Government Gazette | 政府憲報 | 1843

No. 53 VOL. II.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

HONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 23RD, 1843.

 

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zetto," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. Lieutenant Colonel G. A. Malcolm, C. B. having returned from England, will resume charge of his duties as Secretary of Lega- tion to Her Majesty's Special mission in China.

Richard Woosnam, Esq. will continue to act as Secretary to His Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart. G. C. B. agreeable to the Notification of the 17th of Septem- ber. 1842, published in the Hong Kong Gazette of the 3rd of November last, and all intimations and replies under that Gentleman's Official signature are to be deemed valid and authorized.

By Order,

J. ROBT. MORRISON, Secretary and Treasurer to H. M's Chief Superintendent.

THE DECEMBER MAIL. By the Ardaseer, which Teft Bombay on the 19th January, the December Mail was received yesterday. The home news are not of any great importance, but it appears that the intelli- gence of the successful termination of the Affghan and China Wars had diffused great joy throughout the nation, though after the first feelings of satisfaction had subsided, a very bitter contest ensued between the Whig and Tory Journals about the. Policy of the measures, and on which side ought to fall the glory of our successes. The Atlas very justly observes that "this extreme party feeling at such a moment exhibits. bad taste and worse feeling. Surely, if ever there was a time for angry discussion to cease, and political an. imosity to become silent; it is at such a juncture, when no one with the bluntest fellings or commonest com- prehension can fail to add his voice of rejoicing at cheering intelligence, whose like has not been heard since the French were derated at Waterloo.

DOWNING STREET, DEC. 24. The Queen has been pleased to appoint Captain T. Bouchier R. N., to be a Knight, Commander of the Bath

Her Majesty has been pleased to appoint the follow- ing officers, in Her Majesty's Naval Service, to be Companions of the "Bath:-Capt. Hon. F. W. Grey; Capt. P. Richards; Capt. Sir J. E. Home, Bart Brev. chards, Capt. H. Kellett; Capt. R. B. Watson; Capt. Lieut-Col. S. B. Ellis Royal Marines; Capt. C. Ri- W. H. A, Morshead; and Capt. R. Collinson.

ADMIRALTY, DEC. 23. Naval Promotions which have taken ploce in con- sequence of the recent war in China. Commanders to be Captains-H. Boyes, Esq; C. Frederick, Esq., C. Richards, Esq.; H Kellett, Esq; R. B. Watson, Esq.; W. H. A. Morshead, Esq.; R. Collinson, Esq.; E. N. Troubridge, Esq.

Price $14 monthly Or 12 yearly

Madagascar: JS Peddie Victory: A Adams Samarang. R Hastings Thunderbolt: J Finlay (addit) Illustrious: Bernard Madagasca: MJ Dill Spiteful: J Hen- derson [addit] Caledonia: J J W Roberts to Haslar J Thompson Gleaner: G H Ryan St Vincent for service at Haslar.

Pursers-W BV Farror Spiteful: W Coningworth Gorgon: -Cunningham to be Act Wolverine: W Bateman Dido v Bulman dec,

Thomas Gleaner [in charge): S watson Samarang: 1 Clerks-W H Bateman Acheron [in charge]: W K Down [Assist] Pique: w Hickman late of Gleaner to Spider: J A Massman Thunderbolt: Naval Instructor--C Osbourne Thunderer: LETTERS and papers received in England, fir- nish account of the production of last year of the United States, and show an unusually large amount of every kind, and of the consequent low prices.

Lieutenant to be Commanders-J. Tudor, Esq; the Cotton has b sold at lower prices at New Or H. E. I, C. R. B. Crawford, Esq.; J. J. M'Cleverty, leans, than has been known for many years, name- Esq.; the H. E. I. C.; C. Wise, Esq.; G. Skipwith. ly 2 to 3d per lb. for inferior, and 4 to 4ld. for Esq.; J. G. Harrison, Esq; C. Starmer, Esq.; J. Fits the finer qualities-and freights from thence to james, Esq.; H. C. Hawkins, Esq.; J. Stoddart, Esq; Liverpool only 3-8ths per pound. P. A. Helpman, Esq.

This new state of mattesr is considered as likely Mates to be Lieutenants-Mr. H. Clarke; Mr. A. T. to be beneficial to the United States, by enabling Freese, the H. E I. C.; Mr. E. L. Strangways, the them to set their Banking affairs in better condi H. E. 1. C.; Mr. E. W. Vansittart; Mr. A. R. Henry, tion, Already, indeed, specie is getting plantiful Mr. H. F. N. Rolfe; Mr. A. P. Green; Mr. H. 8. in the City of New Orleans; and which such good Hillyar; Mr. H. Phelps; Mr. A. Anderson; Mr. G. H. Hodgson; Mr. N. Vansittart; Mr, C. K. Jackson. crops, and imports checked by the high tariff, the been transmitted to Vice Admiral Sir William Parker, may recover their position. In addition to the above promotions, orders have banks which have lately suffered there so much, Under these circumstances, it behoves shippers the commander in chief, to report, for promotion, the names of the Senior Lieutenants and Senior Mates of and speculators in our staple here, to be cautious, Ships engaged; the services of which ships shall, in as the larger portion of the United States Crop of his opinion, entitle them to such reward, and who shall Cotton will undoubtedly be sent to England, and not be included in the foregoing list. at such prices the Bombay qualities have no chance of competing with it.

ADMIRALTY, DEC. 27.

Royal Marines-To be Sec. Lieuts, Cadets, H. Spratt, G. E. O. Jackson, F. A. P. Wood, E. P. Usher. G. B, Puddicombe, M. Spratt, and C. T. F. Onslow.

ADMIRALTY, DEC. 30-

The undermentioned Naval Promotion has taken place, in consequence of the recent war in China :- Lieutenant to be commander-T. F. Birch, Esq. PROMOTIONS.

Lieuts.-H. R. Foote, F. T. Chetham, S. Fowell, J. N. Norman, S. H. Derriman, J. Sectombe.

APPOINTMENTS

Coms-G G Macdonald Dublin: C C Robinson Gleaner: W Maitland Spiteful: G G Otway Vizen: v Boyes prom W G Glanville St Vincent.

Lieats T W Sidney Styx: B Aplin Acheron :- Goldsmith Warspite v Gordon prom E Slade and EJ Bedford Gleaner: A C Murray Spiteful: HA Story

Baquelerek Gargon Heard c Wade and H W Baugh Samarang: Stirling to be Free Press, 25th Feby Flag Lieut to Admiral Sir E Codricgton; HR Foote Albert: S Fowell Harlequin: W Horton Gorgon: F W Horton Dido: JC Provost St Vincent: GR Moyle LONDON, 5th December, 1842 Dublin: P Parkhurst and W H Rushbrooke Cam- bridge: G Wodehouse Thunderbolt: R M'K Richard- son Illustrious: JB Emery Comet vice Harding to Columbia vice Kortright: Henry L Cox vice Edwards Styr: J Jayes African.

The arrival of the extraordinary Overland Mail which reached this on 924 ultimo, conveying the glorious intelligence of the conclusion of Peace with Chips, and of the successes in Afghan. istan, diffused general joy, and Her Majesty to mark her appre ciation of the services rendered by the Commanding Officers employed in these distinguished proceedings, has already been pleased to confer the following honours upon them, a notification of which appeared in the Gazette of 2d instant. Vice Admiral, Sir William Parker, a Knight Grand Cross of the Bath, as also Major General Sir Henry Pottinger. Major General George Pollock and Major General William Nott of the East India Com. pany's service, to be also Knights Grand Cross of the Bath; and the dignity of Baronet has been conferred on Lieut. General Sir Hugh Gough, G. C. B. 1 Ibid.

The news of the termination of hostilities in China and the opening of additional Ports for the reception of British Goods has given an impetus to our Manufacturers, and caused a revival of trade in all branches. If the advantage we have derived be jn- diciously used this conntry will reap material benefit, but it has su frequently happened that when a new-opening has occurred for British Merchandize it has been poured in with so little judgment both as to quantity and the qualities required, that it has proved the ruin of many who have embarked in it. Some persons have already urged that as Sir Robert Peel imposed the Property and Income Tax partly on account of the Chinese War, that having terminated he should repeal it the no.T Session: of this there is no probability, as there is every expectation he will proceed still further with his alteration in our Con-mercial Tariff, and if the mission of Sir Henry Ellis to the Brazils should terminate favour. ably with regard to the abolition of Slave labour in that Country in the cultivation of Sugar, there is no doubt the duty on the importation of this staple article, when of foreign growth, will be materially reduced, and a strong hope that our own cultivators of that important commodity will also be relieved from a portion of the heavy tax at present imposed on their produce.

Bombay Times, 15th Feby

THE Glasgow East India Association have transmit- ted a memorial to the Lords of her Majesty's Treasu ry. praying for a material reduction in the duty on tea, and the establishment of fair reciprocity with China. They say that the direct trade of this country to China had seldom exceeded 1,200,000 per annum, and the annual trade from China has seldom exceeded 4,000,000, both sums exclusive of what passes through the medium of America and Australia; the difference Capts.-C. Richards, J. Hallowes. between the two being made good chiefly by the opium Coms.-T. G. Forbes, E. Peirse, J. A Gordon, G. and cotton exported from British India, the former to the annual value of 3,000,000!., and the latter of up- Smith. wards of 1,000,000l., whilst the balance of trade against China has been paid in bullion. The supply of opium and cotton is not likely to be materially reduced. The silk of China is constantly losing ground in competi tion with thaf of Italy. The miscellaneous articles admitted of little increase; and TEA, the great staple of China, is already imported to as great an extent as the consumption, limited by high price, will allow. Great Britain, therefore, already exports about as much to China direct, and from India, as she receives, or can at-present receive, of the produce of the latter The list accordingly show to the First the Treasury that there is no room for an export trade to any considerable extent with China, because although there be an immense territory and population in that country, yet they have not produce to give which we can at present take in return, as it is clearly proved by the large quantity of bullion requir ed from China to adjust the balance of trade. The duty charged on tea by our tariff is equal to 200 per cent, on the shipping cost, viz. 2s. 1d. per lb. on an article which, at an average, costs 1s. on board; and whilst a tariff is negotiating in China for the admission of our products, it is but reasonable to expect that the Chinese will keep in view the monstrous duty charged in England on their staple. The duty so charged talls chiefly on the poor, who are the largest consumers; and it falls the more heavily, that they consume the low-priced teas. The memorialists accordingly con- Fclude that the present high duty restricts the consump- tion materially, and, by limiting imports, limits also the exports. That the intercourse with China, having heretofore been confined to one port, the intercourse could not be so extended as to increase the quantity of tea taken in return, so much as might enable her Ma- jesty's Government to reduce the duty and yet main- tain the revenue; but the previous hindrances being re- Volunt. 1st Class-A D Mercer Tweed: A. W Bed-moved, and we having now access to the port nearest ford Saumarez: SLJ Peile Samarang: JH Ormonde the principal place of growth, the time is come when and CF Vyvyan Samarang: G Tucker Thunderbolt: such a reduction is imperiously called for. The me TW Smyth Cambridge: C F Evelyn Volage: R morialist further say that a reduction of duty on black Blakeston Thunderbolt. teas, of one half would not only facilitate the forma tion of a fair tariff with China, and increase the amount of our exports, but would greatly add to the combri, especially of the poorer classes of British subjects, would not (at least it would only partially, and for time) injure the revenue, and would, moreover, materi- ally increase the consumption of sugar, another article vast importance to the Exchequer Lon

Masters-W. Mills Spiteful: J W Symonds (act.) Gleaner: E Petley (act,) Styr: J H Ashton Thunder bolt: H N Thomas to com. Sapphire v Cole dec. H Baker Gorgon: EM Chaffers (act.) Warspite: JD Pascoe Frolic.

Mates.-H JAF Maddock Warspite: F Willougby and W. C Marshall Gorgon: GTS Winthrop Agin- court: A Luckraft Frolic: E Marshall Caledonia: W Smith Excellent: CM Aynsley Scout

Sec. Masters-A L Halloran Acheron: R Saunders Gorgon: R Walker Gleaner: A Betts Cleopatra: R Dean Belvidera.

Midshipmen.-P. Saumarez Frolic: JPC Owen Warspite: F Rich Indus: JT Cust Thunderbolt: B O Adelborg Warspite.

Master's Assist-N J Soane Magara: T Spicer Sa- marang: M Richards Warspite: W N Jewell and W H Harvey, Victory: G F M Dougall Samarang. Surgs-H W Mahon Samarang: J Hateley Thun- derbolt: J Rees Frolic.

Assit Surgs-A Eusta Acheron TR Pickthorn Warspite & St G Bowen Minden: Er (addit)

1

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addressed.

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our outstanding arrears, (nearly one half of our receipts,) admonishes us to request our friends and subscribers, to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our claims; which trifling as they are individually

China. The article in question is distin- guished for the same sound sense and prac- tical sagacity, which marked his former production. In our next, we hope to give a more lengthened notice.

THE connexion of the Rev. Mr. SHUCK with the FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GA- ZETTE having ceased; it is requested that henceforth, in all matters relating to the paper, parties will be pleased to apply atIt is indeed the part of a good citizen to the PRINTING OFFICE, where all Commu- impart to his fellows, the knowledge and in- nications for the Editor must in future be formation which he has gathered from per- sonal observation and research in remote lands. We nanseate the cry which is rais- ed in every colony against the ignorance This benightedness is of folks at home." indisputable, but how comes it so? Why from the supineness and indifference of the professed friends of the complaining Colo- nists. If some who have had the like op- portunities, would follow the example of Mr. Wise and emulate his truly British feelings, by publishing the result of their of matured experience, we dare promise them a most genial reception from the Public at home, whilst they will earn a just title to the gra- titude and thanks of their Countrymen a- broad.

yet aggregately amount to a considerable sum.

17 Any irregularity of delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAFER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

WANTED.-A dollar each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos. 16 and 27 on application to the PRINTING OFFICE. Hongkong 9th March.

ETEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE, HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 23RD. 1843.

THE Vixen Steamer from Bombay with Lieut. Col. Malcolm C. B. the bearer of the Ratified Treaty arrived here on the 16th Inst. London Letters to January the 6th were received by the same opportunity. ON March the 9th, we remarked "it is expected that Keying, a near relative of the Emperor will be re-appointed Imperial Commissioner in which case, H. E. the Ple- nipotentiary might proceed Northward &c. We have since learned that the Authorities : at Canton, consider it quite certain that Ke-ying will be sent down immediately by the Emperor, to resume the negotiations with a view to an early settlement, hence it will be unnecessary for H. E. at present to visit the North.

We understand H. E. on the 15th re- ceived a visit from Hien-lieng (one of Ele- poo's assistants) and some other oflicers. Hwang (the Secretary and Elepoo's other assistant) was unable to leave Canton, as he was engaged in arranging the late Im- perial Commissioner's papers, and making the necessary reports to the Cabinet at Peking.

By our advices from London, we learn that the accouchement of Her Majesty is expected to take place about this time. The gossip, is that the expulsion from the Palace of a German Ba- roness. by the influence of the Prince, has led to a restoration of those feelings, which ought to sub- sist between mother and daughter, and hence at the levees and drawing-rooms of the present sea- son Her Majesty will be represented by tha Duchess of Kent,

A visit from the King of Hanover to England is threatened.

Lord Melbourne, we are glad to hear is restored to health. Parliament will meet for dispatch of business on the 2nd of Feby.

A further relaxation of the oppressive Corn laws is expected.

IN beginning a new volume we may he pardon- to future coufidence, instancing the conformity of ed for taking a retrospective glance, and as a titlo events with our anticipations.

In our address of the 17 March 1842 "we said we cherish the expectation that the mighty pro- blem now in process of solution will be fraught with unmixed good not ouly to China itself but to inscribe Free Trade on our banner and that it may our beloved country and mankind at large. We wave triumphant we shall insist on the permanent occupation of Hong Kong--the authoritative decla- ration of its being a Free Port, and the exercise of a generous Policy by the Home and Local Go- vernments to foster and encourage this iusular set- tlement on the coast of China, which we earnestly believe requires but little aid, to become one of the most important commercial emporia in the East."

On the 31st March we remarked "We doubt

not that by this time, in parliament, Sir Robert Peel has exhibited himself as a Reformer, not only of our Criminal but also of our Fiscal Code, which has hitherto been a disgrace to the Civilization we so often and so proudly invoke." On the 12th of March, Sir Robert Peel submitted his Financial Statement and announced his intention to revolu

tionise our Tariff..

When we quoted (in No. 2) the passage from Lord Ellenboroughs Speech commencing. "Yet he felt he had much to do-to terminate the War in China-to restore tranquility to both banks of the Indus: in a word to give peace to Asia" we remarked we may safely say it can be accepted as a correct index of his Indian Policy, which will we think be of a very auspicious character. What- ever may be the peculiarities of the Noble Lord he is not effeminate in mind" &c. &c.

On occasion of the Affghanistan disaster (No 4) We said "The tenure of our Indian Empire im- peratively demands that the heaviest retribution of a righeous judgement be immediately exacted". We feel sure only a few short months will elapse ere the insurrection be crushed--the leaders ex- tinguished &c. &c.

On the 26 May (No. 10) we say "We do not share the opinion of the oldest residents and those most acquanted with Chinese character, who con- It is hoped the present right-minded, energetic fidently aver several years must elapse before this President of the United States, will be able to War will end" and add we count on a successful obtain the passing of an Act to introduce into Am-issue within twelve months "that our establishment erica the Bonding system, and a reduction of the on this Island is now fixed on a basis that it cannot duties by the late Tariff.

The £50,000 required by the Corn Law League to carry on the war, will be raised it seems.

THE attempt to to revive Monachism in Eng- land, is likely to be successful. Another fire at Liverpool has taken place, the loss is estimated at from £70,000 to £100,000. The Anti, Opium agitation, as we prognosticated, has revived and is aided by the Thunderer of the Times. We hold it is pretty certain, the issue of all this will be, that the monopoly or rather the right of preemption by the Company will be ab o- lished, and as free a cultivation of the poppy, as of the sugar cane, or any other agricultural product be permitted. Should the Company levy 200 Rupees per chest on the export of Onium and sell Licences to retail venders, as in the case of Spirits; we have no doubt the Revenue derivable from this source, during the next ten years would ex- ceed that of the ten preceding.

HAVING now completed our first volume, thank curfionds and sub scribers for their support and assistance. We commenced under the most discourag- ing circumstances, and with the risk of a considerable pecuniary loss. This we are The occupation of the Marquesas Islands by glad to say has been avoided, so that wa the French, has attracted considerable notice in are encouraged to believe that before ano-Europe. The report of Rear Anmiral du Petit Thouars has rendered the idea of colonising these ther year shall elapse, the extent of our sup Islands very popular in France. Some of the port will enable us (without any additional English papers affect deep indignation at the ag charge) to double the size of our Print and gressive spirit of the French, which is very absurd greatly increase the interest and value of in this case, if it be true, that the Native Chiefs its contents; thus striving as far as possible were induced to place themselves under the pro- to render it, not only the exponent of the tection of the French, to shield themselves from a opinions, but the representative of the cha-punishment they expected, and merited from the United States; surely France and America can racter and importance of our rising Colony. settle the question in dispute without our interfer- We take this opportunity of tendering ence. our warmest acknowledgenients to British and Colonial contemporaries, many of whom have, much to our surprise, eulogised our lucubrations far, very far beyond their de- serts-an amount of praise far too cheaply earned for sach off hand, unlaboured efforts. • We have been much gratified by the peru- sal of a communication if the Colonial Magazine on the China Pacification. We have transferred an extract to our Columns, and we inuch regret our space will not permit our presenting to our Readers the article in its entirety. The author Mr. Ro- bert Wise of Allonby (who in early life served on this coast on board of H. M. Ship Dover) has earned a deserved reputation from his Pamphlet on Affghanistan and

The excesses of the populace, instigated it is said by that Arch-intriguer Louis Phillippe, which led to the Bombardment of Barcelona by the Captain General, has created great disgust throughout Europe.

THE SHIPPING arrivals in London from China during December, were the Eleanora, Bengallee, Niagara, Mary Imree, Chusan, and Gratitude. At Liverpool, the John Christian. The Ships loading in London for China were the Passenger, Maid of Athens, Rokeby, Possidone, Arundel, Eleanora, Emu, Indian, Zenobia. At Liverpool the Ivan- hoe, Thomas Fielden, Patna, Chieftain, Aden, Ranger, John Horton, and Iris. In the Clyde, the James Campbell and Duke of Wellington. SAIL- ED in December for China, the Sappho, Charles Jones, Ingleborough, Nautilus, Antilla, besides some four or five Vessels, whose ultimate destina- tion was supposed to be China.

be abandoned."

On June the 18th we say "we hold that the present armament is sufficiently powerful to coerce the Chinese into a Pacification. We might much extend this recapitulation, but enough of Political events, we turn to Commercial matters; with respect to JUSTICE TO CHINA in a reduction of Tea duty &c. our views are now acknowledged to be cof- rect. We can also instance both our Staples TEA and SILK, particularly the latter with respect to which, the last Loudon accounts almost guarantee that our confident anticipations will be realized to the very letter.

We claim no particular merit for judgement or discernment, well knowing that most of our Rea- ders if non-interested spectators (as we were) of passing events would have come to the same con-

WHEN announcing the Pacification, we said, speaking of the victors, "we are confident that a noble guerdon for their gallantry and services will be accorded by their Sovereign, and they will re- ceive the well merited applause of their fellow countrymen." It is now our pleasing duty (in the list of promotions which will be found in an- other column) to record the ample fulfillment of our expectations. As regards the effects of the news of the PEACE at home, all accounts concur, that they fully verify what was stated in our No. 35, viz. "we aver that no intelligence in our time (excepting only the victory of Waterloo) will have produced such general rejoicing in England"-in- deed almost the identical phraseology has been been used by a leading London Journal.

As was expected, the NEws induced an instan- taneous revival in the commercial world. In the manufacturing districts an important impulse was felt, which with the almost unprecedentedly mild winter, has gone far to alleviate a state of desti- tution which one shudders to contemplate, but which is most astoundingly attested by the falling off last Quarter's Revenue. In the Excise alone the deficiency amounted to £717,262! In the Customs to £581,105!

Public attention is strongly turned towards Chi- na, hence Hongkong, we feel sure, cannot but benefit thereby, and to an extent far beyond what its friends now contemplate. The length of our Extracts, precludes us at present going into fur- ther details.

We have gone through our files, and the article we have yet seen on the China question, is one in the Examiner, which we have transferred to our Columns, and which well merits a perusal. It is by the same writer, whose admirable paper on Chinese affairs, we published in our No. 9.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

We cannot now comment on the sayings and doings at home, in reference to China; we would however observe, that all the papers we have yet seen are unanimous in the opinion we have repeat- edly expressed, viz. It is alone the business of the Chinese to prevent smuggling, and that it would be not only inexpedient but decidedly adverse to British interests for us interfere in the matter. Thus much we would however add, it is our confident expectation (should an exceptional policy be adopted in China) that a supposed equivalent will be obtained as a recompense.

By our late advices from Bombay, we learn that all is tranquil in India. The Ameers of Scinde appear disposed to make terms with Major Outram. Lord Ellenborough is going to Agra, where the Government and Courts of Law will be stationed for some time. Trade generally was better, and Freights also have improved.

TO CORRESPONDENTS. THE Communication of L with respect to the Claims for losses by the late riot at Canton, was received too late for our last issue. Want of space precludes its publi- cation this week. For the same reason we cannot insert the account of the open- ing of the Theatre at Koolongsoo, for which we are indebted to V. We are much obliged to our Foreign friend for his description of the Steam Rope Manu- factory at Manila. We shall translate and insert in an early number. In reply to J. F. E. we can only say that we have not yet seen a Copy of the ratified Treaty, but think with him that its publication will be no longer delayed, as by this time (Parlia- ment having met) its contents will be fully known in England.

PROSPECT OF AN IMPROVED TRADE IN CHINA. Peace having been happily concluded between Great Britain and China, it only remains for us now to make the best of our altered position, by using every honest effort within our reach, to ex- tend the trade profitably and honorably, and to endeavour to cemen, friendship with China. It is to be hoped the treaty of peace concluded by Sir Henry Pottinger, may give that full expan- sion to our intercourse with China, which the late war gave us the power of opening up; everything now depends on the terms on which the questions are settled respecting duties on imports and ex- ports, transit duties chargeable on foreign and home merchandise passing from one part of China to another, privileges of the Hong merchants, port charges on shipping, system to be adopted of con- ducting business at the four ports newly opened, and also at Canton in future, how the British mer- chants are to be accommodated with residences for themselves, their wives, and their families, at the ports newly opened, how protection to life and property is to be made secure, how grievances are

the British are to be recovered, and how we are to be assured that the voice of the representatives of England reaches the Emperor's ears, and has due attention and consideration paid to it without delay. If these points be severally fully gone in- to, clearly settled, and fairly established, by being put into good working order, and into full opera- tion under the auspices of our forces now in China, before them forces move one foot homeward from China, (or before any considerable part move homeward,) then, from the great resources and wealth of China; from the persevering industry of her 300 million inhabitants, and from the fixed and resolute national trading propensities, and the ceaseless commercial enterprise of the plodding Chi- nese part of the population, (above ninety-nine parts of one hundred of the whole,) it is not too much to anticipate confidently, that the result of the China war will be the effect of affording more relief to the industry and enterprise of our overflowing population, and of infusing more new life, in mo- tive for active commercial (and no doubt profitable operations, than any other one measure whatever. and prove in the result highly beneficial to both

countries.

But if the foregoing points referred to, be left, in a great measure, in an unsettled state, to find their own level according to surrounding circumstances, after the wain part of our forces have been with- drawn, then our splendid powder-and-shot opera- tions will have availed but little, as the every act of the Tartar government will be to drive matters) back to their old feeing custom, which in China is law,and not law-custom.

Hong-kong, our only British free port on the whole coast of China, will in the latter case avail little, for, while the Tartars hold the control of

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THE Commercial accounts received by the pre- sent Mail, are, on the whole, satisfactory. Busi- ness generally was reviving, and although high prices are not likely to reign again for some years, there seems to be a returning confidence, in a stea- dy and improving trade.

the interior transit of merchandise, the Mandarining the needful to pay us for our merchandise to a officers, with the assistance of the privileged Hong very large amount annually; doubtless the indus- merchants, can force. or at least direct, the main trious millions of China, can do as much in propor- current of trade to any point on the main land of tion to their numbers, in this respect, as the indolent the empire which may suit them, or their govern- thousands in some of the South American States, ment; however, as we have got the key of China, have done for a series of years past. Colonial Magazine, we can use it or otherwise, as circumstances may from time to time require, and should we unfor- tunately be compelled again to unlock the door to get into China, then the shortest and surest way to end the matter would be, to run a line by steamers and an army, right accross China, from Nankin to Canton, via the the Poyang Lake, and declare and hold the country between that line and the sea as British, in which section would be included all the tea and silk districts, and the most opulent and populous provinces of China. Hong-kong being a free port will largely share as a depot in the trade of the Straits and Malay Archipelago, which will doubtless considerably increase; it will also as a natural consequence largely participate in the coasting trade of China, but what share it might have in the Tea and European trade remains yet to be seen, as under the old system, all regular trade in the Canton river had to pass through the gras- ping hands of the privileged Hong merchants.

power

The great falling off in the revenue both for the year and quarter, appear to have caused serious misgivings in the minds of capitalists, and stocks had been slightly affected in consequence; but there seemed to be no apprehensions that the di- minution would be otherwise than temporary. We re-publish Messrs. TRUEMAN and Cook's Circular, which gives a lucid, and apparently ac- curate, account of the state of the market.

which the year eighteen hundred and forty twoshas

Notwithstanding the excitement arising out of the in-

As respects Property, the change has been no less

MONEY AND EXCHANGES.-The important events by been marked will, hereafter, render it one of the most The four additional ports opened to us by war memorable epochs in the commercial annals of this for trade in China, are admirably selected in point Country; commencing, as it did, with a general stag of position, for the extension of our commerce with nation in duration and extent quite unprecedented ne- the most populous and most wealthy parts of companied with losses, arising from failures both at China, Shanghai is most especially so, from its home and abroad, and from the depreciation of mèr- being the sea-port of the ancient imperial capital chandize, estimated at not less than from twenty to of Nankin, and also of the mighty Yang-tse river; thirty millions sterling; and terminating with the re- from its being situated in the middle of the most sumption of activity, and a revival in manufactures, as richly and thickly inhabited parts of China; and extraordinary as it was sudden and unexpected. from its having also the most opulent populatien. telligence from China has passed away, the Manufac- The great fear of our not succeeding lies in the turing Districts present a marked change for the bet- of the Mandarin officers and privileged ter; not, however, produced, as generally imagined, by Hong merchants combined, to thwart the terms of an impetus given from the completion of a treaty with the treaty of peace, which admits of freedom of China, but owing to other causes which have been si- trade between us and the Chinese generally-iflently in operation for some time past. the Tartar government honourably act up to the spirit and letter of the treaty of peace, allowing us extraordinary within the period referred to; Mills and freedom of trade generally, and if that government Machinery, which were not saleable at all, have been have the power of forcing the Mandarin officers sought after; and the latter, considered to be deterio- through the empire to carry into effect their en-rated by some years of wear, has been saleable at prices gagements with us, against all Hong, or other above half the cost of new. From the report of one of privileged opposition, the Tartar government the Factory Commissioners, presented to Parliament cause all restrictions on trade to be thrown off de last February, and bearing date December, 1841, it would appear that of 1,:64 Cotton Mills in his district, facto, at once throughout the entire Empire, upon there were 139 on short time, and 138 not working at the principle of a moderate inland duty being all, making a difference of 25,000 in the number of chargeable on merchandise passing from one part persons employed; whereas all the Mills which were of China to another, then there can be no longer on short time are now in full work: a similar observa- the shadow of a doubt of a most immense exten- tion may be made as to those on other branches of sion to our China trade in goods and merchandise, manufacture particularly suited the wants of the China mar- SUGAR. A strong impression has for some time past ket; but only in such particularly suited goods and prevailed, that an early revision of the Sugar Duties merchandise, can any extension be expect ed for would take place, which has had a great effect on the the next few years least. Unsuitable goods do market, and sales, in consequence, could only be made very badly in China, no one will give any price upon a reduced scale, and at a considerable decline in for them. Plain cottons, cotton-twist, and cam- price;-although the extent of Consumption, as well blets, and woollens of suitable colours and qualities, as the very moderate Stocks, warranted the expecta- and some metals, are the chief European articles tion that the demand would have been more extensive. of consumption in extensive demand in China.

What may be the ultimate issue of negociations now But if the Tartar government still continue to pending, must necessarily be only vague conjecture; rumour assuming a reduction of the present duty of levy heavy transit duties on goods passing into the 24s. per Cat. to 16s, on British, and of 63s. tn 30s. on interior of China from the five trading ports, (Can- Foreign-a scheme which would involve a sacrifice of ton included,) then however favourably the import revenue of not less than one million sterling, even al- and export duties may be regulated, aud levied, at lowing for a much greater quantity being taken for the port at which thr British merchandise is land- home use; such rumours serve, however, to increase

eu, the extension P

must necessarily be slow and limited in its deve- on a solid foundation. lopment. SPICES.-Cassia Lignea has latterly fallen very Teas and Silk have always been procurable in considerably in value, chiefly in expectation of large China in quanties equal to our demand, notwith-supplies;-the decline from the highest point is free 15s. 18s, and prices now range from 70s. 80s. per standing that the war has been of three ye are Cwt against 85s, 93s. in 1841, and 80s. 90s. in duration, what further quantities of these stapls 1840. Imports this year 21.500' Packages, against articles we can with profit take annually, in pay- 18,000 and 10,800. Stock 3,000, against 2,700 and ment for British merchandise, or what increased 9,500. SILK, &c.-Silk has been in very good demand, and quantities of these staples China can supply, re- mains yet to be acertained; but be that as it may, the value of Bengal has been maintained, but China there is, I think, little, if any, fear of silver and and Italian have given way, about six or seven per gold being forthcoming (from the nmerous mines Cent. The Imports of Bengals for 1842 exceed those of China) in abundance, to pay for our merchand- of the preceding year by 1800 Bales, being 8784, ise, so long as we continue to supply their wants against 6975-Chinas, on the contrary, there is a fal as at present, at one-third less than they can supling off, being 2014 only, against 3793;-the Deliveries ply themselves elsewhere; this remark applies Bengal, 6835, against 6037; China, 2991, against particularly to woollens (thin ladies' cloth, the 3973, and the Stock on the 31st December, Bengal, heaviest article as regards money amounts,) 7,300 Bales, against 5350; China, 1203, against 2180. Silk piece Goods have been depressed for the last wanted in China. The main question does not twelve months, Corahs having declined in that period appear to be, which is the best port for procuring 1s. 6s. at 2 pcr Piece, and not of free sale at that teas and silk cheaply, but it appears to be which reduction, the low price of Bengal Silk enabling our is the largest market for the sale of our productive manufacturers to fabricate an article materially into industry, and Shanghai the sea-port of Nankin and competition with them. Bombay Times. the Yang-tse River, appears to be that market; and from that river, by its tributaries and canals standing in connexion with the whole interior of China, the Imperial capital, Pekin, is included. Some of the South American States, which possess little or nothing else but gold and silver for foreign trade, have for a great number of years taken largely of our merchandise annually, and paid us mainly in the precious metals; China has gold, silver, copper, and other ore mines in abun- dance, her population is certainly both the largest and the most industrious on the face of the earth, she therefore possesses all the requisites for obtain-

DEATHS. Viscount Hill, Sir F. S. Weatherall, Lord Gil- father of Miss Mitford of literary celebrity, Vice lies, Arch-Deacon Wrangham, Dr. Mitford, the Admiral Evans, the Countesses of Denbigh, Howth, and Munster, Dr. A. Goode, E. I. Co's Service- at sea on his return from China, Hon. C. B. Strat- ford. Capt. in the 18th Royal Irish, Admiral Sir John Lingford, K. C. B., Major-Gen. Percy Drummond, C. B.

VIDE SUPPLEMENT.

212

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART

OF THE WORLD.

The fast sailing Ship "CAMAILU, A. 1 for 12 years. Burthen 288 tons, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843. FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

THE AI barque WELCOME, 290 tons per Register, H. Morris, Commander.

For particulars apply to Hong Kong, 7th March, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

THE A. 1. British built Barque "ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co., Hongkong, 15th February, 1843.

NOTICE,

QIr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

FOR SALE Shaw and Maxwells l'ort and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1842.

FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all des, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warin Clothing, and Beaver Hats. Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

mises to

D. WILSON & Co. WINE, BEER & SPIRIT MERCHANTS, OIL & ITALIAN WAREHOUSMEN, HOTEL and STORE KEEPERS. have, in connexion with their Establishment in Calcutta, completed most extensive arrangements with the first Houses in England and France for receiving regular consignments of every descrip- tion of goods: and they are now prepared to exe- cute orders to any extent for goods of the best qua- lity, on the most moderate terms, and every ar- ticle is guaranteed to arrive in the best Condition. FIRST RATE WINES.

received from the most eminent Houses in Eng- land and on the Continent.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount

given to Regimental Messes and Dealers taking their regular supplies.

Lists of goods for sale to be had on application at the Store. AUCKLAND HOTEL

January 1st 1843.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE, the house and lot opposite the Hongkong Market, known as the Auckland Hotel, also one lot on Queen's Road, south cido, Apply to

C. V. Gillespie. Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843. NOTICE.-Storage can be obtained at low rates in Granite Godowus on application C. V. Gillespie, Hongkong 20th December 1842. SALE. On the marine Lot next the China Bazaar. Chains 1, 1 and 15 16 inches,

FOR

do. Rigging, Topsail sheets, Jyes &c. 1-16, 5-16, 11-16, Anchors 330 to 360 lb, and 21,, 22, and 23 Cwt. cach, One double purchase Crab,

Canvas (English lengths) and twine,

Singapore spars 68 to 74 feet, by 22 to 24 inches,

Rough pine spars 30 to 50 feet,

Java Coffee in bags,

Sherry in wo.d and bottle, very Superior,

Java Arrack in half Leaguers.

Apply to MR. ANTONIO COLLAÇO, on the premises, or to WILLIAM SCOTT, -MACAO. Hongong, October 5th, 1842.

FOR SALE.-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal gitto, English C. V. Gilespie 46 Queens Road, has on Sale Large Singapore

and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar. rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in ses, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from

England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Ments and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as. sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Sali, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to

FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS.

Hongkong, March 1st, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant For Charter, Freight or Passige apply

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Spars suitable for Lowes Masts, Orrel Coal, square Iron, Plate Glass, Irish Pork in barrels, Preserved Meats, Fish and Vegetables in tin and in cases of sit dozen each, Sherry. Cham- paigne, Por, Hock, Brandy, White and Grey Long Cloths, 4-c Hong-kong 3 ih Nov. 1842.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting; and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley.

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. NOTICE.GOODs and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods nro received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843

NOTICE THE interest and responsibility of MR. WILLIAM that of Buchanan & Co. Glasgow, ceased on the 31st Decem ber last. [Signed] DUNNETT, SHAW, & Co.

Pinang, 10th June, 1842.

FOR Sale at the Rooms of the undersigned the FOR SALE -Newcastle Coals in bags at 50 cents ollowing Goods Viz.

Anchors of all Sizes,

Chain Cables,

Manila Segars, 4: Superior,

Black Silk Stockings,

White coloured and Fancy Socks,

Regatta Shirts,

Duck and Faucy Trowsers,

Dress and Shooting Coats.

Negro hend Tobacco. Pilot bread

Soap

These goods are just landed from the American vessels LARK and NAVIGATOR and are in prime con- dition: Apply to G. F. DAVIDSON. Hongkong: 7th March, 1843.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Baly Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry Copenhagen Cheray Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hongkong, 1st March, 1843. The Bungalow, with six FOR SALE. Rooms, convenient Offices for servants, and Godown; also Stables situated on the Queen's Read, opposite to Marine lot No. 46. dimensions of lot, f120+ f105. Apply to

C. V. GILLESPIE.

OR SALE-Several Extensive and Valuable Lots of Ground, eligibly situate on the Queen's Road, having deep water nvenient one Storey Dwelling House, with a large plot of frontage, and within a short distance of the Government Offices. ground attached, fronting the Sea. Particulars may be had of. RICHARD OSWALD. Hongkong, 7h Feby. 843.

Ships.

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for P. Townsend & Co. FOR SALE. Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

NOTICE. THE undersigned is authorized to re- ceive all packages or Parcels addressed to any of the Officers or to the Mess of Hon. 18th Royal Irish Regiment, and will pay any expences incurred upon them. N, DUUS,

Fearon's Wharf, Hongkong, 22d March, 1842,

NOTICE-ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS Printed by Messrs Galignani, rue Vivienne, PARIS. [Orders to be accompanied by a bill payable in London or Paris.] GALIGNANIS MESSENGER.-A daily Politi cal Journal. The object of this well-known Journal is to supply the reader with a SUBSTITUTE FOR THE EN- TIRE OF THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH NEWSRAPERS. Con- ducted on a system of undeviating impartiality, the sentiments of every party, Ministerial and Opposition, find their place in its columns.

In the English Department will be found the leading articles of the Tory, Conservative, Whig, and Radical journals. A prominence correspondent with their vast importance is given to the parliamentary debates. In addition to all news of fashionable or general interest, the proceedings at the India House, and every subject important to Eastern subscribers. is specially attended to. The French Department contains (in a special ar- ticle) the political sentiments of the Paris press; the proceedings of the French Chambers; the fashionable and local news of Paris, Stocks, etc.; the earliest infor. mation from Spain, Switzerland, Italy and Ger- many, Russia, and all other parts of the Continent.

Terms of Subscriptions: (Payable in advance) One Year, £5. 10s; Six Months, £2. 17s.

THE LONDON AND PARIS OBSERVER, Journal of Literature. Science, and Fine Arts. -This Journal, published every Sunday, consisting of forty- eight columns of closely-printed, matter large 4to. (al- most the matter of an octavo volume), contains the élite of all that is intellectual, useful. or recreative, in more than TWENTY London Quarterly, Monthly, and Weekly Publications.

Terms y subser vpetons

year £2. 10s., Six months £1, 7s.

Shipping Intelligence.

17th Monarch,

17th Edmonston,

20th Arethusa,

20th S. Frazer,

20th Erigone frigate,

21st H.C.Str. Proserpine, Hough,

Chusah

ARRIVED.

per pecul.

Apply to

C. V. Gillespie.

MAR.

46 Queens Road.

16th H.M.Str. Vixen,

Bombay

Robertson,

Bombay

Hongkong 20th December 1842.

M'Dougal,

Bombay

do. do. 4: Fine equal to 3rd Superior

FOR SALE.

17th Sri Singapura,

Whampoa

Superfine Blue cloth,

Beef

Pork

Christian,

Whampoa

Ladies Muslin dresses of all colours,

Tar

Pitch

Williams,

Whampoa

Silks, Satin and Straw Bonnets,

Rosin

Mackrell in Kits

Ct Cecille,

Stout and Patent Leather Shoes,

Navy bread

Macao Macao

Sewing Cotton of all numbers,

Flour

SAILED.

150 boxes of raisins &c. &c.

16th Minerva,

16th Inglewood,

Brown, Kerr,

Whampoa Whampoa

16th H.M S. Pelican,

Justice,

16th H.1.S. Wolverine, 16th Lafayette [French], 16th Terror,

Johnson,

Macao

Costey.

Macao

Macao

Boyce,

Whampoa

Sproule,

Whampoa

M.Cartey,

Whampoa

Splatt,

Whampoa

18th Minerva,

Brown,

Whampoa

18th Monarch,

Robertson,

Macao

19th H.C.Str Proserpine, Hough, 20th Thetis.

Macao

Roach,

Macao

20th Sri Singapura,

Whampoa

22nd Arethusa,

Christian, William, Salewangen,

Manila

Macao

Macao

William Pedder Harbor Master

Woollen Caps, and Striped Ginghams for Shirtings, Bengal Towels,

Copying and writing ink,

Best double distilled Lavender water with Glass Stoppers

by Smith & Co.

Eau de Cologne.

Needles of all Nos.

Fancy quilling for Gents, Vests and Childrens Frocks,

Plain and figured Jean and drillings.

Figured Flannel for Ladies winter dresses,

Quills and Black Lead Pencils,

Fresh Table Raisins,

Copper Kettles horn Lanterns and fish Boilers,

Spermecete candles. Pad Locks, Powder Flasks, Vices, Chisels, files &c. &c. &c.

Dutch Blankets, Persian Carpets, &c. &c. Best Brandy, Sherry, Gin and Beer &c. &8. &c.. G. MOSES & Co.

Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843 Queen's Road.

FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA Roon" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

ALSO

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com For particulars apply to plete in every respect. BENNETT, PAIN & Co.

Hougkong, 3rd March, 1843.

17th Eden,

17th Maia,

17th Eliza,

18th Anderson,

22nd S. Frazer,

NOTICE.-Just opened and exposed for Sale. Eng. 22nd Jagatra [Dutch], lish Saddles and Bridles complete, cut Tumblers Wine, Champagne and Liquor Glasses, Decanters, Fin ger Cups and Butter Pots, ludian shades and spare burners, price moderate-

Hongkong, 1st March 1843

G. Moses & Co.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

SUPPLEMENT-

No. 53, OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA, 23RD MARCH, 1843.

THE CHINESE TREATY.

We propose to examine briefly the conditions of the Chinese Treaty, and to offer some observations on its probable results. We feel the more disposed to do this, because we perceive that there are abroad some rather wild and even dangerous speculations on the subject. There are but three portions of the Treaty which it is necessary to advert to, viz., the pecuniary contribu- tion, the arrangements for the extension of our trade, which include the opening of new ports and the cession of Hongkong, and what relates to our future relations with the Chinese Government. The Chinese are to pay a contribution of twenty-one millions of Spanish dollars, and, in the ransom of Canton, they had already paid six millions, making twenty-seven millions, which, at the exchange of the day, is more than seven million sterling, but we shall call it, in realised cash to the British Treasury, only six millions. Now this sum, after allowing a million and a half for the expenses of the war, and as much more as compensation for the captured opium, will leave a net profit to the British Exchequer of three millions. Sir Robert Peel will certainly recommend to his Sovereign to ratify the Chinese Treaty, and as he before uttered pious inter- jections, and turned up his honest eyes to Heaven against the opium war, he will now, assuredly, give vent to more pious interjections, and turn up the same honest eyes, in the same direction, in contemplation of its results.

meet with insults and mortifications which, sooner or later, would lead to war, and the war, sooner or later, do conquest. We do not wish his despatches to be wholly at the mercy of such supreme tricksters as the Chinese, in a land journey of 1200 miles, nor himself without the possibility of getting an answer to them under eight months, if he got one at all; and last, al- though certainly least, we dislike an expenditure of 20,000l. a year, which, to a certainty, such a mission would cost. Those who recommend the appointment seem to forget all about Teheran, and Herat, and Ca- bool, and Burmah, nor even to think much about Constantinople.

has exported these largely, and, in particular years, to the extent of two millions of pounds,-one of the great griefs of the Chinese Government, and a principal cause of its violence, of the war which it entailed on itself, and of the punishment which its vanity, folly, and injustice have received.

The benefits which will accrue from our improved commercial relations with the Chinese, will chiefly consist in this-that they will receive our goods, and we their's, more conveniently and cheaply. The greater part of the tea and raw silk had, under the old system, to be transported by a land carriage of from four hundred to seven hundred miles before they came to our hands at Canton, The distance, under the new, will be reduced to ahont one tenth of this, through our direct intercourse with the ports of Amoy, Fuchoo, Ningpo, and Shanghai; and even the more bulky of our imports may be conveyed to the capital from the same ports, by a cheap river and canal communication. To bring these prospects to maturity, will be the work, not of a day, but of years, and we must not for- get, in our estimates of the future, that China has been three years at war, and has to pay a contribution equal, on the spot, to seven millions sterling, within three years more-that the whole public revenue is but twelve millions, the bulk of it paid to kind, and that, consequently, the weight of the payment must fail, in the shape of a forced contribution, on the richest prov. inces, that is, on those that are to be our chief cus. tomers.

Some are disposed to think that Sir Henry Pottinger ought to have included in his Treaty some stipulation on the subject of Opium; but whatever Government, whether Whig or Tory, which directed him to restrain from meddling with this question, in our judgment, pursued a wise and politic course, an opinion which we have before expressed. Every nation must mind the police of its own fiscal laws. If the Chinese make unwise and impracticable laws, that offer a splendid premium to smuggling, they must take the conse qnenee of brisk smuggling and heavy loss of revenue, and much demoralization. We ourselves offer a band- some premium to the smuggler of from 8002 to 12001.per Ct.in the duties on brandy and tobacco, and we have con. traband trade and loss of revenue as our reward; but we do not ask the French and Americans to assist our Custom-house officers, and if we did they would langh But the extension of the Trade with China will de- at us for our folly and impertinence. The English Guarda Costas of the Opium trade would have a line of pend fully as much on our own legislation as on our 1500 miles to look after, from the Gulf of Tonquin to improved relations with that country. China can, no that of Pechili. If successful, the Opium trade would doubt, produce as much raw silk as we can want, but fall into the hands of the Americans, French, and the silk trade must be extended to produce a demand. Dutch; and whether successful or unsuccessful, the for it, and this cannot be with Corn Laws. The Chi- Guarda Costas would bo a pest to ourselves, the Chinese, as experience has amply proved, can produce any nese, and every nation that traded with China. We, quantity of tea that we can consume, but the tea duty therefore, trust that the good sense which has guided must not be levied as now, on the principle of encour. Sir Henry Pottinger in other matters will not allow aging the consumption of the few rich and discourag him to create a public nuisance, for which international ing that of the many poor. Six pennies' worth and six shillings' worth must not be made to pay the same law affords no sanction. There are some, we perceive, sanguine enough to be- amount of tax-the one be charged 400 per cent. on lieve that the restoration of peace with the Chinese is the value, and the other less than 35, or the consumers at once to give life and activity to our languishing of tea will increase but slowly, and our improved rela tions with China will be in vain. Under this precious commerce. The sense which these parties evince, it is evident, is not common sense, but the kind of sense system, which has now been in operation for six years, which their predecessors in speculation displayed on the neither consumption nor revenue has improved, and opening of the South American trade, and under the both are, in fact, at this moment, little better than they guidance of which they are alleged to have sent invest-were under the old monopoly. Three short words, ments of pattens to Chili and Peru, and of skates to the We shall beg, therefore, in order to disabuse our countrymen, to say a few words on the subject of our future commercial prospects with China. China, excluding Tartary, and the other continental dependencies of the empire, which are very thinly peo- pled, contained, according to a census taken in 1813, population of three hundred and fifty-eight millions, spread over a million and a half of square miles. The gives, after all, less than 240 to every square mile-a smaller population than that of Bengal, of Lombardy, of Belgium, of our own Islands, and indeed hardly ex- ceeding that of any one of the civilised countries of Europe. In the mere density of this population there is, therefore, nothing very surprising, but it is surpris. being enough that such vast multitudes should obey one Government, and that a feeble one. It is the result of the isolation of China, of the fertility and convenience of its land, and of the amalgamation and laborious dis- cipline of forty ages. We have similar results from similar causes on a smaller scale in the example of Ja. more industrious than any other Asiatic nation.

After all, it is a convenient thing to have two con- sciences, or one so easy and supple that it can serve two purposes-one couscience to denounce robbery, and another to pocket its produce, and thank God for it- one conscience for poisoning wells, and another for pocketing dollars-one conscience for making war on a third part of the human race-for nothing, and an- other for taking six millions of sovereigns from the same large portion of mankind-for nothing. The nicknamed "opium war," which, however, it ought not at the same time to be altogether forgotten, was a war for the incarceration of an Ambassador, the imprison. mont of British merchants, and the wholesale and treacherous confiscation, of their property, is the only one which this country ever carried on that has paid its own expenses-that has paid millions into the Ex- chequer, and that has extended our commerce, or, in- deed, that has done any one of these things. Now for the extension of our trade. Heretofore we have had a direct intercourse only with one port and one province of China, containing about eight millions of people; this province, not only not centrical, but separated from the populous pertion of the empire by a range of mountains, and without good roads, or navig- able canals. Now, our direct intercourse extends to five ports and five provinces, containing upwards of seventy millions of inhabitants, the most productive of the empire in industry and staple exports, and thee of them traversed by the great canal, and by the greatest a navigable river of China, and one of the greatest and finest of the world, which confers agricultural and commercial wealth on the central empire from its west- ern to its eastern confines.

Then, there are to be Consuls for the protection of our trade at each of the five ports, and the Chinese Government is to publish a fixed Tariff, which we will venture to predict will, in a good many particulars, an improvement on Sir Robert's. Thus, for example, it will contain no" sliding scale ;" but on the contrary, in conformity with ancient usage, it will give a bounty on the importation of corn. Neither will it give a monopoly of sugar to the island of Hainan or Formosa, to pay one hundred per cent more for that necessary of life than it is intrinsically worth.

The cession of the sovereignty of the island of Hong. kong, in the estuary of the Canton river, is, no doubt, an important acquisition, for as a free port to all the world, which it ought without a moment's hesitation to be declared, it must become the emporium of a vast commerce, to the common benefit of every commercial nation, but most of all to Britain, which is in the posi- tion to reap the greatest advantage from it. Still, we think this one point d'appui not sufficient over a line of coast of nine degrees of latitude as many of long itude, to which our regular commercial intercourse is to extend, and more especially when we consider that in a voyage of at least eight hundred miles from the extreme points, there must invariably be a foul wind either going or coming,--for, if the south-west mon- soon be with us, the north-east is sure to be against us, to say nothing of typhoons at both equinoxes. To have penetrated with our fleet and army to Nankin, and to have scized the head of the canal which carries its life-blood to the Chinese Government, and the knowledge that, we can easily do so again, may, how ever, in some degree, counterbalance this disadvantage. Still we could have wished to have seen the cession if practicable, of one or two other stations similar to Hongkong, such as Koolong, in the bay of Amoy, and especially a small island in the estuary of the spendid Yang Che-kiang. One such station is, for our com- mercial security and independence, worth fifty Ambas. sadors at the Court of Pekin, which some of our con- temporaries insist, very idly and very ignorantly, on the necessity of. We desire no political or diplomatic intercourse with the Chinese that can be avoided, for reasons which on former occasions we fully stated, but which in substance we may now repeat. We do not desire to see an Ambassador residing at a Court that has yet to learn what an Ambassador, in the European sense of the office, means. We do not desire to se him there, because, in all human likelihood, he would

Plate and Amazons,

Such is the country, and such are the people. But it is not a new trade that is to be opened with China The trade has existed for two centuries, has been a

ad valorem duty," will set all right, and Sir Robert, who has, in this case, no party interests to court, can rectify the thing with a stroke of his pen and let us trust that he will be wise enough to do it.-Examiner.

n

The Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts intend establishing a mission at Hong Kong, and will raise a special fund for that

purpose.

A correspondent in the Examiner states that when the Mint price of silver is at the high rate of 5s. per ounce, the Spanish dollar (which the Chi- nese give) is worh 4s. 2d. delivered in London; but the price on the 10th Dec. was only 4s. 9 d. per ounce. At this rate, after deducting freight and necessary charges, the dollars from China, when delivered at the Mint, will not produced more than 3s. 9d. each; while, had they been sold at Hong-Kong, and bills taken on London at six would have done at 4s. 9d, per dollar, the present gate of exchange, and which bills in the present state of the money market could be negotiated at 14 per cent. Thus, upon this single item of transmitting 6,000,000 dol- lars from China to England, a loss of upward of 270,0001. sterling will be sustained, and if this in- sane policy is permitted with regard to the re- maining 15 millions of dollars, a loss of nearly one million sterling will be incurred.

free one, as far as our laws are concerned, for the last eight years, and has been but very little interrupted even by a three-years' war. Whas, then, is the amount of the trade? The whole British exports and imports do not each certainly amount to seven millions sterling, and the major part of the imports, in value, are not from England, but from India. Of the seven millions im- TEA-During the past month the market has ported by British subjects, one-half, at least, consists of opium, and a large portion of the remainder of cotton, been in a most unsettled state. At public sales on wool, and tin, with a great variety of the raw produce the 7th, 16th and 21st Dec. 28,000 chests were of the Malayan Archipelago. There remain to Britain offered, of which, notwithstanding the low prices. the staple articles of woollens, cottons, cotton-yarn, submitted to, not one-sixth of the whole quantity and metals, the amount of which does no equal one- was sold. About 20,000 chests are advertised for th part of what the fifteen millions of the United States sale on 10 Jan. The market is now rather firmer, take from us in the same commodities, or, in other and prices: inay be quoted-Bohea, Canton 11d. terms, is short of a million a year. The cotton wool, to 1s: Fokien 1s 1d to 1s 2d; Congou 14 2d to 2s and some of the more bulky metals, are confined to the 1d; Campoi 1s 6d; Caper is 4d to Is 7d; Pbu- consumption of two or three of the provinces on the sea. chong 1s 4d to Is 6d; Souchong Is 2d to 3s; Pekoe, board near Canton, the emporium; but Opium, woollens, black leaf 18 4d to 2s 2d; Orange Pekoe is 9d to. and cottons, spiceries, and other valuable articles are,

even now, dispersed over the empire, penetrating even 2s 6d; Flowery ditto 2s 2d to 3s 10d; Twankay 1s 4d to 1s 7d; Hyson Skin 1s 4d to 2s 10d; Hy- Tartary And now, as to the Chinese exports, or means of pay- son 1s 9d to 4s 6d; Young Hyson is to 2s 10d; ment. Hitherto China has afforded but two great Imperial 1s to 3s 6d; Gunpowder 1s 2d to 4s 10d. staples of our consumption, tea and raw silk, which Stock in Dec. 1849, 26,000,000 lbs; 1841, 29,763, may be considered more as manufactured articles pe- 000lb.-London Mail. culiar to the soil, climate, and industry of China than mere raw products. The fertile and industrious prov- inces of China, themselves highly peopled, can afford no corn, no raw cotton, no timber, and little or no su-

THE Pittsburgh papers say that Captain Chaun- cey had inspected 100 Paixhan guns made there gar for exportation. On the contrary, all these things for Government, and that every gun passed in- spection, no one having proved deficient. They are imported. China has neither wine, on, coffee, or are all 32 pounders, and weigh about 2 tons each. fruits to export; but she has productive mines of gold We further perceive that the Iron Steam Frigate, and silver, and pays for the balance of imports over ex- ports in the precious metals. Every year since the building at Pittsburgh, is in rapid progress to com commencement of the activity of the Opium trade, shepletion.-New York Paper.

I

No. 54 VOL. II.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

LONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1843.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official.

By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION, The accompanying Notification regard- ing a Floating Light lately established at the entrance of the Harbour of Bombay, is published for general information and guidance. By Order, G. A. MALCOLM. Government House, Hongkong, March 27, 1813.

NOTICE

Is hereby given, that a Floating Light is station- ed in the fair Channel into Bombay harbour, about of a mile to the S. W. by S. from the Fair Way Buoy, in about 9 fathoms at high water, and 7 fathoms at dow spring tides, with the following bearings and distances.

Flag-Staff on Malabar Point, N. 5° 46" E. dis- tant 6. 90. Nautic Miles.

The Light House on Colaba, N. 21° 34" E, distant 4. 56, Nautic Miles.

The Fair Way Buoy N. E. by N. distant of a mile.

The Floating Light at the Sunken Rock, N. 38° 50" E. distant 4. 68. miles

Kennery Island, S. 14° 15" E. distant 7. 43. miles.

. The Point of the S. W. Prong in 6 fathoms foul Ground, bears North about 2 miles.

The middle of Thull Shoal E. S. E. 2 miles. When approaching the harbour, if the Floating Light Vessel is seen bearing on any point from N. by E. round to the Eastward as far as S. E by S. a Ship might steer directly for it, and when up with the Light Vessel, should steer from her N. E. Easterly, so as to pass about of a mile to the Eastward of the other Light Vessel, which is

partel of a me to the

of the Sunken Rock. After rounding the Rock Light Vessel, you may steer moie Northerly, and if it be at night, should anchor about 1 mile to the N. E. by N from it, where the water will be smooth. The South point of the Middle Ground Shoal, bears N. N. E. distant 2 miles from the Rock Light Vessel.

Both Light Vessels are painted Red, each car- rying a Ball on the Light Mast, and during day light they hoist a Red Flag when a sail is in sight. The Outer Floating Light, burns a Blue Light at the end of each hour during the night, and displays a Torch at the half hours.

The Flood Tide comes in from S. W. and Ebb from the N. E. It is high Water at 12 hours on the full and change of the moon.

D. ROSS.

Master Attendant.

Bombay. 28th December, 1842. NOTE. The Floating Light was tried during the last Monsoon and rode well, but in the event of her breaking adrift, the Fair Way Buoy is contin- ued at its station.

FROM THE LONDON GAZETTE (*). THE Commissions dated 23rd December, 1842. To be Lieut. Colonels in the Army. Major Charles Warren of the 55th Foot. Major George Alex. Malcolm, of the 3rd Light Dragoons-

Major David Iynar Fawcett, of the 55th Foot. Major John Bloomfield Gough, of the 3rd Light Dra- goons.

Major Norman Maclean of the 55th Foot.

To be Majors in the Army:

Capt. James Paterson, of the 26th Foot. Capt. William Greenwood, of the Royal Artillery. Capt. William Raikes Faber, of the 49th Foot. Capt. Arthur O'Leary of the 55th Foot. Foot. Capt. Henry Charles Branston Daubeney of the

55th

of

Capt. David M'Andrew, of the 49th Foot. Capt. Francis Wigston, of the 18th Foot. Capt. Ferdinand Whittihgham, of the 20tb Foot. Colonel in the Army. To be Aides de Camp to the Queen, with the rank Lieut. Col. Colin Camphell, of the 98th Foot. Lt. Col. Peter Edmonstone Craigie of 55th Foot. Lt Col. Edmund Morris, of the 49th Foot. Officers of the Royal Marines appointed to take rank by Brevet, Commissions dated 23rd Dec. 1842. To be Majors in the Army: Capt. James Whitcomb

Capt. Francis Smith Hamilton.

Officers of the East India Company's Forces to take rank by Brevet in Her Majesty's Army in the East Indies, Coumissions dated 231 Dec, 1842.

To be Lieut. Colonels, Major Frederick Blundell, Madras Artillery. Major Charles Wallace Young, 14th Madras N, 1. Major John Campbell, 41st Madras N. I. To be Majors,

Capt. William Henry Simpson, 36th Madras N. I. Capt. Francis Archibald Reid. 6th Madras N. I. Capt. Robert Sherreft, 2nd Madras N. 1. Capt. Tho. Townsend Pears, Madras Engineers. Capt. Richard Cornwallis Moore, Madras Artillery. By the Gazette of 27th ult. Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to nominate and appoint Major General Lord Saltoun, a Companion of the Most Ilon- orable Military Order of the Bath. local Rank of Major-General in India; and Colonel Colonel Robert Bartley, of the 49th Foot, with the James Holmes Schoedde of the 55th Foot, with the local rank of Major-General in India, to be Knights Commanders of the said Most Honorable Military Order of the Bath.

The following Officers in Her Majesty's Service are appointed Companions of the said Most Hon'ble Military Order of the Bath:

Colonel Colin Campbell of the 98th Foot. Col. Peter Edmonstone Craigie, of the 55th Foot. Lieut. Col. John Knowles, of the Royal Artillery, Lieut. Col. Jeremiab Cooper, of the 18th Foot. Lieut. Col, William Johnstone, of the 26th Poot. Lieut. Col. Charles Warren, of the 55th Foot. Lieut.-Col. Geo. Alex. Malcolm 3d Light Dragoons Lieut,-Col. David Lynar Fawcett, of the 55th Foot Light Cragoons. Lieut.-Col. John Bloomfield Gough, of the 3rd

Lieut.-Col. Norman Maclean, of the 55th Foot, Major Grattan, of the 18th Foot. Major James Hope Grant, 9th Light Dragoons, Major Thomas Scott Reynolds, 49th Foot. Major William Greenwood, Royal Artillery. Major Chas. Henry Barnston Danbeney, 55th Foot. Major Ferdinand Whittingham, 26th Foot. Also the following Officers in the service of the Hon. East India Company to be Com

Most Tron, Miltary Order of the Bath:

teers.

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

AUSTRALIA.

ANOTHER year has nearly closed itself upon us-let us look around and reflect. What have been the signs of decay in the town of Melbourne during that period? Handsome and commodious dwellings every where superseding the miserable skillions which preceded them: Drapers. ironmongers, druggists, grocers, book- sellers, and confectioners establishments, equal to any in the country towns of England, established and esta blishing.

An elegant and commodious Mechanics Institute completed; Courts of Law progressing; a splendid Banking House commencing; an Organ, fitted for u Cathedral, erected in a Dissenting Place of Worship, and Private Docks and Warehouses founded and in operation, not inferior to any private depositaries of the kind in London or Liverpool.

Account of weight of Wool Exported from Port Phillip, in

1840

929.325 lbs.

1841

. 1,713,430

1842

2,752,330

Value of Imports to Port Phillip, in

1840

£392,026

1841

364,398

1842

269,305

Value of Exports from Port Phillip, in 1840

£154.650

1841

200,308

223,392

1812 .

The Port Phillip Patriot.

THE TIMES AND THE GLASGOW MERCHANTS. publication of Thursday, "seems determined not to "SCOTCH Commerce," says the leading journal in its lose anything for asking." The Scotch merchants may perhaps say in reply, that what is worth having is worth the asking; and, without asking, due ex- shape of concession, from any Chancellor of her Ma- perience tells them that nothing can be got, in the jesty's Exchequer. But what is it, let us enquire, that the Glasgow merchants really seek for? A reduction of the duty on black tea by one half, which, they say truly, in the memorial from their East India Associa- tion, would not only facilitate the formation of a fair tariff with China, and increase the amount of British exports; but would not (at least only partially, and increase the consumption of sugar; another article of for a time) injure the revenue, and would, moreover, vast importance to the Exchequer. The Glasgow East India Association only seeks justice for China, and an observance of the strict principles of FAIR RECIPROCI TY with the Celestial Empire, in settling the tariff to be negotiated with this country, agreeably to the pro- visions of the treaty of Nankin.

If we do not act thus, other nations will, and we . shall justly forfeit the priority of footing in opening up new markets for our manufactures, which we pos sess by the skill and valour of our naval and military forces... These are the claims which "Scotch com- that very inconsistent organ of public opinion most Lieut. Col. George Wm. Aylmer Lloyd, of the 68th falsely denounces as a deinand upon the Government, Bengal Native Infantry, Commanding Bengal Volun- to agree to a loss of one million and a half of revenue." The Glasgow East India Association asks, certainly, Lieut.-Col. Roger Williamson Wilson, of the 65 B.N,I. for a remission of half the duty levied on black tea, Lieut-Col. Fraucis Spencer Hawkings of the 38 B.N.I.but they deny that compliance with their wishes will Lieut-Col John Cynaston Luard, of 2d Madras N. I. entail any permanent loss of revenge to the Fxchequer. Lieut. Col. Fredk. Blundell, of the Madras Infantry. We believe they are well founded in that denial, and Lieut.-Col. Chas. Wallace Young, 14th Madras N. I. that a diminution of 100 per cent on the duty presently Lieut. Col. John Campbell, 41st Madras N. I. levied on the low priced tea would not only be found Major Henry Moore. 34th Bengal N. I, to inofense the consuming power of the Chinese na. Major Wm. Hy. Simpson, 36th Madras N. I. tion, so as to enable them to buy largely of our manu- Major Francis Archd, Reid, 6th Madras N, I. facturers in exchange; but that it would be forced to Major Thos. Townsend Pears, of the Madras Engrs. operate as a most beneficial lever in enabling the Go- Major R, Cornwallis Moore, of the Madras Artillery. vernment to reduce the sugar duties, for every addi-. tional pound of tea consumed would be attended with an increase in the consumption of sugar.

We had not space to insert this list in our last issue when we referred thereto.

Major Malcolm arrived in town on the 10th Dec., with des. patches from China for the Earl of Aberdeen, Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. Commander Richards, Royal Navy, arrived in town at the same time with despatches from China for the Lords of the Admiralty. Major Malcolra attended at the Foreign-office, and also paid a visit to the Earl of Aberdeen at his private resideace in Argyll-street." The great seal of England was affixed on the 31st December to the treaty recently ratified between this country and China, at the residence of the Lord Chancellor, in Great George-street, Hanover-square; after which it was transmitted to the War. ffice, for the purpose of being forwarded to the "Celestial" empire, un- der the care of Major Malcolm. The seal is enclosed in a very handsome silver bux (similar to that used for the patent of his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales) and, together with the important documeut to which it is appended, is enclosed in an elegant case covered with crimson velvet. Of the seal itself, it is Expected that no trace of the impression of Mr. Won's beautiful mould will exist when the case reaches its destination, on account indeed, on former occasions, it has been discovered that during of the yielding nature of the materials of which it is composed; the comparatively short journey between Scotland and London the design has been completely obliterated. London Mail.

The Timessays:-"We apprehend that this grant of a million and a half to the adventurous importers or exporters of Glasgow and other place, might encourage a demand for the other 1,500,0001 or 2,000,000! which remains behind; and that even ofter that concession were made to their feverish appetita, it might at last appear that we had only Been fostering an unhealthy and unwarranted extension of export. sicular in its character to that of 1838-7. similar in the distress. which it would produce, and probably similar in the cry which the sufferers would immediately raise to be reimbursed at the expense of some interest."

This is sheer begging of the question. It is no gool answer to the deraand for an abatement of the present exorbitant duty levied on black tea, that if that demand were conceded it might lead to a demand for taking off the remaining duty. Such a claim wowld be laughed at by any Government, because it would have no good support it. But at prosent the duty levied on black ground of grievance or sound commercial principle to tea is equal to 200 per cent, while on the high priced tea consumed by the wealthy classes, it is not over 50 per cent. (To be continued in our next)

1

6

m

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE Connexion of the Rev. Mr. SHUCK with the FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GA- ZETTE having ceased; it is requested that henceforth, in all matters relating to the paper, parties will be pleased to apply at the PRINTING OFFICE, where all Commu- nications for the Editor must in future be addressed.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. The large amount of our outstanding arrears, (nearly one half of our receipts,) admonishes us to request our friends and subscribers, to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our claims; which trifling as they are individually yet aggregately amount to a considerable sum.

IT Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

WANTED.-A dollar each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos. 16 and 27 on application to the

1

PRINTING OFFICE.

Hongkong 9th March.

TREEND OF CHINA

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 30гn. 1843.

As promised in our last, we now glance at the sayings and doings in England, on receiving news of the PEACE. We have only space to cite the two Leading English journals. The Times expressed its lively satisfaction at the termination of a War it has "never been able to believe just." It said "the gains are ill-gotten and may share the fate of many similar acquisitions, but then we shall no longer be sickened by seeing the brethren and successors in arms of those who stemmed the tide of battle at Albuera, or Waterloo, sweeping away with cannon or bayonet crowds of poor pigtailed animals; and read after a day of slaughter, that a Corporal and half a dozen privates comprise the whole loss of the British Army." Speaking of our future prospects and altered position,it observes our o fficers in Canton, Amoy and Ningpo will now speak in another tone, and will receive a dif- ferent attention; and something of European law and regularity will be infused into those perplexing and irregular relations to which in part we owe the late contest.

The Chronicle of course exults in the news, and

for the special laudation, or rather exculpation of the ex-foreign Secretary twits the adverse faction with the memorable debate in 1840 on China Af fairs, which was so near ousting the Melbourne Ministry. It seeks to justify the oflicial neglect or abandonment of Captain Elliot, by pointing to the magnificent results achieved by II. E. Sir Hen- ry Pottinger, who also it avers was not shackled with definite instructions and the absence of which secured his diplomatic success. It says with res- pect to Captain Elliot and the Debate, in vain was it mged the impossibility of controlling by minute

instructions the conduct of our relations with Country more than 15,000 miles distant from us. It asks how conclusively the validity of this argu- ment is proved by the recent intelligence, but also says, had the Chinese only held out a little longer a special mission (alluding derisively to Lord Ash: burton's to America) must have been the reward of their perseverance.

On the Continent, France excepted, the modera- tion of Great Britain is justly extolled, and much satisfaction is expressed at the vast prospect pre- sented by the opening of a new Continent to the increasing activity of all Europeans. A Paris pa per, La Presse, denounces the War as unjust but remarks with a good deal of truth "the English are immutable in their Policy. In all their ar- rangements with foreign nations we find the trace of the same prevailing principles. They tend in- cessantly to seize upon the best positions through- out the globe. The Island of HONGKONG was long coveted by the English. It is the best situation in the Chainese Seas; it is auf inestimable advanced post in the southern Archipelago. For these rca sons England takes possession of it." It adds with regard to the Conditions of the PACIFICATION, "this is a great, a magnificent success-a success which does honour to our Civilization, to the age we live in and particularly to the people who have extort- ed it from the pusillanimity of the authorities of the Celestial Empire."

Having touched on the Sayings, we turn to the doings on receipt of the gratifying intelligence. It was on the 23d November, that Lord Stanley ad- dressed the Lord Mayor, announcing "that it has pleased Almighty God to crown her Majesty's arms with complete success; and that the Em- peror of China, has been compelled to recognize

the claims of Great Britain." In the metropolis the Church Bells rang, the Park and Tower guns roared in honour of the occasion. A Salute from the Castle and the chimes of the City Bells glad. dened the denizens of Auld reckie. In Dublin, more gay and joyous still, the whole garrison as- sembled in Phoenix Park and hailed the welcome news by firing a feu de joie. At Liverpool the in- telligence was greeted with firing of guns and ring- ing, of bells. In the Provinces the demonstrations of popular satisfaction were universal so that one. might then have justly called our country by its time-honoured, genial, but alas! almost obsolete title of merry England.

The funds of course rose, nearly every article of produce and manufacture sympathised and brought better prices. The value of shipping and machinery was sensibly affected, the city quidnuncs even affirmed the Income Tax was to be taken off instanter. Having braved the unpopularity of such an impost the Premier is toe sagacious, we think, not to continue it for the terin prescribed by the act, to say nothing of the grievous falling off in the Revenue for the last quarter.

All our letters indulge in a strain of buoyancy and confulence highly satisfactory, and we rejoice to know that tens of thousands of our countrymen were--thanks to the PEACE-agreeably surprised in- to the unexpected enjoyment of a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

IT is reported that Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane will shortly proceed to Manilla, that the Belleisle will soon sail for England, and the Royalist for Port Essington and Sydney.

Chinese Tariff-IN reply to C. K. we may observe that although we had prepar ed a Pro-forma Chinese Tariff, classified on the plan of Mr. Mac Gregor, as given in the Report of Import Duties Committee and which has been adopted in the late revision of Sir Robert Peel, yet owing to the want of accurate statistical information and the non-existence of a Chamber of Commerce, we were so dissatisfied with the number of blanks in the Columns. that we would not venture to present it to our readers. When the press of recent intel- ligence is over, we hope to give a specimen of our attempt.

In our early issue we called attention to the propriety, nay the necessity of an application to the Government for a reduction of the Tea Duty, We were confident of a ready response and a hearty co-operation at home. We have not been deceived, the East India Association of Glasgow (vide our last) have transmitted a memorial to the Lords of the Treasury, wherein they very forcibly urge the expediency of a reduction of the duty on black Teas of one half.

It was in reference to this memorial that the TIMES assailed them. We much regret that we have been compelled for want of space, to abridge the rejoinder of the LONDON JOURNAL OF COM- MERCE, which appears in another part of our Paper. We however cannot forbear expressing our cordial satisfaction at its tone and spirit, and we tender to our Metropolitan Contemporary the warmest thanks for his powerful assistance in promoting the cause of JUSTICE TO CHINA.

We cannot detail in full our own views, suffice it to say, at present, that we would prefer abstractedly an ad valorem duty on Tea, as is recomended by many influential parties. But we do not disguise from ourselves, the practical difficul- ties, which it is, alleged, would now arise from such a mode of assessment, although during the Company's Monopoly they were not felt.

We would be very chary of recommending any plan which should in the least interfere with the enterprise of our Merchants, or the legitimate fa- of Tea. At the same time, we find much exag- cilities and convenience of the buyers and sellers gerated apprehension exists; with respect to the inconveniencies which would spring from levying an ad valorem. The plan we would venture to recommend would be a combination of a fixed and an ad valorem duty, and hence perhaps liable o the objections so strongly urged against a sliding scale.

If an ad valorem duty were levied on all Teas above the value of Is. 3.1. per lb. and no less than 1s. 3d. per lb. leviable on any sort or kind of Tea imported: the capital objection to an ad valorem have Tea dust, and spurious stuff, called Tea, duty would be removed. We should not then brought in, as alleged for Dyeing purposes, but really, to mix with Teas paying a much higher rate of Duty.

With an ad valorem duty, unmodified by some such limit as we have indicated, Her Majesty's lieges would stand a chance of being poisoned by the cargoes of rubbish, not Tea, although so design- in bond. We need hardly say, with an ad valorem ated, which would be vended, at 6d. to 9d. per lb. duty, there would be such a serious deficiency in the Revenue, as would bar its adoption now by any ly show, would entail no greater loss of Revenue, minister. Our recommendation, as we will short- than Sir Robert Peel would cheerfully make, (it convinced on this point) to promote the comfort of the people, and the just clans of Anglo-Chinese cominerce.

We take this opportunity of telling C. K. that with the best mutual efforts of friendly Europeans powers, we yet never knew a Tariff, or Commercial Treaty that did not require a year, at least, to complete its ad- justment. It would perhaps have savoured too much of la nation boutiquiere, to have We make out, that the consumption of Tea, du- made it a condition of the Treaty of Nan-ring the present year, will reach, if it do not ex-- kin, that our Cottons and Broad Cloths ceed lb.40,000,000. It is fair to assume that the should be admissible at not more than a average value of such Tea, when imported, will be specified duty, yet not having done this, we £3.000.000. The general improvement of the 15. Gd: per lb., thus producing Revenue of

for such formal arrangements.

Japan.-WE see it is reported that the Samurang, 26, has been commissioned by Capt. E. Belcher for surveying. We are told he is appointed to make a hydrogra- phic survey of the Coast of Japan and neighbouring islands.

muy. and the continuance of the Income Tax, quite satisfy us, that with the reduction we ask, the national expenditure in 1843, will not exceed the income. Our proposition would not involve a present loss of more than £500,000 to the Revenue.

Again, Sir Robert Peel on introducing his fin- ancial measures, and as a plea for so irksome an Impost, as the Income Tax, declared that the sav ings on many articles of daily consumption, would be so much reduced, by the operation of his new Tariff, that generally, the payers of the Income Tax would be inore than re-imbursed. We be

and additional interest to everything ap-lieve this has been partially realized, but it would Our occupation of longkong gives a new pertaining to Japan. Despite the unsuc- be entirely so, by the adoption of our suggestion. cessful attempt of the Morrison, to open a communication with the authorities, and to restore to their homes some shipwrecked Japanese Sailors we yet hope (if the Samu- rang proceeds to the destination indicated,) the attempt will be renewed and that some of the Japanese, now at Macao, will be af- forded an opportunity of returning to their own country.

The Chinese Repository says the num- ber of Japanese vessels driven off their own coast and part of the crews of which are known to have been rescued, during the last seven years, have been fourteen in num- ber. The last vessel from Mazatlan brought two of this nation, who were astonished to recognise at Macao, two of their country- men whom they had last spoke in the Bay of Yedo,

It is superfluous to mention, that Tea is no long- ea a luxury, but an article of prime necessity, that a reduction in its cost, would go far to popularize the Income Tax, would greatly augment the com- fort of the poorer classes, would promote the cause of temperance and morality, and at the same time benefit the rever ue by increasing the con- sumption of Sugar, besides affording additional facilities to our commerce with China.

Glad shall we be, if proper efforts shall be made to secure these results, if made, success is certain. In which case, we should not be at all surprised to see (sume two and half years hence, when the. Income Tax expires) the minister propose to di- minish the Tea Daty, so far, as even to fix the starting point at one shilling per pound, instead of 1s. 3d, which we now recommend. With such a reduction, we would venture to affirm, but a few years could elapse, ere the consumption of Tea in Great Britain would be at least doubled, seeing that, at present, the average annual consumption is little more than one pound and a quarter per head !

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. FRIEND

COMMERCIAL

8

We learn from our Correspondent at Cauton, under date of the 28 inst. that on the reported arrival of the January Mail at Hongkong, there was considerable found some Commercial Statistics of Ma-ters had been digested, and the reports of the Brokers In another part of our paper will be excitement which led, to an immediate cessation of transactions. When however the contents of the let

We claim the attention of our readers to the account of his visit to Samarcand and cir- following reply of Lord Aberdeen, to the applica- cumjacent countries will possess much tion of the East India and China'Association to be interest. informed with respect to the Treaty of Nankin. We should infer from this official communication, that the Treaty would not be officially published in England, till intelligence of the exchange of rat- ifications was received, some six months hence nila, from the SEMINARIO FILIPINO. We well weighed, it was discovered therefrom and by the perhaps, by which time Parliament for this ses- have before enlarged upon the present and Account Sales that after all, matters were not quite so sion will be up. growing importance of our relations with bad in England as was expected. The most discouraging circumstance in the Home Although diplomatic etiquete may prescribe the Philippine Islands, and it is really sur-market was considered to be, not the gradual depres these formalities, it is quite apparent, we think, from prising that every maritime nation but sion of prices after the receipt of the news of the the tone of the reply, that every important stipula- Great Britain has a Consul at Manila. Peace, but the injudicious pressing of Sales by Specu tion and condition of the Treaty, will be well known in England, long prior to the period we That of France occupies a prominent po-lators and Importers. By the last accounts, the mar- ket was somewhat relieved from this pressure, hence name. The national mind is so fully impressed sition, being a Consul-general and placed it was thought, in face of the ordinary Spring demand with a sense of the vast results which may over all the Consuls in Indo-China and for exportation to the Continent and Canada, with the arise therefrom, irrespective of the important China. general aspect of the deliveries and stock, besides the interests directly concerned, that we feel sure This omission has arisen we have no growing demand consequent on the improving state of doubt from the locality of Manila, being as the Country, that the Prices of Tea would at least be maintained in England, if they even did not advance. it is, within the limits of the East India Although 25 millions have been shipped since the Companys Charter; but now its Trading 30th June, and nearly as much more will be despatched privileges are abolished, we are really as- before the season ends; yet the probability of a reduc tion of the Tea Duty (which we hold to be likely,. if tonished British interests has been so for-pressed in the right quarter and which we have so long gotten, or neglected at home,that we should earnestly advocated) and a greatly increased consump- not, ere this, have had a Consul of our na- tion, led parties to come into the Market, and a very tion on an Island, with which we have so large business has been done during the past week. Upwards of 100 Chops have been fixed; the prices of considerable a trade. CONGOU from 16 to 27 taels. Almost every gool Chop has been picked up, and at rates which, with re- ference to the opening prices, are cousidered moderate, not to say Cheap.

Min-

during the present session, sundry questions (by con- sent) will be put to the Premier, or Foreign ister, the answers to which, will fully satisfy the laudable curiosity and just expectations of the public.

Sir,

Foreign Office, Jany, 3rd, 1843.

I am directed by the Earl of Aberdeen to ac- knowledge the receipt of the Letter,which you ad- dressed to His Lordship on the 31st Dec. on be half of the Committee of the East India and China Association, requesting to be made acquainted with such provisions of the Treaty signed by Sir Henry Pottinger with the Chinese Plenipotentiaries on the 29th August, as may have reference to the regulation of the future Commercial intercourse between this country and China. His Lordship directs me to state to you in reply, that altho' Her Majesty has been pleased to ratify the Treaty signed by Sir Henry Pottinger, it would be in consistent with the general practice, officially to inake known the contents of that Treaty until Her Majesty's Ratification shall have been ex- changed against the Ratification of the Emperor of China, as the Treaty cannot be considered to be formally concluded, until that exchange has taken place.

Lord Aberdeen, however, regrets the less that he is precluded from giving you officially the infor- mation that you request, as the accounts contained in the Public prints of the late negociations in China, are substantially correct, and His Lordship desires me to state to you that Her Majesty's Govt. trusts that the stipulations of the Treaty, and the arrangements which have yet to be made for giving full effect to it, will place the intercourse between the two Countries on a satisfactory footing Her Majesty's Govt. will spare no exertion to pro- tect and promote the legal Trade of Her Majesty's Subjects resorting to China; but Her Majesty's Govt. feel that the advantages which Her Majes- ty's Subjects may derive from the trade with Chi- na must after all depend in a great measure on the manner in which that Trade shall be conduct- ed by the parties who may engage in it. Her Majesty's Govt. would therefore call the attention of all such parties to the expediency of impressing upon those whom they may employ, that, at the commencement of the new era which is about to open to British Trade in China, it is of the utmost importance that the feelings and prejudices of the Chinese Authorities and people should, as far as possible, be respected, and that every endeavour should be made to conciliate the good will of the inhabitants of the Country, and to inspire them with a favorable opinion of the British character. I am, Sir,

To

Your most obedt. Servant CANNING.

(Signed) Sir George Larpent Bt. &c. &c.

OUR New Zealand friends will be glad to hear that the recommendation (Vide No. 46) to supply them the products of this Country direct has been adopted; and our Countrymen at Wellington and Auckland will, we are sure, gladly greet such an arri- val to their shores. We hope we shall have to announce the successful issue of this adventure.

DEATHS.--By the London Mail for De- comber we see reported the demise of the Bishop of Waterford, Viscount Gort, Sir George Walker, William Hone author of

There are besides few, if any port to which so many of our shipwrecked coun- trymen are brought, or are compelled to seek refuge as Manila. The Merchants there, are unanimous as to the expediency of the appointment we recommend; the pro- priety of which, is also confirmed by the Merchants here.

We feel confident the attention of the Home Government, has only to be directed to the matter by H. E. the Plenipotentiary, and this acknowledged deficiency in our Consular arrangements will no longer exist. Grievous are the complaints, which from time to time reach us, from the want a Bri- tish representative at Manila.

We reluctantly insert the letter of L; not be- cause we entirely disagree with him in opinion, but because we much dislike the tone of his com- munication. We believe the Chinese authorities would at once pay any demand for the losses by the late riot at Canton, which ought be sanctioned II. E. the Plenipotentiary. For this very reason it behoves H. E. as the guardian, not only of Brit- ish interests but of British honour, to take especial care, that none but just claims should receive his official sanction for liquidation.

With every confidence in the integrity of our British merchants, and the general correctness of their claims, yet it must not be forgotten, that in one or two instances exorbitant compensation has been demanded, which necessitates the strictest scrutiny and examination of every claim, We have no doubt, a very short time will elapse, ere H. E. will see that every sufferer is indemnified for his losses. by the Canton riot.

FIVE Orass Canon captured from the Cm- nese have been placed in the Tower. Four of them are of large Calibre and of excellent work- manship.

-The East India and China Association has again urged on Government the expediency of se- curing to England in the Treaty the right of hav- ing an ambassador at Pekin. We need repeat our reasons for protesting against such a mischiev- ous condition at the present juncture. The as- sociation is far more reasonable when it requires that to all Eurapeans settled in China the permis- sion to have their wives and families residing with

them should be accorded.

-

- According to the Morning Post the Chinese no sooner heard of the arrival of Major General Lord Saltoun C. B., G. C. H., than they at once agreed to abandon all further resistance as hopeless. At the Polytechnic Institution, Mr. Carey has lately exhibited a microscope of Six powers, rang- millions of times. By the latter power the eye of ing from 'one hundred and thirty to seventy-four a fly which is said to contain 750 lenses, is so magnified that each lens appears to be fourteen inches in diameter, and the human hair is magnified to eighteen inches in diameter, or four feet in circumference.

the Every Day Book and the well known Piracy. Captain Anderson of H. M. S. political parodies and satires, John Bellamy Pylades, his officers and crew, have been the celebrated author of the New Transla- awarded by the Admiralty Courts £20 per tion of the Bible, and Professor Lehmann, head on 52 pirates, killed in action, on the the Russian naturalist. We hope his tra- 31st July 1841, in Chusan roads. No head vels in Central Asia will be published if it money was allowed on a like number that be true that his M. S. were preserved. An escaped.

The buyers have good reasons for now purchasing, seeing that (owing to the delay-albeit inevitable) in opening the Northern Ports, all expectation of any important supply from thence this season, is abandoned. Then too, remunerating rates are obtainable on the Staple imports of British manufacture, Further, the large shipments, now on their way, have a direct ten. dency to keep up the prices of Exports and also di- minish those of Imports, from the natural and laudable anxiety of commission Merchants to make quick re- turns to their Constituents.

Hysons may be now quoted 2, and good Sorts of CoxGous fully 1 tacl higher.

There has been a heavy Crop of CONGOU this sea. son, and stocks on hand at Canton are very large for this period of the year; still with an Export duty of taels, it is hardly likely Congous will descend much, if anything lower them 16 taels. The prices quoted as ruling are for Congou common

6

fair to good common

Mxd. bikh. If.

39

ra. coa. to ra. stt. -

19

blkh, lf.

Pekoe kd, and fla..

39

PEKOE, Scented Orange flowery TWANKAYS

SP

HYSON

taels 16 to 17

a

17, 18

19 20

71

20 21

21

22

26

27

30 37

30 60

22

28 upds.

28

It is thought the present rates for Imports, will not long continue, as the Chinese Merchants and dealers are fully aware that heavy arrivals will soon take place. At the present time there is not much doing, are in fair demand, the former, of good quality, grey except in LONG CLOTHS and COTTON TWIST which 82.80 to 83.10, white 82,80 to $3,30; the latter for 18s. to 20s. 824 to $30. WOOLLENS. Spanish stripes 81 to 81,40 but dull of Sale. In COTTON nothing do- ing of importance.

taation in the value of the more staple descriptions of Goods. 27-inch 72-reed Printers have been dull of sale, and have receded a little in price, but are in better demand, and prices firmer. 36-40-inch Shirtings and fine Long Cloths are held at about Is per piece advance on lowest prices current some months ago, and these rates are firmly maintained. Stocks are very low, and many of our most extensive manufacturers are under contract at 9a. 9d. for 36-inch 72 reed Shirtings; 89. 10 & half d. for 39-40 inch 64-read, and 10s. 7 & half d. for 72-reed grey Lung Cloths. Some of them are even holding at 3d. advance on these rates, in anticipation of favourable intelligence from India. The stock of Twist are light, and the market in a very healthy state, although not much doing. Our last quotations are fully supported, with the exception perhaps, of 16.24's Water Twist, which is heavy, and may in some instances be purchased on rather more favour. able terms.

LONDON MAIL-

THE TEA TRADE-A pamphlet on the Tea trade just publish. ed, states that in.

"The year 1839 the highest price of the year paid for Com. pany's Congou at the sale price was 2. 74. per lb.; the lowest Is 5d. per lb.; stock on the 31st of December, 5:2,500,000lb.; stuck of Company's congou 33,000 cheste; delivered for home con- sumption 32,366 4121b.; gross duty paid, 3,385,963. In 1840 the highest price was 31. 3d. per lb.; lowest, 1s. 11d. stock 31st gross amount of duty paid £3,663,008. In 1841 the highest price of December, 46,500,000lb.; stock of Company's congou, 28,700 chests; quantity delivered for home consumption, 35,136,232b. was 2. 9d. per lb.; lowest, 1s. 44d; sock 31st of December; 36,000,000lb.; ditto Company's congou, 11,500 chests; quantity delivered for home consumption, 32,262,905lb.; gr sa amount of duty paid, £3,473,951. Jn 1812 the stock on hand of Company's congou on the 30th November, was 8,400 chests; the highest price, 2s, lowest, 1s, 5d.; stock at close of the year about 31,006, 003lb; quantity taken for home consumption, 36,000,000; quan- tity delivered for exportation stated at 4,000,000lbs

Bombay Times. THE whale ship America arrived at New Bed- ford on Saturday, after a cruise of 26 months, with 4700 barrels of oil and 4500 pounds of whalebone, the largest cargo ever recorded in the annals of whale fishing in any part of the world.

VIDE SUPPLEMENT.

Ibid.

17

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE Connexion of the Rev. Mr. SHUCK with the FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GA- ZETTE having ceased; it is requested that henceforth, in all matters relating to the paper, parties will be pleased to apply at the PRINTING OFFICE, where all Commu- nications for the Editor must in future be addressed.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. The large amount of our outstanding arrears, (nearly one half of our receipts,) admonishes us to request our friends and subscribers, to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our claims; which trifling as they are individually yet aggregately amount to a considerable sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAFER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

WANTED.-A dollar each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos. 16 and 27 of application to the PRINTING OFFICE.

Hongkong 9th March.

FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 30TH. 1843.

As promised in our last, we now glance at the sayings and doings in England, on receiving news of the PEACE. We have only space to cite the two Leading English journals. The Times expressed its lively satisfaction at the termination of a War it has never been able to believe just." It said "the gains are ill-gotten and may share the fate of many similar acquisitions, but then we shall no longer be sickened by seeing the brethren and successors in arms of those who stemmed the tide of battle at Albuera, or Waterloo, sweeping away with cannon or bayonet crowds of poor pigtailed animals; and read after a day of slaughter, that a Corporal and half a dozen privates cothprise the whole loss of the British Army." Speaking of our future prospects and altered position,it observes our o fficers in Canton, Amoy and Ningpo will now speak in another tone, and will receive a dif- ferent attention; and something of European law and regularity will be infused into those perplexing and irregular relations to which in part we owe the late contest.

The Chronicle of course exults in the news, and

the claims of Great Britain." In the metropolis the Church Bells rang, the Park and Tower guns roared in honour of the occasion. A Salute from the Castle and the chimes of the City Bells glad. more gay and joyous still, the whole garrison as- dened the denizens of Auld reckie. In Dublin, sembled in Phoenix Park and hailed the welcome news by firing a feu de joie. At Liverpool the in- telligence was greeted with firing of guns and ring- ing, of bells. In the Provinces the demonstrations of popular satisfaction were universal so that one. might then have justly called our country by its time-honoured, genial, but alas! almost obsolete title of merry England.

The funds of course rose, nearly every article of produce and manufacture sympathised and brought better prices. The value of shipping and machinery was sensibly affected, the city quidnuncs even affirmed the Income Tax was to be taken off instanter. Having braved the unpopularity of such an impost the Premier is too sagacious, we think, not to continue it for the terin prescribed by the act, to say nothing of the grievous falling off in the Revenue for the last quarter.

All our letters indulge in a strain of buoyancy and confulence highly satisfactory, and we rejoice to know that tens of thousands of our countrymen were--thanks to the PEACE-agreeably surprised in- to the unexpected enjoyment of a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

It is reported that Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane will shortly proceed to Manilla, that the Belleisle will soon sail for England, and the Royalist for Port Essington and Sydney.

Chinese Tariff-IN reply to C. K. we may observe that although we had prepar- ed a Pro-forma Chinese Tariff, classified on the plan of Mr. Mac Gregor, as given in the Report of Import Duties Committee and which has been adopted in the late revision of Sir Robert Peel, yet owing to the want of accurate statistical information and the non-existence of a Chamber of Commerce, we were so dissatisfied with the number of blanks in the Columns. that we would not venture to present it to our readers. When the press of recent intel- ligence is over, we hope to give a specimen of our attempt.

a

In our early issue we called attention to the propriety, nay the necessity of an application to the Government for a reduction of the Tea Duty, We were confident of a ready response and a deceived, the East India Association of Glasgow hearty co-operation at home. We have not been (vide our last) have transmitted a memorial to the Lords of the Treasury, wherein they very forcibly urge the expediency of a reduction of the duty on black Teas of one half.

It was in reference to this memorial that the TIMES assailed them. We much regret that we have been compelled for want of space, to abridge the rejoinder of the LONDON JOURNAL OF COM- MERCE, which appears in another part of our Paper. We however cannot forbear expressing our cordial satisfaction at its tone and spirit, and we tender to our Metropolitan Contemporary the warmest thanks for his powerful assistance in promoting the cause of JusTICE TO CHINA.

suffice it to say, at present, that we would prefer We cannot detail in full our own views, abstractedly an ad valorem duty on Tea, as is recomended by many influential parties. But we do not disguise from ourselves, the practical difficul- ties, which it is, alleged, would now arise from such a mode of assessment, although during the Company's Monopoly they were not felt.

We would be very chary of recommending any plan which should in the least interfere with the enterprise of our Merchants, or the legitimate fa- of Tea. At the same time, we find much exag- cilities and convenience of the buyers and sellers gerated apprehension exists; with respect to the inconveniencies which would spring from levying an ad valorem. The plan we would venture to recommend would be a combination of a fixed and an ad valorem duty, and hence perhaps liable to the objections so strongly urged against a sliding scale.

If an ad valorem duty were levied on all Teas above the vale of 1s. 3.1. per lb. and no less than 1s. 3d. per lb. leviable on any sort or kind of Tea imported: the capital objection to an ad valorem have Toa dust, and spurious stuff, called Tea, duty would be removed. We should not then brought in, as alleged for Dyeing purposes, but really, to mix with Teas paying a much higher rate of Duty.

