Danish,

16

40,397

644

5

725

175

21

41,122

819

Dutch,

58

129,895

3,881

11

12,205

387

69

142,100

4.268

French,

489

583,748 22,309

10

8,010

441

499

591,758

22,750

German,

785

1,190,575

47,544

77

75,782

3,032

862

1,266,357

50,576

Italian,

12

31,704

1,155

12.

31,704

1,155

Japanese,

496

1,083,545

35,688

Norwegian,

223

215,041

7,662

85

38

42,972

1,725

534

1,126,517

37,413

67

50,687

1,878

290

265,728

9,540

Portuguese,

56

18,224

2,273

138

22,774

1,609

194

40,998

3,882

Russian,

10

22,760

587

3

8,152

163

13

30,912

750

Swedish,

11

12,970

320

11

12,970

320

No Flag,

Steam-ships

under 60 tons;

trading to

260

15,101 5,720

528

19,834

6,142

788

34,935

11,862

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 17,425 10,374,425 | 517,919

6,394 1,137,798

95,213

23,819 11,512,223 | 613,150

the sight

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of Vessels of each Nation CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong, in the Year 1907.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY

OF VESSELS.

WITH CARGOES.

IN BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels.

Tous.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews,

British,

5,055 | 5,535,097 321,419

241

388,606

13,547

5,296

5,923,703 334,966

American,

39

248,571

7,853

4

3,632

176

43

252,203

8,029

Austrian,

30

104,136

1,662

30

. 104,136

1,662

Belgian,..

Ι

...

2,903

59

31

2,903

59

Corean,

3

3,761

105

11

18,237

469

14

21,998

574

Chinese,

341

277,420 15,521

20

5,722

339

361

283,142 15,860

Chinese Junks,

9,682

998,260 227,528

5,100

442,318

52,197

14,782

Danish,

17

35,003

358

580

311

21

Dutch,

57

127,355 3,792

12

19,198

567

1,430,578 279,725 35,583 669 69 146,553 4,359

French,

483

361,644 14,490

19

17,083

144

502

578,727

14,634

German,

630

1,075,252

35,921

235

274,852

10,145

865

1,350,104

46,066

Italian,

12

31,704

1,225

12

31,704

1,225

Japanese,

429

799,249

27,504

106

150,924

5,794

535

950,173

33,298

Norwegian,

185

174,127 6,909

106

91,743

2,910

291

265,870

9,819

Portuguese,

'60

20,043 1,173

134

42,647

1,236

194

62,690

2,409

Russian,

10

23,304

603

3

5,786

144

13

29,090

747

Swedish,

8

10,294

254

5

4,663

147

13

14,957

401

No Flag,

1,468

44

6

1,468

44

Steam-ships

under 60 tons

trading to

656

29,808 10,804

137

5,278

1,106

793

35,086 11,910

Ports outside

the Colony,

TOTAL, 17,697 10,045,028 677,121

|

6,144

1,475,640

89,335

23,841 11,520,668 766,456

48

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkong from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves-

gers.

sels.

Tons. Crews.

East Coast,....

682 42,570 5,788

36

95

4,524 981

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

777 47,094 6,769|

Tons Crews.

l'assen-

gers.

36

San On District,

113

342

West River, &c., 8,399 681,844 93,185 14,283

West Coast,

Macao,

4,757 497,784 57,848|| 40,846 13,1561,179,628 151,033

55,129

7,043 908

29

69

55,449 4,582

325

4,758 800

25,930 | 4,251

182 12,791 1,708

667 81,379 8,833

32

Total,... 9,536 786,906 104,463 14,348 5,246 533,986 63,880 40,851 14,782 1,320,892 168,343 55,199

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at Ports in the Colony of Hongkon g

for Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves-

sels gers.

Į

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

514

27,066 4,273|| 16 401

33,116 4,294

23

914

60,182 8,567

39

East Coast,..

San On District,

West River, &c., 8,395 849,860 113,452 24,076 4,694 334,260 46,160 24,355 13,089 1,184,120 159,612 48,431

West Coast,

64

5,022 709

8

71 4,409 606

Macao,..............

566

71,810 7,716

2

78

Total,... 9,539|| 953,758 126,150|

135 9,431 1,315

5,035 890

644 76,845 8,606 24,102 5,243 376,820 51,950 24,532 14,7821,330,578 178,100 48,634

143

151

11

13

Table IX.

A

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

Tous. Crews.

sels.

Passen-

gers.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chow,

Deep Bay, Hunghom,

8889

50.

1,853 409

4

224

42

25

728

126

65

111

54 2,077 451 281

793 137

--

27 1,475

222

7

451

6-4

34

1,926

286

Long Ket,

:

Sai Kung,

7

206

45

7

Sham Shui-po,

443

41,245 4,572

227

18,901

2,397

670

Shaukiwán,.

88

2,604 691

40

25

906 173

113

Stanley,

24

15

24

206 60,146 6,969| 3,510 864 15

45

40

27

1,587

130

17

6

247

25

33 1,854 155

17

Tai 0,

Tai Po,

Victoria,

...

8,865 737,184 98,253 14,291 4,974 513,192 61,168 40,851 13,839 1,250,376 159,421 55,142

Total,.. 9,536 786,906 104,463 14,348 5,246 533,986 63,880 40,851 | 14,782 1,320,892168,343 55,199

E

49

Table X.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews and Passengers of Junks CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of

Hongkong (exclusive of Local Trade), during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves- sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Aberdeen,

151

25

16

404' 106

18

555 131

Cheung Chow,

176

43

13

493

76

21

669. 119

Deep Bay,

Hunghom,.

28

1,942

257

16

682

132

75

44

2,624 389

76

Long Ket,.

Sai Kung

111

31

6

198

37

11

309

68

Sham Shui-po,

255

20,695 2,626

452

42,129 5,000

707

62,824 7,626

Shaukiwan,

147

6,121

1,188

65

2,325

514

23

212

Stanley,

18

11

1

4

8,446 1,702

22

23

15

Tai O, Tai Po,

5

313

29

5

21

989

120

74

26 1,302 149

79

Victoria,

9,086 924,231 121,940

24,096 4,653 329,596 45,961|| 24,360|13,739 1,253,827 167,901 48,456

Total,...

9,539 953,758 126,150 24,102|5,243|| 376,820 51,950|||24,532 14,782|1,330,578,178,100 48,634

Table XI.

Return of Junks (Local Trade) ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen- Ves- gers. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Ves-

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

sels.

gers.

Aberdeen

61

1,505 405

10

400

85

71

1,905 490

Cheung Chow,

28

705

164

2

56

13

30

761

177

Deep Bay,...

Hunghom,.

25

16

22

1,079

191

27

1,104

207

Long Ket,.

Sai Kung,

12

330

68

10

187

58

22

517 126

Sham Shui-po,

49

4,099

822

28

3,087

454

77

7,186 1,276

Shaukiwan,

123 5,209

988

46

2,328

424

169

Stanley,.

Tai 0,

7,537

1,412

310

36

132

27

9

442

63

152

32

4

8

152

32

4

Tai Po,

9

275

42

4

48

25

34

13

323

67

36

Victoria,

7,038

267,407 63,480 15,529 13,356 605,484 103,308 48,502 20,394

872,891 166,788

64,031

Total,....

7,338 280,017 | 66,053 15,535 |13,482 612,801 104,585 48,536 20,820 | 892,818170,638 €4,071

Table XII.

Return of Junks (Local Trade) CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hongkong, during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Ves-

[crews.

Tous. Crews. Passen. Ves-

i

sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

Ves-

gers. sels.

Tons. Crews. Passen-

gers.

sels.

gers.

Aberdeen,

26

Cheung Chow,

8

744 211

179

81

2,680 621

107

3,424 800

34

29

668

162

37

879 196

Deep Bay,

:

Hunghom,

10

256

54

7

150

50

20

17

Long Ket,

406 104

20

Sai Kung,

10

246

48

175

45

18

Sham Shui-po,

16 1,738 268

24

3,816 381

40

421 4,554

93

639

Shaukiwan,

33

1,212 201

40

37

1,390

281

70

Stanley,

2,602 572

40

220

25

165

38

9

Tai 0, Tai Po, Victoria,

385

63

5

266

36

7

91

28

15

10

224

58

32

3

99

19

13

7,912 358,555

77,766 60,035 11,714 514,163| 87,264

1,962 (19,626

357 64 323 872,718 165,030

9

77

32

61,997

Total,

8,036 363,672 78,749 60,107 11,916 522,397 88,889

1,996 19,952 886,069 167,638 62,103

FOREIGN TRADE.

50

Table XIII.

SUMMARY.

No. of VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Ships entered with Cargoes,

5,050

5,588,545

257,192

Do.

do.

in Ballast,...

238

334,285

14,098

Total,......

5,288

5,922,830

271,290

British Ships cleared with Cargoes,

5,084

5,525,952

323,278

Do.

do. in Ballast,

212

397,751

11,688

Total,......

5,296

5,923,703

334,966

Foreign Ships entered with Cargoes,

2,579

3,983,173

150,544

Do.

do.

in Ballast,.

382

249,693

11,111

Total,.................

2,961

4,233,566

161,655

Foreign Ships cleared with Cargoes,

2,304

3,481,863

117,560

Do.

do. in Ballast,

666

649,438

22,295

Total,.........

2,970

4,131,301

139,855

Steamships under 60 tons entered with Cargoes,

260

15,101

5,720

Do.

do.

do. in Ballast,

528

19,834

6,142

Total,..

788

34,935

11,862

do.

Steamships under 60 tons cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

656

29,808

10,804

do. in Ballast,

137

5,278

1,106

Total,....

793

35,086

11,910

Junks entered with Cargoes,

9,536

786,906

104,463

Do. do. in Ballast,

5,246

533,986

63,890

Total,......

14,782

1,320,892

168,343

Junks cleared with Cargoes,

Do.

do. in Ballast,.

9,617 5,165

1,058,793

228,665

371,785

51,060

Total,.....

14,782 1,430,578

279,725

Total of all Vessels entered,

23,819

11,512,223

613,150

Total of all Vessels cleared,

23,841

11,520,668

766,456

Total of all Vessels in Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,

47,660

23,032,891 1,379,606

LOCAL TRADE.

Total Junks entered,

Do. cleared,

20,820

892,818

170,638

19,952

$86,069

167,638

40,772 1,778,887

338,276

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,....

Total Foreign Trade, entered and cleared,...............

Total Local Trade, entered and cleared,

47,660 23,032,891 1,379,606

40,772 1,778,887

338,276

Graud Total,..................

88,432 24,811,778 1,717,882

51

Table XIV.

STATEMENT of REVENUE collected in the Horbour Department during the Year 1907.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1889,

Head of Receipts.

Amount.

$

cts.

80,389.00

2. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified :-

Boat Licences, .

33,505.70

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

1,395.00

Emigration Brokers' Licences, Ordinance I of 1889,

Fines,

1,000.00

2,814.50

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

177.00

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,.

2,606.50

Junk Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

52,342.20

Junk Licences, &c., from the New Territories, Ordinance 10 of 1899, ..

18,303.50

Pilots' Licences, Ordinance 3 of 1904,

80.00

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,898.00

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reimbursements-in-Aid :-

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen, Ordinance 10 of 1899,......

Engagement of Masters and Engineers of Steam-launches, Ordinance 10 of 1899, ...

24,446.40

287.00

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899,

2,900.00

Gunpowder, Storage of-Ordinance 10 of 1899..........

11,664.76

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

31,675.00

Printed Forms, Sale of,

58.75

Private Moorings and Buoys, Rent for Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,630.00

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act), Ordinance 10 of 1899,

1,309.00

Steam-lunches, Surveyor's Certificates, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3,405.00

Sugar Convention, Ordinance 14 of 1904,

1,350.00

Survey of Steamships, &c., Ordinance 10 of 1899, .

29,770.39

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ordinauce 1 of 1891,

7. Miscellaneous Receipts-Message Fees for notifying ships,.....

41,250.00

42.40

1

TOTAL,.

348,300.10

Table XV.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Entered in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

120,970 2,872,228 981,578

5,045

88,631 2,736,038 786,156 4,526,878 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,734 4,531,923

Total,......

120,970 2,872,228 981,578

5,045

88,631

2,736,038 786,156 4,526,878 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,734 4,531,923

PLACES.

Within the Waters of the Colony,

*

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

:

:

· 52 -

1

271

1

27

102

4,219

885

260

395

15,101 5,720 14,675 5,073

1,879 260

497

9,598

15,101

5,720

1,879

18,894

5,958!

9,598

103

4,246

892

655

29,776 10,793

11,477

758

34,022]

11,685

11,477

121,073 2,876,474 982,470

5,045

89,286 2,765,814 796,949 4,538,355 210,359 5,642,288 1,779,419 4,543,400

* The figures under the heading "Steam-launches plying within the Waters of the Colony" are incomplete: the "Star Ferry" Company stating that since 1901, "owing to the they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers carried by their launches, and also number of trips. amount of work entailed

""

J

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

Wuchow,

Macao,...

Other Places,

Total,.

Grand Total,..............

1.

I

Table XVI.

RETURN of LICENSED STEAM-LAUNCHES Cleared in the COLONY of HONGKONG during the year ending 31st December, 1907.

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

122,777 2,876,149 983,770 4,965

86,824 2,732,117 783,9643,866,353 209,601 5,608,266 1,767,7343,871,318

Total,..

122,777 2,876,149 983,770 4,965

86,824 2,732,117 783,9643,866,353 209,6015,608,266 1,767,7343,871,318

Within the Waters of the Colony,

*

Outside the Waters of the Colony

Samshui,

Kongmun,

Kamchuk,

Wuchow,

Macao,................... Other Places,

·

*The figures under

the amount of work entailed

>>

Total,..

Grand Total,.

I

27

1

102

4,219

885

260 15,101 5,720 1,905 395 14,675 5,073 9,527

260

27

15,101:

7

5,720

1,905

497

18,894,

5,958 9,527

103

4,246

892

655 29,776 10,793 11,432

758

34,022 11,685 11,432

,395 122,880 2,880,395] 984,662 4,965

3,877,785

1,3595,642,288 1,779,4192 87,479 2,761,893 794,7573,877,785 201,359 5,642,288 1,779,419 3,882,750

the heading "Steam-launches plying within the Waters of the Colony " are incomplete: the "Star Ferry" Company stating that since 1901, "owing to they have had to discontinue keeping a record of the passengers carried by their launches, and also number of trips.

53

54

Table XVII.

NUMBER OF BOAT LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1907.

(Under Table U., Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

LICENCE.

DUPLICATE.

FEES.

Passenger Boats, Class A.,....

640

Passenger Boats, Class B.,

Passenger Village Boats,

Cargo Boats,

853

10,246.00

1,558

1,762

2

Lighters,

175

22,101.00

Water Boats,

83

Other Boats,

988

Cinder, Bum, Hawker and Marine Dealers' Boats, ........

376

I

680.70

Fish Drying Hulks,

73

478.00

Total,.....

6,458

$33,505.70

Table XVIII.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE EMIGRATION from HONGKONG to Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHITHER BOUND.

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F. M. F.

M. E

M.

F.

To Banka,

369

Billiton,

1,046

Callao, Peru,

1,781

co

52

:

1,836

852

3

12

369 369 1,046 1,046-

867 2,633

6

64

369 1,046 2,703

""

Honolulu, Sandwich Is-

lands,

13

13 296 2

""

Iquique, ( hili,

Japan Ports,

45

1

46

20 170

303 22

309

20

181

215

Java,

67

67

67

:

:

122 60

316 22

227

:

:

67

,་

Mauritius,

468

Mexico,

2,622

46

2,668 2,209

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

633

10

16

Seattle, U.S.A..

651 3,026 11

::༣

29 45

543

468

29

45

543

28

2,237 4,831

74

4,905

28 123

5 3,192 3,659

40

12

11

139 1

""

Straits Settlements,

52,452 9,158 2,276 93264,818 |15,992 1,666 | 421

"

Tacoma, U.S.A.,.

1

Vancouver, British Co-

lumbia,

7,157

"

Victoria, British Columbia, 1,192

157 38

107

7,314 1,230

203

18,230 68,444 10,824 2,697 1,083

109 107 .:.

7,157

9 1

213 1,395

157 47

3,843

12 83,048

109

7,314

1,443

TOTAL PASSENGERS,... 65,895 9,163 2,586 | 932|78,576 24,836 1,741 | 653|16127,391190,731 10,904 | 3,239 1,093 105,967

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

65,895 9,163 2,586 932 78,576

24,836 1,741 653 161 27,391

|41,059 7,422 1,933 771 51,185

T

55

Table XIX.

RETURN OF EMIGRATION FROM HONGKONG to Ports other than in China, for 20′ Years,

from 1888 to 1907, inclusive.

Month.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1597.

January,

6.751

3,831

1. 63

3,352

2, 79

6.941

4.723

February.

2,934

3,169

5,866

1.828

3,530

2,355

809

1,846

2,217

1.400

March.

4,919

1.501

11.558

6,175

1,800

5.139

3,485

6,134

10,583

9.334

10.532

April,

4,242

12,820

6.887

6.61

5.46

6.362

7,271

1

94

9.961

May,

9,645

9,559

17,5 8

5.745

8,183

5,074

6,400

6.312

10.884

4.831

June,...

8,320

9,927

11,000

4,81

7,572

3.42

4,268

4,403

July,

8,629

28

7,80:

5,480

6,250

3,424

4556

6,365

3.872

4,121

6.093

5,452

5.719

August,

7,078

5.441

3.358

2.579

2.662

3.892

3.928

157

1,853

September,

4,211

3,895

4,498

3,054

3,543

3.572

8741

4,976

2.086

October,

4,814

5,621

7.050

3.785

5,611

2.884

4.570

3.75

4,220

November,

6, 91

5,391

5.344

4,536

2.927

4,005

2,57

2,297

4.721

4,361

6.028

5.097

December,

3.807

3.616

4,179

3,500

3.494

3.505

4.398

4.710

4.284

4,944

3,906

4,423

Total,...

96,195

47,849

42.068

45,162

52.143

82.336

49,023

73,138

66,822

62,831

Month.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

January,

1,963

5.756

6.383

7,247

4.634

4.120

5,867

4.325

2.831

February.

7.936

3.893

2.312

8,570

1,409

1,509

6.063

2.239

March,

1,588

3.786

5.945

6.846

1,242

18,373

8.690

8.216

11.150

9.691

April,

7,726

7,401

10,418

14.065

10.379

14.451

11.857

11.927

11.717

11,707

$,695

May,

9,002

4.576

13,714

9.314

11.979

10.499

8.887

-13.751

12,695

9,170

June,

8,480

15.488

5.019

1,360

2.279

976

1.966

4.146

5.850

5.187

July...

4.600

7.673

7.874

1.197

1,056

555

3.936

1,063

4,331

3,711

August,.

4,810

8.213

9,764

1,510

2,058

3,147

4.589

1,891

8,470

4 407

6.766

September.

8.383

4,648

889

5.776

6.860

6,478

8,037

5,550

October,

4,779

5.909

5.079

8,516

5.012

5,919

7.012

7.985

8.509

5,196

5.627

November,

7.083

4.347

9.119

8,683

6.400

6,475

15.897

7,847

4,862

5.108

7.044

December,

5,134

7,381

6,494

5.399

5,277

5,747

5,590

4,846

4.018

5,996

5 359

Total,....

€0,432 61,075

83,643

69,774

71,711 83,384

76,304

64,341

76,725

105,967

The

RETURN OF MALE AND FEMALE EMIGRANTS FROM HONGKONG to Ports other than in China,

Whither bound.

for 10 Years, from 1898 to 1907, inclusive.

1898.

1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906. 1907.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

38,577

6,803

Total,

45,380

45,666 69,213

40,736 61,057 48,732 4,930 8,156 8.174

56.903

49,260 53.759 53,131 45,948

8,108 9,628 9,596

57,668 63,387 62.727

51,589 71,141 9,026 8.731 11,907

54,974 60,320 83,048

Other Ports, Males,

14,712

Other Ports, Females,

Total

340

132

80

113

15,277 14,350 12.758 13,967 19,915 13.499

76

82

78

9,308 59

16,348 57

22,829 90

15,052

15,409 14,430 12,871 14,043 19,997 13,577

9,367

16,405 22,919

Grand Total,

60,432

61.075 83,643 €9,774

71,711 83,384 76,304

64,341

76,725 105,967

56

Table XX.

SUMMARY OF CHINESE IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China,

during the Year ending 31st December, 1907.

BRITISH VESSELS.

FOREIGN VESSELS.

GRAND TOTAL.

WHERE FROM

Adults.

Children.

Adults. Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F M. F

M.

F.

M.

F.

From Bangkok, Siam,

2.809 8

2

2.819

2,809

2

Callao. Peru,

457

457

457

2,819 457

Durban, British South

Africa,

905

:

905

:

:

:

:

:

:

905

:..

:

:

:

:

905

Honolulu. Sandwich

Islands.

19

3

27

19

60

5

3

27

Java & Sumatra,.

22

22 3,842

3,842

3.864

Japan Ports,

329

336

74%

742

1,071

Melbourne,

876

870

362

362

1,232

New South Wales.

312

312

100

100

412

Queensland Ports....

408

408

187

187

595

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

7901

13

826 4,047 24

19

14

:=

4.104

4,837

33

32 28

Seattle. U.S.A.,

1,317

1,317

1,317

::

3,864

2

1,078

1,232

412

595

4,930

1,317

South Australian Ports,

71

73

71

2

73

Straits Settlements,

101.841 2.009

104.75819,533

37

6

4 19,580 121,374 2,046

561 357 124,338

17

Tacoma, U.S.A...

408

408

Vancouver, British

Columbia,

3,347

20

:

3,367

:

408

3,347

408

28

20

:

:

3,367

TOTAL PASSENGERS.... 109,760| 2,041 572 369 112,742 32,958

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

69

32

21 33,080 142,718 | 2,110

604390

145,822

Total Passengers by Foreign Vessels,

Excess of Passengers by British Vessels,

109,760 2,041

32.958 69

76,802 1,972

572 369

112,742

32 21

33,080

540 348

79,662

Table XXI.

RETURN of IMMIGRATION to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China, for 20 Years

from 1888 to 1907, inclusive.

Month.

1888.

1889.

1890.

1891.

1892.

1893.

1894.

1895.

1896.

1897.

January,

9.863

9.241

6,889

11,015

7.455

8,357

9,727

7,521

11,133

9.745

February,

4.112

6.114

8,855

3,854

6,879

4,685

4,663

8.474

6,356

6.447

March,

11,184

7.055

8,485

10,949

9,010

9,048

12.582

8,925

11.558

9.815

April,

7,658

10,162

8,209

7,863

7,179

8,548

7.688

8,432

9,967

10,392

May,

7.681

8.749

7,743

8,897

8,733

9,713

9,600

10,397

9.257

9.658

June....

6,926

7,422

7,716

8,377

8.307

9,513

5,520

9.202

9,910

9.281

July,

7.069

8,740

8,076

7.328

6,945

10,044

4.415

8.356

9.104

9.590

August......

7.729

7,432

8,005

8.052

7,417

8,997

6.225

-9,166

8.852

8.909

September,

8.587

7.604

7,174

9,039

8,041

9,565

7,876

9,836

9.985

10.167

October,

9.763

10.353

11,472

9,804

8,896

10,215

8,010

11,139

10,123

10,030

November,

9.366

8386

7,344

10.314

9,108

9,190

10,055

10.096

12,423

9,885

December,

8.862

8,057

8,566

9,707

10,001

10,769

9,734

11.141

10,800

11.283

Total,

98,800

99,315

98,534 105.199 97,971 108,644

96,095 112,685

119,468

115,207

Month.

1898.

1899.

1900.

1901.

1902.

1903.

1904.

1905.

1906.

1907.

January,

7.415

10,274

8,994

February,

6,036

5,020

5,923

11.995 7.649

11.276 7,535

10,896 12,342

15,139

10,793

17,829

8,860

8,270

8,762-

9.773

6,246

March,

9.304

9.165

12,994

10,712

12,036

12.228

16,350

11.935

12,433

12.758

April,

9.489

8.539

8,259

9,807

8,655

10,615

12,191

8,153

10,581

11.195

May,

8,065

9.582

9.348

10,137

11.039

10,511

10,558

11.143

10,189

12,908

June..

9.227

8.686

10,712

8,542

8.817

10,724

11,419

11,354

10,724

8.843

July,

6,260

8.648

11,633

9.478

9,498

11,248

11,167

11.686

13,221

13.127

August,

9,610

7.015

7.313

10,815

8,794

10,555

12,035

12,122

9,633

11,767

September,

8,090

8,461

10,094

10,244

11.352

11.934

11,995

11.528

10,275

10.277

October.

9.714

11.694

9,554

13,595

13,989

12,523

15,130

11,695

12,018

12,573

November,

10,888

11,343

9,823 13,541

December,

Total.... 105,441 110,448 121,322 129,030 129,812 140,551

10,619 15.879

13,984 12,816 12,072 14,005

15.466

14,212

13.652

11,338

11.874

14.991

13,526

13,314

13,934

16,925

149,195 140,483

134,912

145,822

17

3

57

RETURN of MALE and FEMALE IMMIGRANTS to HONGKONG from Ports other than in China,

for 10 years, from 1898 to 1907, inclusive.

Where from.

1898.

1899.

1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904. 1905. 1906.

1907.

Straits Settlements, Males. Straits Settlements, Females,

88,580 90.191 3.760 4,671

98,782 | 106,923

4,586 4,943

108,362 116,705 123,542114,653 110.525 3.891 5,778 4,842 6,210 4.043

121,985

2,403

Total,

92,340

94,862 | 103,368 | 111,866 112,253 122,483 128,384120,863 114,568 124,338

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

12,839 262

15,316 270

17,661 293

16,870 294

17,826 233

17,826 242

20,447 19.291 19,848

364 329

496

21,387 97

Total,

13,101

15,586

17.954 17,164 17.559

Grand Total.

19,620 20,344 21,484

105,441 110,448 121.322129,030 129.812 140,551 | 149,195 | 140,483 | 134,912 145,822

18,068

20,811

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.!

Table XXII.

RETURN of VESSELS REGISTERED at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1907.

Registered

Tounage.

Horse

Fower.

Rig.

Built

of.

Where built and when,

Remarks.

Tai Sze,

Luk Ho,...

123,073

241.79

Tarang,

123,074

Crane..

. (Str.) | 123,075

Evening Star,

123,076

Morning Star,

123,077

Northern Star,

86.76 22.02 16 50.65 235

I.H.P. 50.65 235

I.H.P.: 123,078 50.65 235

. Nil

120,995

205.61

Nil

Steel Shanghai,

.1906.

Tai Loong,.

Sui An,

Sui Tai, Fati, Cormorant,

Yat Ho,

Yee Ho,

(Str.) | 120,997 | 1,005,46

(Str.) | 121,000

59.89 24 188.33 123,072 188.33

120,996

205.61

1906.

"

120

.1899.

120,998 1.005.46

120

1899.

.Motor. 120.999

9.00 24

;!

Amsterdam, Wood Hongkong,

.1906.

1890.

123,071

1896.

.1897.

Steel

Schooner Wood San Francisco,

1899.

Hougkong,.

1903. Foreign name Tarang. 1906.

1904.

:

I.H.P.

Polar Star,.......

123,079

50.65 235

:

Southern Star,

123.080

I.H.P. 50.65 235

I.H.P.

...1900.

.1904.

.1902.

.1900.

Chan Po,

Ng Ho, Heron,

Penguin,.

Stork,

123.081 123.082

(Str.) 123,083

123,084

123,087

129.92 28 156.93

17.71 16 27.26 16 16.51

1901. Foreign name Chan Po.

Steel Shanghai, Wood Hongkong,

....... 1896. ...1897.

.1900.

1898.

Auster,

120.971

222.71

Steel

1897. Cut down, 1907.

Brynhilde.

123,086

11.27

Cutter

Wood

1904.

Kowloon,

(Str.) 123,087

34.20

Nil

1886.

Sam Sap Yat,

123.088

45.99

Steel

1896.

Tsat Ho...

123,089

115.88

1895.

Syren,.... Pat Sap,. Pat Yat.. Pat Yee,

Pat Sam, Pat Sze,

Pat Ng,

Kathleen,

Albatross,

72,851

123.090

50.67 55.01

Schooner Wood Shanghai.

Ni

1896. Transferred from Shanghai,

Hongkong.

.1906.

123,091 55.01

1906.

123,092

55.01

1906.

123,093 55.01

.1906.

123.094

55.01

1906.

123,095

55.01

1906.

Kau Sap Sam,

123,096

55.01

1901.

Motor. 123,097

28 50

30

1906.

(Str.) 123,098

39.83

16

1907.

!

58

Table XXIII.

RETURN OF REGISTRIES of VESSELS cancelled at the Port of Hongkong, during the Year 1907.

Name of Vessel.

Official Number.

W. Cores de

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Horse Power.

Rig.

Built of.

Where and when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

Vries,

.(Str.)

Sual,

Sabine

Rickmers,

Wing Chai,...

Robert Cooke,

Hong Kong,

71,561 672.45 1883 64,100 781.61 1886 60

107,024 | 690.38| 1898 104 109,871 547.89 1903 $8 109,875 217.95 1903 125 109,864 413.30 1904 40

23

52 Schooner Iron

Steel

Nil

Wood

1873 Sold to Foreigners. [haven, 1894 Grestemund, Bremer- Hongkong, Steel Hongkong. Wood Hongkong,

Fyenoord, Rotterdam,1865 Sold to Foreigners. Hongkong

Sold to Foreigners.

1902

Lost at Hongkong.

.1902

Lost in the vicinity of Cape

1901 Lost at Hongkong.

[Varella.

Kukuburra for-

merly Dorothy", 116,037 41.74 1904

Lorcha

Africus,

116,055 173.33 1904

Nil

Auster,

Albatross, ...(Str.)

Loongwo,

Hoi Ning,

120.971 404.08 1904 120,973 82.79 1905 24 120,989 2,386.06 1906 600 120,994 80.84 1906 18

Nil

Hongkong,

Steel Hongkong, Hongkong, Schooner Wood Hongkong, Steel Hongkong, Wood Hongkong,

.1901 | Sold by Public Auction. Regis-

try no longer required.

.1899 Lost at Hongkong. .1897 Registered anew.

1904 Lost outside Hongkong. .1906 Transferred to London.

1963 Converted into a launch. Re-

gistry no longer required.

Table XXIV.

RETURN of MARINE CASES tried at the MARINE MAGISTRATE'S COURT, during the

year

1907.

Defendants how disposed of.

NATURE OF CHARGE.

No. of Cases.

No. of Defendants.

Imprisonment with Hard Labour.

Imprisonment with

Hard Labour and forfeiture of pay.

Imprisonment with-

out Hard Labcur.

Imprisonment in default of fine.

Fined.

Forfeiture of

Pay.

Reprimanded.

Sent back to

duty.

Dismissed.

Amount of Fines.

Absent without Leave,

Arrival without reporting,

Assault,

Breach of Conditions of Licence, (Launches,

&c.),

Desertion,

Disobeying the lawful orders of the Harbour

Master, (Junks, &c.),......................

Engagements of Masters or Engineers of

Steam-launches, Neglecting to register,

2121

13

4

15 22

Harbour Regulations, Breach of, (Junks, &c.), 33 84 Leaving a Port without a Clearance,

12 14

11

Lights, Neglecting to exhibit, (Launches, &c.), 17 22 Passengors, Carrying excess of, (Launches, &c.), 11 Plying without certificated Master or Engineer,

(Launches),

Plying without a Licence, (Boats, &c.), Refusal of Duty,

Rubbish, Throwing in Harbour,

Rules of the Road, Failure to observe,

(Steam-launches),

Steam-whistle, Using for other purpose than

of navigation,

4202

10

+202

དཀ

5

13

13

10

2

:

:

:

:

:

**

25.00

11

1

163.00

21

5

75

14

21

11

:

:

~ ~

:

:

1

12

Total,

145 217 1 11

1 180

:

:

:

:

:

1-

1

1336.00

40.00

8901.50

1

:

300.00 212.00

367.00-

:

2 100.00

35.00

25.00

1

70.00

1240.00

16 $2,314.50

B

61

Appendix A.

MERCANTILE MARINE OFFICE.

Twenty thousand nine hundred and ninety (20,990) Seamen were shipped and nineteen thousand five hundred and twenty-nine (19,529) discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year.

One hundred and sixteen (116) Distressed Seamen were received during the year, of whom 30 were sent to the United Kingdom, 3 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 1 to Singapore, 1 to Melbourne, and 1 to Sydney; 18 were sent as passengers to Canton, 4 to Foochow, 1 to Hoihow and 2 to London; 3 were taken charge of by the Japanese Consul, 2 joined the Chinese Customs, 1 obtained employment on shore, 35 were shipped, 5 died at the Government Civil Hospital, 3 remained in the Government Civil Hospital and 5 at the Sailors' Home.

$2,920.11 were expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these Distressed Seamen.

Appendix B.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE.

2. The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium reported was

as follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

Imported,

47,566

40,842

6,724

Exported,...

47,575

42,702

4,8731/

Through Cargo reported

but not landed,.

9,712

8,938

774

The return shows that during the year the amount of Opium skin reported was as

follows:-

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Pels. Cat. Tls. Pels. Cat. Tls. Pels. Cat. Tls.

Imported,

348. 82. 0.483. 6. 2. 84. 21.

2.

Exported,

340. 85.

434. 44. 5.

93. 59.

4.

  Eighteen thousand and thirty-four (18,034) Permits were issued from this Office during the year being an increase of 554 as compared with 1906.

-,

62

A daily memo. of exports to Chinese Ports was, during the year, supplied to the Commissioner of Imperial Maritimes Customs and a daily memo. of exports to Macao was supplied to the Superintendent of Raw Opium Department of Macao.

Surprise visits were paid to 94 godowns during the year.

The return shows that during the year the amount of Morphia and Compound of Opium reported was as follows:-

COMPOUND OF OPIUM.

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

Imported,

Taels. Taels. Taels.

129,682.9.0 184,602.8.2 54,919.9.2

Exported,.

77,082.0.0 113,450.3.01 36,368.5.0

Local Comsumption,

52,600.9.0 67,759.3.2 15,158.4.2

MORPHIA.

1906.

*

1907.

. Increase.

Decrease.

Cases.

lbs. Cases. lbs.

Cases.

lbs.

Imported,

444

415 9,694.10

29

Cases.

Exported,

359

398 9,469.0 47

:

   Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong, by vessels of different nationalities during the year 1907.

American Steamers.

Austrian

""

British

Tons. Curt. Qr. 2,177

415 161,788

lbs.

2

9

...

3

2

8

Dutch

43,601 12

1

728

"}

French

2,860

19

2

26

""

German

55,721

11

1

6

:

">

Japanese Norwegian Portuguese

2,907

5

1

CO CO

6

22

.

16,278

5

2

"1

11

18

1

9

Swedish

5,897

15

1

13

By Junks.

867

8

2

Total,

292,527

8

1

7

* 9 months ouly.

63

Return of Sugar imported into the Colony of Hongkong during the year 1907.

From

Tons.

Crot. Qr.

lbs.

Austria China

....

Cochin China

Germany

Java

London

Mauritius

New Territories

223

18

2

1

7,089

12

1

5,808

5

15

584

4

2

16

215,486

4

4

20

11

2

18

2,721

18

1

25

73

3

2

14

Philippine Islands

Straits Settlements...

...

58,978

18

19

1,540

12

6

Total,

292,527

|-|

7

Two hundred and forty (240) Certificates of Origin for Exportation of Sugar were issued from this Office during the year 1907.

  Thirty (30) Permits for Delivery of Sugar arrived at the Colony without Certificate of Origin were issued from this Office during the year 1907.

IMPORTS.

The return shows that during the year the amount of Sugar reported was as follows:-

1906.

1907.

        Tons. Cwt. Qr. lbs. Imported... 483,119 13 1 19

Tons. Cwt. Qr. lbs.

292,527 8 1 7

Decrease.

Tons. Cut. Qr. lbs. 190,592 5 0 12

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF OPIUM.

IMPORTS.

MALWA. chests.

PATNA.

BENARES. PERSIAN.

chests.

chests.

chests.

TURKISH. chests.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

1906,.. 1907,..

4,975

24,963

13,115

2,646

987

880

47,566,

5,1195

23,220

10,232

2,217

4

50

40,842

Increase,...

144

144

Decrease, .

1,743

2,883

429

983

830

6,868

EXPORTS.

MALWA.

PATNA.

chests.

chests.

chests.

1906,

5,9613

25,177

13,192

BENARES. PERSIAN.

chests. 1,706

TURKISH.

chests.

985

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

chests.

chests.

654

47,575

1907,.....

5,700

22,404

10,621

3,846

25

106

42,702

Increase,...

2,140

2,140

Decrease, .

1611/2

2,773

2,571

960

548

7,013

Through Cargo reported in Manifests but not landed

( 1906,...................

1907,..

9,712 chests.

8,938

Decrease,

774 chests.

NUMBER OF PERMITS, &c., ISSUED.

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Landing Permits, ...(Opium)

365

377

12

Removal Permits,

""

8,244

8,542

298

Export Permits, ....(

),...

8,611

8,784

173

Landing Permits,...(Opium Skin),.

109

153

44

Removal Permits,...(

""

),..

10

11

1

Export Permits, ...(

22

).......

141

167

26

Memo. of Exports to the Commissioner of Chinese Customs,... Memo. of Exports to the Superintendent of Raw Opium

544

584

40

...

Department, Macao,......

293

289

4

64

SUMMARY OF EXPORTS, 1907.

Malwa. Patna. Benares. Persian. Turkish. Chinese. Total. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests. chests.

Total in Piculs.

By Steamers to

Amoy,

15

225

2,467

519

...

:

Bushire,..

16

3,226/1/

16

3,777.88.8

16.40.0

Canton,

83

6,714

1,132

28

56

8,761

Changsha via Shanghai,

28

2

31

10,330.90.0 37.00.0

Chefoo,

I

1

2

2.40.0

Foochow,

1,022

662

349

8373

1

2,872

3,095.13.7

Hankow via Shanghai,

5

2

8.40.0

Hohow,

206

35

241

289.20.0

Hoihow,

869

69

...

938

1,125.60.0

Kwong Chau Wan,

158

20

50

228

263.60.0

Kuchinatzu,

1

...

1.20.0

London,

778

17

795

814.45.0

...

Macao,

Macassar,

Matupi,

Merida,

Namtao,

43

4

Nauking via Shanghai,

41

100

Newchwang,

1

New York,

1

Pakhoi,......

182

38

Panama,

8

Philippine Islands,

307

Shanghai,

1,563

6,869

428 3,959

149

Smyrna,

Straits Settlements,

Swatow,

1,762

Tamatave,

Tamsui,

Tientsin,

Vancouver,

3,462

3,463

4,155.60.0

1

1.20.0

1

1.20.0

1

1.02.5

47

56.40.0

141

161.00.0

1

1.20.0

7.35.0

220

264.00.0-

...

8

9.60.0

10

1,339 1

713

...

120 11

884 12,391 5 120 3,825

1,034.72.5 14,556.60.0

5.00.0

123.00.0 4,236.17.5

1

....

1.20.0-

223

1,348

1,209

2,780

2

2

3,124.42.5

2.00.0%

101

101

121.20.0

Weihaiwei,

Victoria, B. C.................

Wuchow,

By Steam-launches and

Junks to various ad- jacent Ports in China,

491

2

493

591.60.0

2

32

34

40.80.0

...

6

1

7

8.40.0

464

399

15

878

960.80.0-

Total,

5,700 22,404

10,620

3,675

25

106

42,530

49,226.67.5

The information in Column 8 above is on the following assumption

Patna and Benares, per chest,

Malwa, Turkish and Chinese, per chest,... Persian, per chest,.................

ཡ་

1.20.0 pieuls. 1.00.0 99 1.02.5.

OPIUM IMPORTED.

MALWA.

PATNA.

BENARES.

YEAR.

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

PERSIAN.

Chests.

TURKISH. CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Chests. Chests.

Chests.

1888..

26,4455

25,612

14,074

5,205

176

71,513

1889.....

17,460

27,211

16,865

5,7981

96

67,4302

1890...

13,684

25,233

16,384

7,1021

613

62,4641

1891..

12,420

24,520

15,435

5,925

119

58,4193

1892.

13,118

23,041

13,431

7,171

103

56,864

1893..

9,803

17,935

6,674

4,684

2

39,098

1894

10,910

18,314

7,252

5,092

10

41,578

1895...

10,494

15,892

6,491

3,717

15

36,609

1896.

7,576

17,883

5,008

3,687

54

34,208

1897

6,167

18,517

7,555

5,134

8

327

37,708

1898.

7,483

19,63 i

7,319

4,894

31

34

39,392

1899......

9,028

17,866

8,739

5,966

51

39

41,690

1900..

10,218

19,351

8,045

5,184

418

40

43,2561

1901..

6,666

21,140

9,254

5,252!

2

42,314

1902..

7,7814

23,207

8,723

4,062

8

43,781

1903...

8,679

22,253

8,468

6,521

19

94

46,0345

1904...

8,051

22,761

9,894

5,070

34

126

45,936

1905..

6,763

23,779

10,218

2,922

35

211

43,928

1906....

4,9755

24,963

13,115

2,646

987

880

47,566

1907.

5,1191

23,220

10,232

2,217

50

40,842

65

OPIUM EXPORTED.

MALWA.

Year.

China. Formosa.

Philip Straits. pines

N. & C. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests-

Total

1888..

27,090

2

27,092

1889.

16,702

16,703

1890..

13,404

5

13,409

1891.

11,826

4

11,830

1892.

11,936

9

3

11,948

1893

10,692

4

10,696

1894

10,132

53

10

2

10,197

1895.

10,337

1

2

8

10,348

1896.

7,464

12

7,476

1897.

5,956

6

1

5,964

1898.

6,896

6,896

1899..

8,999

17

1

9,017

1900.

9,391

1

9,392

1901.

7,424

2

1

......

7,427

1902.

7,312

7,314

1903..

7,999

1

8,004

1904.

8,253

15

12

1

8,281

1905.....

5,878

6

2

2

5,888

1906.

5,853

4

1

1

5,859

1907

5,700

5,700

PATNA.

Philip- N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosa.

Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888...

23,951

17

465

437

8

24,878

1889.....

23,040

40

379

443

23,902

1890.

22,775

250

260

908

24,193

1891.

23,075

315

203

844

3

24,440

1892.

18,410

410

174

954

* a

19,948

1893......

16,675

429

301

787

......

4

18,196

1894.

16,758

16

41

330

167

3

17,320

1895..

15,033

245

307

20

15,608

1896..

15,783

265

334

16,387

1897..

16,721

360

......

410

6

17,509

1898.

17,297

444

37

457

18,236

1899......

17,285

432

32

61

17,812

1900.

15,892

100

618

17

2

1

16,630

1901.

18,328

150

160

1,073

22

19,733

1902...

21,482

300

163

323

6

22,274

1903.

21,843

309

34

507

80

6

22,787

1904..

20,152

120

520

4

105

2

20,903

1905..

22,193

602

13

93

5

22,906

1906.....

24,569

312

8

278

1907..

21,271

223

307

9

592

SS

25,177

2

22,404

BENARES.

Philip- N. & C.

Total

Year.

China. Formosa.

Straits.

pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

1888

13,390

658

86

35

......

7

14,176

1889......

14,625

530

37

29

874

16,095

1890......

14,011

560

109

38

46

14,764

1891

15,112

399

24

109

10

15,654

*

1892.

12,309

157

332

79

1

4

12,882

1893

7,418

124

256

92

4

7,894

1894.

6,569

179

26

70

13

6,857

1895.

6,209

96

214

139

6,658

1896.

5,185

34

30

129

5,378

1897

6,747

302

157

10

7,216

1898.

7,316

1

......

387

17

7,721

1899.

8,263

330

......

4

8,597

1900..

7,104

300

543

1

7,948

1901

7,297

360

42

1,099

6

8,804

1902.

7,606

500

10

555

8,671

1903.

7,394

566

3

753

1

8,717

1904.

7,775

1,120

9

578

9,482

1905.

8,396

880

22

615

9,917

1906.

10,667 2,000

84

432

8

18,191

1907.

8,840

1,348

428

2

10,620

66

PERSIAN.

Year.

1888.

1889.

1890..

1,102

Philip- China. Formosa. Straits. pines.

1,389 3,414 1,463 3,429 4,328

N. & C.

Total

America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

87

2

4,892

1

64

14

6

5

4,982

31

2

73

18

5,554

1891.

1,282 4,637

9

10

41

5,979

1892.

3,161

4,296

210

3

67

7,737

1893.

2,555

3,795

286

7

18

6,661

1894.

1,057

3,321

156

22

4,556

1895.

967

2,556

69

15

3,607

1896.

2,811

991

187

97

5

4,091

1897

2,584

2,035

114

3

32

22

4,790

1898.

1,805

2,771

262

17

9

41

4,905

1899.

900

3,502

572

17

43

5,034

1900...

521

2,729

1,123

5

26

92

4,497

1901.

466

2,160

1,237

1

7

11

90

135

4,107

1902

2,376

1,348

999

90

9

2

264

5,089

1903.....

3,774

762

2,104

265

15

1

7

6,928

1904.

2,974

1,500

333

333

8

2

1

5,151

1905.

1,543

1,060

234

206

11

35

52

3,141

1906..

881

485

19

47

121

2

42

15

1,612

1907.

1,396

1,209

120

149

778

16

3,675

Year.

TURKISH.

Philip

N. & C.

Total

China. Formosa, Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

103

1888...

92

2

9

2

128

1889...

126

105

1890.

105

97

1891

97

111

1892.

111

1893..

25

2

46

73

44

49

1894.

5

20

1895.

20

32

54

1896...

22

2

1897

2

1898.

10

2

15

7

3

37

27

1899...

6

20

1900..

17

120

18

6

94

255

1901.

1

5

178

189

2

1902.

2

1903....

10

1

9

20

8

1904.

7

1

2

1905...

10

2

2

29

4

47

...

1906...

1

960

14

10

985

17

5

25

19

3

CHINESE.

Philip- N. & C.

Total

China. Formosa. Straits. pines. America. Canada. Egypt. London. Other Ports. Chests.

Year.

1888.

1889..

1890.

1891.

1892

1893.

1894.

1895......

1896. 1897

327

1898..

34 37

1899.

1900.

1901

1902.... 1903.

1904.....

1905.

1906......

1907

......

......

1

327

34

37

94

94

34

34

169

169

......

31

621

1

654

106

106

:

i

67

Appendix C.

MARINE SURVEYOR'S OFFICE.

3. During the year, the total number of vessels surveyed for Passenger Certificate and Bottom Inspection were 192 of 431,705 gross register tons, a decrease of 5 vessels and 7,533 tons, as compared with the previous year.

The nationalities and tonnage of these vessels were as follows :-

British.. German

127 vessels of 319,571 tons.

French

Norwegian

Chinese

49

""

of 85,886

"1

5

7

11

of 6,922

19

of 11,245

""

"}

4

of

19

8,081

""

Emigration surveys were held on 115 vessels, 45 of which were British and 70 Foreign. The number of boilers built under inspection were 16, an increase of 2 as compared with last year.

RETURN OF WORK performed by the GOVERNMENT MARINE SURVEYOR'S DEPARTMENT.

Years.

Passenger

Certificate and

Inspection of

Bottom.

Emigration.

Tonnage for Registration.

British Tonnage

Foreign Vessels.

Certificate for

Inspection of

Lights and

Markings.

Crew Space,

Minor Inspec-

tions.

Survey of Licen-

Steam-launches. sed Passenger

Boilers under Construction.

Survey of

Inspection of Government

Launches.

Examination of Engineers.

Examination of

Chinese Engin-

cers for Steam- launches.

Number of Visits in Estimated Total

connection with fore-

going Inspections.

1898,

164

83

1899,

144

1900,

151

1901,

157

8588

10

61

10

83

7

92

1902, 175

93

1903,

190

111

1904, 196

125

35

1905, 188

93

1906,

197

81

1907,

192

115

36

OOOO-INDO

JO NO OTNN-QO

∞ ∞ 1 2 10 HO-

5

2

121

61

26

72

48

1,729

134

62

27

:

57

78

1,602

187

73

47

99

124

1,834

217

36

102

88

118

2,031

210

25

126

109

76

1,768

184

30

126

85

72

2,107

2

203

45

126

82

104

2,140

193

23

172

77

81

1,989

2

190

14

145

80

84

2,063

227

16

81

99

81

1,764

Appendix D.

GUNPOWDER DEPOT.

4. During the year 1907, there has been stored in the Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island :-

No.

Approxi-

mate

of Cases. Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

Do, Government owned,

5,208 121,495

102

9,470

1,855

321,300

200

18,300

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,.

866

55,153

Do.

Government owned,

76

1,996

Non-explosives, privately owned,

23

2,225

Do.

Government owned,

239

23,850

Total,

8,569

553,789

68

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt

No. of Cases. Weight.

Approxi- mate

lbs.

For Sale in the Colony :

Gunpowder, privately owned,

985

20,725

Cartridges, privately owned,

149

40,625

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

100

8,825

Non-explosives, privately owned,

For Export :-

Gunpowder, privately owned, ....

2,492

61,675

Cartridges, privately owned,..

359

43.875

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

413

21,350

Non-explosives, privately owned,

18

1,875

Total,

4,516

198,950

On the 31st December, 1907, there remained as follows:-

Approxi-

No.

mate

of Cases. Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do. Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,..............

Do. Government owned,

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

1,731

39,095

31

3,002

1,347

236,800

17

1,700

353

24,978

Do.,

Government owned,

34

1,614

Non-explosives, privately owned,

5

350

Do.,

Government owned,

1

10

Total,

3,519 307,549

Appendix E.

5. The amount of Light Dues collected was as follows:-

Class of Vessels.

Rate. No. of! per ton. Ships.

Tonnage.

Total Fees collected.

$ ...

Ocean Vessels,

Steam-launches,

1 cent 1

4,255 524

7,495,290 | 74,952.90 ·

River Steamers, (Night Boats), River Launches, (Night Boats), River Steamers, (Day Boats),. River Launches, (Day Boats),

Free. Free.

2,378 73 1,689

20,577 1,564,686

205:77

5,216.18

4,234

14.15

1.124,199

191

10,124

Total,

9,110 10.219.110 80,389.00

CAPE COLLINSON.

The New Occulting Light at this Station was inaugurated on the 1st October, it is working satisfactorily and is found to be a great improvement.

GAP ROCK.

Owing to telegraphic communication being interrupted, no vessels were reported during the year as passing Gap Rock.

69

  The Typhoon of the 13th September did serious damage to the Lantern, Glazing, Lenses, Derrick, etc., and owing to the above circumstances, the Lamp could not be lit until the night of the 15th September.

  The Fog Signal Gun was fired three times and Blue Lights burnt on the night of the 14th September to warn a steamer approaching the Rock,

The New Fog Signal Apparatus was fixed in position in September.

Vessels signalled passing the Station: 1,122.

One hundred and thirty-five hours and ten minutes Fog were reported from this Station during the year and the Fog Signal Guns were fired 838 times.

  On three occasions the fortnightly relief could not be carried out owing to the rough sea and bad weather prevailing.

WAGLAN ISLAND.

  During the year, one thousand seven hundred and seventy (1,770) vessels were reported as passing this Station. Five hundred and thirty (530) messages were received and one thousand one hundred and sixty (1,160) sent, also 236 vessels were not reported owing to telegraphic interruption, embodying forty-four days.

  There were two hundred and five hours Fog reported from this Station during the year and the Fog Signal Gun was fired 2,128 times.

The above messages sent include weather observations to the Observatory.

On no occasion was the relief delayed during the year.

No. 5.

DIEU

ET

SOIT

MA

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 10th of APRIL, 1908.

Published by Authority:

REPORTS OF THE CAPTAIN SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE, AND OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

The total of all cases reported to the Police was 11,540 as against 11,144 in 1906 being an increase of 396 or 3.55 per cent.

In the division of these cases into Serious and Minor Offences there appears a decrease as compared with 1906 of 27 cases or .81 per cent. in the former and an increase of 423 cases or 5.41 per cent. in the latter.

The decrease, as compared with 1906 in Serious Offences of 27 is shown as follows:-

Decrease.

Robbery,

Unlawful Possession,

13

229

242

Increase.

Murder,

Burglary or Larceny from dwelling,

6

58

Kidnapping and Protection of Women and Children,

10

Larceny,

109

Felonies not already given,

32

215

Nett Decrease..

27

72

   2. Table I shows the number and character of the Serious and Minor Offences reported to the Police during the past year, and the number of persons convicted and discharged in connection with these offences.

MURDER CASES.

3. On the 7th of March CHAN SING, Master of Cargo-boat No. 7468, reported that while he, his wife, and a brother were going in a small boat from the Harbour Master's Pier to his Cargo-boat, his boat was capsized by the back-wash from a steam-launch. The occupants he said were precipitated into the water and his wife drowned.

oar and

One day later the body was picked up and there were several wounds on the head. It is supposed that the husband and his brother hit the woman on the head with an threw her into the water and made the report to cover their crime. Both men absconded after making the report. No arrest has yet been made.

On the 25th of March CHEUNG TAI, age 30, a gardener residing in a matshed with his mother and a man named YIM HUNG and his family at Telegraph Bay, Pokfulam, ran amok with a chopper and attacked YIM HUNG and his two children aged 3 and 6 respectively. YIM HUNG died from his injuries before he reached Hospital. The younger of the two children recovered and the elder died on the 7th of April from his injuries. CHEUNG TAI was convicted of murder and sentenced to be hanged, the sentence was commuted to penal servitude for life.

On the 3rd of April at about 5.30 a.m. the body of CHEUNG KIU, a widow, age about 46 years, residing alone in a house at No. 6 San Shan in the Hung Hom District, was found on the floor of her house by a neighbour who saw the door open. From the appearance of the body and medical testimony death was probably the result of strangulation, a piece of cord was tightly fastened round the neck and robbery appears to have been the motive for the crime. Deceased was known to have jewellery valued over $100 and this she was wearing the day before her death. When the body was found the jewellery was missing. No arrest.

On the 4th of April a Japanese named ARAKI Tuzo, age 32 years, unemployed and of no fixed abode was attacked in a Japanese boarding house at 55 Connaught Road Central by a number of Japanese men who stabbed him on the head and body with knives and swords causing such injuries that he died before removal to Hospital. Tuzo the deceased man was the head of a party who imported Japanese women for immoral purposes and some differences arose between some of the party when it was suspected that Tuzo was not acting honestly towards his own party. They decided to remove him and appoint some one else as their head. Some of the party set off in search of Tuzo who apparently took shelter in the boarding house where they found him and murdered him. Four men were arrested and indicted for murder; they were found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to ten years hard labour each. A number of others connected with the party were arrested and banished from the Colony.

On the 15th of May an Indian named MELA, age 40 years, employed as a watchman by ESSABHOY, PABANY & Co., who lived at No. 4 Hing Lung Lane East, West Point, was murdered in his hut by other Indians who no doubt went there to rob him. Deceased was known to have $400 in his box, the box was found by the Police broken open and the money and other property stolen. Six Indians were arrested, four of whom were convicted of murder and sentenced to be hanged. The sentence was commuted to penal servitude for life. The charge against the other two was withdrawn.

On the 21st of July about 10 a.m. To CHEUNG, age 30, employed as a foreman in Messrs. A. S. WATSON & Co.'s aerated water factory was found lying in Des Voeux Road near the Taiwan Bank in a dying condition with a wound in the region of his heart. The man died before removal to Hospital. It appears that deceased had been the means of causing the dismissal from the Factory of one or two men who were slack in their work: this led to a fight and resulted in the man's death. Five men were arrested; 3 were convict- ed and sentenced to be hanged, one was hanged, in the case of the other two the sentence was commuted to penal servitude for life and two were discharged--no information filed against them.

+

73

On the 7th of August while the S.S. Monteagle was lying in the Kowloon Docks the body of a European woman, age about 30 years, was found by the Carpenter in a trunk which had been placed in the baggage room on the 4th of August. The trunk containing the body was handed over to the Police and the body removed to the Mortuary: the appear- ance of the body showed that death was caused by strangulation, a lady's dress band was tightly fastened around the neck and secured with a brush which had been used as a tourni- quet. Later inquiries revealed the fact that two persons who took a room in the Hongkong Hotel on the 3rd of August in the names of a Mr. and Mrs. JONES were missing from their room, this information led to the identification of the body and later the arrest of the murderer. The body was identified as that of a female named GERTRUDE DAYTON, one of the unfortunate class, and the man as one W. H. ADSETTS who accompanied the woman from Manila, arriving in the Colony by the S.S. Eastern on the 3rd of August. The mur- der was committed sometime in the early morning of the 4th after which the body was put in the trunk and later in the day conveyed on board the steamer then lying at anchor in the Harbour. After disposing of the body ADSETTS flel from the Colony. He was arrested in Chefoo by the United States Authorities and conveyed to Manila whence he was extradited. ADSETTS was brought back to the Colony on the 23rd September, was tried and convicted of murder and hanged.

On the 26th of August the body of a man named FAN MUK FAT, age 38 years, a farmer residing at Pak Ngan Heung Village, Mui Wo, Lantao Island, was found by relatives on the roadside near No. 17 Pak Ngan Heung. It had on it several wounds. Death was the result of a rupture in an enlarged spleen. It transpired that deceased went to the house of a fisherman named To HING CHUN at 10 p.m. on the 25th, it is alleged for an unlawful pur- pose, and was beaten by the fisherman and his wife. The fisherman and his wife were arrested and charged with murder and convicted of manslaughter, the man was sentenced to 3 years and the female to 18 months hard labour.

On the 18th of September WONG TAM ON, age 34 years, an earth-coolie living in a mat- shed at the back of Yaumati employed on the reclamation work was removed to the Government Civil Hospital suffering from a stab wound in the side inflicted by another earth-coolie named HU YEUNG Ko, age 28, living in the same shed. WONG TAM ON died in Hospital the same day the result of his injuries. HU YEUNG Ko absconded immediately after the affray. No arrest was made.

         No arrest was made. The motive for the crime was a quarrel between the two men over a loan of 10 cents which the deceased borrowed and refused to refund.

   On the 11th of October the body of a Chinese woman named M TONG, age 23 years, lately living at 168 To Kwa Wan, was exhumed from a grave on the hillside at Shek Shan in the Hung Hom District. Deceased was a widow and it was said that foul play was the cause of death and that her late husband's relatives were implicated. Four men arrested and discharged at the Police Court owing to the want of sufficient evidence.

were

   On the 15th of October a man named FU KAT, age 22 years, a carpenter residing in a boat-builder's shed at Mong Kok Tsui in the Yaumati District, was removed to the Govern- ment Civil Hospital suffering from injuries inflicted by a youth named Hó Sze, age 16 years, who struck him with a chisel. FU KAT died in Hospital a day later. Deceased and Ho Sze were relatives and were continually having quarrels over family matters and deceased struck the boy who returned the blow by striking him with a chisel. The boy absconded. No arrest made.

   On the 29th of October the body of a man named CHEUNG CHEONG, age 50 years, a hawker who lived in a matshed at Lai Chi Kok in the Sham Shui Po District was found on the floor of his shed with the throat cut and a wound in the fore-arm. Robbery appears to have been the motive for the crime, as it was known by persons living in the neighbourhood that deceased had money and that he had $25 in his purse. When the body was found no money was forthcoming. No arrest was made.

   On the 17th of November the body of a man named CHEUNG FUK, age 50 years, a stone- cutter residing at 59 High Street was removed to the Public Mortuary for Post Mortem examination. Examination showed that deceased died from the effects of a poison. Deceased's concubine LAM KUI alias Mo Ho was arrested and charged with administering a poison. She was convicted at the Criminal Sessions and sentenced to be hanged, since commuted to penal servitude.

74

At 6 a.m. on the 27th of December a Native Officer attached to the 129th Baluchi Regiment, Kowloon, reported to the Police at the Water Police Station that a murder had been committed in a matshed in the lines occupied by 26 men belonging to A. Co. Baluchi Regiment. In consequence of this report the Police went to the shed, where they found the body of a sepoy, one WAZIR KHAN, age 23, underneath the bed of another sepoy named MAHOMED KHAN of the same Regiment, the latter man had previously been removed to the Military Hospital suffering from severe knife wounds in the face, neck, hand and arms supposed to have been inflicted by the deceased who was not of the residents of the shed and who it is supposed entered the shed to murder MAHOMED KHAN whom he had previously threatened. A Magistrate's

          A Magistrate's enquiry was held: Verdict-- Murder against some person or persons unknown.

MANSLAUGHTER CASES.

4. On the 10th of January a coolie named U LUK, age 21 years, was convicted of burglary at No. 109 Kau Lung Tong; he was sentenced to 6 months hard labour and 4 hours stocks. After being admitted to Gaol he showed symptoms of illness and was removed to the Government Civil Hospital where he died two days later the result of a ruptured spleen. The complainant and a witness in the burglary case were both arrested and charged with causing his death and were discharged at the Police Court.

On the 12th of March Lo CHING, age 33, a vegetable hawker residing in a matshed at AP MA LIN in the Yaumati District was beaten by four men. The deceased was hawking his vegetables near Temple Street when a dispute arose with a coolie who wanted to borrow the hawker's basket. Deceased died on the street the result of a ruptured spleen. Four men were arrested: 3 convicted and sentenced to 6 months hard labour each and the fourth discharged.

On the 18th of August LEUNG WAN, age 34, a street coolie residing at No. 108 Second Street was removed to the Tung Wah Hospital by his brother suffering from injuries caused by a fall into the Engine-room of the S.S. Po Cheung. The man died in Hospital a day later, the cause of death was fracture of the vertebral column. It appears that the deceased with other coolies rushed on board looking for employment and was pushed by an Indian Watchman employed on board which caused the man to fall. The Indian was arrested and convicted and sentenced to two months hard labour.

On the 22nd of August LI CHU, a vegetable gardener residing at Cheung Sha Wan in the Sham Shiu Po District, was removed to the Government Civil Hospital suffering from an injury in the head inflicted by two Indians who struck him with a bamboo pole. LI CHU died in Hospital a day later, the cause of death was a fractured skull. The deceased had been watering his vegetables from the well and he was accused by the two Indians of making the water dirty. The Indians snatched the man's pole and struck him in the head with it. Three men were arrested, two were convicted and sentenced to 1 year hard labour each and the third man was discharged.

On the 27th of August the body of a man named LUN TSI, age 2 years, furniture- maker, who lived in the Kwong On Club, New Street, was found by the Police in French Street, West Point. Police investigation showed that the motive for the crime was a dispute between the members of different Triad Clubs, a number of whom met at Shek Tong Tsui to fight out their disputes. Deceased and some of his party who did not go to Shek Tong Tsui waylaid some of the members of the other Clubs near Water Street and deceased was driven into French Street where he was fatally stabbed. Four men were arrested, one was convicted at the Criminal Sessions and sentenced to 7 years hard labour, two were discharged by the Police Magistrate and the other at the Sessions.

On the 1st of September WAN TAM MUI, age 28, was removed to the Government Civil Hospital suffering from injuries the result of having been beaten by a number of men in the Wanchai Market; the man died on the 6th of September. The cause of death being a rupture of the spleen. Deceased was a hawker and went to the market to purchase pork and had a quarrel with the stallholder and his fokis whom he accused of assaulting him. Four men were arrested and discharged by the Police Magistrate.

75

On the 22nd of October a man named CHAN SING KIU, a passenger on board the S.S. Japan, from Singapore, was removed to the Government Civil Hospital where he died a day later; the cause of death was a rupture of the spleen. It appears that while the ship was moored alongside the Tanjong Pagar Wharf at Singapore and shortly before leaving for Hongkong a fight between Indian and Chinese passengers took place about selecting comfortable quarters on deck. One man (Indian) was arrested and discharged by the Police Magistrate.

GANG ROBBeries.

5. There were 6 gang robberies reported during the year. In connection with 3 of these cases, 12 prisoners were arrested, 9 being convicted and 3 discharged. In 3 cases no arrest was made.

 Two of these robberies took place in the City of Victoria, 1 occurring in the Eastern and 1 in the Central District.

Of the remaining 4, 1 was reported from Tsim Tsa Tsui, and 3 from the New Territories.

STREET AND HIGHWAY ROBBERIES.

6. Twenty-two cases were reported. In connection with 7 of these cases 14 prisoners were arrested, 4 being convicted and 10 discharge. In 15 cases no arrest was made. Of these robberies (Highway), two affected Europeans, viz. :-

On the 17th of September while a seaman named ARTHUR GIESE who lived in the Sailors' Home was riding in a ricksha in the Queen's Road and when a little distance past the Ko Shing Theatre going West, the driver suddenly dropped the shafts of his vehicle and threw his fare out. The fare was suddenly pounced on by the driver and two others who robbed the man of a purse containing $30. The men were arrested but owing to the unsatisfactory nature of the evidence the Police Magistrate discharged the 3 men.

  On the 6th of November while Mrs. GIBBS was walking on Plantation Road towards the Tram Station, she was suddenly attacked by a Chinaman who had the appearance of a houseboy who stole a silver chain purse containing some small silver and a handkerchief, total value about $10. An advertisement giving the man's description failed to get any information.

ROBBERIES ON BOATS AND Junks.

7. Four cases were reported, of which 2 occurred in the New Territories. In connection with 1 of these cases 4 prisoners were arrested and convicted. In 3 cases, no arrest was made.

  8. An impudent case of larceny occurred when the thief took the brass hinges off the Chinese Constables' beds at the Central Station representing himself to be an employee of the Public Works Department. He made the attempt once too often with the result that he was convicted, birched and imprisoned.

FELONIES NOT ALREADY GIVEN.

9. Under this heading are comprise the following:-

Attempted Arson,

1

Administering Poison,

1

Cutting and Wounding,.

17

Demanding money with menaces,.

11

Embezzlement,

27

Forgery,

**

22

Housebreaking,

135

Manslaughter,

7

....

Shooting and Wounding with intent to do grievous bodily harm,

3

Abominable Offences,.

9

233

76

GAMBLING.

10. One hundred and forty-seven gambling warrants were executed and convictions obtained (150 in 1906).

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

   11. The estimated value of the property reported stolen during the year $141,353.98.

was

   The value of the property recovered by the Police and restored to owners was $18,787.02.

LOST PROPERTY.

   12. The following is a return showing property lost or recovered during the year 1907:

Articles reported lost.

Value lost.

Articles recovered and Articles found which were not reported lost.

Value found.

293

$19,870.72

149

$1,870.24

WOMEN AND GIRLS' PROTECTION ORDINANce.

13. Number of Brothel-keepers convicted and fined,

52

Number of Brothel-keepers absconded after warrants were taken out..... Number of Brothel-keepers discharged by Police Magistrate, Number of cases reported by the Hon. Registrar General, Number of convictions in cases reported by the Hon. Registrar General, Number of keepers absconded after warrants were taken out in cases

reported by the Hon. Registrar General,

6

1

33

2

4

Number of cases reported by Army and Navy, no proceedings taken, 43 Number of cases discharged by the Police Magistrate, Mumber of cases reported, on inquiries being made, found not to be

brothels,

1

34

Total,

.176

Number of visits to the different houses reported,...

.528

7

Number of convictions under the Chinese Registration Ordinance,... Number of convictions for soliciting Prostitution in the Public Street, 1 Numb r of convictions for living on the proceeds of Prostitution,... 1 Number of Brothels closed by order of the Police Magistrate,...................

Total,...........

1

10

OPIUM WARRANTS.

14. Two thousand seven hundred and eighty-one (2,781) Search Warrants for prepared opium were executed by the Police and Excise Officers of the Opium Farmer, as compared with 3,128 in 1906. In 787 cases Opium was found and 1,057 persons were arrested.

1

77

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

15. The Examiner of Weights and Measures made the following verifications :---

European scales,

Chinese scales,

Yard measures,.........

Chek measures,

Examined.

Correct.

Incorrect.

377

377

2,319

2,295

24

261

261

590

590

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

24

Convictions. 24

Total Amount of Fines. $665.00

DANGEROUS GOODS ORDINANCE.

16. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance :-

No. of Cases.

7

Convictions. 7

Total Amount of Fines. $47.00

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

17. No prosecutions were instituted under the Food and Drugs Ordinance.

Samples collected and sent to Analyst were as follows:-

Brandy.

4

Whisky. 8

Gin. 3

Port Wine. 3

Àle.

3

  All these samples were certified to be genuine with the exception of one sample of Brandy.

MENDICANTS.

  18. Thirty-one beggars were dealt with by the Police Magistrate and three sent to Tung Wah Hospital. 183 were sent to Canton as follows:----

Once, Twice,

Thrice...

How often sent away.

Four Times,

Five

""

Six

17

Canton.

176 6

1

Total,...

183

1

78

DEAD BODIES.

19. Table V shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during each month of the year.

LICENCES.

20. The following licences were issued during 1907.

1,175 Hongkong Jinrickshas.

50 Quarry Bay Jinrickshas.

250 Kowloon Jinrickshas.

37 Private Vehicles (27 Carriages, 6 Motor Cars and 4 Hearses).

1,083 Truck Licences.

644 Hongkong Chairs.

60 Hill District Chairs.

7 Gharis.

14,097 Drivers and Bearers. They are continually coming and going, hence the

large number.

DOG ORDINANCE.

21. 1,623 dogs were licensed during 1907.

5 watch dogs were licensed free of charge.

110 dogs were destroyed.

54 stray dogs were impounded and restored to owners or ransomed.

ARMS ORDINANCE.

22. Eight licences to import and deal in Arms and three to deal in Sporting Arms and Ammunition were issued during 1907. During the whole year a Proclamation has been in force prohibiting the export of warlike stores from the Colony.

The following Arms and Ammunition were confiscated during the year, viz. :-

15,036 rounds ammunition, 137 rifles, 37 revolvers, 36 muskets, 16 daggers and swords, 2 fighting irons, 2 cartridge belts, 1 set loading tools, 16 boxes caps, 34 boxes primers, 8 packages and 5 boxes detonators, 222 lbs. dynamite, 40 coils fuse and two bayonets.

EDUCATION.

23. During the year 7 Europeans and 61 Indians obtained certificates for knowledge of Chinese and 5 Indians obtained certificates for English.

It would appear that the test is too difficult for the Chinese Police.

MUSKETRY.

24. The Europeans and Indians were put through the usual course of Musketry, 55- Europeans and 99 Indians qualified as marksmen.

IDENTIFICATION BY FINGER IMPRESSIONS.

   25. 185 persons were identified as recidivists, of whom 28 had not served their sent- ences in gaol having paid fines. 7 were Straits Settlements deportees. Of the 150 who went to gaol 145 were recognised by the gaol warders as having been previously convicted.

+

79

CONDUCT.

26. The conduct of the European contingent has been on the whole good. The total number of reports against them was 56 as against 59 in 1906. There were 16 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink as against 10 in 1906; one for sleeping on duty (same as last year), 3 for disorderly conduct and 2 for neglect of duty. Nine of the 16 cases of drunkenness, and 15 of the other offences, were committed by men who are no longer in the Force. One European Constable was convicted by the Police Magistrate for being drunk and incapable when off duty, one for assault and one for desertion.

                                               90 men had no offence recorded against them.

The conduct of the Indian contingent was fair. There were 465 reports, as against 448 for the preceding year. For drunkenness there were 61 as against 45, for disorderly conduct 23, as against 33, for neglect of duty 52 as against 46, for absence from duty 51 as against 65, for gossiping and idling on duty 91 as against 107 and for sleeping on duty 40 as against 35. Anxiety to get away to Canada caused men to commit themselves in order to be released from their engagements. 211 men had no report. Nine Indian Constables were convicted by the Police Magistrate, 5 for assault, 1 for indecent behaviour, 1 for being drunk and unfit for duty, 1 for disobeying orders and 1 for larceny.

The behaviour of the Chinese contingent showed improvement. There were al- together 1,086 reports, as against 1,129 in 1906. There were 5 reports for drunk- enness as against 1, 104 for sleeping on duty as against 113, 11 for disorderly conduct as against 23, and 356 for minor offences as against 387.

Two Sergeant Interpreters were convicted by the Police Magistrate, 1 for larceny and 1 for forging the signature of a European Sergeant and 8 Constables for the following offences: 3 for assault, 1 for giving false testimony, 3 for demanding money by menaces and 1 for larceny.

167 men of this contingent were not reported during the year.

The Seamen, Coxswains, Engineers and Stokers had 228 reports as compared with 300 for last year. For drunkenness there was no report (same as last year), 102 for absence from Station and late for duty as against 193 in the previous year.

Two Seamen were convicted by the Police Magistrate, one for fighting and one for larceny; and one Engineer for assault.

63 had no report recorded against them.

REWARDS.

27. Two European Sergeants were granted medals for smart and energetic detective work and one Chinese Constable was granted a medal for long and faithful service; two Chinese Constables were granted rewards for zeal displayed in the discharge of their duty and one Chinese Constable was commended by His Excellency the Governor and granted a reward for plucky conduct in arresting a soldier for robbery. A European Lance Sergeant and a European Constable were commended for rescuing two Chinese from drowning.

NOTABLE EVENTS.

28. At about 1 p.m. on the 28th January a sudden and very violent squall, accom- panied by heavy rain and hail, swept over the island and harbour, capsizing many boats and causing loss of life. Seventy-one rowing boats, 22 cargo boats, 7 junks, 1 fishing boat and 1 ballast boat were capsized in the harbour, and 24 adults and 48 children were drowned; 50 bodies were subsequently recovered by the Police, and 6 by the Tung Wah Hospital launch. Launches and boats belonging to the Police, Harbour, Naval and Military Depart- ments, besides a number of privately owned ones, were soon at work rescuing people from the water and righting the capsized craft. Through their means about 110 persons were rescued from drowning. A Chinese launch owner named NG So Tar dived beneath a cap- sized sampan and, at the risk of his own life, rescued therefrom a woman and child. For this brave act he was subsequently awarded the Belilios Medal.

80

   On the 1st August part of Hongkong Hotel Buildings collapsed. The Directors wrote to thank the Police and Fire Brigade for the prompt and able assistance given in the work

of rescue.

   On December 5th, 6th, and 7th a Chinese Procession took place. His Excellency the Governor was good enough to express his approval of the Police arrangements made and the way in which they were carried out on this occasion.

HEALTH.

29. Admissions to Hospital during the last three years were as follows:-

Nationality.

Europeans Indians

Chinese

1905 Strength 1,018.

1906

1907

Strength Strength

1,047.

1,048.

102

98

132

407

375

421

187

224

187

   Return of Police treated in Government Civil Hospital for fever or dengue fever from 1st Januray to 31st December, 1907 :-

Old Territories. New Territories.

Nationality.

Europeans Indians

Chinese

26

72

20

18

4

In additon to cases treated in Hospital for fever or dengue fever, the cases treated for fever in the various Stations in the New Territories without being removed to Hospital were Europeans 12, Indians 45 and Chinese 13.

EXECUTIVE STAFF.

30. I acted as Captain Superintendent of Police and Mr. WODEHOUSE as Deputy Superintendent of Police from the 7th September, when Mr. BADELEY left the Colony on leave of absence.

POLICE FORCE.

31. Eighteen Europeans were engaged during the year, 12 were recruited from Eng- land and 6 enlisted locally.

   Table VI shows changes in the personnel of the Force during the year, and Table VII the numbers of the several contingents and the total cost for the past five years.

NEW TERRITORIES.

32. I attach a report on the policing of the New Territories by Mr. HALLIFAX (Appendix B).

13th February, 1908.

F. W. LYONS, Captain Superintendent of Police.

:

DITHDRAW

81

Appendix A.

Report on the Police School.

To The Captain Superintendent of Police.

SIR,

POLICE SCHOOL,

HONGKONG, 16th January, 1908.

     I have the honour to submit to you the report on the Police School for the year ending 31st December, 1907.

   2. The only change on the staff is that I.P.S. JHANDY KHAN has been appointed in charge of English School at No. 8 Station, to enable Indian Constables there to continue their study of English during absence from the Central Station.

3. At your visit of inspection on the 30th December last, your kind offer of prizes for efficiency, (a) in English Conversation, (b) in Reading and Writing English for Indian Constables, Indian Gaol Staff, and for Chinese Constables, will, I feel certain, give additionial impetus to their work.

an

   4. During the year 1907 the following Police Constables obtained the necessary certificates of exemption :

January,... July,

July,

December,

December,

E. P. C.s.:-54, 66, 43, 9. 51, 68, 47.

E. P. C.s.:-111, 116, 117, 1, 62.

.I. P. C.s.:-669, 540, 789, 595, 570, 770, 827, 699.

I. A. W.:--11.

E. P. C.s.:-24, 104, 115, 36, 98, 198, 86, 100, 37, 47, 30, 58. ...I. P. C.s.:-508, 859, 867, 392, 834.

Gaol Guards :-58, 85.

I. A. W.s.:--50, 91.

A total of passes as follows:-

E. P. C.s.........

I. P. C.s.....

Gaol Guards,

Assistant Warders,.

Total,

24

13

29

42

5. The total attendance during the year was :-

Central Station,

No. 8 Station,

Total.

7,129

170

7,299

School was open on 100 days giving an average daily attendance of 73.

The highest attendance was on 10th December, when 109 men were present.

6. The number of units present were as under :-

E. P. C.s

J. P. C.s

C. P. C.s..

Gaol Staff,

Botanical Garden boys,

36

196

248

68

2

550

ARTHUR W. GRANT, B.A. (Canterbury), Master in Charge.

1

1

82

Appendix B.

Report of the District Officer and Collector on the New Territories for 1907.

1. The change of most importance during the year has of course been the beginning of the Railway. A great number of New Territories natives have found employment in connection with it, and they have done well out of it-so well in fact that the minimum monthly rate of wages has gone up from $7.30 to $9 for any kind of unskilled work: a rate as high as that obtaining in Hongkong. In spite of this however the construction work has not been an unmixed blessing even to the natives themselves; the kind of adventurer that is attracted to any spot newly busy has been quite sufficiently in evidence all along the line, and seems unfortunately to have done fairly well. And this in spite of a marked absence of serious crime; his profits have been made by methods which laid him open only to civil action. A great number of cases of this kind have been brought to Tai Po during the year, and while a number have been more or less successfully settled, the task is getting a more and more difficult one. Debtors are beginning to see the advantages of being obdurate, for the Summary Court in Hongkong has more terror for their Creditors than for them. Partly due perhaps to a number of cases of this kind, and partly also to the closer intercourse with imported coolies and outside traders is the rather regrettable fact that the natives on this side of the country are shewing signs of becoming civilised-of losing, that is, their own proper simplicity.

   2. As compared with the Railway, nothing of any great note has occurred during the year. The readiness with which the Crown Rent was paid-it could hardly be taken fast enough was a pleasing sign of a growing prosperity and of content with things as they are. Other signs are not wanting that the condition of the population is improving; the making of several roads by private village enterprise, of a kind much superior to anything here existing before 1898: the erection of a number of new houses, though any advance in this is perhaps counterbalanced by the fact that quite number have also been vacated. As far as can be seen however the reasons for this desertion are mostly particular-the houses are inferior ones which would not pay for repair, something has occurred to ruin their Fung Shui, or the owners have died without heirs; they contain nothing to discount the idea of a generally increasing prosperity. The markets are busy-those at a distance from the line as well as the nearer ones; and local capitalists seem to have been studying the railway methods with a view of starting works of their own-preferably brick-making. Best of all, there has been very marked reduction in the cases of serious crime reported -and this in spite of the fact that the state of things over the border seems to be no better than it ever was.

   3. The one great want of the country is proper roads. Quite a few of the local business men are waiting to put into practice the lesson they have learnt from the railway bullock carts, and the opening of the new Ping Shan to Castle Peak Road is, very keenly looked forward to as the beginning of a proper road system. As long as there is no internal communication in the Territories, local enterprise has little opportunity; when the opportunity offers, there is not a little capital ready to take advantage of it to the full.

9th February, 1908.

E. R. HALLIFAX, District Officer and Collector.

3

!

1907.

Table I.

RETURN of SERIOUS and MINOR OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1907, with the Results of such Reports.

Robberies with violence! from the

person.

Burglaries.

Larcenies in Dwelling

Houses.

Assaults

with Intent

Larcenies.

Felonies

not

already

Assaults

and

Disorderly

Gambling.

Conduct.

to rob.

given.

Kidnapping.

Offences against Ord.

4 of 1897,

(Protection

of Women

& Girls.)

Unlawful

Possession.

Piracy,

Miscellaneous

Euro-

Jeans

and

Ameri-

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Offences.

cans.

Cases reported.

| No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. f Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Case: reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

Ko. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Drunkenness.

