Hongkong Directory 1917





FOR ALL

INDUSTRIAL AN* IIOUSEHOLD

SEE INSIDE—PAGE XL.

THOS. HARRISON & CO. ESTABLISHED 1S45

CONTRACTORS TO H.M. and FOREIGN GDVERNMENT3

anb ^Taefic 'g&anufaciurers

Also of Distilled Dehydrated Coal Tar for Roads as per Road Board Specification

IMPORTERS OP FOREIGN ASPHALTES AND BITUMEN

PROPRIETORS OF DAY’S EYAMEL FOR SHIPS, A.YD A.YTI-FOl’LIYG COMPOSITIONS

Office & Works:—CANAL BANK, BLACK HORSE BRIDGE,

DEPTFORD, LONDON, ENGLAND

REGISTERED.

HARRISON’S ASPHALTE

 

This Article is packed in casks averaging 4-cwt. o-qrS. 14-lbs. Gross,

Tare 21-lbs., as it has been packed and sent to India, Far East and the Colonies

for more than 60 years. Invoiced on nett weights.

It is invaluable for Railway Work, Viaducts, Bridges,

Floors, Godowns, Drying Grounds, Damp Courses, and for all purposes for which

Asphalte is applicable.

Its antiseptic properties and hygienic value are too well known

to need comment.

It being impervious to moisture and all kinds of vermin, makes

it the cleanest of floors.

To obtain the full advantages of this article it must be borne in

mind that the best article is the only one that can be relied on, and our

Asphalte has stood the test of 60 years.

To ensure obtaining HARRISON’S ASPHALTE, it is necessary to see that

a signed label is in every Cask.

There is still a large and increasing demand for our Asphalte,

although we are competing with cheaper sorts. It is most essential to

obtain an article as reliable as ours, as the cost of removing an inferior article,

when once laid (if not impossible), would be very great.

In this article the small difference in price cannot be compared with

the loss the use of an inferior article may entail.

Shipments made through Merchants in Great Britain, and

we shall .be glad to, have your esteemed enquiries and orders through them, and

we are also prepared to give any further information or advice as to its use, etc.

TWO POPULAR HOTELS IN CENTRAL LONDON

OPPOSITE THE BRITISH MUSEU.VI

THACKERAY HOTEL

GREAT RUSSELL STREET, LONDON

NEAR THE BRITISH MUSEUM

KINGSLEY HOTEL

HART STREET, BLOOMSBURY SQUARE, LONDON

T HESE Temperance Hotels are situated close together in one of the healthiest districts of London. They are very

near the British Museum, the Thackeray HoteHserrig^directly opposite and the Kingsley within two minutes'

walk of that famous place of interest.

The Hotels are most favourably situated with regard to'the Houses of Parliament, Law Courts, Art Galleries and

Theatres. In fact, they are within easy walking distance or short iab-drive of nearly all places of interest frequented by

those visiting London. They are almost equi-distant from the great Railways, North, South, East and West t also the

Museum and Holborn Stations of the Electric Railways being so close at hand, bring the Hotels to within 8 to 10

minutes of the City, Royal Exchange, and the Bank of England; while the Agricultural Hall, South Kensington, Earl's

Court, Olympia, etc., can be reached within 15 to 30 minutes.

LOUNGES.

Spacious Dining, Drawing, Writing, Reading, Billiard and Smoking Rooms.

Perfect Sanitation. Floors Fireproof Throughout.

Night Porters. Telephone.

PASSENGER LIFTS. ELECTRIC LIGHT THROUGHOUT

BATH ROOMS ON EVERY FLOOR, HEATED THROUGHOUT

Single Bedroom, Attendance and Table d’Hote Breakfast

from 5s. 6d. with Table d’Hote Dinner from 8s. 6d

FULL TARIFF AND TESTIMONIALS ON APPLICATION

Intending visitors are requested to send an intimation, if possible, by post

or telegram prior to amval, that rooms may be reserved

THACKERAY HOTEL: “THACKERAY, LONDOIf

Telegraphic Addresses:

KINGSLEY HOTEL: “BOOKCKAFT, LONDON”

f THACKERAY HOTEL: MUSEUM 1230 (2 Lines)

Telephones: j KINGSLEY HOTEL : MUSEUM 1232 (2 Lines)

AGENTS

(LONDON Office of “Hongkong Daily Press,” 131, Fleet Street, E.C.

Do Mr. F. Algar, 11, Clement’s Lane, Lombard Street, E.C.

Do Messrs. G. Street & Co., Ltd., 30, Cornhill, E.C.

PARIS Messrs. G. E. Puel de Lobel & Cie., 53, Rue Lafayette

•SAN FRANCISCO The Fisher Advertising Agency

SEOUL (COREA) “Seoul Press” Office, Seoul

SOUTH AFRICA Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, Long Street, Cape Town

STDNET Messrs. Gordon & Gotch, 123, Pitt Street

MELBOURNE Messrs. Gordon & Gotch,, 124 and 126, Queen Street

BRISBANE Messrs. Gordon Gotch, Queen Street

-CALCUTTA Messrs. Thacker, Spink & Co., 5 and 6, Government Place

BOMBAY .'. “ Times of India” Office .

Do Messrs, Thacker & Co.

•COLOMBO Messrs. A. M. & J. Ferguson, “ Ceylon Observer ” Office

BATAVIA Drukkerij Papyru* (H. M. Van Dorp & Co.)

SINGAPORE Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 32, Raffles Place

FEDERATED MALAY STATES...Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Singapore

BORNEO Mr. J. Nimmo Wardrop, Sandakan

SAIGON Cie. de Commerce et de Nav. d’Extreme-Orient.

TONKIN (HAIPHONG)... do.

.MANILA Philippine Education Co.

YOKOHAMA Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, 60, Main Street

KOBE & OSAKA “Japan Chronicle” Office, Kobe

NAGASAKI “ Nagasaki Press ” Office

FORMOSA Mr. G, Miedbrodt, Taipeh

YLADIVOSTOCK Messrs. Sinkievitch Bros.

PEKING & TIENTSIN ...G. M. Gillard & Co.

^SHANGHAI, &O Messrs. Kelly & Walsh, Limited, The Bund

Do. Messrs. Brewer & Co.

YANGTSZE PORTS Messrs. Kelly A Walsh, Limited, Shanghai

-CHEFOO Me-srs. Curtis Brothers

IFOOCHOW ......i........Messrs. T Brockett & CO. •»

AMOY Messrs. A. S. Watson & Co., Limited, Kulangsu

•SWATOW Kwai Fung, Wai An Street

•CANTON .^ociadide Economica Portugueza

MACAO.^ Mr. A. A.de Mello

BANGKOK “ Baj gkok Times” Office

TOKIO - ...Mes-rs. Kelly & Walsh, Ltd.

TSINGTAU Messrs. Cornabe, Eckford A Go.

DAIREN Mr. F. J. Bardens

rw 1

~' — r-nn i ui.,; : 'V

tke Directory & Chronicle

John Bartholonievr St Co«E3ii^

11

8

Sill ■ .

THE

DIRECTORY & CHRONICLE

CHINA, JAPAN, COREA, INDO-CHINA,

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS, MALAY STATES r

SIAM, NETHERLANDS INDIA, BORNEO,

THE PHILIPPINES, Sc.

WITH WHICH ARE INCORPORATED “THE CHINA DIRECTORY” ANI>

“ THE HONGKONG DTRECTOEY AND HONG LIST FOR THE FAR EAST”

FOR THE FEAR

:.;,

1917

i i

10A, DES VCEUX ROAD, HONGKONG, AND 131, FLEET STREET, LONDON, E.C.

; l

^ ' MDeoeexyii.

• ' i ATTiiP. T.M’EL LTF; I:’. I! V ('HP T' LlfA CL (:V/A CD T-EIU HIU

' ^Price Thirty'Shillings fat) " ^

A

Cables: LEOPOLDINI, LONDON. Code: A.B.C. 5th Edition.

LEOPOLD FRANK

Established 1885.

i and 2, Addle Street, LONDON, E.C.

I THE LEADING SPECIALITY FIRM FOR LARGE STOCKS

AND BEST VALUES IN

BLANKETS and RUGS.

ORIGINATOR OF

a _

2.mm

mn-m

siffiif 5:|St mmm

fitelst m\

ma^sl

5c® &

n

. _ trfeteiisi

samir w.it&'i'&m

BRITISH MANUFACTURE.

feH »

BUSH RUGS—ColouredStripes and Fancy Checks.

CAMEL HAIR BLANKETS—With Striped and Key Borders.

COTTON BLANKETS—White, Grey, Fawn and Red Drab. All with Bright

Coloured Borders.

FRINGED TRAVELLING RUGS—In a Variety of Beautiful Designs.

UNION AND WOOLLEN BLANKETS—Brown, Fawn and Grey.

SUPPLY WHOLESALE AND EXPORT ONLY.

ENQUIRIES AND ORDERS THROUGH MERCHANTS IN GREAT BRITAIN.

WORLD WIDE REPUTATION FOR QUALITY AND RELIABILITY.

INDEX, DIRECTORY

INDEX

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS

A.B.C.DIRECTORY OF BRITISH MER- BUILDING CONTRACTORS :—

CHANTS AND MANUFACTURERS ... Ixxiii A Hon ... xcviii

ASPHALTE MANUFACTURERS:—

BUSINESS NOTICES :—

Thos. Harrison & Co... Inside front cover Hankow Horse Bazaar xciy

AUCTIONEERS :— Hankow Toilet Club xciii

Kam Hing Knitting Co liv

Ching Keng Lee & Co li

Nutter & Co xxv CANDLE MANUFACTURERS :—

BANKS :— Russo-Asiatic Trade and Manu-

Bank of China xix facturing Co Ixxx

Bank of Chosen xviii CARPET MANUFACTURERS :—

Bank of Communications xxi

Bank of Taiwan (Formosa) xiii North China Carpet Export Co. .. Ixxx

Banque Industrielle de Chine ... xv CEMENT MANUFACTURERS :—

Chartered Bank of India, Aus. and

China xi Green Island Cement Co. ... ... xlvi

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank ... x Indo-China Portland Cement Co.,

Hongkong Savings Bank xxii Ld xlvii

Mercantile Bank of India xii Onoda Cement Co., Ld Ixxviii

B,usso-Asiatic Bank xvii CHEMISTS AND DRUGGISTS :—

Sumitomo Bank, Osaka xyi

Yokohama Specie Bank xiv Ban Lam Drug Co., Ld xeviii

BASIC SLAG MANUFACTURERS CHINESE PIECE GOODS : —

Baltic Basic Slag Co., Ltd., Man- China Drawn Work Co xcvi

chester Ixxvii CHRISTMAS CARDS, ETC.:—

BICYCLE DEALERS :— Raphael Tuck & Sons, Inside bach cover

International Bicycle Co xlix

COAL MERCHANTS -

BLANKET AND BUG MANUFACTURERS :— Bismarck

Leopold Frank Opposite Index Kailan Mining Admin., Tientsin... xl

Do. Front cover

BOOKSELLERS & PUBLISHERS:— Kwong Sang & Co xc

Commercial Press, Ld Ixxxiii McAlister & Co., Ld., Singapore... xxvi

Maruzen Co., Ld xxxviii Nutter & Co xxv

BOOT AND SHOEMAKERS Mitsubishi Goshi Kwaisha xxxix

Mitsui Bussan Kaisha vi-yii

Cherry & Co. ... ... . li Tsang Foo & Co liv

D. Nigniewitzky ... . ...Ixxxv

Wheelock & Co xxv

Sekido & Co. Ixxxiv

Ixxxv Wing Kee & Co Ivi

Taiyo & Co.

DOCKS:—

BREWERS:—

Dai Nippon Brewery Co Ixxxi Hongkong & Whampoa Dock Co.. 1064B

Kawasaki Dockyard Co., Ld. ...xxxvii

BRICK MASJUFACTURERS :— Mitsubishi Docks, Nagasaki ... 592B

Kail an Mining Administration, Mitsubishi Dockyard, Kobe ... 592A

Tientsin xl Yokohama Dock Co., Ld. ...xxxv-xxxvi

BRONZE MANUFACTURER :— EDUCATIONAL :—

Kuroda lii Armstrong College, Newcastle . ...Ixxvii

yi COAL MERCHANTS

HONGKONG,

PRINCE’S BUILDINGS, ICE HOUSE STREET.

Head Office - - - TOKYO, JAPAN.

(MITSUI & CO., LIMITED, IN EUROPE AND AMERICA.)

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AKD GEKERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

COAL CONTRACTORS to Home and Foreign Mail and

freight Steamers, Railways, Army and Navy, and Principal Industrial

W orks.

MIIKE HARBOUR AND DOCKS built by the Company to-

facilitate Loading and Shipment of Miike Coals.

SOLE PROPRIETORS of Miike, Tagawa, Ida, Yamano,

Hondo and Noborikawa Coal Mines.

SOLE AGENTS for Ohnoura, Ohtsuji, Mannoura, Yoshio,

Mameda, Iwaya, Kishima, Mineji,Yubari, Matsushima and other Coals.

Agents for:

TOKYO MARINE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

TOKYO FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

MEIJI FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

NIPPON FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD. Tokyo.

KYODO FIRE INSURANCE. CO., LTD. Tokyo.

CHIYODA FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Tokyo.

YOKOHAMA FIRE INSURANCE CO., LTD Yokohama.

DAI NIPPON BREWERY CO., LTD v...Tokyo.

ONODA CEMENT CO., LTD Onoda.

etc., etc., etc.

Telegraphic Address: “Mitsui.”

COMMISSION MERCHANTS

mm mm KAMI LID. TOKYO

(Mitsui & Co., Ltd., in Europe & America)

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND

- GENERAL COMMISSION MERCHANTS

HEAD OFFICE:

1, Surugacho, Nihonbashiku, TOKYO

BRANCHES AND REPRESENTATIVES:

JAPAN:—

CHEMULPO KUCHINOTZU NAGASAKI OTARU WAKAMATSU

KARATSU MIIKE NAGOYA SEOUL YOKOHAMA

KISHIMA MOJI NIIGATA TAINAN

KOBE MURORAN OSAKA TAIPEH

OTHER COUNTRIES

AMOY FOOCHOW MUKDEN SOURABAYA

ANTUNGHSIEN HAMBURG NEWCHWANG SWATOW

BANGKOK HANKOW NEW YORK SYDNEY

BOMBAY HARBIN PORTLAND DAIREN

CANTON HONGKONG RANGOON TIENTSIN

CALCUTTA LONDON SAN FRANCISCO TIEHLING

CHANGCHUN LYONS SHANGHAI TSINGTAU

CHEFOO MANILA SINGAPORE YLADIY OSTOCK

Telegraphic JLd.

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS—Continued

PAGE PAGE

ENGINEERS AND MACHINISTS:— MERCHANTS, COMMISSION AGENTS, ETC. :—

Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ld Ixxxii Arculli Brothers xliv

Canning & Co., W., Birmingham Ixxvi Bam Lam Drug Co., Ld xcviii

Hongkong &Whampoa DockCo.,Ld. 1 064B Bismarck & Co lv

Kwong Tuck Cheong ... Ixxxii C. Abdoola & Co xli

Mitsubishi Docks, Nagasaki ... 592B China Trading Co xcvii

Mitsubishi Dockyard, Kobe ... 592A Cox, McEuen, London Ixxviii

Peace, W. K. & C., Sheffield ... Ixxiv De Souza & Co lii

Rapid Magn'etting Machine Co., Ekman Foreign Agencies xlii

■Ld.; Birmingham ... Ixxvi Gilloh & Co xlv 1

Tting King Lung & Co xcvii H. Goldenberg ... xlv

Hoo Cheong Wo & Co. xc

FURNITURE MAKE-RS :— John D. Hutchison & Co., Hong-

Li Kwong Loong xcviii kong ..: xliv

GARAGES :— John D. Hutchison & Co.,

Eastern Garage Co., Shanghai ... 1 Shanghai Ixxix

Exile Garage 1 Kwong Sang Hong, Ld xcvi

Masuda &,Co. ... ... xliii

GtiN AND RIFLE MAKERS Mitsui Bussan Kaisha, China and

Wm. Schmidt & Co xciv Japan vi-vii

Nutter & Co xxv

HOTELS :—

Omiya & Co., Y Ixxix

Astor House, Peking Ixxxvi Russo-Asiatic Trade & M:ufg. Co. Ixxx

Grand Hotel de Pekin ... xlyiii S. Soboleff & Co. xciii

Hankow Hotel, Ixxxvi Sino Swiss Commercial liii

Kulangsu Hotel xciv Tschurin & Ca. ... 53&

Peak- Hotel,. Hongkong xlix

Thackeray and Kingsley Hotels METAL MERCHANTS :—

Inside front end paper Cheong Wo & Co Ivii

E. Hing & Co xc

INSURANCE, FIRE :— Hop Fung xcvii

Fire & Marine Insc. Co. (United), xxiv Singon Co., Hongkong xc

Imperial Marine Transport & Fire

Insurance Co xxiii MILK :—

McAlister Jr Co. ... xxvi Milkmaid Brand Back end paper

Nutter & Co. ... ... ... xxv

NAVY CONTRACTORS :—

Sale & Frazar, Ld xxiv Bismarck & Co., Hongkong Ir

Wheelock & Co xxv

NEWSPAPERS:—

INSURANCE, LIFE .

Chung Ngoi San Po - liii

Nutter & Co. ... xxv

Standard Life ... Front cover Hongkong Daily Press... ... ..v -536

Hongkong Weekly Press 536

"Wheelock & Co. • ... ... xxv.

NURSERYMEN AND FLORISTS :—

INSURANCE, MARINE : -

The Yokohama Nursery xcv

Fire &■ Marine Insc. Co.

(United), xxiv

Imperial Marine Transport & Fire OIL MERCHANTS :— .

Insurance Co. xxiii Asiatic Petroleum Co xx

McAlister & Co xxvi Rising Sun Petroleum Co xx

Nippon, Marine and Fire xxii OPTICIAN :— : Ssis«r/- : • , f

Nutter & Co- '••• ••• xxv N. Lazarus xc^y

JEWELLERS AND GOLDSMITHS PAPER AGENTS:-- ' ^

LuenWo&Co ... xci Ekmah Foreign Agencies 7 ; xlii; ;

Sing Fat Co. ... xci PASTRYCOOKS AND CONFECTIONERS:^ }

Tuck Chang & Co., Ld xci E. Cazzi ,.. ... Llxxxyii )

E. Manini... ...v . .. Ixxxvji.)

LACE MANUFACTURERS :

Morinaga Gdafectionery Ci>„ _Ltd. •: 7hi-)

China Drawn Work ... ... xcvi

PERFUMERIES :— '• - --7... J

LAMP MANUFACTURERS:— Kwong Sang Hong, Ltd xcvi

A. C. Wells & Co., London ... ... Ixxv

PRINTERS & PUBLISHERS:—

MACHINERY :— Commercial Press, Ld Ixxxviii

Hongkong 4^ WJiampdADd^k.Oo. 1064A ' Hongkong Daily Press,. Ld; .v ... liv

Rose,Downs & Thompson, Lcl. ... xxxii Maruzfen Co., Ld. ... ''... ... ,,.xxxviiii

INDEX TO ADVERTISERS—Continued ix

i , PAGE PAGE

PROVISION MERCHANTS STEEL MANUFACTURERS :— ' . i1

; : See Storekeepers Peace, Ltd, W. K. C. Shetiield ... Ixxiv

RAILWAY COMPANIES:— Singon & Co., Hongkong ... ... xc

Chinese Govt. Railways xxxiv N

STEVEDORES:— r ,

ROPE MANUFACTURERS

H’kcmg. Rope Manufacturing Co. 1064A Bismarck & Co; ... ' Iv

Leung Kon Tai & Co ..... Ivii

SEED MERCHANTS Sing Kee & Co Ivi

The Yokohama Nursery xcv Tsang Foo & Co liv

SHIPBUILDERS :— Wing Kee

H’kong. Whampoa Dock Co., Ld. 1064B

Kwong Tuck Cheong Ixxxii StOREKEEPERS :—

Mitsubishi Docks, Kobe 592A Ban Lam Drug Co, Ld xcviii

Mitsubishi Docks, Nagasaki ... 592B Bismarck & Co, Hongkong Iv

Tung King Lung & Co xcvii Cheong Wo & Co. .... Ivii

Yokohama Dock Co xxxv D. Komeya xcvi

SHIPCHANDLERS

Dombey & Son Ixxxviii

E King

A. Kwai & Co.... Ixxxix French Store Ixxxviii

Bismarck & Co., Hongkong... ... Iv

Cheong Wo & Co Ivii Heng Tick Hoat ... ... ... Ixxxviii

Hoo Cheong Wo & Co. ... ... ... xc

Hoo Cheong Wo & Co xc J. Tornoe xciii

. J. Tomoe xciii On Fat & Co ..Ixxxix

Kwong Sang & Co... xc

On Fat & Co Ixxxix Singon & Co. ... ... xc

Sing Kee & Co. Ivi

TAILORS, ETC. :—

Singon & Co xc

Wing Kee & Co Ivi Madame Flint ... ... xcii

Noordin ... ... xcii

SHIPPING BROKERS, AGENTS, ETC.

Ekman Foreign Agencies xlii

TIMBER MERCHANTS :—

Masuda & Co ... xlii

McAlister & Co.,Ld., Singapore ... xxiv E King & Co. xc

Nutter & Co xxv Wm. Stewart & Co. ... Back of cover

Sale & Frazar, Ld xxiv

Wheelock & Co xxv TOBACCONISTS :—

SOAP MANUFACTURERS: — E. N. Paizis & Co xcii

Pears, London... .... ... ...Back cover

STEAMSHIP LINES :— TYPE FOUNDRIES :—

A Kwai & Co Ixxxix Commercial Press, Ld Ixxxiii

Apcar Line xxvii Tokyo Tsukiji Type Foundry ...Ixxxiii

British India S. N. Co., Ltd. ... xxvii

Dairen Kisen Kaisha ... xxx WHARVES AND GODOWNS:—

Douglas Steamship Co xxxi Tokyo Soko Kaisha, Kobe 59iF

Eastern & Aus. S.S. Co xxxii

Indo-China Steam Nav. Co xxviii

WINES AND SPIRITS :—

Nippon Yusen Kaisha 592E

Okazaki Steamship Co., Ld Ixxx Cockburn & Campbell, Gt. Britain Ixxvii

Osaka Shosen Kaisha ... ... ... xxix Dombey & Co ... Ixxxviii

P. & O. S. N. Co xxvii Heng Tick Hoat Ixxxviii

Tokyo Soko Kaisha 592F J. Tornoe ... xciii

Toyo Kisen Kaisha .u xxxiii The Ban Lam Drug Co xcviii

BANKS

Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation.

PAID-UP CAPITAL $15,000,000

STERLING RESERVE FUND £1,500.000 at 2/- =£15,000,000

SILVER RESERVE FUND 18,000,000

33,000,000

RESERVE LIABILITY OF PROPRIETORS ~~ 15,000,000

COURT OF DIRECTORS:

CHAIRMAN—S. H. DODWELL, ESQ.

DEPUTY CHAIRMAN—J. A. PLUMMER, ESQ.

HON. MR. C. E. ANTON

G. T. M. EDKINS, ESQ.

W. L. PATTENDEN, ESQ.

C. S. GUBBAY, ESQ. HON. MR. E. SHELLIM

HON. ME. P. H. HOLYOAK

E. V, D. PARR, ESQ.

BRANCHES, AGENCIES AND SUB-AGENCIES:

AMOY IPOH PENANG

BANGKOK JOHORE RANGOON

BATAVIA KOBE SAIGON

BOMBAY KUALA LUMPUR SAN FRANCISCO

CALCUTTA LONDON SHANGHAI

COLOMBO LYONS Do. (HONGKEWy

CANTON MALACCA SINGAPORE

FOOCHOW MANILA SOURABAYA

HANKOW NAGASAKI TIENTSIN

HARBIN NEW YORK TSINGTAU

HONGKONG PEKING YOKOHAMA

ILOILO

CHIEF MANAGER :

Hongkong—IX. J. STABB.

MANAGER:

Shanghai—A. G. STEPHEN.

LONDON OFFICE-9, GEACECHURCH STREET.

LONDON BANKERS-LONDON COUNTY & WESTMINSTER BANK, LD.

HOIVOKOIXO.

Interest Allowed

On Current Deposit Accounts at the rate of 2 per cent, per annum on

the daily balance.

On Fixed Deposits:—

For 3 months, 2| per cent, per annum

6 „ 3i

12 „ 4“ „ „

LOCAL BILLS DISCOUNTED.

CREDITS granted on approved Securities, and every description of Banking and

Exchange business transacted.

DRAFTS granted on London and the chief commercial places in Europe, India,

Australia, America, China, and Japan.

N. J. STABB,

HONGKONG, 1ST JANUARY, 1917. Chief Manager,

BANKS xi

Charted Bank of India, Australia and China

Head Office: — 38, BISHOPSGATE, LONDON.

INCORPORATED BY ROYAL CHARTER.

PAID-UP CAPITAL, in 60,000 Shares of £20 each £1,200,000

RESERVE FUND £1,800,000

Court of Directors

SIR M. CORNISH TURNER, Chairman. WM. H. NEVILLE GOSCHEN, ESQ.

SIR H. S. CUNNINGHAM, K.C.I.E. RT. HON. LORD G. HAMILTON, G.C.S.I.

THOMAS CUTHBERTSON, ESQ. WM. FOOT MITCHELL, ESQ.

SIR ALFRED DENT, K.C.M.G. L. A. WALLACE, ESQ.

—:o:—

managers

T. H. WHITEHEAD | T. FRASER

Subinanager

W. E. PRESTON

Auditors

MAGNUS MO WAT, ESQ. I WM. ADOLPHUS BROWNE, ESQ, F.C.A.

Bankers

The Bank of England

The London City and Midland Bank, Limited

The National Bank of Scotland, Limited

The London County and Westminster Bank, Limited

The National Provincial Bank of England, Limited

Agencies and Branches

AMRITSAR ILOILO PUKET

BANGKOK IPOH RANGOON

BATAVIA KARACHI SAIGON

BOMBAY KLANG SEREMBAN

CALCUTTA KOBE SHANGHAI

CANTON KUALA LUMPUR SINGAPORE

CEBU MADRAS

SOURABAYA

COLOMBO MANILA

DELHI MALACCA TAIPING

FOOCHOW MEDAN TAVOY

HAIPHONG NEW YORK TIENTSIN

HANKOW PEKING YOKOHAMA

HONGKONG PENANG

:o

Correspondents in the Chief Commercial places in

EUROPE, ASIA, AFRICA, AUSTRALIA AND AMERICA.

QUBEN’S ROAD, Hongkong, 1st Jan., 1917. T. C. DOWNING, Manage". Unnykong.

xii BANKS

THE

MERCANTILE RANK .;§>

# 21 INDIA, LIMITED.

Authorised Capital =£1,500,000

Subscribed ■ 1.125,000

Paid-up . 562,500

Reserve Fund....... • 550,000

HEAD OFFICE: 15, CRACECHURCH ST., LONDON, E.C.

Bank of England and the

London Joint Stock Bank, Limited,

BRANCHES

Calcutta, Howrah, Bombay, Karachi, Madras,

Rangoon, Colombo, Kandy, Galle,

Port Louis (Mauritius), Singapore, Penang, Kuala-

Lumpur, Kota-Bharu, and Shanghai.

INTEREST allowed on Current Accounts at the rate of two per

cept. per annum on the daily balance.

The Bank receives Current and Fixed Deposits on terms which

may be learned on application.

Telegraphic Address: “PARADISE.”

C. CHflIVSPKIN,

HONGKONG, IST JANUARY, 1917. Acting Managtr.

BANKS

IT m m

BANK OF TAI WAN, LP.

(TAIWAN GiNKO).

Incorporated by Special Imperial Charter, 1899.

CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED ...Yen 20,000,000

CAPITAL PAID-UP ...L:.. „ 12,500,000

RESERVE FUND „ 4,680,000

HEAD OFFICE :

TAIPEH, FORMOSA.

BRANCHES:

JAPAN—KOBE, OSAKA, TOKYO.

FORMOSA—AKOH, GIRAN, KAGI, KARENKOH, KEELUNG,

MAKUNG, PINAN, SHINCHIKU, TAICHU, TAINAN,

TAKOW, TAMSUI.

CHINA—AMOY, CANTON, FOOCHOW, HANKOW, KIU-

KIANG, SHANGHAI, SWATOW.

OTHERS—HONGKONG, LONDON, SINGAPORE,

SOERABAIA.

LONDON BANKERS:

Capital and Counties Bank, London and South-Western Bank,

Parr’s Bank.

The Bank has Correspondents in the Commercial centres of

Russia, Manchuria, Indo-China, India, Philippine Islands, Java,

Australia, America and elsewhere.

HONGKONG OFFICE:

Prince’s Building, 3, Des Voeux Road.

xiv BANKS

®jje fMvokma Specie

ESTABLISHED I 880. ESTABLISHED l88o.

■CAPITAL SUBSCRIBED Yen 48,000,000.00

CAPITAL PAID UP „ 30,000,000.00

RESERVE FUND - „ 20,800,000.00

President :-JUNNOSUKE INOUYE, ESQ.

Vice-President:—YUKI YAMAKAWA, ESQ.

Directors

J. INOUYE, ESQ. Y. YAMAKAWA, ESQ.

N. SOMA, ESQ. M. ODAGIRI, ESQ.

K. SONODA, ESQ. T. KAWASHIMA, ESQ.

R. KIMURA, ESQ. BARON K. IWASAKI

R. KARA, ESQ. K. TATSUMI, ESQ.

GENERAL MANAGER—S. K. SUZUKI, ESQ.

HEAD OFFICE: YOKOHAMA

HODSUMI, ESQ.

MANAGER—T.

Branches and Agencies:

ANTUN G-HSIEN HONGKONG NEWCHWANG SHANGHAI

BOMBAY HONOLULU NEW YORK SINGAPORE

CALCUTTA KOBE OSAKA SYDNEY

CHANGCHUN LIAOYANG PEKING TIEHLING

DAIREN (Dalny) LONDON LOS ANGELES TIENTSIN

FENGTIEN (Mukden) TSINGTAU RYOJUN (Port TOKYO

HARBIN LYONS Arthur) TSINAN

HANKOW NAGASAKI SAN FRANCISCO

Correspondents at all the Chief Cities in the World.

The Bank buys and receives for collection Bills of Exchange, issues Drafts and

Telegraphic Transfers and Letters of Credit on above places and elsewhere,

and transacts General Banking Business,

Deposits received for fixed periods at rates to be obtained on application.

SHIIHAKICHI SUZUKI,

General Manager.

BANKS

lanque |itkstritllc k

If $& it K 'He ^

CAPITAL Francs 45,000,000 (1/4 Paid up).

1/3 of the Capital, /.

SUBSCRIBED BY

THE GOVERNMENT OE THE CHINESE REPUBLIC.

Statutes approved by the Government of the Chinese

Republic on the nth January, 1913.

PRESIDENT ... ... ... ... ANDRE BERTHELOT.

GENERAL MANAGER A. J. PERNOTTE.

MANAGER FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS... WANG KO MING.

HEAD OFFICE: 74, Rue Saint Lazare, PARIS.

BRANCHES in PEKING, SHANGHAI and TIENTSIN.

IB .A. USTIK: IE S =

IN FRANCE:—SOCIETE GENERALE POUR LE DEVELOPPEMENT

DU COMMERCE ET DE L’INDUSIRIE EN FRANCE.

IN LONDON —LONDON COUNTY & WESTMINSTER

: BANK, LTD.

IN ITALY:—BANCA COMMERCIALF. ITALIANA.

Telegraphic Address: CH IBANK IN D.

Interest allowed on Current Accounts and Fixed Deposits.

Terms on application.

Every description of Banking and Exchange business transacted.

Gr. LION, Manager, P, SELLIER, Manageri

SHANGHAI BRANCH. PEKING BRANCH.

P. CORN U, Manager,

TIENTSIN BRANCH.

xv£ BANKS

Cable Address: “ SUMIT BANK, OSAKA ”

; ESTABLISHED 1912.

(Successors to the Sumitomo Bank)

Capital - - - - - -Yen 15,000,000.00

Paid-up Capital - - - - - „ 7,500,000.00

Reserve Fund - - - - 1,350,000.00

Deposits (June, 1916) - - - 102,000,000.00

Baron K. SUMITOMO... ... .^President.

K. YUKAWA, Esq ...Managing Director.

Branches:—

Tokyo, Yokohama, Nagoya, Kyoto, Kobe, Onomichi, Kure, Hiroshima,

Yanai, Shimonoseki, Moji, Wakamatsu, Hakata, Kurume, Etc. i

Agents : -

Lloyds Bank, Limited, London.

National City Bank of New York, New York.

National Bank of India, Limited, Bombay.

Correspondents

In all important places at home and abroad.

The Bank buys, sells and receives for collection Drafts and

Telegraphic Transfers; issues Commercial and Travellers’

Tetters of Credit available in all important parts of the World,

besides doing General Banking Business. ;

BANKS xvii

RUSSO-ASIATIC BANK.

Capital (fully-paid) - - - Rbls. 55,000,000

lieserve Fund „ 24,664,557

Capital Contributed by Chinese

Government - - - Kpg. Tls. 3,500,000

Reserve Fund - - - - ,, 1,240,242

Special Reserve Fund - - ,, 503,333

Head Office:—PETROGRAD.

Paris Office:—9, Rue Boudreau.

London Office:—64, Old Broad Street, E.C.

£5 Branches and Agencies in Russia, Siberia and Mongolia

and 23 in Europe and Asia

Telegraphic Address“ SINORUSSE.”

BANKERS :

LONDON:—Messrs. Glyn, Mills, Currie & Co.

PARIS:—Soci&e Gen^rale pour favoriser'le D^veloppement du Commerce et de

I’lndustrie en France. Banque de Paris and des Pays-Bas.

AMSTERDAM :—Messrs.- Lippmann, Rosenthal & Co. '

Interest allowed on current accounts in I'aels at the rate of 2 per cent, per annum

on the daily balance. :^

Fixed Deposits in Taels and Dollars. Terms on application.

Local Bills discounted. Special facilities for Russian Exchange. Foreign

Exchange on the principal cities of the world bought and sold.

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES

J. JEZIERSKI, ESQ. C. C/IRERRE, ESQ.

MANAGERS FOR CHINA AND' JAPAN.

xviii BANKS

CIK Bank of Chosen

Capital Paid tip Yen 10,000,000

Governor:—K. SHODA, Esq,, M.P.H.

Directors JR. MIZUKOSHI, Esq., T. MISHIMA, Esq., Y. KIMURA, Esq.

HEAD OFFICE:—SEOUL, CHOSEN.

Telegraphic Address: “CHOGIN.”

Codes used : A.B.C. 5th Edition and Lieber’s Code.

BRANCHES:

CHOSEN—Chemulpo, Pyengyang, Wonsan, Taiku,

Fusan, Chinnampo, Kunsan, Mokpo, Ranam,

Masan, Shin-wiju, Hoilyong.

MANCHURIA—Dairen, Mukden, Chang-chun, Antung,.

SzU'ping'chieh, Kai^yuan, Harbin.

JAPAN—Tokyo, Osaka.

CORRESPONDENTS:—In all the principal Cities

in the World.

Every description oj general banking and

exchange business transacted.

BANKS xix

Bank of CDina

The Goi>e#*nment Bank

{Specially authorised by the President Mandate

of the loth April, 1913)

PAID-UP CAPITAL ... $30,000,000

Head Office: PEKING.

Telegraphic Address: “ CENTROBANKCodes used: A.B.C. 5th Edition, Lieber’s & Private

BRANCHES AND SUB-BRANCHES:

Chihli Shantung Kweiteh Wusih

Kalgan Chefoo Lowanho Yangchow

Paoting Chowtsun Nanyang Chekiang

PEKING Lincsin Sinyangchow HANGCHOW

TIENTSIN Linyi Yuchow Huchow

Fengtien Tsingtao Hupeh Kashing

Antung TSINAN HANKOW Lanchi

Chinchow T,sining Ichang Ningpo

Dairen Waiming Hunan Shaohing

Moukden Weihsien Changsha Wenchow

Liaoyuan Shansi Kiangsi Fukien

Newchwang KWEIHWACHENG Kanchow Amoy

Sinmin Paotowchen Kiukiang FOOCHOW

Taonan TAYUAN NANCHANG Kwangtung

Tiehling Yuncheng Anhwei CANTON

Kirin Shensi ANKIN Kiungchow

CHANGCHUN Sanyuanhsien Wuhu Kongmoon

Harbin SIAN Kiangsu Swatow

Kirin Honan Chinkiang Szechwan

Heilungkiang Changte NANKING Chengtu

Taheiho Chowkiakow SHANGHAI CHUNGKING

Tsitsihar Hsuchow Soochow Tzeliutsing

KAIFENG Tsingkiangpu Wanhsien

Agencies throughout all important towns in China.

Every description of general banking and exchange business transacted.

rETKOLEITM EEFINEES

SHELL PHOTOR SPIRIT FOR MJM ^BS

OROWi^ MOTOR SPIRiT FOR IViOTOB TRUCKS

KEROSENE FOR ALL PURPOSES

LIQUiD FUEL FOR HEAVY OIL ENGINES

CANDLES, LUBRICATING OILS

PARAFFiN WAX

OBTAINABLE EVERYWHERE

ASIATIC PETROLEUM CO.

CH/N/?, STRAITS, SIAM, INDIA

PHILIPPINES

RISING SUN PETROLEUM GO.

JAPAN AND FORMOSA

BANKS

( 3!v * ft S) ft la iffl 3S

BANK OF COMMUNICATIONS.

CAPITAL TIS. 10,000,000

HEAE OFFICE :-PEKING.

Every description of Banking and Exchange Business transacted.

Interest allowed on Current Accounts and Fixed Deposits

according to Arrangement.

Credits granted on Approved Securities.

Special Facilities for Transfers in all Parts of China.

BKANCHES:-

MANCHURIA—Newchwano-, Mukden, Changchun, Kirin, Harbin, L’aoyang,

Sunkaitai, Kaiping, Tilin, Kinhsien, Sinmingtun.

CHIHRI—Peking, Tientsin, Kalgan, Paoting, Haitien, Shenoteh, Peitungchow,

Tangshan, Pungcheng, Sungfang, Cheakiachoung.

SHANSI—Taitung, Yangkaou.

SHENSI.—Mienchih.

SHANTUNG—Tsinan, Tsinin, Tsochuang, Chefoo, Techow.

HONAN—Kaifeng, Tsioutso, Chowkaikow, Taho, Taokow, Chiangteh, C hen-

chow, Sinyangchow, Loyang, HsinshanLr.

KIANGSU—shanghai, Soochow, Wusih, Chinkiang, Pukow, Peipu, Hsuchow,

Yangchow, Tsinkiangpu.

CHEKIANG—Hangchow, Ningpo.

ANBUI—Wuhu, Panpu, Shiencheng, Anching.

KIANGSI—Kiukiang.

HUPEH—Hankow, Ichang, Shashi.

HUNAN—Changsha, Yiyang, Uengchow, Siangtan, Shongteh, Pa< clung.

SZECHUAN—Ch’en-tu, Chungking.

KUANGTUNG—Canton.

SPECIAL TERRITORIES—Jehol, Kweihua.

FOREIGN TERRITORIES—Hongkong, Singapore, New York, San Francisco, etc:

LIANG SHIH-YI, JEN FUNG-POA,

President. Vice-President

xxii BANKS AND INSURANCES

HONGKONG SAVINGS BANK.

The Business of the above Bank is conducted by the

HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANKING CORPORATION

Rules may be obtained on application.

INTEREST on deposits is allowed at 3| PER CENT, per annum

on the minimum monthly balances.

Depositors may transfer at their option balances of $100 or more to the HONGKONG

AND SHANGHAI BANK, to be placed on FIXED DEPOSIT at 4 PER CENT.

per annum.

For the HONGKONG AND SHANGHAI BANKING CORPORATION,

N. J. STABB,

Chief Manager.

IHE NIPPON IMAOINE INSURANCE CO., LD.

Subscribed Capital Yen 3,000,000.000

Paid-Up Capital „ 900,000.000

Reserve Funds „ 3,283,017.328

President:—G. UKON, ESQ. | Managing Director:—W. UKON, ESQ.

HEAD OFFICE:—144, NICHOME, MINAMI-DORI, YEDOBORI, OSAKA, JAPAN.

BRANCHES:—KOBE, TOKYO, YOKOHAMA AND SHANGHAI.

PRINCIPAL AGENCIES

BowDENB

Ros.i Co., LTD. , LONDON: —C. T. BOWRING & Co.

Blaess

- ) (INSURANCE), LTD.

HALLIWELL. ; MANILA:—SMITH, BELL & Co., LTD.

"gEMEN;—F. RECK Co. ) MARSEILLES:-R. DE CAMPOU & FILS.

bb

£bANE :—BOWDEN BROS. & Co., LTD. > MELBOURNE :—BOWDEN BROS. & Co.,

TT :__GLADST0NE

kwvr^ 4, WYLLIE & Co. ^ LTD.

E

X ^OA:—EVAN MACKENZIE. I NEW YORK:—WILLCOX, PECK k HUGHES.

TON TRADING CO. ( RANGOON:—HARPERINK, SMITH & Co.

OT

w A YT^

B

S^^ yRGr:—ELEICHRODER (k Co. ■ SAN FRANCISCO:—STEWART S. LOWERY

MOT

°SHIGE. & Co.

SINGAPORE:—MCALISTER k Co., LTD.

LIYERPO O L:—BRODRICH, LEITCH < SEATTLE:—CALHOUN, DENNY k EWING.

KENDALL. \ SYDNEY :—BOWDEN BROS, k Co., LTD.

A.rtd. all other principal ports in the M^oPld^.

INSURANCES xxiii

Cbe Imperial marine transport

AND

fire Insurance Co-, Ctd-

ESTABLISHED 1898

Subscribed Capital ... Yen 3,000,000.000.

Reserve Funds .... ,, 2,574,806.484.

HEAD OFFICE:

No. 6, KITA SAYACHO, NIHONBASHI-KU, TOKYO.

Telephone Nos. 1935-8 (HONKYOKU).

BRANCH OFFICES:

OSAKA and KOBE.

Policies are granted at Current Rates to all parts of the

World, payable at its numerous Agencies.

Claims arranged by local Agents and paid with promptitude

and Liberality.

Xxiv INSURANCES AND SHIPPING

Fire ana marine Insurance Cos.

T H £ UNITED:

Netherlands Lloyd of Amsterdam, Established 1853

East-India Sea and Fire Insurance Co. of Amsterdam, Established 1832

Batavia Sea and Fire Insurance Co. of Batavia, Established 1843

Java Sea and Fire Insurance Co. of Ba'avia, Established 1861

WORKING ON JOINT ACCOUNT

.are prepared to issue Fire and Marine policies at current rates. Policies can be made

payable at the Companies’ Branches or Agencies throughout the world. y

Claims payable without reference to Head Office.

Subscribed Capital ad. FI. 9,700,000.00

Reserve Funds ad. „ 1,408,642.74

Premium Reserved ad. „ 1,421,294.98

BANKERS FOR CHINA:

Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corporation.

Netherlands Trading Society.

SHANGHAI BRANCH OFFICE:

8b, Kiukfang: Road. Manager: R. A. KREULEN.

SALE &

FRAZAR, LTD.,

JAPAN,

TOKYO, KOBE, YOKOHAMA and MOJI.

Chartering, Sale and Purchase of Steamers.

AGENCIES

London Assurance (Fire) Corporation.

Bank Line, Limited (Indian African and Oriental-African Lines)

Ellerman & Bucknall Steamship Co;, Ltd.

(American and Manchurian Line).

(Atlantic, Gulf and Far East Line).

Isthmian Steamship Lines.

The Royal Mail Steam Packet Company

. . . (Trans-Pacific 1 ine.)

The “Ellerman” Line ^European Service).

INSURANCES AND SHIPPING XXV

WHEEXOCK & CO.

Ship, Freight, Metal, Coal and General Brokers

Agents for the

Shanghai Tug & Lighter Co., Ltd.

No. 2, French Bund, Shanghai. Telephone Nos. 18 & 2793.

Submarine Signal Co.

The British Anti-Fouling Composition and Paint Co., Ltd.

Contractors to the Admiralty.

Stocks kept at all the docks in Shanghai. Prices upon application.

General Accident, Fire, Life Assurance Corporation, Ltd.

Telegraphic Address:

“Whlelock, Shanghai.” Agents:

Watkins’

Wetmore’s & Codes:

Appendix.-

C'. 4th 3rd& 5thEdition.

A.AlJi.Telegraphic Edit ions

CodeCode. r WfiEELOCK CO.

