Hongkong Directory 1922





Premiums Co nd (tions

K|

Modemte. , Liberal. |

STANDARD LIFE OFFIC

Claims Paid aver £37,430,000

MOTOR SPIRIT

■y-TTT.

t •r :

WILLIAM

MORRIS

AND COMPANY

(WESTMINSTER) LIMITED

 

ARE PREPARED TO SUBMIT

DESIGNS AND ESTIMATES FOR

STAINED GLASS WINDOWS,

BRONZE STATUES

AND TABLETS,

STONE AND MARBLE

WAR MEMORIALS

“MORRIS HOUSE”

ROCHESTER ROW, WESTMINSTER,

LONDON, S.W, 1, ENGLAND,

TN NO WAY CONNECTED WITH ANY OTHER HOUSE OF BUSINESS

KENYON’S

PATENT INTER-STRANDED

COTTON

DRIVING

ROPE

for MAIN

DRIVES.

Rim, Scroll and

all classes of Bandrngrs.

Our Book on

Transmission of Power by Ropes"

on application.

William Kenyon & Sons,

CHAPEL FIELD WORKS,

DUKINFIELD, MANCHESTER (ENG.)

TELS.: KENYON. DUKINFIELD. A.B.C. CODE 5TH EDITION.

1

” ;

London Office: 95 97, FINSBURY PAVEMENT, E.C. 2.

Head Office:

Seattle, Washington

Hongkong Office:

Fourth Floor, Union Building

Phone. 2004

Cable Address: "NORTRACO.”

This Company imports all sorts of British,

European and American Steel Products, Copper,

Brass, Window Glass and Machinery. Buying

Offices are maintained in London, New York

Seattle and other American Points, and the

selection of goods and the forwarding of ship-

ments attended to with care and consideration

for our customers’ interests.

An Office is maintained in Shanghai which

offers the same facilities for North China.

THE

DIRECTORY & CHRONICLE

FOE

CHINA, JAPAN, COREA, INDO-CHINA,

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS, MALAY STATES,

SIAM, NETHERLANDS INDIA, BORNEO,

THE PHILIPPINES, &c.

WITH WHICH A EE INCOKPOEATED “THE CHINA DIEECTOEY” AND

“THE HONGKONG DTEECTOEY AND HONG LIST FOE THE FAE EAST”

FOR THE YEAR

THE HONGKONG DAILY PRESS, LTD.

10A, DES VCEUX EOAD, HONGKONG, AND 131, FLEET STBEET, LONDON, E.C. 4.

MDCCCCXXII.

A

AGENTS

LONDOX Mr. J. H. a. Marrow, 131, Fleet Street, E.C. 4

Do Mr. F. Algar, 58, Gracechurch Street, London, E.C. 3

Do Messrs. G. Street & Co., Ltd., 30, Cornhill, E.C.

PARIS Messrs. G. E. Fuel de Lobel & Cie., 53, Rue Lafayette

SOUTH AFRICA Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Long Street, Cape Town

SYDNEY Messrs. Gordon

MELBOURNE Messrs. Gordon tfc Gotch, 124 and 120, Queen Street

BRISBANE Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Queen Street

CALCUTTA Messrs. Thacker, Spink «k Co., 5 and 6, Government Place

BOMBAY “Times of India” Office

Do Messrs. Thacker

VLADIVOSTOCK Messrs. Sinkievitch, Bros.

TOKIO Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Ltd., Yokohama

YOKOHAMA Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Ltd., 60, Main Street

KOBE & OSAKA “Japan Chronicle” Office, Kobe

NAGASAKI .“ Nagasaki Press ’’ Office

FORMOSA ...Mr. A. W. Gillingham, Taipeh

SEOUL (COREA) “Seoul Press” Office, Seoul

DAIREN Mr. F. J. Bardens

TSINGTAU Messrs. CornaW, Eckford & Co.

PEKING

CHEFOO Messrs. Curtis, Brothers

SHANGHAI,

Do. Messrs. Brewer & Co.

H easr3

YA^GTSZE PORTS.. }^ - Kelly * Walsh, Ltd., Hankow

FOOCHOW Messrs. T. Brockett &. Co.

AMOY Messrs. Douglas, Lapraik & Co.

SWATOW Messrs. Jardine, Matheson

CANTON Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., Ltd., Shameen

MACAO Mr. A. A. de Mello

SAIGON Cie. de Commerce et de Nav. d’Extreme-Orient

TONKIN (HAIPHONG).. do.

BANGKOK “ Bangkok Times ” Office

SINGAPORE Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Ltd., 32, Raffles Place

* EST^ATEBED..^f} ^essrs- Kelly & Walsh, Singapore

MANILA Philippine Education Co.

BORNEO Mr. F. W. Pinnock, Sandakan

INDEX, DIRECTORY

Page Page*, P—Cont. Page

Alphabetical List of Japan ... ... 484 : Perak . 1290

Foreign Residents.. 1510 Johore... ... 1348 ; Perlis

Amoy 929 Philippine Islands .. . 1423

Annam 1142 K Port Arthur ... .. . 697

Kedah ... ...*1359

Annam Provinces .. 1144

Anping 574 Kelantan ... 1354 i

Quinhon

Q

695 Keelung ... 570

Antung ... 874 I

Kewkiang S

Kiaochau . . ... 717 ! Saigon 1152

Bangkok . 1174 Kirin ... 692 : Samshui 961

. 1385 Kobe-Hyogo ... 529 | Santuao 919

Batavia

Borneo... . 1472 Kongmoon Sarawak 1472

. 1489 Kouang-tcheou-wan.. 967 i Selangor 1308

Brunei...

Buitenzorg Kowloon Frontier .. 959 Semarang

Kuliang 922 Seoul ...

Kunsan 590 Shanghai 724

Cambodge Kyoto ... 528 ! Shasi 901

Canton... L Shimonoseki 549.

Cebn ... Labuan , 1487 Siam 1173

Changchun Lappa . 960 Singapore 1214

Changsha . 903 Lungchingtsun . 693 Soerabaja 1394

Chefoo ... , 705 Lungchow 973 Song-jin 593

Chemulpo . 585 Lungkow . 712 Soochow 86 3

China ... , 591 Steamers, Coasting .. 1501

Chinkiang , 865 M Straits Settlements .. 1213

Chinnampo , 5-9 Macao ... . 1095 Sumatra 1407

Chinwangtao . 677 Makassar . 1404 Swatow 936

Cholon... 1168 Malacca . 1280 979

Chosen... . 577 Malay States (Fed.) ... 1289

Chungking Malay States (Unfed.) 1347

Cochin China Manchurian Trade C. 683 Tainan... 574

Manila... Taipeh... 572

Masampo 589 Takao ... 574

Dairen... 699 Mengtsz 975 Taku ... 675

Daitotei 572 Moji ... 549 Tamsui... 570'

Mokpo ... 589 Tengyueh 978

Mukden 683 Tientsin

Eastern Siberia Tokyo ...

N Tonkin... . 1136

N agasaki 552 Tourane . 1144

Foochow Nanking 867 Trengganu . 1358

Formosa Nanning 966 Tsingtao . 717

Fusan ... Naval Squadron, Brit. 1491 Tsinanfu . 721

Naval Squadron, Jap. ir.ni

I Naval Squadron, U.S. 14963

Haiphong N egri Sem bilan 1333 | . 585

Hakodate Netherlands India ... 1364 j

Hangchow . 911 Newchwang 678 Vladivostock .

Hankow . 876 Nicolajewsk 480

Hanoi ... . 1112 Ningpo 915 Wei-hai-wei 713

Harbin... . 687 North Borneo, State of, 14-8 Wenchow 91&

Hoihow . 971 Wonsan 587

O

Hokow... . 977 Osaka ... Wuchow 964

Hongkong . 981 Wuhu ... 871

Hue . 1142 P

Hunchun . 694 Padang , 1403

Pahang . 1343 j Yochow 899

Pakhoi... 969 ! Yokohama 505

Ichang... . 905 Peiteiho 677 Yunnanfu 975

Iloilo ... . 1456 Peking... ' 619 |

Indo-China . 1110 Penang... . 1264 ! Zamboanga

A*

INDEX, DIRECTORY

Page Page Page

Alphabetical List China -Continued Japan 484

Alphabetical List of Southern Ports—Gont. Hakodate 521

Foreign Residents... 1510 Foochow Kobe-Hyogo 529

Hoihow Kyoto 528

Annam 1142 Kongmoon Moji 549

Nagasaki 552

Annam Provinces ... 1144 Kuliang 922

Osaka 523

Hu4 H42 Nanning

Shimonoseki 549

Quinhon 1145 Pakhoi... Tokyo 488

Tourane 1144 Samshui Yokohama 505

Santuao

Borneo 1472 Swatow ... ... 936

Brunei 1489 Wuchow 964 Macao

Labuan 1487 Yangtsze Ports Macao ... 1095

Sarawak ••• ••• 1472 Changsha 903

North Borneo, State of, 1478 Chinkiang ... 865 Malay States

Chungking ^Federated & Unfederated)

China 591 Hankow 876 Johore 1348

Central Ports Ichang 905 Kedah 1359

Hangchow 911 Kewkiang 874 Kelantan 1354

Nanking 887 Shasi ... Malay States (Fed.) ... 1289

Ningpo 915 Wuhu ... Malay States (Unfed.) 1.347

Shanghai 724 Yochow Negri Sembilan ... 1333

Soochow 863 Pahang 1343

Wenchow 918 Chosen (Corea) 577 Perak 1290

Frontier Ports Chemulpo 585 Perils 1362

Hokow 977 Chinnaiupo 589 Selangor 1308

Kouang-tcheou-wan... 967 Fusan ... 587 Trengganu 1358

Kowloon 959 Kunsan 590

Lappa 960 Masampo 589 Naval Squadrons

Lungchow 973 Mokpo ... 589 Naval Squadron, Brit. 1491

Mengtsz 97 > Seoul ... 580 Naval Squadron, Jap. 1502

Szemao 979 Song-jin 590 Naval Squadron, U.S. 1496

Tengyueh 978 Unsankinko 585

Yunuanfu 975 Wonsan 587 Netherlands India 1364

Northern Ports Batavia 1385

Antung ... ... 695 Cochin-China 1151 Buitenzorg 1386

Changchun Cam bodge 1167 Makasser 1404

Chefoo 705 Choi on H68 Padang ... 1403

Chinwangtao 677 Saigon 1152 Semarang 1399

Dairen 699 Soerabaja ... ... 1394

Harbin 687 Eastern Siberia 479 Sumatra 1407

Hunchun 694 Nicolajewsk 480

Kiaochau 717 Vladivostock 479 Philippine Islands 1423

Kirin 692

Lungchingtsun Formosa 568 Cebu 1459

c93

Lungkow 712 Anping Iloilo 1456

574 Manila 1436

Manchurian Trade C. 63 Daitotei ... 572 Zamboanga 1468

Mukden 683 Keelung 570

Newchwang ... 678 Tainan,Takao& Anping, 561 Siam 1173

Peiteiho 677 Taipeh... ... ... 572

Peking 619 Tamsui... 570 Bangkok 1174

Port Arthur 697

Taku 675 t-'ongkong 981 Steamers

Tientsin 642 Ladies’ List 1087 Steamers, Coasting ... 1504

Tsingtao 717 Peak Residents ... 1092

Tsinanfu 721 Straits Settlements

Wei hai-wei 713 Indo-China 1110 1213

Southern Ports Haiphong 1126 Malacca ... ... 1280

Amoy 929 Hanoi 1112 Penang 1264

Canton 941 Tonkin, Prov. da ... 1136 Singapore 1214

INDEX

TREATIES, CODES AND GENERAL

PA6*

Advertisers, Index to i Great Britain, Emigration Convention, 1904 57

Agents S^k of Title page Great Britain, Kowloon Extension, 1898 23

■Calendar and Chronology vi Great Britain, Nanking, 1842 3

Calendar, Anglo-Chinese v Great Britain, Opium Agreement, 1911 69

Chair and Boat Hire, Hongkong 402 Great Britain, Opium Convention, 1885 19

Chamber of Commerce, Scale of Commissions, Ac 472 Great Britain, Sup. Commercial Treaty with China 25

Chinese Festivals xviii Great Britain, Tibet-Sikkim Convention, 1890 .... 21

Chinese Passengers’ Act .‘{84 Great Britain, Tibet Convention 64

•Consortium Agreement, 1920 850 Great Britain, Tientsin, 1858 5

Court of Consuls at Shanghai, Rules of Procedure 860 Great Britain, Weihaiwei Convention, 1898 24

Customs Tariff, China, Exports 52 Japan, Commercial, Peking, 1890 131

Customs Tariff, China, Imports, Revised 1919 37 Japan, Protocol, New Ports, Peking, 1896 136

Customs Tariff, China, Rules, Exports 54 Japan, Regarding Manchuria, 1905 145

Customs Tariff, China, Rules, Imports 50 Japan, Regarding Shantung, 1915 147

Customs Tariff, Japan 178 Japan, Regarding, S. Manchuria and Mongo’ia, 1915,149

Customs Tariff, Korea 164 Japan, Shimon seki, 1895 128

Draft Customs Tariff I,aw (Japan) ’.71 Japan, Supplementary Treaty, 1903 137

Foreign Jurisdiction Act, 1890 277 Portugal, 1888 115

:

Harbour Regulations, Japan ',99 Portugal, 1904 123

Hongkong, Charter of the Colony Ii65 United States of America. Additional, 1866 101

Hongkong, Constitution of Councils •'•69 United States of America, Commercial, 1903 ... .108

Hongkong, Legislative Council, Rules of 878 United States of America, Immigration, 1894 106

Hongkong, Port Regulations 388 United States of America, Immigration A Comm. 103

Hongkong, Stock Exchange 474 United States of America, Tientsin, 1858 95

Hongkong Typhoon Signals and Stations 401 With Japan:—

Insurance, Japanese Ordinance 387 China, Agreement China-Korean Boundary, 1909, 239

Malay States Federation Agreement, 1896 267 China, Agreement Regarding Manchurian Ques-

Manila Invoice Charges 471 tions, 1909 241

Orders in Council (Amendment) China A Corea, 1907, 3’3 Great Brit: in, 1894 167

Orders in Council (Amendment) China & Corea, 1909, 327 Great Britain, Alliance, 1911 232

Orders in Council (Amendinent)China and Corea, 1910. .328 Great Britain, Commerce and Nav., 1911 218

Orders in Council (China Amendment), 1913 329 Great Britain, Estate of deceased persons, 1900 . .216

Orders in Council (China Amendment) 1914 336 Great Britain, Japan-IndiaCommercial, 1904 .. .217

Orders in Council, China (Amendment No. 2), 19.0 ..338 Korea, Treaty of Annexation, 1910 H9

Orders in Council, China (Amendment No. 3), 1910 . .338 Lansing-IshiiNote respecting China 231

Orders in Council (Companies) China, 1915 340 Russia, Convention 1910 239

Orders in Council (Companies) China Amendment, Russia, Railway Convention, 1907 236

19.9 . Russia, Relating to China 235

Orders in Council (Treaty of Peace) China, 1919 847 Russia, Treiaty of Peace, 1906 232

Orders in Council (War Powers) China, 1917 345 United States, 1886, Extradition Treaty 228

Orders in Council, H.B.M., China and Corea 283 United States, 1908, respecting the Pacific 250

Port Regulations for H.B.M. Consulates in China ... .395 With Korea:—

Postaee, Chinese 466 Great Britain, Trade Regulations 161

Postal Guide, Hongkong 417 • With Siam:—

Shanghai Mixed Court, Rules of the 861 France, 1904 256

Siam, Foreign Jurisdiction, 1909 251 France, 1907 258

Signals, Storm, Ac., Hongkong 401 Great Britain, 1866 242

Stamp Duties, Hongkmig, 1921 4 3 Great Britain, 1909 248

Statutory Rules and Order- (China and Corea), 1909 . .353 Great Britain, 1913, re Fugitive Criminals 263

Treaty Ports, etc 27J Great Britain, Registration of Subjects 247

Treaties:—With China:— Great Britain, Trade Regulations with 245

Final Protocol with Eleven Powers, 1901 151 Japan, 1898 262

France, Additional Convention, 1895 93 Russia, 1899 266

France, Convention, 1887 91 Great Britain and France, Siamese Frontier, 1896 . .266

France, Convention of Peace, 1860 72 Great Britain and Portugal, Opium, 1913 268

France, Pekin, I860 81 Great Britain and Russia, Railway Agreement, 1899. 62

France, Tientsin, 1885 83 Gt. Britain and Russia, Armngemeut concerning Tibet 64

France, Trade Reglns. for Tonkin Fiontier, 188s. 86 United States Cousular and Court Fees 362

•Germany, Peking, 1921 156 United States Consular Courts in China, Regulations . .364

Great Britain, Burma Convention, 1897 21 U ited States Court for China,, Jurisdiction 357

Great B'itain, Chefoo Convention, 1876 13 Washington Conference Resolutions, 1921 269

Great Britain, Chungking Agreement 1890 20 Weights and Measures, Money 475

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

PAGE PAGE

A.B.C. DIRECTORV

OF BRITISH MER- DRUGGISTS

CHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS ... xlii Ferris & Co., Ld., Bristol xli

BANKS EDGE TOOL MANUFACTURERS :—

Bank of Taiwan (Formosa)’ xxiv Geo. Thornton & Co., Ld., Birming-

Chartered Bank of India, Aus. and ham 1212A

China xxii Do. Hinge of cover

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank ... xxi Do. Back of cover

Hongkong Savings Bank xxvii

Mercantile Bank of India xxiii ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS :—

Sumitomo Bank, Osaka xxv Hongkong & W’poa. Dock Co., Ld. 1038C-D

Yokohama Specie Bank xxvi Mitsubishi Soko Kaisha, Kobe ... 1038F

Mitsubishi Zosen Kabushiki Kai-

BOOKSELLERS

Maruzen Co., Ld., Tokyo xxxvi W. K. & C. Peace, Sheffield ... Iviii

BREWERS :— Rapid Magnetting Machine Co.,

Dai Nippon Brewery Co., Japan... Ixiv Ld., Birmingham lx

J.

BRICK MANUFACTURERS Youngs, Birmingham lx

Kailan Mining Administration,

X GLASS MANUFACTURERS :—

Tientsin 1

S. & C. Bishop & Co., Lancashire... Ivii

CEMENT MANUFACTURERS :—

Indo-China Portland Cement Co., HARDWARE MANUFACTURERS :—

Ld xxxvii Youngs, Birmingham lx

CHRISTMAS CARDS, ETC.:— HOTELS :—

.Raphael Tuck & Sons, Inside back cover Hongkong Hotel 1736

Peak Hotel 1736’

COAL MERCHANTS

Peninsular Hotel 1736

Sun Man Woo Co., H’kong. ... xxxviii

Repulse Bay Hotel 1736

Kailan Mining Admin., Tientsin... xl

Do. Front cover INSURANCE, LIFE, FIRE AND MARINE

Kwong Sang & Co ... Ixiii Standard Life Front cover

Mitsubishi Shoji Kaisha xxxix

KNITTING COMPANY

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha ii-iii

Kam Hing Knitting Co., H’kong. xxvii

COTTON GOODS MANUFACTURERS :—

E. Spinner & Co., Manchester ... Ixi LIFTING TACKLE

F. Ryder & Co., London Ixi Youngs, Bii'iningham lx

DOCKS MACHINERY

Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. 1038C-D Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co. 1038C-D

Mitsubishi Soko Kaisha, Kobe ... 1038F W. K. & C. Peace, Eagle Works,

Mitsubishi Zosen Kabushiki Kai- Sheffield Iviii

sha, Tokyo ...xxxiii J. & Riley Carr, Sheffield lix

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS-Continued

PAGE PAGE

MEMORIAL MAKERS: — PAINT MERCHANTS :—

Wm. Morris & Co., London ... Sun Man Woo Co. ... xxxviii

Inside front cover

PAPER MERCHANTS

MERCHANTS, COMMISSION AGENTS, ETC. : — J. P. Heilbronn Co., Manila xxxv

A.B.C. Directory of Merchants and

Manufacturers xlii POSTAGE-STAMP DEALERS:—

Arculli, Brothers, Hongkong ... xxxiv Gra^a & Co., Hongkong... Hinge of cover

Compagnie Sino-Francaise de

Commerce xxxiv

PRINTERS & PUBLISHERS :—

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha, China and 11-111

Hongkong Daily Press, Ld Ixiii

Japan

Maruzen Co., Ld., Tokyo xxxvi

Mitsubishi Shoji Kaisha,Tokyo... xxxix

Northwest Trading Co., Ld.

Front end paper PRINTERS’ SUPPLIERS:—

J. P. Heilbronn Co., Manila xxxv

F. Ryder & Co., London Ixi

Sun Man Woo Co xxxviii PROVISION MERCHANTS :—

See Storekeepers

METAL MERCHANTS

Tai Lee Chan, Hongkong Ixvi

ROPE MANUFACTURERS :—

MILK Thomas Gill & Sons, England Ixiii

Nestis & Anglo-Swiss Condensed H’kong. Rope Manufacturing Co. 1038A-B

Milk Co., Hongkong... Back end paper Wm. Kenyon & Sons, England ...

Inside front cover

MINING AND PLANTATION TOOL

MANUFACTURERS : — RUBBER MANUFACTURERS

Deo. Thornton & Co., Ld., Bir- Wm. Warne & Co., Ld., London ... Ixii

mingham 1212A

Do. Hinge of cover SEED MERCHANTS :—

Do. Back of cover The Yokohama Nursery Ixv

Gra<;a & Co., Hongkong ... Hinge of cover

NAVY CONTRACTORS

Sun Man Woo Co xxxviii SHIPBUILDERS

H’kong., Whampoa Dock Co.... 1038C-D

NEWSPAPERS :—

Mitsubishi Soko Kaisha, Kobe ... 1038F

Hongkong Daily Press

Mitsubishi Zosen Kabushiki

Inside back end paper

Kaisha, Tokyo xxxiii

Hongkong Weekly Press ... do.

SHIPCHANDLERS :—

NURSERYMEN AND FLORISTS :—

The Yokohama Nursery Co., Ld... Ixv A. Kwai & Co., Hongkong Ixvi

Sun Man Woo Co., Hongkong ...xxxviii

OIL MERCHANTS Kwong Sang & Co., Hongkong ... Ixiii

Asiatic Petroleum Co xx

Do. ... Front cover SOAP MANUFACTURERS:—

Rising Sun Petroleum Co xx A. Kwai & Co., Hongkong Ixvi

Continued on Page iv.

ii COAL MERCHANTS

x||x

MITSUI BUSSAN KAISH A, LTD. HONGKONG,

PRINCE'S BUILDINGS, ICE HOUSE STREET.

Head Office - - - TOKYO, JAPAN.

(MITSUI & GO., LIMITED, IN EUROPE AND AMERICA.)

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

COAL CONTRACTORS to Home and Foreign Mail and Freight

Steamers, Railways, Army and Navy, and Principal Industrial Works.

MIIKE HARBOUR AND DOCKS built by the Company to facilitate

Loading and Shipment of Miike Coals.

SOLE PROPRIETORS of Miike, Tagawa, Ida, Yamano, Hondo,

Yubari, Noborikawa Coal Mines.

SOLE AGENTS for Fushun, Kishima, Mineji, Yubari, Matsu-

shima, Shikyakutei and other Coals,

Agents for:

TOKYO MARINE & FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD. Tokyo.

MEIJI FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

TAISHO FIRE & MARINE INSURANCE CO., LTD. Tokyo.

NIPPON FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

KYODO FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

TOKYO SALVAGE CO., LTD Tokyo.

DAI NIPPON BREWERY CO., LTD Tokyo,

etc., etc., etc.

Telegraphic Address: “MitsuL,,

COMMISSION MERCHANTS

X^X

MITSUI BUSSAN KAISHA, LTD.TOKYO.

(Mitsui & Co,, Ltd,, in Europe & America.)

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND

- GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

HEAD OFFICE:

l, Honchonichome, Nihonbashiku, TOKYO.

BRANCHES AND REPRESENTATIVES:

JAPAN:—

KARATSU MIIKE NAGOYA SEOUL YOKOHAMA

KISHIMA MOJI NIIGATA TAINAN Ac., Ac.

KOBE MURORAN OSAKA TAIPEH

KUCHINOTZU NAGASAKI OTARU WAKAMATSU

OTHER COUNTRIES:-

AMOY CHEFOO MANILA SINGAPORE

ANTUNGHSIEN DAIREN MUKDEN SOURABAYA

BANGKOK FOOCHOW NEWCHWANG SWATOW

BATAVIA HANKOW NEW YORK

RANGOON SYDNEY

BOMBAY HAMBURG

HARBIN SAIGON TIENTSIN

BUENOS AIRES

CANTON HONGKONG SAN FRANCISCO TIEHLING

CALCUTTA LONDON SEATTLE TSINGTAU

CHANGCHUN LYONS SHANGHAI VLADIVOSTOOK

Telegraphic Jlcld.ress: “ ^MITSUI.’

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS—Continued

PAGE PAG*

STAINED CLASS MANUFACTURERS:— STEVEDORES: -

Wm. Morris & Co., London Sun Man Woo Co., Hongkong ... xxxviii

Inside front coveT STOREKEEPERS :—

STATUE TABLET MAKERS: —

• Sun^M^n WQO.CO., Hongkong ...xxxviii

Wm. Morris & Co., London ... SURGICAL INSTRUMENT DEALERS: —

Inside front cover Ferris & Co., Ld., Bristol xli

STEAMSHIP LINES :— TEXTILE MERCHANTS :—

Apcar Line xxviii F. Ryder & Co., London Ixi

British India S. N. Co., Ld. ... xxviii

Dairen Risen Kaisha xxxii TOY DEALERS:—

Douglas Steamship Co xxx Gra

Eastern and Australian Line ... xxviii

TRADE MARKS OF BRITISH MERCHANTS

Indo-China Steam Nav. Co. xxix

Nippon Yusen Kaisha 1038E

AND MANUFACTURERS Ivii

Osaka Shosen Kaisha xxxi TYPE FOUNDRIES;—

P. & O. S. N. Co xxviii Tokyo Tsukiji Type Foundry ... Ixv

STEEL MANUFACTURERS:— WINES AND SPIRITS :—

W. K. & C. Peace, Ld., Sheffield ... Iviii Cockburn

^.nglo-ffjjtnxsc (Calcniiar for 1922

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

JANUARY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

... 7h. 03m. 5h. 50m. 1920 1921

... 7h. 06m. 6h. 00m. Maximum 64.9 64.2

Minimum 54.3 54.1

MOON’S PHASES

Mean 59.1 58.8

d. h.

First Quarter P.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Full Moon P.M. Mean 30.21

Last Quarter P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 0.065 inches 0.195 inches

K RRMARKABLE EVENTS

Kobe and Osaka opened, 1868. Overland Telegraph through Russia opened, 1872.

Russians surrender Port Arthur to the Japanese, with 878 officers, 23,491 men, 546 guns

and vast stores of ammunition, also 4 battleships, 2 cruisers, 14 gunboats and de-

stroyers, 10 steamers and 35 small vessels, 1905. Inauguration of Chinese Republic with

Dr. Sun Yat Sen as Provisional President, 1912. First Chinese Celebration of Western

New Year, 1913.

First election by the Hongkong Chamber of Commerce of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884. Evacuation of Shanghai completed, 1903. First sitting of Reconstituted

Appeal Court, Hongkong, 1913.

Tues. First election by the Hongkong Justices of the Peace of a member of the Legislative

Council, 1884,

Wed. Decree of Emperor Tao-kwang prohibiting trade with England, 1840. Commissioner

Yeh captured, 1868. Chinese Government definitely refused te submit the Macao

boundary question to arbitration, 1910.

Thanksgiving services for the Armistice at the Hongkong places of worship and mass

meeting of thanksgiving at Theatre Royal, 1919,

EPIPHANY. Fearful fire at Tientsin, 1,400 famine refugees burnt to death, 1878.

Sfttur. Forts at Chuenpi taken with great slaughter, 1841. Chinese Govt. Press Bureau

initiated, 1914.

Sun. 1ST AFTER EPIPHANY. Ice one-fourth inch thick at Canton, 1852. British str. “Nam-

chow" sunk off Cup Chi, near Swatow ; about 350 lives lost, 1892. The French

evacuated Chantaboon, 1905. President Yuan Shih-kai declares 7 cities in North Chin*

open to international trade, viz., Kweihwa Ch’eng, Kalgan, Dolon-Nor, Chinfeng, Tao-

nanfu, Licngkow, Hulutao, 1919.

Mon, Murder of Mr. Holworthyat the Peak, Hongkong, 1869.

Tue».

Wed.

of $1,250,000 for proposed Hongkong University, 1909.

Tung-chi, Emperor of China, died, in his nineteenth year, 1875. China’s Parliament

dissolved, 1914.

Ki-ying, Viceroy of Two Kwang, issues a proclamation intimating the intention to open

up Canton according to the Treaties, 1846.

Satur. Secretary of United States Legation murdered at Tokyo, 1871. Volcanic eruptions and

tidal wave in Kagoshima (Japan); famine in Northern Japan, 1914.

Sun. 2ND AFTER EPIPHANY. Bread poisoning in Hongkong by Chinese baker, 1867. Indo-China.

str. “Yik Sing” lost at The Brothers, 1908- Hongkong Courts of Justice opened, 1912.

Mon. Severe frost in Hongkong, 1893. Chinese Imperial Court returned to Peking, 1902.

The Tai-wo gate at the Palace, Peking, destroyed, 1889.

Wed.' Great gunpowder explosion in Hongkong harbour, 1867.

Elliot and Kishen treaty, ceding Hongkong, 1841. Sailors’ Home at Hongkong formally

opened, 1863.

Attempt to set fire to the C. N. Co.’s steamer “Pekin” at Shanghai, 1891. Collision near

Woosung between P. & O. steamer “Nepaul” and Chinese transport “Wan-nien-

ching latter sunk and eighty lives lost, 1887. Hongkong ceded to Great Britain

1841. Celebration of Hongkong’s Jubilee, 1891.

Satur. Death of Queen Victoria, 1901. The first Chinese Ambassadors arrived in London, 1877.

Sir Henry May left Hongkong to become Governor of Fiji, 1911.

Sun. 3RD AFTER‘EPIPHANY. P. & O. steamer “Niphon” lost off Amoy, 1868. Pitched battle

between Police and robbers in Gresson St., Hongkong, 1918. Sir H. May’s resignation

of the Governorship of Hongkong, 1919,

Matheus Ricci, the Jesuit Missionary, enters Peking, 1601. U. S. corvette “Oneida"

lost through collision with P. & O. steamer “Bombay,” near Yokohama, 1870,

Decree .announcing resignation of Emperor Kwang Hsu, 1900.

Decree from Yung-ching forbidding, under pain of death, the propagation of the

Christian faith in China, 1733.

4TH AFTER EPIPHANY. Lord Saltoun left China with $3,000,000 ransom money, 1846.

British gunboat patrol withdrawn from West River, 1908. Big fire among flower-boat*

in Canton: 100 lives lost, 1909.

THE CALENDAK FOll 1921

FEBRUARY—28 DAYS

6.24 64.8

55.9 55.9

58.8 59.7

d. h.

First Quarter 5 0 52 F.M.

Full Moon 12 9 17 A.M.

Last Quarter 19 2 18 A.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 27 2 48 A.M. 2.640 inches 1.040 inches

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

MARCH-31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 6h. 46m. 6h. 27m. 1920 1921

15th 6b. 33m. 6h. 33m. Maximum 66.7 68.9

Minimum 59.3 59.5

MOON’S PHASES Mean 62.4 63.9

d. h. m.

First Quarter 7 3 22 A.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Full Moon 13 7 14 P.M. Mean 30.05

Last Quarter 20 4 43 P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 28 9 3 P.M. 1.390 inches 4.505 inches

DAYS OF (DAYS OF

WKEK MONTH CHRONOLOGY REMARKABLE EVENTS

Wed. 1 ASH WEDNESDAY. S. DAVID’S DAY. Bombardment of the Chinhai forts by French men-

of-war, 1886. Twenty-six opium divans closed in Hongkong, 1909. Mr. Herrmann,

manager of Siemens Schuokert at Yokohama, arrested in connection with Japanese

Naval scandal. 1914.

Thurs. 2 First Dutch Embassy left China, 1657.

Fri. 3 5 Foreign Ministers received in audience by the Emperor at the Tsz Kuang Po, 1891.

Satur. 4 6

Sun. 5 1ST IN LENT. Expulsion of Chinese Custom House from Macao by Govr. Amaral, 1849.

Mon. 6 Hostilities at Canton recommenced. Fort Napier taken by the English, 1841

Tuea. 7 Departure of Governor, Sir J. P. Hennessy, from Hongkong, 1882. Kongmoon opened

to foreign trade.

Wed. 8 10 Arrival in Hongkong of Prince Henry of Prussia, 1898. Russo-Chinese Manchurian

Convention signed, 1902. Tiger killed on the New Territory, after a European and an

Indian constable h d lost their lives in the chase, 1916.

11 Attack on Messrs. Farnham and Rohl at Shanghai, 1872.

ErL " ' 18

10 12 Lin arrived in Canton, 1839. 12,000 Chinese troops attacked the English in Ningpo and

Chinhai and were repulsed with great slaughter, 1842. The Japanese army after a

sanguinary battle lasting several days occupied Moukdeh, and pursued the retreating

Russians, whose losses in the battle were estimated at 20,000, 1905. Yuan Shih KaS

inaugurated as President of the Chn ese Republic, 1912.

Satur. Governor Sir R. G. MacDonnell arrived in Hongkong, 1866. Hongkong University opened

by Sir F. W. Lugard, 1912.

-Sun. 2ND IN LENT. Imperial Commissioner Ki-chen, degraded by the Emperor, left Canton

as a prisoner, i841. Capture of Bac-Ninh, by the French, 1884.

15

16 8,000 Chinese troops routed by the English at Tze-hi with great slaughter, 1842. New

Law Courts at Yokohama opened, 1890. Hongkong and Shanghai Bank at Peking

burnt down, 1900.

Wed. 17 Governor Sir H. Robinson left Hongkong for Ceylon, 1865. Jubilee of Hongkong Chamber

of Commerce, 1912.

Thurs. Chinese Envoy Ping and suite left Shangjiai for Europe, 1866. Japanese Diet resolved to

nationalise the railway. China released the Japanese str. “Tatsu Maru” at Canton, 1908.

Sir F. D. Lugard laid foundation stone of Hongkong University, 1910.

17 19 S. PATRICK'S DAY. Lord Macartney’s Embassy left China, 1794. Severe earthquake in

Formosa, 1906.

-Satur. 18 20 Edict of Commissioner Lin to surrender all opium in Canton, 1839. Chungking declared

open to foreign trade, 1891.

Sun. 19 21 3RD IN LENT. Governor Sir G. Bonham landed at Hongkong, 1848.

Mon. 22

Tues. 21 23 British ship “Sarah,” first free-trader, sailed from Whampoa, 1834. Mr. F. A. Aglen

appointed Deputy Inspector of Chinese Maritime Customs, 1910.

Wed. 21 Death, at Peking, of Sir Harry Parkes, H B.M. Minister to China, 1885. Sir Robert Hart

left Peking for Home, 1908.

T hnrs. 23 25 Captain Elliot forced his way to Canton, 1839. Aguinaldo captured by the Americans

in the Philippines, 1901

SFri. 24 26 First Section of Manila-Dagupan railway opened, 1891, Attempted assassination of Li

Hung-chang at Shimonoseki, 1895

- Satur. 25 27 Captain Elliot demands passports for himself and all the British subjects imprisoned in

Canton, 1839.

-Sun. 4TH IN LENT. Great flood at Foochow. 1874 Newchwangplaced under Russian martial law.

Launch of the Autolycus, the largest ship built in British Overseas Dominions, at Taikoo

Dock, 1917. Protocol of Convention between China and Portugal signed at Lisbon, 1887.

Tues. | 28 20,289 chests of opium burned by Lin at Canton, 1839. Foundation stone of New Customs

House at Canton laid, 1914.

*Wed. I 29 Seizure and occupation of the Pescadores by the French fleet, 1885.

Thurs. j 30 Arrival of Governor Sir George Bowen, G.C.M.G., 1883. Chinese Regiment at Weihaiwei

disbanded 1904. Cantonese resolved on a boycott of Japanese products which lasted

throughout the year, 1908

iFri. 31 Abolition of the coolie trade at Macao, 1874. Arrival of the Duke and Duchess of

Connaught in Hongkong, 1890. All gambling saloons in Canton closed, 1912. T.K.K.

liner Chiyo Maru wrecked off Lema Islands, 1916.

THE CALENDAR FOR H-22

APRIL-30 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 6h. 16m. 6h. SMm. 1920 1921

15th 6h. 04m. 6h. 43m. Maximum 73.3 76.4

Minimum 66.5 6&7

MOON’S PHASES Mean .-..69.3 71.9*

d. h. m.

BAROMETER, 1921

First Quarter 46 P.M.

Full Moon 44 A.M. Mean 29.98

Last Quarter 54 A.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 4 P.M. 8.265 inches 2.820 inches

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLK EVENTS

Satur. ! 1 The port of Hoihow, Hainan, opened, 1876. The ports of Pakhoi, Wenchow, Wuhu and '

Ichani'opened, 1877. lO. Romeo adopted the Strails Settlements currency, It05.

Dowaper Empress of Japan died, 1914.

Sun. 2 5TH IN LENT. French flag hoisted at Kwang-chau-wan, 1898. Belilios Refoi matory opened

at Hongkong, 19t 0.

Mon. I 3 Tai On pirated between Hongkong and Kongmoon, 19i3.

T e?. j 4 8 Protocol arranging the preliminaries of peace between France and China signed at

Paris, 1885. The Tsarevitch and Prince George of Greece arrhed in Homrkong 6 K

1891.

Wed. 6 9 1 Bogue Forts dest royed by General D’Aguilar, 1847. Wheelbarrow Riot'at Shanghai, 1897,

Attempt to destroy with dy namite the Prince Regent’s Palace at Peking, 1910.

!

10 Convention between Sir John Francis Davis and the Viceroy Ki-ying for the admission

ot Europeans into the city of Canton within two months, 1842.

Fri. 7 11 j Hongkong Mint opened, 1866. Indignation Meeting at Shanghai respecting Wheelbarrow*

i Riot, 1897. Great powder explosion at Canton, 1903.

Satur. 8 12 | Arrival of M. Paul Bert at Hanoi, 1886. Chinese Parliament inaugurated 1913.

Sun. 9 13 [ PALM SUNDAY. Terrific tornado in Canton; 2,000 houses destroyed and 10,000 lives lost,.

1878. Tartai General at ( anton assassinated, 1911.

Mon. 10 14 j 37,000 Christians butchered in Japan, 1738. Death at Peking of Marquis Tseng,.

16 Presentation of colours to Hongkong Regiment, 1895. Russian flagship Petropavlovii.

sunk by a mine off Port Arthur, nearly every man drowned, including Admiral

Makaroff, 1«04.

17 Soldiers’ Club opened at Hongkong, 1900. Imperial Palace, Seoul, destroyed by.'

Are, 1904. Aliens given the right to own land in Japan, 1910.

Fri. 14 18 Goon FRIDAY. S. Francis Xavier left Goa for China, 1552. Riots at Changsha, 1910.

Satur. 15 19 British Flag hoisted at Taipohu, Kowloon Newr Territory, 1899. Governor Sir Arthun

Kennedy arrived in Hongkong, 1872. Junk Bay Flour Mills, Hongkong, suspended

operations, 1908.

Bun. 16 20 EASTEU DAY.

Mon. 17 21 EASTER MONDAY. Telegraph to Shanghai opened, 1871. Execution at Kowloon city of,

I nineteen pirates, including “Namoa” pirates, 1891. Treaty of Peace between China

and Japan signed at Shimonoseki, 1895.

Tues. 18 22 Convention between China and Japan settling Corean differences signed at Tientsin,

j 1885. The O. & O. steamer “ San Pablo ” wrecked near Turnabout, 1888. One-fourth

j of the opium divans at Shanghai closed, 1908. Town of Wagima, J apan, destroyed

by fire, 1910,

Wed. 19 23 The “Sir Charles Forbes,” the first steamer in China W'aters, arrived, 1830. The.

| Tsarevitch arrived at Hankow', 1891.

Thurs. 20 24

Fii. 21 25 Resignation of Shanghai Municipal Council, 1897.

26 East India Company ceased trade with China, 1834. Arrival of Governor J. Pope;

Hennessy in Hongkong, 1877. Opening of new commercial port of Heungchow near

Macao, 1909. Bank of China authorised to issue $3,000,000 in subsidiary notes, 1915.

Sun. 23 27 1ST AFTER EASTER. S. GEORGE’S DAT. P. M. steamer Asia wrecked near Foochow, 1911.

Chinese Imperial Edict issued disranking Roman Catholic missionaries, 1908. Capture of

the citadel at Hanoi, Tonkin, by the French forces, 1882. First sod of the Shanghai-

Nanking Railway cut at Shanghai, 1905.

Tues. Foundation stone of Queen’s College, Hongkong, laid, 1884. Contract for Quintuple

Loan of £25,000,000 signed at Peking, 1913.

Wed. A crowded public meeting in Hongkong demands exclusion of Germans from the Colony

after the War, 1917.

Thurs. Appointed by Chinese Government a Day of Prayer for Christian Churches, 1913.

Ratifications of Corean Treaty with England exchanged, 1884. Privy Council for

Japan constituted by Imperial decree, 1888. Sir F. D. Lugard laid foundation stone of

Hongkong Seamen’s Institute, 1909. Daring piracy on the s.s. “ Tai On” off Kai Au, 1914.

Battle of the Yalu, Russo-Japan War; Russians defeated with great slaughter, 190*.

Sun. 2ND AFTER EASTER, Arrival of General Grant in Hongkong, 1879.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

MAY—31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 5h. 51m. 6h. 50m. 1920 1921

15th 5h. 43m. 6h. 55m. Maximum ...80.1 81.3

MOON’S PHASES Minimum 73.1 74.1

d. h. m. Mean 76.1 77.1

First Quarter 4 8 56 P.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Full Moon 11 2 6 P.M. Mean 29.80

Last Quarter 19 2 17 A.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 27 2 4 A.M. 18.155 inches 33.785 inches

CHRONOLOGY OP REMARKABLK EVENTS

First number of “Uongkonj? Gazette” published, 1841. Telegraphic communication

established between Hongkong and the Philippines, 1880. Spanish fleet destroyed by

U.S. fleet at Cavite, 1898. Emperor.Kwang Hsu buried, 1909.

Ratification at Tientsin of the Treaty between Portugal and China, 1888. United State*

formally recognised Republic of China, 1913. Presentation of Chinese Note in reply

to Japan’s revised demands, 1915.

Suspension of. Oriental Bank, 1884.

Riot in French Concession at Shanghai, 1874. Roman Catholic Cathedral at. Peking

inaugurated, 1884. Aomori devastated by fire, 1910.

British troops evacuated Ningpo, 1842. Imperial Government ordered steps to be taken

at Hongkong to close opium divans, 1908.

King Edward VII. died, 19i0. Attack on Mr. Wood at the British Legation at Tokyo, 1874.

3I;D AFTER EASTER. Departure of Governor Sir William Des Vceux from Hongkong,

1891. Japan presents ultimatum to China, 1916.

New Town Hail at Tientsin opened, 1890. Waglan Lighthouse opened, 1893. Chinese

Government submits to Japan’s revised demands, 1915.

Hongkong declared infected with plague, 1894. Colonel Gordon with the Imperial

troops captured Chang-chow, the rebel city, 1864. Occupation of Port Hamilton

by the British Squadron, 1885. Meeting of Chinese merchants at Shanghai

instituted a boycott of American products as a protest against the Chinese Immigration

Act, the movement, eventually spreading extensively in China, 1906.

Attempted assassination of the Tsarevitch by a Japanese at Otsu, Japan, 1891. Execution

of fifteen pirates, including leader of “Namoa” pirates, at Kowloon, 1891. Portuguese

cruiser Adumustor struck rock near Hongkong, 1913.

East India Co.’s garden at Canton destroyed by the Mandarins, 1831. Swedish str. Nippon

wrecked on Scarborough Reef, 1913.

A corporal of the British Legation murdered by Chinese soldiersat Peking,1864. An ti-foreign

riot at Wuhu, 1891. Bill for amending the Trading with the Enemy Ordinance, 1914,

read a third time and passed bv the Hongkong Legislative C ouncil, 1915.

4TH AFTER EASTER. Arrival of Sir John Walsham, Bart., in Hongkong, on his way

to Peking to assume the functions of British Minister, 1886.

Ratification at Peking of the amended Treaty between Russia and China, 1881. Anti-

foreign riot in the Hochow district, 1891.

Loss off Amoy of the French war steamer “Izere,” 1860. Arrival of General Grant in

Shanghai, 1879. Kowloon walled city occupied, 1899.

The city of Chapu taken by the British troops, 1842. Anti-foreign riot at Nanking, 1891.

Disastrous surprise of a French sortie in Tonkin led by Commandant Riviere and

death of the latter, 1883. “ Hongkong Daily Press” enlarged, 1900.

Forts at mouth of Peiho captured by British and French forces, 1858. The Canton Mint

commenced striking silver coins, 1890.

Sun. ROGATION SUNDAY. Lossof M.M. str. “Menzaleh" while on her passage from Hongkong

to Yokohama, 1887. Imperial Edict respecting anti Christian literature, 1892. Ministers’

Joint Note to Chinese Government on the Boxer agitation, 1900. Mandate issued

cancelling arrangements for Chinese monarchy, 1916.

Foreign factories at Canton pillaged, 1841. Opening of new' Medical School of Hongkong

University by H.E the Officer Administering the Government, 1919. U.S. Legation at

Tokyo burned down, 1863.

EMPIRE DAY. Captain Elliot and all the British subjects left Canton for Macao, 1839.

British flag hoisted at Weihaiwei, 1898.

ASCENSION DAY. The city of Canton invested by British troops, 1841. Anti-foreign riot

at Nanking, 1891. Formosa Republic declared, 1895. Sino-Japanese Treaty signed at

Peking, 1915. British Chamber of Commerce inaugurated at Shanghai, 1915.

Death of Grand Secretary Wen-siang, 1876.

Canton ransomed for 156,000,000,1841. Boxers burn station on Lu-Han line, 1900. Battle of

Kinchau, Russo-Japan War; Japanese stormed Nanshan and captured 78 guns, 1904.

Battle of the Japan Sea; Admiral Togo practically annihilates Admiral Roshdesvensky s

fleet, 1905. A Bill to provide for the levy of Estate Duty passed by the Hongkong

Legislative Council after considerable opposition from the Unofficial members, 1915.

SUNDAY AFTER ASCENSION. Queen’s Statue, Hongkong, unveiled, 1896. Anti-foreign

riots in Szechuen, 1895. H. M. Queen Mother of Siam visited Hongkong, 1911.

“ Empress of Ireland” sunk and 600 lives lost, including several prominent Far Eastern

residents, in the St. Lawrrence River, 1914.

H.B.M. screw sloop “Reynard” lost on the Pratas shoal in trying to rescue remainder

of crew of “Velocipede,” 1851. Opening of the Peak Tramway, Hongkong, 1888.

Chinese Postal Service transferred to Board of Communications, 1911. Conscription

Bill introduce in Hongkong, 1918.

Typhoon at Hongkong and Macao; loss of the “ Poyang,” with 100 lives. ir Macao, 1874.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922 xi

JUNE—30 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 5h. 38m. 7h. 03m. 1920 1921

15th 5h. 38m. 7h. 08m. Maximum 85.0 85.2

Minimum 77.9 77.8

MOON’S PHASES Mean 81.0 81.0

d. h. m.

BAROMETER, 1921

First Quarter 3 2 10 Mean 29.72

Full Moon 9 11 58 P.M.

Last Quarter 17 8 3 P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

New Moon 25 0 20 P.M. 15.555 inches 14.740 inches

DAYS OP DAYS OF 6&Int,6

CHRONOLOGY QF REMARKABLE EVENTS

WEEK MONTH MOONS

Thins. I 1 6 Attempt to blow up the Hongkong Hotel, 1878. New Opium Agreement between

Hongkong and China came into force, 1887. Anti-foreign riot at Tanyang, 1891.

Cantoh-Samshui Railway completed

Fri. 2 7 Hongkong connected with London by wire, 1871. Formal transfer of Formosa from

China to Japan, 1895. Revs. Norman and Robinson murdered, 1900.

Satur 3 8 Earthquake at Manila, killing more than 2,000 persons, 1863. Death of Sir Arthur

Kennedy, 1883. Keelung taken possession of by Japanese, 1895.

fiun. j 4 9 WHITSONDAY. Treaty between France and Corea signed at Seoul, 1880. West River

Mon. | 5 10 Departure of the first O. & O. steamer from Hongkong to San Francisco, 1875. Messrs.

Argent and Green murdered in an anti-foreign riot at Wusueh, 1891. Communica-

tion with Peking cut off, 1900. French str. if. Lebaudy pirated on West River, 1913.

Tues. 6 Heavy rains in Hongkong, propertv to the value of $500,000 destroyed, and many lives lost,

1864. Death cf Yuen Shih-kai, 1916.

12 Attempted anti-foreign riot at Kiukiang, 1891. Hongkong-Canton steamer “ Powan ”

wrecked, 1908. Tornado in Macao, 1913.

Thurs. 8 13 Destruction of Mission premises at Wusieh by anti-foreign mob, 1891.

Fri. 9 14 Suspension of New Oriental Bank, 1892. The P. & O. steamer “Aden" wrecked off

Socotra, 78 lives lost, 1897

•Satur. 10 15 Typhoon at Formosa; loss of several vessels, 1876. Admiral Seymour starts lor

Peking, 1900. Arrival in Hongong of H.R.H. Prince Charles, heir to the Rumanian

Throne, 1920.

Sun. 16 TRINITY SUNDAY. Portuguese prohibited trading at Canton, 1640.

Mon. Opening of the first railway in Japan, 1872.

British steamer “ Carisbrooke ” fired into and captured by Chinese Customs cruiser,

1875. Imperial Edict condemning attacks on foreigners, 1891. Baron von Ketteler,

German Minister, murdered in Peking, 1900.

Wed. Russo-Chinese Treaty7, 1728. Battle of Telissu Russo-Japan War. Russians defe ted

with a loss of 7,000 men and 16 guns, 1904. Capi John Alcock and Lieut A. W. Brown

made the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic in an aeroplane on June 14th, 1919.

Thurs. Tidal Wave, Japan, 28,000 lives lost, 1896. British barque “ Caesar " and Danish schooner

“ Carl ” taken by pirates off Pedro Blanco, 1866. Hope Dock opened at Aberdeen 1867.

Russian squadron sank Japanese transport “Hitachi,” badly injured “Sado," 1904.

Hongkong Legislature passed Ordinances prohibiting circulation of foreign bank note*

and foreign silver coins, 1914. Train from Canton to Hongkong “ held up,” American

missionary killed, 1916.

Fri. 16 21 Woosung taken, 1842.

Satur. 17 22 First foreign-owned junk leaves Chungking, 1891. Capture of Taku Forts by Allies, 1900.

Death of Sir Hormusjee Mody, 1911.

Sun. 18 Explosion of the “Union Star” at Shanghai, 17 persons killed and 10 wounded, 1862.

Disastrous inundation at Foochow, 2,000 lives lost, 1877.

Mon. 19 24 Shanghai occupied by British forces, 1842.

Tues. 25 Macartney’s embassy arrived in China, 1793. Attack on mission premises at Hainan

city, 1891. Unprecedented floods in the West River, 1908.

Wed. 21 Massacre at Tientsin, 1870.

22 27 (. anton blockaded by English forces,1840. Queen Victoria’s DiamondJubileecelebration,1897.

Coronation of King George, V., 1911. Inauguration of Tsan Ching Yuan, Chines*

Administration Council, 1914.

Fri. 23 Ki-ying visits Hongkong, 1843 Shock of earthquake in Hongkong, 1874. French troop*

surprised by Chinese near Langson, 1884. Russian Baltic Fleet, after remaining six

weeks in Tonkin waters, sailed from Kamranh Bay northward, 1906.

Satur. 24 29 Lord Robert Cecil announced in the House of Commons that the Government had decid-

ed to prohibit trading with the enemy in China, 1916

1 Assassination of M. Carnot, President of the French Republic, 1894. Treaty of Nanking

exchanged, 1843. Attack on British Legation at Tokyo, 1862. Foundation stone of

new wing of Berlin Foundling House laid by Lady May, 1914.

Mon. 26 2 Treaty between England and China signed at Tientsin, 1858. Additional Convention

between France and China signed at Peking, 1887.

Tues. 27 3 Treaty between France and China signed, 1858. Confiscation of the str. “ Prince Albert

by the British Consul and Customs at Canton, 186*>.

Agreement effected between Great Britain and the United States for reciprocal protection

of British and American Trade Marks in China, 1905.

Thurs. 29 The Foreign Ministers admitted to an audience of the Emperor of China at Peking, 1873.

Indian Mints closed to silver, 1893.

Fri. 30 6 British expedition to China arrived, 1340. Opening of a section of the Shanghai and

Woosung Railway, 1876. Flooding of the Takasima coal mines, 1891.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

JULY-31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

. ...5h. 42ra. 7h. 11m. 1920 192[

. ...5h. 47m. 7h. llm. Maximum 87.0 86.2

MOON’S PHASES Minimum 79.1 77.8

d. h. Mean 82.6 81.6

First Quarter 52 A.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Full Moon 9 11 A.M.

Mean 29.79

Last Quarter P.M.

New Moon P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

First Quarter P.M. 24.040 inches 11.875 inches

v REMARKABLE EVEJ

Safcui. | 1 Hakodate, Kanagawa, and Nagasaki, Japan, opened to trade, 1857. Two Swedish mission-

aries murdered at Sungpu, 1893. Attempted assassination of Sir H. May on his return

to Hongkong as Governor, 1912. Restoration of Emperor of China by Chang Hsun, 1917.

Sun. 2 Amoy forts and many junks destrojred by H.M.S. “ Blode,” 1840. French Expedition

from the Hoongkiang arrived in Hongkong, 1873. Hongkong Legislative Council

approved a development scheme for the south side of toe island of Hongkong, 1914.

Steamer “Don Juan" burnt at sea near Philippines; 145 persons perished, 1893.

Hongkong low level electric tram service opened, 1904.

10 Declaration American Independence, 1776. Telegraph cable laid between Hongkong

and Macao, 1884. U. S. Pacific Cable opened to Manila.

Wed. | 5 Tinghai first taken, 1840. Attack on British Embassy at Tokyo, 1886. Duke of

Connaught’s Statue unveiled in Hongkong, 1902. H.mgkong Legislative Council voted

*50,000 for the relief of distress in the West River districts, 1914.

Thurs. i 6 12 Order of nobility instituted in Japan, 1884.

Fri. | 7 13 Serious flooding of the West River involving great loss of life and damage to property, 1915.

Satur. | 8 14 Canton factories attacked by Chinese, 1*46. Japanese occupy Sakhalin, 1905.

Sun. 9 15 First Dutch embassy arrived at Tientsin, 16.56.

Mon. ! 10 16 Portuguese fleet left Malacca for China, 1522. The Yangtsze blockaded by British

fleet, 1840. First Bazaar by Chinese held at Hongkong in aid of relief of distress

caused by West River floods, 1908. Rebellion against Yuan Shih Kai broke out in the

Yangtsze provinces, 1913.

TUBS. 11 17 Engagement between the U. S. Naval Forces and the Coreans. Amherst’s embassy

arrived in China, 1816.

Wed. 12 18 Foreign Inspectorate of Customs established in Shanghai, 1854. Suspension of Hongkong

Police Officers for accepting bribes, 1897. Macau troops commenced operations

to exterminate pirates at Oolowan Island, 1910.

Thurs. I 13 19 First English ship reached China, 1635. French gunboats fired on by Siamese at

Paknam, 1803. Pirates attacked S. S. “Sainam” on West River, killing Rev. Dr.

MacDonald and injuring several of the crew, 1906.

Fri. j 14 20 Statue of Paul Beau unveiled at Hanoi, 1890. Tientsin native city captured by Allies,

1900. Chinese Imperial Edict declared bow and arrow obsolete arms, 1905.

Satur. I 15 21 Shimonoseki forts bombarded by the English, French, and American squadrons, 1874.

Eruption of Bandai-san volcano, Japan, 500 persons killed, 1888. Radio-telegraphic

station at Cape D’Aguilar opened, 1915.

Sun. ! 16 22 British trade with China re-opened, 1842, The King of Cambodia arrived on a visit to

Hongkong, 1872.

Mon. 17 23 Ningpo Joss-house Riots, Shanghai, 15 killed and many wounded. Agreement between

Russia and China on Amur River, 1900. Crisis at Peking; Chihli fights Anfu faction

and 6,000 casualties reported, 1920.

24 Terrible earthquake at Manila, 1880. Additional Article to Chefoo Convention signed in

London, 1885. Li Hung-chang passed through Hongkong on his way North, 1900.

Chan Kwing Ming declared independence of Kwangtung, 1913. Hongkong’s two

days’ Peace Celebrations begin, 1919.

Wed. 19 Nanking captured by the Imperialists, 1864. Indo-China S.S. “Hopsang” sunk by

Russians, Pechili Gulf, 1904.

20 Wreck of theC.M.S.N. Co.’sstr. “Pautah”on Shantung Promontory, 1887.

21 Yellow River burst its banks at Chang-kiu, Shangtung, great inundation, 1889. Typhoon1

Satur, 22 in Hongkong, 1902. Death of Sir Kai Ho Kai of the Hongkong Executive Council, 1914.

Sun. 23 Armed attack on Japanese Legation at Seoul, Corea, and eight inmates killed, 1882.

Mon. British trade prohibited at Canton, 1834. Anglo-Chinese Burmah Convention signed

at Peking, 1886.

26 “Kowshing,” British steamer, carrying Chinese troops, sunk by Japanese, with loss-

of about 1,000 lives, 1894. Defeat of British forces at Taku, Admiral Hope wounded,

1850. First visit of Prince Chun, the Emperor’s brother, to Hongkong, 1901. Japanese-

occupy Newchwang, 1904.

Wed. 26 3 Great flood at Chefoo kills 1,000, 1903. Royal Proclamation forbidding British subjects to-

trade with the enemy in China and Siam came into force, 1915.

27 Canton opened to British trade, 1843. Terrific, typhoon at Canton, Macao, Hongkong,

and Whampoa; loss of life estimated at 40,000 persons, 1862. Disastrous typhoon at

Hongkong, 1908. ; “Empress of China” wrecked, 1911.

Fri. 28 Nanking re-taken by Imperialists, 1864. Sir Matthew- Nathan arrived Hongkong, 1904.

Baron de Macar sentenced at Shanghai to a year’s imprisonment for false pretences and

abuse of confidence in connection with the flotation of “ The British and Belgian

Industrial Bank of China,” 1914. Severe typhoon visits Shanghai, 1915.

German gunboat “ litis ” wrecked off ShantungPromontory, all but eleven of the crew per-

ished, 1896. Outbreak of rebellion at Manila,1896. Emperor Mutsuhitoof Japan died,1912.

Severe typhoon at Macao, 1836.

8 Hongkong low level electric tram service started, 1904.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

AUGUST-31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

...5h. 54m. 7h. 04m. 1920 1921

15th ...6h. 00m. 6h. 55m. Maximum 85.4 87.4

Minimum 78.5 78.6

MOON’S PHASES

Mean 81.7 82.2

d. h. i

Full Moon 8 0 1 BAROMETER, 1921

Last Quarter 16 4 4 Mean 29.69

New Moon 23 4 £ 1920 RAINFALL 1921

First Quarter 29 7 5 10.975 inches 15.445 inches

F REMARKABLE EVEKTS

TUBS. Both China and Japan declare war, 1894. Kucheng massacre, 1896. Germany declared

war against Russia, 1914.

Wed. Victims of massacre at Tientsin buried, 1870.

Thurs. British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842. First Chinese Bazaar held at Canton, 1908.

War declared by Great Britain against Germany, 1914. Macartney’s Embassy entered

Peiho, 1796. Bombardment of Keelung by7 French, 1884. Allied march on Peking

Started, 1900. Li Hung Chang visited Queen Victoria, 1896.

Political unrest in Kwangtung culminated in seriour fighting 1916.

Serious flood at Tientsin, 1871. Hongkong Volunteers mobilised, 1914.

British Squadron arrived off the Peiho, 1840.

Assassination of Mr. Haber, German Consul, at Hakodate, 1874.

Wed*.' British troops landed at Nanking, 1842.

Sir H. Pottinger arrived at Hongkong, 1841. Destructive typhoon at Foochow, 1888. Lady

May launched the TFar Drummer, first standard ship built in Hongkong, 1918.

First public meeting of British merchants in Canton, called by Lord Napier, who

suggested the establishment of a Chamber of Commerce, 1834.

Satur. 174 British prisoners executed in Formosa, 1842. Manila occupied by U.S. Troops,

1898. Attempted assassination of Admiral Li Chun at Canton, 1911.

Bun. Tong-ur-ku taken, 1860. Japanese squadron sinks Russian cruiser Jturik near Tsushima,

1904. Fighting and looting at Canton following flight of rebel leaders, 1913. Compul-

sory Military Service Bill passed its third reading in the Legislative Council of the

Straits Settlements, 1915.

Mon. British steamer “Glenfarg ” sunk after striking a submerged rock near Goto Islands, 1914.

China declares war against Germany and Austria-Hungary, 1917.

Tues. Great fire on French Concession, Shanghai, 991 houses destroyed, loss Tls. 1.500,000,1879.

Total loss of the E. & A. steamer “Gatterthun” near Sydney, 1895. Peking Legations

rescued, 1900. Murder of Messrs. Bruce and Lewis at Chengchow, Hunan, 1902.

Prince and Princess Arisugawa entertained at Hongkong, 1904.

Wed. British trade of Canton stopped by Hong merchants, 1834. French Treaty with Siam

signed, 1856.

Thurs. “Empress of India” sinks Chinese cruiser “ Wong Tai” in collision near Swatow, 1903.

Destructive typhoon at Macao, 1913.

Lord Napier ordered by the Viceroy to leave Canton, 1834. Great fire in Hongkong, 1868.

Indian troops landed in Shanghai, 1900. Large gang of pirates attacked Cheungchow,

killing three Indian constables, and looting the village, 1912. American Chamber of

Commerce established at Shanghai, 1915.

Satur.

Bun. First conference between Sir Henry Pottinger and Ki-ying on board the “Cornwallis,”

at Nanking, 1842. Taku forts taken by the Allied forces, 1860.

Palace Revolution at Peking, Empress Dowager again assumes the Regency, 1898.

Governer Amaral, Macao, assassinated, 1849. Seizure of steamer “Spark” by pirates

between Canton and Macao, 1874. Telegraph line to Peking opened, 1884. Korea

annexed by Japanese, 1910. H.M.S. Bedford wrecked at Qnelpart, 1910.

Large meeting in Hongkong to protest against the military contribution, 1864.

Chinese fleet at Pagoda Anchorage destroyed by French, 1884. Japan declared war on

Germany, who had ignored her request to evacuate Kiaochow with a view to its

“ eventual restoration ” to China, 1914.

Wreck of the C. N. Co.’s str. “Tientsin” near Swatow, 1887. Disturbances at Amoy,

Japanese landed marines, 1900.

British Chamber of Commerce established at Canton, 1834. Treaty between Great Britain

and Japan signed, 1858.

Satur. British left Macao, 1839. British steamer “Dunearn” foundered in a typhoon off Goto

Islands, 1908.

Bun. Amoy taken by the English, 296 guns captured, 1841.

Mon. Lord Amherst’s Embassy left for Yuen-ming-yuen, 1816. Slavery abolished in British,

possessions, 1833. Kimpai forts silenced by French, 1884. Hongkong Legislative-

Council passes Ordinance to admit enemy aliens only on licence for 3 years, 1919.

Treaty of Nanking signed, 1842.

Wed. Wreck of “Futami Maru” off Cape Calavite, 1900.

Thurs. Severe typhoon on coast of China, many lives lost, and much damage done to shipping at

Hongkong, Macao and Whampoa, 1848.

THE CALENDAR TOR 1922

SEPTEMBER-30 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 6h. 05m. 6h. 41m. 1 .i* 1921

15th 6h. 10m. 6h. 27m. Maximum 85.6 84.4

Minimum 77.6 76.8

MOON’S PHASES Mean 81.2 80.0

d. h. m.

Full Moon 6 3 47 P.M.

BAROMETER, 1921

Last Quarter 14 6 20 P.M.

Mean 29.86

New Moon 21 0 3S P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

First Quarter 28 6 40 A.M. 11.750 inches 12.100 inches

CHRONOLOGY or RWMARKABLK EVE;

Foundation stone of Gap Rock lighthouse, n<

Decree published announcing a decision t<

sive floods in Shant ng, 1914.

Arrival of the “Vega” at Yokohama after having discovered the North-East Passage,

1879. Kiaochau declared a free port, 1898. Japanese occupied Lioa-yang, capturing

vast stores of ammunition and provisions, 1904.

Hongkong Plague proclamation revoked, 1894. Disastrous floods at Shanghai, 1904.

TUBS.

Vfed. H.R.H. Prince Alfred received by the Mikado of Japan, 1860. Chinese Court left Hsianfu»

on the way to Peking, 1901. Assassination of Mr. McKinley, President of the U.S.A.,

1901. Sir James Mackay’s Treaty with China signed, 190 '.

Attack on Dr. Greig, near Kirin, by soldiers, 1891.

Great typhoon in Hongkong, 1867. H.I.H. Prince Tsai Hsun visits Hongkong, 1909.

Sir Hercules Robinson assumed the government of Hongkong, 1859. Floods near Swatow

rendering a million people destitute, 1911. Riots in Szechuan to protest against the use

of foreign capital for railway construction, 1911. Helena Mav Institute, Hongkong,

opened, 1916. Chinese Government announces its intention to assume the administra-

tion of Russian Concessions and Russian Government property in China, 1920.

Sun. Riot by Chinese mob at Canton; great destruction of houses and property in Shameen,

1883. British gunboat “Wasp” left Singapore for Hongkong and seen no more, 1887.

Death of Sir Claud MacDonald, former Minister at Peking and Tokio. 1915.

Mon. Public meeting of foreign residents at Yokohama to protest against proposed new Treaty

with Japan, 1890. Japanese flagship “Mikasa” foundered as the result of an explosion

in Sasebo harbour, with a loss of 599 men, 1905.

Convention signed at Chefoo by Sir Thomas Wade and Li Hung-chang, 1876.

Public Meeting in Hongkong with reference to the blockade of the port by the Chinese

Customs’ cruisers, 1874. Severe typhoon in Southern Japan, 1891. Funeral of Emperor

Mutsuhito, 1912.

Chinese transport “Waylee” driven ashore on cadores, upwards of 370 lives lost, 1887.

Pingyang captured by the Japanese, 1894.

New Convention between Germany and China ratified at Peking, 1881.

Satur. The battle of the Yalu, in which the Chinese were defeated by the Japanese, losing five

vessels, 1894.

Sun. Destruction by fire of the Temple of Heaven, Peking, 1889. Loss in Kii Channel, near

Kobe, of the Turkish frigate “Ertogrul,” with 667 lives, 1890.

Typhoon at Hongkong, the most disastrous in the Colony’s history, 1906.

Allied Generalissimo reached Hongkong, 1900. ’ “

Farewell parade of Hongkong Police Reserve

Count von Waldersee reached Shanghai 1900. Sir Robert Hart died, 1911. Typhoon at

Swatow, 1891

Chinese Govt, signed a contract with Messrs. Samuel & Co., of London, for a loan of

$16,000,000 for the development of Hankow, 1914. Appeal at Government House for

$1,500,000 to meet immediate needs of Hongkong University, 1919.

U. S. brig “Lubra” taken by pirates, 1866. Terrific typhoon in Hongkong and Macao,

many thousands of lives lost, 1874. Hongkong Volunteer Reserve Association

inaugurated 1904. Prize Court in Hongkong condemned H.A.L. “Frisia” captured by

H.M.S. “Triumph”, 1914.

H.M.S. “Rattler” lost off Japan, 1868. Piratical attack on theGerman barque “Apenrade,”

near Macao, 1869. The Satsuma rebels in Japan routed with great slaughter, their

leader, Saigo, killed, and the insurrection suppressed, 1877. Bomb thrown at Chinese

Commissioners when about to leave Peking for Europe, 1905.

Arrival of Governor Sir Henry A. Blake in Hongkong, 1“”° Jubilee of Dr. A. H. Graves,

missionary labours at Canton celebrated, 1906.

Tues. Lord Napier arrived at Macao dangerously ill, 1834.

Wed. Commissioner Lin degraded, 1840. Lord Kitchener in Hongkong, 1909. j

Thure. Yellow River burst its banks in Honan; calamitous inundation, 1887. H.A.L. “ Lydia’’

wrecked near Hainan Strait, 1910.

Hurricane at Manila, causing immense damage to shipping, 1865. S.S. “Charterhouse ’

foundered in a typhoon off Hainan Head, 70 persons drowned, 1906.

All the Bogue forts destroyed by the Britishfleet, 1841. S. S. “Hsiesho” sank after striking

amine in Pechili Gulf, 1906,

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922 xv

OCTOBER—31 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st ... ,..6h. 15m. 6h. 12nfi. 1920 1921

15th 6h. 19m. 5h. 59m. Maximum 80.6 81.0

Minimum 72.5 72.3

MOON’S PHASES Mean 76.1 75.8

d. h. m.

Full Moon 6 8 58 A.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Last Quarter 14 5 55 A.M. Mean 30.06

New Moon 20 9 40 P.M. 1920 RAINFALL 1921

First Quarter 27 9 26 P.M. 6.190 inches 0.395 inches

CHRONOLOGY OF REMARKABLE EVE.'

The “ Hongkong- Daily Press ” started, 1857; its Diamond Jubliee celebrated in 1917 with

publication of special souvenir number. Inauguration of Hongkong College of

Medicine, 1887. Hyogo declared an open port, 1892. Gold Standard adopted in Japan,

1897. British Section, Canton-Kowloon Railway opened, 1910. Arrival in Hongkong

of Sir R. E. Stubbs to assume the Governorship, 1919.

Tamsui bombarded by French, 1884.

Serious riot at Hongkong, 1884. Treaty between France and Siam signed at Bangkok,

1893. Withdrawal of British steamers from West River, 1900. Chinese National

Assembly Inaugurated, 1910.

Attack on foreigners at Wenchow, 1884. Terrible fire at Amoy, 1802. Typhoon at

Hongkong, 1894. Canton-Kowloon Railway opened for through traffic, 1911. Founda-

tion-stone of new wing to the Tung Wah llospitai, Hongkong, laid by H.E, The

Governor to commemorate the Hospital’s Jubilee, 1920.

French expedition left Chefoo for Corea, 1860. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir

William Des Vceux, 1887.

Hongkong Government agreed to lend the Viceroy of Wuchang LI,100,000 to repurchase

from an American syndicate the Canton-Hankow railway concession, 1905. H.R.H.

Prince Alfred visited‘Peking, but not received by the Emperor, 1869. Great public

meeting at Hongkong to consider increase of crime in Colony, 1878. Chinese Court

left Kaifengfu on its way to Peking, 1901. Hongkong Legislative Council passed

a Bill to prevent trading with the enemy, 1914.

Supplementary Treaty signed at The Hague, 1848. French landing party at Tamsui

repulsed, 1884. Battle of Shaho, Russo-Japanese War, commenced. Ended 25th in

disastrous defeats of Russians; casualties 45,800 Russian ; 15,879 Japanese, 1904.

Moo. Shanghai captured, 1841. Chinhai taken, 1841. Official inspection of Tientsin-Kaiping Rail-

way, 1888. Shanghai-Woosung Railway placed under Chinese control, 1904.

Lord Napier died at Macao, 1834. Wreck off the Pescadores of the P. & O. str. “ Bokhara,"

with loss of 125 lives, 1892. Tuan Shih Kai inaugurated President of the Chinese

Republic, 1913.

Wed. The first Chinese merchant str. (“Meifoo”) left Hongkong for London with passengers to

establish a Chinese firm there, 1881. Outbreak of revolution in China at Wuchang, 1911.

Revolt in the Philippines, 1872. Eight Chinese banks in Peking suspended payment, 1910.

FriUr8' Ningpo occupied by British forces, 1841. First railway in Japan officially opened by the

Mikado, 1872. Allies capture Paotingfu, 1900.

Sfttur. Explosion on the Chinese trooper “Kungpai,” loss of 500 lives, 1895.

Sun.

Mon. Khanghoa, in Corea, taken by the French, 1866. Train disaster between Harbin and

Tsitsihar, resulting in many deaths, 19;6.

St. John’s Cathedral, Hongkong, dedicated, 1842. Daring piracy on board the British str,

“ Greyhound,” 1885.

Wed. At a meeting of the Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, London and China, a scheme

of reconstruction was approved, 1892.

Thurs. Great fire in Hongkong, 1859. Great typhoon at Formosa, 1861. Japanese Government

welcomed American Battleship Fleet, 1908.

Terrific typhoon at Manila; enormous damage to property, 1882. The Shanghai and

Woosung railway closed by the Chinese Government, 1877.

H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Shanghai, 1809. Cosmopolitan Dock opened, 1875.

68 piratical vessels destroyed by Captains Hay and Wilcox, H.M. ships “Columbine” and

“Furj ,” 1849. Hongkong Legislative Council voted $100,000 to the Prince of Wales

National Relief Fund, 1914. Arms and ammunition consigned to India by German*

discovered at Shanghai, 1915.

Mon. King Chulalongkorn of Siam died, 1910.

Tues. Japanese cross the Yalu, 1894.

Wed. Treaty of Whampoa between France and China signed, 1S44. Kahding recaptured by

the Allies, 1862.

Chin-lien-cheng taken by the Japanese, 1894.

Serious earthquake in Central Japan, 7,500 persons killed, 1891. Attempted insurrection

at Canton, 1895. Prince Adalbert of Prussia visited Hongkong, 1904. Massacre of four

American Missionaries and a child at Linechow, 1905. Prince Ito assassinated at Har-

bin, 1909. Hon. Mr W. D. Barnes, Colonial Secretary of Hongkong, died suddenly

whilst playing polo, 1911, Bomb thrown in Canton, killed 37 people, 1914.

Note presented from the Powers to China advising the suspension of the monarchical

movement, 1915.

Portuguese frigate “ D. Maria II.” blown up at Macao, 1850.