Nuisances.

No Pass or Light.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

No. of Pers. ns convicted.

12

239 103 19 26

6

226

85 16 22

6

1

January,...

2

29

}

:

February,

4

1

10

21

:

March,

3

1

15

-

:

1

19

April,

11

18

}

May,

6 2 11 4 1 17

June,

I

17 I

2

176

July,.

3 3

3

20

,

August,

4

12

September,.

5 2 1

October,

11

...

November,.

4

15

December,..

2

6

13

9

66

136

6 43 349 11

2

5

LA

53

78

5 40 224 1 ?

1

21

14

LO

21 188

ون

3

1.2

87 231 22

10 2

79

130

5

!!

x9

16

G

4 91 115 18

23 207

1 3

37 25

13

15 88 12! 19

23 192

(8

1 1 21 11

105 147 15

27.229

1

170

80 19 16 10 4 114

201 32

23 196

5

LA

1

J

Co

4 29 22 10

3 1831

457

496

27

18

3

1

No. of Persons discharged.

TOTAL

OF

ALL

CASES.

1,103

83

1,124

$5

1,125

**

19

24

1

6 76

33

33333

19 195

:

:

28)

314 25

6

4

1

722

53

735

54

762

409

477 21

7 4

=

4

2 921

59

932

6:

1, 13

شات

3

30

24

10 1167

445

! GGF

37 10

2

www

1

938: 8.. 952 85

1408

co

31

9 {121

-96

551 32

14

317

5 993 167 1024 115

1,014

9

84

87

2

12180

454

49.5 €2

19

1 4

990

41566

71

1,013 72

1,044

3 29

30

7.

א

14:

5.7

5×2

F

18 3

5

12

1,085

86 1,:08 82

1.069

9

74

446 481

63

18

5

LA

G

3 187

85

914

93

911

5

3

3

1

7.

170

8

23

18

18

10 | 107

168

12

1. 125

2 3 3 2

19 12 11 20

25

+

28

2

2

181 69 24/15

7

5110

181

9

18 104

:

:

4

3 14

13

3

co

21

3

116 63 20 21

61.12

96

:45

11

15 105

10

co

ī

4

3 23

25

10

16

143 79 21 26

4

78

121 16 27 306

4 Z

16

14 3

21 31

Co

9

21

197

93

25 16

4

2 95 161 12 31273

1

2

12

10

4 29 28

4

A

TOTAL,. 32 17 13 117

32 2 240

12 3

40 European Prisoners absconded from bail.

1 Indian

124

Chinese

"

}}

་།

2,235 1,016 251247 112

651,119 1,708 163815 2,498 37 13

الت

9

:

:

:

10 58

14 125

7 79

11

:

:

:

358 431

11

4:8 500

21

12

2 17

1

778

57 816 GO

812

15 2 6 3 832 83 $53 84

9:3

458:

500 23

1-1

5 10

3 1,053

74

1,077

82

8:4

456 15

16!

9

3·1,010

65

1,305

8J

4-15

883

66

96 62

46 $21 331 55

118 1.505

5,177 5,785 315

179 28

92

23 11,312

908 $11,583

696

11,540

- 83

1907.

January,...

February,..I

1;

58

58

3

3

March,..... 4

103 105

April,...... 3

2 1 115 119

1

5

May,

2 2

150 | 152

4

C

9

Co

114 116

T

Cr

:

..

18

20 4 12 13

.. 47 68

I

3 3..194 191 15.

4 3 31

| 86

3

00

N

4

:

N

10

e

w

N

LA

**

3.

20 39

6

1 281 314 25

N

10

2

457

457

496

27

| Cases reported.

|

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported,

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.*

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

| No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

Nc. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

| Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted. No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Breach of Spirits

and Opium Ordinances.

Men-

Table II.

RETURN of MISCELLANEOUS OFFENCES reported to have been committed during the Year 1907, with the Results of such Reports.

Unlicensed Street Cries.

dicants. Hawking.

Desertion.

Refusal and Neglect of

Duty.

Rogues and

Vagabonds,

Suspicious

Characters, Vagrants and.

Breach of

Public Vehicles &

Trams

Ordinances.

Triad Society.

Breach

of

Breach of Merchant

Shipping Consolidation Emigr.

Ordinance.

Ord.

Breach of

Police, Gaol, Deportation

and

Prevention

of Crime

Ordinances.

Breach of Pawnbrokers, Markets and

Weights and

Measures

Ordinances.

Cutting

Trees

Intimidation, Extortion,

Bribery and

Conspiracy.

Earth.

or

Trespass.

Breach of Registration Ordinance.

Spurious Coin.

Obtaining Goods

or Money by balse Pretences.

Damage to

Property.

commit

Atte: pt to

Su.ci..e.

Animals & Furi-¡

ous Driving.

Cruelty to

Contempt of Court & False Charge.

Breach of

Dangerous

Goods and

Arms Ords.

Totals.

June, ......3] 2 1|| 103 | 103.

叠 2

1

2

4

July, ......3

4: 122 119

4

2

August, ......

70

81

..

September, 2| 2.

57

1

1

+

October,....3

.G

81 85 ..

6

November, 1

1.

124 135 2 19 19

December,..5

6.. 100 | 102

སྦྱ །

2 5

5

TOTAL,..27 29 21,197 1,232 20 | 69

05

..

16

..

وت

:

N

:

15 19

1 28 21 3

..

16 20 2 19 19 1

33

19 21 12 13 13

30 43

2 1 1 95

G

30

"

15 14 2

47: 106

1 4 5.147 148

9

40

78

56.178 187

وان

-

198213

7

1

2

N

T

6

II

2

671

12

11 I

G

8. 1

08

..

35

15 16: 1

.39

61

1

...... 182 188 6 I 1..

11

6

2

18

18

..

25 27

21

..

23

1

56 : 1 10

6

1 2.. 220 236 |

1

6

9

16

Сл

2

..

22

23

21 30

21

22:

34 .

I

12

36

20 21

w

27

49

3

21 1220 225 |

8

11

17

17

..

ون

151 17

1 43

06

1

· · · · . . 164 183

2

1 .. 5 5

10

14

:

18 18. 1 40

63

6

215 224

19 17

..

22 22

..

2

..

15 15

3

14

20

18 2 16

20

29

23

..

59

* 1 Case of Conspiracy, 3 Prisoners undecided not entered.

ลง

N

1

3

2

10

N

2 1 1

| 168 | 172 |

8

10

1

19

20

:

N

148| 152

.. 9

CO

10

17 17

..

*4

4 3 1

N

1

N

10

:

10

N

C

N

OC

4

10

:

:

12 15.14 8 1

16

3: 1.

27 3 2 1 2 3]..

8 10

-

18 19

1 12 23

7

9

9

#

----

N

Co

21

236273 30 |204|213

15411 816 33 1618] 32,129 2,217 65 ₤10 9 7 97

92

6145 143 9 25 226 22 16

08

8103 163 18 76 38 33 32 32 4 36 64196 274 36 16 21

4..

N

[1513]

..

11 19

†3; 3

18 35

1

6 20.. 4 2 3 5 5.

1

17:28

† 1 Case of False Pretence, 1 Prisoner undecided not entered.

1

7

1

2;

-

من

K

2 2.

5

..

A

-

N

2

08

9

12

••

2

358

..

~

4

60

409

477

17

445 499 37

496

551

32

454

495 32

527 582 21

1440

484

12

12 2 458

21

6

8

1

1 458

28

388

888

81 11 5,177 | 5,785 315

15

1!

6Z

31

YEAR.

Table III.

RETURN of SERIOUS OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1907, showing the Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged.

Murder.

Robbery.

Burglary

and

Larceny in

Dwelling House.

Felonies

Assault with

Intent to Rob.

Kidnapping and Protection of Women and

Piracy.

Unlawful Possession,

Larceny.

All Serious Offences.

not already given.

Girls.

N

2

15170

29

N

2

:

15

436

2,124| 1,042

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No, arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

¡ No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

| Total

No.

arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

| Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged. Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No, arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

Cases reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No. arrested.

1898,

15 15

1899,

6

3

00

30

$5

48 23

71 247

42

62

1900,

4

2

59

1901,

6

2

8

88

45

58316 67 21

78

82

51

66 301 43 6 19

1902,

66 59 26 651401 65

20

SE

ལ་

00

Total,... 19

18

6

24307 198 77:275

,435 236

74310

19

10!

37

63

3 66

32 18 50 1

21 37 58

:

Q

2

10

33

233

22 10

18 28 2

17 29

46

L167 143 105 2481

co

49

503

132 1,174 147

47

13

60 2,935 1,654

204 1,858

389

384

59 443

2,432 1,023 | 220 1,243 194

434 448 80

528

2,477 1,112

277| 1,419|193

4

388 412

8

487

2,421 1,130

315 1,445182

491 483 $7

570 2,742 1,247

330 | 1,577 | 256 73

인원의 인

G

60 8,392 1,589

349 1,938

58

25

83 3,532 1,779

453 2,232

56 25

818,401 1,710

458 2,168

51 124 6,998 1,931 545 2,476

7 2,138 2,181 350|2,531 |12,196 | 5,584 1,274 6,858 972 288120 408 17,261 8,663 |2,009 | 19,672

85

1903,

1904,

4

99 52 42

16 17

941481 58 19

72

1905,

G

8

10 48 30

1905,

I

45 13 18

1907,

14 16 8 21

32

13

33 374 ++ 10 51 361330: 27 10 37 811299 20 2 22

301357 44

49

A

19

90

73

90

68

00

99

X R 3 K

31 40

71

526

543 73

33106

127 422 87

37 105

284

303 67

32 109

550

568

79

109

67

52 119

321

331 55

2 6 5 2 3

360

2,036

953

647

2,126 954

616 3,281 1,565 297 | 1,862412 | 152 509 2,338 1,075 239 1,314239 | 111 246 1,199 | 183

240 1.194 | 201

55 2074,862 2,401

527 2,928

84

78

386 2,235 1016 254 1,270 233

96

36 | 147 8,552 1,746 424 2,170 37 121 2,984 1,473 || 401|| 1,874 43 1213,333 1,717 418 2,135 52148 3,306 1,592 444 2,036

Total,... 40 29 18

47278 128

96 2241,811

188

46 234 27 17 5 22 437 | 316|194. 510 2

2,108|| 2,167|351 | 2,518 12,016|| 5,563 1,276 | 6,839 1,268 521 223 744 18,017 8,929 2,214 11,143

Average off 1st period. Average of 2nd period,

1.0 4.4 87.4 63.2 38.8 102.0 (0.4

3.8 3.6 1.2 4.8 1.4 39.6 15.4 55.0 287.0 47.2 14.8 62.0 3.8 2.0 0.2 2.233.4 28.6 21.0 49.6 1.6 1.0 0.4 1.4 427.6 436.2 70.0 506.2 2439.2 1116.8 254.8 1371.6194.457.6 24.0 81.6 3452.2 1732.6 401.8 2134.1 8.0 5.8 3.6 9,4 [55.6 25.6 19.2 14.8 368.2 37.6 9.2:46.85.4 421.6 433.4 70.2 | 503.6 [2403.2 1112.6 255,2 1367.8 253.6 101.2 44.6 148.8 3603.1 1785.8 112.8 2228.6

Total,

YEAR.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons

discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

Table IV..

RETURN of MINOR OFFENCES reported to the POLICE, during the 10 Years ending 1907, showing Number of Prisoners Arrested, Convicted and Discharged.

ASSAULT.

GAMBLING.

MISCELLANEOUS.

DRUN-

NUIS-

KENNESS.

ANCES.

No

LIGHT

OR PASS.

ALL MINOR OFFENCES.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

1898,

1,765 2,380 242 2,622

235 1,077

1899,

1,414 1,595 281 1,876

1900,

1,531 1,891 344

2,235

· 199

324

661

1901,

1902,

1,620 2,034 297 1,287 1,667 271

2,331 265 1,938 259

1,564 35

1,517

1,378

ပြီးပေး

55

1,132

4,531

5,412

307

5,719

161

70

731

1,599

42

3,170 3,434 320 3,754 3,265 3,625 375 4,000 1,559 3,267 3,844 390 4,234 1,395 3,653 4,562 571 5,133

133

939

715

182

1,039

150

466

167

1,057

Total,.

7,617 9,567 1,435

11,002 1,312

6,197

219

6,416

17,886

20,877 1,963 | 22,840

793

4,216

Cases reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No

arrested.

Cases reported.

Cases reported.

Cases reported.

Cases

reported.

No. of Persons

convicted.

No. of Persons discharged.

Total No.

arrested.

1903,

1904,

1905,

1,169 1,539 269 1,808 204 1,160 1,575 269 1,844 166 1,239 1,823 165

1,101

44

1,145

4,134

4,475 440 4,915

160

723

890

25

915

5,466

6,074 497 6.571

191

1,297

1,988 178

1,404

87

1,491

5,842

6,663 405 7,068

161

1,113

1906,

1907,

1,136 1,705 172 1,119 1,708 163

1,877 299 2,460 1,871 315

44

2,504

5,0×5

5,589 472 6,061 112

1,179

2,498 37

2,535

5,177

5,785 315 6,100 118

1,505

7,661 8,869 604 9,473 | 5,631 5,690 671 6,361 6,341 7,080 754 7,834 5,768 7,895 729 8,124 6,423 7,607 859 8,466

5,623|8,350 1,038

9,388 1,162 8,353 237

8,590

25,704

28,586 2,129 29,815 742

5,817

39,248 45,2893,404 | 48,693

Average of 1st period,... 1523.4 1913.4 287.0 Average of 2nd period,...1164.6 1670.0 207.6

2200.4 262.4

1877.6 232.4

1670.6

1239.4 43.8

47.4 1718.0

1283.2

3577.2

4175.4 392.6 4568.0

158.6

843.2

6364.8 7328.2723.4 8051.6

5140.8

5717.2 425.8 5963.0 148.4 1163.4

7849.6 9057,8|680.89738.6

31,824 36,641 | 3,617 40,258

6,390 7,115 753 7,868 8,280 | 8,539 791 9,330 8,533 | 9,890

7,811| 9,754

657|10,547 68810,442

8,234 9,991 515 10,506

98

1907.

Male.

Female.

Sex

unknown.

Table V.

Dumped Bodies, 1907.

KOWLOON.

HARBOUR.

VICTORIA.

UNDER 4 YEARS.

4 YEARS

AND OVER.

UNDER 4 YEARS.

4 YEARS

AND OVER.

UNDER 4 YEARS.

4 YEARS

AND OVER.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

Sex

unknown.

Male.

January,

23

27

10

February,

26

23

10

March,

36

30

18

April,

25

33

10

10

May,

27

27

1

16

June,

20

·

18

5

379067

13

10

11

COLLE

8

1-00 00

I

...

I

14

11

10

...

16

1

9

July,

22

16

...

16

1

10

14

1

August,

19

14

September,

13

7

1

3

October,

11

November,

12

December,

13

272

1

10

3

64089

5

:

10

13

4

2

a a

9

I

11

9

1

5

:~

2

Total,...

247

226

10

121

50

101

118

7

92

02 30

28

24

Males

758

Females

503

Unknown

12

1,273

Female.

2

:..

*d[9]

3

***

Female.

::::

:::

Sex unknown.

3268 +

12

70

222

32

1

Male.

11

13

*a[gumoj

*3[*]

ELSEWHERE.

4 YEARS

UNDER 4 YEARS.

AND OVER.

TOTAL.

*p[Budg

Sex

unknown.

Male.

Female.

2

1

2

4

1

1

3

940506D7BEN2

N

0212

107

125

145

1

132

10

137

I

108

108

1

85

89

77

1

81

1

79

31

16

:

68

1,273

87

88

Table VI.

RETURN SHOWING THE ESTABLISHMENT, ENLISTMENTS AND CASUALTIES IN THE POLICE FORCE, 1907.

Nationality.

Establish- ment of the Force.

Enlist-

ments.

Death.

Resigna- tion through sickness.

Resignation through Ex- piry of terms

Dismissal

or

Total Number of

of service or Desertions. Casualties.

otherwise.

Europeans,

135

18

I

20

00

8

17

Indians,

410

59

เร

5

5

16

31

57

.

Chinese,

503

103

4

4

29

68

105

Total,

*1,048

180

9

10

333

53

107

179

*This number includes the Police paid for by other Departments and Private Firms and also the Engineers, Coxswains, and Stokers, but is exclusive of :-

1 Captain Superintendent.

1 Deputy Superintendent.

2 Assistant Superintendents (one of them District Officer, N. T.).

1 Probationer.

1 Accountant.

1 Clerk and Hindustani Interpreter.

3 Clerks.

6 Telephone Clerks.

81 Coolies.

Strength on 31st December, 1907 :-

128 Europeans (7 short of Establishment).

410 Indians.

503 Chinese.

Total, 1,041

Table VII.

TABLE SHOWING STRENGTH OF THE POLICE FORCE AND THE TOTAL EXPENDITURE

Year.

Europeans.

ON IT FOR FIVE YEARS.

STRENGTH OF THE FORCE.

Indians.

Chinese.

421

Total Strength.

Total Expenditure.

921

mm

485

503

1903

133

367

$512,860.20

1904

133

375

993

506,008.34

1905

133

382

1,018*

521,057.72

1906

133

410

504

1,047

515,874.08

1907

135

410

503

1,048

520,169.75

89

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF FIRE BRIGADE

FOR THE YEAR 1907.

  There were 39 Fires and 76 Incipient Fires during the year as against 30 and 67 in 1906. Details with regard to these Fires are given in Tables I and II.

  The estimated damage caused by Fires was $214,710.65 and by Incipient Fires $1,541.90.

The Brigade turned out 56 times during the year.

2. There was constant supply of water in the Fire Mains throughout the

year.

3. One Fire occurred in the harbour during the year.

  4. I attach a list of places where Fire Despatch Boxes and Fire Alarms are stationed and of private telephones to which the l'olice have access in the event of a Fire (Appendix A). I also enclose a copy of a report by the Engineer on the state of Fire Engines (Appendix B).

5. The conduct of the Brigade has been good.

F. W. LYONS,

13th February, 1908.

Superintendent of Fire Brigade.

Appendix A.

List of Places where Fire Brigade Despatch Boxes are kept.

1 Box. Kennedy's Stable Leighton Hill Road. 1 Box. 2 Boxes. Engine House at No. 2 Police

Station.

1 Box. Naval Dockyard, Queen's Road.

1

""

1

1

1

""

1

9.3

1

1

1

99

1

1

""

1

19

1

99

1

Clock Tower.

Government Offices.

Government House.

No. 10, Queen's Garden, Registrar

General's House.

Central Police Station.

Gough Hill Police Station.

tion.

Bonham Strand West, at West

End.

1

;)

Engine House No. 7 Police Sta-

1

1

Gas House, West Point.

""

1

""

1

Wellington Street at Lyndhurst 1

Terrace.

Government Civil Hospital.

Staunton Street, at Sing Wong

Street.

Central.

Water Lane, at

Lane, at Queen's

""

""

1

29

3 Boxes.

1 Box.

1

""

Road 1

""

1

""

""

1

1

1.

""

1

""

1

""

Robinson Road corner of Seymour 1

Terrace.

No. 6 Police Station, Peak.

No. 11, Mountain View, Peak.

Botanical Department, Garden Road.

2 Boxes. Tsim Tsa Tsui Police Station.

Fat Hing Street, at Queen's Road

West.

Ko Shing Theatre.

Government Lunatic Asylum.

Nam Pak Hong Insurance Office. Man Mo Temple.

No. 5 Police Station.

Kennedy Town Hospital. Collinson Street West.

No. 552, Connaught Road West. Pumping Station, Yau-ma-ti. Yau-ma-ti Police Station.

Hung Hom

,་

Mong Kok Tsui Market.

Government Observatory, Kowloon.

Sham Shui Po Police Station.

Tai Kok Tsui Market.

..

90

List of Telephones to which the Police can have access to communicate with

Central Station in the event of a Fire breaking out.

Hongkong and China Gas Company, East and Hongkong Hotel, Des Voeux Road Central.

   West Points, from 7 A.M. to 9 P.M. Tung Wah Hospital, Po Yan Street. Man On Insurance Office, Queen's Road West.

Clock Tower.

Royal Naval Yard, Queen's Road East. Mr. J. KENNEDY'S, Causeway Bay.

Electric Light Company, Queen's Road East.

FIRE ALARMS.

Old Harbour Master's Office at Wing Lok Street. Hollywood Road at Queen's Road West.

Wilmer Street at Des Voeux Road West. *Blake Pier at Pedder Street.

* Lyndhurst Terrace at Wellington Street End. * Central Market at Des Voeux Road. * Staunton Street at Sing Wong Street. * Canton Wharf at Hillier Street. * Man Mo Temple at Ladder Street.

* Jervois Street at Hillier Street.

Tung Wah Hospital at Po Yan Street. * Bonham Strand West, at West End.

Appendix B.

HONGKONG, 10th February, 1908.

SIR, I have the honour to forward the Annual Report on the condition of the Government Fire Engines for the year ending 31st December, 1907.

1.

STEAMER No. 1.

Floating Fire Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

The New Hull was completed on the 10th September and after a satisfactory trial of both pumping and propelling Machinery the vessels was placed on her station for duty and has been regularly used at Drill for Drivers and Fires.

The Hull, Boiler and Machinery are all in good working order.

STEAMER No. 2.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

The Boiler of this Engine is 10 years old. It has been regularly used and tested at monthly drill for Drivers and Fires, and is now in good working order.

STEAMER NO. 3.

Land Engine by Shand, Mason & Co.

This Engine was thoroughly overhauled in November and a new outer shell fitted to Boiler, after completion of repairs it was tested under steam and found to be in good working order.

* In course of Construction.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

Table I.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

Wholly. Partly.

January

2

1.30 a.m.

Wooden Huts at Ho Man Tin,.

wooden

huts 5

2

"}

2

19

2.10

House No. 45, Kowloon City Road,....

1

1

99

Co

""

3❘ 1.30

""

4

""

2.15 p.m.

A small matshed at Au Pui Leung, Railway Depôt, Tai Kok Tsui,.

1

เร

18

4.20

House No. 38, Ship Street,.

"7

6

21

2.00 a.m.

House No. 72, Jervois Street,.

February

1

8.40 p.m.

Matsheds at Ho Man Tin,

matshed

2

2

5.00 a.m.

House No. 3, Tung Loi Lane,

1

2-

""

9

"9

10

>>

11

9.40

On board S.S. Monmouthshire on the high seas.

"}

10

8.20

""

House No. 21, Hing Lung Street,

11

8.45

Ilouse No. 2, Bullock Lane,

པར་

12

ᎠᎪᎷᎪᏀᎬ .

CAUSE.

REMARKS

$

500.00

Unknown,

13,000.00

Sparks from the kitchen

stove,

5.00

Unknown,

50,000.00

Sparks from the Engine Room,

1

3,000,00

Unknown,

1

1,500.00

4,000.00

""

3,000.00

Spontaneous Combustion,

1

1,200.00

Unknown,

1

200.00

17

4.00 p,m. ¡

Matsheds used as a Hospital on the Rail- matsheds

way Works, Sha Tin,

2

1,000.00

Carried forward,

77,405.00

Sparks from the 1st floor cook-house falling down and igniting rattan on the ground floor,

Sparks from cook-house falling on the roof of a matshed,

Nine persons were burnt to death.

- 92 -

- 93 -

с

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,-Continued.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

Brought forward,

$ 77,405.00

13

February 28

1.25 p.m.

A matshed at the Race Course,

matshed

Unknown,

1

14

28

10.20 a.m.

House No. 63, Connaught Road Central,

1

22,000.00

""

15

March

1

3.18 ""

House No. 20, New Market Street,

2

20,000.00

"}

16

5

7.25

>>

House No. 226, Des Voeux Road Central,

240.00

Lighted joss sticks,

17

14

3.50

""

""

House No. 4, Sai On Lane,

1

5,000.00

Unknown,

18

28

12.15 p.m.

House No. 6, Lee Yuen Street East,

I

5,000.00

19

April

10

3.5 a.in.

House No. 70, Queen's Road Central,

1

4,500.00

Upsetting of

an

Oil

Lamp by a dog or cat,...

21

202 203

13

77

11.30 p.m.

A grass stack at Hang Hau, Sai Kung,

22

23

23

June

July

16

1.10 a.m.

House No. 74, Reclamation Street,

23

8.30 p.m.

House No. 3, Mason's Lane,...

August

9

1.00 a.m.

House No. 21, Praya East,

225

24

14

""

9.30 p.m.

House No. 164, Des Voeux Road Central,

90.00

Unknown,

1

11,600.00

""

I

15,000.00

700.00

I

5,700.00

25

13

7.45

A small storehouse at Tai Po belonging to Mr. Last of Land Office,

1

- 26

19

10.00 a.m.

Matsheds at New Naval Yard Extention,

matsheds

2

150.00

600.00

Match dropped on the Kerosine,

A drying frame became ig-

nited by red hot charcoal used for drying tobacco, Unknown,

A spark from a passing launch, or some person smoking carelessly,

Carried forward,

.$ 167,985.00

FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,-Continued.

NO. OF BUILDINGS DESTROYED.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

Wholly. Partly.

Brought forward,

$167,985.00

20 10 10 20

27

August

25

28

35

27

10.45 p.m.

1.30

A.S.P. matshed at Tai Po,

matshed

6,500.00

Unknown,

1

""

Matsheds at Wong Kok Tsni,

matsheds!

800.00

19

11

29

September 15

30

20

12.30 a.m.

2.15 p.m.

House No. 180, Wing Lok Street, Royal Dutch Petroleum Co.'s Works, North Point,

1

16,000.00

1,000.00

36

14

8.30 p.m.

Boiler and Blacksmith's Shop of the Cosmo- politan Dock of the Hongkong and Whampoa Dock Company,

House No. 77, Cheong Po village, Pat Neung Valley, An Tau, N.T.,

31 October

1.30 ""

32

17

5.50

On board Cargo-boat No. 1490 in Victoria Har- bour alongside S.S. Sultan van Langkat, Matshed at Queen's Statue Wharf,

matshed

6,221.25

114.40

"

>>

">

1

33

18

""

34

November

1

10.00 a.m.

1.00 a.m.

Blackhead's Point,.....

1,000.00

Spontaneous Combustion,

House No. 58, Reclamation Street,

1

1,960.00

Unknown,

35

11

2.00

"}

39

Explosion of a Kerosine Oil Lamp,

stud from cylinder cover of engine being blown out, throwing the kerosine oil on to the boiler,

Unknown,

.....

5,000.00

1

400.00

""

214,710.65

A lighted lamp being ac- cidently knocked over and setting fire to kero- sine oil in a tin, Unknown,

Lighted candle left burn- ing on a bag of sugar,... A 5 years old girl throw- ing lighted match on to a mosquito curtain,......

2 88 33

37

December

1

10.00 a.m.

Matsheds at Sai Wan Ho,

matsheds

6

700.00

38

4

1.00

""

""

House No. 298, Des Vœux Road Central,

6,000.00

39

21

7.00

""

A matshed at Telegraph Bay,

matsheds

6

......

1,030.00

Total,

94-

No.

DATE.

TIME.

Table II.

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

9

=234 10 01-20 a

1 January

""

>>

77

"

"

""

وو

O O CO 80 10 10 1079

3 p.m.

4

""

9.45 a.m.

9.40 p.m.

2

8

11

60, Mosque Street,......

";

3

""

8.15 a.m.

15

10

11

12.30

South of Wong Chuk Hang near Little Hongkong, Government Pavilion, Mount Kellet,

Hillside at Harlech Road,.

House No. 57, Wanchai Road,....

Hillside between Stanley and Wong Ma Kok,

House No. 87, Aplichau,

""

Hillside above the reservoir, Pokfulam,.

A small wooden house on the roof of house

No. 32, Hollywood Road,

House No. 70, Queen's Road West,.

...

""

11

11

2.45

""

116, Wellington Street,

>>

12

11

3.45

""

48, Gage Street,

Chimney on fire,....

13

12

4 p.m.

34, Bridges Street,

""

Grass on fire,

300.00

Overheating of a chimney,

Hired Coolies.

Grass on fire,

1.00

Unknown,

Grass on fire,

Unknown,.

Chimney on fire,

Grass on fire,

5.00

Trifling.

Sparks from cook-house chimney, Accident,

"}

""

"

"

.10

""

>>

77

""

"}

""

>>

""

Put ont by Police and Coolies.

"}

""

"

""

""

"

>>

""

>>

""

Firemen.

>>

Occupants.

Hired Coolies.

Inmates.

Police and Hired Coolies.

Occupants.

14

20

9.40

101, Queen's Road West,.

5.00

Accident,

""

י,

15

23

4.20

""

A

6, Kennedy Street, Yaumati,

""

16

February 3

7

11, Wing Kut Street,

17

13

1.34 a.m.

""

""

20, Lyndhurst Terrace,

18

13

3.15

>>

"2

227, Queen's Road Central,

Upsetting of a kerosine lamp,

Lighted joss paper setting fire to wooden

partition,

Fire Crackers setting fire to mattings,

>>

Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

19

13

""

7.30 p.m.

41, Nullah Lane,

60.00

Unknown,

>>

20

18

11.35

>>

""

>>

35, Connaught Road Central,

""

""

""

77

""

""

""

""

""

21

19

1.15 a.m.

7, Un Fuk Lane,

50.00

Overheating of an oven,

י,

17

>>

22

24

7.30

""

""

63, Wing Lok Street,

23

25

1.25 p.m.

Hillside above Wong Nei Chung Road,

Unknown,

Grass on fire,

""

Brigade.

Police and Occupants.

Firemen.

99

24

28

>>

3.35 a.m.

25

March

11.45

""

73

26

6.30

""

27

8

5

"

""

""

& le 6 !

28

13

12.30 p.m.

"

29

23

2.24

יי

30

24

12.45

House No. 26, Bonham Road,

near No. 3 Bridge, Pokfulam Road, House No. 68, Lower Lascar Row,

318, Queen's Road Central,...

2, Pokfulam Road, 67, Queen's Road Central,..

Hillside near Aberdeen Cemetery,

...

Grass on fire,

56.00

Overheating of cook-house flue,

""

""

Occupants.

Grass on fire,

>>

">

...

Sparks from cook-house firc,

""

Unknown,

Coolies.

Occupants.

>>

"}

10.00

Lighted cigarette setting fire to some papers, Chimney on fire,...

Brigade.

Police.

""

Carried forward,..

481.40

- 95 -

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,-Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

ᎠᎪᎷᎪᏀᎬ .

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

C.

Brought forward...........$

481.40

31

April

4

p.in.

Hillside at Mount Davis,

32

3

7.14

House No. 7, Lan Kwai Fong,

"}

33

4

12 noon.

Hillside at Mount Davis,

34

35

15

12.40 p.m.

House No. 224, Hollywood Road,

19

8

""

""

Dairy Farm Office, Glenealy,

Unknown,..

...

Chimney on fire,.

36

22

4.20

House No. 54, Stanley Street,

...

""

37

May

6

9.44

"

""

44, Wing Lok Street,

38

14 5.30

19, Pokfulam Road,

""

""

"}

39

"?

40

22

19 9.20

6, Mountain View,

50.00

350.00

Attempted Arson,

Chimney on fire,................

Children playing with joss sticks, Exploding of a kerosine lamp,

""

"}

22 4.30 a.m.

On board Steam-launch Hoi How in Victoria

"}

Harbour,

Overheating of boiler,

41

June

11

3.15

"}

House No. 31, Queen's Road East,

5.00

Accident,.

42

14

2.30

Room No. 41, Central Barracks,

5.00

""

""

""

43

15

"

1.30 p.m.

House No. 161, Reclamation Street, Yaumati,.

Chimney on fire,.......

44

22

8

284, Des Vœux Road West,

7.00

"}

"}

""

45

28

8.30

123, Queen's Road West,

"9

""

46

July

2

1 a.m.

48, Bonham Strand East,.

Trifling.

Overheating of a drying pan, Upsetting of a kerosine lamp, Unknown,

Grass on fire,

Bursting of a kerosine lamp,. Grass on fire,

Put out by Police and Coolies.

Brigade.

Police and Hired Coolies. Occupants and Police. Police and Employees.

Police.

Occupants.

the Crew.

Occupants.

Police and Occupants. Police.

Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

>>

"3

"}

";

"}

"

Brigade.

"}

""

""

""

""

19

"

99

"}

""

"?

47

4

12.45

A small store at the back of Ordnance

"

""

48

16

2.45

>>

"}

Department,......

House No. 174, Des Voeux Road Central,

...

30.00

Upsetting of a lamp,

""

""

49

29

12.15 a.m.

A house in Wing Sing Street,

Chimney on fire,...

"}

50

31

12.50

}}

>>

51

August 28

3.30 p.m.

"

52

28

6.10

"

>>

""

53

28

7.15

>>

54

28

11

House No. 31, Elgin Street, 104, The Peak,...

87, First Street,

Hotel Mansions, 2nd floor,

House No. 92, Queen's Road East,

.50

Accident,....

50.00

Sparks from a stove,

Brigade.

Police and Occupants.

"}

Occupants.

""

Watchmen and Servants.

Chimney on fire,

Police and Inmates.

>>

40.00

Overheating of a kerosine stove,

Police.

""

Accident,

Police and Inmates.

"

"

"

55

56

57

1998 583

September 6

3.30 a.m.

344,

"?

""

6

""

11 p.m.

Central, On board a motor yacht belonging to Mr. Musso on the Southern Fairway off West Point,..

30.00

Falling of a charcoal from drying stove,

""

Firemen and Occupants.

150.00

Careless use of matches,

8

>>

12.03 a.m.

House No. 20, Queen's Road Central,

100.00

14

1

140,

East,

20.00

"}

""

59

29

1.54

p.m.

A temporary bamboo mat roof over the roof

of House No. 15, Queen's Road Central,..

50.00

Overheating of a drying stove,..

Flames from the chimney igniting the beams,

A spark from some adjoining buildings,

""

""

Police and Firemen.

Firemen.

Occupants.

""

>>

and Brigade.-

Carried forward,...

1,378.90

- 96-

INCIPIENT FIRES DURING THE YEAR 1907,~Continued.

No.

DATE.

TIME.

SITUATION OF FIRE.

DAMAGE.

CAUSE.

REMARKS.

- 97

$

C.

Brought forward,.

.$ 1,378.90

60

61

62

63

64

85883

October

25

"

=333

8.45 a.m.

Roof of Blake Pier,

Trifling.

A spark from the Fire Float,

November I

10.53 p.m.

4.15

House No. 270, Queen's Road Central,

""

Chimney on fire,..........

"

House No. 19, High Street,

Accident,.......

""

9

8.30

"

39

""

27, Hollywood Road,

Chimney on fire,

""

9

2.30

>>

";

79, Aberdeen,

Slight.

65

11

9.30

"

""

>>

354, Queen's Road West,

·

Some charcoal got ignited from the heat of a furnace,.........

Chimney on fire,..

}}

>>

دو

66

23

12.05

"}

"

""

11, Wellington Street,

>>

"}

67

December 3

12 midnight

""

124, Stanley,

10.00

68

5

8.30 a.m.

""

""

5, Temple Street,

A heap of straw accidentally set on fire,. Careless use of matches,

Put out by Firemen from the Fire Float.

Occupants.

Police and Inmates.

Occupants.

Police, Boatmen and Occupants.

and Occupants.

Occupants.

Police.

"}

""

""

and Occupants.

69

14

11

""

"}

""

70

19

12.15

223, Station Street, Mong Kok, 352, Queen's Road Central,

50.00

""

""

Brigade.

43.00

""

>>

71

20

"

6 p.m.

""

A

26, Graham Street,

30.00

Overheating of some basket of tea,

Bed curtain caught fire,....

""

>>

">

""

72

21

5.15 a.m.

}}

""

2, Bullock Lane,....

40.00

73

21

7.30

>>

""

22, Hollywood Road,

""

Trifling.

Sparks from chimney igniting some chairs,.....| Carelessness with joss paper,

>>

"}

"

Mr. Lane, Chinese Firemen

74

24

77

3.30 p.m.

75

24

7.15

""

""

76

29

1.15 a.m.

""

""

135, Queen's Road Central,. 32, Stanley Street,

46, Aplichau, .................................

Chimney on fire,...

";

Upsetting of a lamp,

.....

Trifling.

Overheating of stove flue,

""

and Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

Occupants.

Police and Occupants.

TOTAL,...

$ 1,541.90

103

Table VI exhibits the number of days on which certain meteorological phenomena were registered, and also the number of thunderstorms noted in the neigh- bourhood during the past year.

Table VII shows the frequency of clouds of different classes.

Table VIII is arranged as last year.

Table IX exhibits the monthly and annual extremes.

Table X contains five-days means.

  21. The rainfall in inches recorded by the gauge placed in the Police Compound at Taipo, New Territories, was as follows:-Jan. 3.70, Feb. 0.07, Mar. 0.21, Apr. 12.29, May 10.15, June 9.97, July 7.20, Aug. 18.79, Sep. 30.26, Oct. 10.58, Nov. 1.38, Dec. 1.56, the total for the year 1907 being 106.16 inches, or about 13 per cent. above the amount re- corded at this Observatory.

  22. The observations of magnetic declination and horizontal force published in Tables XI and XII were made with magnet No. 55 on Kew pattern unifilar magnetometer Elliot Brothers, No. 55. The dips were observed with dip circle Dover, No. 71. The height above mean sea level at which the magnets are suspended is 116 feet, and the position in which they are placed is 156 yards almost due Westward of the transit instrument. This is equivalent to a difference of longitude of 0. 33. The methods adopted in making the ob- servations and in determining and applying the corrections are explained in Appendix G of Observations and Researches made in 1885 "On the verification of unifilar magnetometer Elliot Brothers No. 55." The value of 72K used was 3.44914 at 25° Cent. The value of P was 7.037. The mean value of the magnetic moment of the vibrating needle was 570.65. From comparisons made between magnetometers No. 55 and No. 83 in the year 1898 it was shown that the correction to the horizontal force obtained by the former as given in Tables XII and XIII was +0.00052 (see "Observations and Researches made in 1898" page 19).

The times of vibration exhibited in Table XII are each derived from 12 observa- tions of the time occupied by the magnet in making 100 vibrations, corrections having been applied for rate of chronometer and arc of vibration.

  The observations of horizontal force given in Table XIII are expressed in C.G.S. units. The vertical and total forces have been computed by aid of the observed dips.

  23. The Director, Dr. W. DOBERCK, went on leave at the end of May and retired on pension in September after 24 years service. I was appointed to fill the vacancy so caused, and consequent on these changes Mr. C. W. JEFFRIES, formerly at the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, was appointed First Assistant and arrived in the Colony in October last.

:

Hongkong Observatory,

7th March, 1908.

F. G. FIGG,

Director.

104

Table I.

Meteorological Observations entered in 10° Squares, from 1893-1907 inclusive.

Square Number.

Jan.

Feb.

March April May

June July Ang. Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

19

6

B

7

15

10

15

20

71

50

35

62

55

32

17

29943

10

1

1

1

46

15

49

30

31

21

66

43

64

55

66

21

32

47

18

36

47

54

22

27

29

22

43

60

30

66

37

12

31

30

9

23

326

424

178

156

128

103

219

194

130

239

178

335

24

800

572

730

649

543

584

904

851

657

753

891

827

25

674

446

435

376

411

361

462

535

424

753

789

713

26

3480

3073

3665

3794

3910

4001

4188

4434

4200

4236

3745

3525

*27

7

5

15

8

9

12

5

4

4

55

22

37

26

20

27

45

40

33

20

10

23

25

56

23

59

30

15

34

40

62

55

16

33

39

22

57

62

89

49

76

69

38

83

57

12

58

42

48

58

96

94

119

92

115

80

90

111

42

36

124

98

59

149

168

171

83

100

112

153

128

34

115

185

156

60

420

487

454

361

425

400

605

492

353

339

386

415

61

4162

3581

4181

3929

4452

4577

4810

4849

4747

4867

4518

4266

62

2020

1964

2219

2163

2357

2409

2242

2277

2323

2212

2129

2066

63

50

56

64

77

77

96

82

83

88

95

77

65

91

121

205

116

214

33

46

54

53

59

128

256

151

92

107

217

118

192

39

19

45

27

38

93

228

163

93

77

179

92

109

10

28

10

42

37

81

148

146

94

76

71

87

112

77

98

90

67

46

36

200

90

95

104

138

108

121

128

72

127

126

74

129

104.

155

96

2333

2108 2246

2109

2459

2412

2533

2390

2195

2421

2233

2158

97

1009

988

1169

1035

1053

1133

1131

1119

1137

1179

1204

1131

98

321

292

| 311

327

391

386

417

419

401

404

401

T

379

127

295

154

247

189

258

287

298

296

302

279

203

172

128

334

196

282

247

300

330

347

381

355 353

233

233

129

370

256

375

358

327

388

354

446

388

381

343

326

130

1074

833 1125

1013 1140

1154

1173

1195

1004

1068

1108

1082

131

674

6.49

664

690

708

762

843

974

668

723

676

588

132

2019

1839

2374

2755

3012

3073

3382

3103 2840

2943

2750

2150

133

6

4

130

143

176

186

191

155

146

185

169

38

163

451

308

369

450

457

425

485

529

421

461

437

381

164

649

459

598

683

672

738

762

790

692

704

617

560

165

714

483

620

684

796

807

806

826

775

728

692

631

166

207

183

215

207

274

299

316

285

306

255

249

227

167

27

21

28

82

92

133

190

170

113

76

62

24

168

I

7

15

12

12

12

8

7

18

16

169

...

170

199

102

200

38

104

120

13

6

14

155 7

153

177

157

151

169

149

136

95

11

9

11

2

31

10

33

2

201

:

:

:

1

3

202

4

...

203

2

22

1

1

318

3

21

319

66

57

98

200

15

I

21

3

7

27

.8

41

34

13

5

34

11

34

320

52

59

86

64

74

137

116

83

78

94

123

70

321

.96

118

100

102

80

134

145

123

127

129

171

133

322

158

79

123

151

164

201

160

192

208

185

192

194

323

684

387

567

407

398

432

475

428

441

424

554

557

324

631

485

396

230

192

201

340

367 477

640

713

711

325

564

467

552

677

577

715

893

949

992

785

656

553

326

1

...

25792 22558 25790 25528 26911

| 27797

30030

29959

27648 | 28964 | 28170 | 23807

105

Table II.

means too late.

Errors of Time Ball in 1907.

+ means too early.

Date.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar. April.

May. June. July.

Aug. Sept.

Oct. Χον.

Dec.

8.

S.

1

- 0.4

+ 0.2

0.4

433

S.

S.

S.

ያ.

S.

S

S.

S.

S.

0.1

-

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

...

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

· 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

- 0.3

0.1

0.2

+ 0.3

0.1

0.1

- 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.5

0.1

0.3

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.5

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.3

0.1

6

0.1

· 0.3

0.1

...

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.3

0.1

0.4

0.1

7

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.4

0.2

0.1

8

0.1

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.2

0.1

0.1

9

+ 0.3

0.1

0.1

+ 0.4

0.1

+ 0.2

02

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.2

10

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.2

0.2

0.1

11

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

12

+ 0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

+ 0.3

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

13

+ 0.2

I

- 0.2

...

+ 0.2

+ 0.4

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

0.1

+ 0.4

14

+ 0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

+ 0.5

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

15

+ 0.2

+ 0.3

0.2

+ 0.2

+ 0.3

+ 0.6

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

16

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

17

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

0.1

...

0.1

02

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

18

0.1

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

+ 0.5

0.1

-

0.3

0.1

+ 0.3

..

0.1

19

0.1

+ 0.2

+ 0.2

0.1

+ 0.6

+ 0.2

0.2

20

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

21

+ 0.2

+02

+ 0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

+ 0.2

22

+ 0.3

+ 0.5

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

0.1

23

+ 0.3

+ 0.2

+ 0.4

0.1

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

- 0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

24

+ 0.6

+ 0.2

+ 0.3

0.1

0.1

0.4

+ 0.3

0.1

25

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

+ 0.3

0.1

0.1

+

0.2

- 0.5

+ 0.4

0.1

26

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.3

0.1

0.1

...

0.2

0.1

0.1

27

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.1

-

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

28

0.2

0.2

0.1

0.1

+ 0.2

0.1

0.1

29

0.1

0.2

+ 0.2

0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

...

0.1

0.1

0.1

30

0.3

+ 0.8

0.2

0.1

+ 0.2

- 0.2

0.1

31

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

0.1

0.2

0.1

0.1

WITHDRAWI

Table III.

Mean Values and Hourly Excess above the mean of Meteorological Elements in 1907.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6a.

7 a.

sa.

9a.

10a. 11 a.

Noon,

1 p.

2 p.

3p.

4 P.

5. p.

6 p.

7 p.

Sp.

9 p.

10 p.

11 p.

Midt.

Mean or

Total.

.003 +.015 +.022 +.021 +.013 0.4

Pressure,

Temperature,.

Diurnal Range,

Humidity,

Vapour Tension,

+++

+.003

1.4

5 +

-.008 -.016

1.6

1.8

-.019-014

2.0

2.2

.001

2.2

+.014 +.030 +.042 +.044 +.035 0.6 0.6 + 15 + 2.1

1.5

+.016 -.007 -.026 + 2.7 + 2.7 + 2.7

-.039

+ 2.3

-.043

-.038

-.029

+ 1.7 +

1.0

+ 0.2

.015

0.2

29.836

0.6

0.7

1.1

1.2

72.2

8.2

...

...

...

5

+

6 +

+.012 .010 +.008 +.003 +.001

5 + 6

+

5

+

0

3

-.002

-.007

.006

6 -.008 -.015 ..011

7

--

S

7

.011

-.008

-.010

Sunshine (Total).

18.1

102.4

159.7

186.9

190.1

192.1

194.7

191.7

193.3

Rainfall (Total).

2.515

3.415

Hours of Rain (Total),

37

36

3.185

42

4.340

56

6.285

6.810

5.050

6.425

5.405

3.865

3.265

1515

3.465

2.125

52

53

46

49

38

34

29

Intensity of Rain.

0.068

0.095

0.076

0.077

0.120

0.128

0.110

0.131

0.142

0.114

0.113

23

0.666

34

30

Wind-Velocity,

Wind- Direction,

0.8

10

-

1.1

1.0

0.5

1.1

1.4

0.8

0.0

+ 1.0

+ 1.4 + 2.0 + 2.0

-

30

10

70

0

49

29

0° + 3° +

+ .005 +.001 +.005

.CC8

.009

108.0 19.1 183.7 163.1

1.910 4.210 2.715

31 30

25

0.004 0.109 0.136 0.071 0.102 + 2.2 + 2.2 + 1.9 + 1.3 + 0.7 + $° +11° + $° + $o + 30

5

0

1

+ 2

+.007

+ 2 + 3 + +.009 +.012 +.018 +.015

5 +

77

0.645

1902.9

4.170

25

4.215

28

0.167

0.151

4.155

36

0.115

3.775

35

3.580

39

4.045

3.155

93.545

36

30

874

0.108

0.092

0.112

0.105

0.107

0.5

0.8

1.4

1.5

1.4

1.3

1.2

12.6

019

5o

60

50

3o E

4° S

Cloudiness,

Excess of do.

6

+

6

+

+

69

Solar Radiation,

120.3

43.7

Table IV.

Number of Hours during a portion of which it rained for each Mouth of the year 1907.

- 106

Month.

1 a.

2 a.

3 a.

4 a.

5 a.

6 a.

7 a.

8 a.

9 a.

10 a.

11 a.

Noon.

1

P.

2 p.

3 p.

4 p. 5 p.

6 p.

7 p.

8 p.

9p.

10 p. 11 p. Midt. Total.

2

January,

1

February,

2

March,

0

April,

May,

June,

July,.

5

5

7

6

August,

September,

October,

6

November,

3

3

2

· December,

2

2

6

4UBOASAT 1010 - 10

4120ETTO 47 NO

moomCOLO ON THE LONO

2104 HLO T10 21 420 N

3

6

0

3

6

5

1

5

7695PX∞IA O∞

3

2

1

1

I

1

1

4

1

2

2

4

4

4675 OL 10

4

9

6

3

4

6

0

2

5

1OO2 - N♡ 21

1003 - 10 00 to 0-03

1-12 CO 30 TH COLON

0

5

1

2

4

4

6

2

1

2

0001 44 - CO 30 - 21 2

0

2

4

1

2

1

6

6

4

9

4

3

}

2

4

2

3

0

0

2

1

4

1

2

NOIN 40 20 01 30 CO 2 ~ +

2014 20 10 30 21 CO CORO

2O27 ESO OHION

2

3

0

3

1

7

6

4

2

1

1

4

4

3

1O04 CO 20 21 422 CO

41

7

20

118

87

104

64

139

106

80

35

73

Total,..

37

36

42

56

52

53

46

49

38

34

29

23

31

30 25

31

30

25

28

36

35

333

39

36

30

874

༢་ ད་

107

Table V.

Number of Days with Wind from eight different points of the Compass during each month of the year 1907.

MONTH.

N.

NE.

E.

SE.

S.

SW.

W.

NW.

January,

February,

March,

April,

May,

10 10 4 --

5

5

4232

21

1

20

I

16

3

3

1

1

21

2

2

21

3

1

June,

15

5

9

July,

6

3

12

2

1

August,

September,

4

October,

November,

December,

10

~~NO O

2

15

4

5

3

15

1

20

3

4

14

12

Sums,

38

36

196

25

24

33

7

6

Table VI.

Total number of Days on which different Meteorological Phenomena were noted and

total number of Thunderstorms during each month of the year

1907.

MONTH.

Fog.

Electric

Phenomena.

Lightning.

Thunder.

Thunder-

storms.

Umisual

Visibility.

January,

February,

2

1

1

March..

13

April,

5

10

10

10

16

May, June,

16

15

11

7

7

July,

12

12

August,

19

17 12

September,

3

23

22

9

October,

13

13

6

November,

2

December,

233144 EP- 10 10 1

Dew.

1

Rainbow.

Lunar Halo.

Corona.

Lunar

Solar Halo.

Corona.

Solar

3

6

3

13

8

8

1247 00 00 21

3

3

3

1

2

:

co:

1

8

2

1

N

Sums,

31

106 102 65

57

40

60 22 21

15

17

6

:

108

Table VII.

Total number of times that Clouds of different forms were observed in each month of the year 1907.

Month.

e-str.

c-cum. sm-cum.

cum. cum-str.

str.

r-cum.

cum-nim.

nim.

January,

1

20

80

11

2

8

17

February,

5

56

120

35

7

6

March,

41

130

33

14

15

April,

4

3

28

104

1

21

28

58

May,

33

9

63

137

3

18

39

June,.

18

7

29

177

1

10

27

July,

68

14

51

194

1

1

2

22

August,

53

20

25

168

42

September,

28

9

45

153

31

October,

23

7

43

192

2

November,

7

45

162

19

December,

49

40

69

11

12

2285

27

39

Sums,

284

84

486

1686

2

137

Month.

Barometric Tide.

Mean Diurnal

Variability of Temperature.

Weight of Aqueous Vapour.

Table VIII.

RAINFALL.

Mean.

1907.

Hourly Intensity

of Rain.

00

127

345

MEAN DIRECTION NUMBER OF DAYS

OF CLOUDS

WHENCE COMING.

WITH

CLOUDS BELOW.

Lower.

Upper. 2000 ft. 1000 ft.

January,

0.106

2.73 4.19

1.32

3.445 0.101

E 41° S W 7°S

10

5

1

February,

March,

April,

May,

0.080 1.91

June,

0.071 1.12 8.72

0.104 1.77 4.20

0.101 328

0.085 1.82 6.64

7.96 13.43

16.80

* 1.86

0.165 0.055

E 2° SW 12° S

10

5.43

2.63

5.56

0.335 0.030 S 17° E W 11° S

11.755

17

4

0.163 S 45° E W 21° S

19

6

11.280 0.213 S 39° E W

:

17

6

July,

0.069 0.82 9.34

13.32

13.170 0.244 S 11° E

7.385 0.308

W

12

3

S 22° W N 26° E

4

1

August,

0.076 0.92 9.37

14.22

September,

.0.077 1.01 8.66

8.21

14.855 0.270 E 31° SN 50° E

19.465 0.295 E 16° N N 23° E

10

5

3

LO

5

I

October,..........

0.087 0.78 8.45

4.73

November,.....

December,...

0.096 1.82 6.19

0.101 2.24 3.87

1.71

8.965 0.219 E 15° S S 17° W

1.265 0.079 E 12° S W 33° S

ลง

2

1

6

10

1

1.03

1.460 0.025 E 10° N W 31° S

10

5

2

1

Mean or Total,

0.088

1 68

692 84.82

93.5450.192 E 36° S

:

107

29

7

109

Table IX.

Monthly Extremes of the Principal Meteorological Elements registered during the year 1907.

BAROMETER.

TEM-

PERATURE.

Month.

HUMIDITY.

VAPOUR TENSION.

RAIN.

WIND

VELOCITY.

RADIA-

TION.

Max.

Min. Max. Min. Min.

Daily

Max.

Min.

Max.

Hourly Max.

Max. Sun Max.

January,

March,

30.229 29.799

Feburary, 30.258 29.821

30.319 29.698

75.0 45.0 16

0.634

0.079

1.505

0.420 38

129.9

67.8 46.7 34

0.527

0.152

0.140

0.115 36

125.5

80.1

48.5 23

0.762

0.102

0.105

0.070 41

131.2

April,....

30.158

29.514 81.7

53.9

31

0.856

0.200

2.765

1.325 34

136.7

May,

29.959

29.492 86.8 67.4 42

0.983

0.391

3.495

1.960 40

147.5

June,

29.845

29.418 89.5 71.8 37

0.985

0.440

5.275 1.100 35

138.4

July, ....

29.819

29.439 90.2

74.7

58

1.016

0.687

2.340 1.270 44

141.6

August,......

29.726

29.407 91.6

74.5

56

1.052

0.685

2.135 0.955 46

142.7

September, 29.912

29.277 88.6 73.7

44

0.953

0,470

5.530 1.215 75

151.0

October,

29.999

29.609

87.1 67.7

56

0.906

0.557

2.985 0.845 34

141.5

November, 30.179

29.735

81.1 54.2

40

0.834

0.271

0.680 0.365 30

132.2

December,...

30.265 29.903 76.4 49.5

18

0.578

0.099

0.575 0.100 41

128.4

Year,......

30.319 29.277

91.6 45.0

16

1.052

0.079

5.530 1.960 75

151.0

-

110

Table X.

Five-Day Means of the Principal Meteorological Elements observed at Hongkong in 1907.

FIVE-DAY PERIODS.

Barometer. Temper-

Humidity.

ature.

Vapour Tension.

Wind Velocity.

Nebulosity. Sunshine.

Rain.

Jan. 1-5 6-10

30.128

60.5

47

0.250

9.1

0.6

9.8

.069

61.8

61

.340

9.9

0.3

9.5

11-15

.083

60.4

67

.354

12.7

1.8

8.6

16-20

.003

64.1

75

.446

15.7

7.5

4.6

0.044

21-25

29.993

63.0

81

.469

15.3

6.6

4.8

0.080

26-30

.932

61.0

82

.461

13.0

8.6

1.4

0.565

31-4

30.069

56.6

67

.322

22

13.5

6.8

3.4

Feb. 5-9

29.998

61.8

81

.445

18.3

8.0

5.6

10-14

.932

60.7

99

76

.404

17.3

6.6

4.3

0.028

15-19

30.012

57.4

77

.365

وو

12.7

9.2

1.7

0.005

20-24

.187

53.6

68

.280

13.2

8.7

3.4

25- 1

.043

58.9

":

80

.407

13.6

9.1

1.4

0.017

Mar. 2-6

.143

57.6

56

.275

16.8

5.2

6.8

0.021

7-11

29.850

65.9

""

84

.539

9.6

5.6

4.7

0.001

12-16

.912

65.2

""

87

.563

9.6

9.6

0.5

0.007

17-21

30.039

59.2

99

80

.410

14.7

8.4

1.8

0.002

22-26

29.843

71.9

89

.697

8.4

9.5

2.9

0.008

27-31

.946

65.7

82

.532

18.1

9.6

0.6

0.011

Apr. 1-5

30.025

63.5

71

.427

15.8

9.3

2.1.

0.155

6-10

29.958

66.9

86

.571

9.4

7.4

4.3

0.129

11-15

.807

72.0

88

.687

10.7

8.0

4.6

0.208

16-20

.784

70.3

""

93

.690

15.3

9.3

0.4

1.134

21-25

.798

69.7

27

84

.615

16.0

8.6

2.3

0.204

26-30

.695

72.5

"2

86

.688

13.7

9.2

2.0

0.521

May 1-5

.788

72.3

88

.707

16.5

9.2

2.4

0.157

6-10

.763

74.4

""

.749

14.3

9.2

2.7

1.213.

11-15

.815

75.3

""

.705

10.9

6.3

6.4

0.350

16-20

.720

78.7

27

.832

12.4

7.7

6.2

0.050

21-25

.648

79.5

""

85

.854

10.6

8.0

4.9

0.486

26-30

.717

77.0

""

68

.634

18.7

6.2

8.5

31-4

.662

78.7

"

82

.806

14.9

8.8

4.6

0.436

June 5-9

.675

76.2

76

.690

14.8

8.3

1.5

0.310

10-14

.726

79.7

""

84

.853

9.1

4.6

10.5

0.003

15-19

.659

83.4

""

77

.887

7.6

5.3

10.6

0.030

20-24

.568

80.2

لاو

86

.883

13.3

8.7

3.1

1.344

25-29

.539

80.1

""

74

.761

10.6

6.5

7.2

0.444

30- 4

.661

81.9

77

82

.895

14.2

9.5

2.2

0.177

July 5-9

.719

83.2

76

.870

9.5

5.8

10.2

0.037

10-14

.685

83.8

""

74

.863

7.7

4.5

10.7

0.030

15-19

.546

82.3

""

83

.913

5.8

7.6

3.9

0.716

20-24

541

80.7

""

81

.849

16.5

8.3

5.0

0.498

25-29

.605

82.6

}}

80

.893

7.9

8.4

7.3

0.066

30- 3

.582

80.7

22

84

.880

12.8

8.4

3.8

0.868

Aug. 4- 8

.623

81.5

82

.887

14.2

6.7

7.6

0.511

9-13

.623

78.8

""

87

.855

22.7

8.3

3.4

1.110

14-18

.652

81.3

""

83

.883

9.6

5.3

7.8

0.353

19-23

.541

83.1

""

78

.882

5.5

3.9

9.8

0.051

24-28

.545

84.6

>>

76

.913

6.3

4.5

10.6

0.007

29- 2

.555

82.9

81

>>

.912

12.1

8.0

5.0

0.593

Sept. 3- 7

.609

82.2

72

.788

8.1

5.6

8.0

0.314

8-12

.634

82.0

""

79

.857

6.6

5.3

6.5

0.311

13-17

.618

79.5

84

.846

21.2

7.2

4.0

2.275

18-22

.810

80.0

""

78

.806

8.0

5.1

7.8

0.226

23-27

.780

80.1

""

79

.818

8.1

5.8

6.4

0.147

28-2

.837

79.6

""

72

.726

17.0

5.0

7.4

0.133

Oct. 3-7

.838

80.3

81

.837

9.3

6.1

6.4

0.125

8-12

.864

79.2

""

81

.835

11.5

6.7

5.0

0.742

13-17

.855

79.6

777

.782

19.9

6.6

8.2

0.042

18-22

.808

80.2

79

.824

8.7

5.3

8.4

0.029

23-27

.891

78.5

""

77

.747

14.2

6.8

6.1

0.060

28- 1

.818

75.2

83

.725

15.8

8.8

1.8

0.780

Nov. 2- 6

.980

74.5

74

.635

11.9

7.1

4.5

0.013

7-11

.979

72.5

""

58

.468

8.1

5.2

6.1

0.013

12-16

.866

72.2

""

77

.606

11.6

7.4

2.5

0.168

17-21

.920

74.2

""

86

.729

16.4

9.3

1.9

0.008

22-26

30.008

70.8

"7

76

.586

12.7

8.0

4.2

0.051

27- 1

.094

"7

62.8.

61

351

10.8

6.0

6.6

Dec. 2-6

.088

61.3

62

.331

8.7

6.3

5.0

0.075

7-11

""

.080

62.9

61

.350

7.8

3.0

7.8

0.012

12-16

.066

63.1

""

56

.329

7.4

5.6

5.9

0.035

17-21

.129

59.8

46

""

.243

15.3

4.5

8.2

22-26

.044

61.6

66

.373

14.7

8.0

2.5

0.041

27-31

29.993

62.2

""

88

.491

21.2

8.7

1.7

0.129

L

.t

111

Table XI.

Observations of Magnetic Declination and Dip.

1907.

H.K.M.T.

Declination East.

Observer. H.K.M.T.

Dip North.

Needle

Observer.

No.

February,

21d2h.29m.p.

0° 7′ 23′′

J.I.P.

184.311p. 31° 3′ 8′′

3 30

May,

16 2 27 p.

0 6

0

14 3

""

9 p.

3 10

5 4

August,.

November,

21 2 52 p.

0 3 55

29

19 3 19 p.

5 23

1 27

15 2 29 p.

0 6 27

55

13 3 4 p.

1 28

Ι

8

Table XII.

Observations of Horizontal Magnetic Force.

Time of

1907.

H.K.M.T.

one

Tem- Vibra-perature

Cent.

tion.

100 # CO HA CO HA Co

3

J.I.P.

4

""

""

""

95

Log mX.

Value of

M..

Distance

H.K.M.T.

timetres.

Tem- in Cen-perature Deflection. Log

Cent.

m Value of Obser- X X.

ver.

February,

19d. 3h. 0m.p. 3o 6527

179,55

2.32455 570.88| 19d. 2h.21m.p.

30

170.3

10

6° 34′ 26′′ .3 3.18854 0.36984 J.I.P. 2 45 46 .9

3 49 p.

30

18 .0

6 34 6.3

40

2 45 25.7

May,

15 3 12 p. 3 .6598

26.25

2.32440 | 570.66 15 2 25 p.

30

26 .9

33 13.8 3.18837 0.36984

40

2 44 46 .9

4

6 p.

30

26 .4

6 32 32 .5

40

2 44 50 .0

August,

20 3

9 p. 3 .6625

32.95

2.32497 | 570,60 20 2 25 p.

30

33 .6

6 31 13 8 3.18769 0.37037

21

40

2 43 53 .1

4 2 p.

30

33 .1

6 31 6.3

40

2 44 6.9

November, 14 2 56 p. 3 .6580

26.35

2.32478 570,45 14 2 15 p.

30

26 .3

6 31 56.3| 3.18765 | 0.37031

40

2 44 40.6

3 47 p.

30

25 .8

6 31 58 .8

40

44 48 .8

Table XIII.

Results of Magnetic Observations made in 1907.

Magnetic Force.

MONTH.

Declination Dip

East. North.

X.

Y.

Total.

February,

May,

August,

0° 7′ 23′′

0 6 0

0 3 55

31° 3′ 19′′

31 4 7

31 3 25

0.36984

0.36984

0.37037 0.22304 0.43234

0.22271 0.43172

0.22282 0.43178

November,

0 6 27

31 1 18

0.37031 0.22267 0.43211

Mean,......

0 5 56

31 3 2

0.37009

0.22281 0.43199

No. 7.

DIEU

ET

·

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 10th of APRIL, 1908.

Published by Authority.

RETURNS OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1907.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor.

I. Abstract of Cases during the year.

II. Return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain Classes of Offences during

the year.

III. List of Offences during the year.

IV. Comparative Return of Cases for the past ten years.

MAGISTRACY,

31st January, 1908.

H. H. J. GOMPERTZ,

Police Magistrate.

;

CLASSIFICATION OF ÖFFENCES.

Table I.

ABSTRACT of CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1907.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

*

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES DURING THE YEAR 1907.

Warrants.

TOTAL NUMBER

OF CASES.

TOTAL NUMBER OF

PRISONERS.

Convicted and

Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial

at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pending

Orders of H.E. the Governor.

To keep the

Peace.

M.

F. M. F. M. F. M.

1.

Assaults and other Offences against.

the Person..

Malicious Injuries to Property,. Gambling,

998

1,437

533 26 501 321 37

115

150

82 1

45

317

2,502 2,427 31

38

125

100

::

Offences against Property other than Malicious Injuries to Prop- erty or Prædial Larceny.

1,416 1,672

1,153 17

427

12 35

:

Offences against Revenue

Acts.

Highway Acts, Health Acts, and other Acts relating to the Social Economy of the Colony, Offences against Masters and Ser- vants Acts, including Acts relat- ing to Indentured Coolies, Other Offences,

2,533

3,676

3.166 119

333

:

47

109

Total,

76 7,988: 10,170 · 8,146 | 534 | 1,143 | 102 | 33 13,414 19,716| 15,533|732

26 1

:

47

2,563 | 160 | 105

47

To be of Good Behaviour.

To answer

any

Charge.

Witnesses punished for preferring

False

Charge or giving wilful False Testimony

Undecided.

M. F.

M. F. M.

221

28

17

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

25

10

2

12

::

1

53

21

47

10

1

291

51

88

17 21

Total Number of Prisoners.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

:

:

:

:

Summons for Defendants.

Summons for Witnesses.

Notices of Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering Gambling Houses.

Magistrates' Orders.

TOTAL.

26

1,344 932,197

41

145

2,467

1,633

39

39

3,549

127

2

19

87

TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment,

105

9,499

671

1 18,742 974 2,197 41

19,716

:

:

213

3,534 341

36

6,371

213

9 3,534 341 36

6,371

114 --

115

Table II.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year 1907.

Assaults and other

PUNISHMENTS.

Number of

Offences against the

Malicious Injuries to

Gam-

bling.

Property.

Description.

each kind

l'erson.

inflicted.

Offences against Property other than Malicious Injuries to Prop- erty or Prædial Larceny.

Offences against Offences against

Revenue Acts, Highway Acts, Health Acts, and other Acts relating to the Social Economy of the Colony.

Servants Acts, including Acts relating to Indentured Coolies.

Masters and

Other Offences.

Fines,

11,710

428

69

2,150

17

2,874

21

6,151

Imprisonment in

lieu of fine or

security,

2,900

69

12

311

11

407

6

2,084

Peremptory Im-

prisonment,

834

54

1

474

2

303

Whipping,.

29

N

:

27

Solitary Confine-

ment.

...

...

:

Exposed in Stocks,

757

5

1

:

611

2

138

Sentenced to House

of Detention, ....

40

1

30

9

Bound over with or

without Sureties,

480

280

18

2

28

12

1

139

TOTAL,

16,750

839

101 2,463 1,198

3,297

28

8,824

116

Table III.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED in the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the year 1907.

OFFENCES.

NUMBER No. of

PRI-

OF CASES. SONERS.

OFFENCES.

NUMBER No. of

PRI-

OF

CASES. BONERS.

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,-

Brought forward,..

4,335 7,794

Contraventions of,

65

73

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865,-

Banishment and Conditional Pardons Ordinance-1 of

Injuries by fire to buildings and goods therein, Miscellaneous injuries,

1

1

113

148

1882,-

Contraventions of,

91

91

Marriage Ordinance-7 of 1875,-

Offences under,...

1

1

Bankruptcy Ordinance-7 of 1891,-

Offences under..............

3

3

Married Women (Maintenance in case of desertion) Or-

dinance-10 of 1905,-

Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance-7 of 1896,-

Contraventions of,

Proceedings under,.....

1

10

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-10 of 1899,-

Chinese Emigration Ordinance--1 of 1889.-

Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,

8

11

Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,

23

23

VI,

133

""

""

"

91

218

Part III,

16

+9

""

35

""

VII,

5

9

**

Regulations made thereunder,

*:

21

39

IX,

16

16

"

11

"

X,

48

82

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889,-

Proceedings under,

19

י

Regulations made thereunder,

99

156

20

3

Ordinance 5 of 1905. An Ordinance

'to amend the,

52

72

Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865,--

Offences relating to the King's gold and silver coin,

18

19

foreign coin,........

25

29

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-16 of 1906,-

Offences under,

"

*!

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

20

22

62

10

223

Common Law Offences,

14

16

Merchant Shipping Act,-

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873,-

Breaches of discipline,

1

Contraventions of.

39

43

"}

"

Regulations made thereunder,

5

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

7

Dogs Ordinance-5 of 1893,-

Contraventions of,

17

25

Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898,-

Offences under,

43

50

Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,-

Offences under,........

45

107 Morphiné Ordinance-9 of 1893,-

Offences under,

3

Extradition Acts (1870-1873), ~

Proceedings under,

Foreign Offenders Detention Ordinance-1 of 1872,-

Proceedings under,

Forgery Ordinance-4 of 1865,-

Forgery of Bank Notes,

12

Deeds, Wills, Bills of Exchange, &c.,

Records, Process, Instruments of Evi-

dence, &c.,

18

200

14

24

=ல்

6 Naval Stores Ordinance (Hongkong)-4 of 1875,-

Contraventions of,

New Territories (Regulation) Ordinance-8 of 1899,-

Contraventions of Rules made thereunder,

Offences against the person Ordinance-2 of 1865,-

Homicide......

16

22

-

30.

66

16

48

Attempt to murder,

3

1

1

Letters threatening to murder,

1

...

Demanding property upon forged instruments,

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891.-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

10

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c., Assaults,

25

36

9081,284

317 2,502

Foreible taking or detention of persons, Abominable Offences,

12

18

27

Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1901,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

Order and Cleanliness Ordinance-2 of 1867,-

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

17 105

5

5

Pawnbrokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,-

Contraventions of,..

40

43

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,-

Simple Larceny,

Larceny of cattle and other animals,

Piers Ordinance-11 of 1899,-

9781,081

10

Contraventions of,

9

16

"9

་་

written instruments,

things attached to or growing on land, from the person and similar Offences,

1

1

36

50

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900;-

Offences under,

83

98

142 184

Post Office Ordinance-6 of 1900,-

Sacrilege Burglary and house breaking,.

78 110

Larceny in dweiling houses,

20

24

Contraventions of and Offences nuder,

Orders and Regulations made

12

12

19

in ships, wharves, &c.,...........

19

22

or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c.,

15

15

"9

Frauds by bankers, agents, &c..

Obtaining property by false pretences,

60

77

thereunder,

2 repared Opium Ordinance,-8 of 189!,

Contraventions of and Offences under,

1

1

2,207 2,377

Receiving stolen property,.

54

89

Ordinance 15

Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,-

Apprehension of Offenders and other proceedings,

Contraventions of and Offences under,

1,038 1,084

of 1906. An Ordinance to amend the,

Prevention of Crimes Ordinance-4 of 1887,-

Contraventions of and Offences under..

510

523

1

1

""

29

Regulations made thereunder,

632|1,413

Prison Ordinance-4 of 1899,-

Liquor Licences Ordinance-8 of 1898,-

Offences under,

1

Contraventions of and Offences under,

76

89

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

1

1

Private Vehicles Licensing Ordinance-5 of 1895,-

Offences under,

8

9

Live Stock Import and Export Regulation Ordinance-15

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

40

46

of 1903,-

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

I'rotection of Women and Girls Ordinance-4 of 1897,-

Offences under,

82

96

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,-

No. 6 of 1905. An Ordinance to

Offences under,

397

438

amend the,

1

1.

""

No. 19 of 1903, An Ordinance to

further amend,

20

25

2 of 1906,

Do.,

1

1

Public Assemblages (Regulation of Traffic) Ordinance-

2 of 1869,

7

8

"

";

Carried forward,

4,335 7,794

Carried forward,..

8,940 13,466

OFFENCES,

117

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,- · Continued.

No. of CASES.

No. of

PRI- SONERS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

NO. OF

PRI-

CASES.

SONERS.

Brought forward.......

8,940 13,466

Brought forward,

10,035 | 15,108

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,-

Contraventions of Part II,

#

VI,

288

454

III,

144

172

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-

Nuisances, Trespasses and Similar Offences,... Offences against good order, Possession of stolen goods.

2,075

2,551

649

1,248

347

420

5

Failure to comply with B. A. Notice.

S. B.

58

73

under the Ord.,

34

34

Proceedings under Miscellaneous Provisions.

No. 7 of 1905. An Ordinance to

amend the,

11

11

14

18

19

""

Contraventions of Bye-laws made thereunder.

Regulations made thereunder,

Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,-

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,...

89

97

61

114

Suppression of Piracy Ordinance-1 of 1868,

Offences under,

2

14

17

2220

34 3

Raw Opium Ordinance-9 of 1887,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

89

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888, -

Offences under Part III,

7

7

""

"

V, VII,

24

76

Tramway Ordinance-10 of 1902,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,.......

Rules made thereunder,.

"1

""

88 Triad and Unlawful Societies Ordinance-2 of 1887, Contraventions of and Offences under,

ཚ།

Vaccination Ordinance-2 of 1890,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

11

16

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

5 Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,-

Proceedings under,......

M

25

27

River Steamers Ordinance-6 of 1895,-

Offences under,..

9

44

Vehicles Regulation Ordinance-3 of 1899,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

97

114

Bye-laws made thereunder,

10

10

Rogue and Vagabond-5 Geo. IV c. 83,.

205

274

Servants Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,-

Water Works Ordinance-16 of 1903,-

Offences under,

11

15

Offences under.......

32

59

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder,

6. St

Small Tenements Recovery Ordinance-10 of 1897,-

Proceedings under,'.

3

Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,- Contraventions of and Offences under,

33

33

Stonecutters Island Ordinance-4 of 1889,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903,-

Offences under........................

1

1

Wild Birds and Game Preservation Ordinance-6 of

1885,-

Contraventions of and Offences under,

35 107 Undecided Cases,

Carried forward......

10,035 15,108

Total,..

W

N

63

88

|13,414 | 19;716

118

TOTAL NUMBER

I

Years.

OF

CASES Convicted and

Discharged.

Trial at

l'unished.

Supreme

Court.

5

6 7

9

Table IV.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of

Ten Years, from 1st January, 1898, to 31st December, 1907, inclusive.

CASES, HOW disposed of, and THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH Head.

Committed Ordered to

Commit- to Prison or

ted for

detained pending Or- der of His Excellency the ¡Governor,}

8

find Security

To keep the Peace, to be of

Good Beha- viour, and to answer any Charge.

Did not

and

appear

absconded

Escaped

before

being

brought

Escaped.

False

Testimony.

Punished for preferring

Total

False Charge Undecided.

Number

for trial at the Ma- gistracy.

or giving

of Defendants.

12

10

11

13

14 15

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M. F. M. M.

F. M.

16

M.

17

18

19

20

21

F. M. F.│ M.

F

1898,... 13,341

12,663 834 1,196 93

1899, 10,158 9,007 511 1,527 114 128

1900, 14,081 13,149 501 2,416

1901, 14,531 13,689 536 2,129

1902, 16,070 14,404 803 2,071

235131 5

325

65

3

61

209 43 1

1

25

00

8

142

14,304 985

co

3

1

90

11

211

220

12

1

17

2

28

3.

10,800 646

20 1

1

13

3

77

00

8

16,010 773

147 121

2

6

287 25

165 95 4

9

264 26

195

105

18

16,339 728

3

2

211

17,057 1,000

Total, 68,181 62.9123,185 9,339

754 540 17 30 21,061126 3 1

1

60

15

563

33

74,510 4,132

Average per Year,

13,636-2 12,582.4| 637 1,867-8150-8108 3.4

4 212.2 25.2 6

04

•2

12

3 112.6

6.6

14,902 8264

1

13,450

1905....

1906, 13,871 16,910 299

1903, ... 14,268 12,906 553 2,104 167 164

1904, 14,505 13,129 796 1,966

14,512 912

O

210 83

3

00

t-

2

211 21

148 25

...

1907, ... 13,414 15,533 732

2,097

2,351

2,563

226 85

N

19

1 312 68

888

49 61

160 105

· 19

317 24

3

47

403 77

Total,.. 69,508

72,990 3,292 11,081

812 498 17

100

31,391 215

per

Average} 13.901.6 14,598 658 4 2,216-2162-4 996 3·4

20.

6278.2 43

1 ear,

Grand

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Total for the

137,689 155,902 6,477

20,420 1.566 1,038 34

130

52,452 341

3

"

10

Years,

Average

per 13,768-9 13,590 2 | 647-7 2.0421566 102-8 3.4

13

•5 |245·2 | 341 3

Year,

9

266

22

15,668 774

1

15

1

75

15,424 1,085

6

4

224

7

17,255 | 1,220

2

1

25

95

19,755

373

87

18,742

974

***

G1

36

747

30

86,844 4.376

7.2

1.4

149.4

35

2 96

01

:

:

9.6

995

17,368 8 875-2

22

1310

63

161,354 8,508

2.2

131 6.3

16,1354 | 850-8

No. 8.

SOIT QUEM

DIEU

ET

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

TO

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of THURSDAY, the 16th of APRIL, 1908.

Published by Authority.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, April 16th, 1908.

1.-ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

The number of Actions instituted in this division of the Court during the Table I. year 1907 was 261, and there were 162 pending at the commencement of that year. Of these, 143 were disposed of during the year, 39 being settled or withdrawn before trial, leaving a balance of 280 undisposed of.

The total amount involved was $3,276,203.22.

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $809,049.36.

There was no Injunction or Interim Injunction granted.

The total fees collected and paid into the Treasury amounted to $16,201.35.

2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

    The number of Actions instituted was 1,894 during the year 1907, and 243 Table I. were brought forward from 1906. Of these, 1,912 were disposed of, 792 being settled or withdrawn before trial, and 231 being struck out of the Cause-Book as having been standing over generally for more than a year, leaving a balance of 225.

    The total amount involved was $474,500.43; and the total fees collected and paid into the Treasury amounted fo $8,705.10.

J

!

Table II.

Table III.

120

The number of Distress Warrants for Rent issued was 469, representing aggregate unpaid Rents amounting to $65,614.26, of which the aggregate sum of $22,122.50 was recovered, 229 Warrants having been withdrawn on settlement between the parties.

The fees collected for issuing Distress Warrants and paid into the Treasury amounted to $2,770.

3.-CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 34 cases and 70 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions.

The number of persons actually indicted was 56, of whom 48 were convicted and 8 were acquitted. Against 13 persons no Indictments were filed, and they were discharged pursuant to the provisions of "The Criminal Procedure Amend- ment Ordinance, 1904," and one case was postponed.

Table IV.

4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

There were 13 Appeals instituted during the year, being

From the decision of the Chief Justice,.

99

of the Puisne Judge,

91

Magistrates,

Award of an Arbitrator,

of which 9 were disposed of, being :

From the Chief Justice,

""

""

3

4

1

13

Puisne Judge... Magistrates,...

2

4

9

leaving 4 pending.

Leave to appeal to the Privy Council was granted in one case, i.e., In Original Jurisdiction Action No. 149 of 1902, Ceasar Leuba and Charles Leuba v. J. Ullmann & Co.

5.

ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Table V.

Table VI.

There were 5 Actions instituted, 1 of which was disposed of, 1 having been settled before trial, leaving 3 pending.

The number of vessels arrested was 1.

The total fees received and paid into the Treasury amounted to $314.50.

6.- BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

There were 51 Petitions filed, 34 being Creditors' Petitions and 17 being Petitions by the Debtors themselves.

The number of Receiving Orders made was 46, being 31 on Creditors' Peti- tions, and 15 on Debtors' Petitions. One Administration Order was made.

The number of Public Examinations held was 34.

There were 39 Adjudications; 2 Compositions and 1 Scheme of Arrangement were approved by the Court.

There were 3 Discharges.

The aggregate amount of declared Assets was $860,308.99, and declared Liabilities $2,383,714.06.

121

The fees paid into the Treasury amounted to $6,255.23, including the Official Receiver's commission as Trustee where no Trustee has been appointed by the Creditors.

A tabulated statement of the work done is attached to this Report.

7.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

There were 174 Grants made by the Court, being :---

Probates,

Letters of Administration,

Table VII.

82

...

92

174

The aggregate value of the Estates was $12,675,740.00.

Probate duties amounted to $368,938.00. Court fees amounted to $11,820.90 and Official Administrator's commission paid into the Treasury to $1,468.13.

There were 42 Estates vested in, or administered by, the Official Administrator Tables VIII during the year, representing an aggregate value of $24,560.78.

22 Estates were wound up during the year, as against 39 in 1906, representing an aggregate value of $20,977.40.

8.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The total number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of 1907 was 27, and the aggregate amount of Trust funds $116,215.47 as against 24 Estates aggregating $111,707.58 in 1906, and certain house property.

9.-REGISTRATION OF COmpanies.

The total number of Companies registered from the commencement of the "Companies Ordinance, 1865," was 530 with an aggregate capital of $245,155,803.