Western

Scott’s Code Union1906,Tel.Tenth Edn. Telephone No. 587. No. 2, French Eund, SHANGHAI

Telegrams: Codes:

“NUTTER, MOJI."’ NUTTER Sc GO ABC 5th, Al,

Telephone No. 866 5 Scott’s 10th,

I’. O. Box No, 3 East Main Street (Higashi Hon Machi) Western Union.

MOJI, JAPAN.

Shipping, Coal Bunkering, Commission, Insurance,

Import and Exports, Surveyors and Auctioneers,

Government Contractors.

SALE AXD PUitCHASE OF STEAMERS A SPECIALITV.

AGENTS FOR :

The Robert Dollar Company. North of England Protecting and Indem-

Birch, Kirby & Co., Ltd., Kobe & London. nity Association.

Suffern & Suffern, New York. i “iCommercial.

Kyushu.

Japan” Trade Journal, >

Transatlantic Marine Insurance Co. ,

Hind Rolph & Co., San Francisco. Sun Fire Office.

F. Green & Co., London. Manufacturers’ Life Insce. Association.

New Zealand Insurance Co., Ltd. Etc., etc., etc.

brU A... • A /

Chartering Experience of over ,30 years. Correspondence irtvi ted.

XXTi INSURANCES AND SHIPPIN

McAlister & Co., la

Singapore^ Penang, and Federated Malay States.

SHIPPING AND COAL MERCHANTS

INSURANCE . AND BUNKERING

AGENTS . . TRADE MARK. CONTRACTORS, etc.

ESTABLISHED 1857.

Cable Address :—“ McALISTER. ”

London Correspondents: -Messrs. Mcllwraith McEacharn & Co.f Propy., Ltd.

AKK.XTS FOR—

Mcllwraith, McEacharn & Co., Propy., Ltd. (Australian

Line.)

Toyo Risen Kaisha (Oriental Steamship Co.). Steamers of this

Line leave Hongkong at regular and frequent intervals for San

Francisco, via Shanghai, Nagasaki, Kobe, Yokohama, and

Honolulu. Passengers booked to principal points in United

States and Europe. Special round-the-world tours arranged.

EUerman & Bucknall Steamship Co., Ltd. (American and

Manchurian Line). A regular service of steamers to and from

New York, via all principal China-Japan ports, and Straits

Settlements. ( “ Ellerman ” Line.) A regular service of

steamers from Far East to Marseilles, London and Liverpool.

Howard, Smith Co., Ltd. (Australian Line of Passenger and

Cargo Steamers).

Seaham Colliery Co., Ltd.

Abermain Colliery Co., Ltd.

Hetton Coal Co., Ltd.

Queensland Insurance Co., Ltd.

Nippon Marine Transport and Fire Insurance Co., Ltd.

Every facility for bunkering steamers with Australian and

Japanese Coals, and supplying all requirements.

SHIPPING xxYii

P. Sa O. B. I.

AND

Apcar Line

Companies incorporated in England,

PENINSULAR & ORIENTAL S. N. Co.

ROYAL MAIL SERVICE

Under Contract with H. M. Government.

OUTWARDS HOMEWARDS

To Straits, Colombo, India,

Shanghai and Japan. Australasia, Egypt,

Marseilles and London.

ForSailing,

full information,

apply to Passage Fares, Freights, Hand Books, Dates of

Telephone No. 19. E. V. D. PARR, Superintendent.

BRITISH INDIA S. N. Co., Ltd.

NEW SERVICE OF STEaMERS BETWEEN

YOKOHAMA, KOBE, HONGKONG A xi D RANGOON.

Steamers are despatched Eastward and Westward at regular intervals taking

Passengers and Cargo at Current Hates.

For Freight or Passage, Sailings and full information, apply to

Telephone No. 215. JARDINE, MATHESON & Co., Agents.

APCAR LINE.

REGULAR SERVICE BETWEEN

SHANGHAI AND JAP/ N PORTS, STRAITS, RANGOON AND CALCUTTA.

Steamers are despatched Eastward and Westward at regular intervals

taking Passengers and Cargo at Current Rates.

For Freight or Passage, Sailings and full information, apply to

Telephone No. 828. DAVID SASSOON & Co., Ltd., Agents.

xxviii SHIPPING

INDO-Cm STEM NMIIGiniON Co., Ltd.

The Company’s Ocean and Coasting Fleet:

Steamer

“Kutsang-” Steamer Tons

“Namsang” 2326 ““ Mausang” ” ” 2161 “ Yusang”

““ T.Kumsang

aisang- ” ” ““ Kwongsang”

Choysang” 2284

2284 ““ Hopsang

Hangsang

Koonshing ” 2143 ““ Waishing

2148 Tungshing” ” 1868

1865

1783

“' ‘ Fooksang

Ilinsang”” ” “ Fooshing”

“Yatshing ” 2283 ““ Cheongshing

Chipshing’’ ” “ Wosang”

“Loongsang ” 1783

““Suisang”

Onsang ““ Fausang

Chunsang” ” 2251 “ Kingsing ”

2217 “Taksang” ““ Loksang"

Yuensang”

The Company’s Yangtsze River Fleet

•S. S. “ Luongwo ” 3924 S. S. “ Tuckwo ” 3770 S. S. “Changwo” 1065

S. S. “ Kutwo ” 2665 S. S. “ Kiangwo ” 2174 S. S. “ Tungwo ” 1350

S. S. “ Suiwo ” 2672

Calcutta, Hongkong, Shanghai, and Japan Line

The steamers Kutsang (4895 Tons), Namsang (4034 Tons), and Fooksang (3100

Tons) maintain a three-weekly service between Calcutta and Kobe, calling at Penang,

Singapore, Hongkong and Shanghai en route, in addition to Moji when westward

bound.

Calcutta, Hongkong and direct to Japan Line

In addition to the above, the Laisang (3459 Tons), Kumsang (3236 Tons), and

Yatshing (2283 Tons) run at 3-weekly intervals between the above ports.

Hongkong and Manila Line

A weekly service is also maintained between Hongkong and Manila by the S. S.

Yuensang and Loongsang, leaving each port on Saturday.

Canton, Hongkong, Tientsin Line

A regular fortnightly service between these ports is maintained from March to

mid November.

Canton, Hongkong, Shanghai Line

A regular service is maintained between the above ports with sailings about once

a week from Hongkong.

Haiphong, Hoihow, Hongkong Line

A weekly service is maintained between the above ports by the S. S. Loksang and

Taksang, leaving each port about every Wednesday.

Jardine, Genera!

Matheson Managers

& Co., at

Limited Hongkong

SHIPPING XXI:*

Capital, Yen 24,750,000

Debentures - - „ 7,000,000

Fleet: 155 Steamers - - 300,000 Tons.

HEAD OFFICE: OSAKA, JAPAN

Hongkong Office: No. 1, Queen’s Buildings.

BRANCHES :—Osaka, Kobe, Moji,Naw.i,

hama, Beppu,Pusan,

Kagoshima, Shimonoseki,

Keelung, Yokohama, Nagasaki,Anping,

Taipeh, Dairen,

Tamsui, Kochi, Takao,

T.ika-

Pescadores, Mokpo, Chemulpo,

Ilongkomr, Bombay, Canton, Tacoma, U. S. A. Ohinnampo, Foochow, Amoy,

AGENCIES:—Tokyo,

Niigata, Yokohama,

Tsuruga, Masampo,Shimizu, Nagoya,

Seishin,Yokkaichi,

Wonsan,Tientsin, Kuasampo, Hakodate, Otaru,

Yladivostock,

Antung,

Shanghai, Port Arthur,

Swatow, Newchwang,

Batavia, Sam iraug, Chefoo,

Soerabaya, Tsingtau,

Mac ass ir. Hankow,

Sandakin,

Hoihow, Pal;hoi,

Rangoon, Calcutta,inHaiphong,

Colombo, Manila, Saigon, Bangkok,

and allSingapore, Penantr,

ports and points the Orient Victoria, Vancouver

and American Continent. other important

REGULAR, SERVICES.

AMERICAN LINE—Fortnightly, in connection at Tacoma with the Chicago, Milwaukee and St.

Paul Railway.

JAPAN-SAN

JAVA FRANCISCO

LINE—Monthly. LINE—Monthly.

KOBE-BOMBAY LINE-Fortnightiy.

TSURUGA-VLADIVOSTOCK LINE—Weekly, in connection with I. J. Railways and Trans-Siberian

Railway.

OTARU-VLADIVOSTOCK LINE—About three times a amonth.

OSAK A-KOREA-VLADIVOSTOCK

OSAKA-DAIREN (DALNY) LINE-Three

LINE—Twice a Week,timesin connection

month. with I. J. Government Railways and

South Manchurian

NAGASAKI-DAIREN Railway.

LINE—Via Korean Ports, Weekly.

YOKOHAMA-DAIREN

KOBE-KEELUNG LINE—Three

LINE—Six times

times Railways. a month.

a month, in connection with I. J. Government Railways and

Imperial Formosan

YOKOHAMA-TAKOW Government

LINE—About Eight atimes

FORMOSA COASTING

KESLUNG-HONGKONG LINE-Nine

LI ME—Weekly. times month.a month.

CANTON-TAKOW

TAKOW-TIENTSIN LINE—Fortpjghtly.'

LINE—Weekly. in connection with I. J. Government Railways.

OSAKA-TIENT3IN

03OSAKA-KOREAN LINE—Weekly,

VKA-TSINGTAIJLINES,

LINE—Weekly.

CALLING ALL PORTS—About Twenty times a month.

&c., Ac., &c.

JAPAN

The COASTING & INLAND

O. S.runK. toInland SEA SERVICES—Steamers

Sea Service are despatched

is ideal for sight-seeing DAILY.as

on the littorals,

steamers all points.

XXX SHIPPING

f %

Dairen Risen Kaisha.

HEAD OFFICE Dairen, Manchuria.

BRANCHES:—Tientsin, Antung, Tsingtau and Kcte^

AGENCIES:—Shanghai, Chefoo, Lungkou, Pitsuwo

and Port Arthur.

Tsai: co.nr.i~\' fFI.EF/S's

Steamer Tons Steamer Tons

“RYUSHO MARU” 2,880 “ SA1TSU MARI ” 1,138

“ TAISHO MARU” 2,579 “ RYOIIEI MARU ” 757

“ HAKUSHIN MARU ” 1,535 “RTSAIMARU” 663

“ISSHI3S MARU” ... 1,486 “BENTEX MARU” 199

“TENCHO MARU ” 1,300

REGULAR SERVICES:

DAIREN-ANTUNG-TIENTSIN LINE ... Six times a month.

DAIREN-TSINGTAU LINE „

DAIREN-LUNGKOU LINE „

DAIREN-PITSUWO LINE Ten „

TSINGTAU-SHANGHAI LINE Four „

The passengers between Japan and Tientsin can regularly

connect at Dairen with the steamers of Osaka Shosen Kaisha's

Osaka-Dairen Line.

SHIPPING xxxi

Douglas Steamsbip Companp, £•!

HQNCKONC AND SOUTH CHINA COAST PORT SERVICE.

Regular Service of Fast, High-Class Coast Steamers having good

accommodation for First Class Passengers, Electric Light and

Fans in Staterooms and Excellent Cuisine. Arrivals and

Departures from the Company’s Wharf (near Blake Pier).

Sailing to Swatow Four times Weekly, to Amoy and Foochow

Twice Weekly, on Tuesday and Friday. Round trip to

Foochow, calling at Swatow and Amoy, occupies about nine

days. Stay of Steamers at Swatow and Amoy on upward

and downward trip about 8 hours. Stay at Foochow 48 hours.

FLEET OF STEAMERS:

“ Haiyans ” Tons 2,289

“ Haichine ” 2,080

** Haihong ” 2,026

Haitan ”... 1,856

For Freight and Passage apply to: —

Agents at Coast Ports:—

At Amoy—Messrs. DOUGLAS LAPRAIK & Co.

At Swatew and Foochow—Messrs. JARD1NE, MATHESON & Co., Ltd.

xxxii SHIPPING AND MACHINERY

BETWEEN JAPAN, HONGKONG AND AUSTRALIA.

emm i mmm steamship com lb,

HIGHEST CLASS BRITISH STEAMSHIPS.

The splendid Steamers of the E. & A. Line keep op a Service between Japan,

Hongkong and Queensland ports to Sydney and Melbourne at frequent intervals.

Vessels also call at Manila, Port Darwin’etc.' when inducement offers.

Each Steamer has Electric Light throughout, and is fitted with Refrigerating

Chambers, which ensure a supply of Fresh Provisions during the entire voyage.

A duly Qualified Surgeon and Stewardess are carried.

iNT.i3.—To ensure the additional comfort of passengers the steamers of

this Company have electric fans fitted in state-rooms. They are also fitted

with Wireless Telegraphy.

For Freight and Passage apply to

GIBB, LIVINGSTON & 00.,

Agents cat Hongkong, .Shanghai and Foochow.

OIL MILL MACHINERY

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, FOR ALL OIL-BEARING SEEDS & NUTS.

BY THE OLDEST AND LARGEST MAKERS IN THE WORLD

THE “KINGSTON”

GRAB-DREDGER and EXCAVATOR

SIMPLEST. CHEAPEST. BEST.

jfOR ALL DREDGING PURPOSES ASHORE AND AFLOAT,

CATALOGUES, ESTIMATES AND FULL INFORMATION ON APPLICATION.

ROSE, DOWNS & THOMPSON, LIMITED.

S EC IT Gr H ^ X .

HEAD OFFICE & WORKS :-HULL, ENGLAND. : ' <'LOND0N OFFICE ;-l2, MARK LANE, E.C,

. , fiSJAjBLISHED ,1777..

SHIPPING xxxii

Toyo Kisen Kaisha

(Oriental Steamship Co.)

imperial Japanese XTrans^paciftc /Ifcail OLines

SAW FRANCISCO LIME;

New Triple Screw Turbine Steamers, 22,coo Tons and 21 Knots Speed

“TENYO MARU” “SHINYO MARU”

Twin Screw “SIBERIA MARU” and “KOREA MARU”

18,400 Tons, 18 Knots,

The Twin Screw “NIPPON MARU” 11,000 Tons, 18 Knots, and

“ PERSIA MARU ” 9,000 Tons, 17 Knots,

And Three Cargo Steamers

From Hongkong via Shanghai, Japan Ports and Honolulu

DIRECT SAILINGS TO AND FROM MANILA

SOUTH AIWERICA LINE 5

From Hongkong via Japan Ports, Honolulu, Hilo, San Francisco,

Los Angeles, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Chili to Valparaiso

“K1YO MARU” “ANYO MARU” “SEIYO MARU”

17,200 Tons 18,500 Tons 14,000 Tons'

AH Steamers are Fitted with Wireless Telegraphy and Telephones

HEAD OFFICE:—Yokohama, Japan.

Haem ^

HONGKONG Mr. T. Daigo. I KOBE Mr. Y. Shimada.

SHANGHAI :-American Trading Co. YOKOHAMA i-General Traffic Dept.

MANILA:—Erlanger&Galinger,Inc. SINGAPORE :—McAlister

NAGASAKIHolme, Ringer & Co. | PENANG:—Sandilands, Buttery&Co.

And at all the Important Cities of the World.

xxxiv RAILWAYS

Chinese Government Railways: Peking-Mukden Line

and Through Servicelioute:

Trans-Siberian between Pekingconnection

at Peking and Mukden,

is madeeonneet;ng with the South Railway

Manchuriafor Hankow

Exp res*

and

ChingYangts/e

Line, Ports,

and the and Intermediate

Pienio Railway to Points reached

Kaifengfu and bywiththe theCheu-Tai

Ilonaitfu.

Peking-Iiaiikow’

bineis also

Connection to Taiyuanfu,

made at the with

Peking Tao-

tiie

withpicturesque Kalgan Line,

the Tientsin-Pnkow Line“The Road to and

for Tsinanfn the (ireat Mali.” At Tientsin (Central) connection is made

Shanghai.

The Railways of North China Pass Through the Most Interesting Part of China.

Peking: the Capital, with in connection with the

its Walls, Palaces, Temples through ServiceandofSouth

Trans-Siberian the

and Tombs. Tientsin: the Manchuria Railways.

Great Trade Centre

North China. Tongshan: of

the Largest Mining and

Industrial Shan Townhaiku

in an:the donThrough

and otherTicketsplaces

to Lon-in

Country. Europe

atfromPekingcan be obtained

where

atthe the Great

theBusy

Sea. Wall ends

Newchwang: which and Tientsin

Stations Pas-

Commercial Port sengers’ Luggage can be

of Manchuria. Mukden: registered

stination. through to De-

the AncestralDynasty.

the Manchu Home ofA

Miniature Peking, with its Through Tickets are

Walls, issued and Passengers’

TemplesImperial

and Tombs.Palaces, Baggage registered

between through

the Important

The

equipped Through Trains are Stations on the Peking-

Dining Carwith Buffetandanda

Service, Mukden Railway and

South Manchuria

the

Railway,

Comfortable,

de Luxe of Modern Train

Compartment Chosen (Korean) Railway

Sleeping Cars is operated and Imperial Government

Railways of Japan.

For Informationiregarding the many places of interest in China, Tourists will

>’ Hand bool

iv of the Offices of Thos. Cook & Son. The Chineseuseful.

i for China” with Maps most It is obtainable

Government Railways

Time

Son, and The International Sleeping Car Co., Hotels, Clubs and at allThos.important

Table Book with Railway Map can be had at any of the Offices of Cook &

Stations. Full particulars on application to any ofontheapplication

Stations orto toanytheoffice

Traffic

America, Europe or the Far East of The Cie. International des Wagons-in

Manager of any of the Railways mentioned, and

Lits; Thos. Cook & Son; or Traffic Manager, Chinese Government

Railways (Peking-Mukden Lins), Tientsin, North China.

DOCKS XXXV

Ok Yokohama Dock

Companp. timiiccl.

Dry Dock and Warehouse Owners.

DIRECTORS:—

Chairman-ROKURO HARA, Esq.

Managing Directors— i Directors—

SHINKICHI YAMADA, Esq. TOSHINOBU SUDA, Esq.

SHIGEYA KONDO, Esq. | SOBEI MOGI, Esq.

DRY DOCK DEPARTMENT:

No. 1 Dock. No. 2 Dock. No. 3Y)ock.

Docking I ength ...515 feet. Docking Length ...376 feet. Docking Width ofLength

Entrance...481

63 feet.

Width of Entrance 80 „ Width of Entrance 50 „

Water on Blocks... 28 „ Water on blocks... 26 „ Water on Blocks...21.5 „

Mooring Basin 600 feet x 180 feet x 25 feet deep.

Every description

material ofshafts

repair workin stock.

is undertaken. A large assortmentfloatingof

derrick toincluding

lift up to tail

45 tons, is kept

pneumatic, Two powerful

electric, hydraulic towetc.

plants, boats,Manufac-

turers

on shortofnotice

engines, boilers,ortugs,

by letter cable.lighters, constructional steel work, etc. Tenders

WAREHOUSE DEPARTMENT:—

TELEPHONES Head Office, Nos. 533, 575 ; Midori-cho Customs Branch

Office, No. 1392; Irifune-cho Customs Branch Office, No. 2251.

Containing private bonded warehouses and sugar consumption tax covered

warehouses.

14 acres.buildings,

99 principally

Direct water of ofbrick

frontage 2.36and

milessteel, Floor area

in length, part67,917

havingsquare yards

a depth of 25or

feet at low water, suitable for steamers discharging direct into warehouses.

way siding with direct connection to the Government Railways. Use of 45-ton Rail-

derrick, tugs, launches, etc. Every description

brokerage and insurance undertaken. Rates moderate. of warehousing. Custom-house

AGENCIES:—

Ota Hanroku Jimusho, Yurakucho, TOKYO.

Goko Shokai, Sakaye-machi Itchome, KOBE.

xxxvi DOCKS

THE YOKOHAMA DOCK Co., Ltd.

DRY DOCK NO 1 515 FT

I.2.. CUSTOMS

ENGLISH OUAY.

HATORA •>y NO Z 37 b »

NO 3 ^-31 »

3 SAKURAGICHO RY.STATION.'

4. ' YOKOHAMA RY STATION.

5. KANAGAWA RY. S TAT ION.

DOCKS xxxvii

Codes Used:

Cable Address: Al, A.B.C. (4th & 5th),.

Engineering, Lieber’s,

“DOCKYARD,” KOBE. and

Western Union Codes,.

KOBE MAIM WORKS,

SHIPBUILDERS, ENGINEERS and REPAIRERS.

Sole Manufacturers of Curtis Marine

Steam Turbines, M.A.N.’s Diesel Oil

Engines, Schmidt’s Superheaters for iniin:\ mu

Higashi Shiriike, Marine and Locomotive use, Westing-

house Lebranc’s Refrigerators, Con- Dairen, Manchuria,

KOBE. densers, Air Pumps, R. Allen’s .Pis- N.C.

tons, Packings, Yarrow’s & Robinson’s

Superheaters, etc., and Licensed.

Manufacturers of Makers of Thornycroft’s Steam

Boilers and Oil Fuel Burners and DOCKYARD & ENGIN-

LOCOMOTIVES, Weir’s Pumps, Evaporators, Feed

RAILWAY & ELECTRIC Heating and Distilling Plant. EERING WORKS.

CARRIAGES, ffli SHII'BUIIMG BERTHS.

HEAVY STEEL Capacity: Graving Dock:

Vessels up to 950 feet Length - - 412 feet.

and (about 40,000 tons).

IROH CASTINGS, Breadth - 51 feet.

WATER & GAS PIPES, GRAVING DOCK AND

PATENT SLIPS.

GIRDERS & BRIDGES, Powerful Salvage and Towing Powerful Salvage and

PLANKS and Boat will be supplied Towing Boat will be

SAW-MILLING, at Short Notice. supplied at

One 200-ton Floating Crane and

etc., etc. Cranes of Medium Capacity. Short Notice.

ffc S # ft til Si « @r

pt. F itr . 111 ^ .| ^ T @

c

xxxviii BOOKSELLERS AND PUBLISHERS

MARUZEN COMPANY, LTD.

PUBLISHERS, BOOKSELLERS, STATIONERS,

DRY-GOODS & OUTFITTERS.

11 16, NBHONBASHI TOR! SAHCHQIHE, TOKYO.

TELEPHONES:-Nos. 28 (Special), 17, 208, 876, 1,033, 1,039, 3,332,

4,229, 4,323, 4,345, 4,908, and 5,090, H0NKY0KU

THE LARGEST AND OLDEST PUBLISHERS AND IMPORTERS OF FOREIGN

BOOKS IN THE EAST.

THE LARGEST AND OLDEST IMPORTERS OF FOREIGN STATIONERIES

(TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS ESPECIALLY) IN THE EAST.

THE LARGEST INK MANUFACTURERS IN THE EAST.

AGENTS FOR THE FAR EAST OF LEADING PUBLISHERS AND STATIONERS

THROUGHOUT THE WORLD.

ALL BOOKS—Supplied In Any Language, No Matter On What Subject.

WRITE US—We Can Get You Any Book Published In The World.

BRANCHES:

O S A K AShinsaibashi-sti]i, Bakuromachi, Shichome.

KYOTO:—Sanjodori, Fuyacho-Nishi-ye-iru.

FUKUOKA:—Kami-Nishimachi.

SENDAI:—Kokubuncho.

PLEASE STATE WANTS.

When in JAPAN call and see our Large Collection on Exhibition

in Show Rooms.

COAL MERCHANTS xxxix

Cable Ad:—“IWASAKISAL” Al, A.B.C. 5th Edition,

Coal Department, Head Office, ♦

“ IWASAKI ” Bentley's and

All Eranch Offices. Western Union Codes used.

MITSUBISHI COSHIKWAISHA

CMIITSTTIBISH:! CO.)

COAL DEPARTMENT

HEAP OFFICE: —MARUNOUCHI. TOKIO.

branch OFFICES t — NAGASAKI. MOJI, KARATSU,

WAKAMATSU, OTARU, MURORAN, HAKODATE,

KOBE, OSAKA, KURE, TOKYO, YOKOHAMA,

NAGOYA, TSURUGA, LONDON, NEW YORK,

SHANGHAI, HONGKONG, HANKOW, PEKING,

VLADIVOSTOCK, HAIPHONG & CANTON.

All Letters Addressed:—MANAGER, MITSUBISHI CO., with Name of Place above

AGENCIES:

MANILAMessrs. Macotstdray & Co. I GLASGOW :—Messrs. A. R. Browi*

SINGAPOREMessrs. Borneo Co., Ld. | McFarlane & Co., Lr>.

Solb Proprietors op TAKASHIMA, OCHI, MUTABE, YOSHINOTANI,

KISHIDAKE, HO JO, KANADA, NAMAZUTA, SAYO, SHINNEW,

KAMI-YAMADA, B1BAI, AND OYUBARI COLLIERIES.

Sole Agents for:

SflKITO coat.

The Head and Branch Offices and the Agencies of the Company will

receive any order for Coals produced from the above Collieries.

C*

xl COAL MERCHANTS

KAIPING COALS

THE KAiUN MINING ADMINISTRATION.

Head OfficeTientsin, ^orth China.

The Collieries situated in the Kaiping District of the Province of Chihli have an

output of 4,000,000 tons per annum, which is classified to meet the local demands as

•under:—

Navy Lump is a fuel specially suited to the Far Eastern Naval requirements ; pos-

sessing all the characteristics of the best Cardiff coal.

LOCO. Lump.—A first quality steam coal comparing favourably with the best

Japanese, Australian or Scotch coals. As a special fuel for locomotives,

it is used on all the Chinese Railways North of the Yangtze. Locomotive

Lump mixed with a proportion of slack from the same seams is used as a

bunker coal by all the large Eastern Shipping concerns. For steady steam-

ing this mixture gives excellent results, being both cheap and economical in

consumption.

Linsi Lump is a good quality coal most suitable for household purposes.

Slack in two grades is a good, cheap fuel largely in demand by the Chinese in the

brick-burning and distilling industries, in bean cake factories, etc., and tor

general domestic use.

Coke of a SPECIAL quality, manufactured with great care from the best coal, is

used with good results by the Government Arsenals, Mints and Dockyards and

is considered equal in quality to the best Durham product. It is close-grained,

hard, heavy and free from sulphur.

No. 2 Coke is used for household purposes.

Firebricks Marked

in any size and shapeK.M.A. of the well-known

at the Tongshan C.E.M.C.L.

Brickworks. brandofarefirebrick

This brand made

practically monopolizes the refractory clay trade from Netherlands India to

Manchuria and is used exclusively by the large iron producing works in the

Far East as well as the prominent Municipal and Government power works

throughout China.

Brown Glazed Stoneware Pipes. Glazed Tiles.

-A”or all information please apply to:—

General Manager—Tientsin.

Agent—i, Jinkee Road, Shanghai.

Agents—Messrs. Dodwell & Co., Ltd., Hongkong,

or any of the Administration’s Agencies.

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS xli

C. ABDOOLA & CO..

IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS AND AGENTS,

Japan Agents:

Imperial Flour and Oil Mills, Limited,

28, Sannomiya Ichome, KOBE, JAPAN.

P. O. Box No. 171. Telegrams: ABDOOLA.

Telephones: Sannomiya 705, 760, 895 & 1023.

Import of everything from Raw Cotton.

Export of all the commodities carried

under five departments.

BEST REFERENCES.

CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.

xlii IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS

THE

EKMAN

FOREIGN AGENCIES, Limited,

6, KIANGrSE ROAD, SHANGHAI.

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS,

SHIPPING AGENTS.

SPECIALITYPaper oi All Kinds,

Pulp and Paper Mill Supplies.

AGENTS:

THE SWEDISH ASIATIC Co., Ld.,of GOTHENBURG,

Regular Fortnightly Steamship Service

between Sweden and China/Japan.

AT GOTHENBURG (SWEDEN):

Messrs. EKMAN & Co., Estd. 1802.

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS xliii

Founded Over Half A Century.

P. O. Box 68. Codes used :

A.B.C. 4th and 5th Editions,

•General Cable Address : Al, Scott’s, Lieber’s, Bentley’s,

“MASUMASU,” Western Union, Okay Zebra

YOKOHAMA. and Private Codes.

Trade Mark.

Masuda & Co.

(Masuda Gomel Kaisha).

68 and 69, Shichome, Honcho, YOKOHAMA,

JAPAN.

General Importers and Exporters

Shipping Brokers

Principal Imports: Principal Exports:

Sugar, Wheat and other Grains, Wheat- j Timber and Lumber (Oak, Birch and

flour, Beancake, Beans and other Cereals, | Pine), Sulphur, Raw and Refined Sugar,

Zinc ore and Concentrates, Copper ore, i Rice, Barley, Oats and other Cereals,

Lead, Iron and Steel, Tin and Tin-solder; Beans, Peas, Maize, Wheat Flour, Chemi-

Sulphate of Ammonia, Nitrate of Soda cals, Superphosphates, Bean cakes, Veget-

.-and other Fertilizers; Chemicals, Wood- able and Fish Oils, Menthol, Tinned

pulp, Hops, Hides and Skins, Tallow, Salmon, Tinned Crabs, Coal, Manganese

Wool, Wool-yarn and Tops; Bonemeal, ore, Wolframite, Graphites, Copper,

Rape-cake, Raw Cotton, Indigo, Orange- Copper wire, Spelter, Zinc Dust, Insula-

shellac, Resin, Glue, Gelatine, Teak, Pine, tors, Electrical Machinery and Instru-

Tapioca, Sago, Hessian, and Gunny-bags, ments, Gas Fittings, Porcelain, Portland

Rattan and Mat, Rubber, Caustic Soda, Cement, Toys, Silk and Cotton Goods,

Soda Ash, etc., etc. Glassware, etc., etc.

Branches:—Tokyo, Kobe, Osaka, Shimonoseki, Dairen,

Shanghai, Tientsin, Hankow, Fusan, Sydney & London.

Masuda Saw Mill, Masuda Flour Mill,

YOKOHAMA. KOBE.

Yokohama Beancake Mill,

YOKOHAMA.

Matsuo Sulphur Mine, Masuda Sugar Refinery,

IWATE. YOKOHAMA.

xliv MERCHANTS

flrculli Brothers,

MERCHANTS and COMMISSION AGENTS,

64, QUEEN'S ROAD CENTRAL, HONCKONC.

Telegraphic Address: “CURLY.” Telephone No. 409.

SOLE AGENTS FOE:

SEAMING TWINES of Messrs. Linificia and CanapificiO'

Nazionale of Milan, Italy.

"ACORN BRAND" ELASTIC BOOT WEB and BOOT

LOOPING of Messrs. Flint, Pettit & Flint, of

Leicester, England.

John D. Hutchison & Co.

IMPORT AND EXPORT,

King’s Buildings, Connaught Road Central.

Telephone No. 63. Tel. Ad: “ SPERO,” Hongkong.

AGENCIES:

Patriotic Assurance Co. Quaker Oats Co.

Muller, Maclean & Co.,

New York. Roneo, Ltd.

Colgate & Co , Perfumers. Oliver Typewriter Co r

Belfast Ropeworks Co., Ltd.

Ltd., Ireland. J. & J. Colman, Ltd., Lon-

Nicholson File Co., Provi- don and Norwich,

dence, R.I.

MERCHANTS

CILLON h COMPANY.

MERCHANTS,

YOKOHama, japan.

SOLE AGENTS FOR

James Buchanan & Co., Ltd.

Gordon’s London Dry Gin Co., Ltd.

Bollinger Champagne.

Jas. Hennessy & Co.

British-American Tobacco Co.

Alex. Pirie & Sons, Aberdeen.

Apperly, Curtis & Co., Strand.

Etc., Etc.

H. GOLDENBERG & Co.

6b, Kiangse Road,

GENERAL MERCHANTS.

Safe Agents Jor:—

DERHAM LUMBER Co., Manila, P.I.

Suppliers of finest Hardwood for Railways and^ Con-

structional purposes.

PRATT & LAMBERT, INC., New York, U.S.A.

Paints, Enamels, Varnishes and Stains.

WIRT ELECTRIC SPECIALTY Co., Phil., U.S.A.

Electric Specialties (Dim-a-lites).

BADGER FIRE EXTINGUISHERS Co. U.S.A.

Household Fire Extinguishers.

POLAKS FRUTAL WORKS, Amersfoort, Holland.

Oils, Essences, Synthetics and Natural Perfumes, &c.

JAMES & JOHN G. SCOTT, Glasgow, Scotland.

Oil Merchants, White Lead Paints, Colours, &c.

xlvi CEMENT MANUFACTURERS

Green Island Cement Co„

Limited,

Manufacturers of

The Best Portland Cement

IN THE EAST.

It is the only Cement

used by the British

Government of

Hongkong.

BEWARE OF

IMITATIONS.

DRAIN PIPES,

FIRE BRICKS,

FIRE CLAY,

AND TILES.

For further particulars apply to

SHEWAN, TOMES & CO.,

Hongkong, Shanghai, Tientsin, Kobe,

CEMENT MANUFACTURERS xlvii

PORTLA! CEiENT CO., LTD.

Telegraphic

Telephone: Address:

No. 266. “CIPORTIN

HAIPHONG.”

COPE

English :

A.B.C. Code

5th EDITION.

General Agents:

COCHIN-CHINA, CAMBODGE and LAOS DESCOURS & CABAUD.

Shanghai,

Hankow,

Tientsin

RACINE, ACKER- mgapore:

MANN & Co. DUPIRE

Philippine I-4S BROTHERS.

Islands:

SMITH, BELL & Netherlands

Co., Ltd. India:

HANDELS-

Bangkok: VEREENIGING

MONOD & Co. “ROTTERDAM.”

USE DRAGON BRAND

FOR HIGH CLASS SOLID AND ENDURING CONSTRUCTION

xlviii HOTELS

Grand Hotel de Pekin,

X* 1E1 ]E 3$r G- -

Societe Anonyme francaise au capital de $250,000'

Telegraphic Address: “ ITALO,” PEKING. Codes: A. B. C. 5th Edition.

Telephone No. 581 Ting-Chu.

Pei- Tching- Ta-Fan- Tien. 0 ^^

Yis-a-¥is ITALIAN LEGATION. On the Glacis. Entirely Rebuilt 1915.

Modern Sanitation. Sixty Rooms. Steam Heating throughout.

Every Room has private Bath and Flush Toilet.

Hot and Cold Water.

CTTISITTE.

For Terms apply to

B. RUSSO, Manager,

GRAND HOTEL DE PEKING Co.

HOTELS AND BICYLE MANUFACTURERS xlix

PEAK HOTEL,

HONGKONG.

Fjrst-Class Besidential and Tourist Hotel.

Telegraphic Address: “PEACEFUL.”

1,400 FEET ABOVE SEA-LEVEL.

15 MINUTES FROM PRINCIPAL

LANDING STAGE.

Telephone in Every Room.

European Runner Meets Incoming Steamers.

International Bicycle Cq.

CYCLE AND RICKSHA MANUFACTURERS,

GENERAL IMPORTERS AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS.

Head Office and Show Room :

RUE DE FRANCE, TIENTSIN.

BranclKS and flguicies:

KAIFENGFU, POATINGFU, PEKING, MUKDEN,

NEWCHVYANG, TA1YUANFU, TSINANFU.

Cable Address;— “ CYCLOPS.' Telephone No. 1391.

Code:—A.B.C. 5th Edition. Hong NameQUAI-LEE*

1 GARAGES

The Eastern Garage Co.,

129a & 130a, Szechuan Road, SHANGHAI.

CARS FOR HIRE.

Telephone No. 1159.

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.

Try a ride in our 1916 Model 7-passenger

Cadillac Cars.

Exile Garage,

Nos. 33 and 35, Des Voeux Road, HONGKONG.

CARS FOR HIRE.

Automobiles and Motocycles

Repairs Executed by Expert Mechanics.

Telephone No. 1036. Cable Address: “ EXILE.’'

SHOEMAKERS AND AUCTIONEERS If

CHING KENG LEE & CO.,

SINGAPORE.

Auctioneers, Valuers and Estate Agents.

Auctioneers appointed by the Supreme Court to

conduct the largest and most important Sale

of Real Estate ever held in Singapore.

VALUATIONS MADE, MORTGAGES ARRANGED,

AND RENTS COLLECTED.

AGENCIES: AUCTION SALES OF

Hong Joo’s Estate, Malacca. House & Landed Properties Every

Monday.

Eastern United Assurance Pawnbrokers’

Corporation, Ltd. held Monthly. Pledges

Unredeemed

lii BUSINESS NOTICES

MORINAGA CONFECTIONERY CO., LIMITED,

12, Itchome, Tamachi, Shiba-ku, TOKYO, JAPAN.

Branch OSAKA.

Capital ¥500,000 (Paid up)

Annual Sales ¥3,000,000

MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONERS.

Our Speciality; CANDIES and BISCUITS.

Only Factory making Foreign Confections in the Orient.

DE. SOUSA & Co.,

GENERAL MERCHANTS,

No. 20, DBS V

EXPORTERS OF CHINA PRODUCE AND MANUFACTURED GOODS.

IMPORTERS OF ALL CLASSES OF EUROPEAN, AMERICAN AND AUSTRALIAN PRODUCTS,

AND WINES AND SPIRITS.

li U R Q D A ,

MANUFACTURER OF

ARTISTIC BRONZE: GOLD, SILVER m COPPER BRONZE,

No. 19, Teramachi, Shijo Minami, KYOTO.

Telephone No. 1714 (SHIMO).

Cold Medal: Panama Pacific International Exhibition.

BUSINESS NOTICES liii

THE SINO'SWISS COMMERCIAL CO.,

55, SZECHUEN ROAD, SHANGHAI

Telegraphic Address: “SWISS,” SHANGHAI

AGENCIES:

Society of Chemical Industry of Basle, Basle.

The Federal Insurance Co., Ltd., in Zurich.

M. Winteler, agent, Mes rs Volkart Bros.,

Inda.

M. WIMELER and E. HIRER, Signs the firm.

CHUNG NGOI SAN- PO

The oldest and most widely circulated

Chinese paper in South China.

Fo~ advertisement tariff apply to

Hongkong Daily Prfss,

10a, Des Voeux Road Central,

HONGKONG.

BUSINESS NOTICES

-A-<3-33 Iff T S8 "W A 3XT T E X> ■

Stockings, Socks, Singlets, Sweaters and Underwear.

Summer and Winter Qualities.

CHEAPEST PRICES.

Why pay for high-'priced articles when our cheap

goods are as good ?

Ask for samples from

RAM HING KNITTING COMPANY, LIMITED,

Kow/loon, Hongkong.

N.B.—This is a British Company.

TSANG FOO & Co., siaa#

Co&l Merchants and Stevedores,

No. 48, Des Voeux Road Central, HONGKONG.

Coal Storage for 10,000 tons under cover in the Firm's Godowns-

at Wanchai and Yaumati.

The Bunkering of Steamers executed at the Shortest Notice.

Telephones 329, 330 and K80. Manager: TSANG FOO.

PRINTING AND BINDING

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION EXECUTED AT THE OFFICES

OF THE

HONGKONG DAILY PRESS, LIMITED,

10A, DES VCEUX ROAD, HONGKONG.

SHIPGHANDLERS Iv

BISMARCK & Co.

(A Chinese firm named Sun Man Woo Co.)

NAVAL CONTRACTORS Cable Address: PURVEYORS TO THE -

“ Bismarck ”

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sme IQ3I3 & co.,

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SHIPCHANDLERS AND FLAG MAZERS,

METAL AND HARDWARE DEALERS AND

GENERAL STORE-KEEPERS,

No. 133, Des Vceux Road, Central, Hongkong.

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LEUNG RON T AI,

SS^E^r3E3J303Et,3ES-

TELEPHONE No. 687.

No. 14 and 15, Lee Yuen Street East

(2nd FLOOR),

HONGKONG.

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THE CALENDAR FOR 1917 lix

JANUARY—31 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset Hongkong Temperature

1st 7h. 03m. 5li. 50iu. 1915

15th 7h. 05m. 6h. 00m. Maximum 64.0 191665.5

Moon’s Phases Minimum

Mean 56.3 60.7

60.1 56.3

rl. h. m. Barometer, 1916

Full Moon 8 3 42 p.m. Mean 30.16

Last

New Quarter

Moon 2316 37 4042 p.m.

p.m. 1915 Rainfall 1916

First Quarter 3i> 9 1 a.m. 0.345 inches 4.075 inches

eruption at Taal, P.I.,

’lx THE CALENDAR FOR 191’

FEBRUARY-28 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset Hongkong Temperature 1915 1916

1st 7h. 02m. 6h. 11m. Maximum 67.8 62.9

'15th 6h. 5om. 6h. 20m. Minimum 59.4 56.1

Moon’sd. Phases h. m. Mean 63.6 59.6

"Full Moon 7 119 28 A.M. Barometer, 1916

Last Quarter 15 53 A.M. Mean 30.03

New Moon 22 2

First Quarter 29 0 449 A.M. A.M. 0.5051915 inches Rainfall 1.3051916 inches

Hays

Wkekoi |; Days

Monthof Moons

1

Thiirs. 10 Inhabitants

Chefoo atConvention of Hongkong came declared British subjects,

meeting1841.of International

The Additional Article onto

Fri. TlieOpium

German Shanghai,

Club at 1909.into force,

Hongkong opened,

1887. First

1872. Weihaiwei citadel captured

Commission

by Japanese,

3 1896. Loss of Daijin Maru, in the China Sea, 160 lives lost, 1916.

Sun. 4 13 Great robbery

West Riverriotsigned, in the Central Bank, Hongkong, discovered, 1865.

1897. foreign houses burned and looted, 1889. Local Administra- Agreement opening

Mon. 5 14 Anti-foreign tive bodies in at Chinkiang,

China suppressed, 1914.

Tues. 6 16 ThetheSpanish burning Envoy

of1904.theHaleon

Spanish arrived

brigstr.“at“Bilbaino,”

Macao to 1840.demandJapansatisfaction from the Chinese for

with Russia,smuggling

forkong,alleged Japanese

arms, 1908. Tatsu

Sir George ” seized byabroke

MaruPhillippo, Chinese

former

offgunboats

diplomatic

Chief nearrelations

Justice of Macao

Hong-

Wed.

Thurs. Suez

Thepurpose(’analdiedadopted

Spanish

at Geneva,

fleet

1914.regular route for the Eastern Mails, 1888.

as thethe

Russian takingleaves

ofgunboat offFormosa, port1626.

Chemulpo,

of Cavite,

1904.

by orderbetween

Hostilities

Japanese

of the GovernorandofJapan

made aRussia

Manila, for theby

successful torpedo begun attack at

midnight

Theand“250Henrietta on Russia’s Port Arthur

Maria ” was1857.found squadron,

drifting 1904.

about inKiddle

the Palawan Passage, captain, crew,on

Yunnan coolies missing,

border,consequences

1900. Naval fight Murder of Messrs. and Sutherland at Mengka

Satur. 10 with disastrous to theat latter,

Port Arthur1904. between Japanese and Russian fleets

Sun. 11 20 TheEmperor Japanesein person constitution granting

1889. representative government proclaimed by the

Mon. 12 21 China’s New CurrencyatLaws Tokyo,published, 1914.

Tues. 13 22 Outbreak and of convictsof intheSingapore

remainder Chinese Gaol, 1875. Surrender1895.of Liukungtao Islandof China

forts

announce their

1915 abdication, 1912.fleetSir toRobert

the Japanese,

Ho Tung givesManchu $50,000Rulers

to Hongkong

23 |[ Tung University,

Wa Hospital, Hongkong, opened by Sir R. G. MacDonnell, 1872.

Thurs. 15 24 Ij Ports and of Hongkong and Tinghai declared free, 1841.in Sheipoo

The Chinese frigate

1885. “ Yu-yuen

Mutiny of”

16 25^ jIj Insurgents Indiancorvette

troops “atChin-cheng

evacuated Singapore,

Shanghai,

” sunk

involving

1855.

by thetheFrench

Stewart lossscholarship harbour,

of a numberat ofCentral

lives, School,

1915, Hongkong,-

.Satur. founded, 1884. Alice Memorial Hospital, Hongkong, opened, 1887.

Sun. 1718 27 The U. S. paddle man-of-war “ Ashuelot ” wrecked on the East Lammock Rock, near

Mon. 19 28 | LordSwatow, Amherst’s 1883.Embassy, returning from China, shipwrecked in the Java Sea, 1817.

Tues. 2) 29 ! Shrove Tuesday. China’s Provincial Assemblies suppressed, 1914.