With an ad valorem duty, unmodified by some such limit as we have indicated, Her Majesty's lieges would stand a chance of being poisoned by the cargoes of rubbish, not Tea, although so design- in bond. We need hardly say, with an ad valorem ated, which would be vended, at 6d. to 9d. per lb. duty, there would be such a serious deficiency in ly show, would entail no greater loss of Revenue, the Revenue, as would bar its adoption now by any minister. Our recommendation, as we will short- than Sir Robert Peel would cheerfully make, (it convinced on this point) to promote the comfort of the people, and the just clauns of Anglo-Chinese commerce.

for the special laudation, or rather exculpation of that with the best mutual efforts of friendly We take this opportunity of telling C. K. the ex-foreign Secretary twits the adverse faction with the memorable debate in 1840 on China Af Europeans powers, we yet never knew fairs, which was so near ousting the Melbourne Tariff, or Commercial Treaty that did not Ministry. It seeks to justify the official neglect require a year, at least, to complete its ad- or abandonment of Captain Elliot, by pointing to justment. It would perhaps have savoured the magnificent results achieved by II. E. Sir Hen- too much of la nation boutiquiere, to have We make out, that the consumption of Tea, du- ry Pottinger, who also it avers was not shackled made it a condition of the Treaty of Nan-ring the present year, will reach, if it do not ex-~ with definite instructions and the absence of which secured his diplomatic success. It says with reskin, that our Cottons and Broad Cloths ceed lb.40,000,000. It is fair to assume that the pect to Captain Elliot and the Debate, in vain was should be admissible at not more than a average value of such Tea, when imported, will be £3,000,000. The general improvement of the 1s. 6d. per lb., thus producing a Revenue of country, and the continuance of the Income Tax qane satisty us, that with the reduction we ask, the national expenditure in 1843, will not exceed the income. Our proposition would not involve a present loss of more than £500,000 to the Revenue.

it urred the impossibility of controlling by minute specified duty, yet not having done this, we instructions the conduct of our relations with a must be content to wait the time necessary

of their perseverance.

country more than 15000 miles distant feum ne It asks how conclusively the validity of this argu- ment is proved by the recent intelligence, but also says, had the Chinese only held out a little longer a special mission (alluding derisively to Lord Ash- burton's to America) must have been the reward On the Continent, France excepted, the modera- tion of Great Britain is justly extolled, and much satisfaction is expressed at the vast prospect pre- sented by the opening of a new Continent to the increasing activity of all Europeans. A Paris pa- per, La Presse, denounces the War as unjust but remarks with a good deal of truth "the English are immutable in their Policy. In all their ar- rangements with foreign nations we find the trace of the same prevailing principles. They tend in- cessantly to seize upon the best positions through- out the globe. The Island of HONGKONG was long coveted by the English. It is the best situation in the Chinese Seas; it is auf inestimable advanced post in the southern Archipelago. For these rea- sons England takes possession of it." It adds with regard to the Conditions of the PACIFICATION, "this is a great, a magnificent success--a success which does honour to our Civilization, to the age we live

Japan. We see it is reported that the Samurang, 26, has been cominissioned by Capt. E. Belcher for surveying. We are told he is appointed to make a hydrogra- phic survey of the Coast of Japan and neighbouring islands.

Again, Sir Robert Peel on introducing his fin- ancial measures, and as a plea for so irksome an Impost, as the Income Tax, declared that the sav- ings on many articles of daily consumption, would be so much reduced, by the operation of his new Our occupation of Hongkong gives a new Tariff, that generally, the payers of the Income and additional interest to everything ap-lieve this has been partially realized, but it would Tax would be inore than re-imbursed. We be- pertaining to Japan. Despite the unsuc- be entirely so, by the adoption of our suggestion. cessful attempt of the Morrison, to open a communication with the authorities, and to restore to their homes some shipwrecked Japanese Sailors we yet hope (if the Sam rang proceeds to the destination indicated,) the attempt will be renewed and that some of the Japanese, now at Macao, will be af- forded an opportunity of returning to their own country.

The Chinese Repository says the num-

It is superfluous to mention, that Tea is no long- ea a luxury, but an article of prime necessity, that a reduction in its cost, would go far to popularize the Income Tax, would greatly augment the com- fort of the poorer classes, would promote the cause of temperance and morality, and at the same time benefit the reverue by increasing the con- sumption of Sugar, besides affording additional facilities to our commerce with China.

Glad shall we be, if proper efforts shall be made to secure these results, if made, success is certain. In which case, we should not be at all surprised to in and particularly to the people who have extort-ber of Japanese vessels driven off their own see (sume two and half years hence, when the ed it from the pusillanimity of the authorities of the coast and part of the crews of which are Income Tax expires) the minister propose to di- Celestial Empire." known to have been rescued, during the minish the Tea Daty, so far, as even to fix the last seven years, have been fourteen in num- starting point at one shilling per pound, instead of ber. The last vessel from Mazatlan broughts. 3d, which we now recommend. With such a two of this nation, who were astonished to reduction, we would venture to affirm, but a few years could clapse, ere the consumption of Tea in recognise at Macao, two of their country- Great Britain would be at least doubled, seeing men whom they had last spoke in the Bay that, at present, the average annual consumption is little more than one pound and a quarter per head! of Yedo,

Having touched on the Sings, we turn to the doings on receipt of the gratifying intelligence. It was on the 23d November, that Lord Stanley ad- dressed the Lord Mayor, announcing "that it has pleased Almighty God to crown her Majesty's arms with complete success; and that the Em- peror of China, has been compelled to recognize

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. FRIEND

COMMERCIAL

8

We learn from our Correspondent at Canton, under date of the 28 inst. that on the reported arrival of the January Mail at Hongkong, there was considerable In another part of our paper will be excitement which led, to an immediate cessation of found some Commercial Statistics of Ma-ters had been digested, and the reports of the Brokers

transactions. When however the contents of the let

well weighed, it was discovered therefrom and by the Account Sales that after all, inatters were not quite so

We claim the attention of our readers to the account of his visit to Samarcand and cir- following reply of Lord Aberdeen, to the applica- cumjacent countries will possess much tion of the East India and China'Association to be interest. informed with respect to the Treaty of Nankin. We should infer from this official communication, that the Treaty would not be officially published in England, till intelligence of the exchange of rat- ifications was received, some six months hence nila, from the SEMINARIO FILIPINO. We perhaps, by which time Parliament for this ses- have before enlarged upon the present and sion will be up. growing importance of our relations with bad in England as was expected. The most discouraging circumstance in the Home Although diplomatic etiquette may prescribe the Philippine Islands, and it is really sur-market was considered to be, not the gradual depres- these formalities, it is quite apparent, we think, from prising that every maritime nation but sion of prices after the receipt of the news of the the tone of the reply, that every important stipula- Great Britain has a Consul at Manila. Peace, but the injudicious pressing of Sales by Specu- tion and condition of the Treaty, will be well lators and Importers. By the last accounts, the mar- known in England, long prior to the period we That of France occupies a prominent po-ket was somewhat relieved from this pressure, hence name. The national mind is so fully impressed sition, being a Consul-general and placed it was thought, in face of the ordinary Spring demand with a sense of the vast results which may over all the Consuls in Indo-China and for exportation to the Continent and Canada, with the arise therefrom, irrespective of the important China. general aspect of the deliveries and stock, besides the interests directly concerned, that we feel sure This omission has arisen we have no growing demand consequent on the improving state of during the present session, sundry questions (by con- doubt from the locality of Manila, being as the Country, that the Prices of Ten would at least be sent) will be put to the Premier, or Foreign Min- it is, within the limits of the East India maintained in England, if they even did not advance. Although 25 millions have been shipped since the ister, the answers to which, will fully satisfy the laudable curiosity and just expectations of the Companys Charter; but now its Trading 30th June, and nearly as much more will be despatched public. privileges are abolished, we are really as- before the season ends; yet the probability of a reduc- tonished British interests has been so for- tion of the Tea Duty (which we hold to be likely,, if pressed in the right quarter and which we have so long gotten, or neglected at home,that we should earnestly advocated) and a greatly increased consump- not, ere this, have had a Consul of our na- tion, led parties to come into the Market, and a very tion on an Island, with which we have so large business has been done during the past week. Upwards of 100 Chops have been fixed; the prices of considerable a trade. CONGOU from 16 to 27 taels. Almost every good Chop has been picked up, and at rates which, with re- ference to the opening prices, are cousidered moderate,

Foreign Office, Jany. 3rd, 1843.

Sir, I am directed by the Earl of Aberdeen to ac- knowledge the receipt of the Letter, which you ad- dressed to His Lordship on the 31st Dec. on be half of the Committee of the East India and China Association, requesting to be made acquainted with such provisions of the Treaty signed by Sir Henry Pottinger with the Chinese Plenipotentiaries on the 29th August, as may have reference to the regulation of the future Commercial intercourse between this country and China. His Lordship directs me to state to you in reply, that altho' Her Majesty has been pleased to ratify the Treaty signed by Sir Henry Pottinger, it would be in consistent with the general practice, officially to inake known the contents of that Treaty until Her Majesty's Ratification shall have been ex- changed against the Ratification of the Emperor of China, as the Treaty cannot be considered to be formally concluded, until that exchange has taken place.

Lord Aberdeen,however, regrets the less that he is precluded from giving you officially the infor- mation that you request, as the accounts contained in the Public prints of the late negociations in China, are substantially correct, and is Lordship desires me to state to you that Her Majesty's Govt. trusts that the stipulations of the Treaty, and the arrangements which have yet to be made for giving full effect to it, will place the intercourse between the two Countries on a satisfactory footing Her Majesty's Govt. will spare no exertion to pro- tect and promote the legal Trade of Her Majesty's Subjects resorting to China; but Her Majesty's Govt. feel that the advantages which Her Majes- ty's Subjects may derive from the trade with Chi- na must after all depend in a great measure on the manner in which that Trade shall be conduct ed by the parties who may engage in it. Her Majesty's Govt. would therefore call the attention of all such parties to the expediency of impressing upon those whom they may employ, that, at the commencement of the new era which is about to open to British Trade in China, it is of the utmost importance that the feelings and prejudices of the Chinese Authorities and people should as for.ne possible, be respected, and that every endeavour should be made to conciliate the good will of the inhabitants of the Country, and to inspire them with a favorable opinion of the British character. I am, Sir, Your most obedt. Servant CANNING.

To

(Signed) Sir George Larpent Bt. &c. &c.

OUR New Zealand friends will be glad to hear that the recommendation (Vide No. 46) to supply them the products of this Country direct has been adopted; and our Countrymen at Wellington and Auckland will, we are sure, gladly greet such an arri- val to their shores. We hope we shall have to announce the successful issue of this adventure.

There are besides few, if any port to which so many of our shipwrecked coun- trymen are brought, or are compelled to seek refuge as Manila. The Merchants there, are unanimous as to the expediency of the appointment we recommend; the pro- priety of which, is also confirmed by the Merchants here.

We feel confident the attention of the Home Government, has only to be directed to the matter by H. E. the Plenipotentiary, and this acknowledged deficiency in our Consular arrangements will no longer exist. Grievous are the complaints, which from time to time reach us, from the want a Bri- tish representative at Manila.

We reluctantly insert the letter of L; not be cause we entirely disagree with him in opinion, but because we much dislike the tone of his com- munication. We believe the Chinese authorities would at once pay any demand for the losses by the late riot at Canton, which ought be sanctioned II. E. the Plenipotentiary. For this very reason it behoves H. E. as the guardian, not only of Brit- ish interests but of British honour, to take especial care, that none but just claims should receive his official sanction for liquidation.

With every confidence in the integrity of our British merchants, and the general correctness of their claims, yet it must not be forgotten, that in one or two instances exorbitant compensation has been demanded, which necessitates the strictest scrutiny and examination of every claim, We have no doubt, a very short time will elapse, ere H. E. will see that every sufferer is indemnified for his losses by the Canton riot.

-

Five brass Cannon captured from the Chi- dese have been placed in the Tower Four or them are of large Calibre and of excellent work- manship.

The buyers have good reasons for now purchasing, seeing that (owing to the delay-albeit inevitable) in opening the Northern Ports, all expectation of any important supply from thence this season, is abandoned. Then too, remunerating rates are obtainable on the Staple imports of British manufacture, Further, the large shipments, now on their way, have a direct ten. deney to keep up the prices of Exports and also di- minish those of Imports, from the natural and laudable anxiety of commission Merchants to make quick re-

turns to their Constituents.

Hysons may be now quoted 2, and good Sorts of CONGOUS fully 1 tael higher.

There has been a heavy Crop of CoxGou this sea, son, and stocks on hand at Canton are very large for this period of the year; still with an Export duty of taels, it is hardly likely Congous will descend much, if anything lower them 16 taels. The prices quoted as ruling are for Congou common

6

39

fair to good common

99

Mxd. bikh. If.

ra. coa. to ra. stt. -

39

blkh, lf.

Pekoe kd, and fla.. flowery

PEROE, scented, Orango

39

TWANKAYS

HYSON

taels 16 to 17

17. 18

19 20

20 21

31

21

22

26, 27

30. 37

30, 60

22, 28 28 upds.

It is thought the present rates for Imports, will not long continue, as the Chinese Merchants and dealers are fully aware that heavy arrivals will soon take place. At the present time there is not much doing. except in LONG CLOTHS and COTTON TWIST which are in fair demand, the former, of good quality, grey 82.80 to $3.10, while 82,80 to 83,30; the latter for 18s. to 20s. 824 to $30. WOOLLENS. Spanish stripes 81 to 81,40 but dull of Sale. In Corrox nothing do- ing of importance.

MANCHESTER. During the month there has been a slight flge. 27-inch 72.reed Printers have been dull of sale, and have recoded a little in price, but are in better demand, and prices firmer. 36-40-inch Shirtings and fine Long Cloths are held at about 1s per piece advance on lowest prices current some months ago, and these rates are firmly maintained. Stocks are very low, and many of our most extensive manufacturers are under contract at 93. 9d. for 36-inch 72 reel Shirtings; 83. 10 & half d. for 39-40 inch 64-reod, and 10s. 7 & half d. for 72-reed grey Long Cloths. Some of them are even holding at 3d. advance on these rates, in

-The East India and China Association has again urged on Government the expediency of se- curing to England in the Treaty the right of hav- ing an ambassador at Pekin. We need repeat our reasons for protesting against such a mischiev-anticipation of favourable intelligence from India. The stocks of ous condition at the present juncture. The as- sociation is far more reasonable when it requires that to all Eurapeans settled in China the permis- sion to have their wives and families residing with

them should be accorded.

-According to the Morning Post the Chinese no sooner heard of the arrival of Major General Lord Saltoun C. B., G. C. H., than they at once agreed to abandon all further resistance as hopeless. At the Polytechnic Institution, Mr. Carey has lately exhibited a microscope of Six powers, rang- ing from 'one hundred and thirty to seventy-four millions of times. By the latter power the eye of a fly which is said to contain 750 lenses, is so magnified that each lens appears to be fourteen inches in diameter, and the human hair is magnified to eighteen inches in diameter, or four feet in circumference.

DEATHS.-By the London Mail for De- cember we see reported the demise of the Bishop of Waterford, Viscount Gort, Sir George Walker, William Hone author of the Every Day Book and the well known Piracy. Captain Anderson of H. M. S. political parodies and satires, John Bellamy Pylades, his officers and crew, have been the celebrated author of the New Transla- awarded by the Admiralty Courts £20 per tion of the Bible, and Professor Lehmann, head on 52 pirates, killed in action, on the the Russian naturalist. We hope his tra- 31st July 1841, in Chusan roads. No head vels in Central Asia will be published if it money was allowed on a like number that be true that his M. S. were preserved. An escaped.

Twist are light, and the market in a very healthy state, althought not much doing. Our last quotations are fully supported, with the exception perhaps, of 16.24's Water Twist, which is heavy, and may in some instances be purchased on rather more favour. LONDON MAIL- able terms.

THE TEA TRADE-A pamphlet on the Tea trade just publish. ed, states that in.

of

"The year 1839 the highest price of the year paid for Com- pany's Congou at the sale price was 24. 7d. per lb.; the lowest 1s 5d. per lb.; stock on the 31st of December, 52,500,000lb.; stuck of Company's congou 33,000 chesta; delivered for homescon- sumption 32,366 4121b.; gross duty paid, £3,365,963. In 1840 the highest price was 33. 3d. per lb.; lowest, 1s. 11d. stock 31st December, 45,500,000 stock Consumption, 35,136,233lb. gross amount of duty paid £3,663.008. In 1841 the highest price chests; quantity delivered for home was 2. 9d. per lb.; lowest, 18. 44d.; stock 31st of December; 36,000,000lb.; ditto Company's congou, 11,500 chests; quantity delivered for home consumption, 32,262,905lb.; gr sa amount of duty paid, £3,473,951. In 1812 the stock on hand of Company's congou on the 30th November, was 8,400 chests; the highest price, 2s. lowest, 1s, 5d.; stock at close of the year about 31,006, 003lb.; quantity taken for home consumption, 36,000,00); quan- tity delivered for exportation stated at 4,000,000lb

Bombay Times. THE whale ship America arrived at New Bed- ford on Saturday, after a cruise of 26 months, with 4700 barrels of oil and 4500 pounds of whalebone, the largest cargo ever recorded in the annals of whale fishing in any part of the world.

VIDE SUPPLI

ENT.

Ibid.

3

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR CALCUTTA, TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AND PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig "ALGERINE." J M. Hill Com- mander, will sail for the above named , ports in all April: For freight or passage apply to Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD. The fast sailing Ship "CAMAIEU," A. 1 for 12 years. Burthen 288 tons, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. L. British built Barque

"ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong. 15th February, 1843

NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and.Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

FOR SALE

D. WILSON & CO.

BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their

Vessel the ALGKINE," beg to announce to the Public that she will bring on a choice investment of fancy goods of every description consisting of Perfu mery, Stationery, Cutlery, Hardware, Ironmongery, Drapery, Grocery, Preserved meats, Confectionary, Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes. Oilman's Stores, Wines, Beer, Spirits, Liqueurs &c., &c., which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes taking their regular supplies.

AUCKLAND HOTEL, Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

FOR SALE-At the Godown of the Undersigned just landed: Port, Madeira and Sherry of really superior Quality, Bass's Beer in Hogsheads. Apply by letter to WILLIAM SCOTT. Hongkong, 28th March, 1843.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE, the house and lot opposite the Hongkong Market, known as the Auckland Hotel, also one lot on Queen's Road, south side, Apply to Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843.

C. V. Gillespie.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut

Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hongkong, 1st March. 1843

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co. FOR SALE. Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843. NOTICE.-The undersigned is authorized to re- ceive all packages or Parcels addressed to any of the Officers or to the Mess of Hou. 18th Royal Irish Regiment, and will pay any expences incurred upon them. N, DUUS, Fearon's Wharf, Hongkong. 22d March, 1842, NOTICE-ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS Printed by Messrs Galignumi, rue Vivienne, PARIS, [Orders to be accompanied by a bill payable in London or Paris.] GALIGNANIS MESSENGER.- A daily Politi cal Journal. The object of this wes known Journal is to supply the reader with a SUBSTITUTE FOR THE EN- ducted on a system of undeviating impartiality, the sentiments of every party, Ministerial and Opposition, find their place in its columns.

• Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in NOTICE.-Storage can be obtained at low rates in TIRE OF THE ENGLISH AND FRENCHI NEWSRAPERS. Con-

3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1842. FOR SALE--Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stres of all des criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, und Beaver Hats, Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre-

inises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

FOR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditio, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar. rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Ram, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as sortiment of Marine Stores, Stockholin, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar ; just ar. rived a small quantity of Batter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at 93 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1813.

NOTICE. A fine large new LORCA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European. will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

N. Duvs-Hongkong Fearon & Son Mincuo

FOR Sale at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods Viz.

Anchors of all Sizes.

Chain Cables,

.Manila Segars, 4: Superior,

do. do. 4: Fine equal to 3rd Superior

Superfine Blue cloth,

Ladies Muslin dresses of all colours,

Silks, Satin and Straw Bonnets,

Stout and Patent Leather Shoes,

Sewing Cotton of all numbers,

Black Silk Stockings.

White coloured and Fancy Soeks,

Regatta Shirts,

Duck and Fancy Trowsers,

Dress and Shooting Coats.

Woollen Caps, a Striped Ginghams for Shirtings,

Bengal Towels,

Copying and writing ink,

Granite Godowns on application Hongkong 20th December 1842.

C. V. Gillespie.

C. V. Gillespie 46 Quens Road, has on a coal, Square Tron, Plate Glass. Irish Pork in barrels, Preserved Meats, Fish and Vegeables in tin and in cases of six dozen each, Sherry. Cham- paigne, Port, Hock, Brandy, White and Grey Long Cloths, de Hog-kong 3.ih Nov. 1849.

Spars suitable for Lower Masts, Orrel

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

W. T. Kinsley.

NOTICE.Goops and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate terius. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843

NOTICE THE interest and responsibility of MR. WILLIAM WARDROP SHAW in our firms here, at Maulmain, and in that of Buchanan & Co. Glasgow, ceased on the 31st Decem- ber last. [Signed] DUNNETT, SHAW, & Co. Pinang, 10th June, 1842.

FOR SALE-Newcastle Coals in bags at 50 cents per pecul. Apply to C. V. Gillespie. 40 Queens Road. Hongkong 20th December 1842.

FOR SALE.

Beef Tar Rosin

Pork

Pitch

Alackrell in Kits

Negro head Tobacco. Pilot bread

Navy bread Flour

Soap

articles of the Tory, Conservative, Whig, and Radical In the English Department will be found the leading journals. A prominence correspondent with their vast importance is given to the parliamentary debates. In addition to all news of fashionable or general interest, the proceedings at the India House, and every subject important to Eastern subscribers. is specially attended to. ticle) the political sentiments of the Paris press; the The French Department contains (in a special ar- proceedings of the French Chambers; the fashionable and local news of Paris, Stocks, etc.; the earliest infor- - mation from Spain, Switzerland, Italy and Ger- many, Russia, and all other parts of the Continent. Terms of Subscriptions: (Payable in advance) One Year, £5. 10s; Six Months, £2 17s.

THE LONDON AND PARIS OBSERVER, Journal of Literature. Science, and Fine Arts. This Journal. published every Sunday, consisting of forty- eight columns of closely-printed, matter large 4to. (ul. most the matter of an octavo volume), contains the élite of all that is intellectual, useful. or recreative, in more than TWENTY London Quarterly, Monthly, and Weekly Publications.

Terms of Subscriptions:-(Payable in advance) One year £2. 10s., Six months £1, 78.

PRICES for Job Printing are as follows:

Bills of Lading and Exchange, per 100 $ 2 Policies and folio pages Letter paper size

Of Ships

ADVERTISEMENTS

Not exceeding 7 lines

21

for 3 months

"

$ 5

1

,t

6

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing, Eaglish and Chinese at moderate prices.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

DIED.

On the 29th inst., at Hongkong, of mal! pox, 150 boxes of raisins &c. &c. after a week's severe illness, Theodosia Ann, wife These goods are just landed from the American of the Rev. William Dean of the American Bap- vessels LARK and NAVIGATOR and are in prime con-list Mission. The burial will take place to day Apply to (Thursday) at 10 r. M.

dition

Hongkong; 7th March, 1843.

FOR SALE. -The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA Rook" built by the same Builder as the Crles-

tial. with Musts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

ALSO

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com plete in every respect. For particulars apply to BENNETT, PAIN & Co.

Hongkong, 3rd March, 1843.

NOTICE. Just opened and exposed for Sale. Eng lish Saddles and Bridles complete, cut Tumblers Wine, Champagne and Liquor Glasses. Decanters, Fin-

ger Cups and Butter Pots, Indian shades and spare burners, price moderate-

Best double distilled Lavendor water with Glass Stoppers Hongkong, 1st March 1843

by Smith & Co.

Eau de Cologne.

'Needles of all Nos.

Fancy quilling for Gents, Vests and Childrens Frocks,

Plain and figured Jean and drillings,

Figured Flannel for Ladies winter dresses,

Quills and Black Lead Pencils,

Fresh Table Raisins,

Copper Kettles hora Lanterns and fish Boilers,

Spermecete candles. Pad Locks, Powder Flasks,

Vices, Chisels, files &c. &c. &c.

Dutch Blankets. Persian Carpets, &c. &c. Best Brandy, Sherry, Gin and Beer &c. &c. &c. Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1943 G. MOSES & Co. Queen's Road.

FOR SALE.

G. Moses & Co.

The Bungalow, with six Rooms, convenient Offices for servants, and Godown; also Stables situated on the Queen's Road, opposite to Marine lot No. 46. dimensions of lot, f120+ 1105. Apply to C. V. GILLESPIE

FOR SALE-Several Extensive and Valuable Lots of Ground, eligibly situas on the Queen's Road, having deep water frontage, and within a short distance of the Government Offices. A convenient ine Storey Dwelling House, with a large plut of ground attached, fronting the Soa. Particulars may be had of. Hongkong, 7th Feby. 943.

RICHARD OSWALD.

Shipping Intelligence.

MARCH.

24th Hope

24th Athenian

24th Lou'sa

25th Guess

25th Parrock Hall

26th Aden

26th Druid

27th Liverpool

27th Anglona

27th Brahmin

ARRIVED.

Barrett Man Frogan

Chusan

Macao

Macao

McKellar

Macao

Macno

Boice

Macno

Hitchie

London

McDowall

Whampoa

Mc Arthur

Whampoa

Macau

Macao

Macao

Frogan

Mycao

Vincent

London

Whampoa

Macao

Macao

Macao

Macao

28th H C.Str. Proserpine Hough

28th Mazeppa 28th Louisa

29th City of Derry

MARCH

SAILED. Me Dougal 25th Edmonstone 25th Camaieu 26th H.C.Str. Proserpine Hough 26th Louisa 27th Abberton

Clucas Frog. n Catt REPORT Will sat shortly the B AuMIN for Bom- bay. The MAZEPPA and H M. S, WOLF for Chusan. On the 12th Jany. in the Ombry passage the DRUID spoke the Barq e INA from Liverpool and on the 21st Feby in the Gillolo Passage spoke the CITY OF DER- RY from London with loss of main-mast.

William Pedder Harbor Master

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETOR 3, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

54

SUPPLEMENT

No. 51, OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA, 30TH MARCII, 1843.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

Sir,

To the Editor of the Friend of China.

In your last issue, whilst commenting on the demise of Elepoo and the consequent probability of H. E Sir Henry Pottinger having to proceed Northward, you remark.--"Our readers cannot but he gratified at this additional instance of the eagerness and promptitude, which have been uniformly manifested by H. E. to bring all matters to a final and satisfactory settlement". This is certainly a consolatory announcement, espe- cially as a plain thinking man would have been led, looking at the recent correspondence and communica. tions of H. E. with British Merchants, to the conclu. sion that he was inimical to their commercial interests in China; and, on the contrary.was far from manifesting eagerness to bring all matters to a satisfactory settle. ment." I still conceive, notwithstanding your opinion, Mr. Editor, Sir Henry Pottinger has not shown any very great promptitude, to adopt a course likely to re- lieve or adjust the commercial difficulties which our trade with China is labouring under, and which as Chief Superintendent of our trade, I hold it is his first duty on all occasions to pursue. For instance, look at the delay in adjusting and settling the Claims of British Merchants for losses sustained in the late riot at Canton. What has he done towards getting them paid? Nothing. The Chinese local authorities of fered to liquidate all just Claims immediately, but how has this honourable and straight forward offer been met by Sir Henry Pottinger, whom you have been pleased to say, "has always evinced eagerness and promptitude to bring all matters to a final and satisfactory settlement? Why by throwing impediments in the way of the just Claimant.

I have no wish to trespass] further on your valuable space, Mr. Editor, but as a liberal and independent journalist, I trust you will give this a place in your

next Number.

Hongkong, 13th March, 1843.

L.

Koo.LONG-Soo-We have much pleasure in announcing the opening of the Koo-Long-Soo Theatre, on the night of the 4th ult., under the Management of the Officers of the Army and Navy at Amoy. The evening's entertainment con- sisted of the Burletta of the "King's [Gardener, in one act." After which a Comic Song, admirably sung by Thos. Martin, Esq. 18. R. Irish. The After- Piece of "All the World's a Stage," the whole concluded with a Hornpipe, by Mr. Green. The performance appeared to give universal satisfac- tion, and it is hoped that the Theatre,has opened under favourable auspices. The parts were ably sustained by the under mentioned Officers. The band of the 18. R. Irish was kindly volun- teered for the occasion, by Col. Cooper. Before the rising of the curtain a Prologue was spoken by Mr. Greene, of H. M. S. Cambrian, The overture to "Semiramide" was then played with great taste, and the curtain rose to "God save the Queen" a- midst the most unbounded applause.

MISCELLANEA.

Prince George of Cambridge has publicly deni- ed the reports affecting the honour of Lady Au- gusta Somerset.

MANILA EXPORTS,

Exports from 1st January to 31st December, 1842.

Sugar

The gross amount of British registered tonnage 2,600,000 tons was estimated not long since worth £28,000,000. At the time news of the Hemp Peace arrived in England it was supposed this property had depreciated fully 40 per Cent. or £11,440,000. Whitby and Newcastle ships were Coffee selling at about £3 per ton, and new American ships at half their cost or £4 or £5 per ton.

It is expected Sir Robert Peel, next session will Indigo effect the reduction of the 33 per Cent Stocks to 3 per Cent. If so, the saving to the nation per annum would be £1,000,000.

The fortune of Suisse, the valet of the Marquis of Hertford is is stated at £400,000. He is resid- ing in Paris.

has

been formally opened in Glasgow. Queen's College for the education of ladies

to Europe. Peculs

44

Singapore, &c.," Europe

U. States

10

74500

". U. States

42400

29

Sydney

112000

11

52000

39

44

23

U States

66

6200 95000

39

Singapore, &c.

600

37

Europe

46

1500

U. States

44

4000

Eincapore, &c.

5700

Europe

qq.

1900

13

500

19

Hides

Sincapore, &c. " Europe

1900

Peculs

4200

31

U. States

2000

Sincapore, &c. "

4500

Rice

19

China

46

60000

39

Sydney

64

2100

Hats

19

Europe

Hats

750

"

U. States

840

17

Sincapore, &c. "

16000

11

Europe

Catties

700

37

U. States

44

500

19

Sincapore, &c. "

3000

Europe

Peculs

2500

71

U. States

46

150

31

Sincapore, &c. "

900

Rope

Europe

480

33

U. 'States

64

200

"

Sydney

1200 4000

The democratic party having triumphed in New York and many other States has naturally had T. Shell a favourable effect on the value of State Stocks and public credit in America.

Prince de Joinville is to be united to a Brazilian x.o P. do " Princess, and his sister, the Princess Clementine to Prince Augustus of Cobourg, brother of the King of Portugal.

France has officially notified that it will not ra- tify the treaty of the 20th Dec. 1841, for the Sup- pression of the Slave trade.

A new Post Office treaty between France and England has been completed.

tria Great Britaiu has we see failed. In making a new Commercial Treaty with Aus- The Peninsular and Oriental Steam Company has declared a dividend at the rate of 7 per Cent per annum. It is expected the next declaration will be at a higher rate.

A new Steam Yacht is preparing for the Queen and is expected to be ready in the Spring. On the evening of the 31st of December, 1842, Sir E, Codrington resigned, and on the morning of the 1st of January, 1843, Sir G. Rowley as- sumed, the command at Portsmouth.

Admiral Sir Lucius Curtis, Bart.. who is named as the successor of Sir J. Louis, as Port Admiral at Malta, will, it is expected, exchange commands with Admiral Parker,

Lieut.-Col. Malcolm, C B. left town late on the evening of the 4th with the China Treaty, the precise nature of which will not transpire before the meeting of Parliament.

At a Privy Council. held at Windsor on the 4th, an order was passed directing the removal of Her Majesty's Vice-Admiralty and other Courts from Canton to Hongkong,

Sir Robert Peel has granted £150 from the "Royal Bounty Fund.', to Mrs. Dwyer, a sister of the late Sir Sydney Smith, and appointed her son to a situation on board Her Majesty's ship Thun-

bolt.

Great praise is due to Mr. Marriott, of H. M. S. Cambrian, the stage Manager, for the able manner There has been fixed up in the Bibliothèque in which the scenery and decorations were ar- Royale, in the room next the reading-gallery, a ranged. We may perhaps better describe the tout framed case containing a Chinese document, above ensemble by calling it a Drury Lane, in miniature, al- which is placed the following inscription :-"Chin- though the rain poured in torrents the house was ese Bulletin of the pretended defeat of the English crowded, at the same time the utmost order prevail- under the walls of Canton in 1841, purchased in ed. At the conclusion of the first Piece the audience that City by Mr.Robert Thom,and presented by him called loudly for the appearance of the principal to the translator, Stanislaus M. Julien, Jan. 1842." characters, most ably sustained by Messrs. Mar-The bullets in Chinose boring than e The bar.

we bully as mention-

ed hearafter. The part of "Diggory" in the after-barous English have excited disturbance. They revolted against the celestial wisdom on the 3rd piece was performed to the life, by Mr. Wardrope, day of the 4th month (Jan. 23, 1841.) They at- of the Serpent. The Comic Song by Mr. Martin tacked the city of the Lambs (Canton,) but the was not acting-it was life itself. God cf heaven visited them with his vengeance, Koo-LONG-SOO THEATRE--On Saturday March and the God of earth swallowed up their vessels." 4th, will be represented the Burletta of the "King's The Chinese document is headed with a pictorial Gardener." representation, executed with a pencil, depicting two kind of vessels, in the rigging of which are seen men dressed in scarlet, and holding telescopes in their hands.

Monsr, Galichard, Monsr. Bendirard, Chevalier Bussy,

Susette

(King's valet)

Louise de la Valliere, Madame Galichard,

Mr. Marriott.

Mr. Ballard. Mr. Dolling. Mr, Ward. Mr. Collingwood.

Mr. Curqenble. Mr. Campbell, After which a Comic Song by M. Martin, 18 R. Irish, followed by the much admired Farce of "All the World's a Stage." Sir Gilbert Pumpkin, Capt. Stukely,

Capt. Stanley,

Diggory,

Cymon,

Watt,

Miss Bridget Pumpkin, Kitty,

Mr. Dolling. Mr. Greene. Mr. Austen. Mr. Wardrope. Mr. Campbell. Mr Ward. Mr. Martin.

Mr. Collingwood. Mr. Bullen, (Senior.)

William, The whole to conclude with a Hornpipe by Mr. Greene, H. M. S. Cambrian. V. R,

We must tell our correspondent V. it will be utterly im- possible to insert any of his communications, unless written far mors legibly than the above, which we have no doubt is full of blunders in consequence. Ep.

The Dublin Corporation, for soure reason not clearly expressed, has declined to vote thanks to the heroes of China and Affghanistan: but at a

Sincapore &c. "

AMERICA.

THE Clerk of the House of Representatives, in compliance with an Act of Congress, has published in the National Intelligencer a detailed statement of the appropriations made during the late Session of Con. gress specifying the amount and object of each. The following is a recapitulation of the whole : Civil and Diplomatic list,

Army, Navy.

Fortifications, Pensions,

Indian Department, Treaties, &c. Private bills, House of Representatives, Private bills, Senate,

89,363,293 53 6,405,280 36

6,774.405 42

278.000 00

730.000 00

1,300,077 00

37.585 01

64,673 03 824,952,190 83

SPIRITS AND WINE-The number of gallons of proof spirits dis. tilled in the United Kingdom, in the year ending January 5, 1842, was: in England. 5,919,207; in Scotland, 8,54,333; in Ireland, 6,359,12% total, 20,782,664. The number of gallons of proof spirits on which duty was paid for consumption, during the same period, was, in England, 8,166,985; in Scotland, 5,989,905; in Ireland, 6,485,443: total, 20,624,333. The amount of duty paid upon this quantity of spirits was £5,161,610 15s. 6d. The dif ference between the number of gallons distilled and the number on which duty was paid for consumption, in England, gives us the quantity of whisky consumed in this country, namely, 2,247,778- gallons. The lovers of this spirit, who, relying on the professions dealers, flatter themselves with the notion that they are sup plied with "pure malt whisky," will be a little surprised to learn that the whole quantity of whisky made from malt consumed in England amounts to only 520,942 gallons! From Scotland we get 1,894,657 gallons of whisky, but the "canny" Scot takes care to send us only 519,009 gallons of the malt; the rest consists of a "mixture of malt with unmalted grain," which, doubtless, is con.

of

sidered god enough for the stomachs of English loons ;" and 33 gallons made from malt. Turning to Scotland, we find that of 5,999,905 gallons consumed int iar country 5,375,16 were inade from malt, and only 614,743 from a mixture of malt with unmalt- ed grain. In Ireland the case is reversed; of the 6,485,443 gallons

it is as long as they put up with it. From Ireland we obtain 1,933

from a mixture of malt with unmalted grain. The number of gal- lons of proof rum, brandy, Geneva, and other foreign and colonial spirits, consumed in England between 5th January, 1841, and 5th January, 1849, was 3,344,922; in Scotland it was 88,814; in Ireland, 30,338. The total amount of duty paid on this quantity of spirit was £2,417,166. It is curious to contrast the consump tion of spirits of all kinds with the population, thus:-

Population. 15,911,725

Consumption of Spirits,

- 11,511,907 6,078,719 6,515,781

England (and Wales) Scotland 2,628,257 Ireland 8,205,382 Without troubling the reader with minute fractions, the above figures give two quarts and one gill as the quantity of spirits con- sumed per head (that is, including every man, woman, and child) in England two gallons, one quart, and one gill per head for Scotland; and three quarts and one quartern in Ireland. This

n

recent meeting of the Limerick Corporation, Alder-account will probably excite some surprise. If the question were man Watson gave motions of thanks to the gallant mooted in any English or Scotch company, in which part of the officers, natives of Limerick, who distinguished United Kingdom the largest quantity of spirits was consumed, the reply would immediately be "Ireland." The quantity consumed themselves in China, namely, Sir Hugh Gough, Ireland certainly is large: yet it is comparatively insignificant Capt. Bourchier, ane Maj. Serjeant and his son, when contrasted with the quantity consumed in Scotland, which 18th Royal Irish. Councillor N. Kelly suggested allows no less than two gallons one quart and half a pint for every man, woman, and child! We are accustomed to hear the use of that, as Limerick had ever been distinguished by ardent spirits spoken of as being the fruitful source of crime in the gallantry of its ladies, the name of Lady Sale England and Ireland; but what is the case as regards Scotland? should be included. Alderman Watson said he The people of Scotland are, undoubtedly, the most virtuous and orderly portion of the population of the United Kingdom, and yet would do so with great pleasure. they drink more spirits than any other. Persons who are in the habit of drawing hasty conclusions might say that in Scotland virtue and order resulted from the drinking of spirits. We do not say so, for it is not our purpose to draw conclusions, but merely to furnish the materials for speculation to others. Assuming, however, that the use of spirits tends to produce crime, there must be a strong counteracting influence in Scotland. The number of gallons of foreign wine on which duty was paid for home consump. tion in the United Kingdom in the year ended 5th January, 1842, was 6,184,960; of which Portuguese 2,387,017, Spanish 2,412,821, French 353,740, Cape 441,238, Madeira 107,701, Sicilian and other sorts 401,429, Khenish 55,242, Fayal 137-(Galignani.)

A French artist, Monsieur Borget, has recently returned from China with a numerous collection of spirited sketches made at Hongkong and Macao. We werd gratified by a sight of them; and as they were the first views of Chinese scenery and architec ture, made by an European artist, that we had seen, the extreme. ly picturesque character of the landscapes, buildings, and ship- ping, was very striking. The country round Hongkong is hilly, and has bold and varied features: and the dwellings of the people both on land and water make rich groups for the artist, which Mr. Borget has sketched with a free and vigorous pencil. Spectator

No. 66 VOL. II.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND DONGBONG GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 6TH, 1843,

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. His Excellency Sir HENRY POTTINGER G. c. B. is pleased to publish the following Letters for general information. By order

No. 131.

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

A letter from Mr. Gutzlaff to Mr. William Mathe-nothing is known of the economical condition of China son of Glasgow, dated Nankin, 10th September, and what little is known does not promise an immediate gives some interesting information. great result.

"The tariff is not yet settled, and the whole ar- rangement about it, is to be made at Canton, which is, indeed, the most difficult place for bringing so important an affair to a conclusion. Part of the six millions of money has been paid, and, there is scarcely anything that can retain the forces, who are very sickly, much longer in the river. The Macao, 30th March, 1843. French offered their mediations rather in an un- Gentlemen.--I am directed by Sir Henry Pottinger to intimate called-for manner, after the peace had actually to you, that having now had under his consideration, and having been concluded; and Captain Cecille, of the Eri- must carefully perused and weighed the proceedings of the Com- mittee which investigated the claims against the insolvent Hing gone, was witness to the signing. Thus, the Chi- tas Hong in 1837, His Excellency has residved to confirm those nese, who are not over-anxious for foreign interie- proceedings, and to authorize the payment of dividends accord. ingly, under the superintendence of an officer on the part of the renice, settled the matter of their own acord, and British Government who will be deputed to Canton for that are rather desirous that other nations should not share in the privileges which the English have The Co-hong having reported that a further sum of 500,000 $ obtained with so much blood and treasure. is ready to discharge the established claims against the Hingtae.

purpose.

and other honga, orders will be issued for its early division, and you are requested to pass the usual receipts.

The cases of protest against the proceedings of the Commitee in the case of the Hingtae-debts have been referred to England, and the decision of Her Majesty will be here after communicated to those who are interested in it.

I have the honor to be, Gentlemen,

Your most obdt. humble Servant G. A. MALCOLM

TO THE BRITISH MERCHANTS IN CHINA, CREBITORS OF THE LATE HINOTAE HONO.

No. 135,

Gentlemen,

Macao, 31st March, 1813.

In settling the commercial affairs, the acting man who arranges every thing, Treasurer Kwang, asked most particularly for the volume on Trade; which he duly and attentively perused; so that he is theoretically acquainted with the leading principles of M'Culloch's Dictionary." Landon Paper.

Tus forced peace with China is too grand a subject to be overlooked by the French newspapers; and true to the genius, of their country, they regard it on broad and abstract principles. They view it as an European question; claim a share in the new ingress to the sealed region; and speculate on the field of propa- gaudisin opened to European superiority and energy. And they are right. Never before had the accumu lated intelligence and wealth of Europa so vast a field WITH reference to my letter of yesterday's suddenly opened to them. Some of our neighbours date, I am now directed to further intimate to you seem half or wholly angry with this new instance of that Sir Henry Pottinger has examined into the the vaunted energy of the Anglo-Saxon race, and spe- Claims against the insolvent Hongs of Kingqua culation of China among England and her European and Mowqua, and has, authorized the payment of rival. Partitioned or "regenerated," China henceforth them from the monies about to be received, in vir-enters upon a new existence; having been edragged in tue of the Treaty, froh the Provincial Govern- as a subject of European discussion, and made its ports ment of Canton, in the proportion which such the goals for the emalous intrusion of European rivals Claims, and those of the Hingiae Hong, may bear If English diffusion of useful knowledge" and French to the forthcoming Instalments. "political regeneration" extend into the Celestial Em- As soon as the Capital of Kingqua's debt is dis- pire, how much longer will Japan succeed in exclud- charged, at rangements will be made (and pro- ug the foreigner? It will want but that link to mulgated) for adjusting the accumulated Interest make Europeanism encircle the globe.--(Spectator.)

on it.

CHINESE TRADE, FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC

With respect to Mowqua's debt, His Excellency has desired ine to state to you, that after having given the question the most careful consideration, le can by no means recognize, or admit, the prin- Is the manufactures and trade of England were in ciple that Interest on any portion of the Capital a healthy condition, the prospect of extended commerce can be demanded for a single hour after such por- with China would be a source of unmingled congra tion shall be discharged, and therefore any of the tulation. A body of experienced merchants, incited Creditors who have received Interest for a year in- barrassments, would feel their way, and extend their by the prospect of increased gain, not goaded by em- stead of eight months, on the late dividend, must dealings boldly yet with due caution. But at this mo. write the difference back to Mowqua's credit, and met we have manufacturers whose warehouses are, allow it to be deducted from the amount of their and have long been crammed with more goods than next Instalment. they know how to dispose of, and others who suffer less by working their mills at a loss, than by allowing their machinery to rust in inaction. One consequence of

The tea trade is the great staple of China-the point upon which all the mercantile speculations of the Chi- direction to their other enterprises. Mr. M'CULLOCH, na turn-the line of business which gives form and notwithstanding his habitual accuracy, says that China has "capacities for raising unlimited quantities of tea." The cultivation of tea in China ig limited to the pro- vinces lying between the 24th and 33d parallels of North latitude; and even within this range all places are not capable of growing tea, or ten of a high quality, any more than the whole valley of the Rhine is fit for vineyards, or-fit to produce Johannisberger. The tea- provinces of China consist of two groups. The Wes- tern group comprises portions (not the whole) of the Fo-kien, one district of Honan, and one of Hooquang. four provinces-Kiang-uan, Kiang-si, Che-kiang, and Only one of these tea-districts lies on the North side Southern part of Fo-kien. The Eastern group of the of the Yang-tse-kiang, and they stop short of the most Chinese tea districts lies between 27 and 30 degrees or at the very utmost 31 degrees North, and is now liere more than from 200 to 250 miles in breadth 1t is to this group that the growth of the finer teas is ex- clusively confined, and even here they succeed only in some favour.d spots. The Western group embraces nine districts in Yunan, Setchuen, and Koejtchoo, (most of them in the upper valley of the Yang-tse- kiang and its larger affluenta,) and extends beyond the limits of the Chinese empire, Beuthward into Tonquin and Burmah, and Westward as far as Assam- This region is much more extensive than the Western group; but the tea-culture is more thinly scattered, the tea of a very inferior quality, and the nature of the coun. try and climate in many places such as to render it not very probable, that its quality or quantity will ever be materially increased or improved. That the tea. cultivation has not yet extended beyond the limits now indicated, is not for want of a sufficient demand, for much greater quantities of (nominal) tea are every year consumed in, and exported from the Chinese ter- ritories than the tea-countries can supply. The tea is mixed with the leaves of the kindred camelia, with the olea fragrans, and besides with numberless mosses, ferns, and other plants; and of the tilesten" as the Russians call it, a large article of export by land, tea is the least component part.

It is less for its extent and numerous ramifications

(though these too are wonderful) that the tea-trade of China is remarkable, than for the influence it exercises over the whole commerce of that country. As our ob- ject at present is to look at it in this latter point of view-as it is its distribution and the proportionatu amount sent in different directions to which we are desirous of attracting attention-we do not take the would derange their relations to the exports by land. latest statements of the sea-borne exports, for that The most recent accounts, accessible to us, of the trade

from the tea-provinces to China Proper, Chinesa and Independent Tartary, and Russia, come no later down trade to Europe for 1840 would give a distorted view than 1830; and to combine these with returns, of the of the system. It is the system we seek to delineate. and America have hitherto drawn their supplies of tex European countries (with the exception of Russia) from the Eastern tea-districts through the port of Canton.

continued in our next

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

It appears from the accounts of Mowqua's debts which have been submitted, that discrepancies exist in a number of the pouvan amount of $7620-70. Sir Henry Pottinger thinks it that year aftor year goods have been sent, not to order. most desirable that these sums should be at once but upon speculation; which after being hawked about settled, and be either struck off, or paid; and Cap- unable to find a customer, are brought to the hammer ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. tain Balfour (Her Majesty's Consul at Shanghai) to pay warehouse expences, if a high enough price can who is about to proceed to Canton, to superintend be got, China will open a new field for these unsa. these matters on behalf of Her Majesty's Govern leable commodities: herds of sharkish adventurers, ment, will be authorized to have them finally ad- who hear that China is a large country with numerous justed, either by an amicable arrangement between inhabitants, but are totally ignorant of what the Chi the Creditors and Debtors, or by arbitration. neso can give in return, will obtain any credit There still remain to be considered Debts that from the plethoric warehouses of Leeds and Manches- have been claimed as payable by the Co-Hong, tr, will inundate the five open ports of China with but of which the details have not been agreed to,untry has nothing to exchange. There will be a gods unfitted for the market, and for which that and likewise debis not originally owing by Hong temporary briskness in English trade, and a crash. Merchants, but which are claimed as having been assumed by those individuals.

forward.

Extracts from a letter dated WOAHOO (Ohau) 14th Feby., 1843. "We received the glorious news of the peace with China, by the U. S. S. Boston, which arrived here, yesterday, by way of Sydney and Tahiti.

Mr. Charlton, the Consul, left here for England via Mexico last September, to lay before the Government a full detail of the great capabilities A crcumstance that ought to render all who have of this group, the present in ockery of a Govern- any thing to lose cautious how they speculate on the ment, and our serious grievances. Every British opening of the Chinese trade is, that li.nited though the subject except the agent of the Hudson's Bay com- foreign trade of China is, the country does not at pre-pany signed the Memorial. It is quite obvious sent supply commodities to balance the import of Can- this company which has so grossly neglected the ton alone. The oozing of the Sycee silver out of the national interests, now wish to acquire an influence. country to pay for commodities for which the country every way detrimental to sound British policy and has nothing else to give in exchange, and the conse-

With respect to these debts I shall again address you as soon as Sir Henry Pottinger has had time to look into, and make up his mind upon them, and in the meantime I have to call your attention to His Excellency's letter of the 25th of last month to Mr. Morrison's address, in which it is stated that it is the business of the Claimants, and not of Go-quent derangement of the internal ourrency, is believed commercial freedom. The attempts to depreciate vernment, to establish claims that may be brought to have been a chief cause of the measures for exclud: ths character and functions of the late and present Consul have excited the greatest disgust, originating ing foreign opium which gave occasion to the war. I have the honor to be, Gentlemen, The Chinese are a money-loving, acute people, ener as they have with the agent in question. Thank Your most Obedient, Humble Servant getic and enterprising in their own way, possessed of God, H. M. S. Carystart, Captain Lord George great mechanical talent, and inhabiting a country Paulet, has been despatched hither by the Admiral which has many fine provinces. In time, their land to put matters right. What has been already The British Merchants in Chins, must become a rich and profitable resort for merchants; done has given satisfaction, but much more would buy any immediate extension of their trade is little less be given if he were to take possession of the Is- Creditors of the late Kingqua, Mowqua problematical than the great trade with the Niger lands, for if we do not, the French will, having and other Hongs. which worthy Mr. BUXTON was to conjure up. Alinost already taken Tahiti (Otaheite,)

G. A MALCOLM.

:

12

THE FRIEND OF CHINA, AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS. The large amount of our outstanding arrears, (nearly one half of our receipts,) admonishes us to request our friends and subscribers, to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our claims; which trifling as they are individually yet aggregately amount to a considerable sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

WANTED.-A dollar each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos.. 16 and 27 on application to the PRINTING OFFICE. Hongkong 9th March. TREND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE, HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 6TH. 1843. In our No. 29, (Oct. 6th) we drew at- tention to our Oregon or Columbia River territory, to which the Americans lay claim. A reference to this unsettled North Wes- tern boundary question, in the last message of the President, has excited some notice at home. It is much to be regretted that ere this, measures have not been taken by the two Governments to determine their res- pective boundaries from the Atlantic to the Pacific. It would involve a considerable expenditure, but which is not to be put in comparison with the grave consequences which may result from further procrastina tion.

It is obvious every day's delay will in- crease the difficulty, and diminish the like lihood of a satisfactory settlement of the North Western boundary question. It is to be deplored that the treaty of Lord Ashburton, should not have embraced all subjects calculated in future to lead to a misunderstanding between the two Govern-

ments.

We do hope that this outstanding dispute will soon be adjusted, and with that friendly and conciliatory spirit, which we are glad to see, has hitherto marked the foreign policy of Lord Aberdeen.

At the very time we were pointing out to our readers, the new value and import ance which recent events and the cession . of Hong-Kong gave to the question, and the necessity of a settlement on the Sandwich Islands, the patriotic Editor of the Colonial Magazine (Mr. Montgomery Martin) was expressing the same views, The country, he says, both in a commercial and territorial point of view is very valuable. By making this coast the principal outlet of the Furs ostained to so great an amount throughout our vast North American territory, and

between our. North West territory and HONG-KONG, the national importance of which,-dullard must he be, who does not discover it by a glance at the Map.

AMONG the points bearing upon the interests of this country is the following:-The President observes that "The territory of the United States, called the Oregon territory, lying on the Pacific Ocean, north of the forty-second degree of latitude, to a portion of which great Britain lays claim, begins to attract the attention of our fellow citzens." And further observes that. "In advance of individual rights to these lands, sound policy dictates that every effort should be resort- ed to by the two governments to settle their respective claims." But it became manifest at an early hour of the late negotiations, that any attempt for the time

being, satisfactorily to determine those rights, would lead to a protracted discussion, which might embrace in its failure other more pressing matters; and the executive did not regard it as proper to waive all the advantages of an honourable adjustment of other diffi- culties of great magnitude and importance, because this, not so immediately pressing stood, in the way. London Paper

IN another part of our Columns will be found several notices of the Russian trade with China. In our No. 36, we pointed out the discrepancies existing in the various estimates we had seen of this Trade, which are also very obvious in the statements we now re-publish.

It will be observed that the TIMES states the Exports to China from Russia-contra- band trade included-at about four millions of Roubles (the Silver rouble is worth about 38. 3d. the paper rouble about 11d.) whilst the GOVERNMENT GAZETTE, publish- ed at St. Petersburgh, accounts for an aug- mentation in the Foreign Exports, for the year 1841, of upwards of eight millions of silver rubles, or some £1,250,000, by the "extraordinary development of the relations between Russia and China during that year."

and indigo, brought directly from India to Suez by the Indian ship. Bengalce, and thence to Cairo on camels' first cargo which has been conveyed directly from India

backs. This fact is interesting, inasmuch as it is the to Trieste. We are assured that carriages on two wheels are now in progress of construction to convey merchandise from Suez to Cairo, which will effect a considerable saving in the price of the conveyance of those articles. In future, merchandise intended for consumption on the continent of Europe. instead of coming round the Cape of Good Hope, and remaining for months in the warehouses of England, can be con- veyed to Trieste, Leghorn, Marseilles, within two months, which must add considerably to the commer- cial advantages of those cities."

London Mail.

COMMERCIAL. We have received the Semanario Fil- ipino of the 14th March, by which we learn that the Markets are without any im- portant alteration at MANILA. In Cotton Goods the dealers are well supplied, and Grey Shirtings are heavy and unsaleable at $2-6. Metals and Provisions, super- abundant and neglected. Sugar, conti- nues firm at our late quotations. The accounts from Sydney are bad, and it is expected, after the execution of the present orders, prices will fall. Indigo, dull, little of good quality on hand. Coffee not in much request, 300 peculs are reported to have been recently sold at $9 three eighths a 9. Exchange on London Treasury on Bills 4s. 4d., Private Bills 6 mos. sight 4s. 53d. in demand and very scarce. Freights scarce, it is thought seeking ships before the monsoon changes will proceed else: where, unless Clayed Sugars come down.

ARRIVALS-The Blenheim, Velocipede, Isis, Belvedera, (Am.) D'Arcy, Frances Elisabeth, (Fr.) Gitana, from China,

DEPARTURES.-The Osprey for New Zealand, the Hope for Sydney, the Rock- liff and Blenheim for Singapore, and the New Zealand for Cowes. We add partic- ulars of the Exports from the 1st of January to the 5th March, 1843. Sugar

We would remark that Russia can now manufacture fine Woollen Cloth, at a rate that will in a common market, like China, stand the test even of British competition. This trade was created by our expatriated countrymen, forced from home by our re- Hemp strictive policy.

We are quite disposed to think that a not inconsiderable vent may be found in the Northern Ports for the low-costed, and durable linen manufactures of Ireland. To Indigo the North, cotton cloth (not matting, as Hides in these parts) is used for the sails of the Junks and coasting craft. Unbleached canvas or coarse Irish linen would be much better adapted for this purpose, and far more durable than Cotton cloth, although dyed with Cutch, as a preservative against rotting.

to 105. per 1 at which pre

by the rast

Rice

4

"Europe

Singapore &c.

Sydoey

U. States

Europe

1

peculs 13500

U. States

30

Sydney

6500 35500

"

14

Singapore &c.

28000

"

"Europe

3020

19

U. States

13100

Singapore

&c.

2230

1200

250

1120

99.

peculs

362 1320

U. States Singapore &c. China Sydney China

04.720

800

850

1000

8600

Europe

1600

U. States

1000

29

Singapore &c.

5600

China

650

1300

catties

400

U. Stutes

414

11

31

Europe

peculs in 1260

. Sydney.

39

Singapore &c. "Singapore &c.

970 1.290

bys.

"C

Sydney

3640 890

"

China

1400

Spain

2140

Sapanwood,

Cotton

MOP. do. Rope

Segars

OPIUM. On receipt of the News of the PEACE, 1. Shell Turkey Opium advanced in London from Os. Gd. tained by traffic with the Natives along the accounts. On arrival of the news at Smyrna, Opi- coast, we might annually collect to the va- um rose 20 per cent, but on the news of the lue of above half a million sterling, of an treaty not being ratified it fell 7 per cent. This article singularly suited for the trade of years crop is estimated at 180,000 chaquees or China, and thus realize a very considerable 315,000 lb., not one seventeenth of the annual con- profit, as well as strengthen our commercial sumption of the drug in China, one third of the erop is already sold. By a proforma Invoice we relations with that empire. At present a have seen, it appears Turkey Opium could be put large proportion of the advantages of our on board ship at Suez, all expenses included, on trade in Furs is relinquished to the Rus- the 1st of January last, at 9s. 11d. per lb As by sians, who, importing them from us in Eu- the annexed extract, it will be perceived that TEA, rope, send them into China by way of INDIGO, and other Eastern produce has arrived at Suez, and been despatched through Egypt for Kiachta. There is reason to dread that Coutinental consumption, we put it to our readers the litigation will be terminated by the whether it would not be expedient to avail then- ultima ratio regum, the bayonet and can- selves of this new, or rather revival of the old route non, for the cogent application of which, for the transit of such articles of China produce as our recent acquisition of Hong-kong will, are adapted for the consumption of Southern Eu- Valuable articles, such as Raw and we trust, afford acquisition of onto and Wrought Silks, many sorts of which would be were added the acquisition of a command-profitable exports, and as the transit duties and ing position in the Sandwich Islands, we charges would not exceed 1 per cent, we are need little fear opposition or rivalry in the disposed to think when fitting arrangements are made, a direct trade from hence to Suez may North Pacific." be established with great advantage.

In connexion with the latter suggestion, we would refer our readers to our lettes from the Sandwich Islands, from which it will be seen British interests are not ne- glected in that quarter. and mayhap the British Flag is now flying on one of the group; thus forming the connecting link

China

Europe

A letter written at Vienna on the 6th says "The effects of the peace with China already begin to be felt with us in several ways: the cot- ton manufacturers, in particular, have received a new stimulus, and prices have risen considerably. A couple of Greek houses, which have had a large quantity of cotton in their warehouses for some years, have gained large sums on this occasion."

London Paper.

THE Naval and Military Gazette announces an im portant suggestion; bearing, however, little appear- ance of authenticity.

The treaty of peace with China will leave disposable a large land and sea force. A private letter from Bombay mentions that Sir Henry Pottinger ind proposed to take advantage of these means, and to proceed to Japan and demand satisfaction for the to require admission for our to those islands on terms of mutual mereantile advantage. We cannot say how far our co- that this is not the first time the matter has been proposed to respondent's information may prove correct, but we have heard Government. The cruelties exercised against the crews of vessels

THE Company of the Austrian Lloyd's at Trieste, has published the following details relative to the communication between India and the Mediterra-wre ked on these islands deinand that some steps should be nean by Suez and Alexandria

The Austrian brig Pylades. Captain Feoris, has just arrived from Alexandria, with a cargo of TEA, rice,

taken; and no more favourable opportunity has been afforded than the presence of our ships and troops in China, from which they can easily be directed upon Jeddo and other ports in Ja. pan."-[Colonial Gazette.]

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE Times AND THE GLASGOW MERCHANTS.

[Contiuued from our last]

The Glasgow East India Association ask that this grievance may be redressed, and that the ma. nufacturers of Great Britain may enjoy the legitimate advantages of free commercial interchange with China by the negotiation of a treaty based on the true prin ciples of reciprocity. They are entitled to have these advantages. The best interests of England support them in their demand, and if it be yielded, they will have themselves to blame, if they, make a bad use of the opportunity. If, as in the excitement of 1836-7, they again rush headlong into a fever of prod-intion, and glut the markets of China as they did those of the United States and South America at that memorable era, they will do it with their eyes open, and must take the consequences. But there is a vast difference between the two periods. The markets of 300,000,000 of souls are not so easily glutted us those of all Europe and all America joined together. There is no paper money in the Celestial Empire to inflate prices in the first instance, and to subject them to a ruinous depre- ciation, in the second. The goods seut to China must be paid for in pure barter, or bullion; and the China trade is thus free from the fictitious temptations and dangers which induced our merchants to get involved in the crash of American credit in 1830. As yet, too, China has not been blessed, or carsed either, with the advantages of English capital and English loans,

as the United States and the States of South America. Besides the wisdom learned by experience, therefore, the chief causes which led to an unhealthy and un- warranted export trade in 1836 are now destroyed; and the increased demand for our goods, which would be produced by an increased consumption of the Chi- nese staple, through the reduction of the Crown duty, promises to be healthy, and calculated most clearly to create a permanent prosperity in our export trade. The whole question is, however, ultimately conceded by our contemporary; for notwithstanding his abuse and denunciations of the Glasgow inerchant, he adds "If, however, we were actually told that Kesken Elepoo, or Gnu, were actually engaged in negotiating a commercial treaty with Sir Henry Pottinger, by which that fair reciprocity' between ourselves and China, which the Glasgow memorialists desire, was to be definitively and bona fide secured; then, indeed, we might be well disposed to meet the Celestial proposals in a spirit of fair and mutual concession; we have no objection to a quid pro quo."

LOSS OF THE "PELIANCE" EAST INDIAMAN. THE first news of the loss of the Reliance" East Indiaman, off the French coast, was brought to Dover on the 14th Nov. by the "Waterwitch" steamboat from Boulogne-sur-Mer. The "Reliance" was 1,500 tons burden, and was wrecked off Etaples, to the west- ward of Boulogne. The total loss of life amounted to 109. Seven only were saved, six Lascars, and the car penter. The "Reliance" was homeward bound, with au immense and most valuable cargo

13

Furs and peltry are the most important articles of importation on the side of the Russians. Most of these come from Siberia and the newly discov ered islands, but, as a sufficient supply is not thus obtained for the Kiachta-market, foreign furs are sent to St. Petersburgh and are thence despatched to the frontiers Cloth, the coarser sort of which is manufactured in Russia, while the finer sort principally comes from England,, Prussia, and France, is the second article of exportation. Cam- lets, calimancoes, druggets, white flannels, stuffs, velvets, coarse linen, Russia leather, tanned hides, "Reliance," 1,500 tons burden, Thomas Green commander, which glass ware, hardware, tin, talc, cattle, sporting dogs, vessel came on the coast of Merlimont last night, and went to provisions, and meal are the remaining articles, pieces this morning. She left Canton on the 7th of May, with a though meal is less imported than formerly, from cargo of tea; we regret to add, that only about eight ur ten, out the Chinese having extended their agriculture. of 122 persons composing the crew and passengers, have been On the other hand the Chinese supply the Russians saved. The last express we received from the coast does not give much information respecting the survivors; we only know with silk, both manufactured and raw, cotton, teas, that the ship's carpenter is saved, and it is from him that the porcelain, furniture, toys, artificial flowers, tiger ship's name was accertained. The other duri heimaco and panther skins, rubies, colouring matters, canes, colour. The English consul has just proceeded to their assistance. There were on board 75 English, 27 Chinese, and 20 Dutchman tobacco, rice, candies, rhubarb, and musk. total, 122.

The following letters have been received at Lloyd's: Boulogne-sur-Mer, Nov. 12. Sir,-It is our painful duty to apprize you of the total loss of the

November 13.

Trade with China is found to be exceedingly Sir,-By advices just received from the const we are informed profitable to Russia, as she is able to dispose of that the names of the survivors are Robert Dixon (the carpenter). Such furs as are of so little value that they would W. O'Neill, of Kingston, Ireland; Johan Anderson, of Laurvig, not pay the expense of carriage from the east of Norway: Charles Batts, of Dautsic; and three Malays. The Siberia to European Russia, while the richer furs, body of Captain Green has been identified by the carpenter; also that of the fourth mate Griffin and a seaman; their remains will which are sold very dear to China, would not find be conveyed here, where they will receive the rite of Christian purchasers in Russia on account of their expen- burial. Gaptain Tucker, late commander of her Majesty's ship siveness. They are also able to obtain from Iris," is among the drowned. Everything is being done for the China, in exchange for these articles, which would benefit of the owners of the vessel. The services received from otherwise be unprofitable, many goods which they the horse soldiers is in every way efficient. We are, &c, A. ADAMS and Co. would be unable to purchase at an advantageous To W. Dobson, Esq., Secretary at Lloyds'. rate from the European Powers. The gross amount of the average trade, including such ar- ticles as are smuggled, is estimated at 4,000,000 roubles: the calculation for the present year, in which the contraband trade is omitted, giving 2,869,333 roubles,

The Morning Chronicle has published the following

additional observations and particulars The shipwreck of the "Reliance," from China to London, at Etaples, near Boulogne, on Saturday, has created considerable sensation in the city. The loss of 110 persons out of the 116 on board has cast a gloom of the most melancholy description among the merchants connected with the East India trade. Her last place of resort was St. Helena, and the parties interested in her fate were therefore in expectation every day of hearing of her safe arrival. It appears that of the crew and passengers, numbering the amount of persons already stated, the saved are one European, described to be the ship's carpenter, and five Lascars, who reach d the shore in one of the boats of the vessel. The "Reliance" was an old ship on this trading station, and had on board a cargo of ten of considerable value, besides the freightage incidental to a voyage she was in the habit of performing. The quantity of tea she brought was 1,884,748lb., of which there 1,277,566lb. of congou, and 406,565lb. of twankay, with Smaller proportions of other descriptions. Most fortunately for the insurance-ice and underwriters in this country, their risks upon this vessel do not include more than from 14,000l. to 15,0001. of the 195,000. for which, it is said, she is insured; the Indian offices, that is to They simply ask a quid pro quo, and that the tariff, say, the insi rance-offices of Canton Calcutta and Bombay, being under the treaty of Nankin, may be adjusted in a spi. This mishap, with from the of the entire amount. rit of fair and mutual concession. They have been This mishap, with those reported from the Cape of Good Hope on Saturday, and others which have occurred on the coast during distinctly told by official authority, that mutual tariffs on Saturday, and others are, in a material degree, depressed the are to be drawn up agreeably to an express stipulation feelings of parties connected with our shipping interest. The in the treaty now in this country, and which only London insurance-offices, and also the underwriters, have suffer. waits the progress of regal etiquette to be signed by the bd by the loss of the "Abercrombie Robinson" and the "Waterloo," ruler of the Central Flowery Land. They according-out, we are assured, not to any serious extent.-Atlas. ly pray the First Lord British authorities to deal with of her Majesty's Treasury to give instructions to the the Chinese on the enlightened principle of reciprocity and equal justice. They point out to the Right Ho. nourable Baronet that the consumption of British goods in China must be measured by the consumption of Chinese products in British markets; and that, to create a commensurate demand for our products in the vast markets of China, it is necessary to diminish the duty now levied on the China staple in British ports. After advancing the most absurd doctrine, that the Chinese would lay on upon their exports, the taxes which we should remit on their imported produce, our contemporary denies that they would allow the reduc- tion of one shilling per pound on the ton duty to induce them "to sacrifice the revenue derivable from our ma- nufactures." Nobody asks them to make any sacri- fice. On the contrary, the Glasgow merchants are arions that the revenue of China should derive a great increase, instead of making any sacrince,

British manufactures. They wish to make the esta blishment of peace between the two countries mutually profitable to the exchequers and to the individuals of both nations.

America set us an example of free trade under her Compromise Act. by which British goods were admit. ted at twenty per cent. We obstinately refused to give her a quid pro quo, and adhered to our protective scale of duties on the raw produce of her soil. until we compelled the northern states to become manufacturers. The same course of conduct produced the same results with the Continent of Europe. The Prussian Minis ter, Baron Maltzsahu, judicially offered Mr. Canning, in 1826, to enter into a commercial treaty with Eng Innd, admitting British goods at a moderate duty, provided England would corn and timber

on equal terms. A was returned

to that offer; and yet the Times talks of the "obstinate principles the part of rica and the enlightened nations of Europe." The truth is to be found precisely the reverse. England met the free-trade offers of America and the enlighten- ed nations of the Continent with obstinate resistance. Her statesmen adhered to a bigoted suicidal' protective scale, until they forced other nations to emulate her by retaliations; and then, but not untill then, when she has discovered her error at the eleventh hour, and wishes to turn over a new leaf, the Times and that school of writers have the hardihood to attempt to throw the blame on the shoulders of foreign countries whose offers to reciprocate we received, with the most haughty and unbending denial. Journal of Commerce.

RUSSIAN TRADE WITH CHINA.

Times.

Total of foreign exports, 1839 to 1841, exclu- sive of corn from Russia. Silver Rubles.

In 1838

1939

1840 1841

70,562,252

69,640,761

68,704,971 76,999,676 The increase which took place in 1841 is ac- counted for by the extraordinary development of the relations between Russia and China during that year. The latad never before sent so large a quantity of tea to the market of Kiachta, so that the importation of that article, although very considerable during the preceding years, augmented in a remarkable proportion in 1841. Total of imports from 1838 to 1841 :-

In 1838

2839 1840

1841

Silver Rables. 69,693,824

69,993,589

76,726,111 79,420,490

The gold and silver ingots or coin are not in- cluded in the above amounts. In 1841 the ex- ports of precious metals were 4,023,728 silver rubles, and the imports 9,347,867.

A very respectable correspondent has sent to us the following letter:-

"LINEN TRADE WITH CHINA-In the present depressed state of

1825.

Rubles.

70.119

1830. Rubles. 139 231

268,521

The recent extension of the trade of Russia with China, which has lately become such an object of interest, is well described in a work recently trans- lated from the Russian of Dr. Pallas and M. Mul- ler, and entitled the Conquest of Siberia. In this there is a succinct account as well of the origin of the commerce in question as of the extent to which it is at present carried on. The commencement the linen trade, it may be interesting to many of your readers to of all connexion between the Russians and Chin- know that the Russians have a considerable and increasing ese seems to have been towards the middle of the trade in linens with the Chinese. In the appendix to Lord Lond. 17th century, when the Russians, spreading east-annerry's Tour in the North of Europe (1936-7), we find the ward through the territory on each side of the following statement of exports of Russian manufacture. to China, at three different periods, from the Russian town of Kinkhta, river Amoor, and subduing several independent viz:- Tongusian hordes, which the Chinese also designed to conquer, the two contries were brought tnto minating in a regular treaty, by which the progress of the Russian arms was checked, and the founda- tion of a commerce were laid, and which was signed in 1689. The Russians lost by the treaty the Navigation of the Amoor, but obtained in re- turn a permanent trade with the Chinese. Under it much difficulties arose, and it was not till 1728 that the treaty of Kiachta was signed, which is the basis of all transactions carried on between the two countries at the present time. In that treaty it was declared that a Caravan might go to Pekin every three years, on condition that it should not contain more than 200 persons, and directly this caravan reached the frontier notice was to be sent to the Chinese court, which would despatch an officer to meet the caravan, and conduct the per- sons to Pekin. Kiachta and Tuenchaitu, both of which are situated on the confines of Siberia, were appointed as places of resort, where a trade to the subjects of both nations was allowed.

The commerce, as it is now carried on, is en- tirely a trade of barter, the Russians being pro- hibited to export their coin. The Chinese mer- chant comes first to Kiachta, and examines the merchandise he wants in the warehouse of the Russian trader, and when the price is settled the goods are sealed in the presence of the Chinese. Both parties repair to Maimiatchin, where the Rus sian chooses his commodities, and leaves behind a person of

1835. Rubles. Linens 203 115 Cluths 1,434,550 2,266,641 The treaty recently concluded by our gallant towasman, Sir Henry Pottinger, having opened the northern districts of China to the commercial enterprise of our people, we may fairly assume that a long period will not elapse tills me of the staple produc. tions of the north of Ireland finds its way to that country. In deed, I believe I have good authority for stating that a small shipment has already been despatebed thither from our town."-- [Northern Whig)

of lower descriptions for the English market, likovite of the better qualitics for China. The new crop of Cotton is large and good, and prices are consequently declining--The following are the quitations for all descriptions at present in the Market. Surat, Broach, & Jumbooseer.. Rs. 90 a 91 por Candy Oomrawutty

Corros-Considerable purchases are continuing to be made,

Dholera, & Bhownuggur Komptah

80 85

3

88 85

78 81 Mangarole, Pore bunder 70 71 Chests have been sold, The Exports of late have however been Orivst.-Rs. 910 to 950 per Chest, at which rates about 400 all made of former The

Official statement of the Import, Expert Beflowing 18 the to the 7th Instant. Imported from 3d Nov. 1811 to the 7th Feb. 1843 Chests 27,0025 Exported under passes 3r 1841-12 and from pre- vidus year's balance of 2000 chests, from 22nd October 1841 to the 7th Feb. 1843..

" 20,970 6,032

Remaining-Chests. Bombay Price Current, Feby 11th,

ST. PETERSBURG, Dec. 7-The Gazette of Commerce an nounces that a lump of native gold, weighing hove 63 lbs, ha been found in the mines.of Zlatoust, and that it is already de posited in the Museum of the Mining Institution at St. Peters-

house Confidence, who remains in the ware- burg-[London Paper]

Russian goods are delivered, when he returns with the Chinese merchant to Kiachta.

VIDE SUPPLEMENT

?

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR CALCUTTA, TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AND PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig ALGERINE. J. M. Hill Cor mander, will sail for the above nam d ports in all April.

D. WILSON & Co.

For freight or passage apply to Hong kong, 30th March, 1843.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD.

The faat sailing Ship "CAMAIEU," A. 1 for 12

yeare. Burthen 288 ton, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. 1. British built Birque "ABBERTON," Captain Carr, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passago, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong, 15th February, 1843

NOTICE.

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1842.

FOR SALE Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all des' Icriptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Mareella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to Clothing, and Beaver Hats. A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

FOR SALE-Java Coffee

ce, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Bisus, in whole, and half Bar. rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, Eriglish Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in gases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, ani Cognac, in one and three duzen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jauns and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as. sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigara, Crockerey.ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar. rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Beagal Bouled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1813. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant For Charter, Freight or Passage apply ou board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong

15th March 1843

Fearon & Son-Macao.

FOR Sale at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods Viz.

Anchors of all Sizes.

Chain Cables,

Manila Segars, 4: Superior,

do. do. 4: Fine equal to 3rd Superior

Superfine Blue cloth.

Ladies Muslin dresses of all colours,

Silks, Satin and Straw Bonnets,

Stout and Patent Leather Shoes,

Sewing Cotton of all numbers,

Black Silk Stockings.

White coloured and Fancy Socks,

Regatta Shirts,

Duck and Fancy Trowsers,

Dress and Shooting Coats.

Woollen Caps, and Striped Ginghams for Shirtings,

Bengal Towels,

Copying and writing ink..

D. WILSON & CO. BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their Vessel the "ALGERINE," beg to announce to the Public that she will bring on a choice investment of fancy goods of every description consisting of Perfu- mery, Stationery, Cutlery, Hardware, Ironmongery. Drapery, Grocery, Preserved meats, Confectionary. Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes, Oilman's Stores, Wines, Beer. Spirits, Liqueurs &c., &c., which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes taking their regular supplies.

AUCKLAND HOTEL, Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

FOR SALE-At the Godown of the Undersigned just landed: Port, Madeira and Sherry of really superior Quality, Bass's Beer in Hogsheads. Apply by letter to WILLIAM SCOTT.

Hongkong, 28th March, 1843.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE, the house and lot opposite the Hongkong Market, known as the Auckland Hotel, also one lot on, Queen's, Road, south side, Apply to

C. V. Gillespie. Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843. NOTICE.-Storage can be obtained at low rates in Granite Godowus on application Hongkong 20th December 1842.

C. V. Gillespie,

Car lapis 16 Queens Road, has on Sale Large Singapore

Spars suitable for Lower Masts, Orrel Coal, square Iron, Plate Glass. Irish Pork in barrels, Preserved Meats, Fish and Vegetables in tin and in cases of six dozen each, Sherry. Chain- nigne, Port, Hock, Brandy, White and Grey Long Cloths, c Hong-kong 3.ih Nov. 1842.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley. Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

NOTICE. GOODS and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843. NOTICE-THE undersigned is authorized to re-

ceive all packages or Parcels addressed to any of the Officers or to the Mess of Hon. 18th Royal Irish Regiment, and will pay any expences incurred upon N, DUUS, Fearon's Wharf, Hongkong. 22d March, 1842,

them.

FOR SALE-Newcastle Coals in bags at 50 cents per pecul. C. V. Gillespie. Apply to Hongkong 20th December 1842.

Beef Tar

Rosin

FOR SALE.

Pork

Pitch

Mackrell in Kits

Navy bread Flour

Negro head Tobacco. Pilot bread Soap

150 boxes of raisins &c. &c. These goods are just landed from the American vessels LARK and NAVIGATOR and are in prime con- G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hongkong; 7th March, 1843.

FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOK" built by the same Builder as the C-los- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

ALRO

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoannt Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cheray Cordial, in Pints. Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders and a great variety of other articles.

Hongkong, 1st March. 1843.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co. FOR SALE.-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

NOTICE-ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS Printed by Messrs Galignani, rue Vivienne. PARIS. [Orders to be accompanied by a bill payable in London or Paris.] GALIGNANIS MESSENGER.-A daily Politi cal Journal. The object of this well-known Journal is to supply the reader with a SUBSTITUTE FOR THE EN- TIRE OF THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH NEWSRAPERS. Con- ducted on a system of undeviating impartiality, the sentiments of every party, Ministerial and Opposition, find their place in its columns.

In the English Department will be found the leading articles of the Tory, Conservative, Whig, and Radical journals. A prominence correspondent with their vast importance is given to the parliamentary debates. In addition to all news of fashionable or general interest, the proceedings at the Indin House, and every subject important to Eastern subscribers. is specially attended to.

The French Department contains (in a special ar. ticle) the political sentiments of the Paris press; the proceedings of the French Chambers; the fashionable and local news of Paris, Stocks, etc.; the earliest infor ination from Spain, Switzerland, Italy and Ger- many, Russia, and all other parts of the Continent. Terms of Subscriptions: (Payable in advance) One Year, £5. 10s; Six Months, 2 17s.

THE LONDON AND PARIS OBSERVER, Journal of Literature. Science, and Fine Arts. -This Journal. published every Sunday, consisting of forty- eight columns of closely-printed, matter large 410. (al- most the matter of an octavo volume), contains the Elite of all that is intellectual, useful. or recreative, in more than TWENTY London Quarterly, Monthly, and Weekly Publications.

Terms of Subscriptions:-(Payable in advance) One year £2. 10s., Six months £1. 78.

DIED.

after a few days illness, JoHN H. LARKINS Esq. of Ar Macao, on the 30th March, of the small pox, the firm of Messrs FLETCHER, LARKINS & Co.

Shipping Intelligence.

MARCH.

ARRIVED.

29th Esperanza [Sp.]

1st April H. C. Str. Akbar Pepper

28th Guess 30th Ly Raffles

Macao Maca

Macao

Ahuga

Macao

40 Queuns Road.

30th Wm. Hyde

Stewart

31st H. M. S. Wolverine

Johnson

31st Ardasseer

McIntyre

Whampoa Maca o Macao

31st Ariel

Burt

Macao

31st John Knox

Cleland

Whampo a

Macao

24 Culdee

Campbell

Manila

24 Judith Allen

Macao

2d Bandicea

Withers

Macao

3d H. M. S. Wanderer

Seymour

Amoy

31 Louisa 3d Linnett

Jackson

Chusan

Phillips

5th H. C. Str. Proserpine Hough

SAILED.

MARCH

McKellar

Maono

Macao

31st Erigono [Fr Fe] 31st Louisa

Cecille

Frogan

Ahuga

Whampoa Manila

E. Coast

Stewart

Smith

Cork Bully

3d

H, M. Str. Vixen

3d John Knox 4tn Ariel

White Hayes Johnson Bayes Cleland

Whampoa

Chusan

Macao

Amoy Singapore

Burt

Whampoa

G. Moses & Co.

4th II. C. Str. Proserpine

Hough

4th Baodicea

Withers

Singapore

5th Adelaide

Wharton

Singapore

Boyce

Singapore

McArthur

Bombay

McDowall

Liverpool

Phillips

Chusan

Macao

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com plete in every respect. Fer particulars apply to BENNETT, PAIN & Co.

Hougkong, 3rd March, 1843. NOTICE. Just opened and exposed for Sale. Eng.

lish Saddles and Bridles complete, cut Tumblers Wine, Champagne and Liquor Glasses. Decanters, Fin- ger Cups and Butter Pots, Indian shades and spare burners, price moderate.

Best double distilled Lavender water with Glass Stoppers Hongkong, 1st March 1843

by Smith & Co.

Fau do Cologne.

Needles of all No.

'Fancy quilling for Gents, Vests and Childrens Frocks,

Plain and figured Jean and drillings,

Figured Flannel for Ladies winter dresses,

Quills and Black Lead Pencils,

Fresh Table Raisins,

Copper Kettles horn Lanterns and fish Boilers,

Spermecete candles. Pad Locks, Powder Flasks,

Vices, Chisels, files &c. &c. &c.

Dutch Blankets. Persian Carpets, &c. &c.

Best Brandy, Sherry. Gin and Beer &c. &c. &c.

Hongkong. 25th Jany, 1843 G. MOSES & Co. Queen's Road.

FOR SALE.

The Bungalow, with six Rooms, convenient Offices for seryants, and Godown; also Stables situated on the Queen's Road, opposite to Marine lot No. 46. dimensions of lot, f120+ 4105. Apply to C. V. GILLESPIE.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LoжBOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to JOHN LEATHLEY HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN MACAO

31st Esperanza

31st Mazeppa

31st Gazelle

31st Wm. Hyde

31st Asia

2d April Athena

3d 1. M. S. Wolf

3d H. M. S. Wolverine

5th Eden

5th Brahmin

5th Liverpool 5th Linnett

5th H. C. Str. Proserpine Hough

Macao

Reports. H. M. S. Royalist for Singapore and 11. M. S. Agincourt for Manila and H. M. T. S. Apollo for England in a few days.

The Sir Robert Peel for Macao and Singapore this

day,

William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE IRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

$5

SUPPLEMENT

No. 55, OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA, 6TH APRIL, 1843.

PRESENT CLOSE OF THE WAR WITH CHINA.

15

those vital necessaries which our own immediate territory is too narrow to afford in full.

Colonial Gazette.

THE REV. JOHN LOCKE ON THE OPIUM QUESTION. fairs. I would not be the apologist for war, or for promoting the MISTAKES, doubtless; have been committed in the Chinese af. use of a baneful drug; but the question is complicated, and mighty interests are involved on either side. If the British gov- ernment suddenly prohibits the cultivation of the poppy, famine- tion of our commercial marine rots npon the waves. The pseudo. sweeps the plains of Malwa and the Ganges, and a vast propor. religious sentimentalism, the agueish philanthropy, which is abroad, is positively disgusting. Some do not consider that un- may prove deadlier than the harvest of the bayonet and postpone, timely peace, and inglorious resignation of international rights, to an indefinite period, those moral and physical benefits, which must necessarily accrue to the three hundred millions of Chinese, from'a fair and free intercourse with the British Nation. The sub. stance of our demands upon the Chinese is a treaty of commerce, and negociation upon equal terms. The opium question has very

that if the constitution of the Chinese empire re- OUR views respecting the origin of the war with main unenfeebled-if the arrangement for carry- China are upon record, in the volumes of the ing the treaty into effect be satisfactorily settled- Colonial Gazette for 1839-40, as well as of the if the ransom be duly paid, the Chinese territory modes in which a better understanding might have evacuated by the British troops, and an understand- been brought about; and it were now bootless to ing come to about the opium-trade-and if the recur to an irremediable past. No success, how- Western nations 1est satisfied with confining their ever dazzling, can hide the original inherent guilt relations with China to a legitimate commercial of the war, now said to be brought to a close. intercourse-much substantial benefit inay;be de- "Said to be"-for though there is little doubt that rived from the opening of the four new ports. the Emperor's fears will confpel him to ratify the But here is a fearful array of ifs to qualify our treaty, and though any renewal of hostilities may anticipations of future benefit. The views and be called a new war, it is impossible to look upon the temper expressed by the organs of public that treaty as "the be-all and the end-all" of our opinion in France and England are the reverse of aggressions in China. It makes us proprietors of encouraging; and to all of us the mind and mo- an island in the river of Canton; it gives our tra- rals of China are an utter terra incognita: we ders free access to five Chinese ports: and it con- have no facts whence to infer the probable or even cedes the appointment of consuls at those ports by possible course its Government may steer. Add little to do with the matter; a wise Government, and the in- the British Government to protect its subjects. to this, that there are grounds for apprehension influence of public opinion at home, will compel a settlement of The power and privileges of the consuls-the man- the over-sanguine spirit of speculation, which is be- that question, when the other demands are conceded, We have no quarrel with the Chinese people, who, indeed, are peculiarly ner in which they are to transact business with ginning to speak out in the City and elsewhere. addicted to trade and commerce, in spite of the tyrannous re the Chinese authoities-the tariff of duties upon It reminds one of the baseless and grasping dreams strictions of their government; but the haughty exclusiveness of goods exported and imported, and the rates of in- of profit which characterized the period when the the Emperor and his administration, is inimical to the true in- land transit-all these important details remain to markets of South America where first thrown the social compact which binds the great nations of this world by terests of the human race; and he cannot longer eet at nought to be settled by after-negotiation; and until they open to British enterprise. Already we hear of the links of free intercourse and reciprocal benefits. When suc. ces crowns our efforts, we shall all view the question in a similar

be distinctly settled, the treaty je little more than an advance in the price of goods intended for the a dead letter. This negotiation must be carried newly opened market, and of the raw material-bably, before the expiration of one year, the waters of the Indus,

light-and of that success there can be no rational doubt. Pro-

as well as the Chinese ports, will be crowded with British mer chantmen. The Tartar of Central Asia will trim his beard with a Sheffield scissors, and every spinster in Pekin must have a Coventry ribbon. "To tie up her bonny black hair."

in

[Bombay Times.]

THE Chinese themselves affirm that the use of the drug acts as

a preventive against disease: and in this opinion, when smoked moderation, I am inclined in post to agree with them. The particles, by their direct and topical influence on the nerves of the lungs, which carry the impressions they receive to the heart, brain, and spinal cord, and, through them to all parts of the body, and, by their tonic influence, strengthen the several organs. may thus, to a certain extent, guard the system against discase, This opinion gains strength when we call to mind that a peculiar active principle in opium, the narcotic, has of late been employed It

with considerable success in Bengal as a substitute for quinine. may also be mentioned, that at the time fevers prevailed so ex- tensively among our troops at Hongkong, but comparatively few of the Chinese suffered, though exposed throughout to the same

exciting causes.

on at a distance of seven or eight hundred miles of a rise in freightage-and indeed of a general from the central seat of Government: for no pro- stir in all branches of trade directly or indirectly vision has been made for permission to a British interested; the news has imparted an entire dif- agent (temporary or permanent) to transact busi- ferent tone to the commercial reports. This is no ness directly with the Imperial Ministers in the healthy spirit of enterprise, springing from a know- capital. It must be carried on while the payment ledge of what the Chinese want and can give in of the twenty-one millions of dollars, spread over a return: it is the sickly longing to throw off a DE. M'PHERSON ON THE EFFECTS OF OPIUM-SMOKING. period of three years, is yet uncompleted, and plethora of goods into the first apparent opening, the pawned islands of Chusan and Kolangsoo are without stopping to inquire whether they are fit for still occupied by British troops; a state of affairs the market, or whether the dealers can afford to which will necessarily keep alive angry and dis- pay for them. What have the Chinese to give us, trustful feelings on both sides. Lastly, whatever but their teas, their silks, their cottons, and their may be thought of the reports of disaffection in the porcelains?-the two last of which we now manu- Southern provinces, hitherto so hastily credited, facture in larger quantities, better, and cheaper, than the weakness of the Imperial Government in con- they can do. Any permanent beneficial trade bet- senting to buy a peace will create disaffection even ween this country and China must be a round about where it did not exist before. The mere presence one.-goods exported from England to China, and of a British force on the frontiers will encourage goods exported from China to third markets in the governors of distant provinces to ass ume a order to balance our transactions in them, or an deportment verging upon independence towards inversion of this order of the transaction. Time the Court at Pekin. The spirit of subordination and experience will be requisite to find out what in China is unsettled by that treaty; and the de- articles of traffic China can afford, and in what sire of our consuls and merchants to stand well markets they can be turned to best accounts. If with the local authorities at the ports which they there were in this country no over-accumulation are allowed to trade, the misunderstandings art of capital and excessive supply of labour, deranging sing from the reluctance of the Ghinese to pay the all the calculations of trade, and creating a wild ransom, and their anxiety to see their territory impatience of human suffering, the opening now evacuated, will be constantly involving the British presented to us might be rendered available deli- residents in the political intrigues of China. Add berately and safely. But the blind yearning for to all these sources of anxiety for the future, that relief, the necessary consequence of our actual the relations between this country and China, out condition, is more likely to plunge us into rash and of which the war arose, are as unsettled as ever. gigantic speculations, that must, in many cases, No arrangement has been made as to the footing increase the evil. The tragi-comedy of the time on which the opium-trade is to stand. It is a traf when British goods littered the wharfs of Rio Janei- fic prohibited by the Chinese Government, and in ro, so cheap as to be deemed not worth the expense which the British Indian Government has a large of warehousing, and when men went mad about pecuniary stake. The great but the sole advantage the mines of South America, may be acted over of the armistice with (China, (for it 18 in truth no- again: there may be a feverish hopefulness, lavish thing more,) is that it gives us an opportunity of credit, busy factories, banks, and joint-stock com- shaping our course anew and acting more wisely panies springing up like mushrooms, dreams of an and honestly in time to come. Eldorado millennium, and then a crash, spreading bankruptcy, desolation, and despair over the land.

Not that there is at this moment any increased cause for despondency as to the country's pros-

nects The terms of the armistice do not create

These facts would certainly, on the whole, rather tend to show that the habitual use of opium is not so injurious as is commonly supposed; its effects, certainly, are not so disgusting to the be holder as that of the sottish, slavering drunkard. True, like all other powerful stimulants and narcotics, it must ultimately pro. duce effect injurious to the constitution; and the unhappy ir- dividual who makes himself a slave to the drug shuns society. and in indifferent to all around him ; and, when deprived of his

usual allowance, he describes his feelings as if rats were gnawing his shoulders and spine, and worms devouring the calves of his

legs, with an indescribable craving at the stomach, relieved only by having recourse to his pipe, now his only solace.-[Colonial

Gazette.]

THE Times uses a vast deal of the most transparent "cant" about the "demoralising influences of the opium trade" The consumption of the poppy cannet be stop-, in China which ardent spirits do in Europe. The only ped by prohibitory enactments. It serves the purpose way to stop its use is to encourage habits of religion vocates for crusading missions to enforce the tenets of and temperance amongst the masses. We are no ad- Christianity in China; but we are confident that the light of revealed religion, following the footsteps of peace with China and England, is more likely to ex- tirpate the vice of opium-eating than any "proscrip- tive" measures that the most sanguinary penal code could devise. Some-of-the most enlightened states....... men of China have laid their sentiments before the

SOME recent circumstances and events, in which the names of

These considerations show that the position in which the treaty places this country is one which demands the utmost caution and the gravest deli- beration, instead of being ground for confident course is likely to be encompassed, will be greatly these dificulties, they only reveal them. From the so as to make it a source of revenue, and place it un- increased by the complication of our Chinese rela- moment hostilities commenced, it was certain that der the protection of the laws; satisfied that no pu- tions with the European and American diplomacy. our relations with China never could be re-estab-nishment, however severe, could put un end to the French and American vessels of war are already lished on the old footing. The treaty tells us little most extensive smuggling. The use of opium is, in beginning to show themselves in the Chinese wa- more than that these new relations, and others fact, like the use of many other medicines, of the ters. Those nations will not only insist upon (what springing from them, will be infinitely more com- greatest value to human life. Taken in moderation, is their right) being placed in commercial matters plicated and on a more gigantic scale than the old; and only when required in sickness, to assuage pain, on as favourable a footing as Great Britain, but and that our wariness and exertions must be cor- its effects are most conducive to the restoration of they will become as deeply involved in the politic- respondingly increased. Over the past we have health; but when taken in excess, it leads first to al intrigues of China as ourselves. The history no power: we must shape our conduct to our inebriety, then to madness, soon to imbecillty, and last of the past teaches us that even the most meddling new position-we must "dree our weird." But of all to death.-Journal of Commerce. governments have interfered in the domestic squab this untried state of being is one to be adventured bles of foreign states, as often out of dread that upon with resolute foresight, not unreasoning ex- some of their neighbours would do it if they did ultation. The City capitalist, who looks only to a not, as from any other motive. To the diploma- vent for his unemployed funds-the manufacterer tists of each of the nations we have named, the who is only anxious to keep his mills going-the bare presence of the others in China will be an country gentleman, who thinks an extension of irresistible inducement to mix themselves up in the trade may render the outcry against the Corn-laws factions and political intrigues of the country: less urgent-each centered in self, may see in the and while they are busy in the South, Russia will new market a relief to all their anxiety: but the not be idle in the North. The acquisition of Hong- general public, and the statesmen to whom it is Kong by the British, and the admission of their given to guide their destiny, must act upon more consuls into five Chinese ports, may be but the be- comprehensive views. Well-regulated, the open-pay ginning of a game similar to that which was played ing of the China markets, if all go smoothly as to by the French and the English in India, after the the performance of treaties, may bring a real ex- latter obtained possession of Jagheer at Calcutta tension of trade: but if the whole force of our and established factories at Madras and Bombay; surplus productive powen is to be directed to this but among a greater number of Competitors, and one vent, it may be glutted almost as soon as open- these possessed of greater resources, more devel-ed-the occasion of new "distress" and new cla- oped skill, and (if possible) more indomitable pride. mours for relief; for it still leaves us with an The commercial view of the question is perhaps over-crowded population seeking to derive from the most encouraging. There can be no doubt the more precarious source of foreign commerce

Lords Frankfort, Huntingtower, and Chesterfield have been observations on the conduct which, noblemen ought to display. mixed up, led the Times of last Tuesday to offer a few general which we regret we cannot find space transcribe into our columns. The two former members of this trio are certainly sufficiently obfcure, but the last is well known in "the fashion. able world, and by the élite of society." In the case of Lord Chesterfield, which has been lately brought before the public, a certain Count Bathyany took a fancy to a certain Elcanur Suter, and purchased her for an annuity of 3001. a year. After a month's "protection" the lady quitted him, and another admirer was the chosen Lothario. The disappointed Count refused to the annuity" because the consideration for the deed which guaranteed it was immortal." So the case came on in the Court of Chancery, where first amongst this woman's formal and rec gnieed trustees was an English peer-Losd Chesterfield. This was, indeed, a most untoward circumstance for the aristo- cracy, especially coming quick after Lord Huntingtower's bank. ruptcy, Lord Frankfort's prosecution, and Lord Hertford's will. One observation of the Times we must extract; it is like a bushel of March dust-worth a king's ransom :-"The people are not yet alienated from their natural leaders;-they feel respect for their superiors, but they will not continue to feel it, unless the better part of those superiors hold out to them not only the reality,. but the appearance of deserving it."-[Atlas.]

66

THE FRIEND OF CHINA, GAZETTE.

LONGBONG

AND 御

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

EXTRA.