·

Of the 530 Companies on the Register 94 are defunct, 2 were not floated, 120 were wound up, and 52 were in the course of being wound up, leaving 262 on the Register at the end of 1907 representing an aggregate capital of $163,434,528.

There were 29 Companies registered in 1907, the revenue from which was :-

Registration Fees,

Filing and other Fees,

$4,227.50

1,969.90

$6,197.40

and VIII (a).

".

10. FEES AND COMMISSIONS.

The total sums collected during the year by way of Fees and Commissions Tables IX paid into the Treasury amounted to $56,156.78, as against $52,904.11 in the and IX (a). previous year.

11.-STAFF.

   Mr. ARATHOON SETH, I.S.O., Registrar, &c., proceeded on 4 months vacation leave followed by 4 months leave of absence on half salary on the 16th March and re- turned to the Colony on the 6th November resuming his duties on the following day. During his absence his place was filled by Mr. KEMP, the Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, who continued to act also as Official Receiver in Bankruptcy.

   Mr. CHARLES ALEXANDER DICK MELBOURNE, Magistrates' First Clerk, acted as Deputy Registrar and Appraiser from the 11th April to the 14th August when he was transferred to the Magistracy to act as 2nd Magistrate.

1

122

Mr. JOSEPH HORSFORD KEMP, Deputy Registrar and Appraiser, acted as Official Receiver in Bankruptcy from the 2nd April, and as Registrar, &c., from the 16th March to the 6th November.

Mr. JAMES DYER BALL, Chief Interpreter, continued to act as Assistant Registrar General until the 22nd January when he resumed his duties in this department.

Mr. LI HONG MI, Second Interpreter, continued to act as Chief Interpreter until the 22nd January, his place being taken by Mr. NICHOLAS GEORGE NOLAN, Interpreter at the Magistracy.

Mr. A. B. SUFFIAD, 1st Grade Clerk of Court and Clerk to the Chief Justice, resumed his duties on return from 4 months vacation leave on the 1st A

April.

Mr. J. U. MIRZA, 2nd Grade Clerk of Court and Clerk to the Puisne Judge, proceeded on 3 months vacation leave on the 10th December, to be followed by 3 months leave of absence on half pay, the discharge of the duties of his office being arranged departmentally.

Mr. A. J. MACKIE, Land Bailiff, Land Registry Office, New Territories, was on the 3rd July appointed en six months probation to the newly created office of Third Interpreter. He took up his duties on the 10th July.

Mr. U HANG TOK, Temporary 4th Grade Clerk, resigned on the 16th April.

Mr. WONG PO FUK, Librarian, was appointed on three months probation in his stead, and was confirmed in the appointment as from the 17th July.

    Mr. WONG KIU Wo was on the 18th April appointed Librarian on three months pro- bation in place of Mr. WoNG PO FUK. He took up his duties on the 22nd April and was confirmed in the appointment as from the 22nd July.

8th April, 1908.

ARATHOON SETH,

Registrar.

Table I.

RETURN OF CASES brought under the cognizance of the SUPREME Court of HONGKONG during the Year 1907.

ORIGINAL AND SUMMARY JURISDICTIONS.

JUDGMENT.

Jurisdiction.

In Depen- dency in 1906.

No. of Cases in

Total.

Debt and Damages.

Settled or with-

drawn

before

1907.

trial.

Plaintiff.

Defendant.

Nonsuit.

Struck out,i Dismissed

Struck out of the Cause-Book

as having been

& lapsed standing over generally for

Writs.

more than'

In Dependency.

Debt and

Damages recovered.

a year.

Original,... 162

261

423

$3,276,203.22 39

93

3

280

$809,049,36

Summary,

243 1,894 2,137

474,500.43

792 766 59 12

52

231

225

183,952 21

Table II.

RETURN OF DISTRESS WARRANTS FOR RENT issued during the year 1907.

(Ordinance No. 1 of 1883.)

Number issued.

Sold to pay Claims.

Number withdrawn.

469

240

229

Aggregate Rent involved.

Aggregate Sum recovered on sales.

$65,614.26

$22,122.50

:

༣.

Number of Cases.

Number of Persons.

1

2

1

123

www

Table III.

RETURN OF CRIMINAL CASES tried in the SUPREME Court of HONGKONG during the

year 1907.

CRIME.

2 Aiding and abetting to commit murder,

Assault occasioning actual bodily harm,..

2 Attempted buggery,

Conspiracy,

Disobedience of Order of Banishment,.

Falsification of Trade Mark,

6 Forgery,

Highway robbery,

1 Larceny by servant,

Larceny in a dwelling house with menaces

16

Manslaughter,

4 7 Murder,

4

15

Robbery,

1

1 Uttering a forged document,

1 Uttering forged notes,

28

888

56

Convicted.

Acquitted.

Death.

Death recorded.

2

Sentence.

13

6

7

13

|(b) 2

48 8

9

:

28

11

:

Note.-Indicted

56

Either not indicted or Nolle prosequi entered (included under the heading of

Charges abandoned ".)

13

Postponed

(a) Bail estreated.

(b) Nolle prosequi entered.

Table IV.

APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

70

Charges abandoned.

Cases postponed.

No. of Persons.

...

5

13

1

1

APPEALS

COMMENCED.

*

APPEALS TRIED.

JUDGMENT.

Number of Cases.

No. of Cases.

Appellant. Respondent. Pending.

Withdrawn.

13

9

6

4

Table V.

ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Actions instituted.

Number heard.

Settled or withdrawn.

Pending.

5

1

1

3

In 1 action the ship was arrested.

1

Table VI.

BANKRUPTCY JURISDICTION.

RETURN of BANKRUPTCIES during the year 1907.

124

DATE OF RECEIVING

DATE OF COMPOSITION

DATE OF FILING

No.

PETITION.

ORDER OR AD- MINISTRATION ORDER.

DATE OF ADJUDICATION.

OR SCHEME OF ARRANGEMENT IF ANY.

DECELARED

ASSETS.

DECLARED

LIABILITIES.

ASSETS

REALIZED.

REMARKS.

1907.

1907.

1

2nd January,

21st January,

10th

31st

""

>>

1907.

5th March, 25th April,

$

C.

$ C.

$

C.

8,111.34

29,560.73

49,714.60

93,664.97

17th

31st

13th

""

""

June,

1,700.00

2,000.00

...

17th

31st

...

""

>>

23rd

14th March,

""

15th August,

24,182.88 153,247.01

4,217.46

2,340.35

1,607.84

Adjudication Order annulled.

Receiving Order rescinded.

24th

""

31st October,

151.17

7

25th

""

21st February,

14th March,

1,387.27

Debtor absconded.

8

25th

""

31st January,

21st February,

16,532.91

26,679.68

6,361.11

9

28th

14th March,

""

25th April,

68,587.97

161,352.86

4,767.93

10

30th

14th

11th

172,391.86

270,327.91

12,183.48

Debtor absconded.

""

11

30th

>>

12

31st

""

31st January, 21st February,

13

2nd February,

14

8th

21st

14th March,

13th

June,

115,029.17 347,267.60

11,347.00

""

""

2nd May,

613.65

15

12th

14th

......

Receiving Order rescinded. Ditto.

Debtor absconded.

Receiving Order rescinded.

""

""

16 20th

21st February,

13th

June,

14,953.18

191,866.33

3,384.03

17

25th

14th March,

27th

4,775.48

17,112.43

992.13

""

""

18

27th

Vide Bankruptcy No. 17 of 1907.

""

19

4th March,

14th March,

13th

June,

13,923.61

88,393.23

4,914.00

20

8th

11th

99

April,

2nd May,

14,799.03

11,913.44

2,746.15

21

5th

11th

9th

19,530.00

99,100.33

""

>>

22

5th

25th

""

""

29th August,

715.00

5,260.00

23

19th

""

24

30th

13th

2nd May,

June,

27th June,

34,559.93

68,108.16

27th

""

25

6th May,

13th

31st October,

93,500.00 351,595.54

703.50

1,172.03

12,747.62

764.07

Debtor absconded.

.........

""

26

6th

Petition withdrawn.

""

Carried forward,... 653,006.96 1,917,450.22 72,400.79

RETURN of BANKRUPTCIES,-Continued.

125

No.

DATE OF FILING PETITION.

DATE OF RECEIVING

ORDER OR AD-

DATE OF ADJUDICATION.

DATE OF COMPOSITION OR SCHEME OF

MINISTRATION Order.

ARRANGEMENT IF ANY.

DECLARED

ASSETS.

DECLARED ASSETS LIABILITIES. REALIZED.

REMARKS.

1907.

1907.

1907.

27

8th

May,

1907. Brought forward,...

$

$ 653,006.96 1,917,450.22

$

C.

72,400.79

1

28

22nd

Petition dismissed.

30th

May,

29

24th June,

25th

July,

30 26th

25th July, 12th September,

2,057.68

7,568.33

576.27

52,360.77

125,866.95

1,569.61

25th

""

12th

""

""

9,027.03

13,891.30

246.19

31

29th

31st

...

""

5th

32

1st July,

99

1,537.36

6,415.96

549.93

25th

12th

""

11,200.00

29,179.56

1,502.50

33

10th

18th

99

5th

وو

>>

3,569.00

10,480.83

314.60

34

19th

15th August,

7th November,

682.87

35

22nd

Debtor absconded.

""

22nd

"

31st October,

4,074.55

27,429.00

36

4,309.14

25th

15th

""

2

37.

3rd August,

...

15th

19th December,.

38

13th

29th

""

""

......

42,595.93

63,330.70

39

16th

""

...

40

20th

""

41

2nd September,

20th August, 7th November,

31st October,

7,100.02

15,738,57

42

25th

""

31st October,

28th November,

43

1st November,

14th November,

44

8th

21st

""

45

13th

21st

""

19th December,.

46

27th

28th

""

""

47

29th

""

19th December,

...

......

2,459.79

1,073.65

Debtor absconded.

4,223.99

15,971.00

1,497.46

6,225.00

61,435.70

1,220.00

1,708.61

77,425.84

74,860.80

...

477.46

...

Receiving Order rescinded. Scheme of Arrangement approved.

Petition withdrawn.

Non-official trustee appointed.

Administration Order.

48

4th December,

21st

49

11th

19th

""

50

31st

""

51

31st

6.57

Petition withdrawn.

""

...

TOTAL,....

860,308.99 2,383,714.06

90,595.44

J. H. KEMP,

Official Receiver in Bankruptcy.

Table VII.

Calendar of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION granted by the SUPREME COURT of HONGKONG during the year 1907.

- 126 -

Date of

No.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Grant.

1906.

Dec., 29 John Robertson Craik,

1907.

2 Jan., 4 Clement Tulloch,

1906.

Dec., 15 Thomas Arnold,

Time and Place of Death.

14th Dec., 1906, Kowloon Docks, Hongkong, 16th Sept., 1906, Singapore.

20th of Oct., 1906, Exmouth, England,.. 6th April, 1906, Shaukiwan, Hongkong, 25th March, 1900, Victoria, Hongkong. 6th of July, 1898, Swatow, China, 4th April, 1906, Kobe, Japan,

10th Aug., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong, 5th Nov., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

Shi Kuk Shan alias See Kok Shan alias 13th of Feb., 1906, Canton, China,

23rd Dec., 1996, Victoria, Hongkong,

4 Sept., 17

Li Kung Sau,

5 Nov., 20

Wong Kau alias Wong Kow,

6

Dec, 29

1907.

7 Jan., 14

1906.

Chan Tso Kow alias Chan Cheong Hop,

James Hunter Smyth,

8 Dec., 29

· 1907.

Saul Abdulla Joseph,

9 Jan., 14

William Eric Craig,

10

16

See Kock Shan alias Shi Pak Lim,

11

14

Agnes McColl Carmichael,

12

18 Leung Mok Shan,

13

14

Maria Carmide de Souza,

14

21

Harold Burton,

1st of Oct., 1906, Fatshan, China, 4th June, 1906, Shanghai, China, 17th July, 1906, Swatow, China,

15

12 Wong U Lam, .

16

7 Ng Kim Wan alias Ng Kim Guan,.

17 Feb., 1

Alfred Harry Dawbarn,........... 18 Jan., 25 | Tsang Kam,

19

25 Tsang Ng,

9th Sept., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

27th Oct., 1899, at Tak Chiu near Chow Choofoo, China,.

17th of Sept., 1906, Brighton, England, 24th April, 1905, Cheung Lok, China, 26th March, 1906, Cheung Lok, China,.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Value under which sworn.

Letters of Adm.,

Elizabeth Sarah Craik, the widow and relict,

Sealing of Duplicate Probate,

Herbert Murray Tulloch and Harold Walter Hudson. Executors,

Probate with power reserved.

Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm., cum testamento annexo, Letters of Adm., for use and benefit, &c., Sealing Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm., for use and benefit, &c., Letters of Adm., cum testamento annexo,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Probate durante minoritate,

Thomas Isaac Rose, Secretary, H. K. & W. Dock Co., Ltd., and John Arnold, Asst., H. K. C. & M. Steamboat Co., Ld.

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

500

16,900

507

140,000

4,200

Li Ngai Shi, the widow and relict,

2,100

42

John Hennessey Seth, Accountant,.

32,000

960

Chan Kai Man alias Chan Woo Fu, Attorney for Chan Lam Shi, the widow and relict,

1,600

32

Robert Spencer Smyth, the father,.

1,600

32

Joseph Edgar Joseph, Attorney for Sophia Joseph, the widow and relict,

*

:

George Duncan McIlraith, Mercantile Assistant,

Shi Ip Shi, the widow and relict,

Hugh Fletcher Carmichael, the husband,

Leung Nai Pak, Trader,

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, Attorney for John Joseph de Souza, the husband,

Arthur Rylands Lowe, Attorney for Edward Fairburn Mackay, the Executor.

4,200

84

36,200

1,086

9,100

182

4,600

92

500

5

25,000

750

25,200

756

Ng Tek Tong, one of the Executors,

24,900

.747

Edward Dawbarn, sole Executor, Tsang Yan Toi, Shopkeeper,.

7,000

140

600

6

17

Tsang Lung, Shopkeeper's Assistant, .

500

៦.

Carried forward, ..

332,500

9,631

Letters of Adm., for use and benefit, &c., Letters of Adm., cum testamento annexo for use and benefit, &c., Probate with power reserved, Sealing of Probate,

Sealing of Probate,

Probate,

Wong Tam Shi, Wong Tsui Shi and Chan Po Tung, three of the Executors.

* Sworn insufficient for payment of the debts owing by the deceased.

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Calendar of ProBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued,

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Amount of

probate

Value under which sworn. duty paid.

$

1906.

20 Nov., 20

1907.

21 Jan.,

22 Feb., 20

Li Man Tseung,

2nd July, 1906, Shaukiwan, Hongkong,

23 Jan., 17

9 Li Cheung Fong alias Li Chak, Robert Law,

Li Wai,

20th July, 1895, Fatshan, China,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Brought forward,

Li Kat Cho and Li Kat Shing, the children, Li Ip Shi, the widow and relict,...

332,500

9,631

20,000

600

100

5th July, 1906, Shanghai, China,..

Sealing of Probate,

3rd April, 1904, Sun Ning, China,..

Letters of Adm.,

24 Feb., 11 Wong Ming Nam.

26 Jan., 26

6 Edgar Swindells,.

25

18

Lo Wong Shi,

31

Chinn Poy Woo alias Chan Pek Shan, 27 March, 6 Basile Coury,

28

29

William Ogston Milue Young,

30

Տ

Edwin Heath Warner,

31

Feb.,

9

Lo Hok Ting,

32

2,7

Maria Thereza Perpetuo,

33 March,25 Sir Robert Jardine,

34

21

"+

Wong Yuk Lin alias Yuk Len,

35

6 John McDonald,

35

36

25

Dickran Mouradian,

""

37

20

39

Francisco Ignaçio Parra,

Letters of Adm.,

27th Nov., 1906, Tung Koon, China, 3rd April, 1906, Shun Tak, China, 4th Nov., 1906, Canton, China, 25th April, 1901, Alexandria, Egypt, 28th Feb., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong. 9th May, 1906, Glasgow, Scotland,. 28th April, 1906, Kansas, U. S. A. 6th June, 1905, Heung Shan, China, . 14th Jan., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

17th Feb., 1905, Castlemilk, Dumfries, Scotland,

7th Nov., 1904, Sun Ning, China, 15th Sept., 1906, Shimbashi-Uchi, Japan, 30th Nov., 1906, Manchester, England,.. 29th Dec, 1901, Laga, Dilly, Timor,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Sealing of Letters of Adm.,

Letters of Adm.,

Sealing of Testament Testamentar,

Scaling of Testament Testamentar, Letters of Adm.,

Sealing of Probate,

Aharni Dickran Mouradian and G. A. Shacklian, the Executors,

Olympio Joaquim de Oliveira, Attorney for Maria José Guinnar, Eugenio Celestino da Cunha, Domingos Manuel Parra, Maria José Gonçalves, Maria da Conceição Parra, Manuel Ignacio Manso, Jus- tina da Piedade Parra, Manuel Antonio Pinto, Maria da Conceição Parra, and Francisco Augusto Parra,

Carried forward,

Mary Elizabeth Law, sole Executrix,.. Li Hu Shi, the widow and relict, Wong Tang Shi, the widow and relict,

10,200

306

300

3

3,500

70

Lo Cheuk Hin, Cestui que trust,

Chan Lai Shi, the widow and relict,

5,700

114

John Coury, a brother,

400

4

Aratboon Seth, Official Administrator,

500

5

Brodie Augustus Clarke, of Shanghai, Ship and General Broker,

24,600

738

Sealing of Letters of Adm.,

Herbert Kirkman Bibby, the Residuary Legatee,

265,800

7,974

cum testamento annexO, Probate,

Lo Hi To, Student, sole Executor,

16,000

480

Maria Pereira, Spinster,

4,500

90

Sir Robert William Buchanan Jardine and William Keswick, 8,758,100 Merchants,

262,743

Wong Kau Lin, a brother,

1,900

38

Elizabeth Mc Donald, sole Executrix,

10,200

306

800

1,300

26

9,456,400

283,136

* Sworn to consist entirely of trust property.

127

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

128

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Value under which sworn.

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

1907.

Brought forward,

$

9,456,400

$

283,136

38 March, 6 Chung Sam Choi,

39

25

Lee Iu Wing,

40

20

Lo Sing Yuk,

41

April, 15

Ma Chew,.

42

17

Au Kin Tin,

43

22 Tangun Kwong,

44

27 Sun Lok Ting,.

45

May,

Thomas George Harkness,.

16th Jan.. 1907, Yaumati, Kowloon, 11th Feb., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 18th Oct., 1903, Hoi Ping, China, 3rd May, 1904, Singapore,

Letters of Adm.,

Ip Yuk, the widow and relict,.

500

5

Lec Kan, a son of the sole Executor,.

8,000

160

Au Yin Tin alias Au Lung Kwong alias | 28th Jan., 1907, at Victoria, Hongkong,

18th July, 1906, Kowloon Tsai, New Territories, Hong-

Probate,

Letters of Adm..

Probate,

Lo Yin Chit,

900

9

Ma Tam Shi, the mother,

250

No duty.

Au Wai Chuen, sole Executor,

41,100

1,323

"

Leung Yan l'o, Compradore, and Ng Fook, Contractor,

Nominal.

!

47 | April, 15

José Ribeiro,

1906.

48

Dec., 10

1907.

49 May,

John Walter,

50

4 Leong Ü Sam,...........................

51

1

Chin Sin Hce,

52

53

54

28

13

Charles Edward Lamplough,

Sedeliza Andersen,.....

46 | March,20 || Ip A Ming alias Ip Hip Choc,.

13th Feb., 1907, Macau,

Poon Hung alias Poon Shing, alias Poon || 25th Dec.. 1901, Nam Hoi, China,

Fai Ting alias Pon Sze Liu,

kong,

16th Aug., 1903, Shun Tak, China,

20th Dec., 1906, Wimbledon, England,

15th Dec., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong.

Letters of Adın.,

Sun Pak lang, one of the children.

1,800

36

Sealing of Probate,

Probate,

Henry Prescott George Blencowe, one of the Executor, · Leung Mui, sole Executrix,

27,700

831

100

No duty.

Letters of Adm. for use and benefit &c.,

Delfino José Ribeiro. Attorney for Lydia Eufronia Soares Ribeiro, the widow and relict,

6,700

134

Letters of Adm, de bonis, Arathoon Seth, L.S.O., Official Administrator, non with the will annexed,

143,400

25th Jan., 1907, Leonards on Sea, England,..

Sealing of Probate,

Emily Elizabeth Walter, the widow and relict, William Walter, the brother, and Alfred George Lucas,

79,700

2,391

12th Feb., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,...

14th Oct., 1906, S.S. Hankow, Victoria Harbour, Hong- kong,

17th May, 1905, San Remo, Italy,

26th April, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Letters of Adm. for use and benefit &c... Scaling of Probate,

Probate,

Probate,

Leong Chan Shi, the widow and relict,

2,000

40

Chin Kim Siew, Attorney for Chong Man, Nyong, the widow and relict,

33,300

999

Cecil Harland aud Hamilton Charles Lamplough, Executors.

100

No duty.

George Parker, Master Mariner,

2,700

54

55

9

""

16

Tam Shun alias Tam Foo Yau, David Lyell Low,

24th Sept., 1906, Hunghom, Kowloon,

17th Oct., 1996, Hampstead, England,

"}

Tam Wing, Trader,

800

Sealing of Probate,

Rosetta Margaret Campbell Low, sole Executrix,

2.400

48

Curried forward,

9,810,850 289,174

* Probate duty paid on Original Grant.

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

&

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-- Continued.

Time and Place of Death.

Amount of

probate

Value under which sworn. duty paid.

129

1907.

56 May,

57

58

2 Joao Maria Antonio da Silva, William Robert von Glehn,

21

25

25

Thomas Rowan,

Joachim Hermann Christian Oetgen,.

İ

16

U liu Ki alias U Pun Cho,

25

"

GOA

17

"

H. H. Just,

1

35

Luk Yew Cho,.

27

286288282 28 3* *

*

May,

Chung Chik Sang.

21 | Chan On Ting alias Chan Wai,

Henry Sleeman,

30 Ün Kwong Tsun,

7th April, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 10th Aug., 1906, Middlesex, England, 8th Mar.. 1906, Victoria, Hongkong, 13th May, 1905, Victoria, Hongkong.. 4th Dec., 1906, Hamburg, Germany,.

26th April, 1907, Hongkong, 20th Mar., 1907, Sam Shui, China,

12th Nov., 1906, Canton, China, 17th Jan, 1907, Canton, China.. 12th Oct., 1906, Hankow, China, 16th Jan., Canton, China,. 19th May, Victoria, Hongkong,. 12th Feb., 1907, Sam Shui, China, 21st May, 1906, Victoria, Hongkong, 6th Nov., 1906, San Wui, China..

Luice Marie Caroline Meynne alias 17th July, 1906, Brussels, Belgium,

64 June,

8

66 June,

8

Wei On...

B

35

Tang Shing (or Sing),

68 May, 16

Tam Fook,

69 | June, 11

Chan In Fan,

8

Nicaise alias Schryver.

8

Ng Man Cho alias Ng Po Kwan,

U Fong Wo alias Yee Fong Wo,..

William Giuseppe Gulland,

6th Dec., 1906, Brighton, England,

31st Dec., 1966, Lancaster, England,

71

72 May, 28

73 July, 28

2 John Cresswell Brentnall,

74

""

22 23

12th October, 1906, Victoria Hongkong, 31st March, 1907, Sau Ning, China,

Paulo Felippe Vas,

30th May, 1907, Kennedy Town, Hongkong, 17th July, 1906, London, England,..

8th April, 1907, Shaukiwan, Hongkong,

10th Sept., 1906, Hongkong,

75

June, 19 Jahangir Khan,

76

29

51

William Pollock,..

77

8

Lo Hap Hing,

78

11

11

---

Probate, Scaling of Probate,

Double Probate,

Probate,

Letters of Adm., for use and benefit, &c.

""

*

Probate,

Scaling of Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

ད་

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

cum testamento annexO for use and benefit, &c. Probate,

Letters of Adm., for use and benefit, &c.

Sealing of Exemplifica- tion of Probate. Sealing of Probate,

Letters of Adm.. Sealing of Exemplifi- cation of Probate, Letters of Adm.,

$

$

Brought forward,

9,810,850

289,174

Joao Maria Placé da Silva, one of the sons,

Sophie Lowe von Glehn, the widow and relict, and Ernest Greig von Glehn, a brother,

85,400

800

2,562

8

Thomas Isaac Rose, Secretary to the Hongkong & Whampoa Deck Company, Ltd., and Thomas Meek, Gentleman, U Yuk Chi, a brother,

83,000

*

10,000

200

Godfrey Cornwall Chester Master, Solicitor, Attorney for..

3,000

60

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator,

1,200

24

Luk Yuet Woon, Attorney for Luk Mok Shi, the widow and relict,

2,100

42

Chung Ho Shi and Chung Hung Shi, widows,

6,000

120

Leung Yan Po, Compradore, and Chiu Chun Yat, Contractor,

30,000

900

Herbert Spear, of Shanghai, Master Mariner.

5.000

100

Un Tang Shi, the widow and relict,

300

3

Lee Ah Sz, the mother,

Tang Cheuk ling, the eldest son,

3,000

60

200

No duty.

Lam Kwan, Compradore, S.S. Nam Sang, Chan Yee Koo, Executrix..

1,700

34

1.500

30

Friederich Erich Carl Georg, the Attorney for François Auguste Mangelschots and Louis Vermandel, Exccutors.

47,400

1,422

Ng Mok Shi, the widow and relict,

99,500

2,985

U Shiu Wo, Attorney for U Chu Shi, the widow and relict.

1.100

22

Frederick Selmes Jackson and John James Gulland, Executors,

15,300

459

7,300

146

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator, Thomas William Pollock, of Shanghai, Engineer,

400

.4

3,400

68

1,500

30

3,000

60

$10,232,950 298,513

Sarah Smith Prentnall, the widow and relict, Robert Henry Meek, Assistant Manager, and Alfred Shuttleworth, Chartered Acct.,

Lo Ping Chun, a son,

Marçal Antonio Vas, a son,

Carried forward,

*

Duty paid on Original Grant.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

130

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

1907.

Time and Place of Death.

79 April, 16 | Tso King,

12th Sept., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

80 June, 22 Jang Wan Chew alias Ching Wan Chew, 1st June, 1907, at Sea on the S.S. "Siberia,' 81 May, 16 | Wong Kwai (or Quai),

28th Nov., 1906,. Yaumati, Kowloon,

...

*

82 June, 15 Reginal Walter Heyshal Wood,

19th March, 1906, at Sea,

83

14

Alexander Tillett,

lith Feb., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

:

81 July, 15

Frank Arthur Morgan,

85

11 Chan Sui Shang,

86

10 Ng Sing,

87

10

Mathew Joseph O'Regan,

88

15

89

Chen Jack Thee alias Chun Jock Chee,...

10 Tse Kang Tong alias Tse Ü Shek alias Tse Yau Shun alias Tse Shung To,

90

12

Julius Wondrak,

""

91 | May, 30

Wong Chik Shi,

11th Feb., 1907, Glamorgan, Wales, 29th Jan., 1907, Hankow, China, 17th Feb., 1903, San Ning; China, 13th April, 1906, Cornwall, England,. 13th April, 1907, Heungshan, China,

5th Aug., 1906, Canton, China,

22nd June, 1907, The Peak, Hongkong, 15th July, 1905, Victoria, Hongkong...................... 3rd Sept., 1906, Shanghai, China, . 93 July, 12 Chi Chik Ki alias Kam Fong alias Lai | 28th Jan., 1907, Nam Hoi, China,

92 June, 20 | Li Sing Sun,

12th March, 1907, Kowloon, 26th May, 1907, Shanghai, China,

Chuen alias King Wa,

94

,,

16

Mary Millicent Boyle,

95

Aug.,

1

Steven Simpson,.

96

1

Juana Zaragoza de Jackson,..

}}

97

1

Wong Lui Pang.

1st Oct, 1906, Nam Hoi, China,

12th Dec., 1896, Manila, Philippine Islands,.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Probate,

Sealing of Exemplification of Letters of Adm.. Sealing of Letters of Adm. cum testamento annexo, Sealing of Exemplifica- tion of Probate, Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

Sealing of Probate,

Ng Shi Sing, Trader,.

Value under which sworn,

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

Brought forward,

10,232,950

298,513

Letters of Adm.,

Horace Percy Smith, Land and Estate Agent,

13,500

405

Ching Wan Fan, a brother,

300

B

Albert Ahwee, Gentleman,

10,000

200

Maria Louisa Wood, the Administratrix,

29,400

882

David Malcolm Carment, the Syndic appointed by The Law Guarantee and Trust Society Limited,

287,400

8,622

John Currie Hanson, one of the remaining Executors,

8,500

170

Chan Li Shi, the widow and relict,

700

7

600

6

Lelybelle O'Regan, the widow and relict,

Chan Un Shi, the widow and relict,

30,200

906

4,600

92

39,200

1,176

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator,

Wong Hang Chuen, Gentleman,

Li Hok Wa alias Li Sat Chan, a son,

Chu Cheung Yü, one of the sons,

Henry Butterworth, a brother,

James Hutchison, one of the Executors,

...

200

No duty.

6,600

132

9,200

184

10,500

315

250 No duty.

2,100

42

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, Attorney for Emma Mary Turner, widow, one of the children,

2,100

42

Wong Chan Shi, the widow and relict,

Carried forward,

800

|10,689,100 || 311,705

Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

Letters of Adm., Probate according to the tenor with power reserved, Letters of Adm., Sealing of Probate, Letters of Adm. for use

and benefit, &c., Probate,

Tse Chung Tin, Tse Chung Man and Tsc Chung Shing, l'awnbrokers,

GA

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

}

་་

131 -

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Value under which sworn.

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

$

1907.

Brought forward,

10,689,100

311,705

98 July, 29

Kwok A Yee,

11th Aug., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

Probate,

Chow A Ng, widow, sole Executrix,

4.000

80

99

29

Don Juan Ortiz Monasterio,

21st April, 1907, Seville, Spain,

Letter of Adm., for use and benefit, &c..

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, Attorney for Francisco Godinez and Daniel Grifol, the Executors,

3,500

70

100

27

Samuel Newton,

101

29

Budroodien Moola Nooroodin,.

26th Oct., 1906, New Jersey, United States of America,. 24th Jan., 1897, Cambay, India,

Robert Gordon Shewan, Attorney for Samuel Newton, the

9,800

196

son,

17

Hoosain Ali, Attorney for Fidahoosen, Alihoosen and Endyethoosen, the sons,

-800

8

102 | Aug, 13

Shiu Tuen Shi

103

Lee Tung.........

104 Jan., 23

Wong Fong alias Yue Shan,

105 Aug., 12 Tam Shing, 106 July, 26 P. J. Blick. 107 Aug., 19 Artbur H. de C. Hamilton, 108 July, 27 James Ritchie Wilson, 109 Aug., 22 | Harry Wicking,

110

111

"

112

27

A. J. Bowden.

IR

22 | Silas Enos Burrows,

Yuen a-Wong alias Shin Yuen Shi alias 7th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

26 Charles Isaac Sassoon, 12 José Maria Basa,.

114 Sept., 3 George Smith,

19th May, 1907, Nam Hoi, China,. 1st Jan., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 24th Feb., 1907, Hoi Ping, China, 29th May, 1997, Lo Fong, China. 16th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 14th May, 1907, Glasgow, Scotland, 30th April, 1907, Yokohama, Japan, 14th Dec., 1906, Chester, England....

10th July, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

31st July, 1907, at Sea between Haiphong and Hoihow,

28th Sept., 1906, Brighton, England,

17th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,..

Probate.

Letters of Adm.,

Ietters of Adm., with Will & Codicils annexed. for use and benefit.

Probate,

Godfrey Cornewall Chester Master, Solicitor, Attorney for

the Union Trust Company of New Haven, Connecticut, U.S.A., and Henry Stuart Hotchkiss, two of the Execu- tors,

Martha Smith. the widow and relict.

Letters of Adm

Shiu a-Kan. the husband,.

149

Nil.

Lee Kwai, the only son,

800

8

Probate,

Wong Chung Shi, the widow and relict,

3,500

70

Tam Ip Shi, the widow and relict,

500

Letters of Adm..

Joseph Horsford Kemp. Official Administrator,

150

Nil.

Do.

do.

do..

500

Probate,

Sealing of Probate,

William Roberts, Engineer,

11,600

348

Hannah Wicking, the widow and relict.

124,600

3.73$

Flora Sassoon and Davil Charles Sassoon, Executors, Ricardo Basa, one of the sons,

9.000

180

27.200

816

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator.

8,000

160

39.100

1,173

Carried forward,

8,400

168

10,940,690

318,730

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

Time and Place of Death.

132

-

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Valne under which sworn.

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

$

Brought forward..

|10,940,690

318,730

Lau Leung Shi, the widow and relict,

8.000

160

Fung Nam Pak, Merchant,

33,800

1,014

Reginald Francis Chester Master, Solicitor, Attorney for Andres Canals, the Administrator,

1,900

38

Charles Dixon Cousins, the husband,

1,600

32

Chu Fung Shi, the widow and relict,.

3,000

60

Lee Ng Shi, the widow and relict,

20,500

615

Letters of Adm. cum

testamento annexo, for

David Harvey, Attorney for Isabella Deas, sister of the deceased, the Executrix,

3,300

66

use and benefit, &c.

Probate,

Mary Ann Ramsay, the widow and relict,

19,600

588

Sealing Exemplification | Alfred Wolff, George Solomon Joseph and Lionel Worm-

8,000

160

of Probate,

ser Harris, the Executors,

Probate with Power

Alfred Norton Huke, Stationer,

21,500

645

.

reserved,

Sealing of Probate.

Probate,

George Philip Lammert, Auctionee",

34,500

1.035

Sophia Jemima Beach, Thomas Boswell Beach and Flet- cher Beach, the surviving Executors,

7,200

144

Wong Yiu, only son,

3,000

60

Ling Cum, Spinster,

200

No duty.

Tam Sheong, a son,

3,100

62

Probate,

Luk Tam Shi, mother, and Luk Leung Shi and Luk Lai Shi, Spinsters,

5,900

118

Letters of Adm.,

James Vanstone, the husband,.........................

600

6

Probate,

Ng Chung Shi, widow, and Chiu Piu, Medical Practitioner, the Executors,

8,700

174

Carried forward,

$ 11,125,090

323,707

1907.

115 | Aug., 30 | Lau Lung Shang,

116

29. Fung Pak,

117

26

Salud de la Rosa,

118

30

Edith Annie Cousins,

119

26

"}

Chu Kwing Sheung,

120

29

38

121 Sept., 6

6th Mar., 1907, Canton, China,

11th Mar., 1907, Kwong Tung, China, 13th Feb., 1997, Manila, Philippine Islands,

21st Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 28th Mar., 1907, Canton, China,

Lee Ting San alias Ing San Lee alias | 6th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Ing San Li,

William Matthew Deas,

122

6 | William Ramsay,

123

9 Louis Jephson,

"

Walter William Brewer,

18th Aug., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

25th July, 1907, at sea on board the S.S. Roon, between Aden and Suez,

20th March, 1905, Brighton, England,

Letters of Adm.

Probate

according to tenor. Letters of Adm, cum testamento annexo, for use and benefit, &c. Letters of Adm.

Probate,

Letters of Adm.,

124 Aug., 26

125

11

126

127

15 Edward William Mitchell, Sept., 19 | William Roberts Beach, 13 Wong Wai Chau,

:

*

128

>>

25 Jesse Haslup Chesney,

129 May,

1

Tam Bing Yec,

130 Sept., 30 Luk Man Tsun,

27th April, 1907, at Sea,

7th Sept., 1906, Ersham, England, 22nd Jan., 1907, Reading, England,

29th July, 1907, Pun Ü, China, 2nd Sept., Kowloon, Hongkong, 6th Jan., 1907, Canton, China, 29th July, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 22nd Sept., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

131

132

21

30 Lizzie Vanstone,

Ho Tau,.

28th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

}}

Letters of Adm.

1

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

1

ہے۔

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

1907.

Brought forward,.

Value under which sworn.

$

11,125,090

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

$

323,707

133 Oct., 17

Chow Sow Ling,

7th Dec., 1906, Victoria, Hongkong,

Letters of Adm..

Chow Li Shi, the widow and relict,

12,800 :

384

134

7

Wong Chi Fung,.

24th Sept., 1907, at Sea between Saigon and Hongkong,

Wong Cheuk Hi, a son,

150

No duty.

135

16 Grace Annette Woodcock.

17th Sept., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong.

George Albert Woodcock, the husband,

4,500

90

136

12

William Basil Dixon,.

137

138 Sept., 9

140

141

"!

7

R. Olsen,

17 Lottie Bagnold Firth,

Ip Yau,

139 Oct., 11

Ernest Henry Grainger,

9 Pallonjec Merwanjee Sethna.

142

143

14

John David Minhinnett, 22 Edward Bowdler.

:>

144

18

Wai Po Shin,

145 May, 27 Jayme alias James de Souza,

146 Nov.

Philip Solomons,

147

Oct.

Chan I,

148

31 Ole Martin Anderson.

...

5th Oct., 1906, Blackheath, England,..

15th Mar., 1907, Deal, England, 27th Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 24th Sept., 1907, Wuchow, China, 14th July, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 23rd Dec., 1900, Bombay, India.

5th Oct., Victoria, Hongkong,

4th Oct., 1907, The Peak, Hongkong,. 20th May, 1907, San Ning, China,

8th August, 1905, Victoria. Hongkong,

4th July, 1907, Middlesex, England,

17th May, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

10th Oct., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Sealing of Exemplifi- cation of Probate, Probate,

Letters of Adm..

Letters of Adm. for use and benefit, &c.,

Sealing of Probate.

Herbert Edward Boyce, the surviving Executor,.

52,900

1,578

Beatrice Mary Firth, a sister and sole Executrix,

4,500

90

Li Chuen, Contractor,

1,500

30

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator,

350

4

¡

Do,

150

No duty.

Takeo Takamichi, Manager of the Yokohama Specie Bank, Attorney for Kaikhushroo Pallonjee Sethna, one of the sons,

800

8

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator,

8,500

170

Probate,

Anne Bowdler, the widow and relict,...................... Wai Shu Wing, Merchant,

73,000

2,190

9,800

196

Sealing of Probate,

Julio Cesar da Rocha of Macau, Priest in Holy Orders, Attorney for Hermeneguilda Libania da Rosa and Theobaldo Joaquim Collaço, Gentleman, Francis Colurn, Solicitor; and Lionel Seligman, Gentleman,

47,000

1,410

800

8

Probate.

Chan Ah Woon and Chan Mui Chai, widows; and Fuk Kam Tai, Coxswain, the Executors,

Joseph Horsford Kemp, Official Administrator,.

Carried forward,

3,100

62

4,700

351

11,349,640 | 330,278

133 -

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,- Continued.

134 -

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant,

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Value under

which sworn.

Brought forward,

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

$

11,349,640

330,278

1907.

149 Oct., 17

David Gilmour,

Au King Man,.

7

Siu Yiu Shing,..

"}

155

3rd Oct., 1907, Victoria. Hongkong,

150 Nov., 13

151

152 Oct., 31 George Hermann Drewes,... 153 Sept., 13 | Johannes Jacobus Van der Pot.

154 Nov.,

8 Lam Yung,

18

Lau Chin Ting,

8th Mar., 1907, Downs, England,

11th Nov., Victoria, Hongkong,

14th Oct., 1907, on board the S.S. Korea, in the Harbour - of Kobe, Japan,

21st Aug., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

13th Sept., 1905, Arnhem, Holland,

15th Oct., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Scaling Exemplification | William Henry Dalgleish, James Muirhead, and Heury of Probate, Morris, Executors,

Letters of Adm.,

Probate with power reserved, Scaling of Probate.

94,600

2,838

Au Li Shi, the widow and relict,

100

No duty.

Siu Lam Shi, the widow and relict,

1,100

22

""

Carl William Longuet, Merchant,

19,700

591

Combertus Willem van der Pot and Fredrick Eduard Karch Stoelman. Executors,

500

Probate,

Fung Shek, Trader,

12,600

378

1

Lan Leung Shi and Lau Leung Shi, Spinsters; Lau Po Tsun, a son ; and Lo Sut Po, son-in-law,

655,300

19,659

156

21

Rachel Hay Cox otherwise Rachel Hay 9th Mar., 1907, Pasteur, Algiers,

Sealing of Probate,

Eustace Maude Richardson Cox and Arthur Oswald Fisher, Executors,

44,500

1.335

Richardson Cox,

157

29

Ernest Joseph Meugens,

158

13

Wai Yiu Chuen,

159

30

Francisco de Paula Enriquez,

160 Dec.,

5 Alexander Fowlie,

24th July, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Wai Iu Chuen alias Wai Yu Chuen alias 10th May, 1891, Heung Shan, China,

Probate,

Double Probate,

Minna Amanda Meugens, the widow and relict,.

250

No duty.

Wai Ah Lau, Gentleman,

26,000

15th Mar., 1878, Manila, Philippine Islands,

Letters of Adm., cum testamento annexo, for use

Reginald Francis Chester Master, Attorney for Rafael Enriquez,

1,200

24

162

Dec.,

Edward Langham Stainfield,

163

161 Nov., 13 | Charlotte Meyer,.

Gertrude E. McKelvey alias Dayton,

15th April, 1907, Aberdeen, Scotland,

14th March, 1907, Florence, Italy,

3rd Jan., 1907, on board the S.S. Tai On, on a voyage from Kong Mun to Hongkong,

4th August, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

and benefit, &c., Exemplification of Settlement and Con- firmation of the Will, Lettters of Adm., cum testamento for use and benefit, &c., Letters of Adm.,

Arathoon Seth, L.S.O., Official Administrator,

Margaret Ogston Fowlie, Charles Cameron and James Black, Executors,

35.600

1,068

Friedrich Hermann Arnold Fuchs, Attorney for Hans Wossidlo, the Executor,

25,100

753

800

8

Do.

do.,

1,600

32

Carried forward,...

|12,268,590

356,991

*

Duty paid on Original Grant,

No.

Date of

Grant.

Name of Testator or Intestate.

1907.

:

CALENDAR of PROBATES and LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION,-Continued.

Time and Place of Death.

Nature of Grant.

Name and Description of Executor or Administrator.

Value under which sworn.

Amount of

probate

duty paid.

$

356,991

Brought forward,

12,268,590

Letters of Adm.,

Probate,

Arathoon Seth, I.S.O., Official Administrator,

250

No duty.

Li Leung Shi and Li Chim Shi. widows,

1,400

29

""

Chan Hing, Trader,

2,000

40

Adelino Augusto dos Remedios (Senior), the father,

150

No duty.

Annie Wylie, a sister,

7,500

150

annexo, Letters of Adm.,

Cheung Yu Shi,

1,100 |

22

Probate.

Wong Hon Shi, Wong Tsoi Shi, Wong Ng Shi and Wong Ho Shi, Executrixes,

383.000

11,490

Letters of Adm.,

Ng Cheong Shi. the widow and relict.

300

Arthur Frederick Osmund, the husband,

250

No duty.

Chan Hing, a brother,

1,700

34

Probate.

Letters of Adm.

Li Shun Ying, the widow and relict,

7,500

150

Chan King, a cousin,

100

No duty.

;

'Pang Yau, the father,

1,100

22

Joseph Chan otherwise Chan Shang Hi, Clerk in Holy Orders,

500

5

Cheang Lo Shi, the widow and relict,

300

3

164 Dec., 7

Meed Gulam,

165 Nov., 20 Li Ho Shi,.

166

167 Dec.,

29

Chun Sun Poo alias Chan Ming,

19

5

168

13

";

Adelino Augusto dos Remedios, Jr., Richard Aspinall Wylie,

169

"

12 Cheung Po,

170 Nov., 29

171

30

Wong Ki Sam alias Wong Sing Kai, Ng King Ting,

21st Nov., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,.. 10th May, 1906, Canton, China, 23rd Sept., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 6th Mar., 1907, Victoria, Hongkong, 12th Jan., 1997, Chester, England,

28th June, 1907, at or near Butler, Ontario, Canada, .

30th May, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

Letters of Adm.,

Sealing of Letters of Adm, cum testamento

28th Mar., 1907, Canton, China,

172 Dec., 20

173

2

95

Angelica Maria Ozorio Osmund, 16 Chan Qwai,

19th June, 1907, Victoria, Hongkong,

2nd Jan, 1906, at Green Quicksilver Mine about 100 miles from San Francisco, 23rd July, 1907, Canton, China,

174 Nov., 20 | Lam Big Kwong,

121

Chan Leung Lok alias Chong Loon Lee, 9th Nov., 1907, at Sea between San Francisco and Hono- lulu,

Pang Ting Loy.

175

Dec., 23

176

28th June, 1907, at or near Butler, Ontario, Canada,.

177 | Nov., 13

Chen Chung Fu alias Chen Chung Tong, 29th Sept., 1907, Canton, China,

178

Dec., 16

Cheang Man Tsoi,

1st April, 1903, Heung Shan, China,

Letters of Adm. cum- testamento annexo, Letters of Adm.

Total,

12,675,740

368.938

135

136

Table VIII.

RETURN of ESTATES of INTESTATES for the first half-year ending 30th June, 1907.

(Ordinance 2 of 1897, section 28.)

Amount Deductions Balance on

Suknunden Singh,

A Yan,

Sam Yau,

1,625.40

Wong Kin,

3.97

.20

received on for Dis-

Name of Intestates.

account of bursements. Accounts.

Estates.

$$

C.

200.00

4.60

$ 10.00 .23

$

C.

190.00

4.37

Disposal of Balance.

Paid to Yu Cheng.

Paid to Hu Po, Guardian of Lung

Ping.

1,625.40 Paid to Otto Kong Sing, Solicitor

for Tsiu Hok Sing.

Paid into the Treasury.

closing

3.77

H. H. Just,

1,143.57

98.38

1,045.19

Poon Hung,

828.07

41.40

786.67

Jabagir Khan,

359.27

17.96

341.31

Various Estates under $50

in value,

3.09

3.09

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

J. Ribeiro,

641.01

32.00

609.01

C. W. B. Beach,

600.00

30.00

Paid to F. X. d'Almada é Castro,

Solicitor.

570.00 Paid into the Treasury

Charles Arshow...

2,413.48

702.30

1,711.18

Dr. Edgar Swindells..........

805.24

505.15

300.09

Do.

Do.

Total,......

8.627.70

1,437.62

7,190.08

Table VIII (a).

RETURN of ESTATES of INTESTATES for the second half-year ending 31st December, 1907.

(Ordinance 2 of 1897, section 28.)

Deductions

Balance on

Disposal of Balance.

for Disburse- closing Ac-

Amount re-

Name of Intestates.

ceived on

account of Estates.

ments.

counts.

$

C.

$

C.

$ C.

P. Nevarino,

30.30

24.51

5.79

R. Olsen,

112.61

82.43

A. J. Bowden,

1,583.45

415.71

30.18 1,167.74

G. E. McKelvey or Dayton,..

323.60

A. H. de C. Hamilton,

967.43

71.38 958.10

252.22

Paid into the Treasury

Do.

Paid to Johnson, Stokes &

Master, Solicitors.

Paid into the Treasury.

9.33

Do.

E. E. J. Erskine,

29.15

7.46

21.69

Do.

E. H. Granger,

J. D. Minhinnett,

652.86

446.60

206.26

Do.

9.389.81

1,222.77

8,167.04

Do.

O. M. Anderson,...

824.75

616.64

208.11

Do.

J. Macaulay,

110.57

5.53

105.04

Do.

Meed Gulam,

217.25

43.21

174.04

Do.

E. L. Stainfield,

767.86

263.59

504.27

Do.

Imtiaz Ali,

131.29

46.71

84.58

Do.

C. J. Bryant,

235.44

11.77

223.67

Do.

A. de P. Barros,

100.00

5.00

95.00

Do.

J. B. Muir,

258.72

12.94

245.78

Do.

M. Merlees,.....

119.17

5.96

113.21

Do.

Total,.

15,854.26

4,240.31

11,613.95

137

Table IX.

RETURN of all Sums received as REVENUE in the REGISTRY of the

SUPREME COURT, during the

year 1907.

Original Jurisdiction,

Summary Do.

Bankruptcy Do.

Probate

Do.

Admiralty Do.

Official Administrator's Commission,

Official Trustee's Commission,

$ 16,201.35

C.

8,705.10

3,073.35

11.820.90

314.50

1,468.13

728.47

Bailiff's Fees, (including what was hitherto described as Sheriff's Fees).

1,354.00

Fees on Distraints,.................

Registrar of Companies' Fees,

Fines and Forfeitures,

Unclaimed Balances of Intestate Estates,

2,770.00

6,197.40

275.00

20.25

Unclaimed Dividends in Bankruptcy Estates,

3,228.33

Total,....

$ 56,156.78

Table IX (a).

COMPARATIVE RETURN of all SUMS COLLECTED in the REGISTRY of the SUPREME COURT,

ar 1907, and paid into the TREASURY.

during the year

1906.

1907.

REGISTRAR.-Court Fees paid by Stamps,.

$ C. 38,902.66

$ (. 42,885.20

OEFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR.-5% on amounts encashed and

paid into the Treasury,

4,180.70

1,468.13

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.-2% on amount of Trust on taking over up to $10,000, above $10,000 Commission 1%, & 2% on income,

143.25

728.47

BAILIFF'S FEES.-(including what was hitherto described as

Sheriff's Fees),

1,378.00

1.354.00

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES,

8,299.50

6,197.40

FINES AND FORFEITURES,

275.00

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS,.

...

Unclaimed Balances of Intestate Estates,

20.25

Unclaimed Dividends in Bankruptcy Estates,....

...

3,228.33

Totals,.

$ 52,904.11

$56,156.78

No. 9.

DIEU

ET

SOIT

QUI

MA

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

TO

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 1st of MAY, 1908.

Published by Authority.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR GENERAL FOR THE YEAR 1907.

Laid before the Legislative Council by Command of

His Excellency the Governor, April 30th, 1908.

1. Revenue and Expenditure.

(See Tables I a and I b.)

   The revenue collected during the year amounted to $163,261.13, a sum $14,023.08 below the revenue collected in 1906. The estimated revenue for the year was $156,180; the principal items in which the estimate was exceeded were Hawkers' Licences, Money Changers' Licences and Householders'. Registration. Reference is made to these increases. below. The revenue from Markets fell short of the estimate by $3,000.

The only material decrease in the revenue compared with that for 1906 is under the head Boat Licences. In 1906 the revenue from these licences was something over $24,000. It is now collected by the Harbour Master. There were substantial increases under the heads Hawkers' Licences, Money Changers' Licences, Householders' Registration and Markets. The number of hawkers' licences issued increased from 14,165 in 1906 to 15,193. The subjoined table gives an indication of the probable number of hawkers at any one time. during the year.

First half-year ending 31st March, 1907.

Second half-year ending 30th September, 1907.

New Licences issued,

Licences renewed,

7,116

3,638

4,159

Total,

7,116

7,797

year.

140

An increase of 50 per cent. in the revenue from Money Changers' Licences is due no doubt to the great discount at which the silver subsidiary coinage stood for a part of the The inclusion of the Kowloon Peninsula in that part of the Colony to which Part III of Ordinance No. 3 of 1888, providing for the Registration of Householders, applies, accounts for the comparatively large sum received under the heading Householders' Regis- tration. The increase in the revenue from Markets is a little over one per cent. and is fairly evenly distributed.

   It is satisfactory to find that the rents for the stalls in the Mongkoktsui Market are maintained at the level at which they stood twelve months ago; the market evidently meets a want. The Des Voeux Road Market has not been hitherto a great success but for some reason the market people turned their attention to it in November and all the market is now fully let at the rate of $1,306 a year, a low rent it is true, but an increase of 30 per cent. on the rent received in 1906. As I stated in last year's report the accommodation for the poultry dealers in the New Western Market was found insufficient and two dealers have been given permission to move into premises outside the market. The Old Western Market has been opened out by the removal of unnecessary stalls and the remainder of the premises has been divided between the butchers and vegetable and fruit dealers. The arrangements were completed on the 15th October.

   Of the total revenue collected by the Registrar General's Department in 1907, 67 per cent. came from the rent of market premises, and 18 per cent. from fees for hawkers' licences.

   The total expenditure during the year was $35,630.88 compared with $36,947.46 in 1906. The expenditure in 1906 was increased by the Census. The actual expenditure fell short of the estimated expenditure by $2,701.12. The principal items in which the expenditure was below the estimate were Personal Emoluments, Census and Kent of Quarters for student-interpreters.

2.-Protection of Women and Girls.

(See Tables II a to II f.)

(i.)-Women and Girls' Protection Ordinance, No. 4 of 1897.

   The number of women detained under warrant was 139 compared with 160 in 1906. The subjoined Table enables a comparison to be made between the last seven years.

Women detained by the Registrar General.

Year.

At the Registrar General's Office.

1

2

At the Emigration

Office.

3

Released after Percentage of

enquiry:

5 to 4.

Total.

5

6

1901

82

335

113

34

1902

139

587

310

53

:

1903

144

826

407

50

?

1904

289

135

424

237

56

1905

191

71

262

94

36

1906

110

50

160

49

31

1907

90

49

139

39

28

--

141

     It is satisfactory to find that the percentage of cases in which after examination at the Po Leung Kuk, no grounds can be found for detention, has fallen as low as 28. To send 800 women to the Po Leung Kuk in one year throws a very great deal of work on the directors and puts a severe strain on the resources and accommodation of the institution, whilst it is unpleasant to find that in 400 cases the detention was not justified. On the other hand it may be that during the last year, too many doubtful cases have been per- mitted to pass. It is very hard in this business to strike the mean.

     In all, 316 persons were admitted to the Po Leung Kuk, 16 being runaway maid- servants. In the case of maidservants wherever there is evidence of ill-treatment the Police are asked to prosecute, but even in cases of ill-treatment the fault is probably not all on one side. The schools to which these children are sent find thein as a class unsatisfactory and hard to manage. The number of girls added during the year to the list of those required under bond to report themselves regularly to the Registrar General was twelve. Sixty-six girls were reported to the Po Leung Kuk as being missing in Hongkong during 1907, and of these only nine were reported to have been recovered.

     Five persons were sent to the Italian Convent during the year and twelve to Miss Eyre's Refuge, and of these four were sent under warrant, two to each institution. Table II f gives the necessary details regarding them. Both institutions have been visited by me more than once during the year, and Miss Eyre's Refuge has also been visited by some of the directors of the Po Leung Kuk. At a final inspection made at the close of the year only one complaint was made. The girls both at the Refuge and at the Convent looked clean, healthy and happy. The Sisters tell me that they have now no trouble with the girls and that they will be willing to receive any more who can be sent to them. Two of the girls who have been married happened to be in the Convent at the time of my last visit: they were well-dressed and seemed happy.

(ii.)-Po Leung Kuk Incorporation Ordinance, No. 6 of 1893.

The report of Society, for the year 1907, will be found in Appendix A to this Report.

The Permanent Board of Directors consists of the following members :-

Ex-Officio Members :---

The Registrar General.

The two Chinese Members of the Legislative Council.

Other Members:---

1. LAU SHAI-CHAK appointed 26th June, 1893.

2. LEUNG PUI-CHI

""

3. LI SAU-HIN

99

17th July, 1897.

4. KU FA-SHAN

26th October, 1905.

5. CHỊU CHAU-SAM

6. PUN YAN-TSUN

7. YUNG SHIU-PO

8. TAM TSZ-KONG'

"

23rd. November, 1905.

27th March, 1906.

8th May, 1906.

14th November, 1907..

3.-Emigration.

Emigration Ordinance, No. 1 of 1889.

(See Tables III a to III c.)

(i.)-Female Emigration.

The examination of females and children under 16 is conducted by the Assistant Re- gistrar General and occupied about 156 hours; this is exclusive of the time spent by the Registrar General in re-examining doubtful cases. The number of women and children examined was 15,571, the examination is therefore conducted at the rate of about 100 emigrants the hour. This rate of speed may seem to be excessive and to give little. opportunity for ascertaining the actual status of the emigrants, but as a matter of fact in the case of eighty per cent. no examination is called for, only identification.

There are very

rarely any grounds for suspicion in the case of single women over 30, and of women and children going in families.

4

142

On the suggestion of the Protector of Chinese at Singapore, when the examination of an emigrant raises suspicions but does not justify detention full details of her statement are given on the Passenger List. In not a few instances the statements can be verified easily on the arrival of the emigrant at her destination, and detention here to enable enquiries to be made in China is unnecessary. Table III a shews the destination of emigrants; there is at present small probability of any abuse arising in connection with emigration to places. other than the Straits Settlements. 49 or 0.31 per cent. of the women and children examined before embarkation were detained for enquiries as against 35 or 0.32 per cent. in 1906. Ten cases were still under consideration at the close of the year. Of the remaining 39, 15 or 38 per cent. were ultimately allowed to leave without any order being made, as against 19 per cent. in 1906. 94 per cent. of the emigrants examined were going to the Straits Settlements.

(ii.)-Male Emigration.

  Male emigration has been very carefully supervised during the year. A number of ships taking Third Class passengers to the Straits Settlements have been inspected, and from the 1st November the emigration of labourers has been satisfactorily supervised by the adoption of measures agreed upon at a conference held in March with Mr. BARNES, the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in the Straits Settlements. A probable change in the Emigra- tion Law was foreshadowed by me in my annual report for 1905, but it was decided to take no steps until an opportunity had been given of discussing the whole question in personal conference with some officer from the Straits Settlements. This opportunity occurred in March last when Mr. BARNES passed through the Colony and an arrangement was come to, by which no immigrant to the Straits Settlements from Hongkong would be permitted to enter into a labour contract unless he had appeared before the Registrar General before embarkation.

  It is too soon to say what effect the new arrangement will have on the volume of emigration, but everything so far has worked smoothly. The examining officer has detected a number of cases of misrepresentation and fraud, and has rejected a number of youths and men physically unfit for work at the mines. This Office is in constant communication with the Protectorate of Chinese in Singapore and it is hoped that with a little more experience all but a few cases of fraud will be eliminated. A number of Chinese gentlemen who have served as members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk have undertaken to in- spect the emigrants when they present themselves for examination, and they commence their duties at the beginning of 1908. There is no doubt that their assistance will be of the greatest value.

  A Bill to give legal sanction to the present arrangement and to remove from the Emi- gration Ordinance those portions of Ordinance No. 37 of 1901 (original number) which proved valueless as well as burdensome has passed the Legislative Council. As the precau- tions which the bill will place under the sanction of the law have shewn their usefulness and effectiveness in a trial of three months, it is not premature to say that the Government will now find itself at last in a position to discover and check any serious abuses that may arise. In future, "assisted emigrants", i.e., those who get their passages to the Straits Settlements paid with the intention of working under contract on their arrival there, will.be separated from the bulk of the emigrants, who require no special protection, and the examination of them will be transferred from the Harbour Department to the Registrar General's Department. The men are examined on their arrival in the Colony, photographed and again examined before embarkation and every opportunity is given them of learning where they are going and of changing their mind if they so wish and going home. A full report on the work done under this head has been made by the Assistant Registrar General.

  During the year, 51 hotel-licences and 34 emigration-house licences were issued. The boarding-houses are those which are made use of by "assisted emigrants". Hotels are pa- tronised not only by intending emigrants but by visitors to Hongkong-both men and women. From the subjoined table a comparison can be made between the number of houses licensed and the accommodation provided at the close of the two years. 1906 and 1907.

Licensed on 31st December,

1906.

Accommodation for boarders.

Licensed on 31st December, 1907.

Accommodation for boarders.

Hotels,....

47

2,714

48

3,505

Emigration

houses,......

29

412

24

498

Xxx

143

Since 1905 the accommodation provided in hotels has increased 34 per cent. and that in boarding-houses 100. Two boarding-house licences have been cancelled for misbehaviour on the part of the keepers. In the one case a man had been induced to go on board by fraud and lept overboard, in the other an unwilling emigrant was prevented leaving the house.

Enquiries have been made in several cases for relatives who had gone to the Straits Settlements or to Borneo, and the missing men have been traced with the help of the records kept by the boarding-houses. In most instances the relatives have repaid, sometimes with the assistance of this office, the advances made to the emigrant ; in some they have been content with an interchange of letters.

It is pleasant to learn that the efforts made in Hongkong to stop emigration abuses are recognised elsewhere than in the Colony.

4.-Regulation of Chinese. Ordinance No. 3 of 1888.

(i.)--Registration of Householders.

(See Tables IV a and IV b.)

By an Order-in-Council dated the 2nd April, 1907, the provisions of Part III of the Ordinance were extended to the urban part of the Kowloon peninsula. In May, circulars were sent to landlords and householders calling their attention to the law, and by the end of the year, 1,788 houses out of 1,913 had been registered. The work of registration entailed the engagement of two temporary clerks for six months.

ii.) -District Watchmen.

(See Tables V a and V b.)

The balance to the credit of the Fund on the 31st December was $12,900 as against $10,276 for the preceding year. Contributions shew an increase of $690, expenditure a decrease of $880. There was no expenditure on building in 1907, but in 1908 it will become necessary to increase the accommodation in the District Watchmen's House at West Point. The Procession which was held in December necessitated the engagement of of Special Watchinen and entailed an expenditure of $1,100. Effect was also given to a resolution of the Board passed some time ago and the three Watchmen's Houses and the Registrar General's Office were placed on the Telephone Exchange. The increase in the Force during the last few years has been as follows :-

31st December, 1901

1903..

1904-1907 ...

.70 District Watchmen of all ranks.

... 82

.95

The number of resignations during the year was 8, and of dismissals 11, the same as last year. One hundred and forty-four convictions were obtained before the Police Magis- trate through the instrumentality of the District Watchmen. Since 1905 recruits are drilled and receive instruction in their duties at the Central Police Station and all District Watch- men attend drill there once a week. The District Watchmen Committee met nine times during the year, the average attendance being ten members. Mr. Li Pak who has been a member since the year 1900 resigned, but as the Committee was already complete no one

144

has been appointed to take his place. The list of present members and the dates of their appointments are given below-

Chairman :

The Registrar General.

Other Members :--

The Hon. Dr. Ho KAI, appointed 1st December, 1891.

Но Fuk,

LAU NAM CHỦNG,

TSEUNG SZ KAI,

LEUNG PUI CHI,

FUNG WA CHÜN,

Ụ Hoi CHAU,

LAU CHU PAK.

The Hon. Mr. WEI YUK.

TONG LAI CHUEN,

CHAN CHUN CHUEN,

CHOA LEEP CHEE,

"

"

71

26th September, 1892.

14th July, 1898.

29th November, 1901.

6th February, 1902. 28th February, 1903. 27th October, 1905.

יי

>>

22nd November, 1905.

7th May, 1906.

(iii.)-Permits.

The nature and number of permits issued during the year were as follows:-

To fire crackers for marriages,

286

on other occasions,

110

396

To hold processions,

30

Jin

     in other than permanent build- To perform theatricals- ings,

(in permanent buildings,.....

54

40

To hold religious ceremonies,

48

Total,

568

   Permits to hold religious ceremonies and theatrical performances in the New Territorios. North of the Kowloon Range are issued by the Assistant Superintendent of Police at Taipo.

The holding of theatrical performances in a temporary building in connection with a temple festival is of regular occurrence: The trustees of the temple invite tenders for the provision of a performance and the successful tenderer provides the theatrical company, builds as large a matshed as he thinks will be profitable and fills it as full as it can hold with seats. As is known the result in China is sometimes disastrous. To remove as far as possible the chance of such a catastrophe in Hongkong all applications for permits are to be accompanied in future by a sketch of the matshed, in order that the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade may see that there are adequate exits and gangways.

5.-Population.

Marriages. Ordinance No. 7 of 1875 as amended by Ordinance .No. 15 of 1902 and Ordinance No. 6 of 1903.

The number of marriages solemnized during the year was 137, as compared with 125 in 1906. Twenty-seven marriages were contracted at the Registrar General's Office.

'

145

286 permits were issued to fire crackers on the occasion of Chinese marriages, as against 225 in 1906.

Births and Deaths. Ordinance No 7 of 1896.

( Tables VI a to VT c).

For full particulars regarding these, reference should be made to the Annual Report of the Medical Officer of Health.

The Births registered during the year were as follows:---

Chinese, Non-Chinese,

Males.

Females.

Total.

736

388

1.124*

161

135

296†

897

523

1.420

* Including 3 males registered after the expiration of 12 months.

+

1 female

19

19

"

91

Four hundred and eighty-two (482) births were registered during the year in the West Point and East Point registration offices in Victoria, an increase of 66 on the number registered in 1906. The total number also of Chinese births registered in Victoria shews a satisfactory increase. The figures for the last ten years are:-

Number of Births registere.

Year.

1898,

.778

1899,

.684

1900,

.544

1901,.....

...663

1902.

738

1903,

...550

1904,

...622*

1905,.

.605

1906,

...644

1907.

.775

*The two district registries were opened on 1st July, 1904.

с

    Table VI c has been specially compiled for this report in the hope that it may lead to the forming of a more, reliable estimate than the present methods afford of the actual number of births among the Chinese.

The number of deaths registered during year was :-

Chinese, Non-Chinese,

..6,999

287

Total,...

7,286

Exhumations.

    Two hundred and ninety-nine (299) permits were issued to exhume human remains for removal to China or for reburial in the Colony.

Removal of Bodies from the Colony.

Four hundred and forty-one (441) certificates were issued by the Police for removal of bodies from the Colony.

-

6. Vaccination.

146

Ordinance No. 2 of 1890.

(See Tables VII a to VIIe.)

The total number of vaccinations recorded in Table VII a is 7,420 compared with 7,450 in 1906. The record includes only vaccinations performed at the hospitals and dispensaries and by the hospital and dispensary vaccinators. An increase is shown in the vaccinations. at Hunghom, Kowloon City and Yaumati. The returns from the villages shew an improve- ment. At Yaumati and Shaukiwan however the percentage of vaccinations to births is not yet as high as it ought to be.

7.-Registration of Books. Ordinance No. 2 of 1888.

Fifty-three books were registered during the year, compared with sixty-five in 1906.

8.-Copyright in Works of the Fine Arts. Ordinance No. 17 of 1901.

  Two sets of photographs and one "Map and Wall Directory of Hongkong Central " were registered during the year.

9.-Certificates of Identity to Chinese entering the United States of America, etc. Ordinance No. 3 of 1898.

The number of certificates issued during the years 1906 and 1907 was :-

To the United States.....

""

>>

Hawaiian Islands, Philippines,......

1906.

1907.

1

7

2

...

3.

t-

7

The issue of these certificates is now confined to Chinese who are British Subjects resident in Hongkong.

147

10.-Tung Wa Hospital. Ordinances No. 1 of 1870 and No. 9 of 1904.

(See Table VIII and Appendix B.)

The names of the Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital elected on the 24th November, 1907, are :-

TAM HOK-PO

CHAN LOK-CHUN

of the Yat On Bank.

""

King Wo Firm.

NG HON-CHI

National Bank of China, Ltd.

CHAN TIN-SHAN LI YUE-TONG

""

Yu Tak-shing Firm.

""

Kwong Wing Cheung Firm.

WONG CHIU-TONG

"?

CHUI CHUNG-YIK

CHAN CHEUK-HING

NG SAU-SHANG

15

CHEUNG CHEUNG-CHI

SHE TAT-TSOI

TSE SHI-PING

Standard Oil Co.

San Hing Opium Firm.

Chin Cheung Firm.

Fuk On Insurance Co.

Shun Kee Firm.

Hongkong, Canton & Macao Steamboat Co.

Tung Kee Firm.

HUNG TSZ-LEUNG

""

Kung Hing Firm.

CHEUNG SEI-KUN LI MAU-CHI

Ming Fat Rice Shop.

""

Ki Hing Pawn Shop.

The accounts will be found in Appendix B.

The expenditure during the year was $71,796 and exceeded the revenue by $2,750. Endeavours are now being made to increase the number of regular subscribers. The expenditure was less than the expenditure in 1906 by $700. The small number of plague cases allowed of a reduction in the expenditure on the Plague Hospital and economy has been effected under the heads Food and Salaries. $3,000 have been spent on building, repairs and furniture, $13,000 on burials and coffins. The expenditure under these last two heads. on bodies sent to the Government Mortuaries appears separately. The number of admis- sions to the hospital was 3,796 and of out-patients 70,843, an increase of 596 and 5,255 respectively over the numbers in 1906.

   The balance at the close of the year was $15,031. In addition to the varying cash balances and the landed property of the hospital the directors have the control of several funds of which so far no record has appeared in this report. Appendix B now gives the total amount of the funds referred to under their different heads, and the way in which they are invested. The directors have decided to make larger investments in landed property, their power to do so having been facilitate by Ordinance No. 9 of 1904, The Tung Wa Hospital (Extension of Powers) Ordinance 1904.

   The charitable work of the directors is not confined to administering the hospital; they must provide for the burial of the poor, must take a leading part in all charitable movements, especially in the raising of Famine Funds, and must repatriate the destitute. The sum spent on burials in 1907 exclusive of the burials of bodies sent from the Public Mortuaries was $9,035, and 950 persons were repatriated. Their assistance was invited by the chari- table societies of Canton in April to provide cheap rice, and the directors telegraphed to the Cantonese communities in other parts of the world for help. In answer to the appeal a sum of $110,000 was subscribed; two-thirds of this was sent to Canton and the remaining third kept for local needs. Fortunately a fall in the price of rice relieved the directors from the necessity of making immediate use of the fund.

   The gift of 30,000 taels by the Emperor of China towards the relief of the sufferers in the typhoon of 1906 was received too late for distribution and has been formed into an Emergency Fund for the relief of distress caused by any extraordinary calamity such as storm, fire, collision, &c.: the interest may be used for such purposes by the Committee with the approval of the members of the Corporation, the capital is not to be touched with- out the approval of the Governor (7522/06 C.S.O.).

148

-

During the year particular attention has been paid by the directors to the consumption of rice and firewood. It is hoped that a secure check has been placed on the consumption. of the former, and a saving in the expenditure on firewood has been made by buying it wholesale from importers. It is expected that a saving of $1,000 a year will be effected in this way.

The street lying between the new wing of the hospital and the l'o Leung Kuk has been leased to the hospital by the Government and has been enclosed. The inmates of the Po Leung Kuk are to be permitted the use of this ground, and it is proposed to plant it with trees.

The members of the Advisory Board have been consulted by me during the year on matters relating to the hospital, and their advice has proved of great value. The names of the members are :-

The Hon. Dr. Ho KAI, C.M.G.

Mr. WEI YUK.*

Mr. CHAN KANG-UE.

Mr. CHAN Tsz-WUN.*

Mr. CHAU SIU-KI.*

Mr. Ho FOOK.

Mr. Ho TUNG.

Mr. KU FAI-SHAN.*

Mr. LAU CHU-PAK.

Mr. LAU YAM-TSÜN.

Mr. LEUNG PUI-CHI.*

Mr. LI YAU-TSÜN.

Mr. Ló KUN-TING.*

Mr. PUN YAN-TSÜN.

Mr. TANG LAN-KUK.*

Mr. U HOI-CHAU.

Mr. UEN LAI-TSUN.*

* Ex-Chairmen of the Board of Directors.

In July the hospital applied for an increase in the annual Government Grant. The directors pointed out in support of their application the increased expense they had been. put to in recent years in burying dead bodies from the Government Mortuaries, in maintaining the Infectious Diseases Hospital at Kennedy Town and in repatriating destitutes. application was granted, and an addition of $2,000 to the annual grant approved.

Their

It has become necessary to enlarge the Hospital Cemetery at Kailungwan, and the Government Cemetery which it was proposed to open between the Hospital Cemetery and the road has been placed at the disposal of the hospital. The ground thus made available and the further extensions it is possible to make, will suffice for a number of years.

The hospital vaccinators visited Shamshuipo 8 times during the year, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Yaumati 6 times and Stanley twice.

Progress has been made with the scheme for providing a hospital for Chinese at Yaumati. The Government proposes to grant a site containing about 2.84 acres, to give $30,000 towards the cost of the building and to make an annual grant of $6,000. At the close of the year subscriptions to the amount of $63,141 had been promised, and of this sum $51,260 had been collected. The Chinese inhabitants of the Kowloon Peninsula are actively supporting the scheme; out of the total amount of subscriptions, $10,700 have been promised by them and they hope to raise at least $5,000 more. A public appeal is now being made to the European coinmunity and to the Chinese of Victoria.

149

11.-Chinese Public Dispensaries.

(See Tables IX a to IX d.)

The work of the dispensaries has been steadily carried on during the year. The Central District Dispensary in Kau Ue Fong was opened on the 1st February and has proved as useful as the two dispensaries first opened at West Point and East Point.

    A series of three lectures delivered at the theatres by Mr. FUNG WA-CHÜN, Mr. LAU CHU-PAK and Mr. HO KAM-TONG did much to make the objects of the dispensaries known to the public, and resulted in a large increase in the work. During the four weeks ending the 23rd March, 640 cases were treated at the three dispensaries in Victoria, during the four weeks ending the 28th December, 859. In the four weeks ending the 2nd November as many as 1,323 cases were treated.

    On the 1st August Mr. YEUNG WAN-PO was engaged to deliver street lectures on the benefits of the dispensaries and on sanitation: these have proved very successful and have been very well attended. Simple (though somewhat more elaborate) lectures on sanitation have been prepared and are being translated into Chinese for the use of the lecturer.

    The Committee look to local street committees to secure the necessary financial support and to make known the benefits of the dispensaries. These have been formed and com- menced work after China New Year.

    The West Point Committee has been of great assistance in inducing people to take their dead or sick infants to the dispensary. In 1907 the West Point Dispensary received 174 infants as against only 13 in 1906. It is satisfactory in this connection to note that the number of infants under 5 years of age treated at the dispensaries is more than three times what it was in 1906. A comparison of the statistics given in Table IX a this year and in my report for 1906 will shew the progress that has been made in all branches of the work.

    The expenditure on the three dispensaries in Victoria is just under $16,000 and exceeds the regular subscriptions by nearly $1,700. Fortunately the promoters of the Chinese Procession were able to make a grant out of their surplus funds of $4,800. The Yaumati Dispensary closed the year $170 in debt. The expenditure was $5,000 and the receipts from subscriptions was not quite $3,300. At Hunghom the recurrent expenditure exceeded subscriptions by $440, at Kowloon City by $670. It is recognised that the community at Kowloon City cannot maintain a dispensary by their own unaided efforts, and that Kowloon City and the neighbourhood cannot be called on to subscribe more than $2,400 a year. This year the subscriptions have fallen short of this sum by $480. The financial position of the dispensaries is therefore by no means assured. Table IX c gives an account of all the money that has passed through the Registrar General's hands. Table IX d gives separate statements of the full accounts of each dispensary.

    Steps are now being taken to secure further support from the Chinese, and arouse a more general interest in the movement. One of the objects of the dispensaries is to bring the mass of the population into closer touch with the Government in all sanitary matters, and through the agency of the dispensary at Kowloon City the charge on householders for white-washing their premises has been reduced by about one-half.

    Subjoined are statistics drawn up in such a form as to shew whether any connection exists between the abandoning of bodies and the prevalence of infectious disease.

Infants.

VICTORIA.

DUMPED BODIES.

Others.

Plague Cases.

Small-pox Cases.

Total.

1905....

400

176

614

160

28

1906........

530

266

796

611.

133

1907.

478

171

619

84

231

Infants.

DUMPED BODIES.

Others.

150

KOWLOON.

Plague Cases.

Small-pox Cases.

Total.

1905.....

171

88

259

96

1906.......

275

176

451

220

35

1907

226

122

348

104

56

The dispensaries in Victoria will extend their activity in one direction still further in 1908. The directors of the Tung Wa Hospital have made an arrangement to employ the dispensary coolies in removing patients and dead bodies to the hospital instead of employing -as they do now-outside undertakers. It is hoped that this arrangement will put a stop to the irregularities which it is believed were connected with the old system. (See my report for 1904.)

The piece of ground in Kau Ue Fong bought in 1905 for a dispensary has been found small and in May a yearly permit was obtained to occupy an additional piece of land on which to build a shed for the ambulance and dead-box.

12.-District Plague Hospitals.

Progress has been made during the year in the provision of District Plague Hospitals. The hospital at West Point which continues to occupy houses Nos. 63 and 65 Third Street was kept upon throughout the year, and nine cases were received. Six died on the day of admission, two on the second day, and the ninth was discharged after 23 days. It is hoped within the next year to secure permanent quarters for this hospital. In Wanchai four sites for a hospital have been under consideration, but so far negotiations have not been successful. In the central district the directors of the Tung Wa Hospital have taken the matter in hand and have made proposals to the Government. In Kowloon City an applica- tion from the local committee to adapt and repair one of the old buildings inside the city was granted, and the building was rendered fit for occupation by the end of September. In Hunghom an isolated building-No. 86A Des Voeux Road West--has been rented by the local committee and put in proper repair. In Yaumati the committee are in treaty for two semi- detached houses in a suitable locality.

Out of the vote "Charitable Allowances-Vote for District Hospitals," $1,100 have been granted to the West Point Hospital, $480 to the one at Kowloon City and $365 to the Hunghom hospital.

13.-Chinese Recreation Ground. (See Table X.)

The disposal of the balance to the credit of this Fund has been under consideration. during the year but nothing has been settled. The schemes proposed depend on the carrying out of other proposals which have not so far been put into effect. The ground is intended to be simply an open space where people can stroll about and sit under the trees, and is made full use of in the summer. An attempt has now been made to further improve its appearance without curtailing to any extent the space available for recreation, by contracting with a gardener to display 100 pot-plants on the ground, and this has relieved the bareness- somewhat. Additional seats have also been provided.

:

4.

151

   Regulations for the maintenance of good order and the preservation of property on the ground were made on the 14th May (Government Notification 377 of 1907, Gazette of 7th June, 1907).

14.-Passage Money Fund.

(See Table XI.)

   At the close of 1906 there was a balance to the credit of this Fund of $4,673. Authority was obtained to grant $1,250 to the Alice Memorial Hospital to be added to the endowment fund, and to place $3,250 on fixed deposit and pay the interest to Miss Eyre's Refuge.

15. Registrar General's Office Charitable Fund.

(See Table XII.)

An account of this Fund is annexed for the first time to the Annual Report. The Chinese have so many claims on them at present that I have postponed indefinitely any attempt to obtain substantial additions to the Fund. It is still my design however to create a Fund for helping destitute widows and workmen injured by accidents. among the labouring classes in Hongkong are frequent and there are now six widows pensioners of the office.

Casualties

16.-Legislation.

   The following Ordinances passed in 1907 more particularly affect the Chinese Community :-

No. 8.-The Public Health and Buildings (Amendment) Ordinance.

No. 12. The Local Communities Amendment Ordinance. No. 13. The Stocks Punishment Limitation Ordinance. No. 15. The Seditious Publications Ordinance.

   Two only of these Ordinances, No. 13 and No. 15, call for comment in this Report. Ordinance No. 13 was found necessary in order to regulate the imposition of a punishment which had fallen somewhat into disuse but which of late years had been awarded in a large number of cases. I refer to Ordinance No. 15, the necessity for which is described in the preamble, in order to record that the relations between the Chinese Press and this Office are of a very friendly nature and that I find the editors and managers, of newspapers are always ready to render any services that are asked for.

   Several Rules and Orders-in-Council relate to the Chinese. Stone, earth and turf may now be obtained from Crown Land free of charge in the New Territories if needed for personal use in building houses or farm buildings. Rules dated the 2nd April regulate the issue of Forestry Licences, and others dated the 30th May, the conversion of land into salt-pans.

17.-Prosecutions.

(See Table XIII.)

   A reference to Table XIII shows the extreme difficulty there is in obtaining a conviction under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance. Out of 47 defendants only 5 were convicted.

152

18. Interpretation Sub-Department.

Government Notification No. 581 of 1901.

(See Table XIV.)

  The Interpretation Department consists of 21 posts, in addition to the Sergeant Inter- preters in the Police Department and the Inspectors' Interpreters in the Sanitary Depart-

(See General Order No. 16.)

ment.

  During the year five student-interpreters passed the examination for a third class certificate. Four received appointments in the Sanitary Department and one in the Police. Five new student-interpreters were appointed and at the close of the year the approved number of student-interpreters (nine) was complete. Their conduct and progress have been quite satisfactory. A full list of all who have received appointments as student-interpreters is given in Table XIV.

19.-General.