Wed. 21 AshYunnan,

Wednesday. Mr. A. 1875.

by Chinese, R.Margary,of

Statue1913.ofH.B.M.’s

HungConsular

LiHongkong Service,atwasShanghai,

ChangA.D.C.

unveiled murdered1906.

atManwyne,

Consort

Thurs 2223 of the Emperor

Massacre of Kwangsuat Nanchang,

missionaries died, 1906. Centenary Production, 1914.

i’ri. Hostilities

and burnt between

by pirates,England

1857. andFirstChina

stone recommenced,

of the Hongkong1841.CitySteamer

Hall “Queen”

laid, 1867. captured

.Satur. 24 Chusan evacuated by the British troops, 1841. Explosion of boiler of the str. “ Yotsai"

between

destroyed, Hongkong and Macao;agreement

1884. thePreliminary six Europeans andbythirteen Govt,aChinese

of Chinakilled andloanvesselof

£4,Yamchow

000,000 (Kwangtung),

from Banque1914. Industrielle designed Chine tothebuild railway for Yunnan

from the to

.Sun. j 25 1stkong,in Lent.

1849.Canton,Captain DaImperial

Chinesedestroyed Costa and Lieut. Dwyer murdered at Wong-ma-kok,

Llama of Tibet,in1910.Hong-

Mon. | 26 Bogue Forts, byEdictSir issued

Gordondismissing the Dalai

Bremer, 1841.

'Tues. 27 Treaty of peace bybetween Japanforces,

and1887. Corea signed at Kokwa, 1876. Evacuation of

Wed. j 28 Port Hamilton

Capture of the Sulu capital the Britishby the Spaniards, 1876.

THE CALENDAR FOR 19i; 1x6

MARCH-31 DAYS

Hongkong Temperature

1915 1916

Maximum 69.2 63.4

Moon’s Phases Minimum

Mean 61.0 60.2

64.9 57.3

Full Moon d. 9 h.

5

Last Mean ...30.08

New Quarter

Moon 2316 80 1915 Rainfall 1916

First Quarter 30 6 2.640 inches

ixii THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

APRIL-30 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset

1st 6h. 17m. 6h. 38m. 1915 1916

15th 6h. 05m. 6h. 44m. ...78.7 75.3

Moon’sd. Phases ...71.3 67.1

h. m. ...74.6 70.6

Full Moon 7 9 49 p.m. 1916

Last Moon

New Quarter 2115 104 121 a.m. p.m. 1915 Rainfall

First Quarter 29 1 22 p.m.

I'Days of Days of 2 Ixt. & 3

between Hongkong and Kon^oon, 1913.

flS£S£

Hong

8teamer in owna WaterS arriVCd 1830 The

’ ’ -

THE CALENDAR FOR 1917 Ixiii

MAY—31 DAYS

1915 1916

...79.9 82.9

Moon’s Phases ...72.0

...75.5 74.5

78.1

d. h. m.

Full Moon 7 10 43 a.m.

Last

New Quarter

Moon 1421 98 4847 a.m.

a.m. 1915 Rainfall 1916

First Quarter 29 7 33 a.m. 12.760 inches 12.935 inches

THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

JUNE-30 DAYS

1st ■ t

unrise

5h. 29m.

39m. 7h. Sunset

7h. 08m.03m. Hongkong Temperature

15th 5h. 1915 1916

Maximum .....' 86.2 83.4

Minimum 78.4 76.5

Moon’sd. Phases Mean ...81.6 79.6

h. m. Barometer, 1916

Full Moon 5 9 7 -P.M. Mean 29.70

Last Quarter

New Moon 19 9 12 2 38 p.m.

First Quarter 28 0 82 A.M. P.M. 1915 Rainfall 1916

11.960 inches 32.18 J inches

Chronology of Rkmarhaulk Events

Attempt

Hongkong to blow up

and China the Hongkong

came Hotel,1887.

into force, 1878. Anti-foreign

New OpiumriotAgreement at Tanyang,between1891.

Canton-Samshui

Hongkong connected Railway completed

withRevs.London by andwire,Robinson

1871. murdered,

Formal transfer of Formosa from

Sun. China

Trinity to Japan,

Sunday. 1895.

Earthquake Norman

at Manila, killing more than 2, 0 1900.

00 persons, 1863. Death

Mon. 5 16 I Treaty of Sirbetween

Arthur France

Kennedy,and1883. Keelung

signedfromattaken possession of River

by Japanese,

opened,1875.1895.

Tues. Departure

Argent of theGreen

and O. & O.Corea

first murdered steamer

in an

Seoul,

Hongkong

anti-foreign

1886. toWest

riot at SanWusueh,

Francisco, 1897.Messrs.

1891. River,

Communica-

Wed. 6 17 Heavy tion rains

with Peking

in Hongkong, cut off, 1900. French

property1916. to the value of $500,000 destroyed, and many lives1913.lost,

str. It. Lebaudy pirated on West

Thins. 7 18 Attempted 1864. Death of Yuen Shih-kai,

anti-foreign riotin atMacao,

Kiukiansr,

wrecked, 1908. Tornado

China, 1916.of Mission premises at Wusieh 1913. 1891. Hongkong-Canton

Li Yuan-hung assumed office steamer “Powan”of

as President

Destruction

Suspension by anti-foreign mob, 1891.

Sun. 10 21 Typhoon Socotra, 78ofFormosa;Newlost,Oriental

lives 1897. Bank, 1892. The P. & O. steamer “Aden” wrecked off

Mon. 11 2! Portuguese Peking, at1900. loss of several vessels, 1876. Admiral Seymour starts for

prohibited trading at Canton, 1640.

Tues. Opening of the first railway in Japan, 1872.

Wed. British

1876. steamer “Edict Carisbrooke” firedattacks

into andon captured by1891.

ChineseBaronCustoms cruiser,

Thurs. GermanImperial

Russo-Chinese Minister,

Treaty,

condemning

murdered

1728.and in16Battle

Peking, 1900. foreigners,

of1901.Telissu Russo-Japan War. Russians defeated

von Ketteler,

with

Tidal“Carl” a loss

Wave,taken of 7, 0 00 men

Japan,by 28,pirates

000 lives guns,

lost, 1896. British barque “ Caesar” andatDanish schooner

Russian squadron off Pedro

sankpassed

Japanese Blanco, 1866.“Hitachi,”

transportprohibiting Hope Dock badlyopened

injured Abeideen

“Sado,” 1867. <

1904.

Hongkong Legislature

and foreign killed, silver coins, Ordinances circulation o! foreign bank notes

mi-sionary

Woosung taken, 1842.junk 1916. 1914. Train from Canton to Hongkong “ Held up,” American

FirstDeathforeign-owned

of Sir Hormusjee leaves Chungking, 1891. Capture of Taku Forts by Allies, 1900. j

Explosion

Disastrous of the “UnionatMody,

inundation Star”

Foochow,

1911.

at Shanghai,

2,000 lives17lost,persons1877. killed and 10 wounded, 1862. j

Shanghai

Macartney’s occupied

embassy by British

arrived forces,

in China, 1842. 1793. Attack on mission premises at Hainan 1

city. 1891.at Tientsin,

Massacre Unprecedented

1870. forces,floods in the West River, 1908.

• anton

Cor. blockaded

nation of byKingEnglish

George, V. 1, 840.

191!. Queen Victoria’s DiamondJubileecelebration,1897.

Inauguration of Tsan Ching Yuan, Chinese ;

Administration

Ki-ying Council,1843.

visitsbyHongkong, 1914, Shock of earthquake in Hongkong, 1874.

surprised Chinese near Langson, 1884. Russian Baltic Fleet, after French

remainingtroops

six j

Sun. Lordweeks

Robertin Tonkin

Cecil

ed to prohibitof trading

waters, sailedin the

announced

withPresident

fromHouseKamranh

the enemyofintheChina, of Bay northward,

Commons that the 1905.

Government had decid- j

Assassination

exchanged, M. Carnot,

1843. Attack on British Legation Frenchati915Tokyo,

Republic,1862.1894.Foundation

Treaty of stone

Nanking^?

oft]

new

Treaty wing

betweenof Berlin

England Foundlinr

andsigned House

Chinaatsigned laid by Lady May, 1914.

at Tientsin, 1858. Additional Convention

betweenbetween

Treaty FranceFrance and China

and China Peking,

signed, 1858. 1887.Confiscation of the str. “ Prince Albert ’*U

by the

Agreement British

effectedConsul and

betweenTrade Customs

GreatMarks at Canton,

and the1866.

Britainin China, United States for reciprocal protection;:

of British

TheIndian

Foreign and American to an audience of1905.

British MintsMinisters admitted

closedto toChinasilver,arrived,

1893. the Emperor of China at Peking, 1873.

Woosung Railway', 1876. Flooding of the Takasima coalof amines,

expedition 1840. Opening section1891.of the Shanghai and:

THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

JULY —31 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset

1st 5h. 43m. 7h. Dm. 1915 1916

45th 5h. 48m. 7h. 10m. ...88.1 88.0

Moon’s Phases ...79.3 78.2

Full Moon • d. h. m.

5 5 40 a.m

Last

New Quarter

Moon 1911 118 120 a.m

p.m

First Quarter 27 2 40 p.m Rainfall 8.2951916

inches

ssrpspgs—

9SiISs;XSrfs,1"

" occupy Newchwang, 1904. 5:'S» S5

sr«ss=spir;“-i

aSHSBJsxissi's

Ixvi THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

AUGUST-31 DAYS

1st Sunrise

5h. 55m. Sunset 7h. 04m. Hongkong Temperature

15th 6h. 00m. 6h. 55m. 1915 1916

Maximum 88.5 88.5

Moon’s Phases Minimum 79.7 78.6

d. h. Mean 83.5 82.6

Full Moon 3 1 11 Barometer, 1916

Last Mean 29.71

New Quarter

Moon 1810 23 2156 1915 Rainfall 1916

First Quarter 26 3 8 10.520 inches 5.040 inches

p Remarkable Eve.'

Wed. BothwarChina and Japan declare war, 1894. Kucheng massacre, 1895. Germany declared

Victimsagainst

of massacre Russia,at1914.

Tientsin buried, 1870.

Fri. British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842. First Chinese Bazaar held at Canton, 1908.

Satur. Macartney’s marchEmbassy entered

started,Peiho,

1900.1796. Bombardment of Keelung by French,1896.1884.

Sun. WarAllied

declared byonGreat PekingBritain against Li Hung

Germany, Chang Political

1914. visited Queen

unrestVictoria,

in K wantun g:

Mon.

British Squadron arrived off the Peiho, 1840.

Wed. Assassination of Mr. Haber, German Consul, at Hakodate, 1874.

Thors. British troops landed at Nanking, 1842.

Fri. Sir H. Pottinger arrived at Hongkong, 1841. Destructive typhoon at Foochow, 1888.

Satur. 24 Firstsuggested publicthemeeting of British merchantsofinCommerce,

establishment Canton, 1834.

called by Lord Napier, who

Sun. 25 1741898.BritishAttempted prisoners executedof inaofChamber

assassination Formosa,Li 1842.

Admiral Chun Manila

at Canton, occupied by U.S. Troops,

Mon. Tong-ur-ku

1904. taken,and

Fighting 1800.looting

Japaneseat squadron

Canton sinks flight

following cruiser1911.

Russianof rebel Uurik 1913.

leaders, near Tsushima,

sory Military

Straits Settlements, Service1915.Bill passed its third reading in the Legislative CouncilCompul

of the

2728 British

Great steamer

lire on French“ Glenfarg ”

Concession,sunk after striking

Shanghai, 991 a submerged

houses rock

destroyed, near

loss Goto

Tls. 1,Islands,

000,11914.

500,Legations;

879.

Total

rescued, loss of the E. &

1900.PrincessMurderA. steamer

of Messrs. “Gatterthun” near

BruceatandHongkong, Sydney,

Lewis at1904. 1895. Peking

Chengchow, Hunan, 1902.

Prince

British and Arisugawa entertained

30 “Empress signed,trade 1856. of Canton stopped by Hong merchants, 1834. French Treaty with Siam*

of India”

LordDestructive

Napier typhoonsinks

ordered

Chinese1913.cruiser “Wong Tai” in collision near Swatow, 1903.

attheMacao,

Indian three

killing troopsIndianlandedbyconstables,

Viceroy to1900.leaveLarge

in Shanghai, Canton, 1834.of pirates

looting thegang

and 1915.

Great fire in Hongkong,

village, 1912. attacked

AmericanCheungchow,.

1868.

Chamber of

2 Commerce established at Shanghai,

Firstat Nanking,

conference1842.between SirfortsHenry

takenPottinger and forces,

Ki-ying1860.

on board the “Cornwallis,”

Palace

Governer Revolution

Amaral, atTaku

Peking,

Macao, Empress

assassinated,

byDowager

the Allied again ofassumes

1849. Seizure steamertheopened,

Regency,by1898.pirates*

“Spark”

between

annexed Canton

by Japanese, and Macao,

1910. 1874.

H.M.S. Telegraph

Bedford line

wrecked to

at Peking

Quelpart, 1910. 1884. Korea,

Large

Chinese meetingfleet atinPagoda

Hongkong

Anchorage to protest against the 1884.

militaryJapancontribution, 1864.on

Germany,

“ eventual who had ignored

restoration” to China, request to evacuate Kiaochow with a viewwarto its-

destroyed

her 1914. by French, declared

St.turbances

Bartholomew. at Amoy, Wreck

Japanese of thelanded

C. N. Co.’s str.1900.“Tientsin” near Swatow, 1887. Dis-

Satur. British Chamber

and Japan signed,of Commerce

1858. British establishedmarines,

at Canton, 1834. Treaty between Great Britain,

Sun. British

Islands, left Macao,

1908. 1839. steamer “Dunearn” foundered in a typhoon off Goto-

Amoy taken by the English, 296 guns captured, 1841.

Tues. j 2£ 11 Lordpossessions, Amherst’s1833.Embassy Kimpaileftfortsfor silenced

Yuen-ming-yuen,

by French,1816.1884. Slavery abolished in British'

Wed.

Thurs. I 293130 1213 Treaty ofof Nanking

Wreck typhoon “Futamion coastsigned,

Maru”ofoff1842. CapemanyCalavite, 1900.

Fri, Severe

Hongkong, Macao and Whampoa, 1848. China, lives lost, and much damage done to shipping aO

THE CALENDAR FOR 1917 Ixvii

SEPTEMBER-30 DAYS

Sunkise . Sunset IRATUKE1916

..6k.

..6h. 06m.

10m. 6h.

6h. 40m.

27m. Maximum . 1915

Minimum . 85.4 84.7

Moon’s Mean .80.9 80 5

[oo d. Barometer, 1916

£ 3 05 P.M.

ju. Rainfall 1916

10.520 incl

YSO

10

13

14

l.i

17

2)2119

22

23

24

25

26

£

29

30

Ixviii TJIE CALENDAll FOR 1917

OCTOBER-31 DAYS

1st Suxrise

6h. 15m. 6h. Sunset 11m. Hongkong Temperature

15th ..jBH. 20m. 5h. 59m. 1915 1910

Moon’scl. I’uases Maximum 82.7 80.2

Minimum 75.4 72.3

Full Moon 1 li.4 m. 31 a.m. Mean

Barometer, 1916

78.9 75.9

Last Quarter

New Moon 8 6

16 10 41 a'.m. 14 a.m. Mean 30.01

First Quarter 2330 lo2 3819 p.m.

Full Moon p.m. 11.7101915 inches

Rainfall 1916

0.730 inches

Oats

Wekkor;I Days

Monthok j Chronology op Remarkable Events

Mon. 1 j TheMedicine,

“Hongkong Daily

1887?Section, Press.”

declaredstarted,

HyogoCanton-Kovvloon an open1857.port, Inauguration

1892.opened,

Gold1910. of Hongkong

Standard adoptedCollege

in Japan,.ot

Toes. 1897. bombarded

British Railway

Wed. 23 Ij Tamsui

Serious

1893. riotWithdrawal by

at Hongkong, French, 1884.

1884. Treaty between FranceRiver,

and 1900.

Siam signed Chineseat Bangkok,.

Thurs. 4 ! 10 Attack Assembly Inaugurated,atof Wenchow,

on foreigners

British

1910. steamers 1884.

from West

Terrible firethrough

at Amoy,traffic,

National

1902.1911.Typhoon at

F,i. 6 j 2J French Hongkong, 1894. Canton-Kowloon Railway opened for

21 Hongkong Williamexpedition

Des Voeux,left1887.

Government

Chefoo for Corea, I860. Arrival in Hongkong of Governor Sir

agreed tothelendCanton-Hankow

the Viceroy of Wuchang £1,100,000 3905. to repurchase-

from an

Prince Alfred American syndicate

visited Peking, but notincrease

receivedof crime

by therailway concession, GreatH.R.H.

meeting

left at Hongkong

Kaifengfu on its to consider

way to Peking, 1901. Hongkong inEmperor,

Colony,

Legislative

1869. Chinese

1878. Council

publie-

Court

passed

Bun. 7 i 22 a Bill to prevent trading with the enemy, 1914.

Mon. S Supplementary

repulsed, 1884. Treaty

Battle signed

of Shaho,at TheRusso-Japanese

Hague, 1848. War, French landing party at Tamsut

Tues. 21 Shanghai disastrous defeats1841.

captured, of Russians

Chinhai; Railway

casualties1841.45,Official

taken, s00 Russian ;commenced. Japanese,Ended

15,879of Tientsin-Kaiping

inspection 1904.25thRail-in'

Wed. way,

25 LordwithNapier 1888. Shanghai-Woosung placed under Chinese control, 1904.

ofdied125atlives,

loss 1913. Macao,1892.1«:14. Yum WreckShih off theKaiPescadores

inaugurated of thePresident

P & O. str.of “theBokhara,”

Chinese-

Thurs. 21 TheRepublic, tirst

establish Chinese

a Chinese merchant

firm str.

there, (“Meifoo”)

1881. Outbreakleft Hongkong

of revolution for London

in China with

at passengers1911.to-

Wuchang,

2723 Ningpo

Revolt inoccupied

the Philippines,

by British 1872.forces,Eight1841.Chinese

Firstbaid s in Peking

railway in Japansuspended

officially payment,

opened by1910. the-.

Sun.i. Mikado, on1872.theAllies

2910 Explosion Chinesecapture

trooperPaotingfu,

“ Kungpai,”1900. loss of 500 lives, 1895.

Mo Khanghoa, in Corea, taken by the French, 1866. Train disa between Harbin and:

Wed. St.“John’s Cathedral,1885.Hongkong, dedicated, 19 6 1842. Daring piracy board the British str.-

Thars. AtofaGreyhound,”

meeting

reconstruction of the Chartered

was approved, Mercantile Bank of India, London and China, a scheme

1892.typhoon at Formosa,

Fri. Great fire

welcomed in Hongkong,

American 1859.

Battleship Great

Fleet, 1908. 1861. Jnpanese Government

Satiir. 20 Terrific

Woosung typhoon

railway at Manila;

closed by enormous

the Chinese damage to property,

Government, 1877. 1882. The Shanghai and

Sun. H.R.H. Prince Alfred arrived at Shanghai, 1869. Cosmopolifan Dock opened, 1875.,

22 58“Fury,”

piratical1849.

vesselsHongkong

destroyed Legislative

by CaptainsCouncil Hay andvoted Wilcox, H.M.

009 toships “Columbine” and

Nadiscovered

ional Relief

at Fund, 1911.1915.Anns and ammunition $11)0,

Shanghai, consigned totheIndia

Princeby ofGermans,

Wales’

King Chulalongkorn

Japanese of Siam

1894.died, 1910.

Treaty ofcross

the Allies,

the Yalu,

Whampoa

1862.takenbetween France and China signed, 1844. Kahding recaptured by

Chin-lien

Serious cheng

earthquake bv the Japanese, 1894.

atAmerican

Canton, 1895. inPrince

Missionaries

CentralAdalbert

and

Japan,of7,5Prussia

a child at

00 persons

Lienchow,visitedkilled, 1891. Attempted

1905,Hongkong,

Prince

insurrection'

Ito1904.assassinated

Massacre atof Har-

four

bin, 1909. Hon. Mr. W. D. Barnes, Colonial Secretary of Hongkong, died suddenly

Sun. 13 Notewhilstpresentedplayingfrom polo, the1911.Powers

Bombtothrown in Canton, killed 57 people,

China advising the suspension of the monarchical. 1914.

Mon. Portuguese frigate “D. Maria II.” blown up at Macao, 1850.

30 15- Great fire in Hongkong,

American B itthship Fleettakenat Amoy,

1866. Feughuang by the 1908.

Japanese, 1894. Chinese Govern-

Wed. 31 16 II-ment R- H.welcomed

Japanese, Prince

1894. Allred arrived at Hongkong, 1869. Talienwan occupied by the-

THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

NOVEMBER—30 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset Hongkong Temperature

1915 1916

1st 6h. 27m. 5h. 46m. Maximum 75.5 73.5

15th 6h. 35m. 5h. 40m. Minimum 66.8 . 62.4

Moon’scl. Phases

h. m. Mean 70.9 67.8

Last Quarter 7 13 a.m. Barometer, 1916

hJew Moon 15 2 2« a.m. Mean 30.10

First Quarter 22 6 29 a.m. 1915 Rainfall 1916

Full Moon 29 2 41 a.m. 1.890 inches 0.075 inches

IZ:

it.

a

“ss:::::,:::::,:"-1'18’'-

D

Ixx THE CALENDAR FOR 1917

DECEMBER—31 DAYS

Sunrise Sunset Hongkong Temperature

1st 6h. 55m.46m. 5h. 5h. 38m. 1915 1916

15th 6h. 41m. Maximum 67.9 67.9

Moon’s Phases Minimum 58.6 57.9

Mean 63.4 62.8

d. h. m. Barometer, 1916

Last

New Quarter

Moon 146 105 1417 p.m. p.m. Mean 30.11

First Quarter 2128 25 f 27 p.m. P.M. 1915 Rainfall 1916

Full Moon 0.775 inches 0.050 inches

Days

Weekof i Days

Monthof i 10Moons

& 11 jj Chronology of Remarkable Events

'Satur. 1 17 i Queen Alexandra born, 1844.

Sun. 2

Mon. 3 19 j S. Francis Xavier died on Sanchoan, 1552.

Tues. 4 20 { First census of Hongkong taken, population 15,000, 1841.

"Wed. 5 21 |j SixGeneral foreigners killed1863. at Watig-chuh-ki, 1847. Soochow re-taken by the Imperialists under

Thurs. 6 j heard of Gordon,

again, 1886. The Japanese warship “ Unebi-kan ” left Singapore and not

Fri. 7 European factories i Canton destroyed by a mob, 1842.

Satur. 8

■Sun. 9 25 Ningpo Peking,captured

1888. 1913. by the Taipings,

Piratical 1861. Consecration

attack on Portuguese of newnearPei-tang Cathedral,

being

Chamber killed,

of Commerce, Election

1915. str.of Hon. Mr. D.str,Landale

American,as chairmanMacao,of theHongkong

captain

26 Piracy Captainon board

Pocock the and Douglas

three others “ Namoa,”

murdered five

and hours

several after leaving

seriously Hongkong.

wounded,

Arrival inofHongkong

ElectionLegislative H. ofHolyoak

Mr. P.Council, Governorto represent

Sir WilliamtheRobinson,

Chamber1891.of Commerce

Confucius died, .1890.

on theB.CHong-

400.

27 Indemnity kong 1915.

Wed. 1867. stating that the Foreign Ministers at Peking are to be received• atin

Osaka, Decree

Imperial

paid by Prince of Satsuma, 1863. Admiral Bell, U.S.N., drowned

Thurs. 29 French audienceflagevery New Year,from 1890. Consulate at Canton by Chinese, 1832, First

Reception ofhauled

Shih-kai invited foreigndown ladies bythethethe

EmpressThroneDowager of China,

by a1898. President

vote ofYuan

provincial delegatesto atascend Dragon

Peking, 1915. of China unanimous the

AllCourt

Romancondemned

Catholic Priests (not Portuguese) expelled from Macao, 1838.

German steamer “ Tannenfels,” seized as a Prize by the destroyer Hongkong Prize

“ Chelmer,”

Memorial Stone1914.

of New Harbour of Refuge at Mongkoktsui laid by the H. E. Governor,

United States District Court for China opened at Shanghai, 1906. Sir W. Des Vceux,

Tues

Wed. Sirformerly

Hugh GoughGovernorandoftheHongkong, died, 1909.

Eastern Expedition left China, 1842.

Thurs. 20 Arrival

1881. ofTwoPrinces

cotton Albert

mills Victor and George of Wales at Hongkong in the “ Bacchante,”

Fri. 2122 Tuannavigation

Steam Fane murdered, 1911. 1736. Osaka, 120 persons burnt to death, 1893.

destroyed

first attempted,

by fire at

Two Mandarins arrived at Macao with secret orders to watch the movements of

Sun. 23 10 SirPlenipotentiary worth May, ofElliot.

Henryof forged Hongkong,

Chinese

1836. appointed Governor of Fiji,

banknotes 1910. One million dollars

Mon. | 24 11 British performed the Worship

Consulate at Shanghai of Heaven,

destroyed1914.by fire, 1870. 1912. President Yuan Shih-kai

seized in Hongkong,

Tues. 23 Christmas

of property, Day.1878.Great fire in Hongkong, 368 houses destroyed, immense destruction

Wed. ! 26 Bank

lives Holiday.1897.lost.St.The Stephen.

lost,lives Great “fireShanghai

N. C. Co. steamer at Tokyo,. 11,000 byhouses

” destroyed fire ondestroyed,

the Yangtsze,26

Thurs. S 27 over 300

Dedication of Hongkong Masonic Hall, 1865.

Fri. J 28

-Satur. Canton bombarded by Allied forces of Great Britain and France, 1857.

Sun. j 29so

-Mon. si Yat Sen elected Provisional President of the Republic of China, 1911.

INESE FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN 1917

2013 Slight

Festival Cold. Pan, the patron saint of carpenters and masons. He is said

haveof ofLu

torelated beenhis aingenuity

contemporary itmen of that,

is said Confucius.

oncarved

accountAmong histhefather

ofeffigy many having

stories

been

genii put to death

withprevailed by the

one of itsforhands of

stretched Wu, he the of one of the

drought

with gifts from Wu, hethree

cut years.

off the Ontowards

hand, being

and

Wu,

rain

when, inand

supplicated

immediately

consequence,

presented

fell. On

23 this dayof the

Worship carpenters

god of refuse

the hearthto work.

at nightfall.

2724Ti The

GreatgodColdof the hearth reports to heaven.

ngloon. Chinese

131510 Fete

Beginning dayNew ofoftheYear’s

SpiritsDay.of the Ground.

Spring.

Feast ofofShen

Fetepraying Lanterns, FStethe

andwealth

Ts’ai, of Shang-yuen,

two guardians ruler of heaven.Auspicious day for

Moon

16

Fete day of for

the Supreme andJudge

offspring,

in the wellof astheoffordoor.

as Courts rain.

Hades.

2 Mencius born, B.C. 371. Spring worship of the gods of the land and grain.

133 Fete day

FSte of the

of

from drowning,

god of literature,

Hung-shing,and for god of

sendingthe worshipped

Canton river,

rain in times

bypowerful

students.

of drought. to preserve people

15 Birthday

Fete of of Lao Tsze,

Kwanyin, goddess founder

of of Tauism,

mercy. B.C. 604.

2819 Vernal Equinox.

14 Tsing-ming or Tomb

Moo ruler of the sombreFestival.

heavens and FeteofofPeh-te,

HiuenTauist T’ien Shang-ti,

god of thethe Northsupreme

Pole.

15 Feteshipped

of I-ling, a

onSummer.deified physician,

behalf of sick children. and of the god of the Sombre Altar, wor-

1618 Beginning

FeteCentral of

of Heumountain,

Tu, the goddess worshipped behind graves, of the god of the

2326 FSte ofof Tien Heu,goddess

Queen andofofHeaven,

the threeHolybrothers.

mother, goddess of sailors.

28 FSte

National Tsz Sun,

Festival of Ts’ang of progeny.

Kieh, inventor of writing.

Moor FSte of San

the Kai,

Bodhisattva Mandjushri ; worshipped on behalf of the dead.

10118 FSte of

Fete of the dragon

Anniversary of

ruler

the

of heaven, the ground. of Hades; also a fSte of Buddha.

spiritsofofConfucius.

death

of earth, and

1417 FSte ofof Lii Sien,

2028 FSte

FSte of Kin

the Hwa,Tauist

goddess

patriarch,goddess

theof Cantonese

the blind.

worshipped by barbers.

of parturition.

Moo FSte of Yoh Wang, the Tauist god of medicine.

451 FSte

Summer

National

of theSolstices.

fSte

god of the South Pole.

day. Dragonpaddle boatabout

festivalin long

and boat races.

Cantonese

ted. frantically

The festival is called PaWatLungTien,Shunwhonarrow

ordrowned

Tiu WatboatsOn Uen,

thisornamen-

much and

day the

is held

to500,commemorate

forfetehisofmaster the death

theWang, of

princetheof tutelary

Tso refusedgodtoofaccept himself

histowns. about B.C.

faithful advice.

131116 National

National Sheng

fSteofoftheKwan Ti, god of war,andandEarth. walled

of hisFStesonof General Kwan.

Anniversary

(A.D. Formation of Heaven Chang Tao-ling

claim34),theancient

totransmigration headship.

of the

head ofItthe is

soulyouthful

Tauist

said “ the

of each member

sect.succession

His descendants

successorofoftheChang is still continue

perpetuated

Tao-ling, by

on the

his

decease,tothebody

isShakyamuni

supernaturally of some

revealed as soon as the miracle family,

is whose

effected.” heirship

Feta

20 Slight Heat. Buddha, the founder of Buddhism.

FESTIVALS AND OBSERVANCES IN 1917

6 Great Heat.

212419 Fete

BeginiofingtbeofGoddess

Autumn.of Mercy.

Anniversary

of fire ; and ofKwan

of the Ti’sgod ofascent to heaven. Fete of Chnh Yung, the spirit

thunder.

. Mo.1

First

- souls,day when

of theBuddhist

seventh moon. During thisreadmoon is heldto the festival

soulsoffrom

all

purgatory,

accompanied, scatter

by riceand

finger

Tauist

toplayfeed priests

starving

imitating ghosts,masses

mystic

release

recite magic

Sanskrit incantations

characters which

are supposed

benefit to comfort souls in purgatory, visitburn paper clothes for the

behalf ofof the

of statuettes,

the deceased

souls of themembers

dwarf plants,

drowned, of theandfamily.

silk festoons,

family shrines

Exhibitions

and ancestral

to pray on

tabletsofaregroups

com-

bined with these ceremonies, which are enlivened by music and fireworks.

7 HeatFete day of LaoFeteTszu,

andAbating

of the seven

the god

of the

goddesses

founder

of the

of Tauism.

of Ursa

Pleiades, Major, worshipped

worshipped by scholars

by women.

1518 Fete of Chung Yuen, god of the element earth.

F§te of the three gods of heaven, of earth, and of water, and of the five

20 Feteattendant

of Changsacrificial

Fi, A.D.spirits. 220. A leader of the wars during the Three

Kingdoms.

After many He is said

heroic to havehebeen

exploits, at firstbyathe

perished butcher

hand andof anwineassassin.

seller..

2224 White Dew. Fete of the god ofhermit.

wealth.

29 Fete of Hii Siin-ping, a Tauist

Fete of Ti Ts’ang-wang, the patron of departed spirits.

[.Me 1 Fete of Hii Sun, a deified physician, worshipped by doctors, and of Kin Kiah

23 a (god

Fete of the

of the gods golden

ofgodland armour)

andnorthern worshipped by the literati.

grain.

Descent of the star of the measure, and fete of the god ofthe hearth.

158 Autumnal

National fete Equinox.

day. Worship of the moon, and Feast of Lanterns.

2425 Cold

27 Fete Dew.

of the god of the Sun.

Mo Fete of Confucius (born 552 B.C.), the founder of Chinese ethics and politics.

1 Descenttoofthethe9thStardaygods of the northern and southern measures from the

9 Froi-t1stDescent. Fete ofinclusive.

Kwan Ti, the god of war; kite-flying day. FeteofTung,

a ruler in Hades.

1511 Fete of Yen

National feteHwui,

of Shuthe favourite

Hiwhose

(A.D. disciple), the

1130-1201' of Confucius.

mostChinese

eminentclassics

of thehave

laterform-

Chi- .

^ nese

ed forphilosophers

centuries the commentaries

recognized standard on ofthe

orthodoxy.

16 Fete of the god of the loom.

17 Fetes of tfieand

godadepts

of wealth; of Koh Hung,

^ doctors inofalchemy; ofonetheofgolden

and inventors the mostdragon

celebratedof

king. Tauist

242818 Fete of

Beginning Tsii Sheng, one the reputed of writing.

Moi3 Fete day ofofHwa Winter.

.Kwang, the god of fire, and Ma, a deified physician.

Fete of the three brothers San Mao.

159 Slight Snow.

FetesgodofaudHagoddess

Yuen, the godbedstead.

of water; of the god of small-pox; and of the

of the

24Mo Heavy Snow.

69 Fete daySolstice.

of Yuh Hwang, the higher

Winter * god ° of the Tauist pantheon.F

TEEATIES, CODES, &

TREATIES WITH CHINA

GREAT BRITAIN

TREATY BETWEEN HER MAJESTY AND THE EMPEROR OF CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Nanking,

29th August, 1842

Ratifications Exchanged at Hongkong, 26th June, 1843

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland'

and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous of putting an end to the

misunderstandings and consequent hostilities which have arisen between the two

countries, have resolved to conclude a treaty for that purpose, and have therefore

named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say: Her Majesty the Queen of Great

Britain and Ireland, Sir Henry Pottinger, Bart., a Major-General in the Service of

the East India Company, &c.; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China,

the High Commissioners Ke-ying, a Member of the Imperial House, a Guardian of

the Crown Prince, and General of the Garrison of Canton: and Ilipoo, of the Imperial

Kindred, graciously permitted to wear the insignia of the first rank, and the distinc-

tion of a peacock’s feather, lately Minister and Governor-General, &c., and now

Lieut.-General commanding at Ghapoo—Who, after having communicated to each

other their respective full powers, and found them to be in good and due form, have

agreed upon and concluded the following Articles:—

Art. I.—There shall henceforward be peace and friendship between Her Majesty

tlie Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and His Majesty the

Emperor of China, and between their respective subjects, who shall enjoy full security

and protection for their persons and property within the dominions of the other.

Art. II.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees that British subjects, with

their lamilies and establishments, shall be allowed to reside, for the purpose of carry-

ing on their mercantile pursuits, without molestation or restraint, at the cities and

towns of Canton, Amoy, Foochow-foo, Ningpo, and Shanghai; and Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britain, &c., will appoint superintendents, or consular officers, to

reside at each of the above-named cities or towns, to be the medium of communication

between the Chinese authorities and the said merchants, and to see that the just

duties and other dues of the Chinese Government, as hereinafter provided for, are

duly discharged by Her Britannic Majesty’s subjects.

Art, III. —It being obviously necessary and desirable that British subjects should

have some port whereat they may careen and refit their ships when required, and keep

stores for that purpose, His Majesty the Emperor of China cedes to Her Majesty the

Queen of Great Britain, &c., the Island of Hongkong to bo possessed in perpetuity

by Her Britannic Majesty, her heirs, and successors, and to be governed by such laws

and regulations as Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain, &c., shall see fit to direct,.

Art. IV.—The Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of six millions of dollars,,

as the value of the opium which was delivered up at Canton in the month of March,.

1839, as a ransom for the lives of Her Britannic Majesty’s Superintendent and sub-

jects who had been imprisoned and threatened with death by the Chinese high officers,.

Art. V.—The Government of China havingcompelled theBritishmerchants trading

at Canton to deal exclusively with certain Chinese merchants, called Hong merchants (or

Co-Hong), who had been licensed by the Chinese Government for this purpose, the

Emperor of China agrees to abolish that practice in future at all ports where British

merchants may reside, and to permit them to carry on their mercantile transactions

with whatever persons they please; and His Imperial Majesty further agrees to pay to

the British Government the sum of three millions of dollars, on account of debts due

1*

NANKING TREATY, 1842

to British subjects by some of the said Hong merchants, or Co-Hong, who have become

insolvent, and who owe very large sums of money to subjects of Her Britannic Majesty.

Art. YI.—The G-overnment of Her Britannic Majesty having been obliged to send

out an expedition to demand and obtain redress for the violent and unjust proceeding,

of the Chinese high authorities towards Her Britannic Majesty’s officers and subjects

the Emperor of China agrees to pay the sum of twelve millions of dollars, on account

of expenses incurred; and Her Britannic Majesty’s plenipotentiary voluntarily agrees,

on behalf of Her Majesty, to deduct from the said amount of twelve millions of

dollars, any sums which may have been received by Her Majesty’s combined forces,

as ransom for cities and towns in China, subsequent to the 1st day of August, 1811.

Art. VII.—It is agreed that the total amount of twenty-one millions of dollars,

described in the three preceding Articles, shall be paid as follows :—

Six millions immediately.

Six millions in 1843; that is, three millions on or before the 39th June, and

three millions on or before 31st of December.

Five millions in 1844; that is, two millions and a half on or before the 33th of

June, and two millions and a half on or before the 31st of December.

Four millions in 1845; that is, two millions on or before 30th of June, and

two millions on or before the 31st of December.

And it is further stipulated that interest at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum,

shall be paid by the Government of China on any portion of the above sums that are

not punctually discharged at the periods fixed.

Art. VIII.—The Emperor of China agrees to release, uncon litionally, all subjects

of Her Britannic Majesty (whether natives of Europe or India), who may be in con-

finement at this moment in any part of the Chinese Empire.

Art. IX.—The Emperor of China agrees to publish and promulgate, under his

imperial sign manual and seal, a full and entire amnesty and act of indemnity to all

subjects of China, on account of their having resided under, or having had dealings

and intercourse with, or having entered the service of Her Britannic Majesty, or of

Her Majesty’s officers; and His Imperial Majesty further engages to release all

Chinese subjects who may be at this moment in confinement for similar reasons.

Art. X.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to establish at all the

ports which are, by Article II. of this Treaty, to be thrown open for the resort of

British merchants, a fair and regular tariff of export and import customs and other

dues, which tariff shall be publicly notified anl promulgated for general information;

and the Emperor further engages that, when British merchants shall have once

paid at any of the said ports the regulated customs and dues, agreeable of the tariff

to be hereifter fixed, such merchandise may be conveyed by Cninese merchants

to any province or city in the interior of the empire of China/on paying a further

amount of transit duties, which shall not exceed per cent, on the tariff value of

such goods.

Art. XI.—It is agreed that Her Britannic Majesty’s chief high officer in China

shall6rcorrespond with the Chinese high officers, both at the capital and in the provinces,

^ermprovinces

officers in the " C0Tnmunication

under the term the subordinate

“ statement,”British

on theofficers

part ofand

theChinese

former, high

and

on the part of the latter, “ declaration,” and the subordinates of both countries on a

footing of perfect equality; merchants and others not holding official situations, and

therefore

m all papersnot addressed

included into,the orabove, on bothfor,sides

intended thefornotice

use the termrespective

of the “ representation

Govern-”

ments.

Art. XII.—On the assent of the Emperor of China to this Treaty being received,

and the discharge of the first instalment of money, Her Britannic Majesty’s forces

will retire from Nanking and the Grand Canal, and will no longer molest or stop the

rade of China. The military post at Chinhae will also be withdrawn, but the island

ol Jloolangsoo, and that of Chusan, will continue to be held by Her Majesty’s forces

until the money payments, and the arrangements for opening the ports to British

merchants, be completed.

BANKING TREATY, 1842—TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. XIII.—-The ratifications of this Treaty by Her Majesty the Queen of Great

Britain, &c., an 1 His Majesty the Emperor of China, shall be exchanged as soon

as the great distance which separates England from China will admit; but, in the

meantime, counterpart copies of it, signed and sealed by the Plenipotentiaries on

behalf of their respective Sovereigns, shall be mutually delivered, and all its provisions

and arrangements shall take effect.

Hone at Nanking, and signed and sealed by the Plenipotentiaries on board Her

Britannic Majesty’s ship Cornwallis this 29th day of August, 1842; corresponding

with the Chinese date, twenty-fourth day of the seventh month, in the twenty-second

■year of Taou Kwang.

Henby Pottinger,

Her Majesty's Plenipotentiary.

And signed by the seals of four •Chinese Commissioners.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Palificat ions exchanyed at Peking, 24t/i October, 1860

Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland

and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous to put an end to the existing

misunderstanding between the two countries and to place their relations on a more

satisfactory footing in future, have resolved to proceed to a revision and improvement

ef the Treaties existing between them; and, for that purpose, have named as their

Plenipotentiaries, that is to say :—

Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, the Right Honourable the

Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, a Peer of the United Kingdom, and Knight of the

Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the High Commissioner Kweiliang, a

Senior Chief Secretary of State, styled of the East Cabinet, Captain-General of the

Plain White Banner of the Manehu Banner force, Superintendent-General of the

Administration of Criminal Law; and Hwashana, one of His Imperial Majesty’s

Expositors of the Classics, Manehu President of the Office for the Regulation of the

•Civil Establishment, Captain-General of the Bordered Blue Banner of the Chinese

Banner Force, and Visitor of the Office of Interpretation:

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and

found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the

following Articles :—

Art. I.—The Treaty of Peace and Amity between the two nations signed at

Nanking on the twenty-ninth day of August, in the year eighteen hundred and forty-

two, is hereby renewed and confirmed.

The supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of Trade having been

•amended and improved, and the substance of their provisions having been incor-

porated in this Treaty, the said Supplementary Treaty and General Regulations of

Trade are hereby abrogated.

Art. II.—For the better preservation of harmony in future, Her Majesty the

•Queen of Great Britain and His Majesty the Emperor of China mutually agree that,

in accordance with the universal practice of great and friendly nations. Her Majesty

"the Queen n>ay, if she see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic

Agents to the Court of Peking; and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like

manner, if he see fit, appoint Ambassadors, Ministers, or other Diplomatic Agents

to the Court of St. James.

Art. III.—His Majesty the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the Ambassador,

^Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent, so appointed by Her Majesty the Queen of

•Great Britain, may reside, with his family and establishment, permanently at the

•capital, or mayvisit .it occasionally at the option of the British Government. He

TIENTSIN- TEEATT, 1953

shall not be called upon to perforin any ceremony derogatory to him as representing

the Sovereign of an independent nation on a footing of equality with that of China,

On the other hand, he shall use the same forms of ceremony and respect to His

Majesty the Emperor as are employed by the Ambassadors, Ministers, or Diplomatic

Agents of Her Majesty towards the Sovereigns of independent and equal European

nations.

It is further agreed, that Her Majesty’s Government may acquire at Peking a

site for building, or may hire houses for the accommodation of Her Majesty’s Mission,

and the Chinese Government will assist it in so doing.

Her Majesty’s Representative shall be at liberty to choose his own servants and

attendants, who shall not be subject to any kind of molestation whatever.

Any person guilty of disrespect or violence to Her Majesty’s Representative, or to

any member of his family or establishment, in deed or word, shall be severely punished.

Art. IV.—It is further agreed that no obstacle or difficulty shall be made to tho

free movements of Her Majesty’s Representative, and that he and the persons of his

suite may come and go, and travel at their pleasure. He shall, moreover, have full

liberty to send and receive his correspondence to and from any point on the sea-coast

that he may select, and his letters and effects shall be held sacred and inviolable:

He may employ, for their transmission, special couriers, who shall meet with the same-

protection and facilities for travelling as the persons employed in carrying despatches

for the Imperial Government; and, generally, he shall enjoy the same privileges as

are accorded to officers of the same rank by the usage and consent of Western nations.

All expenses attending the Diplomatic Mission of Great Britain shall be borne*

by the British Government.

Art. V.—His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to nominate one of the

Secretaries of State, or a President of one of the Boards, as the high officer with

whom the Ambassador, Minister, or other Diplomatic Agent of Her Majesty the Queen

shall transact business, either personally or in writing, on a footing of perfect equality.

Art. VI.—Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain agrees that the privileges

hereby secured shall be enjoyed in her dominions by the Ambassador, Minister, or

Diplomatic Agent of the Emperor of China, accredited to the Court of Her Majesty.

Art. VII.—Her Majesty the Queen may appoint one or more Consuls in the

dominions of the Emperor of China ; and such Consul or Consuls shall be at liberty

to reside in any of the open ports or cities of China as Her Majesty the Queen may

consider most expedient for the interests of British commerce. They shall be treated

with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and enjoy the same privileges and?

immunities as the Consular Officers of the most favoured nation.

Consuls and Vice-Consuls in charge shall rank with Intendants of Circuit; Vice-

Consuls, Acting Vice-Consuls, and Interpreters, with Prefects. They shall have access-

to the official residences of these officers, and communicate with them, either personally

or in writing, on a footing of equality, as the interests of the public service may require.

