Government Gazette | 政府憲報 | 1842

THE FRIEND FRIEND OF CHINA

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING

HONG-FOND THURSDAY, MARCH 17TH 1842.

 

ADDRESS edge this most gladdening state of things to TO TER PUBLIC.After much toil anxie be attributable to the cordial cooperation of and expense we are combled, with grate the Authorities of this Teledy who have to feelings, to lay, before our friends and the atmost of their power afforded every le- Public the First, Number of Tegitimato and proper encouragement to native And foreign settlers, and we hope ere long 1680 OF CHINAL Ou intro fucing ourselves to the Public in to see Hongkong become a modern Tyre and fitting that we should fully state something one of the brightest diadems in the crown of England: With the proper fostering care four views objects and plan, and the pre ensions upon which we confidendy ground What, we ask, is to linder in onward and rapid advancement In Politics we are essentially and ically liberal, but we

ur expectations of Patronage and support. A year has vercely elapsed since the British fog was unfurled on this land evis de facto of its being henceforth part dpirsel of the wale suread British Empire hste Empire on which then never

e regeneration social and politics

ast Empire of China

estined to be the deme

alls of partition which,

are separater one third

om communi

Never to

history

presen

at the

China; it not we confidently believe, wa shall have to trace the steps of our gallant countrymen to the capital of this vast emis pira, and whilst we deprecate the horrible. alternatives of war in all its forms we yet hope in this instance may lead to a pers manent peace honorable slike to us as Ent glishmen and philantrophists. We beleive we may promise our readers the latest and most authentic intelligence from the seat of war, and from the other Parts lately decla phatred free; and it will be our pleasing duty the giant steps of our new seules ant here, and report the rise sud Pros of the firit Britsh Settlement in the Celestial Empire.

inion

how and as we do ma of party spirit, count on fully performing our Editorial function irrespective of those clams interests entiona which deform

tion.

pran

It will be our andeviating aim to promote not only the prosperity of the China trade but specially of Hongkong and we shall endeavor to make our boss exertions subserve that and in all particulars,

From the foregoing may be fully infered our intention, olfact and plan We may say that it shall be our constant study to assim ifate the Friend of China in character pri ciple and conduct with that-most-useful and xcellent phot d of India onductors of whi have for some past been in cor pondence and whose and we can calculate upon Based such principles

sceful

Excell

authoriti

hich

the Chines

nds we shall

of buil

to erec

from native

be productive

to make illon

limes that may the manne

758

C

2

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

weekly issue. Owing to the hurry of removing our press, and the unavoidable claims on our attention incident to a first issue in our new

colony, we claim the indulgence of our readers,

much advantage to the foreign community. The Land, Harbour and all Government regulations will appear as soon as possible and we hope we shall be made the organ and venture to assure them that our first number of their first communication to the public. should not be accepted as a fair, specimen of We hope to be able to furnish an accu- yate review of our markets and the prices of the arrangements which we now have in pro- what we hope to submit to our friends when the leading Exports and fimports at least greas shall be completed. Notwithstanding the once a month. Ou: present Monetary sys-outlay which has already been incurred, the tem demands and will receive much at- Proprietores have in reserve a still larger sum, tention at our hands as we cannot but think fully determining to spare no reasonoble ex- a change is inevitable and rendered impera- pense in rendering the Paper permanent, res- tive by the foundation, of this Settlement, pectable and useful. and out widely extending relations with . China.

We believe it is only required to bring the matter properly before the Home Go- vernment where a remedy might be devised to remove all the numerous compliants a- gainst the present Sistem.

We shall be obliged by a loan of newand interesting Publications in the various Euro- pean languages, and hope our friends vill not forget to send us the latest Papers whether British, Colonial or foreign, as unul our arrange- ments are completed we shall be dependent in some measure upon their considerate kindness Special pains will be taken to forward copies to all subscribers by the earliest & sufest uppor tunities; and to the large number of Officers, also,both Naval & Military, connected with the China Expedition we hope our paper will prove itself to be a frequent and welcome visitor. Unless parties otherise prefer, no payment of subscription will be required for a month or two to come. Ve

Whilst our print is a vehicle of Local in- telligence we shall yet not neglect the mor- al and national hentmena. around us and hence we shall open our columns to communications relative to ih Philipine Islands, Malay Peninsula, Indian. Archinel- ago, Society, Islands Bone with the King doms of Jup in, Cochin China, Birmah and Siam and specialy with the kindred Settle HONKONG PROPRIETORS.-W. ments of New Holland and New Zealand below ou Alphebetical list of the Prop te with whom we count ou establishing the most tons of Lands and biuldings in the Town of intimate and mutually beneficial relations. Hongkong. The list my not be entirely ac- We are happy to announce that we have curate, but in a future number we shall correspondents in all the above named local-pblish another list revised and corrected ities with the exception of Japan, and Many of the parties have each several lo. without vanity we are led to believe that we shall beihe organs of communicating much Almack W. ad Burn D. L. useful and interesting matter to our friends here and at home. Boughton J. Burd J. R. Caine. W. Major. -Gadell Cant.-

We take this opportunity of thanking many of the best of our chinese friends for their kind proffers of aid and assistance the value of which we duly estimate and which we shall be but too proud to avail ourselves.

Although our print starts with its pre- sent size up shall be much deceived if the encreazed facilities of communication, new interests springing up, and the Government relations do not compel us annually to give at least fifty per cent more matter than has hitherto been given by any paper yet publish ed in China.

In conclusion we cannot but beleive that- our humble efforts in diffusinga better knowl- edge of China and the Chinese may be in- strumental in giving increased means of sub- sistence to our industrious fellow country- men and moreover aid in throwing open a greatly augmented and profitable field of employment for our Capitalists and in no small degree promotive of the social ad- vancement of this extraordinary people among whom we are placed and who already form a most important and thriving portion of the population of the British Settlement of Hongkong.

To SUBSCRIBERS AND CORRESPONDENTE OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA. - We design keeping box premanently wit hthe Post Master at Hongkong, and all communications will safety reach their destination if seut through the Hongkong Post office and addressed" Proprie- tors of the Friend of China, Hongkong." We respectfully solicit the names of Subscribers and the number of copies they may require at as early a Hate as possible in order that we many be enabled to determine with reasonable cer tainty, the requisite number of copies for our

Dend

Campbell Ens. Cullery J M. Cowa je Rustomjee. Challaye C. ab Dia&Co

Dent & Co. -DA. Duues Capt.

Edwards Robert. dend Ferguson, Leighton & Co. Fox, Rawan & Co.

Framjee Runonjes. Fearon C.

Fearon S.

Gemmell & Co. Gibble, Gapt

Gibb, Livingstone & Co.

Gillespie, G. V

Holliday, Wise & Co. Herjeeboy Rustomjee. Harton, W. H Henderson, W. Hughes WH

Holgate, Dr.

Innes Fletcher & Co. Jardine Matteson & Co. Jamaison Ho & Co. -Juze Pedro

Johnstone, A. R Esq. Larkins Capt. babrat. Afred. Read

Lindsay & Co. Molby, Capt.

Maikwick C.

Morrison Education Society.

MARCH 17 1812.

Missionary Society, Medical. Mission of the Amer. Bourd Oswald, R. Ochterlony, Lieut Pybus, H. de Pedder, Lieut. Romsay Capt. Rober son P. F. Strachn, R. Slade, John. de Shaik Madeen: Turner &. 4o. White James. Walker Capt. Webster, R. Zabell Capt.

the accomplished partner of the well known On the 10 h int. James Matheson Erq. lim of Me-sers Jurdine Matheson & Co. sailed for England in the Tartar after sidence of many years in China. Mr. Ma thegon has had it in contemplation to leave China for some time, but we regret to leara that ill health has oce gioned his immediate deurtu e. Was eak from experience when we say, that Mr. Mathon proved himself to be a kind and literal gentleman, and follow him with the kindest wishes present and fu ure welfare. One of acts which he performed on les shores of China was to place at the of His Excellency the Gavance five thousand dollars to be approf me benevolent establishment control of the Portuguese Governin Henry Wright Esq an siniable the same firm, also left China ago for his native land in the ship Earl

Three of the Hong Mercha Mowqua & Punkequa have with past made a visit to Macais in are audience with the Plenipotentin the seizure of a foreign bost by These venerable gentlemen, the chants wish to know how much cellency would require to Of course His Excellency The Chinese are reaping a foreign trade by means of duties placed upon Teas rendy, they will very soon lions of dollars paid for t

It will be seen by the fo

we clip from the Friend

rv 12 that the continued

na interfere but little with um sales in India.

Five thousand five Opium were sold yester 1842) at the Exchange an average, the Bahar at 761 Cos. Pupees. The anoated to the larger Rupees, nearly Four H Thousand Pounds Sterlin

A day or two ago a port rounding the large Chinese Macao gave way and we a two Chinese have been ki and a third very seriously

We have much pleasure in givi lamation a prominent place in All Chinese Merchants may, as Avail themselves of His Excellency's

Missionary Society, American Bap- policy we give a translation for

tist.

and information.

which

Op

THE FRIEND OF CHINA

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING

HONG-KONG THURSDAY, MARCH 17r 1842

this most gladdening attributable

Anthorities of this

ost of their powe

and proper encou

eign settlers, and

kong become brightest disdema i With the pro bind

to Chi

il not

Price

11 nently Or 12 yearly

confidently Believe we the steps of our gallant capital of this vast ent

ate the horrible all its forms we yet may lead to per le alike to us as Ene antrophists. We beleive roaders the latest and ligence from the seat of other Ports lately decla twill be our pleasing daty ettle

of our new the rise aud

Bri

Celestial Empire.

Gor

heerfully

die mans

potentiary

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

much advantage to the foreign community, weekly issue. Owing to the hurry of removing The Land, Harbour and all Government our press, and the unavoidable claims on our ⚫ regulations will appear as soon as possible attention incident to a first issue in our new and we hope we shall be made the organ and venture to assure them that our first number colony, we claim the indulgence of our readers, of their first communication to the public. should not be accepted as a fair specimen of . We hope to be able to furnish an accu- what we hope to submit to our friends when rate review of our markets and the prices of the arrangements which we now have in pro- the leading, Exports and Imports at least gress shall be completed. Notwithstanding the once a month. Our pres-nt Monetary sys-outlay which has already been incurred, the tem demands and will receive much at- Proprietores have in reserve a still larger sum, tention at our hands as we cannot but think fully determining to spare no reasonoble ex- a change is inevitable and rendered impera- pense in rendering the Paper permanent, res- tive by the foundation of this Settlement,pectable and useful. and our widely extending relations with China.

We believe it is only required to bring the matter properly before the Home Go ⚫vernment where a remedy might be devised

to remove all the numerous compliants a- gainst the present System.

We shall be obliged by a loan of newand interesting Publications in the various Euro- peau languages, and hope our friends vill not forget to send us the latest Papers whether british, Colonial or foreign, as until our arrange. ments are completed we shall be dependent in sour measure upon their considerate kindness Special pains will be taken to forward copies Whilst our print is a vehicle of Local in- to all subscribers by the earliest & safest oppor- telligence we shall yet not neglect the mortunities; and to the large number of Officers, al and national henomena around. us also, both Naval & Military, connected with the and hence we shall open our clumns to Chian Expedition we hope our paper will prove communications relative to th Philipine itself to be a frequent and welcome visitor. Islands, Malay Peninsula, Indian Archipel Unless parties otherise prefer, no payment of sgo, Society, Islands Borneo with the King subscription will be required for a month or two doms of Jupin, Cochin China, Baruah and to come. Siamo and specialy with the kindred Settle. ments of New Holland and New Zealand with whom we count on establishing the most intimate and mutually beneficial relations. We are happy to announce that we have correspondents in all the above named local- ities with the exception of Japan, and without vanity we are led to believe that we shall bethe o gans of communicating much useful and interesting matter to our friends here and at home.

We take this opportunity of thanking many of the best of our chinese friends for their kind proffers of aid and assistance the value of which we duly estimate and which we shall be but too proud to avail ourselves.

Although our print starts with its pre- sen size ur shall be much deceived if the encrazed facilities of communication, new interests springing up, and the Government relations do not compel us annually to give a least fifty per cent more matter than bas hitherto been given by any paper yet publish

ed in China.

In conclusion we cannot but beleive that- aur humble efforts in diffusings better knowl. edge of China and the Chinese may be in- strumental in giving increased means of sub- Bistence to our industrious fellow country- men and moreover aid in throwing open a greatly augmented and profitable field of employment for our Capitalists and in o small degree promotive of the social ad- vancement of this extraordinary people among whom we ate placed and who already form a most important and thriving portion of the population of the British Settlement of Flongsong.

To SUBSCRIBERS AND CORRESPOND ENTE OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA. - We design keeping a box premanently wit hthe Post Master at . Hongkong, and all communications will safety reach their destination if seut through the Hongkong Post office and addressed" Proprie- tors of the Friend of China, Hongkong." We respectfully solicit the names of Subscribers and the number of copies they may require at as early a date as possible in order that we many be enabled to determine with reasonable cer- sainty, the requisite number of copies for our

[ MARCH 17 184.

Missionary Society, Medical, Missin of the Auer. Board Oswald, R.

Ochterlony, Lieut. Pybus, H. Pedder, Lieut. Romsay Capt. Rober son P. F.

Strachn, R. Slade, John. Shaik Madeen: Turner &. Co. White James. Walker Capt. Webster, R. Zabell Capt.

On the 10 h inst. James Matheson Esq. the accomplished partner of the well known tim of Messers Jardine Matheson & Co. sailed tor England in the Tartar after a re- sidence of many years in China. Mr. Ma- theson has had it in contemplation to leave

ARCH 17 18 2.]

PROCLAMATION.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

A CHINESE STEAMER.-A Canton man- ufacturer has recently succeeded in effecting an entire completion of a perfect model steamer. On her first trial the boiler burst owing to ite being soldered, but on being repaired and fas reasonably well. The boat itself is very small tened with rivets the whole machinery works but a complete model, and the experiment quite successful-Memory of Fulton!

PIRATES. We hear so ne astounding ru Her Britannic majesty's plenipotentiary, nours implicating certain influencialChinese ister extraordinary, and chief superin- residents in the town of Hongkong. We et of the trade of British subjects in will here just say that it is our intention to na, deems it advisable to notify, that gift this matter to the bottom and if we suc ding the receipt of the queen's gracious ceed in securing accurate and well authen royal plea ure, the harbours of Hong-ricated information we shall fearlessly drag and Tinghse (Chusan) and their de to the light the dark deeds of piracy and dencies, shall be considered "free ports," crime. We are sure that such diabolical that no manner of customs, port duties, procedures need only be brought to the ny other charges, shall be levied in the notice of the Plenipotentiary to secure the lately purchased fifteen hundned stand of foreign poris, on any ships or vessels of what prompt attention of His Excellency. The arms from foreign vessels near Macao. In nation, or sailing under whatever flag, swarms of pirates which prow between this Canton hey have a large estabishment for the may enter those ports, or on their Island and the Bogue is proving decidedly manufactury of various arms after foreign mod detrimental to the interests of the setleges. They also manufacture gun carriages ment. with revolving centres.

oes.

er Britannic majesty's minister 'plenipo- ary, &c., further notifies, that every y for landing and disposing of mer- dinary circumstances, will be afforded dize, as well as ample protection under that may visit the anchorage of ships and vessels, of whatever flag or angsoo in the harbour of Amoy, and rise that, in the improbable event of her

hina for some time, but we regret to learny's forces being withdrawn from the that if health has oce sinned his immediate in question, a sufficient period will

departure. Was seak from experience when lowed for all merchants and other to we say, thar M. Matheson proved himselfve their goods, as well as to adjust their to be a kind and liberal gentlemang and wents. allow him with the kindest wishes for hit God save the queen of England.

HONKONG PROPRIETORS, -W? Ive below ou Alphebetical list of the Prope-present and fu ure welfare. One of the last tons of I.tuds and busiding in the Town of acts which be performed on leaving the Hongkong. The list in iv not be entirely ac- shores of China was to pluce at the disposal curate, but in a future number we shall of His Excellency the Governor of Macho pblish another st revised and corrected five thousand dollars to be appropriated to Many of the parties have each several lum

Almack W. Burn D L. Boughton J. Burd J. R.

Caine. W. Major. Cadell Cant. Campbell Ena. Cullery J M.

Cowaje Rustomjee. Chullaye C. Diuom & Co. Dent & Co. Duran J. A. Duues Capt.

Edwards Robert.

Fergusson, Leighton &. Co. Fox, Rawon & Co. Framjee Rustonjee. Fearon C.

Fearon S.

Gergmell & Co. Gribble, Capt.

Gibb, Livingstone & Co. Gillespie, C. V.

Holliday, Wise & Co. Heijeeboy Rustomjee. Harton, W. H. Henderson, W. Hughes W. H.

Innes Fletcher & Co.

Jardine Matteson & Co. Jamaison How & Co. Joze Pedro

Johnstone, A. R Esq. Larkins Capt. Labtate. A fred.

Lindsay & Co.

Molby, Capt.

Markwick C.

Morrison Education Society.

benevolent establishment under the control of the Portuguese Government. Hemy Wright Esq an amiable partner of the same firm, also lett Chins a week or two ago for tris native land in the ship Earl Grey.

Three of the Hong Merchants, Howqua, Mowqua & Punkeyna have within a day or two past made a visit to Macau in order to seek au audience with the Plenipotentiary relative to the seizure of a foreign bont by the Chinese, These venerable gentlemen, the said Hung Mer. chants wish to know how much money His Ex- cellency would require to hush up the matter. Of course His Excellency would not see them. The Chinese are reaping a fine harvast from the foreign trade by means of the vastly increased duties placed upon Teas If they have not al- ready, they will very soon get back the six mil- lions of dollars paid for the ransom of Canton.

It will be seen by the following item which

we clip from the Friend of India of Jana- ry 12 that the continued difficulties in (hi-

na interfere but little with the usual Opt- um sales in India.

Five thousand five hundred chests of

Opium were sold yesterday (January 4th. 1842) at the Exchange Hall (Calcutta); on an average, the Bahar at 787, the Benares at

764 Cos. Pupees. The proceeds of the sale amounted ishlangan $9,97 875 Rupees, nearly Four Hundred and Thirty Thousand Pounds Sterling.

A day or two ago a portion of the walls sur-

rounding the large Cuinese Temple at Makok,

Macao gave way and we are sorry to learn that

two Chinese have been killed by the accident,

and a third very seriously injured.

We have much pleasure in giving the following Proc-

at Hongkong, on the 16th day of Fehr, 184?. Henry Pottinger, her majesty's plenipotentiary.

易處曉天

一貿言

易香金

As persons who have been plundered. have come to us and asked what it would we here append a notice in Chinese stating cost to complain to the British Authorities against parties odging complaints. that no charges whatever will be made

捉刮來現

瘦奪

究.

巷客長 領商龍

之快

現今海上多有長龍

來投告香港領

顆究辦不受一毫之私特示

大英國欽差大臣總管事務煲顛茶

海目 今本海總

毋大

稅庇 餉護 等爾

候等

處務

lanation a prominent place in our pages; and that

大隻國 皇交各為

al Chinese Merchants may, as far as in their power,

Missionary Society, American Bap- policy we give a translation for their special benest

Avail themselves of His Excellency's wise and Julicious

tist.

and information.

人 果

特領

示事其

自盜

等舣截

.却

* * ..

We are gratified in being able to an- nounce in this our first number that we have now connected with our Establishmenl a complete Chinese Department, and we are prepared to translate, prat and publish Proclamations, Advertisements, Notices &c. in Chinese entirely, or in Chinese and En- glish combined.

It is said that the Chinese authorities hav

The report of there being Russian and French military officers in the employ of the Canton go- confirmed. Certain it is that the local Govern verament seems not yet to bave been entirely ment have been and still are, making unusual warlike preparations,

ADVERTISEMENTS.-The, majority of the Advertisement- were not sent to us for publi cation, but we have inserted hetm in order the more fully to show our plan. Our prices

for Job Printing are as fol-lows

Bills of Landing and Exchangs, 100 $t

Policies and folio pages

Leter paper size

ADVERTISE

Of Ships ...

5.

Not exceding 7 lines....,, f. for 3 months..", 6. Exceeding 7 lines. 10 centes per line ad ditional.

NOTICE

An Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established at the office of the FRIEND

OF CHINA, and all orders for that excellent

work will be p omptly attende i to.

Hongkong March 17th. 1812,

FOR SALE-

At the ffice of the FRIEND OF CHIRA

copies of the Holy Bible from the American

and Foreign Bible Society bandsomely boun

in extra calf and gil. Price $3--

Hongkong March 17th. 1842.

NOTICE.

Masters of vessels arriving at Macao with Go vernment Stores for the use of the Commissaria department in China, are requested on their ar.

rival to report themselves without delay to Mr.

C. Fearon, from whom they will receive instruc

tions as to the disposal of the Stores.

Hongkong Bay Dep Commissary's Office, Marion, 6th Aug., 1841. Hawkins, Major, Deputy Commissary General, E. E. Force.

A CARD.-J. R. Burd, late of Singapore,- begs to inform the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship-wright and Engineer in the Queen's Road, on the British Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage, which b hope to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named handcrafts.

FOR SALE-Newton, Gordon, Cos & Co's, fiue Old London Particular Madaire, in wood and bottle, just received ex" Foun Apply to

INNES, FLETCHER & Co.

he

reason of their said vessels breaking adrift and occasioning damage, subsequent to the precautionary orders of Harbour Master being delivered on board.

ART IV Transports entitled to carry Pendants will be always harthed by their own agent and the Harbour Master will application to the Senior Naval Of ecting any moverment connected with such transport that he i

may

Magistrate at Tingunt, who are nerey Wampon. It is perfons for me to observe authorized, at the written request and com- the safety of the shipping and their crews at that she plaint of the Harbour Masters to summon rage imperatively demande every precantion and the partics charged, and thereupon to make lence; and I fo Lassoned you will cheerfully aid summary decision; and all Fines that may the manuer I bove pointed out. be recovered will go to the use of Her Majesty the Queen By order,

Robt Morrison,

Cantlouient

Your Obedient and faithful s

II. M. Plenipotentiary, To The Mercantile Community at Hou

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

much advantage to the foreign community, weekly issue. Owing to the hurry of removing The Land, Harbour and all Government our press, and the unavoidable claims on our regulations will appear as soon as possible attention incident to a first issue in our new. and we hope we shall be made the organ and venture to assure them that our first number colony, we claim the indulgence of our readers, of their first communication to the public. should not be accepted as a fair specimen of . We hope to be able to furnish an accu- what we hope to submit to our friends when rate review of our markets and the prices of the arrangements which we now have in pro- the leading Exports and Imports at least gress shall be completed. Notwithstanding the once a month. Our present Monetary sys-outlay which has already been incurred, the tem demands and will receive much at- Proprietores have in reserve a still larger sum, tention at our hands as we cannot but think fully determining to spare no reasonable ex- a change is inevitable and rendered impera- pense in rendering the Paper permanent, res- tive by the foundation of this Settlement, pectable and useful. anil out widely extending relations with China.

We shall be obliged by a loan of newand interesting Publications in the various Euro- We believe it is only required to bring peau languages, and hope our friends vill not the matter properly before the Home Go forget to send us the latest Papers wffether ⚫vernment where a remedy might be devised British, Colonial or foreign, as until our arrauge- to remove all the numerous compliants a-ments are completed we shall be dependent in souf measure upon their considerate kindness gainst the present System. Special pains will be taken to forward copies Whilst our print is a vehicle of Local in- to all subscribers by the earliest & safest oppor- telligence we shall yet not neglect the mortunities; and to the large number of Officers, al and nations henomena around. us also,both Naval & Military, connected with the and hence we shall open our columns to China Expedition we hope our paper will prove communications relative to th Philipine itself to be a frequent and welcome visitor. Islands, Malay Peninsula, Indian Archipel Unless parties otherise prefer, no payment of ago, Society, Islands Boneo with the King subscription will be required for a month or two doms of Jup in, Cochin China, Baruah and to come. Siamo and specialy with the kindred Settle. ments of New Holland and New Zealand with whom we count on establishing the most intimate and mutually beneficial relations.

We are happy to announce that we have correspondents in all the above named local-p ities with the exception of Japan, and without vanity we are led to believe that we shall bethe o gans of communicating much useful and interesting matter to our friends here and at home.

We take this opportunity of thanking many of the best of our chinese friends for their kind proffers of aid and assistance the value of which we duly estimate and which we shall be but too proud to avail ourselves.

Although our print starts with its pre- sen size ue shall be much deceived if the encreazed facilities of communication, new interests springing up, and the Government relations do not compel us annually to give at least fifty per cent more matter than has hitherto been given by any paper yet publish

ed in China.

In conclusion we cannot but beleive that- our humble efforts in diffusinga better knowl edge of China and the Chinese may be in- strumentul in giving increased means of sub- Bistence to our industrious fellow country- men and moreover aid in throwing open a greatly augmented and profitable field of employment for our Capitalists and in no small degree promotive of the social ad- Vancement of this extraordinary people among whom we are placed and who already form a most important and thriving portion of the population of the British Settlement of Hongkong

To SUBSCRIBERS AND CORRESPONDENTE OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA. We design keeping a box premanently wit hthe Post Master at . Hongkong, and all communications will safety reach their destination if seut through the Hongkong Post office and addressed" Proprie- tors of the Friend of China, Hongkong." We respectfully solicit the names of Subscribers and the number of copies they may require at as early a date as possible in order that we many be enabled to determine with reasonable cer- sainty, the requisite number of copies for our

HON.PNG PROPRIETORS, -W? Ive below ou Alphebetical list of the Prop te tons of I.tuds and buildings in the Town of Hongkong. The list is not be entirely ac- curate, but in a future number we shall

blish another at revised and corrected Many of the parties have each several lo..

Almack W. Burn D. L. Boughton J. Burl J. R.

Caine. W. Major.

Cadell Capt. Campbell Ena. Cullery J M.

Cowuje Rustomjee. Chullaye C. Diuom & Co. Dent & Co. Dairan J. A. Duues Capt.

Edwards Robert.

Fergusson, Leighton &. Co. Fox, Rawon & Co. Framjee Rusenje..

Fearon C. Fearon S.

Gergmell & Co. Gribble, Capt.

Gibb, Livingstone & Co. Gillespie, C. V. Holliday, Wise & Co. Heijeeboy Rustomjee. Harton, W. H. Henderson, W. Hughes W. H.

Holgate, Dr

Innes Fletcher & Co.

Jardine Matteson & Co. Jamaison How & Co. Joze Pedro

Johnstone, A. R Esq. Larkins Capt. Labtate. A fred. Lindsay & Co. Molby, Capt.

Markwick C.

Morrison Education Society.

Missionary Society, American Bap-

tist.

[ MARCH 17 184.

Missionary Society, Medical, Missin of the Auer. Board Oswald, R.

Ochterlony, Lieut. Pybus, H. Pedder, Lieut. Romsay Capt. Rober son P. F. Struchn, R.

Slade, John. Shaik Madeen: Turner &. Co. White James. Walker Capt. Webster, R. Zabell Capt.

On the 10 h inst, James Matheson Esq. the accomplished partner of the well known im of Messers Jardine Matheson & Co. sailed for England in the Tartar after a re- sidence of many years in China. Mr. Ma- thegon has hat it in contemplation to leave

ARCH 17 18 2.1

PROCLAMATION.

Her Britannic majesty's plenipotentiary, ister extraordinary, and chief superin- at of the trade of British subjects in na, deems it advisable to notify, that ding the receipt of the queen's gracious royal plea-ure, the harbours of Hong- g and Tinghae (Chosun) and their de

oes.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

PIRATE. We hear so ne astounding ru nors implicating certain influencialChinese residents in the town of Hongkong. We will here just say that it is our intention to gift this matter to the bottom and if we suc ceed in securing accurate and well authen ticated information we shall fearlessly drag to the light the dark deeds of piracy and

A CHINESE STEAMER.-A Canton man- ufacturer has recently succeeded in effecting an entire completion of a perfect model steater. On her first trial the boiler burst owing to ite being soldered, but on being repaired and fas- reasonably well. The boat itself is very small tened with rivets the whole machinery works but a complete model, and the experiment quite successful-Memory of Fulton!

dencies, shall be considered "free ports," crime. We are sure that such diabolical that no manner of customs, port duties, procedures need only be brought to the ny other charges, shall be levied in the notice of the Plenipotentiary to secure the lately purchased fifteen hundaed stand of foreign It is said that the Chinese authorities base ports, on any ships or vessels of what prompt attention of His Excellency. The arms from foreign vessels near Macao. In nation, or sailing under whatever flag, swarms of pirates which prow between this Canton they have a large estabishmeut for the may enter those ports, or on their Island and the Bogue is proving decidedly manufactory of various arms after foreign pd- detrimental to the interests of the settleges. They also manufacture gun carriages er Britannic majesty's minister plenipo- ment. with revolviug centres. ry. &c., further notifies, that every y for landing and disposing of mer- dize, as well as ample protection under dinary circumstances, will be afforded ships and vessels, of whatever flag or that may visit the anchorage of angroo in the harbour of Amov, and rise that, in the improbable event of her

hina for some time, but we regret to learay's forces being withdrawn from the that if health has oce sioned his immediated in question, a sufficient period will denartu e. Was eak from experience when lowed for all merchants and other to

God save the queen of England.

at Hongkong, on the 16th day of Febr, 184. Heury Pottinger, her majesty's plenipotentiary.

we say, that Mr. Matheson proved himselfve their goods, as well as to adjust their to be a kind and liberal gentleman and wents. follow him with the kindest wishes for his present and fu ure welfare. One of the Inst acts which he performed on leaving the shores of China was to place at the disposal of His Excellency the Governor of Mucho five thousand dollars to be appropriated to Home benevolent establishment under the control of the Portuguese Government.

Henry Wright Exq an amiable partner of the same firm, also left Chins a week or two ago for his native land in the ship Earl Grey.

Three of the Hong Merchants, Howqun, Mowqua & Pankeyna have with in a day or two past made a visit to Macau in order to seek na audience with the Plenipotentiary relative to the seizure of a foreign boat by the Chiness. These venerable gentlemen, the said Hung Mer. chants wish to know how much money His Ex- cellency would require to hush up the matter. Of course His Excellency would not ere them. The Chinese are reaping a fine harvast from the foreign trade by means of the vastly increased duties placed upon Teas If they have not al- ready, they will very soon get back the six mil. lions of dollars paid for the ransom of Canton.

It will be seen by the following item which

we clip from the Friend of India of Jana- ry 12 that the continued difficulties in hi-

na interfere but little with the usual Opt-

um sales in India.

Five thousand five hundred cheats of Opium were sold yesterday (January 4th. 1842) at the Exchange Hall (Calcutta); on an average, the Bahar at 787, the Benares at

761 Cos. Pupees. The proceeds of the sale

amounted to the large mum of 49 97 875 Rupees, nearly Four Hundred and Thirty Thousand Pounds Sterling.

A day or two ago a portion of the walls Fur-

rounding the large Chinese Temple at Makok,

Macao gave way and we are sorry to learn that

two Chinese have been killed by the accident,

and a third very seriously injured.

We have much pleasure in giving the following Proc- lanation a prominent place in our pages; and that al Chinese Merchants may, as far as in their power, avail themselves of His Excellency's wise and Judicious policy we give a translation for their special benefit sad information.

易處晓英

貿言

之 入

今本

毋·大 庸 庸臣 稅庇 餉護

等爾

候等

海總

As persons who have been plundered. have come to us and asked what it would cost to complain to the British Authorities we here append a notice in Chinese stating that no charges whatever will be made against parties odging complaints.

捉到來現

獲奪 客今

究.

巷客長 領商龍 毫事之快

私其 果?

特領

示事其截

獲究辨不受一毫之私特

大英國欽差大臣總管事務煲

晚諭香港定海海口等處知悉各國各

處務

大隻 皇交各為

自盜 然賊往

The report of there being Russian and French military officers in the employ of the Canton go- verament seems not yet to have been entirely confirmed. Certain it is that the local Govern ment have been and still art, making unusual warlike preparations,

ADVERTISEMENTS.-The, majority of the Advertisement- were not sent to us for publi cation, but we have inserted hetm in order the more fully to show our plan. Our prices

for Job Printing are as fol-lows

Bills of Landing and Exchangs, 100 $

Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

**

ADVERTISE

Of Ships ..

Not exceding 7 lines....

for 3 months..",

5.

1.

6.

Exceeding 7 lines. 10 centes per line ad. ditional.

NOTICE

An Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established at the office of the FRIEND

OF CHINA, and all orders for that excellent

work will be p omptly attende i to.

Hongkong March 17th. 1812.

FOR SALE

At the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA

copies of the Holy Bible from the American

and Foreign Bible Society handsomely boun in extra calf and gilt. Price $3-

Hongkong March 17th. 1842. NOTICE,

Masters of vessels arriving at Macao with Go vernment Stores for the use of the Commissaria department in China, are requested on their ar rival to report themselves without delay to Mr. C. Fearon, from whom they will receive instrups tions as to the disposal of the Stores.

Hongkong Bay Dep Commissary's Office, Marion, 6th Aug.. 1941. Hawkins, Major, Deputy Commissary General, E. E. Force.

A CARD.-J. R. Burd, late of Singapore, begs to inform the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship-wright an Engineer in the Queen's Road, on the British Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage, which be hope to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named

FOR SALE-Newton, Gordon, Cos & Co's, fiue Old London Particular Madeire, in wood and bottle, just received ex" Foun Apply to

We are gratified in being able to un-handcrafts. nounce in this our first number that we have now connected with our Establishmenl a complete Chinese Department, and we are prepared to translate, print and publish Proclamations, Advertisements, Notices &c. in Chinese entirely, or in Chinese and En- glish combined.

INNES, FLETCHER & Co.

reason of their said ressole breaking adrift and occasioning damage, pubsequent to the precautionary orders of the Harbour Master being delivered on board.

ART. IV. Transports entitled to carry Pendants will be always herthed by their own agent, and the Harbour Master wül make application to the Senior Naval Of acer on the spot, respecting any movement connected with euch earport that he may

Magistrate at Tingal, who are hereby Whampoa. It is superfluous for me to observe authorized, at the written request and com- the fety of the shipping and their crews at that t plaint of the Harbour Masters to summon rage imperatively demands every precaution and the parties charged, and thereupon to make leuce; and I feel assured you will cheerfully aid ma summary decision; and all Fines that may the manner I have painted out. be recovered will go to the use of Her Majesty the Queen. By order,

J. Robit Morrison, heting Startery and Treasurer.

I a Gentiument

Your Obedient and faithful se Henry Pottinger. II. M. Plenipotentiary

Th The Mercantile Community at Hong

THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

TENDERS for the supply of dors in soms not under of Messers JARDINE MATHESON & Co, will meet

dollars one thousand for Bals to be drawn with prompt attention.

1000, on the Right Hoorable the Governor General of India in Council at (30) thirty

FOR SALE AT HONGKONG.

A quantity of Timber and Planks fit for ship aud House building.

also

Rs. 225 days sight, at the Exhange of Rupers two handred and twenty five per 00 Spanish dol- lars will he received the office of the Go- dersigned on board the transport"Moira," at Hong kong, and at the office of Messers Jar- Suares 70 to 90 feet by 20 to 27 inches, 14 to 0 do. dine Matheson & Co, at Macao, ndtil noon and 50 to 69 of the 10th proximo. daily expected from Manila. Apply to JAMES RAMSAY, Assistant Paymaster. "Moira," Hon kong Pay Ofice,

3rd March, 1847.

JARDINE MATHESON & Co. or to CAPT. MORGAN General Wogdat Hongkong.

[MARCH 17 19:2

For Freight or Charter to Great Britain, or any Port in India- THE AI British Barque "Sa pho." Capt. Dunlop, 368 Tuna Register O. M. Apply to

Griuble, Hughes & Co. Macao, 15th January, 1842.

For Freight or Charter, THE AI British Basque "Are thusa," 214 Tuns Register Capt. Christian, is ready to receive Car go, and cau be engaged for any port in Great Britian or the W. & T. Gemmel & Co. 17th. Fehrnary, 1842. For Singapore and Calentta.

For Sale.-Madeira Wine in Pipes and Hogsheadu from the well known house of Keirs & Co.; for sale DENT & Co.

Continent.

Cffertas para supprimetito de Palacas, em somma esa by nao menos de mil Petacas, para Letras saremdas soh r o mui Honoravel Governador General da India em Con-

ello a0 dias de vista, no eahin de Dazentan vinte e For Sale -Singapure Beams and American Pim cinco Rupias por cem Patacas Patacas Espanholas se re- cebern no escriptoria do shaise assignado a hordo do Spårs sinitable for top masts, gallant masts. transporte "Moira" em Hong kong, on un dos Srs Jar studding sail booms; apply to

dine Matheson & Ca., em Marno, athe ao meio dia, do

dia 10 de Abril proxima futuro.

JAMES RAMSAY,

Ajudante do Pagador.

"Nario "Moira'el Hongkong Escriptoria,

da Pagudoris, 3 de Março de 1812

FOR FREIGHT OR HARTER, TO THE EAST COAST OF CHINA O ANY FORT IN ASIA OR THE WEST COAST OF SOUTH A- MERICA.

TIE new Clipper ARROW, Cantalu GEARE I. C. 5, now in the Roads, Apply to

JARDINE MATHFSUN & Co.

TO MERCHANTS &c.

C. V. GILLESPIE, Hongkong, Jan. 1, 12.

46 Queen's Rad,

en

For Sale-Sherry Wine in hogsheads one doze" ach, Holland Gin in glass and in stene jugs, and ases of tire and six dozen; apply to

C. V GILLESPIE 46 Queens ad. Hoong, 1st November, 1841.

HONGKONG.

Goods and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Godowns, at Hongkong; upou moderate termes; apply upon the Premises to iguscio Peres Pereira, or to C. FEARON,- Macao. 23rd February, 1842.

For Sale Sherry in Putts and Hdds, Port and A GENTLEMAN letely arrived in China is desirous of obtaining a situation in a Mercantile establishment as Sherry in bottle ex Sapho and Allsupp's fine Pale Clerk, Warehouseman, or Corresponding Chik: he Ale in Huds. ex" John R Gannt"&"Regular." has for years been similarly employed, and can give the mnost undeniable references as to his respectability and qualification. Applicatit as addrested to S. J. C., care!

WHAMPOA PORT CHARGES.

Pilotage inward and outward

TURNER & Co.

20th Januray, 1812.

(Linguist's and comprador's fees vary on ships of different nations.) English country ships pay for comprador

for Linguist's fers

Coinsha, on French vessels 1, 880 Taels,

On other vessels 1, 600 Taels, or

Charged alike on all vessels

THE John Brightman Viall, an a few days. For freight ur pass ge apply to W. H. Harton. Marno, 25th. February, 1842.

CIRCULAR. We beg to intimate that our establishuient in China, formerly under the firm uf Jamieson & How, will henceforward be car ried on under that of Jamieson, How & Co. and that Mr. Joseph Frost Edger is animited t partner from the 1st. July Inst.in our respective houses of Jameson & Co., Calcutta, and of Jamieson, How & Co., Chin. Jamieson & Co, Calcutta, 14th Sente her, 1841.

NOTICE. Tea and other valuable arerchan. dise received in double matted Godowus, 40 Queen Road on molerate rates. Apply to C. V. Gillespie. Hongkong, 6th September, 1811..

CANTON CURRENCY.

The circulating medium at Canton is broken Spanish dollars by weight the proportion of which to a tael varies in different transac tions; being in calculations of prices, or accounts between foreigners and native merchants, at the rate of 720 Tuels per 1000 Drs. But in the weighing of money for payment. 717 " Excepting to the Companys treasury,

$120

50 173

1000 "

2223

when it is weighed.

718 "

1000 **

£2566

As do also ship and house compradors. Pecul

Or to native merchants not of the co- hong, who receive, unless otherwise agreed.

715 #

1000 "

£700

COMMERCIAL WEIGHTS. Catties. Taels. Lbs, av. 100 1600 1334

Cwt. Lilogrammes. 1,0,21 or 1,10047

16

18

0,6047

EXTRA CHARGES, imposed by the Consoo, on the 24th of August, 1838, for the purpoeses of meeting the necessary expenses.

One mace on very pecul of goods composing cargo. On Country ships

On large ships (formerly belonging to the E. I. Co)......... 1000 On American ships ****

.....700

The Sum of £1189 on rice-ships, includes all other customhouse charges.

By a conclusion of the Committee of the General Chamber of Com- merce, the sum paid to the Hoppown Rice laden ships, should be considered a charge on the vessel not off the rice.

£939,50

And that the sum paid to the Linguist, should also be charged to the ship..

Total Charges of ship

And thatall other charges should fall on the Rice

250

1189,50

Measurement is charged at three different rates, according to the product arising from multiplying the length between the mizen and foremasts by the breadth at the gangway, and dividing the product by 10.

The first class, of which the product so arising is not less than or about 160 covids or 1950 feet, pays 0,7874755 taels per covid $0,8974 per foot.

Second class, above 1200 covids, or 14621 feet, pays 0,7221091 tuels per covid, or about $0. 8229 per foot.

Third class, 1200 covids and under, pays 0.5082341 taele per co- vid, or about, $0. 5769 per foot.

When the Consignee of a ship has no share of her import or ex- port cargo under his management, the hong merchants usually de- mand $600 or $ 700 to defray the harges on securing her.

One Tou16 peculs, 80 catties. One cwt, 84 catties. One Pond avoirdupois of a catty. For Ounces avoirdupois 3 taels. MONEY WEIGHTS. Once troy 1,208

Tael. Mace. Cand. Chish. [10 100 1000

110 100

10

500 Taels 604 ounces troy. 500 do. Usage una estaniched

Grains troy. 570 84

Ind. Tolahs.

57,960

5,7084

302 pounds troy.

weights which, a the rate of 33 pounds to the pecul, weights 5831

Macao Memoranda.

Cotton-No movement in this staple, which .coutinues without de- mand, some transaction have, however, taken place, in barter for China goods. For first quality of Bengal, offers of $ 12 have been made, for about 200 a 300 Bales.

Sharksfins of 1st and 2d quality have declined in prices, and we are informed that almost the whole quantity now in the Customhouse has been sold at quotation. Of fish maws sales have also been made of almost all landed here..

PAINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS QUEENS ROAD, MONGKONG,

VOL. J.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA

AND LONGE LONGBONG GAZETTE.

NEMINI SUBJECTUS, SUIS VIRIBUS INNITENS. HONGHONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 24TH 1842.

judge necessary for the general safety of the shipping in either of the said Ports. ART. V.-All Seamen permitted to land from Transports or other merchant ships or

NOTIFICATION. THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, Tickets of Leave, from the master or person will be discontinued from this date: but all vessels, on liberty, are to be furnished with public orders and notifications appearing in in Charge of the vessel to which such sea- men may belong; but this regulation is not The Friend of China and Hongkong Gå-in zette," with the signatures of duly autho-to be considered applicable to men who may come on shore, for a short time, on duty or business.

rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

ART. VI.-All Mails, Packets, Letters, &c. to the address of the Post Master, or other Public Functionaries, are to be deli- vered to the Harbour Master immediately said Ports.

N. L

THE annexed Notification is published for general information. By order,

:

J. Rob. Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong 23d. March 1842.

NOTIFICATION.

His Excellency, Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart., Her Britannic Magesty's Plenipotentiary &c. deems it expedient to intimate to all persons interested in the subject, that its his intention to appoint, very shor tly, a committee, consisting of not less than three members, to investigate any claim that may yet be pending, regarding allotted locations of ground, of whatever description; and to finally define and mark off the limits of all locations that have yet been sold or granted upon any other terms.

CHAS. E. Stewart, Esq., is appointed to on the arrival of vessels in either of the direction, breadth, &c., &c, of the "Queen's" and

be Assistant Secretary & Treasurer to the Superintendents of the Trade of British Subjects in China, from this date. By order,

J. Kobt: Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, 18th, March, 1842. THE following amended Regulations for the Shipping in the Ports of Hongkong, and Tinghai (or Chusan), are promulgated for general information and guidance, under the authority of His Excellency SIR HENRY POTTINGER, Bart, Her Majesty's Plenipoten- tiary, and Chief Superintendent of Trade, in China.

By order,

J. Robt: Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, 7th. March, 1842.

Regulations.

ART. I.-Every master or other person in charge of any merchant vessel, arriving at either of the said Ports, is to take up the berth pointed out by the Harbour Master, and not to remove from it without his per- mission, under a penalty of $100; which penalty is to be recovered in the manner hereinafter set forth.

ART. VII.-All masters or other persons in charge of vessels about to proceed to sea are to give notice thereof to the Harbour Master at least 24 hours before the time of intended departure; and it is hereby notifi- ed that no vessel will be allowed to depart, the master or other persons in charge of which shall not have previously paid any fines or expences, awarded or incurred for breaches of these regulations.

The Committee will likewise definitively fix the all other existing public Roads, within the settlement and will be empowered to order the immediate remo val of any encroachments, that may be found to have been unauthorizedly made upon them, the expence of such removals being chargeable to the individuals, to whom the locations, in which they have been made, belong.

The Committee will further be instructed to turn

its attention to the examination of the best points for laying down new lines of Roads, beyond those that have already been marked off, with a view of providing locations, to meet the demands for them that may be expected, from the rapidly increasing population of the Colony, both European and Native and any suggestions that individuals may wish to offer on this part of the Committee's proceedings will receive from it the fullest consideration; but it is, at the same time, expressly notified, that no purchases of ground by private persons, from the natives-formerly or now in possession, will be recog nised or confirmed, unless the previous sanction of the constituted authorities shall have been obtained

ART. VIII.-It being obviously neces- sary, that all vessels should be furnished with some sort of Port Clearance, or certifi- cate of their being allowed to proceed on their intended voyages from the said Ports of Hongkong and Tinghai (Chusan), to obviate the risk of their being detained at sea, on account of informality, by any of it being the basis of the footing on which the Island Her Majesty's Ships which they may fall in of Hongkong has been taken possession of, and is to be held pending the Queen's Royal and gracious with, it is further notified, that the Harbour Commands, that the proprietory of the soil is vested Masters of the said Ports will henceforward in, and appertains solely to, the crown. On the same furnish to all ships such Port Clearances, principle, the reclaiming of land, beyond bigh water or certificates, agrecable to a form to be mark; must be deemed an infringement on the probibited by any private persons. deposited in their offices, and will likewise at- Royalties of Her Majesty, and it is therefore positively God save the Queen of England. test their manifests (duplicates whereof are to be left with the said Harbour Masters); Dated at Hongkong. Government House, and every vessel neglecting to obtain these Papers previous to her departure will do so at her own risk of being seized and detained.

ART. IX.-All Passage Boats, Lorchas, or other small vessels, plying between Hong- kong and Macao or Canton, are required to make known their intended departure two hours before they start, by hoisting a Blue Peter.

ART. II.-Every master or other person in charge of any merchant vessel, lying within either of the said Ports, shall imme- diately remove such vessel to any new berth ART. X.-Masters or other persons in pointed out by the Harbour Master, under a fine of $20 for every hour that the vessel oharge of vessels, Boats, &c., will be ex- shall remain in her old berth, after a writ-pected to comorin to anoramas. B ten notice to quit, signed by the Harbour gulations, in addition to those herein specifi- Master, shall have been delivered on board ed: and they are warned particularly not to throw overboard any stone or other bal- last.

of her.

ART. III.-All masters or other persons in charge of vessels are immediately to strike their topgallant yards and masts, and to have their jib and spanker booms rigged close in, when called upon to do so; and are, generally, to follow such directions as the state of the weather, the crowded con- dition of the Port, or other circumstances, may render necessary or expedient in the judgment of the Harbour Master, with a view to the safety of the whole shipping: and any master, or other persons in charge of vessels disobeying or neglecting this Re- gulation will subject themselves to a fine not exceeding $200, exclusive of payment of all expences that may be incurred by reason of their said vessels breaking adrift and occasioning damage, subsequent to the precautionary orders of the Harbour Master being delivered on board.

ART IV Transports, entitled to carry Pendants will be always barthed by their own agent and the Harbour Master will raske application to the Senior Naval Of -feer on the spot, respecting any movement. onnected with such that he may

ART. XI. All persons are required to take notice, that the authority of the Har- bour Masters extends to the preservation of order at the several landing places in the Harbour, as well as to the regulation, in concert with the Chief Magistrate at Hong- kong, and the Military Magistrate at Ting- hai, of all native boats that ply for hire; and any complaints against such Boats are and any complaints against such Boats are to be laid in the first instance before the said Harbour Masters.

All Fines for breaches of these Regula tions will be proceeded for before the Chief Magistrate at Hongkong and the Military Magistrate at Tinghai, who are hereby authorized, at the written request and com- plaint of the Harbour Masters to summon the parties charged, and thereupon to make summary decision; and all Fines that may be recovered will go to the use of Her Majesty the Queen.

By order

J. Robi: Morrison, Acting Seorary and Treasurer

this 22d, day of March, 1842. HENRY POTTINGER. [Signed] [True Copy] J. Rob. Morrison.

Acting Secretary and Treasurer.

CIRCULAR. Government House Hongkong 22nd March 1842. Gentlemen.

You are aware, that some of the Hong Merchants lately paid a visit to Macao, and it is probably by that visit was to find out whether the Provincial this time known to most of you that the object of Government of Canton would he owed to

the Bogue, and other dismantled Forts, or to erect new ones on this side of the Whampoa anchorage. Although I of course declined having any sort of intercourse with the Hong Marchants I took advan- tage of the kindness of a friend to let those indivi- duals know, in distinct terms, that orders had been long issued to prevent the repair of the old, or the erection of any new Forts lower down than Wham- sort would be the renewal of hostilities in the Can poa, and that the consequence of any attempt of the ton River, the stoppage of Trade, and consequent distress to the Province and city.

m

I trust this warning will have the desired effect, present tranquil course, but I nevertheless, think it and that matters will be allowed to go on in their my duty to acquaint you with my resolution, which has been fully approved and confirmed by the experie judgment of the Senior officer of H. M. Navy ind Canton River, and in doing so. I would request individually and collectively to give me the earl possible notice of any collecting of materials, bling of workmen, or other apparently defensi though in reality offensive] prepartion that your Wharepo. It is superfluous for me to observe th selves, or your Agents may perceive on the River low the safety of the shipping and their crews at that sho rage imperatively demands every precaution and lence; and I feel assured you will cheerfully aid o the manner I have painted out.

I am Gentlement

Your Obedient and faithful serat Henry Pottinger. H. M. Plenipotentiary,

To The Mercantile Community at Honke Marco .

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE

FREEND OF CHINA table Chinese to undertake Government contracts with

we

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH, 24r. 1842.

HAVING now completed our arrangements, have to secure uniformity, called this Issue No. 1; and wish the Copy of the Friend of China containing the ad- dress, which was distributed last week, to be considered as a Prospectus, which it shall be our study to carry into full effect. All communciations are to be addressed to the Editor, at the Office, Queens Road; Hongkong; where also advertisements notifications and subscriptions will be notifications and subscriptions will be

received.

the avowed object of not throwing too much into one persons hands, and with the view of suppressing as far as possible, all attempts at monopoly and the exercise of sinister and impure influences. The slightest inquiry will satisfy our contemporary on this point.

In respect to the implication of said party with the Pimies which we regret to say have been too numerous, we beleive such a charge is wholly unwar- ranted by facts. We are quite cognizant of the state- ments which have so openly been made at Macao, as a reference to our last number will show. Since then we have instituted an inquiry and we are glad to say that we fully believe that the China man in question is wholly innocent of any connexion, or correspondence with the Pirates. Our opinion is corroborated by the fact that very recently his mother was [on her passage from hence to Canton] plundered of all her property and money to the amount of about 400 dollars besides, being divested of her ornaments and a part of her

clothing.

Our contemporary says that he does not think his allegations are susceptible of proof; he is quite right in so saying, if his informants are Chinese. Veracity never was the characteristic virtue of a China man and our experience, in China as also that of our contemporary must long ere this have demonstrated the little reliance to be placed on such testimony unless supported by fists. We believe the imputations now so rife are wholly referrable to the jealousy and hatred of competitors and rivals. We quite acquit our contem- porary of knowingly lending himself to a clique which has to the uttermost opposed this settlement from its first foundation, and to whose active efforts the errone- ous impression of the unhealthiness of the Island, the settle-insecurity of property is mainly if not wholly owing Still we think that much, if not all of which he com plains might without much difficulty be traced to this

How will the coming events of 1842 affect our position in China Vainly have we essayed to solve this momentous and all-engrossing question, but the study of the past affords no clue by which we can speculate on the future. If experience had not taught us the humiliating truth, that we have yet to learn the character of our enemy that our opinions have been built on a foundation of ignorance-we should express our fears that a satisfactory ment of the pending quarrel is still most

remote.

so arce

The suppression of these piratical depredations can- not but have received the anxious attention of the au- thorities; the question is however environed with many and great difficulties and if some of the plans proposed had been adopted the remedy would have been worse

Our Government is now about to com- In respect to authenticated details of piracies it is but mence what it should have done two years justice to the authorities to say they will be duly noted ago; to carry on the war with vigour and and all proper remedial measures will be taken. A case upon a becoming scale. The petty buc- was reported yesterday and before daylight this morning both steamers, and the Royalist were despatched to ap. caneering system of warfare that has hith-prehend the Pirates, and to protect the Trade, erto been pursued, while it has cost us a We find that the Pirates are even more audacious at thousand lives, has not advanced our cause and near Macao than in this vicinity if we may trust the local prints. one jot the moral effect upon the people, occasioned by the invariable success of our arms, has lost much of its force, and famili- arity with our mode of warfare and the superiority of our weapons has opened the eyes of the enemy to his own deficiencies. The immediate consequence has been the endeavour to improve the discipline and armament of his forces: what may be the ultimate consequences of such improvement we dare not pretend to say; but we believe the assertion not to be extravagant, that we shall now require ten thousand men to do what five could easily have performed two years ago.

As to what will be the effect of the entry into and occupation of Peking by our troops, conjecture is vain. Of two possible con tingencies the flight of the court and the suicide of Taoukwangwe think the latter the more probable; for the desertion of the capital the abandonment of the sacred la- res of the palace to barbarian pollution- would we fancy, but prelude the fall of the Ta Tsing dynasty. Assuming, then, that Taonkwang ende his troubles and, at the same time, his days with his gir die or garter, are we to dictate terms to the heir in the Imperial palace? Prepos terous as such a dilemma would seem now, we see not how it is to be escaped.

As well-wishers of Hongkong we should like to see the Canton River the scene of active hostilities, provoked, and justly leser- ved, by the gross violation of the truce con- cluded with Captain Elliot: on no other ground, however, could we defend the policy of killing the goose which lays such valu- ableggs.

PIRACIE-Under this head a respected contemporary in his last se indulged in some very severe animad versions on one of our Chinese Residents. Whatever may have been the fortner habits and pursuits of the indivi- dual in question, it is certain that he rendered himself very useful to the late Plenipotentiary, by whom he was appointed Government comprador; and in the first set tlement of the colony his services were extremely valua ble to the Island authorities. That he should have seen this and presumeed on it is not surprising, nor is it un- likely that his connexion with the Government may have given him an amount of influence among his own countrymen which may have been very profitable to him. This may be admitted and yet as is the fact no one has been able to do the work of the Government so well hitherto as he has. Every encouragement has been and is now afforded by the authorities to respoc-

than the disease.

The desideratum is to secure as unrestricted an inter- course with the Chinese is is compatible with proper police surveillance. To accomplish this will be very difficult. The numbering of the Boats, appointing signals, giving flags with registration of owners & crews are all objectionable on many grounds, but especially when we remember the state of our existing relations with China and that any commerce or intercourse with this Island is expressly forbidden by the mandarins. Hence any distinctive mark or requirement would subject the frequenter hither from the mainland to pains and penalties from their own authorities which would prevent their return and he moreover in the highest degree detrimental to the best interests of this rising settlement,

We feel confident that his Excellency the Plenipoten tiary will adopt all possible measures to secure due protection to the persons and property of all who may have occasion to resort to or reside on this Island, His determination with respect to the seizure of the Junks must have given unmixed satisfaction to all. His Ex- cellency's ready accessibility and affable deportment to whomsoever may have occasion to wait upon hi (38 trymen can personally testify) affords a guarantee that wo ourselves in common with most of uur fellow coun no real grievance or wen grounded cause of complaint will be unheeded or unredeed if within his province, and the compass of his commission. Whilst we shall exercise all proper scrutiny as regards what is passing around, yet being sincerely desirous of promoting the interests of Hongkong we shall not adopt a querulous tone of dissatisfaction, because we have not yet attained to the regularity and precision which should but does not always characterise a settlement when a century old

When we remember the four population must amount to at least 20,000, many if not most of whom are outcasts from their own country and perhaps liable to punishment for crimes aganist their own laws, it be comes we may a matter of felicitation that order is so well established; for despite of Piracies and Robberies we hesitate not to assert that a like aggregation of our own countrymen would be far more prolifie of vice and crime. Farther a reference to criminal statistics as issued by H. M Secretary of state for the Home Department, will satisfy our readers that there is no maritime city or Port in England where in reference to population there are relatively so few crimes against persons and property, as in the now British settlement of Hongkong.

With reference to our conteporary's allusion to the Editorship and dependant character of this paper, we have to inform him that he is mistaken on both points. Beyond the kind promises of useful statistics and information, government officers are totally unconnected with our paper,

On Friday last, royal salutes were fired from the Batteries and ships of war in honor,

of the birth of the Prince Royal. As usual on such occasions of public rejoicing, ten of the unhappy men confined in H. M. Gaol were restored to freedom.

In another column will be found a census of the native population of Hongkong which we obtained through the kindness of a friend. Nothwithstanding the very great care which was, we are told, bestowed on this census, the totals appear to us far too small. For instance, the boat population is stated to be 2100, whereas we believe that 5000 would still be within the mark. The old residents, whose opinions we fancy will at least carry as much weight with them as those of tra- vellers, estimate the population at 15,000 or 18,000 Souls.

Tas friends of Captain Elliot will be happy to hear of his having safely reached, England on the 6th. of

November last,

By the arrival of the Mariam from Chusan, which place she left on the 2d. Instant, we received the melancholy intelligence of the atrocious murder of an Officer of the Ernaad, by the inhabitants of a village within gunshot of Chinae. We are told that the head and limbs of the wretched man were severed from his body, which was otherwise mangled in the most brutal manner, but we have no particulars of the when and wherefore of the atrocity. All that is known of the mat- ter, we believe, amounts to this:-One of the Ernaad's boats having grounded, a second boat was sent to her assistance, but having, failed in their endeavours to launch, remained to protect her. The mate was per suaded by the natives to go into the village accom panied by two lascars, one of whom soon after returned

to the boat, in a wounded state, and gave information of the murder of the mate, Phe other lascar has not

been heard of. We hear that some villagers are in custody on suspicion, and we sincerely hope that, should any thing like evidence be adduced against them, they will be visited with fearful retribution. In a case like the present, the hacknied and canting whine of forbearance and humanity should be scouted, and the village in which the outrage was perpetrated be razed to the dust.-Two sailors and some natives have also disappeared and supposed to have been carried off.

A singular Proclamation from the Imperial Commis- sioner, addressed to the supposed disaffected persons among our troops, had han published at Chinhata W hope to obtain a translation of this document for our next issue.

In consequence of some affray between the natives and a foraging party, near Tinghai, in which two of the former were shot, the population were greatly ex- cited, and when the Mariam sailed many of the in- habitants had left and were leaving the City.

The force continued healthy. No immediate move mont was contemplated.

Rumour says that the ministerials in Peking are talk ing of the receipt of Lord Palmerston's letter, and are the Plenipotentiary, to ascertain the object of his thinking of appointing Commissioners to wait upon Mission to China! A revelation which has been for months organising has broken out in Hospih. There is an Imperial Edict on the subject, a translation or which

promised for our next paper. Macao. It is matter of astonishment to us that our neigh- bounafch

Becent continue to incest large eums in building, when in all human probability our countrymen will soon vacate the Island for the more congenial protection of their own flag, and a conse quent depreciation in the value of household property

must result.

Were Macao a free Port, it might exist, and even rival Hongkong, so long as the war shall endure and until the rocks of this Island give place to bricks and mortar but while, on the one hand, the expences at fending a residence, there have become so extravagant and burdensome, as almost to crush & once promising trade, Hongkong has advanced with a degree of rapid ity unexampled in the annals of colonization, and of fers a FREE AND UNEXPENSIVE ASYLUM, WITH AMPLE PRO- TROTSON, FOR PERSONS AND PROPERTY.-Judging from the present aspect of the Macao horizon, we doubt the success of the building speculations.

CRIURE AFTER PIRATES-On Tuesday, the 22d. instant, the H. C. Steamer Ariadne and Hooghly, under command of Captain Nias, C. B. of HL B Herald proceeded to the Island of Chungchow [Cheungchow, long island, we believe, in cones- quence of representations from a man, "passing over from Macao to Hongkong, that be bad been attacked by Pirates, and his boat and property carried into Chungchow, while be was allowed singly to proceed in a small boat to Hongkong, in order to arrange For the ransom of the property. They succeeded, we hear in recovering the man's boat, and rescuing such individuals from on board it as were kept i restraint; but no trace of the property was found. It was stated, we believe, that it had been taken in boats; but would be brought back and away the Steamers therefore returned in the afternoon, bringing with them hostages for the restoration of

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

what had been stoeen, As these hostages have been delivered over to the Chief Magistrate for examina- tion, we must await the result of that examination, for futher particulars.

Ir affords us pleasure to republish from the "Canton Register" the correspondence relative to Mr. Matheson's handsome of- fering of $5000, to H, E. the Governor of Macao, to be applied to some public charity. We had hoped that our brother Editor would have appended a translation of the Portuguese documents, his qualifications as a linguist well fitting him for the task. As it is, we must beg our readers to un- derstand that H. E. has said all that the subject requires, in handsome terms. We hear that the money is to be applied to educational purposes.

NATIVE POPULATION OF HONGKONG. QEEN'S TOWN, (Extending from the East to the West Barracks,) Shops. Souls.

Chandlers, Butchers, Bakers,. Confectioners, Greengrocers,

Shoemakers,

Drapers, Barbers,

INQUEST.

ON Tuesday afternoon an inquest was held at the Victoria Tavern on the body of Leong Afat, a car. penter, who was killed by the falling of a newly erected wall. Verdict, Accidental death; with a deodand of 15 dollars on the house. Two other Chinese suffered severely from the same accident.]

FOLION REPORTS.

(BEFORE THE CHIEF MAGISTRATE.)

BENJAMIN Smonds was brought up on a charge of having been drunk and riotous the previous evening. It appeared that the accused, who was a Seaman belonging to the Ariadne, Steamer having a few dollars in his pocket, determined according to his own eccen. tric phraseology to have a blow-out at the Britain's Boast. Potations deep and strong did the favored one of the Goddess indulge in, and the outward and visible signs of the inward and spiritual grace but too soon developed themselves he burned to knock down a policeman, which feat he accomplished at the price of his liberty. Vainly did he invoke Ariadne to assist him as she did Theseus, and get him out of the scrape; the ruthless constable insisted upon his company to the Gaol.

The Magistrate sent him to the Senior Naval Of ficer with a letter of introduction.

Choo Ahe, a Chinese, was charged with stealing a log of wood.

As the felony was ungarnished with anything like atrocity, arising, as Choo Ahe himself stated, in a sim ple mistake respecting his right to the article, he was sentenced to receive 20 lashes.

Illmo. Sr. John Slade.

Redactor de Canton Register.

O ILLMO. Sг. Governador desta Cidade e suas De. pendencias dezejando que da generoza offerta de que trata a carta junta do Subdito Britanico o Sr. James Matheson, tenha o publico cabal conhecimento encar- rega-me de rogar a V. Sa. o obzequio de a publicar em o seu Periodico, e assim mesmo a que servio de resposta

a essa Carta a que V. Sa. achará junta. Tenho a honra de ser

De V. Sa. Muito Attehto Venerador e Criado, Jozé Maria de Siqueira,

67

402

7

56

6

39

1

10

4

31

Fishmongers,

3

17

Rice dealers,

9

Eating houses,

3

28

Apothecaries,

22

Carpenters,

17

566

Blacksmiths,

7

53

Silversmiths,

2

14

Boat-builders,

6

59

Masons,

1

380

Bamboo workers,

3

43

Tailors, -

14

89

5

28

4

36

11

66

Stationers,

1

2

Pawnbrokers,

1

8

School masters,

2

10

Tanners,

2

17

Macao 12 de Março de 1842.

Washermen,

6

42

Shroff's,

12

24

131

23

439

100

500

50

120

10 30

1366 600 200 500

2100

Total, 8181

8000 200 300

200 80

400

Grand Total. 12,361

Opium sellers,

Prostitutes,

Compradors,

Bricklayers,

Brickmakers,

Lime-burners,

Ropemakers.

House-painters, Labourers, Hawkers,

In the employ of Europeans,

Having no ostensible employment, Boat population,

Chek-chi, Wang-nei-chung, Heongkong,. Shek-pei-wan,

Soo-koon-poo,

In the different hamlets,

TRANSLATION.

On the 2d day of the 4th. month, the following Imperial Rescript was delivered to the cabinet.

Yutai has just reported that, in Hupe Province in the district of Tsung yang, Chung Jinshu and other lawless people have riotously assembled together in large numbers, causing disturbance, killing officers of the Government, and holding possession of the walled district town. Our pleasure has already been declared, that Yutai (the Governor General of Hupe and Hunan), and Lyu Yunhyao, (the commander-in-chief in Hupe), be directed to select the best troops of the Province, and to proceed to the destruction of these insurgents: and also, that 2,000 of the best troops of the united provinces of Shensi and Kansu be sent to Hupe, to be at the disposal of those officers,"

Macao, 9th March, 1842, To His Excellency Adrião Accacio da Silveira Pinto

Governor of Macao, &c. &c. &c. Sir,-Being about to depart from China, after a residence of many years, though not without the hope of returning. I am desirous of leaving some memorial to testify my grateful sense of the protection afforded to me in common with the rest of my countrymen at Macao, more especially under the enlightened Go- vernment of Your Excellency, by whose able manage- ment all the evils of a state of War have been averted from this important settlement, under circumstances of complicated perplexity and danger converted into elements of peace and encreased prosperity.

I therefore take the liberty of placing at Your Excellency's disposal the sum of five thousand ($5,000) dollars, with a request that you will have the goodness to appropriate it to some permanent purpose of public benevolence, bearing an inscription that it is an offering of gratitude from a British subject to the Government of which Your Excellency is the head, the Portuguese indaitants generally of Macau I have the honour to remain with cordial wishes for the welfare Your Excellency and family, Sir,

Your Excellency's very faithful and grateful servant. JAMES MATHESON. True Copy Jozé Maria de Siqueira. Macao 12 de Março de 1842.

Illmo. Sr.-Em a Carta de V. Sa. desta datta cuja recepção eu tenho a honra d'accuzar não dezejando que V. Sa. parta sem huma resposta partecipa-me a sua retirada para a Europa e os dezejos que tem de deixar perpetuada a sua memoria neste Estabellecimento por algum acto de publica beneficencia para o que poem a minha dispozição a somma de sinco mil [5,0008] Patacas Espanholas, Eu seria criminozo ou pelo menos merecedor de grande censura se recuzasse huma offerta que tem por fim hum bem publico, ou se deixasse d'agradecer não obstante ver em V. Sa. dezejos de que o não fizesse com a expressão da mais bem merecida gratidão.

Estimaria eu que V. Sa. houvesse prefixado a applicação da somma offerecida, mas pois o não quiz fazer talvez pela sua extremada delicadeza eu conjun- ctamente com o Leal Senado desta Cidade procurare- mos satisfazer a esse encargo de hum modo satisfatorio

"The insurgents being in possession of the more difficult passes, and well-protected in the rear, are gradually extending their wings, and are even now beginning to stop up the important routes, and to make for themselves military weapons. It is most incumbente para o offerente e para o publico aquem o dom he that speediest measures be adopted for their utter offerecido. anihilation, lest the evil spread still more widely. Let As expressoens que eu encontro em a sua Carta a TeeShin (lately Joint Commissioner in Canton), retain-mim particularmente dirigidas ainda que eu as attribuo ing the office of Joint.Commissioner, and taking with mais devidas a ja bem reconhecida generozidade de him the seals of that office, proceed with speed to Hupě, V. Sa. do que ao meu proprio merecimento não posso and unite with Yutai and Lyu Yunhyao in active deixar d'agradecer-lhas com todas as minhas forças. measures for the rapid destruction of the insurgents. Resta-me pois dezejar a V. Sa. mais prospera visgem Make these commands known, by an express travel e que em o seu Pais natal, possa encontrar tantas ven. ling six hundred le daily," (Respect this turas quantas tem direito a esperar.

3.

Sou com os sentimentos da mais perfeita conside- ração, Illmo, Sr. James Matheson.

De V. Sa. O mais attento venerador e obediente servo, ADRIAO ACCACIO DA SILVEIRA PINTO. Está conforme,-Jozé Maria de Siqueira.

(From the London Mail of 4th December.) NAVAL AND MILITARY.

Major Ceneral Lord Saltoun, C. B. K. C. H., whose servicea in the Peninsular and at Warterloo were eminent, has been up. pointed second in command to Sir Hugh Gough in the China Expedition, and is embarked on board H. M. S. Belleisle. His

Lordship takes out with him the 98th regiment, and a company

of artillery.

Capt. J. H. Grant, of the 9th of Queen's loyal Lancers has been appointed Major of Brigade to Majoreneral Lord Saltoun, G. C. H. upon the staff of the army in China.

The Naval and Military Gazelle Bays, "We are happy to find that it is intended to appoint an eleventh company to every

regiment in India and in China, immediately the consent of the Court of Directors has been obtained.

Our naval force in China will receive a considerable reinforce. ment in the following ships. The Belleisle; The Andromache, with a large party of supernumerary marines; the Cambrian, 36, 28, captain Baines; The Harlequin. 16. hon. G. F. Hastings, capt. Chads; the Syren. 16. com. W. Smith, which has sailed via South America: the North Star, 2°, capt. Sir E. Home; com. P. vice Napier promoted; the North Star accompanies the troop Justice is a passenger to China in that ship to join the Pelican, ships which convey the reinforcements to the army in China.

The Thomas Coutts, Premier, and Resistance, troopships, are about to proceed to China. The following vessels, it is thought may also proceed to China. The Indus, 84, and Calcutta, 84, from the Mediterranean, and the Malabar, 12, l'Aigle, 50, Isis, 50, Beividera, 42, Pique, 36, Hazard, 18, and Heroine, 16. Regt 18th-Ens. Elliot and Hayman, and Assist, surg. Marsh all with a draft-of 70 men have embarked at Portsmouth for China. 26th-A draft of 450 men has embarked at Portsmouth for

China; Lieutenants Piper and Duff, Ens. De Quincey, Dickens, Skinner and Bredin accompany it.

49th.-A draft of 200 men has embarked at Ports mouth for China; Lieutenant Col. Bartley, Capt. Pasley and Ens. Glazbrook accompany it.

35th-Capt. Rose, and Lieutenants Herriot and Magrath with a draft of 100 men, have embarked at Portsmouth for China. ARTILLERY-At Woolwich on the 27th November, Capt. Greenwood's company embarked on board the Belleisle to proceed to China. The officers who embarked were Capt. Greenwood, Lieutenants C. C. Young, Freese, and Anderson, and Assist, Surg. Barrat.

BREVET OF THE INDIAN ARMY.

To be Major General, Col. Sir Henry Pottinger, 'Bart, BREVET OF H. M. ARMY.

To be Lieut, General, Sir Hugh Gough, e. c. B.

To be Major General, Lt. Col. G. Burrell, c. B.

To be Lt. Col., R. Bartley, 49th;

55th;

To be Major, H. F. Strange, and W. Caine, 26th; N. Maclean, To be Aide de Camp to Her Majesty with the rank of Colonel; Lieut Col J. H. Schoelde, 55th. NAVY. Sir W. Parker, Rear Admiral of the Red, to be Vice Admiral of the Blue, MILITARY PROMOTIONS. War office, Nov., 5th. 18th foot. Captain T. B. Lord Cochrane, from 66th Foot to be Capt. v. Moyle, who exchanges. War office, Nov., 19th. Haly, dec, May ; Ens. W. P. Cockburn, v. Graves, appointed 18th. To be Lieutenants, without p. Ens. J. H. Hewitt, v. Adj June 20th. To be Lieutenants by p. Ens. W. Venour from 95th Foot v. Gwynne who retires; Ens, C. Woodright, v. Hewitt, whose promotion by p. has been cancelled Nov. 20; Ens. J. F. Nov. 21; To be Ensigns without y. L. M. P. Humphrays, Gent, Mayo, v. Cockburn, whose promotion by p. has been cancelled. v. Woodwright Nov. 20; J. S. Brodick, Genl. v. Mayo Nov. 21. To be Adj Lieut. J. W. Graves, v. Wilson, dec.

War office, Nov. 23. 18th. Maj. N. R. Tomlinson, to be Lieut. Col. without p.: War office, Dec. 9. 18th.-Lieut. W. T. Colman, from 55th Foot, to be Capt. without p. v. Dillon promoted.

Br. Major F. W. Dillon, to be Major v. Tomlinson.

26th-Br, Lieut. Col. T, S. Pratt to be Lieut. Col. without p. v. James dec. Br. Major G. Hogarth to be Capt. v. Hogarth. Aug. 28 Ens. C. H. Rhys to be Lieut. v. Thompson-Ens. C. J. S. Wallace from 41st Foot to be Ens. v. Rhys.

Sous. R. Won, to 15 Lieut. Wimout p. v. Comitan, promoted in 18th Foot. Gent. Cadet. J. Lloyd from Roy. Mil. Col. to be Ens. v. Wilson.

CHINESE INTERPRETERS, BLACKWOOD-that arch-critic of Modern Athens- in his September number of last year, fulminates, with a degree of " insolent mendacity for which we were quite unprepared, the grossest charges of incompetency and treachery against our interpreters. To local read- ers we need not point out the absurdity-the very "perfection of ignorance"-displayed in almost every line of the delicious morsel we quote.

We shall notice the article, at more length, in our next number.

"The delusions as to facts are theirs; but we ourselves are exposed to the most serious delusions as to the Chinese mean- ing, by the mendacious qualities of those translations which we consent to receive from our interpreters. These interpre- ters, manifestly British, are more palpably falsifiers from igno- rance than the Turkish from fraud. They know little enough, perhaps, of the orel Chinese; but every body knows how much more difficult is the written Chinese, which it takes a long life to master in any reasonable proportion of characters. At all translators are falsifiers. Even in our own literature, not one events, the translations themselves are good evidence that the translation in thirty from the German, but is disfigured by the vilest ignorance of the German idiom. Under the govern ment of Napoleon, Chenier, who was personally pensioned by the state, and was sometimes employed to translate Spanish despatches, &c., shows by mistranslations the most childish, in his printed specimens from many Spanish poets, that he was a mere incipient student of that language, at a time when he was undertaking the Spanish literature, and when Yet, in such a case, the anischief had limits. Many Spaniards he was confidentially relied on by the French government. are always to be found in Paris; and too gross an error would at once have awakened suspicion. In China, on d other hand thero is nobody on our part to make a sceptical view of the anslations; and sentiments the most impossible a Chinese,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE

mind pervade the whole documents. Thus the emperor is made to say at one time, that the English must be made pri soners and conducted to Pekin, "there to undergo the last pe- salties of the law." This phrase is a pure fiction of the trans Intor's: no sach idea as that of the law's supremacy, or prisoner's death being a sacrifice to law and not to the em peror'e wrath, ever entered or could enter an Oriental bead- far less a Chinese head. Again, in a more recent state-paper, the emperor is made to say that one of the two nations bitant must conquer, and one must die. Here the very inso lence of mendacity appears in the translator. What Oriental potentate could by possibility acknowledge a deadly or a doubt. ful contest 7

H. M. SQUADRON.

AT CHUSAN CHINHAZ AND NINGPO.

72-Bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. c. B., command- er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain T Bourchier, c. B. Justice,

Watson,

Cornwallis

Blonde Pelican

18-comdr.

18 18

G. Goldsmith,

Columbine Clio Algerine

18-

Morshead.

16-

E Troubridge,

10 lieut.

Maitland.

What Chinese povereign, parsed in the Se-Hyacinth Modeste liefs that all Europe in composed of a few petty islands in a dark corner of the world, abandoned by all respectable peo ple, who admits into his maps no important etate but Russia and views himself a brother of heavenly powers,would ever present to his people even the hypothesis of such a di lemms? The case begins in ignorance, and ends in men

desity. We shall never phtain one glimmer of the Chine meaning, nor they of ours, if some remedy is not instantly applied to this grout of all abuses"

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We are obliged to our kind Subscribers reminding us that our first issue, which must now be considered rely as a Prospectus, took place on St. Patick's day and an the Saint has been canonized n the honoured instrument of introducing the light of Christianity among the heathen in Ireland we accept the underigned coincidenes of date as a good omen, and sincerely trust we shall be acting in akindred spirit by diffusing the blewing of Christian civilizati and useful knowledge through the means of that Potent aaachine, PRESS. The writer of the kind letter to whom we refer savar things will be expected from you". We can only say that the handsome rate at which our subscription list is progressing encourages us to think that our friends will have no occasion to complain of ag exertions

We request that all Communications, Advertisements &c, be sent

to the office, as early in each week as possible,

AT HONGKONG.

Sir Thomas Herbert

K

Blenheim

72-captain

c. a. Senior Command-

ing Officer.

Herald

26-

J. Nias.

Nimrod

Cruizer

18-comdr. 18-

Glasse,

Royalist

Young Hetǝ

H. C. S.

10-lieut.

J. Pearse,

Chetwolde,

4-comdr. Wood

Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross,

Ariadne, lieut. Roberts

with an assorted cargo of British manu- factures. She carries with her a competent supracargo and tea inspector.

THE Potentate, Capt. Ramsay, left the Lady Bentinck, surveying, essel comdr. R. Collinson, Harbour yesterday for the Northern Ports Troopship Jupiter mr. comg.. Nemesie, lieut. W. H. Hall, Queen, mr. comg W. Warden, Phlegethon, lieut Me Cleverty, Sesostris, comdr. Ormsby, I. N. AT.ANOY.

H. C. 8.

Druid

Pelades

Chameleon Starling

44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 18-Comdr Tindal (absent) 10-lieut

Hunter

6 comdr H. Kellett,

The Australasian Packet also sailed yesterday for Namou and Amoy, with a full cargo of Opium.-The Mary Imry, sails to day for Amoy and Chusan with Commissariat Stores The Ariel leaves in a day or two for Madras,

SHIPPING REPORT,-JANUARY 1842.

DATE OF

TONS FLAD

FROX.

To.

ARRIVAL

OF SUBSCRIPTION TO THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

12

January 1st Sri Singapore

85 British

21. Mavis

118

647

451

N.S. Wales Maxils

276

418

37

For six months

For three

For the Convenience

Singapore Chuns Govt. Store Macao

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

what had been stoeen. As these hostages have been delivered over to the Chief Magistrate for examina tion, we must await the result of that examination, for futher particulars.

Ir affords us pleasure to republish from the "Canton Register" the correspondence relative to Mr. Matheson's handsome of- fering of $5000, to H. E. the Governor of Macao, to be applied to some public charity. We had hoped that our brother Editor would have appended a translation of the Portuguese documents, his qualifications as a linguist well fitting him for the task. As it is, we must beg our readers to un- derstand that H. E. has said all that the subject requires, in handsome terms. We hear that the money is to be applied to educational purposes.

NATIVE POPULATION OF HONGKONG. QEEN'S TOWN, (Extending from the East to the West Barracks,) Shops. Souls.

INQUEST.

ON Tuesday afternoon an inquest was held at the Victoria Tavern on the body of Leong Afat. a car. penter, who was killed by the falling of a newly erected wall. Verdict, Accidentul death; with a deodand of 15 dollars on the house. [Two other Chinese suffered severely from the same accident.]

POLICE REPORTS.

(BEFORE THE CHIEF MAGISTRATE.) having been drunk and riotous the previous evening. BENJAMIN Smonds was brought up on a charge of It appeared that the accused, who was a Seaman belonging to the Ariadne, Steamer having a few dollars in his pocket, determined according to his own eccen. tric phraseology to have a blow-out at the Britain's Boast. Potations deep and strong did the favored one of the Goddess indulge in, and the outward and visible signs of the inward and spiritual grace but too soon developed themselves; he burned to knock down a policeman, which feat he accomplished at the price of his liberty. Vainly did he invoke Ariadne to assist him as she did Theseus, and get him out of the scrape; the ruthless constable insisted upon his company to

the Gaol.

The Magistrate sent him to the Senior Naval Of ficer with a letter of introduction.

Choo Ahe, a Chinese, was charged with stealing a log of wood.

As the felony was ungarnished with anything like atrocity, arising, as Choo Ahe himself stated, in a sim ple mistake respecting his right to the article, he was sentenced to receive 20 lashes.

Illmo. Sr. John Slade.

Redactor de Canton Register.

O ILLMO. Sr. Governador desta Cidade e suas De. pendencias dezejando que da generoza offerta de que trata a carta junta do Subdito Britanico o Sr. James Matheson, tenha o publico cabal conhecimento encar- rega-me de rogar a V. Sa. o obzequio de a publicar em o seu Periodico, e assim mesmo a que servio de resposta a essa Carta a que V. Sa. achará junta.

Tenho a honra de ser

De V. Sa. Muito Attento Venerador e Criado.

Macao, 9th March, 1842.

Chandlers, Butchers,

67

402

7

56

Bakers,

6

39

EXPORT

TDAT OF DEPARTUR

Confectioners, Greengrocers,

1

10

4

31

Fishmongers,

3

17

20. Jan.

Rice dealers,

9

Eating houses,

3

28

9th...

Apothecaries,

6

22

28th.

Carpenters,

17

566

Genl Ourgo 17th.

Blacksmiths,

7

53

Silversmiths,

2

14

Boat-builders,

6

59

100 British

Macao Chunen

Sto

293

Macao

N.E-Squad 9th. Goods

Masons,

1

380

Bamboo workers,

3

43

Tailors, -

14

89

10th Friends 18th. Euphrates

204

Singapore

620

13

Whampo

Shoemakers,

5

28

14th Livingston

467

Young Queen

85

Bydney Macao

Macao

Drapers,

36

Barbers,

11

66

15th. Urgent

408

Pribe Cargo

Stationers,

1

2

16th Sundrapovy

Pawnbrokers,

8

208

18th Prince George 482

Chusan

Singapore Ballas

365

Macao

Whampoa Ric

Ballant Rice

17th Feb.

School masters,

2

10

Jozé Maria de Siqueira,

28th Jan.

Tanners,

2

17

Macao 12 de Março de 1842.

Forth Mandest

481

Manila

21

18th Feb.

Washermen,

6

42

236

Chue

Jan

Shroffs,

2

12

28d. William

153 American E. Coast

124th.

Opium sellers,

24

131

To His Excellency

Adrião Accacio da Silveira Pinto

24th. Sylph

M

Caroline Thistle

85

Calcutta Whampoa

Opium

2d. Feb.

Prostitutes,

23

439

7th Jan,

Compradors,

8

100

140

31

130th.

Bricklayers,

237 500

25th, Saphpo

445

Macao

6th

120

W. Micalle

448

G. Henderson 517

10 30

Ino Beawick Cacique

402

1366

172

Young Queen

85 British

Australasian P 104

600 200 500 2100

27th Lady Grant

236

28th Algerine

145

283

Total, 8181

3000 200 300 200

80

400

Grand Total. 12,361

817 British

125 Mexican

31st. Austen

SHIPPING REPORT

For one year payable in advance,

Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mo.

derate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into, the Chi neee language.

NOTICE

N Agency r the Chinese Repository has been

A cashed at the office of the FRIEND OF

CHINA, and all orders for that excellent work will be promptly attended to.

Hongkong, March 17th, 1842.

FOR SALE

T the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA Copies of

A the Holy Bible from the American and For.

eign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $ 3.-

N

Hongkong, March 17th, 1842,

OTICE The Granite Godown No. 46. Queen's Road Howan,will be completed and ready on the let. pruzimo for

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go

down has a Bione Pier in front, 975 feet long, and is situated at distance above high water mark

will protect it against the rise of

Godown, white and black

double noa wall that

aal in Typhoons.

charging in front of the

been laid down at a short

distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 2 fathome,

with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to

Hongkong, 21st, March 1849.

C. V. GILLESPIE

N Sale at 46 Queen's Road American Wine, Spars, Provi

ON

Cut Rope, Canvass, Paints and other stores by C. V. GILLESPE Hongkong, 21st. Marok 1942.

BRITISH Piece Goods for Sale in quantities to suit purchasess

Hongkong, lat. March 1842,

V. GILLESPIE

40 Quvets Road.

唎多布有

士少發各

内在論吉

記買利

RON Square, from to 1 inch suitable for window grating. and other building purposes for Bale by C. V. GILLEPIES Hongkong, 21st. March 1849. 48 Queens Road.

物做八發行花

俱屋九客有旗 可內分濶四記 合器不一方唎 用料等寸铁士

什能或條庇

4th Canton 5th. Abberton

7th Regina

Louis Bailli Anglona

8th Leimet Austen

21st Canopus

26th Primavera

20th H. C. Arindne 21st. Harrier

108 American

DATE OF

ARRIVAL

Febry. 2d. Amazon

8d. Australasian P

F

Macao

UARY 1842.

Cargo

3d. March

4d Feb.

70

15th

Lat. March

Arethusa

Harlequin

賣樣

Anglona

7th. Heabella

Brit

可不

8th John Cooper

659

不英

10th Ann

270

Terror

300

H of Malo

482

Thistle

140

12th Chelydra

349

18th Aurora Masdeu

00

Ballast

237

14th Manly

186

Horses

16th Young Quen

85

Ballast

Opium

B. Horma jee 888

Whampoa Calcutta Ten

Ballast

16th Mermaid

16th

29

Ariel

Anglona

105 American Macao 108

E Coast Opium Min Same

17th.

17th. Terror

300 British

Whampoa Ballast

Rice

24th

Sappho

440

Cotton

Cotton

Rica 18th

13

Bombay Custle 602

Bombay

19th. Reliance 11516 Orixa

365

Manila

Glenl. Cargo

Steamer

163 British

Macao

Coast

Ballast

Opions

23d. Young Queen カラー Time

85

97

97

Macao

Balla

25th.

24th Palatine

507

26th. Red Rover

250

Bombay Caleutin F. Coast Opium

Cotton

Opium

PRINTING OR, QUEEN's Rest HOMONG,

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PHOTO

RECEIVED SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY MASERS BONTEIN AND SO

Brickmakers,

Lime-burners,

Ropemakers.

Labourers,

Having no ostensible employment,

House-painters,

Hawkers,

In the employ of Europeans,

Boat population, .

Chek-chi,

Wang-nei-chung, Heongkong,. Shek-pei-wan,

Soo-koon-poo,

In the different hamlets,

TRANSLATION.

Governor of Macao, &c. &c. &c.

3.

Sou com os sentimentos da mais perfeita conside- ração, Illmo, Sr. James Matheson.

De V. Sa.

O mais attento venerador e obediente servo, ADRIAO ACCACIO DA SILVEIRA PINTO, Está conforme,-Jozé Maria de Siqueira.

(From the London Mail of 4th December.) NAVAL AND MILITARY.

Major General Lord Saltoun, C. B. K. C. H., whose services in the Peninsular and at Warterloo were eminent, has been ap pointed second in command to Sir Hugh Gough in the China Expedition, and is embarked on board H. M. S. Belleisle. His Lordship takes out with him the 98th regiment, and a company

of artillery.

Capt. J. H. Grant, of the 9th or Queen's loyal Lancera has been appointed Major of Brigade to Major General Lord Saltoun, G. C. H. upon the staff of the army in China.

The Naval and Military Gazelle says, "We are happy to find that it is intended to appoint an eleventh company to every

regiment in India and in China, immediately the consent of the

Court of Directors has been obtained.

Our naval force in China will receive a considerable reinforce ment in the following slips. The Belleisle; The Andromache, 28, captain Baines; The Harlequin. 16. hon. G. F. Hastings, with a large party of supernumerary malines; the Cambrian, 36, capt. Chads; the Syren. 16. com. W. Smith, which has sailed via South America: the North Star, 28, capt. Sir E. Home; com. P. vice Napier promoted; the North Star accompanies the troop Justice is a passenger to China in that ship to join the Pelicas, ships which convey the reinforcements to the army in China.

The Thomas Coutts, Premier, and Resistance, troopships, are about to proceed to China. The following vessels, it is thought may also proceed to China. The Indus, 84, and Calcutta, 84, from the Mediterranean, and the Malabar, 72, PAigle, 50, Isis, 50, Beividera, 42, Pique, 36, Hazard, 18, and Heroine, 16. Regt 18th.-Ens. Elliot and Hayman, and Assist, surg. Marsh- all with a draft of 70 men have embarked at Portsmouth for China. 26th.-A draft of 450 men has embarked at Portsmouth for

China; Lieutenants Piper and Duff, Ens. De Quincey, Dickens,

Skinner and Bredin accompany it.

49th.-A draft of 200 men has embarked at Porta 'mouth for China; Lieutenaut Col. Bartley, Capt. Pealey and Ens. Glazbrook accompany it.

35th-Capt. Rose, and Lieutenants Herriot and Magrath with a draft of 100 men, have embarked at Portsmouth for China. ARTILLERY-At Woolwich on the 27th November, Capt. Greenwood's company embarked on board the Belleisle to proceed to China. The officers who embarked were Capt. Greenwood, Lieutenants C. C. Young, Freese, and Anderson, and Assist. Surg. Barrat.

BREVET OF THE INDIAN ARMY.

To be Major General, Col. Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart. BREVET OF H. M. ARMY.

To be Lieut, General, Sir Hugh Gough, a. c. 3.

To be Major General, Lt. Col. G. Burrell, c. s.

To be Lt. Col., R. Bartley, 49th;

To be Major, H. F. Strange, and W. Caine, 26th; N. Maclean, 55th; To be Aide de Camp to Her Majesty with the rank of Colonel; Lieut Col J. H. Schoelde, 55th. NAVY.

Sir, -Being about to depart from China, after a residence of many years, though not without the hope Capt. v. Moyle, who exchanges. 50 of returning. I am desirous of leaving some memorial to testify my grateful sense of the protection afforded to me in common with the rest of my countrymen at Macao, more especially under the enlightened Go- vernment of Your Excellency, by whose able manage- ment all the evils of a state of War have been averted from this important settlement, under circumstances of complicated perplexity and danger converted into elements of peace and encreased prosperity.

On the 2d. day of the 4th. month, the following Imperial Rescript was delivered to the cabinet.

Yutai has just reported that, in Hupě Province in the district of Tsung yang, Chung Jinshu and other lawless people have riotously assembled together in large numbers, causing disturbance, killing officers of the Government, and holding possession of the walled district town. Our pleasure has already been declared, that Yutai (the Governor General of Hupe and Hunan), and Lyu Yunhyao, (the commander-in-chief in Hupe), be directed to select the best troops of the Province, and to proceed to the destruction of these insurgents: and also, that 2,000 of the best troops of the united provinces of Shensi and Kansu be sent to Hupe, to be at the disposal of those officers.'

"The insurgents being in possession of the more difficult passes, and well-protected in the rear, are gradually extending their wings, and are even now beginning to stop up the important routes, and to make for themselves military weapons. It is most incumbent that speediest measures be adopted for their utter anihilation, lest the evil spread still more widely. Let TseShin (lately Joint Commissioner in Canton), retain- ing the office of Joint-Commissioner, and taking with him the seals of that office, proceed with speed to Hupě, and unite with Yutai and Lyu. Yuniyao in active measures for the rapid destruction of the insurgents." "Make these commands known, by an express travel- ling six hundred le daily." (Respect this.)

I therefore take the liberty of placing at Your Excellency's disposal the sum of five thousand ($ 5.000) dollars, with a request that you will have the goodness to appropriate it to some permanent purpose of public benevolence, bearing an inscription that it is an offering of gratitude from a British subject to the Government of which Your Excellency is the head, and to the Portuguese inhabitants generally of Macao. Thave the honour to remain with cordial wishes for the welfare Your Excellency and family,

Sir,

Your Excellency's very faithful and grateful servant, JAMES MATHESON.

True Copy Jozé Maria de Siqueira.

Macao 12 de Março de 1842. Illmo. Sr.-Em a Carta de V. Sa. desta datta cuja recepção eu tenho a honra d'accuzar não dezejando que V. Sa. parta sem huma resposta partecipa-me a sua retirada para a Europa e os dezejos que tem de deixar perpetuada a sua memoria neste Estabellecimento por algum acto de publica beneficencia para o que poem a minha dispozição a somma de sinco mil [5,0008] Patacas Espanholas. Eu seria criminozo ou pelo menos merecedor de grande censura se recuzasse huma offerta que tem por fim hum bem publico, ou se deixasse d'agradecer não obstante ver em V. Sa. dezejos de que o não fizesse com a expressão da mais bem merecida gratidão.

Estimaria eu que V. Sa. houvesse prefixado a applicação da somma offerecida, mas pois o não quiz fazer talvez pela sua extremada delicadeza eu conjun- ctamente com o Leal Senado desta Cidade procurare- mos satisfazer a esse encargo de hum modo satisfatorio e para o offerente e para o publico aquem o dom he offerecido.

As expressoens que eu encontro em a sua Carta a mim particularmente dirigidas ainda que eu as attribuo mais devidas a ja bem reconhecida generozidade de V. Sa. do que ao meu proprio merecimento não posso deixar d'agradecer-lhas com todas as minhas forças. Resta-ne pois dezejar a V. Sa. mais prospera viagem e que em osta Pais natal, possa encontrar tantas ven- turas quantas tem direito a esperar.

Sir W. Parker, Rear Admiral of the Red, to be Vice Admiral of the Blue. MILITARY PROMOTIONS. War office, Nov., 5th. 18th foot.-Captain T. B. Lord Cochrane, from 66th Foot to be War office, Nov., 19. 18th-To be Lieutenants, without p. Ens. J. H. Hewitt, v. Haly, dec, May B; Ens. W. P. Cockburn, v. Graves, appointed Adj June 20th. To be Lieutenants by p. Ens. W. Venour from 95th Foot v. Gwynne who retires; Ens. C. Woodright, v. Hewitt, whose promotion by p. has been cancelled Nov. 20; Ens. J. P. Mayo, v. Cockburn, whose promotion by p. has been cancelled. Nov. 21; To be Ensigns without y. L. M. F. Humphrays, Gent, v. Woodwright Nov. 20; J. S. Brodick, Genl. v. Mayo Nov. 21, To be Adj Lieut. J. W. Graves, v. Wilson, dec. War office, Nov. 23. 18th.-Maj. N. R. Tomlinson, to be Lieut. Col. without p.1 Br. Major F. W. Dillon, to be Major v. Tomlinson. War office, Dec. 9. 18th.-Lieut. W. T. Colman, from 55th Foot, to be Capt." without p. v. Dillon promoted.

26th.-Br, Lieut. Col. T, S. Pratt to be Lieut. Col. without p. v. James dec. Br. Major G. Hogarth to be Capt. v. Hogarth. Aug. 28 Ens. C. H. Rhys to be Lieut. v. Thompson-Ens. C. J. S. Wallace from 41st Foot to be Ens. v. Rhys. v. Colman, 55th-Ens. R. Wilton, to be Lieut. without promoted on 19th com Col. to be Ens. v. Wilson.

CHINESE INTERPRETERS, BLACKWOOD-that arch-critic of Modern Athens- in his September number of last year, fulminates, with a degree of "insolent mendacity" for which we were quite unprepared, the grossest charges of incompetency and treachery against our interpreters. To local read- ers we need not point out the absurdity-the very perfection of ignorance"-displayed in almost every line of the delicious norsel we quote.

We shall notice the article, at more length, in our next number.