HONGKONG, SATURDAY, APRIL 8TH. 1843.

16

and a SEPARATE account of the foreign postage must be rendered every quarter.

at Hongkong and Macao, on the subject of postage chargeable on letters arriving in Bombay from China. THE annexed Copies of letters from the Post 2. I had before endeavoured to explain these Master General at Bombay, together with the No- tification alluded to in No. 1721 of 1842 are pub-rules to the Post-Master at Macao, but as I have lished for general information, and with the ob- been informed by Captain Richards of II. M. Ship ject of giving effect to those arrangements, the fol- Cornwallis, that the greatest uncertainty prevails lowing local Regulations are laid down and will in China, in regard to the regulations under which come into operation from the 1st day of June next ceived at this office, I have been induced to trou- letters, and particularly letters for Europe, are re- both as regards the Post Office at Hongkong, and ble you, in the hope that all the necessary informa- Council, will be chargeable. This might be pre-

the British Consular Office at Macao, 1st. Boxes will always be kept open at the Post tion on the subject may, through your means be Offices for the receipt of letters to be transmit- communicated to the public, and that the Post Office authorities in China may be directed to fa ted to the different Presidencies of India when-cilitate the dispatch of letters, by adopting the ever opportunities may offer, 2nd. On those letters that may be put into the course which I have pointed out, in regard to the Bombay Box, outward Ship Postage will invar- pre-payment of the whole of the Ship postage at the Office of despatch, iably be charged at the rate of 2 Annas on a I have the honor to be letter of three Tolas weight, and an Anna on Sir, every additional Tola.

Bombay

Genl. Post Office 14th Octr. 1842.

3rd. The same rule will be applied to all letters that may be put in the Boxes for Madras and Calcutta. 4th. When the letters are addressed to Persons in India, it will be optional with the Posters of them to pay or not, the inward Ship Postage which is the same as the outward-and in case they do not pay it, it will be recovered from the Receivers. 5th. When letters are intended to go beyond India To the inward and outward Ship Postage must be invariably paid.

No, 1721-of 1842.

Sir,

Your most obdt. Servant W. ESCOMBE

Acting Post-Master General,

The Post Masters at

in conclusion, that when letters for Europe are 9. It must be borne in mind, I would observe forwarded to Bombay either by Madras or Cal- catta, inland, postage according to the rates laid down in the Notification of the 14th August 1839, No. 184, Genl. Dept. published by order of the

Hon. the President of the Council of India in

paid in China in the same manner as has been above provided for Ship and foreign postage. All that is necessary is, that the accounts of each des- cription of postage should be kept quite distinct. I have the honor to be &c., [Signed] W. ESCOMBE, Actg. Post-Master General. Bombay Genl. Post Office 14th October 1842. [True Copy]

W. ESCOMBE, Acting Post-Master General.

NOTIFICATION. COMMANDERS of Ships, trading with the Port of Bom- bay, are hereby informed, that all Letters for England, arriving from Sea-ward, are subject in Bombay to Ship Postage, and all Letters for Foreign Europe, to General Department Steamer Postage, in addition.

Hong-Kong, and Macao. As great misunderstanding appears still to pre- vail in regard to the postage leviable in Bombay on letters received from China,. I have the honor to forward a Notification issued under date the 14th March 1842, which contains all the rules neces- sary for your guidance.

6th. On letters intended for the United Kingdom no Postage except the outward and inward Postage can be received under any circumstan- ces if placed in the Bombay Box, but when placed in the Madras or Calcutta Boxes, the Indian inland Postage, agreeable to the annex- ed scale marked A, must be paid, in addition to the outward and inward Ship Postage. 2. It may be attended with much inconve 7th. When letters are intended for Foreign Eu-nience to oblige parties in China to have recourse rope or any intermediate Place, additional Post- to an Agent in Bombay to pay the postage due age will be levied on them agreeable to the here, and I therefore beg that you will cause it to Table laid dowu in the Bombay Government be understood that the entin postage, both the Notification of the 14th March 1842, and such outward and inward, may be paid in your office, letters will accordingly bear four Items of by which all further charge will be done away charge namely

Outward Ship Postage

"Inward Ship Postage

"Indian Inland Postage

if put in the Madras or Calcutta Boxes "Foreign Postage

8th. The same rules will be applied to Newspa- pers, Pamphlets &c, the Postage on them being charged agreeable to the Table inserted in the Bombay Government Notification above advert-

ed to.

with.

To prevent disappointment, therefore, to parties not, acquainted with these rules, Commanders of Ships are recommended only to receive Post Office Packets or Letters-for places not in India,--on which they are themselves prepared to pay the postage, according to the rates laid down in the accompanying Table.

Bombay. Genl. Post Office, 6th September 1842.

W. ESCOMBE,

Actg. Post Mr. Genl.

NOTICE is hereby given, that Letters arriving from Sea-ward for transmission to any place beyond the Territories of the East India Company, whether by Ship, or by the Government Steamers, will be detain- ed in Bombay until the Ship or Steamer Postage, or both, to which such Letters, may be liable, shall be paid according to the rates laid down in the subjoined

tional Tola.

3. It has lately been the practice to send mo- Table. ney to pay the postage as well here as in England. This is a very inconvenient proceeding and I have to request that it may be discontinued. In place of it, you will be so good as to forward with each Mail a Bill shewing the number of letters and the amount of inward postage due thereon to the Bombay Office. A quarterly return of the entire amount collected should be made up to the end of April, July, October and January, and the money should then be remitted by an order on the Trea- sury in Bombay or in any other mode which may

9th. Although it is stated in the 6th Paragraph of the Bombay Post-Master General's letter to the be more convenient.

Post Master at Hongkong &c, that letters from 4. I have to request that when the entire post- Members of the China Expedition are to be ex-age is prepaid, the letters may be marked thus.

cused Ship Postage, yet looking to the changes that have taken place since that letter was wris ten, and to the return of a large part of the Ex- pedition to England and India, it is considored more than propable that the privilege therein referred to has been declared to be. or is, con- sidered null and void, and therefore persons for warding letters are recommended not to rely on that rule being still in force. 10th The Regulations herein promulgated will be

utward Shin nostage-naid. As "Inward Do. Do. As. Rs.

When only the outward postage is paid, that they may be marked "Outward Ship-póstage only." In this last case, provision must be made for the pay- ters will be detained, ment in Bombay of the inward postage, or the let- communiceted to the different Goveruments of 5. These remarks are intended to apply to let- India by the first departure, aud as they provide ters not for delivery in India; when letters are for for the transmission of letters &c under every India, the Inward Ship postage can of course be possible circumstance, they will no doubt be ri-recovered from the addressees.

gidly enforced, so that Individuals neglecting to 6. Letters from members of the China expedi- conform to them will have only themselves totion are received free of Ship postage.

India or returned.

blame, should their letters be either detained in 7. No postage is leviable in India on letters England, and no pre-payment can, under any cir-

11th. The only exceptions to Postage being levied for the United Kingdom. It is collected solely in will be in favor of Official despatches, under the cumstances whatever, be made in India on such signatures of Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, letters,

the Naval Commander in Chief and the Gen- 8. Letters for other places than the United eral Officer Commanding Her Majesty's Land Kingdom are chargeable with a postage according Forces, or the Senior Officers of the Civil, Na-to the rates laid down in the accompanying table,

val and Military Services in China.

By Order Hongkong, Govt. House, 6th April, 1843. No. 1722-of 1842.

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

General Department, To The Secretary of Legation, Hong-Kong.. Sir, I have the honor to forward Copy of a letter I have to day addressed to the Post-Masters

and this postage must be prepaid. When it may be inconvenient to parties to employ Agents in Bombay, the foreign postage can be levied in your Office in the same manner as Ship postage such foreign letters should then be marked. "Outward Ship postage paid As "Inward Do. Do. As Do. As "Foreign postage Total Rs.

ded for every addi-

onal 6 Tolas weight. An anna being ad- An anna being dded for every additi- Two annas being added for every additi- onal 100 Tolas up to 300 Tolas, beyond

which no Parcel will be received.

1. Anna.

Tolas.

Tolas. ceeding 3 ceeding 3 Not ex- Not ex-

Not exceeding 6 Tolas weight."

Not exceeding 100 Tolas weight.

Annas.

Annas.

2.

2.

2. Arnas.

Outward Inward.

atach end. ed papers packe in short covers, open, Parcels not exceeding 300 Tolas weight.

Newspapers, Paphlets and other print-

Continued to Second Page.

LETTERS.

Table of Ship Postag to be levied on Letters received or sent by sea.

EXTRA.

Table of Steamer Postage leviable upon Letters arriving from, or addressed to any other place than the United Kingdom, via the Red Sea or the Persian Gulf..

Rs. As.

A letter not exceeding 1 Tola, is to be charged one rate of Postage.......

0

9

Ditto above 14 Tola, and not exceeding

2 Tolas, two rates......

1

Ditto above 24 Tolas, and not exceeding

5 Tolas, four rates......

2

Ditto above 5 Tolas and not exceeding

3

7 Tolas, six rates.....

and so on in proportion. two additional rates of Post

age being charged for every additional weight of 2

Tolas, or for any fraction of that weight.

Bombay, Genl. Post Office,

14th March 1842.

ce, }

W. ESCOMBE,

Acig. Post Mr. Genl.

N. B. 2 tolahs are equal to one ounce English, 16 annas

make one Rupee, and one Rupee is equal to two Shillings Eng-

lish.

A

Table of Indian inland Postage from Calcutta and Madras to Bombay.

CALOUSTA

MADRAS

Rs. As. Ps

7

» 14

Single Letter not exceeding one Quarter of a Tola in weight.", Double Letter exceeding one Quarter of a Tola, but not ex- ceeding one Tola in weight. Single Postage (that is 7 Annas) to be added for every addition. al half Tola weight. Newspapers not exceeding 3 Tolas in weight

Newspapers exceeding 3 Tolas but not exceeding 6 Tolas. Newspapers exceeding 6 Tolas but not exceeding 9 Tolas. Single Postage (that is 3 Annas) to be added for every addition al 3 Tolas.

Single Letter not exceeding one

Quarter of a Tola in weight.", Double Letter exceeding one Quarter of a Tola, but not ex- ceeding one Tola in weight Single Postage (that is 5 Annas) to be added for every addition- ald half Tola weight Newspaper not exceeding 94

Tolas in weight. Newspaper exceeding 34 Tolas

but not exceeding 6 Tolas. Newspaper exceeding 6 Tolas but not exceeding 9 Tolas. : Single Postage (that is 3 Annas)

to be added for every additi enal 3 Tolas.

6

Rs. As. P

5

39

10

9

N. B, It is to be understood that the above Rates are exclusive of the Inward Ship Postage of 2 Aunas which will be levied on each Newspaper whether for warded to Calcutta, Madras, or Bombay.

Newspapers must be put up in short covers open at each end, and if they are found to contain any writing except the Superscription they will be charged as let ters of a corresponding weight. By order

Government House,

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Government Notification. WITH reference to the preceeding No- tification it is hereby announced that, to obviate inconvenience to the Public, Let- ters will be received at the Post Office at Hongkong, and the British Consular Agency at Macao, (as they have been for some time past) for transmission to Eu- rope, and India, on the payment of the Ship and Indian inland Postage, (as the case may be) although the necessity for enlarging the Post Office and providing a proper establishment, will not admit of the system being fully introduced before the 1st of June.

By order,

Government House,

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Hongkong, 7th April, 1843.)

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

No. 55 VOL. II.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

ND

4.ONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 13TH. 1843.

T NOTICE THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- Tenders for Bills on the Lords Commis- zette under the authority of Government, sioners of Her Majesty's Treasury, for the will be discontinued from this date: but all Sum of £1,500, in sets of £250 each, pay- public orders and notifications appearing in able at 30 days sight, will be received at the "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- Superintendent's Office, Hong Kong, and zetto," with the signatures of duly authe-opened on Thursday, the 20th instant, at rized Functionaries of the Government are Noon.

still to be considered as official, Telo By order,

Robt: Morrison, Arting Secretary and Treasurer. Hong Kong. March, 28, 1943. GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

CHARLES E. STEWARTIC Assistant Secretary & Treasurer. GOVERNMENT HOUSE, IIongkong, 11th April, 1842,

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our outstanding arrears, (early one half of our receipts,) admonishes us to request our friends and subscribers, to oblige us by, forthwith liquidating our claims; which trifling as they are individually yet aggregately amount to a considerable sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavor to rectify. We when any change of realdende takes place. vietus ni som arbe PRODUCT OF PRECIOUS METALS SINCE THE DIS.

COVERY OF AMERICA. intel; Tue greatest part of the Gold and Silver thrown on the World was first taken from our Country. Before Humboldt published his POLITICAL ESSAY upon New Spain various Reports, formed by learned individuals, had been circulated, respect ing the quantities of Gold and Silver exported from America. Notwithstanding, they all differed

In consequence of Instructions recently received from Her Majesty's Government, and until defined Regulations can be framed and promulgated, grounded upon those Instructions, His Excellency Sir HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., K. C. B., &c., &c., is pleased to Notify, as follows: 1ST. All Persons holding Land of any denomination on the Island of to Hong-Kong, are hereby required to send in the fullest explanations, as well as the proofs they possess, of their Claims to such Land, to the Land Officer, with the least possible delay. 2ND. The Land Officer has been author ized, and instructed, to prevent the commencement of any further tom Buildings upon, or clearing away of, Locations, until final arrange- ments can be made. The Land Officer has also been author- Moncada ized and instructed, to take summary mea- Navarrete sures, in concert with the Chief Magistrate, Raynal. to put a stop to all Buildings that may be Robertson

1492

S Price & monthly {Prior 12 yearly

Dallars.

Registered from the Spanish Colonies 4.085,150000 Portuguese... 681514.000 Not registered from the first

Idem Idem

second

816.000.000 171.000.000

5 706.700.000

Of which amount, during those 311 Years, the proportions furnished were as follows: ⚫ 2:028 000,000 2,410 303,0JJ

NEW SPAIN

PERU and BUENOS AYRES NEW GRANADA

CHILE BRAZILS

275 300,000

1:8 000,000 835,500,000

The computation which the same Author forms of the ANNUAL PRODUCT of the mines of the New World at the commencement of the present cent- ury, is as follows: Marks of Gold Marks of Silver Dollars New Spain 7.000 23.000.000 3400

Peru

12 212 2.200

Buenos Ayres New Granada 20.500 29,900 Brazil

6240.000

2.338 220

611 090

4 850,000:

28.700 481,830

2.060,000

2,990.000 4,360,000

horts bil 75,217 3.430 840 43.500.000 Baron Humboldt has likewise calculated, that

the annual Product of the European mines of Hungary, Saxony and other places, and that of northern Asia during the same period amounted to nearly five millions more.

(To be continued in our next.)

COURT OF COMMON PLEAS. Important Decision

in their Calculations from one another, on acEANS AND ANOTHER V. HUTTON. This action count of their having derived their information was brought by the plaintiffs, to recover damages from sources which could not be relied upon, as from the defendant for the breach of a contract to is shewn by the following calculation: to deliver a cargo of goods at the port of Canton, AUTHORS EPOCHS DOLLARS to which it was consigned. The defendant plead- Ustariz 1492 to 17248,030,000,000 ed that he had been prevented landing the goods at Canton, as he had contracted, in consequence Solorzano 1628, 1,500,000,000 14921595 2,000,000,000 of the interference of Capt. Elliot, the British Su- 1519 1817. 1,536,000,000 perintendent and Representative at Canton, who had prohibited the debarkation of any goods, on 1718 5,154,000,000 1775. 8,800,000,000 account of the existing hostile relations between 1777,304,000,000 this country and the Chinese government, and that, 1800, 1,600,000,000 having carried the cargo to Canton, he had per- formed all the conditions of the contract accord- all the ing to the best of his power, the fulfilment of them

Gerboux

14900

#1492

1768

1724

31

in progress on Locations of whatever deno- Necker mination, where the Explanation, or Proofs The Author of submitted, may appear to him to be at vari- the Investiga ance with his present Instructions; and, tion upon Com-14021775. 5,072,000,000 being precluded by the authority of Her Majesty's

most famed names

time

also, in cases where the Explanation and merce Amsten Officer in the Chinese port, acting for the protec tion and government of British subjects. The Proofs now called for, may be delayed dam, 1779 But Humboldt, by his extensive and laborious plaintiff demurred to the defendant's plea, that the beyond a reasonable time. 3RD. The Land Officer has further been investigations has left every one else far behind. Canton did not relieve the defendant from the authorized and instructed, to sum- This illustrious traveller besides having know. hability of his contract, inasmuch as Capt. Elliot Imarily prevent, the progress of all ledge of all that had hitherto been written on this had not the power of declaring war against the subject, had access to official sources which were Buildings, on Locations which unknown to the Authors just alluded to he was Chinese, which declaration alone could justify such may, in his opinion, encroach on a man well versed both in the theoretical as well a departure from the terms of his undertaking Mr. Serjeant Channell argued in support of the the present, or any future, Line of as the practical knowledge of Mining, and had ox-plea; and Mr. Serjeant Bompas was heard in Bail to oblive all amined with the eves of a critic, several of the favent of the demurrer. Persons to confine themselves to the exact dimensions of the Lots the past, as well as on the actual Produce of the ly the most apt to form correct conclusions on which were originally allotted to Mines, upon which point, so many until then had them.bu formed speculations. It is true that his assertions have been thought to be exaggerated, and we are inclined to believe that this accusation, in a certain measure, is well founded particularly the state ments he sets forth of the gains made by mining as well as with regard to the quantity obtained, in the returns of the precious Metals. But this cri- ticism fat the most could only be applicable in a very inferior sense to the information, which Humboldt has given of the total product of the Mines, and exportation to Europe; so that in ma- king every concession for the imperfections which are ever inseparable from such investigations, it is always clear that the assertions of that Traveller and the inquiries upon which they are founded ought certainly to be enumerated amongst the most precious contributions that have ever been made to the Science of Statistics.

4TH. It has been repeatedly intimated, that the terms and tenure of hold ing all Lands on the Island of Hong-Kong, were to depend solely on the pleasure, and commands, of of Her Majesty's Government, and the information called for in this Notification, is required, before such terms and tenure can be announced to the Public. By order

Hong-Kong,. Government-House,

RICHARD WOOSNAM, wd of omis mit Gospeloof to bamen todendron

10th April, 1843.)

NOTICE.

of 100

It is particularly requested that all Marks, Pickets, and Lines, placed in the course of a survey commenced on the North side of this Island, be left undis- turbed; the Pickets will be painted White, with a Black cross.

LAND OFFICE,

Hong Kong, 10th April, 1843.

According to Humboldt the quantity of precious quantity taken out of the mines of America is as follows Since 1492 to 1500 Marks 250,000 15000 11545, 3,000,000

01291545

1600 11,000,000 1600 e da1700k-e 16,000,000 1700 17504 22,500,000 is 1750 1750 1808 35,300,000

He presents, besides the following recapitulation of the value of Gold and Silver taken from the Mines of America since 1492 to 1803ste

The Court was of opinion that the plea was 2d and 3d Wm. IV., which gave power and au- insufficient. According to the provisions of the thority to the Superintendent at Canton to act, no such, power was given as the plea set forth. The Superintendent might, in the course he had pursued, have acted with great discretion and for the pro- motion of the interests of all parties, but still he had exceeded the powers given him by the Act of sufficient to justify the defendant in the violation of Parliament, and therefore the plea did not state the contract, or exonerate him from the conse- quences of such a departure, as the declaration disclosed, from the terms of his undertaking. Judginent for the plaintiff Monthly Times.

There are well-authenticated cases of wine having been sold in various parts of Portugal during last yearfor half a noidare (11s per pipe. The common wholesale price is about 2. the almude (28 bottles y year), or about 1d. a bottle; and the nipe containing 120 gallons, or 720 bottles, come to precisiy £3. We arrive at the same result in the gross, through the fact that the price paid

per pipe to the lavrador is, from 19 to 15 mil-rei", the rate being a little higher for the finest qualities of port and Estremadura wines. Most undeniably the average first cost does not oxceed 3. Hoiv, then, stands the case? The first cost is £3, and the proposed duty of 33. per gallon being a reduction of 5-11ths in the actual duty per pipe of 120 gollons is £18 sterling, being a duty of exactly 600 per cent. ad aetorem.-[Sun]

hab

A communication from M. Negier. on nasal hemor- rhage, was next read. This gentleman announced that the hemorrhage may be almost instantaneously check- ed, by raising the arm on the same side as that of the nostril fromhich the blood flows.-French Paper.

G

1

:

16

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 13Tu, 1841.

The Article which appears in our columns, on the Product of Precious Metals, is translated from a late Lima paper. We inuch regret the compiler had not increased the value of his communica- tion, by adding thereto the stores of his own knowledge, and recent experience, which, we assure him, would have made the document more interesting, besides adding to its practical value.

According to the Mining Journal, the following statement of the produce of the precious metals appears,-"In forty years, from 1790, to 130,--Mexico produced £6,136,453 worth of gold, and £139,817,032 of silver. Chile, C2,768,488 of gold, and Buenos Ayres, £1.892,924 of silver. £4,024,895, of gold, and £27,182,673 of silver. Russia, C3,703,743 of gold, and £1,500,971 of silver. Total, 1880 millions sterling, or forty-seven millions per annum. Dr. Ure, says-the Mines of America have sent into Europe, three and a-half times more gold than those of the ancient Continent. The total quantity of silver, was to that of gold, in the ratio of fifty-five to one; a very different ratio from that which holds really in the value of those two metals, which, in Europe is one to fifteen. Before the discovery of America, the value of gold approached nearer to that of silver, and in Asia, the proportion is held to be only one to eleven, or twelve.

Major Lowe, in his Dissertation on Pin- ang, remarks, that "the differenee in value of gold, betwixt the Straits and, England, is ordinarily seven per cent., in favour of the former; the market value of pure silver, he adds, may be stated at 12 dollars per lb." Gold is widely disseminated through the Malay Peninsula, and Eastern Archipelago, but we know of no Silver Mines.

Borneo is most famed for its product of gold, of the amount of which annually, we have no correct data accessible.

fore done) to the expediency of a monthly Steam Communication with England, or rather with Signapore, which would be

tantamount thereto.

Mr Wise of Allonby, has, in an Article which recently appeared in the Colonial Magazine, urged the necessity of this measure very co-gently. Nationally, his recommendation, to have a line of Steam Vessels from England to China, via Sal- danha Bay, Cape of Good Hope, has strong claims on the Home Government. We must, however, confine ourselves within more circumscribed limits, and would only require that a monthly com- munication, by steam, to and from Singa- pore, should be established; our compatri- ots there would do the rest, and establish the communication with Point de Galle and Suez. By this route, we should be brought within two months distance of the Metro- polis.

of South America; but may mention that the flat- tering accounts of Lord Valentia and Mr. Salt, with regard to the products and commercial pros- pects of such a barbarous country as Abysinnia, led a London merchant to send a large cargo of goods to that market, which venture resulted in an almost entire loss.

From the foregoing may be inferred the spirit and extent of mercantile expectation and adven- the highly coloured statements and imaginative ture which will be stimulated into existence, by descriptions, which have been so widely promul- gated with regard to China, and its teeming and industrious millions.

We hold it to be our duty to combat these false the memorable instances of commercial infatua- impressions, and by our admonitory reference to tion, we endeavour as far as possible to avert the recurrence of similar calamities.

An Edinburgh Reviewer has well remarked, what we can confirm by our own experience, that "The spirit of romance may walk in the homeliest attire as well as of silk of tissue. Men dream feats of chivalry-there are Quixottes upon'Change about pounds, shillings, and pence, as well as of as well as in the mountains of La Mancha. Ro-

Mr Wise goes into a lengthened detail, mance is the buoyant spirit of enterprise unchecked to prove that, via the Cape, the steam voy-by the realities of life; it can run riot in schemes of age from England to China, could be per-mercantile aggrandizement, as well as in the vis- In connexion with this subject, it would be formed in sixty days. His intimacy with ions of a higher ambition." the navigation of these seas entitles his opi-curious to publish a list of novel articles now on nions to much respect. He points out the their way from England, sagaciously destined for shortest route that can be taken from Eng- the special wants of the inhabitants of the Celestial land to Saldanha Bay, to be 5,650 miles, Empire. Many very singular items are named; which voyage can be made in twenty-six among the most notable are Dutch drops, parasols, days, at the average rate of speed which jews' harps, and credat Judaeus, temperance medals. the Atlantic ocean steamers perform at pre- sent-say about nine miles per hour. From Saldanha Bay, to Hong-Kong, by the nearest route, is 7,000 miles, which may be performed in thirty-two days, at the same rate.

There is much force in the following observation of Mr Wise with which we are compelled to close our remarks of this week. "Hence the steam voyage between England and China, via Saldanha Bay, Cape of Good Hope, can be performed in sixty days, allowing two days to take inecoal, at the average rate of speed per- forming at present, all the year round, in the stormy Atlantic Ocean; it is, therefore, only rea- sonable, that a very considerable higher rate of speed will be obtained on the comparatively VERY FINE weather voyage from England to China, via the Cape of Good Hope."

The French frigate Erigone, Command- ant Cecille, on arriving here (the last time) from Macao, saluted the British Flag, flying on the Island: the battery at the fort of the artillery the first official acknowledgment bya foreign power barracks returned the salute. This is, we believe, of the cession of Hong-Kong to Great Britain. As declined to make a similar recognition. We do yet, the American Commodore, we are told, has not the less value the significant courtesy of the galulnt and much esteemned French officer in com- mand in these waters, nor do we take umbrage at the different conduct of the American Commo- dore, who (if we may judge by Lord Aberdeen's reply to the East Indian and China Association, published in our No. 54) has acted strictly correct in refusing to salute the British Flag on the Island, changed and officially communicated. till the ratification of the Treaty had been ex-

We regret to hear that several burglaries have of late been commiited, and nocturnal visits from the marauders at Kowloon, have much in- creased of late. More than one landing has been made by an armed body of miscreants, at the in obtaining any booty. POINT, but on the last occasion, without succeeding

W

We would advise our friends at home to be Dr. Earle, in his Eastern Seas, says very cautious in any experimental Shipments they "the amount of Gold Dust imported at make to China. We have not the slightest doubt Singapore, from the Western Coast of that many articles both of Import and Export, now Borneo, averages three thousand eight hun- unknown to our commerce with this country dred ounces Troy," which he estimates at will hereafter assume important rank; still, until we obtain more certain knowledge of the wants From another Correspondent, who signs about one-tenth the produce of the mines. It is Chaptal, we think, who states, the and capabilities of the Northern Ports, we would animal product of gold in the Indian Archi- counsel the shipment only of those articles which himself " A Constant Reader," we have received are well known as of ordinary and large consump- a glowing critique of the theatrical performances que samog or about one-ion and which the very low rates of cost at at Koo-lang-soo. He says" the House was oss, and the Company were hon- eighth of the total production, which is calcu-home cannot but mauce at the these parts; now that peaceable relations are re-oured with the attendance of the most of the fates lated to be nearly 36 tons per annum. on the Island, and all the magnates of our little Gold is known to be produced in many established-wholly irrespective of what may is- chard, in the "King's Gardener," elicited unbound- parts of China and Thibet; we much mis-sue from the probable de bouche Northward for our garrison The performnce of Mr Marryat as Galo- take if it does not hereafter become of im ed applause, and Mr Campbell, as Madame Galo- portance as an export. We are told that chard was unanimously admitted to be a per- it is often offered in the Coast trade, fect rustic divinity. Mr Wardop as Lord Potterly, The length of the but the Shroffs on board, are very reluctant in the After-piece of the " Unfinished Gentleman," to take it in lieu of silver, at the proportion- excited much amusement. ate rate, owing to the fear of its being adulte- following letter, precludes our publishing the com- munieation of "A Constant Reader," as we ori- rated. We have heard of China Gold so ginally intended. taken, having realized at the Calcutta Mint, barely the price of silver.

manufactures.

In saying thus much we would not discounten- ance the attempts to introduce new articles; the capacity of the Chinese to take which, can only be tested by actual shipments, for musters or pat- terns would be almost wholly useless in eliciting anything like accurate data to arrive at a safe conclusion, for mercantile objects. Hence what experimentul shipments are made, should be on small scale, so that if unadapted for this market the loss would not be serious.

a

We are called upon to make these remarks by The gold, when seen here, is of various forms; it is called leaf gold, when about an the exaggerated feeling which is so very prevalent, and which we are sorry to see is generally adopt- eighth of an inch thick. This sort is gene-ed by our contemporaries at hoine, in all that rally esteemed among the best, and gold in regards China, and the consequences of the late the form of Bangles among the worst. As pacification. We much err if the public mind is gold is not currency in China, it is to be not already infected with a spirit of speculation, presumed that the Emperor will view with as to the China trade which will inevitably result more complacency its oozing out, than he in disappointment. formerly did that of Sycee, Silver.

At a future time, we shall return to this subject, in connection, especially, with the Empire of China.

We published, by request, on the 8th inst., an Extra, containing the intended Post-Office regulations, on which, at another time, we shall have occasion to remark. At the present time, we would claim the atten- tion of our readers (as we have often be-

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

KOOLANGSOO.

To the Editor of the Friend of China, and Hong- Kong Gazette. MR EDITOR,-Allow me, briefly to trespass, and to solicit the favour of a little space in your interesting as they, from time to time, transpire in the pigmy periodical, for the purpose of recording passing events, Island of Koolangsoo.

We, however, do not however look for any You will, perhaps, be at a loss to conjecture what very grave derangement of commercial affairs, from these inflated anticipations. This will be re- incidents can possibly happen, in any way calculated to ferrible rather to the extremely low cost of the cheer or enliven our existence, confined as it is, within rious articles of British manufacture, at the time the painfully narrow precincts of about two and-a-half miles of action; yet, in spite of this reasonable supposi- of shipment, than to the prudence or circumspec- tion, it remains a most incontrovertible fact, that we have tism of many of the shippers. Late events too-hitherto, and still continue, considering the unpropiti- the bitter memory of which still abides, will rath- ous character of the place, to get on thundering well. er tend to check that rash and romantic enterprise How far the volcanic origin of the island is concern- which has marked the commercial annals of our ed in the result, as an acquaintance was wont, quaintly, country, on the advent of any new vent or out- to remark, being no Theologist, myself, I willingly re- let for British goods. We need not cite the well sign the explanation into the hands of those more deeply known instance of the establishment of the republics conversant with terrestial phenomena.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

As" method, is the soul of business," ve shall re- duce the few following items of news, we have at pre- sent to communicate, into something like a systematic arrangement, and begin with an account of the magical transformation that has taken place in the Western village of the Island..

If any place ever presented a dismal and dilapitated aspect, it had a pre-eminent claim to that unenviable distinction, previous to its occupation by the 41st Regiment, N. 1., and by way of rendering it still more conspicuous: a few stately buildings, in comparative preservation, towered up in painful contrast to the sur rounding ruins. China-fash-like, not a inch of ground was allowed to escape the victimizing power of Brick and Mortar," and as many houses wero squeezed into a "given space," as the laws of nature would permit. The village was in a great measure in. debted for its ruinous condition, to the Chinese them. selves, who very characteristically, diverted themselves during the sickly season, and at a time when it was altogether untenanted, with the innocent pastime of nocturnal excursions, for the purpose of lifting and appropriating to themselves, all the doors and windows that in the least, interfered with the ventilation of the

houses.

17

traders and one-half to each of the others. The ex- to the coast and river fisheries, and keeps alive the manufactures in the coal-district North west of Pekin. ports to England consisted exclusively of tea; the ex- The Western tea-districts are on a smaller scala, and ports to America chiefly of tea, along with small quan- tities of nankeens, raw and wrought silks, sugar, and after a ruder fashion, for Setchuen, Kocitchoo, Yunnan the North of Siam and Burmah, and the Thibets, while some minor articles: the exports to India were to a trifling amount tea, china-ware, sugar, naukeens, cas- the Eastern group are for the wealthier coast-lands, sia and camphor, but the imports from that country and the whole of the rest of the world To under- were chiefly balanced by bills and bullion. The im-stand and appreciate aright the commercial capabilities of China. it is necessary to master thoroughly the con- ports from England consisted of woollens in value one half of the whole, cottons one-quarter, metals and mis-dition and relations of these two groups of provinces. cellaneous articles another quarter. The imports from Unless fresh misunderstandings intervene, the throw- America were in value cottons one-half, woollons one-ing open of the four new ports to British enterprise quarter. and miscellaneous articles another quarter. will soon and materially alter the condition and direc The imports from India wero-opium to the value of tion of the commerce of the Eastern tea-districts, and more then two millions of pounds; cotton, tin, pepper, of all the countries which trade with them. To Can. betel-nut, and other articles to the value of about a ton the new arrangement will in all probability be n million. The articles of export are exclusively the heavy blow Its chief articles of export are tea and produce of the Chinese provinces South of the Yang-bullion: the former will henceforth be shipped in pre- tse-kiang. Two of their staples (cotton and earthen ference at the ports in the tea-provinces; and the ex- ware) are imported to a considerable amount. and portation of silver, if tolerated, can be effected as easi the whole of the commodities they produce are not ly at Shanghai as at Canton. If return-cargoes can be enough to pay for the necessary imports, woollen and obtained, the first of our manufactures likely to find an coltou cloths and opium, (also become a necessary for increased sale in China are our woollens. The incle- them, let moralists say what they will,) for the latter ency of the winters even in the provinces at the is always paid in cash. mouth of the Yang-tse-kiang, and still more in the The trade from the tea-districts to the Northern mountain-regions which abound in the Chinese empira, provinces of China. to Chinese Tartary, to Russia and render warm clothing in great request. This it is that to Independent Tartary, is active and extensive. The occasions the ready sale of Russian furs. There was annual import of tea into Russia alone. in 1830, a- at one time a considerable importation of furs from mounted to five millions and a half pounds. This was America; but the increasing scarcity of the game, and the amount of the legitimate traffic at the station of the rising of furs in the general market owing to the Kiachta, but gives no idea of the busy trade along the purchase of them by Russians to send to Kiachta: in- Great Canal, supplying the whole of the provinces of duced the Americans to substitute woollen cloths; and China, except Sethuen, north of the Yang-ise-king, it has been found to answer. The game is decreasing the whole of Central Asia, north and west of China in Siberia as well as in America; and, with four har- Proper, and nutaerous remote hordes within the Rus bours in the very heart of the trading provinces, wo sian frontier, who procured supplies of tea of which will have better opportunities of bringing our woollens Government knew nothing. Some idea of the state into competition with the furs introduced at one poin- of this trade may be gathered from what was witnessed of a remote frontier. The woollens of France, Bel- by TIMKOWSKI on his route from Kiachta to Khalgangium and the Rhine provinces. must come into com- on the Great Wall. At Urga, he met several cara- petition with us; but even with that competition, there vans of forty camels, laden with tea, for Ulinssutai, a are fair grounds for expecting a decided advantage to station in Chinese Tartary west of the road he travel- our woollen manufactures. if our traders act judicious. led. From the 25th September to the 2d October he ly† It is not Chint alone that we have to look: to net daily, small parties of travellers, all of whom Chinese traders will carry our woollens into the very c.rried ventures of Ten; on the 2nd October he met heart of Central Asia. The immense frontier of Asia- with fine black tea, for Kinchta; on the 6th and 9th Next in importance, most likely, will be our exporta- a Chinese caravan, with two hundred cars laden tic Russia cannot be guarded against their entrance. We met cracks with equal quantities, the last of still tions of colon twist to China. Already considerable finer quality; on the 4th November he tnet "the great quantities are carried there to be worked up the in- tea-caravan for Kiuchta"; on the 6th, another scarcely creased impetus given to its internal industry by our less numerous; from the 12th to the 14th, (the day on more direct and extensive trade with the ten-districts which he reached Khalgan,) he met numerous tea- will increase the domestic manufactures of China, and caravans of 100, 200 and 250 camels. At Khalgan, its demand for this partly-manufactured commodity. he was informed that there was constantly a depot of As the Chinese have already begun to work up our tea large enough to load at any time 000 camels. cotton-twist, and have a strong mechanical turn, it is "When le recrossed the desert in July from Khalgan not unlikely that the exportation of machinery. and to Kiachta, the tea-caravans which ho passed seemed their noble and numerous rivers, will induce them to quite as frequent. TIMKOWSKI travelled along the take large quantities of steam boat machinery. Other principal line of traffic north of the Great Wall; but articles of our manufactures w II by degrees (not slow) there are many minor routes to the east and west of it; enter in the wake of these two: but they will be the and an equally-frequented line conducts from the Ho- first. The great difficulty at the outset will be to find angho westward to Kashgar on the South, Guldja on appropriate articles for return-cargoes. Even with its and Chi North," "Tea is a necessary of life in Chis existing limited foreign commerce, China pays for no nese Tartary, and scarcely less so in Russia, and a- inconsiderable portion of its imports in bullion and bills. mong the independent nomades and great trading Its supply of the precious metals is scanty, and ren- towns between the Chinese frontier, the Oxus, and the dered mere so by the prohibition to export silver from Caspian; and all these countries are supplied from the Russia. The slow progress of just views of the com- Eastern groups of ten-countries. The returns from merce in the precious metals by more civilized nations The particulars of the Koolangao Reace and Regatta, have Russia are furs; of which a greater quantity is re- affords little room for hope that Russia will soon ahan- the great amusement afforded by the former, a repetition of that quired to balance the tea and other imports than that don its unwise interference, or the Chinese Govern already appeared in your columns, and we may add, that from ment cease to have cause for being alarmed at the de- truly English sport will take place soon, when the Sporting Public country itself can spare; and furs are consequently will be put in possesion, through your paper, of the race" run. imported for the demands of this trade. The Chinese rangement of their currency It is extremely question- ning qualities, and bolting propensities," of the Koo langsoo would take silver, but its exportation is prohibited in able whether the cultivation of tea in China can be ex- steeds. Perhaps you are not aware that " Hunting" is carried on here Russia. The returns from Tartary and Northern tended, or its use elsewhere, so as to balance a very mo with great spirit; the nature of the ground, and "peculiarity of China consist of cattle, some articles of domestic ma derate increase in the importation of our manufactures. the ciltagne Bayasu inverting it with all the charms of novelty.nufacture, some articles of European manufacture, fit can be extended in China, so can it in the adigin-

Since its occupation, by the above-named Regiment, however, it has undergone a wonderful change, and who would recognize in the present snug-looking dwellings of the officers, the comfortable and cleanly barracks of the men, the parade ground, and the bustle and acti. vity with which it is enlivened, the deserted and ruin- ous village of only yesterday. It is now, likewise sup- plied with another great convenience, a capital market- place, where the Chinese find a ready sale for all those articles most in demand by the natives. All these improve.ments, we understand, are mainly to be ascribed to the unwearied exertions of Captain Hll, who, in conjunction with our worthy Com. mandant, has conferred another great boon upon the place, by the construction of a fiue road, sweeping round a hill on the Amoy side of the Island, broad enough for three persons to ride abreast. A beautiful little Theatre, has just been got up, which, for its rapid completion, and decided elegance and finish, reflects the greatest credit upon the assi- duity and taste of the managers. Ahout a fortnight ago, it was, for the first time thrown open to the public. After an appropriate prologue by Mr G-n, the enter- tainment of the evening commenced with the laughable Burletta of the "Kiug's Gardener," and was concluded with the well-known Farce, "All the World's a Stage." The Band of the Royal Irish was in attendance, and performed with their accustomed felicity, the overture to" Semiramide," and a variety of other airs. Laying aside the office of a critic-to which we have no. ambition to aspire-we must confess that the Scenery was really excellent, the Dresses good, and the several Parts throughout, remarkably well sustained. Between the Acts, Mr M-n, favoured the audience with a Comic Song, which, from its amusing character. and the perfect manner in which it was personified, occasioned great laughter, and was repeatedly encor ed The House was well illuminated, and the tout en- semble produced an effect, at once striking and brill- iant.

A Racket Court of stately dimensions, is in progress of building, which, it is expected, will be completed in the course of a fortnight, or three weeks.

We meet regularly twice WCCAD

have, generally speaking, capital bursts and most animating runs, The Chinese New-Year was ushered in on the 35th January, by a great waste of gun-powder, in the shape of fire-works, and roaring of" Big Guns." The grand festival took place on the 2d of February, when several persons were invited over to Amoy, to partake of the hospitality of a Chinaman of some distinction. The table was laid out and supplied, exclusively, a la mode Anglaise." both as regards eatables and drinkables, and a plat. form was erected in the immediate neighbourhood, for the diver. sion of the guests, where a Band of juvenile Actors shewed off their agility, by going through a variety of the most singular and amusing pantomimes. You, thus perceive, Mr Editor, that however much our loco. motive powers may be circumscribed, no such restraint is allowed to check the "national instinct," of making ourselves happy and comfortable wherever we are, abroad or at home, on a Island of China, or on the happy shores of Merry Old Eng.

land."

BLUE-BUTTON.

CHINESE TRADE-FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC.

desert

Witten and then way and gin-seng from the land of the Mantchoos, and rhubarb from the mountainous region on the upper Hoang-lo. The teas send to the North are the finest blacks, and the tile-tea above mentioned,-a villanous compound of the refuse of the better teas, mosses, ferns, boiled up with bullock's blood or some other animal substance, and made up into cakes like chocolate.

The tea of tho Eastern group supplies the domestic consumption of the provinces immediately adjoining, and is exported into Siam and Burmah, and westward throught Thibet as far as Ladak. It is of the coarsest quality, and as far as can be learned, most frequently prepared much in the same way as the tile-ten. But beyond the fact of there being a steady permanent trade in this commodity along the route indicated, scarcely any thing is known with certainty.

The tea-districts are the centres of the productive industry of China, and of its commercial wealth and enterprise with reference both to its foreign and do. mestic trade, They are to China what Staffordshire. (Continued from our last.) About 1830, the annual importation of tea into Lancashire, and Yorkshire are to England, The min. Great Britain amounted to nearly thirty millions or traffics cluster round and take their direction from the great staple trade. The principal porcelain ma. of pounds; the consumption of the United States vari- ed from six to eight millions; the Consumption of Hol-nufactories are in the Eastern tea district. The ar- land to something more than two millions and a half; ticles of foreign manufacture imported at Canton, and the importations of Germany to about two millions; the Russian furs imported at Kiachta, find their way the importations of South America, France, Italy, and of course to the producing-districts, and from them are Spain, scarcely amounted to one million. Some tea distributed through the empire, or re-exported in the must have been exported from the harbours on the junks of Fo-kien and Choking, to be exchanged for South-east coast of China by the junks trading with trepang, edible birds-nests, shark fricts is the centre of Tonquin and Cochin China, Singapore and other The trade of the Eastern tea. districts the places in the Eastern Archipelago; but we have vitality of the overland trade to the port of Canton; no means of conjecturing its amount. The trade with of the coasting-trade from Fo-kien and Chekiang to Canton at the time we are referring to, was principally Mantchoo Tartary, and of the trifling trade to Japan; in the hands of the East India Company, (now thrown of the traffic on the Grand Canal, and along the roads open,) the country-traders of India, and the Ameri. which branch off from its termination to the Amur, cans, in the proportions of one-half to the country. Kiachta, Ili and Kashgar. It lends greaters energy

countries; and tuns win neutranze the increase. Silk, cotton, tobacco. China can produce, abundant in quantity and excellent in quality, but not more so than countries as easily or more easily accessible. The truth is, that the wealth and resources of China are vet very imperfectly developed; time will be required to develop them; and till that is done, China can afford. us nothing like the market which dreamers talk of The extended trade with China will not of itself prove a panacea for our economical ailments.-Spectator. The grand attraction for customers in England is "cheap. ness"; the Chinese look mainly to good quality, of which they aro most shrewd judges-none of your manufacturing "Devils dust"

tricks for them!

MISSIONS TO CHINA.-The London Missionary Society which nearly forty years since commenc- ed a mission to China, and sent out Drs. Morrison and Milne, by whom, and especially by the former, the herculean tasks of translating the Scriptures into Chinese, and forming a Chinese and English dictionary, were accomplished, is about to avail itself of the opening which Providence has now afforded, to send ten or twelve additional missiona- ries to that Empire, The Anglo-Chinese College? supported by this society at Malacca (distant 1,500 miles from China), is also to be removed to Hong- Kong, together with the printing-presses and mis- sionary apparatus; some of the missionaries will be stationed on that island, and others will pro- ceed to such of the Chinese cities, opened for com- merce by the treaty of peace, as may appear most eligible. To meet the cost of this great Christian enterprise, a special subscription is to be opened; a devotional service is to be held at Surrey Cha- pel next Tuesday, and a public meeting in Exeter Hall on 17th January,-[Herald.]

.

21

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR AMOY & CHUSAN, The A. I. British built Barque" COLONIST," THOMAS LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named Ports in all April.-For Freight or Passage, apply to. JOHN BURD, & Co. Hong-Kong, 13:h April, 1843.

FOR CALCUTTA TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE A D PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig ALGERINE" J Hill Com mander. will sail for the above name ports in all April. For freight or passage apply to Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD.

The fast sailing Ship "CAMAIEU," A. 1 for 12 years, Burthen 288 tous, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1943.

FOR L ODON.

THE A. 1. British built Barque "ABBERTON," Captain Carr, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong. 15th February, 1843

NOTICE.

D. WILSON & CO. BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their Vessel the "ALGERINE," beg to announce to the Public that she will bring on a choice investment of fancy goods of every description consisting of Perfu- inery. Stationery, Cutlery, Hardware, Ironmongery,. Drapery, Grocery. Preserved incats, Confectionary, Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes. Oilman's Stores. Wines, Beer, Spirits, Liqueurs &c.. &c., which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut

Gil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and

Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial. in Pints. Europe Anchors and Chatus. Manila Rum, Chocolate. Cigars, and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders and a great variety of other articles. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes Hongkong, 1st March. 1843 taking their regular supplies.

AUCKLAND HOTEL,

Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

just landed:

FOR SALE -At the Godown of the Undersigned Port, Madeira and Sherry of really superior Quality, Bass's Beer in Hogsheads. Apply by letter to WILLIAM SCOTT. Hongkong, 28th March, 1843.

A CARD.

R ALEXANDER BIRD, Accountant, first

Morth-East House, Praya Grande, Macao.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET. BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. HEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

THE

ALSO,

Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per Package. Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE, 46, Queen's Road.

NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Public

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co.

FOR SALE.-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1812.

criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne, FOR SALE-Ship Chandlery, Cables and Stores of all d'es Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bouled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to Clothing, and Beaver Hats. A. HUMPHREYS, Magist racy St. NOTICE-ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS Printed by Messrs Galignani, rue Vivienne. PARIS.

MPEN, are duly authorized to sign for me, by and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street (Orders us be accompanied by a bill payable in London ur Paris.)

R JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR. JOHN LEFF. Procuration, during my absence from China,

Macno, 5th April, 1843.

HENRY PYBUS.

NOTICE. Goods and Merchandize of all de scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre-

mises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

FOR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar- rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all rizes, Gin in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickies, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and small as sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar. rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned

and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captate s

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley. Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

NOTICE. GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate ternis. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843. REAL ESTATE AT AUCTION THE PREMISES known as the AUCKLAND HOTEL, opposite Hong-Kong Marker.Place The Building is 65 x 60 feet, two Stories, with offices in the rear; dimensi ns of Loty 93 x 105 feet. It is considered the best situation in the settlement, for Hotel or Store.

Also-the BUNCALOW, on the Queen's Rad, in the rear of Marine Lot, No. 46, with Well, and large offices, including Stable; dimensions ef Lot, 120 x 105 feet.

The above-described Property will be Sold at Auction, on Saturday, the 29th instant, at 12 o'clock M., on the Verandah of the Auckland Hotel.

Terms at Salc-For further particulars, apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE Hong-Kong, 10th April, 1843.

NOTICE. THE undersigned is authorized to re- ceive all packages or Parcels addressed to any of the Officers or to the Mess of Hon. 18th Royal Irish Regiment, and will pay any expences incurred upon them. N, DUUS,

Hongkong, 22d March, 1842,

Beef

For Sale at the Rooms of the undersigned the Tar

following Goods Viz.

Anchors of all Sizes.

Chain Cables,

Manila Segars, 4: Superior,

do.

do. 4: Fine equal to 3rd Superior

Superfine Blue cloth,

Ladies Muslin dresses of all colours,

Silks, Satin and Straw Bonnets,

Stout and Patent Leather Shoes,

Sewing Cotton of all numbers,

'Black Silk Stockings,

White coloured and Fancy Soeks,

Regatta Shirts,

Duck and Fancy Trowsers,

Dress and Shooting Coats,

Bengal T, and Striped Ginghams for Shirtings,

Copying and writing ink,

Best double distilled Lavender water with Glass Stoppers by Smith & Co.

Eau de Cologne.

Needles of all Nos.

Fancy quilling for Gents, Vests and Childrens Frocks,

Plain and figured Jean and drillings,

Figured Flannel for Ladies winter dresses,

Quills and Black Lead Pencils,

Fresh Table Raisins,

Copper Kettles horn Lanterns and fish Boilers,

Spermecete candles, Pad Locks, Powder Flasks,

Vices, Chisels, files &c. &c. &c.

Dutch Blankets, Persian Carpets, &c. &c.

Best Brandy, Sherry, Gin and Beer &c. &c. &c.

Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843 Queen's Road.

G. MOSES & Co.

These goods are just landed from the American vessels LARK and NAVIGATOR and are in prime con- dition Apply to G. F. DAVIDSON. Hongkong; 7th March, 1848. FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOKH" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well wo thy the attention of any Cientleman as a pleasure boat

GALIGNANIS MESSENGER.-A daily Politi- cal Journal. The object of this well-known Journal is to supply the reader with a SUBSTITUTE FOR THE EN- TIRE OF THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH NEWSRAPERS. Con- ducted on a system of undeviating impartiality, the sentiments of every party, Ministerial and Opposition, find their place in its colunins.

In the English Department will be found the leading articles of the Tory. Conservative, Whig, and Radical journals. A prominence correspondent with their vast importance is given to the parliamentary debates. In addition to all news of fashionable or general interest, the proceedings at the India House, and every subject important to Eastern subscribers. is specially attended to. The French Department contains (in a special or- ticle) the political sentiments of the Paris press; the proceedings of the French Chambers; the fashionable and local news of l'aris, Ste.cks, etc.; the earliest infor- mation from Spain, Switzerland, Italy and Ger- many, Russia, and all other parts of the Continent.

Terms of Subscri, tions: (Payable in advance) One Year, £5. 10s; Six Months, £2 17s.

THE LNDON IND PARIS OBSERVER, Journal of Literature. Science, and Fine Arts. -'I his Journal. published every Sunday, consisting of forty- eight columns of closely-printed, matter large 4to. (al. most the matter of an octavo volume), contains the élite of all that is intellectual, useful. or recreative, in more than TWENTY London Quarterly, Monthly, and Weekly Publications.

Terms of Subscriptions :-(Payable in advance) One year £2. 10s., Six months £1, 78.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

"Little Catherine

Omega

9th Sarah and Abigail

White

46

6th U. S. S. Constellation Kearny Colonist

Leiske

Bally

FOR SALE.

7th H. M. Str Vixen

Boyce

Amoy

Pork

Mercury

Humphreys

Macao

Pitch

Franklyn

Rosin

Mackrell in Kits

8th

Chusan

Negro head Tobacco. Pilot bread

Navy bread

Prescott

Maoao

Flour

10th Louisa

Forgan

Soap

150 boxes of raisins &c. &c.

of

Syed Khan

Horsburgh

Amoy

11th Surrey

Naylor

Manila

Harlequin

Oliver

Amoy

44

Moffatt

Gilbert

Sydney

SAILED.

APRIL

5th Ardasseer

Mc. Intyre

Macao

46

Sir R. Peel

Somes

46

Parrock Hall

7th Bella Marina

Wharton Frederick Slack Asbridge

46

England Macao

Whampoa

George the 4th

Parsons

Macao

8th Orixa

Ager

16

U. S. S Constellation

H. M. S. Agincourt

Kearney Brace

Manila

9th Omega H. M. S. Royalist 10th Syed Khan

White Chetwode Horsburgh Prescott

Macao

Singapore

Wbmpoa

Forgan Oliver

ALSO

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com plete in every respect. For particulars apply to BENNETT, PAIN & Co. Hougkong, 3rd March, 1843. FOR SALE.

The Bungalow, with six Rooms, convenient Offices for servants, and Godown; also Stables situated on the Queen's Road, opposite to Marine lot No. 46. dimensions of lot, f120+ f105. Apply to C. V. GILLESPIE..

FOR SALE A quantity of LоMBOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY HONGKONG ALEXR. GRIFFIN MACAO.

6th H. M. T. S. Appollo Madras

11th Sarah and Abigail

"Louisa

"Harlequin

"H. M. T. S. Belleisle Kingcome

Macao

Macao

England

REPORTS. Expected daily, H. M. Hospital ship Minden, from Chusan, the Abberton from Whampoa, bound for England in a few days, and the Little Cath erine for the Coast.

William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND LONGBONG

No. 57 VOL. II.

NOTIFICATLON.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 20 TH 1843.

J. Robt: Morrison, Arting Secretary and Treasurer. Hong Kong, March 23, 1843. GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

PROCLAMATION.

Price $ 11 monthly Or 12 yearly

I avail myself of this occasion to wish your Excellency health and happiness.

A most important Communication. (Signed) HENRY POTTINGER.

True Copy,

His Excllency KEKUNG,

THE publication of the longkong Ga- HIS EXCELLENCY SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., zette under the authority of Government, G. C. B., Her Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentiary, will be discontinued from this date: but all and Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British public orders and notifications appearing in Subjects in China, issues this PROCLAMATION. RICHARD WOOSNAM. The Friend. of China and Hongkong Ga- in the name, and in behalf of. Her Majesty the Governor-General, &c., &c, Canton. zette," with the signatures of duly autho- Queen, and the Government of Great Britain, &c., with the view of making fully known, the senti- rized Functionaries of the Government are ments of deep regret, and unmitigated disapproba- still to be considered as official. GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. tion under which he was obliged to address the By order, Communication, of which an English version is HIS EXCELLENCY SIR HENRY POTTINGER, annexed, to His Excellency, the Viceroy of the two Kwang Provinces, on the 13th of this month. Bart., G. C. B., Her Britannic Majesty's Plenipo tentiary, and Chief Superintendent of British As at present informed, it is impossible for Her Trade in China, is pleased to Pablish the following Majesty's Plenipotentiary, &c., it particularize, List, shewing the total Claims of Firms and Indi- either the firms or individuals, or even the countries viduals, for losses alleged to have been incurred at to which they belong, who have, with the conniv- Canton, during the Riots, in the month of Decem- ance of the Chinese Custom-House Officers, en ber last, as well as the portions of such Claims as tered into this shameless and disreputable system have been admitted or rejected, after the fullest of wholesale smuggliug,-a system which, were it inquiry and consideration. overlooked and permitted, would not only speedily Those Firms or Individuals whose Claims have sap and destroy the existing foundations of all been wholly rejected, have already been informed Legal Traffic, but would render absolutely nuga- of the grounds on which such rejection took place, tory, every exertion and arrangement that may be and those Firms and Individuals, whose Claims made, or may be attempted to be made, to have been partly rejected, will receive, under put such Legal Traffic, on a firm, regular, Blank Envelopes, Memoranduins of the Items of and respectable footing. Her Majesty's Plenipo- their Claims, which Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, tentiary anticipates, however, that he may, at a &c., has not felt himself justified in admitting. future period, have it in his power to make known the names of those individuals, in order that- whatever be their country-they may be held up to the public estimation they merit, and which it would be superfluous to designate.

In consequence of Instructions recently received from Her Majesty's Government, and until defined Regulations can be framed and promulgated, grounded upon those Instructions,His Excellency Sir HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., &c., &c., is pleased to Notify, as follows:- 1ST. All Persons holding Land of any denomination on the Island of Hong-Kong, are hereby required to send in the fullest explanations, as well as the proofs they possess, of their Clains to such Land, to the Land Officer, with the least possible delay.

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, can only lament, that at this moment, his power to check these reprehensible proceedings, so far as British Sub- 2ND. The Land Officer has been author-jects are concerned, is not equal to his wish, but ized, and instructed, to prevent the commencement of any further Buildings upon, or clearing away of, Locations, unti! final arrange

ments can be made.

3RD. The Land Officer has also been authorized and instructed, to take summary measures, in concert with the Chief Magistrate, to put a stop to all Buildings that may be in progress on Locations of what- ever denomination, where the Explanation, or Proofs submitted, may appear to him to be at riance with his present Instruc- tions; and, also, in cases where the Explanation and Proofs now called for, may be delayed beyond a reasonable time.

authorized and instructed, to sum- marily prevent, the progress of all Buildings, on Locations which may, in his opinion, encroach on the present, or any future, Line of Roads or Streets, and to oblige all Persons to confine themselves to the exact dimensions of the Lots which were originally allotted to them.

5TH. It has been repeatedly intimated that the terms and tenure of hold- ing all Lands on the Island of Hong-Kong, were to depend solely on the pleasure, and commands, of of Her Majesty's Government, and the information called for in this Notification, is required, before such terms and tenure can be announced to the Public. By order,

Hong-Kong, Government-House, 10th April, 1843.

RICHARD WOOSNAM,

We re-publish the above GOVERNMENT NOTIFICA TION which appeared in out last issue, but not quite accurately. This was owing to the hurry incident to entirely new arrangements that we were compelled to make in our Printing Establishment, and which must be our apology for other errors apparent in our last.-ED.

The object of this arrangement, as to Blank Envelope, is to obviate all further protracted and useless Correspondence, since the decisions now announced-are final, so far as Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary is concerned; though they are, of course, open, like all other Acts of Her Majesty's servants, to appeal to Her Majesty's Government, Sir Henry Pottinger, thinks it right to declare, that in the delicate and invidious situation in which he trusts, that on the expected arrival of the he has been placed, as the Umpire between the Imperial Commissioner [successor to Elepoo] Government of China, and the Claimants, he has concert with the Provincial Authorities of Canton, them were to have been disbursed from Her means will be devised by that High Officer, in weighed the claims precisely as if the amount of to bring all parties [whether Foreier or Chi- Majesty's Treasury. neso] to account for their share in the transactions The Claims now admitted will be paid on appli- which have led to this Proclamation; and the cation to Captain Balfour, [Her Majesty's Consul, Plenipotentiary hereby intimates, beforehand, that at Shanghai) at Canton, on, and after, the 1st day he will, as far as may be legal, aid and advise the of May, 1843. Chinese Officers in whatever measures they may By order, adopt to eradicate the Evils herein denounced, Government House, and especially towards removing all British Smugglers, and their Vessels and Boats from the Hong-Kong, 7th April, 1843, River of Canton

His Excellency further intimates, that such Smugglers and their Boats and Vessels will not

receive protection in the Harbour or Waters of Hong-Kong.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

Dated at the Government House, at Hong-Kong, this 15th day of April, 1843. HENRY POTTINGER.

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary

GOVERNMENT-HOUSE,

Hong-Kong, 13th April, 1843. It has been brought to my notice, through a private channel, that a very extensive system of Smuggling and evasion of Duties, both Outwards,

and Inwards, are at this time practized at Can- ton, with the connivance of the Local Custom- House Officers, and lest the same fact should come to your Excellency's knowledge, and you should be led to imagine, that I either approve, or detriment of the Legal Trade, and the great loss countenance such proceedings, to the obvious of the Imperial Revenue, I do myself the honour of assuring your Excelleney to the contrary, and of declaring, in this official manner, that such prac tices are totally at variance with the intentions and wishes, both of my Government and myself, and that I shall be happy to unite with your Excellency in any step consistent with my situation and duties, towards putting a stop to this evil. It is almost

needless, however, for me to repeat, that which I have over and over again explained to the Impe- rial Commissioners, and other High Chinese Authorities, that the suppression of Smuggling,

must depend on the activity and integrity of the Chinese Custom-House Officers; that neither British Officers, nor People, nor Vessels, can be employed in it; and that, however deeply I may deplore such disreputable and disgraceful conduct, the remedy does not lie in my hands

REJECTED.

ADMITTED,

CLAIMS,

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

CLAIMS FOR LOSSES AT CANTON,

C.

8.

C.

282

350

211" 30

79" 50

594

8.326" 89

33" 33

206

C.

282

350

211

62

4 Messrs Gemmell, & Go.

1 Messrs Dirom, & Co.

2 Messrs Turner, & Co.

3 Messrs Bell, & Co.

18

09

35

55

1.497" 25

6,441 22

1,133" 34

200,917" 68

$285,563

15

$67,397 22

8218,165" 90

Mr Barnet,

TO Mr Mc. Kean.

7. Mr Baynes,

19 Mr Larkins.

11 Mr Compten.

12 Mr Ponder.

Major.

14 Mr Burns,' £1,449 5s 6 at 4s 6

16 Messrs Gibb, Livingston, & Co.

†17 Messrs Jardine, Matheson, & Co,

15 Messrs Mc. Vicar, & Co.

2,994 50

4,692 80 43,207 33 200,917

1.497 25 4,692 80 3.220 61 42,073 993

1,199

3,220 " 61

5 Mr

Hughes

594

6 Messrs Jamieson & How.

671 14,198

5,871

60

671

8 Mr

784 33

751

206

152

92

9,429

8,230

352

297

These two claims are

under

*13 Mr

further

consideration

†The losses set forth in these two Items having been alleged to be incurred in American Hongs, are left to the United States Officers. RICHARD WOOSNAM-

:

23

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

WANTED.-A dolle each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos. 16 and 27 on application to the

PRINTING OFFICE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERA-The Inrge amount of our out-standing Arrears, [nearly one-half of our receipts] admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our Claims, which, trifling as they are, individually,-yet, aggre gately amount to a considerable sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 20TH, 1843 THE important NOTIFICATIONS, &c., which appear in our first Columns, our space does not afford us an opportunity of doing more than drawing the attention of our readers to their very interesting contents.

We do not share the opinions of those who deny the ability of China to make profitable returns for a greatly increased Import of British Manufactures. It is true, our fiscal regulations may require to be liberalized, to fully develope a mutually advantageous commerce. The labours of the last Session, are plain enough proofs of the right tendencies of Government, from which everything in the way wise com- mercial legislation may yet be realizable. Hence, justice will be done to the claims of Anglo-Chinese Commerce.

In our No. 16, we drew attention to the Article of FLAX, from which the beautiful fabirc known as Grass-Cloth, is manu- factured, and then mentioned, that from experiments we had instituted in Europe, there was no doubt of the applicability of the Chinese Flax, to the finest products of the British or Continental Manufacture.

We have only space now to say, that that the Import, into Great Britain, of Flax and Hemp, (mainly from Russia) during the last year, was about double the value of the whole Import of Tea. We may add, that the import of Flax, is increas- ing, as is the Linen trade generally. In 1825, the import of Flax was but 18,000 tons; in 1838, it had reached 81,000 tons; the Export of Linen, in 1825, was 61,000,000 yards; in 1838, it had risen to 78,000,000; and Yarn, the value of the whole Export was, in 1832, only £32,000, has now risen to at least, £800.000

concur with him in thinking such a determinati on would go far to induce the Chinese to keep to the spirit and letter of the Treaty of Peace. For the transmission of the Mails, and the desirability of frequent Official Communication, would, we are inclined to think, render it absolutely necessary to have a steamer expressly appropriated to this purpose.

We misinterpret the disposition of the Home, and Local Government, if we imagine that the new arrangements will not be on a scale commen- surate with the magnitude of the interests involved. We feel certain, neither niggardliness, nor ill- judged parsimony, will interpose to prevent the fulfillment of the requirements of the Colony, as well as those of the general trade; and, to our minds, there can be no better application of funds, than to the promotion of our facilities of inter-

communication.

The following extract is taken from the work above-mentioned, and as evidence, (if any were needed) in favour of steam; we may cite a recent instance. A fine new ship, [the Sir Robert Peel] was despatched from hence to Amoy, by Govern- ment, on the 19th February. She made what was thought a good passage, and returned into our port on the 4th of April, or forty-four days absence, of which thirty-seven were consumed in the voyage to and fro. On the 3rd instant, H. M.'s Steamer, Vixen, was sent to Amoy, and after staying nearlya day, was back to Hong- Kong on the 6th.

"The ports opened to us for trade in China extend over a line of Coast of about 800 miles in

length, from Hong-kong, at the mouth of Canton River, to Shanghai, mouth of Yang-tze river, in about the following directions:-

The Course from Hong-kong to Amoy is about N. E. by E., rounding the coast; Distance about 270 miles, or 11 day's steam run: from Amoy to Foo-Choo, N. E. by N., rounding the coast, Distance about 150 miles, or 1 short day's runby steamer: from Foo-Choo to Ningpo, N. b E. by the coast line; Distance about 300 miles, or 2 short day's run by steamer: from Ningpo to Shanghai, N. b W., across Hang-Choo bay, Dis- tance about 100 miles, or day's run by steamer: whole distance from the two extreme ports about 820 miles, 5 day's steaming, or about 4 days direct from Hong-kong to Shanghai."

tured by our Police, and handed over to the Mandarin'at Kowloon.

We are sorry to see by the Sydney Papers, the announcement of t he failure of the firm of Willis Sandeman, & Co., of that City. The liabilities are stated to amount to £100,000, and the deficiency is expected to be large. This house was in connexion with George Willis, & Co., of London.

We learn from a Correspondent at Canton, that there is a strong disposition to be rid of stock. and on the whole a fair business is doing. The following prices are quoted for TEAS, viz:- Congou, commonest,

Caper

Twankay Skin Hyson Gunpowder Imperial

17 to 18 Tuels. 19 20

44

good common

Souchong, Hung-muey

17. 21

23 44 40

46

28.34

30" 40

44

44

orange, plain scented

20" 26 30" 26 19" 26

16

1723

25" 55

44

32 .. 42

16

32 53 29

46

50

IMPORTS,

680 to 685 660

535" 540 57 Taels. 5" 9 6 "

66

young

Opium, old, Patna

new

+6

Malwa Cotton, Bombay Bengal 44 Madras white

Long Cloths, grey Long Ells, scarlet Sp. Stripes

64

Lead

assorted

Iron, Nail rod

44

2-70 3-05 8 2-60" 344 9" 10" 7-50

1-15 1-30 4-50

44

3-50 per Picul. 4-50

Hoop FREIGHT-Secured ships £4 per ton, unsecured,

£3-10.

ENCHANGE-48-9; no drawers,

At foot we give particulars of the last month's. Export of TBA, and in the nine months from 1st July, 1843, to 31st March, 1843. It is expected the Shipments during April will nearly double those of March.

By our last letters from Alexandria, we learn the new crop of Cotton was arriving, its quality is said to be much superior to the last. This article could be laid down 7d. half-penny per lb., which we are told is Bohea about double the price which the best In-Congr dian Cotton realize in the Canton market, Souchong We do not know whether these superior Hungmuey kinds of Cotton have ever been tried in the Sorts China market, but we think not. The manifold purposes to which the Chinese apply this valuable staple, would induce us to think the experiment would be worthy of trial.

Pekoe

Orange Pekoe-

Twankay Hyson Hysonskin Young Hyson

The low rates at which Cotton ruled in America by the last accounts, and the As China is an importer of Raw Fro-dounaath Crop, redus us to an ducts, it may be alleged that Flax will be will be a large increase of imports into Imperial too dear to become an advantageous return China from that quarter, during the coming cargo. We think, in the Northern Ports, season. and even, perhaps, at Amoy, (for Fokeen has been long famed for its Flax) it will be obtainable at a much lower rate than at Canton. The price quoted there (some five years since) was certainly too high.

The China Flax, we have seen, would come into competition with the better kinds imported into England, from Holland, France, and Belgium, the medium value of which, during the last five years, has been £66 5s. per ton.

Another reason why we think. Hemp and Flax are cheaply produced in China- besides our knowledge of their admirable agricultural treatment-is, that we do not find one or the other, among the Chinese Imports, and although the contiguous Phillipine Islands, send Cotton to China, yet, the whole of their export of Hemp, is to the United States, Europe, and a little to Singapore.

We see by Mr R. Wise's excellent Pamphlet, entitled PEACE WITH CHINA-which we have had more than once, occasion to refer to that the expediency of a few War Steamers being kept plying between this Island and the Consular Ports, has not escaped his attention. We quite

We gave the American quotations in our No. 54; they seem to be rates which will enable the American Cotton to suc- cessfully compete with that of India. And whilst we are endeavouring to introduce into India the cultivation of the long stapled kinds of American Cotton for British consumption, our trans-Atlantic brethren may also find it worth their while to introduce the short stapled, less valuable, but more productive cottons of India, which with their economic culture and scientific appliances, might perhaps be sent to a com- mon market, like China, ut even a lower rate than those of India

In March. In 9 months.

250.322 lb., 22,459.520" 138,135 " 467,447.

8,890.331

35 550 168.631

25,289

148,834 "

435 53.204

38.982"

306,052.

171,977

610,408"

Total Black 4,345,417

24,419.700 lb.

446.877 87,498

1,599,766 lb. 907,629

3.254

49,677

43.888

434,744

480,543

17,852

199,245 "

Total Green 647,819 3,622,010 Ib.

Total in March in 8 vessels, 4,993,236 lb. Grand Total in 9 months, from 1st July to 30th March, in 56 vessels, 28.041,710 lb.

PRODUCT OF PRECIOUS METALS, SINCE

THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA.

(Continued from our last.)

The quantities of Gold which America yielded at the commencement of this Century was, to the quantity of Silver in the proportion of 1 @ 46, and in Europe, the proportion between Gold and Silver was, as one to forty. The value of Gold and Silver of equal quantities, was then in the proportion 15 to 15 and a-half of the latter, to one of the form- er. Finally, the quantity of Gold produced has augmented in comparison to the quantity of Silver. From 1800 to 1810 the product of the Ameri- In our last we forgot to mention that can Mines had a considerable increase, but during a Mandarin from Kowloon, by name Lai, the latter year the contest commenced which re- had paid an official visit to the Chief and sulted in the complete separation of the Colonies Marine Magistrates. He was received with want of security caused by the struggle, likewise from the mother country, and the convulsions and due honour. The object of his visit was the proscription of the old Spanish families,-the to concert measures for the extirpation of principal proprietors of the mines,-who fled with the pirates who infest the adjacent waters, the relics of their fortune to Spain, Cuba, Bor- On Thursday last a piratical vessel was deaux and other parts of the south of France, chased into our harbour by the Chinese caused the abandonment of several mines, and a authorities; on nearing the shore the crew their Product. We have not the means to cal- very extraordinary diminution in the amount of jumped over board, but several were cap-culate with precision the exact extent of this de-

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

Great Britain, is calculated with excess, in the same proportion as the consumption of France, or a one- fourth. There is no doubt that during late years, there has been a considerable increase in the con- sumption of Gilded and Plated articles; but much better evidence is wanted, than that which is now possessed by the Public, to guarantee the con- clusion that a sum so large as 8 11.353,292 could be appropriated to such objects.

The consumption of Switzerland according to Mr Jacob's statement is probably correct enough. But the amount which he allots to all the other countries of Europe, appears to us quite as exag: gerated as that which he assigns to France and England. According to Mc. Culloch the consump- tion will be as follows: Great Britain

cadence. According to Mr. Ward, in Mexico, during the years of 1811 @ 1828 the average of the coined metals was only ten millions a-year whilst in 1810 it had risen to 26,500,000 dollars. According to Mr. Jacob, (who in a work upon the PRECIOUS METALS, reunited and compared all the information which existed upon this matter) the total product of the American mines, includ- ing those of Brazil during the twenty years termi- nating in 1829, may be estimated at 379,937,731 Dollars-or $18,996,845 yearly; which is considerably less than half the Amount which was produced at the beginning of this Century. The mines in Europe likewise declined during the twenty Years we speak of; but there was a very material augmentation in the Product of the Mines in Russia. According to Humboldt this Product amounted to 5,898,039 dollars. So that France by forming a basis upon the calculations of Hum- Switzerland boldt and Jacob and calculating the total annual The rest of Europe Product of the American and European Mines to America be 24,804,884 dollars, there would result from 1810 to 1829 inclusive, an annual Deficit of 18,605, 116, or of 372,102,320 in the total amount. have seen another calculation in the Quarterly Re- view, which makes the product of Precious Metals during that period ascend to 23,890,000 dollars annually, or 455,620,000 in all, and to 1,161,000 for the demand of them, for all the objects of circula- tion, coining, arts, and consumption of wear and

We

tare, loss and other accidents, there still remains a Deficit of 708,880,000 dollars. That is to say that this Deficit may very well be calculated at 540,241,160 up to 1829; the diminution of Gold, however, has not been so large as that of Silver, as the decrease which was experienced in the first of those two metals in New Granada, the Brazils, and Chilé, was compensated by the increase which they have had in Russia and the United

States of America.

21

cleaned of its woody and useless parts, which, increases the cost from the greater loss of material whilst it improves the cordage, considerably in this process. At present the steam Cordag: sells at 88 per pecul, the ordinary kind at $6-5) About 16 Piculs can be produced daily. Th: cost of the raw material is 81 per Picul, nearly forty natives are employed, whose average dail pay is about 33 cents. The engine fuel is wood, which costs $1 25 the telaran--contents 7% cubic feet.

NAVAL OFFICERS DISTINGUISHED IN CHINA.- Captain Charles Richards, who lately distinguish- ed himself in China, and was honourably mention- ed in Sir William Parker's dispatches; has been seized with serious illness in consequence of the 1,842.016 hardships fie endured. Capt. Cichards was in the 866,190 Albion at the battle of Algiers. He was long sta- 355,000 toned at Portsmouth in the Victory and Britannia, 1,204,118 and was flag-lieutenant to Admiral Bouverie when 300,000 superintendent of the dockyard.-Captain Peter Richards, of the Cornwallis, who was also honor- £4,568,224 ably named in the Admiral's dispatches, was first lieutenant of the Queen Charlotte at the battle of Chinghae and Segalion, as well as at Chin-keang- Algiers, and served on shore at the attack upon foo-Captain Bourchier, c. B., has been in all the affairs in China. He commanded a brigade of seamen at the capture of Canton, was engaged at Amoy and Chinghae, and at the attack upon the Commander R. B. Watson was first lieutenant of camp at Segahon, as well as at Chin-keang-foo.-- the Calliope at the capture of the forts at the Boc- ca Tigris and Canton; commander of the Blen- heim at Amoy, and of the Modeste at Chinghae and Segahon.-Commander W. Maitland, who killed two mandarins at Chin-keang-foo, was first lieu- tenant of the Benbow at the attack upon Tortosa and bombardment of St. Jean d'Acre.-Lieut. W. T. Bate, who had the honour of capturing a Mandarine single-handed, was mate of the Blen-

Or Dollars 21,670,054 According to Humbolt the total consumption of This computation is probably still too high. Precious Metals in Europe for other objects besides that of coinage, amounts to 17.436,400 Dollars, and adding to this amount $1,411,764-5) Rials for the consumption of America, the total less than the calculation of McCulloch, and no less sum would be $18,848,164, which is 82,821,889 than 88,919,541 under that of Mr Jacob.

MANILA.

has served in all the affairs in China. Mr Bate

We have much pleasure in translating and publishing the following communica- tion, from an intelligent foreign correspon- Whilst the amount of these Precious metals de- dent. We are truly glad to observe and creased, however, during the same 20 years, the commerce, wealth, civilization, and population of applaud any attempt to open up the abound-heim, and was wounded at Canton in 1841, and Europe had very much increased, and the lattering resources of the Phillipine Islands:- ascended to 190 millions in 1810, and to European arts and industry have hithertoo been 210 millions in 1830. The circulating medium almost unknown in the Philippine Islands. Of was augmented in that epoch, for reasons which late an attempt has been made to introduce them, we shall explain, in absolute quantity, at least 10 and it is much to be wished that this first enter- per cent. Storck in correcting the calculations of prise may be sucessful, as if so, there is little doubt Humboldt, computes that the circulation of Metals that other individuals will be disposed to engage in Europe, which in 1815 amounted 1320 millions in undertakings, which may develop the great, but of dollars, in 1830 was increased to 1600; being very imperfectly known resources of these rich in a great measure on account of England with- Islands. drawing her Paper money, and resuming Cash Payments, and likewise through Russia, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States having followed her example; besides the consumption of Gold and Silver wrought up into Plate, Jewels, and other artificial objects,-having considerably augmented.

Gold and Silver serve either for the use of coinage, or that

An American named Mr O'Keating, has lately established in the environs of Manila,a manufactory of cables and cordage, from the Native Hemp, (Abaca) upon the most improved system, now in use in England and America.

After having passed several years at Manila, and collected all the information necessary for the execution of his project, Mr O'Keating returned to loss to learn in of the Arts. We are quite at a the United States, in order to procure the neces what proportion they were applied sary apparatus and machinery. He brought from to these objects, during the epochs given and as Boston a high pressure steam engine of 30 horse that proportion perpetually varied with the cir- power, with all the requisites for dressing the cumstances of each country; as for example, the Hemp, and converting it into rope, large or small issues of Paper money, and the rate in which the use of the money is diminished, for the various methods which occur by Banks, &c, to economize the circulation, according to the great or small riches of the people. Fla moda en punto a vagula, the knowledge of public security which was enjoyed at the moment, and by a thousand other circumstances, all of which are subject to great and repeated mutations. According to Mr. Jacob, the value of Precious Metals which are annually destined for adornments and other objects of splendour, may be computed as follows: Great Britain, France,

Switzerland,

The rest of Europe, And that whobic calculated for the same objects in America,

3

The factory is situated on the banks of the Passig near the village of Nactajan, about three miles from Manila. The first floor is occupied with the dressing machines, three of which are cylinders of covered with points of iron of about two inches in length, onstant from each otter about 15 metry these first open the fibre of the Hemp, which then passes to another machine, under a cylinder of inuch larger diameter, of which the points (cards) are much smaller, and placed close together. These separate the fibres of the Hemp into a thread much finer, and divest them of the woody 2.457,221 or useless particles. 1,200,000

After this preparation, the Hemp passes be- 350,000 tween two iron cylinders, which compresses it 1,605,499 very strongly, from thence it is conducted to a smaller machine, which gives the first twist and 287,280 winds it on a bobbin of about 6 inches diamater. The dimensions of the cord are increased or dim- inished by means of an iron screw, which adjusts the diameter of the hole (through which the fibres pass) to the required size.

£ Strg. 5,900,000 Dollars, 27,764,705 The data on which this computation is founded, are in every way vague and unsatisfactory, so much so that it is necessary to look upon it as a mere conjecture.

M. Chabrol whose investigations are much more worthy of confidence than those of M. Chaptal, to which Mr. Jacob refers, calculates that the annual consumption of Gold and Silver in Paris, for the use of Works of Art, amounts to 82,910.400 every year; which corresponds with the elaborate calculation of M. Benoiston de Chateauneuf. These two authorities agree that the cousumption of Precious Metals in Paris in objects of Art, is double that of the rest of France; so that we have for the consumption of the whole kingdom 4,365,000, that is to say, £338,810 Ster- ling the year less than the calculation of Mr Jacob, Persons who have good means of forming a cor- rect opinion on this point, assert that the quantity which Mr Jacob assigns for the consumption of

The Ropery is a building 800 feet in length, built entirely of American timber, with a shed at each extrhmity; in the one farthest from the house is the rack upon which the bobbins are ranged. bobbi Eight or ten bobbins of hemp suffice to make a cable of a large size, twelve or fifteen may be made at a time. The strings of the bobbins pass through round holes, pierced in a plate of brass, having an octagonal form fixed on another rack (ratelier) perpendicular to the line of the Ropery The mass of strings or strands are united together by an iron hook, which is fixed on a carriage with a double catch, drawn by the steam engine of a railway. The Engine is high pressure on a con- struction remarkably simple.

This manufactory was begun in May last. The article produced is very superior to that made by hand, and in strength and durability, there is no comparison between the two articles. It should be said that by this machinery the hemp is better

was a son of the late Captain Bate, who died when Governor of Ascension.-Hants Standard. volution in nautical affairs, which by science and per- NORTH-EAST PASSAGE TO CHINA-In the great re severance in exploring different parts of the globe is in course of accomplishment, it is extraordinary that the greatest maritime nation of the world has never yet directed its attention to a N. E. passage to China; in vain have individuals attempted for several successive years to explore a N. W. passage under those able navigators Parry, Ross, Franklin, Back, &c. Even the Russian Government is at this moment organizing at St.. Petersburg a land expedition for exploring the whole of the northern coast of Siberia; simultaneous- ly with this enterprise, what a desirable opportunity now presents itself for her Majesty's government to send out a steainer from England to Archangel-there to fill up her coals, take in her pilots, and also scientific men! This, no doubt, the Emperor of Russia who has

hore of les

devoted a large sum of money for the purpose, would be very glad to avail himself of, and give the expedi tion every assistance. From Archangel the steamer would immediately proceed to Pick:oron, and obtain fishermen and pilots to pass through Waygate Sound into the Nova Zembla Seas, and endeavour to double the Vostechroi Noss on the N. E. Cape of Russian Asia, lying in latitude 78 30 N. Once having round- ed this Cape, the coast suddenly branches to the S., and no doubt the navigation through the Archipelago of the Lead to Being's strane, saray open and unobstructed in the summer, for it is well, known that the Russian hunters. in their very defec- tive bayards, or country boats made of hides, have na- vigated that Archipelago and coast for upwards of 200 years. From Behring's Straits to Kamschatka, through Perouse's Straits to Teentsin, Chusan, &c., could be readily accomplished. Various circumstances for the last ten years would seem to favour such an enterprise for it is well known that immense icebergs for years past bave drifted into the Atlantic. to the great danger of ships navigating those seas, and which would seem to portend some vast convulsion of nature in those northern regions; and it must be borne in mind, that in the summer months of those high latitudes there is twenty-three hours day-light, and generally speaking calm seas. The only difficulty to be apprehended for a steamer, would be in the Nova Zembla Seas, from about the latitude 74 N to the doubling of the N. E. Cape of Russian Asia [Velocktenoi Noss), in latitude 78 30 North; should, however, the steamer not think it prudent to venture round the Cape in one season, she might be usefully and expeditiously employed in exploring the mouths and delta of the great rivers Obi and Yenessey, and even take a trip to Tobolsk up the former river, and thence return through Waygate Sound to Archangel, in good time and season to return to England in the month of October, but not later-or winter at Archangel, and commence operations in the spring as eaily as the season might permit them to do 80. Should the above passage ever be brought into practical use for the purpose of navigation, it is neces- sary to bear in mind, that the distance from London by the above route to Pekin is in round numbers about 8,000 miles, while the distance, via the Cape of Good Hope. from London to Pekin is 26,000 miles, and it is superfluous to add that science would be immensely benefited by the accomplishment of such a desirable object-Cheltenham Chronicle.

25

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, THE Brig "SNIPE" CAPT. W.W. FROST, will be despatched in few days. For freight apply to HUGHESDON, BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1813.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, The A. I. British built Barque "COLONIST," THOMAS LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named Ports in all April.-For Freight or Passage, apply to. JOHN BURD, & Co. Hong-Kong, 13th April, 1843.

FOR CALCUTTA

D. WILSON & CO. BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their Vessel the "ALGEKINE," beg to announce to the Public that she will bring on a choice investment of fancy goods of every description consisting of Perfu- mery, Stationery, Cutlery, Hardware, Ironmongery, Drapery, Grocery. Preserved meats, Confectionary, Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes. Oilman's Stores. Wines, Beer, Spirits, Liqueurs &c., &c, which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices. taking their regular supplies.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes AUCKLAND HOTEL, Hongkong. 30th March, 1843. NOTICE-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passige apply THE fast sailing Clipper Brig on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao. Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AD PENANG.

"ALGERINE. J. M. Hill Com mander, will sail for the above name ports in all April. For freight or passage apply to Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD. The fast sailing Ship "CAMAIEU," A. 1 for 12 years. Burthen 288 tons, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. 1. British built Barque ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong, 15th February, 1843.

W. T. Kinsley.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. FOR SALE. Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

landed ex JAGATRA

NOTICE. GOODS and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission.

Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Ilong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE,

WANTS A SITUATION.

A RESPECTABLE Young Man with a good character, and has some knowledge of house building. Would be glad to meet with some employment of any kind where he could make himself useful.

Apply at the Office of this paper.

PUBLIC AUCTION

Will be offered to the highest hillers on Friday next. the 21st Instant, by BENNETT PAIN, & Co. the following articles, viz: -

Yarls and Masts of all descriptions. Preserved Meats, Wines, Brandy, Cotton Wicks, Hardeware, &c. and a variety of other Articles

FOR SALE-The following goods; --Sillery Champagne, Claret, St. Julien, Sauterne, Superior Brandy, Gentlemen's Dress Coats, Gold Watches, Keys, Brooches, Pins, Silver Chains, Rings, and Seals, the best Cut Crystal Decanters. Claret, & Water Jugs of various elegant designs. a Musical Box with eight airs. Apply to Mr Ad. Guillaine at the Auckland Hotel. from 10 to 4. HATS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hats, for sale by the undersigned, at 84 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co, Hong-Kong. April 19th. 1843. NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods, ciz:- de-oz. cases, Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, in Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jams and Jellies in 1 doz, cases of half pints, pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses, Butter, fresh in Jars. Soups of all des criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salinou do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels, American Beef and Pork in barrels, Munila Coffee, do. Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 doz. bottles, Sardines in Tius, Split Peas. Westphalia Hams, Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions, Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Super- ior (in Loxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaning Twine, Canvass, Cakum, Tar Blacking. Rozin &c, Coconut Oil, Linseed do. in Jars of 5 Gals., Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes, Yellow bar Soap. Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knifes und Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices, Britannia Metal Tea Spoons. Cork Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large. Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks, Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes. Hong-kong. April, 18th 1842.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just MR JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR. JOHN LEFF. LER, are duly authorized to sign for me, by Procuratione during my absence from China. HENRY PYBUS.

Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY. HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co. FOR SALE. The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA Rooku built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been ⚫ newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of- any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

ALSO

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com plete in every respect. For particulars apply to

BENNETT, PAIN & Co.

Hongkong, 3rd March, 1843.

Beef

Tar

Rosin

FOR SALE

Pork

Pitch

Mackrell in Kits

Navy bread

Flour

Negro-head Tobacco.

Pilot bread

150 boxes of raisins &c. &c. Soap These goods are just lauded from the American vessels LARK and, NAVIGATOR and are in prime con- Apply to

dition.

Hongkong; 7th March, 1843. FOR SALE

G. F. DAVID. ON.

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1842.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in, Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Mania Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders and a great variety of other articles.

Hongkong, 1st March, 1843.

JOHN BURD & Co. •Queen's Road.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET,

BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

ALSO,

Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per Package. Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE, 46, Queen's Road.

Macao, 5th April, 1843.

FOR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar. rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and

Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in cares, a few Pipes, Quarter caska, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from

England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as- sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware. Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar- rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bouled Beer, at 83 and a half per Dozen. N. DUUS.

Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18. Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-At the Godown of the Unders ged just landed: Port, Madeira and Sherry of really superior Quality, Bass's Beer in Hogsheads. Apply by letter to WILLIAM SCOTT.

Hongkong, 28th March, 1843.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers on Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843- A CARD.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage, BENNETT PAIN, & Co. Hong-kong, 15th March, 1843.

DIED. On the 15th of April at the Morrison Education Society's house in Hong-kong, JoHN ABBAGE, aged 3 months and 11 days, infant Son of BENJAMIN HOBSON, Esq., superintending the Medical Missionary's Hospital at this place.

APRIL.

Shipping Intelligence.

10th Urgent

13th Zoe

ARRIVED.

ני

Thompson Miller

Масао

13

19

14th Omega

White

Venice

Terit

Sydney

11

Athena

White

Whampoa

19

Wiil o'the Wisp

Walker

Macao

33

Harlequin

Oliver

16

Heron

Killick

Singapore

17 Edmonstone

18th Lark

39

11

Sir E. Ryan D'Arcy

Macdongal Tibbits Anderson Garrick

Macao

33

99

Manila

SAILED.

14th Urgent

29

Zoe

Champbell Thompson Miller

Whampoa

Manila

Whampoa

19

Marchioness Douro

Woodworth

17th Raymond Omega

Mc. Kay

11

White

Chusan

White

Cromarty

Macdongul

London Whampoa Macao

Oliver Digby

Amoy

Whampoa

APRIL

13th Culdee

MR ALEXANDER BIRD, Accountant, first 18th Athena

North-East House, Praya Grande, Macao. NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

REAL ESTATE AT AUCTION THE PREMISES known as the AUCKLAND HOTEL, opposite Hong-Kong Market Place The Building is 66 x 60 feet, two Stories, with offices in the rear; dimensions of Lot, 93 x 105 feet. It is considered the

best situation in the settlement, for Hotel or Store.

Also the BUNGALOW, on the Queen's Road, in the rear of Marine Lot, No. 46, ith Well, and large offices, including Stable; dimensions ef Lot, 120 x 105 feet.

The above.described Property will be Sold at Auction, con Saturday, the 29th instant, at 12 o'clock M., on the Verandah of the Auckland Hotel.

Terms at Sale,-For further particulars, apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE Hong-Kong, 10th April, 1843.

17 Equestrian "Edmonstone

19th Harlequin 19 Susan

GOVERNMENT TENDER. TENDERS will be received for the immedi- ate conveyance to Madras, of a detachment of Troops, consisting of one European Officer, and twenty-two men. For fur- ther particulars, apply at the Harbour

Master's Office.

Hong-kong, 19th April, 1843.

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND DONGBONG GAZETTE.

No. 59 VOL. II.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 4TH. 1813.

Price $4 monthly Or 12 yearly

APRIL 28TH.-BEFORE THE SAME. who had been killed on the night before, in the Bazaar This was an inquest on the body of three Chinamen

Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two from loss of blood from the large Axdiary blood Kwang," &c., &c., has the honour to inform vessels.-Verdict--Wilful Murder against hung Her Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentiary, that, on the 23rd instant, he received a Despatch from the Ministers of the Grand Council of State, covering a Copy of Imperial Commands, received the Cabinet on the 6th of April, 1:43, and which are of the following terins :-

NOTIFICATION. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Gia-by zette," with the signatures of duly autho-

rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hong-Cong, March 23, 1812 GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

behind Messrs Jardine Mathe-on and Co's Cindows.

The Jury proceeded to the view. Mr. C. W, Bowra was sworn as interpreter to the "Let Ke Ying be made Imperial Commis- Court. Chariem, a Lascar sworn. says--This morning "sioner, and let him proceed with all haste, by "Post, to Canton, to inquire into, and conduct at a quarter past one I was asleep in my house, at the "affairs there. Of the Viceroyship of the Two back of Jardine & Matheson's Godown, I was awoke by Kwang, let Pichang take acting charge; and till the report of fire arms, when I heard the firing tran "such time as Pichang shall reach that post, let out to assist the Sepoys, who were on duty in the "Sun Shenpao be temporarily entrusted with the Bazaar behind the odowns. On arriving at tho Bazaar I met a Chinaman, who attempted to stab in with a spear, I then fired a l'istol at him, but missed him -1 saw 3 or 4 of the Robbers entering the door of a house inhabited by Jardine, & Co's Comprador, when

46

"care of its duties."

RESPECT THIS.

It becomes, then, the Governor-General's duty With reference to the Proclamation of to send, with due respect, a Copy of these Com-retreated behind one of the Guns and reloaded my the 15th ult., on the Subject of Sinuggling mands to the Honourable Plenipotentiary, request.

in the Canton River, His Excellency Siring that he will take the trouble to examine, and Henry l'ottinger, is pleased to publish the act accordingly. (A most necessary Communication.) following Communication from His Excel- lency Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two Kwang.

By order, RICHARD WOOSNAM. Government House, Hong-Kong, 1st May, 1843.

Ke Kung, a Guardian of the Crown Prince, a President of the Board of War, Governor-General of the Two Kwang, &c., hereby makes this Com- munication in reply.

I have this instant, received the Honourable Plenipotentiary's Communication of the 14th day of the 3rd Moon, (13th April 1843) which I per- fectly understand, and by it may be seen, the Hon- ourable Plenipotentiary's most praise-worthy inten- tions to maintain peace and harmony.

To

SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., H. B. M.'s Plenipotentiary. Taoukwang, 23rd year, 3rd Month, 24th day. (23rd April, 1843.) True Translation. (Signed)

J. ROBERT MORRISON, Chinese Secretary & Interpreter. NOTE.-Pichang was long at Yarkand, and has been recently appointed to command the Tartar Force at Fuchow, but has not yet gone thither. Shun Shenpao, is Governor of Kiangsoo, Soochow. [Signed]

True Copy.

J. R. M. RICHARD WOOSNAM.

INQUEST-29TH APRIL 1843.

Pistol, as the Robbers were going off with the booty and the Sepoys fired, and the men fell near the door. The Robbers when they found that some of their companions were wounded, carried away 2 of them with them. As they were carrying them off I saw a man staggering, and having lost the ramrod of my pistol t could not re-load, so I went up to the man and knocked him down with the butt end; in knocking the man down 1 happened to fall on him, and a Sepoy who was with ine secured the man. As we were tying the man, one of the Robbers ran past us, on which the Sepoy fired at him and shot him in the shoulder. I and the Sepoy dragged two of the men who were shot up to the house, and gave the.n some water. and at about an hour after they expired. As the Robbers were going away I heard a shot fired, the shot was fired from a window in the Bazaar.