Great fire in Hongkong, 1866. Fenghnang taken by the Japanese, 1894. Chinese Govern-

ment welcomed American Battleship Fleet at Amoy, 1908.

H.R.H, Prince Alfred arrived at Hongkong, 1869. Talienwan occupied by Japanese, 1894.

xvi THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

NOVEMBER—30 DAYS

SUNRISE SUNSET HONGKONG TEMPERATURE

1st 6h 27m. 5h. 47m. 1920 1921

15th 6h. 36m. 5h 40m. Maximum 75.0 75.6

Minimum ... 67.4 65.6

MOON’S PHASES Mean 70.9 69.8

d. h. m.

Full Moon 5 2 36 A.M. BAROMETER, 1921

Last Quarter 12 3 52 P.M. Mean 30.10

New Moon 19 8 1920 RAINFALL 1921

First Quarter 26 4 15 P.M. 7.045 inches 0.220 inches

OATS OF [DAYS OF! 9 & 10 (

WEEK MONTH I MOONS j CHRONOLOOY OF REMARKABLE EVENTS

Wed. 1 13 ALL SAINTS. The port of Quinhon, Annam, opened to foreign trade, 1876. Riotous dis-

turbances at Hongkong connected with the boycott of Japanese goods, 1908. AH

Germans in Hongkong of Military age interned; others required to leave the

Colony, 1914. Presidential mandate issued denouncing Sun Yat-sen, 1914.

Thurs. 2 14 Wreck of the U.S. cruiser “ Charleston ” off North Luzon. Wireless telegraph service

opened between Macao and Hongkong. 1920.

Fri. 3 | 15 Great Britain commenced the first war with China by the Naval action of Chuen-pee, 1839.

Satur. 4 16 Hongkong Jockey Club formed, 1884. Pacific Mail S.S. withdrawn owing to the La

Folette Seaman’s Act coming into force in the U.S.A., 1915.

Sun. 5 I 17 Great fire at Macao, 500 houses burnt, 1834. Peking evacuated by the Allies, 1860.

President Yuan Shih Kai proclaimed Kuomintang a seditious organisation and unseated

438 members of Parliament, 1913.

English and French Treaties promulgated in the “Peking Gazette,” 1860. Indo-China

str. “Tingsang” wrecked in Haitan Straits.

Tues. Fall of Tsingtao to Anglo-Japanese force, 1914.

Wed. Death of Li Hung-chang, 1901.

Thurs. The French repulsed in Corea, 1866. Celebration of Queen Victoria’s Jubilee in Hongkong,

1887. Typhoon at Hongkong, 1900, H.M.S. “ Sandpiper ” and “ Canton City ” sunk.

Independence of Kwangtung province announced, 1911. Twelve people killed by a

bomb in Canton, 1914. German cruiser “ Einden ” destroyed by H.M.A.S. “Sydney "

at Cocos Island, 1914.

Fri. 10 22 Statue of Sir Arthur Kennedy unveiled in the Botanic Gardens, Hongkong, 1887. Assas-

sination of Admiral Tseng Ju-cheng at Shanghai, 1915. Coronation of Emperor

Yoshihito of Japan, 1915. *

Satur. 11 23 H.M.S. “Racehorsp” wrecked off Chefooin 1864. Death of M. Paul Bert, Resident General

of Annam and Tonkin, 1886. New Chinese Tariff came into force, 1901. Disturbances

at Shanghai, following measures to prevent a plague epidemic, 1910.

Sun. 12 ; 24 Hongkong first lighted by gas, 1864. The Foreign Ministers had audience within the

! Palace, Peking, 1894.

Mon. 13 25 Earthquake at Shanghai, 1847. Macao Boundary Delimitation Conference at Hongkong

interrupted, 1909.

Tues. 14 26 Convention signed between Russia and China, 1860. Celebration of Shanghai Jubilee,

1893. Germans took possession of Kiaochau Bay, 1897. Death of the Chinese Emperor

Kwang Hsu, 1908. Armistice celebrations in Hongkong, 1918.

Wed. 15 ! 27 H. M. gunboat “Gnat” lost on the Palawan, 1868. Opening of Canton-Fatshan Rail-

way, 1903. Death of the Chinese Empress Dowager Tze Au, 1908.

Thurs. 16 i 28 Shanghai opened to foreign commerce, 1843. Celebration of Shanghai Jubilee, 1893.

17 29 Great fire in Hongkong, 1867. First section Shanghai-Nanking railway to Naziang opened.

General strike of printers commenced in Hongkong, 1911.

Satur. 18 i 30 Important Harbour Improvement works at Macao announced, involving an expenditure

19 1 of over ten million dollars, 1920.

Sun. Terrific gunpowder explosion at Amoy; upwards of 800 houses destroyed and several

hundred lives lost, 1887. Jesuit fathers expelled from Macao, 1910.

Mon. Portuguese Custom House at Macao closed, 1845. Lord Elgin died, 1863.

Tues. 21 3 Port Arthur taken by the Japanese, 1894. Departure of Governor Sir Henry Blake from

22 4 Hongkong, 1903. Rebels repulsed at Hankow, 1911.

Terrible boiler explosion on board the str. “ Yesso” in H.K. harbour, 86 lives lost, 1877.

Resignation en Hoc of unofficial members of Hongkong Licensing Board as a protest against

23 ! 5 the action of the Executive in restoring the licences of the Peak and Grand Hotels, 1915.

Thurs.

Fri. 24 [ 6 Chinese commenced boycott of trams in Hongkong which lasted seven weeks, 1912.

Death of the Hon. Mr. E. A. Hewett, C.M.G,, member of the Executive and Legislative

Councils of Hongkong, 1915.

25 I 7 Capture of Anping, Formosa, 1868. Treaty between Portugal and China signed, 1871,

Imperial Diet of Japan met for the first time, 1890. Terrible floods in Chihli; Hong-

kong voted $100,000 towards relief of distress, 1916.

Sun. Edict issued by the Viceroy of Canton forbidding trade with British ships, 1839.

Mon. M. Thiers accepts the apology ofCh’ungHow, the Chinese Ambassador, for the murder

of the French at Tientsin (June 21st, 1870), 1871.

Tues. 28 10 Foreign factories burnt at Canton, 1866. Great fire in Hongkong, 1867. Blake Pier,

Hongkong, opened, 1900. .

Wed. 29 11 Opening of the Japanese Diet at Tokyo by the Emperor in person, 1890. Revolt of

Thurs. troops at Macao, 1910.

30 12 ST. ANDREW’S DAY. ST. Joseph’s Church, Hongkong, consecrated, 1872. The Japanese

cruiser “ Chishima Kan” sunk in collision with the P. & O. steamer “Ravenna"

in the Inland Sea, 61 lives lost, 1892. Armistice arranged between Chinese Revolu-

tionists and Imperialists, 1911.

THE CALENDAR FOR 1922

DECEMBER—31 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset Hongkong Temperature

1st

15th 6h.

6h. 47m.

56m. 5h. 5h. 38m. 41m. 1920 1921

31st 7h. 03m. 5h. 49m. Maximum

Minimum G8.7 69.3

61.3 61.3

Moon’s Phases Mean 64.8 64.5

d. h. 24 p.m. Barometer, 1920

Full

Last Moon

Quarter 124 07 4120 A.M. Mean 30.16

p.m.

First Moon

New Quarter 1826 81 53 p.m. 1920 Rainfall 1921

1.810 inches 0.220 inches

Oats

Wkbkor ;|DMonth

ats or 10Moons

& 11 Chkonolooy or Remarkablk Events

Fri. 13 Queen Alexandra born, 1844.

Satur. 2 14 Large civilans,publicandmeeting atunder

City Hall,

Y.M.CHongkong, approvesas theof 'nmain

ew Club

War forMemorial

joint useof theof

Sun. 3 15 1stColony,

in 1920. services

Advent. S. Francis Xavier died

.A. management,

on Sanchoan, 1552.

Mon. 16 First census of Hongkong taken, population 15,000,1841.

17 SixGeneral foreigners killed1863. at Wang-chuh-ki, 1847. Soochow re-taken by che Imperialists under

Wed. 18 heard of Gordon,

again, 1886. The Japanese warship “Unebi-kan" left Singapore and not

19 European guese Clubfactories

in Duddellat Canton

Street,destroyed

Hongkong,by alaidmob,by IfH.E,42. The

Foundation-stone

Governor of Macao,of new1920.Portu-

Frl. 8 20

Satur. 9 Ningpo

Peking,captured

1888. 1913. by the Taipings,

Piratical 1861. Consecration

attack on Portuguese of newnearPei-tang

str. American, Macao, theCathedral,

captain

being killed,

22 2ndHongkong. in Advent. Captain Piracy onPocockboard theandDouglas str. “ Namoa,” five hours after leaving

wounded, 1890. Arrival in Hongkongthree others Sirmurdered

of Governor William and several1891.seriously

Robinson,

Mon. 23 Indemnity paid by Prince of Satsuma, 1863. Admiral Bell, U.S.N., drowned at Osaka,

Tues. 24 Imperial audienceflagDecree

every stating

Newdown that1890.

Year, the Foreign Ministers at Peking are to be received in

Wed. 26 French Reception hauled

of foreign ladies from

by theEmpress

ConsulateDowager

at Canton by Chinese,President

1832. First

Shih-kai

provincial invited

delegates to atascend

Peking,thethe1915.

Dragon Throne of China,

of China by a1898.

unanimous vote ofYuan the

2627 All Roman Catholic Priests (not Portuguese) expelled from Macao, 1838. Hongkong Prize

Court

“ Chelmer,”condemned German steamer “ Tannenfels,” seized as a Prize by the destroyer

28 Memorial Stone1914.of New Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui laid by the H. E. Governor,

29 3rd1915. in Advent.

W.inspects

Des Vosux, United

formerly States DistrictofCourt for China opened at Shanghai,

Sir R.1906. Sir

Hongkong, Hongkong

1919. DefenceGovernor

Corps on itsHongkong,

last parade,died,1919. 1909.

CoastalH.E.shipping Stubbs

strike at

Mon.

Tues. 23 SirArrival Hugh Gough and the Eastern Expedition left China, 1842.

Wed. 1881. Faneof Princes

Two murdered, Albert Victor and George of Wales at Hongkong in

cotton mills1911.destroyed by fire at Osaka, 120 persons burnt to death, 1893. the “ Bacchante,”

Tuan

Steam navigation first attempted,

Two Mandarins

Plenipotentiary arrived

Elliot, at Macao1736.with secret orders to watch the movements of

1836.

Sirworth

Henryof forged

May, ofChinese Hongkong, appointed

seized Governor of Fiji,

1912.1910.President

One million dollars

4thperformed

in Advent,the British ofbanknotes

WorshipConsulate Heaven,at 1914. in Hongkong,

Shanghai destroyed by fire, 1870.

Yuan Shih-kai

Mon. 8 Christmas

of property, Dat.1878.Great fire in Hongkong, 368 houses destroyed, immense destruction

9 Bank lives Holiday.

lost, St. Stephen. Great fire at Tokyo, 11,000 houses destroyed, 26“

Wed.

Thurs. 111210 Canton of1897.Hongkong

Dedicationbombarded Masonic

by Allied forcesHall,of Great

1865. Britain and France, 1867.

Fri.

Satur.

Sun. 14 Dr. Sun Yat Sen elected Provisional President of the Republic of China, 1911.

INESE FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN ]

1-II

, Me9

20 Slight

Festival Cold.of Lu Pan, the patron saint of carpenters and masons.

He

many saidis stories torelated

have been of tohisadeath

contemporary

ingenuity is ofsaid

itmen Confucius.

that,heoncarved Amongof the

account his

father

ofconsequence,having

one of the genii been put

withprevailed by

one of its forhandsthe stretchedof Wu, towards the effigy

Wu,supplicated

when, m

and presented drought

with gifts from Wu, threehe years.

cut off On

the being

hand, and raim

immediately fell. On this dayatcarpenters nightfall.to refuse to work.

2423

Moo:

Worship

Great cold.of theThegodgodof ofthethehearth hearth reports heaven.

1 Chinese New Year’s Day.

810 Peginning

Fete day ofoftheSpring.

Spirits

1516 Feast ofofShen

Fetepraying Lanterns, Feteofthe

andwealth

Ts’ai, oftheShang-yuen,

Ground. ruler of heaven.

two guardians

Moc 1 Fete day of for

the Supreme and offspring,

Judge in the wellof astheoffordoor.

as Courts rain. Auspicious day for

Hades.

2 Mencius born, B.C. 371. Spring worship of the gods of the land and grain

133 Fete

Fetepeople

dayof the god of literature,

offromHung-shing,

drowning, god

and forof worshipped

the Canton

sending rain

byriver,students.

timespowerful

in604. of drought.to preserve

1915

23Mo

Birthday

Fete of

Yernalof Equinox.

Lao Tsze, founder

Kwanyin, goddess of mercy. of Tauism, B.C.

3 F§teandofofHiuen Peh-te, T’ien

TauistShang-ti,

god of the theNorth

supreme Pole.ruler of the sombre heavens

159 Tsing-ming

Feteshipped

of I-ling, or Tomb Festival.

a deifiedof physician, and of the god of the Sombre Altar, wor-

18 FeteCentral onTu,behalf

of Heumountain, the goddesssick children.

worshipped behind graves, of the god of the

2326 Fete of Tien Heu, Queenand of

of the

Heaven, three brothers.

Holy mother, goddess of sailors.

28 Fete of TszFestival

National Sun, goddess

of Ts’angof Kieh,

progeny. inventor of writing.

Mo 4 Fete

10118 Fete ofof San

Beginning

the Kai,ruler

Bodhisattva

of Summer.

Mandjushri;

of heaven,

Fete of

worshipped

oftheearth, and spirits

dragon of Hades; on behalf

of aoffetetheof dead.

alsoground.

the Buddha.

14 Anniversary

Fete of Lii Sien, of the death of Confucius

202817 Fete

Fete ofofof Kin Hwa,Tauist

the goddess

patriarch,goddess

theof Cantonese

theTauist

worshipped

blind.god of medicine.

by barbers.

of parturition.

Mo<1 Fete Yoh Wang, the

5 Fete

Nationalof thefetegodday.of theDragonSouthboat Pole.festival and boat races. On this day the

Cantonese

ted. The frantically

festival is paddlePaabout

called inShun

LungUen, long narrow boatsTien,

muchandornamen-

to500,commemorate

for his master thethedeath

prince ofofWatTso refused whoortodrowned

Tiu Wat

accept himself

his faithful

is held

aboutadvice.

B.C.

131611 National

( National

Anniversary

fete of Sheng

feteofoftheKwan Wang,

Formation Ti, god the tutelary god

of war,andandEarth.

of Heaven

of walled towns.

of hisFetesonof General

Chang Kwan.

Tao-ling

(A .D.claim34),the

totransmigiation ancient

headship.head ofItthe is Tauist

said “ sect.succession

the His descendants

is still continue

perpetuated

decease, to the of the

body of soulyouthful

some of each member

successorofoftheChang family, Tao-ling,

whose onby the

heirshiphie

isShakyamuni

supernaturaily revealed

Buddha, the as soon asof the

founder miracle is effected.” Fete

Buddhism.

27 Summer Solstice.

CHINESE FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN 1922 xix

July8 Tnt.V. Moon

i 14 Slight Heat.

24 8 ! VI. Moon.

Aug. 16191 Great BeginningHeat.of Autumn.

1116 Fete of

Anniversary the Goddess

of KVan of Mercy.ascent to heaven. Fete of Chuh Yung, the

24 spirit of fire; and ofTi’sthe god of thunder.

23 Firstsouls,

day when

of theBuddhist

seventh moon. and During

Tauist thisread

priests moonmasses

is heldto release

the festival

soulsoffromall

purgatory,

accompanied scatter rice

byto finger to feed starving

playsoulsimitating ghosts, recite

mystic burn

Sanskrit magic incantations-

characters

are

benefit supposed

of the soulscomfort

the deceased of themembers in purgatory,

drowned, andfamily.

visit familypaper clothes

shrines forwhich

toof pray the

on

behalf

ofbined of

statuettes, dwarf plants, silk of tlje

festoons, and Exhibitions

ancestral tablets aregroups

com-

with

FeteAbating these ceremonies, which

day of Lao Tszu, the founder of Tauism. are enlivened by music and fireworks.

2429 27 Heat F6tegoddesses

of the god

Sept.8 6 1517 Fete ChungofYuen,

ofDew. theof Pleiades,

Ursa Major,

god of the

worshippedwomen.

worshipped

element byearth.

by scholars and of the seven

‘9 White

18 Feteattendant of the three gods ofspirits.

heaven,^ of earth, and of water, and of the five-

11 of Changsacrificial

FeteKingdoms. Fi, isA.D.

He said 220.

to haveAhebeenleaderat offirstthea butcher

wars duringwine the seller.

Three

1315 2224 FeteAfter of many

the god heroic

of wealth.exploits, perished by the hand and of an assassin.

20 VIII.29Moon. Fete Fete ofof TiHiiTs’ang-wang,

Sim-ping, a the Tauistpatronhermit.

of departed spirits.

21 FeteKiahof Hit(godSun,of the a deified physician, worshipped by doctors, and of Kin

2223 23 Fete of the gods of land and grain. worshipped by the literati.

golden armour)

4 Descent of the star god of the northern measure.and fete ofthe god ofthe hearth.

Oct.249 5 1915 Autumnal National

Cold Dew. feteEquinox.

day. Worship of the moon, and Feast of Lanterns.

1517 2527 FSte Fete of Confucius

of the god of (born the Sun.552 B.C.), the founder of Chinese ethics and politics.

20 IX. Moon.

Descent of

1st Descent. the Star gods

to the 9th day inclusive. of the northern and southern measures from the

2428 59 Frost

FeteHades.

of Kwan Ti, the god of war; kite-flying day. Fete of Tung, a ruler in

Nor.30 6 1115 National Fete of Yen feteHwui,

of Shuthe favourite

Hiwhose

(A.D. disciplethe

1130-1200), of Confucius.

mostChinese

eminent of the later Chi-

nese

ed forphilosophers

centimes the commentaries

recognized standard on ofthe

orthodoxy.classics have form-

16 Fete

17 Fetesdoctors of the

of theand god of

godadepts the

of wealth; loom. of Koh Hung,

5

68 1820 Fete of Tsii Sheng, oneinofalchemy;

the reputed ofonetheofgolden

and inventors the mostdragon

of

celebratedof

writing. king. Tauist

16 28 Fete Beginning

day ofofHwa Winter.Kwang, the god of fire, and Ma, a deified physician.

2123 X. Moon. 35 Fete of the three brothers San Mao.

Dec. 3 15 Slight FetesgodofSnow

and goddess the

Ha Yuen, of thegodbedstead.

of water; of the god of small-pox; and of the

20 Heavy Snow.

8 XI. Moon.

2322 WinderdaySolstice.

56 | Fete of Yuh Hwang, the higher god of the Tauist pantheon.

XX PETROLEUM REFINERS

‘‘SHELL” MOTOR SPIRIT for MOTOR CARS

“SHELL" AVIATION SPIRIT for AIRCRAFT

KERQSEKE tor ALL PURPOSES ■ Obtainable

FUEL OIL for ALL PURPOSES - ; Everywhere

CANDLES, LUBRICATING OILS -

PARAFFIN WAX, etc., etc. ■

BUNKERING STATIONS FOR DIESEL OIL AND FUEL OIL.

Adelaide

Alexandria Christiania

Civitavecchia LaKarachi

Guayra [Vene- Pangkalan Beran- Seattle [Wash’ton.]

Amsterdam

Antofagasta

Antwerp Colombo

Colon [Panama Las Palmas zuela] Penang

Leghorn Pernambuco

Shanghai

Singapore

Soerabaya

Aomori

Avonmouth Canal] Liverpool

Constantinople Piraeus

Portland Southampton

Augusta [Sicily] CuracaoCopenhagen London [Shell Port

Port Louis Stockholm

Balboa [Panama

Balik Canal] Dunkirk

Pappan Durban Macassar

Madras Port St. Louis du St. Nazaire

Said St. Thomas Indies]

[West

Bangkok

Barcelona Funchal

Oemsah [Madeira] Malmo

Malta Port Sudan

Puerto Cabello St.SuezVincent

Barrow

Barton [Manches- Glasgow Manila Pulo

Maracaibo 'Vene- Pulo Bukom

Samboe Svolvaer

Gothenburg

terCanal]Ship Gran ton Marseilles Rotterdam Tampico

Tarakan

Batavia

Bilbao Hamburg

Hankow Melbourne

Mombasa Rio de Janeiro Trieste

Trinidad

Boelebaai

Bombay Ceram Havana

Havre Montevideo

Montreal Saitozaki Tuxpam

Vado

Bordeaux

Buenos Ayres Hongkong

Hud Nagasaki

New Orleans Salina

San Cruz [Pacific]

Francisco Valparaiso

Vancouver

Calcutta Hurehada

HoIquique

Ho New York

Palembang San Juan [Porto

Canton

Cape Town Palermo San Pedro Rico] Vera Cruz

Yokohama

To Ensure Supplies Adequate Notice Should be Given.

ASIATIC PETROLEUM CO.

CHINA, STRAITS, SIAM, INDIA,

PHILIPPINES

RISING SUN PETROLEUM CO.

JAPAN and FORMOSA

BANKS xxf

Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation,

PAID-UP

RESERVE CAPITAL

FUNDS 515,000,000

STERLING

SILVER £2,500,000

821,500,000

RESERVE LIABILITY OF PROPRIETORS . 15.000,000

COURT OF DIRECTORS:

CHAIRMAN—G. T M. M.EDKINS, Esq. Esq.

BERNARD,DEPUTY

D. G.A. M.8. GUBBAY, Esq.

Esq.

CHAIRMAN-G. E. V.DODWELL,

D. PARR,

W. L.J. PATTEN Esq.DEN, Esq.

P. H.Hon.

HOLYOAK,

Mb. A. O.Esq.LANG. A.H. PLUMMER,

P. WHITE, Esq.

Esq.

BRANCHES, AGENCIES AND SUB-AGENCIES:

AMOY

BANGKOK IPOH

JOHORE PENANG

RANGOON

BATAVIA

BOMBAY KOBE

KUALA LUMPUR SAIGON

SAN FRANCISCO

CALCUTTA

COLOMBO LONDON

LYONS SHANGHAI

CANTON

FOOCHOW MALACCA

MANILA SINGAPORE(HONGKEWV

Do.

SOURABAYA

HANKOW

HARBIN NAGASAKI

NEW YORK TIENTSIN

TSINGTAU

HONGKONG PEKING YLADIYOSTOOK

YOKOHAMA

ILOILO

CHIEF MANAGER: Hougkoug—A. G. STEPHEN.

MANAGER: Shanghai—G. H. STITT.

LONDON OFFICE-9, GRACECHURCH STREET,

LONDON BANKERS:

LONDON, COUNTY, WESTMINSTER & PARR’S BANK, I LTD.

iiotv iirtiorv o.

Interest Allowed

On Current Deposit Accounts at the rate of 2 per cent, per annum os

the daily balance.

On Fixed Deposits:—

Rates may be ascertained on application.

LOCAL BILLS DISCOUNTED.

Credits granted on approved Securities, and every description of Banking and

Exchange business transacted.

Drafts granted on London and the chief commercial places in Europe, India,

Australia, America, China, and Japan.

A. G. STEPH3E2M,

Hongkong, January, 1922 Chief Manager.

BANKS

Chartered M of India, Australia and China

Head Office: —38, BISHOPSGATE, LONDON.

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER.

"PAID-UP CAPITAL ...£3,000,000

RESERVE FUND ... ...£3,600,000

Court of Directors

Sir MONTAGU CORNISH TURNER, Rt. Hon. Lord G. HAMILTON, g.c.s.i.

Chairman. Rt. Hon. Sir JOHN NEWELL

Sir DUNCAN CARMICHAEL JORDAN, G.C.I.E., K.C.B., K.C.M.G.

THOMAS CUTHBERTSON, Esq. Wm. FOOT MITCHELL, ]

Sir ALFRED DENT, k.c.m.g. J. M. G. PROPHIT, Esq.

Sir Wm. H. NEVILLE GOSCHEN, k.b.e. LEWIS A. WALLACE, Esq.

Cbkf manager

W. E. PRESTON

managers

-J. S. BRUCE I

D. C. WILSON, f.c.a. I H. C. K. STILEMAN, f.c.a.

Bankers

The Bank of England

The London Joint City and Midland Bank, Limited

The London, County, Westminster & Parr’s Bank, Limited

The National Provincial and Union Bank of England, Limited

The National Bank of Scotland, Limited

Agencies and Branches

Aloe Star Hongkong Penang

Amritsar Iloilo Puket

Bangkok Ipoh Rangoon

Batavia Karachi Saigon

Bombay

Calcutta Klang Seremban

Canton Kobe Shanghai

Cawnpore Kuala Lumpur Singapore

Cebu Madras SOURABAYA

Colombo Manila Taiping (F.M.S.)

Delhi Medan Tavoy

Haiphong New York Tientsin

Hankow Peking Yokohama

Correspondents in the Chief Commercial places in - -

Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and America.

3, Que.en’8 Kd., II ngkong, 1st Jan., 11112. A. H. FERGUSON, Ac

BANKS xxiii

THE

MERCANTILE RANK *

of India, I imited.

Authorised Capital £3,000,000

Paid-up £1,050,000

Reserve Fund and Undivided Profits ...£1,227,638

HEAD OFFICE: 15, CRACECHURCH ST., LONDON, E.C.

BANKERS:—

Bank of England

AND THE

London Joint City and Midland Bank, Ltd.

BRANCHES

Calcutta, Howrah, Bombay, Karachi, Madras,

Rangoon, Colombo, Kandy, Galle, Port Louis

(Mauritius), Singapore, Penang, Kuala-Lumpur,

Kota-Bharu, Shanghai, Hongkong and New York.

INTEREST allowed on Current Accounts at the rate of two

per cent, per annum on the daily balance.

The Bank receives Current and Fixed Deposits on terms which

may be learned on application.

Telegraphic Address: “PARADISE.”

C. L. C. SANDES,

Hcngkong, ist January, 1922. Manager.

xxiv BANKS

tr m m m

BANK OF TAIWAN, LD.

(TAIWAN GINKO).

Incorporated by Special Imperial Charter, 1899.

CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED Yen 60,000,000

CAPITAL PAID-UP „ 37,500,000

RESERVE FUND ,, 11,080,000

HEAD OFFICE:

TAIPEH, FORMOSA.

BRANCHES:

Japan—Kobe. Osaka. Tokyo. Yokohama. Moji.

Formosa—Heitoh. Giran. Kagi. Karenkoh. Keelung,

Makung. Pinan, Shinchiku. Taichu. Tainan.

Takow, Tamsui, Tohyen, Hanto.

China—Amoy, Canton, Foochow, Hankow, Kiu-

kiang, Shanghai, Swatow.

Others—Hongkong, London, Hew York, Singapore,

Soerabaia, Samarang, Bombay, Batavia,

Bangkok.

LONDON BANKERS:

Capital and Counties Bank, London and South-Western Bank,

Parr’s Bank

The Bank has Correspondents in the Commercial centres of

Russia, Manchuria, Indo-China, India, Philippine Islands, Java,

Australia, America, South Africa and elsewhere.

HONGKONG OFFICE:

Prince's Building, 3, Des Voeux Road.

S. KOSDOH, Manager. F. SARITA and M. KISHI, Sign per pro.

BANKS XXi

THE SUMITOMO BANK, LTD.

OSAKA, JAPAN.

Cable Addres: “ SUVUTBANK.”

Established March, 1912.

(Successors to the Sumitomo Bank)

Subscribed Capital - - - -Yen 70,000,000.00

Paid-up Capital „ 50,000,000.00

Reserve Fund „ 19,000,000.00

DIRECTORS:

Baron K. Sum I TQM o ...President.

K. Yukawa, Esq ...Managing Director.

T. Kanho, Esq. ...Managing Director.

S. Yoshida, Esq ...Managing Director.

N. Yatsushiro, Esq ...Managing Director.

Head Office

KITAHAMA, OSAKA.

City Offices:—

Semba, Bingomachi, Kawaguchi, Nakanoshima, Dotombori, etc.

Home Branches:—

Tokyo, Yokohama, Nagoya, Kyoto, Kobe, Onomichi, Kure, Hiroshima,

Yaoai, Shimonoseki, Moji, Kckura, Wakamatsu, Hakata, Kurume, etc.

Foreign Branches :—

Shanghai, Hankow, Bombay, London, New York, San Francisco and Seattle,

Agents :—

Lloyd’s Bank, Limited, London. National City Bank of New York, New York.

The Sumitomo Bank of Hawaii, Ltd., Honolulu.

The Sumitomo Bank of Seattle, Seattle.

Correspondents :—

In all important places at home and abroad.

The Bank buys, sells and receives for collection Drafts and Telegraphic Transfers,

issues Commercial and Travellers’ Letters of Credit available in

important parts of the World, besides doing General Banking Business

XKvi BANKS

m\\,

ESTABLISHED I ESTABLISHED lS8o.

CAPITAL (FULLY PAID UP) Yen 100,000,000.00

RESERVE FUND - „ 57,000,000.00

President :-N. KAJIWARA, Esq.

Vice-President;—S. K. SUZUKI, Esq.

Directors;—

N. KAJIWARA Esq. Baron KOYATA IWASAKI Baron K. MORIMURA

S.N. K.SOMA,

SUZUKI,-Esq. K. TATSUMI, Esq. R. ICHINOMIYA, Esq.

Esq. F. WATANABE, Esq. K.K. TAKEUCHI,

KODAMA, Esq.Esq.

Y.M. YAMAKAWA,

ODAGIR1, Esq.Esq. I. MATSUKATA, Esq. T. HODSUMI, Esq.

HEAD OFFICE: YOKOHAMA

Manager—H. MORI, Esq.

Branches and Agencies

BATAVIA HONGKONG NEW NEWCHWANG SINGAPORE

SOERABAYA

BOMBAY

BUENOS AIRES HONOLULU

KAIYUEN OSAKAYORK SYDNEY

SAIGON

CALCUTTA KOBE PEKING

RANGOON TIENTSIN

CHANGCHUN

DAIREN (Dalny) LONDON

LOS ANGELES RIO DE JANEIRO TOKYO

FENGTIEN (Mukden) LYONS SAN FRANCISCO TSINAN

SEATTLE TSINGTAU

HAMBURG

HARBIN MANILA

NAGASAKI SHANGHAI VLADIVOSTOK

HANKOW NAGOYA SHIMONOSEKI

Correspondents at all the Chief Cities in the World.

The Bank buys and receives for collection Bills of Exchange, issues Drafts and

Telegraphic Transfers and Letters of Credit on above places and elsewhere,

and transacts General Banking Business.

Deposits received for fixed periods at rates to be obtained on application.

H. MORI,

Manager.

BANK AND KNITTING COMPANY xxvii

HONGKONG SAVINGS BANK.

The Business of the above Bank is conducted by the

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANKING CORPORATION

Buies may be obtained on application.

INTEREST on deposits is allowed at 3£ Pee Cent, per annum

on the minimum monthly balances.

Depositors may transfer at their option balances of $100 or more to the Hongkong

and Shanghai Bank, to be placed on FIXED DEPOSIT at 4 Per Cent,

per annum.

For the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation,

A. G. STEPHEN,

Hongkong, January, 1922. Chief Manager.

AGENTS WANTED.

Stockings, Socks, Singlets, Sweaters & Underwear

Silk Stockings and Silk Half-Hose.

CHEAPEST PRICES.

Why pay for high-priced articles when our cheap

goods are as good ?

Ask for sample from

Kam Hing Knitting Company, Ltd.

26. Haiphong Road—Kowloon. Hongkong.

N.B.—This is a British Company.

B

xxviii SHIPPING;

P. & 0., B. I., APCAR

AND

EASTERN & AUSTRALIAN LINES

Companies incorporated in England.

ROUND THE WORLD TOURS. CIRCULAR TICKETS via! SUEZ.

DIRECT STEAMERS JAPAN, CHINA, AUSTRALIA.

MAIL and PASSENGER SERVICES

(Under Contract with H.M. Government)

TO

Shanghai, Japan, Straits, Java, Burma, Ceylon,

India, Persian Gulf, West Indies, Mauritius,

East and South Africa, Australia, New

Zealand. Egypt, Europe, etc.

For full Information, Passage Fares, Freight, Handbooks,

Dates of Sailing, etc., apply to

MACKINNON, MACKENZIE & CO.,

Telephone No. 19. Agents.

SHIPPING xxix

INDO-CHINA STEAM IIAVIGATIOI Co., Ltd.

Calcutta and Japan Line:—Vessels leave Hongkong for Calcutta via,

Singapore

•Calcutta oneandsteamer

Penangevery

approximately every 10 todays;

three weeks proceeds Kobeonviathe return journey from

Shanghai.

All steamers on this Line have excellent passenger

•electric light and fans, and carry a fully qualified Doctor. accommodation, are fitted with

Cargo accepted on through Bills of Lading to Rangoon, Port Swettenham, Madras

and Dutch East Indies.

Hongkong-Shanghai LineSailings approximately every three days

between Canton, Hongkong and ShanghaiSwatow. Steamers on this Line have a

limited amount of passenger accommodation. Through Tickets and Bills of Lading

issued tp all Northern and Yangtsze Ports.

Pukow Weekly

and tothrough sailings are maintained by steamers on the above Line to

Tsingtau.

Hongkong- Manila

and Manila by vessels with good Linepassenger

A weeklyaccommodation;

service is maintained

sailingsbetween Hongkong

from both ports

every Friday.

Hongkong-Haiphong Line:—A weekly service is maintained between

Hongkong and Haiphong for passengers and cargo; sailings from both ports every

Tuesday via Hoihow.

Borneo Line:-Fortnightly sailings to and from Sandakan by two 5,000 ton

steamers, s s. Hin*an

accommodation. Cargoand

takens.s.onMausany, bothofsteamers

through Bills Lading forhaving

Kudat,excellent

Jesselton,passenger

Labuan,

Tawao and Lahad Data.

Hongkong-Tientsin Line :—A regular service is run from March to November

between Hongkong and Tientsin, calling at Weihaiwei and Chefoo, steamers leaving

about every 10 days.

Bangkok Line:—A regular weekly service is maintained between Hongkong

and Bangkok via Swatow.

Shanghai-Tientsin Line :—The steamers Koonshing, tons 2,130, and Kingsinq,

tons 1,983,

during the leave

season.Shanghai for Tientsin via Weihaiwei and Chefoo about twice a week

Yangtsze Line : —The Twin-screw steamers Kungwo (completed 1922), lodngwo

tons 3,923, Tuckwo, tons 3,770, Suiwo, tons 2,672, and Kutivo, tons 2,665, also s.’s. Luenho

tons

Hankow,2,868,connecting

leave Shanghai

at thetwice weekly forport

last-mentioned Chinkiang,

with theNanking,

steamersWuhu, Kiukiang,

Kiangvo, ami

Changwo,

and Tungwo.

The Kiangwo and Tungwo leave Hankow for Ichang weekly, calling at Yochow

and Shasi.

The Changwo runs between Hankow and Yochow, Changsha and Siangtan.

Round Trip Tickets are issued from Shanghai to Hankow, thence to Tientsin by

•rail, and backof visiting

opportunity to Shanghai

Peking.by steamer, and vice-versa, at reduced rates, affording an

Amoy-Manila LineOne steamer runs continually in this trade, the round

trip occupying about one week.

Jardine, Matheson & Co., Limited,

General Managers, Hongkong & Shanghai.

XXX SHIPPING

Douglas steamsDip Companpt £>i

HONGKONG AND SOUTH CHINA COAST-PORT SERVICE.

Regular Service of Fast, High-Class Coast Steamers, having good

accommodation for First-Class Passengers, Electric Light

and Fans in Staterooms. Arrivals and Departures from

the Company’s Wharf (near Blake Pier).

Sailing to Swatow, Amoy and Foochow on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Round trip to Foochow calling at Swatow and Amoy,

occupies about nine days. Stay of Steamers at Swatow

and Amoy on upward and downward trip about 8 hours.

Stay at Foochow 48 hours.

FLEET OF STEAMERS :—

“ HAIYANG " Tons 2,289

“HAICHING" „ 2,080

“ HAIHONG " 2,067

“ HAILOONG" >. 1,929

For Freight and Passage apply to:—

DOUGLAS LAPRAIK & Co.,

General Managers,

20, Des Voeux Road Central, Hongkong.

Agents at Coast Ports:—

A* Amoy-Messrs, DOUGLAS LAPRAIK & Co.

At Swatow and Foochow - Messrs. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co., Ltd.

SHIPPING xxxi

CABLE ADDRESS: Codes Used :

“SHOSEN” OSAKA, At &. A.B.C. 5th Edition,

Scott’s 10th Edition (1908)

AND ALL BRANCHES. Bentley’s Complete PhraseCode

Osaka Shosen Kaisha

(.OSAKA MERCANTILE S. S. Co., Ltd.)

Capital Yen 100,000,000

Fleet 140 Steamers 430,000 Tons

HEAD OFFICE: OSAKA, JAPAN

Hongkong Office: No. 1, Queen’s Buildings.

Telephone Nos. 744, 745.

BRANCHESOsaka,

hama, Takamatsu, Tokyo,Beppu,

Yokohama, Kobe, Nawa,

Kagoshima, Moji, Shimonoseki,

Keelung, Nagasaki,

Taipeh, Kochi,Anping,

Tainan, Taka-

Takao,

Foochow, State

Amoy, Pusan, StateSingapore,

Hongkong, Chemulpo,Bombay,

Chinnampo,

Canton, Dairen,

Tacoma, Tientsin,

New York, Shanghai,

Chicago,

U.S.A., Buenos Ayres, Calcutta, Sourabaya, Sydney, London.

AGENCIES:—Shimidzu,

Wonsan, Seishin, Nagoya, Yokkaicbi, Hakodate, Otaru,

Port Niigata, Tsuruga,Newchwang,

Masampo,

Tsingtau,

Saigon, Swatow,Kunsampo,

Haiphong, Colombo,

Hoihow,

Yladivostock,

Victoria,

Antung,

Port Swettenham,

Vancouver,Penang, Arthur,

Calcutta,

Seattle, San

Chefoo,

Sandakar,Honolulu,

Francisco, Manila,

London,

Melbourne,Macassar, Soerabaya,

Adelaide,’I'oPort Samarang,

Pirie, Perth, Batavia,

Auckland, Townsville, Brisbane, Sydney,

Dunedin, Rio de Janeiro, Samtos,

Buenos

pal portsAires,

and Cape

importantwn,.Durban, Port Said,

cities at Home and Marseilles,

abroad. London, and all other princi-

NORTHEUROPEAN

JAVA EUROPEANLINE.LINE—Monthly service.

SOUTH AMERICAN

PUGETYORK

SOUND LINE—Monthlymservice.

LINE—Fortnightly, connection at Tacoma with the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway,

NEW

NEW ORLEANS LINELINE PANAMA.

via via SUEZ.

JAVA LINE—Monthly.

BOMBAY LINE—Fortnightly.LINE—Weekly, in connection with I. J. Railways and Trans-Siberian Railway.

TSURUGA-VLADIVOSTOCK

OTARU-VLADIVOSTOCK LINE—About three times

OSAKA-KOREA-VLADIVOSTOCK

OSAKA-DAIREN LINE—Three timesa with

amonth.

month.

Railway. LINE—Twice

NAGASAKI-DAIREN LINE—Via

a week,

Korean

in connection

Ports, Weekly.

I. J. Government Railways and South Manchurian

YOKOHAMA-DAIREN

KOBE-KEELUNG LINE—Three

LINE—Weekly, in times a month.

connection with I. J. Government Railways and Imperial Formosan

Government Railways.

YOKOHAMA-TAKOW LINE—About eight atimes a month.

FORMOSA COASTING

KEELUNG-HONGKONG LINE—Nine

LINE—Weekly. times month.

KEELUNG-BANGKOK

TAKOW-CANTON LINE—Monthly.

LINE—Fortnightly

TAKOW-TIENTSIN

OSAKA-TIENTSIN LINE—Weekly. in connection with I. J. Government Railways

LINE—Weekly,

OSAKA-TSINGTAO

OSAKA-KOREAN LINE—Weekly.all ports. About twenty times a month.

LINES—Calling

AUSTRALIANJAVA-BANGKOK

SINGAPORE LINE—Monthly. LINE.-Weekly.ly.

SINGAPORE JAVA-OALOUTTA

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS INLANDLINE.-Week'

LINE.-Weekly.

JAPAN COASTING

Sea Service& isINLAND

ideal forSEA SERVICES—Steamers

sight-seeing on the littorals,are despatched

as steamersDAILY.

run to allThepoints.

O. S. K. Inland

xxxii SHIPPING

Dairen Risen Kaisba.

President T. TSUKAMOTO

General Manager E. KOREMATSU

HEAD OFFICE: Dairen, Manchuria.

BRANCHES:—Antung, Kobe, Tientsin and Tsingtao.

AGENCIES:—Chefoo, Hongkong, Lungkow and Shanghai.

CO.U/'/.EET.

Steamer Tons Steamer Tons

“MANSHU MARU” ...5,266 ‘ GHOHEI M ARU” 1,737

“CHOJUN MARU ” 2,213 “TENCHO MARU” .. 1,300

“KOJUN MARU ” 2,200 “ SAITSU MARU ” 1,138

“HAKUSHIN MARU ” 1,535 ” RYOHE1 MARU” 757

“ISSHIN MARU ” ... 1,486 “BENTEN MARU”... 200

“YEKISHUN MARU” 1,136 “KAISHU MARU” 200

REGULAR SERVICES:

TPENTSIN-DAIREN-TSINGTAU-SHANGHAI LINE Two sailings a month

TIENTSIN-DAIREN-ANT UNG LINE Six

DAIREN-LUNGKOW LINE Six

TSINGTAU-SHANGHAI LINE Four

TSINGTAU-HAICHOW LINE Six

The passengers between Japan and Tientsin can regularly

connect at Dairen with the steamers of O. S. K.’s Osaka-Kobe-

Dairen Line.

Agents:—Messrs. Togo Kisen Kaisha.

Tel. Ad.: “ 1WASAKISI P/’ Codes:

Bentley's; A.B.C. 5th Ed.;

TOKYO. A Western Union.

Mitsubishi Zosen Kabushiki Kaisha

(MITSUBISHI SHIPBUILDING & ENGINEERING COMPANY, LTD.)

HEAD OFFICE:

1, Yaesucho, Itchome, Kojimachi-ku, TOKYO.

DESIGNERS, CONSTRUCTORS & REPAIRERS

OF

ALL CLASSES OF WARSHIPS, PASSENGER & CARGO STEAMERS,

OIL TANKERS, CROSS CHANNEL FERRIES, £rc., €rc.,

ENGINES, Boilers, Turbines, Electrical Machinery, Hydraulic Plant, Steel

Castings &- Forgings and all Machinery for the Complete Equipment of

WARSHIPS k VESSELS.

LICENSEES AND MANUFACTURERS

OF

Most all Famous Foreign Patented Machinery and Apparatus.

WORKS & DOCKS:—

NAGASAKI WORKS, Akunoura, Nagasaki.

Tel. Ad.: “POCK,” >A’GASAKI. Jodes: Brnttej’s; Engiiimiiig; A.l.; A.B.C. 5th Kd.: Western Union.

DOCKS : No. 1 —L. on„ K.B. ...350'

No. 2.— .. 513' B. at„ Ent. ...89'

...6(i' D. of Water „ on K.B....27'

...24'

No. 3.— „ ...714' „ ...97' „ ...35'

CRANES : One 150-ton Gantry : Two 60

One Patent Slip—1,000-tons capacity.and 40-ton Floating Cranes ;

KOBE WORKS, Wadamisaki, Kobe.

Tel. Ad.: “DOCK.” KOBK. Codes: as above.

FLOATING No. 1.—Lift. Power 7.000 tons. Ships taken in 400' x 56' x Draft 22'

DOCKS: /No. (No. 3.— „„

2.— 12,000 „„

16,000 „„ 66' xx „„ 26'

580' xx 98'

470' 30'

CRANES : One 100-ton Tripod and One 40-ton Floating Crane.

HIROSHIMA WORKS, near SHIMONOSEKI.

Tel. Ad.: “ DOCK,” HIK0SH1MA. Codes: as above.

DOCKS: INo. (No. 1—L. on K.B. ...360' B. at„ Ent. ...70' D. of Water on K.B. ...25'

...25'

(No. 3— „„ ...450'

2— 256' „ ....75' 35' „„ ...17'

ALL WORKS & DOCKS are closely connected with each other, thereby

enabling them to co-operate in the prompt execution of work.

XXXIV MERCHANTS

SAIGON RICE.

fompagnie SINO-FRANCAISE to COMMERCE.

Capital paid up: Frs. 2,000.000.

EXPORTERS & IMPORTERS.

Shipping & Insurance Agents.

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS—

For RICE MILLS - YEE CHEONG, CHOLOTt.

THONG GUHN, MYTHO.

SAIGON—7 & 9, rue Lefebvre.

Cable address: SINOFRANC, all codes.

ArculSi Brothers,

MERCHANTS and COMMISSION AGENTS,

64, QUEEN'S ROAD CENTRAL, HONGKONG.

Telegraphic Address: “CURLY.” Telephone No. 409.

SOLE AGENTS FOR:-

SEAMING TWINES of Messrs. Linificio and Canapificio

Nazionale of Milan, Italy.

"ACORN BRAND” ELASTIC BOOT WEB and BOOT

LOOPING of Messrs. Flint, Pettit & Flint, of

Leicester, England.

PAPER MERCHANTS XXXV

I. P. HEILBRONN CO.

MAN I LA, P. I.

Cable Address: PAPERTRADE, MANILA.

THE PIOMEER PAPER HOUSE

IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

PAPER OF All KINDS

CARRIED IN STOCK.

CHANDLER ^ PRICE

PRINTING PRESSES, ALL SIZES.

Types a Printers’ Supplies

WRITE FOR SAMPLES

AND QUOTATIONS.

xxxvi BOOKSELLERS AND PUBLISHERS

HMDZER CO., ITU.

11-16, Nihonbashi Tori Sanchome, TOKYO.

TELEPHONES:-Nos. 28 (Speciali, 17, 207, 208, 209, 876, 1,033, 1,039,

2,297, 3,332, 4,229, 4,323, and 4,345, H0NKY0KU.

BRANCHES. Publishers, Booksellers, Stationers,

Ih v (doods and Outfitters.

KANDA—

Kanda Omote*

ji.nbocho

(Burn gadai- The Largest and Oldest Publi-

shita), Tokyo. shers and Importers of Foreign

OSAKA— Books and Periodicals in the

Higashiku, East.

Bakuromachi, The Largest and Oldest Importers

Shichome. of Foreign Stationery, Dry-

KYOTO— Goods, etc., in the East.

Sanjodori,

Fuyacho-Nishi- The Largest Ink Manufacturers

e-iru. in the East.

YOKOHAMA— Agents for the Far East of Lead-

Bentendori ing Publishers, Stationers, etc.,

Nichome. throughout the World.

FUKUOKA—

Hakata,

Kami-Nishi- All Books supplied in any Language, no

machi. matter on what subject.

SENDAI—

Kokubun- Write us; we can get you any book pub'

machi. lished in the world.

CEMENT MANUFACTURERS

PBBTLID CEMENT CO., LEO.

Telegraphic

Telephone : Address:

No. 566.

English

A.B.C. Code

5th & 6th French

Editions, A. Z. Code

Bentley’s 3rd Edition.

General Agents:

COCHIN-CHINA, CAMBODGE and LAOS: DESCOURS & CABAUD.

Shanghai,

Hankow,

Tientsin :

RACINE & Co.

Philippine

Islands:

SMITH, BELL &

Co., Ltd. Netherlands

India:

Bangkok: HANDEL S-

E. C. MONOD VEREENIGING

& Co. “ROTTERDAM.”

USE DRAGONli BRAND

FOR HIGH-GLASS, SOLID AND ENDURING CONSTRUCTION

xxxviii SHIPCHANDLEKS AND COAL MERCHANTS

SUN MAN WOO CO.,

(Late Ithmarck & Co.: a Chinese Firm.)

NAVAL CONTRACTORS Cable Address: PURVEYORS TO THE ■

“ Bismarck"

SHIPCHANDLERS, GENERAL HONGKONG. ENGLISH ARMY & NAV

IMPORTERS, COAL AND - FRENCH, RUSSIAN

PROVISION MERCHANTS 3A X AND AMERICAN NAVIES

Calling Flag.

SAIL AND FLAG MAKERS, Price List Sent

on Application. HARDWARE AND MACHINERY, -

RIGGERS, STEVEDORES - Codes used: ELECTRIC FITTINGS, CABLES,

AND GENERAL COMMISSION At, A.B.C., 4th and 5th WIRES, LAMPS, BELL SETS,

Editions.

AGENTS. Telephone 309. PUMPS, RAILWAY MATERIALS, &c.

Ships’ and Engine Rooms’ Stores of all Descriptions

Always in Stock at REASOHABLE PRICES.

* * *

FRESH CARDIFF AND JAPANESE COAL.

PAINTS, COLOURS, OIL AND VARNISHES.

Pure Fresh Water Supplied to Shipping by Steam

Pumping Boat on Shortest Notice.

* * *

BAKERY:—Capable of putting out 10,000 lbs.

of Biscuits per Day.

99 & ioir DES VCEUX ROAD CENTRAL,

Near Central Market, HONGKONG.

COAL MERCHANTS XXXIX-

Cable Ad:—“ IWASAKISAL” Codes used:

Head Office and all Branch Offices Al, A.B.C. 5th Edition,

“MITSUBISHI” ♦ Western Union and Bentley’s

London, New York,

Seattle and Paris. Complete Phrase.

MITSUBISHI SHOJI KAISHA,

LIMITED

(Mitsubishi Trading Co., Limited.)

Importers and Exporters,

Shipping Merchants.

Coal, Coke, Copper, Pig Iron, Paper, Window-Glass,

Canned Fish and Sundry Goods, Etc., Etc.

Head Office MARUNOUCHI, TOKYO.

BRANCHES:-TOKYO, YOKOHAMA, NAGOYA, OSAKA, KOBE, MOJIr

NAGASAKI, WAKAMATSU, KARATSU, TSURUGA, KURE, OTARU,

MURORAN, HAKODATE, PEKING, SHANGHAI, HANKOW,

TIENTSIN, DAIREN, TSINGTAO, HONGKONG, SINGAPORE,

VLADIYOSTOCK, LONDON, PARIS, LYONS, BERLIN, NEW YORK,

SEATTLE.

AGENCIES MITSUBISHI GOSHI KAISHA, Tokyo.

•xl COAL MERCHANTS

KAIPINO COALS

THE KAILAN MIIVI1\G VIUMMSTUVITOA.

Head Office :--Tientsin, North China.

AGENCIES:

SHANGHAI K.NI.A.,3,

PEKING K.M.A.,HsiNo,Tongtse

1, JinkeeHutung.

Road. II CHEFOO YeeSouth

Tai &. Co.

HONGKONG Dodwell &. Co., Ld. j DAIREN & MANCHURIA

ManchurianMessrs. The

Railway Co., Dairen.

CANTON Dodwell &. Co., Ld. 1 JAVASAIGON Mitsui

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha.

Bussan Kaisha.

FOOCHOW

AMOY DodwellBoyd& Co.,&. Co.

Ld. 1 SINGAPORE & STRAITS SETTLEMENTS

Paterson,

shi Simons &. Co., Ld.

s■) G°Tokyo,

HANKOW Dodwell & Co., Ld. JAPAN Kaisha

TSINCTAU

CHINWANCTAO Mitsui BussanCoalKaisha.

K.M.A., Port. KOREA Kobe,Shosho

Seoul,Yoko,

etc.

WEI-HAI-WEI W. E. Southcott. I PHILIPPINETheISLANDS

Pacific• Commercial Co., Manila.

LONDON OFFICE:—The Chinese Engineering & Mining Co, Ld, 22, Austin Friars, E.C. 2.

BRUSSELS OFFICE:—The Chinese Engineering & Mining Co, Ld, 13, Rue Brederode.

The Administration’s Collieries are situated in the Kaiping District of the Province

of Chihli and have an annual output of over four million tons of bituminous coal.

The principal port of shipment is Chinwangtao on the Gulf of Chihli, which is

open all the year round and affords special facilities for rapid loading. Coal is also

shipped from the Administration’s wharves at Tongku.

The Administration controls a fleet of steamers, maintaining a regular service

Retween Chinwangtao and Shanghai, Hongkong and Manila as well as with various

smaller ports.

Kaiping Coal

Islands, etc.,isetc.,in for

general use throughout

all industrial, China,and

steam-raising Korea, Japan,purposes.

domestic the Philippine

Kaiping

sulphur. Suitable for metallurgical and household purposes. and free from

Coke is of first-class quality, close grained, hard, heavy

Firebricks Marked K.M.A. are made in any size and shape at the Tongshan

Brickworks. This brand of firebrick practically monopolizes the refractory-

clay trade from Netherlands India to Manchuria and is used exclusively by

the large iron-producing works in the Far East as well as the prominent

Municipal and Government power works throughout China.

-GlazedAdministration

Stoneware and Pipes up are

large stocks to held.

12" diameter are manufactured by the

Glazed Tilesare stocked in a wide range of colours.

TREATIES, CODES, &c.

1

T11E A TIES WITH CHINA

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Nanking,

29th August, 1842

Ratifications Exchanged at Hongkong, 26th Jvne, 1843

Her Majesty the Queen of tiie United Kingilom of Gnat Britain and Irelanl

and His Majesty ihe Emperor of China, being desirous of putting an end to the

misunderstandings and cohsequen: hostilities which have arisen between the two

countries, have tesolved to conclude a treaty for that purpose, and have therefore

named as th'eir Plenipotentiaries, that is to say: Her Majesty the Queen of Great

Briiain and Ireland, fcir Henry 1‘ottiiiger, Bart., a Major-Geneial in the Service of

the East India Company, &c.; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Ciiit a,

the High Commissioners Ke-ying, a Memb r of the Imperial House, a Guardian of

ti.e Crown Prince, and General of the Ganison of Canton : and Ilipoo, of the Imperial

Kindred, graciously peimitted to wear tlie insignia of the first rank, and the distinc-

tion of a peacock’s feather, lately Minister and Governor-General, &c., and now

Lieut.-General commanding at CLapoo—Who, after having communicated to each

other their respective full powers; and found them to be in good and due form, have

agreed upon and concluded the following Aiticles:—

Art. 1.—TTieresball henceforward be peace and friendship between Her Majesty

the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and His Majesty the

Emperor of China, and between their respective subjects, who shall enjoy full security

and protection for their persons and property within the dominions of the other.

Art. II.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees that British subjects, with

their families and establishments, shall be allowed to reside, for the purpose of carry-

ing on their mercantile pursuits, without molestation or restraint, at the cities and

towns of Canton, Amov, Foochow-foo, Ningpo, and Shanghai; and Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britain, &c., will appoint superintendents, or consular officers, to

reside at each of the above-named cities or towns, to be the medium of communication

between the Chinese autboriti s and the said merchants, and to see that the just

duties and other dues of the Chinese Government, as hereinafter provided for, are

duly discharged by Her Britannic Majesty’s subjects.

Art. III. —It being obviously necessary and desirable that British subjev ts should

have some port whereat they may car en and refit their ships when required, and ke< p

stores for that purpose, His Majesty the Emperor of China cedes to Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britan, Ac., the Island of Hongkong to bo | ossess d in perpetuity

by Her Britannic Majesty, her heirs, and successors, and to be governed by such laws

and regulations as Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, Ac., shall soefitto direct.

Art. IV —The Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of six millions of dollars,

as the value of the opium which was delivered up at Canton in the month of March,

1839, as a ran-om for the lives of Her Britannic Majesy’s Superintendent and sub-

jects who had been imprisoned and tin eatened with death by the Chinese high officers.

Art. V.—The Government of China having compelled iheBritishmerchanstraling

at Canton to deal exclusively v ith certain Chinese merchants, called Hong merchants (or

Co-Hong), who had been licensed by th Chinese Government for this purpose, the

Emperor of China agtees to abolish that practice in future at all ports where British

merchants u ay reside, and to permit them to carry on their mercantile transactions

with whatever persons they please; and His Imperial Majesty further agrees to pay to

the British Government the sum of three millions of dollars, on account of debts due

1*

NANKING TREATY, 1842

to British subjects by some of the said Hong merctiants, or (Jo-Hong, who have Lecoine

insolvent, and who owe very large sums of money to subjects of Her Britannic Majesty.

Art. YI.—The Government of Her Britannic Majesty having been obliged to send

out an expedition to demand and obtain redress for the violent and unjust proceeding,

of the Chinese high authorities towards Her Britannic Majesty’s officers and subjects

the Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of twelve millions of dollars, on account

of expenses incurred; and Her Britannic Majesty’s plenipotentiary voluntarily agrees,

on behalf of Her Majestv, to deduct from the said amount of twelve millions of

dollars, any sums which may have lem received by Her Majesty’s combined forces,

as ransom for cities and towns in China, subsequent to the 1st day of August, 1841.

Art. VII.—It is agreed that the total amount of twenty-one millions of dollars,

described in the three preceding Articles, shall be pai l as follows

Six miliions immediately.

Six millions in 1843; that is, three millions on or before the 30-h June, and

three millions on or before 31st of December.

Five millions in 1844; that is, two millions and a half on or before the 30th of

June, and two millions and a half on or before the 31st of December,

Four millions in 1845; that is, two millions on or before 30th of June, and

two millioi s on or before the 31st of December.

And it is further stipulated that interest at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum,

shall be paid by the Government of China on any portion of the above sums that are

not punctually discharged at the periods fixed.

Art. VIII.—The Emperor of China agrees to release, uncon litionally, all subjects

of Her Britannic Majesty (whether natives of Europe or India), who may be in con-

finement at this moment in any part of the Chinese Empire.

Art. IX.—The Emperor of China agrees to publish and prom ilgate, under his

imperial sign manual and seal, a full and entire amnesty and act of indemnity to all

subjects of China, on account of their having resided under, or having had dealings

and intercourse with, or having entered the service of Her Britannic Majestv, or of

Her Majesty’s officers; and His Imperial Majesty further engages to telease all

Chine*e subjects who may be at this moment in confinement for similar reasons.

Art. X.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to establish at all the

ports which are, by Article II. of this Treaty, to be thrown open for the resort of

British merchants, a fair and regular tariff of export and import customs and other

dues, which tariff shall be publicly notified and promulgated for general information;

and the Emperor further engages that, when British merchants shall have once

paid at any of the said ports the regulated customs and dues, agreeable of the tariff

to be hereafter fixed, such merchandise may be conveyed by Chinese merchants

to any province or city in the interior of the empire of China, on paying a further

amount of transit duties, which shall not exceed per cent, on the tariff value of

such goods.

Art. XI.—It is agreed that Her Britannic Majesty’s chief high officer in China

shall correspond with the Chinese high officers, both at the capital and in the provim es,

under the term “communication the subordinate British officers and Chinese high

officers in the pi evinces under the term “ statement,” on the part of the former, and

on the part of the latter, “ declaration,” and the subordinates of both countries on a

footing ot perfect equality; merchants and others not holding official sT lations, and

therefore not included in the above, on both sides for use the term “ representation ”

in all papers addressed to, or intended for, the notice of the respective Govern-

ments.

Art. XII.—On the assent of the Emperor of China to this Treaty being received,

and the discharge of the first instalment of money, Her Britannic Majesty’s forces

will letire from Nanking and the Grand Canal, and will no longer molest or stop the

trade of China. The military | ost at Chinhae will also be withdrawn , but the island

of Koolaugsoo, and that of Chusan, will continue to be held by Her Majesty’s forces

until t he money payments, and the arrangements for opening the ports to British

merchants, be completed.

NANKING TREATY, 1842—TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. XIII.—The ratifications of this Treaty by Her Majesty the Queen of Great

Britain, &c., an! His Majesty the Emperor of China, shall be exchanged as soon

as the great distance which separates England from China will admit; but, in the

meantime, counterpart copies of it, signed an! sealed by the Plenipotentiaries on

behalf of their respective Sovereigns, shall be mutually delivered, and all its provisions

and arrangements shall take effect.

Done at Nanking, and signed and sealed by the Plenipotentiaries on board Her

Britannic Majesty’s ship Cornwallis this 29th day of August, 1842; corresponding

with the Chinese date, twenty-fourth day of the seventh month, in the twenty-second

year of Taou Kwang.

Heney Pottingee,

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary.

And signed by the seals of four Chinese Commissioners.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Peking, 24

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing

misunderstanding between the two countries and to place their relations on a more

satisfactory footing in future, have resolved to proceed to a revision and improvement

of the Treaties existing between them; and, for that purpose, have named as their

Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :—

Her Majesty tlie Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, the Right Honourable the

Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, a Peer of the United Kingdom, and Knight of the

Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the High Commissioner Kweiliang, a

Senior Chief Secretary of State, styled of the East Cabinet, Captain-General of the

Plain White Banner of the Manchu Banner force, Superintendent-General of the

Administration of Criminal Law; and Hwashana, one of His Imperial Majesty’s

Expositors of the Classics, Manchu President of the Otfice for the Regulation of the

Civil Establishment, Captain-General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese

Banner Force, and Visitor of the Office of Interpretation:

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and

found them to be in good and due -form, have agreed upon and concluded the

following Artich s: —

Art. I.—The Treaty of Peace and Amity between the two nations signed at

Nanking on the twenty-ninth day of August, in the year eighteen hundred and forty-

two, is hereby renewed and confirmed.

The supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade having been

•amended and improved, and the substance of their provisions having been incor-

porated in this Treaty, the said Supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of

Trade are hereby abrogated.

Art. II.—For the better preservation of harmony in future, Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britain and His Majesty the Emperor of China mutually agree that,

in accordance with the universal practice of great and friendly nations. Her Majesty

the Queen may, if she see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers,"or other Diplomatic

Agents to the Court of Peking; and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like

manner, if he see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents

to the Court of St. James.

Ait. III.—His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the Ambassador,

Minister, or other Diploipatic Agent, so appointed by Her Majesty the Queen of

Great Britain, may reside, with his family and establishment, permanently at the

capital, or may visit it occasionally at the option of the British Govenuuent. He

TIENTSIN TREATY", 1858

shall not be called upon to perforin any ceremony derogatory to him as representing

the Sovereign of an independent nation on a footing of equality with that of China,

On the other hand, he shall use the same forms of ceremony and respect to His

Majesty the Emperor as are employed by the Ambassadors, Ministers, or Diplomatic

Agents of Her Majesty towards the Sovereigns of independent and equal European

nations.

It is further agreed, that Her Majesty’s G-overnment may acquire at Peking a

site for building, or may hire houses for the accommodation of Her Majesty’s Mission,

and the Chine e Government will assist it in so doing.

Her Majestv’s Representative shall be at liberty to choose his own servants and

attendants, who shall not be subject to any kind of molestation whatever.

Any person guilty of disrespect or violence to Her Majesty’s Representative, or to

any member of his family or establishment, in deed or word, shall be severely punished.

Art. IV.—It is further agreed that no obstacle or difficulty shall be made to the

free movements of Her Majesty’s Representative, and that he and the persons of his

suite may come and go, and travel at their pleasure. He shall, moreover, have full

liberty to send and receive his correspondence to and from any point on the sea-coast

that he may select, and his letters and effects shall be held- sacred and inviolable.

He may employ, for their transmission, special couriers, who shall meet with the same

protection and facilities for travelling as the persons employed in carrying despatches

for the Imperiu Government; and, generally, he shall enjoy the same privileges as

are accorded to officers of the same rank by the usage and consent of Western nations.

All expenses attending the Diplomatic Mission of Great Britain shall be borne

by the British G vernment.

Art. V.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to nominate one of the

Secretaries of State, or a President of one of the Boards, as the high officer with

whom the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent of Her Majesty the Queen

shall transact business, either personally or in writing, on a footing of perfect equality.

Art. VI.—Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain agrees that the privileges

hereby secured shall be enjoyed in her dominions by the Ambassador, Minister, or

Diplomatic Agent of the Emperor of China, accredited to the Court of Her Majesty.

Art. VII.— Her Majesty the Queen may appoint one or more Consuls in the

dominions of the Emperor of China ; and such Consul or Consuls shall be at liberty

to reside in any of the open ports or cities of China as Her Majesty the Queen may

consider most expedient for the interests of British commerce. They shall be treated

with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and

immunities as the Consular Officers of the most favoured nation.

Consuls and Vice-Consuls in charge shall rank with Intendants of Circuit; Vice-

Consuls, Acting Vice-Consuls, and Interpreters, with Prefects. They shall have access

to the official residences of these officers, and communicate with them, either personally

or in writing, on a footing of equality, as the interests of the public service may require.

Art. VIII.—The Christian religion, as professed by Protestants or Roman

Catholics, inculcates the practice of virtue, and teaches man to do as he would be

done by. Persons teaching it or professing it, therefore, shall alike be entitled to the

protection of the Chinese authorities, nor shall any such, peaceably pursuing their

calling and not offending against the laws, be persecuted or interfered with.

Art. IX.—British subjects are hereby authorised to travel, for their pleasure or

for purposes of trade, to all parts of the interior under passports which will be issued

by their Consuls, and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if

demanded, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If

the passport be not irregular, the bearer will be allowed to proceed, and no opposition

shall be offered to his hiring persons, or hiring vessels for the carriage of his baggage

or merchandise. If he be without a passport, or if he commit any offence against the

law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment, but he must not

be subjected to any ill-usage in excess of necessary restraint. No passport need be

applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance

not exceeding 100 li, and for a period not exceeding five days.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint

of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

To Nanking, and other cities, disturbed by persons in arms against the Govern-

ment, no pass shall be given, until they shall have been recaptured.

Art. X.—British merchant ships shall have authority to trade upon the Great

River (Yangtsze). The "Upper and Lower Valley of the river being, however,

disturbed by outlaws, no port shall be for the present opened to trade, with the

•exception of Chinkiang, which shall be opened in a year from the date of the signing

of this Treaty.

So soon as peace shall have been restored, British vessels shall also be admitted

to trade at such ports as far as Hankow, hot exceeding three in number, as the British

Minister, after consultation with the Chinese Secretary of State, may determine shall

•be ports of entry and discharge.

Art. XI.—In addition to the cities and towns of Cant >n, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo,

and Shanghai, opened by the Treaty of Nanking, it is agreed that British subjects

may frequent the cities and ports of Newchwang, Tangchow (Chefoo), Taiwan

(Formosa), Chao-chow (Swatow), and Kiung-chow (Hainan).

They are permitted to carry on trade with whomsoever they please, and to proceed

to and fro at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise.

They shall enjoy the same privileges, advantages, and immunities at the said

towns and ports as they enjoy at the ports already open to trade, including the

aright of residence, buying or renting houses, of leasing land therein, and of building

churches, hospitals and cemeteries.

Art. XII.—British subjects, whether at the ports or at other places, desiring to

build or open houses, warehouses, churches, hospitals, or burial grounds, shall make

their agreement for the land or buildings they require, at the rates prevailing among

the people, equitably and without exaction on either side.

Art. XIII.—The Chinese Government will place no restrictions whatever upon

the employment, by British subjects, of Chinese subjects in any lawful capacity.

Art. XIV.—British subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the

transport of goods or passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled

between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government.

The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either

of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying the goods be granted to

any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will, of course, be

punished according to law.

Art. XV.—All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person, arising

between British subjects, shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the British authorities.

Art. XVI.—Chinese subjects who may be guilty of any criminal act towards

British subjects shall be arrested and punished by the Chinese authorities according

to the laws of China.

British subjects who may commit any crime in Clina shall be tried and punished

by the Consul, or other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws

of Great Britain.

Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

Art. XVII.—A British subject, having reason to complain of Chinese, must

proceed to the Consulate and state his grievance. The Consul will inquire into the

merits of the case, and do his utmost to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a

Chinese have reason to complain of a British subject, the Consul shall no less listen

bo his complaint, and endeavour to settle it in a friendly manner. If disputes take

place of such a nature that the Consul cannot arrange them amicably, then he shall

request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may together examine

into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Art. XVIII.—The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest

protection to the persons and property of British subjects, whenever these shall have

been subjected to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism or robbery, the

local authorities shall at once take the necessary steps for the recovery of the stolen

8 TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

property, the suppression of disorder, and the ari’est of the guilty parties, whom they

will punish according to law.

Art. XIX.—If any British merchant-vessel, while within Chinese waters, be

plundered by robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use

every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover the

stolen property, that it may be handed over to the Consul for restoration to the owner.

Art. XX.—If any British vessel be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coast

of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any port within the dominions of the

Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities, on being apprised of the fact, shall

immediately adopt measures for its relief and security ; the persons on board shall

receive friendly treatment and shall be furnished, if necessary, with the means of

conveyance to the nearest Consular .station.

Art. XXL—If criminals, subjects of China, shall take refuge in Hongkong or

on board the British ships there, they shall, upon due requisition by the Chinese

authorities, be searched for, and, on proof of their guilt, be delivered up.

In like manner, if Chinese offenders take refuge in the houses or on board the

vessels of British subjects at the open ports, they shall not be harboured or concealed,

but shall be delivered up, on due requisition by the Chinese authorities, addressed to

the British Consul.

Art. XXII.—Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a

British subject, or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their

utmost to effect his arrest and enforce recovery of the debts. The British authorities

will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any British subject fraudulently 1

absconding or failing to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

Art. XXIII.—Should natives of China who may repair to Hongkong to trade

incur debts there, the recovery of such debts must be arranged for by the English

Court of Justice on the spot; but should the Chinese debtor abscond, and be known

to have property real or personal within the Chinese territory, it shall be the duty of

the Chinese authorities on application by, and in concert with, the British Consul, j

to do their utmost to see justice done between the parties.

Art. XXIY.—It is agreed that British subjects shall pay, on all merchandise

imported or exported by them, the duties prescribed by the tariff; but in no case shall

they be called upon to pay other or higher duties than are required of the subjects

of any other foreign nation.

Art. XXV.—Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the ;

goods, and duties of export on the shipment of the same.

Art. XXVI.—Whereas the tariff fixed by Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking,

and which was estimated so as to impose on imports and exports a duty of about

the rate of five per cent, ad valorem, has been found, by reason of the fall in value of

various articles of merchandise therein enumerated, to impose a duty upon these

considerably in excess of the rate originally assumed, as above, to be a fair rate, it is

agreed that the said tariff shall be revised, and that as soon as the Treaty shall have

been signed, application shall be made to the Emperor of China to depute a high

officer of the Board of Revenue to meet, at Shanghai, officers to be deputed on behalf

of the British Government, to consider its revision together, so that the tariff, as

revised, may come into operation immediately after the ratification of this Treaty.

Art. XXVII.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this

Treaty may demand a further revision of the tariff, and of the Commercial Articles of

this Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within

six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for

ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten ye irs, and so it shall

be at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XXVIII.—Whereas it was ngreed in Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking

that British imports, having paid the tariff duties, should be conveyed into the interior,

free of all further charges, except a transit duty, the amount whereof was not to

exceed a certain percentage on tariff value; and whereas, no accurate information

having been furnished of the amount of such duty, British merchants have constantly

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

complained that charges are suddenly and arbitrarily imposed by the provincial

authorities as transit duties upon produce on its way to the foreign market, and on

imports on their way into the interior, to the detriment of trade ; it is agreed that

within lour months from the signing of this Treaty, at all ports now open to British

trade, and within a similar period at all ports that may hereafter be opened, the

authority appointed to superintend the collection of duties shall be obliged, upon

application of the Consul, to declare the amount of duties leviable on produce between

the place of production and the port of shipment upon imports between the Consular

port in question and the inland markets named by the Consul; and that a notification

thereof shall be published in English and Chinese for general information.

But it shall be at the option of any British subject desiring to convey produce

purchased inland to a port, or to convey imports from a port to an inland market, to

clear his goods of all transit duties, by payment of a single charge. The amount of

this charge shall be leviable on exports at the first barrier they may have to pass, or,

on imports at the port at which they are landed; and on payment thereof a certificate

shall be issued, which shall exempt the goods fromall further inland charges whatsoever.

It is further agreed that the amount of the charge shall be calculated, as nearly

as possible, at the rate of two and a half per cent, ad valorem, and that it shall be fixed

for each article at the conference to he held at Shanghai for the revision of the tariff.

It is distinctly understood that the payment of transit dues, by commutation or

otherwise, shall in no way affect the tariff duties on imports or exports, which will

continue to be levied separately and in full.

Art. XXIX.—British merchant vessels, of more than one hundred and fifty tons

burden, shall be charged tonnage-dues at the rate of four mace per ton ; if of one

hundred and fifty tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open

ports, or for Hongkong, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special

certificate from the Customs, on exhibition of which she shall be exempted from all

further payment of tonnage dues in any open ports of China, for a period of four

months, to be reckoned from the port-clearance.

Art. XXX.—The master of any British merchant vessel may, within forty-eight

hours after the arrival of bis vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking

bulk, in which case he will not be subject to pay tonnage-dues. But tonnage-dues

shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. Ho other fees or

charges upon entry or departure shall be levied.

Art. XXXI.—No tonnage-dues shall be payable on boats employed by British

subjects in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provision, or

other articles not subject to duty, between any of the open ports. All cargo-boats,

however, conveying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage-dues once in six

months, at the rate of four mace per register ton.

Art. XXXII.—The Consuls and Superintendents ofCustoms shall"consult together

regarding the erection of beacons or lighthouses and the distribution of buoys and

lightships, as occasion may demand.

Art. XXXIII.—Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorised by the Chinese

Government to receive the same in its behalf, either in sycee or in foreign money,

according to the assay made at Canton on the thirteenth of July, one thousand eight

hundred and forty-three.

Art. XXXIV.—Sets of standard weights and measures, prepared according to

the standard issued to the Canton Custom-house by the Board of Revenue, shall be

delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port to secure

uniformity and prevent confusion.

Art. XIQIV.—Any British merchant vessel arriving at one of the open ports

shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like

manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her

departure, she shall be allowed to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XXXVI.—Whenever a British merchant vessel shall arrive off one of the

open ports, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or more Customs officers

10 TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

to guard the ship. They shall either live in a boat of their own, or stay onboard the

ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their food and expenses shall be supplied'

them from the Custom-house, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever

from the master or consignee. Should they violate this regulation, they shall be

punished proportionately to the amount exacted.