"The delusions as to facts are theirs; but we ourselves are exposed to the most serious delusions as to the Chinese mean. ing, by the mendaciou qualities of those, translations which we consent to receive from our interpreters. These interpre- ters, manifestly British, are more palpably falsifiers from igno- rance than the Turkish from fraud. They know little enough, perhaps, of the oral Chinese; but every body knows how much more difficult is the written Chinese, which it takes a long life to At all events, the translations themselves are good evidence that the master in any reasonable proportion of characters. translators are falsifiers. Even in our own burature, not one translation in thirty from the German, but is disfigured by the vilest ignorance of the German idiom. Under the govern ment of Napoleon, Chenier, who was personally pensioned by the state, and was sometimes employed to translate Spanish despatches, &c., shows by mistranslations the most childish, in his printed specimens from many Spanish poets, that he was a mere incipient student of that language, at a time when he was undertaking the Spanish literature, and when he was confidentially relied on by the French government. Yet, in such a case, the mischief had limits. Many Spaniards are always to be found in Paris; and too gross an error would at once have awakened suspicion. In Chips, on the other hand there is nobody on our part to make a sceptical review of the translations; and sentiments the most impossible to a Chinese,

4.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

mind pervade the whole documents. Thus the emperor is made to say at one time, that the English must be made pri soners and conducted to Pekin, "there to undergo the last pe- malties of the law." This phrase is a pure fiction of the trans. lator's: no such idea as that of the law's supremacy, or a prisoner's death being a sacrifice to law and not to the em peror's wrath, ever entered or could enter an Oriental head- far less a Chinese head. Again, in a more recent state-paper, the emperor is made to say that one of the two nations mi- litant must conquer, and one must die. Here the very inso- lence of mendacity appears in the translator. What Oriental potentate could by possibility acknowledge a deadly or a doubt. ful contest ? What Chinese sovereign, nursed in the be-Hyacinth

lief that all Europe is composed of a few petty islands in a dark corner of the world, abandoned by all respectable peo- ple, who admits into his maps no important state but Russia, and views himself as a brother of heavenly powers, would ever present to his people even the hypothesis of such a di- lemma? The case begins in ignorance, and ends in men-

dacity. We shall never obtain one glimmer of the Chinese meaning, nor they of ours, if some remedy is not instantly applied to this grossest of all abuses."

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. We are obliged to our kind Subscriber for reminding us that our first issue, which must now be considered merely as a Prospectus, took place on St. Patick's day and as the Saint has been canonized as the honoured instrument of introducing the light of Christianity among the heathen in Ireland we accept the undesigned coincidence of date as a good omen, and sincerely trust we shall be acting in akindred spirit by diffusing the blessing of Christian civilizati nand useful knowledge through the means of that Potent machine, A FREE PRESS. The writer of the kind letter to whom we refer says" great things will be expected from you". We can only say that the handsome rate at which our subscription list is progressing encourages us to think that our friends will have no occasion to complain of our exertions.

We request that all Communications, Advertisements &c, be sent

to the office, us early in each week as possible.

TERMS.

OF SUBSCRIPTION TO THE FRIEND OF CHINA.

For one, year payable in advance.

For six months....

For three,,

H. M. SQUADRON.

AT CHUSAN CHINHAE AND NINGPO. 72-Bearing the flag of Rear-Admiral Cornwallis Sir W. Parker, K. C. B., command- er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. B. 18-comdr.

Justice,

Blonde

Pelican

18- "

G. Goldsmith,

18-"

Watson,

18-

Morshead.

16-

99

E. Troubridge, Maitland.

Modeste Columbine Clio Algerine

10- lieut.

AT HONGKONG.

Sir Thomas Herbert K.

Blenheim

72-captain

C. B. Senior Command-

Herald

26-.. 18-comdr.

Cruizer

18- "

J. Pearse,

Royalist

Young Hebe

Nimrod

10--lieut.

ing Officer.

J. Nias.

Glasse,

Chetwolde,

4-comdr. Wood.

H. C. S. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross, Ariadne, lieut. Roberts

THE Potentate, Capt. Ramsay, left the Lady Bentinck, surveying, vessel comdr. R. Collinson, Harbour yesterday for the Northern Ports Troopship Jupiter mr. comg. Nemesis, lieut. W, H. Hall, Queen, mr. comg.. W. Warden, Phlegethon, lieut. Mc Cleverty, Sesostris, comdr. Ormsby, I. N.

H. C. S.

39

Druid Pylades Chameleon Starling

AT AMOY.

44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 18-comdr. Tindal (absent) 10-lieut Hunter,

6-comdr. H. Kellett,

with an assorted cargo of British manu- factures. She carries with her a competent supracargo and tea inspector.

The Australasian Packet also sailed yesterday for Namou and Amoy, with a full cargo of Opium.-The Mary Imry, sails to day for Amoy and Chusan with Commissariat Stores. The Ariel leaves in a day or two for Madras.

SHIPPING REPORT,-JANUARY 1842.

وو

Genl. Cargo Genl. Oargo 17th,

9th. 8th. 11th. 9th. Feb. 13th, Jan.

DATE OF

NAMES.

TONS. FLAG.

FROM.

To.

IMPORT.

EXPORT.

ARRIVAL.

DATE OF DEPARTURE

8 12

$ 7

January 1st. Sri-Singapore

85 British

Whampoa Whampoa Ballast

Opium

2d, Jan.

2d. Mavis

113

21

Macao

23

Opinm

39

4th Canton

547

11

N.S. Wales

21

Ballast

Ballast

9th.

5th Abberton

451

33

Manila

19

29

"3

28th.

276

33

Macao

"Louisa Baillie 413

11

12

33

29

21

Anglona

108 American

21

100 British

29

233

39

33

204

23

620

33

14th Livingston

467

Sydney

Macao Stores & Pass. Passengers Chusan &c Stores &c.for the N. E.-Squad Macao Piece Goods Singapore Tor. shell. &c. The same Whampoa Cotton Macao Ballast

11

:

19

15th. Urgent

Young Queem

85

Macao

33

39

Ballast Opium

408

23

Singapore Chusan

Govt: Stores

Pribe Cargo

19th.

99

16th Sundrapovy

208

Macao

29

39

18th. Prince George 482

37

Chusan

Ballast

21st Canopus

365

Macao

Rice

35

Forth

481

"1

Manila

21

11

33

Masdeu

236

23

Chusan

Macao,

Ballast

Ballast

23d. William

153 American E. Coast

39

29

17th. Feb. 28th. Jan. 13th. Feb. 22d. Jan. 24th.

317 British Calcutta

39

37

Caroline

85

19

Whampoa

Genl. Cargo Opium Ballast

99

2d. Feb. 27th. Jan.

99

Thistle

140

11

23

39

19

25th, Saphpo

445

29

Macao

Coals

Rice Ballast

30th.

39

6th. Feb.

W. Mtcalfe

448

17

33

Ballast

31

G. Henderson 517

31

12

33

13

11

31

Ino Renwick

402

21

Cacique

172

11

Sydney

33

Young Queen

Australasian P 194

31

236

28th | Algerine

145

233

24th Sylph

Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mo.

derɛte rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into, the Chi- nese language.

NOTICE.

N Agency for the Chinese Repository has been

A established at the office of the FRIEND OF

CHINA, and all orders for that excellent worh will be promptly attended to.

AT

Hongkong, March 17th. 1842.

FOR SALE.

T the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA Copies of the Holy Bible from the American and For eign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.-

Ilongkong, March 17th. 1842.

OTICE.-The Granite Godown No. 46. Queen's Road-

the

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go-

down has a Stone Pier in front, 275 feet long, and is situated at

a distance above high water mark with a double sea wall that

will protect it against the rise of the sea usual in Typhoons.

For the Convenience of Vessels discharging in front of the Godown, white and black buoys have been laid down at a short distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 2 fathoms, with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

N Sale at 46 Queen's Road American Wine, Spars, Provi.

Coir Rope, Canvass, Paints and other stores by C. V. GILLESPE Hongkong, 21st, March 1842.

BRITISH Piece Goods for Sale in quantities to suit purchases

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

C. V. GILLESPIE,

46 Queens Road.

唎多布有 士少發各 庇亦 ** 行可不英 內在論吉

7th. Regina

8th Leimet

"Austen

10th Friends 13th. Euphrates

26th. Primavera

27th. Lady Grant

Febry. 2d. Amazon

در

125 Mexican Macao

85 British

Singapore Ballast Whampoa Rice

Whampoa Specie & Rod. Cotton Macao Ballast

3d. March

17th. Feb.

Ballast

39

Opium & Alm.

13

(28th. Jan.

Ballast

Opium

26th.

Ballast

26th.

E. Coast

Opium

Opium

28th.

Chusan

Ballast

Stores

19

Piece Goods

33

31st. Austen

SHIPPING REPORT,-FEBRUARY 1842.

3d. Australasian P 194

13th. Aurora

Macao Chusan

19

Macao

14th Feb.

DATE OF DEPARTURE

3d. March

DATE OF

NAMES.

TONS. FLAG.

FROM.

To.

IMPORT.

EXPORT,

ARRIVAL.

423 British

Macao

Ballast

39

Arethusa

214

29

Macao

21

Genl. Cargo

71

Harlequin

292

19

E. Coast

Specie

Recog. Ship Genl. Cargo Specie

4d. Feb.

11

Macao

E. Coast

Ballast

Opium

7th.

39

Anglona

108 American

Macao

Stores

99

6th.

7th. Isabella

422 British

Jorn. & Cotton Cotton

15th.

8th. John Cooper

659

29

Calcutta

Chusan

Coals & Rice Coals &c.

1st. March

10th Ann

270

39

Macao

Cotton

Cotton

10th. Feb,

21

Terror

300

11

Sidney

Ballast

Ballast

11th.

11

H of Malon

482

Madras

19

19th.

23

Thistle

140

|Whampoa |Macao

Opium

13th.

記買利

12th. Chelydra

349

Genl Cargo

Genl. Cargo 15th.

90

Ballast

Opium

15th.

79 Masdeu

237

Ballast

16th.

14th. Manly

186

13

Manila

Horses

39

19

14th.

4

RON Square, from to 1 inch suitable for window grating,

15th. Young Queen

85

Macao

Ballast

99

Opium

17th.

33

B. Hormanjee 888

Whampoa Calcutta

Tea

Ballast

24th.

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

46 Queens Road.

16th Mermaid

16th,

19

物做八發行花

Ariel

19

Anglona

105 American Macao 108

E. Coast Opium

Same

19

17th.

17th. Terror

300 British

19

Whampoa Ballast

Rice

24th.

19

俱屋九客有旗

Sappho

445

99

19

Cotton

Cotton & Rice 18th.

Bombay Castle 602

99

Bombay

13

37

23th.

43

19th. Reliance

1515

39

"

"1

19

23th.

19

Orixa

365

19

Manila

"

Genl. Cargo

Steamer

19

163 British

Macao

Coast

Ballast

Opium

24th.

合器不一方唎

85

99

31

39

28th.

97

19

Macao

Ballast

25th,

24th. Palatine.

507

71

Bombay

Cotton

用料等寸铁士

26th. Red Rover

250

"1

Calcutta E. Coast Opium

Opium

1st. March.

什能或條庇

可內分濶四記

20th H. C. Ariadne 21st. Harrier.

23d. Young Queen Time

22

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD. HONGKONG, SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AND SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY MESSES BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO.

AND

N°.2.-VOL. 1.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA

WONGBONG

GAZIC

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 31ST 1842.

NOTIFICATION. WITH reference to the Notification dated on the 22d. instant, the following Gentle- men are appointed a Committee, to carry into effect the objects therein described. With the sanction of Major General Burrell, c. B.

Major Malcolm, Captain Meik, H. M's. 49th. Foot Lieut. Sargent R. WOOSNAM, Esq.

With the sanction) Mr. Pasco, 2d. Master of H. M's. of Capt. Sir Thomas Herbert, K. C. B. Ship "Blenheim." Captain MYLIUS, Land Officer, will attend the Committee for the purpose of giving effect to its Proceedings, by laying down the necessary Land marks, Bound- aries, Roads, &c. &c.

The Committee will report to Govern- ment, any cases in which they are of opinion, that the Native Chinese should be remunerated for ground, which was in their possession, previous to the occupation of the Island by Her Majesty's Forces, and which may have been appropriated;

as well as the amount of remuneration.

{Price $12 yearly.

Among the "red barbarians," too, there are some, ment, is quite preposterous; and H. E. will who have been brought by those rebels from other doubless select proper official persons, to lands, with no will to follow them, and with no share in their plunder. Why should these continue in their perform the required duties. This notifica- tion has, we find, given much satisfaction to employ? Therefore is this clear Proclamation issued. If, in the residents on the Island. The intimation the day of battle, either "red," or "black" barbarians that any suggestions, that individuals anay will-should they be on shore, cast away their arms, wish to offer, will receive the fullest consid- and kneeling, offer submission,-or, should they be afloat, refuse to fire,they shall in all cases be spared eration, is to our minds quite evidential alive. Any who shall seize and deliver up a great that H. E. seeks as far possible to make his "barbarian Eye" [or Chief] shall be rewarded with intended regulations, conformable with, and a high dignity. Any who shall make prisoners of the minister to, the convenience, health, and common "demons" [privates or sailors]. shall be richly comfort of the present, and future residents rewarded with money and if any shall deliver up a foreign vessel, they shall receive for their reward what of our new city.. Some exception has been taken, and we think causelessly, to the para- ever goods the vessel shall contain. graph in the notification wherein it is stated "that reclaiming land beyond high water mark must be deemed an infringement on the Royalties of Her Majesty. "Till the Land tenures are fixed, it is but right that

A special Edict. 21st. year of TAOUKWANG, 12th. month, 19th. day, [30th. January, 1842.]

WE call the attention of our Readers to the above Translation of the Edict of the such an announcement be made, at any Imperial Commissioners of Che-keang, in-rate, can do no harm, although we feel sure citing the Sepoys and others to acts of when the, assessment and terms of the Treason and desertion. Experience has holdings shall be determined, that no spe- shown, that the tender mercies of the Chi- cial case will be made in the instance of our nese are cruel, and we have little expecta- city, and hence every person will have the tion that the promulgation of this Edict right to reclaim, or subjugate from the sea, as much as he can, provided always that will shake the loyalty of the lowest camp such recovered ground be immediately The Committee will select the most follower. The publication of this Edict is, abutting on his own land, and its recovery eligible spots for Public Landing Places: however, an additional evidence of the un- will define the limits of the Cantonments, compromising spirit of hostility with which be not obstructive of, or detrimental to, the or Locations for officers, near the differ- the Emperor is animated towards us, and navigation or convenience of the neigh- bours, vicinage, or Harbour. In the port ent Barracks: will likewise fix the extent which he has diffused throughout his vast of London all these matters are determined of ground to be reserved for the Naval dominions. We must now emulate this spirit Depôt, and for Dock yards, including and dismiss at once and for ever all by a "Court of conservancy of the Rivers spots for one or more Patent Slips, which thoughts of settlement and peace until we Thames, and Medway" which from time im- it is understood are likely to be erected can dictate and enforce in his own Capital, Land, the persons so undertaking, paying memorial has permitted the reclaiming of by Companies or Individuals. such terms as will guarantee to us the main a merely nominal fee, for such permission. It being the intention of Government tenance, inviolate, of peaceful relations, for This is a matter, which might very proper- to form a watering Place for the Ship- many a long year to come. ly be referred to the above named commit- ping hereafter, the Committee will select tee, as also a plan or rule for the proper the most eligible spot with a running FORTIFICATIONS OF THE BOGUE. construction of Chinese tenements. Al- stream of good water for that purpose. ready within a week have four fellow crea Dated at Hongkong, Government House, In our last number we had not time to tures fallen victims to the wretched ignor- this 29th, day of March 1842. call the attention of our readers to the very ance or deplorable stupidity of our Chinese HENRY POTTINGER, important Circular of H. E. dated 22d. Builders, as will be seen by the coroners Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, &c. March and which we then published. The March and which we then published. The inquests, in another part of our columns. We authoritative announcement by H. E. are quite aware that the throng of Chinese that the consequence of "the repair of the to this settlement, the little knowledge we old, or the erection of any new Forts lower have of them, and they of us, points out down than Whampoa, would be, the renew- each day something new to be learned both al of hostilities in the Canton River and by the governors, and the governed. It the Stoppage of Trade" has put the whole cannot be a matter of reproach, that the matter on a perfectly intelligible footing. authorities have not provided for every pos- Both the Hong and the Foreign merchants sible-contingency, and we are of those who now know what they have to expect; and think, that much mischief is done, by go- will therefore act accordingly. We are verning too much, and we would encourage asked, whether we think the Chinese will in individuals as far as possible, the true En- proceed to such overt acts of hostility, as to glish principle of self supporting, and self go- repair the Forts? We hesitate not to say verning. We would earnestly impress on the that we believe they will attempt doing so, Committee. the necessity of framing some goaded on as the mandarins are, by the general Building regulations, for the Chi- declared will of their great Emperor. That nese, and which we think are essentially Lieut. W. Pedder R. N. Marine Magistrate and heavy retribution will be exacted, for such necessary for their security, health, and unprecedented perfidy, we nothing doubt, welfare. We would recommend the regula- and it may perchance happen, that the tions to be framed so as to interfere no furth- campaign of 1842 may be signalised by the er with every one's right to manage his own second capitulation of Canton, and if so, it property, than is necessary to protect the must, we think, at all hazards be retained, health of the community. If wished we till a final settlement of the whole question may in a future number insert the Land and is arranged and ratified. Tenements regulations, which we think adapted to the wants of this colony; and which at present we have only roughly drafted.

PUBLIC AUTHORITIES OF HONGKONG.

MAJOR General Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart. Her Ma- jesty's. Plenipotentiary and Minister Extraordinary, Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British Subjects Alex. Lehestsus, Egg, Deputy Superintendent, John Robert Morrison, Acting Secretary and

in China-Charged with the Government. Charged with the Government

Treasurer

do.

do.

Chas. E. Stewart, Assistant Alex Anderson, (absent) Colonial Surgeon. Henry Holgate, Acting Colonial Surgeon. Major W. Caine, 26th. Regt. Chief Magistrate. S. Fearon, Interpreter and Clerk to the Court

and Coroner

G. F. Mylius, Captain 26th. Regt. Land Officer. Lieut. Sargent, 18th. Regt. Surveyor.

Harbour Master.

Mr. A. Lena, Assistant Harbour Master.

Mr. Mullaly, in charge of the Post Office and letters.

TRANSLATION.

THE High Imperial Commissioner Yihking, "awe spreading General," and Teishun and Wan,-his coad- jutors, hereby make clear proclamation.

LANDS' AND ROADS' COMMITTEE.

It appears, that amongst the "black barbarians," IN respect to the appointment of the there are many natives of the land, who having been taken captive by the English Rebels, are by change of above committee as officially notified in our dress so altered in appearance, that they cannot be last, much misapprehension seems to have recognized. Being forced by those Rebels to do them menial service, they are greviously oppressed, and have prevailed. At Macao, it was believed that the prospect of being placed, in the day of battle, fore- this committee, would be constituted from most to stand the whole brunt of the conflict, or on the the holders of land in the Colony, and many other hand the fear that, if they retreat, they will meet were the prognostics of quarrels, and feuds, death at the hands of their oppressors. Unable to speak which would date their origin from such an out, and without opportunity either of advancement or retirement from among them, these are indeed to be appointment. We need hardly say, such an abnegation of the functions of Govern-

commiserated.

Since the above was written, we have received the Official notification, of the nomination of the Committee, which will be found in our first Column.

We beg to call the attention of our readers thereto, and we would urge all parties in- terested in Lands &c. to apply as early as possible to the Committee, so that all dubi- ous points may at once-be determined.

6

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CENA

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH, 31ST. 1849.

LOOKING to the important position, which is about to be filled by Lord Ellenborough, the new Governor General of India, we have (to answer inquiries) copied into our Columns, a rather caustic, biography of the noble Lord, as given by a London correspondent of the Madras Atheneum the substantial correctness of which we can avouch; although, we rate, and justly, much higher his mental qualifications. It is well known, that the settlement of the China question is committed to his hands: indeed at the Official Ban- quet, given to him on leaving England, he admits the fact, and we would call the particular attention of our readers, to his speech on that occasion; and which will be found in another part of our Paper. This speech is very unlike the deplorable effort of Sir John Cam Hobhouse, when (in the same room at the congratulatory dinner to Lord Keene) he ventured to pompously vaticinate, the early occu- pation of Pekin, and speedy termination of the China war. The new Governor General's speech is valuable, inasmuch as (from our knowledge of his Lordship) we may safely say, it can be accepted as a correct index of his intend- ed Indian Policy, which will, we think, be of a very auspicious character. What- ever may be the peculiarities of the noble Lord, he is not effeminate in mind and we know no nobleman of the Party to which he belongs, so well qualified as himself; for the very exalted positio.. he is called-upon to fill. Endowed with a masculine intellect, and imbued with practi- cal knowledge, (as evidenced in committees of the house of Lords) we expect much at his hands; and our readers may not be aware, that as respects the commerce of the East, the noble Lord is the best in formed member of the upper House: and the Lords Report on Equalization of Sugar and Rum duty, admission of India Products &c. &c. was drawn up by him, and is a document, highly creditable to his talents and industry.

ADEN AND THE RED SEA.

We translate the following paragraph from a letter of the celebrated Abyssinian traveller, M. Edmond Combes, dated Cairo 1st Sept. 1841 and whieh ap- peared in the Journal des Débats of 28th Sept.

"I have already sent you some particulars of Aden; which the English now designate their new Gibral tar. From this important post, which serves as a base for future operations, the English will be able to execute, without difficulty, their designs on the Abyssinian Coast. They hope moreover, atrast to Aden the whole of the Coffee Trade; and the Arab chiefs in ruining, by their exactions, the Ports of Mocha and Odeida, are most effectually promoting the interests of Great Britain. I visited successively Berbera, Zeyla, Tajoura and Bahita on the western Coast of the Red Sea. Everywhere, I encountered English influence, which closed the ways to French explorery. It was in consequence, quite impossible to penetrate into the interior, and six other travellers, besides myself, who were in these parts were not more successful in their attempts. In all the Ports I found an English vessel of war, and in some places two. The East India Company has besides acquired Tajoura the only point by which strangers can penetrate into the interior of Abyssinia. When I presented myself at this Village I was badly received, and after fruitless negociations, and animated discussions, the Chief and the Cadi both told me, I should not set out for the interio, unless I had a permission from the Governor of Aden; and because I persisted, they repulsed me with violence, and I was compelled to leave without

delay.

From thence I proceeded to Massowah; the news I there received from Abyssinia, was very unsatisfac- tory. Oubi distrusting the Europeans [whose incre- asing numbers alarmed him] had declared to M. Blondel, the Belgic Consul-General in Egypt, on travelling in Abyssinia, that he was the last European, who should be permitted to enter his territories. At the same time Mr. Coffin, an English agent in "le Tigre", had left for London on a Mission from Oubi with presents to Queen Victoria. Despite this dis.

Zanzibar.

tressing intelligence M. Evin a French Officer has entered "le Tigré", with gigantic projects; he wishes to penetrate according to circumstances to Algeria or The inhabitants of Judda, and above all the mer- chants, support impatiently the yoke of the Sultan and but for fear of England would revolt in favor of the Pacha of Egypt. I met in this City, M. d'Ab- badie the Younger, who had not been able to pene- trate into the interior. He assured me, the English had already taken possession of Tajoura, and the go- vernor of Aden had sent as a present some field picees, and on hundred thousand talaris to the King of Choa. The attempts of the English, upon the Coast of Abys- sinia, demonstrate the truth of my reports on this Country, and give the lie to the statements circulated by some, who would try to persuade us, this Country is destitute of resources. Unfortunately, the vicinage of the East Indies, the occupation of Aden, the acqui- sition of Tajoura give England great advantages in the Red Sea."

would be immense.

W'e rejoice to find the most profound thinkers, and best authorities, have acknowledged thus much; some of them adding, the paramount obligations of our Ex- chequer, alone forbad a reduction, till the presumed deficit, could be levied on some other article.

Should our opinions, on this point, be in accordance with the intelligent commercial community, (whose best interests we have at heart) we shall in that case, most earnestly advocate the reduction of the Tea Duty; and in aid of our efforts, we may count on the active support, of all the friends of commercial Freedom, and also the zealous co-operation, of an enlightened and high-minded population, which at home, have ranged themselves under the Temperance Banner.

We rejoice to know that this movement is not a national paroxysni, but a durable feeling which has already effected a most beneficial improvement on the national morals of England, Ireland, and America. In thus urging the reduction of the Tea Duty irrespective of the material advantages which would result to our subscribers] we shall be promoting, a cause eminently moral, not to say religious, and of the efforts, which have been so ungrudgingly made, for objects of infinitely less importance, be made in this our success is certain, as influential correspon- dents at home, in agitation of this question. have already promised us their most hearty cooperation and support.

.There is some truth and much exaggeration in the foregoing; we met in September last at Cairo Mr. Coffin on his way to England, from him and from the Political resident at Aden we learned some- thing of the French intrigues on the Coast of Abys- inia; it was not till some fifty miles of sea coast had been for some £10,000 acquired by the French that the English interfered and as it seems crushed in embryo the proposed Colony. With a strong govern- NAME OF OUR Town. We have been asked by ment the development, of the resources of Abyssinia many Subscribers, whether it is intended to call the At present a little trade is done at Capital of the first British Settlement in China "Queens Massowah and at certain seasons mules are procurable Town," as given in the Census quoted in our last at 6 to 8, dollars each and are worth at the Isle of number?-All we can say is, that we printed from a France 40 to 80. Sheep three or four for a dollar and document which we supposed had been submitted to of excellent quality. Coffee of the very best quality the authorities, and received their sanction. At the and the women who are jet black [but have not the distinctive cognomen for our Capital, other than Hong- at moderate rates. There is a large trade in slaves same time, whilst we admit and would require, a woolly hair and flat noses of the negro race) are kong (the name of the Island and also of one of our deemed in point of regularity of feature and symmetry villages) we yet think Queens Town for its appellation of person to be among the finest in the world. Boys is no happily chosen, other towns having already adopt- and women were obtainable at lesser rates than hors-ed this designation. In Jamaica there is one so called es and mules. Certain we are [if English influence and also in Canada and Ireland; hence one valuable predominates as is alleged] an end will soon be put to quality of a name to the avoidance of mistake and this odious traffic. confusion, viz distinctiveness is lost. The original Chinese name would, in this respect, be far prefe- its similarity to New York led the Government, a few rable. The capital of upper Cenada was called York: years since, to change it to Toronto, the name by which it was known among the aborigines. Many post office mistakes, and misdirections have been prevented by this change. If, however, it be deter mined that the Town shall have a name, which shall announce the nation to which it belongs,

in the following paragraph, that the China gras's THE correspondent of the Times errs in saying cloth is manufactured from the Aloe plant. By an inspection of the yarn-and plant it will be recognised to be a genuine species of the FLAX. Indeed the Chinese name of it, Ma, at once determines its classification. We now remember that about three years ago a friend in Canton succeeded, after much delay and trouble and by paying a consider- material, and his examination convinced him, that able sum, in obtaining a large bundle of the raw it was Flax decidedly. From the Aloe plant, however, a peculiar kind of stuff is manufactured not unlike to silk in Sicily and Spain; and we gant in appearanance and very durable in wear have seen bell ropes, tassels and chair seats, ele- made from this very useful material. Toulon Dock yard it was recently demonstrated by experiment that for ropes and cables the Aloe plant furnished a vegetable fibre stronger than any other yet tested, and at a very moderate cost.

At the

We shall be glad to receive particulars of Chi- mese products, arts and handicrafts from intelligent correspondents.

CHINA GRASS-CLOTH-If any person wil be at the trouble of cutting a leaf from an aloe plant, which is reared and son, deed as an exotic in this country, he will, upon close inspection, detect a course of long white fibres, possessing considerable tenacity. These, when elicited from the fleshy part of the leaf, and placed together by themselves, will exhibit a very beautiful clean hemp, corresponding precisely with the material of which the linen cal led Chian grass-cloth is composed. The slogs wild and in great abundance throughout China, and the people of that country have turned it, as they do everything else, to a profitable account. The flax which constitutes the fishing lines known under the name of Indian twist, but which is in reality a chinese production, is manufactured from the same identical commodity. There are many Chinese inventions, at present retained as a monopoly by the above people, which are easily capable of being arrived at by those of other countries, if proper attention and a very moderate share of curiosity were bestowed upon the subject-Times.

TEA DUTY.

OUR readers are doubtless well aware, that a thorough revision of Customs Duties in England is imminent. We know enough of the entiments of the coryphaei of the rival factions, and deep seated convictions of the British People to say, that it matters little, to his pow gress of that enlightened public opinion, which is being concentrated on the great questions of social advancement and Fiscal reform whether the Whigs or the Tories govern. ment, will give in its adhesion, to every measure of It is quite certain, that Sir Robert Peel's Govern expedient liberality, and if it loes not take the initiative, it must at least follow, in the wake of public intelligence. Robert Peal has exhibited himself, as a Reformer not We doubt not that by this time, in parliament, Sir has hitherto been a disgrace to the civilization we so only of our criminal but also of our Fiscal Code, which often, and so proudly invoke.

with Chinese commerce, whether justice to them, be It will rest with the important interests, connected done or not. We allude in particular, to the enor. mously heavy impost on our staple article of Export, Tea. If our commercial legislation had been founded reference to the frist principles of Justice, and wisdom, on any recognised, genera, equitable laws, having. such a heavy tax would never have been imposed.

We

then we would venture to recommended that it hereafter be called Victoria; an appellation now become thoroughly English, by being the name of the beloved sovereign, under whose beneficent sway. this Island has just come by formal treaty. know no designation, that can be more distinctly appellative than this. We are confident it not only would be generally acceptable but its announcement would be hailed with the most cordial satisfaction by all our fellow countrymen. We deem Victoria a name of good omen and full of significant and auspicious meaning, as we would fain hope it preludes not only a martial ovation over the Chinese, but a glorious Victory over their superstition, pride, and prejudice; and we humbly trust Victoria will be the fulcrum, from which, with our lever of more than Archimedean power, (we mean a Free Press) we shall be able to move the world of ignorance which, for so many centuries, has oppressed our benighted and enslaved neighbours.

We are sorry to perceive by a late Boston Atlas that the Barque Florida, Capt. Fau con, which left China for New-York, May 19th. 1841 with a valuable cargo of teas and silks, has been totally lost on the American coast. The crew were all saved. The celled in New-York only the day previous insurance policies on the cargo were can- to her going ashore. The vessel and Capt's. effects were insured in New-Bedford.

from Calcutta that the American Baptist We regret to learn by a private letter Board for Foreign Missions have lost fifteen thousand Rupees by the failure of the firm of Boyd & Co, Calcutta. Boyd & Co. were the sole Agents through whom their missionaries in Asia. It is worthy of the Baptist Board paid the salaries of all honorable mention (as we learn by the same letter per Cowasjee Family) that nevolently agreed to assume three fourths J. W. Alexander Esq. of Calcutta, has be- Baptist Missionaries in Asia, until remit- of the usual expenses of all the American tances can be received from the Board at in Asam, Madras, Burmah, Arracan, Siam Boston. The said Board has missionaries and China, and the manly and opportune benevolence of the above gentleman has sared the missions from incredible derange- meat and trouble.

3

THE FRIEND OF CHINA

AND W

N°.2. VOL. 1.

WONGBONG

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH 31ST. 1842.

NOTIFICATION. WITH reference to the Notification dated on the 22d. instant, the following Gentle- men are appointed a Committee, to carry into effect the objects therein described. With the sanction Major Malcolm, of Major General Captain Meik, Burrell, c. B.

H. M's. 49th. Foot Lieut. Sargent R. WOOSNAM, Esq.

With the sanction Mr. Pasco, 2d. of Capt. Sir Thomas Master of H. M's. Herbert, K. C. B. Ship "Blenheim." Captain MYLIUS, Land Officer, will attend the Committee for the purpose of giving effect to its Proceedings, by laying down the necessary Land marks, Bound- aries, Roads, &c. &c.

The Committee will report to Govern- ment, any cases in which they are of opinion, that the Native Chinese should be remunerated for ground, which was in their possession, previous to the occupation of the Island by Her Majesty's Forces, and which may have been appropriated; The Committee will select the most eligible spots for Public Landing Places: will define the limits of the Cantonments, or Locations for officers, near the differ- ent Barracks: will likewise fix the extent of ground to be reserved for the Naval Depôt, and for Dock yards, including spots for one or more Patent Slips, which it is understood are likely to be erected by Companies or Individuals.

as well as the amount of remuneration.

It being the intention of Government to form a watering Place for the Ship- ping hereafter, the Committee will select the most eligible spot with a running stream of good water for that purpose. Dated at Hongkong, Government House, this 29th, day of March 1842.

HENRY POTTINGER,

Price $1 monthly Or $12 yearly

Among the "red barbarians," too, there are some, ment, is quite preposterous; and H. E. will who have been brought by those rebels from other doubless select proper official persons, to lands, with no will to follow them and with no share in their plunder. Why should these continue in their perform the required duties. This notifica- employ? tion has, we find, given much satisfaction to

Therefore is this clear Proclamation issued. If, in the residents on the Island. The intimation the day of battle, either "red," or "black" barbarians that any suggestions, that individuals may will-should they be on shore, cast away their arms, wish to offer, will receive the fullest consid- and kneeling, offer submission,-or, should they be afloat, refuse to fire,--they shall in all cases be spared alive. Any who shall seize and deliver up a great barbarian Eye" [or Chief] shall be rewarded with a high dignity. Any who shall make prisoners of the common "demons" [privates or sailors], shall be richly rewarded with money and if any shall deliver up a foreign vessel, they shall receive for their reward what ever goods the vessel shall contain.

A special Edict. 21st. year of TAOUKWANG, 12th. month, 19th. day,

[30th. January, 1842.]

WE call the attention of our Readers to the above Translation of the Edict of the Imperial Commissioners of Che-keang, in- citing the Sepoys and others to acts of Treason and desertion. Experience has shown, that the tender mercies of the Chi- nese are cruel, and we have little expecta- tion that the promulgation of this Edict follower. The publication of this Edict is, will shake the loyalty of the lowest camp however, an additional evidence of the un- compromising spirit of hostility with which the Emperor is animated towards us, and which he has diffused throughout his vast dominions. We must now emulate this spirit and dismiss at once and for ever all thoughts of settlement and peace until we can dictate and enforce in his own Capital, such terms as will guarantee to us the main tenance, inviolate, of peaceful relations, for many a long year to come.

39

eration, is to our minds quite evidential that H. E. seeks as far possible to make his intended regulations, conformable with, and minister to, the convenience, health, and comfort of the present, and future residents of our new city, Some exception has been taken, and we think causelessly, to the para- graph in the notification wherein it is stated that reclaiming land beyond high water mark must be deemed an infringement on the Royalties of Her Majesty. Till the Land tenures are fixed, it is but right that such an announcement be made, at any rate, can do no harm, although we feel sure when the, assessment and terms of the holdings shall be determined, that no spe- cial case will be made in the instance of our city, and hence every person will have the right to reclaim, or subjugate from the sea, abutting on his own land, and its recovery as much as he can, provided always that such recovered ground be immediately abutting on his own land, and its recovery be not obstructive of, or detrimental to, the navigation or convenience of the neigh- bours, vicinage, or Harbour. In the port of London all these matters are determined by a "Court of conservancy of the Rivers Thames, and Medway" which from time im- memorial has permitted the reclaiming of Land, the persons so undertaking, paying a merely nominal fee, for such permission. This is a matter, which might very proper- ly be referred to the above named commit- tee, as also a plan or rule for the proper construction of Chinese tenements. AI- tures fallen victims to the wretched ignor- ready within a week have four fellow crea ance or deplorable stupidity of our Chinese March and which we then published. The inquests, in another part of our columns. We authoritative announcement by II. E. are quite aware that the throng of Chinese that the consequence of "the repair of the to this settlement, the little knowledge we old, or the erection of any new Forts lower have of them, and they of us, points out down than Whampoa, would be, the renew-cach al of hostilities in the Canton River and each day something new to be learned both the Stoppage of Trade" has put the whole cannot be a matter of reproach, that the by. the governors, and the governed. It matter on a perfectly intelligible footing. authorities have not provided for every pos- Both the Hong and the Foreign merchants sible contingency, and we are of those who now know what they have to expect; and think, that much mischief is done, by go- will therefore act accordingly. We are verning too much, and we would encourage asked, whether we think the Chinese will in individuals as far as possible, the true En- proceed to such overt acts of hostility, as to glish principle of self supporting, and self go- repair the Forts? We hesitate not to say verning. We would earnestly impress on the that we believe they will attempt doing so, Committee. the necessity of framing song goaded on as the mandarins are, by the general Building regulations, for the Chi- declared will of their great Emperor. That heavy retribution will be exacted, for such nese, and which we think are essentially unprecedented perfidy, we nothing doubt, welfare. We would recommend the regula- necessary for their security, health, and and it may perchance happen, that the tions to be framed so as to interfere no furth- campaign of 1842 may be signalised by the er with every one's right to manage his own second capitulation of Canton, and if so, iter property, than is necessary to protect the must, we think, at all hazards be retained, health of the community. If wished we till a final settlement of the whole question may in a future number insert the Land and is arranged and ratified. Tenements regulations, which we think adapted to the wants of this colony; and which at present we have only roughly drafted.

FORTIFICATIONS OF THE BOGUE.

In our last number we had not time to call the attention of our readers to the very

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, &c. important Circular of H. E. dated 22d. Builders, as will be seen by the coroners

PUBLIC AUTHORITIES OF HONGKONG.

MÁJon General Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart. Her Ma. jesty's. Plenipotentiary and Minister Extraordinary, Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British Subjects in China-Charged with the Government. Alex. R. Johnstone Esq. Deputy Superintendent, Charged with the Government John Robert Morrison, Acting Secretary and

Treasurer

do.

do. Chas. E. Stewart, Assistant Alex Anderson, (absent) Colonial Surgeon. Henry Holgate, Acting Colonial Surgeon. Major W. Caine, 26th. Regt. Chief Magistrate. 5. Fearon, Interpreter and Clerk to the Court

and Coroner

G. F. Mylius, Captain 26th. Regt. Land Officer. Lieut. Sargent, 18th. Regt. Surveyor,

Lieut. W. Pedder R. N. Marine Magistrate and

Harbour Master.

Mr. A. Lena, Assistant Harbour Master.

Mr. Mullaly, in charge of the Post Office and letters.

TRANSLATION.

THE High Imperial Commissioner Yihking, "awe spreading General," and Teishun and Wan,-his coad. jutors, hereby make clear proclamation.

It appears, that amongst the "black barbarians," there are many natives of the land, who having been taken captive by the English Rebels, are by change of dress so altered in appearance, that they cannot be recognized. Being forced by those Rebels to do them

LANDS' AND ROADS' COMMITTEE.

IN respect to the appointment of the above committee as officially notified in our last, much misapprehension seems to have menial service, they are greviously oppressed, and have prevailed. At Macao, it was believed that the prospect of being placed, in the day of battle, fore. this committee, would be constituted from most to stand the whole brunt of the conflict, or on the the holders of land in the Colony, and many other hand the fear that, if they retreat, they will ineet were the prognostics of quarrels, and feuds, death at the hands of their oppressors. Unable to speak which would date their origin from such an out, and without opportunity either of advancement or retirement from among them, these are indeed to be appointment. We need hardly say, such an abnegation of the functions of

commiserated.

Since the above was written, we have received the Official notification, of the nomination of the Committee, which will be found in our first Column.

We beg to call the attention of our readers thereto, and we would urge all parties in- terested in Lands &c. to apply as early as possible to the Committee, so that all dubi- nous points may at once be determined.

6

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FLEEND OF CHINAtressing intelligence M. Evin a French Officer has

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MARCH, 31ST. 1842.

LOOKING to the important position, which is about to be filled by Lord Ellenborough, the new Governor General of India, we have (to answer inquiries) copied into our Columns, a rather caustic biography of the noble Lord, as given by a London correspondent of the Madras Atheneum the substantial correctness of which we can avouch; although we rate, and justly, much higher his mental qualifications. It is well known, that the settlement of the China question is committed to his hands indeed at the Official Ban- quet, given to him on leaving England, he admits the fact, and we would call the particular attention of our readers, to his speech on that occasion; and which will be found in another part of our Paper. This speech is very unlike the deplorable effort of Sir John Cam Hobhouse, when (in the same room at the congratulatory dinner to Lord Keene) he ventured to pompously vaticinate, the early occu- pation of Pekin, and speedy termination of the China war.. The new Governor General's speech is valuable, inasmuch as (from our of his knowledge Lordship) we may safely say, it can be accepted as a correct index of his intend- ed Indian Policy, which will, we think, be of a very auspicious character. What- ever may be the peculiarities of the noble Lord, he is not effeminate in mind and we know no nobleman of the Party to which he belongs, so well qualified as himself; for the very exalted position he is called-upon to fill. Endowed with a masculine intellect, and imbued with practi- cal knowledge, (as evidenced in committees of the house of Lords) we expect much at his hands; and our readers may not be aware, that as respects the commerce of the East, the noble Lord is the best in- formed member of the upper House: and the Lords Report on Equalization of Sugar and Rum duty, admission of India Products &c. &c. was drawn up by him, and is a document, highly creditable to his talents and industry.

ADEN AND THE RED SEA.

We translate the following paragraph from a letter of the celebrated Abyssinian traveller, M. Edmond Combes, dated Cairo 1st Sept. 1841 and which ap- peared in the Journal des Débats of 28th Sept.

"I have already sent you some particulars of Aden; which the English now designate their new Gibral- tar. From this important post, which serves as a base for future operations, the English will be able to execute, without difficulty, their designs on the Abyssinian Coast. They hope moreover, to attract to Aden the whole of the Coffee Trade; and the Arab chiefs in ruining, by their exactions, the Ports of Mocha and Odeida, are most effectually promoting the interests of Great Britain. I visited successively Berbera, Zeyla, Tajoura and Bahita on the western Coast of the Red Sea. Everywhere, I encountered English influence, which closed the ways to French explorery. It was in consequence, quite impossible to penetrate into the interior, and six other travellers, besides myself, who were in these parts were not more successful in their attempts. In all the Ports I found an English vessel of war, and in some places two. The East India Company has besides acquired Tajoura the only point by which strangers can penetrate into the interior of Abyssinia. When I presented myself at this Village I was badly received, and after fruitless negociations, and animated discussions, the Chief and the Cadi both told me, I should not set out for the interio, unless I had a permission from the Governor of Aden; and because I persisted, they repulsed me with violence, and I was compelled to leave without delay.

From thence I proceeded to Massowah; the news I there received from Abyssinia, was very unsatisfac- tory. Oubi distrusting the Europeans [whose incre- asing numbers alarmed him] had declared to M. Blondel, the Belgic Consul-General in Egypt, on travelling in Abyssinia, that he was the last European, who should be permitted to enter his territories. At the same time Mr. Coffin, an English agent in "le Tigre", had left for London on a Mission from Oubi with presents to Queen Victoria. Despite this dis-

entered "le Tigré", with gigantic projects; he wishes to penetrate according to circumstances to Algeria or Zanzibar...

The inhabitants of Judda, and above all the mer chants, support impatiently the yoke of the Sultan and but for fear of England would revolt in favor of the Pacha of Egypt. I met if this City, M. d'Ab. badie the Younger, who had not been able to pene- trate into the interior. He assured me, the English had already taken possession of Tajoura, and the go- vernor of Aden had sent as a present some field picees, and on hundred thousand talaris to the King of Choa. The attempts of the English, upon, the Coast of Abys- sinia, demonstrate the truth of my reports on this Country, and give the lie to the statements circulated by some, who would try to persuade us, this Country is destitute of resources. Unfortunately, the vicinage of the East Indies, the occupation of Aden, the acqui- sition of Tajoura give England great advantages in the Red Sea."

We rejoice to find the most profound thinkers, and best authorities, have acknowledged thus much; some of them adding, the paramount obligations of our Ex- chequer, alone forbad a reduction, till the presumed deficit, could be levied on some other article.

Should our opinions, on this point, be in accordance with the intelligent commercial community, (whose best interests we have at heart we shall in that case, most earnestly advocate the reduction of the Tea Duty; and in aid of our efforts, we may count on the active support, of all the friends of commercial Freedom, and also the zealous co-operation, of an enlightened and high-minded population, which at home, have ranged themselves under the Temperance Banner.

We rejoice to know that this movement is not a national paroxysm, but a durable feeling which has already effected a most beneficial improvement on the national morals of England, Ireland, and America. In thus urging the reduction of the Tea Duty [irrespective of the material advantages which would result to our subscribers] we shall be promoting, a cause eminently moral, not to say religious, and of the efforts, which have been so ungrudgingly made, for objects of infinitely less importance, be made in this our success is certain, as influential correspon- dents at home, in agitation of this question. have already promised us their most hearty cooperation and support.

There is some truth and much exaggeration in the foregoing; we met in September last at Cairo Mr. Coffin on his way to England, from him and from the Political resident at Aden we learned some thing of the French intrigues on the Coast of Abys- sinia; it was not till some fifty miles of sea coast had been for some £10,000 acquired by the French that the English interfered and as it seems crushed in embryo the proposed Colony. With a strong govern- NAME OF OUR TOWN. We have been asked by ment the development of the resources of Abyssinia many Subscribers, whether it is intended to call the would be immense. At present a little trade is done at Capital of the first British Settlement in China "Queens Massowah and at certain seasons mules are procurable Town," as given in the census quoted in our last at 6 to 8 dollars each and are worth at the Isle of number?-All we can say is, that we printed from a France 40 to 80. Sheep three or four for a dollar and document which we supposed had been submitted to of excellent quality. Coffee of the very best quality the authorities, and received their sanction. At the and the women who are jet black [but have not the distinctive cognomen for our Capital, other than Hong- same time, whilst we admit and would require, a at moderate rates. There is a large trade in slaves woolly hair and flat noses of the negro race] are kong (the name of the Island and also of one of our deemed in point of regularity of feature and symmetry villages) we yet think Queens Town for its appellation of person to be among the finest in the world. Boys is not happily chosen, other towns having already adopt- and women were obtainable at lesser rates than hors-ed this designation. In Jamaica there is one so called es and mules. Gertain we are '[ if English influence and also in Canada and Ireland; hence one valuable predominates as is alleged) an end will soon be put to quality of a name to the avoidance of mistake and this odious traffic. confusion, viz distinctiveness is lost. The original Chinese name would, in this respect, be far prefe- rable. The capital of upper Canada was called York: its similarity to New York led the Government, a few years since, to change it to Toronto, the name by which it was known among the aborigines. Many post office mistakes, and misdirections have been mined that the Town shall have a name, which prevented by this change.-If, however, it be deter- shall announce the nation to which it belongs, then we would venture to recommended that it hereafter be cailed Victoria; an appellation now the beloved sovereign, under whose beneficent sway become thoroughly English, by being the name of this Island has just come by formal trouty. We know no designation, that can be more distinctly appellative than this. We are confident it not only would be generally acceptable but its announcement would be hailed with the most cordial satisfaction by all our fellow countrymen. We deem Victoria a name of good omen and full of significant and auspicious meaning, as we would fain hope it preludes not only a martial ovation over the Chinese, but a glorious Victory over their superstition, pride, and prejudice; and we humbly trust Victoria will be the fulcrum, from which, with our lever of more than Archimedean power, (we mean a Free Press) we shall be able to move the world of ignorance which, for so many centuries, has oppressed our benighted and enslaved neighbours.

THE correspondent of the Times errs in saying in the following paragraph, that the China gras's cloth is manufactured from the Aloe plant. By an inspection of the yarn-and plant it will be recognised to be a genuine species of the FLAX. Indeed the Chinese name of it, Ma, at once determines its classification. We now remember that about three years ago a friend in Canton succeeded, after much delay and trouble and by paying a consider material, and his examination convinced him that able sum, in obtaining a large bundle of the raw it was Flax decidedly. From the Aloe plant, however, a peculiar kind of stuff is manufactured not unlike to silk, in Sicily and Spain; and we have seen bell ropes, tassels and chair seats, ele- gant in appearanance and very durable in wear made from this very useful material. At the Toulon Dock yard it was recently demonstrated by experiment that for ropes and cables the Aloe plant furnished a vegetable fibre stronger than any other yet tested, and at a very moderate cost.

We shall be glad to receive particulars of Chi- nese products, arts and handicrafts from intelligent correspondents.

CHINA GRASS-CLOTH.-If any person will be at the trouble of cutting a leaf from an aloe plant, which is reared and encouraged as an exotic in this country, he will, upon close inspection, detect a course of long white fibres, possessing considerable tenacity. These, when elicited from the fleshy part of the leaf, and placed together by themselves, will exhibit a very beautiful clean hemp, corresponding precisely with the material of which the linen cal. great abundance throughout China, and the people of that country led China grasscloth is composed. The aloe grows and in have turned it, as they do everything else, to a profitable account. The flax which constitutes the fishing lines known under the name of Indian twist, but which is in reality a chinese production, is manufactured from the same identical commodity. There are many Chinese inventions, at present retained as a monopoly by the Jabove people, which are easily capable of being arrived at by those of other countries, if proper attention and a very moderate share of curiosity were bestowed upon the subject.-Times.

TEA DUTY.

OUR readers are doubtless well aware, that a thorough revision of Customs Duties in England is imminent. We know enough of the sentiments of the coryphoei of the rival factions, and deep seated convictions of the British People to say, that it matters little, to the pro- gress of that enlightened public opinion, which is now being concentrated on the great questions of social advancement and Fiscal reform whether the Whigs or the Tories govern.

It is quite certain, that Sir Robert Peel's Govern. ment, will give in its adhesion, to every measure of expedient liberality, and if it does not take the initiative, it must at least follow, in the wake of public intelligence. Robert Peal has exhibited himself, as a Reformer not We doubt not that by this time, in parliament, Sir only of our criminal but also of our Fiscal Code, which

has hitherto been a disgrace to the civilization we so often, and so proudly invoke.

with Chinese commerce, whether justice to them, be It will rest with the important interests, connected mously heavy impost on our staple article of Export, done or not. We allude in particular, to the enor. Tea. If our commercial legislation had been founded reference to the frist principles of Justice, and wisdom, on any recognised, general, equitable laws, having." such a heavy tax would never have been imposed.

WE are sorry to perceive by a late Boston Atlas that the Barque Florida, Capt. Fau- con, which left China for New-York, May 19th. 1841 with a valuable cargo of teas and silks, has been totally lost on the American coast. The crew were all saved. The insurance policies on the cargo were can- celled in New-York only the day previous to her going ashore. The vessel and Capt's. effects were insured in New-Bedford.

from Calcutta that the American Baptist We regret to learn by a private letter Board for Foreign Missions have lost fifteen thousand Rupees by the failure of the firm of Boyd & Co, Calcutta. Boyd & Co. were the sole Agents through whom the Baptist Board paid the salaries of all their missionaries in Asia. It is worthy of honorable mention (as we learn by the same letter per Cowasjee Family) that nevolently agreed to assume three fourths J. W. Alexander Esq. of Calcutta, has be- Baptist Missionaries in Asia, until remit- of the usual expenses of all the American Boston. The said Board has missionaries tances can be received from the Board at and China, and the manly and opportune in Asam, Madras, Burmah, Arracan, Siam benevolence of the above gentleman has saved the missions from incredible derange-

ment and trouble.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

RIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

To the Editor of the Friend of China. Dear Sir,

I propose sending you, from time to time, as leisure and health permit, sundry miscellaneous articles on China, and the Chinese, provided you may deem fit to give them some unoccupied corner in your valuable paper, and herewith I send as

No. 1.

CHINESE SUPERSTITIONS.

THE Chinese, alike with all other idolatrous nations of the Earth, possess many absurd and foolishly supersti. tious observances; indeed all nations are more or less infected with the darkness of superstition, and which is only dispelled by their advancement in civilization and Christianity. The Chinese may be justly said to be an extremely superstitious people.

A Carpenter on erecting a building when he reaches the upper beam worships it and offers up prayers that success and happiness may attend those who are to reside within. The Chinese believe that the masons can materially affect the happiness of the inmates of a dwelling; should he conceal in the wall an image or representation of some evil spirit he would by no means confer a blessing on them, but a curse. This belief in- duces them to adore and worship the Patrons of these Masons and place money under the door that the lot of happiness may be theirs. Murder is not a rare accurrence in the celestial Em. pire. The spirit of the murdered individual is supposed to be wandering about in a restless condition, and of. ferings are annually presented, and in some cases the bloody sacrifice of the murderer, when he can be arrest. ed is offered to appease the injured manes of the dead, whose wrongs they think can never be atoned for, except by the shedding of blood. In former times, prisoners of war were frequently offered, as sacrifices to the stand. ards of the army, in order to ensure success to certain military undertakings. The Generals of the hostile armies when taken, were in some instances, put to death, and their blood sprinkled on the tombs of those whom they had slain in war. These sacrifices are not presented to any deity, but to the departed and restless spirits of men.

To obtain fame, the Chinese literati worship the Northern Polar Star. Their prostrations are made before a representation of Kwei-sing, who is considered the god of learning. He is represented standing on one foot, holding a pencil in his right hand and is sup. posed to have been, in consequence of his great talent and erudition, translated to the Northern Polar Star. It is fabled, that a certain bride on leaving her father's house to go to that of her husband, was met by the way and devoured by a tiger. At the present day to prevent a catastrophe so fatal, the parents of the bride- groom on similar occasions, suspend a piece of meat at their door to bribe the cruel Tiger. A common sieve and a pair chopsticks are laid at the door, over which the bride leaps on entering the house of her husband, which act is thought to promote the felicity of their future progeny. Also when the bride is going to the house of her betrothed, they scatter rice in her pathway to prevent her from being molested by the fabulous bird Kin-ke-sing, which holds its lofty habitation among

the stars.

Among the lower classes of Chinese, the prevailing opinion with regard to an eclipse is, that an animal, a monster of the frog-kind, having one leg and two fore paws, swallows the sun or moon, in consequence of which the priests in the Temples, the people in the streets, and the officers at the public courts keep up an incessant beating of drums. As near the time of the commencement of the eclipse as can be ascertained; each one sounds his drum as loudly as he possibly can, in order to affright the frog, and cause it to cast forth the luminary which it has seized. The noise of the drums continues until the eclipse is over. Eclipses are generally regarded with dread by the Chinese and they present offerings to the sun when he is thus obscured, believing some national calamity to be portended. On the 7th, day of the 7th, moon (7th. of August) unmar- ried females offer wine, flowers and cosmetics to two of the stars of the milky way.

By the Chinese, the Magpie is held in very great esteem, and its flight over a house, is supposed to be indicative of the arrival of some stranger. The Rook, on the contrary, is regarded as an unhappy bird, and her visits are thought to be prognostic of some dif. ficulties with the magistrates.

To cause an abundant harvest of grain, they suspend from the highest beam of the house, a corn sieve and in the same manner, a piece of red cloth to promote "good luck."

The Chinese possess an imperfect knowledge of a Supreme Being. They believe that all things animate or inanimate possess a presiding spirit, consequently they ignorantly adore gods of seas and rivers, of wood and stone, of lofty hills and mountains, as well as of heaven and earth.

The Chinese yearly note in their almanacks, the number of fortunate days that will occur during the year. The year 1819 had 150 lucky days. They are very particular, with regard to the kind of work, which may be performed on those days.

Very frequently one observes two or three Chinese characters, meaning "eight inmortals" worked neatly on the caps of young children. This is done with a desire, that they may confer on the children, the bles sings of longevity and prosperity.

During the troubles of the three contending states. alarm for fear the measure should be rejected. With Chang-keó pasted up charms in the streets, to prevent one or two exceptions, Lord Ellenborough has adopted, the further spread of some disease then prevailing. during his political career, those courses which have The custom is still adhered to by the Priests of Fuh been of the most pacific and conciliatory nature. and Taou. The charm consists of two or three charac- ters, written in such a manner as to be perfectly un- inteleigible. If it can be decyphered the charm is lost.

Yours &c.

A. K.

YESTERDAY Nov. 3rd, a Court of Directors was held at the East India House, when the Right Hon. Lord For each year in the Chinese cycle, which compri. Ellenborongh was sworn in as Governor-General ses 60 years, there is a particular charm pasted up as of India, a preventive against disease. In the evening the East India Company gave a Che-hwang-te, whose death took place about 150 grand dinner at the London Tavern to the newly- years before Christ, caused all of his domestics to be appointed Governor-General. The chair was occu. put to death, that they might still attend on him pied by Mr. Lyall, M. P.supported on the right though in a future state. The practice of burning by Lord Ellenborough, the Duke of Wellington, gilt, and other kinds of paper, seems to have commenced the Earl of Lincoln, Earl Delawarr, the Earl of immediately after his death. A vast deal of this Rosslyn, Sir Robert Peel, Mr. Goulburn; and on paper is annually consumed in the present age, as well the left by the Deputy-Chairman of the Hon. East as paper made into the shapes of all kinds of their India Company, Lord Wharncliffe, the Duke of garments, and representations of men, women, horses, Buckingham, the Earl of Haddington, the Earl of houses &c. &c. They use this paper on all religious Jersey, Lord Hill, Lord Fitzgerald &c. &c. His health having been drunk, Lord Ellenborough occasions. At the tombs of their departed relatives they burn it, foolishly believing the dead wear it in their in acknowledging the compliment, assured them that future state, and otherwise receive some good from their he felt most deeply the importance of the trust which so doing. The making of these various kinds of had been confided to him. He knew too well the paper affords an extensive branch of trade to the Chi- difficulties of his situation not to feel much appre- nese. This, with many others, may prove a barrier hension, that no endeavours of his, however well intended and directed,could effect one tenth of the good against the promulgation of the gospel of Christ in he desired; but if there was any one thing which China. Many thousands of these wretched idolators are wholly employed in making these gods, papers and qualified him rather than any other man for the office other things worshipped by them. Should they embrace he now held, it was, that placed at the head of the India the gospel, this of course, must be given up, though they of Wellington, he had from that time to the present Board thirteen years ago by his noble friend the Duke may have no other way of gaining a subsistence. A cry will probably ere long be heard throughout these constantly and confidentially communicated with him extensive territories, not dissimilar to that of the rabble on every subject relative to the affairs of India. He at Ephesus, who perceiving their craft in danger ex- felt that in going to India he went strong in the noble claimed with one accord Great is Diana of the Duke's confidence (cheers), and that he might say. Ephesians!!" was one chief support of the government he went to administer, He felt also that he was about to succeed Hongkong March 28th, 1842. a man who in the office of Governor-General had, he rejoiced to have this opportunity of declaring, exhibited EDWARD Law, Lord Ellenborough, was born in the great personal as well as publie satisfaction to him, year 1790: he is consequently now nearly fifty-two united as he had been with the Earl of Auckland in years of age. He is the son of the celebrated Lord El- former times by ties of the closest friendship, to observe lenborough, who was so well known by the high judi the indefatigable industry, the great ability, and the cial reputation Le acquired as Lord Chief Justice of the extensive knowledge he had brought to the investigation, Queen's Bench. elucidation, and management of all the great questions The present Lord Ellenborough succeeded to his fa- which had come before his government. [Cheers ] ther's title in the month of December of the year 1818. Yet he felt he had much to do--to terminate the war He had been for some years previously a member of in China by a peace honorable to the Crown, and dura the House of Commons. He called himself a Whig for ble in its provisions, to restore tranquillity to both some time, and was seen to act in that capacity, al- banks of the Indus; in a word, to give peace to Asia though more than one of his political confederates, -a peace giving that sense of security to the people, doubted whether his opinions were based upon any without which peace itself was valueless; and by more substantial ground than a mere whim or caprice. means of that peace to create surplus revenue, the The moment he succeeded to the title of his father- only true security for great public improvements-for provious to which he had filled the situation of chief liberal, even for honest, government; by means of clerk in the Court of Queen's Bench, with a salary of that surplus revenue to emulate the magnificent £9625 per annum,--he went into opposition in the benevolence of Mahomedan Emperors in the great House of Lords. In 1828, Lord Ellenborough took works of public improvement, and, more than all, by office as Lord Privy. Seal, in the Tory administration. gradually, cautiously, having regard to the prejudices None of his friends were surprised at this circums- and feelings of the natives, imparting to them all we tance;-nor did it create any astonishment on the part knew of arts and civilization, so as at once to elevate of the public or the press. He shortly afterwards the character, and better the condition of that gene- became President of the Board of Control, and again rous and mighty people. [Cheers.] filled this important office in the Peel-Wellington administration in the year 1834. A remarkable fact signalized the career of the noble lord at that period; which was the extraordinary letter which he addressed to the authorities in India, on the occasion of recom- mending the means by which a judge, might be so reduced to subjection as to be rendered the tool of any government purposes. The manner in which the ad- vice was given, was however more ludicrous than the doctrine itself was detestable. His lerdship was well aware that one just and upright mau, shackled by two venial and corrupt ones, would become totally powerless; and agadintentions of the former would be superse ded and annihilated by the evil devices of his coadjutors. He accordingly recommended the tame elephant to be placed between two wild ones-a simile which was too significant to be misunderstood. A lady politician, well known for her pointed epigrams, observed that the mere sight of Lord Ellenborough, cantering upon horseback down Whitehall to the House of Lord, decked out in all the paraphernalia of fashion, and with his self-sufficient and complacent air, was sufficient to justify a revolution, when it was remembered that he was a member of the Cabinet. He is certainly a very good- looking man. His countenance possesses something of the Grecian form about it; and its expression indicates coldness of manner and great self possession. He is tall and well-made, with a robust constitution and evidently in the enjoyment of excellent health.

FRONTIER TROUBLES.

By the Levant we have intelligence direct from the United States. Sundry secret lodges, and considerable excitement prevailed on the Frontiers of Canada and state of New-York.

JUST previous to the sailing of the Levant, the Great Western Steam Ship left New York for Bristol on her forty second voyage, carrying, besides cargo and letters, forty one passengers, and about three hundred thousand dollars in specie.

ON DITS.

On dit.-The American Merchants will now de mand satisfaction for the gross ontrage committed by the Chinese Authorities on the Boat of the "Morrison". and the murder of one of her crew, and if necessary. both the Constellation and Boston will vindicete the honour of the U. S. Flag by exacting from the Chinese a most heavy retribution for their most treach- erous violation of international law.

On dit.-Col de Jancigny, French Commercial Agent, and Mr. Challaye the Vice Consul, have had a pro- longed and secret conference with Yihshan and Kekung the Governor of Canton, not at their official residences but at the country house of Tinqua, the son of the late Hong merchant of the same name.

On dit.-The "Auckland" Indian Steamer may be daily expected from Bombay with the January mail. On dit.-The Prince of Wales was christened Edward, after his grand father the good Duke of Kent.

Lord Ellenborough affects an effeminate lisp-besides which be has also a thousand other little affectations. He is the very emblem of foppery and self conceit, and mars the natural advantages of his good appearance by the assiduity with which he seeks to distinguish himself for his coxcombry. As a speaker, he possesses a fair command of language, but pursues his theme with cold and inanimate correctness. His enunciation is timed to the ear with even musical precision; he stands mo- tionless as a statue when addressing the House; his THE John Horton, Cunningham, has arrived in voice is clear and strong, and would be harmoniously beautiful, were it not for the lisp which he affects, and the harbour during the week haring left Liverpool Oct. his ideas are invariably clothed in the most elegant garb. 30. She passed the Prima Donna in the Dampier He is one of those noble Lords who evidently study, Straits; and in the Banda sea, Lat 6.34, Long. 126.34. and study with industry too, in order to prepare them- she spoke the ship Lady Leith from London bound selves for a debate. Lord Ellenborough is however to Macao. All well. courtly and gentlemanly in language: no one ever heard We are glad to announce the arrival in China of him utter an unbecoming word, either in or out of the the U. S. Frigate Constellation, Commodore Kearney. house of Lords. When the Commons were deliberating and U. S. Corvette Boston, Commander Long We upon the municipal corporation Reform Bill, as altered are uninformed as to the probable length of their by the Lords in 1836, his Lordship evinced the greatest stay in China.

OIROULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

form Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the rm the Ladies and Gentlemen Calcutta, beg respectfully to in. Officers of H. M. Army and Navy, and Captains of Ships tra- ding to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced bu- siness as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hongkong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Wharf, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description.

Messrs. D. W. & Co. iu soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best enden. vours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines, from the first Houses in Bordeaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newspapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the Lon den Club Houses, also to attach a confortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the necessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on "their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling. The "Algerine" Brig will leave this for Calcutta for a fresh supply of Stores of all necessary kinds on the 6th of next month.

Hongkong 29th. March 1842.

FOR SALE.

N board the American Ship Forum, at Reduced prices,

mon, do Herrings, Hams, Dried apples, Champaigne cider, Syrup tongued and grooved

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, re Brick Go- carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to

N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, OFFERS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles :

11

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, ditto. ditto. Sherry, Madeira, and Claret, Gin and Soda Water,

Beer,

English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots

and Stockholm Tar.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

ACARD, J. R. Bird, late of Singapore, begs to inform

the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship Wright and Engineer in the Queen's Road, and Superintendent of buildings on the Brit- ish Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage, which be hopes to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named handicrafts.

Hongkong, 30th March, 1842.

N Pine Spars, Provis

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.

We are exceedingly obliged to our fair correspondent for her valuable contribution on Chinese Superstitions, and shall be too gled to avail ourselves of the kind promise of future papers on China and the Chinese.

We are also obliged to "N." for his two notices of the recent sad accidents. Tho publication of the inquest precludes the necessity of inserting his letters.

We shall be obliged by a loan of New and interesting Publi- cations in the various European languages, and hope our friends vill not forget to send us the latest Papers whether British, Co- lonial or Foreign, as until our distant arrangements are completed, we shall be dependent in some measure upon their considerate kindness.

We are disappointed at not having received in time, Reports of the Coroners inquests; we have only space to add that the Verdict in both cases was Accidental Death.

PRICES OF PROVISIONS. Potatoes per pecul, [133] lbs.] - Sweet Potatoes,

Tobacco, Lerotheure, Timber 4 inch to 8 do square. Samples On Sale at 46 Queen's Road, Ameries, Brandy dito, ditto. Lamp oil, 12 to 13 catties,

of the above can be seen at N Duus' Godown or on board.

Hongkong March 30th. 1842.

FOR SINGAPORE AND CALCUTTA.

TO SAIL POSETIVELY ON THE 6TH APRIL.

THE

HE Clipper Brig "Algerine" Charles Buckton H. C. S. Commander. Fur Freight or passage apply to Capt. Buckton, on board, or to

Messrs. JAMIESON, HOW, & Co. Macao.

Hongkong 29th March 1842.

有各樣莫

Coir Rope, Canvass, Paints and other stores by C. V. GILLESPIE Hongkong, 21st, March 1842.

RICES for Job Printing are as follows:

PRICES

for 3 months

8 5

"

6

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mo- derate rates. Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into, the Chi- nese language.

WE perceive by the late Bengal Papers that great activity still prevails in all the departments at Calcutta completing prepa- rations for the approaching compaign in China. The Friend of India of 20th January notes that "Sixteen vessels have been taken up by Government for China; and it is said that two or three others will be accepted."

SHIPPING REPORT,-MARCH 1842.

EXPORT. SAILED

- 824

- 81

White Rice, No. 1. 40 catties for

- 81

Ditto. Ditto. No. 2, 45 Bread, large loaves, 11 Ditto. second size, 22. for for Fish, large fresh 8 to 10 cents per catty [1] pound] Do. small do. 5 to 7 cents per catty

19

...

for for

. 81

- 81 - 81 81

Fowls, 8 catties for

81

Paddy, per pecul,

Yams, per pecul,

. 81 811

Bills of Lading and Exchange, per 100

$

Policies and folio pages

5

19

.

Letter paper size

ADVERTISEMENTS

Of Ships....

B

RITISH Piece Goods for Sale in quantities to suit purchasess C. V. GILLESPIE, by

Not exceeding 7 lines

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

46 Queens Road.

唎零

布有

ARRIVED.

NAMES.

MEN. TONS.

FLAG.

FROM.

To.

IMPORT.

內在論吉

2nd William

35 172 British

Macao

J. Brightman 28

404

91

E. Coast Macao

Ballast

Opium

4th.

Sundries

Pt. of the same 12th.

3rd Futty Salam

11

Hongkong Calcutta

Bengal volunteers on board

3d.

記買利

4th. Harlequin

50

292

31

Macao

E. Coast Ballast

Opium

8th.

Prima Vera

14

125

29

13

Opium & Alum Cotton Cargo

6th.

Euphrates

37

620

21

Whampoa Cotton

Same

15th.

5th. Theresa

10 80

19

99

Macao

Passengers

15th.

10

90

99

31

Whampoa Ballast

Opium

7th.

Hygeia

22

377

11

Young Queen

Macao Ten& saltpetre. Ballast

10th.

14

85

Whampoa Whampoa Ballast

Opium

7th.

7th. Ariel

6

7th.

Arrow

12

175 British

Sydney

Macao,

Hannah Kerr

26

594

91

Macao

11

99

11

10th.

20

100

,"

50 350

21

Chusan

11

39

22 358

Mary Im rie

14 314

31

Sydney Macao Calct.Sine. Amoy Chu.

9

296 American Macao

8

140 British

12th. Algerine

20

143

33

Whampoa Macao Amoy

Ballast

Opium 16th. Gov Transport Prize on board. 12th. 37th Regt.M.NI. Head quart. 10th. Remaining part of the 37 Regt 10th. Ballast Ballast 22d. Comt. Stores The same 24th. Merchandize 20th.

39

19

Stores

Opium Same

23d.

物做八發行花

13th. John Adams

Govt. Stores

Transport

13th.

15th, Masdeu

12

236

29

Macao AmoyChu. Genl. Cargo

The same

19th.

16th. Ardaseer

48 422

33

Macao Opium

21

29th.

17th. B. Ariel

60

371

39

"Madras

Australasian P 20

194

E. Coast Ballast

Sandalwood 25th. Opium

23d.

Arrow

12

175

11

Coals

40 140

33

60 257

Opium

The same

20th.

37

Ballast

27th.

13 250

11

Macao Genl. Cargo

The same

26th.

Prima Vera

30 105

39

,"

Opium

22d.

58 380

39

39

23d.

23rd Black Swan

23

150

31

33

24th.

24th. Young Queen 14 John Horton

85

31

19

19

16

336

39

Liverpool

Genl. Cargo

SirRobert Peel 19

608

19

Calcutta

25th. Sri-Singapura

12

90

99

Macao

39

Com. Stores Opium

26th. Alibi

The same

25th.

30 318

21

Calcutta Chrusan

Comt. Stores

Kestrel

24 326

29

13

The Same

30th.

27th. Queen Mab

20

394

11

Liverpool

28th. Young Queen

14

85

39

Macao Macao

Genl. Cargo

Ballast

Algerine

Opium

28th.

20

145

21

Stores

Same

Maulmein

45 171

29th Prima Vera.

Bom. Mac. E. Coast Opium

33

30 105

11

Macao

39

30th.

30th, Ariel Sch.

82

32

39

12

32

29

33

P.css Charlotte 20 | 400 |

Singapore Singapore Genl. Cargo From the Harbour Master's List..

39

30th.

OTICE.-The Granite Godown No. 46. Queen's Road-

the

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go- down has a Stone Pier in front, 275 feet long, and is situated at

a distance above high water mark with a double sea wall that

will protect it against the rise of the sea usual in Typhoons

For the Convenience of Vessels discharging in front of the Godown, white and black buoys have been laid down at a short distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 24 fathoms, with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to

Hongkong, 21st. March 18.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

RON, Square, from 1 to 1 inch suitable for window grating and other building purposes, for Sale by C. V. GILLESPIE Hongkong, 21st. March 1842. 46 Que ens Road.

6th Aurora

8th. Peycha

9th Mariam

10th. MahomedShah

David Malcolin Victoria

11th Forum

Thistle

俱屋九客有旗

可內分濶四記 合

不一方唎 用料等寸铁士 什能或條庇

AN

NOTICE.

N Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established at the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, and all orders for that excellent work will be promptly attended to.

Hongkong, March 17th. 1842.

FOR SALE.

A the Holy Bible from the American and For-

T the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA copies of

eign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $ 3.-

Hongkong, March 17th. 1842.

18th. Poppy

19th. Anonyma

Mercury

21st. Rob Roy

98 American Macao Coast

I

E. Coast Calcutta

Hongkong Madras

Hongkong Calcutta

21

Macao & B. 39

E. Coast Opium

Whampoa Ballast

33

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE

RECEIVED AND SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY MESSRS BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND LO

LONGBONG

N°.3. VOL. 1.

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 7TH 1842.

Price 81 monthly Or 812 yearly

are few individuals who are not as well qualified as ished for so many centuries) hate and

himself, to form a correct estimate of the reliance to

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- be placed on the agreement and promises of the pro despise us. Another, and perhaps the most vincial government of Canton. He has intimated to formidable obstacle to an early settlement, zette under the authority of Government, that government, that he is willing for the present to is the important. British fiscal and domestic will be discontinued from this date: but all respect the existing truce, but that the slightest infrac- considerations, which are so closely inter- public orders and notifications appearing in tion of its terms will lead to an instant renewal of woven with, and encumber an otherwise active hostilities in this province; and it is according "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga-ly to be borne in mind that such an event is not only purely international question. zetto," with the signatures of duly autho-highly probable, from the well understood perfidy and rized Functionaries of the Government are bad faith of the provincial officers themselves, but also still to be considered as official. because they may be compelled, at any moment. by orders from the imperial cabinet to set aside and By order, disavow their own acts: with these views and senti- ments, it only remains for sir Henry Pottinger to warn her majesty's subjects, and all other foreigners, against putting themselves or their property in the power of the Chinese authorities, during the present anomalous and unsettled state of our relations with the empire; and to declare, that, if they do so, it must be clearly understood to be at their own risk and peril.

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer: Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

THE BOGUE FORTS. We have no doubt H. E. the Plenipotentiary, is thoroughly well advised as to every movement in the Canton River. For ourselves we still are disposed to believe the official announcement contained in ours of the 22d March will have the effect of delaying for some

time the restoration of the Bogue forts. By every one it will be perceived, that forbearance is wholly wasted when exercised towards the Chinese. By the Convention or Truce made by Captain Elliot on the 27th. of May last

with the Chinese authorities: when to use his own words: "the perfidy of the Imperial Commissioners having induced a course of brilliant operations by land and water, placing H. M. forces in commanding posi tions over the walls of Canton." Among "the terms then granted to them" was this express stipulation-it is the final clause of the third condition viz. "When the whole [id est the six millions of dollars] is paid all the British forces to return without the Bocca Tigris, and Wangtong, and all fortified places within the river to be restored, but not to be rearmed, till affairs are set- tled between the two nations."

The public notification made by H. E. SIR HENRY POTTINGER, on his arrival bearing date the 12th. Au- gust last we have re-printed at the request of many of our subscribers, some of whom believe a crisis is im- minent and that the Canton river must soon be the scene of our warfare. Some of our quidnuncs even venture to affirm that the Chinese have already been guilty of many overt infractions of the Elliot truce. We think they must be in error, seeing his H. E. has positively announced "that the slightest infraction of its terins will lead to an instant renewal of active hostilities in this province," and moreover H. E. will to use the words of the notification, "allow no consideration con- nected with mercantile pursuits and other interests to interfere with the strong measures which he may find it necessary to authorise and adopt, towards the govern ment and subjects of China, with a view to compelling an honorable and lasting peace."

The whole notification which follows will be re-pe- rused with interest at this juncture, more especially as it is confidently asserted by Chinese and Foreigners on the authority of parties yesterday arrived from Wham- poa, that preliminary steps have already been taken to restore the defences of the Bogue.

Whilst we are still incredulous, we at the same time acquit the propagatasa ofthe report of any intention $2. deceive; we yet think more time will elapse before the attempt will be made. Unless some Imperial re- script diametrically opposed in tenor to all lately sent from Pekin be received, we quite expect an unequivo cal and manifest infraction of the Elliot truce will, ere long, be but too apparent.

NOTIFICATION

Issued at Macao 12th. August 1841.

IN taking charge of the offices of her majesty's sole plenipotentiary, minister extraordinary, and chief superintendent of British trade in China, sir Henry Pottinger deems it requisite and proper to publicly

to him. At the same time, it becomes his first duty to

Sir Henry Pottinger avails himself of this opportu nity to announce, that the arrangements which have been made by his predecessor, connected with the is land of Hongkong, will remain in force until the pleasure of her majesty regarding that island, and those arrangements, shall be received; and on this point, Sir Henry Pottinger further desires to call the attention of all concerned to the public notice issued by her majesty's plenipotentiary on the 10th of June last.

[Signed]

HENRY POTTINGER.

Her majesty's plenipotentiary CORROBORATORY of the prevalent opinions above referred to, we copy the following remarks from the Chinese Repository for March, which came to hand after the foregoing was in type.

According to public notice, given by captain Elliot last June, it was agreed between the high contracting parties, English and Chinese, that none of the fortified places within the river should be rearmed, nor any ad. ditional preparations made. At the time when Yihshan entered into this engagement, he told the emperor, that, "as soon as the ships of war have retired, be- ginning with the river in front of the city, and continuing the work down to the Bogue, they would block it up with piles of stones at every important pass, and there erect forts and place guns. On sir Henry's arrival, he took an early opportunity to signify to the provincial au. thorities that he was willing, for the time being, to respect the then existing truce, but, declaring at the same time, that the slightest infringement of its terms would lead to an instant renewal of hostilities in this pro- and many new ones built, and guns placed in them; vince. Old forts above Whampoa have been rearmed and yet hostilities have not been renewed--unless the destruction of the works on Wangtong and the late seizure of junks outside, be so considered. For the exercise of this indulgence, on the part of H. B. M. plenipotentiary, there must have been good reasons; but can such reasons operate in the coming season? And will Yihshán fail to attempt to keep his promise with his master? It is much to be regretted that the forts at Canton have been rebuilt; once opened, the fiver to Canton and the Macao Passage, ought to have remained so-and this could have been easily effected, had captain Elliot's measure, of visiting the river at short intervals, to see that no repairs were going on, ben persisted in. And unless this is done in future, we fear repairs will go on below Whampoa.

PROSPECTS OF THE WAR.

If our last London letters fairly indicate the general feeling at home, we should say that "John Bull" expects that the War, if not already terminated; will be ended with- in six months from this date. We shall ad- dress to him an observation or two, with the view, if possible, of restraining his impati- ence, should it be protracted, as we fear it will, beyond that period.

It is undeniable that as much has been done, as could be, with so small a dispos- able force. Indeed the temerity of our

notify. that he enters on his important functions, with the most anxious desire to consult the wishes, and to promote the prosperity and well-being, as well as to provide for and secure the safety, of all her majesty's subjects, and other foreigners (so far as the concerns of the latter can be affected by his proceedings), at this moment residing in any part of the dominions of the emperor of China; and that he will be ready and hap- py, at all times and under all circumstances, to give his best attention, to any questions that may be submitted distinctly intimate, for general and individual informa: Commanders, would, in case of a reverse be tion, that it is his intention to devote his undivided characterised as the height of rashness. energies and thoughts to the primary object of securing Hence till very powerful reinforcements are a speedy and satisfactory close of the war, and that he therefore can allow no consideration connected received, but little can, or perhaps ought to with mercantile pursuits. and other interests, to inter- be attempted. Certain we are our gallant fere with the 'rong measures which he may find it troops, in actual conflict, would come off vic- necessary to authorize and adopt, towards the govern- tors, no matter the odds in point of number ment and subjects of China, with a view to compelling opposed to them. But unlike India, in an honorable and lasting peace. Sir Henry Pottinger is conscious, that among the defeating the armies, we do not conquer the persons to whom this notification is addressed, there people, who from intense nationality (nour-

Our friends at home must, and will, have Tea.-The Chancellor of the Exchequer must, and will have, the four million of Tea Duties. Holding Hongkong, Kulangsoo, and Tinghae, we believe neither the one contingency, nor the other, would be imperi!- ed should it be determined to Blockade the maritime Coast of China, and the Port of Canton. To our minds, it seems quite hopeless to expect a prompt settlement; until there is an avowed and total dissever- ance of the Fiscal from the International question. And we should be truly mortified to find our excellent Plenipotentiary make a wreck of his truly well earned reputation, by (like Captain Elliot) an honorable but fatal adherence to official instructions, which we almost fear lay too much stress on the form- er, rather than the latter-the vital part of the question. To gain much, we must risk much, the gallant Nelson going into action exclaimed Death or Westminster Abbey" in a kindred spirit we hope H. E. will dare all, to obtain an honorable peace, for which "John Bull" is waxing very impatient; and which the dilapidated state of our Home Finances so imperatively requires. Should H. F. accomplish this at an early period (which yet is hardly to be hoped for) we can- not but think that he will receive the well merited guerdon of a Peerage which it was quite understood in London, would be gra- ciously accorded him by the Sovereign, if he succeeded, as we trust he will, in accom- plishing fully, the great objects involved, in his most important special mission to China.

Name of our Town.-We are very glad should be called Victoria, is universally to find the suggestion in our last that it approved. We would respectfully recom. mend, that some authoritative annuncia- tion to that effect, be made as early as possible: to the great contentment of the best friends of Hongkong.

PRICES OF PROVISIONS.

THESE were given in the last number: it is enough for us now to say, the markets are well supplied, with all kinds of comestibles, adapted to the absolute wants of the humble cooley, and the utmost requirements of the refined gastronome. We have noticed in the Bazaar all the excellent varieties of Fish, with which we were familiar at Macao, and many other kinds before unknown to us.

Beef is cheap, but Mutton at present very dear, and we have seen at dinner Pheasants, Partridges, and Venison, said to be products of our Island. We are bound to say, in our rambles, we have as yet, seen only Snipe, Quails, and Partridges, but we know a few small deer have been shot by sportsmen on the other side of the Jaland. Of Vegetables the supply is very abundant. Good Bread and Biscuit are made here, and Milk and Butter are no longer rarities. Goats thrive very well, as also Cows. Of Sheep but few have been imported, the eager demand for mutton has hitherto been very fatal to their longevity. We count ere long to see many thousand head brows- ing on our hills, and Hongkong mutton rivalling, in reputation, that of Cambria.

10

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TRIEND OF CHINA

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 7TH. 1842.

THE AFFAIRS AT NINGPO AND TAISHAN.

THE public Circular below obviates the necessity of our publishing the private com- munications and intelligence we have re- ceived. Where all behaved so well, it is almost invidious to praise any one in par- ticular. We may yet mention that the gal- lant and indefatigable Hall of the Nemesis Steamer, deserves the warmest commenda- tion for his promptitude in the Taishan af- fair. We hear that forty five of the enemy were left on the field, a mandarin mortally wounded, and the military chest taken; con- tents only about $2000. At Ningpo it was said, that previous to the attack three and four dollars per man, was distributed among the Chinese soldiers. Many of the killed, had as much, and more on their persons. The dexetrous manner in which the outposts and sentries retired on the main corps, the effect of this movement on the Chinese, speak highly for the good discipline of the troops and the strategic skill of the gallant officer in command.

We should inform our Readers that the following Circular of H. E. the Plenipotentiary, is copied from a Macao contemporary, and although it has not yet reached us officially. no doubt it is authentic; as we have Letters dated Chusan the 12th March, which, narrating the several affairs quite agree with the

account in the Circular.

CIRCULAR.

TO HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S SUBJECTS IN CHINA.

HEX Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentiary in China has great pleasure in announcing to Her Majesty's subjects the complete repulse of two bodies of Chinese Troops which attacked the Brit.

ish positions at Ningpo and Chinhae at daylight on the morning of the 10th of last month.

During the whole of February, almost daily intelligence reached the Head Quarters of Her Majesty's Forces showing that the Chinese High Authorities contemplated some active operations, but they were from time to time deferred on such frivolous pre- tences, that it appears their Excellencies the Naval and Military Commanders-in-Chief had gone over to Chusan to make arrange. ments at that place preparatory to a forward movement of a portion at least of Her Majesty's combined forces.

In this state matters remained until the date and bour above mentioned, when a considerable body of Chinese, estimated at from 10 to 12,000 men, advanced upon the South and West gates of Ningpo, got over the walls and penetrated to the market place in the centre of the City, where they were met by our troops and instantly driven back with great loss; in fact, it would seem that the moment the Chinese troops found themselves so warmly received, their sole object was to get out of the City as fast as pos- sible and in their retreat to the South gate, the field guns drawn ponies came up and opened on a dense mass with grape and canister, at a distance less than 100 yards. Above 250 dead bodies were found inside the walls, and when the accounts came away Her Majesty's 49th Regiment had not returned from the pursuit of the discomfited and flying enemy.

Whilst these operations were progressing on shore, a number of Fire Boats (Sampans) lashed together with chains, were floated down the river, and were towed into the mud by the boats of the Sesostris Steamer. In the meantime a was brought down a lane in the eastern suburb (across the River) and as the inhabitants had been previously warned that any such attempt would bring chastisement upon them Her Majesty's ship Mo. deste opened her guns, and did great execution in that quarter. The attack on Chinhae was much more feeble. The enemy advanced to the North Gate, where they were driven off by the Guard, and followed by one Company (afterwarde reinforced by three others) of Her Majesty's 55th Regiment, who killed 30 men and two mandarins in the pursuit.

Simultaneously with the attack on the city of Chinhae, fire sampans chained together were set adrift to burn the shipping at that anch rage, but they all went on shore above the ships of

war and merchant vessels and did no sort of harm.

Shortly before these repulses occurred, the Nemesis steamer was sent from Chusan to recomnoitre the Island of Taishan, where it was understood Chinese troops were cllecting with the purp se of attacking Her Majesty's forces at Tinghae. The Steamer sent her boats into a creek where they were fired on, and in conse. quence Comman der Collinson and Lieut. Hall landed the Steam er's ship's company, when the Chinese fled with the loss of about thirty killed and a number wounded. The Steamer's boats then set fire to a number of junks which had also fired on her, and Their Excellencies the Naval and Military Commanders in Chief had gone back to Ningpo, and proposed to follow up the repulses the enemy had experienced, by active measures.

returned to Chinhae.

It affords Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary the highest satisfaction to close the Circular, by stating that in these attempts of the ene. my. Her Majesty's combined force had not lost a man. The latest intelligence from the Head Quarters of the Chinese Army south of the Hangchow River speak of the troops being in almost a state of insubordination, and in want of supplies &c.

Chinese Products.--The sale at Hong- kong of the Prize Junks, has made us acquainted with many articles much used by the native population. Among others Sarsaparilla, which we have had analys- ed and its curative efficacy tested by one of our medical friends, who confirms our judgment as to its being the true Sarsa- parilla of commerce. We really think this article merits the attention of our mercan- tile friends; desirable as it is, to increase the number of our Exports, as Returns for the annually augmenting amount of our Imports. Sarsaparilla and its preparations is increasing in consumption at home.

""

99

In 1831 the Import was 176,854 lbs. In 1840 ,,220,397 The Duty is 6d per lb. It is a South American product, and the best quality we believe comes from the Brazils. The prices in London on the 1st. January 1841 were from one shilling and three pence to two shillings and nine pence per lb.

The price at the Public sale was less than 6d per lb. We may add that an Extract of Sarsaparilla is imported from France: it is a costly article with the duty of some 30 per cent, which is imposed. Al- cohol which is largely used in the manufac- be obtained more cheaply ture, can here than in France; and as the root is a native product we should think it hereafter, may be also made an article of Export. It is certain it would be admis- sible at a lower duty than the French Ex- tract. Liquorice Root is also produced to a considerable extent here but the home duty of 63s per cwt is quite prohibitory. On the juice or extract their is a duty of seventy five shillings per cwt; which it is expected will be reduced. It is brought from Sicily and Spain, and the home con- sumption is about 200 Tons per annum. The price by last account from London was from six to seven pounds sterling per cwt for Liquorice.

TEA CULTIVATION IN JAVA AND ASSAM.

THE following paragraph we have copied from the "Friend of India." We are disposed to think that the cultivation of-Tea in Java, will extend and its European consumption be fostered by a preferential duty, which no doubt will be affixed, by the Dutch Government, if it has not already done so. As regards the growth of Tea in Assam, from the same source, we find that the estimated prospective Return of Tea in that district, during the next four years will be as follows:

1842

1843

1844

1845

lb. 80.000

"196.000

39

240,000

" 320,000

We hope these anticipatory statements, [which ordi narily are far too favorable, will be more than realised. At the same time we may say that however low the cost of production, it can have for some time but little, if any effect on the price of Tea as affixed by the Chinese, seeing that the quantity which it is antici- pated may be produced in Assam four yeris hence will not amount to one twelfth of the present annual English Import.

the Chinese. Ed.

We have had a very good account of the Brazil Tea, which will not however become an export article for some years, as there is an increasing native con- sumption which it will take some time to supply. The quality of the Brazil Tea by some connoisseurs is deemed excellent. Relieved from the very heavy exactions of the Mandarins, it is satisfactorily proved that no part of the World can so cheaply, as well as so abundantly supply Europe with Teas, as China. The establishment of Free Ports to the northward, may in the course of years. have an important influence on the prices of Tea which have for a long time, and especially of late, been upheld to exorbitant rates by JAVA.-Advices of June last from the Duch colony of Java are of rather more interest than usual, especially in relation to the cultivation of the tea-plant. Since the first attempt was made to grow the leaf in the island. the success had been so great as to induce many others to follow the example. For the capital invested in this way a very ample return has been ob- much favoured the enterprise, for many wealthy Chinese mer. chants, resident in the colony, finding themselves cut off from the employment of their resources in the usual traffic, had com- menced tea plantations. It had been found that the hilly grounds were much more favourable for the cultivation of the black descriptions than many of the flat lands hitherto selected. The opinion was very general, that before many years the Dutch colonists will rival the Celestials in the extensive supply of the European markete; but we hope our own plantations in Asram will be successful competitore, and that ere long, with both.

IMPORTANT FROM CABUL!!!

WE stop the Press to insert the follow- ing important documents from the Calcutta Government Gazette extraordinary of Ja- nuary 31st, this moment received.

We hope in an early number to give a review of all the recent disastrous affairs in Affghanistan.

NOTIFICATION. FORT WILLIAM, SECRET DEPARTMENT,

THE 31ST JANUARY, 1842. INTELLIGENCE having been received which leaves no room to doubt that, after the British Force at Ca- bul had maintained its position against overpowering numbers of Insurgents for more than six weeks, the Officer Commanding had judged it necessary, in conse quence of a failure of Provisions, to agree to a conven- tion with the enemy, and to retire, in reliance on the faith of that convention, towards Jellalabad. when the

Troops exposed to the worst rigors of cold and priva- tion in the mountain defiles, and harassed by treacher- ous attacks, suffered extreme disaster-the Governor General in Council deems it proper to notify, that the most active measures have been adopted. and will be steadfastly prosecuted, for expediting powerful rein- forcements to the Affghan Frontier and for ussisting the maintenance of the honor and interests of the Bri- such operations as may be required in that quarter for tish Government.

The ample Military means at the disposal of the British Government will be strenuously applied to these objects, so as at once to support external opera- tion, and to ensure efficient protection to its subjects and allies.

sassination, has, through a failure of supplies, followed A faithless enemy, stained by the foul crime of as- by consummate treachery, been able to overcome a body of British Troops, in a country removed by dis- tence and difficulties of season, from the possibility of he most deeply lamems the loss of brave Officers and succour. But the Governor General in Council, while men, regards this partial reverse only as a new occasion for displaying the stability and vigor of the British Power, and the admirable spirit and valor of the Brit. ish Indian Army.

eral of India in Council, By order of the Right Hon'ble the Governor Gen- T. H. MADDOCK,

Secy. to the Govt of India.

GENERAL ORDERS BY THE RIGHT HONORABLE THE GOVERNOR GENERAL OF INDIA IN COUNCIL. FORT WILLIAM,

31st January 1842.

No. 25 of 1842. -The Right Honorable the Gover- nor General of India in Council is pleased to direct, that a Depôt of Recruits for the Light Cavalry, to the extent of 500 men, and Four Infantry Depôts of 1,000 Recruits each, be formed at the undermentioned, or such other Stations, as His Excellency the Comman. der in Chief may be pleased to select :

Cavalry Depôt at

- Do. do.

1st Infantry do.

13

39

3d Do. do.

4th Do. do.

" 31

Meerut.

... Cawnpore.

Agra.

Delhi.

Meeru'.

The Recruits now at Cawnpore, under charge of Captain Tayler, of the 1st European Light Infantry, to be incorporated with the Depot to be formed at that Station, as far as they may be fit for the Service.

A Commandant and Adjutant, with the Allowances assigned to corresponding Appointments in Corps of the Line, and as many other Cfficers, as the Comman- der in Chief may consider necessary, will be nominated to each Depot.

Indents for Clothing, Arms and Accoutrements, are to be pepared by the Officers Commanding the De pôts, who will also furnish all necessary Articles of Half Mounting required for the Recruits, agreeably to the Regulations of the Service, and draw their Pay, as on former similar occasions.

that an 8th Regiment of Irregular Cavalry, of the His Lordship in Council is further pleased to direct, usual strength, be raised at such Station as His Ex- cellency the Commander in Chief may appoint, and that the Nusseeree, Sirmoor, and Kemaoon Battalions, and the Hurreeana Light Infantry, be forthwith aug mented to the present strength of Infantry Corps of the Line. His. Excellency the Commander, in Cheif will be pleased to issue such subsidiary Orders, as may into effect.

The Emperor had ordered, that the provinces which are the seat of the war, should bear the expenses of it, and as the inhabitants tained; and the protraction of the war with China had very be necessary for carrying the foregoing arrangements ream resolved to make no further sacrifices, there appears every probability of the army dissolving itself, and becoming totally disorganized.

God save the Queen.

Dated at Macao on the 1st day of April, 1842.

HENRY POTTINGER. Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary.

All Officers absent on leave from their Regiments, otherwise than on certified sickness, are directed to rejoin their respective Corps without delay.

J. STUART. Lt..Col

Secy, to the Govt. of India, Mily. Dept.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

Macao 1st. April 1842. To the Editor of the "Friend of China and Hongkong Gazette," Hongkong.

Sir

I have to request that you will publish, for the infor- mation of those whom it may concern, the accompany ing copy of a letter from Commodore L. Kearney. Your Obet. Svt. W. Delano Junr. Vice Consul of the United States of America.

(Copy.)

TRADE BETWEEN KUMAON AND CHINESE TARTA- RY.-The Agra Ukhbar, received yesterday, contains an interesting communication on the Trade between Kumaon and Chinese Tartary. The goods exported territories between October 1840 and May 1841, amoun- from Almora, over the Himalayas into the Chinese ted to Rupees 79. 875, viz: Rs. 62,875 over the Juwahir pass, and 16,500 over the Beeaus and Dharma to Rs. 1,55,700, viz.-by the Juwahir pass, Rs. 1,00,400, passes. The Imports during the same period amount and by the Dharma and Beeaus passes Rs. 55,300. The following is a statement of the trade:-

Exports to Chinese Tartary. Imports from Do. Rs. 2,000 Tincal or Borax Sugar candy 2,500 Salt.

Dates

Gour.

Confectionary.

Almonds

Cloves Chielies.

400 Chowins.

1,300 Zedoary.

700 Saffron

400 Tea

100 Shawl wool

500 Shawls

Cardamoms

225 Ponies

U. S. Ship Constellation. Macao Roads, 31st. March, 1842. Sir, The Friend of China and Hongkong Gazette of the Nutmegs 24th inst, contains a shipping report in which is the Camphr name of an American Vessel engaged in carrying Indigo Opinm, therefore I beg you will cause to be made Pewter known with equal publicity, and also to the Chinese Kincoba Authorities, by the translation of the same, that the Moleskin &c. Broadcloth Government of the United States does not sanction Khurwa. "the smuggling of Opium" on this Coast under the Coarse cloth American Flag in violation of the Laws of China. Difficulties arising therefrom in respect to the seizure of any Vessel by the Chinese, the claiments certainly will not, under my instructions, find support, or any interposition on my part after the publication of Tobacco this Notice.

Pearls Coral

250 Chinese Silke 500 Coarse woollens

150 Goats, and sheep

300 Mule Yaks.

17,000 Musk.

4,000 Gold dust.

3,000 Ladak Tamashas

. 14,000 Kuldar Rupees 1,000 Orpiment.

800

Penknives, Buttons &c. Grain. Hardware

550

.24,000

1,506

3,500

Betelnut.