Richard Fry, a Serjeant of the Ninty-eighth Regi.

atment, sworn, says-1 was awoke at one o'clock this morning, and went to the window of the house where I was staying that night, in Jardine and Matheson's Bazaar, the window was open, and I saw a number of Chinese armed with weapons resembling boarding. pikes, I saw them break open the door of the house opposite, and on this I went into a back room and took a musket which I knew was loaded, and when I As to the Hoppo's Clerks and followers receiving came to the window I saw 3 or 4 of the Robbers inside Bribes to connive at Smuggling, it is, I really fear, of the house, and one of them in the act of breaking difficult to guarantee, that such is not the case, (Before Mr E. Farncomb, Coroner,) open a locker or drawer in the inner part. The and I, the Governor-General, have communicated This was an Inquest on the body of a Chinaman. Robbers had thrown a fire-ball into the house which the same to His Excellency, the Hoppo, that, by The Jury on being sworn proceeded to the view. The made it quite light, so that I could see everything that some examples of severity, he may cleanse out this Rev. Mr Dean was sworn as Interpreter to the Court. was going on quite distinctly; I then fired my musket fountain of evil. As regards the English Mer- Hoken--A Chinaman, being a Christian, was sworn at a Robber who was breaking oper. the locker, and chants, no doubt there are good and upright men on the Holy Bible, says-Ahung the man who com- he then fell; the flash from my musket attracted the among them; but yet, it is to be feared, that out of mitted the deed had for a long time behaved ill to attention of the Robbers, and one of them then made every ten of them, there may at least be one or Alay, and yesterday morning he had acqused him of a thrust at me with a spear through the venetians, I two given to deceit. The Honourable Plenipoten- defrauding him of money; after some altercation then went into the inner room, re-loaded my musket, tiary, for his part, gives no protection or encourage- the deceased hearing of the affair, went down and when I returned to the window I found they were ment whatever, to Smuggling, and 1, the Gov- by the request of Aly to assist in adjusting the retreating down the Bazaar, I then fired the musket crnor-General, never had the smallest suspicion matter. On proceeding to the place,ar Mr Gil. and shot another as he was running away under the that he did so, still, it is difficult for a single person lespie's, Akung accosted the deceased in abusive verandah of the house opposite. The men who to oversee so much, and if, perchance, his super-language, and wanted to know the reason why he had were shot were not quite dead when they were vision is not perfect, there will be less or more of one down there, after this a struggle ensued, and brought back to the house by the Lascars, but died house Alung stabbed the deregend with, then the shortly after: the man that deceased fell, Aung fed, Atay pursued him, Ahung out of the house, and were the in ourable Plenipotentiary, that the two countries turned back and struck him with the knife, and cut the Bazaar, when he could proceed no further. Tho being now united in friendship, he will be more his face open; I do not know where Ahung has gone rat man was shot with a bullet, and the other with stringent than ever in his superintendence: the to. After the altercation the deceased laid hold of slugs and shot mixed. The length of time that English Merchants should not be permitted to Ahung to give him in charge of the Police, And Ahung elapsed from the time that I first saw the Robbers to listen to the seductions of the Hoppo's Clerks and then drew his knife and stabbed him; 1 do not know their running away, was about 5 minuits I think. Two followers, to league with them in evading the where the man got the knife from; it was a long straight Chinese Watchmen endeavoured to seize some of the Duties; and now that we are engaged in consult-knife and very sharp. The affray took place about sun Robbers, but did not suceed. The Comprador whose ing about a Tariff of Duties, I still more devoutly set yesterday. Atuy on being struck fell, Ahung then fled, house was attacked, told me there had been 284 Dollars hope, that the Plenipotentiary will come forward I witnessed the whole affair, I do not know how often stolen and 9 catties of Opium The third Robber who with a plan of Rules and Regulations to be in the deceased was struck, I think that the deceased was shot was found in the upper part of the Bazaar. scribed in our Code as a lasting guide, how that was not aware that Aung had a knife, after the When I went into the Shop I found it on fire-Un my we may act together in searching and preventing deceased fell he could not speak, and I went away to return I found the 3 bodies tied together-Two persons who were in the room of the house opposite such abuses. give information, and when I returned deceased was dead. Neither Aty or myself had any weapon, I with me, saw the two Robbers whom I shot at all, Ahoy, a Chinaman, sworn, says-fam Purser to when I found that the blood was flowing so copiously Messrs Jardine, Co.'s Comprador. The goods in thought I could reader no assistance to the deceased from the wound,-the affair took place near a Mat the Shop belonged to the Comprador-About half past one this morning I heard a noise outside the door; [ Shed at a small distance from the road. Atuy the person wounded not being able to give his thought some Thieves were coming. They broke evidence verbally, on account of his mouth and face open the door, and I then ran up stairs and fastened being dreadfully cut, admits the truth of the above the trap door, I afterwards heard 2 guns fired. When evidence the Robbers Had gone away I came down, and found the door broken open and the Shop on fire-1 then got water to put the fire out-There were 3 dead men lushed together outside the door.

For this I now reply, and avail myself of the opportunity to wish your Excellency all health and happiness. To His Excellency

SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., H. B. M.'s Plenipotentiary. Taoukwang, 23rd year, 3rd Moon, 17th day. (16th April, 1843.) True Translation. (Signed) R. THOM,

True Copy.

Joint Interpreter.

RICHARD WOOSNAN.

The following Communication, from His Excellency Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two Kwang, is published for general

information.

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

By order, Government House, Hong-Kong, 1st May, 1843.

Yu, a Chinaman, (sworn by cutting off the cock's head) says-I was at work on the road near where the affair took place, and hearing that a man had been killed, I went to the place, and found the deceased already dead, I did not see Ahung, I know nothing more about the matter.

The Smuggler bold,

Wm. Lockhart, Surgeon, sworn, says-I examined the bodies of 3 Chingmen, each having severe shot wounds on the head and trunk, and it is my opinion that their deaths were caused from the effects of the W. Lockhart, Surgeon, sworn, says-I examined the wounds.-Verdict-Justifiable Homicide. Body of a Chinaman this morning, and found a punc- tured wound on the back part of the left shoulder, and inches deep, extending from behind the bone of the on enlarging the orifice found the wound to be four Arin into what is called the Axillary space, wounding the large blood vessels in the neighborhood; there was a small skin wound on the fore arm of the same side, also a cut above the right wrist, wounding a part of the radial artery; my opinion is that the deceased died

Risks Lite for his Gold;

If he meets the Excise,

Why their courage he tries,

In defence of his Lace, or his Leno.

But for him who o'er tops,

The Consoo with faise chops,

And is not over nice

About cargoes of Rice,

The best advocate truly is NEMO.--COMMUNICATED,

!

23

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

WANTED. A dollar each, will be paid for Clean Copies of No. 28 of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and half a dollar for Nos. 16 and 27 on application to the

PRINTING OFFICE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS-The large amount of our out-standing Arrears, [nearly one-half of our receipts] admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forth with liquidating our Claims, which, trifling as they are, individually,-yet, aggre. gately amount to a considerable sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 20TH, 1843

THE important NOTIFICATIONS, &c., which appear in our first Columns, our space does not afford us an opportunity of doing more than drawing the attention of our readers to their very interesting contents.

We do not share the opinions of those who deny the ability of China to make profitable returns for a greatly increased Import of British Manufactures. It is true, our fiscal regulations may require to be liberalized, to fully develope a mutually advantageous commerce. The labours of the last Session, are plain enough proofs of the right tendencies of Government, from which everything in the way wise com- mercial legislation may yet be realizable. Hence, justice will be done to the claims of Anglo-Chinese Commerce.

In our No. 16, we drew attention to the Article of FLAX, from which the beautiful fabirc known as Grass-Cloth, is manu- factured, and then mentioned, that from experiments we had instituted in Europe, there was no doubt of the applicability of the Chinese Flax, to the finest products of the British or Continental Manufacture.

We have only space now to say, that that the Import, into Great Britain, of Flax and Hemp, (mainly from Russia) during the last year, was about double the value of the whole Import of Tea. We may add, that the import of Flax, is increas- ing, as is the Linen trade generally. In 1825, the import of Flax was but 18,000 tons; in 1838, it had reached 81,000 tons; the Export of Linen, in 1825, was 61,000,000 yards; in 1838, it had risen to 78,000,000; and Yarn, the value of the whole Export was, in 1832, only £32,000, has now risen to at least, £800,000.

ducts, it may be alleged that Flax will be too dear to become an advantageous return cargo. We think, in the Northern Ports, and even, perhaps, at Amoy, (for Fokeen has been long famed for its Flax) it will be obtainable at a much lower rate than at Canton. The price quoted there (some five years since) was certainly too high.

The China Flax, we have seen, would come into competition with the better kinds imported into England, from Holland, France, and Belgium, the medium value of which, during the last five years, has been £66 5s. per ton.

concur with him in thinking such a determinati on would go far to induce the Chinese to keep to the spirit and letter of the Treaty of Peace. For the transmission of the Mails, and the desirability of frequent Official Communication, would, we are inclined to think, render it absolutely necessary to have a steamer expressly appropriated to this purpose.

We misinterpret the disposition of the Home, and Local Government, if we imagine that the new arrangements will not be on a scale commen- surate with the magnitude of the interests involved. We feel certain, neither niggardliness, nor ill- judged parsimony, will interpose to prevent the fulfillment of the requirements of the Colony, as well as those of the general trade; and, to our minds, there can be no better application of funds, than to the promotion of our facilities of inter-

communication.

The following extract is taken from the work above-mentioned, and as evidence, (if any were needed) in favour of steam; we may cite a recent instance. A fine new ship, [the Sir Robert Peel] was despatched from hence to Amoy, by Govern- ment, on the 19th February. She made what was thought a good passage, and returned into our port on the 4th of April, or forty-four days absence, of which thirty-seven were consumed in the voyage to and fro. On the 3rd instant, H. M.'s Steamer, Vixen, was sent to Amoy, and after staying nearlya day, was back to Hong- Kong on the 6th.

tured by our Police, and handed over to the Mandarin at Kowloon.

We are sorry to see by the Sydney Papers, the announcement of t he failure of the firm of Willis Sandeman, & Co., of that City. The liabilities are stated to amount to £100,000, and the deficiency is expected to be large. This house was in connexion with George Willis, & Co., of London.

We learn from a Correspondent at Canton, that there is a strong disposition to be rid of stock. and on the whole a fair business is doing. The following prices are quoted for TEAS, viz:- Congou, commonest,

good common

Caper Souchong, Hung-muey

44

orange, plain scented

Twankay Skin Hyson

young

Gunpowder Imperial

extend over a line of Coast of about 800 miles in Opium, old, Patna "The ports opened to us for trade in China length, from Hong-kong, at the mouth of Canton River, to Shanghai, mouth of Yang-tze river, in about the following directions:-

The Course from Hong-kong to Amoy is about N. E. by E., rounding the coast; Distance about 270 miles, or 11 day's steam run: from Amoy to Foo-Choo, N. E. by N., rounding the coast, Distance about 150 miles, or 1 short day's runby steamer: from Foo-Choo to Ningpo, N. b E. by the coast line; Distance about 300 miles, or 2 short day's run by steamer: from Ningpo to Shanghai, N. b W., across Hang-Choo bay, Dis- tance about 100 miles, or day's run by steamer: whole distance from the two extreme ports about 820 miles, 5 day's steaming, or about 4 days direct from Hong-kong to Shanghai."

By our last letters from Alexandria, we learn the new crop of Cotton was arriving, its quality is said to be much superior to the last. This article could be laid down 7d. half-penny per lb., which we are told is about double the price which the best In- dian Cotton realize in the Canton market,

We do not know whether these superior kinds of Cotton have ever been tried in the China market, but we think not. The manifold purposes to which the Chinese apply this valuable staple, would induce us to think the experiment would be worthy Front would be of trial.

abundant cron loads us to think that thera

new

46 Malwa Cotton, Bombay Bengal Madras white

Long Cloths, grey

64

IMPORTS,

17 to 18 Taels.

1920

17

23 44

21

- 40

28

34

30" 40

20426 30" 26 19" 26 1723 25" 55

32. 42 32 53

29" 50

680 to 685 660

535540

54 7 Taels. 5 " 9

assorted

64 91 06 2-70 3.05 8 2-60" 3 46 9 " 10. 7-50

44

1-15 1.30 4-50

Long Ells, scarlet Sp. Stripes

Lead

Iron, Nail rod

ww

3-50 per Picul. 4-50

Hoop FREIGHT-Secured ships £4 per ton, unsecured,

£3–10.

ENCHANGE-48.-9; no drawers,

At foot we give particulars of the last month's. Export of TBA, and in the nine months from 1st July, 1842, to 31st March, 1843. It is expected the Shipments during April will nearly double those of March.

Bohea Congou Caper

Souchong Hungmuey

Sorts Pekoe Orange Pekoe -

Twankay Hyson Hysonskin Young Hyson

The low rates at which Cotton ruled in America by the last accounts, and the will be a large increase of imports into Imperial China from that quarter, during the coming season.

We gave the American quotations in our No. 54; they seem to be rates which will enable the American Cotton to suc- cessfully compete with that of India. And whilst we are endeavouring to introduce into India the cultivation of the long stapled kinds of American Cotton for British consumption, our trans-Atlantic brethren may also find it worth their while to introduce the short stapled, less valuable, but more productive cottons of India, which with their economic culture and scientific

Another reason why we think. Hemp and Flax are cheaply produced in China-appliances, might perhaps be sent to a com- besides our knowledge of their admirable mon market, like China, ut even a lower agricultural treatment-is, that we do not rate than those of India find one or the other, among the Chinese Imports, and although the contiguous Phillipine Islands, send Cotton to China, yet, the whole of their export of Hemp, is to the United States, Europe, and a little to Singapore.

We see by Mr R. Wise's excellent Pamphlet, entitled PEACE WITH CHINA-which we have had more than once, occasion to refer to that the expediency of a few War Steamers being kept plying between this Island and the Consular Ports, has not escaped his attention. We quite

In March. In 9 months.

250.322 lb., 22,459.520"

138,135 " 467,447.

148,834 " 38.982"

3,890.331

35 550 168.631

25,289

435 53.204

306,052.

171,977

610,408"

Total Black 4,345,417

24,419.700 lb.

446,877 87,498

1,599.766 lb. 907,629 "

3.254

43.888

17,852

49,677 " 434,744 " 199,245 "

Total Green 647,819 3,622,010 lb.

Total in March in 8 vessels, 4,993,236 lb. Grand Total in 9 months, from 1st July to 30th March, in 56 vessels, 28.041,710 lb.

PRODUCT OF PRECIOUS METALS, SINCE

THE DISCOVERY OF AMERICA.

(Continued from our last.)

The quantities of Gold which America yielded at the commencement of this Century was, to the quantity of Silver in the proportion of 1 @ 46, and in Europe, the proportion between Gold and Silver was, as one to forty. The value of Gold and Silver of equal quantities, was then in the proportion 15 to 15 and a-half of the latter, to one of the form- er. Finally, the quantity of Gold produced has augmented in comparison to the quantity of Silver. From 1800 to 1810 the product of the Ameri- In our last we forgot to mention that can Mines had a considerable increase, but during a Mandarin from Kowloon, by name Lai, the latter year the contest commenced which re- had paid an official visit to the Chief and sulted in the complete separation of the Colonies Marine Magistrates. He was received with want of security caused by the struggle, likewise from the mother country, and the convulsions and due honour. The object of his visit was the proscription of the old Spanish families,-the to concert measures for the extirpation of principal proprietors of the mines, who fled with the pirates who infest the adjacent waters. the relics of their fortune to Spain, Cuba, Bor- On Thursday last a piratical vessel was deaux and other parts of the south of France, chased into our harbour by the Chinese caused the abandonment of several mines, and a very extraordinary diminution in the amount of authorities; on nearing the shore the crew their Product. We have not the means to cal- jumped over board, but several were cap-culate with precision the exact extent of this de-

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

cadence. According to Mr. Ward, in Mexico, | Great Britain, is calculated with excess, in the same during the years of 1811 @ 1828 the average of proportion as the consumption of France, or a one- the coined metals was only ten millions a-year fourth. There is no doubt that during late years, whilst in 1810 it had risen to 26,500,000 dollars. there has been a co..siderable increase in the con- According to Mr. Jacob, (who in a work upon sumption of Gilded and Plated articles; but much the PRECIOUS METALS, reunited and compared all better evidence is wanted, than that which is now the information which existed upon this matter) possessed by the Public, to guarantee the con- the total product of the American mines, includ- clusion that a sum so large as 8 11.353,292 could ing those of Brazil during the twenty years termi- be appropriated to such objects. nating in 1829, may be estimated at 379,937,731 The consumption of Switzerland according to Dollars-or 8 18,996,845 yearly; which is Mr Jacob's statement is probably correct enough. considerably less than half the Amount which But the amount which he allots to all the other was produced at the beginning of this Century. countries of Europe, appears to us quite as exag: The mines in Europe likewise declined during gerated as that which he assigns to France and the twenty Years we speak of; but there was a England. According to Mc. Culloch the consump- very material augmentation in the Product of the tion will be as follows: Mines in Russia. According to Humboldt this Great Britain Product amounted to 5,898,039 dollars. So that France by forming a basis upon the calculations of Hum- Switzerland boldt and Jacob and calculating the total annual The rest of Europe Product of the American and European Mines to America be 24,894,884 dollars, there would result from 1810 to 1829 inclusive, an annual Deficit of 18,605, 116, or of 372,102,320 in the total amount. We have seen another calculation in the Quarterly Re- view, which makes the product of Precious Metals during that period ascend to 23,890,000 dollars annually, or 455,620,000 in all, and to 1,161,000 for the demand of them, for all the objects of circula- tion, coining, arts, and consumption of wear and

tare, loss and other accidents, there still remains a Deficit of 708,880,000 dollars. That is to say that this Deficit may very well be calculated at 540,241,160 up to 1829; the diminution of Gold, however, has not been so large as that of Silver, as the decrease which was experienced in the first of those two metals in New Granada, the Brazils, and Chilé, was compensated by the increase which they have had in Russia and the United

States of America.

24

cleaned of its woody and useless parts, which, whilst it improves the cordage, considerably increases the cost from the greater loss of material in this process. At present the steam Cordag sells at 88 per pecul, the ordinary kind at 86-51 About 16 Piculs can be produced daily. Th: cost of the raw material is 84 per Picul, nearly forty natives are employed, whose average daily pay is about 38 cents. The engine fuel is wood, which costs $1 25 the talaran--contents 7% cubic feet.

NAVAL OFFICERS DISTINGUISHED IN CHINA.- Captain Charles Richards, who lately distinguish- ed himself in China, and was honourably mention- ed in Sir William Parker's dispatches; has been seized with serious illness in consequence of the 1,842.916 hardships he endured. Capt. Cichards was in the 866,190 Albion at the battle of Algiers. He was long sta- 355,000 toned at Portsmouth in the Victory and Britannia, 1,204,118 and was flag-lieutenant to Admiral Bouverie when

300,000

£4,568,224

Or Dollars 21,670,054 This computation is probably still too high. According to Humboldt the total consumption of besides that of coinage, amounts to 17.436,400 Precious Metals in Europe for other objects Dollars, and adding to this amount 81,411,764-51 Rials for the consumption of America, the total less than the calculation of McCulloch, and no less sum would be $18,848,164, which is $2,821,889 than $8,919,541 under that of Mr Jacob.

MANILA.

We have much pleasure in translating and publishing the following communica- tion, from an intelligent foreign correspon- Whilst the amount of these Precious metals de- dent. We are truly glad to observe and creased, however, during the same 20 years, the commerce, wealth, civilization, and population of applaud any attempt to open up the abound- Europe had very much increased, and the lattering resources of the Phillipine Islands:- ascended to 190 millions in 1810, and to European arts and industry have hithertoo been 210 millions in 1880. The circulating medium almost unknown in the Philippine Islands. Of was augmented in that epoch, for reasons which late an attempt has been made to introduce them, we shall explain, in absolute quantity, at least 10 and it is much to be wished that this first enter per cent. Storck in correcting the calculations of prise may be sucessful, as if so, there is little doubt Humboldt, computes that the circulation of Metals that other individuals will be disposed to engage in Europe, which in 1815 amounted 1320 millions in undertakings, which may develop the great, but of dollars, in 1830 was increased to 1600; being very imperfectly known resources of these rich in a great measure on account of England with- Islands. drawing her Paper money, and resuming Cash Payments, and likewise through Russia, Austria, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and the United States having followed her example; besides the consumption of Gold and Silver wrought up into Plate, Jewels, and other artificial objects,-having considerably augmented.

France,

Switzerland,

An American named Mr O'Keating, has lately established in the environs of Manila,a manufactory of cables and cordage, from the Native Hemp, (Abaca) upon the most improved system, now in use in England and America.

After having passed several years at Manila, and collected all the information necessary for the execution of his project, Mr O'Keating returned to the United States, in order to procure the neces sary apparatus and machinery. He brought from Boston a high pressure steam engine of 30 horse power, with all the requisites for dressing The Hemp, and converting it into rope, The factory is situated on the banks of the Passig, near the village of Nactajan, about three miles from Manila. The first floor is occupied with the dressing machines, three of which are cylinders of covered with points of iron of about two inches rength, distant nom cach

superintendent of the dockyard.-Captain Peter Richards, of the Cornwallis, who was also honor- ably named in the Admiral's dispatches, was first lieutenant of the Queen Charlotte at the battle of Algiers, and served on shore at the attack upon Chinghae and Segahon, as well as at Chin-keang- affairs in China. He commanded a brigade of foo.-Captain Bourchier, c. B., has been in all the seamen at the capture of Canton, was engaged at

Amoy and Chinghac, and at the attack upon the Commander R. B. Watson was first lieutenant of camp at Segahon, as well as at Chin-keang-foo. the Calliope at the capture of the forts at the Boc- ca Tigris and Canton; commander of the Blen- heim at Amoy, and of the Modeste at Chinghae and Segahon.-Commander W. Maitland, who killed two mandarins at Chin-keang-foo, was first lieu- tenant of the Benbow at the attack upon Tortosa and bombardment of St. Jean d'Acre.-Lieut. W. T. Bate, who had the honour of capturing a Mandarine single-handed, was mate of the Blen- heim, and was wounded at Canton in 1841, and has served in all the affairs in China. Mr Bate was a son of the late Captain Bate, who died when Governor of Ascension.-Hants Standard. NORTH-EAST PASSAGE TO CHINA-In the great re- volution in nautical affairs. which by science and per- severance in exploring different parts of the globe is in course of accomplishment, it is extraordinary that the greatest maritime nation of the world has never yet directed its attention to a N. E. passage to China; in vain have individuals attempted for several successive years to explore a N. W. passage under those able navigators Parry, Ross, Franklin, Back, &c. Even the Russian-Government is at this moment organizing at St.. Petersburg a land expedition for exploring the whole of the northern coast of Siberia; simultaneous- ly with this enterprise, what a desirable opportunity now presents itself for her Majesty's government to send out a steamer from England to Archangel-there to fill up her coals, take in her pilots, and also scientific men! This, no doubt, the Emperor of Russia who has devoted a large sum of money for the purpose, would be very glad to avail himself of, and give the expedi would immediately proceed to Pickoron, and obtain tion every assistance. From Archangel the steamer fishermen and pilots to pass through Waygate Sound into the Nova Zembla Seas, and endeavour to double the Vostechroi Noss on the N. E. Cape of Russian Asia, lying in latitude 78 30 N. Once having round- ed this Cape, the coast suddenly branches to the S., and no doubt the navigation through the Archipelago of the Lend to being's Strands, is unway's more or less

Gold and Silver serve either for the use of coinage, or that of the Arts. We are quite at a loss to learn in what proportion they were applied to these objects, during the epochs given and as that proportion perpetually varied cumstances of each country as for exam their example, the large or small issues of Paper money, and the rate in which the use of the money is diminished, for the various methods which occur by Banks, &c, to economize the circulation, according to the great or small riches of the people, la moda en punto a aug and pine knowicage or prone security wineh was enjoyed at the moment, and by a thousand these first open the fibre of the Hemp, which then open and unobstructed in the summer, for it is well, other circumstances, all of which are subject to passes to another machine, under a cylinder of known that the Russian hunters, in their very defec great and repeated mutations. According to much larger diameter, of which the points (cards) tive bayards, or country boats made of hides, have na- Mr. Jacob, the value of Precious Metals which are much smaller, and placed close together.vigated that Archipelago and coast for upwards of 200 are annually destined for adornments and other These separate the fibres of the Hemp into a years. From Behring's Straits to Kamschatka, through objects of splendour, may be computed as follows: thread much finer, and divest them of the woody Perouse's Straits to Teentsin, Chusan, &c., could be Great Britain, 2,457,221 or useless particles. Both temp passes 1,200,000 After this preparation, the Hemp passes be- 350,000 tween two iron cylinders, which compresses it 1,805,499 very strongly, from thence it is conducted to a 287,280 smaller machine, which gives the first twist and winds it on a bobbin of about 6 inches diamater. The dimensions of the cord are increased or dim- inished by means of an iron screw, which adjusts the diameter of the hole (through which the fibres pass) to the required size. The Ropery is a building 800 feet in length, built entirely of American timber, with a shed at each extrhmity; in the one farthest from the house is the rack upon which the bobbins are ranged. Eight or ten bobbins of hemp suffice to make a cable of a large size, twelve or fifteen may be made at a time. The strings of the bobbins pass through round holes, pierced in a plate of brass, having an octagonal form fixed on another rack (ratelier) perpendicular to the line of the Ropery. The mass of strings or strands are united together by an iron hook, which is fixed on a carriage with a double catch, drawn by the steam engine of a railway. The Engine is high pressure on a con- struction remarkably simple.

The rest of Europe,

And that which is calculated for the same objects in America,

Strg. 5,900,000 Dollars, 27,764,705 705 The data on which this computation is founded, are in every way vague and unsatisfactory, so much so that it is necessary to look upon it as a mere conjecture.

M. Chabrol whose investigations are much more worthy of confidence than those of M. Chaptal, to which Mr. Jacob refers, calculates that the annual consumption of Gold and Silver in Paris, for the use of Works of Art, amounts to $2,910.400 every year; which corresponds with the elaborate calcu calculation of M. Benoiston de Chateauneuf. These two authorities agree that the cousumption of Precious Metals in Paris in objects of Art, is double that of the rest of France; so that we have for the consumption of the whole kingdom 4,365,000, that is to say, £338,810 Ster- ling the year less than the calculation of Mr Jacob, Persons who have good means of forming a cor- rect opinion on this point, assert that the quantity which Mr Jacob assigns for the consumption of

This manufactory was begun in May last. The article produced is very superior to that made by hand, and in strength and durability, there is no comparison between the two articles. It should be said that by this machinery the hemp is better

readily accomplished. Various circumstances for the last ten years would seem to favour such an enterprise for it is well known that immense icebergs for years past have drifted into the Atlantic. to the great danger of ships navigating those seas, and which would seem to portend some vast convulsion of nature in those northern regions; and it must be borne in mind, that in the summer months of those high latitudes there is twenty-three hours day-light, and generally speaking calm seas. The only difficulty to be apprehended for a steamer, would be in the Nova Zembla Seas, from about the latitude 74 N to the doubling of the N. E. Cape of Russian Asia [Velocktenoi Noss), in latitude 78 30 North; should, however, the steamer not think it prudent to venture round the Cape in one season, she might be usefully and expeditiously employed in exploring the mouths and delta of the great rivers Obi and Yenessey, and even take a trip to Tobolsk up the former river, and thence return through Waygate Sound to Archangel, in good time and season to return to England in the morth of October, but not later-or winter at Archangel, and commence operations in the spring as eaily as the season might permit them to do so. Should the above passage ever be brought into practical use for the purpose of navigation, it is neces- sary to bear in mind, that the distance from London by the above route to Pekin is in round numbers about 8,000 miles, while the distance, via the Cape of Good Hope, from London to Pekin is 26,000 miles, and it is superfluous to add that science would be immensely benefited by the accomplishment of such a desirable object-Cheltenham Chronicle.

B

M71

25

LARGAZIN

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, THE Brig "SNIPE" CAPT. W. W. FROST, will be despatched in few days. For freight apply to HUGHESDON, BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1813.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, The A. I. British built Barque "COLONIST," THOMAS LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named Ports in all April.-For Freight or Passage, JOHN BURD, & Co. apply to. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843.

FOR CALCUTTA TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AD PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig ALGERINE.." J. 3. Hill Com mander, will sail for the above name. ports in all April. For freight or passage apply to Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD. The fast sailing Ship "CAMATE," A. 1 for 12 years. Burilen 288 tons, (new measurement). CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR NON.

THE A. 1 British built Barque ARBERTON," Captain CATT. loads at Hongkong and Macro, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong. 15th February, 1843.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by

W. T. Kinsley.

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. FOR SALE. Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

landed ex JAGATRA

D. WILSON & CO. BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their Public that she will bring on a choice investment of Vessel the ALGERINE," beg to announce to the fancy goods of every description consisting of P'erfu- mery, Stationery, Cutlery. Hardware, Ironmongery, Drapery, Grocery. Preserved meats, Confectionary, Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes. Oilman's Stores. Wines, Beer, Spirits, Liqueurs &c., &c., which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices. N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes taking their regular supplies. AUCKLAND HOTEL, Hongkong. 30th March, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant For Charter, Freight or Passige apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus--Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao Hongkong. 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE.-- Goons and Merchandise of all descrip tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20 at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE,

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes. Hong-kong. April, 18th 1842.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just MR JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR. JOHN LEFF- LER, are duly authorized to sign for me, by Apply to Procuration, during my absence from China. HENRY PYBUS.

JOHN LEATHLEY. HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

FOR SALE.

P. Townsend & Co.

FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOKH" built by the same Builder as the Crles tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

Macno, 5th April, 1843.

FOR SALE. Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Ships. Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar ; just ar- rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road

ALSO

a Teak Built Copper fastened Gig 24 feet long, com For particulars apply to plete in every respect. Hongkong, 3rd March, 1843.

Beel

Tar

Rosin

BENNETT, PAIN & Co.

FOR SALE

Pork

Pitch

Mackrell in Kits

Navy bread

Flour

Negro-head Tobacco. Pilot bread

Soap

150 boxes of raisins &c. &c. These goods are just landed from the American vessels LARK and NAVIGATOR and are in prime con- dition Apply to G. F. DAVID 07. Hongkong; 7th March, 1843.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in

3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong 10th December 1842.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Chery Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders and a great variety of other articles.

Hongkong, 1st March, 1843.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET,

BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

ALSO,

Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per Package. Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE,

46, Queen's Road.

N. DUITS.

FOR SALE-At the Godown of the Undersigned just landed:

Port, Madeira and Sherry of really superior Quality, Bass's Beer in Hogsheads. Apply by letter to WILLIAM SCOTT.

WANTS A SITUATION.

A RESPECTABLE Young Man with a gool character, and has some knowledge of house building. Would be glad to meet with some employment of any kind where he could make himself useful.

Apply at the Office of this paper.

PUBLIS AUCTION Will be offered to the highest billers on Friday next. the 21st Instant, by BENNETT PAIN, & Co.. the following articles, viz: -

Yarls and Masts of all descriptions. Preserved Meats, Wines, Brandy, Cotton Wicks, Hardeware, &. anla variety of other Articles.

FOR SALE -The follow.ng goods: --Sillery Champagne, Claret, St. Julien, Sauterne, Superior Brandy, Gentlemen's Dress Coats, Gold Watches, Keys, Brooches, Pins, Silver Chains, Rings, and Seals. the best Cut Crystal Decanters. Claret, & Water Jugs of various elegant designs, a Musical Box with Apply to Mr Ad. Guillaine at the eight airs Auckland It. from 10 14. HAPS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hats, for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co, Hong-Kong. April 19th. 1843. NOTICE.

-

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Gods, riz: Hanging Lamps (of 4 Barners), superior Brandy, in one doz. cases, Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jans and Jellics in 1 doz. cases of half pins. pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses, Butter, fresh in Jars. Soups of all des criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels, American Beef and Pork in barrels, Manila Coffee, do. Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 doz. boules, Sardines in Tins, Split Peas. Westphalia Hums. Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions, Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Super- ior (in Loxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaning Twine, Canvass, Oakum, Tar Blacking. Rozin &, Coconut Oil, Linseed do. in Jars of 5 Gals., Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes, Yellow bar Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knifes and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices. Britannia Metal Tea Spoons. Cork Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large. Powder Flasks, Padlocks. Dressing Cascs, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks. Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage. BENNETT PAIN, & Co. Hong-kong. 15th March, 1843.

DIED.-On the 15th of April at the Morrison E-lucation Society's house in Hong-kong, JOHN ABBAGE, aged 3 months and 11 days, infant Son of BENJAMIN HOBSON, Esq., superintending the Medical Missionary's Hospital at this place.

Shipping Intelligence.

10th Urgent APRIL.

ARRIVED.

ני

13th Zoe

Thompson Miller

Macao

4th Qwera

White

Trong hung, araren 1st, 1843,

Venice

Torit

11

Athena

White

19

Wiil o'the Wisp

Walker

Sydney Whampoa Macao

11

Harlequin

Oliver

16

Herpn

Killick

Singapore

13

Edmonstone

18th Lark

Macdongal Tibbits

Macao

33

39

Sir E. Ryan D'Arcy

Anderson

Garrick.

Manila

SAILED.

APRIL

Champbell

14th Urgent

Thompson

33

Zoe

Miller

Whampoa Manila Whampoa

13

Marchioness Douro

Woodworth

17th Raymond

Mc. Kay

39

Omega

White

White Cromarty

Macdongal Oliver Digby

Chugan London Whampoa Macao Amoy Whampoa

Hongkong, 28th March, 1843. NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843. A CARD.

MR ALEXANDER BIRD, Accountant, first North-East House, Praya Grande, Macao. NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

REAL ESTATE AT AUCTION

THE PREMISES known as the AUCKLAND HOTEL, opposite Hong-Kong Market-Place The Building is 65 x 60 feet, two Stories, with offices in the rear; dimensions of Lot, 93 x 105 feet. It is considered the Also the BUNCALOW, on the Queen's Road, in the rear of Marine Lot, No. 46, with Well, and large offices, including Stable; dimensions ef Lot, 120 x 105 feet.

best situation in the settlement, for Hotel or Store.

The above-described Property will be Sold at Auction, on Saturday, the 29th instant, at 12 o'clock M., on the Verandah of the Auckland Hotel.

Terms at Sale,-For further particulars, apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE Hong-Kong, 10th April, 1843.

13th Culdee

18th Athena

11

Equestrian Edmonstone

19th Harlequin Susan

13

GOVERNMENT TENDER.

TENDERS will be received for the immedi- ate conveyance to Madras, of a detachment of Troops, consisting of one European Officer, and twenty-two men. For fur- ther particulars, apply at the Harbour Master's Office.

Hong-kong, 19th April, 1843.

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 68 VOL. II.

WONGBONG GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 27TH, 1813.

Pruet monthly

Or 12 yearly

Laborious and commercial people, as devoid of national demashes its consumption and this small measure of prejudices as any of the inhabitants of Europe and in good is fully counterbalance by the great encourage. ment which is held out to the banetai practice of whom you cannot discover, either the unsocialness of 6. Ihose who are even but slightly acquainted with

SOFTFEGATEON. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of tiocernment, the indoo, or the intolerant bigotry of the Mussulman sinuggling. will be discontinged from this date: but all be particularly forward, and while they crowd around China, will admit, that from the nature and im uense you, attempting hastily to drive them away, would length of its const, from the corruption of its officers. and the universal demand for pum, it is impossible

I must allow however that the lower classes seem to

public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of Chin and Hongkong Ga-probably be attended with unpleasant consequences.

zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robta Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hong Kong, March 23, 1842.

C. RONER'S INQUEST-APRIL 3, 1843. (Before Mr E. Farncomb, Coroner.) This was an Inquest held on the Body of a China- man who had been found on the shore near the Harbour Master's Wharf.

The Jury on being sworn proceeded to view the Body at the Harbour Master's Wharf. after which, on their meeting in the Court, the Coroner produced and read a certificate by Henry Holgate. Surgeon, which went to show that the deceased met his death by drowning, and no evidence appearing the jury were charged to give their verdict, which was as follows, namely Found drowned. There were severe bruises on the face and head of the deceased, which in the absence of evidence the Jury said they could not There were some suspicious papers found on the body, and the jury recommended that they should by sent to the Chief Magistrate for inspection, as thee might furnish some information.

account for.

APRIL 10TH-BEFORE THE SAME.

This was an Inquest held on the Body of a China. inan, who had been buried the day before, but was supposed to have met his death by violent means. On the Jury being sworn they proceeded to view the Body, after which, the following evidence was produced :-

James Donolly, a Policeman, says - Yesterday there was a letter sent from Mr Jamieson to Serjeant Collins of the Police respecting a dead Chinaman, and I was directed by Serjeant Colins to have the body buried, I found the body lying on the hill, at which I did. some distance above Messrs Jamieson, & Co's house swollen, there was also blood about the face. William Horley, Policeman, sworn, says-1 was directed by Major Caine to give notice to the Coroner about the Body, and I caused it to be disinterred by that Gentleman's order. I have heard that Mr Hight wrote to the Chief Magistrate, informing him that he saw some Chinamen dragging a Body down the hill Dear his house and he thought there had been a mur- der committed,-This is all I know of the case. William Lockhart, Surgeon, sworn, says I have seen the body and it appears to be that of a Chinaman www.wuch swollen and decomposed. having been dead should say about four or five ways: There were several marks of injury on the face and limbs but all apparently were caused after death, as if the body had been drugged along the ground. Decom- position was so far advanced that no opinion could be formed of thec ause of his death.-Verdict-" Found Dead."

It was covered over with matting and appeared much

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

[TO THE EDITOR OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA.] SIR,

1. As it appears to me desirable that the feelings of the people of Canton towards our countrymen, together with every other circumstance connected with the state of, that city should be made known, I send you the following remarks, with the view of contributing my share, however small, to attain that object. 2. Notwithstanding the events which have recently occurred, from the nature of our by-goue relations with the Chinese, I expected to undergo while visiting Canton, much of incivility from the people. For eigners are still prohibited from entering the City itself In walking along the streets of the Suburbs, some of the youngsters called out Fangu, and with a playful significance waved their little fingers

across their necks; this I believe is all I can justly complain of. The soldiers and petty-offi. cers pass you without notice, and the shop-keepers are unusually civil. In Europe this absence of all offensiveness would not excite comment, but when you recollect the unwearied efforts which the Pekin Government and its officers have made, to degrade Foreigners in the estimation of the inhabitants, and the equally unwraried submission by them to all that vili- fication, I confess, such quiet and orderly demeanor surprised inc. This peculiar race are essentially a

3. I was informed that the Troops stationed at that the Chinese Government could prevent the intro Canton are natives of the place, and that they are by duction of this article into the Empire. However no means a formidable body. those that I saw were obviously true this appears to us. it is probable that a poorly armed with bows and rusty match-locs considerable perind will elapse before it is generally Until these long-ta lel wariors are better ar ned, disci- acknowledged in China, unless soine means are devised plined, and commanded, all the fortifications which are to eniigaten those exercising authority there on ind being erected on the Chu Kiang would in the event of subject. The Pekin Government could easily obtain of another war, prove of little avail to them, tho' they a considerable reveie by taxing instead of prohib.ting certainly may be productive of a radiant shower of this article. Selfish considerations facilitate the ribbands and medals to others. This inefficient state of acquisition of knowledge. I would reconmen 1 that a the military is however a matter of serious consideration Chinese Paper be drawn, up, with the view of convin- for whatever may have been the origin of the tunult that cing the Chinese ministers. of the manifold advan- terminated in the destruction of the British factory. it tages of legalizing the trade in Opium- is uncertain whether they could have kept the peace 15th April, 1843. and dispersed the inob, not that this apprehension justifies the Provincial authorities, because even on the supposition that they acted with a timely vigilance, if the Military are ineficient. the fault rests with them.

EXTRACTS.

OBSERVER.

4. Adverting to that tumult I may state, that ! A CHINESE MART. consider a wise discretion was exercised in not precip. The Mai-mai-tchin is a small rectangularly-built itating us into a new war and that as the affair was commenced with moleration, I hope it will be con- hamlet, having two principal streets, which cross cach cluded with firmness. Pecuniary compensations will other at right angles, at the end of each of which is fully repair private losses, but I trust yet to see a a gate, looking towards the four points of the compass. public atonement made for the insult offered to our It is surrounded with a wooden wall, which is its only national flag. I do not require the punishment of a fortification. The streets are exceedingly narrow and few obscure individuals, but I would demand that the ill-paved. so that two camels can barely pass each high and responsible officers of government should be other as at Cairo; but there is a great difference in signally disgraced before the eyes of the whole Cantun the height of the houses of the two plaes. Here they are very small, all of one story, and of woool; the roof population, 5 Altho' the soldiery at Canton are un-warlike, the inostly of the same material, though the more inferior police are active and efficient, the Foreign Factories sort are covered with turt; they have no windows are for the most part closely surrounded with Chinese towards the street, and consist of two small rooms, one houses, yet they have been secure from robberies. of which serves for a warehouse and shop, the other The system of espionage is carried to such lengths in for the oecupant to live in. On the other side, the despotic states, and especially in China, that the wnidows are composed of oiled-paper, painted with Police can probably be brought to greater perfection in different devices, and sometimes of Russian tale. There is in general a great air of cleanliness, and the such countries. than where greater freedom prevails. turniture of the houses is often of a superior description. 10th of April, 1843. They are heated with stoves, like the Russian houses. which are needful, small as the apartments are, for the cold is very great, and in spite e all they are not well warmed. A great display is made of all the nonde- script articles they have for sale in the shop, and in [TO THE EDITOR OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA.] those of the higher class of merchants, there is great SIR, 1. In reflecting upon our future intercourse with order in stowing away their bedding and household China, the opium question presents many difficulties. furniture, all of which are in one common, sitting,

OPIUM QUESTION.

OBSERVER.

It is one of those thorny and unsatisfactory (except to eating and sleeping room. The number of the inhub. those who deal in it) subjects, which people willingly itants is about fifteen hundred, all males, no Chinese resign to the wisdom of authority, and sagaciously women being allowed to go there; a few common reserve their opinions, until the course of events Mongolese women are seen about, but not many.-Re- discloses the soundness or unsoundness of the policy collections of Siberia in the years 1840 and 1841, by pursued.

2. Legalizing the trade in Opium, would at once remove all difficulties, but as the most eonvenient things are frequently denied us in this world, we must nake what provision we cau against the more ugly alternative.

the Pekin Govern.

ment has an undisputable right to prohibit the trade in Opium, and every compulsory effort to contravene thus right, ought to be denounced by right thinking

men.

C. H. Cotterell.

ACADEMY OF SCIENCES, PARIS.-An interesting paper from M. de Humboldt was lately read. I informs the Academy that the prepa- ratory labours for cutting a canal across the 1sthmus of Panama are advancing rapidly. The commission appointed by the government of New Grenada for-the construction or u can to une terminated its examination of the localities, and has I admire the liberal and enterprising character The chain of the Cordilleras does not extend, as was arrived at a result as fortunate. as it was unexpected. of British merchants, many of them like those of supposed, across the Isthmus, and. on the contrary, a ancient Tyre, may well be ranked amongst the valley very favourable to the operation has been dis- honourable of the earth" But if any, under the covered. The natural position of the waters is also delusion that the true nature of their proceedings, is favourable. Three rivers, over which an easy control altered, by the magnitude of the scale upon which they may be established, and which may be made partially are carried on, seek the gain of illicit trade, and offend navigable, would be connected with the canal. The against the laws of the country where they will enjoy excavations necessary would not extend to more than fair commercial intercourse, I maintain that so noto.-124 miles in Ingeth. The fall may be regulated by rious and systematic smuggling, cannot be tolerated four double locks, 138 feet in length; and the total without setting at defiance every just idea of interna- length of the canal will be 49 miles, with a width of tional law. It cannot be expected that a fleet should 135 feet at the surface, and 55 feet base; the depth be kept up, to prevent British subjects from engaging will be 20 fect. The canal, when executed, will in this contraband traffic, and yet it will not suffice be navigable by vessels of from 1000 to 1400 tons. for the representative of the British authority, merely According to the estimate of M. Morel, a French en- to shew, that he has no concern or sympathy with gineer, the total cost of this canal would be only 14 these offenders, on a complaint being made by the millions of francs, including the purchase of two steam- Chinese Government, I do not see how they can ers.-Galignani's Messsenger.] escape punishment; without the slightest ill-nature I submit this consideration to their serious reflection. 4. Without entering into the history of this trade, I willingly acknowledge that I see no good reason to reproach those concerned in it, for what has hitherto occurred. The duties of nations are reciprocal, and the Chinese Government never would admit this prin- ciple. But the treaty has enjoined new duties on both nations, and the conduct of both must now be regulated by the rules of justice,

It is believed that Sir Henry Pottinger will not long remain in China. It is rumoured at the Clubs, that his Excellency considers his claim to distinguished honours to have been underrated.- Monthly Times.

A brother to Sir Henry Pottinger is to be ap- Much astonishment pervades the military circles pointed Consul-General at Hong-Kong-Ibid. at Lord Ellenborough ordering home the 26th regiment, when there are so many who justly claini precedence to that privilege.-Ibid.

5. While the penal consequences of being concerned in the smuggling of Opium, seem to me unavoidable, I should be happy to see the trade legalized; nor do I attach much weight to the objections against this traffic, arising from the nature of the drug itself. The circumstance of its being contraband, scarcely-Ibid.

Charles Norris, Esq., late secretary to the Go- vernment at Bombay, expired suddenly at his residence in Regent's Park, aged fifty-one years.

310

27

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS,The large amount of our out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith quidating our Claims, which, trifling as they are, individually,-yet, aggregately, amount to a consider

able sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PATER, if Frought to our notice we will cadeau to rectly. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, a try will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 27TH, 1843.

We hear that letters have been received from Chusan, by the Masdea, which men- tion the seizure, by it. M. senior Naval Officer, of three British Vessels that were trading at Woosung, which, it cannot be danied, is as much the Port of Shanghai, as Whampoa is that of Canton. It was on the ground, that said vessels were con- travening the Proclamation of H. E. the Plenipotentiary, of the 14th November, 1812, (vide our No. 36) that they were seized. As far as we can judge, there was no other course for a Naval Officer so cir- cumstanced to pursue, unless, forsooth, the the Proclamation we refer to, is to be con- sidered as nothing more than a piece of waste paper.

After the extraordinary decision in the case of Erans, r. Hutton, in the Court of Common Pleas reported in our 56 No, we should now hardly dare to affirm, that a direct violation of the Proclamation in question, would be held in England to render any ship, or cargo seizable. At the same time, the mature experience, and practical sagacity of H. E., and with his knowledge of the China Trade, leads us to think, that he would be the very last person who would issue a Proclamation he could not legally enforce.

Many persons whom we know, are ready and desirous of proceeding to the Northern Ports, and are only detained here by their respect for this Proclamation. We think it would certainly be too bad that all such should be damnified, for respectful obedi- ence to the commands of Her Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentiary. Yet, are they not so, if the conditions of the Proclama- tion be not strictly enforced?

We could only, in our last, call the attention of our readers to the remarkable Official Documents we then published. Even amidst the many claims upon the public attention at home, it is certain they will there create a sensation.

At the request of subscribers (themselves umpli- cated in a system they abhorred) we some months since publicly drew the attention of His Excel- Jeney to the doings in Canton River. ̈

In December last

these proceedings-" It is due to the Merchants to say, that they almost unanimously deprecate a sys- tem, which they hold to be discreditable, if not, disgraceful; but they allege they have been co- erced into it, by the force of competition."

It was then reported to us, but we did not avouch the fact [and it has since been contradicted] that it was the American Agents of the firm in question, who first adopted the system which has now called forth the strong official condemnation of H. E., Sir Henry Pottinger.

At the time we mention, our remarks gave great offence in certain quarters, and did not inconsider- ably diminish the list of our subscribers; all who then took umbrage we would now beg to re-peruse our remarks, and we ask, whether they be not tame and weak, en contrast with the indignant cen- sure with which H. E. has branded the proceedings at Whampoa?

We deeply regret that II. E. has deemed it necessary to use such strong language, and to threaten to publish the names of the parties impli- cated. Were he to proclaim the firm or firms which first embarked in this daring violation of the Chinese law, a large majority of the mercantile community would applaud the determination.

But the publication of the individuals imme- diately concerned in the system which has pro- voked the " unmitigated disapprobation" of H. E., would be proclaiming the names of every indivi- dual merchant, British or Foreign, now in China. We must repeat, that the Merchants, in justice to their constituents-in maintenance of their own positions, and the necessities of the times,

have been constrained to follow an example they loathed at heart.

the Port Dues in the Canton River, was one of the It is well known, that in general, the evasion of acts which called forth the reprehension of II E. In an extract from a Memorandum addressed by H. E., to the late Imperial Commissioner, Elepoo [vide our No. 46] it was well, and strongly put, that "In considering the anchorage and harbour charges, it is to be borne in mind, that the Govern- ment of China has hitherto done nothing towards facilitating commercial intercourse, by building Light-Houses, laying down Buoys or moorings, and erecting Beacons, and therefore it necessarily follows, that those charges should be exceedingly light."

The monstrous exactions on shipping in the Canton River have long been an acknowledged, and an oppressive grievance. The redundancy of tile marine, and the supposed early termination of, tonnage the wretched condition of our mercan- the old system-are strong grounds, we think [besides the weight of the above quotation] for the Merchants endeavouring, if possible, to save a heavy loss to the ship-owner, by getting rid of this flag- rant and long-complained-of exaction. Again, the delay's in the adjustment of the Tariff, &c., should unexpected demise of ELEPOO, and unavoidable plead, we would urge, as some apology for our Merchants striving to counteract the mischievous operation of the old system, which they all con- fidently counted, would, by this time, have been numbered among "the things that were."

the motives which prompted the communication to Every right-minded person, cannot but applaud KEKUNG, and the consequent PROCLAMATION of II. E. It must, also, be admitted, that it was very important at this juncture, that the Chinese Autho- rities should be fully assured that the British Go- course now pursued in the Canton River. Such vernment, neither connived at, nor approved the a disclaimer, on the part of II. E., would have challenged our humble, but hearty, commendation. Would that we could say thus much of the docu- ments under consideration; but we cannot, we are too much alive to the grave consequences which of the conduct of the whole mercantile community. may result from an official condemnation, by H. E. the Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British Such a condemnation, emanating as it does, from Subjects in China, forbids, we fear, that cordial co-operation and assistance, which it was expected would be gladly afforded by British Merchants, to E., in the adjustment of the pending negocia- wrong, but we are inclined to believe, that this tions for a Commercial Treaty. We may be news, when received at home, will beget the im- pression there, of the utter hopelessness of an early and satisfactory settlement of the most difficult [the Commercial] part of the CHINA QUESTION.

is passing around us; we also know H. E. has We may be imperfectly acquainted with what sources of information inaccessible to ourselves, and hence, perhaps, the justification for the strong animadversions which our lack of knowledge ren- ders us unable to appreciate or commend.

The conclusion of the Proclamation, gave us, we are constrained to avow, a bitter pang. We will not say what we have done and endured for the Island, but we shall quote this final paragraph "His Excellency further intimates, that such Smugglers, and their Boats and Vessels, will not receive protection in the Harbour or Waters of

If Hong-Kong be a Free Port, we have not, nor can we have Smugglers in it, so far as the British Government is concerned; and if our Port is to be FREE, not merely in name, but in fact, then, not the smallest impediment can be offered to the ingress and egress of Boats or Vessels laden with merchandize. We would not dogmatize in the teeth of the above declaration, but would respect- fully urge, that we think it is rather inconsistent with our recognized mercantile policy, and going a little beyond the requirements of international law, to enforce such hard conditions. strict fulfillment would be fatal to the best interests More, their of the Colony, and effectually extinguish its rising greatness.

Further, a like prohibition, if acted upon at Gibraltar, would annihilate the trade of that port. We say nothing of the direct encouragement of course of British policy, nor the establishments sinuggling which has hitherto characterized the which have been founded by our Government for the avowed object of affording facilities to contra- band trade.

We leave to others, to decide the moral and legal questions which, by the comity of nations, are involved,-åll we would say is, that the circum- stances (as far as we can judge from the facts before us) which have provoked the honest indigna- tion of H. E., are neither novel nor unanticipated. Smuggling to a vast extent, even of so bulky an article as Saltpêtre, has, by the confession of witnesses before the Committee of the House of Commons, on the Company's Charter, been in existence during the last twenty years. It was

explicitly declared, by competent authorities, that the illicit trade would inevitably, greatly increase. Company's servant, and long resident in China, One gentleman, Charles Marjoribanks, Esq., a went further, and avowed, that should the Com- pany's Monopoly be subverted-to quote his own words I think we should be all Sangglers in Chinatogether, and there would then be no legal trade in China." To this complexion, all acquainted with China, long since thought that it would come at last, owing to the EXACTIONS OF THE CHINESE, which, since the period referred to, have been greatly augmented.

We have deemed it our bounden daty to ex- press our opinions on these important documents, confident that our motives will not be mistaken nor misconstrued, yet, it may not be wholly inapt to cite a Despatch of Lord John Russell, to a Colo- nial Governor, wherein he urges the publication of lent recommendations, he adds, such a paper a Government Newspaper. Among other excel- should be " without passion or partiality in favour of the persons administering in the Queen's name." Acting in the spirit of this injunction, we have penned the foregoing remarks.

It is but justice to our contemporary of the Canton Register to state, that he, also, on one occasion, (Feb. 28) joined us in calling public attention to the "cunning smuggling trado in the Canton River."

Many inquiries have been made of us as to the term and tenure of the future holding of the land in Hong-Kong. Until the information called for in 1843, H. E. declines making the conditions known,' the Government Notification of the 10th April hence our inability to afford any authorized reply to numerous querists, who are deeply interested in the matter.

The latest Legislative Enactment which touches Stanley, which passed last Session, and although on the subject of Crown Lands, was that of Lord the peculiarities of our settlement wih necessitate important modifications, we are yet disposed to, think the main principles of this very useful Act will be adopted, and rendered applicable to Hong-Kong.

The Act we refer to, is the 5th and 6th of Victoria, Cap. 36, entituled "An Act for regulat- Crown in the Australian Colonies." ing the Sule of Waste Lands belonging to the declares that no land shall be alienated, except by It properly Sale, with the exception of such land as may be required for public uses, or for Military or Naval settlers, conformably with the regulations made in favour of such individuals.

schools, places of worship, and places for the En passant, we are glad to note, that sites for recreation and amusement of the inhabitants, as well as for their interment, are held to be in- cluded in the exception in favour of land for Public they have, we believe, been allowed to commute uses. With regard to Naval and Military settlers, their pay or pensions when purchasing Crown Lands in the Colonies. Lands are to be surveyed before being sold, and the Governor of a Colony is authorized to convey the lands. Quarterly sales by auction, are to take place, the same being duly place, particulars of the land, and upset prices. notified by public proclamation, with the time,

guished into three separate classes, viz.-Town, The lands offered for sale, are to be distin- SUBURBAN, and COUNTRY lots. The lowest upset price is

for the Governor to raise the upset price at his discretion, by proclamation, and he may name a different upset price for special Country Lots, as well as for, Town and Suburban Lots.

may be sold by private contract, at the upset price Land which has been refused at public auction, at which the same was last put up for sale.

down at the time of sale, in ready money, a The purchasers of lands are required to pay deposit fixed by the proclamation, as aforesaid, but it is not to be less than onc-tenth of the whole price. The residue to be paid within one month from the day of sale.

gration Commissioners, who are authorized to Payments may be made to the Land and Emi- thereof, are to be accepted as equivalent to the to grant Certificates; the production and payment amount of money for which the same shall have been given, in London.

to be the primary charge on the Land Revenues. The expenses of Survey, Management and Sale, The gross proceeds of Sales of Land, to be applied to the Public Service, and one-half to be appropri- ated to the purposes of Emigration.

we adverted to the future Land Regulations, and With regard to this Clause, in our No. 20 (when gave a copy of the Colonial Service Instructions and Rules) we pointed out to what a small extent such an appropriation would be needed in this Colony.

under existing Contracts are saved, we quote entire, The twentieth clause of the Act by which rights in order to remove erroneous impressions, which are too prevalent with respect to grants made prior to the formal cession of our Island. It says,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

China, and the Chinese, will prove that they are no more disaffected to the present dynasty, than we, as Englishmen, are to the House of Bruns wick. The lapse of years, and wise governmental institutions, have extinguished any aversion to the usurping Mantchoo's in China, as effectually as all affection for the expelled Stuarts in England.

and subjects of the same Emperor, it seems from Tartars and Chinese being equal before the law, all we can learn, that there is more of kindred feel-

24

NOTICE MR JOSEPH PYDUS, and Mr. JOHN LEFF LEI, are duly authorized to sign for me, by Procuration, during my absence from China HENRY PYBUS

Macao, 5th April, 1813.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, THE Brig "SNIFE" CAFT. W W. FROST, will be despatched in few days. For freight apply to HUGHESDON BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1813.

Provided always, and be it enacted, that nothing herein contained, shall affect, or be construed to affect any contract, or to prevent the fullfillment of any promise or engagement, made by, or on behalf of Her Majesty, with respect to any lands situate in any of the said colonies, in cases where such contracts, promises, or engagements, shall be made by, or on behalf of Her Majesty, with respect to any lands situate in any of the said Colonies, in cases where such contract, promises, or engagements, shail have been lawfully made before the time at which this Act shall take effecting, sympathy, and real union, between the two in any such Colony." races, than has unhappily subsisted between the natives of England and Ireland. In many parts of the empire, the distinction between a Tartar and a Chinese, is wholly unknown, except in the Gas- tronomical Manuals wherein directions are given for preparing sundry viands, (horse-flesh among LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named the number) a la mode des Tartares. Ports in all April.--For Freight or Passage, apply to. JOHN BURD, & Co. Hong-Kong, 13th April, 1843.

In connection with this subject, we would ven- ture to recommend that every endeavour be made to enable Hong-Kong to become a self-supporting Colony. Of course, the charge for Consular Esta- blishments would not form a part of the Island Expenditure, appertaining as it does, to the whole British Trade,

Seeing the desirability of constracting a road which shall make the complete circuit of the Island, also the speady erection of the Public Offices and Establishments, we think it would not be unwise or impolitie, to ask the Home Govern- ment to guarantee a Loan, which might be now raised in England, on very advantageous terms. The future Lard Fund would be an ample secu- rity for this Loan, and for its ultimate redemption by a Sinking Fund.

During the last Session, an Act was passed authorising for Public Works, a sum not exceed ing £1,500,000 to be advanced by the Home Go- vernment, to Canada, at five per cent. interest. The first series of this Loan, amounting to £300,000 was, by the last accounts, taken by one individual, at £108 for £100 of four per cent. Stock; so that the Government have £21,000 towards a Sinking Fund to begin with, besides £3000 per annuni difference in the rate of interest for their guarantee.

The undeniable security of our Land Fund, putting aside the strong claints of Anglo-Chinese commerce, will, we have no doubt, induce the Home Government to neglect no opportunity to promote the true interests of Hong-Kong, identical as they are with the legitimate extension of British influence in China.

On these grounds we should say, it is indeed important that Hong-Kong should be rendered not merely a healthy, but a desirable place of residence for British subjects, who will be compelled to resort thither as the focus and centre of a large commerce, which cannot but be called into exist ence by the late Treaty.

We may further say, that the present flourish- ing state of the city of Ningpo, contrasted with its wretched condition when abandoned by us is a striking evidence of the just confidence the Chinese people have in their own government. We are glad to learn that the dilapidated houses and public Buildings there, have been already restored alacrity and cheerful obedience with which these restorations were made, excited much surprise in the foreign beholders who were unacquainted with the habits of this singular people.

The

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, The A. I. British built Barque COLONIST," THOMAS

FOR CALCUTTA TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AND PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig ALGERINE," J. M. Hill Com- mander, will sail for the above name d ports in all April. For freight or passage apply to

Hongkong, 30th March, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER TO ANY PART OF THE WORLD. The fast sailing Ship "CAMATE," A. 1 for 12 years. Burthen 288 tons, (new measurement) CAPTAIN CLUCAS. JAMIESON, HOW, & co.

defects which undeniably exist in the institutions Without shutting our eyes to many obvious of China, we are yet constrained to confess, (with the best informed, and those who have long lived in the country) that if the greatest happiness of the greatest number, be the aim and end of a good government, then, do we see in Pagan China, a better practical exemplification of a good govern Hongkong, 15th March, 1843. ment, than is anywhere exhibited throughout the length and breadth of Christian Europe, or British India.

We are glad to learn that proposals for establishing an Exchange, and also a Sub- scription Reading-Room, are in circulation. We are told the number of Subscriber's names already received, warrants the ex- pectation of the full success of the latter part of the undertaking, and with respect to the former, we hope soon to see a begin- ning, and moreover, the early establish- ment of a Chamber of Commerce, which is confessedly much wanted in China-if its non-existence be not a reproach to our mercantile community.

We are much obliged to our Correspond-

It is much to be lamented that a plan of the future City, had not been made and authoritatively determined, before a single brick was laid. Hap- pily matters have not so far advanced but that we may yet hope to see a town, which may be as ent at Canton, for his full and circumstan- remarkable for its convenience and beauty, as it tial detail of details of the Chow-Chowing, will be for its commerce and wealth. To do this, which has been going on at Canton, and it is, we hold, imperatively neccessary that a public Whampoa. Quay or Wharf (like the Praya Grande at Macao) should occupy the Sea Front. Every maritime town founded in modern times. whether it be in Australia, New Zealand, or America, uniformly preserves a public quay and road along the shore, The convenience comfort health and an, are denentted by such an arrangement.

We should do our Correspondent in- justice, were we to curtail his narrative, and its length precludes its present inser- tion. The very interesting information

therein contained we

ourselves of on a future occasion.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. I British built Barque

ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to JAMIESON, HOW & Co. Hongkong, 15th February, 1843.

A CARD. MR ALEXANDER BIRD, Accountant, first North-East House, Praya Grande, Macao. NOTICE, Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley. Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

FOR SALE.-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of Hongkong, March 21st, 1843. P. TOWNSEND & Co.

Shin Chandlow

Ships.

FOR-SALE---------

P. Townsend & Co. GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD.

More, we would require that all buildings which We are sorry to hear so bad an account should face the public quay, or wharf, should be of IMPORTS. Nothing, it appears, is now erected in conformity with a plan préviously selling but the low numbers of Cotton-Twist sanctioned. Such stipulations are now made in and also Iron. Opium, too, is drooping; local improvement acts, and their public utility so yet, owing to the scarcity of good Malwa well recognised, that further remark is unneces- and time bargains, it was run up in two Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per Package.

sary.

It is amusing to note the very absurd opinions which are circulated by our Indian contempo- raries with respect to China. Our readers will be astonished to learn, according to a respectable Calcutta paper, that" we have struck a blow at the despotism of the Chinese Government, from which it will never recover." Further, 'that "Disaffection to the present dynasty is believed to be rife in China, more particularly in the Central Provinces, and a very slight affair may blow the smouldering heat into a flame."

As to the first allegation, it is wholly incorrect, although it is true, that in the Canton River, and in the vicinage of British Shipping, the Chinese Authorities tolerate much, that could, and would, be immediately suppressed by them, but for at mistaken apprehension, that umbrage would be taken by the British Government at their interfer- ence. Nowhere else, are the bonds of social order loosened, nor the salutary restraint of the laws unfelt.

THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO, Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE,

landed ex JAGATRA

46, Queen's Road.

days, from $530, to $580, and $585, is from the North, and up-country, are not so now the rate, but no demand. The accounts FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just good as they have been of late. It is expected the arrival of the Compton and the Anonyma, would depress prices. Cot- ton, hardly ever was so low.

TEAS are still looking up, which, in the face of the heavy Export, was not gene- rally anticipated. A common Congou, fresh and new Bohea kind, is worth 19 taels, and anything like "Blackish Leaf," will bring 22 taels.

It is stated in India, that Mahommed Akbar Khan, is Lord of the ascendant at Cabul, and that he is about proclaiming a Jahad, or Holy War against the Pagan Seiks, with a, view to recover the territory

Apply to JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hongkong, 10th December 1842.

REAL ESTATE AT AUCTION THE PREMISES "known as the AUCKLAND HOTEL, opposite Hong-Kong Mark et-Place rear; dimensions of Lui, 93 x 105 feet. It is considered the The Building is 65 x 60 feet, two Stories, with offices in the best situation in the settlement, for Hotel or Store. of Marine Lot, No. 46, with Well, and large offices, including Stable; dimensions of Lot, 120 x 105 feet.

Also-the BUNGALOW, on the Queen's Road, in the rear

The above.described Property will be Sold at Auction, on

With regard to the second statement, it is only wrested from the Doorannee Monarchy, by Saturday, the 29th instant, at 12 o'clock M., on the Verandali

the revival of a popular error, which long since the late Runjeet Sing. The Ex-Ameer ought to have been consigned to the tomb of all Dost Mahommed, seems very loath to trust the Capulets. The smallest acquaintance with himself in the power of his son.

of the Auckland Hotel.

Terms at Sale,-For further particulars, apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE

9

Hong Kong, 10th April, 1843.

29

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission. G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE. American Beef and Pork, Negro.head Tobacco, Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels.

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole Barrels.

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER NAVIGATOR.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry; in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars.

Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1943.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE ON BOARD THEMOFFATT." Port Wine in 3 doz Cases. Sherry Wine in do.,

Brandy per doz. or gallon, London (ld Tom per doz., Champagne in do, Superior Fine Biscuit in tins, English Cows in Milk, (thorough-bred Devon] imported by the above ship; Prime Irish Butter in excellent state being, in double packages.

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

FOR SALE, BY THE UNDERSIGNED. American Flour,

Do Cabin & Ship Biscuit

Do Beef and Pork,

Bengal Rico

Manila Patent Cordage,

Seidlitz Powders,

Gunpowder, Coarse

Paint Oil,

Paints, of Sorts,

Turpentine,

Tar.

Pitch,

Rosin,

Paint Brushes,

Twine,

Cigars, No. 3 & 4, Oakum,

Do Rope,

Do

Chocolate,

Do

Rum

Do

Do

Coffee,

Do

Cocoanut Oil,

Brandy,

"Ciin,

Sherry,

Port,

Liqueurs,

Cherry Cordial,

Jams and Jellies,

Dutch Cheeses, Corks, Sardines,

Canvass,

Soap,

Sperm Candles,

Copper Boat Nails Foolscap & Writing Paper, Dinner Sets,

Cutlery and Hardware, American Drill,

And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Piuts, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843.

For Sale at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods Viz.

Anchors of all Sizes.

Chain Cables,

Manila Segars, 4: Superior,

do. do. 4: Fine equal to 3rd Superior

Superfine Blue cloth,

Ladies Muslin dresses of all colours,

Silks, Satin and Straw Bonnets,

Stout and Patent Leather Shoes,

Sewing Cotton of all numbers,

Black Silk Stockings,

White coloured and Fancy Soeks,

Regatta Shirts,

Duck and Fancy Trowsers,

Dress and Shooting Coats.

Woollen Caps, and Striped Ginghams for Shirtings,

Bengal Towels,

Copying and writing ink,

D. WILSON & CO. BEING in daily expectation of the arrival of their Vessel the "ALGEKINE," beg to announce to the Public that she will bring on a choice investment of fancy goods of every description consisting of Perfu- mery. Stationery, Cutlery, Hardware, Ironmongery, Drapery, Grocery. Preserved meats, Confectionary, Medicine, Glass and Earthenware, Brushes. Oilman's Stores. Wines, Beer. Spirits, Liqueurs &c., &c, which they will offer at the lowest remunerating prices.

N. B. Liberal Credit and the usual Discount given to Messes

taking their regular supplies.

AUCKLAND HOTEL.

Hongkong. 30th March, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LoRCIA, well manned

and armed, and Commanded by an European. will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843- NOTICE.-Goons and Merchandise of all descrip.

FOR SALE-The following goods: --Sillery

ampagne, Claret, St. Julien, Sauterne, Superior Brandy, Gentlemen's Dress Coats, Gold Watches, Keys, Brooches, Pins, Silver Chains, Rings, and Seals, the best Cut Crystal Decanters. Claret, & Water Jugs of various elegant designs, a Musical Box with eight airs Apply to Mr Ad. Guillain at the Auckland Hotel. from 10 to 4.

AUCTION.

ON MONDAY next-a quantity of FANCY ARTICLES Sale to commence at Eleven o'clock precisely. P. TOWNSEND. & Co. Hong-Kong, 27th April, 1843. HATS--Fine English mad Black Beaver Hats, for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co. Hong-Kong. April 19th 1843.

FOR SALE. -The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA

Rook" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentlegian as a pleasure boat

BENNETT PAIN, & Co, Hong-Kong, 3rd March, 1843. NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods, riz:-

in one doz. cases. Gin Schiedam do. Beer and Porter, Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality Jams and Jellies in doz. cases of half p'nts, pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses. Butter. fresh in Jars Soups of all des. criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels. American BEEF, [ec American Barque "LARK"] also Pork, in barrels, Manila Coffee, Manil Chocolate. Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 dozen

tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate tern:s. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre-hottles, Sardines in Tins, Split Peas. Westphalin mises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macac Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE,

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread] will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.-

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes. Hong-kong, April, 18th 1842.

FOR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar- rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to N. DUUS. FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

NOTICE-ENGLISH NEWSPAPERS Printed by Messrs Galignani, rue Vivienne, PARIS, [Orders to be accompanied by a bill payable in London or Paris.] GALIGNANIS MESSENGER.-A daily Politi cal Journal. The object of this well-known Journal is to supply the reader with a SUBSTITUTE FOR THE EN- TIRE OF THE ENGLISH AND FRENCH NEWSRAPERS. Con- ducted on a system of undeviating impartiality, the sentiments of every party, Ministerial and Opposition, find their place in its columns.

In the English Department will he found the leading articles of the Tory, Conservative, Whig, and Radical journals. A prominence correspondent with their vast importance is given to the parliamentary debates. In In addition to all news of fashionable or general interest, the proceedings at the India House, and every subject important to Eastern subscribers. is specially attended to. The French Department contains (in a special ar- proceedings of the French Chambers; the fashionable and local news of Paris, Stocks, etc.; the earliest infor. mation from Spain, Switzerland, Italy and Ger-

Best double distilled Lavender water with Glass Stoppers ticle) the political sentiments of the Paris press; the

by Smith & Co.

Needles of all Nos.

Eau de Cologne.

Fancy quilling for Gents, Vests and Childrens Frocks, many, Russia, and all other parts of the Continent.

Plain and figured Jean and drillings,

Figured Fannel for Ladies winter dresses,

T

Duet Black Load Pencil

Fresh Table Raisins,

• Copper Kettles horn Lanterns and fish Boilers, Spermecete candles, Pad Locks, Powder Flasks, Vices, Chisels, files &c. &c. &c.

C

Dutch Blankets, Persian Carpets, &c. &c. Best Brandy, Sherry, Gin and Beer &c. &c. &c. Hongkong, 25th Jany, 1843 G. MOSES, & Co. Queen's Road.

Terms of Subscriptions: (Payable in advance) One Year, £5. 10s; Six Months, £2. 17s.

THE LONDON AND PARIS OBSERVER, Journal of Literature, Science, and Fine Arts.-This Journal, published every Sunday, consisting of forty- eight columns of closely-printed, matter large 4to. (al. most the matter of an octavo volume), contains the élite of all that is intellectual, useful, or recreative, in more than TWENTY London Quarterly, Monthly, and Weekly Publications."

Terms of Subscriptions :-(Payable in advance) One year £2. 10s., Six months £1. 7s. !

Hains Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do.. Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces. Superfi e Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats. Buck-skin Gloves. Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions, Manila Cigar Cases. Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Super- ior (in boxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaming Twine, Canvass, Cakum, Tar Blacking. Rozin &c., Coconut Oil, Linseed do. in Jars of 5 Gals.. Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes, Yellow bar Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knives and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains. Dinner services of prices. Britannia Metal Tea Spoons. Cork Screws. Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large. Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks. Fancy Lace. Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage, BENNETT, PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR SALE-SCOTT & Co's BENGAL DIRECTORY, for 1843: price, Spanish Dollars 4. Apply to

Macao, 18th April, 1843.

JNO SMITH.

FOR SALE Ship Chandlery, Cables and Stores of all de cripus Port whites, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale Cruthung, and Beaver Hats, Apply to

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVED.

Carr Lakeland

APRIL 22nd Vixen 23rd Ina 24th H. C. Str. Phlegethon Mc.Cleverty n Gazelle

13 Edmonstone

21 H. M. S. Harlequin 25th Caledonia

39 Zoe

26th Algerine

APRIL.

20th Sir E. Ryan

Arun

Macao Whampoa Macao

Macdougal • Chusan Cunningham Whampoa Miller Macao Hill

"1

19

SALLED.

Anderson Killick.

21st H. C. Str. Phlegethon Mc. Cleverty Surrey

21

24th H. M. Str. Vixen

31

H. M. S. Wanderer

Naylor Boyce Seymour

25th Colonist

Leiske Carr

21

Vixen Gazelle

Macao

31

Chusan

Southward Macao

East Coast REPORTS Edmonstone, for Madras in a few days; the Zoe, this day, for Chusan, and H. C. Str. Phlegethon is expected to leave for Calcutta soon after the Receip of the Feby. Mail.

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Muster.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND U O

No. 59 VOL. II.

LONGBONG

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 4TH. 1823.

NOTIFICATION. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official.

By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hong-Cong, March 23, 1842. GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

86

Price monthly Or 128 yearly S

Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two irom loss of blood from the large Axillary blood Kwang," &c., &c., has the honour to inform vessels.-Verdict--Wüful Murder against ..hung. Her Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentiary, that, on the 23rd instant, he received a Despatch from the Ministers of the Grand Council of State, covering a Copy of Imperial Commands, received by the Cabinet on the 6th of April, 143, and which are of the following terms:-

44

46

APRIL 28TH. BEFORE THE SAME. who had been killed on the night before, in the Bazaar This was an inquest on the body of three Chinamen behind Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co.'s Godow is.

The Jury proceeded to the view. Mr. C. W, Bowra was sworn as interpreter to the Court.

"Let Ke Ying be made Imperial Commis- sioner, and let him proceed with all haste, by Chariem, a Lascar sworn, says-This morning "Post, to Canton, to inquire into, and conduct at a quarter past one I was asleep in my house, at the "affairs there. Of the Viceroyship of the Two back of Jardine & Matheson's Godown, I was awoke by Kwang, let Pichang take acting charge; and till the report of fire arms, when I heard the firing I ran "such time as Pichang shall reach that post, let out to assist the Sejoys, who were on duty in the "San Shenpao be temporarily entrusted with the Bazaar behind the Godowns. On arriving at the Bazaar I met a Chinaman, who attempted to stab me with a spear, I then fired a l'istol at him, but missed him-I saw 3 or 4 of the Robbers entering the door of a house inhabited by Jardine, & Co's Comprador, when retreated behind one of the Guns and reloaded my Pistol, as the Robbers were going off with the booty and the Sepoys fired, and the men fell near the door.

"care of its duties."

RESPECT THIS.

(A most necessary Communication.)

It becomes, then, the Governor-General's duty With reference to the Proclamation of to send, with due respect, a Copy of these Com- the 15th ult, on the Sabject of Snuggling mands to the Honourable Plenipotentiary, request- in the Canton River, His Excellency Siring that he will take the trouble to exainine, and Henry Pottinger, is pleased to publish the act accordingly. following Communication irom His Excel- lency Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two Kwang. By order, RICHARD WOOSNAM. Government House, Hong-Kong, 1st May, 1843.

Ke Kung, a Guardian of the, Crown Prince, a President of the Board of War, Governor-General of the Two Kwang, &c., hereby makes this Com- munication in reply.

I have this instant, received the Honourable Plenipotentiary's Communication of the 14th day of the 3rd Moon, (13th April 1843) which I per- fectly understand, and by it may be seen, the Hon- ourable Plenipotentiary's most praise-worthy inten- tions to maintain peace and harmony.

To

SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., H. B. M.'s Plenipotentiary. Taoukwang, 23rd year, 3rd Month, 24th day. (23rd April, 1843.) True Translation. (Signed)

J. ROBERT MORRISON, Chinese Secretary & Interpreter. NOTE-Pichang was long at Yarkand, and has been recently appointed to command the Tartar Force at Fuchow, but has not yet gone thither. Shun Shenpao, is Governor of Kiangsoo, at Soochow.

True Copy.

[Signed] J. R. M.

RICHARD WOOSNAM. INQUEST-29TH APRIL, 1843.

The Robbers when they found that some of their companions were wounded, carried away 2 of them with the. As they were carrying them off I saw a man staggering, and having lost the ramrod of my pistol I could not re-load, so I went up to the man and knocked him down with the butt end; in kuocking the man down 1 happened to fall on him, and a Sepoy who was with ine secured the man. As we were tying the man, one of the Robbers ran past us, on which the Sepoy fired at him and shot him in the shoulder. I and the. Sepoy dragged two of the men who were shot up to the house, and gave them some water, and at about an hour after they expired. As the Robbers were going away I heard a shot fired, the shot was fired from a window in the Bazaar.

Richard Fry, a Serjeant of the Ninty-eighth Regi. morning, and went to the window of the house where ment, sworn, says-I was awoke at one o'clock this I was staying that night, in Jardine and Matheson's Bazaar, the window was open, and I saw a number of Chinese armed with weapons resembling boarding pikes, I saw them break open the door of the house opposite, and on this I went into a back room and took a musket which I knew was loaded, and when I As to the Hoppo's Clerks and followers receiving came to the window I saw 3 or 4 of the Robbers inside Bribes to connive at Smuggling, it is, I really fear, of the house, and one of them in the act of breaking difficult to guarantee, that such is not the case, (Before Mr E. Farncomb, Coroner,) open a locker or drawer in the inner part. The and I, the Governor-General, have communicated This was an Inquest on the body of a Chinaman. Robbers had thrown a fire-ball into the house which the same to His Excellency, the IIoppo, that, by The Jury on being sworn proceeded to the view. The made it quite light, so that I could see everything that some examples of severity, he may cleanse out this Rev. Mr Dean was sworn as Interpreter to the Court. was going on quite distinctly; I then fired my musket fountain of evil. As regards the English Mer- Hoken--A Chinaman, being a Christian, was sworn at a Robber who was breaking oper. the locker, and chants, no doubt there are good and upright men on the Holy Bible, says-Ahung the man who com- be then fell; the flash from my musket attracted the among them; but yet, it is to be feared, that out of mitted the deed had for a long time behaved ill to attention of the Robbers, and one of them then made every ten of them, there may at least be one or Atay, and yesterday morning he had accused him of a thrust at me with a spear through the venetians, I two given to deceit. The Honourable Plenipoten- defrauding him of money; after some altercation then went into the inner room, re-loaded my musket, tiary, for his part, gives no protection or encourage the deceased hearing of the affair, went down and when I returned to the window I found they were ment whatever, to Sinuggling, and 1, the Gov- by the request of Atuy to assist in adjusting the retreating down the Bazaar, I then fired the musket ernor-General, never had the smallest suspicion matter. On proceeding to the place, near Mr Gil. and shot another as he was running away under the that he did so, still, it is difficult for a single person lespie's, Alung accosted the deceased in abusive verandah of the house opposite. The men who to oversee so much, and if, perchance, his super- language, and wanted to know the reason why he had were shot were not quite dead when they were vision is not perfect, there will be less or more of come down there, after this a struggle ensued, and brought back to the house by the Lascars, but died Smuggling; so I must, as before, beg of the Hon-dong stabbed the deceased with a knife, when the shortly after; the man that was shot in the house, house, and went a short distance up ourable Plenipotentiary, that the two countries deceased fell, Ahung fled, Aty pursued him, Ahung crawled out of being now united in friendship, he will be more turned back and struck him with the knife, and cut the Bazaar, when Ire would proceed no further. The his face open; I do not know where Akung bas con brat man was shot with a bullet and the her with zher the "aftercation the deceased laid hold of bigs and shot mixed. The length of time that elapsed from the time that I first saw the Robbers to their running away, was about 5 minuits I think. Two Chinese Watchmen endeavoured to seize some of the Robbers, but did not suceed. The Comprador whose house was attacked, told me there had been 284 Dollars stolen and 9 catties ef Opium The third Robber who was shot was found in the upper part of the Bazaar. When I went into the Shop I found it on fire-On my return I found the 3 bodies tied together -Two persons who were in the room of the house opposite with me, saw the two Robbers whom I shot at fall.,

stringent than ever in his curasing

English Merchants should not be permitted to listen to the seductions of the Hoppo's Clerks and followers, to league with them in evading the Duties; and now that we are engaged in consult- ing about a Tariff of Duties, I still more dévoutly hope, that the Plenipotentiary will come forward with a plan of Rules and Regulations to be in- scribed in our Code as a lasting guide, how that we may act together in searching and preventing

such abuses.

For this I now reply, and avail myself of the opportunity to wish your Excellency all health and happiness. To His Excellency

SIR HENRY POTTINGER. Bart., G. C. B., H. B. M's Plenipotentiary.

Taoukwang, 33rd year, 3rd Moon, 17th day.

6th April, 1843.) True Translation. (Signed)

True Copy.

R. THOM, Joint Interpreter.

RICHARD WOOSNAM

The following Communication, from His Excellency Ke Kung, Governor-General of the Two Kwang, is published for general information.

By order, RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Government House, Hong-Kong, 1st May, 1843.

LOO

Ahung to give him in charge of the Police, And Ahung then drew his knife and stabbed him; 1 do not know where the man got the knife from; it was a long straight knife and very sharp. The affray took place about sun set yesterday. Atuy on being struck fell, Ahung then fled, I witnessed the whole affair, I do not know how often the deceased was struck, I think that the deceased was not aware that Ahung had a knife, after the deceased fell he could not speak, and I went away to give information, and when I returned deceased was dead. Neither Atuy or myself had any weapon, I thought I could render no assistance to the deceased when I found that the blood was flowing so copiously from the wound,-the affair took place near a Mat Shed at a small distance from the road.

Atuy the person wounded not being able to give his evidence verbally, on account of his mouth and face being dreadfully cut, admits the truth of the above

evidence

Yu, a Chinaman, (sworn by cutting off the cock's head) says-I was at work on the road hear where the affair took place, and hearing that a mun had been killed, I went to the place, and found the deceased already dead, I did not see Ahung, I know nothing more about the matter.

W. Lockhart, Surgeon, sworn, says-I examined the Body of a Chinaman this morning, and found a punc tured wound on the back part of the left shoulder, and inches deep, extending from behind the bone of the on enlarging the orifice I found the wound to be four Arin into what is called the Axillary space, wounding the large blood vessels in the neighbourhood; there was a small skin wound on the fore arm of the same side, also a cut above the right wrist, wounding a part of the radial artery; my opinion is that the deceased died

Ahoy, a Chinaman, sworn, says-I am Purser to Messrs Jardine, Co.'s Comprador. The goods in the Shop belonged to the Comprador-About half past one this morning heard a noise outside the door; [ thought some Thieves were coming. They broke open the door, and I then ran up stairs and fastened the trap door, I afterwards heard 2 guns tired. When the Robbers had gone away I came down, and found the door broken open and the Shop on fire-I then got water to put the fire out-There were 3 dead men lashed together outside the door.

Wm. Lockhart, Surgeon, sworn, says-I examined the bodies of 3 Chinamen, each having severe shot wounds on the head and trunk, and it is my opinion that their deaths were caused from the effects of the wounds.Verdict-Justifiable Homicide.

-7

The Smuggler bold,

Risks Life for his Gold;

If he meets the Excise,

Why-their courage he tries.

In defence of his Lace, or his Leno.

But for him who o'er tops,

The Consoo with falso chops,

And is not over nice

About cargoes of Rice,

The best advocate truly is NEMO.COMMUNICATED,

100

10

32

L

. 31

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our || out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our Claims, which, trifling as they are individually,-yet, aggregately, amount to a consider

able sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PATER, if brought to our notice we will endeav, ur to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 4TH, 1843.

We have only just time to call the atten- tion of our readers to the Government Announcements in our first page. Whilst it is satisfactory to observe the cordial and friendly tone of KE KUNG's reply, it yet behoves us to note the assumption on his part that it is the duty of H. B. M's Plenipotentiary to repress Smuggling If the London Papers are to be believed, (vide the Extract in our No. 55) a Govern- ment Interpreter boasts he has been able to make the Chinese High Authorities comprehend the theory of modern Political Economy, as laid down by Mr Mc Culloch. If this be true, another, we think, might be well employed in explaining to them our inter-national law, in which case they would recognise the expediency of Euro- pean nations repudiating all Governmental interference in mutual fiscal regulations. We would respectfully urge that this point cannot be rendered too obvious, and much future mis-apprehension may be avoided by this principle, now being dis- tinctly understood & acknowledged by the

Chinese.

It would not surprise us should the Chinese Authorities hereafter aver, that H. E. has the ability and the power to supress the illicit trade. Every manifesta- tion of H. E.'s will in his intercourse with them, has been backed, by an irresistible force, and reasoning, analogically it must be hard for them to believe that H. E. cannot restrain a few merchants, a class, too, which the Chinese uniformly affect to despise.

We need not parade the authority of Political Economists or Statesmen, to prove that smuggling is the offspring of the rapacious fatuity of the governors, rather than of an "ignorant impatience of taxation" in the governed. The late emi- nent Mr Huskisson's eloquent appreciation of smuggling. on proposing, his "Free Trade" measures, is well known.

Sir Robert Peel's exhibition in the House of Commons last Session, of some smuggled goods, so ingeniously introduced, as to afford the most valid arguments for RE- VOCED DUTIES, Must be fresh if the reconec tion of our readers. Thus it is, in the admirable fitness of things, that even the self-interest and avarice of individuals sub- serve the general good.

but the best authorities we have consulted, vari- ously affix it at some fifteen to twenty millions of souls.

Late events in China, have at last had the effect of directing public attention at home to the East- ern Archipelago, and it is hoped that measures will now be taken to extirpate the Pirates, who have so long infested those seas. At the same time, we hope every effort will be made to extend the British Trade in that very interesting locality. Mr. Earle deserves much credit for his exertions in endeavouring to awaken, in influential, quarters, a sense of the importance of those Islands for Com- mercial objects. He has been well seconded by Honourable mention should also be made of Mr. Brooke, whose recommendation of founding a Set- tlement in Borneo, we hope yet to see adopted. We have before Brought to the notice of our readers the views we entertain on this subject, and we do not now deem it necessary to go into a lengthened detail. We may, however, say, Great Britain, by extending her influence in this quarter, would materially benefit the native popu- lations, who are mostly addicted to commerce, and many of which are quite alive to the advantages accruing from the protection and security afforded by the British Flag. Any estimate of the population of those almost unknown Islands, inust be purely conjectual;

that

C

It is certain we shall soon be better acquainted with this long-neglected part of the world. What was denied to the claims of philantrophy and com- mon sense, will be extorted by national jealousy, and hence we rejoice at the occupation of the Marquesas Islands by the French, as it will com- pel our Government to take requisite measures to prevent the predominance of French influence in

the Eastern Seas.

By the way, we learn that a Bishop of the Mar- quesas Islands has been appointed, who, with a band of Ecclesiastics, has already sailed from France. The Catholic world, it is expected, will receive a large augmentation in the Eastern Archi- pelago from the devoted zeal of its Missionaries, a large number of whom have dedicated themselves to the holy work of converting the heathen; they have our best wishes and prayers for their full success.

The growing importance of our Colonies in Australia and New Zealand, with the early pos- sibility of the completion of a Ship Canal across the Isthmus of Panama, and the adoption of that route to and from the Mother Country, has led, it is alleged, to the present occupation of the Mar- quesas Islands by the French Government.

The advices report favourably of the We demand for British Manufactures. regret to hear the demise of CAPTAIN FARMER, of H. M. S. Driver.

A fire broke out in the ravine at the rear of the Lower Bazaar, on Monday night last. About thirty Mat-Houses were destroyed. The conflagration was so rapid that all apprehension of its further extending had ceased, before the engines could reach the spot.

We regret to learn that another attack has been made on the Bazaar situated at the POINT. Although some booty was obtained, the ruffians did not this time get off scatheless, three of their number having been shot. Great praise is due to Sergeant Fry, for his promtitude and gallantry on the occasion. The Coroner's inquest on the bodies, which appears in another part of our paper, affords details of this lament- able outrage. On the same night, other burglaries, we are told, were effected. Our Printing Office was also forcibly entered and robbed during the past week.

A glance at the map, will satisfy one, that in the event of a war, a hostile power, so placed, could cut our lines of communication, and till these Islands were captured by us (as of course, they We had not space in our last to give the state- would be) we should be subjected to considerable ment of Exports to Great Britain, from 30th June, annoyance, if indeed, our trade did not receive a1841, furnished by our Correspondent in his letter, vast injury. dated CANTON, 19th April, and to which we then referred. We now subjoin it :- Bohea

A great many British vessels now touch at Bally and Lombock, proceeding to, or from Syd- ney, and large cargoes of rice and other products Congou are shipped thence annually, in British bottoms, Souchong, &c. (our Whale Fishery is also very considerable Caper in the adjoining Seas)-yet we have not heard Black Leaf Pekoe that a British Man of War has ever visited Pekoe those Islands. This is much to be regretted,

"9

Orange

as there is a strong feeling in our favour Sorts among the natives, who, in their hatred of the Twankay Dutch, would be but too glad to hoist the British Hyson Flag, had they but the bare assurance that they would be protected from the encroaching policy of the Batavian Government.

Skin

Young Gunpowder

If, as expected, the China Seas becomes an Imperial Admiral's Station, and Hong-Kong the Depôt and Arsenal, we make no doubt that expedient known and respected throughout the Eastern Archi- measures will be taken to make the British name pelago.

We are greatly gratified to find that our humble exertions in aiding to point out the capabilities and value of the Eastern Seas, have received the cor roborative sanction of one of the most valued authorities on commercial matters, Mr J. R. Mac- Culloch, who, in the last supplement to his well- known" Dictionary of Commerce," says "A very little outlay on the part of Government might make, in so far at least, as piracy is concerned, the navigation of the Eastern Seas quite as safe as resulting to our trade, would, in a very short period, that of the Channel; and the advantages thence far more than countervail the little sacrifice re- piracy in the Eastern Seas, Government should sulting at the outset. Besides putting down take the necessary measures for obtaining accurate information with respect to them, and the ports and countries to which they afford access. We should say, of most of the Islands to the East of Malacca; and yet, several of them are of great extent, and they all abound in valuable products; and might, it is probable, were we better acquainted with their ports and capabilities, fur- nish the means of carrying on an extensive and all attended to in such matters, the exploration of advantageous commerce. Had utility been at New Guinea, and of the Seas and numberless Islands in is vicinity, would have taken precedence of many late expeditions."

We are gratified to publish the official confirmation (of the long since reported) appointment of KE YING as Imperial Commissioner. We have not yet heard when this High Functionary may be expected at Ganton, but we should suppose in about a morfth.

the Chinese Government still continues to By late letters from Chusan, we learn evince the most amicable disposition towards us, and with the people seem, eager to open up mutual commercial relations. In well informed quarters it is asserted that the balance of the $21,000,000 (War Indemnity) is ready to be paid by the Chinese upon the evacuation of Chusan and Koo-lang-800.

342,762 28,724,610 643.598 168,134 390,854 285,044 610,555 33,131

2,750,938 1,041,897

501,039 49,677 318,374 237,332

lb.35,103,945

This amount is exclusive of the DEVON, about lb. 500,000, and the ELISABETH, about lb.400,000, say altogether thirty-seven millions shipped up to this date.

There are now loading with Teas the Grecian

Oriental Marchioness of Douro Bella Marina

Inglewood Monarch Minerva

for London.

for Liverpool. Leith.

» Glasgow.

after all be shipped. So that by July the 1st, fifty millions may perhaps

of the 3d December, we now quote, as The following extract from the Times strongly corroborative of the opinions we strongly corroborative of the opinions we have uniformly expressed with regard to

matters in this quarter:-

umerical interference in Commercial

constitute the basis of peace, so happily concluded "Our readers are aware that among the terms which between Great Britain and China, no stipulation upon the subject of the Opiuin trade is to be found. The plenipotentiaries of the Celestial Emperor were natu- point, but they were not in a position to insist upon it, rally anxious to come to an understanding upon this and the British negotiator peremptorily declined to introduce any such question into the arrangements.

In this SIR HENRY POTTINGER doubtless acted with prudence, inasmuch as evident reasons of convenience COGNIZED IN EUROPE, THAT EACH recommended the principle, UNIVERSALLY RE- NATION MUST ENFORCE ITS OWN FISCAL REGULATIONS AS BEST IT CAN, without holding the breach of them by the subjects of a foreign against that Government. It is no less unreasonable Government to constitute any gund of complaint for the Chinese EMPEROR to call upon Great Britain to guarantee the obedience of every private British trader to the laws of China, than it would be for us to laws. Our business is to decline all responsibility on of our merchants as think proper to disobey those assume the right of guaranteeing impunity to all such the one hand, and on the other hand, to abstain from all interference with the due enforcement [whether against cipal regulations of the country in which we trade." our own countrymen, or against strangers] of the muni-

and publishing the following Communica- We have much pleasure in translating, tion from a FOREIGN FRIEND, to whom, on more than one occasion, we have expressed

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

The principal dimensions we now give ;- Length 70 CUBITS. 13 do.

our obligations for very interesting informa- tion :-

THE CHINESE SMUGGLING BOATS. These boats, named by the Chinese, Tcheong- long-teng, are employed in the contraband (opium) trade in the Canton River, and its various branches. They take a certain number of chests of the drug, from on board vessels anchored at Macao, in the Typa, Hong-Kong, and even at Whampoa, and they carry it for sale to the towns and villages in the vicinity. In whatever part of China the trade in opium may have been esta- blished, by common consent it has been determin- ed to sell it for money; or rather. the English Clippers will not deliver Opium except for Sycee Silver, or Dollars; but in all cases, the money is deposited by the buyer, on the deck of the vessel, where the quality of the Sycee is tested, and the Dollars examined and weighed by the Shroff, and it is not until the amount is agreed upon, and the money verified, that a delivery of the opium is made to the buyer, who, ordinarily, takes the chests without opening, or any examination. Occa- sionally, Gold, in Ingots, and small Plates, are received in payment.

The inferior Mandarins [whose silence and con- nivance are mostly purchased by means of con- siderable presents from the smugglers, but some- times by the offer of so much per cent. on all the transactions which may be made under their cog- nizance] are always disposed to give the smugglers a very great latitude. The Mandarins, in fact, are well aware, that the Contrabandists would oppose to their authority or interference, an ener- getic resistance in case of need, and that, besides being well armed, they would, mutually succour each other, so that, they would come best out of an encounter, unless attacked by very superior

numbers.

The war by England, against the Celestial Empire, has induced such a laxity and con- fusion in the public service, and departmental administration of the Chinese, that, since a year and a-haif, Whampoa has become not merely the rendezvous of the Chinese smugglers, but also of European. They have there a special anchorage, near the mouth of Junk River, and now you are almost always certain to see there, some dozen of cutters or schooners who openly vend the drug. Although the Chinese smugglers do not pre- cisely fear the Mandarin boats, they always endea- vour to avoid them, unless they have come to some agreement. If they, however, cannot escape being overhauled, they endeavour to negociate, and will offer the Mandarin and his crew a Cumsha La persent] in order to obtain permission to continue their voyage. They do not fight except at the last extremity, or unless the demands of the Mandarin are too exorbitant, or what is still more rare, unless that functionary shews himself inac il to corruption, and will not traffic with his uties. In this case a conflict will ensue, and if the smugglers think they shall get the worst of it, they endeavour to gain the shore, from which they are rarely very far, and abandon to the victor the boat and its cargo.

Breadth amid-ship Depth of the hold Height of the Main-mast

5 do. 50 do. Do. Mizen 35 do. Drawing water 3 do. of the second class. One of the first would be 78 These are the dimensions of a Sariggling boat cubits long. It is to be noted that the cubit is about 1 foot 3 inches English

When the vessel is fully manned, the crew consists of 1 Captain, 1 Second ditto, 60 Rowers, and 10 Sailors, to steer and shift sails.

The greater part of the men on board this boat belonged to the town of Whaupoa, where the wives of those who are married reside. In every case they are not permitted to embark with their husbands, in the fear that they would cause them to lose courage in time of danger.

This Vessel (or fast boat) is able to carry 350 chests of Opium, or 400 chests of Congou Ten. deduct the cost of provisions for the crew, which From the profits of each voyage they always amounts to $6 per day, or $180 per month.

This first allowance made, the proprietor of the Boat takes for himself half of the remaining sum, the other moiety devolves to the boat; and is divided among the crew in such proportions that the Captain gets 100 per cent, and the second Ditto 50 per cent, beyond all the rest on board.

With a calm sea and fair tide this boat can go at the rate of 6 miles per hour, without using her sails. With a good breeze she can sail 10 or 12 miles in the same time.

During the night the watch consists of 6 men, relieved every hour. As there is no watch or clock on board, they calculate the time by means of a Joss Stick, on which are four marks at equal distances. A watch extends from one mark to another; the Joss Stick is lighted at 8 o'clock at night, they use two during the night, from whence it will be seen the last watch finishes at 4 o'clock in the morning.

manner;- The armament is composed in the following

1 Long Cannon, 12 Pounder do.

1

8 do.

12 Ginjalls (small Rampart Pieces fixed on pivots.)

1 English Musket

20 Pairs of double Swords 30 Rattan Shields

200 Pikes or Lances of diverse forms 60 Oars

15 Mats to cover the vessel

2 Cables, one of Bamboo, the other of Coir, of about 50 fathoms length. The latter kind is not ordinarily used by the Chinese.