Art. XXXVII.—Within twenty-four hours after arrival, the ships’ papers,,

bills of lading, etc., shall be lodged in the hands of the Consul, who will within a

further period of twenty-four hours report to the Superintendent of Customs the name

of the ship, her registered tonnage, and the nature of her cirgo. If, owing to neglect

on the part of the master, the above rule is not complied with within forty-eight

hours after the ship’s arrival, he shall be liable to a fine of fifty taels for every day’s

delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred taels.

The master will be responsible for the correctness of the manifest, which shall

contain a full and tiue account of the particulars of the cargo on board. For

presenting a false manifest, he will subject himself to a fine of five hundred taels; but

he will be allowed to correct, within twenty-four hours after delivery of it to the customs

officers, any mistake he may discover in his manifest without incurring this penalty.

Art. XXXVIII.—After receiving from the Consul the report in due form, the-

Superintendent of Customs shall grant the vessel a permit to open hatches. If the

master shall open hatches, and begin to discharge any goods, without such permission,

he shall be fined fivehundred taels, and the goods discharged shall be confiscated wholly.

Art. XXXIX —Any British merchant who has cargo t > land or ship must apply

to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Cargo landed or shipped

without such permit will be liable to confiscation.

Art. Xb.—-No transhipment, from one vessel to another can be made without

special permission, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped.

Art. XLL—When all dues and duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent

of Customs shall give a port-clearance and the Consul shall then return the ship’s

papers, so that she may depart on her voyage.

Art. XLII.—With respect to articles subject, according to the tariff, to an a&

valorem duty, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer in affixing

its value, then each party shall call two or three merchants to look at the goods, and

the highest price at which any of these merchants would be willing to purchase

them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

Art. XUII.—Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each a1 tide,

making a deduction for the tare, weight of congee, &e. To fix the tare of any articles,

such as tea, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Custom-house otbcer, then

each party shall choose so many chests out of every hundred, which being first

weighed in gross, shall afterwards be tared, and the average tare upon these chests

shall be assumed as the tare upon the whole; and upon this principle shall the

tare be fixed upon other goods and packages. If there should be any other points in

dispute which cannot be settled, the British merchant may appeal to his Consul, who

will communicate the particulars of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, that

it may be equitably arranged. But the appeal must be made within twenty-four

hours or it will not be attended to. While such points are still unsettled, the

Superintendent of Customs shall postpone the insertion of the same in his books.

Art. XLIV.—Upon all damaged goods a fair reduction of ditty shall be allowed

proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in

the manner pointed out in the clause of this Treaty having reference to articles which

pay duty ad valorem.

Art. XLV.—British merchants who may have imported merchandise into any of

the open ports, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall

be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to

prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made by suitable officers,

to see that the duties paid on such goods, as entered in the Custom-house books,

correspond with the representations made and that the goods remain with their

original marks unchanged. He shall then make a memorandum of the port-clearance

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858 11

of the goods, and of the amount of duties | aid, and deliver the same to the merchant,

and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs of the other ports. All which

being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the gf ods are laden, every-

thing being found on examination there to correspond, she shall be permitted to break

bulk, and land the said goods, without being subject to the payment of any additional

duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall

detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to

confiscation by the Chinese Government.

British merchants desiring to re-export duty-paid imports to a foreign country

shall be entitled, on complying with the same conditions as in the case of re-exporta-

tion to another port in China, to a drawback certificate, which shall be a valid tender

to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Foreign grain brought into any port of China in a British ship, if no part thereof

has been landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

Art. XLYI.—The Chinese authorities at each port shall adopt the means they

may judge inost proper to prevent the r'evenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

Art. XLVII.—British merchant-vessels are not entitled to resort to otherthanthe

ports of trade declared open by Treaty; they are not unlawfully to enter other ports in

China, or to carry on clandestine trade along the coast thereof. A ny vessel violating this

provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

Art. XLYIIl.—If any British merchant-vessel be concerned in smuggling, the

goods, whatever their value or nature, shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese

authorities, and the ship may be prohibited from trading further, and sent away as

soon as her account shall have been adjusted and paid.

Art. XLIX.—All penalties enforced, or confiscations made, under this Treaty

shall belong and be appropriated to the public service of the Government of China.

Art. L.—All official communications addressed by the Diplomatic and Consular

Agent of Her Majesty the Queen to the Chinese Authorities shall, henceforth, be writ-

ten in English. They will for the present be accompanied by a Chinese version, but it

is understood that, in the event of there being any difference of meaning between the

English and Chinese text, the English Government will hold the sense as expressed in

the English text to be the correct sense. This provision is to apply to the Treaty now

negotiated, the Chinese text of which has been carefully corrected by the English original.

Art. LI.—It isagreedthat henceforward the character ^“1” (barbarian) shall not

be applied to the Government or subjects of HerBritannicMajesty in any Chinese official

document issued by the Chinese authorities, either in the capital or in the provinces.

Art. LII.—British ships of war coming for no hostile purpose, or being engaged

in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit all ports within the dominions

of the Emperor of China, and shall receive every facility for the purchase of pro-

visions, procuring water, and, if occasion require, for the making of repairs. The

commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on

terms of equality and courtesy.

Art. LIII.—In consideration of the injury sustained by native and foreign

commerce from the prevalence of piracy in the seas of China, the high contracting

parties agree to concert measures for its suppression.

Art. LIY.—The British Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all

privileges, immunities, and advantages conferred on them by previous Treaties: and

it is hereby expressly stipulated that the British Government and its subjects will be

allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that

may have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China

to the Government or subjects of any other nation.

Art. LY.—In evidence of her desire for the continuance of a friendly under-

standing, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain consents to include in a Separate

Article, which shall be in every respect of equal validity with the Articles of this

Treaty, the condition affecting indemnity for expenses incurred and losses sustained

in the matter of the Canton question.

12 TIENTSIN TREATY, 1S5S

Art. LVI.—The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and of His Majesty the Emperor of China, re-

spectively, shall be exchanged at Peking, within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and s aled this

Treaty. Done at Tientsin, this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight; corresponding with the Chinese date, the

sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and

Signature of 1st Chinese Plenipotentiary. Kincardine.

Signature of 2nd Chinese Plenipotentiary.

Separate Article annexed to the Treaty concluded between Great Britain and China on the

twenty-sixth day of June, in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty eight.

It is hereby agreed that a sum of two millions of taels, on account of the losses sus-

tained by British subjects through the misconduct of the Chinese authorities at Canton,

and a further sum of two millions of taels on account of the Military expenses of the ex-

pedition which Her Majesty the Queen has been compelled to send out for the purpose of

obtaining redress, and of enforcing the observance of Treaty provisions, shall be paid

to Her Majesty’s Representatives inChinabythe authorities oftheKwangtung Province.

The necessary arrangements with respect to the time and mode of effecting

these payments shall be determined by Her Majesty’s Representative, in concert with

the Chinese authorities of Kwangtung.

When the above amounts shall have been discharged in full, the British forces

will be withdrawn from the city of Canton. Done at Tientsin this twenty-sixth day of

June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding

with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Signattre of 1st Chinese clenipotentiary. Signature of 2nd Chinese Plenipotentiary.

AGREEMENT IN PURSUANCE OE ARTICLES XXVI.

AND XXVIII. OE THE TREATY OE TIENTSIN *

Signed at Shanghai, 8th November, 1858

Whereas it was provided, by the Treaty of Tientsin, that a conference should be

held at Shanghai between Officers deputed by the British Government on the one part

and by the Chinese Government on the other part, for the purpose of determining the

amount of tariff duties and transit dues to be henceforth levied, a conference has been

held accordingly; and its proceedings having been submitted to the Right Honourable

the Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, High Commissioner and Plenipotentiary of Her

Majesty the Queen on the one part; and to Kweiliang, Hwashana, Ho Kwei-tsing,

Ming-shen, and Twan Ching-shih, High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries of His

Imperial Majesty the Emperor, on the other part, these High Officers have agreed

and determined upon the revised Tariff hereto appended, the rate of transit dues

therewith declared, together with other Rules and Regulations for the better explana-

tion of the Treaty aforesaid ; and do hereby agree that the said Tariff and Rules—

the latter being in ten Articles, thereto appended—shall be equally binding on the

Governments and subjects to both countries with the Treaty itself.

In witness whereof they hereto affix their Seals and Signatures.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiangsu, this eighth day of November, in

the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the

tenth moop of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Seal of Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Signatures of the Five Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

♦The Import Tariff was

arranged in 1919. superseded, by been superseded by one

THE CIIEEOO CONVENTION, 1876

WITH ADDITIONAL ARTICLE THERETO FOR REGULATING THE

TRAFFIC IN OPIUM

Ratifications exchanged at London, 6th May, 1886

Agreement negotiated between Sir Thomas Wade, k.c.b., Her Britannic

Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at tlie Court of China,

and Li, Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Grand

Secretary, Governor-General of the Province ol Chihh, of the First Class of the

Third Order of Nobility.

The negotiation between the Ministers above named has its origin in a despatch

received by Sir Thomas Wade, in the Spring « f the present y. ar, from the Earl of

Derby, Principal Secretary oi State for Foreign Affairs, dated 1st January, 1876.

This contained instructions regarding the disposal of three questions: first, a satis-

factory settlement of the Yunnan affair; secondly, a faithful fulfilment of engagements

of last year respecting intercourse between the high officers of the two Governments ;

thirdly, the adoption of a uniform system in satistaction of the understanding arrived

at in the month of September, 1875 (8th moon of the 1st year of the reign Kwang

Su), on the subject of rectification of conditions of trade. It is to this despatch that

Sir Thomas Wade has referred himself in discussions on these questions with the

Tsung-li Yamen, further reference to which is here omitted as superfluous. The

conditions now agreed to between Sir Ihomas Wade and the Grand Secretary are as

follows:—

Section I.—Settlement of the Yunnan Case

1. —A Memorial is to be presented to the Throne, whether b

Yamen or by the Grand Secretary Li is immaterial, in the sense of the memorandum

prepared by Sir Thomas Wade. Before presentation the Chinese text of the Memorial

is to be shown to Sir Thomas Wade.

2. —The Memorial having been presented to the Throne, and the

in reply received, the Tsung-li Yamen will communicate copies of the Memorial and

Imperial decree of Sir Thomas Wade, together with copy of a letter from the

Tsung-li Yamen to the Provincial Governments, instructing them to issue a proclama-

tion that shall embody at length the above Memorial and Decree. Sir Thomas WTade

will thereon reply to the effect that for two years to come officers will be sent by the

British Minister to different places in the provinces to see that the proclamation is

posted. On application from the British Minister or the Consul of any port instructed

by him to make application, the high officers of the provinces will depute competent

officers to accompany those so sent to the places which they go to observe.

3. —In order to the framing of such regulations as will be neede

of the frontier trade between Burmah and Yunnan, the Memorial submitting the

proposed settlement of the Yunnan affair will contain a request that an Imperial

Decree be issued directing the Governor-General and Governor, whenever the British

Government shall send officers to Yunnan, to select a competent officer of rank to

confer with them and to conclude a satisfactory arrangement.

4. —The British Government will be free for five years, from

next, being the 17th day of the 11th moon of the 2nd year of the reign of Kwang Su,

to station officers at Ta-li Fu, or at some other suitable place in Yunnan, to observe

the conditions of trade ; to the end that they may have information upon which to

base the regulations of trade when these have to be discussed. For the considera-

tion and adjustment of any matter affecting British officers or subjects, these officers

will be free to address themselves to the authorities of the province. The opening

14 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

of the trade may be proposed by the British Government as it may find best at any

time within the t rin of five years, or upon expiry of the term of five years.

Passports having been obtained last year-for a Mission-from Ifidiainto Yunnan,

it is open to the Viceroy of India to send such Mission at any time he may see fit.

5:.—The amount of in letnnity to be paid on account of the families of the officers

and others killed in Yunnan, on account of the expenses which the Yunnan case has

occasioned, and on account of claims of British merchants arising out of the action

of officers of the Chinese Government up to the commencement of the present year.

Sir Thomas Wade takes upon himself to fix at two hundred thousand taels, payable

on demand.

(5. -When the case is closed an Imperial letter will be written expressing regret

for what has occurred in Yunnan. 'Ihe Mission bearing the Imperial letter will

proceed to England immediately. Sir Thomas Wade is to be informed of the

constitution of this Mission for the information of this Government. The text of the

Imperial letter is also to be communicated to Sir Thomas Wade by the Taung-li

Yamen.

Section II.— Official Intercourse

Under this heading are included the conditions of intercourse between high

officers in the capital and the provinces, and between Consular officers and Chinese

officials at tie ports; also the conduct of judicial proceedings in mixed cases.

• 1.—In the Tsung-li Yamen’s Memorial of the 28th September, 1875, the Prince

of Kung and the Ministers state! that their object in presenting it had not been

simply the transaction of business in which Chinese and Foreigners might be con-

cerned; missions abroad and the question of diplomatic intercourse lay equally with-

in their prayer.

To the prevention of farther misunderstanding upon the subject of intercourse

and correspondence, the present conditions of both having cuused complaint in the

capital and in the evinces, it is agreed that the Tsung-li Yamen shall address a

circular to the Legations, inviting Foreign Representatives to consider with them a

code of etiquetle, to the end that foreign officials in China, whether at the ports or

elsewhere, may be treated with the same regard as is shown, them when serving

abroad in other countries and as would be shown to Chinese agents so serving abroad.

The fact that China is about to establish Missions and Consulates abroad renders

an understanding on these points essential.

2. —The British Treaty of 1858, Article XVI., lays down that “Chin

who may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and

pu ashed by Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

“British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and

punished by the Consul, or any other public functionary authorised thereto, accord-

ing to the laws of Great Britain.

“Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.”

The words “functionary authorised thereto” are translated in the Chinese text

“British Government.”

In order to the fulfilment of its Treaty obligation, the British Government has

established a Supreme Court at Shanghai with a special code of rules, which it is

now about to revise. The Chinese Government has established at Shanghai a Mixed

Court; but the officer presiding over it, either from lack of power or dread of un-

popularity, constantly fails to enforce his judgments.

It is now understood that the Tsung-li Yamen will write a circular to the Lega-

tion, inviting Foreign Representatives at once to consider with the Tsung li Yamen

the measures needed for the more effective administration of justice at the ports

open to trade.

3. —It is agreed that, whenever a crime is committed affecting the

property of a British subject, whether in the interior or at the open ports, the British

Minister shall be free to send officers to the spot to be present at the investigation.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876 1&

To the prevention of misunderstanding on this point, Sir Thomas Wade wilE

write a Note to the above effect, to which the Tsung-li Yamen will reply, affirming,

that this is the course of proceeding to be adhered to for the time to come.

It is further understood that so long as the laws of the two countries differ from

each other, there can be but one principle to guide judicial proceedings in mixed cases-

in China, namely, that the case is tried by the official of the defendant’s nationality ;

the official of the plaintiff’s nationality merely attending to watch the proceedings in>

the interest of justice. If the officer so attending be dissatisfied with the proceedings,,

it will be in his power to protest against them in detail. The law administered will

be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case. This is the meaning of

the words hui t'ung. indicating combined action in judicial proceedings, in Article-

XVI. of the Treaty of Tientsin; and this is the course to be respectively followed by

the officers of either nationality.

Section III.—Trade.

1. —With reference to the area within which, according to the

lehin ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, Sir Thomas Wade-

agrees to move his Government to allow the ground rented by foreigners (the so-called

Concessions) at the different ports, to be regarded as the area of exemption from

lekin; and the Government of China will thereupon allow Ich’ang, in the province

of Hu-pi; Wu-hu, in An-hui; Wen-chow, in Che-kiang ; and Pei-hai (Pak-hoi),

in Kwang-tung to be added to the number of ports open to trade and to become

Consular stations. The British Government will, further, be free to send officers to-

reside at Chung-k’ing to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuen -

British merchants will not be allowed to reside at Chung-k’ing, or to open establish-r

ment s or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port. When

steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be

taken into consideration.

It is further proposed as a measure of compromise that at certain points on the-

shore of the Great River, namely, Tat’ung and Ngan-Ching in the province of An-

hui ; Ho-Kou, in Kiang-si ; Wu-sueh, Lu-chi kou, and Sha-shih in Hu-Kwang,

these being all places of trade in the interior, at which, as they are not open ports,

foreign merchants are not legally authorised to land or ship goods, steamers shall be

allowed to touch for the purpose of landing or shipping passengers or goods; but in

all instances by means of native boats only, and subject to the regulations in force

affecting native trade.

Produce accompanied by a half-duty certificate may be shipped at su h points

by the steamers, but may not be landed by them for sale. And at all such points,

except in the case of imports accompanied by a transit duty certificate or exports

similarly certificated, which will be severally passed free of lekin on exhibition of such

certificates, lekin will be duly collected on all goods whatever by the native authorities.

Foreign merchants will not be authorised to reside or open houses of business or

warehouses at the places enumerated as ports of call.

2. —At all ports open to trade, whether by earlier or later agr

settlement ar. a has been previously defined, it will be the duty of the British Consul,

acting in concert with his colleagues, the Consuls of other Powers, to come to an

understanding with the local authorities regarding the definition of the foreign

settlement area.

3-—On Opium, Sir Thomas Wade will move his Government to sanction an

arrangement different from that affecting other imports. British merchants, when

opium is brought into port, will be obliged to have it taken cognisance of by the

Customs, and deposited in bond, either in a warehouse or a receiving hulk, until such

time as there is a sale for it. The importer will then pay the tariff duty upon it,

and the purchasers the lekin, in order to the prevention of evasion of the Treaty. The

amount of lekin to be collected will be decided by the different Provincial Govern-

ments according to the circumstances of each.

16 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

4. —The Chinese Government agree that Transit Duty Certificate

framed under one rule at all ports, no difference being made in the conditions set forth

therein; and that, so far as imports are concerned, the nationality of the person

possessing and carrying these is immaterial. Native produce carried from an inland

centre to a port of shipment, if bond fide intended for shipment to a foreign port,

may be, by treaty, certified by the British subject interested, and exempted by

payment of the half dutv from all charges demanded upon it en route. If produce be

not the property of a British subject, or is being carried to a port not for exportation,

it is not entitled to the exemption that would be secure! it by the exhibition of a

transit duty certificate. The British Minister is prepared to agree with the Tsung-li

Yamen upon rules that will secure the Chinese Government against abuse of the

privilege as affecting produce.

The words nei-ti (inland) in the clause of Article VII. of the Buies appended to

the Tariff, regarding carriage of imports inland, and of native produce purchased

inland, apply as much to places on the sea coasts and river shores as to places in the

interior not open to foreign trade; the Chinese Government having the right to make

arrangements for the prevention of abuses thereat.

5. —Article XLV. of the Treaty of 1858 prescribed no limit to the te

which a drawback may be claimed upon duty-paid imports. The British Minister

agrees to a term of three years, after expiry of which no drawback shall be claimed.

6. —The foregoing stipulation, that certain ports are to be opened to foreign trade,

and that landing and shipping of goods at six places on the Great Biver is to be

sanctioned, shall be given effect to within six months after receipt of the Imperial

Decree approving the memorial of the Grand Secretary Li. The date for giving effect

to the stipulations affecting exemption of imports from lekin taxation within the for-

eign settlements an 1 the collection of lekin upon opium by the Customs Inspectorate

at the same time as the Tariff Duty upon it, will be fixed as soon as the British Gov-

ernment has arrived at an undi r-t anding on the subject wiihother foreign Governments.

7. —The Governor <>f Hongkong having long complained of the inte

the Canton Customs Eevenue Cruisers with the junk trade of that Colony, the Chinese

Government agrees to the appointment of a Commission, to consist of a British Consul,

an officer of the Hongkong Government, and a Chinese official of equal rank, for

the establishment of some system that shall-enable the Chinese Government to

prote:t its revenue without prejulice to the interests of the Colony.

Separate Article

Her Majesty’s Government having it in contemplation to send a Mission of

Exploration next year by way of Peking through Kan-su and Koko-Nor, or by way of

Ssu-chuen, to Thibet, and thence to India, the Tsung-li Yamen, having due regard

to the circumstances, will, when the time arrives, issue the necessary passports, and

will address letters to the high provincial authorities and to the Besident in Thibet.

If the Mission should not be sent by these routes, but should be proceeding across

the Indian frontier to Thibet, the Tsung-li Yamen, on receipt of a communication to

fhe above effect from the British Minister, will write to the Chinese Besident in

Thibet, and the Besident, with due regard to the circumstances, will send officers to

take due care of the Mission; and passports for the Mission will be issued by the

Tsung-li Yamen, that its passage be not obstructed.

Done at Chefoo, in the province of Shan-tung, this thirteenth day of September,

in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-six.

[l.s.J Thomas Francis Wade,

[l.s.] Li Hung-chang.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876 17

Additional Articles to the Agreement between Great Britain and China

Signed at Chefoo on the 13M September, 1876

Signed at London, 18th July, 1885

The Governments of Great Britain and of China, considering that the arrange-

ments proposed in Clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Agreement between Great

Britain and China, signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876 (hereinafter

’referred to as the “ Chefoo Agreement ”), in relation to the area within which lehin

ought not to be colhc ed on foreign goods at the open ports, and to the definition of

the Foreign Settlement area, require further consideration; also that the terms of

•Clause 3 of the same section are not sufficiently explicit to serve as an efficient regula-

tion for the traffic in opium, and recognizing the desirability of placing restrictions

■on the consumption of opium, have agreed to the present Additional Article.

1. —As regards the arrangements above referred to and propo

and 2 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that they shall be reserved

•for further consideration between the two Governments.

2. —In lieu of the arrangement respecting opium proposed in C

II. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that foreign opium, when imported into

China, shall be taken cognizance of by the Imperial Maritime Customs, and shall be

deposited in bond, either in warehouses or receiving-hulks which have been approved

-of by the Customs, and that it shall not be removed thence until there shall have

been paid to the Customs the Tariff duty of 30 taels per chest of 100 catties, and also

a sum not exceeding 80 taels per like chest as leltin.

3. —It'is agreed that the aforesaid import and lehin duties hav

•owner shall be allowed to have the opium repacked in bond under the supervision of

the Customs, and put into packages of such assorted sizes as he may select from such

sizes as shall have been agreed upon by the Customs authorities and British Consul

at the port of entry.

The Customs shall then, if required, issue gratuitously to the owner a transit cer-

-tificate for each such package, or one for any number of packages, at option of the owner.

Such certificates shall free the opium to which it applies from the imposition of

.any further tax or duty whilst in transport in the interior, provided that the package

has not been opened, and that the Customs seals, marks, and numbers on the packages

fhave not been effaced or tampered with.

Such certificate shall have validity only in the hands pf Chinese subjects, and

shall not entitle foreigners to convey or accompany any opium in which they may

be interested into the interior.

4. —It is agreed that the Regulations under which the said cer

dssued shall be the same for all the ports, and that the form shall be as follows:—

“ This is to certify that “Tariff

OpiumandTransit Certificate.

lehin duties at the rate of taels per chest

-of 100 catties have been paid on the opium marked and numbered as under; and

that, in conformity with the Additional Article signed at London the 18th July, 1885,

and appended to the Agreement between Great Britain and China signed at Cbefoo

'the 13th September, 1876, and approved by the Imperial Decree printed on the back

thereof, the production of this certificate will exempt the opium to which it refers,

•wherever it may be found, from the imposition of any further tax or duty whatever,

provided that the packages are unbroken, and the Customs seals, marks, and numbers

lhave not been effaced or tampered with.

“ Mark, Ho.

X — 00 packages

“ Port of entry,

“ Date “ Signature of Commissioner of Customs.”

5. —The Chinese Government undertakes that when the packag

•opened at the place of consumption, the opium shall not be subjected to any tax or

18 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

contributi"U, direct or indirect, other than or in excess of such lax or contribution

as is or mav hereafter be levied on native opium.

In the event of such tax or contribution being calculated ad valorem, the same

rate, value for value, shall be assessed on. foreign and native opium, and in ascertaining

for this purpose the value of foreign opium the amount paid on it [or lekin at the

port of entry shall be deducted from its market value.

6. —It is agreed that the'present Additional Article shall be considere

part of the Chefoo Agreement, and that it shall have the same force and validity as

if it were therein inserted word for word. It shall come into operation six months

after its signature, provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they

have not, then on the date at which such exchange takes place.

7. —The arrangement respecting opium contained m the present Addit

shall remain binding for four years, after the expiration of which period either

Government may at any time give twelve months’ notice of its desire to determine it,

and, such notice being given, it shall terminate accordingly. It is, however, agreed

that the Government of Great Britain shall have the right to terminate the same at

any time should the transit certificate be found not to confer on the opium complete

exemption from all taxation whatsoever whilst being carried from the port of entry

to the place of consumption in the interior. In the event of the termination of the

present Additional Article the arrangement with regard to opium now in force and

the regulations attached to the Treaty of Tientsin shall revive.

8. —The High Contracting Parties may, by common consent, adopt

tions of the provisions of the present Additional Article which experience may show

to be desirable.

9. —It is understood that the Commission provided for in Clause 7 o

of the Chefoo Agreement to inquire into the question of prevention of smuggling

into China from Hongkong shall be appointed as soon as possible.

10. —The Chefoo Agreement, together with, and as modified b

Additional Article, shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at London

as soon as possible.

In w itness whereof the Undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective-

Governments, have signed the present Additional Article, and have affixed thereto-

their seals.

Done at London, in quadruplicate (two in English and two in Chinese), this-

18th day of July, 1885, being the seventh day of the sixth moon, in the eleventh year

of the reign of Hwang Hsu.

[n.s.] Salisbury.

. ‘ [l.s.] Tseng.

The Marquis Tseng to the Marquis of Salisbury.

Chinese Legation, London, \9>th July, 1885.

My Lord—In reply to your Lordship’s note of this date, I have the honour to-

state that the Imperial Government accept the following as the expression of the

understanding which has been come to between the Governments of Great Britain

and China in regard to the Additional Article to the Chefoo Agreement relative to

opium, which has been signed this day:—

1. —It is understood that it shall be competent for Her Majesty’s

once to withdraw from this new arrangement, and to revert to the system of taxation

for opium at present in operation in China, in case the Chinese Government shall fail to»

bringtheotherTreaty Powers toconform to the provisions of the said Additional Article.

2. —It is further understood that, in the event of the terminat

Additional Article, the Chefoo Agreement, with the exception of Clause 3 of Section

III., and with the modification stipulated in Clause 1 of the said Additional Article,,

nevertheless, remain in force.

THE OPIUM CONVENTION

Memorandum of the basis of Agreement arrived at after discussion betwe'en Mr.

.James Russell, Puisne Judge of Hongkong; Sir Robert Hart, k.c.m.g., luspector-

General of Customs, and Shao Taotai, Joint Commissioners for China; and Mr.

Byron Brenau, Her Majesty’s Consul at Tientsin, in pursuance of Article 7, Secton

illl. of the Agreement between Q-reat Britain and China, signed at Chefo > on the 15th

September, 1876, and of Section 9 of the Additional Article to the said Agreement,

•signed at London on the 18th July, 1885.

Mr. Russell undert ikes that the Government of Hongkong shall submit to the

Legislative Council an Ordinance * for the regulation of the trade of the Colony in

Raw Opium subject to conditions hereinafter set forth and providing:—

a. —For the prohibition to the import and export of Opium i n quantities less than

b. —For rendering illegal the possession of Raw Opium, its custody or control

tities less than one chest, except by the Opium Farmer.

c. —That all Opium arriving in the Colony be reported to the Harbour Master,

no Opium shall be transhipped, landed, stored or movedfrom one store to another, or re-

exported without a permit from the Harbour Master, and notice to the Opium Fanner.

d. —For the keeping by Importers, Exporters, and Godown Owners, in suc

the Governor may require, books showing the movements of Opium.

e. —For taking stock of quantities in the stores, and search for deficiencie

Opium Farmer, and for furnishing to the Harbour Master returns of stocks.

f. —For amendment of Harbour Regulations, as to the night clearances of

The conditions on which it is agreed to submit the Ordinance are —

a. —That China arranges with Macao for the adoption of equivalent measu

b. —That the Hongkong Government shall be entitled to repeal the Ordin

be found to be injurious to the Revenue or to the legitimate trade of the Colony.

■ c.—That an Office under the Foreign Inspectorate shall be established on Chinese

Territory at a convenient spot on the Kowloon side for sale of Chinese Opium Duty

Certificates, which shall be freely sold to all comers, and for such quantities of

Opium as they may require.

d.—That Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than Tls.

110 per picul, shall be free from all further imposts of every sort, and have all the

benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article on behalf of Opium on which duty

has been paid at one of the ports of China, and that it may be made up in sealed

parcels at the option of the purchaser.

■ e.—That junks tending between Chinese ports and Hongkong and their cargoes shall

not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their

cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and that no dues whatsoever

shall be demanded from junks coming to Hongkong from ports in China, or pro-

ceeding from Hongkong to ports in China, over and above the dues paid or payable

at the ports of clearance or destination.

f.—That the Officer of the Foreign Inspectorate, who will be responsible for the

management of the Kowloon Office, shall investigate and settle any complaints

made by the junks trading with Hongkong against the Native Customs Revenue

Stations or Cruisers in the neighbourhood, and that the Governor of Hongkong, if

he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send a Hongkong Officer to be present at

and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not agree, a

reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for joint decision.

Sir Robert Hart undertakes, on behalf of himself and Shao Taotai (who was com-

:pelled by unavoidable circumstances to leave before the sittings of the Commission

were terminated), that the Chinese Government shall agree to the above conditions.

The undersigned are of opinion that if these arrangements are fully carried out,

a fairly satisfactory solution of the questions connected with the so-called “Hong-

kong Blockade ” will have been arrived at.

Signed in triplicate at Hongkong, this 11th day of September, 1886.

- ••See Ordinauce 22 of 1887. tA modification allowing export in smaller quantities than one chest was subsequently ag reed t o

THE CHUNGKING AGREEMENT, 1890

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TO TEE AGREEMENT BETWEEN GREAT'

BRITAIN AND CHINA OF SEPTEMBER 13th, 1876

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 18th January, 1891

The Governments of Great Britain and China, being desirous of settling in an*

amicable spirit the divergence of opinion which has arisen wi’h respecl to the First

Clause of the Third Section of the Agreement concluded at Chefoo in 1876, which*

stipulates that “The British Government will be free to send officers lo reside at

Chungking to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuan, that British mer-

chants will not be allowed to reside at Chungking, or to open establishments or

warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port, and that when*

steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be

taken into consideration,” have agreed upon the following Additional Articles

I. —Chungking shall forthwith be declared open to trade on the same

any other Treaty port. British subjects shall be at liberty either to charter Chinese

vessels or to provide vessels of the Chinese t , pe for the traffic between Ichang and

Chungking.

II. —Merchandise conveyed between Ichang and Chungking by the

of vessels shall be placed on the same footing as merchandise carried by steamers-

between Shanghai and Ichang, and shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty

Tariff Rules, and the Yangtsze Regulations.

III. —All regu'ations as to the papers and flags to be carried by

above description, as to the repackage of goods for the voyage beyond Ichang and

as to the general procedure to be observed by those engaged in the traffic between*

Ichang and Chungking with a view to insuring convenience and secui’ity, shall be-

drawn itp by the Superintendent of Customs at Ichang, the Taotai of the Ch’uan

Tung Circuit, who is now stationed at Chungking, and the Commissioners of Customs

in consultation with the British Consul, and shall be liable to any modifications that

may hereafter prove to be desirable and may be agreed upon by common consent.

IV".—Chartered junks shall pay port dues at Ichang and Chungking in accord-

ance with the Yaugtsze Regulations; vessels of Chinese type, if and when entitled

to carry the British flag, shall pay tonnage dues in accordance with Treaty

Regulations. It is obligatory on both chartered junks and also vessels of Chinese

type, even when the latter may be entitled to carry the British flag, to-

take out at the Maritime Custom-house special papers and a special flag

when intended to be employed by British subjects in the transport of goods-

between Ichang and Chungking, and without such papers and flag no vessels-

of either class shall be allowed the privileges and immunities granted under this

Additional Article. Provided with special papers and flag, vessels of both classes-

shall be allowed to ply between the two ports, anrl they and their cargoes shall be

dealt with in accordance with Treaty Rules and the Yangtsze Regulations. All other

vessels shall be dealt with by the Native Customs. The special papers and flag-

issued by the Maritime Customs must alone be used by the particular vessel for

which they were originally issued, and are not transferable from one vessel to-

another. The use of the British flag by vessels the property of Chinese is strictly

prohibited. Infringement of these Regulations will, in the first instance, render

the offender liable to the penalties in force at the ports hitherto opened under Treaty,,

and should the offence be subsequently repeated, the vessel’s special papers and flag

will be withdrawn, and the vessel herself refused permission thenceforward to trade-

between Ichang and Chungking.

Y.—When once Chinese steamers carrying cargo run to Chungking, British*

steamers shall in like manner have access to the said port.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION, 1890 21

YI.—It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be considered as

forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and as having the same force and validity as

if it were inserted therein word for word. It shall be ratified, and the ratifications-

exchanged at Peking, and it shall come into operation six months after its signature,

provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then on

the date at which such excharge takes place.

Done at Peking in triplicate (three in English and three in Chinese), this

thirty-first day of Mai’ch, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and

ninety, being the eleventh day of the Second Intercalary Moon of the sixteenth year

of Kuang Hsu.

[l.s.] John Walsham [l.s,] Signature of Chinese

Plenipotentiary.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION, 1890

Ratified in London, 17th August, 1890

Art. I.—The boundary of Sikkim and Thibet shall be the crest of the mountain

range separating the waters flowing into the Sikkim Teesta and its affluents from

the waters flowing into the Thibetan Machu and northwards into other rivers of

Thibet. The line commences at Mount Gipmochi on the Bhutan frontier, and follows

the above-mentioned water-parting to the point where it meets Nepaul territory.

Art. II.—It is admitted that the British Government, whose protectorate over

the Sikkim State is hereby recognised, has direct and exclusive control over the

internal administration and foreign relations of that State, and except through

and with the permission of the British Government neither the ruler of the State

nor any of its officers shall have official relations of any kind, formal or informal,

with any other country.

Art. III.—The Government of Great Britain and Ireland and the Government

of China engage reciprocally to respect the boundary as defined in Article 1. and to

prevent acts of aggression from their respective sides of the frontier.

Art. IV.—The question of providing increased facilities for trade across the

Sikkim-Thibet frontier will hereafter be discussed with a view to a mutually

satisfactory arrangement by the high contracting Powers.

Art. V.—The question of pasturage on the Sikkim side of the frontier is

reserved for further examination and future adjustment.

Art. YI.—The high contracting Powers reserve for discussion and arrangement

the method in which official communications between the British authorities in

India and the authorities in Thibet shall be conducted.

Art. YII.—Two Joint Commissioners shall within six months from the ratifica-

tion of this Convention be appointed, one by the British Government in India, the

other by the Chinese Resident in Thibet. The said Commissioners shall meet and

discuss the questions which by the last three preceding articles have been reserved.

Art. YIII.—The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall

be exchanged in London, as soon as possible after the date of the signature thereof.

THE BURMAH CONVENTION

Signed at Peking, 4th February, 1897

In consideration of the Government of Great Britain consenting to waive its-

objections to the alienation by China, by the Convention with France of June 20th,

1895, of territory forming a portion of Kiang Hung, in derogation of the provision

THE BURMAH CONVENTION

of the Convention between Great Britain and China of March 1st, 1894, it has been

agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the following

additions and alterations shall be made in the last-named Convention, hereinafter

referred to as the Original Convention.

(Articles T. to XL. refer to the Burrnah Frontier and trade across it between Burma

and Yunnan.)

Art. XII. (Providing for the free navigation of the Irrawady by Chinese

vessels).— Add as follows:— The Chinese Government agree hereafter to

consider whether the conditions of trade justify the construction of railways in

Yunnan, and in the event of their construction, agrees to connect them with the

Burmese lines.

Art. XIII.—Whereas by the Original Convention it was agreed that China

might appoint a Consul in Burmah to reside at Rangoon, and that Great Britain

might appoint a Consul to reside at Manwyne, and that the Consuls of the two

Governments should each within the territories of the other enjoy the same

privileges and immunities as the Consuls of the most favoured nation, and further

that in proportion as the commerce between Burmah and China increased, additional

■Consuls might be appointed by mutual consent to reside at such places in Burmah

and Yunnan as the requirements of trade might seem to demand.

It has now been agreed that the Government of Great Britain may station a

Consul at Momein or Shunning Fu as the Government of Great Britain may prefer,

instead of at Manwyne as stipulated in the Original Convention, and also to station

a Consul at Szumao.

British subjects and persons under British protection may establish themselves

and trade at these places under the same conditions as at the Treaty Ports in

China.

The Consuls appointed as above shall be on the same footing as regards

correspondence and intercourse with Chinese officials as the British Consuls at the

Treaty Ports.

Art. XIV. (Providing for issue of passports by the Consuls on each side of the

-frontier).—Instead of “ Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul at Manwyne ” in the Original

Convention read “ Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul at Shunning ‘ or Momein,’ ”

in accordance with the change made in Article XIII.

Failing agreement as to the terms of revision the present arrangement shall

remain in force.

Special Article.

Whereas on the twentieth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and

ninety-six, the Tsung-li Yamen addressed an official despatch to Her Majesty’s

Charge d’Affaires at Peking, informing him that on the thirtieth day of December,

one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, they had submitted a Memorial

respecting the opening of ports on the West River to foreign trade, and had received

an Imperial Decree in approval of which they officially communicated a copy.

It has now been agreed that the following places, namely, Wuchow Fu in

Kwangsi, and Samshui city and Bongkun Market in Kwangtung, shall be opened as

Treaty Ports and Consular Stations with freedom of navigation for steamers between

Samshui and Wuchow and Hongkong and Canton by a route from each of these

latter places to be selected and notified in advance by the Maritime Customs, and

that the following four places shall be established as ports of call for goods and

passengers under the same regulations as the ports of call on the Yangtsze River,

namely, Kongmoon, Kamchuk, Shiuhing and Takhing.

It is agreed that the present Agreement, together with the Special Article, shall

come into force within four months of the date of signature, and that the ratifications

thereof shall be exchanged at Peking as soon a£ possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned duly authorised thereto by their respective

Governments have signed the present agreement.

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898

Done at Peking in triplicate (three copies in English and three in Chinese),

the fourth day of February in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred

and ninety-seven.

(Sd.) Claude M. MACDONiLD. (Seal)

(Hieroglyphic) Li Hung-chang (Seal)

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898

Whereas it has for many years past been recognised that an extension of Hong-

kong territory is necessary for the proper defence and protection of the Colony,

It has now been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China

that the limits of British territory shall be enlarged un ler lease to the extent

indicated generally on the annexed map.

The exact boundaries shall be hereafter fixed when proper surveys have been

made by officials appointed by the two Governments. The term of this lease shall

be ninety-nine years.

It is at the same time agreed that within the City of Kowloon the Chinese

officials now stationed there shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as

may be inconsistent with the military requirements for the defence of Hongkong.

Within the remainder of the newly-leased territory Great Britain shall have sole

jurisdiction. Chinese officials and people shall be allowed, as heretofore, to use the

road from Kowloon to Hsinan,

It is further agreed that the existing landing-place near Kowloon city shall be

reserved for the convenience of Chinese men-of-war, merchant and passengers vessels,

which may come and go and lie there at their pleasure; and for the convenience of

movements of the officials and people within the city.

When, hereafter, China constructs a railway to the boundary of the Kowloon

territory under British control, arrangements shall be discussed.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the

inhabitants of the district included within the extension, and that if land is required

for public offices, fortifications, or the like official purposes, it shall be bought at

a fair price.

If cases of extradition of criminals occur they shall be dealt with in accordance

with the existing treaties between Great Britain and China and the Hongkong

Regulations.

The area leased by Great Britain includes the waters of Mirs Bay and Deep

Bay, but it is agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise,

shall retain the right to use those waters.

This Convention shall come into force on the first day of July, eighteen hundred

and ninety-eight, being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year

of Kwang Hsii. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the

ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective

Governments, have signed th^present agreement.

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and in Chinese) the

ninth day of June, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being

the twenty-first day of the fourth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kwang Hsii.

Claude M. Macdonald.

Li Hung-chang, ) Members of

Hsu Ting K'uei, 3 Tsung-li Yamen.

THE WEIHAIWEI CONVENTION, 1898

Ratifications exchanged in London, 5th October, ^ 898

In order to provide Great Britain with a suitable naval harbour in North China,

and for the better protection of British commerce in the neighbouring seas, the

Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to lease to the Government

of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain aud Ireland, Weihaiwei, in the province

of Shantung, and the adjacent waters for so long a period as Port Arthur shall

remain in the occupation of Russia.

The territory leased shall comprise the island of Liukung and all other islands

in the Bay of Weihaiwei, and a belt of land ten English miles wide along the entire

coast lire of the Bay of Weihaiwei. Within the above-mentioned territory leased

Great Britain shall have sole jurisdiction.

Great Britain shall have, in addition, the right to erect fortifications, station

troops, or take any other measures necessary for defensive purposes, at any points on

or near the coast of the region east of the meridian 121 degrees 40 min. E. of Green-

wich, and to acquire on equitable compensation within that territory such sites as

may be necessary for water supply, communications, and hospitals. Within that

zone Chinese administration will not be interfered with, but no troops other than

Chinese or British shall be allowed therein.

It is also agreed that within the walled city of Weihaiwei Chinese officials shall

continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with naval

and military requirements for the defence of the territory leased.

It is further agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise,

shall retain the right to use the waters herein leased to Great Britain.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the

inhabitants of the territory herein specified, and that if land is required for forti-

fications, public offices, or any official or public purpose, it shall be bought at a fair

price.

This Convention shall come into force on signature. It shall be ratified by the

Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London

as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective

Governments, have signed the present agreement.

Claude M. Macdonald.

Prince Chino, Senior Member of the Tsung-li Yamen.

Liao Shod Heng, President of Board of Punishments.

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and four in Chinese)

the first day of July, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,

being the thiiteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsii.

SUPPLEMENTARY COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Signed at Shanghai, 5th September, 1902

Ratifications exchanged at Peking, 28th July, 1903

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of

the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Em-

peror of China, having lesolved to enter into negotiations with a view to carrying out

the provisions contained in Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed at Peking on the

7th of September, 1901, under which the Chinese Government agreed to negotiate the

amendments deemed useful by the Foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce

and Navigation and other subjects concerning commercial relations with the object of

facilitating them, have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to

say:—

His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland, His Majesty’s Special Com-

missioner, Sir James Lyle Mackay, Knight Commander of the Most Eminent Order of

the Indian Empire, a member of the Council of the Secretary of State for India, etc.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Imperial Commissioners Lii Hai-huan,

President of the Board of Public Works, etc., and Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian

of the Heir Apparent, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, etc.

WIio having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and

found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the

following Articles:—

Art. I.—Delay having occurred in the past in the issue of Drawback Certificates

owing to the fact that those documents have to be dealt with by the Superintendent

of Customs at a distance from the Customs Office, it is now agreed that Drawback

Certificates shall hereafter in all cases be issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs

within three weeks of the presentation to the Customs of tbe papers entitling the

applicant to receive such Drawback Certificates.

These Certificates shall be valid tender to the Customs Authorities in payment

of any duty upon goods imported or exported (transit dues excepted), or shall, in the

case of Drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported abroad within three years from the

date of importation, be payable in cash without deduction by the Customs Bank at

the place where the import duty was paid.

But if, in connection with any application for a Drawback Certificate, the

Customs Authorities discover an attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant 'shall

be liable to a fine not exceeding five times the amount of the dutv whereof he

attempted to defraud the Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods.

Art. II.—China agrees to take the necessary steps to provide for a uniform

national coinage which shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other

obligations throughout the Empire by British as well as Chinese subjects.

Art. III.—China agrees that the duties and lekin combined levied on goods carried

by junks from Hongkong to the Treaty Ports in the Canton Province and vice versa

shall together not be less than the duties charged by the Imperial Maritime Customs

on similar goods carried by steamer.

Art. IV.—Whereas questions have arisen in the past concerning the right of

Chinese subjects to invest money in non-Chinese enterprises and companies, and

whereas it is a matter of common knowledge that large sums of Chinese capital are

so invested, China hereby agrees to recognise the legality of all such investments past,

present and future.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

It being, moreover, of the utmost importance that all shareholders in a Joint Stock

Company should stand on a footing of perfect equality as far as mutual obligations

are concerned, China further agrees that Chinese subjects who have or may become

shareholders in any British Joint Stock Company shall be held to have ac ;epted, by

the very act of becoming shareholders, the Charter of Incorporation or Memorandum

and Articles of Association of such Company and regulations framed thereunder as

interpreted by British Courts, and that Chinese Courts shall enforce compliance there-

with by such Chinese shareholders, if a suit to that effect be entered, provided always

that their liability shall not be other or greater than that of British shareholders in

the same Company.

Similarly the British Government agree that British subjects investing in

Chinese Companies shall be under the same obligations as the Chinese shareholders

in such companies.

The foregoing shall not apply to cases which have already been before the Courts

and been dismissed.

Ait. V.—The Chinese Government undertake to remove within the next two

years the artificial obstructions to navigation in the Canton River. The Chinese

Government also agree to improve the accommodation for shipping in the harbour of

Canton and to take the necessary steps to maintain that improvement, such work to

be carried out by the Imperial Maritime Customs and the cost thereof to be defrayed

by a tax on goods landed and shipped by British and Chinese alike according to a

scale to be arranged between the merchants and the Customs Authorities.

The Chinese Government are aware of the desirability of improving the naviga-

bility by steamer of the waterway between Ichang and Chungking, but are also fully

aware that such improvement might involve heavy expense and would affect the

interests of the population of the provinces of Szechuen, Hunan, and Hupeh. It is,

therefore, mutually agreed that until improvements can be carried out steamship

owners shall be allowed, subject to approval by the Imperial Maritime Customs, to

erect, at their own expense, appliances for hauling through the rapids. Such

appliances shall be at the disposal of all vessels, both steamers and junks, subject to

regulations to be drawn up by the Imperial Maritime Customs. These appliances

shall not obstruct the waterway or interfere with the free passage of junks. Signal

stations and channel marks where and when necessary shall be erected by the

Imperial Maritime Customs. Should any practical scheme be presented for improv-

ing the waterway and ass:sting navigation without injury to the local population or

cost to the Chinese Government, it shall be considered by the latter in a friendly

spirit.

Art. VI.—The Chinese Government agree to make arrangements to give increased

facilities at the open ports for bonding and for repacking merchandise in bond, and,

on official representation being made by the British Authorities, to grant the privi-

leges of a bonded warehouse to any warehouse which, to the satisfaction of the

Customs Authorities, affords the necessary security to the revenue.

Such warehouses will be subject to regulations, including a scale of fees according

to commodities, distance from Custom-house and hours of working, to be drawn up

by the Customs Authorities who will meet the convenience of merchants so far as is

compatible with the protection of the revenue.

Art. VII.—Inasmuch as the British Government affords protection to Chinese

trade marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by British

subjects, the Chinese Government undertake to afford protection to British trade

marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by Chinese subjects.

The Chinese Government further undertake that the Superintendents of Northern

.and of Southern trade shall establish offices within their respective jurisdictions under

control of the Imperial Maritime Customs where foreign trade marks may be

registered on payment of a reasonable fee.

Art. VIII.—Preamble. The Chinese Government, recognising that the system

of levying lekin and other dues on goods at the place of production, in transit, and at

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH EHINA 27

destination, impedes the free circulation of commodities and injures the interests of

trade, hereby undertake to discard completely those means of raising revenue with

the limitation mentioned in Section 8.

The British Government, in return, consent to allow a surtax, in excess of the-

Tariff rates for the time being in force, to he imposed on foreign goods imported by

British subjects, and a surtax in addition to the export duty on Chinese produce-

destined for export abroad or coastwise.

It is clearly understood that after lekin barriers and other stations for taxing"

goods in transit have been removed, no attempt shall be made to revive them in any

form or under any pretext whatsoever; that in no case shali the surtax on foreign-

imports exceed the equivalent of one and a half times the import duty leviable in

terms .of the Pinal Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the 7th day of Sep-

tember, 1901; that payment ot the import duty and surtax shall secure for foreign

imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or non-Chinese subjects, in original packages

or otherwise, complete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay ; that

the total amount of taxation leviable on native produce for export abroad shall, under

no circumstance's, exceed 7| per cent, ad valorem.

Keeping these fundamental principles steadily in view, the high contracting

parties have agreed upon the following methods of procedure :—

Section 1.—The Chinese Government undertake that all barriers of whatsoever

kind, collecting leMn or such like dues or duties, shall be permanently abolished on all

roads, railways, and waterways in the Eighteen Provinces of China and the Three

Eastern Provinces. This provision does not apply to the Native Custom-houses at

present in existence on the seaboard or waterways, at open ports, on land routes, and-

on land frontiers of China.

Section 2.—The British Government agree that foreign goods on importation, in

addition to the effective 5 per cent, import duty as provided for in the Protocol of 1901,.

shall pay a special surtax equivalent to one and a half times the said duty to com-

pensate for the abolition of lelcin, of transit dues in lieu of lekin, and of all other

taxation on foreign goods, and in consideration of the other reforms provided for in

this Article; but this provision shall not impair the right of China to tax salt, native-

opium and native produce as provided for in Sections 3, f>, 6 and 8.

The same amount of surtax shall be levied on goods imported into the Eighteen

Provinces of China and the Three Eastern Provinces across the land frontiers as on

goods entering China by sea.

Section 3.—All Native Custom-houses now existing, whether at the Open Ports,.

On the seaboard, on rivers, inland waterways, land routes or land frontiers, as

enumerated in the Hu Pu and Kung Pu Tse Li (Regulations of the Boards of Revenue-

and Works) and Ta Gh’ing Hui Tien (Dynastic Instit utes), may remain; a list of the

same, with their location, shall be furnished to the British Government, for purposes-

of record.

Wherever there are Imperial Maritime Custom-houses, or wherever such may

be hereafter placed, Native Custom-houses may be also established ; as well as at any

points either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

The location of Native Custom-houses in the Interior may be changed as the

circumstances of trade seem to require, but any change must be communicated to the

British Government, so that the list may be corrected; the originally stated number

of them shall not, however, be exceeded.

Goods carried by junks or sailing-vessels trading to or from open ports shall not

pay lower duties than the combined duties and surtax on similar cargo carried by

steamers.

Native produce, when transported fro n o; e place to another in ihe interior, shall,

on arrival at the first Native Custom-house, after leaving the place of production, pay

duty equivalent to the export surtax mentioned in Section 7.

When this duty has been paid, a certificate shall be given which shall describe the

nature of the goods, weight, number of packages, etc., amount of duty paid and

intended destination. This certificate, which shall be valid for a fixed period of not.

THE BEITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

less than one year from date of payment of duty, shall free the goods from all taxation,

-examination, delay, or stoppage at any other Native Custom-houses passed en route.

If the goods are i aken to a place not in the foreign settlements or concessions of an

open port, for local use, they become there liable to the Consumption Tax described

in Section 8.

If the goods are shipped from an open port, the certificate is to be accepted by

the Custom-house concerned, in lieu of the export surtax mentioned in Section 7.

Junks, boats, or carts shall not be subjected to any taxation beyond a small and

reasonable charge, paid periodically at a fixed annual rate. This does not exclude the

right to levy, as at present, tonnage (Chuan Chao) and port dues (Chuan Liao) on

junks.

Section 4.—Foreign opium duty and present lehin—which latter will now become

a surtax in lieu of lekin—shall remain as provided for by existing Treaties.

Section 5.—The British, Government have no intention whatever of interfering

with China’s right to tax native <'piuin, but it is essential to declare that, in her

arrangements for levying such taxation, China will not subject other goods to taxation,

delay, or stoppage.

China is free to retain at important points on the borders of each province—either

on land or water—offices for collecting duty on native opium, where duties or contribu-

tions leviable shall be paid in one lump sum ; which payment shall cover taxation of all

kinds within that province Each cake of opium will have a stamp affixed as evidence

of duty payment. Excise officers and police may be employed in connection with these

offices ; but no barriers or other obstructions are to be erected, and the excise officers

or police of these offices shall not stop or molest any other kinds of goods, or collect

taxes thereon.

A list of these offices shall be drawn up and communicated to the British Govern-

ment for record.

Section 6.—Lekin on salt is hereby abolished and the amount of said lekin and of

other taxes and contributions shall be added to the salt duty, which shall be collected

at place of production or at first station after entering the province where it is to be

consumed.

The Chinese Government shall be at liberty to establish salt reporting offices at

which boats conveying salt which is being moved under salt passes or certificates may

be required to stop for purposes of examination and to have their certificates vised,

but at such offices no lekin or transit taxation shall be levied and no barriers or

obstructions of any kind shall be erected.

Section 7.—The Chinese Government may re-cast the Export Tariff with specific

duties as far as practicable on a scale not exceeding five per cent, ad valorem; but

existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months’ notice has been

given.

In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent, they shall be

reduced to not more than that rate.

An additional special surtax of one half the export duty payable for the time

being, in lieii of internal taxation and lekin, may be levied at time of export on goods

exported either to foreign countries or coastwise.

In the case of silk, whether hand or filature reeled, the total export duty shall not

exceed a specific rate equivalent to not more than five per cent, ad valorem. Half of

this specific duty may be levied at the first Native Custom-house in the interior which

the silk may pass and in such case a certificate shall be given as provided for in Section

3, and will be accepted by the Custom-house concerned at place of export in lieu of

half the export duty. Cocoons passing Native Custom-houses shall be liable to no

taxation whatever. Silk not exported but consumed in China is liable to the Con-

sumption Tax mentioned in Section 8.

Section 8.—The abolition of the lekin system in China and the abandonment of all

other kinds of internal taxation on foreign imports and on exports will diminish the

revenue materially. The surtax on foreign imports and exports and on coastwise

exports is intended to compensate in a measure for this loss of revenue, but there

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

remains the loss of lekin revenue on internal trade to be met, and it is therefore agree1*

that the Chinese Government are at liberty to i mpose a Consumption Tax on articles

■of Chinese origin not intended for export.

This tax shall be levieJ only at places of consumption and not on gooJs while in

transit, and the Chinese Government solemnly undertake that the arrangements which

they may make for its collection shall in no way interfere with foreign goods or with

native goods for export. The fact of goods being ol foreign origin shall of itself free

them from all taxation, delay, nr stoppage, after having passed the Custom-house.

Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the

Gustom-house, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each package,

on payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in the

interior.

Native goods brought by junks to open ports, if intended for local consumption—

irrespective of the nationality of the owner of the goods—shall be reported at the

Native Custom-house only, where the consumption tax may be levied.

China is at liberty to fix the amount of this (consumption) tax, which may vary

according io the nature of the merchandise concerned, that is to say. according as the

articles are necessaries of life or luxuries; but it shall be levied at a uniform rate on

goods of the same description, no matter whether carried by junk, sailing-vessel, or

steamer. As mentioned in Section 3, the Consumption Tax is not to be levied within

foreign settlements or concessions.

Section 9.—An excise equivalent to double the import duty as laid down in the

Protocol of 1901 is to be charged on all machine-made yarn and cloth manufactuied in

China, whether by foreigners at the open ports or by Chinese anywhere in China.

A rebate of the import duty and two-thirds of the import surtax is to be given

on raw cotton imported from foreign countries, and of all duties, including Consump-

tion Tax,'paid on Chinese raw cotton used in mills in China.

Chinese machine-made yarn or cloth having paid excise is to de free of Export

Duty, Export Surtax, Coast Trade Duty, and Consumption Tax. This Excise is to be

collected through the In perial Maritime Customs.

The same principle and procedure are to be applied to all other products of foreign

type turned out by machinery, whether by foreigners at the open ports or by

Chinese anywhere in China.

This stipulation is not to apply to the out-turn of the Hanyang and Ta Yeh Iron

Works in Hupeh and other similar existing Government Works at present exempt from

taxation; or to that of Arsenals, Government Dockyards, or establishments of that

nature for Government purposes which may hereafter be erected.

Section 10.—A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs F< reign

Staff shall be selected by each of the Governors-General and Governors, and appointed,

in consultation with the Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, to each pro-

vince for duty in connection with Native Customs affairs, Consumption Tax, Salt and

Native Opium Taxes. These officers shall exercise an efficient supervision of the work-

ing of these departments, and in the event of their reporting any case of abuse, illegal

exact.on, obstiuction to the movement of goods, or other cause of complaint, the

Governor-General or Governor concerned will take immediate steps to put an end to

same.

Section 11.—Cases where illegal action as described in this Article is complained of

shall be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently

high rank, in conjunction with a British officer and an offiei r of the Imperial Maritime

Customs, each ot sufficient standing; and in ihe event of its lining found by a majority

of the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and loss has been

incurred, due compensation is to be at once paid from the Surtax funds, through the

Imperial Maritime Customs at ihe nearest open port. The High Provincial Officials

are to be held responsible that the officer guilty of the illegal action shall l e severely

punished and removed from his post.

If the complaint turns out to be without foundation, complainant shall be held

responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TRATEY WITH CHINA

His Britannic Majesty’s Minister will have the right to demand investigation

where from the evidence before him he is satisfied that illegal exactions or obstructions*

have occurred.

Section 12.—The Chinese Government agree to open to foreign trade, on the same-

footing as the places opened to foreign trade by the Treaties of Hanking and Tientsin,,

the following places, namely:—

Changsha in Hunan;

Wanhsien in Szechuen;

Nganking in Anhui;

Waichow (Hui-chow) in Kwangtung; and

Kungmoon (Chiang-men) in Kwangtung.

Foreigners residing in the

Regulations on ihe same footing as Chinese residents, and they are not to be entitled

to establish Municipalities and Police of their own within the limits of these Treaty^

Ports except with the consent of the Chinese authorities.

If this At ti.de does not come into operation the right to demand under it the-

opening of these ports, with the exception of Kongmoon, which is provided for in-

Article 10, shall lapse.

Section 13.— Sub'je. t to the provisions of Section 14, the arrangements provided

for in this Article are to come into force on 1st January, 1904.

By that date ail Jelcin barriers shall be removed and officials employed in the

collection of taxes and dues prohibited by this Article shall be removed from their

posts.

Section 14.—The condition'on which the Chinese Government enter into the

present engagement is that all Powers entitled to most favoured nation treaiment in

China enter into the same engagements as Great Britain with regard to the payment

of surtaxes and other obligations imposed by this Article on His Britannic Majesty’s

Government and subjects.

The conditions on which His Britannic Majesty’s Government enter into the-

present engagement are: —

(1.) That all Powers who are now or who may hereafter become entitled to most

favoured nation treatment in China enter into the same engagements;

(2.) Andtha' their assent is neither directly nor indirectly made dependent on the

granting by China of any political concession, or of any exclusive commercial concession.

Section 15.- Should the Powers entitled to most favoured nation treatment by

China have failed to agree to enter into the engagements undertaken by Great Britain

under this Article by the 1st January, 1904, then the provisions of the Article shall

only come into force when ail the Powers have signified their acceptance of these

engagements.

Section 16.—When the abolition oilekin and other forms of internal taxation on

goods as provided for in this Article has been decided upon and sanctioned, an Imperial

Edict shall be published in due form on yellow paper and circulated, setting forth the

abolition of all lekin taxation, lekin barriers and all descriptions of internal taxation on

goods, except as provided for in this Article.

The Edict shall state that the Provincial High Officials are responsible that any

official disregarding the letter or spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and

removed from his post.

Art. IX.—The Chinese (Government, recognising that it is advantageous for the

country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract Foreign as

well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprises, agree within one year from the

signing of this Treaty to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing Mining

Regulations. China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go into the whole

question uf Mining Rules and, selecting from the rules of Great Britain, India, and

other countries, regulaiions which seem applicable to the condition of China, she will

re-cast her present Mining Rules in such a way as while promoting the interests of

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 31

Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of China, shall offer

no impediment to the attraction of foreign capital, or place foreign capitalists at a

greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted foreign regulations.

Any mining concession granted after the publication of these new Rules shall be

subject to their provisions.

Art. X.—Whereas in the year 1898 the Inland Waters of China were opened to all

such steam vessels, native < r foreign, as might be especially registered for tbat trade

at the Treaty Ports, and whereas the Regulations dated 28th July, 1898, and Supple-

mentary Rules dated September, 1898, have been found in some respects inconvenient

in working, it is now mutually agreed to amend them and to annex such new Rules

to this Treaty. These Rules shall remain in force until altered by mutual consent.

It is further agreed that Kongmoon shall be opened as a Treaty Port, and that, in

addition to the places nan ed In the special Article of the Burmah Convention of 4th

February, 1897, British steamers shall be allowed to land or ship cargo and passengers,

under the same regulations as apply to the “ Ports of Call ” on the Yangtze River, at

the following “ Ports of Call Pak Tau Hau (Pai-t'u k‘ou), Lo Ting Hau (Lo-ting k'ou),

and Do Sing (Tou-clTeng); and to land or discharge passengers at the following ten

passenger landing stages on the West River:—Yung Ki (Jung-chi), Mah Ning (Ma-

ning), Kau Kong (CLuu-chiang), Kulow (Ku-lao), Wing On (Yung-an), How Lik

(Houli), Luk Pu (Lu-pu), Yuet Sing (Yiieh-ch'eng), Luk To (Lu-tu) and Fung Chuen

(Feng-ch‘uan).

Art. XI.—His Britannic Majesty’s Government agree to the prohibition of the

general importation of morphia into China, on condition, however, that the Chinese

Government will allow of its importation, on payment of the Tariff import duty and

under special permit, by duly qualified British medical practitioners and for the

use bf hospitals, or by British chemists and druggists who shall only be permitted

to sell it in small quantities and on receipt of a requisition signed by a duly qualified

foreign medical practitioner.

The special permits above referred to will be granted to an intending importer

on his signing a bond before a British Consul guaranteeing the fulfilment of these

conditions. Should an importer be found guilty before a British Consul of a breach

of his bond, he will not be entitled to take out another permit. Any British subject

importing morphia without a permit shall be liable to have such morphia con-

fiscated.

This Article will come into operation on all other Treaty Powers agreeing to its

conditions, but any morphia actually shipped before that date will not be affected by

this prohibition.

The Chinese Government on their side undertake to adopt measures at once to

prevent the manufacture of morphia in China.

Art. XII.—China having expressed a strong desire to reform her judicial system

and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Great Britain agrees to

give every assistance to such reform, and she will also be prepared to relinquish her

extra-territorial rights when she is satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the

arrangement for their administration and other considerations warrant her in so

doing.

Art. XIII.—The missionary question in China being, in the opinion of the

Chinese Government, one requiring careful consideration, so that, if possible, troubles

such as have occurred in the past may be : vsrted in the future. Great Britain agrees

to join in a Commission to investigate this question, and, if possible, to devise means

for securing permanent peace between converts and non-converts, should such a

Commission be formed by China and the Treaty Powers interested.

Art. XIY.—Whereas under Rule V. appended to the Treaty of Tientsin of 1858.

British merchants are permitted to export rice and all other grain from one port of

China to another under the same conditions in respect of security as copper “ cash,”

it is now agreed that in cases of expected scarcity or famine from whatsoever cause in

any district, the Chinese Government shall, on giving twenty-one days’ notice, be at

liberty to prohibit the shipment of rice and other grain from such district.

32 THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Should any vessel specially chartered to load rice or grain previously contracted

for have arrived at her loading port prior to or on the day when a notice of prohibition

to export comes into force, she shall be allowed an extra week in weich to ship her

cargo.

If during the existence of tins prohibition, any shipment of rice or grain is allowed

by the authorities, the prohibition shall, ipso facto, be considered cancelled and shall

not be re-imposed until six weeks’ notice has been given.

When a prohibition is notified, it will be stated whether the Government have any

Tribute or Army Rice which they intend to ship during the time t f prohibition, and,

if so, the quantity shall 1)6 named.

Such rice shall not be included in the prohibition, and the Customs shall keep a

record of any Tribute or Army Rice so shipped i r landed.

The Chinese Government undertake that no rice, other than Tribute or Army

Rice belonging to the Government, shall be shipped during i he period of prohibition.

Notifications of prohibitions, and of the quantities of Army or Tribute Rice for

shipment shad be ma le by the Governors of the Provime concerned.

Similarly, notifications of the removals of prohibitions’ shall be made by the same

authorities.

The export of ri -e and other grain to foreign countries remains prohibited.

Art. XY.—It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties to this Treaty

may demand a revision of the Tariff at the end of 10 years; but if no demand be made

on either side within 6 months after the end of the first 10 years, then the Tariff shall

remain in force for 10 ye trs more, reckoned from the end of the preceding 10 years,

and so it shall be at the end of each successive 10 years.

Any Tariff concession which China may hereafter accord to articles of the produce

or manufacture of any other State shall immediately be extended to similar articles

of the produce or manufacture of His Britannic Majesty’s Dominions by whomsoever

imported.

Treaties already existing between the United Kingdom and China shall continue

in force in so far as they are i.ot abrogated or modified by stipulations of the present

Treaty.

Art. XYI.—The English and Chinese Texts of the present Treaty have been care-

fully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between

them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense.

The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of His Majesty the King of

Great Britain and Ireland and of His Majesty the Emperor of China respectively shall

be exchanged at Peking within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and scaled this

Treaty, two copies in English and two in Chinese.

Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September in the year of Our Lord, 1902,

corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-

eighth year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] Jas. L. Maokay.

Annex A.—(1)

(Translation.)

Lu, President of the Board of Works ;

Sheng, Junior Guardia i of the Heir Apparent, Yice-President of the Board of

Works ;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to

Sir James Mackay, His Pritannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner fir the dis-

cussion of Treaty matters.

THE BEIT1SH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Shanghai: K. H. XXYIIL, 7th moon, 11th day

; (Received August 15, 1902J

We have the honour to inform you thut we' have received the following telegram

from His Excellency Liu, Governor General of the Liang Chiang, on the subject of

Clause II. mutually agreed upon by us :

As regards this clause, it is necessary to insert therein a clear stipulation, to the

.‘effect that, no matter what changes may take place in the future, all Customs’ duties

'must continue to be calculated on the basis of the existing higher rate of the Haikwan

“ Tael over the Treasury Tael, and that ‘ the touch ’ and weight of the former must be

“made good.”

As we ha,ve already arranged with you that a declaration of this kind should be

embodied in an Official Note, and form an annex to the present Treaty, for purposes of

record, we hereby do ourselves the honour to make this communication.

•' ' Annex A—(2)

Gentlemen, Shanghai, August 18th, 1902.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 14th instant

forwarding copy of a telegram from His Excellency Liu, Governor-General of the

Liang Chiang, on the subject of Article II. of the new Treaty, and in reply I have the

honour to state that His Excellency’s understanding of the Article is perfectly correct.

I presume the Chinese Government will make arrangements for the coinage of a

national silver coin of such weight and touch as may be decided upon by them.

These coins will be made available to the public in return for a quantity of silver

bullion of equivalent weight and fineness plus the usual mintage charge.

The coins which will become the national coinage of China will be declared by

the Chinese Government to be legal tender in payment of Customs duty and in

discharge of obligations contracted in Haikwan taels, but only at their proportionate

value to the Haikwan tael, whatever that may be.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Your obedient Servant,

Their Excellencies (Signed) Jas. L. Mackat.

Lu Hai-huan and Sheng Hsuan-huai,

etc., etc., etc.

Annex B—(1)

(Teanslation)

Lu, President of the Board of Works ;

Sheng, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of

Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to

Sir James L. Mackat, His Britannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 2nd, 1902.

We have the honour to inform you that on the 22nd of August, we, in conjunction

with the Governors-General of the Liang Chiang and the Hu-kuang Provinces, Their

Excellencies Liu and Chang, addressed the following telegraphic Memorial to the

Throne

“ Of the revenue of the different Provinces derived from lehin of all kinds, a

“ portion is appropriated for the service of the foreign loans, a portion for the Peking

Government, and the balance is reserved for the local expenditure of the Provinces

concerned.

2

34 THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

44 “ Tn the negotiations now being conducted with Great Britain for the amendment

4< of the Commercial Treaties, a mutual arrangement has been come to providing for

the imposition of additional taxes, in compensation for the abolition of al kinds of

“lekin and other imposts on goods, prohibited by Article VIII. After payment of

“ interest and sinking fund on the existing foreign loan, to the extent to which lekin

41“is thereto pledged, these additional taxes shall be allocated to the various Provinces

to make up deficiencies and replace revenue, in order that no hardships may be

■41“entailed on them. With a view to preserving the original intention underlying thfe

4 proposal to increase the duties in compensation for the loss of revenue derived Irom

4 ‘ lekin and other imposts on goods, it is further stipulated that the surtaxes shall Hot

‘be appropriated for other purposes, shall not form part of the Imperial Maritime

■4“Customs revenue proper, and shall in no case be pledged as security for~-any new

‘foreign loan.

4 “ It is therefore necessary to memorialize for the issue of an Edict, giving effect

4‘to the above stipulations and directing the Board of Bevenue to find out whal

‘proportion of the provincial revenues derived from lekin of all kinds, now about

“ to be abolished, each Province has hitherto had to remit, and what proportion it

“ has been entitled to retain, so that, when the Article comes into operation, due

4“ apportionment may be made accordingly, thus providing the Provinces with funds

‘ available for local expenditure and displaying equitable and just treatment towards

“all.”

On the 1st instant an Imperial Decree “Let action, as requested, be taken,”

was issued, and we now do ourselves the honour reverently to transcribe the same

for your information.

Annex B—(2)

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902.

Gentlemen,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 2nd instant

forwarding the text of the Memorial and Decree dealing with the disposal of the

surtaxes.

I understand that the surtaxes in addition to not being pledged for any new

foreign loan are not to be pledged to, or held to be security for, liabilities already

contracted by China except in so far as lekin revenue has already been pledged to an

existing loan.

I also understand from the Memorial that the whole of the surtaxes provided by

Article VIII. of the New Treaty goes to the Provinces in proportions to be agreed

upon between them and the Board of Revenue, but that out of these surtaxes each

Province is obliged to remit to Peking the same contribution as that which it has

hitherto remitted out of its lekin collectl ns, and that the Provinces also provide as

hitherto out of these surtaxes whatever funds may be necessary for the service of the

foreign loan to which lekin is partly pledged.

I hope Your Excellencies will send me a reply to this despatch and that} o i will

agree to this correspondence forming part of the Treaty as an Annex.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,.

Your obedient servant,

(Signed) Jas. L. Maceay.

Their Excellencies,

Lu Hai-huan and Sheng Hsuan-huai,

etc., etc. etc.

TUE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 35

Annex B—(3)

(Translation)

Lit, President of the Board of Works;

Sheng, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of

Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to'

Sir James L. Mackay, His Britannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902.

We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of to-day’s

date with regard to the allocation of the surtax funds allotted to the Provinces, and to

inform you that the views therein expressed are the same as our own.

We would, however,’wish to point out that, were the whole amount of the alloca-

tion due paid over to the Provinces, unnecessary expense would be incurred in the

retransmission by theiii of such portions thereof as would have to be remitted t >

Peking in place of the contributions hitherto payable out of lekin revenue. The

amount, therefore, of the allocation due to the Provinces, arranged between them and

the Board of Revenue^ will be retained in the hands of the Maritime Custouis, who

will await the instructions of the Provinces in regard to the remittance of such

portion thereof as may be necessary to fulfil their Obligations, and (on receipt of

these instructions) will send forward the amount direct. The balance will be held

to the order of the Provinces.

In so far as lekin is pledged to the service ot the 1893 loan, a similar method of

procedure will be adopted.

As you request that this correspondence be annexed to the Treaty, we have the

honour to state that we see no objection' to this being done.

Annex C

INLAND WATERS STEAM NAVIGATION

Additional Rules

1. —British steamship owners are at liberty to lease warehouses and jett

banks of waterways from Chinese subjects for a term not exceeding 25 years, with

option of renewal on terms to be mutually arranged. In cases where British mer-

chants are unable to secure warehouses and jetties from Chinese subjects on satis-

factory terms, the local officials, after consultation with the Minister of Commerce,

shall arrange to provide these on renewable lease as above mentioned at current

equitable rnes

2. —Jetties shall only be erected in such positions that they will not ob

inland waterway or interfere with navigation, and with the sanction of the nearest

Commissioner of Customs; such sanction, however, shall not be atbitrarily withheld.

3. —'British merchants shall pay taxes and contributions on these wareho

jetties on the same footing as Chinese proprietors of similar properties in the neigh-

bourhood. British merchants may only employ Chinese agents and staff to reside in

warehouses so leased at pla es touched at by steamers engaged in inland traffic to

carry on their business; but British merchants may visit these places from lime to

time to look after their affairs. The existing rights of Chinese jurisdiction over

Chinese subjects shall not by reason of this clause be diminished or interfered with

in any way.

4. —Steam vessels navigating the inland waterways of China shall be res

for loss caused to riparian proprietors by damage which they may do to the banks

2*

3« THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

or works on them and for the loss which may be caused by such damage. In the

event of China desiring to prohibit the use of some particular shallow waterway by

launches, because there is reason to tear that the use of it by them would be likely

to injure the banks and cause damage to the adjoining country, the British

authorities, when appealed to, shall, if satisfied of the validity of the objection,

prohibit the use of that waterway by British launches, provided that Chinese

launches are also prohibited from using it.

Both Foreign and Chinese launches are prohibited from crossing dams and weirs

at present in existence on inland waterways where they are likely to cause injury to

such works, which would be detrimental to the water service of the local people.

5. —The main object of the British Government in desiring

waterways of China opened to steam navigation being to afford facilities for the rapid

transport of both foreign and native merchandise, they undertake fo offer7no impedi-

ment to the transfer to a Chinese company and the Chinese flag of any British

steamer which may now or hereafter be employed on the inland waters of China

should the owner be willing to make the transfer.

In event of a Chinese company registered under Chinese law being formed to run

steamers on the inland waters of China the fact of British subjects holding shares in

such a company shall not entitle the steamers to fly the British flag.

6. —Registered steamers and their tows are forbidden, just as

been forbidden, to carry contraband goods. Infraction of this rule will entail the

penalties prescribed in the Treaties for such an offence, and cancellation of he Inland

Waters Navigation Certificate carried by the vessels, which will be prohibited from

thereafter plying on inland waters.

7. —As it is desirable that the people living inland should be

as possible by the advent of steam vessels to which they are not accustomed, inland

waters not hitherto frequented by steamers shall be opened as gradually as may be

convenient to merchants and only as the owners of steamers may see prospects of

remunerative trade.