200

I am, Very Respectfully Your obt. Servant L. KEARNEY. (Signed) Commanding the United States East India Squadron.

Balance

Rs. 79,375 .76,325

To the United States Consul or Vice Consul at Canton.

OPIUM AND ARDENT SPIRITS.

We have extracted from the Coloniat, a statement of the con. sumption of spirituous liquors in New South Wales. Such statis. tic, afford a very deplorable evidence of the moral state and condition of that Colony. Whilst the consumption of ardent epirits there amounts in value to twe pounds per head per anuum the consumption of opium by the Chinese does not exceed three: pence per head. In saying this, we would not for a moment Thave it inferred, that we justify, the use of this most potent, but noxious exhilirant. We deplore deeply, the addiction of the Chinese, to the pernicious practice of smoking opium; at the same time, the smallest knowledge of Chinese character will satisfy one, that its renunciation may be expected; when ardent spirits shall be used by western nations, solely for medicinal pur. poses. Further, we would hesitate not to aver, that a comparison of Chinese and English society will demonstrate that indulging in the use of opium, in with the Chinese, far less subversive of individual duties and social rights than the immoderate use of ardent spirits, by our working population at home. The Chinese Opium sot seeks seclusion from the gaze of the multitude whilst the Foreign Drunkard, openly disgraces his species before the mocking gaze of all.

This humiliating contrast is too often painfully exhibited in our own streets; and what few assaults, disturbances and pollice cases occur, are almost invariably occasioned by the drunken delinquen- cies of our fellow countrymon; whose excesses and freaks ashore excite the astonishment, and we are compelled to add, the contempt of the native population.

Ed.

NEW SOUTH WALES.

CONSUMPTION OF SPIRITUCUS LIQUORS.

Tax duties on epirits imported, duties on spirits distilled in the colony, permits to remove spirits, licenses to distillers, and licen. Bea to retail spirituous and malt liquore-these five classes of taxation upon our appetite for strong drink, during the last four. teen years, give the following amounts-fractions of a pound not included. We give only the extremes. Increase on the year £15,309.

In 1894...27,586

1825. 49,895

1836... 136,562

1837... 142,233

Ditto.

ditto

5,671.

Total in 14 years £1,158,136. Thus has the infant colony paid to Government, in the space of fourteen years, upwards of one million sterling, for permission to drink spirituous liquors! It appears that within these fourteen years there were but but three general musters-namely, in 1828,

in 1833, and in 1835. The total population in those years respectively, including free and bond-men, women, and chil-

dren, was as follows:-

In 1826-Total population,

Revenue from spirits,

In 1833-Total population,

Revenue from spirits,

In 1836-Total population,

Revenue from spirits,

36,598 £57,112 60,794 £104,692 77,096 £136,562

This last comparison gives nearly 21 per head. But the fairest way of putting the case is to exclude the amount paid for publi. cans' licenses on one hand, and children under twelve years of age. We shall thus have, for the year 1836.

Consumers,

Direct revenue from epirits,

£62,925 127,057

Showing that every male and female throughout the entire territory of New South Wales, above twelve years of age sup- posing the consumption to have been equally divided, paid in direct taxation, for ardent spirits, rather more than two pounds sterling! What part of the world, we mournfully sak, could exhibit a parallel to this awful picture?

Another most remarkable fact, in connexion with these compa risons, demands attention.

The entire revenue of the last fourteen years exclusively of the land revenue, was. From this deduct the amount derived from duties on spirits and publicans' licenses..

And we have left only...

result:-

(£1,702,762 £1,158,136

£544,626

Rupees 1,55,700

.

CHINESE LITERATURE.

11

CHINA is full of books, and schools and colleges. New authors are continually springing up, though com. press is active, and the traffic in books is a lucrative paratively few of them gain much celebrity. The and most honorable branch of trade. Individuals have their libraries, and government its collections. Of simply the titles of books with the names of their these there are catalogues, some of which contain authors; but others, in addition to the titles and names, give brief notices of their contents, intimating in few words what each work contains. Of the imperial library at Peking, there are catalogues in both these Rs. 85,000 forms. 20,000 2,200

250 500

1,150 1,500

That catalog.e of books in the imperial library -- noticed in the third Annual Report of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge in China-is pro- 200 bably one of the best ever published. It is called Yam ting. Sz' Fú tsün Suh Tsung Muk, General Catalogue 3,000 of all the Books in the Four Libraries, by Imperial Au. 1,200 thority. This catalogue is in itself a very valuable 3,000 work, comprised in one hundred and twelve duodecimo 1,200 volumes of 140 or 150 pages each. 1,000

800

The above is from the Chinese Chrestomathy by the 12,00 Revd. E. C. Bridgman, Macao 1841. We have much 7,000 pleasure in recommending this work, as very valuable, 15,000 not only to the Chinese Student, but to the general reader desirous of acquiring information respecting China and the Chinese.

700

Rupees 1,55,700

THE "imports" in the above table were purchased by the Almora merchants from the Bhoteas-a race of people partly residing on this side the snowy range, and partly on the other, who are the "carriers" of the trade between the two countries. The correspondent of the Ukhbar describes them to be

"A very hardy race, living at the limit of almost perpetual snow, and are trained form their infancy to endure cold, and the effects of a rarefied atmosphere. They may be said to have a complete monopoly of the trade, and it is believed that this is a great obstacle to its extension in these distant countries. A very consid. erable increase, it is supposed would take place, were a direct communication and free trade with Tartary, established. The native merchants of Almora offered to enter into a hond to pay our Government forty thousand Rupees yearly, if they would abolish the Bootia monopoly, and lay open the trade to them. The monopoly is a self-arrogated or self-established one, and no other parties dare to infringe it, such is the fear of the Chinese, whose subjects the Booteas profess to be, and under whose sanction they pretend to hold it, although they principally reside in our own territories The undeviating reason for this, as for every thing else, is "Cheen ka hookm."

The "difference" between the exports and imports, as exhibited in the above table, is not, however, all profit. The following is a rough estimate of the expenses: Sheep and Goats purchased for carriage, Rs. 10,000 Cotton cloths do. for apparel, Coarse Thibetan Woollens re-purchased for Government Lend Revenue Interest of Loans from Almora Merchants, Expenses of Jubboos, Goats and Sheep for Domestic use,

Loans advanced by Bhotias,

Losses of all kinds,

4.000 do. 4.000 4,849 15,000

CHINA-We are glad to find that the Queen's Gov- ernment is not disposed to do things by halves in reference to China. The 98th Regiment has received orders to proceed in a seventy-four to the seat of war, and a fleet of troop-ships bear them company. Means of transport from India to tho Canton river will thus be abundantly at the disposal of the Indian Government; do the work handsomely. There must be no peace and for the rest, men enough will doubtless be found to with China now till his Celestial Majesty has been taught how powerless he is when brought into collision with the might of the British empire.-Weekly Paper.

in China are natives of the South of Ireland, and NEARLY all the leading officers in the gallant affairs among them we are proud to record three freemen of Limerick, Major-General Sir Hugh Clough, son of the late Colonel Gough, City Limerick Militia; Captain Major Sargent. 18th, son of the late James Sargent, Bouchier, R. N., son of the late General Bouchier; and Esq., all of this city. Captain Sir Thomas Herbert, K. C. B. now second in command of the navy in China. was some years ago High Sheriff of the county of Kerry-Limerick Chronicle.

ON DITS.

On dit-In the Bazaar that Yang an Imperia! Com- missioner is en route, to offer 40,000,000 as com. pensation to the British for the Expenses of the War, and the surrendered Opium: also the cession of Hong. kong as the price ef peace.

On dit -The Chinese have already commenced removing the debris and rubbish preparatory to rebuild. ing the Bogue Forts.

On dit.-Colonel Jancigny has given the Imperial Commissioner Yihshan the best advice, and which, it is confidently asserted, he dares not follow.

On dit.-During the last month most stringent meas ures have been taken by the Mandarins for the sup- pression of Piracy in the Canton River and its embou. chures: which have issued in the capture of nearly one 4.000 hundred offenders, of which number forty four were 4,000 decapitated at Canton on one day-since then sixteen 6,000 more have been executed -Rigorous measures are still pursued by the Mandarins against Piracy. 51,849 24,476 Rupees. 76,325

Total.

Profit or balance in favor of Bhotias

GERMAN SETTLEMENT ON THE NERBUDDA-Wa learn from Nagpore that a German Mission, consisting of a clergyman, a Medical man and three or four intel- ligent mechanies, recently passed through on their way Northward, with a view to settling themselves some

where on the Nerbudda.

The goods sold to the Bhoteas are rarely paid for in cash, but bonds are taken made payable in cash and goods at the season of return traffic. The Kuldar Rupees are the only cash return in India coinage. WE call the attention of our Readers to 'The correspondent of the Ukhbar, adds:- "When our quarrels with China are settled. it is to the formal Notification of Commodore be hoped the countries beyond our Himala frontier may Kearney, commanding the United States not be entirely forgotten. We ought to make a free East India Squadron. In making public trade with Tartary, and permission for Europeans to travel in it, one of the conditions of our treaty, and this document we would remark, that we I am confident, as well as are many others who have shall gladly insert any Notice or Announce- given their attention to the subject. that it would be ment of Foreign Functionaries, which we highly advantageous to both countries. There is a vast tract of country beyond the Himalas, in the table may deem of interest to the Commercial land of Tartary, richer in mineral treasures than most Community and Residents in China. parts of the world, and the developement of its resources might lead to results which it would be impossible to BRITISH AND RUSSIAN REVENUE FROM ARDENT SPIRITS. predict." £8,057,929 was the amount of Public Income which in the United Kingdom, was produced by the Custoras and Excise Duties on Ardent Spirits, during the year 1839. Independent of the large illicit distillation, and contraband Import, we make ont, that the consumption exceeds one Imperial Gallon for every man, woman, and child, which cannot cost the consumers less than fifteen shillings per annum. The Revenue of Russia is estimated at 600.000,000 roubles of which one fourth or 8 25,000,000 in our money, are derived from the farming out of the sale of ardent Spirits.

[Bombay Times.]

JAVA TEA.

LETTERS from Amsterdam mention a very large sale at Rotterdam of Java tea, at which about 3.000 cheats were sold for about the same price as the China A similar deduction from the entire revenue of 1836 gives this leaf. Formerly very small quantities of this article were sold at a time, and, as was supposed, more as a £198.129 matter of curiosity than for actual use. Now, some 136,582 of the judges of tea in Holland have been heard to remark that they consider the Java tea equal to, if not 61,567 better than, that of China, with the advantage that it will be found impossible to mix inferior with superior [Singapore Free Press.]

Entire revenue.

Revenue from spirits.

In other words. while the adult population paid rather more than two pounds per head for spirituous liquors, they paid rather less than one pound per head for all other taxes put together!

sorts.

So true it is that our Vices are much greater fax eaters, and harder taskmasters than our Governors.

1

12

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

ON

FRIDAY, APRIL 8TH. 1842, AT 12 O'CLOCK NOON,

BY

C. MARKWICK, AUCTIONEER,

A LARGE CHINESE TRADING JUNK NOW LYING AT ANCHOR OFF MR. FEARON'S GODOWNS. TERMS OF SALE, CASH,

THE JUNK TO BE AT THE RISK OF

THE PURCHASER FROM THE TIME

SHE IS KNOCKED DOWN.

Hongkong, April 4th. 1842.

CIRCULAR.

Messrs. D. Wilson & Co. of Calcutta, beg respectfully to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army end Navy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hongkong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description.

Messrs. D. W. & Co. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement in given to their best endeav. ours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bordeaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to sup ply every kind of stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newspapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly selcet by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the necessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting ou their part to ensure the same patronage which bas been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

Messrs. D. W. & Co. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and reputation.

1st-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

24.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c.

to be of the best procurable quality-enable to do so by the care

of, and confidence in, our agents.

SALT PROVISIONS, &c. Navy Beef, in tierces. Ditto Pork, in barrels. Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried

HERMITECALLY SEALED PROVISIONS,

In Tin Canisters, Essence of Mocha Coffee. Concentrated Essence of Meat, in small tins, for Invalids. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries. Sir Hans Sloane's Choco-

late.

Tapioca, in tins.

Pearl Barley, in do. Do. Sago.

Robinson's prepared Groats,

in tins.

Do Patent Barley, in do. Scotch Oatmeal, in do. Speed's Arrow Root, in do. Bloom Raisins. Jujubes. Liquorice.

Zante Currants. Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders,

PICKLES. KETCHUP.

Anchovies. Lucca Oil. English Vinegar, Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats. Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waistcoats. Lascars Clothing. White ditto Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves. Guernsey Frocks. Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth. Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes

Europe Rope of sizes. Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Lead Lines, Europe. Log ditto ditto. Seaming Twine ditto. Roping ditto Seaming Lines.

White Lead.

Black Paint.

Gren ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes.

Bunting.

Fish hooks.

Nails of sizes,

Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tucks--

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Cloaks. And various other Articles too numerous to detail.

Orange and Lemon Peel.

FOR SALE.

JAMS AND JELLIES

3d.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much A FINE Chesnut Sorel Chusan Mare. Inquire at the Office of

lower rate and secure to ourselves the best description; persons

in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments will

at once acknowledge this truim and admit of its decided indis.

pensability in procuring a superior article at a low price.

We beg to annex a list of Stures at present in our Godowns.

The "Algerine." Brig will leave this for Calcutta for a fresh supply of Stores of all necessary kinds this day.

Hongkong, 7th. April 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from All- Loaf and Pine Cheese. sopp and Campbell in Yorkshire Hams. hhds.

Do do, do do. in bottles. Fine Pale French do, in bottles.

., Old Geneva, in cases.- Very fine small still Scotch .whiskey.

Old Tom. London Porter, in hhds. Dublin Stout, in bottles. Champagne, from Moét of Epernay.

Superfine Brown Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port Wine, from Cock-

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds Briskets and

Tongues, assorted, in kegs each containing 3 Brisk ets, 2 Rounds 2 Humps and 6 Tongues. Spiced ditto, in ditto ditto Yarmouth Bloaters. Pastry suet.

Essence of Peppermint. Lavender Water. Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.]

Soda Water Powders. Brown Windsor Soap.

burn, and Carbonell and Scrubbing Brushes. Co.

⚫Shoe ditto.

Knudsden's Cherry Brandy. Plate Brushe

Annisette de Bordeaux.

Cyder.

Lemon Syrup

Best Bengal Cheroots.

MISCELLANEOUS.

Wine Glasses. Plates.

"Sandoway Imitation Ha- Tallow Candles.

vanah Cigars.

BISCUITS, &c.

Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, do.

Wine ditto, ditto.

Spice Nuts, ditto.

ARRIVED.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads. Playing Cards.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice. Dholl.

Ceylon Moss.

the Friend of China.

Hongkong, 7th. April 1842.

FOR SALE.

ON board the American Ship Forum, at Reduced prices.

new superfine American flour, Mess pork, Pickled Sal. mon, do Herrings, Hams, Dried apples, Champaigne cider, Tobacco, Lemon Syrup and tongued and grooved planks, for flooring or other use, Timber 4 inch to 8 do square. Samples of the above can be seen at N. Duus' Godown or on board.

Hongkong March 30th. 1842.

FOR SINGAPORE AND CALCUTTA.

TO SAIL POSETIVELY ON THE 7TH APRIL THIS DAY. HE Clipper Brig "Algerine" Charles Freight or passage apply to Capt. Buckton, on board, or to Messrs. JAMIESON, HOW, & Co. Macao.

Hongkong 7th April 1849.

NOTICE.

and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and

carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles: Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, Beer,

ditto. ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret, Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm, Tar.

Alle a quantely of Paint-Paint Oil (Turpentine) Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compases, and others Marine Stores. Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

CARD, J. R. Bird, late of Singapore,-bege to inform the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship' Wright and Engineer in the Queen's Road, and Superintendent of buildings on the Brit. ish Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage which be hopes to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named handicrafts.

Hongkong, 30th March, 1842.

ON Sale at 46 Queen's Road, American Pine Spars, Provis.

ions, Sherry Wine in wood and glass, Brandy ditto, ditto. Coir Rope. Canvass, Paints and other stores by C. V. GILLESPIE Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

FOR SALE.

T the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society hund- somely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.- Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

DEPARTURES.

30th Mar.Barque Kestrel R.N.Beaubais for Chusan C.Stores. 31st Brig R.Exchange, G. Rees ,, Macao G.Stores

"

3ls April, Barque Hongkong, S Whettein

4th Ship Queen Mab. R. Ainley

Macao. G,Cargo

H.C.S. Hoogly, Com. Rose,

39

Macao.

"

Singap. Ballast,

"

95

11

Brig Maulmein &. D. Pritt

E.Cast, Opium.

"

"Ship GoodSuccess W, Eames

6th

"1

Macao Cotton. G.Stores

39

Chusan C.Stores

", Barque J.H.Yates N.Moullins

31

Alibi R.Vooght

from Trincomalee,

ARRIVAL OF PASSENGERS PER CHAMPION. Mrs. Grattan wife of Major G. Mrs. Wigston do. Captain W. Of the 18th Royal Irish at Ningpo.

FROM the Government Gazette of yesterday, we have extracted a copy of a circular addressed by Rear Ad-

OTICE.-The Granite Godown No. 46. Queen's Road-miral Sir W. Parker, K. C, B. to the Captains of Her

For the Convenience of Vessels discharging in front of the Godown, white and black buoys have been laid down at a short distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 24 fathoms, with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go-junks excepting those trading between the coasts of down has a Stone Pier in front, 275 feet long, and is situated at the Fokien province and the British settlements in the a distance above high water mark with a double sea wall that Straits. When the cargoes of the captured vessels are will protect it against the rise of the sea usual in Typhoons, valuable, they are to be brought into port and deliver- ed into the custody of the prize Agents. When the cargo is of an ordinary nature, the junk with its con- tents is to be destroyed. It does not appear whether the crews are to be detained as prisoners of war or landed on the coast. Five prize Agents have been appointed to receive charge of the captured property. A Captain of Her Majesty's land forces on the part of the Crown; two officers of similar rank, one from the Royal and the other from the Madras Army, as repre- sentatives of the military portion of the expeditionl The Admiral's Secretary and a Purser of the Roya Navy on dean of the officers and seamen of Her Ma- jesty's squadron, and such vessels of the Indian Navy as may be attached to it. The struggle between Great Britain and China is likely to be of long duration.

A

NOTICE.

N Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established at the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," and all orders for that excellent work will be promptly attended to Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

RICES for Job Printing are as follows:

PR

Bills of Lading and Exchange, Policies and folio pages.

• per 100

11

Letter paper size...

ADVERTISEMENTS

Of Ships

Not exceeding 7 lines

for 3 months

89

00 5.:

253

$ 5

"

"

6

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod.

erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into, the Chi- nese language.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

The confiscated property will doubtless amount to very considerable sum, and their commission on it will be a source of considerable emolument to the Agents. The following are the names of the fortunate parties who have been nominated to perform this duty. Cap. tains Campbell, 55th Regt., Ware 49th Regt., Balfour, Madras Artillery, Mr. Secretary Chimmo, and Mr. Purser Whichelo, R. N. Bombay Courier, January. 14.

SHIPPING REPORT FROM THE 30TH OF MARCH TO THE 6TH APRIL INCLUSIVE. 1842.

NAMES.

CAPTAINS.

March 31st. Royal Exchange G. Rees

CONSIGNEES,

MEN. TONS. FLAG.

FROM.

To.

IMPORT.

EXPORT.

SAILED

J.Matheson & Co.

14 131 British

33

39

39

John H. Yates R. Moullins Ramoncito

To Order

12 180

91

R. Gonzalez

April 1st. Thistle

Caldwell

Holliday Wise & Co. Self

23.

200 Spanish

Chu & Amoy Macao Singapore Manila

Stores & Spècie Same

33

Genl. Cargo

31st March 6th April

In port

19

17

8 140 British

Whampoa

Tea &c.

J. Kell

Holliday Wise & Co.

14

31

222

Liverpool

37

77

Com: Ross

11

Macao

3d.

J. Matheson & Co.

60 550

31

Bombay

39

J. Smith

11

18 404

Calcutta

Macao In port

27

V. Budd.

45 460 13

Trimcomalee

Cotton Comt. Stores Naval Stores

Same

4th April

" Prima Donna

H. C. S. Hoogly

5th. Wanderer

W, Eames

Good Success

Champion

35

Genl. Cargo

From the Harbour Master's List.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AND SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY

MESSES BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO.

4

X

+

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND BONGBONG GAZETTE.

N°. 4. VOL. 1

NOTELICATION.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG. THURSDAY, APRIL 14TH. 1942. GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. Dated at Hongkong, Government-House,

(SIGNED) HENRY POTTINGER Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary and Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British Subjects in China.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- this 29th. Day of March, 1842. zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and.Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official, By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

PROCLAMATION.

WITH the desirable object of preventing Disputes and laying down some defined Sys- tem regarding the Circulating Medium in this Settlement, his Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart, Her Majesty's Plenipoten- tiary, and Chief Superintendent of the Trade of British Subjects in China, is pleased to promulgate the follorving brief Rules, which are to be considered applicable to all commca Bazaar Purchases and Barter, Hire, &c. &c. but not to interfere with, or affect what may be termed Mercantile Transactions; and are to be in force on the Island of Hongkong, pending the Gra- cious Pleasure of her Majesty the Queen

of Great Britain.

BY ORDER.

CHAS. E. STEWART.

Assistant Secretary and Treasurer. Assistant Secretary and Treasurer.

CIRCULAR,

TO HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S SUBJECTS IN CHINA.

HER Britannic Majesty's Plenipotentia- ry TY &c. in China has high satisfaction in announcing, to Her Majesty's Subjects, that he has this day received Official intel- ligence that a body of Chinese Select Troops, estimated at from 8 to 10,000 men, partly forming the Garrison of the District City of Tsekee, (20 miles from Ningpo)and partly posted in a strongly fortified camp on the heights close to that City, were to- tally defeated with the loss of all their Guns, Small arms, Ammunition, Stores, Camp equipage, &c. (both in the City and Camp) by Her Majesty's combined Forces, on the 15th, of last mouth.

{

Price &1 monthly

Or $12 yeary

Camp, where they destroyed a number of Gun Boats and Fire Vessels, and shortly after, on the Fugitives from the Camp pas- sing near them, they landed their small crews and pursued them in various direc- tions putting a number hors de combat?

It is estimated, that the Enemy could not have lost fewer than one thousand men killed in these different affairs, independent of great numbers that were carried off have been many Mandarins and Officers of Wounded, and amongst whom are known to Rank.

HER Majesty's Plenipotentiary has not received a Return of the casualties in Her Majesty's Land Forces, but he re- grets to mention, that three were killed and fifteen wounded (most of them severely) in the Naval Brigade.

THE British Forces remained the night of the 15th. in the Chinese deserted Camp, and the next day, after the necessary delay for embarking the wounded, detroying the Guns, wall pieces, and Matchlocks, as well as the useless Provisions and ammunition, and burning the Camps and Barracks; the Commanders in Chief pushed forward to a from Tsekee at the Chongke Pass, but it second entrenched Camp about seven Miles was found that it had been vacuated during the night, and after destroying the works and burning everything that was ignitable includig the Joss Houses and other build- ing which had been converted into Ma- gazines or Barracks, Her Majesty's Forces returned to Thekee the same evening and to Ningpo on the 17th.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN HENRY POTTINGER. Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary.

AFFGHANISTAN.

ACCOUNTS had for some time before reached Their Excellencies the Naval and Military Commanders in Chief of the as- 1st. THE following Coins are to be deem-semblage of Troops at Teekee', and as there ed Legal Tenders Spanish, Mexi- was reason for believing they intended to can, and other Dollars, and their com-retire on Pikwan, forty miles distant; in ponent Parts. Conpany's Rupees and consequence of the repulse sustained by the their component Parts "Cash", or the Chinese Forces at Ningpo and Chinhae on Copper coin current in China. the morning, of the 10th. March, Their 2nd. DOLLARS of whatever denomination or movement in the hope of bringing them to eral's Orders and notification, in reference to the dis Excellencies determined te make a rapid In our last number we published the Governor Gen- action, before they could retrograde. astrous events in Cabul, It cannot be denied, that THE Troops, Seamen, and Marines, were our Supremacy in India, has never before received so accordingly embarked in the Nemesis heavy a blow as has been inflicted by late events. We Phlegathon" and "Queen" Steamers tow-have not space nor inclination to give an historical re- capitulation of the past but we may glance at the caus ing a number of Boats of the Squadron, es and probable consequences of our expedition beyond 3rd. Two and one Quarter Company's early on the morning of the 15th. and after the Indus. Rupees shall be considered equal to proceeding Sixteen miles by the River, and It is notorious that territonal aggrandizement in In- one Dollar. marching five, reached Tsekee at half past demned by the Court of Directors and disclaimed by dia has been repudiated by the British Nation. con- ONE Rupee and two Annas (or three O'Clock, when a fire was opened on each succeeding Governor General and yet despite of half a quarter) equal to half a Dol- them by some Guns from the Ramparts. such repudiation, condemnation and disclaimers; the lar and half a Rupee and one anma and a considerable body of Matchlockmen, remoteness of the stene, of the uncontrollable force of (or Nine annas) equal to one quar-who retired on receiving a few rounds from circumstances, has at last led to the present enormous expansion of our Indian Empire. During the Govern- ter of a Dollar. two small field Pieces and the Walls were ment of Lord Wm. Bentinck, there was a rigorous

device, and whether whole or chop- ped, are to circulate at par with reference to each other, always pro- viding that they be of the proper, weight and Standard.

resistance.

4th. TWELVE hundred Cash (1200) (cop-immediately escaladed without further pcr Coin) shall be equal to one Dollar.

Six hundred (600) to half a Dollar. THREE hundred (300) to one Quar-

ter of a Dollar.

to one Company's Rupee.

Two hundred and sixty six to half a Rupee.

(266)

ONE hundred and thirty-three (133) te one Quarter of a Rupee.

adherence to the policy of non-intervention and non

augmentation. Commendable as such policy (abstrac- tedly considered) is, yet looking to our peculiar rela- tions with India, the adoption of such a policy for a few short years of Sir Williams Government, could not fail to be fraught with disastrous consequences. It was

moreover diametrically opposed to all antecedents, and constituted as human nature is; it was hardly to be

THE Chief body of the British Troops &c. marched round outside the Town, and were joined at the East Gate by the Esca- lading Party, where the whole had an ex- cellent view FIVE hundred and thirty three (533) ched on two distinct lofty Hills in front, expected such self denying policy would be carried out tly made to attack them, as nearly as possi-Dust Mahomed, the then ruler of Cabul, and his bro- and on the left. Arrangements were direc- When the Lion of the Punjaub was despoiling the Afghan power by depriving it of its fairest provinces; ceeded admirably, and although the enemy Power, in order to avert their threatened destruction. ble at the same instant. This maneuvre suc- thers, the chiefs of Candahar appealed to the British disputed their steep and difficult positions 5th. ANY other Coins whether British or so obstinately that many instances of hand to Foreign, not enumerated in the pre-hand combat accurred, Her Majesty's For- ceding Rules, are not to be deemed ces gallantly and steadily persevered in their a legal Tender, but they can of ascent, under an increasing fire, until the course be sold, or otherwise bartered summits were gained and the rout of the in the Bazaar, according to their Chinese became complete at all points, and was followed up by a pursuit, which was continued till sunset.

intrinsic value.

6th. CASH" (Copper Coin) at the rate laid down in the 4th. Rule, will be sold to any individual requiring it in sums of not less thon Fifty Doliars, on application to the Treasurer and Secretary to her Britannic Masjes- ty's Superintendents of Trade &c.

True to his line of policy Lord Wm. Bentinck de- clined all intervention, and hence the Dost was driven to apply to his co-religionist the Shah of Persia, to aid arrived in India, the consequences of the rejection of him against the infidel Sikhs. When Lord Auckland the overtures, from Dost Mahomed, became apparent. His alliance with Persis, (politically considered) a Rus- in Province; owing to the then dominance of Russian influence at that court alarmed our Indian Government. It forthwith despatched the late Sir A. Burnes in 1836-7; avowedly for the purpose of negociating a more WHILST these operations were going on but really, to counteract the supposed effects of Russian free and cordial commercial intercourse with the Ameer. upon the Heights the small Steamers intrigue. We may say an passant, that in India as well (Phlegethon" and" Nemesis") accompa- as in England, there are functionaries who have been nied by some of the Boats of H. Ms. Ships, afflicted with the Russophobia; and who now laugh at proceeded up a branch of the main River, of a Persian Envoy at Candahar, and the visit of a Rus- their former apprechensions. The simultaneous arrival leading in the direction of the entrenchedian Agent, Captain Vicovich to Cabul; both of whom

14

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

were prodigal of promises, quite counteracted all the efforts of Sir Alexander Burnes and led the Dost, who was deeply galled at his former rejection by the British, to adopt the Russo. Persian in preference to our alliance. Upon this, the late Sir Wm. Macnaghten was depu tel by the Governor General, to negociato a tri-partite treaty, between the Brit sh Government, the Ameer's detested foe. Runjeet Singh, and the deposed Sovereign of Cabul, Shah Soojah. The objects were the deposi

tion of Dost Mahomed, the restoration of Shah Soojad to the throne of his ancestors--the independence and integrity of Afghanistan, the general freedom and se- curity of our commerce on the Indus, and among the nations of central Asia, and a lasting barrier raised against Russian intrigue and encroachment. ration of the Shah Soojah, who however has again been The only part of the Treaty realized, was the resto. deposed by his subjects. His personal habits and cha- racter, rendered him so very obnoxious, that at his res. toration it was quite obvious the independent existence of the Doorannee monarchy, under his rule, was wholly

impossible,

And advised attempts to raise a larger contribution to the state, and gross acts of oppression on the people; combined with the personal unpopularity of the Sove. reign and affection for their late ruler are the causes of the late outbreak. It is essentially a popular move ment, the hearts of the people are in the cause, no won der then that an universal disaffection and rising should have been disgraced by excesses, these the leaders could not cheek, they are consequent on such revolutionary

struggles.

FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 14ru. 1842.

FIRE INSURANCE.

NOTIFICATION.

GENERAL ORDERS by His Excellency Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Gough G. C. B. Commanding Dated Head Expeditionary Land Force in China Quarters, Ningpo City, 14th March 1842. 10. Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Gough congrat- ulates the Troops both at Ningpo and Chinhae, on the recent gallant repulse of the Chinese, in their bold and well-planned night attack upon these Cities,

All those employed manifested the spirit which the Lieutenant General feels assured that the whole of the Troops would have displayed, had circumstances ena- Sir Hugh Gough begs Colonel Schoedde and Lieu- tenant Colonel Morris C. B. to accept for themselves, bled them to come into closer contact with the Enemy. as Comminders at the points of attack his very best thanks, and to convey His Excellecny's highest appro- diers, under their respective Commands, particularly to val to the officers, non-commissioned officers and Sol those mentioned by them, and by Lieutenant Colonel Mentgomerie C. B who Commanded the Sortie from the North Gate of Ningpo, and whose praiseworthy conduct was such as might have been expected from this gallant and judicious officer: Lieutenant Colonel Mountain. C B. Deputy Adjutant General; Lieuten-

We see a town rapidly springing up around us, and yet we find there is no place or office in China where the prudent can effect an Insurance against the calamity of Fire! We are aware, as compared to still the consequent diminished rate of pre- Canton, the risk is quite inconsiderable; mium would, or ought to lead every one to Insure. We are glad to see the enforce- ment of the Land Officers regulation, for the removal of Mat and substitution of Brick Houses, by the native population. It is very encouraging to spe, in every instance that a mat house has been demol- ised or removed, (if permitted) its site has been immediately covered by a more subs-ant Colonel Hawkins. Deputy Commissary General; tantial erection. We believe mat houses Major More Deputy Judge Advocate General; Dr. Balfoar, and Lieutenant Molesworth, Medras Artil- will not in future be permitted within a French, Superintending Surgeon; Captains More and distance, that will endanger by their com- lery:-Lieutenants Murray, Armstrong, and O'Toole, The Slaughter of Sir A Burnes, and other distinguish bustion, any portion of the newly erected 18th R. 1. Regt. Brevet Captain Moorhead, 26th Ca- ed Officers, our readers have seen full details of in Town. Hence as the Town extends, so meronian Regiment: Captain Mc. Andrew. Lieuten- contemporary prints. The recent assassination of Sir Wm. Macnaghten will the occupiers of mat houses be com- ant Grand, Lieutenant and Adjutant Browne, Lieu- Danbeney & Co. Schaw of the 55th Regiment. (so strongly denounced in the Notification of the Go pelled to remove their lares. Already theytenant Ramsay and Michell of the 49th and Captain vernor General) was owing some say to the unavoida. are climbing the Hill, and lines of streets 20. The following Letter from the Military Secre. ble delay consequent on the necessary preparations re are forming on spots, which a few weeks tary to the Commander in Chief in India forwarding quiring to be made for the evacuation of Cabul as since were deemed wholly inaccessible. We Copy of a Letter to His Excellency's address from His stipulated with the Insurgents-according to others to Lordship The General Commandig in Chief, having the Envoy's laudable endeavours tonegociate better term hope our remarks, may attract the notice been received by the last mail, Lieutenant General Sir than those he had been coerced to accept or procras of some of our friends, at Calcutta and Hugh Gough has the high gratification of communica tinate his departure till relief should arrive. It seems a London, connected with Fire offices. It is ting to the Force under his command the gracious ex- suspicion of this intention was entertained by the con- federates, and a belief that the leader of the movement certain a very large, and remunerating pression of Her Majesty's approval, as conveyed by Mahomed Ukhbar Khan, Son of Dost Mahomed was business, might be done here. We should implicated therein or endeavoring to make terms for stagger the belief of our friends were we to himself, led to great discontents and the safety of Ma- state our notions of the amount we think homed Ukhbar Khan was perilled. To stifle all doubts of his sincerity, he treacheronsly invited Sir Wm. Mac will be eventually required, but we may say naghten to a conference beyond the Walls of the Can- it is likely within the next twelve months, faith, who retorted, he drew forth a pistol and shot Sir be effected on Houses, Property and Mer- tonments; when after accusing the Envoy of want of Insurances to the amount $5,000,000, would William, who laid his hand on his sword to defend him chandise on the Island of Hongkong, if the calf another pistol shot doprived him of life. at the same time Captain Trevor was cut down and killed by one premiums required were at all proportionate of the chiefs. The two chuprassees were also slanghtered to the very small risk incurred; and proper but Captain Lawrence and Lient Conolly were wounded reference had to the consideration, that and carried prisoners into Cabul. This was all Sir William's Escort. Such daring perfidy almost staggers though in China, we are under the British credibility and looks more like Frenzy than calenlating Flag Ifa Mutual Insurance Company could be established on the Island it would be a better plan, and we think it might easily be made to give, very satisfactory results to all concerned.

Fraud.

The evacuation of so costly a conquest [as subsequen tly agreed on at the convention of Cabul] by the British, the utter discomfiture of the Troops and annihilation or disperion of the whole force on its way to Jellala- bad; whether it be referable to the perfidy of the ene. my, the rigor of the season, the difficultiess of the route. or the incapacity of the Politicals it boots not now to inquire.

The tenure of our Indian Empire imperatively de mands, that the heaviest retribution of a righteous ven- geance be immediately exacted. We feel sure only a few short months will elapse ere the insurrection will be crushed, the leaders extinguished (as Machiavelli would e) and British induenose stall stored in bul. We would fain hope we shall than use our strength justly not tyrannously-respect public opinion [even in Afghanistan] not again place Shah Soojah in the Af fgha durbar-appoint some less obnoxious individual -endeavor in all cases to conciliate the feelings and pre- judices of the People and especially avoid creating deis catisfaction by insisting on enormous contributious and nnexpected exactions.

THE POPULATION OF HONGKONG. Our population is already much greater, than that of Singapore five years after its settlement. One of the most flourishing colonies of Great Britain, and of modern times, then numbered only 10,683 sonls. We hope the protracted provisional state of things, which so much retarded Singapore, will not obtain with us. It was nearly six years after the foundation of Singapore, be- fore its existence was officially recognized, and not till by a treaty with the king of the

In conclusion we may remark, that the expedition Netherlands, and the Malay Sultan of Jo- beyond the Indus, was denounced by the sagacity of pore, was possession of the Island of Singa- the Duke of Wellington, and disapproved of by the pre-hore, finally confirmed to the British. seat Governor General to whom is now committed the

task of upholding the honor of the British name and demonstrating the might of the British power.

lust of conquest-no insane apprehension of Russian in-

The U. S. Frigate Constellation proceed

Full satisfaction obtained, we confidently expect no ed to Whampoa on Monday last. Arrange- trigue, will divert Lord Ellenborough from his glorious ments had been previously made with the objects, of developing the mighty commercial resources Canton Authorities for the Frigate to re- and promoting the internal improvement and moral con- pair to the above anchorage, and it is the dition of the vast Empire he is called upon to Gov-first instance on record of a foreigir ship of ern. Verily he may earn imperishable renown in walking in this path; and we hope the future historian war entering the Canton river by the direct of his career may be compelled to say that it was a consent of the Chinese Government. sublime negation of Burkes magnificent declamation on the impechment of Warren Hastings before the House of Lords.

It is said that H. M. Ship the Nimrod which left this morning proceeds to the Canto River to reconnoitre.. The Stea- mers Hoogly and Ariadne have also sailed for the River and there are rumours of Chinese troops proceeding down the River towards the Bogue."

It is understood that Commodore Kear- ney is to have a special interview with Yih- shan, and the Frigate may remain some weeks at Whampoa. Rev. Mr. Bridgman accompanys the Commodore as Interpreter.

The British Brig Algerine, Charles Buckton Commander, left here on the 10th for Calcuta hnving as passenger Major Johnston with Government despatches for England

General Lord Hill.

Commander in Chief's Office Delhi, Dec 24th 18 41 Head Quarters, Camp, No. 551.

Sir

I am desired by tho Commander in 1841, and to express Eis Excellency's gratification in Chief to forward, for your information, copy of a Let- ter from Lord Hill, dated Horse Guards Octr 30th having the opportunity of conveying these assurances of Her Majesty's approbation.

I have &C.

To Lieut, Genl, Sir H. Gough G. C. B.

Comm. the Military Force, China [Signed] JoHN LUARD, LIEUT. COL. Mil. Sec. Octr 30th 1841. Horse Guards, Sir

Letter of the 10th August last transmiting a printed I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your copy of Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Gough's report of the brilliant successes obtained by the Troops under his Command in the neigbourhood of Canton in the month of May last, and I have the satisfaction of assur- ing you, that the Queen has been pleased to express Her entire approbation of those operations, and of conduct of the officers and Men employed on the occa- sion.

You'will be pleased to signify the same to Sir Hugh Gough, and to inform him likewise, that the zeal, talent and energy he displayed, are duly appreciated by Her Majesty who is no less sensible of the conspic- uous gallantry of the Troops, and of their admirable order under the most trying circumtances-

I have &c.

[Signed] Hill

30. His Excellency has the further pleasure of pub. lishing the following letter from the Political Secre- tary to the Government of India, conveying the appro- bation of the Right Honorable the Governor General of India, in Council.

No. 1723.

To LIEUTENANT GENERAL SIR H. Goveн, K. C.B. Commanding the Expeditionary Force on the Coast of China.

Secret Dept.

Sir

I am directed by the Right Honorable the Govern. or General of India in council to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch under date the 5th Septem- ber, aunouncing the capture of Amoy by Her Majes ty's combined naval and Military forces; and in reply to convey to you, His Lordship's high approbation of the judicious arrangements concerted by Rear Admi ral Sir W. Parker and Your Excellency, and of the conduct of the Officers and men engaged on this occa-

sion.

Official Gazette, and transmitted to the authorities in Copies of the Despatches have been published in the England. Fort William I have & c. 22nd No-[Signed] T. H. MADDOCK, vember 184: Sec: to the Gov. of India By Order

A. S. H. MOUNTAIN. Lientenant Colonel Deputy Adjutant General Expeditionary Force

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

General Orders by His Excellency Lientenant Ge. neral Sir Hugh Gough G. C. B. Commanding the Expeditionary-Land Force Dated Head quarters

Ningpo City 10th March 1842. Lientenant General Sir Hugh Gough congratuenates his brave Comrades in arms on the op rtunity which was gwen to them ou the heights of segoan, of proving to the elite of the Chinese Army, the superiority of Bntons both as Soldiers and as men

Sir Hugh Gough will not here particularize, as the frequency of brilliant deeds in this small bnt formidable force renders it difficult vary the expression of his appro. val, and where all did their duty nobly, the Liutenant General requests all to accept his warmest thanks with the assiuance that he will not fail in his despatch to do justice to their gallant and exemplary conduct so cred. itably displayed as well in the field as in their forbear. cence towards the Peasantry, who-were in many cases intermingled with the fugitive Soediers.

The Lieutenant General's thanks are equally due to the Battalion of Seamen and marines, and he feels assured that every Officer and Soldier will join with him, in admiration of the Spirited advance of a Small body of the Battalion upon the fortified Encampment on the hill to the right of the Enemy,s position, headed by His Excellency Sir Wm. Parker. By-order

A. S. H. MOUNTAIN Lieutenant Colonel

Deputy Adjutant General Expeditionary Force- Circulating medium.-We would venture to suggest that as early as possible should be issued at Hongkong an Anglo-Chinese Dollar of the value of one Thousand copper cash or pice; also divisible of course into one hundred cents; which might also be coined in copper; and into silver pieces of ten, twenty five, and fifty cents. which would be found of great practical utility. We shall be able in a future number, to give a copy of the design recommended, and invite the opinions of our friends and correspondents, as to the expediency of such a measure. The ordinarily abundant supply of sycee silver, and broken money, with the promulgation and enforcement of the laws against clipping and defacing, would we think guarantee to us what is much to be desired, a respectable, safe, and always available supply of current coin. The mint at Bombay could afford very facility, for the coining of these monies, and some arrangement might be made, by which, for a small seignorage, the sycee sent from hence in return for opium might be so converted. The ready adoption by the Chinese of the Spanish Dollar, and the facilities which its circulation afford to their internal and foreign Trade, bespeak, we think, the success of the above recommendation. It will be observed that the Deci- mal System (and its accruing monetary advantages,

which are too obvious to point out) is strictly adhered to, and on that account is quite accordant with Chinese usage and convenience. From a correspondent, who is a member of the Numismatic Society of London, we learn that the adoptation of the current coin of England to this system, has been strenuously recommended by very influential individuals. In September last the matter was introduced by Lord Brougham to the House of Lords, in the way of petition and we are told that this change may be looked for at an early period; seeing the great mercantile advantages, with facilities of computation &c., which have followed its adoption

in France and America.

BURMAX.

On Friday morning last the Cantonment displayed one of the grandest military spectacles that hac ever been witnessed there, the whole Force having been assembled and manoeuvred by Brigadier Logan. We suppose there were not less than five thousand men on the ground, comprising two European Regiments (H. M. 50th and 63d) four Native Regiments (14th, 31st, 33d. and 44th,) a company of Rifles, aud ten Guns. Unfortunately the space within the Can- tonment is not sufficiently large to display with effect so large a body of men, owing to the new barracks having been crected across the ground, thereby cut- ting off a considerable portion of the space formerly available for field movements. On Friday last, the Regiments seemed heaped on each other, and in each other's way, as if the General Commanding could make a conplaint, not very often in Generals' mouths, that he had more men than he wanted or could make use of. The plan of the morning's fight appeared to be that the church was defended by the light divisions who were driven out, but recaptured it and drove the enemy on to their main body, whom they then joined and marched round the best friends in the world, saluting the Brigadier and "the galaxy of beauty" assembled round him to witness the scene. It was certainly a splendid sight and tended to raise reflections as to what that Force, in such an admirable state of discipline, and so well commanded, could do were an enemy before it, and as to the object for which it has been so suddenly assembled in this place. We sup- pose it must be for our defence, as we hear of no preparations for offensive movements; but whether so large a body be required for that purpose. we leave to those more competent to judge on such subjects. We understand that a similar display is to be made on Friday next, but we would suggest whether a more eligible scene of operations could not be selected in the plains in rear of the Pagoda Hills. Maulmain Chronicle,

15

Macao is the reason why our paper this week comes out a day later than usual.

will be expected to have been decided on ere this, and of dismissing our first set of Printers, the Arms, Seal, and Motto of the Colony.-At home. this Having been under the necessity we beg to call the matter to the attention of the proper consequent delay of procuring others from Authorities, who we have no doubt will as early as possible do the needful. We would venture to suggest, that there should be a blending fif compatible of Chi- nese with English heraldic symbols. How the Dra- gon and Lion would agree we cannot say but perhaps the Unicorn, would not kick at the association. This matter we leave in good hands; and have no doubt, when the arms are blazoned, our friends will be quite contented. As to the motto we do not disguise that our predilections are in favour of its being in Chinese.. if a Muncipal motto be wanted we would suggest "In portu quies" Rest in the haven, as in every way. very appropriate and especially so, seeing that the site of our city will be along the shores, of one of the most magnificent and convenient harbours in the known world.

AFFGHANISTAN.

"THERE are letters from Jellalabad to the 12th and from Cabool to the 4th instant.

THE HONGKONG PRICES OF OPIUM THIS DAY OLD PATNA NEW BENARES MALWA

8435 to 440 425 430 400 405 93 345

350

ADVERTISEMENT.

The ander-signed having entered into partnershif on the 1st Jan. 1842.-Under the firm of.

P. Townsend & Co. in the Ship Chan- The substance of the Cabool intelligence is that the dlery, Actionering and Commission bu- Force was to march towards Jellalabad on the next day. siness at Hongkong would be pleased to but that they were uncertain as to the faith that would fulfil any orders in their line, and hope be kept with them, expecting, however, no attack until.by atention to give Satisfaction to any who they reached Jugdulluck. may be pleased to favour them vith busi-

Six hostages had been given-

Captain Drummond, 3d Cavalry; Lieutenan's Co- ness. nolly. Eyre, and Warburton; Brevet Captain Walsh. and Lieut. Webb, of the Madras Army, in Shah Shoojah's Service.

All the sick had been sent into the city to the care of Mohamed Zeman Khan,

It appears certain that Mohamed Akbar Khanh-as openly proclaimed. and gloried in, the deliberate murder of Sir William Macnaghten

The Peshawur letter of the 15th instant, for- warding the above intelligence, states- Ali Musjie was again attacked yesterday by 1,5000 men, who wero beaten back. To-night the 64th and 53d march td reiuforce the Garrison.'"

[Eastern Star, 30th. January.]

SIR William Macnaghten had agreed to take all our Troops out of the country, and peace had been made on these terms, supplies had poured rapidly into Can- tonments day and night, and carriage cattlehad been procured for the march-day after day, however passed and accused Mohomed Ackbar of having betrayed and no move was made, the chiefs became impatient them-Mahomed requested the Envoy to give him a The Envoy was attended by four Officers and 8 of his meeting and discuss the matter. They met at a bridge. body guard, who were halted short of the bridge. The Afghan was accompanred by apparently only a few of his followers, Mahomed Ackbar began by saying that the country on conditions which the opposite party the Envoy had treated him ill, having agreed to quit had fulfilled. "He said we have given you food and camels, now when will you?" the Envoy pleaded weather, &c. &c. and tried to talk Mahomed Ackbar over, promising him all sorts of advantages if he would not press the departure of the troops-.High words fol- Ackbar seized his arm and shot him dead -Trevor lowed and the Envoy rose to depart when Mahomed was instantly cut down and the other Officers were seized. Ibid.

UHUL.

THE following is an extract from a letter received by yesterday's post, dated Kurnaul, January 3:

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale,

at their Godowns, Hongkong. The following Goods, viz Chain Cables of Sies

Anchors.

S

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases Claret "" Sauterne

Vinegar in Bottles Port in Casks and Bottles Hilf Leagures Java Arracks Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvass Duck

Twine and Marline Log Lines

Stationary

Sailors Knives Sail Needles Pad Locks

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the Supply of Shipping in general.

H. M.--SQUADRON. AT CHUSAN CHINHAE AND NINGPO.

Cornwallis

72 Beating the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir W. Barker, x. C. B., command- er in chief; Cat Richards, 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. Pelican 18-comdr. 18- Hyacinth 18- Modeste Columbine

i have only time to inform you that a letter has just been received here from an Officer of the 13th at Jellalabad, stating that Shah Soojah had abdicated in Blonde favor of the Shah Zadeh set up by the people, and that Sir W. MacNaghten and General Elphinstone had agreed to march out of the country, and were expected there in a few day!! A nice finale to this tragic-comedy of events.

"The Commander-in-Chief comes in tomorrow, and will not leave the station before the 10th." [Bombay Times.]

71

18- " 16-

10- lieut.

Justice,

G. Goldsmith,

Watson,

Morshead.

E. Troubridge,

Maitland.

Clio Algerine Lady Bentinck, surveying, vessel comdr. R. Collinson, Troopship Jupiter mr. comg. H. C. S. Nemesis, lieut. W. H. Hall, Queen, mr. comg. W. Warden, Phlegethon, lieut. Mc Cleverty, Sesostris, comdr. Ormsby, I. N. AT AMOY. 44-captain H. Smith, o. B. Tindal (absent) Hunter,

Druid

By a letter from Peshawar date 24th. December, accounts from Jellalabad up to the 19th ultimo, had been received. A report was current that the Arab families had been removed to make room for our Troops in the Bala Hissar, and as it was the custom with the Ka- Pylades bulis to lay in stores of provision and fuel for the win. ter, it was hoped that there would be enough with the Starling stores collected, to enable our forces to hold out till succour could arrive. Snow had fallen and the cold was severe.

The 60th and 64th Regiments reached Peshawur on the 24th December.

The Afredi Maliks, after a deliberation in Council for two days, had determined that they would keep open the Pass, and punish, the parties who had stopped the dak one day.-Ibid.

Chameleon

Blenheim

Herald

Nimrod

Cruizer

Royalist

Young Hebe

18-comdr.

10-lieut

6-comdr.

H. Kellett,

AT HONGKONG.

Sir Thomas Herbert

72-captain C. B. Senior Command

26-" 18-comdr.

18-

10-lieut.

ing Officer. J. Nias.

Glasse,

J. Pearse,

Chetwolde,

4-comdr. Wood.

H. C. S. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross,

Ariadne, lieut. Roberts

B

16

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

Messrs. D. Wilson & Co. of Calcutta, beg respectfully to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Navy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hongkong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description.

Messrs. D. W. & Co. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeav ours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcatta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bordeaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to sup. ply every kind of stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shippingp Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attash a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the necessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour ehall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

Messrs. D. W. & Co. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and reputation.

1st.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with rafety and despatch.

2d.-We guarantee cur Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quality-enable to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agente.

3d-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate and secure to ourselves the best description; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indis. pensability in procuring a superior article at a low price.

We beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns. The, "Algerine" Brig will leave this for Calcutta for a fresh Hongkong 7th. April 1842.

supply of Stores of all necessary kinds this day.

Prime Ripe Beer, from All Lonf and Pine Cheese. sopp and Campbell in Yorkshire Hams. hids.

o do, do do. in bottles.

ine Pale French do, in

bottles,

Old Geneva, in cases. Very fine small still Scotch whiskey.

"Old Tom. Lendon Porter. tn hhds. Doblin Stout, in bottles. Champague, from Moet of Epernay.

Superfine Brown Sherry

Prime Corned Humps Rounds Briskets

and

Tongues, assorted, in kegs cach containing 3 Brisk. ets, 2 Rounds 2 Humps and 6 Tongues.

Spiced ditto, in ditto ditto. Yarmouth Bloaters. Pastry suet.

Essence of Peppermint. Lavender Water.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.]

from Peter Domecq, Soda Water Powders. "Port wine, from Cock-Brown Windsor Soap. burn, and Carbonel and Scrubbing Brushes. Co. Shoe ditto.

Knudsden's Cherry Brand Plate Brushes.

Anni sette de Bordeaux,

Cyder.

Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots."

MISCELLANEOUS.

Wine Glasses. Plates.

"Sandoway Imitation Tallow Candles.

Havanah Cigars.

BISCUITS,

Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, do.

Wine ditto, ditto.

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Salt Provisions, &c. Navy Beef, iu tierces. Ditto Pork, in barrels. Fine Cape Elour, Kiln dri

HERMETECALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters. Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads. Playing Cards.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice. Dholl.

Ceylon Moss.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats. Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waistcoats. Lascars Clothing. White ditto

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves.

Concentrated Essence of Guernsey Frocks. Meat, in small tins, for Witney Blankets. Superfine Blue Cloth. Navy Buttons.

Invalids.

Sardines,

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hang Sloane's Choco-Flannel.

late.

Tapioca, in tins

Pearl Barley, in do.

Do. Sago.

in tins.

Metal ditto.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Robinson's prepared Groats, Europe Rope of sizes. Maldive Coir ditto ditto.

ARRIVED.

NAMES.

Do Patent Barley, in do. Scotch Oatmeal. in do. Speed's Arrow Root, in Bloom Raisins. Jujubes. Liquorice.

Zante Currants. Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

PICKLES. KETCHUP.

Anchovies. Lucca Oil. English Vinegar,

Pine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers.

JAMS AND JELLIES Orange and Lemon Peel.

Lead Lines. Europe.

Log ditto ditto.

do

Scaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seaming Lines.

White Lead..

Black Paint.

Gren ditto.

Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes.

Bunting.

Fish hooks.

Nails of sizes.

Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tucks-- Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Cloaks. Apd various other Articles too numerous to detail.

The undermentioned Goods are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun_yarn. Green aud Black Paint.

Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks. Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Carr's well known fancy

Biscuits. Fine table salt.

Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in 10 boxes.

FOR SALE.

V Board the Barque Chusan-Best ON maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice Canvas, Twine, white, Green and Black Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks also Teah Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank.

Apply on Board

Hongkong April 13th. 1842.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and

carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON-Macao.

. N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles:

Brandy in Wood and Bottles." Vinegar, Beer,

39

ditto. ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret, Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm, Tar.

Allso a quantely of Paint-Paint Oil (Turpentine) Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compases, and others Marine Stores.

A

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

CARD J. R. Bird, late of Singapore,-begs to inform the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship Wright and Engineer in the Queen's Road, and Superintendent of buildings on the Brit- ish Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage which be hopes to merit diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named 'handicrafts.

Hongkong, 30th March, 1842.

ON Sale at 46 Queen's Road, American Pine Spars, Provis

ions, Sherry Wine in wood and glass, Brandy ditto, ditto. Coir Rope, Canvass, Paints and other stores by C. V. GILLESPIE Hongkong, 21st, March 1842.

FOR SALE.

Superior Smoked York. AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy

shire Hams.

FOR SALE.

A FINE Chesnut Sorel Chusan Mare. Inquire at the Office of

the Friend of China.

Hongkong, 7th. April 1842.

ON

FOR SALE.

N board the American Ship Forum, at Reduced prices, new superfine American flour, Mess pork, Pickled Sal. mon, do Herrings, Hams, Dried apples, Champaigne cider, Tobacco, Lemon Syrup and tongued and grooved planks, for flooring or other use, Timber 4 inch to 8 do square. Samples of the above can be seen at N. Duus' Godown or on board. Hongkong March 30th. 1842.

The Granite Godown No. 46, Queen's Road

HOWAN, will be completed and ready on the 1st. proximo for

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go- down has a Stone Pier in front, 275 feet long, and is situated at a distance above high water mark with a double seaw all that

will protect it against the rise of tho sea usual in Typhoons, For the Convenience of Vessels discharging in front of the Godown, white and black buoys have been laid down at a short

distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 2 fathoms, with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to Hongkong, 21et. March 1842.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

NOTICE.

AN Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established

at the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," and all orders for

that excellent work will be promptly attended Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

HongKong 11th. April 1842. To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi- nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil- ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on Shore at HongKong between the Hours of 10 A of 3 P. daily Sundays excepted.

Apply to R. M. Whichelo, Purser of H .M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society hand- somely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.-

Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

quantities to suit purchasess

B

RITISH Piece Goods for Sale in

by

C. V. GILLESPIE.

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

Square, 1 to 1

46 Queens Road.

for window.

and other building purposes, tor Sale by C. V. GILLESPIE 46 Quéens Road. Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

物做八發行花 俱屋九客有旗

可內分四記 合:

噐不一方唎 用料等寸铁士 什能或條

7th April H. M. B. Royalist

DEPARTURES.

for Macan.

Macao.

"

"P

"

Brig "Thistle"

9th

"

Steamer Hoogly

10th

Brig Algerine

" "

13th

Romoncito

H. M. S. Herald

RICES for Job Printing are as follows:

PRIC PR

Bills of Lading and Exchange, Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

Of Ships

and Calcutta

"

per 100

8

"

"

"

ADVERTISEMENTS

.0.

Not exceeding 7 lines

erate rates.

for 3 months

253

516

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod. Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into, the Chi- nese language. The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

ARRIVALS FROM THE 5th. TO THE 13th. INCLUSIVE. 1842

CAPTAINS.

Ward. 7th. H. C. S. Ariadne. Roberts. 9th. H. M. S. Royalist. Chetwode. 10th. Cecilia

April 6th Mysore

CONSIGNEES.

MEN. TONS.

FLAG. FROM.

To.

IMPORT.

EXPORT.

SAILED

30 300 British

Chusan

Singapore Specie

Sugar

Macao

19

31

#

"

19

J. Burd

16

257

"

Singapore Ballast

"9

11th Royal Eachange G. Rees.

J. Matheson & Co.

14 131

Stores

11

33

29

11. C. S. Hoogly Ross

15th. Minerva.

H. Lauga

J. Burd.

20

120 Dutch.

Sandalwood

31

From the Harbour Master's List

19

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AND SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY

MESSRS BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND HONGBONG

No. 5. VOL. 1

NOTIFICATION.

By order,

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

HONGKONG. THURSDAY, APRIL 21ST. 1842.

Price 81 monthly Or 812 yearly

the Southern or Western coast of South America and

the United Kingdom or Colonies, whence there is no nese or Hongkong dollar we have no man- ner of doubt, if its value were fixed as before regular mail, and from foreign countries, having incur. indicated. The prestige in favor of Spanish postage. in addition to the inland postage. Letters not red no previous British charge, are to pay 4d as sea THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- dollars is we believe, confined to a part of exceeding half an ounce, brought into any of the Col- zette under the authority of Government, the Southern Provinces. At Ningpho and onies and not subject to a previous British charge, are will be discontinued from this date: but all Chusan we know Mexican dollars are pre- to be charged, Ad for every half-ounce for sea pog- public orders and notifications appearing in ferred as some of our friends who had between any foreign places in the West Indies and tage. Letters transmitted by Queen's packet boats The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga-only Spanish found to their surprise and North and South America; between ports in the Uni- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- cost very recently. We have suggested ted Kingdom and places on the Northern or Eastern rized Functionaries of the Government are seeking the aid of the E. I. Cos. mint at coast of the isthmus of Panama, or between places on still to be considered as official. Bombay but as this is, or at least will be places on the Southern or Western coast of Panama, a Crown Colony it would be far better to are to be charged at the same scale of weight as that have a mint on the Island. An inquiry if described above, and at the rate of 1s. for every single instituted, would we think convince our postage. Masters of vessel are to be allowed a sum authorities of its immediate expediency, as any post-effice in the Colonies not by the regular mail. not cxeeding 2d. for every letter conveyed by them to a measure of state policy-to say nothing All newspapers delivered in New Zealand, wheresover of its comparative inexpensiveness and the from, are to be charged an uniform rate of 1d. News- vast mercantile advantages which would papers conveyed between places in any other of the col- onies where posts are established, are to pay a rate of accrue from the establishment of a mint 1d.; conveyed between the Colonies and foreign coun in our Town-destined (as we are sure it is) tries without passing through the United Kingdom. to be the Monetary Metropolis of the Fo- they are to be charged in addition to any colonial reign Trade in China. A Trade in Imports postage a sea postage of 2d. Masters of private ships bringing foreign newspapers may be allowed Id. Colo- and Exports in our vicinage which now nial newspapers may be conveyed between the Colonies amounts in value to at least ninety millions by packet-boats free of postage, and by private ships at of Dollars. Id each, as a gratuity to the captain. British, Colonial, and Foreign newspapers, conveyed by Queen's boats between foreign ports in South America, the island of Madeira, and the Canary Islands, or between these is. land and any port in South America, are to be charged at a packet-rate of 2d. Newspapers are to be sent by post withont cover, or in one open at the sides; and they must have no other writing than the name and address of the person to whom they are sent, and no enclosure. This warrant is to come in force on the 11th October

from this date.

MR. EDWARD GLASCOT REYNOLDS is_ap- pointed to be assistant to the Land officer By Order, J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, Government House

16th April, 1842.

MR. ROBERT EDWARDS, having been ap- pointed to take charge of the Post Office at Hongkong; the following regulations are published for his guidance, and for general

information.

ALL mails upon arrival, are to be deliv- ered to the Harbour Master, who will have them conveyed to the Post office. NOTICE of the intended time for closing any mail, is to be given to the Harbour Mas- ter, who will make the necessary arrange- ment for having it taken on board ship. THE Harbour Master is to give informa- tion to MR. EDWARDS, of the arrivals sail- ings and general movements of the vessels in Port, who will cause-anotice of the same to be exposed at the Post office: a general delivery of letters to take place at least once in every twenty four hours.

ALL Government letters are to be for- warded immediately on arrival.

THE office to be kept open and attended from 8 o clock A. M. till 8 P. M. on week- days and from 8. to 10. A. M. and from 3 to 5 P. M. on Sunday. For the present no charge of any discription is to be made on Letters of Parcels Dy order)

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong 15th. April 1842.

CIRCULATING MEDIUM.

THE Proclamation in our last number,pro- vides for a state of things, the inconvenien- ces of which increased daily. Its general promulgation will remove a prolific source of contention and controversy in the Bazaar. We have no doubt the Proclamation will be translated into Chinese, and posted in our streets, with the view to its conditions being carried into full effect.

FALKLAND ISLANDS. THESE Islands, the nominal possession of which about a century since involved us in a war with Spain, and obtained for the cel- lebrated Dr. Johnson, a pension from the crown, for the pamphlet he wrote urging their retention and the manifold accruing advantages obtainable from their occupation; these Islands then, after a renewal of the dispute with Buenos Ayres, our home Go- vernment have at last determined to make real colonies of Great Britain, and the lands are now being disposed of in London at the rate of 12s. per acre by the Emigration and Land Commissioners.

We had the honor, with some other friends,

POST OFFICE ARRANGEMENTS. IT is believed that our Post Office will be soon put on a proper footing by the ap- pointment of a competent person as Post Master, with efficient assistants. It is eve- ry way desirable, that this much required arrangement, should be carried into effect before the permanent removal hither of our Merchants from Macao, prior to whose arrival, we should hope to see the whole organization of our Post office, fully per- fected; otherwise we shall have many and just complaints of this important branch of the Island administration. We have been asked what will be the rates of postage: we conjecture the object desired, is only to re- alize sufficient to pay the expenses of the establishment. Hence the lowest possible rate consistent with the due efficency of of the office, will be levied. The day is gone by, when beginning de novo any ci- vilized Governmental Authority would be bold enough, to propose taxing the trans-to call the attention of the late Govern- mission of intelligence, and communication ment to this matter, and strongly urged the of thought, as sources of Revenue. The local peculiarities of the Islands, as every adoption of the Penny Postage at home. way admirably adapted for a Penal Settle- the diminished rates and facilities afforded ment. As transportation to new South Walls by the French Post office, the eager de- and Van Diemans Land was to terminate, sire now manifested by the whole German the necessity of such a settlement became people to carry into effect the English quite obvious. We are glad to see the Emi. plan of an uniform rate throughout the gration commissioners have reported favor- whole Zoll Verein; (commercial Union) ably on this point. We find the Governor which it is expected will be soon realised. appointed is Lieutenant Moody of the All these circumstances demonstrate the Engineers, Salary £600 per annum, also a true tendencies of high civilization. By magistrate at £400, Clerk £150, Surveyor a Treasury warrant published in one of £300. In the event of war, having a Naval the Gazettes of September last, we find Depôt at the FALKLAND ISLANDS will afford that the rates of Postage for the last new a great protection to our commerce in the colony but one of the united kingdom, we South seas. We think the effectual colo- mean New Zealand, have been already nization of the FALKLAND ISLANDS is an act fixed. We hope by this time ours (although which reflects much credit on the late Go- the last new colony) have been determi-vernment. We are sorry to learn, howe- ned, but some of our friends well knowing ver, that several individuals who (tired of they say, what "Slow coaches" Downing the delay of the colonial office) had alrea- Street officials are, venture to assert that dy at much expense commenced colonising, the question has not yet been mooted; have not yet been reimbursed the outlay and have no doubt that months will elapse they have incurred. before, any Treasury Warrant for the reg- ulation of the rates of Anglo Chinese Post- age will be published in the Gazette. We subjoin the particulars above referred to.

WE hope it is the precursor of some gen- eral regulation, which shall obtain in all mercantile transactions. We glanced at this very important question in our last number; and we are glad our recommendation has been approved in influential quarters. The diminishing supply of Spanish dollars; the re- Letters between places in New Zealand, not exc eed- quirements of our commerce and Govern- ing half an ounce in weight are to be charged a sin: mental arrangements; impose the necessity gle postage of 4d, without reference to number of en- of putting our circulating medium on a se- closures or distance. Letteres of one ounce are to be rates; and for each other ounce up to one cure and permanent basis. That the Chi- pound, two rates are to be exacted. Letters not ex charged two rates nese would readily adopt our Anglo-Chi-ceeding half an ounce, brought into New Zealand from

PORT PHILLIP. WE rejoice to find that this Colony is progressing. despite the monetary derangements of New South Wales. The general Revenue has augmented to £65,000. In 1840 it was £30,000. The customs present an increase of £26.000 on the precedit, year. Owing to the scarcity of money, the slas Crown Lands during the past year a ounte ly £79,421-.7-6. Should Lord John Russell's" Lnj- form price of Land" Despatch be adopted in this lony, we feel certain the produce of the Crown lands will in a year or two be immensely increased.

18

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CEEN A

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, Isr. 1842.

We had not space in our last, to call the attention of our Readers to the circular of H. E. the Plenipotentiary detailing our successes in the north, and which we then published. We are aware it has been ea- gerly perused, and also with much satis-

HONGKONG POST OFFICE.

NEW ZEALAND.

THE official announcement in our first page, of the WE perciive by the Sydney Papers that at the Gov. appointment of Mr Robert Edwards to take charge of the Post Office, will, we are sure, give much satisfac-ernment settlement, Auckland, they have already tion. The long residence of Mr. Edwards in China, passed a manicipal Corporation Bill. It is said that his thorough acquaintance with our local requirements, there is established an English, and also a New Zealand Paper, both supported most liberally by the and mercantile interests, affords a guarantee for the effi- Government. In the latter the natives are most pa ciency of this Department. Our readers will remember that Mr. Edwards was the first person who established ternally invited by the Authorities to make known any a regular delivery of Letters betwixt Canton and Cause of complaint and to seek for information. Macao. The article in our first page headed Post office ar. cial notification of Mr. Edwards appointment.

THERE are in "Auckland" about three hundred

Europeans and there is all the Machinery of Govern- ment (before it was wanted perhaps) seeing there

faction, recording as it does one of the most rangements, was set up before we received the offi- is already an official Expenditure of abont twenty thou

important encounters we have yet had with

the Chinese.

WE are disposed to think that our attack on the Chinese camp (so closely following as it did the repulse of the enemy at Ning- po) may go far to induce the belief of our invincibility. The high authorities of the Chinese must have it forced on their con- viction by these repeated discomfitures of their troops. They are shrewd enough to infer what may, can, and will be done when our reinforcements have arrived, and from what has already been effected, by the hand ful of troops at present employed in the Northern Expedition.

We have just received the Overland January Mail. The contents are not of much interest. The principal items of intelligence are that Prince Albert is to be created King consort. The King of Prussia will at. tend the Christening of the Prince of Wales as one the Sponsors on the 25th. January. The Queen will open Parliament in person. The Dutch India fleet is to be largely auginonted. Mr Laurence Peel has been appointed chief justice of Bengal. Sir Richard Jenkins hopes to be Governor of Madras. Derry Dawson, Sir Robert's brother in law is to be the new Commissioner of Excise, The cost of the late Brevet was £40,000 per annum. Beat- mont Smith pleaded guilty, to forging the Exchequer Bills and was transported for life. The investigation can- not be buried, although Peers may be implicated in the fraud. A comprehensive scheme of Emigration has re- ceived the sanction of the Government. A contemptible compromise of the corn question will be proposed by Sir Robert Peel. Eight persons killed and twenty nine wounded by an accident on the Great Western Railway. Harry Eyres and C. A. Barlow of the Rayal navy are now C. B's. The Chatham Islands have for £10,000 been sold by the New Zealand Land company to the Government of Hamburg who will there form a Ger- man Colony. The French are sending more settlers and some troops to their Colony in new Zealand. The countess of Eglinton gave birth to a Son on the 3rd. December. During the same month, Lord Donglas G. Halyburtone, Earl of Falmonth Mr. Serjeant Ara. bin and Sydney Taylor of the" Herald" have died. LIEUT. Colonel George Macdonald appointed Go- vernor of Sierra Leone. Lord Ashburton at the request of hsr Majesty's Goverment procoeds to the United States on a Speceal Mission with the object of settling all existing, differences. Lady Sarah Villiers the love. ly daughter of the Earl of Jersey and the belle of the last season is affianced to Prince Nicholas Esterhazzy, the marriage is fixed for the 29th. January. Lady Sarah's brother. Lord Villiers, recently married the eldest daughter of Sir Robert Peel. Company's Con- gou on January 4th. was 1.5. per-lb.

LANCELOT DENT ESQR.-Ere this is printed, we be. lieve he will have left China for England. Although this respected gentlemen, was not strictly speaking. member of our Hongkong community; still we could not permit any one so justly esteemed to leave the shores of China without our respectful valediction. The Splendid hospitality which for so many years he has maintained in China has been so universally experienced, that we not only do justice to our own feelings. but to those of our friends of both services and the commercial community when we proffer him our fervent and best wishes for his continued health and prosperity. We trust he may long realize in his native land those social pleasures and amenities he is so eminently qualified to enjoy and inspire. The remembrance of his unswerving integrity, charitable munificence and uniform kindness, will be long cherish- ed in the community of which for so many years he was an eminent member.

A Fraz broke out in the lower Bazaar about eight o'clock on Wednesday night the 13th. Instant: some fifty or sixty mathouses were destroyed. As long As such erections are made by the Chinese it will be impossible to prevent such calamities. The per- petual burnt offerings of the Chinese to their gods lend ono to expect that amidst such inflammable ma. terials fires would occur far more frequently than

and their habitual carelessness or recklessncs would

they now do

NEW SOUTH WALES..

sand Pounds per annum!!--A Bishop is now to be added to the List. The pettv but influential spite of the immutable under secretary of state for the Colonies Mr Stephen (or Mr Mother Country as he is callod in the Clubs) is the alleged reason why the seat of Go- By the Sydney Papers received per Brig vernment is not at Port Nicholson where the Euro- "Liverpool", we perceive that amid all the pean population (including the vicinage) now amounts to 4,000 souls. The discussions of the Legislative embarassments and anxieties of the Colo-Council at Auckland, on the muncipal Corporation nists, they are not unmindful of their polit- Bill provoke invidious comparisons and much discon- ical rights and, a publie meeting was con- tent in Sydney, which we have alluded to in another vened by the sheriff for 16th. Feby. on the part of our paper. requisition of parties of high respectability, to "Consider and adopt petitions to the Queen and both Houses of Parlament, praying for those representative institutions which this Colony is now entitled to".

We do think the Colonists have well grounded cause of complaint that the long promised ameliorations have not before this been carried into effect-It was avowedly the intention of Lord Melbourne's govern- ment, to settle this question among others; but unluckily the whigs were most eager to realize good measures when they had least power to pass them.

WHAT with the contentions and strivings for office of the rival factions, and their equal ignorance of Colonial interests, it ceases to surprise us that the Act of Lord Bathurst passed in 1823 when the popula- tion was but 30,000 of whom only 16,000 were free should still be in force althongh How the population of New South Wales has increased to 140,000 of whom five sixths are free Bristish subjects.

Ws are indebted to the polite attention of Captain Ord of the "Liverpool." for a file of Sydney Papers, the contents of which are referred to in another co-

luma.

PORT ESSINGTON.

THR accounts we have of this new colony are very encouraging. As a harbour of refuge for vessels nav- ed. We note that the crew of the Montreal wrecked igating Torres Straits, its value has already been prov. in the Straits reached Port Essington in two Boats. It is dubious whether they could have made the Is lands of Timor, which they must have attempted, had the talented author of a recent publication on Borneo not this post have been established. From Dr. Earle, and the Eastern Seas, we have personally obtained ve- ry recently much useful and interesting information with reference to the present state and future prospects of this Colony, which we hope to communicate to our Readers in an early number.

JAVA TEA.

We see by a German Paper, that at the last Leipsic for sale by the Dutch. They sold at high rates, and air, several packages of Java tea were brought thither the report on the qualities was, that in goodness of flavor and strength they were not inferior to the finest and beat Chinese caravan sort. The flavor being so much retained, is attributed to the short time, which had elapsed since their production, and the great care packing; by which means they had not suffered by the variations of atmospheric temperature during their transit to Europe,

Ir scoms the Pirates are not deterred from the com- mission of their crimes, by the capital punishment of their comrades. We hear of many ontrages lately committed, but all beyond our jurisdiction.. A Native Passage Boat was a few days since captured in the Canton River many of the crew wounded in the de- fence, and several were afterwards mutilated by the Pirates.

ILLUSTRATIVE of the grost neglect of Col-in onial affairs, amid the party struggles in England, we may mention that this Act, so avowedly repugnant to the whole genius of the British Constitution, was called a provisional one, and was originally tried as an experiment for four years; and yet it has been continued by successive renewals for Nineteen Years-In 1836 it was determin- ed to do something, yet before Parliament was up it was renewed for one Year. This farce after sundry discussions Petitions and Protestations has been each successive Session repeated, Can we then be surprised at the discontent of the Australians?

It is a matter of rejoicing that at home, there is daily increasing interest taken in Colonial matters. Our possessions abroad are now viewed by officials as something bet- ter than mere patronage preserves. In the metropolis we have now a Colonial society (the writer was one of its earliest members) from whence issued the Colonial Club and also as an organ of sound Principles that admirable print the Colonial Gazette-All these circumstances may be hailed, as the advent of a better state of things; and it is not again likely, as has happened, that we shall be almost struck dumb at the appalling, ignorance of an Under secretary of state for the Colonies of Colonial subjects. This both houses of Parliament; and till very ignorance and indifference, was shared by lately it might be truthfully said, as was said in 1680 by the celebrated Sir Josiah Child (as Chairman of the E. I. Co.) that as to the laws of England they were wholly inapplicable to India: a heap of nonsense, compiled by a few ignorant coun- try gentlemen, who hardly knew how-to- make laws for the good government of their own private families, much less for the reg- ulating of Companies and foreign com- merce".

THE Steamers Ariadne and Hooghly, having on board General Burrel and Sir Thomas Herbert, have returned from their reconnoissance of the Canton Riv er. They proceeded to the second bar but found no preparations made (as reported) for the restoration of the Bogue forts.

Ir is reported that intellegence of the wreck of a vessel on the Coast of Formosa has been received. believed to have been the Brig Ann, so long over due. It is added that much specie was on board, hence it is We hope the Crew have not shared the fate of the Nerbudda.

T

brightening in the Political horizon of Affghanistan,as we It is matter for sincere gratulation that there is a learn by the late arrivals from India, none of theladies, al- though close prisoners had been murdered or maltreated

TO OUR CORRESPONDENT A. K lished her interesting No. 2. The paper has been on Ax apology is quite due from us for not having pub- file for a fortnight, is partly in type, and shall certainly appear in our next number.

The Inverna, Captain Grouchy, arrived in the har bour last night from Macao, with Government stores.

POLICE.

DURING the past week, the cases at both offices have been few, of trivial importance, and, as heretofore, wholly devoid of public interest.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETI

FROM THE LONDON MAIL.

January 1842.

APPOINTMENTS.

Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Brace. K. C. B, is be Commander-in-Chief at the Nore. Rear-Admiral the Hon Joceline Percy to be Commander-in-Chief at the Cape of Good Hope. Captains-Francis Brace to Conperdown. Phipps Hornby, C. B., to be Comptroller- General of the Coast Guard, Sir Francis Collier, Knt., to be Captain Super- intendent of Woolwich Dock-yard; and Lord G. Paulet to Carysfort. Peter Fisher to be Captain Superintendent of Sheerness Dock-yard;Sir Watkin Pell to be Captain Superintendent of Pembroke-yard. Thomas Woodman, Esq., to be Secretary to Vice. Admiral Sir Edward Brace, K. C. B-, at the Nore. Rear Admiral Sir Samuel Pym, K. C B-, to be Su- perintendent of Plymouth Dock-yard. The squadron of China are the Cambrian, 36, North Star, 28, Dido, 20, Hazard, 13. Warspitc, 50, Syren, 16, Harlequin, 16, Andromache, 28, which the Mada. gascar, 44, has gone to relieve at the Cape of Good Hope; together with the Belleisle, Apollo, and Sap phire troop-ships, and the Minden hospitai-ship.

It is currently reported in the naval circles that the uniform of the several classes is to be forthwith changed, and that the white collar and cuff are to be again substituted for the red.

DEPOT of H. M. REGIMENTS IN INDIA.-4th Dep. -Ensign Roberts in on leave to 14the of January, 1842 10th Depot.-The regiment has got the order of readiness to embark for foreign service.

21st Depot.-Captam Wrixon is on leave to 27th February, 1842.

22nd Depot.-Lieutenant Deshon is on leave to 30th January, 1842.

25th Depot.-Lieut. Conolly is appointed Act. Adj. 25th Depot.-Major Gord. Captains Beamish and Eglish, Ensign Elkington, and Surgeon Sillery, are on

leave.

39th Depot.-Captain Straubenzee is on leave until required for enbarkation. Ensign Smith is on leave to 14th of February, 1842.

39th Depot.-Captain Layard is appointed to the recruiting service at Stamford.

41st Depot.-Ensign and Quartermaster Young is on leave to 14thof January, 1842.

50th Depot.-Ensign Tottenham is on leave to 30th January. 51st Depot.-Captain Errington is on leave to 27th February.

54th Depot,-The Adjutant-General was to review the regiment at Windsor. 55th Depot moved from Chtham to Canterbury on

the 9th December.

63rd Depot moved from Chatham to Conterbury on

the 8th December.

75th Depot.-Ensign Smith is on leave to 20th February, 1842.

90th Depot.-Captain Tulloch is appointed Act. Paymaster.

95th Depot.-The detachments at Sheerness and Harwich are to be relieved at the end of this month by the 99th. Messrs. Cox are appointed agents to the 95th. in place of Mr. Laurie. 98te. The following officers were taken on board the Belleisle:--Lieutenant-Colonel Campbell. Cap. tains Ilderton and Lovett, Captain Paymaster Hun- ter. Lieutenants Rainier, S. E. Colby, C. Colby, Lieu- tenant and Adjudant Ormsby, Ensigns Bridgeman, Steele, Peyton. Surgeon Bardin, Assistant-Surgeon Blake, Quarter Master Fagan. Captain M. Gavin has joined the Depot.

4th Light Dragoons.-The Depot has marched from Maidstone for Canterbury, under Captain Cumberlege, with Lieutenant Poore and Cornet Barron. Lieutenant Colonel John Scott, C, B.. succeeds Colonel Middleton, half-pay, as assistant Commandant Cavalry Depot, Maidstone,

MILITARY ITEMS. EXPEDITION TO CHINA.-On the 20th the three ships appointed to carry out troops to China, sailed from Plymouth with a .fair wind. The Belleisle conveys Major-General Lord Saltoun with his staff Captain Hope Grant,9th lancers, as Brigade-Major and Captain Cunynghame, 3rd buffs, late of 60th Rifles, as aide-de-

ΑΜΟΥ.

ADVERTISEMENT.

19

The under-signed having entered into

The Anglona has arrived from Amoy bringing letters to the 12th, instant. We find the Sesostris Steamer took a detachment of the garrison of Kolongsoo to Ningpo to aid, it is said, in the intended attack on partnership on the 1st Jan. 1842, under the City of Hang Chow-foo. The force on the Island the firm of P. Townsend & Co. in the being so reduced, the Chinese threaten an attack; and Ship Chandlery, Auctioneering and Com- bodies of men are collecting. So well grounded are mission business at Hongkong, would be the expectations, that the ladies and heavy baggage have been sent on board the Ships in the offing. The pleased to fulfil any orders in their line, Pylades, it is said, has sailed to Namon, the Chinese and hope, by attention, to give satisfaction threatening to destroy the Opium vessels lying there. to any who may be pleased to favour them The merchantmen at Amoy on this date were the with business. & Potentate, Trade was very dull, and prices unremu- Kelpie, Ariel, Australasian Packet, rdaseer, Rob Roy nerating for the risk. The Royalist was daily expected there with the December Mail.

ON DITS.

ON DIT-The Chinese are making preporations to attack Hongkong. The force is variously estimated at ten to fifteen thousand men ; and is to be composed of the elite of the Turtar Troops in the neighbouring pro- vinces.

ON DIT-The Chinese under the command of a high Tartar General have been considerably reinforced, have rallied, reoccupied Tsekee, and threaten another attack on Ningpo.

ON DIT -The expenditure on the Fortifications of the Canton River, have been defrayed by the British, seeing that the legal duties, have during the last twelve months, been so greatly augmented. It is certain on Tea alone to the extent of Six millions of dollars has been disbursed i. e. the amount of the Canton Ran- som!!!

THE ALPACA,

We understand that the ALPACA has been introduced into the Cape of good Hope, and very sanguine expectations are entertained of its naturalization; as also in new South Wales. We are glad to know, that at home the value of its wool is becoming apprecia- ted, and its price has nearly doubled du- ring the last twelve months. The fabrics we have seen manufactured of this material, appear of a very durable texture and pre- sent a glossy silk like appearance. A cam- let every way adapted for the China mar- ket might be made of this material. We hope some of our friends, who have com- mercial connexions with Peru or Chili, may be induced to send for a few of these useful animals, and we should be glad to see them naturalised in Hongkong and think there are no climatic or physical obstacles to prevent their thiving on our hills.

at

9

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale

their Godowns, Hongkong.

The following Goods, viz

Chain Cables

Anchors. of Sizes

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope

American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases Claret

Sauterne

Vinegar in Bottles

Port in Casks and Bottles Half Leaguers Java Arrack Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvass Duck

Twine and Marline Log Lines Stationary Sailors Knives Sail Needles Pad Locks

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the supply of Shipping in general.

H. M. SQUADRON. IN CHINA.

AT CHUBAN CHINHAE AND NINGPO. Cornwallis 72-Bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. c. B., command- er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. B. 18-comdr.

Blonde

Modeste

li

18-"

Justice,

G. Goldsmith,

Watson,

Morshead.

18-

18-

19

16-

99

E. Troubridge, Maitland.

Columbine 10- lieut. Algerine Lady Bentinck, surveying, vessel comdr. R. Collinson, Troopship Jupiter mr. comg.

In the Sydney Gazette of the 1st of June there is an advertisement from Mr. G. R. Dunlop, of the house of Dunlop and Co. stating his intention of proceeding" to the Indian Isles and China," for the purpose of se. lecting labourers for emigration, which he promises to Pelican effect without making any charge beyond the actual Hyacinth cost. The measure is supported by the press of the to which it is said that during the last harvest" whole colony on account of the great dearth of labour, owing fields of the choicest wheat" were left to be reaped by the wind, and many sheep farmers were obliged to of their flocks." The despatch from Lord John Russell, have recourse to means for preventing the increase dated October, 1840, to Governor Gipps, published in the Australian of the 5th. of June, in which his lord- ship proposed" to unite the advantages of the govern ment system with those of the system by bounty," had produced great satisfaction in the colony.

20 A HEATHEN HOSPITAL.

Rev. Mr. Allen, an American Missionary, in giving details concerning the various pub- lic Institutions in Bombay, thus notices what every one must regard as a most sin- gular establishment.

H. C. S. Nemesis, lieut. W. H. Hall,

17

11

11

Druid Pylades Chameleon

Starling

Blenheim

Herald

It has been said that heathenism never established a hospital. There is at least one exception to the Nimrod truth of this remark. There is oue here, supported at Cruizer an expense of about $16,000 annually. It was founded Royalist

Queen, mr. comg. W. Warden, Phlegethon, lieut. Mc Cleverty, Sesostris, comdr. Ormsby, I, N.

AT AMOY.

44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 18-comdr. Tindal (absent) 10-lieut Hunter.

6-comdr. H. Kellett,

AT HONGKONG.

Sir Thomas Herbert

72-captain C. B. Senior Command 26-1 18-comdr.

18- 10-lieut.

ing Officer. J. Nias.

Glasse,

J. Pearse,

Chetwode,

bell, and a detachment of artillery; detachments of the chant of the Jain sect,-the sect which live mer- Young Hebe 4-comdr. Wood.

40th, and some smaller detachments go by the Apollo and Sapphire. The troops on board the Apollo are under the command of Colonel Bartley, of 49th, and those in the Sapphire of Major Pasley, of the same regt. The artillery are under the orders of Captain Greenwood. Mr. C Little, of Madras artillery, who has already been in China, has a passage on board the

Belleisle.

Viscountess Beresford will we undestand in the course of the ensuing spring, present a stand of new colours to the 16th, regiment, of which fine corps the noble and gallant Viscount is colonel.

Commissioner Lin and his favorite wife have been added to the collection of the portraits in wax of Madame Thussaud, The figures are as large as life, and were modelled by a Chinese artist at Canton,

to ap

proach nearer than any other to the primitive Hin- dooism, with which Pythagoras became acquainted at Babylon. Its doctrines strictly forbid the destruction of animal life, in any case whatever. The manage. ment of this hospital is wholly in heathen hands, and heathen liberality furnishes all its resources. In it are gratuitously supported from 50 to 100 old horses, who would otherwise be killed as past service; about 175 cows and oxen; 200 dogs, for whose destruction the authorities of Bombay offer a bounty twice a year; and a large number of cats, monkeys, and other ani- mals. Its charitics are accessible to living beings of every species, except the human race. Men, women and children wounded, sick and destitute, are allowed to die unaided within sight of its walls. Such is the character of the only hospital, so far as is known, that heathenism ever built,

H. C. S. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross, Ariadne, lieut: Roberts-

"

唎多布有

士少發各

庇亦賣樣

行可不英

內在論吉

記買利

20

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & co. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na. vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSES. P. w. & co. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to from an Estab lishment to be regularly supplied from London and. Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,--to supply every kind of stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne.

cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage whieh has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

Masens. D. w. & co. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu.

tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

3D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmana Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Cloods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be puid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu-

Metal ditto. Flannel. Long Cloth

Rusia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Reps of sizes. Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in dit:o. Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Assorted Sauces.

Capers,

Jams and Jelles.

Orange and Lemon Peal.

Lead Lines, Europe.

Log ditto ditto.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto. Seizing Lines. White Lead.

Speed's Arrow Root, in tins. Black Paint.

Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes. Zante Currants. Isinglass.

Licorice.

Seidlitz Powders. Pickles.

Ketchup. Anchovies. English Vinegar. Fine Salt. Chili Vinegar.

Lucca Oil.

Best Durham Mustard.

Green ditto. Turpentine. Blocks of Sizes. Bunting.

Fish hooks.

Nails of sizes.

Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks. And various other Aricles toe numerous to detail.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, Hong Kong. Steam Coals

Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint, Petersburgh Deals with two

Casko.

Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil.

Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jara. Brick and Truckle

Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt. Best mould Candles in

and three cuts Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons. Carr's well known fancy 10 pound boxes. Superior Smoked York. ahire Hams. Fine table Salt.

Biscuits.

FOR SALE.

board fine American Bour, Mem pork, Pickled Sal- N the American Ship Forum, at Reduced prices mon, do Herrings, Hama, Dried apples, Champagne cider, Tobacco, Lemon Syrup and tongued and grooved planks, for flooring or other use, Timber 4 inch to 8 do square. Samples of the above can be seen at N. Duus Godown or on board.

Hongkong March 30th. 1842.

OTICE.-The Granite Godown No. 46. Queen's Road-

ring a good article, without being obliged to pay 'an Noo, will be completed and ready on the 1st. proximo for

exorbitant price.

We beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns. HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp | Tapioca, in tins.

and Campbell in hhds.

ditto in botles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Pearl Barley, in ditto. Ditto Sag

Robinson's prepared Groats, in

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Very fine small still Scotch Yorkshire Hama.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Prime Corned Humpe, Rounde,

Briskets and Tongues, assor

the reception of Merchandise on rent at low rates. This Go- down has a Stone Pier in front, 275 feet long, and is situated at a distance above high water mark with a double seaw all that

will protect it against the rise of the sea usual in Typhoons.

For the Convenience of Vessels discharging in front of the Godown, white and black buoys have been laid down at a short distance from the shore, the white in 3 fathoms, black 2 fathoms, with good holding ground.

Apply on the premises to Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

NOTICE.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

ded, in kegs each containing AN Agency for the Chinese Repository has been established

Dablin Stout, in bottles.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2

Champagne, from Most

of

Humps and 6 Tongues.

Epernay/

Spiced Beef, in tine each lb 10,

Superfine Brown

Sherry,

from Peter Domecq

Port wine, from Cockburn,

and Carbonel and Co.

Knudsden's Cherry

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

at the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," and all orders for that excellent work will be promptly attended to Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

HongKong 11th. April 1842.

Cyder. Boda Watered of every kind.) To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi-

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Soda Water Powders.

Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

Bandoway Imitation

Havannah Cigars.

Fancy dry Biscuite, in tine

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spics Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tine, for Invalide. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Bir Hans Sloane's Chocolata.

ARRIVED.

Brown Windson Soep.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wade.

Playing Cards.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice. Dholl.

Ceylon Moss.

Cartridge Paper.

Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger.

Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Ditto Waistcoats.

Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco.

Worsted Gloves.

Guernsey Frocks. Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil- ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on Shore at Hong Kong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted.

Apply to R. M. Whichelo, Purser

of H .M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

THE HONGKONG PRICES

OF OPIUM THIS DAY.

OLD PATNA

NEW

BENARES

MALWA

48

O

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

THE A. I. British Brig "John Hor- Tton" (336 Tons N. M.)

or to

Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong, Holliday, Wise Co. Macao. Macao, 14th April, 1842.

FOR SALE.

V Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice Canvas, Twine-White, Green and Black Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank.

Apply on Board

Hongkong April 13th. 1842. NOTICE.

GOODS end Merchandize of all descriptions, received and

carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to N. DUUS. Gr

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles : Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, Beer,

"

ditto. ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Ter.

Allao & quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses, and other Marine Stores.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

A CARD.-J. R. Bird, late of Singapore, begs to inform

ish

the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship Wright and Engineer in the faland of Hongking and respectfully solicits their patronage Queen's Road, and Superintendent of buildings on the Brit- which be hopes to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named handicrafts. Hongkong, 30th March, 1842.

N Sale at 46 Queen's Road, American Pine Spars, Provis Coir Rope, Canvass, Paints and other Stores by Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

A

FOR SALE.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

T the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Bociety hand. somely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.

Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

BRITISH Piece Goode for Sale in quantities to suit purchasess

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

V. GILLESPIE.

46 Queens Road.

fto 1 for window,

and other building purposes, for Sale Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

DEPARTURES,

by C. V. GILLESPIE 46 Queens Road.

14th April H. C. Steamers Hoogly and Ariadne on a cruize Barque Champion, Budd Com. for Chusan. Cecilia Clay, London.

"Singapore.

-17

easemen

18th

H. C. S. Hoogly

Macao.

19th

Wanderer J. B. Smith. Com.

Chusan.

20th. Mysore J. Ward Com.

., Singapore.

RICES for Job Printing are as follows:

PRICES

Billa of Lading and Exchange, Policies and folio pages Letter paper size

Of Ships

ADVERTISEME

Not exceeding 7 lines

for 3 months

per 100

253

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional." Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod. erate pates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi- 405 nese language.

435 to 440

425

430

400

"

345 350

90

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

ARRIVALS FROM THE 14th. TO THE 20th. INCLUSIVE. 1842.

NAMES.

CAPTAINS.

CONSIGNEES,

April 14th. Sundrapoovry. 15th. H C. Steamers. 18th. John, H. Yates.

Bryant.

Jardine M. & Co. Hoogly, Ariadne. from a cruize in Canton Moullin. Jardine M. & Co.

MEN. TONS. FLAG. FROM. 24 208 British. Macao. River.

To. Chusan.

IMPORT. Piece-goods.

SAILED EXPORT. Opium & Stores. 19th. April

12 184

Macao.

Coals.

"

" Liverpool.

J. Ord

To order.

12 270

P

Sydney.

H. M. 8. Cruizer.

from a Cruize.

33

17th. Primavera.

Roper.

17 J. R. Crawford.

B. Robertson.

Jardine M. & Co. Duus.

30 115

"

30

131

Namoa. Macao, Macao.

Specie.

Part of same. 17th.

Stores.

19th. Anglona.

J. L. Turner.

C. V. Gillespie.

12

100

Mails,

"

8005

From the Harbour Master's List

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AND SINGLE NUMBERS SOLD BY

MESSAS BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND DONGBONG

N°.6. VOL. 1

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY: THURSDAY MORNING. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL 28TH. 1842. NOTICE

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

PROCLAMATION.

THE letter, of which a Copy is hereunto annexed, having been addressed to me by the Mercantile Firms who have signed it, on behalf of themselves and others, I do hereby direct and proclaim, in conformity with their application, that, pending the Gracious pleasure of the Queen of Eng- land, the Mexican and other Republican Dollars shall be taken as, and consider- ed to be, the standard in all Government and Mercantile Transactions at Hongkong, and other Places in China, in the occupa- tion of her Majesty's Forces, unless at the time of such Transactions taking place, it should be expressly specified to the con- trary.

AND I do further announce, that the pres- ent Proclamation is not to be taken in any way or shape as affecting the Provis- ions of the one which I promulgated on the twenty ninth day of last month rela- tive to the Circulating Medium on the Island of Hongkong.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN. DATED at Hongkong, Government House, this 27th, day of April 1842. (Signed) HENRY POTTINGER. BY ORDER. J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. To His Excellency

Sir Henry 'ottinger Bart: &c. &c. &c.

Sir, With reference to the existing scarcity of the Spanish Pillar Dollar, and the cer- tair farther dsiewoon of that Currency in consequence of the Coinage having ceased. We beg leave to suggest to Your Excellency the eligibility of making the Mexican, and other Republican Dollars, the Standard in all Government and Mercantile transactions at Hongkong or other places in China in the occupation of Her Majesty's Forces.

Price 81 monthly Or 812 yearly

THE CHINA QUESTION.

ANY Persons having Representations to lay before the Land Committlee, are hereby requested to send in written Statements of tal till the weather has become milder, and large reinforcements their cases without delay, else they will not be taken into consideration.

BY ORDER.

Hongkong,

Land Office,

Geo: F. Mylius,

APRIL 27th. 1842.

Land Officer

TRANSLATION.

FROM THE PEKING GAZETTE.

SUPPOSED CASE OF THE NERBUDHA.

THE Imperial will has been received as follows; Tá Hung Ho and others, have sent up a document memorializing in relation to their having sunk a bar. barians ship, seized barbarians and captured their great guns. From the 9th moon to the present (10th moon). barbarian ships have been coming and going to and from the Formosan offings, incoherently wandering about and then casting anchor, regarding which the said high officers have already repeatedly given orders that rigorous measures be adopted for preventing such proceedings. At 5 o clock on the morning of the 11th of the present moon a barbarian ship sailed into the port and when opposite the Sha Wan fort commenced an attack with her great guns. The advisary general Yeu Chin King and others having made ready straight. way opened fire, and being opposite to the said ship their shot with thundering roar took effect and over. whelmed her in the water. In the firing he was aided by Teo Kin and others who were also at Shawan. When Yeu Chin King with his own hand had fired off the gun, he forthwith beheld the masts of the barbarian ship split and her ropes part, and on her retreating out of the port, she was dashed against the rocks and broke in pinnas, and a vast many of the barbarians falling in- to the water lungo Those who reached the shore got into a boat med. tempted to escape, but our high officers made ready, took soldiers, and proceeding in a boat in pursuit caught alive and put to death a great many black barba rians. Another officer was also employed who sta tioned himself in a vessel and proceeded out to sea, and putting forth his exertions seized alive many names of black barbarians and beheld the white barbarians plunge into the sea of their own accord. At this junc- ture also the high officer Chin-tae opened fire from his vessel and sunk a ship's boat, put to death all the white barbarians, and brought off alive very many of the black barbarians. Tso Kin also returned from his cruise to another island having destroyed a ship's boat, put to death the white barbarians and seized alive ma- ny of the black rebels, and having dragged up the guns and found a valuable chart.