In deference to the wishes of the Chinese merchants who do business with Canton it has been decided to continue to license the Postal Hongs which carry letters between Hongkong and that port. These Hongs are of very great service to the business community; they afford special facilities for despatching correspondence and deliver it quickly and safely.

  A petition which received very influential support was presented in August, 1906, complaining of the way in which the Excise Officers of the Opium Farm conducted searches of private premises and the examination of passengers and their baggage on their arrival in the Colony attention was also invited to the prevalence of the practice of "planting opium by informers. Petitioners made various suggestions which were adopted in all essential particulars.

:

""

  A list of the Chinese names of islands, bays, hills and passes in Hongkong and the New Territories to which English names have been affixed was taken in hand and is now being printed.

There does not appear to have been any serious trade dispute during the year. The junks employed in the carriage of timber to Canton took advantage of the scarcity of suitable junks after the typhoon, to try and increase their charges above the fixed rates, and timber merchants were put to some difficulty for a short time in securing carriage.

  The Chinese firms dealing in the export of Chinese clothing and eatables to the Transvaal complained of the high rate at which their goods were assessed for payment of import duty, and representations were made on their behalf to the Transvaal Government.

  A project which first started three years ago for the incorporation of the Man Mo Temple seems likely now to be carried out. A Bill has been submitted by the Trustees of the Temple property for the approval of the Government and is now under consideration.

The Directors of the Tung Wa Hospital who act as managers of the Temple have also been granted a lease of a piece of land behind the Temple. This land was given to the Man Mo Temple in the year 1877 and has since been regarded by the directors as its property, but no lease had ever been granted.

  A dispute as to the management of temple property at Shamshuipo was referred to the Registrar General, and settled by him with the assistance of two Chinese gentlemen. The property consists of a market and a wharf and the dispute originated in a struggle for the control of the property between the Puntei and the Hakka inhabitants of the village.

153

  A petition to which 322 chops were affixed was received in March from the inhabitants of Yaumati. Petitioners complained of the increase in the ferry fare to Hongkong and wished to start a public ferry to be controlled by the community. What may be called a municipal pier exists at Shamshuipo-one of the conditions of the lease being that the pier is to be managed by the lessee to the satisfaction of the Registrar General, who will be guided in his decisions by the wishes of the inhabitants of the village. The Government decided to put the pier site up to auction in the usual way.

  During the winter of 1906-1907 well-substantiated stories reached me of the black- mailing of Chinese by a man who posed as LAM KWA-NG a notorious brigand in the Heungshan district. The man could not be traced, as he carried on his business with great discretion, but he at last committed an error of judgment in attempting to blackmail Mr. TSUI SIEN-TING who knocked him down and marched him a mile to the nearest police station.

  The activity of the Botanical and Forestry Department in protecting plantations led in March to the receipt of numerous petitions from the Kowloon District on behalf of the wood-cutters. As a result further action was suspended pending investigation. In the country districts the principal fuel is dry grass and during the year it was found necessary. to warn the villagers of Little Hongkong that grass-cutting was not permitted in plantatious or in the natural forest.

  On the advice of Mr. LOCKHART and Dr. Ho KAI a Chinese Illustrated Encyclopædia (+4) has been bought for the Office Library. This work was first (古今圖書集成) published under Imperial Authority in 1726 and a new edition has been lately brought out in Shanghai.

  A Chinese procession-the first of its kind since March, 1894,-was held on the 5th, 6th and 7th of December. It attracted a great number of people to the Colony but the large crowds were quite orderly and there was no increase of crime. The committee of management were able to hand over $12,800-the unexpended balance of subscriptions, to charitable purposes.

20.-Staff.

1. The Registrar General was absent on vacation leave from the 27th July to the 3rd September and Mr. E. D. C. WOLFE, Acting Inspector of Schools, acted during his absence. 2. The Assistant Registrar General, Mr. C. CLEMENTI, was absent on leave throughout the year.

     He was promoted Assistant Colonial Secretary on the 29th October and Mr. E. D. C. WOLFE was appointed to fill the vacancy. Mr. J. DYER BALL acted as Assistant Registrar General up to the 22nd January when he was succeeded by Mr R. O. HUTCHISON.

3. Inspector E. BROWNE obtained a Second certificate for knowledge of the Hakka Dia- lect (Colloquial) on the 1st August and was granted an allowance of $60 per annum.

4. Sixth Grade Writer:-Mr. CHAN FUNG-TING was dismissed on the 31st October and was succeeded by Mr. TsU WA-KWAI.

5. First Grade Translator :-Mr. WONG PO-SHAU was placed on the Permanent Staff with a salary of $1,200 per annum from the 1st October.

6. Third Grade Interpreter & Clerk :-Mr. TANG TAT-HUNG obtained the Second Class Certificate on the 15th May.

7. Fifth Grade Interpreter:Mr. KwOK WA-FAN obtained the Third Class Certificate on the 10th July.

8. Sixth Grade Writers :-Three writers were engaged from the 10th May in connec- tion with the extension of Registration of Householders to Old Kowloon. Their services were dispensed with from 1st November with the exception of Mr. LI WAN-SANG, who is to fill the new post of 6th Grade Clerk as from the 1st January, 1908.

Temporary appointment :--Mr. D. W. TRATMAN, Assistant Land Officer, New Terri- tories, was appointed to help in the examination of emigrants from the 3rd December with an allowance of $600 per annum.

26th February, 1908.

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General.

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Table I a.

Revenue for the years 1906 and 1907.

Boat Licences,

Chinese Postmen's and Postal Hong Licences,

Undertakers' Licences,

Emigration House Licences,...

"

venue

not

Licences and Internal Re- otherwise

specified.

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for Specific Purposes, and Reimbur- sements-in-aid.

Rent of Government Prop- erty, Land and Houses.

Interest,

Miscellaneous,

Forfeitures,...

Hawkers' Licences,

Marriage Licences,

Money Chengers' Licences,

Special Fruit Licences,..

Births and Deaths Registration,

Chinese Gazette Sales,..

Certificates to Chinese entering U. S. A. and Manila,

Householders' Registration,

""

99

步步

Re-registration,

Removals,

...

Extracts,

Laundries,

Markets,

Interest acerned on official account,..

Refunds, &c....

Ordinance under which received.

Revenue in 1906. Revenue in 1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

(2)

No. 10 of 1899.

C.

24,098 (2)] (1)

c.

$

3

$

(2)

(2)

6 of 1900.

20

24,098

20

8 of 1887.

440

480

40

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 34 of 1902.

3,008

3,152

144

564

304

260

No. 8 of 1887.

28,330

30,386

2,056

No. 7 of 1875 & No. 15 of 1902.

1,055

936

119

No. 8 of 1887.

1,500

2,980

1,480

1 of 1903.

4,707

4,887

180

No. 7 of 1896.

559

678

118

3 of 1898.

100

350

250

""

30

24

6

3 of 1888.

324

99

5,661

5,337

3 of 1888.

"9

1,479

1,448

31

3 of 1888:

28

20

7

3 of 1888.

35

47

12

1,680

No. 1 of 1903.

109,200

1,515

110,336

165

1,136

1

124

52

1

72

Total,..

177,284.21

163,261.13

10,755.72

(1) Transferred to the Harbour Department. (2) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Deduct Increase,..

Total Decrease in 1907,

A

.$

24,778.80

10,755.72

14,023.08

154

:

155

Table I b.

Revenue from the Markets, and the number of shops and stalls occupied and

unoccupied at the end of 1907.

Markets.

Revenue.

(1)

Shops and Stalls.

Occupied.

Unoccupied.

Central,.... Des Voeux Road, Hung Hom,

51,410. 970.

(.

302

3

42

2,936.

57

Mong Kok Tsui,

931.

40

Sai Ying Pun, -

12,492.

71

Shaukiwan,

1,077.

34

Shek Tong Tsui,..

573.

30

So Kon-po,

1,328.

32

10

Tai Kok Tsui,

422.

20

12

Wan Chai,

3,861.

82

2

Western, New,

13,052.

85

4

Western, Old,.

Yaumati,

15,730.

104

13

5,550.

84

Total,....

$110,336.86

1,003

44

(1) Cents omitted except in the total.

Table II a.

Number of women and girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year

and the

arrangements made regarding

them.

In the Po Leung

Total.

:

:

I

28

29

O

:

:

13

29

T

Committed under Warrant from Registrar General's Committed under Warrant from Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Registrar General's Office. Office.

Sent with their own consent by Registrar General. Sent with their own consent from Singapore, Manila & Swatow.

Sent with their own consent by the Police

Accompanying parents or

Runaway maid-servants. guardian.

Lost Children.

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Placed in charge of hus- band.

Released under bond,

Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Placed in charge of Consul

for Japan.

Placed in charge of Consul for France.

Sent to Charitable Institu tions in China.

Sent to school, Convent or Refuge.

| Adopted.

Married.

Total.

Kuk on 1st Jan- uary, 1907,....

29

20

AUJGAL

Admitted during 316

87 49

21 93

33333

10 17

11

12 16 316|76

5 30101

1 1

19

12 12 25,

282

the year,.

Total,

345 107 53 22

97 10 1711 12

16 345 85 5 30 101

1 1 22

16 12 38

311

Remaining in the Po Leung Kuk on the 31st De- cember, 1907,

34 15

10

10

1

:

:

34

156

Table II b.

Number of women and girls detained under warrant after enquiry in the Registrar General's Office by the Registrar General and arrangements made regarding them.

Detained

previous to Detained 1st January, during 1907.

1907.

Total.

Permitted to leave,

8

25

33

under bond,

5

5

""

29

Restored to husband,

4

4

יי

relatives,

·

Sent to native place,

Married..

Adopted,

12

12

1

5

6

9

14

23

...

2

2

Sent to Refuge and Convent,

Placed in charge of Consul for France, Cases under consideration,

2

7

9

1

1

15

15

20

90

110

Table II C.

Number of Emigrants detained under warrant by the Registrar General after enquiry and arrangements made regarding them.

Permited to leave,

under bond,

Restored to husband,

to relatives,..

""

Sent to native place,

Married,

Sent to Refuge and Convent, Died,

Cases under consideration,.

Detained previous to 1st January, 1907.

Detained during 1907.

Total.

Professed Respectable Prostitutes.! Women.

Professed Respectable Total.

Total.

Prostitutes. Women.

3

1

4

10

14

2

7

7

261 1"

15

7

11

11

4

5

8

9

10

10

4

4

19

30

49

53

1

Hongkong,

China and Macao,

28

8888

99

127

Missing.

Recovered.

157

Table II d.

Particulars regarding girls who are required to report themselves to the Registrar General.

Required to report themselves quarterly,

6

11

17

4

13

29

""

half-yearly,

13

13

13

once a year,

20

I

~

26

12

38

5

33

Exempted from reporting,. Married,

Lost sight of,

2

2

1

Total...

5

Table II e.

Number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing, and of those who have been

reported as recovered during the year

Men.

Boys.

Total.

1907.

Women.

Girls.

Total.

~

Missing.

Recovered.

Missing.

Recovered.

Missing.

Recovered.

Missing.

37

2

65

29

2

128

29

57

57

2

114

6

78

13

91

66

193

10

135

70

3

205

Recovered.

Missing.

Recovered.

Added

Brought forward.

during

Total.

Removed from list.

1907.

Total 31st Dec., 1907.

158

Table II f.

Girls detained under Authority of Section 35 of Ordinance 4 of 1897.

SENT TO MISS EYRE'S REFUGE,

No.

Name.

Date Date of

of

entering detention. Refuge.

Probable

age December, 1907.

Remarks.

Detained previous to 1st January, 1907.

120.05 229 05

Chan Tsoi-fung.

19. 4.05 17. 5.05

(919

Remains in Refuge of her own will; engaged

to be married.

Wong Chau-liu

1. 7.05

22. 7.05

20

Left.

252/05

170'05

Ho Tai-tsoi

Chau Tai-hi

21. 7.05

19. 9.05

20

Married.

30. 5.05

14.10.05

15

In Refuge.

297/05

.... Chau Lan-fa

27. 8.05

2.12.05

(2) 17

In Refuge.

134'06

Lo Kwai alias Kwok Kwai

10. 5.06

10. 5.06

15

In Refuge.

9:06

Fung Hung

10. 1.05

16. 5.06

12

In Victoria Home.

216.05

Lam Su

28. 6.05

18. 7.06

8

In Victoria Home.

(1) Born 22nd August, 1888. (2) Born 6th January, 1890.

Detained during 1907.

90,06 248 07

Chan Sui-i....

Chan Ngan-chuk

4. 4.06 14. 6.07

7. 3.07 14. 6.07

18

In Refuge.

17

In Refuge (sent direct).

No.

Name.

SENT TO THE ITALIAN CONVENT.

· Date of detention.

Date of entering Convent.

Probable

age December, 1907.

Remarks.

Detained previous to 1st January, 1907.

643 04

Wong Tsoi.....

610 04

Chan Lin-ho

17.11.04 3.11.04

10. 2.05 19. 2.05

18

18

30 30

83,05 ....

Pun Hau Yuk

7. 3.05

9. 3.05

18

50,05

Chan Kwai-sin

28. 1.05

15. 3.05

21

Ran away.

Returned to Po Leung Kuk and

married.

In Convent (married 26th January,

1908).

Married.

378,04

Wong Ngan

391/05 198/06 164 06

Lo Yuk

30. 6.04 22. 6.05 23.10.05

18

In Couvent.

12. 5.06

11

In Convent.

Li Tai-tsoi...

19. 7.06

8. 8.06

16

In Convent.

Lo Wong-tsoi

9. 6.06

30.11.06

16

In Convent.

15/07 290/07

Li Tai-hi

Li Lin-yau...

Detained during 1907.

9. 1.07 3. 7.07

17. 5.07 3. 7.07

16

16

96

In Convent.

Ran away.

159

Table III a.

Number of female passengers and boys examined and passed before the Registrar General under "The Chinese Emigration Ordinance, 1889," during the year 1907.

*

Women

Whither Bound.

Boys.

and

Total.

Girls.

Callao,

Honolulu,

58

11

Japan,

Seattle,

1 00 00 00

61

14.

3

4

1

Mauritius,

46

30

76

Tacoma,

3

3

Salina Cruz,

80

80

San Francisco, U.S.A.,

200

30

230

Straits Settlements,

2,761

12,122

14,883

Vancouver, B.C.,

164

164

Victoria, B.C.,

50

3

53

Iquique,.

2

Total,..........

3,376

12,195

15,571

Table III b.

Occupations of Female Emigrants in the

year 1907.

16 YEARS AND OVER.

With husband or other relative,

2,468

To join husband or other relative, ....................

3,588

Actress,

Farmer or Farm-labourer,

Hairdresser,

Nun,

8

25

14

14

Physiognomist,

Prostitute,

Schoolmistress,

Seamstress.

Servant,

Student,

1

822

1

616

3,533

1

Total,...................

11,091

With parents.

With other relatives,

UNDER 16 YEARS.

1,073

31

Total,.

1.104

Grand total,..........

12,195

#

160

Table III C.

Number of Assisted Emigrants examined, passed, rejected, etc., from the 1st November to the 31st December, 1907.

Passed,

1,620

Unwilling to proceed,

.87

Refused as unfit,

48

Returned from Singapore and refused permission to

11

emigrate again,

1.766

Table III d.

Arrangements made regarding Assisted Emigrants who declined or were refused

permission to emigrate.

Sent home by Tung Wa Hospital,.

Given work in Hongkong,

Handed over to relatives,

Discharged without help,

123

10

4

9

146

Table IV a.

Number of Householders' Certificates issued during the

year 1907.

First Registration of Householders,

Re-registration of Householders,

Extracts from Register,

Removal of Householders,

Duplicates of Certificates...

Victoria.

Kowloon.

Total.

99

1.788

1,887

1,407

41

1,448

169

5

174

78

4

82

17

0

17

Total,....

1,770

1,838

3,608

}

Moved in, Removed,

Total,

161

Table IV b.

Changes of Tenancy reported during the year 1907.

Victoria.

Kowloon.

Total.

1,770

282

2,052

1,573

199

1,772

3,343

481

3,824

Table V a.

Statement of the Revenue and Expenditure of the District Watchmen's

Fund for the year 1907.

$

(1) By Wages and Salaries :-

(1)

To Balance,

10,276

$ c.

""

Grant by Government,

2,000

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watchmen, District Watchmen,

1,945

1,457

12,349

Cooks,

432

Contributions,

24,058

Coolies,

384

Collector,

290

""

Payments for Special Services,

170

Interpreter,

45

Manager,

132

Writer,

GO

Interest,

417

"

A

Special District Watchmen for Procession,

700

17,794.84

Fines,

74

By Miscellaneous

Crown Rent,....

11

Water Account,

139

Premium on Fire Policies,

452

Intsructors' Allowance,

96

Uniform and Equipment,

1,562

Stationery and Printing,

127

Photographs...

6

Gratuities and Rewards,

68

Furniture,

26

Fittings and Repairs,

818

Coolie and Conveyance Hire,

125

Loss on Exchange,

1,569

Oil,

360

Pension to Au Pún's Widow,

120

Sundries,

420

Uniform, Equipment, &c., for Special

District Watchmen for Procession,

397

6,301.42

Total Expenditure, Balance,

24,096.26

12,900.29

$ 36,996.55

Total,

......$ 36,996.55

Total,.

Disposal of Balance :-

On Fixed Deposit,

At Current Account,

Advance Account,

Total..............

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

.$9,000.00

3,581.24

319.05

$12,900.29

162

Table V b.

State of District Watchmen's Force on 31st December, 1907.

The force consists at present of 95 men :-

6 Chief District Watchmen,............from $276 to $360 a year. 5 Asst. Chief District Watchmen,

16 District Watchmen,

59

5

Do.

Do.

...

""

216 to 240

""

at

180

150

71

31

120

27

""

180

""

""

4 Special District Watchmen,

1 District Watchman receives $4 a month Extra pay.

4

Do. Watchmen receive 2

""

Return showing strength, enlistment and casualties in District Watchmen's Force, 1907.

Strength of Force,

95

Enlistment,

20

Deaths,....

.none

Resignations through sickness,

5

Do. for other causes,

3

Dismissals or desertions,

11

Total number of Casualties,

19

Victoria,

Kowloon,..

Shaukiwan,.

Aberdeen,

Stanley,

Districts.

Table VI a.

Births and Deaths registered during the year 1907.

British and Foreign Community.

Chinese.

Grand Total.

Births.

Deaths.

Births.

Deaths.

Births. Deaths.

Sex

Boys.

Girls.

Total.

Males. Females. Total.

Boys. Girls.

Total.

Males. Females. Unknown. Total.

142

102

244*

190

60

250

553

222

775†

2,968

2,061

7

5,036

1,019

5,286

19

33

52

27

10

37

132

117

249

838

544

1,386

301

1,423

26

24

50

239

116

1

356

50

356

21

18

39

104

89

1

194

39

194

4

7

11

17

10

27

11

27

Total,

161

135

296

217

70

287

736

388

1,124

4,166

2,820

13

6,999

1,420

7,286

* Including 1 female registered after the expiration of 12 months.

Including 3 males registered after the expiration of 12 months.

"

164

Table VI b.

Number of Births and Deaths registered at the various registration offices in the Colony during the year 1907.

Registration Office.

Registrar General's Office,

No. 2 Police Station,

No. 7 Police Station,

Shaukiwan,..

Aberdeen,

Stanley,.

Yaumati,..

Kowloon City,

Shamshuipo,

Total,.....

Births.

Deaths.

TOTAL.

797

5,115

5.912

117

138

255

157

70

227

50

356

406

39

194

233

11

27

38

102

1:: (c) ཆ

53

872

925

222

324

94

292

386

A

*1,420

7,286

8,706

* Including 4 births registered after the expiration of 12 months.

Table VI C.

CHINESE BIRTH RATE.

1

2

3

4

5

6

00

8

9

Number of females over 15.

Births registered.

Probable No. of births.

Year.

In the Colony.

In the

In Victoria.

In Victoria.

Colony.

In the Colony.

Families Percentage

in

of Victoria. 8 to 3.

In Victoria.

1891

40,500

26,800

1,529

1,255

1,529

1,255

14,100

52

1897

46,200

31,400

1,125

858

1,744

1,470

21,700

69

1901

51,500

32,900

848

663

1,944

1,541

25,100

76

1906

59,400

35,200

801

644

2,243

1,648

26,000

74

Note.-Columns 6 and 7. Exclusive of births of newly born infants who were taken to the Couvents

or abandoned.

Columns 2, 4 and 6.

Exclusive of the New Territories (including New Kowloon).

·

----

165

Table VII a.

Vaccinations performed during the year 1907, at the various hospitals and elsewhere.

Alice Memorial Hospital Government Civil Hospital

Nethersole Hospital

The Gaol.....

517

503

99

1,119

2,696

2,696

By the Tung Wa Hospital Vaccinators

Tung Wa Hospital

The Po Leung Kuk .

Aberdeen....

Hung Hom...

Shamshuipo

Shaukiwan

Shek O....

Stanley

Yaumati

By the Chinese Public Dispensary Doctors-

Victoria

Hung Hom

Kowloon City. Yaumati

1,051

...

63

...

152

90

15

34

1,405

.:1,290

160

338

386

2,174

26

7,420

At the Yaumati Branch of Alice Memorial Hospital, 26

Note. The above figures include all the vaccinations and re-vaccinations performed, successful,

unsuccessful and uninspected.

166

Table VII b.

VICTORIA.

Number of children born during the year 1906 who have been vaccinated, and other particulars up to 31st December, 1907.

Number of Births,

Vaccinated,

Unvaccinated :-

Dead,...

Left the Colony, Cannot be found, Had Small-pox, Certified unfit, Insusceptible,

Carried forward,

Total unvaccinated,.

Total,......

*

Non-Chinese.

27

25

2

293*

234

59

293

Including 3 births registered after the expiration of 12 months.

22

84

69

:

Chinese.

428

249

179

428

Table VII C.

VICTORIA.

Number of children born during the year 1907 who have been vaccinated, and other particulars.

Number of Births,

Vaccinated,

Unvaccinated :-

Dead,.......

Left the Colony,

Cannot be found,

Had Small-pox,

Certified unfit,

Insusceptible,

Carried forward,

Total unvaccinated,

Total,.......

Non-Chinese,

296*

119

Chinese.

501†

136

18

8

8

45

5

31

2

11

3

1

141

269

177

365

296

501

* Including 1 birth registered after the expiration of 12 months.

t

3 births

""

""

Patients.

Remaining in

Number of reminders issued,

Result of reminders :--

Vaccinated,

Unvaccinated :

167

Table VII d.

VICTORIA.

Number of Reminders to vaccinate sent out during the year and action taken thereon.

Dead,..

Left the Colony,

Had Small-pox,

Insusceptible,

Cannot be found,

Certified unfit,

Carried forward,

Total unvaccinated,

Total,

2

11

9

3

3

28

107

Table VII e.

Births and Vaccinations outside the City of Victoria.

Non-Chinese.

79

107

a: 495

12

57

87

6

1906.

1907.

District Office.

Number

Births registered.

registered as

Unac- counted

Number

vaccinated.

for.

Births registered.

Carried

registered as

forward.

vaccinated.

Aberdeen,

28

23

5

39

29

10

Kowloon City,

Shamshuipo,

119

89

30

102

64

38

46

42

4

94

35

39

Shaukiwan,

44

11

33

50

6

44

Stanley,

Yaumati,

* Total,

18

13

5

11

3

8

70

39

31

53

10

43

325

217

108

349

147

202

Hospital on 31st December,

1906.

Percentage of Vaccinations to births in 1906,

64

Percentage of Unaccounted for" to births in 1906,

Table VIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the

Tung Wa Hospital during the year 1907.

Admitted.

Total under

Treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Remaining in

Hospital on

31st December,

1907.

Out-patients.

Male

124

3,229

3,352 2,230

953

170

43,734 588

492

950

Female

40

567

607

319

253

35 | 27,109

817

204

Total.....

In-patients

164 3,796 3,959 2,549 1,206

Note.-Out-patients treated by European methods during the year 1907,......

""

205

70,843 1,405

696

950

2,156.

""

1,978.

67

33

893

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies

brought to Hospital Mor- tuary for burial.

Destitutes sent

home.

163

268

Chinese.

100

268

*

OLD KOWLOON.

Table IX a.

Work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries, Victoria, Old Kowloon and Kowloon City.

VICTORIA.

163 -

KOWLOON

CITY.

GRAND

TOTAL.

CENTRAL.

EAST POINT. WEST POINT.

TOTAL.

HUNGHOM.

YAUMATI.

TOTAL.

1. New Patients visited at their homes,...

91

83

98

272

71

144

215

32

519

""

""

seen at the office,.

2,180

3,470

2,347

7,997

2,617

5,978

8,595

1,281

17,873

Total,

2,271

3,553

2,445

8,269

2,688

6,122

8,810

1,313

18,392

2. Old Cases-(home),

1,211

1,449

743

3,403

403

3,261

3,664

6.57

7,724

""

""

(office),

· 29

43

22

94

17

37

54

11

159

Total,

1,240

1,492

765

3,497

420

3,298

3,718

668

7,883

3. Certificates of nature of disease issued,.

10

7

30

47

135

(3A.

given to persons to leave the Colony),

(15)

(2)

(2)

(19)

(5)

4. Certificates of cause of death issued,.

18

21

23

62

82

228

:ེསྨྲ

135

971

1,153

(9)

(14)

(33)

310

168

540

5. Patients sent to hospital,

86

202

109

397

31

94

125

40

562

6. Patients removed to hospital in ambulance,

54

130

78

262

14

50

64

7

333

7. Corpses removed to hospital or mortuary,

66

76

100

242

27

35

62

304

8. Dead bodies inspected at the request of the Sanitary Department or the Police,

13

13

13

:

...

9. Plague cases sent out of the Colony,

1

1

...

10. Houses cleansed in presence of clerk, 11. Compensation claims sent in,

14

40

58

112

5

48

53

16

5

7

6

18

24

24

12. Applications for coffins,

33

48

98

179

1

25

26

13. Applications for midwives,

2

4

6

12

13

13

WN: 5:

1

181

42.

2

207

3

28

14. Infants brought to office, (alive),

3

4

""

""

""

(dead),

26

7

47

71

78

103

136

: 10

5

13:3

78

:

13

18

154

...

Total,

29

11

174

214

5

13

18

232

...

15. Vaccinations at house,..

167

456

642

1,265

160

360

520

office,.

9

5

11

25*

...

26

26

335

3

2,120

54

""

""

Total,

176

461

653

1,290

160

386

546

338

2,174

:

169

Table IX b.

Details regarding infants treated at the Chinese Public Dispensaries during 1907.

Under 1 year, 1 year and under 2,

2 years,,

3

4

་་

27

3.

ཉ་

Age.

....

AGES.

4,

5)

;)

5,

Total,.

Number.

535

554

623

463

546

2,721

NUMBER TREATED AT EACH DISPENSARY.

Central,

East Point,

West Point,

Hung Hom,....

Yaumati,

Kowloon City,

Dispensary.

Number.

309

640

539

274

774

185

Total,..

2,721

...

170

Table IX c.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Account ending 31st December, 1907.

Receipts :--

Balance

Subscriptious, &c., Victoria

Subscription from Hongkong Procession

Balance of Subscription, Hunghom......

C.

$

C.

4,565.39

14,266.05 4,809.95

19,076.00

1,565.00

""

"

""

""

"

Kowloon City Yaumati

1,371.09

1,450.00

Interest

71.91

Total,

28,099.39

Expenditure

Victoria :-

Salaries and Wages

Rent.

Furniture

Stationery and Printing

Loss on exchange

Drug, &c.

Crown Rent.

Loss on bad coins

Miscellaneous......

Hung Hom (through Registrar General)

Kowloon City

""

"

Yanmati

""

""

Total,..

10,630.47

444.00

242.10

480.30

934.50

1,114.00

10.00

11.55

2,067.19

15,934.11

1,883.95

2,135.67

1,933.95

21,887.68

Balance:

At Current Acconut

Cash in hand ..........

6,086.28

61.28

Advance to dispensary clerks Bad coins

60.00

4.15

6,211.71

Total,

28,099.39

Receipts:-

Balance,.

171

Table IX d.

YAUMATI DISPENSARY.

Subscriptions, &c.,

Refund of loan to Hunghom Dispensary,

Loan from Mr. Li Fung-shan,..

Expenditure:-

Through Registrar General's Office,

Local Committee,

""

į

Balance :-

K

C.

(.

1,452.13 3,294.02 105.30 751.55

Total,.....

5,603.00

1,933.95 3,088.77

5,022.72

384.23 196.05

580.28

Total,...........

5,603.00

At Registrar General's Office,........ With Committee,

Receipts :-

Balance,...

Subscriptions, &c.,

Grant by Government,

Expenditure -

Through Registrar General's Office,

Local Committee,

"

Balance:

At Registrar General's Office,.......

With Committee,

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.

#

C.

#

i

C.

1,222.94 3,202.50 365.00

Total,......

4,790.44

1,883.95 2,125.18

4,009.13

449.37 331.94

781.31

Total,..................

4,790.44

KOWLOON CITY DISPENSARY.

Receipts:-

Subscriptions, &c.,

Subscription from Shamshuipo Temple,....

$ C. 2,215.16 219.97

2,435.13

Graut by Government,.

480.00

Grant from Dispensaries in Victoria,

764.58

Total,......

3,679.71

Expenditure:-

Through Registrar General's Office, Through Local Committee, ....

2,135.67 1,450.64

3,586.31

Balance :-

At Registrar General's Office,... With Committee,

93.40

93.40

Total,.

3,679.71

172

VICTORIA DISPENSARIES.

Receipts:-

Balance,....

Subscriptions, &c.,.................

Subscription from Hongkong Procession,

Interest,.

Expenditure:-

Maintenance of Dispensaries,

Subvention to Kowloon City Dispensary,

Balance :-

At Current Account,

Cash in hand,.

Advance money to Dispensary Clerks,..

Bad coins,

$

14,266.05 4,809.95

C.

2,928.89

19,076.00 71.91

Total,..

22,076.80

15,934.11 764.58

16,698.69

Total,....

5,252.68

61.28

60.00

4.15

5,378.11

22,076.80

6,323

1,336

Table X.

Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Chinese Recreation Ground for the

Dr.

1907.

1st Jan. To Balance,

""

Rent,

$

year

(1) 1907.

1907.

Cr.

(1)

$

C.

By Salary of Collector,

24

Salary of 3 District

Watchmen, .....

450

""

Salary of Scavenger, ...

84

Uniform for Watchmen,

27

Water consumed at

Cooking Stalls, &c.,...

131

Premium on Fire Ince.

"

Policy,

8

55

Repairs of Damage by

Typhoon,

314

Hire of Plants,

120

"

Repairs to Wooden

Pavilion...

17

""

Purchase of Benches,......

53

Notice Board,

3

Oil,

12

""

Brooms,

2

Sundries,

5

Balance,

6,408

Total,...............$ 7,660.33

Total,....

7,660.33

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

3

Dr.

173

Table XI.

Statement of Account of Passage Money Fund.

Cr.

1907.

Jan. 1

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

6. 1907.

C.

..$3,500

(1)

By Refund of Passage Money,

383 (1)

17

"

"

Current Account, Cash,

1,607

""

65

Gifts to 38 women on being married,... Allowance for 12 months to Cheng

84

5,173

Ma Shi,

60

??

Passage Money received,

2,282

Allowance for 12 months to Chan

Cheung,

24

Temporary Deposit Account-Li Ng,...

50

""

Allowance for 12 months to Pang Wa,

36

Interest on fixed deposit,

140

;"

Kwong Ho,

24

Interest on Current Account,

37

"

:"

Chan Shap,

18

21

Anonymous subscription from America,

9

Miscellaneous,

""

Miscellaneous Refunds.......

45

from 12/06-11/08 to Cheung Kau Nui,

>>

Allowance for Oct. to Cheng Fung Shi, Nov. & Dec. to Fung Ho, Annual Subscription to Miss Eyre's

Refuge

Transfer of Temporary Deposit Ac-

count from Li Ng to R. G. O. Charitable Fund R. G. O. 31/07m. Assistance towards repatriating emi-

grants,

50

"

56

""

Travelling expenses, ricksha and ferry

fares, &c..

220

*

Various small gifts to emigrants, ship-

24

***

100

Total,......

7,737.41

wrecked sailors and other dis- tressed persons,

Photographs, postage,

153

79

""

Refund of temporary deposit account,

Leung Tsoi,

500

"

Refund to Protector of Chinese,

R. G. O. 66/07m...................

21

I'rizes towards of the Po Leung Kuk, Grant towards Endowment Fund of

Alice Memorial Hospital,.........

Interest due to Miss Eyre's Refuge,

Miss Eyre's Refuge Endow-

Balance :-

"

ment Fund,

Current Account,

4

1,250

35

Cash,

$3,250

1,299

57

4,607

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,...........

Dr.

1905 To Donations :-

to

Table XII.

Registrar General's Office Charitable Fund.

$ c. 1907

1907

7,737.41

Cr.

*

Mr. Lau Chu-pak,

(1) 50

By Cash Book,

Mr. A. Rumjahn,.

Wo-cheung,

===

50

""

50

Rubber Stamp,....

Balance,

1

245

Wo-shing,.....

10

Mr. Li Wai-lam,

5

Smaller sums,

6

""

Miscellaneous Receipts,

71

Interest,

5

Total,...$247.97

(1) Cents omitted except in the totals.

Total,.................

247.97

174

Table XIII.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 1 of 1889; No. 2 of 1890, No. 7 of 1896 and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

ORDINANCE No. 3 OF 1888.

Bills-posting without permission,

Drums and Gongs-Night noises by beating,

Fireworks-Discharging without permits,

Processions-Organising in the Public Streets without permit,. Chinese Theatre-Breach of conditions of Licence for,

ORDINANCE No. 1 of 1889.

Decoying men or boys into or away from the Colony,

Keeping unlicensed Emigration Houses,

Neglecting to enter names of boarders on register,

Convicted.

Discharged.

No. of Cases.

M.

F.

M.

F.

17

༄:

66

3

Personating Emigrants,

ORDINANCE No. 2 OF 1890.

Contraventions of, and offences under, (failing to produce proper certi-

ficates of vaccination),

1

15

13

85-00

:

21:2]:

:

Ordinance No. 7 or 1896.

Failing to report Death,

Unlawful removal of bodies,.

ai

6

:༢༧

ORDINANCE No. 4 or 1897.

Abduction of girls under the age of 16 years,...

Decoying women and girls into or away from the Colony,

11

Detaining, harbouring or receiving women or girls,

15

2-2

3

Procuration of girls under age to have carnal connection,

Knowingly deriving profits from prostitution, letting women out for hire,

trading in them,

6

:

N:

co:

3

:

:

:

5

195

10

10

5

1

1

&

175

Table XIV.

Student Interpreters.

Name.

Date of Appointment.

Where employed.

Remarks.

Li Sik Lün Tsang Shiu Lun. Wong Wai Sam Cheung Tsam Lo Kam Chak

1st December, 1901.

Resigned. (1)

72

""

Police Department.

""

""

Resigned.

(2)

Dismissed.

"

(3)

19

19

*

Resigned.

(4)

Lo Yuk Lai

""

Dismissed.

(5)

GDCD

Tang Tat Hung

8th February, 1903.

Reg. General's Office.

Tsang Tam Fuk

14th

55

Sanitary Department.

Wong Ka Tseung..

14th

April,

29

Resigned.

Sung Tsui Lun.........

""

"

Fung Ping Shan

22nd June,

""

The Magistracy. Police Department.

Wong Shing Fan

10th

July,

""

""

Chu Tsan Hing

Fung Lo

Chung Cheuk Ki

Leung Tün Sheung

Wong Man Pui..... Ng Yuk Shaü

Wong Tai Kau....

Chan Man Kwong Wong Li Kwong Lau King Tsing Chung Kam Chịu Shin Chung Shang Fok Tung. Wong Ping Chiu Lo In Nin... Chan Kwok Ying Tsoi Tak Sam Ng Chak Wing

""

21st February, 1906.

12th September,

""

22

""

""

29

""

27th February, 1907.

11th September,

""

""

22

""

""

""

""

""

""

"

.....

Dismissed.

9th September,

Police Department.

27th

4th

6th

July, 1904. October, March,

Dismissed.

"

Police Department.

1905.

">

27

""

1st

"1

August,

""

"

""

99

">

""

"

""

""

""

"

"2

(1) On account of ill-health, while a Student Interpreter.

(2) On account of weak health; telephone clerk in Sanitary Department.

(3) For misconduct, while a Student Interpreter.

(+) Allowed to resign on forfeiture of bond.

(5) For laziness, while a Student Interpreter.

176

Appendix A.

Report of the Po Leung Kuk, for the year 1907.

The following ten gentlemen were elected on the 23rd March to act as Managing Committee for the year 1907-

CHAN KENG WAN. CHÜ TSZ HING. HUI CHỊU LAM. KWOK IU-WUN. LEUNG KIN ON. LI PO KWAI. TAM TSZ KONG. U CHU WAN. UEN WAN KIU.

WONG LAI CHÜN.

Mr. TAM TSZ-KONG

   On the 18th June the Board lost by death the services of Mr. IP OI-SHAN who had been a member since 1896. His enlightened advice will be greatly missed. was appointed on the 14th November to fill the vacancy.

On the 7th October the Po Leung Kuk was visited by His Excellency the Governor and Lady LUGARD, and a present was given by Lady LUGARD to each of the inmates.

A statement of the Assets and Liabilities of the Society on the 31st December (together with a statutory declaration to the truth of it made by the two Treasurers), and two state- ments, one shewing the working account and the other the receipts and expenditure for the year are attached.

The balance to the credit of the Society on the 31st December was $18,790.77 compared with $16,732.66 at the close of 1906. Of this balance $15,000 is a portion of the original endowment fund, and is placed on fixed deposit with five Chinese banks. The actual ex- penditure for the year is $7,774.11 as against $7,855.13 in 1906. The subscriptions collected during the year amounted to $8,344 as against $7,804 in 1906. The expenditure is lower than it has been since 1902, and the subscriptions are $1,000 higher than they were in that year.

The Visiting Justices, Mr. DUNCAN CLARK and Mr. CHAU SIU-KI, have paid thirteen visits to the Po Leung Kuk during the year.

Ten meetings of the Permanent Board of Direction have been held. The average attendance of members was ten, and sometimes as many as six members of the Managing Com- mittee have been present. In addition to considering matters relating to the internal management of the Po Leung Kuk, the Board have discussed exhaustively the detection of abuses connected with assisted emigration, the disposal of girls under 16 years of age who have been trained for an immoral life and have been sent to the Po Leung Kuk under war- rant by the Registrar General, and the giving of financial assistance to Miss Eyre's Refuge. The views of the directors on the precautions to be observed for checking emigration abuses have been communicated to the Government, definite rules have been laid down for dealing with girls under sixteen who come under the charge of the Society, and assistance is to be given to Miss Eyre's Refuge proportionate to the balance of revenue over expenditure in the Society's hands at the close of each year. An interim grant of $500 is being made for 1907.

   A return is attached shewing the accommodation of the Home, the number of the Staff, the number of women and children admitted during the year and the disposition made in each case.

Two hundred and forty-five (245) women, 57 girls and 14 small boys making a total of 316 individuals were admitted into the Home.

   Miss EYRE, Miss FLETCHER and Miss PITTS have continued their weekly visits, and a supply of toys for the small children is kept up. A conjurer also has given a performance.

   The matron, Mrs. HAMMOND, does her work conscientiously and well and so does the teacher. A new sewing-mistress was engaged in May but resigned at the close of the year, and it is proposed to see whether the sewing-lessons cannot be given by the matron herself.

177

The old Tung Wa Hospital dispensary and the yard surrounding it have been altered for occupation by the Po Leung Kuk; a door has been opened into the street at the back which is now included in the Hospital premises and the inmates of the Po Leung Kuk are now able to make use of both the street and the yard for taking exercise. It is proposed by the hospital to plant the street with trees.

The average number of inmates at the end of each month was 34. The two upper floors alone of the original quarters can legally accommodate 45 persons so it is now possible to separate the various classes quite effectively.

In March rules were drawn up to define the duties of the matron and servants. Addi- tional rules for the guidance of the matron are now under consideration.

In May Dr. SIBREE very kindly consented to accept the post of Visiting Surgeon. The thanks of the Society are due to the Tung Wa Hospital for placing the services of the House Surgeon at their disposal for so long, and to the House Surgeon himself, Dr. JEW HAWK.

The Man Mo Temple Committee have for nine years subscribed to the Po Leung Kuk one-fifth of the amount collected for the annual religious festivals. Last year their subscrip- tion was $1,918. Their initiative has now been followed by the two committees at West Point who are in charge of the annual All Souls Festival held there. In 1307 they subscribed $250 and the subscription will be gradually increased till it reaches one-fifth of the receipts.

A. W. BREWIN, Registrar General, President. Ho KAI, Vice-President.

26th February, 1908.

We, CHIU CHAU-SAM and KU FAI-SHAN, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk, Incorporated Society, do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached state- ments of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1907, marked "A" and signed with our names on the 22nd February, 1908, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declarations Act 1835 ".

招畫三

古輝山.

Declared by the declarants CHIU CHAU-SAM and Ku FAI-SHAN at Victoria, Hongkong, this twenty-second February, 1908, through the interpretation of WONG KWON-TIN of Hong- kong, the said WONG KWONG-TIN having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.

Before me,

G. A. WOODCOCK, J.P., Victoria.

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you well understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants CHIU CHAU-SAM and KU FAI-SHAN, and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them.

WONG KWONG-TIN.

Declared at the Hongkong Sanitary Board Office, Beaconsfield, Hongkong, this twenty- second day of February, 1908.

Before me,

G. A. WOODCOCK, J.P.,

Victoria.

*

178

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1907.

Assets.

$

C.

On fixed deposit in the hands of the Sui Kat, Hung Ue, Ming San, Shing Tak and Sui Cheung Banks,

At Current Account with the Netherlands

Trading Society,

Total,

15,000.00

3,790.77

.$ 18,790.77

Liabilities.

Nil.

招畫三

古輝山

This is the statement marked " A " referred to in the Declaration of CHIU CHAU-SAM and KU FAI-SHAN declared before me this twenty-second day of February, 1908.

G. A. WOODCOCK, J.P., Victoria.

PO LEUNG KUK.

PERMANENT BOARD OF DIRECTION.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1907.

RECEIPTS.

C.

$ C.

Balance from previous year---

On fixed deposit,

15,000.00

At Current Account,

1,732.66 16,732.66

EXPENDITURE.

Elected Committee,

Stamps,

$

C.

C.

7,500.00

2.55

Interest-

Balance--

On deposit,

1,170.00

On fixed deposit,......

On Current Account,

46.66

At Current Account,

15,000.00 3,790.77

Subscriptions,

1,216.66 8,344.00

18,790.77

Total,

26,293.32

Total,..

26,293.32

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee

from the 1st January to the 31st December, 1907.

RECEIPTS.

EXPENDITURE.

Balance from previous year,

$ C. 185.96

C.

C.

Decorations, Food,

48.30

1,913.84

Received from Permanent Board,..

7,500.00

Grant to Miss Eyre's Refuge,

250.00

Insurance,

321.61

Miscellaneous receipts,

235.73

Light and Fire,

932.39

Miscellaneous,..

484.72

Passage Money,

214.06

Petty Expenditure,..

376.89

Printing,

122.00

Repairs,

557.35

Stationery,

81.58

Wages,...

2,471.37

7,774.11

Balance,

147.58

Total,.....

7,921.69

Total,..

7,921.69

179

Return showing number of beds, of the staff, and of the persons whose cases have been dealt with by the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1907 :---

Beds for the inmates,...

Number of staff,

.76

.17

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

Inmates in the Home on 31st December, 1906,.

28

1

29

Total admitted during the year 1907,

245

57

14

316

Total,.................

273

58

14

345

Restored to parents or relatives or sent to Charitable

Institutions in China,

Sent to Missionary School,

Sent to Convent,

Married,

Adopted,

Permitted to leave,

Still in charge of the Society,..

Total,....

Male destitutes sent home, ...

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

104

43

1 1.

158

8

2

10

3

3

6

38

38

2

10

2

14

85

85

33

34

273

58

14

345

2

Medical Report on the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1907...

The health of the inmates during the seven and a half months that I have had medical oversight of the institution has been good.

During the earlier months there were a few cases of Beri-beri but for the last four months we have had none and from the two previous years' reports I notice the numbers are decreasing.

One case of mumps appeared but was at once isolated and no further cases appeared.

I have visited the Institution regularly three days a week and have found it as a rule clean and well kept. The food is good and the new garden affords an opportunity for

exercise which was much needed.

Appended is a Table showing diseases treated.

ALICE D. SIBREE, Inspecting Medical Officer.

180

Cases treated at the Po Leung Kuk during 1907 :-

Malarial Fever,

Dysentery,

Diarrhoea,

Beri-beri,

8

1

2

5

6

Syphilis,

Rheumatism,

Mumps,

1

Diseases of the Eye,

7

"2

19

Respiratory System,

.14

""

""

Digestive System,

.16

Anæmia,

.16

Tonsillitis,

Boils,

Parasites,

2

3

5

Injuries,

Hæmorrhoids,

Dental Extractions,

4

1

5

98

Appendix B.

Statement of receipts and payments of the Tung Wa Hospital for the Ting Mi year (1907).

RECEIPTS.

PAYMENTS.

$ C.

$

C.

0.

Balance brought forward from Peng

By Food of Employees,

5,601.80

Ng year,

17,782.38

95

Salaries,

12,487.58

To Rent of Hospital property,

27,014.94

};

Sick room expenses,

10,974.59

وو

Annual subscriptions of Hongs, Subscriptions of various shops,

12.433.00

Drugs.

14,469.23

1,590,00

Sundries,

7,023.34

collected on steam-

11

11

Stationery,

898.26

ers,

4,632.38

collected and Dona-

"

Repairs,

Free cemetery,

2,347.58

3,073.25

tions,......

1,516.25

*

Coffins,

5,961.88

>5

Subscribed by Charitable persons

11

Crown Rent,

549.45

for the purpose of supplying medicine, quilted clothing and coffins,

Insurance,

944.59

Quilted Clothing,

161.28

2,821.85

Furniture,

146.60

""

Subscriptions from wealthy per-

"

Branch Hospital, wages and food

sons,

3,000.00

of employees,..

190.26

"

Subscriptions by Directors, As-

Branch Hospital, Plague ex-

sistant Directors and Committee,

2,038.50

penditure,

2,499.53

"

20% of subscriptions collected

Building,

205.00

by the Man Mo temple,.

2,500.00

Burial of bodies frem Govern-

"1

!!

Government grant,

6,000.00

ment mortuary (Victoria),..

866.55

"

Payments for medicine supplied,

!

Coffins for bodies do.,

1,450.83

sale of kitchen refuse and rent

of mortuary,

4,399.62

Interest,

1,099.46

**

Burial of bodies from Govern-

ment mortuary (Kowloon),... Coffins for bodies do.,

600,87 1,044.30

69,046.00

Balance,.

71,796.79 15,031.59

Total,..

86,828.38

Total,......

.$ 86,828.38

181

Statement of Assets and Liabilities at the close of the year of Ting Mi (1907).

LIABILITIES.

AMOUNT.

ASSETS.

AMOUNT.

To Loan from Relief Fund,

$ 8,440.60

C.

C.

By Bank's balance,

House property

(original

11

"

Cheap sale of Rice

value)

Fund,

29,681.33

19

11

"

Subscription for Hos-

pital Extension,

15,226.69

*

J

#

Man Mo Temple Fund,

5,860.49

Balance,

59,209.11 83,309.75

""

2 houses in Bonham Strand and

Jervois Street,

1 house in Wing Lok Street (including cost of additions to buildings),.........

10 houses in Aberdeen Street and Tung Wa Lane (including cost of additions to buildings), 2 houses in Connaught Road

and Des Voeux Road,

Total,.........

142,518.87

ይ.

$

C.

15,031.59

10,400.00

8,108.28

14,900.00

17,386.00

7 houses in Queen's Road West

(including cost of additions to

buildings),

30,363,00

2 houses in Bonham Road

"

West,

26,000.00

"

3 houses in Bonham Strand,.

15,000.00

122,157.28

"}

Subscriptions not yet paid,

5,330.00

Total,.

.$ 142,518.87

No. 10.

SOLT QUTY

DIEU

ET

MON DROTT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 8th of MAY, 1908.

Published by Authority:

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISON, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, May 14th, 1908.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding numbers for the year 1906 were as follows:-

1907.

1906.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts,

.5,027

5,049

Convicted by Courts Martial,

9

19

Convicted by the Land Courts,

1

1

Convicted by the Sanitary Commission,..

1

Convicted by the Captain Superintendent of Police,......

6

2

Convicted by the Commodore, R.N.,

1

Supreme Court for China and Corea,.

6

3

Debtors,

94

71

On remand or in default of finding surety,

733

653

5,877

5,799

There was thus an increase of 78 on the total number of admissions as compared with the year 1906. There was also an increase of prisoners convicted for Larceny during the year under review the numbers being 963 against 808 for the previous year.

:

184

2. The number of prisoners admitted to prison for offences not of a criminal nature was 3,417 made up as follows :-

Convicted by Courts Martial,....

:

""

""

the Land Courts,

""

""

Debtors,

Captain Superintendent of Police, Commodore, R.N.,......

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance,

"}

""

""

""

Gambling Ordinance,

Market Ordinance,

Arms Ordinance,

9

1

6

...

1

94

1,024

440

482

12

....

199

""

Vehicle Ordinance,

52

2

""

""

Sanitary Bye-laws,

182

""

""

Harbour Regulations,

88

::

for Drunkenness,

35

"}

*

>>

""

Trespassing,

63

""

""

Disorderly Conduct,

287

99

Vagrancy,

13

,,

Contempt of Court,

4

92

";

Assault,

169

""

Obstruction,

106

"}

Cutting trees,

44

??

""

Fighting,.....

34

""

Mendicancy,

19

""

under the Post Office Ordinance,..

5

"}

for Rogue and Vagabond,

222

under the Women and Girls' Protection

Ordinance,

25

Total,.....

3,417

The above figures show that 66% of the total admissions to prison were for non-crimi- nal offences.

3. The following Table shows the number of prisoners committed to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine :-

In default of payment of fine.

Without option of fine.

Total.

Served the imprisonment.

Paid full fine.

Paid part fine.

1,599

1,936

856

658

5,049

4. There were 106 juveniles admitted into prison 31 of whom were sentenced to be whipped in addition to various terms of imprisonment varying from twenty-four hours' detention to one month's imprisonment with hard labour. There was an increase of 25 juveniles convicted during the year 1907, as compared with the year 1906.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convic- tions recorded against them was 15·00 as compared with 13:00 for 1906.

V

6. There were 141 prisoners admitted who were convicted by the Magistrates' Courts. in the New Territories against 152 for the previous year.

185

7. The following Table shows the number of convicts confined in Victoria Gaol on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population :-

Year.

No. of Convicts.

Percentage to Estimated Population.

Year.

No. of Convicts.

Percentage to Estimated Population.

1898,

55

.021

1903,

245

.059

1899,

96

.027

1904,

243

.054

1900,

141

.040

1905,

216

.046

1901.

180

.046

1906,

156

.037

1902.

215

.054

1907,

146

.035

8. The following Table shows the daily average number of prisoners undergoing im- prisonment during the past ten years and the percentage borne by this number to the estimated population of the Colony of Hongkong

1899,

Year.

Estimated Population.

Daily Average number

Percentage.

of Prisoners.

1898,......

254,400

511

.200

344,323

432

.125

347,689

486

.139

385,671

499

.129

...

396,835

576

.145

410,642

653

.159

446,217

726

.162

462,861

697

.150

414.049

518

.125

414,415

502

.121

1900, 1901,...

1902.

1903,............

1904, 1905.

,

1906,.. 1907,.

9. There were 755 punishments awarded for breach of prison discipline, being an average of 1.50 per prisoner as compared with 627 with an average per prisoner of 1.21 for the pre- ceding year. There were 4 cases in which corporal punishment was awarded during the Three of which were with the birch sentenced by the Assistant Superintendent alone and one with the cat-o'-nine-tails sentenced by the same Officer in conjunction with a Justice of the Peace.

year.

10. There were no escapes or attempt to escape.

  11. In the month of January a Chinese prisoner employed in the Coir-matting Shop assaulted a fellow prisoner with a mat-making knife for which he was subsequently sentenced to a further period of 2 years' imprisonment.

  12. There were 14 deaths from natural causes, 3 executions and 1 birth. Eleven prisoners were released on medical grounds.

  13. Owing to the low number of prisoners in custody and the extra accommodation afforded by the Branch Prison it has again been possible to strictly carry out the Prison Rules as regards the complete separation of Remands, Juveniles and Debtors from convicted pri soners, also to keep apart first convicted prisoners from habitual criminals thereby bringing our prison system into line with the English Prison Service.

  14. Prisoners employed at Industrial Labour were fully employed during the year and the out-put was quite satisfactory.

  15. There were 4,169,024 forms printed and issued to the various Government Depart- ments and 22,342 books bound and repaired during the year under review.

186

out.

16. The rules and regulations for the government of the prison have been duly carried

17. The sanitary condition of the prison is good.

18. All minor repairs to the Gaol have been carried out by prison labour.

   19. Mr. F. J. BADELEY handed over his duties as Superintendent to me on proceeding to England on 12 months' leave of absence on the 5th September.

20. The conduct of the Staff has been good.

21. The usual Returns are appended.

14th January, 1908.

F. W. LYONS,

Superintendent.

Table I.

Return of Offences punished by Flogging in the year 1907.

Number of Floggings awarded.

Number of Strokes awarded in each case.

Daily

By Prison Authorities.

By Courts.

Date.

Total.

Total.

Average.

By the Assistant

18

. 12

10

6

By the Assistant! Superintendent Superintendent.

and a Justice

By Judge.

of the Peace.

By

Magistrate.

- 187 --

January,

495

10

10

10

10

......

February,

486

2

2

2

2

March,

458

1

4

4

4

२१.

April,.

498

7

7

2

7

......

May,

539

13

13

13

13

June,

558

13

13

11

1

1

13

.......

July,

567

11

11

9

2

11

August,

499

1

1

4

6

1

5

6

......

September,

478

11

11

11

11

4

October,....

473

4

4

......

November,..

494

4

4

Co

1

4

December,....

484

1

6

7

4

3

7

Total,

1

88

92

1

81

9

1

92

188

Table II.

Return of Offences reported of prisoners fighting with or assaulting each other or Officers, for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

Months.

1903.

number

1904.

number

1905.

number

1906.

number

Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average

1907.

number

in Prison, 653. in Prison, 725. in Prison, 697. in Prison, 518. in Prison, 502.

January,

1

3

1

February,

12

2

1

March,

2

3

4

4

1

April,

5

2

May,

4

2

10

5

2

:

June,

11

2

2

July,

*2

1

4

2

August,

4

1

4

2

September,

2

8

LON

5

5

October,

6

4

6

2

..

November,

2

1

December,

LO

5

2

3

1

1

Total,.

56

24

22

32

18

Table III.

Return of Offences of prisoners having Tobacco, for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

Months.

1903.

1904.

number

1905.

number

1906.

number

1907.

Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average Daily average

number

number in Prison, 653. in Prison, 725. in Prison, 697. in Prison, 518. in Prison, 502.

January,

February,

2

N

ལར

1

March,...

April,

May,

June,

1

5

2

3

1

:.

5

6

1

July,

1

1

1

August,

4

4

6

...

September,

3

1

1

October,

3

4

5

1

November,

1

2

2

3

December,

2

1

2

...

Total,

12

24

17

29

19

189

Months.

1903. Daily average number in Prison, 653.

1904. Daily average number in Prison, 725.

Table IV.

Return of Reports for talking, idling, short oakum picking,'etc., for the years 1903, 1904, 1905, 1906 and 1907.

1905.

1907.

Daily average number in Prison, 502.

Daily average number in Prison, 697.

1906. Daily average number in Prison, 518

January,

89

49

80

38

39

February,

80

38

60

42

46

March,.

103

61

59

35

61

April,

87

33

88

63

54

May,

82

56

100

34

68

June,

77

42

102

44

69

July,

100

44

August,

88

40

September,

108

44

October,

163

48

November,

142

30

8 a 2 # 8

82

56

84

84

39

65

97

43

58

88

66

54

70

68

60

December,

161

55

80

38

60

Total,......

1,280

540

990

566

718

Table V.

Return showing the Erpenditure and Income for the year 1907.

Expenditure.

Amount.

Income.

Amount.

C.

Pay and Allowance of Officers includ-

Earnings of prisoners,

$ C.

37,434.05

ing uniforms, &c........

65,516.49

Victualling of prisoners,

13,577.66

Paid by Military for subsistence of

Military prisoners,

282.60

Fuel, light, soap and dry earth,

8,029.76 | Paid by Navy for subsistence of Naval

prisoners,...

102.30

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, furni-

ture, &c.,

2,587.48 Debtors' subsistence,........

998.25

Wei-hai-wei prisoners' subsistence,

684.60

Shanghai prisoners' subsistence,

443.10

Vagrants' subsistence,....

60.00

Waste food sold,

75.00

Actual cost of prisoners' maintenance, 49,631.49

Total,.

$ 89,711.39

Total,..

Average annual cost per prisoner, $98.86.

.$ 89,711.39

Table VI.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the

year 1907.

Departments.

1

2

4

Nature of Industry.

Value of stock

on hand

Value of articles Value of articles! Value of stock

January 1st,

1907.

Value of

Material

purchased.

manufactured

manufactured

Total Dr.

or work done

for payment.

or work done for Gaol or other

on hand December 31st,

1907.

Total Cr.

Value of

Earnings

(Difference between columns 3 and 7.)

C.

$

C.

C.

$

3.642.88

355.56

3,998.44

1,368.81

9.90

2,875.76

4,254.47

256.03

532.56

2,191.01

2,723:57

3,055.77

311.11

1,411.81

4,778.69

2,055.12

8.26

27.34

35.60

376.56

3.46

380.02

344.42

90.80

1,445.01

1,535.81

102.67

1,887.48

228.90

2,219.05

683.24

12.87

51.35

64.22

46.10

130.37

12.87

189.34

125.12

1.89

21.60

23.49

3.73

150.87

3.50

158.10

134.61

498.84

603.00

1,101.84

309.85

333.97

604.93

1,248.75

146.91

3.15

82.19

3,170.36

.40

5,021.40

781.37

9,804.19

3.15

3,252.55

781.77

14,825.59

1.28

5.04

.36

6.68

3.53

232.15

3,493.33

150.27

3,875.75

623.20

4,802.31

267.42

39,128.40

9.97

4,461.13

4,812.28

4,030.51

43,856.95

29,031.36

Total,.

9,892.09

18,453.94

28,346.03

5,764.34

50,252.78

9,762.96

65,780.08

37,434.05

Oakum,

Coir,

Net-making,

Tailoring,

Rattan,

Tin-smithing,

Carpentering,

Grass-matting,

Shoe-making,

Laundry,.

Printing and Book-binding,

.

190

191

Table VII.

Return showing value of articles manufactured or work done for which payment has been received or for which accounts have been rendered during the year 1907.

Department.

Description of Articles.

Amount.

Total.

$

C.

$

C.

Oakum,

By 15,209 lbs. Oakum at 9 cents per lb.,

1,368.81

Coir,......

99

14,068 lbs. matting and brusher at 20 cents

per lb..

1,368.81

25

761 lbs. mats and matting at 22 cents per lb.,

2,813.60 167.42

""

11 lbs. lettered mats at 25 cents per lb.,

2.75

""

Repairs and Extras,

72.00

3,055.77

Net-making,

وو

29 Tennis nets at av. $5.13 each,

148.92

""

10 Boundary nets 7,068 sq. ft. at 2 cents,

194.33

99

3 Boundary nets 2,064 sq. ft. at 14 cents, ... Repairs,

32.56

.75

376.56

Tailoring,..

Rattan,

""

Articles made and repairs for Gaol Officers,

102.67

102.67

""

87 Chairs rattaned,

43.50

Various,

2.60

""

46.10

Carpentering,

""

""

Articles made,

repaired,

303.55

6.30

309:85

Tin-smithing,

>>

34

Articles made,...

repaired,

3.52

.21

3.73

Grass-matting,

"

10 lbs. mats and matting at 12 cents per lb.,

1.28

1.28

Shoe-making,

29

9 pairs leather boots at av. $5.00 per pair,...................

45.00

8

shoes

""

59

3

""

12

canvas boots shoes

$3.60 $2.70

29.00

8.10

39

""

$2.45

29.40

4

""

childrens boots $2.50

10.00

"3

4

shoes

$2.00

8.00

""

""

""

"

"

6 slippers

66 cents

.4.00

""

Repairs,

98.65

232.15

Printing and Book-

binding,

""

Printing Book-binding,

82.77 184.65

267.42

Paid into Bank during 1907 which sum includes

$129.54 for work executed in 1906,

Value of work executed during 1907 for which

payment was deferred to 1908,

5,764.34

5,790.78

103.10

એવું

Industry.

192

Table VIII.

Return showing the value of articles manufactured or work done on account of the Gaol and other Departments during the year 1907.

Department.

Value.

Remarks.

Oakum,

Gaol,

Sanitary,

$

C.

5.40 4.50

Coir,...

Gaol,

Police,

34.56 Mats, matting and brusher at 20 cents per lb.

39.20

Harbour,

41.40

Sanitary,

33.35

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,

132.60

Medical,.

30.00

Tailoring,.

Gaol,

Police,

63.10

1,290.28 Clothing, repairs and bedding at fixed scale.

Do.

Supreme Court,

13.40

/

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,

94.00

Colonial Secretary,

22.60

Government House,

374.05

Treasury,

3.00

General Post Office,..

27.05

Rattan-work,

Gaol,

Police,

Supreme Court,

Tin-smithing,

Gaol,

Public Works,

Sanitary,

Carpentering, ... Gaol,

.40 182.78

Police,

7.25

122.97 Cost of material plus percentage.

1.40

6.00

Do.

125.87 Articles made and repaired at fixed scale.

24.60

Articles made and repaired partly fixed scale

or cost of material plus percentage.

Government House,

119.94

Supreme Court,

24.00

Grass-matting,

Gaol,

5.04

Fixed scale.

Shoe-making,

Gaol,

713.82

Do.

Police,

5.45

Colonial Secretary,

29.00

Sanitary,

2,745.06

Laundry,

Gaol,

Gaol,

Police,

Prisoners' Police

""

-73,252 -22,146

""

Printing and

Book-binding,

See Table IX,

1,940.37 Officers' washing-64,679 pieces at 3 cents.

2,197.56

664.38 39,128.40

""

"

Total,

.$ 50,252.78

193

Table IX.

}

Department.

printed.

No. of forms No. of books Printing.

bound.

Book- binding.

Total.

$ C.

$

(.

$

Government House,

4,252

12

53.75

10.00

C.

63.75

Colonial Secretary's Office,

50.444

171

766.70

53.05

819.75

Registrar General's Office,..

178,220

886

1,800.90

214.30

2,015.20

Public Works Department,

274,114

1,271

2,509.61

291.05

2,800.66

Harbour Department,

272,819

1.132

2.868.65

302.55

3.171.20

Treasury,

154,619

950

1,585.00

208.10 1.793.10

Sanitary Board.

830,973

6,174

7,688.85

821.75

8.510.60

General Post Office,

1,139,387

2,389

7,640.95

444.20

8,085.15

Police Department,

655,790

7,267

4,057.84

383.45

4,441.29

Magistracy,

81.345

95

836.25

40.20

876.45

Government Civil Hospital,

125,224

511

1.380.15

164.70

1,544.85

Supreme Court, .

39,836

90

498.25

118.55

616.80

Land Court,

40,390

182

418.00

68.50

486.50

Land Office,

37,448

376

373.75

86.70.

460.45

Botanical and Forestry Department,

27,980

116

325.75

20.90

346.65

Prison Department,

38,070

130

563.50

52.15

615.65

Queen's College,

2,082

42

43.25

9.35

52.60

Education Department,.

20,760

34

295.50

14.05

309.55

Audit Department,.

1,300

4

25.75

7.50

33.25

Stamp Office,

65,450

19

547.25

4.50

551.75

Assessor's Office,..

Magistracy, Tai Po,..........

2,980

6

34.50

9.45

43.95

50,150

380

442.50

90.65

533.15

Land Office, Tai Po,.....................

10.650

26

142.25

8.95

151.20

Observatory,.

27,460

26

245.75

2.70

248.45

Attorney General's Office,..

2,808

60.75

5.50

66.25

Crown Solicitor's Office,

13,000

6

124.25

6.80

131.05

Hongkong Volunteer Corps,.

9,169

18

131.60

10.05

141.65

Bacteriological Department,

7,794

25

133.50

29.75

163.25

Health Officer's Office,

5,100

54.25

...

54.25

Total,

....

4,169,624

22,342 35,649.00

3,479.40 39,128.40

194

Table X.

Return showing the Employment of Prisoners and the Value of their Labour,

during the year 1907.

Daily Average number

of Prisoners.

Description of Employment.

Value of Prison

Labour.

Males. Females. Totals.

C.

SUNDAYS, CHRISTMAS DAY AND GOOD FRIDAY:-

Cooking,

11

11

71.28

Cleaning,...

24

1

25

135.00

Non-productive,

449

17

466

/

Totals,..........

484

18

502

OTHER DAYS:-

Debtors, Remands, On punishment, Sick,

48

Crank, Shot, Shot and Stone,

46

:

:

48

46

In Manufactories :---

Book-binding,

33

33

2,052.60

Printing,

41

41

2,550.20

Printing labourers,

18

:

18

559.80

Oakum picking,

136

7

143

889.46

Coir-matting,

32

32

1,492.80

Shoe-making,

13

13

808.60

Tailoring,..

11

N

13

606.45

Net-making, String-making, and Ships

fender-making,

24

24

746.40

In Building :-

Carpentering and Fitting,

11

11

684.20

In Service of the Prison :-

Laundry,

Cooking,

33

30

41

1,912.65

11

11

410.52

Cleaning,

24

1

25

777.50

White-washing,

93.30

Totals,...

484

18

502

$13,790.76

Establish-

ment.

195

Table XI.

Return showing the Basis upon which the Value of Earnings of Prisoners in calculated.

In Manufactories:

RATE.

Book-binding,

20 cents

per

diem.

Printing,

20

""

Printing Labourers,

10

""

Oakum-picking,

2

27

Coir-matting,.....

15

33

Shoe-making,

.... 20

""

Tailoring,

15

10

Bricklaying,

Net-making, string and fender-making,

In Building:

Painting,

Carpentering and Fitting,

In Service of the Prison:

15

20

10

""

Laundry,

15

99

Cooking,,

Cleaning,

12

""

10

White-washing,..

10

""

Table XII.

Return showing the Changes in the Gaol Staff*, during the year 1907.

Resigned

Voluntarily.

Pensioned.

Died.

Transferred.

Europeans,

Indians,

34

7

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

2

3

12

65

14

1

Nil.

3

18

pensed with.

Service dis-

* This does not include the Superintendent, Assistant Superintendent or Clerical Staff.

Dismissed.

Total No. of

Changes, etc.

No. 11.

SOIT QUIO

MA

DIEU

ET

MON DROTT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 15th of MAY, 1908.

Published by Authority;

REPORT OF THE POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, May 28th, 1908,

STAFF.

   1. The staff of the Hongkong General Post Office including that at Kowloon and the Western Branch consists of 74 staff, clerks, and sorters, and 99 postmen, messengers and launch crew.

   2. Of the higher Officers Mr. L. A. M. JOHNSTON, the Postmaster General, was on leave from March 23rd until December 31st, and Mr. T. H. MARTIN, Superintendent of the Regis- tration Department, was on leave from July 31st until the end of the year. Mr. E. C. LEWIS, the Assistant Postmaster General, returned from leave on January 17th and Mr. A. J. REED, the Accountant, on February 19th.

   3. During the absence on leave of the Postmaster General, his duties were performed by Mr. S. B. C. Ross from March 23rd until July 28th, and for the remainder of the year by Mr. C. McI. MESSER.

   4. Amongst the remainder of the staff there were 11 resignations, 2 deaths, 1 dismissal, 1 invalided, 3 transferred to other departments and 4 new appointments. In Shanghai there were one resignation and two deaths.

OFFICE ALTERATIONS.

   5. The Chinese distributing office has been removed to the basement under the Local Delivery Room, and the space so rendered vacant has been made into a room for the storage of mails in transit through Hongkong.

   6. An electric exhaust fan has been placed in the Foreign Mail room with the result that sickness due to impure atmosphere has been very greatly reduced.

198

MAILS.

Further

7. The number of mail bags and packets dealt with in the General Post Office, Hong- kong, amounted to 168,141 as against 160,921 in 1906 being an increase of 7,220. details are given in Table I.

REGISTRATION AND PARCEL BRANCH.

8. Registered articles and parcels handled in Hongkong amounted to 856,415 as against 770,820 in 1906, an increase of 85,595. Further particulars are given in Table II.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

9. A statement of Revenue and Expenditure is given in Table III. Revenue amounted to $445,420.92 shewing an increase of $24,966.88 over that of 1906 and an excess of $27,220.92 over the estimate. Expenditure amounted to $366,452.47 being an increase of $6,968.39. The excess of Revenue over Expenditure being $78,963.45, an increase of $17,998.49 compared with last year. The profit was therefore 17% of the revenue.

POSTAGE STAMPS.

10. Table IV shows a comparative statement of the sale of postage stamps at the various British Post Offices in China for the years 1906 and 1907. Table V shows the number of stamps of different denominations issued for sale during the years 1906 and 1907. A six cent stamp was introduced during the year, as under the new postage rate for Union Countries the postage on every succeeding ounce after the first is 6 cents.

MONEY ORDERS.

11. Although exchange ruled high during the year, the issue of money orders has decreased, while, on the other hand, the payment has largely increased. (Table VI.) The fact of the increase of the issue of orders on Japan is owing to Hongkong being the intermediary for the exchange of money orders betweeen Australia and India and the other British Possessions in the East with Japan. About £1,000 of the increase in the sale of Imperial Postal Orders is accounted for by the establishment of another agency at Tientsin.

12. Remittances to the Colony by the means of Imperial Postal Orders have become more popular and are yearly increasing in volume. The reduction in the amount of com- mission on Local Postal Notes from 2% to 1% effected in 1905 has resulted in the marked increased use of this means of remitting money. $22,877 in 1907 against $12,728 and $15,497 in 1905 and 1906 respectively.

13. The exchange of money orders with Macao, hitherto between Hongkong and Macao only, has been extended to all the British Agencies established in China. Direct exchange with Kiautschou also came into force in 1907.

14. A system of advice of payment of money orders, to be furnished to the remitter by the paying office at a fee of 10 cents for each order, was introduced, but the public has not availed itself of this innovation.

15. With a view to expediting the payment of money orders in the United Kingdom a new system of dealing with the advices has been introduced. Instead of forwarding all the advices together with the money order list to the exchange office of London for onward transmission to the paying office, these documents, after being certified, are sent direct from Hongkong to their respective offices of payment under separate covers.

This arrangement has been found to possess considerable advantage over that previously in force, inasmuch as payment has frequently been effected a day and sometimes two days, earlier than could possi- bly have been the case under the old system.

 16. On the first December a new system inaugurated by the Post Office of the Straits Settlements was introduced for the purpose of providing illiterate coolies with a means of taking their savings back to China by means of money orders payable to bearer without any question being raised as to identification. As up to date only $150 has been sent this system does not appear to find favour.

صيد بجد

the

199

DEAD LETTER OFFICE.

17. The total number of all articles returned to and despatched from Hongkong during year 1907 amounted to 79,222, viz., 37,354 of the former and 41,868 of the latter showing an increase of 7,554 on the total of the previous year (Table VII). Of the former, those originating in Hongkong, it was possible to return to the senders 10,747.

  18. Enclosed in 47 of these unregistered returned letters, there were found articles of value, Bank Notes, Bank Drafts, Cheques, Money Orders, etc. These when possible were subjected to registration and returned to the senders.

19. The following correspondence failed to be delivered in Hongkong, viz., Received from abroad-Letters 11,993, Post Cards 1,453, Other Articles 7,011-Locally, Letters 1,595, Post Cards 137, Other Articles 1,959.

  20. There were found among the unregistered letters posted locally 75 containing coin, principally small amounts. These were nearly all Chinese letters and were returned to senders whenever possible.

  21. Thirty-five post cards were posted bearing no address, and very many of them lacked the senders' names. Fifty post cards bearing imitations of postage stamps addressed to places in the United Kingdom had to be withdrawn owing to the entry of such cards into the United Kingdom being prohibited. These were returned when the senders' names and addresses could be ascertained.

22. On account of a regulation made on 28th November the following number of letters and circulars concerning lotteries were stopped and returned :-

Shanghai Watch Club...

German Lottery Circulars

.........

249.

..128.

PILLAR BOXES.

  23. The total number of articles collected during the year from all pillar boxes was 168,496 against 122,899 in 1906 and 92,170 in 1905. Special postmen are detailed for the work of clearing these letter boxes.

CHINESE BRANCH.

24. The total number of Chinese registered articles delivered by the Chinese Branch at the General Post Office was 162,920 of which 103,793 were from the United States of America and Canada and 59,127 from China and other countries showing a total increase compared with the year 1986 of 20,472. The amount of ordinary correspondence dealt with has also largely increased.

POSTAL HONG LICENCES.

25. Thirty-eight Postal Hong licences and 120 licences to letter carriers were issued during the year. These numbers show a decrease of 6 Hong licences and 36 letter carrier licences. The decrease is due to the increased rate of postage on Hong Packets to and from Canton which was raised to 4 cents per half ounce. The Hongs are still in the habit of smuggling their letters on board steamers, instead of sending them through the Post Office for transmission. An appreciable increase in the number of Hong Packets received by the Post Office for transmission to Shanghai was due to one of these hongs being caught smug- gling and fined $200 by the Police Magistrate and having its licence cancelled.

WESTERN BRANCH POST OFFICE.

26. The amount of correspondence sent between this Branch Office and Canton was: Despatched 485,563 letters, 1,214 other articles and 4,647 registered articles; Received 622,745 letters, 6,730 other articles and 3,390 registered articles. This is a total increase compared with last year of 531,788 letters and other articles and 4,637 registered articles. In addition to the above 14,651 Hong Packets were despatched and 19,577 received. revenue of the sale of stamps amounted to $13,928.38 compared with $14,724.20 in the previous year.

The

M

200

TIENTSIN POST OFFICE.

   27. This agency was established in October 1906. During the year 1907 the amount. of correspondence despatched was 45,316 ordinary letters, 4,705 newspapers and packets, and 4,085 registered articles. Exclusive of the above 632 parcels of a nett weight of 2,174 lbs. were dispatched. The nett weight of annual outward mail exclusive of parcels does not exceed 5,000 lbs. while the nett weight of inward mail amounts to about 75,000 lbs. a ratio of fifteen to one.

28. A through service via Harbin was started on 17th October and the use of the Siberian route has come increasingly into favour.

   29. The incoming mail consisted of 1,276 bags of letters and papers from Shanghai, 253 bags from Hongkong, 88 bags from Chefoo and 2 bags of letters only from London. Also 191 boxes and bags of parcels were received from various quarters.

   30. The sale of stamps amounted to $6,025.92. Imperial Notes were sold to a value of £1,114.0.0 and Local Notes to a value of $1,466.75.

LOSSES OF MAILS.

   31. The mail for London, riâ Siberia from Shanghai on 30th March, 1907, was opened and ransacked on board the S.S. Baltica. The S.S. Dakota carrying a mail from America was wrecked off the coast of Japan. The S.S. Sullberg carrying a mail from Ilaiphong to Hongkong foundered during a typhoon and has never been heard of since.

RESULTS OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION HELD AT ROME IN 1906.

   32. The Rome Convention came into, force on October 1st. The chief changes introduced by this convention were as follows:--

   33. The transit charges were altered. Payments for land transit are fixed according to distance instead of one fixed amount for any distance. The Maritime transit charges have been reduced. The Russian Government is still allowed to charge 15 francs a kilogramme for transmission by the Siberian Railway.

   31. The method of taking statistics has also been simplified. Under former conventions efforts were made to arrive at exactitude of statement, which experience has shown to be impossible, and which called for an expenditure of labour out of all keeping with the results. attained. The new method will furnish results quite as satisfactory as those obtained under the former method, and with very much less trouble. The new method is to take gross weight of mails instead of nett weight and for offices of exchange on receiving open mails for forward transmission to other postal administrations to take credit according to the number of letters, post cards and other objects received and then to treat this correspondence as domestic. The transit charge for each letter sent in open mail being, fixed at 6 centimes for each post card and other article 25 centimes.

   35. Statistics were taken for all mails starting during the first twenty-eight days of November, and the results of such statistics are now being worked out so that transit charges for the next six years may be determined.

   36. The postal rates have been altered, an important reduction having been made in the letter rate. For Hongkong the rate was formerly fixed at 10 cents for every ounce. The new rate is 10 cents for the first ounce and 6 cents for every additional ounce.

In the case of countries belonging to the Imperial British penny postage scheme, the unit of weight has been increased from half an ounce to one ounce. At the Postal Agencies in China maintained by the Hongkong Post Office, the unit of weight has been only raised to 20 grammes instead of half an ounce, (about 14 grammes), 20 grammes being the unit of weight for countries in the Postal Union which adopt the metrical measures. The advantage to the public of Hongkong from these rates is very great. In writing a letter of moderate length, it will no longer be necessary to use paper so thin as to make the writing almost illegible, and if one wants to send a heavier letter the diminution in the charge is very considerable. Thus a letter from Hongkong to Germany weighing just 4 ounces used to cost 80 cents, now it only costs 28 cents.

1

201

   37. A scheme for the prepayment of replies to letters has been started, by the issuing of coupons, which may not be sold at a less value than 28 centimes, and which are exchangeable in countries which have adopted this scheme for a stamp of the value of 25 centimes or its equivalent. These coupons have not found favour in Hongkong only 92 having been sold up to December 31st. The reason being that most correspondence is addressed to British Possessions that have adopted the penny post.

   38. It is unnecessary for cards to bear the heading "Post Card" in order to receive treatment as post cards, and the fact that a card is labelled "Post Card" does not prevent it passing through the mails as printed matter, if it contain no unallowable writing.

   39. The rule absolutely excluding all merchandise, as distinct from samples, has been relaxed and widened to include specifically mentioned articles-single keys, fresh cut flowers, tube of serum and pathological specimens which have been rendered inoffensive.

TORN COVERS.

   40. The number of articles received with covers torn off amounted to 1,728, of which 399 were afterwards forwarded to destination.

PROSECUTIONS.

1

   41. During the year there were 13 prosecutions under the Post Office Ordinance, 11 for unlawfully infringing the exclusive privilege of the Postmaster General. Fines to the amount of $1,200 were paid. There were two cases of fraudulently obtaining registered letters by means of forged signature and chop.

28th March, 1908.

*

C. McI. MESSER,

Table I.

MAILS DESPATCHED AND RECEIVED FOR 1907.

Postmaster General.

To and from Hongkong,

For H. M. Ships.

For Foreign Ships of War.

Sent in Transit through Hongkong.

Steamer carrying

Mails.

Loose

Bags.

Packets. Letter Bags. Boxes.

Bags.

Bags and Packets.

Boxes.

Arrivals. Departures.

Received 1907,

Received 1906,

80,317 3,114 2,065 83.243 3,096 1,961

7.630

6.819

7,342

5,901

13,650 12,891

Increase.

- 2,926

18

104

288

918

759

Shanghai and British Postal

Agencies other than through Hongkong,

14,051

487

Despatched 1907,

Despatched 1906,

71.379 7,331 1,486 67,190 7,392 1,395

6,994

6,785

6,597 55,395 8,394 49,111

7,830

7,438

14.270 13,977

Increase,

7,189

61

91

209

1,203

5,984

401

293

Shanghai and British Postal

Agencies other than through Hongkong,

11,192 1,579

:

:

202

Table II.

STATISTICS OF INTERNATIONAL, LOCAL AND AGENCIES REGISTERED CORRESPONDENCE AND PARCELS FOR 1907.

International & Local.

Description of Correspondence.

Total Total 1907.

1906.

Despatched. Received.

Comparison with 1906.

Increase. Decrease.

Insured Letters......

335

Registered Articles,

345,959

371 399,390

706

550

745,349

672,186

156 73,163

Insured Parcels via Gibraltar,

Insured Parcels via Brindisi,

1,850 102

1,772

3.622

3,697

75

...