* In cases where it is intended to run steam vessels on waterways on which such

vessels have not hitherto run, intimation shall be made to the Commissioner of

Customs at the nearest open port who shall report the matter to the Ministers of

Commerce. The latter, in conjunction with the Governor-General or Governor of

the Province, after careful consideration of all the circumstances of the case, shall at

once give their approval.

. 8.—A registered steamer may ply within the waters of a port, or from one open

port or ports to another open port or ports, or from one open port or ports of

places inland, and thence back to such port or ports. She may, on making due

report to the Customs, land or ship passengers or cargo at any recognised places of

trade passed in the course of the voyage; but may not ply between inland places

exclusively except with the consent of the Chinese Government.

9. —Any cargo and passenger boats may be towed by steamers

and crew of any boat towed shall be Chinese. All boats, irrespective of ownership,

must be legistered before they can proceed inland.

10. —These Rules are supplementary to the Inland Steam Nav

of July and September, 1898. The latter, where untouched by the present Rules,

remain in full force and effect; but the present Rules hold in the case of such of the

former Regulations as the present Rules affect. The present Rules, and the

Regulations of July and September, 1898, to which thev are supplementary, are

provisional and may be modified, as circumstances require, by mutual consent.

Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September, in the year of Our Lord, 1902,

corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the

twenty-eighth year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] Jas. L. Mackay.

REVISED IMPORT TARIFF FOR THE TRADE

OF CHINA, 1919

(Superceding the Tariff arranged in 1902)

Note.'those

exceeding —If any of thethe

specified, articles

Dutyenumerated in this inTariff

is to be calculated are imported

proportion to the inmeasurements

dimensions

as defined.

Kamb or Akticlb. Name of Abticlb.

CottonGoods. and Cotton Per T-Cloths,

ins. Grey, overover 34 Per Tls. Hk.

ins. bybut25 not

Imitation yds. Cot-37 Piece 0.15

Native

Cotton Piece Goods, Grey. ton Cloth (including

Grey Shirtings and40 Machine-made),

not over 24 notins. Grey,

wide j

Sheetings, not over and with

ins.a. Weight

by 41 yds:— 7 lb. and 0.091 than

square 110

inch thieadsmore per!| Picul

b. „ not under

overoyer7 lb.9and ! Piece Cotton Flannel or Flan-

lb. ! ,, 0.13 nelette

Twill of Plain :—or

Weave,

c. „ not overover9 lb.11andlb. ,, 0.18 a. Not

31 < ver 32Grey

yds ins. by | Piece

Grey Shirtings and b. Over 32 40ins.ins.but

Sheetings,

40withins.more not

by 41 than over

yds. and not

31 over

yds by !!i „ |

threads per square i 10

inch:— Cotton

or DyedPiece(irrespectm

Goods, White

a. Weight and over

not 11overlb. offinish).

b. „ and J2Ub

over not12iover lb. Plain White Shirtings

154 lb154 lb.... jj1I „„ and

37 ins.Sheetings,

by 42 ydsnotnot over 0.21

Grey c. „ over

Shirtings and White

37 ins. Irishes,

by 42 yds over 0.25

Sheetings,

ins. by 41notyds.overand40 Drills

not and31Jeans,

over ins. White,

by 32

withper110square

le.-s threads

inch:— or yds and Jeans, White, 0.16

a. Weight and over

not lb. jj

11over Drills

not over 31 ins. by 42 0.22

b. „ 154

over lb154 lb.... T-Cloths,

Mexicans, White,

not over and32

Drills and 31Jeans, Grey,31 ins. by 41Piques,

Dimities, yds Vt st- 0.18

not

yds over ins. by ings, Quiltings, and

Drills and Jeans, Grey, Bedford

not Cords, White,

not

yds. over 31 ins. by 41

a. Weight 125 lb. and yds over 30Lawns,

Cambrics,

ins. by 30

and

b. „ Grey, under

over 12notJib.... Muslins,

not White,

over 46 ins. by Plain,

12

T-Cloths,

34a. ins. by 25 yds. over yds

Cambrics, Lawns, and

Weight 7 lb. and Muslins,not White,

gured, over 46 ins. Fi-

b. „ under over 7 lb. ... by 12 yds

38 REVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Name of Akticle.

Cambrics, Cotton

cludingCrapeOatmeal (not in-

Mu-lins, Lawns,

or-Figured, Dyed,

not over

and

Plain

46 Crapes),Grey,

Dyed, Printed, Bleached,

ins.

White by or12I yds

‘y^cl, Plain or {j ina.theNotYarn: — or15Dyed

Figured Muslins,

Lawns, < 'ambries.

Lim- j b. Over wide 15 ins. ins.

over

but Value 5 %

brics.

cades, Pongees,Striped, Bro- not over 30 ins.

Spotted, and

Figured Corded, and

shirtings:— Eastings,

teens.

wide Sat- Yard 0.005®

Italians,Cords,

Ribs,

a. Not Moreens,Tientsin Beatrice

31 ydsover

b. Over 30

30 ins. by

ins. but

Twills,

Satteen Drills, Twills,

Satteen

Stripes, Repps,

42notydsover 37 ins. by Imitation

Venetians, (Weft-faced)

White or

Lenos,

not overWhite 31 ins.or byDyed,30 Dyed, Plain orins,

Figured,

yds Brocades, W hite 0.11 not over 33

yds and Venetians, by 33

Lenoor DyedShirtings and 5% Poplins

Dyed White

not overor33Dyed,

ins. byPlain,33

Sheetings,

a. Not overPlain:—

30 ins. by yds

33 yds Poplins

White not and Venetians,

or over

Dyed, Fi-

b. Not

ovtr < ver33 30yds.ins. and gured, 33 ins.

not over

c. Not over 3643 ins.yds.but 0.18 by

Cotton33 yds

Flannel, or Flan-

21 ydsover 36 irsby

d. Not 0.11 nelette,

Twill of Plain

W eave :— oror

and 1. White, Dyed,

butover

e. Not not< verover33

S6

21 yds

ins.

yds

and

Printed,

inclusive

the Yarn, or Dyed ex-

overever 33 43yds.yds....

but orPrints: of

Reversible Duplex

Dyed not

Drills and Jeans, a. Not over 25 ins by

Plain:—

a. Not over 31 ins. 15 yds

b. Over 25 30ins.ins.but 0.07

by 33over

b. Not yds31 ins. and 0.18 not over

15 yds but not by 0.08&

over

overT-3343loths.

yds.

yds butEm- not c. Over

Dyed 0.23 over 2530ins.

yds ins. by 31 C.1&

bossed

cianos.TurkeyCantoons,

Real and Imita- Alpa- d. Over 30 36ins.ins.but

tion not over by

over 32 ins. by3iReds,

a. Weight

not

25lb.yds.:—

and

15 yds30 ins. but not

e. Over

over 36 ins. by 31

0.10

b. „ not under

overover ....

3| lb.5|but yds

2. Duplex or Rever- 0.22

c.

Mercerised „ over

~ Crimps, lb. lb.... Dyed sible

Stripes:—

Prints

Cotton Spanish 5%

White,

ed, over Dyed, or

Plain32orins.Figured,Print- a. Not over 32 ins.

20 yds32 ins. but not by

not by 32 b. Over 0.11

yds

Oatmeal Crapes, White over 64 ins.

ydsCotton Velvets by 20 0.22

orgured,

Dyed, Plain or Fi- Dyed

by 33 ydsnot over 33 ins. and Velveteens,

not over Plain, J

26 ins. wide... 0.014

REVISE]) IMPORT TARIFF

No. Namb ABTICLI'. Namb or Article. TariffDuty. Unit and

Per Hk. Venetians, Printed Per Hk.Tls.

34 | Cotton Velvets and Vel- Tls. Bastings, Printed

veteens,

|I Velvet

gured, and Printed,

or Embossed, Fi- Beatrice Twills, Print-

Velveteen edPoplins,Cords, Printed

Printed32

jI tians,

Cord-', Moleskins,

< orduroys, Fus- Moreens,

i Plushes and Value

5;% ins.

Printed bv 30 not

yds over

Flannelette. Piece 0.25

35 Canvas,

ing Cotton

Cotton (includ-

Duck), for See No, 31.

Sails, e'c or Knitted Yard 0.015 Duplex

Prints or Reversible

36 Stockinette

Tissue:— Weavenotandofover

only, oneShirting

32colour

ins.

a.b. Not

RaisedRaised Picul 2.20

Value 5 % by 80 yds | and 0.15

Printed

Velveteens. VelvetsSee No.

CottonPrinted.

Piece Goods, 34. Domestic Cre-

Printed

tonnes, PrintedPrinted Sat-

Printed

edMuslins, Cambrics,Print-

Lawns, Printed teenOietonne-i

Printed Shirt- Repp

Printed Cretonnes,

Embossed

ingSjPrintedSheetings,

Printed T-Clothsknown (in- Figures, and Printed Art

cluding Muslins Casement

asPrinted Bluethose

andT-Cloths),

White Cloth,

Coatings, Printed Cotton

Trouserings,

Printed Drills. Diagon-

Printed and

all Gabardines,

other andor

DuplexPrints

Jeans,

alPrinted Printed

Twill Cretonnes, Reversible

Silesias,Print- except those

ed in Classes enumerat-

37 and See42. Value 5 %

edRepps

Repp (not including

Cretonnes) Printed Blankets.

a. wide ot over iO:—ins. Value No.

Printed 4C Handkerchiefs.

b. not

Overover20 46ins.ins.but 5°/o SeeTheNo.term

48.

by Piece 0.051 inPigment

this Tariff “ Printed”

includes

12

c. not yds

Overover20 32ins.ins.but Style, Direct

by Printing

Style. Style,

Discharge Steam

Style,

d not30 yds

Overover32 42ins.ins.but 0.12 Madder orStyle. Dyed Resist

Style,

by Resist

Pad Style, Metal Style,

Printed 30 yds Mercerised 0.15 and so forth irrespective

Crimps. See No. 25. of Thefinish.term “Duplex or

38 Printedand Oatmeal Crapes

Oatmeal Crape32 Reversible Print” allin

Cretonnes, not over this Tariff im-lude-

ins.

Printed by 30 yds.

Cotton Crapes... Printed

(a) a C .ttons

different having

pattern

See No. 27. printed

the on each

(b) thesidessameofof

cloth,on both side

39 PrintedReal Turkey

and Reds,

Imitation, design

not over 31 ins. by 25 the

printed cloth,

with whether

one or

40 Printedyds. Lenos, not over 0.10 more rollers.

31

-41 Printed ins. by 30 yds. 0.12 Cotton Piece Goods,

Satinets,Satteens

Brocades Printed

(including

and

Cotton

Yarn dyed.

Crape. See No.

1Stripes

rinted Fancy Woven 27.

Cotton Flannel, or

or Checks), Flannelette. See No.

No 31.

edPrinted Italians,Printed

Damasks, Print- Stockinette. See 36.

40 REVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Namb or Aeticle.

Cotton and otherwise

Cotton1 Per Tls.

Goods not

enumerated (see also Overnot

but 18 ins.over

square25:[

No. 598.) 5% 0.032

Cotton

otherwise Goods not Value

Pieceenumerated ins.

Oversquare

but 25 ins.oversquare | Dozen

not

(see also No. 598) ! „ 0.04

Cotton, Raw; d. square Over 29 ins.

Thread, CottonCotton

and ofManufacturesTarn, j over 34 ins.butsquare. not 0.052

Cotton. KnittedClothing Raised

Ankle-bands, Plain or j| Picul (including

Decorated

Bags, New (see also No. j1 „ 4.00 edwith Silkthat

withfacings Thread stitch-

and

529) Plain,Printed,

Blankets, jj 2.00 otherCotton

Raw material) or

of Silk 3.70

0.80

orthose

Jacquard

with a(including

taped or Singlets

Raised or Drawers,those

(including not

whipped

other edge of Silkandor i stitched with Silk

Blanketmaterial),

Canvas. Cloth

See No.27.35. i „

Threadof and

ings

material) Silk with

or other!fac-

Crape. See

Counterpanes, No. Honey- Socks

a. either and Stockings

Not side Raised :on—ijj

comb or Alhambra:^

a. long

Not over 2% yds. | „ 2.25 1. gassedMade orof: Un-' Un- j

h. long

Over 2J yds. Value 5% mercerised of Gassed |

2. orMade Mercerised Thread

Embroidered

Insertion. Edging Machine- or

made 1 No.| orThreadSilk

or stitched

embroidered

Flannelette.

31.

Handkerchiefs,

See

neither b.c. with Raised

Others See No, 57.50

%

Embroidered

itialled :— nor In- Stockinette.

Towels :—

(1.)Printed,

White, Dyed, a.b. Honeycomb

Turkish 2.50

(but thread

not with a Huckaback .... 2.20

a.drawn

Not over hem):

13 ins. Thread,

(irrespective

1 а. Sewing

Dyed orofUndyed

finish):

square

b. but

Over not

13 ins.over

square18 0.011 In ballsCotton:

3-cord or skeins :

0.018 6-cord

б.2- On spools or cops:

3-6-cord, ,, „ 0.020

0.030

ms. squareDyed, or

2. Printed,

White, 0.027 0.073-

thread with drawn- Other lengths in

proportion.

Not hem:

a. square over 13 in=. 2. broidery

CrochetCotton, or Em-in

b. but

Overnot13...:ins.over

square18 0 018

Cotton Waste

c. ins.

Over square

18

but square ins.

U'-t over 30square 0.038 Yarn

1. ofGrey :— (irrespective

fold): to and

ins.

3. chiefs,

Printed Handker- 0043 a. Counts

includingupabove

17

a. square Unhemmed:

Not over 13 ins. b. Countsand up to23 and in-17

0.01 cluding

REVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Per Wool and Cotton Unions.

c. Counts

and up above

to and 23

in- Union Shirtings, not Yard | 0.024

35 35 Picul

cluding above

d. Counts

over 33made

Cloth ins. ofwideremanu-

and up to factured Wool and

45and45in-... Value 52.18%

cludingabove

e2. Counts

Cotton,

tons, such Beavers,

Vicunas, as Mel-

Dyed, Mercerised,

bleached. Army

Cloths, Cloths,

Leather Union

Cloths,

Gassed,

etc Presidents (including

Cloth containing

small quantity newa

of pur-

Hemp, Linen, Silk, Wool for facing

and Woollen Goods. I poses), not over 56 ins.

77 'jI Italian

wide Cloth,

Figured, PlainLu-or

Alpacas,

{ stres,

Sicilians Orleans, and 5%

Gunny

„ Bags, „ Old New Picul 50.42%

Hemp Value

Picul 0.70 | Wool and Woollen Goods,

„ or Hessian Bags,

New 7879 j Blankets

Wool, Sheep’s

Hemp or Hessian Bags, 80 jj Bunting, and Rugs

Old

Hessian by 40 ydsnotnotoverover24 ins.31 0.33

Canvas

for ofCloth

Sails, Hemp orJute,

etc (elastic),

81 j Camlets,

ins. by 62 yds 0.78

Yard 0.019 82 |j Flannel

Canvas Linen

for Tailoringof Hemp or Value 5 % ins. wide not

83 j! Lastings,

over 33

Plain,notFigur- 0.024

Tarpaulin

Jute ed31 ins.

or Creped, over

Yard 0.011 by 32 yds 0.73

LlamaElls,

Long Braidnot over 31 7.50

ins.

Russian,by 25 yds

Broad, Super-

Silk

Silk), Piece

Plain,Goods

Figured,(all fine, Medium, and

or Brocaded Habit Cloth, not over

Silk Plushes and....Silk Value 5 % 76

87 Spanish ins. wide 0,076

Velvets,

Silk Seal, Puje

with Cotton Catty 0.55 64 ins.Stripes,

overWoollen

AllYarn

not

wide orsted

andW 0.032

0,15

Silk

ings, Socks

Knittedand(includ-

Stock- cludingand BerlinCord, in-

Wool...

ing thoseSilk)made of

Artificial

Silk Mixture Metals.

«,nd Velvets

ofotherSilk (i.e.,Plushes

mixed made

with Metals.

with fibrous

Cotton material,

back) Aluminium 5%

Silk andorCotton „ Sheets

White

Piece:— Dyed Satins,

in the Antifriction

Antimony Regulus Metals and

а.б. Figured

Plain ..... j Catty Brass „ andOre Refined

Yellow 50.70%

Silk and

Dyedandin theCotton Satins,

5Tarn Mix- Metal:—

Silk Bars and

and Bods

tures

enumerated notCotton

otherwise| Value Bolts

Washers, Nuts,

and Rivets,

Acces-

sories

gS*8

Silk

and Mixtures all Silk

Ribbons, Ingots

Nails

42 RKVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Tls.

Old (fit only for re-

manufacture) Value 5 %

Screws

Sheets and Plates Pioul Rope, Galvanized

Tubes or(with

Ungalvanized

or without

Wir : —

Copper fibre core

Bars

Bolts, andNuts,

Rods Rivets, Steel, Tool and Spring:

and Washers 51.40% BambooSteel

Spring Steel 0.27

Ingots and Slabs Tool Steel (including 0.32

Nails

Old (fit only for re- 2.40 High-speed Steel

manufacture) Value Ironvanized

and:—Steel, Gal-

Sheets and Plates Picul

Tacks

Tubes Bolts,

Washers Nuts, Rivets and

Wire„„ Cable

RopeSteel, Ungal- 51 70% Pipes,

Fittings

Screws

Tubes, and Tube

Ironvanized

and (not Spring,

includ- Sheets,

Plain Corrugated and

ing

and ToolBamboo,

Steel) : — Wire

Wire Rope fibre (withcore)oi

Anvils,

Anchors Swage-blocks,

and Parts(eachof, without

(see a' s o No.

and

weighing Forgingsinover)

every... ,, No.Shorts (see 135)..

118)Dross al-o

Bolts, Nuts orand

case 25 lb. Wa- Iron and Tm

50.26% Lead: —

Castings, Rough Old (fit only for re-

manufacture)

Chains, andWirePartsShorts,

of... 0.38 Pigs or Bars 50.45%

Cobbles,

Defective Wire, Bar Pipe 0.50

Croppings, and Baror Sheet

Wire Value 50.59

Ends, Galvanized Manganese Ferro %

Ungalvanized

Crossings forandRailways Value 50.13%

Fish-plates Spikes Nickel Picul

Hoops Picul o’.27 Quicksilver

Old (fit

manufacture)only for re- 0.10 Tim-

Nail-rod, Bars, Twisted Compound

Dross and Value

or Deformed

Tees, Channels, Bars, Ingots

Pipe andRefuse

Slabs Picul

Angles,! oistStructural

s,Girders, Sheet 52.10%

and other

Sections orand Shapes Tinned Tacks Decorated 0.45

Nails,

Pig andWire Cut...... 0.20

0.30 „„ Plates,„ Plain 0 51

Pipes, Kentledge....

Tubes, 6.10

Type Metal„ Old

„ a0.39%

and Tube

Plate FittingsPipe...

Cuttings

and

0.12 White Metal, or German

Rails 0.16 Silver:—

Rivets

Screws 0.31

SheetsanandinchPlates Value 5 %

more thickj orof Zinc:—*

! Powder and Spelter ... 0.65

„ and Picul

i ofPlates

thick an under

inch Sheets (including

forated), Plates, Per-

Boiler Plates and 0.84

EEVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Name op Article.

!

Canned Goods : Per

Pood, Drink, and

Vegetable j! Picul

Medicines. 203 Asparagus . (Incl.

! weight

Fishery and Sea Products I mediate

packing)

Agar-agar Awabi

Cream Eva- | „„

AwaM,

Biclio dein bulk Mar,Spiked

Black,... porated&Table

Fruits, orMilk,

Sterilised

and Pie j „„ 0.65

0.73

„ Black, not... Milk,

Canned Condensed

Goods, Un- 0.96

„ Spiked

White ... enumerated I' Value 5%

Cockle-, Chocolate „

Compoy , DriedFresh 0.06

2.15

Cocoa

Coffee j „„

Crabs’ Flesh, Dried 0.83% Currants and Raisins,

in bulk Preserved, in 1 Picul 0.63

Fish„ BonesCod, 50.29 Fruits,

„„ Dried CuttleDried

and Smoked

0 68 Glass, etc.

Honey j Value „ 5%

(not including Jams

Lard, and

in Jellies

bulk . „,>

Dried Codfish and Macaroni & Vermicelli, |

„„ Cuttle-fish)

Fresh in bulk

Margarine Pioul

Maws,

—i.e 1st Quality1

, orweighing Meats,

Pork Dried and Salted |jj Value

Rind „„

5

catty over per Sausages, Dry | „

piece

„ —i.e.,

Maws,weighing

Catty

2nd Quality Soy

Tea ■I Value

Picul 50,25%

der 1 catty un- per Cereals, Fruits,

.,„ piece

Salmon Picul 2.80

Value

Bellies ... Substances, Seeds,Medicinal

Spices, ]j

Salt

„ Skin Oysters, and Picul 50.18 %

0.64

and Vegetables.

Mussels, Aniseed,

a. 1st Star: —

Clams, Dried

Prawns Hlc.Quality—value

Tls. 15 and over ||! Picul

Dried, inand bulkShrimps, 1.10 per

b. 2nd picul

Quality—

Seaweed, Cut I 0.17 value underpiculHk.... :J\ ,»

,,„„ LongPrepared

RedDorsal and

Value 5 %

0.13

1.30 Apples,Tls.Fresh

15 per 0.45

0.25

Sharks’ Fins, Value 5%

Tail ...

Picul Barley,

Beans PearlPeas

and

„,, „„ Prepared..

Breast Betelnuts, DriedDried.. 0,24

„ Skins.... 5% Betelnut Husk, 0,12

0.08

Bran

Cereals and FlourMaize,

(in-

Animal

GoodsProducts, Canned

and Groceries. cluding

Millet, Barley,

Oats, Paddy,

Rice,

Flour Wheat,

made and

therefrom;

Bacon

bulk and Hams, in 1.80 also Buckwheat

Buckwheat and

Flour,

Baking

Beef, Powder

Corned or Pickled, 5 % Cornflour

Com and

Meal, Rye Yellow

Flour,

in Barrels

Birds’ Nests, Refuse)

Black and

not Hovis

including Flour;Arrow-

but

(inch Clarified

Birds’Nests, White ... root

Flour, and

Cracked Arrowroot

Wheat,

Butter Germea, Hominy,

REVISED IMPORT TARLFF

Pearl

Flour, Barley,

Quaker Potato

Oats, Olives

Rolled

Sago Oats,

Flour, Sago

Shredded and Oranges, incture. of Value

Opium, '1 Fresh 5%

Picul o!l8

Wheat,

Tapioca Tapioca and Peel, Orange, in bulk... 0.0.65

Yam Flour)Flour, and Pepper, Black

^ a* S

Camphor, Crude or Pepper,

Potatoes, White

Fresh

Refined (including

Shaped) Baroos, Clean Catty Picul Putchuck

Seed, Apricot

w

Camphor,

Camphor, Baroos, Re- Seed,]

Lotus-nutsFlower—i.e

Lily without,

fuse Cutchery

Capoor Value Husks

Seed, Lucraban 1.00

Cardamom Husk Picul 0.25 Seed, Melon Fir-nuts 0.35

0.55

Cardamoms,

Cardamoms, Inferior

Superior... ... 1.00

10.00 Seed,

Seed, Pine—i.e.

Sesamum See No. 0.24

0 24

Cassia Lignea

Twigs and Buds Value Sugar

Cassia 0.90 284. Cane.Dried,

Chestnuts

China-root Picul 50.18

°/o

0.70 Vegetables,

pared, and Salted Pre-

Cinnamon, inbulkbulk 5.00 5%

Cloves,

Cloves, in

Mother 0.90 Sugar.

Cocaine 50.40

0.19% Sugar,

Galangal Clarified or

Ginseng, No.

dard, 11 Brown, under

Dutch“ Green

and Stan-

Gleaned:—

1st over

Quality Sugar”

Hk. —Tls.value25 Sugar, White,

10(including over

Dutch . Standard No.

2ndper catty

Quality

over notHk. over—Tls.value11 Sugar) Cube and Refined

and Hk. Sugar

Loaf White, 0.50

Tls.Quality

3rdover 25 per—catty...

value3 Sugar C andy 0.57

Hk. Tis. Sugar Cane 0.05

and 11notperover Hk.

4thTls.

Quality

not over -•catty...

value 0.36 Wines, Beer,

Waters,Spirits,

etc. Table

Ginseng, cattyHk.Beard,

3 perCrude, Tls.

0.09 Champagne

other Wineand sold)

any r

Roots, and Cuttings:—

1st overQuality under the ” (.1

label

Hk. —Tls.

perQuality

catty

value3 I.

i

“ Champagne

Sparkling

Other Asti

SparklingRedWinesor

2ndnot over — value

Hk. Tls. StillWhite,

Wines, exclusively

3 per catty the produce of the

Ginseng,

Groundnuts, Wildin Shell ... | 50.085

0.15%

natural

tion of fermenta-

grapes (not

Groundnuts, Shelled ... 0.23 including

Liqueur):—Vins de

Hops Vege'.able ... ■ Value

Isinglass,Fresh

Lemons, Picul

1,000

52.70

%

1. In bottles .,

Lichees, Dried ; 1.50

Lily Flowers,

Lungngan Pulp Dried ... Picul 0.53

0.47 2. In bulk

i-botts.

Imp.

| gallon

Lungngans, 0.65 Case of

Malt in allDried

Morphia forms ...

, 0.38

0.41 Port Wine, in bottle j 12botts.

or 24

Mushrooms 1;

52.40% i-botts.

Imp.

Nutmegs 1.50 Port Wine, in bulk ( gallon

KEVISED IMPORT TARIFF 45

Perof

Case

Marsala, in bottles . ]i-botts,

2orbolts,

24 Tobacco.

Imp. igareltes,

Hk. Tls. 4.50value"' over

per 1.000

Marsala, in bulk . •If gallon jo.io and all Cigarettes not

Vins de Liqueur other bearingor name

brond a distinctive

on each

than

(viz., Port and Marsala

Madeira, Malaga, Cigarette.

Sherry, etc.) Cigaret' es, 3 0ovaluebut over

nor

1. In bottles 12Case

orbe24

of Hk.

over 'ils.

Hk. Tls. 4 50p

i-botts.

Imp. 1,000 tes, value over

Cigare

2. In bulk | 0.15 Hk. Tls.

Vera outh,

gallon

Byrrh, 12Caselitresof ; 0.29 over

l,0o0 Hk. 1.Tls.0 3.00

but notper

and Quinquina

Sake, in barrels Picul 0.41 Cigarettes, valfie Hk.

12 re-

puted '1 Is. 1.5u or less perl.OOo

Cigars 0.06

0.80

Snuff Leaf

Tobacco, 51.10%

Tobacco,

tin- Prepared,undtinr

Aland

*% B similar

er. Cider,Liquors

Perry, 5Tobacco,lb. oreach

packages

Prepared, Value 5%

made of Fruits < nd

Berries:— bulk—not

tins or pickedcases.inin Picul

tin-lined

1. In bottles ! gallon

Imp. Tobacco, Stalk

2. In casks .

Chemicals and Dyes.

Chemicals.

reputed

pints Acid, Acetic

,,„ Carbolic

Boracic..., 1.50

l.in

Porters

in casksand Stouts,)f |; gallon Imp. „ Hydrochloric—i.e ............, 5%

Brandy, Cognac, and „„ Nitric Muriatic

Whisky, in bulk 1 Case

„ Sulphate of

of 12

reputed' Ammonia, in bulk

I quarts „ Chloride of—i.e.,. |i

Bleaching„ SalSulphate Ammoniac of ... j:

Powder—i.e.,

I gallon

Imp* i| Chloride of Lime ......! 0.27

Other Spirits—i.e.,Rum,

Aquavit, Y od ka. Borax, < rude

Calcium, Carbideor Refined

of 0.b8

Punch, etc. Copper, Sulphate of 0.37

0.60

)(J I| reputed

Case

of 12 j;|l)1 0.20 Glycerine

Hide Specific.... 52.20%

k\ |jj quarts Manure, or Animal, Chem-

Imp. I '| 0.09

(. gallon

ical,

otherwise Artificial,

enumerated. not 0.15

12 re- Naphthalene

Saltpetre ... 0.63

0.47

Liqueurs Soda Ash

„ Bicarbonate of, in 0.12

bulk .. ..;

„„ Caustic 0.14

0.31

Waters' able. Aerated|V 12j-botts.

and Mineral bolts. ^ 0.0'; Crystal 0,13

Spirits of

Rectified Wine and ( 1 T „„ Nitrate„ Concentrated

of—Chile 0.16

Alcohol......Spirits or]I gallon

..P' Saltpetre

„ Silicate

46 REVISED IMPORT TARIFF

Namf of Ahticlb. Name of AaTicts.

Dyes and Pigments. m,

Tls.

Aniline Dyes not other- 50.084

% Gum„,. Copal Arabic

Benjamin 1 20

0.60

wise

Bark, enumerated

Mangrove 1.20

„ Yellow—for

1 lum-tree Dyeing 0.16 ,, Dragm'

Myrrh s-blood

,,„ Olibanum 3.00

Blue, Parior Pmteian 0.48

0.48

Bronze Powder e.Lamp-

CarbonBlack—i

black , „„,, ShellacResin

Sticklac

0.34

2.00

0.75

Cartbamin Oil,., Tragacanth 0.90

Chr

Cinnabarme Yellow 4.10 ,,„ Caster, Lubricating

„ Medicinal... 0.60

50.80

%

Cobalt, Oxide of

Cochineal 6% „ Coconut Kerosene:—

Cunao

Cutch oror False

GambierGambier

Dyes and Colours, Un- In case | 0.11

classed

Gamboge b2.80% gallons

10galls.

Am.

Green, b. In bulk | | 0.08

infurt, Emerald,

Hartall (Oridment)

Schwe-...

Case empty

and twc Tin 0.01

Indigo,

„„ Liquid Dried, Artificial

„ Natural empty tins Each

Imp. 0,027

Artificial :

or Paste,... Oil Linseed

Oil Lubricating:—

( gallon | 0.06

Indigo, Liqu d Natural Value i a Wholly

of mineral or partly

originnot)( Am.

gallon | 0.016

ILaka-wo

doin... d... b. Other kinds,

Lead,

YellowRed...Extract

White, and 0.51 othe wise enumer-

Logwood 0.77 „ | 0 025

Nutgalls l."0 Oil, Olive, in bulk . iTn ]0.10

galbrn )

Ochre 0.33 Soap,Laundry Household and

(including

Safflower

Sapanwood Blue Mottled), in bulk

Smalt Bars,

duty and Doublet*:

Turmeric

Ultramarine

Vermilion 4.10 nominalto be that

provided

charged

weights

su

on

h

„ ZincArtificial 5% weights

than true beweights

not less

and

White that a Bar does not

Soap, weighToilet less than

and 7Fancy

oz.... Picul | 50.44%

Value

Candles, Gums, Oils, Stearine

Turpentine : — Picul 0.98

Soap,Wax, Varnishes,

etc. Imp.

a. Mineral ( gallon

Wax, b. Vegetable

Bees, Yellow.. 0.04

1.60

Beeswax,

No. 40i. Yellow. See ■„„ Vegetable

Paraffin 0.50

Candles

Candlewick

Gasolene, Naphtha, and Case of

Benzine Mineral:— Books, Maps,Pulp. Paper,

In case and Wood

gallons Picul

b. In bulk..... | lOAm. galls. [0.15 (Incl.

weight

Grease,

wholly or partly Lubricating,

mineral 0.35

EE VISED IMPOKT TAEIPF

Nam* or Abiicik.

PaperCommonPrinting’,

Ci!etidered orSized Un- Leather,Cow Enamelled,

calendered

oror Coloured

Unsized. White Japanned,

PatentB- averand...

„ ed, Marbled, Enamell- Si-ins ( Furs', 59/0

or Glazed Flint >,„ Fox bog

„ orM G.ColouredCap, White „ „ Wh Arctic,

te.

„ ping.PackingandWrap-

Brown or „„ „,. Legs..

Eel...

„ Coloured

Printing,

dered or Calen-

Uncaleu-

„ Goat,nedTan-...

dered. Sized or Un-or „ „ Untan-

sized,

Coloured White

(includ- „ EabbitHarenedand......

ing Simile

Post r and

M G. including hut „ Lamb

not „ , born

Un-

Printing

otherwise Paper „„ Land-otter

erated),

Mechanical freeenum-

Woodof

Lvnx

Ma •ten

Untanned.

Pulp

„„ StUnenumer

rawboarl ted ... 5% Musquash.

Raccoon...

Sable

„ andM.G.

UnglazadBleached Tissue Sheep, Un-...

Sulphite, freeWoodof tanned

Squirrel

Mechanical

Pulp Drawing, Wolf ...

„ Writing,

Art Printing,

Bank-note, Parch- Bones, Feathers,

Horns,Tusks, Hair,

Shells,etc.Sinews,

ment,

and Pergam

Grease-proof..j n,

Wood

Wood Pulp,

Pulp, Mechanical

Mechani-

cala. :—Dry Bones.Bezoar,

Cow Tiger Indian

Crocodile and Armadil o

P cul

Value 52.80

%

b. Wet ing (not contain-40

li ssmoisture'

than Scales Picul 3 00

per cent, Elephants’

or Parts ofTusks,Whole Catty 0.18

Books

Charts and Maps Feathers, Kingfisher,

Newspapers and Periodi- Whole

„ Kingfisher, Skins...

Part 0.60

cals Skins —Tails,

i.e.,

Aitimal Substances, Wings,

or Backs ......

Baw and Prepared. „ Peacock

Hides, Hair,

„ Horse 22 5010

SkinsLeather,

(Furs).and Horns, ,. Tails 0.65

Hides, Buffalo „ Buffalo

Deer Oldand Cow. 1 70

421

4'5 ; Leather

„ Calf Beltingorand Cow.

Kid, 51.10% You 7.00

Enamelled,Patent, Ja- Northern.

„ Young-

panned, Southern. Value

8^88^

and/or

416 „ Cow (including Coloured. 15.00 „ Ehinoeeros Catty

that for Soles... Musk

Sea-horseCowTeeth

and Harness) 2.90 Sinews, and Deer...

48 KEVISED IMPORT TARIFF

No. Namb or Articlp.

Timber,Wood Bam- Hk.

Tls.

boos, and Rattans. 488 Wood Puruand Rose ... 0,09

0.21

490 „„„ Red

491 Sandal

„ Dust ..

0.43

1 000 Wood, Sapan. See Dyes 5%

pieces 492

Ordinary

Teak (notother

and including

en- 493 Wood, Scale

494 i,„„ Veneer

Sticks

Scented Hinoki

Shavings,

...... 60.009

%

umerated ^ W o o d s ). 495

Rough Hewn]:— ^ 1,000 In this Tariff,theby wood

Soft-

467 Hardwood 5 r!.M. 11.45 woodanyis meant

ofand conife ous tree

468 1.15 of all ortre esspinous

“needle” with

Ordinary, Sawn: — 1,0^0 leaves, t.g., Pines, Firs

Hardwood sup.ft. Sprue

Yews,es. Larches,Cedar andofs.

b.M. | 1.80 Cypresses. Junipers,

The w. od

SoftwoodManufactured 1.50 all trees

Ordinary,

(including any process leaves is to bewithclassed

Hardwood.

broadas

further than

sawing), simple

Masts andexclusive^

Spars: — of Coal, Fuel, Pitch,

Hardwood:

a. Clear, - 1.000 and Tar.

measureon net J snp.ft.

496

497 Coal

„ Briquettes Ton 0.27

0.50

Softwood: , 1,000 498

499 Charcoal Picul

T.n 0.05

0.55

a. Clear, Coke

measureon net J\ sup.ft., 600

501 Liquid

Pitch Fuel Picul (>.0.7324

b. Merchantable, on 502 Tar, Coal 0.08

Ordinary, Masts and

Spars Sleepers......... Chinaware, Enamel-

Railway 1,000 ledware, Glass, etc.

Teak-wood,Beams

Planks an 1I sup.ft.,

B.M. 503 Basins, Tin Gross 0.30

504 Chinaware

Enamelled Ironware : Value 5%

505 Mugs,

and Cups,notBasins,

Bowls, overin

Canes, Bamboo

Rattan Skin 0.42

0.75 11 centimetres

diameter 0.05

Rattans,

lore or Whole 0.32

0.34 606 Basins

overn<22t and Bowls,

centimetres

„ Camagon

Wood, 0.16 but over 35 cen-

„„ Ebony

Camphor 5% 507 timetres

Enamelled in diameter.

Ironware, Value 0.10

„„ Fragrant

Garoo 0.12 508 TJnenumerated

Glass and Crystal Ware 5%

„ Kranjee

Wood, 5% 509 Glass Plate,

Bevelled Silvered,

or Unbevell-

Wood, Laka.

Oil..

See Dyes....

Lignum-vitse ed, not

feet each over 5 square Sq. ft. 0.028

* TheCommission,

Revision unit, given has

by been

a clerical errorunder

corrected as “authority

Catty ” inofthe

the Draft

Chineseapproved by the Tariff

Government.

REVISED IMPORT TARIFF 49

TS’o. Name of Article. I TariffDcir. Usm and No. I Name of Abticlr.

S10 Glass Bevelled Silver, d. Per Me.

Plate, Unbevell- Tls. 533 Mats, Formosa Grass Each Tls.

ed,

each over 5orsquare feet Sq, ft. 0.042 534 Mats, (Bed)Rattan Value 50.24

%

Value 5 % 535 Mats, Rush.. 100

512 Glass

ill Glass

mon,

Plate,

Window,

not

Unsilveced

over Com

32 oz. f 100 536

537 Mats,

Mats, Straw

Taami Each

| 0.25 Roll

infootweight per square)C sq. ft. 538 Matting,

by 100 ydsCoir, 36 ins.1S yards K'Oof

il3 .Glass Window, Coloured 0.60

Mirrors (see also No. 089) Valu • 5 % 539 Matting, Straw, 36 V 40 of Roll

s. by 40 yds J

Precious Stones, Buttons.

Stones, & Manufac- 540 Buttons, Fancy (Glass, Value

tures of Earth. Jewellery,Metal etc.)(not 5%

641 Buttons,

cluding those made in-of

514 ACement

mber Value 50.045

% Precious

515

616 Coral Beads Picul

Catty 0.80 plated

Metals) with Pieciousor Gross

Metals

0.02

517

518 Cornelian Beads Rough Value

„ Stones, 100 50.30% 542 Buttons, Porcelain ... ^ gross 12 j 0.017

619 Corundum

Emery & Sand Powder Picul

Glass 0.19 543 Buttons, Shell Gross 0.021

(see also No. and

564)Sand- 0.12 Fans Sunshades.

Umbrellas, and

Emery-cloth

paper (sheet not over

144 square 544 Fans, Palm-leaf, Coarse 1,(00 0.35

620 aiso No. 577)inches) (see Ream 0.26 546

Fire-bricks 546

„„ „„ Fancy Fine...

1.00

0.60

Value 5 % 2.40

621

522 Fireclay

Flints (including Flint Picul

547 „„ Silk

548 Umbrellas

Paper or Cotton ...

& Sunshades: 5 °/o

623 Tiles Pebbles) „

Value , 5 % 0.C4 549 With Handles wholly

orMetals,

partly of Precious

Ivory, Mo-

Miscellaneous. ther-of - Pearl, Tor-

Asbestos. toiseshell, Agate, etc.,

524 Asbestos Boiler Com- 550 With

or Jewelled

les, other Hand- Value

allCotton:

all

5°/o

position

525 Asbestos Fibre and 0.18 a. Length of rib not Value

M etallic Packing 3.20 b. over 17 ins 5°/o

626 Asbestos Millboard

527 Asbestos Sheets and 0.40

551 With 17 all otherribHand-

Length of over Each 0.022

Packing

£28 Asbestos Yarn 2.20 les, Mixtures, not Silk 0.(37

2.00 652 With all other H andles. 0065

Bags, Mats, and Matting. Silk and Silk Mixtures

529 Bags, Colton, New 2.00 Files and Needles.

Bags,

also Gunny,

No. 57) New (see Files of allsurface

kinds :—only,

Bags, Gunny, (see also 0.42 553 Filingnot over 4 ins. long... 0.065

No. 58)Hemp or Bessian, Value &°/0 554 Filing surface

Bags,

New (see also No. 60)... Picul 0.95 over

over 4 ins.

9 ins. longbutonly,

not 0.14

I Old

ags.(see

Hempalsoor Hessian,

No. 61) ... 555 Filing surface only,

530 Bags, Coir and Grass. Value

Straw(Door) 1,000 5°/o over

over 149 surface

1.50 566 Filing ins.long

ins. but not

531 Mats, Dozen 0.40

532 Mats, Fancy Value 5°/o over 14 ins. long only, 0.60

60 REVISED IMPORT TARIFF

No Name of AKTici E. No Name of Article.

Hk.

Per Tls. Sundry. Per Tls.Hk.

657 Nee 11 s. 6/0 Nos. 7/ > and )$ 100 j 2 70

mille Bamboo

boo Baske

Blinds, s, B tin-

,■ nd other j

-658

559 „„ includingNAssorted

,s. 3/0 and(not

2/ ' 2.60

2.00

Bamboo

Bent-wood

Coir Yarn Chairs j Value 5 7®

Waie

7/0)... Cordage andTa niSand-

Matches Emery-cloth

(sheetimandnot

making and Match-

Materials. paper

144 square hes).over... Rt am

Matches, Wood, Safety 57S Furnitui e and other

or other:—

560 Small, inir:s.boxes not 100

gross II)|)> 0.92 579 Glue (not including Value

Woodware

FishCow,

Glue)

5 7®

Picul 1.00

over 2 by I f ins. 580

by f ini i foxes

661 Large,

box

o> K 581 Glue

Glue Fish Refuse 3.1.0>

8<>

overby2jf ins.

ins. in by not gross

bx j)I v 0.80

582 India rubberandGutta-

percha. Crude Value 5 7®

583 India-rubber

Insizesboxes over above Value i 5 % 585 Sot Wasteof all kindsOid or

Inks

Match-making Insect Powder

563

564 Chlorate

Emery ofMaterials:—

& Glass Potash

Po der.... Picul ! 1.80

, 0.12

586

587 Lainpwick

Leather Purses Picul I 2.7)

Gross ('.56

Value 588 Machines, Sewing and

565 Labels

566 Phosph

Wax, rus

Paraffin (see also Pieul J 53.5U °/0

589 Knitting

Mirrors Value j 5 7®

No. 406; „„ Lao 590

591 Moulding,

Oakum Picture Picul | 50.63

567

568 Wood shavings

Splints „ 0.10 0.11 592 Rope Value 7®

593

594 Shoes

Starch and Boots

Metal Threads and Foil. 595 Sulphur

569 Thread, Goll, Im'tation Catty 0.15

596

597 Tinder

Worm

Bottles, Tablets,

not over in Picul 0.45

6)

570 on Cotton

Thread, Silver, Imita- pieces Dozen 0.037

tion,

Thread,on Cotton Unenumerated

671

672 Imitation, onandSilkSilver Value

Tinfoil

Gold

Picul 3.20

G-oods.

Unenumerated Goods.., Value i 5 °/0

RULES

Rule I.—Imports unenumerated in this Tariff will pay duty at the rate of

5 per cent, ad valorem; and the value upon which Duty is to be calculated shall be

the wholesale market value of the goods in local currency. This market value when

converted into Haikwan Taels shall be considered to be 12 per cent, higher than

the amount upon which duty is to be calculated.

If the goods have been sold before presentation to the Customs of the

Application to pay Duty, the gross amount of the bond fide contract will be

accepted as evidence of the market value. Should the goods have been sold on

c. f. and i. terms, that is to say, without inclusion in the price of Duty and other

charges, such c. f. and i. price shall be takei^ns the value for Duty-paying purposes

without the deduction mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

REVISED IMPORT TARIFF 51

If the goods have not been sold before presentation to the Customs of the

application to pay Duty, and should a dispute arise between Customs and importer

regarding the value or classification of goods, the case will be referred to a Board of

Arbitration composed as follows

An official of the Customs ;

A merchant selected by the Consul of the importer; and

A merchant, differing in nationality from the importer, selected by the

Senior Consul.

Questions regarding procedure, etc., which may arise during the sittings of the

Board shall be decided by the majority. The final finding of the majority of the

Board, which must be announced within fifteen days of the reference (not including

holidays), will be binding upon both parties. . Each of the two merchants on the

Board will be entitled to a fee of ten Haikwan Taels. Should the Board sustain

the Customs valuation, or, in the event of not sustaining that valuation, should it

decide that the goods have been undervalued by the importer to the extent of not less

than 7\ per cent., the importer will pay the fees; if otherwise, the fees will be paid

by the Customs. Should the Board decide that the correct value of the goods is

20 per- cent, (or more) higher than that upon which the importer originally claimed

to pay Duty, the Customs authorities may retain possession of the goods until full

Duty has been paid and may levy an additional Duty equal to four times the Duty

sought to be evaded.

In all cases invoices, when available, must be produced if required by the Customs.

Rule II.—The following will not be liable to Import Duty: Foreign Rice,

Cereals, and Flour; Gold and Silver, both Bullion and Coin; Printed Books,

Charts, Maps, Periodicals and Newspapers.

A freight or part freight of Duty-free commodities (Gold and Silver Bullion

and Foreign Coins excepted) will' lender the vessel carrying them, though no other

cargo be on board, liable to Tonnage Dues.

Drawbacks will be issued for Ship’s Stores and Bunker Coal when taken on

board.

Rule III.—Except at the requisition of the Chinese Government, or for sale

to Chinese duly authorised to purchase them, Import trade is prohibited in all

Arms, Ammunition, and Munitions of War of every description. No Permit to

land them will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority

has been given to the Importer. Infraction of this rule will be punishable by

confiscation of all the goods concerned. The import of Salt is absolutely prohibited.

52 CUSTOMS TARIFF ON EXPORTS

TARIFF ON EXPORTS

(As annexed to the Tientsin Treaty of 1858)

OF ARTICLK. Tariff Unit

T.0 m,0 c.4 c.5 Per T.0 m.10c. c.5-

Picul

Alum

„ Green or Copperas 0 10 0 Galangal

Aniseed, Star Garlic

00 52 05 00 Ginseng, Native ad valorem 0 0 3 0-

„„ Broken

Oil 5 0 0 0 ,, pan,Corean

1st or Ja- )( Catty 50p.5cent.

quality 0 0-

Apricot Seeds, or Almonds 00 44 55 00 „ Beads „ 2nd quality... 0350

Arsenic

Artificial Flowers ... Glass

157 05 00 Glass or Vitrified Wire... 0

02 55 000 00-0

5

Bamboo Ware

Bangles,andorPeasGlass Armlets 0

00 50 06 00 Glasscloth, Fine 00 7105 00

Beans „ Coarse

Bean

Bone Cake

and Horn Ware 0150 03 05 Ground-nuts „ Cake.... 0 0 3 O'

Brass Buttons 3 0 0 0 Gypsum,

Plaster Ground,

of Paris or)) 0030

„„ Foil 15 00 00 Hair, Camels 10 0 0

„ Wire]

Camphor

Ware 10

115

0 7 5

Hair,

00 Hams Goats 000 351855 000

Canes Thousand Hartall, or Orpiment 00 39 05 00

Cantharides Picul 002 053 000 000 Honey Hemp

Capoor Cutchery

CarpetsLignea

Cassia and Druggets 30 56 00 00 India Horns, Deers’,

„ Ink„ Old Young ... Picul 041390 005 00-0

Pair

„„ TwigsBuds 00 8150 00 Indigo, Dry 100O

„ Oil 9 0 0 0 Ivory Ware

Joss-sticks Picul 00 2150 00

Catty

Castor

Chestnuts Oil 00 2100 00 Kittysols,UmbrellasWare or Paper}) Hundred 0 5 0 0

China RootsFine 00 9130 00 Lacquered Picul 01 06 00 00

Chinaware, 0 4 5 0 Lamp

Lead, wicks(Minium) ...

Red, 00 33 55 0-0-

Cinnarbar

Clothing, Cotton 0157 05 00 „„ Yellow, White, (Ceruse) ...

(Massicot). 0 3 5 O'

Coal „ Silk 10 0 0

0 0

4 0

0 Leather

Pouches, Articles,

Purses asj ) 15 0 0

Coir Ore

Copper 00 5100 00 Lichees,, Green 001822 007 000

„„ and

Sheathing,

PewterOldWare 0115 5 0 0 Lily„ Flowers,

Seeds or Dried 00 5130 05

Corals,

Cotton, False

Raw 00 33 55 000 Liquorice

Lung-ngan

Lotus Nuts

00 23 55 0-O'

Cow „ Bezoar

Rags 00 03 64 05 Manure „ withoutCakes, Stone.

or \

Crackers, Fireworks Poudrette

0155 00 00 Marble / 0090

Cubebs Slabs 00 22 00 0-O'

Curiosities, Antiques ... ad valorem 5 p. cent. Mats of all kinds Hundred

roll of )

Dates, Black

„ Green

Red Picul 0 15 0 Matting j 40 yards ) 00 21. 00 0O'

Dye,

Eggs, Preserved Catty 000 083 905 000 Melon

Thousand Seeds Ware ... Picul

Mother-o’-Pearl Catty 0 10 0

Fans, Feather Hundred 00 70 54 05 Mushrooms Picul 01 95 00 0'0-

Catty

„„ Palm

Paper Leaf, trimmed Thousand Musk

Nankeen and Native I

„ Palm Leaf, un-)) 0 3 6 0 Cotton Cloths I Picul 01 55 00 0-O'

trimmed 0 2 0 0 Nutgalls

Felt„ Caps

Cuttings Picul

Hundred 0 10 0 Oil, as

CottonBean, Tea, Wood,

& Hemp Seed ' 1 0300

Fungus, or Agaric Picul 0126 05 00 Oiled Paper 0 4 5 0-

CUSTOMS TARIFF ON EXPORTS 5»

Name of Article. d Duty.

T.0 m.3 c.0 c.0 Silk, Ribbons and Thread

Olive Seed Sea-shells.

Oyster-shells, 00 04 95 00 „ Piece Goods,—"l

Paint, Green or Cotton \ Pongees,

Scarves, Shawls,

Crape, I|

Palampore,

Bed 1stQuilts Hundred 2

) Picul 0 7 0 0 7 5 0 Satin, andGauzes,

Paper, quality 0 4 0 0 Velvet

broidered Em- J

Goods

„ 2nd „ 20 03 00 00 „ Piece

Pearls,

Peel, False chuen, Shantung ))

Goods,—Sze- 4500

„„ Orange

Pnmelo,

„ 1st quality

2nd

00 4155 00 „„ Tassels CapsCotton Mixtures!| Hundred

100 09 00 00

Peppermint Leaf Oil . ....; 03 5100 00 Silk Silver and Gold Ware ... Picul

and 1005 008 000 000

Pictures and Paintings... Each 0 10 0 Snuff

Pictures

Rice Paper on Pith or)j Hundred 0 10 0 Straw Soy Braid 000 471200 000

Pottery, Picul 0 0 5 0 Sugar, Brown

Preserves,Earthenware

Comfits, and...( 0 5 0 0 „„ White Candy 00 22 05 00

Rattans, Split 00 32 05 00 Tallow, Animal 00 23 00 00

Rattan Ware 12 5 0 Teaend(see „ Vegetable

NoteTariff)

at the)

Rhubarb 2500

RiceMillet,

or Paddy, and Wheat,

other £ 0 10 0 Tin Foil the

of

Tobacco, Prepared

... j

001 241555 0-00-

Grains ) 9 00 Tobacco, LeafWare

Rugs

Samshoo of Hair or Skin Picul 000 015

Each Tortoiseshell

00 Trunks, Leather Catty

Picul 0152 00 00

Sandalwood Ware Catty

Picul 00 10 15 Turmeric 00 10 00

Sessamun

Shoes Seed 13 5 Twine, Hemp,

„ „ Soochow..Canton ... 00 515

1 8 0G

0

ther and

Shoes, orStraw Boots, Lea-)j

Satin 3 0 0 0 Turnips,

Varnish, Salted

or Crude Lac:

Silks, Raw and Thrown... •) 0500

„ Yellow, from Sze- i 7 0 0 0 Vermillion 02 5180 00

chuen 1 52 05 00 00 Wax, Insect& ...) |I

White orPoles, 15 0 0

Silk,„„ Reeled

Wild from Dupions

Raw Wood—Piles,

JoistsWare Each

) 1| Picul

„„ Refuse

Cocoons

Floss, Canton... 341003 000 000 Wood

Wool '

„ from other Provinces 10 0 0 0

practiceTEA.—Coarse unfired

of the Shanghai Japanese

Customs Tea duty

to charge imported for localon Tea

ad valorem consumption. —Smve February, 1861, it has been the-

of this description.

Tea imported from Japan for the purpose of being retired and re-exported

April, 1861, Japanese Tea imported for re-exportation has been dealt with at Shanghai to a Foreign

accordingcountry.—Since

to the followingtherule1st of

will “Tea imported

be allowed into

a reduction this port from

on theforactual Japan for the

weightamount purpose

imported of being refired and re-exported

Importtoduty,

a Foreign countryre-

exported

provided a Drawback

that the Certificate

terms of Article the entire

XLV. of the Treaty of dutyof Twenty

between paid

Great

perbe granted

willBritain cent, onontheapplication

and China be complied

and

usualwhen

in thewith, manner,

and tha6

the weights, &c., &c., be correctly declared.”

Brick Tea.—In

Mace per picul. the Tariff appended to the Russian Regulations of 1862, the Export duty on Brick is fixed

RULES

{Annexed to the Tariff of 1858)

Rule I. — U?ienumerated Goods.—Articles not enumerated in the list of exports,

but enumerated in the list of imports, when exported, will pay the amount of duty

-set against them in the list of imports; and, similarly, articles not enumerated in

the list of imports, but enumerated in the list of exports, when imported, will pay

the amount of duty set against them in the list of exports.

Articles not enumerated in either list, nor in the list of duty-free goods, will pay

an ad valorem, duty of 5 per cent., calculated on their market value.

Rule II.—Duty-free Goods.—Gold and silver bullion, foreign coins, flour, Indian

meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery,

foreign clothing, jewellery, plated-ware, perfumery, soap of all kinds, charcoal,

firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco (foreign), cigars (foreign), wine, beer, spirits,

"household stores, ship’s stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, druggeting,

-cutlery, foreign medicines, glass, and crystal ware.

The above pay no import or export duty, but, if transported into the interior

will, with the exception of personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins,

pay a transit duty at the rate of 2f per cent, ad valortm.

A freight, or part freight, of duty-free commodities (personal baggage, gold

. and silver bullion, and foreign coins, excepted) will render the vessel carrying them,

though no other cargo be on board, liable to tonnage dues.-

Rule III.—Contraband Goods.—Import and export trade is alike prohibited in

the following articles: Gunpowder, shot, cannon, fowling-pieces, rifles, muskets,

pistols, and all other munitions and implements of war; and salt.

Rule IV.— Weights and Measures.—In the calculation of the Tariff, the weight

of a picul of one hundred catties is held to be equal to one hundred and thirty-three

and one-third pounds avoirdupois; and the length of a chang of ten Chinese feet to

be equal to one hundred and forty-one English inches.

One Chinese chih is held to be equal to fourteen and one-tenth inches English;

and four yards English, less three inches, to equal one chang.

Rule V.—Regarding Certain Commodities Heretofore Contraband.—The restric-

tions affecting trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, sulphur, brimstone, saltpetre, and

spelter are relaxed, under the following conditions:—

1. —*Opium will henceforth pay thirty Taels per picul import

will sell it only at the port. It will be carried into the interior by Chinese only, and

only as Chinese property; the foreign trader will not be allowed to accompany it.

The provisions of Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin, by which British subjects

are authorized to proceed into the interior with passports to trade, will not

extend to it, nor will those of Article XXVII. of the same treaty, by which the

transit dues are regulated. The transit dues on it will be arranged as the Chinese

Government see fit: nor in future revisions of the Tariff is the same rule of revision

to be applied to opium as to other goods.

2. —Copper Cash.—The export of cash to any foreign port i

shall be lawful for British subjects to ship it at one of the open ports of China to

another, on compliance with the following Regulation:—The shipper shall give

notice of the amount of cash he desires to ship, and the port of its destination, and

shall bind himself either by a bond, with two sufficient sureties, or by depositing

X- For duty Opium see Convention signed in 1885, also the Treaty of 1902.

CUSTOMS TARIFF 55-

such other security as may be deemed by the Customs satisfactory, to return, within

six months from the date of clearance, to the collector at the port of shipment, the

certificate issued by him, with an acknowledgment thereon of the receipt of the cash-

at the port of des'motion by the collector nt that port, who shall thereto nffix his

seal; or failing the production of the certificate, to forfeit a sum equal in value to

the cash shipped. Cash will pay no duty inwards or outwards ; but a freight or part

freight of cash, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel carrying it

liable to pay tonnage dues.

3. —The export of rice and all other grain whatsoever, native or foreig

where grown or whence imported, to any foreign port, is prohibited; but these

commodities may be carried by British merchants from one of the open ports of

China to another, under the same conditions in respect of security as cash, on pay-

ment at the port of shipment of the duty specified in the Tariff.

No import duty will be leviable on rice or grain; but a freight or part freight of

rice or grain, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel importing it

liable to tonnage dues.

4. —* The export of pulse and beancake from Tung-chau and Newch

the British flag, is prohibited. From any other of the ports they may be shipped, on

payment of the tariff duty, either to other ports of China, or to foreign countries.

5. —Saltpetre, sulphur, brimstone, and spelter, being munitions of w

be imported by British subjects, save at the requisition of the Chinese Government,

or for sale to Chinese duly authorized to purchase them. No permit to land them

will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority has been

given to the purchase. It shall not be lawful for British subjects to carry these

commodities up the Yang-tsze-kiang, or into any port other than those open on the

seaboard, nor to accompany them into the interior on behalf of Chinese. They must

be sold at the ports only, and, except at the ports they will be regarded as Chinese

property.

Infractions of the conditions, as above set forth, under which trade in opium,

cash, grain, pulse, saltpetre, brimstone, sulphur, and spelter may be henceforward

carried on, will be punishable by confiscation of all the goods concerned.

Rule YI.—Liability of Vessels Entering Port. For the prevention of misunder-

standing, it is agreed that the term of twenty-four hours, within which British vessels

must be reported to the Consul under Article XXXVII. of the Treaty of Tientsin,

shall be understood to commence from the time a British vessel comes within the limits

of the port; as also the term of forty-eight hours allowed her by Article XXX. of the

same Treaty to remain in port without payment of tonnage dues.

The limits of the ports shall be defined by the Customs, with all consideration

for the convenience of trade compatible with due protection of the revenue; also the

limits of the anchorages within which lading and discharging is permitted by the

Customs; and the same shall be notified to the Consul f>r public information.

Rule VII.—Transit Dues.—It is agreed that Article XXXVIII. of the Treaty of

Tientsin shall be interpreted to declare the amounts of transit dues legally leviable

upon merchandise imported or exported by British subjects to be one-half of the tariff

duties, except in the case of the duty-free goods liable to a transit duty of 2| per cent.

ad valorem, as provided in Article II. of these Rules. Merchandise shall be cleared

of its transit dues under the following conditions:—

In the Case of Imports.—Notice being given at the port of entry, from which the

Imports are to be forwarded inland, of the nature and quantity of the goods, the ship

-:i:- NOTIFICATION.

Article

Pulse IV. of Rule

and bean-cake No. 5 appended

mayterms to

be henceforth the Tariff is British

exportedas ofarefrom1858applied

Consulatr, Shanghai, 24ch March, 1862.

rescinded.

Tungehow andNative

Newchwang, and fromRegulation

all otherports in China

open

the by Treaty,

5th December on the same

last; that and conditions to other produce

dutyofatbythethethehalf-duty bearing

anddate

charged at aiiy Chinese port isontopayment

say, theyofmay be shipped

half-duty, with onpower payment

to claimof Tariff

drawback port of shipment, dis-

if re-exported.

By order, Walter H. Mkdhurst, Consul.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

from which they have been landed, and the place inland to which they are bound,

with all other necessary particulars, the Collector of Customs will, on due inspection

made, and on receipt of the transit duty due, issue a transit duty certificate. This

must be produced at every barrier station, and vised. No further duty will be leviable

upon imports so certificated, no matter how distant the place of their destination.

In the Case of Exports.— Produce purchased by a British subject in the interior

will be inspected, and taken account of, at the first barrier it passes on its way to the

port of shipment. A memorandum showing the amount of the produce and the port

at which it is to be shipped, will be deposited there by the person in charge of the

produce; he will then receive a certificate, which must be exhibited and vised at every

barrier, on his way to the port of shipment. On the arrival of the produce at the

barrier nearest the port notice must be given at the Customs at the port, and the

transit dues due thereon being paid it will be passed. On exportation the produce

will pay the tariff duty*.

Any attempt to pass goods inwards or outward otherwise than in compliance

with the rule here laid down will render them liable to confiscation.

Unauthorised sale, in transitu, of goods that have been entered as above for a

port, will render them liable to confiscation. Any attempt to pass goods in excess

of the quantity specified in the certificate will render all the goods of the same

denomination, named in the certificate, liable to confiscation. Permission to export

produce, which cannot be proved to have paid its transit dues, will be refused by the

Customs until the transit dues shall have been paid. The above being the arrange-

ment agreed to regarding the transit dues, which will thus be levied once and for all,

-the notification required under Article XXVIII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, for the

information of British and Chinese subjects, is hereby dispensed with.

Rule VIII.—Peking Pot Open to Trade.—It is agreed that Article IX. of the

Treaty of Tientsin shall not be interpreted as authorising British subjects to enter

the capital city of Peking for purposes of trade.

Rule IX.—Abolition of the Meltage Fee.—It is agreed that the percentage of one

Tael two Mace, hitherto charged in excess of duty payments to defray the expenses of

melting by the Chinese Government, shall be no longer levied on British subjects.

Rule X.—Collection of Duties Under One System at all Ports.—It being by Treaty

at the option of the Chinese Government to adopt what means appear to it best suited

to protect its revenue accruing on British trade, it is agreed that one uniform system

shall be enforced at every port.

The high officer appointed by the Chinese Government to superintend foreign

trade will, accordingly from time to time, either himself visit or will send a deputy

to visit the different ports. The said high officer will be at liberty, of his own choice,

and independently of the suggestion or nomination of any British authority, to select

any British subject be may see fit to aid him in the administration of the Customs

Revenue, in the prevention of smuggling, in the definition of port boundaries, or in

discharging the duties of harbour master; also in the distribution of lights, buoys,

beacons, and the like, the maintenance of which shall be provided for out of the

tonnage dues.

The Chinese Government will adopt what measures it shall find requisite to

prevent smuggling upon the Yang-tsze-kiang, when that river shall be opened to

trade.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiang-su, this eighth day of November, in

the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the

tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Seal of Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Signatures of Five Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

* See Chefoo Convention, Section III., Article 4.

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

Between the United Kingdom and China eespecting the Employment op

Chinese Labour in British Colonies and Protectorates

(Signed in London, \Zth May, 1904)

Whereas a Convention between Her Majesty Queen Victoria and His Majesty

the Emperor of China was signed at Peking on the 24th October, 1860, by Article V.

of which His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China consented to allow Chinese

subjects, wishing to take service in British Colonies or other parts beyond the seas,

to enter into engagements with Brilish subjects, and to ship themselves and their

families on board of British vessels at the open ports of China in conformity with

Regulations’to be drawn up between the two Governments for the protection of such

emigrants:

And whereas the aforesaid Regulations have not hitherto been framed, His-

Majesty the Xing of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Irelan 1 and of the

British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor

of China have accordingly appointed the following as their respective Plenipo-

tentiaries, that is to say :

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ira’and and of

the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, the Most Honourable

Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, Marquess of Lansdowne, His Majesty’a

Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs ; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Teh-Yih, Brevet Lieutenant-General

of the Chinese Imperial Forces, His Imperial Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom

of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor

of India ;

And the said Plenipotentiaries having met and communicated to each other their

respective full powers, and found them in good and due form, have agreed upon and i

concluded the following Articles :—

Art. I.—As the Regulations to be framed under the above-mentioned Treaty

were intended to be of a general character, it is hereby agreed that on each occasion

when indentured emigrants are required for a particular British Colony or Protectorate

beyond the seas, His Britannic Majesty’s Minister in Peking shall notify ti.e Chinese

Government, stating the name of the Treaty port at which it is intended to embark

them, and the terms and conditions on which they aie to be engaged ; the Chinese

Government shall thereupon, without requiring further formalities, immediately

instruct tl.e local authorities at the specified Treaty poit to take all the steps

necessary to facilitate emigration. The notification herein referred to shall only be

required once in the case of each Colonv or Protectorate, except when emigration

under indenture to that Colony or Protectorate from the specified Treaty port has -

not taken place during the preceding three years.

;58 EMIGRATION (CONVENTION

Art. II.—On the receipt of the instructions above referred to, the Taotai at the

pat shall at once appoint an officer, to be called the Chinese Inspector; who,

together with the British Consular Officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall make

known by Proclamation and by means of the native press the text of the Indenture

which the emigrant will have to sign, and any particulars of which the Chinese officer

-considers it essential that the emigrant shall be informed, respecting the country to

which the emigrant is to proceed, and respecting its laws.

Art. III.—The British Consular officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall confer

with the Chinese Inspector as to the location and installation of the offices and other

necessary buildings, hereinafter called.the Emigration Agency, which shall be erected

or fitted up by the British Government, and at their expense, for the purpose of

■carrying on the business of the engagement and shipment of the emigrants, and in

which the Chinese Inspector and his staff shall have suitable accommodation for

■carrying on their duties.

Art. IV.—(1.) There shall be posted up in conspicuous places throughout the

Emigration Agency, and more especially in that part of it called the Depot, destined

for the reception of intending emigrants, copies of the Indenture to be entered into

with the emigrant, drawn up in the English and Chinese languages, together with

-copies of the special Ordinance, if any, relating to immigration into the particular

Colony or Protect rate for which the emi. rants are required.

(2.) There shall be kept a Register in Kng'ish and in Chinese, in which the names

of binding tiendentured emigrants shall be inscribed, and in this Register there shall

■not be inscribed the name of any person who is under 20 years of age, unless he

-shall have produced proof of his having obtained the consent of his parents or other

lawful guardians to emigrate, or, in default of these, of the Magistrate of the district

to which he belongs. After signature of the Indenture according to the Chinese

manner, tips emigrant shall not be permitted to leave'the Dep6t previously to his

■embarkation, without a pass signed by the Chinese Inspector, and countersigned by

the British Consular Officer or his Delegate, unless he shall have, through the

•Chinese Inspector, renounced his agreement and withdrawn his name from the

register of emigrants.

(3.) Before the sailing of the ship each emigrant shall be carefully examined by a

qualified Medical Officer nominated by the British Consular Officer or his Delegate.

The emigrants shall be paraded before the British Consular Officer or his Delegate

aud the Chines; Inspector or his Delegate, and questioned with a view to ascertain

their perfect understanding of the Indenture.

Art. V.—All ships employed in the conveyance of indentured emigrants from

( hina under this Convention shall engage and embark them only at a Treaty port,

and shall comply with the Regulations contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and

forming part of the Convention.

Art. VI.—For the better protection of the emigrant, and of any other Chinese

subject who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the

emigration is to take place, it shall be competent to the Emperor of China to appoint

a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such

Consul < r Vice-Consul shall have all the riguts and privileges accorded to the Consuls

of other nations.

Art. VII.—Every Indenture entered into under the present Articles shall clearly

specify the name of the country for which the labourer is required, the duration of

the engagement, and, if renewable, on what terms, the number of hours of labour

per working day, the nature of the work, the rate of wages and mode of payment,

the rations, clothing, the grant of a free passage out, and, where such is provided for

therein, a free passage back to the port of embarkation in China for himself and family,

right to free medical attendance and medicines, whether in the Colony or Protectorate,

or on the voyage from and to the port of embarkation in China, and any other

advantages to which the emigrant shall be entitled. The Indenture may also

EMIGRATION CONVENTION 59'

provide that the emigrant shall, if considered necessary by the medical authorities,

be vaccinated on his arrival at the Depot, and in the etfent of such vaccination being

unsuccessful, re-vaccinated on board ship.

Art. VIII.—The Indenture shall be signed, or in cases of illiteracy marked, by

the emigrant after the Chinese manner, in the presence of the British Consular Officer

or his Delegate and of the Chinese Inspector or his Delegate, who shall be respon-

sible to their respective Governments for its provisions having been clearly and fully

explained to the emigrant previous to signature. To each emigrant there shall be

presented a copy of the Indenture drawn up in English and Chinese. Such Inden-

ture shall not be considered as definitive or irrevocable until after the embarkation

of the emigrant.

Art. IX.—In every British Colony or Protectorate to which indentured Chinese

emigrants proceed, an officer or officers shall be appointed, whose duty it shall be to

insure that the emigrant shall have free access to the Courts of Justice to obtain the

redress for injuries to his person and property which is secured to all persons, irrespec-

tive of race, by the local law.

Art. X.—During the sojourn of the emigrant in the Colony or Protectorate in

which he is employed, all possible postal facilities shall be afforded to him for com-

municating with his native country and for making remittances to his family.

Art. XI.—With regard to the repatriation of the emigrant and his family

I whether on the expiration of the Indenture or from any legal cause, or in event of

his having been invalided from sickness or disablement, it is understood that this shall

always be to the port of shipment in China, and that in no case shall it take place-

by any other means than actual conveyance by ship, and payment of money to the

returning emigrant in lieu of passage shall not be admissible.

Art. XII.—Nothing in any Indenture framed under these Articles shall

constitute on the employer a right to transfer the emigrant to another employer

of labour without the emigrant’s free consent and the approval of his Consul or

Vice-Consul; and should any such transfer or assignment take place, it shall not in

u any way invalidate any of the rights or privileges of the emigrant under the

>( Indenture.

Art. XIII.—It is agreed that a fee on each indentured emigrant shipped un er

}£the terms of this convention shall be paid to the Chinese Government for expenses of

a inspection, but no payment of any kind shall be made to the Chinese Inspector or

'Dany other official of the Chinese Government at the port of embarkation, t he above

ifee shall be paid into the Customs bank previous to the clearance of the ship, and

ftlshall be calculated at the following rate:—3 Mexican dollars per head for any

i| number of emigrants not exceeding 10,000, and 2 dollars per head for any number

> ] in excess thereof, provided they are shipped at the same Treaty port, and that not more

a( than twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment.

! Should the port of embarkation have been changed, or a space of more than

twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment, inspection charges

shall be paid as in the first instance.

Art. XIV.—The English and Chinese text of the present Convention have been

carefully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between

them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense.

Art. XV.—The present Convention shall come into force on the date of its

signature and remain in force for four years from that date, and after such period

of four years it shall be terminable by either of the high contracting parties on

giving one year’s notice.

In witness whereof the Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Convention,

uand have affixed thereto their seals.

S* Done at London in four copies (two in English and two in Chinese), this

thirteenth day of May of the year 1904.

(Signed) Lansdowne.

T. Y. Chang.

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

SCHEDULE

Regulations

Ships employed in the transport of indentured emigrants from China under this

Convention must be seaworthy, clean, and properly ventilated, and with regard to

the following matters, shall comply with conditions as far as possible equivalent to

those in force in British India with reference to the emigration of natives from India:—

Accommodation required on board (vide Section 57 of “ The Indian Emigration

Act, 1883 ”).

Sleeping accommodation consisting of wooden sheathing to the decks or

sleeping platforms (vide rule regarding “ iron decks,” as amended the 16th August,

1902, in Schedule “ A ” to the rules under “ The Indian Emigration Act, 1883 ”).

Buies as to space on board (vide Section 58 of “The Indian Emigration

Act, 1883”).

Carriage of qualified surgeon, with necessary medical stores.

Storage of drinking water (vide Buie 113, as amended the 24th February, 1903.

■under “ The Indian Emigration Act, 1883 ”).

Provision of adequate distilling apparatus (vide Schedule “ C ” to the rules

under “ The Indian Emigration Act, 1883 ”).

The dietary for each indentured emigrant on board ship shall be as follows per

.day:—

Bice, not less than lb., or flour or bread stuffs

Fish (dried or salt) or meat (fresh or preserved) .,

Fresh vegetables of suitable kinds

Salt 1 oz.

Sugar H„

Chinese tea • 0i ..

Chinese condiments in sufficient quantities.

Water, for drinking and cooking 1 gallon

or such other articles of food as may be substituted for any of the articles enumerat-

ed in the foregoing scale as being in the opinion of the doctor on board equivalent

^thereto.

Notes Exchanged Between the Marquess of Lansdowne and the Chinese

Minister on Signing Convention of May 13th, 1904

Foreign Office, London, May 13th, 1904.

gIBj By Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded between Great

Britain and China with regard to Chinese subjects leaving the Treaty ports of China

under Indenture for service in British Colonies or Protectorates, it is provided

that:—

“ For the better protection of the emigrant and of any other Chinese subject

..who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the

EMIGRATION CONVENTION 61

emigration is to take place, it shall be competent to the Emperor of China to appoint

a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such

Consul or Vice-Consul shall have all the rights and privileges accorded to the Consul

of other nations.”

His Majesty’s Government consider it specially important that the persons

appointed to occupy, for the purpose named, the position of Consul or Vice-Consul

should be experienced officers of Chinese nationality, that they should be exclusively

in the service of the Emperor of China, and that in each case the name of the person

selected should be communicated to His Majesty’s Government, and their agreement

to the appointment obtained.

I have the honour to inquire whether the Chinese Government are prepared to

meet the wishes of His Majesty’s Government in the matter. If so, and if you will

inform me accordingly, this note and your reply might be attached to the Conveution

in order to place on formal record the arrangement concluded.—I have* &c.

(Signed) Lansdowne.

Clxang Ta-Jea, etc., etc., etc.

Chinese Legation, London,

May 13th, 1904.

My Lord Marquess,—In reply to your Lordship’s note of this date, I have the

honour to state that the Chinese Government are in entire accord with His Britannic

Majesty’s Government as to the great importance they attach to the Consuls and Vice-

Consuls to be appointed under Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded

between the two Governments being men of great experience, and will consider it a

duty which they owe to the emigrant to confine the selection of these officers to such

as in all respects conform to the requirements specified in the note above referred to

which, together with the present one, it has been mutually agreed shall, in proof of

that understanding, be appended to the said Convention.—I have, &c.

(Signed) T. Y. Chang.