Thus then the civil and military officers, and the pa- triotic among the people have made a public numer- ical statement as follows Killed

white barbarians, five men. red barbarians, five men. ditto ditto ........ black barbarians, twenty two-men. 123 hlack barbarians. Captured alive..... ten large barbarians, guns. ditto.. barbarians, books and other such like articles. In the conducting of this affair that such rigorous exertions were put forth is matter for highest congra- tulation.

ditto

Ta hung ho, the Commander in chief of all the For

It is evident that no movement can be made towards the Capi have arrived from England. The last accounts from home give reason to hope that the Ministry had begun to act on the Duke's maxim, that we should never engage in a little war. The ships which have been despatched will shew a formidable squadron, and the troops now on their way to China amount, it would ap pear, to nearly three thousand; still this is but a small reinforce. ment for the work on hand, and no farther assistance can be given from India. After leaving garrisons at Hong-kong, Amoy, Chusan, and Chinhae, the ps disposable for a march towards Pekin, would not exceed, perhaps not equal, five thouse There can be no doubt that all the approaches to Pekin by water, will be found to have heen fortified by all the skill and in- genuity which the Chinese can command, and the progress they have made in their military education, under the tuition we have. given them during the last two years, shew that we have never had more apt or diligent scholars. If the Emperor should retire into Tartary,-not an unlikely step, and leave us in possession of his Capital, what are we to do with it, and how will the acqui- sition of it advance the conclusion of a Peace? The Emperor will issue an edict from beyond the great Wall, giving the most plausible and satisfactory reasons for going into Tartary during the summer; and his subjects will doubtless believe him, for the credulity of the Chinese seems to increase in proportion to the de- mand made on it. Are we prepared in that case for the expens es of a fourth campaign-or for the establishment of a new dynasty? Friend of India 10th February.

Ex-President John Quincy Adam's opinions on the China question. The justice of the cause between the two Which has the righteous cause? You parties, have perhaps been surprised to hear me answer. Britain-Britain has the righteous cause. But to prove it I have been obliged to show that the Opium question is not the cause of the war: my demonstration is not yet complete, The cause of thewar is the Kotou!- the arrogant and insupportable pretensions of China, that she will hold commercial intercourse with the rest of mankind, not upon terms of equal reciprocity, but upon the insulting and degrading forms of relation between lord and vassal. The melancholy catastrophe with which I am obliged to close, the death of the gallant Napier, was the first fruit of the bitter struggle against I in the flight of time be permitted again to address you, I should pursue the course of the inquiry through the four questions with which I have begun? But the solution of them all is involved in the germinating element of the first, the justice of the cause. This I have sought in the natural rights of man. Whether it may ever be my good fortune to address you again is in the disposal of a higher power; but with reference to the last of my four questions-what are the duties of the government and the people of the United States re- sulting from the existing war between Great Britain and China? I leave to your meditations the last event of that war which the winds have brought to our ears-the ransom of Canton. When we remember the scornful refusal from the gates of Canton, in July, 1834, of Mr. Astell bearing the letter of peace and friendship from Lord Napier to the Governor of the two Provinces, and the contemptuous refusal to receive the letter itself, and compare it with the ransom of that same city in June 1841 we trace the whole line of con- nection between cause and effect. May we not draw from it a monitory lesson, written upon a beam of phosphoric light, of preparation for war and preserva. tion of peace? New York Herald.

UNITED STATES.

THE "Hibernia," from New York, which arrived at Liverpool on Thursday, brought advices to the Ist. December, which are rather favourable in reference to the mercantile businese of the States, which is descri-

It is the general wish of the Mercantile Community in China to adopt the Repub- lican Dollar as the general Standard of value, as soon as circumstances may admit mosan divisions is rewarded by his Imperial Majesty with bed as being very prosperous, although the absence of of their doing so; but they are clearly of being allowed to exhange his Peacock's feather for a two English buyers caused Cotton to decline in price. The eyed flowery one, and the Formosan Intendent of cir. opinion that some time must elapse before cuit is rewarded with being allowed to wear a plain flow the Chinese will be brought to abolish the ery feather. Let the merits of the other officers and distinction between the different Coins, and brave then be .represented to the high Ministers at Pe- king, and I the Emperor will make the awards. And in the meantime they-conceive an early let the wounded and killed be clearly enumerated, that public intimation from Government to the out of commiseration, their families may be re- effect suggested would tend to accelerate warded. Let the same officers retain their stations on Formosa, and let thorough preparations be every where and facilitate the measure. kept up. Sir,

Your most obedient Servants (Signed) Jardine, Matheson &c. Dent & Co.

Macao 4th April 1842.

X

Fergusson, Leighton & Co.

Macvicar & Co.

(True Copy)

J. Robt. Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer.

RESPECT THIS.

We thankfully acknowledge the receipt of two files of Peking Gazettes from our Chinese agent inCanton through a Canton subscri- ber. From time to time we hope to present to our readers various extracts. The docu- ment, a Translation of which we give above doubtless refers to the unfortunate budha, and is interesting as showing how the Chinese report such circumstances.

tone of the newspapers in relation to the payment of the debts of the States is also satisfactiory, as in gene- ral they strongly deprecate the dishonesty of not paying their just debts. The New York Herald says," it in probable that Mississipi, Indiana, and Illinois will not pay, and possible that Michigan, Florida, Mayland, and Pennsylvania may likewise pass their dividends. There is, however, notwithstanding the result of the elections in Mississipi, every confidence that payment will ultimately be made in all the States, both of princi- pal and interest. The following prices are quoted: Illinois Bonds, 34 to; Indiana, 344 to 5; Harlem Railway, 16 to Exchange on England, 94 to pm.; Amsterdam, 40 to: Hamburgh, 36 to Bremen,

78 to; Paris, 5 24 to 5.

IN connection with the payment of the interest on some of the state stocks, we may mention that the div idends due on the 1st. January have been advertised for payment in London the following.-Louisiana Ner-State Bonds and Loan and South Carolina, Maryland and Alabama State Stocks or Bonds, besides some of the City and Railroad Stocks.

Atlas,

22

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CHIN

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, APRIL, 28TH. 1842.

evacuated by the British troops owing to the smallness of the force. Chinhae would continue to be garrisoned. Several persons had been carried off by the Chinese under the very walls of Ningpo; among the number was Sergeant Campbell of H. M. By our letters from London we find 49th Regiment. Letters state that General there is a wide spread misconception as to Gough would ch upon Nankin, and the salubrity of our Island. In some of the Hangchowfoo and other cities, but keep- public Journals it is called the "valley of ing possession of none. Seeing what vast death" The mortality and sickness of the numbers the Chinese can command for troops is dwelt on as evidence of the un-harassing warfare it is certainly commen- healthiness of the site selected for the first dable policy not to locate a number of British Settlement in China. Chusan was small and isolated garrisons. The evacua- also called pestiferous; with what justice tion of Ningpo will be heralded by the Chi- many of us now know too well. We con- nese as a glorious victory gained over the fidently rely on such official returns being barbarians, and will no doubt embolden transmitted to England or they do exist), them to more obstinately determined resis- as will demonstrate the utter groundless-tance. ness of the alleged charge of insalubrity against our Island. Macao is one of the healthiest towns in the world, and it is ful- ly certain that when proper houses, bar- racks &c. are erected with the sanitary regulations which always obtain in an English town, Hongkong will lay claim, and justly, to even a superior salubrity.

as prize-money on the army, and navy, the rest will be carried to the credit of the consolidated fund.

THE case of the holders of the Elliot scrip, begin therefore to look some what dark. There can be no hope that Parliament will ever make good their loss from the public exchequer, after Her Majesty's Min isters have refused to appropriate the ransom of the town where the opium was destroyed, to the object. from the Treasury of Pekin. But there can be little The only source from which it can now be expected is doubt that Sir Henry Pottinger's primary demand. when the Emperor has been brought to reason, will be for a re-imbursement of the expenses of the war, and those expenses will have swelled to so large a sum before the account is brought to a close, that we fear a secondary demand of some two Millions sterling to make good the destroyed Opium, will be found to exceed the capabilities of the Chinese Exchequer. If it be discovered that the Chinese are not equal to the pay- ment of both sums, the weakest claim will of course go to the wall.

In these circumstances it is some consolation to learn, from those whose experience qualifies them to give an opinion on the subject, that the loss sustained by the delivery of the twenty thousand Chests to the Chinese Government has-been, in a great measure, if not altogether, made up, by the gains which the mer- chants have subsequantly made on their Opium tran sactions. The destruction of so large a quantity of the drug, did not fail to give it an enhanced value in market; and thus to contribute in some measure from us to hint even in a whisper that their claim on the Parliament of Great Britain, which authorized the trade by its own Act. has been weakened by any such event; only we venture te express our satisfaction in learning that the profits of subseqrent speculations have in a great measure afforded a compensation for the loss thev suffered, and thus served to mitigate the regret, which might otherwise be felt if no relief should be given by the Government of England.

to reimburse those who had been sufferers. Far be it

We have copied from the Friend of India the following article; and we fear the con- clusion arrived at by the Editor must now be but too obvious to the unfortunate hold- ers of the Opium Scrip. Unless compen-th sation be obtained, we hesitate not to say the holders will be deeply aggrieved, con- fidence in public men will be wholly de- stroyed, and our national honor will be sore- THE Sydney papers are quite exultant at the intel.ly tarnished. Instances have before oc- ligence, that the Governor is now authorised, to throw open for colonization and settlement Moreton Bay and the northern district generally. Very sanguine expec- tations are indulged in, as to the success of this meas. ure. Much of the Capital lying in the Banks of Syd: ney on deposite it is conjectured, will be invested in these lands when they are put up for Sale.

MORETON BAY.

We are fully satisfied of the great capabilities of this section of the Australian continent, and we think a supply of labour from this quarter, would enable the colonists to produce Rice, Sugar, Indigo, Coffee, and other tropical productions at a very moderate cost. quite satisfied not the least important of the advantages accruing from the retention of Hongkong will be, that, we shall soon be able to give a regu- lar supply of labour from hence to our Australian Co. lonies and at a very low rate. Such will certainly be the case, when peaceful relations are reestablished with are upon the threshold of this vast empire, it will be easy when we are better known and appreciated by the Chinese, to direct their constantly flowing stream of Emigration to the shores of our own Colonies. The paternal treatment of the Chinese by our government at Singapore, has gone far to remove false impressions. It is admitted that dearth of labour, is the only obsta- cle to the almost indefinite progress of our Australian Colonies. We shall be glad to lend our aid to remove this impediment, and at all times will afford what ever information may be needed, or is in our power to give, on this very important matter, which enga ges so large a share of public attention in England and the Colonies. The rates here per diem for a coo- ley, vary from seven pence to nine pence; and we are told on good authority, that these rates are much higher, than these ordinarily paid in the Canton pro-

vince.

THIS republic to which our late Plenpotentiary has been appointed Consul general had a population of 300,000 Souls in March 31st, 1841. Its Imports during the fifteen Months preceding, amounted to 1,670.240: the Exports during the Same period of Foreign and do- mestic products amounted to only 8 220,401. An attempt was made to obtain in London a Loan for the infant Republic but it failed owing to the frightful de- preciation of the United States Stocks and Bank Shares occasioned by the last monetary crisis in America, and want of confidence in all kinds of American Se curities. The Loan if made to the Texans would not have been on States Security but it would have had the guarantee of the whole republic-Texas not being a federal union as is the United States nor have the Provinces or departments Sovereign and in- dependent rights of Self government and Self taxation. We find that the Texan Commissioner was more Suc cessful in Paris and he has we believe succeeded in Lafitte Co. on these conditions: Texas is to receive raising a Loan through the instrumentality of Messrs 750 francs or about $150 for Shares of 1000 f. or 8200. paying 6 per cent on 35,000,000 f. mortga- ging for ten years her Customs Revenues, selling 3.000.000 acres of her best land's and leaving the de- posit of 25 per cent for two years at Lafittes for the further guarantee of the Shareholders. On such terms we much question whether its ratification be not an infliction instead of a benefit to the permanent well being of Texas.

NINGPO.

The latest advices from this city repre- sent things to be in a most excited state, and we are informed that the city is to be

curred, where the drafts of Functionaries on the home Government have been pro- tested for non-payment; but the dismissal or retirement of the Functionary has been the consequence of such unauthorised drafts. Captain Elliott, despite such a practi- cal condemnation of his conduct, was still continued as Plenipotentiary, some year or more after it. was known how deeply he had compromised the Government. Such continuance of authority in his hands re- leased him from all liability, and made the Home Government wholly responsible, (in their ministerial plum claims. No subse- canacity) for the duo payment of the quent disclaimer or dismissal, can one iota invalidate the perfect righteousness of such claims. Had the protest of the Bills and the dismissal of Captain Elliott been con- temporaneous, even then, we should have deemed it grossly unjust to inflict so deep a wrong on private individuals, for having placed faith in a public officer.

One hundred and seventy troops, we understood last week, was the number now at Amoy, but we are glad to learn that there are upwards of three hundred, although the Queen Steamer had recently been down for several detachments. The Steamer we learn arrived at Chusan from Amoy after a passage of only sixty hours.

From the late Indian Papers we learn, with deep regret, that the late disastrous scenes in Affghanistan will be the means of causing the names of about one hun- and eighty officers to be stricken from the army list.

LORD AUCKLAND had engaged his passage home in the Hungerford; and it is un- derstood that the Tenasserim steamer, after taking that vessel down the river, will prosecute her voyage to the Straits, on her way to join the Expedition in China.

Big: g: Free Press.

THAT Compensation is never denied to priest, peer or even an anticipative sinecu- rist of the privileged classes, the million Loan, the Scarlett job and a thousand fa- miliar instances, strikingly witness. How comes it then that the merchants of our land-its stay, support, and pride, should be the class which cannot obtain its Just dues-its rightful compensations?. We have not space here to answer this important query; but the treatment of the Spanish, AFFGHANISTAN.-Our intelligence from Affghanis French and Danish claimants, (the latter tan is now unhappily contracted to the advices which after some thirty years constant exertions information has been received respecting the fate of the come in from Jellalabad and Peshawur. No authentic not long since conquered the opposition of army of Cabul. For seven days after the arrival of Dr. the then Ministers) may show what the Brydon, and a native troeper, at Jellalabad, no other Opium claimants may expect; with far fugitives had made their appearance, and a British more chance of an entire ultimate loss, if is thus emphatically missing. By far the large portion force consisting of between four und five thousand men they do not now unitedly in China, India of these troops must now be regarded as having been and at home, agitate this question and de- annihilated by the treachery of the Affghans and the mand that justice be done. As to repay- rigor of the season, but it is still to be hoped that a con- ment by the Chinese when the pacifica- be preserved from death by the interposition of Divine siderable number may have returned to Cabul, and may tion takes place-who that is here expects Providence. All accounts concur in the fact that it? We trust there will not be added ano-Generel Elphinstone had delivered himself up to Akbar ther page to the chronicles of our commerce, which by the supineness and neglect of our Governors, have too often been the veritable martyrology of our merchants.

THE OPIUM SCRIP.-The hopes which had been long cherished by the holders of Captain Elliott's Opium scrip, that the ransom of Canton would be appropria- ted either wholly or in part to make good their losses- are annihilated by the declaration of the present 'Con, servative Chancellor of the Exchequer, who appears anxious to vindicate the principles of his party, by pre- serving that which he has obtained. In reply to an appeal from those who are interested in the Opium stated that the ransom of Canton is a droit of the delivered to the Chinese Commissioner Lin, he has Crown; and that, with the exception of that portion of this unexpected windfall,which the Crown may bestow

Khan on the line of march. Though a mere conjecture, in consequence of letters from Jellalabad. It was one it may probably be found that this step was adopted of the stipulations of the treaty at Cabul that-General Sale shuld evacuate that post, leaving his guns behind him. We know that he had positively refused to do so; and that he had communicated this resolution to the Commander-in-Chief., Doubtless, the same determi nation was conveyed in his reply to General Elphin. stone. It is possible that on the receipt of this resolu tion the General, finding himself unable to secure the fulfilment of one of the most important articles of the treaty, may have delivered himself up as a hostage to Akbar Khan. A few days will clear up the mystery, and we hope afford us some farther information of the abandoned, which may serve to mitigate the indignation actual state of the cantonment at Cabul before it wa now so universally felt touching this humiliating con convention, Friend of India.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

RIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

FOR THE FRIEND OF CHINA No. 2. CONTRADISTINCTIONS.

IF has often been remarked that China, not only in Geographical position, but as to habits, manners, customs &c. &c. is the very antipodes of western nations. On first coming to China a foreigner is forcibly struck with the prominent dissimilarities he every where sees around him. To note one half of the points on which the Chinese differ from us would make my present paper entirely tob long as well as too tedious and at present I shall notice only a few. Their language (which is the most common charac. teristic of any country] not only differs from ours in every essential particular both written and oral but is contrary to the great first principle of all other languages in common with our own in that it has no alphabet. Our instrument of writing is composed of the hardest part of the quill and very frequently of metal and when being used is held slantingly the instrument of writing universally employed by the Chinese is of the softest kind being made(as it were of the other end of our pen). of the finest hair, and when they write they hold it perpendicularly. The lines of our writing cross the page from left to right, and theirs from top to bottom, and the begninig of all their books is exatly on the page where ours-end. The types or blocks used for printing are not metal but wood and they never print but on one side of the paper.

Frequently may be seen old men busily employed in flying their kites, while groups of little boys are looking on enjoying the scene with the utmost ap. parent gratification.

There are an abundance of barbers, shops in China as well as in our own country but the Chinese very rarely have their faces shaved but always the head except a very small place on the crown; and it is not at all uncommon to see an old man with a beard five or six inches long hanging to his chin and mustachios accordingly while nearly every hair of his head has been closely shaved off.

The external mark of a Chinese gentlamn are long finger nails, and those of a lady cruelly cramped feet, and a miserably awkwardgait.

Their dates begin where ours end, thus they say Taou Kwang seventh year, moon (or month) twentyfith day.

The mariners compass was known and used in China long before it was thonght of in Europe, but from re- motest antipuity to the present they have spoken and still speak of it as pointing to the south, regarding the south as the grand point of attraction and not the north as has been decidedly settled upon by the Western Literati of natural science. Were you therefore to ask a Chinaman for the direction of Bor- neo he would say "west south" and for that of Japan his reply would be "east north" and not south west and north east as are universally used with us.

On entering a louse where the family tie has just been severed by death instead of seeing the relatives of the deceased clad in the sable habiliments of mourn- ing yon perceive them all clothed in white garments, and being thus arrayed, white awakens in them those contemplations relative to death and the grave as black similarly affects us. When the corpse is conveyed to the place of interment instead of that slowness of pace and that marked solemnity so common with us they all Proceed by walking remarkably fast, and almost running sometimes, and are accompanied with the most deafening confusion of lamentations, of gongs, of rude pipes and other instruments of silly noise.

There are very many minor points also.such as peal- ing an orange or a pear which they do by holding the blade of the knife from you instead of towards you as we do; begining at the vertex of the roof instead of the eares to cover their houses; carving their meats before cooking. &c. &c. &c. Yours &c. Hongkong April 17th. 1842.

A. K.

HONGKONG 25 APRIL 1842.

To the Editor of the SIR,

Friend of China..

THE disgraceful scenes of which our streets are the arena, call loudly for magisterial interference; each day they become worse and worse. You must be quite of our Soldiers and Sailors: for the conduct of the sure, I can only allude to the drunken delinquencies native population, by contrast, is truly admirable.

THE occurrence I particularly refer to. and which induces me to address you I will now detail. Yesterday, Sunday, as I was passing Labtats tavern at quarter past five P. M., I was much shocked at witnessing two Sailors, stripped to the waist, engaged in a regular pugilistic encounter with backers &c. &c. The combatants were both intoxicated and streaming with blood- This was disgusting enough, but still com paratively harmless in moral effect on the Chinese Spectators, compared with the fact that six of our Police, (in England they would be peace Officers, being sworn to keep and maintain the Peace) were passive, and appa- rently gratified spectators, of this conflict. I called on the police to interfere, they declined. I demanded on what ground they refused. Replied that they were commanded by an Officer of the Blen- heim to let the men fight it out-which officer ? I dont see him now, he is a small man. Did you ask his name? No-Do you refuse to interfere? Yes, our orders are not to interfere but with the Chinese. Whose orders? It is so, and we have no place to put the men in, if we were to take them up. I remained to witness some Seven or eight rounds, took the name of the Spokesman of the Police, told him I should report their conduct to the Chief Magistrate, which I now do through your medium. I also took the name of a Spectator, who was informed by me that I should perhaps require his testimony to corrobborate my statement, as to this dis- graceful neglect of duty by the Police. eunogh to call attention to conduct, which strikingly I might say much more, but I think I have said attests the notoriously deplorable inefficiency of the Hongkong Police.

And I remain

Your obt, Servt A Friend.

We are sorry to say that we are compelled of our our knowledge to certify to the correctness of the above Statement, and shameless, especially on the Sabbath are the scenes enacted in our Streets. We are sure the Authorities will be glad such complaints, when true, should be made so that immediate steps may be taken to prevent their recurrence.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE

SIR,

Ed.

AMOY.

23

MANY rumours are afloat about an attack upon Koolongsoo by the Chinese; some parties were about proceeding on board ship, and others were packing up. The following is an extract from a private letter from an unquestionable source just received.

"This morning early Captain Smith sent Akune with a Chinaman to get me to find out more definitely and and minutely what the latter had to communicate. He came to announce a meditated attack upon the place. He had a map or plan drawn out to show where the soldiers now are and from what quarter they expect to come. One Goe, a pirate lately caught by the man- has 1000 thousand welltrained men at Amoy ready to darins is to lead on 500 of his invincibles, One Tan cooperate with him. To these will be added 20,000 regular troops. They are to make the attempt this connected and plausible, and he is offered $500 it he month probably toward its close. The man's tale is returns a day before the attack and it proves true. I see reasons both for believing and disbelieving it. Capt. Smith and the Major are determined to act on the safe side and be ready and vigilant".

received an other letter from the same source Since the above was in type we have dated Koolangsoo 14th April from which we extract the following: "Last night was a time of much excitement : and the drums beat and the bugle sounded to arms at midnight. All things were ready to receive the enemy in a few minutes; but it proved a false alarm. It was a party of pirates attacking some houses at Amoy instead of Chinese troops attacking us. We can only muster a few above three hundred troops; but they are probably suf- ficient to repel many thousands if they can only be prepared for them. This unsettled state of things is very unfavoruable to Mis- sionary work. The island is nearly deserted by its original inhabitants."

CABUL.

CABUL.-By the intelligence received this week from Cabul, our worst fears have been realized. The treaty which Sir William Macnaghten had commenced, was completed by Major Pottinger, who assumed charge of the office of Envoy. It is supposed to have stip- ulated for a safe conduct for the troops at Cabul, du- ring their retreat, and for the entire evacuation of Affghanistan by our armies. Six European officers were given up as hostages to the insurgents; the sick and wounded were left behind at Cabul. It appears from the very indistinct accounts that have reached Calcutta, that the troops began their melancho- ly march out of the place which they had entered in FRIEND OF CHIMA, triumph, about the 6th of January; but the Affghans broke their faith on the first day, and began their attack You may not be aware, Mr. Editor, but I know on the cintonment, as soon as our troops began to quit that several parties at Macao have justified their oppo- it. At Khoord Cabul, which was their third march. the sition to this Settlement, and I think correctly, on the ladies of the party were sent back to Cabul, under the grounds that the intentions of the home Government charge of Mahomed Akbar Khan, the assasin of Sir have not yet been Officially made known, and hence W. Macnaghten, who had consented to protect them its restoration to the Chinese may take place. Many en route. At the Huft Cotul, part of the troops were of them who are British subjects complain bitterly of disorganized, many were destroyed, and the others fled. the dilemma in which they are thus placed. By the At Tezeen, the last gun fell into the hands of the ene- Plenipotenticry's first Proclamation they are warned my, and. Generals Elphinstone and Shelton were made "against putting themselves or their property in the prisoners. From Tezeen to Jugdulluk, about 200 power of the Chinese authorities" if they do so", it men of H. M. 44th kept well together; there they be must be at their own risk and peril" and yet they are came disorderly; and Dr. Brydon separated from them not told how, and where, they may carry on their trade on the night of the 12th January and reached Jellalabad with safety. As Superintendant of the Trade they the next day, wounded and confused. The above ac- allege that Sir Henry Pottinger as a corollary to the count is derived from his statements. He states more- above, should have invited all British Subjects to over that ten officers had fallen. Hongkong assuring them at the same time, if ever the Island was given up, compensation would be made. Had this been done the progress of our Settlement would have been immensely greater; and we continue to hope it may yet be done.

The custom of most nations when receiving guests is that the head be uncovered; but in China when distinguished personages pay their mutual visits to each other for their heads to be uncovered would be impolite and unbecomingly familiar. In contradis tinction also to every other people the Chinese consider the left hand seat the seat of honour. You never see the Chinese wear furred hats, but they make their coats of furs and skins while their hats or caps are invariably of silk. With us the pantaloons are worn over the stockings, but the Chinese always wear the, stockings drawn over the pantaloons as high as the knee, and pride themselvis in the beautiful embroidery of their garters. Drinking tea with us is the part of a regular meal and is consi- SUCK, would have been the policy of that much dered insipid without the accompaniments of cream and abused public Officer Captain Elliott, and whatever sugar. The Chinese do not use tea as a part of their may have been his Official blunders, it is quite certain stated meals nor do they ever mix whith it any other in. he fully appreciated the peculiar advantages derivable gredient. With us shoes are handsome in proportion to from Hongkong as a British Settlement. Had he their shining blackness, but the Chinese take particular continued with us he would have rivalled, perhaps sur- care to keep the thick soles of their shoes (which is the passed the reputation of the late Sir Stamford Raffles; only part made of leather) porfectly white. as the founder of one of the most flourishing commer- Our church bells are rung by causing the inside to be cial emporiums in the East. His heart was entirely in struck but the bells in the Chinese Temples have no the Cause and had his views been fully developed by clappers and are rung by striking the outside with an his successors, arrangements would have been, by this instrument made for the purpose. This also is done by time so far matured, that we make no doubt the whole the priest which constitutes one of the principle items of of the next Seasons teas for Englaud, would have been his duty. A priest in England or America very rarely shipped from this Port, He would not have shrunk acts as bell ringer. In our country Christianity is from the proper responsibilities of his Office and I am promulged under the impression that moral disorders of quite sure in thus acting he would have commanded the mind will be corrected and that peace and good will the sanetion and approval of his employers and the every where shall abound: the Chinese Authorities applause of the people of England. in their numerous edicts against it say that" Chris- tianity tends to corrupt the heart, renders base the human passions, and spreads confusion throughout the land."

I remain

Your obt. Servt. An old Resident,

It is impossible to peruse this statement without sen- timents of the deepest affliction, whether we consider the disgrace inflicted on our national character by the Convention, or the annihilation of so large a body of officers and men. Never, since we erected our stan- dard on the plains of India, has so awful a catastropho befallen us. The Convention with these ruthless savages has tarnished our reputation, in the eyes of the world, civilized or barbarous, and we are left in a far worse position than before we crossed the Indus. We have moreover the bitter reflection, that the unmolester retreat which the disgraceful treaty was intended to se- cure, was not attained. The slaughter of our troops has been as ruthless, perhaps more so, than if the Gen- eral had adopted the resolution of cutting his way through the enemy, and another example is thus afford. ed of the truth of the maxim, that pusillanimous coun- cils always entail greater misfortune, than those which are dictated by resolution. But it is painful to dwell on the subject. The mind sickens at the reflections

it creates; and we turn for relief to the consideration

of those measures which must be adopted to retrieve our national honour, and to inflict a just retribution, on" these predestinated villains, the enemies of human inter- course itself," whose atrocious perfidy has brought about this fearful catastrophe.

Friend of India.

24

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor- deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct-to supply every kind of Stores which. may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne. cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the

terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu. tation.

18T-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in,. our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Gloods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

Wa beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp Soda Water Powders.

and Campbell in hhds. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in casos.

Brown Windsor Soap.

Platea.

Wine Glasses.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Weds.

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dablin Stout, in bottles.

Champagne, from Most Epernay.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

of Ceylon Moss.

Superfine Brown Sherry,

from Peter Domecq. "Port wine, from Cockburn.

and Carbonel and Co.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Knudeden's Cherry Brandy Ditto Waistcoats.

Anisette de Bordeaux Cyder Shirt

Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

Sandoway Imitation

.. Havannah Cigars.

"Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Epics Nuts, ditto.

Navy Boof, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

Sardines.

in small tins, for Invalids.

Preserved Cherries.

Bir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in dns.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Ditto Sago.

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves. Guernsey Frocks. Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Rusia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes,

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants. Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

Fine Salt,

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard.

Assorted Sauces. Capers,

ded, in kegs each containing Jams and Jelles.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel. Humps and 6 Tongues. Lead Lines, Europe. Spiced Beef, in tins each ib 10, Log ditto ditto. Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Esence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Bauffs, [essorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting.

Fish hooks.

Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Clothe.

French Velvet Corks.

FOR SALE.

Madeira Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and

Quarter Casks from the well known And, various other Aricles to House of Kiers & Co. Apply to Dent & Co. at Macao.

numerous to detail.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The undersigned having entered into partnership on the 1st Jan. 1842, under the firm of P. Townsend. & Co. in the Ship Chandlery, Auctioneering and Com- mission business at Hongkong, would be pleased to fulfil any orders in their line, and hope, by attention, to give satisfaction to any who may be pleased to favour them with business.

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale

at their Godowns, Hongkong.

The following Goods, viz Chain Cables of Sizes

Anchors.

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases Claret

.Sauterne

""

Vinegar in Bottles Port in Casks and Bottles Half Leaguers Java Arrack Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvas Duck

Twine and Marline Log Lines

Stationary

Sailors Knives

Sail' Needles

Pad Loeks

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the supply

of Shipping in general.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale

on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Steam Coals

Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron.

Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons. Carr's well known fancy Biscuits.

Fine table Salt.

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle

Wiltshire Cheeses

packed in lead and

stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in 10 pound boxes.

Macao 20th April 1842.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

Tton (338 Tons N. M.)

11

HE A. I. British Brig "John Hor. Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong, Holliday, Wise Co. Macao.

Macao, 14th April, 1842.

ON

or to

FOR SALE.

N Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice Canvas, Twine-White, Green and Black Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank.

Go

Apply on Board

Hongkong April 13th. 1842.

NOTICE.

LOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to N. DUUS, or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles :

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, Beer,

ditto. difto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Allso a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses, and other Marine Stores.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

A CARD J. R. Bird, late of Singapore, bege to inform

the public of Hongkong, Macao, and Canton, that he has established himself as a Ship Wright and Engineer in the Queen's Road, and Superintendent of buildings on the Brit. ish Island of Hongkong; and respectfully solicits their patronage which be hopes to merit by diligence and attention to all orders he may receive in the above named handicrafts. Hongkong, 30th March, 1842.

N Sale at 46 Queen's Road, American Pine Spare, Provis Coir Rope, Canvass, Paints and other Stores by Hongkong, 21st, March 1842.

FOR SALE.

C. V. GILLESPIE.

N board the American Ship Forum, at Reduced prices,

mon, do Herrings, Hams, Dried apples, Champagne cider, Tobacco, Lemon Syrup and tongued and grooved planks, for-flooring or other use, Timber 4 inch to 8 do square. Samples of the above can be seen at N. Duus' Godown or on board. Hongkong March 30th. 1842.

BRITISH Piece Goods for Sale in quantities to suit purchasess

Hongkong, 21st. March 1842.

V. GILLESPIE, 46 Queens Road.

Superior Smoked York- IRON or building purposes, for Sale by C. V. GILLESTIE.

shire Hams.

HongKong 11th. April 1842.

O be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi- To nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil- ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant

Square, from 1 to 1 inch suitable for window. grating Hongkong, 21st. March 1842. 46 Queens Road.

IT ARRIVALS AND DEPARTURES. For these we are entirely dependent week none have been sent to us. upon the HARBOUR MASTER'S OFFICE, but this

at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on PRICES for Job, Printing are as follows: Shore at Hong Kong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P.M. daily, Sundays excepted.

Apply to R. M. Whichelo, Purser

of H. .M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the "FareD OF CHINA," copies of the Holy

Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society hand. samely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price 3- Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

Bill of Lading and Exchange,

Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

ADVERTISEMENT

Of Ships...

Not exceeding 7 lines

per 100

"

243

516

for 3 months Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional." Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod. erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi. nese language.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

PRINTED AND PUBLIMEED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECRIVER AND SINGLE NUMBERS HOLD BY

Maas Berrain AND SIMMONDS, MACAO,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

LONGBONG

AND DON

N°.7. VOL. 1

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 5TH. 1842.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842. NOTIFICATION.

His Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart., having been pleased to increase, in some respects, the powers and authority originally granted to the Chief and Marine Magistrates, respectively, the Warrants of those Officers have been revised and modi- fied, and in their new form are now publish- ed for general information.

By order,

J. Robt. Morrison. Acting Secretury and Treasurer. Government House. Hongkong, 30th April, 1842.

CHIEF MAGISTRATE'S

WARRANT.

any regulations to be the issued from time to time by this Government according to the customs and usages of British Police Law. AND I do hereby, authorize you, for the police purposes herein before specified to arrest, detain, discharge and punish such offenders according to the principles, and practice of General British Police Law and to inflict on any such offender corporal punishment, to the extent of thirty six strokes or lashes, when you may consider that mode of punishment called for by, and appropiate to, the offence.

AND all persons' subject to the mutiny act, or the general law for the Government of the Fleet, found committing police or other offences, shall be handed over to their proper military superior for punishment.

AND I do further authorize and require you, to detain in safe custody any persons whatever found committing within the Go- vernment of Hongkong, crimes and offences amounting to felony, according to the laws of England; forthwith reporting your pro- ceedingstherein and the grounds thereof, to the head of the Government for the time being.

AND 1 further authorize and require you to investigate and summarily to decide all claims for debts, not exceeding the sum of Fifty Dollars, or one hundred and twenty five Rupees, that may be brought before you: and further to investigate when so brought to your notice, either claims for By his Excellency Sir Henry Pottinger, debts, beyond that sum and not exceeding Bart, her Majesty's Minister Plenipoten- Two hundred Dollars, or Five hundred Ru- tiary, Envoy Extraordinary, and Chief Superintendant of the Trade of British pees, but referring in all cases, such larger claims to the head of the Government for Subjects in China, charged with the the time being, for instruction. And I Government of the Island of Hongkong. further require you, as often as you may Pending her Majesty's further pleasure, deem it neccessary to confine debtors, with I do hereby constitute and appoint you, the view of enforcing your awards, imme- William Caine Esquire, brevet Major, and diately and specially to report such decision Captain in Her Majesty's 26th. (or Camero-to the head for the time being of the Go- nian) Regiment of Infantry, to be Chief Magistrate of the Island of Hongkong and

vernment.

AND for all your lawful proceedings in the its dependencies: and I do hereby empow-premises, this warrant shall be your suffici- er and require you to exercise authority, ent protection and authority. according to the laws, customs, and usa-

GIVEN under my hand and seal of Office ges of China as near as may be (every de-at Hongkong, this twenty-fifth day of April scription of torture excepted) for the preser- in the year 1842. vation of the peace and the protection of life in the year 1842. and property of all the native inhabitants on the said Island, the shores and harbours thereof.

And I do further authorize and require you, in any case where the crime, according to Chinese laws, shall involve punishments of such severity as are included in the annexed scale, to remit the case for the judg- gement of the head of the Government for the time being.

SCALE

Imprisonment) with or without hard labor) for more than Six-months. Penalties exceeding 400 Dollars. Corporal punishment exceeding Strokes or lashes.-

the

its

SIGNED

Government. SIGNED

HENRY POTTINGER

Price 1 monthly Or $12 yearly

And I do hereby authorize you, for the police purposes herein before specified, to arrest, detain, discharge, and punish, such Offenders, according to the principles and practice of general British Police Law: requiring you, however, in any case when the crime shall involve punishment of such degrees of severity as are included in the annexed scale, to remit the case for the judgement of the head of this Govern- ment for the time being.

SCALE. Imprisonment (with or without hard la- bor) for more than one calendarmonth. Penalties exceeding $400. Corporal punishment exceeding thirty-six strokes or lashes. Capital punishment. AND I do futher require you, in all cases followed by Sentence or infliction of pun- ishment, to keep a Record containing a brief statement of the case, and copy of the sentence.

ALL persons, subject to the mutiny act, or the general law for the government of the fleet, found committing police or other offences, shall be handed over to their proper Naval or Military superiors for punishment.

AND I do further authorize and require you to detain in safe custody any person whatever, found committing within the Har- bours and waters appertaining to the Go- vernment of Hongkong, crimes and offences amounting to felony, according to the laws of England; forthwith reporting your proceedings herein, and the grounds thereof, to the head of the Government for the time being.

AND I further authorize and require you to investigate, and summarily to decide, all claims for debts, not exceeding the sum of Fifty Dollars, or one hundred and twen- ty five Rupees, that may be bronght before you: and further to investigate, when so brought to your notice other claims for debts, beyond that sum, and not exceeding Two hundred Dollars, or Five hundred Ru- pees, but referring, in all cases, such lar- ger claims to the head of the Government for the time being, for instruction. And I further require you, as often as you may deem it neccessary to confine debtors, with

By the Chief Superintendant '&c. Charged with the view of enforcing your awards, imme- diately and specially to report such deci- ionthe head for the time being of the Government. And for all your lawful pro- ceedings in the premises, this warrant shall be your sufficient protection and authority. GIVEN under my hand and seal of Office at Hongkong, this Twenty-fifth day of April in the year 1842. SIGNED

J. Robt: Morrison Acting Secretary and Treasurer. MARINE MAGISTRATE'S

WARRANT.

HENRY POTTINGER By the Chief Superintendent &c. Charged with the SIGNED

Pending her Majesty's further pleasure, I do hereby constitute and appiont you, William Pedder, Esquire, Lieutenant in her Majesty's Royal Navy, to be Marine Government. Magistrate of the Island of Hongkong and dependencies:-And I hereby emporwer 100 and require you, to exercise anthority, agreeably to the Regulations from time to time issued by the head of the Government And I do further require you, in all cases over all persons other than those subject to followed by sentence or infliction of punish- the mutiny act, or to the General law for ment to keep a record, containing a brief the Government of the fleet, resorting to or statement of the case, and copy of the sen-abiding in the Harbors of the said Island.

Capital punishments.

tence.

And I further authorize and require you And I further authorize and require you to exercise Magisterial and police authority to exercise Magisterial and police Autho- over any persons other than those herein be- rity over all persons whatever (other than fore described, who shall be found commit- natives of China dwelling on the Island, or ting breaches of the peace in any of the persons subject to the Mutiny Act or to the Harbors of this Island, or breaches of General for the Government of the any Regulations issued from time to time fleet), who shall be found committing brea- by this Government, according to the cus- ches of the peace on shore in any part or toms and usages of general British Police dependency of this Island, or breaches of Law.

J. Robt: Morrison

Acting Secretary and Treasurer.

NOTIFICATION.

WITH a view to the prevention of future misun- derstanding and difficulties, His Excellency, Sir Henry land are to be made by the holders of Grants, to other Pottinger, Bart, is pleased to direct, that no Sales of parties, except with the knowledge of the Land Officer: and that any Sales that may have been made, or may be made in future, unless registered in the Land Office, PURCHASERS of grants from the individuals before shall be held to be invalid.

holding them are to understand distinctly, that they will co ne under the same liabilities to Government as the parties from whom they purchase.

BY. ORDER, Geo, F. Mylius,

Land Office, Hongkong, 2d May, 1342.

Land Officer.

26

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

ANY Persons having Representations to lay before the Land Committee, are hereby requested to send in written state- ments of their cases without delay, else they will not be taken into consideration. BY ORDER.

Geo: F. Mylius.

Land Officer.

Hongkong,

Land Office,

April 27th. 1842.

NOTICE TO OUR MACAO SUBSCRIBERS.

The Post Office arrangements of the Island be. ing now complete onr Friends and Subscribers at Macao will please take note that, in future, the Friend of China will be uniformly sent through the medium of our Post Office to their respective addresses, and of course will be obtainable. with their letters, from hence, at the office of the Agent for the Superintendents, John Rickett Esq. Macao, FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY, 5TH. 1842.

FROM THE PEKING GAZETTE. PATRIOTISM OF NATIVE MERCHANTS OF CHEKEANG.

THE Imperial will has been received as fellows: LEW YUEN 0, (the Lieut Govern- or) has sent up a memorial representing, that Kin yu shing, and other merchants of Sze Sho in the Province of CheKeamg, with warmest patriotism, desire to respond to the Imperial favours shown to them. In consequence of the troops assembling in this said Province, and the preparations requir- ed for exterminating the barbarians, and the necessary expenses of the war being urgent aud important, the above merchants have petitioned that they might be permit- ted to offer to the State the sum of one mil- lion two hundred thousand Taels(nealy three millions of dollars), and Lew Yuen O soli- cits his Imperial Majesty to reward them accordingly.

THE said merchants anxionsly desiring to repay their obligations to the State, has- tened to meet the Imperial wishes-THEY certainly are worthy of being most hand- somely rewarded. The Lieut. Governor is therefore, hereby ordered to enol their names in an official list and lay it before the throne, that I the Emperor may mani- fest my imperial favours toward them. RESPECT THIS.

We call the attention of our Readers to the two Warrants in our first page. This augmentation of magisterial power will, we know not be abused, and cannot but tend to give increased efficiency to our police judicature: at the same time it will im portantly raise it in the estimation of the resi- dents; whilst it will remove many very serious cau ses of objection to which it was before liable.

We hope our friends will take note of the Land Officers announcement. With respect to any claims or business with the Land Committee, no time should be lost in bringing them before it.

H. M. S. Cambrian Captain Chads, C. B. arrived in our harbour on the 28th ult. She sailed for Amoy and Chusan on the 3rd. inst. The new Governor General of India came out in her to Cal- cutta from England.

When the Calliope left Singapore the Tennasser- im Steam frigate was detained there repairing dam ages done to her engines when she had the Hunger. ford in tow. The late Governor General was on hoard the Hungerford.

We understand from respectable native sources, that it is the intention of the Canton Authorities very soon to issue a rigorous ediet forbidding all exportation of whatsoever kind from Canton to Hongkong.

SIAM AND COCHIN-CHINA.

WAR BETWEEN THE TWO COUNTRIES.

CANTON RANSOM.

We are much disappointed in not having received the promised particulars of the appropriation and dis- tribution of the Prize money--Wehope in our next to THE Cochin-Chinese and Siamese gov-be able to give full particulars; meantime we may say ernments have long been at loggerheads: that we hear on good authority a Captain in the army or, as an esteemed freind ouce observed to will obtain at least four hundred and fifty Pounds as us when speaking on the subject, the Siam- his Share. ese have, for along time been buzzing about

the ears of the Cochin-Chinese.

The following extract of a letter just received from Bangkok, Siam, contains the most recent particulars.

LORD ASHBURTON'S

Special mission to the United States.

LORD Ashburton's special instructions are limited "The Siamese forces for Cochin-China have left to these three points, the Caroline affair, the Boundary, Bangkok. They consist of five ships of war and the right of search. The juncture is favourable, on the European model, and forty war-junks,con. and the man well chosen. Both countries have just taining, perhaps, some two or three thousand men, escaped from a minor quarrel, the trial of M'Leod, and these, with the forces already sent, and at which might have appealed to the point of honour on their command near the boundary line of the two both sides, and involved both in a profitless and unwel- nations will probably make a Siamese army of ten come war: both are the more desirous of peace. A or fifteen thousand men. The bone ofcontention man of no common talent and sagacity-once the prince seems to be a Province in Cambodia, which was of British merchants-our leading merchant in the formerly under Siamese rule. The Cambodians, how. American trade, and the head of the family which ever, not liking their rulers, sought and obtained the occupies the post that he relinquished on his elevation protection of the Cochin.-Chinese-Now the Siamese to the peerage-connected with the country by inter- wish to bring them back to their allegiance, and marriages-thoroughly informed, no less in the actual hence they are involved in a war with the Cochin- state of American feeling than in the history of the Chinese. News have just reached here that a fort Republic, and of the particular questions which he is to oceupied by the Cochin-Chinese was evacuated and treat-with the rights, wants and difficulties of Ameri- then taken immediate possession of by the Siam-ca-Lord Ashburton is pointed out by many circum- ese, but no sooner had they done this than tances as the fittest man that could have been selected the fort blew up. How many Siamese were kill- for such a mission. He is a thorough Englishman, ed by this stategem is not stated. I am inclined but possessed with American sympathies and alive to to think that this news want confirmation." American interests No keen partisan, he is Liberal in disposition, and yet not to be suspected of any lack of will not be against him with our Democratic cousins. Conservative views. Even the accident of his title And we have reason to believe that his shrewd atten- tion has been given to the subject of his mission, with that regard to the rights and the difficulties of both sides, which will secure him as much influence as any man could command with hoth. His appointment is tbe wisest preliminary step towards a real adjustment of these uselessly and dangerously protracted dis- putes Taking the measure and the man together, is in promise whatever it may turn out in fruition, the luckiest hit that Sir. R. Peel has made.-(SPECTATOR)

A friend has kindly handed us the fol- lowing extract. At this juncture any thing of this nature touching the intercourse of any foreign nation with China, during any period of the past, must be regarded with

interest.

SETTLEMENT OF THE DUTCH AT FORMSA (1624.)

a

to the Province of Fokeen, and at thirty leagues from THIS Island (Formosa) although situated opposite its coast was not subject to the empire of China, for the Chinese had no passion for conquest; and from an inhuman and mistaken policy they preferred allowing part of their population to perish to sending the super abundance into the neighbouring country. IT was found that Formosa was one hundred and thirty or one hundred and forty leagues in circumfer. ance. The inhabitants of the Island judging from the northern Tartars of Asin, and probably Corea was their manners and their faces were descended from the route they came by. These people lived mostly by fishing and the chase, and went nearly naked.

It is, indeed, not amongst the least curious circums- tances of the present friendly relation between Russia

and England, that so many marriages are daily oc. curring between our fair young countrywomen and the Russian nobles, and the warm encouragement which is given to these unions by the Emperor Nicholas and his Empress. Indeed, a young English lady, at all dis tinguished for her beauty and talents, no sooner arrives himself is a man of respectable condition, such as being at a private residence at Petersburgh, where the host an officer in the service, or a British merchant of the court, and immediate steps are taken by the order of the Emperor for her introduction. If upon her appea- rence at court she is then approved, the imperial family seem on the instant to apply themselves to procure her an alliance and a good or at least a noble marriage is almost the certain consequence of her court favour. Such is the pleasing preference which it given in this northern court to English beauty, manners, and habits; we should say such are the simple but effectual means which the Emperor and his consort are taking to im prove the habits and manners of their own court. Not only this lady's sister, but we believe the lady herself, affords an example of this

first class, than the fact becomes known in the Russian

THE Dutch prudently thought that the best adapted spot for an establishment was a little island in the neighbourhood of the large one, Here they found three considerable advantages-facility of defense should hatred or jealonsy lead to their being troubled-a port formed by the two islands-and the facility of keeping up a free communication with China during they might have chosen would have been found wan- both monsoons: advantages that in other situations ting. The new colony was fortified insensibly and without notice, when it rose at once to a state of pros- perity that astonished all Asia. It was to the conquest of China by the Tartars that this rapid rise was owing Great Brinth and ter delightful preference of Thus do the torrents fertilize the vaucys with the sub- stance of the despoiled mountains. More than one hundred thousand Chinese who would not submit to the conquerors took refuge on Formosa. They carried thither their characteristic industry, and introduced the the cultivation of sugar and rice, aud attracted from the mother country a vast quantity of vessels. Soon this Island become the centre of all communications between Java, Siam, the Philipines, China and Japan. In a few years it become the largest market in India. The Dutch hoped for still greater success when for tune abandoned them, (A Free translation from the "HISTOIRE Philosophique et Politique des establisse. mens et la commerce des Europeens dans les deux Indes.")

Ice. This should not be omitted in the enumeration

of the articles which bore the appearance of imports.

the Russian Court, and it is this circumstance which affords us a more than usual satisfaction in recommending the work before us. If any of our readers,-a gentleman perhaps with half a dozen danghters,--should feel the wish to dispose of them in a foreign marriage, and does not re- gard distance, we would say at once, send one or more of them out as visitors to a friend at St. Petersburgh instead of Calcutta; they will find a quicker settlement, and better bargains. Perhaps it would be as well not to put them altogether in the vessel's invoice, but to ship them with the general cargo without, any further notice. London Review of a Recent Work on Rus- sia by a Lady.

CHINESE LITERATURE.

THв Yi King or Book of changes is the oldest

Seven or eight rather extensive ice-houses were discover and most admired literary work extant among the ed on the island near the town of Ting-hae, though Chinese,-The number of treatises on it of various only one was found to contain any of this valuable lux-kinds, such as memoirs, commentaries &c. enumerated ury: in this the ice was preserved in the most simple in the Imperial Catalogue, is about 1450.-The Yi King manner between layers of twisted straw on a well drain- treats of general philosophy as supposed to have been ed stone floor, around which were mud walls of great taught by Fuhi or Confucius-By some European thickness surmounted by a roof of high pitch thickly writers it has been called a" book of riddles." The thatched. The use which the Chusan islanders and Shu King or Book of Records to the foreign student is even the inhabitants of the main make of ice, appears much more interesting than the Yi King.-Its moral to be confined almost exclusively to the preservation of sentiments are the purest and best in the language.- fish caught during the hottest months of the year. The Shi King or Book of Odes in point of excellence THREE rather extensive timber yards, well stored as literary Compositions are Second only to the Shu with spars and planks, were found in the sea-port town; King. They are short, sententious, and often verv but, as there appeared no indications of any junk build. hard to understand.-The writings on ceremonial obser- ing, or of any projected increase to the town, it seems vances are exceedingly voluminous and thongh much probable that the port is used as a depot for the supply Studied by the Chinese are but little valued by foreign of the article to the Southern ports. Lieut Ochterlony's students.-They exercise great influence in forming Sketch of Chusan. the manners of the Chinese.-Chi. Chr.-

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

OREGENAL CORRESPONDENCE.

NARRATIVE OF EVENTS AT CABUL. The following narrative of events drawn up by the Editor of the Delhi Gazette, is the clearest we have yet seen on the subject.-Ed. Fof 1. 10 March.

TO THE EDITOR OF THE FRIEND OF CHINA. Sir YOUR Correspondent A.K. has in your last, pointed In our last number we gave a very hurried extract and notice out many dissimilarities.(or contradistinctions of the from letters received at Jellalabad and Peshawur from some of Chinese) from European usages.--Many more the prisoners or guests of Akhbar Kan, and which, it will have might have been added; for instance as been seen, gave a different version to the atrocities and treachery decoration the Chinese put the feather or plume as we possibly can from really authentic sources, the letters of se a attributed to Akhbar Kan. We have collected as many details behind the Cap and hanging down. They drink veral of the prisoners, and if the following compilation be truc, their wines hot, and even water must have an infusion as we firmly believe it to bo, 8ir Wm. Macnaghten has been mo of tea and be made warm before it it is drinkable by Akhbar Kan, if not altogether exculpated of the intention of trea- re blamed than he deserved, the military authorities less so, and our Coolies.--Again, they hold in the lowest estimation chery, at least exonerated from the actual murder. Whether our the profession of arms, in the highest that of literature poor countrymen and women write more favourably of their pre. or civil merit--With us our high priest ranks next to sent protector than they otherwise would, if beyond his reach, more Royal blood, and the priesthood is highly estimated. especially as their letters are, from necessity, sent forward without No archbishop of Canterbury forms part of their state seal or wafer, we cannot say ; but really, if Akhbar Kan is beha. ving as represented, let his motive be what it may, he cannot be pageantry, and the priesthood is held in contempt by so black as it has lately been the fashion to paint him. There the Literati and upper classes, not much respected, are many breaks in our present detail which, from the circumstan Imight say despised, by the lower ranks of life. There the awful events, but we give it as it is, and fully believe that what ces of our friends, is also incomplete as regards the latter part of are some who (knowing what Enropean hierarchies we do present may be relied on, and it must serve our purpose un- are) say, that it is an enviable "contradistinction" of til fuller details are supplied. the Chinese their not having an Established Church.- Certes, none will contest having no Attornies or Prac- tising Lawyers throughout their vast Empire, is an inappreciably valuable contradistinction which we ought to imitate.

FURTHER the enlightened Rationalism of the Educa- ted and upper classes among the Chinese is intellec- tually superior to the degrading superstitious creeds and observances, which obtain among the pseudo ci- vilized of Europe. Even when the Chinese indulge in sensuous gratifications, is it not for them a refined and creditable contradistinction, that instead of pouring large quantities of alcoholic liquids dowr their throats, inducing Drunkenness and all its horrible consequen- ces they etherially inhale the fumes of an agreeable exhilirant, thus realize an oblivion of care, and forget. fulness of sorrow, at a far less sacrifice of health, than attends the indulgence of vi nous intoxication? Then the personally disgusting, and socially annoying ac- companiments and concomitants of Drunkenness; as compared with opium Ecstacies, are they not all in favor of the Chinese? A walk through our streets, and a visit to the Grog and Opium Shops, will at onee demonstrate the fact.

As to their division of Ranks, every one knows the Chinese place Scholars in the first. husbandmen in the second, mechanics in the third, and merchants in the fourth class. Few will however so far divest them- selves of national prejudices, as to acknowledge, as is the fact that such an arrangement of classes, is morally and civizedly superior to that of Europe. Hoping yor will find room for this trifle, in a corner of your very valuable journal, I remain Your Obedt. Servant- A COSMOPOLITE

Macao 30th April 1842,

ON DITS. ON DIT. Hang chow foo has been taken by the Brit- ish forces, who arrived before it, four days after eva- cuating Ningpo.

27

morning they found the camp nearly surrounded with enemies, hill close to our troops, he told him, it was their own fault for and on Capt Skinner going to Mahomed Akhbar, who was on's leaving cantonments before the troops appointed to escort them were ready, and that the Chiefs had not (save himself) the power to prevent their being attacked; that he was willing still to do this on their giving six hostages for our not moving beyond Tazeen till sale's Brigade had left Jellalabad. Major Pottinger, who was still lame from his wound, offered to go for one, and, at the parti. cular request of Mahomed Akhbar, Captains Lawrence and Mac. kenzie were added; with these, the Khan appeared satisfied, and the troops marched to the Khoord Cabul, but, notwithstanding, all the Sirdar's endeavours he could no: restain the Gazees who at tacked the column et all points. Mahomed Akhbar and the hs. tages tollowed a few hours after, and witnessed a scene of slaughter so fearful as to render all description impossible; the remaining gun was deserted. Mrs, Anderson and Mrs. Boyd had each a child carried off; Mrs. Mainwaring was nearly so, but was saved, and Mrs, Boyd's child, a European woman, and a wounded soldier, were also brought back by Mahomed Akhbar. The next day the Sirdar said, after lamenting his inability to re- strain his people, that the only sefaty for the ladies would be in their putting themselves under his charge, which they all did, and were received by him with every alleniion. The halted the la-

dies, hostages, &c., a day or two, and then proceeded towards Jagdullack, finding the road covered with the dead and dying of the Army: the poor fellows seemed to have fallen victims to the severity of the weather as much as, or more than from the fire of the enemy. At Jugdulluck it was said that the Troops had endeavoured to make a stand at an old ruined fort, and did so They tried to negociate with the Ghilzies, and Mahomed Akhbar until only 30 rounds of ammunition remained for each man, assisted them and asked for General Elphinstone, Brigadier Shel. ton, and Captain Johnson to be sent to him; this was agreed to, but to any longer contend against the severities they were ex- posed to, and maddened by the lose, as they supposed, of the two Chiefs, rushed during the night on to the road towards Jellala. bad, to which place only one Officer has as yet arrived.

The letters from which we have taken the above accounts are dated Buddiabad in Lughman or Zughman, and here it is suppo. sed the Hostages, Guests and Prisoners will remain until some definitive arrangements are concluded. In the mean time, the Sirdar does every thing in his power to make them comfortable and feel perfectly at their ease.

Of course we cannot possibly know upon what terms the trea-

towards the restoration of Dost Mahomed, who, whatever may be the determination of Government, is more likely to settle the coun try than the puppet now on the throne, whose conduct, conne. ted with that of Sufder Jung's, is, to say the least, most suspicious; we cannot however, clearly see what good he has to gain to him. self by playing us false, though we doubt not that the Government would be glad enough to find a good reason for breaking with him.

In order to squeeze as much interesting matter as possible into this issue for our friends at home, we reserve editorial comments for another time: we had prepared a list of the officers present with their Regiments when the out-break occurred in Cabul, mentioning their supposed fate, but we shall leave it for a future issae, fearful of giving pain until we can be more certain.

We already know that the insurrection broke out in the city on the 2d. November, and it appears that the Envy immediately despatched an Officer to the King in the Bala Hissar. To reach sisted several attempts of an enflamed populace to cut him down; His Majesty, he had to run the gauntlet of a heavy fire, and re- he, however, succeded in his purpose, and persuaded the King to allow Brigadier Shelton, with nearly two regiments and Capt. Nicoll's troops, to take possession of the Bala Hissar whence the shelling of the town took place. The following day the insurgents got possession of the Commissariat Fort in which were stored all the provisions of the force. This was a most dreadful contre-temps, and it appeard completely to paralyze all in cantonments where there were only two days atta remaining. The effect was that of a panic, and the madness of not having their supplies in canton- ments, as also the folly of having constructed their defences upon so very extensive a scale as to require all the troops to defend them, now became fearfully appareut. On the previous day Sir Alexan. der Burnes, Captain Burnes and Captain Broadfoot of the Euro. pean regiment were killed, Sir Alexander's house was completely ties have been made, but we have reason to think that they tend sacked and then burned, and Captain Johnston's treasury also fell a prey to the flames. He, himself, had fortunately slept in ca- tonments, whilst Brigadier Anquetil and Captain Troup, who li ved in the same quarter, were out riding and also escaped. An attack was made by the enemy upon another fort which was al- so used as a commissariat depot, but Captain Mackenzie most gall antly defended it with a handfull of men for three days, till al his ammunition was expended and then brought off his party into cantenments during the night. Captain Trevor remained in the city, with his wife and children, two days, protected by the Ha- zarbash who afterwards escorted them all safely into the canton. friends in the city for some days. Now followed various reverses ments. Captains Skinner and Drummond were concealed by and successes on both sides; two forts close to the camp were taken by us, at the earnest request of the Envoy, as they contai. ned a small quantity of grain: in fact without adverting to parti. culars which will no doubt appear in the proper time, it does seem to us that the only energetic measures that were taken, origina. ed with the Envoy, who, when his eyes were once open, was on til occasions, strongly in favour of offensive measures, whilst Ge- THE CHATHAM ISLANDS.-The statement that a aneral Elphinstone, from circumstances connected with the force, German colony is about to be planted in the Chatham among whom there seems to have been much vacillation and Islands, in the Southern Pacific, that group having despondency, appears to have been desirous of entirely keeping been purchased with that view by M. Syndicus Sieve- upon the defensive, The fighting still continued, and many offi. cers were killed, whilst the news in the mean time arrived of the king, of Hamburg, on account of a Colonization Com- cutting up of Codrington's corps at Chareekar. After some days pany now forming in Germany, is somewhat premature. (our accounts are rather deficient in dates) it was deened neces. The fact is that the diplomatic agents of the Hanseatic sary to recall Brigadier Shelton from the Bala Hissar to the aid of towns have opened some negociations with the British the cantonment force: he came and brought one Regiment with Government in reference to the Islands named; and him; but still the measures recommended by the envoy, of acting on the offensive, were not adopted. The General is said to have that a conditional arrangement has been made with considered any vigorous attack upon the enemy as futile; the the New Zealand Company, which is the owner of minds of the sldiers became imbued with despondency, and but the soil; but which, by the terms of its charter, cannot one idea seemed to pervade those whose duty it was, at least, to conclude a treaty in the matter without the sanction of have made one push previous to securing a safe retreat by a treaty. the Crown. The Chatham group consists of three Matters went on from day to day necasionally enlivened by skir ON DIT. Ningpo was made a bonfire of by the British mishes with the enemy which did no good, but weakened and principal islands, viz, Warrekauri, or Chatham Island, previous to its evacuation.-The Magazines and some dispirited our troops, who, sent out in small numbers, could not containing a surface of about 300,000 square acres; be expected to withstand the immense forces opposed to them, and Rangihande, or Pitt's Island; and Rangatira, or public edifices were alone destroyed at Hang who were actually driven back on one occasion into camp, by the Cornwallis Island, the surface of which two lastmep- enemy whom they attempted to dislodge from a hill, after being exposed to a galling fire for several, hours, and were only saved tioned isles does not exceed 100,000 acres. The group ing his troops. The force was again reduced to a prospect of Zealand. Great Britain claims the right of sovereignty from being totally destroyed by the Chief Osman Khan withdraw. lies three or four days' sail to the eastward of New starvation there being only six days' provision in camp, and it was now feared that the bribes and premises, which had hithert brace pro discovery and possession taken by the oneers as against all European powers-a right founded upon red sufficient supplies of atta for the men, would no longer be of avail. One party then suggested the propriety of an attempt to of His Majesty's brig Chatham, in the year 1791, and retire into the Bala Hissar, which Captain Conolly, who was with which, so far as we are aware, the Hanseatic towns the King, strongly advocated, and to which the Envoy was quite can have no legitimate ground for disputing. How willing to accede, till informed by the Military Authorities it was impossible, as the dispirited troops were no longer to be depended far the policy of Her Majesty's Government may lean towards a cession of the islands to a German State in upon! The last Regiment in the Bala Hissar (the 54th N. I.) was retnrn for an equivalent compensation, is a different then withdrawn, and the King was left to his own resources for question, and the solution of which may depend upon several days. The Envoy still remained firm as to the advocat- a variety of considerations not fully before the public. ed negotiations, and it was not until he heard that the Brigade We have no donbt, however, that, as a token of good- there were no hopes of getting General Sale's Brigade from Jel- he had written for from Kandahar, had retraced its steps and that will and conciliation, such a cession would be well ti- lalabad, nor of any assistance from Peshawar, that he, most reluctant. med. It wonld gratify the nationa feelings of the ly, complied with the wishes of the General and other Comman- Germans, who are bent upon the posselssion of a colony, ON DIT. The Effigy of the head of the late Sir Wilding Officers, and entered into overtures for a treaty with the however small, and might allay much of the irritation Envoy. Several conferences took place beiween the Envoy at. liam Macnaghten, adorned with a pair of green spec. tended by Capts. G. Lawrence and Trevor and all the Chiefs, the conclusion of the treaty between this country and which has prevailed in the south of Germany ever since tacles. has been paraded about in India, at several of the outside cantonments, and eventually some twenty articles, drawn Celebrations of Mohammedan festivols.-One case up by the Envoy in Persian, were read and approved of. On the Zollverein. By proper stipulations for the admis- of a stipendiary Mussulman Rajah is now under Gov- these occasions Mahomed Akhbar took the most prominent part, sion of British produce and manufactures on the footing other meetings following subsequently, at which the Chiefs ex- ernmental investigation. of the national flag, Great Britain might secure herself pressed an earnest desire to bring matters at once to a conclusion, and a message to this effect was brought on the evening of the precisely the same advantages from a German as from an English colony in the Chatham Islands The case 22d December,, by a cousin of Akhbar Khan accompanied by Captain Skinner who it appears was still in his power, and on the differs materially from that of the establishment of a morning of the 23d Sir William Macnaghten accompained by community of Germans within a British colony, and Captains Lawrence, Mackenize, and Trevor proceeded to the is altogether of a new and peculiar nature. Without supposed conference; the party had scarcely been seated five mi- nutes when, at a signal, all were seized, McKenzie, Lawrence, committing ourselves by expressing any deliberate and Trevor were bound to horses, and mounted behind Affghans, opinion on the snbject, our present impression is that the latter who is represented to have fallen off was cut to pieces this colonizing proposal of the Hanseatic Towns is one by the Gazeet. The Envoy refused to mount a horse, and shared which ought not to be hastily rejected by the Govern- the same fate. The other two Officers were most wonderfully ment of Great Britain.-Chronicle. preserved though a whole host of fanatics cut at them as they were carried off, but being mounted behind Aff hans the mob was afraid to use fire arms; they were imprisoned for some days, and after some interviews with Akhbar Khan were returned on the time were taken up by Major Pottinger, and on the 6th January 28th December to cantonments. The negotiations during this the force marched from cantonments with a foot of snow on the ground, and reached Beegroma unmolested, except the rear guard which was attacked, and Hardyman of the 5th Light Cavalry, and some men were killed. On the 7th the force moved to Ba. here the three mountain guns were carried off. It now became reekhur, the rear guard beiug on the defensive the whole way; clear they would have to fight their way onwards. The following

chow-foo.

ON DIT. Captain Elliot thoroughly satisfied the Chan cellor of the Exchequer, that Hong Kong expenditure need not be an item in the forthcoming budget, as it could well now all its own expenses when recognized as a British Colony by the Home Government. ON DIT. The Hong merchants at Canton exult in having at last communicated with the English Man- darin, who they say, out of complaisance to them, and their usages, made an eminent English merchant his official medium !!

ON DIT. The Madras contingent of the Chinese Ex- pediti on, refused to embark, owing to the Indian Go- vernment's refusal to give the wives and friends of those who perished in the Golconda, the same allowances they would have been entitled to, had their relatives died in battle, or on shore !!

ON DIT. They have just discovered at Macao tbat Teas and other produce, will be abundantly brought by the Chinese to the free Port of Hong Kong; when Buyers are domciled there! ! !

Ellenborough

ON DIT. At Calcutta that Lord is about to appoint native Aid-de-eamps.

The Imperial Academy at Pekin is a public hall for the residence of those who having attained the rank of honlam, have not become magistrates. It is also cal- led the 'golden horse' and the 'gemeous court' and its ordinary appellative means literally the 'pencil forest court'. It is the emperor's principal laboratory for state papers. Official documents and all national lit. rary works, are prepared for publication either by, under the direction of, the members of this insti- There are several subordinate branches of the titution, with their appropriate officers,

bour from Chusan, brings dates, we are told, to tho The Eagle, which arrived yesterday in our har- 27th ultimo. Preparations were then making to ad- vance on Chapoo and it was hoped Hang Chow would be reached and taken by our forces. H. M. Sloop Hyacinth was, on the 27tb. ultimo to sail from Chusan to. Amoy,

28

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor- deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended

to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the

Green difto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting Fish hooks. Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks.

Madei

FOR SALE.

adeira Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks from the well known Apply to

And various other Aricles too House of Kiers & Co. numerous to detail.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The undersigned having entered into partnership on the 1st Jan. 1842, under the firm of P. Townsend & Co. in the Ship Chandlery, Auctioneering and Com- mission business at Hongkong, would be pleased to fulfil any orders in their line, and hope, by attention, to give satisfaction to any who may be pleased to favour them with business.

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale

terms on which their business has been carried on, and at their Godowns, Hongkong. which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu. tation.

1ST-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an erorbitant price.

WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp Soda Water Powders.

and Campbell in hhds.

ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Brown Windsor Soap.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Tallow Candles.

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dublin Stout, in bottles.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay.

Superfine

Brown Sherry, from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn.

and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews

Essence Jamaica Ginger.

Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Brandy

Ditto Waistbats.

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder.

Lemon Syrup

Best Bengal Cheroots.

.. Sandoway Imitation

39

Havannah Cigars.

"Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tine, for Invalids.

Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Tapioca, in tins.

Ditto Sago.

Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobreren

Worsted Gloves.

Guernsey Frocks.

Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovice.

Lucca Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers,

ded, in kega each containing Jams and Jelles.

3 Briskets, 9 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel.

Humps and 6 Tongues.

Lead Lines, Europe.

Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

The following Goods, viz

Chain Cables of Sizes

Anchors.

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases . Claret Sauterne Vinegar in Bottles

"1

"

Port in Casks and Bottles Half Leaguers Java Arrack Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvas Duck

Twine and Marline

Log Lines

Stationary

Sailors Knives

Sail Needles

Pad Locks

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the supply

of Shipping in general.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale

on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong.

Steam Coals

Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron.

Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green aud Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two and three cuts

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons. Carr's well known fancy Biscuits.

Fine table Salt.

Best Stockholm Tar

Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Lead and Log Lines.

Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil.

Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle

Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in 10 pound boxes. Superior Smoked York. shire Hams.

HongKong 11th. April 1842.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi-

nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil-

Dent & Co. at Macao.

Macao 20th April 1812.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

HE A. I. British Brig "John Hor- ton" (336 Tons N. M.Y

To

or to

Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong Holliday, Wise Co. Macao. Macao, 14th April, 1842-

FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice Canvas, Twine-White, Green and Black Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank.

Apply on Board

Hongkong April 18th. 1842.

N

PUBLIC AUCTION.

Of Meturday Tins &Clock at the Godowns

of Messrs Macvicar & Co. 40 and 41 Queens Road. 112 Barrels Hambro Pork 29 Tierces English Beef

for further particulars

Hongkong 3rd May 1842.

Apply to

C. V. GILLESPIE. 46 Queens Road

NOTICE

TENDERS, (written or verbal) for the supply of the following articles for the use of Troops, will be receiv-

ed by the undersigned until noon on the 10th Prox. imo.

Fresh Beef.

Soft Bread.

Vegetables.

Fowls.

Milk.

At Hongkong. Chek Chu, and Shek pi wan.

Particulars may be ascertained at the Office.

JAMES RAMSAY, CAPTAIN.

Depty. Asst. Comry. Genl.

Hongkong.

Commissariat Office

30th April 1842.

Shipping Intellingence.

2222 &= = = =

27

ARRIVED.

Euphrates, Wilson Whampoa. Methuen, Bombay,

Mor.

H. C. S. Hooghly, Ross,

Courier,

Ariel, Primavera,

Austn. Packet,

April 21

11

11

33

Macao,

19

Young Queen,

Jauncey

22

23

Roskell,

Manilla.

31

24

Thistle,

Caldwell, Whampoa.

25

Abts. Reding,

26

Cecilia,

Clay

Crawford, Liverpool Macac

Eleonora,

Jackson,

Fraser.

Roper,

Parker

H. M, S. Herald,

Nias,

28

"Cambrian, 36

Chads,

" Calliope, 28

Eagle,

Concio,

Chunepee. Calcutta. Kuper Pattison, Chusan. Blanco, Manilla

SAILED.

April 23

Euphrates.

39

31

Hy. Yates.

24

Anglona.

26

Cecilia.

27

Ariel.

28

Austn. Pact.

30

Primavera.

21

S. R. Crawford.

11

Liverpool.

2

Mor.

"H. M. S. Cambrian.

Juverna.

11

Thistle.

Wilson- London. Young Queen, Jauncey. Whampoa. Moullin. London. Turner. Macao. Clay. Singapore. Namoo. Fraser, Parker. Sydney. Chetwode. Chusan. Roper. Macao. Robertson, Ord. Amoy. Methuen. Calcutta. Chads. Caldwell. Whampoa.

Chusan. Macao.

4

Sir K. Peel.

Craig.

Manilla.

ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not May less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant

at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on Shore at HongKong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted. Apply to R. M. Whichele, Purser

of H. M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

A

White Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

FOR SALE.

Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society hand. somely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.- Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

29 H. M. S. Royalist.

LATEST DATES.

England,

4 Jany.

U. States, 29 Decr. Calcutta, Bombay, Manilla,

19 March.

15 Feby. 20 April.

Singapore, 1 April. Java, 17 Feby. 10 April. Amoy. Chusan, 28

Passengers per

Eagle, Lieutenants Bartley, Montgomery, Lane Rogers, eight Chinese criminals, and fifty eight invalids.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PAINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG. SUBSCRIPTIONS WILL BE RECEIVED AND SINGLE MESSRS BONTEIN AND SIMMONDS, MACAO,

NUMBERS SOLD BY

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

No. 8. VOL. 1

HONG KONG GAZETTE.

NOTEFICATION.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 12TH. 1842.

NOTICE.

The papers of the deceased Alfred Ri- THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- vers Labtat having been duly examined, zette under the authority of Government, and no will or other document disposing will be discontinued from this date: but all of his effects having been discovered, his public orders and notifications appearing in estate will be administered by Mr Robt: "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- Edwards, who has been appointed by Her zette," with the signatures of duly autho- Majesty's Superintendents of Trade to act rized Functionaries of the Government are on their behalf, and to whom therefore it is still to be considered as official. desired that all claims on the estate may By order, be sent, and all debts owing thereto paid. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

NOTIFICATION. GENERAL ORDERS by His Excellency Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Gough G.C.B. Commandig Expeditionary Land Force.

DATED, Head Quarters, Ningpo, 17th April 1842.

J. Robt. Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Government House. Hongkong 9th May 1842.

OPENING OF PARLIAMENT.

FEB. 4.-Yesterday the Queen proceeded in stat from Buckingham Palace to open the Session of Par The following is her Majesty's most gracious speech:

liament.

1. LIEUTENANT GENERAL Sir Hugh THE QUEEN'S SPEECH. Gough has the gratification to communi- My Lords and Gentlemen. cate to the Force uuder his command, the following letter which his Excellency has out making a public acknowledgment of my gratitude cannot meet you in parliament assembled, with had the honor to receive from the Right to Almighty God, on account of the birth of the Prince, Honorable the Governor General of India, my son, an event which has completed the measure expressive of His Lordships approbation of of my domestic happiness, and has been hailed with the concluding operations of the last cam-demonstrations of affectionate attachment to my person and government, by my faithful and loyal subjects. paign. I am confident that you will participate in the sa- tisfaction which I have derived from the presence in this country of my good brother and ally the King of Prussia ; who at my request undertook in person the office of Sponsor at the christening of the Prince of

SIR,

No. 1866.

To His Excellency Lieutenant General Sir Hugh Gough

G. C. B. Commanding in Chief Expeditionary Military Force. China.

I have the greatest pleasure in ac- knowledging your Excellency's several des- patches noted in the margin, and received yesterday per "Ariel".

arms.

2. AND I avail myself of the first op- portunity of conveying to your Excellency the expression of my most sincere congrat- ulations, and warm admiration of the brilliant successes, which those despatches communicate and of the gallantry and excellent conduct of the officers and men of all arms and ranks on every occasion, by which such successes have been achieved, and such honor resulted to Her Majesty's 3. I have hastened to communicate the despatches now acknowledged to the authorities in England, by the Packet from Calcutta for the Mail, which will leave Bom- bay on the 1st. Proximo, and I am well assured that those authorities will cordially share in the sentiments of high approbation which I have now the satisfaction to record of the courage and conduct of the Troops under your Excellency's command. I have &c. [Signed] "Auckland".

BY ORDER

A. S. H. MOUNTAIN Lieutenant Colonel Deputy Adjutant General Expeditionary Force.

NOTICE.

ANY Persons having Representations to lay before the Land Committee, are hereby requested to send in written, state- ments of their cases without delay, else they will not be taken into consideration. BY ORDER.

Geo: F. Mylius. Land Officer.

Hongkong, Land Office, April 27th, 1842.

Wales-

I receive from all Princes and States the continued assurance of their earnest desire to maintain the most friendly relations with this country.

It is with satisfaction I inform you that I have concluded with the Emperor of Austria, the King of the French, the King of Prussia, and the Emperor of Russia, a treaty for the more effectual suppression of the Slave-trade, which when the ratifications shall have been exchanged, will be communicated to Parliament. There shall also be-aid before you a treaty which I have concluded with the same Powers, together with the Sultan, having for its object the security of the Turkish empire, and the maintenance of the general tranquility.

The restoration of my diplomatic and friendly in. tercourse with the Court of Teheran has been follow. ed by the completion of a commercial treaty with the King of Persia, which I have directed to be laid be-

fore you.

The uniform success which has attended the hos- tile operations directed against that power, and my confidence in the skill and gallantry of my naval and military forces, encourage the hope on my part that our differences with the government of China will be brought to an early termination, and our commercial relations with that country placed on a satisfactory

basis.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons, The Estimates for the year have been prepared, and will be laid before you.

I rely, with entire confidence, on vour disposition, while you enforce the principles of a wise economy, to make that provision for the service of the country which the public exigencies require.

Price 1 monthly Or 812 yearly

I have observed with deep regret the continued distress in the manufacturing districts of the country. The sufferings and privations which have resulted from it have been borne with exemplary patience and for- I feel assured that your deliberations on the various

titude.

important matters which will occupy your attention, will be directed by a comprehensive regard for the in- terests and permanent welfare of all classes of my subjects, and I fervently pray that they may tend in encourage the industry and promote the happiness of their result to improve the national resources, and to my people.'

GEOGRAPHICAL CONFIGURATION OF HONGKONG.

CAPTAIN Grindlay, reviewing in the LONDON Atlas a new publication by Wyld of a Chart of the operations against Canton remarks "There is a curious coin- cidence strikingly remarkable in this map. The island of HongKong-of which we have heard so much, of which we know so little, and of which Mr. Wyld has, in a few lines, taught us a great deal is in form and in the position of the adjacent islands, ridic- ulously like our own sea-girt Island. The stantly. "Frae maidenkirk, to John o'Groats" startling resemblance catches the eye in- hay,

even extending to Ireland the Isle of Man, and the Scilly Islands there you have, in HongKong, a perfect miniature of "right little, tight little island."

HONGKONG MARKET PLACE.

This establishment, which promises much convenience and benefit, will be open- ed to the Public on Monday morning next, the 16th. instant. The whole has been ju- diciously arranged into separate and well constructed departments 1st for all kinds of Meat, 2nd Fruit and Vegetables, 3rd Poul- try 4th Salt Fish, 5th Fresh Fish, 6th Weighing rooms, 7th Money Changers house &c. &c. &c. Its position is central, fronts upon the Queen's Road, and faces also in a long line on the water. The gen- tleman to whose spirited enterprise the town is indebted for this convenience, well deserves and will receive the best thanks of its inhabitants.

CANTON RANSOM.

I am engaged in negociations with several Powers, which I trust by leading to conventions founded on the just principle of mutual advantage, may extend de and commerce of the country. I regret that I am not able to announce to you the the amount receivable by a Captain we are now told re-establishment of peaceful relations with the Govern- that it has been determined, to award as prize money, ment of China. the amount of twelve months batta, not only to those actually employed under the walls of Canton; but to all who have from the beginning of hostilities been in China to the end of last year. We make ont that by this arrangement a Colonel will obtain about £900; a Lieut. Colonel £700, a Major £540; a Captain £220, a Lieutenant £140, an Ensign £100. The officers and men of the fleet and Companys steamers, are to receive corresponding allowances. We see the India Gazette calls this handsome",we-hope our gallant troops may so deem this royal, but we say not regal dona- tion. We counted on a much larger appropriation being made, as a fit and meet reward for the trying and difficult service, to which the China Expeditionary force has been exposed. Actual conflict is the least thing in an English Soldiers life. Residents here well know what the officers and men have unrepiningly borne and suffered.-We are sure we speak the senti ments of our Anglo-Chinese community when we say, they are surprised at this parsimony of the Tories- which is as ill timed as it.is ill judged.-Peels Admi istration has on the whole begun well, and an unpre- judiced person although of the adverse faction, must admit, that with respect to the late Brevet, recent naval and Military Promotions, and Rewards, as also in Civil Appointments; the Tories by the discreet exercise of their power and patronage have won the golden opinions of the people. Hence we the more deeply feel, this departure, from their previous unex- ceptionable policy. In justice to our intelligent and liberal minded merchants we may say truly, they (whose persons endangered and property confiscated, were the cause of the War) would have accorded more to the gallant captors than the present allowance, aye, had the augmentation gone in diminution of their own just dues,

My Lords and Gentlemen,

I recommend to your immediate attention the state of the finances, and of the expenditure of the country You will have seen with regret that, for several years past, the annual income has been inadequate to bear the public charges; and I feel confident, that fully sensible of the evil which must result from a continued deficiency of this nature during peace, you will carefully consider the best means of averting it.

I recommend also to your consideration the state

of the the laws which affect the import of corn, and of

other articles the produce of foreign countries. Measures will be submitted for your consideration for the amendment of the Law of Bankruptcy, and for the improvement of the jurisdiction exercised by the Ecclesiastical Courts in England and Wales.

It will also be desirable that you should consider, with a view to their revision, the laws which regulate the Registration of Electors of members to serve in parliament,

1

30

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CHINA on the news per the London mail which brought dates

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY, 12r. 1842.

In the first and subsequent numbers, of our Print, we called the attention of our Readers, to the necessity, of a change in our currency. We had to announce the week before last by a Proclamation from H. E. the Plenipotentiary, that henceforth "Mex- ican and other Republican dollars shall be taken as, and considered to be, the standard in all Government and mercantile transac- tions at Hongkong and other places in Chi- na in the occupation of her Majesty's forces". In our incipient state more could not at present be done. Of the ultimate adoption of the recommendation in our fourth number we feel sure; the force of cir- cumstances and its practical utility will ne- cessitate its application, or some such equiv- alent plan. Such cordiality as the names of the firms "who on behalf of themselves and others" subscribed the letter addressed to Sir Henry Pottinger, renders it quite a work of supererogation, to say more in favor of the expediency of the Proclamation of the 27th of April. We may however add that the joint signatures to the letter in aid of a common object, we were much rejoiced to see; as we trust it may be accepted as an evidence of the total abandonment of that narrow provincial rivalry and opposition which it is alleged did formerly exist in our commercial community. Seven years since Sir G. B. Robinson wrote to Lord Palmerston expressing "his unfeigned re- gret at the dissensions and violent party spirit that so fearfully prevailed among the mercantile community" and called his at- tention to this dangerous state of society" adding that "the most strenuous efforts and best exertions of the officers of the govern- ment, must be in vain if counteracted by such a strong under-current."

. We now present a short digestof and Commentary recently purchased of the Earl of Sefton) was £47,000. The rapid increase of Popery without a Pope, alias to the 4th Feby. Her Majesty opened Parliament in Puseyism, has at last provoked the Bishops to think of person on the 3d Feby, and her Speech well be found having a Convocation Many defections from the in another part our Columns,-The Christening of the Church of England are reported principally among its Prince of Wales, took place at Windsor on tho 25th priests; many of whom have embraced the faith of the Jany, with great pomp and magnificence.-After the founders of their Colleges and Cathedrals.-The seces- ceremony there was a Chapter of the order of the Gar- sion of the Duke of Buckingham "the farmers friend" ter holden, when the King of Prussia, one of the Spons from the Peel administration, will afford unmitigated ors of the Prince of Wales, was elected and installed, satisfaction to the friends of civil, religious, aud com- A truly royal banquet in St. Georges Hall followed. mercial liberty; who for some time past have perceiv- when Crown plate was displayed, valued at two Mil-ed, that Peel was eagerly desirous, of emancipating lions Sterling.-The King of Prussia remained in himself from the bigots; whose tool in times past he London thirteen days, saw all the sights, was enter consented (for his own purposes) to be. The vacant tained by the Nobility and the Lord Mayor. His vis riband of the Garter,is it is said, to be given to the Lord two accept as an evidence of the cordial feeling sub- of Stowe, as a soothing plaister, or healing salve for his sisting between the two nations, and as an earnest of pride. "So much for Buckingham."-The Government combined action, should the detestahle war mania, of have determined much to their honour to found two France provoke hostilities in Europe. If so, the in-normal schools in Scotland and will devote £10,000 to terests of Civilization demand, that the most condign that object. One is to be at Edinburgh the other at punishment should be inflicted on the aggressor.-It is Glasgow-£1000 per annum will be appropriated in said the Government have determined to establish a aid of their maintenance. The Chartists say as much Steam communication, from the Pacific Coast of South was given to build the Queens new dog kennel. It is America to New Zealand. The Land Company have certain, the same session the whigs proposed the grant offered to aid liberally in carrying this project into effect, of £20,000 for National Education they carried one of and the authorities of Panama, have offered great facili- £70,000 for the erection of the Queens new stables at ties to an English Company, to undertake making a pro- Windsor.-A Scotch episcopal College is about to be per line communication, across the Istl.mns, Colonel built at Perth, large contributions are announced, one Biddle, the brother of the too notorious Nicholas, hav. of £1000 by the Society for the promotion of Christian ing failed in completing his contract in the stipulated knowledge: who we are told would vote a similar sum in time.-Charles Dickens or Boz. author of the Pick- aid of an endowment for the Bishop of Anglo-China wick Papers, has sailed for the United States where should the residents wish to indulge in such a luxury we are sure he will be "pretty considerably lionized." and also offer pecuniary assistance.-Lord Morpeth We have no doubt he will collect abundant materials (who was absent in America) was not elected M. P. for for a Work, which whilst it may amuse, and benefitwill Dublin, but the Tory Candidate by a small majority. not over irritate the morbid sensibility of brother As usual there are complaints of partiality and all the Jonathan.-Sir Fowell Buxtons Niger expedition has disgusting circumstances which disgrace the present completely failed in its objects, and the mortality was exercise of our electoral franchise.-Mr. Thiers on the frightful. Its fate was predicted by all the least con- discussion of the reply to the address of the King of versant with the Coust, and the navigition of the the French, had an opportunity of evincing his ran- party secured the adoption of their plans by the Govern- ers cannot place to any other account than monomania. River. Despite of speeches and pamphlets, the "Saint" corous hatred of England, which we phlegmatic island- ment. It is not the first time in our history, that the worthiest and best intentioned, by their fanatical obsti- Circassians is confined. It is the most signal the nacy, have done immense mischief. --Voltaic electri- Russians have yet received in this, to them, disastrous cety has been applied successfully, as the motive power, war, and which has been most unexpectedly prolonged to a turret Clock, which is placed on the London Po- by the unaided but desperate bravery of the Circassi lytechnic Institution. For some time past, the electric ans. If we must be guilty of the very egregious folly telegraph, has been in action on the Railway lines. of interfering with other peoples affairs, then we hesi The communication of intelligence is almost instan scientific men are endeavouring, to render electricity with Russia, would reflect far more honor on English tate not to say, rescuing a brave population from even- At this very time in all parts of Europe, tual destruction or slavery, by using our influence available as a motive power, to the supercession of diplomacy than our imbecile intervention in Turkey. Steam. We hear, that at Dresden a locomotive en- An absurd policy of Palmerston which we are sorry to gine, has been for some time, impelled on the Railway hear Aberdeen thinks he is compelled to carry out. model engine, on the railway at Ghent. We have seen by this power. It is said to have been applied to a The believers in the regeneration of Turkey, and the millenarians are equally rational. Is it not sadly destruc. it applied to many small models in England. A friend Now that we are strictly for the first writes us from thence, 'assuring us that he has at last sive power, te see both nations really checkmated by a tive of the"prestige of the French and Russian aggres time under the aegis of the British flag we accomplished the grand desideratum, He can give few barbarians, (natives of the Soil) in Algiers and confidently count on the general prevalence the Engine if of 200 horse power, will be contained in he says, his power at one fifth the cost of Steam, and of a kind and truly catholic spirit: pleas- a Space, not larger than that required for a ten horse ing indications of which, become each day Steam Engine. Whilst we are to feasiblity of the more manifest. None can doubt that for at the same time, acknowledge the feasibijity the all "there is ample scope and verge enough". that it will be practically realized. How much civili. theory, and our full conviction (after laborions efforts) The profitable field of industrial enterprise zation will be benefitted; who can tell?--The Rev. and mercantile adventure in China, is sure-enue to the 5th Jany. 1842 has been published. ly far too ample, to congenially nourish Thanks to the most energetic efforts of the new admin. the petty jealousies of a provincial town? istration, and their officers in collection of the Taxes. the result is obtained of an apparent increase on the If ever such unamiabilities did exist, they last year of £506,095,--A handsome piece of Plate happily now are dead, buried, and soon we has been subscribed for, by 399 naval officers, and hope will be forgotten... presented to Commander Somervill for his exertions

Ir is also very gratifying to perceive in our Functionaries, such a proper co-inci- dence of opinion with the mercantile commu- nity and to see both using their utmost exertions to promote the best interests of the British Island of Hongkong. "Esto perpetua" is our fervent wish and prayer.

taneous.

on their

Military Inquiry.

thision of

THE Emperor of Japan accepted the annual presents of the Dutch, and last year for the first time for a long period, in return sent very magnificent presents, of solid gold, enriched with gems. Has our operations much greater value. Among them were Chessmen of against the Chinese, led to this altered treatment of the Dutch ?-The King of Prussia has conferred the order of the Red Eagle, on Captain Walker R. N. Ad. miral of the Turkish navy, and known as Walker Bey. The Registrar general Mr. Farr makes out the aver- By the Tenasserim Steam frigate, which age duration of human life to be in towns in England left Calcutta on the 12th March, we learn 39 years; in the country 55 years. The population she towed the Lord Hungerford, with the formed by the Government Actuary Mr. Finlaison, returns, exhibit the perfect correctness of the tables, late Governor General of India on board, some years since. The predicted increase &c. was vc- into Latitude 7. North-Cast her off on rified by events, as nearly as could be ascertained in the 25th, and arrived at Singapore 2d April, the several cases. So great is the distress among the having touched at Pinang. She left Sin- operatives in London, that several instances have oc- curred, in which the bakers shops have been broken into pore on the 27th ult, and arrived off Macao and robbed by gangs of 40 or 50 men, who have after on the 6th May, having experienced north-wards quietly surrendered themselves to a single police easterly winds and a heavy sea. She pas- man.-The first stone of the new Royal Exchange, sed Ships Lady Flora, Teazer, Defiance, He afterwards dined with the Lord Mayor.- was laid by Prince Albert on the 18th Jany. and City of London Transports with Horse During a cruise of six months lately, as many Artillery and other troops on board. The as 33 Slavers and upwards of 6000 Slaves were cap- Princess Charlotte and Futtay Salaam tured by three of our cruizers on the coast ef Angola. had arrived at Singapore, where also were of the Import of Wool into England in 1841 fully the following Transports bound for China quality was from Australia; about four times the that came from thence Seven years ago.-Mr. Rapireal, Surat Merchant, City of Palaces, Cayley of Trinity was declared first and Mr. Simpson Forth, William Money, Duke of Bedford, of St. Johns Cambridge second Wrangler --R. V. and Maria, Steam Ship. The Iron Steamer Yates Esq. of Liverpool, has imitated the princely mu- Pluto, had arrived from England direct, and nificence of Mr. Strutt, the cotton spinner of Derby, and presented 43 Acres of land to the Corporation of was to leave 5 days after the Tenasserim Liverpool, to be laid out as a park for the recreation for this Port. of the townsfolk. The Cost of the land (which was

THE news of the defeat of the Russians by the

Circassia?

NEUROLOGY.

THE London Mail of Feby, reports the turalist. Dr. Calvert, and John Vaughan, deaths of A. B. Lambert the eminent na- an old English resident of Philadelphia, and the friend of the illustrious Americans of the last century viz, Washington, Frank- lin and Jefferson. Also the demise of the Revd. Henry Mathurin: Dr. Fisher of the Charter House: Walter H. Watts of the "Chronicle

mole of Sir Robert-

Peel, immensely wealthy, and E. Howard the marine novelist author of "Ratlin the Reefer."

THE existence of coal in China, and its being worked by the inhabitants has long been known, and two local. ities of this mineral have come under my notice-one near Canton, and the other in Chinese Tartary.

THE former of these carboniferous deposits is situated to the north-west of Canton, where a chain of hills run- ning east and west separate the province from the low lands of central China.

during the progress of the expedition to the northward, deposits. The locality of the mineral, though not actu- ally visited, was pretty accurately ascertained, being about 39° 10' North, aud longitude 121° 25' East, and is situated within a mile of the sea coast, on the western shore of the Bay of Petcheelee. Some junks were found laden with this coal, of which it is rather difficult to form a a correct opinion from the small quantity apparently chonchoidal, resembling anthracite of supe- brought away: it burns without flame, and has a fracture rior quality. Its price was stated by the people on board the junks to be 160 Cash per pecul of 133 lbs. equiv- alent to about 12s. 6d. per ton. Some specimens of the rocks prevailing on the coast were brought away by the parties who visited this district, and prove that ig neus rocks prevail there also. A slaty rock of the na- ture of shale was said to have been found in the water courses, but unfortunately no specimens were preserved. The mere existence of this rock wonld however imply the occurrence of a regular coal series, in which beds of better quality may be found. From a Sketch of Chusan by Lieutenant Ouchte-lony F. G. S.of the Madras Engi

ONE of the most interesting geological facts elicited was the existence of the second of these carboniferous

neers'.

POLICE

THE FRIEND OF CHINA. AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

AT THE CHIEF MAGISTRATES OFFICE.

MAY 7TH. 1842.

"TUNG Akwei," Chun Acheong, and Kwan Ayan. charged with stealing a boat.

31.

IN our last we gave a narrative of the recent deplorable events in Cabul and from time to forget their mutual hatreds in order the rival septs or tribes consented for the all we gather it appears, the chieftains of the better to effect, the expulsion of their common foe the detested Feringhee. This

Friday 29th-Leong Awing states that he is a fish was sitting in his boat, which was anchored off Wong KwOR Yeng foo, states that yesterday morning, he erman, on the 22nd Inst. he was bound to "Sunhwuy" nei-chung, when ten or fifteen men came along side with a cargo of salt fish, and was attacked by a large and took his clothes, a mace, afterward his boat (having boat off "Sin-lung" and brought into "Hongkong". His previously landed him); he afterwards said the boat an- father and himself were detained on board the pirates chored in another part of the river, procured assistance seems the only rational solution of the mat- boat until yesterday when they released the Son to and had the prisoners apprehended. enable him to procure sonte money, to ransom his boat and father, he immediately gave information to the Po-ers on board a boat belonging to the first witness; present occupation of the Doorannce throne Wo Ahun States that he yesterday saw the prison-ter, in so far as it is reconcileable with the lice and some of the Pirates were taken but the father he knows nothing more. has not been found and he thinks that he has been made by our "friend" Shah Soojah-ool-moolk- away with. THE prisoners took the boat merely to enjoy them. His Majesty, governed as he is by his crea- tures, was we think committed to a junc- tion of interests with the insurgents, by the acts of the most influential, and fanatical of his adherents' and tribe. A due allow- ance for the religious feelings or preju- dices of the Affghans, will also aid much present state of affairs in Cabul. in explaining the apparent enigma, of the

THE fishing boats crew consisted of 14 men, his loss amounts to 300-The pirate boat had a large crew and was well manned and armed, his crew made no resistance.

Police Sergt. Collins states in consequence of infor mation last evening, he, went on board a boat and ap- prehended the prisoners Ko-pe-lok and the others, who were pointed out to me as pirates-on his passage to the shore Ko-pe-lok jumped overboard and was recap- tured after a long swim by Private Cunningham who jumped overboard after him, two men escaped from the pirate boat before, I, could secure them- there were no arms on board the pirate boats, in the maller one, I, found some salt fish and cash.

3

-REMANDED.-

selves, but had no evil intent.

Sentenced to 80 Lashes each.