Art. VIII.—The Christian religion, as professed by Protestants or Roman

Catholics, inculcates the practice of virtue, and teaches man to do as he would be

done by. Persons teaching it or professing it, therefore, shall alike be entitled to the

protection of the Chinese authorities, nor shall any such, peaceably pursuing their

.calling and not offending against the laws, be persecuted or interfered with.

Art. IX.-—British subjects are hereby authorised to travel, for their pleasure or

for purposes of trade, to all parts of the interior under passports which will be issued

by their Consuls, and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if

demanded, must be produced for examination in the localities passed through. If

the passport be not irregular, the bearer will be allowed to proceed, and no opposition

shall be offered to his hiring persons, or hiring vessels for the carriage of his baggage-

or merchandise. If he be without a passport, or if he commit any offence against the

law, he shall be handed over to the nearest Consul for punishment, but he must not

be subjected to any ill-usage in excess of necessary restraint. No passport need be

applied for by persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distanoe-

not exceeding 100 li, and for a period not exceeding five days.

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint

of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

To Nanking, and other cities, disturbed by persons in arms against the Grovern-

ment, no pass shall be given, until they shall have been recaptured.

Art. X.—British merchant ships shall have authority to trade upon the Great

River (Yangtsze). The Upper and Lower Valley of the river being, however,

disturbed by outlaws, no port shall be for the present opened to trade, with the

•exception of Chinkiang, which shall be opened in a year from the date of the signing

of this Treaty;

So soon as peace shall have been restored, British vessels shall also be admitted

-to trade at such ports as far as Hankow, not exceeding three in number, as the British

^Minister, after consultation with the Chinese Secretary of State, may determine shall

be ports of entry and discharge.

Art. XI.—In addition to the cities and towns of Canton, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo,

.and Shanghai, opened by the Treaty of Nanking, it is agreed that British subjects

may frequent the cities and ports of Newchwang, Tangchow (Chefoo), Taiwan

(Formosa), Chao-chow (Swatow), and Kiung-chow (Hainan).

They are permitted to carry on trade with whomsoever they please, and to proceed

-to and fro at pleasure with their vessels and merchandise.

They shall enjoy the same privileges, advantages, and immunities at the said

towns and ports as they enjoy at the ports already open to trade, including the

right of residence, buying or renting houses, of leasing land therein, and of building

churches, hospitals and cemeteries.

Art. XII.—British subjects, whether at the ports or at other places, desiring to

huild or open houses, warehouses, churches, hospitals, or burial grounds, shall make

their agreement for the land or buildings they require, at the rates prevailing among

the people, equitably and without exaction on either side.

Art. XIII.—The Chinese Government will place no restrictions whatever upon

the employment, by British subjects, of Chinese subjects in any lawful capacity.

Art. XIV.—British subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the

transport of goods or passengers, and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be settled

between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese Government.

The number of these boats shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either

of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged in carrying the goods be granted to

any parties. If any smuggling takes place in them the offenders will, of course, be

punished according to law.

Art. XV.—All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person, arising

between British subjects, shall be subject to the jurisdiction of the British authorities.

Art. XVI.—Chinese subjects who may be guilty of any criminal act towards

British subjects shall be arrested and punished by the Chinese authorities according

to the laws of China.

British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and punished

by the Consul, or other public functionary authorised thereto, according to the laws

•of Great Britain.

Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

Art. XVII.—A British subject, having reason to complain of Chinese, must

proceed to the Consulate and state his grievance. The Consul will inquire into the

merits of the case, and do his utmost to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a

Chinese have reason to complain of a British subject, the Consul shall no less listen

do his complaint, and endeavour to settle it in a friendly manner. If disputes take

place of such a nature that the Consul cannot arrange them amicably, then he shall

request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they may together examine

into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Art. XVIII.—The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest

protection to the persons and property of British subjects, whenever these shall have

been subjected to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism or robbery, the

•local authorities shall at once take the necessary steps for the recovery of the stolen

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

property, tlie suppression of disorder, and the arrest of the guilty parties, whom they

will punish according to law.

Art. XIX.—If any British merchant-vessel, while within Chinese waters, be

plundered by robbers or pirates, it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use

every endeavour to capture and punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover the

stolen property, that it may be handed over to the Consul for restoration to the owner.

Art. XX.—If any British vessel be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coast

of China, or be compelled to take refuge in any port within the dominions of the

Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities, on being apprised of the fact, shall

immediately adopt measures for its relief and security ; the persons on board shall

receive friendly treatment and shall be furnished, if necessary, with the means of

conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

Art. XXI.—If criminals, subjects of China, shall take refuge in Hongkong or

on board the British ships there, they shall, upon due requisition by the Chinese

authorities, be searched for, and, on proof of their guilt, be delivered up.

In like manner, if Chinese offenders take refuge in the houses or on board the

vessels of British subjects at the open ports, they shall not be harboured or concealed,

but shall be delivered up, on due requisition by the Chinese authorities, addressed to

the British Consul.

Art. XXII.—Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a

British subject, or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do their

utmost to effect his arrest and enforce recovery of the debts. The British authorities

will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any British subject fraudulently

absconding or failing to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese subject.

Art. XXIII.—Should natives of China who may repair to Hongkong to trade

incur debts there, the recovery of such debts must be arranged for by the English

Court of Justice on the spot; but should the Chinese debtor abscond, and be known

to have property real or personal within the Chinese territory, it shall be the duty of

the Chinese authorities on application by, and in concert with, the British Consul,

to do their utmost to see justice done between the parties.

Art. XXIV.—It is agreed that British subjects shall pay, on all merchandise

imported or exported by them, the duties prescribed by the tariff; but in no case shall

they be called upon to pay other or higher duties than are required of the subjects

of any other foreign nation.

Art. XXV.—Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the

goods, and duties of export on the shipment of the same.

Art. XXVI.—Whereas the tariff fixed by Article X. of the Treaty of Nanking,

and which was estimated so as to impose on imports and exports a duty of about

the rate of five per cent, ad valorem, has been found, by reason of the fall in value of

various articles of merchandise therein enumerated, to impose a duty upon these

considerably in excess of the rate originally assumed, as above, to be a fair rate, it is

agreed that the said tariff shall be revised, and that as soon as the Treaty shall have

been signed, application shall be made to the Emperor of China to depute a high

officer of the Board of Bevenue to meet, at Shanghai, officers to be deputed on behalf

of the British Government, to consider its revision together, so that the tariff*, as

revised, may come into operation immediately after the ratification of this Treaty.

Art. XXVII.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this

Treaty may demand a further revision of the tariff, and of the Commercial Articles of

Inis Treaty, at the end of ten years ; but if no demand be made on either side within

six months after the end of the first ten years, then the tariff shall remain in force for

ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years, and so it shall

be at the end of each successive ten years.

that Art.

BritishXXVin.—Whereas

imports, having paidit was agreedduties,

the tariff in Article

shouldX.be ofconveyed

the Treaty of Nanking

into the interior,

tree of all further charges, except a transit duty, the amount whereof was not to

exceed a certain percentage on tariff value; and whereas, no accurate information

having been furnished of the amount of such duty, British merchants have constantly

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Complained that charges are suddenly and arbitrarily imposed by the provincial

authorities as transit duties upon produce on its way to the foreign market, and on

imports on their way into the interior, to the detriment of trade ; it is agreed that

within four months from the signing of this Treaty, at all ports now open to British

trade, and within a similar period at all ports that may hereafter be opened, the

authority appointed to superintend the collection of duties shall be obliged, upon

application of the Consul, to declare the amount of duties leviable on produce between

the place of production and the port of shipment upon imports between the Consular

port in question and the inland markets named by the Consul; and that a notification

thereof shall be published in English and Chinese for general information.

But it shall be at the option of any British subject desiring to convey produce

purchased inland to a port, or to convey imports from a port to an inland market, to

clear his goods of all transit duties, by payment of a single charge. The amount of

this charge shall be leviable on exports at the first barrier they may have to pass, or,

on imports at the port at which they are landed; and on payment thereof a certificate

shall be issued, which shall exempt the goods fromallfurther inland charges whatsoever.

It is further agreed that the amount of the charge shall be calculated, as nearly

as possible, at the rate of two and a half per cent, ad valorem, and that it shall be fixed

for each article at the conference to be held at Shanghai for the revision of the tariff.

It is distinctly understood that the payment of transit dues, by commutation or

otherwise, shall in no way affect the tariff duties on imports or exports, which will

continue to be levied separately and in full.

Art. XXIX.—British merchant vessels, of more than one hundred and fifty tons

burden, shall be charged tonnage-dues at the rate of four mace per ton ; if of one

hundred and fifty tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the open

ports, or for Hongkong, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to a special

certificate from the Customs, on exhibition of which she shall be exempted from all

further payment of tonnage dues in any open ports of China, for a period of four

months, to be reckoned from the port-clearance.

Art. XXX.—The master of any British merchant vessel may, within forty-eight

hours after the arrival of his vessel, but not later, decide to depart without breaking

bulk, in which case he will not be subject to pay tonnage-dues. But tonnage-dues

shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. No other fees or

charges upon entry or departure shall be levied.

Art. XXXI.—No tonnage-dues shall be payable on boats employed by British

subjects in the conveyance of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provision, or

other articles not subject to duty, between any of the open ports. All cargo-boats,

however, conveying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage-dues once in six

months, at the rate of four mace per register ton.

Art. XXXII.—The Consuls and Superintendents of Customs shall consult together

regarding the erection of beacons or lighthouses and the distribution of buoys and

lightships, as occasion may demand.

Art. XXXIII.—Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorised by the Chinese

Government to receive the same in its behalf, either in sycee or in foreign money,

according to the assay made at Canton on the thirteenth of July, one thousand eight

hundred and forty-three.

Art. XXXIV.—Sets of standard weights and measures, prepai'ed according to

the standard issued to the Canton Custom-house by the Board of Revenue, shall be

delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the Consul at each port to secure

uniformity and prevent confusion.

Art. XXXV,—Any British merchant vessel arriving at one of the open ports

shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like

manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her

departure, she shall be allowed to select a pilot to conduct her out of port.

Art. XXXVI.—Whenever a British merchant vessel shall arrive off one of the

open ports, the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or more Customs officers

10 TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

to guard the ship. They shall either live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the

ship, as may best suit their convenience. Their food and expenses shall be supplied

them from the Custom-house, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever

from the master or consignee. Should they violate this regulation, they shall be

punished proportionately to the amount exacted.

Art. XXXVII.—Within twenty-four hours after arrival, the ships ’papers,

bills of lading, etc., shall be lodged in the hands of the Consul, who will within a

further period of twenty-four hours report to the Superintendent of Customs the name

of the ship, her registered tonnage, and the nature of her cargo. If, owing to neglect

on the part of the master, the above rule is not complied with within forty-eight

hours after the ship’s arrival, he shall be liable to a fine of fifty taels for every day’s

delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not exceed two hundred taels.

The master will be responsible for the correctness of the manifest, which shall

contain a full and true account of the particulars of the cargo on board. For

presenting a false manifest, he will subject himself to a fine of five hundred taels; but

he will be allowed to correct, within twenty-four hours after delivery of it to the customs

officers, any mistake he may discover in his manifest without incurring this penalty.

Art. XXXVIII.—After receiving from the Consul the report in due form, the

Superintendent of Customs shall grant the vessel a permit to open hatches. If the

master shall open hatches, and begin to discharge any goods, without such pei’mission,

he shall be fined five hundred taels, and the goods discharged shall be confiscated wholly.

Art. XXXIX—Any British merchant who has cargo to land or ship must apply

to the Superintendent of Customs for a special permit. Cargo landed or shipped

without such permit will be liable to confiscation.

Art. XL.—No transhipment from one vessel to another 'can be made without

special permission, under pain of confiscation of the goods so transhipped.

Art. XLI.—When all dues and duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent

of Customs^ shall give a port-clearance and the Consul shall then return the ship’s

papers, so that she may depart on her voyage.

Art. XLII.—With respect to articles subject, according to the tariff, to an ad

valorem duty, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer in affixing

its value, then each party shall call two or three merchants to look at the goods, and

the highest price at which any of these merchants would be willing to purchase

them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

• Art. XLIII.—Duties shall be charged upon the net weight of each article,

making a deduction for the tare, weight of congee, &q. To fix the tare of any articles,

such as tea, if the British merchant cannot agree with the Custom-house officer, then

each party shall choose so many chests out of every hundred, which being first

weighed in gross, shall afterwards be tared, and the average tare upon these chests

shall be assumed as the tare upon the whole; and upon this principle shall the

tare be fixed upon other goods and packages. If there should be any other points in

dispute which cannot be settled, the British merchant may appeal to his Consul, who

will communicate the particulars of the case to the Superintendent of Customs, that

it may be equitably arranged. But the appeal must be made wiihin twenty-four

hours or it will not be attended to. While such points are still unsettled, the

Superintendent of Customs shall postpone the insertion of the same in his books.

Art. XLIV.—Upon all damaged goods a fair reduction of duty shall be allowed

proportionate to their deterioration. If any disputes arise, they shall be settled in

the manner pointed out in the clause of this Treaty having reference to articles which

pay duty ad valorem.

Art. XLV.—British merchants who may have imported merchandise into any of

the open ports, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to re-export the same, shall

be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of Customs, who, in order to

prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made by suitable officers,

to see that the duties paid on such goods, as entered in the Custom-house books,

correspond with the representations made and that the goods remain with their

original marks unchanged. He shall then make a memorandum of the port-clearance

TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858 11

of the goods, and of the amount of duties paid, and deliver the same to the merchant,

and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs of the other ports. All which

being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in which the goods are laden, every-

thing being found on examination there to correspond, she shall be permitted to break

bulk, and land the said goods, without being subject to the payment of any additional

duty thereon. But if, on such examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall

detect any fraud on the revenue in the case, then the goods shall be subject to

confiscation by the Chinese Government.

British merchants desiring to re-export duty-paid imports to a foreign country

shall be entitled, on complying with the same conditions as in the case of re-exporta-

tion to another port in China, to a drawback certificate, which shall be a valid tender

to the Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Foreign grain brought into any port of China in a British ship, if no part thereof

has been landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

Art. XLVI.—The Chinese authorities at each port shall adopt the means they

may judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or smuggling.

Art. XLVII.—British merchant-vessels are not entitled to resort to otherthanthe

ports of trade declared open by Treaty; they are not unlawfully to enter other ports in

China, or to carry on clandestine trade along the coast thereof. Any vessel violating this

provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

Art. XLVIII.—If any British merchant-vessel be concerned in smuggling, the

goods, whatever their value or nature, shall be subject to confiscation by the Chinese

authorities, and the ship may be prohibited from trading further, and sent away as

soon as her account shall have been adjusted and paid.

Art. XLIX.—All penalties enforced, or confiscations made, under this Treaty

shall belong and be appropriated to the public service of the Government of China.

Art. L.—All official communications addressed by the Diplomatic and Consular

Agent of Her Majesty the Queen to the Chinese Authorities shall, henceforth, be writ-

ten in English. They -will for the present be accompanied by a Chinese version, but it

is understood that, in the event of there being any difference of meaning between the

English and Chinese text, the English Government will hold the sense as expressed in

the English text to be the correct sense. This provision is to apply to the Treaty now

negotiated, the Chinese textof which has been carefully corrected by the English original.

Art. LI.—It is agreed that henceforward the character (barbarian) shall not

be applied to the Government or subjects of Her Britannic Majesty in any Chinese official

document issued by the Chinese authorities, either in the capital or in the provinces.

Art. LII.—British ships of war coming for no hostile purpose, or being engaged

in the pursuit of pirates, shall be at liberty to visit all ports within the dominions

of the Emperor of China, and shall receive every facility for the purchase of pro-

visions, procuring water, and, if occasion require, for the making of repairs. The

commanders of such ships shall hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on

terms of equality and courtesy.

Art. LIII.—In consideration of the injury sustained by native and foreign

commerce from the prevalence of piracy in the seas of China, the high contracting

parties agree to concert measures for its suppression.

Art. LIV.—The British Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in all

privileges, immunities, and advantages conferred on them by previous Treaties: and

it is hereby expressly stipulated that the British Government and its subjects will be

allowed free and equal participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that

may have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China

to the Government or subjects of any other nation.

Art. LV.—In evidence of her desire for the continuance of a friendly under-

standing, Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain consents to include in a Separate

Article, which shall be in every respect of equal validity with the Articles of this

Treaty, the condition affecting indemnity for expenses incurred and losses sustained

in the matter of the Canton question.

12 TIENTSIN TREATY, 1858

Art. LVI.—The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of Her Majesty the-

Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, and of His Majesty the Emperor of China, re-

spectively, shall be exchanged at Peking, within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Treaty. Done at Tientsin, this twenty-sixth day of June, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight; corresponding with the Chinese date, the

sixteenth day, fifth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Signature of 1st Chinese Plenipotentiary. Signature op 2nd Chinese Plenipotentiary.

Separate Article annexed to the Treaty concluded between Great Britain and China on the

twenty-sixth day of June, in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty-eight.

It is hereby agreed that a sum of two millions of taels, on account of the losses sus-

tained by British subjects through the misconduct of the Chinese authorities at Canton,

and a further sum of two millions of taels on account of the Military expenses of the ex-

pedition which Her Majesty the Queen has been compelled to send out for the purpose of

obtaining redress, and of enforcing the observance of Treaty provisions, shall be paid

to Her Majesty’s Representatives in Chinaby the authorities of the Kwangtung Province.

The necessary arrangements with respect to the time and mode of effecting

these payments shall be determined by Her Majesty’s Representative, in concert with,

the Chinese authorities of Kwangtung.

When the above amounts shall have been discharged in full, the British forces

will be withdrawn from the city of Canton. Done at Tientsin this twenty-sixth day of

June, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eiglit, corresponding

with the Chinese date, the sixteenth day, filth moon, of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Signature op 1st Chinese Plenipotentiary. Signature op 2nd Chinese Plenipotentiary,

AGREEMENT IN PURSUANCE OE ARTICLES XXVI.

AND XXVIII. OE THE TREATY OE TIENTSIN *

Signed at Shanghai, 8th November, 1858

Whereas it was provided, by the Treaty of Tientsin, that a conference should b©

held at Shanghai between Officers deputed by the British Government on the one part

and by the Chinese Government on the other part, for the purpose of determining the

amount of tariff duties and transit dues to be henceforth levied, a conference has been

held accordingly; and its proceedings having been submitted to the Right Honourable

the Earl cf Elgin and Kincardine, High Commissioner and Plenipotentiary of Her

Majesty the Queen on the one part; and to Kweiliang, Hwashana, Ho Kwei-tsing,

Ming-shen, and Twan Ching-shih, High Commissioners and Plenipotentiaries of His

Imperial Majesty the Emperor, on the other part, these High Officers have agreed

and determined upon the revised Tariff hereto appended, the rate of transit dues

therewith declared, together with other Rules and Regulations for the better explana-

tion of the Treaty aforesaid ; and do hereby agree that the said Tariff and Rules—

the latter being in ten Articles, thereto appended—shall be equally binding on the

Governments and subjects to both countries with the Treaty itself.

In witness whereof they hereto affix their Seals and Signatures.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiangsu, this eighth day of November, in

the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and fifty-eight, being the third day of the

tenth moon of the eighth year of the reign of Hien Fung.

[l.s.]

Seal of Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Elgin andorKincardine.

Signatures the Five Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

* The Tariff Import has been superseded by one arranged in 1902.

THE CHEEOO CONVENTION, 1876

WITH ADDITIONAL ARTICLE THERETO FOR REGULATING THE

TRAFFIC IN OPIUM

Ratifications exchanged at London, 6th May, 1886

Agreement negotiated between Sir Thomas Wade, k.c.b., Her Britannic

Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of China,

and Li, Minister Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China, Senior Grand

Secretary, Governor-General of the Province of Chihli, of the First Class of the

Third Order of Nobility.

The negotiation between the Ministers above named has its origin in a despatch

received by Sir Thomas Wade, in the Spring of the present year, from the Earl of

Derby, Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, dated 1st January, 1876.

This contained instructions regarding the disposal of three questions: first, a satis-

factory settlement of the Yunnan affair; secondly, a faithful fulfilment of engagements

of last year respecting intercourse between the high officers of the two Governments ;

thirdly, the adoption of a uniform system in satisfaction of the understanding arrived

at in the month of September, 1875 (8th moon of the 1st year of the reign Kwang

Su), on the subject of rectification of conditions of trade. It is to this despatch that

Sir Thomas Wade has referred himself in discussions on these questions with the

Tsung-li Yamen, further reference to which is here omitted as superfluous. The

conditions now agreed to between Sir Thomas Wade and the Grand Secretary are as

follows:—

Section I.—Settlement of the Yunnan Case

1. —A Memorial is to be presented to the Throne, whether by t

Yamen or by the Grand Secretary Li is immaterial, in the sense of the memorandum

prepared by Sir Thomas Wade. Before presentation the Chinese text of the Memorial

is to be shown to Sir Thomas Wade.

2. —The Memorial having been presented to the Throne, and the Im

in reply received, the Tsung-li Yamen will communicate copies of the Memorial and

Imperial decree of Sir Thomas Wade, together with copy of a letter from tho

Tsung-li Yamen to the Provincial Governments, instructing them to issue a proclama-

tion that shall embody at length the above Memorial and Decree. Sir Thomas Wade

will thereon reply to the effect that for two years to come officers will be sent by the

British Minister to different places in the provinces to see that the proclamation is

posted. On application from the British Minister or the Consul of any port instructed

by him to make application, the high officers of the provinces will depute competent

officers to accompany those so sent to the places which they go to observe.

3. —In order to the framing of such regulations as will be needed f

of the frontier trade between Burmah and Yunnan, the Memorial submitting the

proposed settlement of the Yunnan affair will contain a request that an Imperial

Decree be issued directing the Governor-General and Governor, whenever the British

Government shall send officers to Yunnan, to select a competent officer of rank to

confer with them and to conclude a satisfactory arrangement.

4. —The British Government will be free for five years, from the

next, being the 17th day of the 11th moon of the 2nd year of the reign of Kwang Su,

to station officers at Ta-li Fu, or at some other suitable place in Yunnan, to observe

the conditions of trade ; to the end that they may have information upon which to

base the regulations of trade when these have to be discussed. For the considera-

tion and adjustment of any matter affecting British officers or subjects, these officers

will be free to address themselves to the authorities of the province. The opening

14 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

of the trade may be proposed by the British Government as it may find best at any

time within the term of five years, or upon expiry of the term of five years.

Passports having been obtained last year for a Mission from India into Yunnan,

it is open to the Viceroy of India to send such Mission at any time he may see fit.

5. —The amount of indemnity to be paid on account of the familie

and others killed in Yunnan, on account of the expenses which the Yunnan case has

-occasioned, and on account of claims of British merchants arising out of the action

of officers of the Chinese Government up to the commencement of the present year.

Sir Thomas Wade takes upon himself to fix at two hundred thousand taels, payable

on demand.

6. —"When the case is closed an Imperial letter will be written e

for what has occurred in Yunnan. The Mission bearing the Imperial letter will

proceed to England immediately. Sir Thomas Wade is to be informed of the

-constitution of this Mission for the information of this Government. The text of the

Imperial letter is also to be communicated to Sir Thomas Wade by the Tsung-li

Yamen.

Section II.—Official Intercourse

Under this heading are included the conditions of intercourse between high

officers in the capital and the provinces, and between Consular officers and Chinese

officials at the ports; also the conduct of judicial proceedings in mixed cases.

1. —In the Tsung-li Yamen’s Memorial of the 28th September,

•of Kung and the Ministers stated that their object in presenting it had not been

simply the transaction of business in which Chinese and Foreigners might be con-

cerned; missions abroad and the question of diplomatic intercourse lay equally with-

in their prayer.

To the prevention of further misunderstanding upon the subject of intercourse

and correspondence, the present conditions of both having caused complaint in the

•capital and in the provinces, it is agreed that the Tsung-li Yamen shall address a

circular to the Legations, inviting Foreign Representatives to consider with them a

code of etiquette, to the end that foreign officials in China, whether at the ports or

elsewhere, may be treated with the same regard as is shown them when serving

abroad in other countries and as would be shown to Chinese agents so serving abroad.

The fact that China is about to establish Missions and Consulates abroad renders

an understanding on these points essential.

2. —The British Treaty of 1858, Article XV1., lays down that “

who may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects shall be arrested and

punished by Chinese authorities according to the l&ws of China.

.“British subjects who may commit any crime in China shall be tried and

punished by the Consul, or any other public functionary authorised thereto, accord-

ing to the laws of Great Britain.

“Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.”

The words “functionary authorised thereto” are translated in the Chinese text

“British Government.”

In order to the fulfilment of its Treaty obligation, the British Government has

established a Supreme Court at Shanghai with a special code of rules, which it is

now about to revise. The Chinese Government has established at Shanghai a Mixed

Court; but the officer presiding over it, either from lack of power or dread of un-

popularity, constantly fails to enforce his judgments.

It is now understood that the Tsung-li Yamen will write a circular to the Lega-

tion, inviting Foreign Representatives at once to consider with the Tsung-li Yamen

the measures needed for the more effective administration of justice at the ports

open to trade.

3- Itof isa British

property agreed subject,

that, whenever

whether ain crime is committed

the interior or at theaffecting

open ports,thetheperson or

British

Minister shall be free to send officers to the spot to be present at the investigation.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876 15

To the prevention of misunderstanding on this point, Sir Thomas Wade will

write a Note to the above effect, to which the Tsung-li Tamen will reply, affirming

that this is the course of proceeding to be adhered to for the time to come.

It is further understood that so long as the laws of the two countries differ from

each other, there can be but one principle to guide judicial proceedings in mixed cases

in China, namely, that the case is tried by the official of the defendant’s nationality;

the official of the plaintiff’s nationality merely attending to watch the proceedings in

the interest of j ustice. If the officer so attending be dissatisfied with the proceedings,

it will be in his power to protest against them in detail. The law administered will

be the law of the nationality of the officer trying the case. This is the meaning of

the words hui t'ung. indicating combined action in judicial proceedings, in Article

XVI. of the Treaty of Tientsin; and this is the course to be respectively followed by

the officers of either nationality.

Section III.—Trade.

1.—With reference to the area within which, according to the Treaties in force,

lelein ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, Sir Thomas Wade

agrees to move his Government to allow the ground rented by foreigners (the so-called

Concessions) at the different ports, to be regarded as the area of exemption from

lekin; and the Government of China will thereupon allow Ich’ang, in the province

of Hu-pi; Wu-hu, in An-hui; Wen-chow, in Che-kiang ; and Pei-hai (Pak-hoi),

in Kwang-tung to be added to the number of ports open to trade and to become

Consular stations. The British Government will, further, be free to send officers to

reside at Chung-k’ing to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuen -

British merchants will not be allowed to reside at Chung-k’ing, or to open establish-y

ments or warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port. When,

steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be

taken into consideration.

It is further proposed as a measure of compromise that at certain points on the

shore of the Great Biver, namely, Tat’ung and Ngan-Ching in the province of An-

hui; Ho-Kou, in Kiang-si; Wu-sueh, Lu-chi kou, and Sha-shih in Hu-Kwang,

these being all places of trade in the interior, at which, as they are not open ports,

foreign merchants are not legally authorised to land or ship goods, steamers shall be

allowed to touch for the purpose of landing or shipping passengers or goods; but in

all instances by means of native boats only, and subject to the regulations in force

affecting native trade.

Produce accompanied by a half-duty certificate may be shipped at such points

by the steamers, but may not be landed by them for sale. And at all such points,

except in the case of imports accompanied by a transit duty certificate or exports

similarly certificated, which will be severally passed free of lekin on exhibition of such

certificates, lekin will be duly collected on all goods whatever by the native authorities.

Foreign merchants will not be authorised to reside or open houses of business or

warehouses at the places enumerated as ports of call.

2. —At all ports open to trade, whether by earlier or later agreem

settlement area has been previously defined, it will be the duty of the British Consul,

acting in concert with his colleagues, the Consuls of other Powers, to come to an

understanding with the local authorities regarding the definition of the foreign

settlement area.

3. —On Opium, Sir Thomas Wade will move his Governmen

arrangement different from that affecting other imports. British merchants, when

opium is brought into port, will be obliged to have it taken cognisance of by the

Customs, and deposited in bond, either in a warehouse or a receiving hulk, until such

time as there is a sale for it. The importer will then pay the tariff duty upon it,

and the purchasers the lekin, in order to the prevention of evasion of the Treaty. The

amount of lekin to be collected will be decided by the different Provincial Govern-

ments according to the circumstances of each.

16 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

4. —The Chinese Government agree that Transit Duty Ce

framed under one rule at all ports, no difference being made in the conditions set forth

therein; and that, so far as imports are concerned, the nationality of the person

possessing and carrying these is immaterial. Native produce carried from an inland

centre to a port of shipment, if bond fide intended for shipment to a foreign port,

may be, by treaty, certified by the British subject interested, and exempted by

payment of the half duty from all charges demanded upon it en route. If produce be

not the property of a British subject, or is being carried to a port not for exportation,

it is not entitled to the exemption that would be secured it by the exhibition of a

transit duty certificate. The British Minister is prepared to agree with the Tsung-li

Yamen upon rules that will secure the Chinese Government against abuse of the

privilege as affecting produce.

The words nei-ti (inland) in the clause of Article VII. of the Buies appended to

the Tariff, regarding carriage of imports inland, and of native produce purchased

inland, apply as much to places on the sea coasts and river shores as to places in the

interior not open to foreign trade; the Chinese Government having the right to make

arrangements for the prevention of abuses thereat.

5. —Article XLV. of the Treaty of 1858 prescribed no limit to

which a drawback may be claimed upon duty-paid imports. The British Minister

agrees to a term of three years, after expiry of which no drawback shall be claimed.

6. —Toe foregoing stipulation, that certain ports are to be opened to foreign trade,

and that landing and shipping of goods at six places on the Great Biver is to be

sanctioned, shall be given effect to within six months after receipt of the Imperial

Decree approving the memorial of the Grand Secretary Li. The date for giving effect

to the stipulations affecting exemption of imports from lelcin taxation within the for-

eign settlements and the collection of lelcin upon opium by the Customs Inspectorate

at the same time as the Tariff Duty upon it, will be fixed as soon as the British Gov-

ernment has arrived at an understanding on the subject with other foreign Governments.

7. —The Governor of Hongkong having long complained of t

the Canton Customs Bevenue Cruisers with the junk trade of that Colony, the Chinese

Government agrees to the appointment of a Commission, to consist of a British Consul,

an officer of the Hongkong Government, and a Chinese official of equal rank, in order

do the establishment of some system that shall enable the Chinese Government to

protect its revenue without prejudice to the interests of the Colony.

Separate Article

Her Majesty’s Government haying it in contemplation to send a Mission of

Exploration next year by way of Peking through Kan-su and Koko-Nor, or by way of

Ssu-chuen, to Thibet, and thence to India, the Tsung-li Yamen, having due regard

to the circumstances, will, when the time arrives, issue the necessary passports, and

will address letters to the high provincial authorities and to the Besident in Thibet.

If the Mission should not be sent by these routes, but should be proceeding across

the Indian frontier to Thibet, the Tsung-li Yamen, on receipt of a communication to

the above eftect from the British Minister, will write to the Chinese Besident in

Thibet, and the Besident, with due regard to the circumstances, will send officers to

teke due care of the Mission; and passports for the Mission will be issued by the

Tsung-li Yamen, that its passage be not obstructed.

Done at Chefoo, in the province of Shan-tung, this thirteenth day of September,

in tue year of Our Lird One Thousand Eight Hundred and Seventy-six.

[l.s.J Thomas Francis Wade.

£l.s.] Li Htjng-chang.

THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876 17

Additional Articles to the Agreement between Great Britain and China

Signed at Chejoo on the \%th September, 1876

Signed at London, 18th July, 1885

The Governments of Great Britain and of China, considering that the arrange-

ments proposed in Clauses 1 and 2 of Section III. of the Agreement between Great

■Britain and China, signed at Chefoo on the 13th September, 1876 (hereinafter

'referred to as the “ Chefoo Agreement ”), in relation to the area within which lakin

ought not to be collected on foreign goods at the open ports, and to the definition of

'the Foreign Settlement area, require further consideration; also that the terms of

Clause 3 of the same section are not sufficiently explicit to serve as an efficient regula-

tion for the traffic in opium, and recognizing the desirability of placing restrictions

on the consumption of opium, have agreed to the present Additional Article.

1. —As regards the arrangements above referred to and proposed

and 2 of Section III. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that they shall lie reserved

-for further consideration between the two Governments.

2. —In lieu of the arrangement respecting opium proposed in Clau

II. of the Chefoo Agreement, it is agreed that foreign opium, when imported into

-China, shall be taken cognizance of by the Imperial Maritime Customs, and shall be

deposited in bond, either in warehouses or receiving-hulks which have been approved

of by the Customs, and that it shall not be removed thence until there shall have

been paid to the Customs the Tariff duty of 30 taels per chest of 100 catties, and also

a sum not exceeding 80 taels per like chest as lelcin.

3. —It is agreed that the aforesaid import and lehin duties having

owner shall be allowed to have the opium repacked in bond under the supervision of

the Customs, and put into packages of such assorted sizes as he may select from such

sizes as shall have been agreed upon by the Customs authorities and British Consul

at the port of entry.

The Customs shall then, if required, issue gratuitously to the owner a transit cer-

tificate for each such package, or one for any number of packages, at option of the owner.

Such certificates shall free the opium to which it applies from the imposition of

any further tax or duty whilst in transport in the interior, provided that the package

has not been opened, and that the Customs seals, marks, and numbers on the packages

liave not been effaced or tampered with.

Such certificate shall have validity only in the hands of Chinese subjects, and

shall not entitle foreigners to convey or accompany any opium in which they may

be interested into the interior.

4. —It is agreed that the Regulations under which the said certif

issued shall be the same for all the ports, and that the form shall be as follows:—

“ Opium Transit Certificate.

“ This is to certify that Tariff and lelcin duties at the rate of taels per chest

of 100 catties have been paid on the opium marked and numbered as under; and

that, in conformity with the Additional Article signed at London the 18th July, 1885,

and appended to the Agreement between Great Britain and China signed at Chefoo

the 13th September, 1876, and approved by the Imperial Decree printed on the back

thereof, the production of this certificate will exempt the opium to which it refers,

wherever it may be found, from the imposition of any further tax or duty whatever,

provided that the packages are unbroken, and the Customs seals, marks, and numbers

have not been effaced or tampered with.

“ Mark, No,

X -— 00 package#

“ Port of entry,

“ Date “ Signature of Commissioner of Customs.”

5. —The Chinese Government undertakes that when the package

opened at the place of consumption, the opium shall not be subjected to any tax or

18 THE CHEFOO CONVENTION, 1876

contriDution, direct or indirect, other than or in excess of such tax or contribution

as is or may hereafter be levied on native opium.

In the event of such tax or contribution being calculated ad valorem, the same-

rate, value for value, shall be assessed on foreign and native opium, and in ascertaining

for this purpose tbe value of foreign opium the amount paid on it for lekin at the-

port of entry shall be deducted from its market value.

6. —It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall be cons

part of the Ohefoo Agreement, and that it shall have the same force and validity as-

if it were therein inserted word for word. It shall come into operation six monthsr

after its signature, provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they

have not,.then on the date at which such exchange takes place.

7. —The arrangement respecting opium contained in the present A

shall remain binding for four years, after the expiration of which period either

Government may at any time give twelve months’ notice of its desire to determine it,

and, such notice being given, it shall terminate accordingly. It is, however, agreed

that the Government of Great Britain shall have the right to terminate the same at

any time should the transit certificate be found not to confer on the opium complete-

exemption from all taxation whatsoever whilst being carried from the port of entry"

to the place of consumption in the interior. In the event of the termination of the-

present Additional Article the arrangement with regard to opium now in force and.

the regulations attached to the Treaty of Tientsin shall revive.

8. —The High Contracting Parties may, by common consent, ad

tions of the provisions of the present Additional Article which experience may show

to be desirable.

9-—It is understood that the Commission provided for in Clause 7 of Section III.

ofintotheChina

Chefoo

fromAgreement

Hongkongtoshall inquire into the asquestion

be appointed soon asofpossible.

prevention of smuggling

10.—The Chefoo Agreement, together with, and as modified by, the present

Additional Article, shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at London

as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the Undersigned, duly authorized thereto by their respective

Governments, have signed the present Additional Article, and have affixed thereto

their seals.

Done at London, in quadruplicate (two in English and two in Chinese), this-

18th day of July, 1885, being the seventh day of the sixth moon, in the eleventh year

of the reign of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] Salisbury.

[l.s.] - Tseng.

The Marquis Tseng to the Marquis of Salisbury.

j0r< 11 r Chinese Legation, London, \Sth Jidy, 1885.

state-MV thatI thel—I eplyGovernment

Imperial to your Lordship’s notefollowing

accept the of this date, I have

as the the honour

expression to •

of the

understanding

and China in regard whichtohasthebeen come to Article

Additional betweento the

the Governments of Great

Chefoo Agreement Britainto

relative

opium, whichs has been signed this day:—

once !■to withdraw

Tt i understood

from thisthatnewit shall be competent

arrangement, and toforrevert

Her toMajesty’s Government

the system of taxationat

for opium at present in operation in China, in case the Chinese Government shall fail to

bring the other Treaty Powers to conform to the provisions of the said Additional Article.

. , ^ isArticle,

Additional furthertheunderstood that, in the

Chefoo Agreement, withevent of the termination

the exception of Clause 3ofofthe said.

Section

lii., and with the modification stipulated in Clause 1 of the said Additional Article, ,

nevertheless, remain in force.

THE OPIUM CONVENTION

Memorandum of the basis of Agreement arrived at after discussion between Mr.

..'James Russell, Puisne Judge of Hongkong; Sir Robert Hart, k.c.m.g., luspector-

■General of Customs, and Shao Taotai, Joint Commissioners for China; and Mr.

Byron Brenan, Her Majesty’s Consul at Tientsin, in pursuance of Article 7, Secton

III. of the Agreement between Great Britain and China, signed at Chefoo on the lath

September, 1876, and of Section 9 of the Additional Article to the said Agreement,

signed at London on the 18th July, 1885.

Mr. Russell undertakes that the Government of Hongkong shall submit to the

Legislative Council an Ordinance * for the regulation of the trade of the Colony in

Raw Opium subject to conditions hereinafter set forth and providing:—

a. —For the prohibition to the import and export of Opium in quantities less than 1 ches

b. —For rendering illegal the possession of Raw Opium, its custody or control in qu

tities less than one chest, except by the Opium Farmer.

c. —That all Opium arriving in the Colony be reported to the Harbour Master, and t

no Opium shall be transhipped, landed, stored or movedfrom one store to another, or re-

exported without a permit from the Harbour Master, and notice to the Opium Farmer.

d. —For the keeping by Importers, Exporters, and Godown Owners, in such form

the Governor may require, books showing the movements of Opium.

e. —For taking stock of quantities in the stores, and search for deficiencies by

Opium Farmer, and for furnishing to the Harbour Master returns of stocks.

/i—For amendment of Harbour Regulations, as to the night clearances of junks.

The conditions on which it is agreed to submit the Ordinance are —

a.—That China arranges with Macao for the adoption of equivalent measures.

. b.—That the Hongkong Government shall be entitled to repeal the Ordinance if it

be found to be injurious to the Revenue or to the legitimate trade of the Colony.

.c.—That an Ofiice under the Foreign Inspectorate shall be established on Chinese

Territory at a convenient spot on the Kowloon side for sale of Chinese Opium Duty

Certificates, which shall be freely sold to all comers, and for such quantities of

Opium as they may require.

d.—That Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of not more than Tls.

110 per picul, shall be free from all further imposts of every sort, and have all the

benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article on behalf of Opium on which duty

has been paid at one of the ports of China, and that it may be made up in sealed

parcels at the option of the purchaser.

. —That junks trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong and their cargoes shall

not be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their

cargoes trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and that no dues whatsoever

shall be demanded from junks coming to Hongkong from ports in China, or pro-

ceeding from Hongkong to ports in China, over and above the dues paid or payable

at the ports of clearance or destination.

f. —That the Officer of the Foreign Inspectorate, who will be responsible fo

management of the Kowloon Office, shall investigate and settle any complaints

made by the junks trading with Hongkong against the Native Customs Revenue

Stations or Cruisers in the neighbourhood, and that the Governor of Hongkong, if

he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send a Hongkong Officer to be present at

and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not agree, a

reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for joint decision.

Sir Robert Hart undertakes, on behalf of himself and Shao Taotai (who was com-

ipelled by unavoidable circumstances to leave before the sittings of the Commission

were terminated), that the Chinese Government shall agree to the above conditions.

The undersigned are of opinion that if these arrangements are fully carried out,

;a fairly satisfactory solution of the questions connected with the so-called “Hong-

kong Blockade ” will have been arrived at.

Signed in triplicate at Hongkong, this 11th day of September, 1886.

•See Oi'iliuauce 22 of 1*87. tAmoditiciitioa allowing'\port in nn.lV.- .)u uititii -1 ban oueehe.-twas subseijnently agreed ta.

THE CHUNGKING AGREEMENT, 1890

ADDITIONAL ARTICLE TO THE AOREEMENT BETWEEN GREA1

BRITAIN AND CHINA OF SEPTEMBER 13th, 1876

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, \9>th Jantmry, 1891

The Governments of Great Britain and China, being desirous of settling in an

amicable spirit the divergence of opinion which has arisen with respect to the First

Clause of the Third Section of the Agreement concluded at Chefoo in 1876, which

stipulates that “ The British Government will be free to send officers to reside at

Chungking to watch the conditions of British trade in Szechuan, that British mer-

chants will not be allowed to reside at Chungking, or to open establishments or

warehouses there, so long as no steamers have access to the port, and that when

steamers have succeeded in ascending the river so far, further arrangements can be

taken into consideration,” have agreed upon the following Additional Articles

I. —Chungking shall forthwith be declared open to trade on the

any other Treaty port. British subjects shall be at liberty either to charter Chinese

vessels or to provide vessels of the Chinese type for the traffic between Ichang and

Chungking.

II. —Merchandise conveyed between Ichang and Chungking b

of vessels shall be placed on the same footing as merchandise carried by steamers-

between Shanghai and Ichang, and shall be dealt with in accordance with Treaty

Tariff' Rules, and the Yangtsze Regulations.

III. —All regulations as to the papers and flags to be carr

above description, as to the repackage of goods for the voyage beyond Ichang and

as to the general procedure to be observed by those engaged in the traffic between

Ichang and Chungking with a view to insuring convenience and security, shall be

drawn up by the Superintendent of Customs at Ichang, the Taotai of the Ch’uan

Tung Circuit, who is now stationed at Chungking, and the Commissioners of Customs

in consultation with the British Consul, and shall be liable to any modifications that

may hereafter prove to be desirable and may be agreed upon by common consent.

IV. —Chartered junks shall pay port dues at Ichang and C

ance with the Yangtsze Regulations; vessels of Chinese type, if and when entitled,

to carry the British flag, shall pay tonnage dues in accordance with Treaty

Regulations. It is obligatory on both chartered junks and also vessels of Chinese

type, even when the latter may be entitled to carry the British flag, to

take out at the Maritime Custom-house special papers and a special flag

when intended to be employed by British subjects in the transport of goods

between Ichang and Chungking, and without such papers and flag no vessels

of either class shall be allowed the privileges and immunities granted under this

Additional Article. Provided with special papers and flag, vessels of both classes

shall be allowed to ply between the two ports, and they and their cargoes shall be

dealt with in accordance with Treaty Rules and the Yangtsze Regulations. All other

vessels shall be dealt with by the Native Customs. The special papers and flag

issued by the Maritime Customs must alone be used by the particular vessel for

which they were originally issued, and are not transferable from one vessel to

another. The use of the British flag by vessels the property of Chinese is strictly

prohibited. Infringement of these Regulations will, in the first instance, render

the offender liable to the penalties in force at the ports hitherto opened under Treaty,.

and should the offence be subsequently repeated, the vessel’s special papers and flag

will be withdrawn, and the vessel herself refused permission thenceforward to trade

between Ichang and Chungking.

V. —When once Chinese steamers carrying cargo run to C

steamers shall in like manner have access to the said port.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION", 1890 21

VI.—It is agreed that the present Additional Article shall he considered as-

forming part of the Chefoo Agreement, and as having the same force and validity as

if it were inserted therein word for word. It shall be ratified, and the ratifications

exchanged at Peking, and it shall come into operation six months after its signature,

provided the ratifications have then been exchanged, or if they have not, then on

the date at which such exchange takes place.

Done at Peking in triplicate (three in English and three in Chinese), this

thirty-first day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and

ninety, being the eleventh day of the Second Intercalary Moon of the sixteenth year

of Kuang Hsu.

[l.s.] John- Walsham [l.s.] Signature of Chinese

Plenipotentiary.