1 Pump of Bamboo tubes, (this is very rarely used because always being near the coast, if the boat makes water they heave her down on the beach to caulk.)

1 good Telescope, (European) 1 Compass,

garden cultivation in a liquid state, after the man- ner which from time immemorial has been in usc with the Chinese; the beneficial effects are so great that it renders it the most economical and productive manure for such purposes.

We have every reason to credit these statements, and as Guano is obtained on the west coast of from thence arrive in ballast, we would ask whether South America, and as all the vessels that come it would not be worth trying the experiment of importing this article?

taken by the Chinese in the care, preparation, It is well known that the greatest pains are and appliance of manures. In no other part of the world are fertilizing matters so economised or designate dropping fatness." so wisely appropriated. Manuring land they

from the Southern to the Northern provinces at a We are assured that manure is transported cost for freight, exceeding that which would be incurred on Guano, if brought hither. The prime cost of the Chinese article ranges we are told The best is far in inferior in fertilizing efficacy to according to quality, from 825 to $50 per ton. Guano, which could be imported, we believe, at one-third of this price.

Dr, Ure, in his DICTIONARY OF ARTS, MANUFACTURES, &c.. says "GUANO is a substance of a dark-yellow colour; of a strong ambrosial smell, which blackens in the fire, with the exhalation of an ammoniacal odour; solable with effer. vescence in hot nitric acid. When this solution is evapo rated to dryness, it assumes a fine red colour, evincing the presence of uric acid. GUANO is found upon the coast of Peru, in the Islands Chinche, near Pasco, and several other places more to the South. It forms a deposit fifty or sixty feet thick, and of considerable extent, and appears to be the excrements of innumerable flecks of birds, especially Herons and Flamands, which inhabit these Islands. It is an excellent manure, and forms the object of a most exten- sive and profitable trade." For many years a desiccated compost, similar to that in use here, has been exported from London, to the West Indies, to fertilize exhausted sugar plantations.

By a late Pamphlet on the Tea Trade, we see it stated that the daily consumption of Tea in the United Kingdom is lb.100,000, and that the annual consumption has reached lb.36,000,000, the cost of which to the consumers is estimated to fully reach £9,000,000, of which sum £3,500,000 goes into the national Exchequer as duty, the remainder to the Importers and Dealers.

According to the same authority when the late speculation in Tea commenced, there was a stock of lb.54,000,000, which afterwards became reduced to 29,000,000, and at the beginning of this year it was lb.34,000,000.

NOTICE. MR JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR, JOHN LEFF- Procuration, during my absence from China. LER, are duly authorized to sign for mo, by HENRY PYBUS

Macao, 5th April, 1843.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, THE Brig "SNIPE" CAPT. W. W. FROST, will be despatched in few days. For freight apply to HUGHESDON, BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1843.

All boats of this kind do not use the European Compass, being generally so near shore the Chinese compass is found to be sufficienly exact for them. Except at Hong-Kong, where the Smugglers find The smugglers go up as high as Canton, and even beyond to Fo-shan-foo, with supplies of themselves at perfect liberty to dous they please, Opium, which they unload clandestinely at night. the crews generally remain on board; a few only They study the markets with great care, and going on shore to purchase the necessary pro- Ports in all April.--For Freight or Passage

endeavour to arrive with the drug at the places

meny they aw

m suppnet, or or which to

stocks are well nigh exhausted. They go some- times into the districts of Chin-Chew (province of Fo-kien) on the East coast, from the shores of which on going up they always keep at but a little distance. The innumerable number of bays, coves, and creeks, which exist on this coast, offer them abundant shelter in case of bad weather.

On their return they bring to Macao, or Hong- Kong, Teas and Silk which they have bought either on the East Coast at Amoy, Foo-Chow, or at Fo-shan-foo. Although they are not of equal quality to those furnished by the Hong Merchants, yet the teas often realize advantageously, as they pay no export duty, and the English or American vessel which is laden with them, has not in that case to submit to the hard necessity of going up to Whampoa, and there paying the enormous port charges exacted from all foreign vessels, by the avarice or ignorance of the Chinese.

We now present all the information in detail, which we were able to obtain some days since, from on board a large Smuggling boat anchored in the bay of Hong-Kong,

This Boat belonged to a rich Chinese merchant named Aqui, established for some time in the new English Colony, and where this boat was built. Its construction employed 40 carpenters during the whole of one month, and the entire cost with rigging &c. was $1600. These kind of Boats after three or four years will require to be repaired, and if that be done, will last some three years more, say altogether about seven years.

visions.

by common consent, put ashore. The captain has not the power to strike a man, nor to put him in

irons.

There are no regular articles of agreement, the Captain gives merely some one or two dollars in advance to the sailors, whom he selects. There are no medicines on board, and the sick or wounded are landed as soon as possible to be nursed. No man is permitted to smoke Opium till the vessel is at anchor ip some place, where she is in safety.

All breakage or damage in manoeuvring or by bad weather, is at the risk and cost of the Owner; but if a man breaks anything by negligence, he is obliged to pay for it.

The powder is in a wooden chest, in care of the Captain: the cartridges are made of Chinese bamboo paper, resembling silk paper, it combines great strength and fineness. In ordinary times the Smugglers never have more than a picul of powder on board, (say 133 lb.) but when they apprehend an attack from the Mandarins or Pirates, they put on board one or two piculs more.

At the risk of provoking a smile from the reader which may hereafter become a considerable we yet shall not hesitate to mention an article Import of China. It is the new manure Guano, which is becoming so popular in England. The Agricultural Journals give detailed statements of valuable fertilizing matter with which we have the results, which demonstrate that it is the most yet become acquainted.

The latest accounts report that, when applied to

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, The A. I. British built Barque "COLONIST," THOMAS

LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named

Hong-Kong, 13th April, 1843.

DORD, & CO.

FOR CALCUTTA TOUCHING AT SINGAPORE AND PENANG.

THE fast sailing Clipper Brig "ALGERINE." J. M. Hill Com- mander, will sail for the above named ports on Saturday, the 6th Instant. For freight or passage apply to Hongkong, 30th March, 1843. D. WILSON & Co.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. I. British built Barque "ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao,, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. For Freight or Passage, apply to Hongkong, 15th February,, 1843.

JAMIESON, HOW & Co.

A CARD. MR ALEXANDER, BIRD, Accountant, first North-East House, Praya Grande, Macao. NOTICE

and Solicitor No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public Hongkong.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- and Woollen Tartan-by ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs W. T. Kinsley. Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

114

33

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission.

Hong-Kong, 24th April, 1843. FOR SALE

G. F. DAVIDSON.

American Beef and Pork.

Negro-head Tobacco,

PBR NAVIGATOR.

Tar in barrels.

Mackerel in Kits,

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR SALE-The following goods: --Sillery Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," and exposed for Champagne, Claret, St. Julien, Sauterne, Superior Sale, the undermentioned Goods, viz. :-

Superfino Black Cloth

Do. Red do.

Do. Blue do,

Do. Scarlet do.

Glengarry Caps

Superfine Kerseymere Travelling Caps Hore hair do. Oiled-skin do. Cloth do.

Navy Gold Lace

Europe Boots

Writing Desks

Hooks and Eyes

Glazed Hats

Leather Dressing Cases

Dressing Case's Silver Fittings

Ladies' Work Boxes

Sausages in Boxes

> PER VENICE.

Looking Glasses

Brushes of all kinds

Champagne Cider, in one

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

Prime Pork.

dozen Cases

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars.

Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

Perfumery of do. Court Plaister

Stationary of all kinds Blotting Cases Envelopes and Cases

Memoranduin Books, Rulers

Hones

Drawing Pencils

Gilt edged Cards

Colour Boxes

G. F. DAVIDSON. Foolscap and Overland Paper

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:-Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar. Pitch, Anchors. Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks. of sizes; Log. Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of

other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

FOR SALE-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET. BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

ALSO,

46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LoxBOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA

Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. NOTICE. Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY. CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

Patent Drawing Pencils Steel Pens Chit Paper Sealing Wax Patent Lends

Bronze Inkstands Chit Seals

Glass and Earthenware

Lamp Glasses and Chinnies Coloured Tumblers, Glass Chandeliers Bronzed do.

Decanters

Salt Cellars

Hall Lamps

Telescopes

Thermometers

Plates and Dishes

T by Philpotts Jugs

Embossed Jugs and Covers

Cruet Frames

Coat Buttons

Silk Gloves

Cotton Socks

Hair Combs

Small tooth do.

Naples Soap

Lozenges of kinds Pistols

Surveying Instruments Saddles and Bridles Time Pieces

Sauce pans

Tea Kettles

Tea Pots

Silver do.

Patent Water Filterers Do. Marble do.

Iron Spoons

Bellows

Twine

Yard Measures

Beer Taps

Bird Shot

Cooling Pots

Velvet Corks

Iron Cash Boxes

Table Knives

Bottled Herbs

Bloom Raisins

Patras Currants

Liqueurs

Cayenne Pepper

Cherry Brandy

White Claret

Hermetically sealed Hams. Beer and Porter

Brandy, Gentlemen's Dress Coats, Gold Watches, Keys, Brooches, Pins, Silver Chains, Rings, and Seals, the best Cut Crystal Decanters. Claret, & Water Jugs of various elegant designs, a Musical Box with eight airs.

Apply to Mr Ad. Guillain, Mr Boulle's Store, Queen's Road.

HATS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hats/ for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co. Hong-Kong. April 19th. 1843.

FOR SALE. The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOK" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat BENNETT PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 3rd March, 1843. NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods, eiz:- Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, in one doz. cases, Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jams and Jellies in 1 doz, cases of half pints, pints and quaris, Pine Cheeses, Butter, fresh in Jars. Soups of all des criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels, American BEEF, [ex American Barque "LARK"] also Pork, in barrels, Manila Coffee, Manila Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 dozen bottles, Sardines in Tins, Split Peas. Westphalia Hams, Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin

P. S.-Their Slate Billiard Table will be ready in Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions,

the course of next week.

Hong-Kong, 4th May, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European. will run between this, Macao and Whampoa afier the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package. ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE, N. DUUS. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843- NOTICE.-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen' Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. 8 Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission HONGKONG, ISL JANUARY, 1842.

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street.

FOR SALE, BY THE UNDERSIGNED.

American Flour,

Do Cabin & Ship Biscuit

Do Beef and Pork, Bengal Rice

Manila Patent Cordage, Rope,

Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder, Coarse Paint Oil,

Paints, of Sorts,

Turpentine,

Tar,

Rosin,

Cigars, No. 3 & 4, Oakum,

Do

Do Rum

Do

Do

Coffee,

Paint Brushes,

Do Cocoanut Oil,

Twine,

Brandy,

Canvass,

Gin,

Soap,

Sperm Candles,

Sherry,

Port,

Liqueurs,

Cherry Cordial,

Jains and Jellies,

Dutch Cheeses, Corks, Sardines,

Copper Boat Nails

Foolscap & Writing Paper, Dinner Sets,

Cutlery and Hardware, American Drill,

And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA

at No. 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

FOR SALE

'Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th Decmeber, 1842. (

NOTICE,

DAVID HUME, BARFE, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread) will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes,

WANTED,

A stout Lad, as an Apprentice to the Business. A Premium will be expected,

N. B.-No business done on Sundays, after nine o'clock in the morning.

Hong-kong, April, 18th 1842..

FOR SALE Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American four, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar- rels, Salt Provisions, Sak Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gia in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marling and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar- rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S WHer No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1813,

Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Super- ior (in boxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaming Twine, Canvass, Cakum, lar Blacking, Rozin &c., Coconut Oil, Linseed do. In Jars of 5 Gals.. Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes, Yell. w bar Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knives and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices, Britannia Metal Tea Spoons, Cork Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large, Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks, Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage, BENNETT, PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR SALE-SCOTT & Co's BENGAL

DIRECTORY, for 1843: price, Spanish Dollars 4. Apply to

JNO SMITH.

Macao, 18th April, 1843. FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all d'e, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Bn Chin, Boted and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, and Beaver Hats. Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

Calcutta

APRIL

26th Algerine

ARRIVED. Hill

91

Sir Robert Peel

27th Hero

Fowler

19

Gitana [Sp.]

Salado

Calcutta Macao

30th Louisa

Forgan

1st

May. John Cooper

J. Salmon

Chusan

13

H. M. S. Pylades

Comr. Tindal, R. N.

"3

39

H. M. B. Algerine

Lt. Dolling, R. N.

39

2nd

Narcisso [Sp.]

S. Taya

19

Plover

Macao Capt Collinson, C.B. Amoy

"

Starling

19

Colonist

Surveying Vessels.. Capt. Kellet, CB. Leisk

Macao

APRIL.

39

SAILED

Manila

Madras

·

Macao

28th II.M.S. Wolverine Comnr. Johnston, R. N. Amoy 29th Gitana [Sp.] Salado Edmonstone Mc. Dougal Little Catherine 30th Hero 2nd May, Scotland Druid

Franklyn

Fowler

Cunningham

23

Whampoa Manila Macao

Ritchie 3rd Louisa Forgan REPORTED-H. M. S. Algerine and Pylades, in a few days for England. Narcisso for Manila. Algerine on the 7th Inst. for Calcutta. Colonist in a couple of days for Amoy.

EXPECTED-H. M. S. Sapphire, from Amoy. H. M. S. Minden, from Chusan. Fortescue from Do. Mary Anne, from Do.

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 60 VOL. II.

HONGBONG GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 11TH, 1843.

NOTEELCATLON. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hong-Kong, March 23, 1842. HOUSE OF LORDS, FEBRUARY 4TH, 1843.

At two o'clock the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Buccleuch, the Earl of Shaftesbury, and Lord Wharncliffe, having taken their seats in front of the throne, and the Speaker, with a number of members of the House of Commons, having appeared at the bar,

The LORD CHANCELLOR said, that her Majesty not thinking fit to be personally present to open the Session, had been pleased to direct a Commission to be prepared for opening it by Commission. The Lord Chancellor then proceeded to read the speech, of which the following is a copy;-

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"We are commanded by her Majesty to acquaint you that her Majesty receives from all princes and states assurances of a friendly disposition towards this coun- try, and of an earnest desire to co-operate with her Majesty in the maintenance of general peace..

"By the treaty which her Majesty has concluded with the United States of America, and by the adjust ment of those differences which from their long continuance had endangered the preservation of peace, her Majesty trusts that the amicable relations of the two countries have been confirmed.

"The increased exertions which by the liberality of Parliament, her Majesty was enabled to make for the termination of hostilities with China have been emi- nently successful.

people.

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

Her Majesty regrets the diminished receipt from some of the ordinary sources of revenue.

Price monthly Or 12 yearly

NAPOLEON'S OPINION OF A WAR WITH CHINA.

The following Extract from O'Meara's" Voice from

"Her Majesty fears that it must be in part attributed to the reduced consumption of many articles! caused St. Helena" will be read with interest at this mo by that depression of the manufacturing industry of met If, sad Napoleon (alla ling to Lord Amherst's the country which has so long preveled, and which embassy to China) I had seat an ambassador to China, I should have ordered him to make himself acquainte her Majesty has so deeply lamented. "In considering, however, the present state of the with the ceremonies performed before the Emperor by revenue, her Majesty is assured that you will bear in the first mandarins, and if required, to do the ste mind that it has been materially affected by the exten. himself. Now, perhaps, you will lose the friendship sive reductions in the Import Duties, which received of the Chinese nation, and great commercial advantage your sanction during the last Session of Parliament, and through this piece of nonsense,' I said' adds O'Meara, that little progress has been hitherto unade in the that we could easily compel the Chinese to grant collection of those taxes which were imposed for the good terms by means of a few ships of war-that, for purpose of supplying the deficiency from that and other example, we could deprive them altogether of salt by a few cruisers properly stationed.' Napoleon replied,

causes.

Her Majesty feels confi-lent that the future produceIt would be the worst thing you have done for a of the revenue will be sufficient to meet every exigency number of years to go to war with an immense empire like China, an possessing so many resources. You of the public service. "Her Majesty regrets that in the course of last year would, doubtless, at first succeed, take what vessels the public peace in some of the manufacturing districts they have, and destroy their trade and cities; but you was seriously disturbed, and the lives and property of would soon teach them their own strength. They her Majesty's subjects were endangered by tumultuous would be e compelled to adopt measures to defend them- assemblages and acts of open violence. The ordinary selves against you. They would consider, and say, law, promptly enforced, was sufficient for the effectual we must try to make ourselves equal to this nation. repression of these disorders. Her Majesty confidently Why should we suffer a people so far away to do as relies upon its efficacy, and upon the zealous support they please with us? we must build ships, we must of her loyal and peaceful subjects for the maintenance put guns in them, we must render ourselves equal to them. They would,' continued the Emperor, get of tranquillity. "Her Majesty commands us to acquaint you that artificers and ship-builders from France and America, her Majesty derived the utmost gratification from the and even London; they would build a fleet, and in loyalty and affectionate attachment to her Majesty the course of time defeat you.'" which were manifested on the occasion of her Majesty's visit to Scotland.

Her

submitted for your consideration.

The above apposite Extract appeared in a London Paper. It remains to be seen whether "We are commanded by her Majesty to acquaint you that measures connected with the improvement of Napoleon's prediction will be verified. We know that, the Chinese are building ships of European the law. and with various questions of domestic policy; models for defensive objects, that they repea will be Majesty confidently relies on your zealous structing their forts on better principles, that they endeavour to promote the public welfare, and fervently have Foreigners (some two or three) in their pay, prays that the favour of Divine Providence may direct from whose instructions they hope to benefit in the and prosper your counsels, and make them conducive practice of gunnery. to the happiness and contentment of her people. The house then adjourned until five o'clock, at which time the Lord Chancellor took his seat on the Wool sack.

EXTRACTS.

"The skill, valour, and discipline of the naval and THE COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH RUSSIA. military forces employed upon the service have been most There is naturally great anxiety felt among the conspicuous, and have led to the conclusion of peace inercantile class to learn the particulars of the com: upon the terms proposed by her Majesty. mercial treaty which ministers have concluded "Her Majesty rejoices in the prospect that by the with Russia. The commercial policy which has free access which will be opened to the principal marts been so steadily pursued for so many years past, of that populous and extensive empire, encouragement by the Russian Government, has been so decidedly will be given to the commercial enterprise of her ultra protective against the products of industry that it will be considered a feather in the cap of ministers if they have suceeded in procuring any- thing like a tolerable relaxation of the prohibitions and excessive import duties, amounting also nearly to absolute prohibition against so many important articles of manufacture. COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH THE GERMAN CUSTOMS UNION.We copy the following from the letter of the private correspondent of a morning contemporary If the information it contains be true, we earnestly hope that the negocations may be carried to a successful issue: Froin positive information, I am able to announce to those interested in the commercial intercourse between Germany and England, an event which

As soon as the ratifications of the treaty shall have been exchanged, it will be laid before you. "In concert with her allies, her Majesty has succeed. ed in obtaining for the Christian population of Syria an establishment of a system of administration which they were entitled to expect from the engagements of the Sultan, and from the good faith of this country, "The differences for some time existing between the Turkish and Persian governments had recently led to acts of hostility: but as each of these states has accented the joint mediation of Great Britam and Russia, her Majesty entertains a confident hope that their mutual relations will be speedily and amicably adjusted. "Her Majesty has concluded with the Emperor of a treaty of commerce and navigation, which

The late struggle was too short, and the national humiliation too local, to engender the wide spread conviction among the Chinese, of their inferiority in the warlike, or in any other arts, to the foreigners. Until their obstinate prepossessions and inveterate prejudices of national superiority and wisdom are uprooted, China cannot importantly progress.

Experience tells us that very rarely has the India, been content with the first drubbing he has pettiest Rajah or predatory Chieftain in British received at our hands. Hence we deem another which case we shall of course be successful, but war with China sooner or later inevitable; in then we think the Chinese will be constrained thoroughly to feel and acknowledge their inferi ority, and if so, their next defeat will, perhaps, be the precursor of their social advancement. Who dare prognosticate the result of this national awakening? Who can foresee the mighty changes which may ensue therefrom? In our own days we have seen what the will of one man can accom- plish. We allude to the Pacha af Egypt, who with a population not one hundredth of that of China, and with a revenue that ena extracted from a single province of the Celestial Empire, has yet managed to erect himself into a power courted by France England, w. power courted by France he very nearly involved Any one who ha treaty with great as who has also passed through Egypt, and for a short time resided here, must increased intercourse between her Majesty's subjects ein, to lay the foundations of a future treaty of of the Cith the moral and physical superiority and those of the Emperor. Commerce between the two countries. success has attended the recent military operatious in Affghanistan. "Her Majesty has the greatest satisfaction in record. ing her high senso of the ability with which those operations have been directed, and of the constancy and

Russiaid before you. Her Majesty regards this entitles us to entertain great hopes; negotiations

will be

The com

be struck

in a war.

hom

"Her Majesty is happy to inform you that complete mercial navy of Germany (excluding that of Austria) en riminese cooley to the Egyptian fellah. In

and Native forces.

"The superiority of her Majesty's rms has been

We are commanded by her Majesty to inform you occupation by a military force of the countries to

that it has not been deemed advisable to continue the

the westward of the Indus.

is more important; it contains a greater numbere tons (ships cargo weight) than that Chopra Parcelled and isolated, if escaped atention; united under the same flag, it will

France.

now occupy its due enough to be an im Dugland, but considerable

aurance of fatigue, cheerful obedience, tact and courage, the Chinaman far surpasses any other Asiatic, and with European tactics and discipline, it is believed, would rival the Sepoy as a Soldier. With no caste prejudices, a supply only of rice, and salt, would suffice to subsist the Chinese Soldier. The magnificent water communications afford every facility for the transport of large bodies of troops to any given point.

a

Should, the successor of Taou Kwang, be in-

established by decisive victories on the ines of former It has beeportant ally." disasters; and the complete liberation of her Majesty's Pottinger whispered that Sir Henry soms been urgently requested to subjects who were held in captivity, and for whom her remain some time in China, to finally at- bued with Europeanism, what is there he cannot Majesty felt the deepest interest, has been effected. range mee of our rasures consequent on the cession do? The mind staggers at the contemplation. It is, given new settlements. Sir Henry has been perhaps, the destiny of despotic China in the of the plenary powers to adjust the claims East, and of democratic America in the West, to rid both continents of European domination. vole merchants: for Opium, they having Peter the Great, a Meheinet Ali, ion. Were Ali, or even a might not acentarily expressed their readiness to Sultan Mahmoud, to spring up in China, a quiesce in the decision he may make. We Tartar hoides again desolate the valley of the He been given to understand that Sir Danube, and Europe tremble, not at the prospect EnglanPottinger is desirous of returning to of a Russian, but of a Chinese invasion? If this nd that he may be expected to be dubious, is it not certain, that all the boasted t July or August.-London power of Russia would then but suffice to pre- serve its Asiatic Frontier of the Oural Mountains? ED. F. C.

"Gentlemen of the House of Commons, «Her Majesty has directed the estimates for the

ensuing year to be laid before you.

"Such reductions have been made in the amount of the naval and military force as have been deemed compatible, under present circumstances, with the efficient performance of the public service throughout the extended empire of her Majesty.

ha

arrive abo Paper.

10

33

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission.

Hong-Kong, 24th April, 1843. FOR SALE

G. F. DAVIDSON.

American Beef and Pork.

Negro-head Tobacco,

PBR NAVIGATOR.

Tar in barrels.

Mackerel in Kits,

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Aless Beef in half and whole

D. WILSON & Co.

FOR SALE-The following goods: --Sillery Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," and exposed for Champagne, Claret, St. Julien, Sauterne, Superior Sale, the undermentioned Goods, viz. :- Superfino Black Cloth

Do. Red do.

Do. Blue do,

Do. Scarlet do.

Glengarry Caps

Superfine Kerseymere Travelling Caps Hore hair do. Oiled-skin do. Cloth

do.

Navy Gold Lace

Hooks and Eyes

Glazed Hats

Europe Boots

Leather Dressing Cases

Salt Cellars

Hall Lamps

Telescopes

Thermometers

Plates and Dishes

T by Philpotts Jugs

Embossed Jugs and Covers

Cruet Frames

Coat Buttons

Silk Gloves

Cotton Socks

Hair Combs

Small tooth do.

Surveying Instruments

Time Pieces

Naples Soap

Dressing Case's Silver Fittings

Lozenges of kinds Pistols

Ladies' Work Boxes

Barrels.

Writing Desks

Saddles and Bridles

Sausages in Boxes

PER VENICE.

Looking Glasses

Brushes of all kinds

Champagne Cider, in one

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

Prime Pork.

dozen Cases

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Ogars.

Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

Perfumery of do. Court Plaister

Stationary of all kinds

Blotting Cases Envelopes and Cases

Saucepans

Tea Kettles

Tea Pots

Silver do.

Do. Marble

Patent Water Filterers do.

Memorandum Books, Rulers

Iron Spoons

Bellows

Hones

Yard Measures Beer Taps

Drawing Pencils

Gilt edged Cards

G. F. DAVIDSON. Foolscap and Overland Paper

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terins: --Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrrack; Seltzer Water: Stockholm Tar. Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20, Queen's Road,

Hong Kong, 29th April, 1843. FOR SALE-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of

P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hongkong, March 21st, 1843.

FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET. BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

Colour Boxes

Patent Drawing Pencils Steel Pens

Chit Paper

Sealing Wax

Patent Leads Bronze Inkstande Chit Seals

Glass and Earthenware Coloured Tumblers, Glass Chandeliers Bronzed do.

Lamp Glasses and Chinnies

Decanters

Twine

Bird Shot

Cooling Pots

Velvet Corks Iron Cash Boxes

Table Knives

Bottled Herbs

Bloom Raisins

Patras Currants

Liqueurs

Cayenne Pepper

Cherry Brandy

White Claret

Hermetically sealed Hams. Beer and Porter

Brandy, Gentlemen's Dress Coats, Gold Watches, Keys, Brooches, Pins, Silver Chains, Rings, and Seals, the best Cut Crystal Decanters. Claret, & Water Jugs of various elegant designs, a Musical Box with eight airs.

Apply to Mr Ad. Guillain, Mr Boulle's Store, Queen's Road.

HATS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hats,/ for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co: Hong-Kong. April 19th. 1843.

FOR SALE.-'I he fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA Rook" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of Gentleman as a pleasure boat any BENNETT PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 3rd March, 1843. NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods, riz:- Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, in one doz. cases, Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jams and Jellies in 1 doz, cases of half pints, pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses, Butter, fresh in Jars. Soups of all des criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels, American BEEF, [er American Barque "LARK"] also Pork, in barrels, Manila Coffee, Manila Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 dozen bottles, Sardines in Tins, Split Peas. Westphalia Hams, Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin

P. S.-Their Slate Billiard Table will be ready in Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions,

the course of next week.

Hong-Kong, 4th May, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in Chinn, to receive all pack Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per packago. ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE, Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

ALSO,

46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LoxBOCK RICK just landed ex JAGATRA

Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. NOTICE-Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY. CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street.

FOR SALE, BY THE UNDERSIGNED.

American Flour,

Do Beef and Pork,

Bengal. Rice

Do Cabin & Ship Biscuit

Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder, Coarse Paint Oil,

Manila Patent Cordage,

Do

Rope,

Paints, of Sorts, Turpentine, Tar,

Do

Rum

Rosin,

Do

Cigars, No. 3 & 4, Oakum,

Do

Coffee,

Paint Brushes,

Do

Cocoanut Oil,

Twine,

Brandy,

Canvass,

(iin,

Sherry,

Port,

Liqueurs,

Cherry Cordial,

Jains and Jellies,

Dutch Cheeses, Corks, Sardines,

Soap,

Sperm Candles,

Copper Boat Nails

Foolscap & Writing Paper, Dinner Sets,

Cutlery and Hardware, American Drill,

And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA at No. 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown

of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th Decmeber, 1842. (

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843-

Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Super- ior (in boxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaning Twine, Canvass, Cakum, Tar Blacking, Rozin &c., Coconut Oil, Linseed do. In Jars of 5 Gals.. I urpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes, Yell. bar Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knives and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices, Britannia Metal Tea Spoons. Cork Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large, Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks, Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage.

BENNETT, PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR SALE-SCOTT & Co's BENGAL

Macao, 18th April, 1843.

JNO SMITH.

NOTICE. GOODS and Merchandise of all descrip. DIRECTORY, for 1843: price, Spanish Dollars 4. tions received and carefully stored in spacious Apply to dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen' Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. B Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to

NDUUS or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. AVAG, ISU JANUARI) 1094D

NOTICE,

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread] will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes,

WANTED,

A stout Lad, as an Apprentice to the Business. A Premium will be expected,

N. B.-No business done on Sundays, after nine o'clock, in the morning.

Hong-kong, April, 18th 1842..

FOR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American four, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar- rels, Salt Provisions, Sa Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from sizes, Gin in cases, a few Pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Cherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as. sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar-

rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at 3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S WHS No. 18, Queen's Road.

N. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1843,

FOR SALE-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stures of all de, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Cluthing, and Beaver Hats. Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

APRIL

26th Algerine

ARRIVED. Hill

Parrock Hall

Wharton

Sir Robert Peel

27th Hero

Fowler

13

Gitana [Sp.]

Salado

Calcutta Macao Calcutta Macao

30th Louisa

Forgan

29

1st

May. John Cooper

J. Salmon

Chusan

37

H. M. S. Pylades

Comr. Tindal, R. N.

"1

39

H. M. B. Algerine

2nd

Narcisso (Sp.]

19

Plover

"

Starling

19

Colonist

Macao Capt Collinson, C.B. Amoy Surveying Vessels.. Capt. Kellet, C.B. Leisk SAILED.

Lt. Dolling, R. N. S. Taya

29

APRIL.

28th II.M.S. Wolverine

29th Gitana [Sp.]

Salado

n

39 Edmonstone 30th Hero

Little Catherine

Mc. Dougal Franklyn

@

Manila Madras Macao Whampoa Manila Macao

2nd May, Scotland 99 Druid 3rd Louisa

Macao

Comnr. Johnston, R. N. Amoy

Fowler

Cunningham Ritchie Forgan few days for England. Narcisso for Manila. Algerine REPORTED-H. M. S. Algerine and Pylades, in a on the 7th Inst. for Calcutta. Colonist in a couple of days for Amoy.

H. M. S. Minden, from Chusan. Fortescue from Do. EXPECTED-H. M. S. Sapphire, from Amoy. Mary Anne, from Do.

WILLIAM PEDDER,

Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND LONGBON GAZETTE.

No. 60 VOL. II.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 11TH. 1843. "My Lords and Gentlemen,

NOTIFICATION. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hong-Kong, March 23, 1842. HOUSE OF LORDS, FEBRUARY 4TH, 1843.

At two o'clock the Lord Chancellor, the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Duke of Buccleuch, the Earl of Shaftesbury, and Lord Wharncliffe, having taken their seats in front of the throne, and the Speaker, with a number of members of the House of Commons, having appeared at the bar,

The LORD CHANCELLOR said, that her Majesty not thinking fit to be personally present to open the Session, had been pleased to direct a Commission to be prepared for opening it by Commission. The Lord Chancellor then proceeded to read the speech, of which the following is a copy;-

"My Lords and Gentlemen,

"We are commanded by her Majesty to acquaint you that her Majesty receives from all princes and states assurances of a friendly disposition towards this coun. try, and of an earnest desire to co-operate with her Majesty in the maintenance of general peace,

"By the treaty which her Majesty has concluded with the United States of America, and by the adjust. ment of those differences which from their long continuance had endangered the preservation of peace, her Majesty trusts that the amicable relations of the two countries have been confirmed.

"The increased exertions which by the liberality of Parliament, her Majesty was enabled to make for the termination of hostilities with China have been emi nently successful.

people.

Her Majesty regrets the diminished receipt from some of the ordinary sources of revenue.

Price

Or 12 yearly NAPOLEON'S OPINION OF A WAR WITH CHINA.

The following Extract from O'Meara's "Voice from "Her Majesty fears that it must be in part attributed to the reduced consumption of many articles: caused St. Helena" will be read with interest at this m by that depression of the manufacturing industry of ent: If, sad Napoleon (alu ling to Lord Aniherst's the country which has so long prevailed, and which embassy to China, i had seat an ambassador to China, her Majesty has so deeply lamented. I should have ordered him to make himself acquainte l

causes.

Her Majesty feels confident that the future produce of the revenue will be sufficient to meet every exigency of the public service.

"In considering, however, the present state of the with the ceremonies performed before the Emperor by revenue, her Majesty is assured that you will bear in the first mandarins, and if required, to do the same mind that it has been materially affected by the exten. himself. Now, perhaps, you will lose the frien. Iship sive reductions in the Import Duties, which received of the Chinese nation, and grent commercial advantage your sanction during the last Session of Parliament, and through this piece of nonsense,' I said' adds O'Meara, that little progress has been hitherto unade in the that we could easily compel the Chinese to grant collection of those taxes which were imposed for the good terms by means of a few ships of war-that, for purpose of supplying the deficiency from that and other example, we could deprive them altogether of sit by a few cruisers properly stationed.' Napoleon replied, It would be the worst thing you have done for a number of years to go to war with an immense empire like China, an possessing so many resources. You "Her Majesty regrets that in the course of last year would, doubtless, at first succeed, take what vessels the public peace in some of the manufacturing districts they have, and destroy their trade and cities; but you was seriously disturbed, and the lives and property of would soon teach them their own strength. They her Majesty's subjects were endangered by tumultuous would be compelled to adopt measures to defend them- assemblages and acts of open violenes. The ordinary suives against you. They would consider, and say. law, promptly enforced, was sufficient for the effectual we must try to make ourselves equal to this nation. repression of these disorders. Her Majesty confidently Why should we suffer a people so far away to do as relies upon its efficacy, and upon the zealous support they please with us? we must build ships, we must of her loyal and peaceful subjects for the maintenance put guns in them we must render ourselves equal to them. They would,' continued the Emperor, get of tranquillity. Her Majesty commands us to acquaint you that artificers and ship-builders from France and America, her Majesty derived the utmost gratification from the and even London; they would build a fleet, and in loyalty and affectionate attachment to her Majesty the course of time defeat you.'" which were manifested on the occasion of her Majesty's visit to Scotland.

6.

66

We are commanded by her Majesty to acquaint you that measures connected with the improvement of the law. and with various questions of domestic policy, will be submitted for your consideration. *Her Majesty confidently relies on your zealous endeavour to promote the public welfare, and fervently prays that the favour of Divine Providence may direct to the happiness and contentment of her people. and prosper your counsels, and make them conducive The house then adjourned until five o'clock, at which time the Lord Chancellor took his seat on the Wool sack.

EXTRACTS.

The above apposite Extract appeared in a London Paper. It remains to be seen whether Napoleon's prediction will be verified. We know that the Chinese are building ships of European models for defensive objects, that they are con- structing their forts on better principles, that they have Foreigners (some two or three) in their pay, from whose instructions they hope to benefit in the practice of gunnery.

The late struggle was too short, and the national humiliation too local, to engender the wide spread conviction among the Chinese, of their inferiority in the warlike, or in any other arts, to the foreigners. Until their obstinate prepossessions and inveterate prejudices of national superiority and wisdom arc uprooted, China cannot importantly progress. Experience tells us that very rarely has the

"The skill, valour, and discipline of the naval and THE COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH RUSSIA. military forces employed upon the service have been most There is naturally great anxiety felt among the conspicuous, and have led to the conclusion of peace inercantile class to learn the particulars of the com.pettiest Rajah or predatory Chieftain in British upon the terms proposed by her Majesty. mercial treaty which ministers have concluded India, been content with the first drubbing he has "Her Majesty rejoices in the prospect that by the with Russia. The commercial policy which has received at our hands. Hence we deem another free access which will be opened to the principal marts been so steadily pursued for so many years past, which case we shall of course be successful, but war with China sooner or later inevitable; in of that populous and extensive empire, encouragement by the Russian Government, has been so decidedly then we think the Chinese will be constrained will be given to the commercial enterprise of her ultra protective against the products of industry thoroughly to feel and acknowledge their inferi- that it will be considered a feather in the cap of ministers if they have suceeded in procuring any-ority, and if so, their next defeat will, perhaps, be thing like a tolerable relaxation of the prohibitions the precursor of their social advancement. Who dare prognosticate the result of this national and excessive import duties, amounting also nearly to absolute prohibition against so many important awakening? Who can foresee the mighty changes which may ensue therefrom? In our own days we articles of manufacture. COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH THE GERMAN have seen what the will of one man can accom- CUSTOMS UNION. We copy the following from plish. We allude to the Pacha-af Egypt, who the letter of the private correspondent of a morning with a population not one hundredth of that of contemporary. If the information it contains be China, and with a revenue that would be easily

"As soon as the ratifications of the treaty shall have been exchanged, it will be laid before you. "In concert with her allies, her Majesty has succeed. ed in obtaining for the Christian population of Syria an establishment of a system of administration which they were entitled to expect from the engagements of the Sultan, and from the good faith of this country.

The differences for some time-existing between the Turkish and Persian governments had recently led to acts of hostility; but as each of these states has accepted

mojome metaation of Cr

Carnesary hope that

Majesty entertains a confident hope that their mutual may be carried to a successful issue: Froin relations will be speedily and amicably adjusted. positive information, I am able to announce to "Her Majesty has concluded with the Emperor of those interested in the commercial intercourse Russia a treaty of commerce and navigation, which between Germany and England, an event which will be laid before you. Her Majesty regards this entitles us to entertain-great hopes; negotiations treaty with great satisfaction, as the foundation for have been opened between England and the Zollver- increased intercourse between her Majesty's subjects ein, to lay the foundations of a future treaty of and those of the Emperor. Commerce between the two countries. The com mercial navy of Germany (exclu.fig that of Austria) is more important; it contains a greater number of tons (ships' cargo weight) than that of France. Parcelled and isolated, if escaped attention; united under the same flag, it will now occupy its due rank, far froin rivaling England, but considerable enough to be an important ally."

"Her Majesty is happy to inform you that complete success has attended the recent military operations in Affghanistan.

Her Majesty has the greatest satisfaction in record. ing her high sense of the ability with which those operations have been directed, and of the constancy and valour which have heen manifested by the European

and Native forces.

"The superiority of her Majesty's rms has been established by decisive victories on the ines of former disasters; and the complete liberation other Majesty's subjects who were held in captivity, and for whom her Majesty felt the deepest interest. has been effected.

We are commanded by her Majesty to inform you occupation by a military force of the countries to

that it has not been deemed advisable to continue the

the westward of the Indus.

"Gentlemen of the House of Commons, "Her Majesty has directed the estimates for the ensuing year to be laid before you. "Such reductions have been made in the amount of the naval and military force as have been deemed compatible, under present circumstances, with the efficient performance of the public service throughout the extended empire of her Majesty.

a single province of the Celestial

Empire, has yet managed to erect himself into a power courted by France and England, whom he very nearly involved in a war.

Any one who has passed through Egypt, and who has also for a short time resided here, must of the Chinese cooley to the Egyptian fellah. In be struck with the moral and physical superiority endurance of fatigue, cheerful obedience, tact and courage, the Chinaman far surpasses any other Asiatic, and with European tactics and discipline, it is believed, would rival the Sepoy as a Soldier.

With no caste prejudices, a supply only of rice, Soldier The magnificent water communications and salt, would suffice to subsist the Chinese afford every facility for the transport of large bodies of troops to any given point.

It has been whispered that Sir Henry Pottinger has been urgently requested to Should, the successor of Taou Kwang, be im- remain some time in Chipa, to finally ar- bued with Europeanism, what is there he cannot range measures consequent on the cession do? The mind staggers at the contemplation. It is, of our new settlements. Sir Henry has been perhaps, the destiny of despotic China in the given plenary powers to adjust the claims East, and of democratic America in the West, to of the merchants for Opium, they having rid both continents of European domination. Were a Peter the Great, a Mehemet Ali, or even a voluntarily expressed their, readiness to Sultan Mahmoud, to spring up in China, might not acquiesce in the decision he may make. We Tartar hoides again desolate the valley of the have been given to understand that Sir Danube, and Europe tremble, not at the prospect Hen Pottinger is desirous of returning to of a Russian, but of a Chinese invasion? If this England, and that he may be expected to be dubious, is it not certain, that all the boasted gerve its Asiatic Frontier of the Oural Mountains? arrive about July or August.-London power of Russia would then but suffice to pre- Paper. ED. F. C.

109

34

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our,

able sun.

1 Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PATER, it brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of rosidence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 11ru, 1843

on the 16th he would propose to give the thanks of the House to the officers and troops concerned in military operations in the East Indies, in which he proposed to include the Governor-General, but it would refer only to the subject of thanks, and would not touch on any political matters what-

ever.

WAK OFFICE, JAN. 17.-MEMORANDUM--In com. memoration of the distinguished services and of the gallantry displayed by Her Majesty's troops which have been recently employed on the coasts and in the rivers of China, Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to permit the undermentioned corps, viz:-

We see the French Ministry, with the out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our view of preserving their Colonies, and aid- Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our Clains, which, trifling as they are, ing their mercantile marine, have deter- individually,-yet, aggregately, amount to a consider-mined to compensate the domestic Beet Root Sugar Growers, by a payment of £2,500,000, and admit Colonial Sugar at a rate which will extinguish this branch of native manufacture. We have not seen the details of the measure, but we suppose the Sugars of Manila, and Siam, will be admit- ted into France, at low rates; perhaps, also, the refined Sugar of China. It is apparent, from what we hear, that the French Government is determined on pro- By H. M. Steamer, Vixen, we have moting, to the utmost, commercial relations letters from Chusan to the 2nd instant. with this part of the world. We should Correspondent at the determination of H. E. Ratti de Menton, will lead to a great deve- Much dissatisfaction is expressed by a confidently expect, the Mission of Count not to interfere with the the Opium Ships, lopement of trade between China and six or seven of which, in defiance of H. E.'s France. On some future occasion we may Proclamation have proceeded up the Yang-point out the fiscal changes which France to wear the cross of the Spanish order of Isabella tze-Keang. It is now said the Proclamation should make, (and she could do so without the Seconds conferred upon them by the Queen of of the 14th November does not apply to a sacrifice of income) to secure this importing on the north coast of Spain in the year 1837. Spain, in approbation of their conduct whilst serv- Opium Vessels, and hence the order of ant object. H. E. to tlle senior Naval Officer to release the detained vessels.

We are asked whether it be just that Opium Vessels should have immunities and privileges denied to vessels filled only with British manufactures? We would tell our Correspondent (whose very interesting let- ter we shall insert at length in our next) that had not the vessels in question been released, ships under Foreign Flags would have been immediately chartered and despatched to the Yang-tze-Keang with the Drug. So what else could be done?

The Erigone, which left Macao on the 5th inst., proceeds we understand to the coast of Cochin-China, and will perhaps visit Bankok, afterwards she will proceed to Manila, to meet the French Frigate Cleopatra, (50 guns) Commandant Roy, which is expected to arrive there by that time. The King of Cochin-China is now at war with Cambodia and Siam; and accounts have been received that five French Missionaries have been seized by the said King and condemned to death. The promptitude of Commandant Cecille, in at once proceeding to the spot, to pro- cure their release or satisfaction for their martyrdom (if unhappily they have been executed,) merits the highest commenda- tion. We look with interest to the result.

From a Correspondent's letter, we learn, under date of Canton, 8th May, that "Exports are going on fast, and I begin now to think, unless folks en- courage the Chinese to bring down and cook up rubbish, à la Macao, the season's Export will not exceed forty-five millions. Of Hyson, the stock is said to be reduced to 3000 chests. Twankay, about a million left; Congou, eighty-six Chops; Souchong, 4 or 5000 chests. Very few Caners

To good of the Toung Tysons, or Gunpower, and or useful English sorts of Congou,

ver few.

The arket is not so brisk, during the last few days, although Hysons have gone on 2 taels in con- sequence of the diminished stock. Good Congous maintain 22 to 24, for black leaf kinds, while sound common, is not to be had under 10. Tumakys

are 18 for good.

The Augsburgh Gazelle states that His Holiness, the Pope, contemplates sending an Apostolic Vicar to China, at the request of the Roman Catholics in that empire.

By the Anonyma, from Bombay, we have received dates from London to the 6th of February. The news by the Mail is rather barren of interest, ex- cept of an afflicting character. The most notable incidents are the loss of the Conqueror, Jessie Logan, England, during a violent tempest which raged Arundel, and many other vessels on the coast of unintermittingly for thirty-six hours. The loss of life, it is computed, will exceed five hundred souls. Also the assassination of the very estimable and appears the wretched maniac who committed this talented private Secretary of Sir Robert Peel. It atrocious deed, intended to have sacrificed the Premier.

The Addresses in both Houses were carried with- out a division, and afforded an opportunity for the take" approval of the entire policy of Lord Ellen- Duke of Wellington, to give an emphatic no mis- borough's Government of India, at which we re- joice, as we have ever held, it merits the heartiest praise. We should mention that the proximate accouchement of her Majesty prevented her opening Parliament, in person.

Laws will take place, but not a measure adequate It is expected a further modification of the Corn- to stifle the growing agitation of this vital question. The negotiations of Commercial Treaties now in progress with Spain, Holland, Austria, France, Portugal, and Brazil, will necessitate changes in our Tariff, which cannot but be important ameliora-

tions.

to

1.

18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot. 26th (the Cameronian) Regiment of Foot. 29th (the Princess Charlotte of Wales's or the Hertfordshire) Regiment of Foot. 55th (the Westmoreland) Regiment of Foot. 98th Regiment of Foot.

bear on their colours and appointments the word

China," and the device of the Dragon.

been graciously pleased to permit the non-com-s- THE ROYAL ARTILLERY.-Her Majesty nas sioned officers and privates of the Royal Artillery

Her Majesty has also been graciously pleased to permit the Royal Artillery to bear upon their appointments the word "China," and the device of the Dragon, in commemoration of their distin- guished services under Sir Hugh Gough.

FIRST SHIP TO HONG-KONG FROM SCOTLAND-The ielaw for Hong-Kong, one of the ports opened to James Campbell sailed yesterday from the Broom- the merchants of Great Britain, in terms of the late treaty with the Emperor of China. The vessel, we understand, is a complete bumper, having as much merchandize on board as it can conveniently carry.--Glasgow Courier.

tion in the daily journals which may not give unmixed satisfaction CONNECTED with Hong-Kong, we observe an intima to Government. It is, that the Missionary Chinese College at Malacca is to be immediately transferred to Hong-Kong. Since than of any other class of foreigners, If it become aware of an its misunderstandings with the Jesuits and Dominicians, the Chi nese Government has been, if possible, more jealous of missionaries unintermitting effort of missionary zeal in the Island of Hong- Kong, the Chinese Government will be hard to be persuaded that China may be embarrassed on this account. Still, no Christian, the English authorities cannot stop it; and our relations with no philosophical Government, could for a moment dream of refusing leave to strangers to come and have access to the refusing missionaries leave to settle in its territortes and teach their doctrines to all such as may apply for instruction, or of missionaries. The duty prescribed to Government alike by reason and religion, of allowing the gospel free course, is as clear as their duty to abstain from playing the missionary part in their sure remain at the mercy of the discretion of the missionary own persons. In this matter, Government must in a great mea. bodies. The patrons of missionary efforts must be aware how now and useful information to the tribes they addressed. They much the progress of Christianity has at all times been accelerated when those sent to propagate it have been able to communicate must therefore see the advantage of making their college at Hong- Kong as complete a seminary of instruction as they can, and of tion in the useful and ornamental arts, the sciences, and above all not confining its advantages to neophytes. Let them give instruc. medicine. Let them avail themselves of their intercourse with the students to explain and recommend the Christian religion; but

let them not insist upon its profession as a requisite for adinission, Commercial langour or stagnation, we regret toto confer. They will thus increase their power for good. The or for the attainment of such degrees as it may be found admissible say, still exists, and the movement which the news Jesuits, who to a considerable extent acted upon their principle, from China and India gave, has subsided. Heavy might have kept their footing in China still but for the rash and losses by Fires and Marine Insurance, and several against the intrusting of the missionary task at Hong-Kong to vulgar meddling of the mendicant orders. Let this example warn failures of magnitude, have added to the pervading uneducated zeal. The British Government would do well to gloom, which still hangs over mercantile affairs. encourage any inclination that may be evinced by the friends of We are, however, glad to note, the increasing Hong-kong, by contributing something to the support of their missions to employ exclusively educated and judicious men at consumption of our staple-TEA-and manifest college on condition that satisfactory evidence shall be given to it symptoms of improvement in the demand for this of the qualification of every man that shall be sent out. Embar- article. The East India Company have reduced rasaments with the Chinese authorities may thus be avoided, and the rate of Exchange to le 114 a Hong-Kong rendered a powerful instrument of civilization in the

WE HAVE TRANSFERRED to our columns several items of intelligence bearing on the interests of this Island, which must be our apology for the brevity of our Editorial remarks.

We are compelled. again, to defer the account of the Amoy Races, which, with Observer's Communication, shall appear in

bour next.

meetings which was ever held in Exeter-hall, was MISSIONARIES TO CHINA-One of the largest held on Tuesday evening at that building, convened by the London Missionary Society, to consider the means of extending and promoting in China the objects of the Society, The doors were opened at five o'clock, and by six o'clock the hall was so full that policemen was stationed at the various entrances to prevent others entefing. Wm. T. Blair, Esq., of Bath, presided, and on the platform Leichfield, the Rev. Dr. Alder, W. A. Hankey, Esq., were the Hon. and Rev. B. Noel, the Rev. Dr J. Foulger, Esq., the Rev. A. F. Lacroix, the Rev. J. Clayton, the Rev. T. Archer, the Rev. R. Moffat, &c. The chairman having briefly addressed the meeting, Dr. Leichfield moved the first resolution, expressive of thanksgiving to God for the termina- tion of the war between China and Great Britain, the treaty of peace for the introduction of christi- and for the greatly enlarged facilities secured by

The victory gained at Meeance, near WE much regeret to hear the number of Burgla- Hydrabad, by Sir Charles Napier, over the ries nightly committed have not diminished. An Ameers of Scinde, will rank in lustre with attack was made on the Morrison Institution, carly any of our achievements in India. We are on Tuesday morning; property of some value was glad to learn that about 2 crores of treasure taken, and the Reverend Principal was, we are told, stabbed, as also one of his Servant. Our much were found secreted in the City of Hydra-respected Chinese Secretary, was an inmate at the bad. We hope the gallant victors will have, time, but we are glad to say was not mal-treated. as they deserve it, for their prize-money. To give a list of the Robberies committed dur- The part of Scinde we now incorporate ing the last fortnight would fill the whole of our anity into that empire. Several other resolutions with our territory, is just the slice we want-columns. We believe all preventive measures were passed, one of which, moved by the Hon, and ed for the free navigation of the Indus, and that can be taken with so small a Police Force are Rev. B. Noel, stated that the Anglo-Chinese Collego which, of course, had nothing to do with the adopted. We would strongly recommend a large was to be removed from Malacca to Hong-Kong,

quarrel.

IT is reported that the increasing years and infirmities of the Duke of Wellington, will induce him to resign the office of Com- mander-in-Chief. Sir George Murray is named as likely to be his successor.

ENGLISH INTELLIGENCE.

Duke of Wellington gave notice that on the 14th THE BRITISH CORPS IN INDIA AND CHINA The of February he should submit a motion of the thanks of the House to the Naval and Military Officers and men engaged in service in China; and

and that the missionary labours were to be specially directed to that island.-Patriot.

ASTONISHING THE CHINESE-It is nothing un- to an estate playing all sorts of pranks to make his common to see one who has suddenly fallen heir new neighbours stare, John Bull's recent acquisi tion of Hong-Kong appears to have infected him with this spirit. He is all agog to enter into

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

AT the end of a late message trom the President of the UNITED STATES to the House of Representatives, touching the "Haiwaian or Sandwich Islands," is introduced the following passage respecting the recent treaty between England and China, and the hopes which the Americans rest upon the fact of that convention:-

possession of his new estate, and to show the natives | ports, seems at least problematical. In the meanwhile, that he can do things in style. John Chinaman our watchful trans-atlantic brethren seems determined will be puzzled with the self-contradiction of the to lose no time:- new comers. He will see ships" sailed on the "Being of opinion that the commercial interests of the United tea-total principle" anchoring alongside opium-clip- degree of attention and vigilance such as there is no agent of this States connected with China, require at the present moment a pers; and the same fleet that brings the Missionaries Government on the spot to bestow, the President recommends to from Malacca, to denounce gambling among other Congress to make appropriation for the compensation of a coin. vices, will most likely carry out the "first-rate missioner, to reside in China, to oxcercise a wateful care over billiard-table," which has already been ordered for persons and property; empowered to hold intercoura with the the concerne of American citizens, and for the protection of their the use of the Ninety-eight Regiment at Hong-local authorities, and ready, under instructions from his Govern. Kong. The billiard-table cannot fail to increase adress himself to the high Functionaries of the empire, or through ment, should such instructions become necessary hereafter, to the Chinese estimate of the warlike dispositions of them t the Emperor himself." the British. "These men," it will be said, "make balls their playthings when the are no longer engaged in shooting them at us." The table in question, is said to be a fac-simile of that made for her Majesty at Windsor Castle; and it has been shipped on board the ship Possidone, which carries despatches for her Majesty's Government. Here are fresh themes of wonderment for the Celestials. The playthings of her Majesty's soldiers are as fine as her Majesty's own; her Majesty, too, though young and a woman, has as manly a taste for play-It ing with balls as her warriors. The African chief on the Niger, who requested Captain Becroft to bring him a couple of brass guns and a strong box for his money, evinced by the request the beautiful simplicity of his theory of government. Perhaps the Chinese, recalling their own experience, may imagine the Royal game, implements of which are sent out along with the despatches, a playful allegory of the British constitution, as chess is said to be of the art of war, and infer the theory of our government is as uncomplicated as that of the African prince. "The Queen of Great Britain," they will say, "canons and pockets in her hours of leisure, and thus learns how to extend her empire and fill her treasury."-Spectator.

THE establishment in China of courts of justice, with criminal and admiralty jurisdiction-the mission of that intelligent and highly esteemed officer of engineers, Major Aldrich, to Hong-Kong, with a view to the application of his professional talents to the improvement of the acquired ter- ritory-the receipt at the East India House for indents for steam vessels--the establishment of consular agencies by the British Government at the several Chinese ports, and the probable estab- lishment of a consulate in London on the part of the Chinese Government, are strong and unerring indications of a movement in advance.-Monthly Times.

"The military operations carried on against the Chinese empire by the English Government have been terminated by a treaty according to the terms of which, four important ports hitherto shut against foreign commerce, are to be opened to the British merchants, viz., Amoy, Foo-choo-Fow, Ningpo, and Changhae. cannot but be interesting [How delicate is this mode of putting to the mercantile interests of the United States, whose bee me en considerable, to ascertain whether these other ports, now interests with China at the single port of Canton has already open to British commerce, are to remain shut, nevertheless, against

the commerce of the United States. The treaty between the Chinese Government and the British Commissioner provides

noither for the admission nor the exclusion of the ships of other nations. It would seem, therefore, that it remains with every other nation having commercial intercourse with China, to seek t empire in this respect."-IBID.

make proper arrangements for itself with the Government of that

DISASTERS AT SEA.-The disasters at sea have been innumerable, and in very many instances, vessels have gone down with all on board. The coast is strewed with wrecks. But one of the worst that has occurred is that of another East Indiman on the coast of Bologne. The Cosqueror, a fine vessel of 800 tons, belonging to Mr Richard Green, of the firm of Wigram and Green, bound from Calcutta to London, and commanded by Captain Duggan, after beating about in the Channel during the heavy gale on Friday night, was driven on shore about half-past ten o'clock, off Lionel, a small town on the French coast, six miles distant from Merlimont, (where the Reliance struck) and almost immediately went to pieces; and every soul on board was lost, except Henry Abchurch, a boy, one of the cuddy servants. There were eigh- teen passengers on board.

About the same time, a Swedish vessel was also wrecked near the spot, and all hands perished; as also an English fruit-vessel, with the whole of her crew. Three other vessels were wrecked, and the crew of one of them were drowned.

Several vessels were stranded at Plymouth and Devonport; among them the Seawitch, with a cargo valued at £35,000. The Royal Adelaide, 120, which parted with her chain-cables and drove some distance, was brought up in safety.

We have been informed that Sir Henry Pottinger has been requested to remain in China, and that the appointments of Consuls and other Officials have been left at his disposal. We also have heard that Sir Henry Pottinger has been directed to pro- ceed to Pekin, for the purpose of arranging many matters of importance with the Emperor, and ex- plaining the advantage to both countries of having an ambassador duly accredited. These objects are Few instances of loss were more unmerited than of such national importance, that we conclude Sir that of the Percy, steamer which left North Shields Henry Pottinger, unless prevented by ill health, on Thursday night, to look out for vessels in dis will consent to remain some time longer in China, stress. She was overtaken by the storm in the to place our future Political and Commercial inter-morning, pitched among the rocks, and became a course on a well-understood and mutually satisfac- wreck, All the crew, however, saved themselves, torily principle.-Ibid. except a boy who could not swim.

A Mr Macdonald Stephenson, has addressed the authorities of China, requesting to be appointed Chinese Consul in London. He expects his appli- cation will be backed by H. E. Sir Henry Pottin- ger; moreover, the Monthly Times gravely recom- mends the nomination!

mee hours in reaching the sure,

TOTAL LOSS OF THE ARUNDEL YACHT, ON THE SUSSEX COAST. The Arundel, bound for Hong- Kong and Macao, took the ground on the Win- chilsea track, about half-past one o'clock A.M., on the 28th ult., and soon after became a perfect wreck. The escape of the crew, under the cir- THE CHINESE TREATY.-By a fortunate accident, cumstance, seems to have been miraculous, They tung, I had yesterday an opportunity of seeing one of although the distance scarcely exceeds so many the most important documents of modern times, namely miles. The Arundel was well known as one of the treaty of peace with the Emperor of China. It the finest vessels belonging to the royal yacht was on Sunday (Christmas day) that I went to the squadron, and was built by the late Duke of Norfolk, Foreign Office, and everything about the building seemed from timber grown on his own estate. At the sale as silent as a grave, At the door, a man from the of the late duke's property, she was purchased by post-office was unloading several bags heavy with letters Captain Richardson, who intended her for the local and dispatches, and a common workman was receiving them, and throwing them on the floor of the hall. I trade in China-her peculiar build and extraordi- inquired for Mr Collins, the purchaser of Taylor's in-nary sailing qualities adapting her for that service vention of Calotype, a process differing from the Dagu. most especially. She was laden with general orreotype, inasmuch as the impression is always taken merchandize, partly on the owner's account, and off on prepared paper. I was directed to the top of the partly by private merchants. house. I met no one on my way to the printing-office, where I found Mr. Collins in a small room with closed shutters, and busily engaged, with an assistant, in mak- ing a fac-simile of the treaty by aid of an artificial light. The document itself is on straw paper four feet long, and about ten inches broad. The letters are prettily painted, and ratified by three long impressions in red ink, taken from wood. Two copies have been ordered. One for the Queen, to be glazed and framed, and hung up in Buckingham Palace; the second as Mr. Collins observed with a smile. " to astonish,the natives," and will be sent to the Emperor of China along with the original-Times.

Whether the opening of the Chinese ports is to be an opening to England only, or to all the world, 13 cer- tainly a matter of some importance, both to the in orests of the maritime nations, and hlso to the improvement and success of our own commercial intercourse with China, as it would be likely to affect the relations and regulations of our own trade through the five ports; but the probability of an unrestricted extension, im- mediately, of the privilege of trading through these

the U. S. 10-gun brig Somers, a mutiny was disco- UNITED STATES-On the return from Africa of vered to have been in active preparation, and on the eve of explosion, at the head of which was Mr Spencer, a midshipman, and son of the secretary at war. The seizure and examination, of the papers disclosed so deep laid and horrible a con- spiracy, that summary measures were considered expedient. Spencer and two of the ringleaders young man is only 19 years of age, and no cause were at once hung at the yard-arm, the unfortunate has been assigned as the possible motive for the contemplation of such a crime.

The ARRIVALS from China were-the Crest,

Royal Saxon, Bombay, Cleopatra, British Sovereign, Larkins; the latter reported to be aground near Margate.

SAILED. The Nautilus, from Liverpool, and the James Campbell from the Clyde.

LOADING at London, the Zenobia, Rookery, Eleonora, Emu, Indian Maid of Athens, and Pas-

35

senger.-At Liverpool, the Thomas Fielder, and Ranger; the Aden and Ivanhoe, wind bound.

DEATHS. Admiral Thomas Alexander; Rear Jollitle, Esq.; Viscount Ferrard; Charles Fyshe Admiral S. Henderson; General Browne; Hylton Palmer, Esq.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route. UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under. signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ s. d. Do. UNDER lb. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 6 0 Do. do. 2 01 do, 0 10 6

PACKAGES.

Do.

do. 4

01

do.

1 0 0

Do.

do.

6 05

do.

1 5 0

Do.

do. 10. 03

do.

1 10

Do.

do. 15

1

do.

2

Do

do. 20

do.

Do.

do. 25

do.

Do.

do. 30

2

do. 3

do. 40

do.

Do. 24 3 10 0 Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will be computed by either Weight or Measure.

JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on delivery.

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the

month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open to 10 lb., 3. per lb. at both ends,) will be charged-- lb., Is- lb., Is. 9d.; from 1 lb.

RISK--To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,- unlces insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two

and a-half per cen', will be made.

the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (payable to and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every article, will be added the above rates.

RECEIPT Receipts will be given on the delivery of each Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt.

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and particulara will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the carliest advice to the Consignees or if the postage (1s.) be paid, we will ourselves write to the party to whom the packages are addressed. AGENTS-Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras Capt. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Penineular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); Bombay, Messrs. William Nicol, & Cn.

OFFICES 41, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Cratched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe,

JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. BARBER, & Co,. 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London.

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future to send their orders and subscriptions to HENRY GRIBBLE. Macao, May 5th, 1843.

NOTICE. MR JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR. JOHN LEFF. LER, are duly authorized to sign for me, by Procuration, during my absence from China. HENRY PYBUS

Macno, 5th April, 1843.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, THE Reic SC

will be despatched to-morrow. For freight apply to HUGHESDON, BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1843.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN,

The A. I. British built Barque "COLONIST," THOMAS

LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named Ports this day.-For Freight or Passage, apply to JOHN BURD, & Co. Hong-Kong, 11th May, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. I. British built Barque "ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. JAMIESON, HOW & Co.

For Freight or l'assage, apply to Hongkong, 15th February, 1843.

, as it is

A CARD. MR ALEXANDER BIRD, Acel North-East House, Praya Grand

ap

ountant, first

FOR SALE the, Macao. Ship Chandlery, and Stor P

Ships.

NOTI

Thees of all kinds for

ed Townsend & Co.

otal

Mr. Edward Far'first and Solicitor, No. bgether Hongkong.

ICE.

-Ibid comb, Notary Public

& 2 Magistracy Street

109

34

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our

out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our Claims, which, trifling us they are, individually,-yet, aggregately, amount to a consider

able sun.

1 Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, it brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of rosidence takes place.

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 11Tu, 1843

on the 16th he would propose to give the thanks of the House to the officers and troops concerned in military operations in the East Indies, in which he proposed to include the Governor-General, but it would refer only to the subject of thanks, and would not touch on any political matters what

ever.

WAK OFFICE, JAN. 17.-MEMORANDUM--In Coin- memoration of the distinguished services and of the been recently employed on the coasts and in the rivers gallantry displayed by Her Majesty's troops which have of China, Her Majesty has been graciously pleased to permit the undermentioned corps, viz:-

We see the French Ministry, with the view of preserving their Colonies, and aid- ing their mercantile marine, have deter- mined to compensate the domestic Beet Root Sugar Growers, by a payment of £2,500,000, and admit Colonial Sugar at a rate which will extinguish this branch of native manufacture. We have not seen the details of the measure, but we suppose the THE FRIEND OF CHINA, Sugars of Manila, and Siam, will be admit- ted into France, at low rates; perhaps, also, the refined Sugar of China. It is apparent, from what we hear, that the French Government is determined on pro- By H. M. Steamer, Vixen, we have moting, to the utmost, commercial relations letters from Chusan to the 2nd instant. with this part of the world. We should Correspondent at the determination of H. E. Ratti de Menton, will lead to a great deve- Much dissatisfaction is expressed by a confidently expect, the Mission of Count not to interfere with the the Opium Ships, lopement of trade between China and six or seven of which, in defiance of H. E.'s France. On some future occasion we may Proclamation have proceeded up the Yang-point out the fiscal changes which France to wear the cross of the Spanish order of Isabella tze-Keang. It is now said the Proclamation should make, (and she could do so without the Second, conferred upon them by the Queen of of the 14th November does not apply to a sacrifice of income) to secure this import-ing on the north coast of Spain in the year 1837. Spain, in approbation of their conduct whilst serv- Opium Vessels, and hence the order of ant object. H. E. to tlle senior Naval Officer to release the detained vessels.

We are asked whether it be just that Opium Vessels should have immunities and privileges denied to vessels filled only with British manufactures? We would tell our Correspondent (whose very interesting let- ter we shall insert at length in our next) that had not the vessels in question been released, ships under Foreign Flags would have been immediately chartered and despatched to the Yang-tze-Keang with the Drug. So what else could be done?

The Erigone, which left Macao on the 5th inst., proceeds we understand to the coast of Cochin-China, and will perhaps visit Bankok, afterwards she will proceed to Manila, to meet the French Frigate Cleopatra, (50 guns) Commandant Roy, which is expected to arrive there by that time. The King of Cochin-China is now at war with Cambodia and Siam, and accounts have been received that five French Missionaries have been seized by the said King and condemned to death. The promptitude of Commandant Cecille, in at once proceeding to the spot, to pro- cure their release or satisfaction for their martyrdom (if unhappily they have been executed,) merits the highest commenda- tion. We look with interest to the result.

From a Correspondent's letter, we learn, under date of Canton, 8th May, that " Exports are going on fast, and I begin now to think, unless folks en- courage the Chinese to bring down and cook up rubbish, à la Macao, the season's Export will not exceed forty-five millions. Of Hyson, the stock is said to be reduced to 3000 chests. Twankay, about a million left; Congou, eighty-six Chops: Very Tow Capers or Pekoes. No good or fine Young Hysons, or Gunpower, and or useful English sorts of Congou, ver few.

The arket is not so brisk', during the last few days, although Hysons have gone a 2 taels in con- sequence of the diminished stock. Good Congous maintain 22 to 24, for black leaf kinds, while sound common, is not to be had under 10. Takys

are 18 for good.

The Augsburgh Gazelle states that His Holiness, the Pope, conteinplates sending an Apostolic Vicar to China, at the request of the Roman Catholics in that empire.

By the Anonyma, from Bombay, we have received dates from London to the 6th of February. The news by the Mail is rather barren of interest, ex- cept of an afflicting character. The most notable incidents are the loss of the Conqueror, Jessie Logan, Arundel, and many other vessels on the coast of England, during a violent tempest which raged unintermittingly for thirty-six hours. The loss of life, it is computed, will exceed five hundred souls. Also the assassination of the very estimable and appears the wretched maniac who committed this talented private Secretary of Sir Robert Peel. It atrocious deed, intended to have sacrificed the Premier.

The Addresses in both Houses were carried with- Duke of Wellington, to give an emphatic no mis- out a division, and afforded an opportunity for the take" approval of the entire policy of Lord Ellen- borough's Government of India, at which we re- joice, as we have ever held, it merits the heartiest praise. We should mention that the proximate accouchement of her Majesty prevented her opening Parliament, in person.

Laws will take place, but not a measure adequate It is expected a further modification of the Corn- to stifle the growing agitation of this vital question. The negotiations of Commercial Treaties now in progress with Spain, Holland, Austria, France, Portugal, and Brazil, will necessitate changes in our Tariff, which cannot but be important ameliora-

tions.

to

18th (Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot. 26th (the Cameronian) Regiment of Foot. 29th (the Princess Charlotte of Wales's or the Hertfordshire) Regiment of Foot. 55th (the Westmoreland) Regiment of Foot. 99th Regiment of Foot.

bear on their colours and appointments the word

China," and the device of the Dragon.

THE ROYAL ARTILLERY.-Her Majesty nas been graciously pleased to permit the non-comas- sioned officers and privates of the Royal Artillery

Her Majesty has also been graciously pleased to permit the Royal Artillery to bear upon their appointments the word "China," and the device of the Dragon, in commemoration of their distin- guished services under Sir Hugh Gough.

FIRST SHIP TO HONG-KONG FROM SCOTLAND-The elaw for Hong-Kong, one of the ports opened to James Campbell sailed yesterday from the Broom- the merchants of Great Britain, in terms of the late understand, is a complete bumper, having as much treaty with the Emperor of China. The vessel, we merchandize on board as it can conveniently carry-Glasgow Courier.

tion in the daily journals which may not give unmixed satisfaction CONNECTED With Hong-Kong, we observe an intima to Government. It is, that the Missionary Chinese College at Malacca is to be immediately transferred to Hong-Kong. Sinco than of any other class of foreigners, If it become aware of an nese Government has been, if possible, more jealous of missionaries its misunderstandings with the Jesuita and Dominicians, the Chi. unintermitting effort of missionary zeal in the Island of Hong- Kong, the Chinese Government will be hard to be persuaded that Chins may be embarrassed on this account. Still, no Christian, the English authorities cannot stop it; and our relations with no philosophical Government, could for a moment dream of their doctrines to all such as may apply for instruction, or of

refusing missionaries loave to settle in its territories and teach refusing leave to strangers to come and have access to the missionaries. The duty prescribed to Government alike by reason and religion, of allowing the gospel free course, is as clear as own persons. In this matter, Government must in a great mea their duty to abstain from playing the missionany part in their sure remain at the mercy of the discretion of the missionary bodies. The patrons of missionary efforts must be aware how new and useful information to the tribes they addressed. They much the progress of Christianity has at all times been accelerated when those sent to propagate it have been able to communicate must therefore see the advantage of making their college at Hong- Kong as complete a seminary of instruction as they can, and of tion in the useful and ornamental arts, the sciences, and above all not confining its advantages to neophytes. Let them give instruc. medicine. Let them avail themselves of their intercourse with the students to explain and recommend the Christian religion; but

let them not insist upon its profession as a requisite for adinission, Commercial langour or stagnation, we regret to to confer. They will thus increase their power for good. The or for the attainment of such degrees as it may be found admissible say, still exists, and the movement which the news Jesuits, who to a considerable extent acted upon their principle, from China and India gave, has subsided. Heavy might have kept their footing in China still but for the rash and losses by Fires and Marine Insurance, and several against the intrusting of the missionary task at Hong-Kong to vulgar meddling of the mendicant orders. Let this example warn failures of magnitude, have added to the pervading uneducated zeal. The British Government would do well to gloom, which still hangs over mercantile affairs. encourage any inclination that may be evinced by the friends of We are, however, glad to note, the increasing Hong-kong, consumption of our staple-Tex and manifest college on condition that satisfactory evidence shall be given to it Hong-kong, by butyly theated and judicious of that contributing something to the support of their symptoms of improvement in the demand for this of the qualification of every man that shall be sent out. Embar article. The East India Company have redangements with the Chinese authorities may thus be avoided, and the rate of Exemange, to 19 11d on Bengal.

WE HAVE TRANSFERRED to our columns several items of intelligence bearing on the interests of this Island, which must be our apology for the brevity of our Editorial remarks.

We are compelled. again, to defer the account of the Amoy Races, which, with Observer's Communication, shall appear in

our next.

East-CULONIAL GAZETTE.

meetings which was ever held in Exeter-hall, was MISSIONARIES TO CHINA-One of the largest held on Tuesday evening at that building, convened by the London Missionary Society, to consider the objects of the Society, The doors were opened means of extending and promoting in China the at five o'clock, and by six o'clock the hall was so full that policemen was stationed at the various entrances to prevent others entefing. Wm. T. Blair, Esq., of Bath, presided, and on the platform ries nightly committed have not diminished. An J. Foulger, Esq., the Rev. A. F. Lacroix, the Rev. WE much regeret to hear the number of Burgla. were the Hon. and Rev. B. Noel, the Rev. Dr Leichfield, the Rev. Dr. Alder, WA. Hankey, Esq., attack was made on the Morrison Institution, early J. Clayton, the Rev. T. Archer, the Rev. R. Moffat, on Tuesday morning; property of some value was taken, and the Reverend Principal was, we are told, &c. The chairman having briefly addressed the tion of the war between China and Great Britain, stabbed, as also one of his Servant. Our much meeting, Dr. Leichfield moved the first resolution, expressive of thanksgiving to God for the termina-

The victory gained at Meeance, near Hydrabad, by Sir Charles Napier, over the Ameers of Scinde, will rank in lustre with any of our achievements in India. We are glad to learn that about 2 crores of treasure were found secreted in the City of Hydra-respected Chinese Secretary, was an inmate at the bad. We hope the gallant victors will have, time, but we are glad to say was not mal-treated. and for the greatly enlarged facilities secured by as they deserve it, for their prize-money. To give a list of the Robberies committed dur- the treaty of peace for the introduction of christi- The part of Scinde we now incorporate ing the last fortnight would fill the whole of our anity into that empire. Several other resolutions with our territory, is just the slice we want-columns. We believe all preventive measures were passed, one of which, moved by the Hon. and ed for the free navigation of the Indus, and that can be taken with so small a Police Force, are which, of course, had nothing to do with the adopted. We would strongly recommend a large was to be removed from Malacca to Hong-Kong,

quarrel.

ENGLISH INTELLIGENCE. IT is reported that the increasing years and infirmities of the Duke of Wellington, Duke of Wellington gave notice that on the 14th THE BRITISH CORPS IN INDIA AND CHINA The will induce him to resign the office of Com-of February he should submit a motion of the mander-in-Chief. Sir George Murray is thanks of the House to the Naval and Military named as likely to be his successor. Officers and men engaged in service in China; and

Rev. B. Noel, stated that the Anglo-Chinese College

and that the missionary labours were to be specially directed to that island.-Patriot.

ASTONISHING THE CHINESE-It is nothing un- to an estate playing all sorts of pranks to make his common to see one who has suddenly fallen heir new neighbours stare, John Bull's recent acquisi tion of Hong-Kong appears to have infected him with this spirit. He is all agog to enter into

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

to lose no time:-

possession of his new estate, and to sow the natives | ports, seems at least problematical. In the meanwhile, that he can do things in style. John Chinaman our watchful trans-atlantic brethren seems determined will be puzzled with the self-contradiction of the new comers. He will see ships" sailed on the "Being of opinion that the commercial interests of the United tea-total principle" anchoring alongside opium-clip- degree of attention and vigilance such as there is no agent of this States connected with China, require at the present moment a pers; and the same fleet that brings the Missionaries Government on the spot to bestow, the President recommends to from Malacca, to denounce gambling among other Congress to take appropriation for the compensation of a coin. vices, will most likely carry out the "first-rate the concerns of American citizens, and for the protection of their missioner, to reside in China, to oxcercise a watelful care over billiard-table," which lias already been ordered for persons and property; empowered to hold intercours with the the use of the Ninety-eight Regiment at Hong-local authorities, and ready, under instructions from his Govern. Kong. The billiard-table cannot fail to increasement, should such instructions become necessary hereafter, to the Chinese estimate of the warlike dispositions of thress himself to the high Functionaries of the empire, or through thom t the Emperor himself." the British. "These men," it will be said, "make balls their playthings when the are no longer the UNITED STATES to the House of Representatives, AT the end of a late message from the President of engaged in shooting them at us." The table in touching the "Haiwaian or Sandwich Islands," is question, is said to be a fac-simile of that made for introduced the following passage respecting the recent her Majesty at Windsor Castle; and it has been treaty between England and China, and the hopes which shipped on board the ship Possidone, which carries the Americans rest upon the fact of that convention:- despatches for her Majesty's Government. Here are fresh themes of wonderment for the Celestials. The playthings of her Majesty's soldiers arg as fine as her Majesty's own; her Majesty, too, though young and a woman, has as manly a taste for play- ing with balls as her warriors. The African chief on the Niger, who requested Captain Becroft to bring him a couple of brass guns and a strong box for his money, evinced by the request the beautiful simplicity of his theory of government. Perhaps the Chinese, recalling their own experience, may imagine the Royal game, implements of which are sent out along with the despatches, a playful allegory of the British constitution, as chess is said to be of the art of war, and infer the theory of our government is as uncomplicated as that of the African prince. "The Queen of Great Britain," they will say, "canons and pockets in her hours of leisure, and thus learns how to extend her empire and fill her treasury."-Spectator.

THE establishment in China of courts of justice, with criminal and admiralty jurisdiction-the mission of that intelligent and highly esteemed officer of engineers, Major Aldrich, to Hong-Kong, with a view to the application of his professional talents to the improvement of the acquired ter- ritory-the receipt at the East India House for indents for steam vessels--the establishment of consular agencies by the British Government at the several Chinese ports, and the probable estab- lishment of a consulate in London on the part of the Chinese Government, are strong and unerring indications of a movement in advance.-Monthly Times.

We have been informed that Sir Henry Pottinger has been requested to remain in China, and that the appointments of Consuls and other Officials have been left at his disposal. We also have heard that Sir Henry Pottinger has been directed to pro- ceed to Pekin, for the purpose of arranging many inatters of importance with the Emperor, and ex- plaining the advantage to both countries of having an ambassador duly accredited. These objects are of such national importance, that we conclude Sir Henry Pottinger, unless prevented by ill health, to place our future Political and Commercial inter- course on a well-understood and mutually satisfac- torily principle.-Ibid.

"The military operations carried on against the Chinese empire by the English Government have been terminated by a treaty according to the terms of which, four important ports hitherto shut against foreign commerce, are to be opened to the British merchants, viz., Amoy, Foo.Choo-Fow, Ningpo, and Changhae. It cannot but be interesting [How delicate is this mode of putting to the mercantile interests of the United States, whose interests with China at the single port of Canton has already bec me so considerablo, to ascertain whether these other ports, now open to British commerce, are to remain shut, nevertheless, against the commerce of the United States. The treaty between the noither for the admission nor the exclusion of the ships of other Chinese Government and the British Commissioner provides nations. It would seem, therefore, that it remains with every other nation having commercial intercourse with China, to seek t make proper arrangements for itself with the Government of that empire in this respect."-IBID.

4

DISASTERS AT SEA.-The disasters at sea have been innumerable, and in very many instances, vessels have gone down with all on board. The coast is strewed with wrecks. But one of the worst that has occurred is that of another East Indiman on the coast of Bologne. The Cosqueror, a fine vessel of 800 tons, belonging to Mr Richard Green, of the firm of Wigram and Green, bound from Calcutta to London, and commanded by Captain Duggan, after beating about in the Channel during the heavy gale on Friday night, was driven on shore about half-past ten o'clock, off Lionel, a small town on the French coast, six miles distant from Merlimont, (where the Reliance struck) and almost immediately went to pieces; and every soul on board was lost, except Henry Abchurch, a boy, one of the cuddy servants. There were eigh- teen passengers on board.

About the same time, a Swedish vessel was also wrecked near the spot, and all hands perished; as also an English fruit-vessel, with the whole of her crew. Three other vessels were wrecked, and the crew of one of them were drowned.

Several vessels were stranded at Plymouth and Devonport; among them the Seawitch, with a cargo valued at £35,000. The Royal Adelaide, 120, which parted with her chain-cables and drove some distance, was brought up in safety.

senger.-At Liverpool, the Thomas Fielder, and Ranger; the Aden and Ivanhoe, wind bound.

DEATHS. Admiral Thomas Alexander; Rear Jolliffe, Esq.; Viscount Ferrard; Charles Fyshe Admiral S. Henderson; General Browne; Hylton Palmer, Esq.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route. UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under. signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. PACKAGES. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ 8. Do. UNDER 1 lb. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 6 do. 2 01 do.

do.

d. 0

Do.

0 10

Do.

do. 4

04

1

Do.

do. 6

05

do.

1 5

Do.

do. 10

do.

1 10

Do. Do

do. 15

do.

2

do. 20

do.

2 10

Do. Do.

do. 25

14

do.

2 15

2 24

do.

do. 3 0 0 3 10 0

do. 30 Do. do. 40

Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will be computed by either Weight or Measure.

JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond tho delivery. value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 clock on the last day of the

month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open at both ends,) will be charged-- lb., Is-- lb., Is. 9d.; from 1 lb. to 10 lb., 3s. per lb.

RISK--To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,- unless insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two

and a-half per cen. will be made.

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (payable to the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every

article, will be added the above rates.

Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt.

RECEIPT Receipts will be given on the delivery of each

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, advice to the Consignees or if the postage (Is.) be paid, we will ourselves write to the party to whom the packages are addressed. AGENTS-Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras Capt. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); Bombay, Messrs. William Nicol, & Co.

OFFICES 44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Cratched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe,

JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES

BARBER, & Co,. 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London. Subscribers to the MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future

will consent to remain some time longer in China, stress. She was overtaken by the storm in to send their orders and subscriptions to

A Mr Macdonald Stephenson, has addressed the authorities of China, requesting to be appointed Chinese Consul in London. He expects his appli- cation will be backed by H. E. Sir Henry Pottin- ger, mercover, the Monthly Times gravely recom- mends the nomination!

THE CHUNERE Tretry Bod fchica) i

the

Few instances of loss were more unmérited than that of the Percy, steamer which left North Shields on Thursday night, to look out for vessels in dis- morning, pitched among the rocks, and became a wreck, All the crew, however, saved themselves, except a boy who could not swim.

TOTAL LOSS OF THE ARUNDEL YACHT, ON THE SUSSEX COAST. The Arundel, bound for Hong- Kong and Macao, took the ground on the Win- chilsea track, about half-past one o'clock &.M., on the 28th ult., and soon after became a perfect wreck. The escape of the crew, under the cir- were more than three hours in reaching the shore, although the distance scarcely exceeds so many miles. The Arundel was well known as one of the finest vessels belonging to the royal yacht squadron, and was built by the late Duke of Norfolk, from timber grown on his own estate. At the sale of the late duke's property, she was purchased by Captain Richardson, who intended her for the local trade in China-her peculiar build and extraordi-

te the sumon correspondent of the Allgemeine Zeit tung, I had yesterday an opportunity of seeing one of the most important documents of modern times, namely the treaty of peace with the Emperor of China. It was on Sunday (Christmas day) that I went to the Foreign Office, and everything about the building seemed as silent as a grave, At the door, a man from the post-office was unloading several bags heavy with letters and dispatches, and a common workman was receiving them, and throwing them on the floor of the hall. inquired for Mr Collins, the purchaser of Taylor's in-nary sailing qualities adapting her for that service vention of Calotype, a process differing from most especially. She was laden with general Dagu. orreotype, ipasmuch as the impression is always taken merchandize, partly on the owner's account, and off on prepared paper. I was directed to the top of the partly by private merchants. house. I met no one on my way to the printing-office, UNITED STATES-On the return from Africa of where I found Mr. Collins in a small room with closed the U. S. 10-gun brig Somers, a mutiny was disco- shutters, and busily engaged, with an assistant, in mak-vered to have been in active preparation, and on ing a fac-simile of the treaty by aid of an artificial the eve of explosion, at the head of which was light. The document itself is on straw paper four feet Mr Spencer, a midshipman, and son of the secretary long, and about ten inches broad. The letters are at war. The seizure and examination of the prettily painted, and ratified by three long impressions papers disclosed so deep laid and horrible a con- in red ink, taken from wood. Two copies have been spiracy, that summary measures were considered ordered. One for the Queen, to be glazed and framed, expedient. Spencer and two of the ringleaders and hung up in Buckingham Palace; the second as Mr. Collins observed with a smile. " to astonish,the were at once hung at the yard-arm, the unfortunate natives," and will be sent to the Emperor of China young man is only 19 years of age, and no cause along with the original.-Times. has been assigned as the possible motive for the contemplation of such a crime.

Whether the opening of the Chinese ports is to be an opening to England only, or to all the world, 13 cer- tainly a matter of some importance, both to the in:orests of the maritime nations, and also to the improvement and success of our own commercial intercourse with China, as it would be likely to affect the relations and regulations of our own trade through the five ports; but the probability of an unrestricted extension, im- mediately, of the privilege of trading through these

The ARRIVALS from China were-the Crest, Larkins; the latter reported to be ground near Royal Saxon, Bombay, Cleopatra, British Sovereign, Margate.

SAILED. The Nautilus, from Liverpool, and the James Campbell from the Clyde.

LOADING at London, the Zenobia, Rookery, Eleonora, Emu, Indian Maid of Athens, and Pas

Macao, May 5th, 1843.

HENRY GRIBBLE.

NOTICE. MR JOSEPH PYBUS, and MR. JOHN LEFF- LER, are duly authorized to sign for me, by Procuration, during my absence from China. HENRY PYBUS

Macao, 5th April, 1843.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN, will be despatched to-morrow. For freight apply to HUGHESDON, BROTHERS. Macao, 17th April, 1843.

FOR AMOY AND CHUSAN,

The A. I. British built LEISK, Commander, will sail for the above-named Barque "COLONIST," THOMAS Ports this day.-For Freight or Passage, apply to JOHN BURD, & Co. Hong-Kong, 11th May, 1843.

FOR LONDON.

THE A. I. British. built Barque ABBERTON," Captain CATT, loads at Hongkong and Macao, and has the greater part of her Cargo engaged. JAMIESON, HOW & Co.

For Freight or Passage, apply to Hongkong, 15th February, 1843.

A CARD. MR ALEXANDER BIRD, Accountant, first North-East House, Praya Grande, Macao. FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for Ships. P. Townsend & Co.

NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor, No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hongkong.

10v

10

36

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

PER NAVIGATOR.

Tar in barrels.

Mackerel in Kits,

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

D. WILSON & Co.

NOTICE.

Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," and exposed for A Mail for Amoy and Chusan, per "SNIPE," will be closed at this Office, on Friday evening, at 5 Sale, the undermentioned Goods, viz. :- o'clock-12th Inst

Superfine Black Cloth

Do.

Red do.

Do. Blue do,

Do. Scarlet do.

Glengarry Caps

Superfine Kerseymere Travelling Caps Horse hair do. Oiled-skin do. Cloth do.

Navy Gold Lace

Hooks and Eyes

Glazed Hats

Europe Boots

Leather Dressing Cares

Dressing Case's Silver Fittings

Writing Desks

Ladies' Work Boxes

Looking Glasses

Sausages in Boxes

PER VENICE.

Brushes of all kinds

Champagne Cider, in one

Butter in Firkins

Prime Pork.

dozen Cases

Pilot and Navy Bread.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

Perfumery of do. Court Plaister

Stationary of all kinds

Blotting Cases Envelopes and Cases

Memorandum Books, Rulers

Hones

Drawing Pencils.

Gilt edged Cards

G. F. DAVIDSON. Foolscap and Overland Paper

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:--Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co., 20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843. FOR SALE. Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hong-Kong, March 21st, 1843.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton.

ALSO, Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package. Apply to, C. V, GILLESPIE, 46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LoxBOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG, ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. NOTICE-Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY' CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY. A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street,

FOR SALE, BY THE UNDERSIGNED.

American Flour,

Do Cabin & Ship Biscuit

Do Beef and Pork,

Bengal Rice

Manila Patent Cordage,

Chocolate

Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder, Coarse Paint Oil,

Paints, of Sorts,

Turpentine,

Tar, Pitch

Cigars, No. 3 & 4, Oakum,

Do Rope,

Do

Rum

Do

Do

Coffee,

Do

Cocoanut Oil,

Brandy,

Gin,

Sherry,

Port,

Liqueurs,

Cherry Cordial,

Jams and Jellies,

Dutch Cheeses, Corks, Sardines,

C

Paint Brushes,

Twine,

Canvass,

Soap,

Sperm Candles,

Copper Boat Nails

Foolscap & Writing Paper,

Dinner Sets,

Cutlery and Hardware, American Drill,

And a wariety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA, at No 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, 'Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pirts, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley; Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1813.

Colour Boxes

Patent Drawing Pencils

Steel Pens

Chit Paper

Sealing Wax

Patent Leads Bronze Inkstands Chit Seals

Glass and Earthenware

Lamp Glasses and Chinnies

Coloured Tumblers,

Glass Chandeliers Bronzed do. Decantors

Salt Cellars

Hall Lamps

Telescopes

Thermometers

Plates and Dishes

Toby Philpotts Jugs

Embossed Jugs and Covers

Cruet Frames

Coat Buttons

Silk Gloves

Cotton Socks

Hair Combs

Small tooth do.

Naples Soap

Lozenges of kinds

Surveying Instruments

Pistols

Saddles and Bridles

Time Pieces

Saucepans

Tea Kettles

Tea Pots

Silver do.

Patent Water Filterers Do, Marble d. Iron Spoons

Bellows

Twine

Yard Measures

Beer Taps

Bird Shot

Cooling Pots

Velvet Corks Iron Cash Boxes Table Kuives

Bottled Herbs

Bloom Raisins Patras Currants

Liqueurs

Cayenne Pepper Cherry Brandy

White Claret

Hermetically scaled Hams.

Beer and Porter

ROBT. EDWARDS, Post-Master. Post-Office, Hong-Kong, 10th May, 1843.

HATS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hats, for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co: Hong-Kong. April 19th, 1843.

FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOKI" built by the same Builder as the Celes- tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

BENNETT PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 3rd March, 1843.

NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Goods, viz:-

Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, in onu doz. cases. Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jams and Jellies in 1 doz, cases of half pints, pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses, Butter, fresh in Jars, Soups of all des- criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels, American BEEF, [er American Barque "LARK"] also Pork, in barrels, Manila Coffee, Manila Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 dozen hottles, Sardines in Tins, Split Pens, Westphalia Hams, Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions, Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Supe-

P. 8.-Their Slate Billiard Table will be ready in rior (in toxes of 500), Negrohend Tobacco, Corks at the course of next week.

Hong-Kong, 4th May, 1843.

NOTICE-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843- NOTICE-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen' Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANBON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission, to on Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 NOTICE. Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON. Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, ISU JANUARI, 20:

inises to

NOTICE,

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread] will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes. WANTED,

A stout Lad, as an Apprentice to the Business. A Premium will be expected,

N. B. No business done on Sundays, after nine o'clock in the morning.

Hong-kong, April, 18th 1842.

FOR SALE Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar rels, Salt Provisions, Salt Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, in casks of all sizes, Gin in cases, a few pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Sherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English, and Country Canvas, and a small as- sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar; just ar rived a small quantity of Butter, Hams, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road.

M. DUUS. Hongkong, March 1st, 1843.

per Gross, Seaming Twine, Canvass Oakum, Tar Blacking Rozin &c., Coconut Oil, Linseed do. in Jars of 5 Guls., Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes. Yellow bar, Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knives and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices, Britannia Metal Ten Spoons. Cork Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays small and large, Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks, Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage, BENNETT, PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR SALE Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stures of all de, BALES criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale And Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, and Beaver Hats. Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. FOR SALE-Newcastle Coals. in bags, at, 50 cents per pecul. C. V. Gillespie. Apply to brand. 46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th Decmeber, 1842.

MAY.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.-

3rd Janthe Salopian

5th Time

33 Gondolier

Bombay Macao

231

Hicks [43 days] Bombay

Robinson

White

Wood

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 61 VOL. II

DONGBONG G%C

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THUR DAY, MAY 183 1823.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

CHARLES BATTEN HILLIER, Esq., has been appointed Assistant to the Chief Magis- trate of the Island of Hong-Kong. This appointment is to take effect from the 10th instant.

By order,

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Government-House, Hong-Kong, 13th May, 1843.

..ער

Or 12 yourly S

IMPORTS.-Principal] Rice, Sugar, Timber, Pepper, Rattans, Paper, Tobacco, Crockery, Salt, Sandal Wood, Red Wood, Ebony, Camphor, Tin- Foil, Spices, Beans, Bean-Oil, Junks, Fruits, &c. RHUBARD, $15 per picul. Many warehouses occupied with drugs which form an important article of bulky trailic, and would be worthy of investigation, as they are mostly unknown to us. COTTON CLOTH.-(Native) 1st quality,

Cis.

white even cloth, each piece 241 by 16in. 600 Ene bleached Nanking straw-colour, 18 feet by 12 inches Do. natural colour, 18 feet by 12 inches - 400

600

STS-Of this debente article, e as scarce pre- same to speak. The manufactured are in every respect sim lar to the Canton article, and the ave- (From our Ningpo Correspondent.) rge is 18 per rif of 29 yards, but Hang-chow-loo After entering the river from seaward, and folks are sold by weight, 45 cents per cunce, the lowing its gently serpentine stream, to the S. W. raw material is 116 to $150. for four or five leagues, you arrive off the city of Ningpo, situated on the fork, or confluence of two streams,-for, here the river splits into equal branches. The city is about central in the deed flat extensive valley, circumscribed by moun- tains, abrupt, but of moderate elevation and during the late season were very often covered with snow, forming a beautiful and picturesque landscape. The valley is intersected with numerous canals GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. and the prospect from the only pagoda in the city, (a very ancient ruin) is highly exhilirating; a WITH reference to the GOVERNMENT densly populated and elaborately cultivated valley, NOTIFICATION published in the Friend of relieved with well wooded tombs and silvery China and Hong-Kong Gazette, of the blinks of river and stream!et,--the boundary of 13th and 20th of last month, it is hereby sight being an elliptical ridge of diminutive alpine SHEEP abundantly supplied at the average of three announced, that the Land Officer has been the authorities and merchants, is certainly beyond blishments,-Land and Sea. The Transit Duties scenery. The kindness and hospitality of both dollars and a-half, each. instructed to report, finally, on the subject all expectation; intensely anxious to know every of that Notification, on Saturday, the 27th day of May, and that any Lands, regard- ing which he may not have received explanations, &c., before that day, will be In cases where such Lands have Buildings of any description, or Materials on them, the owners of such Buildings or Materials will be called on to remove them, or that will be done by the Land Officer, at the expense and risk of the

resumed.

owners.

By order, RICHARD WOOSNAM,

Government-House, Hong-Kong, 16th May, 1843.

EXPORT OF TEA, from China to England, in the month of April, 1843, in 17 vessels.

Bohea Congou

Caper

8,801,242 80,254

Souchong

213,011

Hungmuey

148,682

Sorts

Pekoe

Orange Pekoe

15,345 148,872 162,093

Total, Black, lbs. 9,569,499

Twankay Hyson

1,076,085 311,434

Hysonskin

1,680

Young Hyson

Gunpowder Imperial

105,620 137,707

68,424

Total, Green, lbs. 1,700,950

Total Export in April, lbs. 11,270,449

EXPORT OF TEA from China to England, in the 10 months, from 1st July, 1842, to 30th April,

1843, in 73 vessels.

Souchong

ARKIVED.

Steele Bell

List

Oliver

Macao Calcutta Macao Liverpool

33

Kelsall

Roxburgh'

19

Warlock

Sullivan

39

Syed Khan

Ilorsburgh

Bohea

13

Anonyma

-73

H. M. S. Serpent

Capt Neville

Chusan

Congou

7th Monarch

⚫ Whampoa

Caper.

250,322 31,260,707 218,389

Emma

680,458

17

Snipe

Macao

Hungmuey

333,516

8th H: M. Str. Vixen

Lt. Downs

Chusan

Sorts

54,327

Pekoe

SAILED.

Orange Pekoe

454,924 772,501

MAY.

4th

Faya

Manila

Capt. Mc. Cleverty India

Total, Black, lbs. 34,025,204

" D'Arcy

Garrick

11

Algerine

Hill

Manila Calcutta

Twankay

2,675,851

31

H. M. 8. Pylades

Hyson

1,219,063

8th

Emma

London

Hysonskin

51,347

9th

Monarch

19

Syed Khan

Leith Amoy

Young Hyson

540,364

Gunpowder

568,656

Imperial

267,669

Narcisso [Sp.] 7th H. C. Str. Phlegethon

Capt. Tindal England

White

Robinson

Horsburgh

REPORTS-Shortly for England, H. M. S. Algerine;

the Salopian; and H. M. S. Serpent to Amoy. WILLIAM PEDDER,

Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

Total, Green, lbs. 5,322,960 Grand Total, lbs. 39,348,164

Canton Press.