NAVAL COURT MARTIAL. board H. M. S. Blenheim, to investigate a charge of A naval Court martial was held on Monday last, on drunkenness, which was preferred against Lieutenant Christopher of H. M. S. Herald by his Commander Captain Nias C. B. The Court was composed, of Capt. Cintra reached England, many of the pub- WHEN intelligence of the convention of Chads C. B. Capt. Kuper, Comr Glasse and Comr. lic prints went into mourning; their Co- Reynolds. After a lengthened investigation Lieut. lumns edged with black were truly "en Christopher was honorably acquitted of the Charge. Mr. Purser Dobbins of the Calliope officiated as Judge grand deuil". Ere this the disastrous Advocate. The Court was crowded by officers of the news from Affghanistan will have reached Saturday 30th Re-examined. Fleet; among whom the inquiry excited much interest, England throughout whose length and DEFENDANT, Cheong Alok (wounded in the thigh by and who most unequivocally expressed their satisfac- a matchlock ball) states I belong to a fishing boat tion at the verdict of the Court. We are told the breadth there will have gone forth one uni- owned by "Gno Ayow" about ten days ago we were accused is much esteemed by his brother officers. It is versal cry of hearty, honest indignation. It fishing off "Heongshan" when we were attacked by said the specific charge originated, in Lieut. Christo. will be vain the effort if made to slur over or a pirate boat and myself and three others were wound-pher having fallen down in a fit, on the day in question, burke an inquiry. It will be sternly asked ed. Our crew consists of 16 men-We detained no- and cut his chin. The very conclusive evidence of body on board against his will-the men who accuses the Surgeon of the Ship, Mr. Bankier also satisfied how comes it that this Cabul army is annihi- us came on board to ask for a passage. I can bring no all present, that the charge would not have been pre-lated? An army too, we are told, which proof that I was attacked by Pirates. ferred, had Captain Nias been at the time in good well found in provisions, held an easily de- health. Unfortunately when this occurrence took fen sible post, and as a whole more effective position was confined to this cabin by severe indis. than that, which commanded by a Clive or a

LEI Aye, Lum Atong and Chung Asam who were found on board the small boat near the pirates boat, but

against whom there is no charge, state that they went off to get a debt from Asam, one of the crew of a fish- sing boat, they can bring people to speak to their cha

racters.

PONG Achun states I am a Sailor on board the boat belongeng to Ko-pe-lok, alias (Cheong Alok) when, I, entered his employ, I did not know that he was a pirate, my pay is 1 tael 3 mace a month; On the 17th Inst we attacked a Chin-Chew junk near the Lema Island, but were beaten off, and Seven of our men wounded; Our crew consisted of twentyseven men, and we had two guns, and 30 Catties of pow-

position.

The Arrivals since our last are-the Hero, China

Coote was sufficient to achieve us our noblest victories? Whether it be to ineptitude, imbe- cility, cowardice, or a combination of all 1st April, and the Cownsjee Family, Do 4th Do. three that this catastrophe is owing at, pres- Steamer Maria, Calcutta. 25th March and the Forth ent we know not. The mystery must, how- Do. 30th Do.-the Ruparell, from Bomby the 14th ever, be soon cleared up, and for our nation- Do. and the Pantaloon from Calcutta the 1st inst. al honor's sake we would fain hope some By the Clipper Pantaloon we learn, that Opium was selling at 800 a 810 Rs. Patna and Rs 790 a 795 Bena-ed may yet be given. The best informed more favorable explication than has appear- res, and that no change was expected until accounts arrived from China of the result of shipments made after the first Opium sale. The Pantaloon has about I know of nothing that has occurred since I was 300 Chetls for this Port, and a similar quantity for wounded; Lei Aye, Lun Atong, and Chung Asam China. Pepper is quoted at Rs. 910 a 912 with a joined our vessel six days ago; Ko-pe-lok is the Cap-heavy stock in the marker; Tin 25; Beteluut 24; tain of the boat, I, beleive the Salt fish found on Camphar, 65 a 66; Cassin 16 a 17; China Root 8 a board our boat was stolen from a fisherman's hut; Our 10; Tea, Jnnk, 12 a 22; Hyson, 70 a 75; and Alum guns have been thrown overboard, (this man is bad-38. EXCHANGE on England, 1s. 11d. Freights £2, 10s. ly wounded)

der ;

LEONG Asam states that he was cook on board

Ko-pe-lok's boat, and handed up powder when the Chin-Chew junk was attacked on the 17th Inst. some of the powder blew up and he was wounded, Since which he knows nothing; Heard on his arri- val at Hongkong that a fishing boat had been cap- tured on the 22nd Inst but knows nothing of the mat- ter; Ko-pe-lok was Captain of the boat; he has frequently scan the three sensei Aye, Lum Atong, and Chung Asam with Ko-pe-lok, (this pris- oner who had previously undergone 3 mo: Impt in this Jail for robbery is much burnt.)

THE Complainant states that this morning the wife of Ko-pe-lok went to him and offered to pay him 300 tacls in the name of her husband, if he would intercede for the liberation of the accused.

Inst.

a £2, 158.

A Friend of India of the 24th ultimo has sincebeen handed to us, which we perceive, that General SALE had actualy been attacked with a force of 2,600 horse and foot by ACKBHAR KHAN without any impression however being made on the Garrison. And that a large supply of the munitions of war had reached Peshawur on the 6th March! Singapore Free Press.

TEA EXPORTED

TO THE UNITED KINGDOM FROM 1ST. JULY 1841 TO 30 APRIL 1842.

WANG Asze the wife of Ko-pe-lok corroborates the above, and now repeats the offer Witness believes that BOREA- the complainants father has gone to his country; the Congou fishing boat was captured by her husband on the 22nd Caper Souchong MAY 2nd The Lient. Govr. having taken his seat Sorts. and gone over the evidence, Sentenced "Ko-pe-lok to 3 Hong Muey Years Impt with labour, Pong Achung, and Leong Pekoe Asam to 18 months Impt with labour and Lei Aye. Lum Oe. Pekoe Atong, and Chum Asam to receive 100 Lashes Twankay each. Hyson Hyson Skin Young Hyson Gunpowder Imperial -

KO-PE-LOK to be further Impd until he shall have refunded the sum of 300 being the value of the property stolen from Leong Awang.

MAY 3RD. 1842. "NANG Aye" states that he built sometime ago, two boats, at Lintin, one of which was stolen from him on the night of the 20th. Inst.; Suspecting that it would he brought to Hong Kong, he came here, and found his boat in the possession of the prisoners; he gave information, and the boat was taken by the police. "NANG Asam" corroborates the above. "Sum Atai" the person who sold the boat to ita present owners, de- clares her to have been his property, when he sold-her; he built her at Tung Koon, but can bring no proof of ownership.

SENTD to receive 100 Lashes and to be Impd. 6 mo: with labour; he is to be further detained until he re- fund the money receved for the boat.

TOTAL Black

19

Green Sorts

TEA Exported to the United States

1.816.343

in India say when the punishment is inflic- ted, and securities for future good behaviour given by the Afghans, we shall recross the Indus, content that that River shall in future be, the boundary of our Indian Empire. We think this is and will be the Policy of Lord Ellenborough. Sure we are it is a prudent, mote effect on our relations with India, just and wise Policy. Its present and re- Russia, and Central Asia is well worthy of consideration; our remarks thereon we shall give in a future number.

AMERICA.

The Treasury of the United States was bankrupt owing to the failure of the loan, to which the capitalists would not subscribe to the full amount. The members of Congress could not get their wages, the judges of the court their salaries, nor the fune tionaries their pay. There was, therefore, a dreadful "pressure" on the pockets of legislators and civilians. The deficiency in the Treasury was increasing. Its aniount was 14,000,000 dollars, between two and three millions sterling. A bill was before Con- gress for supplying the deficiency. London Mail.

EAST INDIA INTELLIGENCE.

The overland mail from India via Marseilles reached London. on the 7th January, with advices to the following dates: China, 19th Oct. Singapore, 24th Oct.

19,453,759 129.367 585,628 Calcutta, 21st Nov.

77,340

132.904

$1,102,801

Madras, 22d Oct.

Ceylon, 21st Oct.

Bombay, 1st Dec.

No metallic ores of any description were seen in any 477.757 spot visited by the expedition during the past year 536.698 (1840), nor does the general appearance of the country 2,777,568 to the castward convey an impression of their existence 1,694,224 excepting that iron might perhaps be met with in 271.583 the mountains. The gold and silver produced in Chi- na are obtained, exclusively it would seem, from the wes 1,928.897 tern provinces bordering on Thibet; but upon this 616,286 point no information as to the precise locality of the mines has been obtained, Veins of the metallic ores are how- ever very unlikely to be found among the igneous rocks 22,132,456 of the eastern coast, so far at least as they came under 7.491.309 my observation.. 77,340

during, the same period 127,888 Chests

RAW-SILK exported to the United Kingdom

during the same period-Piculs 760,-

NOTICE TO OUR MACAO SUBSCRIBERS

The Post Office arrangements of the Island be ing now complete onr Friends and Subscribers at Macao will please take note that, in future, the Friend of China will be uniformly sent through the medium of our Post Office to their respective addresscs, and of course will be obtainable. with their letters, from hence, at the office of the Agent

From the Canton and Macao Price Current 3d. May. for, the Superintendents, John Rickett Esq. Macao,

32

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot. Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor- deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu.

tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.--By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp | Soda Water Powders.

and Campbell in hhds. Brown Windsor Soap. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto, in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Very fine small still Scotch

whiskey

.. Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dnblin Stout, in bottles.

Wine Glasses. Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Playing Cards.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay.

Superfine Brown

Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn. and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Brandy Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

Sandoway Imitation Havannah Cigars.

Fancy dry Biscuite, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tins, for Invalids.

Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Tapioca, in tins.

Ditto Sago.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waistcoats. Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves. Guernsey Frocks. Witney Blankets. Superfine Blue Cloth. Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes,

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovies.

Lucea Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor

Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers,

ded, in kegs each containing Jams and Jelles.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel.

Humps and 6 Tongues, Lead Lines, Europe. Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting. Fish hooks. Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Earope Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks. And various other Aricles too numerous to detail.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The undersigned having entered into partnership on the 1st Jan. 1842, under Ship Chandlery, Auctioneering and Com- the firm of P. Townsend & Co. in the mission business at Hongkong, would be pleased to fulfil any orders in their line, and hope, by attention, to give satisfaction to any who may be pleased to favour them with business.

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

1

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale

at their Godowns, Hongkong.

.

The following Goods, viz Chain Cables Anchors. of Sizes

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases

· Claret

Sauterne

"

Vinegar in Bottles

Port in Casks and Bottles Half Leaguers Java Arrack Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvas Duck

Twine and Marline

Log Lines

Stationary

Sailors Knives

Sail Needles

Pad Locks

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the supply

of Shipping in general.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale

on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Steam Coals Best Stockholm Tar Pig Lead Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two and three Cu

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Carr's well known fancy Biscuits.

Fine table Salt.

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil.

Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown mustard ill Jars.

Brick and Tryckle

Wiltshire Cheeses

packed in lead and

stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in

10 pound boxes.

Superior Smoked York. shire Hams.

HongKong 11th. April 1812.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi- nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil- ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on Shore at Hong Kong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted. Apply to R. M. Whichelo, Purser

of H. .M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

FOR SALE.

Madeira Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks from the well known House of Kiers & Co. Apply to Dent & Co. at Macao. Macao 20th April 1812.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

HE A. I. British Brig "John Hor-

Tron (336 Tons N. M.)

Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong, Holliday, Wise Co. Macao.

Macao, 14th April, 1842

or to

FOR SALE.

Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Canvas, Twine-White, Green and Black Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank.

Apply on Board

Hongkong April 13th. 1842.

FOR SALE.

A

T the office of the. "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society hand. somely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.- Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

11

7

PUBLIC AUCTION.

On Saturday the 11th inst will be Sold

at Public Auction by

C. MARKWICK

Sundry Household effects, Wines, Beer, Wearing appar el. &c. &c. &c. The effects of the late A Labtat. Terms Cash c. 7. 1. 7.

The lands belonging to the estate of the said Labtat will be put up for sale at a fu- ture time of which due notice will the giv-

en.

Hongkong 11th May 1842.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

TO be sold by Acow, Chinese Comprador, on Saturday next the 14th of May 1842 at noon.-

Two Pirate Boats,

With masts, sails, anchors and cables complete-the larger ves. sel measures in length 63 feet: breadth at the broadest part 20 feet-is perfectly sound, and well worthy the attention of any one requring a boat of her Class,

Terms Cash, Boats to be resold if payment be not made within three days after the day of Sale,-

PE

H. PEDDER.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

EDRO MARCAL will sell by Auction to the high test Bidder on Monday the 16th Instant at 11 o Clock A. M. At the Factory of P. F. J. de Fritas in the inner Harbour of Macao.-

A large size Chain Cable of about 5,50 Inches.-

A do. Anchor-of abt. 50 Cwt.

4 Spars, measuring 71-64-65-and 60-feet long.

6 Coils of Europe Shrouds laid Hawser-measuring 8,50-8-7,50 and 6,50 Inches.-

Macao 7th May 1842.-

Shipping Intelligence.

11

ARRIVED.

May 6th H. M. S. Druid, Capt. Smith C. B. Amoy H. C. Str. Tenasserim, Capt Wall I. N. Singapore. Macao.

May

RI. Exchange, Rees,

9th Lousia, Forgace,

33

Thistle, Caldwell,

31

Martha, Donaldson,

SAILED.

Courier.

Prima donua.

56270

Abbots Reading,

7 John Horton,

8 Anua,

"

Arrow,

"

H. M. S. Calliope Eagle,

10 Royal Exchange,

31

Consuelo.

Koskell, Kelle Crauford Cunningham Bowrar

Geare,

31

Calcutta

Macao.

91

Chusan. Kuper Amoy. Patterson Calcutta. Rees. East. Coast. Blanco

"H. C. Str. Tenasserim Wall

11 H. M. S. Herald Nins

Macao.

Chusan. Macao.

England,

29 Decr.

30 March.

LATEST DATES. 4 Feby. Singapore, 27 April. U. States, Java, 17 Feby. Calcutta, Amoy. 1 May. Bombay, 25 Feby. Chusan, 28 April. Manilla, 20 April.

Passenger per Tenasserim, Captain Mylius for Chusan.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

N°. 9. VOL. 1

LONGBONG

NOTEELCATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY 19TH. 1842.

FRIGATE CONSTELLATION. THE late occurrence between a boat of the Constel- THE publication of the Hongkong Ga-lation and a Chinese fort, is thus noticed in a recent private letter from a friend in Canton. zette under the authority of Government, "Perhaps you may get some exaggerated stories at will be discontinued from this date: but all Hongkong about the Fort in Junk River having fi public orders and notifications appearing in red upon the US. Frigate's boat on the 3rd instant "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- surveying, and when nearing the Fort, 2 or 3 shot were The facts are simply 'thse-the boat was sounding and zette," with the signatures of duly autho- fired, whereupon the boat returned quietly to the Fri- rized Functionaries of the Government are gate. When the fact was reported to the Governor, still to be considered as official, H. E- expessed much regret, and sent special orders to the Commander of the Fort not to repeat such an aet By order, and furthermore H. E. is to make a satisfactory expla- nation to the Commodore. Where the Chinese were wrong was in firing shot. It would have been all in order to have given notice to the boat by to leave firing blank cartridges."

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

THE appointments of Land Officer, Surveyor, and Acting Colonial Surgeon at Hongkong, are, under Instruction from Her Majesty's Government, to cease from the

31st of the current month.

THE arrangements to be continued for the discharge of the duties hitherto per- formed by the Land Officer will be notified in due time.

By order,

Chas. E. Stewart, Assistant Secretary and Treasurer. Government House.

Hongkong, 17th May, 1812.

PUBLIC NOTICE. THE Sale of two Boats (ordered to be confiscated and sold as having been pirat- ically employed) of which notice has been given that it would take place on Saturday the 14th Inst. is deferred till Saturday the 21th Inst.

BY ORDER WILLIAM PEDDER Harbor Master. Harbor Master's Office Hongkong 12th May 1842.

FROM THE PERING GAZETTE.

DEFENCES OF SHANTUNG PROVINCE,

To Kwan foo (Lieut Governor of Shan tung Province) kneeling memorializes and beseeches the sacred glance. It is palpably evident that encamp- ments and military stations on the sea-board for the keeping out of the English barbarians, the selection of ablebodied recruits, and the disciplining of the Troops are now matters of magnest import, And still more is it decidedly necessary for the general officers (up to the highest of them) to be on their guard, that they may be able to take charge of the men, be always ready thoroughly to explain milita- ry tactics, and being in a state of preparedness and having their plans laid, victory may be definite and certain. When I your Minister, was in the de- partment of Tong chow, every encampment upon the sea board was under the most careful inspection of the general officers. The Commandant of Wan tăng has under his charge the military station of King shing, which, as it borders on the eastern offings (of Shantung Province) is a station of the very first importance. Having, in person, seen the sea entrances put into a state of defence; the said Commandant aided by an Adjutant General re- moved the troops to King shing-his original en- campment in Wan tăng being also near the sea- port. It was difficult for the said high officer to govern both stations; but he held his subordinates responsible for drilling the troops and keeping up preventive guard on the coasts. I now, how- ever, memorialize his Imperial Majesty that the high Officer Low she, may be transferred to the sea board fortifications, and that the high off- cer Le chang kang, be ordered to the interior de- fences, as both of these officers are best qual ified by long experience for these said stations, Then will errors be avoided in the arrange- ments, and every territory of Shantung be proper ly guarded.

And I your, Minister, herewith present this me- morial praying that the Imperial will may be re-

corded,

THE CANTON RANSOM,

(from the Friend of India.) FORT William 2d March No. 54 of 1842-The Right Hon'ble the Governor General of India in Coun mation of the Army, the following paragraphs, which cil has great gratification in publishing for the infor, they have been informed by the Secretary to the Honor- able the Court of Directors, will form the next Military letter to the Governor General of India in Council.

ing you that as a mark of the high sense which Her Para, 1. We take the earliest opportunity of appriz. Majesty entertains of the gallant behaviour and succss- ful exertions of the officers and men of Her Majesty's and of our Service employed in the late operations in China, the Queen has been graciously pleased to direct that a grant be made to them of a portion of the sum of money received from the Chinese Authorities at Canton under the Convention concluded by Captain Elliot.

21.-'We now enclose a copy of a Minute by the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's Treasury, di- recting that Her Majesty's Grant shall consist of the following Allowances; viz.

1st-The Officers and Men employed in the opera tions against Canton in 1811 (eighteen hundred and forty one) twelve mouths full Batta. 2d-To the Officers and Men not entitled to share under preceding paragraph who were employed in the opera. tions on the Coast of China from the comencement of hostilities to and of the month of June 1841 (eighteen hundred and forty, or in one only of those operations, six months full Batta.

Price 81 monthly Or $12 yearly

the engines, of 400.horse power, were constructed. by Messrs Maudslay, Sons, and Field, with copper boilers and change water apparatus, which keeps the salt wa ter below a certain point, and by that means prevents any deposit taking place, so that a vessel might proceed on a voyage to India withont inscrustation to the extent of the thickness of a sixpenny piece. The cylinders tion of fuel can be admirably regulated to suit any are double.on the expansion principle, and the consump circumstance of slow or quick sailing; she has also disconnecting gear to work one wheel without the other if found necessary.

Whilehall, Feb. 14th -THE Queen has been pleased to direct letters patent to be passed under the Great Seal, granting the dignity of a Knight of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland unto Jamsetjen Jeajeobhoy, of Bombay, in the East Indies, Esq.

GENERAL HOME INTELLIGENCE. UPWARDS of sixty firms in Manchester, who trace the distress of the cotton trade to the high price of pro- visons, trace that to the sliding scale, and recommend an early struggle for a fixed duty. Their proofs aro certainly demonstrative.

IRELAND.

THE Lord Mayor of Dublin says that the last ticket (for a teetotaller) he saw signed by Father Mathew was marked FIVE MILLIONS, TWO THOUSAND, SEVEN HUNDRED AND Two. At least 10,000 more have taken the pledge since,

SHIPS LOADING AT LONDON. Elizabeth, for Madras and China. Raymond, and Judith Allan, for Hongkong. Pink. for Singapore and China. Anna Maria for Ching.

THE FOREIGN OFFICE.-The personnel of the For- eign Department under Lord Aberdeen, including the new appointments made by the resignation of Mr. Un- der-Secretary Backhouse. is as follows:

U. Addington Precis Writer, W. B. Stolpford, Esq, UNDER Secretaries, Viscount Canning and Mr. II, Private Secretary to Lord Aberdeen, C. G. Dawkins Esq.; Collector and Transmitter of State Papers, Arch- deacon Goddard. In consequence of the press of busi al-attached to that departiment The Hon. S. Ponsonby, ness relating to the slave trade, four clerks have been son of Viscount Duncannon, and the Hon. C. Spring Rice, son of Lord Monteagle, are to retain their ap. pointments as junior clerks

deduction will necessarily be made from this lowance in either case of any sum which may have been already given as gratuity to any portion of the Force employed.

It is further the pleasure of Her Majesty that the Officers. Petty Officers, Seamen and Marines of Her Majesty's, Fleet should receive the same allowances of full Batta as are accorded to the corresponding ranks in the Land Forces employed, and further, that officers and Men of the East India Company's Steam- ers should receive the allowance as Officers and Men of Her Majesty's Ships.' 3d-You will take the necessary measures for car. rying these instructions into effect.' 69 of 1842.

J. STUART, Lieut. Col. Seny. to the Govt. of India, Mily. Dept.

BROM THE LONDON MAIL 4 MARCH.

THE Bombay Mail ef January 1st, ria Marseilles, arrived in London on February 8th, with dates from Calcutta, December 22nd; Madras, December 23d; China. November 14th.

INDIAN HOME INTELLIGENCE. THE late firm of Magniac, Smith & Co., having admitted W. Jardine, Esq., M. P., late of China the firm is now Magniac. Jardine & Co.

SOME Nutmegs of very superior quality, grown at Singapore by Dr Montgomery, have reached England, and been reported fully eqnal to any yet imported. We believe that these nutmegs will entitle Dr Montgomery to the premiun offered by the Royal Society.

THE value of the rich island of Java to the revenue of Holland may be gathered from the fact, that only eight years' labour (1833 to 1841) has brought its pro duce of coffee from 12 million kilogrammes annually to 55 millions; its sugar from 7 millions to 50 millions; and its indigo, from scarcely anything at all, to up. wards of 800,000 kilogrammes.

THE EAST INDIAN COMPANY'S STEAM FRIGATE MEMNON."-On the 22nd this splendid vessel, of 1.100 tons burden, mounting two 64-pounders, and four 32-pounder guns, and having them and all her shot on board, with about 300 tons of coals, and a heavy cargo sufficient to test her capabilities for a long voyage, was loosened from her moorings at Blackwall, and proceeded down the river in excellent style, for the purpose of ascertaining the efficiency of her engines and sailing qualities. The Memnon was built by Mr-Fletcher, and

THE King of the French has conferred two gold medals on Captains Sharpe and Ward, masters of the Clifford and Mysore, merchant vessels, in testimony of the services rendered by them to the French frigate Magicienne, wreaked in the China Seas in November,

1840.

Ir is rumoured that it is the intention of Govern. ment to impose a property tax, propably of 3 per cent. It is undoubtedly Sir Robert Peel's intention to make some material inproven being West India interest are already suspecting him.

THE Edinburgh and Glasgow railway was opened throughout on the 13th.

A new species of rice, requiring neither a damp soil nor constant frigation, has just been introduced from Mongolia into France.

A true bill has been found by the Grand Jury at the Central Criminal Court, against Lord Ashburton, Mr Francis Baring, and Mr Humphrey Mildmay, for a conspiracy to bribe certain legislators of Mexico to pass a measure preventing foreigners from holding land in the state, in order to deprive one Thomas Kinder of certain advantages in a contract which bad been con. cluded with the defendants. The Recorder ezpressed an opinion that the Court had no jurisdiction in the case. A writ of certiorari has been issued, at the ins tance of Lord Ashburton, to remove the case to the Court of Queen's Bench.

NAVAL INTELLIGENCE. THE Vindictive has been repaired with extraordinary dispatch, and is now at Spithead, ready to proceed to China with Rear adınl. Sir T. Cochrane.

THE Harlequin, 19, left Madeira for China on the 29th, and the North Star, 28, on the 30th December. THE Wolverine, 16, Com. Johnson, has sailed for China with numerous supernumeraries for the fleet. She is to be followed immediately by the Minden, 74, Capt. M'Quin; the Carysfort, 26, Lord G. Paulett, the Ringdove, :6, Com. Sir W. Daniel, and the Driver steamer. Com, T. F. Harmer.

THE Implacable, 74, having been found defective, the Agincourt, 72, has heen commissioned by Capt H. W. Bruce, for service in China." Lon. Mail,

31

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TEIENL OF CHINA of Runjeet Singh. Surely Mr. Clerk can

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY, 19. 1842.

In our last we gave a digest of and com- mentary on the news brought by the Overland Feby. mail. The arrival of the Auckland Steamer at our port from Bom- bay enables us to give intelligence from London to the 4th March, from Bombay to the 14th and Singapore to the 29th April The Corn Law question absorbed almost entirely the public attention at home. Its importance on the future destinies of our Empire cannot be exaggerated. Sir Ro- bert Peel may pass his present bili into a law, but it will be wholly inoperative, as a means of contentment for the people, or a settlement of the Question. Sir Robert before he was in office was pleased to liken himself to a physician; the pompous an- nouncements in the Queen's Speech and the poverty of his performances, constrains us to believe he his after all but a homœopathic professor and will attempt curing the chro- nic, maladies, of the people, by administer- ing infinitesimally small doses of political improvement. In so doing he will miserably fail-although a conqueror in the House of Commons, he dare not adopt the language of Victory already he has been constrain- ed to admit that further relaxations of the Provision Laws will take place. Our rea- ders may expect the next accounts from England will record a continuance and augmentation of the Corn Law agitation.

WE extract from the Eastern Star an intimation of the intended departure of the new Governor General, on a progress through the provinces. It is believed he is desirous of being nearer the seat of war; the better to direct the "retribution" to be exacted from the "treacherous Afghans." We deplore this necessity (if it be deemed such,) and are sorry Lord Ellenborough should think himself compelled to carry out a wretched policy, which originally, he so energetically denounced. We nauseate the talk of vengeance, retribution, condign punishment, base aud treacherous Affghans &c. &e. Putting aside the conduct of our friend the puppet Shah Soojah the Aff- ghans as a people have only adopted the policy which was pursued by the Spaniards towards the French, during the peninsular war which by us was designated" most magnanimous, "devotedly patriotic and "touchingly heroic"! !Frightful has been the

кетсекса,

sufficiently prove to the satisfaction of Lord Ellenborough the connivance of Shere Singh with the Afghan outbreak? He is a poor Political and will disgrace his Indian teach- ing, if he cannot accomplish this trifle. At the Board of Control it was some time since said Mr. Clerk would earn a Peerage. The time has now arrived when he may plant a coronet on his brow, save the effusion of blood; the waste of treasure, and at the same time heal the wounded honor of his country. Never will he again have, so auspi- cious an opportunity of accomplishing this brilliant destiny.

Sir T. Cochrane, appointed the new naval comman. der-in-chief in the East Indios; is to hoist his flag in the Hastings. 74. Captain W. H. Bruce. Sir Thomas was to have sailed immediately in the Vindictive. 50, Captain S. T. Nicholas, but this vessel having got on shore on Dean Bank during the late hurricane making up to Spithead will proceed to China with the Implacable 74, recently returned from the Mediteranean. The Wol- verine. 16. Commander Johnson, is to sail in a few days to China.

doubt, imitate his example. Sure we are, in so doing, they will act wisely.

Ox dit. General Burrel C. B. is to be appoin- ted Governor of our Island. We believe this re- port has obtained currency by letters having been received, which were so addressed by the Home Authorities. It is obvious that at present the occu- pation of HongKong is also viewed in England, as a part of the naval and military operations now directed against the Chinese Empire. The impor- tant commercial advantages which would accrue stood, and will not be lost sight of. If the Port from its permanent possession are well under, of Canton had, been blockaded, if all our efforts had been singly applied to the rigorous prosecution of the War, (as has been our wont when bellig- erent in previous times) the whole world would now fully appreciate the value of HongKong, as a mercantile and also as military Position. We sayit is one of the very first order.

WITHOUT affecting in this instance to be offici- ally informed, or at all knowing the intentions of Government, we yet should not be surprised at the appointment of a Commandant of the Island, or Military Governor. A position which of course could only be filled by the Senior Officer on the Station. Looking to what has occurred, good rea- THE above extract has led several of our friends sons may perhaps be adduced, why such an ap- to imagine, that the Supercession of Admiral Par-pointment should be made; when II. E. the Ple- ker, was consequent on the change of Ministry at nipotentiary leaves for the North. We speak the home. This is not the fact, Sir Thomas Cochranes sentiments of those most interested in the prospe- appointment is in strict conformity with official eti-rity of Hong Kong, when we say, during such ab- quette and naval precedent. Our naval station al- sence, they confidently rely on all matters relating though it is the scene of hostilities (the effect of to the Civil Government of the Island being refer- which, on the destinies of a large portion of the hu- red, as heretofore, to the Deputy Superintendent man race, none dare yet prognosticate) is still held of British Trade: to whose unremitting exertions to be as heretofore a Rear, not a Vice Admiral's and earnest devotedness the present prosperity of Station. Hence the promotion of Admiral Parker our Colony is main ly owing. In our existing halcyon state, we must not forget to whom such a according to usage vacates his present command. WE certainly counted on the interests of the gratifying condition is largely referrible. Certain service and our national honor overriding such "red we are our early Settlers will never forget the obli- tape" policy. We did think the Tories would gations they are under to the Deputy Superinten- waive, and properly so, this rule in deference to the dent and the Chief Magistrate when the success of exigences of the service, this Island was very dubious.

A perfect fatuity seems destined to preside over our relations with China. Here we have a gallant officer of great experience, perfect habits of busi ness, and having now learned enaugh of the very peculiar porple he is in contact to guarantee the hearty cooperation (not only of his own) but the truly united services. Thus on the threshold of victory he is superseded by a novus homo who, not obtaining a seat in the Admiralty, as he expected, has yet sufficient influence to obtain his present ap- pointment. Sir Thomas Cochrane is held to be man, of considerable sagacity, and we have no doubt will benefit much by fully carrying out his predecessors, plans. It was at the urgent request of influential friends that Admiral Parker consented in the first instance to take the Command of this Station.

a

Since the foregoing was setup we have been appris. ed (in consideration of our position as belligerents) Sir Thomas Cochrane has very wisely been appointed second in command to Admiral Parker.

In our number Seven, we had only time to draw the attention of our Readers to the Magistrates Warrants, therein officially published. It is certain that much patient inquiry and investigation, must have taken place, previously to their announce- ment; and we have no doubt due consideration has been given to the peculiar circumstances of our Colony. We would however venture to suggest cases of breach of Contract, (which are perpe- tually occurring) should be remitted to the magis- trate, as is done in claims for debts. That mani- of this recommendation, the slightest knowledge of fold advantages would accrue, from the adoption the daily increasing inconveniences, resulting from the want of such a provision, too plainly shows.

Persons ignorant of the local requirements of the Port, and the necessity of having power to repress the drinken disorderliness and insubordination of the mixed crews which

will not

once recognise the absolute need of investing the Magistrates with power, to inflict Corporal punish- ment. The oldest residents and best informed men in China we have yet seen; unanimously a- gree in the propriety of the magistrates possessing authority so to punish offences, Holding it in ter- rorem will they say, oft prevent the need of its inflic- aversion, in all and every case, to the infliction on still deemed necessary for the maintenance of disci- adults of corporal punishment, yet it is in practice pline in our navy and army to apply the lash occa- sionally. Hence authorising the use of the lash on offenders against Police Law may be palliated, and on this ground, perhaps justified, We certainly wish such punishment could be summarily inflicted by our magistrates on Soldiers and Sailors for civil offences, that is, if such a punishment be in any case allowed. The non-possession of such a power, has in many instances, given impunity to offenders, and occasioned much discontent among the aggrie We shall not adopt a captious spirit of cri- ved, sed than ourselves, have already determined that ticism being fully aware that persons better advi- such Warrants, and their provisions, are most. ur- gently required by the Colony. Whilst however we regret the necessity for their promulgation, and adoption of a mode of punishment in practice all but repudiated in England, we at the same time feel assured that the powers given (whilst in the kec- and beneficially executed. No apprehension need a- ping of our present magistrates) will be discreetly rise that such powers will be abused, From the past, we may judge of the future, and hence we have a right to speak thus confidently.

HONGKONG MARKET PLACE. THIS Convenient building so much re- waste of treasure and blood during this un-quired was opened on Monday last. We just war. The progress of India has been were much pleased with the Show made on the misery or its Wretched authe cecusion hereront of bedonor ouseresitate hot-to-do our itants much increased, and according to lers which thronged its spacious area the late Sir Alexander Burnes, the interests afforded a convincing proof of the necessity of Russia largely benefitted. We do hope for its erection. The exhibition of Fruit Lord Ellenborough will leave the Afghans and Vegetables was large and its effect to themselves, the slightest knowledge of was very pleasing. The singular variety their national character and intestine feuds of fish exposed, would afford many subjects will convince him that this would be an of interest to the ichthyologist. From an adequate punishment. As to the verbiage attentive inspection of the plan and propo- about the honor of our arms requiring an- sed arrangements, we are led to believe the other expedition, it is arrant fudge. No successful opening of the market may modest woman brags of her chastity. In be looked upon, as conclusive evidence of India the time is long gone by, when such the ability of the projector, to render it a boastful demonstration of British Valour every way adequate to meet the pressing could be needed or required. Ifwe must requirements of our daily increasing, popu- exhibit the appearance of augmented pow-lation. er we would venture to suggest instead of expending some £15,000,000 in pun- ishing the Afghans (all of which amount will be sheer waste, as we shall abandon the country, or incur a loss of at least one million sterling per annum. by its occupa- tion,) that one half would suffice to add the rich and fertile Punjaub to our dominions, thus completing our acquisitions by making the Indus the geographical (as it is the natural) boundary of our Anglo Indian Empire. An addition by the way which sooner or later must take place, and which we deemed inevitable on the death

THE friends of the Island will rejoice to know, that a gentlemen, who was the most determined opponent of the Colony in the early stages of its existence, has made an overt avowal of his change of opinion by in- vesting his Capital in buildings on the is land. From the site selected we know enough to say he will never have occasion to regret his present speculation. Many parties who were mainly influenced in their hostility to the Island, by the known pro- fessional ability and standing of the gentle- man referred to, will now, we make no

There are other parts of the Warrants which ra- ther grate against one's English feelings (or English them out, appreciating quite our present provisional prejudices as perhaps they are). we do not point state; for which all due allowance will be made by every well wisher of the future Capital of Anglo- China.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

33

us, already cast some pretty pieces of brass cannon: but our of war should recollect that the art of war ennsists no more m fabricating weapons, than the art of writing consiste in neking pens or manufacturing paper. In truth, if the Chinese, a fare, should attempt an imitation of ours, they will only, accor very probable event,-abandoneng their own rude modes of war. Is-ding to our repeated experience of Asiatic nations, become the more easy victims. It will give them a temporary and a false confidence. They will meet us in greater numbers, and on a fairer field, and such being the case, the sure consequence will be, that a greater number will be shot and the contest be the earlier decided.

COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE, THE Government Notification with respect to the By letters dated London the 4th March, we find indicate that the attention of the Home Government Land officer, Acting Colonial Surgeon. and Surveyor. the aspect of Commercial affairs is still very gloomy. has been thus early directed to our local arrangements. The recent failures in the East India Trade, have We hope we may add, with a view to the definitive given rise to many sinister reports, affecting the appointment of permanent establishments on our stability of other firms engaged in the same trade. land. We would hope the worst is past; but it is appre hended in well informed circles, that the heavy FROM a correspondent in London we learn on losses which it is almost certain, will accrue on March the 4th it was generally believed at Court. East India and China produce, now in transit, may that again, her Majesty was as ladies wish to be lead to further disasters. It is expected the Im- who love their lords". porters of Indigo, Bengal Silk, Tea and other staple products will be heavy sufferers more especially seeing that these returns, were in most cases, made land is forthwith to be garrisoned by a de- Ir is said that the Fort an Kellett's Is- for British, Manufactures which had realized rui-tachment of forty men under the command

nously low rates, both in India and China,

In the burial ground, which is immediately upon the Queen's Road in that part of the town fronting upon Howwan Bay there has recently been erect- ed a chaste granite Monument to the memory of a brave British officer who fell in action. A copy of the inscription which we give below was handed to us by one of his companions in arms,

SACRED

On the 4th of March the Tea Market was a of Lieut. Rogers. shade Better Bohea 1s, 7d.-Company's Congou 1s. 10d.--Pouchong 1s. 7d. to 1s. 10d.-Souchong 1s. 10d. to 2s. for ordinary to good ordinary.-Flow- ory Pekoe 33. to 3s. 8d.-Caper 1s, 10 d. Orange Pekoe 25. 3d. to 3s.-Twankay good or- dinary 1s. 10d.-Hyson Skin, ditto Is. 9d. IIyson, ditto, 2s. 3d. to 2s. 5d.-Imperal 2s. to 3s.-Gun- powder 2s. 3d. to 4s. 10d.-The arrivals during the, Month were, the Beulah, Simon Taylor, Asia and Bussorah Marchant, It is thought when the News of the heavy Exports from hence, arrives in England, the prices of Teas will importantly suc- cumb. The expected arrivals from Amoy and the Northern Ports will however, not for some time be realized 1841. Deliveries to 28 Feby 5,411,906 Exported 270,000 3,285,343 30,301,539

Imports Stock

39

21

33

39

39

1842

5,572,176 280,000 5,870,884 30,164,020

Silk is firm and the scanty Imports will cause Chi na raws to maintain disproportionately high rates; fair supplies from hence would bring them to their proper level. The last Sales were a Run of Good Tsatlee ex Beulah at 21||-and one of fair to good Cargo, Sortat 19||6. Unless at low-rates this article will never again assume its for- mer prominent position in the London Market. The importers of Coffee, Foreign grown Sugar, and Cinnamon have memorialised the Government for a reduction of Duties in the promised revisal of our Tariff. We do not hear of any movement with respect to our Staple article Tea, which we repeat, is burdened with an Impost, the amount of which, besides the mode of its assessment, is so wholly irreconcileable with sound policy and poli- tical justice, that it only requires to be urged in the proper quarters to obtain an amended scale of Du- ties, At present, the poor man's tea pays a duty of nearly 150 per Cent, whilst that of the rich man only amounts to about 50 to 75 per Cent on the first Cost: Many parties of high standing (who have given this matter much consideration) venture to affirm the consumption of Tea might be donbled in the United Kingdom, within the next six years if a fair ad valorem duty were imposed thercon. Money 'was easy, it was advanced by the Bank of England at 4 p, Ct,, which was the current rate of Discount for undoubted paper, The general want of confidence prevented investments and with Capitalists money was said to be very abun- dunt, In the manufacturing districts, glimpses of improvement were visible, and had Peel's amend- ment of the Corn Laws been accordant with the just rights of the suffering many, we are assured the impoved tone and feeling engendered thereby, would have been almost magical: so strong is the disposition to hope for the best, among our Coun- trymen,

POLICE

AT THE CHIEF MAGISTRATES OFFICE. MAY 11th 1842. Mr. W. Burd claims one spar, in the possession of Shun-lin, a carpenter.

TO THE MEMORY OF

Lieut. Benjamin Fox R. N. AGED 29 YEARS Late 1st, Lieutenant

OF

H. M. 8. Nimrod Who was killed on the heights

OP

CANTON During the attack of that City 24th MAY 1842. (on the reverse.) This monument

was erected BY

his late Captain Messmates and friends AS A TESTIMONY

OP

Their regard and esteem

CHINESE AFFAIRS. Tur news from China, which appeared in our last publication, was of a far brighter complexion than that from India; and in this quarter every hope may be entertained of a prosperous, al. though perhaps not of a speedy, issue to our quarrel. By the last account, we were in possession of four important points on the coast of China-the great island-studded estuary of Canton, close on the black-tea districts, and commanding the intercourse the long-established seat of our trade; the fine harbour of Amoy, between Formosa and the mainland; the principal island of the Chusan group; and the castle and town of Chin-hae, with the great city of Ningpo, close to a green-tes district, to a country southern entrance of the great canal which conveys the taxes, ab unding in silk, and at a convenient distance for atack to the contributions, and tea from the rich provinces of the south to the populous but sterile districts of the metropolis.

Chinese, what we want, and we want nothing else, is a peaceful When it is decided, what remains to be done? With the and unshackled commercial intercourse. This will be best se cured by refraining from every step that can disturb the internal tranquility of the empire, or to set an empire of 370 millions positions, close on the coast of the most commercial and popu into confusion, which would not be difficult, would not tend to the extension of our commerce. Certain insular or peninsular lous provinces, and having good harbours, should in occupied

as emporia, free to the commerce of all nations. They ought to be of small extent, so as to be easily and cheaply garrisoned, Such is the thirst of the Chinese for commerce, and their skill in spite even of their own Government, which in its feebleness and activity in conducting it, and evading fiscal traminels, that would have little power to hinder them, the emporia in queerin would soon become places of great commercial resort. The 35th deree of latitude, contain, to say nothing of those connected six maritime provinces of China, extending from the 20th to the with them by navigable rivers, canals, or tolerable highway, the enorm us population of 140 millions, the most industrious of the whole empire. These are, in fact, the countries which produce all the tea, all the raw and wrought silk, and most of the minor productions exported by Europeans, and, moreover, that consume m st of our metals, woolens, calicoes, and Indian produce.

It rests with those who have local and recent experience to de. cide on the actual positions; and we presume that when for selection can be made from a line of more than 1.200 mil hes coast,mere studded with islands, and more abounding in geod harbour and navigable rivers, than any other in that part of the world of the same extent, there can be no great difficulty in making a choice, One position within the estuary of Canton, where the people have been long accustomed to the European trade, and where much capital and much experience are accu mulated, is indispensable, In the next province, Fukien, which produces most of the black tea, and all of it that is good, with a great deal of fine sugar, and of which the inhabitants are already distinguished for their skill and enterprise in foreign trade, we are in possession of the fine harbour of Amoy, with its conve. nient island; and this, therefore, may be suggested as a very convenient locality for an enporium. The next province, Che kiang, is one of the most industrious and commercial of the em pire, produces green tea and raw silks, and in it commences the great canal which leads to the capital, while it is besides the seat of the Chinese commerce with Japan. Here we are in oc- qupation of the island of Chusan, of too extensive an area, how. ever, for a secure and economial permanent possession; but the fortress of Chin-hae, at the mouth of the Ningpo river, situa ted on a promontory, and 250 feet above the level of the sea. will probably answer every purpose. The two next provinces are the richest of the empire, and contain between them abova seventy millions of inhabitants. They produce most of our green tea, a great deal of raw silk, the great canal runs through them, and they contain, moreover, the embouchure and the much of the course of the greatest river in China-one which can only be compared, for magnitude and convenience, to one of the prin. cipal streams of America. Should a position be required here, we imagine that to fix upon a convenient one cannot be difficult. Emporia so situated, while they will command all that is val. uable in the foreign commerce of China, will be secure from all the petty aggression of which the Chinese Government is cu pable; and, what is of even more consequence, by keeping us apart from the Chinese, save us from the greater danger of the ritorial acquisition, as not only valueless and burthensome in suggestions of our own ambition. We deprecate, then, all ter- itself, but as inevitably, and in the long run leading us already overcharged with a heavy burthen of the same nature, to the conquest of China. For the same reason we deprecate all per. and so impracticable a Government as that of China. Such a manent diplomatic relations whatsoever with so vile so tricky, connexion would assuredly lead to insults-the insults to rotabation -and the retalation possibly to a revolution that night, as on for half a century, a result not to be desired by a nation anxious the last occasion, throw the empire into disorder and anarchy only for the extension of a peaceful commerce. Examiner.

time he admitted that

dignity conferred than the gentleman who has been se ors will be accepted and worn by Sir Jamsetjee with lected to receive it. This participation of British hon-

less victories. The Chinese, although far from wanting physical These important acquisitions have been made by almost blood. strength or personal courage, and still less intelligence, cannot, or will not, fight; and we think bot causes have contributed to our successes. This seems an odd anomaly, but it is not diffi cult of explanation. In practical civilization, in industry, and SIR JAMSETJEE JEJEEBHOY-THE distinction which progress in the useful arts, they as far excel the most civilized of it has pleased the Queen to bestow on, this amiable and the other nations of Asia as we excel them, and perhaps farther. benevolent Parsee is cause for congratulation to the But in the military art the case is reversed, for they are in this whole native community of India. Although many below the rudest tribes that surround them, and indeed below might be found equally deserving, it must at the same contempt. Hence their easy subjugation, twice over, by bands Tartar shepherds the handful of ing, in lapse of time, essentially Chinese. The Chinese have neighbouring nations and tribes, who, for interested motives, no intercourse with equals, and justly enough look upon the pamper them with adulations, as nating but barbarians. A weak and anwieldy Government, which has to hold together a number becoming pride, and convince those wealthy natives of of human beings equal to half the race of mankind, proclaims, as India. who have the happiness to be subjects of the ap tent talisman for maintaining its authority, that the institutions Crown of England, that its favoars in future will be of the empire are already perfect and admit of no amelioration; dispensed without reference to caste or colour. We and hence improvement or innovation are denounced as a species have also been highly gratified by an inspection of a of lèse majesté. In war, the bow, arrow, quiver, and javeein are the weapons of the Chinese, and their few wre'ched fire-arms very magnificent service of plate, intended as a present are still less efficient. Add to this, that the whole military pow. to Sir Jamsetjee. The principal pieces, the candelabra, er having been exclusively in the hands of the descendants of have inscribed on them the following:- the Tartars for almost two centuries, and that, consequently, the of the nation is wholly unused to arms, and we great body of shall cease to wonder that the Chinese make so poor a figure in warfare. But even the Tartar soldiers themselves fight badly, or refuse to fight at all, as at Ningpo; and no wonder, when the weapons they wield and the weapon load opposed to, and peace of two hundred years, are duly considered, After all, if the Chinese really possessed skill in war, or a stomach to fight, what object can the inhabitants of the coast, at least, have to peril their lives in combating us? Notwithstanding not yet forget that they are ruled by strangers; and with a tem- the long time that has elapsed since the last conquest, they do per and disposition for commercial intercourse not exceeded by any nation on earth, it is impossible they should not feel aggrier. ed by the restraints under which their intercourse with stran. gers is placed, or that they should not sympathise with those who are struggling to remove them. And this, in fact, they have Hong-done to all the extent that was compatible with the security of their lives and property. Thus, on the island of Hongkong, there is congregated already a large Chinese population, under the English flag, entertaining a bitter hostility against the Chi. protracted contest with us the Chinese may learn the art of war. ore authoritar But some military gentlemen are apprehensive that, in their

Mr, Burd, hereupon deposes, that in December last, 1 purchased a spar for 35 Dollars from Capt Nash of the Princess Charlotte; and months ago, some person stole it and a few days ago, I discovered the spar in the Defendant's possession; I swear positively to the spar, as I cut a particular mark on it shortly after, I a had made the purchase and knew it by two other

marks.

Mr. E. G. Reynolds, assistant to the Land officer. Sworn, states, I was present in December last when Mr. Burd purchased a spar from Capt Nash of the Princess Charlotte.

The Defendant states I gave 50 Dollnas (25 days since) to Sam-lung, for the Spar in question at koug. Sam-lung informed me he had purchased the spar from a man at Whampoa.

"Presented to Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy, Esq., of Bombay, by Wm. Jardine and James Matheson, of Canton, as a merk of their sin. cere friendship, and to commemorate their admiration of his liber. ality in busiuess, pure philanthropy, and extensive benevolence." There are also on the base of the candelabro two

chasings, representing the great services rendered by this gentleman in relieving the inhabitants of Surat at the time of the conflagration, he having distributed both food and clothing, with an unsparing hand. The ser- vice is for 24 persons, and of the value of £3,000. Monthly Times.

NECROLOGY.

By the monthly Times, dated London 4th March, we find reported the demise of the Duke of Cleveland, the Marquis of Herteford, Lady Ogle, Sir H. W. Martin M. P. or Bristol, the Countess Sebastiani. Bart, Lady Mary Stuart, Hart Davies late Howard, Colonel Harvey of Norwich, Morres of the"Haymarket"and Old Roberts the Royal state Coachman, and the veteran diplomatist Count Pozzo di Borgo.

to Kowloon when the Spar was nea'r Hat Foco boat. They have heard that this ingenious people have, in imitation of Mr. Menzies F. L. S. Lady Katherine

Sam-lung, deposes, I sold the spar alluded to Dollars to the Defendant, and gave 80 Dollars for it to to for 50 Hat Focer who is a Whampoa man, and, I went over will send for "Hat Foee"; but he lives at Kowloon The Spar returned to Mr. Burd and Sam-lung to be detained until evidence is produced as to the means of his gaining possession of the Spur.

It is the Government, and not the pe ple, who are more ame: nable to improvement than any nation of Asia that stands still; witness, the rapid increase in the consumption of out woollens metals, calicos, yarn, watches, elaware, and Indian produce, and we may find even their imitations of us in the Fine Arts;

the annual value of which cannot be less than seven millions,

36

very

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at give moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. supply every kind of Stores which may be required in new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of 'members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne. cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage whieh has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

deaux, Epernay, Oporte, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-te

a

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu.

tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch.

2D. We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONOKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp | Soda Water Powders.

and Campbell in hhds. Brown Windsor Soap. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses. Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dublin Stout, in bottles.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay.

Superfine Brown

Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn, and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Brandy Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

"

Sandoway Imitation Havannah Cigars.

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,|

in small tine, for Invalids.

Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Ditto Sago.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waistcoats, Lascars Clothing. White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves. Guernsey Frocks.

Witney Blankets

Superfine Blue Cloth. Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants,

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humpe, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

ded, in kegs cach containing

Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Beet Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces.

Capers,

Jams and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel.

Humps and 6 Tongues.

Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10,

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Snuffe, [assorted of every kind.]

Lead Lines, Europe.

Log ditto ditto.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Black Paint.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting.

Fish hooks. Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.- Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks. And various other Arieles 100 numerous to detail.

ADVERTISEMENT.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

HE A. I. British Brig "John Hor- ton" (336 Tons N. M.)

THE

Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong,

or to

Holliday, Wise Co. Macao.

Macao, 14th April, 1842-

BY in the

The undersigned having entered into partnership on the 1st Jan. 1842, under the firm of P. Townsend & Co. Ship Chandlery, Auctioneering and Com- mission business at Hongkong, would be pleased to fulfil any orders in their line, and hope, by attention, to give satisfaction to any who may be pleased to favour them with business.

P TOWNSEND

A MOLBYE

FOR SALE

0401010-

AUCTION.

OY C. Markwick on Saturday 21st inst. 11 A.M. a Lorcha that will carry the bulk of 250 bales Cotton, has a furnished the bulk of 250 bales Cotton, has a furnished cabin and the whole versel has been recently painted. The Lorcha lies off the Baasar, For futher particulars apply to the Auctio

neer.

OM

Hongkong 14th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

N Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice Canvas, Twine-White, Green and Black

P. Townsend & Co. now offer for Sale Paint-Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks

at their Godowns, Hongkong.

The following Goods, viz Chain Cables Anchors. of Sizes

Europe, Coir and Manila Rope American Beef and Pork

Bass and Allsops beer in bottles Gin in Cases and half Cases Claret

Sauterne

Vinegar in Bottles Port in Casks and Bottles Half Leaguers Java Arrack Tar, Coal tar and Pitch English and German canvas Duck

Twine and Marline

Log Lines

Stationary Sailors Knives

Sail Needles

Pad Locks..

Butt Hinges

Compasses and Cards.

And all other articles for the supply

of Shipping in general.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale

on Board the Prima Donna, Hong Kong.

Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron.

Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green aud Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons. Carr's well known fancy Biscuits.

Fine table Salt.

also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank,

Apply on Board Hongkong April 13th. 1842.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and

downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to N. DUUS. Gr C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles;

Brandy in Wood and Bottles, Vinegar, Beer,

"

⚫ ditto, ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret: Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herring Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Alleo a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasser, and other Marine Stores.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

May. 12th Lambton Warren

Macao, ,, M. C. Str. Auckland Capt Ethersey I. N. Bombay. 18th Lyra, Hubertson. Macao

Macao

H. C. Str Pluto. Lieut Tudor R. N. Sing. 14th Mercury Humpherys 15th H. C. Str, Hoogly Comdr. Ross 16th Vixen, Carr Marquis Elder Hickman

Best Stockholm Tar

Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Thames

Madras

IP

Robarts

41st N. L.

30

"

Percy

11

"

17th Maria,

48th Caledonia

Prima Donna Kelle. Macao. Lonsdale Bel. Voltrs, Cal. cutte. Lawson Bombay.

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle

packed in lead and stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in 10 pound boxes.

May 12th H. C. Str. Hoogly Comar. Ross 13th Lambton

17th

Lyra,

Warren Hubertson

Macao, Whampoa

Chimmo.

H. M. S. Nimrod Capt. Glass.

Superior Smoked York. shire Hams.

39

H. C. Str. Plate Lieut. Tudor Vixen, Carr

Macao. Chusan.

Namoa,

Caldwell.

HongKong 11th April 1842.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chi- T®

nese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Sil- ver Spanish Dollar in Quantities of not less than 50 Dollars which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th. Instant at Messrs. Jardine Matheson and Co. on Shore at Hong Kong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays excepted.

Apply to R. M. Whichelo, Purser

of H. .M S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent.

Madeir

FOR SALE.

adeira Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks from the well known House of Kiers &Co. Apply to Dent & Co. at Macao. Macao 20th April 1842.

18th Thistle

Macao. W. Pedder, Harbor Master.

POSTSORIPT.

harbour late last afternoon, having ieft Singapore, we are informed, just one week ago.

THE War Steamers Vixen and Medusa arrived in the

THE Fall of Guznee is eonfirmed. A court of Inquiry ordered to held on the conduet of General to attempt to force on the 2d April. If he failed Jellal. Elphinstone. The Khyber Pass,General Pollock was labad must fall.

By the Steamer Medusa which left Calcutta 24th April we have received the particulars of the 3rd Opium Sale, viz:-

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND LONG LONGBONG

N°.10. VOL. 1

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG. THURSDAY, MAY 26TH. 1842.

Masons Carpenters Painters

99

3 per diem for $1

3

"1

2

39

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, OUR friends at Macao and elsewhere, will will be discontinued from this date: but all be glad to know that the public and private public orders and notifications appearing in buildings are progressing very rapidly. "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- The erections of the Chinese in the Ba- zette," with the signatures of duly autho-zaars, although of substantial brick, rized Functionaries of the Government are spring up at a rate almost magically fast. still to be considered as official. EMIGRATION. By order, In the House of Commons on a recent occasion J. Robt: Morrison, Lord Stanley stated the average annual emigration Acting Secretary and Treasurer. during the last five years, except in 1838, (the year of the Canada outbreak) was from 75,000 to 80,000. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1812. In 1840, 90,700 emigrated, in the first three quar- ters 1841, 106,475. The much-looked-for Govern- CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. ment plan of emigration ends in an improved Pas- AVIS. sengers act and a measure for the appropriation of the land fund of Australia, which we humbly opine will be deemed no improvement by the Col- onists. We are sorry to see the present Adminis- tration, as regards this most important question, as much behind the public intelligence as the last. We can find money at all times, in aid of the mis- chievous policy of foreign intervention. In times past it never has been wanting for the utmost pro- digality of princes. Strange "the poor crieth and there are none to help them". We know that a com- prehensive scheme of Emigration, could be carried into effect, without the Cost of a farthing to the Government; but so great a horror has the Colo- nial office of economical expenditure and local self government that it has hitherto refused its authorization.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Américains.

C. Alex: Challaye Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine.

HONGKONG, 25 Mai 1842. FROM THE PERING GAZETTE: AMOY.

THE Imperial will has been received as follows:

As it may be interesting to some of our Military friends know the Composition of the Bengal Voluteers, we have obtained the numbers of the Corps from which they have Volunteered, together with the Ships they are now on board of. Lt. Col. Lloyd. Commd. 28th. N. I. Burrumpooter Major Kent. Captains. Capt. Turton.

39

Innis. Wakefield. Platt.

17

Swinton.

Halford.

Harvey from the

Shaw. Watson.

Warrior.

{Price Or 812 yearly

In the Singapore Free Press of 7th April, there is a Public Notification of the appointment of an Acting Governor during the absence of the Gove ernor who purposes visiting Borneo, to obtain sat- mitted on that Coast. May not this visit be pre- isfaction, it is said, for Piratical acts lately com- cursive of the establishment so long talked about, of a British Settlement in that quarter ?-Should the existence of a Coal formation of good quality and in an accessible site be confirmed, we know no better position for a Colony; to say nothing of the vast mineral wealth of the interior and the exuber- tant fertility of the plains, adapted for the culture of all kinds of tropical products and which with British Capital and Chinese Labour might be im- mensely developed.

LONDON

CONTEMPORARY SELECTIONS. National Dietetics. In Prussia the consumption of meat was at the rate of lb. 35 per head per an- num; In England it was lb. 50. The consump- tion of Sugar in Europe generally was lb. 21, while in England it was lb. 17 according to Sir Robert Peel.

The Explosion of Curteis and Harvey's Powder Mill took place on the 19th Feby. Two men killed and three seriously wounded.

Spain. At the British Smelting house opened at Alicant, the lead yielded eight ounces per hundred weight; this is a very heavy proportion, and will much reduce the cost of the Lead, which is abundantly supplied in the vicinity.

Belgian Railways. During ten months of 1838 upwards of 2,000,000 travelled on them. The pop- ulation is but 4,000,000 The cost of transit is about Id per mile.

Lord Elgin. Till the recent demise of his fa- ther, the M. P. for Southampton was the new Go- vernor of Jamaica and replaces the much esteemed Sir Charles Metcalfe who retires from ill health. Corn Laws. DURING the war of Napoleon and from countries under his Control, we in one year Tamerlane. drew 2,000,000 quarters of corn. How stolid must be the intellects of those who assert with a Free Tamerlane. trade we shall at times want an unobtainable Supply. Burrumpooter Maria. The Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway Was open- ed on the 18th Feby. with much eclat. It was Burrumpooter Forth. determined by 1219 votes to 648 that the trains 52nd City of Palaces. should run on Sunday.

18th 3rd 15th 17th

23rd

32nd

41st

Warrior.

32

Shuldham. Bamfield.

56th Lieutenants.

3rd

⚫ 15td

17th

23rd

32nd

41st

52rd 56th

Interpreter and Qr. Mr.

Although, on a former occasion, Yen pih taou made representations to the court rel- ative to the fall of Amoy, yet it is feared that his report has not been true and tho- rough. His Majesty therefore in person gave instructions to Twan kwa hastily to proceed to Amoy to make secret investi- gations. It now appears that the said (Shelang) court officer (Twan kwa) kneel- ing has made representations, the whole of which agrees with the former statements (of Yew pih taou), and his statements also rel- ative to the number of fighting troops and marines do not very greatly differ. The Governor and high officers, who were encamped at Amoy, gave their sole atten- Sissmore. tion to the keeping up of a proper guard, Davidson. which they did through the space of Onslowe, half a year. But Yen pih taou having once allowed the rebellious barbarians abrupt- ly to approach Amoy, and forthwith losing the city retired upon Tanggaw and Prat keun for their and protection, and being in a state of constant trepidation, he became utterly useless and his crimes unpardonable. But in consequence of his recovering Amoy again, he is indulgently allowed to es- cape the due punishment of his offer.ces. Let him, however, be degraded three steps, and be deprived of his official rank but tained in office in order that he may re- deem his past delinquencies.

RESPECT THIS.

HONGKONG.

Beavan.

Pownall. Surgeon D. Mc. Queen Gray Esqr. Asst. Surgeon Mi. 1. COM.

Adjutant.

and 4 additional Asst. Surgeons Provisionally. It will be remembered that both Lt. Colonel Lloyd and Major Kent were with the last Ben- gal Volunteers at Chusan (the former Commanding) and thus possess the advantage of knowing from personal experience how to provide for the com- fort and health of their Men.

THE Volunteers from the 23rd and 41st Regi- re-ments who have been on shore are splendid speci- mens of our Bengal Soldiers, and when we remem- ber that these two Corps were greatly distinguished at the Assault and Capture of Bhurtpoor we feel assured that the same gallantry will be equally displayed by the brave Volunteers, and with the same results if the Troops of the Celestial Empire will at least give them the opportunity.

PRICES OF BUILDING MATERIALS.

Bricks Clay, Blue

99

-86 per Thousand Sand, Blue -- $4 $4-50 Red large Mud Sun-dried large $4

19

99

Chests. Highest. PATNA... 2.895 805 BENARES. 1,165 776 4,060

Lowest. 770 764

Average. 785, 2. 4, 768. 4. 2.

Tiles

19

Paving

-$30

Roofing

and

---814

Ridge

THE Vessels about leaving for the Straits are the Kit- ty. Elizabeth and Guess; and for, China the Water Sophia Frazer, and Isabella Robertson. Witch, Isis, Sylph. Herald. Mermaid, Coringa Packet, Singapore Free Press 7 May.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

Chunam 3 peculs for

99

99

-one Dollar Granite Squares 20 by 8 inches $3,25 per 100 Singapore,, Beams -- 20 ft. long. each $ 4 Manilla -- do. do. Planks per 100- - -- $30 Fir Spars 10 ft. long. each 50 cts .. Seven per dicm for 8 1

99

91

China

99

Coolies

29

37

THE 15th and 32rd also Served at Bhurtpoor. WE are happy to record a gratifying evidence of the attachment of our native troops to British officers, with whom they may be brought in con- tact in course of duty, and who by discreet con- duct prove they know how to merit their affec- tionate regard. On Monday our worthy chief magistrate was surprised to find his Verandah taken possession of by some 90 or 100 men of the 23rd who with their officers had just landed from the Maria. They had come to pay him their compliments. Some had fought by his side at Bhurtpoor, many had been his personal orderlies when Brigade Major there, and all had known him as the friend of the native Soldier. Cold must be the heart that could be unmoved at such a greeting.

The Thames Tunnel is completed and will soon be opened to the public. It is supposed one half penny will be the toll for each passenger.

Forged Exchequer Bills. The Government at last begin to see that innocent holders should not be victimized by the official neglect and fraud of their paid servants.

Mr Washington Irving has been sent by the United States, as Envoy and Plenipotentiary to the court of Spain.

The Town Clerk of Lenton, Henry Woodthorpe Esqr. L. L. D. died on the 3d March.

and it now seems certain, that but a few-years will elapse, when in England as now in Scotland, there will be no such thing as a Private Bank. During the last 25 years in the metropolis, the chances have been that any one engaged in business, would make a bad debt with his Bankers. More have failed, than have held their ground, during that period. So in Calcutta and elsewhere.

India Steamer. Calcutta letters by her arrived in London via Suez in 48 days.

Cholera. During the fourteen years it raged in Europe and Asia it is alleged fifty millions were victims.

The Do-nothings are an ancient, numerous and thriving family: they claim descent from the noble house of the Farnientes in Italy and are closely allied to the Fainéants of France. They are a very opulent people and have no relations whatever with the Have-nothings and Sans-avoirs. The Buckingham Lament. It opens thus: A Premier, high in Downing Street, Who liv'd in Treasury quarter, Seduc'd a Duke, who hung himself, Next morning in his Garter.

Among the Epigrams the best are

THE EEL PEEL.

DISSECT this statesman, probe his patriot zeal; 'Tis Surface, what his name imports, mere Peel. And from that name, should we deduct a letter, Behold 'tis Eel, than which, none fits him better.

THE SLIDING SCALE.

UPON a slide, the boy who slides The slowest meets disaster, So Johnny, will trip Bobby up, If Bobby don't slide faster.

38

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

On dit. Robie Burns' popular ditty of "Corn Rigs are Bonnie" was sung by "an unco queer chiel" vclept Robie Peel before a very numerous assemblage on the 16th Feby.

Naval Estimates for1842-3 are £6,921,587. Troops in India. Of all ranks 26,940. Horses 2805. Cost estimated for 1842-3 £871,656,13,2. British Army. Of all ranks 122,568 beyond the above annual cost £3,644,636,16,1.

Militia. A Bill is to be introduced to reorganize this force so as to make it the depôt for the standing army. Ordnance Estimates for 1842-3 are £2,184,549. Cost of a Soldier. La Presse states to be £26 per annum in England. In France £13. In Prus- sia £8,10. In Russia £5 and in Austria £9,10.

FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, MAY, 26TH. 1842.

information received by the Harbour Master he has we are told, succeeded in capturing and bring- ing to justice Eleven pirates, who have also receiv ed the same amount of punishment awarded in the case reported this day.

The affair of the Thistle took place in sight of the anchorage, and we have heard, under the eyes of the Senior naval officer; who promptly des- patched the young Hebe Schooner to the scene of action. We are told the" Young Hebe" was fired seem to point out the necessity of some exemplary on by the retiring pirates. Such audacity, would punishment being immediately inflicted on the offenders, and also on the Villages which aid and abet these maritime marauders. Otherwise, many will begin to think that these molesters of our Trade, are only executing the orders of the Chinese Au- thorities, whom we are told have interdicted com- merce with our Island.

of this most important question.-Insular, or peninsular positions, (as is well put in the article we have copied from the Exa- miner, and which fully represents the en- lightened public opinion at home on this subject) is all we require; all that for some years we shall have in China. The discon- tented temper of England, the morbid jeal- ousy of America, the ill concealed aversion of Russia, the deadly hatred of the War party in France, added to the present pos- ture of Indian politics, makes it sheer mad- ness to think of now making territorial ac- quisitions in China. We, however believe Hongkong is destined, by the uncontrolla- ble force of circumstances, to become the base of moral and martial operations, which Whilst we applaud the measures taken to pro- sooner or later must revolutionize, or sub-tect those who resort hither we are constrained vert the existing state of things in China.- to add that we wish more ample powers were vest- Meantime, we suppose we must be contented in the hands of the Chief Magistrate, or other to abide by a Policy, which Napoleon must hold there would be no complaint of supineness; competent Island authority: in which case we have appreciated,when he called us a nation nor neglect of proper measures for the suppression of Shop-keepers. Henceforth we fear we (as alleged) of a daily augmenting evil.-With shall be nicknamed a nation of tea-dealers, every disposition to make allowance for our pres- seeing that in an entirely groundless ap- ent provisional state; we yet cannot refrain point- prehension of not obtaining a supply of ing out what to us appears an anomaly in thus this article, we have pursued a policy, which punishing the Chinese prisoners (whom we call pirates) on the complaint of their fellow contrymen. otherwise, would be referred to intense sto- In England it has been the law for some centuries lidity or blundering ignorance. to give up property within the realm if it had been Whilst we exceedingly doubt the exis- taken by pirates: but then any foreigner sueing tence of the more "comprehensive states- upon this statute is bound to prove that his Sove- manship" which our contemporary says reign, or Government, at the time of the Capture, was on terms of mutual amity with the Sovereign or "now obtains in England" we yet confident- Government of the Captor. In this point of view, ly hope a greatly improved aspect of our can the attack on the Thistle be correctly desig affairs will soon be assumed-Powerful rein-nated piracy? Is it possible the plundered Chi- forcements are at last on their way. Con- naman can say we are at this time on terms of siderable as they are, we cannot expect that amity with the alleged pirates Sovereign? Again, they will be able to make, a conquest or de- if they be really pirates, should not their Boats be destroyed, or rendered wholly inapplicable to monstration sufficiently important, to at once their former nefarious purpose? The Custom coerce the emperor into terms of pacifi- here has hitherto been to sell them by Public Auc- cation as it is said, is counted on by Lord tion as will be seen by an Advertisement in our Ellenborough. We do not share the opinions No. 8. Grave objections may be made to this of some of our oldest residents, and those practice. Although we have not our Law Books most, acquainted with the Chinese charac- to refer to, yet we shall much err if there be not an express enactment to this effect in a recent ter, who confidently aver several years must statute which also regulates the appropriation of elapse, before this War will end. If unfetter- captured Slavers. ed by fiscal considerations, really possessed of plenary powers, and backed by ade- quate support in India and England-we nothing doubt H. E. Sir Henry Pottinger may yet succeed in bringing matters to a successful issue within twelvemonths from this date. Whether we are to have a speedy peace, or whether this war is still to drag its slow length along"one thing is certain, that our establishment on this Island is now fixed on such a basis that it cannot be abandoned.

We have transferred to our Columns, an article on "Chinese affairs" from the Bom- bay Times Summary of intelligence for the month of March. We have done this, in order to make a few comments thereon, knowing as we do, that the above paper is read and referred to in influential quarters, and in some of the Metropolitan clubs, it is deemed the best authority on Indian and Chinese affairs. Much credit is justly due to the accomplished editor, for the great amount of sterling information he lays monthly before his English readers. In reference to the present article there is much, very much to approve, and little to censure. But when, however, he specially notes" the ignorance manifested by the Plenipotentiary and Admiral &c." As re- gards the Chinese who is there we would venture to ask that is well informed? And where is the man conversant with their soci- al feelings,moral habitudes,and conventional usages? All of which are the elements of political philosophy; by which alone we can duly estimate national character and national policy. In sooth, the most sur- prising thing is the ignorance in China of China; an English inquirer will only find it parallelled by the prevalent ignorance in India of native affairs and native interests: an ignorance which, we are glad to say, our respected contemporary is doing his best to remove. Again, have not the pe- culiarities of the Chinese War been refera- ble to the fiscal part of the question? Al- though not touched upon by our contempo- rary, yet we are sure he will admit, that such an exceptional course, would not have been adopted, had not considerations of home interests, and tea duties, been per- mitted to unduly influence if not to domi- nate. Confessedly the war is sui generis we hope from historie ammals, it may ever be so characterised.

"THE fact lately transpired before the Supreme Court of Calcutta, that the principal Editor of a daily Paper there (the Englishman) received £2000 per Annum, Rs1600 a month. The library of the Bengal Hurkaru, which is now for Sale and which was bought for the use of the Editors, Cost Originally £40,000; so if Editors in India do not improve themselves it is not for lack of means or opportunity." We have extracted the above from the Bombay Times and we confess our friends in England had no conception of such munificent rewards for literary labours in India. Would that Hence with Englishmen, whom we know we had the bibliothecal advantages of the Hurkaru. will not belie their origin, nor yield without With a genial climate, agreeable society, the soul a struggle the palm of honest enterprise and ing us at every step, we only yearn for a good gladdening evidences of prosperous industry meet- honorable ambition to any section of their public library of reference and then with this Cap- fellow Somanay men at frome or abroad. Stone to our reneity, we should conscientiously Hence it is we dare predicate of aver our little Island of Hongkong to be a "gem THE seizure of the Junks within these Hongkong (adopting the language of our of the Ocean," and to our eyes at least one of the waters cannot be justified, it was confessed- Bombay Contemporary) that it will speed-pleasantest in the World. ly an enormous political blunder, as Fou-ily be converted into a mean of producing che would say. Further we are certain had the most stupendous effects on the desti- vigorous measures at first been adopted, nies of man." the war would ere this have been ended.

AFFGHANISTAN.

THE Bombay Times Summary for March Creole affair. This is now a great cause is accompanied with a well executed By this time, the foreign trade might have of irritation to our trans-atlantic brethren. Lithographed Map of the present seat of been concentrated on this Island, under It seems that the whole of Westminster War, as also of Scinde, the Punjaub, and a the protection of our own flag, and if so Hall is unanimously agreed, that the law of portion of the North West Provinces of with a saving of dues now exacted at Can- England interdicted the delivery up to India. On the Margin of the Map there is ton which only on the next seasons Export America of the crew of the Creole. Their a list of the Engagements and Casualties in of Tea say 15 40,000,000 will amount to at being Slaves and Criminals, afforded no Scinde aud Cutchee since the 1st of Jany least £1,000,000 Sterling, to say nothing, of ground for their detention. Orders were 1840. Beneath the title there is the follow- the very heavy and augmented imposts we sent out by Lord Aberdeen for their libera-ing staggering recapitulation for its nu- are compelled to pay on other exports, and tion. Sir Charles Wetherell said the mur- also on the whole of our Imports, and which derers of a Foreign Monarch, could not merous European Readers. we are told will with Port dues and other legally be given up to justice, after setting exactions be nearly another million of foot on any part of the British Empire. On pounds. all sides it was admitted, to be very desirable to adopt an international law, for the surren- der of Criminals.

Could anything more demonstrate the necessity of a Free Port in this vicinage and the high desirability of declaring this Island a British Settlement? Yet it is not now and will not be declared a British Col-

PIRACY.

EXPENDITURE since Oct. 1838 estimated at 15

Millions. Loss of British Soldiers and Camp fol- ficers: Camels about 50,00, costing about £500,000 lowers 15,000.-including 200 Commissioned Of- Results-A Pension of £2000 a year and a title

to Lord Keene; an Earldom to Lord Auckland; and half a dozen Knighthoods; The ruin of India and disgrace of England-The friends of India We have in another part of our paper, reported and Civilization cannot, but applaud the patriotic ony by the Authorities at home for some the condemnation of some pirates, who were cap- exertions of this Print, which much to its honor, has tured by the Master of the Thistle; whose con-uniformly denounced the insane lust of conquest, months, perhaps years,-they are now are now duct throughout the affair, seems to have been very which hitherto has retarded the development of only beginning to see some of the bearings spirited, and deserving of commendation. From the mighty resources of Hindostan.

POLICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

(BEFORE the Lieut. Governor and the Chief Magistrate.)

ON Thursday last, Assing, an Old Chinaman and eight others Charged with Piracy. DANIEL Caldwell gave evidence that he is master of the Thistle, and when getting under weigh Akoo came on board and informed him his Salt Junk with a Cargo worth abont 600 dollars had been captured by Pirates in the vicinity of Hong- kong. He offered me 50 dollars to recover it for him. On nearing the Island of Pang chow a Salt Junk under Sail was pointed out to me as his. On nearing her four Pirate Boats of about 70 or 80 oars each attacked and fired 9 Shots at me. In return I fired 5 Shots when they sheered off. I boarded the Salt Junk and took the prisoners who offered no resistance. I found three of the origi- nal crew confined with hands tied, under the hatch- es. Assing on returning to my berth came on board he was recognized as the hirer of the Pirates and endeavoured to recover the Junk again by intimidation.

Axоo the owner of the Salt Junk in question entirely corrobborated the foregoing, as also other witnesses.

THE prisoners in their defence, allege they are not pirates, and had nothing to do with the four Pi- rate Boats which attacked the Thistle. They were hired by Assing to repair the Boat which he had bought.

ASSING (being an old man) was sentenced to 21 Months Imprisonment in Irons with hard la- bour; the other 8 prisoners to Corporal punish- ment of 100 Lashes each, and to be imprisoned in Irons with hard labour for eighteen Months. The Salt Junk was given up to its owner and the Guns and Swivels found on board handed over to the Harbour Master's care.

CHINESE AFFAIRS. NOTWITHSTANDING the high hopes primarily entertained of the career of bir Henry Pottinger and Admiral Parker, hopes at first in some measure realized, for what they have done has been done promptly and well, the manly tone assumed by them con- trasted favourably with the miserable drivelling which preceded, -the course latterly pursued by them has been anything but satisfactory. The instructions of the successors of the Elliots were, we have much reason to believe, closely akin to those by which the operations of the expedition were meant primarily to have been guided; that the system pursued since has improved, is referrible to the character of the individuals now in charge of it -the principles by which it is governed, unless very lately

altered, are rotten and worthles as ever. The makeshift,--the rab-on-any-how-system of Lord Palmeraton, so conspicuously dis. played in the illustrious cases of the Canadian rebels and Amer. ican sympathisers, and in that of our interference with the affairs of the Levant, required but the China war-and-no-war arrange. ments to put the copestone to its absurdities. It looks as if the whole arrangements had been made somewhat thus.--On the first outbreak, the destruction of three millions worth of British property is pressed on the consideration of the Foreign Secretary Something wrong in China,"cries Cupid to his colleagues, "cant tell what it is, but something clearly wrong-must have an expedition, "twill furnish good berths for a brother and cousin of Minto's. I know nothing about the matter myself, they will surely find out when they get there what ought to be done; the India Company will fork out the money first, that will save all the bother about supplies till the accounts come finally in and then they must be paid. China is too far off to make folks critical about a little blundering; they will surely manage as many victo ries over the pig tails as will make this be forgotten, soff with the expedition, and let something be done." This actually seems to embody the whole views of the late Foreign Secretary, as well a those of the men who have managed the expedition from the com- mencement to the present hour. In England the most profound ignorance of the whole affair seems to have prevailed from the first; we were fighting about something, and gaining victories, and the Tea trade remained uninterrupted, and this appeared to be all about which any concern was experienced. We well m forory and ignor mce intuifested by the Plenipo. tentiary and Admiral, as to the great and ultimate ends of their mission, struck all with whom they came in contact in Bombay in July last;-an ignorance only one whit less surprising than their still more conspicuous indifference as to the means of obtain ing information. Sir Henry Pottinger and Sir William Parker -more especially the latter-took every precaution to ensure the success of a great expedition, destined, as they rightly and wisely conceived, to extend in all likelihood over a considerable number of years; but beyond the expression that "they were determined to bring the Emperor to his senses, to capture Amoy,

39

69

phrase is, his senses would take leave of him the moment we took ment, would be a mockery, and the peace or the pactions we leave of his shores: a convention without security for its fulfil 4. The claims of all deceased Officers and Men are before our retiring squadrons were one-half the way back to Eng-fied, in the column of remarks. in the Nominal Roll might enter on would be broken through and flung to the winds to be included in the Abstracts of Companies, Detach- ments or Departments, and it will be particularly speci only be hoped for by our permanently maintaining on the coasts land. The China Expedition is a delusion, unless it secures to accompanying each Bill, whether the Heirs or Assigns us a lasting and honorable peace: and the attainment of this can of China the means of, at the shortest notice, making war. We of the deceased are present, as only in case of their must, in fact, occupy and retain along the Coast, portions of the for the purpose of being paid over under the order and maintained. This must be done, and that right speedily, though where the Heirs or Assigns are not present, the presence will the amount be issued by Pay Masters, celestial territory, as ample as can conveniently and profitably be responsibility of Commanding Officers. In cases not till after we have shewn the Emperor that if we do not insist but simply because Pekin suits us less than many of the positions on keeping the capital in our possession it is neither from the want of power, nor from regard to the imperial rights or person, along the coast.

for deposit, until legally claimed. Officers and Men, amount drawn will be deducted from the Bills, and transferred to the General Treasury by Pay Masters absent from their Corps, will be drawn for one rejoining. red for audit and adjustment to the Public Department of the Presidencies to which Corps, Departments, or 5. The Batta Bills for the Donations will be refer- Individuals respectively belong.

In talking of the violation of the rights of nations in our con. quest or occupation of China. we suffer ourselves to be perplexed lated and organized conditions of society. The Chinese and with the idea and nomenclature appertaining to well-regu. their rulers have no rights whatever kindred to those arrangements of another, unless by a line of policy which is in of all ranks drawn for in it, agreeably to the following itself criminal and unjust. In China there are no institutions Form, and European Officers who may have been em. which in Europe prevent one kingdom from interfering with the 6. Each Bill will be acompanied by a Nominal Roll

upholden for the public good, or by the public pleasure or consent. ployed on the Staff, or who may have been interme which either respect or protect the people, or are constituted or the present Tartar ruler-the right of the strong to govern over Expedition, or who may be absent on leave, will pre. A Guelph or a Bourbon has as good a right to the sovereignty as diately transferred to Regiments not serving with the an individual nation-which are in this case, and this sense, the weak or the unresisting. But besides the internal rights of pare and submit separate Bills supported by Certificates distinctly recognized than this,--that no individual people on the nonexistent-there is no principle of national jurisprudence more obnoxious to the great Commonwealth of nations: no corporate face of the earth is warranted to assumo a position injurious or community, however ample, or under whats ever designation it tion, or to mar the happiness or improvement of the vast family of may shelter itself, is entitled, to obstruct the march of civiliza. man. In this sense China has set herself up as an offence and a stumbling-block, which must be removed by force from the united movement of the great human family.

Roll of Officers, Staff, Non-Commissioned, Private or of Service in China. ing with the China Expedition. Troopers, belonging to -Regiment serv-

Rank and Names.

&c.,

&c.,

&c.

the territories of China will be the next object of our operations, Assuming that the conquest and retention of ample portions of we think we may look forward to the ultimate results likely to large of any which ever followed in the wake of conquest. The accrue from these as amongst the most important to the world at shores of China, indented as they are with innumerable inlets, Colonel,. studded with the most fertile and lovely groups of islands and Lieutenant Colonel,. furnishing the debouchures of the magnificent rivers which spread over and enrich the land; furnish perhaps the finest situations in in existence for the permanent settlements of a country such as Major, England. There are hundreds of positions, such as those of sula might be maintained by a single regiment, a frigate and an Amoy and Chusan, where an easily defensible islet or penin. sands to colonize under the shelter of our guns, and the protection iron steamer; and where the inhabitants would flock in thou. of our laws. The Chinese people are on all hands admitted to be amongst the most industrious, and the most thoroughly imbued with the spirit of commercial enterprise, of any race in the Eastern Seas; they need but to be saved from the abominable tyranny which enslaves and torments them. In a religious pint sions of civilization: and inquisitive and acute enough to examine of view they present materials still more remarkable for the mis superstition to prevent its reception or its spread. The priesthood and appreciate the truth, they have few or no prejudices, and no are powerless amongst them, and the secular sovereign demands all the worship as his own. Sweep this source of idolatry away, and the field is open for the spread of the Gospel.

We must now view the relations about to be opened up, not as referring to the civilized nations of the Western world: within those 20 years the seeds of human improvement have been sown, celerity on their southern borders. Saxon races, transplanted and civilization has spread with almost miraculous strength and mature and fresh-full of life and European vigour and resources, are convering the shores of New Holland in every direction. A old world-England and America alone excepted (for in relation commerce, speedily promising to surpass that of any nation in the to Australasia, America herself must consent to be called old),- is springing up within 50 degres of Canton--a distance less than ready to reciprocate in the exchanging tide of benefits which na- that intervening betwixt the Cape of Good Hope and Ceylon,- tions which trade with each other mutually bestow and receive. aspect and its policy, and instead of consisting, as here tofore, of The Chinese war may probably by this time have changed its a little peddling paltry buccaneering expedition for the redress of a commercial insult, and the cementation of a commercial treaty, obtains in Eagland, speedily be converted into a mean of produ- may, under the more comprehensive statesmanship which now cing the most stupendous effects on the destinies of man.

ARMY

from the 86th Foot, to be Lieut. vice Phipps, who 26th Foot-Lieut. George William Molyneux Lovett, exchanges.

49th Foot-Lieut. A. Mackenzie, from h.-p. 30th Foot. to be Lieut. (repaying the difference), vice Gib. purchase, vice Mackenzie, who retires; R. Thompson, bons, promoted; Ens. C. Faunt to be Lieut., by gent., to be Ens., by purchase, vice Faunt.

26th Depôt-Lieut. Edwards of the 21st has reliev. ed Lieut. Kelly of the 31st in the charge and pay. ment of this depot. The latter officer has returned to Chatham, and taken charge of his own depôt.

55th Depôt-Lieut. Edwards has relieved Lieut Bayly of the 94th in the charge and payment of this depôt. The latter officer has returned to Chatham and taken the charge of the depot of his own regiment.

Ningpo, and Chuaan, and move morthwards towards Pekin in March or April, nothing whatever seems to have been thought of or agreed upon. It is to this indefinite aimlessness this object. lessness of system, that we are, we conceive, indebted for all the confusion and all the mischiefs now accumulating around us in China. We are conducting a war, little in the extreme in the most unmitigated acceptation of the term. We are fighting at Chinhae, and trading at Canton; capturing junks on the sca coast, and bargaining with them in the river! To what other conclusions can we look to those so well described by our corres pondent, conquering without humbling our enemy; fighting without results: conducting on a small scale at once the operations Fort William, 16th March 1842. of traffic and of war, without reaping the benefits of commerce, No. 54, dated 2d March 1842, granting Donations of No. 68 of 1842.-WITH reference to General Orders softening the asperities of strife, or approaching the blessings or the hope of peace It is stated by the Calcutta Courier, that Sir twelve and six months Full or Field Batta to the Offi- Henry Pottinger had received the Mail which left England on the cers and Men of Her Majesty's and the Honourable 4th December, and reached Bombay on the 15th January. This Company's Service employed in the late operations in must be a mistake: but the Mail of 4th November may have been received. If it has been so, it is probable that he will have China, for their gallant behaviour and successful exer- obtained dispatches of a much more definite and conprehensive tions, the Right Honourable the Governor General of character than any hitherto possessed by him;;-announcing, among other things, the sailing of a powerful reinforcement from and guidance of all parties concerned, the following India in Council is pleased to publish. for the informa. England, and the organization of a still more powerful one from India. We have hitherto proceeded with the Chinese as we Subsidiary Orders. would have done with a people who recognized the principles by which civilized nations regulate their conduct in battle or treaty. We have sought to chastise by war, the errors of a nation which maintains its own infallibility as a principle of belief: we have hoped to humble, by a series of uniform conquests, a people who refuse to admit that they are vanquished-who assort their bound less superiority over their conquerers in the very midst of the blackest of their disasters. And worst, and most unwise of all, we have endeavoured to treat, without guarantee for the mainten ance of the treaty sought for, with a people who laugh at faith who spurn the thought for one moment of truth-with whom falsehood seems not more a practise than a prin- ciple! Were we' to bring the Emperor to his senses," as the

2. The Donations of six months Batta granted by the General Orders above referred to, is extended as a special indulgence, to the Heirs or Assigns of the Offi- cers and Men of the 37th Regiment Madras Native In- fantry, who were lost in the China Seas in the Trans. port Golconda. Regimental rank in which the individuals were serving 3. The rate of Batta to be regulated according to the at the date of the General Order granting the Dona- tions, unless entitled to a higher rate annexed to Staff employment.

Company or De-

partment.

Date of Casualty

Date and nature

and where.

of leave of ab.

sence.

Remarks.

A. B. Commanding the Company. C. D. Commanding the Regiment. Examined E. E. Adjutant,

tachment, and Department, will be prepared within one 7. A Nominal Acquittance Roll of each Corps, De- month after the issue of the Donations, shewing the the appropriation of all shares of absentees or deceased manner in which the distribution has been made, and persons.

8. These kolls will be deposited in the Military Au- dit Offices, for future reference, in the event of dispnted or additional claims to the Donations being preferred bted to Her Majesty's Government. 9. The amount of the Batta Donation will be de-

Superintending Surgeon to the Force serving in China. No. 69 of 1842. Surgeon J. Thompson is appointed from the date of his quitting his Corps at Kurnaul. F. of I. CALCUTTA,

THE DEPARTURE OF LORD ELLENBOROUGH FOR THE PROVINCES.

(From the Eastern Star, April 3.) or General in the North West Provinces, was an. ON Wednesday, the intended journey of the Govern nounced in our daily paper, and on the following day the intelligence was confirmed by a Gazette Extraordinary specifying that circumstances made it expedient his Lordship should proceed thitherward unaccompanied by any of his Council, and that in consequence it was enact

of laws and regulations. We were further informed as vernor General in Council, excepting only the framing the full powers of the Go- to the parties proceeding by dawk; these being, Mr Maddock the Secretary in the Secret and Political De- partment, Mr Mansell, and Colonel Stewart, Secretary so as to admit of a start on Saturday next. The Body in the Military Department, together with the whole of his Lordship's personal Staff-the dawks being laid Guard will march up, and establishments are to follow by steam during the month. The suddeness of this resolution has occasioned a corresponding surprise throughout the Presidency, and as may he conjectured given rise to multifarions reports as to its cause. It has been ascribed to many that have evidently no bet- ter foundation than the speculation of the propounders, bit it is we believe, generally received that certain dis- patches from home which reached India before his Lordship, determined him to the course, its object operations to a successful terzination by the adoption than, and the measures necessary to bring the present being principally. the conduct of affairs in Affghanis- of means sufficiently energetic to insure a triumphant issue. We understand that his Lordship's decision is fixed as to prosecuting the war with due vigour, but of the policy of his administration when retribution has course not a syllable has transpired as to what may be abroad about the duration of Lord Ellenborough's ab- been fully inflicted. There are a thousand reports least, as on dit he intends to visit Peshawur in person, sence, some pretending it will be for two years at the For the benefit of these quidnuncs we may state that with a variety of other and equally sapient affirmations. they are arguing upon what it is probable his Lordship himself has not as yet contemplated. The necessity ness in Afghanisthan will be pretty well settled, look- hope that before the point could be attained the busi- for a march beyond the Indus is not evident; for we ing, as we do, to the forcing of the Khybur as the only obstacle of real moment in the path of our advancing Corps.

0

40

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu. tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash,. we obtain our Cloods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp Soda Water Powders. and Campbell in hhds.Brown Windsor Soap. Wine Glasses. ditto in bottles. Fine Pale French Brandy ditto, Plates.

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds. Dublin Stout, in bottles. Champagne, from Moet

Epernay.

Superfine

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

of Ceylon Moss.

Brown Sherry, from Peter Domecq.

, Port wine, from Cockburn.

and Carbonel and Co.

dodest Chow Brandy

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

,, Sandoway Imitation

Havannah Cigars.

Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tins, for Invalids. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Ditto Sago.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Ditto Waistcoats. stars

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves.

Guernsey Frocks.

Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth,

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto.

Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

ded, in kegs each containing

Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard.

Assorted Sauces. Capers,

Jams and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel.

Humps and 6 Tongues, Lead Lines, Europe. Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

Green dit to. Turpentine. Blocks of Sizes. Fish hooks. Bunting. Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks,- Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks. And various other Aricles too numerous to detail.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to

N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles:

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. ditto. Vinegar, 11 ditto.

Beer,

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water,

English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots Allso a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine

and Stockholm Tar.

Stores.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two and three cuts

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt. Best mould Candles in

Carr's well known fancy 10 pound boxes. Superior Smoked York. shire Hams. Fine table Salt.

Biscuits.

FOR SALE.

AUCTION.

WILL be sold at Auction on Saturday the 28th inst: a 11 A. M. the following Goods, by P. Townsend Co. at their Godowns, viz.

A quantity of Ceylon Coir. Beef, Pork.

Pickled Salmon, in small Kegs. Paints.

1 Anchor weighing about 10 cwt (Patent). I do. 12 cwt. Nails in Kegs.

33

Lascar Caps, Handkeechiefs & Dresses, English Crockery.

Window and Plate Glass.

And whatever other articles may offer. Hongkong, May 21th 1842.

A STOREKEEPER WANTED.

A PERSON of sober and industrious habits with experience in the department of re- ceiving and delivering valuable merchan- dise, may apply at 46 Queens Road be- tween the hours of 10 and 11 a. m.

An ex-second officer of a vesset familiar with the above mentioned duty would probably prove a suitable person for the situation.

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

A Handsome Double dinner service of En- glish crockery, complete. Apply at N. Duus Godowns.

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

FOR SALE. MANILLA Segars 4th and 6th Superior at moder- MR. OLIVEIRA.

ate Prices

Apply to

On Board the AMAZON.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy May 18th H. M. Str. Vixen, Capt. Boyes R. N. Sin- Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.

Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

HONGKONG 11TH APRIL 1842.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chinese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Silver Spanish Dollar, in Quan- tities of not less than 50 Dollars, which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th Instant at Messrs. Jar. dine Matheson & Co. on Shore at Hongkong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays except- ed.

Apply to R. M Whichelo, Purser

of H, M. S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board

HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

THE A. I. British Brig "JOHN HOR- TON" (336 Tons N. M.)

Captain O. Cunningham. Apply to W. T. Kinsley, Hongkong, or to Holliday, Wise Co. Macao.

MACAO, 14TH APRIL, 1842.

FOR SALE.

MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. DENT & Co. at Macao. Apply to MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA,, a Grammar of the Chinese Language, Published at Batavia. Price $1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com- ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men. Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price $ 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

ON Monday the 30th instant will be sold

at Public Auction, by C. MARKWICK, THE PREMISES of the late A. B. LABTAT in two lots. Terms Cash 7. 1.7.

ROBT. EDWARDS. Adminisrator to the Estate. HONGKONG, 25th May, 1842.

"3

H. C. Str. Medusa, 21st Sri Singapore,

31

31

Young Gueen

gapore. Hewett I. N. Sing. Forman Macao. "Johncey

39

"

Forth, Transport

N. Heckford Singapore

Harvey Abott

B. V. Regt. Macao.

39

22nd Gratitude,

Wm. Hughes 23rd H. M. S. Endymion, Capt. Grey R. N. Singapore. 24th City of Palaces, J. Sheriff, Transport Singapore Bengal volunteers. Capt. Goldsmith R. N. Amoy. Com. Ross Macao. Turner

H. M. S. Hyacinth,

H. C. Str. Hoogly, Anglona, 25th Harmony

31

A. Smith

Calcutta.

William Pedder

Harbor Master

and Marine Majestrate.

SAILED.

May. 19th Louisa.

18th Caledonia,

Forgan Lawson

22nd Sri Singapore, 23rd H. M. Str. Ariadne,

H. C. Str. Hoogly

Chusan. Macao.

Whampoa. Forman Macao. Capt. Robarts I. N. Chusan. Comr. Ross Macao. A. Lena Asst. Hav. Mas.

THE Tenasserim Steamer arrived at Amoy on the 13th, the Calliope on the 17th, the Herald on the 18th instant. The Royalist had also arrived. This intel- ligence was brought by H. M. S. Hyacinth which left Amoy on the 20th inst.

THE Harmony which arrived this day from Cal- cutta reports that she spoke the Duke of Bedford, William Money, and another Madras Transport with troops on board (about 1000) close at hand.

P. S. On the 19th, at Amoy, it was believed, in well informed quarters, that the advance had already been made on Hang chow foo, accounts of its fall were hour- ly expected: our troops had fallen back from Ningpo.

RICES for Job Printing are as follows:

PRICES

Bills of Lading and Exchange, Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

Of Ships

per 100

ADVERTISEMENTS

Not exceeding 7 lines

for 3 months

11

2003

51

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional." Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod-

erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi- nese language.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND DONGBONG GAZETTE.

No.11 VOL. 1

NOTIFICATION.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

NOTIFICATION WITH reference to the Notification of the 17th Instant, abolishing the Situation of Land Officer, &c., &c., it is hereby notified, that Mr. Edward Glascot Rey- nolds is appointed "Land and Road Inspec-

tor", from the 1st Proximo.

THE annexed Extracts of Instructions issued to Mr. Reynolds, are published for General information.

By order,

J. Robt. Morrison. Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Government House. Hongkong, May, 27th 1812.

EXTRACT OF INSTRUCTIONS. "As the existing prohibition against further Grants of Land is to continue in full force, pending the receipt of Commands from Her Majesty's Government, it will not even be necessary for you to bring any applications on that Subject to the notice of the Deputy Superin. tendent, who will be Charged with the Civil Govern. ment of the Island, during the absence of His Excel- lency Sir Henry Pottinger Bart."

"You are to take the utmost care to prevent any en- croachments on the unappropriated lands in any part of this Island, or on the Roads, whether completed, or now in progress; and, should any thing of the kind come to your knowledge, you will, whatever may be the plea or pretence assigned. instantly stop the Work and report the circumstance to the Deputy Superin tendent." "GROUND will probably, however, be required for the erection of Barracks, and other Military Buildings, on different parts of the Island, and regarding it you will receive directions from the Deputy Superinten- dent."

"Your chief duty, and that of the Establishment placed under you, will be to see that the Roads, Bridges, and Drains, are kept in perfect order, that the unfinished Contracta rewarding Ham well fulfilled, that the Public Watering Places, and Jetties, and likewise the Government Market Place, are preserved from damage, and are kept clean and in a fit state for the uses for which they are designed, and that no Nuisances of any sort are permitted on the Roads or in the Streets. Should any such come under your observation, you are to report the same instantly to the Deputy Superintendent and the Chief Magistrate, who will take the necessary steps, through the Police, to abate them."

"You will register in your office all Sales and transfers of Land, in conformity with the Notification issued by the Land Officer on the 2nd., and published in the Friend of China aud Hongkong Gazette" of the 5th Instant."

(True Extracts.)

acts. Robt. Morrison.