The Marquess of Lansdowne, K. G.,

etc., etc., etc.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM

AND RUSSIA WITH REGARD TO THEIR RESPECTIVE

RAILWAY INTERESTS IN CHINA

No. 1

, Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

The Undersigned, British Ambassador, duly authorized to that effect, has the

honour to make the following: declaration to bis Excellency Count Mouravieff,

Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs:—

G-reat Britain and Russia, animated by a sincere desire to avoid in China all

cause

tion theof economic

conflict onand

questions where their

geographical interestsofmeet,

gravitation and parts

ceitain takingofintothatconsidera-

Empire*

have agreed as follows:—

1. Great Britain engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of

British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the Great

Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway

concessions in that region supported by the Russian Governm-nt.

2. Russia, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account,

of Russian subjects or of others, any railway concessions in the basin of the Yang-

tze and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in

that region supported by the British Government. .

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the

sovereign rights of Cnina or existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the

Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting ilbcause of com-

plications between them* is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to

serve the primordial interests of China herself.

(Signed) Charles S. Scott.

St. Petersburg, April 28, 1899.

The Undersigned, Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized to that

effect has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Sir Charles

Scott, British Ambassador:—

Russia and Great Britain, animated by the sincere desire to avoid in China all

cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera-

tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have

agreed as follows—

1, Russia engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of Russian

subjects or of others, any railway concessions in the basin of the Yangtze, and not

to obstruct, directlv or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region

supported by the British Government.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND RUSSIA 63

2.—Great Britain, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on

Behalf of British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the

Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for

radway concessions in that region supported By the Russian Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way

the sovereign r.ghts of China or of existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate

to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause

of complication between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East,

and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

The Undersigned, etc. (Signed) Count MouravIeff.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

No. 3

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

In order to complete the Notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of

spheres for concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it

has been agreed to record in the present additional Note the arrangement anived

at with regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which

a loan has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-

Hongkong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned Notes is not to

infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, *and the

Chinese Government may appoint both an English engineer and an European

i accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question, and the expenditure

! of the money appropriated to it.

But it remains understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a

right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to r> main a

Chin' se line, under the control of the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged

or alienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaoheichan to Sinminting, in addition to the

aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China her-

self, who may permit European—not necessarily British—engineers to periodically

inspect it, and to verify and certify that the work is being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any wav with the

right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian

subjects or establishments for concessions for railways, which, starting from the

main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region in

which the Chinese line terminating at Sinraintingand Newchwang is to be constructed.

(Signed) Charles S. Scott.

St. Petersburg, April 28th, 1899.

No. 4

Count Mouravieff to Sir C. Scott

In order to complete the Notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of

spheres for concessions for the construction and ivorking of railways in China, it lias

been agreed to record in the present additional Note the Agreement arrived at with

64 AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which a loan

has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-Hong-

kong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned Notes is not to

infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the

Chinese Government is at liberty to appoint both an English engineer and an

European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question and the

expenditure of the money appropriated to it. But it remains well understood that

this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control,

and that the line in question is to remain a Chinese line, subject to the control of

the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged or alienated to a non-Chinese

Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaohe'iohan to Sinminting, in addition to

the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China

herself, who may permit European—not necessarily British—engineers to periodi-

cally inspect it,- and to verify and certify that the works are being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with

the right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of

Russian subjects or establishments for concessions for railways, which, starting from

the main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region

in which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be

constructed.

The Undersigned, etc.

(Signed) Count Mouravieff.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Signed at Peking, April 27th, 1906

To Which is Annexed the Convention Between the United Kingdom

akd Tibet, Signed at Lhasa, September 7th, 1904

Ratifications exchanged at London, July 23rd, 1906

Whereas His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British

Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of China

are sincerely desirous to maintain and perpetuate the relations of friendship and

good And

understanding

whereas thewhich nowofexist

refusal between

Tibet their respective

to recognise Empires

the validity of or; to carry into

full effect the provisions of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of March 17th, 1890, and

Regulations of December 5th, 1893, placed the British Government under the necessity

of taking steps to secure their rights and interests under the said Convention and

Regulations;

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET 65>

And whereas a Convention of ten articles was signed at Lhasa on September

7th, 1904, on behalf of Great Britain and Tibet, and was ratified by the Viceroy and

G-overnor-General of India on behalf of Great Britain on November 11th, 1904, a

declaration on behalf of Great Britain modifying its terms under certain con litions-

being appended thereto;

His Britannic Majesty and His Majesty the Emperor of China have resolved to-

conclude a Convention on this subject, and have for this purpose named Plenipoten-

tiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland :

Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order

of Saint Michael and Saint George. His said Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China:

His Excellency Tang Shao-yi, His said Majesty’s High Commissioner Pleni-

‘potentiary an i a Vice-President of the Board of Foreign Affairs;

Who, having communicated to each other their respective full powers and find-

ing them to be in goo I and true form, have agree 1 upon and concluded the follow-

ing Contention in Six Articles:—

Art. I.—The Convention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain

and Tibet, the texts of which in English and Chinese are attached to the present

Co veition as an Annex, is hereby confirmed, subject to the modification stated in

the declaration appended thereto, and both of the High Contracting Parties engage

to take at all times such steps as may be necessary to secure the due fulfilment of the-

terms specified therein.

Art. II.—The Government of Great Britain engages not to am ex Tibetan

territory or to interfere in the administration of Tibet. The Government of China,

also undertakes not to permit any other foreign State to interfere with the territory

or internal a I ministration of Tibet.

Art. III.—The concessions which are mentioned in Article 9 (d) of the Con-

vention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain and Tibet are denied to

any State or to the subject of any State other than China, but it has been arranged

with China that at the trade marts specified in Article 2 of the aforesaid Convention

Gre it Britain shall be entitled to lay down telegraph lines connecting with India.

Art. IV.—The provisions of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890 and

Regulations of 1893 shall, subject to the terms of this present Convention and

Annex thereto, remain in full force.

Art. V.—The English and Chinese texts of the present Convention have been,

carefully compared and found to (orrespond, but in the event of there being any

difference of meaning between them the English text shall be authoritative.

Art. VI.—This Convention shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of both countries,

an 1 ratifications shall be exchanged in London within three months after the date

of signature by the Plenipotentiaries of both Powers.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Convention, four copies in English and four in Chinese.

Done at Peking this twenty-seventh day of April, one thousand nine hundred

and six, being the fourth day of the fourth month of the thirty-second yenr of the

reign of Kuang Hsii.

[l.s.] Eknest Satow.

(Signature and Seal of the Chinese

Plenipotentiary.)

3

r>6 AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Signed at Lhasa, 7th September, 1904

Whereas doubts and difficulties have arisen as to the meaning and validity of the

Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890, and the Trade Eegulations of 1893, and as to the

liabilities of the Tibetan Government under these agreements; and whereas recent

occurrences have tended towards a disturbance of the relations of friendship and good

understanding which have existed between the British Government and the Government

of Tibet; and whereas it is desirable to restore peace and amicable relations and to

resolve and determine the doubts and difficulties as aforesaid, the said Governments

have resolved to conclude a Convention with these objects, and the following Articles

have been agreed upon by Colonel F. E. Younghusband, C.I.E., in virtue of full powers

vested in him by His Britannic Majesty’s Government and on behalf of that said

Gov. rnment, and Lo-Sang Gyal-Tsen, the Ga-den Ti-Eimpoche, and the representatives

of the Council of the three monasteries Se-ra, Dre pung, and Ga-den, and of the

ecclesiastical and lay officials of the National Assembly on behalf of the Government

of Tibet:—

I. —The Government of Tibet engages to respect the Anglo-Chinese

1-90 and to recognise the frontier between Sikkim and Tibet, as defined in Article I.

of the said Convention, and to erect boundary pillars accordingly.

II. —The Tibet an Government undertakes to open forthwith trad

nil British and Tibetan subjects shall have free right of access at Gyangtse and Gartok,

as well as at Yatung.

The Eegulations applicable to the trade mart at Yatung, under the Anglo-Chinese

Agreement of 1893, shall, subject to such amendments as mav hereafter be agreed upon

by common consent between the British and Tibetan Governments, apply to the marts

above mentioned.

In addition to establishing trade marts at the places mentioned, the Tibetan

Government undertakes to place no restrictions on the trade by existing routes, and to

consider the question of establishing fresh trade marts under similar conditions if

development of trade requires it.

III. —The question of the amendment of the Eegulations of 1

separate consideration, and the Tibetan Government undertakes to appoint fully

authorised delegates to negotiate with representatives of the British Government as

to the details of the amendments required.

IY.—The Tibetan Government undertakes to levy no dues of any kind other than

those provided for in the tariff to be mutually agreed upon.

V. —The Tibetan Government undertakes to keep the roads to

Gartok from the frontier clear of all obstruction and in a state of repair suited to the

needs of the trade, and to establish at Yatung, Gyangtse and Gartok, and at each of

the other trade marts that may hereafter be established, a Tibetan Agent who shall

receive from the British Agent appointed to watch over British trade at the marts in

question any letter which the latter may desire to send to the Tibetan or to the Chinese

authorities.* The Tibetan Agent shall also be responsible for the due delivery of such

communications and for the transmission of replies.

VI. —As an indemnity to the British Government for the expen

despatch of armed troops to Lhasa, to exact reparation for breaches of treaty obligations,

and for the insults offered to and attacks upon the British Commissioner and his

following and escort, the Tibetan Government engages to pay a sum of Pounds five

hundred thousand, equivalent to Eupees seventy-five lakhs, to the British Government.

The indemnity shall be payable at such place as the British Government may

from time to time, after due notice, indicate, whether in Tibet or in the British districts

of Darjeeling or Jalpaiguri, in seventy-five annual instalments of Eupees one lakh each

on the 1st January in each year, beginning from the 1st January, 1906.

VII. —As security for the payment of the above-mentioned in

fulfilmentof the provisions relative to trad emarts specified in Articles II., III., IV.,and V.,

AGEEEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET 6T

the British Government shall continue to occupy the Chumbi Yalley until the-

indemnity has been paid and until the trade marts have been effectively opened for

three years, whichever date may be the later.

'VIII.—The Tibetan Government agrees to raze all forts and fortifications and

remove all armaments which mi^ht impede the course of free communications between

the British frontier and the towns of Gyangtse and Lhasa. .

IX. —The Government of Tibet engages that, without the previous c

British Government—

(a) No portion of Tibetan territory''shall be ceded, sold, leased, mortgaged, or

otherwise given for occupation, to any foreign Power;

(b) No such Power shall be permittfed to intervene in Tibetan affairs;

(c) No representatives or agents of any foreign Pow er shall be admitted to Tibet;

(d) No concessions for railways, roads, telegraphs, mining or other rights, shall

be granted to any foreign Power, or the subject of any foreign Power. In the event

of consent to such concessions being granted, similar or equivalent concessions shall

be granted to the British Government;

(e) No Tibetan revenues, whether in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned

to any foreign Power,#or the subject of any foreign Pbwer. . uc

X. —In witi ess whereof the negotiators have signed the same, and aff

unto the seals of their arms.

Done in quintuplicate at Lhasa, this 7th day of September, in the year of our

Lord one thousand nine hundred and four, corresponding with the 'iibetan date,,

the 27th day of the seventh month of the Wood Dragon year.

Arrangement Between Great Britain and Russia Concerning Tibet

The Governments of Britain and Russia recognizing the suzerain rights of China

in Tibet, and considering the fact that Great Britain, by reason of her geographical

[ position, has a special interest in the maintenance of the status quo in the external

i relations of Tibet, have made the following Arrangement:—

I. —The two High Contracting Parties engage d respect the territorial

i of Tibet and to abstain from all interference in its internal administration.

II. —In conformity with the admitted principle of the suzerainty of

' Tibet, Great Britain and Russia engage not to eiiter into negotiations with Tibet

: except through the intermediary of the Chinese Government. This engagement dees

i not exclude the direct relations between British Commercial Agents and the Tibetan

r, authorities provided for in Article V. of the Convention between Great Britain and

" Tibet of September 7th, 1904, and confirmed by the Convent'on between Great

? Britain and China of April 27th, 1906; nor does it modify the engagements entered

i into by Great Britain and China in Article I. of the said Convention of 1906.

It is clearly understood that Buddhists, subjects of Great Britain or of Russia,

n may enter into direct relations on strictly religious matters with the Dalai Lama and

I the other representatives of Buddhism in Tibet; the Governments of Great Britain

fi and Russia engage,, as far as they are concerned, not to allow those relations to-

a infringe the stipulations of ther present arrangement.

III. — lhe British and Russian Governments respectively engage

a representatives to Lhasa.

IV. —The two High Contracting Parties engage neither to seek n

[j whether for themselves or their subjects, any concessions for railways, roads, te!e-

t graphs and mines, or other rights in Tibet.

V. —The two Governments agree that no part of the revenues of Tibe

in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned to Great Britain or Russia or to anv

i of their subjects.

3*

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Annex

Great Britain reaffirms the Declaration, signed by His Excellency the Viceroy

and GoTemor-General of India and appended to the ratification of the Convention of

September 7th, 1904, to the effect that the occupation of the Chumbi Valley by

British forces shall cease after the paynn nt of three annual instalments of the

indemnity of 25,000,000 Rupees, provided that the trade marts mentioned in Article

II. of that Convention have been effectively opened for three years, and that in the

meantime the Tibetan authorities have faithfully complied in all respects with the

terms of the said Convention of 1904. It is clearly understood that if the occupa-

tion of the Chumbi Valley by the British forces has, for any reason, not been

terminated at the time anticipated in the al>ove Declaration, the British and Russian

Governments -will enter upon a friendly exchange of views on this subject.

The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications exchanged at St.

Petersburg as soon as possible.

In witness' whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present

Convention and affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at St. Petersburg, the 18th (31st) August, 1907.

[L.S.] A. Nicolson.

[L.S.] IsWOLSKY.

St. Petersburg, August 18?A (31s<), 1907

M. le Ministre,—With reference to the Arrangement regarding Tibet, signed to-

day, I have the honour to make the following Declaration to your Excellency :—

“ His Britannic Majesty’s Government think it desirable, so far as they are

concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the Russian Government,

for a period of three years from the date of the present communication, the cl try

into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever, on condition that a like assurance is

given on the part of the Imperial Russian Government.

“His Britannic Majesty’s Government propose, moreover, to approach the

Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similiar obligation for a

corresponding Period; the Russian Government will, as a matter of course, take

similar action.

“ At the expiration of the term of three years above mentioned His Bt itannic

Majesty’s Government will, if necessary, consult with the Russian Government as to

the desirability of any ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet.”

I have, etc,

A. Nicolson.

St. Petersburg, August \§th (31st), 1907

M. 1’Ambassadeur,—In reply to your Excellency’s note of even date, I have the

honour to declare that the Imperial Russian Government think it desirable, so far as

they are concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the British

Government, for a period of three years from the date of the present communication,

the entry into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever.

Like the British Government, the Imperial Government propose to approach the

Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similar obligation for a

corresponding period.

It is understood that at the expiration of the term of three years the two

Governments will, if necessary, consult with each other as to the desirability of any

ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet.

I have, etc.,

Iswolsky.

OPIUM AGREEMENT

[Done at Peking, May 8th, 1911]

Under the arrangement concluded between His Majesty’s Government and the

Chinese Government three years ago, His Majesty’s Government undertook that if

during the period of three years from January 1st, 1908, the Chinese Government

should duly carry out the arrangement on their part for reducing the production

and consumption of opium in China, they would continue in the same proportion of

ten per cent, the annual diminution of the export of opium from India, until the

completion of the full period of ten years in 1917.

His Majesty’s Government, recognizing the sincerity of the Chinese Govern-

ment, and their pronounced success in diminishing the production of opium in China

during the past three years, are prepared to continue the arrangement of 1907 for

the unexpired period of seven years on the following conditions:—

I. —From the first of January, 1911, China shall diminish an

years the production of opium in China in the same proportion as the annual export

from India is diminished in accordance with the terms of Agreement and of the

Annex appended hereto until total extinction in 1917.

II. — The Chinese Government have adopted a most rigorous

ing the production, the transport and the smoking of native opium, and His

Majesty’s Government have expressed their agreement therewith and willingness to

give every assistance. With a view to facilitating the continuance of this work, His

Majesty’s Government agree that the export of opium from India to China shall

cease in less than seven years if clear proof is given of the complete absence of

native opium in China.

III. —His Majesty’s Government further agree that Indi

conveyed into any province in China which can establish by clear evidence that it

has effectively suppressed the cultivation and import of native opium.

It is understood, however, that the closing of the port s of Canton and Shanghai

to the import of Indian opium shall not take effect except as the final step on the

part of the Chinese Government for the completion of the above measure.

IV. —During the period of th s Agreement it shall be

Majesty’s Government to obtain continuous evidence of this diminution by local

enquiries and investigation conducted by one or more British officials accompanied,

if the Chinese Government so desire, by a Chinese official. Their decision as to the

extent of cultivation shall be accepted by both parties to this Agreement.

During the above period one or more British officials shall be given facilities for

reporting on the taxation and trade restrictions on opium away from the Treaty

ports.

V. —By the arrangement of 1907 His Majesty’s Governm

despatch by China of an official to India to watch the opium sales on condition that

such official would have no power of interference. His Majesty’s Government

further agree that the official so despatched may be present at the packing of opium

on the same condition.

70 OPIUM AGREEMENT

VI. —The Chinese Government undertake to levy a uniform tax

grown in the Chinese Empire. His Majesty’s Government consent to increase the

present consolidated import duty on Indian opium to Tls. 350 per chest of 100

catties, such increase to take effect as soon as the Chinese Government levy an

equivalent excise tax on all native opium.

VII. —On confirmation of this Agreement and beginning with

the new rate of consolidated import duty, China will at once cause to be withdrawn

all restrictions placed by the Provincial authorities on the wholesale trade in Indian

opium, such as those recently imposed at Canton and elsewhere, and also all taxation

on the wholesale trade other than the consolidated import duty, and no such

restrictions or taxation shall be again imposed so long as the Additional Article to

the Chefoo Agreement remains as at present in force.

It is also understood that Indian raw opium having paid the consolidated

import duty shall be exempt from any further taxation whatsoever in the port of

import.

Should the conditions coniained in the above two clauses not be duly observed.

His Majesty’s Government shall be at liberty to suspend or terminate this

Agreement at any time.

The foregoing stipulations shall not derogate in any manner from the force of

the laws already published.or hereafter to be published by the Imperial Chinese

Government to suppress the smoking of opium and to regulate the retail trade in

the drug in general.

VIII. —With a view to assisting China in the suppress

Majesty’s Government undertake that from the year 1911 the Government of India

will issue an export permit with a consecutive number for each chest of Indian

opium declared lor shipment to or for consumption in China.

During the year 1911 the number of permits so issued shall not exceed 30,600

and shall be progressively reduced annually by 5,100 during the remaining six years

ending 1917.

A copy of each permit so issued shall, before shipment of opium declared for

shipment to or consumption in China, be handed to the Chinese official for trans-

mission to his Government, or to the Customs authorities in China.

His Majesty’s Government undertake that each chest of opium for which such

permit has been granted shall be sealed by an official deputed by the Indian

Government in the presence of the Chinese official if so requested.

The Chinese Government undertake that chests of opium so sealed and

accompanied by such permits may be imported into any Treaty Port of China

without let or hindrance if such seals remain unbroken.

IX. —Should it appear on subsequent experience desirable at an

the unexpired portion of seven years to modify this Agreement or any part thereof,

it may be revised by mutual consent of the two high contracting parties.

X. —This Agreement shall come into force on the date of signature.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective-

Governments, have signed the same and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four in English and four in Chinese) this,

eighth day of May, one thousand nine hundred and eleven, being the tenth day of

the fourth month of the third year of Hsuan T’ung.

[n.s.] J. N. Jordan. [L.S.] Tsou Chia-Lai.

OPIUM AGREEMENT 71

Annex

On the date of the signature of the Agreeme it a list shall be taken by the

■Commissioners of Customs acting in concert with the Colonial and Consular officials

of all uncertified Indian opium in bond at the Treaty Ports and of all uncertified

opium in stock in Hongkong which is bond fide intended for the Chinese market,

and all such opium shall be marked with labels and on payment of Tls. 110 con-

solidated import duty shall be entitled to the same Treaty rights and privileges in

China as certificated opium.

Opium so marked and in stock in Hongkong must be exported to a Chinese

port within seven days of the signature of the A green ent.

All other uncertificated Indian opium shall for a period of two months from the

date of the signature of the Agreement be landed at the ports of Shanghai andCanton

only, and at the expiration of'this period all Treaty Ports shall be closed to uncerti-

ficated opium provided the Chinese Government have obtained the consent of the

other Treaty Powers.

The Imperial Maritime Customs shall keep a return of all uncertificated opium

lauded at Shanghai and Canton during this period of two months, other than opium

marked and labelled as provided above, and such opium shall pay the new rate of

•consolidated import duty and shall not be re-exported in bond to other Treaty ports.

In addition to the annual reduction of 5,100 chests already agreed upon, His

Majesty’s Government agree further to reduce the import of Indian opium during

each of the years 1912, 1913 and 1914 by an amount equal to one-third of the total

ascertained amount of the uncertificated Indian opium in bond in Chinese Treaty

Ports, and in stock in Hongkong on the date of signature, plus one-third of the

amount of uncertificated Indian opium landed during the ensuing two months at

Shanghai and Canton.

Done nt Peking this eighth day of May one thousand nine hundred and eleven,

being the tenth day of the fourth month of the third year of Hsuan T’ung.

[L.S.] J. N. Jordan. .[l.s.] Tsou Chia-Lai.

FRANCE

TREATY OF PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND

NAVIGATION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Signed, in the French and Chinese Languages, at Tientsin, 27th June, 1858

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 25th October, 1860

His Mn jestv the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

being desirous to pnt an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two

Empires, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship, com-

merce, and navigation between the two Powers, have resolved to conclude a new

Treaty based on the common interest of the two countries, and for that purpose have

named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Baron Gros, Grand Officer of the Legion

of Honour, Grand Cross of the Order of the Saviour of Greece, Commander of the

Order of the Conception of Portugal, etc., etc., etc.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, Imperial High Commis-

sioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, Grand Minister of the East Palace, Director-General

of the Council of Justice, etc., etc., etc.; and Hwashana, Imperial High Commissioner

of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, President of the Board of Finance, General of the Bordered

Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, etc., etc., etc.;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, which they have found in good and

due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the

Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between the

subjects of the two Empires, who shall enjoy equally in the respective States of the

high contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—In order to maintain the peace so happily re-established between the

two empires it has been agreed between the high contracting parties that, following

in this respect the practice amongst Western nations, the duly accredited diplomatic

agents of HistheMajright

shall have cstyoftheresorting

Emperortoof the

the French

capitaland of Hisempire

of the Majesty the Emperor

when importantofaffairs

China

call them there. It is agreed between the high contracting parties that if any one

of the Powers having a treaty with China obtains for its diplomatic agents the right

of permanently residing at Peking, France shall immediately enjoy the same richt.

The diplomatic agents shall reciprocally enjoy, in the place of their residence,

the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international law, that is to say,

that their persons, their families, their houses, and their correspondence, shall be

inviolable, that they may take into their service such employes, couriers, interpreters,

servants, etc., etc., as shall be necessary to them.

The expense of every kind occasioned by the diplomatic mission of France in

China shall be defrayed by the French Government. The diplomatic agents whom

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 78

it shall please the Emperor of China to accredit to His Majesty the Emperor of

the French, shall be received in France with all the honours and prerogatives which

the diplomatic agents of other nations accredited to the Court of His Majesty the

Emperor of the French enjoy.

Art. III.—The official communications of the French diplomatic and consular

agents with the Chinese authorities shall be written in French, but shall be accom-

panied, to facilitate the service, by a Chinese translation, as exact as possible, until

such time as the Imperial Glovernment at Peking, having interpreters speaking

and writing French correctly, diplomatic correspondence shall be conducted in this

language by the French agents and in Chinese by the officers of the Empire.

It is agreed that until then, and in case of difference in the interpretation, in

reference to the French text and Chinese text of the clauses heretofore agreed upon

in the conventions made by common accord, it shall always be the original text and

not the translation which shall be held correct. This provision applies to the

present Treaty, and in the communications between the authorities of the two

countries it shall always be the original text, not the translation, which shall be

held correct.

Art. IY.—Henceforth the official correspondence between the authorities and the

officers of the two countries shall be regulated according to their respective ranks and

conditions and upon the basis of the most absolute reciprocity. This correspondence

shall take place between the high French officers and high Chinese officers, in

the capital or elsewhere, by dispatch or communication; between the French sub-

ordinate officers and the high authorities in the provinces, on the part of the former

by statement, and on the part of the latter by declaration.

Between the officers of lower rank of the two nations, as above provided, on

the footing of a perfect equality.

Merchants and genei ally all persons not having an official character shall on both

, sides use the form of representation in all documents addressed to or intended for the

notice of the respective authorities.

Whenever a French subject shall have recourse to the Chinese authority, his

representation shall first be submitted to the Consul, who, if it appears to him

reasonable and properly addressed, shall forward it; if it be otherwise, the Consul

shall cause the tenour to be modified or refuse to transmit it. The Chinese, on their

part, when they have to address a Consulate, shall follow a similar course towards

the Chinese authority, who shall act in the same manner.

Art. V.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French may appoint Consuls or Con-

sular Agents in the coast and river ports of the Chinese empire named in Article YI.

of the present Treaty to conduct the business between the Chinese authorities and

French merchants and subjects and to see to the strict observance of the stipulated

rules. These officers shall be treated with the consideration and regard which are

due to them. Their relations with the authorities of the place of their residence

shall be established on the footing of the most perfect equality. If they shall have

; to complain of the proceedings of the said authorities, they may address the superior

authority of the province direct, and shall immediately advise the Minister Plenipo-

tentiary of the Emperor thereof.

In case of the absence of the French Consul, captains and merchants shall be

at liberty to have recourse to the intervention of the Consul of a friendly Power, or,

if this be impossible, they shall have recourse to the chief of the Customs, who shall

advise as to the means of assuring to the said captains and merchants the benefits of

the present Treaty.

Art. VI.—Experience having demonstrated that the opening of new ports to

foreign commerce is one of the necessities of the age, it has been agreed that the

forts of Kiung-chow and Chao-chow in the province of Kwangtung, Taiwan and

Tamsui in the island of Formosa (province of Fohkien), Tang-chow in the pro-

vince of Shantung, and Nanking in the province of Kiangsu, shall enjoy the same

privileges as Canton, Shanghai, Ningpo, Amoy, and Foochow. With regard to

74 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Nanking, the French agents in China shall not deliver passports to their nationals

for this city until the rebels have been expelled by the Imperial troops.

Art. YIL—-French subjects and their families may establish themselves and

trade or pursue their avocations in all security, and without hindrance of any kind

in the ports and cities enumerated in the preceding Article.

They may travel freely between them if they are provided with passports, but

it is expressly forbidden to them to trade elsewhere on the coast in search of

clandestine markets, under pain of confiscation of both the ships and goods used in

such operations, and this confiscation shall be for the benefit of the Chinese Govern-

ment, who, however, before the seizure and confiscation can be legally pronounced,

must advise the French Consul at the nearest port.

Art. VIII.—French subjects who wish to go to interior towns, or ports not open

to foreign vessels, may do so in all security, on the express condition that they are

provided with passports written in French and Chinese, legally delivered by the

diplomatic agents or Consuls of France in China and vised by the Chinese authorities.

In case of the loss of his passport, the French subject who cannot present it

when it is legally required of him shall, if the Chinese authorities of the place refuse

him permission to remain a sufficient time to obtain another passport from the

Consul, be conducted to the nearest Consulate and shall not be maltreated or insulted

in any way.

As is stipulated in the former Treaties, French subjects resident or sojourning

in the ports open to foreign trade may travel without passports in their immediate

neighbourhood and there pursue their occupations as freely as the natives, but they

must not pass certain limits which shall be agreed upon between the Consul and the

local authority. The French agents in China shall deliver passports to their

nationals only for the places where the rebels are not established at the time the

passport shall be demanded.

These passports shall be delivered by the French authorities only to persons

who offer every desirable guarantee.

Art. IX.—All changes made by common consent with one of the signatory Powers

of the treaties with China on the subject of amelioration of the tariff now in force, or

which may hereafter be in force, as also all rights of customs, tonnage, importation,

transit, and exportation, shall be immediately applicable to French trade and mer-

chants by the mere fact of their being placed in execution.

Art. X.—Any French subject who, conformably to the stipulations of Article

VI. of the present Treaty, shall arrive at one of the ports open to foreign trade, may,

whatever may be the length of his sojourn, rent houses anJ warehouses for the

disposal of his merchandise, or lease land and himself build houses and warehouses.

French subjects may, in the same manner, establish churches, hospitals, religious

houses, schools, and cemeteries. To this end the local authority, after having

agreed with the Consul, shall designate the quarters most suitable for the residence

of the French and the sites on which the above-mentioned structures may have

place.

The terms of rents and leases shall be freely discussed between the interested

parties and regulated, as far as possible, according to the average local rates.

The Chinese authorities shall prevent their nationals from exacting or requiring

exorbitant prices, and the Consul on his side shall see that French subjects use no

violence or constraint to force the consent of the proprietors. It is further under-

stood that the number of houses and the extent of the ground to be assigned to

French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade shall not be limited, and that they

shall be determined according to the needs and convenience of the parties. If Chinese

subjects injure or destroy French churches or cemeteries, the guilty parties shall be

punished with all the rigour of the laws of the country.

Art. XI.—French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade may freely engage,

on the terms agreed upon between the parties, or by the sole intervention of the

Consul, compradores, interpreters, clerks, workmen, watermen, and servants. They

shall also have the right of engaging teachers in order to learn to speak and write

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 76

the Chinese language and any other language or dialect used in the empire,

as also to secure their aid in scientific or literary works. Equally they may teach to

Chinese subjects their own or foreign languages and sell without obstacle French

books or themselves purchase Chinese books of all descriptions.

Art. XII.—Property of any kind appertaining to French subjects in the Chinese

empire shall be considered by the Chinese inviolable and shall always be respected

by them. The Chinese authorities shall not, under any circumstances whatever,

place French vessels under embargo nor put them under requisition for any service,

be it public or private.

Art. XIII.—The Christian religion having for its essential object the leading of

men to virtue, the members of all Christian communities shall enjoy entire security

for their persons and property and the free exercise of their religion, and efficient

protection shall be given the missionaries who travel peaceably in the interior

furnished with passports as provided for in Article VIII.

No hindrance shall be offered by the authorities of the Chinese Empire to the

recognised right of every individual in China to embrace, if he so pleases, Chris-

tianity, and to follow its practices without being liable to any punishment therefor.

All that has previously been written, proclaimed, or published in China by

order of the Government against the Christian religion is completely abrogated and

remains null and void in all provinces of the empire.

Art. XIV.—No privileged commercial society shall henceforward be established

in China, and the same shall apply to any organised coalition having for its end the

exercise of a monopoly of trade. In case of the contravention of the present article

the Chinese Authorities, on the representations of the Consul or Consular Agent,

shall advise as to the means of dissolving such associations, of which they are also

bound to prevent the existence by the preceding prohibitions, so as to remove all that

may stand in the way of free competition.

Art. XV.—When a French vessel arrives in the waters of one of the ports open

to foreign trade she shall be at liberty to engage any pilot to take her immediately

into the port, and, in the same manner, when, having discharged all legal charges

she shall be ready to put to sea, she shall not be refused pilots to enable her to

leave the port without hindrance or delay.

Any individual who wishes to exercise the profession of pilot for French vessels

may, on the presentation of three certificates from captains of ships, be commissioned

by the French Consul in the same manner as shall be in use with other nations.

The remuneration payable to pilots shall be equitably regulated for each parti-

cular port by the Consul < r Consular Agent, who shall fix it, having regard to the

distance and circumstances of the navigation.

Art. XVI.—After the pilot has brought a French trading ship into the port,

the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or two officers to guard the ship and

prevent fraud. These officers may, according to their convenience, remain in their

own boat or stay on board the ship.

Their pay, food, and expenses shall be a charge on the Chinese Customs, and

they shall not demand any fee or remuneration whatever from the captain or consignee.

Every contravention of this provision shall entail a punishment proportionate to the

amount exacted, which also shall be returned in full.

Art. XVII.—Within the twenty-four hours following the arrival of a French

merchant vessel in one of the ports open to foreign trade, the captain, if he be not

unavoidably prevented, and in his default the supercargo or consignee, shall report

at the French Consulate and place in the hands of the Consul the ship’s papers, the

bills of lading, and the manifest. Within the twenty-four hours next following the

Consul shall send to the Superintendent of Customs a detailed note indicating the

name of the vessel, the articles, the tonnage, and the nature of the cargo; if, in

consequence of the negligence of the captain this cannot be accomplished within the

forty-eight hours following the arrival of the vessel, the captain shall be liable to a

penalty of 50 Dollars for each day’s delay, to the profit of the Chinese Government,,

but the said penalty shall in no case exceed the sum of 200 Dollars.

76 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Immediately after the reception of the consular note the Superintendent of

Customs shall give a permit to open hatches. If the captain, before having received

the said permit, shall have opened hatches and commenced to discharge, he may

be fined 500 Dollars, and the goods discharged may be seized, the whole to the profit

of the Chinese Government.

Art. XVIII.—French captains and merchants may hire whatever boats and

lighters they please for the transport of goods and passengers, and the sum to be

paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the

intervention of the Chinese authority, and consequently without its guarantee in case

of accident, fraud, or disappearance of the said boats. The number of these boats

shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the

carriage of merchandise by porters be granted to any one.

Art. XIX.—Whenever a French merchant shall have merchandise to load or

discharge he shall first remit a detailed note of it to the Consul or Consular Agent,

who will immediatelv charge a recognised interpreter to the Consulate to communicate

it to the Superintendent of Customs. The latter shall at once deliver a permit for

shipping or landing the goods. He will then proceed to the verification of the goods

in such manner that there shall be no chance of loss to any party.

The French merchant must cause himself to be represented (if he does not prefer

to attend himself) at the place of the verification by a person possessing the requisite

knowledge to protect his interest at the time when the verification for the liquida-

tion of the dues is made; otherwise any after claim will be null and of no effect.

With respect to goods subject to an ad valorem duty, if the merchant cannot

agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or

three merchants to examine the goods, and the highest price which shall be offered

by any of them shall be assumed as the value of the said goods.

Duties shall be charged on the net weight; the tare will therefore be deducted.

If the French merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer on the amount

of tare, each party shall choose a certain number of chests and bales from among the

goods respecting which there is a dispute; these shall be first weighed gross, then

tared and the average tare of these shall be taken as the tare for all the others.

If during the course of verification any difficulty arises which cannot be settled,

the French merchant may claim the intervention of the Consul, who will immediately

bring the subject of dispute to the notice of the Superintendent of Customs, and both

will endeavour to arrive at an amicable arrangement, but the claim must be made

within twenty-four hours; otherwise it will not receive attention. So long as the

result of the dispute remains pending, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter

the matter in his books, thus leaving every latitude for the examination and solution

of the difficulty.

On goods imported which have sustained damage a reduction of duties propor-

tionate to their depreciation shall be made. This shall be equitably determined, and,

if necessary, in the manner above stipulated for the fixing of ad valorem duties.

Art. XX.—Any vessel having entered one of the ports of China, and which has

not yet used the permit to open hatches mentioned in Article XIX., may within two

days of arrival quit that port and proceed to another without having to pay either

tonnage dues or Customs duties, but will discharge them ultimately in the port where

sale of the goods is effected.

Art. XXI.—It is established by common consent that import duties shall be

discharged by the captains or French merchants after the landing and verification

of the goods. Export duties shall in the same manner be paid on the shipment of

the goods. When all tonnage dues and Customs duties shall have been paid in full

by a French vessel the Superintenent of Customs shall give a general aquittance, on

the exhibition of which the Consul shall return the ship’s papers to the captain and

permit him to depart on his voyage. The Superintendent of Customs shall name

one or several banks, which shall be authorised to receive the sum due by French

merchants on account of the Government, and the receipts of these banks for all

payments which have been made to them shall be considered as receipts of the

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 77

Chinese Government. These payments may be made in ingots or foreign money,

the relative value of which to sycee shall be determined by agreement between the

Consul or Consular Agent and the Superintendent of Customs in the different ports,

according to time, #place, and circumstances.

Art. XXXI.— After the expiration of the two dav$ named in. Art. XX., and

before proceeding to discharge her cargo, every vessel shall pay tonnage-dues accord-

ing to the following scale :—Vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and upwards at

the rate of foi r trace per ton; vessels of less than one hundred and fifty tons mea-

surement at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the

open ports, or trading between China and such ports in Cochin-China as belong to

France, or any port in Japan, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to

a special certificate from the Superintendent of Customs, on exhibition of which

the said vessel shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in any

open port of China for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of

her port-clearance; but after the expiration of four months she shall l e required to

pay tonnage-dues ayain.

Small French vessels and boats of every class, whether with or without sails,

shall be reckoned as coming within the category of vessels of one hundred and fifty

tons and under, and shall pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per ton once in

every four months.

Native craft chartered by French merchants shall in lik * manner pay tonnage-

dues once in every four months.

Art. XXIII.—All French goods, after haring discharged the Customs duties

according to the tariff in one ot the ports of China, may be transported into the interior

without bring subjected to any further charge except the transit dues according to

the amended scale now in force, which dues shall not be augmented in the future.

If the Chinese Customs Agents, contrary to the tenour of the present Treaty,

make ill gal exactions or levy higher dues, they shall be punished according to the

laws of the empire.

Art. XXIV.—Any French vessel entered at one of the ports open to foreign

trade and wishing to discharge only a part of its goods Ihere, shall ] ay Customs dues

only for the part discharged; it may transport the remainder of its cargo to another

port and sell it there. The duty shall then be paid.

French subjects having paid in one \ ort the duties on their goods, wishing to

re-export them and send them for sale to another port, shall notify the Consul or

Consular Agent. The latter shall inform the Superintendent of Customs, who, after

having verified the identity of the goods and the perfect integrity of the packages,

shall send to the claimants a declaration araesting that the duties on the said goods

have been paid. Provided with this declaration, the French merchants on their

arrival at the other port shall only have to present it through the medium of the

Consul or Superintendent of Customs, who will deliver for this part of the cargo,

without deduction or charge, a permit for discharge free of duty ; but if the autho-

rities discover fraud or anything contraband amongst the goods re-exported, these

shall be, after verification, confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XXV.—Transhipment of goods shall take place only by special permission

and in case of urgency; if it be indispensable to effect this operation, the Consul

shall be referred to, who will deliver a certificate, on view of which the transhipment

shall be authorised by the Su| erintendent of Customs. The latter may always

delegate an emplojri of his administration to be present.

Every unauthorised transhipment, except in case of peril by delay, will entail

the confiscation, to the profit of the Chinese Government, of the whole of the goods

illicitly transhipped.

Art. XXVI. — In each of the ports open to foreign trade the Superintendent of

Customs shall receive for himself, and shall deposit at the French Consulate, legal

* Substituted for the original Article in 1866.

18 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

scales'for goods and silver, the weights and measures agreeing exactly with the

weights and measures in use at the Canton Custom-house, and bearing a stamp and

seal certifying this authority. These scales shall be the base of all liquidations of

duties and of all payments to be made to the Chinese Government. They shall be

referred to in case of dispute as to the weights and measures of goods, and the decree

shall be according to the results they show.

Art. XXVII.—Import and export duties levied in China on French commerce

shall be regulated according to the tariff annexed to the present Treaty under the

seal and signature of the respective Plenipotentiaries. This tariff may be revised

every seven years in order to be in harmony with the changes brought about by time

in the value of the products of the soil or industry of the two empires.

By the payment of these duties, the amount of which it is expressly provided

shall not be increased nor augmented by auv kind of charge or surtax whatever,

French subjects shall be free to import into China, from French or foreign ports, and

equally to export from China, to any destination, all goods which shall not be, at the

date of the signing of the present Treaty and according to the classificati'>n of the

annexed tariff, the object of a special prohibition or of a special monopoly. The

Chinese Government renouncing therefore the right of augmenting the number of

articles reputed contraband or subjects of a monopoly, any modification of the

tariff shall be made only after an understanding has been come to with the French

Government and with its full and entire consent.

With regard to the tariff, as well as every stipulation introduced or to be in-

troduced in the existing Treaties, or those which may hereafter be concluded, it

remains well and duly established that merchants and in general all French subjects

in China shall always have < the same rights and be treated in the same way as the

most favoured nation.

Art. XXVIII.—The publication <>f the regular tariff doing away henceforth with

all pretext for smuggling, it is not to be presumed that any act of this nature may

le co omitted by French vessels in the ports of China. If it should be otherwise,

all contraband goods introduced into these ports by French vessels or merchants

whatever their value or nature, as also all prohibited goods fraudulently discharged,

shall be seized by the local authority and confiscated to the profit of the Chinese

Government. Further, the latter may, if it see fit, interdict the re-entry to China of

the vessel taken in contravention and compel it to leave immediately after the settle-

ment of its accounts.

If any foreign vessel fraudulently makes use of the French flag the French

Government shall take the necessary measures for the repression of this abuse.

Art. XXIX.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French may station a vessel of war

in any principal port of the empire where its presence may be considered necessary to

maintain good order and discipline amongst the crews of merchant vessels and to

facilitate the exercise of the Consular authority; all necessary measures shall be taken,

to provide that the presence of these vessels of war shall entail no inconvenience, and

their commanders shall receive orders to cause to be executed the provisions of

Article XXXIII. in respect of the communications with the land and the policing

of the crews. Vessels of war shall be subject to no duty.

Art. XXX.—Every French vessel of war cruising for the protection of commerce

shall be received as a friend and treated as such in all the ports of China which it

shall enter. These vessels may there procure the divers articles of refitting and

victualling of which they shall have need, and, if they have suffered damage, may

repair there and purchase the materials necessary for such repair, the whole without

the least opposition.

The same shall apply to French trading ships which in consequence of great

damage or any other reason may be compelled to seek refuge in any port whatsoever

of China.

If a vessel be wrecked on the coast of China, the nearest Chinese authority, on

being informed of the occurrence, shall immediately send assistance to the crew,

provide for their present necessities, and take the measures immediately necessary

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 79

for the salvage of the ship and the preservation of the cargo. The whole shall then,

be brought to the knowledge of the nearest Consul or Consular Agent, in order that

the latter, in concert with the competent authority, may provide means for the

relief of the crew and the salvage of the debris - f the ship and cargo.

Art. XXXI.—Should China be at war with another Power, this circumstance

shall not in any way interfoie with the free trade of France with Chi; a or with the

opposing nation. French vessels may always, except m the case Of effective blockade,

sail without obstacle from the ports of the one to the ports of the other, trade in the

ordinary manner, and import an 1 export evi ry kind of merchandise not prohibited.

Art. XXXII.—Should sailors or other persons desert from French ships-of-war,

or leave French trading vessels, the Chinese authority, on the requisition < f the

Consul, or failing the Consul that of the captain, shall at once use every means to

discover and restore the aforesaid fugitives into the hands of one nr the other of them.

In the same manner, if Chinese deserters or persons accused of any crime take

refuge in French houses or on hoard of French vessels, the local authority shall

address the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused, shall immediately take

the measures necessary for their extradition. Each party shall carefully avoid

concealment and connivance.

Art. XXXIII.—When sailors come'on shore they shall be under special dis-

ciplinary regulations framed by the Consul and communicated to the local authority,

in order to pi event as far as possible all occasion of quarrel between French sailors

and the people of the country.

Art. XXXIV.—In case of French trading vessels being attacked or pillaged by

pirates within Chinese waters, the civil and military authorities of the nearest place,

upon learning of the occurrence, shall actively pursue the authors of the crime and

shall neglect nothing to secure their arrest and punishment according to law. The

pirated goods, in whatever place or state they may be found, shall be placed in the

hands of the Consul, who shall restore them to the owners. If the criminals cannot

be seized, or the whole of the stolen property cannot be recovered, the Chinese officials

shall suffer the penalty inflicted by the law in such circumstances, but they shall not

be held pecuniarily responsible.

Art. XXXV.—When a French subject shall have a complaint to make or claim

to bring against a Chinese, he shall first state his case to the Consul, who, after

having examined the affair, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In the same

manner, when a Chinese has to complain of a French subject, the Consul shall

attentively hear his claim and endeavour to firing about an amicable arrangement.

But if in either case this be impossible, the Consul shall invoke the assistance of a

competent Chinese official, and these two, after having conjointly examined the affair

shall decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI.—If hereafter French subjects suffer damage, or are subjected

to any insult or vexation by Chinese subjects, the latter shall be pursued by the

local authority, who shall take the necessary measures for the defence and pro-

tection of French subjects ; if ill-doers or any vagrant part of the population com-

mence to pillage, destroy, or burn the houses or warehouses of French subjects or

any other of their establishments, the same authority, either on the requisition of the

Consul or of its own motion, shall send as speedily as possible an armed force to

disperse the riot and to arrest the criminals, and shall deliver the latter up to the

severity of the law; the whole without prejudice of the claims of the French subjects

to be indemnified for proved losses.

Art. XXXVII.—If Chinese become, in future, indebted to French captains or

merchants and involve them in loss by fraud or in any other manner, the latter shall

no longer avail themselves of the combination which existed under the former state

of things; they may address themselves only through the medium of their Consul to

the local authority, who shall neglect nothing after having examined the affair to

compel the defaulters to satisfy their engagements according to the laws of the

country. But, if the debtor cannot be found, if he be dead, or bankrupt, and is not

able to pay, the French merchants cannot claim against the Chinese authority.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Id case of fraud or non-payDaent on the part of French merchants, the Consul

shall, in the same manner, afford every assistance to the claimants, but neither he

nor his Government shall in any manner be held responsible.

Art. XXXVIII.—If unfortunately any fight or quarrel occurs between French

and Chinese subjects, as also if during the course of such quarrel one or more persons

be killed or wounded, by firearms or otherwise, the Chinese shall be arrested by the

Chinese authority, who will be responsible, if the charge be proved, for their punish-

ment according to the laws of the country. With regard to the French, they shall

be arrested at the instance of the Consul, who shall take the necessary measures that

they may be dealt with in the ordinary course of French law in accordance with the

forms and prac' ice which shall be afterwards decided by the French Government.

The same course shall be observed in all similar circumstances not enumerated

in the present convention, the principle being that for the repression of crimes and

offences committed by them in China French subjects shall be dealt with according

to the laws of France.

Art XXXIX.—Disputes or differences arising between French subjects in China

shall, equally, be settled by the French authorities. It is also stipulated that the

Chinese authorities shall not in any manner interfere in any dispute between French

subjects and other foreigners. In the same way they shall not exercise any authority

over French vessels; these are responsible only to the Flinch authorities and the

captain.

Art. XL.—If the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of ihe French shall

consider it desirable to modify any of the clauses of the present Treaty it shall beat

liberty to open negotiations to this effect with the Chinese Government after an

interval of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It is also

understood that no obligation not expressed in the present convention shall be

imposed on the Consuls or Consular Agents, nor on their nationals, but, as is

stipulated, French subjects shall enjoy all the rights, privileges, immunities, and

guarantees whatsoever which have been or shall be accorded by the Chinese Govern-

ment to other Powers.

Ai t. XLI.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French, wishing to give to His

Majesty the Emperor of China a proof of his friendly sentiments, agrees to stipulate

in separate Articles, having the same force and effect as if they were inserted in the

pi’esent Treaty, the arrangements come to between the two Governments on the

matters antecedent to the events at Canton and the expense caused by them to the

Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French.

Art. XLII.—The ratifications of the present Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and

Navigation shall be exchanged at Peking within one year after the date of signature,

or sooner if possible.

After the exchange of ratifications, the Treaty shall be brought to the

know'ledge of all the superior authorities of the Empire in the provinces and in the

capital, in order that its publication may be well established.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

and affixed their seals thereto.

Done at Tientsin, in four copies, this twenty-seventh day of June, in the year of

grace one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding to the seventeenth

day of the fifth moon of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(Signed) [t.s.] Baron Gros.

„ [l.s.] Kwei-Liang.

„ £l.s.] Hwashana.

CONVENTION BETWEEN EBANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, 25th October, 1860

His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China

■being desirous to put an end to the difference which lias arisen between the two

Empires, and to re-establish and assure for ever the relations of peace and,amity which

before existed and,which regrettable events have interrupted, have named as their

respective Plenipotentiaries:—

His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Sieur Jean Baptiste Louis, Baron Gros,

Senator of the Empire, Ambassador and High Commissioner of France in China,

Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Legion of Honour, Knight Grand Cross

of several Orders, etc., etc., etc.;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Prince Kung, a member of the Imperial

Family and High Commissioner ;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have

agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—His Majesty the Emperor of China has regarded with pain the conduct

of the Chinese military authorities at the mouth of the Tientsin river, in the month of

June last year, when the Ministers Plenipotentiary of France and England arrived

there on their way to Peking to exchange the ratifications of the Treaties of Tientsin.

Art. II.—When the Ambassador, the High Commissioner of His Majesty the

Emperor of the French, shall be in Peking for the purpose of exchanging the ratifica-

tions of the Treaty of Tientsin, he shall he treated during his stay in the capital with

-the honours due to his rank, and all possible facilities shall he given him by th

Chinese Authorities in order that he may without obstacle fulfil the high mission

■confided to him.

Art. III.—The Treaty signed at Tientsin on the 27th June, 1858, shall be faith-

fully placed in execution in all its clauses immediately after the exchange of the

ratifications referred to in the preceding Article, subject to the modifications intro luced

by the present Convention.

Art. IY.—Article IV. of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin, by which His Majesty the

Emperor of China undertook to pay to the French Government an indemnity of two

million Taels, is annulled and replaced by the present Article, which increases the

amount of the indemnity to eight million Taels.

It is agreed that the sum already paid by the Canton Customs on account of the

sum of two million Taels stipulated by the Treaty of Tientsin shall he considered as

having been paid in advance and on account of the eight million Taels referred to in

•the present Article.

The provisions of the Article of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin as to the mode of

payment of the two million Taels are annulled. Payment of the remainder of the sum

of eight million taels to be paid by the Chinese Government as provided by the present

•Convention shall be made in quarterly instalments consisting of one-fifth of the gross

Customs revenues at the ports open to foreign trade, the first term commencing on

-the 1st October of the present year, and finishing on the 31st December following.

This sum, specially reserved for the payment of the indemnity due to France, shall be

-paid into the hands of the Minister for France or of his delegates in Mexican dollars

•or in bar silver at the rate of the day of payment.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

A sum o£ five hundred thousand Taels shall, however, be paid on account in

advance at one time, and at Tientsin, on the 3Cth November next, or sooner if the !

Chinese Government judges it convenient.

A Mixed Commission, appointed by the Minister of France and by the Chinese \

Authorities, shall determine the rules to be followed in effecting the payment of the >

whole of the indemnity, the verification of the amount, the giving of receipts, and in j

short fulfilling all the formalities required in such case.

Art. V.—The sum of eight million Taels is allowed to the French Government to

liquidate the expenses of its armament against China, as also for the indemnification (

of French subjects and proteges of France who sustained loss by the burning of the

factories at Canton, and also to compensate the Catholic missionaries who have

suffered in their persons or property. The French Government will divide this sum

between the parties intereste l, after their claims shall have been legally established, '

in satisfaction of such claims, and it is understood between the 'conti-acting parties f

that one million of Taels shall be appropriated to the indemnification of French subjects :

or proteges of France for the losses they have sustained or the treatment to which

they have been subjected, and that the remaining seven million Taels shall be applied 1

to the liquidation of the expenses occasioned by the war.

Art. VI.—In conformity with the Imperial edict issued on the 20th March, 1856, ;

by the August Emperor Tao Kwang, the religl ms and charitable establishments which ‘j

have been confiscated during the persecutions of the Christians shall be lestored to

their proprietors through the Minister of France in China, to whom the Imperial

Government will deliver them, with the cemeteries and edifices appertaining to them.

Art. VII.—The town and port of Tientsin, in the province of Pechili, shall be

opet.ed to foreign trade on the same conditions as the other towns and ports of the

Empire where such trade is permitted, and this from the date of the signature of the

present Convention, which shall be obligatory on the two nations without its being

necessary to exchange ratifications, and which shall have the same force as if it were

inserted word for word in the Treaty of Tientsin.

The French troops now occupying this town shall, on the payment of the five

hundred thousand taels provided by Article IV. of the present Convention, evacuate t

it and proceed to occupy Taku and the north-east coast of Shantung, whence they

shall retire on the same conditions as govern ihe evacuation of the other points

occupied on the shores of the Empire. The Commanders-in-Chief of the French force

shall, however, have the right to winter their troops of all arms at Tientsin, if they

judge it convenient, and to withdraw them only when the indemnities due by the

Chinese Government shall have been entirely paid, unless the Commanders-in-Chief

shall think it convenient to withdraw them before that time.

Art. VIII.—It is further agreed that when the present Convention shall have

been signed and the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin exchanged, the French

forces which occupy Chusan shall evacuate that island, and that the forces befoie

Peking shall retire to Tientsin, to Taku, to the north coast of Shantung, or to

the town of Canton, and that in all these places or in any of them the French

Government may, if it thinks fit, leave troops until such time as the total sum of

eight million taels shall have been fully paid.

Art. IX.—It is agreed between the high contracting parties that when the

ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin shall have been exchanged an Imperial edict

shall order the high authorities of all the provinces to permit any Chinese who wishes

to go to countries beyond the sea to establish himself there or to seek his fortune, to

embark himself and his family, if he so wishes, on French ships in the ports of the

empire open to foreign trade. It is also agreed, in the interest of the emigrants, to

ensure their entire freedom of action and to safeguard their rights, that the competent

Chinese authorities shall confer with the Minister of France in China for the making

of regulations to assure for these engagements, always voluntary, the guarantees of

morality and security which ought to govern them.

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Art. X.-—It is well understood between the contracting parties that the tonnage

•dues which by error were fixed in the French Treaty of Tientsin at five mace per ton

for vessels of 150 tons and over, and which in the Treaties with England and the

United States signed in 1858 were fixed at four mace only, shall not exceed this

same sum of four mace, and this without the invocation of the last paragraph of

Art. XXXII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, which gives to France the formal right to

claim the same treatment as the most favoured nation.

The present Convention of Peace has been made at Peking, in four copies, on the

25th October, 1860, and has been signed by the respective plenipotentiaries.

"TREATY OE PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND COMMERCE

BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Tientsin, 9th June, 1885

The President of the French Eepublie and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

each animated by an equal desire to bring to an end the difficulties which have

given rise to their simultaneous intervention in the affairs of Annam, and wishing to

re-establish and improve the relations of friendship and commerce which previously

existed between France and China, have resolved to conclude a new Treaty to further

the common interest of both nations on the basis of the preliminary Convention

signed at Tientsin on the 11th May, 1884, and ratified by an Imperial decree of the

13th April, 1885.

For that purpose the two high contracting parties have appointed as their Pleni-

potentiaries the following, that is to say :—

The President of the French Bepublic, M. Jules Patenotre, Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary for France in China, Officer of the Legion of Honour,

Cfrand Cross of the Swedish Order of the Pole Star, &c., &c.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Imperial Commissioner,

Senior Grand Secretary of State, Grand Honorary Preceptor of the Heir Presumptive;

Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Ports, Governor-General of the Province

of Chihli, of the First degree of the Third Order of Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Assisted by Hsi Chen, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamen,

President of the Board of Punishments, Administrator of the Treasury at the Ministry

of Finance, Director of Schools for the Education of Hereditary Officers of the

Left Wing of the Yellow Bordered Banner ;

And Teng Chaug-su, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamen,

Director of the Board of Ceremonies ;

Who, having communicated their full powers, which have been found in good

and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—France engages to re-establish and maintain order in those provinces of

Annam which border upon the Chinese empire. For this purpose she will take the

necessary measures to disperse or expel the bands of pirates and vagabonds who

endanger the public safety, and to prevent their collecting together again. Nevertheless,

the French troops shall not, under any circumstances, cross the frontier which separates

84 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Tonkin from China, which frontier France promises both to respect herself and to

guarantee against any aggression whatsoever.

On her part China undertakes to disperse or expel such bands as may take refuge

in her provinces bordering on Tonkin and to disperse those which it may be attempted

to form th^re for the purpose of causing disturbances amongst the populations placed

under the protection of France ; and, in consideration of the guarantees which have

been triven as to the security of the frontier, she likewise engages not to send troops

into Tonkin.

The high contracting parties will ftx, by a special convention, thp conditions under

which the extradition of malefactors between China and Anmm shall be carried out.

The Chinese, whether colonists or disbanded soldiers, who reside peaceably in

Annam, supporting themselves by agriculture, industry, or trade, and whose conduct

shall give no cause of complaint, shall enjoy the same security for their persons and

property as French proteges.

Art. II.—China, being resolved to do nothing which may imperil the work of

pacification undertaken by France, engages to respect, both in the present and in

the future, the Treaties, Conventions, and Arrangements concluded directly between

France and Annam, or which may hereafter be concluded.

As regards the relations between China and Annam, it is understood they shall

be of such a nature as shall in no way injure the dignity of the Chinese empire or

give rise to any violation of the present Treaty.

Aid. III.—Within a period of six months from the signature of the present

Treaty commissioners appointed by the high contracting parties shall proceed to the

spot in order to define the frontier between China and Tonkin. They shall place

landmarks wherever necessary to render the line of demarcation clear. In those

cases where they may not be able to agree as to the location of these landmarks or on

such rectifications of detail as it may be desirable to make, in the interest of the two

nations, in the existing frontier of Tonkin, they shall refer the difficulty to their

respective Governments.

Art. IV.—When the frontier shall have been agreed upon, French or French

proteges and foreign residents of Tonkin who may wish to cross it in order to enter

China shall not be allowed to do so unless they shall have previously provided them-

selves with passports issued by the Chinese frontier authorities on the requisition of

the French authorities. For Chinese subjects an authorisation given by the Imperial

frontier authorities shall be sufficient.

Chinese subjects wishing to proceed from China to Tonkin by the land route-

shall be obliged to provide themselves with regular passports, issued by the French

authorities on the requisition of the Imperial authorities.

Art. V.—Import and export trade shall be permitted to French or French-

protected traders and to Chinese traders across the land frontier between China and

Tonkin. It shall, however, be carried on through certain spots which shall be

settled later, and both the selection and number of which shall correspond with the-

direction and importance of the traffic between the two countries. In this respect

the Regulations in force in the interior of the Chinese Empire shall be taken into

account.

In any case, two of the said spots shall be marked out on the Chinese frontier,

the one above Lao-kai, the other beyond Lang-son. French traders shall be at

liberty to settle there under the same conditions, and with the same advantages, as

in the ports open to foreign trade. The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of

China shall establish Custom houses there, and the Government of the French Republic

shall be at liberty to maintain Consuls there whose powers and privileges shall be

identical with those of Agents of the same rank in the open ports.

On his part, His Majesty the Emperor of China shall be at liberty, with the-

concurrence of the French Government, to appoint Consuls in the principal towns of

Tonkin.

TREATT BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 85

Art. VI.—A special code of Regulations, annexed to the present Treaty, shall

define the conditions under which trade shall be carried on by land between Tonkin

and the Chinese provinces of Yiinnan, of Kwang-si, and of Kwang-tung. Such

Regulations shall be drawn up by Commissioners, who shall be appointed by the

high contracting parties, within three months from the signature of the present

Treaty.

All goods dealt with by such trade shall be subject, on import and export

between Tonkin and the provinces of Yunnan and Kwang-si, to duties lower than

those laid down by the present tariff for foreign trade. I he reduced tariff shall

not, however, be applied to goods transported by way of the land frontier between

Tonkin and Kwang-tung, and shall not be enforced within the ports already open

by Treaty.

Trade in arms, engines, supplies, and munitions of war of any kind whatsoever

shall be subject to the Laws and Regulations issued by each of the contracting

States within its own territory.

The export and import of opium shall be governed by special arrangements to

be inserted in the above-mentioned code of Regulations.

Trade by sea between China and Annam shall likewise be dealt with by a separate

code of Regulations. In the meanwhile, the present practice shall renUtin unaltered.

Art. VII.—With a view to develop under the most advantageous conditions the

relations of commerce and of good neighbourship, which it is the object of the present

Treaty to re-establish between France and China, the Government of the Republic

shall construct roads in Tonkin, and shall encourage the construction of railways

there.

When China, on her part, shall have decided to construct railways, it is agreed

that she shall have recourse to French industry, and the Government of the Republic

shall afford every facility for procuring in France the staff that may be required. It

is, moreover, understood that this clause shall not be looked upon as constituting an

exclusive privilege in favour of France.

Art. VIII.—The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty and the Regula-

tions to be agreed upon shall be liable to revision after an interval of ten complete

years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. But

in case six months before it expires neither one nor other of the high contracting

parties shall have expressed a wish to proceed to a revision, the commercial stipula-

tions shall remain in force for a fresh period of ten years, and so further in like

manner.

Art. IX.—As soon as the present Treaty shall have been signed, the French

forces shall receive orders to retire from Keelung and to cease search, &c., on the high

seas. Within one month from the signature of the present Treaty the Island of

Formosa and Pescadores shall be entirely evacuated by the French troops.

Art. X.—All stipulations of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions

between France and China, which are not modified by the present Treaty, remain in

full force.

The present Treaty shall be ratified at once by His Majesty the Emperor of China,,

and after it shall have been ratified by the President of the French Republic the

exchange of ratifications shall take place at Peking with the least possible delay.

Done in quadruplicate at Tientsin, this ninth day of June, one thousand eight

hundred and eighty-five, corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the fourth moon

of the eleventh year of Kwang-Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] Paten6tre.

„ [l.s.] Hsi Chen.

„ [l.s.J Li Hung-chang.

„ [l.s.J Teng Chang-su.

TRADE REGULATIONS EOR THE TONKIN ERONTIER

JOINTLY DETERMINED ON BY ERANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, 25th April, 1886

[Translated from the French Text]

Whereas in Article YI. of the Treaty between the President of the French Re-

public and His Majesty the Emperor of China, signed the 9th day of June, 1885, it is

stated that “ Regulations for the conduct of overland trade between Tonkin and the

Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Kwang-si, and Kwang-tung shall be jointly discussed and

concluded by Commissioners appointed by the two Powers, and will form a supple-

ment to the present Treaty”; and whereas in Article X. of that Agreement it is

set forth that “provisions of former Treaties and Regulations agreed to by France

and China, except in so far as they are modified by the present agreement, will continue

-to retain their original validity,” the two high contracting parties have for this

purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

The President of the French Republic, Gr. Cogordan, Minister Plenipotentiary

of France to China, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Knight of the Order of the Crown

of Italy, &c., &c., together with E. Bruwaert, Consul of the first class, Assistant

Commissioner for Treaty negotiations, Knight of the Order of G-ustav of Sweden, and

of the Order of Leopold of Belgium ;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li, Grand Preceptor of the Heir Ap-

parent, Grand Secretary of State, Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Seaboard,

Joint Commissioner of Admiralty, Governor of Chihli, and a member of the first

degree of the Third Order of the Hereditary Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and

found them to be in due form, have concluded the following Articles:—

Art. I.—In accordance with the terms of Article V. of the Treaty of the 19th

June, 1885, the high contracting parties agree that for the present two places shall

be opened to trade, one to the north of Langson and the other above Lao-kai. China

will establish Custom-houses there, and France shall have the right to appoint

-Consuls, who shall enjoy all rights and privileges conceded in China to the Consuls

• of the most favoured nation.

The work of the Commission charged with the delimitation of the two countries

not being completed at the time of the signature of the present Convention, the place

to be opened to trade north of Langson shall be selected and determined in the

course of the present year by arrangement between the Imperial Government and the

representative of France at Peking. As to the place to be opened to trade above

Lao-kai, this will also be determined by common accord when the frontier between

the two countries shall have been defined.

Art. II.—The Imperial Government may appoint Consuls at Hanoi and at

Haiphong. Chinese Consuls may also be sent later on to other large towns in

Tonkin by arrangement with the French Government.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER 8T

The agents shall be treated in the same manner and have the same rights and

privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation in France. They shall maintain

official relations with the French authorities charged with the Protectorate.

Art. III.—It is agreed, on the one side and the other, that in the places where

Consuls are appointed the respective authorities will facilitate the installation of these-

agents in suitable residences.

Frenchmen may establish themselves in the places opened to trade on the frontier

of China under the conditions set forth in the Articles VII., X., XI., XII., and others

of the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Annamites shall enjoy in these places the same privileged treatment.

Art. IV.—Chinese shall have the right of possessing land, erecting buildings,

opening commercial houses, and having warehouses throughout Annatn.

They shall receive for their persons, their families, and their goods the same

protection as the most favoured European nation, and, like the latter, may not he made

the object of any ill-treatment. The official and private correspondence and telegrams

of Chinese officials and merchants shall be freely transmitted through the French*

postal and telegraphic administrations.

Frenchmen will receive from China the same privileged treatment.

Art. V.—Frenchmen, French proteges, and foreigners residing in Tonkin may

cross the frontiers and enter China on condition of being furnished with passports.

These passports will be given by the Chinese authorities at the frontier, on the

requisition of the French authorities, who will ask for them only for respectable-

persons; they will be surrendered to be cancelled on the holder’s return. In the case

of those who have to pass any place occupied by aborigines or savages, it will be

mentioned in the passport that there are no Chinese officials there who can protect

them.

Chinese who wish to come from China to Tonkin by land must in the same

way be furnished with passports granted by the French authorities on the lequisition

of the Chinese authorities, who will ask for them only on behalf of respectable

persons.

The passports so granted on the one side or the other shall serve only as titles

to travel and shall not be considered as certificates of exemption from taxes for the-

transport of merchandise.

Chinese authorities on Chinese soil and French authorities in Tonkin shall have

the right to arrest persons who have crossed the frontier without passports and send

them back to their respective authorities to be tried and punished if necessary.

Chinese residing in Annam may return from Tonkin to China on simply

obtaining from the Imperial authorities a pass permitting them to cross the

frontier.

Frenchmen and other persons established in the open places on the frontier may

travel without passports to a distance of 50 li (578 metres to the li) around such

places.

Art. VI.—Merchandise imported into the places opened to trade on the frontier

i of China by French merchants and French proteges may, after payment of the import

duties, be conveyed to the interior markets of China under the conditions fixed by

Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, and by the general rules of

the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs with regard to import transit passes.

When foreign merchandise is imported into these places a declaration shall be

made at the Custom-house of the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as

of the name of the person by whom it is accompanied. The Customs authorities will

proceed to verification, and will collect the duty according to the general tariff of the

Imperial Maritime Customs, diminished by one-fifth. Articles not mentioned in the

tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent, ad valorem. Until this duty has

been paid the goods may not be taken out of the warehouses to be sent away and sold.

A merchant wishing to send foreign merchandise into the interior shall make a*

fresh declaration at the Custom-house, and pay, without reduction, the transit dues

fixed by the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

After this payment the Customs will deliver a transit pass which will enable the 1

carriers to go to the localities mentioned in the pass for the purpose of disposing of

the said merchandise.

Under these conditions, no new duties will be levied at the interior barriers or ,

lekin stations.

Merchandise for which transit passes have not l een obtained will be liable to all

the barrier and lekin duties imposed upon indigenous products in the interior of the j

country.

Art. VII.—Merchandise bought by Frenchmen and persons under French I

protection in the interior markets of China may be brought into the open places on |

the frontier, for the purpose of being from thence exported to Tonkin, under the f

conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, with

regard to the transit of merchandise for export.

When Chinese merchandise for export arrives at these places, declaration i

shall be made at the Custom-house as to the nature and quantity of the merchandise, \

as well as the name of the person accompanying it.

The Customs authorities will proceed to verification.

Such of this merchandise as shall have been bought in the interior by a merchant j

furnished with a transit pass, and which consequently has not paid any lelein

or barrier duty, shall in the first place pay the transit duty fixed by the general

tariff of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

It shall then pay the export duty, diminished by one-third. Articles not named t

in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent, ad valorem.

After payment of these duties the merchandise will be allowed to pass free, and

to be sent beyond the frontier.

The merchant who, not being furnished with a transit pass, has bought goods

in the interior, shall pay the duties levied at the barriers and lekin stations; receipts

shall be delivered to him, and on arriving at the Custom-house he shall be exempted .|

from payment of the transit dues ou presentation of these receipts.

French merchants and persons under French protection importing or exporting

merchandise through the Customs offices on the frontiers of Yunnan and Kwangsi, f

and Chinese merchants importing or exporting merchandise to or from Tonkin, :

will not have to pay any toll on their carriages or beasts of burden. On the navigable

water-courses on the frontier, vessels may, on the one side and the other, be subjected s

to the payment of tonnage-dues, conformably to the rules of the Maritime Customs „

uf the two countries.

As regards the provisions of the present Article and the preceding one, it is

agreed by the high contracting parties that if a new Customs tariff should be

established by common accord between China and a third Power, for trade by land

on the south-western frontiers of the Chinese Empire, France shall obtain the

application of it.

Art. VIII.—Foreign merchandise which, not having been sold within a period ,

of thirty-six months after having paid the import duty at one of the Chinese frontier j

Customs stations, is forwarded to the other frontier Customs station, shall be

examined at the first of these stations, and if the wrappings are found intact, and

if nothing has been disturbed or changed, a certificate of exemption for the amount

of the first duty collected will be given. The bearer of this certificate will deliver it

to the other frontier station, in payment of the new duty which he will have to pay.

The Customs may in like manner give bonds which will be available for payment of

duties at the Custom-house by which they are issued any time within three years.

Money will never be returned.

If the same merchandise is re-despatched to one of the open ports of China, it

will there, conformably to the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs, be

subjected to payment of the import duties, and the certificates or bonds given at

•the frontier Customs shall not there be made use of. Neither will it be allowed to

present there, in payment of duties, the quittances delivered by the frontier Customs

on the first payment. As to transit dues, conformably to the rules in force at the

TEADE EEGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

open ports, when once they have been paid, bonds or exemption certificates will never

be given in respect of these.

Art. IX.—Chinese merchandise which, after having paid transit and export dues

at one of the frontier Customs stations, may be sent to the other frontier Customs

station to be sold, shall be subjected on its arrival at the second station only to a

payment—called a re-importation duty—of one-half the export duty already collected.

The merchandise conformably to the rules established in the open ports may not be

transported into the interior by foreign merchants.

If this Chinese merchandise be transported to one of the open ports of China, it

will be assimilated to foreign merchandise, and shall pay a new import duty in full,

conformably to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs.

This merchandise will be allowed to pay transit duty on being sent into the in-

terior. Chinese merchandise imported from a Chinese seaport into an Annamite port

in order to be transported to the land frontier and then to re-enter Chinese territory

will be treated as foreign merchandise and will pay the local import dues. This

merchandise will be allowed to pay the transit duty on being sent into the interior.

Art. X.—Declarations to the Chinese Customs must be made within thirty-six

hours of the arrival of the goods under a penalty of Tls. 50 for each day’s delay; but

the fine shall not exceed Tls. 200. An inexact declaration of the quantity of the goods,

if it is proved that it has been made with the intention of evading payment of the

duties, will entail upon the merchant confiscation of Ids goods. Goods not provided

with a permit from the chief of the Customs, which are clandestinely introduced

by by-ways, and unpacked or sold, or which are intentionally smuggled, shall be

entirely confiscated. In every case of false declaration or attempt to deceive the

Customs as regards the quality or the real origin or real destination of goods

for which transit passes have been applied the goods shall be liable to con-

fiscation. The penalties shall be adjudged according to the conditions and proce-

dure fixed by the Eules of 31st May, 1868. In all cases where confiscation shall

have been declared, the merchant shall be at liberty to recover his goods on payment

of a sum equivalent to their value, to be duly settled by arrangement with the Chinese

authorities. The Chinese authorities shall have every liberty to devise measures to-

be taken in China, along the frontier, to prevent smuggling.

Merchandise descending or ascending navigable rivers in French, Annamite, or

Chinese vessels will not necessarily have to be landed at the frontier, unless there is-

an appearance of fraud, or a divergence between the nature of the cargo and the-

declaration of the manifest. The Customs will only send on board the said vessels

agents to visit them.

Art. XI.—Produce of Chinese origin imported into Tonkin by the land frontier

shall pay the import duty of the Franco-Annamite tariff. They will pay no export

duty on leaving Tonkin. The Imperial Government will be notified of the new

tar ff which France will establish in Tonkin. If taxes of excise, of consumption, or

of guarantee be established in Tonkin on any articles of indigenous production,

similar Chinese productions will be subjected, on importation, to equivalent taxes.

Art. XII.—Chinese merchandise transported across Tonkin from one o£ the

two frontier Customs stations to the other, or to an Annamite port to be from thence

exported to China, shall be subjected t > a specific transit duty which shall not exceed

two per cent, of the value. At the point where it leaves Chinese territory this

merchandise will be examined by the French Customs authorities on the frontier,

who will specify its nature, quantity, and destination in a certificate which shall be

produced whenever required by the French authorities during its transport across

Tonkin, as well as at the port of shipment.

In order to guarantee the Franco-Annamite Customs against any possible fraud,

such Chinese produce, on entering Tonkin, shall pay the import duty.

A transit permit will accompany the goods to the place of leaving the country,

whether this be the port of transhipment or ihe land frontier, and the sum paid by

the proprietor of the merchandise will, after deducting the transit dues, be then

restored to him in exchange for the receipt delivered to him by the Tonkin Customs-

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

Every false declaration or act evidently intended to deceive the French admini- 1

stration as to the quality, quantity, real origin, or real destination of merchandise ;

•on which the special treatment applicable to Chinese products traversing Tonkin in J

transit is asked, will entail the confiscation of such merchandise. In every case

where confiscation has been declared, the merchant shall be free to recover his goods !

on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, which shall be duly determined by '

an arrangement with the French authorities.

The same rules and the same transit duty will be applicable in Annam to Chinese j

merchandise despatched from a Chinese port to an Annamite port in order to get to

the Chinese frontier Customs by crossing Tonkin.

Art. XIII.—The following articles, that is to say, gold and silver ingots, foreign

money, flour, Indian n eal, sago, bisc uits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese,

butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated ware, perfumery, soaps of all

kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco, wine, beer, spirits, household ^

stores, ship’s stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, cutlery, drugs, foreign

medicines, and glassware, shall be verified by the Chinese Customs on their entry i

and clearance; if they are really of foreign origin and intended for the personal |

use of foreigners, and if they arrive in moderate quantity, a duty exemption certificate J

will be given which will pass them free at the frontier. If these articles are withheld

from declaration or the formality of an exemption certificate, their clandestine intro- I

duction will render them subject to the same penalty as smuggled goods.