CUSTOM-HOUSES.-There are two of these esta-

thing concerning us, and quite desirous and willing are not oppressive. The authorities rather wish to to afford us all the information we required. Never waive the trade with the British until the terms of was the locality of a commercial city maple check the ordinary traffic carried on in the native Tariff are arranged; but they are quite unable to chosen than that of Ningpo. It forms a triangle, two of the sides being parallel with navigable boats between Chusan and Ningpo; they exact a streams; it seems at present in a very flourish trifling duty upon each bale or package, but it is ing condition,--the mercantile community are very merely a sort of acknowledgment. The Ningpo eager for the opening of trade, and point out the merchants carry on an inland traffic (by means of site for the establishment of the British factory-canals) with Canton. Period of transit, thirty an eligible position on the western branch. I should OPIUM-Malwa, $345; Ditto Patna, $754; consider the following remarks worse than useless, had they not been collected and corroborated with

some care.

days.

dull of sale. The supply is large; much competi- tion among the sellers.

WHITE SHIRTINGS in good demand, at 85; very few left on hand.

GREY SHIRTINGS-Market well supplied; few sales at $4.

TRADE, in every description of Merchandize has been very dull for the last month. Magy complaints about the scarcity of silver. The Emperor does not at present permit the working of the Mines. Gold Ingots are very often tender- ed.

HEMP is not imported; it is of long staple, strong fibre similar to Manila, and is pretty gene- rally used. It sells from nine and a-half, to ten dollars, per Ningpo picul (100 lbs.)-[however desirous it may be to discover return produce from this country, hemp can never be exported hence, but will probably be largely imported]. RAW COTTON.-This is an article of export. It is fair long staple, well cleaned, and perfectly white; price of native article, $20 per picul. Perhaps there has seldom been witnessed They prefer the Manila cotton. As for the lower such a reckless disregard of public principle, for qualities of American and Bombay, they are the sake of individual gain, as occurred up here two almost unsaleable at half the quoted price. months ago, in the dispatch of the Opium Ships, RICE varies from 2 to $3 per picul, and the belonging to your leading firms, from hence to rice picul is 145 catties. It scarcely promises to the Yang-tse-keang. As Englishmen, we were be a profitable article of import; for, this must be bound to consider that river shut until the termi- the period of greatest scarcity, and Bengal Moon- nation of the Treaty. But, regardless of conse- ghy, would find slow sale at $2 50cs. per bag. quences, these Opium Smugglers presuming upon TIMBER.-The largest number of their ship- the system of non-interference which has always, ping are employed in transporting this bulky in their case, obtained, press into an interdicted article. It is mostly soft inferior Pine; unsquared, port, moor under the ruined batteries, and carry it averages $20 per load of 50 C. F.; Planks, on their lawless traffic in the teeth of the Chinese choice, $37 per load. No hard wood at present. Authorities. An Official Complaint from the SUGAR. The cane is tolerably abundant, but Mandarins induced our senior Naval Authority to entirely used as an edible; the supply is from order their return, and a communication of what Fokien and Formosa. Good Grocer's sugar 6 to had been effected, was made to the Local Autho- $7 per pieul; white, with--good grain, 894-best-rities of Shang-hai, but the recent arrival of Candy, 11 to $12. H. M. Str. Vixen conveying Sir Henry Pottinger's nefarious Traffic, has enabled them again to wend their way up the river, and thus "bearding the harmless Dragon," by running the drug at the cannon's mouth. Is this wise or honourable, and may it not peril the ultimate settlement. indeed, seriously, interfere with, every thing desir-, able as regards this country?

89 could be readily obtained. BIRD'S NESTS.-1st quality, $80 per catty; 2nd do., $60; 3rd do., $40. SANDAL WOOD.-The demand seems limited, suppose the consumption is small, but they seem curious about the quality. Ningpo prices, $13 to $14 per picul.

LEAD-Ordinary, equal to pig-lead, selling at

$7 50cs.

WOOLLEN CLOTH.-(Russian) All the dealers have very large stocks on hand; it seems in uni- versal use, and qualities are exceedingly various. It is quoted, nay, sold, at particularly low prites, and much of it is very durable. Serviceable cheap cloth (superior sorts) 180 cash, to $1 per

cubit; breadth 43 cubits.

TOBACCO, leaf, very mild, $7 pes picul. HIDES.-Cow and bullock's, $10 per picul, dressed; undressed, $7 per picul. CASTOR OIL-[indigenous] $6 per picul; used for varnishes, &c., unknown as a medicine. WHITE LEAD, $15 per picul. Used as a cos-

metic chiefly.

BLACK TEAS are offered at 25 to $67 per picul. The appearance of this article does not recom- mend it being generally coarse, leaf quite void of the curly finished look necessary for the home

inarket.

GREEN TEAS generally 'Have a better face than the above; more regular, and perfect leaf, but unusually large. Prices, from 25 to $80 per picul.

30th April, 1843.

NAUTICUS.

A Communication dated Petersburgh, 13th Do- cember, says-" During the war between England and China the supply of Tea at Kiakhta, increased cluded, the supply is now likely to fall off, and the to a surprising degree. Peace having been con- price to rise. At this year's fair at Nishny, Novo- gorod, there were 4,500 more chests brought from Kiakhta, than in 1841; but nearly one-half of this supply remained unsold. Of the Zieglthee, as it is called, on account of its form, and which is in great favour with the Nomadic tribes of Siberia, and among the lower classes of European Russians, about 6,000 chests were brought to the fair, and not one remained unsold.-London Paper.

of horned cattle in the United Kingdom is esti- mated at 7,000,000, and the total number of sheep at 32,000,000. Valuing the first over-head at £10 value of £110,000,000.-Ibid and the last at 25s, both together will give a total

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS.-The total number

D

38

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZ

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 18TH, 1843.

We beg to thank our Ningpo Correspond- ent, for the very interesting communication which we now publish. Although not agreeing with his views, we are yet bound to let him be heard on a question which so largely occupies the public attention.

We understand that II.E. Sir HENRY POTTINGER will (on board the Cornwallis) this morning, invest Admiral Sir WILLIAM PARKER, with the insignia

of G. C. B.

Our harbour has, during the last few days ex- hibited an unusual appearance, by the arrival and stay of five Chinese War Junks. They conveyed the Mandarins, Hwang, Judicial Secretary, and attached to the Imperial Commission, and Heing ling, the Tartar General who came to Canton, as second in command to Elepoo, and has all along been attached to the Mission, now on a visit of compliment to His Excellency. A steamer was sent to meet them, but they declined going on board. The Mandarins (five) landed under a salute from the Junks, and were received with honours, by a guard placed at the wharf, where Mr Thom, and Mr Lay, the interpreters, were in attendance to welcome their arrival, and accom- pany them to the houses which had been fitted up for their accommodation.

between the two nations.

the final examination at Pekin, he is the Chief Judge of Keangsoo province. The attendant Mandarins are, Yang-pwce, a Tartar. newly appointed eligible to govern a Foo; also, 'oo-tin-look, a native of Shan- ung province, at present a Magistrate in Sing-ngan. yan-Kean-800. Loo-pin-kin, the Magistrate of Sarng-gnan.yan, a native of Kan-su province. About a month since was appointed to his office. Besides the sailors, the flag, and sedan bearers, with other at- tendants, number fully three hundred. The sailors on board the five Junks, about seventy, are each given 100 Cash daily. Hwang and Hein-ling have two large row-boats which accompanied them. whole expenses are defrayed by Loo-pin-kin, who, doubtless is of opinion that Mandarin visits, as Royal Progresses should be like angel visits, "few and far

between."

The

OBSERVER'S communication is received, and we hope to publish it in our next. We regret we cannot insert S. II.'s letter, it being too long, and we think he discusses points wholly irrevelant to the subject he proposed in addressing us. In a few words we may condense the latter and most important part of his communi- cation.

According to S. H, the ** British ship, arrived in our harbour a few days since from Whampoa, with a deck load of smuggled Tea. S. H. asks, whether after the Proclamation of H. E., of the 20th ult., the Chinese Revenue Officers would have been permitted to take possession of her here, had they been cognizant of the fact. S. H. goes on to say that smuggled Tea and other articles will still continue to be brought to Hong- Kong, and adds, that the Chinese diplo- matist now on a visit there will be made acquainted with the fact, and if so, should they ask permission to order their war Junks now lying in the harbour to take possession of the vessels containing the Smuggled Goods-could it be refused? seeing that it has been clearly, distinctly, and positively announced, that "His Ex- cellency further intimates, that such Smugglers and their Boats and Vessels will not receive protection in the harbour or waters of Hong-Kong?"

Since their arrival, the two principal Mandarins have daily taken an airing in an open carriage. They have been fétéd by the authorities; have visited the Men-of-War, and different parts of the Island, and are loud, we are told, in their expres- sions of gratification at the very hospitable and kind character of their reception. The most cherished incident in the recollections of their visit will be, the last entertainment of H. E., when the élite of the fair were invited to meet the illustri- ous strangers. The ladies are in raptures at the polished, bland, and truly gentlemanly behaviour of Hwang. His bright eyes, black mustachoes, handsome intelligent face, graceful person, small and alabaster-white hands, would, irrespective of his high talents, make him a Lion of the greatest magnitude, in the first circles of London society, should the Emperor ever permit him to realize his wish, of paying a visit to Great Britain. Many resident ladies and gentlemen have called on the Mandarins, who have uniformly seen the callers. As far as the English population is con- cerned, much satisfaction has been expressed at this visit, all hailing it as the precursor of those friendly relations and mutual confidence which H. E. has untiringly endeavoured to create We wish we could add that this satisfaction was shared by the Chinese residents. It is evident they looked at the advent of the Mandarins with affright, may be, and no doubt is, erroneous; but it is very pre- valent, and many of the resident Chinese allege they are afraid to visit Macao, as heretofore. and some who still risk the consequences of placing themselves squeezed if discovered to be inhabitants of this Island. Hwang and Heing ling were accompanied by three other Mandarins, one of whom was the Magistrate of Sin-ngun Yan, a distance about a day's journey from hence, and of which Hong-Kong is a depend ency; for the Chinese (we presume only till the ratification of the Treaty) still continue to consider our Island as part and parcel of the Celestial Empire. Our Local Government is not amenable, Our native informant, to whom we are indebted we think, to the slightest blame, for it is for the foregoing particulars, says, that the Sin-ngun Yan Magistrate was compelled to return to the neither supine nor indifferent to the im- scene of his duties on Saturday last; an express hav-portance of this question. We shall be ing arrived that a conflict had taken place between much deceived, if it do not hereafter be- two villages, which ended in the loss of forty lives. The Chinese law commands that Mandarins be maintained during official visits, by the local authori- ties of the districts through which they pass, or in which they stay, hence the visit of Hwang and Heing ling, to Hong-Kong, falls heavily on the Magistrate of Sin-ngan Yun, who will have to bear the whole ex- pense, amounting to some four or five hundred dollars

under native authority, make up their minds to be

daily. Unluckily for this Magistrate, he hes no accu- mulated stores, and, indeed, is a poor man who has only been appointed to his present office some few weeks. Our native informant adds, he was com pelled to pay a visit to the Kwang-fow-choo, at Can- ton, and obtained a loan of $4000 to defray the ex- penses he would be obliged to incur.

SINCE the establishment of our Print, we have never ceased urging the necessity of a regular Steam Communication with China. We are now glad to see that our contemporary, the Seminario Filipino, enters heartily into our views. In com- menting on an article of ours, it says,- «notwithstanding the immense importance of the trade between China and England, and also her Indian dependencies, yet, the British Government has never, hitherto, given it that protection which it would be supposed it could not fail to do. We have no doubt now, she will not lose sight of this object, when she understands her real in- terests. It is quite reasonable that the Anglo-Chinese Merchants should complain of the neglect of the Local Government in not improving existing relations, by a re- gular Steam Communication with India, where is centered their principal mercan- tile speculations."

come apparent, that H. E. has already recommended to the Home Government the expediency of Steam Communication between Hong-Kong and India, if not, also, with the new Consular Ports.

We learn that the Oriental and Penin- sulat Company are prepared to undertake the line, on receiving an annual contribu- tion for carrying the mails, &c., as is" done with the North American and West India steamers. The proposition made to the We give a list of the names and titles of H. E.'s very favourably entertained. The ratifica- Home Government, we are told, has been visitors:Heing-ling, 4th rank [from the Emperor] ation of the Treaty, and the recommenda- sze-we, Cofmander of the Imperial body-guard; Hwang-gnen-toong, of Keang-nan, province. He tion of H. E., are alone required to secure obtained the high literary degree of Chin-tser, at this important object, As before said, we

are sure the Itor will be accorded, and the former can be much longer delayed.

We dare assert, with a reasonable pecu- niary contribution from the Government, the smallest inquiry into the nature and extent of the existing trade will demon- strate that the establishment of Steam Navigation in this part of the world, would give a highly remunerating return on the capital employed. A friend who has paid considerable attention to this subject, and whose great nautical experience and gene- ral mercantile knowledge entitles his opi- nions to much respect, has been kind enough to send us a sketch of a scheme for this object, which we now publish, and shall be glad if it elicit any suggestions promo- tive of this intéresting and desirable end.

It is proposed that a line of Steamers be established, for a monthly communication from Calcutta to China, and from Bombay to Madras and China; thus allowing the following dates of arrival and departure:-

The steamer from Suez leaves on the 24th of each month; the one from Cal- cutta leaves there on the 11th of each month. The Bombay and Suez steamer leaves the latter place on the 24th, and the former on 1st of each month.

No. 1. As the Bombay and Suez steamer arrives about the 8th of each month, it is proposed by the plan projected, that a steamer for China should leave on the 10th; she would arrive at Colombo on 15th, take in the mail left there by the direct Suez and Calcutta mail, leave on the 17th, call at Trincomallee, and arrive at Madras on the 19th; Leave Madras on the 21st, reach Pinang on the 27th, and arrive at Singa- pore on the 2nd of each month.

No. 2. The Calcutta and Suez steamer arrives in Calcutta about the 18th. The Calcutta and China steamer should leave Calcutta about the 21st, calling at Maul- mein on the 24th, leaving there on the 25th, would reach Pinang on the 28th, and arrive at Singapore by the 2nd of each

month.

No. 3. The steamer leaving China on the 18th or 20th, will arrive at Singapore on the 30th; leave there on the 2nd, call at Pinang on the 4th, at Maulmein on the 7th, and arrives at Calcutta on the 11th, in time for the steamer to Suez, on the 14th of each month.

No. 4. The steamer from Bombay will leave Singapore shortly after the arrival of the China steamer-say on the 1st or 2nd, touch at Pinang on the 3rd, arrive at Madras on the 9th, leave there on the 11th, and call at Trincomallee, and reach Co- founoo on the 19t, with t passengers for the direct Calcutta and Suez steamer, and leaving there on the 16th, arrive at Bombay on the 21st of each month.

man and

No. 5. A steamer for China to leave Singapore on the 3rd, and arrive in China on or before the 13th of each month.

The above (No. 4) is so put, as it is un- certain whether the two steamers should come on to China. This must depend on freights, &c., &c. One only would be required from China, but generally two would be needed from Singapore to China.

No. 1. The Bombay Steamer, calling at Mad ras will enable parties from England by either the Suez and Calcutta direct Steamer, to call there and transact business, or join at Madras, if requisite, affording opportunities also for passengers to or from Madras and Bombay.

No. 2. The Calcutta line.. The communication and trade, with Maulmein and the Straits, especially the latter, is very considerable, and there is no regular mail communication.

13th, and leaving on the 18th or 20th, will enable No. 5. The Steamer arriving in China on the replies to be sent to the letters from hence,

With regard to FREIGHTS, the quantity of annual increase on the establishment of the new Opium from India may now be estimated at 40,000 chests, with the certain prospect of a large Consular ports. If 1000 chests (a very usual quantity in a Clipper) are sent on monthly by each Steamer, this would be equal to 24,000

chests per annum, which, at the low rate of 88 por chest (this is recommand to extinguish competition) would produce 1005. TREASURE amounting to about £4,000,000 is annually Exported from China, fully £3,000,000 might be counted on being sent by the Steamers. At the present charge of one per cent, this would give £30,000.

Silk and Silk Manufactures. Large quantities (of late years more than has been sent to Eng- land) are shipped to Bombay, and would afford as they do now, a liberai per centage for Freight. If the Oriental and Peninsular Company under- took this time, it is certain that with their complete arrangements, a vast quantity of the above articles would be transmitted :rom hence to Europe, via Egypt, with many other valuable products of this country. We happen to know that this respect- able Company could create a vast traffic from hence by that route, now that we are entering into new and more liberal commercial relations with China, and are to have access to the Northern Ports.

We cannot doubt that the Home Government would grant at least £50,000 per annum towards carrying out this project. Such amount is very incommensurate with the advantages secured thereby We could easily prove, independent of our relations with China, that such a grant would be more than repaid to the mother country. This sum, with aid and assistance from the Dutch and Spanish Governments of Manila and Batavia, and the greatly augmented number of passengers who would avail themselves of this mode of transit, leaves no doubt in our mind that the project we recommend would be highly lucrative, if under- taken with becoming spirit, and by an association of the experience, influence, and respectability of the Oriental and Peninsular Company.

We must not omit haentioning that it is proposed that the Steamers shall be of a size capable of conveying 800 Troops and 500 tons of Cargo. During the N. E. monsoon they should proceed via Palawan or Celebes Sea, calling at Manila; during the S. W. monsoon, proceed by the Western side of the China Sea, the course of H. C. Str. Atalanta, which then made the passage to Singapore in eight days.

The time allowed for passage, is more than is necessary for Steamers of 450 horse power, but affords time enough to ensure, regularity in arrivals and departures,

In addition, it has been suggested that Iron Vessels should be built, with bulk heads on a non-conducting principle, to prevent damage to the Opium; and it is added, that five Steamers would suffice to keep up the line of communica- tion we have indicated.

Our space debars us from now going into further detail, but we shall resume the subject on an early occasion, when we hope we may be authorised to state that some such plan as the one before mentioned, has received the sanction and powerful advocacy of H. E. Sir Henry Pottinger. We need not say H. E. would be thereby earning an incontestible title to the lasting gratitude and thanks not only of all the mercantile community here, but also of our merchants and manufacturers at home, who would be largely benefitted by the increased facilities and development of Anglo-Chi- nese commerce, consequent on regular Steam communication with this part of the world,

RACES.-AMOY SPRING MEETING.

First day-Monday, 9th April, 1843. FIRST RACE-The Maiden Plate, value Rs. 45, for all horses that never before started-Entrance, Rs.4-- Weight, 10 stone and upwards--Heats, three

entrances, or no Race-Gentlemen Riders-

ND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

tha: Planet with all his velocity could not pick him up. Fagan went through a variety of the most amusing evolutions, and then, as if delighted at his own execu tion, and with many knowing wags of his tail started off, and came in considerably in the rear. 3rd Heat-A good start-No bolting-Won easily by Planet.

SECOND RACE--A sweep Stakes, value Rs. 35, for all horses--Entrance, Rs. 4--Weight. 10 stone and upwards--three entrances or no Race--Gentlemen Riders--

Mr Martin's g g Ptarmigan, blue, black sleeves; Capt. Call's g g Ringleader, black and white; Sir Charles Burdett's c p Small Bones, pink and

blue.

All the horses entered, had a capital start. On going round the course the second time, a little beyond the Stand, Small Bones bolted, and was with difficulty coaxed into good humour. Ptarmigan and Ring leader, however, were so far a-head that, though Small Bones proved himself a very fast pony, he was unable effectually to make good his distance. After a well contested race, it was won by Ptarmigan. 2nd Heat-Differs very little from the former, except that Small bones made a more determined bolt at the same spot than before.

THIRD RACE--The Ladies' Purse-Entrance Rs. 5, (with Rs. 50 from the Fund)-for all Horses--Heats- Weight, 11 stone---Gentlemen Riders--Three entrances

or no Race,-

Mr Hilliard's Foot-pad, black and yellow; Mr Martin's King-Cole, blue and black sleeves; Mr Bloomfield's Dean Swift, red and white; Mr Money's Planet, white; Planet bolted at the old spot, but was brought back on the course after loosing considerable ground, repeated the bolt in rounding the course a second time, was last at Promotion Corner, and though his rider was burdened with lb. 20 weight, in the shape of shot- came in a winner of the Heat-Foot-pad and King belts, he steadily gained ground from that spot, and Cole close together-Dean Swift last.

2nd Heat, was well contested between King-Cole and Foot-pad, and won by the former, by a neck. Planet made a desparate and irrecoverable bolt, and was entirely thrown out for that heat.

3rd Heat-A repetition of the 2nd, Planet bolted as usual-King-Cole and Foot-pad both hard pushed- a beautiful Race, and won by King-Cole, after a severe struggle. Dean 8wift's penetration told this Heat, he surprised every one by his running, and kept up well with the other two horses. Foot-pad carried one stone extra in every Race he ran for.

BLUE BUTTON.

ORIGINAL COMMUNICATION. [To the Editor of the Friend of China.] 1st. This possession is so distant from the seat of Empire, that the supreme Government will always remain to some extent, unacquainted with its actual state, and those holding controlling authority over the Island, will reasonably expect, that the Local Govern ment, as well as the public, should inform them of our most pressing wants, in order that the suitable reme- dies may be applied. I appreciate the application and energy of our Plenipotentiary, but the interests of a British Island are not to be left to the sole guar- dianship of any Functionary. however zealous and enlightened.

2nd. The administration of justice, with regard to the punishment of the more serious critaes, must soon

be taken into consideration. It an atrocious murder were now committed, I fear the criminal would escape without adequate punishment. Permitting the Chinese authorities to seize, upon our coast, such persons as

To accusca of muc

when taken by us, is an arrangement that ought to be discontinued as soon as possible

3rd. The Imperial officers will naturally endeavour to prevent their countrymen resorting to this Island, and that arrangement will unduly facilitate their doing so; the very fact of being caught hovering about our shore, will be looked upon as presumptive evidence of guilt: besides, I have no confidence in the integrity of those officers,-the Pirate is indeed the hostis humani generis, and beyond the pale of national protection; but whenever we have been concerned in his apprehension, we are bound to see that the crime is fully proved against him. In one of the maritime states of India a Culprit was handed over by the chief British authority to the Prime Minister for trial, on investigating the case, the person was found to be unjustly accused, and the Minister sent a message to this effect, but added, if it was thought proper a limb would instantly be cut off. The Chinese might not

39

I doubt if this would be advisable, even as a temporary measure, it would be difficult to procure a competent person to atminister them, and establishing them, would enhance the obstacles to introduce a better system at a future period.

7th. The laws of Britain are at variance with the feelings and habits of the different classes likely to compose the great majority of our fellow-subjects here; some would be inapplicable, For instance, when a native chief was triel for tre ason in Ceylon, a few years ago, the address of the Judge to the Jury, startled those not acquainted with the subtilties of the law. I forget the exact expression be made use of, he however, laboured to prove that the prisoner had been aiming at the King's death. In Britain this judicial reasoning would not have excited surprise, but the very remoteness of Ceylon, cast a sha de darker than that of ridicule over a charge so utterly impus- sible.

8th. Although I do not think that either the laws of China or Britain, ought to be established for the punishment of the more heinous crimes committed in this Island yet, the generally mild and equitable spirit of the latter, ought to pervade every enactment, Let me not be misundersood, I do not ask for a complete code, or an expensive judicatory, I limit my demand to the positive exigencies of our society, to make such laws as will punish those crimes, with the necessary power to administer them.

2nd May, 1843.

OBSERVER.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route. UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under- signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before o'clo k on the last day of the month, an extra charge the 27th of each month, from which date, until four of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month.

PACKAGES. Do.

WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ 8. d. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 UNDER 1 lb. do. 2 01

6 6

Do.

do. 0 10

Do.

do. 4

04

do.

1

0 0

Do.

do. 6

0

do.

1

0 5

Do.

do. 10

03

do.

1 10 0

Do.

do. 15

1

do.

20

0

Do

do. 20

14

do.

2 10 0

Do.

do. 25

1

do.

2 15

0

Do.

do. 30

do.

3 0 0

Do.

do. 40

21

do.

3 10 0

Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight Will be computed by either Weight or Measure.

JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on delivery.

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open at both ends,) will be charged-- lb., Is- lb., 18. 9d.; from 1 lb.

to 10 lb., 3s. per lb.

RISK--To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,- unless insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two and a-half per cent, will be made.

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (payable to

the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every

article, will be added the above rates.

RECEIPT-Receipts will be given on the delivery of each

Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the

Receipt.

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and

particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest advice to the Consigneesot if the postage (1s.) be paid, we will Ourstives wine to the party to mon

AGENTS-Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras, Capt. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); OFFICES-44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Bombay, Messrs. William Nicol, & Co. Crutched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe, JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES. BARBER, & Co,. 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London.

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future to send their orders and subscriptions to HENRY GRIBBLE. Macao, May 5th, 2843.

Mr Money's dig Planet, black and white; Mr Greave's bh Holdfast, blue; Mr Bloomfield's b g Dean Swift, white and red; Mr Ward's b g Oliver Twist, green; Mr Horak's jg Fagan, blue, pink sleeves. • Dean Swift having been withdrawn, only four At the word "off" they all went off kindly, and ran very well for a very short time, when Planet described a sudden and unex- pected revolution to the complete discomfiture of his rider's seat; Holdfast tried to make the most of this acci- dent, and got a considerable way a-head before Planet could be induced to resume the race; on rounding Pro- act thus to please us, and yet, they might act worse to FOR SALE.-Flour, Beef &c. ex American

horses started for this race.

serve their own purposes.

4th. The British Parliament has already provided for the trial of this offence, in any of her Majesty's islands, and if the authority to hold courts of this nature, has not been sent from home, an immediate application ought to be made for it.

.

FOR SALE. Ship, Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for P. Townsend & Co. Ships. Barque LARK only at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hong-Kong, March 21st, 1843. GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD.

motion corner, however, Planet was close on his heels, and could with difficulty be prevented from passing Holdfast. Close to the Stand, in going round the second time, Planet again showed his wandering disposition, giving Holdfast another opportunity of turning it to account,-he soon, however, and without no apparent effort, made good his lost ground, and won the Heat easily. Olver Twist modestly declined gratifying the public, by going round the course; and old Fagan, true to his character, was determined to do nothing in ture a Chinese vessel, when under convoy of one of Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package.

day-light.

2nd Heat-Oliver Twist withdrawn, the remaining three went round the course once without bolting, when Planet again darted off at the same point of reflection as before. Fagan, consistent with his character, could do no less than follow the heavenly example Holdfast in the mean time gained so much ground,

5th. The crime of Piracy, from the frequency of its occurrence, has been forced upon the public attention, in January last, the pirates had the audacity to cap.

her Majesty's sloops of war; the necessity of provid- ing for the punishment of other felonies committed here is equally obvious.

6th. There would be no violation of justice, in trying Chinese offenders by the laws of their country, excluding of course the practice of torture, and such punishments as are rejected by civilized nations. Still

taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO,

THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con-

Apply to, C, V, GILLESPIE,

NOTICE.

46, Queen's Road.

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public

• Hong-Kong, and Solicitor, No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street

40

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holiday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

PER NAVIGATOR.

D. WILSON & Co.

HATS--Fine English made Black Beaver Hat, Have just landed, ex « ALGERINE," and exposed for for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. Sale, the undermentioned Goods, viz.:- P. TOWNSEND, & C). Hong-Kong, April 19th. 1843. Supine Black Cloth

Red do.

Salt Cellars

Hali Lanips

D. Blae do,

Telescopes

Da. Searlet

do

Termometers

Glengarry Caps

Superfine Kerseymere

Travelling Caps Horse hair do.

Oiled-skin do. Cloth do.

Navy Gold Lace

looks and Eyes

Glazed Hats

Europe Boots

Leather Dressing Cass

Dressing Case's Silve: Fittings

Ladies' Work Boxes

Writing Desks

Perfumery of do.

Court Plaister

Looking Glasses

Sausages in Boxes

PER VENICE.

Brushes of all kinds

Champagne Cider, in one

Butter in Firkins

Prime Pork.

dozen Cases

Pilot and Navy Bread.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:--Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors. Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Loud-Lines, Sail Needles: Blocks, of sizes; Log.Classes, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co., 20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE

At the Godowns of the Undersigned ;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plauk and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions. Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Serlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cuttery and Hardware, And a variety of other

Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

NOTICE-Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY. A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street, FOR SALE BY PUBLIC AUCTION, on Thurs-

Fearon's Wharf.

do. do. do.

Proemery, ut

1 & half "

1

1 & half "

300 Singapore Beams, 22, 28, and 30 feet. & from 6 to 10 in. 500 Do. Planks. 16 2000 Do. Do. 11 300- Do. Do. 11 A quantity of Red Furniture Wood-also, Ship and Cabin Biscuit in bags, Salt Beef, Salmon and Flour in casks, Rum and Arrack in Pipes; Cape, Madeira, and Lisbon Wine in quarter casks, Sherry and Port, in 6 dozen cases; Claret, in 3 and 1 dozen cases; Cognac and Annisette, in 1 doz cases; Seltzer Water, in baskets of 25 bottles; Bengal Rice and Grain, in 2 maund bags; Table Salt; Window Glass; Hinges and Screws. At the same time will be offered, a quantity of Muskets, Fowling. Peices, and Pistols, in convenient lots.

P. TOWNSEND. & Co.

TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to R. WEBSTER.

.NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843,

W. T. Kinsley,

Stationary of all kinds

Blotting Cases

Envelopes and Cases

Memorandum Books,

Rulers

Hones

Drawing Pencil

Gilt edged Cards

Foolscap and Overiana Paper

Colour Boxes

Patent Drawing Pencils

Steel Pens

Chit Paper

Sealing Wax

Patent Leads

Bronze Inkstands, Chit Seals

Glass and Earthenware

Lamp Glasses and Chimnics

Coloured Tumblers, Glass Chandeliers Bronzed do. Decanters

Plates and Dishes

Toby Philpotts Jugs

Embossed Jugs and Covers

Cruet Frames

Cont Buttons

Silk Gloves

Cotton Socks

Hair Combs

Small tooth do.

Naples Soap

Lozenges of kinds

Pistols

Surveying Instrumenta

Saddles and Bridles

Time Pieces

Saucepans

Tea Kettles

Tea Pots

Silver do.

Patent Water Filterers D. Marble de.

Iron Spoons

Bellows

Twine

Yard Measures

Beer Taps

Bird Shot

Cooling Pots

Velvet Corks Iron Cash Boxes Table Knives

Bottled Herbs

Bloom Raisins

Patras Currants

Liqueurs

Cayenne Pepper

Cherry Brandy

White Claret

Hermetically scaled Hams.

Beer and Porter

FOR SALE.-The fast sailing Teak Schooner "LALLA ROOK" built by the same Builder as the Celes tial, with Masts and Sails &c. complete, has just been newly coppered and is well worthy the attention of any Gentleman as a pleasure boat

BENNETT PAIN, & Co, Hong-Kong, 3rd March, 1843. NOTICE.

To be disposed of at the Rooms of the undersigned the following Coods, viz:-

Hanging Lamps (of 4 Burners), superior Brandy, in one doz. cases, Gin Schiedam do, Beer and Porter, Wines of all descriptions, superior quality, Jams and Jellies in 1 doz, cases of half pints, pints and quarts, Pine Cheeses. Butter, fresh in Jars, Soups of all des- criptions in tins of all sizes, Fresh Salmon do., Ship Biscuit in air tight puncheons, Flower in Barrels. American BEEF, [ec American Barque "LARK"] also Pork, in barrels, Manila Coffee, Manila Chocolate, Seidlitz Powders, Quinine in 1 dozen bottles, Sardines in Tins, Split Peas, Westphalia Hams, Moongy and Bengal Rice, Kennett's Pickles, Bottled Fruits do., Best White Wine Vinegar, Olives, Sauces, Superfine Blue Cloth, Beaver Hats, Buck-skin Gloves, Superfine letter Paper of all descriptions, Manila Cigar Cases, Manila Cigars No. 3 & 4 Supe- rior (in boxes of 500), Negrohead Tobacco, Corks at per Gross, Seaming Twine, Canvass, Oakum, Tär Blacking, Rozin &c., Coconut Oil, Linseed do. in Jars of 5 Gals., Turpentine, Raisins, Shot of Sizes. Yellow bar Soap, Coffin Nails, Carpenters' Tools of every description, Carving Knives and Forks, Steels, and Cutlery of all descriptions, Dog Chains, Dinner services of prices, Britannia Metal Tea Spoons, Cork

P. S.-Their Slate Billiard Table will be ready in Screws, Sewing Cotton in Balls, Japaned Tin Trays the course of next week.

Hong-Kong, 4th May, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant.. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE-The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843-

NOTICE.-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843

NOTICE,-The Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the Public generally, can be furnished with fine ENGLISH MUTTON, [at one-half dollar per Pound] by Saturday Mornings..

Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

NOTICE,

DCAST On

DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, begs that Captains of Ships about proceeding to sea, [that may want new bread] will favour him with their orders 24 hours previous to their sailing; and by their giving such notice he will warrant it to keep for 10 or 12 days.

Meat Pies and Fruit Tarts made according to order, by parties sending their own dishes. WANTED,

A stout Lad, as an Apprentice to the Business. Premium will be expected,

N. B.-No business done on Sundays, after nine o'clock in the morning. Hong-kong, April, 18th 1842.

small and large, Powder Flasks, Padlocks, Dressing Cases, Ink-Stands, Salt cellars, Cotton Wicks, Fancy Lace, Straw Bonnets, A new assortment of Books, with a variety of other Articles.

N. B. Goods received and sold on Commission free of Storage. BENNETT, PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 15th March, 1843.

FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all de, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale Clothing, and Beaver Hats, and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. FOR SALE-Newcastle Coals, in bags, at 50 cents per pecul. Apply to C. V. Gillespie. 46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Hong-Kong, 10th Decmeber, 1842. NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- scriptions, received and carefully stored in kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre-

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVED.

MAY.

12th Thomas Crisp 13th Sylph

Metcalfe

Mc. Donald

11

A

12

"Lyra Harlequin 14th Sarah Eagle

Erskine

Macao Calcutta Macao

Oliver

17

Mossman Sawell

Manila Singapore

SAILED.

MAY.

11th Anonyma 12th Colonist

Hicks Leisk

Macao Amoy Singapore

Neville

Amoy

Lt. Dolling

Wood

Salmon

Bell

Oliver

Erskine

England Amoy Calcutta Whampoa Macao Amoy

OR SALE-Java Coffee and Rice, Bengal ditto, English and American flour, and Biscuits, in whole, and half Bar.

rels, Salt Provisions, Saft Salmon in half Barrel, dry Codfish and Haddocks in Drums, Tobacco, Soap, Candles, Paints and Paint Oil, Manilla Rum, Java Arrack, English Brandy, a casks of all sizes, Gin in cases, a few pipes, Quarter casks, Octaves 3 and 6 dozen cases of first rate Sherry and Port, lately arrived from England, Champagne, Claret, Noyeau, Annisette, Sherry Cor- dial, and Cognac, in one and three dozen cases, Preserved Meats and Fruits, Jams and Jellies, and Pickles, Europe and Manilla Rope, English and Country Canvas, and a small as sortment of Marine Stores, Stockholm, American and Coal Tar, and Pitch, Window Glass, Deep-sea, Hand, and Log Lines, Table Salt, Sauces, Snuff, and White Wine Vinegar ; just ar- Marline and Housing, Seltzer Water, Cigars, Crockerey-ware, rived a small quantity of Butter, Hains, Cheese, Sausages, and prime Bengal Bottled Beer, at $3 and a half per Dozen. Apply to N. DUUS. FEARON'S Wharf, No. 18, Queen's Road. Hongkong, March 1st, 1843,

39

13th

33

H. M, S. Harlequin Hastings Serpent Algerine

Snipe 14th John Cooper 15th Salopian

17th Lyra 16th Gondolier

19

Harlequin

Oliver WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master!

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG

RIEND OF CHINA,

AND DONGBONG

No. 62 VOL. II.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 25TH, 1843.'

NOTIFICATION. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zetto," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official.. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hong-Kong, March 23, 1842.

SANDWICH ISLANDS.

This cluster of Islands was discovered in 1778, by Captain Cook, who was killed by the natives at Hawaii (Owhyhee), the largest of the group, in 1779. Hence, on the ground of discovery, we have a prior right to occupancy over all other nations. The Islands, ten in number, lie about midway between Hong-kong and the western coast of America. Their total superficial extent, is about 6000 square miles. The present population is about 160,000, more than one half of which number reside on the island of Hawaii. Woahoo, which contains the capital and residence of the King. Honolulu, has a population of some 24,000 souls, more than a third of whom reside in the principal town.

The climate is warm, but very salubrious; the highest range of the thermometer during the year is 880, and the lowest 610. We happen to know parties extremely well informed with regard to these Islands, who allege the climate to be quite congenial with the European constitution, and who (in the Metro. polis), have strongly urged the eligibility of founding a British Colony, on the Wakefield principle, on one of these Islands. Many respectable parties encouraged the project, but it was held indispensible, to first have the protection and security which the British Flag affords. By the late cession this difficulty will be removed, and we trust the contemplated undertaking will be persevered in, we can truly say if it is, few new Settlements present equally favourable prospects of aerly and great success as one at the Sandwich

Islands.

The situation of these Islands renders them very important, if ever Steam Navigation shall be established between this part of the world and the Western coast of America, then they will become a kind of halfway house, or place of call and refreshment. At present they are resorted to, for repairs and provisions, by the whalers and other vessels navigating the Northern Pacific. We have no late statistical returns from the Islands, still we know the number, and tonnage of vessels which annually visit them must be large, seeing that in one year, according to "Stewart's visit to the South Seas, in 1829 and 1830, 125 American vessels, amounting in the total to 40,000 tons visited

these Islands,

The products are sugar, coconuts, jams, bread fruit, and other tropical productions. Oranges, grapes

successfully introduced. Sugar and rum have, believe, been long manufactured, but the principal article of export has hitherto been sandal wood, but not to a large extent. We have little doubt but that every thing which is required for man's comfort and enjoyments can be abundantly produced on these fertile Islands.

At present, but a small trade is carried on between the Islands and China. The exports from China consist of silk piece goods, and a variety of (chow chow articles. As a British colony with the immigration of a few thousands, of our countrymen, and a proper proportion of capitalists, it is quite obvious that a very important trade with Hong-Kong and China would be called into existence.

The natives are of a mild and docile character, and have beyond all other savages shown a disposition to adopt civilized institutions and manners. The English language is generally understood, and Christ. ianity is professed we are told by the whole population

Price 1 monthly Or 12 8 yearly

chain; and then took several articles and 2nd. Vessels for the purpose of Smuggling are placed candles under them on the floor, invariably armed, they are prepared to resist every with the intention of burning the house. It effort made by the revenue officers of the Chinese Emperor to search them, so must be held respon- is supposed it was by a boy who was recom- sible for all the consequences liable to follow mended to Mr Rogers by the Comprador illegal resistance. This system is regularly carried in the market-place, along with his accom- on in the face of day, and without an attempt at plices. No clue has as yet led to their concealment. Does any man think that the discovery. Mr R.'s house was again forcibly British Parliament will allow such practices to entered between eight and nine o'clock, on prevail within the limits of its jurisdiction? Our great enemy called us a nation of shopkeepers, the night of the 18th inst., and nearly but as yet, we have not been pointed at as a cleared of every thing it contained, fire set nation of smugglers. to the bed and bedding, which almost en- veloped the house in flames, but was, how ever, extinguished with some buckets of water. The value of things stolen and de- stroyed, amount to upwards of eight hun-provision in the Treaty, which in its inevitable and dred dollars. Communicated.

INQUEST.

(Before Mr E. Farncomb, Coroner) This was an Inquest on the body of a Chinaman, alleged to have killed himself by swallowing Opium.

The Jury proceeded to the view; Afoon, Overseer of the market. examined, says, A person came and told me this morning that there was a Chinaman lying in the Bazaar who had taken opium, I went to see him, and found him lying on the ground, he was insensible. He was a A person there told me that the deceased had taken opium to put an end to his life, as he could not get any thing to eat.

poor man.

this morning, and I saw the deceased put on the Alung, examined, says, I went into the market remainder of his clothes the deceased looked very ill. On going up to him, I found a pot containing opium beside him the deceased never spoke. then went and told Aqui (Afoon's son) that there was a man in the Bazaar who had swallowed opium. The deceased had a disease upon him, and no one would buy any thing of him on account of this disease the deceased had told me about a month ago that he wanted to destroy himself. When the deceased was putting on his clothes his face turned black-the deceased after wards laid on his back and never spoke

David Gaily, a Policeman,sworn-This morning on going into the market I saw a crowd at one of the vegetable stalls, on arriving there I saw a man lying on a stretcher behind the stall he appeared to have the hiccups, I turned him on his back, but he never spoke. Afoon who was present, told me the deceased had been taking opium to kill himself. I then went to Dr. Lockart, who came down and tried to give the deceased some medi- cine, but the deceased could not swallow it then put him in Afoon's house, and told Afoon to watch him, and let me know when the mono died nothing could be done with him, Afoon went up

to the Chermaguar

deceased to be taken up to Dr. Winchester's, and he was then taken. When I went to Dr. Win- chester's quarters, I found that the deceased was dying.

CA. Winchester, sworn, says, I am acting as Colonial Surgeon. The de ceased was brought to me at about 6 o'clock this morning, as having swallowed a dose of opium. He was insensible, breathing very softly, there was some saliva running from his mouth, his face was livid, some- what swollen, eyelids shut, and the pupils very much contracted. I proceeded to give him some strong stimulants, and employed powerful means, of irritation, under which he lived for an hour and a-half, and sunk at about a quarter to 9. Having heard the Evidence just produced, I have no doubt the deceased's death was caused by taking an excessive dose of opium.

VERDICT. Felo de Se.

3rd. It is unneccessary, however, to enlarge upon the reasons of a general nature, why we ought to do something more than merely to with-hold tection from smugglers, because there is a distinct

pro-

legitimate consequences, entails upon us the obligation to punish them. It stipulates that the offenders of either nation are to be delivered up to the officers of the Government to which they belong, but every nation has an undisputable right to punish those who violate its laws, and when this power is transferred to the native state of the criminal, justice must still be administered. Surely, a provision intended for the security of the innocent, is not to be perverted to defeat the ends of justice, and to shelter the guilty from merited chastisement. Allowing such criminals to escape, would guarantee the impunity of every Chinese culprit offending against us, for with what consist- ency could you demand their punishment.

4th. I believe those best acquainted with China will admit the propriety of that condition of the Treaty, from the decided declaration of the Duke subject, I conclude that he will approve of this of Wellington, as to not surrendering a British arrangement, and it is needless to remark upon the weight to be attached to the opinion of so

consummate a statesman.

9th May, 1843.

OBSERVER.

We think our intelligent Correspondent to whom we are often under obligations, quite as wrong in his view of the provisions of the Treaty as in his inter-national law. We would refer him to the concluding paragraph of our leader on the Peace and Treaty with China, which fully expresses our oft-repeated sentiments.

(To the Editor of Friend of China.) BIR,-On Baturday evening last, two officers of H. Ms 55th regiment went on board the Agincourt, to visit some friends, officers on board, on their return from Manila. They sat talking in the gun-room till gun-fire, immediately upon which, they went upon deck, purposing to return home; but, although the surprise, found that their boat would not be permitted ship went to Sir Thomas Cochrane, who was on the to come alongside at their request. An officer of the poop, to obtain his permission for the boat, under the peculiar circumstances these "Soldier Officers" were placed in; but the polite Admiral distinctly refused permission, and desired the boat to be driven away, by throwing holy-stones at it, which was accord- ingly done, One of the officers, in preference to a compulsory detention on board all night, jumped over- board, and fortunately succeeded in reaching his China-boat. Had this young gentleman been drown- ed, Sir Thomas's feelings could hardly be agreeable.

The other gentleman was about to follow the ex- ample, but feeling a want of confidence in his swim- ing with his clothes on, remained on board. So it is supposed the Admiral offered him a bed, although the fact of lys having done so is not mentioned.

Surely, if it is contrary to order, for a boat to come alongside the Agincourt after nine p. m., the officers of the ship should be instructed to give their friends like proceeding, than to visit the offence on landsmen who, inadvertently, stay beyond the proscribed hour.

We regret to learn, that on Saturday ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE due warning, which would be a far more gentleman night, 13th inst., some thieves entered No. 8 house, Mr. Webster's Bazaar, occu- pied by Mr. Rogers, 18th regiment. They lifted the doors out of their places, got in, and went up stairs, broke open a chest of drawers, and took $99 along with several other articles, also broke open two boxes, and took a great many clothes a piece of linen, a double-barrelled gun, two pistols, spying-glass, two silver watches and gold

[To the Editor of the Friend of China] SIR-In your News-paper of date the 4th inst., you quote the following remarks from the Trass, dated the and December last "Each nation must enforce its own Fiscal regulations as best can," "that this principle is universally recog, nised in Europe." Now, if it is meant to extend this rule so far, as to connive at, or tolerate smug- gling, by British subjects, or those residing funder the protection of our Government, I apprehend such extension is totally unjustifiable.

It is supposed that Sir Thomas Chochrane, on coolly considering his conduct, will offer an apology to the officer in question; but, in? the interim, I think valuable paper, may prove a useful warning to the gentlemen at this station, of the treatment they are able to receive on visiting the Agincourt, I am, Sir,

Your vory obedient Servant,

Hong-Kong, 22d May, 1843

P. Q.

MYERS N2345

WATE

38

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.--The large amount of our out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith quidating our Claims, which, trifling as-they are, individually,-yet, aggregately, amount to a consider

able sum.

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the PATER, if brought to out notice we will endeavour to rectify. We shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 25TH, 1843. THE Mandarins left the Island, for Wham- poa, on Thursday last, on board H. C. Str. Akbar. We understand they proceeded into the interior, to meet and escort the Imperial Commissioner KE-YING, now en route for Canton.

Before taking their departure, they went on board H. M. S. Cornwallis, to witness the investiture, by His Excellency, Sir Honry Pottinger, of Admiral Sir William Parker, with the Grand Cross of the Bath. A Correspondent is very indignant " at the excessive bad taste thus exhibited, of making the Mandarins spectators of hon- ours accorded for the humiliation and dis- asters of their country."

We may observe, that the Mandarins were unaccompanied by a Native Linguist, and hence, were entirely at the mercy of our attendant Interpreters, who doubtless, gave a very correct and proper version of the whole ceremony,-and, for aught we know, might have persuaded them it was got up for their especial honour and delec- tation.

AN article on the PEACE AND TREATY WITH CHINA, has been published in the Foreign and Colonial Quarterly Review, of January last. We have carefully perused it, and should not have deemed it worthy of serious criticism, had we not observed that it had been largely quoted and commended in several of the English Papers. More, the same publication contains a paper attributed to one of the most accomplished of her Majesty's ministers, but as that article has not De sent via overland, we have not yet an opportunity of pronouncing an opinion thereon, from internal evidence. But it is on these grounds that we review the reviewer.

hoan

The Article opens with a sketch of the events which preceded the war; abundantly abuses the Whigs, and extravagantly eulogises the Tories. Indeed, the introduction is written in a rabid spirit of partizanship, for which we have an utter disgust, feeling sure as we do, that by no combi- nation of circumstances, can any set of men be placed at the Helm of power at home, who will not uphold the honour of the British Flag, and strenuously endeavour to bring to a successful issue any war in which we may be engaged. We have an abiding fan in the precomme of essentially British feeling, it boots not what party may be in the ascendant. During the usurpation of Cromwell was England less respected or feared?

The late war is attributed by this Reviewer to "the clamour which was raised, in 1834, against the East India Company's exclusive privilege of trading with China"-Lord Palmerston is ridiculed for selecting a Bed Chamber Lord to be chief Superintendent, whose memory is reproached for not having taken up his lodgings at the Company's Factory," but the Opium merchants (we suppose we must not call them smugglers) had got hold of him."*

ONG

upon during the last Campaign? On the departure of the expedition to the North, whilst we dis- claimed any official illumination, we yet designated the course to be pursued, which we now find was exactly that alleged to have been marked out by Lord Stanley. So far from thinking this any great merit, or proof of political sagacity, we have before shown that our opinions were based wholly on circumstantial evidence, albeit, corroborated by many respectable authorities on Chinese affairs.

The Critic, nert details the military and naval operations, and among the horrors of the assault of Chin-Keang-Foo, records that a Surgeon of the expedition cut off such a number of the small feet of Chinese ladies, who had committed suicide as filled a cask, in which he salted them; and, we believe some indefatigable craniologists decapi- tated not a few of the defunct.

A brief geographical view of Hong-Kong and the four new ports next follows, and whatever there is of new information happens to be false, and the old quite stale. That this allegation may not rest on our unsupported assertion, we make the following extract;-

"There is a subject, however, conne cted with Hong-Kong, of which we believe there can be but one opinion. Sir Henry Pottinger, on his first arrival, was greatly astonished, as well he might be, to find large portions of the Island had been assigned to certain individuals, and that grants even had been made of whole villages, the rents of which, the poor Chinese occupiers had been ordered to pay the grantees. This can be no secret, for some of them have boasted of their estates in Hong-Kong." Every local reader cannot but laugh at such a monstrous mis-repre- sentation, for which we have been at a loss to discover the slightest colourable pretext or explanation. The only village near any location or allotment is that at the POINT. It is true the proprietor (wishing perhaps to be Laird of that Ilk) did, for protection, inclose it with- in the ring fence of his own allotment, but at the request of the villagers themselves. The Government, however, immediately interfered, and had the fence removed, to the detriment, we think, of the villagers, who had they hereafter been ousted from their homesteads, would have been right glad, as the amount of compensation uniformly adjudged to the aborigines, has very far exceeded their expectations. If any cause of com- plaint exists, it rests mayhap with the new settlers, who have sunk large sums of money in buildings and improvements; without as yet being informed upon what terms or tenure they are to hold the land. Up to this time, Government has reserved all its rights: not an Inch of ground has it alienated. It remains to be seen whether this extreme scrupu- lousness will be beneficial to the colony, at one time its success was jeopardized by it

We most decidedly protest against the opinion of the Reviewer, on the cession of Hong-Kong in perpetuity. He says, "Should it turn out however, that the Chinese only meant to confer occupation simply, retaining the sovereignty, as in the case of Macao, even this will be sufficient for our purposes."

We need not add we also hold as heretical the following recommendation. "There is a portion of our species, however, which it will be advisable the Consurar agents should not

them, and that is, their wives, daughters, or ladies of any description."

We feel we have already bestowed more space on this article than it justly merits, yet we cannot forbear citing the following passage, which is really curious, from its astounding absurdity-- Free trade indeed, destroying three millions of revenue, is it not notorious that its receipt has never been seriously perilled, and the Imports of Tea, into Great Britain have greatly increased since the abolition of the Company's monopoly? This season will exceed its largest Import more than fifty per cent.

"All the mischief that has happened in China, during the last seven or eight years, is the natural result of the alteration of matters to a system of FREE TRADE. It destroyed an extensive and flourishing commerce, by which many thousand families obtained a decent support, and reduced them to beggary; it destroyed the exchequer receipt of three millions of revenue, without, the trouble or expense of collecting; it deluged China with Opium, which was the cause of bloodshed to thousands, and brought millions to a state of poverty and misery, not by its use or abuse, but by creating a destructive war."

Had not the writer's ignorance been so

Of Captain Elliot it is said, " he went out with some other Scotchmen,-with Lord Napier to be provided for, and he contrived to bring the whole of the authorities of Canton against him, by setting their regulations at defiance; and finally, by taking up the Opium question and joining the Opium dealers, brought on the war."The Superintendent (Lord Napier) threw himself into the arms of the great Smugglers, and the succeed-eminently conspicuous, we should have been dis- ing Superintendent left his quarters at Macao to posed to believe he was an old Company's servant, do the same." Besides Captain Elliot "was so whose present enjoyments were embittered by incautious as forcibly to take out of custody one past recollections. But seriously, is it not of the Opium dealers, so placed by the authorities afflicting, that the mental aliment of our friends of Canton, and to save his life, surrendered the at home should be such garbage? whole of the Opium, pledging the name of the Queen for payment of its value to the owners, vho were of course delighted with so unlookd fer

a clearance."

We pass over a fertile topic of party controversy in England. viz., whose instructions were acted

With equal justice might the saine be said of the present Plenipotentiary.ED.

was a Chinese affair and not theirs. So now, under the new had the good sense and prudence to take no notice of it, as it system, we do not think that the Consul ar agents can or ought to take any part in this question, it being one of municipal regulation. The Chinese may be told, that every nation takes articles; that Holland attempts to pour into England illicit Gin! its own measures to prevent the introduction of contraband France, Brandies; America, Tobacco; and that neither Ameri- ca, France, nor Holland, consider themse Ives bound to take any measures for preventing their subjects from introducing it into the country of a friendly powar; and that England is obliged to maintain a coast guard of some five hundred naval officers, with half as many thousand men, at a great expense, stationed along the coast, for the purpose of preventing the induction of these prohibited articles. In this, or some manner, ought China to take her own measures, to crush the practice which sho

That we may not be suspected of doing injustice to this critic, we conclude with a passage, wholly accordant with opinions we have too often been compelled to express, and which if not held to be political axioms in China, yet are naught but redundant truisms in Europe. With respect to the Opium trade it is remarked,—

in, during the India Company's monopoly; but their servants No one can suppose Opium was not in use, and smuggled

affects to consider as an evil."

The British Flag now flies on the Islands of the Sandwich group. On April the 6th, we drew the attention of our readers to the probability there existed of the cession to, or occupation by, Gfeat Britain, of the Sandwich Islands. We then, and be- fore, pointed out, that with the possession of Hong- Kong, these Islands assumed a new value, and a higher importance. We were not wrong, for, our trans-atlantic brethren, with that instinctive sagacity for which they are world-renowned, on the receipt of the news of the Peace with China, and the ces- sion of Hong-Kong, at once perceived it.

A message was immediately sent from the Pre- sident of the United States, to the House of Re- presentatives, touching the "Hawaian, or Sand- wich Islands," and incidentally, the hopes and prospects of American Commerce, from late events in China were discussed (vide No. 60).

It appears the American Government has recog- nized the Independence of the Sandwich Islands, and accredited Consuls, and moreover declared, that any infringement or interference with the native Government would provoke the resentment of the American people. Although the cession took place before this could be known at Honolulu, yet, the news, when communicated in France and America, will, we are sure, engender very bitter feelings of national animosity towards us.

We hope, however, the British Government will be firm, and retain these Islands, for it can- not be tolerated that they should continue to be under the thraldom of a band of Missionaries, who had contrived to erect a sort of theocracy, alike repugnant to sound policy and liberal princi- ples. It is too much to suppose that these beauti- ful islands are to be surrendered to the dominance of well-meaning, but ignorant fanatics.

In another part of our paper, we give a short sketch of the Sandwich Islands. We have now lying before us in English, and the Native lan- guage, the " Official Correspondence relating to the late provisional cession of the Sandwich Islands,” by which it appears, H. M. S Carysfort, Captain Lord George Paulet, arrived early in February, at Woahoo, and intimated, that his visit was " for the purpose of affording protection to British sub- jects, as likewise to support the position of H. M.'s Representative here, who has received repeated insults from the Government authorities of these Islands, respecting which it is my intention to communicate, only with the King in person."

The demands made, were-" The immediate removal of an attachment from the property of Mr Charlton, [the British Consul, then absent) and reparation for his heavy losses; also the acknow- ledgment of the right of Mr Simpson to perform the functions delegated to him by Mr Charlton,

Consul alena

guarantee that no British subject should be im- prisoned in fetters, unless accused of a crime, which by the laws of England would be consider- ed a felony." Some minor requisitions were also made, to which no fair objection could be urged, hence we only state the principal demands.

Copies of these documents were sent to Captain Long, the U.S. S. Boston, then at Honolulu, and it was at same time notified, that an attack, would next day be made on the town, if the demands were not complied with. His Majesty, Kamehameha III, declares" our impossibility of complying with the demands in the manner in which they are made by H. B. M.'s Representa- tive, in reference to the claims of British subjects. We do hereby cede the group of Islands known as the Hawaian (or Sandwich) Islands, unto the Right Honourable Lord George Paulet, represent- ing her Majesty Victoria, Queen of Great Britain and Ireland."

A Proclamation is subsequently issued by Lord G. Paulet, declaring the Provisional Cession of the Islands; that the British Flag shall be hoisted on all the group'; the natives to enjoy the_protec- tion and privileges of British subjects; a Commis- sion for the Government of the Islands to be insti- tuted, &c., &c.

We have copies of Public Notices of the BRI- TISH COMMISSION to March the 3rd. We are sorry to see the French Consul (M. Jules Dudoit) declined to lay his authorization before the Com- mission, which, in consequence, was compelled to announce, it would not recognize him in that capa- city.

No other course, however, could be adopted by the French Cousul until he had received orders from his own Government.

F CHA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

39

A very proper notice on land claims is promul- endanger the continuance of our amicable relations | lic functionaries at those several stations, gated, but we cannot approve of so soon proclaim- with that country,

1 have the honour to

ng that a certain number of Licenses for the sale I am desired, therefore, to urge the appointment of Spirituous liquors (for each $150 is to be such a Representative, as a matter of the deepest harged) will be granted. We are well aware importance. the Missionaries could not prevent the illicit sale and use of spirits, and that the continuance of the prohibition on their sale and use, was incompatbile with British law; still, permission under severe regulations might have been unostentatiously,

Sir,

Your obedient humble Servant, (Signed)

G, G. de IL LARPENT,

To the Right Honourable,

Chairman..

if not secretly, accorded. We regret that one Sir Robert Peel, Bart., M. P, &c, &c,, &c.

of the first acts of the new Government should be to parade a sanction and approval of prolific Source of misery and crime, and which, whatever may have been the faults of Missionary rule, much to its honour, it has invariably striven to the utmost to check.

By a late letter from Canton, we learn that the very unfriendly disposition towards us is increas- ingly manifest.

A few days since, the Square was occupied by a mob, (owing to a fire over in Honam) when an opportunity was taken to pelt the British. Our correspondent holds the opinion that another out- break is inevitable. Commercial matters are dull, and but little doing. Of RAW SILK there is but little, it is Tsatlee, not No. 1, and $465 is demand- ed. TEA is firm and the shipments large, so that it seems certain fifty millions will be exported this

season.

The following vessels are loading, or about to load, with Teas at Whampoa;-The Equestrian. Susan, Orixa, Morley, Penang, Siam, Scotland, City of Derry, Columbus, Greenlaw, and Culdee.

In our No. 54, (March 30th) we pub- lished the reply of Lord Aberdeen to the application of the East India and China Association, with respect to the stipulations of the Treaty of Nankin. As we have not seen the application itself, nor the prelimi- nary letter to the Premier, in any of the English Papers, we think these documents may be of interest, and hence we submit them to our readers. We have referred to their contents on previous occasions. We also publish Fxtracts from the Seventh Report of the East India and China Association, with respect to the CHINA TRADE and STEAM COMMUNICATION with

China.

SIR,

London, East India aud China Association, Cowper's Court, Cornhill, 3rd Decr. 1842.

On the 2nd November, 1839, at the request of the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, the Committee of the E. I. and C. Association, addressed a letter, copy of which is to be found in the papers laid before Parliament-Page 16.

2d. In that letter, they ventured to state, as the unanimous opinion of the Trade, the several objects which were then thought desirable to be obtained from the Chinese, in order to place British Trade in China upon a proper and satisfactory footing.

3d. Upon reference to the above letter, it will be found that most of those objects have been conceded

No 2, Cowper's Court, Cornhill, 31st December, 1842. MY LORD, Under the impression that the Treaty between Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary and the Emperor of China has been ratified by her Majesty, and is about to be returned to China to receive the formal ratification of the Emperor, whose consent to its provisions has already been given, I am requested by the Committee of the East India and China Association. to express to your Lordship the extreme anxiety felt by all persons engaged in the trade with the Emperor of China to be made acquainted, as soon as Her Majesty's Government may think proper to disclose the same, with the provisions of the said Treaty, relative to the future conduct of the trade; information, which it is considered indispensable before any commercial operations upon an extensive scale can prudently be undertaken.

In a letter I had the honour to address to Sir Robert Peel (and which he informs me has been transmitted to your Lordship, I was desired to the terms upon which British Merchants might by the Committee to ask for information relative henceforth reside in China at the seveal ports pointed out in the Treaty; and also as to the mode by which the interests of British Merchants might be placed under the protection of diplomatic agents; and to these matters I beg respectfully to draw your Lordship's attention.

I am further desired to press upon your Lordship the importance of the Trade being furnished, at as early a period as possible, with the particulars mentioned in the 3rd article of the Proclamation of His Excellency the British Pleni- potentiary, dated the 26th August, in regard to the Tariff on imports and exports and to the inland

transit duties.

To place these several matters clearly before your Lordship, I take the liberty of enumerating them in the following order :-

1st. Whether the import, export, and shipping duties in China are to be fixed or arbitrary? If possible, what the amounts arbitrary are to -be? And whether they are to be uniform at the five ports opened to British commerce? 2nd. Whether the Co-hong monopoly is to be continued at Canton, and similar monopolies extended to the other parts (a system considered to be deeply injurous), or Whe- ther the trade is to be left entirely free?! 3rd. Whether British Merchants are to be allowed the privilege of possessing factories and warehouses of their own, and whether a system of bonded warehouses have been provided for at all the five ports; or, are the duties to be levied immediately upon entering

And punishment of British subjects in criminal

own country?

the Chingen Governe ment; but that there still remain some, to which the Trade attach the greatest importance, and upon which 1 am directed to lay before you the following observa-cases, in accordance with the laws of their tions, in the hope, that if not already provided for by the Treaty, of which the preliminaries only appear by the latest advices to have been agreed upon, they may, if they should be deemed proper by H. M. Government, be included in the details of the Treaty which is yet to be ratified.

Ath. The first remark applies to at the str: rying on Trade with the Chinese at the several sta- tions to which the British are allowed to resort. The Merchants trust that they may be allowed to possess Factories and Warehouses of their own at those several stations; that their wives and families may reside

In order to show your Lordship the necessity of obtaining information upon these important matters, I transmit herewith a statement of the charges heretofore levied on British trade in China, that they may be compared with those under the new tariff.

In conclusion, I beg to state that this Commitee is in correspondence with the East India and China Association of Liverpool, and I am author- ized to say that they participate in our feelings

and that to press the subject at this carly period would be premature.

CHINA TRADE.

The extra Mail from Bombay, bringing intelli- gence of the Peace with China, reached London the 23d November, when the principal conditions of the Treaty became known; and by reference to the Proclamation of Her Majesty's Plenipoten- tiary of the 26th of August, it will be seen that the main objects which the Committee, in 1839, submitted to Government as desirable to be obtained from the Chinese, had been oonceded. Still there remained some points to which the Trade attached considerable importance, and which, if not overlooked, were at least not noticed as such,-Whether the Merchants were to be allowed to possess factories and warehouses of their own, and to have their families residing with them; and, with reference to the consular establishments at the five ports opened to British commerce-Whether those appointed to that duty ought not to be wholly unconnected with trade; and that a Functionary of superior station, as a representative of Her Majesty, should reside at Pekin; and on the 3rd December the Commitee addressed Sir Robert Peel on the subject, whose reply stated, that he had forwarded the communi- cation to Lord Aberdeen, and that, "he would not fail, in concert with Her Majesty's Govern- ment, to give due consideration to the various matters. which will require attention in conse- quence of recent events in China.” The Commitee subsequently addressed Lord Aberdeen more at length upon other points which welfare of the future trade with China, and for the Commitee deemed of vital importance to the your information the Commitee's letter to his Lordship and his Lordship's reply will be found in the Appendix.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route.

UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and

Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under- signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. PACKAGES. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. UNDER 1 lb. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 do. 2 01

Do. Do.

do.

Do.

do. 4

04

do.

Do.

do. 6

05

do.

Do.

do, 10

03

do.

Do.

do. 15

1

do.

Do

do. 20

吐 do.

Do.

do. 25

1

do. 30

2

do.

Do. Do. do. 40 21

1112223

£ S. d.

6

G

10

0

0

10

0 0

10 0

do. 2 15 0

0 0

do. 3 10 0

will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above

be computed by either Weight or Measure. JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on delivery.

month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the

to 10 lb., 3s. per lb.

RISK-To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,-

unless insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two

and a-half per cent. will be made.

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (payable to

the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every article, will be added the above rates.

RECEIPT-Receipts will be given on the delivery of each Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt.

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest ourselves write to the party to whom the packages are addressed. advice to the Consignees or if the postage (1s.) be paid, we will

AGENTS Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras, Capt.

there with them, and that they be permitted to deal upon the various subjects now brought before your Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents

generally as they please with the Chinese people, and without the intervention of any particular class of Merchants, similar to the Hong Merchants of Canton. 5th. The second remark has reference to the esta blishment of Consuls at the several stations. Hitherto the Consuls known to the Chinese Government have been Merchants, and have been treated by the Chinese Authorities as such, and not as the Representatives of the Crown. The Association well knowing the pre- judices of the Chinese, and the inferior light in which persons engaged in trade are considered in China, are of opinion that the two characters of Merchant and Consul, should be separated, and a Consul at each place be appointed totally unconnected with trade, and that a Functionary of superior station as representative of her Majesty, should reside at the Court of Pekin, and they think that only by some such arrangement being made, the infractions and oppressions to which the Trade has in former times been subjected, will be prevented, when the impression of recent events shall have worn off, the recurrence of which, without the power of appeal to the Emperor, might very shortly

Lordship's notice.

I have the honour to be, My Lord, &c. GEORGE LARPENT, Chairman.

STEAM COMMUNICATION TO CHINA.

The Committee here beg to say that, aware how advantageous a regular Steam communication to China will be, now that the British have possession of Hong-Kong, (declared to be a free port by proclamation of the 16th February, 1842,) and the privilege of trading to five other ports, they only hesitate to take any steps in the matter at. present in the conviction that the Governments here and in India must, at no great length of time, have occasion for constant communication with the pub-

to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); Bombay, Messrs. William Nicol, & Co. OFFICES 44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Crutched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe,

JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES BARBER, & Co,. 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the

above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London.

forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TINES," are requested in future

to send their orders and subscriptions to

Macao, May 5th, 1843.

HENRY GRIBBLE.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD.

THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO,

Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package.

Apply tu, C. V. GILLESPIE, 46, Quen's Road.

MYERS NO 34:35

40

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND 1 NGK

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

PER NAVIGATOR.

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

D. WILSON & Co.

Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," and exposed for Sale, the undermentioned Goods, viz. :- Superfine Black Cloth Do. Red do. Do. Blue do,

Do. Scarlet do.

Glengarry Caps

Superfine Kerseymere Travelling Caps Horse hair do.

Oiled-skin do. Cloth do.

Navy Gold Lace

Hooks and Eyes

Glazed Hats

Salt Cellars

Hall Lamps

Telescopes

Thermometers

Plates and Dishes

Toby Philpotts Jugs

Embossed Jugs and Covers

Cruet Frames

Coat Buttons

Silk Gloves

Hair Combs

Naples Soap

Europe Boots

Leather Dressing Caus

Dressing Case's Filver Fittings

Writing Desks

Cotton Socks

Small tooth do.

Lozenges of kinde Pistols

Saddles and Bridles

Time Pieces

Perfumery of do.

Ladies' Work Boxes

Looking Glasses

Sausages in Boxes

PER VENICE.

Brushes of all kinds

Court Plaister

Champagne Cider, in one

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

Prime Pork,

dozen Cases

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

Stationary of all kinde

Blotting Cases

Envelopes and Cases

Memorandum Books, Rulers

Hones

Drawing Pencil

Gilt edged Cards

G. F. DAVIDSON. Foolscap and Overiana Paper

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terins :--Sherry. Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co., 20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE. Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street,

TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to R. WEBSTER.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europo and Monil Bore Oakum Corks Singapore Planks Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE-A quantity of LonвOCK RICE just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

W. T. Kinsley.

HATS-Fine English made Black Beaver Hats, for sale by the undersigned, at $4 each. P. TOWNSEND, & Co: Hong-Kong, April 19th, 1843. FOR SALE. Ship Chandlery, and Stores of all kinds for P. Townsend & Co. Ships. FOR SALE-Flour, Beef &c. ex American Barque LARK orily at the Godowns of P. TOWNSEND & Co. Hong-Kong, March 21st, 1843.

NOTICE,

Mr. Edward Farncomb, Notary Public and Solicitor, No. 1 & 2 Magistracy Street Hong-Kong.

Colour Boxes

Patent Drawing Pencils

Steel Pens

Chit Paper Sealing Wax Patent Leads Bronzo Inkstands Chit Seals

Glass and Earthenware Lamp Glasses and Chimnica Coloured Tumblers, Glass Chandeliers Bronzed do. Decanters

Surveying Instruments

Saucepans

Tea Kettles

Tea Pots

Silver do.

Patent Water Filterers do.

Do, Marble

Iron Spoons

Bellows

Twine

Yard Measures

Beer Taps Bird Shot

Cooling Pots

Velvet Corks

Iron Cash Boxes

Table Knives

Bottled Herbs

Bloom Raisins

Patras Currants

Liqueurs

Cayenne Pepper

Cherry Brandy

White Claret

Hermetically sealed Hams. Beer and Porter

P. 8.-Their Blate Billiard Table will be ready in the course of next week.

Hong-Kong, 4th May, 1843.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE, BY PRIVATE CONTRACT, . THE Premises known as the Auckland Hotel, oppo site Hong-Kong Market-Place.

The Building is 65 x 60 feet, two Stories, with offices in the rear; dimensions of Lot, 93 x 105 feet. It is considered the best situation in the settlement, for Hotel or Store.

Also-the BUNGALOW, on the Queen's Road, in the rear of Marine Lot, No. 46, with Well, and large offices, including Stable; dimensions of Lot, 120 x 105 feet.

The above described Property will be Sold by Private Contract.

For further particulars. apply to

BENNETTE PAIN, & Co. Hong-Kong, 25th May, 1843.

1

NOTICE-DAVID HUME, BAKER, Queen's Road, begs to intimate, that he intends to remove from his present Premises, in the course of a few days, to nearly opposite the Old London Hotel.

Hong-Kong, 24th May, 1843.

NOTICE The Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the Public generally, can be furnished with fine ENGLISH MUTTON, [at one-half dollar per Pound] by sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BOAST, on Saturday Mornings.

Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article, of the recent Steam Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made in the United States, and worked by mechanics from that country. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and executed in a short time. Apply to WILLIAM SCOTT. Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843.

No. 46, Queen's Road.

A BAY PONY for Sale. Apply Hong-Kong, 22nd May, 1843.

NOTICE-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. FOR SALE Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all de, Apply upon the premises to criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigno W. ALLANSON & Co. Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale Goods are received and sold on Commission. and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 Clothing, and Beaver Hats, A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

per pecul

Apply to

C. V. Gillespie.

NOTICE-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned FOR SALE-Newcastle Coals, in bags, at 50 cents and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao,

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- mises to N. DUUS, or

FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE-The undersigned is authorized by

His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843- FOR SALE, Singapore BEAMS, from 22 to 28 feet long, and 6 to 12 inches diameter. Ditto Planks. 16 feet by 1 & half inch thick. Ditto ditto 11 "1 ditto.

Ditto ditto 11 ""one-half "

ditto.

ALSO,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture Wood in Planks and Stanchions. Apply to, N. DUUS, 18, Queen's Road. Hong Kong, 20th May, 1843. FOR SALE,

A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound Bags. Apply to N. DUUS, 18, Queen's Road. Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. FOR SALE.

Just received, per "GONDOLIER"-A small quantity of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong Kong, 20th May 1843,

18, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE

46, Queen's Road,

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong,

1841.

1813.

1830.

10th December, 1842.

An Account of the quantities of

the following Articles imposed for Home

consumption, in Great Britain, on an average of three years to the 5th of 1793. 1781. January, 1781, 1798, 1813, 1830, and 1841.

lb. 6,816,692 30,789,572 78,811,288 218,484, 24 445,059.623

13%

958,080 3,204,342 7,430,477 27,182, 04 52,829,738

39

426,958

919,162

3,503, 39

2,522, 11

347.775

1,005, 37

426, 30

EL

COTTON WOOL,]

SHEEP'S

FIR TIMBER,

RAW SILK,

INDIGO, TALLOW,

560,590⚫

CWT. 92,487 LOADS. 84,568

251,690

Edinburg Review.

LC

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE VIDE SUPPLEMENT.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG.

M

G

.nd of China & Hong Kong Gazette.

SUPPLEMENT TO No $2

HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, MAY 25TH, 1843.

OFFICIAL REPORT,

OF THE

CEREMONY OF THE INVESTITURE OF HIS EXCELLENCY, VICE ADMIRAL SIR WILLIAM PARKER, WITH THE INSIGNIA OF A KNIGHT GRAND CROSS

Of the

Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath, On the 18th of May, 1843, on board Her Majesty's

SHIP CORNWALLIS.

When His Excellency SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., &c., proceeded on board the Cormvallis, a salute of fifteen guns was fired from the Batteries on shore, as he embarked,-and, as Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, he was received on board the Cornwallis, at half-past ten o'clock, with a similar salute, and a Guard of Honour. A Throne, decorated with Flags, was erected on a Platform, at the fore part of the Quarter- Deck; a Portrait of Her Majesty the Queen, being suspended in the centre of a canopy over the Throne.

The Royal Standard being hoisted on board the Cornwallis, was saluted with royal salutes by all the Man-of-War Ships in the harbour, and the batteries on shore; the Cornwallis (bearing the Standard) excepted.

The Procession of His Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, Her Majesty's Representative, then proceeded from the Larboard door of the State, Cabin in the following order :- Lieut. Pedder, R. N. Marine Magistrate, &c. A. T. Gordon, Esq., Land Officer, &C.

C. E. Stewart, Esq., Acting Secretary and Treasurer to Government, Captain C. Edwards, H. M.'s 18th Regt., Surveyor, &c. Capt. Ouchterlong Executive Engineer. Richard Woosnam, Esq..

Capt. Davidson, Assistant Com.-Gen. Capt. Edwards, 'H.M.'s 98th Regt. Assist. Quarter-Master Gen. The Rev. Mr Burrowes, J. R. Morrison, Esq., Chinese Secy.& Interpreter to H. M's Mission. Lieut. Col. Wilson, C. B. Paymaster to the Forces in China.

Secy. to H. E. Sir Henry Pottinger. Chaplain of the Cornwallis. Major Moore, C. B. Dep. Judge Advocate- General. Major William Caine, Chief Magistrate of Hong-Kong.

A. R. Johnston. Esq., Her Majesty's Deputy- Superintendent of Trade, bearing on a Cushion the Insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath.

His Excellency the Vice Admiral, supported by Major-General The Right Honourable Lord Saf- toun, K. C. B., Commanding Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, and Captain Peter Richards, C. B. of Her Majesty's Ship Cornwallis, on approaching the Throne made his obeisance, and was received by Her Majesty's Representative. Lieut.-Colonel Malcolm, the Secretary of Legation, then read and published the letter from His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, com- municating the Queen's Warrant. The Lieut. Colonel also read and published the Royal Warrant from Her Majesty the Queen; at the conclusion of which Mandate, the Chaplain of the Cornwallis delivered the usual prayer.

Sir Henry Pottinger addressing Sir William Parker as follows, invested him with the decora- tions:-

SIR WILLIAM PARKER,

In obedience to the Queen's Most Gracious Warrant, which we have just heard read, I have the sincerest gratification in proceeding to invest you with the Decorations of a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath.

In carrying Her Majesty's Commands into effect on this Quarter-Deck, I am vividly reminded that on this spot, I have had many opportunities of personally witnessing that rare union of valour, skill, energy, foresight, and decision which, as one of its results has directly led to the auspicious occa- sion on which we are now assembled, and thence I am led, as a matter of course, to turn to the ample field that is opened to me, on which I might enlarge, without the fear of being charged with flattery or exaggeration, on your long devoted and brilliant career in the service of your Country; but, I feel, Sir William, that no observations from me could enhance or exalt the merits of that career, and I also feel that it might appear super- fluous, if not presumptuous, on my part to pass any lengthened eulogium or opinion on your Services, at a moment when I am here, by Her Majesty's Special Commands, to bestow on you these Honourable Insignia, as a lasting and Public Memorial of the exalted and distinguished appro- bation and applause with which your Sovereign is pleased to proclaim to the world, her sense of your claims to these pre-eminent Honours.

For these reasons, I abstain, Sir Williain, from intruding on your notice, and on the notice of the Friends and Admirers by whom you stand sur- rounded, any lengthened expression of my own sentiments, and, after this explanation, my motive

cannot be misunderstood.

Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm, C. B., Secretary It is, however, due to myself, and also right to of Legation, bearing on a Salver, a Letter from add, that I am highly sensible of the honour that His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, Acting is reflected on me, by becoming the humble instru Great Master of the Order, transmitting Herment of giving effect to the Queen's Royal and Majesty's Warrant, and also the Royal Warrant Gracious Favour towards you, and I entreat you to Sir Henry Pottinger, for investing Sir William Parker with the Insignia of the Order, Knight Grand Cross of the Bath. Lieutenant-Colonel Malcolm was attended by Mr. Midshipman Commerell, of H. M. S. Corn wallis, as a Page, who held the Salver during the The Representative of the Crown, His Excel- lency Major-General SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary in China.

This Procession advanced from the Larboard State-Cabin door, to the Throne, between Guards of Royal Marines, drawn up on each side of the Quarter-Deck, who saluted with presented Arms, as the Representative of the Crown passed. A Mate of the Royal Navy, and the junior Officer of the Royal Marines, at the same time, lowered the Colours with which they were stationed, on each

side of the Throne.

SER HENRY POTTINGER taking his station then seated himself on the Right of the Throne, and Sir William Parker, on receiving intimation From Her Majesty's Representative to advance, as preceded by his Suite, moving from the Starboard door of the State-Cabin, in the follow-

ing order :-

Lieutenant Wilmot, Flag Lieutenant. Mr Phayre,

Mate of the Cornwallis! Dr. King, Surgeon of the Cornwallis. Lieutenant Barrow,

Lieutenant Morris,

of the Cornwallis. Mr Forbes, Mate of the Cornwallis.

Mr Jackson, Master of the Cornwallis. Mr Chimmo,

Madras Artillery. Secy. Captain Haythorne, H. M.'s 98th Regt. Captain Conyngchame, Aid-de-Camp to Major-General Lord Saltoun. Commander Hough,

H. C. S. vessel Proserpine: Lieut. Col. Knowles, Royal Artillery. Captain Kellett, C. B., of the Starling. Captain Richards, C. B.,

of the Cornwallis.

to the Commr. in Chief. Commander Vyner,f. H. M.'s Sloop Wol Commander Wise, of the Cornwallis. Major Grant, C. B., Assist. Adjutant General. Captain Collinson, C. B.,

of the Plover.

Colonel Campbell, C. B., H. M.'s 98th Regt. Major-General The Right Honourable Lord Saltoun, K. C. B.

41

It is no small gratification to me, Sir, to receive these flattering badges of distinction from the hands of Your Excellency, who has been so closely, and beneficially, for our Country, associated with the late operations of the Combined Forces in China. I feel most sensibly the Courtesy and Kindness with which Your Excellency has conveyed Her Majesty's condescending favour to myself, and beg to return you my most cordial and sincere thanks.

Her Majesty's Ships of War and the Batteries on shore then fired a Salute of 15 Guns, as a personal Compliment to the Vice-Admiral, which was returned by the Cornwallis with an equal number of Guns.

(True Copy)

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

the Chief Magistrate, to the Chinese Inhabitants It has been lately NOTIFIED by Proclamation of of Hong-Kong, that, between the hours of Eight and Ten P. M., they are prohibited from being out of their houses without lanthorns, and that after Ten o'clock P. M., and until daylight on the following morning, no Chinese will, in future, be permitted to go out under any consideration, unless he can produce a pass in English, specifying his object in being out at so late an hour.

A Proclamation has also been issued, prohibiting, under penalty of severe Punishment, all Chinese Boats or Vessels, from moving about the harbour after Gun-fire at Nine o'clock P. M., and until Gun-fire at daylight on the following morning.

W. CAINE,

CHIEF MAGISTRATE

FOR AMOY AND CHIUSAN- The Schooner LEVANT PACKET, Cap- tain CATTO, has room for a few Tons of light Goods only, and will sail, positively on the 31st instant. For Freight, apply on board. Hong-kong, 24th May, 1843.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

MAY. 17th Louisa 18th Wave 19th Levant Packet

39

Oinega

Mais

ARRIVED.

Forgan

Macao

Jones

13

33

White

Catto

Van Winning

Mauritius Manila

31

Macao

33

20th H. M. S. Agincourt Sir Thomas Cochrane 21st Caroline 23rd Mazeppa

19

Gazelle

19

99

13

Sappho Dunlop Velocipedo Woodward Catt H.M.T.S.Sapphire Fittock SAILED.

London

Singapore

Whampoa

Amoy

Calcutta

to believe, that Her Majesty could not have dele- Abberton gated this high duty to any individual who could feel more pride and happiness than I do, in execut- ing Her Majesty's High Behests towards one of MAY. her trusty and valued Servants,-for whom, from a long course of association of the most important the highest sentiments of public and private re- gard, esteem, and respect.

mal to onfortain

17th Regina 18th H. C. Str. Akhbar 21st Time 22nd Omega 23rd Wave

Caroline

Venice

24th Gazelle Mazeppa Abberton

19

31

Poole

Comre. Pepper Whampoa

Calcutta

East Coast Chusan

Whampoa

Chusan

Ronald

White

Jones

Perrit

New York

East Coast

19

Catt

London

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

I, now, Sir William, place these Insignia in your possession, with an unfeigned prayer, that you may long be spared to enjoy them, and to add to their honours, by serving your Queen and Country, whenever, and wherever, your ex- ertions may be called for;-that an increase to their honours will be the result, should opportu nity offer, the past is a sufficient earnest for the future, and whether, on your next return to your Native Land, it may be your destiny to pass the P. S.-H. M. T. S. Sapphire reports that the remainder of your days, surrounded by those whom Opium Schooner Ariel (Jardine Matheson, & Co.'s) you love, and troops of valued friends, or to go has been seized by Commodore Kearney, of the U. S. S. forth again to fight your Country's Battles and Constellation, at Amoy, for a violation of the American uphold her good cause, I will conclude, by Navigation Laws. It is said that the "Ariel" had humbly and devoutly praying the Great Disposer 8150.000 on board and those best informed allege the of all Events to shield you with His Protection eventual confiscation of the Vessel and Cargo to be almost certain. If so, we shall hear of more Captures. and Blessing.

Sir William Parker having given the following reply, the Royal Standard and decoration Flags on board the Cornwallis, and the other Ships of the Squadron were hauled down, SIR HENRY POTTINGER,

Permit me to assure your Excellency that I receive this distinguished mark of Her Majesty's approbation and favour, with becoming pride and gratitude.

I can truly say, that, for upwards of fifty years since I entered the Navy, it has been iny undevi- ating desire to fulfil my dutics with zeal and fide- lity.

With an honest ambition for the honour and

success of my profession, I have never ceased to cort- template with admiration and delight, the glorious deeds of the sister Service, nor have they failed to inspire a firm belief that, hand in hand, we shall, in every quarter of the Globe, continue the tri- umphant defenders of the honour and dignity of the Crown, and the interests of our Country.

The following Notification of the American Commodore, has been placarded at Koo-lang-

500:-

TO AMERICAN MERCHANTS, AND OTHERS.

All persons having Goods, Merchandize, or Trea- sure to ship from one Port to another, on this coast, are hereby cautioned against entrusting the same on board any vessel in the "Opium Trade," sailing under the Flag of the United States of North America.

Dated on board the U. S. frigate, Con- stellation, harbour of Amoy, Coast of China, this the 18th day of May, 1843. L. KEARNEY, Commanding the U. S. Squadron, in the East Indies,

MYERS NO 3413

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 63 VOL. II.

STATEMENT

LONGBONG GAZETTE.

D

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY JUNE 1ST, 1843.

OF THE FORMS AND CEREMONIES OBSERVED AT THE INVESTITURE OF HIS EXCELLENCY MAJOR-GENERAL SIR HENRY POTTINGER, BART., G.C.B., HER MAJESTY'S PLENIPOTENTIARY IN CHINA, With the Insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath,

AT THE

GOVERNMENT HOUSE,

At Hong-Kong, on the 20th day of May, 1843.

to the Cornwallis, as Page, to hold the Salver during the period of reading the aforesaid Docu-

ments.

THE REPRESENTATIVE OF THE CROWN,

His Excellency, Vice-Admiral SIR WILLIAM PARKER, G. C. B. This Procession passed on from the Ante-Room towards the Throne, between. Guards of H. M.'s 98th Regt., which were drawn up on each side of the Reception-Room; saluting with presented Arms, as the Representative of the Crown passed:

The Band of that Regiment playing "God save the Queen."

On Saturday, the 20th of May 1843, being the day appointed for the Public Investiture of His Excellency, Major-General 8IR HENRY The Vice-Admiral, having first made his rever- POTTINGER, Bart., G. C. B., Her Majesty's ence to the Throne, took his seat on the right hand Plenipotentiary in China, with the Insignia of a of it;-His Aides-de-Camp were then directed to Knight Grand Cross of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, by His Excellency Vice-Admi- inform His Excellency, the Plenipotentiary, that ral SIR WILLIAM PARKER, G. C. B., Commander- all was in readiness for his reception. in-Chief of Her Majesty's Naval Forces in India, SIR HENRY POTTINGER, immediately advanc His Excellency, Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, and China, the Vice-Admiral, attended by the ed from the Ante-Room, towards the Throne in Captains and Officers of the Squadron, left the the following order; Cornwallis at ten o'clock, with a procession of Barges, the yards of the Ships-of-War being man- ned in compliment. On landing, he was received by a Guard of Honour.

His Excellency and party, joined the Civil and Military Officers of the Island, at half-past ten o'clock, at the Government House, at Hong-Kong, where a Guard of Honour of Her Majesty's 98th Regiment was also posted for his reception. The ceremony commenced at eleven, when the Royal Standard was hoisted in front of the Govern- ment House, and saluted by Her Majesty's Ships, and those of the Indian Navy, then present, and by the Batteries on shore; the Ships being decorated with Flags used on occasions of Royal Festivals, and their yards manned during the Royal Salute. A Throne was erected in the Reception-Room of the Government House, on a Platform, decorat- ed with Flags, a Portrait of Her Majesty the Queen, being suspended in the centre of the canopy,

over the Throne.

His Excellency, Vice-Admiral Sir WILLIAM PARKER, G. C. B., who was delegated to represent his Sovereign, on the occasion, began his Procession from the Ante-Room of the Government House in following order :-

AIDES-DE-CAMPS. Lieutenant Wilmot, of Cornwallis, Flag Lieutenant Lieutenant Morris, of Cornwallis, senior Lieutenant

Lieut. Daniell, (Indian Navy) H. C.S. Vessel, Acber. Lieutenant Pedder, R. N., Marine Magistrate.

A. T. Gordon, Esq., Land Officer, &c, C. E. Stewart, Esq, Assistant Treasurer, & Secretary to Government,

Mr Phayre, Mate of the Cornwallis Mr Shairp, Mate of the Cornwallis,

Capt. C. Edwards, H. M. 18th Regt., Surveyor, &c. Lieut. Davidson, Sub, Asst. Commursary-General. Capt. Barrow, Madras Artillery. Lieut. Young, Royal Artillery.

Lieut. Downes, R.N., Com. H.M. Steatr Vessel Vixen. Lieut. Phelps, R. N. of the Cornwallis

Richard Woosnam, Esq, Secretary to His Excellency, Robert Thom. Esq., Interpreter to H. M.'s Mission.

Sir Henry Pottinger.

Commander Vyner, H. M. Sloop Wolf. Lieut. Bate, R. N., H. M. Surveying Vessel Plover. Major Moore, C. B., Dep. Judge Advocate-General. Commander Hough, R. N., Commanding H. C. S. Vessel Proserpine,

Major Caine, Chief Magistrate of Hong-Kong.

Mr Hill, Mate, Mr Blake, Assistant-Surgeon, Mr Capt. Collinson, R. N., C. B., H. M. Surveying Vessel

Willes, Mate, all of the Cornwallis,

Lieutenant Hay, 41st M. N. Infantry. Dr. Graham, Medical Store-keeper.

Mr Hoffmeister, Master Com H. M's Troop Ship Jupiter

Captain Haythorne, Aide-de-Camp to Major-General Lord Saltoun.

Mr McKnight, Naval Store-keeper, and Agent Vic- tualler.

Captain Graham, R. M., H. M. S. Cornwallis, Captain Conynghame, Aid-de-Camp to Major-General Lord Saltoun,

Plover.

A. R. Johnston, Esq., Dept. Superintendent of Trade. Lieut-Col. Wilson, C. B., Paymaster to the Forces. Col. Campbell, C. B.. H. M. 98th Regiment.

His Excellency, Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Supported by the Right Honourable, Major-Gene- ral Lord Saltoun, KČ B., G. C. H., Commanding the Land Forces in China: and Lieut-Golonell Malcolm C. B., the Secretary of Legation.

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

and at the same time, mark in the most public manner, Her Majesty's just sense of the zeal and abilities, SIR HENRY POTTINGER has displayed, in the service of his Sovereign and Country. I am.

To

[Signed]

With consideration, Sir,

Yours &c., AUGUSTUS FREDERICK,

Acting Great Master. Vice-Admiral, SIR WILLIAM PARKER, G. C, B.,

Commanding Her Majesty's Naval Forces, in China, &c. &c. &c. The Secretary, also, read and published the Royal Warrant, from Her Majesty the Queen.

VICTORIA. R.

VICTORIA, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Queen, Defender of the Faith, and Sovereign of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath. To our trusty and well beloved SIR WILLIAM PARKER, Knight Grand Cross of our said Most Honourable Military Order, Vice-Ad- miral of the Blue Squadron of our Fleet, and Commanding our Naval Forces in China- Greeting:

Whereas, we have been graciously pleased to nominate and appoint, Major-General SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Baronet, Our Pleni- potentiary in China, to be a Knight Grand Cross, of our Most Honourable Order of the Bath, and whereas, in consequence of SIR HENRY POTTINGER's absence from Great Bri- tain, the Ceremony of Investing him cannot personally be performed by us,-know, Ye, that We, of our Princely Grace, and Special Favour, do hereby authorize and require you, at such time and place, as may appear to you Name, and on our behalf, to the Ceremonial most proper and expedient, to proceed in our

of the Investiture of the said SIR HENRY POTTINGER, with the Ensigns of a Knight Grand Cross, of our said Most Honourable Order.

Wherein, you are to take especial care that nothing be omitted, which may redound to the honour, splendour, and dignity of our said Most Honourable Order, and which may at the same time evince the sense we entertain for the said SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Baronet, Given at our Court at Windsor, under our Sign Manual, this Seventh day

of December, 1842, in the Sixth

year of our Reign.

By Her Majesty's Command [Signed]

AUGUSTUS FREDERICK,

Acting Great Master. At the conclusion of this Mandate, the Chaplain of the Cornwallis, delivered the following appropriate Prayer:-

Rev. Mr Burrough, Chaplain of H. M. S. Cornwallis (to which he made due obeisance) Her Majesty's Lady Victoria, to be our Queen; and so together with

Captain Young, commanding wing of H. M's 55th Regiment, Captain Hail, Cammanding wing of 41st M. N.L. Lieutenant Carter, of Cornwallis. Major Grant, C. B., Assistant Adjutant-General. Commander Wise, of Cornwallis. Lieutenant-Colonel Knowles, C. B., commanding Royal Artillery. CAPTAIN HENRY KELLETT, C. B., of Her Majes tey's Surveying Vessel Starling, bearing on tapestried Cushion, the Insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath.

As the Plenipotentiary approached the Throne Representative rose to receive him. Mr Chimmo, the Secretary to the Vice-Admiral, then read, and published the letter from His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex, communi- cating the Queen's Warrant.

SIR,

Kensington Palace,

Dec. 12th, 1843,

O Lord our God, who governest all things in Heaven and Earth, receive our humble prayers, with our hearty thanks-givings for that Thou hast set over us by thy grace and providence, Our Sovereign her, Bless our Gracious Queen Dowager, Adelaide, the Prince Albert, Albert Prince of Wales, and all the Royal Family: that they, ever trusting in thy goodness, and protected by thy power, may live long and happy lives on Earth, and after death obtain, everlasting life and glory in the Kingdom of Heaven. And do Thou, O Lord teach us, and all mankind, so to number our Days, that neither the splendour of any thing that is great, nor the conceit of any thing that Her Majesty having been graciously pleased, is good in us, may withdraw our eyes from looking on as a Mark of Her Royal approbation, of the distin-ourselves es sinful dust and ashes; but, that after the guished Services of Major-General, Sm HENRY example of, thy blessed Son, we may so pass the time of POTTINGER, Baronet, Her Majesty's Plenipo- our mortal lives, that hereafter we may dwell with thee tentiary in China, to nominate lam to be a Knight in all glory and Honour. And humbly we beseech Grand Cross, of the Most Honourable Order of the thee O Lord, as for ourselves in general, so especially Bath, I am to signify to you, Her Majesty's for this, thy servant, whom thou hast signally blessed virtues of his Most Honourable Order, and grant unto Insignia of that Order (herewith transmitted) in Admiral, bearing on a Silver Salver, a Letter conformity to the enclosed Royal Warrant, and it him long to live, so that in Thy, and in his Sovereign's from His Royal Highness, the Duke of Sussex, being Her Majesty's intention, that the same be service, he may, both by his life and deeds, approve Acting Great Master of the Order, transmitting done in the most honourable, and distinguished himself a true Knight, and so fight under thy bannet Her Majesty's Warrant to SIR WILLIAM manner that circumstances will allow of, you will against. Sin, the World, and the Devil, that finally PARKER, for investing SIR HENRY POTTINGER, concert, and adjust with him, such time, and Father, he may come to thine everlasting Kingdom, through the merits, and for the sake of Jesus Christ with the Insignia of the Order of Knight Grand manner fo: investing him with the Ensigns of a Cross of the Bath, and also the Royal Warrant. Knight Grand Cross, of 'that Most Honourable our Lord." MR. CHIMMO was attended by Mr. Robert Order, as shall appear to you most proper for Gibson, a Volunteer of the First Class, belonging shewing all due respect to Her Majesty's Order,

a

BENJAMINE CHIMMO, Esq., Secretary to the Vice- pleasure, that you should invest him with the with the marks of thy favour; endue him with all the

O

SIR WILLIAM PARKER addressing SIR HENRY POTTINGER as follows, invested him with the

MYERS N 34:33

43

100

42

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

Insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath:-

By Her Majesty's Commands, I take upon me with a sincere feeling of personal satisfaction, the Honourable Office of Investing Your Excellency, with the Insignia of a Knight Grand Cross, of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath.

This high distinction conferred by our Sovereign, will, I am sure, be appreciated by Your Excellency. as a proud testimony of the sense entertained by Her Majesty, of your eminently valuable servicos; the result of a life devoted to Public Duty, and of talents energetically, and successfully exerted, in the Service of your Country.