Acting Secretary and Treasurer. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, & Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine.

Hongkong, 25 Mai 1842.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 2ND. 1842.

(From the Friend of India)

The Governor General in Council has directed that the Commander in Chief will submit the conduct of Ghuznec, to the judgment of a Court Martinl, at the Licut Colonel Palmer, in surrendering the Citadel of earliest period at which such Court can be duly assem bled

Cornwallis

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

H. M. S. SQUADRON IN CHINA. 1. ON THE COAST OF CHEKIANG. [AT CHUSAN, &C.] 72-Bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. c. B., command- er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. B. 36-captain H. D. Chads, c. B, 26-captain A. L. Kuper. Justice, Watson,

Blonde Cambrian

The Governor General in Council has already (on the 28th of January last.) directed that a full Military nected with the direction and conduct of the Troops Calliope Enquiry shall be made into all the circumstances con- at Cabool, at the earliest period at which such an En Pelican quiry may be practicable. Modeste The Governor General has how direct that the Columbine conduct of Major General Elphinstone, in Affghanis- Clio tan, shall be submitted to the judgment of a Court Martial at the earliest period at which such Court can be duly assembled.

The Governor General in Council will further direct that a full Enquiry shall likewise be made into the con. duct of all the Political Functionaries employed at Caboul, at the earliest possible period after he shall be he has already ordered the immediate transmission to in possession of certain material documents of which Government.

By order of the Right Hon'ble the Governor Gener- al of India in Council. T. H. MADDOCK. Secry to the Govt. of India.

Algerine Royalist Starling

18-comdr.

.

18. 18-

39

16-

"

10-lient.

10- lieut.

Morshead

E. Troubridge,

E. Maitland. Chetwode,

6-comdr. H Kellett, surveying. Lady Bentinck., comdr. R. Collinson, surveying, Jupiter Troopship mr. comgt. H.C. S. Ar. Str. Sesostris, comdr. Ormsby, I. N. Phlegethon, lieut. Mc Cleverty, n, N. Nemesis, lieut. W. H. Hall, R. x. Pluto lieut. Tudor, R. N. Ariadne

Herald Pylades Chameleon-

WITH reference to the annexed, the undersigned will be glad to receive and remit to the "Kurnal Committee" such subscriptions in aid of the desired object Druid as may be forwarded to him. HONGKONG 15 MAY 1842.1

JAS: RAMSAY, DPT. ASST. COXY. GENL HEAD Quarters, Camp Busseekusba 12 March 1842. THERE are few cases in which the Commander in Chief sanctions the circulation of Papers, for Charita- ble Subscriptions without reluctance, feeling, that individuals may make donations who would not spon- taneously do so, or may be induced to give, to their in. convenience.

On the present occasion this feeling docs not exist. from Cabool and the distresses of their widows and The suffering of our fellow Soldiers on the retreat fatherless children, will meet with the sympathy of all; and the misery of those who had no claim upon the Government for pay or pension,and many of the widows will readily receive relief from those who can afford it. I am therefore desired by his Excellency to circulate this paper. and to add, that the donations will be for the relief of such of our countrywomen as have either had husbands killed in the late disasters in Affgahnistan; or whose husbands being yet alive fare in the Hands of the enemy; or for their children, also for the relief of all other persons, followers of the Camp. who have no claim on the Government for pay or pension, to be left to the discretion of a Committee.

The General Officer Commanding the Scinde Di- vision will be requested to form a Committee at Kur- naul, to inquire into the cases of all applicants, and to distribute the funds; and branch Committees will be carry the object of the Funds into effect

The Subscribers at Futtehgurh and Delhi, and all other paces, will be invited to cooperate with the Kur- naul Committee, and transmit the Funds subscribed, for the purpose of being distibuted by that Committee S. JOHN LUARD L. Gol Military Secretary.

True Copy JAS. RAMSAY

P. S. The Subscription List in India is headed by the Comdr. in Chief (1000 Rs.) and the total amt. Subscribed by last advices are about 20,000 Rs. J. R.

EXTRACT FROM GENERAL ORDERS,

HONGKONG.

MAJOR General Burrell has much pleasure in ex- pressing his entire approbation of the Soldier like and healthy appearance of the 41st Regt. M. N. I. and begs to convey to Lieut. Col.. Huleman and the Corps his best wishes for their health, and that every success and honor may attend them on the Service on which they are to be employed.

Present Lieut. Col. Haleman

Major J. Campbell Captains Jogacel

Hall

Rochfort

Lieuts.

Ens.

Hare

Emmerson Trist

Holmes

Curties

Smith

Sir C.Burdett, Bart: Lieuts. Grant and w Dr Burrell

Hales

Cotton

Money

McViccar

Asst. Surg. Horrock

Hilliers

Lieut. and Intr. Hay 35 Regt, doing duty.

Blenheim

Endymion

Nimrod

lient, hoberts, 1. N.

Queen, mr. comg. W. Warden,

ON THE COAST OF FUKIEN. [AT AMOY]

26-

J. Nias. c. B.

18-comdr. Tindal (absent)

Hunter,

ON THE COAST OF CANTON. [AT HONGKONG. &c]

72-captain Sir Thomas Herbert, x.C.B. 44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 44-captain the hon. F. Grey. 18-comdr. Glasse,

J. Pearse,

G. Goldsmith, Wood.

Cruizer 18 Hyacinth Young Hebe 18- 4-comdr. H. M. S. armed Str. Vixen,- H. C. S. armed Str. Auckland, comdr. Ethersay, 1. N. Medusa, lieut. Boys. 1. N. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross,

New Invention. We hear that great expecta the Patent for compressing Wood. We are told tions are entertained, of the practical usefulness of that even English Oak can be compressed into one fourth of its original Bulk and without crushing the fibre. This Wood indeed becomes then al- most of the hardness of iron. We expect specimens of various qualities ex Dovecot which were prom- ised us by a correspondent in London. We should be right glad to know a practicable pro- cess, to convert our cheap spongy China fir, into a compact wood of greater strength and durability. Ere this, we expected to have had in Hongkong very considerable supplies of Wood from Manilla and Singapore: it is certain that for some years there will be a largely increaseng demand for Building Timber and Planking at remunerating rates. No one building for himself would use Chi- na Wood, if at a proportionately higher price who have always "their weather eye open" have opportunely furnished us with Spars and Planks which have been eagerly bought up aud much approved by the Purchasers.

The Americans

Russians in China. According to the St. Pe- tersburgh correspondent of the Times, the commer- cial relations of Russia and China have vastly in- creased since the War with us commenced, and are still augmenting via Kiakhta. The religious mission (?) sent last year to Pekin by Russia, as it is said, met with the most favorable reception. Has the pertinacious refusal of all negotiation by the Chinese court been induced by Russian intri- gue? We think not. As matters have been man- aged and our deplorable procrastination it is natural to suppose such pertinacity may have been en- gendered, without invoking the aid of external influences.

dia, "The impulse given to the disposal of the -Opium Trade. According to the Friend of In- drug through the presence of our army, has carried up prices to such an extent, that the profits of the East India Company from this source may be con- sidered as fully equal to half the expenses of the Campaign" and adds, at home they may insist "that as the Company has reaped three or four Millions sterling indirectly from the War, they should in all reason pay some portion of the ex- penses incurred." We are much mistaken, if our respected contemporary, is not quite misinformed on this point. The present War is alleged by those engaged in the Trade as the reason why the Drug has so long been, and now is, at so low a quotation.

42

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND CF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE, 2ND. 1842.

WE beg to announce to our Readers that a Subscription has been opened in India, for the relief of the Widows and Children of those who have perished, or are prisoners in Affghanistan. It has received the sanc- tion of the Commander in Chief who has contributed 1000 Rupees to the fund. By the last accounts more than 20,000 Rupees had been collected. Here an auxiliary list

has been commenced. We find it headed by H. E. Sir Henry Pottinger who has handsomely given 500 Rupees; our Lieut. Governor 200, Mr. Morrison 200, Major Malcolm 200, Dr. Woosnam 100, Captain Ramsay 200. This latter gentleman has kindly consented to receive and transmit the contributions. We are confident that this announcement is sufficient to cause our military and naval friends to aid so good an object which has moreover special claims on their best and holiest sympathies. As to our opulent mercantile community, it has always been foremost in good works and generous deeds; its intimate connexion with the Indian service and Indian interests, will be an additional motive for the noble exercise of its wonted benevolence on this occasion. In another Column we give a copy of the authorised Circular and we hope soon to have to record a largely aug- mented amount of benefactions.

INTELLIGENCE FROM THE NORTH

A VALUED Correspondent at Chusan un- der date of May 14th writes as follows: THE cities of Ningpo and Chinhai were evacua- ted last week, and reoccupied by native authori- ties who are doing what damage they can to those lately engaged in assisting the English.

Ar the fort of Chow fan shan, overlooking Chin- hai city, there is a company of the 55th, and another of the 18th detained, in all130 Men, with a small Company of artillery. Capt. OLeary, (a veteran officer) is left in charge. The "Pelican" and transport "Faize Allum" lie off the stakes at the mouth of the Takea. Very likely this small band will be attacked. Mr. Thom femains there as

interpreter.

THE troops,on leaving Ningpo and Chinhai,re-em- barked on board their respective Ships, and met the Admiral in the way last Sunday evening. Here the whole force lay till yesterday when, the tides being milder, for they had been running at the rate of 6 miles an hour, the fleet set sail for Chapoo. Ir is rumoured that the Chinese troops have deserted Chapoo, where extensive fortifications had been prepared, and retired to Hangchow foo; but this is rather doubtful, a day or two, however, will show. About three thousand British troops are now on their passage to Chapoo, full of the bitter- est rancour against the enemy for the numerous kidnappings that have occurred, and the cow- ardly annoyances they have inflicted.

HERE, (i. e. Tinghai) they muster some 350 troops who are able to do duty, and pehaps 100 more who are in the hospital sent from other regi- ments. The city is quiet, and prospering as well you could expect. The shops are, I think, all or nearly all open and well supplied. The Market excellent.-I suppose you have heard of the pro- posed measure of deserting the gates of the city to the N. E. and W.-of placing a post of 40 men at the S. gate-of establishing a market patrol for the day, and a patrole also for the night. Read Sir Henry's solemn proclamation of protection to the inhabitants-think of the present state of Chi- ex-nese feeling, or rather Manchow feeling, against the English, and then judge if the proposed measures are politic-are safe!

THE "Erigone", French frigate. by the last accounts has arrived at Chusan. The "Favorite", French vessel of war, it is pected will touch here on its voyage to the same destination. It is said that admiral La Place with a squadron is en route from France, and it is expected may soon be seen in the Chinese waters. By letters dated at Chusan 14th inst. we learn they expected to hear of the fall of Chapoo in about three days. The fleet was all off that place. The Yang tzekeang had been accu- rately surveyed a long way up.

As to kidnapping, that course of villainy and annoyance, has not yet closed. It is only 4 days ago they carried off a youth and the horse on which he rode.

HOWEVER, the late seizures by Capt. Dennis of 24 individnals (among whom was one on whom a blue button had been conferred lately with a fox tail, and another with a brass button, both for kidnapping, and other acts of violence on British Subjects) may put a stop to these cowardly proceed- ings for a little time at least. CHAPOO, intelligence of the fall of which I am glad to say the troops seem in good health. is hourly expected, the present port for the But they must soon he relieved, or the heavy duties largest trade of Hangchow, that from Ja- they have to perform will prove too severe for them. SIR Henry is hourly, expected. We look for pan particulary, is a bay and fortified town, among hills, on the north shore of the wi-him as the people mentioned in Shang Mang look dest part of the gulf or entrance of the ed for old Tang see Four Books large type, Tsientang, or River of Hangchow. It is vol. 7, page 102. somewhat farther out to sea than the an- cient Kanfu (Canfu) of Mahommedan trav- ellers, formerly the port of Hangchow.

It has been lately brought to the notice of the undersigned, Plenipotentiary, &c., that some of the inhabitants of the above named city of Tinghai as well of other places, are laboring under a feeling of apprehension, that they will hereafter be punished by the Imperial government and the mandarins, for having returned to reside under the authority of the British government, and also for having held intere armed dealt with its officers and its sub. measures to allay and remove the above described feeling of ap.

WE are much indebted to our friend W. D for his interesting communication res-fests. It therefore esant to be exopdient and necesarz do adent

pecting Siam. We hope he will find an opportunity to gives us full details of the manners, habits and social condition of the Siamese. The war iam is now carrying on against Cochin China, the connexion of the Court of Bankok with that of Pekin, will suggest many topics the elucidation of which at this juncture would be very in- structive.

prehension; and with that view, the undersigned, Plenipotentia, 7, &c., hereby further announces, that (if they ever are restored) one of the stipulations on which the restoration of the said city and island, and its dependencies, is to depend, will be, that the Emperor shall, under His Imperial sign manual, confirm and pro- mulgate an edict of amnesty and indemnity to all and every one of the subjects of China, on account of his or their residing under, or holding intercourse and dealings with, the British government its officers and subjects." Dated at Ningpo on the 14th day of December, 1841.

FROM ANOTHER CORRESPONDENT.

cannot be surprised that with the timid Chinamen have ventured to attempt firing the barracks, kidnapping the man and firing at the watering parties, have for some time been the order of the day. Is it forgotten that we are in an enemy's Country?

AN alleged Case of Robbery which dur- Ir is expected after the fall of Chapoo, a further ing the past week has been the subject of advance on Hang chow foo will take place. It lengthened examinations before the Chief appears a very questionable policy to leave so small a force at Tinghae. It now consists of 12 Royal Magistrate, turns out to have been a con- Artillery Men, one Company of the 18th R. I. and spiracy by some of our Kowloon neigh-one of the 55th!! Two transports, the Faize Allum bours, who not content with robbing one of and the Pelican, are lying in the harbour. You our native towns-folk of some twenty dollars (he had incautiously taken with him to a Sing Song on the opposite shore) but kept him a Prisoner for some time. Not obtaining the expected ransom, they charged him with theft and Piracy. The non-appearance of the complainants at the appointed time, the testimony of Lieut. Edwards of the Druid and the good character given of the Prison- er by Captain Morgan, satisfied H. E. that the Prisoner had been falsely accused. It is said, the Chinese can get up as bad cases of conspiracy, as have ever been exhibited in the Courts of the Old Bailey.

WE fear we shall have some lamentable catas- trophe to deplore if we despise our foe too much.

China. There will be an additional force of seven powerful War Steamers in the China waters. H. M. vessels Viten and Ardent have sailed; the Growler, Driver and Geyser will leave England in a few days. The E. I. Cos. Steamer Memnon sails on the 6th and the Akbar will immediately follow. Monthly Times 4th March.

Chinese news paper. We are glad to be able to announce to our numerous readers that arrange- ments are making to publish at intervals in our town a newspaper in the Chinese Language. We accept this intimation as an omen portentous of great good to the best interests of civilization, and promotive of British influence in this hitherto almost isolated Empire. The establishment of such a Print would be strongly indicative of the enterprising enlightenment which we hope will ever characterise the Capital of Anglo-China. It is right that a Native Free Press should spring in- to congenial existence on the soil of the first Brit- ish settlement in China. We would indulge the expectation, that this powerful organ of social and moral improvement will erelong lead all to ac- knowledge that hitherto hermetically sealed China, has become in verity and indeed "China Opened". Much credit is due to H. E. Sir Henry Pottinger, who, we are informed, has liberally accorded the use of the Government types for this object. Be- ing the first attempt to publish a Newspaper in Chinese, the full realization of the proposed plan, will we are told, be mainly dependent on the pres- ent support it may receive from the foreign com- munity in China. We would fain hope the pro- jectors, will be enabled, by the kind assistance of their friends, to prosecute their undertaking to a We are disposed to think it successful issue. would offer an admirable medium for mercantile advertisements and Government notifications. We beg to wish our intended contemporary an auspic- cius advent, a continuous prosperity, and a perma- nent usefulness. J

ON DITS.

On dit. Contracts for Teas to a considerable amount

have been made; delive.able at this Port during the ensuing season. On dit. The Hyacinth reports several Junks are now loading in the northern ports with Teas for this vessels are also taking in Teas. place. At Chimmo it is said, some two or three English

On dit: A fort mounting forty guns is now com- pleted a short way above where large Ships have of late anchored. - And below Whampoa !!!

On dit. Silk piece goods have lately been smuggled under cover of the American flag.

On dit. All the Guns of the Magicienne are at last mounted and are in efficient condition for service. The gunnery practice of the Chinese is rapidly improving On dit. The American officers are not drilling the Chinese troops.

POLICE.

Before the Chief Magistrate on the 25th inst Wil- liam Radford, James Mundy and Michael Sheehan,

all privates of the 49th Regiment, and belonging to the Magistracy Safety Guard, were charged by a China man named Hung fook with robbery. He deposed that the night before, abont 12 o'clock, he was awakened by the forcible entry of the three Prisoners into his He is sure of his men, as the moonlight mat hut. enabled him fully to distinguish their features -Shee- han took 7 Mexican dollars and 3000 Cash from under his pillow, Munday stood with a knife over him and Radford held him down. His wife ran away and gave the alarm; the Cap produced (a Forage Cap of the 49th) fell off Radfords head when they ran away. Ano- ther Chinaman deposed saw three Soldiers run into the Guard Room and at the same time saw the Forage Ting Fable hand. The itance Command and It was alleged by Hung fook that he was so afraid Sentries on duty, saw and knew nothing of the matter of the Soldiers, that he dared not complain at night at the Guard room.-The Prisoners denied all knowledge of the matter and said they were not out at the time in question. Radford owned the Cap, and could not explain how it could have been so found.- As to the Eleven Mexican Dollars found in his posses- sion, they were lately paid him by a man just arrived from India.

cation.

The prisoners with the depositions of the witnesses were remitted to the military authorities for adjudi- We are compelled to add,, many of our Chinese inhabitants declare (and we believe them) that numerous instances of similar outrages have before occurred although no exertions have been want- ing by the authorities to induce the sufferers to give evidence against the Soldiers, but for obvi- ous reasons, the Chinese have generally been content quietly to put up with the loss of their property.

SANDWICH ISLANDS, The King, Chiefs and Delegates are now in session as a Parliament to transact the the annual business of the kingdom. And we see in this and the accompanying movements of this government, a most sublime moral spectacle; to the nation is given a Constitution and laws, and to the people are granted many rights, and the chiefs circumscribed in their au thority by the voluntary action of those who possessed despotic power, and all this without spilling a drop of blood, or as the effect of any rebellion or revolution among the mass. Surely the effects of the gospel, and its attendant blessings, are seen in this.-Cor of the Jour of Com.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

SIAM.

To the Editor of the Friend of China. My dear Sir THE Siamese Prince. concerning whom you inquire is the elder son of the late King, and on the death of his father was the rightful heir to the throne. On the accession of the present i cumbent, he. to avoid doing homage to an usurper, entered the priesthood where, in common with the fraternity, he shares in the homage of the highest dignities of the Kingdon. He is between thirty and forty years old, possesses good men- tal capacities, is familiar with the native books. of the country though not a firm believer in all their contents. and has a little knowledge of Latin and English, and speaks and reads Chinese to a limited extent. He has made some efforts at Romanizing the Siamese language. and recently ordered from England a printing press and all the necessary apparatus for printing. He has also commenced a font of Siamese metalic type, which are now in an advanced state of preparation. The punches are cut, the matrices are formed and the type cast by Siamese artizans under his own instruction and personal superintendance. He has met with some lit. tle difficulty in different parts of the work, but has received the necessary aid and instruction from the American gentlemen who have now two type foundries And four printing presses in successful operation in the Siamese Capital.

In return for this assistance, he proposes to furnish the matrices for a font of his type, which are formed more in accordance with Siamese taste, and better a. dapted to practical purposes, than either the one prepared at Malacca, or the one from Singapore. What may be the precise object of this Royal high Priest in thus introducing the printing art into the country is not known, but from the character of the man and the position he occupies, being surrounded by an ignorant people who couple an inquisitive disposi. tion with a capacity to read, and who look up to their nobility with trembling fear and to their priests with religious veneration, it is reasonable to expect that

good will be the result.

As to the reading ability of the Siamese compared to that of the Chinese, some idea may be derived from the fact, that the youth who would spend six or eight years in learning to read Chinese would acquire the same knowledge of Siamess in an equal number of months. Add to this, the fact, that there are in the cap. ital alone not less than one hundred public institu. tions of learning including teachers and pupils containing on an average not less than one hundred persons, we may conclude the Siamese to be a reading people. But it is necessary to explain that these insti tutions of learning are nothing more nor less than the Budhists temples, which occupy the most prominent and inviting sites in the country, and all to a greater or less degree share in the royal patronage. * Every native boy in the country is expected to enter the temple, where he learns to read under the instruc. tion of the priests and afterward before he can be eli- gible to office, he must enter the priesthood for three months. But after stating that the Siamese language is simple and easily acquired. and noticing the ample provision made for the education of the young. it is found from observation. that few if any of the Siamese are educated. Many are found among them who, like some of the Chinese can repeat fluently the sounds without knowing their significatio. But few Si- amese females can read, though as before intimated a person of ordinary talent speaking the Siamese lan- gunge might. in less than one year-(some say in three months) learn to read it understandingly.

scratched

mni u m. -Maria Christina of Spain, or rather Madam Munoz has had her dowry of £30,000 a year, as Widow of Ferdinand the Seventh, stopped. We are glad of it. Having plundered Spain of valua- bles and specie to the extent of more than £4,000,000 ought surely to suffice her Wants. -Slaves in the United States. According to the last Census amounted to 2,487,213: of Free Blacks there were in the seven principal States 270,000. -Sir Charles Metcalfe. We are glad to know that the Diamond Star presented to this much es- teemed gentleman by the Bengal Civil Service has been inspected by competent judges and pronoun- ced to be superb

COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE.

43

1 During the last six or seven years, the various descriptions of goods usually imported into this Presi. dency from Great Britain, have increased to a vast extent. Printed and dyed goods, for example, have increased from 1.92.000 pieces in 1836-37 to 5,70,000 in 1840-41; Plain Cottons during the same period from 1200.000 to 20 00.000 pieces; Cotton vara from 17.60 000 to 2500 000 lbs; Cochineal from 60.000 to 2,10,000 lbs; and most other articles in a similar ratio. But in proportion as the importations of these com mod. ities have increased in quantity, they have generally dimin shed in value, even simultaneously with an in- creased consumption. The consequence has been a general downward course of prices with hardly a single rally. Take the following as examples:

Grey Longeloths, Male Twist Cochineal. 34 in. by 33 yds. No. 20 No 40 an as per lb.

1816-8 Rupees per piece. 12 15 4 Rs. per lb.

1832 6

-The Duke of Wellington as President of the Council issues the notices of meeting, which are couched in these terms; You are desired to at- tend a meeting of her Majestys Servants. At times, as in the case of the Paisley deputation, the Duke affects not to be a responsible minister of the Crown. What is he then? We hope he will take 183774 warning by the fate of Marlborough and remember 1838 7 the caustic lines of Pope. -The Duke of Cambridge, has lately been voted 1140 6 the freedom of the City of London in a gold box 1841 51 1842 5 of the value of one hundred guineas. We are glad to notice this testimonial as he is personally a very amiable Prince and his frequent friendly and cha- ritable visits to the City, have not a little tended, to popularize Monarchy in that quarter. It is said of him, that his father, George the third declared, of all his Childern he alone, had never cost him a tear or a regret. He possesses the rare privi- lege of a Prince of the Blood viz: in not being in debt-indeed he is reported rich, which with his habits he may well be, seeing that whilst out of England for a long series of years (and enjoying the appendages and emoluments of a Viceroy in Hanover) John Bull has uncomplainingly continued to pay him his annual income as a Prince of the Blood Royal of England.

-Corn Laws. Our unfortunate ancestors, says the Westminster Review, "had the Divine right of Kings to settle." We their Children, have got per- haps a harder thing tosettle, the Divine right of squires. -Coals carried annually coastwise from the Tyne exceed, it is said 2,500,000 Tons and sent to Foreign parts amount now to 1,500,000 Tons. -Naval Force of Great Britain now consists of 592 Ships of War; of which 107 are armed stea- mers the number of which, it is intended largely to augment.

he

China War. Will Sir James Graham, now is in, say as he did when out of Office, viz: It is a War in which success would not be attended with glory, and in which defeat would be our ruin and our shame?

Glass has been very successfully applied in Europe to the fabrication of Church bells. The tone is alleged to be incomparably superior to that of Metal.

Infusoria. Professor Ehrenberg the great mi- crocapical naturalist alleges that Chalk is but a product of animalcula of which about 10,000,000 are required to make a pound weight.

-The Author of the Pickwick Papers is now on a tour in the United States: we are sure he will meet with the kindliest welcome. We are glad The Siamese books are written either upon palm leaf to see that one of the most eminent of the Ameri- or coarse paper, resembling paste board and folded to. can Writers (and who also enjoys a high European gether like a fas On the former, the characters are reputation) Dr. Chanoing says "Charles Dickens. haha illustrates the liberalizing all har with a soft stone resembling a slate pencil, the paste.monizing tendency of our times, whose genius has board first being covered with a composition giving it sought and found subjects of thrilling interest in the the character of slate paper. They sometimes write passions, sufferings and virtues of the mass of the with a pen made of bamboo, using for ink a prepara- people. He shows, that life in its rudest forms may tion formed from a yellow stone found in the country wear a tragic grandeur; that amidst follies and called horodan. This is reduced with much labor to a sensual excesses, provoking laughter and scorn, fine powder and mixed with water. Their books being the moral feelings do not wholly die; and that the thus copied out on such bulky materials contain but little matter in a large space, whilst the scope of Si- haunts of the blackest crimes are sometimes lighted amese literature, if such it may be called, is confined to up by the presence and influence of the noblest narrow limits. Their books contain some historical souls. The tendency of his dark pictures is to account of their own country, with much that is fabu- awaken sympathy with our race, to change the lous, a little on the subject of medicine. and their re. unfeeling indifference which has prevailed towards the depressed multitude, into sorrowful and indig- ligions system (Budhism) written in Bali. nant sensibility to their wrongs, and woes." Napoleon and Wellington. Whilst tens of thou- sands of portraits of Napoleon have been sold in England, according to the Art Union, there is no instance of Wellington's portrait being sold in France, The English print sellera confirm the

The Sam Kok Chi has been translated into Siamese and holds a somewhat prominent place among Siamese books, and is generally used by foreigners as a class book in learning the language, and is a popular work among native readers.

Allow me to postpone a reply to your other questions till another day, meantime I remain

Yours &c W. D.

His Majesty annually visits, in pers n these temples, distrib. tutes articles of clothing to the priesthood, who also receive from the royal treasury an allowance amounting to from one to fifteen ticals monthly. The nobility also share the honor and reward with the common people of dealing out food every morn- ing in person to the priests as they pass round from house to house to receive it.

NEWSPAPERS OF THE WORLD. Spain, 12; Portugal. 17; Switzerland. 30; Belgium, 62; Demmark. 80; Austria, 82; Russia and Poland, 84; Holland, 150; Prussia. 288 Great Britain and Ireland, 480; the Germanic States, 208, Australia. 9; Africa. 12; Asia 30; United States, newspapers, 1555, periodicals, 305.

statement.

"1

34

71 11

10 12 4

9 10 4

7 9 31

63 9 3

6 81 3 51 8 2

And as a proof that prices at the commencemeut of the present year, hand not attained their minimum, we may mention, that Cochineal has been sold in February at 2: in the beginning of March at 13; and ten days ago at 14 Rupees per lb !!

FOR No. 20 Mule twist, 5 annis can now with difficulty be obtained; and almost every other article is in a similar predicament.

Bombay Times.

NAVY. The total number of vessels that have already sailed, or are about to sail, to join the squadron in the Chinese 83as. is fifteen-being one line-of-battle ship. Cochrane; four frigates, the "Cambrian," 36, Cap- the "Implacable." 74. fitting for the flag of Sir Thomas tain H. D. Chads. C B.; "Thalia." 44 Captain C. Hope; "North Star." 28. Captain Sir J. E Home; and "Vindictive." 50, Captain J. T. Nicholas; six sloops of war-the "Dido." 20. Captain the Hon. H. Kappel; "Hazard." 18. Commander C. Bell; "Syren." 16, Commander W. Smith; "Harlequin." 16, Commander G. F. Hastings; "Wolverine." 16. Commandor J. W. S. Johnson; and Serpent." 16, Commander W. Mevill; "Apollo," Commander C. Frederick; and "Sapphire,' three troop-ships -the Balleisle," Captain J. Kingcome Master-Commander G. H. Cole; and one hospital-ship, the "Minden." Captain M. Quin. The ships of war carry altogether 334 guns. The majority of them have already sailed; the "Implacable." "Vindictive." "Wol- verine," and "Minden," (hospital-ship), being the only vessels not yet ready. The "Wolverine" and "Minden" will sail in a day or two, and the Vindictive' in about three weeks. The "Implacable" will take some time longer, as she has only recently been put in commis- sion. It is now understood that the "Carysfort''frigate, 28. Captain Lord George Paulett, which has lately been conmissioned at Portsmouth. is to proceed to China This will make the number of vessels ordered to reinforce the squadron already there sixteen, and the total number of guns 360, exclusive of those on board the troop-ships, which are armed en flute.

Bombay Times.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Is the New York Money Market some excitement prevailed in consequence of a draft draw by Mr. Ever ett, the American Minister at the court of St. James, for 12.000 dollars. negotiated in London, having been protested at Washington for non payment, the depart ment having nothing to offer but Treasury notes, and not feeling at liberty to pay them except at par.

The examination of Nicholas Biddle, and others, on a charge of conspiracy arising out of their connexion with the Bank of the United States, took place on the 13th Jan., before the Recorder of Philadelphia All the prisoners were present in court. The crowd was very great, as the curiosity of the auditory was intense to hear the development in this interesting proceeding. The examination was resumed on the afternoon of the 14th. The Court, after examining one witness, ad- the night of the 17th Jan. A cashier and a teller of journed to the next day. The examination closed on the bank were the only witnesses examined: they pro duced books, papers, and memoranda. At the conclu- sion of the examination, the Recorder stated it as his firm belief, that, there was sufficient cause produced in the investigation and, testimony before him to warrant him in binding the defendants ever, and he accordingly boanl over Nicholas Biddle, Samu- el Jaudon, Joseph Cowperthwaite, Thomas Dunlap, and John Andrews, each in the sum of 10.000 dollars, in two sureties, to apear at the Court of General Ses- sions, to answer the charges brought, against them by Austin Montgomery, that is, for a conspiracy to rob and cheat the stokholders of the United States Bank. The Court room was crowded all the afternoon, and a great number remained to hear the results Mr. Samuel Jaudon was committed to the custody of an officer, and an habeas corpus was immediately sued by his counsel Monthly Times. on his behalf."

Ir is expected that the honourable distinction of "C. B." is about to be conferred upon the gallant Lieut. Colonel Ellis for his services in China, and that of Brevet Major upon Captain Whitcomb for his ser- vices in the same quarter.

Sra James Alexander, R. M. A. proceeds to China in the Driver. Lieut-Col R. Edwards, Capt J. Land, and Lieut H. H. McCarthy, have been appointed to the Minden. There are also on board Captains Graham and Pearce, Lieutenants Farrant, Pennington, Rea, Jones, Allen, and Wilson, with 3 serjeants, 2 drum. mers, and 130 privates, for China.

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu. tation.

1ST-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali- ty enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

We beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. AFRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp, Soda Water Powders. and Campbell in hhds. Brown Windsor Soup. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses. Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Very fue small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dublin Stout, in bottles.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder. Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay.

Superfine

"

Brown Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

Port wine, from Cockburn. and Carbonel and Co.

Knudsden's Cherry Brandy

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

.. Sandoway Imitation

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waiste ats.

Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco.

Worsted Gloves.

Guernsey Frocks.

Fancy dry Biscuits, in answyranty Brankers.

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditte,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tins, for Invalids.

Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Ditto Sago.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Metal ditto.

Navy Buttons.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Rumia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto.

Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Isinglass.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Seidlitz Powders.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Fine Salt.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tina.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard.

Assorted Sauces.

Capers,

ded, in kg each containing Jama and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 9 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel,

Humps and 6 Tongues. Lead Lines, Europe. Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting. Fish hooks. Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks.

A STOREKEEPER WANTED.

A PERSON of sober and industrious habits with experience in the department of re- And various other Aricles too ceiving and delivering valuable merchan- dise, may apply at 46 Queens Road be- tween the hours of 10 and 11 a. m.

numerous to detail.

NOTICE. GOOD's and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to

An ex-second officer of a vessel familiar with the above mentioned duty would probably prove a suitable person for the situation. C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS. or

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles :-

Brandy in Wood and Bottles, Vinegar, ditto. Beer, ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

ate Prices

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

FOR SALE. MANILLA Segars 4th and 6th Superior at moder- Apply to MR. OLIVEIRA. On Board the AMAZON. ON SALE.

Allso a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine NAIL rod Iron Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

Stores.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron.

Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Best Stockholm Tar

Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Lead and Log Lines. uperior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle

Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt.

Best mould Candles in

Carr's well known fancy 10 pound boxes. Fine table Salt..

Biscuits.

shire Hams.

Apply to W. T. Kinsley. HONGKONG, 1st June, 1842.

SQUARE IRON AT AUCTION. 300 Peculs of Square Iron of sizes, from to 1 inch, suitable for building purposes will be offered at Auction in Convenient lots at the new building opposite the Hong- kong Market Place, on Saturday next 4th inst. at 11 A. M. The Iron in the meantime can be viewed at the Godowns No. 46 Queens Road. HONGKONG 1st JUNE 1842.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

Superior Smoked York- May 27th Faize Rabahny Transport, T. Steward 14th Regt. N. I. Maulmein, Urgent Transport I. Marshall 2nd Rgt. M. N.I. Wm. Money, W. Bickford Duke of Bedford,, I. Lay,

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.

Hongkong, April 7th. 1812.

HONGKONG 11TH APRIL 1842. To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chinese Copper Coin, at 1200 for Oue Silver Spanish Dollar, in Quan. tities of not less than 50 Dollars, which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th Instant at Messrs. Jar. dine Matheson & Co. on Shore at Hongkong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays except- ed.

Apply to R. M Whichelo, I urs r

of H. M. S. Blenheim, and Prize agent

FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice. Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board

HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

MADEIRA Wine i Tipes, Trogstreads and Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. DENT & Co. at Macao, Apply to MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

arcer

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar

of the Chinese Language. Published at Batavia. Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com- ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men. Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price 8 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

A Handsome Double dinner service of En- glish crockery, complete. Apply at N. Duus Godowns. ita t

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and bottles

Pine Cheese

Manilla Segars No. 4. Apply to

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

No. 18 Queen's Road.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

A. L. de Encarnação.

Singapore. Singapore.

33 39 99 999 99

H. M. Brig Childers Capt. Halstead R. N. Fortescue

W. Hall Porter

Maulmein. Macao.

28th Pantaloon 29th Katharine St. Forbes Ino Hobbs Chusan. 30th Serpent H. M. Brig Capt. Neville R. N. Sin. W. Gibson H. Artly.", N. Ford

Teazer Transport

31

Ledy Flora,,

Defiance

City of London,,

R. W. Evatt,, I Anbraw

23 11

Anna Watson

31

H. M. I. Dido

Warrior

"Privateer Schr.

W. Dailey Bengl. Vol.,, N. N. Sapers Macao. Honble. Capt. Keppel P. N. Singapore. D'Lange Macao.

H M. Sch. Young Hebe Lieut Cashman R. N.,, 31st H. M. Brig Harlequin Honble. Capt. S. F.

H.M S. Thalia Tamerlane

John Fleming Anna

Hastings, Singapore.

Capt Charles Hope Mackenzie Bengl. Vol.

J. Clark Bowrar

11

Macao.

SAILED.

Chusah

May 26th Wm. Hughes Abbott East Coast. 27th H. C. Steamer Medusa Capt. Hewett IN. 28th H. M.S. Cambrian Capt. Grey R. N., H. M. Str. Vixen, Capt. Boyes R. N. Thames Marquis Chusan Transports 41st Robarts Elder Regt. N. I, on board.

13

Perey

Forth

Hickmace Heckford Maria Lonsdale

39

17

Bengal Volun-

"City of Palaces. Sherifi,, Martha Donaldson

29th H. M. S. Hyacinth,

30th Brig Pantaloon

31st Schr. Privateer

19

H. M. Brig Childers

June 1st Mercury

19

teers and follow-

ers of the 98th

Capt. Goldsmith R. N.

England. Porter Macao. D'Lange Whampoa. Capt. Halstead Amoy and Chusan.

H. Humphries Macao

William Pedder Harbor Master.

per 100

n

PRICES for Job Printing are as follows:

Bills of Lading and Exchange,

Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

Of Ships

ADVERTIS

Not exceeding 7 lines

for 3 months

953

516

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod.

erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi nese language.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

LONGBONG

EXTRAORDINARY.

GAZETTE

HONGKONG. SATURDAY, JUNE 4TH. 1842.

CERCULAE

TO HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S SUBJECTS IN CHINA.

HER Majesty's Plenipotentiary, &c., &c., has much satisfaction in promulgating, for general information, the annexed extracts of official Despatches, under dates the 23rd and 21st of May, which Lave this day reached him from their Excellencies the Naval and Military Commanders in Chief, announcing the capture of the Port and City of Chapoo.

I regret to add, that this has not been effected without a greater loss than I an- ticipated. One officer, one sergeant, and 7 men killed; seven officers, one serjeant, and 42 men wounded, of the military arm; and about 5 or 6 of the ma- rines and seamen. In the list of killed, I feel deep regret in naming Lt.-Colonel Tomlinson, an officer of high promise. Amongst the wounded are Li-Col. Moun- tain, Depy. Adjt. Genl., a very superior staff officer,-who has received three rather severe wounds: and Captn. Campbell, 55th, a most zealous officer."

True Extract,

G. A Malcolm, Secretary of Legation.

(Signed) H. GoUGH, LA. Genl. Comg. Land Forces Eastern Expedition.

Whilst Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary must feel, in common with all Her Majesty's Subjects, great thankfulness and pride at this most important success, he participates most warmly in the expressions of regret which have been recorded by Their Excel- lencies the Naval and Military Commanders-in-chief of Her Ma- jesty's combined forces, at the losses which our gallant country- inen have sustained in killed and wounded, as well as at the a- mount of suffering which has fallen on the Chinese soldiers and inhabitants, in spite of every effort made to induce the former toby His Excellency Lieutenant-General Sir Hugh Gough, G. C. B., commanding Expeditionary Land Force, dated Head, Quarters, Chapoo City, 19th May, surrender, and, as well as the latter, to trust to our clemency and kind treatment of them.

1842.

GENERAL ORDERS

THE Lieutenant General has again to congratulate his brave comrades in arms The whole of the prisoners made, have been released and on another very brilliant achievement executed with their usual gallantry by the sent back to the Chinese High Officers, who had subsequently Chinese Expeditionary Force. SIR Hugh Gough's best thanks are due to all ranks, and he again has to request made overtures for accommodation, but which it is impossible to pronounce to be sincere. Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, how-Officers in command of Corps and Detachments to convey to their respective Officers and Soldiers his highest sense of approbation. ever, indulges the strong hope, that the irresistible power of Her Majesty's Arms will, at no distant neriod, compel the Govern- ment of China to come to terms, and thereby put a stop to a war, which it is his anxious duty and wish to see terminated on an honorable and lasting basis.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN!

Dated at Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1842.

HENRY POTTINGER

Dated Cornwallis at Chapoo 23rd May 1842.

Dated "Cornwallis," at Chapoo, 23rd May 1842. "Commanders Kellett and Collinson. who have been indefatigable in surveying every part we have had to navigate, succeeded during the night in thoroughly sound. ing between the anchorage of the ships and the shore, which enabled the Corn. wallis, Blonde. and Modeste, while the troops were landing, to take up excellent positions against the Sea Batteries, consisting of two works mounting 7 and 5 guns, about one third of the way up a steep hill, at the Eastern extremity of the suburb, and crowned with a Joss House, occupied by a large body of men; and three other masked batteries mounting 30 guns, in front of the suburbs; making a total of 42 guns of different calibre. These all were thronged with Chinese sol diers, who also lined t defences on the heights, to a considerable extent, with matchlock men and n erous jinjalls.

"Against these Fi works the Sesostris was anchored, for the purpose of dis- persing them with shells as our Troops advanced; and the inhabitants of the suburbs and city were duly warned to retire out of the line of our fire."

"By the exertions of the Nemesis, Phlegethon, and Queen, steamers, and the boats of the covering vessels Starling, Columbine, Bentinck, and Algerine, together with those of the transports, conducted by Lieut. Somerville, the troops were all put on shore in admirable order, under the able direction of Commander Charles Richards of the Cornwallis, before nine o'clock, when the antamed onerry immediately pushed forward at their head, the Ships, by a preconcerted signal, opening their fire at the same time on Batteries. A few shot however put the men stationed in them, and at the Joss House on the summit of the hill opposite to us, to a precipitate flight, and not a moment was lost in landing the Seamen and Marines of the Squadron, under Cap. tain Bourchier of the Blonde and the officers named in the accompanying list, who got possession of the Batteries before the mines which were prepared in them could be sprung, and having succeeded in cutting off several of the Chinese Troops that were endeavoring to reach the Suburbs, joined our Land Forces on their approach to the City." WILLIAM PARKER. Vice Admiral

A true Extract

G. A. MALCOLM.

Secretary of Legation.

(Signed)

Dated Head Quarters, Chapoo, May 21st 1842.

THE Lieutenant General commanding cannot deny himself the melancholy gratification of recording the deep feelings of regret he has experienced at the loss of one of our brightest ornaments, Lieut., Colonel Tomlinson, 18th Royal Irish, who fell at the head of his Corps, nobly doing his duty. His honorable remains will be committed to the deep to morrow, in accordance with the express wishes

of his brother Officers.

THE Lieutenant General is happy to announce that Lieutenant Colonel Moun. tain, C. B, Deputy 'Adjutant General, whose zealous exertions have been so fre- quently recorded, is doing well, as also the other wounded Officers and Men.

TRUE COPY

G. A. Malcolm,

Secretary of Legation.

(Signed) J. B. GOUGH, Major,

Deputy Quarter Master Genl., Acting for Depy. Adjt. General, Expeditionary Force,

In a hurried note from a correspondent dated Chapoo, May 26th, is the following sentence, "The Chinese have made the first offer of peace." No further particulars.

It appears that the Chinese offered no resistance till after the troops had landed and entered the town, when, beginning to sepa- rate, one party arrived before a temple occupied by about two hundred and fifty of the enemy, who, as fast as any one showed hi self before the door, took shot at him, in many instances with dedly effect. Their resistance was so obstinate that to dislodge them or silence their fire was found impossible, and ultimately, we hear, the house was set fire to. When this devoted party had eps thus orterminated, many others of the Tartar garrison (for Chapoo is one of the places occupied by a Mantenou garrison that has been settled there since the foundation of the dynasty) killed their own wiyes and children and then slew themselves, rather than survive the disgrace of such defeat. Fifteen hundred dead were found and buried

3rd.

THE flect arrived at an anchorage, thirteen miles from this, on the 14th instant. On the 16th His Excellency, Sir Wm. Parker and myself reconnoitred the de- fences of Chapo; when we made our dispositions for its attack. On the 17th the fleet came to anchor about four miles to the East of the City-and the troops 4th. were ordered to prepare to land at daylight next morning. By 8 o'clock, on the 18th every man was on shore without being opposed. By ten o'clock the whole range of heights and fortified encampments, forming the principal military defences of Chapoo, were in our possession, and by 12 I was on the walls of the city--having escaladed the castern angle, during the confusion and panic occasioned by the previous attacks; and having cut off the retreat of a large por tion of those who defended the heights, which fortunately were the enemy's best troops composed of Mantchoo Tartars. The Chinese had about 8000 regulars, 1700 of whom were Tartars. Their loss must have been very great, as we have buried from 1200 to 1500 men-We have made but few prisoners, and those are principally wounded. From 80 to 90 guns have fallen into our hands; all of which I am in the act of destroying, except the brass. Vast quantities of jin. jalls. with some thousands of matchlocks, and innumerable bows and arrows, have also fallen into our hands, as have also a foundery, gunpowder manufactory, ether with several arsenals, - which shall all be destroyed.

HARBOR MASTER'S OFFICE,

ARRIVED.

Kestrel, from Chusan 1st June.

Sea Queen, from Macao.

H. M. Ship North Star, from Singapore, Capt. Sir E. Home,

H. M. Troop Ship Belleisle, Capt. Kingcome, with Lord Saltoun and Staff,

the 98th Regt., and detachment of Royal Artillery.

Trio, from Calcutta,

Mary Imrie, from Chusan.

H. C. Steamer Queen, from Chapoo, Chusan, and Amoy!

Prussia,-from London.

Blundell-from Calcutta 39th Regt. M. N. 1,

Burhampooter,

do.

Bengal Volunteers.

Rohomany, 2nd Regt. Madras N. I.

William Turner, 6th Regt. Madras N. 1,

John Wickliffe-39th Regt. MN. L

H. M. Troop Ship Sapphire-Capt. Cole-Detachts. of 18th, 49th and Royal Artry.

H. M. Troop Ship Rattlesnake-with Stores from Trincomalee. Now arriving, H. M. Troop Ship Apollo,

4th June 1842,

W. PEDDER. Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

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THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

N°. 12. VOL. 1

LONGBONG GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 9TH. 1842.

CIRCULAR

TO HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S SUBJECTS IN CHINA. HER Majesty's Plenipotentiary, &c., &c., has much satisfaction in promulgating, for general information, the annexed extracts of official Despatches, under dates the 23rd and 21st of May, which have this day reached him from their Excellencies the Naval and Military Commanders in Chief, announcing the capture of the Port and City of Chapoo.

Whilst Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary must feel, in common with all Her Majesty's Subjects, great thankfulness and pride at this most important success, he participates most warmly in the expressions of regret which have been recorded by Their Excel- lencies the Naval and Military Commanders-in-chief of Her Ma- jesty's combined forces, at the losses which our gallant country- men have sustained in killed and wounded, as well as at the a- mount of suffering which has fallen on the Chinese soldiers and inhabitants, in spite of every effort made to induce the former to surrender, and, as well as the latter, to trust to our clemency and kind treatment of them.

Price 1 monthly Or 8 12 yearly

I regret to add, that this has not been effected without a greater loss than I an- ticipated. One officer, one sergeant, and 7 men killed; seven officers, one serjeant, and 42 men wounded, of the military arm; and about 5 or 6 of the ma- rines and seamen. In the list of killed, I feel deep regret in naming Lt. Colonel Tomlinson, an officer of high promise. Amongst the wounded are Lt.-Col. Moun- rather severe wounds: and Captn. Campbell, 55th, a most zealous officer.'" tain, Depy. Adjt. Geul, a very superior staff officer,-who has received three

1842.

True Extract,

G. A Malcolm, Secretary of Legaiton.

GENERAL ORDERS

(Signed) H. Goven, Lt. Gen! Comg. Land Forces Eastern Expedition.

L

by His Excellency Lieutenant-General Sir Hugh Gough, G. C. B., commanding Expeditionary Land Force, dated Head, Quarters, Chapoo City, 19th May, on another very brilliant achievement executed with their usual gallantry by the THE Lieutenant General has again to congratulate his brave comrades în arms Chinese Expeditionary Force.

The whole of the prisoners made, have been released and sent back to the Chinese High Officers, who had subsequently made overtures for accommodation, but which it is impossible to SIR Hugh Gough's best thanks are due to all ranks, and he again has to request pronounce to be sincere. Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, how-Officers in command of Corps and Detachments to convey to their respective Officers and Soldiers his highest sense of approbation. ever, indulges the strong hope, that the irresistible power of Her Majesty's Arms will, at no distant period, compel the Govern- ment of China to come to terms, and thereby put a stop to a war, which it is his anxious duty and wish to see terminated on an honorable and lasting basis. GOD SAVE THE QUEEN! Dated at Government House, Hongkong, 4th June, 1842.

HENRY POTTINGER.

Dated "Cornwallis" at Chapoo 23rd May 1842. "Commanders Kellett and Collinson. who have been indefatigable in surveying every part we have had to navigate, succeeded during the night in thoroughly sound. ing between the anchorage of the ships and the shore, which enabled the Corn. wallis, Blonde, and Modeste, while the troops were landing, to take up excellent positions against the Sea Batteries, consisting of two works mounting 7 and 5 guns, about one third of the way up a steep hill, at the Eastern extremity of the suburb, and crowned with a Joss House, occupied by a large body of men; and three other masked batteries mounting 30 guns, in front of the suburbs: making a total of 42 guns of different calibre. These all were thronged with Chinese sol diers, who also lined their defences on the heights, to a considerable extent, with matchlock men and numerous jinjalls.

"Against these Field works the Sesostris was anchored. for the purpose of dis- persing them with shells as our Troops advanced; and the inhabitants of the suburbs and city were duly warned to retire out of the line of our fire." "By the exertions of the Nemesis, Phlegethon, and Queen, steamers, and the boats of the covering vessels Starling, Columbine, Bentinck, and Algerine, together with those of the transports, conducted by Lieut. Somerville, the troops were all put on shore in admirable order, under the able direction of Commander Charles Richards of the Cornwallis, before nine o'clock, when the Central, with mis accustomed energy, hammerely proted forward her head the Ships, by a preconcerted signal, opening their fire at the same time on the Batteries. A few shot however put the men stationed in them, and at the Joss House on the summit of the hill opposite to us, to a precipitate flight, and not a moment was lost in landing the Seamen and Marines of the Squadron, under Cap- tain Bourchier of the Blonde and the officers named in the accompanying list, who got possession of the Batteries before the mines which were prepared in them could be sprung, and having succeeded in cutting off several of the Chinese Troops that were endeavoring to reach the Suburbs, joined our Land Forces on their approach to the City." . (Signed) WILLIAM PARKER. Vice Admiral

A true Extract

G. A. MALCOLM.

Secretary of Legation.

THE Lieutenant General commanding cannot deny himself the melancholy gratification of recording the deep feelings of regret he has experienced at the loss of one of our brightest ornaments, Lieut. Colonel Tomlinson, 18th Royal Irish, will be committed to the deep to morrow, in accordance with the express wishes who fell at the head of his Corps, nobly doing his duty. His honorable remains

of his brother Officers.

THE Lieutenant General is happy to announce that Lieutenant Colonel Moun- tain, C. B, Deputy Adjutant General, whose zealous exertions have been so fre- quently recorded, is doing well, as also the other wounded Officers and Men.

TRUE COPY

G. A. Malcolm,

Secretary of Legation.

(Signed) J. B. Govcu, Major,

Deputy Quarter Master Genl., Acting for Depy. Adjt. General, Expeditionary Force.

In a hurried note from a correspondent dated Chapoo, May 26th, is the following sentence, "The Chinese have made the first offer of peace." No further particulars.

It appears that the Chinese offered no resistance till after the troops had landed and entered the town, when, beginning to sepa- rate, one party arrived before a temple occupied by about two hundred and fifty of the enemy, who, as fast as any one showed himself before the door, took aim at him, in many instances with deadly effect. Their resistance was so obstinate that to dislodge them or-silence their fire was found impossible, and ultimately, we near, the mouse was set fire to. When tins devoted party ad been thus exterminated, many others of the Tartar garrison (for Chapoo is one of the places occupied by a Mantchou garrison that has been settled there since the foundation of the dynasty) killed their own wives and children and then slew themselves, rather than survive the disgrace of such defeat. Fifteen hundred dead were buried.

3rd.

Tela ban mollabo da uogai golillo ide o M 11

armelo banoft

nohen T

A St

moonil moi ? digte go ollo qida qour l

WI

Dated Head Quarters, Chapoo, May 21st 1842.

THE fleet arrived at an anchorage, thirteen miles from this, on the 14th instant. On the 16th His Excellency, Sir Wm. Parker and myself reconnoitred the de. fences of Chapo; when we made our dispositions for its attack. On the 17th the fleet came to anchor about four miles to the East of the City-and the troops 4th were ordered to prepare to land at daylight next morning. By 8 o'clock, on the 18th every man was on shore without being opposed. By ten o'clock the whole range of heights and fortified encampments, forming the principal military defences of Chapoo, were in our possession, and by 12 I was on the walls of the city--having escaladed the eastern angle, during the confusion and panic occasioned by the previous attacks; and having cut off the retreat of a large por- tion of those who defended the heights, which fortunately were the enemy's best troops, composed of Mantchoo Tartars. The Chinese had about 8000 regulars, 1700 of whom were Tartars. Their loss must have been very great, as we have buried from 1200 to 1500 men-We have made but few prisoners, and those are principally wounded. From 80 to 90 guns have fallen into our hands; all of which I am in the act of destroying, except the brass. Vast quantities of jin- jalls, with some thousands of matchlocks, and innumerable bows and arrows, have also fallen into our hands, as have also a foundery, gunpowder manufactory, together with several arsenals, - which shall all be destroyed.

HARBOR MASTER'S OFFICE.

ARRIVED.

Kestrel, from Chusan 1st June.

Sea Queen, from Macao.

H. M. Ship No.th Star, from Singapore, Capt. Sir E. Home,

H. M. Troop Ship Belleisle, Capt. Kingcome, with Lord Saltoun and Staff, the 98th Regt., and detachment of Royal Artillery.

Trio, from Calcutta,

Mary Imrie, from Chusan.

H. C. Steamer Queen, from Chapoo, Chusan, and Amoy.

Prussia,-from London.

Blundell-from Calcutta 39th Regt. M. N. 1,

Burhampooter, do. Bengal Volunteers.

Rohomany, 2nd Regt. Madras N. I.

William Turner, 6th Regt. Madras N. L.

John Wickliffe-39th Regt. Mr N. L

H. M. Troop Ship Sapphire-Capt. Cole-Detachts. of 18th, 49th and

Royal Artry.

H. M. Troop Ship Rattlesnake-with Stores from Trincomalee.

Now arriving, H. M. Troop Ship Apollo.

4th June 1842,

W. PEDDER.

Harbor Master.

40

NOTIFICATION.

still to be considered as official,

By order,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

NOTIFICATION,

thereto, not exceeding three Acres,

It is to be understood that the House alone is to be sold, and that the ground will hereafter come under any Regulations or Orders that Her Majes- ty's Government may be pleased to lay down for similar lots, Terms, Payment in three days after the Sale, By order

Chas. E. Stewart Assist, Secy, aud Treasurer Govt. House, Hongkong 3rd June 1843. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE, AVIS,

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

FsIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE, 9TH. 1842.

outrages,

HER Majesty's ship Belleisle, commanded by Captain King- come, having on board, Major.General Lord Saltoun, and his

ing of the 20th December, 1841: touching at and leaving the undermentioned places herein stated. Arrived at Teneriffe, 30th December, 1811; sailed 1st January, 1812. At Rio de Janeiro, 2nd February, 1842; sailed, 8th February-42. At the Cape of Good Hope, 14th March; sailed, 22nd March,-42. Passed St. Baul's on the 9th of April; Java Head, on the 28th April. At Singapore, 12th May; sailed, 17th May,-42. Hor Majesty's 98th Regiment, commanded by Lieut. Col. Campbell, embarked on the 11th; including officers, 803 strong, with 40 women and 73 children: which, with half u company of the Royal Artillery, the Belleisle's crew, &c.; making in all, 1278 souls. Distributed as follows: Qff. 98th Decks.

M. D. L. D.

Cab.

without.

sol. sail

Poop,....

..8 26...267

& Artil.

19

711 241

8

25

6.

12

3.

... 978

300

33

31

O. D.

14..

ered. They escaped to a large boat which was destined to carry off the plunder, It is said it was the same party (which also arrived by water from Kowloon) that robbed lhe Commissariat Stores THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- and broke though the wall of Captain Duus, Go- down a few weeks since and stole therefrom some zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date; but all THE accomplished author of England 200 dollars worth of Copper Cash. No other public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga-and America (who has done more for property we are glad to say was lost. Unsuccess- zetto," with the signatures of duly autho-Ships, Colonies and Commerce than any ful attempts, we are told, have been made on the sul's and also at the Victoria Hotel, In the rized Functionaries of the Government are living writer or statesman) in a chapter on Godowns of Mr. Kinsley, at the French Con- the means of extending Free Trade to the latter attempt one of the burglars was severely whole coast of China says "much as the wounded as he entered through the wall he had English and Americans have the propen-perforated. We are disposed to think these oc- sity to truck, barter and exchange they are currences would not have taken place but for the in that respect surpassed by the Chinese." very summary abolition of our Municipal Police, No provision whatever being made prior to the The experience of this settlement abun- disbandment of this useful force it is not surpris. dantly shows this to be the case. He more-ing depredators should deem it almost an immu- The House built for Mr. Parkinson, Superinten- over adds "Foreign trade with the Chi-nity for their calling. Our worthy Chief Magis- dent of the Roads having reverted to Govern- nese never has been and for ages to come trate will we are sure, if he have the power, take ment in consequence of the abolition of his appoint- never will be conducted, without the pres- proper measures to prevent the recurrence of such ment, it will be sold by Public Auction at the Vic-ence of foreign dealers and foreign ships toria Tavern on the evening of the 16th Instant at half past five Oclock, with a lot of ground attached on the coast of China. Opportunity serv- ing, every body who is a trader smuggles, not excepting the officers appointed to pre-staff-sailed from Plymouth-on service to China-on the morn, vent it." Mr. Marjoribanks, late Chief of the Companys' factory at Canton, gave evidence before a Committee of the House of Commons that "when the Company was abolished he thought we should be all smugglers in China together and there would be no legal trade in China," How far recent events verify these prognostica- tions our mercantile friends can best tell. To further show the certainty, of any po- sition occupied by the English on the Coast of China becoming a considerable mercantile emporiun, the author above mentioned instances the vast amount of the opium trade which is wholly contraband (now we believe annually amounting to nearly $20,000,000) and to the smug- gling of almost every kind of article of Im- port and Export, even such a low priced bulky article as Saltpetre.!! That the Chinese Junks will resort thither he cites corroboratively the opinion of the late Governor of Singapore who says "The coasting trade of China is nearly free from all duties and other imposts. The mer- chant takes advantage of this and intending in reality to proceed to Siam or Cochin Our last letters from Singapore animadvert China for example, clears a junk out for the strongly on the late resolution of the Union Bank, island of Hainan, and thus avoids the pay. It seems it had resolved on the 6th ult, to entirely ment of duties. When she returns she will decline further discounting for the present. This lie four or five days off and on to, make a sudden and wholly unlooked for determination, bargain for duties to be paid; the mer- arises it is said from no local circumstances, but chant threatening to sail to another port if from the state of monetary affairs in Calcutta, he cannot obtain a reduction of duties. As which thus induced the parent establishment to regards Hongkong, we have reason to be- dictate so preemptory an order. There are some lieve this practice has already been adopted just strictures on this conduct in the Singapore Free Press of the 12th ult. We are informed ar- by some of the Chinese who have rosorted rangements are now in progress to establish a Lady Bentinck, " comdr. R. Coffinson, surveynigthither. As to the eligibility of Hongkong för Bank here Capitalists in London being willing to invest thich fursa a trading position it was pointed out some years since by a very experienced naviga- there is a British Settlement in China. With every for Captain Aken whose skill is attested in confidence in the respectability of the parties in- terested and admitting the acknowledged conveni- the work of Captain Flinders and who ap-ence of a Paper currency, which the Chinese pointed him master of the Investigator Dis- would take and which to the Opium and other illi- covery Ship. He, when examined before a cit trade would afford immense facilities, still these, Committee of the House of Commons, re- and other manifest advantages would be more than commended our Island; where he said their counterbalanced, if we are to have an imitation of is good anchorage for a great number of the Bank of England in this quarter, which in its worst features seems to be slavishly copied by Ships and plenty of water. Hongkong ap- the Colonial Banks, By excessive Paper issues, peared to him to be the "best of the Islands money is rendered too Cheap and spirited enter- near the mouth of the C anton River." With prise dogenerates into mad speculation, Too late, equal sagacity and discrimination, he also the originator of the mischief takes the alarm on recommended an Island in the neighbour- a sudden unduly contracts its issues and facilities, disregarding even the legitimate requirements of hood of Amoy to be forthwith occupied. wholesome trade. The sequel is a Panic and wide At home, it will excite surprise and aston- spread misery and distress, as has been too often. ishments that doubts can now be entertained seen in England and America. of our permanent retention of Hongkong.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE

Gérant le Consulat de Gérant le Consulat de

France en Chine,

Hongkong, 25 Mai 1842.

H. M. S. SQUADRON IN CHINA, I. ON THE COAST OF CHEKIANG. [AT CHUSAN, &c.] 72-Bearing the flag of Vice Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. C. B., command:

er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. R. 36-captain H. D. Chads, c. a. 28-captain A. L. Kuper, 18-comdr. Justice, Watson,

Cornwallis

Blonde

Cambrian

Calliope

Pelican

Modeste

18-

-

98

North Star

86-

Columbine

18-

11

Clio

16-

Dido

11

10- lieut.

E. Maitland.

Algerine Royalist Starling

10- lieut. 6-comdr.

Super Troopship me cong

Sir E. Home, Morshead.

E. Troubridge,

Cappel.

Chetwode,

H. Kellett, surveying.

H.M. T. S. Belleisle, Capt. Kingcome,

H.M. T. S. Ratlesnake 11

H. M. T. S.Apollo

Federick.

H. C. S. Ar. Str. Seşostris, comdr. Ormsby, 1. N. Phlegethoa, lieut. Mc Cleverty, B. N. Nemesis, lieut. W. H. Hall, R. N.

"

Herald.

Pylades

Chameleon

Blenheim

Druid

Endymion

Nimrod

Cruizer

Pluto lieut. Tudor, R. N. Ariadne lieut, Koberts, Į. N. ON THE COAST OF FUKIEN, [AT AMOY.]

26-", J. Nias. C. R. 18-comdr. Tindal (absent) 10-lieut Hunter,

ON THE COAST OF CANTON. [AT HONGKONG. &c]

72-captain Sir Thomas Herbert, x.C.B. 44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 44-captain the hon. F. Grey, 18-comdr.

Glasse,

18-

11

J. Pearse,

Neville. Wood,

H M. Brig Serpent

Young Hebe 4-comdr.

.HM. S. armed Str. Vixen,-

39

II C. S. armed Str. Auckland, comdr. Ethersay, I, N. Medusa, lieut. Boys. 1. N. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross, Queen, mr. comg, W. Warden,

A new class of Shippers of Teas have sprung up. The Chinese and Armenian merchants prefer the risk of Shipping their Teas direct to England, to wait for the uncertain fluctuations at Home, in preference to sale on the spot. We are glad to observe this feature in the tea trade of the settle, ment, as it illustrates very strongly the degree of credit that is placed in the faith of English mer- cantile transactions.

The Straits Messenger.

We are informed that intelligence of the foreing of the Khybur Pass has been received. On learning the advance of Genl. Pollock a simultaneous sally was made from Jellullabad by the brave General Sale. which ended in the total discomfiture and dispersion of the besieging force.

A daring attempt to plunder the godowns of Mr, Pybus took place on the morning of the 1st, inst, about three o'clock; the alarm was given the thieves had then penetrated the two sides of an ex- terior granite built drain and had perforated the brick wall of the Godown when they were discov-

||

ABOVE we have copied the particulars of the Passengers and Crew of the "Belleisle" from the title Page of a Book, which was printed during the voyage by an ingenious and gallant Military offi- cer on board, The excellent health and condition of the numerous voyagers (1278,) bespeaks a high state of discipline and efficient regulation which reflects very great credit on the Commanding and Medical officers, When we remember the fright- ful mortality of long sea voyages before the days of our great Circumnavigator Cook we then ap- preciate the value of his ameliorations which are now universally adopted at Sea,

COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE.

that

our cor.

We have reprinted the intelligence which, at the request of Government, we published in a "Gazette Extraordinary" on Saturday Inst. We hope we shall often have cccasion to anticipate our Weekly issue by the communication of interesting intelligence from the Seat of War. We now append a letter from our respondent, which will well repay perusal as he has the best opportunities for, obtaining correct informa tion. We are authorised to state II. E. the Plenipo- tentiary will leave for the North on Sunday next the 12th instant per the "Queen" Steamer.

-THE Indian Government, at the request of the Trades Association, has directed that all unclaimed dividends, shall, after six years, be divided among the creditors who may have proved their claims,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE.

Extract of a Letter from a Correspondent at Chapoo dated 23rd May. "Our old friend, corporal White, paid us a visit yesterday, saying that Elepoo would be here to day; (we may mention that cor- poral White is the nickname of a white button Man- darin who has often visited our authorities falla- ciously holding out prospects of peace; he did so at Chinhai and also at Ningpo) we all here think there will be no peace till we enter Pekin. You no doubt will have the full official details of late events, still I may as well give you my version. We left Ningpo on the 7th, rendesoused mid-way between Chusan and Chinhae. We anchored here on the 17th and landed on the 18th in full martial order in a little sandy bay about a mile eastward of the positions on the heights, then occupied in force by the enemy. The Men of War took up positions for destroying some paltry works facing seaward and which never fired a shot. We landed in three brigades, consisting first, of the Artillery, Sappers and Rifles under Col. Montgomerie, 2d of the 18th and 49th under Col. Morris, 3d of the 26th and 35th under Col. Schoedde; the 1st and 2nd Brigades by a flank movement gained the rear of the enemy. The General was with the 2d Brigade, and when the Ships opened their fire we advanced along the ridge and stormed the several positions of the enemy driving them on the 25th and 55th. A con- siderable body of the enemy seeing their retreat cut off, sought refuge in a joss house in a ravine, we were compelled to burn them out and in doing this there were killed and wounded at least thirty of the 18th and 49th. Poor Tomlinson here fell, having received two matchlock wounds in the neck; Col. Mountain was also wounded here, Poor Campbell received a bullet which lodged in the head, and lies in a very precarious state. After the action we were quartered in the town of Cha- poo. It is walled and about as large as Tinghae, but has extensive suburbs, It is about half a mile from the Sea. The Tartar portion of the town, which was walled in the interior of the town, and occupied by the Garrison, was completely deserted. The occupants were then (and long after we had possession of the town) destroying themselves, des- pite our efforts to prevent them. Poisoning, hang ing and drowning seemed the farvorite means of self destruction though many others were adopted. In one house eight were found dead from poison, and a ninth calmly endeavouring to share their fate. We were told by many that they would not sur vive the disgrace of defeat; many of these victims of self immolation were women and children who disregarded all efforts to save their lives. It is ex pected we shall reembark in two or three days and await the arrival of the reinforcements which I hope are large enough to enable us to more than show ourselves in the Pei ho river. It is still affirm- ed the Yang tze keang will be the scene of future operations, and I begin to think no definite plan has yet been determined on, and it may happen that the campaign of 1842 will prove only to be a series of erratic demonstrations and bootless expeditions of no political value or bearing on the grand ques- tion at issue. I must not forget to tell you the country herabouts is very fertile, far beyond any place I have yet seen. Our troops I am glad to say are in excellent health and spirits. The" Tenas- serim" is in to day, your ex-Land officer Captain Mylius on board,

FOR THE FRIEND OF CHINA No. 3.

FEMALE DEGRADATION. Females of Europe and America are but little aware of the sad condition in which their sisters of China are immured. The birth of a female Child is here a source af great grief to its parents, and much money is ex- pended in offerings to their idols in order to propitiate their favour, and secure to them the precious boan of a

san.

47

him to be if an end be not put to such outrages against common sense, common justice, and the common weal.

human father and mother, she shares not the privi- in Indigo districts is a disgrace to a civilized Go- leges and pleasures of a wife. Her husband looks upon vernment. Even the Chinese Government, which we her as far inferior to himself, and she receives from him are accustomed to style barbarian, presents no paral- such treatment as an inferior being merits. lel to it. In the course of the trials, the fact of arm- For an instance of female subserviancy the followed violence by Mr. Clarke was never question- ing may be noticed as an illustration. Not long since ed. Lord Ellenborough is not the man we take an European passage boat going from Macao to Canton, by some means came in contact with a small busily engaged in fishing. The rudder of the passage Chinese boat in which were seated a man and his wife boat came in contact with their fishing net,and it became Sugar. From Calcutta the export has nearly necessary for some one to swim out in the water in tripled in the last four years and is still increasing order to disentangle it. The husband, whose business rapidly. In 1838 the Export was 587,169 Maunds and duty it was, remaind quiet in his seat and despatch- in 1841, 1,592,173 Maunds. At home 33 ed his wife to perform the task. The poor woman tons of Sugar manufactured from Potatoes was readily went, and after being some time in the water lately seized by the Excise officers. A large man- accomplished her object and returned to her boat. Her ufactory of this article existed in London and it heartless husband was sitting the whole while looking was used by the Grocers to mix with East India on, and did not pretend to render her the least assistance Sugar. Sugar has also been made from Rags. although she had to struggle hard to get up into A large quantity of Slave grown Sugar has lately the boat again. This incident proves that a Chinese been introduced into London from the Channel Is husband is not only void of affection, but of even com-lands in the shape of course confectionary, which mon politeness.

Again, infanticide which is almost exclusively con- after its reconversion afforded, it is said, a saving fined to the female sex, is not at all uncommon in China, on the duty of at least ten shillings per cwt. We and the Chinese do not consider this hideous crime of have heard that at some of the Northern Ports of a great deal of importance. When questioned with China unclayed Sugar of excellent quality can be regard to it, they reply "why it is only a female" as if obtained abundantly at 2 to 2 dollars per pecul. that in any degree mitigated the horror of so vile an Surely this article on proper representations "being act. Indeed the females are taught to look upon them made in the right quarter would be admissible at selves much in the same manner as they are looked a lesser rate than the foreign slave grown article? upon by the other sex. . China and India Shipping. It appears during 1840 592 Ships, 235,440 tonnage, 12,764 Men 1841 788 318,980 16,304 19 were entered inwards at the Port of London. -Lord Melbourne has been promised, it is said, the Reversion of the Wardenship of the Cinque Ports. It is the personal patronage of the Sove- reign and is now held by the Duke.

Pan Hwuy pan, an ancient Chinese female historian, when speaking of wives, says, that "they hold the lowest rank among mankind, and that employments the least honourable ought to be, and in fact are their lot". She also teaches that the wife should consider herself as the slave of her husband, and should willingly undergo all selfdenial however great, to please her frowning lord. The same historian observes "In ancient times the female infant was thrown upon some old rags by The northern capital is now, more than ever before, the side of its mother's bed and for three or four days was scarcely spoken or thought of. At the end of that an object of attention-attracting alike all eyes, foreign time it was carried to a temple by the father, accompa: as well as native far and near. The Gazettes, down nied by attendants with bricks and tiles in their hands." to about the middle of April, are filled as usual with "The bricks and tiles," says this lady historian, signifies memorials and edicts, announcements of new oppoint- the contempt and suffering which are to be her compan- ments, &c.. &c., seeming to indicate little or no con- ions and her future portion. Bricks are of no use ex- cern, by the conductors of the "machinery of govern- copt to form enclosures and to be trodden under foot: ment," for its continued safe administration. and tiles are useless except when they are exposed to the injuries of the air." And this renowned book of antiquity says that "she is incapable either of evil or good. "And" if she does ill she is not a woman, and if she does well, she is not a woman: slavish submis sion is her duty and her greatest praise". The great Confucius him self divorced his wife without asssign ing any reason for so doing. Similar cruel and arbi- trary treatment toward the weaker sex have been up to the present day, characteristic of his numerous fol- lowers. By all classes of males in China, females have always been regarded with contempt and degradation. They are frequently sold by their parents, and the kid- napping of female children is by no means uncommon. Some kidnappers have lately been arrested by Govern- ment and they have confessed that they themselves had stolen and sold into perpetual slavery huudreds of female children.

Those who purchase them always plunge them in the most degrading bondage and drudgery. And it happens that sometimes after being imprisoned, and beaten until life is almost extinct, these female victims of man's ferocity terminate their wretched existance in starvation. Annual ship loads of females are taken from the main land of China to Formosa, and there sold into a slavery, which ends only in an untimely death. The degraded state of our sex in China can never be alleviated until Christianity triumphs in this

Muer hands

Christianity there is no hope, for it is that alone, which assigns to woman her proper rank in society, and secures her against the vile and oppressive encroach- ments of the stronger sex. Hongkong June 1st 1842.

Yours &c A. K.

Miscellanea.

-A NATIVE gentleman of Madras has lately sent to the Queen a pair of beautiful cream col- oured Ava ponies.

-Law and Justice in India. Mr. Marcarenhas,

The mercy of Kwan yin is especially sought. But in vain do they bow to this wretched idol In vain is their money consumed, for not unfrequently, after all their longings for a son, the house is filled with an Indigo planter, made advances to Ryots stipu- mourning at the birth of a despised and wretched daugh. lating that when the indigo plant was fit for cut- ter. Chinese females are degraded in various ways.ting.he was to have it at 8 Bundles the Rupee. From their infancy they are deprived of those comforts When it was ready his neighbour, a Mr. Thomas Clarke, came down with a large body of armed and joys which render life pleasant and happy. First, with regard to Education. Seldom can a men, cut it and carried it off by main force. Mr. Chinese female be met with who can even read the Marcarenhas sued Mr. Clarke for damages and simplest book in her own language. While much obtained a decree in his favour for more than money and time are spent in educating the well 18.000 Rupees. The defendant appealed to the beloved son, the daughter is totally neglected. She Sudder Court where Mr. Lee Warner ruled the is suffered to grow up in ignorance and is fit only to Ryots ought also to have been sued. On the new Occupy the place of a servant. I have yet seen but suit it came before Mr. Barlow, who decided that one Chinese female who could read her own language the Cultivators, who received the advances, alone even to a limited extent. In very ancient times there were had the right of action against Mr. Clarke. The some female authors. In the choice of a partner for

life the poor Chinese woman, unlike those in Chris- case was then sent to Mr. Reid, who coincided tian countries, has nothing to say. She is, almost in with Mr. Barlow and made the case final, order infancy, betrothed to a person, and perhaps sees him ing the whole of the Costs both of the original suit on the wedding day for the first time in her life. She and appeal with interest to be borne by the injured is disposed of by her hard hearted and cruel pa-party Mr. Mascarenhas. No wonder, in reference rents for that sum of money which they see fit to re-to this case, the Friend of India is compelled to ex. quest. And now though she is separated from her in- claim that, "The violence which already prevails

The four principal ministers of the cabinet are-as at the commencement of the year-Muchangah, Pwan Shingan, Pauhing, and Wang Ting; and fifth and sixth are Yiking and Cho Pinghwo. The original At Amoy the rumored attack has not taken place: captain Smith in the Druid has returned from Amoy to Hongkong, and captain Nias in the Herald has taken his place at Amoy. sentence, sending Lin to Ili, "the cold country," has been put in execution; so we have been informed. He left Peking sometime last month. Kishen has been banished to Mantchouria; and old Ilipu sent again to Chekiang.

The rumor that Taukwang has fled from Peking to Moukden, we do not find authenticated. The mo- narchs of the reigning dynasty have been accustomed we believe, annually, early in summer, to retire to the ancient residence of their family in Mantchouria, there to spend the hot months. This precaution for avoiding hot weather, we imagine H. 1. M. will probably not neglect during the present season.

At Tientsin, and along the Pci ho, from the sea to the capital, the Chinese, by all acconts, have made great preparations for defeuse. The forts are reported to be more than a hundred in number, and the troops almost innumerable.

At Chinhai and Chusan, several attempts to cause destruction of the shipping by fire-boats and by shallops containing boxes of giporder bet teen deremet oly one case with the loss of four men killed and wound- ed). The routed fugitives from Tsz'ki were met in their flight by a new commissioner, Chulahang, just arrived from Peking with violent warlike denuncia- tions, and a large store of honorary distinctions for brave combatants. A council of war was held on his arrival, and he strongly urged renewed attacks upon Ningpo, that the enemy might be driven into the depths of the sea. Those who had already felt the effects of British prowess showed, hovever, great un- willingness again to advance, and Chulahang himself hesitated to become the leader of the new attacks he recommended. To fight to the last by their own posts, and not to seek death in advancing seems therefore to have been the determination with which the council broke up. Meanwhile, it has become the purpose of the British authorities, if report speak correctly, not to approach Hángchaw, but to turn the flank of all this force, and by attacking the defences that have been erected in the Yangtsze kiang, to throw open that river to the British forces. The reinforcements which have begun to arrive from India and England, will soon more than double the effective force.

At Canton Yishan has been permitted to send back some portions of his force that had come from distant provinces. Yiking, in the north, it is said has done the same. in order to conceal the fact of the numerous desertions that had taken place in his corps.

In the south. taken up with watching the rising pro- measures that might require a retention here of a large gress of Hongkong, or averse to commit themselves to force, the British authorities have permitted the Chi- nese to rebuild their defences; and from a little above Whampoa upwards, Canton and its approaches are now much more strongly fortified than ever before. Repository.

48

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na. vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne. cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them af Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu-

tation.

1st-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our yarious branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-embled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

Wx beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp, Soda Water Powders. and Campbell in hhds. Brown Windsor Soup. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads,

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

"

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dublin Stout, in bottles.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting. Fish hooks. Screws of ditto.

Nails of sizes.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

ON SALE.

NAIL rod Iron

Apply to

And various other Aricles too numerous to detail.

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go- downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to

N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles :

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, Beer,

ditto. ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Allso a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine Stores. Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong.

Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron.

Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn.

Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts

Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Best Stockholm Tar

Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and

Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in

Jars.

Brick and Truckle Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt. Best mould Candles in

Carr's well known fancy 10 pound boxes. Superior Smoked York. Fine table Salt. shire Hams.

Biscuits.

FOR SALE. AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.-

Hongkong, April 7th. 18'2.

HONGKONG 11TH APRIL 1842. To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chinese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Silver Spanish Dollar. in Quan- tities of not less than 50 Dollars, which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th Instant at M s s Jar. dine Matheson & Co. on Shore at Hongkong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. x. daily, Sundays except-

ed.

Apply to R. M Whichelo, Purs r

of H. M. S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent FOR SALE.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder. ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

of Ceylon Moss.

Cartridge Paper.

Sherry,

Corkscrews.

Champagne, from Moet Epernay.

Superfine Brown

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn. and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Brandy

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder.

Lemon Syrup.

-Best Bengal Uberoots.

Havannah Cigars.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Ditto Waiste-ats.

Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negra head Tobacco...

Guernsey Frocks.

.. Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins Witney Blankets.

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tins, for Invalids. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries,

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Ditto Sago.

Superfine Blue Cloth

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto.

Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

HONGKONG, 1st June, 1842.

W. T. Kinsley.

特合鉄厘現

宇造發不

預釘客有

現在堅時

聞用可細時

NOTICE.

MR. DUTRONQUOY lof the LONDON HOTEL, SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa- pore.

MR. DUTRONQUoy also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c., at the shortest notice.

LONDON HOTEL, QUEEN'S ROAD. HONGKONG, 8th JUNE 1842.

PRICES for Job Printing are as follows:

Bills of Lading and Exchange, per 100 Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

Of Ships..

ADVERTIS

Not exceeding 7 lines

"

for 3 months

253

51

21

1

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional." Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod,

erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi- nese language.

The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

11

19

30

"1

19

DENT & Co. at Macao. MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

29

FOR SALE.

June 4th H. M. T. S. Apollo with part of the 49th 55th Cap. C. Frederick R. N., Engd. & Sing. 5th Cherokee, Mc Kellar Stores, Singapore. "Flowers of Ligie,Annard, Camp followers 98th Singapore. Thomas Coutts, Wade, Naval Stores England direct. Asia, Davison, Part 6th Rt. M. N. 1. Singap. Amelia Thomson, Dawson, Gun Lascars &c.,, Gertrude, Stead, Part 6th Rgt. M. N. I. Surat Merchant, Fudson, Camp. followers, Runnymede,, Sepoys & camp followers, Cursetjee Cowasjee, Campbell, Part 14th Rt. M, N, 1. Singapore. Lysander, Currie, Gun Lascars & followers, Livingstone, Rickerty, Gun Lascars & foll. 6th Mallekal Bahar, Hutchison, 14th Rts. M.N.I, Victoria, Shilstone, Pekin Laign.

"

20

39 29

93

Batavia.

FOR SALE.

MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar

of the Chinese Language. Published at Batavia. Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com- ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men.

Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price 8 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and bottles

Pine Cheese

Manilla Segars No. 4

Walmer Castle, Campbell, 7th Kappa Schooner, Addalla,

SAILED.

June 1st Kestrel, Beauvais,

Macao.

3rd Anna Watson Sayers Amoy and Chusan.

5th Faize Rabahny (Trans.) Stewart 14th Rt. M. N. I. Chusan

Urgent Marshall 2nd Rt. M. N. 1.

99

Win. Money, Bickford,

Isinglass.

19

Duke of Bedford, Lay

Seidlitz Powders.

Apply to

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAO.

29

H. M. Brig, Serpent. Capt. Neville,

Pickles.

Ketchup.

No. 18 Queen's Road.

21

Teazer. (Trans.) Gibson, Horse Arly.

?P

"1

Lady Flora, Ford,

Anchovice.

19

Lucca Oil.

11

Defiance, Evatt

39

"City of London, Antram

Fine Salt.

"Warrior, Dailey, Bongl. Volteers.

Tamerlane, Hurrie

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

fins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams. Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor

ded, in kegs each containing

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds Humps and 6 Tongues.

Spiced Beef, in tins cach lb 10,

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers,

Jams and Jellies.

Orange and Lemon Poel. Lead Lines, Europe.

Log ditto ditto.

Seaning Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

A STOREKEEPER WANTED.

A PERSON of sober and industrious habits with experience in the department of re- ceiving and delivering valuable merchan- disc, may apply at 46 Queens Road be- tween the hours of 10 and 11 a. m.

An ex-second officer of a vessel familiar with the above mentioned duty would probably prove a suitable person for the situation.

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

33

וי

H. M. S. North Star, 36 Capt. Sir E. Home. ,,Dido Capt. Capel

Amazon, Mc. Farlane

Macao.

19

H. M.T. S. Belleisle Capt. Kingcome Chusan. H. M. T. S. Rattlesnake

8th H. M. T. S. Apollo Capt Frederick

,, H. C. S. Hoogly Capt. Ross

Macao.

William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

No. 13. VOL. 1

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

LONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 16TH. 1842.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga zette under the authority of Government will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official.

By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine.

Hongkong, 25 Mai 1842.

FROM THE BREING GAZETTEE:

THE ARMY IN CHEKEANG.

[AN IMPERIAL EDICT.]

Will they but enforce a rigorous and well un- derstood discipline, and render the rewards of merit doubt that they will speedily return with cases of sure and equitably distributed, there can be no victory complete.

{

Price

1 monthly

Or 8 12 yearly

THE Yang tsze-keang, one of the finest rivers in the world, takes its rise some degrees bond the source of way down to Sze-chuen it is called Muhloosoo ; but the Yellow river, in Tsinghae or nokonor. On'its Soon after entering Sze.chuen it takes the name of Kin- The honorary gifts named below are now en-sha, 'golden-sanded,' and runs southward through Yun- Commissioner) and his companions, to be convey- afterwards takes the well known name Yang tsze-keang, trusted to Chulehang (a newly appointed Joint chuen which are inhabited by subdued Meaou-tsze. It and then northward through those parts of Sze- nan, ed to the camp in Chekiang, and committed to the which it retains as it flows on through Sze-chuen, generalissimo, Yiking, for distribution. If among Hoo-pih, the northern parts of Keang-se, Gan-hway, the officers and soldiers, the volunteers, and de- and Keang-soo, to the sea. This river is broad, deep, tachments from other provinces, any have stepped and sometimes rapid; and from its long course and the prominently forwards and, regardless of the ene- number of provinces through which it passes, it has my's fire, rushed on and slain a rebellious English been called 'the girdle of China.' In some places it officer, let the generalissimo take of the things now spreads out so as to form islands, upon which rushes sent to him, and bestow liberal rewards upon the grow abundantly; and many of the most fertile and deserving individual, at the same time also report- densely populated parts of the Chinese empire are found ing his good deeds to the throne, when his sove- along its banks. Having a central course, in respect reign will show him favor overstepping all usual to the provinces, it is easily connected by canals with bounds. many other rivers, and forms a most extensive inland-

The generalissimo and his colleagues must, by water communication. The boats which are employed acombined exhibition of good favor and severe dis-on the Yang-tsze-keang are very numerous, and with perfect order, and fulfil their Monarch's high desire traversing the most fertile parts of China Proper, it cipline, bring the army under their command into Thus while this noble river affords great facilities for little difficulty they can ascend almost to its source. to calin and set at rest the sea coasts. brings the adventurer into Thibet, near to other waters which flow southward through the territories of British India. There is no doubt that by means of these ri. vers a communication might be opened between some of the principal cities and marts of India and those of China.

List of honorary gifts.

50 Large peacock feathers.

50 Blue (Jay) Feathers.

40 Thumb rings.

70 Small swords

75 Flint steels (for striking fire)

RESPECT THIS.

60 Cap knobs, or buttons, of the sixth rank. 80 17 seventh rank.

39

H. M. S. SQUADRON IN CHINA. I. ON THE COAST OF CHEKIANG. [AT CHUSAN, &C.] 72-Bearing the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. c. B., command- er in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain Charles Hope 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. B. 36-captain H. D. Chads, c. B. 26-captain A. L. Kuper c. B. 18-comdr. Justice,

Cornwallis

Thalia

Watson,

Sir E. Home Bart. Morshead.

18-

36-

-

18-

-

"9

16-

21

T. Troubridge,

20

11

10- lieut.

E. Maitland. Chetwode,

Honble. H. Keppel.

Algerine Royalist Starling Lady Bentinck,,, H. M. T. S. Jupiter mr. comg. G. B. Hoff meister H. M. T. S. Belleisle, Capt. Kingcome, H. M. T. S Ratlesnake H. M. T. S.Apo'lo Frederick.

10- lieut. 6-comdr. H. Kellett, surveying. comdr. R. Collinson, surveying,

In the employment of a military force, the first principle to be regarded is, that the rules of discip line should be clearly defined and strictly regarded, Blonde that rewards and punishments should be sure. Cambrian When the rules are strictly enforced, the dignity Calliope of law is then maintained: When punishments Pelican and rewards are certain, kindness will then con- Modeste join with due subordination. For two centuries North Star that our national family has enjoyed peace, our Columbine military officers and soldiers have been sustained Clio with richest favors and trained up with utmost Dido kindness. When by chance called forth to con- test, with what effort then should they strive to be foremost, and labor for their Country's good But since the first call to arms in the last year, in all the contests they have had with the rebellious English, it has only been at Chusan that they have stood well their ground. There they stren- nuously fonght six days and nights, and killed num- berless of the enemy. But every where else, the officers.in command of them have failed clearly to enforce the wules of discipline and stir up the ardor of their men, till they have even fled on approaching the battle field, and till the onward progress of the barbarians has gone beyond our power to stay them. This has indeed arisen from the constant lax indulgence of the high officers chief in command, by which the authority of officers has been sapped: if a remedy be not im- mediately applied, how shall the evil effect of such Herald habits be arrested, and the spirit of the army be Pylades aroused?

Let the awe spreading Generalissimo, and the Joint Commissioners examine and clearly ascer-

tain who, in the several cities that have fallen,

"" 17

H. M. T. S. Sapphire Capt. Cole. H. C. S. Ar. Str. Sesostris comdr, Ormsby, I. N. Phlegethon, lieut. Me Cleverty, R. N. lieut. Tudor, R. N. lieut. Koberts, I. N.

Chameleon

Pluto Ariadne Tenasserim comr. Wall 1. N. Queen, mr. comg. W. Warden,

ON THE COAST OF FUKIEN.

[AT AMOY ] 26-captain J. Nias. c. B. 18-comdr. Tindal (absent) 10-lieut Hunter,

ON THE COAST OF CANTON. [AT HONGKONG. &c.] 72-captain Sir Thomas Herbert, x.C.B. 44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 44-captain the hon. F. Grey. 18-comdr. Glasse,

were the first among the officers and soldiery to Blenheim flee; Where by strict scrutiny they have proved Druid the offence against any, let them immediately inflict Endymion the punishment of military law, without extend- Nimrod ing the least measure of indulgence. But while Cruizer offenders are duly punished with death, it is right H M. Brig Serpent that the deserving should be liberally rewarded Young Hebe

18- "

J. Pearse, Neville.

4-comdr. Wood.

and encouraged. To stir up and stimulate their H. M. S. armed Str. Vixen,-comr. Boyes. spirits by encouragements, and to repay their en-H C. S. armed Str. Auckland, comdr. Ethersay, 1. N. deavors by gifts and rewards, are duties resting upon the generalissimo and his colleagnes, who should with sincerity of purpose set forth the merits of all, and give commands and employ: ments hefore all others to the faithful and honest hearted. Thus, with bravery and intelligent move ments combined, and with singleness of determi- nation strenuously to resist the foe, what diffi- culty can remain to prevent the utter extermina- tion of a barbarous, murderous, crafty and covetous enemy, the measure of whose wickedness is so full, that the minds of men and the principles of haven are lassed together aggine him?

In order to obtain a more perfect knowledge of the Yang-tsze-keang, let us take a survey of it through its whole course. The mouth of the river is about twenty miles broad; it is in lat. 31° 84' N., lon. 120° 32' E. from Greenwich. There are extensive banks near its entrance, and the whole island of Tsung-ming is an alluvial deposite formed by the waters of the river. Near the mouth of the Yang-tsze.keang, are some of the largest and richest cities of China. Soo-chow-foo, the Chinese Arcadia, and the most beautiful of all their cities, is in lat 31° 23' N., lon. 120° 20' E Shang- lat. 31° 9 N., fon. 121° 4' E. Both of these places, hae-heen, a very extensive and important mart, is in by means of canals, are connected with the Yang-tsze keang; indeed almost all the important cities which are near the river, are united with it by canals. Not far southward are Keang-foo and Hang-chow; both of them are important cities; the latter is the capital of Che-keang. On the northern shore, is Hae-mun, which has a fort for the defense of the river, but it is utterly dismantled. Beyond Hae-mun northward, is Tung-chow; westward on the banks of the river, in lon. 120o 4', is Tsing-keang-heen; and opposite to it is Yin-keang heen.

Passing on westward through the province of Keang- soo, the first cities we meet with are Tae-chow, Chang- chow-foo, and Chin-keang-feo, all of which carry on a brisk trade. Nan-king, or Keang ning-foo, in lat. 32° 44' N., lon. 118° 38 E. is only a league from the Yang-tsze-keang, with which it is connected by canals. Nanking, as a commercial city, is too well known to need any further description in this connection. Before leaving the province of Keang-soo, in ascending the rtver, we find at diminished to a mile in breadth, but covered with boats some of which are of town hundspde tons burden.

The first remarkable city, which we find in Gan- hwuy, is Tae-ping-foo in lat. 31° 38' N., lan. 118° 24' E on the southern banks of the river. Opposite to this city is Ho-chow; and the whole adjacent conntry is fertile and well cultivated. Further onward is Woo.wei chow and Gan-king-foo; this last city, which is the capital of the province, is situated in lat. 30° 37' N.. and lon. 116° 55' E.

Proceeding up the river, we pass through the north- ern extremity of Keang-se, and enter the province of Hoo pih. The river here receives several tributary streams, the principal of which is the Han-keang, which comes down from the northwest, and falls into the Yang-trze-keang near Han-yang-foo, in lat. 30° 34 N., lon. 114° 38' E; this place is near Woo- chang-foo, the capital of the province, in lat. 30° 34' N., lon, 114° 35' E. The river here bends southward," and almost reaches the Tung-ting lake; and then northward to Sze-chuen. In this province the majority of the commercial cities stand on the Yang-tsze-keang, which winds its way through a hilly country, and is increased by several streams which fall into it, some frem the north, and some from the south. From Szc chuen, it stretches on in a northwest direction to Koko- nor or Tsing-hac, but its sources are not well defined. The regions of Kokonor and Thibet are well watered, and give birth to several important rivers, which flow upper countries, might then select his route, and des southward. The traveller, having now surveyed these

Medusa, lieut. Boys. 1. N. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross, Earthquake. A shock was experienced a little before noon on the 19th Feby its focus of emanation as well as of greatest intensity seems to have been about Peshawar or Jellalabad, points 100 miles from each other and where much damage was done to the build-cend to the British possessions in Burmah or Bengal. ings. Westward it propagated itself to Quetta, where, at the distance of 400 miles, it was felt on the same day and near y the same hour, but that very feebly. It was experienced with little diminution of its maximam intensity at Simla and Loodianah.

Bombay Times.

THE above we are told is the communication of a gentleman, who is deservedly, rated as our best living Chinese Geographer. Allhough written some years since it has now in the course of events an augmented interest, hence its republication in our Columns.

7. [

50

NOTICE.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

HAVING had repeated complaints of the irregular receipt of the Paper by our Macao Sub- scribers, we deem it right to state, that except in one instance our Print has been uniformly issued every Thursday morning and during the forenoon of the same day all copies for Macao have been regularly put up in separate printed envelopes, made into a package which has been pasted, ad- dressed "Superintendent's Office, Macao" and sent through the medium of the Hongkong Post Office. We are thus particular in our details as we fully recognize the essentiality in a newspaper of punc- tual publication and regular transmission, We regret there should have been any occasion of complaint from causes over which we have had no controul. We shall be deeply indebted to our friends by immediately apprizing us should their copies at any time not reach them punctually.

all they hold dear and sacred-Should they tions, and the amount of our demands; the passively acquiesce in all the decrees and full acquittance of which would alone ordinances, which the occupants of Pekin cause us ever to depart. At the same time (albeit English barbarians), may impose, we would make arrangements for perma- still our Diplomacy never contemplated, nent occupation, and would announce that nor are we prepared to govern China. the indemnification to be exacted by En- What then is to be done? We ask whether gland, would daily augment. our quarrel cannot be given a dynastic or popular turn? If the present Tartar Em- peror continue obstinate, surely we could contrive to co-operate with the native mal- contents and appoint his Chinese successor. To whom, on ascending the Imperial throne, we could surrender in entirety, all our conquests and possessions in China excep- ting only Hongkong and some one or two other small insular positions to the north- ward. These Islands mnst of course be de- FRIEND CF CHINAclared Free Ports, equally available and

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE, 16TH. 1842.

THE long promised expeditionary force and armament, having at last safely arrived and been despatched to the North, (whither also his H. E. the Plenipotentiary has pro- ceeded) it now behoves us calmly to ask ourselves, what is the probable plan of the ensuing Campaign, and whether we can now exact from the Chinese a full indem- nification of our just claims: and having coerced them into a pacification, what gua- rantees can we demand for its present ful- fillment and future maintenance? These are questions of vast importance, and include considerations which should be treated in

Our readers are well aware the two provinces in question are the two most fer- most favored regions in the world. Abound- tile in China and altogether one of the ing in everything which can minister to the wants and luxury of man, and inhab- ited by a people eminently skilful in all mechanic arts and manufactures, of dis- positions especially docile, industrious and commercial. In the same space of coun- try, there is not existing, we believe, an equal extent of natural and artificial water communication. Near Hang Chow, the modern capital of Che Keang, the Grand Canal (after crossing seven degrees of lati- tude) terminates. The remote civilization and productiveness of this district is attest- ed by the early formation of what is still the noblest Hydraulic internal communica- tion in the World,

accessible to the Merchants of every Clime and every Nation. Our indemnification and War Expenses, would be easily discharged; for China has no national debt. (It is no- torious we could now obtain it, if we would consent to leave the Emperor alone, and take it as a bribe or hush money from the Mandarins.) A liberal commercial treaty, should also be ratified with the new Em- 'The cities of these provinces, which are peror. Such reasonable requirements and conditions could be granted to us, without of the first rank, (among them are Hang- the new occupant of the throne being de-chow, Ningpo and Nanking), are many of graded in the eyes of his subjects or of them approachable by Vessels of the largest himself. The whole civilized world would class, and nearly all would be accessible applaud our moderation. Even the jealous to small vessels and Steamers. rivalities of Russia, France and America would not be evoked.