129

231

214

17

Insured Parcels via Marseilles, Ordinary Parcels ria Gibraltar, Ordinary Parcels via Brindisi, Ordinary Parcels rià Marseilles,

313

313

321

00

14,605

13,569

28,174

24,435

3,739

271

331

602

507

95

...

...

1,031

1,031

950

81

America, Manila and Honolulu Parcels,

German Parcels by German Steamers, . French Parcels received by French

1.827

2,841

4,668

4.251

417

438

1,861

2,299 2,547

248

Steamers,

Insured Indian Parcels,

Ordinary Indian Parcels,

958

958

910

48

501

500

1,274

1.737

Australian Parcels,

Japanese Parcels,

Miscellaneous Parcels,

1,057

818

68,462 60,252

8,210

:

2,092

1,884

41,007

17,592

411,318

445,097 856,415 770,820

85,926

331

Parcels received for China Fleet,

Parcels, Shanghai and Agencies,

20.409

2,267 2,267 13,872

Registered Articles, Shanghai,..

51,458

29,032

.

Registered Articles, Agencies,.

2,920

2,133

2,410 34.281 30,807 3.474 80,490 118,135 5,053 4,715

143

37,645

338

(Exclusive of articles also passing

through Hongkong,)...............

74,787

47,304 122,091 156,067

3,812 37,788

Grand Total for 1907, 978,506; increase of 51,619 against 1906.

Table III.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Receipts.

1906.

1907.

Increase.

Decrease.

Expenditure.

1906.

1907.

Increase. Decrease.

$

$

$

Sale of Stamps,

Hongkong.... !

Do., at the ì Agencies, !

275,158.77 289,189.26 14,030,49

106,189.51114,861.67

8,672.16

Unpaid Postage,

6,763.24

5,375.37

1,387.87

Transit Payments to the United Kingdom,

Transit Payments to other Coun- tries,

17,656.45

⚫ 6,739.70

10,916.75

45,128.85 45,104.12

24.73

Boxholders' Fees, 7,480.32

7,601.20 120.88

Commission on ì Money Orders, f

Profit on Ex-

change on Money Order transactions,

Interest

Money Order

14,613.16 14,045.11

568.05

Gratuities to Shipmasters for the conveyance of Mails,.......

3.799.99 4,091.38

291.39

9,665.76 12,781.98

3.116.22

Contribution to- wards P. & 0. Subsidy,

116,418.94 116,430.19

11.25

on

Commission on } Money Orders,.

2,112.72 1,962.27

150.45

546.73

1,458.43 911.70

Fund,

Void Money

Orders and Postal Notes,

36.55

107.90

71.35

Working Expenses, 174,367.13| 192,124.81 17,757.68

Total Receipts, ... 420,454.04 | 445,120.92 26,922.80

Totals,

..$420,454.04 445,420.92

1,955.92 Total Expenditure, 359,484.08 366,452.47 18,060.32 11,091.93

Profit,

60,969.96 78,968.45

Totals, ..$420,454.04 445,420.92

i

1.

203

Table IV.

REVENUE FROM THE SALE OF POSTAGE STAMPS, &C., AT THE BRITISH POST OFFICES

IN CHINA, 1906 AND 1907.

1906.

$65,718.97

1907.

Shanghai

$65,063.42

Amoy

4,610.14

9,960.49*

Canton....

11,205.60

10,827.37

Chefoo...

1,610.87

1,609.71

Foochow

4,442.29

4,783.67

Hankow

4,788.95

3,925.03

Hoihow

1,605.27

1,202.33

Liu Kung Tau..

4,272.72

4.424.51

Ningpo...

499.82

527.33

Swatow

5,660.96

6,374.50

Tientsin t

1,773.92

6,163.31

$106,189.51

$114,861.67

Of this amount $2,771.42 was in respect of sales during the year 1906.

† Opened 1st October, 1906.

Table V.

POSTAGE STAMPS, etc., issued for SALE in HONGKONG and at the BRITISH POST OFFICES in CHINA during the years 1906 and 1907.

Denomination.

1906.

1907.

Postage Stamps, .

1 cent.

2 cents.

501,115 2,044,075

426,000 2,330,880

4

29

2,445,115

2,414,160

5

"7

817,675

879,600

6

17,760

8

"

10

"

85,195 1,036,555

87,600

1,108,560

12

""

27,835

31,440

20

149,275

139,642

30

""

64,795

67,680

50

99

62,935

62,520

1 dollar.

50,315

44,581

2 dollars.

14,055

18,148

3

""

5,285

5,600

5

""

3,145

2,420

10

وو

3,405

  Books of Stamps, Post Cards,

2,870

1

1 cent.

2 cents.

4

""

""

Newspaper Wrappers,

Postage Envelopes,

""

5,994 22,695

240

17,140

60

2,405

18,900

6,075

26,251

520

450

1,325

4

""

905

528

11

""

1,020

925

22

2,340

1,620

41

""

6,590

8,225

51

""

240

200

10/13

""

390

200

Registration Envelopes,.

11

""

10,925

11,070

IN STERLING.

COUNTRIES.

Orders Issued.

United Kingdom, Queensland,..

New South Wales,.

Victoria,

South Australia,.

Tasmania,

New Zealand,.

Western Australia,.

Transvaal,

Cape Colony,

United States of America and Hawaii,

Canada,

Japan,..

Straits Settlements..

Federated Malay States,

British North Borneo,

Siam,

Macao,.

Kiautschou,.

Shanghai,

Agencies in China,.

Base Post Office,

India,

Ceylon,

Germany,

Table VI.

STATEMENT OF MONEY ORDER TRANSACTIONS.

IN GOLD DOLLARS.

IN GOLD YEN.

IN SILVER DOLLARS.

IN RUPEES.

IN MARKS.

Orders Paid. Orders Issued | Orders Paid. Orders Issued. Orders Paid. Orders Issued. Orders Paid. Orders Issued. .Orders Paid. Orders Issued. Orders Paid.

·

£

d.

S.

£

117,277 18

S.

d.

4

17,400 2

103 18 2 18,778 8 6

...

C.

Yen. Sen.

Yen. Sen.

ር.

3

\

998 13 9

3,040 19 10

582 19 1

128 15 3

47 18

1,690 1

1,646 17

3

...

445 2 11

376 9 11

1,170 1 11

93 11 7

3,286 13 9

4 19 9

396

787 17 5

167 4

9

5,207.63

1,413.12

20,415.83

11,803.64

...

256,758.10

45,714.22

:

3,989.26

212.02

18,653.17

...

13,747.58

.160.63

5,858.29

82.30

571.90

...

1,020.42

1,712.92

139.51

54,697,54

462.87

24,920.50

41,587.49

230.08

...

...

Rs

As.

Rs As. Ps. Mks. Pfs. Mks. Pfs.

...

...

...

...

243,911

4,149 2

9

|152,567 09 4,715 15 0

31,983.94 63,254.74

Total in 1907,

19,740 17 948,291 6 3

Total in 1906,.

21,022 4 836,640 0 4

6,620.75| 32,219.47 | 256,758.10 45,714.22 60,301.68 107,744.80248,060 11 157,282 15 9 7,469.10 23,964.73 | 198,694.09 44,034.89 62,417.08 92,016.32 284,048 11

31,983.94 64,254.74

|160,938 3 0

40,062.30 33,158.48

أسم

204

205

STATEMENT OF BRITISH POSTAL ORDERS ISSUED AND PAID AT HONGKONG AND AT THE AGENCIES IN CHINA.

ORDERS ISSUED.

VALUES.

AMOUNT.

d. -16

s. d. s. d. s. d.

1-

16

2/6

d. 5-

s. d. 10-

s. d. 10/6

s. d. 20-

£

s. d.

Total in 1907,...

952

2,944 2,169 2,132 3,216 3,983

736

7,982 11,764 16

1906...

683

""

2,248 1,546 1,578 2,5143,018

437 6,438

9,247 12 0

ORDERS PAID.

No.

Amount.

£

S.

d.

Total in 1907,

4,314

3,269 4 9

1906,

3,082

2,208

08

STATEMENT OF LOCAL POSTAL NOTES ISSUED AT HONGKONG

AND AT THE AGENCIES IN CHINA.

VALUES.

25 cts. 50 cts. $1.00 $2.00 $3.00 | $4.00 $5.00 $10.00

AMOUNT.

cts.

Total in 1907,

354 470 375 408

461 515 8281,378

22,877 50

1906,

217 344 714 275 286

331 485 940

15,497 25

206

Table VII.

RETURN OF DEAD LETTERS RECEIVED AND DESPATCHED IN THE DEAD LETTER BRANCH.

RETURNED TO HONGKOng.

RETURNED BY HONGKONG.

Letters.

Post Cards.

Other Articles.

Letters.

Post Cards.

Other Articles.

United Kingdom,

2,819

873

626

2,872

406

9,225

India,

947

42

92

2,744

540

648

Straits Settlements,

3.353

44

54

2,578

75

803

Ceylon,...

146

31

7

99

38

52

Batavia, N. I.,..

98

2

359

28

89

Egypt,

38

2

133

41

65

Continent of Europe,

842

326

1,960

U. S. of America,

3.358

435

170

2,054

235

2,155

Canada,

395

40

24

339

34

241

Mexico,

175

1

13

...

...

Honolulu,

134

7

5

...

...

Manila,

152

18

301

30

67

Japan,

295

144

312

580

329

307

China,

4,530

81

1,244

7,690

352

753

French Indo-China,

92

4

27

379

19

78

Foreign Offices in China,

317

37

13

Macao,

168.

11

11

Siam,

212

2

7

68

10

8

Victoria,

126

18

9

106

15

81

New South Wales.

112

19

10

230

51

112

South Australia,

17

4

24

9

12

Western Australia,

50

Queensland,

32

280

6

30

41

57

8

34

Tasmania,

14

12

10

2

New Zealand,

74

40

co

54

12

Natal (inclusive of all South Africa),

246

13

...

...

20

29

27

Transvaal,

399

Other Places,

2,680

Shanghai,.

3,164

:སྐྱཱ

32

8

582

1,408

135

2

437

5,808

B. P. O.'s in China,

557

28

638

::

Total in 1907,

23.969

Total in 1906,

19,968

10,486 2,899 2,629 12,327

22.417 17,971

2,636

16.815

2,410

16,363

No. 12.

SOIT

QUI MA

PEN

DIEU

ET

S

MON DROITZA

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 19th of JUNE, 1908.

Published by Authority;

REPORT ON THE HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS, FOR THE YEAR APRIL 1ST, 1907. TO MARCH 31ST, 1908.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, June 25th, 1908,

1. On March 31st, 1907, the total strength of the Corps was 289 and on March 31st, 1908, it was 295.

Table I shows the inspection state on 21st March.

2. During the past year 68 members have resigned (3 on medical certificate, 27 in the Colony and 38 on leaving the Colony).

3. Seventy-four new members have been enrolled.

4. The Hongkong Volunteer Reserve Association had on March 31st, 1908, a member- ship of 219, a decrease of 29 during the past 12 months. Rifle practice is carried out on 2 days a week throughout the year at King's Park Rifle Range, Kowloon, and at the Peak Range.

Table II is a nominal roll of the Reserve Association.

208

APPOINTMENTS, ETC., OF OFFICERS AND STAFF.

5. The changes amongst the Officers and Staff of the Corps have been as follows:-

STAFF.

Major C. G. PRITCHARD, R. A., Commandant, resigned 1st April, 1907, having com- pleted the period of his tenure of the Command.

Major A. CHAPMAN 2nd in Command appointed Commandant 2nd April, 1907.

  Major A. CHAPMAN awarded Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers' Decoration 11th April, 1907.

Captain D. MACDONALD promoted Major 2nd in Command 15th April, 1907.

  Captain A. J. THOMPSON, R.G.A., appointed Staff Officer, Hongkong Volunteer Corps, 18th April, 1907.

Surgeon Lieut. C. FORSYTH promoted Surgeon 'Captain 9th August, 1907.

Doctor J. W. HARTLEY appointed Surgeon Lieut. 30th September, 1997.

  Captain J. H. W. ARMSTRONG was appointed Honorary Aide-de-Camp to His Ex- cellency the Governor on the 15th November, 1907.

Sir MATTHEW NATHAN, K.C.M.G., having resigned the appointment, His Excellency Sir FREDERICK JOHN DEALTRY LUGARD, K.C.M.G., C.B., D.S.O., was pleased to accept the Honorary Colonelcy of the Hongkong Volunteer Corps on the 25th November, 1907.

No. 1 COMPANY, H.K.V.A.

Lieut. W. NICHOLSON promoted Captain 15th April, 1907.

Lieut. J. T. HAYTON resigned 30th January, 1908, having left the Colony.

No. 2 COMPANY, H.K.V.A.

Sergeant G. BLOOD appointed 2nd Lieutenant 30th September, 1907.

ENGINEER COMPANY.

Lieutenant F. O. REYNOLDS resigned 25th February, 1908, having left the Colony.

EQUIPMENT.

6. The four 15-pr. B.L. Guns on loan from C.R.A. were withdrawn during March, 1908, and are to be replaced by four 15-pr. Q.F. Guns, two of which have already been received.

DISCIPLINE, TRAINING, ETC.

7. The Discipline of the Corps has, as in previous years, been very good.

209

The following Table gives the number of Efficients, etc. :-

NON-EFFICIENTS.

Efficients Efficients

with

with

STAFF.

more

than 30 drills.

less than 30 drills.

On

Medi-

cal Re- Certi- cently

Non-

leave.

Absent with- out

Effici- Total.

ents

ficate. joined. leave. to pay

fine.

:.

:

:

:

Staff,

7

Hongkong Volunteer Troop,

13

14

12

1

:

Right No. 1 Company,....

28

Left No. 1 Company,

30

15

ན་

Right No. 2 Company,

31

10

C

7

1

1

Left No. 2 Company,

36

6

Engineer Company,.

29

Total,

174

62

33

2

12

:

:

:

7

40

45

55

56

48

44

12 295

   With reference to the above Table 4 members (exclusive of the Staff) have attended over 100 drills and 74 between 50 and 100 drills. The highest number of drills attended

was 123 by Corporal A. E. WRIGHT.

Table III is a nominal roll of Efficients.

8. An ambulance class was formed in April, 1907, under Surgeon Captain FORSYTH. At the conclusion of the course this class was examined by Lieutenant FRASER, R.A.M.C., and 9 members passed a satisfactory examination.

   9. On 1st May, 1907, a Semaphore Signalling class was formed under the Staff Officer. This class was examined on 3rd and 5th July and 14 qualified.

10. A special course of instruction was held during September with 4 attendances a week for N.C.O.'s and others desirous of promotion. This course was well attended with most excellent results.

11. Recruits' drills were held twice a week during the summer months and from begin- ning of September, 1907, to end of March, 1908, there were drills for all members 4 times a week..

GUN PRACTICE, MUSKETRY, ETC.

12. 15-pr. B.L. Gun Practice was carried out on 26th October, 2nd and 30th November, 1907, 3rd February and 14th March, 1908. On all occasions the practice was by sections from one of the Corps' mobilization positions on Stonecutters' Island at targets placed on Chun Hue.

These practices were arranged by and carried out under the supervision of Lieutenant R. M. CROSSE, R.G.A., Instructor in Gunnery and Range Finding, South China.

This Officer kindly attended at Volunteer Head Quarters after each practice and criticized the same in the presence of all the Officers concerned.

I desire to record my thanks to Lieutenant CROSSE for all the time and trouble he has devoted to the Corps.

See Table IV and Appendix A, Camp Report.

13. 303 Maxim Gun Practice was carried out on 23rd and 24th October, 1907, 29th February and 14th March, 1908.

210

See Table V and Appendix A, Camp Report.

14. Musketry returns for the whole of the Corps are forwarded herewith (see Army Forms B 187 attached) in accordance with the recommendation made by the Colonial Defence Committee. Musketry is very popular with the majority of the members of the Corps and would undoubtedly be still more so if the King's Park Range at Kowloon was available more frequently for their use. During the year 52,089 rounds have been fired by members of the Corps and 25,715 rounds have been supplied to the Reserve Association.

15. The Officers and Staff Sergeants carried out Revolver Practice during Camp. See Army Forms B 187 attached.

CAMPS OF INSTRUCTION.

16. The Annual Camp for the Artillery and Engineer units was held at Stonecutters' Island from 21st October to 4th November, 1907, and that for the Troop near Fan-ling in New Territories from 21st to 26th December, 1907.

I attach Camp Reports (Appendices A and B).

1

COMPETITIONS.

17. The following interunit competitions took place during the year :-

(1.) Sir MATTHEW NATHAN'S Cup for Efficiency.

This was won by Left No. 2 Company under Captain SKINNER.

The following is the order of efficiency :---

1. Left No. 2 Company, H.K.V.A., O.C., Captain SKINNER. 2. Hongkong Volunteer Troop,

O.C., Lieutenant Ross.

3. Right No. 1 Company, H.K.V.A., O.C., Captain NICHOLSON. 4. Engineer Company,

O.C., Captain CRAKE.

5. Left No. 1 Company, H.K.V.A., O.C., Captain Woon.

6. Right No. 2 Company, H.K.V.A., O.C., Captain ARMSTRONG, A.D.c.

   (2.) The Blake Musketry Shield for teams of 8 from each unit at ranges 200, 500 and 600 yards.

   This competition took place on 4th May, 1907, and was won by Left No. 1 Company, H.K.V.A., O.C., Captain LAMMERT, and also on 11th January, 1908, and was again won by the same company under Captain Wood.

3.) The Sanders' Cup was competed for by the Artillery units at 15-pr. B.L. Practice on Chinese New Year's day, 3rd February, 1908, and was won by Left No. 1 Company under Captain WOOD.

   (4.) The Gascoigne Shield for Maxim Gun Practice was competed for on 29th February, 1908, and was won by Right No. 2 Company (O.C., Captain ARMSTRONG, A.D.C.)

MISCELLANEOUS.

   18. The Corps took part in the King's Birthday parade with the remainder of the Garrison on November 9th, 1907.

   19. The Corps paraded with the remainder of the Garrison and lined the streets on 20th April, 1907, on the occasion of the departure of Sir MATTHEW NATHAN from the Colony and again on 28th July, 1907, on the arrival in the Colony of Sir FREDERICK LUGARD.

On each occasion the Troop furnished an escort.

20. The Cadet Company has increased in numbers since the beginning of the present year, there are now 22 members.

211

A bugle band is being started, and a miniature rifle range close to the Victoria School will shortly be opened.

21. The New Headquarters have been equipped with a complete gymnastic apparatus purchased out of private funds; classes were held during the winter months and were well attended.

22. The winter clothing alluded to in my last report has now been provided.

   23. Alterations in the establishment of the Corps, providing for the formation of an Infantry Company, have been approved and will come into force early in 1908.

   24. The purchase of a subtarget machine has been postponed pending the recommenda- tion of the Colonial Defence Committee regarding a similar but cheaper apparatus.

INSPECTION.

25. The Annual Inspection of the Corps was carried out on 21st March, 1908, by His Excellency. Major General R. G. Broadwood, c.p., Commanding the Troops South China, who expressed his satisfaction with the soldierlike appearance of the Corps and the smart way in which the various drill movements were carried out.

SERVICES.

   26. I am indebted to Major PRITCHARD for the efficient state in which he left the Corps on his resignation on 1st April, 1907, and am glad to be able to report that this standard of efficiency has been maintained thanks to the willing co-operation of all members of the Corps and to the help I have received from my Staff Officer. Corps Sergt.-Major W. HIGBY and Staff Armourer G. W. AVENELL have continued to perform their duties to my entire satisfaction.

I have, etc.,

ARTHUR CHAPMAN, Lieut.-Col., Commandant, Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

25th April, 1908.

Present,

Absent

DISTRIBUTION.

With leave,

Without leave,.

Wanting to complete,

Establishment,

Supernumerary,

Cadets,

Total,..

Table I.

HONG KONG

STAFF.

Commandant.

Major, 2nd in Com-

mand.

Staff Officer.

CORPS.

VOLUNTEER

Parade State, 21st March, 1908.

Nos. 1 & 2 ARTILLERY COMPANIES.

ENGINEERS.

BAND.

TROOP.

Corps Sergt.-Major.

Corps Armr.-Sergeant.

Orderly Room Clerk.

Captains.

Lieutenants.

Co. Sergt.-Majors.

Co. Qr.-Mr.-Sergts.

Sergeants.

Corporals.

Bombardiers.

Trumpeters.

Gunners.

Captains.

Lieutenants.

Co. Sergt.-Major.

Sergeants.

Corporals.

Sappers.

Sergeant-Drummer.

Corporals.

Drummers.

Lieutenant.

Troop Sergt.-Major.

Sergeants.

Corporals.

Troopers.

*Holding

1

1

2

1

N

...

......

...

...

1

1.1

2

...

...

:

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...

...

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1

1

6

Co

:

...

1

...

A

...

...

H

6

...

***

...

A

t

...

8

00

2 12 11

...

4

...

:

...

2

193

...

43

10

...

...

1

4

2 26

7

.*.

2

...

...

2 2 16 14 8

2

2

'

00

8

2 8

24 16

16

1 146

3 86

4 232

1

...

1

...

***

...

:

...

...

...

...

...

1

منه

4

3.

35

:

1 13 1 2

48

1

2

3

...

تت

3

1

3

4

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...

...

...

...

1

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1

1

2

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...

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1

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

21

12

2 31

...

-

...

...

40

...

212

A

213

Table II.

-

HONGKONG VOLUNTEER RESERVE ASSOCIATION.

NOMINAL ROLL OF MEMBERS,

Atkinson, Dr. J. M., Barker Road, The Peak. Auld, J. D., Dodwell & Co., Ltd.

Abley, T., The Disinfecting Station, Caine Road. Atkinson, R. D., Deacon, Looker & Deacon. Abraham, E., Chartered Bank of India. Adams, P. R., H. M. Naval Yard.

Beavis, C. E. H., Wilkinson & Grist.

Bird, L. G., Palmer and Turner. Berkeley, Sir H. S., Bank Buildings. Bird, R. E. O., Queen's College. Bowley, F. B. L., Dennys & Bowley. Braidwood, W. D., Ellis Kadoorie School.

Brett, C. W. T., No. 7 Ormsby Terrace, Kowloon. Buyers, C. B., H.K. High Level Tramway Co. Boyce, W. B., Punchard, Lowther & Co. Bryer, A., Leigh & Orange. Blowey, A., H. M. Naval Yard. Bryan, J. J., Sanitary Board.

Branch, Capt. B., Co. Butterfield & Swire. Bird, H, W., Palmer & Turner. Bond, C., Soldiers' Club.

Baker, R., Chater's Bungalow, Kowloon. Belilios, Dr. R. A., Alexandra Buildings. Black, Capt. H. J., 6 Mountain View, The Peak. Bolton, A. A., Kowloon Docks.

Carter, W. L., China & Japan Telephone Co. Chater, Sir Paul, Queen's Road Central. Calthrop, H. G., Queen's Road Central. Capell, J. R., A. S. Watson & Co. Campbell, H. F., Shewan, Tomes & Co.

Chatham, Hon. W., Director of Public Works. Carruthers, E. S., R. E. Office, Headquarters. Chawkley, H. G., Canteen, Murray Barracks. Cumming, A., C/o. Butterfield & Swire.

Davis, W. H. T., Hotel Mansions. Dealy, T. K., Craigmin, Magazine Gap. Dobbs, W., Public Works Department. Duncan, G. L., McEwen, Frickel & Co. Donald, W. H., The China Mail. Douglas, Capt. J., Prince's Buildings. Dow, P., Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Dawson, E. W., Sanitary Board Office, Kowloon. Daniel, W., Punchard, Lowther & Co. Dixon, Capt. A. W., Butterfield and Swire. Dowley, W. A., Vacuum Oil Co.

Douglas, J. P., Green Island Cement Co., Hokun. Denison, A., Denison, Ram & Gibbs. David, A. J., S. J. David & Co.

Edwards, W. T., Public Works Department. Eves, G. W., 4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon. Elwes, W. B., E. E. Aust. & C. Telegraph Co.

Farrell, U. A., Public Works Department. Forsyth, G. G. S., H.K. & Shanghai Banking

Corporation.

Franklin, A. C., Government Civil Hospital. Fisher, H. G., Public Works Department. Flood, E. P., H. M. Naval Yard.

Gardiner, J. H., Brutton & Hett. Glover, C., Punchard, Lowther & Co. Gibbs, L., Denison, Ram & Gibbs. Gow, J. C., Kowloon Docks, Hunghom.

Grist, E. J., Wilkinson & Grist.

Graham, W. D., Wilkinson, Heywood & Clark. Gompertz, H. H. J., Supreme Court. Goldsmith, H. E., Public Works Department. Gubbay, A. S., E. D. Sassoon & Co. Gale, Č. H., Public Works Department. Gow, D., Cosmopolitan Dock, Yaumati. Gubbay, C. S., E. D. Sassoon & Co. Goldring, P. W., Goldring & Barlow. Gibson, Adam, Beaconsfield Arcade. Gast, W. J. J., Victoria Gaol. Griffin, A. E., Martinhoe, The Peak. Green, S. E., 2 Woodland Terrace. Gipson, G., Victoria Gaol. Grove, F., Shameen, Canton.

Hickling, Rev. C. H., Union Church. Hough, T. F., Hughes & Hough. Hughes, J. Owen, H. Wicking & Co. Hutchings, J., Public Works Department. Harvie, J. H., Taikoo Sugar Refining Co. Hickie, S. D., C/o. McEwen, Frickel & Co. Hastings, G., Hastings & Hastings. Hazeland, F. A., Police Court. Humphreys, W. G., Queen's Road. Harston, Dr. G. M., Alexandra Buildings. Haxton, G. K., Kowloon Docks, Hunghom. Harston, J. Scott, Ewens & Harston. Henderson, J. M., H.K. & W. Dock Co., Ltd.,

Hunghom.

Hett, F. P., Brutton & Hett.

Hastings, J., Hastings & Hastings.

Hinds, E. H., McGregor Brothers & Gow. Humphreys, H., J. D. Humphreys & Son. Hornby, T. W., 2 Stewart Terrace, The Peak. Hynes, A. C., H.K. & Shanghai Banking Corp.

Innes, Capt. R., Butterfield & Swire. Irving, E. A., College Chambers.

Johnston, L. A. M., General Post Office. Jordan, Dr. G. P., Alexandra Buldings. Jones, P. N. H., Public Works Department. Jones, Dr. Evan, Bank Buildings. Jenkins, A., Hongkong Hotel Office. Jones, J. N., H. M. Naval Yard.

Jupp, J. A., Humphreys Estate Finance Co. Jack, W. C., Wilks & Jack, Des Voeux Road. Jordan, E. G., Bowling Club.

Joseph, E. S., Hongkong Hotel.

Kew, C. H. W., H.K. & K. Wharf & Godown Co. Koch, Dr. W. Y. M., Government Civil

Hospital.

Knyvett, P. K., Vacuum Oil Company. King, R. H., Punchard Lowther & Co. Kadoorie, Ellis, Des Voeux Road.

Katsch, E. A., Pacific Mail Office.

Lyon, J. A., Sanitary Board, 10 Robinson

Road, Kowloon.

Lewington, J. S., 2 Ripon Terrace. Lewis, L. S., P. & O. S. N. Co. Lowe, A. R., Hongkong Club. Logan, W., Hongkong Hotel.

Law, D. R., Butterfield & Swire.

Logan, H. M., 4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

....

214

NOMINAL ROLL OF MEMBERS, H.K.V.R.A.,-Continued.

Lambert, J., Lloyds' Register, Alexandra Buildings. Leask, W. L., C/o. Leigh & Orange. Lamble, P. T., Sanitary Board, Beaconsfield. Lane, E. C., Union Insurance Society of Canton. Lemm, J., Queen's Road.

Lafrentz, C. I., Caldbeck, Macgregor & Co.

Moore, Dr. W. B. A., Hongkong Hotel. Mackenzie, A., Arthur & Co. Maitland, F., Linstead & Davis.

May, Hon. F. H., Colonial Secretary.

May, C. W., H.K. & Shanghai Banking Corp. Medhurst, C. H., Dodwell & Co.

Moses, E. J., Prince's Buildings.

McCubbin, J., Gas Co.

Martin, T. H., Post Office.

May, G. H., Kelly & Walsh. Moir, A., Peak Hotel.

Michael, J. R., Prince's Buildings. Michael, S. H., Prince's Buildings. Marriott, Dr., Alexandra Buildings.

McInnes, J., Engineers' Institute, Des Voeux Road. Macdonald, Jas., Harbour Office. Meyer, H. A., E. D. Sassoon & Co. Mooney, C., Hongkong Hotel. Miller, J. F., Bradley & Co.

Mackay, E. F., Butterfield & Swire. Murray, Capt., S.S. Tak Hing..

Nobbs, A. P., A. S. Watson & Co.

Olson, J., C. E. Warren & Co., 30 Des Voeux Road. Ormiston, E., Mercantile Bank of India. Osborne, E., H.K. & K. Wharf & Godown Co. Ough, A. H., Leigh & Orange.

Parr, W. R. McD., 16 Queen's Road Central. Piggott, Sir Francis, Supreme Court. Peter, J. C., H.K. & Shanghai Banking Corp. Pinckney, H., International Bank. Potts, W. H., Alexandra Buildings.

Pidgeon, J. H., 6 Pedder's Hill, Hongkong. Phelips, H. R., Audit Office.

Plummer, L., P. & O. S. N. Co.

Pemberton, C., China Fire Insurance Co.

Pile, A. G., 5 Humphreys' Avenue, Kowloon. Pearse, Dr. W. W., Sanitary Board.

Perkins, T. L., Public Works Department. Pattenden, W. L., Gilman & Co. Parkinson, C. H., Victoria Gaol.

Rennie, A. H., Hongkong Milling Company. Ritchie, A., Dodwell & Co.

Raymond, A. J., E. D. Sassoon & Co. Rattey, W. J., H.K. & W. Dock Company.

Ram, E. A., Denison, Ram & Gibbs. Richardson, H. T., C. P. R. Co. Robins, F. T., Victoria Gaol.

Scott, Chas. R., International Bank. Stewart, Hon. G., Beaconsfield Arcade. Shepherd, E. B., H.K. Land Investment Co. Sutton, W. D., A. S. Watson & Co. Sykes, Henry, Diocesan School.

Smith, A. Brooke, Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Slade, H. W., Gilman & Co.

Sassoon, M. S., Prince's Buildings.

Stubbings. J. J., Gibb, Livingston & Co. Seth, A., Supreme Court.

Smith, A. F., McEwen, Frickel & Co.

Scott, J. Gray, H.K. Electric Tramway Co. Smith, P., Queen's Road Central. Shewan, R., St. George's Buildings. Smyth, F., Vernon & Smyth.

Swan, Dr. J., Alexandra Buildings.

Stedman, Dr. F. O., Alexandra Buildings.

Steen, J. C., 4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

Stackwood, W. G., Ordnance Office, Queen's Road. Southey, F., 4 Austin Avenue, Kowloon.

Terrey, E. W., Gas Co.

Thomas, G. E., P. W. D., New Law Courts.

Thompson, D. D., Queen's Road Central.

Tomkins, H. E., Reiss & Co.

Turner, A., Palmer & Turner.

Thomson, Hon. A. M., The Treasury. Tuxford, A. S., N. Lazarus & Co. Thornhill, Soldiers' Club.

Thomas, H., Public Works Department.

Underwood, J. H., China Sugar Refining Co.

Wakeman, G. H., Land Office.

Wise, His Hon. Mr. Justice, Supreme Court. Wheal, J. A., Public Works Department. Wilks, E. J., Wilks & Jack, Des Voeux Road. Wilkinson, C. D., Wilkinson & Grist. Wickham, W. H., Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Watt, A. W. J., H.K. & Shanghai Banking Corp. Wright, F. J., Benjamin, Kelly & Potts. Wodehouse, P. P. J., Central Police Station. Willis, David, Victoria Gaol.

White, H. P., Douglas, Lapraik & Co.

Wright, R. J. L., 6 Stewart Terrace, The Peak.

White, H. G., C/o. F. Blackhead & Co.

Woolley, W. H., Sanitary Board, 44 Elgin Street.

Young Hee, Kiabra, Kennedy Road.

Rank.

215

Table III.

HONGKONG VOLUNTEER TROOP.

Roll of Efficients.

Name.

Rank.

Name.

Lieutenant

T. S. M.

Ross, C. H.

Moxon, G. C.

Sergeant

Brutton, G. K. H.

Corporal

Williams, A. J.

Slade, M.

Trooper

Looker, H. W.

""

**

""

A

""

Paterson, J. Melbourne, C. D. Potts, P. C.

Howard, E.

Walker, A. T. Master, R. F. C.

Dupree, W. S.

Trooper

Hickman, H. F.

Stewart, M.

Blason, C. H.

""

"

Leefe, L. N.

""

""

Munro, R. F. Roberts, A. G. Morrell, G. E.

""

Hall, F. C.

""

1

99

Morfey, A. Vernon, T. C.

Marshall, G.

Maxwell, C. L.

""

""

19

""

Bernard, E. P.

"

Morton Smith, G.

Rank.

RIGHT HALF No. 1 COMPANY. HONGKONG VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.

Roll of Efficients.

Name.

Rank.

Name.

Captain Lieutenant

C. S. M. Sergeant

Nicholson, W.

Gunner

Plummer, J. A. T.

"2

Kennett, H. W.

Haggard, H. E. Pelling, W. Shaw, E.

Meek, T.

""

Sibbet, J.

Hance, C. E. A.

Leonard, J.

Henderson, R.

""

""

Mackie, A. J.

ولو

James, E. W. H.

Petley, H.

Corporal

Seth, S. A.

""

Herbst, C. E.

Bombardier

Craddock, H. E.

""

Hays, J. S.

Seth, H. A.

""

Colvin, H. E.

Watling, H. W.

Turnbull, T. G.

""

Louriero, F.

""

Blunn, A. B.

Peake, A. J. W.

Witchell, G. B.

Trumpeter Gunner

99

"

9:

Bain, H. M.

Duncan, G. Humphreys, E. Humphreys, C.

*

Attached.

Pfordten, A. R.

Young, A. H. Haigh, F. D.

McIntyre, M. E.

""

""

""

Smith, C.

Captain

Macdonald, D.

Rank.

216

LEFT HALF No. 1 COMPANY. HONGKONG VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.

Roll of Efficients.

Name.

Rank.

Name.

Captain Lieutenant

C. S. M. Sergeant

Lammert, G. P.

Gunner

Manuk, M.

Gubbay, J. S.

""

Evans, G.

Gloyn, J.

""

Flood, G. W.

Sayer, H. W.

""

Marshall, J.

""

""

Hayward, E. M.

29

Chapman, E. A.

Corporal

Sayer, H. C.

""

""

Crapnell, A. E.

Judah, L. J.

""

Crawford, F. M.

39

Bombardier

Lock, H.

Rodrigues, C. A. Carter, R. P.

Page, B.

Ellis, A. R.

Jephson, H.

Sargon, E. Tollan, D.

95

Hayward, C. B.

Marshall, A. M.

Gunner

Penfold, J. W.

23

Hope, E.

Brown, A.

""

Loft, T.

Wilkins, F. E.

""

""

Read, W.

Judah, J. J.

""

""

Lewington, W. J.

膨师

Cousins, G. A. T.

Gourgey, M.

Jephson, D.

Paterson, R.

""

""

""

""

39

Brewer, W. F.

Catchick, G. G.

Quick, H. J.

Hill, G.

""

Raymond. E.

""

Ellis, E. E.

Rank.

RIGHT HALF No. 2 COMPANY.

Name.

""

"

Stewart, R.

Mulrooney, J. J.

Hurlow, A. W.

HONGKONG VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.

Roll of Efficients.

Rank.

Name.

Captain Lieutenant 2nd Lieut.

Amstrong, W. Northcote, M. S.

Gunner

Jacks, P.

"

Blood, G.

C. S. M.

Andrew, J. I.

""

35

Sergeant

Grey, B. W.

A

""

Rees, L. C.

""

"

Corporal

""

Darby, A. J. Day, F. O.

Wright, A. E.

Garrett. H. L.

99

""

""

*

99

39

Biden, F. A.

· 99

""

Pugh, A. J.

""

Bombardier

Jackman, H. T.

""

Lang, E. P. H.

McGillivray, J. P. Greenhill, L. S. Bone, C. W.

Bevington, F.

Clarke, F. S.

Moore, S.

Chapman, B. F. Rowe, O. S. B.

Gregory, A. Bullock, J. A. E.

Franklin, G. G.

Gunner

Ironside, W.

""

Weall, T. G.

""

Turner, W. C. D.

""

Harrop, C. E. D.

""

Beattie, R. B.

""

Fielder, B. E.

Ramsey, A.

""

Stevens, H. J.

""

Lester, H. W.

"9

Warrack, A. F.

""

Hagen, E. C.

Wilkinson, H. V.

Young, J. A.

"

Piercy, A.

99

Le Breton, L.

..

Rank.

Captain

*

Captain Lieutenant

""

C. S. M. Sergeant

""

217

LEFT HALF NO. 2 COMPANY. HONGKONG VOLUNTEER ARTILLERY.

Roll of Efficients.

Name.

Rank.

Name.

Skinner, T.

Gunner

Boulton, S.

Wood, G. G.

Anderson, W.

"

Scott, W. M.

""

Scriven, H. S.

Wolfe, E. D. C. Rodger, J.

""

"

Corporal

Lochead, J.

McCorquodale, J.

McKirdy, A.

McIver, M.

Grimshaw, T. Kinnaird, J. D.

""

Crosbie, J.

33

Witchell, R.

Bombardier

Gunner

Sorby, V.

Bassford, W. F.

**

""

McIntyre, J.

·

""

Muir, J. G.

93

Rank.

Frith, C. E.

Ward, C. W.

Duncan, R.

Johnston, J.

* Attached.

/

""

"

"

""

Saunders, G. H. McIntyre, W.

Arnold, C. E.

Peche, J. Tillman, H.

Gibson, J. H.

O'Halloran, D. J.

McPherson, J. L.

McKay, W.

Carmichael, H. C.

Miller, R. F. Bridger, R. Young, D. Croucher, B. Mackintosh, W.

Kirby, J. Bullen, J. A. Dinning, H.

ENGINEER COMPANY. HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS.

Roll of Efficients.

Name.

Captain C. S. M. Sergeant

""

Corporal 2nd Corpl. Sapper

"

A

""

""

95

A

Crake, W. A. Logan, J. D.

Bevan, H. S. Crawford, J. Lapsley, R. Logan, J. C. Kynoch, G. W.

Barrington, J. H.

Cullen, W. F. Hirst, J.

Ross, J.

Quark, F. W. Lenfesty, F. P. Watkins, H. Clements, H. Pepper, S. G.

19

25

""

Pearson, H.

Simmons, A. J. Knight, N. J.

Rank.

Sapper

Pryce, C.

Pestonji, R.

وو

""

A

F

""

""

""

""

""

""

Name.

Haines, N. F.

Souza, M. A. R.

Carroll, A. H.

Chunnutt, O. R.

Tennant, T. B. G.

Todd, A. H. Poole, C. J. Moore, W. H. Taylor, R. A. Thom, W. J.

Fuller, T.

Pendlebury, J. C.

Longstaff, J.

Crane, A.

Long, E.

""

Melbye, A.

"

Ilott, A. J. W.

218

Table IV.

HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS.

Report on Gun Practice carried out during the year ending 31st March, 1908.

Number Number

Date on which

Nature of Practice.

Practice was

present

on

carried out.

Parade.

of Rounds fired.

Range.

15-pr. B.L.

26th October, 1907.

97

80

99

2nd November, 1907.

94

80

29

30th November, 1907.

41

60

3rd February, 1908.

91

100

""

14th March, 1908.

49

64

Table V.

From

3,400 to 4,100

Remarks.

4 series of 20 rounds each from 2

guns. Targets visible from gun emplacements.

4 series of 20 rounds each from 2

guns. In 2 series targets invisible from guns.

3 series of 20 rounds each from 2

guns. In 2 series targets invisible from guns.

4 series of 20 rounds each from 2 guns. Targets visible from guns.

3 series at visible targets. In all cases owing to the nature of the ground observation of fire was very difficult but the ex- perience obtained from the year's practice has been most valuable and the majority of the battery commanders now show very fair ability in coping with the difficulties of observation.

HONGKONG VOLUNTEER CORPS.

Report on Gun Practice carried out during the year ending 31st March, 1908.

Nature of Practice.

Date on which Practice was crrried out.

on

Parade.

Number Number present of

Rounds fired.

Range.

Remarks.

303 Maxim. 23rd October, 1907.

46

890

600

to

24th October, 1907.

48

1,079

750

Instructional practice on Stone-

cutters' Rifle Range.

29th February, 1908.

92

3,429

700

14th March, 1908.

49

343

300

to 600

Competition for Sir W. J. Gascoigne's Shield at Tai Hang Range.

Fired at towed targets from Stonecutters West. Inspection by General Officer Command- ing.

219

Appendix A.

CAMP

From: The Commandant, H.K.V.C.

To:-Major, General Staff,

South China.

REPORT.

VOLUNTEER HEADQUARTERS,

HONGKONG, 14th December, 1907.

   SIR,-I have the honour to forward the following report on the Volunteer Camp held at Stonecutters' Island from October 19th to November 4th, 1907.

   I also forward a duplicate copy (with accounts attached) for the information of His Excellency the Governor.

1. Numbers.-Out of a total of 21 Officers and 236 N.C.O.'s and men, 17 Officers and 182 N.C.O.'s and men attended Camp. 4 Officers and 20 N.C.O.'s and inen were absent from the Colony.

The Troop did not attend Camp and is therefore excluded from the above total.

   The average daily attendance was 125. In addition to which 10 Cadets from the Victoria British School attended Camp from November 1st to November 3rd inclusive.

   The following Table shows the average attendance and proportion of full strength daily for the Camps 1901 to 1907 inclusive :-

Strength deducting those on leave.

Attendance at Camp.

Da'e.

Average daily attendance.

Proportion of total strength daily.

N.C.O.'s and

N.C.O.'s and

Officers.

Officers.

men.

men.

1901,

16

286

14

204

157

.52

1902,

16

234

14

175

142.1

.568

1903.

18

204

17

159

121.6

.548

1904,

16

210

14

170.

135.5

.6

1905,

13

189

13

169

127.5

.631

1906,

15

189

15

178

136.75

.67

1907,

17

217

17

182

128

.55

   The lower average this year is chiefly due to the very bad weather during 3 days of the second week, also the fact that the cholera junks were moored so close to the Camp was the cause of some men staying away.

2. Drills.-I attach a Camp Programme showing the drills carried out by units, but owing to the bad weather some of the parades on the 28th, 29th and 30th October had to be cancelled and lectures which could be given under cover substituted.

3. Gun Practice.-A.-Maxim Gun Practice was carried out on 3rd November.

   The object of this practice was to test the capabilities of gun detachments in remedying the various failures that are liable to occur with these guns in action. Dummy rounds and different kinds of defective cartridges were inserted at intervals in the ammunition belts. The detachments show a good knowledge of the various causes of failure and were quick in remedying the same.

B.-15-pr. B.L. Gun Practice was carried out on 27th October and 2nd November. On each occasion each half company fired a series of 20 rounds from 2 guns. On 27th October the targets were visible from the gun emplacement and direct laying was employed. The targets represented batteries in action and infantry in fire trenches on hills distant about 3,400 yards. Practice was slow but gave fair results. On 2nd November, Colonel KENT, C.R.A., inspected the Artillery units at gun practice. In 2 series the target was visible from the

guns,

220

direct laying with tangent sights being employed. During each of these series a surprise target came into view some distance from the target being engaged and the Battery Commander was ordered to change to this target. This target was very difficult to locate and the fire effect in these series was poor. In the 3rd and 4th series on this day the target was visible from the guns. Direction was obtained by means of aiming posts in one series and an aiming point in the other. Elevation was given to the guns by using the telescopic sights as clinometers, the angle of sight having been obtained by means of Abney level. Observation of fire was not easy, this was specially so in the 4th series the target being scarcely visible through field glasses. The results were not good but the difficulties of indirect laying have aroused much interest throughout the artillery companies and all gun layers are now attending regularly for instruction in the same.

   4. Engineer Company.-The technical examination of the N.C.O.'s and men of this company was carried out on November 2nd by Captains WAIT and PHILLPOTTS of the Royal Engineers.

Twenty-seven men were present on this occasion and the examining officers expressed themselves as well satisfied with the results of their examination.

   5. Inspection by G.O.C.-His Excellency the General Officer Commanding the Troops South China visited the Camp on the afternoon of 23rd October and saw the artillery units at maxim practice. He afterwards inspected the Camp, and expressed satisfaction with what he had seen.

6. On November the 3rd, Colonel DARLING, C.E., Commanding the Troops South China in the General's absence, inspected the Corps on parade and subsequently the Camp. He stated that the turn out of the men was good and the Camp arrangements perfectly satisfactory.

   7. Inspection by His Excellency the Governor.--His Excellency the Governor made his inspection at 5 p.m. 2nd November. He saw the men at 15-pr. B.L. and maxim gun drill and the Cadets at semaphore signalling and afterwards inspected the whole Camp. His Excellency expressed his appreciation of the general efficiency and smartness of the Corps and his satisfaction with the messing and lighting arrangements for the Camp.

8. Discipline. The discipline of all ranks was excellent.

9. Medical Officer's Report.-I attach a report from the Corps Medical Officer Surgeon Lieutenant HARTLEY. This officer had much civil work in the New Territories to attend to and was consequently often absent from Camp. During the unavoidable absence of the medical officer Corporal KNOTT, R.A.M.C., proved himself well capable of dealing with any cases of accident or illness that occurred.

   10. Accounts.-I attach a copy of the Camp accounts and a summary of the amount due from the estimates for the purpose.

   11. Remarks.-The Camp was laid out in a similar manner to last year and was again lit throughout with electric lights by the Engineer Company.

Ten Cadets from the Victoria British School attended Camp during the last 3 days and attained a very fair degree of smartness at squad drill and semaphore signalling.

The Naval Rifle Range was kindly placed at the disposal of the Corps for the whole period of Camp so that most of the members of the Corps were able to carry out their class firing.

The Officers and Staff Sergeants shot their revolver course during Camp.

Instructors were kindly lent to the Corps by the C.E., C.R.A. and Officer Commanding 3rd Middlesex Regiment and all carried out their work well and tactfully.

All the Officers of the Corps present in the Colony attended Camp regularly throughout and greatly assisted in making it a success.

I have, &c

ARTHUR CHAPMAN, Major,

Commandant, H.K. Volunteer Corps.

PROGRAMME FOR WORK IN CAMP, 1907.

OCTOBER, 1907.

Saturday 19th

Camp opened 2 p.m.

5-15 p.m. Infantry Drill. All Units. E. Coy. Temporary E.L. Circuits.

Sunday 20th

10-45 a.m. Divine Service

12 Noon. Camp Inspection by Com- mandant.

Monday 21st

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.... 6 a.m. No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.... 6 a.m.

H.K.V.E.

15-Pr. Gun Drill, Officers to fall in as Gun numbers.

Maxim Gun Drill, Officers to fall in as Gun numbers.

6 a.m. Squad and Coy. Drill.

Tents to be arranged according to the authorized pattern in Camp.

N.C.O.s in charge of Subsections will be held responsible for this duty.

Engineer Coy. Musketry Practice during the day.

10 a.m. Gun Laying

Do.

10 a.m.

10a.m. Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

4-45 p.m. 15-Pr. Gun Drill

4-45 p.m. Maxim Gun Drill

5-30 p.m. Instruction by R.E. Instructors. Defence Incandescent Lighting.

Right Half No. 1 Co. Musketry Practice during the day.

Left Half No. 1 Co. Musketry Practice during the day.

Tuesday 22nd

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.... 6 a.m. No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A... 6 a.m.

H.K.V.E.

Maxim Gun Drill, Officers to fall in as Gun numbers.

6 a.m.

15- Pr. Gun Drill, Officers to fall in as Gun numbers. Instruction by R.E. Instructors..

10 a.m.

10 a.m. Do.

10 a.m. Wiring E.L. & Cables.

Instruction in Ammunition, Fuze Setting, &c.

4-45 p.m.

Maxim Gun Drill

4-45 p.m. 15-Pr. Gun Drill 7-30 p.m. Manning Defence Lights.

221

Wednesday 23rd.. No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A....

a.m.

Maxim Gun Drill

a.m.

15-Pr. Gun Drill

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.......... 6 a.m.

H.K.V.E.

15-Pr. Gun Drill.

a.m.

Maxim Gun Drill.

6 a.m.

Instruction by R.E. Instructors in Con- struction of Dynamo Engines.

10 a.m.

Command Telephones Com- munications. Testing Oils.

5-30 p.m.

10 a.m. Instructions by R.A. Instructors. 4-45 p.m.

Maxim Gun Practice

Right Half No. 2 Co. Musketry Parctice during the day.

E.L. Instructions. Theory of 6 a.m. Oil Engines.

4 Officers and the Staff Sergeants Revolver Practice.

Thursday 24th

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

6 a.m.

Maxim Gun Drill..

7 a.m.

15- Pr. Gun Drill.

10 a.m.

Gun Laying..

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A..

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m.

15-Pr. Gun Drill

4-45 p.m. Lecture by Instructor in Gun- nery, R.G.A.

7 a.m.

Maxim Gun Drill,

6 a.m.

Instruction by R.E. Instructors...

10 a.m.

Arc Lamps. Drawing pistons. ... 5-30 p.m. E.L. Instructions. Theory of Oil Engines.

6 a.m.

Left Half No. 2 Co. Musketry Practice during the day.

4 Officers and the Staff Sergeants Revolver Practice.

Friday 25th

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m. Battery Drill and Fire Discipline, Firing | 10 a.m. Blank Cartridge.

Mekometer Range Finding and Gun Laying.

4-45 p.m. Battery Drill and Fire Dis-

cipline.

6 a.m. Musketry Course....

4-45 p.m. Musketry Course.

Saturday 26th...

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

6 a.m.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.)

Battery Drill and Fire Discipline, Firing Blank Cartridge.

10 a.m.

Gun Laying.

2 p.m. 15-Pr. B.L. Practice.

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m. Adjustment of Lamps & Starting Engines. 10 a.m. Musketry Course.

Musketry Course.

2 p.m. Musketry Course.

*******

Sunday 27th......] No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

8-30 a.m.

Divine Service..

12 Noon. Camp Inspection by Com- mandant.

Right Half No. 2 Co. Musketry Course during the day.

Monday 28th.

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m.

15-Pr. B.L. Battery Drill and Fire Dis- cipline.

10 a.m. Instruction by R. A. Instructors.

6 a.m.

E.L. Connections, etc.

4-45 p.m.

4-45 p.m.

5-30 p.m.

15-Pr. B.L. Gun Drill.

Maxim Gun Drill.

Instruction by R.E. Instruc- tors.

Left Half No. 2 Co. Musketry Course during the day.

Official Guest Night, Tuesday 29th..

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K,V.A. Į

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m.

Infantry Drill Marching Order..

10 a.m. Fuze Setting and Gun Laying.

Do.

10 a.m. Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

10 a.m. Instruction by R.E. Instructors. Testing Dynamos.

4-45 p.m. All Units Infantry Drill Re- hearsal for King's Birth- day Parade. 6-30 p.m. Working Defence E.L..

Right Half No. 1 Co. Musketry Course during the day.

4 Officers and Staff Sergeants Revolver Practice.

Wednesday 30th.. No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

( 6 a.m.

7 a.m.

6 a.m.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

a.m.

Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

Maxim Gun Drill. 15-Pr. Gun Drill 15-Pr. Gun Drill Maxim Gun Drill.

10 a.m.

Range Finding & Gun Laying. 4-45 p.m. Battery Drill and Fire Dis- cipline.

10 a.m. Instruction by R.E. Instructors. 6-30 p.m. Working Defence E.L.

6 a.m.

4-45 p.m.

Fire Discipline.

10 a.m. Instruction R.E. Instructors Dis- 6-30 p.m. Working Defence E.L. mantling Projectors, Drawing Piston.

Left Half No. 1 Co. Musketry Course during the day.

Revolver Practice for Officers and Staff Sergeants.

Thursday 31st

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m.

6 am. Battery Drill and Fire Discipline, Marching past with Guns, &c., &c. Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

10 a.m.

Gun Laying.

NOVEMBER. Friday 1st..

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

Ga.m.

Battery Drill and Fire Discipline, | 10 a.m. Marching past with Guns, &c., &c.

6 a.m.

Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

10 a.m.

Fuze Setting and Gun Laying. 4-45 p.m. Battery Drill and Fire Dis- Nos. 1 & 2 Co.s to complete Musketry Course. cipline. Firing Blank Cartridge. Instruction by R.E. Instructors. 5-30 p.m. Manning Defence Section

....

222

NOVEMBER.

Seturday 2nd...

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A.

No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A.

H.K.V.E.

6 a.m.

15-Pr. Gun Drill and Fire Discipline. 10 a.m. Firing Blank Cartridge.

Gun Laying. '.

* 2-30 p.m. 15 B.L. and Maxim Practice * Every member of the Corps should be present at the 2-30 p.m. Parades,

for Inspection by C.R A.

6 a.m.

General Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

10 a.m.

Instruction by R.E. Instructors.

* 2.30 p.m.

Technical Examination by 0. i/c E.L. & Tele. '

Tent Inspection by Com- Inspection by H E. the G.O.C. after Church Parade.

mandant.

Sunday 3rd

No. 1 Co. H.K.V.A. No. 2 Co. H.K.V.A. | 7-30 a.m.

H.K.V.E.

9-15 a.m.

Rehearsal for Ceremonial Parade.

10-45 a.m.

Divine Service..

Monday 4th

All bedding, etc., to be returned to Quar- ter Master's Store.

E.L. Store to be dis- mantled and re turned.

Camp struck and return to Hongkong.

223

224

  Statement of expenditure incurred by the Hongkong Volunteer Corps during the Camp of Instruction at Stonecutters' Island from 19th October to 4th Novhmber, 1907.

CAMP SERVICES.

To Catering at Camp from 19th October to 4th November, ...$4,184.25

Fatigue party pitching Camp (H.K.S.B., R.G.A.),

Fatigue party striking Camp (H.K.S.B., R.G.A.),

Range parties for gun practice,

Extra Instructors,

Naval Range Expenses,

Electric Light Sockets, etc.,

Coolies cleansing camp, etc.,

Coolies for water supply

Coolies cutting grass,

Watchmen,

....

Scavenging: 16 days at $3.50 each,

Disinfectants, etc.,

Erecting matsheds,

Medical Comforts,

Lamps, etc.,

...

TRANSPORT AND COOLIE HIRE.

To Hiring Steam Launches for Routine and transport,

Cargo boats for camp equipment, etc.,

Hiring coolies for transporting equipment, stores, etc., to

and from Stonecutters' Camp,

31.75

64.50

104.00

70.70

49.00

93.50

56.10

45.10

6.60

56.00

400.00

11.25

34.88

14.40

$5,222.03

554.25

52.00

267.20

$873.45

MEDICAL REPORT ON THE CAMP AT STONECUTTERS' ISLAND, 1907.

The Commandant, H K.V.C.

SIR, The general health of the Camp this year was exceedingly good, especially when one considers the amount of wet weather experienced and the consequent continuous moist state of the ground.

    What few accidents occurred were very trivial and resulted in small scratches and skin abrasions only.

There were no serious cases of Diarrhoea--a sickness which one almost expected to occur almost fairly frequently.

The most serious case was one of snake-bite, when Gunner ANDERSON suffered from a wound on the left foot. Owing to the prompt attention of Corporal KNOTT, R.A.M.C., the patient became quite well in a few days.

    Three cases of fever occurred; one, distinctly malarial, made itself apparent too soon after the commencement of Camp to have been contracted on the island and was a recurrent attack of Malaria contracted in the New Territories previously.

Corporal KNOTT, R.A.M.C., was exceedingly attentive and performed his duties admirably.

I am, etc.,

J. W. HARTLEY,

Surgeon Lieutenant, H.K.V.C.

225

Appendix B.

HONGKONG, 7th January, 1908.

To:-The Commandant, H.K.V.C.

From:-Lieut. C. H. Ross, Commanding H.K.V. Troop.

Camp in New Territories, 1907.

SIR,--I have the honour to give you herewith a short report on the Volunteer Troop Camp, which was held from the 21st to the 26th December last.

Site. The Camp was pitched on the same site as that selected in 1906, viz., on the Southern slope of the hills at the North end of the Fanling valley, close to the village of Ho Sheung Heung and about one mile distant from Cheung Shui. The site is an excellent one for a small camp the ground being level and of a dry sandy composition, with a good stream of water alongside flowing direct from the hill top.

    Weather. The weather was good, some rain fell on the 24th and 25th December, but did not interfere with our work.

    Tents.-Ten small tents and two E. P. tents were drawn from the Ordnance Store De- partment. The E.P. tents were joined together and used as a mess tent. An ample supply of tent-pegs was provided this year, and though we had some strong wind none of the tents were blown down.

Stabling-A temporary matshed stable was erected for our ponies, it was an improve- ment on that put up last year.

Transport of ponies across Harbour.--The Army Service Corps being unable to provide lighter on the 21st December, we transported our ponies to Kowloon by junk. On the return journey an Army Service Corps lighter was provided. I wish again to draw atten- tion to the form of gangway which is provided for the purpose of connecting the lighter with the shore. Last year we were given simple planking about 25 feet wide, which worked well except that by reason of its narrow width, the ponies were apt to slip a leg over its side,--this year high canvas sides have been added to the planks, and though possibly the arrangement may be excellent for trained animals, it certainly does not commend itself to the China pony.

       We had great difficulty in getting our ponies to face it, tired though they were after a 26 mile ride. One pony despite our efforts refused to enter and as the tide was falling had to be left behind and brought across later in a junk.

I would recommend a plain gangway about 5 to 6 feet in width, with raised edges say about 6 inches in height.

Attendance in Camp.-Owing to absence from the Colony, sickness, and other causes the attendance of members was ten less than last year.

   Our present available strength in the Colony is 24. Of this number, 4 are married men who apparently cannot leave their families at Christmas time, 3 were sick, and 4 were unable to obtain leave of absence from their work. All remaining members attended Camp.

   Work performed.-The march out to Camp (26 miles) was performed with two halts of about one hour each, in 7 hours; the return journey with only one halt taking just 6 hours.

   I attach a map (which please return) showing the roads ridden or walked over by members during our Camp.

I would draw attention to one expedition, which I think was creditable work performed by two sections each under a N.C.O. working from opposite directions, i.e., from the Camp to Sha-Ta-Kok and over the mountain along the frontier to the Samchun River, and back to Camp vid Taku-Lin (Kong Ta Hau) Block House. The path over the mountain by the frontier is very steep, some 1,500 feet in height, the road being paved and in many places stepped". The ride, about 24 miles, took 51⁄2 hours in the case of the section working from the North, and 6 hours for the section approaching the pass from the Southward.

...

226

I think the members, who have attended both the 1906 and 1907 camps, have now a very good knowledge of the frontier portion of the New Territories. The ponies stood the work well, and beyond a few falls off bridges and paddy bunds, we had no accidents. I have to report one case of sore back, and two ponies girthgalled, these were treated with the simple remedy of salt and water and were able to carry their owners back to Hongkong without further harm.

A farrier was in attendance, but his services were not required. Last year many of our ponies required re-shoeing or attendance of some kind, this year we covered more ground and theoretically more shoeing work should have been required. I can only ascribe this satis- factory state of affairs to the better weather we enjoyed this year, and consequent drier state of the ground with less suction on the ponies' shoes.

   Saddlery.-I much regret to report that the leather of most of the bridles and head- stalls at present in use, has perished.

   Practically every bridle had to be repaired while in Camp, and though some of the breaks were no doubt due to careless handling on the part of the members, I think there is no doubt that the condition of these articles is not good. I would recommend that 40 new sets be ordered from India without delay.

I would also ask that a supply of stout straps for fastening blankets and overcoats to saddles be ordered at the same time; these last named articles we have hitherto procured ourselves locally, but they are not a success.

   Field Firing.--On Christmas morning, the Troop was divided into two sections and field firing was carried on at small figure targets. The shooting was very fair.

   Sentry Work.--Sentries were placed over the Camp from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. Every man present in Camp thus performed from four to six hours sentry-work, during the five days we

were out.

   In conclusion I would mention that the Camp was pitched in a most satisfactory manner, two temporary bridges built and some roads made by Inspector HUDSON, who acts as our Instructor, and whose services were kindly lent to us by the Sanitary Authorities of Hongkong.

   The Commissariat was attended to by Ying Kee who carried out his onerous duties to: the satisfaction of all who were present.

I have, etc.,

C. H. Ross, Lieut., Commanding H.K. Vol. Troop.

227

Army Form B. 187.

REGULARS AND MILITIA.

REGIMENTAL MUSKETRY RETURN FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 1908.

Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

RECRUITS, CAVALRY AND

INFANTRY

Number who qualified during the year

Number who failed to qualify...

Nil.

Nil.

Part I.

Nil.

R.E., A.S.C., R.A.M.C. and Militia. Number trained Nil. Averages:

Part II.

Nil.

TRAINED SOLDIERS.

Classification and Percentage.

Number. Percentage.

Averages obtained in

Squadron or Company.

Part I., Part II.,

Table B. Table B.

Staff.

117.8

Marksmen

1st Class Shots

Right No. 1 Coy. V.A.

90.3

2nd Class Shots

3rd Class Shots

Left No. 1 Coy. V.A.

91-25

:

:

65

36.72

43

24.29

25

14:13

44

24.86

Total Number Classified

177

Right No. 2 Coy. V.A.

98.74

Number of men exercised as far as possible, Į

but not classified

Nil.

Left No. 2 Coy. V.A.

97.18

(A.S.C. and A.0.C.-Number exercised)

Nil.

Regimental Totals.

494.28

Regimental Averages. 98.85

Number of men who did not commence the course, but who should have been exercised under the Reg- ulations

Remarks by the Command- ing Officer as to the reason.

1 Sick, remainder Non-Effi- cient, and will be dealt with according to Regula- tions.

Result of the repetition of the practices of Part I., Table B., by 3rd class shots.

Standard reached.

Number of Men.

Marksmen.

1st Class.

Nil.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

228

Number of detachments trained during the year

Nil.

Machine Gun

Percentages obtained

Nil.

Course

Nature of Targets used

Nil.

REVOLVER PRACTICE.

First Year's Practice.

Subsequent Years' Practice. |

Numbers Exercised.

Numbers Exercised.

Total

Wt. Officers,

1Officers. N. C. Officers,

Officers.

Wt. Officers, N. C. Officers,

of all Ranks Exercised.

and Men.

and Men.

Commanding Officer's Remarks as to the Standard of

the Practice.

Nil.

Nil.

12

6

18

Good.

AMMUNITION ACCOUNT.

(Not to be completed until the end of the Musketry year.)

Quantity authorised by Regulations to be drawn.

Rounds.

In :

Quantity expended.

Rounds.

...

7,080

For:-

-Recruits who commenced Table A.,

at――rounds per man

Repetition practices of--recruits who

failed to qualify,

164 Trained soldiers who commenced Table B., at 40 rounds per man

13 Officers at 40 rounds each

...

The practices of Table A. ...

Repetition practices for recruits

The practices of Table B., Parts I.

and II.

6,560

The practices of Table B., Part III.

The further training of 3rd class

shots (para. 110).......

520

Received in exchange for Aiming Tube

Ammuntion

...

...

For Machine Gun practice

Total allowed

...

...

On hand, 1st

Received

from the Army Ordnance Department during the year

...

TOTAL

7,080

The further training of recruits who

fail in Table A. (para. 79)

...

The testing of arms (paras. 52 & 301)

Competition for good-shooting bad-

ges (para. 176)

...

Practice by Company (para. 29)

Voluntary practice (para. 24)

Machine Gun practice

Remaining on hand on 1st.

...

...

:

TOTAL

7,080

Regimental Figure of Merit 98.85.

229

REPORT BY COMMANDING OFFICER.

   (This should be a comprehensive report on all matters connected with the musketry training of his unit.)

   The Volunteer Range is at Tai Hang which is very unpopular among the members owing to its inaccessibility.

   The King's Park Range at Kowloon which is very handy is only available to a limited extent. Consequently as many members as possible had to be put through their course during Camp.

As Camp is held early in the drill season very little, preliminary practice was possible.

This is the first time the Artillery Course has been fired by the Artillery Units.

The results are satisfactory.

Hongkong.

A. CHAPMAN, Lieut.-Col., Commanding Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

REMARKS BY THE GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING.

Nil.

230

REGULARS AND MILITIA.

Army Form B. 187.

REGIMENTAL MUSKETRY RETURN FOR THE YERR ENDED 31ST MARCH, 1908.

Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

RECRUITS, CAVALRY AND Number who qualified during the year... Nil.

Number who failed to qualify.

...

INFANTRY

Nil.

Part I.

Nil.

R.E., A.S.C., R.A.M.C. and Militia. Number trained Nil. Averages:

Part .II.

Nil.

TRAINED SOLDIERS.

Classification and Percentage.

Number. Percentage.

Averages obtained in

Squadron or Company.

Part I., Part II..

Table B. Table B.

Marksmen

Hongkong Vol. Troop

92.81

59.44

1st Class Shots

Hongkong Vol. En-

gineer Company.

84.84

51.43

Regimental Totals.

177.65 110.87

Regimental Averages. 88.82 55.43

2nd Class Shots

3rd Class Shots

:

:

:

:

Total Number Classified

2

:

:

11

17.19

17

26.56

13

20.31

23

35.94

64

Number of men exercised as far as possible,

but not classified

4.

Nil.

...

Nil.

(A.S.C. and A.O.C.-Number exercised) ...

Number of men who did not commence the course, but who should have been exercised under the Reg- ulations

These men are Non-Efficient

and will be dealt with according to Regulations.

Result of the repetition of the practices of Part I., Table, B., by 3rd class shots.

Standard reached.

Number of Men.

Marksmen.

1st Class.

2nd Class.

3rd Class.

Nil:

231

Number of detachments trained during the

year

Nil.

Machine Gun

Percentages obtained

Nil.

Course

Nature of Targets used

Nil.

REVOLVER PRACTICE.

First Year's Practice.

Subsequent Years' Practice.

Numbers Exercised.

Numbers Exercised.

Total

Wt. Officers,

Officers. N. C. Officers, Officers.

and Men.

Wt. Officers. N. C. Officers, and Men.

of all Ranks Exercised.

Commanding Officer's Remarks as to the Standard of

the Practice.

1

1

2

Good,

AMMUNITION ACCOUNT.

(Not to be completed until the end of the Musketry year.)

Quantity authorised by Regulatious to be drawn.

Rounds.

Quantity expended.

Rounds.

For

:

-Recruits who commenced Table A.,

at

Repetition practices of

failed to qualify

rounds per man

recruits who

...

62 Trained soldiers who commenced Table

B., at 70 rounds per man

2 Officers at 70 rounds each

Received in exchange for Aiming Tube

Ammunition

For Machine Gun practice

Total allowed

...

...

:

:

...

...

On hand, 1st-

Received from the Army Ordnance

Department during the year

4,340

140

In:

The practice of Table A.

...

Repetition practice for recruits

:

The practices of Table B., Parts I.

and II.

...

The practices of Table B., Prat III.

The further training of 3rd class

shots (para. 110)...

The further training of recruits who

fail in Table A. (para. 79)

The testing of arms (paras. 52 & 301)

Competition for good-shooting bad-

ges (para. 176) ...

...

Practice by Company (para. 29) ..

Voluntary practice (para. 24)

Machine Gun practice

Remaining on hand on 1st

...

4,480

TOTAL

...

4,480

TOTAL

...

4,480

Regimental Figure of Merit 144·25.

232

REPORT BY COMMANDING OFFICER.

(This should be a comprehensive report on all matters connected with the musketry training of his unit.)

Troop.

   This is the first year the Troop has fired the Engineer Course, and the results are satisfactory.

The Course was fired at King's Park Range.

Engineer Company.

See remarks on report of Artillery Units.

   The average obtained is very fair considering the number of young soldiers in the Company.

   It speaks well for the trouble taken by the Commanding Officer that only 2 men failed to fire the course.

Hongkong.

A. CHAPMAN, Lieut.-Col., Commanding Hongkong Volunteer Corps.

REMARKS BY THE GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING.

Nil.

No. 13.

DIEU

IT

SNA

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 10th of JULY, 1908.

Published by Authority,

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS FOR THE YEAR 1307.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, July 23rd, 1908.

STAFF.

1. Appointment.-Mr. S. R. MOORE, 2nd Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, from 1st October, 1907.

2. Leave. Mr. E. A. IRVING, Inspector of Schools, from the 4th April, 1907.

Mr. B. JAMES, Head Master of the Kowloon British School, from 11th April, 1997.

Mr. W. CURWEN, Head Master of the Yaumati School, from 30th October, 1907.

3. Acting. Mr. E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector of Schools, from the 4th April, 1907.

Mrs. M. E. MAIN, Head Mistress of the Kowloon British School, from 11th April, 1907.

Mr. S. R. MOORE, Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, headmaster from 30th October, 1907.

   Resignation.Mrs. E. MURRAY, Assistant Mistress of the Kowloon British School, from 10th October, 1907.

Mr. J. C. PARKIN, Assistant Master of the Yaumati School, from 1st October, 1907.

5. There have also been several changes in the Chinese Staff of the District Schools.

234

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

    6. The revenue collected by the Department amounts to $18.780.50 an increase of $4,000 on last year's figures. The District Schools are again the chief contributors, Saiyingpun School alone shewing an increase of $2,500. The Belilios Public School which shewed a decrease in fees last year has now exceeded the 1905 tctal by over $200. The fees at the English Schools and the Lower Grade Anglo-Chinese Schools have with one exception. decreased. A comparative statement of the revenue collected during the last 6 years. is given in Table II.

    7. The expenditure on Education inclu ling Queen's College was $184,028.00 or 3.19% of the total expen liture of the Colony. Table III gives the proportion of the total expenditure

of the Colony devoted to Education during the past 12 years.

NUMBER AND CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS AND PUPILS.

    8. The number of Government and Grant Schools in the Colony in the year under review is 79 as compared with 85 in 1906. The decrease is accounted for by the closing of 4 inefficient Vernacular Grant Schools by the Government, i.e., Nos. 16, 65, 67 and 71 and the voluntary closing of 2 schools, the Cathedral School No. 10 and the Sacred Heart School No. 23 by the Roman Catholic Mission. The Cathedral School pupils now form the greater portion of the Chinese division at St. Joseph's College. The average attendance. was 5,924 as against 5,496, a substantial increase in both Government and Grant Schools.

    The Berlin Foundling House No. 17 and the Training Home for Girls No. 20 are again Upper Grade Schools. The Anglo-Indian (Government)

The Anglo-Indian (Government) School remains in the Lower

Grade as before.

    Table IV gives the number of Schools, Government and Grant, and the number of pupils attending at each. It also shows the Grade to which they belong.

9. Table V shews the fluctuations in the average attendance from 1895 up to the present time. As in past years the figures in the case of private schools represent the maximum monthly enrolment, it being quite impossible to obtain correct figures shewing the average attendance. It will be seen, however, that there is an upward trend in the numbers under instruction in the Colony. At the Government and Grant English Schools the attendance has risen from 3,350 to 3,569 and at the Vernacular Schools from 2,146 in 1906 to 2,355. The private English Scho Is shew an in rease of 500 pupils and the private Vernacular Schools an increase of 441. At all the Vernacular Private Schools modern text books compiled on the lines of the Japanese school books are now in use.

The pupils attending Private English Day Schools have decreased by 86, those attending Night Schools have increased from 494 to 826 almost double last year's number. There are now 32 night schools as compared with 26 in 1996.

10. Table VI gives the proportion of girls to boys under instruction during the year.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

    11. Table I gives details of the nature of the Government Schools and of the attendance thereat as compared with the same statistics in 1906. Reports on the work of each School appear in Appendix A.

12. The average attendance of pupils in Government Schools (excluding Queen's College) is 1,153 this year as compared with 927 in 1906. There are 761 boys and 392 girls in attendance at Government Schools and of these 1,036 are in the Upper Grade and 117 in the Lower Grade. The Upper Grade shews an increase of 33 % on last

year and the Lower Grade a decrease of 22 %.

235 -

13. The cost of each pupil to Government during the past year ranges from $6.66 at the Belilios Public School, Vernacular Side, to $126.32 at Uen Long and $124.12 at Victoria British School. The average cost to Government of the 3 District Schools is $18.70 as compared with $30.81 at Queen's College. The proportionately larger cost of each pupil at Yaumati School is accounted for by the fact that there are two European masters at that school as against one at Saiyingpun.

New Schools, and Schools Closed.

14. No new schools have been opened during the past year. The cost of Uen Long School has increased to such an extent owing to the poor attendance that its immediate closure has been recommended.

Kowloon British School.

15. The average attendance dropped from 55 in 1996 to 47 this year, chiefly through the withdrawal of a number of children, whose fathers belong, to the military establishment, on the opening of the New Garrison English School in June last. The fees also decreased The maximum enrolment from $2,101.50 in 1906 to $1,493.00 for the same reason,

The withdrawal of several children however exceeded that of the previous year by 10 whose parents were returning to England assisted in still further reducing the numbers.

/

16. During the absence on home leave of Mr. R. JAMES, the head-master, the school was unler the charge of the healmistress Mrs. MAIN and its efficiency has been well maintained.

Victoria British School.

17. At Victoria School the average attendance remains at the same figure (44) as in The attendance has always 1906 in spite of a somewhat longer vacation in the summer. been so poor in the hot months that it was considered advisable to increase the summer holidays this year from 6 weeks to 2 months and to curtail the Christmas holidays pro- portionately. The new plan seems to work well and the school has not lost in efficiency through its adoption.

18. The draining of the swampy land around the school has now been completed and it has been decided to convert the bamboo plantation im nediately below the school into a play-ground. The headmaster's quarters are being enlarged by the addition of two new rooms above the present quarters. A few months more should suffice to rid Victoria School entirely of its bad reputation from a sanitary point of view.

19. The Cadet Corps now numbers 16 in all. 10 Members attended camp where their stay however was very short as the school had only just re-opened after a lengthy summer vacation when the Volunteers went into camp. Signalling remains the important work of the Corps. Next year it is hoped to start a Bugle Band if the numbers continue to increase.

   20. Candilates for the Preliminary Oxford Local Examination were presented for the first time in the history of the School in July and all of thein, 4 in number, passed.

Belilios Public School, Anglo-Chinese Side.

21. There is a marked increase in the average attendance for the year. The figures are 108 as compare with 82 in 1906. The fees have also increased by $100. The increase in numbers is chiefly due to the larger attendance of Non-Chinese girls.

   22. The school has up to the present time been divided into two sections, one Non- Chinese and the other Chinese. At the annual inspection it was found that the work of the Chinese section was not up to the required standard. Objection was also taken to several matters of discipline and organization in the Chinese section and as a result it was decided to remodel the school, retaining the old class divisions as far as possible. Under the new arrangement the headmistress takes the first and second classes only and supervises the rest of the school more thoroughly, the 1st Assistant Mistress takes Classes III, IV and V, English and Chinese divisions, and the 3 Junior Assistant teachers are in charge of Classes VI, VII and VIII respectively under the direct supervision of the head-

..

236

mistress. It is to be hoped that the re-arrangement of the classes will lead to a fairer distribution of work among the teachers and to a consequent increase in efficiency, especially in the Chinese section. In addition all Chinese pupils are to devote a certain amount of time to Chinese as at the Boys Schools.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, UPPER GRADE.

23. The attendance at Saiyingpun and Wantsai Schools rose during the year to over 200. The average attendance at Yaumati School also shows a slight increase.

  24. There was a marked increase in the number of boys admitted to the District Schools on failing to pass the entrance examination to Queen's College. The number of boys who obtained admittance to Queen's College from the upper forms of the thre: District Schools was 29, a substantial increase on former years and one which tends to show that the linking up of the schools in Hongkong is gradually becoming an accomplished fact. The actual number admitted is still very small as compared with the sotal nuniber of sch lars at Queen's Col ege. it is however likely to become an important factor when these schools reach their maximum of 400 pubils each, with a proportinate number in Class IV. the highest Class at the District Schools. In addition to the 29 boys already mentioned 4 free scholars selected by competitive examination among the 3 schools were also admitted to Queen's College.

Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School.

25. An extraordinary increase in the number of pupils has taken place during the past year and the average attendance has risen from 9 in 1905 to the large total of 204.

In spite of this abnormal increase in numbers an the ina lequacy of the staff in the early part of the

year the efficiency of the school work has been well maintained throughout the year.

26. The large increase in numbers has necessitated the addition of a new storey to the school building. This work is now well in hand and the school his ben temporarily removed to another locality owing to lack of suitable accommodation in the immediate neighbourhood. The attendance shows no signs of falling off at present on this account. When the new storey is completed the building will accommodate 400 boys. The work should be finished by August.

27. The staff will shortly be strengthened by the appointment of an Assistant English Master as at Yaumati School. The average cost to the Government per pupil. which is very low this year, (i.e., $10.52) will necessarily rise in consequence of this appointment.

Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School.

28. The School has been practically full the whole year and though the average attendance shews but a slight increase the maximun enrolment has gone un considerably. The average attendance was 171 in 1906. It is now 185. Satisfacto y progress has been made by the pupils in their studies during the year an I the selection froʼn this school of three out of 4 free scholars from the District Schools for a mission to Queen's College speaks well for the work of the staff.

29. Mr. PARKIN the assistant master, left the Government service in October and his place was taken by Mr. S. R. Mo RE who is temporarily undertaking the duties of headmaster during the absence on home leave of Mr. CURWES.

30. The gradually increasing interest taken by people on the mainlan is this District School will probably ere long necessitate its enlargement. It is at present the only Govern- ment Anglo-Chinese institution on the mainland of Kowloon.

Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School.

  31. The average attendance at this school which was 140 in 1906 is now 210 and the numbers may

be expected to rise still further when the two new school-rooms which are now being added are completed. A portion of the increase will be due to the absorption of Tanglungchau School but the majority of the new-comers will in all probability be boys who have been refused admission owing to lack of accommodation.

237

   32. The entrance examination which all candidates for admission to the District Schools have to pass appears to have been made somewhat too easy.

In future a fair knowledge of Chinese will be insisted on before boys are admitted.

33. One of the four free scholars admitted to Queen's College was selected on the results of the inter District Schools Competitive Examination from this school.

34. A small gymnasium has been started which the boys appear to appreciate very much. It is to be hoped that the services of a qualified gymnastic instructor may be obtained to give a course of instruction in gymnastics and physical drill.

THE DISTRICT SCHOOLS, LOWER GRADE.

  35. Excluding the Vernacular School (.e., the Belilios Public School, Chinese Side) and Tai Po School there has been a decrease in the average attendance. In the case of Uen Long the falling off has been so marked that it has been decided to close the school. It is curious that in some of the outlying districts where Government Schools exist the people fail to appreciate the advantages to be derived from them, whereas in others they are clamouring for new schools and are even prepared to offer ancestral halls as school premises.

36. It is proposed to open a new Anglo-Chinese School at Shaukiwan. There are at present no English Schools in this district which is increasing in population year by year andTM which is in close touch with the City of Victoria, It is anticipated that the attendance with repay the Government for the outlay incurred in opening this school.

Anglo-Indian School.

37. The sudden death of the headmaster Mr. JEHANGIR KHAN accounts for the slight falling off in the attendance. Under the new headmaster who is well qualified for the post it is to be hoped the numbers will rise to at least 40.

38. The present school premises' are most unsuitable. They are badly lighted and very noisy.

Anglo-Chinese Schools, Lower Grade.

39. There are five of these schools. Tanglungchau which is closely connected with Wantsai School, Aberdeen on the south side of the island and Tai Po, Ping Shan and Uen Long in the New Territory. The average attendance has decreased everywhere except at Tai Po and the popularity of these schools which was never very great shews no signs of increasing. At Uen Long School to which reference has already been made the average attendance for the year was only 10 and the cost to the Government per pupil was $126.32.- Uen Long and Ping Shan Schools are within a mile and a half of each other, it is therefore just possible that the attendance at Ping Shan will improve now that Uen Long School is to be closed. Tai Po is increasing in population owing to its proximity to the new Kowloon- Canton Railway. The attendance has slightly improved and will probably continue do so year by year.

VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

Belilios Public School, Chinese Side.

  40. This Girls school which is the only Vernacular Government School in the Colony is very rapidly increasing in numbers. This year the average attendance has risen from 187 to 237 but the main idea that it should be a feeder for the English Division appears to be lost sight of by the parents. Their one object is to give their children a good Vernacular education and then to withdraw them and make them useful in their homes rather than to allow them to continue their education and learn English. The latter study parents apparently consider serves no very useful purpose.