THE THIBET-SIKKIM CONVENTION, 1890

Ratified in London, V7th August, 1890

Art. I.—The boundary of Sikkim and Thibet shall be the crest of the mountain-

range separating the waters flowing into the Sikkim Teesta and its affluents from

the waters flowing into the Thibetan Machu and northwards into other rivers of

Thibet. The line commences at Mount Gipmochi on the Bhutan frontier, and follows

the above-mentioned water-parting to the point where it meets Nepaul territory.

Art. II.—It is admitted that the British Government, whose protectorate over

the Sikkim State is hereby recognised, has direct and exclusive control over the

internal administration and foreign relations of that State, and except through

and with the permission of the British Government neither the ruler of the State

nor any of its officers shall have official relations of any kind, formal or informal,

with any other country.

Art. III.—The Government of Great Britain and Ireland and the Government

•f China engage reciprocally to respect the boundary as defined in Article 1. and t®

prevent acts of aggression from their respective sides of the frontier.

Art. IV.—The question of providing increased facilities for trade across the

Sikkim-Thibet frontier will hereafter be discussed with a view to a mutually

satisfactory arrangement by the high contracting Powers.

Art. V.—The question of pasturage on the Sikkim side of the frontier is

reserved for further examination and future adjustment.

Art. VI.—The high contracting Powers reserve for discussion and ai'rangement

the method in which official communications between the British authorities in

India and the authorities in Thibet shall be conducted.

Art. VII.—Two Joint Commissioners shall within six months from the ratifica-

tion of this Convention be appointed, one by the British Government in India, the

•ther by the Chinese Resident in Thibet. The said Commissioners shall meet and

discuss the questions which by the last three preceding articles have been reserved.

Art. VIII.—The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications shall

he exchanged in London, as soon as possible after the date of the signature thereof.

THE BUBMAH CONVENTION

Signed at Peking, 4th February, 1897

In consideration of the Government of Great Britain consenting to waive its

objections to the alienation by China, by the Convention with France of June 20th.

1895, of territory forming a portion of Kiang Hung, in derogation of the provision

.22 THE BURMAH CONVENTION

of the Convention between Great Britain and China of March 1st, 1894, it has been

agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China that the following

additions and alterations shall be made in the last-named Convention, hereinafter

referred to as the Original Convention.

(Articles I. to XL refer to the Burmah Frontier and trade across it between Burma

and Yunnan.)

Art. XII. (Providing for the free navigation of the Irrawady by Chinese

vessels).— Add as follows:— The Chinese Government agree hereafter to

consider whether the conditions of trade justify the construction of railways in

Yunnan, and in the event of their construction, agrees to connect them with the

^Burmese lines.

Art. XIII.—Whereas by the Original Convention it was agreed that China

might appoint a Consul in Burmah to reside at Rangoon, and that Great Britain

might appoint a Consul to reside at Manwyne, and that the Consuls of the two

Governments should each within the territories of the other enjoy the same

privileges and immunities as the Consuls of the most favoured nation, and further

that in proportion as the commerce between Burmah and China increased, additional

•Consuls might be appointed by mutual consent to reside at such places in Burmah

and Yunnan as the requirements of trade might seem to demand.

It has now been agreed that the Government of Great Britain may station a

Consul at Momein or Shunning Fu as the Government of Great Britain may prefer,

instead of at Manwyne as stipulated in the Original Convention, and also to station

a Consul at Szumao.

British subjects and persons under British protection may establish themselves

and trade at these places under the same conditions as at the Treaty Ports in

China.

The Consuls appointed as above shall be on the same footing as regards

correspondence and intercourse with Chinese officials as the British Consuls at the

Treaty Ports.

Art. XIY. (Providing for issue of passports by the Consuls on each side of the

-frontier).—Instead of “ Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul at Manwyne” in the Original

Convention read “ Her Britannic Majesty’s Consul at Shunning ‘ or Momein,’ ”

in accordance with the change made in Article XIII.

Failing agreement as to the terms of revision the present arrangement shall

remain in force.

Special Article.

Whereas on the twentieth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and

•ninety-six, the Tsung-li Yamen addressed an official despatch to Her Majesty’s

Charge d’Affaires at Peking, informing him that on the thirtieth day of December,

•one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five, they had submitted a Memorial

respecting the opening of ports on the West River to foreign trade, and had received

an Imperial Decree in approval of which they officially communicated a copy.

It has now been agreed that the following places, namely, Wuchow Fu in

Kwangsi, and Samshui city and Bongkun Market in Kwangtung, shall be opened as

Treaty Ports and Consular Stations with freedom of navigation for steamers between

. latter

Samshui andtoWuchow

places and and

be selected Hongkong

notifiedand Canton byby atheroute

in advance from each

Maritime of these

Customs, and

that the following four places shall be established as ports of call for

passengers under the same regulations as the ports of call on the Yangtsze River,goods and

.namely, Kongmoon, Kamchuk, Shiuhing and Takhing.

It is agreed that the present Agreement, together with the Special Article, shall

come into force within four months of the date of signature, and that the ratifications

-thereof shall be exchanged at Peking as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned duly authorised thereto by their respective

•Governments have signed the present agreement.

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898 23

Done at Peking in triplicate (three copies in English and three in Chinese),

the fourth day of February in the Year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred

and ninety-seven.

(Sd.) Claude M. Macdojtald. (Seal)

(Hieroglyphic) Li Hung-chang (Seal)

KOWLOON EXTENSION AGREEMENT, 1898

Whereas it has for many years past been recognised that an extension of Hong-

kong territory is necessary for the proper defence and protection of the Colony,

It has now been agreed between the Governments of Great Britain and China'

that the limits of British territory shall be enlarged under lease to the extent

indicated generally on the annexed map.

The exact boundaries shall be hereafter fixed when proper surveys have been

made by officials appointed by the two Governments. The term of this lease shall

be ninety-nine years.

It is at the same time agreed that within the City of Kowloon the Chinese

officials now stationed there shall continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as

may be inconsistent with the military requirements for the defence of Hongkong.

Within the remainder of the newly-leased territory Great Britain shall have sole

jurisdiction. Chinese officials and people shall be allowed, as heretofore, to use the

road from Kowloon to Hsinan,

It is further agreed that the existing landing-place near Kowloon city shall be

reserved for the convenience of Chinese men-of-war, merchant and passengers vessels,

which may come and go and lie there at their pleasure; and for the convenience of

movements of the officials and people within the city.

When, hereafter, China constructs a railway to the boundary of the Kowloon

territory under British control, arrangements shall be discussed.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the

inhabitants of the district included within the extension, and that if land is required

for public offices, fortifications, or the like official purposes, it shall be bought at

a fair price.

If cases of extradition of criminals occur they shall be dealt with in accordance

with the existing treaties between Great Britain and China and the Hongkong

Begulations.

The area leased by Great Britain includes the waters of Mirs Bay and Deep

Bay, but it is agreed that Chinese vessels o£ war, whether neutral or otherwise,

shall retain the right to use those waters.

This Convention shall come into force on the first day of July, eighteen hundred

and ninety-eight, being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon ot the twenty-fourth year

of Kwang Hsu. It shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of the two countries, and the

ratifications shall be exchanged in London as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective

Governments, have signed the present agreement. ,

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and in Chinese) the

ninth day of June, in the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, being

the twenty-first day of the fourth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kwang Hsii.

Claude M. Macdonald.

Li Hung-chang, 7 Members of

Hsu Ting K'uei, ) Tsung-li Yamen.

THE WEIHAIWEI CONVENTION, 1898

Ratifications exchanged in London, 5th October, 1898

In order to provide Great Britain with a suitable naval harbour in North China,

and for the belter protection of British commerce in the neighbouring seas, the

Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China agrees to lease to the Government

.of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland, Weihaiwei, in the province

of Shantung, and the adjacent waters for so long a period as Port Arthur shall

remain in the occupation of Russia.

The territory leased shall comprise the island of Liukung and all other islands

in the Bay of Weihaiwei, and a belt of land ten English miles wide along the entire

-coast line of the Bay of Weihaiwei. Within the above-mentioned territory leased

Great Biitain shall have sole jurisdiction.

Great Britain shall have, in addition, the right to erect fortifications, station

troops, or take any other measures necessary for defensive purposes, at any points on

or near the coast of the region east of the meridian 121 degrees 40 min. E. of Green-

wich, and to acquire on equitable compensation within that territory such sites as

may be necessary fur water supply, communications, and hospitals. Within that

zone Chinese administration will not be interfered with, but no troops other than

'Chinese or British shall be allowed therein.

It is also agreed that within the walled city of Weihaiwei Chinese officials shall

continue to exercise jurisdiction, except so far as may be inconsistent with naval

.and military requirements for the defence of the territory leased.

It is further agreed that Chinese vessels of war, whether neutral or otherwise,

shall retain the right to use the waters herein leased to Great Britain.

It is further understood that there will be no expropriation or expulsion of the

inhabitants of the territory herein specified, and that if land is required for forti-

fications, public offices, or any official or public purpose, it shall be bought at a fair

price.

This Convention shall come into force on signature. It shall be ratified by the

Sovereigns of the two countries, and the ratifications shall be exchanged in London

.as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorised thereto by their respective

Governments, have signed the present agreement.

Claude M. Macdonald.

Prince Chino, Senior Member of the Tsung-li Yamen.

Lia5 Shou Heng, President of Board of Punishments.

Hone at Peking in quadruplicate (four copies in English and four in Chinese)

the first day of July, iai the year of Our Lord eighteen hundred and ninety-eight,

■being the thirteenth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-fourth year of Kuang Hsu.

SUPPLEMENTARY COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Signed at Shanghai, 5th Septembek, 1902

Ratifications exchanged at Peking, 28th July, 1903.

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain’and Ireland and of

the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Em-

peror of China, having resolved to enter into negotiations with a view to carrying out -

the provisions contained in Article XI. of the Final Protocol signed at Peking on the

7th of September, 1901, under which the Chinese Government agreed to negotiate the

amendments deemed useful by the Foreign Governments to the Treaties of Commerce

and Navigation and other subjects concerning commercial relations with the object of

facilitating them, have for that purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to

say:—

His M i jesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland, His Majesty’s Special Com-

missioner, Sir J,imes Lyle Mackay, Knight Commander of the Most Eminent Order of

tdie Indian Empire, a member of the Council of the Secretary of State for India, etc.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Imperial Commissioners Lii Hai-huan,

President of the Board of Public Works, etc., and Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian

of the Heir Apparent, Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, etc.

Who having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and

found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the

following Articles:—

Art. I.—Delay having occurred in the past in the issue of Drawback Certificates

•wing to the fact that those documents have to be dealt with by the Superintendent

of Customs at a distance from the Customs Office, it is now agreed that Drawback

Certificates shall hereafter in all cases be issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs

within three weeks of the presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the

applicant to receive such Drawback Certificates.

These Certificates shall be valid tender to the Customs Authorities in payment

of any duty upon goods imported or exported (transit dues excepted), or shall, in the

case of Drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported abroad within three years from the

date of importation, be payable in cash without deduction by the Customs Bank at

the place where the import duty was paid.

But if, in connection with any application for a Drawback Certificate, the

Customs Authorities discover an attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant shall

be liable to a fine not exceeding five times the amount of the duty whereof he

attempted to defraud the Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods.

Art. II. —China agrees to take the necessary steps to provide for a uniform

national coinage which shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other

obligations throughout the Empire by British as well as Chinese subjects.

Art. Ifl.—China agrees that the duties and lekin combined levied on goods carried

by junks from Hongkong to the Treaty Ports in the Canton Province and vice versa

shall together not be less than the duties charged by the Imperial Maritime Customs

on similar goods carried by steamer.

Art. IV.—Whereas questions have arisen in the past concerning the right of

Chinese subjects to invest money in non-Chinese enterprises and companies, and

whereas it is a matter of common knowledge that large sums of Chinese capital are

so invested, China hereby agrees to recognise the legality of all such investments past,

present and future.

;2G THE BRI FISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

It being, moreover, of the utmost importance that all shareholders in a Joint Stock

Company should stand on a footing of perfect equality as far as mutual obligations

are concerned, China further agrees that Chinese subjects who have or may become

shareholders in any British Joint Stock Company shall be held to have accepted, by

the very act of becoming shareholders, the Charter of Incorporation or Memorandum

and Articles of Association of such Company and regulations framed thereunder as

interpreted by British Courts, and that Chinese Courts shall enforce compliance there-

with by such Chinese shareholders, if a suit to that effect be entered, provided always

that their liability shall not be other or greater than that of British shareholders in

the same Company.

Similarly the British Government agree that British subjects investing in

Chinese Companies shall be under the same obligations as the Chinese shareholders

in such companies.

The foregoing shall not apply to cases which have already been before the Courts

and been dismissed.

Art. Y.—The Chinese Government undertake to remove within the next two

years the artificial obstructions to navigation in the Canton .River. The Chinese

Government also agree to improve the accommodation for shipping in the harbour of

Canton and to take the necessary steps to maintain that improvement, such work to

be carried out by the Imperial Maritime Customs and the cost thereof to be defrayed

by a tax on goods landed and shipped by British and Chinese alike according to a

ncale to be arranged between the merchants and the Customs Authorities.

The Chinese Government are aware of the desirability of improving the naviga-

bility by steamer of the waterway between Ichang and Chungking, but are also fully

aware that such improvement might involve heavy expense and would affect the

interests of the population of the provinces of Szechuen, Hunan, and Hupeh. It is,

•therefore, mutually agreed that until improvements can be carried out steamship

owners shall be allowed, subject to approval by the Imperial Maritime Customs, to

.erect, at their own expense, appliances for hauling through the rapids. Such

appliances shall be at the disposal of all vessels, both steamers and junks, subject to

regulations to be drawn up by the Imperial Maritime Customs. These appliances

shall not obstruct the waterway or interfere with the free passage of junks. Signal

stations and channel marks where and when necessary shall be erected by the

Imperial Maritime Customs. Should any practical scheme be presented for improv-

ing the waterway and assisting navigation without injury to the local population or

cost to the Chinese Government, it shall be considered by the latter in a friendly

spirit, t-

. rV at the openChinese

facilities ports forGovernment

bonding andagree

for torepacking

make arrangements

merchandisetoingivebond,

increased

and,

on official representation being made by the British Authorities, to grant the privi-

leges of a bonded warehouse to any warehouse which, to the satisfaction of the

Customs Authorities, affords the necessary security to the revenue.

Such warehouses will be subject to regulations, including a scale of fees according

to commodities, distance from Custom-house and hours of working, to be drawn up

by the Customs Authorities who will meet the convenience of merchants so far as is

compatible with the protection of the revenue.

Art. VII.—Inasmuch as the British Government affords protection to Chinese

trade marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by British

subjects, the Chinese Government undertake to afford protection to British trade

marks against infringement, imitation, or colourable imitation by Chinese subjects.

The Chinese Government further undertake that the Superintendents of Northern,

and of Southern trade shall establish offices within their respective jurisdictions under

control of the Imperial Maritime Customs where foreign trade marks may be

registered on payment of a reasonable fee.

Art. VIII.—Preamble. The Chinese Government, recognising that the system

Oi levying lekin and other dues on goods at the place of production, in transit, and at

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 2T

destination, impedes the free circulation of commodities and injures the interests of

trade, hereby undertake to discard completely those means of raising revenue with

the limitation mentioned in Section 8.

The British Government, in return, consent to allow a surtax, in excess of the1

Tariff rates for the time being in force, to he imposed on foreign goods imported by

British subjects, and a surtax in addition to the export duty on Chinese produce

destined for export abroad or coastwise.

It is clearly understood that after lehin barriers and other stations for taxing

goods in transit have been removed, no attempt shall be made to revive them in any

form or under any pretext whatsoever; that in no case shall the surtax on foreign

imports exceed the equivalent of one and a half times the import duty leviable in

terms of the Final Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the 7th day of Sep-

tember, 1901; that payment of the import duty and surtax shall secure for foreign

imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or non-Chinese subjects, in original packages

or otherwise, complete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay ; that

the total amount of taxation leviable on native produce for export abroad shall, under

no circumstances, exceed 7| per cent, ad valorem.

Keeping these fundamental principles steadily in view, the high contracting

parties have agreed upon the following methods of procedure:—

Section 1.—The Chinese Government undertake that all barriers of whatsoever

kind, collecting lehin or such like dues or duties, shall be permanently abolished on all

roads, railways, and waterways in the Eighteen Provinces of China and the Three

Eastern Provinces. This provision does not apply to the Native Custom-houses at

present in existence on the seaboard or waterways, at open ports, on land routes, and

on land frontiers of China.

Section 2.—The British Government agree that foreign goods on importation, in,

addition to the effective 5 per cent, import duty as provided for in the Protocol of 1901-

shall pay a special surtax equivalent to one and a half times the said duty to comr

pensate for the abolition of lekin, of transit dues in lieu of lehin, and of all otheA

taxation on foreign goods, and in consideration of the other reforms provided for in

this Article; but this provision shall not impair the right of China to tax salt, native

opium and native produce as provided for in Sections 8, 5, 6 and 8.

The same amount of surtax shall be levied on goods imported into the Eighteen

Provinces of China and the Three Eastern Provinces across the land frontiers as on

goods entering China by sea.

Section 3.—All Native Custom-houses now existing, whether at the Open Ports,

on the seaboard, on rivers, inland waterways, land routes or land frontiers, as

enumerated in the Hu Pu and Kung Pu Tse Li (Regulations of the Boards of Bevenue

and Works) and Ta Ch’ing Hui Tien (Dynastic Institutes), may remain; a list of the

same, with their location, shall be furnished to the British Government, for purposes

of record.

Wherever there are Imperial Maritime Custom-houses, or wherever such may

be hereafter placed, Native Custom-houses may be also established ; as well as at any

points either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

The location of Native Custom-houses in the Interior may be changed as the

circumstances of trade seem to require, but any change must be communicated to the

British Government, so that the list may be corrected; the originally stated number

of them shall not, however, be exceeded.

Goods carried by junks or sailing-vessels trading to or from open ports shall not

pay lower duties than the combined duties and surtax on similar cargo carried by

steamers.

Native produce, when transported from one place to another in the interior, shall,

on arrival at the first Native Custom-house, after leaving the place of production, pay

duty equivalent to the export surtax mentioned in Section 7.

When this duty has been paid, a certificate shall be given which shall describe the

nature of the goods, weight, number of packages, etc., amount of duty paid and

intended destination. This certificate, which shall be valid for a fixed period of not

28 THE iramSH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

less than one year from date of payment of duty, shall free the goods from all taxation,

examination, delay, or stoppage at any other Native Custom-houses passed e» route.

If the goods are taken to a place not in the foreign settlements or concessions of an

-open port, for local use, they become there liable to the Consumption Tax described

in Section 8.

If the goods are shipped from an open port, the certificate is to be accepted by

the Custom-house concerned, in lieu of the export surtax mentioned in Section 7.

Junks, boats, or carts shall not be subjected to any taxation beyond a small and

reasonable charge, paid periodically at a fixed annual rate. This does not exclude the

right to levy, as at present, tonnage (Chuan Chao) and port dues (Chuan Liao) on

junks.

Section 4.—Foreign opium duty and present leliin—which latter will now become

a surtax in lieu of lekin—shall remain as provided for by existing Treaties.

Section 5.—The British Government have no intention whatever of interfering

with China’s right to tax native opium, but it is essential to declare that, in bet

arrangements for levying such taxation, China will not subject other goods to taxation,

delay, or stoppage.

China is free to retain at important points on the borders of each province—either

on land or water—offices for collecting duty on native opium, where duties or contribu-

tions leviable shall be paid in one lump sum ; which payment shall cover taxation of all

kinds within that province. Each cake of opium will have a stamp affixed as evidence

of duty payment. Excise officers and police may be employed in connection with these

offices ; but no barriers or other obstructions are to be erected, and the excise officers

nr police of these offices shall not stop or molest any other kinds of goods, or collect

taxes thereon.

A list of these offices shall be drawn up and communicated to the British Govern-

ment for record.

Section 6.—Lekin on salt is hereby abolished and the amount of said lekin and of

other taxes and contributions shall be added to the salt duty, which shall be collected

nt place of production or at first station after entering the province where it is to be

consumed.

The Chinese Government shall be at liberty to establish salt reporting offices at

which boats conveying salt which is being moved under salt passes or certificates may

be required to stop for purposes of examination and to have their certificates vised,

but at such offices no lekin or transit taxation shall be levied and no barriers or

obstructions of any kind shall be erected.

Section 7.—The Chinese Government may re-cast the Export Tariff with specific

duties as far as practicable on a scale not exceeding five per cent, ad valorem; but

existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months’ notice has been

given.

In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent, they shall be

reduced to not more than that rate.

An additional special surtax of one half the export duty payable for the time

being, in lieu of internal taxation and lekin, may be levied at time of export on goods

exported either to foreign countries or coastwise.

In the case of silk, whether hand or filature reeled, the total export duty shall not

exceed a specific rate equivalent to not more than five per cent, ad valorem. Half of

this specific duty may be levied at the first Native Custom-house in the interior which

the silk may pass and in such case a certificate shall be given as provided for in Section

3, and will be accepted by the Custom-house concerned at place of export in lieu of

half the export duty. Cocoons passing Native Custom-houses shall be liable to no

taxation whatever. Silk not exported but consumed in China is liable to -the Con-

-sumption Tax mentioned in Section 8.

Section 8.—The abolition of the lekin system in China and the abandonment of all

other kinds of internal taxation on foreign imports and on exports will diminish the

•revenue

exports ismaterially.

intended to The surtax onin foreign

compensate imports

a measure and loss

for this exports and on but

of revenue, coastwise

there

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 29

remains the loss of lekin revenue on internal trade to be met, and it is therefore agreed

that the Chinese Government are at liberty to impose a Consumption Tax on articles

of Chinese origin not intended for export.

This tax shall be levied only at places of consumption and not on goods while in

transit, and the Chinese Government solemnly undertake that the arrangements which

they may make for its collection shall in no way interfere with foreign goods or with

native goods for export. The fact of goods being of foreign origin shall of itself free

them from all taxation, delay, or stoppage, after having passed the Custom-house.

Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the

•Custom-house, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each package,

on payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in the

interior.

Native goods brought by junks to open ports, if intended for local consumption—

irrespective of the nationality of the owner of the goods—shall be reported at the

NativeCustom-h >use only, where the consumption tax may be levied.

China is at liberty to fix the amount of this (consumption) tax, which may vary

according to the nature of the merchandise concerned, that is to say, according as the

.articles are necessaries of life or luxuries; but it shall be levied at a uniform rate on

■goods of the same description, no matter whether carried by junk, sailing-vessel, or

■steamer. As mentioned in Section 3, the Consumption Tax is not to be levied within

foreign settlements or concessions.

Section 9.—An excise equivalent to double the import duty as laid down in the

Protocol of 1901 is to be charged on all machine-made yarn and cloth manufactured in

(China, whether by foreigners at the open ports or by Chineise anywhere in China.

A rebate of the import duty and two-thirJs of the import surtax is to be given

on raw cotton imported from foreign countries, and of all duties, including Consump-

tion Tax, paid on Chinese raw cotton used in mills in China.

Chinese machine-made yarn or cloth having paid excise is to be free of Export

Duty, Export Surtax, Coast Trade Duty, and Consumption Tax. This Excise is to be

collected through the Iir.periid Maritime Customs.

The same principle and procedure are to be applied to all other products of foreign

type turned out by machinery, whether by foreigners at the open ports or by

Chinese anywhere in China.

This stipulation is not to apply to the out-turn of the Hanyang and Ta Yeh Iron

Works in Hupeh and other similar existing Government Works at present exempt from

taxation; or to that of Arsenals, Government Dockyards, or establishments of that

nature for Government purposes which may hereafter be erected.

Section 10.—A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs Foreign

Staff shall be selected by each of the Governors-General and Governors, and appointed,

in consultation with the Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, to each pro-

vince for duty in connection with Native Customs affairs, Consumption Tax, Salt and

Native Opium Taxes. These officers shall exercise an efficient supervision of the work-

ing of these departments, and in the event of their reporting any case of abuse, illegal

exaction, obstruction to the movement of goods, or other cause of complaint, the

Governor-General or Governor concerned will take immediate steps to put an end to

•same.

Section 11.—Cases where illegal action as described in this Article is complained of

shall be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently

high rank, in conjunction with a British officer and an officer of the Imperial Maritime

Customs, each of sufficient standing; and in the event of its being found by a majority

of the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and loss has been

incurred, due compensation is to be at once paid from the Surtax funds, through the

Imperial Maritime Customs at the nearest open port. The High Provincial Officials

are to be held responsible that the officer guilty of the illegal action shall be severely

punished and removed from his post.

If the complaint turns out to be without foundation, complainant shall be held

responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

30 THE BEITISH COMMEKCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

His Britaiitiic Majesty’s Minister will have the right to demand Investigation

where from the evidence before him he is satisfied that illegal exactions or obstructions •

have occurred.

Section 12.—The Chinese Government agree to open to foreign trade, on the same •

footing as the places opened to foreign trade by the Treaties of Nanking and Tientsin,

the following places, namely:—

Changsha in Hunan;

Wanhsien in Szechuen;

Nganking in Anhui ^

Waichow (Hui-chow) in Kwangtung; and

Kongmoon (Chiang-men) in Kwangtung.

Foreigners residing in these open ports are to observe the Municipal and Police

Regulations on the same footing as Chinese residents, and they are not to be entitled'

to establish Municipalities and Police of their own within the limits of these Treaty

Ports except with the consent of the Chinese authorities.

If this Article does not come into operation the right to demand under it the-

opening of these ports, with the exception of Kongmoon, which is provided for im

Article 10, shall lapse.

Section 13.—Subject to the provisions of Section 14, the arrangements provided)

for in this Article are to come into force on 1st January, 1904.

By that date all lekin barriers shall be removed and officials employed in the-

collection of taxes and dues prohibited by this Article shall be removed from their

posts.

Section 14.—The condition on which the Chinese Government enter into the

present engagement is that all Powers entitled to most favoured nation treatment in..

China enter into the same engagements as Great Britain with regard to the payment

of surtaxes and other obligations imposed by this Article on His Britannic MajestyV

Government and subjects.

The conditions on which His Britannic Majesty’s Government enter into the-

present engagement are: —

(1.) That all Powers who are now or who may hereafter become entitled to most

favoured nation treatment in China enter into the same engagements;

(2.) And that their assent is neither directly nor indirectly made dependent on the'

granting by China of any political concession, or of any exclusive commercial concession..

Section 15.—Should the Powers entitled to most favoured nation treatment by

China have failed to agree to enter into the engagements undertaken by Great Britain

under this Article by the 1st January, 1904, then the provisions of the Article shall

only come into force when all the Powers have signified their acceptance of these

engagements.

Section 16.—When the abolition of leTcin and other forms of internal taxation on.

goods as provided for in this Article has been decided upon and sanctioned, an Imperial

Edict shall be published in due form on yellow paper and circulated, setting forth the-

abolition of all lekin taxation, lekin barriers and all descriptions of internal taxation on.

goods, except as provided for in this Article.

The Edict shall state that the Provincial High Officials are responsible that any

official disregarding the letter or spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and

removed from his post.

Art. IX.—The Chinese Government, recognising that it is advantageous for the-

country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract Foreign as

well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprises, agree within one year from the

signing of this Treaty to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing Mining

Regulations. China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go into the whole-

question of Mining Rules and, selecting from the rules of Great Britain, India, and

other countries, regulations which seem applicable to the condition of China, she will

re-cast her present Mining Rules in such a way as while promoting the interests o

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 31

Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of China, shall offer

aio impediment to the attraction of foreign capital, or place foreign capitalists at a

greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted foreign regulations.

Any mining concession granted after the publication of these new Eules shall be

subject to their provisions.

Art. X.—Whereas in the year 1898 the Inland Waters of China were opened to all

such steam vessels, native or foreign, as might be especially registered for that trade

.at the Treaty Ports, and whereas the Eegulations dated 28th July, 1898, andSupple-

anentary Eules dated September, 1898, have been found in some respects inconvenient

in working, it is now mutually agreed to amend them and to annex such new Eules

-to this Treaty. These Eules shall remain in force until altered by mutual consent.

It is further agreed that Kongmoon shall be opened as a Treaty Port, and that, in

addition to the places named in the special Article of the Burmah Convention of 4th

February, 1897, British steamers shall be allowed to land or ship cargo and passengers,

under the same regulations as apply to the “ Ports of Call ” on the Yangtze Eiver, at

the following “ Ports of Call”: PakTau Hau (Pai-t‘u k‘ou),Lo Ting Hau (Lo-ting k'ou),

and Do Sing (Tou-ch‘eng); and to land or discharge passengers at the following ten

passenger landing stages on the West Eiver:—Yung Ki (Jung-chi), Mah Xing (Ma-

ning), Kau Kong (Chiu-chiang), Kulow (Ku-lao), Wing On (Yung-an), How Lik

(Houli), Luk Pu (Lu-pu), Yuet Sing (Yiieh-ch‘eng), Luk To (Lu-tu) and Fung Chuen

.(Feng-ch‘uan).

Art. XI.—His Britannic Majesty’s Government agree to the prohibition of the

general importation of morphia into China, on condition, however, that die Chinese

Government will allow of its importation, on payment of the Tariff import duty and

under special permit, by duly qualified British medical practitioners and for the

use of hospitals, or by British chemists and druggists who shall only be permitted

to sell it in small quantities and on receipt of a requisiiion signed by a duly qualified

foreign medical practitioner.

The special permits above referred to will be granted to an intending importer

•on his signing a bond before a British Consul guaranteeing the fulfilment of these

conditions. Should an importer be found guilty before a British Consul of a breach

•of his bond, he will not be entitled to take out another permit. Any British subject

importing morphia without a permit shall be liable to have such morphia con-

fiscated.

This Article will come into operation on. all other Treaty Powers agreeing to its

cpnditions, but any morphia actually shipped before that date will not be affected by

this prohibition.

The Chinese Government on their side undertake to adopt measures at once to

prevent the manufacture of morphia in China.

Art. XII.—China having expressed a strong desire to reform her judicial system

and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Great Britain agrees to

give every assistance to such reform, and she will also be prepared to relinquish her

extra-territorial rights when she is satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the

arrangement for their administration and other considerations warrant her in so

doing.

Art. XIII.—The missionary question in China being, in the opinion of the

Chinese Government, one requiring careful consideration, so that, if possible, troubles

rsuch as have occurred in the past may be averted in the future, Great Britain agrees

to join in a Commission to investigate this question, and, if possible, to devise means

for securing permanent peace between converts and non-converts, should such a

Commission be formed by China and the Treaty Powers interested.

Art. XIY.—Whereas under Eu!e Y. appended to the Treaty of Tientsin of 1858.

British merchants are permitted to export rice and all other grain from one port of

China to another under the same conditions in respect of security as copper “cash,”

it is now agreed that in cases of expected scarcity or famine from whatsoever cause in

any district, the Chinese Government shall, on giving twenty-one days’ notice, be at

liberty to prohibit the shipment of rice and other grain from such district.

32 THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

Should any vessel specially chartered to load rice or grain previously contracted;

for have arrived at her loading port prior to or on the day when a notice of prohibition

to export comes into force, she shall be allowed an extra week in which to ship her

cargo.

If during the existence of this prohibition, any shipment of rice or grain is allowed

by the authorities, the prohibition shall, ipso facto, be considered cancelled and shall

not be re-imposed until six weeks’ notice has been given.

When a prohibition is notified, it will be stated whether the Government have any

Tribute or Army Eice which they intend to ship during the time of prohibition, and,

if so, the quantity shall be named.

Such rice shall not be included in the prohibition, and the Customs shall keep a

record of any Tribute or Army Rice so shipped or landed.

The Chinese Government undertake that no rice, other than Tribute or Army

Eice belonging to the Government, shall be shipped during the period of prohibition.

Notifications of prohibitions, and of the quantities of Army or Tribute Eice for

shipment shall be made by the Governors of the Province concerned.

Similarly, notifications of the removals of prohibitions shall be made by the same

authorities.

The export of rice and other grain to foreign countries remains prohibited.

Art. XY.—It is agreed that either of the High Contracting Parties to this Treaty

may demand a revision of the Tariff at the end of 10 years; but if no demand be made

on either side within 6 months after the end of the first 10 years, then the Tariff shall

remain in force for 10 years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding 10 years,

and so it shall be at the end of each successive 10 years.

Any Tariff concession which China may hereafter accord to articles of the produce

or manufacture of any other State shall immediately be extended to similar articles

of the produce or manufacture of His Britannic Majesty’s Dominions by whomsoever

imported.

Treaties already existing between the United Kingdom and China shall continue-

in force in so far as they are not abrogated or modified by stipulations of the present

Treaty.

Art. XYI.—-The English and Chinese Texts of the present Treaty have been care-

fully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between

them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense.

The ratifications of this Treaty, under the hand of His Majesty the King of

Great Britain and Ireland and of His Majesty the Emperor of China respectively shall

be exchanged at Peking within a year from this day of signature.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Treaty, two copies in English and two in Chinese.

Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September in the year of Our Lord, 1902,

corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the twenty-

eighth year of Kwang Hsu.

[L.S.] Jas. L. Mackat.

Annex A.—(1)

(Translation.)

Lu, President of the Board of Works ;

Sheng, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of

Works ;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to

Sir James Mackat, His Britannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner for the dis-

cussion of Treaty matters.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 33

Shanghai: K. H. XXVIII., 7th moon, 11th day

(Received August 15, 1902,)

We have the honour to inform you that we have received the following telegram

from His Excellency Liu, Governor General of the Liang Chiang, on the subject of

Clause II. mutually agreed upon by us:

“ As regards this clause, it is necessary to insert therein a clear stipulation, to the

“effect that, no matter what changes may take place in the future, all Customs’ duties

“ must continue to be calculated on the basis of the existing higher rate of the Haikwan

“ Tael over the Treasury Tael, and that ‘ the touch ’ and weight of the former must be

“ made good.”

As we have already arranged with you that a declaration of this kind should be

embodied in an Official Note, and form an annex to the present Treaty, for purposes of

record, we hereby do ourselves the honour to make this communication.

Annex A—(2)

Shanghai, August 18th, 1902.

Gentlemen,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 14th instant

forwarding copy of a telegram from His Excellency Liu, Governor-General of the

Liang Chiang, on the subject of Article II. of the new Treaty, and in reply I have the

honour to state that His Excellency’s understanding of the Article is perfectly correct.

I presume the Chinese Government will make arrangements for the coinage of a

national silver coin of such weight and touch as may be decided upon by them.

These coins will be made available to the public in return for a quantity of silver

bullion of equivalent weight and fineness plus the usual mintage charge.

The coins which will become the national coinage of China will be declared by

the Chinese Government to be legal tender in payment of Customs duty and in

discharge of obligations contracted in Haikwan taels, but only at their proportionate

value to the Haikwan tael, whatever that may be.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Your obedient Servant,

(Signed) Jas. L. Mackay.

Their Excellencies

Lu Hai-htjan and Sheng Hsuan-huai,

etc., etc., etc.

Annex B—(1)

(Teanslation)

Lit, President of the Board of Works ;

SfiENG, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of

Works ;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to

Sir James L. Mackay, His Britannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 2nd, 1902.

We havethe honour to inform you that on the 22nd of August, we, in conjunction

with the Governors-General of the Liang Chiang and the Hu-kuang Provinces, Their

Excellencies Liu and Chang, addressed the following telegraphic Memorial to the

Throne :—

“ Of the revenue of the different Provinces derived from lehin of all kinds, a

“ portion is appropriated for the service of the foreign loans, a portion for the Peking

“ Government, and the balance is reserved for the local expenditure of the Provinces

“ concerned.

2

34 THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

“ In the negotiations now being conducted with Great Britain for the amendment 1

“ of the Commercial Treaties, a mutual arrangement has been come to providing for j

“ the imposition of additional taxes, in compensation for the abolition of all kinds of

■“ lekin and other imposts on goods, prohibited by Article VIII. After payment of

u“ interest and sinking fund on the existing foreign loan, to the extent to which lekin

is thereto pledged, these additional taxes shall be allocated to the various Provinces

<<“ to make up deficiencies and replace revenue, in order that no hardships may be

proposal to increase the duties in compensation for the loss of revenue derived from i

“ lekin and other imposts bn goods, it is further stipulated that the surtaxes shall not (j

“ be appropriated for other purposes, shall not form part of the Imperial Maritime

“Customs revenue proper, and shall in no case be pledged as security for any new

“ foreign loan.

“ It is therefore necessary to memorialize for the issue of an Edict, giving effect

“ to the above stipulations and directing the Board of Revenue to find out what j

‘‘proportion of the provincial revenues derived from lekin of all kinds, now about i

“ to be abolished, each Province has hitherto had to remit, and what proportion it ■

“ has been entitled to retain, so that, when the Article comes into operation, due ■

“ apportionment may be made accordingly, thus providing the Provinces with funds I

“ available for local expenditure and displaying equitable and just treatment towards

“ all.”

On the 1st instant an Imperial Decree “ Let action, as requested, be taken,”

was issued, and we now do ourselves the honour reverently to transcribe the same

for your information.

Annex B—(2)

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902. |

Gentlemen,

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 2nd instant

forwarding the text of the Memorial and Decree dealing with the disposal of the1

surtaxes.

I understand that the surtaxes in addition to not being pledged for any new:

foreign loan are not to be pledged to, or held to be security for, liabilities already1

contracted by China except in so far as lekin revenue has already been pledged to ani

existing loan.

I also understand from the Memorial that the whole of the surtaxes provided by|

Article VIII. of the New Treaty goes to the Provinces in proportions to be agreed,

upon between them and the Board of Revenue, but that out of these surtaxes each;

Province is obliged to remit to Peking the same contribution as that which it has;

hitherto remitted out of its lekin collections, and that the Provinces also provide as!

hitherto out of these surtaxes whatever funds may be necessary for the service of the

foreign loan to which lekin is partly pledged.

I hope Tour Excellencies will send me a reply to this despatch and that you will

agree to this correspondence forming part of the Treaty as an Annex.

I have the honour to be,

Gentlemen,

Your obedient servant,

Their Excellencies, (Signed) Jas. L. Mackat. j

Lu Hai-huan and Sheng Hsuan-huai,

etc., etc., etc.

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA 35

Annex B—(3)

(Translation)

Lu, President of tlie Board of Works;

Sheng, Junior G-uardian of the Heir Apparent, Vice-President of the Board of

Works;

Imperial Chinese Commissioners for dealing with questions connected with the

Commercial Treaties, to

Sir James L. Mackat, His Britannic Majesty’s Special Commissioner.

Shanghai, September 5th, 1902.

We have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of to-day’s-

date with regard to the allocation of the surtax funds allotted to the Provinces, and to

inform you that the views therein expressed are the same as our own.

We would, however, wish to point out that, were the whole amount of the alloca-

tion due paid over to the Provinces, unnecessary expense would be incurred in the

retransmission by them of such portions thereof as would have to be remitted to

Peking in place of the contributions hitherto payable out of lehin revenue. The

amount, therefore, of the allocation due to the Provinces, arranged between them and

the Board of Revenue, will be retained in the hands of the Maritime Customs, who

will await the instructions of the Provinces in regard to the remittance of such

portion thereof as may be necessary to fulfil their obligations, and (on receipt of

these instructions) will send forward the amount direct. The balance will be held

to the order of the Provinces.

In so far as lehin is pledged to the service of the 1898 loan, a similar method of

procedure will be adopted.

As you request that this correspondence be annexed to the Treaty, we have the •

honour to state that we see no objection to this being done.

Annex C

INLAND WATERS STEAM NAVIGATION

Additional Rules

1. —British steamship owners are at liberty to lease warehouses and

banks of waterways from Chinese subjects for a term not exceeding 25 years, with

option of renewal on terms to be mutually arranged. In cases where British mer-

chants are unable to secure warehouses and jetties from Chinese subjects on satis-

factory terms, the local officials, after consultation with the Minister of Commerce,

shall arrange to provide these on renewable lease as above mentioned at current

equitable rates.

2. —Jetties shall only be erected in such positions that they will not

inland waterway or interfere with navigation, and with the sanction of the nearest

Commissioner of Customs ; such sanction, however, shall not be arbitrarily withheld.

3. —British merchants shall pay taxes and contributions on these wa

jetties on the same footing as Chinese proprietors of similar properties in the neigh-

bourhood. British merchants may only employ Chinese agents and staff to reside in

warehouses so leased at places touched at by steamers engaged in inland traffic to

carry on their business; but British merchants may visit these places from time to

time to look after their affairs. The existing rights of Chinese jurisdiction over

Chinese subjects shall not by reason of this clause be diminished or interfered with

in any way.

4. —Steam vessels navigating the inland waterways of China shall

tor loss caused to riparian proprietors by damage which they may do to the banks

2*

THE BRITISH COMMERCIAL TREATY WITH CHINA

or works on them and for the loss which may be caused by such damage. In the

event of China desiring to prohibit the use of some particular shallow waterway by

launches, because there is reason to fear that the use of it by them would be likely

to injure the banks and cause damage to the adjoining country, the British

authorities, when appealed to, shall, if satisfied of the validity of the objection,

prohibit the use of that waterway by British launches, provided that Chinese

launches are also prohibited from using it.

Both Foreign and Chinese launches are prohibited from crossing dams and weirs

at present in existence on inland waterways where they are likely to cause injury to

such works, which would be detrimental to the water service of the local people.

5. —The main object of the British Government in desiring to

waterways of China opened to steam navigation being to afford facilities for the rapid

transport of both foreign and native merchandise, they undertake to offer no impedi-

ment to the transfer to a Chinese company and the Chinese flag of any British

steamer which may now or hereafter be employed on the inland waters of China

should the owner be willing to make the transfer.

In event of a Chinese company registered under Chinese law being formed to run

steamers on the inland waters of China the fact of British subjects holding shares in

such a company shall not entitle the steamers to fly the British flag.

6. —Registered steamers and their tows are forbidden, just as jun

been forbidden, to carry contraband goods. Infraction of this rule will entail the

penalties prescribed in the Treaties for such an oflence, and cancellation of the inland

Waters Navigation Certificate carried by the vessels, which will be prohibited from

thereafter plying on inland waters.

7. —As it is desirable that the people living inland should be dis

as possible by the advent of steam vessels to which they are not accustomed, inland

waters not hitherto frequented by steamers shall be opened as gradually as may be

• convenient to merchants and only as the owners of steamers may see prospects of

remunerative trade.

In cases where it is intended to run steam vessels on waterways on which such

vessels have not hitherto run, intimation shall be made to the Commissioner of

■Customs at the nearest open port who shall report the matter to the Ministers of

Commerce. The latter, in conjunction with the Governor-General or Governjr of

the Province, after careful consideration of all the circumstances of the case, shall at

once give their approval.

8. —A registered steamer may ply within the waters of a port,

port or ports to another open port or ports, or from one open port or ports of

places inland, and thence back to such port or ports. She may, on making due

report to the Customs, land or ship passengers or cargo at any recognised places of

trade passed in the course of the voyage; but may not ply between inland places

• exclusively except with the consent of the Chinese Government.

9- —Any cargo and passenger boats may be towed by steamers

and crew of any boat towed shall be Chinese. All boats, irrespective of ownership,

must be registered before they can proceed inland.

10- and September,

of July —These

1898. The latter,Rules are untouched

where supplementary

by tothethepresent

Inland Rules,

Steam Na

remain in full force and effect; but the present Rules hold in the case of such of the

former Regulations as the present Rules affect. The present Rules, and the

Regulations of July and September, 1898, to which they are supplementary, are

provisional and may be modified, as circumstances require, by mutual consent.

Done at Shanghai this fifth day of September, in the year of Our Lord, 1902,

corresponding with the Chinese date, the fourth day of the eighth moon of the

■twenty-eighth year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] Jas. L. Mackay.

CUSTOMS TARIFF OF CHINA

IMPORT DUTIES

Arranged in 1902 between Special Commissioners representing Great Britain

and China, and subsequently accepted by the Treaty Poivers

Note.—If any of the articles emanerated in this Tariff are imported in dimensions

exceeding those specified, the Duty is to he calculated in proportion to the measurements

as defined.

Namk op Abticle. Tariff Unit and Duty. Name op Abticlk. Tariff Unit

Agar-agarSee Fungus. Per T

Picul Q 3 0 0 Basins, Tin (Common)... Per T.m.02

Agaric,

Amber Catty 0 3 2 5 Basins, Up

ter to Iron,

9 ins.

Decorated

Enamelled

in diame-

or Un-

:

Aniseed

fvalue Star, 1st Quality

Tls. 15 and over Picul 10 0 0 Over decorated Dozen 0 0 5 0

per

Aniseed,jiicul)

Star, 2nd Quality Agate,9 ins.Bluein diameter.