With the exception of gold, silver, money, and luggage, which will remain exempt |

from duty, the above-mentioned articles destined for the personal use of foreigners 1

and imported in moderate quantity, will pay, when they are transported into the

interior of China a duty of-2^ per cent, on their value.

The Franco-Annamite frontier Customs shall collect no duty on the following 1

articles of personal use which Chinese carry with them, either on entering or leaving j

Tonkin, that is to say, money, luggage, clothes, women’s head ornaments, paper, 1

hair pencils, Chinese ink, furniture, or food, or on articles ordered by the Chinese

Consuls in Tonkin for their personal consumption.

Art. XIV.—The high contracting parties agree to prohibit trade in and trans-

port of opium of whatsoever origin by the land frontier between Tonkin on the one

side and Yunnan, Kwaug-si, and Kwangtung on the other side.

Art. XV.—The export of rice and of cereals from China is forbidden. The

•import of these articles shall be free of duty.

The import of the following articles into China is forbidden :—Gunpowder, pro- J

jectiles, rifles and guns, saltpetre, sulphur, lead, spelter, arms, salt, and immoral |

publications.

In case of contravention these articles shall be entirely confiscated.

If the Chinese authorities have arms or munitions bought or if merchants 1

■receive express authorily to buy them, the importation will be permitted under the

special surveillance of the Chinese Customs. The Chinese authorities may, further- J

more, by arrangement with the French Consuls, obtain for the arms and munitions

which they wish to have conveyed to China through Tonkin exemption from all the

Franco-Annamite duties.

The introduciion into Tonkin of arms, munitions of war, and immoral publica- .1

tions is also prohibited.

Art. XVI.—Chinese residing in Annam shall be placed under the same condi- 1

ttions, with regard to criminal, fiscal, or other jurisdiction, as the subjects of the most

favoured nation. Law-suits which may arise in China, in the open markets on the ■

frontier, between Chinese subjects and Frenchmen or Annamites shall be decided in 1

a Mixed Court by Chinese and French officers.

With reference to crimes or offences committed by Frenchmen or persons under j

French protection in China, in the places opened to trade, the procedure shall be in

.conformity with the stipulations of Articles XXXIIL and XXXIV. of the treaty of

the 27th June, 1858.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FEANCE AND CHINA, 18&7 91?

j Art. XVII.—If in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China, Chinese-

asdeserters or persons accused of crimes against the Chinese law shall take refuge, in

Lithe houses or on hoard the vessels of Erenchmen or persons under French protection,

the local authority shall apply to the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused,

ihall immediately take the necessary measures in order that they may be given up,,

md delivered to the regular course of the law.

Chinese guilty or accused of crimes or offences who seek refuge in Annarn shall,

>n the request of the Chinese authorities and on proof of their guilt, be sought for,

rrested, and extradited in all cases where the subjects of the countries enjoying the

tost liberal treatment in the matter of extradition might be extradited from France.

Frenchmen guilty or accused of crimes or offences, who seek refuge in China,

ihall, at the request of the French authorities and on proof of their guilt, be arrested-

id delivered up to the said authorities to be tried according to the regular process-

>f law.

On both sides all concealment and connivance shall be avoided.

Art. XVIII.—In any difficulty not provided for in the preceding provisions-

oirecourse shall be had to the rules of the Maritime Customs, which, in conformity

iwith existing Treaties, are now applied in the open towns or ports.

In case these rules are insufficient the representatives of the two countries

ihall refer the matter to their respective Governments.

In accordance with the terms of Article VIII. of the treaty of the 9th June,

.885, the present Stipulations may be revised ten years after the exchange of the

■atifications.

Art. XIX.—The present Convention of Trade, after having been ratified by the

overnments, shall be promulgated in France, in China, and in Annam.

The exchange of the ratifications shall take place at Peking within one year from

le date of the signature of the Convention, or earlier if possible.

Done at Tientsin, in four copies, the25ih April, 1886, corresponding to the 22nd

[ay of the third moon of the twelfth year of Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] G. Cogordan.

„ [l.s.] E. Bruwaert.

„ [l.s.] Li Hung-chang.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

[Translated from the Chinese Text}

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and the President of the French

^[Republic, desiring to strengthen the commercial relations between the two countries,

mnd also to ratify and give effect to the Treaty signed at Tientsin on the 25th April,

881886, have appointed Plenipotentiaries to take the necessary steps thereto. H.I.M.

ajihe Emperor of China has specially appointed H.I.H. Prince Ching, and H.E. Sun

fu-wen, member of the Tsung-li Yamen and Vice-President of the Board of Works.-

irhe President of the Republic has appointed His Excellency Constans, Deputy,

Oix-Minister of the Interior, and Minister Plenipotentiary in Cl ini. Who, having

bixchanged their full powers and established their authenti.ity in due form, have

t^igreed on the following Articles:—

Art. I.—Such Articles of the Treaty signed at Tientsin as are not affected by this-

ao)onvention shall on the exchange of the ratifications be put in force at once.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887

Art. II.—Whereas it was agreed by the Treaty of 1886 that Lungchow in Kwangsi

and Mengtzu in Yunnan should be opened to trade, and whereas Man^hao, which

lies between Paosheng and Mengtzu, is in the direct road between the two places by

water, it is agreed that this also should be opened to trade on the same conditions as

the other ports, and that a deputy of the Consul at Mengtzu shall be allowed to

reside there.

Art. III.—In order to develop the trade between China and Tonkin as rapidly

as possible the tariff rules laid down in Articles VI. and VII. of the Treaty of 1886

are temporarily altered, and it is agreed that foreign goods imported to Yunnan and

Kwangsi from Tonkin shall pay 70 per cent, of the import duties collected by the

Customs at the Coast Ports in China, and that produce exported from China to Ton-

kin shall pay 60 per cent, of the export duties in force at the Treaty Ports.

Art. IV.—Chinese produce which has paid import duties under Art. XI. of the

Treaty of 1886, and is transported through Tonkin to a port of shipment in Cochin-

China, shall, if exported thence to any other place than China, pay export duties accord-

ing to the Franco-Annamite tariff.

Art. V.—Trade in Chinese native opium by land is allowed on payment of an

export duty of Tls. 20 per picul, but French merchants or persons under French pro-

tection may only purchase it at Lungchow, Mengtzu, and Manghao, but no more than

Tls. 20 per picul shall be exacted from the Chinese merchants as inland dues. When

opium is sold the seller shall give the buyer a receipt showing that the inland dues

have been paid, which the exporter will hand to the Customs when paying export duty.

It is agreed that opium re-imported to China by the Coast Ports cannot claim the

privileges accorded other re-imports of goods of native origin.

Art. VI.—French and Tonkinese vessels other than men-of-war and vessels

carrying troops and Government stores plying on the Songkat and Caobang Rivers

between Langshan and Caobang shall pay a tonnage due of 5 candareens per ton at

Lungchow. but all goods on board shall pass free. Goods may be imported to China

by the Songkat and Caobang Rivers or overland by the Government road, but until

the Chinese Government establishes Custom-houses on the frontier goods taken

overland must not be sold at Lungchow until they have paid duty there.

Art. VII.—It is agreed that should China enter into treaties with regard to com-

mercial relations on her southern and south-western frontiers all privileges accorded

by her to the most favoured nation are at once without further formality accorded to

France.

Art. VIII.—The above Articles having been agreed to and translated into

Chinese, H.I.H. the Prince on behalf of China and H.E. the Minister on behalf of

France have signed duplicate copies and affixed their seals hereto.

Art. IX.—When the ratifications of ,this .Convention and of the Treaty of 1886

shall have been exchanged they shall be put in force as if they were one Treaty.

Art. X.—The ratifications of the Convention shall be exchanged at Peking

when the assent of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and of His Excellency

the Pre sident of the French Republic shall have been signified.

Signed at Peking on the 26th June, 1887.

E. CONSTANS.

Pbince Chi’ng.

Sun Yu-wen.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN ERANCE AND

CHINA

Signed at Peking, 20th June, 1895

Art. is agreed, to assure the policing of the fioutier, that the French

Government will have the right of maintaining an agent of the Consular order at

Tonghing opposite Monkay on the frontier of Kwan tune. A further regulation

will determine the conditions under which these should be exercised in accordance

with th^ French and Chinese authorities and the communal police of the Sino-

Annamite frontier.

Art. II.—Article II. of the Convention, signed at Peking, June 26th, 1887, is

modified and completed as follows:—It is agreed between the high contracting

parties that the town of Lungchow in Kwangsi and that of Mengtse in Yunnan

are open to French-Annamite commerce. It is intended besides that the port

open to commerce on the river route of Laokay to Mengtse will no L nger be

Manhao, but Hokow, and that the French Government have the right of ma ntaining

at Hokow an agent under the Consul at Mengtse, at the same time the Chinese

Government can maintain a Customs agent.

Art. III.—It is agreed that the town of Szemao in Yunnan shall be open to

French-Ann am ite commerce, like Lungchow and Mengtse, and that the French

Government will have the right as in the other open port of maintaining* a Conr ul

at the same time that the Chinese Government can maintain a Customs agent. J he

local authorities will employ themselves to fac litate the installation of the French

Consul in the proper residence. Frenchmen and protected French subjects may

establish themselves at Szemao under conditions c f tl e Articles VII., X., XI., and XII.,

and others of the T:e ty of June 27th, 1858; also by Article III. of the Convention of

April 25th, 1886. Goods destined for China can be transported by the rivers,

particularly the Loso and the Mekong as well as by land routes, and particularly by

the Mandarin-road, which leads either from Mongle or Ipang to Szemao and Puerh,

the duties which these goods will be subject to being paid at Szemao.

Art. IV.—Article IX. of the Commercial Convention of April 25th, 1886, is

modified as follows:—(1) Chinese goods in transit from one of the other four towns

open to commerce on the frontier, Lungchow, Mengtse, Szemao, and Hokow, in

passing by Annam, will pay on leaving the reduced duties of four-tenths. A

special certificate will be delivered stating the payment x f this duty, and destined

to accompany the goods. When they have come to another town they .-hall be

exempt from payment and import duty. (2) Chinese goods which shall be exported

from the four above-named localities and transported to Chinese ports, maritime

or fluvial, open to commerce, shall be Ireed on leaving the frontier by payment of

the reduced export duty of four-tenths. A special certificate will be delivered

stating the payment of this duty, and destined to acc< mpany the goods. When

they shall arrive at one of the ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, they

shall be freed the half-duty of re-importation in conformity with the general

rule for all such goods in the maritime or fluvial ports open to commerce.

(3) Chinese goods which shall be transported from Chinese ports, maritime or

fluvial, open to commerce, by way of Annam, towards the four above named

localities, shall be freed on leaving of all duty. A special certificate will be

94 ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN EKANCE AND CHINA, 1895

delivered, stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods.- 1

When they shall have arrived at one of the frontier Customs they shall he freed 1

on entry by half duty of re-importation based on the reduction of four-tenths.

(4) The Chinese goods above mentioned, accompanied by the special certificate I

above mentioned, shall be, before passing the export Customs, or after passing 1

Customs re-importation, submitted to the regulations governing native Chinese- 3

goods.

Art. V.—It is understood that China, for the exploitation of its mines in the- 1

provinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi, and Kwangtung, will address itself, in the first

instance, to French commerce and engineers, the exploitation remaining otherwise ]

subject tb the rules and the edicts by the Imperial Government which affects

national industry. It is understood that railways already in existence or projected

in Annam can, after mutual agreement, and under conditions to be defined, be

prolonged on Chinese territory. ,

Art. VL—Article II. of the Telegraphic Convention between France and Chinar

signed at Chefooj'December 1, 1888, is completed as follows:—D.—A union shall I e

establish 'd between the secondary prefecture of Szemao and Annam by two stations

which shall be Szemao in China and Muang Hahin in Annam, midway between ;

Laichow and L iang Prabaag. Th ■ tariff shall be fixed in conformity with Article i

VI. of the Telegraphic CouVention of Chefoo. •

Art. VII. —It is agree 1 that the commercial stipulations contained in the present

Convention being of a special nature, and the result of mutual 'concessions deter-

mined by the necessities of the relations between Lungchow, Hokow, Mengtse, .

Szemao, an 1 Annam, the advantages which result therefrom cannot be invoked by j

the subjects and protected subjects of the two high contracting parties, but on these

points as well as on the fluvial and laud ways here determined of the frontier.

Art. VIII.—The present stipulations shall be put in force as if they were in-

serted in the text of the additional Convention of June 26th, 1887.

Art. IX.—The terms of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions between

France and China not modified by the present Treaty remain in full force. The pre-

sent complementary

Emperor Convention

of China, and shallbeen

after it has be ratified

ratified immediately by Hisof Majesty

by the President the

the French

Republic the exchange of ratifications shall be made at Peking with the least delay

possible.

Done at Peking in four copies, June twentieth, one thousand eight hundred and

ninety-five, corresponding to the twenty-eighth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-

first year Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) A. Gerard.

„ Chino.

UNITED STATES

"/TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OE AMERICA

AND CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Tientsin

18th June, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Pehtang, 16th August, 1859

The United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire, desiring to maintain

I'dtirm, lasting, and sincere friendship, have resolved to renew, in a manner clear and

c| positive, by means of a. Treaty or general Convention of Peace, Amity, and Commerce,

5the rules which shall in future be mutually observed in the intercours.' of their

respective countries; for which most desirable object the President of the United

ijStates and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for their

H Plenipotentiaries, to wit: the President of the United States of America, William B

•i Reed, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China; and His

Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, a member of the Privy Council and

[/I Superintendent of the Board of Punishments, and Hwashana, President of the Board

1 of Civil Office and Major-General of the Bordered Blue Banner Division of the

1 Chinese Bannermen, both of them being Imperial Commissioners and Plenipotenti-

i aries: And the said Ministers, in virtue of the respective full powers they have received

from their Governments, have agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art I. There shall be, as there has always been, peace and friendship between

c the United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire, and between their people

s respectively. They shall not insult or oppress each other for any trifling cause, so as

to produce an estrangement between them; and if any other nation should act

il unjustly or oppressively, the United States will exert their good offices, on being

t1 informed of thefriendly

showing their case, tofeelings.

bring about an amicable arrangement of the question, thus

Art. II.—In order to perpetuate friendship, on the exchange of ratifications by

I the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and

ja by His way,

in this Majesty

viz.:theThe

Emperor

originalof China,

Treaty,this

as Treaty

ratifiedshall be kept

by the and sacredly

President of the guarded

United

18 States, shall be deposited at Peking, the capital of His Majesty the Emperor of China

a in charge of the Privy Council; and, as ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China’

1 shall be deposited at Washington, the capitaLof the United'States, in charge of the

'< Secretary of State.

Art. III.—In order that the people of the two countries may know and obey the

( ! provisions of this Treaty, the United States of America agree, immediately on the

exchange of iatifications, to proclaim the same and publish it by proclamation in the

■Gazettes where the laws of the United States of America are published by authority

3 and His Majesty the Emperor of China, on the exchange of ratifications, agrees

immediately to direct the publication of the same at the capital and by the Governors

of all the provinces.

Art. IV.—In order further to perpetuate friendship, the Minister or Commis-

sioner, or the highest diplomatic representative of the United States of America in

■China, shall at all times have the right to corre-pond on terms of perfect equality and

confidence with the officers of the Privy Council at the capital, or with the Governor-

General of the Two Kwang, of Fohkien and Chekiang, or of the Two Kiang • and

whenever he desires to have such correspondence with the Privy Council at the capital

it he shall have the right to send it through either of the said Governors-General or by

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

general post; and all such communications shall be most carefully respected. The

Privy Council and Governors-Q-eneral, as the case may be, shall in all cases consider

and acknowledge such communications promptly and respectfully.

Art. Y.—The Minister of the United States of America in China, whenever he has

business, shall have the right to visit and sojourn at the capital of His Majesty the

Emperor of China and there confer with a member of the Privy Council or any other j

high officer of equal rank deputed for that purpose, on matters of common interest

and advantage. His visits shall not exceed one in each year, and ho shall complete

his business without unnecessary delay. He shall be allowed to go by land or come

to the mouth of the Pei-ho, in which he shall not bring ships-of-war, and he shall

inform the authorities of that place in order that boats may be provided for him lo go

on his journey. He is not to take advantage of this stipulation to request visits to

the capital on trivial occasions. Whenever he means to proceed to the capital be

shall communicate in writing his intention to the Board of Bites at the capital, and

thereupon the said Board shall give the necessary direction to facilitate his journey,

and give him necessary protection and respect on his way. On his arrival at the

capital he shall be furnished with a suitable residence prepared for him, and he shall

defray his own expenses; and his entire suite shall not exceed twenty persons

exclusive of his Chinese attendants, none of whom shall be engaged in trade.

Art. VI.—If at any time His Majesty the Emperor of China shall, by Treaty

voluntarily made, or for any other reason, permit the representative of any friendly

nation to reside at his capital for a long or short lime, then, without any further

consultation or express permission, the representative of the United States in China ?

shall have the same privilege.

Art. VII.—The superior authorities of the United States and of China in

corresponding together shall do so on terms of equality and m form of mutual

communication (chau-hwui). The Consuls and the local officers, civil and military,

in corresponding together shall likewise employ the style and form of mutual

communication (chau-hwui). When inferior officers of the one Government address

the superior officers of the other they shall do so in the style and form of memorial

(shin-chin). Private individuals, in addressing superior officers, shall employ the

style of petition (pin-ching). In no case shall any terms or stjle be used or suffered

which shall be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed that no

present, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demanded of the United

States by China, or of China by the United States.

Art. VIII.—In all future personal intercourse between the representative of ;

the United States of America and the Governors-General or Governors the interviews

shall be had at the official residence of the said officers, or at their temporary resi-

dence, or at the residence of the representative of the United States of America,

whichever may be agreed upon between them; nor shall they make any pretext for

declining these interviews. Current matters shall be discussed by correspondence

so as not to give the trouble of a personal meeting.

Art. IX.—Whenever national vessels of the United States of America, in cruising

along the coast and among the ports opened for trade for the protection of the com-

merce of their country, or the advancement of science, shall arrive at or near any

of the ports of China, the commanders of said ships and the superior local authorities

of government shall, if it be necessary, hold intercourse on terms of equality and

courtesy, in token of the friendly relations of their respective nations ; and the said

vessels shall enjoy all suitable facilities on the part of the Chinese Government in

procuring provisions or other supplies, and making necessary repairs. And the

United States of America agree that in case of the shipwreck of any American vessel

and its being pillaged by pirates, or in case any American vessel shall be pillaged or

captured by pirates on the seas adjacent to the coast, without being shipwrecked, the

national vessels of the United States shall pursue the said pirates, and if captured

deliver them over for trial and punishment.

Art. X.—The United States of America shall have the right to appoint Consuls

and other commercial agents for the protection of trade, to reside at such places in the

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 97

dominions of China as shall he agreeU to bfei opened, who shall hold official intercourse

and correspondence with the Ideal officers of the'Chinese Government (a Consul dr a

Vice-Consul in charge taking rank with an intendarit of circuit or a prefect), either

personally or in writing, as occasion may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal

respect. And the Consuls and local officers shall employ the style of mutual

communication. If the officers of either nation are disrespectfully treated, or aggrieved

in any way by the other authorities, they have the right to make representation of

the same to tlm superior officers of their respective Governments, who shall see that

full inquiry and strict justice shall be had in the premises. And 1 he said Consuls and

agents shall carefully avoid all acts of offence to the officers and people of China.

On the arrival of a Consul duly accredited at any port in China, it shall be the duty

of the Minister of the United States to notify the same to the Governor-General of

the province where such port is, who shall forthwith recognize the said Consul and

grant him authority to act.

Art. XI.—All citizens of the United States of America in China, peaceably

attending to their affairs, being placed on a common footing of amity and good-

will with subjects of China, shall receive and enjoy for themselves and everything

appertaining to theni'fhe‘protection of the local authorities of Government, who shall

defend them from ailiiisult or injury of any sort. If their dwellings or property be

threatened of. attacked by mobs, incendiaries, Or other violent or lawless persons, the

local officers,Am requisition of the Consul, shall immediately despatch a military force

to disperse the'ridterS; apprehend the guilty Individuals, and punish them with the

utmost rigour df'thelaw. Subjects of China guilty of any criminal act toW&rds citizens

df the United States shall be punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws

of China; and citizens of the United States, either on shore or in any merchant vessel,

who may insult, trouble, df wound the persohs dr injure the'prdperty of Chinese, or

commit any other improper act in China, shall be punished only by the Consul or other

public functionary thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States. Ar-

rests in order to trial may be made by either the Chinese or United States authorities.

Art. XII.—Citizens df the United States, residing or sojourning at any of the

ports open to foreign commerce, shall be1 permitted to rent houses and places of

business or hire sites on which they can themselves build houses or hospitals,

churches, and cemeteries. The parties interested can fix the rents by mutual and

equitable agreement; the proprietors shall not demand an exorbitant price, nor shall

the local authorities interfere, unless there be some objections offered on the part of

the inhabitants respecting the place. The legal fees to the officers for applying their

seal shall be pai l. The citizens of the United States shall not ui reasonably insist

on particular spots, tut each party shall conduct themselves with justice and

moderation. Any desecration of the cemeteries by natives of China shall be severely

punished according to law. At the places where the ships of the United States

anchor, or their citizens teside, the merchants, seamen, or others can freely pass and

re pass in the immediate neighbourhood ; but in order to the preservath n of the

public peace, they shall not go into the country to the villages and marts to sell their

goods unlawfully, in fraud of the revenue.

Art. XIII.—If any vessel of the United States be wrecked or stranded on the

coast of China aud be subjected to plunder or other damage, the proper officers of the

Government, on receiving information of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures

for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment, and

be enabled to repair at, once to the nearest port, and shall enjoy all facilities f< r

obtaining supplies of provisions and water. If the merchant vessels of the United

States, while within the waters over which the Chinese Government exercises

jurisdiction, be plundered by robbers or pirates, then the Chinese local authorities

civil and military, on receiving information thereof, shall arrest the said robbers or

pirates, and punish them according to law, and shall cause all the property which can

be recovered to be restored to the owners, or placed in the hands of the Consul. If

by reason of the extent Of territory and numerous population of China it shall in any

case happen that the robbers cannot l>e apprehended, and the property only in part

4

TREA.TY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

recovers 1, the Chinese Government shall not make indemnity for the goods lost; but

if it shall be proved that the local authorities have been in collusion with the robbers,

the sa ne shall be communicated to the superior authorities for memorializing the

Throne, and these officers shall be severely punished and their property be confiscated

to repay the losses.

Art. XIY.—The citizens of the United States are permitted to frequent the ports

and cities of Canton and Chan-chau, or Swatow, in the province of Kwangtung; Amoy,

Foochow, and Tai-wan in Formosa, in the province of Fuhkien; Ningpo in the province

of Chekiang; and Shanghai in the province of Kiangsu, and any other port or place

hereafter by Treaty with other powers or with the United States opened to commerce;

and to reside with their families and trade there, and to proceed at pleasure with their

vessels and merchandise from any of these ports to any

shall not carry on a clandestine or fraudulent trade at other ports of China, not declared

to be legal, or along the coasts thereof; and any vessel under the American flag violating

this provision shallf with her cargo, be subject to confiscation to the Chinese Govern-

ment; and any citizen of the United States who shall trade in any contraband article

of merchandise shall be subject to be dealt with by the Chinese Government, without

being entitled to any countenance or protection from that of the United States; and

the United States will take measures to prevent their flag from being abused by the

subjects of other nation-* as a cover for the violation of the laws of the Empire.

Art. XY.—At each of the ports open to commerce, citizens of the United States

shall be permitted to import from abroad, and sell, purchase, and export all merchan-

dise of which the importation or exportation is not prohibited by the laws of the Empire.

The tariff of duties to be paid by the citizens of the United States, on the export and

import of goods from and into China, shall be the same as was agreed upon at the

Treaty of Wanghia, except so far as it may be modified by Treaties with other nations,

it being expressly agreed that citizens of the United States shall never pay higher

duties than those paid by the most favoured nation. *•'

Art. XYI.—Tonnage duties shall be„paid on every merchant vessel belonging to

the United States entering either of the open ports at the rate of four mace per ton of

forty cubic feet, if she be over one hundred and fifty tons burden; and one mace per

ton of forty cubic feet if she be of the burden of one hundred and fifty tons or un ler,

according to the tonnage specified in the register; which, with her other papers, si all,

on her arrival, be lodged with the Consul, who shall report the same to the Commis-

sioner of Customs. And if any vessel, having paid tonnage duty at one port, shall

go to any other port to complete the disposal of her cargo, or being in ballast, to

purchase an entire or fill up an incomplete cargo, the Consul shall report the same to

the Commissioner of Customs, who shall note on the port-clearance that t!.e tonnage

duties have been paid, and report the < ircumstance to the collectors at the other

Custom-houses; in which case the said vessel shall only pay duty on her cargo, and

not be charged with tonnage duty a second time. The collectors of Customs at the

open ports shall consult with the Consuls about the erection of beacons or light-

houses, and where buoys and lightships should be placed.

Art. XYIL;—Citizens of the United States shall be allowed to engage pilots to

take their vessels into port, arifl, when the lawful duties have all been paid, take them

out of port. It shall be lawful for them to hire at pleasure servants, compradores,

linguists, writers, labourers, seamen, and persons for whatever necessary service, with

passage or cargo-boats, for a reasonable compensation, to be agreed upon by the

parties or determined by the Consul.

Art. X YIII.—Whenever merchant vessels of the United States shall enter a port,

the Collector of Customs shall, if he see fit, appoint Custom-house officers to guard

said vessels, who may live on board the ship or their own boats, at their convenience.

The local authorities of the Chinese Government shall cause to be apprehended all

mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China on

being informed by the Consul, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officers

for punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the houses, or on

board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall not be harboured, but

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA £>&■

shall be delivered up to justice on due requisition by the Chinese local officers,,

addressed to those of the United States. The merchants, seamen, and other citizens

of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate offirers of

their Government. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence or disorder,

use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances endangering life, the officers of

the two Governments will exert themselves to enforce order and to maintain the

public peace, by doing impartial justice in the premises.

Art. XIX.—Whenever a merchant vessel belonging to the United States shall

cast anchor in either of the said ports, the supercargo, master, or consignee, shall,

within forty-eight hours, deposit the ship’s papers in the hands of the Consul or

person charged with his functions, who shall cause to be communicated to the Super-

intendent of Customs a true report of the name and tonnage of such vessel, the number

of her crew, and the nature of her cargo, whicli being done, he shall give a permit for

her discharge. And the jnaster, supercargo, or consignee, if he proceed to discharge

the cargo without such permit, shall incur a fine of five hundred Dollars, and the goods-

so discharged without permit shall be subject to forfeiture to the Chinese Government.

But if a master of any vessel in port desire to discharge a part only of the cargo, it

shall be lawful for him to do so, paying duty on such part only, and to proceed with

the remainder to any other ports. Or if the master so desire, he may, within forfy-

eight hours after the arrival of the vessel, but not later, decide to depart without

breaking bulk; in which case he shall not be subject to pay tonnage or other duties-

or charges, until, on his arrival at another port, he shall proceed to discharge cargo-

when he shall pay the duties on vessel and cargo, according to law. And the tonnage

duties shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. In case

of the absence of the Consul or person charged with his functions, the captain or

supercargo of the vessel may have recourse to the Consul of a friendly Power; or, if

he please, directly to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall do all that is required

to conduct the ship’s business.

Art. XX.—The Superintendent of Customs, in order to the collection of the

proper duties, shall, on application made to him through the Consul, appoint suitable

officers, who shall proceed, in the presence of the captain, supercargo, or consignee

to make a just and fair examination of all goods in the act of being discharged for

importation, or laden for exportation, on board any merchant vessel of the United

States. And if disputes occur in regard to the value of goods subject to ad valorem

duty, or in regard to the amount of tare, and the same cannot be satisfactorily

arranged by the parties, the question may, within twenty-four hours, and not after-

wards, be referred to the said Consul to adjust with the Superintendent of Customs-

Art. XXI.—Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise-

into any of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to-

re-export the same in part or in whole to any other of the said ports, shall be entitled,

to make application, through their Consul, to the Superintendent cf Customs, who,

in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made, by

suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods as are entered on the Custom-

house books correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain,

with their original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum in t le

port-cleara .ee of the goods and the amount of duties paid on the same, and deliver

the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the„ facts to the officers of Customs

at the other ports; all which being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in

which the goods are laden, and everything being ioui.d, on examination there, to

correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods without

being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such

examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in

the case, then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and confiscation to the Chinese

Government. Foreign grain or rice brought into any port of China in a ship of

the United States, and not landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

Art. XXII.—The tonnage duty on vessels of the United States shall be paid on

their being admitted to entry. Duties of import shall be paid on the discharge of the

4*

ICO TEEATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

goods, and duties of export on the lading of the same. When all sncli duties; shall

have b«;en paid, and not before, the Collector of Customs shall give a port-clearance,

and the Consul shall return the ship’s papers. The duties shall be paid to the shroffs

authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the same. Duties shall be paid and

received either in sycee silver or in foreign money, at the rate of the day. If the

Consul permits a ship to leave the port before the duties and tonnage dues are paid

he shall be held responsible therefor.

Art. XXIII.—When goods on board any merchant vessel of the United States

in port require to be transhipped to another vessel application shall be nude to the

Consul, who shall certify what is the occasion therefor to the Superintendent of

Customs, who may appoint officers to examine into the facts and permit the

transhipment. And if any goods be transhipped without written peimits, they shall

be subject to be forfeited to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXIV.—Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the

United States, the latter may seek redress in law ; and, on suitable representation being

made to the local authorities through the Consul, they will cause due examination hi

the premises, and take proper steps to compel satisfaction. And if citizens of the

United States be indebted to subjects of China, the latter may seek redress by

representation through the Consul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither

Government will hold itself responsible for such debts.

Art. XXV.—It shall be lawful for the officers or citizens of the United States to

employ scholars and people of any part of China, without distinction of ] ersohs, to

teach any of the languages of the Empire, and assist in literary la! ours, and the

persons so employed shall not for that cause be subject to any injury on the part

either of the Government or individuals; and it shall in like manner be lawful for

citizens of the United States to purchase all manner of books in China.

Art. XXVI.—Relations of peace and amity between the United Stat 'S and China

being established by this Treaty, and the vessels of the United States being admitted ,

to trade freely to and from the ports of China open to foreign commerce, it is further

agreed that, in case at any time hereafter China should be at wai with any foreign

nation whatever, and should lor that cause exclude such nation from entering her

ports, still the vessels of the United States shall none the less continue to pursue their

commerce in freedom and security, and to transport goods to and from the ports of

the belligerent Powers, full respect being paid'to the neutrality of the flag of the

United States, provided that the said flag shall not protect vessels engaged in the

transportation of officers or soldiers in the enemy’s service, nor shall said flag be

fraudulently used to enable the enemy’s ships, with their cargoes, to enter the ports

of China; but all such vessels so offending shall be subject.to forfeiture and confisca-

tion to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXVII.—All questions in regard to rights, whether of property 01 person,

arising between citizens of the United States in China, shall be subject to the

jurisdiction and be regulated by the authorities of their own government;. an i all

controversies occurring in China between citizens of the United States and the

subjects of any other government shall be regulated by the Treaties (*xistiug; between

the United States and such governments respectively, without interference on the

part of China.

Art. XXVIII.—If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address

any communication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they sh ill submit the

same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and

respectful, and the matter just and right, in which event he shall transmit the same

to the appropriate authorities for their consideration and action in ihe.premises. If

subjects of China have occasion to address the Consul of the United States they may

address him directly, at the same time they inform their own officers, representing the

case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if controversies arise

between citizens of the United Staies and subjects of China,.which cannot be amicably

settled otherwise, the same shall be examined and decided conformably to justice and

equity by the public officers of the two nations, acting in conjunction.. Tne extortion

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 101

of illegal fees is expressly proBIbited. Any peaceabTe persons are allowed to enter

the Court in order to interpret, lest injustice he doi e.

Art. XXIX—The principles of the Christian Religion, as professed by the

Protestant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do r,ood

and to do to others as they would have others to do to them. Hereafter those”who*

quietly profess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on

account of their faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese

convert, who, according to those tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles

of Christianity, shall in no case be interfered with or molested.

Art. XXX.—The contracting parties hereby agree that should at any time the

Ta-Tsing Empire grant to any nation, or the merchants or citizens of any nat;on, any

right, privilege, or favour, connected either with navigation, commerce, political or

other intercourse, wl.ich is not conferred by this Treaty, such right, privilege, and

favour shall at once freely enure to the benefit of the United States, its public officers

merchants, and citizens.

The present Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce shall be ratified by the

President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate,

within one year, or sooner, if possible, and by the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing’

Empire forthwith; and the ratifications shall be exchanged within one year from the

date of the signature thereof.

In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of the United States of

America and of the Ta-Tsing Empire, as aforesaid, have signed and sealed these

presents.

Done at Tientsin, this eighteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight and the Independence of the United States

of America the eighty-second, and in the eighth year of Hien Fung, fifth moon, and

eighth day.

William B. Reed.

Kweiliang.

Hwashana.

[Appended to the foregoing Treaty are Tariff and Rules identical with those

annexed to the British Treaty of Tientsin.]

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Washington

28th July, 1868

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 23rd A ovember, 1869

Whereas, since the conclusion of the Treaty b- tween the United States of America

and the Ta-Tsing Empire (China) of the 18th June, 1858, circumstances have

arisen showing the necessity of additional Articles thereto: the President of the

UnitedPlenipotentiaries:

their States and the August

to wit,Sovereign of the ofTa-Tsing

the President Empire

the United haveofnamed

States for

America,

William R. Seward, Secretary of State; and His Majesty the Emperor of China’

Anson Burlingame, accredited as his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo-

tentiary, and Chih-kang and Sun-chia-ku, of the second Chinese rank, associated

high Envoys and Ministers of his said Majesty; and the said Plenipotentiaries, after

having exchanged their full powers, found to be in due and proper form, have agreed

upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—-His Majesty the Emperor of China’ being of the opinion that in making

coficVssions to the citizens or subjects^ff^oreign Powers, ol the privilege of residing

102 ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

on certain tracts of land, or resorting to certain waters of that Empire, for purposes

of trade, lie has by no means relinquished his right of eminent domain or dominion

over the said lauds and waters, hereby agrees that no such concession or grant shall

be construed to give to any Power or party which may be at war with or hostile to

the United States, the right to attack the citizens of the United States, or their

property, within the said lands or waters: And the United States for themselves

hereby agree to abstain from offensively attacking the citizens or subjects of any

Power or party, or their property, with which they may be at war, on any such tract

of land or water of the said Empire. But nothing in this Article shall be construed

to prevent the United States from resisting an attack by any hostile Power or party

upon their citizens or their property.

It is further agreed that if any right or interest in any tract of land in China,

has been, or shall hereafter be, granted by the Government of China to the United

States or their citizens for purposes of trade or commerce, that grant shall in no

event be construed to divest the Chinese Authorities of their right of jurisdiction

over persons and property within said tract of land except so far as the right may

have been expressly relinquished by Treaty.

Art. II.—The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

believing that the safety and prosperity of commerce will thereby best be promoted,

agree that any privilege or immunity in respect to trade or navigation within the

Chinese dominions which may not have been stipulated for by Treaty, shall be subject

to the discretion of the Chinese Government, and may be regulated by it accordingly,

but not in a manner or spirit incompatible with the Treaty stipulations of the parties.

Art. HI.—The Emperor of China shall have the right to appoint Consuls at

ports of the United States, who shall enjoy the same privileges and immunities as

those which are enjoyed by public law and Treaty in the United States by the Consuls

of Great Britain and Bussia, or either of them.

Art. IV.—The 29th Article of the Treaty of the 18th June, 1858, having stipulated

for the exemption of the Christian citizens of the United Slates and Chinese converts

from persecution in China on account of their faith, it is further agreed that citizens

of the United States in China of every religious persuasion, and Chinese subjects in

ftie United States, shall enjoy entire liberty of conscience, and shall be exempt from

all disability or persecution on account of their religious faith or worship in either

country. Cemeteries for sepulture of the dead, of whatever nativity or nationality,

shall be held in respect and free from disturbance or profanation.

Art. V.—The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially

recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance,

and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens

and subjects respectively from the one country to the other for the purposes of curiosity,

of trade, or as permanent residents. The high contracting parties, therefore, join in

reprobating anv other than an entirely voluntary emigration for these purposes.

They consequently agree to pass laws, making it a penal offence for a citizen of the

United States, or a Chinese subject, to take Chinese subjects either to the United

States or to any other foreign country; or for a Chinese subject or citizen of the

United States to take citizens of the United States to China, or to any other foreign

country, without their free and voluntary consent respectively.

Art. VI.—Citizens of the United States visiting or residing in China shall enjoy

the same privileges, immunities, or exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may

there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. And,

reciprocally, Chinese subjects visiting or residing in the United States shall enjoy

the same privileges, immunities, and exemptions in respect to travel or residence as

may there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. But

nothing herein contained shall be held to confer naturalization upon citizens of the

United States in China, nor upon the subjects of China in the United States.

Art. VII.—Citizens of the United States shall enjoy all the privileges of the

public educational institutions under the control of the Government of China ; and,

reciprocally, Chinese subjects shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREA TIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 103

institutions under the control of the Government of the United States, which are

enjoyed in the respective countries by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured

nation. The citizens of the United States may freely establish and maintain schools

within the Empire of China at those places where foreigners are by Treaty permitted

to reside; and, reciprocally, Chinese subjects may enjoy the same privileges and

immunities in the United States.

Art. VTII.—The United States, always disclaiming and discouraging all prac-

tices of unnecessary dictation and intervention by one nation in the affairs or domestic

administration of another, do hereby freely disclaim and disavow any intention or

right to intervene in the domestic administration of China in regard to the construc-

tion of railroads, telegraphs, or other material internal improvements. On the other

hand, His Majesty the Emperor of China reserves to himself the right to decide the

time and manner and circumstances of introducing such improvements within his

dominions. With this mutual understanding it is agreed by the contracting parties

that, if at any time hereafter his Imperial Majesty shall determine to construct, or

cause to be constructed, works of the character mentioned within the Empire, and

shall make application to the United States or any other Western Power for facilities

to carry out that policy, the United States will in that case designate or authorize

suitable engineers to be employed by the Chinese Government, and will recommend

to other nations an equal compliance with such applications; the Chinese Government

in that case protecting such engineers in their persons and property, and paying

them a reasonable compensation for their services.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and

thereto affixed the seals of their arms.

Done at Washington, the twenty-eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

[l.s.] (Signed) William H. Seward. [l.s.] (Signed) Chih Kang,

[l.s.] „ Anson Burlingame. [l.s.] „ Sun Chiaku.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN

THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, in the English and Chinese Languages,

on the 17th November, 1880

The Immigration Treaty

Whereas, in the eighth year of Hieu Fung, Anno Domini 1868, a Treaty of Peace

and Friendship was concluded between the United States of America and China, and

to which were added in the seventh year of Tung Chi, Anno Domini 1868, certain

supplementary Articles to the ad vantage ofr both parties, which supplementary Articles

were to be perpetually observed and obe} ed; and

Whereas the Government of the United States, because of the constantly in-

creasing immigration of Chinese labourers to the territory of the United States, and

the embarrassments consequent upon such immigration, now desires to negotiate a

modification of the existing Treaties which will not be in direct contravention of their

spirit; now, therefore, the President of the United States of America appoints James

B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of

South Carolina, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty

the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member ofHis Imperial Majesty’s

Privy Council and Superintendent of the Board of Civil Office, and Li Hung Tsao, a

member of His Imperial Majesty’s Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipo-

tentiary ; and the said Commissioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined

104 IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN TFIE IT. S. & CHINA

their full powers, and, having discussed the points of possible modifications in existing

Treaties, have agreed upon the following Articles in modification :—

Art. I.—Whenever, in the opinion of the Government of the United States, the

coming of Chinese labourers to the United States, or their residence therein, affects,

or threatens to affect, the interests of that country, or to endanger the good order of

any locality within the territory thereof, the Government of China agrees that the

Government of the United States may regulate, limit, or suspend such coming or

residence, but may not absolutely prohibit it. The limitation or suspension shall be

reasonable, and shall apply only to Chinese who may go to the United States as

labourers, other classes not being included m the limitation. Legislation in regard

to Chinese labourers will be of such a character only as is necessary to enforce the

regulation, limitation, or suspension, of immigration, and immigrants shall not be

subject to personal maltreatment or abuse.

Art. II.—Chinese subjects, whether proceeding to the United States as traders

or students, merchants, or from curiosity, together with their body and household

servants, and Chinese labourers who are now in the United States shall be allowed

to go and come of their own free will and accord and shall be accorded all the rights,

privileges, immunities, and exemptions which are accorded to the citizens and subjects

of the most favoured nations.

Art. III.—If Chinese labourers, or Chinese of any other class, now either

permanently or temporarily residing in the territory of the United States, meet with

ili-treatment at the hands of any other persons, the Government of the United States

will exert all its power to devise measures for their protection, and secure to them the

same rights, privileges, immunities and exemptions as may be enjoyed by the citizens

or subjects of the most favoured nation, and to which they are entitled by Treaty.

Art. IV.—The high contracting Powers, having agreed upon the foregoing

Articles, whenever the Government of the United States shall adopt legislative

measures in accordance therewith, such measures will be communicated to the

Government of China, and if the measures, as effected, are found to work hardship

upon the subjects of China, the Chinese Minister at Washington may bring the

matter to the notice of the Secretary of State of the United States, who will consider

the subject with him, and the Chinese Foreign Office may also bring the matter to

the notice of the U.S. Minister at Peking and consider the subject with him, to the

end that mutual and unqualified benefit may result. In faith whereof, the Plenipo-

tentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking, in English and Chinese,

there being three originals of each text of even tenor and date, the ratifications of

which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking, this 17th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand

eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

Signed ai d sealed by the above-named Commissioners of both Governments.

The Commeecial Treaty

The President of the United States of America and His Imperial Majesty the

Emperor of China, because of certain points of incompleteness in the existing Treaties

between the two Governmen s, have named as their Commissioners Plenipotentiary:

The President of the United States of America, James P>. Angell, of Michigan; John

F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Com-

missioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has

appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty’s Privy Council and Super-

intendent of the Board of Civil Office; and Li Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial

Majesty’s Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and the said Com-

missioners Pienipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having

discussed the pomts of possible modification in existing Treaties, have agreed upon

the following Additional Articles:—-

Art. I—The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the

benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order to still further promote such

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA 105

relation between tbe citizens and subjects of the two Powers, mutually agree to give

the most careful and favourable attention to the representations of either as such

special extension of commercial i tercourse as either m iy desire.

Art. II.—The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree

and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to impox-t opium in any

of the ports of the United States, and citizens of the United States shall not be

permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China, or transport from one

open port to any other open poi’t, or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports in

China. This absolute prohibition, which extends to vessels owned by the citizens

or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned

by the citizens or subjects of either Power and employed by other persons for the

transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of

China and the United States, and the benefits of the favoured nation clauses in

existing Treaties shall not be claimed by the cit'zens or subjects of either Power as

against the provisions of this Article.

Art. III.—His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and

agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports or ex-

ports or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon

vessels wholly belonging to citizens of t; e United States, or upon the produce, manu-

factures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States, or from any

foreign country, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the

same to the United States, or any foreign country, or transported in the same from

one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levied on vessels or cargoes

of any other ration, or on those of Chinese subjects. The United States hereby pro-

mises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage duties and dues for

imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels

wholly belonging to the subjects of his Imperial Majesty, coming either directly or

by way of any foreign port from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign

trade to the ports of the United States, or returning therefrom either directly or by

way of any foreign port to any of the open ports of China, or upon the produce,

manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China, or from any foreign

country, than ax’e imposed or levied on vessels of any other nations which make no

discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports,

exports, or coastwise trade, than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of

citizens of the United States.

Art. IV.—When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of

tbe United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined

and decided by the public officer of the two nations, it is agreed between the

(Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the

proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official

of the plaintiff’s nationality shall be fieely permitted to attend the trial, and shall

be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper

facilities for watching the proceedings in the interest of justice, and if he so desire

he shall have the right to be pi'esent and to examine and to cross-examine witnesses.

If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall be permitted to protest against

them in debate. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer

trying the case.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed the

foregoing, at Peking, in English and Chinese, there being three originals of each text,

of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within

one year from the date of its execution.

Hone at Peking, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

(Signed) James B. Angell. (Signed) Pao Chon.

„ John F. Swift. ,, Li Httng-tsao.

„ William H. Tbescott.

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE

UNITED STATES OE AMERICA AND CHINA, 1894

Ratifications Exchanged at Washington, 7th December, 1894

Whereas, on the 17th of November, a.d. 1880, and of Kwang Hsu, the sixth

year, the tenth month, and the 15th day, a Treaty was concluded between the United

States and China for the purpose of regulating, limiting, or suspending the coming

of Chinese labourers to and their residence in the United States, and, whereas the

Government of China, in view of the antagonism and much deprecated and serious

disorders to which the presence of Chinese labourers has given rise in certain parts

of the United States, desires to prohibit the emigration of such labourers from

China to the United States; and, whereas the two Governments desire to co-operate

in prohibiting such emigration and to strengthen in many other ways the bonds of

relationship between the two countries; and, whereas the two Governments are desirous

of adopting reciprocal measures for the better protection of the citizens or subjects

of each within the jurisdiction of the other; now, therefore, the President of the

United States has appointed Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State, as his

Plenipotentiary, and his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed

Yang Yui, Officer of the Second Rank, Sub-director of the Court of Sacrificial

Worship and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and the said

Plenipotentiaries having exhibited their respective full powers, found to be in due

form and good faith, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—The high contracting parties agree that for a period of ten years

beginning with the date of the ratifications of this Convention, the coming, except

under the conditions hereinafter specified, of Chinese labourers to the United States

shall be absolutely prohibited.

Art. II.—The preceding Article shall not apply to the return to the United

States of any registered Chinese labourer who has a lawful wife, child, or parent in

the United States or property therein of the value of #1,000, or debts of like amount

due to him and pending settlement. Nevertheless, every such Chinese labourer

shall, before leaving the United States, deposit, as a condition of his return, with

the Collector of Customs of the district from which he departs, a full description in

writing of his family or property or debts as aforesaid, and shall be furnished by

the said Collector with such certificate of his right to return under this Treaty as

the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe, and not inconsistent

with the provisions of the Treaty; and should the written description aforesaid be

proved to be false, the rights of return thereunder, or of continued residence after

return, shall in each case be forfeited. And such right of return to the United

States shall be exercised within one year from the date of leaving the United

States; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an

additional period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness or

other cause of disability beyond his control such Chinese labourer shall be rendered

unable sooner to return, which facts shall be fully reported to the Chinese Consul

at the port of departure, and by him certified to the satisfaction of the Collector of

the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no

such Chinese labourer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea

without producing to the proper officer of the Customs the return certificate herein

required.

IMMIGKATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE U. S, & CHINA 107

Art. III.—The provisions of the Convention shall not affect the right at present

enjoyed by Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants, or.

travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not labourers, of coming to the United

States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese subjects as ai e above described

to admission into the United States they may produce a certificate either from their

Government or from the Government of the country where they last resided, vised

by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the country or

port whence they depart. It is also agreed that Chinese labourers shall continue

to enjoy the privilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the

course of their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations by

the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent the said

privilege of transit from being abused.

Art. IY.—In pursuance of Article III. of the Immigration Treaty between the

United States ai d China, signed at Peking on the 17th day of November, 1880, it is

hereby understood and agreed, that Chinese labourers or Chinese of any other class,

either permanently or tt mporarily residing in the United States, shall have for the

protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the

United States to citizens of the more favoured nations, excepting the right to

become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms

its obligations, as stated in the said Article III., to exert all its power to secure the

protection to person and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

Art. Y.—The Government of the United States having, by an Act of Congress,

approved May 5th, 1892, as amended and approved November 3rd, 1893, required all

Chinese labourers lawfully within the United States, before the passage of the

first-named Act, to be registered, as in the said Acts provided, with a view of

affording them better protection, the Chinese Government will not object to the

enforcement of the said Acts, and reciprocally the Government of the United States

recognises the right of the Government of China to enact and enforce similar laws

and regulations, for the registration, free of charge of all labourers, skilled or

unskilled (not merchants, as defined by the said Acts of Congress), citizens of the

United States in China whether residing within or without the Treaty Ports. And

the Government of the United States agrees that within twelve months from the

date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention, and annually thereafter,

it will furnish to the Government of China registers or reports showing the full

name, age, occupation, and number or place of residence of all other citizens of the

United States, including missionaries residing both within and without the Treaty

Ports of China, not including, however, diplomatic and other officers of the United

States residing or travelling in China upon official business, together with their

body and household servants.

Art. VI. —This Convention shall remain in force for a period of ten years,

beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications, and if six months before

the expiration of the said period of ten years neither Government shall have formally

given notice of its final termination to the other, it shall remain in full force for

another like period of ten years.

In faith whereof, we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this

Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done, in duplicate, at Washington, the 17th day of March, a.d. 1894.

Walter Q. Gresham,

Secretary of State.

Yang Yui,

Chinese Minister to the United States.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

Signed at Shanghai, 8tH October, 1903

[Translation]

The TJuited States of ‘America and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being:

animated by an earnest desire to extend farther the commercial relations between

them and otherwise to promote the interests of the peoples of the two countries, in

view of the provisions of the first paragraph of Article XI. of the Final Protocol

signed at Peking on the 7th day of September, a.d. 1901, whereby the .Chinese Gov-

ernment agreed to negotiate the amendments deemed necessary by the foreign-

Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and Navigation and other subjects concern-

ing commercial relations, with the object of facilitating them, have for that purpose

named as their Plenipotentiaries:—

The United St des of America, Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to China; John Goodnow,

Consul-General of the United States of America at Shanghai, John F. Seaman, a

Citizen of the United States of America resident at Shanghai;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Lu Pai-huan, President of the Board

of Public Works: Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent^

formerly Senior Vice President of the Board of Public Works; Wu Ting Fang,

Senior Vice-President of the Board of Commerce;

Who, having met and duly exchanged their full powers, which were found to be

in proper form, have agreed upon the following amendments to existing Treaties of

Commerce and Navigation previously concluded between the two countries, and upon

the subjects hereinafter expressed connected with commercial relations, with the

object of facilitating them.

Art. I.—In accordance with international custom, and as the diplomatic

representative of China has the right to reside in the Capital of the United States,

and to enjoy there the same prerogatives, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed

by the similar representative of the most favoured nation, the diplomatic representa-

tive of the United States shall have the right to reside at the capital of His Majesty

the Emperor of China. He shall be given audience of His Majesty the Emperor

whenever necessary to present his letters of credence or any communication from the

President of the United States. At all such times he shall be received in a place

and in a manner befitting his high position, and on all such occasions tbe ceremonial

observed toward him shall be that observed toward the representatives of nations on

a footing of equality, with no loss of prestige on either side.

The diplomatic representatives of the United States shall enjoy all the preroga-

tives, privileges and immunities accorded by international usage to such representatives,

and shall in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar representatives

of the most favoured nation.

The English text of all notes or despatches from United States officials to

Chinese officials, and the Chinese text of all notes or despatches from Chinese officials

to United States officials shall be authoritative.

Art. II.—As China may appoint consular officers to reside in the United States

and to enjoy there the same attributes, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed by

consular officers of other nations, the United States may appoint, as its interests may

_ 'CoitivCEEClAL TREATY tj'viTiEt)‘gTATEs' AND CHINA 109

require, consular ofiicers to reside at the places in the Empire of China tha are ijotv

or,.that niay hereafter be opened to- foreign residence and trade. 'They shall hold

direct bffiicial intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the ( hinese

Government within their consular di^tr cts, either personally or in writing as the case

may squire, on terms of equality a d reciprocal respect. These officers .-hail be

treated with proper res; ect.by all Chinese authorities, and they shall enjoy all the

attributes,, privileges and immunities, and exercise all the jurisdiction over their

nationals which are or n/ay hereafter be exten led to similar officers of the nation the

piost favoured in these respects. If the officers of either Government are disrespect-

fully treated of aggrieved in any way by the authorities of the other, they shall have

the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of their own

Government, whi shall see t at full inquiry and strict justice be had in the promises.

And the said consular officers'of either nation shall carefully, avoid all acts of offence

to the officers and people of the other nation.

On the arrival of a Consul propefly accredited at any place in China opened to

foreign trade, if shall be the duty of the Minister of the Unite i States to inform the

Board of Foreign Affairs, which shall, in accordance with international usage, forth-

with cause the aiie recognition of the said Consul and grant him authority to act.

Ar';, ILL—Citizens,of the United States may frequent, re :d*\ and carry on trade,

industries and manufactures, or pursue any lawful avocation in all the ports or

localities of China which are now open or may hen after be opened to foreign trade

and residence; an 1, within the suitable 'Idealities at tho-e places which have been or

may be set apart for the use uud occupation of foreigners, they may rent or purchase

houses, places of Business and other buildings, arid rent or lease in perpetuity land

and build thereon. They shall generally enjoy as to their persons find property all

such rights, privileges and immunities as are or may hereaf er be granted to the

su|>j cts or citizens of the nation the most favoured in these respects.

Art.'iy,—The Chinese Government, recognising that the existing system of

levying dues on goods in transit, and especially the system of taxation known as

lekin, impedes the free circulation of commodities to the general injury of trade,

hereby undertakes to abandon the levy of leMn and all other transit dues throughout

the empire and to abolish the offices, stations and barriers maintained for their

collection arid not to establish other offices for levying dues on goods in transit.

It is clearly understood that, after the offices, stati.-ns and barriers for taxing goods

in transit have been abolislied, no attempt shall be made to re-establish them in any

form or under any pretext whatsoever. ,

The Government of the United States, in return, consents to allow a smtax, in

eycess of the tariff rates for the time being in force, to be imposed on foreign goods

iriiported by citizens of the United -Mates and On Chinese produce deotiued for export

abroa 1 or coastwise. It is clearly understood that in no case shall the surtax on

foreign imports exceed one and one-half times the import duty leviable in terms of

the final Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the seventh day i f September,

a d. 1901; that the payment of the import duty and surtax shall secure for foreign

imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or foreigners, in original packages or other-

wise, coinp'ete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay; that the total

amount ol taxation, inclusive of the tariff export duty leviable on native produce for

export abroad, shall, under no circumstances, exceed seven and one-half per cent.

ad valorem. ■ .

Nothing in this Article Is intended

to levy such other taxes as are not in conflict with its provisions

Keeping these fund imeptal principles in view, the high contracting parties

have agreed upon the following method of procedure:

The Chinese Government undertakes that all offices, stations and barriers of

whatsoever kind for collecting lekin, da les, or such like dues on goods in transit, shall

be permanen ly aJbolished on all roads, railways and waterways in the nineteen

Provinpes of China and the three Eastern Provinces. This provision does not apply

to the native Customs offices at present irt existence on the seaboard, at open ports

110 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEX UNITED STATES AND CHINA

where there are offices of the Imperial Maritime Customs, and on the land trontiers

of China embracing the nineteen Provinces and the three Eastern Provinces.

Wherever there are offices of the Imperial Maritime Customs, or wherever such

may be hereafter placed, native Customs offices may also be established-,.as well .as at

any point either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

The Government of the United States agrees that foreign goods on importa-

tion, in addition to the effective five per cent, import duty as provided for in the

Protocol of 1901, shall pay a special surtax of one and one-half times the amount of

the said duty to compensate for the abolition of lehin, of other transit dues besides

lekin, and of all other taxation on foreign goods and in consideration of the other

reforms provided for in this Article.

The Chinese Government may re-cast the foreign export tariff with specific

duties as far as practicable, on a scale not exceeding five per cent, ad valorem; but

existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months’ notice has been

given. In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent., they shall

be reduced to not more than that rate. A'1 additional special surtax of one-half the

export duty payable for the time being, in lieu of internal taxation of all kinds, may

be levied at the place of original shipment, or at the time of export on goods exported

either to foreign countries or coastwise.

Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the

Customs officers, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each pack-

age, on the payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in

the interior.

Native goods brought by junks to open ports, if intended for local consumption,

irrespective of the nationality of the o vner of the goods, shall be reported at the

native Customs offices only, to he dealt with according to the fiscal regulations of the

Chinese Government.

Machine-made cotton yarn and cloth manufactured in China, whether by foreigners

at the open ports or by Chinese anywhere in China, shall as regards taxation be

on a footing of perfect equality. Such goods upon payment of the taxes thereon

shall be granted a rebate of the import duty and of two-thirds of the import suitax

paid on the cotton used in their manufacture, if it has been imported from abroad,

and of all duties paid thereon if it be Chinese grown cotton. They shall also be free

of export duty, coast-trade duty and export surtax. The same principle and pro-

cedure shall be applied to all other products of foreign type turned out by machinery

in China.

A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs foreign staff shall be

selected by the Governors-General and Governors of each of the various provinces of

the Empire for their respective provinces, and appointed in consultation with the

Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, for duty in connection with native

Customs affairs to have a general supervision of their working.

Cases where illegal action is complained of by citizens of the United States shall

be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently high

rank, in conjunction with an officer of the United States Government, and an officer

of the Imperial Maritime Customs, each of sufficient standing; and, in the event of

it being found by the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and

loss has been incurred, due compensation shall be paid through the Imperial Mari-

time Customs. The high provincial officials shall be held responsible that the officer

guilty of the illegal action shall tie severely punished and removed from his post. If

the complaint is shown to be frivolous or malicious, the complainant shall be held

responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

When the ratifications of this Treaty shall have been exchanged by the high

contracting pat ties hereto, and the provisions of this Article shall have been accepted

by the Powers having Treaties with China, then a date shall be agreed upon when

the provisions of this Article shall take effect, and an Imperial Edict shall be

published in due form on yellow paper and circulated throughout the Empire of

China setting forth the abolition of all lekin taxation, duties on goods in transit,

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA III

offices, stations and barriers for collecting the same, and of all descriptions of internal

taxation on foreign goods, and the imposition of the surtax on the import of foreign

goods and on the export of native goods, and the other fiscal changes and reforms

provided for in this Article, all of which shall take eifeit from the said date. The

Edict shall state that the provincial high officials are responsible that any official

disregarding the letter or the spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and

removed from his post.

Art. Y.—The tariff duties to be paid by citizens of the United States on goods

imported into China shall be as set forth in the schedule annexed hereto and made

part of this Treaty, subject only to such amendment and changes as are authorised

by Article iy. of the present Convention, or as may hereafter be agreed upon by the

present high contracting parties. It is expressly agreed, however, that citizens of

the United States shall at no time pay other or higher duties than those paid hy the

citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Conversely, Chinese subjects shall not pay higher du'ies on their imports into the

United States than those paid by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Art. VI.—The Grovernment of China agrees to the establishment by citizens of the

United States of warehouses approved by the proper Chinese authorities as bonded

watehouses at the several open ports of China, for storage, re-packing, or preparation

for shipment of lawful goods, subject to such needful regulations for the protection

of the revenue of China, including a reasonable scale of fees according to com-

modities, distance from the Custom-house, and hours of working, as shall be made

from time to time by the proper officers of the Government of China.

Art. VII.—The ( hinese Government, recognising that it is advantageous for

the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign

as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterpris< s, agiees, within one year

from the signing of this Treaty, to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing

mining legulations. To this end China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go

into the whole question of mining rules; and, selecting from the rules of the United

States and other countries, regulations which seem applicable to the condition of

China, will recast its present mining rules in such a way as, while promoting the

interests of Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of

China, will offer no impediment to the attraction of foreign capital nor place foreign

capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted

foreign regulations ; and will permit citizens of the United States to carry on in

Chinese territory mining operations and other necessary business relating thereto,

provided thry comply with the new regulations and conditions which may be imposed

by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the

renting of mineral land, and the payment of royalty, and provided they apply for

permits, the provisions of which in regard to necessary business relating to such

operat ons shall be observed. The residence of citizens of the United States in

connection with such mining operations shall be subject to such regulations as shall

be agreed upon between the United States and China.

Any mining concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be

subject to their provisions.

Art. VIII.—Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the

Imperial Maritime Customs to citizens of the United States within three weeks of

the presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive such

drawback certificates, and they shall be .receivable at their face value in payment of

duties of all kinds (tonnage dues excepted) at the port of issue; or shall, in the case

of drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported w'ithin three years from the date of

importation, be redeemable by the Imperial Maritime Customs in full in ready money

at the port of issue, at the option of the holders thereof. But if, in connection with

any application for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an

attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant shall be dealt with and punished in

accordance with the stipulations provided in the Treaty of Tientsin, Article XXL, in

the case of detected frauds on the revenue. In case the goods have been removed

112 COMMERCIAL TREATY UETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

from Chinese terntoyv. then tiie Coiisiil shall inflict on the guilty party a fine to be

paid.to the ^inneBe G-oyernment.

Art. IX.—VVhereas the tlnited States undertakes to protect the, citizens of any

country in th,e exclusive use within the United States of any lawful trade-marks,

provided that such country agrees by Treaty or; Convention to give like protection to;

citizens pf. tl^e United .States : ..

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such protection in the

United States for its^ subjects, now agrees to fully protect any citizen, firm or corpora-

tion of the United States in the exclusive use in the Empire of China of any lawful

trade-mark to.the exclusive use of wlmh they are entitled in the United States, or

which they hava adopted and used, or intend to adopt and use as soon as registered*

for exclusive use within the;Empire of China. To this end the Chinese Government

agrees to issue byiits proper authorjtes proclamations having the: force: of law, for-

bidding all subjects of China from infringing on,, imitating, colourably imitating^ or

knowingly passing off an imitation of trade-marks belonging to citizens of therUnited

States, which shall have been registered by the proper authorities of the United States'

at such offices as the Chinese Government will establish for such purpose, on payment

of a reasonable fee, after due investigation by the Chinese: authorities, and in com-

pliance with reasonable regulations.

Art. X.—The United States Government allows subjects of China to patent their

inventions in.the United States and pn tects them in the use and ownership' of sufeh

patents. The Government of China now agrees that it wifl establish a.Patent Office.,

After this office has been establisiied and special lalvs with regard to, inventions have

been adopted it1 will thereupon, after the payment of fhe legal fees, issue certificates1

of protection, valid for a fixed term of years, to citizens of the United States oh a !

their patents issued by the United States, in respect of articles the sale of which is

lawful in China, which do not infringe on previous inventions of Chinese subjects,

in the same manner as patents are to be issued to subjects of China.

Art. XI.—Whereas the Government of the United States engages to save ihe

benefits of its copyright laws to the citizens of any foreign State which gives to the

citizens of the United States the benefits of copyrights on an equal baisis.with its own

citizens:—

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such benefits in the United

States for its subjects, now agrees to give full protection, in the same way and

manner and subject to the same conditions upon which it agrees to protect trade-

marks, to all citizens: of the United States who are authors, designers or proprietors

of any book, map, print or engraving especially prepared for the use and education

of the Chinese people, or translation into Chinese of any book, in the exclusive right

to print and sell such book, map, print, engraving or translation in the Empire of

China during ten years from the date of registration. With the exception of the

books, maps, etc., specified above, which may not be reprinted in the same form, no

work shall be entitled to copyright privileges under this Article. It is understood that

Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to make, print and sell original translations into

Chinese of any works written or of maps compiled by a citizen of the United states.

This Article shall not be held to protect against due process of law any citizen of the

United States or Chinese subject who may be author, proprietor or seller of any

publication calculated to injure the well-being of China.

Art. XU.—The Chinese Government haying in 1898 opened the navigable

inland waters of the Empire to commerce by all steam vessels, native or foreign, that

may be specially registered for the purpose, fot the conveyance of passengers and ,

lawful merchandise, citizens, firms and corporations of the United States may engage .

in,such commerce on equal terms with those granted to subjects of any foreign Power.

In, case either party hereto considers it advantageous at any time that the rules

and regulations then in existence for such commerce be altered or amended^, the

Chinese- Government, agrees to c onsider, amicably, and to adopt such, modifications

thereof, as are,found necessary fpr trade ^nd for the benefit of, China.

COMMERCIAL TREATY .BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA 113

- r".: Tlie Chinese Government, agrees that, upon the exchange of the ratifications of

i this Treaty,Mukden and Antung, both in the province of.Sheng-king, will be opened

vx by China, itsVl'f; as places of international residence and trade. The selection of

fitting localities to be set apart for international use and occupation; and the regula-

oi; tions for these places set apart for foreign residence and.trade shall be agreed upon

d by the Governments of the TJuited States and China after consultation together,

g Art. XIII.—China agrees to take, the necessary steps to provide for a uniform

nr national coinage wdueh shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other

dc obliga'ions throughput the Kmpire of China by the citizens, of the IJnited States as

n well as Chinese subjects. It is understood, however, that all Customs duties shall

oi continue to be calculaL.d and paid on the basis of the Haikuan Tael.

Art. XIY.—The principles of the Christian religion, as professed by the Pro-

3® tbstant and Eoman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good

uA and to do to others as they would have others do to them. Those who quietly pro-

ioI fess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on account of their

H faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese convert, who,

o| according to these tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles of Chris-

iJ tianity shall in no case be interfered with or molested therefor. No restrictions shall

ad be placed on Chinese joining Christian Churches. Converts and non-converts, being

[1 Chinese subjects, shall alike conform to the laws of China; and shall pay due respect

oil to those in authority, living together in peace and amity; and the fact of being con-

3B verts shall not protect .them from the consequences, of any offence they may have com-

rq mitted before or may commit after their admission into the Church, or exempt them

■pj from paying legal taxes levied on Chinese subjects generally,.except taxes levied and

oj| contributions for the support of religious customs and; practices contrary to their

religion. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by the native authorities

Ip of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects; nor shall the native authorities make any

■ b distinction between converts and non-converts, but shall administer the laws without

i«Ji partiality so that both classes can live together in peace.

Missionary societies of the United States shall be permitted to rent and to lease

ix in perpetuity, as the property of such societies, buildings or lands in all parts of the

3. Empire for missionary purposes and, after the title deeds have been found in order

rfi and duly stamped by the local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be

required for carrying on their good work.

Art. XV.—The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform

ti its judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, the

United States agrees to give every assistance to this reform, and will also be prepared to

>| relinquish extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the

s arrangements for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XVI.—The Government of the United States consents to the prohibition

d by the Government of China of the importation into China of morphia and of instru-

ct; ments for its injection, excepting morphia and instruments for its injection imported

>! for medical purposes, on payment of tariff duty, and under regulations to be framed1

11 by China which shall effectually restrict the use of such import to the said purposes.

F This prohibition shall be uniformly applied to such importat’on from all countries.

P' The Chinese Government engages to adopt at once measures to prevent the manu-

k faeture in China of morphia and of instruments for its injection.

Art. XVII.—It is agreed between the high contracting parties hereto that all

f the provisions of the several Treaties between the United States and China which

r were in force on the first day of January, a.d. 1900, are continued in full force and

J effect except in so far as they are modified by the present Treaty or other Treaties to

r which the United States is a party.

- The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years beginning with

1 the date of the exchange of ratifications and until a revision is effected as hereinafter

|« provided.

It is further agreed that either of the high contracting parties may demand

t that the Tariff and the Articles of this Convention be xevised at the end of ten years

114 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

from the date of the exchange of the ratifications hereof. If no revision is demanded

before the end of the first term of ten years, then these articles in their present form

shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years reckoned from the end of

the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

The English and Chinese texts of the present Treaty and its three Annexes have

been carefully compared; but, in the event of there being ary difference of meaning

betueen them, Ihe sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the

correct one.

This Treaty and its three Annexes shall be ratifie 1 by the two high contracting

parties in conformity with their respective constitutions, and the ratifications shall

be exchanged in Washington not later than twelve months from the present date.

In testimony whereof, we, the undersigned, by virtue of our respective powers,

have signed this Treaty in duplicate in the English and Chinese languages, and have

affixed our respective seals.

Done at Shanghai, this eighth day of October in the year of our Lord one

thousand nine hundred and three, and in the twenty.ninth year of Kuang Hsii eighth

month and eighteenth day.

Annex I.

As citizens of the United States are already forbidden by Treaty to deal in or

handle opium, no mention has been made in this Treaty of opium taxation.

As the trade in salt is a Government monopoly in China, no mention has been

made in this Treaty of salt taxation.

It is, however, understood, after full discussion and consideration, that the col-

ection of inland duties on opium and salt and the means for the protection of the

revenue therefrom and for preventing illicit traffic therein are left to be administered

by the Chinese Government in such manner as shall in no wise interfere with the

provision of Article IV. of tins Treaty regarding the unobstructed transit of other

goods.

Annex II.

Article IV. of the Treaty of Commerce between the United States and China of this

date provides for the retention of the native Customs offices at the open ports. For the

purpose of safeguarding the revenue of China at such places, it is understood that the

Chinese Government shall be entitled to establish and maintain such branch native

Customs offices at each open port within a reasonable distance of the main native

Customs offices at the port, as shall be deemed by the authorities of the Imperial

Maritime Customs at that port necessary to collect the revenue from the trade into

and out of such port. Such branches, as well as the principal native Customs offices

at each open port, shall be administered by the Imperial Maritime Customs as pro-

vided by the Protocol of 1901.

Annex III.

The schedule of tariff duties on imported goods annexed to this Treaty under

Article V. is hereby mutually declared to be the schedule agreed upon between the

representatives of China and of the United States and signed by John Goodnow for

the United States and Their Excellencies Lii Hai-huan and Sheng Hsuan-huai for

China at Shanghai on the sixth day of September, a.d. 1902, according to the Proto-

col of the seventh day of September, a.d. 1901.

PORTUGAL

iPROTOCOL, TREATY, CONVENTION AND AGREEMENT

BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

Art. I.—A Treaty of Friendship and Commerce with the most favoured nation

-clause will be concluded and signed at Peking.

Art. II.—China confirms perpetual occupation and government of Macao and

its dependencies by Portugal, as any other Portuguese possession.

Art. III.—Portugal engages never to alienate Macao and its dependencies without

Agreement with China.

Art. IV.—Portugal engages to co-operate in opium revenue work at Macao in the

*6ame way as England in Hongkong.

Done at Lisbon, the 26th March, 1887.

Henrique de Barros Gomes.

James Duncan Campbell.

The Treaty

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking 2%th April, 1888

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, and His

Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to draw closer and to consolidate the

4ies of friendship which have subsisted for more than three hundred years between

Portugal and China, and having agreed in Lisbon on the 26th day of March, 1887, 2nd

day of 6rd moon of the 13th year of the reign of the Emperor Kwang Hsu, through

their representatives, on a Protocol of four Articles', Kave now resolved to conclude a

Treaty of Amity and Commerce to regulate the relations between the two States;

for this end they have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal, Thomas de Souza Koza, his

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Peking, Knight of

the Order of Nossa Senhora de Conceicao de Villa Vicosa, Grand Cross of the Order of

the Rising Sun of Japan and of the Crown of Siam, Commander of the Order of Charles

II. and of Isabella the Catholic of Spain, and Knight of the Iron Crown of Austria ;

His Imperial Majesty tbe Emperor of China, His Highness Prince Ching, Pre-

sident of the Tsung-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior

Vice-President of the Board of Public Works;

Who, after Laving communicated to each other their respective full powers and

found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—There shall continue to exist constant peace and amity between His Most

Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China,

whose respective subjects shall equally enjoy in the dominions of the high c mtracting

parties the most complete and decided protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—China confirms in its entirety the second Article of'the Protocol of

Lisbon, relating to the perpetual occupation and government of Macao by Portugal.

It is stipulated that Commissioners appointed by both Governments shall proceed

to the delimitation of the boundaries, which shall be determined by a special Con-

vention ; but so long as the delimitation of the boundaries is not concluded, every-

thing in respect to them shall continue as at present, without addition, diminution, or

Alteration by either of the parties.

116 TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINa

Art. III.—Portugal confirms the third Article of t he Protocol of L’sbon, relating

to the engagement never to alienate Macao without previous agreement with China.

Art. IV.—Portugal agrees to co-operate with China in the collection of duties on

opium exported from Macao into China ports, in the same way and as long as England

co-operates wiih Gliina in the collection of duties on opiurn exported from Hongkong,

The basis of this co-operation will be established by a Convention appended to

this Treaty, which shall be as valid and binding to bo’h the high contracting parties

as the present Treaty.

Art. V.—His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint an

Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to the Court of His Im-

perial Majesty the Emperor of China, and this agent, as well as the persons of his

suite and their families, will be permitted, at the option of the Portuguese Govern-

ment, to reside permanently in Peking, to visit that Court, or to reside at any other

place where such residence is equally accorded to the diplomatic representative of other

nations. The Chinese Government may also, if it thinks fit, appoint an Ambassador,

Minister, dt other diplomatic agent to reside at Lisbon, or to visit that Court when

his Government shall order.

Art. VI.—The diplomatic agents of Portugal and China shall reciprocally enjoy

in the plada of theil* residence all the prerogatives and immunities accorded by the

laws of nations; their persons, families, and houses, as well as their correspondence

shall be inviolate.

Art. VII.—The official correspondence addressed by the Portuguese authorities to

the Chinese authorities shall be written in the Portuguese language accompanied by

a translation in Chinese, and each nation shall regard as authoritative the document

written in its own language.

Art. VIII.—The form of correspondence between the Portuguese and the Chi-

nese authorities will be regulated by their respective rank and position, based upon

complete reciprocity. Between the high Portuguese and Chinese functionaries at the

capital or elsewhere, such correspondence will take the form of dispatch (Chau-hoeiy,

between the subordinate functionaries of Portugal and the chief authorities of the

provinces, the former shall make use of the form of exposition (Xen-chen) and the

latter that of declaration (Chn-hsing) ; and the subordinate officers of both nations

shall correspond together on terms of perfect equality. Merchants and generally all

others who are not invested with an official character shall adopt, in addressing the

authorities, the form'of representation or petition (Pin-ching).

Art. IX.—His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint

Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consul*, or Consular Agents in the ports or

other places where it is allowed to other nations to have them. These functionaries

will have powers and attributes similar to those of the Consuls of other nations,

and will enjoy all the exemptions, privileges, and immunities which at any time the

consular functionaries of the most favoured nation may enjoy.

The Consuls and the local authorities will show to each other reciprocal civilities

and correspond with each other on terms of perfect equality.