As before said, all that man wants or covets is here abundantly produced. Here also is situated the Chinese Arcadia and here the inhabitants enjoy a climate, repu- ted to be highly congenial to the European constitution, and the familiar products Silk, Tea, Sugar &c would as returns be the most acceptable to English merchants. We should tire, were we further to dilate on the teeming wealth, abounding resources. and exhaustless capabilities of these highly favoured provinces: we must however men- tion, two products which (if we are destin- ed to be the rulers) will be of inapprecia- WE affect not to be the depositaries of ble importance to us, we mean Iron and Coal. With them, what may we not do? official secrets. We crave not to possess the arcana imperii. We ask our readers. IF then, we do not in this campaign compel With the skill of our artificers, and with an to accept the opinions we may express, as the Chinese to make peace, we must do intelligent and very teachable population, our own, wholly uninfluenced or dictated something of almost equivalent importance. we can, at will evoke, the giant power of by parties who from position may have Else the honor of our Arms will be tarnish-Steam and with such magnificent internal access to sources of information unattaina-ed-our diplomacy despised and British navigation who will say we cannot take ble by ourselves. Having premised thus influence diminished throughout the world. and hold (aye against the World), these truly much, we may say it is understood that what must we do? We will now shortly magnificent Provinces? Nanking and Shanghai will be captured, state what we think should and perhaps what whilst a simultaneous movement will be made on the Peiho River, and it is expected, may be done. ASSUMING we gained nothing by the oc- no time will be wasted in following its south- ern zigzag course to the strongly fortified cupation of Peking, we would then con- city of Tientsin, but the troops will be discm-rate the whole of the Expeditionary barked at the most accessible point of the Northern channel of the Peiho and will make a rapid advance on Pekin. The Cavalry and Horse Artillery (from the alleged character of the country) will it is supposed be here of singular efficacy and service. UNLESS the Emperor then gives way, we shall fight a battle, gain a victory, and oc- cupy the Capital of the Celestial Empire. But what then? Is our presence in the Imperial precincts to be the signal of the demise of the Tartar Dynasty and of a total

FAILING the adoption of the foregoing the spirit of the most liberal and compre-plan, we next inquire whether the present hensive statesmanship. We trust we have armament is sufficiently powerful to coerce those to direct affairs who are posessed of the Chinese into a Pacification. We hold sufficient mental endowments to enable them that it is, and would add that the admirable to rise with the occasion, not succumb to condition, health, discipline and good spirits impending responsibility, nor be dwarfed of the several corps, with their well known by the altitude of the mighty interests in- gallantry and efficient equipment (if well volved therein. We have only space for a directed) cannot but command success. few cursory remarks and can but glance at England expects it, and has a right to do some of the prominent features of the ap- so. Literally, the eyes of the world are on proaching struggle. this Expedition. The next few months may be pregnant with events of uncommon in- terest and of the highest social import.

revolution in China?

OWING to the system of Governmental Centralization, Paris is France, the occu- pation by an enemy of the French capital is the virtual subjugation of the French Kingdom. If this arises, as it does, from the centralization system of an unstable, mo- dern bureaucratie, may it not with greater likelihood be characteristic of an ancient, fixed despotism, whose moral strength and political energy have been mainly derivable from the huge, immemorial and almost per- fect system of its governmental Centraliza tion? With no people has custom greater power than with the Chinese.

SHOULD no revulsion of feeling be pro- duced among them, by our trampling on

Should peace not be effected this cam- paign, still if we have no "little war," but make the Yang tze keang the scene of operations somewhat-correspondent with ho

force in the embouchure of the Yang-tze- sue cannot but be honorable to the British We dare prognosticate the success Kéang and we would subjugate and keep name. the Provinces of Chekeang and Kiansu. of a line of policy, such as we have at- We are aware their united population, tempted to sketch. Should however one amounts to some 60 Millions; still, we think. diametrically opposite, be pursued we on many grounds this could be accomplish- would yet hope, but do not expect, that ed. A glance at the Map will at once de- success will result. monstrate that by so doing we fasten upon the very vitals of the Empire.

IT is certain in China there is such a thing as public opinion, although hitherto our Diplomacy has not recognized its exis- tence. Why should we not publish to China and to the world what we do want. The reasonableness of our demands, and a gene- ral knowledge thereof, might not be with- out influence on the Court of Pekin. Well informed natives, we know fully believe our object to be the acquisition of territory. Their Emperor's determination to resist such pretensions to the death, is highly ap- plauded. Would not the obstinacy of Taou kwang be condemned by the Imperial Cen- sorate, if we made proper disclaimers and avowals, taking corresponding measures to set the Chinese people right on these points? In taking possession of the two provin- ces before mentioned, we would counsel the most explicit declaration of our inten-

It is certain that now an energetic and vigorous policy must be adopted. Half measures must be abhorrently rejected or our disgrace and discomfiture is certain. The past should be an useful monitor and late experiences be beneficial to future con- duct, then the uncontrollable force of cir- cumstances may do the rest and perchance we may attain our desideratum, Peace. If so, how long will it he maintained? What Guarantees should be required? these and other concomitants we must defer the con- sideration of to another opportunity.

WE are very thankful to our talented Corres- pondent at Chusan (an extract from whose letter will be found in another part of our columns) for his obliging communication. We would venture to hope he will, from his excellent opportunities, be able to furnish us (as he promises) with information and intelligence of much interest to our Readers during the present Campaign.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

51

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE. OUR friends of the United Service will, we are them. We are glad to say that we know no in- surei be glad to be reminded of the claims which stance, as at Macao, of outrages on the person as WE had not space in our last week's Paper to their very interesting museum in the Metropolis well as the property of foreign residents. We insert the following letter from our Correspondent has upon their notice during the China expedition. have been assured that our Kowloon visitors are at Chusan; under date of the 13th ult. Many things of little value and wholly unregard- no strangers at Macao; some of our friends affirm "Or the general movements of the troops, you will ed here would be much valued in London. Any they are of the same gang, which not long since, be officially apprised. I will however point out to you. contributions to the excellent collection of arms robbed the domiciles of almost every foreign re. one of the most remarkable features in the present would be very acceptable. At our last visit, in all sident there, and but a few weeks ago, forced state of the contest, it is the system of kidnapping, that respects China the museum was singularly open the treasury of an eminent firm, and undis- which the native Authorities have adopted and carry deficient, we hope the mention of this fact, will turbed and undetected, carried away an amount on with much perseverance; notwithstanding the cap- incite our friends to supply the deficiency. It will in Specie; which it is averred, will far exceed the ture of many of their agents. These men, if really be far more satisfactory to send ones' spoils to aggregate amonnt of all the losses by robbery guilty, can hardly be said to have been treated with improve a collection which forms one of the sights which have occurred in Hongkong since it has proper severity, many of them receiving, as kidnappers of London, than to friends who may happen not been a British possession. a very moderate degree of corporal punishment, and to cherish a like veneration for antiques or our being then set at liberty, to repeat their mal-practices, love for articles of virtû and who may perhaps if they feel so inclined. The frequency of attempts at

this crime, is particularly to be deplored, as it has neglect or not preserve them. NEWS OF THE WEEK FROM THE SEAT OF WAR.-The occasionally brought the inhabitants into collision with We say nothing of having a handsome acknowl- intelligence from Affghanistan during the past week is our people, and has more than ever, led to an extensive edgement with thanks, the donors names blazoned of no small importance. A rumour has reached Bom destruction of property, by the burning of houses; a on the articles exhibited and the bright eyes which bay that the 27th Native Infantry has been annihila- mode of retaliation, which, though it be justifiable will glisten as when visiting this interesting muse ted by the attacks of the Ghazees, whom Col. Palmer under certain circumstances, is to say the least of it, a um Mary finds that George has sent this, and Emi- in his despatch represented as filling the town of nost undesirable necessity to be driven to. ly that Charles has sent that. We need not add Ghuzni, and that the whole body fell in the the strug It is now evident that (whatever may have been our another syllable, the proverbial gallantry of the gle, after having maintained it with the noblest gallan- successes in the field) the persevering resistance of the United Service is a guarantee that during the dence on the reports which have come by way of try. We are inclined however to place more depen- Chinese Government, and still more, the cautious and northern Expedition, our friends (should some of Peshawur, from whence we derived the first authentic almost passive character which it has assumed, render them indulge their acquisitive propensities) will intelligence of the capitulation of that fort. Those the garrisons left at the three Northern points of we are sure also gratify the laudable curiosity reports state, that from six to eight of the officers, were occupation, Amoy, Chinhai and Chusan, totally inad- of their fair friends at home. We had intended in the hands of the Chiefs on their way to Cabul. equate to impress on the minds of the Chinese in. to have put in a plea for the Geological, Numis- habitants, a becoming sense of our rule and power. We are in fact blockaded on all hands as regards thematic and other scientific bodies in London to land side; and on the sea, we have not the means of which we belong, and whose interests we would wish to promote on this occasion, but we have not protecting native boats from the Pirates. space, so must defer our remarks till another op- portunity.

It will no doubt be asked in England, whether the most has been done with the very formidable Naval force which has for the last nine months been on the Coast of China?

The numerical strength of the Land force is far too small for the important services expected from it. Still the bulk of this force has been quartered at Ning: po, in almost undisturbed inactivity, for five or six months. And what has been the result? Why nothing truly, beyond the ruin of that once flourishing City, save extorting under the name of ransom some thou sands of dollars from such of the unfortunate inhabit. ants, as had not had time to remove their property;

AFTER the above was in type, we received the gra- tifying intelligence that General Pollock had travers- ed the Khyber pass, without any farther opposition, and was within two days march of Jellalabad. But before he could reach that post, Sir Robert Sale had already achieved a victory over Akhar Khan. It ap- pears that on the 7th of April, that chief gave out that ANOTHER of the anomalies of the present China he had discomfited General Pollock and fired a salute War (?) is, that instead as was naturally expected to confirm the report. Sir Robert Sale upon this sal- the arrivals of Chinese Junks at Singapore if they lied forth from Jellalabad with 1500 men, and attacked should not altogether cease would at least most sen- and completely routed Akbar Khan, who had six thou, sibly diminish, it now turns out that more Junks sand men under him. The whole of the enemy's camp and four of our own lost gus and two standards, were have visited Singapore than during any preceding Season. Those from China amounted to about captured. Their loss is estimated at 500. Our casual- ties were small, but our loss great. Brigadier Dennie one third more than usual. All this increased is among the slain, and three officers have been wound- traffic, in face of the destruction and capture of ed. Sir Robert Sale has deserved nobly of his country, their Junks off this coast by our men of war, con- and we trust his extraordinary merits will meet with having their just reward. It is matter of high delight to find

and levying a toll amounting to a very few hundreds, vincingly demonstrates the importance of a that the glory of first turning the tide of war, which is

upon the poor affrighted fishermen in the River. Might not this little army have been more advan. tageously employed, in reducing to subjection the Is. land of Chusan; instead of leaving it in such a state, that an unarmed European cannot now at noon day walk in safety from the landing place to the south gate of Ting Hae?

The withdrawal of the inhabitants too from British influence, both at Ningpo, Chin hai and Chusan long after these places had been occupied, is a startling fuct and unavoidably leads to the inquiry, has every thing been done, which might and ought to have been done, to conciliate the people, and make them feel that Brit. ish rule was likely to be a blessing and not a curse.? Involved in a struggle the end of which it is impos. sible to foresee the mighty consequences of which none dare prognosticate, it expecially behoves us, without delay, to take an honest and fearless view of all the difficulties of our position, of whatever nature they may be, and it will be well indeed, if those who have committed errors now show themselves willing to learn wisdom by experience.

Wurn respect to the passive resistance of the Chinese alluded to by our Correspondent we may mention that however unexpected it may hav been, to many persons in Europe it will occa- sion no surprise. In France, many well informed parties have quite counted on our having to en- counter great obstacles from this cause and M. Adolphe Barrot (late French Consul at Manilla and now Ambassador to Brazil) confidently pre- dicted the same in la Revue de deux mondes publish- ed in Paris, November 1839. In the article allud- ed to, (adopting the language of Colonel Jancigny in his Progrés de la Puissance Anglaise en Chine et dans l'Inde en 1840). Il insistait surtout sur la resistance passive que la Chine n'hesiterait pas à opposer aux Anglais. Editor.

ON DITS.

On dit. HANG-CHOW if not already, is not now to be attacked but forthwith Shanghai is to be Chapoo-ed. On dit. The Island of Tsang-ming is to be occupied, never to be restored (?) nnd made our Rendezvous. On dit. The Yang-tse-keang will be the scene of important warlike operations. Nanking is to be taken and abandoned. At the same time the Peiho River will be visited. Tientsin and its formidable defensive works will be turned and a rapid advance made on Pekin. It is expected the Cavalry and Horse Artil- lery will here render very effective service. On dit. If we get to Pekin and the Tai-wong Taou. kwang non est inventus shall we then epically declare à la Napoleon the taching dynasty is no more!! and place a descendant of the old native Emperors, or Ming dynasty, on the dragon throne of imperial China. that is-if we can catch one.? On dit. The anti Tartar party have already made overtures, which we have scornfully rejected.

insular positions to which the Chinese can at

times resort. It is too late in the day, to require to carry us in triumph to Cabul, has fallen to his lot, us now to point out the probability af Hongkong and that of his noble associates. The achievment of becoming one of the most important commercial this victory by his troops, after five months of suffer. emporia in the East. All that is required at Hong-ing, without the aid of General Pollock, connot fail to kong, says an old resident is, that the Government produce such an effect on the minds of the natives as should do something or nothing; in our case there to render the future operation of the campaign light and easy. But the victory has been dearly bought is no happy medium. the loss of his companion in arms, the gallant Dennie, Sir Robert Sale's feelings on this occasion may be more easily imagined than described:-

"In that glorious and well fought field, They kept together in their chivalry,

We are informed that the learned author the "Systema Phoneticum Scripturae Sinicae" has safely arrived in his native country, and has urged on the attention of the French and English Govern- ment, his proposals to publish a translation of the And then to be separated by the hand of death, in Grand Dictionary of the Emperor Kang-hi. A the very arms of victory, just when their extraordinary perfect copy of the best edition of which work, we toils and labours had been rewarded by the most signal believe he had presented to him by a much respect-success-and just as the path had been opened to Ca- ed resident. Monsieur Callery proposes to Stere- bul-this is the bitterest ingredient in this cup of joy. otype two editions one English and the other General Pollock's arrangements are praised on all French. We hope he will obtain the assistance sides, as evincing coolness and determination, and con- so gigantic and praiseworthy an undertaking so sequently there has, as yet, been no loss in camels, well merits. He has already commenced his stores, or baggage, and comparatively but little loss labours, with the view to the ultimate accomplish- of life. It is rumoured that Sale and his truly gallant ment of his grand design. The estimated cost of band will be recalled to the provinces as soon as the this work cannot be less than 100,000 dollars, and other troops reach Jellalabad; we do not think, how- will take at least ten years time to complete it on ever just this may be towards this hero, that he or his the proposed plan. Monsieur Callery has selected a location on our Island and hopes a few months only well clapse before he and his Printers and Assistants are domiciled and at work in our town.

defenders will desire to he deprived of the portion of revenge and glory, which, on the march to Cabul and subsequently, should be shared by those who we feel certain would gladly retrace their steps not only to avenge their slaughtered companions, but to point out the road to the new arrivals.

Friend of India.

ROBBERIES. Ox Friday night, the 3rd inst. one of the China houses of Mr. Almack was bro- ken into. One of the thieves was captured, as he It is gratifying however to observe, the rapid though entered the perforated wall. His three compare sident progress Hongkong is making as the first British ions escaped. The prisoner was sentenced, we are told, by the Chief magistrate to receive Sixty, Settlement formed in the Chinese Dominions, and as lashes, or rather strokes of the bamboo; for that is the future seat of commercial enterprise. Besides Port and Land Regulations, which have the mode of inflicting legal punishments among the Chinese, and which we have adopted. The already been established for the guidance of those two same night the Godowns of Messrs Townsend & important sources of national prosperity, we observe Co. were forcibly entered, and robbed of property Rules (which will be found elsewhere) promulgated. amounting to between three and four hundred dol- establishing the circulation of certain coins as legal lars in value. An unsuccessful attempt was also tenders and for bazaar currency-an expedient well made on the premises of Messrs D. Wilson & Co of calculated to prevent imposition on the public by the petty money dealers and bazaar men. It were much Calcutta. The thieves however managed to enter to be wished that some system of the kind existed the next night by means of a ladder placed at the here to put a stop to the arbitrary rates that are first floor window; they abstracted property of sometimes imposed by the same class of men in this about 8 200 Value. Some cases which contained Settlement. We perceive also that among other con- property, were found at the waterside, and it is comitants of trade Auction and commission Rooms, presumed the robbers were of the same gang, Shops, and other commercial depôts have been open- which the week before came from Kowloon and ed in Hongkong. Upon the whole this island affords attempted to force the Godown of Mr. Pybus. promise of thriving rapidly, and his likely to prove We are informed on that occasion they were a place of considerable commercial importance at Singapore Free Press. completely armed à la Chinoise. Some of the some future period. carpenters employed on the buildings near, al- though aware of their intentions, did not give the alarm; alleging they dared not, for fear of the is to be favored with a set of Port Regulations which it needs go robbers, who would, they said, have then attacked much,

By the way, can any of our Readers tell us when Singapore

52

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na. vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road,

Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor- deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu.

tation.

1ST-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali- ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

exorbitant price.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp, Soda Water Powders. and Campbell in hhds, Brown Windsor Soap ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads.

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dablin Stout, in bottles,

Blank Visiting Cards.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting. Fish hooks. Screws of ditto.

Nails of sizes.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths. French Velvet Corks. And various other Aricles too numerous to detail.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go. downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to

N. DUUS. or

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles:

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, ditto. Beer, ditto.

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Allso a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine Stores. Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale on Board the Prima Donna, HongKong. Steam Coals Pig Lead

Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn.

Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons.

Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil.

Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt. Best mould Candles in

Carr's well known fancy 10 pound boxes. Biscuits. Superior Smoked York- Fine table Salt. shire Hams.

FOR SALE. AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.- Hongkong, April 7th. 18:2.

HONGKONG 11TH APRIL 1842.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chinese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Silver Spanish Dollar, in Quan- tities of not less than 50 Dollars, which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th Instant at Messrs. Jar dine Matheson & Co. on Shore at Hongkong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays except- ed.

Apply to R. M Whichelo, Purser

of H. M. S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent FOR SALE.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder. ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir.

Fine Table Rice. Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay. Superfine

Brown Sherry, from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn. and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Brandy

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

"

.. Sandoway Imitation

Havannah Cigars.

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tims, for Invalids. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries,

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Dit'o Sago.

Cartr dgo Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers.

Ditto Waisterats. Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves.

Guernsey Frocks.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Cair ditto ditto.

Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto.

Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

Zante Currants.

Ketchup.

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Fine Salt.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard. Assorted Sauces. Capers,

ded, in kegs cach containing Jams and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel. Humps and 6 Tongues,

Lead Lines, Europe.

Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Pastry Suet.

Roping ditto.

Ereence of Peppermint.

Seizing Lines.

Lavender Water.

Whit Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar

of the Chinese Language, Published at Batavia. Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com-

ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men.

Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price $ 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

NOTICE.

MR. DUTRONQUOY of the LONDON HOTEL, SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa-

pore.

MR. DUTRONQUoy also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c., at the shortest notice.

ON SALE.

NAIL Rod Iron Calcutta Bottled Beer, in Cases of 6 doz. Navy and Pilot Bread American Flour.

Apply to Hongkong 13 June, 1842.

Wm. T. Kinsley.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER. THE A. S. Prussian, Barque Borussia, Capt. Kuhr, 379 tons.

Apply to W. T. Kinsley Hongkong. Holliday Wise & Co. Macao.

or

Macao 14 June, 1842.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

THERE will be sold by Public Auction on Monday next June 20th, at 11 o'colock, by C. Markwick, at the Godowns of N. Duus Esqr. 18 Queens Road the following articles viz.

Bengal Rice in Bage

Dholl

"

Ghee

Tins

Bristol Tripe in Jars English Biscuit

"Seizing Line

"

Bottles in Crates

Salmon in Koga Caska Liquerus Manilla Cigars Singapore Planks

Gin in Cases of 15 Bottles Soda Water

Brandy in Hhds and Cases Lochfine Herrings in Kegs Small Manilla Line

Seil zer Water

Pea Jackets

Trousers

Allsops Ale in Hhds

Raisins in Boxes

Java Teak Beams And various other articles. Terms Cash, on delivery.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

Chusan

9th June Trio Transport, Capt. Hall Camp folrs. Brown Benl. Volts. Norris 2d M NI.

IP

Dawson: Gun Lascars &c.

,, Shipstone 14th M NI.

19

Burampooter Rohomany

19

"1

91

" W. Money

93

"

Flowers of ugie,,

Roals 6th, 19

35 43

,, Annard: Camp follrs.

11

Thomas Coutts

19

.. Wade Govts. Stores

. Asia

39

,, Davison 6th MNI.

1, Amelia Thomson

"

Gertrude

Chusan.

99

17

,, Stead 6th MNI.

21

Surat Merchant

31

» Fudson, Camp follrs.

DENT' & Co. at Macao.

49

Runnymede

19

39

MACAO 20г APRIL 1842.

21

Cursetje

21

Campbell 14th MN 1

H

Cowasics

FOR SALE.

Lysander

"

,.Livingston

91

39

Malekal Bahar

"Hutchinson 14th M NI.

,, Currie, Gun Lascars &c., "Rickerty,

"

10

Pekin

19

Laing 19

39

Waliner Castle

"Campbell 14th M NI,

"1

HMS. Thalia

19

Harlequin

29

"

Hope R N.

» Hastings N R.

HMTS. Sapphire

"Cole

11 15

11th

Victoria

12th H M S, Druid

19

Smith NR.

19

Westmoreland

"Brigstock

"1

Zoe

"Miller

Falcon

19

Jauncey

Blundell

39

., Trail

19

19

93

13th H C. Str. Qucen, Warden, HE Sir H. Pottin- ger on boadr Chusan .. Arun Kelly Macao 14th H C. Str. Hoogly, Ross Rappar Abdalla 15th William Wilson Hawkins Cherookee Kellar

Chusan

SAILED.

Jauncey

Macao.

39

19

Kelly

Bradely

Singapore. Macao. William Pedder

FOR SALE.

FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and bottles

Pine Cheese

Manilla Segars No. 4.

Apply to

No. 18 Queen's Road.

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAO.

A STOREKEEPER WANTED. A PERSON of sober and industrious habits with experience in the department of re- ceiving and delivering valuable merchan- dise, may apply at 46 Queens Road be- tween the hours of 10 and 11 a. m.

An ex-second officer of a vessel familiar with the above mentioned duty would probably prove a suitable person for the situation.

Hongkong 25th May 1842.

June 8th Falcon

9th H. C. Str. Hoogly Ross Zoe Miller Brigstock

99

Westmoreland

10th Arun

14th Fourteen

Bombay

Chusan

Macae

East Coast Chusan

Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND ON

No.14. VOL. 1

LONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 23RD. 1842.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine.

Hongkong, 25 Mai 1842.

TRANSLATION. YI, imperial commissioner and rebel quelling gen- eral, Tse, joint commissioner and high minister, Ke, governor of the two Kwang Provinces, and E, lieut, governor put forth this their official despatch.

It appears that when the English barbarian Pottin- ger first arrived as Superintendent he offerred up a barbarian letter. Upon this we, the generals com- manding and others, deputed the Kwangchowfoo (Mayor of Canton city) Yu Po shun, to repair straightway to Macao to make clear our commands, and open the way of reason to the said Superintendent. The Kwang- chowfoo, by petition, reported that after he had pro- ceeded to Macao the barbarian Superintendent Pot- tinger was at Canton presenting a barbarian letter, and that on the third of the seventh moon he had ifted anchor and proceeded to Amoy in Fokien and was unable face to face to open to him the way of reason, and words to this effect. Now, therefore, we again hasten to deliver our definite orders to all the mili-.

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

POLICE.

Afoo being But a youth was ordered to have 50 Strokes

and lose his tail.

H. B. M. ship Lion, captain sir Erasmus Gower, having on board the carl of Macartney, embassador, minister plenipotentiary, &c., anchored near the same custody on the 8th inst, charged with Cattle Stealing Aroo and Assum were brought up to this office in place on the 25th of July, 1793. by Acheoong (the elder of l'ok-foo-lune village) who The line of coast, from that point where the Great deposed that about noon, a number of people came to Wall terminates in the sea, lat. 40° 4' N., long, 120 the village and forcibly carried off his Cow. Seeing 2' E., runs southwest till to the south of the river, this he gave the alarm and with his neighbours pursu where it trends first southward and then eastward. In ed the robbers, among whom were the two prisoners, clear weather the forts and a pagoda, near the river's who had hold of the cow by the horns. Its value is mouth, are visible from the anchorage 12 or 14 miles ten dollars. This evidence was corroborated. Assum due east. At the mouth of the river is a bar, stretch- was sentenced to receive 100 Strokes and lose his tail. ing north-northeast and south-southwest, over which, at low water, the depth is not more than three or four feet, and which in many places is nearly or quite dry. The Madagascar, on the 11th of August, 1840, had twelve feet, at spring tides. Lieutenant Campbell, in Attuk charged with selling Samshu, and stealing from 1793, found "that a course of west by north, according the person of John Northgate the sum of eight dollars. to the compass, led up the best channel, in a line with Jack who is one of the lads belonging to H. M. the fort which stands on the southwest side of the en- S Druid said all he knew was, that when he paid trance into the river, which at its mouth was about Attuk a rupee for two Bottles of liquor, he had eight one-third of a mile in width, and three fathoms in depth dollars in his pocket, he knew nothing more, as he got at low water." Upon the bar, and within it, Staunton very drunk. One of his mates (who did not get so says the water is thick and sandy, although outside it drunk) swore he saw the robbery committed The is remarkably green and clear. He found the bar guilt of the prisoner being proved. he was sentenced divided into a number of sandy banks, lying in various to be imprisoned for four months with hard labour and directions, but so high and so close to each other as to to repay the 8 dollars, or continue in prison till it be prevent the passage, even of small vessels, except at paid. high water. Immediately within the bar, the water deepened to three or four fathoms. The river was there about five hundred yards in width. Mr. Gutzlaff, who visited Tientsin in a Chinese vessel,in Sept., 1831, says "the river has no regular tides, but constantly flows into the sea with more or less rapidity."

On its southern bank, or the left of the entrance, is the small village of Tungkú. Its situation is low and swampy, and the ground in its vicinity is covered, in summer, with the Arundo phragmites, a long and not altogether useless reed.

a

river's channel.

From this village the vessels first move almost due north for three or four miles, then turning westward and southward, 'making a complete elbow, they move against the current, till nearly due west from Tungku they reach Sikú (Seckoo); thence turning again west ward and northward, and making another elbow, they arrive at Tákú; and thus on, zigzag course, they wind their way to Tientsin, a instance of forty miles in right line, but more than twice that following the Dr. Abel says, no country in the world can afford fewer objects of interest to the traveler, than the banks of the river between the sea and Tientsin: the land is marshy and sterile, the inhabitants are poor and squalid, their habitations mean, dirty, and dilapidated; and the native productions of the soil are few and unattractive. The banks of the river, during his first day's journey; were not much above its level; the country beyond them was low, exhibiting a dreary waste, unbroken by marks of cultivation. Patches of millet, interspersed with a species of bean, occasionally surrounded mud- huts, on the immediate margin of the river. During the second day's journey, the country gradually, though slowly, improved. The land along the banks, bears the strongest marks of recent formation; consisting of THE above is the translation of a copy of an clay and sand, in nearly equal proportions, and being official despatch recently sent by the governor of free from the smallest pebble. The beds and shells, the two Kwang Provinces to the commandants of alternating with strata of earth, of unequal thickness, the various military stations. The childish absur-mark its periodical and unequal accumulation by the dilies and falsehoods which it contains win be soll, which is brought down by The debris of the mountains (situated on the obvious to all our local readers. It is well known seasons. that on the arrival of Sir Henry Pottinger in China, north and west) afford, no doubt, the materials of its Repository. the said Kwang chowfoe was deputed to Macao accumulation. to seek an interview with H. E. but H. E. per- COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE. emtorily refused to see the gentleman; and, after an unofficial interview with the Secretary of Le- gation, Major Malcolm, the Kwang-chowfoo re- Calcutta, 10th May. Here matters are assuming turned to Canton chagrined and disappointed. a rather better aspect. The last Overland report The letter of the Superintendent referred to in ed no further failures connected with this City. Our Money Market is not nearly so tight and con- the despatch, was sent by Sir Henry in his capa-fidence is daily increasing. It is generally beley- city of Plenipotentiary and merely intimated his willingness to abide, by the Canton Truce entered into by his predecessor, Capt. Elliot.

tary stations on the sea board, and also in the de- partments and districts that with combined purposes of heart our confines be guarded with strictest dis- cipline.

THE PEI-HO RIVER. PEKING THE northern capital, so called in contra- distinction to Nanking, or southern capital-is situated near the western extremity of an immense plain, dis. tant to the northwest, say one hundred and fifty miles from the anchorage for ships, at the mouth of the Pei- ho. Barrow says the distance is 170 miles from the entrance of the river to the city of Tungchau; but measuring in a right line, on the chart accompanying Staunton's Account of Macartney's embassy, the dis- tance is only 108 common English miles. From Tungchau to Peking the distance is twelve miles.

On the 9th of August, 1840, the Wellesley anchored off the mouth of this river, in lat. 38° 55' 30" N., and long. 118° E., with six fathoms at low tides.

H. B. M. ship Alceste, captain Murray Maxwell, bearing the right honorable lord Amherst, ambassador extraordinary, minister plenipotentiary, &c, anchored off the mouth of this river on the 28th of July, 1816, in five fathoms, about lat, 38° 58' N., and long. 117

57' E.

ed the worst is past but some croakers persist in declaring the worst is yet to come. Prices gener- ally are steady with but little doing. The 3rd Government Sale of the season took place on the 10th ult, the result of which was as follows, viz. Chests highest lowest Average Proceeds Behar 2,895 805-770-785,2,4-22,73,000 Benares 1,165 775-765-768,2,4- 8,95,625 The present rates in the Bazar as follows;-viz Behar 785 to 790 Benares 775 to 780. Freights $5 to$7 per Bale of Cotton to China 14,, Chest of Opium,, Exchange. First rate Agency Bills, without documents 28. 24d to 2s. 2d. With documents 2s. 2d. Treasury Bills 1s. 111d to 2s. od.

8

12

SIR H. Hardinge on the 8th March in bring. ing forward the Army Estimates, recommended an increase of 1,447 men and a material alteration and improvement in the present Depot system. The 20th, 23d, 29th 71st 97th Regiments and 2d. Battalion Rifle Brigade are to have an augmenta- tion of two Companies.

OUR readers will share our satisfaction in knowing that the native municipal Police has been re-established. We ventured to impugn the propriety of the summary suppression of this very useful force. The robberies which took place on its abolition, most unpleasantly attested its efficiency. With adequate powers our Island authori- ties will afford to the residents, as full a security of person and property as is pos- sessed by the inhabitants of any town of a like population in her majesty's dominions.

Fire Insurance. We would press on our friends the urgent expediency of either establishing a Company, or else putting themselves in corre- spondence with some existing Society. No more time should be lost. We know of instances, where considerable sums would be embarked in Buil- dings in our Town, but the parties very prudent- ly demur augmenting their risks to a serious extent. Surely an arrangement could be made with some one of the existing Marine Insurance offices here, to take land Fire risks? It would eventually be a very profitable department. In our fourth number, we called the attention of our Readers to this important subject, we confidently hoped ere this something would have been done.

We are glad to see in some of the Villa Resi- dences now erecting that provision is made to store Ice. From our maritime locality and admirable position, the summer treats are attempered by a Hlingual banaan, sill the introduc ton of Ice to our tables will be an agreeable luxu- ry, and although it is so easily procurable, it never we believe has yet been seen or tasted more to the southward than Amoy.

Trifling as the mention of this incident may be deemed, our friends in England will acknowledge it to slightly testify to our Anglo Saxon enter- prise, love of comfort and of home which could not or has not been exhibited at Canton or Macao in this respect.

ST Robert Peel in his Budget Speech said the China War would bring this year on the country, an expense of at least £1,400,000, that is more than £800,000 beyond the original estimate.

Pursers R. N. on the recommendation of the Committee of Inquiry will, on board of H. M. Ships, be called in future Paymasters. Many other ameliorations are proposed which it is believed will be adopted.

-The Cotton Cultivation Experiment has tem- porarily failed in the Bombay presidency be- be Chief Collector did not like to be bothered accord- cause the overpaid incapable who happened to ing to his own note which has been published. In Bengal the matter has fallen into better hands. It is confidently hoped the better qualities of Ameri- can Cotton will be naturalized. We hear that the a strong remonstrance to both the Bombay and Court of Directors have very properly addressed ton Cultivation Experiments. Madras Governments for their neglect of the Cot-

1

54

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CHINA' powers with whom we are now in negoti-

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE, 23RD. 1842.

ALTHOUGH the lengthened residence of H. E. the Plenipotentiary on our Island, had no special reference to Hongkong, or its interests as the future Capital of Anglo- China; but was occasioned by circum- stances wholly referrible to the War now in progress; still, it is but justice to H. E. to say, that no proper representation was ever made or submitted to him whilst here, which did not immediately receive due attention. The case, brought to his notice by the merchants, of the necessity of a general standard of Value, and the conse- quent Proclamation, directing Mexican dollars to be accepted as such, will be fresh in the recollection of our readers. The Harbour regulations which were made and circulated, and the augmented powers giv- en by I. E. to our magistrates will also be deemed of great utility. The appointment of the Land Committee (however well in tentioned) could not be productive of the great advantages which some of our friends conjectured would result, seeing that the Committee was restricted from allotting Lands to other than Chinese and philan- trophic objects.

Macao, garrison it with native troops from Bengal, "IF Great Britain were to take possession of ation for commercial treaties. The most and declare it a free port, it would be one of the disgusting features of our Tariff are how-most flourishing places in the East". In this opi- ever now and for ever removed. Out of nion, however, this intelligent traveller has been 1200 enumerated articles the duty is redu- misinformed, for Macao would be worse than use- ced on no less than 750. After the deluge less to Great Britain, owing to the humiliating of Cant, which has inundated us, we were tenure on which it is held from the Chinese, and not surprised to find that no alteration is of the smaller class. If any island is taken posses- its want of a suitable anchorage for any but vessels made in the Sugar Dutics. From the sion of, it should be in a central part of China,- contentedness or supineness of our mer- CHUSAN for instance, as suggested by Sir James chants the monstrous inequality of the Tea Urmston, formerly chief of the Company's factory. Duties is maintained. We are glad to see Then indeed might we hope to see it become one a reduction in Coffee. Foreign grown will of the most flourishing places in the East; "for," pay 8d instead of 1s 3d. British grown 4d of smuggling, that they would not hesitate to trade continues Mr. Holman, "the Chinese are so fond instead of 9d. On Timber the reduction with foreigners if they could be assured of receiv- henceforth will be very important. Canadian ing protection; and there is no doubt that they 1s instead of 10s. Foreign timber and would use all those arts of bribery with their own deals 25s and 30s instead of 41s. Stage countrymen, which would be necessary to promote Coach Proprietors and letters of pleasure their own ends, and which are so irresistible to the carriages are to obtain considerable relief. equivocal integrity of the Chinese. By these means, It is with unfeigned satisfaction that we tensive and productive trade might be established therefore, there is not a doubt that a very ex- see so many of the recommendations of the with China, and very important advantages secur- much abused Import Duties Committee ed to the British nation. When these facts are so accepted by a conservative premier. Public self-evident," well may the writer add, "it is won- opinion now, is far too strong and enlight-derful that some measures have not been taken to ened not to compel any set of men in office, from the insults and obstacles which are now so secure the commerce and to protect the merchants to progress in the right direction. The much complained of, as well as to lower the bul- general character of the proposed revision lying and imperative tone which the Chinese at is highly liberal, and our Tariff is classified present think fit to adopt in all their mercantile and arranged under twenty heads like the transactions." Prussian. With few exceptions the maxi- mum duty on Raw materials is to be five per cent; on articles partly manufactured, twelve per cent; and on manufactured ar- ticles, twenty per cent.

THE above extract is taken from a pamphlet published at London in 1836 entitled "The present position and prospects of the British trade with Chi- to tell our readers, that no better authority is cita- na by JAMES MATHESON ESQ." It is unnecessary ble on all that belongs to our commercial relations pro-izes the desiderata mentioned and which are with the Chinese Empire. Hongkong now real- unobtainable at Macao. The possession of this Island and its permanent retention as a commer- cial emporium, may now be considered as un fait accompli. For years past, the occupation by us of insular positions on the coast of China, has been Chambers of Commerce and Oriental associations pressed on the attention of Government by the at home. Such earnest representations have not been without their effect in the proper quarter: as also the obviously grave inconveniences which would now result, from capricious suspensions of the Trade by the mandarins at Canton. The Glasgow East India association in their memorial

THE erection of the Market place, and the clearing of our streets of the huckster population, was a very great benefit con- ferred on our town. The great utility of the market was tested at once, by the si- Nor having received a copy of the multaneous arrival of the fleet of Trans-posed tariff we cannot specify the full ef- ports. We were pleased to find this sud- fects thereof on the China Trade. From den and enormous demand was readily all we gather, our trade will benefit in a met and without any important advance much less degree than any other by these on the current prices. Our thanks are beneficial changes. The consumption in justly due to II. E. for the appointment of a England of China Silk manufactures, may Post Master, who by the prompt perform- by the reduction proposed (some ten per ance of his duty has already earned the cent) be a little increased; as also the finer confidence of our community. The crown- qualities of grass cloth, which will be ad- ing act (although the first on the arrival of missible at half the old duties. A variety his II. E.) was the immediate suppression of of articles which are here expressively call- Junk-seizing by our men of war. Other claims to our gratitude he may have earned for we entertain no doubt that his II. E. during his stay with us has moved the Home Government to make definitive ar- rangements with respect to our Island. At any rate, it would be a poor tribute to the well known sagacity of H. E. to suspect he had not claimed the attention of her Ma- jesty's Government to our legitimate require-

inents.

By the "Vindictive" we have received a copy of the Times newspaper, dated Lon-

Robert Peel brought forward his Budget in the House of Commons on the 11th of that month; although of so comprehensive a cha- racter, it was well received by both sides of the house. To meet the annual deficiency he proposed a general Income tax of seven pence in the pound, or £2,18,,4 per cent; which he estimates will produce £3,775,000. From this impost, all incomes of under 150 a-year will be exempt : an additional duty on Irish Spirits of Is per gallon is im- posed, and seeing that Ireland has no as- sexed taxes, Irish absentees resident in England will be subject to the Income tax. Additional Stamp duties in Ireland will be levied, so that from these sources an increase of £310,000 is counted on. £200,000 is expected to be obtained from a new duty of As per Ton on the export of Coals to For- eign Parts.

The augmented revenue will amount from these sources to £4,385,000 of which sum £2,570,000, goes to provide for the estimated deficiency. £1,210,000 is devo- ted to the reduction of duties, which affect our trade and commerce. £605,000 is re- served as an available surplus, which may be needed, in making the concessions which will be required by Brazil, Spain and other

ed chow-chow will be imported into En- to Lord Melbourne say: "It would be of the great- gland on much easier terms, and the aggre-est advantage to British Trade in that part of gate amount of these articles exported from the world, were his Majesty's Government to ob- China will much increase. But no sub-tain one or more of the Islands near China, as an stantial or important advantage can accrue to us, that does not involve a reduction of duty on our staple article Tea. Now that a further reduction on Coffee (as we prog- nosticated) has been made the justice of our demand for a revision and alteration of the Tea duties is considerably increased and we hope will be urged in the proper quarter.

of Shah Soojah. Circumstantial details are given THERE seems no doubt now of the assassination in the Indian papers; but we have not yet seen any statements which satisfactorily account for his untimely end. One narrative states that when the Shah was shot, he was on his way to succour Sale, and raise the siege of Jellullabad!! Hence the made out. Should it be proved against the de- question of treason to his benefactors, is not yet ceased Shah, it is affirmed in well informed quar- ters, that the deposed Dost Mahomed will be re- stored by the power which dethroned him. If it should be satisfactorily made out that Akbar Khan did not instigate the murder of our Envoy, and moreover that he has well treated the Cabul pris- Lord Ellenborough will replace his father, the Dost, oners; then we really think it not improbable that in the Affghan Durbar, Lord Auckland (wise as this course of policy may be) could not have done this, without a sacrifice of consistency which is not compromised in the case of his Successor who duct pursued in Afghanistan. denounced, from the beginning, the course of con-

ALL the demands made by Commodore Kearney have been satisfactorily met by the Provincial Authorities of Canton, and the U. S. Ships, Constellation and Boston, have withdrawn from the River. What these demands were we have not yet learned. The Commodore is thinking of visiting Chusan.

emporium for carrying on commerce free from the exactions, control, or annoyance of the Chinese it is guaranteed by the very heavy and recently Government". As to the full success of Hongkong, augmented Imposts and dues of the Port of Canton, which in the aggregate on Exports and Imports now amount we are informed to nearly Seventeen millions of dollars per annum. This enormous sum the location of our merchants in this Free Port is payable by the British Trade. We are assured would immediately effect a saving of one fourth of their being

those oraations

nearly the sum total might be saved, if proper en- few months. Some of our sanguine friends say, still further diminished, to fully one half, within a couragement be given to the Chinese to resort hither. In 1836 Mr. Matheson said that at Can- ton "the regulations of trade are so contrived as to secure, the most grievous and increasing impo- sitions" and asks "how can a British merchant Canton, but at a sacrifice of his personal safety continue to carry on his commercial pursuits at and self-respect?" How singularly applicable are these remarks now, and it must be confessed that they are very creditable to the respected author's sagacity and far-sightedness: which however was still more strikingly shown by the firm, of which he was the head being the first to build a business establishment on the British Island of Hongkong.

house or godown at Macao, will suffice to con- We are assured that three years rental of a struct an equal accommodation of a stable cha- racter at Hongkong. The Charges for Landing Goods, and discharging Cargo amount to about one fourth of the customary rates at Macao. We are glad to see these advantages becoming more and more appreciated.

THE Scientific Commission composed of Sir John Herschell, Mr. Lubbock and Professor Airey in all weights, measures and moneys; 2, the abo- recommend; 1, A system of decimal computation lition of troy and substitution of avoirdupois weight and 3d, an uniform standard.

ORIGINAL CORRESP

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TDENCE.

55

stand as erect before a prince as they would before Ere an unrestricted trade can be carried on with all an equal and this national independance mode of showing respect is either unheeded, or noticed with a laugh. Chow Fah is very popular among the Chinese population in the country by whom he is called the O Che wang, or black tongued prince. The Siamese consider that in cansequence of his great merit he is invulnerable to musket balls. He is in reality a person of no ordinary character and it is reasonable to expect that his influence upon his coun- try will be salutary and extensive.

Macao, 17th June 1842.

Yours &c.

My dear Sir, THE brother of the Siamese Prince noticed in my last is generally known by the name of Chow Fah Noi, i. e. Chow Fah the younger, and may be considered the heir apparent to the throne. He is a young man of more than ordinary mental endow- ments, of a commanding personal appearance, accus. tomed to habits of activity and is the known and acknowledged friend of foreigners, the imitator of their arts and customs, and a popular Prince among his own countrymen. He introduced the art of Ship building in his own country after the model of Europeans by setting an example in person, and laboring with his own hands in the execution of his praiseworthy designs. Another countryman of his, a person of rank has I imitated his example and now they have six vessels, each from two to eight hundred tons. Some of the first were poorly fastened and imperfectly formed but such improvements have been made that some of the last are strong and fine looking vessels and will sail as well as the ships of any other nation. They have been employed as merchant vessels in trade with Sin gapore, but in the early part of the present year they were all furnished with guns and sent to the Cochin Chinese war. Prince Chaw Fah, not resting conten- ted with his success in the art of ship building, turned his attention also to the science of navigation, and by NATIVE Smugglers, in any numbers, and of all des- his patient application and persevering enterprise has criptions fast-crabs, scrambling-dragons, &c., &c., ship building, he has ever been ready to avail himself built like a large fastboat, having mat sails, and an navigator, In this, as in neither Chinese nor European craft a nondescript, of the aid of ship Captains visiting the place, as well English flag, manned by all sorts of people of divers as those in the Siamese employ, while he has by the aid colors, A Man who called himself a compradore, of these and other gentlemen residing in the country so said She was a free trader, and carried two signs writ- far acquired the English language as to employ it suc- ten in Chinese, one offering for sale opium, at so much cessfully in his mathematical studies. As the head of per catty the other offering to take cargo to Hongkong His Majesty's marine forces he spends much time in at so much a picul. drilling his men and takes much pride in their martial exhibitions. In their exercise in gunnery the word of command is given in English, and often by himself in person, compelling his men to learn the techicalities and the manouvres at the same time. He has in con- nexion with the men of his own country a few hundred Cochin Chinese prisoners of war under a course of martial discipline. In their recent expedition against the Cochin Chinese he went as Commander in Chief of the fleet, composed of five ships and forty five war boats. He is supplied with an English dress appro- priate to his office, his own ship is kept in fine order, hiving on board a band of music, and his men are trained to observe the appropriate regulations of their

so far mastered its

or these people, a vast deal of mutual jealousy and hatred could ensue without a Resident in that direction to must be reconciled; nor do we think that success smooth all differences and remove all impediments. The Siamese Shans are almost constantly at logger heads with Burmese Shans, and the red Kayens carry off people indiscriminately from the one party and sell them as slaves to the other. These Kayens, however, or at least some portion of them, have, on more than one occasion, we understand, offered to place their country under our jurisdiction without stipulation of W. D. of any kind, but no attention has been paid to such offers. Their country is said to produce tin in unlimit. ed abundance, not as in these Provinces, collected from have seen and heard and will tell you. As I came ore on the sides of mountains. The existence of such MR. EDITOR: You ask for news: Some things the beds of running streams, but in large masses of the up the river, I saw a fine fleet of Smugglers, bearing ore ought be ascertained by some competent person, as, the English flag: at Whampoa there were ten or if true, we doubt not that some enterprizing individuals twelve Sail in all. I was told a Lorcha recently came would engage in working it. among them, but was taken and towed out of the fleet. The Tea plant flourishes well throughout the whole They do business in high style, are on the best possible country to the north-east of Zimmay, but to bring this terms with the people, and are, to say the least, let to account in our Market, would require much capital alone by the Mandarins. I saw five or six other En- and more settled state of affairs than now exists in those glish vessels, the two U. S. A. Ships of War, and one regions. We think all these countries should be visited or two other Merchant vessels of that Nation, and yearly by some officer of this Government, in order to also a small Schooner called the Echo, and belonging, cultivate friendly feelings towards us, to inquire into it was said, to the consulate. their resources, and to remove impediments to free intercourse. The expense of such an undertaking would be trifling, while the advantage gained would annually increase far beyond what we have incidentally alluded to, there is much to engage the attention of traders. THE above extract from the Maulmain Chronicle (which we find in the Singapore Free Press of the 12th of May) is very in- teresting as proving the gradual extension of our commercial influence to the South lestial Empire. We are glad to know the western and Southern frontiers of the Ce- Chinese, who trade to Zimmai, wish to extend their journey to Maulmain. But for our War with China, we have no doubt ere this, they would have resorted thither in considerable numbers. Zimmay, referred to, is indifferently called Zemmai and Shaimai, according to Malte Brun. The Society for the diffusion of Useful Know- ledge, have very properly adopted the Siam- It is a city containing, we are told, 25,000 ese designation Changmay in their Map. inhabitants who have a considerable inter-

and practice a comculties as to become in theory I also saw ;andwhat shall I call them I saw, what was

station.

At his palace he has several rooms furnished in Eu- ropean style, and while his residence is made the fre- quent resort of foreigners residing in the city as well as of strangers visiting the place, he receives his guests in a manner which does honor to his taste and hospitality. His chairs, couches, tables etc. are either of foreign inanufacture or are successful imitations made by his own servants. In common with his countrymen he shows a fondness for flowers, and has some pretty gar- dens of flowers and fruit trees. He has also a cabinet cantaining a choice collection of shells, insects and

birds.

Though he observes some of the formalities of the re- ligion of the country it is believed that he has but little regard for religion in any form, still he manifests a liberal disposition and has contributed generously for the support of christian schools, He keeps up a friendly intercourse with Europeans and Americans residing at the Capital, often visiting at their houses and making them welcome guests at his own table. His power and influence enable him to do much to wards mitigating the inconveniences attending their resi- to render the needful assistance. The ladies from his palace participating in his desires for cultivating the acquaintance and friendship of foreigners occasionally visit at the residence of the American ladies of the place. His eldest son, three or four years old, is of princely appearance and promise. His name is George Washington. The late Queen, mother to Prince Chaw Fah, died at his palace in 1838. Her funeral was celebrated with great pomp, and afforded an occa- sion for assembling multitudes from different parts of the Kingdom to witness the ceremonies. She was a person of great dignity of character before whom the Prince himself was in the habit of prostrating himself according the custom af the country when a person enters the presence of a superior. The princes and ministry in their daily visits to the palace prostrate themselvs in the presence of His Majesty while they also in going to their own dwellings find a number of under officers waiting their return in a prostrate posi- tion, while these again at their own homes are sur- nunded by their servants on their knees and elbows. A Siamese prince in going abroad is accompanied by some fifteen or twenty attendants, some of whom propel his boat, some are prostrate before and behind him, one bears his sword, one his betul box, one his tea-pot, one his cigar box and fire, and perhaps one his watch. At his landing at any place, except the armour bearer who precedes and gives notice of his approach, all follow him to the house and while he enters in, they remain without the door either in a sitting or prostrate position unless some one of the number may be called on to admire something strange or to mark something new which is to be imitated on their return home. The native servants of the house at such times either prostrate themselves or flee from their presence, but the Chinese unless it be those who are accustomed to wait on the nobility,

dence in a heathen enty, and he is ever ocen

factories, five stand near to each other half way to the I counted seven forts between Whampoa and the city the others near the city. There is one opposite to the factories, and three or four more, I am told, further up on the same side as the factories. I could see one or two large works north of the city on the hill. There are said to be several forts in the Macao Channel, and the Blenheim passage. Almost every morning I hear the cracking of firearms in all directions about the city.

The factories are still more than half deserted. Some are in utter ruins. There are not, so I have been told, more than fifty or sixty foreigners now in Canton; and they are much restricted, not allowed to The people however, so far as I have seen, are very go, except on certain days, even to the Fa-te Gardens. quiet and do not molest you as you go in the streets. In the few streets, through which I have walked and have been as far as "Physic Street", business seemed to be brisk. Four flags staffs, the Dutch, English, American, and French, are standing; but the American flag is the only one now flying.

I

I have not met any of the hong merchants, but have seen several of the shopmen, and also a doctor Longhead, and a linguist called Alanisi. People here tell me that Howqua does not often go abroad, and wishes to keep himself clear of all business. The Chinese like trade better than fighting.

Canton 16th June 1842.

MAULMAIN.

YOURS

VIATOR.

course with the Chinese Province of Yun- nan. They have also a regular intercourse with Ava, and Bankok. The country round Zemmai is densely peopled and the inhabitants, (Shans) are said to be an intel- ligent, peaceable, prosperous race, in arts and civilization advanced far beyond the Burmese. Dr. Richardson of Maulmain (who in the Asiatic Journal, from a personal visit, has given the best account we know of these regions) speaks highly of the "pre- eminent salubrity of the climate." Much of the Tin which arrives from the interior at An unusual number of Shan traders have made their Bankok, is said to come from the Kayen appearance in Maulmain in this year, bringing numer. Country. We think the existence of con- ous ponies and a large assortment of silks and lac-siderable deposites of Tin ore very prob- quered bong The great mjölity of these traders are able. From what we know of the theolog from the districts of Englay and Monay, N. W. of ical character of this part of Asia, we these Provinces, while some are from Kiaingtoun to the northward of Zimmay. The market of Maulmain think its primitive formation may be a has evidently irresistible attractions for these people, stanniferous granita Any way, it would for they are said to have found their way to our terri- be very desirable to appoint a resident in tories, through entirely new routes, thereby evading the this quarter, which we hope will be done prohibitions and impediments to their visiting us. We again hear of the strong desire manifested by the Chi- before many months elapse. nese, who trade overland to Zimmay, to extend their journey to Maulmain, but that they are prevented from doing so by the authorities of that place. How far their non-arrival here may be attributed to that cause we do not know, but we think the removal of any im. pediment that may exist is well worth an effort on the part of Government. We did at one time understand that an Officer was to be deputed to the Shan country on this and other accounts during this fine season, but we suppose attention was diverted from it by the uncertain state of affairs in this quarter, consequent on the Royal progress to Rangoon, and the preparations made here to meet any contingency that might arise from it. Great advantage would, no doubt, be deriv. ed from opening a free and unrestricted intercourse with all the countries lying to the northward of us, though many interests must be consulted ere such an intercourse can be entirely effected. To the northward and eastward of us we have the Shan States dependent on Siam. Between them and the frontiers of China are other Shan States nominally dependent on Ava, though virtually perhaps more so on China, if not althogether independent. On the right bank of the Salween we have the red Kayens, an apparently half civilized race, who have always asserted and defended their independence of all around them, especially of Ava, which has made several unsuccessful efforts to reduce them. This country is bounded to the north- ward and westward by Shan States dependent on Ava,

1842

1842

lb

lb 114,665,483 4,915,109

EXPORT of Cotton) Yarn from England 107,456,575 Cotton Thread

"9

2,876,709 yds

Calicoes printed) and Dyed (253,071,143

Plain 301,840,036 Cambrics and Muslin 5,105,473

yds 278,748,275 366,966,452 55,118,166

Corporal Punishment. Out of 70.000 male adult Criminals iu 1840. Corporal punishment was only inflicted on 70, or one in ten thousand. So much is this mode of punishment repudiated in England for civil offences according to Sir James Graham in a recent Debate on Prison Discipline.

Ignorance in England: Of 120,000 marriages solemnized before the Registrars 40,587 of the Males and 58,959 of the Females could not write their names. Iu Bedfordshire 55 per cent of the Males and 66 per cent of the Females signed by marks. Of 66,238 Persons summarily convicted in 1840, 35,552 could not read or write, 13,644 could only read, and 21, 483 could only write imperfectly.

56

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res pect full to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na. vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queens Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO. in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor. deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu-

tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali- ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu-

ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our

exorbitant price.

Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp, Soda Water Powders. Brown Windsor Soap.

and Campbell in hhds. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads.

Very fine small still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds.

Dublin Stout, in botiles.

Blank Visiting Cards.

Diamond Grained Gun Powder. Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

Champagne, from Moet of Ceylon Moss.

Epernay.

Superfine Brown Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn. and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Brandy

Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

11

Sandoway Imitation

Havannah Cigars.

Fancy dry Biscuits, in tins

Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

in small tins, for Invalids. Sardines.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Ditto Sago.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waisterats. Lascars Clothing. White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco. Worsted Gloves.

uchussy Proces Witney Blankets.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth.

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto.

Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Licorice.

i

Zante Currants.

Isinglass.

Seidlitz Powders.

Pickles.

Ketchup.

Anchovies.

Lucca Oil.

Fine Salt.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

ded, in kegs each containing

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard.

Assorted Sauces.

Capers,

Jams and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel. Humps and 6 Tongues.

Lead Lines, Europe.

Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10, Log ditto ditto.

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.]

Seaming Twine ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seizing Lines..

White Lead.

Black Paint.

Green ditto. Turpentine.

Blocks of Sizes. Bunting. Fish hooks. Screws of ditto.

Nails of sizes.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

1'rench Velvet Corks.

numerous to detail.

NOTICE.

MR. DUTRONQUOY of the LONDON HOTEL, SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment

And various other Aricles too under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa-

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and Go. carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the N. DUUS. or Premises to

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION The following Articles :

Brandy in Wood and Bottles. Vinegar, ditto. Beer, ditto.

99

Sherry, Madeira, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams, Tongues and Tripe. Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Also a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine Stores. Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

Best Stockholm Tar Sheathing Copper and nails Nails assorted

pore.

MR. DUTRONQUoy also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c., at the shortest notice.

ON SALE.

NAIL Rod Iron Calcutta Bottled Beer, in Cases of 6 doz. Navy and Pilot Bread American Flour.

Apply to

Wm. T. Kinsley.

FOR FREIGHT OR CHARTER.

The undermentioned Goods, are for Sale Hongkong 13 June, 1842. on Board the Prima Donna, Hong Kong. Steam Coals Pig Lead Nail Rod Iron. Scrapers Paint brushes. Cordage and Spun yarn. Green and Black Paint. Petersburgh Deals with two

and three cuts Fine mustard in Cases Bottled ale and Porter in Casks.

Best and Second Cabin Breads in air tight Pun cheons. Carr's well known fancy Fine table Salt.

Biscuits.

Lead and Log Lines. Superior White Lead and Linseed Oil. Petersburgh Battens. Superior brown Mustard in Jars.

Brick and Truckle Wiltshire Cheeses packed in lead and stowed in Salt. Best mould Candles in 10 pound boxes. Superior Smoked York-

shire Hams.

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3.-

Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

HONGKONG 11TH APRIL 1842.

To be Disposed of, a Quantity of Chinese Copper Coin, at 1200 for One Silver Spanish Dollar, in Quan. tities of not less than 50 Dollars, which will be ready to be delivered on Monday 18th Instant at Messrs. Jar- dine Matheson & Cc. on Shore at Hongkong between the Hours of 10 A. M. to 3 P. M. daily, Sundays except

ed.

Apply to R. M Whichelo, Purser of H. M. S. Blenheim, and Prize Agent FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Apply on Board

Plank.

HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to DENT & Co. at Macao. A 1940

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar of the Chinese Language. Published at Batavia. Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com- ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men. Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

FOR SALE.

FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and bottles

Pine Cheese

Mauilla Segars No. 4. Apply to

No. 18 Queen's Road.

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAD.

A STOREKEEPER WANTED.

A PERSON of sober and industrious habits with experience in the department of re- ceiving and delivering valuable merchan- dise, may apply at 46 Queens Road be- tween the hours of 10 and 11 a. m.

An ex-second officer of a vessel familiar with the above mentioned duty would probably prove a suitable person for the situation. Hongkong 25th May 1842.

THE A. S. Prussian, Barque Borussia, Capt. Kuhr, 379 tons.

Apply to W. T. Kinsley Hongkong. Holliday Wise & Co. Macao.

or

Macao 14 June, 1842..

LATEST INTELLIGENCE.

WE understand the April London Mail is in. As yet, we have not received our Letters and Papers, but owing to the kindness of our Post Master we have seen a Sunday Times of the 27th March from which we gather that whilst the infamous Corn and Provision Laws are maintained; John Bull will not willingly consent to so inquisitorial a tax, as the one on Income, proposed by Sir Robert Peel. By repeated motions of adjournment the consideration of Sir Robert's financial plans has been put off till after the Easter Holidays. The ultra Tories seem very discontented at what is and said Lord Ripon is about to secede from the Cab- the Liberals at what is not done by Sir Robert. It is inet.-We are sorry to learn that the Earl of Munster committed Suicide by shooting himself through the head. The verdict of the Coroners Inquest was mental derangement. The deceased Earl was much respected, and was of literary tastes, and an excellent Oriental scholar. By advi- ces from America to the 12th March it appears the President had demanded an explanation or redress from Great Britain in respect of the affair of the Creole. It is not, however, expected that any war between the two powers will ensue.- An Explosion of a Steam Vessel had taken place at Glasgow, some twenty persons killed and about as many wounded.-The Government Commission consisting of Sir F. Smith, and Professor Barlow had decided on the general practicability of the Atmospheric Railway as a m of cheap and expeditious loco-motion.-Among the merchants, the new Tariff appears to give satisfaction, but they seem to fear the adverse interests will com- nel Sir Robert to alter many of its provisions for to the worse. We are sorry to see the pressure of distress in the manufacturing districts is not yet lightened.-Cherubini, the composer, is dead.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

11

11

15th June, H. C. Str. Porserpine Capt. Hough R. N. from Calcutta ,, Gazelle, Transport Robert Ogg » Isis George Graham "Cherokee (Put back) Mc. Kellar, sailed again on the 21st inst 18th Sir Robert Peel Frederick Somes from England 19th H. M.S. Vindictive, Capt. I. Toup Nicolas R. N 90 days from England, with Rear Admiral Sir. Thomas Cochrane on board..

,, Nerva with Govt. stores Melvill 21st Govr. Doherty

Lacy

Calcutta Macao

,, H. MS. Hazard Capt. Charles Bell R. N. Sing SAILED.

18th June, John Wickliff, Wm. Cheyne for 21st Cherokee Mc. Kellar 22nd H.C. Str, Hoogly Ross H.C, Str. Proserpine Capt. Hough H. S. Forbes Sir Robert Feel

Chusan

33

93

Macap

13

23

Hobbs Somes Amoy and Chusan. William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

N. 15. VOL. 1.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

LONGKONG

NOTIFICATION.

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zetto," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les males droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine. Hongkong, 25 Mai, 1842.

FROM THE PERING GAZETTE.

THE BRITISH AT YUYAOU.

THE Emperor's commands have been received as follows: ON a former occasion Lew-yun-ho sent up a representation that the English rebels had commit- ted depredations upon Yuyaou. The acting super- intendent of prisons of the district, Lin-chew-pang, proceeded in person to the barbarian ships and reprehendingly ordered them to retire. It is pro- per that we order Yih-king to make strict investiga- tion and become security for his representations. The General Yih-king, has now made clear report, and requests the above Lin-chew-pang may be promoted to the Chief Magistracy of the district. The rebellious barbarians committing depredations upon Yu-yaou designingly scheming to excite law- less confusion, and the said acting Magistrate, in consequence of the reports of the aggressors being desirous of setting fire to the dwellings of the peo- ple, placed himself at the head of water braves and and his own domestics, and boarding the barbarian junks reproved them by the great principles of righteousness, and with voice loud, rigorously raged

at them fоr сен стисну

said rebels then weighed anchor and went away. Really was he brave and dared to act in this wise. Let, therefore, increased favours be shown toward Lin-chew-pang by promoting him to the full Chief Magistracy and detain him in Chekeang until a vacancy occurs that he may fill it up. He is also raised to the sixth rank in the army and allowed, as a reward, to wear the blue Jay plume in order to arouse and excite others to duty. RESPECT THIS,

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE 30TH. 1842.

TIENTSIN AND COUNTRY ABOUT PEKIN,

TIENTSIN, the general emporium of the northern provinces, built, says Staunton, at the confluence of two rivers, from which it rises in a gentle slope. One of these two flows down from near Peking, the other comes from a more southern region. A third flows in Tientsin and the Grand canal. from the south, forming a communication between

The practicability of marching from the coast to Tientsin, we are unable to determine from any infor- mation in our possession. Infantry no doubt could easily move across the plain, but artillery probably could not-for we suppose (from what we know of other parts of the country) that ditches and small canals run in almost every direction, and that the only roads are narrow foot-paths. Staunton says, the governor of the province, who awaited the arrival of the ambassador at Takú, came to Tientsin from thence, over land, by a shorter route than was described by the windings of the river. Ellis mentions, in his Journal, while at Síkú, the carts on two wheels, as justifying the complaints that have been made of them. He says also, that he was surprised with the size of the Chinese horses, having been led to expect that their height did uct exceed that of small ponies; on the contrary, they wer were not inferior in that respect to the generality of Arab horses: they are, however, coarse and ill-shaped, and promise neither strength nor action.

Judging from all that we have read of Tientsin, we presume it is, in its general features, not unlike the other great cities of China. The present city appears to be built on a rising ground, though on every side the country falls into a perfect flat, like the sea, presenting one extensive plain terminated only by the horizon. If fine buildings and striking localities are required to give interest to a scene, has no claims; but, the other hand, if the gradual crowding of junks till they become innumerable, a vast population, buildings though not elegant, yet regular and peculiar, careful and successful cultivation, can supply those deficiencies the entrance to Tientsin will not be without attrac- tions to the traveller.' So writes Mr. Ellis.

Tientsin, and the ground between it and the anchor. age for foreign ships, may soon become a scene of have been directing their attention to that spot; have great interest. For many months past the Chinese thrown up numerous and strong defenses; and have there assembled large bodies of troops. The scale, on which these works have been conducted, may be con- jectured from what has been found at Canton, Amoy, Chusan, and Chinhái. The site being nearer the cap- ital than the above named places, it becomes naturally a source of deeper interest, and ere it can be reached by the invading forces, will have been made very strong. Battery after battery will have been erected, and a variety of means devised to render the channel of the river impracticable. If attacked, however, we know what must be the fate of all these defenses. The lines once broken, and consternation excited, the cap- ital will become the next object.

Price $1monthly Or 12 yearly

have been brought at least sixty miles: "the nearest mountains," says Barrow, "where quarries of granite are found, being those that divide China Proper from Mantchou Tartary, near the Great wall." On each side of this granite pavement is a road unpaved, wide enough for carriages to pass upon it. In many places the road is bordered with trees, particularly willows Chinese Repository. of a very uncommon growth.

A GREAT NOVELTY, and which is now being sought after for ornamenting of bonnets, made in velours epingle or muira glace, is a branch of Tcheukin, a sort of plant growing in China, and which is only to be found in the marshes situated northwest of Ching Tou, a town celebrated for the making of silks. This flower in pink and white, or citron and white colours, the leaves resembling the willow tree of a whitish green, and which is, admirably imitated when made in wax is the most distingue ornament which can be worn. London Paper.

POLICE.

On the 21st Afoon and Afoo two Chinese Shop- keepers, on the Queen's Road, were cited before the Chief Magistrate, by Mr. Pascoe (assistant to the road Inspector) for having created an obstruc- tion in a public thoroughfare, by pulling down a The prisoners acknowledged their error (?) and truly alleged that but for so doing, they would not have been able to reach their houses, without being ankle deep in mud. They were ordered to remove the obstruction forthwith and dismissed with a suitable admonition by the chief magistrate.

few stones and some sand before their houses.

We are sure if our worthy chief magis- trate had witnessed the obstruction in ques- tion, he would have deemed that the two China men had acted most laudable.

FOR ourselves, we can truly say, that but for the obstruction complained of, we should not have been able to approach our present humble abode, without being at least ankle deep in mud. We mean during direct interest in the matter, else we should the late heavy rains. But that we have a not have so long maintained silence, as to the state of the Queen's Road in this quar- ter. There are drains across, but for want of a lateral one, which could be made at a few dollars expense, the water collects, stagnates and putrefies in the most popu- lous quarter of the town, and on a part of the public road, where there is now by far the greatest thoroughfare.

Horse Stealing. A correspondent writes us Above Tientsin the river is gradually contracted in its dimensions, and the stream becomes more powerful. that the following occurrence took place on the The tide, of which the flood had aided the progress of 4th instant at the house now occupied by Mr. the yachts conveying Macartney's embassy, ceased Parkinson, which is situated at the head of the about thirty miles beyond the city. The embassy was Wang-ni-chung Valley. Five Horses were turned

SIX days in passing from

rungenaty an

it was not until the fourth day that "some high blue Tytam Road, very coolly about eight o'clock in mountains were seen rising from the northwest." On the evening caught three of the horses, tied them this small branch of the river, within a distance of by the four legs, turned them up à la Swine, slung ninety miles, Barrow estimated that there were floating them on Bamboos, shouldered and carried them not less than 100,000 souls. As the embassy advanced, off towards Chek-chu. The whole affair was the country began to assume a less uniform appearance, witnessed by a gang of masons passing but, who, Few trees fearful of being beaten, gave no alarm. being now broken into hill and dale. appeared, except large willows on the banks, and knots of elms or firs before the houses of distinguished men. HOWEVER formidable may be our present and the temples-both of which were generally found at the head of each village. More grain was cultivated China expedition, and that it is so, none here than on the plains near the mouth of the river. dare deny, yet in comparison with the Different sorts of kidney-beans, and some patches of magnitude of the objects contemplated and buck-wheat, also, were observed, and a species of nettle, with the adverse interests, it sinks into pos- the Urtica nivea, of which cloth is manufactured.

Considerable tracts of pasture or meadow land inter.itive insignificance. Here we have a force veued between the villages, on which were seen a few of all arms, amounting to some seven- teen thousand men, about to encounter the cattle, and some of the broad-tailed sheep. Here may be noted-what all the travellers seem to

small

as

Her

THE above will afford some idea of the manner in which the Great Emperor is duped by his Ministers with regard to the real movements of the British forces. No instance has probably yet occurred where genuine intelligence of the true position of have omitted, that the Pei ho enters the sea, or gulf, despotic head of the Great Pure Dynasty, affairs between the English and Chinese through two channels. The embassies ascended the (Ta Tsing Kwo), who rules over an Em- has reached the Imperial ears. May not southern one. The northern is maked on native maps pire, exceeding in extent the whole of Eu- this, in a great measure, account for the being broader than the other, and runs nearly pa rope, and numbering in population one rallel to it, until some mire hinese maps the northern third of the human race! If we succeed, it apparent obstinate determination with two unite. On one of our Chinese maps this northern will indeed be a startling demonstration of which the Emperor still holds out? And channel is forked, one branch coming from the Pei ho, does it not demonstrate that it would have say thirty miles below Tungchau, and the other twenty the truth of the Baconian aphorism that been wise policy in the high British func-miles lower down. This practicable for me (probably "Knowledge is power." a marshy expanse) is impracticable for boats of any tionaries to have approached the imperial considerable size. The avenue, or great road to the capital, lies across palace at as early a period possible? We level, sandy, and ill-cultiva believe Pekin could have been reached with an open country, perfectly the road, for the width of far more ease during the first campaign fifteen to twenty feet, is paved with granite slabs than during the present, and with vastly from six to sixteen feet in length, and about four feet broad. Each one of these enormous flag-stones must greater prospect of successful negotiation.

7

THE 10th and 78th Regiments will embark from England forthwith for India. Officers and men of each corps in India will be upwards of eleven hundred in future.

THE Government Corn Bill was read the second time on the 9th March. Ayes 284 Noes, 176.

58

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JUNE, 30TH. 1842.

amounts to more than Is 3d per Ib!!! The Raw Su- gars of China which would be importable into England at about 2d per tb would have to pay a duty of 6d per Ib! As it is quite certain that there will be an early revision of the Sugar duties (from the avowed dissatisfaction of Brazil, and other foreign and domestic causes we have not time to specify), we would urge on our Merchants to take early measures to secure Justice to China as respects this very important article which should become one of our Staples, for we see no reason why the crude and refined Sugars of China and neighbouring countries should not be brought to Hongkong and thence reshipped to En- gland and other countries.

It cannot be doubted by any, the least acquainted with our domestic and colonial policy, that Teas, if shipped from a British Possession, would be entitled to be admit- ted at a lower duty, than from a Foreign Port. The commercialists of Singapore, have not urged the matter on the attention of the Home Government, thinking from their connexion with the East India Com- pany that it was perhaps its affair. Hap- Now that we have received a Copy of pily we are under no Leadenhall influ- ence and with us, in good time, the point will, to alter our opinion as expressed in our ence and with us, in good time, the point will, the proposed new Tariff we see no reason we are sure, be successfully mooted. It last number. But little advantage will was in conformity with an acknowledgod right, that the late Plenipotentiary pub-accrue to the China Trade from the alter- licly notified last June, his intention to ations propounded by Sir Robert Peel. It move her Majesty's Government to make is quite in conformity with the acknow- an abatement of one penny per lb on Car- ledged principles of our Colonial Policy to goes of Tea Shipped from Hongkong. Had retain the system of differential duties in the Merchants generally responded to favour of the produce of the dependencies. Captain Elliott's appeal, it is not unlikely Hence we were not surprised to find the Captain Elliott's appeal, it is not unlikely scale of duties imposed were in most cases Teas from hence would now by Peels new Tariff have been admissible at a reduced only one half the amount levied on similar duty of at least two pence per lb. This is produce imported from foreign countries. important, but as a principle we abhor pro- With the ignorant bolstering system, which important, but as a principle we abhor pro- has so long obtained we could hardly ex- tective and discriminating duties, and we hold that the surest guarantees of our fu- pect a closer approximation to the true ture greatness will be the maintenance of principles of political economy. The pro- our Free Port. Time and the force of cir- corn law aristocracy and the West India in- cumstances will do the rest--e'en more than terest-backed by the advocates of protec- the most sanguine now ventures to antici- tion to native industry (?) are far too strong to permit Sir Robert Peel now to pate. do more than he has done. The proxi- mate treaty with Brazil will settle the Su gar duties-the clamorous wants of the People the Corn question. Sir Robert knows this, but is silent. His silence is eloquent.

WE often denounce the Fiscal System of the Chinese. We much question whether on the whole, it is not better than our own; seeing that it affords not merely an encouragement but a large bounty to the Importers of food, whilst we prohibit its introduction unless at a famine price. We pro hibit Foreign Sheep, Oxen, Swine Fish and meat; whilst we permit to be brought in Duty free Tur tle, Turbot and Lobsters!!! This is the equal jus tice which is the characteristic of our class legis- lation. By comparison, the enactments of the Chinese are truly paternal,

As our merchants complain, and with justice, of the very heavy, and lately augmented imposts, levied by the Chinese on British Imports; we have taken the trouble to refer per contra to the amount of duties levied on Chinese Exports and we find that the Present Duties in England on the follow- ing China Products, (at the Current Cost Prices) will amount to, on Alum from

Ginger Sago Cloves Nutmegs, Wii

Pimento

PROPOSED NEW DUTIES FOREIGN

. Cwt

10s

British Cwt 58

3d

6d

Ib

6d

ld

19

6d

3d

48

Cwt 28

Is

6d

fb 13d

Pepper Borax Camphor

·

Cwt

China Root Gum

Cwt

Opium

Ib

120

to 160

per Cent,

Indigo

99

Camphor

20

30

China Ware

18

Cassia

75

120

3P

13

39

China Root

200

300

China Ware

20

Cubebs

100

150

Ginger -

50

70

"

Glass heads.

60

100

Hartall-

20

30

99

Lead, white

99

"P

Silk Goods

30

60

31

Sugar - Tea.

275.

300

39

50

250

99

}

50

averaging 175)

11

Viciously bad as we acknowledge the Chinese mode of assessing Duties to be, it has yet to be proved whether it be more opposed to the true principles of Political and Social Economy than

our own.

The larger our ability to take the products of China, the larger will be the capability of the Chinese to buy our manufactures. If it be an object to give employment to our Starving popu- lation at home, no better plan could be devised than to equalise the Tea Duties and admit the Sugars of China as those of India at the low duty, Sugars of China as those of India at the low duty, Were not China Sugars in effect prohibited in England, we are assured they would be largely sent as returns for Cotton manufactures, In sev- eral of the northern Ports they could be cheaply and abundantly supplied as returns, but our mer. chants are debarred from taking them and hence the Chinese there, cannot become pirchasers; and what would be an important outlet for our manu- factures is effectually closed by our suicidal policy, We understand that the beautifully refined and highly saccharine Sugars of Chin-chew could be regularly deliverable in London at or under 4d per pound. The article is we are told fully equal for domestic purposes to lump Sugar which is retailed in England at 10d to 1s per Ib. The duty on it which, as before said, is in effect prohibitory, it

ཎྜ ཌཙོ ཿ ཧྨ ཙ ཤ ཌ ཚ སྐ ཋཙ

39 Cwt 1s,6d

1s ld

Th 6d 2d

7 per Ct,

tb 6d

15 per Cent Silk, Thrown . Ib Hemp rough, Cwt Cwt d Above we give a list of a few of the new Du- ties which affect China and India products. There is no reduction on Sugar, Tea, Spirits Whis or Tobacco, and as these live articles pro- duce Sirtean out of the twenty two millions of our Customs Dutles hence the observation that the Re-

vised New Tariff (as it did not affect the principal articles of importation) was like performing Ham- let with the part of the Prince omitted,

We

A Correspondent asks us whether the Opium Mania prevails in Japan. do not think it does. In the digest of the best Dutch authorities (which has been re- cently published by Murray of London) we do not remember that any mention is made of the addiction of the Japanese to the smoking of Opium.

IN 1836, according to Mr. Matheson, the duty authorised by the Chinese Tariff to- gether with the Hong Merchants exactions, amounted to one tael and a half on each pecul of Raw Cotton. We are told now, (at the present price of this Staple at Can- impost fully twenty per cent ad valorem. ton,) the lately augmented duty makes this By the Canton and Macao Price Current we see that Teas are procurable lower at Macao than Canton. Some qualities are 20 per cent lower. If this has already en- sued at Macao where there exists Chinese Custom houses, authorities and surveillance, what, may we not expect at the Bri- tish settlement of Hongkong? It rests en- tirely with our merchants, whether the o- dious Hong monopoly shall continue or not. We are glad to know that contracts can be made in Macao and Canton, to deliver here Teas, Cassia and other China pro- ducts at much lower rates than the same parties would consent to take, if as hereto- fore, the goods were deliverable at Canton or Macao.

In our second number we said "our readers are well aware a thorough revision of Customs Duties in England is imminent, and we doubt not ere this (March 31st) Sir Robert Peel has exhibited him- self as a Reformer not only of our Criminal, but also of our Fiscal Code; which hitherto has been a disgrace to the civilization we so often and so proudly evoke". We are unfeignedly rejoiced at the full verification of our prognostics as will be evident by a reference to the important commer- cial amelioriations of Sir Robert Peel which we announced in our last. Whilst we think the mea- sure imperfect. in so far, as there is no diminution of duty on foreign grown Sugar, and there being no alteration in the enormous Impost levied on our Staple article-Tea, Yet for bringing forward such a Ministerial project, Sir Robert will have earned for himself imperishable honour as a Com- mercial Reformer. Would that he were not so bound and tied by the chains of aristocracy, as not to be able to accomplish a full measure of justice for our poorer brethren, the distressed labouring population of Great Britain.

We think from his high intelligence he is dispos- ed, and we may add sooner or later must do it.

THE late heavy rains, which were wholly unex- pected so late in the season, have, we are sorry to say, done much injury to our lines of communica-

Ponds and Bridges have both suffered and in some instances been carried away by the tor- rents from the hills. Several of the newly erected sea walls have sustained partial injury by the land been done to some of the new buildings. We re- waters. In a few instances we find damage has gret to hear that a China house fell in, two of the inmates of which were killed on the spot, and four By a Delhi Gazette Extraordinary of the or five others severely wounded. They were told 8th May we perceive the Cabul prisoners humanely offered but refused quarters from one to remove, before the accident happened, and were have been well treated. Captain Colin of our Residents. We have no doubt unless other- Mackenzie had arrived at Jellalabad on wise compelled the Chinese will build in the same parole from their captors to negociats their way, on the same spot and be annually liable to surrender. The Captain avers he saw the same disaster, Instead of profiting by experi Mahomed Ukbar kill Sir Wm, Nacnaghten ance they affect to call it chance pigeon and ejacu and alleges that Shah Soojah was deeply native population, it is quite necessary that some late maskee, We cannot but think, that for the implicated in the outbreak. General Elphin- general provisions as respects buildings and tene- stone (happily for his own sake) died on ments should be made, We hold they are essen- the 23rd or 24th April. A junction had tially necessary for their welfare; of course inter- taken place between Monteaths and Bol-fering as little as possible with private property, ton's Brigades near the west end of the and no further than the strict necessity of the case Khybur Pass. Much sickness prevailed at justifies, Jellalabad; Cornet l'isher of the 3d Dra- goons and Major Anderson died on the 25th April. As proof of the scarcity still prevailing in Camp, we may mention at the sale of these officers property, six quires of letter paper sold for 25 Rupees: An old small tea kettle 23 Rs., a Cup and Saucer 10 Rs., about 2 seers of Sugar Candy 25 Rs. less than 2 seers of Tea 55 Rs.!!!

Corn Law Debate. The ministerialists themselves are not without their own peculiar embarassments. his. If Sir Robert calls public attention to the extent Sir Robert Peel the other day pathetically described of relaxation intended, the county members are all in a fidget; if he observes how little foreign corn will after all, be admitted, -how little it is probable prices begin to doubt whether the plan is not a humbug.

will be affected,-the merchants and manufacturers Times,

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

59

The Lords of the Treasury have refused to sanction Letters from China, to 17th January, had been the sum of 6,000,000 of dollars was paid by the Chinese auth-ri The conclusion come to by the Treasury (Dec. 4, 1841) is "that Captain Elliots proper appropriation of a part of received. The report of continued heavy shipments ties in Canton, and was received by Captain Elliot as the price of the Canton ransom to the illegal but honest payment had made the market very dull, and it was expected the relief of that city from the pressure which was about to be of the righteous demand of Messrs. Dent & Co., for during May, the tea market would submit to a re-applied to it by the forces of her Majesty ;" so that the sale of Opium which they generously surrendered to release duction of at least 74 per cent. On the 6th April, by the Treasury. The sum is then a droit of the Crown, and ve her Majesty's representative from durance vile. This prices ruled for, Bohea, 1s. 6d.-Co's Congou, 1s. 10d 1 and 2, Vict. capt. all droits of the Crown, which shall not have shabby conduct of the Peel Cabinet, to the sufferers-Pouchong, 1s. 6d. to 1s. 9d.-Souchong, ordin- been applied in the payment of any charge thereupon, or in grate by the forged Exchequer Bills and the Opium surren

Canton, so strenuously denied by the Whig journals, is recognized

der fully warrants the observations of the leading ary, 1s. 9d.-Flowery Pekoe, 2s, 9d. to 3s. 9d.-ing remuneration to officers, become a part of the Consolidated Fund, and can only be disposed of by the legislature. The amount Journal in Europe," their habitual advocate, which is Capers, 1s. 7d. to 1s. 10d.--Orange Pekoe, 2s. to remitted in bills and specie to England is 2,862,810 dollars, and a constrained to say. "The consequences of a successful 28. 9d.-Twankay, good ordinary, Is. 8d. to 1s. 9d. portion of this sum has to be applyed, by the Queen's direction, to resistance in the two descriptions of claims referred to,-Hyson skin, ditto, Is. 7d.-Hyson, ditto, 2s. to remunerate the force engaged in the recent operations in China. must have the effect hereafter of rendering all employ. 28. 3d.-Imperial, 2s. to 3s.-Gunpowder, 2s, to The balance in, we presume, at the disposal of Parliament. ment of Government responsibility a mockery, and 48. 6d. may have important political consequences, far beyond The arrivals from China, during March, were the the saving produced by such successful resistance; and St. Mungo, Neptune, Ann Jane, Ann, Fatima, and this should have weight, though none is allowed to honor Blakeley. At Liverpool, the Litherland and and justice. A British agent must become in all cases Penang. of the kind a mere cipher, or rather a man shunned as leading on innocent and confiding persons to ruin."

From the London mail we gather that Sir George Arthur (hitherto a most unpopular and arbitrary colo- nial governor) is appointed the new Governor of Bom- bay.-It is said Lieut. Gen. Sir Benjamin D. Urban will go to India as Commander in Chief.-We see there is to be a stout opposition to the proposed Income tax, we expect a difference of assessment on Incomes derivable from professional and mercantile pursuits, or from real property should be conceded.- Lord John Russell will move resolutions declaratory that the amount of Taxation taken off or reduced since the war exceeds £23,000,000; exclusive of the Income tax which was especially a War Tax. That before such a Tax should have been again proposed a judicious alteration of the duties on Corn, a reduction of the prohibitory duty on Foreign Sugar, an adjust ment of the duties on Timber and Coffee with a repeal or diminution of various protective and differential duties should have been tried and this plan would have made up the deficit in the Revenue, and at the same time, greatly benefitted the people.

The disastrous news from Affghanistan has had the most startling effect. The Government will send it is said fully 10,000 men to India. Captain Boldero says the Infantry sent will all be furnished with effi. cient percussion lock pieces. The whole augmenta. tion will now it is said exceed fifteen thousand men.- At a recent meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society, Sir Alexander Johnstone stated that be had been informed by Colonel Sabine, that at Pekin there was a magnetic observatory, on the same principles and construction as those recommended by the Royal Society.-Captair Blackwood R. N. is going out on an expedition to New Guinea, we hope it is precursive of Colonization in that quarter as it would benefit our Island as also the mother Country.-The relations of Russia with Central Asia were never before so prosperous as now. Orenberg may be regarded as the centre of these com- munications which extend to Scinde and Afghanistan. The Duke of Norfolk, and Lord Rolle, are dead.

ITEMS OF LONDON NEWS. PRINCE ALBERT is to be the Lord Warden of the Stannaries, vacant by the demise of the marquis of Hertford.

LORD Waterford is to be united to a daughter of Lord Stuart of Rothesay. A military revolt took place in St. Petersburgh, when the Emperor with his own hand shot the ring leader, and afterwards crushed the outbreak.

China Silk Piece Goods rather better and Stocks much reduced.

Captain Elliot, it will be seen, does not come personally scot- free out of his remittance to India and England of the proceeds of his sale of Canton. He has so mismanaged even this part of the transaction as to have rendered himself personally responsible to Messrs. Dent and Co., for the amount of £60,000. The Plenipo. tentiary touched nothing that he has not botched in some way

or other.

stated in your despatches, the Lords of the Treasury have come to "I am now to inform you that upon a review of the circumstances the conclusion, that the sum of 6,000,000 dollars, which the Chinese authorities engaged on the 27th of May to pay, was re-

1841. 1842. The present state of the case may be stated in the words of a letter of the 16th of December last, in which Lord Canning con. Deliveries to 81st March, 8,902,988 8,476,970 veyed to Captain Elliot the opinions of the Lords of the Treasury Exported, 954,200 754,000 on the subject:-- Imported, 3,865,383 6,420,035 Stock, 33,407.299 27,844,235 It must be noted that the cargoes ex Ann Jane, Neptune, Blakeley, Ann, and Fatima are not in-ceived by you as the price of the relief of the city of Canton from the pressure which was about to be applied to it by her Majesty's cluded in this statement of Imports and Stock. forces. This being the case, the money so obtained from the The Silk Market is a shade lower, but prices are Chinese is a droit of the crown, and, as such, comes within the expected to rally in May and June. provisions of the 1st and 2nd Victoria, cap, 2. which provides that all droits of the crown which shall not have been applied in pay. ment of any charge thereupon, or in granting remuneration to officers or others taking the same, shall be carried to, and form a part of the Consoldated fund of the United Kingdom; and neither the Lords of the Treasury nor any other authority can apply that money to other purposes, without the special authority of Parlia ment. The Lords of the Treasury are, therefore, unable to sanction the payments which you have made to Messrs Dent and Co., as reported in your despatch of the 26th of June; those payments have been made by you without any authority, out of a fund which could not legally be applied to that purpose, and the propriety of sanctioning them under the peculiar circumstances of the case will be for the future consideration and decision of Parliament. The same observation will apply to all other payments made out the money obtained from the Chinese, under the arrangement of the 27th of May, which are not within the exception contained in the Act of 1st and 2nd Victoria, cap. 2. At the same time how. ever, that the Lords of the Treasury have apprized Lord Aberdeen of their view of this question, their Lordships have stated that they give full credit to you for the motives which induced you to make these payments; and their Lordships are satisfied that, being your. self convinced of the justice of the claims, you did not advert to the specific appropriation by Parliament, to other objects of the funds out of which the payment was made; but their Lordships are, nevertheless, unable to relieve you from the responsibility which you have incurred,

THE ancient marbles collected for the British museura by Mr. Charles Fellows, in Lycia, are, we are glad to see by the Malta Papers, nearly ready for embarkation Judging by what he has said and published of their value we are inclined to think they will rival in interest the Elgin marbles. Their cost to the country will be merely the transit.

THE Geyser steam-frigate mounts four guns of the largest size ever put on board a British man-of-war. The bore of two is ten inches diameter carrying a shot of 86 lb. and two guns of eight inches bare."

THE Minden Hospital Ship has on board it is said stores to the value of £150,000 and is fitted with all the aids and appliances which modern science pre. scribes for its inmates.

Tax Driver steam-frigate. This fine vessel has an excellent library on board and is very complete in all her appointment.

THE CHINESE PUZZLE.

The Papers relating to the moneys received from the Chinese authorities in the city of Canton, under an agreement entered into with her Majesty's Plenipotentiary, on the 27th of May, 1841," just presented by the Queen's command to Parliament, will be found elswhere; and very lourious papers they are, provoking, alternately, laughter and indignation, and, so far as Captain Elliot in concerned, unmitigated contempt.

of

"I am, &c., "CANNING." Without attempting to prejudge the curse which the Govern. ment may take with reference to the claim of Messrs. Dent, if it be brought before Parliament, it is certainly a matter of just sur. prise that a public officer filling so important a situation should have been ignorant that money obtained by the pressure of the Queen's forces in legal warfare is a druit of the Crown, and that droits of the Crown cannot be used at discretion to cover the per- Monthly Times. sonal liabilities of officers in its service.

H. M. S. SQUADRON IN CHINA. ON THE COAST OF CHEKIANG. [AT CHUSAN, &c.] 72-Bearing the flag of Vice.Admiral Sir W. Parker, x. c. B., comman. der in chief; Capt. Richards, 42-captain Charles Hope 42-captain T. Bourchier, c. n. 44-captain the hon. F. Grey. 36-captain H. D. Chads, c. R. 26-captain A. L. Kuper c. B. 18-comdr.

Blonde

The Treasury seems to have been somewhat astonished at the receipt by her Majesty's Plenipotentiary of the moneys and securi ties to the amount of six millions of dollars, and altogether at a loss in what character to look on the unexpected millions about to be poured into its empty chests, "My lords," of the Treasury were therefore, on November 9, compelled to write to the Foreign office, Carnwallis most naively, to say, "that it would be satisfactory if some informa tion could be furnished by Lord Aberdeen as to the grounds on which the money in question was demanded and paid." The in. Captain Elliot's despatches to the Foreign-office were quite silent quiry puzzled Lord Aberdeen quite as much as their lordships, for Thalia as to wherefore he had demanded and received the cash. "There is, writes Lord Canning, only one expression in these Endymion despatches which has any bearing whatever on the point In Cambrian that this dullest of plenipotentiaries coolly felicitated the Foreign Calliope office on the indemnity being rather more than double the Pelican charges and duties the Chinese had received from the trade of the Modeste season" in other words the Canton Hong had taken advantage of North Star hostilities to squeeze three millions of dollars out of British mer chants, and when the city was at his disposal, Captain Elliot Columbine returned the compliment by charging the authorities thereof six Clio millions of dollars for its safety. It is characteristic of the man Dida that the theme of his despatches appears to have always been- tea; his sympathy for the lander-provoking beverage is a perfect Algerine Fortis He extents six millions of dollars and, instead of telling Royalist the Foreign Office Way of warefore the Aber es el tie ir patarting harps upon the quantity of tea which had just beeen shipped Lady Bentinck, from Canton." He treats with the Chinese about everything but peace; he writes home about everything but that which is most needful. So pitiable and disgraceful an exhibition was never be. fore made by any human kg. Whatever may have been Lord Palmerston's instructions, they must have been bettered in their execution; the Plenipotentiary seems to have "fooled it to the top of his bent." It is a perfect mercy to the nation that he is now safe in England; here let us keep the larue nature; he is far too rare a specimen of humanity to part with again. Very fortunately for the Foreign-office the late gallant and la. mented Sir Humphrey Senhouse, to whose debilitated frame the disgraceful sale of Canton brought premature death, had been quite as much puzzled about the dollars on the heights above Canton," the day after the signature of the agreement under which they were told down, as the Treasury and the Foreign-office were quar-six months afterwards, and had actually asked the Plenipotentiary

The French Government will raise their steam flotilla to 70 of which 40 will be complete ships of war. The West India Steam Packets have in voyages realized an average speed of 253 miles per day. The Queen has proposed to pay three per cent on her Athunty No Ships are in future to go to sea without a full complement of men.

Fifteen barrels of beef sent by benevolent individuals of New York to the distressed Paisley weavers were, by a Treasury Order admitted free of Duty. A monument is erecting to the Scotch martyrs of Parliamentary reform on the Calton Hill. Commodore Napier on the 22nd of March brought forward a motion for the appointment of a naval first Lord of the Admiralty, and other propositions; which were negatived by a majority of nearly 100. In the course of the debate he stated it was a civilian who as first Lord, issued the order not to engage American Frigates which he and others appropriated to the ter gallery.

THE German papers say the King of Hanover is about resigning his Crown to his son, who is blind.

COMMERCIAL INTELLIGENCE. By letters from London of the 6th April, we find that commercial matters there, were still on a very unsatisfactory footing. A general want of confidence, induced by the late heavy failures, seems to prevail. We are sorry to see several highly respectable firms, were obliged to suspend payment during the month of March. Imports generally are low, and stocks in consumers hands very small; so that restored confidence would lead to a great augmentation of business and improved rates. Money was abundant and cheap. The stock of bullion in the bank, large and increasing. It is hoped Peel will carry his amended Tariff; when, it is confidently believed, an improved tone will be given to the aspect of mercantile affairs.

who sold Canton without saying a single word to the comman ders of the forces at whose merey it was the very question thus put by the Treasury. The correspondence which ensued between bir Humphrey and Captain Elliot had been sent home to the Ad. mirality, and by that board transmited to Lord Aberdeen, who thus evidently found out the real nature of the payment obtained from the Chinese,

Justice,

Morshead.

18-

39

Watson,

36-

Sir E. Home Bart.

39

18-

W

16- 20

39

T. Troubridge,

31

Honble. H. Keppel.

10- lieut. E. Maitland. 10- lieut.

Chetwode,

comdr. R. Collinson, surveying,

H. M. T. S. Jupiter mr. comg. G. B. Hoff meister H. M. T. S. Belleislę, Capt. Kingcome, H. M. T. S. Ratlesnake, H. M. T. S. Apollo

Frederick.

H. M. T. S. Sapphia Capt. Cole.

11

Phlegethon, lieut. Mc Cleverty, R. N. H. C. S. Ar. Str. Sesostris comdr, Ormsby, I. N. Nemesis, lieut. W. H. Hall, R. x. Pluto lieut. Tudor, R. N.. Ariadne lieut. Roberts, I. N.

Tenasserim comr. Wall 1. N. Queen, mr. comg. W. Warden,

H. M. S. armed Str. Vixen,-comr. Boyes. H C, S, armed Str. Auckland, camdr. Ethersay, 1. N. Medusa, lieut. Boys. 1. N. Proserphine, Capt. Hough

Herald

Captain Benhouse's letter of May 28 to Captain Elliot-forced from him "to maintain the national honour and the credit of the British flag"--will be perused with feelings of regret for the loss Pylades of so brave and intelligent an officer, and of indignation at the de- Chameleon gradation he must have felt in writing this inquiry. Sir Humphroy could not understand the precious agreement entered into on the previous day; he jurly regarded it an "a settlement for a general peace" and regarding the entire arrangement as a very poor compensation for all the insults and injuries received," he sought Blenheim to be informed what it really amounted to. The just tone of this letter stung the Plenipotentiary to the quick, and he retorted that he was unable to see the necessity for it !" but had no hesitation in declaring that the "late arrangement had "reference only to the relief of the city and province from pressure," which pressure, be added, was in forgetfulness of her Majesty's gracious pur- poses, and in defiance of the temper and feeling of the British that is reasonable, directed the application of this" pressure" but nation upon all such subjects." Why, who, in the name of all the yery man who sold its withdrawal for six millions of dollars

Druid

Vindictive Nimrod

Cruizer

Hazard

ON THE COAST OF FUKIEN. [AT AMOY.] 26-captain J. Nias. c. B. 18-comdr. Tindal (absent) 10-lieut Hunter,

ON THE COAST OF CANTON. [AT HONGKONG. &c.]

72-captain Sir Thomas Herbert, x.c.B. 44-captain H. Smith, c. B. 18-captain J. Troup Nicholas. 18-comdr. Glasse,

18-

39

J. Pearse, 18-captain Chas. Bell. Neville. H. M. Brig Serpent 4-comdr. Wood, Young Hebe H. C. Str. Hooghly, mr. comg. Ross,

89

CIRCULAR.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.T

MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res. pectfully to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na. vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Port, that they have. for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queen's Road, Hong-kong, immediately opposite to Fearon's Godown, where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS. D. W. & CO in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bor-

deaux, Epernay, Oporto. Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to ercet a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part to ensure the same patronage which has been extended to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for then such celebrity and repu-

tation.