GRANT SCHOOLS.

  41. A detailed report on the work done in each school is given in Appendix B. The Annual Grant List shewing the number of standards, the average attendance and grant earned by each school together with further information is given in Table VII.

238

English Schools (Non-Chinese.)

   42. There are 10 schools in this class with a total average attendance of 1,059. The three largest schools are the Diocesan School for Boys, the Italian Convent and St. Joseph's College. Since the closing of the Cathedral School the latter now contains also a Chinese division. The numbers at St. Joseph's have increased considerably during the year chiefly owing to the formation of the Chinese Division. All these schools were returned as thoroughly efficient, St. Joseph's for the 2nd time in succession; it thus earns the full grant, for the first time,

Anglo-Chinese Schools.

43. The Ellis Kadoorie School is still the most important of the Upper Grade Schools which number 3 in all. It has increased in numbers and the average attendance now stands at 397 as compared with 319 in 1906. The Government contribution of $7,000 towards the extension of the school building was paid in June. Of the two remaining schools of this class Fairlea School which was not a great success has now been voluntarily closed by the management.

44. The Lower Grade Schools are now reduced to 2. One of the original 3, i.e., No. 15 has been closed as it has been inefficient for two years in succession.

Vernacular Schools.

45. The Training Home for Girls and the Berlin Foundling House are again Upper Grade Schools as Europeans are now in charge of them as in 1905.

46. The number of these schools has decreased during the year as stated in paragraph 6 but the total number of attendances has increased from 1,947 to 2,118.

47. The "A" Class Vernacular Schools, i.e., those carning a grant of at least $7.00 and with 25% in the case of boys schools and 20% in the case of girls schools in Standard III and above is smaller than it was in 1906. 4 Boys Schools and 3 Girls Schools are in the "A" Class as compared with 6 Boys Schools and 3 Girls Schools in 1906. The general standard of work in nearly all schools is however rapidly improving and there now remain only very few inefficient "C" Class Schools, on the Grant list. The progress is greatly due to the increased interest taken by managers in the schools under their charge and the formation of School Committees whose duties consist in improving the standard of work in the schools over which they have control.

48. A building grant of $1,500 was paid to the Roman Catholic Mission as the Government share of the cost of rebuilding Grant Schpol No. 28 at Aberdeen.

49. Free scholarships to Government Schools for 4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn year by year have again been offered to the Grant Schools in the "A" Class. The work of the 6 pupils selected for these scholarships from Boys Schools in 1906 has been very satisfactory and all have been continued. In the case of the Girls Schools one has been continued and one has been discontinued as the pupil has left school. (Three were offered in 1906 to Grant Girls School but 2 only were accepted.)

GENERAL.

Scholarships.

   50. Table VIII contains a list of all the Government free scholars at present at the Government Schools. The table also shews the date at which the various scholarships were granted and the position of the scholars in the case of those who have held scholarships for one or more years already at the Annual Examination. The final column shews whether the scholarship is to be continued or not. New scholars appear at the end of each list.

   51. The Government now offers annually not more the 6 free scholarships to Boys Vernacular Grant Schools and 3 to Girls Schools to be held for 4 years at the District Schools in the case of boys and at the Belilios Public School in the case of girls. Free scholarships 5 in all are also offered annually by the Government, one to each of the two top boys at Tanglungchau and Aberdeen Lower Grade Government Schools (at the latter school only one if the average attendance is less than 40 for the year) and one to the top boy of the three New Territory Lower Grade Schools in competition, to be held at the Upper Grade

!

239

 District Schools for 4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn in their studies by the scholars. 4 free scholarships to be held at Queen's College for 3 years each are offered annually to candidates selected from the 3 District Schools, Saiyingpun, Yaumati, and Wantsai.

Five free scholarships tenable for 4 years each but only offered as vacancies occur are given to lower class pupils at the Belilios Public School, English Side, to encourage young girls to remain longer at school.

   52. The system of scholarships appears to be working well in the Boys Schools where the competition for them is getting very keen, especially so in the case of Queen's College. Girls, however, appreciate the efforts of the Government in this respect very much less than the boys and show no great desire to obtain the scholarships. Even the offer of scholar- ships for 4 years does not appear to check to any appreciable extent the tendency on the part of parents to withdraw then daughters from school as soon as they have obtained a fair vernacular education to which allusion has already been made in paragraph 40.

Visual Instruction.

53. Series of lectures in this subject have been given during the year at all large English Schools in the Colony. At several of these no lectures had previously been delivered owing to the late arrival of the lanterns. The slides and the subject matter were therefore in these cases quite new to the pupils. At other schools however the course has been taken once. It thus appears a matter of necessity to supplement existing slides with one or two new series for next year's course.

   54. The arrangements for the lectures, all of which have been well attended, were slightly modified as a course was given at Queen's College this year for the first time. The heads of the District Schools are now anxious to take courses at their respective schools also, it will therefore be necessary in the coming year either to shorten the time during which the lanterns and slides are at the disposal of individual schools or to arrange for a course to be held, as was originally suggested, either at Queen's College or the City Hall at which pupils from several schools may attend together.

Hongkong Technical Institute.

(Formerly Evening Continuation Classes).

   55. These classes which started in October 1906 were carried on until the end of May when the first year of instruction came to a close. The attendance which averaged 256 in October 1906 dwindled down to 197 in January chiefly owing to the non-attend- ance of those who had originally only joined the classes out of curiosity and ceased. to attend as soon as they were called upon to settle down to solid work. In March 1907 the average attendance showed a further slight drop to 178 and in May the last month of the session the average attendance was 162 a very small decrease as compared with the heavy drop in January. An examination was held at the end of the May Session and certificates were granted to those who were successful in the various subjects of study.

   56. At the close of the New Year session in May a Committee was appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to enquire into the working of the classes and submit proposals for the future. The Committee collected evidence and reported to the Government in August. Its proposals, practically all of which were eventually adopted, were to put the classes under the management of a Director, personally respons- ible to the Inspector of Schools, and to have an Advisory Committee which was to be consulted if any changes in the subjects and courses of study were contemplated. Subjects which had failed to attract students were given up and on the evidence collected it was deemed advisable to introduce several new ones such as steam and light. The subjects of study were definitely laid down as also the length of the course in each subject. Matters such as the fees chargeable and the remuneration to be paid to lecturers were also dealt with. Under the name of the Hongkong Technical Institute the classes were re-opened in October for one year to begin with. A marked improvement was noticeable in the attendance and a greater tendency was shown to take lectures in subjects which went together and formed part of a systematic course, rather than as was the case when the classes started, to pick out the subjects at random. The attendance was well maintained and only began to drop off as it invariably does elsewhere towards the end of the Chinese Year. The average attendance is likely to remain at roughly 200, which figure shews clearly the necessity for the establishment of these classes. A detailed report of the year's work will be found in Appendix C.

240

Hygiene.

   57. This subject now forms a part of the course of study at all' Government schools in the Colony and the annual inspection on which the grant to Aided Schools depends will em- brace an examination in the subject. The Challenge Shield presented by Sir MATTHEW NATHAN the late Governor two years ago was again competed for in December by Govern- ment and Grant Schools but on this occasion no individual prizes were offered and the competition in the Advanced Course was dropped. A separate report on this subject will be found in Appendix D.

EDUCATION Department, 2nd April, 1908.

Tables.

A. D. C. WOLFE,

Inspector of Schools,

I. Government Schools: Statistics.

II. Revenue of the Department during recent years.

III. Expenditure of the Department during recent years.

IV. Numbers of Schools and Pupils in Upper and Lower Grades compared.

V. Chart shewing attendances and number of pupils in Hongkong Schools during recent

years.

VI. The proportion of boys to girls in the Schools.

VII. Annual Grant List.

VIII. Scholarships.

-.

Appendices.

A. Detailed Reports on Government Schools.

B. Detailed Reports on Grant Schools.

C. Detailed Report on The Hongkong Technical Institute (Evening Continuation Classes). D. Detailed Report on Hygiene.

Table I.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.-[The figures in Red are those for last year.]

241 -

DESCRIPTION.

SCHOOL STATISTICS.

No.

Name and Nature.

Number of Number Maximum Average Standards, of School Monthly At- Classes or Days. Enrolment. tendance.

Forms.

Rate of

Fees.

Gross Cost

Fees

Collected.

Ditto for Net Cost each unit to Govern- in average

REMARKS.

ment. attendance.

C.

C.

C.

6

198

78

1

Kowloon British School.-Children of European British Parentage. Boys under thirteen and Girls,

6

186

888

55

6,723.21

2,101.50

4,621.77

84.03

88

47

$2 to 5

6,925.43 1,493.00

5,432.43

115.58

and Infant Class.

2

Victoria British School.-Children of European British Parentage. Girls under thirteen and Boys,

6

6

1943

177

21

54

71

and Infant Class.

6

192

101

3

Belilios Public School.-English and Anglo-Chinese Side. Boys under twelve and Girls,

197

204

(No pupils in

class III).

5

186/1

119

གཱཝཱ སྨྱཉྫ Ë

44

5,826.17

1,439.00

4,387.17

99.70

44

$2 to 5

6,628.84

7,167.50

5,461.34

124.12

82

8,076.34 108 50c. to$1.50 7,606.62 1.479.00

1,098.50

6,977.84

85.09

6,127.62

56.73

92

4,795.81

1,907.00 2,888.81

31.40

4 Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

5

1911/2

383

204

$2.00

189

218

171

5

Yaumati

do.,

do.,

c

196

213

185

$2.00

6,642.95

8,729.78 3,555.00 5,174.X8 10,499.08 4,079.00 6,420.08

4,496.00

2,146.95

10.52

30.26

34.70

6

Wantsai

do.,

do.,

10 10

231

185

230

290

4

1881/

7

8

Anglo-Indian School (Boys),

Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School (Boys),

206

9

Tanglungchau

do.,

do.,

10

Venlong

do.,

do.,

11

Taipo

do.,

do.,

12 | Ping Shan

do.,

do.,

13

Belilios Public School,-Vernacular Side, (Girls),

...

14

Sheko Vernacular School (Boys),

22

22

186

216

188

191

192

1

2

- 2

-21

2023

152

2023

108

209

230

268

243

470

རྒྱ ཙ༩ ས བ སཚེ གླ ིིཎྜ

146

210

34

50

34

99 ** *2 88 20 21

$2.00

5,593.62 3,022.00 2,571.62 6,455.56 4,176.00 2,279.56

17.61

10.85

1.432.96 50c. to$1.50 1,637.61

572.50 860.46 504.00 1,133.61

22.06

33.34

680.02

112.00

568.02

24.69

50 cents.

776.06

99.50

676.56

32.21

792.55

331.00

461.55

13.99

$1.00

810.52

325.00

485.52

16.18

1,332.30

91.50

1,240.80

77.55

50 cents.

1,322.25

59.00

1,263.25

126.82 Closed at end of

January, 1908.

614.32

53.00

561.32

46.77

50 cents.

693.57

87.00

606.57

46.66

16

306 40

58.00

248 40)

15.52

9

50 cents.

615.19

52.00

563.19

62.57

187

237

25 cents.

2,079.21

2,342.58

564.00 1,515.21 763.50 1,579.08

810

6.66

240

13

150.00

150.00

13.63 Closed, 1906.

1,231

927

1,922

1,153

|

47,132.75 14,995.00 32,227.75 52,956.26 18,780.50

34.76

34,175.76

29.66

Note. The schools italicised are Lower Grade, the rest Upper Grade Schools.

242

Table II.

REVENUE OF THE EDUCATION DEPARTMENT.

(SCHOOL FEES) 1902-1907.

Name of School.

1. Kowloon School,.

2. Victoria School,

3. Benlios Fublic School (English), 4. Saiyingpun Anglo-Chinese School, 5. Yaumati Anglo-Chinese School, 6. Wantsai Anglo-Chinese School,.

7. Anglo-Indian School,

8. Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School, 9. Tanglunchau Anglo-Chinese School,... 10. Taipo Anglo-Chinese School,..... 11. Uenlong Anglo-Chinese School, 12. Pingshan Anglo-Chinese School,

13. Belilios Public School, (Chinese),

1902. 1903. 1904. 1905.

1906.

1907.

Ch

C.

$

Up

C.

$

C.

...

924.00 1,849.50 1,952.50 1,979.00 2,101.50 769.50 1,439.00 1,452.50 1,604.00 1,278.50 1,248 00

118.50 587.50 934.00

3.50 308.00 1,219.50 1,832,00 3,555.00 34.00 612.00 1.591.50 2,349.00 3,022.00

1,493.00

1,167.50

1,098.50

1,479.00

745.00 1,907.00

4,496.00

4,079.00

4,176.00

201.50

485.00 572.50

504.00

...

123.00

112.00

99.50

163.00

331.00

325.00

53.00

87.00

...

90.00

91.50

59.00

58.00

52.00

564.00

763.50

Total,......$2,532.50 4,961.00 7,177.50 9,783.50 14,905.00 18,780.50

4,961.00|7,177.50 |

905.00

Table III.

PROPORTION OF THE TOTAL EXPENDITURE OF THE COLONY DEVOTED TO EDUCATION. (Includes Queen's College.)

Year.

Expenditure of Expenditure on

the Colony.

Per cent.

Education.

1896....

2,474,910

76,511

3.09

1897.

2,641,410

72,984

2.76

1898.

2,841,805

72,420

2.54

1899..

3,162,792

75,152

2.37

1900..

3,628,447

79.994

2.20

1901.....

4,111,722

86,946

2.11

1902.

5,909,546

92,356

1.56

1903.

5,396,669

130,620

2.42

1904..

6,531 349

151,589

2.32

1905.

6,951,275

158,678

2.28

1906

6,832,610

159,373

2.33

1907.

5,757,203

184,028

3.19

243

Table IV.

TOTAL OF GOVERNMENT AND GRANT SCHOOLS (UPPER AND Lower GradeS.)

HDRAW

UPPER GRADE. LOWER GRADE.

TOTAL.

MANAGING Body.

Schools.

Pupils. Schools. Pupils. Schools. Pupils.

Education Department,

Secular,

Queen's College,...

Roman Catholic Mission,

Church of England,

h Missionary

991

1

991

1,036

770

397

2

289

ety,

132

14

18

I

::1

13

1,153

15

1,085

439

289

767

75

93

Rhenist

38

18

643

19

681

London Missionary-

4

245

245

Basel Mission,

2

70

70.

Wesleyan Mission,.

American Board Mission,

Berlin Foundling House.

71

71

40

40

25

3,711

51

2,213

79

5,924

Total,.....

!!!

441

036

"'7:

1924

12.146

3780

2

1875

3750X

19375

Girls,

Boys,

Girls

Boys,

244

Table VI.

Proportion of Girls to Boys.

A

IN GOVERMENT SCHOOLS, INCLUDING QUEEN'S COLLEGE.

IN GRANT

TOTAL.

SCHOOLS.

392

1,771

2,163

1,752

2,009

3767

2,144

3,780

5,924

B

IN LOWER GRADE

IN UPPER GRADE VERNACULAR SCHOOLS.

VERNACULAR

TOTAL.

SCHOOLS.

427

1,051

1,478

877

877

427

1,928

2,355

From.

Managing

Body.

To

Period.

Table VIII.

FREE SCHOLARSHIPS.

"A" Boys.

Position in

Class at

Won by.

Date.

Date.

Annual

Recommendation. *To be continued.

Remarks.

Cost to Government.

Examination.

- 247 -

Saiyingpun, D. S.

Three Years.

Li Hin Cho,

1905. 28th in Class VI. 1907.

Expires July 1908. Given as a re-

$2.00 p.m. for 10 ms.=

$20.00

ward for long and faithful ser- vice in Govern-

ment employ of

Father Li Shing

Fat.

Govt. D. S. Queen's College.

3 years if satisfactory progrees shewn,

Tang Po Cho,

1906.

5th

IV A.

1907.

Continued 1907.

Third year.

2.00

annually

24.00

"

To be

1908.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

To Mui Shang, Pan Fung I,

Do.

23rd

IV A.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

1907.

Excellent II A.

Do.

Continued 1908.

Second year.

3.50

42.00

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Yeung Kin Chan, Lo Kwong Fuk, Yeung Ki Shan,

Do.

Very good II B.⠀

Do.

Do.

Eo.

3.50

42.00

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3.50

42.00

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

3.50

42.00

་་

Aberdeen,

Do.,

Tanglungchau,

Govt.

Saiyingpun, D. S.

4 years if satisfactory

Liu Fuk On,

Do.

31st in Class VI..

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

for 10 ms.:

20.00

progress shewn,

Do.

Wantsai. D. S.

Do.

Lu Yung Ching,

Do.

11th

VI.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Do.

Do.

Do.

Ho Shiu Lau,

Do.

Discontinued boy

:

left.)

Do.,

Do.

Do.

Do.

Ling Man Lai,

Do.

7th

VJ.

Continued 1908.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Uen Long,

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Chan Hi Wo,

Do.

2nd

V.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Grant School No. 64.

R.

Saivingpun, D. S

10.

Pun Kwai.

Do.

13th

VIII!

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Do..

No. 29.

L. M. S.

Do.

Do.

Chan Ki Ching,

Do.

17th

VIII.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

,"

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

Do.,

No. 40.

No. 72.

No. 48.

No. 50.

Do.

Secular.

Do.

Do.

Pun U Chiu,

Do.

16th

VII.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Yaumati, D. S. |

Do.

Hung King Po.

Do.

4th

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

B. M.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Sum Loi On,

Do. 3rd

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Do.

Do.

Chu Tam Shing.

Do. 7th

VIII B.

Do.

Do.

Do.

2.00

20:00

Yaumati, D. S.

Govt.

Queen's College.

3 years if satisfactory

William Wong,

1908.

First year.

2.00

annually

24.00

:

Wantsai, D. S.

Do.

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Do.

progress shewn. Do.

· Do.

* Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

Ip Kam Cheung,

Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

Leung Kwok Tsoi,

Do.

Do.

2.00

24.00

Tang Yuk Tin,

Do.

Do.

2.00

for 10 ms.

20.00

Do.

Aberdeen,

Saiyingpun, D. S.

4 years if satisfactory

Chan Pok Tiu,..

Do.

Tanlungchau,

Do.,

Do.

Wantsai, D. S.

progress shown. Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Tsoi Kam Tat,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Do.

Do.

Do.

Lai Kwan,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

"

Uen Long, Taipo and Ping-

Do.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

*Mak Lam Mun,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

Shan in Competition,

Grant School No. 64.

R. M.

Saiyingpun, D. S.

Do.

Tsang Yui Meng,

Do.

Du.

2.00

20.00

Do.,

DO.

No. 72.

No. 49.

Secular.

Yaumati, D. S.

Do.

Ng Sui Ying,

Do.

Do.

2.00

20.00

B.

M.

Do.

Do.

Cheung Chung Fat,

Do.

$62.00

$672.00

*From Taipo School,

From.

Managing

Body.

To.

Period.

Table VIII,-Continued.

"B"

Girls.

་བ་ ག 3{¢ %འབའ

Position in

Class at

Won by.

Date.

Date.

Annual

Recommendation. "To be continued.'

Remark.

"}

Examination.

Annual Cost to Government. ((in loss of Revenue.)

Belilios

School Lower

Govt.

Belilios School,

Classes,

Upper Classes.

4 years if satisfactory progress is shewn.

Lo Lai Wa,

1907.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Sissie Johannsen,

Do.

4th in Class V. B.

1907.

Left in November previous to Exam. Not renewed.

Work unsatis-

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Leung A Lin,

Do.

7th

V.B. Do.

Do.

factory.

Do.

ז,

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Ng Ngai Sin,

Do.

3rd

VI.B.

Do.

Renewed for one

2nd year.

$1.50 p.m. for 10 ms.$ 15.00

year.

Do.

Ist

VII.B.

Do.

Three years.

Do.

1.50 "}

15.00

>

Do.,

Do.

Do.

Three years.

Chan So,

"1

Grant School No. 33,

L. M. S.

Do.

Do.

No. 69,

W. M.

Do.

Belilios

Classes,

School-Lower

Govt.

Do.

Do.,

Do.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory Shin Tak Hing, progress is shewn.

Do.

4 years if satisfactory | Chan A Yuk,

progress is shewn.

One year.

Do.

Very good.

Do.

Continued 1908.

Do.

1.50

15.00

"

Jm A Chu,

Do.

3rd in Class

Do.

Left.

Do.

VIII. B.

Ist year.

1.50

15.00

1908.

Do.

15.00

1.50

"

Chan Pik Mi,

Do.

Do.

15.00

1.50

>>

"

Do.,

Do.

Do.

One year.

Wong Sai Mui,

Do.

Do.

1.50

15.00

>>

}}

Grant School No. 33,

L. M. S.

Do.

progress is shewn,

years if satisfactory

Leung I Tak,

Do.

Do.

1.50

15.00

""

""

Do.

No. 51,

B. M.

Do.

Do.

Cheung Fuk To,

Do.

Do.

1.50

15.00

""

>>

Do

No. 69,

W. M,

Do,

Do.

Wong Yuk Lau,.

Do.

$13.50

$135.00

S

249

Appendix A.

No. 1-Kowloon British School.

Staff Mr. B. JAMES, M.A. (on leave), Mrs. MAIN, Headmistress, Mrs. DRUMMOND, Mrs. ROBERTSON (temporary), Miss RODGER.

   Discipline and Organization.--Very good. The school has suffered in numbers owing to the establishment of a Garrison English School in Kowloon and the consequent withdrawal of children whose fathers belong to the military establishment.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 230 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.-Reading.--Very good.

Handwriting. Very good throughout.

Composition.-Gool, but in the upper forms the essays were very short

and the subject matter was by no means fully treated.

Dictation.Good.

Grammar.-Good. It should be noted however that when definitions are given they should always be il'ustrated by examples. Mere definitions are useless.

The map

Geography.-Good except in Form IV which might have been better. The drawing in Forms V and VI was excellent and good in Form IV.

History-Fair in Form IV where the important dates were not well known and distinctly good in Forms V and VI.

Arithmetic.-Good. In Form IV as the working of the sums was not shown marks. were deducted. Forms V and VI very good.

   French. This subject is taught in Forms V and VI. The unseen translation French into English and vice versa was good and the prepared work was very good.

Dictation.-Good.

Grammar.-Good.

Drawing and Painting.-Good especially in the upper forms.

Singing and Musical Drill.-Very good indeed.

Recitation.-Very good.

Hygiene.--The upper forms did well. The paper set was not very

   Needlework.This suject appears to be somewhat neglected. but it was very simple.

difficult.

What there was was good

Scripture The Rev. C. H. HICKLING examined the whole school. In the lowest forms the work was good, Form IV did fairly well and Forms V and VI very well. The Rev. HICKLING Concludes his report as follows:-Regarding the whole school the impression I brought away was of conscientious and thorough teaching resulting in a good standard of attainment with marked advance among the seniors.'

17

   General. The general knowledge of the pupils in the upper standards is weak and possibly acounts for the paucity of ideas in such subjects as composition. It might be well to substitute General Modern History for Greek and Roman History as the former appears more useful in a school where pupils do not remain long enough to receive instruction in both subjects.

250

INFANT SCHOOL.

The work in this division has been satisfactory throughout the year.

No. 2.-Victoria British School.

Staff.-W. H. WILLIAMS, F.R.G.S., Mrs. WILKINSON and Mrs. L. MORRIS.

Discipline and Organization.--Discipline very good with the exception of Class III where it appeared somewhat lax. The organization is good; there are now no girls in the Upper School.

Sanitation. The school is gradually improving is this respect. The drainage works in the immediate neighbourhood have been completed and it has now been decided to convert the bamboo plantation imme liately below the school, which has been a dumping ground for all kinds of rubbish, into a playground. It will be filled in and levelled and turfed as funds allow. When the playground is completed there should be no further complaints about the insanitary state of the school. Two new rooms are being added to the Headmaster's quarters which up to the present have consisted of two rooms only.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 182 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

English-Reading.--Good-on the whole.

read better.

Handwriting.Good.

One or two boys in the highest class might

Recitation. Better in the lower classes than in the apper ones.

Dication.-Fair. There is room for improvement.

Composition-Good on the whole.

Grammar.-Fair to poor except Class VI which was good.

English Literature.-This subject is only studied in the Upper School.

The results

were rather disappointing. One boy in Class VI; did very well. Class V did badly as a whole.

  Geography.-Fair in the lower, school. work. Class V did badly and VI was poor. in this subject as compared with last year.

History.-Classes V and VI fair.

VI.

Class II did not offer enough for one year's I am at a loss to account for the poor results

Mathematics.-Arithmetic.--Good in the lower school. Poor in Class V and fair in The standard of the paper in the highest class is below the average in other schools of the same type in the Colony.

Algebra.-Very fair.

Hygiene.-Class VI (only) good. Class V should be examined in this subject next year.

Drawing.-(Freehand and model.) Very fair.

Geometrical Drawing.-Very good.

Singing. Distinctly good especially the scales.

Musical Drill.- (Lower School.) Very good.

251

INFANT SCHOOL.

Useful work has been done during the

year.

General.-Geography and Grammar will have to improve in the new year. Class V as a whole is not as good as it should be, but the poor results at the annual examination are due to the fact that the school year has been altered to bring this schol into line with the other Government Schools and that the boys have not had a full year in this class.

OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATION,

For the first time in the history of the School candidates from Victoria School entere l for the Preliminary Oxford Local Examination in July last.

                                  The results were very satisfactory indeed. second division.

4 boys entered and all passed; 3 in the First Division and 1 in the

No. 3.-Belilios Public School, English and Anglo-Chinese Side.

  Staff Teacher.

Mrs. TUTCHER, Miss BATEMAN, three Junior Assistants and 1 Needlework

  Discipline and Organization.-Discipline. Good on the whole. Girls however still persist in not speaking up especially so in the Anglo-Chinese Division where some pupils absolutely declined to give audible answers. Matters improved somewhat when it came to recitation possibly as prizes are offered by the Belilios Trust No. II for the best recitations. The refusal to take my advice and speak up was so marked however that I decided not to apply to the Trustees for any prizes for elocution this year and hope that pupils will bear in mind that these prizes will not be awarded until they make some real effort to speak up, not only when reciting, but when answering any questions put to them. The discipline in Class VIIIB must improve. There was too much talking during my examination.

Organization.--The new arrangemet of classes indroduced in 1906 entails rather too much class work on the part of the headmistress at the expense of supervision, most of which is required in the Anglo-Chinese division. It also tends to throw the teaching of the largest classes on the youngest and most inexperienced teachers. It will therefore be necessary to modify the present arrangement of the classes to some extent in the new year.

  Sanitation. Very satisfactory. The school building has been put in thorough repair and has been repainted and colourwashed throughout.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 500 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory..

A. THE ENGLISH DIVISION. CLASSES I & II (HII NO PUPILS) IV, VA, VIA, VIIA & VIII A.

Reading.-Very good except in VII A & VIII A the two lowest classes.

  Colloquial. Very good in Classes I and II, good in IV and V A, very fair in VI A, very limited in VIIA and VIII A.

Dictation.-Good.

  Composition.-Good on the whole, but many of the essays in Classes I and II (on the subject of exercise) read more like hygiene papers. Each paragraph was also numbered. There should be no numbering, no firstly and secondly in an essay. The reproductions of stories in the lower classes were quite good. In some essays especially in IV and V the spelling was poor.

Grammar.-Practically none is taught. The parts of speech should be learnt and parsing should be done.

252

Geography.-Good in Classes I, IV and V; fair in II which would have been better had the questions been more carefully studied. The lower classes were fair. Class VIII should do the geography of the school and eighbourhood.

History. Good in I, IV and V, fair to poor in II. In all classes especially in II marks were lost through not answering the questions set and through wasting time on details which were not asked for.

Arithmetic.-Good in Class I, poor in II, good in the lower classes; Class VI A however had not got as far as division. The standard of this subject is a good deal below that of other schools in the Colony and will have to receive more attention.

Hygiene. Good ia I and II, poor in IV and V.

B.--ANGLO-CHINESE DIVISION. CLASSES VB, VIB, VIIB & VIIIB.

   The results were disappointing throughout this division and I can only infer that they were due to the lack of proper supervision of the classes. The headmistress who under pre- sent conditions has to take 5 classes herself will have to be relieved of part of her present work to enable her to supervise the whole school more thoroughly.

Reading.-Fair.

Colloquial. Poor except in VIIB.

Object Lessons.-Fair.

Recitation.-Good on the whole.

Dictation.-Very fair.

Grammar.-None taught.

Composition.-Poor throughout. The essays were very ungrammatical, the spelling was poor and in VIIB the work was also untidy.

Geography.--Fair to poor. There is room for improvement in this subject.

History.-VB only. Poor.

Arithmetic.---Very fair. Good in VB. The remarks on Arithmetic in the English Division apply here also.

Hygiene. Poor. This subject has evidently not received much attention. Physiology which has been taught should be given up and more time devoted to this subject.

Needlework.-Needlework throughout the school was good.

   General. Prizes were again very kindly offered by Mr. BELILIOS for composition in the spring and some very good essays were sent in.

No. 4.-Saiyingpun District School.

Staff-A. MORRIS and 6 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization. The discipline in very good and the organization very satisfactory. The staff has been increased by the addition of two Chinese Assistant Masters and an European Assistant Master is provided for in the 1908 Estimates. To further improve the Chinese work the system of separate Chinese classes is being introduced on the same lines as at Queen's College.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

-:

253

a`

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 187 pupils. This is to be increased by the addition of a second storey to the school.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Good in Classes IV and V, Fair in VI, VII and VIII. Class VI

will have to practise colloquial to a greater extent.

Reading.-Very good in Class V, good in IV, VII and VIII and fair in VI.

Writing. Good in the upper forms but bad in the lower.

Composition-Good on the whole in Classes IV, V and VII but poor in VI

and VIII.

Dictation. Should be better in the upper classes.

Grammar.-Good with the possible exception of Class VII.

Geography. Very good in Class IV, good in the remaining classes. the Kwangtung Province was not well known.

In Class VII

Arithmetic.-Mental.-This subject has evidently received more attention and has very

much improved.

Written.-Fair in Class IV (the highest Class) very good in V and

good in VI, VII and VIII.

Drawing and Brushwork.-These two subjects continue to arouse interest. Some excellent brushwork was done.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good.

Composition.-Very good in Classes V and VII, good in VI and VIII.

Translation.-Chinese into English.-Poor. The piece set was possibly a

little difficult.

Hygiene. Very good.

No. 5.-Yaumati District School.

Staff-W. CURWEN, S. R. MOORE and 6 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-The school is practically full now.

Differences in the

standards of attainment are very marked in all classes. The discipline is very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 268 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Distinctly good in all classes excepting VI. This appears to be the weak class in English in all the District Schools. Lessons devoted entirely to practice in colloquial would probably im- prove the standard.

Reading. Good in the upper classes, fair in VII and VIII.

Composition.--Fair to good except in VIII which was weak. matter in Class IV was not well thought out. their ideas down as they occurred to them.

Dictation.--Poor in Class V, good in VI and VII, fair in VIII.

The subject

Boys wrote

Writing.-Good.

254

Grammar.-Good throughout.

Geography.-Very good in the two upper classes, good in VI and VIII, weak in VII.

Arithmetic. Still continues weak with the exception of Class IV where the test paper was very well done and Class VIII which did well. The comments in last year's report have only been noted in part. Classes V, VI and VII will have to improve materially in the new year.

Hygiene. Very good.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Classes IV and VIII but poor in the remainder.

1

Composition.-Poor in Class IV, very fair in the other classes. It is to be hoped that the re-arrangement of the Chinese classes will lead to a marked improvement in this snject.

Translation.-The results were poor in a somewhat difficult paper.

}

No. 6.-Wantsai District School.

Staff. YOUNG HEE and 7 Chinese Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good except in VIIIB where there was too much talking. In the lowest class there are quite a number of boys who could not have passed the regular test examination in Chinese. This rule must be more strictly adhered to.

  Sanitation.-Satisfactory. A portion of the covered play-ground has been converted into a temporary school-room. The additions to the school are to be begun shortly.

Floor Space-Sufficient for 241 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory. More dual desks are on order.

English.--Colloquial.-Weak except Class VII. This subject shows a falling off since

last year.

Reading. -Good.

Writing. Very neat in the upper classes but very untidy in VII and VIII.

Dictation.-Good except in Class VII.

·

Composition.-Good on the whole in Classes IV and V, very fair in VI and

VIII and poor in VII. Ideas seemed scarce in the essays of Class IV.

Grammar.-Fair to good.

Geography.-Very good in Classes IV and V, good in VII but poor in VI and VIII.

  Arithmetic.-Two very good papers were shown up in Class IV but the average was brought down by 2 failures. V and VI weak. VII and VIII good. The working was in

all cases neat.

Hygiene.-Fair.

Drawing.-Good.

Chinese.-Reading.-Very good in the highest classes, good in the lower ones.

Composition. Good in IV and V, poor in VI, VII and VIII.

Translation.-Weak: the paper was by no means easy.

J

+

No. 7.-Anglo-Indian School.

255

Staff.-MOHAMED AKBAR and 1 Assistant Master.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline; good in the upper classes but not so good in VII and VIII where there is always too much talking. The headmaster should give these classes more personal attention.

Organization.-Owing to the death of the late headmaster Mr. JEHANGIR KHAN and the unavoidable delay in the appointment of his successor the school work suffered and the results are not as good as they should otherwise have been. It is to be hoped that now that the new headmaster has had time to become thoroughly acquainted. with the school work the results next year will show a very marked and necessary improvement. Class V should remain the highest class for another year as the boys in that class are not far enough advanced for promotion to Class IV.

Sanitation.--The present school premises are very unsatisfactory as they are too dark and too noisy. On the expiration of the present lease it is to be hope I that more suitable school premises may be acquired.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 120 pupils.

Apparatus.-More maps are required.

English.-Reading.-Good except in VIII.

Colloquial.-Fair in Classes V and VII, good in Class VI and poor in VIII.

Composition.--Weak. The boys have no facility in expressing their ideas

on paper.

Grammar.-Weak throughout the school.

  Geography.-Good in Class V but poor in the remaining classes. In the lower classes definitions were learnt by heart without their meaning being understood.

Classes VII and VIII should follow the Model Course.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good on the whole in V and VI but the working of sums was in many cases inaccurate. Poor in VII and VIII. In Class VII only 1 boy had the multiplication sum right and none the division sum. In Class VIII numeration was bad.

Recitation.--Good.

Hygiene.-Good. This subject is only studied in Classes V and VI.

Urdu. --Fair.

General -Composition and Grammar throughout the school and. Arithmetic and Geography in the lower classes will have to receive more attention in the new year. The written work of the lower school is untidy and must improve. Boys must be made to hold their slates straight and not at an angle when writing. They must also speak more distinctly.

No. 8.-Aberdeen Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff-LEE KING SHUM.

Discipline and Organization.-The work of Class VIII is not as

                 The work of Class VIII is not as thorough as it should be. The number of pupils attending the school is very small considering the size of the place.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

256

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Weak in Class VIII and good in VII.

Colloquial.-Fair in VIII and good in VII.

Grammar.-Poor; requires attention.

Handwritting.-Fair.

Composition. Poor throughout.

Dictation.-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. Poor in Class VIII where multiplication was not known at all. Good in Class VII except the problem. Problems should be practised.

Geography. Good.

Chinese.-Rea ling. -Gool on the whole but Class VIII will have to offer very much

more next year.

Composition.-Very fair, too much "Tsuk Wa".

·

  General. The pupils especially in Class VIII should be more attentive and alert. I had great difficulty in eliciting answers to my test questions in the early part of examination. Matters improved however as the examination progressed.

my

No. 9.-Tang Lung Chau School.

Staff.-KWOK King Shan.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The headmaster does not appear to take a very lively interest in his work.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 51 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.~Very little.

Composition.-Fair.

Grammar.-Very fair.

Dictation.-Poor throughout. This subject requires serious attention.

Arithmetic.-Poor. In Class VII the problem was not attempted.

Geography.-Fair.

Chinese.- Reading.- Fair to poor.

Composition.-Fair.

257

No. 10.-Uen Long School.

Staff PUN U SAM.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. The school room should not be used by the master for his meals. The school has lost ground as far as attendances are concerned, the average attendance not exceeding 10 at any time during the year. It has also not improved materially in any other respect and does not warrant the expenditure incurred on it by Government. I have therefore recommended that it be closed.

Sanitation.-Fairly satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Very fair.

Reading. Very fair. The pronunciation in Class VII is faulty.

Dictation.-Very fair.

Handwriting.Good.

Grammar.Good.

Composition.-Poor in Class VIII and fair in VII.

Geography.None is taught in Class VIII. This is not in order. Class VII very

Arithmetic. Mental.Good.

fair.

Written-Fair.

Chinese.-Reading.-Class VII should be much further on only very easy work was

offered. Class VIII good.

Composition. Good to fair.

.

No. 11. Taipo School.

   Staff-CHU WING TO. (MAK PING FUI was transferred to Ping Shan after the sum- mer holidays).

   Discipline and Organization.-Good on the whole. Boys should be taught to speak only when addressed.

   Sanitation. The school building is not at all suitable as it adjoins a tea shop which is very noisy especially on market days. No other building is at present available. It is to be hoped however that one of the new houses in course of erection in a quieter locality may be leased shortly. The present school premises are also very hot and stuffy.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.- Good.

Colloquial. Very fair.

Dictation.-Fair.

Writing.-Fair.

Grammar.-Good.

Composition.-Good. The reproduction of a short story in Class VII was well done on the whole though the grammar was in several cases faulty.

258

Geography.-Good in Class VIII but fair in Class VII.

Grithmetic. Mental.-Good.

Written.--Good.

Chinese.- Reading.-Good as far as it went but too little was offered for one year's work.

Composition.Good. There is rather a tendency to write "TSUK WA

(Colloquial Chinese).

No. 12.-Pingshan School.

Staff.-MAK PING FUI (exchanged with CHU WING Tỏ at midsummer).

Discipline and Organization.-Good. The numbers have gone down considerably since

the school first started but as this school is better patronized than Uen Long School it may improve as regards attendance now that the latter school has been closed.

Sanitation. The portion of the ancestral hall used as a school should be partitioned off.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Good.

Colloquial. Very fair. 3 beginners rather brought down the average of

Class VIII.

Writing.Good.

Dictation.-Very fair.

Composition.Distinctly good especially in Class VII.

Grammar. Fair in Class VIII and good in VII.

Geography.-Very fair.

Arithmetic.---Good.

Chinese,--Reading. -Good.

Composition.Good. Chinese pens should always be used for composition.

No. 13.--Belilios Public School.

Vernacular Side. ....

Staff.-SUNG HOK PANG, 5 Assistant Teachers, one Needlework Teacher and 2 Pupil

Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good except in Standard I where there was too much talking. A further unsatisfactory feature in this class was the manner in which pupils conducted themselves at examination. They read in a great hurry, explained the sentences in a sing song and refused to be stopped. They paid no attention to my remarks and declined to listen even to their own teachers. More supervision will have to be exercized by the headmaster to remedy these weak points in the lowest class to some of which attention was called last year.

Organization:-very good. At future examinations pupils will not be allowed to make rough copies of their essays in the first instance as the true test of good composition lies in expressing one's thoughts clearly on paper without any hesitation whatever.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 432 pupils.

259

Chinese.-Reading.-Very good in all classes. Standard VII were studying a very advanced book on etiquette, and appeared to understand it thoroughly. Standard VI did Mencius and from V to I different volumes of the National Reader were studied.

In

Class VI there was a slight tendency to get confused over the identity of the different persons speaking. The explanation of the text in Standards V to I was good throughout.

Composition.--Very good in Standards VII, VI and V, good in IV, II and I but fair only in III. The latter class was at sea when called upon to do sentence building and did not excel at converting colloquial into written Chinese.

Arithmetic. Mental.--Good.

Written.-Fair in Standards VII and VI; very good indeed in V and IV good in II and I; Standard III was fair only. The work in this class was also badly written. In Standard VII simple interest was not understood, in VI the working of fractions was inaccurate and in proportion only the answers were shown.

Geography. - Very good throughout the school.

Physical. Standards VII and VI only. Good.

Needlework.-Embroidery very good. Plain sewing still appears to be neglected.

260

Appendix B.

DETAILED REPORTS ON GRANT SCHOOLS.

NOTE.-The reports of the schools marked with an asterisk are upon the work of the year ending 30th June.

* No. 1.-St. Joseph's College.

Staff-BROTHER SYLVESTER (Director) 11 Assistant Masters and 1 Chinese Assistant

Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 522 pupils.

Apparatus.-A great deal of attention is given to the apparatus which is excellent. English-Colloquial.-Good throughout the School especially so in the highest standards. where explanations of difficult passages were given with fluency and accuracy.

Reading.-Good. The pupils all understand the subject matter. Comopsition.-Distinctly good in the upper and fair in the lower stendards.

Handwriting.--Good throughout the school including the Chinese division.

The punctuation has improved..

Literature.--Is taught in Standards VII and VI. Standard VII Senior did well in a Shakespeare paper and VII Junior very fairly well except in quoting where none of the boys seemed to feel the rythm of the lines. Standard VI were examined in the "Talisman" and did very well.

Grammar.- Very fair. However in some cases the questions had not been

carefully read and the answers were not to the point.

  Geography.-Standard VII might have done better in the physical geography paper; one question was not answered correctly by any one. All the other standards except III did well. Standard III was poor.

History.-Standards VII, VI and IV did well, standard V was not so good. The subject matter was generally well known but the dates were very inaccurate in many cases. Mathematics. Arithmetic. For some unknown reason the working of sums was not

always shown and it was quite impossible to tell how the answers had been obtained. The work in Standard VII was rather disappointing. It was fair in the other standards except in III where it was distinctly good. The papers were very neat indeed and it is a pity the results fell short of last year's work.

Algebra.-VII Senior did some excellent work, VII Junior were not so good. VI and V did well, IV fairly well only. I am inclined to believe that in Class IV some boys copied the answers as out of 11 correct answers to a division sum only 1 shewed no mistake in the working, and 6 were so hopelessly, wrong that it is impossible to come to any other conclusion.

Geometry.-Standard VII very good.

Geometrical Drawing.-VI very good. Some definitions were rather

weak.

Euclid.-Standard V good.

Book-keeping. Very good and very neat.

261

Hygiene. In the advanced course a boy from this school was bracketed first. No team was entered for the Team Competition.

Chinese Division.-Since last year it has been found more convenient to create a Chinese division to which only Chinese pupils are admitted. It is divided into 3 Standards. I ex- amined them in the usual subjects, details of which are given below, and am of opinion that the classes are a distinct success.

English.-Reading.--Good throughout. The explanation of the subject matter had

been well taught.

Handwriting.-Good.

Composition and Dictation.--Good.

Grammar.-Very fair.

Chinese-Reading. Good.

Composition.-Fair in Standards III and II, good in I.

should do better.

good in I. The upper standards

Geography-Good on the whole. In Standard II the physical geography was well

known.

    Arithmetic.-Very good throughout, but here again the full working of the sums was not always shown.

General. In some papers the spelling was rather faulty and in a few cases information was given in part and the rest left to my imagination by the addition of the word "etc." This is not permissible in examination papers.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 35/- (the full grant), and report that the school is again "thoroughly efficient ".

* No. 2.-Italian Convent.

Staff-7 Sisters of Charity.

    Discipline and Organization.-Very good. In some subjects many marks were lost by pupils not answering the questions set. Again such expressions as "etc

"etc" leaving the remainder of the information required to the imagination of the examiner are not allowed. Some curious similarities in the mistakes in several history and geography papers lead me to think that in these cases the questions were not answered unaided. Great care should be taken to prevent collaboration, as was pointed out in last year's report.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 430 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.-Reading.-Good throughout the school.

Colloquial.-Good in the two highest standards, very fair in V, IV and III,

poor in II and I.

Composition.-A little disappointing in Standard VII, distinctly good in V, and good in VI and IV. In the lower standards the spelling was very weak and the punctuation was poor.

Grammar.--Good throughout. The papers were very neat and well written.

    Geography.--Good in Standards VI and III, very fair in VII and V and poor in the remaining standards. In standard V there appears to have been collaboration.

262

History.-Poor in Standard VII; only 3 questions were attempted though all the questions set were within the syllabus. In this standard as in-Standard V the answers seem to have been learnt by heart. This mode of learning history should be discouraged. Standard VI fair, Standards V and IV good.

Arithmetic. Good in the two highest standards. Many pupils however seem unable to discriminate between discount and interest. In standard V fractions were not properly understood. Standard IV did very badly indeed. Standard III did well but in the simple rules only; they should be more advanced. The lowest standards did fairly well.

Hygiene.--Very good. In the elementary course the team of this School took the 2nd place, good marks were also obtained in the Advanced Course.

Needlework. Very good.

  Grant. The school is again "thoroughly efficient." I recommend a grant at the rate of 35/-.

*No. 3.-French Convent.

Staff.-2 European Sisters of Charity and 1 Assistant Teacher.

·

  Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The study of Arithmetic in the higher standards is still very por and inust receive early attention or the grant will have to be reduced. There is no VI Standard this year. The present staff is too small.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space. -Sufficient for 138 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial. } Good in Standards V, IV and II, very fair in III and I.

Reading.

Composition.-Good in. Standard V, fair in IV and III.

Dictation.-Very fair in Standard II but poor in I.

#

Grammar.-Good in Standard V, very fair in IV and poor in III.

Geography.-Good in Standard V but poor in the rest of the School. Standard I had not begun the subject.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Bad in Śtandards V and IV, very poor in HII, good in II and

very fair in I.

  ·History. This subject is only learnt in Standards IV and V and was not well known. Dates were almost unknown.

Hygiene. The result of the annual examination was disappointing.

Needlework. - Good.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

*No. 4.-Victoria Anglo-Portuguese School.

Staff.--Mrs. CORDEIRO and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organizatian.-The organization is very good. Discipline is good on the whole though the lower standards are a little noisy over their work.

263

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 86 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial. Very good throughout the school.

Reading.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Good.

   Arithmetic.-Very good in all standards except III which was only fair in written arithmetic though good in mental.

   History.-Fair. It was good in Standards II, III and IV except for the dates, but poor in Standard V. Dates must be known.

Hygiene-Very good.

Grammar.-Good throughout the school.

/

   General. When Arithmetic is done on paper the full working of sums should be shown. In the subject of composition the spelling is somewhat faulty and should receive special attention. No sentence should begin with "and".

   Grant. I report that the school is "thoroughly efficient" and recommend a grant at the rate of 35/-.

* No. 5.-Bridges Street.

Staff.-Two Sisters of Mercy.

   Discipline and Organization.-Very good. There are now 4 pupils in Standard III who are very well up in their work.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English.-Colloquial.-Good.

Reading. Very good.

Composition.-Standard III only: very fair.

Dictation.-Very good.

Geography.--Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

༄!

264

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* No. 6.-Sacred Heart.

Staff. Two European Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.Good. There are only 3 Standards.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 88 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Good.

Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography-Fair. This subject has not been taught in Standard I; it should be taught. Standard II was good, Standard III poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good.

Written.-Very good.

Standard I might do better in mental arithmetic.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

* No. 7.-Diocesan Girls School.

Staff-Miss SKIPTON, Miss HAWKER and 2 Assistants.

  Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. Some confusion is caused by the fact that the school year and the grant year do not coincide. At my annual examination only six months work in the school year had been done and as it is only fair to other schools that a whole year's work should be offered, I would suggest that if possible the school year be made to correspond with the grant year in which case no difficulties should again arise. The 3 highest standards are still taught together. This practice should be discontinued.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 64 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English.--Reading.-Good. The explantation of the text was fair and leaves room

for improvement.

Composition and Dictation.-Staudard VII was distinctly good. The style, treatment of the subject, spelling and punctuation were all carefully studied. Standard VI was disappointing the more so as the piece selected for reproduction was very easy. Standards V, IV and III were poor, the spelling was faulty and the punctuation bad. Standard II did better than Standards III and IV.

Grammar.-This subject is very weak and it appears as though the elementary ideas of it were not taught properly in the lower classes. Standard VII did better than last year but the pupils seem to dislike the subject. This dislike was shown in examples such as; "Grammar taxes my patience," "I dislike grammar" and others in equally bad taste.

  Geography-Very good in Standards VI and VII. The sketch maps were very neat and accurate. Good in Standards IV and III and very fair in Standards V and II. Standard I should be taught this subject.

265

History.--Good except in Standard V where the work was poor. Dates were well known on the whole.

Arithmetic. Very weak indeed. Standard V broke down completely on a paper originally set for Standard IV, and in a very easy paper Standard IV only did fairly well. This subject will have to be taken seriously in hand as it is distinctly below the average.

   Hygiene. This subject shows a falling off both as regards the advanced and the elementary courses.

Needlework.-- Good.

   Grant. I recommend a grant at rate of 30/-. The grammar and arithmetic especially will have to improve if the school is to maintain its present position on the grant list.

1

No. 8.-Diocesan Schoòl, Boys.

   Staff-Headmaster. G. PIERCY, 8 Assistant European Masters and Mistresses and 2 Chinese Masters.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. The work of the school continues to be very efficient on the whole but more attention will have to be paid to Arithmetic and Grammar in certain classes and Chinese throughout.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 470 pupils.

English. Colloquial.-This subject is distinctly good in the upper standards but I and

II are weak.

Reading.-Good throughout.

Writing. All papers shown up were neat and showed that this subject had

received attention.

Composition.-Very good in Standard VII. The subject matter was well thought out and the essays were written in good style, but the first person and such terms as firstly, secondly should be avoided in an essay. In Standards VI and V there were numerous grammatical errors and mistakes in spelling which brought down the standard of the essays. Standard V reproduced a story which only 2 boys failed to understand. The 4 lower standards were fair. Their chief weaknesses were mistakes in grammar.

Dictation. In the lower standards was good.

Grammar. Good on the whole. The parsing in Standard IV was poor.

Standard VII was distinctly good.

Geography.Good. The papers were neat. Standard VI might have done better as he paper was very easy. The work in III and II is rather too general being chiefly ton fined to definitions. II offered very little for examination.

   History.-Standard VII did very well indeed. Their work was well above the usual school standard and showed careful teaching. In this connection the paper shown up by Chiu Yau Tsz deserves special mention. Standard VI very fair. Standard V good.

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266

Mathematic.-Arithmetic.-Good in the lower standards, poor in IV, V and VI aud good in Standard VII. This subject will have to receive more attention in the new year.

Geometry.-Good. If a proposition is continued on a new page the figure should be drawn again to facilitate the proof being checked. Geometrical Drawing-Standard VI good, VII very good. The inking

in of the drawings is a great improvement.

Algebra.-Standard V very fair. The average was brought down by several complete failures. Standard VI fair only. Standard VII distinctly good and a great advance on the two lower standards. Book-keeping. This subject is taken in Standard VII only. The work was fairly accurate and the commercial terms were well known.

   Latin. The upper classes VI and VII suffered as this subject had to be dropped during the preparation of pupils for the Oxford Local Examinations. Class V where the study was not interrupted did well.

Chinese.-Reading and Composition were done in Standards I to III only, and transla- tion from and into Chinese in Standards V, VI and VII. Standard IV appears to be omitted. Reading and composition should be contin- ued up to Standard V at least.

Reading.-Standard I fair to poor. boys were quite unable to read. requires more attention.

י

Standard II good on the whole but 5 III fair to poor. Reading certainly

Composition.-Very fair, but each class had a tail consisting of boys who

knew nothing.

   Translation from Chinese into English.-Standard VI very fair, Standard VII good, but only 4 boys in all showed up papers in these two standards. In V 8 boys did translation. Two did well, the remainder badly and among them 3 wrote nonsense.

   English into Chinese.-Standard VI did well as did Standard VII but in the former some boys did not know the Chinese title for the Registrar-General! In the same standard one boy did not knew the form in which a Chinese petition should be written.

   Chinese seems to be somewhat neglected and should receive more attention. It might be well to class the boys in Chinese according to their attainments and not according to the English Class they are in. The present system tends to keep good boys back.

   Grant.-I again return the school as "thoroughly efficient" and recommend a grant at the rate of 35/-.

* No. 9.-St. Mary's, Kowloon.

Staff-Four Sisters of Mercy and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory,

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 152 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

English. Reading.-Good in all standards except I. The pupils read too fast and somewhat inaccurately in the upper standards. The subject matter of the reading is fairly well understood.

Colloquial.-Fair except in Standards IV and I where it was distinctly poor.

267

Composition. Should be better in Standard VI. Good in Standard V where however the handwriting was bad. In Standard IV the spelling very faulty. Dictation in Standards II and I was good.

was

Geography-Good in the three upper Standards VI, V and IV and poor in the lower standards. Both in Standards VI and V there was a somewhat suspicious similarity in many of the papers, the same mistakes appearing and the same expressions being made use of. Å proper syllabus of work should be drawn up for the three lower standards. They should have learnt very much more than they presented for examination.

   History.-Poor on the whole. Fair in Standard VI but I have doubts as to whether the work was done unaided by each pupil. Standard V was very weak; many of the questions were not even attempted. In Standard IV the proportion of bad papers shown up very much exceeded the good ones.

Arithmetic.-Bad in Standards V and VI. Fractions are apparently not understood. IV fair, weak in problems, III. II and I good but Standard III should be more advanced.

Hygiene. The school did not do very well either in the elementary or in the advanced courses, but this is hardly surprizing as the subject has only recently been taken up.

Needlework.-Good.

   Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-. Arithmetic and listory will have to receive greater attention if the position of the school on the grant list is to remain what it is at present.

* No. 11.-Ellis Kadoorie School.

Staff.-Mr. BRAIDWOOD, 3 Assistant English masters and 11 Chinese masters.

   Discipline and Orga ization.-Good on the whole. The school now number over 500 boys. The roll is called in a very short time considering the number of boys. Discipline is well maintained by the English masters but the same does not appear to be the case with the Chinese ma-ters. On one occasion while I was exa nining boys on the 1st floor of the new building a great deal of noise was going on on the 2nd floor where Chinese masters were teaching. Discipline and obedience to orders should be strictly enforced by all in authority.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 1076 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

English-Colloquial.-Fair except in Class IV where it was distinctly poor.

Reading-Good throughout the school.

Composition.- Fair. The style it faulty especially so in letter writing.

The junior boys appeared to take much more interest in this branch of their work than the seniors. In Classes I and II it was very difficult to get an answer even to the simplest question.

Grammar.-There was a great lack of uniformity in the analysis of sentences. Many mistakes were due to carelessness, and it was obvious the ques- tions had not been studied properly before the answers were given. In this subject as in several others the answers were very similar and appeared to have been learnt by heart.

Geography.--Good except in Class VII. Class I was distinctly good, Class II did well except in map drawing. The maps of the course of the Yang Tse Kiang indicating the important towns on its banks were failures in almost all cases.

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268

History.-Good on the whole. The subject chosen was extremely difficult i.e., the history of the ancient Egyptians, Chaldaeans and Assyrians and had been learnt by heart. I very much doubt if the subject was well understood. A knowledge of the history of China or of the nations with whom China has dealings would appear to me a more profitable subject of study and one which would be very much easier to acquire.

Mathematics.-Arithmetic.-Weak in Classes I and II and good throughout the rest of

the school.

Algebra.- Fair.

Euclid.-Fair in Classes I and II and good in Class III. The figures were in many cases very badly drawn and in this as well as in other subjects there was an absence of neatness and method.

Mensuration. --Very good. This subject is only studied in Class I.

In

As in

Science.-Good. The textbook is rather old fashioned and should be changed. classes II and III the answers to the questions appear to have been learnt by heart. the grammar and history papers when one paper has been read through the contents of all the remaining papers are known. The teaching of this subject should be of a more practical nature and boys should be discouraged from using the exact words of the textbook. To quote some instances of the similarity of papers the word capacity appears in almost all cases as "capicity, and fire" as "fires ". Sentences begin in the words of the book: "An astonishing fact may here be mentioned". These have obviously been learnt by heart.

Chinese.--There are 12 Chinese classes in all. The reading in six of them was good as was the explanation of the text, in the remainder fair only. The composition also varied from very good in the upper classes to fair in the lower ones.

Chinese Translation.-Very fair on the whole, but the boys use sentences and expres- sions which are so alike that it is very difficult to believe that they have not copied from each others papers. Such expressions as "fallen in bankruptcy" occur in nearly every paper. In one piece of translation every boy left out the final sentence.

"Herewith a copy

of the Account for goods supplied". The English was in some cases very bad. Greater care must also be taken to translate the full text and not to omit sentences or parts of

sentences.

Hygiene.-Good in the advanced course. Poor in the elementary course.

General. The new wing was opened about one year ago, but even with this additional accommodation the congestion in the old building is still great. Some of the classes are almost too big for one master to supervise properly.

The boys throughout the school should be encouraged to speak louder and more distinctly as at present their answers are often quite inaudible especially if they happen to be seated at the back of one of the large class rooms.

  Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/- and consider that very satisfactory progress has been made during the past twelve months.

No. 12.-Fairlea.-English School.

Staff-Miss HAZELAND and Miss S. V. FLETCHER.

  Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. Some of the girls prompted each other and in at least one instance a girl copied from another girl's papers. The teachers should be very particular to check this practice and punish any offenders.

There

Organization-The organization does not appear to be satisfactory at present. are only three Standards I, III and VI and there seems some doubt as to whether Standard III should be called III or IV. The school apparently lacks a nucleus of permanent scholars who pass from class to class each year. An attempt should be made to fill the vacant classes in the new year and a more definite programme of studies for each standard should be drawn up.

269

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 44 pupils.

English.-Reading.-Very fair. In many cases the meaning of what was read was

not understood.

Composition.-Good in Standard VI, fair in III and bad in I.

Grammar.-Fair in Standard VI and poor in III.

Geography.-Poor except Standard VI which was good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor.

Written. Very fair.

Needlework.-Very good.

1

History.-Fair. Many of the papers were suspiciously alike.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/- which will have to be reduced next year unless the scholars are more evenly distributed in the different standards.

* No. 13.-St. Francis,

Staff-One European Sister of Charity and 2 Assistant Mistresses.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 147 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

English.--Colloquial.-Very fair.

Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Very fair.

Reading & Dictation.-Infant Class: very fair.

Grammar.-Standard III only. Poor.

    Geography.-Standard I knew very little and the Infant Class had not been taught the subject. Standard II poor. Standard III good. More attention should be paid to this subject in the lower standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very fair.

Needlework.--Fair.

    General.-There was only one pupil in Standard III, there were 13 in Standard II and I and 18 in the Infant Class,

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-.

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No. 14.-St. Stephen's Anglo-Chinese School.

Staff.-TANG CHI KUN and 5 Assistant Masters.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline might be better. There is too much talking and boys are constantly leaving the room. This is quite unnecessary. Boys should be taught to speak up and should be punished when detected prompting. At my examination I had reason to complain of boys prompting each other.

Sanitation. Fairly satisfactory. The rooms require colour washing. They might be kept cleaner.

Apparatus.--Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 233 pupils.

English.-Reading.-Fair in the lower standards and good in III, IV and V.

Grammar.-Fair throughout.

Colloquial.-Poor in I and II, very fair in III, IV and V.

Dictation.-I good, II fair.

Composition. Good in III and IV. Fair in V. Boys should think out their subject before writing anything down. Many essays consisted of a mass of meaningless sentences.

Geography.-Weak in Standard I and II where definitions were learnt by heart without being understood. Standard III fair. Here too much was attempted. Standard IV good on the whole but several boys at the bottom of the class knew nothing. V fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good with the exception of Standard V which was a little below

the average.

Hygiene.-Poor. The boys have not grasped this subject properly yet.

Chinese. Reading.-Very fair to good except in Class I where it was impossible to

hear what was said. The boys absolutely declined to speak up. Composition.-Good throughout the school.

   General.-Class I is too big; it contains 62 boys. It is quite impossible to teach so large a number whose attainments vary considerably together. It should be divided into IA and IB.

   There are 85 boys in Standards I and II compared with 38 in III, IV and V, a rather large proportion in the lower standards.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 15.-146 Hollywood Road. Anglo-Chinese School,

Staff-WONG TSZ TSUM.

   Discipline and Organization.-Discipline. There is too much talking. Boys must be taught to speak up especially in schools which are situated in a noisy locality.

Sanitation. Fairly satisfactory. The rooms should be colourwashed.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 53 pupils.

271

English.-Reading.-Poor in Standard I, good in II and III. In Standards I and II boys could only explain the meanings of words in Chinese. Colloquial: nil in I and II, very fair in III which is very much ahead of the other two classes.

Composition.-Poor throughout the school,

Geography.--Fair to poor. Definitions were known by heart without being understood.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Poor.

   Chinese. Reading.-Poor in Standards I and II, good in III. 3 boys did not do composition.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. I must again report this school as "inefficient" on the grounds that the instruction is defective, and also that too many boys are in the lower standards.

No. 17.-Berlin Foundling House.

Staf-PASTOR MÜLLER, Mrs. LAI WONG SHI and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good. The remark made in last year's report that the children were pushed on too rapidly applies more strongly this year and as regards the upper classes the pupils are not up to the work of the standards they are in.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 102 pupils.

Chinese. Rea ling.-The children should be taught to speak up and explain their

reading sentence by sentence. Very fair on the whole.

Composition.-Poor. The writing is also bad in some cases.

Geography.-Good in Standards I, III and VII and fair in the remainder.

Arithmetic.-Mental. Poor.

Written.-Fair on the whole. Standard IV good. Standard VI bad.

Needlework. Very good especially the drawn work.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of/6. The school will have to improve to earn the same grant next year.

No. 18.-Fairlea. Vernacular School.

Staff-Miss H. S. FLETCHER, WONG NGAN HING and 4 Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.-There is too much talking otherwise the discipline is good. The Assistant teachers prompt the pupils. This practice should be put a stop

to at once.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 136 pupils.

272

Chinese-Reading.-Good except in Standard VII where the Mencius was not well known or understood. The pupils should read very much more slowly.

Composition.-Fair in the three upper standards, good in I and II and

poor in III and IV. Several pupils in III collaborated.

Geography. Very fair. The physical geography was not well known in Standards V, VI and VII.

Arithmetic.--Mental.-Weak.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 17/6d.

No. 19.--Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Staff. Miss HOLLIS and two Assistant Mistresses.

Discipline and Organization. -Discipline very good. There are no pupils in Standard VI this year. There are 2 in Standard VII. The children should be male to speak up and to explain sentences in their own words.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory. A new map of Kwang Tung Province is required.

Floor Spice.-Sufficient for 145 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading. --Good. The explanation of Mencius in Standard VII was

very good.

Composition.-Fair on the whole. It should be better.

Geography.--Good except the physical geography.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor throughout.

Written.-Good except in Standard VII which was only fair.

Needlework. Very good.

Physical Grill.-Very good.

Grant.--I recommend a grant at thate of 17/6d.

No. 20.-L.M.S. Traning Home for Girls.

Staff-Miss DAVIES, Miss WONG, Mr. CHIN SHIU Ü and 3 Assistant Teachers.

Discipline and Organization.- Very good indeed. The supervision is all that could

be desired and all the teachers are thoroughly competent.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good.

- da

Composition.-Very good. Standard VII very good indeed.

t i

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273

Geography.--Very good except the physical geography in Standards V, VI and VII.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework. Very good.

   Grant.-I recommend the full grant at the rate of 20/-. The school is again "thoroughly efficient".

No. 21.-Italian Convent.

Staff-Italian Sisters of Charity.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. Some of the pupils still continue to reply to questions in an inaudible voice. One of the teachers prompted a pupil whom I was examining; this must not occur again.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 127 pupils.

Chinese.-- Reading.-Good.

Composition.Good.

Geography.-Very fair. Standard I, lower half, had learnt nothing at all.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Weak.

Written.-Fair. More attention must be paid to this subject.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a Grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 22.--Bridges Street..

Staff--Italian Sisters of Charity.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. The Attendance Register should be marked up as the roll is called and not afterwards.

Sanitation.-Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 91 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.--Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Good excepting Standard I lower half.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written. Good.

Needlework.-Very good.

Grant.-I recommed a grant at the rate of $7.

274

*No. 24.-Holy Infancy.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Mercy.

Discipline and Organization.- Very good. No attempt was made by the teachers to prompt the pupils as on previous occasions.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 92 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very good indeed.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good. More attention should be paid to the explanation of the lessons which seem to be learnt off. by heart at present without necessarily being understood.

Geography.-Upper Standards good. Standards I and II fair.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good except Standard II whose subtraction was weak.

Needlework.-- Very good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $8 and return the school as "throughly

efficient."

* No. 25.-Hunghom.

Staff.-Two Chinese Sisters of Mercy.

Discipline and Organization.-Excellent. The roll is called at the proper time, the pupils attend very regularly and the records are well kept.

Sanitation.-Very good.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 72 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading. -Very good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

  Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $8, and report the school as "thoroughly efficient".

  General.-There are 3 pupils in Standard IB and 20 in Standards IA, II and III. It is a pity there are no pupils in Standard IV. The pupils in all standards know more than is required of them by the Code.

275

* No. 26.--Yaumati.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. There should be no talking while examination or instruction is going on.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

   The pupils should read slowly and explain each sentence in an intelligent manner not as though they had learnt it off by heart.

Geography.-Good except in Standard III which was weak last.

}

}

year

also.

Arithmetic.-Mental. Both good except in Standard I which is very weak especially

Written. in written arithmetic.

Needlework,-Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 27.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good though there are still too many pupils in the lower Standards. There are 52 pupils in all only 5 of whom are in Standard II. There is no Standard III.

Sanitation. Quite satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 118 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. Good in Standard II, poor in Standard I.

Needlework.-Good.

M

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 28.-Aberdeen.

Staff-Two Chinese Sisters of Charity.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

270

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 116 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good except in Standard III which was fair.

Geography.-Good in Standards I and II, fair in III.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good except in Standard III which was poor.

Written.-Standard III should be able to do all the 4 rules. they do no division. Standard I fair, Standard II good.

At present

Needlework. Very good.

Grant.---I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

The work in Standard III must

improve.

* No. 29.-109 Second Street.

Staff-LAI FUK-CHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good indeed. The teacher follows the Model Course strictly.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 74 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Good. Standard IV might be better.

Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very good.

Written.-Good.

   General. This school is very well managed. Last year there was a Vth Standard, it is a pity that there is none this year.

   Grant.-I report that the school is again "thoroughly efficient" and recommend the full grant of $9.

* No. 30.-22 Taipingshan Street.

Staff.-HO NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading -Good.

Composition.-Good except in Standard IV which is only fair.

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277

   Geography-Fair in the upper Standards, poor in the lower Standards. The names of the Government Officials are not known.

Arithmetic-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Very good. This subject has improved, especially the written.

work.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. Should the work of this school continue to improve the grant might be increased next year; the numbers in the upper standards must also be increased still further.

* No. 31,-5 Clarence Terrace.

Staff.-CHAN CHAK-LAM.

Discipline and Organization.-Good.

Sanitation.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

Chinese.--Reading. --Good.

}

Composition.-Very fair. Composition is weak in the upper Standards.

Geography.-Fair. This subject shows a falling off. Standards II and III were very weak; in Standard IV the routes to Europe were well known but not so the geography of China.

Arithmetic.- Mental.-Good.

Written. The written arithmetic was good in Standards I and IV; Standards II and III were weak and failed completely in subtraction.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

* No. 32.-380 Queen's Road West.

Staff.-FONG CHUNG-SHI.

Discipline and Orginazation. Not at all good. I repeatedly had to speak to the pupils for talking while my examination was going on. The organization is bad. As regards reading most standards were using the text books of the standard above theirs and did not know the text books they were required to know, the same applied to geography. The teacher was absent and I presume the loose discipline and bad organization are due to the fact that she is constantly absent.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 44 pupils.

Sanitation.-Fair. The premises might be cleaner.

Apparatus.-There was no map of Hongkong island. There were no flags.

Chinese.-Reading. - Fair.

Composition.-Poor. In Standard III one pupil refused to read saying that she had not studied the Chinese Reader No. 3 and only knew No. 4. Written Chinese is apparently not taught only the colloquial writing (tsuk wa).

278

Geography. Very fair.

Arithmetic. Mental.Good.

Written.-Very fair. In Standard II subtraction was a failure.

Needlework.-Fair.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $5. I should have entered the school as inefficient only for the fact that it had unavoidably to be closed last year and it may have been found difficult to start it again.

* No. 33.-Queen's Road East.

Staff-SIN NG-SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 52 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.---Good.

Composition.-Good.

  Geography.-Very good in Standards II and III, good in the other standards. The geography of Europe was well known in Standard VI but not the physical geography.

Arithmetic.- Mental.-Good in Standards I to III very good in Stan lards IV to VI.

Written.-Good. Problems have been done but the knowledge of the

pupils is limited.

Needlework.-Very good.

  Grant.--I recommend the maximum grant at the rate of $9. The school is again "thoroughly efficient".

* No. 34.-Yaumati.-46 Station Street South.

Staff-FONG TSE-NAM.

  Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The change of teachers has certainly not benefitted this school.

Sanitation. The premises are rather dirty. They should be kept cleaner.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.- proper chart showing the flags of different nationalities should be provided.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair.

Composition.-Very poor.

Geography.-Bad.

Arihmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Bad.

279

   General. The master from this school was sent to Shaukiwan, and the one from Shaukiwan took charge of this school about 2 months ago. The new master is certainly a failure and I am inclined to think he takes no trouble with the school. He should be replaced by a more satisfactory teacher.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and return the school as "inefficient".

* No. 35.-D'Aguilar Street.

Staff.-YEUNG Sin Shi.

   Discipline and Organization.-Fair. The school has removed to a very noisy neigh- bourhood where it is almost impossible to carry on school work properly. More suitable premises should be rented. The weakness in geography throughout the school to which attention was drawn last year still continues and must be taken in hand to prevent the school being returned as inefficient next year.

Sanitation.--Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.- Reading.-Good.

Composition.--Good on the whole.

1

Geography.-Poor. Only one pupil really knew something about this subject.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Bad, except the one pupil in Standard V.

Needlework.-Fair.

   General.-The poor results in some subjects are due to the fact that the teacher has tried to push on some of the pupils too fast so as not to have too many in the lower stand- ards. There are at present 26 pupils in Standards I and II and one each in III, IV and V. It is useless to try and push on pupils too rapidly as it lowers the standard of work throughout the school.

{

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 on the distinct understanding that it be reduced next year if more attention is not paid to geography, written arithmetic and needlework.

* No. 36.-Wantsai Chapel.

Staff-KWAN KING CHUNG.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. The numbers in the upper standards have in- creased. There are now 4 pupils in Standard V.

Sanitation.Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 96 pupils.

   Apparatus. Satisfactory. The new map of the Island has not yet been purchased. It should be got at once.

Chinese. -Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Very good.

Geography.-Good. The names of the Government Departments are not known. Phy- sical geography was very fair in Standard V.

}

280

Arithmetic. Mental Mental Arithmetic was good throughout the school.

Written.

A

Written Arithmetic was poor. The Model Course has not been followed, Standard I knew nothing, II was weak in multiplica- tion, III in division and multiplication. IV weak in division; in V fractions were hardly known at all.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

be.

* No. 37.-L.M.S. Hospital Chapel.

Staff-Ho Ho-CHAI.

Discipline and Organizaton.-Discipline good. The organization is not what it should Several standards are doing the work of the standard below them, and not that laid down in the Model Course. This was especially noticeable in Arithmetic and Geography. Standard I would do better if it were sub-divided into IA and IB.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 71 pupils.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading. Very fair except in Standard II where oue boy only was good and

The lessons are not explained properly.

the rest poor.

Composition.-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor except in Standard IV which was very fair.

Written. Very fair except Standard I which was bad. The Model Course is not Written.--Very followed.

Geography.-Bad, except in Standard I where it was fair.

Grant. The school has certainly not done any better than last year in fact it has done badly again I therefore recommend the reduced grant of $5 and return the school as "inefficient".

* No. 38.-84 Macdonell Road.

Staff-LEUNG HO-SHI.

 Discipline and Organization.-Good. The Model Course should be followed more strictly.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 37 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.―Reading.- Very good.

Composition.-Good.

 Geography.-Fair. This subject does not receive proper attention yet. Standard I and III have improved but Standard V is poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair. The written arithmetic should receive more attention

throughout the school.

281

Needlework.-Good.

General. There should be some pupils in Standard IV next year.

Grant

recommend a Grant at the rate of $6.

*No. 39.-Hung Hom.

Staff-TSE CHun-San.

  Discipline and Organization.- Fair. The pupils paid very little attention to remarks addressed to them, and in one instance a boy in Standard III wandered off to examine a map while being examined in some other subject. The organization is not good. The Model Course is not followed especially in geography.

Sanitation.-Fair. The floor was rather dirty in places.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 50 pupils.

Apparatus.Good.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair. but had apparently been learnt by heart. The meaning of what was read was not understood throughout the school.

Composition.-Fair except in Standard III which was poor.

Geography.-Poor. The Model Course was not followed.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Fair. Subtraction was not well done in Standard II.

  Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 and return the school as "inefficient. A marked improvement will have to be shown if the school is to remain on the Grant List.

No. 40.-343 Queen's Road West.

Staff-Pun Chi Tung and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Good. There are 41 pupils in Standards I and II (29 in Standard I) as compared with 10 in III, IV and V. The proportion of pupils in the lower Standards is getting too large.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

Chinese-Reading.-Good.

Composition. Good in Standards I and II, very bad in III where several

boys copied, and poor in IV and V.

Geography.-Fair in the lower and very good in the upper standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.Good.

Written.-Good except in Standard IV.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

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282

given.

No. 41.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-SIU KING-CHUNG.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline fair. Too little attention is paid to orders

Sanitation. The sanitary condition of the school is not very good. The building is in need of extensive repairs.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 54 pupils.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair except Standard IV which was poor.

Composition.-Standards II and III good, I and IV poor. The boys in

Standard IV should anwer questions at greater length.

Geography.-Poor in IB and II. Fair in IA, III and IV.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor in I and II, good in III and IV.

Written.-Poor except in Standard II. Boys in Standard IV could only

do the 4 rules. They should do fractions and decimals.

Grant.-I recommend a great at the rate of $6. I again return the school as " inefficient" on the ground that too small a proportion of the pupils are in the third and higher standards.

   Note. I propose to recommend that the grant be continued for another 12 months to give the school a final opportunity of becoming efficient.

No. 42.-Tanglungchau Chapel. Staff-WONG WUN HING.

Discipline and Organization.-Very fair. There was too much noise in the teacher's private quarters which are immediately above the school. The boys should be taught to take immediate notice of remarks addressed to them by the teacher or the Inspector of Schools.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 65 pupils. Only 26 present.

Apparatus.-Should be better, especially the wall maps. New maps of (i) Kwang Tung province (ii) China and (iii) Asia are urgently required. The remarks on this subject in last year's report have not received attention.

Reading-Chinese.-Good. The explanation of the text is learnt by heart. The

boys should be able to explain it in their own words.

Composition.-Fair in Standard 1, good in Standard II, III and V and

bad in IV. Two boys in Standard IV copied from each others slates.

Geography.-Good in Standards I, II and IV and fair only in III and V. The names of Government Officials were unknown.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor throughout the school. This subject must not be neglected.

Written.-Good.

Grant.- recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

283

No. 43.-Mongkok.

Staff-LI KWAN PING.

   Discipline and Organization.-The drill is good as far as it goes but the boys are constantly running about the room. There is also too much talking. The attendance register should be kept better.

Sanitation. The school room might be kept cleaner.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 55 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in I and III, good in IV.

There is no Standard II.

Composition.-Very fair except Standard I which was poor.

Geography. Very poor indeed.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair only.

1

Written.-Poor except Standard IV which was very fair.

   Grant.-1 recommend a grant at the rate of $5. This school will have to improve very considerably to avoid being returned as inefficient next year.

No. 44.-20a Aberdeen Street.

Staff-WONG PAK LIN.

   Discipline and Organization.-Good. Pupils must be taught to answer questions in a clear audible voice. Many girls refused to open their mouths when reading, and it was impossible to hear whether they were reading correctly or not.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 59 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Classes IV and III good in II and I.

Composition.-Good in all standards except IV. The latter was fair only.

Geography. Very good in Standard IV, good in II and I and fair only in III.

Arithmetic.-Mental.--Very fair.

Written. Very good in the two upper and good in the two lower

standards.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant.I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 45.-Tanglungchau Chapel.

Staff.-LI LO SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Fair. There is too much talking among the pupils. Standard I should be split up. There were 18 in this standard of whom at least 5 were very much ahead of the rest. The teacher's private quarters which are immediately over the school are somewhat noisy.

!

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284

Sanitation.--Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 45 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese. Reading.-Fair. Explanation weak.

Composition.-Poor in Standard I, fair in II and good in III. The composi- tion is too short. Pupils should answer the questions at greater length.

The titles of Officials were quite

Geography.-Good in Standards I and II, fair in III.

unknown.

Arithmetic.-Mental.

Poor in Standard I, fair in II and good in III.

Written-

Needlework.-Fair.

General. The pupils especially in Standard I'should be taught to read louder, more distinctly and not so fast.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

No. 46.--Wantsai Chapel.

Staff-KWAN CHAN SHI and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is very lax.

Silence is quite unknown.

It is a great pity that a school otherwise well organized should absolutely fail in this essen- tial. Organization good on the whole.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 81 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good. The explanation of the text was also quite good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography. Very good.

Arithmetic.--Mental.Good.

Written.--Good.

Needlework. - Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7 on the distinct understanding that the discipline improves materially during the new school year.

No. 47.-4 Bridges Street.

Staff-CHENG SAI-KWONG and one Assistant.

  Discipline and Organization-Discipline good. Organization: There are 63 boys in Standards I and II as compared with 12 only in the upper Standards III and V. There is no IVth Standard. The number in the lower standards is therefore quite out of proportion to the number in the upper standards.

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:

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285

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 79 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good.

Geography.-Good except the physical geography in Standard V which is weak.

Arithmetic.- Mental.-Good in the upper standards, fair in Standard II and weak in

Standard I.

Written. Good in the upper standards, weak in the lower standards.

Addition and subtraction should be taught in Standard I.

   Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 but must return the school as "inefficient" as there are too many pupils in the lower standards.

No. 48.--Shamshuipo.--Basel Mission.

Staff-CHAN KING YAN and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. There is a IVth Standard again this year and the work shows a steady improvement. There are two divisions one for boys and one for girls.

Sanitation. Not altogether satisfactory. The door near the lavatory should be kept closed and in the lavatory itself disinfectants should be used.

Apparatus. --Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 139 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.-Very good.

Composition.-Good on the whole. Some standards have a weak tail.

  Geography. Very good except for the titles of Officials which where not known in Standard III.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.--Good.

  Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7 and return the school as "thorough- ly efficient". It should not earn the full grant next year unless an even larger proportion of pupils are in the upper standards.

No. 49.-Shaukiwan.

Staff-CHEUNG TAK-HING.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good. The school has very much improved since last year.

     All the standards with the exception of VI did well on the whole. Geography is rather weak in the upper standards.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 87 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

:

286

Chinese. Reading.--Very good. The explanation of the text was good except in

Standard VI.

Composition. Good in Standards I and II, but fair only in III, IV, V and

VI. This subject should receive more attention.

Geography.Good in the lower standards but fair to poor in the upper standards. The physical geography was not well known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Fair in the lower standards and in the upper excepting VI.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. The boys are fairly well distributed in the different standards. If the improvement is maintained this school should soon earn the full grant.

No. 50.-Tokwawan.

Staff-CHAN WING WO.

}

Discipline and Organization-Discipline poor. There was too much talking. The boys also copied from one another's slates in the most bare-faced manner.

www.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory. The boys should be made to keep themselves cleaner.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 127 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good.

Composition. Good in I and V, fair in III and poor in II and VI.

There are no boys in Standard IV.

Geography.-Good except the physical geography in the upper standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Good in the lower standards but weak in Stan lards V and VI.

Grant.-Considering that this is a village school the work was satisfactory. However all collaboration on the part of pupils must be put a stop to before the full grant can be earned. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 51.-High Street.

Staff.-Rev. J. VÖMEL, CHAU PING CHING and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Good on the whole. The standards. 7 in number, varied very much in their achievements. Some were distinctly good others were very poor. Standards III and VI were not at all good and should improve. The pupils should be taught to speak up.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 167 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Standards I to IV, good in VI and VII.

three pupils in Standard II who could not read at all.

There were

Composition. This subject varied very much. It was good in IB and II, fair in VII, poor in IA and III and bad in IV and VI. There were no pupils in Standard V.

287

Geography.-Poor in Standards II and VI, fair in IV and good in I, III and VII. In III the names of Officials were not well known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written. Fair to good on the whole; poor in Standard III.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7.

No. 53.-218 Hollywood Road.