The Consuls and acting Consuls w’ill rank with Taotais, Vice-Consuls, acting

Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and interpreters-translators, with Prefects. rI he

Consuls must be officials of the Portuguese Government, and not merchants. The

Chinese Government will make no objection in case the Portuguese Government

should deem it unnecessary to appoint an official Consul at any port and choose to

entrust a Consul of some other nation, for the time being, with the duties of Portu-

guese Consul at that port.

Art. X.—All the immunity's and privileges, as well as all the advantages con-

cerning commerce and navigation, such as any reduction in the duties of navigation,

importation, exportation, transit or any other, which may have been or may be here-

after granted by China to any other State or to its subjects, will be immediately extended

to Portugal and its subjects. If any concession is granted by the Chinese Govern-

ment to any foreign Government under special conditions, Portugal, on claiming the

TEEAT Y BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

;ume concession for herself and for her own subjects, will equally assent to the condi-

- aipns attached to it.

Art XL—Portuguese subjects are allowed to reside at, or frequent, the ports of

hina opened to foreign commerce and there carry on trade or employ themselves

• i&eely. Their boats may navigate without hindrance between the ports open to foreign

unimmerce, and they may import and export ther merchandise, enjoying all the rights

fad privileges enjoyed by the subjects of the most favoured nation.

1 Art. XII.—Portuguese subjects shall pay import and export duties on all mer-

tiMaandi- e according to the rates specified in the tariff of 1858, adopted for all the other

c Nations; and in no instance shall higher duties be exacted from them than those paid

i1 y the subjects of any other foreign nation.

- If. Art. XIII.—Portuguese subjects are permitted to hire any description of boats

ygaey may require for the conveyance of cargo or passengers, and the price of said hire-

Brill be fixed by the contracting parties alone, without interference by the Chinese

orovernment. No limit shall be put to the number of boats, neither will it be per-

Jlliitted to any one to establish a monopoly of such boats or of the service of coolies-

tqlmployed in the carriage (f merchandise.

Should contraband articles be on board any such boats, the guilty parties shall

(mediately be punished according to law.

Art. XIV.—Portuguese subjects residing in the open ports may take into their

rvrervice Chinese subjects, and employ them in any.lawful capacity in China, without

it estraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government; but shall not engage them for

i#6reign countries in-contravention of the laws of China.

Art. XV.—The Chinese authorities are bound to grant the fullest protection to-

aihe persons and to the property of Portuguese subjects in China, whenever they may

9|>e exposed to insult or wrong. In case of robbery or incendiarism, the local autho-

sfities will immediately take the necessary measures to recover the stolen property, to

ml erminate the disorder, to seize the guilty, and punish them according to the law.

raBimilar protection wdll be given by Portuguese authorities to Chinese subjects in the

asbossessions of Portugal.

Art. XVI.—Whenever a Portuguese subject intends to build or open houses,

joshops or .warehouses, churches, hospitals, or cemeteries, at the Treaty ports or at

jibthe r places, the purchase, rent, or lease of these properties shall be made out accord-

ging to the current terms of the place, with equity, without exaction on either side,

Ihwithout offending against the usages of the people, and after due notice given by the

p-proprietors to the local authority. It is understood, however, that the shops or ware-

ccnouses above mentioned shall only be allowed at the ports open to trade, and not in

rany place in the interior.

Art. XVII.—Portuguese subjects conveying merchandise between open ports

lixshall be required to take certificates from the Superintendent of Customs such as

mare specified in the regulations in force with reference to other nationalities.

But Portuguese subjects, who, without carrying merchandise, would like to go

*

fsigned by the local authorities. The bearer of the passport must produce the same

when demanded, and the passport not being irregular, he will be allowed to proceed

Hand no opposition shall be offered, especially to his hiring persons or vessels for the

licarriage of his baggage or merchandise.

If he be without a passport, or if he commits any offence against the law, he

d shall bo handed over to the nearest Consul of Portugal to be punished, but he must

not be subjected to an oppressive measure. No passport need be applied for by

i9(.persons goirg on excursn-ns from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding:

100 li and for a period not exceeding five days.

|l:v

1 of whom The regulations

provisions ofwillthisbeArticle

drawndoupnotby apply to crewsandoftheships,

the Consul localforauthorities.

the due restraint

.N by pirates

Art. XVIII.—In

or thieves witidn Chinese waters, the Chinese authorities are toplundered'

the event of a Portuguese merchant vessel being employ

I18_ TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

their utmost exertions to seize and punish the said robbers and to recover the stolen

goods, which, through the Consul, shall be restored to whom they belong.

Art. XIX.—If a Portuguese vessel be shipwrecked on the coast of China, or be c

compelled to take refuge in any of the ports of the Empire, the Chinese authorities, i

on receiving notice of the fact, shall provide the necessary protection, affording,]j

prompt assistance and kind treatment to the crews and, if necessary, furnishing them 1

with the means to reach the nearest Consulate.

Art. XX.—Portuguese merchant vessels of more than one hundred and fifty |

tons burden will pay tonnage dues at the rate of four mace per ton ; if of one hundred 1

,and fifty tons and under they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton. The

Superintendent of Customs shall grant a certificate declaring that the tonnage dues |

have been paid.

Art, XXI.—Import duties shall be paid on the landing of goods; and export ji

duties upon the shipment of.the same.

Art. XXII.—The captain of a Portuguese ship may, when he deems convenient,

land only a part of his cargo at one of the open ports, paying the duties due on the

portion landed, the duties on the remainder not being payable until they are landed :

at some other port.

Art. XXIII.—The master of a Portuguese ship has the option, within forty- !

eight hours of his arrival at any of the open ports of China, but not later, to decide 1

whether he will leave port without opening the hatches, and in such case he will not

.have to pay tonnage dues. He is bound, however, to give notice of his arrival or

the legal registering as soon as he comes into port, under penalty of being fined in

case of non-compliance within the term of two days.

The ship will be subject to tonnage dues forty-eight hours after her arrival in

.port, but neither then nor at her departure shall any other impost whatsoever be

exacted.

Art. XXIV.—All small vessels employed by Portuguese subjects in carrying

passengers, baggage, letters, provisions or any other cargo which is free of duty,i

between the open ports of China, shall be free from tonnage dues; but all such vessels

carrying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage dues every four months at

the rate of one mace per ton.

Art. XXV.—Portuguese merchant vessels approaching any of the open ports

will be at liberty to take a pilot to reach the harbour; and likewise to take a pilot to

leave it, in case the said ship shall have paid all the duties due by her.

Art. XXVI.—Whenever a Portuguese merchant ship shall arrive at any of the

open ports of China, the Superintendent of Customs will send off one or more

-Custom-house officers, who may stay on board of their boat or on board of the ship

as best suits their convenience. These officers will get their food and all necessaries

from the Custom-house, and will not be allowed to accept any fee from the captain

of the ship or from the consignee, being liable to a penalty proportionate to the

amount received by them.

Art. XXVII.—Twenty-four hours after the arrival of a Portuguese merchant

ship at any of the open ports, the papers of the ship, manifest, and other documents,

shall be handed over to the Consul, whose duty it will be also to report to the

Superintendent of Customs within twenty-four hours, the name, the registered

tonnage, and the cargo brought by the said vessel. If, through negligence or for

any other motive, this stipulation be not complied with within forty-eight hours

after the arrival of the ship, the captain shall be subject to a fine of fifty Taels for

each day’s delay over and above that period, but the total amount of the fine shall

not exceed two hundred Taels.

The captain of the ship is responsible for the correctness of the manifest, in

which the cargo shall be minutely and truthfully described, subject to a fine of five

hundred Taels as penalty in case the manifest should be found incorrect. This fine,

however, will not be incurred if, within twenty-four hours after the delivery of the

manifest to the Custom-house officers, the captain expressed the wish to rectify any

error which may have been discovered in the said manifest.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA lltf-

Art. XXVIII.—The Superintendent of Customs will permit the discharging of

31 ae ship as soon as he shall have received from the Consul the report drawn up in due

.mtrm. If the captain of the ship should take upon himself to commence discharging

odiithout permission, he shall be fined five hundred Taels and the goods so discharged

.laall be confiscated.

■l’T Art. XXIX.—Portuguese merchants having. goodAto ship or to laud will have

do> obtain a special permission from the Superintendent of Customs to that effect,,

uhithout which all goods shipped or landed shall be liable to confiscation.

I: Art. XXX.—No transhipment of goods is allowed from ship to ship without

iapecial permission, under penalty of confiscation of all the goods so transhipped.

Art. XXXI.—When a ship shall have paid all her duties, the Superintendent

Of Customs will grant her a certificate and the Consul will return the papers, in order

amt she may proceed on her voyage.

1 Art. XXXII.—When any doubt may arise as to the value of goods which by the

n'ariff are liable to an ad valorem duty, and the Portuguese merchants disagree with

) Be Custom-house officers as regards the value of said goods, both parties will cal!

own or three merchants to examine them, and the highest, offer made by any of the

biaid merchants to buy the goods will be considered as their just value,

j Art. XXXIII.—Duties will be paid on the net weight of every kind of merchandise.

Should there be any difference of opinion between the Portuguese merchant and the

Jajcustom-house officer as to the mode by which the tare is to be fixed, each party will

offlhoose a certain number of boxes or bales from among every hundred packages of

^ ghe goods in question, taking the gross weight of said packages, then the tare of each

iilf the packages separately, and the average tare resulting therefrom will be adopted

1 |or the whole parcel.

‘ In case of any doubt or dispute not mentioned herein, the Portuguese merchant

y|nay appeal to the Consul, who will refer the case to the Superintendent of Customs;

8|his officer will act in such a manner as to settle the question amicably. The appeal,,

waowever, will only be entertained if made within the term of twenty-four hours ; and

r8||n such a case no entry is to be made in the Custom-house books in relation to the

bniaid goods until the question shall have been settled.

Art. XXXIV.—Damaged goods will pay a reduced duty proportionate to their

sMeterioration; any doubt on this point will be solved in the way indicated in the

[Jclause of this Treaty with respect to duties payable on merchandise ad valorem.

Art. XXXV.—Any Portuguese merchant who, having imported foreign goods

jfinto one of the open ports of China and paid the proper duties thereon, may wish to

9-re-export them to another of the said ports, will have to send to the Superintendent

) -jjf Customs an account of them, who, to avoid fraud, will direct his officers to examine

^whether or not the duties have been paid, whether the same have been entered on the

ocoooks of the Customs, whether they retain their original marks, and whether the

ten tries agree with the account sent in. Should everything be found correct, the same

i will be stated in the export permit together with the total amount of duties paid, and

llkll these particulars will be communicated to the Custom-house officers at other ports.

Upon arrival of the ship at the port to which the goods are carried, permission

liwill be granted to land without any new payment of duties whatsoever if, upon

.^examination, they are found to be the identical goods; but if during the examination

■ any fraud be detected, the goods may be confiscated by the Chinese Government.

Should any Portuguese merchant wish to re-export to a foreign country any

togoods imported, and upon which duties have been already paid, he will have to make

This application in the same form as required for the re-exportation of goods to

'^another port in China, in which case a certificate of drawback or of restitution of

d duties will be granted, which will be accepted by any of the Chinese Custom-houses in

■payment of import or export duties.

Foreign cereals imported by Portuguese ships into the ports of China may be

■9 re-exported without hindrance if no portion of them has been discharged.

Art. XXXVI.—The Chinese authorities will adopt at the ports the measures which*

i they may deem the most convenient to avoid fraud or smuggling.

120 TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA;

Art. XXXVII.—The proceeds of fines and confiscations inflicted: on Portuguese j

subjects, in conformity to this Treaty, shall belong exclusively to the Chinese i

Government.

Art. XXXVIII.—Portuguese subjects carrying goods to a market in the interior I

-of the country, on which the lawful import duties have already been paid at any of ;

the open ports, or those who buy native produce in the interior to bring to the ports

on the Yang-tsze-kiang, or to send to ftoreign ports, shall follow the regulations

.adopted towards the other nations.

Custom-house officers who do not comply with the regulations, or who may-exact i

more duties than are due, shall be punished according to the Chinese law.

Art. XXXIX.—TheConsuls and localauthoritiesshallconsulttogether,when neces- i

sary, as to the construction of Light-houses and the placing of Buoys and Light-ships, j

Art. XL.—Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorized by the Chinese Govern-1

ment to receive them in sycee or in foreign coin, according to the official assay made |

at Canton on the 15th July, 1843.

Art. XLI.—In order to secure the regularity of weights and measures and to j

avoid confusion, the Superintendent of Customs will hand over to the Portuguese ;|

-Consul at each of the open ports standards similar to those given by the Treasury jj

Department for collection of public dues to the Customs at Cailton.

Art. XLII.—Portuguese merchant ships may resort only to those ports of China

which are declared open to commerce. It is forbidden to them, except in the case of

force majeure provided for in Article XIX., to enter into other ports, or to carry -

on a clandestine trade on the coast of China, and the transgressor of this order shall

be subject to confiscation of his ship and cargo by the Chinese Government.

Art. XLIII.—All Portuguese vessels despatched from one of the open ports of

China to another, or to Macao, are entitled to a certificate of the Custom-house, which

will exempt them from paying new tonnage dues, during the period of four months

reckoned from the date of clearance.

Art. XLIV.—If any Portuguese merchant ship is found smuggling, the goods

smuggled, no matter of what nature or value, will be subject to confiscation by the

Chinese authorities, who may send the ship away from the port, after settlement of

all her accounts, and prohibit her to continue to trade.

Art. XLV.—As regards the delivery of Portuguese and Chinese criminals, with

the exception of the Chinese criminals who take refuge in Macao, and for whose

extradition the Governor of Macao will continue to follow the existing practice, after

the receipt of a due requisition from the Viceroy of the Kwangs, it is agreed that,

in the Chinese ports open to foreign trade, the Chinese criminals who take refuge at

the houses or on board ships of Portuguese subjects shall be arrested and delivered

to the Chinese authorities on their applying to the Portuguese Consul; and likewise

the Portuguese criminals who take refuge in China shall be arrested and delivered

to the Portuguese authorities on their applying to the Chinese authorities; and by

• neither of the parties shall the criminals be harboured nor shall there be delay in

delivering them.

Art. XLYI.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this

Treaty may demand a revision of the Tariff, and of the commercial Articles of this

Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six

months after the end of the first ten years, then the Tariff shall remain in force for

ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years ; and so it shall be,

at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XLVII.—All disputes arising between Portuguese subjects in China with

regard to rights, either of property or person, shall be submitted to the jurisdiction

of the Portuguese authorities.

Art. XLVIII.-—Whenever Chinese subjects become guilty of any criminal act

towards Portuguese subjects, the Portuguese authorities must report such acts to the

Chinese authorities in order that the guilty be tried according to the laws of China.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA 121

If Portuguese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Chinese subjects,.

0 ne Chinese authorities must report such acts to the Portuguese Consul in order that

ae guilty may be tried according to the laws of Portugal.

j Art. XLIX.—If any Chinese Subject shall have become indebted to a Portuguese

rdibject and withholds payment, or fraudulently absconds from his creditors, the

nihinese authorities shall use all their efforts to apprehend him and to compel him to

vay, the debt being previously proved and the possibility of its payment ascertained,

she Portuguese authorities will likewise use their efforts to enforce the payment of

, ny debt due by any Portuguese subject to a Chinese subject.

I But in no case will the Portuguese Government or the Chinese Government be

[^considered responsible for the debts of their subjects.

Art. L.—Whenever any Portuguese subject shall have to petition the Chinese

'.luthority of a district, he is to submit his statement beforehand to the Consul, who

ijjrill cause the same to be forwarded should he see no impropriety in so doingr

leftherwise he will have it written out in other terms, or decline to forward it.

ofLikewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to petition the Portuguese

^Consul he will only be allowed to do so through the Chinese authority, who shall

lolroceed in the same manner.

| Art. LI.—Portuguese subjects who may have any complaint or claim against

liny Chinese subject, shall lay the same before the Consul, who will take due

mjognizance of the case and will use all his efforts to settle it amicably. Likewise,

njfhen a Chinese subject shall have occasion to complain of a Portuguese subject, the

ujjponsul will listen to his complaint and will do what he possibly can to re-establish

narmony between the two parties.

I If, however, the dispute be of such a nature that it cannot be settled in that

iotfcnciliatory way, the Portuguese Consul and Chinese authorities will hold a joint

isBivestigation of the case, and decide it with equity, applying each the laws of his own

n|puntry according to the nationality of the defendant.

I Art. LII.—The Catholic religion has for its essential object the leading of men

tifti virtue. Persons teaching.it and professing it shall alike be entitled to efficacious

dbrotection from the Chinese authorities ; nor shall such persons pursuing peaceably

Tjgheir calling and not offending against the laws be prosecuted or interfered with.

| Art. LIII.—In order to prevent for the future any discussion, and considering'

Uihat the English language, among all foreign languages, is the most generally

«*nown in China, this Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, is written in Por-

mluguese, Chinese, and English, and signed in six copies, two in each language. AH

aaehese versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen to beany

xovivergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions, the English

hsext will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

| Art. LIY.—The present Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, shall be

Ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves and

ajis Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China. The exchange of the ratifications shall

die made, within the shortest possible time, at Tientsin, after which the Treaty,

xhhith the Convention appended, shall be printed and published in order that the

Hunctionaries and subjects of the two countries may have full knowledge of their

uqtipulations and may fulfil them.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

B nd have affixed their seals thereto.

I Done in Peking, this first day of the month of December in the year of Our Lord

o»esus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the-

arjlhinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of

emwang-Hsu.

[l.s.] (Signed) Thomas he Souza Roza.

[Chinese Seal] Prince Ch’ing.

Signatures of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Sun-io-uen.

122 CONVENTION BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

Convention

It having been stipulate! in the Art. IV. of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce,

concluded between Portugal and China on the 1st day of the month of December, ;

1887, that a Convention shall be arranged between the two high contracting parties

in order to establish a basis of co-operation in collecting the revenue on opium ex-

ported from Macao to Chinese ports, the undersigned Thomas de Souza Roza, Envoy

Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King

-of Portugal and the Algai ves, in special mission to the Court of Peking, and His

Highness Prince Ching, President of the Tsung-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of

the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, Min-

isters Plenipotentiary of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, have agreed _

on the following Convention in three Articles:—

Art. I.—Portugal will enact a law subjecting the opium trade of Macao to the

following provisions:—

1. —No opium shall be imported into Macao in quantities les

2. —All opium imported into Macao must, forthwith on arriv

the competent department under a public functionary appointed by the Portuguese*

■Government, to superintend the importation and exportation of opium in Macao.

3. —No opium imported into Macao shall be transhipped, land

■from one store to another, or exported, without a permit issued by the Superintendent.®

4. —The importers and exporters of opium in Macao must keep

ing to the form furnished by the Government, showing with exactness and clearness '

dhe quantity of opium they have imported, the number of chests they have sold, to

whom and to what place they were disposed of, and the quantity in stock.

5. —Only the Macao opium farmer, and persons licensed to s

will be permitted to keep in their custody raw opium in quantities inferior to one chest.

6. —Regulations framed to enforce in Macao the execution

equivalent to those adopted in Hongkong for similar purposes.

Art. II.—Permits for the exportation of opium from Macao into Chinese ports, "

after being issued, shall be communicated by the Superintendent of Opium to the

■Commissioner of Customs at Kung-pac-uan.

Art. III.—By mutual consent of both the high contracting parties the stipula-

tions of this Convention may be altered at any time.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Convention.

Done in Peking this first day of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ

one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of

the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] (Signed) Thomas de Souza Roza. |

[Chinese Seal] Pbince Ch’ino.

Signature of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Sun-iu-uen.

Agreement

The basis of the co-operation to be given to China by Portugal in the collection .*

of duties on opium conveyed from Macao to Chinese ports, having been fixed by a

Convention appended to the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between J

China and Portugal on the 1st December, 1887, and it being now convenient to come I

to an understanding upon some points relating to the said co-operation as well as to

fixed rules for the treatment of Chinese junks trading with Macao, Bernardo Pinheiro

Correa de Mello, Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty in

COMMEECIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL 123

firing, duly authorized by His Excellency Thomas de Souza Roza, Chief of the said

;fusion, and Sir Robert Hart, k.c.m.g., Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial

hritime Customs, provided with the necessary instructions from the Chinese

jfijjrernment, have agreed on the following:

-J| 1.—An office under a Commissioner appointed by the Foreign Inspectorate of

:ill Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs shall be established at a convenient spot on

jflinese territory, for the sale of opium duty certificates, to be freely sold to merchants

•«3 for such quantities of opium as they may require. The said Commissioner will

la|> administer the Customs stations near Macao.

-.1 2.—Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than 110''

dulls per picul, shall be free from all other imposts of every sort, and have all the

ifiefits stipulated for by the Additional Article of the Chefoo Convention between

Ina and Great Britain on behalf of opium on which duty has been paid at one of

■idii ports of China, and may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser.

-.| 3.—The Commissioner of Customs responsible for the management of the

illtoms stations shall investigate and settle any complaint made by Chinese mer-

sllnts of Macao against the Customs stations or revenue cruisers ; and the Governor

sao, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send an officer of Macao to

present and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not

!e, a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for a joint decision.

4.—Junks trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and their cargoes, shall not

lubject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their cargoes

ing between Chinese ports and Hongkong, and no dues whatsoever shall be de-

ided from junks proceeding to Macao from ports of China, or coming from Macao-

ilworts in China, over and above the dues paid, or payable, at the ports of clearance

■destination. Chinese produce which has paid Customs duties and lekin tax before

(ring Macao may be re-exported from Macao to Chinese ports without paying

>ms duties and lekin tax again, and will be only subject to the payment of the

amed Siao-hao.

In witness whereof, this agreement has been written in Portuguese and English-

$$ signed in duplicate at Peking this the first day of December, 1887.

(Signed) Bernardo Pinheiro Correa de Mello,

Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty.

(Signed) Sir Robert Hart,

Inspector-General of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA

AND PORTUGAL

Signed at Shanghai, November, 1904

4 Art. I.—The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between China and Portugal

dhd the first day of December, 1887 (17th day, 10th moon, 13th year of Kwang Hsu),

aninues in force except in so far as modified by the present Treaty.

xA Art. II.—Portugal accepts the increase in the import duties stipulated for in

okcle YI. of the Peking Protocol of 7th September, 1901, from the date of the ratifica-

io of this Treaty. Portugal will enjoy the privileges of tbe most favoured nation,

ai in no case shall Portuguese subjects pay higher or lower duties than those paid by

Uusubjects of any other foreign nation. Article XII. of the Treaty of First Decem-

bii 1887, is therefore rendered null and void.

124 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

Art. Ilf.—The duty and lekin on foreign opium will continue as provided for

an existing Treaties. The Governirent of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to con-

tinue as heretofore to co-operate with the Government of His Imperial Chinese

Majesty in the collection of the duty and lekin on opium exported from Macao to

China, and also to co-operate in the repression of smuggling in accordance with the

Treaty and Special Opium Convention of 1st December, 1887. In order to render this

co-operation effective, it is clearly stipulated that all opium importtd into Macao

-shall, on arrival, be registered at the Special Government Bureau provided for this

purpose, and the Portuguese Government will take the necessary steps in order to

have all this opium stored under its exclusive control in a depot from which it will be

removed as required by the demands of trade. The quantity of opium required for

-consumption in Macao and its dependencies will be fixed annually by the Government

of Macao in agreement with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs

referred to in Article II. of the above-meniimed Convention, and under no pretext

will removal from the Portuguese Government depot be permitted of any quantity of

opium for local consumption in excess of that fixed by the said agreement, and neces-

sary measures will be taken to prevent opium removed from the depot for re-export

-to any port other than a port in China being sent fraudulently to Chinese territory.

The removal from the depot of opium for export will not be permitted except

on production of proof that such opium has already paid all dues and duties leviable

•thereon by China. The rules for the carrying out of this Article shall be arranged by

delegates from the Government 6f Macao and the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

Art. IV.—Such steps as are necessary for the repression of smuggling in the

territory and waters of Macao shall be taken by the local Portuguese Government in

concert with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs, and similar

steps in the Chinese territory and waters near Macao shall be taken by the Imperial

Maritime Customs in concert with the Portuguese Government of Macao. This co-

operation is intended to render such steps effective on all points in respect of which co-

operation is needed, and to avoid at the same time any injury to the sovereign rights'

of either of the high contracting parties. Special delegates from the local Government

of Macao and the Imperial Maritime Customs shrill proceed to fix the respective zones i

of operations, and shall devise practical means for the repression of smuggling.

Art. V.—With a view to the development of trade between Macao and neigh-

bouring ports in the Kwangtung Province, the high contracting parties have agreed

as follows:—

1. —Portuguese steamers desirous of proceeding for the purpo

Macao to any of the ports of call and passenger stages on the West Biver,

-enumerated in the Special Article of the English-Burmah Convention of 1897, and

Article X. of the British Treaty of Commerce of 1902, shall be permitted to do so,

provided they comply with the Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by

the two high contracting parties.

2. —Steamers specially registered for trade under the Inla

Navigation Rules shall be permitted to ply between Macao and places in the Depart-

ment of Kwang-chow-fu other than those mentioned in Section 1, provided they

-report to the Kungpei-kuan Customs for examination of cargo and payment of duties

in accordance with Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by the two high ‘

-contracting parties. Such vessels may engage in all lawf ul trade, including the tow- ■

age of junks and conveyance of passengers and cargo, subject to the regulations for

the time being in force.

The privileges hereby granted are granted on the express understanding that j

Special Regulations shall be framed defining in detail the conditions under which

such traffic may be carried on. Until then, the said Regulations have been agreed 1

upon and published, the Article shall not become operative; and subsequently only

on compliance with the said Regulations.

Art. VI.—Portugal having the right of most favoured, nation treatment, it is

.clearly stipulated that any advantages China may think fit to grant'to any nation in i

COMMEECIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL 125

the importation of agricultural products, specialty wines and oil, or in the importa-

tion of industrial products,, spe<-ially woollen and cotton goods and preserved food-

stuffs, shall be extended to similar Portuguese goods on exactly the same conditions.

It is also clearly understood that Portuguese wine of all kinds proved by means

of certificate of origin, issued by Portuguese Consuls, to have been imported from

Portugal, direct or otherwise, shall when their alcoholic strength exceeds 14° pay

the duty leviable according to the annexed tariff on wines exceeding 14° of alcholic

strength. Wine passed through the Chinese Customs under designation “ Port

Wine ” shall not be entitled to the benefit of this Article unless accompanied by a

certificate of origin as above.

Art. VII.—Portuguese subjects may frequent, reside at, and carry on trade,

industries and manufactures, and pursue any other lawful avocation in all the ports

and localities in China which have alreaby been or may hereafter be opened to

foreign residence and trade; and wherever in any such ports or localities a >pecial

area has been or may hereafter be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners,

Portuguese subjects may therein lease land, erect buildings, and in all respects enjoy the

same privileges and immunities as are granted to subjects of the most favoured nations.

Art VIII.—Whereas China, with the object of reforming its fiscal system,

proposes to levy a surtax in addition to the tariff duties on all goods passing through

the Custom-houses, whether maritime or inland and frontier, in order to make good

the loss incurred by the complete abolition of lelein, the Portuguese Government agrees

that foreign goods imported into China by Portuguese subjects shall on entry pay

an import surtax equivalent to one and a half times the duty fixed by the Import

Tariff as now revised, and that Chinese produce exported abroad by Portuguese sub-

jects shall pay export duties, inclusive of the tariff export duty, not exceeding seven

and a half per cent, ad valorem, provided always that such import surtax and export

•duties have been accepted by all the Powers having Treaties with China. With

regard to the produce tax, consumption tax, and excise, as well as the duties on native

opium and salt, leviable by China, Portugal further agrees to accept the same

arrangements as shall be agreed upon between all the Treaty Powers and China. It

is, however, understood that the commerce, rights, and privileges of Portugal shall

not, in consequence of this undertaking, be placed in any way at a disadvantage as

compared with the commerce, rights, and privileges of any other Power.

Art. IX.—Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the

Imperial Maritime Customs to Portuguese subjects within twenty-one days from the

•date of presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive

sych drawback certificates. These certificates will be accepted at their face value by

the Customs authorities at the port of issue in payment of duties of all kinds, ton-

nage dues excepted; or shall, in the c.ise of drawbacks for duty paid on foreign

goods re-exported abroad within three years from the date of importation, be

redeemable in full in ready money by the Imperial Maritime Customs at the port of

issue, at the option of the holders thereof. But if, in connection with any applica-

tion for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an attempt on the

part of a Portuguese subject to defraud the revenue, he shall be liable to a fine not

exceeding five times the amount of the duty whereof he attempted to defraud the

Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods. In case the goods have’ been, removed

from Chinese territory, then the Consul shall inflict on the guilty party a suitable

fine to be paid to the Chinese Government.

Art. X.—China agrees to herself establish a system of uniform national coinage

and provide for a uniform national currency, which shall be freely used as legal

tender in payment of all duties, taxes, and other obligations by Portuguese subjects

as well as by Chinese subjects in the Chinese Empire. It is undei’stood, however,

that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid on the basis of the

Haikwan Tael.

Art. XI.—The Government of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to the prohibi-

tion by the Chinese Government of the importation into China of morphia and of

Instruments for its injection, on condition, however,, that the Chinese. Government

126 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

will allow tlie importation of morphia and of instruments for its injection for medical1

purposes by Portuguese doctirs, chemists, and druggists, on payment of the

prescribed duty and under special permit which will only be granted to an intending

importer upon his signing at the Portuguese Consulate a suitable bond undertaking

not to sell morphia except in small quantities and on receipt of a requisition signed

by a duly qualified foreign medical practitioner. If fraud in connection with such

importation be discovered by the Customs authorities the morphia ami instrument

for its injection will be seized and confiscated, and the importer will be denied the

right to import these articles.

Art. XII.—The Chinese Government recognizing that it is advantageous for

the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign

as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprise, agrees to revise its exist-

ing mining regulations in such manner, by the selection of those rules in force in

other nations which seem applicable to conditions in China, that the revision, while

promoting the interests of Chinese subjects and in no way prejudicing the sovereign

rights of China, will offer no impediment to the employment of foreign capital, nor

place foreign capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally

accepted foreign regulations, and will permit Portuguese subjects to carry on in

Chinese territory mining operations and other necessary business relating thereto,

provided they comply with the new regulations and conditions which will be imposed

by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the

renting of mineral land, and payment of royalty, and provided they apply for permits,

the provisions of which, in regard to necessary business relating to such operations,

shall be observed. The residence of Portuguese subjects in connection with such

mining operations shall be agreed upon between Portugal and China. Any mining

concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be subject to these

provisions.

Art. XIII.—It being only right that the shareholders of any joint stock com-

pany, or the partners in any commercial undertaking, should all be on a footing of

equality as regards division of profits and payment of obligations, according to the

partnership agreement or memorandum and articles of association, the Chinese

Government agrees that Chinese subjects joining with Portuguese subjuct in the or-

ganisation of a joint stock company or commercial undertaking, legally constituted,

shall be liable to the fulfilment of the obligations imposed by said agreement or

memorandum and articles of association, and that Chinese Courts will enforce fulfil-

ment of such obligations, if a suit to that effect be entered; provided always that

their liability shall not be other or greater than that of Portuguese shareholders or

partners in the same company or partnership. Similarly Portuguese subjects who

invest their capital in Chinese enterprises shall be bound to fulfil the obligations

imposed by the partnership agreement or memorandum, and articles of association,

and their liability shall be the same as that of the Chinese subjects engaged in the

same undertaking. But as existing Treaty stipulations do not permit foreign mer-

chants to reside in the interior of China for purpose of trade, such joint stock com-

panies and commercial undertakings may be established in the interior by Portuguese

and Chinese subjects conjointly.

Art. XIV.—As Portugal affords protection to trademarks used by subjects of

any other nationality, provided a like protection is reciprocated for trademarks used

by Portuguese" subjects, China, in order to obtain this protection for its subjects in

Portuguese territory, agrees to grant protection to Portuguese trademarks against

unlawful use, falsification or imitation by Chinese subjects. To this end the Chinese

Government will enact the necessary laws and regulations, and will establish

registration offices at which foreign trademarks may be registered on payment of

reasonable fees. Further, the Chinese Government agrees that, as soon as a Patent

Office has been < stablished, and special laws with regard to inventions have been

adopted, it will, after payment of the prescribed fees, issue certificates, valid for a

fixed term of years, to Portuguese inventors, extending to their inventions the same

protection as shall be given to Chinese patents in Portugal, provided that such inven-

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL 127

tions do not infringe on previous inventions by subjects of China. Any Chinese or

Portuguese subject who is the author, proprietor, or seller of any publication

injurious to the peace and good government of China shall be dealt with in accordance

with the laws of his own country.

Art. XY.—The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform

its judicial system, and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Portugal

agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and will also be prepared to relinquish

extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrange-

ments for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XVI.—The missionary question in China demands, in the opinion of the

Chinese Government, careful consideration, so as to avert in the future troubles

which have occurred in the.past. Portugal, as a nation specially interested in the

protection of its Catholic missions in Chinese territory, agrees to join in a commission

to investigate this question and, if possible, to devise means for securing permanent

peace between converts and non-converts, should such a commission be formed by

China and the Treaty Powers interested. No person, whether Portuguese subject or

Chinese convert who, according to the tenets of Christianity, peaceably teaches or

practises the principles of that religion, which aims at teaching men to do good, shall

be persecuted or harassed on account of his faith. But converts and non-converts,

being alike subjects of China, shall conform to her laws, and shall pay due respect

to those in authority, living together in peace and amity; and the fact of his being

a convert shall protect no one from the consequence of any offence he may have

committed before or may commit after his admission into the Church, or exempt him

from paying legal taxes and contributions levied for the support of religious custom s and

practices contrary to his faith. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by

the native authorities of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects, nor shall the native

authorities - make any distinction between converts and non-converts, ‘but shall

administer the law without partiality, so that both classes may live together in peace.

Portuguese missions shall be permitted to rent and lease in perpetuity, as the

property of the mission, buildings or lands in all parts of the Empire for mission

purposes, and, after the title-deeds have been found in order and duly stamped by the

local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be required for carrying out

their good work.

Art. XVII.—The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years

beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications and until a revision is ejected

as hereinafter provided.

It is further agreed that either of the two high contracting parties may

demand revision of the Tariff and the Articles of the Treaty six months before the

end of ten yerrs from ihe date of the exchange of ratifications thereof. If no re-

vision is demanded before the end of the first term of the ten years, then these Articles

in their present form shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years

reckoned from the end of the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

Art. XVIII.—In order to prevent in the future any discussion, this rJ reaty is

written in Portuguese, Chinese and English, and signed in six copies, two in each lan-

guage. All these versions have the same sense and meaning, nut if there should happen

to be any divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions,

the English text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. XIX.—The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty

the King of Port ugal and Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China.

The exchange of the ratifications shall be made within the shortest possible tin e,

and the Treaty

subjects will be printed

of the respective and may

countries published, in knowledge

have full order that oftheitsfunctionaries

stipulations and

and

may fulfil them.

In laith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

and have affixed tht ir seals thereto.

JAPAN

TREATY OF PEACE BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

Signed at Shimonoseki (Bakan), Japan, on the 17th April, 1895

Ratifications Exchanged at Chefoo, China, on the 8th May, 1895

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and His Majesty the Emperor of China

desiring to restore the blessings'bf peace to their countries and subjects, and to*

remove all cause for future complications, have named as their Plenipotentiaries for

the purpose of concluding a Treaty of Peace, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of

the Imperial Order of Paullownia, M inister-President of State, and Viscount Mutsu

Munemitsu, Juuii, First Class of .the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister

of State for Foreign: Affairs; ;■

And .His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung Chang, Senior Tutor to the

Heir Apparent,, Senior Grand. Secretary of State, Minister:Superintendent of Trade

for the Northern Ports of Gpina, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the

First Rank, and Li Ching Fong, ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service.of the Second

Official Rank;

Who, after having exchanged their-full-powers, which were found to be in good

and proper.form, have agreed to the .following Articles:—

Art. I.—China recognizes definitely the full and complete independence and

autonomy of Corea, and, in consequence, tbe payment of tribute and the perform-

ance of ceremonies and formalities by Corea to China in derogation of such independ-

ence and autonomy shall wholly cease for the future.

Art. II.—China cedes to Japan in perpetuity and full sovereignty the follow-

ing territories, together with all fortifications, arsenals, and public property thereon

(a.) The southern portion of the Province of Feng-tien, within the following

boundaries-—

The line of demarcation begins at the mouth of the River Talu, and ascends that

stream to the mouth of the River An-ping; from thence the line runs to Feng Huang ;

from thence to Haielmng; from thence to Ying Kow, forming a line which describes

the southern portion of the territory. Tbe places above named are included in the

ceded territory. When the line reaches the River Liao at Ying Eow it follow the

course of that stream to its mouth, where it terminates. The mid-channel of tbe

River Liao shall be taken as the line of demarcation.

This cession also includes all islands appertaining or belonging to the Province

of Feng Tien situated in the eastern portion of the Bay of Liao Tung, and in the

northern part of the Yellow Sea.

(6.) The Island of Formosa, together with all islands appertaining or belonging

to the said Island of Formosa.

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

(c.) The Pescadores Group, that is to say, all islands lying between the 119th

and 120th degrees of longitude east of Greenwich and the 23rd and 24th degrees of

north latitude.

Art. III.—The alignments of the frontiers described in the preceding Article, and'

shown on the annexed map, shall be subject to verification and demarcation on the

spot by a Joint Commission of Delimitation, consisting of two or more Japanese and

two or more Chinese Delegates, to be appointed immediately after the exchange of

the ratifications of this Act. In case the boundaries laid down in this Act are found

to be defective at any point, either on account of topography or in consideration of

good administration, it shall also be the duty of the Delimitation Commission to-

rectify the same.

The Delimitation Commission will enter upon its duties as soon as possible, and

will bring its labours to a conclusion within the period of one year after appointment.

The alignments laid down in this Act shall, however, be maintained until the

ratifications of the Delimitation Commission, if any are made, shall have received!

the approval of the Governments of Japan and China.

Art. IV.—China agrees to pay to Japan as a war indemnity the sum of 200,000,000'

Kuping taels. The said sum to be paid in eight instalments. The first instalment of

50,000,000 taels to be paid within six months, and the second instalment of 50,000,000“

taels to be paid within twelve months, after the exchange of the ratifications of this

Act. The remaining sum to be paid in six equal annual instalments as follows : the-

first of such equal annual instalments to be paid within two years, the second with-

in three years, the third within four years, the fourth within five years, the fifth

within six years, and the sixth within seven years after the exchange of the ratifications

of this Act. Interest at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum shall begin to run on all

unpaid portions of the said indemnity from the date the first instalment

falls due.

China shall, however, have the right to pay by anticipation at any time any or

all of said instalments. In case the whole amount of the said indemnity is paid

within three years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, all

interest shall be waived, and the interest for two years and a half, or for any less

period if then already paid, shall be included as a part of the principal amount of

the indemnity.

Art. V.—The inhabitants of the territories ceded to Japan who wish to take up

their residence outside the ceded districts shall be at liberty to sell their real property

and retire. For this purpose a period of two years from the date of the exchange

of the ratifications of the present Act shall be granted. At the expiration of that

period those of the inhabitants who shall not have left such territories shall, at the

option of Japan, be deemed to be Japanese subjects.

Each of the two Governments shall, immediately upon the exchange of the

ratifications of the present Act, send one or mqre Commissioners to Formosa to effect

a final transfer of that province, and within the space of two months after the

exchange of the ratifications of this Act such transfer shall be completed.

Art. VT. —All Treaties between Japan and China having come to an end in

consequence of war, China engages, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifica-

tions of this Act, to appoint Plenipotentiaries to conclude with the Japanese Pleni-

potentiaries a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and a Convention to regulate

frontier intercourse and trade. The Treaties, Conventions, and Begulations, now

subsisting between China and European Powers, shall serve as a basis for the said

Treaty and Convention between Japan and China. From the date of the exchange

of the ratifications of this Act until the said Treaty and Convention are brought

into actual operation, the Japanese Government, its officials, commerce, navigation,

frontier intercourse and trade, industries, ships and subjects, shall in every respect

be accorded by China most favoured nation treatment.

China makes, in addition, the following concessions to take effect six months

after the date of the present Act:—

5

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

1. The following cities, towns, and ports, in addition to those already opened

shall be opened to the trade, residence, industries, and manufactures of Japanese

subjects under the same conditions, and with the same privileges and facilities as

exist at the present open cities, towns, and ports of China.

(a.) Shashih, in the Province of Hupeh.

(6.) Chung King, in the Prov.nce of Szechuan.

(c.) Suchow, in the Province of Kiang Su.

(d.) Hangchow, in the Province of Chekiang.

The Japanese Government shall have the right to station Consuls at any or all

of the above-named places.

2. Steam navigation for vessels under the Japanese flag for the conveyance of

passengers and cargo shall be extended to the following places:—

(a.) On the Upper Yangtsze River, from Ichang to Chung King.

(b.) On the Woosung River, and the Canal, from Shanghai to Suchow and

Hangchow.

The Rules and Regulations which now govern the navigation of the inland waters

of China by foreign vessels, shall, so far as applicable, be enforced in respect

of the above-named routes, until new Rules and Regulations are conjointly

agreed to.

3. Japanese subjects purchasing goods or produce in the interior of China or

transporting imported merchandise into the interior of China, shall have the right

temporarily to rent or hire warehouses for the storage of the articles s > purchased or

transported, without the payment of any taxes or exactions whatever.

4. Japanese subjects shall be free to engage in all kinds of manufacturing

industries in all the open cities, towns, and ports of China, and shall be at liberty to

import into China all kinds of machinery, paying only the stipulated import duties

thereon.

All articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China, shall in respect of

inland transit and internal taxes, duties, charges, and exactions of all kinds and also

in respect of warehousing and storage facilities in the interior of China, stand upon

the same footing and enjoy the same privileges and exemptions as merchandise

imported by Japanese subjects into China.

In the event of additional Rules and Regulations being necessary in connection

with these concessions, they shall be embodied in the Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation provided for by this Article.

Ait. VII.—Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding Article, the evacua-

tion of China by the armies of Japan shall be completely effected within three

months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act.

Art. VIII.—As a guarantee of the faithful performance of the stipulations of

this Act, China consents to the temporary occupation by the military forces of Japan,

of Wei hai wei, in the Province of Shantung.

Upon the payment of the first two instalments of the war indemnity herein

stipulated for and the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation, the said place shall be evacuated by the Japanese forces, provided the

Chinese Government consents to pledge, under suitable and sufficient arrangements,

the Customs Revenue of China as security for the payment of the principal and

interest of the remaining instalments of said indemnity. In the event of no such

arrangement being concluded, such evacuation shall only take place upon the pay-

ment of the final instalment Of said indemnity.

It is, however, expressly understood that no such evacuation shall take place

until after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation.

Art. IX.—Immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act, all

prisoners of war then held shall be restored, and China undertakes not to ill-treat or

TEEATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA 131

punish prisoners of war so restored to her by Japan. China also engages to at once

release all Japanese subjects accused of being military spies or charged with any

other military offences. China further engages not to punish in any manner, nor to-

allow to be punished, those Chinese subjects who have in any manner been

compromised in their relations with the Japanese army during the war.

Art. X.—All offensive military operations shall cease upon the exchange of the

ratifications of this Act.

Art. XI.—The present Act shall be ratified by their Majesties the Emperor of

Japan and the Emperor of China, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Chefoo-

on the eighth day of the fifth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding,

to the fourteenth day of the fourth month of the twenty-first year of Kwang Hsu.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and

have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Shimonoseki, in duplicate, this seventeenth day of the fourth month

of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji,'*corresponding to the twenty-third of the third

month of the twenty-first year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of the

Imperial Order of PauUownia, Minister- President

of State, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor

of Japan.

[l.s.] Viscount Mtttsit Munemitsu, Junii, First Class

of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Plenipotentiaryr

of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

[l.s.] Li Hung-Chang, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the

Emperor of China, Senior Tutor to the Heir Ap-

parent, Senior Grand Secretary of Northern Ports

of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl

of the First Panic.

[l.s.] Li Ching-Fong, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the

Emperor of China, Ex-Minister of the Diplomatic

Service, of the Second Official Rank.

TREATY OE COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION

Made at Peking, July 21st, 1896

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China-

having resolved, in pursuance of the provisions of Article VI. of the Treaty signed

at Shimonoseki on the 17th day of the 4th month of the 28th year of Meiji,

corresponding to the 23rd day of the 3rd month of the 21st year of Kwang-Hsii, to-

conclude a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, have for that purpose, named as

their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

5*

132 TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Shoshii, Grand

Cross of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Grand Officer of the Imperial

Order of the Rising Sun, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Yin-hoon, Minister of the Tsung-li

Yamen, holding the rank of the President of a Board and Senior Vice-President

of the Board of Revenue.

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be

in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:—

Art. I.—There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty

the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between their

respective subjects, who shall enjoy equally in the respective countries of the high

contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—It is agreed by the high contracting parties that His Majestv the

Emperor of Japan may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatic Agent to the Court

of Peking and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, if he sees fit, accredit a

Diplomatic Agent to the Court of Tokyo.

The Diplomatic Agents thus accredited shall respectively enjoy all the pre-

rogatives, privileges and immunities accorded by international law to such Agents,

and they shall also in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar

Agents of the most favoured nation.

Their persons, families, suites, establishments, residences and correspondence

shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their

own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and attendants without any kind of

molestation.

Art. III.—His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may appoint Consuls-General,

Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at such of the ports, cities, and

towns of China which are now or may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and

trade, as the interests of the Empire of Japan may require.

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese Authorities, and

they shall enjoy all the attributes, authority, jurisdiction, privileges and immunities

which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation most favoured

in these respects.

His Majesty the Emperor of China may likewise appoint Consuls-General, Consuls,

Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at any or all of those places in Japan

where Consular officers of other nations are now or may hereafter be admitted, and,

saving in the matter of jurisdiction in respect of Chinese subjects and property in

Japan which is reserved to the Japanese Judicial Courts, they shall enjoy the rights

and privileges that are usually accorded to such officers.

Art. IV.—Japanese subjects may, with their families, employes and servants,

frequent, reside and cany on trade, industries and manufactures or pursue any other

lawful avocations in all the ports, cities and towns of China, which are now or may

hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They are at liberty to proceed to

or from any of the open ports with their merchandise and effects, and within the

localities at those places which have already been or may hereafter be set apart for

the use and occupation of foreigners, they are allowed to rent or purchase houses,

rent or lease land and to build churches, cemeteries and hospitals, enjoying in all

respects the same privileges and immunities as are now or may hereafter be granted

to the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

Art. V.—-Japanese vessels may touch for the purpose of landing and shipping

passengers and merchandise, in accordance with the existing Rules and Regulations

concerning foreign trade there, at all those places in China which are now ports of

call, namely, Ngan-ching, Ta-tung, Hu-kow, Wu-sueh, Lu-chi-kow and Woosung

and such other places as may hereafter be made ports of call also. If any vessel

should unlawfully enter ports other than open ports and ports of call in China or

carry on clandestine trade along the coast or rivers, the vessel with her cargo shall be

subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

TJREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN 133

Art. VI.—Japanese subjects may travel, for their pleasure or for purpose of

trade, to all parts of the interior of China, under passports issued by Japanese Consuls

and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be

produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passports be not

irregular, the bearers will be allowed to proceed and no opposition shall be offered

to their hiring of persons, animals, carts or vessels for their own conveyance or for

the carriage of their personal effects or merchandise. If they be without passports or

if they commit any offence against the law, they shall be handed over to the nearest

Consul for punishment, but they shall only be subject to necessary restraint and in no

case to ill-usage. Such passports shall remain in force for a period of 13 Chinese

months from the date of issue. Any Japanese subject travelling in the interior

without a passport shall be liable to a fine not exceeding 300 Taels. Japanese sub-

jects may, however, without passports go on excursions from any of the ports open

to trade, to a distance not exceeding 100 Chinese li and for a period not exceeding

five days. The provisions of this article do not apply to crews of ships.

Art. VII.—Japanese subjects residing in the open ports of China may take

into their service Chinese subjects and employ them in any lawful capacity without

restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government or authorities.

Art. VIII.—Japanese subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the

conveyance of cargo or passengers and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be

settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese

Government or oflicers. No limit shall be put upon the number of boats, neither

shall a monopoly, in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged

in carrying goods, be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in

them the offenders will of coarse be punished according to law.

Art. IX.—The Tariffs and Tariff Rules now in force between China and

the Western Powers shall be applicable to all articles upon importation into

China by Japanese subjects or from Japan, or upon exportation from China

by Japanese subjects or to Japan. It is clearly understood that all articles, the

importation or exportation of which is not expressly limited or prohibited by the

Tariffs and Tariff Rules existing between China and the Western Powers, may be

freely imported into and exported from China, subject only to the payment of the

stipulated import or export duties. But in no case shall Japanese subjects be called

upon to pay in China other or higher import or export duties than are or may

be paid by the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation ; nor shall any

article imported into China from Japan or exported from China to Japan, be

charged upon such importation or exportation, other or higher duties than are now

or may hereafter be imposed in China on the like article when imported from or

exported to the nation most favoured in those respects.

Art. X.—All articles duly imported into China by Japanese subjects or from

Japan shall, while being transported, subject to the existing Regulations, from one

open port to another, be wholly exempt from all taxes, imposts, duties, lehin, charges

and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, irrespective of the nationality

of the owner or possessor of the articles, or the nationality of the conveyance or

vessel in which the transportation is made.

Art. XI.—It shall be at the option of any Japanese subject desiring to convey

duly imported articles to an inland market, to clear bis goods of all transit duties

by payment of a commutation transit tax or duty, equal to one-half of the import

duty in respect of dutiable articles, and two and a half per cent, upon the value' in

respect of duty-free articles; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued

which shall exempt the goods from all further inland charges whatsoever.

It is understood that this Article does not apply to imported Opium.

Art. XII.—All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects in

China elsewhere than at an open port thereof and intended for export abroad, shall

in every part of China be freed from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and

exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties when

-exported, upon the payment of a commutation transit tax or duty calculated at the

134 TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

rate mentioned in the last preceding Article, substituting export duty for import

duty, provided such goods and produce are actually exported to a foreign country

within the period of 12 months from the date of the payment of the transit tax.

All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects at the open ports of

China, and of which export to foreign countries is not prohibited, shall be exempt

from all internal taxes, imposts, duties, lehin, charges and exactions of every

nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties upon exportation, and all

articles purchased by Japanese subjects in any part of China, may also, for the

purposes of export abroad, be transported from open port to open port subject to

the existing Rules and Regulations.

Art. XIII.—Merchandise of a bona fide foreign origin, in respect of which full

import duty shall have been paid, may at any time within three years from the date

of importation, be re-exported from China by Japanese subjects to any foreign

country, without the payment of any export duty, and the re-exporters shall, in

addition, be entitled forthwith to receive from the Chinese Customs drawback certi-

ficates for the amount of import duty paid thereon, provided that the merchandise

remains intact and unchanged in its original packages. Such drawback certificates

shall be immediately redeemable in ready money by the Chinese Customs Authorities

at the option of the holders thereof.

Art. XIV.—The Chinese Government consents to the establishment of Bonded

Warehouses at the several open ports of China. Regulations on the subject shall

be made hereafter.

Art. XV.—Japanese merchant vessels of more than 150 tons burden, entering"

the open ports of China, shall be charged tonnage dues at the rate of 4 mace per

registered ton ; if of 150 tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of 1 mace

per registered ton. But any such vessel taking its departure within 48 hours after

arrival, without breaking bulk, shall be exempt from the payment of tonnage dues.

Japanese vessels having paid the above specified tonnage dues shall thereafter

be exempt from all tonnage dues in all the open ports and ports of call of China, for

the period of four months from the date of clearance from the port where the pay-

ment of such tonnage dues is made. Japanese vessels shall not, however, be required

to pay tonnage dues for the period during which they are actually undergoing repairs

in China.

No tonnage dues shall be payable on small vessels and boats employed by

Japanese subjects in the conveyance of passengers’ baggage, letters, or duty-free

articles between any of the open ports of China. All small vessels and cargo boats,

however, conveying merchandise which is, at the time of such conveying, subject

to duty, shall pay tonnage dues once in four months at the rate of 1 mace per ton.

No fee or charges, other than tonnage dues, shall be levied upon Japanese

vessels and boats, and it is also understood that such vessels and boats shall not be

required to pay other or higher tonnage dues than the vessels and boats of the most

favoured nation.

Art. XVI.—Any Japanese merchant vessel arriving at an open port of China

shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like

manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her

departure, she shall be allowed to employ a pilot to take her out of port.

Art. XVII.—Japanese merchant vessels compelled on account of injury sustained

or any other cause, to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any nearest

port'of China, without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties upon

goods landed in order that repairs to the vessel may be effected, provided the goods

so landed remain under the supervision of the Customs authorities. Should any

such vessel be stranded or wrecked on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities

shall immediately adopt measures for rescuing the passengers and crew and for

securing the vessel and cargo. The persons thus saved shall receive friendly

treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance ta

the nearest Consular station. Should any Chinese merchant vessel be compelled on

account of injury sustained or any other cause to seek a place of refuge in the nearest

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN 135

port of Japan, she shall likewise be treated in the same way by tbe Japanese

authorities.

Art. XVIII.—The Chinese authorities at the several open ports shall alopt such

means as they judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or

smuggling.

Art. XIX.—If any Japanese vessel be plundered by Chinese robbers or pirates,

it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and

punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover and restore the stolen property.

Art. XX.—Jurisdiction over the persons and property of Japanese subjects in

China is reserved exclusively to the duly authorized Japanese authorities, who shall

hear and determine all cases brought against Japanese subjects or property by Jap-

anese subjects or by the subjects or citizens of any other Power, without the interven-

tion of the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXI.—If the Chinese authorities or a Chinese subject make any charge

or complaint of a civil nature against Japanese subjects or in respect of Japanese

propei'ty in China, the case shall be heard and decided by the Japanese authorities.

In like manner all charges and complaints of a civil nature brought by Japanese

authorities or subjects in China against Chinese subjects or in respect of Chinese

property, shall be heard and determined by the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXII.—Japanese subjects, charged with the commission of any crimes or

offences in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Japanese

authorities according to the laws of Japan.

In like manner Chinese subjects charged with the commission of any crimes or

offences against Japanese subjects in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty,

punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

Art. XXIII.—Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a

Japanese subject or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do

their utmost to effect his arrest, and enforce recovery of the debts. The Japanese

Authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any Japanese subject

who fraudulently absconds or fails to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese

subject.

Art. XXIV.—If Japanese subjects in China who have committed offences or have

failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond should flee to the interior of

China or take refuge in houses occupied by Chinese subjects or on board of Chinese

ships the Chinese authorities shall, at the request of the Japanese Consul, deliver

them to the Japanese authorities.

In like manner if Chinese subjects in China who have committed offences or

have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond should take refuge in houses

occupied by Japanese subjects in China or on board of Japanese ships in Chinese

waters they shall be delivered up at the request of the Chinese authorities made to

the Japanese authorities.

Art. XXV.—The Japanese Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in

all privileges, immunities and advantages conferred on them by the Treaty stipulations

between Japan and China which are now in force; and it is hereby expressly stipu-

lated that the Japanese Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal

participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that may have been or may

be hereafter granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or

subjects of any other nation.

Art. XXVI.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties may

demand a revision of the Tariffs and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty at

the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications; but if

no such demand be made on either side and no such revision be effected within six

months after the end of the first ten years then the Treaty and Tariffs, in their present

form, shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding

fen years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive period of ten years.

Art. XXVII.—The high contracting parties will agree upon Rules and

Regulations necessary to give full effect to this Treaty. Until such Rules and

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

Regulations are brought into actual operation the Arrangements, Rules and

Regulations subsisting between China and the Western Powers, so far as they are

applicable and not inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty, shall be binding

between the contracting parties.

Art. XXVIII.—The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and

English languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Pleni-

potentiaries of the high contracting parties have agreed that in case of any

divergencies in the interpretation between the Japanese and Chinese texts of the

Treaty, the difference shall be settled by reference to the English text.

Art. XXIX.—The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor

of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the ratification thereof shall

be exchanged at Peking not later than three months from the present date.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and

have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Peking this twenty-first day of the seventh month of the twenty-

ninth year of Meiji, corresponding to the eleventh day of the sixth month of the

twenty-second year of Kuang Hsu (July 21st, 1896).

[n.s.] Chang Yin-Hoon.

,, Hatashi Tadasu.

PROTOCOL REGARDING NEW PORTS

Made at Peking, 19th October, 1896

Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of His

Majesty the Emperor of China have agreed upon the following stipulations supple-

mentary to the Treaty of Commerce and Navigation :—

Art. I.—It is hereby agreed that special Japanese settlements shall be formed

at the places newly opened to commerce, and that affairs relating to roads and

police shall be under the control of the Japanese Consul.

Art. II.—Regulations with respect to steamers or ships owned or chartered

by Japanese subjects at Suehow, Hangchow, and Shanghai shall be determined

after conference with Japan, on the basis of the Provisional Regulations for the

conduct of business by foreign merchants at those places, issued by the Shanghai

Customs on August third of the twenty-second year of Kwang Hsii.

Art. III.—The Government of Japan concedes the right of the Chinese Govern-

ment to impose upon articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China such a

tax as may seem expedient, provided that the said tax shall not differ from, or

exceed, the tax paid by Chinese subjects; and provided that the Chinese Govern-

ment shall, when the Japanese Government so desires, immediately provide sites

for the formation of special Japanese Settlements in Shanghai, Tientsin, Amoy,

and Hankow.

Art. IV.—Instructions shall be issued in Sunfu, in Shantung, that no Chinese

troops shall approach, or take possession of any position, within 5 Japanese ri,

that is to say, about 40 Chinese U, of the limits of any positions held by Japanese

forces in accordance with Treaty stipulations.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA 137

The above Protocol shall be drawn up in the Chinese and Japanese languages

and after comparison the two copies shall be signed and sealed, each side taking

one of the copies.

(Signed) Hayshi Tadasau.

„ Prince King.

„ Yin Lu.

„ Chang Yin-whan.

Nineteenth day, tenth month, twenty-ninth year of Meiji; thirteenth day, ninth

month, twenty-second year of Kuang Hsu.

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY OE COMMERCE AND

NAVIGATION BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

Signed at Shanghai, 8th October, 1903

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, in

order to give full effect to the provisions of Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed

at Peking on the seventh day of the ninth month of the thirty-fourth year of Meiji,

corresponding to the twenty-fifth day of the seventh moon of the twenty-seventh year

of Kuang-hsii, have resolved to conclude a Supplementary Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation, designed to facilitate and promote the commercial relations between

Japan and China, and have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that

is to say:

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Hioki Eki, Jugoi, Fifth Class of the

Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, First Secretary of Legation, and Odagiri Masnoske,

Shorokui, Fifth Class of the Imperial Order of the Rising Sun, Consul-General; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China, Lii Hai-huan, President of the Board of

Public Works; Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent,

formerly Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works; and Wu T’ing-fang,

Senior Vice-President of the Board of Commerce.

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be in

good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:—

Art. I.—Whereas China, with the object of reforming its fiscal system, proposes

to levy a surtax in excess of the tariff rates on all goods passing through the Custom-

houses, whether maritime, or inland and frontier, in order to compensate, in a mea-

sure, for the loss incurred by the complete abolition of lekin, Japan consents to pay

the same surtax as is agreed upon between China and all the Treaty Powers. With

regard to the production tax, consumption tax, and excise, and the taxes on native

opium and salt, leviable by China, Japan also consents to accept the same arrange-

ments as are agreed upon between all the Treaty Powers and China. It is under-

stood, however, that the commerce, rights and privileges of Japan shall not, on account

of the above, be placed at any disadvantage as compared with the commerce, rights

and privileges of other Powers.

1S8 SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

Art. II.—The Chinese Government agrees to permit Japanese steamship-owners

to erect, at their own expense, appliances for hauling through the rapids of that part

of the Yangtzeldang between Ichang and Chungking; but as the interests of the-

population of the provinces of Szechuen, Hunan and Hupeh are involved, it is there-

fore necessary that the approval of the Imperial Maritime Customs be obtained before f

such appliances may be so erected. '1 hese appliances, which shall be at the disposal J

of all vessels, both steamers and junks, shall not obstruct the waterway nor interfere ;

with the free passage of junks or of persons on the banks on the river. Such ap- j

pliances shall be subject to special regulations to be drawn up by the Imperial

Customs.

Art. III.—The Chinese Government agrees that any Japanese steamer capable I

of navigating the inland waterways, upon reporting at the Imperial Maritime Cus-

toms, may proceed for the purpose of trade from a Treaty Port to places inland SO'

reported, on complying with the Original and Supplementary Eegulations for Steam

Navigation Inland.

Art. IV.—-In case Chinese subjects conjointly with Japanese subjects organise

a partnership or company for a legitimate purpose, they shall equitably share the

profits and losses with all the members according to the terms of the agreement or

memorandum and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder, and

they shall be liable to the fulfilment of the obligations imposed by the said agreement

or memorandum and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder,

as accepted by them and as interpreted by the Japanese Courts. Should they .

fail to fulfil the obligations so imposed and legal action he taken against them

in consequence, Chinese Courts shall at once enforce fulfilment of such obligations.

It is understood that in case Japanese subjects conjointly with Chinese subjects

organise a partnership or company, they shall also equitably share the profits and

losses with all the members according to the terms of the agreement or memorandum

and articles of association and the regulations framed thereunder. Should such

Japanese subjects fail to fulfil any of the obligations imposed by the said agreement

or memorandum and articles of association, or by the regulations framed thereunder,

Japanese Courts shall in like maimer at once enforce fulfilment of such obligations

by them.

Art. V.—The Chinese Government agrees to make and faithfully enforce such

regulations as are necessary for preventing Chinese subjects from infringing regis-

tered trade-marks held by Japanese subjects. The Chinese Government likewise

agrees to make such regulations as are necessary for affording protection to registered

copyrights held by Japanese subjects in the books, pamphlets, maps and charts

written in the Chinese language and specially prepared for the use of Chinese people.

It is further agreed that the Chinese Government shall establish registration

offices where foreign trade-marks and copyrights held by Japanese subjects in protec-

tion of the Chinese Government shall be registered in accordance with the provisions

of the regulations to be hereafter framed by the Chinese Government for the purpose

of protecting trade-marks and copyrights. It is understood that Chinese trade-

marks and copyrights properly registered according to the provisions of the laws and

regulations of Japan will receive similar protection against infringement in Japan.

This Article shall not be held to protect against due process of law any Japanese

or Chinese subject who may be the author, proprietor, or seller of any publication

calculated to injure the well-being of China.

Art. VI.—China agrees to establish itself, as soon as possible, a system of

uniform national coinage, and provide for a uniform national currency, which shall be

freely used as legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other obligations by

Japanese subjects as well ns by Chinese subjects in the Chinese Empire. It is

understood, however, that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid

on the basis of the Haikwan Tael.

Art. VII.—As the weights and measures used by the mercantile and other classes

for general and commercial purposes in the different provinces of China vary

and do not accord with the standards fixed by the Imperial Government Boards, thus

SUPPLEMENTAKY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

resulting in detriment to the trade of Chinese and foreigners, the Governors-General

and Governors of all the provinces, after careful inquiry into existing conditions, shall

consult together and fix upon uniform standards which, after a Memorial to the

Throne for sanction, shall be adopted and used in all transactions by officials and

people throughout all the Empire. These standards shall be first used in the places

opened to foreign trade and gradually extended to inland places. Any differences

resulting from divergence between the new weights and measures and those now in

vogue shall be equitably settled, whether by way of increase or decrease, according

to the amount of such difference.

Art. VIII.—The Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland of the fifth moon of

the twenty-fourth year of KuangHsu and the Supplementary Rules of the seventh moon

of the same year, having been found in some respects inconvenient in working, the

Chinese Government hereby agrees to amend them, and to annex such new Rules to

this Treaty. These Rules shall remain in force until altered by mutual consent.

Art. IX.—The provisions of all Treaties and engagements now subsisting between

Japan and China, in so far us they are not modified or repealed by this Act, are

hereby expressly stipulated in addition, that the Japanese Government, officers,

subjects, commerce, navigation, shipping, industries and property of all kinds shall

be allowed free and full participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages

which have been or may hereafter be granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China

or by the Chinese Government or by the Provincial or Local Administrations of

China to the Government, officers, subjects, commerce, navigation, shipping, in-

dustries or property of any other nation. The Japanese Government will do its

utmost to secure to Chinese officers and subjects resident in Japan the most

favourable treatment compatible with the laws and regulations of the Empire.

Art. X.—The high contracting parties hereto agree that, in case of and after

the complete withdrawal of the foreign troops stationed in the province of Chihli and

of the Legation guards, a place of international residence and trade in Peking will be

forthwith opened by China itself. The detailed regulation relating thereto shall be

settled in due time after consultation. The Chinese Government ngrees to open to

foreign trade, within six months from the exchange of the Ratifications of this

Treaty, Ch‘angsha-fu in the province of Hunan, on the same footing as the ports

already opened to foreign trade. Foreigners residing in this open port are to observe

the Municipal and Police Regulations on the same footing as Chinese residents, and

they are not to be entitled to establish a Municipality and Police of .their own within

the limits of this Treaty Port, except with the consent of the Chinese authorities.

The Chinese Government agrees that, upon the exchange of the Ratifications of

this Treaty, Moukden and Tatungkow, both in the province of Shengking, will be

opened by China itself as places of international residence and trade. The selection

of suitable localities to be set apart for international use and occupation and the regula-

tions for these places set apart for foreign residence and trade shall be agreed upon

by the Governments of Japan and China, after consultation together.

Art. XI.—The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform

its judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Japan and Western

nations, Japan agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and will also be pre-

pared to relinquish its extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the

Chinese laws, the arrangements for their administration, and other considerations

warrant it in so doing.

Art. XII.—The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and English

languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Plenipotentiaries of

the high contracting parties have agreed that in case of any divergence in the in-

terpretation between the Japanese and Chinese texts of the Treaty, the difference

shall be settled by reference to the English text.

Art. XIII.—The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of

Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and the ratifications thereof shall be

exchanged at Peking as soon as possible, and not later than six months from the

140 SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

present date. In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the

same and have affixed thereto the seals of their arms.

Done at Shanghai, this eighth day of the tenth month of the thirty-sixth year of

Meiji, corresponding to the eighteenth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-ninth

year of Kuang Hsu.

[l.s.] Hioki Eki.

„ OoAGIRI MaSNOSKE.

(Signed) Lu Hai-Huan.

„ Sheng Hsuan-Huai.

„ Wu T'tng-Fang.

Annex 1

INLAND WATERS STEAM NAVIGATION

Additional Rules

1. —Japanese steamship owners are at liberty to lease warehous

the banks of waterways from Chinese subjects for a term not exceeding twenty-five

years, with option of renewal on terms to be mutually arranged. In cases where

Japanese merchants are unable to secure warehouses and jetties from Chinese

subjects on satisfactory terms, the local officials, after consultation with tbe Governor

or Governor-Genera] or Minister of Commerce, shall arrange to provide these on

renewable lease, as above mentioned, at current equitable rates.

2. —Jetties shall only be erected in such positions that they w

the inland waterway or interfere with navigation, and with the sanction of the

nearest Commissioner of Customs; such sanction, however, shall not be arbitrarily

withheld.

3. —Japanese merchants shall pay taxes and contributions on th

and jetties on the same footing as Chinese proprietors of similar properties in the

neighbourhood. Japanese merchants may only employ Chinese agents and staff to

reside in warehouses so leased at places touched at by steamers engaged in inland

traffic to carry on their business; but Japanese merchants may visit these places from

time to time to look after their affairs. The existing rights of Chinese jurisdiction over

Chinese subjects shall not by reason of this clause be diminished or interfered with in

any way.

4. —Steam vessels navigating the inland waterways of China sha

for loss caused to riparian proprietors by damage which they may do to the banks

or works on them, and for the loss which may be caused by such damage. In

the event of China desiring to prohibit the use of some particular shallow

waterway by launches, because there is reason to fear that the use of it by them

would be likely to injure the banks and cause damage to the adjoining country, the

Japanese authorities, when appealed to, shall, if satisfied of the validity of the

objection, prohibit the use of that waterway by Japanese launches, provided that

Chinese launches are also prohibited from using it. Both Foreign and Chinese

launches are prohibited from crossing dams and weirs at present in existence on

inland waterways where they are likely to cause injury to such works, which would

be detrimental to the water service of the local people.

5. —The main object of the Japanese Government in desiring to

waterways of China opened to steam navigation being to afford facilities for the

rapid transport of both foreign and native merchandise, they undertake to offer no

impediment to the transfer to a Chinese company and the Chineseof flag any

SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA 141

Japanese steamer which may now or hereafter be employed on the inland waters of

China, should the owner be willing to make the transfer. In the event of a Chinese

company registered under Chinese law being formed to run steamers on the inland

waters of China, the fact of Japanese subje ts holding shares in such a company shall

not entitle the steamer to fly the Japanese lia^.

6. —Registered-steamers and their tows are forbidden, just as j

been forbidden, to carry contraband goods. Infraction of this rule will entail the

penalties prescribed in the Treaties for such an offence and cancellation of the Inland

Waters Navigation Certificate carried by the vessels, which will be prohibited from

thereafter plying on inland waters.

7. —As it is desirable that the people living inland should be d

as possible by advent of steam vessels to which they are not accustomed, inland

waters not hitherto frequented by steamers shall be opened as gradually as may be

convenient to merchants and only as the owners of steamers may see prospect of

remunerative trade. In cases where it is intended to run steam vessels on water-

ways on which such vessels have not hitherto run, intimation shall be made to the

Commissioner of Customs at the nearest open port, who shall report the matter to the

Ministers of Commerce. The latter, in conjunction with the Governor-General or

Governor of the province, after careful consideration of all the circumstances of the

case, shall at once give their approval.

8. —A registered steamer may ply within the waters of a port,

port or ports to another open port or ports, or from one open port or ports to places

inland, and thence back to such port or ports. She may, on making due report to

the Customs, land or ship passengers or cargo at any recognised places of trade

passed in the course of the voyage; but may not ply between inland places

exclusively except with the consent of the Chinese Government.

9. —Any cargo and passenger boats may be towed by steamers

and crew of any boat towed shall be Chinese. Ail boats, irrespective of ownership,

must be registered before they can proceed inland.

10. —The above Rules are supplementary to the Regulation

fifth and seventh moons of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsvi, which remain in

full force and effect in so far as they are not modified by the Rules now agreed upon.

The present Rules and the Regulations of the fifth and seventh moons of the

twenty-fifth year of Kuang Hsu may hereafter be modified, as circumstances require, by

mutual consent.

Done at Shanghai this eighth day of the tenth moon of the thirty-sixth year of

Meiji, corresponding to the eighteenth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-ninth

year of Kuang Hsu. •

[l.s.] Hioki Eki.

„ Odagiri Masnoske.

(Signed) Lu Hai-Huan.

„ Sheng Hstjan-Huai,

„ Wu T‘ing-Fang.

Annex 2

Imperial Japanese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Chinese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Month of the 36th Year of Meiji.

Gentlemen,—According to Article III. of present Treaty, the Chinese Govern-

ment agree that any Japanese steamer capable of navigating the Inland Waterways,

upon reporting at the Imperial Maritime Customs, may proceed for purpose of trade

from a treaty port to places inland, so reported, on complying with the Original and

Supplementary Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland.

142 SUPPLEMENTARY TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN-AND CHINA

It is understood that all classes of Japanese steamers, whatever their size, provided [,

they are capable of navigating the Inland Waterways, may, on complying with the fj

Eegulations, receive an Inland Waters Certificate, and carry on trade with Inland

places, and the Chinese Government will in no case raise difficulties and stop such v

steamers from plying to and from Inland places.

We have the honour, in order to prevent future misunderstandings, to address

this despatch to Your Excellencies, and to request that instructions be sent to the

Inspector General of Maritime Customs to act in accordance with this understanding.

We have further the honour to request a reply from your Excellencies.

We have the honour, etc.,

(Signed) Hioki Eki

„ Odagiri Masnoske.

Annex 3

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Japanese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 26th Year of Kuang Hsii.

Gentlemen,—We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Excel-

lencies’ despatch of this date, written with a view of preventing future misunder-

standings, to the effect that, in accordance with the provisions of Article III. of the

present Treaty, ail classes of Japanese steamers, whatever their size, provided they are

capable of navigating the Inland Waterways, may on complying with the Regulations

receive an Inland Waters Certificate, and ply to and from inland places, and that the

Chinese Government will in no case raise difficulties and stop them.

During the negotiations of this Article, we received a list from your Excellencies

of the Japanese steamers, viz.:—Sanyo Maru, Setagawa Maru, Hiuga Maru, Urato

Marti, Neisei Maru, Heiau Maru, Taiko Maru, Yoshino Maru, Meiko Maru, Fukuju

Maru, Hijikawa Maru, Nagata Maru, Kyodo Maru, Horai Maru, Kwanko Maru,

Keiko Maru, Kinriu Maru, Zensho Maru and Kohei Maru, ranging from one hundred

and twenty-one tons to four hundred and ten tons register—plying from Chefoo to

inland places in Manchuria, under Inland Waters Certificate and in accordance with

the Regulations for Steam Navigation Inland, which vessels have not been prevented

from doing so on account of their class.

At that time we instructed the Deputy Inspector General of Customs to make

inquiries into the records of the Custom-houses, and he reported that the circum-

stances were in accordance with your Excellencies’ statement.

In consequence of the receipt of your Excellencies’ despatch, we shall communi-

cate with the Waiwupu and request that instructions be sent to the Inspector General

of Customs to take these circumstances into consideration and to act accordingly, and

we have the honour to write this despatch for purposes of record.

We have the honour to be,

(Signed) Lu Hai-Huan.

„ Sheng Hsuan-Huan.

„ Wtr T‘ing-Fang.

SUPPLEMENTARY TEEAT Y BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA 143

AnNex 4

Imperial Japanese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Chinese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Month of the 26th Year of Meiji.

Gentlemen,—The provision contained in No. 9 of the Supplementary Rules

governing steam navigation on Inland Waters, published in the seventh moon of the

twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu, regarding the appointment of an officer to collect

dues and duties, not having in all cases been given effect to, we have the honour to

request that your Excellencies’ Government will again issue instructions to all pro

vinces to give strict effect to this provision, as it is a matter of importance.

We trust that your Excellencies will comply with the request contained in this

despatch and that you will favour us with a reply.