1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

3D.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge this truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in procuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they

may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

WE beg to annex a list of Stores at present in our Godowns.

HONGKONG 7th. APRIL 1842.

Prime Ripe Beer, from Allsopp, Soda Water Powders. and Campbell in hhds. Brown Windsor Soup. ditto in bottles.

Fine Pale French Brandy ditto,

in bottles.

Old Geneva, in cases.

Wine Glasses.

Plates.

Tallow Candles.

Mill Boards for Gun Wads.

Very fine sinnll still Scotch Playing Cards.

whiskey

Old Tom.

London Porter in hhds. Dablin Stout, in bottles, Champagne, from Moet Epernay.

Green ditto. Tarpentine.

Blocks of Sizes

Bunting.

Fish hooks.

Nails of sizes. Screws of ditto.

Europe Canvas.

Boat Hooks.

Copper Pump Tacks.-

Patna Table Cloths.

French Velvet Corks. And various other Aricles too numerous to detail.

NOTICE.

MR. DUTRONQUOY of the LONDON HOTEL, SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa-

pore.

MR. DUTRONQUOY also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c., at the shortest notice.

NOTICE.

GOODS and Merchandize of all descriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Go- downs, at Hongkong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Premises to ...N. DUUS. Gr

C. FEARON.-Macao.

N. DUUS, HAS FOR SALE, ON COMMISSION

Brandy in Wood and Blowing Articles;

Vinegar,

Beer,

Bottles. ditto. ditto.

Sherry, Madeira,, and Claret. Gin and Soda Water, English Hams Tongues and Tripe: Preserved Meats and Smoked Herrings Provisions, Biscuits, Tobacco, Cheroots and Stockholm Tar.

Also a quantity of Paint-Paint Oil, Turpentine, Paint Brushes, Ship Lamps and Compasses and other Marine Stores.

Hongkong 31st March, 1842,

NOTICE,

half acting will take place on Saturday next, July 2nd,

to attend.

at half past 6 o'clock, in the Lazaar Chaple, (three doors from the office of the Friend of China), for the purpose of organizing the "HONGKONG TEMPERANCE UNION." All persons are invited HONGKONG, 30th JUNE, 1842. " FOR SALE.

AT the office of the "FRIEND OF CHINA," copies of the Holy Bible from the American and Foreign Bible Society handsomely bound in extra calf and gilt. Price $3. Hongkong, April 7th. 1842.

100

FOR SALE, har: ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board

HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE. MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Diamond Grained Gun Powder. Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to

Blank Visiting Cards.

Fine Table Rice.

Dholl.

of Ceylon Moss.

Superfine Brown Sherry,

from Peter Domecq.

,, Port wine, from Cockburn.

Brandy

and Carbonel and Co. Knudsden's Cherry Annisette de Bordeaux, Cyder. Lemon Syrup.

Best Bengal Cheroots.

Sandoway Imitation Havannah Cigars. Farey ary Discurly in Cabin Biscuits, ditto.

Wine ditto, ditto,

Spice Nuts, ditto.

Navy Beef, in tierces.

Ditto Pork, in barrels.

Fine Cape Flour, Kiln dried.

HERMETICALLY SEALED

PROVISIONS.

In Tin Canisters.

Essence of Mocha Coffee.

Cartridge Paper. Corkscrews.

Essence Jamaica Ginger. Flushing Coats.

Ditto Trowsers. Ditto Waiste ats.

Lascars Clothing.

White Shirts.

Negro head Tobacco.

Worsted Gloves. Guernsey Frocks. thosey Drinkets.

Concentrated Essence of Meat,

Sardines.

in small tins, for Invalids.

Preserved Cherries.

Sir Hans Sloane's Chocolate.

Tapioca, in tins.

Pearl Barley, in ditto.

Ditto Sago.

Superfine Blue Cloth.

Navy Buttons.

Metal ditto.

Flannel.

Long Cloth,

Russia Duck.

Blue Flannel Shirts. Shoes.

Europe Rope of sizes.

Maldive Coir ditto ditto. Do. Patent Barley, in tins.

Scotch Oatmeal, in ditto.

Speed's Arrow Root, in ditto. Bloom Raisins.

Jujubes.

Isinglass,

DENT & Co. at Macao. MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar, of the Chinese Language. Published at Batavia.

Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com- ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men. Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price 1.

Hongkong 19th May 1842.

FOR SALE. FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and bottles

Pine Cheese

Manilla Segars No. 4. Apply to

No. 18 Queen's Road.

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAO.

FOR SALE.

AT the Godowns of the undersigned,-Queen's Road:

Chain Cables, Anchors,

Europe, Cuir, & Manila, Rope. Tar, Pitch, Paints, Oil, and Turpentine,

Canvass,

Twine, Marline, Hawsing,

Beef and Pork, Bread,

FOR SALE.

A Large Quantity of Singapore Beams, Planks, 100 Cases very Superior Sherry in Pints, and Quarts, 400 Kegs of White Lead. The

Apply to

HONGKONG, 28TH JUNE, 1842.

J. F. HIGHT

at the Godowns of H. PYBUS.

ON SALE.

NAIL Rod Iron Calcutta Bottled Beer, in Cases of 6 doz. Navy and Pilot Bread American Flour.

Apply to

Hongkong 13 June, 1842.

AUCTION.

Wm. T. Kinsley.

ON Friday 1st July will be sold by Public Sale, at the

Godowns of the undersigned, the following Goods: Coir Rope, Europe Nails, Raisons,

Sherry Wine,

A few Casks Bass' Pale Ale,

3 Cases Friction Matches,

quantity of Prime American Europe Crockery,

A

Ale,

han sa Brandy in Cases of 1 Dozen. Soap, Saddles, Beef, Purk, A quantity of Europe Plank from 1 to 2 inches.

A few Kegs of White Lead, HONGKONG, JUNE 29 1812.

P. TOWNSEND & Co.

PUBLIC AUCTION.

To be sold by Auction at the Naval Store at Hongkong on Thursday 7th July at 10 o'clock in the Forenoon, a quantit y of unserviceable Stores consisting of old Casks, Staves, Iron Hoops, Bread Bags, by order of the Senior Naval Officer. May be viewed during working Hours until the day of Sale on Application to the HONGKONG, 25 JUNE, 1842. STOREKEEPER.

高各箍蒨十摩

麫卑日

特開包吧

字投袋桶 預以

知價與鉄有

PRICES for Job Printing are as follows:

Bills of Lading and Exchange,

Policies and folio pages

Letter paper size

Of Ships

per 100

ADVERTISEMENTS

Not exceeding 7 lines

erate rates.

for 3 months

摩見蒨行五月二

13

953

316

Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod- Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi- nese language. The Press cannot be set for less than one hundred copies.

DIED

CAPTAIN CAMPBELL of H. M. 55th Regi- ment, at Chapoo, May 27, 1842, of wounds in the head received at the capture of that city, after lingering nine days.

a

THE Earl of Macelesfield, Lord Teyn- ham, Lieut. Genl. Shrapnell, the inventor of the Shells known by some Me Ha ard of Corby Castle. George Clark, the sculptor, Archdeacon Singleton, the Revd. Cæsar Otway, and Kirkman Finlay of Toward Castle. London Mail.

Shipping Intelligence.

ARRIVED.

June 22nd Shah Allum Transport E. Evans Comder Calcutta, Part 39th Regt. M. N. 1. F. Holst Macao..

Devil "Lowell, (American,)G. Peirce

29

24th Linnet G. L Philips

Stores.

,, Herold Transport G. Parker Calcutta Govt.

Licorice.

Brandy, Gin, Wines, Beer, and

Zante Currants.

Porter.

Seidlitz Powders.

Marryati's Code of Signals, Sadlery,

Pickles.

Pickles, Sauces, and Painst,

,, H. C. str. Hoogly Ross.

99

May mail

Ketchup.

Blocks, Hooks, & Thimbles,

Anchovies.

Candles, Wax and Sperm, Soap,

99

39

31

Macao.

Oars

24th William

59

31

19

Bombay

Lucen Oil.

Robinson's prepared Groats, in English Vinegar.

tins.

Loaf and Pine Cheese.

Yorkshire Hams.

Prime Corned Humps, Rounds,

Briskets and Tongues, assor.

ded, in kegs each containing

Fine Salt.

Chili Vinegar.

Best Durham Mustard.

Assorted Sauces. Capera,

Jams and Jellies.

3 Briskets, 2 Rounds 2 Orange and Lemon Peel.

Humps and 6 Tongues.

Spiced Beef, in tins each lb 10,

Yarmouth Bloaters.

Pastry Suet.

Essence of Peppermint.

Lavender Water.

Lead Lines, Europe.

Log ditto ditto.

Roping ditto.

Seaming Twine ditto.

Seizing Lines.

White Lead.

Snuffs, [assorted of every kind.] Black Paint.

Hawsers, Europe and Coir,

Door and Pad-Locks,

And every other Article in the Ship Chandlery,

and Grocery line.

P. TOWNSEND, & Co.

HONGKONG, JUNE, 28, 1842. FOR SALE.

AT the office of the Friend of China, PORTFOLIO CHINENSIS or a collection of authentic Chinese State Papers illustrative of the history of the present position of affairs in China, with a translation, notes and introduction. By J. LEWIS SHUCK.

Price, 4 Rupees a-copy.

HONGKONG, 29th June, 1842.

27th Charlotte E. Subschwager 28th II. C. str. Hoogly Ross. SAILED.

23rd Isis Transport G. Graham 24th H. M. S. Hazard Capt, C. 26th Govr. Doherty, Lacy Harold

27th H. C. Str. Hoogly Ross Linnet "Harmony Borussia

29

Macao.

Chusa n.

Bell R. N.

Macao.

G. Parker

Chusan.

Macao.

G. C. Philips A. Smith

F. Kuhr

William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

Manilla.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

LONGBONG

GAZETTE

AND

N°. 16. VOL. 1.

NOTIFICATION.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JULY 7TH. 1842.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS.

MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine.

Hongkong, 25 Mai, 1842.

FROM THE PEKING GAZETTE.

THE reported death, in battle, of Sir Henry Pottinger and other English Chiefs.

lows:

amination and accusations.

as in

Price $1 monthly Or 12 yearly

HONGKONG Prices of Fruits and Vegetables such

in the case of the Nemesis in the attack upon Canton, very many have found an early grave for as now in market. themselves and their fortunes. Judging from the undisguised tone of the Gazettes the Emperor has Plaintains not the most distant idea of yielding to the de- Yellow plums mands of the British Government; and our ex- Red plums tracts from time to time will keep our readers in- Brown pears formed of the publicly avowed opinions and designs Yellow pears of the imperial cabinet relative to the present Mangoes war. It is needless for us to say that no "British Lichees Chiefs" were slain or taken at the capture of Water melons Musk melons Tinghae or Tseke.

THE imperial commands have been received as fol YIHKING, upon clear investigation, has sent up a document relative to warlike engagements, the at- tacking and capturing of traitorous natives, their ex- It appears that the rebel. lious barbarians have captured three cities, basely exci- ting confusion and disturbance. They moreover have leagued themselves with traitorous banditti who prowl about spying into our military affairs. This verily is sufficient to cause the hair of the head to stand erect through indignation. It had also been represented that the rebel leader, Pottinger, attacked Tinghae during the sixth month of last year; but was killed by a gun fired by Howanfe; it is now said, that this turns out to be false. It still appears, however, that during the attack upon Tseks there was a barba- rian British chief killed and the barbarians dwelling in the city of Ningpo went into mourning for him. It was reported that the name of the barbarian chief killed was Pa (?) The rebel barbarian An tihche (?) received a wound on the arm, and a great barbarian chief re- ceived some very severe wounds. There were five ship loads of the dead bodies of the barbarians taken back to Tinghae and there interred. There was further an im- portant capture in the person of the traitorous native Chin pan keun and four others, who were clearly ad- indeed and executed. Besides the above the report states that a barbarian enter was taugar d traitorous natives.

Ar present there aro well known names of important personages among the rebellious barbarians who have either been killed in their ranks or who have been slain by severe wounds. Those traitorous natives who aided the rebels in their outlawed wickedness Yihking succeeded in capturing at different times.

THE barbarians employ these abandoned traitors as spies and guides, and the traitors cram themselves with the profit of the barbarians, and thus villiany existing both within and without arouses my imperial vengeance and ire. The people and the military being aware of the calamities being poured upon us let them combine their energies and increase their exertions for defence: and let Yinking and his colleagues lead on our forces to the extermination of the enemy and the rigorous seizure of traitors. Let there be no remisness or delay until the last traces of the rebels are swept clean from the face of the land, and traitors brought to submission, all of which will accord with the righteous vengeance RESPECT THIS

of heaven.

FROM THE PERING GAZETTE. Turnips

EXPENSES OF THE WAR IN CHE-KEANG. The Members of the Board of Revenue re-

FRUITS.

per catty 21

cents

39

do. do.

29

99

25

3

39

2

2

11

3

19

99

1

29

3

11

VEGETABLES.

per catty

1

cents.

Carrots Squashes Pumpkins

4

13

11

1

11

93

1

19.

13.

Beans and snaps

2

39

11

8

99

5.

11

1

99

3

19

ginger root

99

Various kinds of greens Eggplant Various kinds of greens

spectfully report, and looking up beseech the sacred Tomatoes glance. Upon strict investigation of the millitary drish potatoes affairs of the province of Che Keang, we find that Sweet potatoes Fresh at different times, upwards of three millions five hundred and sixty thousand tacls have been supplied. Onions (about five millions of dollars). In view of this amount there need be no anxiety about a lack of funds; but as this is the time when this said prov- ince is preparing to advance with designs of ex- termination, and will require for their use most extensive supplies, it is proper they should be pro- pared and arranged, and therefore a larger amount of funds should be collected, together.

8412

2

IT is said that the Chinese are in active correspondence with Russia. True it is, France has avowed its interest in our We, the Ministers in council assembled, enact quarrel with the Chinese; and should we that there be again collected from each of the prov. extort permission from the Emperor to inces one million of taels, exclusive of the one have an ambassador at Pekin, it is assert- hundred and twenty thousand collected in Che ed Russia and France will make a like Keang Province, and which was formerly expend- demand. It is not unlikely the son of the ed. As to this further sum, we, the ministers of the King of the French (Prince Joinville) may Revenue Board send a flying despatch to each of the governors and lieut. governors. After the soon be seen in the China Waters, When despatch shall have reached the said functionaries, the "National" says the Coast of China let them forwith depute the proper officers to pro- may be the scene of disasters quite as fatal ceed with the funds to the Provincal Treasury of to us, as Affghanistan, we say, fudge. We Keang Soo Province, in order to be in readiness do not deny the more we delay, the less chance we have of ultimate success, and for the use of the army in Che Keang. every day Chinese affairs and their external relations will become more and more com- plicated.

www.an! Respectfully represented. The imperial will has been received according

to the above deliberations.

RESPECT THIS.

CANTON COMPENSATION

the 21st and 24th May, 1841.

J. Hulbert.

Chinese between

During the reign of Keenlung, owing to its great extent of territory and large THE following Lists of claimants indemnified on ac- population the Province of Keangnan was count of pillage of the foreign factories at Canton in divided, its northern portion forming May last is published for general information. Keangsoo, and its southern Gan hwuy LIST of claims for Merchandize, Furniture, &c., the property of Province. The above Provincial Treasury British Subjects, in Canton, and pillaged by the is at Poo Ching sze in Keangsoo which borders upon Che keang. The famous commissioner Yukeen was governor of Keangsoo and Gan hwuy at the time he was induced to commit suicide, owing to the fall safety of of Chinhae and Ningpo, with the which places he was spectaily changed by his imperial master. He was at Chinhae when the British forces stormed the place, but escaping from his enemies he died by his own hand on the same night of his de-

THE Peking Gazettes come out at present during frequent intervals, are widely circulated, and extensively read and believed. We can well ima- gine the effect of such documents as the above upon credulous and self opinionated natives of the middle and higher classes, The Gazettes are regarded as emanating from the highest official sources in the Empire and therefore worthy of im- Under the plicit credit and fullest confidence. influence of such reports as the above hundreds and thousands of the better classes, have repaired with their fortunes to the seat of war; but instead of victory they have met with defeat, where glory was expected disgrace has overtaken them, and,

feat.

We invite attention to the interesting and important communication of SENEX, which will be found under the head of "Original Correspondence". We hope the sound practical suggestions there in con- tained will receive the attention they merit. The indifference or supineness hitherto exhibited in respect of the vital interests of our Island would be deemed wholly inexcusa- ble at home.

The new Zealand Company have voted One Hun. dred guineas, towards the erection of a monument to its establishment. Lord Durham, who was Governor of the Company on

A marble statue to the memory of Sir Pulteney Malcolm has been erected at Langholm.

Arrangements are now making in London to secure a communication, overland, once a fortnight with India.

18th Foot-Capt. John Clark Kennedy, from 7th Dragoon guards to be Captain, vice Sir Harry Darell who exchanges.

Public Clock.

T. Larkins. Joseph Henry- Holliday, Wise & C Jardine, Matheson Superintendents afde. Furniture of office and Hall. Private property of officers 4 servants.

Do.

R. Webster. Macvicar & Co.

Bell & Co. Lindsay & Co. Gibb, Livingston & Hooker & Lane. do. for W. Henderso Names of Claiman

W. & T. Gemmell & Co.

FR. Strachan.

Nature of Claims.

Amount.

Do.

Do.

do. For household furniture, stores &c. Merchandize, stores. do.

$13,466,55

Do.

do.

6,087 3,533 1,782,33

Do.

do.

971,25

Do.

do.

Wearing Apparel

Do.

do.

Dent & Co.

Merchandize, stores, &c.

1.836 9,578,65 140,428,92

137,33

Dirom & Co. Fox, Rawson & Co.

Db.

do.

1,705,50

Do.

do.

5,005,22

524

Do.

do.

Innes, Fletcher, & C

Do.

do.

1,500

Do.

do.

1,607,07

160

M. A McLeod.

W.S, Boyd.

D. Wearing apparel,, &c.

293

do.

D. Jardine.

Merchandize.

1,000

Co. Merchandize, stores, &c. Du. Merchandize do. Wearing apparel, &c. do.

66,450,88

1,022,56

7-5

2,340,75

5,600

1,200

1,400

268,372,01

Value received on behalf of subscribers

Total.

List

មន

of Foreign Claims of Merchandize, Furniture, 4-c. pillaged

or destroyed by the Chinese in Canton, between the 21st and 24th May 1891.

H. J. Reynvaan. Boyet, Brother & Co. F. A. Rangel. J. Ryan, G. Nye.

Furniture.

Names of Claimants. Joseph Coolidge.

Nature of Claims. Household furniture, stores and other property and papers.

Amount.

$33,710,44

354,50

Do. and stores.

3,128

Do.

do.

420

Do.

do.

400

Do.

do.

874

Wearing apparel.

732,75

Chapel furniture.

653

Furniture.

971,

Total.

41,243,69

M. P. Gutierres. E. C. Bridgman. W. A. Lawrence.

From the Hongkong Gazelle July 31st 1841.

14.

62

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JULY, 7r. 1812.

FRIEND OF CHINA pursued was wrong. Yet this policy, is it not adopted by their Successors? Who can say it is not the same? Is not Canton still open? Has any pro- gress been yet made in dissevering the Fiscal from the International question? Could it have been gotten, would not Six Millions have been taken for the ransom of Ningpo? Have not the Canton forts (in violation of the Treaty) been re- stored?

Cloth left no impression, when the stream of Elec- tricity was directed on them, were instantaneously transferred to the Cloth.

We have seen Plates of Landscapes which were taken by Light and engraved by Electricity and thus indicated thereon. We are sorry, but not surprised to see the admirable invention of Mr. Smee (the electro-type) applied to the fabrication of Counterfeit money. We cannot but believe that the dollar, being so widely current, will be inducement enough for some ingenious rogues to make spurious ones by the electro-type process; and if made with care, the specific gravity or actual incision will be the only tests of genuineness. The Daguerreotype process, has been already em- Clai-ployed, to forge signatures so like the originals,

WE are much rejoiced to find the Flax cultivation experiments in India, have been uniformly successful.-The reports from Dundee as to the quality of the Yarn and By the way it seems to be overlooked-but are texture of the Cloth manufactured there- not all the parties who were indemnified by Captain Elliot, for the pillage of their property in from is very encouraging. It is now cer- the factories at Canton-are they not by the tain the growth of Flax and Hemp will Treasury minute refered to placed in the same prove a highly lucrative culture in India. category as Messrs Dent & Co.? We republish We would call the attention of that highly from the Hongkong Gazette the list of the useful society the Agri-Horticultural of In-mants and the amounts paid. dia to the benefit which might accrue from the introduction of the Chinese grass cloth In another part of our paper we narrate plant or as the natives, designate it Ma, French gentlemen on their passage to Ma- the capture of a Pirate Boat, by some the capture of a Pirate Boat, by some Flax. There cannot be a doubt that it would thrive in various parts of India and cao. Among them was the French consul if properly prepared would we think obtain who we are told directed the proceedings. the very highest price realizable in London We are truly happy to have an opportuni- for the finest Belgian flax. Perhaps more ty of recording our heartiest commendation as from the report we had from competent of his admirablo conduct of the affair judges in France we are led to believe that throughout. It reflects high credit on all the staple is far superior. The specimens concerned in the capture. On many oc- of Yarn we submitted to the French lace casions we have remarked the lively inte- manufacturers, were held by them, to be rest, which M. Challaye has taken in the quite applicable to their finest and most ex- onward progress of our Colony. Many of pensive fabrics. Since then through the his suggestions and recommendations have instrumentality of Mons. Hébert the plant been of great value. We well know he has has been introduced into Europe, and is at earned the respect and esteem of all our this time, cultivated successfully in the Island authorities, who have very hand South of France. This matter well merits somely thanked and congratulated him on the attention of the new "Society for pro- his late adventure. We wish many of our moting the growth of Flax in Ireland"as we countrymen would emulate his excellent believe it to be a superior kind to any it example as respects Hongkong. has yet introduced. We are disposed to think it would succeed in Ireland, as it is a very hardy plant, and by the use of liquid manure (the application of which the Bel- gians seem to have borrowed from the Chinese) would perhaps attain perfection in that climate. India with its rich alluvi- al plains inundated annually, would how- ever better suit this plant. Developing the resources of India, is not only the duty, but the best interest of England. The success- ful cultivation of both Hemp and Flax, the Russian staples, would, not only prove, a blessing to India generally, but, be a se- verer blow to Russian aggrandizement and encroachments than the destruction of her fleets, or the annihilation of her aunies.

JUDGING by the report of the debate in the House of Commons, on Mr. Lindsays motion, respecting the Opium Claims, on the 17th March, we cannot but think the honorable member showed great inexperi- ence, or want of parliamentary tact by pressing his motion to a division. After Aliciting the opinions the leaders he rival factions, and obtaining the advocacy of the "Times," it was especially ill judged to show to the world that in a house of 124 members there were 87 adverse to his very proper views. Still for such a question it was a large house, and shows there is a growing disposition at home to pay atten- tion to our important Oriental relations.

In our last number we extracted from the Monthly Times, the Treasury Minute with respect to the Canton Ransom. Although by it, the late Plenipotentiary is held personally responsible, for the payment made to Messrs Dent & Co. and others, yet we have no doubt Sir Robert Peel will bring in and pass an Act of Indemnity releas- ing the ex-Plenipotentiary from this responsibility We are sure if he were a Tory employé, this would be done at once. Six Millions of dollars are not picked up every day. This prudery about the home appropriation of a small portion of the ramsom, finely contrasts with the whole sale mal- versations of the last War. We do not go the length of saying that Whig and Tory stickle for the letter of the law with the affectation of a prude! whilst they oft violate its spirit with the coolest effrontery.

Still Capt. Elliot has been, we think most unduly censured for ransoming Canton. Judging by the whole tenor of the policy of his Whig employ- ers we believe he acted consistently, but wrongly, because only the essential policy throughout

that in the case of an eminent London Banker he frankly avowed on a Bill (purporting to be his,) being shown him, that he could only swear it was not his signature, because it was not entered among reference thereto in their letters or books. the list of acceptances, and they had no advice or

We are glad to know the electrotype process has been very usefully applied to Sheffield Ware, and with great success at Manchester to Cotton Printing Cylinders. The talented inventor has been wholly neglected by those who have so much benefitted by his invention-So goes the world.

WE see Mr. Dunn has transported from America to London his magnificent collec- tion illustrative of China and the Chinese. Finding no exhibition-room in the metrop- olis suited to his purpose, Mr. Dunn has commenced building one for himself. It is to be 260 feet in length and of suitable height and proportions. We hope he will be richly rewarded for his enterprise and spirit. His arrival in London at the pre- sent juncture of a war with China will On the 20th of May, we recorded the of success. Otherwise we should have prove peculiarly favorable to his chances capture of a Pirate by one of our trading confidently predicted the failure of his spec- craft. Now another by the Paradox. Both ulation for as an old resident truly ob- events took place in sight of the flect. This served "It may be safely asserted that four- will appear incredible in England. We fifths of our fellow-countrymen know or hope the crew of the Paradox will be re-care to know little more about our relations warded. We wish we would answer the with China, than that the delightful bever- indignant queries of our correspondents as age "which cheers but not inebriates," and to who is to blame for these audacious a few articles of ornamental dress and outrages. Confessedly some one has much curious earthenware which annually find to answer for. their-way to England from that mysterious and remote region."

alarmed at the prospect of the influx of Cattle, THE country gentlemen at home, seem much Swine &c. from the Continent. It is frightful to it was stated that Coal had been found in no fewer Ar a late meeting of the Royal Asiatic Society think a Hamburgh ox should be admissible on payment of £1! a Pig 5s! and Colonial animals than fifty seven localities in India where, a few at half these duties; especially so seeing that hith-years since its existence was not suspected. It is erto they have been wholly prohibited. The gra- known to exist in Assam and the Western Provin- ziers denounce Peel as a veritable revolutionist.ces of India. We know it abounds in Tartary and will now come to England in large quantities; as Norway Salmon too, and many other kinds of fish in many provinces of China. Mr. Clarke who accompanied the Blonde in its cruise to the Corean also increased quantities of foreign butter and peninsula made out that the Coal which was cheese. Without detracting from the merit of wrought at Tootchu was deliverable, on board, at Sir Robert, it is undeniable that the national im- about 10s 6d per ton. (160 Cash per pecul) Coal is pulse in favor of the removal of restrictions on the called mei tan and Shih hwuy by import of human food, was given by the Manches- the Chinese; a Coal pit mei yaou. Coal has been abused Anti Corn Law League matters would have morial. Marco Polo records its habitual applica- ter manufacturers; and but for the awfully rod auterely as fuel by them from ume imme- gone on very much as heretofore. Honour to the tion in his travels. By a late "Friend of India" men of Manchester, say we, and to the honorable we perceive the supply of Burdwan Coal, or rather member for Stockport who cradled and reared the of the Damooda Valley, (which is a more appro- mighty agitation of Free trade,-fraught with priate designation), will amount this year to nearly untold blessings to countless millions of our race. 50,000 tons. Suitable facilities of transit are alone Brimingham carried the Reform Bill. The pro- required, to diminish the cost fully one half, and vinces the abolition of Slavery. To Manchester at the same time immensely augment the consump- will be accorded the glorious distinction of work- tion. This matter well merits the attention of the ing out the salvation of our beloved country new Governor General. through the medium of the safest, wisest, and best dying honour, by developing the mighty resources He may earn never policy, id est, FREE TRADE. of the vast Country he rules. The civic crown he might win would pale the lustre of the brightest diadem of the mere conqueror or subjugator of his species. These spoils of Peace (gathered in over- coming the obstacles of nature) how much less costly-how much more precious, than the spoils of War?

THE Commerce, French paper, states the Russian Government had purchased for 1,000,000 Rubles (about £ 40,000) the new-process of dyeing blue in France. The cost is but one fifth of the old process with Indigo. It is not the first time we have heard, that the clever chemists of France, had contrived to invent a dye, the use of which would render them independent of India for its indigo. If this discovery be as perfect, as stated, we are disposed to think, the Prussiate or ferro-cyanate of Potass, in combination with some of the metallic salts will be found to be the menstruum employed. We know a long course of experiment (without success), has been pursued in England to accom- plish this desideratum. As we are on the subject of know that Mr. Baggs, has at last succeeded in dyeing, it may interest some of our readers to dyeing Cotton Cloths fast colours by the agency of Electricity. He has proved the practicability of his invention by exhibiting the process publicly, Blocks or patterns, which when pressed on the

Borneo, in accessible sites, is we are glad to know The existence of abundant Coal formations in confirmed. The recent discovery of Coal at Madagascar and Kerguelens land, seems really to evidence the special design of Providence, to afford facilities of intercommunion to the human race. The explorations at Borneo may hereafter exert a potent influence on the new relations, which can- not but spring up betwixt Great Britain and the Celestial Empire.

those above the rank of Lieut-Colonel) at present Stoppage of Furlough. All officers (excepting at home have received instructions from the India House to prepare to return to their regiments forthwith.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

CREGENAL CORRESPONDENCE. Macao 30 June 1842

To the Editor of the Friend of China. Sir,

638

procured at that city. To render thein equally as Women on board the fast boat cried out lustily for needed. Give to fuke these, and he will provide for numbered at least one hundred, and the Paradox. cheap, and as plentiful, security and protection only are assistance. Although the two pirate boat crews, you the best articles in the empire, in any quantities was wholly unprepared for a conflict, yet she you please, and at the very lowest possible prices. On bore gallantly down on the Pirates to the rescue. shore, security and protection are enjoyed, to an We have just had our Revolution. and also our admirable degree, especially when you consider what a Without doubt the Pirates thought it was a man three grandes journées not of July, but of June. The great and heterogeneous mass there is to be controlled. of war schooner, or a vessel despatched from the Governor having been blamed by the Court of Lisbon And as this new government goes on, there is every fleet, which was in full view. Hence, one pirate for certain acts (into the details of which I will not reason to expect it will improve-better arrangements boat got out to sea, the other being close pressed, enter) and in effect being required by it to give the lie introduced, and bad ones set aside. In this harbor ran on the rocks, and after pitching two of their to his past proceedings, magnanimously tendered his too-and it is one of the best in the world-the security Iron Guns overboard, the crew about sixty made resignation to the noble and Loyal Senate who reques. and protection are as complete as possible. But beyond for the hills. ted him not rashly to relinquish his high office. The the reach of the guns of the forts and of the shipping Governor was inflexible. A Provisional Government it is not so. M. Challaye on landing discovered one of the was constituted. Here endeth the first day." And to this-want of security and protection, in the him to the West point Barracks, which are ad- pirates lurking about, captured him and dragged jacent. On representing the case to the Com- manding officer a party of men were promptly despatched in pursuit of the fugitives.

ed with Powder (for igniting vessels) Pikes, Spears Matchlocks two iron and one brass Gun indeed the proper equipment for such nefarious objects. Two Books were also found, which Dr. Bridgman (one of our residents, and an eminent Chinese scho- lar) declares to be the account Books of these lawless adventurers, who even do dishonesty selon les regles.

We are disposed to think the rescued in their fears may have exaggerated their danger, for they tion of the Paradox, they would have been all declared, but for the almost miraculous interven- slaughtered, and pitched over board by the Chi- nese prates. These things do happen. It is but a few days since one of our residents going to Macao in a fast boat, with at least Sixty passen- gers on board was attacked. The presence of well armed Europeans alone prevented a fatal

The Battalion of Macao Invincibles, was unani- neighborhood of the island-I wish to invite the atten- mous not to tolerate a Provisional Government, or tion of those authorities, who may have it in their as it is called a Civic Triumvirate; and as the veritable power, as it certainly must be their wish, to remove an organ of the People, demanded the convocation of the evil which more than any other is acting against the Council General of the Colony, with the view to ratify prosperity of Hongkong." The captured pirate Boat was brought to the the past actions of the Governor and to urge on him From above Whampoa, and from Macao and its vici- Government landing place. It was immediately the propriety of still holding the reins of power. To nity, in all these outer waters, every vestige of Chinese recognised as a Boat which had been quietly back their demands they form, and march (without authority has been swept away by British forces. moored there the night before, indeed till a few orders from their commandant) upon the square of Chinese authority having been crushed, another and hours previously to the occurrence under notice. the Senate, where they take up their position in order a better ought to have been set up in its stead. This On searching her, she was found amply provided of battle, having two field pieces, the gunners with has not been done. Consequently, for many months, with Powder, Shot, Stink Pots, Bamboos charg- matches lighted and all prepared to do or die. The these outer waters have been the scene of frequent and Council General is convoked for the next day. Ma- cruel outrages. Only yesterday, one of the Chinese cao was then without a Government. Here endeth boats of eighty or a hundred tons, carrying sixty or the second day. eighty men, left this harbor; and three or four hours The Council General assembles, over whom ought afterwards was acting tho pirate, when fortunately to preside the Judge, (one of the three members of the some French gentlemen, in the Paradox schooner, Provisional Government, and owing to whose remon- began to reason with her, and brought her back into strances, the Court of Lisbon cancelled the Governors the harbor, a prize! Her men made their escape, so acts)but he feigned indisposition,and did not show himself, that they may fight another day. as he well knew the majority of Votes were in favour of The Chinese authorities of Canton are well aware his enemy the ex-Governor who nobly kept the field, of the operations of these freebooters; and as soon as and who despite his protestations was re-proclaimed by they can fortify themselves in their "ram's-city." the assembly with unanimous acclamation. The they will concert with these sea thieves, to harrass Council General begged him to rest satisfied with this more severely those "traitorous natives," who link revolutionary movement as it would assume all the themselves in with the "barbarian rebels." If rumors responsibility of this little act of rebellion against the are to be heeded at all, the provincial government already meditate hostile designs of this nature. And Authority of the Queen! The ex-Governor was con- siderably softened by this devotedness to his person-if let alone, depend on it, they will mature and carry he was touched at such miracles of patriotism and into effect these designs, unless (what is not very likely heroism, he at last, consented anew to sacrifice himself to happen) peace is concluded with the emperor. for the good of his Country and reluctantly re-accepted Do you ask, What is to be done? The remedy is the painful duties of official life. On this, his announce. easy, with the naval force now on this station, Ex- HELVETIUS says "It is to discussion, and conse ment, there was a manifestation of the liveliest en- cepting the flag-ship let the others be kept daily on quently to the liberty of the Press, that the science thusiasm, a burst of warm emotion, quite astounding. the move, returning into harbor at least once a week. of physics owes its improvements. Had this liber- Then he returned to Government house, escorted by As the season for typhoons is approaching, these ships ty never subsisted, how many errors, consecrated the Authorities and all the notables of Macao, among out-ride the severest storms, Whampoa should be What is here said of physics, is applicable to mo- should take care to go prepared to take shelter, or to by time, would be cited as incontestable axioms! whom figured his bitterest enemies! The troops illu- visited by a steamer two or three times in a month. minated their Caserne: the Citizens imitated their ex- ample. A grand display of fire works or rather the A ship of some size should always be in sight of the rality and politics." May the fact of the Chinese explosion of a few Crackers betokened the general joy. Bogue; another between Lintin and Kapshuy Moon; not possessing the liberty of the press, although At ten o'clock at night Order reigned in Macuo!!! and another on the south of Lantao. The movements possessing the art of Printing, account greatly for Here endeth the third day of the ever Glorious and of these should be so arranged that the sea-thieves the stereotype character of the national mind? We truly immortal revolution of Macao. will always be in uncertainty regarding their course are inclined to think so, and we are fortified in our and designs. opinion by referring to the extravagant dogmatism of the Schoolmen professing the Aristotelian philo- sophy. Is it not exactly analogous to that now preva lent among the Chinese disciples of Confucius? But for the discovery of Printing, or rather, but for the liberty of the Press, we doubt not that Aristo- tle and his commentators would be now the text books of our scholastic and collegiate philosophy. The science of induction from facts, unknown or unheeded, all would now slavishly bow (as do the Chinese iterati) to time honored error, and tena ciously cling to immemorial usage.

I remain

Your well wisher LIBERTAS.

P. S. Joking apart Mr. Editor, it is seriously said that Liberty of the press, Trial by Jury, and redress of grievances will be the result of our revolution. If so we shall gain more by our bloodless insurrection, than some other countries have by their most sangui- nary outbreaks.

FOR THE FRIEND OF CHINA, AND HONGKONG GAZETTE, MR. EDITOR, SECURITY and protection are two of the things most essential and necessary for the steady increase and pros peny of the population and business or Hongkong. These enjoyed by the Chinese, and it is impossible to foresee the limits to which the settlement will grow. Hitherto its progress has been wonderful, though sev- eral circumstances have existed to oppose and retard it."

These are still in force; and I will therefore enumerate some of them, hoping that those who seek the welfare of the island and its inhabitants will do their duty to re- move or neutralize their influence.

1. The Chinese authorities of Canton have done, and are doing, all in their power to prevent the improve. ment of Hongkong under British rule. They are now forming designs, and seeking the means, to work

out its utter ruin.

2. All the native merchants of Canton, whose in- terest it is to keep the trade at the provincial city, are opposed to the growth of this settlement; and are try. ing, in many ways, to injure it, because they foresee that it will by and by diminish their gains.

3. Many of the Portuguese inhabitants of Macao, for similar reasons, wish no good to Hongkong.

4. A few other foreign merchants, not excepting some British subjects, have such arrangements with Macao and Canton that they too wish no prosperity to this settlement

12

11

Native boats, such as are most likely to be attacked by pirates. should now and then, be sent on short cruises, furnished with a guard of three or four armed men, marines and sailors, trusty and brave, and should go in disguise. These measures, or some other more efficient, are I think, called for; and I hope that you, Mr. Editor, will urge this case, which, if answered efficiently, will speedily remove a great evil; and give a powerful impulse to the growing prosperity of the British Settle- ment of Hongkong.

Harding place, Hongkong, July 4th 1812.

04

YOURS

SENEX.

issue.

THE WEST INDIES. We learn that the Duke of Wellington has directed his attention of late to the EXTRANS from a letter dated hear urters 31stcudition of the regiments which neepy Wonk dow May 1842. dia situation, and the causes of the mortality to which, from time to time, they are subjected. His Grace appears to attribute the evil very much to the unhealthy situations of the different barracks and the inadequacy of the buildings themselves to protect the men against the influence of the climate. The results are said to be the concoction of a plan for the fabrication of cast iron barracks, which shall be sent out in pieces from this country, as was, the case with Napoleon's house at Longwood.-These huts will have numerous advantages over brick and mortar houses; not the least obvious of which is, that they will be as moveable as a camp. London Paper. In addition to the numerous War Steamers now in

WE are waiting the arrival of the Reinforcements to proceed to Nankiu, but first we go to another small place at the mouth of the Yang-tze-keang call ,,ed I think Moo-seun or some such name, it is a depôt of theirs. The new Gov. Gen.has we hear written round "that the war one way or other must be concluded this year and if not by treaty, it is said a line of Coast will be taken up and held by the Queen's troops and the Expedition will break up and return to India." Extract from a hurried note dated on board the Queen Steamer, Koolangsoo, June, 15th.

19

1

"The Cambrian is here. The place all quiet. The Herald has gone on. Some of the native troops for the garrison arrived last night. The Sapphire is coming in. The Cambrian, Pylades, and Chameleon, form the naval squadron." The Queen Steamer left Hongkong, on the 13th June.

PIRACY.

5. The island is the resort of many Chinese outlaws, On Sunday last about noon the Paradox Schoon- with others, freebooters, (always numerous on the coaster was working out of our Bay, on her passage of China,) who annoy the peaceful and unarmed people to Macao having a light breeze; on board were who repair thither.

Notwithstanding these, and some other obstacles, the the French Consul, M. Challaye, M. Chonski, population of Hongkong, and the business which it is Secy. to Colonel Jancigny, and M. Froget, one carrying on, have increased, and are increasing, with of our residents, with a crew of five lascars. On most remarkable rapidity. Already several thousands the Paradox rounding the point, near Green Is- of shopmen and merchanics, from Canton and other land, they discovered close in shore, two pirate neighboring places, have purchased land and erected boats vigorously attacking a Chinese fast boat, buildings on the island, and are now able to furnish which carries passengers between Macao and almost all articles, usually found in the markets of Hongkong. At sight of the Paradox the passengers Canton, as good and nearly as cheap as they can be (many of whom were Macao Portuguese) and the

commission, Government has building nineteen more in the different dockyards.

An American Toust. "The ladies; the only endu rable aristocracy, who rule without laws,-judge with. out jury, decide without appeal and are never in the

wrong.

By the reformed Civil list system it was settled by the Whigs, that the Crown should be limited to not create Pensions on this fund beyond £1200 per an- num. During the last year we find the Whigs have appropriated & 650 per annum to one of the tutors of the Queen!!! For services of public utility £ 260!!! For Science and Literature £290!!! Comment is superfluous. On this subject the Spectator very aptly quotes Coleridge who truly sings.

How seldom, friend, a great good man inherits Honor or praise, whatever his worth, or pains It sounds like Stories from the Land of Spirits If any man obtain that which he merits Or any merit that which he obtains.

2

64

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane has shifted his flag from the Vindictive to the Bleuheim. It is not unlikely we are informed that Sir Thomas will pay 4 visit to the Bogue Forts.

CHINESE AFFAIRS.

No wonder the statesmen of the west are in great doubt regard. ing the past and the future courses of events in China, since the best informed even here, and those too most interested in these matters find themselves possessed of very imperfect information.

Facts, principles, deductions, and opinions, by being transferred from one person to another, often come to assume new forms and coloring, as diversified and as fanciful as those of the kaleidoscope occasioned by its slightest change. So far as the future is con- cerned, we are at present with ut any data to enable us to form an opinion, either satisfactory to ourselves, or worthy of being received by others. We can imagine H. B. M.'s combined forces couring the plains of Kiangnan; all communication by the Grand canal intercepted; advanced squadrons far up into the interior of the empire on the waters of the two great rivers and their tribu- taries; and hundreds of towns and cities along their banks attacked and ransomed or deserted. While by these measures, occupying only a few days, the inhabitants of all the central provinces are thrown into consternation, it is easy further to fancy all the de- fenees between the sea and Peking swept away at a stroke; the apital entered and the monarch deposed! However, some- thing quite the opposite of all this might be conjured up by an excited imagination, or (as some would have it) must clearly be foreseen by every unbiassed judgement. Still what is to be the actual order of events, resulting from the present course of opera- tions-how commerce is to be effected at Canton and elswhere-- how the war is to be carried on and brought tq termination- and how negotiations are to be opened and conducted-are topics about which we must leave our readers for the present to their own musings. Did we not know that a Power, far above all human authority, is guiding all these events we should despair of suon seeing any improvment in the moral and political condition of the Chinese. When her H. B. M.'s forces proceded northward, two years ago, in the summer of 1810, the whole coast was defense. less, and not even a gun was mounted on the forts at the mouth of the Fei hó. A speedy termination of all difficulties was ex pected by every body. The results of that expedition, and of another, are on record. For those of a third, all eyes are now anxiously watching.

The British demand, according to a rumor from Peking, Hong- kong; the ports of Amoy, Ningpo, and Shanghái, opened; $20,000,000, expenses of the war, paid; a minister to reside at Peking; ministers to reside at foreign courts; with equality and reciprocity generally,

There is another late rumor that the emperor has found out that

3n.-By purchasing for Cash, we obtain our Goods at a much lower rate, and secure to ourselves the best drscription; persons in business acquainted with the importance of Cash payments, will at once acknowledge his truism and admit of its decided indispensability, in ptrocuring a superior article at a low price.

EVERY attention will be paid to such orders as they may be favored with from Chusan, Ningpo, Amoy, or wherever any of H. M's Forces may be Stationed; and all expedition used in their transmission, thus insu- ring a good article, without being obliged to pay an exorbitant price.

PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT.

THE DEDICATION OF THE QUEEN'S ROAD BAPTIST CHAPEL,

Hongkong

(THE REV. J. LEWIS SHUCK.) Will, by Divine permission, take place on LORD'S DAY next, July, 10th.

SERVICES TO COMMENCE AT 11, A. M.

The Bell will be rung at a quarter before 11. The future Services of the CHAPEL will be as follows:-

EVERY LORD'S DAT,

Seven o'clock in the morning, Chinese Worship-Eleven o'clock A.M., English Preaching-Two o'clock P.M., Chinese Preaching- Half-past 6 in the evening, English Bible Class.

EVERY THURSDAY-half-past 6 in the evening ENGLISH LECTURE

EVERY FRIDAY-half-past 7 in the evening CHINESE LECTURE.

ΠΟΝΟΚΟΝΟ,

N. B. Other Services as occasions require.

the ancient emperors, and his ancestors, when all things went wrong through the errors of his ministers, changed them and al. 4th July, 1842. tered their policy; and therefore he, Taukwang, proposes to do

the same.

THE RECAPTURE OF NINGPO-It is known to most of our readers,

if not to them all, that this city which was taken by the British forces Oct. 10th, last year, was abandoned by them on the 7th of last May. But mark-his excellency, lieut.-governor Liu Yunko, announces to the emperor its recapture weeks before, in a me. morial which appears in the Gazette of April 12th.

REINFORCEMENTS AT HANGCHAU-Immediately after the fall of Chinhai and Ningpó, a very small British force might have moved on Hanchau in triumph-for, as the authorities of the city then declared, in a memorial to the emperor, there was not a soldier in the province on whom any dependence could be placed. But as soon as the routed forces had time to recover from their fears, works of defense and reinforcement began, and are still, down to the latest dates from the the north, in progress. The Tartar general Kiying has recently been sent thither, from Peking, fr the especial defense of the city, carrying with him such full power as to enable him, in concert with commissioner Ti-i-shun, to order from any of the provinces such numbers of forces as they may deem necessary for the defense of that city.

AT CHINHAI-A small garrison has been retained on Joss house hill. Whether the city itself has been recaptured or not, we find as yet no record to inform us. But we understand that the sol diers of the garrison could not go into the town for provisions except in armed parties-so closely were they watched. Chinese Repository

CIRCULAR, MESSRS. D. WILSON & CO. of Calcutta, beg res- pectfully to inform the Ladies and Gentlemen, residents of Hongkong, also the Officers of H. M. Army and Na- vy, and Captains of Ships trading to the Part, that they have, for the present commenced business as General store-keepers at the Algerine Depot, Queen's Road, hong-kong, mandatory apposite

where stores of every kind, and in any quantity may be had, and guaranteed to be of the very best description. MESSRS, D. W. & CO in soliciting your kind support, beg to state that if sufficient encouragement is given to their best endeavours to supply all requisites at very moderate charges, it is their intention to form an Establishment to be regularly supplied from London and Calcutta, and with wines from the first Houses in Bar deaux, Epernay, Oporto, Cadiz, and Madeira direct,-to supply every kind of Stores which may be required in a new Colony, and also for the Shipping Department-to erect a News Room well supplied with Newsapers and Periodicals, and Slate and metal Billiard Tables, kept perfectly select by the admission of members and their friends only, on the principle of the London Club Houses, also to attach a comfortable and well conducted

Hotel, and to increase their Establishment to the ne- cessities of the Port, in luxuries as well as requisites, and that no endeavour shall be wanting on their part

to ensure the same patronage which has been extended

to them at Calcutta, and Darjeeling.

tation.

MESSRS. D. W. & CO. wish to make known the terms on which their business has been carried on, and which has obtained for them such celebrity and repu. 1ST.-Commissions of all kinds are executed, whether in our various branches or not, without any charge for Commission, and every care and attention being paid to forwarding the articles with safety and despatch. 2D.-We guarantee our Wines, Oilmans Stores, Provisions &c. to be of the best procurable quali ty-enabled to do so by the care of, and confidence in, our agents.

the 11 offering.

FOR WHAMPOД.

The Charlotte, Capt Lerbschwa- ger, will be despatched for the above port on Monday next instant, and will take any freight

Apply to the Captain, or on board the ship General Wood.

Hongkong, July, 6th, 1842.

PUBLIC AUCTION."

THERE well be sold by Public Auction on Mon- day the 11th July, at 10A, M. by C. Markwick.

At tho godowns of N. Duus No. 18 Queens Road. Beer, Bescuits, Manilla Rum, and English Brandy, in Hogd. Cordail, old Jamaica Rum, Irish Pork Flour and Lisbon wine in Barrel, Manilla Segars Tobaco brown soap Raisons, Cheese Candles, Soda water, Table salt, Preserved meats, sardines, Butter, Salt Salmon, Herrings Tripe, Also English & Russian Canvass and Dutch Java Coffee, Bengal Rice, Dholl, Ghee, Manilla and Europe Rope Spunyarns, Singapore and Rega Deals Rattans and Sapan wood-Java Teak wood, Crates of empty bottles and Corks, &c. &c.

Fordon deliver

FOR SALE-At 46 Queen's Road.--Singapore Plank, Coals, Provisions, Sherry, Wine Bran- dy, &c., &., &c. C. V. GILLESPIE. HONGKONG 5th July 1842.

NOTICE. Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre-

mises to

N. DUUS, OF

C. FEARON.- Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission, HONGKONG 31st MARCH, 1842.

FOR SALE. A Large Quantity of Singapore Beams, Planks, 100 Cases very Superior Sherry in Pints, and Quarts, 400 Kegs of White Lead, J. F. HIGHT.

Apply to at the Godowns of H. PYBUS, HONGKONG, 28th JUNE, 1842.

NAIL, Rod Iron

ON SALE.

Calcutta Bottled Beor, in Cases of B doz. Navy and Pilot Bread American Flour, Apply to Hongkong 13 June, 1842.

Wm. T. Kinsley,.

FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams apd Sheathing Planks and Singapore Plank. Apply on Board HONGKONG 13TH APRIL 1849.

FOR SALE. MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to DENT & Co. at Macao. MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

NOTICE. ive se MR. DUTRONQUOY of the LONDON HOTEL, SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment. under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa- pore.

MR. DUTRONQUoy also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c.,

at the shortest notice.

FOR SALE-At the Godowns of the under signed, Queen's Road:

Chain Cables, Anchors, Europe Coir, & Manilla, Rope, Tar, Pitch, Paints, Oil, & Turpentine, Can- yass, Twine, Marline, Hawsing, Hawsers, Europe and Coir, Blocks, Hooes, & Thimbles, Oars, Beef & Pork, Bread, Brandy, Gin, Wines, Beer, & Porter, Marryatt's Code of Signals, Saddlery, Pickles, Sauces & Paint, Candles, Wax and Sperm, Soap, Door and Pad-Locks.

And every other Article in the Ship Chandlery, and Grocery line, P. TOWNSEND, & Co. 1842.

HONGKONG, JUNE, 28,

FOR SALE: FINE old Lisbon wine

In wood and battles Pine Cheese Mauilla Segars No. 4. Apply to No. 18 Queen's Road,

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAO.

FOR SALE.

ATthe office of the Friend of China, PORTFOLIO CHINENSIS or a collection of authentic Chin ese State Papers illustrative of the history of the present position of affairs in China, with a translation, not es and introduction. By J. LEWIS SHUCK. Price, 4 Rupees a-copy.

HONGKONG, 29th June, 1842.

FOR SALE.

AT the office of the FRIEND OF CHINA, a Grammar of the Chinese Language. Published at Batavin. Price $ 1, 50.

Also Tea Chew First Lessons, useful to persons com ing in contact with Chin-Chew and Hokien men, Published at Bangkok, Siam. Price $ 1. Hongkong 19th May 1842.

Prices for Job Printing are as follows:

Bills of Lading and Exchange, Policies and folio pages Letter paper size

Of Ships

39

per 100

19

17 6.

Not exceeding 7 lines for 3 months Exceeding 7 lines, 10 cents per each line additional. Advertisements and Job printing English and Chinese at mod,

erate rates.

Advertisements, notices &c, translated from and into the Chi-

nese language.

The Press cannot be set for loss than one hundred copies.

Shipping Intelligence.

British, Christian,

ARRIVED.

June

29th Arethusa

Red Rover

July

July

30th Corsair

Maca

31

J. S. Martyn. Wright

Smith

1st H.C. str. Hooghly Ross

2nd Harmony

Brd Royal Saxon 5th Bidasson

6th Vixen

A cruize. Macao.

J. T, Crawford Spanish R. O. Suza British, W. Carr SAILED.

1st Corsair Martyn 4th H. C. str. Hooghly Ross "Gazelle Rt. Ogg

6th Bidasson "Nerva

R. O. Suza

"1

East coast Macag

G. Melville William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG,

N. 17. VOL. 1.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND

LONGBONG GAZETTE

NOTTEICATION.

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, will be discontinued from this date: but all public orders and notifications appearing in "The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- zette," with the signatures of duly autho- rized Functionaries of the Government are still to be considered as official. By order,

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842. CONSULAT DE FRANCE EN CHINE. AVIS. MESSIEURS les Capitaines et Subrecargues des Navires Français venant en Chine sont prévenus que leurs navires ne paye- ront, à l'avenir, à Whampoa, que les mêmes droits que ceux auxquels sont soumis les navires Anglais et Americains.

C. ALEX.: CHALLAYE Gérant le Consulat de France en Chine. Hongkong, 25 Mai, 1842.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JULY 14TH. 1842.

forty of the insurgent Chiefs to death brought all the disaffected to submission, among which was one "foreign barbarian" who agreeing to yield to remain uninjured. the imperial authority was graciously permitted to

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

"Assam" deposes Chakwan is my brother we until the last month were partner's as butchers but on our accounts being disarranged we separated and for the last month he joined "Acheoo" as partner as butcher, can be answerable for his brother never being connect. ed with the Pirates.

The Prisoner is released on the above security the

burned down consuming four persons in the flames. boat in question is in Charge of the Harbour Master. CANTON. A physic store in Canton city was The Emperor is indignant at such inexcusable carelessness and orders the individual in charge of the district, a Mandarin of the 6th rank, to be forthwith disgraced from his office.

POLICE.

BEFORE THE CHIEF MAGISTRATE

On the 23d ult. James Borton, the proprietor of Translation of a letter addressed to A. R. JOHNSTON, Britain's Boast tavern, was charged by Daniel Ed- Esq. Hong Kong, July 3rd, 1842. Sir, wards with assaulting him,

Before going to Macao very early to-morrow morning, that he saw Borton beat Edwards with a Stick. Did Acting sergeant Crompton of the Police deposed, I find it impossible to give my evidence, in the affair of not see Edwards strike Borton. The assault was made the Pirate boat, which has been seized to-day by the with a Malacca Cane, about an inch in diameter. schooner Paradox, I hasten, in consequence, to trans-dwards, appearance evidenced that he had received mit all the details necessary to throw light on this sub. ject.

severe usage. Mr Borton alleged in defence that Ed- with Messrs Chonski and Froget, was at one o'clock, in front of the Windows, when he shoved him off the The Paradox, on board of which I embarked to-day, ordered him away. Edward returned and would stay wards (who is a Portuguese) came to his house and he in the passage between Green Island and Hong Kong, Kerb stone. On this Edwards made a blow at him, when we saw a little Chinese fast-boat, being chased by with a Malacca cane, when he wrenched it from him a boat which we instantly knew to be a pirate. At the and broke it. The complainant then made the sign of a sight of the schooner, the men of the little fast-boat cross with his two fingers, vilely abused him and swore cried out for help. The pirate boat which was still by his God that he would kill him. Irritated at this he under sail, directed its course to the W. S. W. point of certainly knocked him down, but he used no stick. Hong Kong, when the boat was stranded on the rocks. Mr Borton was sentenced to pay a fine of ten dollars and all her crew. which I and my companions estimate to the Queen; as the complainant was much beaten about 60 men threw themselves on shore. board a Lorcha) Mr Borton was ordered to pay him and incapacitated from performing his duty (on ten dollars as compensation: and further he was bound in his own recognizance in the sum of fifty dollars, with a surety of the like amount, to keep the peace towards the complainant during the next twelve- months.

Our arms were not loaded, and it was impossible to fire into these miscreants, who dispersed immediately among the ravines and abrupt fissures in the mountains. At our appearance, a second pirate boat, doubtless on the watch, escaped rapidly to the south coast of Lantao, Che-rate boat, to see if any one remained on board of her. I and M. Chonski and Froget went on board the pi- and then ordered the Paradox to return with the pirate boat towards West Point Barracks. I had hardly dis- embarked when a Chinese, who came from the valley in which the pirates landed, passed near me. Thinking that if not one of the crew, he could probably give some information of the direction the pirates had taken, I secured him and conducted him at once, to the acting Major of the Barracks, the officer in command had him seized and sent a detachment in pursuit, according to my information.

SELECTIONS FROM THE PEKING GAZETTES. CASTING CANNON. The Emperor in a personal interview with the high officers of the army in Keang has ordered them to make strenuous exer- tions for the erection of foundries and the Casting of Cannon, at some eligible place and that the guns be sent with flying despatch to CheKeang. IMPERIAL PRESENT OF SHOES. It has hitherto been the usual custom for the Emperor annually to present a handsome pair of shoes to all the high military officers of Manchow Tartary. This year His Majesty publishes that only one half of the said officers will be thus distinguished.

THE LATE COMMISSIONER YUKEEN. The Imper- ial will has been declared that the demise of Ya- keen having taken place his son shall be rewarded with a Mandarins cap button. No allusion is made to the circumstances of Yukeen's death, nor is the precise rank stated to which his son is promo-

ted.

THE CURRENCY. Owing to the high price of sil- ver in Shan-se province the Emperor has forbid- den the further coining of Copper Cash in that Province for the period of one or two years.

REBELLION IN HOOPIH PROVINCE. The result of the rebellion in Hoopih five months ago was the getting of entire possession by the insurgents of the cities of Sung Yang and Tung shan, which are situated in departments of the same name in the nordwest part of the province. A recent Ga zette states that a large body of imperial troops had just entered the disaffected districts, attacked the rebels, routed them, and recovered the cities. There were several thousands of the insurgents, and a large number was killed and wounded. Hoopih is one of the central Provinces of China, covers a large extent of territory is densely popu- lated and has long been famed for its wealth and men of letters. It is bounded on the north by the Province of Honan, on the east by Gan hwuy, on the west by Szc-Chuen and on the south by PEKIN. The Governor of Chih te represents to the Emperor the great importance of still larger appropriations being made for strengthening the fortifications both on the east and the west of the imperial Province in order to check all advances of the (Yih E) "rebellious barbarians." CHE KEANG. The Governor lays before the Emperor a detailed statement of the number &c. of all the officers civil and military who have served in Che Keang the seat of war, during the past year he notices Ist, those who had been newly

Hoonan.

1 then returned on board the pirate boat, and had her anchored near the police station at the Bazar At my request, the chic. of the Post sent a guard on board to look out and see that none of the objects of convic. tion and suspicion were carried away.

Caine, wants more detailed evidence, I shall be glad to On my return from Macao in a few days, if Major give it verbally.

The worthy Magistrate humanely ordered the com- plainant, to be taken to the Surgeon of the Island, civit service, for medical treatment.

On the 20th ult. Yu ming, a China man was senten- of the Cameronians. The offender had long been sus- ced to Sixty Strokes for selling Sam shu to the recruits. pected by the Police. The case was completely made out, through the efforts of Sergt. Brown of the Came-

ronians.

Choon Chow, a China man was fined five dollars and punished with twenty Strokes, for having defrauded a Soldier of the Madras service of half a rupee; which he obtained on pretence of giving him Sam shu for it. ing any Sum shu on his premises, yet several jars which he did not. Although the prisoner denied hav- were found by the Sergeant of Police and it was prov- he had sold spirits to the troops.

Chonski and Frozet, who attest with me, to the truth of This letter is signed by my two companions, Messrs.ed the above statement. Signed,

We are glad to see by the above re- ports, that the vigilance of the Police has not relaxed with regard to the illicit sale of ardent spirits. No one is more alive than our Chief Magistrate to the importance of Chucking, as far as possible, and mischiev ous practice, alike subversive of moral conduct and military discipline..

It is notorious that the immoderate use

C. ALEX. CHALLAYE. HENRI DU CHONSKI. F. FROGET. EXAMINATION INTO THE ABOVE CASE OF PIRACY. Chief Magistrate's Office, Hongkong, July, 4th 1842 Futtoo, a Lascar deposes. 1 was passenger on board the Lorcha No 35, be- longing to a Portugese named "Jose" and we left Ma. cao the day before last, we were 2 Portugese, 3 Lascars and 5 Chinese on board. On reaching the "Cup-sin of ardent spirits, is more likely to lead to moon" a Pirate Boat chased us and fired a musket, we sudden death and fatal maladies in hot, than being a lighter boat fled and anchored near a headland in cold Climates. With this knowledge, and remained for the night, and the Pirate took up a we yet are surprised at the peculiar mor- position at a distance watching us, yesterday morning tality which is induced by intoxication from kong, chased by the Pirate who called out that we when the wind got up we again made sail for Hong- sam shu. We repudiate the idea of "Poi- had escaped owing to its being night but that they son in the Pot", still it would be well to would take us. Our boat ran very fast and on reaching submit various qualities of sam shu to chem- the point of Hongkong, a schooner with some French ical analysis in order to discover, if possi- gentlemen on board came in sight as if going to Macao,

we hailed her and turned round to the Pirate and fired ble, the ingredients so strikingly deleterious a musket. She then made for the land at the point of to the human constitution. Much of the cli- this Island and ran on shore. About 60 or 70 men fled matic disrepute of the future Capital of to the mountains and each man taking with him a bundle and 2 swords, they threw 3 Large Guns into the Anglo-China has been referable to circum- Sea near the shore, they may all be recovered, they had stances as wholly unconnected therewith swords and spears and matchlocks and ammunition in as the above. A little practical investigation, abundance. We could recognise none of the Pirates, will satisfy the unprejudiced that for a city, a more salubrious site could hardly have conclusively demonstrate this to the satis- faction of all interested in our Island.

we should have been taken but for the schooners ar

put in office, 2, those who had been long employed, rival. I do not remember ever seeing the prisoner been selected. Our vital statistics will soon

3, those who had left the Province being either expelled or had left to take office elsewhere and 4, those who had died.

REBELLION. Some of the wild tribes north of ze Chuen Province were excited to rebellion by Certain "foreign barbarians" dwelling on the Chi- nese frontiers. Being urged to throw off the Chi- nese yoke they arose and committed great depre- dations. The Gazette states that an imperial force was despatched to the said region, and after putting

"Chak wan" before.

Jose Antonio owner of Lorcha No 35 nearly corro- borates the above in almost every particular does not know that the Prisoner was one of the Pirates but saw him running and saw the French gentleman take him prisoner.

"Acheoo" a butcher of Hongkong Bazaar, states the Prisoner Chakwan is my partner, he left the Bazaar yesterday to sell opium at West point Barrack's he is a good man I will be his security for 100 I have known him more than 1 month.

UPON reference to a good native map we find the relative position of Keangsoo and Ganhwuy to be rather north east and south west instead of north and south. The provincial Treasury to which the Gazettes most likely refer is at Keangning (Nan-

king).

66

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

TEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE. HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JULY, 11TH. 1842.

We would urge on the holders of the Opium Scrip, to lose no fair opportunity of pressing on the attention of Parliament and The country, the justice of their claims. By opportune petitions well timed remon- strances and incidental discussions the just rights of the claimants should he kept from ever becoming dormant or forgotten. In the attainment of the desired object the sufferers, to succeed, must adopt O'Connells advice and agitate, agitate, agitate. It is believed payment will be made when the War is onded-many would addi. c. when the Greek calends arrive.

Is saying public justice, sound policy and political expediency, alike demand an early reimbursement of these claims we only reiterate our previously expressed opinions and the general conviction thereanent.

We are disposed to think a beginning ought to be made, and we would recom- mend some such plan as this for early adop- tion Assuming the value of the surrendered Opium to be £2,000,000, (if interest be added, this amount would be exceeded,) we would say, permit this Opium Scrip to be receivable by the Government here for the purchase or rent of public lands in our Colony. Moreover, as Sir Robert Peel cannot fail to have a Surplus revenue of at least half a million, (should he carry his project) what could be fairer than to allo- cate the whole or part of this surplus in liquidation of the Opium Claims. It might be readily done somewhat after this fashion. Let the Home Government permit a ten per Cent of the duties payable on China Pro- duce, to be receivable in Opium Scrip. Then something like a proper Marketable value would be given the Opium certifi- cates, which would be transferable, and in some four or five years hence, the claims would be wholly extinguished. A ten per Cent on China-produce duties, would last year have amounted to fully £360,000. If some such plan as this were sanctioned by Parliament, we think it would produce much more contentment to the interested, than the most positive assurance by Gov- ernment of exacting full payment from the Chinese at the conclusion of the War. Carrying into effect the arrangement sug- gested, does not preclude, nor bar the claim, as against the Celestial Empire. But hereafter, it may comport with British pol- icy and our supposed interest to waive the prosecution of this claim, in that case, (by our plan being realised.) no political injus tice, no social wrong would be inflicted.

nancial statement, but as the deficit was nancial statement, but as the deficit was nearly £2,000,000 last year; what with the Affghan outbreak, threatened invasion of Tharawaddy, and other unlooked for items of expense, we are sure not much less, per- haps more, will be the actual deficit. We were very glad to see Sir Robert Peel in his Budget speech touched on the question of Indian finances and their connexion with English credit. Still he hardly did enough, for he treated only incidentally on the col- lateral and indirect effects on English cre- dit, of disorder in the Indian finances. He ought to have made a frank avowal of the direct and immediate connexion be- tween the finances of India and those of Great Britain. No time so fitting as when he was making what he called "a full and unreserved disclosure of our financial con- dition" It is notorious that John Bull was pledged (at the expiry of the East India Company's last charter) to make good, if required, the dividends on East India Stock. If therefore the finances of India were so dilapidated, that remittanees could not be made, the English exchequer is bound. and would immediately repair them. John Bull is little aware how near such a catastrophe was taking place. All thanks to Lord Aucklands Russo-phobia. How much might the aspect of India have been changed for the better had Lord William Bentinck been destined to continue his rule to this day?

Since if India cannot, England must pay the Stock holders, would it not be much better to raise any moncy required for India in London? Where it could be obtained so much cheaper, seeing also, there they have so direct an interest in the matter. We understand the new Indian 5 per cent Loan is filling up very slowly at Calcutta, mention is even made that a 6 per cent Loan will be necessary, whilst in London the money would be obtai- nable at perhaps 3, certainly not more than 3 or 4 per cent. As a rule the London market should be uniformly tried. Millions upon millions have been wholly lost by investments in Foreign and Ameri- can Securities which might have been safe- ly laid ont in Colonial and Indian stocks for local improvements and peaceful en- terprises. It will surprise some of our En- glish readers to know, that it is at no very distant period since the Indian Government was constrained to take up money at 10 per cent!

WHETHER the plan suggested by "Dulce" will be adopted, we know not. At home such an op-- portunity of taking an honest advantage of an act of Parliament would be immediately seized. Hint intereses from the magnitude of their operations would not avail themselves of such to them, small and unimportant advantages. It was we think the Prince Pückler Muskau, who said the only after dinner desert ordinarily Charles X records that in his travels in England taiment, was dry biscuits. An ex-minister of he has in a like predicament sometimes encoun- tered an Orange. There is some truth in these remarks, as unless ordered Boniface rarely shines in a desert which in England, is deemed by many perly ruled to be not an unimportant part of the a Surplusage whilst on the Continent, it is pro- dinner. An agreeable and pleasant article for desert, can now it seems be cheaply, and no doubt will be regularly furnished to the folks at home. Hence we hold the poverty of the people's after dinner accompaniments, is in a fair way of being removed, If the duty on Oranges (nearly 100 per lar, at least, amongst the juvenile portion of the cent) is also removed Peel ought to be very popu Queen's lieges,

SOME little experience in political mat- ters warrants us in saying to secure public attention at home to any question not of party interest or association, it is indispen-brought on the table of an English house of enter- sably necessary to have in the Metropolis a paid agent. The same should be so ap- pointed, as to be the true representative of the parties interested. We may add, as the delegate of such body, an agent will at all times be received by the Minister with far more respectful attention, than any mere Member of Parliament or aspirant for Colonial or local popularity. We have known audiences granted willingly to such agents by ministers, who at the same time as far as possible shirked interviews with dil- letante lords and lordlings who may have condescended to take up a question-very graciously bent on seeing (according to their phraseology) what was to be done in the matter.

In the year ending the 5th May 1836 there was a surplus on the Indian Revenue of £1,530,000. In the present year at the same time there must be a deficit of at least £3,000,000. We have not yet seen the fi-

WE have inserted the letter of S. H. and (with all respect to our esteemed correspon- dent) we would say, however valuable may be the commercial information of his com- munications unless he permits us to extract and apply the same ad libitum we shall in future, should he adopt a similar tone, be compelled to refuse them admission into our

Columns. The subject under discussion being of some interest we have inserted his present communication, but we hope he will, in all future contributions, avoid a tone of animadversion which, whether justified or not, we will never consent to adopt or imitate. S. H. truly says the remarks of our Macao contemporary are more our affair than his, thinking so, we wished he would have confined himself to a mere statement of facts and they would have been suffi- ciently interesting without spicing them by attributing improper motives and indulging in personalities as he has done. This is all very facile to the writer but is it not a gross insult to the reader? who looks for other and better fare than such garbage as Editorial squabbles-mere Eatonswill con- troversies.

from Hongkong will be admissible at the Colonial A correspondent asks us whether Cassia, shipped duty of Id. per lb, instead of the Foreign rate 3d per lb? We have not yet received a copy of the Act but our impression is that to obtain admission at the lower duty it must besides being Shipped from, be also the Produce of a British possession. obvious tenour of the Statute be admissible at Id Cassia sent from hence would not we think by the per lb. We hope some of our friends will try the experiment, it can be done without risk of loss. Becanse under the old system Cassia if shipped from a Foreign Port, paid 1s per lb, and if from a British Port (although not produced there) only 6d will be continued, we should say on the contrary; is no good reason for believing a similar absurdity no bad evidence of its probable abolition under the revised System.

ONE good effect of the discussions on the Tar- iff is, that it will set the National mind a-thinking, of the financial expediency of abolishing all indi- and pave the way hereafter for the consideration rect taxation. As yet the public mind is not suf- ficiently well informed, to take up this most im- portant question. To many the practicability of keeping faith with the public creditor, and at the Excise duties and Assessed taxes, would appear same time abolishing all import or export Customs, absurd or utopian. Still it is not the lesst rue that this could be done. The levy of a very small annual per centage on property of all kinds would suffice to defray the national expenditure. Some statisticians affirm that one half per cent would be owned by British subjects, in our Colonies and for- adequate. If we could include the property eign parts we believe this would be nearly suffi- ccent. Assuming however, one per cent to be re- quired-how few are there who would not be large gainers by such an Assessment!

WE should then "eat our food, wear our clothes and enjoy our luxuries free from all cost, charge or impost beyond the market price of the commod- ities we purchase." England for necessaries and luxuries, would become the cheapest country in the World. Thousands of our countrymen who from motives of economy are now domiciled abroad would then most joyfully return to their native land. Let any of our friends who have kept house, at home, take a Tariff, look to the duties on the arti cres of domestic consumption, (Not forgetting the profit of the retailer on the duties) he will soon see how much he would be a gainer by the pro- posed change. How much more considerably our long suffering operatives would gain, who can tell? The flood tide of prosperity which would pour in effected) is quite startling to contemplate. The on our beloved country (could this change be social and moral effects thereof on modern civ- ilization, who dare prognosticate?

TURNING to China would not the adoption of this policy soon double our trade in this quarter? than a double consumption would take place. So If in England Tea was withut Duty, much more of Sugar and many other articles, Philosophers have yet to learn the moral influence-Statesmen have yet to appreciate the political importance- and Financiers to calculate-the magic value of full belly.

a

ARRIVALS AT ST. HELENA FROM CHINA. 4 March Stork sailed 7th John 6 Gaunt

ON

19

39

13

33

20

21

39

31

19

Posthumous

31

Ellen

Gondolier

Elephanta

A. Baring

Thos. Sparks

5

8

7

23

THE latter vessel reported the destruction by Fire of the brig Georgia of Newcastle, Walter Thomas Sparks had on board the first and second Mitchell, Master, from Calcutta to London. The Mates and eight Seaman of the Georgia.

nes

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

ORIGINAL CORRESPONDENCE ing himself for a time in pulling his little boat

H. M. Ship Vindictive, at Hong Kong, Friday, 8th July, 1842.

Yours, &c.

To the Editor of the FRIEND OF CHINA,

W. D. Macao 9th July 1842.

IN to days Press there

67

As I am talking about Sugar will not the low duties on colonial preserves affect in some measure the home consumption of raw Sugar? I see preserved Ginger is admissible at 1d per pound duty if the produce of and from a British possession. Now what is to prevent any Hong-kongian under this statute (when it is law) from buying Ginger (for it is a product of our Island) packing it in Barrels with a very strong syrup of Sug- Channel Islands, have heen sending in lozenges which ar. By one of your papers, I see the folks of the (being admissible at a lower duty than raw Sugar), enabled them by reconverting the lozenges, to save at least 10s per hundred weight on the duty. I make be sold in London with a good profit at actually less per pound than the duty (4d per lb.) payable on raw Sugar. And for confectionary purposes, the Syrup (although flavoured with Ginger) would be reconverti- ble and saleable in quantity, at least thirty to forty per cent under the article now extensively in use, made from lump or refined Sugar.

very great discriminating duties on Foreign Sugar, with his own hands about the river and canals of Ban- was a reference to the connexion subsisting therewith kok, for the purpose of selling pork from house to house and the Slave trade. Unembarrassed by this question by the single catty. Besides the sum paid to the king, he said he should have felt it his duty to have proposed To the Editor of the he is expected to make a present of a catty of silver a considerable alteration on this subject. He added FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONG KONG GAZETTE. (eighty ticals) to cach of the princes, and smaller sums "I cannot consent, neither can those with whom I have SIR, to several of the nobles, according to their rank. When the honour to act, acquiesce in any arrangement the HAVING just seen in your paper of yesterday, a state- we add these several sums to the eighteen peculs paid effect of which would be to permit the import of the ment relative to an affray with two Pirate Vessels having to His Majesty, and to the sum of this add the expense Sugars of Brazil and Cuba and act as an encourage- taken place on Sunday, the 3rd instant," in sight of the of materials and making, and then reflect that it is sold ment of the Slave Trade." This to my mind is unmit- fleet." thereby evidently meaning to throw censure on the for a fuang a pint, or about thirty cents per gallon, we igated Cant and I hesitate not to say so, although officers in command of Her Majesty's Ships at this an- may form some conjecture of the amount consumed and I have always held as detestable the assumed right of chorage for not aiding the Paradox Schooner in the its probable consequences upon the habits and welfare of man to hold as property his brother man. But what capture of these Pirates, and which censure your leading the people. It may have occurred to the mind of the scruples have we ever had in using Slave grown Cotton remark confirms. reader that this suppression of the opium traffic, has or Tobacco? After the sickening verbiage of last In the absence of Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Cochrane, rather the appearance of a commercial transaction ex- session Sir Robert felt it no doubt necessary, to do thus who is at Macao, I find it my duty as the Senior Officer changing a contraband article of foreign growth for one much homage to the Tory pseudo-philanthrophy which, at this port, to give a direct contradiction to the state of domestic manufacture yielding no little income to the as unqualified humbug he must have in his heart des- ment that has been made, as to the affray having taken treasury. pised. place in sight of her Majesty's ships; indeed, the account given of it in your paper must at once, as you will, I 4th July, 1842. am sure admit, Sir, prove that this statement is so far incorrect, for it is represented that it was only when the Paradox rounded or was rounding the point near Green Island. that the two pirate boats were seen close in shore; hence, it must be manifest that these boats could not have been observed from any of Her Majesty's is a very amusing article, in which an extract from Ships at this anchorage, the LAND being between the thereof to be "a specimen of commerical speculation your paper which is deemed by the sapient Editor ships and them. In truth it was not until I saw your of which the data on which it is founded are altogether paper that I knew any thing of the transaction, nor do I think that Sir Thomas Cochrane was aware of it when erroneous!" Can you survive after such a remark? he left this place, on Monday last, the 4th instant. Of How far he was justified in saying this, you will soon this, I am positive, Sir, that had the attack you describe see. But I must premise, till the learned Editor's out, that on a large Scale this Preserved Ginger could been seen from either of Her Majesty's Ships on Sunday remarks of this day appeared, I really thought Formo- last, the Rear Admiral would have hastened to have sent sa was part and parcel of China. It however seems the boats of the squadron to have aided in the capture I was wrong for who dare deny that the Critic whom I of the Pirate Vessels, for I well know it is his earnest am now criticising is as unrivalled in geographical desire, as it must be mine, and that of every officer on knowledge as he is in commercial information? China cannot as he of the Press makes out be a the station, to put down piracy in every form, and above all, to protect the lives and properties of the subjects of Sugar exporting country-because forsooth it imports Her Majesty whenever and wherever it may be put to which consumes, it is said one fifth of all the sugar largely, admirable logic! Why during 1839, England produced in the whole world, yet managed to export Raw and Refined Sugar to the amount £1,500,000 sterling. Does not England import Sugar? Then Hongkong, 9 July, 1842. the Gazetted Average price in Bond of Muscovado Sugar has during the last Seven years been taken all makes out that the Soft Sugar of China cannot be im- ported into London under 44d per lb: or 42s per Cwt. I confess I think your statement of 2d per lb too low, certainly at 3d it could be regularly delivered in Bond including all expenses. It is highly probable if no impediments, or duties on Export hence were imposed, it might be laid down at less. The Press says the cost of Chinese soft sugar averages 6 to 8 dollars per picul. The Macao and Canton Price Current of the 5th July quotes it 4 to 7 dollars a picul that is 1d to 3d per lb here. Add for freight, Insurance. Commis- sion and loss of weight (and it is quite ample) Id per 1b, so that at present high rates the Press statement is quite erroneons. If I tell you that Sugars have been bought within the last six months in China considera. bly under 3 dollars a picul this is a fact I know; you will then admit the Press ought to get some friend to veriby its interested mercantile statements, before it prints them and especially when its Editor presumes to dogmatise thereon.

nese

hazard.

I am,

Sir,

Your very humble Servant, J. TOUP NICHOLAS,

marks in your columns. Hoping you will find admission for these hasty re- I remain

Your obedient servant, DULCE,

Captain, and senior officer at Hong Kong together above 40s. per Ct. The "Press" yet the 28th May, by which means we learn that the

OPIUM IN SIAM.

article.

OUR commercial advices from Calcutta reach to 4th Opium sale of the season took place on the 23rd of that month.

Patna

The following is the result. Chests. Highest Lowest Ave. 1,555 860 825 840,121 900 810 800 803,22 The Water Witch has on board about 500; the Benares Victoria 300; the Clown 180 chests; and the re- mainder of the Opium will probably be shipped in the John Brightman, Mermaid, Bengal Packet, Cowasjee Family, Framjee Cowsajee, and Weraaff, which are bound for the Straits and China. The Calcutta Market is represented as holding very little encouragement for the Shipment of Straits produce.

Freights to England, £2 10 a 3 per ton. Ditto to China, $2 per bale of cotton. Exchange on England, 2s 14d.

DEAR SIR, Opium in Siam has long been a contraband article, still it has been illegally introduced into the country being brought from China in Junks and from Bombay and Singapore in Arab and English ships. The con- sumers are chiefly Chinese, though many of the Siamese, including some of the nobility, use it. In 1839 the consumption of the article had become so extensive as to awaken the fears of His Majesty, when he issued an edict threatening imprisonment and a confiscation of property to all who persevered in the trade or use of it, To some of his subjects who had long been addicted to the habit, he granted favor by allowing a restricted quantity daily until they might be able to discontinue the practice altogether. This edict was printed at Bankok, and circulated throughout the different parts of the kingdom. As the result, about five hundred chests of As a commercial man I thank you for your exer- THE STORM AT CULCUTTA-By the Water Witch wo opium were deposited at the King's palace, many tions to obtain Justice for China. You are quite right were kindly favored by Captain REYNELL with the En- thousands of Chinese lodged in prison, and much op. pression and extortion was practised by the petty officers. in urging the equalisation of the Sugar duties, despite glishman of the 4th and 6th instant, from which we are Notwithstanding the severe measures and apparently what the Press says, China is and will continue to be, enabled to lay before our readers very full particulars of sincere intentions of His Majesty to put an end to a traf- a Sugar exporting Country. The refined Sugars of one of the most awful storms we have seen recorded in fic which was taking large sums of money from the China if properly laid down would have (during late India, that occurred in Calcutta, beginning in the middle country without returning an equivalent to his own years) paid to have sent to London for re-exportation to of the night of the 3rd instant, and ceasing on Sunday the private coffers. still he is obliged to content himself with the British Sugar Colonies!!! What think you of 5th and we regret indeed to find that destruction of life and a reduction instead of a removal of the evil, and in some that fact, Mr. Editor. I say nothing of the Consump- property has been so fearfully extensive as is represented ses the innocent have pined in filthy neigsons and theirtion of English refined sugar on the Continent of Eu. by our contemporary. Though the damage on shore was usefully compared with insertensive as could well be no description of property, families suffered in poverty, while the guilty have when tight roamed at liberty and harped upon the oppression of the deed superseded in many instances by the Chinese having escaped uninjured either wholly or in part, espi- cially among the native population, we grieve to say government. Seizures continue to the present time, that the loss of shipping in the river was if possible still and the prisions are sometimes vacated for new occupants greater. There are no less than forty Vessels that have while the old ones are sent to the wars. run foul of each other, and thus injured themselves irre- mediably, whilst there are many others that have been driven ashore complete wrecks, Such an extensive damage among shipping we do not remember to have heard of-and the loses consequent thereon to owners and Insurance Offices must we fear, be proportionably great. The small craft also suffered very materially, and the boat-men have either entirely lost their boats or found them shattered to piccies-they are it appears also great sufferers, many of them having lost all their goods and chattles. Besides the Vessels mentioned as lost, two I have been much interested in your remarks on the iron Steamers are also said to have gone down. But new Tariff of Sir Robert Peel. However much you among the most lamentable of the occurrences, we re- may have expected I certainly did not look for so good gret to notice the loss of the Globe and the Symmetry, a measure to be brought in by him. With the com- both of which went down off Kedgeree, with all but manding majority of Sir Robert Peel you seem to five persons who were saved-and a Budgerow which was swamped, in which were found four dead bodies two of think the new Tariff as a thing settled. Composed as the house of Commons is, of such discordant materials, which were those of Ladies. The disasters and acci- and as so many interests are affected I think you are dents already known, are we apprehend but a tithe of reckoning without your host till we know the Tariff the actual facts, for at the dates of our accounts the has actually passed. Good as is the proposition, yet it whole extent of the mischief remaned still to be ascer- has many faults which must strike every one: no doubt tained.-Singapore Free Press. they will be amended. I would instance, the duty on The Copeland, Syms from Liverpool to China, was the export of Coals, which will amounted to nearly 100 per cent on the first cost. The imposition of this drifted on the Stroom Rock, in the Straits of Sunda, duty will much diminish the employment of our people, about the 26th of June, and would have sunk in whilst it will much encourage the Collieries of Bel. deep water but for the fortunate appearance of the gium and France. Then as to the non-alteration of Peruvian, from which vessel assistance was render- the Sugar duties, docile as is the house, will not the ed and the Copeland towed on to the Island of pressure from without act on it? The only plea Sir Thwart-the-way. It is supposed she will become a Robert Peel could proffer, for the non-abolition of the total loss.

dation

was

But while the use of opium has been much reduced, that of intoxicating drink has been greatly increased. Whereas seven years ago a drunkard was regarded by a Siamese with feelings of the great abhorrence, and none among them were seen intoxicated, now it has become a matter of daily occurrence, and the dignity of rank and the sanctity of the priesthood are too often involved in the degradation consequent upon this vice. But the national evils and personal ruin entailed upon this people by intemperance, are not to be wholly credited to the suppression of the opium trade, but while they have to a certain extent thus exchanged one evil for another, the example of many who visit them from christian countries renders them to a great extent, accountable for the consequences resulting from the intemperance of the land. We are supported in this conclusion by the fact that among the pilots, and others coming in contact with foreign visitors, we find some of the first victims to intemperance among the Siamese. Some idea may be formed concerning the extent of intemperance in the land, by bearing in mind that His Majesty receives annually from the spirit farm eighteen peculs of silver, equivalent to one hundred and ninety-one thousand, five hundred and twenty ticals, or about one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars. This is merely for the privilege of making ardent spirits in the capital and vicinity, not including the towns and villages in the ountry, and not including the expense of materials and bor in the manufacture. This sum is paid by a naman who went from China when about twenty ars of age, and commenced in poverty, employ-

I might go on, but I fear you will not find room for my letter, if I should go more into detail-therefore, do not remark, but I hope you will on the silly flippan cy nor on the self satisfied, conceited tone of the re- marks in que'stion, which after all is perhaps your I remain affair, rather than mine. YOURS &c. &c S. H.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

TO THE EDITOR OF SIR,

68

THE FRIEND OF CHINA AND HONGKONG GAZETTE.

160

180

06

91,621 24,519 621,640 1,472,344 584,123 135,452 15.507 467,626 2,631,772 160,141 148,605 32,603 329,015 32,845 53,259 167,310 18,509 7,968 82,833 14,480 1,679,079 294,717 464,507 106,993 398,753 12,623 11,170 45.623 11,131 313 3,652,395 103,792 135,091 45,934 14,695 98,354 62.011 190,246 65,412 73.690 5,121,532 27,091 484,990 704,449 3,004,240 136,144 488,968 1,461,514 4,555,016 2,753,650

71,682 40,419 492,741 1,954,255 476

51,260 995,192 4,647,587

534.999 659,288 5,438.979 407,863 4,962,899 50,009 317,447 407.8 40,354 29,832 745,496 3.749,736 50,924 27,402 380,280 3,133,931 15,662 170,320 3,716 19,7:8 117,224 76,350 37,279 110.954 61,770 1,008,858 1.713.307 5,121 299,818 192,379 1,694.925 3,167,269 194,032 129,915 994,311 3.626,083 186,404 81,139 1,532,513 3,211,592

1,810,436 1,209,065 327,749 3,605,305 1,149,406 687,907

30,225 15,316

87,915 24,128 295,819 584,561

Total Green. 8,789,954

Total Export, Lbs. 36.799,905 Total 1326

SILK.

TEA.

Campoi Hung- Pekoe.

Orange Sorts. Pekoe.

Black.

Hyson YgHyson Skin. Twankay Gunpr.

Impl.

Green.

Total.

Bales.

September November December October August July

6,405 97,897

11,461 37.257

2868

February January March

5,534 78.440 20,847 1,373 2,189.428 16,894 98.642 16,537 61,210 137,669 111,392 4228 110,322 4,623,978 45,306 129,620 43,810 38,843 85,083 44,570 3718 357,411 3,927,007

April

May

June

2,903.649 5,819 54,800 2,562,768 22,861 36,536 390,947 11,966 9.093 3,401,971 12,212 15,747 1,098,219 114,205 38,773

411 457 450 33,180 37,977 51,031 8,848 9,842 25,491 20.028 53,265

81,196

Total Black. 28,009,950 29,300 982,308 24,498,061 245,784 635,940 80,540 270,124 530,155 755,636 11,402||

Do. to Liverpool Export to London

Total. Green. 21,726,461 1,017,688 29,744,149 3,423,170 622,299 4,045,469 Black.

Do

to Cork

Do.

to Scotland.

Statement of the Export of Tea and Silk to the United Kingdom, Commencing 1st July, 1841, Ending 30th June, 1842.

Month Tons. Bohea. Congou. Caper. Souchg- &anhoi. muey.

416,268 6,974 3,901 2902 433,073 1,093,027 5,844 37,783 600,057 2546 39,957 1,290.742 3,703 89,224 492 41,545 1380

NOTICE.

MR. DUTRONQUOY of the LONDON HOTEL,

SINGAPORE, in opening an establishment under the same name at Hongkong begs respectfully to inform his friends and the Public that he will adopt here the same system which has already secured him the kind patronage of the Public at Singa-

pore.

MR. DUTRONQUOY also begs to inform the Public, Captains of Ships and Passengers, that he supplies Stores, Wines, &c. &c. &c., at the shortest notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE. OWING to the extreme inclemency of the weather the intended services of the Queen's Road Baptist Chapel have been postponed until next Lord's day the 17th instant 11 A. M.

991,790 26,472 1,895,001 123,496 2,018,497 28,009,950 8,768,955|36,799,905 965,318

8888

PUBLIC AUCTION.

THERE well be sold by Public Auction on Mon- day the 18th July, at 10 A. M. by C. Markwick.

At the godowns of N. Duus No. 18 Queens Road. in Hogd. Cordail, old Jamaica Rum, Irish Pork Beer, Bescuits, Manilla Rum, and English Brandy, Flour and Lisbon wine in Barrel, Manilla Segars Tobaco brown soap Raisons, Cheese Candles, Soda water, Salt Salmon, Also English & Russian Canvass and Dutch Java Coffee, Ghee, Manilla and Deals Rattans and Sapan wood-Java Teak wood, Europe Rope Spunyarns,-Singapore and Rega Crates of empty bottles and Corks, &c. &c.

Terms cash on delivery. FOR SALE. FINE old Lisbon wine In wood and bottles Pine Cheese

FOR SALE

BY AUCTION.

A CABRIOLET, quite new, just landed, the harness for a single horse: also two saddles with bridles, and sundry other articles.

At the London Hotel, Queen's Road, on Friday next, the 15th instant, at 12 o'clock, precisely. TERMS, present Cash.

HONGKONG,

12th July, 1842.}

FOR SALE-At the Godowns of the under- signed, Queen's Road:

Chain Cables, Anchors, Europe Coir, & Manilla, Rope, Tar, Pitch, Paints, Oil, & Turpentine, Can- vass, Twine, Marline, Hawsing, Hawsers, Europe and Coir, Blocks, Hooes, & Thimbles, Oars, Beef

& Pork, Bread, Brandy, Gin, Wines, Beer, & Porter, Marryatt's Code of Signals, Saddlery, Pickles, Sauces & Paint, Candles, Wax and Sperm, Soap, Door and Pad-Locks.

And every other Article in the Ship Chandlery, and Grocery line. P. TOWNSEND, & Co. HONGKONG, JUNE, 28, 1842.

FOR SALE-At 46 Queen's Road.-Singapore Plank, Coals, Provisions, Sherry, Wine Bran- dy, &c., &., &c. C. V. GILLESPIE. HONGKONG 5th JULY 1842.

mises to

NOTICE-Goods and Merchandize of all de- scriptions, received and carefully stored, in spacious, dry and secure Brick Godowns, at Hong- kong upon moderate terms; apply upon the Pre- N. DUUS, or C. FEARON.-Macao Goods are received and sold on Commission. HONGKONG 31st MARCH, 1842.

FOR SALE-A Large Quantity of Singapore Beams, Planks, 100 Cases very Superior Sherry in Pints, and Quarts, 400 Kegs of White

Lead.

J. F. HIGHT.

Apply to at the Godowns of H. PYBUS HONGKONG, 28th JUNE, 1842.

ON SALE. NAIL Rod Iron Calcutta Bottled Beer, in Cases of 6 doz. Navy and Pilot Bread American Flour. Apply to Hongkong 13 June, 1842.

Wm. T. Kinsley.

FOR SALE.

ON Board the Barque Chusan-Best Maldive Coir Rope-Moonghy Rice, Canvas, Twine, White, Green and Black Paint, Lisbon and Tinto Wine in Casks, also Teak Beams and Sheathing Planks and Singappre Plank. Apply on Board HONGKONG 18TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE. MADEIRA Wine in Pipes, Hogsheads and Quarter Casks, from the well known House of KIERS & Co. Apply to DENT & Co. at Macao. MACAO 20TH APRIL 1842.

FOR SALE.

Aune office of the Friend of China, PORTFOLIO CHINENSIS or a collection of authentic Chin ese State Papers illustrative of the history of the present position of affairs in China, with a translation, notes and introduction. By J. LEWIS SHUCK. Price, 4 Rupees a-copy. HONGKONG, 29th June, 1842.

Shipping Intelligence.

July 7 Hope

ARRIVED.

J. Barrett

.. Panther, Amer.

Wm. Martin

H. J. Gay

Kellock

G. Burrell

8 Sylph "Rappa

11 Arun

"Gulnare

Cecilia

Macao.

E. H. Willoughby Liverpool.

Sydney. 12 H. M. S. Wolverene J. S. Johnson R. N. England H. M. S. Cruizer Pearce R: N. Macao

21

37

Raymond

» Ariel

H. M. S. Young Hebe Lieut Need R. N. H. Mc Kay

Frazer

London. Namoa.

Helles

.

Strachan SAILED.

July 9 Sylph

13 Ariel

37

Devil

A. L. DE ENCARNAÇAO.

Manilla Segars No. 4. Apply to

No. 18 Queen's Road.

East Coast. Macao.

William Pedder Harbor Master.

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE PRINTING OFFICE, QUEEN'S ROAD, HONGKONG.

N. 18. VOL. 1.

THE FRIEND OF CHINA,

AND LONGB LONGBONG

NOTIFICATION.

By order,

GAZETTE

PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY MORNING.

HONGKONG, THURSDAY, JULY 21ST. 1842.

THE following is a translation of a Proc- lamation which has been posted on the walls about Hongkong for the past two or three weeks.

Price 1 monthly Or 12 yearly

The Chief Magistrate proceeded to Jardine and Matheson's Godowns, to examine the wounded Chinese who was unable to speak.

"Assam," of the hamlet of Ham Shooee, near Mr. Burn's ground states:-Last night my brother, named Assu," was wounded whilst asleep outside of the house. There was nearly 20 persons there, we awoke on hearing some firing and perceived 7 or 8 black men, as my bro. ther rose from his sleep he was shot down. We did not see or hear of any boat, or decoits, or pirates. The black men immediately ran away

THE publication of the Hongkong Ga- zette under the authority of Government, CAINE, a Military officer of the great English will be discontinued from this date: but all Nation, and charged with the Magisterial autho- public orders and notifications appearing in rity of the regions of Hongkong, clearly makes The Friend of China and Hongkong Ga- known his commands. It appears that recently there have been many lawless characters who in zette," with the signatures of duly autho-buying and selling have mixed up counterfeit cash rized Functionaries of the Government are (with the genuine) which is cause for severest still to be considered as official. wrath. Now therefore, this explicit proclamation is issued for the full information of Merchants and others engaged in trade, and whosoever here- after may be found making use of counterfeit Cash or shall give them in exchange (for other money) shall be immediately siezed and punished The established price of Cash is twelve hundred for every dollar, and there must be neither more nor less in order that justice and equity may be mani-comprador to take care of the ground; I have never seen fested. Let each implicitly obey, and let there a pirate. There is a passage boat pulling 2 or 3 oars about 30 feet long, able to contain 50 men and called the be no opposition. Special edict. "Hongkong Loo" Ferry boat, comes every day to Mr. TAOUKWANG, 22nd year 5th moon 21st day. Burn's ground and remain from 8 in the morning until 4 in the evening I never heard of any ill feeling toward Jardine & Matheson.

J. Robt: Morrison, Acting Secretary and Treasurer. Hongkong, March, 23rd. 1842.

SELECTIONS FROM THE PEKING GAZETTES.

TEEN TSIN. The Emperor lays before the Board of public works a spirited memorial from the Lieut. Governor of Chihle Province, Nit e king, on the importance of increasing the extent of Officer's quarters and soldier's barracks at Teen tsin at the mouth of the Peiho.

POLICE.

BEFORE THE CHIEF MAGISTRATE

On the 28th June. Took Quai, a Chinese, was charged with robbery on the high seas.

THIBET. Ming po, the Superintendent of Tri- Achoo deposes. Three months ago, my boat laden butes, represented to the Emperor that this was the with property was attacked by Pirates in the Kap sin year for the Grand Lama of Thibet to send the customary triennial tribute. His Majesty replies moon, whilst coming to Hong Kong. The prisoner by ordering Ming po to transmit a despatch to Thi-was one of the pirates on board the pirate boat-we bet, stating to the Grand Lama that the imperial made no resistance there was no fighting-we lost all our property as well as the boat and ran to the shore. mind graciously consents to the omission of the Achoo fully corroborates the foregoing having been tribute this year owing to the great distance