"

Staff-SHAM KWAI HING and one Assistant.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good indeed.

The boys are very attentive and the

schol is very efficient but more boys should be in the upper standards. (i.e., 40 in Staniard I, 16 in the remaining 4 standards).

Sanitation.-Good.

Aparatus.-Good.

Flor Space.-Sufficient for 66 boys.

Chinese.-Reding.-Good. The boys should explain the text in their own words.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and IV, very good in Standards II

and III.

Geography.-Good except Standard II which was poor.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written. -Fair only in Standard I, very good in II and III and good in IV.

  Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. With the god material at his disposal the headmaster should succeed in filling the upper forms next year. The school is

thoroughly efficient".

No. 54.-24 Bulkeley Street, Hunghom.

Stuff.-YEUNG NG SHI.

Discipline and Organization.-Poor. The teacher apparently does not know how to conduct the school. The premises are untidy, so are the children and the work is very poor. It is a girl's school but I found 3 boys there. There were 19 children present all but two of whom were in Standards I and II.

Sanitation.-Very untidy and rather dirty.

Apparatus. A new map of Kwang Tung is required.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 40 pupils.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair Standards I and III, poor in II.

Composition.-Fair except Standard III which was poor. Two boys in

this standard did not do their work unaided.

288

Geography.-Poor in IA and II, good in IB and III. In III the names of Officials were not known.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor.

Written.-Poor in I, fair in II, good in III.

Needlework.-Poor.

   Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and return the school as "inefficient" on the ground that too many pupils are in the lower standards.

No. 55.-36 Lyndhurst Terrace.

Stuff-NG KONG SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

here

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. There are far too many pupils i: the lower standards. Out of 66 present 44 were in Standard IB and 57 in I and II. were 5 in III and 4 in IV only.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.--Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 97 pupils.

Chinese-Reading.-Fair in I, good in II and very good in III and IV.

Composition.-Good except Standard IV which was poor.

Geography.-Fair. The European countries were not well known in Standard IV

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Very good.

   Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. It cannot be increased until the number of pupils in the higher standards rises.

No. 56.-6 Hollywood Road.

Staff-So LI SHI.

Discipline and Organization. The discipline is good. The organization is still defective judging by the poor results. The pupils are very careless in arithmetic, the geography is poor and Chinese is not good.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The room is rather crowded and might be tidier.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 32 pupils. (There were 33 present and 36 on the roll.)

Chinese.-Reading.-Good in Standards IV and III, fair in II and poor in I. The explanation of the text was very inaccurate throughout.

Composition.-Bad except in Standards IV and III, fair in II and I.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair to poor.

Written.-Poor in I and II, fair in III and IV. The working of sums was

carelessly done.

289

Needlework.-Fair.

  Grant. The school has not improved during the past year but is still in a generally unsatisfactory condition. I recommend a grant at the rate of $5 and again report the school as "inefficient".

No. 57.-219 Des Vœux Road West.

Staff-CHU CHAN SHI.

Discipline and Organization. --Discipline good. The pupils are now more evenly distributed among the different standards.

Sanitation.-Fair. The room might be cleaner. It should be colourwashed.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 49 pupils.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.--Good in the lower standards, very good in III and IV.

Composition.-Good in Standards IA and IV; poor in the remainder.

Geography.-Good in Standards II and III. Fair only in I and IV.

Arithmetic.- Mental.--Fair in Standards I and III, poor in II and good in IV.

Written.-Poor in I, fair in II and III, good in IV. The multiplication

tables were not well known.

General. The school is situated in a very noisy neighbourhood. If possible a floor in some house in Western Street opposite the Sailors' Home should be selected. It would be very much quieter and just as central as the present premises.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6; a further improvement will be necessary before the grant can be increased.

F

No. 58.-Boys School. C.M.S. Chapel; Yaumati.

Staff-WONG SHUN KIN and one Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline good. The Model Course should be more strictly followed.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Good.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 59 pupils.

Chinese-Reading -Poor in Standard I, good in II, III and IV and very good in

Standard V. The explanation of the text could be better.

Composition.-Good throughout.

   Geography-Poor. This subject should receive more attention and the syllabus should be more closely followed. The routes to England and the names of Officials were not known at all.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good in Standards I and III, good in II and IV but poor

in V.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the increased rate of $7.

290

No. 59.-Girls School. C.M.S. Chapel, Yaumati.

Staff-Ho LI SHI and one Assistant.

  Discipline and Organization.-Very good. The method of instruction has very much improved during the past twelve months.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 64 pupils.

Chinese-Reading.-Good.

Composition.-Good except in Standard II. The composition should contain the ideas of the pupils and not quotations from the readers, very often not to the point.

Geography.-Good in Standard I and very good in the remaining standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Very good.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the increased rate of $7

No. 60.-232 Hollywood Road.

Staff-Lo CHAN SIII and 1 Assistant.

Discipline and Orgmization.-There should be less talking.

Answers are all given in

a sing song. The pupils should be encouraged to speak in a natural voice.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus.-Very satisfactory.

Chinese-Reading.-Good. The explanation of the text is fair.

Composition.-Good except Standard III which was very fair.

Geography-Very poor. Distinctly weak throughout the school..

Arithmetic.-Ment il-Poor except Standard IV which was good. The multiplication

tables were not well known.

Written.-Poor. Standard III could not do multiplication.

Needlework.-Fair.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6 owing to the distinct falling off in Arithmetic and Geography.

No. 61.-No. 22 Pokfulam Road. Staff-WAT SZE HAP.

 Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is fair. my arrival all the pupils were droning out their lessons. discontinued at once as it is useless and has not even the up when they are being examined.

There is too much talking. On This method of learning should be merit of making the pupils speak

291

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The room is very hot.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 39 pupils.

Apparatus.-New maps of (1) Kwang Tung (2) the world are required.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair in Standards I, II and III, good in IV. In the lower standards the lessons had been learnt off by heart but their meaning was not understood.

Composition.-Fair in Standards I and III, good in II and poor in IV.

The pupils in II and III should do their work unaided.

Geography.-Very good in I, good in III, fair in II and bad in IV.

Arithmetic.--Mental.-Very fair.

Written.-Subtraction was not well done in I. II and III were good, IV

very good.

Needlework.-Good.

)

Grant.- recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This school should earn an increased grant next year.

No. 62.-Shaukiwan

Staff-TAM WONG SHI.

   Discipline and Organization.-Fair. The roll must be called at the proper time. Attention was drawn to this last year. The pupils are inclined to be noisy.

Sanitation.-Satisfactory. The floor might be cleaner. The portion of the school used as living quarters shoull be divided off from the school room.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 41 pupils.

A proper map

Apparatus.-The map of the K vang Tung Province has been bought. of China is required for Standard IV. Text books were scarce in Standard I.

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Explanation of text fair except in Standard I where it

was poor.

Compostion.-Fair to poor. Must improve.

Geography.-Good, in Standards IV and III, II and I were not far enough advanced. II knew the map of Victoria but not of the island, I was poor.

Arithmetic.- Mental.-Good.

Written --Good in IV and III, fair in II and poor in I.

Needlework.-Fair.

General. There is no copy of the Model Course at this school. Hence the non- compliance with its requirements. The managers should see that every school is supplied with this book.

Grant..-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6.

No. 63.-Stanley.

Staff-CHU MAN KIN and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is fairly good. Collaboration appears to be the order of the day in the lower forms where the pupils have apparently not been checked in the practice. Composition and geography are weak.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Satisfactory.

Floor Space.- Sufficient for 89 puptils.

292

Chinese.-Reading.-Good. Explanation of text good.

Composition. Good in Standard II only, fair in IV, poor in III and I. In

IA and B pupils collaborated.

Geography-Fair in IV and poor in the remaining standards.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good in Standards IV and III, poor in II and fair in I.

Written.-Very fair except Standard II which was good. The figures

were written very badly and should receive attention.

   Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This rate should however be cut down again next year unless the weak points referre i to receive immediate attention.

No. 64.-263 Queen's Road, West.

Staff-NG TAK Mun.

   Discipline and Organization.--The discipline is good. There are far too many boys for one master to teach thoroughly. There were 67 present but there are actually 87 on the roll. This is a larger number than any one master, however clever, can possibly instruct.

Sanitat on.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 62 pupils.

Apparatus. Very satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair only throughout the school.

Composition.-Good in Standards I and III, fair in IV, poor in II and V. In

I several boys copied and in V npt one boy wrote to the point.

   Geography.-Fair in Standards I to IV; V very poor; no physical geography ha been taught.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair except IB and II which were very good.

Written.-I and II good, III very good, IV and V poor. Fractions, decimals and Chinese money should be taught in Class IV and above.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. It is impossible for so large school to be "thoroughly efficient" with such a hopelessly inadequate staff and I regret to say that it is not in fact.

No. 68.-No. 5 Elgin Street.

Staff.-LAU SHam Ku.

Discipline and Organization. -Discipline good on the whole, but there is too much talking. The pupils especially in Standard II should be taught to speak up.

Sanitation. Satisfactory.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 42 pupils.

:

293

Chinese. Reading.-Good in the lower, very good in the upper standards. (There

are 5 standards in all).

Composition.-Poor. It was quite obvious that in many cases those who could not write copied from their more fortunate neighbours. The pupils in IA, III and IV were the chief offenders.

Geography.-Good.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Fair.

It might be better.

Written.-Fair. Standard IV should be able to do division at least.

Needlework.-Good.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate $5. The grant would have been increased but for the extensive collaboration in composition which was evidently not checked in any way by the teacher.

No. 69.-35 Pottinger Street.

Staff-CHAU WAN SHI and 1 Assistant Teacher.

Discipline and Organization.-Very good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Apparatus. Very good. One blackboard requires renewing.

Floor Space.--Sufficient for 42 pupils.

Chinese. Reading.Good. The girls in Standard I should speak up. The explana-

tion of the text might be better in some cases.

Composition.--Good throughout the school.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Very good.

Geography.-Fair in I and II, good in III and IV and poor in V. Standard V should

receive more attention.

Needlework. Very good.

    Grant. recommend a grant at rate of $7 and return the school, the work of which is highly satisfactory, as "thoroughly efficient."

No. 70.-Kowloon City.

Staff-NG PANG SHI.

Discipline and Orginazation.-Good.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 67 pupils.

Apparatus.--Satisfactory.

Chinese.-Reading. Good except in Standard IV.

Composition.-Fair in Standards I and II, very good in III and poor in IV.

D

294

Geography.-Very fair in Standard I, good in II and III, poor in Standard IV.

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Poor except Standard IV which was fair.

Written.---Multiplication was weak in Standard II; III and IV very

good, I fair.

Needlework.Good.

Grant.-I recommend a grant at the rate of $6. This report is compiled from inspection reports made during the year, as the school closed without authority for the summer holidays before my annual inspection.

*No. 72.-11 Station Street, Mong Kok Tsui.

Staff-KwOK NAI-MING.

Discipline and Organization.-Discipline very good. There are now 6 Standards. The Model Course is being followed except in arithmetic where each standard is a little backward.

Sanitation. Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 78 pupils.

  Apparatus.-A new large size map of Kwang Tung and a large map of the New Territory are required.

Chinese.-Reading.-Very good.

Composition.--Good.

Geography.-This subject was good in Standards V and VI except for the physical geography, poor in Standards III and IV, fair in I and II.

Arith wet c-Mental.-Good.

Written.-Fair. Standard II is weak in multiplication, Standard III in

division, Standards IV and V in decimals and VI in fractions.

Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of $7. The geography and written arithmetic will have to improve before this school can become thoroughly efficient.

* No. 73.-Bonham Road.

Staff-Mrs. GENÄHR,

  Discipline and Organization.-The discipline is very good. The organization is very fair but the Cole should be more strictly adhered to.

Sanitation.-Very satisfactory.

Floor Space.-Sufficient for 56 pupils.

Apparatus.-Satisfactory.

Engl sh-Reading.-Good throughout.

Dictation.-Good. Grammar, fair.

Composition.-Standard IV good. Sentence building in lower stan lards

good.

E

295

Arithmetic.-Mental.-Good in the lower standards and poor in III and IV.

Written.-Good on the whole. The pupils in Standard IV receive no instruction in this subject at present. This should be given. Standard I should be able to do easy addition and subtraction, II addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and compound rules and IV up to fractions.

Geography.-None taught in Standard I. The first standard should learn the geography of Hongkong. Standard II fair, III poor and IV good.

Chinese.-Reading.-Fair. The pupils should study the readers thoroughly before

going on to the Classics.

Composition.-Very fair.

Needlework.-Good.

   Grant. I recommend a grant at the rate of 30/-. The school has done good work during the past year. A definite syllabus of work should now be drawn up for the new school year.

296

Appendix C.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

(EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES).

Director's Report, 1908.

A.-EVENING CONTINUATION CLASSES.

The Evening Continuation Classes opened in May 1906 were continued until May 31st 1907, when they closed for the Summer Vacation.

2. Examinations conducted by the lecturers were held at the end of the session, and This Table shews certificates were granted to successful students as shewn in Table I. that though only a comparatively small number presented themselves for examination the work done by these Students was of a very satisfactory nature.

For these

A prize was presented in each Class to the most successful student. prizes our thanks are due to the gentlemen who, contributed to the Prize Fund. The names of the Subscribers appear in Table II.

3. An Examination in Shorthand was held in May under the auspices of the Pitman Institute, London. The results of the Examination are set forth in Table III.

The collapse in the Speed Class may be attributed to the fact that, while the Regulations required that only 60 words per minute should be dictated the rate was actually over 70 words per minute.

  4. In May a Committee was appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to enquire generally into the working of the Evening Continuation Classes and submit proposals for the future organization of such Classes.

The Committee was constituted as follows:-

The Honourable Mr. A. W. BREWIN.

The Honourable Dr. Ho KAI, M.B., C.M.. C.M.G.

Dr. G. H. BATEson Wright, d.D. (Oxon.)

E. D. C. WOLFE, Esq., B.A. (Cantab.)

J. F. BOULTON, Esq., A.M.I.C.E.

F. BROWNE, Esq., F.C.S.

Rev. T. W. Pearce.

  The Committee after a thorough investigation of the subject published a Report in August. Their proposals, most of which were eventually adopted by the Government, may be summarized thus:-

  I. The Evening Continuation Classes to be styled in future "The Hongkong Technical Institute.

"

II. The Government of the Institute to consist of-

(a.) The Director.

(b.) The Inspector of Schools.

(c.) The Advisory Committee.

  The Technical Institute to be a Sub-Department of the Education Department; the Director to be the official head of the Sub-Department, and to be responsible for the con- duct of the Classes.

The Institute to be subject to regular inspection by the Inspector of Schools, who will The Members of the Committee of Inquiry furnish an Annual Report to the Government. were constituted the Advisory Committee, the Inspector of Schools being ex officio a Mem- ber and the Secretary.

1

:

!

297

   The Committee is empowered to make changes in certain Regulations and recommend to Government changes in others.

III. The Subjects of Instruction to be as detailed in Table VI.

The following subjects to be no longer taught

1. Advanced Book-keeping.

2. Commercial Arithmetic.

3. Commercial Geography.

4. Hygiene.

5. Japanese.

The following subjects to be introduced :-

Steam.

Field Surveying.

Electricity.

Type-writing (in connexion with Shorthand.)

IV: The Length of the Course of Study, was fixed as follows:-

(a.) Engineering Course

.......3 years..

(b.) Commerce Section All subjects .........2 years.

(c.) Science Chemistry & Physics.........3 years.

V. Examinations.

An Annual Examination to test the progress of the students to be arranged by the Director, and conducted jointly by him and by the Lecturers.

Arrangements for Examinations for Certificates (and for Diplomas, if granted) to be made by the Inspector of Schools, and the Examinations conducted by Examiners un- connected with the Classes.

VI. Fees.

A uniform fee of Four Dollars per Session to be charged for each Class, and to be paid in advance.

VII. Sessions.

   Two Sessions in the year; the first commencing in the first week of October, and closing two weeks before Chinese New Year, the second commencing two weeks after Chinese New Year and closing in the last week of June.

VII. The Conditions of Admission, the engagement and payment of lecturers and other minor matters were also outlined by the Committee.

B.-HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

The First Session of the newly-organized Institute opened on October 10th, 1907, and closed on January 24th, 1908.

Table V gives details of Staff and Subjects taught during the year, including the Second Session of the Evening Continuation Classes, when many changes in the personnel of the Staff took place. During the First Session of the Institute there were no changes in the Staff.

   2. Table VI shews the Number of Lectures, Duration of each Lecture, Toiid Number of Attendances, and Average Attendance at each Class for the Session.

Table VII shews the Average Attendance each month,

298

There was a serious falling off in attendance towards the end of the Session. The matter was investigated thoroughly and in nearly every case the reason given for irregular attendance was the great press of work at the end of the year in December, and again in January at the approach of the Chinese New Year. In connection with the subject of attend- ance, the question of Diplomas may be mentioned. It is important that Regulations for Diplomas be published as early as possible: it is certain that when Students have in view some definite object--such as the acquisition of a Diploma in Civil or Mechanical Engineer- ing, in Commerce or in Chemistry-a much greater effort will be made to attend the Lectures regularly. The subject is under the consideration of the Government.

3. Table VIII shews where the Students received their previous education. 80 per cent. were educated in Hongkong, and of these over 55 per cent. or 44 per cent. of the whole, were educated at Queen's College. Curiously, Canton does not figure in the list, but it may safely be assumed that many students received their early education in that City before entering a Hongkong School.

4. Electricity. A Class in this subject was sanctioned, but as only 1 student presented himself, the Class could not be formed. The members of the Physics Class will probably next Session take up Electricity, for which their work in Physics will prove a very useful preparation. Some lessons in Magnetism and Electricity were included in the Second Year's Course in Physics.

5. Laboratory. The Laboratory is now in a very satisfactory condition as a result of the attention devoted to it by Messrs. BROWNE and CROOK. If the work in science is to be developed it will be necessary to purchase more apparatus from time to time, especially in connexion with the Physics Department, which is at present inadequately equipped. Arrangements have been made whereby the College of Medicine for Chinese is entitled to the use of the Laboratory, in return for an annual payment. The sum received is utilised in the payment of a trained laboratory coolie, and in defraying the general laboratory expenses. The arrangement will unquestionably prove beneficial both to the College of Medecine and the Technical Institute.

6. Building Construction and Field Surveying.

The Members of these Classes, accompanied by the Director and Mr. T. L. PERKINS, visited works in progress, notably the Naval Yard Extension and the Tunnels in course of construction on the Kowloon-Canton Railway. Explanations were given to the Students by Mr. PERKINS and also by Engineers connected with the various works. These visits are undoubtedly of great educational value to the Students and it is hoped that in future they will take place at regular intervals and become a recognised part of the Class work.

The Field Surveying Class was very successful, and the members were very anxious that the course should be continued. It is to be regretted that in consequence of lack of

funds, this is not possible at present.

7. Shorthand.

This is a very popular Class, proficiency in Shorthand having an immediate money value.

  During the Session Mr. BAINS delivered several lectures without receiving payinent therefor, in order that backward students might have an opportunity of reaching the standard of the rest of the Class.

8. Type-writing.

The Institute has received from various Government Departments five Type-writing Machines which can be utilised for key-board practice. These Machines reached the Institute too late to be of service during the Session. It has, however, been arranged that two Lectures on Type-writing shall be given next Session, in connexion with the Shorthand Class, and that facilities for practising upon the machines shall be afforded.

299

9. The following Tables are appended :---

List of Certificates granted. May, 1907.

"

I.

II.

Subscribers to Prize Fund.

III.

Shorthand Examination Results.

IV.

Number of Students in each Subject May, 1907.

V.

Staff and Subjects Taught during 1907.

VI.

Lectures and Attendances, for Session ending January 24th, 1908.

VII. Average Attendance.

VIII. Previous Education of Students.

IX.

Nationality of Students.

X.

Nationality in each Class.

XI. Occupations of Students.

XII. Expenditure and Revenue.

XIII. Time Table

Table I.

Subject.

CERTIFICATES GRANTED.

May, 1907.

Regular Attendance.

Passed

Passed

Examination. with Credit.

Building Construction I,

Machine Drawing I,

17

...

12

Mechanics 1,

Mathematics 1.

Do.

II,....

English I,

Do. II,

12

722

6

6

1

3

6

5

5

25

7

6

18

5

5

9

3

3

French 1.

Do. II..

German I,

Shorthand I.

10

15

6

9

4

4

16

5

5

Do.

II,

7

7

Book-keeping I,

10

5

4

Chemistry I,

7

1

3

Physics I,

8

2

3

Hygiene 1,

3

Total,..

168

58

77

300

wwwww+

Table II.

SUBSCRIBERS TO PRIZE FUND.

Hon. Sir PAUL CHATER, C.M.G.

Hon. Mr. A. W. BREWIN.

Mr. R. SHEWAN.

Mr. CHUN KING-YUE.

Mr. HIU SHUN-CHUN.

Mr. Ho FOOK.

Mr. Ho NgoK-LAU.

Mr. Họ TUNG.

Mr. LAU CHU-PAK. Mr. LEUNG PUI-CHI. Mr. LI Tsz-MING.

Mr. NG LI-HING.

Mr. TAM Tsz-KONG. Mr. TONG LAI-CHUN.

Table III.

Results of Shorthand Examination held under the auspices of the Pitman Institute.

London, May, 1907.

SPEED CERTIFICATE, OR FIRST CLASS.

Passed, Failed,

THEORY CERTIFICATE, OR SECOND CLASS.

Passed, Failed,

1

...0 Candidates.

.5

"

.2 Candidates.

..4

ELEMENTARY CERTIFICATE, OR Third Class.

.

Passed,

......9 Candidates.

Failed,

............1 Candidate.

Table IV.

Subject.

NUMBER OF STUDENTS IN EACH SUBJECT.

Session ending May 31st, 1907.

Stage.

January. March.

April.

May.

Building Constrution,.

....

I.

24

26

24

22

Machine Drawing,

Applied Mechanics,

Mathematics,

English,

I

13

15

15

13

22

I

22

17

15

13

A & B

34

34

30

27

I

27

24

22.

21

do.. French,

II

10

12

13

13

A

18

16

20

17

do,

B

11

10

10

7

German,

I

10

10

12

11

Shorthand,

I

18

23

23

24

do.,

II

9

10

א

8

Book-keeping,

I

14

12

13

10

do.,

II

6

4

4

3

Chemistry,

I

9

13

11.

10

Physics,

I

18

12.

11

9.

Japanese,

7

4

0

0

Commercial Arithmetic,

I

4

3 .

0

0

Hygiene,

I

5

4

3

3

Total,

258

248

233

211

Actual No. of Students, .

137

140

· 134

123

...

4

Commerce.

Engineering.

Subject.

301

Table V.

STAFF AND SUBJECTS TAUGHT.

Year ending January, 24th 1908.

Stage.

Lecturer.

Remarks.

Building Construction,..

Field Surveying,

Machine Drawing, Steam,

Applied Mechanics, Do.,

Mathematics,

Mr. T. L. Perkins, Assoc. M. Inst. C. E....

Do.,

From Oct.

10.

Mr. W. Tulip, Assoc. M. Inst. M. E.

Do.,

From Oct,

10.

I

Mr. W. H. Williams. F. C. S ; F. R. G. S.

11

I

{

A

Do., Do.,

From Oct. 10.

Until May 31.

B

Mr. A. R. Sutherland. M. A.

Do.,

II

Do.,

Mr. R. E. O. Bird. M. A.

English,.

Do., French,

I

Mr. H. L. O. Garrett. B. A.

Mr. G. P. de Martin. B. A.

II

I

Mr. B. Tanner. F. R. G. S. Mr. P. d'Agostini,

Do.,

Do.,

II

Madame Ribot,..

German, Do.,

Japanese,

I

Revd. Pastor Muller,

II

Do.,

I

Mr. K. Taguchi,

Shorthand,

Do.,

Book-keeping,

Do..

I

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

Mr. T. Swaby, .......

II

Mr. J. W. Bains,

I

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

Mr. A. E. Crapnell,

II

Mr. A. O. Brawn,

i Commercial Arithmetic,

I

Mr. W. H. Williams,

Chemistry. Theor.

I

Do.. Pract.

I

Physics,

I

Do.,

II

Do.,

Mr. E. Ralphs...

Hygiene

I

Mr. H. Sykes,

Mr. E. Ralphs. F. C. S; F. E. I. S.

Mr. F. Browne. F. C. S; F. I. C.

Mr. A. H. Crook. M. A; F. R. G. S.

From March 27. From Oct. 10. Until May 2.

From Oct.

...

10.

Until May 31. From Oct. 10.

From Oct. 10. J Discontinued in

March.

Until May 31. From Oct. 10.

Until March 15. From March 15. Discontinued in

April.

Until May 17. From March 17.

...

Until March 17. From March 17.

Sciencc.

302

Table VI.

LECTURES AND ATTENDANCES.

1st Session of Technical Institute, October 10th, 1907 to January 24th, 1908 (Chinese New Year)

Subject.

Stage.

Number of Lectures.

Duration.

Total Attendances.

Average Attendance.

Building Construction

I

30

14 hours.

500

16 6

Field Surveying..

I

6

Machine Drawing.

I

22

NN

2

73

12.1

"

2

295

13.4

""

Steam...

I

18

1 hour.

241

13.3

Applied Mechanics..

I

28

1

359

12.8

19

Do.

II

40

1

296

7.4

Mathematics

I

29

148

5.1

""

Do.

English Do.

French....

Do. German Do.

Shorthand Do.

II

29

143

4.9

I

58

1453

25.0

>>

II

44

518

11.7

"

I

28

391

13.9

II

27

143

5.2

"9

I

25

66

2.6

II

28

1

135

4.8

I

31

1

554

17.8

"}

II

31

1

196

6.3

""

Book-keeping

I

14

2

י

hours.

183

13.0

Chemistry Theor........

I

29

1

hour.

286

9.8

Do. Pract..

I

14

2 hours.

125

8.9

Physics

I

29

1 hour.

183

6.3

Do.

II

29

1

105

3.6

""

Subject.

Table VII.

AVERAGE ATTENDANCE.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

Lecturer.

Average Average Average Average Attendance Attendance Attendance Attendance October. November. December. January.

Building Cons. I

Field Surveying I

Steam I

Mechanics I

Mr. Perkins,

22.0

19.9

13.7

10.4

Do.,

13.0

12.6

11.0

Machine Drawing I

Mr. Tulip,

15.4

16.2

12.6

10.1

Do.,

15.0

16.1

13.7

8.8

Mr. Williams,

14.5

15.6

·12.0

9.3

Do. II

Do.,

6.7

8.6

7.6

6.2

Mathematics I

Mr. Sutherland,

7.8

6.4

3.3

3.6

Do.

Do.,

5.0

7.1

4.2

3.0

English I

Mr. de Martin,

32.2

31.4

23.7

18.8

Do.

Mr. Garrett,

29.0

27.2

19.8

14.6.

Do.

Mr. Tanner,

31.0

+

English II

Do.,

16.7

16.2

11.5

8.3

Do.

Mr. Garrett,

16.3

11.2

7.7

6.1

Do.

Mr. de Martin,...

16.5

12.6

11.6

8.0

French I

Mr. P. d'Agostini,.

14.5

15.2

15.0

11.3

Do. II

Madame Ribot,

5.0

6.5

5.0

4.1

German I

Do. II Shorthand I

II

Pastor Muller,

1.8

2.8

3.2

2.6

Do.,

5.0

5.2

4.7

4.1

Mr. Bains,

25.1

20.1

16.1

12.3

   Do. Book-keeping I Chemistry Theor.

Do.,

7.8

7.3

5.6

5.7

Mr. Brawn,

16.2

15.7

9.0

10.3

Mr. Browne,

10.6

10.2

8.7

10.0

Do. Pract.

Do..

9.0

10.2

8.2

7.3

Physics I

Mr. Crook,

7.8

6.5

5.4

6.1

Do. II

Do.,

3.1

4.5

2.8

4.0

303

Table VIII.

Where Educated.

PREVIOUS EDUCATION OF STUDENTS.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

No.

Where Educated.

No.

Hongkong.

Queen's College, Diocesan School,.

St. Joseph's College,

Ellis Kadoorie School,

Victoria British School,

St. Stephen's College,.

England,

16

94

India........

5

19

Manila,

3

15

Macao,

3

7

Austr·lia,

3

7

Singapore,

2

5

Honolulu,

2

Italian Convent,

4

Japan,

2

Belilios Public School,

Private Tutors,

Wantsai Government School,

Tsingtan,

1

St. Paul's College,

2

Tientsin,

I

Various,

12

U. S. A.,

1

Canada,

I

Total,

170

Table IX.

Total,...

42

NATIONALITY OF STUDENTS ON ROLL.

I.-During Session Ending May 31st, 1907.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

128

125

Total,

253

II.-During Session Ending January 24th, 1908.

Chinese,

Non-Chinese,

118

94

Total,

212

Commerce.

Engineering.

304

TABLE X.

NUMBER OF CHINESE AND NON-CHINESE IN EACH CLASS.

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

Class.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

(Building Construction I

25

3

Machine Drawing I

17

4

Steam I

17

6

Mechanics I

7

11

Do. II Mathematics I

Do.

II

Field Surveying

English I

Do. II French

I

Do. II

German I

Do. II

Shorthand I

Do. II

Book-keeping I

Chemistry Theor.....

Do. Physics I

Do. II

Pract...

7

1986

3

8

2

6

3

16

5

32

9

15

10

10

14

2

3

12017

4

27

9

12

5

5

2

1042 4

Science.

TABLE XI.

OCCUPATIONS OF STUDENTS.

UPATIONS

Session ending January 24th, 1908.

Occupation.

Number.

Occupation.

Number.

Clerks and Typists

93

Students

29

Store-keepers.

Merchants & Assistants

20

Engineers and Engineer Apprentices...

15

Book-keepers.

Military (R.A.M.C.)

Stenographers

3

3

2

1

Draughtsmen

14

Shroffs

1

Teachers

14

Telepraph Operators

1

Contractors

Interpreters

8

198

Compradores

Police Sergeants Naval Lieutenants

1

1

1

14

Total.

212

4

January 1st to May 31st... September 1st to December 31st

305

TABLE XII.

EXPENDITURE.

Personal Emoluments.

$ 2934.60 2841.00

TOTAL......

January 1st to May 31st.

Other Charges.

Crown Agents.

$ 435.27)

443.98

1100.36

$ 5775.60

$ 879.25

1100.36

$7755.21

REVENUE.

Class Fees

$ 757,00

Registration Fees Received

Do.

Refunded

$ 495.00 444.50

Balance

$ 50.50

50.50

October 1st to December 31st.

Class Fecs

Total

1377.00

$2184.50

Section.

*

Science.

Engineering.

Table XIII.

HONGKONG TECHNICAL INSTITUTE.

TIME TABLE OF CLASSES.

Subject.

Day.

Time.

Room.

Building Construction, Machine Drawing,

Steam....

Tuesday; Friday.

6-7.30 p.m. Basement.

Monday; Friday. Friday.

6-7

:3

7-8

"

Magnetism & Electricity.

Applied Mechanics, El....

Wednesday.

6-7

Wednesday.

7-8

17

Thursday.

6-7

""

Q. Coll. Lab.

No. 22.

21

Tuesday.

6-7

*

Adv.

Wednesday.

6-7

21

Thursday.

7.8

52

Practical Mathematics,

El...

Tuesday; Friday.

7.8

No. 14.

"

Adv.

Monday; Wednesday. 7-8

Field Surveying,.

By arrangement.

:

Monday; Tuesday.

6-7

No. 9.

English. Junior,

Thursday.

6-7

"

Friday.

7-8

Monday.

7-9

No. 7.

Senior,

Wednesday.

7-8

Friday.

9-10

::

French. Junior,

Senior,

Monday; Wednesday..

6-7

No. 8.

Monday; Wednesday. 7-8

21

German. Junior,

Senior, Shorthand. Junior,

Tuesday; Friday..

6-7

No. 7.

Tuesday; Friday,

7-8

"

Wednesday; Friday.

6-7

No. 15.

"

Senior, Book-keeping. Junior,...

Chemistry,

Wednesday; Friday. Thursday. Monday; Friday.

Tuesday.

7-8

6.8

32

9-10

(Govt. Clvil

""

Lab.

6-8

11

Q. Coll. Lab.

Physics. Junior,

Monday; Thursday.

6-7

""

**

Senior,

Monday; Thursday.

7-8

Commerce.

E. RALPHS,

Director.

306

Appendix D.

HYGIENE.

Report on the Study of Hygiene in Hongkong Schools 1907.

EXAMINATIONS FOR MASTERS.

Instruction in hygiene has been continued during the past year and this subject now figures in every school syllabus. Both masters and pupils have again offered themselves for examination in the subject though not to such an extent as in 1906. Eleven masters, 3 Europeans and 8 Chinese from the District Schools entered for the examination in hygiene held under the auspices of the local branch of the Royal Sanitary Institute in April last and four Messrs CURWEN, PARKIN, MORRIS and YOUNG HEE obtained certificates.

:

NEW PUBLICATIONS.

During the past year Dr. PEARSE's Manual on Hygiene has been translated into Chinese and is now in use in all the Vernacular Grant-in-Aid School.

STUDY OF THE SUBJECT IN SCHOOLS.

The subject is now being taught in all English and Anglo-Chinese Schools without exception. It is also a subject of study in all the Vernacular Grant Schools from Standard IV upwards. Test papers will be set at the next Annual Examination of the Vernacular Grant Schools for the first time. Table I shews the total number of pupils in English and Anglo-Chinese Schools under instruction in hygiene.

EXAMINATION OF SCHOOLS.

Early in the year Sir MATTHEW NATHAN who very generously provided the individual prizes for the Advanced and Elementary Courses in hygiene for two years, left the Colony, and it was decided to discontinue the competition in the Advance I Course. The individual prizes in the Team Competition for elementary hygiene were also given up at the same time. The shield however remained to be competed for. 7 tens only 6 from Boys' Schools and 1 from a Gir's' School as compared with 14 in 1906 entered for the competition held in December 1907, and the shield was again won by the Diocesan Boys School. Table I gives the schools in order of merit with an analysis of the number of marks obtaine 1. Several of the schools whose school year ends in June failed to enter this year on the ground that the schools which promoted at Christmas had their pupils under instruction in Standard V for a whole year before the competition and thus gained a very material advantage over them; others had possibly lost interest in the competition as the in lividual prizes were no longer offered. Before the next competition it is proposed to re-draft the rules governing the eligibility of candidates for the Team Competition and it is to be hoped that greater interest in the Competition will be shown. Government and Grant Schools which enter teams for the Competition are under certain conditions exempt from any further examination. in hygiene during the ensuing twelve months.

  Examinations in hygiene will in future be conducted at the time of the Annual Inspec- tion at all schools which enter no team for the Shield Competition or which fail to obtain 40 per cent. of marks in this Competition.

20th March, 1908.

E. D. C. WOLFE.

Inspector of Schools.

Queen's College,

St. Joseph's College,.

Diocesan Boys',

Saiyingpun,

Yaumati,

Ellis Kadoorie,

Wantsai.

Italian Convent,

Diocesan Girls',

St. Stephen's....

Belilios School,

French Convent, St. Mary's,

...

Kowloon School,

Fairlea,

307

TABLE I.

Numbers Instructed in Hygiene in 1907.

School.

Victoria School,

Anglo-Portuguese School,

Total,...

School.

TABLE II.

A Elementary Course.

B Advanced

Total.

Course.

720

250

970

140

40

180

140

32

172

170

170

85

85

...

72

12

84

74

74

53

· 20

73

45

6

51

50

50

8

12

20

11

6

17

17

17

10

10

4

10

6

6

5

5

1,594

400

1,994

Results of Examination, December 1907.

ELEMENTARY COURSE.

Sum of Marks of Candidates.

Max. 100.

Total

Max.

700

Number of

Candicates.

Average Marks

%

Average Age of

Candidates.

Field of

Selection.

Question

I

II

III

64

77

EF

IV

V

VI

VII

77

+

74

78

520

10

74.28

13

95

Diocesan Boys',.

62

Saiyingpun,

7222242

69

64

37

78

39

89

459 10

65.57

173 174

75

64

80

61

67 54

58

459

10

65.57 17

95

Yaumati,

68

Ellis Kadoories,

43

8

62

51

70

Wantsai,

52

66 50

69

Diocesan Girls',

48

56

Queen's College,

33

59

60

78 28

60

76

60

425

10

60.71

14

78

62

60

51

411

10

58.71 16

66

53 27

48

53

354

10 50.57 13

35

35

48

34

49

318

10.

45.42

17

120

The figures in Red are over 60 % of full marks; those in Black type under 40 %.

Remarks.

No. 14.

DIEU

E

·

MON DROIT

SUPPLEMENT

ΤΟ

The Hongkong Government Gazette

Of FRIDAY, the 17th of JÚLY, 1908.

Published by Authority:

REPORTS ON THE HEALTH AND SANITARY CONDITION OF THE COLONY OF HONGKONG, FOR THE YEAR 1907.

To be laid before the Legislative Council by Command of His Excellency the Governor, July 23rd, 1908.

Table of Contents:

GENERAL REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER

AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,

Table

Table

Table

Page.

313

I.-Return shewing the Number and Causes of Deaths registered

during the year ended the 31st day of December, 1907,...... 332

II. Cases of Notifiable Disease recorded in each month of the year, 344

III.-List of Prosecutions during the year,

ANNEXE A.-PLAGUE MEASures,

345

346

ANNEXE B.-REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, CIVIL HOSPITAL,

348

Table

I.-Admissions and Deaths in the Civil Hospital during each

month of the year 1907,....

352

Table

II.-Diseases and Deaths in the Civil Hospital during 1907,

353

Table III.-Operations performed in the Civil Hospital in 1907,

355

310

Page.

Table

Table

IV.-Monthly Admissions and Deaths in Maternity Hospital,......... 356

V.-Admissions into and Deaths in the Civil Hospital from the

Police during the last ten years,

Table VI. Sick Rate and Mortality Rate in the Different Sections of the

Police for the past ten years,

357

357

Table VII.-Monthly Admissions and Deaths from the Police Force in the

Civil Hospital in 1907,

×

357

Table VIII.-Admissions for Malarial Fever from each Police Station

during each month of the year,

Table

....

358

IX.-Admissions for Malarial Fever from the most important Police

Stations in the New Territories compared with Strength,.... 358

}

ANNEXE C.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN

HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN,

CHARGE OF THE

VICTORIA

............. 359

Table

I.-Diseases and Deaths in the Victoria Hospital in 1907,

361

Table

II.-Average daily number of Inmates of the Victoria Hospital during each month of the years 1905, 1906 and 1907,

... 362

ANNEXE D.-REPORT ON THE LUNATIC ASYLUM,...

363

Table

I.-Diseases and Deaths,

365

Table

II.-Birth Places and Diseases of those under treatment,

366

Table III.-Occupation of those under treatment,

367

ANNEXE E.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE HOSPITALS FOR

INFECTIOUS DISEASES,

Table

I.-Diseases treated at Kennedy Town Hospital,

Table II.-Diseases treated on board the Hulk "Hygeia",

368

371

371

ANNEXE F.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER TO VICTORIA GAOL,

Table I.-Diseases and Deaths in Victoria Gaol Hospital,

Table II.-Rate of Sickness and Mortality in Victoria Gaol,.

372

373

373

Table

....

III.-Number and Results of Vaccinations in Victoria Gaol during

the past ten years,

374

Table IV.-General Statistics connected with Victoria Gaol and the Gaol

Hospital during the past ten years,

374

ANNEXE G.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER TO THE KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY,. 375

܆

311

Page.

ANNEXE H.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER AT TAIPO,

377

Table

I.-Diseases treated at the Dispensary,

378

Table

II.-Return of Diseases and Deaths in the Cottage Hospital during

1907,

378

ANNEXE I-REPORT OF THE INSPECTING MEDICAL OFFICER TO THE TUNG WAH

HOSPITAL,

Table

Table

X

379

I.---Diseases and Deaths in the Tung Wah Hospital during the year, 381 II.-Admissions and Mortality in the Tung Wah Hospital, during the year, with the proportion of cases treated by European and Chinese methods respectively,..

382

Table

III.-General Statistics relating to the Tung Wah Hospital during

the year,

383

Table

IV. Vaccinations at, and in connection with, the Tung Wah

Hospital during the year,

383

REPORT ON THE OPHTHALMIC DEPARTMENT OF THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

BY DR. HARSTON,.....................

384

ANNEXE J.-REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ALICE MEMORIAL

AND NETHERSOLE HOSPITALS,

....

387

Table

Table

I.-Alice Memorial Hospital-Return of Diseases and Deaths,...... 387 II. Alice Memorial Maternity Hospital-Return of Diseases and

Deaths,

388 -

Table III.-Nethersole Hospital-Return of Diseases and Deaths,......

389

ANNEXE K.-REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGIST,

390

Table

I.-Vaccine Statistics,

391

Table

II.-Free Issues of Vaccine during 1907,

391

Table III.-Water Examination,

392

Table

IV.-Material examined for infectious diseases of man,

392

Table

V.-Examinations for infectious diseases of animals,

392

Table

VI.-Examinations for Rat Plague,

392

Table VII.-Tumours Examined,

393

REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY,

394

Table

I.-Epitome of Causes of Death,

394

Table I (a).-General Diseases,..

394

Table I (b).-Local Diseases,

395

312

Table I (c).-Injuries (Deaths from Violence),

Table

II.-Nationality of Bodies,.....

III.-Cancer at Autopsies,

Table

Table IV. Attendances at the Courts,

Page.

396

396

396

396

ANNEXE L.-REPORT ON THE PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON,

397

Table

I.-Return of Causes of Death,

397

Table I (a).-General Diseases,

398

Table I (b).-Local Diseases,

398

.....

399

Table I (c).-Injuries,

Table IL-Nationality and Causes of Death of cases other than Chinese,.... 399

ANNEXE M.-REPORT OF THE GOVERNMENT ANALYST,.......

400

ANNEXE N.-REPORT OF THE COLONIAL VETERINARY SURGEON,..........

404

ANNEXE O.-REPORT OF THE SANITARY SURVEYOR,

Table

I. Drainage and Re-drainage,.

Table

II.-Repairs or Additions,

....

Table

III.-Plans Received,

408

410

410

.....

411

ANNEXE P.-REPORT OF THE HEALTH OFFICER OF THE PORT,

412

Table

I.-Numbers of Vessels arriving and leaving Port with the numbers

of Emigrants,

413

Table

II.-Numbers of Emigrants Examined, with the Rejections and

Ports of Destination,

414

Table

III. Quarantine Chart,

414

Table IV.-Emigration from Hongkong,

414

:

313

GENERAL REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL CIVIL MEDICAL OFFICER

1

AND THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH,

FOR THE YEAR 1907.

C

AREA.

  The Sanitary Board's jurisdiction extends to the Island of Hongkong, which has an area of 29 square miles, and to that portion of territory on the inainland between the shore and the first range of the Kowloon Hills extending from the village of Tseung Kwan O in Junk Bay, on the East, to the village of Kau Pa Hang on the West-with a sea frontage of about thirteen miles and an area of about sixteen square miles. Old Kow- loon, with an area of about 24 square miles, has been in British occupation since 1861, but New Kowloon was leased to this Government in 1898 only, as part of what is known as the New Territories. The remainder of the New Territories is not under the jurisdiction of the Sanitary Board.

}

The City of Victoria, built on the Northern shore of the Island of Hongkong, has a frontage to the sea of nearly five miles and is separated from the opposite mainland of Kowloon by the Harbour, which is rather less than a mile and a third wide opposite the centre of the City and widens out to somewhat over three miles at its widest part, con- tracting again at Lyemun Pass on the East to little more than a quarter of a mile in width.

The domestic buildings of the City of Victoria number 9,672 exclusive of Barracks and Police Stations, of which 976 are Non-Chinese dwellings, while there are also 162 European dwellings in the Hill District. The number of new houses completed during the year was as follows:-City of Victoria 90, Kowloon 28, Outlying districts 21, and Peak 3, making a total of 142.

In addition to the above there were erected miscellaneous buildings such as offices, godowns, etc., to the number of 70.

GENERAL SANITARY CONDITION.

In connection with anti-plague measures to ren ler as far as possible houses rat-proof, 370 ground surfaces in houses have been repaired and 1,201 buildings have had rat-runs filled up with cement. In addition 44 basements illegally inhabited have been vacated, while permits for the use of 58 basements and for 147 basement kitchens have been issued and 9 basements have been altered to fulfil legal requirements.

Open spaces in the rear have been provided to 16 existing houses, while modifications in regard to such open spaces or backyards have been allowed in the case of 20 houses and small obstructions therein allowed in 112 others. Exemption from the provision of a yard has been granted in the case of 19 houses, and obstructions have been removed from backyards, under notice, in 181 houses.

In addition to the above improvements carried out under the supervision of the Sanitary Department various other permanent improv nents have been effected by the Public Works Department. These include the training of nullahs to the extent of 4,346 feet, the build- ing of a public latrine in the Old Western Market, and the resumption and demolition of one house and of portions of two others.

   A considerable improvement is always taking place in the matter of scavenging lanes but the full effect of the Ordinance in this respect will not be noticeable for a considerable number of years. Nevertheless the total area of lanes obtained for scavenging purposes during the year has been 13,771 sq. ft., the length being 2,629' 5".

During the year three wells, the water of which was unsatisfactory, were closed by order of the Sanitary Board, while one Government well was also closed on account of pollution of the water.

year :

314

METEOROLOGICAL RETURN.

The following Table records the meteorological conditions which prevailed during the

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

TEMPERATURE.

HUMIDITY.

Max. Mean. Min. Rel.

Abs.

Cloudiness.

Sunshine.

WIND.

Rain.

Dir.

Vel.

ins.

O

о

о

p. c.

ins.

p. c. hours. ins.

Points.

miles p. h.

January,

February, 30.14 61.8

30.16 66.3 61.4

57.0

69

0.38

44

195.8 3.445

E by N

12.4

58.7

55.2

75

0.38

80

96.5 0.165

E by N

15.3

March,................... 30.08 68.4

63.8 59.7 80

April,

29.96 72.9

69.2 65.7 84

8888

0.50

80

86.8 0.335

E by N

12.8

0.61

86

78.3 11.755

E

13.5

May,

29.85 80.6

76.2

73.0

82

0.74

77

164.0 11.280

E by S

13.9

June,

29.75

84.3

79.9

76.4 80

0.82

72

181.0 13.170

SE by E

11.6

July,

29.74

87.1 82.5

79.1

80

0.88

72

210.5 7.385

S by E

10.3

August,

29.70

86.7

81.9

78.3

81

0.88

62.

222.5 14.855

E by S

11.7

September,

29.81

85.1

80.6

76.6

78

0.82

59

187.9 19.465

E

11.3

October, ....

29.96

83.4 79.0 75.4 80

0.79

66

191.2 8.965

E

13.6

November, 30.08

76.0 71,5

67.5

73

0.57 73

122.9 1.265 NE by E

12.0

December, 30.19 67.0 61.9 57.2

63

0.35

59

165.5 1.460 NE by E

12.4

Mean or Total 29.95

Total

76.6 72.2 68.4 77

0.64 69

1902.9 93.545| E

12.6

The rainfall for last year therefore

The average annual rainfall during the ten years ending 1897 was 92.6 inches, while for the decade ending 1907 it has fallen to 77-3 inches. (93.5 inches) is well above the average of recent years.

POPULATION. ↑

The population of the Colony exclusive of the New Territories at the Census taken on November 20th, 1906, was as follows;

Non-Chinese Civil Community,.

Chinese:

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island),......174,937

Villages of Hongkong,

Old Kowloon,

New Kowloon,...

Floating population,

Mercantile Marine,

Army,

Navy,

Total Chinese Population,..

12,415

17,032

52,331

17,836

42,744

2,508

307,388

4,537

4,298

....... 328,638

Total Population of the Colony, exclusive of New Territories.

(except New Kowloon) in 1906,

At the Census taken in 1901 the Civil population of the Colony, exclusive of the New Territories, was 283,975, so that the increase in the Civil population during this period has been 17,992 exclusive of New Kowloon and the rest of the New Territories.

:

315

The estimated population to the middle of 1907 is as follows:-

Non-Chinese Civil Community,...................................

Chinese :-

City of Victoria (including Peak and Stonecutters' Island).......175,740

12,700

Villages of Hongkong,

16,660

Kowloon,

71,950

Floating population,......

43,530

Mercantile Marine,

2,700

Total Chinese Civil Population,

310,580

Army (average strength),

3,920

Navy (average strength),

2,157

Total Population of the Colony in 1907 exclusive of the New Territories (except New Kowloon),

329,357

   The Chinese population of the New Territories (exclusive of New Kowloon) was 85,011 at the Census taken in 1901 but there are no data as yet on which to base an estimate of the increase in population (if any) in this portion of the Colony since that date.

   The average strength of the troops in Garrison during 1907 was 98 British Officers and 1,461 British N. C. O.s and men with 36 Indian Officers and 1.833 Indian N. C. O.s and men, and 54 Chinese attached to the Royal Engineers. There was also 370 British women and children, and 68 Indian women and children, making a total of 438.

   The average strength of the British fleet was as follows:-Europeans permanently in the Colony 130, Europeans occasionally in the Colony 5.550, Chinese permanently in the Colony 130, Chinese occasionally in the Colony 130-making a total of 5,950. For the purpose of estimating the population it is consid rel a fair average to include one-third only of those "occasionally" resident in the Colony; this gives 2,157 and of these 173 are Chinese.

   The Chinese boat population (exclusive of the New Territories), is estimated for 1907 as 43,530 and the number of boats belonging to the Port and the villages of Hongkong, is as follows:-

Passenger boats, Cargo boats,...........

Steam-launches,

Lighters,

Harbour boats,.

Fishing boats,

Trading junks,

2,555

1,764

266

186

1,415

6,935

2,666

15,787

    The number enumerated at the Census taken in November 1906 was 6,459 but this was only a month after the great Typhoon by which many of these boats were destroyed. There are in addition 9,119 boats in the New Territories.

The population of the Colony is primarily divided into Chinese and Non-Chinese. The Non-Chinese comprised at the Census of 1906 a white population of 12,925 of whom 6,085 were civilians while 4,429 belonged to the Navy and 2,411 to the Army. The coloured races (Non-Chinese) numbered 8,500 and included East Indians, Asiatic Portuguese, Japanese, Filipinos, Malays, Africans, Persians and a few others. The Table on page 12 shows a similar classification of the Non-Chinese population for the year 1907 and from this it will be seen that the total Non-Chinese population for 1907-inclusive of Army and Navy-is estimated at 18,550 while the total Chinese population-inclusive of Army and Navy is estimated at 310,807.

316

The Civil population consists chiefly of male adults. At the last Census (1906) the population of males was 701 per cent of the total civil population; at the 1901 Census the proportion was 72.6 per cent, so there has been an increase in the proportion of females. (which means an increase in family life among the Chinese) during the past few years.

Of the Chinese population in 1906 70-3 per cent. were males, and over half the civil population (56.9 per cent. of the Chinese and 52.6 per cent. of the Non-Chinese) were between the ages of 20 and 45 years.

The City of Victoria is divided into ten health districts with a Sanitary Inspector in charge of each district. During the year under review these ten districts were grouped into five larger districts of two each and a Senior Inspector had general supervision and control of the sanitary work in each of such groups.

  Similarly Kowloon had one Senior Inspector with two District Inspectors under his supervision.

At the end of the year it was decided to abolish the special functions of the Senior Inspectors and to make each District Inspector directly answerable to the Me lical Officer of Health or to one of the Assistant Melical Officers of Health. It is proposed to have at third Inspector for Kowloon. This will enable the staff of Inspectors to be somewhat reduced in number.

There are also four Plague Inspectors in the City of Victoria, two of whom have charge. of three districts each, and there is one Plague Inspector for Kowloon.

The supervision of the sanitary work in the villages of Hongkong aud in Kowloon City and Sham Shui Po is done by the Police Inspectors in their respective districts.

The following Table shows the number of Chinese houses and floors and the inmates per house and per floor in the City of Victoria as estimated for the year 1907.

City of One Two Three Four Five Total Victoria. storey storey storey storey storey Dwell- Health Dwell- Dwell-Dwell- Dwell- Dwell- ings. District. ings. ings. ings. ings. ings.

Average Total

No. of Floors. Floors per Dwelling.

Number of

persons per Dwelling.

Number of

persons per Floor.

1

2

161 425 214 32 Nil.

3 351 573 82 Nil. 1,009

832

1,781 2,752

2.1

14.8

6.9

2.7

20.1

7.4

Most of the Chinese of

50

3

Nil.

11

18 Nil.

Nil.

29

76

2.6

this district live in quarters

attached to offices.

4

5

∞ 2

8

49

566 430

9 1,062

3,569

3.3

22.1

6.6

132

463 321

46 964

3,169

3.3

18.2

5.5

I

6

46

48 437

369

25

925 3,054

3.3

16.9

5.1

7

23

49

445

337

24

918

3,084

3.4

20.2

6.0

8

6

83 616 302

3 1,010 3,243

3.2

18.0

5.6

9

10

28 470 504 69 362 338 80

96

Nil.

1,098 2,864

2.6

22.9

8.7

Nil. 849 2,127

2.5

16.6

6.6

Total and Averages

1907 ... Total and Averages 1906

3461,980 4,174 2,049

107 8,696 25,719

2.8

20.0

6.8

3011,905 4,143 2,050

104 8,503 25,296

2.9

20.4

6.9

317

  The following Table shows the acreage of the City Health Districts with the houses and population in each such district as estimated for the year 1907.

Health Districts.

Total Acreage.

Built-over Chinese

Areas in Dwellings

Acres.'

Non-

Chinese Chinese Population. Chinese

per Acre Dwellings.

Population. (built-over).

Non-

Person

1.....

531

134

832

159

12,364

975

99

2

243

140

1,009

73

20,1951.929 troops

1,594

169

3......

232

137

29

422

8,980

2,695

85

4...

56

53

1,062

163

23,454

1,120

466

5.......

29

27

964

62

17,580

380

665

6.........

30

27

925

15

15,662

330

592

36

31

918

7

18,520

100

606

8........

49

47

1,010

5

18,200

230

393

9.......

44

44

1,098

16

25,000

140

576

10......

252

106

849

54

14,130

310

144

Total 1907... 1,502

746

:

8,696

976

174,085

9,803

246

""

1906... 1,523

746

8,503

982

173,289

9.507

245

The number of Chinese living at the Peak and Stonecutters' Island is estimated at 1,655.

into

which Kowloon is

The following Table shows the distribution of the Chinese population of Kowloon according to Houses and Floors in the different sub-districts divided :-

Kowloon sub- districts.

One storey Two storey Three storey Four storey Dwellings Dwellings

Dwellings

Chinese.

Dwellings

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Total Dwellings.

Total Floors.

Average Number of Floors per Chinese Dwelling.

Chinese Population.

Number of Persons per

Chinese Dwelling.

Number of Persons per

Chinese Floor.

Area in Acres.

1.....

:

176

8

...

184 376

2.0

1,149-

108

:.

:

3.

4.......

30

2

:

17 70

73

319

2 371

65 1319

91

7

CO

166 560

3.4

3,510 24.5

6.9

126

:

791 2,127 2.7 18,680 23.6 8.8

198

7........ 595

8.......... 940

9...... 636

...

219

48 2

5........

6...

29985

20

155 13 13

49

163

69292

446 5

++

4

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

394 1,119 2.8 8,872 22.5

7.9

163

201

395

:

1.9 4,849 25.8

13.1

319

22

595| 1,477

2.5 11,560 21.9

8.6 323

1,050 1,509 1.4 10,350 9.9

1,159 1,378 1.4

6.9 2,758

8,290

7.1

6.0 2,068

686 736 1.1 4,690 6.8

6.4 732

Total 1907. 2,250

1906.. 2,248

1,415 285 1,069 1,407 285 1,067

oc co

8

193

8 193 6 5,226 9,677 5,214 9,653

1.8 71,950 14.6 7.9 6,795 1.8 70,167 14.3 7.8 6,795

318

   Sub-districts 7 and 8 are in New Kowloon, the remainder comprise the whole of Old Kowloon. The Non-Chinese population of Old Kowloon at the 1906 Census was 2,269 civilians and 2.215 troops, most of whom reside in sub-districts 1 and 2, while the Non- Chinese population of New Kowloon was 47.

BIRTHS.

The births registered during the year were as follows:-

Males.

Females.

Total.

Chinese, Non-Chinese,

....736

388

1,124

...161

135

296

Total 1907.....

.897

523

1,420

1906.....

.845

476

1,321

This gives a general birth-rate of 4:31 per 1,000 as compared with 404 per 1,000 in 1906 and 341 per 1,000 in 1905.

The birth-rate amongst the Non-Chinese community was 15.95 per 1,000 as compared with 14:06 per 1,000 in 1906 and 17:03 in 1905.

The nationalities of the Non-Chinese parents were as follows:-British 122, Indian 40, German 11, French 1, American 1, Portuguese 79, Filipino and Malay 20, Japanese 1, Jewish 6, Dutch 3, Parsee 4, Swedish 2, Roumanian 2, Brazilian 2, Swiss 1 and Dane 1.

The number of Chinese births registered does not give an accurate record of the num- ber of births which have occurred. Owing to the custom of the Chinese of not registering births unless the child has survived for a month and often in the case of female children not at all, it is probable that the majority if not all of the infants which are sickly at birth or die before they have lived 1 month have not had their births registered. It is customary, therefore, to assume that all children of 1 month old and under who are admitted to the various convents (being brought there sick by poor people) and all children found dead in the streets, harbour, hillsides, etc., by the police, have been born in the Colony but not registered. By adding the number of such children to the number of the registered births a somewhat more correct number of births is obtained and from this is calculated a corrected birth-rate.

The number of such children in 1907 was 510 males and 873 females, total 1,383, which being added to the registered births, makes a total of 2,803 as compared with 1,904 in 1906. The corrected birth-rate is therefore 8:51 while amongst the Chinese community alone the rate becomes 8·06 instead of 3-62 per 1,000.

The preponderance of male over female registered births is very marked amongst the Chinese, there being 189 males to 100 females; in 1906 the proportion was 199 males to 100 females. With the 1,383 above mentioned unregistered births however the proportion falls to 99 inales to 100 females.

In the Non-Chinese community the proportion of male births to female births for 1907 was 119 to 10 as compared with 122 to 100 in 1906, 103 to 100 in 1905, 83 to 100 in 1904 and 111 to 100 in 1903 and 1902 respectively.

DEATHS.

The deaths registered during the year numbered 7,286. The death-rate was therefore 22.12 per 1,000. These deaths include 198 from Plague.

The following Table gives the death-rates during the past five Census years :---

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

1881

18.22

24.45

1891

18.20

24.18

1896

19.91

24.75

1901

20.50

23.77

1906.

14.02

26.41

319

   The total number of deaths amongst the Chinese community was 6,999 which gives a death-rate of 22.52 per 1,000.

The deaths registered amongst the Non-Chinese community numbered 287 of which 255 were from the Civil population, 24 from the Army and 8 from the Navy.

This gives a death-rate for the Non-Chinese community of 15:46 per 1,000.

The nationalities of the deceased were as follows:-British 73, Indian 85, Portuguese 58, German 12, Japanese 17, American 6, Malay 10, French 4, Italian 4, Spanish 2, Austrian 3, Swedish 3, Danish 3, African 2, Norwegian, Dutch, Brazilian, Javanese and Jew 1 each.

The following Table gives the causes of the 25 deaths registered during the year as having occurred among the Troops :-

}

British Troops.

Indian Troops.

Enteric Fever,..

Plague,

1

Influenza,

Dysentery,

1

Tonsillitis,

1

Malarial Fever,

3

Heart Disease,

1

Sprue,

3

Hepatitis,

Auæmia,

2

Acute Nephritis,.

1

A poplexy,

2

Fracture of Skull,

1

Hæmorrhage-Wound of Neck,.. 1

Drowning,

1

13

10

Indian Women and Children.

Nil.

British Women and Children.

Chinese Troops.

Eclampsia Neonatorum,......... 1

Phthisis,

1

....

1

1

The 8 deaths occurring in the China Squadron which were registered in the Colony were as follows :-

Enteric Fever,....

Heat Apoplexy,

Cervical Abscess-Septicæmia,

Drowning,

1

1

1

1

1

Undefined (body decomposed when discovered)..

1

Otitis Media,

Fracture of Skull,

320

   The deaths of persons employed in the Mercantile Marine or in Foreign Navies which were registered in the Colony were 31 and their causes as follows:--

Enteric Fever,.

5

Rupture of Urethra,

Dysentery,

2

Alcoholism,

1

1

Small-pox

1

Phthisis,

Diarrhoea,

1

Pneumonia,

Malaria,

1

Empyæma,

222

Heart Disease,.

3

Gangrene of Foot,

1

Cancer of Stomach,

1

Beri-beri,

2

Cancer of Tonsil,

Tetanus,

1

....

Bright's Disease,

2

General Paralysis of the Insane, 1

....

Fracture of Skull,

The total number of deaths therefore which occurred amongst the Non-Chinese resident civil population was 224 and allowing 1,500 for the Non-Chinese floating population this gives a death-rate of 20.00 per 1,000 for the resident Non-Chinese civil population.

Table I shows the number and causes of deaths registered during the

year.

  The following Table of population, births and deaths is given for the purpose of ready comparison with similar tables given in the reports from other Colonies :-

Europeans and Whites.

Africans.

East Indians.

Chinese Mixed

and

and Malays. Coloured.

TOTAL.

Number of Inhabitants in 1907

10,025

13

4,102 311,057

4,160

329,357

of Births

in

152

33

...

44

1,144

80

1,420

""

of Deaths

of Immigrants in

of Emigrants in

""

...

of Inhabitants in 1906

(Census Report)

in

25

114

2

85

7,009

76

7,286

145,822

:

**

105,967

...

Increase,

12.525

13

4,229

307,701

4,170

328,638

3,356

719

07

Decrease,..

2,500

127

10

  The figures for 1906 given in last year's Report showed an excess of 400 over the figures shown above, due to an error in the preliminary Census report which was subsequently corrected.

  The decrease in the number of Europeans and Whites is due to the fact that when the Census was taken there were two British regiments in the Colony and a number of ships of the China Squadron were in the Harbour. The figures for 1907 give the estimated average number of inhabitants of the Colony.

  The small decrease in the number of East Indians is similarly due to a reduction in the number of the Indian troops resident in the Colony.

321

AGE DISTRIBUTION OF DEATHS.

The number of deaths of infants under one year of age was 1,606 or 22:9 per cent. of the total deaths, as compared with 194 per cent. in 1906 and 23.3 per cent. in 1905.

    The Infant Mortality amongst the Non-Chinese community during the year was 87 per 1,000 as compared with 157 per 1,000 in 1906 and 119 per 1,000 in 1905.

    Among the Chinese population the known deaths of infants numbered 1,580, while only 1,124 Chinese births were registered. Taking the corrected birth figure to be 2,803 this gives an infant mortality of 564 per thousand. The Census return for 1906 showed 1,329 Chinese infants under one year of age, and 14,980 Chinese children between the ages of one year and five years, it is very evident therefore that the majority of these children are not born in the Colony but are brought here from the mainland of China.

DISEASES.

Respiratory Diseases.

The total number of deaths from these diseases for the year was 1,825 of which 34 were among the Non-Chinese community leaving 1,791 among the Chinese population; 365 out of this total occurred in infants under one year of age.

     Phthisis alone accounts for 669 deaths of which 655 were Chinese. 689 deaths of which 680 were Chinese.

Pneumonia caused

    The death-rate among the Chinese from Respiratory Diseases was 5'8 per 1,000 as compared with 5.1 per 1,000 in the previous year and 44 per 1,000 in 1905; that for Phthisis alone was 2.1 per 1,000 as compared with 2-6 per 1,000 in 1906. The heavy death- rate from Pneumonia suggests that possibly some of them inay have been occasione l by the Plague bacillus.

    The deaths from Phthisis amongst the Chinese were 9.6 per cent. of the total deaths amongst that community.

Nervous Diseases.

The number of deaths under this heading for the year 1907 was 522 of which 424 old or were of Chinese children under 5 years of age, 290 of these being infants of one year less. These deaths of Chinese infants comprise 207 deaths from Tetanus, Trismus and Con- vulsions, 82 deaths from Meningitis and one from Hydrocephalus. The figures compare very favourably with those of the previous year, when the total deaths under this heading amounted to 746.

Malarial Fever.

    The total number of deaths from Malarial Fever during the year was 579 of which 18 were Non-Chinese, 14 being from the civil population, one from the Mercantile Marine and 3 from the Troops.

In the City the districts in which there has been most Malaria are Health Districts. 2 and 9 with 25 and 34 deaths respectively, the total number for the whole City being 138.

In the whole of Kowloon there were 191 deaths, while in the villages of Hongkong there were 203 deaths from this disease.

   Anti-malarial measures were first inaugurated in this Colony in 1899 although the work proceeded very slowly for the first year or two.

YEAR.

322

  The following Table shows the admissions for Malaria to our two largest Hospitals during the past ten years :-

Admissions to Hospital for Malaria.

Government

Admissions.

Deaths.

Civil.

Tung Wa

Case-mortal-

Totals.

Hospital.

Hospital.

ity per cent.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Govt. Civil

Hospital.

Tung Wa

Hospital.

1898,

344

4

521 122 865 126

1.2 23.4

1899,

475

5

305

58 780. 63

1.0

19.0

Average admis-

sions 982.

1900,

679

4

541

159 1,220

163

0.6

29.4

Average deaths

122.

1901,

787

10

507

122 1,294 132

1.3

24.1

1902.

349

9

403

119 752

128

2.6

29.5

1903,

347

2

221

61

568

63

0.6

27.6

1904,

221

2

212

56

433

58

0.9

26.4

Average admis

sions 490.

1905,

266

6

153

48

419

54

2.2 31.4

Average deaths

74.

1906,

233

7

248

96

481

103

3.0

38.7

1907,

247

305

87 552

95 3.2

28.5

The Police admissions to Hospital for Malaria are shown in the following Table :---

Police Admisions to Hospital for Malaria.

From rest of

Total.

Average strength of Police Force.

Percentage of strength.

From the City. the Colony.

1898.

121

630

19

1899,

239

770

31

..

1900,

167

223

390

929

12

1901,

243

164

407

920

44

1902,

121

55

176

919

19

1903,

83

84

167

921

18

1904,

40

67

107

993

11

1905,

42

85

127

1,018

12

1906,

37

37

74

1,047

7

1907,

40

65

105

1,049

10

Average

Average

9.II

31

H

$

323

The next Table shows the total deaths in the Colony from Malaria during each of the past ten years, and from this it will be seen that the average number of deaths has fallen from 526 in the quinquennium 1898 to 1902 to 383 in the quinquennium 1903 to 1907, in spite of the fact that during the same time the population of the Colony has increased from 254,400 to 329,357.

Total Deaths from Malaria.

Deaths in the

Total

YEAR.

City (Chinese

Deaths.

only).

1898,

280

530

1899,

218

546

1900,

242

555

1901,

281

574

1902,

189

425

1903,

152

300

1904,

90

301

1905,

87

287

1906,

134

448

1907,

138

579

Average

Average

383

526

Rainfall in inches.

Total number

of wet days.

57.0

152

72.7

128

73.7

155

55.8

152

97.5

142

93.6

142

80.4

144

70.9

156

77.8

159

93.5

161

The deaths of Chinese in the City of Victoria are shown separately in the foregoing Table, which also includes a statement of the rainfall and of the number of wet days in each year, and some relation to the incidence of Malaria may be traced by a comparison of the

two statements.

   The increase visible in the last two years has certainly been due in part to the cases sent in from the Railway works in the New Territories to the various City Hospitals, but as will be seen from Dr. HARTLEY's report the incidence of Malarial Fever cases amongst the Railway employees has very much diminished since the daily prophylactic use of 5 grains of quinine was instituted in July last.

   In the following Table is shown the seasonal incidence of the deaths from Malaria and it will be seen that the largest average number of deaths belongs to the months of October and November, while during the early months of the year the death-rate is lightest. The rainy season here extends from April to September, but there are occasional showers during the autumn, and it must be remembered that the heaviest death-incidence would naturally be later, by a month or two at least, than the heaviest case-incidence of the disease.

!

321

Seasonal Incidence of Deaths from Malaria.

1898. 1899. 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1904.

1905. 1906. 1905. 1906. 1907. Averages

January,

40

28 37

37

30

30

24

10

24 38

29

February,

41

36

34

46

20

18

10

00

16

22

25

March,.

46

33

43

34

20

April,.

20

44

41

36

19

20

20

23

14

11

33

27

27

17

26

13

29

27

May,

26

73

26

52

34

June,

34

69

17

38

32

July,

45

27

32

30

August,

58

34

50

43

September,

58

47

52

55

October...

65

45

70

82

2 2 3 3 3

21

16

19

10

28

14

27

49

23

55

30

34

28

40

35

32

NO NO NO & N

29

27

31

35

21

25

26

NAHA 3 3

37

34

25

45

32

31

45

31

58

66

45

66

56

46

85

65

54

November,.

48

60

95

62

48

27

28

36

44

88

53

December,..

49

50

58

59

75

32

31

26

48

55

48

Totals,

530 546 555

574

425 300

301

287 448

579

An examination of the subjoined statistics of deaths occurring in each Health District for the past four years will reveal the localities in which further measures of prevention are desirable:-

Deaths of Chinese from Malaria classified into Health Districts.

City of Victoria.

1

N

3

4

7 8

9

10

Unknown.

Sumpujõuṛ anoqJE]],

Kowloon boat

population.

Peak.

Kowloon.

Villages.

1904,

12

15

.10

9

со

2 7 7 13 7

5

7

0

63 129

1905,

24 12 2 8

to

2

14 8 5 10

1 102 83

1906,

1907,

14 25 3 12 9 9

22 19 10 8 13 9 10 S 24

34 7

11 7 15

0 176 103

10 8

7 28

1 191 203

To make the above figures tally with the Table of total deaths 12 deaths of Non-Chinese must be added for 1904, 4 such deaths for 1905, 13 such deaths for 1906, and 18 such deaths for 1907.

These figures show that there is still work to be done within the City, especially in Districts 2 and 9, while the work that has already been done needs constant supervision. Kowloon and the outlying villages are necessarily so scattered that is will take some years to produce as marked a reduction in the Malaria mortality there as we have already obtained

-

325

within the City limits; the large increase in Kowloon for 1906 and 1907 is almost entirely accounted for by the Kowloon-Canton Railway Works. The deaths in the Harbour (boat population) are no doubt the result of infection contracted ashore and almost all of them occurred in boats which lie habitually along the Kowloon shore of the Harbour.

   The fact must also not be overlooked that the malarial infection is not in all cases contracted locally, for the Chinese population is constantly receiving additions from the mainland of China, and the resident Chinese pay somewhat frequent visits to their native land, but for the purposes of comparison the figures given are fairly reliable as an indica- tion of the districts which yet need attention.

The Military return of admissions to hospital for Malaria also shows a markel re luction in the incidence of this disease, as will be seen from the subjoined Table :-

Admissions for Malaria: European Troops.

Year. Strength.

Admissions. Deaths. Invalids.

Ratio

per 1,000.

1898,

1,569

595

10

18

379.3

1899,

1,643

829

5

.25

504.6

1900,

1,484

629

4

16

423.8

1901,

1,673

1,010

4

15

603.7

1902,

1,381

1,523

6

24

1102.8

1903,

1.220

937

2

6

768.0

1904,

1,426

390

1

9

273.5

1905,

1906,

.......

1,370

348

0

1

254.0

1,525

480

4

15

314.7

1907,

1,461

287

12

196.0

Hygiene is taught systematically in all the Schools in the Colony and special attention is paid to the teaching of the mode of conveyance of the infection of Malaria by the mosquito, and the manner in which the mosquito breeds.

Beri-Beri.

There were 562 deaths (561 in 1906) from this disease during the year, of which 3 only were among the Non-Chinese community; one of them was a German stoker employed on S.M.S. Luchs, the second was an Indian employed as a "greaser" on a inerchant steamer and the third was a Japanese infant about two months old whose death was registered as due to "Beri-beri Neonatorum". The various theories as to the aetiology of this disease are being carefully studied in this Colony with a view to arriving at some means of diminishing the heavy toll which it levies yearly upon the native population.

Trachoma.

A Committee was appointed by Government to consider the prevalence of Trachoma amongst the children attending the Schools of the Colony and regulations were drawn up to control this disease.

?

Plague,

Typhoid,...

Cholera,

326

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The total number of cases of infectious disease notified during the year was 775 (1,179 in 1906) of which 240 were of Plague. The following Table shows the nature and

distribution of these diseases :-

CITY OF VICTORIA HEALTH DISTRICTS.

2

3

4

5 6 7

8

9 10

1 13 1

2

7

7 16

:

Small Pox, 16 73 16

Diphtheria,

5

Puerperal

Fever,

Scar et

Fever,

:

1

*

:

2

లు

Peak.

Kowloon.

Harbour.

New

Territories.

Villages

of

Hongkong.

No

Address.

Imported.

Totals

1907.

1906.

Totals

10

5

11

12

27

1

LO

5

...

104

2 8 12

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

34

2

GO

3

2

4 5 240 893

...

18 73 66

222222223

74

74

2

10

15

18 66 3

1

56

24 10

1

7

11 341

192

3

3

2

3

10

1

43

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3 13

සස

13

1

Table II (page 36) shows the number of cases of notifiable disease recorded in each month of the year.

Plague.

There was a small outbreak of Plague, during the year, the total number of cases registered being 240. A few of these however eventually proved not to be cases of Plague, while several entries in the register are duplicates, the result of the same case being reported from the Tung Wa Hospital or perhaps from Kowloon and then from one of the Kennedy Town Hospitals. Where no information is obtainable beyond the fact that the patient is a Chinese male (or female, as the case may be), name and address unknown, it is extremely difficult to avoid duplicate entries of such cases in the register. The Non-Chinese cases comprised 4 Indians and 2 Asiatic Portuguese.

The deaths registered numbered 198 and there were only 7 recoveries so that the actual total number of cases discovered must have been 205 with a mortality of 96 per cent.

The deaths were returned as follows:-

Bodies sent to the Public Mortuary, Kennedy Town,

19

Kowloon,...

Patients dying in the Tong Wa Plague Hospital,

71

Government Plague Hospital (including 4 Non-

Chinese),

Government Civil Hospital (Non-Chinese),

21

their own homes and coffined there,

Total,

69

30

53

10

1

35

198

   The death-rate among Non-Chinese was therefore 83 per cent., while among the Chinese it was 97 per cent.

During the year 25,265 rats were caught or found dead in the City of Victoria and 13,255 in Kowloon. These were all examined by Dr. HEANLEY at the Public Mortuary with the result that sixteen of those from the City and twelve of those from Kowloon were found to be infected with Plague.

:

327

Typhoid Fever.

   The number of cases of this disease during the year was 73 as compared with 66 during 1906 and 90 in 1905; eighteen of the cases were imported.

The European cases numbered 48, while the Chinese cases numbered 12, and 13 cases occurred amongst the other races in the Colony. Twelve of the European cases, one of the "other Non-Chinese" cases and all the Chinese cases died. The case mortality among the European cases was therefore 25 per cent.

   In most of the cases of Typhoid Fever that occur in this Colony the infection is probably contracted by eating salads of raw vegetables, which have been grown in Chinese market-gardens, where it is customary to water and manure the plants with diluted human excreta-both urine and night-soil. Residents in the Far East should carefully avoid such articles of food as water-cress, lettuce, etc., in view of this danger of contracting Typhoid Fever, Cholera or Intestinal Parasites, all of which diseases may be conveyed in this manner.

   It will be seen from the above figures that this disease is much less prevalent among the Chinese than among Europeans in this Colony, the ratio of cases to population being in the case of Europeans 4.78 per 1,000 and in the case of Chinese 0·038 per 1,000.

Cholera.

Seventy-four cases of Cholera were imported into the Colony on board one steamer during the autumn; one of the cases was a European, 72 were Chinese and the remaining one belonged to the class "other Non-Chinese". Thirty-two of the Chinese cases died. The great need of a quarantine station was demonstrated anew by this outbreak and steps have since been taken to meet this want. They will be referred to in the Report for 1908.

Small Po..

During the year 341 cases of Small Pox were certified, of which 14 were European, 314 were Chinese and 13 were of other races; eleven of the cases were imported. One of the European cases, four of the "other Non-Chinese cases and 270 of the Chinese cases died.

,,

The number of vaccinations for the year was 6,799 (7,450 in 1906).

Dightheria.

Forty-three cases of Diphtheria were notified throughout the year. Sixteen of these were Europeans and four were "other Non-Chinese" leaving twenty-three Chinese cases. Most of the cases of Diphtheria occurred during the earlier months of the year, and follow- ed an outbreak during the last three months of 1906. Diphtheria has been comparatively rare in this Colony and it is somewhat significant that so extensive an outbreak should follow the great Typhoon of September 18th, 1906, with its consequent wholesale pollution of the atmosphere by the dead bodies of men and animals.

All of the Chinese cases died, and one European child also died.

Puerperal Fever.

Only three cases of this disease were certified throughout the ycar, all of these in Chinese. The average number of known deaths from this disease. for the decade ending 1904 was eleven.

The scheme inaugurated in 1905 for supplying trained Chinese midwives to attend the poor in their own houses has proved most successful, largely owing to the supervision exercised over these women by Dr. ALICE SIBREE, who is engaged in medical missionary work in the Colony. Three of these midwives were employed at the beginning of the year, and in March the number was increased to six. They have attended 578 confinements dur- ing the year as compared with 188 during 1906, and they exercise a general supervision over

328

the infants during the first year of life, advising the mothers as to the maner of feeling, etc. Fifteen of these infants have been taken out of the Colony while two have been placed in the Convents. Of the remainder, twenty-two were either still-born or died immediately after birth, and twenty-five others have died from convulsions and other infantile ailments, while one was overlaid and one was a twin which was weakly from birth; the remainder are alive and well. Two only of the mothers have died, one from Bright's Disease and the other from Phthisis. These midwives consult Dr. SIBREE in all complications, an l she was

                                                   1 called to 28 of the above cases.

Scarlet Fever.

  Scarlet Fever is practically unknown in this Colony, but one case was reported in January, the patient being a young European girl of 18 years, who ha I lived in the Colony all her life and was employed as a type-writer, she recovered.

INTERMENTS.

  The following number of interments in the various cemeteries of the Colony have been recorded during the year :-

Non-Chinese Cemeteries.-Colonial Cemetery,

Roman Catholic Cemetery,

Mahommedan Cemetery,

Jewish Cemetery,

Parsee Cemetery,

133

1,018

57

0

2

1,210

Chinese Cemeteries.-Mount Caroline Cemetery,

528

Kai Lung Wan

"

Tung Wa Hospital

""

194

2,716

Infectious Diseases

Cheung Sha Wan,

507

...

19

"}

""

Kennedy Town,

4

......

Protestant

Shaukiwan

91

Aberdeen

"

Stanley

43

""

307

191

26

Shek O

Ma Tau Wai

Shai Yü Shek

Sham Shui Po

Christian

2

944

221

218

Kowloon City

22

Eurasian

2

""

Chung Ling Tin

5

}}

5,930

329

There were in addition sixteen cremations of bo lies during the year.

DISINFECTING STATIONS.

   During the year the two Disinfecting Stations dealt with 156,483 articles of clothing, bedding, etc.

These articles were received for disinfection according to the following Table :-

Victoria Station.

Articles from Private Houses,

"

Kennedy Town Hospital,

Tung Wa Hospital,.

.11,874

1,004

782

""

11

Government Civil Hospital,

1.543

77

""

Alice Memorial Hospital,

206

17

Police Stations and Gaol,

335

""

Military Hospital and Barracks,...

1,119

Government Clothing lent to Contacts.........

840

Clothing and Bedding of Staff,

.....

4,200

21,903

The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 225 days.

Kowloon Station.

Articles from Private Houses,

Government Clothing lent to Contacts,

133,383

1,197

134.580

The disinfecting apparatus was in use on 172 days.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

   The free Public Bath-honses erected by the Government at Wanchai and in Pound Lane, Taipingshan, and also the temporary bath-houses, fitted up in Chinese tenement houses rented for this purpose, at 92 Second Street and 2 Sheung Fung Lane, have been in great demand by the poor class of Chinese and the following figures show the total number of persons who have used these bath-houses during the year 1907-

Wanchai,

Pound Lane,

Second Street,

Sheung Fung Lane,

Total,

101,608

110,094

58,684

32,814

303,200

Separate baths, with an ample supply of hot water, are furnishel at each of these bath-houses-that at Wanchai is for men only, and is largely used by the coal coolies engaged in coaling ships in the Harbour, and that at Second Street is also for men only. The Pound Lane bath-house has separate buildings for men and for women and children, and the Sheung Fung Lane bath-house is for women and children only.