We have the honour, etc.,

(Signed) Hioki Eki.

„ Odagiri Masnoske.

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Japanese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 29th Year Kwang-Hsii.

Gentlemen,— We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Excel-

lencies’ despatch of this date to the effect that the provision contained in No. 9 of

the Supplementary Rules governing steam navigation on Inland Waters, published

in the seventh moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu, regarding the appoint-

ment of au officer to collect dues and duties, not having in all cases been given effect

to, you request that instructions be again issued to all provinces to give strict effect

to this provision, as it is a matter of importance.

We have noted the above and have communicated with the proper authorities in

order that action may be taken, and have now the honour to write this reply for your

Excellencies’ information.

We have the honour, etc.,

(Signed) Lu Hai-Huan.

„ Sheng Hsttan-Huai.

„ Wu TTng Fang.

Annex f

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Japanese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 18th Day of the 8th Moon of the 29th Year of Kuang Hsii.

Gentlemen,—According to the provision of Article X. of this Treaty, regarding

the establishment in Peking of a place of international residence and trade, it is

agreed that in case of, and after, the complete withdrawal of the foreign troops, now

144 SUPPLEMENTARY TEEATT BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

guarding the Legations and communications, a place in Peking outside the Inner

■City, convenient to both parties and free from objections, shall be selected and set

apart as a place where merchants of all nationalities may reside and carry on trade.

Within the limits of this place merchants of all nationalities shall be at liberty to

lease land, build houses and warehouses, and establish places of business; but as to

the leasing of houses and land belonging to Chinese private individuals there must

be willingness on the part of the owners, and the terms thereof must be equitably

arranged without any force or compulsion. All roads and bridges in this place will

be under the jurisdiction and control of China. Foreigners residing in this place are

to observe the Municipal and Police Regulations on the same footing as Chinese

residents, and they are not to be entitled to establish a Municipality and Police of

their own within its limits except with the consent of the Chinese authorities. When

such place of international residence and trade shall have been opened and its limits

properly defined, the foreigners who have been residing scattered both within and

without the city walls shall all be required to remove their residence thereto and

they shall not be allowed to remain in separate places, and thereby cause inconvenience

in the necessary supervision by the Chinese authorities. The value of the land and

buildings held by such foreigners shall be agreed upon equitably, and due compen-

sation therefor shall be paid. The period for such removal shall be determined in

■due time, and those who do not remove before the expiry of this period shall not be

entitled to compensation.

We have considered it to be to our mutual advantage to come to the present

basis of understanding in order to avoid future unnecessary negotiations, and we beg

that your Excellencies will consider and agree to it, and will favour us with a reply.

We have the honour, etc.,

(Signed) Lu Hai-Huan.

„ Sheno Hsuan-Huai.

„ Wu T‘ing-Fang.

Annex 7

Imperial Japanese Commissioners for Treaty Revision to Imperial Chinese

Commissioners for Treaty Revision

Shanghai, the 8th Day of the 10th Month of the 36th Tear of Meiji.

G-entlemen,—We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your

Excellencies’ despatch of the 18th day of the 8th moon of the 29th year of Kwang

Hsu.

In reply we beg to inform you that we agree generally to all the terms contained

in the despatch under acknowledgment. As to the detailed regulations, these

shall in due time be considered and satisfactorily settled in accordance with

Article X. of this Treaty; but it is understood that such regulations shall not differ

in any respect to our prejudice from those which may be agreed upon between China

and other Powers. We have the honour to send your Excellencies this communi-

cation in reply and for your information.

We have the honour, etc.,

(Signed) Hioki Eki.

„ Odagiri Masnoske.

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN RELATING

TO MANCHURIA

Signed at Peking, 22nd DfccEMBER, 1905

I. —The Chinese Government agrees to all the transfers made to J

tiy Articles V. and VI. of the Treaty of Peace between Japan and Russia.

II. —The Japanese Government agrees to observe as much as

ing Treaties in regard to the lease of land for the construction of railways, which

have been concluded between China and Russia.

In case of any question arising in future, the Japanese Government will consult

with the Chinese Government before settlement.

III. —This present Treaty will take effect from the date of si

ratified by his Imperial Japanese Majesty and his Imperial Chinese Majesty, and

ratifications will be exchanged in Peking as early as possible within two months from

the date of signing.

In witness whereof the Plenipotentiaries of the two contracting parties have

signed and affixed their respective seals on the Treaty done in duplicate in Japanese

and Chinese.

Done at Peking, 22nd December, 1905.

Komttea Jutaro,

Minister for Foreign Affairs, Special Ambassador;

Uchida Kosai,

Minister Plenipotentiary;

Prince Ching,

Minister Plenipotentiary;

Kn Ko-ki,

Minister Plenipotentiary;

Yuan Shi-kai,

Minister Plenipotentiary.

Supplementary Agreement

The Governments of the two contracting parties have decided on the following

matters in which both parties, are interested in Manchuria and agreed upon the

following stipulations for their guidance:—

I. —The Chinese Government agrees to open the following cities

to"the residence of foreigners and foreign trade with as little delay as possible after

the evacuation of Manchuria by the Japanese and Russian armies:—

Shingking Province:—Whangfengcheng, Liaoyang, Sinminting, Tiding, Tung-

kiangtze, and Fakumen.

Kirin Province:—Changchun (Kwangchengtze),-Kirin, Harbin, Ninguta, Hong-

■chun and Sanchin.

Heilunlcing Province :—Tsitsikar, Hailar, Aihon and Manjuri.

II. —The Chinese Government having expressed its earnest desir

withdrawal of the Japanese and Russian armies and railway guards in Manchuria,

and the Japanese Government being desirous of complying with the desire of the

Chinese Government, agrees to make similar arrangements in case of the Russian

Government agreeing to the withdrawal of its railway guards, or of any special under-

standing having been arrived at between China and Russia in the matter. When

order has been perfectly established in Manchuria and the Chinese authorities have

become able to fully protect the life and property of foreigners in Manchuria, the

Japanese Government, in common with the Russian Government, will withdraw the

railway guards.

III. —The Japanese Government will immediately inform the

146 TREA.TY BETWEEN'CHINA AND JAPAN RELATING TO MANCHURIA

ment of any locality in Manchuria which is evacuated by the Japanese troops, and5

on receiving such information the Chinese Government is authorised to send a force

of troops necessary for the maintenance of the public security and order to the locality

evacuated by the Japanese troops, even before the expiration of the term specified in

the Japanese-Russian Treaty for the withdrawal of the troops. In case of bandits

molesting villages in the district still under occupation of the Japanese troops, the

Chinese local authorities may send troops to arrest the bandits, but Chinese troops

despatched on this work shall not be allowed to enter within twenty Chinese miles of

the place where Japanese troops are stationed.

IV. —The Japanese Government agrees to return to their re

the Government or private property in Manchuria occupied or taken possession of by

the Japanese army for military purposes, as Manchuria is evacuated by the troops.

Even before the evacuation such property, when useless for the needs of the troops*,

will be returned to the respective owners.

V. —The Chinese Government agrees to take all measures necessa

the tombs of the Japanese soldiers killed in battle in Manchuria, and the monuments

erected in commemoration of their loyalty.

VI. —The Chinese Government agrees to the military ra

between Antongcheng and Mukden being transformed into a line for the transmission^

of merchandise of all nationals and conducted by the Japanese Government. The

term in which the railway will be conducted by the Japanese to be fifteen years from

the date on which the transformation of the line is completed. Upon the expiry of

the term, the railway will be sold to the Chinese Government, its value being decided

by two experts, one to be appointed by each of the contracting parties. During the

time the line is under the control of the Japanese, Chinese troops, arms, and provi-

sions will be transported according to the terms of the Chinese Eastern Railway

Treaty. In effecting the transformation of the railway, the Japanese authorities in

charge will consult with commissioners to be appointed by the Chinese Government.

Rates of freight on goods belonging to the Chinese Government or private individuals

will be specially arranged.

VII. —The two contracting parties agree to make arrangeme

for connecting the service of railways in South Manchuria and those in China proper,

in order to promote and facilitate the communications and transport of goods.

VIII. —The Chinese Government agrees to exempt ma

railways in South Manchuria from all duties and lekin.

IX. —At Yingkow (Newchwaug), which is already opened to

also in Antongcheng, Mukden, and other places in theShingkiug province, which it is

agreed to open to foreign trade, settlements for the exclusive use of Japanese will be

established, and the provision for this purpose made by the Japanese and Chinese

authorities in a special agreement.

X. —The Chinese Government agrees to a joint-stock lumber com

and Chinese being formed with a view to carrying on a business of cutting lumber in

the forests on the right bank of the Yalu. The Chinese Government further agrees

that the area of land where the business will be carried on, the terra of the charter,,

the process of the formation of the company, and the articles of the business, will be

determined upon in a special agreement. The interest in the company of the Japanese

and Chinese shareholders will be equally divided.

XI. —In regard to the trade on the frontier of Manchuria a

according to most-favoured-nation principle will be extended to each contracting party.

XII. —The Governments of the two contracting parties agree

specified in the Articles of the Treaty signed this day, and in the supplementary agree-

ment, each party will give the most considerate treatment to the other.

This agreement will take effect from the date of signing and is to be considered

as ratified with the ratification of the Treaty signed this day.

In witness whereof the contracting parties have signed and affixed their seals in-

duplicate in Japanese and Chinese, with due authority entrusted to them by their

respective Governments. '

SINO-JAPANESE TREATY RELATING TO SHANTUNG

Ratified in, Tokyo on June 8th, 1915

Treaty Respecting the Province of Shantung

(Signed at Peking, May 25th, 1915)

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Excellency the President of the

Republic of China, being desirous to maintain the general peace of the Far East and

to further strengthen the relations of amity and good neighbourhood existing between

the two countries, have resolved to conclude a treaty for that purpose, and to that

end have named their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, M. Eki Hioki, Jushii, Second Class of

the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary to the Republic of China; and

His Excellency the President of the Republic of China, Mr. Lu-Cheng-hsiang,

Tsung-Ching, First Class of the Order of Chia-Ho, Minister of Foreign Affairs of

the Republic of China ;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, which

were found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—The Chinese Oovernment engage to recognize all matters that may be

agreed upon between the Japanese Government and the German Government re-

-specting the disposition of all the rights,interests and concessions, which, in virtue of

treaties or otherwise, Germany possesses vis-ct-vis China in relation to the Province

of Shantung.

Art. II.—The Chinese Government engage that, in case they undertake the con-

struction of a railway connecting Chefoo orLungkou with the Kiaochau-Tsinan Rail-

way, they shall, in the event of Germany’s surrendering her right of providing capital

for the Cbefoo-Weihsien railway line, enter into negotiations with Japanese capitalists

for the purpose of financing the said undertaking.

Art. III.—The Chinese Government engage to open, of their own accord, as early

as possible, suitable cities and towns in the Province of Shantung for the residence

and trade of foreigners.

Art. IY.—The present Treaty shall take effect on the day of its signature.

The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and by

His Excellency the President of the Republic of China, and the ratifications thereof

shall be exchanged at Tokyo as soon as possible.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty

made in duplicate, in Japanese and in Chinese, and have hereunto affixed their seals.

Done at Peking the 25th day of the 5th month of the 4th year of Taisho, correspond-

ing to the 25th day of the 5th month of the 4th year of the inauguration of the

Republic of China.

Eki Hioki,

Etc., etc., etc.

Lu Cheng-hsieng,

Etc., etc., etc.

148 SINO-JAPANESE TREATY RELATING TO SHANTUNG

Exchange op Notes

The following Notes dealing with the Shantung Treaty were exchanged :—

Monsieur le Ministre:— Peking, May .25th, 1591.

In the name of the Chinese Government, I have the honour to make the-

following declaration to your Excellency’s Government:—

The Chinese Government will never lease or alienate, under any designation

whatever, to any foreign Power any territory within or along the coast of the

Province of Shantung or any island lying near the said coast.

I avail, etc., etc.,

Lu Cheng-hsieng,

His Excellency Minister of Foreign Affairs of

Mr. Eki Hioki, the Eepublic of China.

H. I. J. M.’s Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Monsieur le MinistrePeking, May 25th, 1915.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receiptjjof your^Excellency’s note of to-

day’s date in which you make, in the name of the Government^of China, the following

declaration to the Imperial Government of Japan:—

The Chinese Government will never lease or alienate, under any designation

whatever, to any foreign Power any territory within or along the coast of the Province

of Shantung or any island lying near the said coast.

In reply I beg to state that I have taken note of this declaration.

I avail, etc., etc.,

Eki Hioki,

His Excellency H. I. J. M.’s Envoy Extraordinary

Mr. Ltr Cheng-hsieng, and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Minister of Foreign Affairs

of the Republic of China.

Monsieur le Ministre:— Peking, May 25th, 1915.

I have the honour to state that the cities and towns to be opened in accordance

with the stipulation of Art. III. of the Treaty respecting Shantung Province, signed

to-day, will be selected and the regulations therefor will be drawn up by the Chinese

Government, and will be decided upon after consultation with the Japanese Minister.

I avail, etc., etc.,

Lu Cheng-hsieng,

His Excellency Minister of Foreign Affairs of

Mr. Eki Hioki, the Republic of China.

H. I. J. M.’s Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary.

SINO-JAPANESE TREATY RESPECTING SOUTH MANCHURIA, ETC. 149

Monsieur le Ministre Peking, May 25th, 1915.

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellency’s note of to-day’s-

date, in which you state that the cities and towns to be opened in accordance with

the stipulation of Art. III. of the Treaty respecting Shantung Province, signed to-

day, will be selected and the regulations therefor will be drawn up by the Chinese-

Government, and will be decided upon after consultation with the Japanese Minister.

In reply I beg to state that I have taken note of the same.

I avail, etc., etc.,

Eki Hioki,

His Excellency H. I. J. M.’s Envoy Extraordinary

Mr. Ltj Cheng-hsieng, and Minister Plenipotentiary.

Minister of Foreign Affairs

of the Republic of China.

SINO-JAPANESE TREATY RESPECTING SOUTH MAN-

CHURIA AND EASTERN INNER MONGOLIA

[Signed at Peking, May 25th, 1915]

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Excellency the President o f the

Republic of China, being desirous to develop the economic relations of the two coun-

tries in the regions of South Manchuria and Eastern Inner Mongolia, have resolved

to conclude a treaty for that purpose and to that end have named their Plenipoten-

tiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Mr. Eki Hioki, Jushii, Second Class of the

Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary to the Republic of China'; and

His Excellency the President of the Republic of China, Mr. Lu Cheng-hsien g

Tsung Ching, First Class of the Order of Chia-Ho, Minister of Foreign Affairs of

the P ablic of China;

w no, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, which

were found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles :—

Ait. I.—The High Contracting Parties mutually agree to extend the term of the

lease of Port Arthur and Dairen, and the term relating to the South Manchurian

Railway and the Antung-Mukden Railway, to a period of ninty-nine years respectively.

Art. II.—The subjects of Japan shall be permitted in South Manchuria to lease

land necessary either for erecting buildings for various commercial and industrial

uses or for agricultural purposes.

Art. III.—-The subjects of Japan shall have liberty to enter, travel and reside in

South Manchuria and to carry on business of various kinds—commercial, industrial

and otherwise.

Art. IV.—-The Government of China shall permit joint undertakings, in Eastern

Inner Mongolia, of the subjects of Japan and citizens of China, in agriculture and

industries auxiliary thereto.

150 SINO-JAPANESE TREATY RESPECTING SOUTH MANCHURIA, ETC.

Art. Y.—With respect to the three preceding Articles, the subjects of Japan

shall produce before the local authorities the passports duly issued for the purpose

of registration, aud shall also submit themselves to the police laws and regulations

and taxes of China.

In civil and criminal suits, the Japanese consular officer, where a Japanese

subject is the defendant, and the Chinese official, where a Chinese citizen is the

defendant, shall respectively try and decide the case, both the Japanese consular officer

and the Chinese official being permitted each to, send his agent to attend the trial of

the other to watch the proceedings ; provided that in civil suits arising out of land

disputes between Japanese subjects and Chinese citizens the cases shall be tried and

decided by the joint tribunal composed of the properly authorized officials of the two

countries, in accordance with the laws and local usages of China.

In the future when the judicial system in the said regions shall have been com-

pletely reformed, all civil and criminal suits involving Japanese subjects shall be wholly

tried and decided by the law-courts of China.

Art. YI.—The Government of China engage to open of their own accord, as early

as possible, suitable cities and towns in Eastern Inner Mongolia for the residence

and trade of foreigners.

Irt. VII.—The Government of China agree to a speedy fundamental revision of

various agreements and contracts relating to the Kirin-Changchun Railway, on the

basis of the terms embodied in railway loan agreements which China has heretofore

entered into with various foreign capitalists.

If in future the Chinese Government grant to foreign capitalists, in matters

that relate to railway loans, more advantageous terms than those in the various

existing railway loan agreements, the above-mentioned Kirin-Changchun Railway

Loan Agreement shall, if so desired by Japan, be further revised.

Art. VIII.—Except as otherwise provided in this Treaty, all existing treaties

between Japan and China with respect to Manchuria shall remain in force.

Art. IX.—The present Treaty shall take effect on the day of its signature.

The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and

by His Excellency the President of the Republic of China, and the ratifications thereof

shall be exchanged at Tokyo as soon as possible.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty made

in duplicate, in Japanese and in Chinese, and have hereunto affixed their seals.

Hone at Peking the 25th day of the 5th month of the 4th year of Taisho,

corresponding to the 25th day of the 5th month of the 4th year of the inaugura-

tion of the Republic of China.

Eki Hioki,

Etc., etc., etc.

Lu Cheng-hsieng,

Etc., etc., etc.

EINAL PROTOCOL MADE BETWEEN CHINA

AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

[ Translation ]

The Plenipotentiaries of Germany, Monsieur A. Mumm yon Schwartzenstein y

Austria-Hungary, Baron M. Czikann; Belgium, Monsieur Joostens; Spain, Monsieur

B. J. de Cologan; United States, Mr. W. W. Bockhill; France, Monsieur Beau;

Great Britain, Sir Ernest Satow; Italy, Marquis Salvage Raggi; Japan, Monsieur

Jutaro Komuro; Netherlands, Monsieur F. M. Knobel; Russia, Monsieur Michael

de Giers; and the Plenipotentaries of China, His Highness Yi-K’uang, Prince of the

first rank; Ch’ing, President of the Board of Foreign Affairs; and His Excellency

Li Hung-chang, Count of the first rank, Su-Yi, Tutor of tiie Heir Apparent, Grand

Secretary of the WAn-Hua Throne Hall, Minister of Commerce, Superintendent of

Trade for the North, Governor-General of Chihli, have met for the purpose of

declaring that China has complied with the conditions laid down in the Note of the

22nd of December, 1900, and which were accepted in their entirety by His Majesty

the Emperor of China in a Decree dated the 27th of December, 1900 (Annex No 1).

Art. I.—By an Imperial Edict of the 9th of June last (Annex No. 2) Tsai-

FAng, Prince of the first rank, Chun, was appointed Ambassador of His Majesty

the Emperor of China and directed in that capacity to convey to His Majesty the

Emperor of Germany the expression of the regrets of His Majesty the Emperor of

China and of the Chinese Government at the assassination of His Excellency the

late Baron von Ketteler, German Minister, Prince Chun left Peking the 12th of

July last to carry out the orders which had been given him.

Art. II.—The Chinese Government has stated that it will erect on the spot of

the assassination of H. E. the late Baron von Ketteler, a commemorative monument,

worthy of the rank of the deceased, and bearing an inscription in the Latin, German

and Chinese languages, which shall express the regrets of H. M. the Emperor of

China for the murder committed.

The Chinese Plenipotentiaries have informed H. E. the German Plenipotentiary,

in a letter dated the 22nd of July last (Annex No. 3) that an arch of the whole

width of the street would be erected on the said spot, and that work on it was begun

on the 25th of June last.

Art. Ha.—Imperial Edicts of the 13th and 21st of February, 1901 (Annexes

Nos. 4, 5 and 6), inflicted the following punishments on the principal authors of

the attempts and crimes committed against the Foreign Governments and their

nationals:—■

Tsai-I, Prince Tuan, and Tsai-Lan, DukeFu-ktio, were sentenced to be brought

before the Autumnal Court of Assize for execution and it was agreed that, if the

Emperor saw fit to grant them their lives, they should be exiled to Turkestan and

there imprisoned for life, without the possibility of commutation of these punishments.

Tsai Hsiin, Prince Chuang, Ying-Nien, President of the Court of Censors;

and Chao Shu-chiao, President of the Board of Punishments, were condemned to

commit suicide.

Yu Hsien, Governor of Shansi; Ch’i Hsiu, President of the Board of Rites; and

Hsii Gi’eng-yd, formerly senior Vice-President of the Board of Punishments, were

condemned to death.

Posthumous degradation was inflicted on K’ang Yi, Assistant Grand Secretary,

President of the Board of Works; Hsu T’ung, Grand Secretary ; and Li Ping-h6ng,

former Governor-General of Szu-ch’uan.

152 FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901

Imperial Edict of February 13th, 1901 (Annex No. 7), rehabilitated the

memories of Hsu Tung-yi, President of the Board of War; Li Shan, President of

the Board of Works; Hsu Ching-ch’eng, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Civil

•Office; Lien Yuan, Vice-Chancellor of the Grand Council; and Yuan Ch’ang,

Vice-President of the Court of Sacrifices, who had been put to death for having

protested against the outrageous breaches of International Law of last year.

Prince Chuang committed suicide on the 21st of February, 1901: Ying Nien and

Chao Shu-chiao on the 24th, Yu-Hsien was executed on the 22nd, Ch’i-Hsiu and Hsii

Ch’eng-yu on the 26th, Tung Fu-hsiang, General in Kansu, has been deprived of

his office by Imperial Edict of the 13th of February, 1901, pending the determination

of the final punishment to be inflicted on him.

Imperial Edicts dated the 29th April and the 19th August, 1901, have inflicted

various punishments on the provincial officials convicted of the crimes and outrages

•of last summer.

A rt. 116.—An Imperial Edict promulgated the 19th August, 1901 (Annex No. 8),

ordered the suspension of official examinations for five years in all cities where

foreigners were massacred or submitted to cruel treatment.

Art. III.—So as to make honourable reparation for the assassination of

Mr. Sugiyama, Chancellor of the Japanese Legation, H.M. the Emperor of China by

an Imperial Edict of the 18th of June, 1901 (Annex No. 9), appointed Na T’ung,

Vice-President of the Board of Finances, to be his Envoy Extraordinary, and specially

directed him to convey to H.M. the Emperor of Japan the expression of the regret

of H.M. the Emperor of China and of his Government at the assassination of

Mr. Sugiyama.

Art. IV.—The Chinese Government has agreed to erect an expiatory monument

in each of the foreign or international cemeteries which were desecrated or in which

the tombs were destroyed.

It has been agreed with the Representatives of the Powers that the Leeations

interested shall settle the details for the erection of these monuments, China bearing

all the expenses thereof, estimated at ten thousand Taels for the cemeteries at Peking

and in its neighbourhood, and at five thousand Taels for cemeteries iu the Provinces.

The amounts have been paid and the list of these cemeteries is enclosed herewith

(Annex No. 10).

Art. V.—China has agreed to prohibit the importation into its territory of arms

and ammunition as well as of materials exclusively used for the manufacture of arms

and ammunition.

An Imperial Edict has been issued on the 25th of August, 1901 (Annex No. 11),

forbidding said importation for a term of two years. New Edicts may be issued

subsequently extending this by other successive terms of two years in case of

necessity recognised by the Powers.

Art. VI.—By an Imperial Edict dated the 22nd of May, 1901 (Annex No. 12),

H. M. the Emperor of China agreed to pay the Powers an indemnity of four hundred

and fifty millions of Haikwan Taels.

This sum represents the total amount of the indemnities for States, Companies,

or Societies, private individuals and Chinese referred to in Article VI. of the Note of

December 22nd, 1900.

(a) These four hundred and fifty millions constitute a gold debt calculated

at the rate of the Haikwan Tael to the gold currency of each country

as indicated below:—

Haikwan Tael—Mark 3.055

Austro-Hungary crown 3.595

Gold dollar 0.742

Franc 3.740

Pound sterling .£0. 3s. Od.

Yen 1.407

Netherlands florin 1.796

Gold rouble 1.412

FINAL PEOTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWEES, 1901 15a

This sum in gold shall bear interest at 4 per cent, per annum, and the

capital shall be reimbursed by China in thirty-nine years in the

manner indicated in the annexed plan of amortization (Annex No-

13). Capital and interest shall be payable in gold or at the rates of

exchange corresponding to the dates at which the different payments

shall fall due.

The amortization shall commence the 1st of January, 1902, and shall finish

at the end of the year 1940. The amortizations are payable annually,

the first payment being fixed on the first of January, 1903.

Interest shall run from the first of July, 1901, but the Chinese Government

shall have the right to pay off within a term of three years, beginning

January, 1902, the arrears of the first six months ending the 31st of

December, 1901, on condition, however, that it pays compound interest

at the rate of four per cent, perannumonthe sums, the payments of which

shall have been thus deferred.

Interest shall be payable semi-annually, the first payment being fixed on

the 1st of July, 1902.

(b) The service of the debt shall take place in Shanghai in the following

manner:—

Each Power shall be represented by a delegate on a commission of bankers

authorised to receive the amount of interest and amortization which

shall be paid to it by the Chinese Authorities designated for that

purpose, to divide it among the interested parties and to give a receipt

for the same.

(c) The Chinese Government shall deliver to the Doyen of the Diplomatic

Corps at Peking a bond for the lump sum, which shall subsequently be

converted into fractional bonds bearing the signature of the delegates

of the Chinese Government designated for that purpose. This

operation and all those relating to issuing of the bonds shall be

performed by the above-mentioned Commission, in accordance with

the instructions which the Powers shall send their delegates.

(d) The proceeds of the revenues assigned to the payment of the bonds

shall be paid monthly to the Commission.

(e) The revenues assigned as security for the bonds are the following:—

(1.) The balance of the revenues of the Imperial Maritime Customs after

payment of the interest and amortization of preceding loans secured on those

revenues, plus the proceeds of the raising to five per cent, effective of the

present tariff on maritime imports, including articles until now on the free

list, but exempting rice, foreign cereals and flour, gold and silver bullion

and coin.

(2.) The revenues of the native Customs, administered in the open ports by

the Imperial Maritime Customs.

(3.) The total revenues of the salt gabelle, exclusive of the fraction previously

set aside for other foreign loans.

The raising of the present tariff on imports to five per cent, effective is-

agreed to on conditions mentioned below. It shall be put in force two-

months after the signing of the present Protocol, and no exceptions shall be

made except for merchandise in transit not more than ten days after the

said signing.

(1.) All duties levied on imports ad valorem shall be converted as far as

possible and as soon as may be into specific duties.

This conversion shall be made in the following manner:—The average

value of merchandise at the time of their landing during the three years

1897, 1898 and 1899, that is to say, the market price less the amount of

import duties and incidental exrw-n es, shall be taken as the basis for the

valuation of merchandise.

154 .FINAL PEOTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWEES. 1901

Pending the result of the work of conversion, duties shall be levied

ad valorem.

(2.) The beds of the rivers Whangpoo and Peiho shall be improved with the

financial participation of China.

Art. VII.—The Chinese Government has agreed that the quarter occupied by

the Legations shall be considered as one specially reserved for their use and placed

under their exclusive control, in which Chinese shall not have the right to reside and

which may be made defensible.

The limits of this quarter have been fixed as follows on the annexed plan (Annex

No. 14.)—

On the East, Ketteler Street ( 10, 11, 12).

On the North, the line 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10.

On the West, the line 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

On the South, the line 12-1 drawn along the exterior base of the

Tartar wall and following the line of the bastions.

In the Protocol annexed to the letter of the 16th of January, 1901, China

recognised the right of each Power to maintain a permanent guard in the said quarter

for the defence of its Legation.

Art. VIII.—The Chinese Government has consented to raze the forts of Taku

and those which might impede free communication between Peking and the sea. Steps

have been taken for carrying this out.

Art. IX.—The Chinese Government conceded the right to the Powers in the

Protocol annexed to the letter of the 16th of January, 1901, to occupy certain points,

to be determined by an agreement between them for the maintenance of open com-

munication between the capital and the sea. The points occupied by the Powers

are:—Huang-ts’un, Lang-fang, Yang-ts’un, Tientsin, Chiin-liang-Ch’^ng, Tong-ku,

Lu-t’ai, Tong-shan, Lan-chou, Chang-li, Ch’in-wang Tao, Shanhai-kwan.

Art. X.—The Chinese Government has agreed to post and to have published

•during two years in all district cities the following Imperial Edicts:—

(a) Edict of the 1st of February, 1901 (Annex No. 15), prohibiting for

ever, under pain of death, membership in an anti-foreign society.

(b) Edicts of the 13th and 21st of February, 29th of April and 19th of

August, 1901, enumerating the punishments inflicted on the guilty.

(c) Edict of the 19th of August, 1901, prohibiting examinations in all cities

where foreigners were massacred or subjected to cruel treatment.

(d) Edict of the 1st of February, 1901 (Annex No. 16), declaring all

Governors-General,Governors and Provincial or local officialsresponsible

for order in their respective districts, and that in case of new anti-foreign

troubles or other infractions of the Treaties which shall not be immedi-

ately repressed and the authors of which shall not have been punished,

these officials shall be immediately dismissed without possibility of

being given new functions or new honours.

The posting of these Edicts is being carried on throughout the Empire.

Art. XI.—The Chinese Government has agreed to negotiate the amendments

-deemed necessary by the Foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and

Navigation and the other subjects concerning commercial relations with the object of

facilitating them.

At present, and as a result of the stipulation contained in Article VI. concern-

ing the indemnity, the Chinese Government agrees to assist in the improvement of

tthe courses of the rivers Peiho and Whangpoo, as stated below;—

(a) The works for the improvement of the navigability of the Peiho, begun

in 1898 with the co-operation of the Chinese Government, have been

resumed under the direction of an International Commission. As soon

as the administration of Tientsin shall have been handed back to the

Chinese Government it will be in a position to be represented on this

FINAL PROTOCOL BETWEEN CHINA AND ELEVEN POWERS, 1901 155

Commission, and will psty each year a sum of 60,000 Haikwan Taela

for maintaining the works.

(b) A Conservancy Board, charged with the management and control

of the works for straightening the Whangpoo and the improvement

of the course of that river, is hereby created.

This Board shall consist of members representing the interests of the Chinese

Government and those of foreigners in the shipping trade of Shanghai.

The expenses incurred for the works and the general management of the under-

taking are estimated at the annual sum of 460,000 Haikwan Taels for the first twenty

years. This sum shall be supplied in equal portions by the Chinese Government and

the foreign interests concerned. Detailed stipulations concerning the composition,

duties and revenues of the Conservancy Board are embodied in Annex No. 17.

Art. XII.—An Imperial Edict of the 24th of July, 1901 (Annex No. 18)>

reformed the Office of Foreign Affairs, Tsungli Yamen, on the lines indicated by the

Powers, that is to say, transformed it into a Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Waiwupu,

which takes precedence over the six other Ministries of State: the same Edict

appointed the principal members of this Ministry.

An agreement has also been reached concerning the modification of Court

Ceremonial as regards the reception of the Foreign Representatives, and has been the

subject of several Notes from the Chinese Plenipotentiaries, the substance of which

has been embodied in a memorandum herewith annexed (Annex No. 19).

Finally it is expressly understood that as regards the declarations specified above

and the annexed documents originating with the foreign Plenipotentiaries, the

French text only is authoritative.

The Chinese Government having thus complied to the satisfaction of the Powers

with the conditions laid down in the above-mentioned Note of December 22nd, 190q

the Powers have agreed to accede to the wish of China to terminate the situation

created by the disorders of the summer of 1900. In consequence thereof the foreign

Plenipotentiaries are authorised to declare in the names of their Governments that,,

with the exception of the Legation guards mentioned in Article VII., the Interna-

tional troops will completely evacuate the city of Peking on the 17th of September,

1901, and, with the exception of the localities mentioned in Article IX., will withdraw

from the Province of Chihli on the 22nd of September, 1901.

The present Final Protocol has been di awn up in twelve identical copies and signed-

by all the Plenipotentiaries of the contracting countries. One copy shall be given

to each of the Foreign Plenipotentiaries, and one copy shall be given to the Chinese

Plenipotentiaries.

(Signed) A. von Mxjmm.

„ M. CziKANN.

„ JOOSTBNS.

„ B. J. DE COLOGAN.

„ W. W. Rockhill.

„ Beau.

„ Ernest Satow.

„ Salvago Raggi.

„ JuTARO KoMURA.

„ F. M. Knobel.

„ M. DE GlERS.

„ Yi K’uang.

„ Li Hung-chang.

Certified copy.

(Signed) A. d’Anthouard.

„ B. Kroupenskt.

„ Reginald Tower.

„ Von Bohlenund Halback,

GERMANY

TREATY OE PEACE BETWEEN CHINA AND GERMANY

Ratified and Signed at Peking on the 1st July, 1921

The Government of the Republic of China and the Government of the Republic

of Germany, animated by the desire to reestablish the relations of friendship and

commerce by an agreement between the two countries, taking as basis the Declara-

tion of the Republic of Germany dated on this day and recognizing that the applica-

tion of the principles of the respect of territorial sovereignty, of equality, and of

reciprocity is the only means to maintain good understanding between the peoples,

have named, for this purpose, as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :

The Government of the Republic of China, W. W. Yen, Minister of Foreign

Affairs.

The Government of the Republic of Germany, H. von Borch, Consul-General.

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, which are

found to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following dispositions :

Art. I.—The tw'o High Contracting Parties have the right mutually to send

duly accredited diplomatic representatives who shall reciprocally enjoy in the country

of their residence the privileges and immunities that are accorded to them by the

law of nations.

Art. II.—The two High Contracting Parties accord to each other reciprocally

the right to appoint, in all the places where there is established a consulate or avice-

•consulate of a third nation, consuls, vice-consuls, and consular agents who shall be

treated with the consideration and regard that are accorded to the agents of the same

grade of other nations.

Art. III.—The nationals of one of the two Republics residing in the territory

of ihe other shall have the right, in conformity with the laws and regulations of the

country, to travel, to reside, and to engage in commerce or industry, in all the

places where the nationals of another nation are allowed to do so.

They shall be placed, their persons as well as their properties, under the juris-

diction of the local courts: they shall conform themselves to the laws of the country

where they reside. They shall not pay any imposts, taxes, or contributions higher

than those paid by the nationals of the country.

Art. IV\—The two High Contracting Parties recognize that all the matters

concerning tariff are regulated solely by the internal legislation of each of them.

Any duties higher than those paid by the nationals of the country shall not, however,

be levied on the products, raw or manufactured, having origin in one of the two

Republics or in a third country at their importations, exportations, or transit.

Art. Y. —The Declaration of the Republic of Germany on this clay and the

stipulations of the present Agreement shall be taken as the basis for the negotiation

of a definitive treaty.

Art. VI —The present Agreement is drawn up in Chinese, German, and

French: in case of difference in interpretation the French text shall prevail.

Art. VII.—The present Agreement shall be ratified as soon as possible and

come into force on the day when the two Governments shall have made known to

each other that the ratifications have been effectuated.

Done at Peking, in double copies, the 20th day, 5th Moon, 10th Year of the

Republic, corresponding to May 20th, 1921.

Notices of ratification were exchanged at 10 o’clock, July 1st, at the Wai-

-chiaopu Building.

(Signed) Dr. W. W. Yen,

Minister of Foreign Affairs, China.

(Signed) H. von Borch,

Representative of the German Government.

TREATY OF PEACE BETVYEEN CHINA AND GERMANY 157

Declaration

The undersigned, being the duly authorized representative of the Government

•of the Republic of Germany, has the honour to make known in the name of bis

G-overnment to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of China the

following :

The Government of the Republic of Germany, animated by the desire to

reestablish the relations of friendship and commerce between China and Germany,

Considering that such relations should be based upon the principles of perfect

equality and absolute reciprocity in conformity with the generally recognized rules of

international law;

Considering that the President of the Republic of China issued a Mandate on

September 15th, 1919, concerning the restoration of peace with Germany ;

Considering that Germany engages herself to fulfil the obligations towards

China, derived from Articles 128 to 134 (inclusive) of the Treaty of Versailles,

■dated June 28th, 1919, and coming into force on January 10th, 1920;

Affirms that Germany has been obliged by the events of the War and by the

Treaty of Versailles to renounce all the rights, interests, and privileges which she

acquired by virtue of the Treaty concluded by her with China on March 6th, 1898,

and other Acts concerning the Province of Shantung, and finds herself deprived

of the possibility of restituting them to China;

And formally declares:

To consent to the abrogation of the consular juris fiction in China.

To renounce, in favour of China, all the rights which the German Government

possessed in the “Glacis” attached to the German Legation in Peking, admitting

that by the expression “ public properties ” in the First Paragraph of Article 130

■of the Treaty of Versailles the above-mentioned ground was equally included ;

And to be prepared to reimburse the Chinese Government the expenses for the

internment of German militaries in the various camps of internment in China.

1 The undersigned takes this occasion to renew to H:s Excellency the assurances

of his high consideration.

(Signed) H. von Porch.

Letter from Dr. W. W. Yen, Minister of Foreign Affairs,

to Herr von Porch

Your Excellency, May 20th, 1921.

“ I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of Your Excellency’s letter of

even date in which it is stated:—

“ ‘ As an explanation to the German Declaration and the Sino-German Agree-

ment I have the honour, at the instruction of my Government, to make the follow-

ing declarations:

(1) Customs tariff on Chinese goods imported into Germany. The statement

that the import, export and transit duties to be paid by nationals of either of the

Two High Contracting Parties shall not be higher than those paid by nationals of

the country, as provided for in Article 4 of the Agreement, does not preclude China

from the privilege of applying Article 264 of the Versailles Treaty.

Payment of Indemnity

(2.) The payment of indemnity. The statement in the German Declaration

that Germany is prepared to reimburse the Chinese Government the expenses o

the internment of German militaries in various camps of internment in China is

understood to mean that Germany, in addition to indemnifying China for her losses,

according to the principles of the Versailles Treaty, is also willing to refund to China

the internment expenses. As to the indemnity for war losses, Germany undertakes

158 TREATY OF PEACE BETWEEN CHINA AND GERMANY

to pay in advance a portion thereof in a lump sum, which represents the equivalent

of one-half of the proceeds from the liquidated German property and one-half of the

values of the sequestrated but not yet liquidated German property, which amount

will eventually be agreed upon and which will consist of $4,000,01)0 in cash and the

balance in Tsin-Pu and Hu-Kuang railway bonds.

(3.) Chinese property in Germany. The movable and immovable properties of

Chinese residents of Germany will be returned at the ratification of the agree-

ment.

(4.) Chinese students in Germany will be returned at the ratification of the

agreement.

(5.) Chinese students in Germany. In regard to the Chinese students in Ger-

many the German Government will be pleased to assist them with its best efforts

in securing admission to schools or acquiring practical experience.’

Queries Answered

As to the queries addressed by Tour Excellency, I have the’honour to reply as

follows:

(1.) The security to be given in future to the property of Chinese or German

residents. The Chinese Government promises to give full protection to the peaceful

undertkings of Germans in China and agrees not to further sequestrate their pro-

perties except in accordance with the generally recognized principles of international

law and the provisions of the laws of China, provided that the German Government

will treat the Chinese residents in Germany in like manner.

(2.) Judicial guarantee. Lawsuits of Germans in China shall be tried in the

modern courts according to the modern codes, with the right of appeal, and in

accordance with the regular legal procedure. During the period of litigation the

assistance of German lawyers and interpreters, who have been duly recognized by

the court, is permitted.

(3.) In regard to the lawsuits in the Mixed Court in which Germans are in-

volved either as one or both parties, the Chinese Government will in the future try

to find a solution so as to insure justice and fairness to all parties concerned.

(4 ) China’s trading with the Enemy Act. All the laws and regulations con-

cerning trade with the enemy will lose their effect from the day of the ratification

of the treaty. All German trade-marks which had been registered at the Customs

House will recover their validity if they are registered again, after the ratification of

the Agreement, at the Customs House by their owners. Prior to the general ap-

gfication of the national tariff in China, the imports of Germans may pay the

ustoms duties according to the tariff rate in general ttse.

(5.) The liquidation of Sino-German indebtedness. The Chinese Govern-

ment has no intention to join the Clearing House system, as provided for in Article

296 of the Versailles Treaty. Furthermore, the Chinese Government, in considera-

tion of the fact that Germany undertakes, as stated above, to pay a lump sum as a

portion of the indemnity for war losses sustained by the Chinese Government,

agrees to effectually cease, at the signature of the Agreement, all liquidation of Ger-

man properties, and on receipt of the aforesaid indemnity and after the ratification

of the Agreement agrees to return to German owners all the proceeds from the

liquidation of German property and all the German property still under sequestra-

tion. The aforesaid procedure shall be considered as a settlement of all the matters

concerning the liquidation, sequestration or control of German property as stated

in the second sentence of Article 133 of the Versailles Treaty.

As to the Deutsch-Asiatische Bank and the Ching-Hsin Mining Corporation,

the Chinese authorities concerned will discuss methods of settlement with the Bank

and the Corporation themselves; the unliquidated premises of the said bank in

Peking and Hankow will, however, be returned to the original owner in accordance

with the procedure stated above. (Siged) W. W, Yen.

KOREA

TREATY OF ANNEXATION TO JAPAN

Concluded 29th August, 1910

DECLARATION

Notwithstanding tlie earnest and laborious work of reforms in the adminis-

tration of Korea in which the Government of Japan and Korea have been engaged for

more than four years since the conclusion of the agreement of 1905, the existing

system of Government in that country has not proved entirely equal to the duty

of preserving public order and tranquillity, and in addition a spirit of suspicion and

misgiving dominates the whole peninsula In order to maintain peace and stability

in Korea, to promote the prosperity and welfare of Koreans and at the same time to

ensure the safety and repose of foreign residents, it has been made abundantly

clear that fundamental changes in the actual regime of Government are absolutely

essential. The Government of Japan and Korea being convinced of the urgent

necessity of introducing reforms respective to the requirements of the situation and

of furnishing sufficient guarantees for the future, have, with the approval of His

Majesty the Emperor of Korea, concluded through their respective Plenipotentiaries

a Treaty providing for the complete annexation of Korea to the Empire of Japan.

By virtue of that important act, which shall take effect on its promulgation, the

Imperial Government of Japan undertake the entire government and administration

uf Korea, and they hereby declare that the matters relating to foreigners and foreign

trade in Korea shall be conducied in accordance with the following rules:—

1. —The Treaties hitherto concluded by Korea with Foreign Powers

operative, Japan’s existing treaties will, so far as practicable, be applied in Korea.

Foreigners resident in Korea will, as far as conditions permit, enjoy the same rights

and immunities as in Japan proper and the protection of their legally acquired

rights, subject in all cases to the jurisdiction of Japan. The Imperial Government

of Japan are ready to consent that the jurisdiction in respect of cases actually pend-

ing in any foreign Consular Courts in Korea at the time the Treaty of Annexation

takes effect shall remain in such Courts until final decision.

2. —Independently of any conventional engagements formerly ex

subject, the Imperial Government of Japan will for a period of ten years levy upon

goods imported into Korea from foreign countries or exported from Korea to foreign

countries and upon foreign vessels entering any of the open ports of Korea the same

import or export duties and the same tonnage dues as under the existing schedules.

The same import or export duties and tonnage dues as those to be levied upon the

aforesaid goods and vessels will also for a period of ten years be applied in respect

of goods imported into Korea from Japan or exported from Korea to Japan and

Japanese vessels.

3. —The Imperial Government of Japan will also permit for a

years vessels under the flags of Powers having treaties with Japan to engage in the

coasting trade between the open ports of Korea and between those ports and any

open ports of Japan.

TREATY OF ANNEXATION TO JAPAN

4.—The existing open ports of Korea, with the exception of Masampo, will be-

continued as open ports, and in addition Shinwiju will be newly opened, so that

vessels, foreign as well as Japanese, will there be admitted and goods may be im-

ported into and exported from those ports.

Treaty

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of Korea,,

having in view the special and close relations between their respective countries,

desiring to promote the common weal of the two nations and to assure permanent

peace in the Extreme East, being convinced that these objects can be best attained

by the annexation of Korea to the Empire of Japan, have resolved to conclude a

treaty of such annexation and have for that purpose appointed as their plenipoten-

tiaries, that is to say: His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Viscount Masakata

Terauchi, His Resident General; and His Majesty the Emperor of Korea, Ye Wan

Yong, His Minister President of State, who, upon mutual conference and deliberation,,

have agreed to the following Articles:—

I. —His Majesty the Emperor of Korea makes complete and

to His Majesty the Emperor of Japan of all rights of sovereignty over the whole

of Korea.

II. —His Majesty the Emperor of Japan accepts the concess

preceding Article and consents to the complete annexation of Korea to the Empire

of Japan.

III. —His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will accord t

Emperor and Ex-Emperor and His Imperial Highness the Crown Prince of Korea

and their consorts and heirs such titles, dignity and honour as are appropriate to

their respective ranks, and sufficient annual grants will be made for the maintenance

of such titles, dignity and honour.

IV. —His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will also accord ap

treatment to the members of the Imperial House of Korea and their heirs other than

those mentioned in the preceding Articles, and the funds necessary for the mainten-

ance of such honour and treatment will be granted.

V. —His Majesty the Emperor of Japan will confer peera

grants upon those Koreans who on account of meritorious services are regarded as

deserving such special recognition.

VI. —In consequence of the aforesaid annexation the Gove

sume the entire government and administration of Korea and undertake to afford full

protection for the persons and property of Koreans obeying the laws there in force

and to promote the welfare of all such Koreans.

VII. —The Government of Japan will, so far as circumstan

the public service of Japan in Korea those Koreans who accept the new regime loyally

and in good faith and who are duly qualified for such service.

VIII. —The Treaty, having been approved by His Majesty

and His Majesty the Emperor or Korea, shall take effect from the date of its

promulgation.

REGULATIONS UNDER WHICH BRITISH TRADE IS

TO BE CONDUCTED IN COREA (CHOSEN)

I.—Entrance and Clearance of Vessels

1. —Within forty-eight hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays

arrival of a British ship in a Corean port, the master shall deliver to the Corean

Customs authorities the receipt of the British Consul showing that he has deposited

the ship’s papers at the British Consulate, and he shall then make an entry of this

ship by handing in a written paper stating the name of the ship, of the port from

which she comes, of her master, the number, and, if required, the names of her

passengers, her tonnage, and the number of her crew, which paper shall be certified

by the master to be a true statement, and shall be signed by him. He shall, at the

same time, deposit a written manifest of his cargo, setting forth the marks and

numbers of the packages and their contents as they are described in the bills of

lading, with the names of the persons to whom they are consigned. The master shall

certify that this description is correct, and shall sign his name to the same. When

a vessel has been duly entered, the Customs authorities will issue a, permit to open

hatches, which shall be exhibited to the Customs officer on board. Breaking bulk

without having obtained such permission will render the master liable to a fine not

exceeding one hundred Mexican Dollars.

2. —If any error is discovered in the manifest, it may be corrected with

four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays) of its being handed in, without the

payment of any fee ; but for alteration or post entry to the manifest made after

that time a fee of Five Mexican Dollars shall be paid.

3. —Any master who shall neglect to enter his vessel at the Corean Cu

within the time fixed by this Regulation shall pay a penalty not exceeding Fifty

Mexican Dollars for every twenty-four hours that he shall so neglect to enter his ship.

4. —Any British vessel which remains in port for less than forty-e

(exclusive of Sundays and holidays) and does not open her hatches, also any vessel

driven into port by stress of weather, or only in want of supplies, shall not be required

to enter or pay tonnage dues so long as such vessel does not engage in trade.

5. —When the master of a vessel wishes to clear, he shall hand in to th

authorities an export manifest containing similar particulars to those given in the

import manifest. The Customs authorities will then issue a clearance certificate and

return the Consul’s receipt for the ship’s papers. These documents must be handed

into the Consulate before the ship’s papers are returned to the master.

6. —Should any ship leave the port without clearing outwards in th

above prescribed, the master shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding Two Hundred

Mexican Dollars.

7. —British steamers may enter and clear on the same day, and they sh

required to hand in a manifest except for such goods as are to be landed or transhipped

at the port of entry.

6

162 REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH TRADE WITH COREA

II.—Landing and Shipping Cargo and Payment of Duties

1. —The importer of any goods wlio desires to land them shall m

application to that effect at the Custom-house, stating his own name, the name of the

ship in which the goods have been imported, the marks, numbers, and contents of the

packages and their values, and declaring that this statement is correct. The Customs

authorities may demand the production of the invoice of each consignment of

merchandise. If it is not produced, or if its absence is not satisfactorily accounted for,

the owner shall be allowed to land his goods on payment of double the Tariff duty,

but the surplus duty so levied shall be refunded on the production of the invoice.

2. —All goods so entered may be examined by the Customs offic

appointed for the purpose. Such examination shall be made without delay or injury

to the merchandise, and the packages shall be at once re-sorted by the Customs

authorities to their original condition, in so far as may be practicable.

3. —Should the Customs authorities consider the value of any g

ad valorem duty as declared by the importer or exporter insufficient, they shall call

upon him to pay duty on the value determined by an appraisement to be made by the

Customs appraiser. But should the importer or exporter be dissatisfied with that

appraisement, he shall within twenty-four hours (exclusive of Sundays and holidays')

state his reasons for such dissatisfaction to the Commissioner of Customs, and shall

appoint an appraiser of his own to make a re-appraisement. He shall then declare

the value of the goods as determined by such re-appraisement. The Commissioner

of Customs will thereupon, at his option, either assess the duty on the value deter-

mined by this re-appraisement, or will purchase the goods from the importer or

exporter at the price thus determined, with the addition of five per cent In the

latter case the purchase money shall be paid to the importer or exporter within five

days from the date .on which he has declared the value determined by his own

appraiser.

4. —Upon all goods damaged on the voyage of importation a

duty shall be allowed, proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise as

to the amount of such reduction, they shall be settled in the manner pointed out in

the preceding clause.

5. —All goods intended to be exported shall be entered at the

house before they are shipped. The application to ship shall be made in writing, and

shall state the name of the vessel by which the goods are to be exported, the marks

and number of the packages, and the quantity, description, and value of the contents.

The exporter shall certify in writing that the application gives a true account of all

the goods contained therein, and shall sign his name thereto.

6. —No goods shall be landed or shipped at other places than th

Corean Customs authorities, or between the hours of sunset and sunrise, or on Sundays

or holidays, without the special permission of the Customs authorities, who will be

entitled to reasonable lees for the extra duty thus performed.

7. —Claims by importers or exporters for duties paid in excess, o

authorities for duties which have not been fully paid, shall be entertained only when

made within thirty days from the date of payment.

8. —No entry will be required in the case of provisions for th

ships, their crews and passengers, nor for the baggage of the latter which may be

landed or shipped at any time after examination by the Customs officers.

9. —Vessels neediug repairs may land their cargo for that pur

payment of duty. All goods so landed shall remain in charge of the Corean Autho-

rities, and all just charges for storage, labour, and supervision shall be paid by the

master. But if any portion of such cargo be sold, the duties of the Tariff shall be

paid on the portion so disposed of.

REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH TRADE WITH COREA 16S

10.—Any person desiring to tranship cargo shall obtain a permit from the Customs

authorities before doing so.

III.—Protection of the Revenue

1. —The Customs authorities shall have the right to place Custom

board any British merchant vessel in their ports. All such Customs officers shall have

access to all parts of the ship in which cargo is slowed. They shall be treated with

civility, and such reasonable accommodation shall be allowed to them as the ship affords.

2. —The hatches and all other places of entrance into that part of the

cargo is stowed may be secured by the Corean Customs officers between the hours of

sunset and sunrise, and on Sundays and holidays, by affixing seals, locks, or other

fastenings, and if any person shall, without due permission, wilfully open any entrance

that has been so secured, or break any seal, lock, or other fastening that has been

affixed by the Corean Customs officers, not only the person so offending, but the master

of the ship also, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding One Hundyed Mexican.

Dollars.

3 —Any British subject who ships, or attempts to ship, or discharges, or attempts-

to discharge, goods which have not been duly entered at the Custom-house in the

manner above provided, or packages containing goods different from those described

in the import or export permit application, or prohibited goods, shall forfeit twice

the value of such goods, and the goods shall be confiscated.

4. —Any person signing a false declaration or certificate with the intent

the revenue of Corea shall be liable to a fine not exceeding Two Hundred Mexican

Dollars.

5. —Any violation of any provision of these Regulations, to which no

specially attached therein, may be punished by a fine not exceeding One Hundred

Mexican Dollars.

Note.—All documents required by these Regulations, and all other communications

addressed to the Corean Customs authorities, may be written in the English language.

[l.s.] Harry S. Parkbs.

„ Min Yong-mok.

6*

164 co kean tariff

IMPORTS

Article. Bate Ad valorem Ad valorem

Peroft Duty. Article. RatePerofcent. Duty.

Agricultural implements Free Enamel-ware ...

Alum

Amber Explosives

imported used

under forspecial

mining,permit &c., and... 2010

Anchorsammunition,

Arms, and chains fire-a i, fowling- Fans, all kinds ... ... ... ... ••• ••• 7J7J

pieces, permit

or sidearms imported under Feathers,... all ...kinds

Felt engines ... ... ... ... ••• ••• Free74

special

ment of the OoreanorGovern- Fire ...

defence flowers ... ... •••self-

for

Artificial

sporting purposes for Fireworks

Fish, ...

fresh and salted ... ... ... ••• 205

Bamboo, „ dried ... ••• 74

Bark forpeas,split

.Seans, tanning

and

or not... ...

pulse, all kinds

Flax,

Flintsrugs, all... kinds... ... ... ... ... ... b574

hemp, and jute...

Beer, porter, and ciderlemonade, Floor

Flour gold

and meal, all kinds... ... ... ... ••• 1074

Beverages,

soda ...and mineral watersginger- 2074

beer,nests such as Foil, and silver

Birds’ ,, tin,fresh,

Fruit, copper,

all and all other

kinds -... kinds...... ... 57474

13 Blankets

Bones ai 1 rugs ... ... .,. 7j ,. dried,of allsalted, or preserved

Books, Furniture as&c.sable,...sea otter, seal, 2010

kinds

Bricks

Bullion,andbeingtilesand

maps,

gold

charts

or... silverand...refined ... .... Free

Free5 Furs,

otter,superior,

beaver,

Buttons, Gamboge ••• 2074

Camphor, crude ... ... ... 57£

buckles, hooks eyes, &c. Ginseng,window,

Glass, red, white,plain crude,

and andoured,

co' clarified

Candles qualities

Glass, plate, ... ...or unsilvered,

silvered ... all... 74

Canvas ...

Carmine fram'ed orallunframed... . . ... ... 1010

Carpets of jute, hemp, or felt, patent Glassware,

Glue and corn, kinds...

tapestrysuperior

Carpets, quality, Grain all kinds ... ... 55

Kidderminster, and olheras kinds Brussels,not Grasscloth,

jute, &c and all textiles in hemp,

enumerated

Carpets, velvet Guano

Hair, allandkinds

manures,

except allhuman kinds... ... ...... 74745

Carriages...

Cement, „„ ornaments,

human... ...silver ... ... 2010

Charcoal...as allPortland

Chemicals, ... and... other...kinds

kinds Hides and skins, goldandandundressed

raw 5

•Clothing

'locks andandparts thereof „ and„hoofs tanned

Horns all kindsandnotdressed

otherwise. 574

hats, bootsandwearing

Clothing shoes,apparel,

andwearing &e.

apparel ...all kinds,

made

provided

Incense for

sticksmanufactured ... ...or not••• ... 2010

wholly ofcokesilk... India-rubber,

Isinglass, all kinds ... ... ... 74

Coal and Ivory, manufactured

Cochineal

Cocoonsgold and ... silver... ... ... ... ... ... ] Jade-ware

Jewellery, real ...or not... ... ... ... 202020

... or imitation

Coins, Kerosine,

Confectioneriesand

Coral, manufactured sweetmeats,

not ...andallsizes...

orkinds kinds minerial oroils petroleum,

Lacquered-ware, ...common ... ...and... other 5

Cordage

Cotton, and rope, all

raw ... all kinds... Lamps, „ kinds superior ... .. ... 201074

all

Cotton and

Cotton manufacture,

woollen mixtures,allallkinds kinds ... Lanterns, allpaper... ... plain... ... ... 574

Cotton and silkkinds

mixtures, Leather, ordinary

,,figured,superior kinds,

Cutlery,

Drugs, all ...

all kindsand paints, paint oils, or coloured...all kinds...stamped,

Leather manufactures,

kinds, and

... ... lO51

Dyes, colours,

and materials used for... mixing paints Lime

Earthenware Linen, linen and cotton, linen and wool-

Embroideries in...gold, silver, or silk alllen mixtures,

kinds linen ... and... silk ...mixtures, 74

COREAN TARIFF

Ad valorem No. Aeticle. RateAd ofvalorem Duty.

No. Abticle. RatePerofcent. Duty. Per cent.

100 Matches ••• 5 147 Scientific thematical, instruments, as physical, ma-

101 Matting,

&c., common floor, Chinese,

qualitiesJapanese, coir, 5 148 Seals, gical, and theirmeteorological,

materials applianci ...s ...and...sur-... Free

for...

102 Matting, superior

“ tatamis,” &c. qualities, Japanese 7a 149 Sea

&c. products, as seaweed, beche-de-mer, 307*

103 Meat, fresh... ... 5 150 Seeds,raw,

151 Silk

Silk, all reeled,

kinds throu n, floss or ...waste 57\

104

105 Meat, dried and

Medicines, salted not otherwise...

all kinds 152 manufactures, as gauze, crape,

provided for .. ... 5 Japanese

damasks, amtier

figuredlustrings, satins, white

satins,...Japanese satin

106 Metals, all kinds, in pie, block, ingot, silk (“habntai”)

slab,

band bar, rod,

and iron... plate, sheet,

flat, T and...angle-iron, hoop, strip, 153 Silk manufactures

for and floss not otherwise pro-1030

and scrap ... old... 5 154 Silk videdthread silk in skein... 1030

107 Metals,

rugated allor galvanized,

kinds, pipewire, or tube,

steel, cor-

tin- 155 Soap, common qualities

plates, quicksilver, nickel, platina, 156

157 Soap,

Soy, superiorandqualities

Chinese Japanese ... .. ... ... 715

German

auge or silver,copper,

white yellow unrefinedmetal, tuten- gold 158 Spectacles ... ... ... 207j

and silver 159 Spices, inalljarskinds

508 Metal manufactures, all kinds, nails, 7J 161

as plant, 160 Spirits,

Spirits and liqueurs, in wood

screws, tools,

and hardware... machinery, railway

... ... ... Free7i 162 Stationery all kinds and writing materials, • or bottle,all 20

109 Models

110 Mosquito of inventions

netting, kinds,and blank books, and &c dressed... 7J7\

111

112 „ boxes...

Musical „ not mademade of silk ... 107£ 163 Stones

of silk... 1010 164 Sugar, brownslate,andcutwhite, all qualities,

113 Musical instruments, all kinds ... 165 molasses,

Sugar candy and syrups...

... ... ... 1074

114 Musk ... 20 166 Sulphur

115 Needles

116 Oil-cake and pins... ... ... 7^ 167 Table stores, all kinds, and preserved... 7J74

...

117

118 Oils,wood

Oil, vegetable, all kinds ... ... 55 3 68 Tallow

(Tung-yu)...

provisions ... ... 747

119 Oil, and floor

120 Packing bags, cloth,

packing all kinds

matting, ...tea- 7h 317069 Tea Telescopes and binocular gbuses ... 10

lead, and ropes for packing goods Free5 172 171 Tortoise

Tobacco,shell,

all kinds and formsor not 200

manufactured

121 Paper,

122 ,, allcommon

kinds, notqualities

otherwise providtd... 173 Travellers’

174 Tooth powder...baggage 10SO

... Free

for 175 Trunks

123

124 Paper,coloured,fancy,wall

Pearls and hanging 1C

205 1-76 Twine in silk and thread, all kinds, excepting 105

and portmanteaux ... ...

125 Pepper, unground 2010 177 Types, new and

126

127 Perftimes

Photographic and apparatus

scent 178 Umbrellas, paperold... ... ... Free5

128 Pictures, prints, photographs, engrav- 179 „„ cotton 74

129 ings, and

Pitch all kinds

tar framed or unframed... 105 181 Umbrella frames ... ... ... 1074

180 silk

130 Planks, soft ... ... 107^ 182 183 Varnish

Vegetables, ... ... 74

131

132 „ trees

Plants, hard andsilver

shrubs, ...all kinds... ... Free 185 Velvet, silk...fresh, dried, and salted ... 20745

184 Vermicelli

133 Plate, gold

134 Plated-ware, andall kindsqualities ... 1071 186 20 Vermilion 10

135

136 Porcelain,

,, common

superior qualities ... ... 10 187 Watches,

metal, and parts

nickel, or thereof in...common... 10

silver

137

13S Precious

Rattans, stones,

splithornsorallnot...kinds, ...set or ...unset 20205 J89 188 Watches,

Wax, bees’in orgoldvegetable

or gilt 2074

139

140 Rhinoceros

Resin 190

7* 191 „ cloth

Wines orin timber,

wood orsoft bottle, all kinds ... 107474

141

142 Saddlerv

Salt and harness ...

' in reasonable quantities ... Free7J 193 ... 10 192 Wood„ sheep’s, „ rawhard 10

143

145

Samples

144 Scales

Sapanwoodand ... ... ... ... ... ... 7j5 194

balances... 195

196

Wool,

Woollen

Woollen manufactures,

and silk kinds all... 574

allmixtures,

146 Scented wood, all kinds 20 kinds ... 74

COEEAN TAEIFP

No. Article. RatePerofvalorem

Ad Duty. Prohibited Goods.

cent. Adulterated drugs or medicines.

197 Works allof artkinds, in cotton, wool, hemp, 20 as ordnance, Arms,ormunitions, shotandandimplements

cannon, side-arms, shell, of war,of

firearms

198 Yarns,

&c. ... 5 all kinds, gunpowder,

cartridges, spears or pikes,

Allmanufactured...

unenumerated articles, saltpetre,

raw... or un-... 5 other explosive substances. guncotton, dynamite, and

Allfactured

unenumerated articles, ... partly manu- 7h permitsThe Corean authorities will grant special

for theforimportationof ofsportarms, firearms, andon

unenumerated articles, completely... 10 ammunition

Allmanufactured... satisfactory purposes ortoself-defence

Foreign ships, when sold in Corea, will pay bond fide character of the application. them of the

proof being furnished

acents

dutyperof ton25 cen-ts per ton on sailing vessels, and 50 Counterfeit coins, all kinds.

on steamers. Opium, except medicinal opium.

EXPORTS

Class I. Class II.

Duty-Free Export Goods. I enumerated

All other nativeI. goods or productions not

Bullion,

Coins, being

andandgold andallsilver refined. j duty of five per cent. will pay an ad valorem

in Class

Plants, gold

Samples trees,

in

silver,

reasonable allkinds,

shrubs,quantity.

kinds. ! bited. The exportation of red ginseng is prohi"

Traveller’s baggage.

RULES

I.

actual —In placetheoftheadproduction

case of imported articles with

the adthevalorem dutiesfreight,

of thisinsurance,

Tariff will

etc. Incosttheofcase

the ofgoods

exportat the

articles valorem orduties

fabrication,

will be calculated addition

on marketof values in Corea.

II. —Duties may be paid in Mexican Dollars or Japanese silver Yen.

as mayIII.be deemed desirable,

—The into specific ratesabove Tariff of import

by agreement betweenandtheexportcompetent

duties shall be converted,

authorities of theas s

two countries.

[l.s.] Harry S. Parkes.

„ Min Yong-mok.

TREATIES WITH JAPAN

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY OE COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION BETWEEN

GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

Signed at London, 16th July, 1894

Ratifications Exchanged at Tokyo, 25th August, 1894

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,

Empress of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, being equally desirous

of maintaining the relations of good understanding which happily exist between

them, by extending and increasing the intercourse between their respective States,

and being convinced that this object cannot better be accomplished than by revising

the Treaties hitherto existing between the two countries, have resolved to complete

such a revision, based upon principles of equity and mutual benefit, and, for that

purpose, have named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland,

Empress of India, the Eight Honourable John, Earl of Kimberley, Knight of the

Most Noble Order of the Garter, etc., etc., Her Britannic Majesty’s Secretary of

State for Foreign Affairs ;

And His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Yiscount Aoki Siuzo, Junii, First Class

of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, His Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of St. James’;

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be

in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :—

Article I.—The subjects of each of the two high contracting parties shall have

full liberty to enter, travel, or reside in any part of the dominions and possessions

of the other contracting party, and shall enjoy full and perfect protection for their

persons and property.

They shall have free and easy access to the Courts of Justice in pursuit and

defence of their rights ; they shall be at liberty equally with native subjects to

choose and employ lawyers, advocates, and representatives to pursue and defend

their rights before such Courts, and in all other matters connected with the

administration of justice they shall enjoy all the rights and privileges enjoyed by

native subjects.

In whatever relates to rights of i-esidence and travel; to the possession of goods

and effects of any kind ; to the succession to personal, estate, by will or otherwise,

and the disposal of property of any sort in any manner whatsoever which they may

lawfully acquire, the subjects of each contracting party shall enjoy in the dominions

and possessions of the other the same privileges, liberties, and rights, and shall be

subject to no higher imposts, or charges in these respects than native subjects, or

subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation. The subjects of each of the

contracting parties shall enjoy in the dominions and possessions of the other entire

liberty of conscience, and, subject to the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations, shall

enjoy the right of private or public exercise of their worship, and also the right of

burying their respective countrymen, according to their religious customs, in such

suitable and convenient places as may be established and maintained for that purpose.

They shall not be compelled, under any pretext whatsoever, to pay any charges

or taxes other or higher than those that are, or may be, paid by native subjects, or

subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

Article II.—The subjects of either of the contracting parties residing in the

dominions and possessions of the other shall be exempted from all compulsory

military service whatsoever, whether in the army, navy, national guards, or militia,

from all contributions imposed in lieu of personal service; and from all forced loan

or military exactions or contributions.

Article 111.—There shall be reciprocal freedom of commerce and navigation

between the dominions and possessions of the two high contracting parties.

The subjects of each of the high contracting parties may trade in any part of

the dominions and possessions of the other by wholesale or retail in all kinds of

produce, manufactures, and merchandize of lawful commerce, either in person or by

agents, singly, or in partnership with foreigners or native subjects: and they may

there own or hire and occupy the houses, manufactories, warehouses, shops, and

premises which may be necessary for them, and lease land for residential and

commercial purposes, conforming themselves to the Laws, Police, and Customs

Regulations of the country like native subjects.

They shall have liberty to come with their ships and cargoes to all places, ports,

and rivers in the dominions and possessions of the other which are or may be

opened to foreign commerce, and shall enjoy, respectively, the same treatment, in

matters of commerce and navigation, as native subjects, or subjects or citizens of the

mostfavourednation, without having to pay taxes, imposts, or duties, of whatever

nature or under whatever denomination levied in the name or for the profit of

the G-overnment, public functionaries, private individuals, corporations, or establish-

ments of any kind, other or greater than those paid by native subjects, or subjects

or citizens of the most favoured nation, subject always to the Laws, Ordinances, and

Regulations o! each country.

Article IV. — The dwellings, manufactories, warehouses, and shops of the

subjects of each of the high contracting parties in the dominions and possessions

of the other, and all premises appertaining thereto destined for purposes of residence

or commerce, shall be respected.

It shall not be allowable to proceed to make a search of, or a domiciliary visit to,

such dwellings and premises, or to examine or inspect books, papers, or accounts

except under the conditions and with the forms prescribed by the Laws, Ordinances,

and Regulations for subjects of the country.

Article Y.—No other or higher duties shall be imposed on the importation into

the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty of any article, the produce

or manufacture of dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan,

from whatever place arriving; and no other or higher duties shall be imposed on the

importation into the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of

Japan of any article, the produce or manufacture of the dominions and possessions

of Her Britannic Majesty, from whatever place arriving than on the like article

produced or manufactured in any other foreign country; nor shall any prohibition

be maintained or imposed on the importation of any article, the produce or

manufacture of the dominions and possessions of either of the high contracting

parties, into the dominions and possessions of the other, from whatever place

arriving, which shall not equally extend to the importation of the like article, being

the produce or manufacture of any other country. This last provision is not applicable

to the sanitary and other prohibitions occasioned by the necessity of protecting the

safety of persons, or of cattle, or of plants useful to agriculture.

Article VI.—No other or higher duties or. charges shall be imposed in the

dominions and possessions of either of the high contracting parties on the exporta-

tion of any article to the dominions and possessions of the other than such as are,

or may be, payable on the exportation of the like article to any other foreign

country; nor shall any prohibition be imposed on the exportation of any article from

the dominions and possessions of either of the two contracting parties to the

dominions and possessions of the other which shall not equally extend to the

exportation of the like article to any other country.

Article VII. —The subjects of each of the high contracting parties shall enjoy

TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

in the dominions and possessions of the other exemptions from all transit duties

and a perfect equality of treatment with native subjects in all that relates to

warehousing, bounties, facilities, and drawbacks.

Article VIIl.—All articles which are or may be legally imported into the ports

of the dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan in Japanese

vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in British vessels, without being

liable to any other or higher duties or charges of whatever denomination than if such

articles were imported in Japanese vessels; and, reciprocally, all articles which are or

may be legally imported into the ports of the dominions and possessions of Her

Britannic Majesty in British vessels may likewise be imported into those ports in

Japanese vesssels, without being liable to any other or higher duties or charges of

whatever denomination than if such articles were imported in British vessels. Such

reciprocal equality of treatment shall take effect without distinction, whether such

articles come directly from the place of origin or from any other places.

In the same manner there shall be perfect equality of treatment in regard to

exportation,so that the same export duties shall be paid and the same bounties and

drawbacks allowed in the dominions and possessions of either of the high contract-

ing parties on the exportation of any article which is or may be legally exported

therefrom, whether such exportation shall take place in Japanese or in British

vessels, and whatever may be the place of destination, whether a port of either of

the contracting parties or of any third Power.

Article IX.—Ho duties of tonnage, harbour, pilotage, lighthouse, quarantine,

or other similar or corresponding duties of whatever nature or under whatever

denomination, levied in the name or for the profits of the Government, public

functionaries, private individuals, corporations, or establishments of any kind, shall

be imposed in the ports of the dominions and possessions of either country upon the

vessels of the other country which shall not equally and under the same conditions

be imposed in the like cases on national vessels in general, or vessels of the most

favoured nation. Such equality of treatment shall apply reciprocally to the

respective vessels, from whatever port or place they may arrive, and whatever may

be their place of destination.

Article X.—In all that regards the stationing, loading, and unloading of vessels

in the ports, basins, docks, roadsteads, harbours, or rivers of the dominions and

possessions of the two countries, no privilege shall be granted to national vessels

which shall not be equally granted to vessels of the other country ; the intention ot

the high contracting parties being that in this respect also the respective vessels

shall be treated on the looting of perfect equality.

Article XI.—The coasting trade of both the high contracting parties is

excepted from the provisions of the present Treaty, and shall be regulated according

to the Laws, Ordinances, and Begulations of Japan and of Great Britain respec-

tively. It is, however, understood that Japanese subjects in the dominions and

possessions of Her Britannic Majesty and British subjects in the dominions and

possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan shall enjoy in this respect the

rights which are or may be granted under such Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations

to the subjects or citizens of any other country.

A Japanese vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or

more ports in the dominions and possessions of Her Britannic Majesty and a British

vessel laden in a foreign country with cargo destined for two or more ports in the

dominions and possessions of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may discharge a

portion of her cargo at one port, and continue her voyage to the other port or ports

of destination where foreign trade is permitted, for the purpose of landing the

remainder of her original cargo there, subject always to the Laws and Custom-

house Regulations of the two countries.

The Japanese Government, however, agrees to allow British vessels to continue,

as heretofore, for the period of the duration of the present Treaty, to carry cargo

between the existing open ports of the Empire, excepting to or from the ports of

Osaka, Niigata, and Ebisu-minato.

170 TREATY BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND JAPAN

Article XII.—Any ship of war or merchant vessel of either of the high

contracting parties which may be compelled by stress of weather, or by reason of

any other distress, to take shelter in a port of the other, shall be at liberty to refit

therein, to procure all necessary supplies, and to put to sea again, without paying

any dues other than such as would be payable by national vessels. In case, how-

ever, the master of a merchant vessel should be under the necessity of disposing of

a part of his cargo in order to defray the expenses, he shall be bound to conform to

the Regulations and Tariffs of the place to which he may have come.

If any ship of war or merchant vessel of one of the contracting parties should

run aground or be wrecked upon the coast of the other, the local authorities shall

inform the Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the district

of the occurrence, or, if there be no such Consular officer, they shall inform the

Consul-General, Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular Agent of the nearest district.

All proceedings relative to the salvage of Japanese vessels wrecked or cast on

shore in the territorial waters of Her Britannic Majesty shall take place in accordance

with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Great Britain, and, reciprocally, all

measures of salvage relative to British vessels wrecked or cast on shore in the

territ trial waters of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan shall take place in accordance

with the Laws, Ordinances, and Regulations of Japan.

Such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, and all parts thereof, and all furniture,

and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandise saved

therefrom, including those which may have been cast into the sea, or the proceeds

thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked ship

or vessel, shall be given up to the owners or their agents, when claimed by them.

If such owners or agents are not on the spot, the same shall be delivered to the

respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular Agents upon being

claimed by them within the period fixed by the laws of the country, and such

Consular officers, owners, or agents shall pay only the expenses incurred in the

preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which

would have been payable in the case of a wreck of a national vessel.

The goods and merchandise saved from the wreck shall be exempt from all the

duties of Customs unless cleared for consumption, in which case they shall pay the

ordinary duties.

When a ship or vessel belonging to the subjects of one of the contracting

parties is stranded or wrecked in the territories of the other, the respective Consuls-

General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents shall be authorized, in case

the owner or master, or other agent of the owner, is not present, to lend their official

assistance in order to afford the necessary assistance to the subjects of the respective

States. The same rule shall apply in case the owner, master, or other agent is

present, but requires such assistance to be given.

Article XIII.—All vessels which, according to Japanese law, are to be deemed

Japanese vessels, and all vessels wh