& White,

(value

per under Tls. 15

picul) 00 49 04 00 Over Grey or Mottled, Un-

decorated

Apricot Seed 9 ins. in(with

diameter, 0090

Arrowroot and Arrowroot Value 5 10 p. cent. Decorated Gold) 0 17 5

Flour

Asafcetida Picul 0 0 Over 9 ins. diameter,

decorated

Gold) (without

Asbestos

sition FibreBoiler Compo- 05 02 00 00 Beads, Coral Catty 07 071205 005

0

Asbestos 0 5 0 0 Beads,

Beads, Cornelian

Glass, of all kinds. Picul 5 p. cent.

Asbestos

Asbestos

ing

Millboardinclud-

Packing,

Sheets and Blocks. 3 5 0 0 Beeswax, Wines, etc. Value

Beer. SeeYellow Picul 16 0 0

Asbestos Packing, Metal- Belting Husk, Dried..'. Value Picul 500p.00cent.

lic Yarn

Asbestos 251502 005 000 Betel-nut

Betel-nut Husk, Fresh... 7187

Awabi

Bacon and Ham Value 5 12 p. cent. Betel-nut Leaves,

Betel-nuts, Fresh

Dried Dried.. 0 0 421855

Bags,

Bags, Grass

Gunny Thousand 45 p.2cent. 55 00 Betel-nuts,

Bezoar, Cow, Indian Value 500p.02cent.

Bags,

Bags, HempGunny Old

Hemp Value 4 2 5 0 Biche

Thousand Biche dede Mer,

Mer, White

Black Picul 0167 00 00

Bags, Old Value 5 12 p. cent. Bicycle Materials Value

Bags, Straw Thousand 5 0 Birds’ BicyclesNests, 1st Quality. CattyEach 5314p.0cent.

00

Baking Powder:—

46 oz.„ bottles or tins... Dozen 0 0 8 3 Birds’

Birds’ Nests,

Nests, 2nd

3rd Quality

Quality. 00 41505 000

„ „ ... 000 2110 Blue, Paris

142 35 Blue, Prussian Picul 15 00

128lib.„ „„ „„ ......... 00 38 0100 BooksBones, Tiger

Books, (Printed)

Chinese Charts, 215Free.

5 00 00

3

Bark,5 »„Mangrove

„„ „„ ...

Picul 001301257 003 Borax, Maps, Newspapers and

Periodicals

Bark, Plum-tree Crude Picul 0Free.

Bark,

Bark, Yellow (for dyeing) Value 5 p. cent. Borax, Kefined 1406 061000

Barley,Fellow

Pearl (Medicinal) Picul 00 83 00 00 Braid, Bricks,Llamas

Fire Value 55p.cent.

88 CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name op Article. p Unit and Unr. Name of Article.

Bronze

Butter, Powder

int'ackages ...

tins, jars, and 2 2 0 0 Canned

Bacon orMeats

ham. —Sliced

other

Buttons, Agate and Por- 2 0 0 0 ? lb. tins

celain Brass,

Buttons. and other 0 0 10 Dried Beef, Sliced... Dozen lb. jars11J

kinds

Byrrh, (not

See Jewellery)..

Wines, etc.... 0 0 2 0 Mincemeat:

Camphor Picul 0 6 5 0 Kits, £ barrels 1J lbs. pails Dozen

Camphor Baroos, Clean

Camphor Baroos, Refuse CaseValue Catty 2 0 4 5

Candles, 9 oz of 25") 5 p. cent. Porkbarrels andwith BeansTomato

Plain

Picul

orSauce:—

00 13

10 03 1 lb. tins Dozen 0 0 4 0

00 00 78 55

Otherproportion.)

weights, duty in PottedMeat:— and Devilled

Candles, of all kinds dif- Picul

ferently

Canes, Bamboo packed Thousand

Picul 0 4 0 0 ii lb.„ tins »

Canes,

Canes, Coir

Coir 1

5 ft.

„ long

long Thousand 00 32 00 00 Potted Poultry and andDevilled

Meat

Canned

bles, Fruits,

etc. (all Vegeta-

weights combined:—

and | lb. tins

matemeasures

):— approxi- Dozen Soups1 „and» Bouilli:—

iS’li Si I 2hcanslb. 0 0 6 5 2 lbs. tins

Grapes ...

Peaches “I Tamales Chicken

Pears )f Fruits.

Pie 5C 0 0 5 7 i lb. tins

Plums

Preserved Fruitscardboard

in glass] Tongues of every des-

bottles,

orcluding

wooden jars, boxes, in- 11 cription

lb.„ tins .-— 00 02 09 48

weight of im-

mediate package Picul

Dozen

n„

2„ „ 0 32 38 87

0

Asparagus 2*tinslb. 0 118 32J „„ „„ 000 554 441555

Corn .. 3J „ „ Canned Meats,

String Beans 00 000 655 404 All other

0 including Game of

Tomatoes | 0 05 25 45 every ordescription,

with without

Allserved

other inVegetables pre-j 0

orweightjars,oftins,immediate!

bottles,!

including! %1 lb.Vegetables:—

„ tins 00 00 65 32

package Sauce s 0

00 231271000

Tomato Catsup:— 614 „„ „„

$ pint bottles 0 8 10

Canvas not andexceeding

Cotton Duck,36

Jams

1 lb.andtins,Jellies

bottles, or jars inches wide Yard 0 0 10

Capoor

Cardamoms, Cutchery Superior, Value 5 p. cent.

Milk (including Con- dozen i ] Case of 4 - and Amomums ...... 10 00 0

densed) lb. tins _ Cardamoms, Inferior,

Paradise...or

Grains ofHusk..., 102 05 00

Cream, Evaporated:—

4 dozen pints (family Cardamoms, 0

0 2 3 0 Cassia Cards,

Cassia Buds Playing Value 50p.7cent.

Picul 50

2 dozen

size) quarts (hotel Lignea

0 2 6 0 Cassia Twigs ..., I 00 91 72 00

CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name or Article. | Tariip._Isit and Duty.

Cement ^ Caskpiculs.of 3 Coral

Coral, Beads

Broken and Refuse Picul 007 075 505 000

Cereals and Flour Cornelian

Cornelian Beads

JwcJttdmsf

Millet, Barley,Maize,

Oats, Paddy, CorundumStones, Sand Rough Hundred Picul 00 3190 05

Rice, Wheat, and Cotton Piece Goods

Flour; made

from also there-

Buck- Grey

Sheetings: Shirtings

not widee:<

wheat and Buck- ceeding

and not 40 ins.

wheat Flour,

flour

Corn and

Meal,

Corn-

Yellow

Rye yds. long:exceeding 40

Flour, a. Weight 7ft).and under 0050

Flour and Hovis b. Over

over 9791b. lblb. and not

0080

Butrowroot

not including Ar- c. Over

over 11 lb and not

root and Arrow- d. Over 11 lb

Wheat,Flour,

miny, Pearl

Cracked

Germea, Ho-

Barley, Imitation Native Cot-

tonCloth (handmade)

■OPotato

ats,

Sago

Flour,

Rolled

and

Quaker

Oats,

Sago

Grey or Bleached

a. Not exceeding 20 ins

:

Flour, Shredded wide

ing and not exceed-

Wheat,

Tapioca Tapioca and weight20 3 yds. poundslongand,

Yam FlourFlour, and b. under

Exceeding 20 ins. 002 7

‘Chairs, Vienna Bent-wood Dozen 0 8 0 0 wide . 5 p. cent.

Picul 5p.0 0cent. 3 0 White Shirtings, White

'Charcoal

CChestnuts

heese Value

Picul 0 18 0

Irishes,

ings, White White Sheet-

Brocades,

China-root,Whole, and WhiteShirtings:

Striped

or in CubesCoarseSliced,

Chinaware, and

Picul 0 6 5 0 ornot> potted

exceeding 37 ins.

Fine of Lime Value 5p.0 3cent. wide

ing 42andyds.notlong exceed- ...

•Chloride Picul

Pound 0 0 12 Drills, u 0

Chocolate, Sweetened

Cigarettes, J st Quality not Grey or 31White

exceeding ins.

(valueper exceeding

4.50 1,0001 Tls. wide and not exceed-

Cigarettes, 2nd Quality ing40yds.long :

(value not exceeding a. Weight 12| lb. and

under

Tls. 4.50 per 1,000) ...

Cigars 00 05 09 00 b. Weight over 12f lb.

Cinnabar Jeans, Grey or White

34 07 05 00 a. Not exceeding 31 in:

Cinnamon

Clams, Dried 0 5 5 0 wide andyds.notlong

exceed-

Clocks of all kinds 5 p. cent. b. ing

Not 30exceeding 31 ins.... 0900

Cloves Mother

Cloves, 0630 wide and not exceed-

Coal, 0 3 6 0 ing 40 yds. long ... 0 12 0

Coal, Asiatic

Coal, other kindsBriquetts

Asiatic, 000 652 500 000 T-Cloths, Grey or

Cochineal 5 p. cent. White:

a. Not exceeding 34 ins.

Cockles,

Cockles, Dried

Fresh 030 655 000 000 b. wideing andyds.notlongexceed-

24exceeding

Cocoa

Coffee 102 00 00 Not

wide 34

andbutexceedingins....

Coir

Coir Canes,

Canes, 1 ft. long ...

5 ft. long ... Thousand 0

00 35 00 00 c. Exceeding24 yds. not ex

Coke, Asiatic Ton ceeding 40 34yds.ins.long. but

Coke,

Compoyother kinds Picul 02 90 00 00 not

wide24exceeding

and 37 ins.

Coral Catty ing yds.notlong.

exceed-

40 CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name of Article. and Duty.

T. m. c. c.

Crimp d. Balzarines:

Printed Lenos and

PlainCloth and Crape, ceeding 31 ins.notwide ex-

a. wide

Not exceeding

and not 30 ins.

exceed- and not exceeding 30 Piece

yds. long

0 0 2 7 e. Printed Sheetings:

b. ing

Not 6exceeding

yds. long30...ins...

wide, exceeding 6 yds. not exceedingexceed- 36 ins.

but wide

ing 43andyds.notlong

yds. notlongexceeding 10 0 0 3 5 /. Printed Turkey

...

Reds,

c. Not

wide exceeding

but exceeding30 10 ofceeding

all kinds : not ex-

yds. long 0 0Q3i and 31 exceeding

ins. wide

White Muslins, White g. Printedyds.notlongSateens,

25Printed

Lawns,

Cambrics: and White Satinets,

ing

not 46 ins.notwide

exceeding

exceed-

12 and

yds.

Printed

Cotton Eeps,Printed

Lastings, in-

long cluding

Piece Goods all Cotton

which

Mosquito Netting’

White or Coloured 1 are both Dyed and

not Printed,

specified except (/)those

inincluding and

wide (h,) and

LenosWhite, and Balzarines, any special finish,

notDyed

ed : wide

ins.

or Print-31

exceeding such asSchreiner

Finish,Gassed Mercerised Fi-

ceeding 30andyds.notlong.ex- Piece nish,

silk Finish Finish,

orElectric

Leno Brocades andDyed

Bal- Finish,

32yds. ins. notwide exceeding

or 32

zarine

Prints: Brocades, Value 5 p. cent. Coloured longWoven 0250

a. Lawns

Printedor Cambrics, tons, i.e., dyed in Cot-

the

not exceeding Muslins

46 ins. Yam except Srimp

wide and not exceed- Cloth Value 5 p. cent.

Silk Finish, or Elec-

b. ing 12 yds. long

Printed

Printed Chintzes,

Crapes,Print-

tric

exceeding Finish: not

32 ins. wide

edFurnitures,

Drills, Printed

Printed and

yds. not

long exceeding 32 Piece 0 2 5 0

Shirtings, Printed h. Reversible

Duplex Prints Cretonnes or

T-Clothgoodsincluding

those known (not including those

asPainted

Blue andT-Cloths,

White goods

and known

White Printed as Blue

Printed Twills goods

; but (T-Cottons:

loths) Value 5 p. cent.

not including Dyed

a. i.e.,

Dyedwithout

Plain woven Cottons,or

1. (mentioned

Not exceedingin 20e, ins.h:)

embossed figures (in-

2. wide

Exceeding

not exceeding20 ins.

31 but

ins.

cluding

lians, Plain

Lastings, Ita-i

Reps,:

wide and Ribs, andPlain all

ing 30andyds.

e.1. Printed

notlong

Crimp

exceed-...

Cloth:

other

Cottons Dyed not other-!

Not exceeding 30 ins. wise

and enumerated,!

including any

wide6 andyds.not

longexceed-

2. ingNot exceeding 30 ins. 0027 asspecial finish,Finish,

Mercerised

Schreiner

such

Finish,

wide,excee ding 6yds.10 Gassed

but notlongexceeding Finish, orFinish, Silk

Electric

3. yds.Not

wide exceeding

but 30

exceeding

0035 Finish)

36exceedg. mot

ins. wide exceedg.

and not

10 yds. long ... 0 0 0 3| 33 yds. long Piece

CUSTOMS TARIFF 41

Name of Aeticle. ■ and Duty.

k. cluding

Dyed T-Cloths (in- T. m. c. c.

b. tons,

Dyedi.e.,Figured Cot-

with figures

woven Dyed Al-

or(including

embossed paeianos). Dyed Real

ItaliansFigured

ings, andFigured

Tast-

Reps, ' and

Reds Imitation

exceeding32of all Turkey

kinds; not

ins. wide

and

and Figured

all other Ribs,

Dyed and yds.notlong:exceeding

251. Weight

Figured Cotton not 31 lb. and Piece 00 0106 00

otherwise

ed, enumerat-

and including any 2. under

Weight over 3)lb

special

asSchreiner finish,

Mercerised Finish, such

Finish, Flannelettes and Cotton

Gassed Finish, Silk «.Spanish

Cotton

ton

Stripes:

Flannel,

Flannel, Can-

Swans-

Finish,

Finish): ornot Electric

exceed- downs, Flannelettes,

ing 36 ins. wide and and

Cloths Raised

ofDyed, Cotton

all kinds.

not

longexceeding 33 yds. Plain, and

Piece 0 15 0 Printed:

c. 1.Dyed 1. ins.Notwideexceeding not36

NotCrimp

ins. exceeding

wide and

Cloth:30

not exceeding and

15 yds.

, exceeding 6 yds. 0027 2. longNot wide,

exceeding 36 0065

2. long

Not exceeding

ins. 6wide, exceed-30 ins.

ing exceed-

15 yds. 30but not

ing yds. but not exceeding

longCotton Spanish yds. 0 13 0

exceeding 10 yds. 0 0 3 5 b. Dyed

3,. long

Not wide

exceeding

but ex-30

Stripes:

1. ins.

Notwide exceeding

ins.

ceeding lOyds.long 0 00 3J exceeding and not32

20 yds.

d. exceeding

Dyed Drills: not

31exceed-

ins. long 0085

wide 2. but Exceeding 32 ins.

ing 43.andyds.notlong Piece 0 17 0 not exceeding

64not ins. wide and20

e. zarines:

Dyed Lenos and

notwide Bal-

exceed- exceeding

yds. long.

ing 31 ins. and 0 17 0

not exceeding 30 yds. Cordage,Cloth: of all kinds Value op cent.

long 0 0 9 0 Crimp

/.g. DyedMuslins,

Dyed Leno Brocades. Value 5 p. cent. a. wideNot exceeding

and not 30 ins.

exceed-

Lawns, ing

b. Not 6 yds. long Piece 0 0 2 7

and Cambrics

exceeding 46 ins. not

wide wideexceeding

yds., and not

but

30 ins.6

exceeding

• yds.and not longexceeding 12 Piece 0 0 3 7 c. Not yds. longexceed-

ing 10exceeding 30 ins.10 0030

h. Sheetings:

Dyed Shirtings and

not wide

ex- widelong but exceeding

ceeding 36 exceeding

ins. yds. Yard 00 0 3J

and not Velvets

Velvet: and Cords,Velveteens,

and Fus-

43 yds.

i. Hongkong-dyed long tians

Shirtings: «. teens

Velvets and Velve-

ceeding 36 ins.not wide

ex-

1. Not : Plain:

and

yds.

j. Dyed

not

long exceeding

Cotton Cuts:

20

2. butins. wide ins.18

exceeding

Exceeding-18 0006

not exceeding36 ins. not exceeding

wide 51andyds.notlong

ingN. B.—The exceed- 3. 22but ins. wide

Exceeding 22 ins. 0007

(rule does n otproapply.)rata 26 ins.notwideexceeding 0008

42 CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name ok Abticle. .'abut Unit and Duty. AND DutY.-

b. teens,

VelvetsPrintedand orVelve- Dyes,Paints:—Colours, and T. TO. c. c.

bossed, not exceedingEm- Aniline Value

c. 30Dyedins. wide Blue, Prussian...

Paris Picul 515p.cent.

Dyed Velvet Cords,

Velveteen Blue,

Bronze Powder 2152 000 000

Cords,Dyed

roys, DyedFustians

Cordu- Carthamin Value 5 p. cent.

ofnotany description: Chrome,

Cinnabar Yellow Picul- 32 77 05 00

exceeding

wide Cotton, Plain, 30 ins. Gambodge

Blankets, 0 0 15 Green, Green, Emerald or

Schweinfurt, 10 0 0

Printed or Jacquard ...

Handkerchiefs,

a. ed,

Plain, Dyed, Cotton:

or Print-

0 0 3 0 Indigo, Dried, Artificial Value 5 10

Imitation

or Natural

00

p. cent.

not

Hemstitched, Embroidered,

or Ini- Indigo, Liquid, Artifi-

tialled : not exceeding cial Liquid, Natural Picul 20 02 2155

Indigo,

1 yd.

b. chiefs square

All other Handker- Dozen 0 0 2 0 Indigo, Paste, Artificial 2025

Singlets or Drawers, t _ ot- Value 5 p. cent. Lead, withRed,

Oil Dry orDrymixedorI 04 5 0

ton Cotton, including Dozen Lead White,

mixedYellow,

with OilDry or 0450

Socks,

Lisle Thread: Lead

1statQuality, mixed with Oil 0

0J 46G 050 O00

dozen 1 ori.e.over

Tls.pairs valued per Logwood

Ochre Extract

2ndatQuality, Pairs 0 0 7 5 Smalt 01650 000 000

dozen thani.e.Tls.valued

lesspairs 1 per Ultramarine

Vermilion 4

Towels, Dozen 0 4 3 2 Vermilion Imitation... 5 p. cent.

a. back.Cotton: Honeycomb

Plan or Printed orHucka- White Zinc

Paints, Unclassed

dimensions exclusive Elephants’

than Teeth (other

of1. fringe:

Not exceeding 38 WholeTusks)

Elephants PartsandWhole

orTusks,. Jaws, Pieul 3 0 0 0

ins. wide and

exceeding 40 ins. not or PartsCloth and Sand- Catty 0 17 0

Emery

2 long

Exceeding

wide and50ins. 19 ins.

notlong. ex-

paper

ceeding (sheets

144 notsquareex-

ceeding 0p.0cent. ins.)

3 0 Emery Powder Ream 50p.2cent.

Value 50

b. All

Cottons,Raw other

UnclassedTowels 5 Enamelled Ironware:—

Cotton, Cugs, Cups, 9 Basins,

Cotton,

BallUndyedThread Dyed or Picul

Thread,

and

under Bowls, ins. or

in diameter.

Decorated or Un- Dozen

On Spools,

On ,, 50yds

100 yds. 003 000 408 000 Basinsdecorated

andinBowls, over

On „Yam,200 yds 016( 9 ins.

Agate, diameter.

BlueCottledand

Cotton

Bleached Grey or White, Grey,

Cotton Yarn, Dyed..,..,... 05p.9cent. 50 —Undecorated

Cotton Basinsins. and Bowls, over

Cotton Yam,

Cotton Yam,

Yarn,

Gassed

Mercerised

Wooloa or

9coratedin (with

diameter,.De-

Gold)...9

Berlinette Picul 3 5 0 0 Basins

ins. and Bowls,over

diameter. Decor-

Cow Bezoar, Indian

Crabs, Fresh

Crocodile (including Ar-

> p. cent.

’ Picul 0 6 0 0 Enamelware, ated (without

U Gold)

nclassed... Value 500p.212

Thousand cent.

8

5

0

madillo) Scales 20 75 02 05 Fans,Fans, Palm-leaf, Coarse...

Fans, Palm-leaf, Fancy...

Fine ... 0104 05 00

Currants

Cutch

Cuttie-fish 0 3 0 0 Fans, Palm-leaf, Paper or Cotton of L400

all kinds ...‘

CUSTOMS TARIFF 43

Name of Article. Tariff Unit AND Duty. I Tariff Uni

Per T. m. c. c. Per T. m. ere.

Fans, SilkKingfisher, Part Value 5 p. cent. Glass,

Feathers, not Window, Common, a( Box

Stained, Obscured.

Coloured, 100feet.sq.of ))> 0 17 0

Skins (i.e„Wings, Tails) Hundred 0 2 5 0 Glue or otherwise •(. Picul 0 8 3 0

or Backs)

Feathers,

Whole Skins King-fisher, 05 p.6cent. 0 0 Gold

See Thread,

Thread, Imitation.

010150 00

Feathers, Peacock Value Ground

Gum Arabic nuts

Files. See Tools. Gum Benjamin 0600

Fireclay Picul 00 00 5100 Gum Benjamin, Value

Oil of ...... Picul 5 4p.0cent. 00

Firewood * Gum, Dragon’s Blood

Fish,

Fish, Cuttle

Dried or(including

Smoked,

0 6 6 7 Gum Gum Myrrh

Olibanum 000 441865 507

inStock-fish

bulk but Gum Resin

Gutta-percha. See India-

not in-...

cluding

Fish, Fresh Cuttle-fish) 004 321351570 Hair,

rubber Horse 14 00 00

Fish, Maws

Fish, Salt 00 316150 Hair,

Hams Horse, Tails Value jo2p.5cent.

Fish, Stock Handkerchiefs.

0 0 4 0 Hartallton Piece Goods, See Cot-

Flints or Orpiment Picul 50p.4cent, 50

Flour. See Cereals. Hemp

Flour,

Sago, Arrowroot,

Tapioca, Potato,... Value 5 p. cent. Hessians

Yam weights or Burlaps, all 1,000 Yds 2 8 5 0

Fungus, White

or Agaric Picul 0172 5150 Hide Poison

BuffaloorCast:

Specific... Picul 50p.8cent.

Value 00

Fungus,

Galangal Catty

Picul 00 3170 00 Hides,

Hollow-ware.

ed or Tinned

and Cow...

Coat- 00 5120 05

Gambier

Gambier

(YamrootFalse, or Cunao

Dye-stuff)... 02 7150 00 Hoofs, Animal

Hops Buffalo

Horns, and Cow... Value Picul 550p.p.3cent.

Value 50

Gamboge

Gasolene

tha or StoveNaph- (( 10 gallon

drum Horns,

0 15 0 Horns, Deer

Rhinoceros Catty 2 4cent.

00

Ginseng, Crude,exceeding

1st Qua- Hosiery.GoodsSee(Socks).

Cotton Piece

lity (value

Tls. 2 per catty)2nd Qua- Catty 0 2 2 0 India-rubber and Gutta-

Ginseng,

lity Crude,

(value not exceed- percha

than Articles

Boots (other Value 5 p. cent

and Gutta-

Shoes)

ing Tls. 2 per catty ... 0 0 7 2 India-rubber and

Ginseng, Clarified or percha, Crude

India-rubber Pair 030 u01482 000

Picul

Cleaned,

per catty)

1st Quality

(value-exceeding Tls. 11 110 0 India-rubber Boots

India-rubber, Shoes

Old (fit only

for remanufacture) Picul 0 2 5 0

Ginseng,

Cleaned, Clarified

2nd Quality or Indigo, Dried, Artificial...

(value

but exceeding Tls. 6 or Natural

Indigo, Liquid, Artificial- Picul 502p.02cent. 2155

11 pernotcatty)

exceeding Tls. 0 3 7 5 Indigo, Liquid,Artificial...

Natural...

Ginseng,

Cleaned, Clarified

3rd or

Quality Indigo,

Ink, Paste,

Printing Value 524p.00cent.

25

(value

but exceeding

notcatty) Tls.

exceeding Tls. 2 Isinglass

Isinglass, (Fish Glue)

Vegetable

Picul j 1 7 5 00 0

6 per

Ginseng, Clarified 0 2 2 0 Jams and Jellies, 1 lb,

or jars2 lb.... Dozen 0 0 6 0

Cleaned, Qualityor

4thexceeding tins, and

Jams

tins,

bottles,

Jellies, 118 0

(value not

Tls. 2 per catty) 0 0 8 0 Joss

KeroseneSticksOil Cansjarsand.../ 2 cans

bottles, or Piculin 0 6 4 0

Glass, Plate, Silvered... [ Empty or Inser-\ j 1 case 0 005

Glass, Plate,

Glass Powder Unsilvered.,.

(see Match- Value 50p.0cent. 2 5 Lace,

Cases,Open-work

tion-work of Cotton,!

Making

Glass, Materials)

Window^ Colour- jCI|| 100

BoxPieul

of "|>• 00 3110 Machine made:— 1

(a.)in.Notwide,

exceeding

ed. Stained, Ground, sq. 0000

or obscured (.1 feet. J 5 0 measurementoutside

44 CUSTOMS TARIFF

Tariff Unit and Duti f Unit and Dctt.

T. m. c. c. Marsala. See Wines, eto.

(b.)butExceeding 1 in. ( 12 dozen f de Liqueur.

' notwide,

'2 ins. ‘ exceeding

outside^(.1 yards ( 0 10 0 Matches, Rainbow orf\ 50boxes gross l) 15 0 0

measurement Brilliant

Matches, Wax Vestas: (

(c.)notExceeding 2 ins. but not

wide, exceeding

outside 3mea- ins. a boxexceeding 100 im(.j 16 0 0

surement 0 16 6 Matches, or other; Wood,

Large: Safety

boxes fy

(d.)wide,Exceeding

outside 3 mea- ins. not

surement 0 2 16 Matches, by 1£exceeding

ins.Wood, 21.in.ins.... 1(.

by f Safety (■ 100 gross )

Lace Open-work or Inser- orother; Small:boxes

tion-work

material of any

except fibrous

Silk or not

by exceeding

If ins. by 2| ins.

ins. 1\(. boxes >

GCotton

(a.)oldHand

or Thread:—

or Silver imitation

0 5 0 0 other,

Matches, boxes

Wood, Safety or

(b.) Machine made made

(includ- above sizes exceeding 5 p. cent.

ing Cotton) 25 p.4cent.0 0 Match-making

Lacquerware

Lamps Materials:—

soriesand their Acces- Glass Powder.. 04 110

Lampwick

Lard, Pure or Compound.

Phosphorus....

Splints

Wax, Paraffin . 00 051208 580

Lead, Red, White, Yellow, WoodCoirShaving: 1110

Dry orBelting

Leather mixed with... Oil. 507p.40cent.

5 0 Mats,

Mats, Formosa, Door.Grass Bed Dozen Each 010 00

Leather,

Leather, Calf

Coloured 7 0 0

0 0

0 Matches,

Matches, Rush

Straw Hundred 0 052 502 005

0

Leather, Cow (not in- 2 5 0 0 Matches, Tatami

Leather,

cluding Harness

Enamelled Matting,

ceeding Coir

36 notwide

ins. BollEachof \J 02 07 45 05

ex- (( lOOyards

Pigskin)Kid

Leather, 37 00 00 00 Matting, Straw: notes- ( Roll of ^

Leather, Sole ceeding 36 ins. wide ( 40 yards )

27 50 00 00 Meats,

Leather, Patent in bulk:—

Leather, all other kinds.. 5 p. cent. Beef, Corned, Pickled,

in barrels....

Lichees,

Lily Dried

Flowers, Dried 0

0 43 5

2 0

5 Dry Salted Meat, in

Lilywithout

Seed (i.e.. Lotus-nuts boxes

Dry and barrels

Sausages

Husks) 10 0 0

0 0 Ham

Lime,

Linen Chloride of 50p.3cent. Bacon;andin Breakfast

barrels boxes

Liqueurs. See Wines', etc.

Liquorice Lard,

pound Pure or Com- Value

Logwood Extract Melon Seeds .... Picul

Lotus-nuts

Seed with (i.e., Lily

Husks) Metals:—

Lucraban Seed 0 4 0 0

00 35 55 00 Anti-friction . 50p.7cent.

Lung-ngan Pulp Antimony ....Metal:— 00

Lung-ngans,

Macaroni and Dried

Vermicelli, 0 4 5 0 Brass Bars &and

Yellowhods 115 0

and similar Paste ^ 2 5 Bolts

0p.3cent. and Nuts and 115

Mace

Machines,

or Foot SeeSewing, Hand 5 Accessories

Foil

Nails

. 16

115 7 500

Madeira.

(Yins See Wines,

de Liqueur.) etc. Screws

Sheets, Value 5 p. cent.

Malaga.

(Vins de Wines, etc.

Liqueur.) Ingots Plates, and Picul 115

Tubes 115 00

Malt

Mangrove Bark ; Wire 115 0

Manure, Chemical

Margarine, 5 p. cent. Copper:—

. Bars andNuts,

Rods Rivets,

.

or kegs. in tins, jars, Bolts,

and Washers

CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name Article. Tariff Unit

Per Per

Ingots Picul Steel,

Steel, PlatesandandCastSheetsj Picul

Tool

Nails

Sheets and Plates .... Steel,

Rope Wire and Wire'j ,»»»

Slabs

Tacks Value 5 p. cent. Tin Steel,Compound

Mild. See Iron. 1 Value

Tubes ... Picul 013160 00 Tin Foil

Wire

Dross, Iron 00 35 00 00 Tin Tin Sheets

Slabs and Pipes ...j| Picul »»

Dross,

Dross, Iron

Tin and Tin ... Tin Tacks, Blue, of all

German Silver, Wire...|

Sheets 2 2 0

15 0 0 Tinned 0 sizes Plates, Decorated1 »> 00 43 05 00

German

& MildSilver,

IronAnchors, Steel, New: — j Tinned Plain | »» 02 22 90 00

Plates,Sheets

and Parts; White

White Metal,

Metal, Wire 15 0 0

thereof.

Mill Mill Iron,!

andand Ships 1

< Yellow

Zinc Metal.

Boiler See

Plates Brass. jI! >>»

Cranks, For-j Zinc Powder

gings for Vessels,]

Steam-engines, and; Sheets, . including!^ »

ZincPerforated

. Locomotives

ing each 25 lbs.weigh-j or! Case of

Angles •114 2650 (r i|12b’tles.

1 lb. tins, i

Anvils, and Parts of ...i] 14

(14 0 0 Mineral Waters .. ] lor 24 *- f 0 0 5 0

Bar

Bolts and Rough

Nuts p.114 cent.00 Mirrors (. | bottles ) 5 p. cent-

Castings,

Chains, and Parts of...I Picul ) 2 6 5 Morphia,

Moulding in all forms ...j 1,000 Value 3 0 0 0

Ounce 10 05 00

Cobbles

Shorts and Wire, .!| Mushrooms Piculfeet > 18

Hoops

Kentledge I

Musical

Musk Dried

u1 74 50 Mussels,

Boxes ! Value

j Catty 94p.00cent.00 0O'

Nail-rod i Needles, No. 7/0 100Picul

mille 18 00 00

Nails, W ire j 2 0 0 No. 3/0 not in 15

Nails, other kinds Value 0cent.

Picul 7 5 „ Assorted,

Pig

Pipes :

and Tubes j Value cent. Nutgalls eluding 7/0 00 98 87 50

Plate Cuttings Picul

Plates

Rails and Sheets Nutmegs

Oakum 001555 001000

Oil, Castor, Lubricating.

Screws 'I VPicul

a'lue Oil,

Oil, „ Medicinal .. 010 041500 O00

Sheets and

Tacks, Blue, Plates

of all sizes Oil, Clove

Cocoa-nut. Amern.

! Iron,WireGalvanized:— Oil, Colza l gallon ) 0 0 5 0

Bolts and Nuts Value Oil, Engine :

Cobbles and Wire Picul

ShortsCorrugated Whollyof mi-or af Ameri-

(a.): partly can >

Sheets,

Sheets, Plain ... (b.) neral

All origin...

other kinds(. gallon J

Tubes

Wire Shorts Value

Picul (except Castor.) Picul

Wire Oil, Ginger Case of 101

Iron, Old, and Scrap, of Oil, Kerosene .. Amern.

gallons J>-

any description fit

only for re-manu-

facture 00 02 98 05 Oil, „ in bulk j 210gallons Amern. \j

Cans

Lead,

Lead, in Pigs

inPipes

Sheets Oil,

00 33 37 05 Cases, Empty „ Cans and ( 1

i Imperial) Casein)) 0 0 0 5

Lead.

Nickel, Unmanufactured Oil, Olive | gallon ) 0 0 6 2

Quicksilver

Spelter 42 62 80 00 Oil, Sandalwood Catty

Picul 0 5 0 0

0240

Steel, Bamboo j 0 3 7 5 Oil, OlivesWood Fresh, Pickled, or

Steel Bars Salted I01

CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name of Article. Tariff Unit and Duty. Tariff Unit and Duty.

Per 30T.m.c,

Duty c.0 T. m, c. c.

Opium ,..Pieul Likin 0 0

800 00 60 20 Sake, Safflower 0105 02 05

Opium,

•Orange Husk

Peel . Catty

Picul 8 0 0 0 in barrels 0400

Oysters, Dried Value 5 p. cent. Sake, in bottles 0 110

Packing,

Asbestos.Asbt Saltpetre

SodaRed and Nitrate of 00 03 24 55

Packing,

Boiler, allEngine

other and

kinds.) Sand,

Sandalwood O0 4112 00

-Paints.

and See

Paints Dyes. Colours,] 1 Sapanwood

Seahorse Teeth 5 p. cent.

Paper,

ceedingCigarette:

2 ins. bynot ex- (100,000)

4 ins. Seaweed, Cut 00 15 0

Paper,

dered Printing,

and/or Sized Calen-j !

( selave j

0 7 0 0 [ j

Seaweed, Prepared

Seaweed,

Seed,

Long ....

(Lilyi.e., Lotus-nuts 10100 00

Paper, printing, Uncal-

enderedWriting

Paper, or Unsized

or Fool- 0 3 0 0 1 Seed, withoutLotus-nuts

Husks) (i,

0

10 0 0

scap all other kinds...

Paper, Value 5012 0 0 Seed,

p.8cent.

Lily

Seed,

Seeds

Lucraban

Melon

with Husks) 00 324 055 00G

Peel, Orange

Pepper, White

Pepper, Black Picul 0 0

0137 36 00 Seed, Seed, Pine

Sesamumor Fir-nuts 001622 000 008

Periumery 5 4p.12 Sharks’

cent. Sharks’ Fins, Black

Fins, Clarified or1 !

Phosphorus 64 06 00 00

Pitch

Plushes and Velvets:— 0 12 55 |j1 Sharks’ Prepared

Shellac Fins, white 2 57 00 00

a. ofPlushes

pure and

Silk Velvets Shells, Mother-of-pearl ...j 0

b. back)

Silk Seal (with Cotton 0 6 5 0 Shells, other kinds 5 p. cent.

0 2 0 0 Shoes Sherry.

(Vinsand deSeeLiqueur.)

Wines, etc.)

c. ofPlushes and Velvets Boots, India-]

othersilk(with

rials

mixed mate-

fibrous with

Cotton

rubber, for Shinese: —

Boots ' Pair .00 00 82 00

Shoes

d. back)

Plushes, all Cotton 0 15 0 Shrimps, Dried (see also

(including Mercer- Picul

e. ised)

Velvets, Cotton,' See 0 110 SilkPrawns) Piece Goods,

(including all Silk

Crape:—)

Cotton Piece Goods Catty

Pork RindDried (see "also

Prawns, 0 5 0 0 ab. Plain Brocaded

wise Figured or other-

Shrimps)

Preserved Fruits,cardboard

in glass 10 0 0 Silk Piece Goods Mix-

bottles, jars, tures

*other (i.e..or Silk

otton,materials) and

Silkinclu-

ordingwooden boxes,

weight of imme- inclu-

diate package ding

cluding CrapeMixtures

but notwithin-

Purses,

cluding Leather

Silver (notGold

or in- Real or Imitation Gold

mounted) or Silver

a.b. Plain Thread:—

Putchuck

Raisins and Currants Brocaded or other-

Rattan Chairs Silver wise FiguredImitation,

Thread,

Rattan Core

Rattan Skin See Thread.

Rattans,

Rattans, Split ]]

Whole

Sinews,

Sinews, Buffalo

Deeror andDrawers,Cow.., 0105 55 00

Resin Singlets

Cotton or Drawers, Dozen ] 0 1 2 5

Ribbons,

Cotton,with Silk,’ siikother

Silkorand ’and Singlets

fibres,

Imitation Gold

without Mixture

Skins, Fish Picul ]550p.p.6cent.

Value

Value

cent.

00

Silver Thread ... 0i p.5cent.

5 0 Snuff Skins,

Smalt Sharks Picul 16 00

Rope Value

CUSTOMS TARIFF 47

asd Duty. Tabiff Uhit AND Duty.

Soap, Household and T. m. C. c. Masts and Spars, Soft- Per r. to. c.

Laundry ^ including woodand Piling, includ- Value 5 p. cent.

Piles

Blue Mottled),

bars and doublets in bulk, ing Oregon Red-wood:

Pine and 1,000 sup.

weighing

£lb. each not less than.. Picul 0 2 4 0 Californian of a thickness of 1 in. feet 115 0

Soap, Toilet Planks, Hard wood

Fancy,.. Value 5 p. cent. Planks, and Flooring. Cubic foot 0 0 2 0

and(including

Socks, Cotton Soft-wood,Pine including

1stLisle

atdozen

Thread)

Quality :—

1 or(i.e.,over

Tls.pairs) valued

per ( Dozen ) 0 0 7 5 fornian

Oregon Red-wood,and Cali- andof

^ pairs J allowing

each 10 per cent,

shipment to be

2ndatQuality

less (i

than e., valued

Tls. 1 Tongued and Grooved:

per dozen pairs) 0 0 3 2 of a thickness of 1 in.

Soda Ash Picul 0 15 0 Planks, Soft-wood,and Flooring,

Soda Bicarbonate

Soda Caustic 0 15 0 and

of Grooved,

above inTongned

lu per excess

cent. Cubic

Valuefoot 50p.0cent,

Soda

Soda Crystals

Crystals, Concen- 0 12 0 Planks, Teak-wood 81

trated 0 14 0 Railway Sleepers of all Value 5 p. cent.

Soy

Spirits. See Wines, etc.. 0 2 5 0 Teak-wood

lengths Lumber,

and descrip-

Spirits tions, ' Piculfoot 500p.03cent.

Cubic 85 01

Wines, ofetc Wine. See

Sticklac

Tinder

Tin-foil Value

0 7 0 0 Tobacco

Stout. See

Sugar, Wines,up etc.

Brown, Tobacco, Leaf

Prepared, ininbulk Picul 00 89 05 00

10 Dutch

Sugar Candy Standardto No. Picul 0 19 0 Tobacco, or Prepared,under

packages tins5

Sugar, White, 0 3 0 0 lbs. each Value 5 p. cent.

Dutch

over, StandardNo.Cube

including and11 Tools:—

Axes and Hatches Dozen 0500

and Refined

Sulphur and Brimstone, 0 2 4 0 Files, File

Raspskinds:— Blanks,fo

and Floats,

Crude and Brimstone, all

0 15 0 Not exceeding 4 ins

Sulphur

Refined Acid long 4 ins. and not 0040

Sulphuric 00 2185 07 Exceeding

Sunshades. SeeBinoculars,

Umbrellas exceeding9 9ins.ins.andlong...

Exceeding not 0072

Telescopes,

and Mirrors..... exceeding1414ins.ins.long...long 00 2162 84

Value 5 p. cent. Exceeding

Thread,

Balls, Cotton:—

Dyed or Undyed Picul 3 0 0 0 Tortoiseshell Catty 50p.4cent. 50

Spools, 50 yards Trimmings, Bead

Gross 0 0 4 0 Trimmings, of Cotton, Value

Thread,

Imitation, G-old and Silver, pure

onandSilkSilver, Value op. cent. other materials but or mixed with

Thread,

Real Gold not Silk of Cotton,

Thread,

on Gold

Cotton Imitation, Catty 0 12 5 Trimmings, mixed with GoldSilk andor

Thread, Silver, Imitation, Imitation

Silver Thread...

on Cotton

Tiles, 6 ins. square 0 0 9 0 Turmeric

Hundred 0 6 0 0 Turpentine Picul 00 0183 65

Timber:— Twine Gallon

Beams, Hard-wood in-... Cubic foot 0 0 2 0 Ultramarine

Beams, Soft-wood,

Umbrella Frames Picul 500p.50cent.

Value

Dozen 08 00

cluding

and Oregon

Californian Pine

Red- Umbrellas, Parasols,

Sunshades:— and

wness

ood,of of1 in a thick- 1.000feetsup. 115 0 With Handles

orMetals,

partly wholly

of Precious

Beams,

Laths Teak-wood ..... Cubic foot 0

Thousand 0 2 10 0 8 1 Ivory,

ther-of-pearl, Mo-

Torto-

Masts

woodand Spars, Hard- Value 5 p. cent. iseshell,

or JewelledAgate, etc., Value 5 p. cent.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

Name oe Abticle. i) d™

With ail other Hand- T. m. c. c. Per12'| T. to. c. c.

Caseof

les, allall other

Cotton, 0020

With les, Mixtures,Hand- not quarts Jj- 00 35 05 00

reputed

Silk : 0 0 3 0 Whisky,

Other in bottles

With les, allSilkother

andHand-

Silk Rum,Spirits

ties etc.), in(Gin,

hot- "l

...)[(

0200

Varnish,Mixtures Crude Lac- 0 0 8 0 Other Spirits (Gin, 0090

quer, Gum Lacquer, Rum,

Spirits etc.),

of Wine,in bulk

in')^1

or Oil

Vaseline Dried andLacquer ...... i p. cent. packages of any 0028

Vegetables, description )

Salted

hulk or Pickled, in

Vermicelli

Vermilion 04 30 25 50 Ales,

Perry,Beers, Cider,

in bottles..;

Vermouth.

etc. of allSeekinds... Wines,

Watches, Ales,

Perry,Beers,

in casksCider,... (M|1

Waters,

Mineral Aerated andijC. 11224 hots, ^-bots. or 1j 50p.0cent.50

Wax,

Wax, Japan Bees, Yellow...I Picul 0600

Wax,

Wax, Paraffin

Sealing Value ,,„ 00 65 05 00 ■ Ili:•

Wax, White ... 5 p. cent.

Porters

in casks and Stouts, (( jl 0025

Champagnes and all f Case iseof Of 12' | Liqueurs 5 op.0cent,

90 00

other inSparkling 1( 24bots. ots. or r Wood, Camagon

StillWines, Wines, bottles

Red or A-i-bots.J Wood.

Wood, Ebony

Fragrant !!1 j 0(Jp.21cent.

00

White,produce exclusively Wood,

Wood, Garoo

Kranjee 1

50p.12 cent.

the

natural of the|

fermenta-;1 Wood, Laka.: j 5

Wood, Lignum-vitse 5 0p.0cent.

a. tion

Having of grapes:less

14 degrees of alcohol: than 1 Wood,

Wood, Purn

Red ...| 0 2 7 50

0

1. In bottles ]C | Case bots.ofor V 13 0 0 Wood,

Wood, Rose

Sandal 00 24112

0 00 00

(. 24^-bots.J Wood, Sapan 5 10 p. cent.

,0. 2.„Having

In. bulk \i ! Imgallon PeriallJt 10 2 5 Wood, Scented Hinoki.

Wood, Shavings, 00

oral-'omore 14

of degrees!

alcohol;

otherVins thandePort.Liqueur!j

1. In bottles i bots. ise ofor12'||- » 5 0 0 Flannel Cotton (Woollen and

: not exceed-

(C 24ots. ■ i-4-bots. J ing

Italian 33Cloth,

inches wide,

Plain

2. In bulk (. imperial

i Case

gallon 115 0 Figured,

ealltirely having

Cottonwarpand

f

Port Wine, in bottle ■’ ! bots. or C ) 7 0 0 of 12) one colour, and

(. j24 weft entirely Wool

ilm2-bots.) rial and all one Colour

Port Wine, in bulk \( ; gallon "f 1) 117 5 not

wide exceeding

andyards 32

not long ins

exceed-

ae ing 32 Piece 0 3 7 2

Vermouth

„ in barrels

Sake,

and Byn-h ( ! '

I 12 Picul

^ l ) 2

litres j ) 4 0 0 Poncho5 0

ceeding Cloth:

76 ex-... Yard 0 0 3 0

notwide.

ins.