330

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

   A complete ambulance service has been established throughout the City, and ambul- ances can now be procured not only at any hour of the night or day by telephoning (No. 363) to the Disinfecting Station, Taipingshan, but additional ones have been stationed at the following places for use by the Police in all cases of emergency :-

The Bay View Police Station.

No. 1 Police Station.

The Recreation Ground, Happy Valley.

Eastern District Sanitary Office.

The Sailors' and Soldiers' Home, Arsenal Street.

The City Hall.

The Post Office.

The Central Police Station.

The Fire Brigade Station, Queen's Road Central.

The New Western Market.

The Tung Wa Hospital.

The entrance gate in Queen's Road West to the Government Civil Hospital.

The Western District Sanitary Office.

The Cattle Depôt, Kennedy Town.

Outside the City limits ambulances have also been stationed at the Pokfulam Police Station, at Aberdeen, Shaukiwan and Stanley Police Stations, at the Water Police Station at Tsim- sha-tsui and at the Kowloon-Canton Railway camps. The Kowloon Disinfecting Station (Telephone No. 44 K.) also serves Kowloon, in the same manner that the City is served by the Taipingshan Disinfecting Station.

   These are all hand ambulances, on bicycle or light wooden wheels, with rubber tyres, and of the St. John Ambulance pattern. Those stationed in the City are in the charge of the various Plague Inspectors, whose duty it is to see that they are kept clean and efficient, and that they are disinfected after use. At the Sanitary Stations coolies are always available for the conveyance of these ambulances, but at the other stations the Police obtain volunteers or engage street coolies for this purpose, and notify the Sanitary Department that the ambulance has been use 1, so that it may be cleansed at once.

OVERCROWDING.

The following Table shows the number of visits paid during the year and the number of houses found overcrowded :-

Health District.

No of floors found overcrowded.

No. of night visits paid.

1

58

16

2

136

52

3

Nil

Nil

4

53

18

City

5

24

11

of

6

46

25

Victoria.

7

69

25

8

41

15

9

157

57

10

25

15

11

118

32

Kowloon.

12

175

26

902

292

331

The following Table gives the record of prosecutions for overcrowding, and of persons displaced, in consequence of such proceedings, during the past three years.

1905,.

1906,

1907,....

Average No. of persons in excess per house.

Prosecutions.

No. of

persons displaced.

493

3.235

6.6

512

3,141

6.1

292

1,944

6.6

ADULTERATION OF FOOD AND DRUGS.

Seventeen samples of milk were taken for analysis during the year and all were found to be pure.

Various lots of condensed milk, cases of hams, and other perishable foods which had become unsound, were seized and destroyed, usually on the application of the owner or his agent. The purity of alcoholic liquors is dealt with by the Police, who periodically submit samples for analysis.

PROSECUTIONS.

A list of prosecutions undertaken during the year for breaches of the Sanitary Laws and Regulations of the Colony is given in Table III.

A note on the present Plague procedure and the reports of the Medical Officers in charge of Hospitals and Sub-Departments are printed as Annexes A to P of this report.

1st February, 1908.

J. M. ATKINSON, M.B. (Lond.), M.R.C.S., L.S.A., D.P.H.,

Principal Civil Medical Officer.

FRANCIS CLARK, M.D., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., D.P.H.,

Medical Officer of Health.

332

TABLE I-RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE' COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

I.-General Diseases.

A-Specific Febrile Diseases.

Small-pox,

a Zymotic.

......

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

5

22

49

6 6

11

00

8

14

10

46 10 1

Measles,

3

1

Whooping Cough,

::

1

...

:

Diphtheria,

2

1

Fever, Typhoid, (Enteric),

8

3

2

1

2

Cholera,

1

...

2

1

I

30

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

Diarrhoea,.

2

7

15

7

13

18

11

19 8

17 1 10

Dysentery,

Plague,

15

4

10

13 13

10

6

6

18

7

...

12 1

5

10 12

10 17 8

Influenza,

:

58:

37

4

7

Total,...... 38

6

2

42

94 29 36

44

27

46

44 98

45 37 1 89

B Malarial.

Fevers, Malarial,

15 3

14

25

12

9

10 8 34 7

7

1

I-

Total,.... 15

3

14

་་་་

:

25

3

12

9

9 10

8

34

-T

7

7

1

7

y Septic.

Erysipelas,

Pyæmia,

Septicemia,

Puerperal Fever,

Cellulitis,

Acute Suppurative Parotitis,

Suppurative Inflamation of Ear,

Thrombosis of Cavernous Sinus,

Total,......

& Venereal.

Syphilis (Acquired),

""

(Congenital),

1

:

1

3

1

4

5

2

4

2

2

6

1

1

2

1

1

1

10

5

:

:

Total,.......

Total Group A.,....

58 9

B.-Diseases dependent on Specific External Agents.

a Parasites.

Worms, (Round),...........................

Total,......

Carried forward, Group A.,........ 58

Group B........!

""

CO

3

:

:

:

:

9

:

6

...

10

5

7

4 2

4

5

8 2 2

113

1 2

55

56

CO 1

3

10

5

57 181 42 55 57 38 61

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

3

57 181

: 08

42 55 57

15:5

:

9

I 1

3

:

::

1

1

4

2

57 144 55

46

2 107

38 61

1

57 144

1

:

:

:

:

...

55 46

12:

2 107

...

...

...

333

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1907.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE Periods.

DIS-

TRICT.

Kow- SHAUKI- ABER- LOON WÁN DEEN

DIS-

TRICT.

STANLEY

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

4

41

NNN NULO

:

1

5

44

:

232 11 54 22

22

1

*

4

1

1

191 21

4

191

21

4

1

10

-

301-

1

1

10

446 33 45

:

446 33 145

...

:

:

པ :

:

:

32

47

***

:

:

:

; ដ

:

...

LO

5

:

:

:.

:

...

Non-Chinese.

Under 1

Chinese.

month.

:

:

:

...

:

:

...

..

...

2

Non-Chinese. 1 month and

Chinese.

under 12

months.

Non-Chinese. 1 year and

-

Co

under 5

Chinese.

years.

∞ N

Non-Chinese.

246

5 years and under 15

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

15 years and under 25

Chinese.

years.

15

1

LO

25 years and under 45

years.

45 years and under 60

years.

60 years

and over.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Age

Unknown.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

X

2

3-

57

19

12

121...

16

N X

}

1 28 261

ск

...

...

...

...

...

:

་ ་ ་

...

...

18

SSR

31 129

17

...

...

28... 316

...

...

GRAND

TOTAL.

275

O 2 CO

NKOIA 3 - C

251

196

...

198

1

2

1,003

...

...

265

4246

4121|| 11112 20269

2.86

3 52

1 1 13... 46

[09

2 86

9235

4 87

2 33...

...

579

1 1 13... 46

60 2 86 9235

4 87

2 33...

579

1

+

w

5

ลง

61

6

2

61...

...

8 3142

...

*

8

་ ་ ་

...

3142

...

:

...

210

26

2 15

2 29 1

91

6...

...

...

...

4303 4192 15214 31541

4303

...

...

:

...

...

:

...

:

:

...

4192 15214 31541

...

...

7178

:

:

...

:

:

:

...

...

:

:

F

:

...

*

~ 3

58

76

:

79

5 87

...

2

1,737

...

...

7178

5 87

...

..

...

:

...

:

-| -

2

1,737

Opium,

331

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Navy.

Brought forward, Group A.,... 58 9

"}

Group B.,...

General Diseases,-Continued.

:

B Poisons.

Total,......

Burns,

y Effects of Injuries.

Scalds,

Heat Apoplexy,

Multiple Injuries,

Drowning,

Strangulation,

Hæmorrhage,

Fracture of Skull,

Shock,

Overdistension of Stomach with Coarse

food,

Hanging,

Cut Throat, (Suicide),

Electrocution,

Shot Wound of Head,.......

Rupture of Liver,....

Poisoned Wound of Face,

Crushed Head,.

Compound Fracture of Humerus,

Rupture of Spleen,

Rupture of Stomach,

Rupture of Urethra,

Suffocation,

Injury to Chest,

Fracture of Thigh,

Asphyxia caused by Ligature round Neck,

Wound of Throat,

Centipede Bite, Toxic Poisoning,

Stab Wound of Heart,

Total,.......

d Errors of Diet.

Alcoholism (Chronic).........

""

(Acute),

Delirium Tremens,

Total,.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 1.

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

3 57 181

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

42 55

57

38

61

5:

888

:

...

57 144 55 46

1

:ཙྪ

2 107

3

3 1

1

1

2

6

1

1 4

1

1

co:

1

1

1

:

1776

21

3 3

تت

3

111

:

12

como:

2

3

1 1

122

1

2 2

2

2

1

:

:

:

3

:: co

3

1

1

1

:

1 1

4 I 1

3351

:

Ni

2 1

43

1

2

4

3

1

1

2

:

: : : :

...

1

1

...

...

1

6

6

12 4 18

5 7

5

:

:

26 3

3 6 12

4

:

12

:

:

1

15 4 16 4 91 49

:

:

21

6

15

4 21

:

:

:

LO

5

10 1 49

3 23

2 4

11 16

10 -

5

1

3

12 227 89 15

1

:::

72-2:

1 6

6 5

:

: : ܘ:

: ܘ

2

8

0021100

32 1 1

os ao

3

6

23

4 3 102 7 1

1228:

3

...

Total Group B.,..........

C.-Developmental Diseases.

Immaturity at Birth,

Debility,

Old Age,

Marasmus and Atrophy,

Inanition,

Injury, Contracted Pelvis of Mother,

CO 2 1

Total Group C., 11

:

29 270

95 25 19 7 7 14 143

8

Curried forward, (Groups A. to C.), 95 12

6 92 463 141 101 82 52

22

83 75 308 68 58 4 185

19

2

1 29

མི།ཆེ

335

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1907,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE Different AGE PERIODS.

Age

Unknown.

GRAND

TOTAL.

Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

15 years and under 25

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

25 years and under 45

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

45 years and under 60

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

and over. 60 years

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

month.

Non-Chinese.

1 month and

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

under 12

months.

1 year and under 5

years.

years and under 15

years.

Under 1

Kow-

SHAUKI- ABER-

STANLE

LOON DIS-

WÁN

DEEN

DIS-

DIS-

Dis

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

446

338

...

:

223

32

:

9

6

:

:

...

LO

13

10

2

1

10

:

:

:

• N

·

1

:

сс

:

..

...

N

4 303

1...

4192 15214 31541 7178

G :

...

...

:

...

...

:

:

::

::

51 6

4

:

...

...

1

...

:

:

:

11

:

...

2

...

...

...

...

52 6 4

1

...

...

***

:

...

5

10

-

...

...

...

...

...

5 87

5

5...

2 2

...

...

:

...

...

12

...

...

...

...

LA

...

...

...

1

2

10

454

=33333

::

140

638

65 172

85

...

:

...

:

:

...

:

2

1,737 1

10

:

10

...

CO CO

3 18...

3 14

...

1 19...

3...

...

...

co

-

4 CT

5

2

...

1

4...

...

2

1

...

31

43

12

3

12

...

་་་

...

...

...

21 115 123

42 16 82

1.25 ...

16

1

...

:

:

...

...

...

Q

...

1 16

ON

...

...

...

...

2

10

239

231

Co

-

1

6

7 47 20 88 2 25...

161 1 2

256

...

1 23

...

...

2315

~

1

...

...

...

121

...

...

:

N

6

9

...

1 54

4198

C

4

102 65

211

535

...

...

...

10

5

3

2216 3328

180...

4...

2

2

16.

5255...

4

917

10

10

CO

3229 6472 6399

5219 22 262 51|631

9219 10358

8

2,910

:

3

83

... 132

6

CO

27

38 74

...

I

...

:

336

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY:

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Brought forward, (Groups A to C'),...... 95

General Diseases,-Continued.

D.-Miscellaneous Diseases.

Articular Rheumatism,

Malignant New Growths

12

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

No. 3.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

Co

6

92 463 141 101

Cancer of Stomach,

1

1

of Breast,

1

""

of Liver,

";

of Uterus,..

""

of Tonsil,

""

of Colon,

...

19

of Scalp,

1

""

of Bladder,

25

of Jaw,

Sarcoma,

1

Scrofula,

General Tuberculosis,

15

Anæmia,

10

2

Leprosy,

1

Diabetes,

Splenic Anaemia, (Banti's Disease),

Retroperitoncal Tumour, (Non-malig-

nant),

Middle Ear Disense,

Beri-beri,

:

:

...

6 125 36

1

1

82

52

:

83

75 30S

68

58 4 185

:

1

:

:

::

:

:

:

1

...

1

1

2

6

5

6 14

44

8

...

...

...

L

...

2

...

...

6

1

1

co:

3

21 60 10

::2

...

8:

1

36

31 21

88

::

38

23

46

21 47

8:3

59

Total Group D........ 36

2

1

30 187 46 42

39 26 44

41

94 30 49

:

65

II.-Local Diseases.

E.-The Nervous System.

Meningitis,

10

Spinal Meningitis,

1

Abscess of Brain,

2

Apoplexy,

2

:

Hemiplegia,

Infantile Convulsions,...

5

1

4

27

168

17

1

4

2

3

6

Tetanus,

1

1 138

13

1

Trismus,

14

Hydrocephalus,

3

Epilepsy,

1

Insanity,

Mania,

4

2 2

3 1

1 4 2

1 1

1 10

2

2::*

1

1

2

4

1

1

~ N

5

1

1

1

2

11

1

1

2

1

General Paralysis of the Insane,

1

...

Total Group E.,................ 23

Co

3

F.-The Circulatory System.

Heart Disease,

13

Aneurysm,

Pericarditis,

311

1

::

:

:..

::

...

6 322 48 9 9

со

10

5

-

33

33

10

5

2 I 11

...

2 9 8

1 2 2

15:

5 9 6 10

1

1

: : ස

3

∞ 2 2

8

2 -

6 2 10

1 i

1

Syncope,

1

1

...

Arterio-sclerosis,

1

Atheroma of Coronary Artery,

Endocarditis,

1

...

:

...

Total Group F.,...... 20

3 11 11 6

7 11 4 12 3 7

2 11

:

Carried forward, (Groups A to F),

174

18

7 131 983 246 158 139

93 143 131 |447 106 116

7 272

337

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1907,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

Kow. SHAUKI- ABER-

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PEriods.

Unknown.

GRAND

TOTAL.

Chinese.

172

638

65 172

85

38 74 10

CO

3

3229

6472 6399 5219 22262 51631 9219 10358

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

STANLEY

LOON DIS-

WÁN DIS-

DEEN

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

Under 1

mouth.

1 month and

under 12

months.

1 year and

under 5

years.

Non-Chinese. 5 years and

Chinese.

under 15

years.

Non-Chinese.

15 years and

under 25

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese. 25 years and

Chinese.

under 45

years.

Non-Chinese. | 45 years and

under 60

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

and over. 60 years

Non-Chinese.

Age

10

21

1

2

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

107 4

2::

286 35 40 20 2

17

:

:

:

⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀

-

:

24

1

1

:

1

3

:

4 27

22

+42

2:3

...

1 59

...

16 6

***

8 2,910

ta

:

12

::

:

1 48

co -

...

...

::

...

464ON

1

4

2

498

* 15

1

1

1

...

...

1

...

...

2

...

65...

CO

562

4 73 1 1 1,115

10 1141

1310

...

159 1 70 7169 20410 5131|

...

6

78

12

·

:

:

:

39

4

2

11

50

...

4

2

998 100 217 106 42

:

3111... 15

་་་

...

4 22 2 16

...

NO

:

2178

5134

:

co

N

3

...

...

220

1

3

32

11

54

164

26

...

...

...

CO 30 - 50 p

1 20 111 6 18

11

2 11...

522

...

:

113

2

81 6 53

1

...

2

1...

5 22

-

...

...

139

6

24

1

1

3

...

:

2

6

9 65

3 36

6 24...

174

5412 17646 11 699 7317 32451 861,124 17397 22466 210 4.721

...

:

338

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

Brought forward, (Groups A to F), ....174

Local Diseases,--Continued.

G.-The Respiratory System.

Bronchitis,

Pneumonia,

Phthisis,

Pleurisy,

Empyemia,

Asthma,

Congestion of Lung,

Tuberculosis of Lung,

Atelectasis,

Hæmoptisis,

18

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

7131 983 246 158 139 93 143 131 447 106 116

7 272

4

9

36

11 109 86

88

14

1

2

2

3

2

2 6

ΤΟ 21

2383

28:

6.3

13 46 16 39 37 32

15 10

44

282:

26 42

39

25 120 38

2288

14 15 25 6 6

28

13

68 25 39

1

1232

::

25

13

72

1

2

2

1

1

Total Group G.,...... 34

H.--The Digestive System.

Acute Pharyngitis,

Dentition,

Angina Ludovici,...

Cancrum Oris,

:

8

5

3

}

1

4

:

: |3

62 253 101 96 102

:

:

...

...

72

96

81 222

61

58

112

2

...

1

Tonsillitis,

Gastritis,

Enteritis,

3

1

Abscess of Liver,.

1

Colic,..

Hepatitis,

Hepatic Abscess,

Cirrhosis of Liver,

5

3

1

Ascites,

Peritonitis,

2

1

3 3

2

2

Hernia,

Gastric Ulcer,

Intestinal Strangulation,

3

Sprue,

Icterus Neonatorum,

Jaundice,

Distomiasis,

Intussusception,

...

1

Appendicitis,

:

Gastro Enteritis,

Total Group H.,..............| 16

10

5

:

:

8

со

8

6

6

1

2

CO

6

5

4

1

:

...

1

...

2

J.--The Urinary System.

Nephritis (Acute),

4

1

1

Bright's Disease,

9

Cystitis,

Uræmia,

2

I

1

1

1

1

2

IP CO

3

4 1

2

2

Hæmatinuria,

1

...

Stone in Bladder,..

Total Group J., .............. 15

1

1

1

5

5

-J

7

3

2

2

:

Carried forward, (Groups A to Jj, ...

239

24

7194 1,245 360 265 249 166 243 225 677 171 177

8 388

:

1

3

00 - 21

339

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1907,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PERIODS.

Kow- SHÁUKI- ABER-

STANLEY

LOON

DIS-

WÁN DIS-

DEEN

DIS-

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT,

Non-Chinese.

Under 1

month.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese. 1 month and

Chinese.

under 12

months.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

998 100 217 106

42

74

10

30

44 4 9 3 20 30 8

134 13 2 1

བྫོ-

:

125 19 22 10

3

1

5

3

1

1

1

315 38 33 14 24 37 12

B

11 1

1

2

3

2

25

2 4 2

9

1

→ 2 -

1

:

:

12

3

:

:

1,350 140 257 122

66 111

:

1

...

1

co

3

Non-Chinese.

1 year and

under 5

under 15

years.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

years.

5 years and

Chinese.

Non-Chinese. 15 years and

under 25

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

25 years and under 45

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

45 years and under 60

Chinese.

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

and over. 60 years

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Age

Unknown.

GRAND

TOTAL.

5412 17646|| 11699| 7317 32451 861,:24|| 19397 22466) 210 1,721

1

87 1 24...

57

2180

1

2284 4

53

1

I

...

+

=:

11

1

11 3 78

1

}

2

...

1

1

1 23

4

1

2 83

2279

3324

:

...

...

1 31

10

11

...

:

4

...

1

3

1

...

...

:

:

7

57

63

2138

390

23 353

22 1 8

1

689

8369

3134

58

...

669

1

1 1

1

...

1

1

I

11

...

1

3

12

8 27

...

:

7

...

1

1

:

2

:

76 4112 13483|

4225

5209

1

1

2

1

1

1

2

2

...

4

6

...

1

3

2

2

1

I

3

1

1

6 2

9 13 28

2 15

31

5

1

1 2

3

...

...

......

1

1

...

...

:

NA

2

:

...

...

...

1

30

3

1,825

...

2

2

1

2

25

2

...

...

19

...

...

...

1

4

...

...

...

4

...

1

:

1

:

3

TO

4 3 4 5 13

6 10 1

6...

62

23 4 7500 20931 141,039 8403 415761171,648 29647|| 31686

3 11

6,711

103

28

28

2

2

1

1

3

1

6

3

1

1

1

3

1

340

RETURN SHEWING THE NUMBER AND CAUSES OF DEATHS REGISTERED

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

CAUSES.

BRITISH

AND

FOREIGN COMMUNITY.

Civil.

Army.

No. 3.

VICTORIA.

HEALTH DISTRICT.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

No. 7.

No. 8.

No. 9.

No. 10.

Unknown.

Peak.

Harbour.

7194 1,245 360 265 249 166 243 225 677 171

177

8 1388

Navy.

No. 1.

No. 2.

Brought forward, (Groups A to J), ... 239

24

Local Diseases, Continued.

L.-The Generative System.

Uterine Tumour,

Endometritis,

2

Total Group L,.......

2

to:

:

M.-Affections connected with

Pregnancy.

Abortion,

Premature Labour,

Tubal Gestation,

Eclampsia,

1

***

1

Total Group M,......

2

N.-Affections connected with

:.:

::

:

1

:

:

:

1

I

...

Parturition.

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,.

Fibroid Tumour of Uterus,....

Milk Fever,

Child Birth,

Placenta Prævia,

Total Group N.................... 2

0.-The Skin.

Gangrenous Cellulitis,

Carbuncle,

Pemphigus,

Furunculosis,

:

...

Total Group 0,.......

...

P.-Diseases of Organs of Locomotion.

Hip Joint Disease,

Osteomyelitis of Femur,

Total Group P,..

III.-Undefined.

:

:

::

:

::

:

1

1

:

1

:

:

...

:

:

1

1 1

2

:

2 2

..

...

1

1

1

1 2

1

1

::

1

1

...

:

...

...

::

...

:

:.

:

:

1

1

...

::

:

...

1

1

::

:

:

::

:

::

:

1

1

1

2

...

...

...

::

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

::

:

1

...

...

1

...

9

34 92

5 10 5

38

16 6 2

78

Total Group III.,... 10

1 34 92 14 8

10 5 9 38 17

6. 2 78

TOTAL, ALL CAUSES,..... 255

24

8 229 1,341 376 275 257 176 249 236 717 188 183

10 467

Dropsy,

Tumour,

Abscess on Thigh,

Gangrene,..

Undiagnosed,

1

1

4

31

4

2

1

: 2

...

:

ཨཱ

پسم

:

...

LOON Kow-

WÁN SHAUKI-

ABER-

STANLEY

DIS-

DIS-

DIS- DEEN

DIS-

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

TRICT.

A

B

- 341 -

DURING THE YEAR ENDED THE 31ST DAY OF DECEMBER, 1907,-Continued.

CHINESE COMMUNITY.

TOTAL AT THE DIFFERENT AGE PEriods.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

Population.

Land

Population.

Boat

1,350 140 257 |122

66 111

33

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:.

...

:

:

150

152

32 12 1

1,510 174 273 128

「:

69 113

$..

2

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

N

:

:

:.

:

...

N

:

C'T

:

...

...

...

...

2...

1

:

:

...

:

:

...

:

:

:

: :

...

-+

...

Population.

Non-Chinese.

Under 1

month.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

1 month and

under 12

Chinese.

months.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

| Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

1 year and under 5

years.

5 years and under 15

years.

15 years and under 25

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

25 years and under 45

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

45 years and under 60

years.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

60 years and over.

Non-Chinese.

Chinese.

Age

Unknown.

7500 20931] 141,039

8403 41 5761171,648 29647 31686

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

NI

2

2

::

2

N

1

:

:

::

:

:

1

3

...

2

14

31

...

4

1 22

...

...

...

:

:

3

1

-

...

3

1

41

42

:

54

54...

137

:

2 24

7593 20987 14 1,179 844542615127 1,776 31675 33712

1 32

4 97

-

-

d

19

521

133

5100

128

21 25

2

6

529

17

7,286

:

1

...

: :.

:

...

2

1

:

21

ليط

...

:

~

:

...

...

2212

4

3 11

6,711

2 2

TOTAL.

GRAND

342

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDERMENTIONED INSTITUTIONS During the Year ended 31st December, 1907.

The Government Civil Hospitals.

Tung Wa Hospital,-Continued.

Mortuary, Continued.

Causes.

No.

Causes.

Νο.

Causes.

No.

Brought forward,... 184

Brought forward,...

133

Diphtheria,

Enteric Fever,

Dysentery,

Measles,

31-22

Dysentery,

67

Multiple Injuries,

2

Malarial Fevers.....

84

Marasmus,

5

Acute Suppurative Parotitis,

1

Immaturity at Birth,...

24

Septicæmia,

22

Debility,

2

Diarrhoea,

1

Puerperal Fever,

1

Beri-beri,

125

Plague,

2

Syphilis,

2

Tuberculosis,

10

Malarial Fevers,

Burns,.

3

Epilepsy,

Septicæmia,

Scalds,

2

Apoplexy,

8

Fracture of Skull,

Shock,.

Hæmorrhage,

Multiple Injuries,

Bullet Wound of Heart,

Fracture of Skull,

Convulsions,

Tetanus,

Heart Disease,

26.

1

10

Multiple Injuries,

Rupture of Liver,

Empyæma,

2

Heat Apoplexy,

Hæmorrhage,

Aneurysm,

1

Rupture of Urethra,

1

Debility,....

Bronchitis,

49

Alcoholism,

3

Immaturity at Birth,...

Phthisis,

124

Debility,

2

Marasmus,

2

Pneumonia,.

90

Old Age...

Old Age,

5

Atelectasis,.

1

Cancer of Bladder,.

1

Cancer of Jaw,

1

Angina Ludovici,

前端

Palate,

1

Breast,

4

Gastritis,

Tonsil,

Stomach,

1

Appendicitis,

""

""

Scalp,

1

Beri-beri,

266

Hernia,

Sarcoma,

2

Leprosy,

1

Hepatic Abscess,

1

Anæmia,

8

Tuberculosis,

17

Cirrhosis of Liver,.

Tuberculosis,

12

Epilepsy,

1

Icterus Neonatorum,

1

Beri-beri,

4

Hemiplegia,

8

Peritonitis,

Meningitis,.

Tetanus,

Child Birth,

2

Eclampsia,

Meningitis,

6

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

Cerebral Thrombosis,

Apoplexy,

10

Cellulitis,

2

Epilepsy,

Heart Disease,

53

Undiagnosed,

20

Tetanus,

1

Aneurysm,

1

Pericarditis,

1

Bronchitis,

70

Syncope,

2

Phthisis,

286

Total,......

650

Aneury sin,

1

Pneumonia,

88

Bronchitis,

1

Peritonitis,

1

Empyæma,

3

Cirrhosis of Liver,.

2

Phthisis,

10

Cystitis,

1

Pneumonia,

4

Bright's Disease,

Pleurisy,...

1

Post Partum Hæmorrhage,

Cancrum Oris,

1

Ulcer of Stomach,

Prolonged Labour (Exhn.), Cellulitis,

1

1

Gastro Enteritis,

Enteritis,

Appendicitis,

Intussusception,..

Cirrhosis of Liver,..

4

Abscess of Liver,

Bright's Disease,

Undiagnosed,

11

The Alice Memorial and Nethersole Hospitals.

Total,

1,237

Causes.

No.

Diarrhoea,

1

Acute Nephritis,

Uremia, Cellulitis,

Dysentery,

6

1

Septicemia,

5

Hæmorrhage,

1

Gangrene,

Mortuary.

Immaturity at Birth,

2

Marasmus,

3

Causes.

No.

Tuberculosis,

3

Fotal,

131

Convulsions,

Small-pox,

6

Meningitis,

1

Plague,

20

Heart Disease,

Diarrhoea,

51

Bronchitis,

Dysentery,

12

Phthisis,

4

Malarial Fevers,.....

18

Pneumonia,

4

Septicæmia, ......

6

Atelectasis,..

1

The Tung Wa Hospital.

Puerperal Fever,

1

Cancrum Oris,

Opium Poisoning,

3

Appendicitis,

Causes.

Enteric Fever,

Small-pox,

Plague,

Diphtheria,.

Diarrhoea,

Carried forward, .....

184

No.

Burns,

1

Peritonitis,

Drowning,

2

Hæmorrhage,

4

Fracture of Skull,

74

Compound fracture of humerus,

5

Overdistension

of Stomach

99

with Coarse Food...............................

Bright's Disease,

Hæmatinuria,

Stone in Bladder, Placenta Prævia, Premature Labour,

Total,......... 47

1

1

1

Carried forward,... 133

343

RETURN OF DEATHS THAT OCCURRED IN THE UNDERMENTIONED INSTITUTIONS,--Continued.

The Italian Convent.

L'Asile De La Ste. Enfance.

L'Asile De La Ste. En-

fance,-Continued.

Causes.

No.

Marasmus,

33

Tuberculosis,

18

Tetanus,

12

Meningitis,

17

Malarial Fevers,

Bronchitis,

Trismus,

14

Infantile Convulsions,

Pneumonia,

3827204 01 10 0

Causes.

Syphilis,...

No.

Causes.

Νο.

Brought forward,

849

56

Old Age,

13

Marasmus, Tuberculosis,

Meningitis, Convulsions,

202

Cancer,

1

110

Pleurisy,

1

168

Heart Disease,

2

15

Phthisis,

1

5

Tetanus,

136

Hydrocephalus,

Bronchitis,

89

Cellulitis,

1

2

Immaturity at Birth,.

18

Cystitis,

5

Pneumonia,

46

Cirrhosis of Liver,

Diarrhoea,

Pemphigus,. Syphilis,

3

Peritonitis,

I

Beri-beri,

1

Malarial Fevers,.

Diarrhoea,

2

Atelectasis,.....

5

Dysentery,.

1

Undiagnosed,

60

Total,

113

Carried forward,...

849

FRANCIS CLARK,

Superintendent of Statistics.

Registrar General's Office, Hongkong.

Total,......... 937

A. W. BREWIN,

Registrar General.

+

Grand Total,

Grand 1907. Total 1907. 1906. Total 1906.

Table II.-CASES OF NOTIFIABLE DISEASE RECORDED IN EACH MONTH OF THE YEAR.

Jan. Feb. March. April. May. June. July. Aug.

Total,

Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

European,

...

Plague,

Chinese,

Others,..

1

6

6

45

60

78

17

10

1

...

...

2

: 5:

Typhoid,

European, 10 Chinese,

12

7

7

1

1

10 2

2

...

Others,

3

2

1

1

...

...

...

Cholera,

...

...

...

...

...

2

2

1

1

1

23

53

78

79

42

14

10

4

2

6

3

1

1

5

· 6

20

1

1

1

7

2

1

1

2

::

".

Small Pox,

{{

• Diphtheria,

...

{

Puerperal Fever,

European,

Chinese,

Others,

...

European,

Chinese,

Others,

...

European,

Chinese,

Others,

European,

Chinese,

Others, ...

...

CO

...

1

...

1

2

1

72

1

6

5

3

2

234

240

870

-893

6

17

T&T

48

43

12

73

12

66

13

11

1

72

74

2

2

...

1

...

...

14

11

::

6

314

341

168

13

13

==

192

16

N:

23

43

4

NG N

13

3

...

...

...

1

...

...

1

...

3

3

12

13

1

...

...

...

...

Scarlet Fever..

European,

1

1

1

...

...

...

Total 1907

54

1906,

23

888

80

115

99

93

85

97

25

16

83

14

14

775

68 133

214

423

191

49

26

7

14

14

12

1179

......

- 344

345

Table III.-LIST OF PROSECUTIONS DURING THE YEAR 1907.

Offence.

Sum- Con- Penal- monses. victions. ties.

Breaches of Bye-laws:-

Basements (using for sleeping purposes),

Conveying Night-soil during prohibited hours, Depositing Rubbish in Streets,

Dairy,

Dirty premises,

Failing to remove rubbish.

burn fumigants in public latrine,

make proper drainage,

have the ground surface of matshed ?

latrine concreted,

10

19

remove excretal matters daily,

>>

cleanse and limewash,

"

provide open space,

""

provide window area,

++

repair kitchen surface,

::

repair waste-pipes,.........

:1

""

D

""

notify infectious diseases,

cleanse latrines,

cleanse opium divan,

fill up rat-runs,

Illegal cubicles,

"

5:

partition,..

room (using for habitation), urinal,

occupation of buildings,

platform on roof,

Keeping cattle without licence,

swine

Overcrowding common lodging houses,.

tenement houses..

19

Obstructing open spaces,

Offensive trade,

Selling fish without licence.......

vegetable without licence,

pork without licence,

poultry without licence, unwholesome provisions,..

Remarks.

$

45

3 Ordered to cease occupation, 1 withdrawn.

72

--

7

715

2 Discharged.

10

70

10

40

Withdrawn.

25

35

12

96

80

140

2 Ordered to do the work. 1 withdrawn 1 Absconded, 3 adjournel sine die.

4 Ordered to do the work, 1 cautioned.

1 Ordered to do the work, I withdrawn.

6 Ordered to do the work, 2 withdrawn.

2 Withdrawn. I adjourned sine die.

Withdrawn.

3 Ordered to remove, I withdrawn.

Cautioned.

Ordered to cense.

Withdrawn.

3

80

1

Absconded.

85

1 Adjourned sine die.

10

*65

2 Absconde 1.

223

172

1. 30

40

32

302

3 Absconded. 4 ordered to remove,

42 Absconded, 3 withdrawn, 8 adjourned sine die.

1 adjourned

1

25

[sine die.

6

110

50

1 Dismissed.

100

Discharged.

Total.

477

377

$3,802

**

1906,

880

706 $6,190

346

Annexe A.

PLAGUE.

   There are at present four Plague Inspectors for the City of Victoria, and one for Kowloon. There are eleven coloured Foremen Interpreters, one for each District of the City of Victoria and one for Kowloon, who supervise the work of the rat-catchers, assist in the house-to-house cleansing, and act as Interpreters to the Inspectors where necessary.

                                                 There are four gangs in the City of Victoria each consisting of one Chinese Foreman, one artisan and seven coolies, while Kowloon has a gang consisting of a Chinese Foreman, two artisans and ten coolies.

   During non-epidemic periods the whole of this staff is engaged in house-to-house clean- sing work, about ten houses or thirty floors a day are dealt with, and each tenant receives three days' notice, on a form in English and Chinese, similar to the sub-joined, marked A, requiring him to thoroughly cleanse his premises. On the day fixed the gang attends in the street in which the houses are situated, and supplies hot water and soap solution to the tenants, and cleans out all empty floors, basements, etc., the tenants themselves cleaning out their own premises. The refuse turned out during this cleansing is removed by the gang to the nearest dust boat. The soap solution is also used by the tenants for washing their bed- boards, etc., in the street or on the verandah.

   When the cleansing work is completed by the tenants the Inspector visits every floor, accompanied by the Foreman Interpreter and some of the coolies with a bucket of Pesterine (liquid fuel) which is applied to the sides and corners of the floors, and to the skirtings and round the partitions of the cubicles, and the corners of the stairs, by means of the mops, under the personal supervision of the Inspector. Pesterine is a black treacle-like liquid which stains woodwork and it was decided therefore at the latter end of the year to substitute for it a mixture of equal parts of Cyllin and Petrol diluted with water to 1 in 200. This mixture acts both as a pulicide and a germicide and has the advantage of not staining the flooring and skirtings. The solution has to be freshly mixed each day as it undergoes certain chemical changes, the nature of which has not yet been worked out. At this visit when the floors are clear of furniture, etc., the Inspector makes special note of the condition of the ground surfaces, the absence of gratings to drain-inlets and ventilators, and the pres- ence of rat-runs, and all these matters are dealt with by legal notice at once. The tenants are invited, by notice in the form attached, to allow their bedding and spare clothing to be steamed, in order to destroy fleas and other vermin and their ova, and compensation is offered for all articles damaged. Should a case of Plague occur in a house, the Kaifong (Street Committee) of the District are informed, and the floor on which the case has occurred is disinfected by the Plague staff, the walls being sprayed with corrosive sublimate, and the floor and the bed-boards washed with the mixture of Cyllin and Petrol; crude carbolic acid is poured into the rat-runs, which are then filled up with cement; and the clothing and bedding is sent to the Disinfecting Station to be steamed. The remaining floors of the infected house are cleansed by the tenants in the same manner as in the house-to-house cleansing. Should there be any ceilings or stair-linings in the infected house they are removed and compensation is paid for them, if the case has been duly reported, while illegalities are dealt with by notice. The compensation is, in the case of, Chinese, assessed separately by the Kaifong of the district and by the Plague Inspector, and their assessments are dealt with by a Committee of the Sanitary Board. The Kaifong are appointed by the Government on the nomination of the Tung Wa Hospital for the City of Victoria, and in Kowloon by the inhabitants of Kowloon Point, Yaumati and Hunghom respectively.

   Any spare time at the disposal of the Plague Inspectors is occupied in paying special visits to houses in which cases of Plague have occurred in the previous season, with a view to seeing that they are free of rat-runs and provided with impervious ground surfaces.

The Chinese have established Public Dispensaries and also District Plague Hospitals which in the City of Victoria are managed by a Committee of which the Registrar General and the two Chinese Members of the Sanitary Board are members; in Kowloon, a local Committee manages the Dispensary and the Hospital. These institutions are supported by voluntary contributions, and each is in charge of a Licentiate of the Hongong College of Medicine who sees out-patients at the Dispensary, performs vaccinations, visits patients in their own homes, and treats patients in the District Hospital. Cases of infectious disease are notified by these licentiates to the nearest District Sanitary Office, and if the case is one of Plague, the patients may be treated in the District Hospital.

A

347

There are 3 Dispensaries in Victoria and one each in Yaumati, Hunghom and Kowloon City.

   Only one District Plague Hospital has up to the present been opened in the City of Victoria, one at Kowloon and a third in Kowloon City.

   Nine persons were treated in the Hospital in Victoria during 1907, and 33 in the Kowloon City Hospital.

A.

SANITARY BOARD OFFICE,

190

SIR,-This is to give you notice that your premises must be thoroughly cleansed on .....In default of your doing so the Sanitary Board will themselves undertake such cleansing unless the premises are found to be already in a cleanly condition.

   All rooms, cubicles, partitions, staircases, kitchens, yards, private lanes, floors, bed- boards, furniture and other woodwork must be thoroughly cleansed.

The Inspector of your District will issue soft soap for the cleansing of yards, kitchens, rooms and woodwork.

As fleas are believed to be the means of conveying Plague to human beings from infected rats, it is the wish of the Board to exterminate them as far as possible and with this object in view, you are asked to let your clothes and bedding be disinfected. All that is necessary is for you to let the Sanitary Officers have your clothes and in a few hours time they will be cleared of all these pests and returned to you. The disinfecting process will not injure the cloth- ing and the greatest care will be taken that the different articles are returned to their proper owners. Any complaint concerning the way in which this is done should be made. in writing to the Secretary of the Sanitary Board, and compensation will be given for any damaged articles.

Please note that you are not in any way compelled to hand over your clothes and bed- ding to be disinfected but the Board earnestly hopes you will do so, and that you will co-operate with the Board in the work of general cleansing as far as possible.

I have, etc.,

Secretary.

ཎྞཾ་

348

Annexe B.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT, CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Staff.

  I returned from home in October and resumed charge, Dr. Koca who had been in charge since the beginning of the year, reverting to his duties as Assistant Superintendent.

  Dr. Koch proceeded in October on six weeks' leave to India during which period I was in sole charge.

  Nursing Staff-The Matron left on home leave in August and was succeeded by Sister MILLINGTON from Victoria Hospital, Sister STOLLARD Succeeding the latter. Sister MOIR left this institution for Victoria Hospital vice Sister LEE who reverted to duty here.

/

  Sister GOURLAY left on home leave in May and Sister SHELBOURNE returned in July from England.

  Sisters JACOBS, MOIR, MAKER and MILLINGTON were all away on short leave during the year.

  Mr. FRANKLIN, Apothecary and Assistant Analyst, left for home in February, his duties in the hospital being taken over by Mr. F. BROWNE, the Analyst.

Wardmaster W. ATKINS joined the service in March and resigned in April. Ward- master CHARLTON joined in July.

Buildings.

  C & B Blocks were colourwashed and painted throughout and numerous minor repairs effected during the year.

Statistics.

  The total number of admissions was 2,711 as against 2,745 last year and 17,032 out- patients were treated as against 16,768.

The following Tables are attached

Table I.-Admissions and Deaths during each month.

""

71

II.-Admissions and Deaths under respective diseases. III.-Operations.

IV.---Admissions and Deaths in the Maternity Hospital.

The following Table gives the number and class of patients admitted during the past ten years and the total number of deaths.

YEAR.

1898. 1899. | 1900. 1901. 1902. 1903. 1901. 1905. 1906. 1907.

Police,

488

Paying Patients,

Government Servants, Police Cases, Free,

692 920 937 938 759 707 806 789 928 858 956 794 186 208 266 339 450 319 306 306 347 348 300 276 785 739 569 466 454 616

726 742 776 794 866 720 762 267 271 339 367 262 329 307 318 555 512 637 488

Total,.

Total Deaths,... Percentage,.

2,571 |2,734 | 3,030 | 2,948 |3,108 |2,794 2,585 |2,704 |2,745 |2,711

138 114 155 153 140 142 128 150 167 170 5.3 4.1 5.1 5.2 4.5 5:0 4.1 5.6 6.0 6.2

349

There was a marked decrease in the number of free patients and an increase in all other classes. Of the free patients only 49 were Europeans.

Of

Deaths.-There were 170 deaths during the year making a percentage of 6.2. these, however, 35.8 per cent. were moribund on admission and died within 24 hours as against 72 (43 per cent.) in 1906.

The average daily number of sick was 103.4 as against 91.74 last year.

Women and Children.--There were 209 women admitted of whom 24 died and 95 children of whom 9 died.

Nationality of persons admitted :-

Europeans-715 against 69% last year.

Indians and Coloured-843 against 738 last year.

Asiatics-1,153 against 1,399 last year.

The increase in Indians (105) is probably due to the Railway and to the Immigration to Canada both of which causes have attracted Indians to Hongkong. A very large number of them are in a hopeless condition of Ana nia, Phthisis, &c., and soon drift into hospital. The death rate amongst the nationalities was Europeans 4.3, Indians 5.3 and Asiatics. 8.1 per cent. The Asiatics provide most of the serious cases of accidents which to some extent explains the higher rate.

ie

Diseases.

e most commonly pervalent diseases were:-

Fevers-Malaria,

247

.....

Febricula,

Typhoid,

265

38

Venereal Disease,

100

Discases of Respiratory System,

149

Diseases of Digestive System,

238

Dysentery,

80

Tuberculosis,

....

56.

Pumatism,

89

Anæmia,

Injuries,

42

457

The largest number of deaths occurred in the following diseases

Tuberculosis,

22

Dysentery,

11

....

Diseases of Digestive System,

13

Urinary System,

11

>>

,, Respiratory System,

9

Injuries,

34

350

New Growths. The following cases of Malignant Disease were under treatment-

*

European, male, aged 38, Sarcoma inguinal glanos.

""

58, Carcinoma Sigmoid Flexure.

46, Epithelioma, face.

t

""

""

""

57,

""

female, inale,

57,

17

of tongue.

""

of scalp.

36, Sarcoma of jaw.

52, Carcinoma of bladder.

""

17

""

60,

Chinese female

25, Sarcoma.

""

male

""

•"

11

22,

49,

""

""

""

""

female

male

Malay

"

(internal).

39, Epithelioma of scalp.

32, Sarcoma of jaw.

face.

orbit.

62, Epithelioma of penis.

45, Sarcoma of liver.

47,

32.

jaw.

back.

""

""

""

35, Carcinoma of tonsil.

* Admitted twice and died in hospital.

† Admitted for recurrence.

Fractures and Dislocations.-The following were the principal Fractures and tions treated :

1, Death 1.

Spine,

Thigh,.

Leg,

Toes,

Patella,

Ribs,

Clavicle,

Arm,

Forearm,

Fingers,

Scapula,

Jaw,

Nasal Bones,

Skull,........

Dislocation of Elbow,

of Hip,

of Shoulder,

9

1.

12

1.

1

2

4

3

7

4

1

3

1.

1

23

13.

་ *

2

1

1

Joca-

year.

DISEASES GENERAL REMARKS.

Malarial Fever.-There was a slight increase in admissions: 247 as against 239 last In addition to cases admitted with this disease 9 cases developed the disease after being in hospital with other ailments.

   Febricula.-There has also been an increase in this disease as might be expected with an increase in both malaria and dengue fevers as a small proportion of cases of malaria who having had quinine previous to admission do not show parasites in the blood fall under this heading and there are always a certain number of mild cases of dengue which escape detec- tion more especially if the epidemic is not a severe one.

   Dengue Fever.-There has also been an increase in this disease, the numbers being 77- the largest on record since 1903.

351

Typhoid Fever.-38 cases with a death rate of 18.4. Since 1901, we have treated 248 cases with a death rate of 21 per cent. but I am glad to say the death rate has steadily dropped year by year since 1901 being year by year 32, 235, 214, 213, 20·0, 19.5 and 18.4 per cent. We have long since abandoned the use of the so called intestinal antisep- tics and judging from the death rate without any reason to regret having done so. cases admitted 16 were imported into the Colony. All the deaths were due to toxæmia and not to any complication. The nationality percentage was European 737, Japanese 10.5, Chinese 52, Indians 7-8, Portuguese 2.6.

Of the

Liver Abscess.--Four cases were under treatment. Of these 3 were Europeans one of whom died and the other two recovered after operation. The fourth case was one of mul- tiple abscesses in a Chinese female. No cause could be found postmortem to account for the pyæmic condition.

Appendicitis.-Eight cases were under treatment. Six were operated on and five recovered. The other two recovered without any operation. One of these latter had his appendix removed at home and the other declined any further surgical interference. the operations were done by Dr. KocH during my absence.

Operations.

All

A total number of 203 operations were performed during the year. For these Chloro- form was administered 169, Ether 4 and A.C.E. Mixture 3 times, whilst a few minor opera- tions were done under Cocaine and Ethyl Chloride: no casualties occurred as a result of the administration of the anaesthetics. Four cases of Ruptured Spleen were operated with one recovery. Dr. KOCH operated on seven cases for the radical cure of Hernia, all of which were successful. Two ovariotomies were done, of which one was fatal being a case of very large Multilocular Cyst the patient succumbing from Shock. A European was successfully opera d on for Pyloric Obstruction. Only three cases of stone in the bladder came under treatment with one death. The cases of Liver Abscess and Appendicitis have already been alluded to. All the major operations were done by Dr. Kocн.

VACCINATIONS.

    During the year 503 were performed -294 primary vaccinations of which 196 were successful and 209 re-vaccinations with 104 successful-a great falling off from last year when the number was 1,060.

1

SICKNESS IN THE POLICE.

Admissions. These amounted to 776 as compared with 677 last year, an increase both in numbers and percentage in all sections of the Force. The Europeans and Indians show a marked increase being 114-27 and 105-66 respectively as compared with 79.70 and 93.00. Table V shows Admissions and Deaths from various sections of the Force for the last ten years.

Table VI gives the sick and mortality rate in percentage of strength for last ten years. Table VII gives the Admissions and Deaths in the Civil Hospital during each month of the year.

Table VIII gives the admissions for Malarial Fever from each station.

Table IX gives the percentage admissions for Malarial from the more important stations of the New Territories.

    Deaths.-There were six deaths during the year. Two Indians died from Dysentery and one from chronic Bright's Disease. Three Chinese died from Beri-beri, Empyema and Tuberculosis.

Invaliding.-Indians 4: for Anæmia 2, Debility and Tuberculosis; Chinese 2: for Beri-beri and Cirrhosis of Liver.

:

352

  Malaria.-105 cases occurred as against 74 last year. The Europeans suffered to the extent of 10.3 per cent. the Indians 167 and the Chinese 4.9 per cent.

                                   The percentage incidence of the whole Force shows an increase of 33 as compared with last year, the increase being common to all sections. There were only six re-admissions for this disease, five coming in twice and one three times. The last, a Chinese, finally came in from No. 2 with the "Coma form but recovered.

Typhoid.-One Europeon and one Indian suffered from this disease and both recovered.

Dysentery.-Six Europeans, eleven Indians and two Chinese were admitted. Indians died.

Other ailments call for no comment.

SICKNESS IN GAOL STAFF.·

Two

  There were 68 admissions out of a staff of 121 as against 96 out of 122 last year. There were no deaths and only one Indian was invalided for Chronic Rheumatism.

SANITARY STAFF.

There were 72 admissions as compared with 42′ last year and 3 deaths from Alcoholism,

Phthisis and Enteric Fever.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

   There were 87 admissions with one death-the largest number of admissions since the. hospital was opened, notwithstanding the friendly rivalry of Victoria Hospital. The death was due to Eclampsia and occurred in a Chinese. Since this institution was opened in April, 1897, 625 cases have been admitted with 18 deaths, all the deaths being amongst Asiatics, save one European who died of Bright's Disease and was only taken in as there no was room in the Civil Hospital.

Of those admitted 18 were wives of Government Servants, 43 private paying and 26 "Free". There were 7 cases of still-birth. Of the children born alive 32 were girls and 28 boys. False pains, Menorrhagia and Miscarriage account for the other cases.

FEES.

The total amount of fees received from the Civil Hospital and its annexes, exclusive of Victoria Hospital, was $33,771 as compared with $29,903 in 1906.

5th January, 1908.

1

J. BELL, Superintendent.

Table I.-Admissions and Deaths in Civil Hospital during each month of the year 1907.

EUROPEANS. INDIANS, &c. ASIATICS.

MONTH.

TOTAL ADMISSIONS.

TOTAL DEATHS.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

D.

Remaining end of 1906,

35

3

12

42

January,

59

51

10

4

89

7

6

101 12

211

20

February,

49

53

1

59

161

12

March,

50

46

67

163

16

April,

41

59

86

186

11

May,

47

64

99

210

17

June,

49

94

101

10

244

15

July,

66

93

111

7

270

15

August,

72

75

106

12

260

19

September,

69

73

112

6

254

8

October,

73

November,

53

December,.

45

212

84

3

115

4

272

9

81

10

95

229

16

2

58

2

59

162

5

Total in 1907,

715

31 843

45 1,153 94

2,711

170

Total in 1906,

698

30 738

33 1.309 104

2,745

167

353

Table II.-Diseases and Deaths in Civil Hospital during 1907.

DISEASES.

Remain-

ing in Yearly Total.

Total

Hospital

Cases

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

1906.

Admissions Deaths,

1907.

at end of

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

3

Measles,

2

Chicken-pox,

Dengue,

77

Influenza,

11

Mumps,

8

Febricula,

262

264

Enteric Fever,

6

32

38

2

Erysipelas,

2

Dysentery,

2

78

80

Plagne,

4

4

Diphtheria,

6

3

6

Malarial Fever:

1. Quartan,

4

4

2. Simple Tertian,

1

76

77

3. Malignant,.

6

156

162

3

4. Mixed infection,

Beri-beri,...

Tetanus,

4

4

33

4

ཾ་

34

1

1

Septicemia,

3

Tubercle,

Leprosy,

Syphilis,

Gonorrhoea,

Alcoholism,...

Rheumatism,

Cyst,

New Growth, non-malignant,

New Growth, malignaut,

Anæmia,

Diabetes Mellitus,

22 3 T

~

54

22

56

3

50

53

43

47

27

N

27

- IN

2

87

89

4

1

4

7

19

Co

20

41

42

1

Debility,

1

98

99

3

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves:

Neuritis,

Meningitis,

Myelitis,

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders

Apoplexy,

Paralysis,

Epilepsy,

Neuralgia,

Hysteria,

Shock,

7

1

1

722

1

anõuav

2

6

1

20

...

ོ tu cདག༔ མ་

20

I

3.

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases :-

Mania,.

Dementia,

Melancholia,

132

:::

132

Curried forward,

36 1,264

87 1,300

23

:

DISEASES,

354

Return of Diseases and Deaths,-Continued.

Remaining in Hospital at

end of 1906.

Yearly Total. Total

Admissions Deaths.

Cases

Treated.

Brought forward,.

LOCAL DISEASES,-Continued,

Remaining in

Hospital at end of 1907.

36

1,264

87

1,300

23

Diseases of the Eye,....

54

54

4

Ear,.

15

15

99

Nose,

2

2

""

"

""

""

Circulatory System,

1

9

1

10

1

""

"1

Respiratory System,

8

132

9

140

2

15

""

Digestive System,

11

226

13

237

7

"

Lymphatic System,

"

"

""

19

"

"

29

"

Urinary System, Male Organs, Female Organs,

Organs of Locomotion, Cellular Tissue,

071 00 00

3

61

64

22

25

86

5

::

54

Skin,

10 01

73

54

2 N

91

5

54

5

LOS

78

56

99

Breast,

1

1

:

""

>

Injuries,

Effects of Heat,

Immersion,

Malformations,

Poisons,

Parasites,

In Attendance,

Malingering,

Total, 1907, Total, 1906,

15

442

34

457

23

25

6

25

7

7

11

11

10

10

23

23

8

8

38

38

658

89

68

2,622 2,677

170

2,711

167

2,745

883

73

89

* Committed Suicide.

Remarks.

کو

:

355

Table III-Operations performed in the Civil Hospital in 1907.

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

REMOVAL OF Tumours :-

Cyst of Neck,.

99

39

Back,

Fibro-chondroma of Parotid,

Fibroma of Thigh,

Carcinoma of Cheek,

Sarcoma of Sealp,............

19

Back,...

OPERATIONS ON THE EYE :-

Entropion,

Pterygium,

Extraction of Lens,

Discission

Needling of Capsule,

Excision of Eye,

OPERATION ON EAR :-

Polypus-removal of,

OPERATIONS ON TRACHEA, &c. :-

Tracheotomy,

OPERATIONS ON CHEST :

Empyema,.

Paracentesis,

OPERATIONS ON VASCULAR SYSTEM :-

Ligature Ext. Circumflex,...

Excision of Varicose Veins,

Ligature of

""

""

OPERATIONS ON LYMPHATIJ SYSTEM :-

Excision of Gland:

OPERATIONS ON BONES:

"

Excision or Gouging of Bones:

Jaw,

Scapula,

Humerus,

Radius,

Phalanges,..

Pelvis,

Femur,..

  Metatarsal Bones, Resection of Ribs,....

Sequestrotomy of Femur,.

Radius,

""

Wiring of Fractured Bones:-

Tibia.......

Femur,

Trephining,

AMPUTATIONS :-

Forearm,

Fingers,..

Thigh,

Leg,

Toes,

OPERATION ON JOINTS :-

Scraping Tuberculosus Joint,

Resection of Elbow Joint,

OPERATIONS

›NS IN MUSCLES, FASCIE, &C. :-

Breaking down contracted Knee Joints, Suturing Tendons,

Muscles,

Operations on CutaneOUS SYSTEM :-

For Ingrowing Toenail,

Scraping Sinuses,

OPERATIONS ON CELLULAR TISSUE:-

Incision of Abscesses of :-

Abdominal Wall,

Back,

Buttock,

Calf,

Chest,

....

NUMBER.

DEATHS.

1

]

2

3

2

2

1

1

2

~ N

121

21

1

1

21321

3D - LO

5

4

375

22

10:

2

}

1

1

33 15

1

2

}

1

Carried forward,......

125

9

356

SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

NUMBER. DEATHS.

OPERATIONS ON CELLULAR TISSUE,-Continued,

Brought forward,

125

Incision of Abscesses of :-

Ischio-rectal,

Neck,..

Psoas,

Cellulitis,

OPERATIONS ON GENITO-URINARY SYSTEM :-

Cystotomy,

Extr. of Calculus per Urethram,

Nephrotomy (for Hæmaturia),

Circumcision,

Amputation of Penis,

Ruptured Urethra,

Excision of Varicocele,

of Sae of Hydrocele,

Hæmatocele,

Fungus Testis,.............

Ovariotomy,

OPERATIONS ON ALIMENTARY CANAL:

Removal of Tonsils,.....................

Abdominal Section for Pyloric Adhesions,

Liver Abscess,

Liver Exploration,

Radical Cure of Hernia,

2021

1

1

1

16

1

1

7

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

2

7

1

1

Appendicitis (Acute),

Appendicitis (with Abscess),

""

(quiescent stage),

1

Intussusception, ......

2

Hæmorrhoids,

7

Fistula in ano,

Splenectomy for Rupture,

4

3

Abdominal Section for Retro-colic Abscess,

1

TOTAL, 1907,

203

17

TOTAL, 1996,

2.5

14

Table IV.-Monthly Admissions and Deaths in Maternity Hospital.

EUROPEANS. JAPANESE. CHINESE.

Remaining Dec. 31, 1906.

January

February,

March,

April,

May,

June,

July, August, September,

October, November, December,

Total, 1907,

"

1906.

A.

D.

A.

D.

3

46 40 2 -

1

20

N

3

1

::

:

27

12=5

12

29

14

10

نے

3

OTHER NATIONALITIES.

Total Ad- missions.

Total Deaths.

D.

A.

D.

2

::

I

4

I

3

7

12

12

10

1

12

20278

6

35

1

31

==

13

17

::

:

NE

87

1

72

1

357

Table V.-Admissions into and Deaths in the Civil Hospital from the Police during the last ten years.

Year.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total Admissions.

Total Deaths.

1898,

87

279

122

488

19

1899,

117

421

151

699

16

1900,

183

522

215

920

4

1901,

202

521

214

937

1902,

150

479

307

936

2

1903,

130

431

198

759

5

1904,

118

342

247

707

4

1905,

109

416

201

726

10

1906,

106

381

190

677

3

1907,

144

429

203

776

6

Table VI. Sick Rate and Mortality Rate in the Different Sections of the Police for the past ten years.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE.

YEAR.

Sick Rate.

Mortality

Sick Rate.

Rate.

Mortality Rate.

Sick Rate.

Mortality Rate.

1898,

77.67

3.57

123.45

1.32

41.78

4.10

1899,

140.46

3.57

151.98

1.08

47.09

2.75

1900,

135.50

147.40

.57

57.02

.40

1901,

160.31

3.17

147.17

.56

52.97

.49

1902,

126.00

0.88

131.90

.80

76.90

1903,

115.04

124.56

.57

54.69

.82

1904,

92.91

1.57

96.33

.28

54.52

.22

1905,

81.96

2.26

117.51

.84

41.61

.81

1906,

79.70

93.00

.24

37.47

.39

1907,

114.27

:

105.66

.73

41.51

.61

Table VII.-Monthly Admissions and Deaths from the Police Force in the Civil Hospital in 1907.

EUROPEANS.

INDIANS.

CHINESE..

Total Admis- sions.

Total Deaths.

A.

D.

A.

D.

A.

Remaining Dec. 31st, 1906,..............

January,

February,

March,

April,

46869

3

17

26

20

31

12

May,

12

38

15

+××720

11

31

42

1

33

52

1

65

1

June,

9

56

1

15

1

80

2

July,

10

48

21

79

1

August,

17

38

25

80

September,

15

40

25

80

October,

22

39

30

91

November,

18

40

December,.

8

33

ཆལ

21

79

12

53

Total,

144

429

3

203

3

776

6

358

Table VIII.

Admissions for Malarial Fever from each Police Station during each month of the Year.

Stations.

Strength.

January.

February.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

August.

September.

October.

November.

December.

Total.

to Strength.

Percentage

Increase or

Decrease

over 1906.

...

++ ::!

Central,

338

2

1

5

حبر

4

3 4 1 2

No. 1,

13

...

No. 2,

38

:=

1

4 2

4

32

9.4

1

1

7.6

1

2

5

13.1

No. 5,

:

:

No. 6 (Peak),

2

No. 7,

64

1

2 3.1

No. 8,

42

...

Gough Hill,

21

Bay View,

10

Tsat Tse Mui,

Quarry Bay,

Shau-ki-wan,

12:~

3:2

1 2

...

4

1

40.0 8114.2

1

2

1

00

8 88.8

...

Shek O,

...

Stanley,

11

1

3

27.2

Aberdeen,

17

2

2

29.4

Pokfulum,

6

33.3

Kennedy Town,

7

1

1

14.2

Tsim Tsa Tsui,*

20

1

1

3

6

30.0

Yaumati,

43

2

4.6

Hung Hom,

19

Sam Shui Po,.

11

1

1

Kowloon City,

16

: ܗ:

3

21.4

Ping Shan,

15

1

1

6.6

Au Tan,

14

2

2

1

2

2

9

64.2

San Tin,

10

:

Sheung Shui,

15

1

6.6

Tai Po,

11

...

1

1

Sha Ta Kok,.

13

Tai O,......

11

Tung Chung,

7

Sha Tin,

14

3

1

1

21

42

2

18.1

7.6

57.1

14.2

Sai Kung.

Sha Tin Gap,

Ta Ku Leng, Lamma Island, Cheung Chau,-

Fau Ling,

Green Island, Water Police,.......

3

1

14.2

1

20.0

20.0

155

:

:..

* Land Force only.

·+++:++++++++: : :+:

Table IX-Admissions for Malarial Fever from the most important Police Stations in the New Territories compared with Strength.

Stations.

1901. 1902.

1903.

1904. 1905.

1906.

1907.

Ska Ta Kok,

30.7

15.38

13.3

57.1

Ping Shan,

62.2

7.1

45.45

13.3

20.0

...

Sai Kung,

28.2

16.6

16.6

50.0

42.8

7.7

7.6

6.6

14.2

San Tiu, Tai Po, Tai O, Sha Tin,

25.0

10.0

70.0

50.0

33 3

27.2

16.6

10.0 9.0

...

18.1

10.0

10.0

11.1

10.0

...

...

25.0

12.5

33.3

14.2

...

...

Au Tau,

121.4

7.6

61.5

50.0

71.4

35.7

64.2

Sheung Shui,

63.6

20.0

9.0

14.3

6.6

...

359

Annexe C.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER IN CHARGE OF THE VICTORIA

HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

ADMISSIONS, DISEASES AND DEATHS.

   There were 211 admissions during 1907 as compared with 278 in 1906, this decrease was partly occasioned by the fact that in the Spring the whole of the hospital was colour- washed and painted internally: during this time patients had to be refused admission. The opening of the Matilda Hospital in January also relieved us of a number of non-paying patients. The year has also been a healthier one than usual.

Table gives in detail the diseases and causes of death during the year, from this it will be seen that there were only 3 deaths, a percentage of 14, as compared with 15 deaths. in 1906.

The admissions may be classified thus:-

(1.) According to Age :

1907.

1906.

Under 3 years.

60

Between 3 and 12 years

29

}

65

89

42

}

107

Over 12 years

122

171

(2.) Nationality :-

Europeans

Asiatics

(3.) Class of Patients :-

Paying Patients

Government Servants......

Wives of Government Servants....

Free.........

166

241

45

37

108

13

9

41

26

134

68

90

    Malarial Fever.-There were fewer cases under treatment than in 1906, the numbers being 12 as against 24.

Of these six were simple tertian and six malignant. The tertian cases comprised four from Kowloon, one from Sai Kung and one from Victoria.

Three of the malignant cases were from Kowloon (Lai Chi Kok), one from West Point, one from Morrison Hill Gap and one from the Peak.

Operations.--The following were performed during the year :-

Curetting Ovariotomy

Absces of Liver

Paracentesis Abdominis

1

1

8

1

1

Vaccinations. There were 21 vaccinations during the year.

Carbuncle (Incision)

Abscess (Incision)

360

J

  Confinements.-There were 21 confinements during the year, all the mothers did well, one infant was still-born.

Table II shows the average daily number of inmates in each month of the year.

The average daily number during the year was 13:39.

  Staff-Sister MILLINGTON was on duty until the 7th March when she went away on leave. Sister STOLLARD took her place and Sister MOIR replaced Sister ALLAWAY ON 24th January.

  There were three Probationers on duty until the 15th November and two from then until the end of the year.

  Buildings. The whole of the building was colour-washed and repainted during the year, the walls of all the wards were plastered. A new latrine was built for the Chinese Staff.

1906.

}

Fees.-$5,812 were received in fees during the year as compared with $6,581.42 in

J. M. ATKINSON, Medical Officer in Charge.

361

Table I.

VICTORIA HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

RETURN OF DISEASES and DEATHS in 1907.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital - at end of

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in Cases Hospital

Remarks.

Treated. at end of

Admissions Deaths.

1906.

1907.

Dengue,

GENERAL DISEASES.

Chicken-pox,

Whooping Cough..

Influenza,

Diphtheria,

Febricula,

Enteric Fever,

Dysentery,

Malarial Fever:

1. Quartan,

2. Simple Tertian, 3. Malignant,

Septicæmia, Tubercle,

Syphilis :-

(a.) Secondary,.

(b.) Inherited,

Malarial Cachexia,

Rheumatism,..

Debility,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of Nervous System.

SUB-SECTION 1.

Diseases of the Nerves:

Hydrocephalus,..

SUB-SECTION 2.

Functional Nervous Disorders:

Paralysis, Chorea,

Hysteria,

SUB-SECTION 3.

Mental Diseases

Idiocy,

Diseases of the Eye,......

2

ནད

N

30 6 2 2 2 O

1

6

4

6

6

6

6

6

1

1

1

3

::

:

1

1

1

3

3

1

1

:

1

1

1

""

99

Respiratory System,

16

18

2

""

""

Digestive System,

1

15

16

Lymphatic Syetem,

1

1

""

""

29

""

"

"

""

Skin,

Urinary System,

Generative System :-

Female Organs, Organs of Locomotion, Cellular Tissue,

1

7

1

Injuries, General,

19

Local,

Parturition,

Under Observation,

In Attendance,.

442

2

21

25

2-21--21

27

32

31 34

:

1

Total, 1907,

1906,

མིི ! -

22

189

3

211

7

271

15

278

22

362

Table II.

  Average daily number of Inmates of the Victoria Hospital during each month of the years 1905, 1906 and 1907.

Average daily Number in

Hospital 1905.

Average daily Number in

Hospital

1906.

Average daily Number in

Hospital 1907.

January,

8.39

7.23

19.29

February,

9.32

5.90

13.05

March,

4.84

9.36

12.61

April,

2.33

5.47

6.63

May,

6:58

10.81

7:58

June,

13.87

17.10

14.13

July,

18.03

14:00

16.77

August,

26.03

19:00

18.48

September,

17.30

21:47

23.16

October,

15:55

19.88

15.67

November,

11:43

17.37

13.66

December,

6.67

18.68

5:45

363

Annexe D.

REPORT ON THE LUNATIC ASYLUM FOR THE YEAR 1907.

During the year there were admitted 158 males and 46 females, and these together with 15 males and 3 females remaining on December 31st, 1906, make a total of 222 patients under treatment.

The following are the admissions for the past 9 years :-

1899,

1900,

....

1901,

1902,

1903,

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907, '

78

.109

.. 90

120

.155

166

..160

..162

..204

The patients under treatment were divided under the following headings

Paying,

Police,

Police Cases,

Free Patients,

Government Servants,

¿

46

8

116

46

6

222

   Of these cases there were repatriated or discharged 146 males and 42 females: 11 males and 2 females died: and there remained under treatment 16 males and 5 females on December 31st, 1907.

THE NATURE OF THE CASES.

It is

Cases of an acute nature were as follows-Acute Mania, 20-13 males and 7 females. Acute Melancholia, 19-17 males and 2 females. Acute Alcoholism bulked largely among the admissions, 51 cases having been under treatment-46 males and 5 females. regrettable to observe that the larger number of these cases were among Europeans, the natives only supplying 16 cases. Two cases of General Paralysis of the Insane were under treatment, an Englishman and an Australian: the latter died, but the former remained well enough to be sent back to England for admission into his County Asylum.

364

-

DEATHS.

These numbered 13-11 males and 2 females-naking nearly 6

per cent. on the number treated. The causes of death were as follows-One male died of General Paralysis: Four males succumbed to Acute Alcoholism-an Englishman, a Scotsman, a Chinese and an Indian: one Chinese male died of Cerebral Softening an one European of Meningeal Hæmorrhage: three Chinese died of Acute Mania-2 males and 1 female: one Indian male succumbed to Dysentery and one Chinese male to Diarrhoea: one Chinese female died of the result of cut throat, self inflicted prior to admission.

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS.

   Various minor repairs were undertaken whenever it was necessary. It is to be regretted that funds are not available for the erection of buildings more in consonance with modern ideas and permitting modern methods of treatment.

STAFF.

   Dr. HARTLEY had charge of the Asylum till October 9th, when I resumed charge on handing over my duties as Superintendent of the Government Civi! Hospital to Dr. BELL. Wardmaster REGAN succeeded Wardmaster COOKE, transferred to the Sanitary Department, and with Wardmaster TONG Po had charge under the direction of the Medical Officer. Several changes occurred among the Chinese Staff.

W. V. M.. KOCH, Medical Officer

365

Table I.-Return of Diseases and Deaths in 1907.

Remaining in Hospital

YEARLY TOTAL.

at end-of

1906.

Total cases Treated.

Admissions.

Deaths.

Diseases.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Febricula,

Dysentery,

Malarial Fever:-

Simple Tertian,

Malignant,

Alcoholism,.....

Debility,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Diseases of Nervous System

SUB-SECTION I.

Diseases of the Nerves :-

Encephalitis,

SUB-SECTION II.

Functional Nervous Disorders:

Apoplexy,

Epilepsy,...

SUB-SECTION III.

:

:

1

1

2-2-

52

¡

1

}

I

1

1

2

Remaining

in Hospital

at end of 1907.

1

3

53

1

1

:

1

1

1

1

:

Mental Diseases:

:

Idiocy,

Mania,

64

Melancholia,

Dementia,

Delusional Insanity,

General Paralysis of the Insane,

Diseases of Circulatory System, Diseases of Digestive System, Under Observation,

Injuries,

18

|:ཀ ༢]

13

4

1

I

1

1

ཀ | 2: ལ ཁ :|:ཡབྷཱུ

5

...

72

12

2

18

6

6

...

27

27

1

9

Total, 1907,

18

204

13

222

21

1906,

22

>>

162

9

184

18

England,

Scotland,

Ireland,

Germany,

Australia,

U. S. A.,

China,

India,

Japan,

Hongkong,

Straits Settlements,..

Macau,

Manila,

Chili,

France,

Norway,

Wales,

Portugal,

Total.

Table II.-Birth Places and Diseases of those under treatment.

GENERAL ACUTE PARALYSIS. MANIA.

CHRONIC

MANIA.

MELAN- DELUSIONAL CHOLIA. INSANITY.

DEMENTIA. IDIOCY.

ALCOHOLISM.

OBSERVA-

TION.

OTHER

DISEASES.

TOTAL.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

TH

C-1

1

?

1

32

16

12

2

13

35

17

14

-

10

13

работата

2

F.

I

2

02

37

2

46

24

00

15

00 10 00 00

2

1

173

49

- 366

Barber,

Barman,

Boatman,

Bookkeeper,

Clerk,

367

Table III.-Occupation of those under treatment.

Males.

Constable, E. 7, I. 1, C. 1,

Cook,

Coolie.

Dispenser,

Engineer,

Fireman,

Fisherman,

Fitter, Foreman,

Gaslighter,

Hawker,.

  Interpreter, Merchant, Overseer,

Prisoner,

Seaman,

  Shipwright, Student,

Stone Mason,

Watchman,

Females.

1

Barmaid,

1

1

Sampan Woman,

....

1

3

Servant,

1

1

Housewife,

7

9

Unclassified (for the most part coolies), 39

9

1

49

28

1

3

4

1

1

....

3

6

29

1

2

1

...

1

61

173

Unclassified,

:

368

Annexe E.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL offICER IN CHARGE OF THE

HOSPITALS FOR INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

  During the year there were 62 admissions to Kennedy Town and 167 to the Hospital Hulk Hygeia as against 75 and 67 respectively in 1906.

A list of the diseases treated is shown in Tables I and II.

  The cases of Measles and Chicken-pox were practically all admitted from the Diocesan Boys' School. Both diseases were very prevalent throughout the Colony during March and April.

PLAGUE.

  The total number of Plague cases notified only amounted to 205 of which 198 proved fatal, i e., 96 per cent. Sixteen of these were treated in Kennedy Town Hospital of which 10 died, 4 were transferred when convalescent to the Tung Wahı Plague Branch, 1 was discharged cured and 1 was transferred to the Hygeia. This last case was a Chinese female who was admitted to Kennedy Town suffering from Bubonic Plague (R.F.B.). The Bubo was nearing maturation and was incised a few days later. The day after admission the patient became covered with a papular rash, thickest on the face, and I had no hesitation in diagnosing Small-pox and had her immediately removed to the Hygeia. A few days later mutiple Pyæmic abscesses began to appear and subsequently a large abscess formed in the region of the Iliac glands on the same side of the Plague bubo. This was incised but death took place a few days later from exhaustion and Pyæmia caused by the suppurating buboes. At the post-mortem I found a broken down infarct in the left lung. The fact that the rash did not mature properly and that Pyæmia set in, suggests that the rash was due to sepsis and not Small-pox.

The nationalities of the cases admitted were as follows:-

....

Chinese, Eurasiau, Indian,

Admitted.

11

Died.

6

1

1

1

4

3

16

10

Five cases died within 24 hours of admission, 4 within 5 days and one after 10 days.

VARIETIES OF PLAGUE.

The different varieties of Plague occurred as follows:-

Bubonic.

Septic.

Pneumonic.

Kennedy Town,

16

0

0

Tung Wah Plague Branch,

56

2

0

Total Cases Notified including the above, 194 Total in 1906,

10

1

810

68

14

All the Septic and Pneumonic cases proved fatal.

COMPLICATIONS OF PLAGUE.

i

  Besides Broncho-Pneumonia and Hæmorrhages which are well known and of common. occurrence, I have noticed that many cases suffer from severe Iritis, affecting as a rule.

eyes, and leading to total blindness by occlusion of the pupils and hypopyon.

both

369

TREATMENT OF PLAGUE.

In addition to the stimulant and symptomatic treatment, which was adopted in all cases, six cases were treated by injections into the buboes of a solution of Cyllin, specially prepared by Mr. AINSLIE WALKER of London; and of these cases one recovered. Two of the fatal cases were given intravenous injections of Cyllin in addition to injections into the bubo. Intravenous injection of Cyllin does not appear to have any effect, but injections into the buboes sometimes appears to do good, by hastening its destruction.

   On the suggestion of the Principal Civil Medical Officer, I treated seven cases with Carbolic Acid in doses of ten grains every 2 hours for 12 doses and then 4 hourly, varied of course in proportion to the age of the patient. Four of the cases, so treated, recovered. Of the three fatal cases all were adults, one died within 6 hours, one within 24 hours and one within 5 days. Excluding the two cases which died within 24 hours, as being beyond human ail, we have 5 cases treated by Carbolic Acid and 4 recoveries. Of the recoveries one adult male took the drug for three days and it was then stopped as carboluria appeared. The bubo suppurated and recovery took place rapidly. Two children aged 13 and 9 years respectively took 30 grains during the first 24 hours and then 15 grains daily for 5 days, the dose was then stopped as carboluria appeared in the younger child.

   The fourth case that recovered was a girl aged 7, who was a daughter of the woman who was transferred to the Hygeia with Small-pox. This girl was sent in for observation. She had fever continuously but nothing could be found in the blood and careful physical examination failed to disclose anything to account for the temperature. I felt all the superficial glands daily and on the fifth day I found there was slight tenderness on pressure over the left Cervical glands, and the next day the bubo was well marked. Carbolic Acid was then exhibited in doses of 15 grains daily. The bubo subsequently suppurated and recovery rapidly followed.

It is difficult to say whether recovery in these cases was due at all to Carbolic Acid, because in the lung Wah Plague Branch 54 cases were given Carbolic Acid, in addition to Chinese treatment, and of these only one recovered. I am of the opinion that the best treatment is the stimulant and symptomatic combined with good nursing.

CHOLERA.

Sixty-four cases of Cholera were treated on board the Hygeia and 21 died.

All the cases were admitted from the S.S. Hong Bee which arrived in the harbour with the disease epidemic amongst the Chinese passengers. The majority of these cases were treated by Dr KEYT, Assistant Health Officer of the Port, as the outbreak occurred in October, when the Hygeia was anchored behind Stonecutters' Island.

SMALL-POX.

On referring to Tables I and II it will be seen that eight cases of Small-pox were admitted to Kennedy Town Hospital and ninety-six to the Hygein, but as seven of the cases admitted to Kennedy Town were subsequently transferred to the Hygeia, the actual number of cases treated was 97 and of these 33 died as against 65 with 7 deaths in 1906.

According to Nationality these were :-

European, ..

Chinese,.

Japanese,

Indian,

Eurasian,

Males.

Females.

11

3

50

20

1

0

9

0

1

GI

Total, 1907,. .... 72

25

1906,..... 45

20

"}

370

VARIETY OF SMALL-POX.

Discrete.

Confluent.

Ilamorrhagic.

Males-European,

9

2

Chinese,

26

22

Japanese,

0

1

Eurasian,

Indian,

7

==

0

1

ONOO-

2.

0

0

1

43

26

CO

3

Females-European,

Chinese,... Eurasian,

12

321

0

6

1

200

16

7

2

Total, 1907,... 59

33

1906,... 52

The Deaths numbered 33 and were:

European-Male,

DEATHS.

10

5

11

2

Chinese :- Do.

Confluent Do.

1

18

Hæmorrhagic 2

Female,

Discrete

1

Confluent

5

Hæmorrhagic 2

Japanese : Male, Indian :-

Confluent

1

Do.

Do.

1

Eurasian-Female,

Hæmorrhagic 1 Confluent

1

33

The epidemic was much more severe than last year, both numerically and as regards the type of the disease. This is shown by the following figures

1907.

1906.

Total Notified,

Cases.

192

Deaths.

Cases. Deaths.

141-73.43% 341

275=80·6%

Treated,

65

7=10·7% 97

33=34·0%

   The total number of cases notified, of course, includes those treated in the Infectious Diseases Hospitals, the remaining cases being reported from the Public Mortuary are nearly all "dumped" bodies, which shows that there must be a large number of cases which remain in their own homes and are never notified, consequently the true rate of mortality must be much lower than my figures make it appear.

WILLIAM B. A. MOORE, L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S., (Ireland).

371

-

Table I.-DISEASES TREATED at KENNEDY TOWN HOSPITAL.

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Yearly Total.

Remain- Total ing in Cases Hospital Treated. at end of

Remarks.

Admissions Deaths.

1906.

1907.

GENERAL DISEASES.

Small-pox,

Measles,

Chicken-pox,

Mumps,

Choleraic Diarrhoea,

Plague,

Leprosy,

Syphilis, Secondary,

LOCAL DISEASES.

Bronchitis,

Urticaria,..

No Appreciable Disease,

8

8

15

15

1

13

14

1

1

1

1

1

16

10

16

1

1

1

-12 N

I

2

In Attendance,

2

...

Total,.......

2

62

12

64

:

"Hygeia" under

[repairs.

Suspected Cholera.

Suspected Small-pox.

>>

Measles. Small-pox.

Table II.--DISEASES TREATED on board the HULK" HYGEIA."

DISEASES.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of

Yearly Total.

Admissions Deaths.

1906.

Remain- Total

ing in Cases Hospital Treated. at end of

1907.

Remarks.

96

32

96

1

2

2

64

21

64

4

4

Total,

167

53

167

  Small-pox, Measles,

Chicken-pox,

Cholera,

In Attendance,

Suspected Small-pox, transferred to Kennedy Town Hospital.

"J

"

372

Annexe F.

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL OFFICER TO VICTORIA GAOL.

The sanitary condition of the Gaol is satisfactory. Throughout the year there has been no overcrowding. The daily average number of prisoners was only 502, which is about the number the Gaol properly accommodates; however as the daily average number of prisoners located in Belilios Reformatory was 69, the Gaol itself has never been completely filled. The general health of the prisoners has been good. The admissions to Hospital numbered 424, but of these 225 were admitted for observation and found to be malingering, so that there were only 199 admissions for genuine illnesses, a percentage of a little over 3 (4 in 1906) on the total admissions to the Gaol.

There were 20 cases of Dysentery as compared with 38 last year and 29 in 1905.

  The cases were distributed throughout the year as follows:-January, 4. February, 1. March, 1. April, 5. May, 2. June, 1. December, 6.

  Malaria shows an increase of 31 as compared with last year. The following figures show the number treated in the Gaol Hospital for the past 8

8 years:-

1900, 1901,

1902,

1903, :

1904,

1905,

1906,

1907,

163

98

63

93

59

52

22

56

  There were 10 cases of Beri-beri as compared with 3 last year. The disease was in all cases contracted be