It would be superfluous to dilate on the public advantages, derived by the firmness and wisdom, with which the various important Missions con- fided to Your Excellency have been conducted; they are recorded in the Archives of India, and will, I am persuaded, be felt for ages to come in the extended commerce and Intercourse, which will be opened by the Honourable Peace, recently concluded with the neighbouring Great Empire. Your Excellency may rely, that I shall ever retain a lively remembrance of the benefits afforded by your enlightened and friendly counsel, as a Colleague, during the progress of the late Expedi-

tion.

In presenting these dignifying decorations, allow me in the purest feeling of warm friendship, to express an ardent hope, that they may be long worn by Your Excellency, with re-established health, to enable you to render further service to your Country, and in the uninterrupted enjoyment of all earthly happiness.

SIR HENRY POTTINGER thus Invested, addressed the Representative of the Crown in reply ;- Sir William Parker,

There are some situations in which it is not possible to give utterance to the feelings of the heart-In such a situation, I now stand before you. I feel all the heartfelt pride, and deep and loyal gratitude, that should fill my bosom in return for The Queen's Royal and Most Gracious approbation, and appreciation of my humble services; but I am not capable of expressing those feelings, as I could

wish to do at this moment.

My life from my earliest boyhood up to the present time, has been literally, uninterruptedly passed abroad in the Service of my Country; and when I declare that this moment is, in my estima- tion, an ample reward for that long exile from my native Land, it will be understood how truly value the honours which you have just bestowed on me in Her Majesty's Name. "During the remainder of my days, whilst I have, under God's blessing, strength and health, my de- voted exertions shall ever be at the disposal of my Sovereign and my Country, in any part of the world where they may be thought useful.

racter.

**

tion, which is at present wholly inexplicable, seeing that the American Consul, at Macao, has publicly declared he is not aware of any inform- ality in the papers," which sounds very odd after the following letter of Commodore Kearney, which we copy from the Canton Press, of the 27th ult.

The observations which succeed the letter, (except the first paragraph) were intended for our last number, but could not be inserted for want of space. Our subsequent knowledge in no way

affects the view we then took.

U.S. Frigate, CONSTELLATION SIR,-After a strict examination into your papers,

in connexion

Harbour of Amoy, May 18th, 1843. with the rights and privileges or benefits of an American vessel, under the Navigation Laws of the Congress of the United States, in relation to the record and registry of vessels-I have made up my mind clearly on the subject, that the Schooner ARIEL has not the privilege of carrying the American Flag, or to take goods on board belonging to other citizens or subjects of any nation. The ARIEL, cannot leave this port, where I found her, unless to return to Macao; and every item of Merchandise or Freight must first be discharged here; and on having done which, to my perfect satisfaction, I will place in your hands a sealed package, containing all the papers and documents of the vessel, which you brought on board this ship; and they are not to be opened except by James P. Sturgis, Esq., the U. S. Vice.Consul, at Macao, to whom the package is addressed, unless on your passage thither you should fall in with a National ship of war and be boarded, or be cast on shore, and evidence such as you have, may be

required for immediate relief from capture or oppression,

The Officer and men now on board the ARIET. will be with drawn, and her own crow returned precisely at 6 to-morrow morning, when you can, if you please, assume the command of your vessel; but the American Flag is not to be

hoisted aboard of her.

It is to be understood, that in the event of her coming out of

I remain,

Your's respectfully, L. KEARNEY, Commanding the U. S. Squadron in the East Indies.

It is true all claims of compensation for losses or injuries by the Chinese, are barred by this Notification, and in this, to our minds, consists its whole purpose and value.

The same course the British have pur- sued, but more authoritatively; for what is the Proclamation of H. E., of the 14th of November last (Vide No. 36) but an equivalent announcement-nothing more; c. a. a. selon la façon de parler admise parmi les diplomates.*

Whilst on this subject, we may remark the late Notice of Commodore Kearney, may be published with the view to conci- liate the feelings or prejudices of the Chinese, and favourably impress them prior to the advent of the American Plenipotentiary, now en route.

If so, we have no ground of complaint, nor have we even, should the American Government (which is not likely) take measures to suppress the Opium trade, somewhat similar to those we have adopted to put down the traffic in Slaves, Great Britain has erected herself into the Custos morum of one hemisphere, why should not America (if she pleases) play the same role in the other?

Notwithstanding the statement in our Macao, it will be necessary, to avoid capture, to obtain a clear and last, we are disposed to think that the "ARIEL" will not be condemned, but if an unquestionable right to display the American Flag. she should be, it will, we think, be in con- sequence of informal papers, and wholly irrespective of her employment in the Opium trade. The Cargo and Treasure property, cannot, we believe, be affected on freight, whether British or Foreign whatever may be the ultimate fate of the Ship, and will of course be given up.

In our last, we had only time to mention the reported seizure of the schooner Ariel, by the U. S. Commodore, at Amoy; we also, then published a Notification issued by him subsequent to that occurrence.

We are still ignorant of the grounds for detention or capture in the case in question, hence we cannot discuss it. The Notifica tion is a Public Document, and its pro- mulgation an overt act, the prudence and policy of which, it well becomes us to con- sider. By it, American Merchants and others are officially warned against putting their property on board any vessel engaged in the "Opium Trade," sailing under the United States Flag.

We expect to have occasion to resume this subject in our next-until which time we defer any additional remarks.

In our last we give some extracts from the Seventh Report of the Committee of the East of February last. It is satisfactory to perceive India and China Association, presented on the first the labours of the Committee, have not been in vain."

We are sorry to note the East India Company decline abolishing the system of advances in India, on the hypothecation of goods. Would that the matter were within the scope of the Governor- grievance would (on proper representation) be General's duties, then, an acknowledged mercantile at once removed.

annum. The amount drawn on the several Pre-

I will only add, that it forms an additional source We learn it is the opinion of many, that of gratification to me, to have received from your this Notification is tantamount to a declara- hands, in the kind and flattering terms in which you have conveyed them, these high tokens of tion, that any property shipped on board The amount of Bills drawn on, or from, India Her Majesty's most distinguished, and gracious such Opium Vessels, would be liable to goodness and favour; and I beg to assure you, seizure by the Naval Officers of the United and China, by the Company, has, it appears, during from the bottom of my heart, of my lasting esteem States. We demur to this conclusion, and the last seven years, averaged £3,154,188 per and regard, both for your health and public cha-accept the Notification merely as a caution sidencies of India, from the 4th of February, After which Sir Henry Pottinger made his which the American Commodore deemed yogiro, post-42, to the 5th of Jan., 1843, amounted to at the Government House, as well as the Decora- announced, on the 31st of March, last from 11s. id, to Rs. 1d. the Rupee. tive Flags on board the Ships, were hauled down, year, (vide our No. 3) "that the Govern- and the Ceremony concluded. ment of the United States does not sanction the Smuggling of Opium on this Coast under the American Flag, in violation of the laws of China."

All the Ships present, and the Batteries on shore, then fired a salute of fifteen-guns each, as a per- sonal compliment to Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, the St. George's Flag being displayed at the Main top-gallant-Mast-head of the Cornwallis during the continuance of the Salute.

The Vice-Admiral afterwards entertained Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, the Right Honourable Major-General Lord Saltoun, commanding the Land Forces, and the principal Naval and Military Officers at dinner, in honour of the distinguished ceremonies of the day. (Signed)

W. PARKER, Vice-Admiral.

TO OUR SUBSCRIBERS.-The large amount of our out-standing Arrears, admonishes us to request our Friends and Subscribers to oblige us by forthwith liquidating our Claims, which, trifling as they are, individually,-yet, aggregately, ambunt to a consider- able sum

Any irregularity or delay in the Delivery or Receipt of the shall be much obliged to our Subscribers, if they will inform us PAPER, if brought to our notice we will endeavour to rectify. We

when any change of residence takes place.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

He, moreover, then added, "Difficulties arising therefrom, in respect of the seizure of any vessel by the Chinese, the claimants certainly will not, under my instructions, find support, or any interposition, after the publication of this notice."

Seeing that the employment of American Shipping in the Opium trade (since this notice was issued) greatly it has increased, is not surprising that the Commodore published his late notice of the 18th inst, which, after all, is but a corollary of his antecedent announcement.

We affect not a profound knowledge of the American Constitution, but all know and jealous guardianship of the rights and its distinguishing characteristic to be a wise privileges of American Citizens. On this ground alone, we should be bold enough to assert that the American Commodore has no more right, title, or ability to interfere with American citizens engaged in the Opium Trade, than has Her Majesty's Since our last the Ariel has arrived at Magad, Plenipotentiary with British subjects simi- and a correspondence has been published in the larly employed. Papers there, with respect to the cause of deten-larly employed.

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 18T, 1843.

The Exports of Bullion from London last year, as far as can be collected from the Custom House returns, are as follows:-

SILVER.

GOLD.

3,308 2,703

957,833 oz. 1,468,745 do. 195,270 do. 109,863 do. 2,000 do.

China Calcutta Bombay Madras Singapore. Although recent events have given a prominent importance to the claims of Anglo-Chinese Com- merce, yet, we have not seen that the Committee have done aught to press on the attention of the Legislature or the Government-the monstrous impolicy of the continuance of the present enor- impost on our Staple-The. perhaps explain this supineness, and may do so on dantly obvious; that we ought to have in London a another occassion; one thing, however, is abun- CHINA ASSOCIATION, distinct and different from any

other. On more than one occasion has the interests of the China Trade been swamped, and its just claims burked by their supposed antagonism commerce, we hope the Chinese Government will to Indian interests. announce before entering on the consideration of the Tariff, that it can only treat with us on the principles of perfect reciprocity. Such a declara- tion, would, we know, be a bar to all further

For the cause of Free Trade and our Local

The prompt and péremptory order of H. E. to release the

Opium Vessels which had been seized by Captain Hope (the Senior Naval Officer at the Chusan station) for a supposed

infraction of the Proclamation, by proceeding to Shanghai, is so recent an occurrence, and to wholly confirmatory of this view of the question, that it aced only be cited.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

negotiation, till advices from home could be re- ceived-for assenting to so equitable a proposition, would more than quadruple the duties now levied on British Imports by the Chinese. The magnanimous policy which forbade us dictating a Commercial Treaty under the walls of Nankin, we never could appreciate, and at the time we expressed our apprehensions that the sequel would prove it to be a capital blunder. We trust our anticipations may not be realized, but thus far they have been.

We are indebted to a much esteemed friend for a file of Peking Gazettes. We have glanced at their general contents, which, as usual, are of a very miscellaneous character. We have given a version of one of them, and in our next we shall present some others to the notice of our readers. Meantime we may enumerate a few of the prin- cipal items of intelligence.

Promotions are accorded to diligent Officers, who have succeeded in bringing to justice the insurgents, who have infested the frontiers of Keangsu and Anhwuy.

The completion of the new Edition of the Great Work on the UNIVERSAL STATISTICS OF CHINA is announced. We should think a Copy of this would be obtainable, and if so, a reference thereto might set at rest many disputed points with regard to this singular people. Some of our Chinese Students might now earn an European reputation, in the untrodden field of Chinese statistics. The Emperor, we see, grants a remission of taxes till the Autumn, 1843, to the inhabitants of a district in Chili, on accouut of a drought and subsequent flood, which had ruined their Crops. He also orders the deepening of a portion of the Grand Canal near Chin-keang-foo, also commands that officers be sent to superintend the deepening now in progress in Keang-su. A seizure of smuggled Ginseng is also made known-A stronger Gunpowder is ordered to be manufactured---And a Copper Coin of larger size than that now current, is to be issued.

There are, as usual, a number of presentations, appointments, and promotions, as well as degrada- tipo dismissals, condemnations, and Literary appeals, some of which exhibit incidents of interest which on a future occasion wemay remark on.

We are indebted to a Foreign friend for the following Communcation which we have translated, and often hope to have the same agreeable task in respect of con- tributions with which we may be favoured from the same quarter. Notice of the Dye extracted from the Root called SU-LEONG.

colour. Care is taken that the Paste be not pressed, which would injure the operation. When the water has been saturated with the Colouring matter, they immerse the Cloth, which is in loose folds, taking care that it is evenly dyed; the cloth is afterwards dried in the sun. This operation is repeated four or five times successively, until the cloth assumes the tint required.

With whatever care this operation is performed, it does not succeed in rendering the Stuff (as is asserted) waterproof. It is not surprising that this should be the general belief, seeing that the Cloth as worn by the Chinesc, closely resembles the impermeable silk or cotton cloths known by the naine of Oil-Skin in England.

During the summer, with vast numbers of the Chinese, their whole habiliments consist of a surtout and trowsers of this prepared Cloth, which is moreover of almost a gossamer texture. The natives' believe the use of this Cloth to be very salutary, and they imagine that they better retain their vigour by the perspiration not saturating their dress. An ordinary shower will not penetrate this cloth, the rain running off its glazed surface. When the wearer of this Cloth is exposed to much bad weather, and wishes to render it imper- vious to rain, he rubs his garment with lard, or pork fat.

We are assured that a close woven cloth prepared carefully with the Su-leong, and the operation carefully repeated, will become com- pletely waterproof.

Cloth dyed with the Su-leong will stand washing; but to give the cloth the same gloss or varnished appearance it had when first worn, it requires to undergo a fresh operation, as after long using, they colour only remains.

COMMERCIAL.

this fair? Are the men in the ranks sufliciently rewarded by only a Medal, after all they have suffered, after all the privations they have experienced haud inerperte loquor'; let any man who has been North, only remember, and I shall pause with confidence for the reply.

and Soldier will wear it with pleasure, but, remember. ing what was done at the Canton River with the first North who suffered ten times the duty-have not these part of the Troops-have not those engaged in the men a right to expect to be at least similarly rewarded. The promotion amongst the Officers brings increase of pay, to the men this cannot extend, they must still continue without one solitary exception to eat their Roman supper, "a radish and an egg." and draw the sauce to sweeten it from contemplating their Medal. I doubt very much if the C, B's. would have been so welcome had they not brought rank as well as honour; for, when men do all they can to deserve a reward, they feel disappointed if they do not receive it, especially when their efforts are crowned with success. I do not urge it as I might do, as a right, because that implies a existing, which those high in Office dislike to hear duty, and this again supposes a moral obligation which reminds them what is due to themselves, than about, they would rather have their honour appealed to. their duty which suggests what is due to others: however, let me trust that the reasonable hopes and the

I do not wish to undervalue the Medal, every Sailor

just expectations,which have heen formed are not to be disappointed, and that those whose rapid and recent promotions cannot yet have effaced what they felt themselves before they obtained their rewards, will forward by every means in their power this most just and most necessary boon. They have now obtained a position and a standing in the service which will render their aid valuable and efficient, and I am confident they will not refuse to aid their less fortunate compa- nions in arms, unless, indeed, like Tiberius Caeser, they are prepared to reply "I do not remember WHAT I WAS." Except something is done soon and seriously it will be too late. and those false notions of economy, which, to use a very homely simile, "would allow the By advices from Canton, we learn that "The Ship to perish for want of the penny-worth of tar," Market for both 1mports aud Exports is very dull. will render all future efforts unavailing; now is the TEAS are neglected, few parties being now disposed time before the Dollars are appropriated; and if those to lay out Cash for them, but should a demand for in command will only remember their office has its Imports arise, or they be forced on the market, then duties attached to it, when success is obtained as well Teas will yet further advance. The Hong-Kong, and as before making the attempt to secure it, the Soldiers outside trade has hitherto taken off the small parcels and Sailors will not even yet be forgotten. of Goods which otherwise would have come up here for sale, which has se, I am persuaded Cotton Goods that circumstance, I would have been 20 per cent, lower, and Teas a tae higher.

market, that but for

The prospect for the coming. Imports of Corrox is truly wretched. For the last month due only Madras and Bengal have been wholly neglected, and sales of Bombay have been, some good parcels at 7-2, to 7-4. An early improvement in the demand, and price is not fooked for.

The Stock of RAW SILK is reduced to some 200 Bales, about double the quantity has been purchased during the last month; the greater part shipped, I believe, ex Oriza. I hear high prices were paid, say. 8465 Tratlee, not by any means No. 1. In Exchange, there is a demand for Bills at 4s 71d to 4s 8d; but the drawers stick out for 4s 7d.. As mentioned in your that

consisting of a surtout and trowsers) with a very will reach Fifty Mill the Export of Tea

During the Summer, the lower classes of the Chinese are generally clothed (the whole dress thin cotton or silk stuff, which is dyed with colouring matter extracted from a species of Yam, called by the natives Suleong. That kind which is brought from Chin Chew is considered as being of the first quality, and costs $10 the picul: that winch is produced in the florace not worth more than 4 or 85 per picul.,

The colour dyed by the root is a very deep Red, if the plant be young. Black if it be old. This root is covered with a black skin, like that of an onion: the inside is porous, and divided into regular compartments by veins of a blood red colouring matter. The substance of this root varies in hue from a pale yellow to a deep red, and has a bitter and disagreeable taste.

The dye from the Su-leong is equally applicable to all sorts of Cotton and Linen goods, and also to some kinds of (boiled off) Silks. The Chinese also say, they can successfully employ it to dye coloured goods,

It is neccessary to choose for the process of dying a fine sunimer's day. The dye is observed to be appreciably better, if the sun be quite unob- scured with clouds, and hence, early, in the morning is generally chosen, in order to be able to finish the operation in one day. One Catty of Su-leong root suffices, for a piece of stuff of 3 or 4 yards length, and about 14 yard breadth. They commence by washing the Cotton, Linen (grass-cloth) stuff intended to be dyed in cold water, then let it dry; this washing has for its object, to deprive it of gum and other matters used in the preparation and weaving of Cloth. The root is first well washed in cold water, then cut into slices (without taking off the skin,) and beaten into a paste, afterwards poured into a jar contain- ing a little water. After having been left to macerate about half an hour, it is passed several times through a sieve, always using the same water, which has already assumed a deep red The length of the OFFICIAL REPORT prevents its insertion.

seems now no doubt. There is more inquiry for OPIUM, and an attempt has been made to give it a spurt, and prices are nomi nally higher. Patna 8635, Benares 8615. Malwa 8555. The arrival of the Imperial Commissioners, and stringent measures of suppression in the Canton

ably.

From Chusan, you will, no doubt, have later advices, but on the 14th of May, the prices for Malia, w was 8640, at which 100 chests were sold; eighty chests of Patna, with a lot of Grey-Shirtings, were shipped on he the rateien 700 month. She was chartered at of per

The expected arrivals are large. Fifteen vessels from England, eighteen from Bombay, and eight

from Calcutta."

Our last advices from Chusan [17th ult.] report large transactions in Cotton Goods. Whites, Stock exhaust- ed; Greys, 83 80cs. Good Woollens also in roquest OPIUM-Patna, 8750 to $760-Malioa, 8830.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE

THE BATTA.

Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843.

Yours Obty.

PERCUSSION.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route.

UNDER arrangements with the Peninsulare and

Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. PACKAGES. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ UNDER 1 lb. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 6 6 do. 2. do. 0 10

8. d.

Do.

Do.

01

Do.

do. 4

01

do. 1

0

Do.

do. 6

0

do. 1 5 0

Do.

do. 10

0

do.

1 10 0

Do.

do. 15

do. 2 0

Do

do. 20

do.

2 10

Do

do 21

do.

215

21

do.

3 10 0

1. Do. do, 40 Goods, in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will be computed by either Weight or Measure. JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid or

delivery

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the

month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open

at both ends,) will be charged-lb., 1s.- lb., ls. 9d.; from 1 lb. to 10 lb., 3s. per lb.

Risk-To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India.- unless insured at the time, of delivery, for which a charge of two and a half per cent, will be made.

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (pay able to the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every

RECEIPT-Receipts will be given on the delivery of each article, will be added the above rates. Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt.

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest advice to the Consignees or if the postage (Is.) be paid, we will IT AGENTS Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras, Capt. ourselves rite to the party to whom the packages are addressed. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); OFFICES 44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Bombay, Messrs. William Mcal, & Co. JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. Crutched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axo, JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSES. JAMES

[To the Editor of the Friend of China.] SIR-The imposing Ceremonies which have just taken place on conferring the Most Honourable Order of the Bath on Vice-Admiral Sir William Parker, and His Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, seem to me, to present a favourable opportunity for making a few observations,, on a subject on which, however silent those interested may have been, they are by no means indifferent, I mean the 12 months Balla to those engaged subsequent to the River. No one rejoices more than I do at the liberal BARBER, & Co,. 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the promotions which has taken place in both arms of the above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will Service. But, what has been done for the Troops? forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of for those by whose sturdy perseverance this success the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s was obtained, and consequently the Medals and C. B's Agency in London. The answer secured to their fortunate possessors.

the

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future

is, that except a Medal; nothing has been done. And to send their orders and subscriptions to nothing appears likely to be done for them; I ask, Is. Macao, May 5th, 1843.

HENRY GRIBBLE.

MYERS

tiss

1.

44

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terins, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission, G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

PER NAVIGATOR.

Mackerel in Kits,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases. No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co.,

Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz.: Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes; Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Foolscap, and Over-Land Paper; Steel Pens, Patent Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day, for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE-The following important and valu- able Property; several extensive Marine Lots, having deep Water Frontage; convenient Bungalows, delight- fully situate, and commanding a fine view of the Bay and Town; Large Plots of Ground eligible for Build- ing purposes,

The whole of the Property is situated in a first-rate a G. F. DAVIDSON. locality, contiguous to Government Hill, and offers highly desirable and safe investment for Capital. For particulars, apply to, E. FARNCOMB, Solicitor and Notary Public. Hong-Kong, 29th May, 1843.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:-Sherry. Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchora Chain Cables. Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

FOR SALE-Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON.

terms.

Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

On Saturday next, June 3rd, at 11 A. M, will be Sold without reserve. all the Stock in Trade of the Eagle Livery Stables, consisting of 9 Ponies, I Araban Horse, 1 Buggy and Harness, 1 Hearse, also a quantity of Saddles and Bridles, and immediately after, a fine Manila Pony. Terms-Cash.

P. TOWNSEND.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road. FOR SALE-Superior Port and Sherry, ex City of Derry. Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

No. 13. Queen's Road FOR SALE-Patent Cordage, from the Steam Manufactory at Manila--a superior article. Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE. Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS. Magistracy Street, TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to R. WEBSTER.

NOTICE. FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE-A quanlity of LOMBOCK RICE just Apply to

landed ex JAGATRA

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

W. T. Kinsley.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of P. TOWNSEND & Co.," was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND P. TOWNSEND, ROBT. EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843.

NOTICE-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned

and armed and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Bon-Macao,

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE. Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre mises to N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

Hong Kong 14th Ansil 843

FOR SALE, Singapore BEANS, from 22 to 28 feet long, and Go 12 inches diameter. Ditto Planks. 16 feet by half inch thick. Ditto difto 111 Ditto ditto 11

one-half

ALSO,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture Wood in Planks and Stanchions. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong Kong, 20th May, 1843.

BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J. S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Gentry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL, and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN. TON,-and that his constant care and attention will be, the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage.

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties.

European Servants always in attendance A Orders for Wines Stores, &c., thankfully received, and punctually attended to. Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms. Canton, 24th May, 1843.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing under the firm of L. E. Christopher & H. J. Carr, is this day dissolved, by mutual consent, and all demands now due are to be settled by L. E. Christopher.

June 1st, 1843.

[Signed] L. E. CHRISTOPHER. [Witness] H. J. CARR.

All Persons indebted to the above named firm, are called upon for immediate payment, and all persons holding claims against the said firm, to send in their claims to L. E. Christopher.

June 1st, 1843.

L. E. CHRISTOPHER. H. J. CARR.

NOTICE,-The 'Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the ENGLISH MUTTON, [at one-half dollar per Pound] by Public generally, can be furnished with fine sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BOAST, on Saturday Mornings."

Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article, of the recent Stem Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made in the United States, and worked by mechanics from that countr. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and executed in a short time. Apply to

Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843.

WILLIAM SCOTT.

A BAY PONY for Sale. Apply No. 46, Queen's Road. Hong-Kong, 22nd May. 1843.

FOR SALE Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all de, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to Clothing, and Beaver Hats, A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. NOTICE.-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate term Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843 RTH-At Chek-Chu, on the 28th instant, the wife of Mr. George Prayson, H. M.'s 98h Regiment, of a son.. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVED,

25th Bombay Castle, Lark 27th Patna

Baxter Tibbits

Ponsonby

29th Ina

Lakeland

31

Louisa

Forgan

ditto. ditto..

30th John Laird [Iron Ship] St. Croix "Will of the Wisp

Walker

Bombay Macao Liverpool Macao Liverpool Macao

Mazeppa

Frazer

SAILED.

MAY.

18, Queen's Road.

25th Eliza

Mc. Carthey

Whampoa

Louisa

Forgan

26th City of Derry 27th Lark

Vincent

"

Tibbits

33

319

Sir R. Peel

80th H. M. Str. Vixen

Mossman Wharton Ritchardson Metcalf Capt. Hoffmeister England A. Catto Amoy WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master!

Manila,

30

Amoy

FOR SALE,

A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound Bags. Apply to N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. FOR SALE.

18, Queen's Road,

18 Queen's Road,

Just received, per "GONDOLIER"-ASmall quantity of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843, FOR SALE-A small quantity of very superio Burgundy; Hermitage; Champagne; Rhenish Wines; Claret; Sherry; Port and Madeira, in Bottles-Also a few casks of prime Claret, Sherry, and Madeira. Apply to N, DUUS, 8, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843,

28th Sarah

29th Parrock Hall

31st Thomas Crisp Ju z.

1st H. M. T. S. Jupiter Levant Packet

The VIXEN Steamer sailed without any previous notice being given. either to the Post or Harbour Master. We should be sorry to be compelled to believe with a Correspondent that "this is only another instance of the contemptuous disregard, with which the mercantile interests have always been treated by the Authorities."--EDITOR.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG,

CHINA,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 64 VOL. II.

LONGBONG

GAZETA.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

SIR,

OPIUM-AND REPRESSING OF

SMUGGLING,

HONGKONG, THURSDAY JUNE 8TH, 1843.

[To the Editor of the Friend of China.] 1st-Dealing in Opium, and Smuggling generally in China, will in all probability soon become the subjects of discussion and legislation at home, and it is desirable that they should be here maturely canvassed. You state, that in my last letter, I am wrong in my view of the provisions of the Treaty, and in my Inter-national Law. With your permission, will endeavour to show that my opinion on these points is supported by competent authority. I shall examine the latter point first, for my whole argument chiefly rests upon the correctness of the principle stated in the 3rd paragraph, "every nation has an undisputable right to punish those who violate its laws" 2nd-In the reign of Queen Anne, a declaratory statute was required, to absolve even an Ambassador from the effects of our laws, and though subjecting such persons to the municipal laws of the country where they reside, is now disclaimed, I believe by all nations, still the necessity of the above act, proves how tenaciously jealous Britain ever has been of this right, and how clearly all foreigners residing in our country are amenable to our laws. Let us enquire what foreign Jurists write regarding this matter; in the 2nd Book, Chap. 8th, of Vattel, it is stated, those countries where foreigners may freely enter, the Sovereign is supposed to allow him access only upon this tacit condition, that be subject to the laws.' virtue of this submission, foreigners who commit faults are to be punished according to the laws of the country." I suppose that it will not be denied, that the ports and harbours of a country, are as much within its jurisdiction as the land itself.

In

3rd-It will not be necessary to enlarge further upon a rule, neither new nor unreasonable, and the dis-allowance of which, would involve every State in disorder.

received by the Chinese Government, it is impossible that those concerned in it, can be allowed to escape with impunity, under the pretext that their offence is of a petty nature

monthly

Price Or 12 yearly

duction of the Press into the Islands, one hundred and ten millions of pages have been published, every page of which contains such reading as tends to elevate the human mind, and make it wiser and happier.

under the thraldom of men whose labours result in such effets Now, why is it not to be tolerated that these Islands are to he as these? What sort of thraldom is that which teaches a man to worship the God who made, and Saviour who redeemed him, to live quitely under his rulers, to respect the rights of his neigh- bour, to enjoy the fruits of his own industry, to hallow the Sabbath, and to dress himself in decent apparel? But I deny that the missionaries have ever erected a theo racy at the Sand- wich Islands, and it is your part, now Mr. Editor, to prove that the sort of theocracy which they have established is " alike re- pugnant to sound policy and liberal principles."

exponent of public opinion, it were proper that your readers If you, as editor of a public print, take upon yourself to be the empty declamation and hard words. If you mislike the doings should be informed of the facts of the case, and not served with

of the missionaries, shew where they have done wrong, and help them with your advice to do better, before you go out of your way to stigmatize them as "ignorant fanas" You make no comment upon the Catholic missionaries, aided by the Captain and Officers of a French frigate, celebrating high Mass at Houo. lulu against the wishes of the people. I have paid more atten. have the effect of informing you regarding the merits of the tion to your remarks than they deserve, but not too much if they

7thi-The only difficulty that occurs to me, is, the extent to which we ought to interfere in repressing Smuggling. It would probably be unwise to go ro for such a systein could not be carried out, without far as the Senior Naval Officer at Chusan lately did, maintaining a fleet on the China coast. would be highly inexpedient to allow the Chinese to Besides it suppose, that we could control, and therefore in some degree, be responsible for every British trader who from his Notification at Koolongsoo, will, I suppose, scils along their coast. The American Commodore, take a still inore vigourous measure against the Opium Trade, than our Captain attempted. Notwithstanding the anxiety of the American Government to conciliate the Cabinet of Pekin, it remains to be seen if it has authorized, or will sauction his proceedings. The Russian Government has already prohibited the traffic in Opium. I would rather however, consult the dictates of justice and of prudent policy, than the example of foreign nations. Our indignation against an unworthy contraband traffic. must not lull us into an oblivion, of the measures regarding Opium in other You well remark upon the conduct of Lord G. Paulet regard. parts of our Empire; I would therefore only recoming the sale of liquor and it is worthy of notice, that one of the mend, with the view of suppressing Smuggling, that frigates (L' Artimise, and Carysfort) is to give, or compel the first acts of the commanders of both the English and French every British subject engaging in it, who may be appre-authorities to give full license for every intoxicating drink to run hended by the Chinese and delivered up to us, should be its course of death through the land. But is this a small matter punished, so that those who resist the search of the compared to the injustice of Lord G. Paulet in thus taking pe Chinese Revenue Officers, be held responsible for all the consequences that may follow-That any one residing on this Island, if complained against as a Smuggler, and convicted, be if a foreigner expelled, and if a British subject, duly punished. They are not to convert a British possession into a den of smugglers, to the degradation of the national character, and to the annoyance and injury of the Empire, with which, we are to be connected by the tics of fair

inter commercial advantages.

29th May, 1843.

OBSERVER.

4th-The Chinese Government, appears therefore to have a perfect right to punish those foreigners who (To the Editor of Friend of China.) violate its laws,--whether she exercises this power SIR, It is no new thing in the world for things to herself, or transfers it to the government to which the be called by their wrong names, to have good called offender is subject, is immaterial, the same high evil, and evil good; yet, it was with some surprise that authority declares, "If the offended State has.in her I read in your paper of the 25th ultimo, "that the power the individual who has done the injury, she Missionaries in the Sandwich Islands were well mean- inay without scruple bring him to justice, and punishing but ignorant fanatics." At this day, after the him. If he has escaped and returned to his own conn- character, objects. and conduct of this body of men try, she ought to apply to his Sovereign, to have has undergon the scrutiny it has, from friend and foc, justice done in the case. And since the latter ought it seems to be almost needless to produce new argu- not to allow his subjects to molest the subjects of other ments to prove their claim to the confidence and States, or to do them an injury, much less to give open approbation of every right-minded man, and I can audacious offence to Foreign Powers, he ought to account for the terms you use, ouly by the supposi- compel the aggressor to make reparation for the tion, that, having spent much of your life in the turmoil damage or injury if possible, or to inflict upon him an of London, aud near the influence of the Quarterly exemplary punishment, or finally, according to the Review, you are ignornat of what these men are, and nature and circumstances of the case, to deliver him what they have done. It is easy to apply harsh up to the offended State, to be there brought to justice. epithets to men and measures, and sometimes their I am aware that the sordid mercantile spirit of our harshness is in direct ratio to the person's knowledge other nations, but I trust it will not overrule the obliga. the writer's private opinion, rather than from an un- tions of Treaties, and of Inter-national justice. biassed view of the merits and demerits of the ques. 5th-To ascertain the design and object of that tion. condition of the Treaty, which stipulates that the offenders of either nation, be surrendered to the Government to which they belong. We have only to recollect the melancholy fate of those unhappy foreigners, who, to the eternal disgrace of those who gave them up, were delivered to Imperial justice. It was necessary to provide against the murder of innocent men in all future times, and the stipulation in question was wisely framed. In virtue of that condition, all offenders will be handed over to us, and "the Sovereign who retuses to cause reparation to be made for the damage done by his subject, or to punish the offender, or finally, to deliver him up, renders himself in some measure an accomplice in the Injury. and becomes responsible for it." A Provision of the nature in question, is not altogether unknown in Treaties, but, it is so rare that its obligations may never have been formally laid down. Had it however, been entirely omitted, and the Chinese voluntarily delivered up a British offender, the law of nations, as just quoted, would have required the infliction of punishment; and the giving up of offenders being now made compulsory on both parties, renders the obligation of punishing them equally, if not more imperative. 6th-Smuggling elsewhere, pursues her dishonest and crooked ways, under the shade of concealment, and practices all those artifices which concious guilt naturally resorts to here she raises her shameless front before the eyes of all men, and in the full blaze of the noon day sun; imagining perhaps, that her bold and gigantic operations will scare us into silence. Smuggling Opium is not only an offence against the fiscal laws of the Empire, but is regar !ed as a serious crime, on account of the drug itself; so that, whether we look to the scale upon which Smuggling is carried on, or to the nature of the chief contraband article, as

case.

Session of the Islands, and deposing the King without allowing the native authorities time to refer their hard case to Her Majesty's Government for decision. I cannot suppose that the British Nation will consent to so summary and flagrant an occupation of the country; if they do, it will go nigh to adding a new para. graph in history, to that chapter of which the story of the partition of Poland is the first section.

PER FAS.

We have much pleasure in being authorised to publish the following communication, which entirely relieves Sir Thomas Cocrhane from an imputation of discourtesy, which we are glad to know, is as alien to his disposition as it is incom- patible with his high character and standing in the Service :-

SIR,

HONG-KONG, 6th June, 1843.

With reference to several documents you have lately shown me, I have the honour to request you will submit to Sir Thomas Cochrane the following statement:-

In a letter addressed to the Editor of the Friend

of China, and published in that Paper, on the 25th ultimo, I made assertions relative to Sir Thomas Cochrane, H. M. S. Agincourt, which, though obtained from sources which I had every reason to rely on, subsequent information has proved to be entirely incorrect. I have, therefore, no hesitation in expressing my and in tendering to Sir Thomas gs, for the imputations a cust

him. upon In thus acknowledging my error, I trust I shall be acquitted of all desire to reflect upon any party, and the circumstances above adverted to, having already been before the public. I would also desire that the above expression of my regret may appear in the same Paper.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your most obedient Servant, J. R. MAGRATH, [Signed] Lieut-Adjutant, 55th Regt.

Hong-Kong.

It is now twenty-two years since the first mission- aries landed at Houolulu. They found the Sandwich Islands destitute of all orderly government, and the weak exposed to the aggressions of the strong; the natives were degraded heathens, living like the brutes, and had but just cast off the tyranny of a system of the grossest idolatry; they were without a written lan guage, and, of course, without books or schools, and ignorant of their obligations to their Maker, and their rights as men. By a late report of the Mission, it appears that during these twenty-two years, among other things which have been done, that the language has been reduced to writing, and the entire Bible translated into it, and 10,000 copies of it, and 20.000 New Testaments, printed; that there are now 335 The Dep. Judge-Advocate-General, &c., &c., &c. Schools established in the group, in which 18,034 pupils are instructed; that the Sabbath is everywhere respected as a day of rest, and that there are 14.893 members of Christian Churches. The natives them. We are glad to find, that the late selves have framed a Constitution, and a system of laws is being established which guarantees to every man measures of the Naval Authorities have the liberty of worshipping God as he likes, and secures effectually prevented the incursions of the to every man the fruits of his own industry. Several Churches too, have been built by the people. In short, Kowloon Robbers. On, Shore we have, we by the labours of these "well meaning" men, the regret to say, accounts of several attempts whole nation has been raised from a state of heathenish at burglary that have been,made, one we are degradation to be a civilized, well-organized society told was successful, at the house of Colonel observant of their own laws, and able to understand their rights as men. Such results have not heretofore Wilson, Pay Master of the Forces, and been the consequences of the labours of ignorant men, property of considerable value was lost. and it were much to be desired (so far as I can see) We would advise our readers not to that the world had more of fanaticism like this exhi-

bited everywhere. A Bible Society, too, has been relax in their watchfulness and precautions, formed, and one auxiliary subscribed 8300 last year for as it is quite certain wherever property of the purpose of giving each child attending school in its convertible value is deposited, an attempt town a copy of the New Testament. Since the intro- at plunder will be made.

MYER

Ov

47

46

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION

TO THE

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

tasked-it is not surprising that his health should suffer. Every thing has devolved FRIEND OF CHINA, AND HONG-KONG on him. Knowing this, and the difficulties of H. E.'s position, we have throughout, forborne from adopting a tone of animad- version, in our horror of invidious and captious criticism.

GAZETTE.

For ONE YEAR (payable in advance.) Do. SIX MONTHS, do. Do. THREE do. Do. ONE do. do.

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On these grounds alone, we curtail our strictures on the present occasion. We must, however, add, that the Act in ques- tion does not at all affect the bulk of the population-the Chinese-and that it gives His Excellency the powers which we be- lieve were applied for by Captain Elliot, and which, had they been despatched from England prior to the news of the Peace, we should not have been so much surprised and disappointed. Still, we anticipatively (on the 5th January last, vide No. 12) ventured to point out the utter inapplica- bility of reverting to the laws, customs, and usages of an effete and worn-out system, nor will they be less obnoxious, although The above Scale of Charges will take effect confirmed by an ill-advised and hasty legislative enactment.

ONE INSERTION not exceeding Seren Lines (Exceeding Seven Lines, ten Cents per Line) N. B.-ALL REPETITIONS at a half charge. JOB-PRINTING.

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And $1 each additional hundred.

from this date.

June 8th, 1843.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 8TH, 1843. WE much mistake if our readers will not share our surprise and disappointment on perusing the Proclamation, and other Official Notifications which we this day publish in a Supplement.

For some time past, we have been anxi- ously awaiting the authorization from home, of the establishment of Courts of Civil, Criminal, and Admiralty jurisdiction.

We do not dissemble our regret at the resurrection of such a notable speci- men, (for we have long considered it dead and buried) of Lord Palmerston's abortive legislation, as the Act of the 3rd and 4th Will. 4, Cap. 93.

When this A was passed in 1833, it had the condemnation of the Torics, the indifference of the Whigs, the contempt of the Radicals, and the calm and temperate remonstrance of the advocates of Free Trade, and those most interested in China.

It was then held to be quite pitiable, that the New System, on its first advent in China, should wear such a motley garb, be patched and disfigured with the fag ends and musty remnants of the old regime.

ALTHOUGH WE SHOULD deplore as an evil, any permanent governmental connec- tion with India, so long as it is ruled by the East India Company, yet we deeply regret that the arrangements for the future conduct of affairs here, have not been made under the control or advice of Lord Ellen- borough. He is so thoroughly informed on all matters affecting our mercantile inter- ests, so well aware of the important con- siderations involved, and more than all, his Lordship is deeply imbued with the spirit of the times, and a zcal for social advancement, that quite convinces us hao our future regulations emanated from him, we should have had only to express feelings of the liveliest satisfaction, in lieu of heart- felt disappointment.

By a late Peking Gazette, we notice that a Re- port has been made by the Treasurer of the Privy Council, wherein he states-that whilst the aggre- gate arrears of Taxes, up to the fifteenth year of the Emperor's reign, had only amounted to 25,003,000 taels of silver (about £8,000,000 Ster- ling), yet, during the last two years alone, the arrears had amounted to 19,906,500 taels.

Owing to the necessity of keeping the Army and Navy in a state of discipline, and the expenses of the War, it is recommended that increased ex- ertions be made by the Viceroys and Provincial Governors to collect the outstanding taxes. The following translation from the Peking Gazette, we referred to, but could not find space for it in our last number:-

TRANSLATION.

It is, however, right to say, this Act was wowedly provisional, the ardan in Council oportertexts i comu the 9th December 1833, says-

"Provided also, and it is further declared, that the regulations herein contained are, and shall be considered as provisional only, and as continued in force only until Ilis Majesty shall be pleased to make such further, or other Order in the provisions, in pursu. ance of the said Act of Parliament, as to His Majesty, with the advice of His Privy Council, may hereafter seem salutary or expedient, in reference to such further information as may here.

after be derived from the future course of the said trade."

This is explicit enough, and yet, after an interval of nearly ten years, and after the momentous changes and great events which have lately come to pass, we very quietly revert to the provisional and wholly inadequate legislation of the year 1833. So little are the wants and requirements of one of the largest trades in the world, or the condition of this rising Colony known or heeded at home.

We are told that Captain Elliot,.in vain endeavoured to render this statute operative, and whilst we admit the expediency of having a Court for the trial of British Subjects for offences amenable to Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdiction, we would yet very respectfully inquire whether one tithe of the inconvenience has been experienced in the Colony from the non-existence of such Courts, as has been felt from the want a Court of Civil Jurisdiction.

It is unnecessary for us to tell our read- ers that H. E.'s labours have been incês- sant-with uncommon energies-yet so

Obey the Emperor's words. Whereas Ke-ying and Military and Naval discipline, the Military Board at Peking, will take measures that an immediate inspec. tion of all Fire Arms takes place, and it will issue conformable directions to every subordinate Board in the Provinces.

The Military Board will despatch certain high Officers (who are named) into the Provinces, to exercise a proper supervision.

Every Soldier and Sailor although accustomed to the use of muskets and cannon, must still learn and practice the new exercise.

Every year there shall be four inspections, at which, the Viceroy or Provincial Governor shall attend. The months, when they shall take place, are the 2nd, 5th, hereafter be named by 8th, and 11th; the days will hereafter be named by

the Military Board.

Whoever excels in firing at the target, to be reported as worthy to be (sent up and see the Emperor) rewarded.

The pattern or model of the Cannon to be an eighteen. Let a broad open space be chosen, outside the Cities, for exercising, and those officers who do not acquire a perfect knowledge, will go back to their former positions.

to the Viceroys and Provincial Governors, will consult The High Officers deputed from the Military Board and arrange with them, clearly distinguishing, what is right and what is wrong.

Theso who excel in firing at the mark, shall be rewarded, whereby is shown how proper it is diligently

to learn.

The musket and cannon practice for Sailors, will be regulated by the difference of the service, the officers will have a target fixed on a boat for the purpose. Send this to Keangsu, Che-keang, Canton, and Shantung Provinces, to every Viceroy and Provincial Governor and Military Commander. Ye will diligently teach and learn, so that it may arrive that

at the quarterly examinations, many who have long striven and earnestly desired to look up on the can hope to attain this without effort. Imperial Face may thus attain their wish. But none All according to this consult and do.

Respect this

We are favoured with the loan of some late numbers of the "Annales Maritimes et Coloniales," by Mr C. A. Challaye, the French Consul. Among many sub- jects of much interest, some of which we hope to translate and present to our readers, we note the following account by CAPTAIN DE ROSAMEL, of the Danaide, Corvette, of his visit to Hong-Kong, in 1841.

It is addressed to the Minister of Marine, of France. Danaide, Oct, 8, 1841.

After quitting Macao, in order to proceed to the North Coast of China, I cast anchor for three days in the Port of Hong-Kong, now entirely an English possession.

Maritimely considered, it is impossible to meet with a finer harbour. All the fleets of the world might lie there in safety. Two entrances equally easy, opening one to the East and the other to the West, render the approach convenient during both monsoons. Unfortunately, it is situated too much inconvenience, already the bay of Hong-Kong is out of the direct route to Canton. Despite this covered with Ships. The difference of the English colonial system-all liberty; and that of the Portuguese-all restriction, has already attracted a numerous Chinese population to the new Colony.

There, at least, there is no Mandarin as at Macao, to make them feel the weight of his authority. At Hong-Kong, the Chinese peoples naturally vicious in their search of enjoyments, can give loose to their propensities and passions, so that the cafés, eating and drinking shops, gambling houses, opium booths, &c., have already fully occupied the space allotted by the authorities. One is astonished at seeing the rapidity with which the Chinese raise their bamboo houses, and above all, the perseverance with which they repair all damages from fires or typhoons.

Without exaggeration, one can rate the number of Chinese at the present time established at Hong- Kong, at fourteen to fifteen thousand. In this number I do not count the floating population, living in boats, who go to seek their subsistence on the opposite coast, north of the Island, or in the neighbouring bays. Barely five or six hundred English form the garrison of this anthill, not an inhabitant of which appears to be idle.

Some

Mr Johnston, Governor of Hong-Kong, ex-sous- intendant commercial with Captain Elliot, employs some hundreds of Chinese in making roads across this mountainous and scarped Island. warehouses for the most eminent English com- mercial houses at Canton, have been already built, upon ground which was sold as dear per square foot, as that realizable for the most valuable situations in Paris. The firm Malhison, & Co. (Matheson, & Co.) pay, they assure me £400 per afnum, ammual rent, for the purchase of a little offrand as the butthat godosia The chiefs of the powerful and rich mercantile houses, wait till the China affair is terminated, when they will all establish themselves at this new commercial entrepôt. But supposing the English Government retains Hong-Kong, it will become perhaps of little importance, if, as is supposed Amoy, Chusan, and Ningpo, are open to foreign trade, then the purchases of land at such exorbitant rates, will be exposed to rude deceptions, as to its real value.

Although eight days before my arrival at Hong- Kong, the Expedition had sailed for the North, yet the anchorage was crowded with Shipping; three men-of-war, many large country vessels, besides transports, and those pretty opium clippers, (ces Jolis klippers marchands d'opium) which an air of animation to the scene, that we could hardly help thinking we were at some old and long established resort of commerce,

gave

such

easily procured water at 1 dollar a butt, delivered on board; and fine bullocks at 14 dollars cach, about half the price paid at Macao.

Professor Liebig, in fis ANIMAL CHEMISTRY, has well remarked- Wes e shall never be able to dis-

cover how men were led to use the infusion of a certain leaf-TEA or the decoction of a certain seed-COFFEE." But some cause, there must be, which has induced whole nations to make the practice a necessary of life. And it is surely still. more remarkable, that the peculiar effects of both Plants on the health, must be ascribed to one and the same substance; the presence of which, in two vegetables belonging to different natural families, and the produce of different quarters of the globe, could hardly have presented itself to the boldest

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

imagination. Yet, researches have demonstrated that Caffeine, the active principle of Coffee, and theine, that of tea, are in all respects perfectly iden- tical. Tea and Coffee were originally met with among nations whose diet is chiefly vegetable. Without entering minutely into the medical action of Caffeine (théine), it will surely appear a most striking fact even if we chose to deny its in- fluence on the process of secretion, that this sub- stance, with the addition of oxygen and the ele- ments of water, can yield taurine, the nitrogenised compound peculiar to bile."

corroboration to the present state of the Protest- ant Missions in China. One thing we must, however, say, and we say it with sincere regret, that the effect of Missionary labours, here at least, are only known and heard of, through the medium of the religious publications and papers, sent to us from England and America.

COMMERCIAL

NOTICE,-The Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the

Public generally, can be farnished with fine sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BOAST, on ENGLISH MUTTON, [at one-half dollar per Pound] by Saturday Mornings.

Pong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article, of the recent Steam Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made in the United States, and worked by mechanics from that countr. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and executed in a short time. Apply to WILLIAM SCOTT.

By letters from Amoy, to the 3rd June, (per We believe, in no previous work on Physiology II. M. S. Thalia) we learn that a fair business in has the function of the bile been pointed out so British Imports was doing at that Port. Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843. RICE had been up to $3 per picul, but had de- clearly as in this of Professor Liebig's. He has clined owing to the heavy arrivals from Formosa FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- demonstrated that it is not an excretion, nor an ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs assistant of digestion, or nutrition of the tissues, but to $2. The late high prices at Amoy would, it was thought, induce large shipments from Manila, an! and Woollen Tartan-by that "it is consumed in the respiratory process, perhaps from Java, which our Correspondent said W. T. Kinsley. and is merely the vehicle of the carbon and hydro- would keep down prices. As at Ningpo the cus- gen, which, in that process, unite with the oxygen, tom of the native trade is to sell Rice per picul of and are given out from the lungs and skin as car- not 100 catties, but about 135 to 140 catties, a bonic acid and water. A horse secretes 37lb of bile daily, and in man, whose diet is mixed, from 17 recollection of this fact will often explain an appar- to 24 ounces of bile are daily secreted. Even in or native rice, and that imported by the British. ent descrepancy between the prices of Formosa the carnivora, a large dog, for example, secretes The Rice trade is the principal one at Amoy, Ib2+ daily." copious and regular supplies are obtained from For- mosa which affords ordinarily but a poor margin for the British Importer. Still, as with us the neces- saries of life fluctuate in value owing to the sea- sons, and hence at times the price of rice at Amoy rules at double the rate it now is.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.

Q. IN THE CORNER we thank, but we must tell him that we should urge the parties to do the very opposite he recomends. OBSERVER'S Letter we now publish, but we must say that we wholly disagree with him in opinion. We should be glad to know what authority in Inter-national or Criminal Law, can be found for constituting a Smuggler a Criminal. The armed resistance against the authorities of one's own country,, not the Smuggling constitutes the crime; as is evident by Smuggling itself, being by British law but a mulctuary offence. The confiscation of the Contraband Property, and a fine, at most, of treble the value, being deemed enough to purge the offence. Some Continental Jurists go so far as to assert, that the infliction and payment of such

SANDAL-WOOD.-The present price is really $6 to 89, according to quality. Higher, but merely nominal rates are given. This article is dull of sale, and large arrivals are expected by the Junks from the south.

and 86 for best, but no sales; the more northern RATTANS. The price is 83 50cs. to 84 50cs, ports afford a better market for this article, which it is said has lately come into use for Charcoal, which is required in the manufacture of a superior kind of gun-powder now made by the Chinese.

PEPPER in little demand, by the Junks' recent arrival with large supplies; nominal prices for good, 85 50cs. to $6.

COTTON GOODS-Grey Long Cloths of good

gell freely, at which figure several lots of inferior have been lately cleared out. Whites in cager demand at $3 75cs., at which, and at 84 large quantities had been sold. Twist, No 20 to 30 dull at $29 to $30 per picul.

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. NOTICE.-Just received, and For Sale, SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street. TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to

R. WEBSTER.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD.

THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con-

taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO, Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package.

Apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE,

46, Queen's Road.

FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Storos of all de,

criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne

Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, and Beaver Hats, Apply to

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St. FOR SALE, Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route. UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under- signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at

fines, involve no loss or dimiunition of personal quality in slight demand at $3 30cs. At $3 would 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown honour to a citizen. It is certain that offences of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. against the revenue laws at home, entail no Hong-Kong, 10th December, 1842. disqualification of citizenship on the offender. As regards the infractions of the Revenue Laws of other countries, we have so often scouted the notion of its beign treated as a cognizable offence by any power but the one affected, that we must refer OBSERVER to our No. 25, but meantime, as he is a respecter of Authorities, we would tell him that it has been expressly held by Lord Mansfield, and confirmed by the whole Court of King's Bench, that "one nation never takes notice of the Revenue-laws of another." On this point, the laws of France entirely coincide with those of England.

nature none swill be without such things as are.

WOOLLENS, for Superfine Cloths and Camlets, no inquiry; for Long Ells a sparing demand.- Spanish Stripes not wanted but at a low rate, and of suitable colours, could be sold to some extent.

OPIUM is being sold in small quantities off the town, say some three or four chests daily. Patna, new, $780, old, $760. Benares, $740. Malwa, $620.

CAMPHOR, at Amoy was $20 to $22 per Picul, but it is lower at the Opium station in Chimmo Bay, and several large lots have been sent to Singapore, by the Opium Clippers, Macao and and Chinese Junks.

As our Correspondent has cited, but we think inapplicably, the eminent Authority of VATTEL, we will favour him with another quotation, It is seldom (he says) that nature is seen to produce The Shipping then in port with Opium, were in one place every thing for the use of man: one Sir Edward Ryan, Wild Irish Girl, Mahmoodie, country abounds in corn, another in pastures and and a captured Chinese War Junk, belonging to cattle, a third in metals, &c. If all these coun- an English firm, and lying off the town. The tries trade together, as is agreeable to human Colonist, and one or two other vessels had come useful and necessary; and the views of nature, Commander, Captain Hope, to be tried [our common mother, will be fulfilled." The correspondent says by a Court Martial] for corollary of this proposition would be, (and who being so verdant as to believe that the Plenipoten- will deny it?) that the Smuggler is, in fact, but tiary's memorable November Proclamation, was the assertor of the laws of nature-the vindicator other than a humble imitation of Chinese official of man's inalienable right to commune and magniloquence" he having prevented merchant commerce with his brother man. It is the vessels proceeding to the yet unopened Ports, rulers and governors with their fiscal enactments and enormous imposts, that are the contraveners of the laws of nature and the claims of eternal justice.

our

We gladly insert the highly interesting Communi- cation of our American Correspondent PER FAS. After his observations, we may be excused saying, that from our veriest infancy we have been a humble friend and contributor to the Missionary cause. Our zeal peradventure was in an inverse ratio to our knowledge.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and

Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE-Superior Port and Sherry, ex City

Far be it, from us to undervalue the labours of pious men of our own communion, still, we are constrained to say, that not a few of of Derry. their number (judging by their own reports) are either endowed, or soon acquire, from their residence in the East, a truly oriental fertility of imagination.

We will not be betrayed into a profitless and uninteresting controversy, or we might refer in

Cafféine was discovered in Caffee, by Robiquet. Dr. Fyfe gives the analysis of Pelletier and Dumas, who found it com posed of,

Carbon

Oxygen

Hydrogen

Nitrogen

46, 51

27, 14

4,81

21, 54

soluble in 100, 00 It is soluble in water and alcohol.-ED,

Apply to C, W. BOWRA, No. 13, Queen's Road, FOR SALE-Patent Cordage, from the Steam Manufactory at Manila-a superior article.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA, No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE GOODS and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderato terms. Apply upon the premises to, W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. flongkong, 16th Feby, 1843,

the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. PACKAGES. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ s. d. UNDER 1 lb. 0 CUBIC FEET 0 do. 2 do. 0 10

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uo.

40. 40

Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will

be computed by either Weight or Measure.

JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on

delivery.

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open) at both ends,) will be charged-lb., Is- lb., ls. 9d.; from 1 lb. to 10 lb., 33. per lb.

RISK-To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,- unless insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (pay able to

and a-half per cent. will be made.

the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every article, will be added the above rates,

RECEIPT Receipts will be given on the delivery of each Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt.

CONSIGNMENT-All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest advice to the Consignees or if the postage (1s.) be paid, we will ourselves write to the party to whom the packages are addressed. AGENTS-Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engledue; Madras, Capt. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt. Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); Bombay, Messrs. William Nicol, & C.

OFFICES-44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Crutched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe,

JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES

BARBER, & Co., 17, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will' forward instructions from partics wishing to avail themselves of the convenient arrangements offered by MESSRS BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London.

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future to bond their orders and subscriptions to HENRY, GRIBBLE.

Macho, May 5th, 1843,

48

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize G. F. DAVIDSON.

for Sale on Commission,

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE. American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER NAVIGATOR.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases. No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co., Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz. :- Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes; Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Foolscap, and Over-Land Paper; Steel Pens, Patent Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day, for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE-The following important and valu- able Property; several extensive Marine Lots, having deep Water Frontage; convenient Bungalows, delight- fully situate, and commanding a fine view of the Bay and Town; Large Plots of Ground eligible for Build ing purposes.

The whole of the Property is situated in a first-rate G. F. DAVIDSON. locality, contiguous to Government Hill, and offers a highly desirable and safe investment for Capital. For particulars, apply to,

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terins:--Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe ard Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of

other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20 Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, th April, 1848

FOR SALE--Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON. & Co. Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

terms.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, dRto Coffee, ditto. Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other

Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing under the firm of L. E. Christopher & H. J. Carr, is this day dissolved, by mutual consent. and all demands now due are to be settled by LE. Christopher,

June 1st, 1843.

[Signed] L. E. CHRISTOPHER. Witness] H. J. CARE.

All Persons indebted to the above named firm, are called upon for immediate payment, and all persons holding claims against the said firm, to send in their claims to L. E. Christopher.

June 1st, 1843.

H. J. CARR.

NOTICE.

To Captains of Vessels and others connected with the Port of Hong-kong.

E. FARNCOMB, Solicitor and Notary-Public. Hong-Kong, 29th May, 1843. NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of P. TOWNSEND & Co." was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND.

P. TOWNSEND, ROBT. EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843,

NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de-

G. R. MESS, CORNWALLIS. THE MESS of the 26th Regiment, on quitting

Hong-Kong, left with a Resident here, a Sum of Money, for the G. R. Mess of the Cornwallis. The CATERER of this Mess will feel much obliged, if this individual will inform the Editor, where he may be

found.

Cornwallis, June 5th, 1843. NOTICE.

IN consequence of the mutual Dissolution of Part- nership betweeen Messrs. BENNETT, PAIN, & Co., the Undersigned begs to Notify.that the Busi. ness will be carried on by himself, on the same Pre- mises, and most respectfully solicits a continuance of the liberal support he has hitherto been favoured with. Parties desirous of sending Goods for Public Auction, are requested to do so two days previous to the time of Sale.

Auctions will be held every Friday, at Eleven A. M. Terms-Five per Cent. on all Goods.

One half per cent. Commission will be charged upon all Goods bought in.

A liberal allowance will be made for the Sale of Ships, Opium, or landed Property.

Account Sales will be rendered three days, and proceeds thirty days, after the day of Sale. JOHN BENNETT,

Queen's Road,

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

EXCHANGE AND READING ROOM.

At the request of several of the resident Inhabitants, and Comm.aiders of Ships, the undersigned has been induced to establish at this rising Port, an Exchange and Reading Room, the utility of which, he feels assured, will be apparent to all,

The first object has been, to provide a place of resort for Subscribers. Secondly, to afford as soon as practicable, the latest Intelligence from all parts Colonies, with all the Local Publications. of Europe, America, India, and the Southern

A well chosen Library has also been added N. B.-The Exchange will be removed to the premises immediately above the Sale Rooms of the undersigned, on Monday the 12th inftant. JOHN BENNETT.

Hong-Kong, Exchange and Reading Room,

1st June, 1843.

THE Undersigned has on hand for Sale, the under- mentioned Stores, at moderate prices.

Pale Ale, Dunbar's; French Claret, St. Julien ; Superior light French Wines, assorted; Superior Brown Sherry; Do. Brandy; Salad Oil, in cases; Mocha Coffee; Superior Hyson, in whole chests; Pickled Salmon; Pickles; Sauces; Vinegar; &c. &c; Pickled Mackerell; Cabin Biscuits, in tins; Superior Butter; Bottled Fruits; Macaroni; Reading and Hanging Lamps Lamp Wicks; Pad-locks; Ger- Clocks, with Alarums: Hunting Whips; Tanned Hides; Bunting Single Barrelled Fowling-pieces, in cases; Shot, ot sizes; Powder Flasks; Rosin in kegs; Writing Paper; Blankets; Lamb's Wool Drawers; Boots and Shoes, Europe and Calcutta ; Blacking, Day and Martin's; Quinine.

scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong-man kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre mises to N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843.

N. DUUS.

FOR SALE, Singapore BEAMB, from 22 to 28 feet long, and Go 12 inches diameter. Ditto Planks. 16 feet by 1 & half inch thick. Ditto ditto 11 " " 1 ditto. Ditto ditto 11 "" one-half " ditto.

Goods Received, and Sold on Commission. N B.-An Auction held every Friday, at 11 A.M. JOHN BENNETT. BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J. S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Gentry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL, and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN. TON-and that his constant care and attention will he the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage.

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties.

European Servants always in attendance

All Orders for Wincs Stores, &c., thankfully received, and punctually attended to.,

Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales

PAINE, & Co, have for Sale at their Stores, (the premises in Magistracy Street, lately known as the AL80,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms.

Exchange Rooms) the following Articles, viz:-

Prime Mess Beef and Pork, Paint and Paint Oil, Ship's Bread, Bunting, Turpentine, Tar, Cabin Bread, Brandy in wood and bottle, very Superior Golden Sherry, Port Wine, [Cockburn's] Claret, St. Julien Margaux, Hock, Frontignac & Barsac, Barclay's Stout, in bottle, Olive Oil, Oilman's Stores, an assortment of Beaver and Solar Hats, and many other Articles too numerous to mention.

'PUBLIC SALE.

Canton, 24th May, 1843.

Wood in Planks and Stanchions. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843, FOR SALE,

18, Queen's Road.

MAY,

A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound Bags. Apply to N. DUUS,

On Friday next, June 9th, will be offered for Sale, without reserve, at the Godowns of the Undersigned, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. at 11 A, M.

Port and Sherry Wines in cases; Claret in cask; Brandy in bottle; Pickles; Sauces; Fruits; a few Hls. Pork; Saddles and Bridles; Boots; and sundry

other Articles.

Also on Saturday, at 11 A. M., at the Albion Godowns; about 500 Piculs of Rice, in lots to suit purchasers.-Java Arrack, and Singapore Planks. P. TOWNSEND.

FOR SALE.

18, Queen's Road.

Just received, per " GONDOLIER"-ASmall quantity of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843,

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

31st Kestrel JUNE.

1st Bencoolen

2nd Mary Ann

23 Gitana

3rd H. M. Str. Vixen

Salado

Capt. Hope

ARRIVED.

Beauvais Clarewood Holton

Whampoa

Manila

Macao

Amoy

33

31

Singapore Macao

Walker Lakeland

East Coast. Amoy

Macao

19

4th H. M. S. Thalia H. M. S. Childers 6th Anna

7th Spec

JUNE

Capt. Wellsely Keling

SAILED.

1st Will o' the Wisp Ina

18 Queen's Road.

3rd Anglona

FOR SALE-A small quantity of very superior

FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just Burgundy; Hermitage; Champagne; Rhenish Wines;

landed ex JAGATRA

Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

Claret; Sherry; Port and Madeira, in Bottles-Also

a few casks of prime Claret, Sherry, and Madeira. Apply to N. DUUS, 8, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

4th Alpha

7th H. C. Str. Akbar

Com. Pepper Unknown WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG.

The Friend of China & Hong Kong

SUPPLEMENT TO No. 61. .

HONG-KONG, THURSDAY. JUNE 8TH, 1843.

PROCLAMATION.

Gazette,

49

or Harbour of Canton; and that the said Court said Court shall be holden by the Chief Superin- should be holden by the Chief Superintendent, for tendent for the time being, appointed or to be HIS EXCELLENCY, SIR HENRY the time being, appointed. or to be appointed, by appointed, by His Majesty under and in pursuance POTTINGER, BART, G. C. B., Chief His said late Majesty, under and in pursuance of of the said Act of Parliament: Superintendent of the Trade of British the said Act of Parliament; And whereas it is expedient, that the said Court Subjects in China, &c., &c., directs that of Justice should henceforth be holden in the Island the annexed Copy of a Despatch, dated of Hong-Kong; now, therefore, in further pursu- the 4th of January, 1843, from Her Ma- ance of the said Act, and of the powers thereby jesty's Principal Secretary of State for in Her Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, Foreign Affairs, together with the Order and of all other powers to Her Majesty belonging of Her Majesty in Councit, referred to by Her Majesty, by and with the advice of Her Wise appertaining, it is hereby ordered

therein,

or in

any

And it is further ordered, that the practice and proceedings of the said Court upon the trial of all issues of fact or law, to be joined upon any indict- ments or informations to be therein brought or prosecuted, shall be conformable to, and corre- spond with the practice and proceedings of the Courts of Oyer and Terminer and Goal delivery Courts, so far as it may be practicable to maintain in England, upon the trial of such issues in such

be Published for the Information, Privy Council, that the said Court shall henceforth such conformity and correspondence, regard being and Guidance of all British Subjects, who be holden in the Island of Hong-Kong; and that had to the difference of local eircumstances; and are Required and Enjoined to pay Due, the same shall have, and exercise jurisdiction for especially it is hereby ordered, that every such and Implicit Obedience to the said Order the trial of offences committed by Her Majesty's issue of fact, or of mixed fact and law, shall be in Council. Subjects within the said Island and within GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. Dated at the Government House, at Hong-Kong, this 1st day of June, 1843.

[Copy-No. 21.]

HENRY POTTINGER.

FOREIGN OFFICE, JANUARY 4, 1842.

said Act:

the Dominions of the Emperor of China, and the by, the said Chief Superintendent for the time Ports and Havens thereof, and on the High Seas being, and a Jury of twelve men,-and that upon every such trial, the examination of witnesses for within one hundred miles of the Coast of China: and against, the party or parties charged shall take and it is hereby further ordered, that the said Court place viva voce, in open Court; and that the sen- shall be holden by the Chief Superintendent, for tence or judgment of the said Court upon every the time being, appointed, or to be appointed, such trial, founded upon the verdiet of such jury, by Her Majesty, under, and in pursuance of the shall be pronounced in open Court, by such Chief Superintendent as the presiding Judge thereof. And, whereas, it will be necessary to frame and prescribe rules of practice and proceeding to be observed upon all such prosecutions, in order to ascertain how far the same can be brought into .. conformity with the practice and proceeding of His Majesty's Courts of Oyer and Terminer and Goal delivery in England, and how far it may be necessary to deviate from such practice and pro- C. C. GREVILLE.ceeding by reason of the differences local cir- RICE WOOSNAM.

And Her Majesty, by, and with the advice of Her said Council, doth hereby confirm in all other respects the said Order of His said late Majesty in Council, dated the ninth December, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three.

(True Copy)

SIR, I transmit to you, herewith, for your information and guidance, a Copy of an Order of And the Right Honourable, the Earl of Aber- Her Majesty in Council, providing that the Court of Justice, with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdic- deen, one of Her Majesty's Principal Secretaries tion, which was appointed by an Order of His of State, is to give the necessary directions herein late Majesty, in Council, dated the 9th of Decem- accordingly. ber, 1833, to be held at Canton, in the Dominions of the Emperor of China, or on board any British Ship, or Vessel, in the Port or Harbour of Canton, shall henceforth be holden in the Island of Hong-Kong, and have Jurisdiction for the trial of GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. Offences committed by Her Majesty's Subjects, WITH reference to the preceding PRO- within the said Island, and within the Dominions CLAMATION ander date the Ist instant, the following Copy of the Order in Council, by His late Majesty, King William the Wth, under date the 9th of January 1833, is published for General Information. By order, RICHARD WOOSNAM. Government House, Hong-Kong, 3rd June, 1843.

of the Emperor of China, and the Ports and Havens thereof, and on the High Seas within one

Hundred Miles of the Coast of China,

I am, with great truth and regard,

SIR,

Your most obedient humble Servant (Signed) ABERLEEN.

SIR HENRY POTTINGER, BA, G.C.B., &c., &c. &c. RICHARD WOOSNAM, (True Copy)

AT THE COURT AT WINSOR, THE 4TH DAY OF JANUARY, 1848 PRESENT, THE QUEEN'S MO EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL.

HEREAS, Dan Act of Parliament, made and passed in the

BRITISH ORDER IN COUNCIL, appoint- ing a Court of Justice at Canton, for the trial of Offences committed by British Subjects in China-9th December, 1833.

AT THE COURT AT BRIGHTON, THE 9TH DAY OF DECEMBER, 1833,-PRESENT,

MAJESTY IN COUNCIL.

cumstances it is, therefore, further ordered, that such Chief Superintendent for the tme being, shall be, and he is hereby authorised, from time to time, but subject to the provisions aforesaid, to promulgate all such rules and practice and pro- ceeding as it may be necessary to adopt and fol- low, upon, or previously to, the commitment of any person to take his trial in the said Court, and respecting taking of bail for the appearance of such person at such trial, and respecting the form and manner of preferring and finding indictments, and of exhibiting criminal informations against any persons charged with any crimes or offences before the said Court; and respecting the manner of summoning and convening Jurors for the trial of such indictments, or informations and respecting qualifications of such Jurors, and the mode of .summoning and compelling the attendance of witnesses; and respecting the process of the said Court, and the mode of carrying the same into execution; and respecting the times and places of holding such Courts, and the duties of the re- d spective Ministerial Officers attending the same, whom he is hereby authorised to appoint provision- ally, subject to His Majesty's approbation; and also respecting every other matter and thing con-- oated with the Administration of Justice therein. which it may be found necessary to regulate:

And it is further ordered, that all rules so to be the third and foueession of Parliament holden in th years of the reign of His late promulgated as aforesaid, shall be binding and Majesty King W liam the Fourth, intituled. An WHEREAS, by a certain Act of Parliament take effect from the respective days of the dates "Act to regulate he Trade to China and India?" it was, amongster things, enacted, that it should made, and passed in the third and fourth year of thereof, but that the same shall, by such Chief and might be ful for His said Majesty, by any His Majesty's reign, intituled " An Act to regulate Superintendent, be transmitted to one of His te such Order on Orders as to His said Majesty in the Trade to China and India," it is, amongst Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, for Hno- Council should appear expedient arld salutary, to other things, enacted, that it shall, and may be Majesty's approbation or disallowance, and thaley create a Court of Justice, with Criminal and Admi- lawful for His Majesty, by any such Order or any such rule shall cease to be binding, or to of ralty Jurisdiction, for the trial of offences commit- Orders as to Flis Majesty in Council shall appear have any force or effect, from and after the time glares His said Majesty's Subjects within the expedient and salutary, to create a Court of Justice, of which his Majesty's disallowance thereof shall darknfions of the Emperor of China and the Ports with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdiction, for the be made known to the Chief Superintendent for Grin Tavens thereof, and on the High Seas within trial of Offences committed by His Majesty's Sub- the time being: wil Hundred Miles of the said Coast of China; jects within the Dominions of the Emperor of

1 to appoint one of the Superintendents, in the China, and the Ports and Havens thereof, and on

And it is further ordered, that a record shall

id Act mentioned, to be the Officer to hold such the High Seas within 100 miles of the Coast of be duly made and preserved of all the proceed- Court, and other Officers for executing the process China, and to appoint one of the Superintendents ings, Judgments and Sentences of the said Court, in the said Act mentioned to be the officer to hold which record shall be retained in the custody

hereof:

of an Officer of the said Court to be by the Chief Superintendent specially charged with the performance of that duty:

And the Right Honourable Viscount Palmer- ston, one of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries herein, accordingly.

And whereas, in pursuance of the said Act, and such Court, and other officers for executing the in execution of the powers thereby in His said late process thereof; now, therefore, in pursuance of Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, it was by the said Act, and in execution of the powers there an Order dated the 9th day of December, one by in His Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, thousand eight hundred and thirty-three, ordered it is hereby ordered by His Majesty, by and with by His said late Majesty, by and with the advice the advice of His Privy Council, that there shall of State, is to give the necessary directions of His Privy Council, that there should be a Court be a Court of Justice, with Criminal and Admi- of Justice, with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdic- ralty Jurisdiction, for the purposes aforesaid, which tion, for the purposes aforesaid; which Court Court shall be holden at Canton, in the said should be holder p Canton, in the said dominions, Dominions, or on board any British Ship or Vessel boarty British Ship Vessel in the Port in the Port or Harbour of Canton, and that the

or on

(True Copy)

C. C. GREVILLE.

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

41

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terins, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission. G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1943.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

PER NAVIGATOR.

Negro-head Tobacco,

. Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in ono

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkine

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases.

No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong. 25th April, 1843.

G. F.

D. WILSON & Co.,

Have just landed. ex " ALGERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz.: Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes; Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases; Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Foolscap, and Over-Land Paper; Steel Pens, Patent Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day, for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE-The following important and valu- able Property; several extensive Marine Lots, having deep Water Frontage; convenient Bungalows, delight- fully situate, and commanding a fine view of the Bay and Town; Large Plots of Ground eligible for Build- ing purposes. The whole of the Property is situated in a first-rate DAVIDSON.locality, contiguous to Government Hill, and offers a highly desirable and safe investment for Capital. For particulars, apply to, E. FARNCOMB, Solicitor and Notary Public. Hong-Kong, 29th May, 1843.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:-Sherry. Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water: Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks. of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of

other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20. Queen's Road, Hong Kong, 29th April, 1843. FOR SALE--Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON. Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

terins.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

On Saturday next, June 3rd, at 11 A. M. will be Sold without reserve. all the Stock in Trade of the Eagle Livery Stables, consisting of 9 Ponies, I Arabian Horse, 1 Buggy and Harness, 1 Hearse, also a quantity of Saddles and Bridles, and immediately after, a fine Manila Pony. Terms-Cash.

P. TOWNSEND.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Coconut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13. Queen's Road. FOR SALE-Superior Port and Sherry, ex City of Derry. Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

No. 13, Queen's Road,

FOR SALE-Patent Cordage, from the Steam Manufactory at Manila-a superior article.

No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE-Just received, and For Sale. SILLARY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS. Magistracy Street,

TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to R. WEBSTER.

NOTICE.

FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate. Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles. JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE-A quantity of LoxBOCK RI just landed ex JAGATRA Apply to

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO. FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843.

W. T. Kinsley.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of P. TOWNSEND & Co.," was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND. P. TOWNSEND, ROBT. EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned

and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong. 15th March, 1843.

NOTICE. Goods and Merchandize of all de-

scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre mises to

N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE-The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Mosses of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS. Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843.

FOR SALE,

Go 12 inches diameter.

1

Ditto Planks. 16 feet by 1 & half inch thick. ข ditto. 11 Ditto ditto 11 ditto. Ditto ditto one-half " ALSO,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture Wood in Planks and Stanchions. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong Kong, 20th May, 1843.

1

BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J. S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Genfry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL, and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN. TON-and that his constant care and attention will be, the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage.

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties,

European Servants always in attendance All Orders for Wines Stores, &c, thankfully received, and punctually attended to.

Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms. Canton, 24th May, 1843.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing under the firm of L. E. Christopher & H. J. Carr, is this day dissolved, by mutual consent, and all demands now due are to be settled by L E. Christopher.

June 1st, 1843.

[Signed] L. E. CHRISTOPHER. [Witness] H. J. CARR.

All Persons indebted to the above named firm, are called upon for immediate payment, and all persons holding claims against the said firm, to send in their claims to L. E. Christopher.

June 1st, 1843.

L. E. CHRISTOPHER. H. J. CARR.

NOTICE,-The Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the ENGLISH MUTTON, (at one-half dollar per Pound] by Public generally, can be furnished with fine sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BOAST, on Saturday Mornings. Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article, of the recent Steam Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made in the United States, and worked by mechanics from that countr. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and executed in a short time. Apply to WILLIAM SCOTT.

Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843.

A BAY PONY for Sale. Apply No. 46, Queen's Road. Hong-Kong, 22nd May. 1843.

FOR SALE-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stures of all de, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Apply to Clothing, and Beaver Hats, A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

NOTICE.-Goons and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored, in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate term Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission.

Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843

BIRTH-At Chek-Chu, on the 8th instant, the wife of Mr. George Brayson, H. M.'s 98th Regiment, of a son. SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE.

ARRIVED.

MAY

25th Bombay Castle,

31 Lark

29th Ina

31

Louisa

Baxter Tibbits Lakeland. Forgan

Bombay Macao

Macao

"

พ.

30th John Laird [Tron Ship] St. Croix Will o' the Wisp Mazeppa

Walker

Liverpool Macao

"

Frazer

SAILED,

MAY.

18, Queen's Rond.

25th Eliza

Mc. Carthey

Whampoa

11

Louisa

Forgan

26th City of Derry

Vincent

39

Tibbits

11

Mossman

Manila

Wharton

19

30

19

Sir R. Peel

Ritchardson

30th H. M. Str. Vixen

Amoy

Metcalf

93

18, Queen's Road.

Ju B.

1st H. M. T. S. Jupiter " Levant Packet

FOR SALE,

A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound Bags. Apply to N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. FOR SALE.

18 Queen's Road.

Just received, per "GONDOLIER"-ASmalt quantity of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Apply to. N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843, FOR SALE-A small quantity of very superior Burgundy; Hermitage; Champagne; Rhenish Wines; Claret; Sherry; Port and Madeira, in Bottles-Also a few casks of prime Claret, Sherry, and Madeira.

Apply to N. DUUS, 8, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

27th Lark

28th Sarah

29th Parrock Hall

31st Thomas Crisp

Capt. Hoffmeister England A. Cafto Amoy WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

The VIXEN Steamer sailed without any previous notice being given. either to the Post or Harbour Master. We should be sorry to be compelled to believe with a Correspondent that "this is only another instance of the contemptuous disregard, with which the mercantile interests have always been treated by the Authorities."--EDITOR.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT

THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG.

;

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 64 VOL. II.

1.ONGBONG

GAZETTL

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY JUNE 8TH, 1843.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. received by the Chinese Government, it is impossible that those concerned in it, can be allowed to escape with impunity, under the pretext that their offence is of a petty nature

OPIUM-AND REPRESSING OF

SMUGGLING,

[To the Editor of the Friend of China.] SIR, 1st-Dealing in Opium, and Smuggling generally, in China, will in all probability soon become the subjects of discussion and legislation at home, and is desirable that they should be here maturely Canvassed. You state, that in my last letter, I am wrong in my view of the provisions of the Treaty, and in my Inter-national Law. With your permission, I will endeavour to show that my opinion on these points is supported by competent authority. I shall examine the latter point first, for my whole argument chiefly rests upon the correctness of the principle stated in the 3rd paragraph, "every nation has an undisputable right to punish those who violate its laws" 2nd-In the reign of Queen Anne, a declaratory statute was required, to absolve even an Ambassador from the effects of our laws, and though subjecting such persons to the municipal laws of the country where they reside, is now disclaimed, I believe by all tenaciously jealous Britain ever has been of this right, and how clearly all foreigners residing in our country are amenable to our laws. Let us enquire what foreign Jurists write regarding this matter; in the 2nd Book, Chap. 8th, of Vattel, it is stated, those countries where foreigners may freely enter, the Sovereign is supposed to allow him access only upon this tacit condition, that he subject to the laws virtue of this submission, foreigners who commit faulis are to be punished according to the laws of the Country." I suppose that it will not be denied; that the ports and harbours of a country, are as much within its jurisdiction as the land itself. 3rd-It will not be necessary to enlarge further upon a rule, neither new nor unreasonable, and the dis-allowance of which, would involve every State in disorder.

7thi The only difficulty that occurs to me, is, the extent to which we ought to interfere in repressing Smuggling. It would probably be unwise to go so for such a systein could not be carried out, without far as the Senior Naval Officer at Chusan lately did, maintaining a fleet on the China coast. Besides it would be highly inexpedient to allow the Chinese to suppose, that we could control, and therefore in some

monthly

(Pre Or 12 8 yearly

duction of the Press into the Islands. one hundred and ten millions of pages have been published, every page of which contains such reading as tends to elevate the human mind, and make it wiser and happier.

under the thraldom of men whose labjurs result in such eff ers Now, why is it not to be tolerated that these Islands are to be as these? What sort of thraldom is that which reaches a man to worship the God who made, and Saviour who redeemed him, to live quitely under his rulers, to respect the rights of his neigh bour, to enjoy the fruits of his own industry, to hallow the Sabbath, and to dress himself in decent apparel? But I deny that the missionaries have ever erected a theocracy at the Sand. wich Islands, and it is your part, now Mr. Editor, to prove that the sort of theocracy which they have established is "aliko re.

scils along their coast. The American Commodore, from his Notification at Koolongsoo, will, I suppose, take a still more vigourous measure against the Opium Trade, than our Captain attempted. Notwithstanding the anxiety of the American Government to conciliate the Cabinet of Pekin, it remains to be seen if it has authorized, or will sanction his proceedings The Russian Government has already prohibited the traffic in Opium. I would rather however, consult the dictates of justice and of prudent policy, than the example of foreign nations. Our indignation against an unworthy contraband traffic, must not lufl us into

pugnant to sound policy and liberal principles." degree, be responsible for every British trader who

If you, as editor of a public print, take upon yourself to be the exponent of public opinion, it were proper that your readers empty declamation and hard words. If you mislike the doings should be informed of the facts of the case, and not served with of the missionaries, show where they have done wrong, and help them with your advice to do better, before you go out of your way to stigmatize them as "ignorant fann ca" You make no comment upon the Catholic missionaries, aided by the Cantain lulu against the wishes of the people. I have paid more atten. and Officers of a French frigate, celebrating high Mass at Houo. have the effect of informing you regarding the merits of the tion to your remarks than they deserve, but not too much if they

case

nations, still the necessity of the above act, proves how ad oblivion, of the measures regarding Opium in other ing the sale of liquor and it is worthy of notice, that one of the

In

meud, with the view of suppressing Smuggling, that parts of our Empire; I would therefore only recom- every British subject engaging in it, who may be appre- hended by the Chinese and delivered up to us, should be punished, so that those who resist the search of the the consequences that may follow-That any one Chinese Revenue Officers, be held responsible for all residing on this Island, if complained against as a muggler, and convicted, be reigner expelled, and if a British subject, duly not to convert a British pos They are to a den of and to the annoyance and inju smugglers, to the degradation of National character, the Empire, with inter commercial advantages. which, we are to be connec the ties of fair

29th May, 1843.

SERVER.

4th-The Chinese Government, appears therefore to have a perfect right to punish those foreigners who (To the Editor of Friend of China.) violate its laws, whether she exercises this power Bi-It is no new thing in the world for things to herself, or transfers it to the government to which the be called by their wrong names, to have good called offender is subject is immaterial, the same high evil, and evil good; yet, it was with some surprise that authority declarcs,If the offended State has.in her I read in your paper of the 25th ultimo, that the power the individual who has done the injury, she Missionaries in the Bandwich Islands were well mean- mayithout scruple bring him to justice, and punishing but ignorant fanatics." At this day, after the him. If he has escaped and returned to his own conn- character, objects, and conduct of this body of men try, she ought to apply to his Sovereign, to have has undergon the scrutiny it has, from friend and foe, justice done in the case. And since the latter ought it seems to be almost needless to produce new argu- not to allow his subjects to molest the subjects of other ments to prove their claim to the confidence and States, or to do them an injury, much less to give open approbation of every right-minded man, and I can audacious offence to Foreign Powers, he ought to account for the terms you use, only by the supposi- compel the aggressor to make reparation for the tion, that, having spent much of your life in the turmoil damage or injury if possible, or to inflict upon him an of London, and near the influence of the Quarterly exemplary punishment, or finally, according to the Review, you are, ignornat of what these men are, and nature and circumstances of the case, to deliver him what they have done. It is easy to apply harsh up to the offended State, to be there brought to justice. epithets to men and measures, and sometimes their I am aware that the sordid mercantile spirit of our harshness is in direct ratio to the person's knowledge policy, is reluctant to protect the revenue laws of and candour, but they are oft-times bestowed from other nations, but I trust it will not overrule the obliga. the writer's private opinión, rather than from an un- tions of Treaties, and of Inter-national justice. hiassed view of the merits and demerits of the ques 5th-To ascertain the design and object of that tion. condition of the U brenders of either nation, be surrendered to the Government to which they belong, We have only to recollect the melancholy, fate of those unhappy foreigners, who, to the eternal disgrace of those who gave them up, were delivered to Imperial justice. It was necessary to provide against the murder of innocent men in all future times, and the stipulation in question was wisely framed. In virtue of that condition, all offenders will be handed over to us, and "the Sovereign who retuses to cause reparation to be made for the damage done by his subject, or to punish the offender, or finally, to deliver him up, rendere himself in some measure an accomplice in the Injury and becomes responsible for it." A Provision of the nature in question, is not altogether, unknown in Treaties, but, it is so rare that its obligations may never have been formally laid down. Had it however been entirely omitted, and the Chinese voluntarily delivered up a British offender, the law of natious, just quoted, would have required the infliction of punishment; and the giving up of offenders being now made compulsory on both parties, renders the obligation of punishing them equally, if not more imperative. 6th-Smuggling elsewhere, pursues her dishonest and crooked ways, under the shade of concealment, and practices all those artifices which concious guilt naturally resorts to: here she raises her shameless front before the eyes of all men, and in the full blaze of the noon day sun; imagining perhaps, that her bold and gigantic operations will scare us into silence: Smuggling Opium is not only an offence against the fiscal laws of the Empire, but is regarled as a serious crime, on account of the drug itself; so that, whether we look to the scale upon which Smugglimg is carried on, or to the nature of the chief contraband article, as

You well remark upon the conduct of Lord G. Paulet regard. frigates (L Artimise, and Chrysfurt) is to give, or compel the first nets of the commanders of both the English and French authorities to give full license for every intoxicating drink to run its course of death through the land. But is this a small matter compared to the injustice of Lord G. Panlet in thus taking pos Session of the Islands, and deposing the King without allowing the native authorities time to refer their hard case to Her Majesty's Government for decision. I cannot suppose that the British

Nation will consent to so summary and flagrant an occupation of the country; if they do, it till go nigh, to adding a now para. graph in history, to that chapter of which the story of the partition of Poland is the first section. PER FAS.

We have much pleasure in being authorised to publish the following communication, which entirely relieves Sir Thomas Cocrhane from an imputation of discourtesy, which we are glad to know, is as alien to his disposition as it is incom- patible with his high character and standing in the Service:

HONG-KONG, 6th June, 1843.

With reference to several documents you have lately shown me, I have the honour to request you will submit to Sir Thomas Cochrane the following statement:

In a letter addressed to the Editor of the Friend of China, and published in that Paper, on the 25th ultimo, I made assertions relative to Sir Thomas Cochrane, H. M. S. Agincourt, which, though obtained from sources which I had every reason to rely on, subsequent information has proved to be entirely incorrect.

deep regret, and in tendering to Sir Thomas I have, therefore, no hesitation in expressing my Cochrane my apology, for the imputations I cast upon him.

and the circumstances above adverted to, having be acquitted of all desire to reflect upon any party, already been before the public. I would also desire that the above expression of my regret may appear in the same Paper.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your most obedient Servant, [Signed] J. R. MAGRATH, Lieut-Adjutant, 55th Regt.

Hong-Kong.

aries landed at Honolulu. They found the Sandwich Islands destitute of all orderly government, and the weak exposed to the aggressions of the strong; the natives were degraded heathens, living like the brutes, and had but just cast off the tyranny of a system of the grossest idolatry; they were without a written lan- guage, and, of course, without books or schools, and ignorant of their obligations to their Maker, and their rights as men. By a late feport of the Mission, it appears that during these twenty-two years, among other things which have been done, that the language has been reduced to writing, and the entire Bible translated into it, and 10,000 copies of it, and 20.000 New Testaments, printed; that there are now 335 The Dep. Judge Advocate General, &c., &c., &c. Schools established in the group, in which 18,034 Hey of pupils are instructed; that the Sabbath is everywhere respected as a day of rest, and that there are 14.893 members of Christian Churches. The natives them. selves have framed a Constitution, and a system of laws We are glad to find, that the late is being established which guarantees to every man measures of the Naval Authorities have the liberty of worshipping God as he likes, and secures every man the fruits of his own industry. Several effectually prevented the incursions of the.. Churches too, have been built by the people. In short, Kowloon Robbers. On Shore we have, we by the labours, of these well meaning" mer, the regret to say, accounts of several attempts whole nation has been raised from a state of heathenish at burglary that have been made, one we are degradation to be a civilized, well-organized society observant of their own laws, and able to understand told was successful, at the house of Colonel their rights as men. Such results have not heretofore Wilson, Pay Master of the Forces, and and it were much to be desired (so far as I can see) We would advise our readers not to been the consequences of the labours of ignorant men, property of considerable value was lost. that the world had more of fanaticism,like this exhi bited everywhere. A Bible Society, too, has been relax in their watchfulness and precautions, formed, and one auxiliary subscribed 8300 last year for as it is quite certain wherever property of the purpose of giving each child attending school in its convertible value is deposited, an attempt town a copy of the New Testament. Since the intro-

to

at plunder will be made.

46

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

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For ONE YEAR (payable in advance.) Do. SIX MONTHS, do.

do.

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do.

Do. ONE do, do.

do.

812

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4

SINGLE NUMBERS (to Subscribers) 25 Cs. each. Do. do. Non-Subscribers, 1 Rupee.

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do. Eight do.

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14

82

4

5

29961

tasked-it is not surprising that his health should suffer. Every thing has devolved on him. Knowing this, and the difficulties of H. E.'s position, we have throughout, forborne from adopting a tone of animad- version, in our horror of invidious and captious criticism.

On these grounds alone, we curtail our strictures on the present occasion. We must, however, add, that the Act in ques- tion does not at all affect the bulk of the population-the Chinese-and that it gives His Excellency the powers which we be- lieve were applied for by Captain Elliot, and which, had they been despatched from England prior to the news of the Peace, we should not have been so much surprised and disappointed. Still, we anticipatively (on the 5th January last, vide No. 42) ventured to point out the utter inapplica- bility of reverting to the laws, customs, and usages of an effete and worn-out system, nor will they be less obnoxious, although The above Scale of Charges will take effect confirmed by an ill-advised and hasty legislative enactment.

(Exceeding Seren Lines, ten Cents per Line.)

N. B.-ALL REPETITIONS at a half charge.

JOB-PRINTING.

·

82

do, do.

2

Bills of Landing, and Exchange, per 100 Opium Orders Auction, and Quarto size Hand-Bills

And 81 each additional hundred.

from this date.

June 8th, 1843-

3

ALTHOUGH WE SHOULD deplore as an evil, any permanent governmental connec- tion with India, so long as it is ruled by THE FRIEND OF CHINA, the East India Company, yet we deeply

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 8TH, 1843. WE much mistake if our readers will not share our surprise and disappointment on perusing the Proclamation, and other Official Notifications which we this day publish in a Supplement.

For some time past, we have been anxi- ously awaiting the authorization from home, of the establishment of Courts of Civil, Criminal, and Admiralty jurisdiction.

We do not dissemble our regret at the resurrection of such a notable speci- men, (for we have long 'considered it dead and buried) of Lord Palmerston's abortive legislation, as the Act of the 3rd and 4th Will. 4, Cap. 93.

When this Act was passed in 1833, it had the condemnation of the. Tories, the indifference of the Whigs, the contempt of the Radicals, and the calm and temperate remonstrance of the advocates of Free Trade, and those most interested in

China.

It was then held to be quite pitiable, that the New System, on its first advent in China, should wear such a motley garb be patched and disfigured with the fag ends and musty remnants of the old regime.

It is, however, right to say, this Act was avowedly provisional, the order in Council of the 9th December 1833, sayɛ-

"Provided also, and it is further declared, that the regulations herein contained are, and shall be considered as provisional only,

and as continued in force only until HEA

To hikke such farther, or other Order in the provisions, in pursu ance of the said Act of Parliament, as to His Majesty, with the advice of His Privy Council, may hereafter seem salutary or expedient, reference to further

after be derived from the future comer information as may here.

of the said trade."

This is explicit enough, and yet, after an interval of nearly ten years, and after the momentous changes and great events which have lately come to pass, we very quietly revert to the provisional and wholly inadequate legislation of the year 1833. So little are the wants and requirements of one of the largest trades in the world, or the condition of this rising Colony known or heeded at home.

We are told that Captain Elliot, in vain endeavoured to render this statute operative, and whilst we admit the expediency of having a Court for the trial of British Subjects for offences amenable to Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdiction, we would yet very respectfully inquire whether one tithe of the inconvenience has been experienced in the Colony from the non-existence of such Courts, as has been felt from the want a Court of Civil Jurisdiction.

It is unnecessary for us to tell our read- ers that H. E.'s labours have been inces- sant-with uncommon energies-yet so

regret that the arrangements for the future conduct of affairs here, have not been made under the control or advice of Lord Ellen- borough. He is so thoroughly informed on all matters affecting our mercantile inter- ests, so well aware of the important con- siderations involved, and more than all, his Lordship is deeply imbued with the spirit of the times, and a zcal for social advancement, that quite convinces us hao our future regulations emanated from him, we should have had only to express feelings of the liveliest satisfaction, in lieu of heart- felt disappointment.

port has been made by the Treasurer of the Privy By a late Peking Gazette, we notice that a Re- Council, wherein he states that whilst the aggre- gate arrears of Taxes, up to the fifteenth year of the Emperor's reign, had only amounted to 25,003,000 taels of silver (about £8,000,000 Ster- ling), yet, during the last two years alone, the arrears had amounted to 19,906,500 taels.

Owing to the necessity of keeping the Army and Navy in a state of discipline, and the expenses of the War, it is recommended that increased ex- ertions be made by the Viceroys and Provincial Governors to collect the outstanding taxes. Gazette, we referred to, but could not find space The following translation from the Peking for it in our last number:-

TRANSLATION.

others report that is expedient to make a change in Obey the Emperor's words. Whereas Ke-ying and Military and Naval discipline, the Military Board at Peking, will take measures that an immediate inspec. tion of all Fire Arms takes place, and it will issue

the Provinces.

The Military Board will despatch certain high Officers (who are named) into the Provinces, to exercise a proper supervision.

Every Soldier and Sailor although accustomed to the use of muskets and cannon, must still learn and practice the new exercise.

Every year there shall be four inspections, at which, the Viceroy or Provincial Governor shall attend. The months, when they shall take place, are the 2nd, 5th, 8th, and 11th the days will hereafter be named by the Military Board. Whoever excela in firing at the target, to be reported as worthy to be (sent up and see the Emperor) rewarded. The pattern or model of the Cannon to be an eighteen. Let a broad open space be chosen, outside the Cities, for exercising, and those officers who do not acquire a perfect knowledge, will go back to their former positions.

The High Officers deputed from the Military Board to the Viceroys and Provincial Governors, will consult and arrange with them, clearly distinguishing, what is right and what is wrong.

Theso who excel in firing at the mark, shall be rewarded, whereby is shown how proper it is diligently to learn.

The musket and cannon practice for Sailors, will be regulated by the difference of the service, the officers will have a target fixed on a boat for the purpose. Send this to Keangsu, Che-keang, Canton, and Shantung Provinces, to every Viceroy and Provincial Governor and Military Commander. Ye will diligently teach and learn, so that it may arrive that

at the quarterly examinations, many who have long striven and earnestly desired to look up on the Imperial Face may thus attain their wish. But none can hope to attain this without effort. All according to this consult and do

Respect this

We are favoured with the loan of some late numbers of the "Annales Maritimes et Coloniales," by Mr C. A. Challaye, the French Consul. Among many sub- jects of much interest, some of which we hope to translate and present to our readers, we note the following account by CAPTAIN DE ROSAMEL, of the Danaide, Corvette, of his visit to Hong-Kong, in 1811.

It is addressed to the Minister of Marine, of France. Danaide, Oct, 8, 1841.

After quitting Macao, in order to proceed to the North Coast of China, I cast anchor for three days in the Port of Hong-Kong, now entirely an English possession.

with a finer harbour. All the fleets of the world Maritimely considered, it is impossible to meet might lie there in safety. Two entrances equally easy, opening one to the East and the other to the West, render the approach convenient during both monsoons. Unfortunately, it is situated too much out of the direct route to Canton. Despite this covered with Ships. The difference of the English inconvenience, already the bay of Hong-Kong is colonial system-all liberty; and that of the Portuguese--all restriction, has already attracted a numerous Chinese population to the new Colony. Macao, to make them feel the weight of his There, at least, there is no Mandarin as at authority. At Hong-Kong, the Chinese people, naturally vicious in their search of enjoyments, can give loose to their propensities and passions, so that the cafés, eating and drinking shops, gambling houses, opium booths, &c., have already fully occupied the space allotted by the authorities. One is astonished at seeing the rapidity with which all, the perseverance with which they repair all damages from fires or typhoons

the Chinese raise their bamboo houses, and above

Without exaggeration, one can rate the number of Chinese at the present time established at Hong- number I do not count the floating population, Kong, at fourteen to fifteen thousand. In this living in boats, who go to seek their subsistence on the opposite boys, or six hundred Island, or in the neighbouring bays. Barely five English form the garrison of this anthill, not an inhabitant of which appears to be idle.