^Sake,

, in bottles ]( Case bots.ofor12' Spanish andStripes (Wool-

Brandies and Whis- 24 i-bots. _] 1110 Union

(.1 jlmperial len

exceeding Cotton.)

Cloth:

not

64ins.wide.

not ex-

0 0 14

kies, in bulk ...... ^ gallon 3 1 .2 5 ceeding 76 ins. wide. 0030

CUSTOMS TARIFF 49

f Unix and Duty. jS'ame of Article. Tariff Unix

Per T. m. c. c.

Woollen Long Ells : notwide

exceed-

Mixtures,andUnclassed,

Cotton ing

not 31 ins. and

including

Lustres, Alpacas,

Orleans, Si- longexceeding

5 p. cent. Medium Cloth:

25 yds. Piece ■ '0 2 5 0

notwide.

ex- Yard 0047*

cilians, etc ceeding 76 ins.

Woollen Manufactures Russian

ceeding Cloth:

76 notwide.

ins. ex- 0 0 4 7}

Blankets and Rugs .. 0 0 2 0 Spanish Stripes : not

Broadcloth:

ing 76 ins.notwideexceed 0 0 4 7j exceeding 64 ins.

wide Unclassed... Value 50p.0cent.

Woollens, 21

Bunting:

ins. not

wideexceeding

24exceeding40yds.long.!

and not 2 0 0 0 Woollen

Yarns and

andWorsted

Cords

■ Camlets, Dutch:ins.notwide]

ex-| (not including Berlin

Wool)

eeeding

and not 33 exceeding] Berlin Wool I 45 30 00 00

61 yards lofig ... Wooloa

Worm or Berlinette

Tablets, in60bottles,; „ 3500

Camlets,

exceeding English: not

31 ins. wide] not exceeding pieces]! Dozen 02 02 55 05

and not exceeding 61 Yarn, Asbestos Picul 5 p. cent.

yards long 0 5 0 0 Yarn,

Yarn, Coir

Cotton, Bleached]]| Value

; Flannel: not exceeding

33 ins. wide 0 0 15 Yarn, Cotton, Dyed ] Value 50p.9cent,

or Grey Picul 50

Habit Cloth: Yarn, Cotton, Grey Picul 5 9 5 0

ceeding 76 ins.notwide.

ex- Yarn, Cotton,

or Gassed Mercerised!

Eastings,

ed or Plain,

Creped:Figur- not Yarn, Cotton, Wooloa or]i! Value

Berlinette Picul

5 p. cent.

exceeding 31exceeding

ins. wide Yarn, Wool, Berlin | „ 43 0q0 500

32andyards

not long .... Piece 0 4 5 0 Jj Yarn,ed W(not

oollen and Worst. j|

including

Llama Braid Picul 5 0 0 0 ^ Berlin Wool) „ 5300

RULES

Rule I.—Imports unenumerated in this Tariff will pay duty at the rate of

5 per cent, ad valorem; and the value upon which Duty is to he calculated shall he

the market value of the goods in local currency. This market value when converted

into Haikwan Taels shall he considered to be 12 per cent, higher than the amount

upon which duty is to be calculated.

If the goods have been sold before presentation to the Customs of the

Application to pay Duty, the gross amount of the bond fide contract will he

accepted as evidence of the market value. Should the goods have been sold on

e., f. and i. terms, that is to say, without inclusion in the price of duty and other

charges, such c., f. and i. price shall be taken as the value for duty-paying purposes

without the deduction mentioned in the preceding paragraph.

If the goods have not been sold before presentation to the Customs of the

application to pay duty, and should a dispute arise between Customs and importer

regarding the value or classification of goods, the case will be referred to a Board of

Arbitration composed as follows:—

An official of the Customs ;

A merchant selected by the Consul of the importer ; and

A merchant, differing in nationality from the importer, selected by the

Senior Consul.

50 CUSTOMS TARIFF

Questions regarding procedure, etc., which may arise during the sittings of the-

Board shall be decided by the majority. The final finding of the majority of the

Board, which must be announced within fifteen days of the reference (not including

holidays), will be binding upon both parties. Each of the two merchants on the

Board will be entitled to a fee of ten Haikwan Taels. Should the Board sustain

the Customs valuation, or, in the event of not sustaining that valuation, should it

decide that the goods have been undervalued by the importer to the extent of not less

than 1\ per cent., the importer will pay the fees ; if otherwise, the fees will be paid

by the Customs. Should the Board decide that the correct value of the goods is

20 per cent, (or more) higher than that upon which the importer originally claimed

to pay duty, the Customs authorities may retain possession of the goods until full

duty has been paid and may levy an additional duty equal to four times the duty

sought to be evaded.

In all cases invoices, when available, must be produced if required by the Customs.

Rule II.—The following will not be liable to Import Duty: Foreign Rice,

Cereals, and Flour; Gold and Silver, both Bullion and Coin; Printed Books,

Charts, Maps, Periodicals and Newspapers.

A freight or part freight of Duty-free commodities (Gold and Silver Bullion

and Foreign Coins excepted) will render the vessel carrying them, though no other

cargo be on board, liable to Tonnage Dues.

Drawbacks will be issued for Ship’s Stores and Bunker Coal when taken on

board.

Rule III.—Except at the requisition of the Chinese Government, or for sale

to Chinese duly authorised to purchase them, Import trade is prohibited in all

Arms, Ammunition, and Munitions of War of every description. No Permit to

land them will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority

has been given to the Importer. Infraction of this rule will be punishable by

confiscation of all the goods concerned. The import of Salt is absolutely prohibited.

CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION

Notification issued by the Imperial Maritime Customs at Canton on the 14th

November, 1901.

Notice is hereby given that:—

1-—On

the list and afterGoods

of Duty-free the 11th

ceaseinst.,

to beiheoperative,

Tariff of Import Duties

and, until hitherto

further existing

notice, and

whatever

is imported with certain exceptions is to pav an effective 5 per cent, ad valorem

duty.

2.—The exceptions are as follows

(a.) Foreign Rice, Cereals and Flour, as well as Gold and Silver, coined and-

uncoined, are exempt from duty.

(&.) The Import Duty on Opium remains unchanged at thirty taels, that

and lelcin at the rate of eighty taels, or one hundred and ten taels in

all, per picul, being payable simultaneously, as at present.

(c.) Foreign Goods on the way to China or which shall have been despatched

to China within six days after the signature of the Protocol—that is,

on or before the 13th September—are to pay Import Duty according

to the old Tariff, a fixed duty if enumerated, and an ad valorem 5 per

cent, duty if unenumerated, and are to be exempt from duty if on the-

Duty-free list. Goods despatched after the 13th September are to pay

an effective 5 per cent, according to the new rule.

CUSTOMS TARIFF 51

(d.) Merchandise taken out of bond is to pay duty according to its liability

on the day of bonding—that is, if already in bond, or if bonded on any

future day, but forming part of a cargo now on the way to China, or

despatched to China ou or before the 13th September, it is to be treated

according to the old Tariff and Tariff Rules. All other bonded imports

are to pay an effective 5 per cent.

(e.) Whatever is imported for the use of Legations at Peking is exempt

from Import Duty—applications for Exemption Permits, etc., to be

countersigned and sealed by the Consulate of the Legation concerned,

(f.) Whatever is shipped or discharged for the use of Foreign forces,

military or naval, is exempt from Import Duty—applications for

Exemption Permits, etc., to be countersigned and sealed by the

Consulate of the flag concernd.

3. —The values on which the new Tariff is to fix duties will

values for the three years 1897, 1898, 1899. Where the valuation ....

is questioned, the market value of the day minus duty and charges, or where that

cannot be ascertained, invoice value plus 10 per cent, will rule instead; but as this

•will involve detention of goods concerned at owner’s risk and expense till such

market, or, failing market, invoice value can be ascertained and settled, it is hoped

the valuation .... will be acquiesced in.

4. —Goods exported pay duty according to the Tariff hitherto exi

5. —Coast Trade Duty, which is not an Import Duty, but a Coast

.produce inwards, remains as before, and is not affected by the effective 5 per cent,

-rules.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

TARIFF ON EXPORTS

(As annexed to the Tientsin Treaty of 1858)

Tariff Unit and Doty.

Alum T.0 m.0 c.4 c.5

„ Green or C 00 5100 00 Galangal 0 103 O’5

Aniseed, Star ..

„ Broken 05 02 05 00

Garlic Native

Ginseng,

„ pan,Corean or Ja- } 50p.0cent.

Oil.. 1st quality) Catty

Apricot

Arsenic Seeds, or Almonds 00 44 55 00 „ ,, 2nd quality... 00 35 05 00

Artificial Flowers ... Glass orBeads

Bamboo

Bangles,andWare

orPeas

Glass Armlets 001575 005 000 Glass

Glasscloth, Vitrified

Fine Wire... 02 55 00 00

Beans 00 00 63 05 „

Ground-nuts Coarse

Bean

Bone Cake

and Horn Ware „ Ground, Cake

Brass

„ Buttons

Foil 315150 000 000 Gypsum,

Plaster of Paris or)) 0030

10 00 Hair, Camels 10 0 0

„ Wire

Camphor 00115 75 05 000

Hair,

Hams Goats

Hartall, orOrpinient 000 531855 000

Canes

Cantharides

Capoor Cutchery 023 035 000 000

Hemp

Honey Pair 000 399 005 000

CarpetsLignea

and Druggets Horns,

„ Ink„ Young

Deers’, Old .. Picul

Cassia

„ Buds 00 68 00 00 India 413 50

10 001500 000'

o9 0i 0; 0 Indigo,Ware

Ivory Dry Catty

Castor Oil..

Oil Joss-sticks Picul 0200

Chestnuts 00 2100 00 Kittysols, or... Paper) Hundred 0500

China RootsFine U mbrellas

Chinaware,

„ Coarse 000 491305 000 Lacquered

Lamp wicksWare

Picul 1000

000 633 055 000

Cinnarbar 0750 Lead, Red,

„„ Yellow, (Miniumj

White, (Ceruse) ...

...

Clothing, Cotton

„ Silk ; 1001500 400 000 Leather (Massicot).

Articles, 0350

Coal

Coir Pouches, Purses )) as 15 0 0

Copper

• ,,„ andOre

Sheathing, Old ... 00115

0 5100 00

500 Lichees „ Green 001822 700 000

Pewter Ware Lily„ Flowers,

Seeds or Dried

Corals,

Cotton, False

Raw 00 33 55 000 Liquorice Lotus Nuts 000 521305 00-5

Lung-ngan

Cow„ Bezoar

Rags

Catty 0045 „ without Cakes, Stone.

0350

Crackers,

Cubebs. Fireworks Picul 00 35 60 00 Manure

Poudrette or/1 0090

Curiosities,

Dates, BlackAntiques 5 15 00

p. cent. Marble Slabs

Mats of all kinds Hundred

00 015o Matting j 40rollyards)

of )

Dye, Green

Eggs, Preserved ' Thousand Catty 0 8 90 00 Melon Seeds Picul 00 10

10 00

Fans, Feather Hundred 00 37 55 00 Mother-o’-Pearl Ware .. Catty

,,,, PalmLeaf,

Paper trimmed 00 03 46 05 Mushrooms

Musk and Native 1 Catty Picul 0159 00 00

„ Palm Leaf, un-) Nankeen

Cotton Cloths . .• I Picul

Felt„ Capstrimmed

Cuttings > Nutgalls 0500

Picul 0 10 0 Oil,Cotton

as Bean, Tea, Wood,

Fungus, or Agaric...!”"! Hundred

Picul 0126 05 00 Oiled Paper & Hemp Seed j< 0300

0450

CUSTOMS TAEIFF 53

Name of Article. I Tariff Usr Name of Article. Tariff Unit and Dpty,

“I Per 0 3 0 0 Silk, Eibbons and Thread | Picul ter

Olive Seed Sea-shells... | Picul

Oyster-shells, „ 00 04 95 00 „ Piece Goods,—' l ! 10 0 0 0

Paint, Green Pongees,

Scarves, Shawls, !

('rape, !i ” !l2 0 0 0

Palampore, or Cotton){ \ Hundred 2 7 5 0 Satin,

Bed 1st

Paper, Quilts

quality I Picul 00 74 00 00 Velvet andGauzes,

broidered Em- |

Goods

„ 2nd „ „ 20 03 00 00 „ PieceGoods,—Sze-

Pearls,

Peel, False j ,, chuen. Shantung)) ! ” 4 5 0 0

„„ Orange

Pumelo, 1st quality

„ Leaf2nd „ | ,, 00 15

„„ 0 4 5 0 „ Tassels

00 Silk„ and

CapsCotton Mixtures'| Hundred S 1005 009 000 000

Peppermint

„ Oil 30 5100 0 Silver and Gold Ware ...I Picul

„ 100 08 00 00

Pictures andon Paintings... Each 1 0.0 Snuff Soy

Pictures

Eice Paper Pith or \ | Hundred 0 10 0

)...I Picul 0 0 5 0 Straw Sugai - Braid

, White

Brown „„ | 00 47 00 00

Pottery, Earthenware „ | !0120

Preserves,

Sweetmeats Comfits, and (

) 0 5 0 0 „ Candy

Tallow, Animal |: „„,, 00 22 05 00

Eattans, Split „ (seeVegetable 10 23 00 0-0

Eattan

Ehubarb Ware Teaend of at the... )j !jI „ 10

NoteTariff)

the 12 5 0 0

EiceMillet,

or Paddy, Wheat,

and other >' Tin Foil Prepared ■j 0124 55 00

Grains Each Tobacco,

Tobacco, Leaf

Eugs of Hair or Skin | Picul Tortoiseshell Ware Catty 100 2150 00

Samshoo

Sandalwood Ware Catty Trunks, Leather Picul 15 0 00

Picul Turmeric

Twine, Hemp, Canton ,.

... ,,, I 00 10

Sessamun

Shoes and Seed

Boots, Lea-1 „

Turnips, „

Salted Soochow... , i; 0

0 511 058 O00

ther or Satin 5 Varnish,

Shoes,

Silks, Strawand Thrown...

Eaw quer or Crude Lac-)) ”„ I 0 5 0 0

Vermicelli

„ Yellow, from Sze-J. 7 0 0 0 Vermillion 0 18 0

„ chuen

Eeeled from Dupions 5 05 00 00 Wax,

2 Wood—Piles, Insect& ...) ! .Each

White orPoles, . „ , | 21 55 00 00

Silk,„ Wild

EefuseEaw 10 0 0 rJoistsWare j Picul T 10 0 3 0

„,, Cocoons

Floss, Canton... 4103 003 000 000 WWood

ool | 01 31 55 O'0

„ from other Provinces

practiceTEA.—Coarse

of the Shanghai unfired Japanese

Customs Tea duty

to charge imported for localon Tea

ad valorem consumption. —SSnce February, 1861, it has been the

of this description.

Tea imported from Japan for the purpose of being refired and

April, 1861, Japanese Tea imported for re-exportation has been dealt with at Shanghaire-exported to a 'Foreign

accordingcountry.—Since

to the followingtherule1st of

will “ Tea imported

be allowed a reductioninto this port from

on the actual Japan for the

weight importedpurpose of being refired and re-exported

Importtoduty,

a Foreign countryre-

exported

provided a Drawback

that Certificate

Articlefordeclared.”

the entire

of the amount of dutyof Twenty

paid perbe granted

GreatwillBritain

cent, onontheapplication and

usualwhen

in thewith, manner,

the weights, &e.the, &e.terms

, be ofcorrectly XLY. Treaty between and China be complied and that

Brick Tea.—In

6 Mace per picul. the Tariff appended to the Russian Regulations of 1862, the Export duty on Brick is fixed at

RULES

( Annexed to the Tariff of 1858)

Rule I.—Unenumerated Goods.—Articles not enumerated in the list of exports,

but enumerated in the list of imports, when exported, will pay the amount of duty

-set against them in the list of imports; and, similarly, articles not enumerated in

the list of imports, but enumerated in the list of exports, when imported, will pay

the amount of duty set against them in the list of exports.

Articles not enumerated in either list, nor in the list of duty-free goods, will pay

an ad valorem duty of 5 per cent., calculated on their market value.

Rule II.—Duty-free Goods.—Gold and silver bullion, foreign coins, flour, Indian

meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery,

foreign clothing, jewellery, plated-ware, perfumery, soap of all kinds, charcoal,

firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco (foreign), cigars (foreign), wine, beer, spirits,

household stores, ship’s stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, druggeting,

cutlery, foreign medicines, glass, and crystal ware.

The above pay no import or export duty, but, if transported into the interior

will, with the exception of personal baggage, gold and silver bullion, and foreign coins,

pay a transit duty at the rate of 2| per cent, ad valorem.

A freight, or part freight, of duty-free commodities (personal baggage, gold

and silver bullion, and foreign coins, excepted) will render the vessel carrying them,

though no other cargo be on board, liable to tonnage dues.

Rule III.—Contraband Goods.—Import and export trade is alike prohibited in

the following articles: Gunpowder, shot, cannon, fowling-pieces, rifles, muskets,

pistols, and all other munitions and implements of war; and salt.

Rule IV.— Weights and Measures.—In the calculation of the Tariff, the weight

of a picul of one hundred catties is held to be equal to one hundred and thirty-three

and one-third pounds avoirdupois; and the length of a chang of ten Chinese feet to

be equal to one hundred and forty-one English inches.

One Chinese chih is held to be equal to fourteen and one-tenth inches English;

and four yards English, less three inches, to equal one chang.

RuleV.—Regarding Certain Commodities Heretofore Contraband.—The restric-

tions affecting trade in opium, cash, grain, pulse, sulphur, brimstone, saltpetre, and

spelter are relaxed, under the following conditions :—

!•—*Opium

will sell it only atwill

the henceforth

port. It willpaybethirty Taels

carried intoperthepicul importbyduty.

interior Theonly,

Chinese importer

and

only as Chinese property; the foreign trader will not be allowed to accompany it.

The provisions of Article IX. of the Treaty of Tientsin, by which British subjects

are authorized to proceed into the interior with passports to trade, will not

extend to it, nor will those of Article XXVII. of the same treaty, by which the

transit dues are regulated. The transit dues on it will be arranged as the Chinese

Government see fit: nor in future revisions of the Tariff is the same rule of revision

to be applied to opium as to other goods.

2.—Copper Cash.—The export of cash to any foreign port is prohibited; but it

shall be lawful

another, for Britishwith

on compliance subjects to ship it atRegulation:—The

the following one of the open shipper ports ofshall

Chinagiveto

^iee of the amount of cash he desires to ship, and the port of its destination, and

shall bind himself either by a bond, with two sufficient sureties, or by depositing

* For duty Opium see Convention signed in 1885, also the Treaty of 1902.

CUSTOMS TARIFF

such other security as may be deemed by the Customs satisfactory, to return, within

six months from the date of clearance, to the collector at the port of shipm mt, the

certificate issued by him, with an acknowledgment thereon of the receipt of the cash

at the port of destination by the collector at that port, who shall thereto affix his

seal; or failing the pi-oduction of the certificate, to forfeit a sum equal in value to

the cash shipped. Cash will pay no duty inwards or outwards ; but a freight or part

freight of cash, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel carrying it

liable to pay tonnage dues.

3. —The export of rice and all other grain whatsoever, native or foreign, n

where grown or whence imported, to any foreign port, is prohibited; but these

commodities may be carried by British merchants from one of the open ports of

China to another, under the same conditions in respect of security as cash, on pay-

ment at the port of shipment of the duty specified in the Tariff.

No import duty will be leviable on rice or grain; but a freight or part freight of

rice or grain, though no other cargo be on board, will render the vessel importing it

liable to tonnage dues.

4. —* The export of pulse and beancake from Tung-chau and Newchwa

the British flag, is prohibited. From any other of the ports they may be shipped, on

payment of the tariff duty, either to other ports of China, or to foreign countries.

5. —Saltpetre, sulphur, brimstone, and spelter, being munitions of war,

be imported by British subjects, save at the requisition of the Chinese Government,

or for sale to Chinese duly authorized to purchase them. No permit to land them

will be issued until the Customs have proof that the necessary authority has been

given to the purchase. It shall not be lawful for British subjects to carry these

commodities up the Yang-tsze-kiang, or into any port other than those open on the

seaboard, nor to accompany them into the interior on behalf of Chinese. They must

be sold at the ports only, and, except at the ports they will be regarded as Chinese

property.

Infractions of the conditions, as above set forth, under which trade in opium,

cash, grain, pulse, saltpetre, brimstone, sulphur, and spelter may be henceforward

carried on, will be punishable by confiscation of all the goods concerned.

Rule VI.—Liability of Vessels Entering Port. For the prevention of misunder-

standing, it is agreed that the term of twenty-four hours, within which British vessels

must be reported to the Consul under Article XXXVII. of the Treaty of Tientsin,

shall be understood to commence from the time a British vessel comes within the limits

of the port; as also the term of forty-eight hours allowed her by Article XXX. of the

same Treaty to remain in port without payment of tonnage dues.

The limits of the ports shall be defined by the Customs, with all consideration

for the convenience of trade compatible with due protection of the revenue; also the

limits of the anchorages within which lading and discharging is permitted by the

Customs; and the same shall be notified to the Consul for public information.

Rule VII.—Transit Dues.—It is agreed that Article XXXVIII. of the Treaty of

Tientsin shall be interpreted to declare the amounts of transit dues legally leviable

upon merchandise imported or exported by British subjects to be one-half of the tariff

duties, except in the case of the duty-free goods liable ito a transit duty of 2^ per cent.

ad valorem, as provided in Article II. of these Rules. Merchandise shall be cleared

of its transit dues under the following conditions:—

In the Case of Imports.—Notice being given at the port of entry, from which the

Imports are to be forwarded inland, of the nature and quantity of the goods, the ship

* NOTIFICATION.

ArticleandIV.bean-cake

Pulse of Rule No.may5 appended to theexported

be henceforth isBritish

Tariff offrom1858Tungchow ConsuIiAtk, Shanghai, 24tti March, 18G2.

rescinded.

andNative

Newchwang, and fromRegulation

all other ports in China

open by Treaty,

the 5th December on the same

last; port terms and

that isontopaymentconditions

say, theyofmay as are

be shipped applied to other produce

dutyofatbythethethehalf-duty bearing

anddate

charged at any Chinese half-duty, with onpower

payment

to claimof Tariff

drawback port of shipment, dis-

if re-exported.

By order, Waltbr H. Medhubst, Consul.

56 CUSTOMS TARIFF

from which they have been landed, and the place inland to which they are bound,

with all other necessary particulars, the Collector of Customs will, on due inspection

made, and on receipt of the transit duty due, issue a transit duty certificate. This

must be produced at every barrier station, and vised. No further duty will be leviable

upon imports so certificated, no matter how distant the place of their destination.

In the Case of Exports.—Produce purchased by a British subject in the interior

will be inspected, and taken account of, at the first barrier it passes on its way to the

port of shipment. A memorandum showing the amount of the produce and the port

at which it is to be shipped, will be deposited there by the person in charge of the

produce; he will then receive a certificate, which must be exhibited and vised at every

barrier, on his way to the port of shipment. On the arrival of the produce at the

barrier nearest the port notice must be given at the Customs at the port, and the

transit dues due thereon being paid it will be passed. On exportation the produce

will pay the tariff duty*.

Any attempt to pass goods inwards or outward otherwise than in compliance

with the rule here laid down will render them liable to confiscation.

Unauthorised sale, in transitu, of goods that have been entered as above for a

port, will render them liable to confiscation. Any attempt to pass goods in excess

of the quantity specified in the certificate will render all the goods of the same

denomination, named in the certificate, liable to confiscation. Permission to export

produce, which cannot be proved to have paid its transit dues, will be refused by the

Customs until the transit dues shall have been paid. The above being the arrange-

ment agreed to regarding the transit dues, which will thus be levied once and for all,

the notification required under Article XXVIII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, for the

information of British and Chinese subjects, is hereby dispensed with.

Rule VIII.—Peking Not Open to Trade.—It is agreed that Article IX. of the

Treaty of Tientsin shall not be interpreted as authorising British subjects to enter

the capital city of Peking for purposes of trade.

Rule IX.—Abolition of the Meltage Fee.—It is agreed that the percentage of one

Tael two Mace, hitherto charged in excess of duty payments to defray the expenses of

melting by the Chinese Government, shall be no longer levied on British subjects.

Rule X.—Collection of Duties Under One System at all Ports.—It being by Treaty

at the option of the Chinese Government to adopt what means appear to it best suited

to protect its revenue accruing on British trade, it is agreed that one uniform system

shall be enforced at every port.

The high officer appointed by the Chinese Government to superintend foreign

trade will, accordingly from time to time, either himself visit or will send a deputy

to visit the different ports. The said high officer will be at liberty, of his own choice,

and independently of the suggestion or nomination of any British authority, to select

any British subject he may see fit to aid him in the administration of the Customs

Revenue, in the prevention of smuggling, in the definition of port boundaries, or in

discharging the duties of harbour master; also in the distribution of lights, buoys,

beacons, and the like, the maintenance of which shall be provided for out of the

•tonnage dues.

The Chinese Government will adopt what measures it shall find requisite to

prevent smuggling upon the Yang-tsze-kiang, when that river shall be opened to

-trade.

Done at Shanghai, in the province of Kiang-su, this eighth day of November, in

i he yearmoon

tenth of our Lordeighth

of the eighteen

year hundred and offifty-eight,

of the reign Hien Fung.being the third day of the

[l.s.] Elgin and Kincardine.

Seal op Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Signatures op Five Chinese Plenipotentiaries.

See Chefoo Convention, Section III., Article 4.

EMIGRATION CONVENTION

Between the United Kingdom and China eespecting the Employment op

Chinese Labour in British Colonies and Protectorates

(Signed in London, 13f/i May, 1904)

■Whereas a Convention between Her Majesty Queen Victoria ,and His Majesty

the Emperor of China was signed at Peking on the 24th .October, 1860, by Article V.

of which His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China consented to allow Chinese

subjects, wishing to take service in British Colonies or other parts beyond the seas,

to enter into engagements with British subjects, and to ship themselves and their

families on board of British vessels at the open ports of China in conformity with

Regulations to be drawn up between the two Governments for the protection of such

emigrants:

And whereas the aforesaid Regulations have not hitherto been framed, His-

Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the

British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor

of China have accordingly appointed the following as their respective Plenipo-

tentiaries, that is to say :

His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of

the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, the Most Honourable

Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice, Marquess of Lansdowne, His Majesty’s

Principal Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs ; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Teh-Yih, Brevet Lieutenant-General

of the Chinese Imperial t'orces, His Imperial Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary at the Court of His Majesty the King of the United Kingdom

of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor

of India ;

And the said Plenipotentiaries having met and communicated to each other their

respective full powers, and found them in good and due form, have agreed upon and

concluded the following Articles :—

Art. I.—As the Regulations to be framed under the above-mentioned Treaty

were intended to be of a general character, it is hereby agreed that on each occasion

when indentured emigrants are required for a particular British Colony or Protectorate

beyond the seas, His Britannic Majesty’s Minister in Peking shall notify the Chinese-

Government, stating the name of the Treaty port at which it is intended to embark

them, and the terms and conditions on which they aie to be engaged; the Chinese

Government shall thereupon, without requiring further formalities, immediately

instruct the local authorities at the specified Treaty port to take all the steps

necessary to facilitate emigration. The notification herein referred to shall only be-

required once in the case of each Colony or Protectorate, except when emigration

under indenture to that Colony or Protectorate from the specified Treaty port has

not taken place during the preceding three years.

£8 EMIGRATION OONVENTION

Art. II.—On the receipt of the instructions above referred to, the Taotai at the

port shall at once appoint an officer, to be called the Chinese Inspector; who,

together with the British Consular Officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall make

known by Proclamation and by means of the native press the text of the Indenture

which the emigrant wi 11 have to sign, and any particulars of which the Chinese officer

considers it essential that the emigrant shall be informed, respecting the country to

which the emigrant is to proceed, and respecting its laws.

Art. III.—The British Consular officer at the port, or his Delegate, shall confer

with the Chinese Inspector as to the location and installation of the offices and other

necessary buildings, hereinafter called the Emigration Agency, which shall be erected

or fitted up by the British ‘Government, and at their expense, for the purpose of

•carrying on the business of the engagement and shipment of the emigrants, and in

which the Chinese Inspector and his staff shall have suitable accommodation for

carrying on their duties.

Art. TV.—(1.) There shall be posted up in conspicuous places throughout the

Emigration Agency, and more especially in that part of it called the Depot, destined

•for the reception of intending emigrants, copies of the Indenture to be entered into

with the emigrant, drawn up in the English and Chinese languages, together with

copies of the special Ordinance, if any, relating to immigration into the particular

Colony or Protectorate for which the emigrants are required. .

(2.) There shall be kept a Register in English and in Chinese, in which the names

of intending indentured emigrants shall be inscribed, and in this Register there shall

not be inscribed the name of any person who is under 20 years of age, unless he

shall have produced proof of his having obtained the consent of his parents or other

lawful guardians to emigrate, or, in default of these, of the Magistrate of the district

to which he belongs. After signature of the Indenture according to the Chinese

•manner, the emigrant shall not be permitted to leave the Depot previously to his

-embarkation, without a pass signed by the Chinese Inspector, and countersigned by

the British Consular Officer or his Delegate, unless he shall have, through the

^Chinese Inspector, renounced his agreement and withdrawn his name from the

register of emigrants.

(3.) Before the sailing of the ship each emigrant shall be carefully examined by a

qualified Medical Officer nominated by the British Consular Officer or his Delegate.

The emigrants shall be paraded before the British Consular Officer or his Delegate

and the Chinese Inspector or his Delegate, and questioned with a view to ascertain

their perfect understanding of the Indenture.

Art. Y.—All ships employed in the conveyance of indentured emigrants from

China under this Convention shall engage and embark them only at a Treaty port,

and shall comply with the Regulations contained in the Schedule hereto annexed and

forming part of the Convention.

Art. YI.—For the better protection of the emigrant, and of any other Chinese

subject who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the

emigration is to take place, it shall be competent to the Emperor of China to appoint

.a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such

Consul or Vice-Consul shall have all the rights and privileges accorded to the Consuls

of other nations.

.Art. VII.—Every Indenture entered into under the present Articles shall clearly

specify the name of the country for which the labourer is required, the duration of

the engagement, and, if renewable, on what terms, the number of hours of labour

per working day, the nature of the work, the rate of wages and mode of payment,

the rations, clothing, the grant of a free passage out, and, where such is provided for

herein, a free passage back to the port of embarkation in China for himself and family,

righu to free medical attendance and medicines, whether in the Colony or Protectorate,

or on the voyage from and to the port of embarkation in China, and any other

advantages to which the emigrant shall be entitled. The Indenture may also

EMIGRATION CONVENTION 59r'

provide that the emigrant shall, if considered necessary by the medical authorities,

be vaccinated on his arrival at the Depot, and in the event of such vaccination being-

unsuccessful, re-vaccinated on board ship.

Art. VIII.—The Indenture shall be signed, or in cases of illiteracy mai-ked, by

the emigrant after the Chinese manner, in the presence of the British Consular Officer

or his Delegate and of the Chinese Inspector or his Delegate, who shall be respons-

ible to their respective Governments for its provisions having been clearly and fully

explained to the emigrant previous to signature. To each emigrant there shall be

presented a copy of the Indenture drawn up in English and Chinese. Such Inden-

ture shall not be considered as definitive or irrevocable until after the embarkation-

of the emigrant.

Art. IX.—In every British Colony or Protectorate to which indentured Chinese

emigrants proceed, an officer or officers shall be appointed, whose duty it shall be to

insure

redressthat the emigrant

for injuries shall have

to his person free accesswhich

and property to theis secured

Courts ofto Justice to obtain

all persons, the

irrespec-

tive ofArt,.race, by the local law.

X.—During the sojourn of the emigrant in the Colony or Protectorate in

which he is employed, all possible postal facilities shall be afforded to him for com-

municating with his native country and for making remittances to his family.

Art. XI.—With regard to the repatriation of the emigrant and his family

whether on the expiration of the Indenture or from any legal cause, or in event of

his having been invalided from sickness or disablement, it is understood that this shall'

always be to the port of shipment in China, and that in no case shall it take place

by any other means than actual conveyance by ship, and payment of money to the

returning emigrant in lieu of passage shall not be admissible.

Art" XII.—Nothing in any Indenture framed under these Articles shall

constitute on the employer a right to transfer the emigrant to another employer

of labour without the emigrant’s free consent and the approval of his Consul or

Vice-Consul; and should any such transfer or assignment take place, it shall not in

anv way invalidate any of the rights or privileges of the emigrant under the

Indenture.

Art. XIII.—It is agreed that a fee on each indentured emigrant shipped under

the terms of this convention shall be paid to the Chinese Government for expenses of

inspection, but no payment of any kind shall be made to the Chinese Inspector or

anv other official of the Chinese Government at the port of embarkation. The above

fee* shall be paid into the Customs bank previous to the clearance of the ship, and

shall be calculated at the following rate:—3 Mexican dollars per head for any

number of emigrants not exceeding 10,000, and 2 dollars per head for any number

in excess thereof, provided they are shipped at the same Treaty port, and that not more

than twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment.

Should the port of embarkation have been changed, or a space of more than

twelve months have elapsed since the date of the last shipment, inspection charges

shall be paid as in the first instance.

Art. XIV.—The English and Chinese text of the present Convention have been

carefully compared, but in the event of there being any difference of meaning between

them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the correct sense.

Art. XV.—The present Convention shall come into force on the date of its

signature and remain in force for four years from that date, and after such period

of four years it shall be terminable by either of the high contracting parties on

giving one year’s notice.

In witness whereof the Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Convention, -

and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at London in four copies (two in English and two in Chinese), this

thirteenth day of May of the year 1904.

(Signed) Lansdownk.

T. Y. Chang.

^80 EMIGRATION CONVENTION

SCHEDULE

Regulations

Ships employed in the transport of indentured emigrants from China under this

Convention must be seaworthy, clean, and properly ventilated, and with regard to

the following matters, shall comply with conditions as far as possible equivalent to

-those in force in British India with reference to the emigration of natives from India:—

Accommodation required on board (vide Section 57 of “ The Indian Emigration

Act, 1883”).

Sleeping accommodation consisting of wooden sheathing to the decks or

sleeping platforms (vide rule regarding “ iron decks,” as amended the 16th August,

1902, in Schedule “A” to the rules under “The Indian Emigration Act, 1883”).

Rules as to space on board (vide Section 58 of “The Indian EmigraCon

Act, 1883”).

Carriage of qualified surgeon, with necessary medical stores.

Storage of drinking water (vide Rule 113, as amended the 24th February, 1903.

under “The Indian Emigration Act, 1883 ”).

Provision of adequate distilling apparatus (vide Schedule “ C ” to the rules

under “ The Indian Emigration Act, 1883 ”).

The dietary for each indentured emigrant on board ship shall be as follows per

• day:—

Rice, not less than H lb., or flour or bread stuffs 11 lb

Fish (dried or salt) or meat (fresh or preserved) Of „

Fresh vegetables of suitable kinds If „

Salt 1 oz.

Sugar . If „

Chinese tea ■ Of „

Chinese condiments in sufficient quantities.

Water, for drinking and cooking 1 gallon

. or such other articles of food as may be substituted for any of the articles enumerat-

ed in the foregoing scale as being in the opinion of the doctor on board equivalent

-thereto.

Notes Exchanged Between the Marquess op Lansdowne and the Chinese

Minister on Signing Convention op May 13th, 1904

Foreign Office, London, May 13th, 1904.

Sir,—By Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded between Great

Britain and China with regard to Chinese subjects leaving the Treaty ports of China

under Indenture for service in British Colonies or Protectorates, it is provided

-that:—

“ For the better protection of the emigrant and of any other Chinese subject

-who may happen to be residing in the Colony or Protectorate to which the

EMIGRATION CONVENTION 61

• emigration is to take place, it shall he competent to the Emperor of China to appoint

a Consul or Vice-Consul to watch over their interests and well-being, and such

Consul or Vice-Consul shall have all the rights and privileges accorded to the Consul

of other nations.”

His Majesty’s Government consider it specially important that the persons

appointed to occupy, for the purpose named, the position of Consul or Vice-Consul

-should be experienced officers of Chinese nationality, that they should be exclusively

in the service of the Emperor of China, and that in each case the name of the person

-selected should be communicated to His Majesty’s Government, and their agreement

to the appointment obtained.

I have the honour to inquire whether the Chinese Government are prepared to

meet the wishes of His Majesty’s Government in the matter. If so, and if you will

inform me accordingly, this note and your reply might be attached to the Convention

in order to place on formal record the arrangement conclude 1.—I have, &c.

(Signed) Lansdowne.

Chang Ta-Jen, etc., etc., etc.

Chinese Legation, London,

May 13th, 1904.

My Lord Marquess,—In reply to your Lordship’s note of this date, I have the

honour to state that the Chinese Government are in entire accord with His Britannic

Majesty’s Government as to the great importance they attach to the Consuls and Vice-

-Consuls to be appointed under Article VI. of the Convention about to be concluded

between the two Governments being men of great experience, and will consider it a

duty which they owe to the emigrant to confine the selection of these officers to such

as in all respects conform to the requirements specified in the note above referred to,

which, together with the present one, it has been mutually agreed shall, in proof of

that understanding, be appended to the said Convention.—I have, &c.

(Signed) T. Y. Chang.

The Marquess of Lansdowne, K. G.,

etc., etc., etc.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM

AND RUSSIA WITH REGARD TO THEIR RESPECTIVE

RAILWAY INTERESTS IN CHINA

No. 1

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

The Undersigned, British Ambassador, duly authorized to that effect, has the

honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Count Mouravieff,

Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs:—

Great Britain and Russia, animated by a sincere desire to avoid in China all

cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera-

tion the economic and geographical gravitation of ceitain parts of that Empire^

have agreed as follows:—

1. Great Britain engages not to seek for her own account, or on behalf of

British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the Great .

Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway

concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.

2. —Russia, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account,

of Russian subjects or of others, any railway concessions in the basin of the Yang-

tze, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in

that region supported by the British Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view to infringe in any way the

sovereign rights of China or existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate to the

Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause of com-

plications between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East, and to-

serve the primordial interests of China herself.

(Signed) Charles S. Scott.

St. Petersburg, April 28, 1899.

The Undersigned, Russian Minister for Foreign Affairs, duly authorized to that

effect, has the honour to make the following declaration to his Excellency Sir Charles

Scott, British Ambassador:—■

. Russia and Great Britain, animated by the sincere desire to avoid in China all

cause of conflict on questions where their interests meet, and taking into considera-

tion the economic and geographical gravitation of certain parts of that Empire, have

agreed as follows—

. 1-—Russia

subjects engages

or of others, anynot to seek

railway for her own

concessions in theaccount,

basin ofortheon Yangtze,

behalf of and

Russian

not

to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for railway concessions in that region

supported by the British Government.

EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AND RUSSIA 03

2.—Great Britain, on her part, engages not to seek for her own account, or on

%ehalf of British subjects or of others, any railway concessions to the north of the

Great Wall of China, and not to obstruct, directly or indirectly, applications for

railway concessions in that region supported by the Russian Government.

The two Contracting Parties, having nowise in view • to infringe in any way

the sovereign rights of China or of existing Treaties, will not fail to communicate

to the Chinese Government the present arrangement, which, by averting all cause

of complication between them, is of a nature to consolidate peace in the Far East,

and to serve the primordial interests of China herself.

The Undersigned, etc. (Signed) Count Mouravieff.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

No. 3

Sir C. Scott to Count Mouravieff

In order to complete the Notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of

•spheres for concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it

has been agreed to record in the present additional Note the arrangement arrived

at with regard to the line Shanhaikuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which

a loan has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-

Hongkong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned Notes is not to

infringe in any wav the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the

Chinese Government may appoint both an English engineer and an European

accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question, and the expenditure

of the money appropriated to it.

But it remains understood that this fact cannot be taken as constituting a

right of property or foreign control, and that the line in question is to remain a

^Chinese line, under the control of the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged

or alienated to a non-Chinese Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaoheichan to Sinminting, in addition to the

aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China her-

self, who may permit European—not necessarily British—engineers to periodically

inspect it, and to verify and certify that the work is being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with the

right of the Russian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of Russian

subjects or establishments for concessions for railways, which, starting from the

main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region in

which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be constructed.

(Signed) Charles S. Scott.

St. Petersburg, April 28th, 1899.

No. 4

Count Mouravieff to Sir C. Scott

In order to complete the Notes exchanged this day respecting the partition of

spheres for concessions for the construction and working of railways in China, it has

been agreed to record in the present additional Note the Agreement arrived at with

64 AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

regard to the line Shanhailcuan-Newchwang, for the construction of which a loan

has been already contracted by the Chinese Government with the Shanghai-Hong-

kong Bank, acting on behalf of the British and Chinese Corporation.

The general arrangement established by the above-mentioned Notes is not to

infringe in any way the rights acquired under the said Loan Contract, and the

Chinese Government is at liberty to appoint both an English engineer and an

European accountant to supervise the construction of the line in question and the

expenditure of the money appropriated to it. But it remains well uudei-stood that

this fact cannot be taken as constituting a right of property or foreign control,

and that the line in question is te remain a Chinese line, subject to the control of

the Chinese Government, and cannot be mortgaged or alienated to a non-Chinese

Company.

As regards the branch line from Siaohe'ichan to Sinminting, in addition to

the aforesaid restrictions, it has been agreed that it is to be constructed by China

herself, who may permit European—not necessarily British—engineers to periodi-

cally inspect it, and to verify and certify that the works are being properly executed.

The present special Agreement is naturally not to interfere in any way with

the right of the Eussian Government to support, if it thinks fit, applications of

Eussian subjects or establishments for concessions for railways, which, starting from

the main Manchurian line in a south-westerly direction, would traverse the region

in which the Chinese line terminating at Sinminting and Newchwang is to be

constructed.

The Undersigned, etc.

(Signed) Count Moueavieff.

St. Petersburg, April 16 (28), 1899.

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Signed at Pekiflg, April 2.7th, 1906

To Which is Annexed the Convention Between the United Kingdom-

and Tibet, Signed at Lhasa, Septembee 7th, 1904

Ratifications exchanged at London, July 23rd, 1906

Whereas His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland and of the British

Dominions beyond the Seas, Emperor of India, and His Majesty the Emperor of China

are sincerely desirous to maintain and perpetuate the relations of friendship and

good understanding which now exist between their respective Empires ;

And whereas

full effect the refusal

the provisions of the ofAnglo-Chinese

Tibet to recognise the validity

Convention of Marchof17th,

or to carry

1890, into

and

Regulations of December 5th, 1893, placed the British Government under

of taking steps to secure their rights and interests under the said Conventionthe necessity

and

Regulations j

AGBEEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET 65'

And whereas a Convention of ten articles was signed at Lhasa on September

7th, 1904, on behalf of Great Britain and Tibet, and was ratified by the Viceroy and

Governor-General of India on behalf of Great Britain on November 11th, 1904, a

declaration on behalf of Great Britain modifying its terms under certain conditions

being appended thereto;

His Britannic Majesty and His Majesty the Emperor of China have resolved to

conclude a Convention on this subject, and have for this purpose named Plenipoten-

tiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the King of Great Britain and Ireland :

Sir Ernest Mason Satow, Knight Grand Cross of the Most Distinguished Order

of Saint Michael and Saint George, His said Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of China; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China:

His Excellency Tang Shao-yi, His said Majesty’s High Commissioner Pleni-

potentiary and a Vice-President of the Board of Foreign Affairs ;

Who, having communicated to each other their respective full powers and find*

ing them to be in good and true form, have agreed upon and concluded the follow-

ing Convention in Six Articles:—

Art. I.—The Convention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain,

and Tibet, the texts of which in English and Chinese are attached to the present

Convention as an Annex, is hereby confirmed, subject to the modification stated in

the declaration appended thereto, and both of the High Contracting Parties engage-

to take at all times such steps as may be necessary to secure the due fulfilment of the-

terms specified therein.

Art. II.—The Government of Great Britain engages not to annex Tibetan

territory or to interfere in the administration of Tibet. The Government of China.

also undertakes not to permit any other foreign State to interfere with the territory

or internal administration of Tibet.

Art. III.—The concessions which are mentioned in Article 9 (d) of the Con-

vention concluded on September 7th, 1904, by Great Britain and Tibet are denied to-

any State or to the subject of any State other than China, but it has been arranged

with China that at the trade marts specified in Article,2 of the aforesaid Convention

Great Britain shall be entitled to lay down telegraph lines connecting with India.

Art. IV.—The provisions of the Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890 and

Regulations of 1893 shall, subject to the terms of this present Convention and

Annex thereto, remain in full force.

Art. V.—The English and Chinese texts of the present Convention have been

carefully compared and found to correspond, but in the event of there being any

difference of meaning between them the English text shall be authoritative.