Mr Johnston, Governor of Hong-Kong, ex-sous- intendant commercial with Captain Elliot, employs some hundreds of Chinese in making roads across this mountainous and scarped Island. Some warehouses for the most eminent English com- mercial houses at Canton, have been already built, foot, as that realizable for the most valuable upon ground which was sold as dear per square

situations in Paris. The firm Malhison, & Co. (Matheson, & Co.) pay, they assure me £400 per annum, annual rent, for the purchase of a little corner of ground, on which is built their godowns. The chiefs of the powerful and rich mercantile houses, wait till

China affair is terminated,

when they will all establish themselves at this new Government retains Hong-Kong, it will become perhaps of little importance, if, as is supposed Amoy, Chusan, and Ningpo, are open to foreign trade, then the purchases of land at such exorbitant rates, will be exposed to rude deceptions, as to its real value.

Although eight days before my arrival at Hong- Kong, the Expedition had sailed for the North, yet the anchorage was crowded with Shipping; three men-of-war, many large country vessels, besides transports, and those pretty opium clippers, (ces jolis klippers marchands d'opium) which gave such hardly help thinking we were at some old and an air of animation to the scene, that we could long established resort of commerce,

I easily procured water at 1 dollar a butt, delivered on board; and fine bullocks at 14 dollars each, about half the price paid at Macao.

Professor Liebig, in his ANIMAL CHEMISTRY, has well remarked-" We shall never be able to dis- cover how men were led to use the infusion of a certain leaf-TEA-or the decoction of a certain seed-COFFEE. But some cause there must be, which has induced whole nations to make the practice a necessary of life. And it is surely still more remarkable, that the peculiar effects of both Plants on the health, must be ascribed to one and the same substance; the presence of which, in two vegetables belonging to different natural families, and the produce of different quarters of the globe, could hardly have presented itself to the boldest

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

imagination. Yet, researches have demonstrated that Caffeine, the active principle of Coffee, and theine, that of tea, are in all respects perfectly iden tical. Tea and Coffee were originally met with among nations whose diet is chictly vegetable. Without entering minutely into the medical action of Cafféine (théine), it will surely appear a most striking fact even if we chose to deny its in- fluence on the process of secretion, that this sub- stance, with the addition of oxygen and the ele- ments of water, can yield taurine, the nitrogenised compound peculiar to bile."

We believe, in no previous work on Physiology has the function of the bile been pointed out so clearly as in this of Professor Liebig's. He has demonstrated that it is not an excretion, nor an assistant of digestion, or nutrition of the tissues, but that "it is consumed in the respiratory process, and is merely the vehicle of the carbon and hydro- gen, which, in that process, unite with the oxygen, and are given out from the lungs and skin as car- bonic acid and water. A horse secretes 37lb of bile daily, and in man, whose diet is mixed, from 17 to 24 ounces of bile are daily secreted. Even in the carnivora, a large dog, for example, secretes 1b24 daily."

corroboration to the present state of the Protest- ant Missions in China. One thing we must, however, say, and we say it with sincere regret, that the effect of Missionary labours, here at least, are only known and heard of, through the medium of the religious publications and papers, sent to us from England and America.

COMMERCIAL

By letters from Amoy, to the 3rd June, (per British Imports was doing at that Port. II. M. S. Thalia) we learn that a fair business in

17

NOTICE,--The Gentry of Hong Kong, and the

Public generally, can be furnished with fine ENGLISH MUTTON, [at one half dollar per Pound) by sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BAST, on Saturday Mornings. Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843.

PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article. of the recent Steam Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made in the United States, and worked by mechanics from that countr. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and executed in a short time. Apply to WILLIAM SCOTT. Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843. FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath- ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W.. T. Kinsley.

Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. NOTICE-Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY.

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street,

RICE had been up to 83 per pical, but had de clined owing to the heavy arrivals from Formosa to 82. The late high prices at Amoy would, it was thought, induce large shipments from Manila, an1 perhaps from Java, which our Correspondent said would keep down prices. As at Ningpo the cus tom of the native trade is to sell Rice per picul of not 100 catties, but about 135 to 140 catties, a recollection of this fact will often explain an appar- ent descrepancy between the prices of Formosa or native rice, and that imported by the British. The Rice trade is the principal one at Amoy, copious and regular supplies are obtained from For-TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point mosa which affords ordinarily but a poor margin for Barracks.-Apply to the British Importer. Still, as with us the neces saries of life fluctuate in value owing to the sea- sons, and hence at times the price of rice at Amoy rules at double the rate it now is. SANDAL-WOOD. The present price is really 86 to 89, according to quality. Higher, but merely opinal rates are given. This article is dull of sale, and large arrivals are expected by the Junks from the south.

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. Q. IN THE CORNER we thank, but we must tell him that we should urge the parties to do the very opposite he recomends. OBSERVER'S Letter we now publish, but we must say that we wholly disagree with him in opinion. We should be glad to know what authority in Inter-national or Criminal Law, can be found for constituting a Smuggler a Criminal. The RATTANS. The price is $3 50cs. to $4,50cs, armed resistance against the authorities of one's and 86 for best, but no sales; the more northern own country, not the Smuggling constitutes ports afford a better market for this article, which the crime; as is evident by Smuggling itself. it is said has lately come into use for Charcoal, being by British law but a mulctuary offence. which is required in the manufacture of a superior The confiscation of the Contraband Property, kind of gun-powder now made by the Chinese, and a fine, at most, of treble the value, being deemed enough to purge the offence.

Some Continental Jurists go so far as to assert, that the infliction and payment of such fines, involve no loss or dimiunition of personal honour to a citizen. It is certain that offences against the revenue laws at home, entail no disqualification of citizenship on the offender.

As regards the infractions of the Revenue Laws of other countries, we have so often scouted the notion of its beign, treated as a cognizable offence by any power but the one affected, that we must refer OBSERVER to our No. 25, but meantime, as he is a respecter of Authorities, we would tell him that it has been expressly held by Lord Mansfield, and confirmed by the whole Court of King's Bench, that "one nation never takes notice of the Revenue-laws of another." On this point, the laws of France entirely coincide with those of England.

PEPPER in little demand, by the Junks' recent arrival with large supplies; nominal prices for good, 85 50cs. to 86,

COTTON

Corron Goods-Grey Long Cloths of good quality in slight demand at 83 30cs. At 83 would sell freely, at which figure several lots of inferior have been lately cleared out. Whites in eager demand at 83 75cs., at which, and at 84 large quantities had been sold. Twist, No 20 to 30 dull at 829 to $30 per picul.

WOOLLENS, for Superfine Cloths and Gumlets, no inquiry; for Long Ells a sparing demand. Spanish Stripes not wanted but at a low rate, and of suitable colours, could be sold to some extent. OPIUM is being sold in small quantities off the town, say some three or four chests daily. Patna, new, 8780, old, $760. Benares, 8740, Malwa, $620.

CAMPHOR, at Amoy was $20 to $22 per Picul, but it is lower at the Opium station in Chimmo Bay, and several large lots have been sent to Singapore, by the Opium Clippers, Macao and and Chinese Junks.

R. WEBSTER. GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET, BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD.

THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con-

taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO, Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package. Apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE, 46, Queen's Road..

FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables and Stures of all de, criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Moselle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bouled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kogs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, and Beaver Hats, Apply to

3

A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

FOR SALE,

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th December, 1842.

FROM ENGLAND TO INDIA. Parcels and Cases by the Overland route.

UNDER arrangements with the Peninsular and signed are prepared to convey Parcels, by the Mail, at Oriental Steam Navigation Company, the under- the following Reduced Rates, if delivered on or before the 27th of each month, from which date, until four o'clock on the last day of the month, an extra charge of one shilling per pound will be incurred, and beyond which time no Package whatever can be received for conveyance by the Mail of that month. PACKAGES. WEIGHT. MEASUREMENT. £ s. d. Do. UNDER 1 lb. 04 CUBIC FEET 0 6 6 Do. do. 2 01 do. 0 10 0

Do.

do. 4

0

do. 1 0 0

Do.

do. 6

0

do.

150

Do.

do. 10

0

do.

1 10 0

Do.

do. 15

do.

2 0 0

do, 20

do.

2 10 0

Do.

do, 25

14

do. 2 15 0

Do.

do. 30

do.

do. 40

do.

3 10

3 0 0 0'

Do

Do.

As our Correspondent has cited, but we think inapplicably, the eminent Authority of VATTEL, we will favour him with another quotation, "It is seldom (he says) that nature is seen to produce The Shipping then in port with Opium, were in one place every thing for the use of man: one Sir Edward Ryan, Wild Irish Girl, Mahmoodie, country abounds in corn, another in pastures and and a captured Chinese War Junk, belonging to cattle, a third in metals, &e. If all these coun- an English firm, and lying off the town. The tries trade together, as is agreeable to human Colonist, and one or two other vessels had come nature, none will be without such things as are in. Also H. M. S. Thalia, bound for Hong Kong, useful and necessary; and the views of nature, Commander, Captain Hope, to be tried [our our common mother, will be fulfilled." The correspondent says by a Court Martial] for corollary of this proposition would be, (and who being to perdant as to believe that the Plepingten uary's memorable November Proclamation was the assertor of the laws of nature-the vindicator other than a humble imitation of Chinese official of man's inalienable right to commune and magniloquence" he having prevented merchant delivery commerce with his brother man. It is the vessels proceeding to the yet unopened Ports, rulers and governors with their fiscal enactments and enormous imposts, that are the contraveners of the laws of nature and the claims of eternal justice.

We gladly insert the highly interesting Communi- cation of our American Correspondent PER FAS. After his observations, we may be excused saying, that from ouri veriest infancy we have been a humble friend and contributor to the Missionary cause. Our zeal peradventure was in an inverse ratio to our knowledge.

Far be it from us to undervalue the labours

of pious men of our own communion, still,

NOTICE.

FOR SALE Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843. FOR SALE-Superior Port and Sherry, ex Cily

we are constrained to say, that not a few of of Derry.. their number (judging by their own reports) are either endowed, or soon acquire, from their residence in the East, a truly oriental fertility of imagination.

We will not be betrayed into a profitless and uninteresting controversy, or we might refer in

Cafféine was discovered in Caffee, by Robiquet. Dr. Fyfe gives the analysis of Pelletier and Duman, who found it com- posed of,

Carbon Oxygen

Hydrogen

Nitrogen

It is soluble in water and alcohol.-ED.

46, 51

27, 14

4,81

21, 54

100, 00

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

No. 13, Queen's Road, FOR SALE-Patent Cordage, from the Steam Manufactory at Manila-a superior article.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA, No. 13, Queen's Road. NOTICE-GooDs and Merchandise of all descrip- tions received and carefully stored in spacious dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's Road No. 20, at, Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1813,

22

Goods in packages larger or heavier than the above will be taken by special agreement. The Freight will

be competed by either oengut of measure. JEWELLERY, &c.-Not accountable for any package beyond the value of £10, unless an additional freight of 2 per cent be paid on

PERIODICALS--If brought by 4 o'clock on the last day of the month (being that of publication), made up like Newspapers (open at both ends,) will be charged-lb., Is- lb., Is. 9d.; from 1 lb. to 10 lb, 3s. per lb.

Risk-To be at the Proprietor's risk, from London to India,- unless insured at the time of delivery, for which a charge of two

and a-half per cent. will be made.

TRANSIT DUTY-Through Egypt, one-half per cent. (pay able to the Egyptian Government, under agreement with the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company,) on the value of every article will be added the above rates,

RECEIPT Receipts will be given on the delivery of each Parcel, and particulars of all Charges will be specified in the Receipt. CONSIGNMENT All Packages must be applied for to our Agents, at each Presidency; to facilitate such applications, the marks and particulars will be advertised in the MONTHLY TIMES newspaper, which being despatched by the same Mail, will furnish the earliest advice to the Consignees or if the postage (1s.) be paid, we will ourselves write to the party to whom the packages are addressed. IT AGENTS-Calcutta, Capt. J. R. Engleduo; Madias, Capt. Christopher Biden; Ceylon, Capt, Twynam, (who are also Agents to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company); Bombay, Messrs. William Nical, & Co.

OFFICES 44, Regent street, Piccadilly; 16, John street, Crutched Friars; and 17, St. Mary Axe,

JAMES HARTLEY, & Co. JAMES BARBER, & Co. The undersigned has been requested by MESSRS. JAMES BARBER, & Co, 47, St. Mary Axe, London, to make public the

above terms for Freight per India Overland Route; and will forward instructions from parties wishing to avail themselves of the convenient arrangements offered by MESSES BARBER, & Co.'s Agency in London.

Subscribers to the "MONTHLY TIMES," are requested in future to send their orders and subscriptions to HENRY GRIBBLE.

Macao, May 5th, 1843.

VO. 7

7.5

48

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission. G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE.

American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels.

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole

Barrels.

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER NAVIGATOR.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases. No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1843.

D. WILSON & Co., Have just landed, ex " ALGERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz. :- Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes; Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases; Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Foolscap, and Over-Land Paper; Steel Pens, Patent Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs ; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day, for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE The following important and valu- able Property; several extensive Marine Lots, having deep Water Frontage; convenient Bungalows, delight fully situate, and commanding a fine view of the Bay and Town; Large Plots of Ground eligible for Build ing purposes,

The whole of the Property is situated in a first-rate G. F. DAVIDSON. locality, contiguous to Government Hill, and offers a highly desirable and safe investment for Capital. For particulars, apply to, E. FARNCOMB, Solicitor and Notary-Public. Hong-Kong, 29th May, 1843.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terms:--Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sai! Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log. Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of

other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co., 20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

FOR SALE--Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON. & Co. Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

terms.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plauk and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other Articles.

Apply to C. W.BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing under the firm of L. E. Christopher & H. J. Carr, is this day dissolved, by mutual consent. and all demands now due are to be settled by LE. Christopher.

[Signed] L. E. CHRISTOPHER. [Witness] H. J. CARE.

June 1st, 1843. All Persons indebted to the above named firm, are called upon for immediate payment, and all persons holding claims against the said firm, to send in their claims to L. E. Christopher. L. E. CHRISTOPHER. H. J. CARR

June 1st, 1843.

To Captains of Vessels and others connected with the Port of Hong-kong.

PAINE, & Co, have for Sale at their Stores, (the premises in Magistracy Street, lately known as the Exchange Rooms) the following Articles, viz:-

Prime Mess Beef and Pork, Paint and Paint Oil, Ship's Bread, Bunting, Turpentine, Tar, Cabin Bread, Brandy in wood and bottle, very Superior Golden Sherry, Port Wine, [Cockburn's] Claret, St. Julien Margaux, Hock, Frontignac & Barsac, Barclay's Stout, in bottle, Olive Oil, Oilman's Stores, an assortment of Beaver and Solar Hats, and many other Articles too numerous to mention.

PUBLIC SALE.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of "P. TOWNSEND & Co.." was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND.

P. TOWNSEND, ROBT. EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843.

NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned and armed, and Commanded by an European, will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

mises to

NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored in spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre N, DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE-The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N..DUUS.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843-

11

FOR SALE, Singapore BEAMS, from 22 to 28 feet long, and Ditto Planks., 16 feet by a half inch thick. Ditto ditto ditto. Ditto ditto one-half" ditto. AL80,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture Wood in Planks and Stanchions, Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843.

FOR SALE

G. I MESS, CORNWALLIS.

THE MESS of the 26th Regiment, on quitting

Money, for the G. R. Mess of the Cornwallis. The Hong-Kong, left with a Resident here, a Sum of CATERER of this Mess will feel much obliged, if this individual will inform the Editor, where he may be found. Cornwallis, June 5th, 1843. NOTICE

IN consequence of the mutual Dissolution of Part. nership betweeen Messrs. BENNETT, PAIN, & Co., the Undersigned begs to Notify, that the Busi ness will be carried on by himself, on the same Pre- mises, and most respectfully solicits a continuance of the liberal support he has hitherto been favoured with. Parties desirous of sending Goods for Public the time of Sale. Auction, are requested to do so two days previous to

Auctions will be held every Friday, at Eleven A. M. Terms-Five per Cent. on all Goods.

One half per cent. Commission will be charged upon all Goods bought in.

A liberal allowance will be made for the Sale of Ships, Opium, or landed Property.

Account Sales will be rendered, three days, and proceeds thirty days, after the day of Sale. JOHN BENNETT,

Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

EXCHANGE AND READING ROOM.

At the request of several of the resident Inhabitants, and Commanders of Ships, the undersigned has been induced to establish at this rising Port, an Exchange and Room, the

assured, will be apparent to all. Y of which, he feels

The first object has been, to provide a place of resort for Subscribers. Secondly, to afford as soon as practicable, the latest Intelligence from all parts of Europe, America, India, and the Southern Colonies, with all the Local Publications.

A well chosen Library has also been added N. B. The Exchange will be removed to the premises immediately above the Sale Rooins of the undersigned, on Monday the 12th instant. JOHN BENNETT.

Hong-Kong. Exchange and Reading Room,

1st June, 1843. dar THE Undersigned has on hand for Sale, the under- mentioned Stores, at moderate prices.

Pale Ale, Dunbar's; French Claret, St. Julien ; Superior light French Wines, assorted; Superior Brown Sherry; Do. Brandy; Salad Oil, in cases; Mocha, Coffee; Superior Hyson, in whole chests; Pickled Salmon; Pickles; Sauces; Vinegar; &c. &c; Pickled Mackerell; Cabin Biscuits, in tins; Superior Butter; Bottled Fruits; Macaroni; Reading and Hanging Lamps; Lamp Wicks; Pad-locks; Ger- man Clocks, with Alarums: Hunting Whips; Tanned Hides; Bunting Single Barrelled Fowling-pieces, in cases; Shot, of sizes; Powder Flasks; Rosin in kegs; Writing Paper Blankets; Lamb's Wool Drawers; Boots and Shoes, Europe and Calcutta ; Blacking Day and Martin's; Quinine.

Goods Received, and Sold on Commission. N B.-An Auction held every Friday, at 11 A.M. JOHN BENNETT. BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J.S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Gentry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL, and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN. TON-and that his constant care and attention will be, the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties,

opeau Servants always in attendance

All Orders for Wines Stores, &c, thankfully received, and punctually attended to.

Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms. Canton, 24th May, 1843.

18, Queen's Road.

MAY,

A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound Bags. Apply to N. DUUS

On Friday next, June 9th, will be offered for Sale, without reserve, at the Golowns of the Undersigned, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. at 11 A, M.

Port and Sherry Wines in cases; Claret in cask; Brandy in bottle; Pickles; Sauces; Fruits; a few Bls. Pork; Saddles and Bridles; Boots; and sundry

other Articles.

Also on Saturday, at 11 A. M., at the Albion Godowns; about 500 Piculs of Rice, in lots to suit purchasers.-Java Arrack, and Singapore Planks. P. TOWNSEND

o

FOR SALE-A quantity of LOMBOCK RICE just Apply to

landed ex JAGATRA

JOHN LEATHLEY, HONGKONG. ALEXR. GRIFFIN, MACAO.

FOR SALE.

SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE,

31st Kestrel

JUNE.

1st Bencoolen

2nd Mary Ann

Gitana

3rd

18, Queen's Road.

Just received, per " GONDOLIER-ASmall quantity of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843,

18 Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A small quantity of very superior Burgundy Hermitage; Champagne; Rhenish Wines; Claret; Sherry; Port and Madeira, in Bottles-Also a few casks of prime Claret, Shorry, and Madeira. Apply to N. DUUS, 8, Queen's Road,

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

4th ixen

Thalia

Salado

ARRIVED.

Beauvais

Whampoa

Clarewood

Manila

Holton

Macao

"

Amoy

Capt. Hope

19

Capt. Wellsely Keling

23

Singapore

Macao

Walker Lakeland

East Coast.

Amoy

Macao

19

H. M. S. Childers

6th Anna 7th Spec JUNE

SAILED.

1st Will o' the Wisp "Ina-

3rd Anglona 4th Alpha

7th H. C. Str. Akbar

Com. Pepper Unknown WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD HONGKONG.

64

The

Friend of China & Hong Kong Gazette,

SUPPLEMENT TO No. 61.

HONG-KONG, THURSDAY. JUNE 8TH, 1843.

PROCLAMATION.

49

or Harbour of Canton and that the said Court said Court shall be holden by the Chief Superin- should be holden by the Chief Superintendent, for tendent: for the time being, appointed or to be HIS EXCELLENCY, SIR HENRY the time being, appointed. or to be appointed, by appointed, by His Majesty under and in pursuance POTTINGER, BART, G. C. B., Chief His said late Majesty, under and in pursuance of of the said Act of Parliament: Superintendent of the Trade of British the said Act of Parliament: And it is further ordered, that the practice and And whereas it is expedient, that the said Court Subjects in China, &c., &c., directs that of Justice should henceforth be holden in the Island proceedings of the said Court upon the trial of all the annexed Copy of a Despatch, dated of Hong-Kong; now, therefore, in further pursu- ments or informations to be therein brought or issues of fact or law, to be joined upon any indict- the 4th of January, 1843, from Her Ma- ance of the said Act, and of the powers thereby prosecuted, shall be conformable to, and corre jesty's Principal Secretary of State for in Her Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, spond with the practice and proceedings of the Foreign Affairs, together with the Order and of all other powers to Her Majesty belonging Courts of Oyer and Terminer and. Goal delivery or in any wise appertaining, it is hereby ordered of Her Majesty in Council, referred to by Her Majesty, by and with the advice of Her in England, upon the trial of such issues in such therein, be Published for the Information, Privy Council, that the said Court shall henceforth Courts, so far as it may be practicable to maintain and Guidance of all British Subjects, who be holden in the Island of Hong-Kong; and that had to the difference of local circumstances; and such conformity and correspondence, regard being are Required and Enjoined to pay Due, the same shall have, and exercise jurisdiction for especially it is hereby ordered, that every such and Implicit Obedience to the said Order the trial of offences committed by Her Majesty's issue of fact, or of mixed fact and law, shall be

in Council.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. Dated at the Government House, at Hong-Kong, this 1st day of June, 1843.

[Copy-No. 21.]

HENRY POTTINGER

FOREIGN OFFICE, JANUARY 4, 1842.

Subjects within the said Island and within Ports and Havens thereof, and on the High Seas every such trial, the examination of witnesses for the Dominions of the Emperor of China, and the by the said Chief Superintendent for the time being, and a Jury of twelve men,-and that upon within one hundred miles of the Coast of China: and against, the party or parties charged shall take and it is hereby further ordered, that the said Court

shall be holden by the Chief Superintendent, for place viva voce, in open Court; and that the sen- tence or judgment of the said Court upon every the time being, appointed, or to be appointed, such trial, founded upon the verdict of such jury, by Her Majesty, under, and in pursuance of the shall be pronounced in open Court, by such Chief

said Act:

And Her Majesty, by, and with the advice of Her said Council, doth hereby confirm in all other respects the said Order of His said late Majesty in Council, dated the ninth December, one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three.

SIR, I transmit to you, herewith, for your information and guidance, a Copy of an Order of Her Majesty, in Council, providing that the Court And the Right Honourable, the Earl of Aber of Justice, with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdic- deen, one of Her Majesty's Principal Secretaries tion, which was appointed, by an Order of His of State, is to give the necessary directions herein late Majesty, in Council, dated the 9th of Decem! accordingly. ber, 1833, to be held at Canton, in the Dominions

(True Copy)

C. C. GREVILLE. RICHARD WOOSNAM.

of the Emperor of China, or on board any Bish Ship, or Vessel, in the Port or Harbour of Canton, shall henceforth be holden in the Island of Hong-Kong, and have Jurisdiction for the trial of GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION. Offences committed by Her Majesty's Subjects Wrr reference to the preceding, Pro- within the said Island, and within the Dominions CLAMATION, under date the 1st instant, the of the Emperor of China, and the Ports: and!:) Havens thereof, and on the High Seas within one following Copy of the Order in Council, Hundred Miles of the Coast of Chine. by His late Majestyy King William the I am, with great truth and regard,Vth, under date the 9th of January 1883 is published for General Information Your most obedient humble Servant, By order, (Signed) ABERDEEN. RICHARD WOOSNAM, Government House, Hong-Kong, 3rd June, 1843.

SIR HENRY POTTINGER, BART, G.C.B., libong&c. &c. (True Copy) RICHARD WOOSNAM

AT THE COURT AT WINDSOR, THE 4TH DAY OF JANUARY, 1843-PRESENT, THE QUEEN'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL.

WHEREAS, by an Act of Parliament, made

66

BRITISH ORDER IN COUNCIL appoint ing a Court of Justice at Canton, for the trial of Offences committed by British Subjects in China 9th December, 1883.

AT THE COURT AT BRIGHTON, THE 9TH DAY OF DECEMBER, 1888 PRESENT, THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL

Superintendent as the presiding Judge thereof. And, whereas, it will be necessary to frame and prescribe rules of practice and proceeding to be observed upon all such prosecutions, in order to ascertain how far the same can be brought into conformity with the, practice and proceeding of His Majesty's Courts of Oyer and Terminer and Goal delivery in England, and how far it may be necessary to deviate from such practice and pro- ceeding by reason of the differences of local cir- cumstances it is, therefore, further ordered,, that such Chief Superintendent for the time being, shall be, and he is. hereby authorised, from time to time, but subject to the provisions aforesaid, to seeding as it may be necessary to adopt and fol- ..promulgate all such rules and practice and pro- law, upon, or previously to, the commitment of any person to take his trial, in the said Court, and respecting taking of bail for the appearance of such person, at such trial, and respecting the form and manner of preferring and finding indictments, and of exhibiting criminal informations against any person's charged with any crimes or offences before the said Court and respecting the manner of summoning and convening Jurors for the trial of such indictments, or informations; and respecting qualifications of such Jurors, and the mode of summoning and compelling the attendance of Court, and the mode of carrying the same into witnesses and respecting the process of the said. execution; and respecting the tunes and places of holding such Courts, and the duties of the re- spective Ministerial Officers attending the same, whom he is hereby authorised to appoint provision- ally, subject to His Majesty's approbation; and also respecting every other matter and thing son- Treated with the Administration of Justice thereir which it may be found necessary to regulate:

promulgated as aforesaid, shall be binding and take effect from the respective day's of the dates thereof, but that the same shall, by such Chief Superintendent, be transmitted to one of His Majesty's Principal Secretaries of State, for His Majesty's, approbation or disallowance, and that any such file shall cease to be binding, or to have any force of effect, from and after the time

and passed in the Session of Parliament holden, in The third and forth stones of the waign of He Majesty King William the Fourth, intituled "An HEREAS, by a certain Act of Parliament "Act to regulate the Trade to China and India," it was, amongst other things, enacted, that it should made, and passed in the third and fourth year of and might be lawful for His said Majesty, by any His Majesty's reign, intituled " An Act to regulate such Order or Orders as to His said Majesty in the Trade to China and India, it is, amongst Council should appear expedient and salutary, to other things engeted, that it shall, and may be create a Court of Justice, with Criminal and Admi- lawful for His Majesty, by any such Order or ralty Jurisdiction, for the trial of ofisinidos commit Orders as to His Majesty in Council shall appear ted by His said Majesty's Subjects within the expedient and salutary, to create a Court of Justice, of which his Majesty's disallowance thereof shall Dominions of the Emperor of China and the Ports with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdiction, for the and Havens thereof, and on the High Seas within trial of Offences committed by His Majesty's Sub One Hundred, Miles of the said Coast of China jects within the Dominions of the Emperor of and to appoint one of the Superintendents, in the China, and the Ports and Havens thereof, and od And it is further ordered, that a. record shall said Act mentioned, to be the Officer to hold such the High Seas, willin 100 miles of the Coast of be duly made and preserved of all the proceed Court, and other Officers for executing the process China, and to appoint one of the Superintendents ings, Judgments and Sentences of the said Court, in the said Act mentioned to be, the officer to hold which record shall be retained in the custody

thereof:

be made known to the Chief Superintendent for the time being let izbora a

And whereas, in pursuance of the said Act, an and suoli Court, and other officers for executing the of an Officer of the said Court to be by the in execution of the powers thereby in His said late process thereof; now, therefore, in pursuance of Chief Superintendens specially charged with the Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, it was by the said Act, and in execution of the powers there- performance of that duty a

of December, one by in His Majesty in Council in that behalf vested, And the Right Honourable Viscount Palmer-

an Order dated the 9th day three, ordered it is hereby, ordered by His Majesty, by and with ston, one of His Majesty's' Principal (Secretaries

thousand eight hundred and

by His said late Majesty, by and with the advice the advice of His Privy Council, that there shall of State, is to give the necessary directions of His Privy Council, that there should be a Court be a Court of Justice, with Criminal and Admi- herein accordingly.

of Justice, with Criminal and Admiralty Jurisdic. ralty Jurisdiction, for the purposes aforesaid, which

tion, for the purposes aforesaid; which Court Court shall be helden, at Canton, in the said should be holden at Canton, in the said dominions, Dominions, or on board any British Ship or Vessel or on board any British Ship or Vessel in the Port in the Purt or Harbour of Canton, and that the

C. C. GREVILLE.

(True Copy) RICHARD WOOSNAM.

50

SUPPLEMENT.

It is expected the Imperial Commis- We understand that Mr Pottinger the brother sioner, KE-YING, will have arrived at of Sir Henry Pottinger, the able negotiator of our Canton, by this time. It is believed peace with China, has been selected by the he will pay an early visit to Hong-Kong, Government for the chief office as resident at Hong-kong, and is to take his departure forthwith. and arrangements to put a newly-erected The appointment is in every respect a good Mansion into a condition fit for his recep- one. tion are being made..

The following paragraph should have con- cluded the COMMERCIAL article in our third

page:-

Wholly disagreeing with our Correspondent's remarks, we yet inserted them, as a similar report was rife here, which we wished to contradict. The high reputation, and long standing, of the gallant officer referred to, is a guaratee for his adherence to instructions, and a right appreciation of his duties.

We have held, that he has uniformly acted like a high minded officer, jealous of the honour of his flag; and, whatever may be the sentiments here, we shrink not from saying, that the last acts of Captain Hope, o the Chusan station, will greatly add to the esteem and respect with which he is now held by his fellow Countrymen at home.

MARCH OVERLAND MAIL. By the March Overland Mail, we learn the demise of William Jardine, Esq. M. P.-The Opium Trade is engaging the attention of the British Public. The bona fide holding of the Forged Exche- quer Bills have been paid; the unfortunate holders of the real Opium Certificates have not.-the Corn Law agitation is progres- sing.-Votes of thanks by both Houses, to the United Services engaged in China and Affghanistan have passed unanimously. Her Majesty's accouchement was expected in April.-A Commercial Treaty has been made with Russia, which can now send id her Ships to India, on the terms of the most favoured nations. These are the most important items of interest.

TRADE still bad-MONEY only 2 per cent.-TEA and SILK lower--and still drooping.

SHIPPING ARRIVALS-H. M. S. Calliope, Frances Speight, Mysore, James Ewing, H. M, S. Columbine.

DEPARTURES-Bahama, 28th Feby; Emu, Ist March; Eleanor, from London: Albert Edward, from Liverpool.

HOUSE OF COMMONS-TUESDAY, Fra. 17th. HONG-KONG.

ernment.

The following Notification, if we do not mistake, will have the effect of trans- ferring the largest and most valuable trade in these Seas to Foreign bottoms. A boon which onr Shipping interests can ill afford to confer at this juncture:--

Under the provisions of 3 and 4 William IV., entitled "An Act to regulate the Trade to China and India," her Majesty in Council is pleased to prohibit her subjects from resorting, for the pur- poses of trade and commerce, to any other ports in the dominions of the Emperor of China than those of Canton, Amoy, Foo-chow-fon, Ningpo, and Shanghae, or than may be in occupation of her Majesty's forces; and her Majesty is pleased to order that any of her subjects committing a breach of violation of this direction shall, upon conviction thereof in any of her Majesty's Courts of Record or Vice-Admiralty, be, for every such offence, liable to a penalty not exceeding 100%, or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three months, at the discretion of the Court before which the conviction shall take place; and her Majesty is hereby further pleased to order that all proceedings which may be had under this order shall be, as far as circumstances will permit, in conformity with the law of England.

H. M. Ship the Calliope arrived from China at Cork on the 25th, and the Modeste at Devonport on the 28th February.

Royal Engineers.-Two Serjeants, two Cor- porals, and thirty Privates of the Sappers and Miners, and First Lieut. Collinson, are to proceed immediately to Hong Kong, where they will be employed in the fortifications under the command of Major Aldrich. It is contemplated, when the fortifications are reported to be in a fit state occupation, to send out a Field-Officer of the Royal Artillery to have the command of two companies of that corps, to be permanently sta-

tioned there.

was completed, reports would be received from both those quarters, on which her Majesty's Go- vernment would be able to maturely form their judgment.

NOTICE.

On Trinity Saturday, the 11th instant, at 9 o'clock in the forenoon, the Roman Catholic Church of Hong-Kong will be opened for Public Worship, when the Undersigned, Préfect Apostolic of the Roman Catholic Mission, will perform the ceremony of Consecrating it; and he takes the present opportu aity of acknowledging, with feelings of deep gratitude, the receipt of the following Donations, viz.

From the English Gentlemen Do. the Portuguese Gentlemen Do, a Portuguese Friend AT HONG-KONG.

2,220

946

1,300

From the English Gentlemen, and seɣeral Regiments 497 Do. the Portuguese Gentlemen, & Sundry Donations 107 From His Lordship, the Archbishop Segui Do. Several Spanish Gentlemen

Hong-Kong, 7th June 1843.

524

- 418 Total $ 6.012

FR. ANTONIO FELICIANI.

NOTICE.

The Overland Mail to England, via Bombay, per "ANNA ELIZA" will he closed at the Post Office on the Evening of the 9th instant,

arrived.

Hong-kong, 7th June, 1843- FOR SALE-A quantity of Singapore Plaaks, just Apply to PAIN, & Co. FOR SALE-Fine Manila Ponies, in good condi- tion, and fit for immediate use. "Apply to PAIN, & Co. NOTICE JOHN W. NORTH, would most respect- fully inform the Merchants and Masters of Vessels, that he has taken the loft over Kent, & Co's Ship Yard, for the purpose of Making and Repairing Sails, and would most respectfully solicit their patronage. Hong-Kong, June 8th, 1843.

D. HUME, Baker, Queen's Road, opposite Allan- son's Godowns. Sausages made to Order, equal to Epping.

opposite the of W. Scott, Esq., Lower J. Mc. MURRAY, Baker, Pastry Cook, &c..

Infantry.-26th-This corps has, by a strange mistake, been ordered from China to England, a house in the above named vicinity, and hopes have been sent by the Overland Mail, it is gener- to participate in that Public Patronage which it shall ally thought that it will have sailed, agreeably to the orders which were set sailed, agreeably to be his constant endeavour to deserve. with the ratification N. B.-Parties can be supplied with Bread, Pastry, &c., on the shortest notice. SHIP BISCUIT.

instead of the 55th, and though counter-orders Bazaar, begs the Public, that he has

of the treaty, before the counter-order can reach

China.

Ships Loading for China.Indian, Rokery, Cleopatra, Ann Maria, Juliet, at London-Iris, Thomas Fielden, Ranger, John Horton at Liver- pool, Duke of Wellington at Glasgow,

FOR SALE-A very good Chronometer, and a few Telescopes. Apply on board the "PATNA." Hong-Kong, 6th June, 1843. TO-THE INHABITANTS OF HONG-KONG. N. BOULE, & Co., beg to anounce to the Public, dan English Raking Eats

They will be happy to send Bread of the best quality, at 6 cents. per lb., to the respective dwellings, and execute punctually any orders they may be favoured with. Hong-Kong, 8th June, 1843,

ABRAHAMS, & Co.. are now ready to receive Goods on Storage and Commission, at their spacious "Godowns-13 Queen's Road.

ABRAHAMS, & Co. have on Sale. Cognac Brandy in casks, Do, in 1 dozen cases, Champagne do., Sherry in quarter casks and cases. Champagne in 3 dozen cases. Claret, Prime Irish Pork. long-Kong, June 1st, 1843.

Compensation to Opium Merchants.-Lord J. The Chancellor of the inquire whether it was the intention of her Majes- Exchequer, on the subject of the peddon Helishment. ty's Government to bring any bill into Parliament presented just previously from Bombay. He in the course of the present session, for the purpose wanted to ascertain the causes of the delay which of regulating the administration of Justice in the had taken place in the payment of the indemnity Island of Hong Kong, and for determining the for the opium surrendered to the Chinese. The powers and jurisdiction of the British consular right honourable gentleman stated that some in- agents who were to be appointed at the several quiry was to be made this year as to the value of!. ports of trade in China, agreeable to the provisions the opium. He begged to ask whether the in- of the Treaty entered into with the Chinese Gov- quiry had yet been made, or was now proceed ing, or was intended? at what time it was likely Sir R. PEEL agreed with the hon. baronet that to be terminated, and whether there was any valid it was absolutely necessary that measures should obejection to the payment of the indemity? be taken to regulate the Courts of Justice at Hong- The Chancellor of the Exchequer said he had Kong; but he thought it would be much better already, apprised certain parties interested in the to postpone legislation on the subject till they, had, payment for oplum, that until the ratification of the an opportunity of advising with Sir H. Pottinger, treaty with China, it was impossible that Govern to whose moderation, good. sense, prudence, ment could act on the stipulations therein "contain energy, and firmness, he was anxious to take the ed. The ratification on our part had been sent earliest opportunity of bearing publiq testimony. out from this country; it would probably soon be (fear, hear.). Before the session came to a ciose exchanged with the Chinese, and then her Ma- he trusted that several points connected with the jesty's Government would be enabled to take steps subjects to which the hon. baronet referred, would in the fulfilment of the condition of the treaty. be noticed by Sir blenry Pottinger in his corres- With respect to the payment of the indemnity, so pondence; but her Majesty's Government did not anxiours was the Government to prevent any de- wish to proceed with any measures in general lay in the settlement of the just claims of the opium legislation until they possessed the advantage of holders, that reference had been made to India his advice and opinions. and China, and when the inquiry into the claims

TO BE SOLD.

A splendid Buggy and Harness, nearly New. For particulars apply to ROBT. LAWRIE, Navy and Army Tavern, Hong-kong, June 8th, 1842.

NOTICE.

Wanted for the Ward-Room Mess of H. M. Ship CCRNWALLIS, a Second Steward. Apply on Board.

Hong-kong, June 8th, 1843.

NO. 7.5

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND WONGBONG ONG GAZETTE.

No. 65 VOL. II.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

GOVERNMENT NOTIFICATION.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY JUNE 16TH, 1843.

THE POST-OFFICE ESTABLISHMENT is removed, to the House formerly used as a Post-Office, on the right hand side of the Main Road leading up to Government House.

A Letter-Bag, by Fast-Boat, to Macao, will be made up daily, at Five P. M., at the Post-Office here, and Letters will be de- livered to Individuals at Macao, at a charge, on delivery, of Ten Cents for each Letter. All Letters must be. Addressed in Chinese, as well as English, or Portuguese. By order,

COMMERCIAL

Price monthly Or 12 8 yearly

I hope, indeed we all hope to see some Official Notification in the FRIEND OF CHINA, which will mental to the interests of the British Trade." relieve us from a state of suspense greatly detri

By letters from Canton, we learn that, "The bought, and not many being shipped, still the market is quite torpid, very few TEAS are being Export for the twelve months ending the 30th (To the Editor of Friend of China.) June, will be nearly fifty millions of pounds. The Export to the 31st May, was about 47,000,000 lbs., Medical Missionary Society's Hill, Siam, now loading, will with others make up the the Medical Missionary Society established in this and the Equestrian, Orira, City of Derry, and June 6th, 1843. SIR,-I beg to inform you that the Hospital of above total, or nearly so.

RAW SILK-No sales are reported in Nankin. place for the benefit of the Chinese population, is now open for the reception of both in and out Cantons are upheld by the heavy orders for manu- factured goods from the South American Coast. patients, and that any cases of an urgent nature, as those arising from accident and wounds can be In Davos, nothing doing. IMPORTS.-Cotton Yarn and Cotton Cloths admitted at any time without delay, and that those of a milder nature are seen every morning except current at last week's quotations, and some transac tions have taken place with ourTaDe men in good the Sabbath, from 8 o'clock to 11. Grey Shirtings, deliverable at Hong-Kong, to

If you think it desirable that the public should

RICHARD WOOSNAM.. Junks bound for Tientsin. The rates were higher be made acquainted with the above, in order to

Government House, Hong-Kong, 12th June, 1843.

The following Notice, received from Her Majesty's Government, is published by order of His Excellency, SIR HENRY POTTINGER, G. C. B.

RICHARD WOOSNAM.

Government, House, Hong-Kong, 12th June, 1843.

Hydrographic Office, Admiralty, March 18th, 1842. NOTICE TO MARINERS. (Received from the French Government.) Alterations in the Lights of Cape GRINEZ, and of Point d' ALPRECK, on the South side of the STRAIT OF DOVER

is

than those ruling at Canton, owing to the exemp-recommend their servants or workmen, and the tion from the heavy charges of that port. Woollens Institution, you will oblige me by inserting it in are little inquired for. Bombay Cotton has found an early number of the Gazette.

a few buyers, but Madras and Bengal are almost unsaleable. The prices quoted are very low, but

merely nominal.

I remain, Sir, Respectfully, yours,

BEN. HOBSON,

The Courrier Français states, that M. DUPERRE

OPIUM had been rather firm and brisk, but the arrival of Ke-ying, the Imperial Commissioner caused prices to droop, and the prices quoted are PATNA 3830, BENARES $620, and MALWA $530; son of the Minister of Marine, sailed a few days but our correspondent says "the fall is attributable since from Brest on board the Cleopatre frigate to the Importers pressing sales, as the demand for for China, to visit that remarkable country. the Drug in the consuming districts is known to be good."

The Cleopatre takes out to the French Mission- aries established in China, several objects and machines calculated to introduce the blessings of civilization amongst the Chinese,

following proof of the aptitude for civilization posses- The author of Doings in China," gives the sed by the juvenile branches of the Celestials:- The children are very intelligent and sharp: they pick up English easily. Almost all the young blackguards about this place could swear in very good English."

He adds, "despite the denunciations of your NOTICE TO MARINERS. Plenipotentiary, our systematised system of regular THERE being grounds for believing that, not- irregularity (which he does not appreciate or withstanding the publicity which was given in the understand) is going on as comfortably as could be month of March last, by direction of the Right expected or desired. Imports and Exports, the Honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admi- greater part do not pay the duties, or rather the ralty, to the Translation of a Notice, issued by the arbitrary exactions as heretofore. Nor do all the French Government, the Alterations which have ships pay a port charge; how can they afford it at since been carried into effect in life Lights at Cape the present low rate of Freights You call this Grinez, and at Point D'Alpreck,-have not become Smuggling, be it so, yet it hardly merits that generally known; The said Notice is now re-appellation, being by the sanction, and with the published for the further information of all persons connivance of the Local Authorities. You will so A voltaic telegraph is stated to be laid down on employed in the Navigation of Vessels in the think, when I tell you that the price of transit from the Great Western Railway to Windsor Castle, English Channel, viz. Whampoa to Canton, by the best Government and back thence to the Houses of Parliament and boats, has fallen so low as $12 to $15 per chest, Buckingham Palace. The effect of this will be, and if the quantity is pretty large, the lower price that on important occasions, when her Majesty may be assumed. The appearance of three or may be at Windsor, any intelligence of an extra- four Mandarin boats coming down, and lying ordinary interest can be transmitted in less than a abreast of the shipping every morning at Whampoa second of time. very pretty, the boats being mostly those lately built for the river service, and to put down Piracy, TREATY NUISANCE.-We can make treaties at they are handsomely painted and decorated. In the cannon's mouth, but in truth we are no diplo fact the trade is now become a very regular and matists. The present cabinet seem unable to quiet one. The moderate rate of Freight by the escape from the labyrinth into which my Lord Mandarins, offers no inducement for us to employ Palmerston had wandered. We shall become the Smuggling boats or Foreign craft, we only encour- sport of the whole world, unless we resume our age native industry, so that there is no fear of any character for decision and independence, and cease disturbance so long as this lasts, which must be a to hold the language of entreaty, or to let our trade source of prodigious contentment to the Hong-be suspended and our tariffs kept open waiting on Fongian dip Say the founousy of the cap Our trade is withering away, and our revenue declines exactly in proportion as we look back for a lesser trade not in our power, and overlook a greater trade within our grasp. interests are neglected, trades combine and memo- All home rialize in vain; after months of wasted labour they sink into apathy, and wonder at the infatuation of powers, and pay no regard to the thousands at the minister who can dally for years with foreign home kept for years in an agony of suspense as to what shape their business may be forced to assume.

CAPE GRINEZ LIGHT. THE fixed Light established on Cape Grinez in November, 1837, in lat., 50° 52' 10" N. and lon., 1°35' 9" E. of Greenwich will on the 1st of July next we converted into a Revolving Light, which will re-appear every half minute.

The additional Flashing Light established in 1838, near the above Fixed Light will then be discontinued..

The new Revolving Light will be visible 8 leagues, and will be distinguished from that of Calais by the difference of their respective inter- vals, that of Calais being 90 seconds, and that of Grinez only 30 seconds: and further, the bright glares of Calais Light are separated by perfect darkness, while in the intervals between those of Grinez a faint light will be visible to vessels within the distance of four leagues.

LIGHT OF POINT D' ALPRECK. On the same day the Fixed Light on Point Alpreck, in lat. 50 41' 37" N. and lon. 1° 33' 54" E. will every two minutes change into flashes of Red Light, which are to continue for three

seconds.

EXCHANGE Mexican Dollars, 7 disct. Fer- rice of other nations. dinand par. Carolus, 6 to 7 prem, Sycee, 1. 8. disct. NEW TARIFF.-The arrival of the Imperial Commissioner Ke-ying has revived this topic, and it is confidently said, a month or so will not elapse before he signs it, as it is all arranged, and only requires Ke-ying's offiical signature.

have before quoted says, "It is understood in some În reference to this, a correspondent whom we quarters that the new Tariff will come into action on the 1st of August, all is ready, and Ke-ying, they say, has only to read, sign, and seal. Others on the contrary, assert that they know that the NEW TARIFF will not come into operation, until it shall have gone to Pekin and received the Imperial ratification. I incline to this opinion, and believe the new order of things, if it ever does begin, will not be before the next Chinese new year. Considering that there is so large a supply of Goods arriving-ships to be secured, and Teas to be shipped, do'nt you think it a little too bad that we should be kept in such utter darkness? Surely

This light will not be visible more than four there is no compromise of Plenipotentiarial dignity leagues. in giving a hint which it is impossible could do any harm, and then we should be able to shape out some course. That is, we could either act now, if the time were distant, or defer acting, if it were

TRINITY HOUSE, LONDON,

6TH JANUARY, 1843.

By Order,

J. HERBERT, SECRETARY.

near.

You will perceive what a loss it would be, should one load a ship with Teas at 6 taels duty, and another keep back his cargo for three or four weeks and ship it at 2 or 3 taels.

-Times.

We understand a band of miscreants, about twenty in number, landed early on the morning of Thursday last, at the foot, and ascended the bill on which is erected the elegant Bungalow, of J. F. Edger, Esq. Their nefarious object was quite obvious; the noise of the dogs alarmed the house, and the villains decamped, leaving behind them a Bamboo spear, near the outhouses, measuring twenty feet in length.

The robbers ascended the hill nearly opposite the berth occupied by the steamer, which would indicate that the means of protection, even under the new arrangement, are insufficient.

We are glad to see the Government have given a military guard to one of our residents who has located himself in the Wan-nei-chung valley. Suburban allotments will be almost valueless, un- less proper measures be taken to protect life and property on the Island.

TVO 7.5

52

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION

TO THE

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE,

FRIEND OF CHINA, AND HONG-KONG

GAZETTE.

For ONE YEAR (payable in advance.). . $12 Do. SIX MONTHS, do.

Do. THREE do. do.

Do. ONE do. do.

do. do. do.

SINGLE NUMBERS (to Subscribers) 25 Cs. each. Do. do. Non-Subscribers, 1 Rupee. ADVERTISEMENTS.

7

4

Sirs For Freight, Sale, Charter, &c., One Insertion - 82 do. do. Four do. 3 do do. Eight do. do. do. Twelve do.

Do.

Do.

Do. ONE INSERTION not exceeding Seren Lines (Exceeding Seven Lines, ten Cents per Linc.) N. B.-ALL REPETITIONS at a half charge.

JOB-PRINTING.

Bills of Lading, and Exchange, per 100 Opium Orders do, do. Auction, and Quarto size Hand-Bills

And $1 each additional hundred.

4

5

1

·

·

·

-

82 2 3

14

of necessity better informed than we can be, || trade to Foreign bottoms. We adhere to as to what is passing around) express the this opinion, although persons of experience most perfect confidence in the permanent and who understand the subject differ with maintenance of the peace, we are diffident us, and say that offenders, whether in the in expressing our own deep seated convic- opium, or any other contraband trade, will tion of the groundlessness of such an uniformly after running their goods proceed expectation; yet, we are fortfied by the to Hong-Kong, lay an information against best nativo authorities accessible to us. themselves, and pay the penalty; (which according to this Order in Council, must not exceed £100,) take in a fresh cargo and proceed to carry on the same traffic; as the fine is so utterly insignificant in comparison with the profits of the venture.

The question involves so many important considerations that we shall be compelled to resume its discussion on another oppor- tunity, and then laying down before our readers the various facts and circumstances, which (after a pains-taking examination) have forced us to arrive at this truly painful conclusion.

Meantime we would remark, although we hold the indication to be of very minor significance to what we may hereafter adduce, as evidence of the ultimate inten-

tions of the Chinese Government-that the severest measures are now being taken by the Emperor against all the Functionaries, The above Scale of Charges will take effect who may have come any way into collision from this date. with the barbarians, and been baffled or worsted. Naval, Military, or Civil officers, none are exempted from condign punishment, although some of them are of the highest rank and station in the empire.

June 8th, 1813.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONG-KONG GAZETTE. HONG-KONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 15TH, 1843. At this time the Peking Gazettes assume a more than common interest, as it is very possible, ascertain the true opinions of the Imperial Cabinet. It cannot be denied that the professions of the Chinese Govern- ment are all that can be wished, and the conduct of the officials is strongly indica- tive of the strong desire of the Authorities, to create the impression in our finds of their sincere wish to cultivate the most amicable relations between the two Coun- trics. This cannot be controverted, at the same time it must not be disguised that the tone of many of the Peking Gazettes, would indicat the existence, in the highest quar-

Yik-shan, and Yik king are condemned to death, and if we may judge from the fate of Yu-poo-yun who has been recently decap- itated, we should say no doubt can exist that the capital punishment will be inflict

The Government at home seems not to be aware of the great importance of the step it has now taken, and it would appear to be unconscious of the mighty changes which have taken place in the commerce of this country, since the abolition of the Company's Monopoly.tion

By the above notification, the Home Government has adopted the exceptional policy we dreaded, and which must event- ually be abandoned, although not without forfeiting the national honour in the eyes both of the people of England and of China.

When it was reported in the Indian Papers that Major Malcolm, openly avowed that Sir Henry Pottinger had promised that English ships should be prohibited under a penalty of confiscation, from pro- ceeding to other than-and Opium vessels from proceeding to--the five Ports named in the Treaty, we were incredulous and passed it by as an rumour, (Well The execution of Yu-poo-yun is a lament-knowing that some of our Oriental contem- able event, seeing that when he was Com-poraries can from a gossamer's web spin a mander-in-Chief of Che-keang province, yarn of a cable's consistence). Again, he defended to the best of his ability the when a very able article appeared on this positions he had taken up at Chin-hao and subject in the EXAMINER, attributed to the Ningpo; from an eye witness we have able historian of the Eastern Seas, we learned that he evinced great personal still thought the premises were incorrect, gallantry at our capture of the former and hence, much labour wasted to prove town. the folly of a mere figment of the imagina- tion.

ters, of unmitigated hatred of the English, atonement, or rather this offering to appease "England is noen wholly wrong, for

and an undying horror of our late invasion, and which it is endeavoured most sedulously to instil into the whole population.

It is an affecting incident in the fate of this officer, but not a rare one in Chinese history-that his son petitioned the Empe- ror to die instead of his father. This vicarious the sanguinary vengeance of the law, has on some occasions been granted, but it was in this instance denied. The Emperor declares the crime to be too heavy to per- mit any mitigation of the sentence, and admonishes the son to retrieve the disgrace of his name and family, by striving, and with his kindred too, in repelling the "cun- ning barbarian slaves" should they again invade the father-land.

This vast Empire, throughout its length and its breadth, resounds with the din of preparation for the possible, and it is hinted, the probable and not remote contigency of another conflict with the obtrusive barbar- ians. The Peking Gazettes are full of warlike recommendations, and orders to give them effect. In our last we gave a translation of one, and we now find no less than three Peking Gazettes within one month speaking of the necessity pineroserial Commissioner KE-VING, arrived there

of

We learn from Canton, that the Impe-

ing mg the strength of the Gunpowder. Intion, and Mr Morrison, proceeded on Tues- one an ex-functionary describes a new method of manipulation, in another we find day into tlie City to congratulate His Ex- a new composition recommended, and an cellency, and to invite him to visit Her order to substitute bullock for hand labour. Majesty's Plenipotentiary, at Hong-Kong. This latter document is so curious that we fore he will arrive here, and fitting arrange Not many days, we hope, will elapse be- intended to have now given a translation, ments are now making, we understand, for but we have not space, and must defer it ments are now making, we understand, for till next week. H. E.'s reception.

Again, we have several official reports on the casting of great guns after the English model In one Gazette we find it recorded that several officers are disgraced, owing to the fact of the Cannon, which had been cast under their supervision, having on being tested, proved defective and burst. In that instance considerable injury was inflcted to the bye-standers, which provoked the commendable wrath of the parental Emperor.

The Order in Council which appeared in the Official part of the Paper last week, was published in the LONDON GAZETTE of the 6th of January, and was copied into the TIMES of the day after. From the delay in its publication here, we believed that the inadequacy and inapplicability of the Provisions of the act which it had resuscitated-were recognised in the highest quarter, but it seems we were quite mis- taken.

With regard to the Notification which appeared in the Unofficial part of the Paper, we may say it was an extract from an order in council which has gone the round of the London prints. On a hurried

Further, it is well known that large num- bers of Muskets and heavy Guns have been bought up by the Chinese, and there is an on dit current (the truth or falsehood of which, a few days will show) that a very large order for both Muskets and heavy Guns has been taken by an eminent Ameri-glance (as we were going to press) we said that the effect of the new regulations Seeing that the Authorities here (who are would be, so transfer a large and valuable

can firm.

In our high estimate of the practical In our high estima sagacity of the administrators of affairs at home, we have been wholly wrong, for in the n the service of China, and the Queen of Eng- land is in effect, Chief Custom House Officer Extraordinary to the Emperor of China."

We are very glad to see by the PENANG GA- ZETTE of the 13th May, that H. M. S. Dido had sailed from Singapore for Borneo, having the enter prising and public spirited Mr Brooke as a passenger. The presence of a man-of-war will have a very salutary influence in that quarter. The supineness hitherto evinced has been very detrimental to British influence and British com merce in the Eastern Archipelago.

The following is an extract from a letter just received from Canton, which has been handed to us. We have not had time to make enquiries for con- firmation of the contents." It seems that the Ladrones outside are worse than ever. They have. themselves in open defiance of the authorities, and mustered a fleet of 150 fighting boats, establishing are exacting Black Mail from all the native craft that pass. I suppose they deem it against their interests to attack Foreign vessels. The other day they captured the Lang-moon heep, the Mandarin who has charge of the Bogue, cut off his ears, and carried away his seals. For these they demand $60,000, but they are only offered $3,000. The report is since, that the Heep is dead."

So many Papers, some of old and some of late dates have arrived altogether, that we have only time to glance at their contents.

By the GENTLEMAN'S GAZETTE of the 20th April,, we learn that Sir Charles Napier after the battle mentioned in our Paper of.to day, received the submission of two of the principal tribes, and so confident was he of the future quiet of the new British Province of Scinde, that he had sent for Lady Napier. The Ameers had arrived at Bombay to end their days as state prisoners,

By the FRIEND OF INDIA we perceive Captain Warden, of the Queen Steam Frigate, had pre-

Vide our Extract, which we have been compelled to abridge in our Supplement. Jons CRAWFURD, Esq., late Governor of Singapore, is the reputed Author.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

sented a very large Iron Bell, which he had brought || houses now erecting near the Upper Bazaar. Two from Ningpo, to the Bishop of Calcutta, who wer were wounded with knives, very severely. The graciously accepted it for the new Cathedral. cause was the attempt of the watchmen to appre- This respectable Paper says," To this bell, Cap- hend some robbers who were wending their way tain Warden has no more substantive title than up the hill, loaded with booty, to the mat huts, Sir John Keane had to Hyder Khan's sword, above, which at the break of day, is quite a com- which he was obliged to resign."

The GENTLEMAN'S GAZETTE complains of the Zephyr not waiting as according to notice issued she ought to have done, and says, the Govern- ment despatches, were left behind, and would be sent by the Emma, which it expected, although sailing so long after would reach China as soon as

mon occurrence.

Near the same spot, on the evening of the 7th instant, about half past seven o'clock, an aged Lascar was knocked down by a Chmaman, and robbed of $5.-Communicated.

The BOMBAY TIMES of the 8th April, gives the prices; Sewing Twine, Save on Sale; at reduced

report (but expresses doubts of its truth) that Colonel Stoddart and Captain Conolly are still alive. The same Paper of the 18th Feby., which we had not before scen, complains of the excessive offensiveness with which the Official character of the Secretary of Legation was paraded by Colonel Malcolm, to the great discomfort and annoyance of his fellow traveller at Alexandria and Suez; and indulges in some other observations of a very strong character, The worthy Editor must have been mis-informed, for most of our readers can attest that the demeanour and character of the gallant Colonel wholly negatives such a statement. (It also cites, the 1st April,) the DELHI GAZETTE, which states Lieut. Rogers, of H. M.'s 18th Royal Irish, had been cashiered, by a general court martial held at Hong-Kong, dn a charge of ine- briety.

With reference to the Government Notification about Land; (Vide our No. 57) the STRAITS MESSENGER says:-

We cannot but observe however, that the prin- ciple upon which this Notification seems founded, is rather built upon law than equity and that, however expedient it may seem, it is any thing but a measure of national justice. We fear that many British subjects will suffer not only inconvenience, but very serious pecu niary losses by curtailment, or perhaps even ejectinent from their holdings, and although such parties may have no title deeds granted them in the first instance, still, as they purchased them on the faith of the Government, or which is the same on that of H. M's Representative, whose guarantee is quite as binding, for the fulfilmen of all official engagenients specially entered into between hum on the part of the government and British subjects, as it is held to be with foreigners. The arbitrary undoing of the acts of his predecessor, by the present Plenipotentiary, is not at all likely to beget confidence in the public mind, as to any future engagements he may enter into on his own responsibility with any of H. M.'s subjects."

With reference to the Canton trade, and the Notification of the 20th of April, the same Paper remarks ;-

"H. E. we think very probably deprecates the practice, and encouragement of smuggling by British subjects, whom it is to be presumed he niore especially alludes to, in this proclamation, and whose conduct must be considered as much more obnoxious than that of any other class of foreigners. We are led to suppose, that not only individuals, but that mercantile, firins are also engaged in this disrespectable system of wholesale smuggling; and it is much to be feared, that the expose which II. E. has threatened to make hereafter of such parties, will tarnish not a little the honourable character hitherto sustained by British merchants, in this as in every other part of the worl! So long. however, as the Chinese Custom-house officers connive at this evasion of the duties, by British and other

C. N. MILES, & Co., 7, Webster's Bazaar, near the Hong-Kong Market, have c Needles, Palins, Marline. spikes, Seizing Stuff, assorted, Butter, wholesale, and retail, Cheese, Pickles, Negrohead Tobacco, Pipes, Turpentine, Paint Oil, White and Black Paint, and many other articles too numerous to mention. June 15th, 1843.

J. Mc. MURRAY, Baker, Pastry Cook, &c. opposite the Godowns of W. Scott, Esq., Lower Bazaar, begs to announce to the Public, that he has opened a house in the above named vicinity, and hopes to participate in that Public Patronage which it shall be his constant endeavour to deserve.

N. B.--Parties can be supplied with Bread, Pastry, &C., on the shortest notice.

SHIP BISCUIT.

NOTICE--JOHN W. NORTH, would most respect- fully inform the Merchants and Masters of Vessels, that he has taken the loft over Kent, & Co's Ship Yard, for the purpose of Making and Repairing Sails, and would most respectfully solicit their patronage. Hong Kong, June 8th, 1843.,

D. HUME, Baker, Queen's Road, opposite Allan- son's Godowns.

Sausages made to Order, equal to Epping.

ABRAHAMS, & Co.. are now ready to receive Goods on Storage and Commission, at their spacious Godowns-13 Queen's Road.

in

ca

ABRAHAMS, & Co. have on Sale. Cognac Brandy in casks, Do, in 1 dozen cases, Champagne du., Sherry cases. Claret, Prime Irish Pork. Clar casks and cases. Champagne in 3 dozen Hong-Kong, June 1st, 1843. NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership NOTICE

heretofore known by the name or Firm of BENNETT, PAINS & Co., as Auctioneers and Commission Agents, Was this day Dissolved by, mutual Commission due to, and payahle by, the said Firm, will be received and paid by the Firm of PAINE & Co. Dated the 29th day of May, 1843.

BENNETT, PAIN, & Co.

E. FARNOOMB-Witness, WANTED, a Steward for the Gun-Room Mess of H. M. S. VIXEN.

15th June, 1843.

Apply on board.

FOR SALE, by the Undersigned, at the following

reduced Prices:-

Sillery Champaigne [white] Do. Eil de Perdrix True Chateau Margaux Do. St. Julien Sauterne

816 per doz.

16 do. do.

12 do. do.

10 do. do.

10 do. do.

AD. GUILLAIN,

At Mr. BOULLE's Stores.

from the JAMES CAMPBELL.

Apply to

NOTICE TO PASSENGERS.

53

THE Barque "BENCOOLEN," CAPT. CLARRIRUTT, for Sydney, Bay of Islands, and Wellington, New Zealand, calling at Manila. For Passage apply on board, or to MESSRS. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co. Hong-kong, June 15th, 1843.

FOR SINGAPORE AND BATAVIA.

The Clipper built Swedish Barque "ZENOBIA," N. BECKMAN, Commander, will sail for the above Ports on the 18th inst. For Freight or Passage. Apply to G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 12th June, 1843. FOR CHARTER OR SALE.

The Clipper Barque " POSSIDONE," CAPT. ASHLIN VALENTINE, 464 Tons, A. 1. at Lloyd's, copper fastened and newly Coppered, now discharging at Hong-kong, and will be clear of Cargo the end of the

month.

Apply to Captain Valentine on board, or to MR RICHARD BROWNE, Macao.

Hong-kong, 12th June, 1843.

FOR SALE-A very good Chronometer, and a few Telescopes.

Apply on board the "PATNA." Hong-Kong, 6th June, 1843.

TO THE INHABITANTS OF HONG-KONG. N. BOULE, & Co., beg to anounce to the Public, that they have opened an English Baking Estab lishment.

They will be happy to send Bread of the best quality, at 6 cents. per lb., to the respective dwellings, and execute punctually any orders they may be favoured with.

Hong-Kong, 8th June, 1843.

FOR SALE-A quantity of Singapore Planks, just Apply to PAIN, & Co.

arrived.

FOR SALE-Fine Manila Ponies, in good condi. tion, and fit for immediate use. Apply to PAIN, & Co. FOR SALE-Superior Port and Sherry, ex City of Derry. Apply to C. W. BOWRA, No. 13, Queen's Road, FOR SALE-Patent Cordage, from the Steam Manufactory at Manila-a superior article. Apply to C. W. BOWRA, No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE-GOODs and Merchandise of all descrip. tions received and carefully stored in spacious

dry and secure Brick Godowns, situated on the Queen's

Road No. 20, at Hongkong, upon moderate terms. Apply upon the premises to W. ALLANSON & Co. Goods are received and sold on Commission. Hongkong, 16th Feby, 1843, PATENT CORDAGE.

A superior Article, of the recent Steam Manufacture recently established at Manila; equal to the best made

that countr. Orders can be forwarded to Manila, and WILLIAM SCOTT.

Hong-Kong, 17th May, 1843.

at Cunton are unable to make their own revenue laws FOR SALE-Beer in wood and bottle, now landing executed in a short time. Apply to respected, either by the Chinese, or by foreigners, it may be predicted notwithstanding, the Plenipotentiary's efforts and co-eperation with the Chinese authorities, whom, by the way, he can only counsel and advise, that the practice of Smuggling will still prevail, as exten- sively as before."

The SINGAPORE FREE PRESS in reference to the same Proclamation; observes ;-

OF

"CHINA. We are this week in possession of papers from China to the 4th instant. From the official Documents which we have extracted from the CHINA, it would appear that the Plenipotentiary has at last become fully apprised of the disgraceful smuggling which has been carried on to such a large extent, and in so barefaced a manner. We only wonder that he has been so long in noticing the matter, as it undoubtedly might have afforded a very fair pretence to the Chinese Government for retarding or refusing to complete the final arrangements under the Treaty. That they did not do so, shews, we think, that they are really anxious that the Treaty should be carried into operation. Now, however, when His Excellency has addressed himself to this subject, and has called the attention of the Chinese Govern. ment to it, it will in all likelihood be put a stop to, and we should think that the British Merchants who have mixed them- selves up with these transactions, will be anxious, by a prompt withdrawl from them, to prevent their names being held up to the world as Smugglers, as Sir Henry Pottinger threatens to do, on a recurrence of these practices."

JOHN LEATHLEY.

FOR SALE A DOUBLE BARREL Percussion FOWL ING PIECE, by JOHN MANTON, with Apparatus com- plete, and spare Nipples Main-Springs, &c., in a Ma- hogany Case,-Price 870. Apply to the Printer. June 14th, 1843.

TO BE SOLD.

A splendid Buggy and Harness, nearly New. For particulars apply to ROBT. LAWRIE, Navy and Army Tavern,

Hong-kong, June 8th, 1842.

NOTICE,-The Gentry of Hong-Kong, and the

Public generally, can be furnished with fine ENGLISHI MUTTON, [at one-half dollar per Pound] by sending their orders to THE BRITON'S BOAST, on Saturday Mornings.

Hong-kong, 17th May, 1843. NOTICE.

Our Canton letter is the best practical comment- FOR SALE.-Bally Rice, Manila Coffee, Cocoanut àry on these anticipations.

Very few of the many outrages daily perpe- trated among the Native population, or even when Europeans suffer, are brought to the attention of the authorities, for reasons which are apparent. Among others may be mentioned, the attack, by robbers, on the watchmen placed to guard some

Oil, Java Arrack in cases and casks, Port and Sherry, Copenhagen Cherry Cordial, in Pints, Europe and Manila Rope, Oakum, Corks, Singapore Planks, Anchors and Chains, Manila Rum, Chocolate, Cigars, Sardines, Turpentine, Seidlitz Powders, and a great variety of other articles.

JOHN BURD & Co. Queen's Road.

Hong-Kong, 1st March, 1843,

FOR SALE Anchors, Cables, Copper Sheath: ing and Nails, Patent Felt, Carpeting and Rugs and Woollen Tartan-by W. T. Kinsley. Hongkong, Jany 11th, 1843. NOTICE. Just received, and For Sale. SILLERY CHAMPAGNE, CLARET, ST. JULIEN, SAUTERNE, and superior FRENCH BRANDY. A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy Street, TO LET-A BUNGALOW, near the West Point Barracks.-Apply to R. WEBSTER.

GRANITE GODOWNS TO LET,

BY THE MONTH, OR LONGER PERIOD. THEY are of different sizes, and capable of con- taining 500 to 2000 Bales Cotton. ALSO, Merchandize received on Storage, at a low rate per package. Apply to, C. V. GILLESPIE, 46, Queen's Road. FOR SALE.-Ship Chandlery, Cables, and Stores of all de. criptions, Port Wines, Pale and Gold Sherry, Champaigne Mosalle, Marsella, English and French Brandy, Gin, Bottled Ale and Porter, English Butter in Kegs, an assortment of Warm Clothing, and Beaver Hats. Apply to A. HUMPHREYS, Magistracy St.

VO. 7

75

54

NOTICE.

1

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize G. F. DAVIDSON.

for Sale on Commission, Hong-Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE. American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels..

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole Barrels.⚫

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER NAVIGATOR.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases. No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1848.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terins:-Sherry, Port, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors. Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines; Jams, Jellies, and a variety of other Articles.

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J.S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Gentry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL. and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN. TON-and that his constant care and attention will be, the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage.

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties.

European Servants always in attendance All Orders for Wines Stores, &c., thankfully received, and punctually attended to.

Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms. Canton, 24th May, 1843.

terms.

FOR SALE--Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON. & Co. Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned ;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Seidlitz Powders, Gunpowder (coarse), Sperm Candles, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

Articles.

.

at No. 13, Queen's Road.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing under the firm of L. E. Christopher & H. J. Carr, is this day dissolved, by mutual consent, and all demands now due are to be settled by L. E. Christopher.

June. 1st, 1843.

[Signed] L. E. CHRISTOPHER. [Witness] H. J. CARR.

D. WILSON & Co., Have just landed. ex "A LOERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz. :- Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Foolscap, and Over-Land Paper; Steel Pens, Patent Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day,

for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE,

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th December, 1842.

FOR SALE-Salad Oil, Cherry Brandy, Gin, English Sad dles, Eau de Cologne, Corks, Plate-ware, Paper, Shot, Window Glass, and several other articles.

Apply to F. H. TIEDEMAN, Magistracy Street. Hong-Kong, 15th June, 1843.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of P. TOWNSEND & Co.," was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND.

P. TOWNSEND, ROBT. EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the and armed, and Commanded by an European, 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

mises to

NOTICE.-Goods and Merchandize of all de- spacious dry, and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- scriptions, received and carefully stored in kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre N. DUUS, or FEARON & SON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG, 1st JANUARY, 1842.

NOTICE-The undersigned is authorized by His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief of Her Majesty's Land Forces in China, to receive all pack- ages addressed to the Officers or Messes of any of the Regiments employed during the late war. N. DUUS.

Hong-Kong, 15th April, 1843-

Singapore BEAMS. from 22 to 28 feet long, and Go 12 inches diameter. Ditto Planks. 16 feet by 1 & half inch thick. Ditto ditto 11 " " 1 " ditto. "" one-half " Ditto ditto 11 ditto.

A L80,-A small quantity of Singapore Furniture Wood in Planks and Stanchions.

G. R. MESS, CORNWALLIS. THE MESS of the 26th Regiment, on quitting

CATERER of this Mess will feel much obliged, if this Hong-Kong, left with a Resident here, a Sum of individual will inform the Editor, where he may Money, for the G. R. Mess of the Cornwallis. The

found.

Cornwallis, June 5th, 1843.

NOTICE

be

IN consequence of the mutual Dissolution of Part- nership between Messrs. BENNETT, PAIN, & Co., the Undersigned begs to Notify, that the Busi. ness will be carried on by himself, on the same Pre- mises, and most respectfully solicits a continuance of the liberal support he has hitherto been favoured with. Parties desirous of sending Goods for Public the time of Sale. Auction, are requested to do so two days previous to

Auctions will be held every Friday, at Eleven A. M. Terms-Five per Cent. on all Goods. One half per cent. Commission will be charged upon all Goods bought in.

A liberal allowance will be made for the Sale of Ships, Opium, or landed Property. days after Sule, or sooner if realized. Proceeds of Account Sales will be rendered fifteen

.JNO. W. BENNETT.

Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

EXCHANGE AND READING ROOM. At the request of several of the resident Inhabitants, and Commanders of Ships, the undersigned has been induced to establish at this rising Port, an Exchange and Reading Room, the utility of which, he feels assured, will be apparent to all..

for Subscribers. Secondly, to afford as soon as The first object has been, to provide a place of resort practicable, the latest Intelligence from all parts of Europe, America, India, and the Southern Colonies, with all the Local Publications.

A well chosen Library has also been added.

N. B.-The Exchange has been removed to the premises immediately above the Sale Rooins of the undersigned. Terms, $1 per month. JNO. W. BENNETT.

Hong Kong, Exchange and Reading Room, 1st June, 1843.

THE Undersigned has on hand for Sale, the under- mentioned Stores, at moderate prices.

Pale Ale, Dunbar's; French Claret, St. Julien ; Superior light French Wines, assorted; Superior Brown Sherry; Do. Brandy; Salad Oil, in cases; Mocha Coffee Superior Hyson, in whole chests; Pickled Salmon; Pickles; Sauces; Vinegar; &c. &c.; Butter; Bottled Fruits; Macaroni; Reading and Pickled Mackerell; Cabin Biscuits, in tins; Superior Hides; Bunting Single Barrelled Fowling-pieces, Hanging Lamps; Lamp Wicks; Pad-locks; Ger- man Clocks, with Alarums: Hunting Whips; Tanned in cases; Shot, of sizes; Powder Flasks; Rosin in kegs; Writing Paper; Blankets; Lamb's Wool Drawers; Boots and Shoes, Europe and Calcutta ; Blacking, Day and Martin's; Quinine; Perfumery of all descriptions, Hair, Tooth, and Nail Brushes, Dres- sing Combs, small Ivory Ditto, Soda, and Seitlitz Ink, Screws, Broad Cloth of colours, Woollen Cloth, Powders, Sponges, Bitters, Account Books, Writing Spanish Stripes, Beaver Hats, white Lead, Corks, and other Articles.

Goods Received, and Sold on Commission. N B.-An Auction held every Friday, at 11 A.M. JNO. W. BENNETT

JUNE.

ARRIVED.

7th H. M. H. S. Minden Quin 8th Harlepuin Oliver

Velocipede

Sumatra

Macao

Amoy

Maci.o

HM. T. S. Alligator

9th Ingleborough

73

James Campbell

Brown Port Essington Rea Pitcairn

Liverpool Glasgow

10th Zenobia [Swed.]

Beckman

London

Apply to, N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843.

29 Possidone

Valentine

18, Queen's Road.

11th Naiad

Cheyne

19

19

Woodworth Crawfurd

29

Batavia

H. C. Str. Proserpine

Hough

Whampoa

FOR SALE,

15th Fortescue

Milty cus Hall

Sydney

Chusan

SAILED.

JUNE

Apply to N. DUUS, Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843. FOR SALE.

10th Gondolier

18, Queen's Road.

39

20

H. C. Str. Proserpine Hough Kelso

Oliver Whampoa

"

Roxburgh

Macao

All Persons indebted to the above named firm, are called upon for immediate payment, and all persons A small quantity of best American Flour, Mess, and holding claims against the said firm, to send in their Prime Beef; Bengal Grain, and Rice in 2 Mound claims to L. E. Christopher. Bags.

June 1st, 1843.

L. E. CHRISTOPHER.

H. J. CARR.

NOTICE.

To Captains of Vessels and others connected with the Port of Hong-kong.

PAIN, & Co, have for Sale at their Stores, (the premises in Magistracy Street, lately known as the Exchange Rooms) the following Articles, viz:-

Prime Mess Beef and Pork, Paint and Paint Oil, Ship's Bread, Bunting, Turpentine, Tar, Cabin Bread, Brandy in wood and bottle, very Superior Golden Sherry, Port Wine, [Cockburn's Claret, St. Julien Margaux, Ilock, Frontignac & Barsac, Barclay's Stout, in bottle. Olive Oil, Oilman's Stores, an assortment of Beaver and Solar Hats, and many other Articles too numerous to mention,

of prime York Hams, Cheese and Butter. Just received, per "GONDOLIER"-ASmall quantity Apply to. N. DUUS Hong-Kong, 20th May, 1843.

18 Queen's Road.

FOR SALE-A small quantity of very superior Burgundy; Hermitage; Champagne; Rhenish Wines Claret; Sheray; Port and Madeira, in Bottles-Also a few casks of prime Claret, Sherry, and Madeira. Apply to N. DUUS, 8, Queen's Road.

Elong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

18th Florà [Swed.]

11th Harlequin 12th Beulah

Oliver Patton

Amoy Bombay

REPORTS.-H. M. S. Thalia, Capt. Hope, is expected to sail this day for Singapore and Calcutta-- H. M.. S. Alligator, for Culcutta direct, in a few days-The Equestrian, about the 20th, for England- The Louisa, for Chusan, in two or three days-And the Mary Ann, for Amoy and Chusan, about the 20th in t.

WILLIAM PEDDER, Harbour Master.

(For the remainder of the news, vide Supplement.)

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, A'T THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S Road Hongkong.

The Friend. of China & Hong Kong SUPPLEMENT TO No. 65

HONG-KONG, THURSDAY. JUNE 15TH, 1843.

file.

Gasrttr,

55

the freest, and even the most flourishing, branch of foreign trade in the empire. It was consumed from Canton to Mantchoo Tartary, and from Yunan to the shore of the Sea of Japan. The civil and military, the naval and police officers of the Govern ment, connived at, and the very highest officers of State-even the Viceroys of Canton in their own persons, or through their nearest relatives, entered zealously into the smuggling trade, if it deserved any longer to be considered such. The only difference, but it was an important one, between the opium and any other branch of trade, was that the customs on it did not go into the public

if brandy and geneva, being declared contraband in this country,

BRITISH OFFICERS IN CHINA-The following 95th, and 1st battalion Rifle Brigade, will remain, account of the services performed by the military as heretofore, at 800; their service companies at officers in China, to whom both houses of parlia- 600, and the depots 200 rank and file. The 2nd, ment have voted thanks, is taken from Lieutenant 3rd, 4th, 9th, 10th, 13th, 17th, 18th, 21st, 22nd, Hart's "Army Book" for 1843. 25th, 28th, 29th, 31st, 39th, 40th, 50th, 51st, 55th, SIR HUON GOUGH.-Sir Hugh Gough served 57th, 58th, 62nd, 63rd, 78th, 80th, 84th, 86th, 94th, at the capture of the Cape of Good Hope, and the 96th, 98th, and 99th, are to remain at 1,000 rank 100 super-numeraries will, however, be Dutch fleet in Saldanha Bay, 1793. Served after- wards in the West Indies, including the attack on allowed to all regiments serving in India or China, treasury, but into the pockets of the officials. This was just as Porto Rico, the Brigand war in St. Lucia, and the and 30 to those serving in all other foreign stations; but freely dealt in and consumed notwithstanding, Sir Robert capture of Surinam. Proceeded to the Peninsula and the recruiting of those regiments will be Peel, Sir James Graham, the Board of Customs and Excise, in 1809, and commanded the 87th regiment at the regulated accordingly. The standard for the and the Horse Guards with their respective subordinates, should battles of Talavera, Barossa, Vittoria, and Nivelle, infantry of the line (with the exception of those quietly pocket among them the million and a half of duties from for which he has received a cross. Sir Hugh had regiments serving in India, China, and New South them, which before went into the public treasury; but suddenly a hores shot under him on the 27th of July, and on Wales) will be raised to five feet six inches and turning round, on some freak of State policy which they and their predecessors had never thought of for forty years, they the 28th at Talavera, he was severely wounded in a-half for men not exceeding 25 years of age, should proceed to empty all the brandy and geneva kegs into the the side by a splinter of a shell; he also received and five feet six inches for growing lads under Thames, imprison every foreigner that dealt in them, or was Regiments serving in suspected of dealing in them; and place, moreover, the French Com eighteen years of age. a slight wound in the head at Tarifa. manded the land force throughout nearly the India, China, and New South Wales, may take, whole of the operations in China, and for which recruits at five feet six inches, but not under eighteen years of age.-Times. service he was created a baronet.

LORD SALTOUN.-Sord Saltoun served in Sicily

in 1806 and 1807: Sir John Moore's campaign

systematically connive at smuggling brandy and geneva, and

and Dutch Ambassadors in durance.

The Opium trade, as we are supposing it under the New Treaty, will go on, and be a smuggling trade as before; and the only difference will be, that it will have FIVE POINTS d' appui, whereas, under the old contraband system, it had but ONE.- Opium stations like Lintin will be planted, inevitably, near each of the Four New Ports of Trade, and the trade will go on swim- mingly, under the noses of British Consuls, and Chinese Vice- roys. The India Board, of which Sir Robert Peel, the Chan- cellor of the Exchequer, and Secretaries of State are members, will indite despatches to encourage the growth of the white poppy. as of vital importance to Indian revenue. One of the members

We fear that the subject of the Opium trade in 1808-9, including the battle of Corunna. Ex- will be found a sore difficulty and embarrassment pedition to Walcheren, 1809. Went to Cadiz in in the settlement of those new relations which are April, 1811, and remained with the Army until opening upon us with China. On the one side we the end of the Peninsula war, in 1814, and was have the merchants engaged in that trade assuring of the said Board. in his capacity of Foreign Secretary, will de present at the storming of Seville, passage of the us, as will have been seen in the extracts which nounce the sale of Opium in China, its principal mart, and on which depends the integrity of the India revenue, as illegal and Bidassoa, battle of the Nivelle, actions of the 9th, we gave from the Indian papers on Tuesday, that immoral; he will even write letters to the Foreign Secretary of 10th, and 12th December, 1813, in front of Bidart, "without the legalization of the opium trade, it is the "Flowery Land," making asseverations of the good faith of passage of the Adour, blockade of Bayonne and hopeless to expect that our future relations with Britain. At the suggestion of the Admiralty, will issue instruc tions for the seizure and confiscation of all British ships trading repulse of the sortie. Served also the campaign the Chinese can be in a satisfactory state ;" and, in Opium in the Five Ports of China, which, by the way, will be of 1815, including the battles of Quatre Bras and in fact, that they hold it to be impossible to contrary to the law and usage of nations. All this will be done, Waterloo, and the storming of Peronne. form any treaty which shall have a prospect of and, in a few months' time, the Chinese will, and the Opium MAJOR-GENERAL GEORGE BURRELL-Major- permanency, should this stipulation be omitted." Trade going on more briskly than ever, charge us, and with good reason too with acting a dishonest farce to deceive them. General George Burrell served at the capture of At the same time, they frankly confess their ap- How the dexterous and pious Sir Robert Peel is to direct this Guadaloupe, 1810, and the campaign of 1814 in prehensions founded upon " the ominous silence of game of cross purposes as head of Her Majesty's Government, we Upper Canada. He is now serving in China, and the Plenipotentiary," and the opinions of the Hong are at a loss to understand. He is adroit, no doubt, but here, If Sir Henry Pottinger has really given the alleged promise to commanded the land force at the first capture of merchants that the traffic will contiune as illicit we think he will be battled. Chusan, and a brigade at the attack upon Canton. as before. On the other hand, we have the mer- the Chinese Government, and for the mere purpose to expediting SIR ROBERT BARTLEY.-Sir Robert Bartley chants of Lancashire and Yorkshire deprecating the signing of the Treaty, we do not hesitate to say that he would served with the 49th regiment during the Ameri- the legalization which the others desire, as a still have acted more wisely had he broke off the negociations. The prospect of revenue, a subject to which the Chinese Go. vernment is keenly alive, ought to have been held out to the can war in 1812, 1813, and 1814, and was present greater evil than the illicit traffic itself, inasmuch as at Fort Erie when attacked on the 28th of its certain effect would be to exclude British pro- Emperor. By means of a moderate duty, a million sterling might November, 1812, on which occasion "the enemy duce almost entirely from the markets of the Celes- easily be added to the Chinese Exchequer, a measure which would at once legalize and restrict the consumption,-put an end was gallantly opposed by Lieut. Bartley, who tial Empire. to those difficulties in carrying on the foreign trade which no commanded a detachment of thirty-five men, and That our opinions and wishes, backed as we other ever can, and remove at once the principal ground of quarrel with the Chineese. At all events, the British nation prevented for a considerable time the landing of a think, by the general moral sense of our country- ought not to have been converted into a Coast Guard to prevent force more than ten times his number, and did not men, incline to the latter view-that we think the Chinese smuggling, or into a police establishment for the mainte relinquish the contest until his party, reduced to course most proper for our Government to take is nance of Chinese morality; nor should the Queen of England be 17 effective men, was threatened by a strong to let the Chinese deal with this traffic as they the Emperor of China.-(From the EXAMINER, January 21.) detachment of the enemy, who had landed on his think proper, and to throw its own weight into the flank, when he made good his retreat, and joined scale of discouragement-our readers are well the main body:" he was also present at the battles aware. And considering that Sir H. Pottinger this morning, brings particulars of the victory of Fort George, Stoney Creek, Chrystler's Farm had it in his power, to dictate what terms he pleas- gained by Sir Charles Napier over the Beloochees (severely wounded,) and Platsburg. Commanded ed when settling the treaty of Nankin.t we can on the 24th of March, the first rumour of which the regiment at the first attack and capture of scarcely doubt that his "ominous silence" arose reached us on the 1st instant. The General had Chusan, and a brigade at the storm and capture of from instructions, or that those instructions were marched out with the whole of his army, 6,000 the city of Chin-keang-foo. conceived in a spirit answerable to our wishes. SIR J. H. SCHOEDDE.-Sir James Schoedde. If so, we earnestly hope that such measures will served the Egyptian campaign of 1801. Served be taken as may teach opium dealers that they war, including the battles of Rhleia, Viniera, ent to be a check up on any proceedings calculated Talavera, Fuentes d'Onor; sieges of Ciudad, to disturb the good understanding between Great Rodrigo, and Badajos; battles of Salamanca, Britain and China.-Times, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthes, and Toulouse, besides numerous actions and skirmishes. Medal for Nivelle. Commanded a brigade at the assault and capture of the city of Chin-keang-foo. -Manchester and Salford Advertiser,

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE.-An official order arrived at Chatam, on Thursday, from the Horse Guards, dated the 11th of February, naming the following regiments that are to undergo the reduc- tion. The following is a copy of the circular letter:-

"Horse Guards.-It having been determined that a reduction shall take place in the infantry of the army, the following regiments are gradually to be reduced to 740 rank and file, each- 1st (1st and 2nd Battalions), 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 11th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 24th, 26th, 27th, 30th, 32nd, 33rd, 34th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 38th, 41st, 43rd,-44th, 46th, 47th, 48th, 49th, 52nd, 53rd, 54th, 56th, 59th, 60th, (1st and 2nd Battalions), 61st, 64th, 65th, 66th, 67th, 68th 69th, 70th, 72nd, 73rd, 74th, 75th, 76th, 77th, 78th. 81st, 82nd, 83rd, 85th, 87th, 88th, 89th, 92nd, and 93rd. The service companies to be 540, and the depots 200 rank and file. The 19th, 90th,

rendered in effect Chief Custom-House Officer Extraordinary ta

The Indus steamer, which came into harbour

strong with eighteen guns, to attack the enemy, commanded by Shere Mahomed of Meerpore. The enemy's force, 20,000 strong, after a severe whole of their guns, 11 in number, were captured, together with several of their standards. Shere Mahomed has escaped into the desert with a body of horse. From this it is supposed he will speedily require to return for want of water. He was hotly pursued by the Irregular Horse. We have no time to give details. Our loss amounts to 39 killed, and 228 wounded. The brunt of the battle fell on H. M.'s 22nd, and Leslie's Troop of horse artillery-Bombay Times.

England in the Coast Guard Service of China. The Indian papers received by the last mail, contain the follow ing paragraph-"It is reported that Sir Henry Pottinger, owing to the instigation of the Emperor, and the better to succeed in get ting the Treaty confirmed the Cooner, had promised to prohibit English vessels importing the Drug to any of the five Ports named in the Treaty, under a penalty of confiscation. Major Malcolm, the bearer of the despatches, on board the AUCKLAND, confirms A splendid new iron steamer, the Royal Admiral, If any such condition has been made, it is clear that the Plenipo the report." This statement has some appearance of authenticity. tentiary has been blundering, and if it has been confirmed it is is now on its way from England, by Singapore. It equally certain that the Prime Minister, as he has better means of is of 600 tons burden, 230 horse power, and when seeing its impolicy, is still a greater blunderer than the Plenipo. laden, draws eight feet water. It will touch at

tontiary.

The history of the Opium trade is briefly this: The Chinese Batavia on its way out. This Steamer was built had, to our authentic knowledge, been smoking opium, chiefly, by a company and purchased by one of the mem- but not exclusively, furnished by India, for three centuries, and for bers, so that it will come to the Straits as a private two centuries and a half of this period, opium was as lawful an article of importation as Spanish Dollars. About fifty years ago, speculation and the line upon which it will be em- however, the government declared it, for the first time, contra. ployed, will depend upon the encouragement that band, and from that moment the trade has acquired importance. may be offered. We sincerely hope the agents. received an additional impetus in 1814, by the partial opening will be induced to run it between Singapore, Ma- of the trade between India and Europe; and a still greater in. lacca, Pinang, and Calcutta. It probably would crement in 1831, by the abolition of our tea monopoly. not be difficult to make an arrangement with the company originated by Messrs Mackay and & Co. If the line is to be continued to Hong-Kong, two steamers at least, will be indispensible.--Pinang Gazette,

It

It was not until this last event that the Chinese Government began to be alarmed on the subject of the opium trade. For the forty years before, although nominally forbidden, it had been

⚫ Vide Friend of China, of October 20th 1843. ditto, 1 Ditto

ditto,

75

C

54

NOTICE.

1

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

THE undersigned having rented those Spacious and Safe Godowns, situated next to the Premises of Messrs. Holliday Wise, & Co., is prepared to Store Goods on moderate Terms, also to receive Merchandize for Sale on Commission, G. F. DAVIDSON.

Hong Kong, 24th April, 1843.

FOR SALE. American Beef and Pork,

Negro-head Tobacco,

PER NAVIGATOR.

Mackerel in Kits,

Tar in barrels.

Flour in Barrels,

Shag Tobacco in barrels

Mess Beef in half and whole Barrels.

Sausages in Boxes

Prime Pork.

Champagne Cider, in one

dozen Cases

Butter in Firkins

Pilot and Navy Bread.

PER VENICE.

London Bottled Sherry, in 3 dozen Cases. No. 4 superior Manila Cigars. Apply at the Godowns of

Hong-Kong, 25th April, 1849.

G. F. DAVIDSON.

FOR SALE-by the Undersigned, at their Godowns, on very moderate terins:-Sherry, Part, Cherry Brandy; Brandy in Wood and Bottle; Arrack; Seltzer Water; Stockholm Tar, Pitch, Anchors, Chain Cables, Rigging, and Boat Chains; Europe and Manila Rope; Twines, Lead-Lines, Sail Needles; Blocks, of sizes; Log.Glasses, Paints, White Lead, Painter's Brushes; Blankets; Paper, Ink; Patent Copying Machines, Jams, Jellies, and a variety of

other Articles,

WILLIAM ALLANSON & Co.,

20, Queen's Road, Hong-Kong, 29th April, 1843.

BRITISH HOTEL, No. 2, POUSHUN HONG. J. S. CASE, Begs leave to inform the Nobility and Gentry of Hong-Kong, and Macao, that he has opened the above-named House, as an HOTEL. and it is in every way adapted for the convenience of Visitors to CAN TON-and that his constant care and attention will be, the comfort of those who may favour him with their patronage.

Private and Commodious Apartments for Families and Parties.

European Servants always in attendance All Orders for Wines Stores, &c., thankfully received, and punctually attended to.

Goods received and sold on Commission, and Sales by Auction effected on the lowest possible terms. Canton, 24th May, 1843.

terms.

FOR SALE--Singapore Beams, on moderate Apply to W. ALLANSON. & Co. Hong-Kong, 31st May, 1843.

JUST RECEIVED, AND FOR SALE At the Godowns of the Undersigned;-Forge Bellows, Blacksmith's Tools, Carpenter's ditto; Singapore Plank and Beams, Ship Chandlery of all description, and Ship Provisions, Wines and Spirits, Bengal Rice, Manila Patent Cordage, ditto Chocolate, ditto Cigars, ditto Coffee, ditto Cocoanut Oil, Corks, Sardines, Copper Boat Nails, Foolscap and Writing Paper, Cutlery and Hardware, And a variety of other

Articles.

Apply to C. W. BOWRA,

at No. 13, Queen's Road.

D. WILSON & Co., Have just landed, ex "A LOERINE," the following Goods which can be seen at their Stores, viz. :- Superfine Cloth, and Kerseymeres; Hooks and Eyes, Glazed Hats; Europe Boots; Dressing-Cases Ladies' Work-Boxes; Writing-Desks; Brushes, and Perfumery of all kinds; Stationery, Drawing Pencils, Visiting Cards, Steel Pens, Paterscap. and Over-Land Paper; Leads; Decanters, Telescopes, Thermometers; Toby Philpott Jugs; Lozenges of all kinds; Saddles and Bridles; Cooling Pots; Velvet Corks; Iron Cash-Boxes; Bottled Herbs; Cayenne Pepper, Cherry Brandy, Hermetically-Sealed Hams; Beer and Porter, &c.

D. W. & Co. beg to announce to the Members of their Subscription Billiard- Room, that the Rooms are opened this day,

for their amusement.

Hong-Kong, 1st June, 1843.

FOR SALE,

Shaw and Maxwells Port and Sherry in 3 and 6 dozen Cases, apply at the Godown of Messrs Gibb, Livingston & Co. Hong-Kong, 10th December, 1842.

FOR SALE Salad Oil, Cherry Brandy, Gin, English Sad dles, Eau de Cologne, Corks, Plate-ware, Paper, Shot, Window Glass, and several other articles.

Apply to F. H. TIEDEMAN, Magistracy Street. Hong-Kong, 15th June, 1843.

NOTICE is hereby given, that the Partnership heretofore existing between PENN TOWNSEND. and ANDREAS MOLBYE, under the Firm of "P. TOWNSEND & Co.," was this day dissolved by mutual consent. All Debts due to, and by, the Partnership, to be paid, and received by, PENN TOWNSEND.

P. TOWNSEND, ROBT, EDWARDS, Attorney for A. MOLBYE,

Hong Kong, May 30th, 1843. NOTICE.-A fine large new LORCHA, well manned will run between this, Macao and Whampoa after the and armed, and Commanded by an European, 20th Instant. For Charter, Freight or Passage apply on board to Captain Prush or to N. Duus-Hongkong Fearon & Son-Macao.

Hongkong, 15th March, 1843.

mises to

G. R. MESS, CORNWALLIS. THE Mess of the 26th Regiment, on quitting

Hong-Kong, left with a Resident here, a Sum of Money, for the G. R. Mess of the Cornwallis. The CATERER of this Mess will feel much obliged, if this individual will inform the Editor, where he may be found. Cornwallis, June 5th, 1843. NOTICE IN consequence of the mutual Dissolution of Part- nership betweeen Messrs. BENNETT, PAIN, & Co., the Undersigned begs to Notify, that the Busi ness will be carried on by himself, on the same Pre- mises, and most respectfully solicits a continuance of the liberal support he has hitherto been favoured with. Parties desirous of sending Goods for Public Auction, are requested to do so two days previous to the time of Sale!

Auctions will be held every Friday, at Eleven A. M. Terms-Five per Cent. on all Goods. One