Art. VI.—This Convention shall be ratified by the Sovereigns of both countries

and ratifications shall be exchanged in London within three months after the date

of signature by the Plenipotentiaries of both Powers.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Convention, four copies in English and four in Chinese.

Done at Peking this twenty-seventh day of April, one thousand nine hundred

and six, being the fourth day of the fourth month of the thirty-second year of the-

reign of Kuang Hsu.

[l.s.] Ernest Satow.

(Signature and Seal of the Chinese

Plenipotentiary.)

€6 AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Signed at Lhasa, 7th September, 1904

Whereas doubts and difficulties have arisen as to the meaning and validity of the

Anglo-Chinese Convention of 1890, and the Trade Regulations of 1893, and as to the

liabilities of the Tibetan Government'under these agreements; and whereas recent

occurrences have tended towards a disturbance of the relations of friendship and good

understanding which have-existed between the British Go vernmentand the Government

of Tibet; and whereas it is desirable to restore peace and amicable relations and to

resolve and determine the doubts and difficulties as aforesaid, the said Governments

have resolved to conclude a Convention with these objects, and the following Articles

have been agreed upon by Colonel F. E. Younghusband, C.I.E., in virtue of full powers

vested in him by His Britannic Majesty’s Government and on behalf of that said

Government, and Lo-Sang Gyal-Tsen, theGa-den Ti-Rimpoche, and the representatives

of the Council of the three monasteries Se-ra, Dre-pung, and Ga-den, and of the

ecclesiastical and lay officials of the National Assembly' on behalf of the Government

of Tibet: —

I. —The Government of Tibet engages to respect the Anglo

lft90 and to recognise the frontier between Sikkim and Tibet, as defined in Article 3.

of the said Convention, and to erect boundary pillars accordingly.

II. —The Tibetan Government undertakes to open forth

all British and Tibetan subjects shall have fred right of access at Gyangtse and Gartok,

as well as at Yatung.

The Regulations applicable to the trade mart at Yatung, under the Anglo-Chinese

Agreement of 1893, shall, subject to such amendments as may hereafter be agreed upon

by common consent between the British and Tibetan Governments, apply to the marts

above mentioned.

In addition to establishing trade marts at the places mentioned, the Tibetan

Government undertakes to place no restrictions on the trade by existing routes, and to

consider the question of establishing fresh trade marts under similar conditions if

development of trade requires it.

HI.—The question of the amendment of the Regulations of 1893 is reserved for

separate consideration, and the Tibetan Government undertakes to appoint fully

authorised delegates to negotiate with representatives of the British Government as

to the details of the amendments required.

IY.—The Tibetan Government undertakes to levy no dues of any kind other than

those provided for in the tariff to be mutually agreed upon.

Gartok V-—The Tibetan

from the Government

frontier clear of allundertakes

obstructiontoand

keepin athestateroads to Gyangtse

of repair suited to and

the

needs of the trade, and to establish at Yatung, Gyangtse and Gartok, and at each of

the other trade marts that may hereafter be established, a Tibetan Agent who shall

receive from the British Agent appointed to watch over British trade at the marts in

question any letter which the latter may desire to send to the Tibetan or to the Chinese

authorities. The Tibetan Agent shall also be responsible for the due delivery of such

communications and for the transmission of replies.

VI. of armed troops—As

despatch an indemnity

to Lhasa, to exact reparation to the British

for breaches of treatyGovernment

obligations,fo

and for the insults offered to and attacks upon the British Commissioner and his

following and escort, the Tibetan Government engages to pay a sum of Pounds five

hundred

The thousand,

indemnityequivalent to Rupees

shall be payable seventy-five

at such place aslakhs,

the toBritish

the British Government.

Government may

from time to time, after due notice, indicate, whether in Tibet or in the British districts

of Darjeeling or Jalpaiguri, in seventy-five annual instalments of Rupees one lakh each

on the 1st January in each year, beginning from the 1st January, 1906.

VII. —As security for the payment of the above-m

fulfilmentof the provisions relative to trade marts specifiedin Articles II., III., IV., and V.,

AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET 67

the British Government shall continue to occupy the Chumbi Yalley until the

indemnity has been paid and until the trade marts have been effectively opened for

three years, whichever date may be the later.

VIII. —The Tibetan Government agrees to raze all forts and

remove all armaments which might impede the course of free communications between

the British frontier and the towns of Gyangtse and Lhasa.

IX. —The Government of Tibet engages that, without the previous

British Government—

(a) No portion of Tibetan territory shall be ceded, sold, leased, mortgaged, or

otherwise given for occupation, to any foreign Power;

(b) No such Power shall be permitted to intervene in Tibetan affairs;

(c) No representatives or agents of any foreign Power shall be admitted to Tibet;

(d) No concessions for railways, roads, telegraphs, mining or other rights, shall

be granted to any foreign Power, or the subject of any foreign Power. In the event

of consent to such concessions being granted, similar or equivalent concessions shall

be granted to the British Government;

(e) No Tibetan revenues, whether in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned

to any foreign Power, or the subject of any foreign Power.

X. —In witness whereof the negotiators have signed the same, and af

unto the seals of their arms.

Done in quintuplicate at Lhasa, this 7th day of September, in the year of our

Lord one thousand nine hundred and four, corresponding with the libetan date,

the 27th day of the seventh mouth of the Wood Dragon year.

Arrangement Between Great Britain and Bdssia Concerning Tibet

The Governments of Britain and Russia recognizing the suzerain r ghts of China

in Tibet, and considering the fact that Great Britain, by reason of her geographical

position, has a special interest in the maintenance of the status quo in the external

relations of Tibet, have made the following Arrangement:—

I. —The two High Contracting Parties engage to respect the territoria

of Tibet and to abstain from all interference in its internal administration.

II. —In conformity with the admitted principle of the suzerainty of

Tibet, Great Britain and Russia engage not to enter into negotiations with Tibet

except through the intermediary of the Chinese Government. This engagement does

not exclude the direct relations between British Commercial Agents and the Tibetan

authorities provided for in Article V. of the Convention between Great Britain and

Tibet of September 7th, 1904, and confirmed by the Convention between Great

Britain and China of April 27th, 1906; nor does it modify the engagements entered

into by Great Britain and China in Article I. of the said Convention of 1906.

It is clearly understood that Buddhists, subjects of Great Britain or of Russia,,

may enter into direct relations on strictly religious matters with the Dalai Lama and

the other representatives of Buddhism in Tibet; the Governments of Great Britain

and Russia engage, as far as they are concerned, not to allow those relations to

infringe the stipulations of the present arrangement.

III. —The British and Russian Governments respectively engag

representatives to Lhasa.

IY.—The two High Contracting Parties engage neither to seek nor to obtain,

whether for themselves or their subjects, any concessions for railways, roads, tele-

graphs and mines, or other rights in Tibet.

Y.—The two Governments agree that no part of the revenues of Tibet, whether

in kind or in cash, shall be pledged or assigned to Great Britain or Russia or to any

of their subjects.

3*

"68 AGREEMENTS RESPECTING TIBET

Annex

Great Britain reaffirms the Declaration, signed by His Excellency .the Viceroy

and Governor-General of India and appended to the ratification of the Convention of

September 7th, 1904, to the effect that the occupation of the Chumbi Wley by

British forces shall cease after the payment of three annual instalments of the

indemnity of 25,000,000 Rupees, provided that the trade marts mentioned in'Article

II. of that Convention have been effectively opened for three years, and that in the

meantime the Tibetan authorities have faithfully’complied! in all respects with the

terms of the said Convention of 1904. It is clearly understood that if the occupa-

tion of the Chumbi Valley by the British forces has, for any reason, not been

terminated at the time anticipated in the above Declaration, the British and Russian

Governments will enter upon a friendly exchange of views on this subject.

The present Convention shall be ratified, and the ratifications exchanged at St.

Petersburg as soon as possible.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present

•Convention and affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at St. Petersburg, the 18th (31st) August, 1907.

[l.s.] A. Nicoeson.

[X.S.] ISWOLSKY.

St. Petersburg, August 18<7i (31si)> 1907

M. le Ministre,—With reference to the Arrangement regarding Tibet, signed to-

day, I have the honour to make the following Declaration to your Excellency :—

“ His Britannic Majesty’s Government think it desirable, so far as they are

concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the Russian Government,

for a period of three years from the date of the present communication, the entry

into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever, on condition that a like assurance is

given on the part of the Imperial Russian Government.

“ His Britannic Majesty’s Government propose, moreover, to approach the

Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similiar obligation for a

corresponding Period; the Russian Government will, as a matter of course, take

similar action.

“At the expiration of the term of three years above mentioned His Britannic

Majesty’s Government will, if necessary, consult with the Russian Government as to

the desirability of any ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet.’'

I have, etc.,

A. Nicolson.

St. Petersburg, August 18th (31st), 1907

M. 1’Ambassadeur,—In reply to your Excellency’s note of even date, I have the

honour to declare that the Imperial Russian Government think it desirable, so far as

they are concerned, not to allow, unless by a previous agreement with the British

Government, for a period of three years from the date of the present communication,

the entry into Tibet of any scientific mission whatever.

Like the British Government, the Imperial Government propose to approach the

Chinese Government with a view to induce them to accept a similar obligation for a

corresponding period.

It is understood that at the expiration of the term of three years the two

Governments will, if necessary, consult with each other as to the desirability of any

ulterior measures with regard to scientific expeditions to Tibet.

I have, etc.,

ISWOLSKY.

OPIUM AGREEMENT

[Done at Peking, May 8th, 1911]

Under the arrangement concluded between His Majesty’s Government and the

Chinese Government three years ago, His Majesty’s Government undertook that if

during the period of three years from January 1st, 1908, the Chinese Government

should duly carry out the arrangement on their part for reducing the production

and consumption of opium in China, they would continue in the same proportion of

ten per cent, the annual diminution of the export of opium from India, until the

completion of the full period of ten years in 1917.

His Majesty’s Government, recognizing the sincerity of the Chinese Govern-

ment, and their pronounced success in diminishing the production of opium in China

during the past three years, are prepared to continue the arrangement of 1907 for

the unexpired period of seven years on the following conditions:—

I. —From the first of January, 1911, China shall diminish ann

years the production of opium in China in the same proportion as the annual export

from India is diminished in accordance with the terms of Agreement and of the

Annex appended hereto until total extinction in 1917.

II. — The Chinese Government have adopted a most rigorous p

ing the production, the transport and the smoking of native opium, and His

Majesty’s Government have expressed their agreement therewith and willingness to

give every as-istance. With a view to facilitating the continuance of this work. His

Majesty’s Government agree that the export of opium from India to China shall

cease in less than seven years if clear proof is given of the complete absence of

native opium in China.

III. —His Majesty’s Government further agree that Indian

conveyed into any province in China which can establish by clear evidence that it

has effectively suppressed the cultivation and import of native opium.

It is understood, however, that the closing of the ports of Canton and Shanghai

to the import of Indian opium shall not take effect except as the final step on the

part of the Chinese Government for the completion of the above measure.

IV. —During the period of this Agreement it shall be p

Majesty’s Government to obtain continuous evidence of this diminution by local

enquiries and investigation conducted by one or more British officials accompanied,

if the Chinese Government so desire, by a Chinese official. Their decision as to the

extent of cultivation shall be accepted by both parties to this Agreement,

During the above period one or more British officials shall be given facilities for

reporting on the taxation and trade restrictions on opium away from the Treaty

ports.

. Y.—By the arrangement of 1907 His Majesty’s Government agreed to the

despatch by China of an official to India to watch the opium sales on condition that

such official would have no power of interference. His Majesty’s Government

further agree that the official so despatched may be present at the packing of opium

on the same condition.

70 OPIUM AGREEMENT

YI.—The Chinese Government nudeitake to levy a uniform tax on all opium

grown in the Chinese Empire. His Majesty’s Government consent to increase the

present consolidated import duty on Indian opium to Tls. 350 per chest of 100

catties, such increase to take effect as soon as the Chinese Government levy an

equivalent excise tax on all native opium.

VII. —On confirmation of this Agreement and begin

the new rate of consolidated import duty, China will at once cause to1 be withdrawn

all restrictions placed by the Provincial authorities on the wholesale trade in Indian

opium, such as those recently imposed at Canton and elsewhere, and. also all taxation

on the wholesale trade other than the consolidated import duty, and no such

restrictions or taxation shall be again imposed so long as the- Additional Article to

the Chefoo Agreement remains as at present in force.

It is also understood that Indian raw opium having paid the consolidated

import duty shall be exempt from any further taxation whatsoever in the port of

import.

Should the conditions contained in the above two clauses not be duly observed.

His Majesty’s Government shall be at liberty to suspend or terminate this

Agreement at any time.

The foregoing stipulations shall not derogate in any manner from the force of

the laws already published or hereafter to be published by the Imperial Chinese

G-overnment to suppress the smoking of opium and to regulate the retail trade in

the drug in general.

VIII. —With a view to assisting China in the

Majesty’s Government undertake that from the year 1911 the Government of India

will issue an export permit with a consecutive number for each chest of Indian

opium declared for shipment to or for consumption in China.

During the year 1911 the number of permits so issued shall not exceed 30,600

and shall be progressively reduced annually by 5,100 during the remaining six years

ending 1917.

A copy of each permit so issued shall, before shipment of opium declared for

shipment to or consumption in China, be handed to the Chinese official for trans-

mission to his Government, or to the Customs authorities in China.

His Majesty’s Government undertake that each chest of opium for which such

permit has been granted shall be sealed by an official deputed by the Indian

Government in the presence of the Chinese official if so requested.

The Chinese Government undertake that chests of opium so sealed and

accompanied by such permits may be imported into any Treaty Port of China

without let or hindrance if such seals remain unbroken.

IX. —Should it appear on subsequent experience des

the unexpired portion of seven years to modify this Agreement or any part thereof,

it may be revised by mutual consent of the two high contracting parties.

X. —This Agreement shall come into force on the date of

In witness whereof the undersigned, duly authorized thereto, by their respective

Governments, have signed the same and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done at Peking in quadruplicate (four in English and four in Chinese) this

eighth day of May, one thousand nine hundred and eleven, being the tenth day of

the fourth month of the third year of Hsuan T’ung.

[l.s.] J. N. Jordan. [l.s.] Tsou Cbia-Lat.

OPIUM AGREEMENT 71

Annex

On the date of the signature of the Agreement a list shall he taken by the

'Commissioners of Customs acting in concert with the Colonial and Consular officials

of all uncertified Indian opium in bond at the Treaty Ports and of all uncertified

opium in stock in Hongkong which is bond fide intended for the Chinese market,

and all such opium shall be marked with labels and on payment of Tls. 110 con-

solidated import duty shall be entitled to the same Treaty rights and privileges in

China as certificated opium.

Opium so marked and in stock in Hongkong must be exported to a Chinese

•port within seven days of the signature of the Agreement.

All other uncertificated Indian opium shall for a period of two months from the

date of C’e signature of the Agreement be landed at the ports of Shanghai and Canton

•only, and at the expiration of this period all Treaty Ports shall be closed to uncerti-

ficated opium provided the Chinese Government have obtained the consent of the

•other Treaty Powers.

The Imperial Maritime Customs shall keep a return of all nncertificated opium

landed at Shanghai and Canton during this period of two months, other than opium

marked and labelled as provided above, and such opium shall pay the new rate of

consolidated import duty and shall not be re-exported in bond to other Treaty ports.

In addition to the annual reduction of 5,100 chests already agreed upon, His

Maiesty’s Government agree further to reduce the import of Indian opium during

each of the years 1912, IH13 and 1914 by an amount equal to one-third of the total

ascertained amount of the uncertificated Indian opium in bond in Chinese Treaty

Ports, and in stock in Hongkong on the date of signature, plus one-third of the

amount of uncertificated' Indian opium landed during the ensuing two months af

Shanghai and Canton.

Done at Peking this eighth day of May one thousand nine hundred and eleven,

being the tenth day of the fourth month of the third year of Hsuan Tung.

[l.s.] J 1ST. Jordan. [e.s.] Tsod Chia-Lai.

FRANCE

TEEATY OE PEACE, ERIENDSHIP, COMMERCE, AND*

NAVIGATION BETWEEN ERANCE ANI> CHINA

Signed, in the French and Chinese Languages, at Tientsin, 27th June, ISSB'

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking, 25th October, I860-

His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China,,

being desirous to put an end to the existing misunderstanding between the two

Empires, and wishing to re-establish and improve the relations of friendship, com-

merce, and navigation between the two Powers, have resolved to conclude a new

Treaty based on the common interest of the two countries, and for that purpose have

named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Baron Gros, Grand Officer of the Legion

of Honour, Grand Cross of the Order of the Saviour of Greece, Commander of the

Order of the Conception of Portugal, etc., etc., etc.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, Imperial High Commis-

sioner of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, Grand Minister of the East Palace, Director-General

of the Council of Justice, etc., etc., etc.; andHwashana, Imperial High Commissioner

of the Ta-Tsing Dynasty, President of the Board of Finance, General of the Bordered

Blue Banner of the Chinese Banner Force, etc., etc., etc.;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, which they have found in good and

due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty the

Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between the

subjects of the two Empires, who shall enjoy equally in the respective States of the

high contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—In order to maintain the peace so happily re-established between the

two empires it has been agreed between the high contracting parties that, following

in this respect the practice amongst Western nations, the duly accredited diplomatic-

agents of His Majesty the Emperor of the French and of His Maj esty the Emperor of China

shall have the right of resorting to the capital of the empire when important affairs

call them there. It is agreed between the high contracting parties that if any one

of the Powers having a treaty with China obtains for its diplomatic agents the right

of permanently residing at Peking, France shall immediately enjoy the same right.

The diplomatic agents shall reciprocally enjoy, in the place of their residence,

the privileges and immunities accorded to them by international law,, that is to say,

that their persons, their families, their houses, and their correspondence, shall be

inviolable, that they may take into their service such employes, courier's, interpreters,

servants, etc., etc., as shall be necessary to them.

The expense of every kind occasioned by the diplomatic mission of France in

China shall be defrayed by the French Government. The diplomatic agents whom

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 73

iit shall please the Emperor of China to accredit to His Majesty the Emperor of

the French, shall be received in France with all* the honours and prerogatives which

the diplomatic agents of other nations accredited to the Court of His Majesty the

Emperor of the French enjoy.

Art. III.—The official communications of the French diplomatic and consular

agents with the Chinese authorities shall he written in French, but shall be accom-

panied, to facilitate the service, by a Chinese translation, as exact as possible, until

such time as the Imperial Government at Peking, having interpreters speaking

and writing French correctly, diplomatic correspondence shall be conducted in this

language by the French agents and in Chinese by the officers of the Empire.

It is agreed that until then, and in case of difference in the interpretation, in

reference to the French text and Chinese text of the clauses heretofore agreed upon

in the conventions made by common accord, it shall always be the original text and

not the translation which shall be held correct. This provision applies to the

present Treaty, and in the communications between the authorities of the two

countries it shall always be the original text, not the translation, which shall be

held correct.

Art. IV.—Henceforth the official correspondence between the authorities and the

officers of the two countries shall be regulated according to their respective ranks and

conditions and upon the basis of the most absolute reciprocity. This correspondence

shall take place between the high French officers and high Chinese officers, in

the capital or elsewhere, by dispatch or communication; between the French sub-

ordinate officers and the high authorities in the provinces, on the part of the former

by statement, and on the part of the latter by declaration.

Between the officers of lower rank of the two nations, as above provided, bn

the footing of a perfect equality.

Merchants and generally all persons not having an official character shall on both

■sides use the form of representation in all documents addressed to or intended for the

notice of the respective authorities.

Whenever a French subject shall have recourse to the Chinese authority, his

representation shall first be submitted to the Consul, who, if it appears to him

reasonable and properly addressed, shall forward it; if it be otherwise, the Consul

shall cause the tenour to be modified or refuse to transmit it. The Chinese, on their

part, when they have to address a Consulate, shall follow a similar course towards

the Chinese authority, who shall act in the same manner.

Art. V.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French may appoint Consuls or Con-

sular Agents in the coast and river ports of the Chinese empire named in Article VI.

of the present Treaty to conduct the business between the Chinese authorities and

French merchants and subjects and to see to the strict observance of the stipulated

rules. These officers shall be treated with the consideration and regard which are

due to them. Their relations with the authorities of the place of their residence

shall be established on the footing of the most perfect equality. If they shall have

to complain of the proceedings of the said authorities, they may address the superior

authority of the province direct, and shall immediately advise the Minister Plenipo-

tentiary of the Emperor thereof.

In case of the absence of the French Consul, captains and merchants shall be

at liberty to have recourse to the intervention of the Consul of a friendly Power, or,

if this be impossible, they shall have recourse to the chief of the Customs, who shall

advise as to the means of assuring to the said captains and merchants the benefits of

the present Treaty.

Art. VI.—Experience having demonstrated that the opening of new ports to

foreign commerce is one of the necessities of the age, it has been agreed that the

forts of Kiung-chow and Chao-chow in the province of Kwangtung, Taiwan and

Tamsui in the island of Formosa (province of Fohkien), Tang-chow in the pro-

vince of Shantung, and Nanking in the province of Kiangsu, shall enjoy the same

privileges as Canton, Shanghai, Ningpo, Amoy, and Foochow. With regard to

74 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Nanking, the French agents in China shall not deliver passports to their nationals

for this city until the rebels have been expelled by the Imperial troops.

Art. VII.—French subjects and their families may establish themselves and

trade or pursue their avocations in all security, and without hindrance of any kind

in the ports and cities enumerated in the preceding Article.

They may travel freely between them if they are provided with passports, but

it is expressly forbidden to them to trade elsewhere on the coast in search of

clandestine markets, under pain of confiscation of both the ships and goods used in

such operations, and this confiscation shall be for the benefit of the Chinese G-overn-

ment, who, however, before the seizure and confiscation can be legally pronounced,

must advise the French Consul at the nearest port.

Art. VIII.—French subjects who wish to go to interior towns, or ports not open

to foreign vessels, may do so in all security, on the express condition that they are

provided with passports written in French and Chinese, legally delivered by the

diplomatic agents or Consuls of France in China and vised by the Chinese authorities..

In case of the loss of his passport, the French subject who cannot present it

when it is legally required of him shall, if the Chinese authorities of the place refuse

him permission to remain a sufficient time to obtain another passport from the

Consul, be conducted to the nearest Consulate and shall not be maltreated or insulted

in any way.

As is stipulated in the former Treaties, French subjects resident or sojourning

in the ports open to foreign trade may travel without passports in their immediate

neighbourhood and there pursue their occupations as freely as the natives, but they

must not pass certain limits which shall be agreed upon between the Consul and the

local authority. The French agents in China shall deliver passports to their

nationals only for the places where the rebels are not established at the time the

passport shall be demanded.

These passports shall be delivered by the French authorities only to persons

who offer every desirable guarantee.

Art. IX.—All changes made by common consent with one of the signatory Powers

of the treaties with China on the subject of amelioration of the tariff now in force, or

which may hereafter be in force, as also all rights of customs, tonnage, importation,

transit, and exportation, shall be immediately applicable to French trade and mer-

chants by the mere fact of their being placed in execution.

Art. X.—Any French subject who, conformably to the stipulations of Article

VI. of the present Treaty, shall arrive at one of the ports open to foreign trade, may,

whatever may be the length of his sojourn, rent houses and warehouses for the

disposal of his merchandise, or lease land and himself build houses and warehouses.

French subjects may, in the same manner, establish churches, hospitals, religious

houses, schools, and cemeteries. To this end the local authority, after having

agreed with the Consul, shall designate the quarters most suitable for the residence

of the French and the sites on which the above-mentioned structures may have

place.

The terms of rents and leases shall be freely discussed between the interested

parties and regulated, as far as possible, according to the average local rates.

The Chinese authorities shall prevent their nationals from exacting or requiring

exorbitant prices, and the Consul on his side shall see that French subjects use no

violence or constraint to force the consent of the proprietors. It is further under-

stood that the number of houses and the extent of the ground to be assigned to

French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade shall not be limited, and that they

shall be determined according to the needs and convenience of the parties. If Chinese

subjects injure or destroy French churches or cemeteries, the guilty parties shall be

punished with all the rigour of the laws of the country.

Art. XI.—French subjects in the ports open to foreign trade may freely engage,

on the terms agreed upon between the parties, or by the sole intervention of the

Consul, compradores, interpreters, clerks, workmen, watermen, and servants. They

shall also have the right of engaging teachers in order to learn to speak and write

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

the Chinese language and any other language or dialect used in the empire,

as also to secure their aid in scientific or literary works. Equally they may teach to

Chinese subjects their own or foreign languages and sell without obstacle French

books or themselves purchase Chinese books of all descriptions.

Art. XII.—Property of any kind appertaining to French subjects in the Chinese

empire shall be considered by the Chinese inviolable and shall always be respected

by them. The Chinese authorities shall not, under any circumstances whatever,

place French vessels under embargo nor put them under requisition for any service,

be it public or private.

Art. XIII.—The Christian religion having for its essential object the leading of

men to virtue, the members of all Christian communities shall enjoy entire security

for their persons and property and the free exercise of their religion, and efficient

protection shall be given the missionaries who travel peaceably in the interior

furnished with passports as provided for in Article VIII.

Xo hindrance shall be offered by the authorities of the Chinese Empire to the

recognised right of every individual in China to embrace, if he so pleases, Chris-

tianity, and to follow its practices without being liable to any punishment therefor.

All that has previously been written, proclaimed, or published in China by

order of the Government against the Christian religion is completely abrogated and

remains null and void in all provinces of the empire.

Art. XIV.—Xo privileged commercial society shall henceforward be established

in China, and the same shall apply to any organised coalition having for its end the

exercise of a monopoly of trade. In case of the contravention of the present article

the Chinese Authorities, on the representations of the Consul or Consular Agent,

shall advise as to the means of dissolving such associations, of which they are also

bound to prevent the existence by the preceding prohibitions, so as to remove all that

may stand in the way of free competition.

Art. XV,—When a French vessel arrives in the waters of one of the ports open

to foreign trade she shall be at liberty to engage any pilot to take her immediately

into the port, and, in the same manner, when, having discharged all legal charges

she shall be ready to put to sea, she shall not be refused pilots to enable her to

leave the port without hindrance or delay.

Any individual who wishes to exercise the profession of pilot for French vessels

may, on the presentation of three certificates from captains of ships, be commissioned

by the French Consul in the same manner as shall be in use with other nations.

The remuneration payable to pilots shall be equitably regulated for each parti-

cular port by the Consul or Consular Agent, who shall fix it, having regard to the

distance and circumstances of the navigation.

Art. XVI.—After the pilot has brought a French trading ship into the port,

the Superintendent of Customs shall depute one or two officers to guard the ship and

prevent fraud. These officers may, according to their convenience, remain in their

own boat or stay on board the ship.

Their pay, food, and expenses shall be a charge on the Chinese Customs, and

they shall not demand any fee or remuneration whatever from the captain or consignee.

Every contravention of this provision shall entail a punishment proportionate to the

amount exacted, which also shall be returned in full.

Art. XVII.—Within the twenty-four hours following the arrival of a French

merchant vessel in one of the ports open to foreign trade, the captain, if he be not

unavoidably prevented, and in his default the supercargo or consignee, shall report

at the French Consulate and place in the hands of the Consul the ship’s papers, the

bills of lading, and the manifest. Within the twenty-four hours next following the

Consul shall send to the Superintendent of Customs a detailed note indicating the

name of the vessel, the articles, the tonnage, and the nature of the cargo; if, in

consequence of the negligence of the captain this cannot be accomplished within the

forty-eight hours following the arrival of the vessel, the captain shall be liable to a

penalty of 50 Dollars for each day’s delay, to the profit of the Chinese Government,

but the said penalty shall in no case exceed the sum of 200 Dollars.

76 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Immediately after the reception of the consular note the Superintendent of

Customs shall give a permit to open hatches. If the captain, before having received

the said permit, shall have opened hatches and commenced to discharge, be may

be fined 500 Dollars, and the goods discharged may he seized, the whole to the profit

of the Chinese Grovernment.

Art. XVIII.—French captains and merchants may hire whatever boats and

lighters they please for the transport of goods and passengers, and the sum to be

paid for such boats shall be settled between the parties themselves, without the

intervention of the Chinese authority, and consequently without its guarantee in case

of accident, fraud, or disappearance of the said boats. The number of these boats

shall not be limited, nor shall a monopoly in respect either of the boats or of the

carriage of merchandise by porters be granted to any one.

Art. XIX.—Whenever a French merchant shall have merchandise to load or

discharge he shall first remit a detailed note of it to the Consul or Consular Agent,

who will immediately charge a recognised interpreter to the Consulate to communicate

it to the Superintendent of Customs. The latter shall at once deliver a permit for

shipping or landing the goods. He will then proceed to the verification of the goods

in such manner that there shall be no chance of loss to any party.

The French merchant must cause himself to be represented (if he does not prefer

to attend himself) at the place of the verification by a person possessing the requisite

knowledge to protect his interest at the time when the verification for the liquida-

tion of the dues is made; otherwise any after claim will be null and of no effect.

With respect to goods subject to an ad valorem duty, if the merchant cannot

agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each party shall call in two or

three merchants to examine the goods, and the highest price which shall be offered

by any of them shall be assumed as the value of the said goods.

Duties shall be charged on the net weight; the tare will therefore be deducted.

If the French merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officer on the amount

of tare, each party shall choose a certain number of chests and bales from among the

goods respecting which there is a dispute; these shall be first weighed gross, then

fared and the average tare of these shall be taken as the tare for all the others.

If during the course of verification any difficulty arises which cannot be settled,

the French merchant may claim the intervention of the Consul, who will immediately

bring the subject of dispute to the notice of the Superintendent of Customs, and both

will endeavour to arrive at an amicable arrangement, but the claim must be made

within twenty-four hours; otherwise it will not receive attention. So long as the

result of the dispute remains pending, the Superintendent of Customs shall not enter

the matter in his boobs, thus leaving every latitude for the examination and solution

of the difficulty.

On goods imported which have sustained damage a reduction of duties propor-

tionate to their depreciation shall be made. This shall be equitably determined, and,

if necessary, in the manner above stipulated for the fixing of ad valorem duties.

Art. XX.—Any vessel having entered one of the ports of China, and which has

not yet used the permit to open hatches mentioned in Article XIX., may within two

days of arrival quit that port and proceed to another without having to pay either

tonnage dues or Customs duties, but will discharge them ultimately in the port where

sale of the goods is effected.

Art. XXI,—It is established by common consent that import duties shall be

discharged by the captains or French merchants after the landing and verification

of the goods. Export duties shall in the same manner be paid on the shipment of

the goods. When all tonnage dues and Customs duties shall have been paid in full

by a French vessel the Superintenent of Customs shall give a general aquittance, on

the exhibition of which the Consul shall return the ship’s papers to the captain and

pennit him to depart on his voyage. The Superintendent of Customs shall name

one or several banks, which shall be authorised to receive the sum due by French

merchants on account of the Government, and the receipts of these banks for all

payments which have been made to them shall be considered as receipts of the

TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 7T

Chinese Government. These payments may be made in ingots or foreign moneyr

the relative value of which to sycee shall be determined by agreement between the

Consul or Consular Agent and the Superintendent of Customs in the different ports,

according to time, place, and circumstances.

Art. XXII.—*After the expiration of the two days named in Art. XX., and

before proceeding to discharge her cargo, every vessel shall pay tonnage-dues accord-

ing to the following scale :—Vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and upwards at

the rate of four mace per ton; vessels of less than one hundred and fifty tons mea-

surement at the rate of one mace per ton.

Any vessel clearing from any of the open ports of China for any other of the

open ports, or trading between China and such ports in Cochin-China as belong to

France, or any port in Japan, shall be entitled, on application of the master, to

a special certificate from the Superintendent of Customs, on exhibition of which

the said vessel shall be exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in any

open port of China for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of

her port-clearance ; but after the expiration of four months she shall be required to

pay tonnage-dues again.

Small French vessels and boats of every class, whether with or without sails,,

shall be reckoned as coming within the category of vessels of one hundred and fifty

tons and under, and shall pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per ton once in

every four months.

Native craft chartered by French merchants shall in like manner pay tonnage-

dues once in every four months.

Art. XXIII.*—All French goods, after having discharged the Customs duties

according to the tariff in one ot the ports of China, may be transported into the interior

without being subjected to any fui'ther charge except the transit dues according to

the amended scale now in force, which dues shall not be augmented in the future.

If the Chinese Customs Agents, contrary to the tenour of the present Treaty,

make illegal exactions or levy higher dues, they shall be punished according to the

laws of the empire.

Art. XXIV.—Any French vessel entered at one of the ports open to foreign

trade and wishing to discharge only a part of its goods there, shall pay Customs dues

only for the part discharged; it may transport the remainder of its cargo to another

port and sell it there. The duty shall then be paid.

French subjects having paid in one port the duties on their goods, wishing to

re-export them and send them for sale to another port, shall notify the Consul or

Consular Agent. The latter shall inform the Superintendent of Customs, who, after

having verified the identity of the goods and the perfect integrity of the packages,

shall send to the claimants a declaration attesting that the duties on the said goods

have been paid. Provided with this declaration, the French merchants on their

arrival at the other port shall only have to present it through the medium of the

Consul or Superintendent of Customs, who will deliver for this part of the cargo,

without deduction or charge, a permit for discharge free of duty ; but if the autho-

I rities discover fraud or anything contraband amongst the goods re-exported, these

shall be, after verification, confiscated to the profit of the Chinese Government.

Art. XXV.—Transhipment of goods shall take place only by special permission

and in case of urgency; if it be indispensable to effect this operation, the Consul

shall be referred to, who will deliver a certificate, on view of which the transhipment

shall be authorised by the Superintendent of Customs. The latter may always

delegate an employe of his administration to be present.

Every unauthorised transhipment, except in case of peril by delay, will entail

the confiscation, to the profit of the Chinese Government, of the whole of the goods

illicitly transhipped.

Art. XXVI.—In each of the ports open to foreign trade the Superintendent of

Customs shall receive for himself, and shall deposit at the French Consulate, legal

Substituted for the

78 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

•scales for goods and silver, the weights and measures agreeing exactly with the

weights and measures in use at the Canton Custom-house, and hearing a stamp and

seal certifying this authority. These scales shall he the base of all liquidations ol

•duties and of all payments to be made to the Chinese Government. They shall he

referred to in case of dispute as to the weights and measures of goods, and the decree

shall be according to the results they show.

Art. XXVII.—Import and export duties levied in China on French commerce

shall be regulated according to the tariff annexed to the present Treaty under the

seal and signature of the respective Plenipotentiaries. This tariff may be revised

every seven years in order to he in harmony with the changes brought about by time

in the value of the products of the soil or industry of the two empires.

By the payment of these duties, the amount of which it is expressly provided

shall not be increased nor augmented by any kind of charge or surtax whatever,

French subjects shall be free to import into China, from French or foreign ports, and

equally to export from China, to any destination, all goods which shall not be, at the

date of the signing of the present Treaty and according to the classification of the

annexed tariff, the object of a special prohibition or of a special monopoly. The

Chinese Government renouncing therefore the right of augmenting the number of

articles reputed contraband or subjects of a monopoly, any modification of the

tariff shall be made only after an understanding has been come to with the French

Government and with its full and entire consent.

With regard to the tariff, as well as every stipulation introduced or to be in-

troduced in the existing Treaties, or those which may hereafter be concluded, it

remains well and duly established that merchants and in general all French subjects

in China shall always have the same rights and be treated in the same way as the

most favoured nation.

Art. XXVIII.—The publication of the regular tariff doing away henceforth with

all pretext for smuggling, it is not to be presumed that any act of this nature may

be committed by French vessels in the ports of China. If it should be otherwise,

all contraband goods introduced into these ports by French vessels or merchants

whatever their value or nature, as also all prohibited goods fraudulently discharged,

shall be seized by the local authority and confiscated to the profit of the Chinese

Government. Further, the latter may, if it see fit, interdict the re-entry to China of

the vessel taken in contravention and compel it to leave immediately after the settle-

ment of its accounts.

If any foreign vessel fraudulently makes use of the French flag the French

Government shall take the necessary measures for the repression of this abuse.

Art. X.5IX.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French may station a vessel of war

in any principal port of the empire where its presence may be considered necessary to

maintain good order and discipline amongst the crews of merchant vessels and to

facilitate the exercise of the Consular authority; all necessary measures shall be taken

to provide that the presence of these vessels of war shall entail no inconvenience, and

their commanders shall receive orders to cause to be executed the provisions of

Article XXXIII. in respect of the communications with the land and the policing

of the crews. Vessels of war shall be subject to no duty.

Art. XXX.—Every French vessel of war cruising for the protection of commerce

shall be received as a friend and treated as such in all the ports of China which it

shall enter. These vessels may there procure the divers articles of refitting and

victualling of which they shall have need, and, if they have suffered damage, may

repair there and purchase the materials necessary for such repair, the whole without

the least opposition.

The same shall apply to French trading ships which in consequence of great

damage or any other reason may be compelled to seek refuge in anv port whatsoever

of China.

If a vessel be wrecked on the coast of China, the nearest Chinese authority, on

being informed of the occurrence, shall immediately send assistance to the crew,

provide for their present necessities, and take the measures immediately necessary

TREATY BETWEEN- FRANCE AND CHIVA. 7»

for the salvage of the shif> and the preservation of the cargo. The whole shall then

be brought to the knowledge of the nearest Consul or Consular Agent, in order that

the latter, in concert with the competent authority, may provide means for the

relief of the crew and the salvage of the debris of the ship and cargo.

Art. XXXI.—Should China be at war with another Power, this circumstance

shall not in any way interfere with the free trade of France with China or with the

opposing nation. French vessels may always, except in the case of effective blockade,

sail without obstacle from the ports of the one to the ports of the other, trade in the

ordinary manner, and import and export every kind of merchandise hot prohibited.

Art. XXXII.—Should sailors or other persons desert from French ships-of-war,

or leave French trading vessels, the Chinese authority, on the requisition of the

Consul, or failing the Consul that of the captain, shall at once use every means to

discover and restore the aforesaid fugitives into the hands of one or the other of them.

In the same manner, if Chinese deserters or persons accused of any crime take

refuge in French houses or on board of French vessels, the local authority shall

address the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused, shall immediately take

the measures necessary for their extradition. Each party shall carefully "avoid

concealment and connivance.

Art. XXXIII.—When sailors come on shore they shall be under special dis-

ciplinary regulations framed by the Consul and communicated to the local authority,

in order to prevent as far as possible all occasion of quarrel between French sailors

and the people of the country.

Art. XXXIV.—In case of French trading vessels being attacked or pillaged by

pirates within Chinese waters, the civil and military authorities of the nearest place,

upon learning of the occurrence, shall actively pursue the authors of the crime and

shall neglect nothing to secure their arrest and punishment according to law. The

pirated goods, in whatever place or state they may be found, shall be placed in the

hands of the Consul, who shall restore them to the owners. If the criminals cannot

be seized, or the whole of the stolen property cannot be recovered, the Chinese officials

shall suffer the penalty inflicted by the law in such circumstances, but they shall not

be held pecuniarily responsible.

Art. XXXV.—When a French subject shall have a complaint to make or claim

to bring against a Chinese, he shall first state his case to the Consul, who, after

having examined the affair, will endeavour to arrange it amicably. In the same

manner, when a Chinese has to complain of a French subject, the Consul shall

attentively hear his claim and endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement.

But if in either case this be impossible, the Consul shall invoke the assistance of a

competent Chinese official, and these two, after having conjointly examined the affair

shall decide it equitably.

Art. XXXVI.—If hereafter French subjects suffer damage, or are subjected

to any ’ insult or vexation by Chinese subjects, the latter shall be pursued by the

local authority, who shall take the necessary measures for the defence and pro-

tection of French subjects ; if ill-doers or any vagrant part of the population com-

mence to pillage, destroy, or burn the houses or warehouses of French subjects or

any other of their establishments, the same authority, either on the requisition of the

Consul or of its own motion, shall send as speedily as possible an armed force to

disperse the riot and to arrest the criminals, and shall deliver the latter up to the

severity of the law; the whole without prejudice of the claims of the French subjects

to be indemnified for proved losses.

Art. XXXVII.—If Chinese become, in future, indebted to French captains or

merchants and involve them in loss by fraud or in any other manner, the latter shall

no longer avail themselves of the combination which existed under the former state

of things; they may address themselves only through the medium of their Consul to

the local authority, who shall neglect nothing after having examined the affair to

compel the defaulters to satisfy their engagements according to the laws of the

country. But, if the debtor cannot be found, if he be dead, or bankrupt, and is not

able to pay, the French merchants cannot claim against the Chinese authority.

*0 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Id case of fraud or non-payment on the part of French merchants, the Consul

shall, in the same manner, afford every assistance to the claimants, but neither he

nor his Government shall in any manner be held responsible.

Art. XXXVIII.—If unfortunately any fight or quarrel occurs between French

And Chinese subjects, as also if during the course of such quarrel one or more persons

be killed or wounded, by firearms or otherwise, the Chinese shall be arrested by the

•Chinese authority, who will be responsible, if the charge be proved, for their punish-

ment according to the laws of the country. With regard to the French, they shall

be arrested at the instance of the Consul, who shall take the necessary measures that

they may be dealt with in the ordinary course of French law in accordance with the

-forms and practice which shall be afterwards decided by the French. Government.

The same course shall be observed in all similar circumstances not enumerated

in the present convention, the principle being that for the repression of crimes and

offences committed by them in China French subjects shall be dealt with according

to the laws of France.

Art. XXXIX.—Disputes or differences arising between French subjects in China

shall, equally, be settled by the French authorities. It is also stipulated that the

Chinese authorities shall not in any manner interfere in any dispute between French

■subjects and other foreigners. In the same way they shall not exercise any authority

over French vessels; these are responsible only to the French authorities and the

captain.

Art. XL.—If the Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French shall

consider it desirable to modify any of the clauses of the present Treaty it shall lie at

liberty to open negotiations to this effect with the Chinese Government after an

interval of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications. It is also

-understood that no obligation not expressed in the present convention shall be

imposed on the Consuls or Consular Agents, nor on their nationals, but, as is

stipulated, French subjects shall enjoy all the rights, .privileges, immunities, and

guarantees whatsoever which have been or shall be accorded by the Chinese Govern-

ment to other Powers.

Art. XLI.—His Majesty the Emperor of the French, wishing to give to His

Majesty the Emperor of China a proof of his friendly sentiments, agrees to stipulate

in separate Articles, having the same force and effect as if they were inserted in the

present Treaty, the arrangements come to between the two Governments on the

matters antecedent to the events at Canton and the expense caused by them to the

Government of His Majesty the Emperor of the French.

Art. XLII.—The ratifications of the present Treaty of Friendship, Commerce, and

Navigation shall be exchanged at Peking within one year after the date of signature,

or sooner if possible.

After the exchange of ratifications, the Treaty shall be brought to the

knowledge of all the superior authorities of the Empire in the provinces and in the

capital, in order that its publication may be well established.

In token whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

and affixed their seals thereto.

Done at Tientsin, in four copies, this twenty-seventh day of June, in the year of

grace one thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight, corresponding to the seventeenth

•day of the fifth moon of the eighth year of Hien Fung.

(Signed) [l.s.] Babon Geos.

„ [l.s.] Kwei-Liano.

„ [l.s.] Hwashana.

CONVENTION BETWEEN ERANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, 25th October, 1860

His Majesty the Emperor of the French and His Majesty the Emperor of China

being desirous to put an end to the difference which nas arisen between the two

'Empires, and to re-establish and assure for ever the relations of peace and amity which

fbefore existed and which regrettable events have interrupted, have named as their

respective Plenipotentiaries:—

His Majesty the Emperor of the French, Sieur Jean Baptiste Louis, Baron Gros,

Senator of the Empire, Ambassador and High Commissioner of France in China,

Grand Officer of the Imperial Order of the Legion of Honour, Knight Grand Cross

of several Orders, etc., etc., etc.;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Prince Kung, a member of the Imperial

Family and High Commissioner ;

Who, having exchanged their full powers, found in good and due form, have

agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—His Majesty the Emperor of China has regarded with pain the conduct

of the Chinese military authorities at the mouth of the Tientsin river, in the month of

June last yeai’, when the Ministers Plenipotentiary of France and England arrived

there on their way to Peking to exchange the ratifications of the Treaties of Tientsin.

Art. II.—When the Ambassador, the High Commissioner of His Majesty the

Emperor of the French, shall be in Peking for the purpose of exchanging the ratifica-

tions of the Treaty of Tientsin, he shall be treated during his stay in the capital with

• the honours due to his rank, and all possible facilities shall be given him by the

Chinese Authorities in order that he may without obstacle fulfil the high mission

confided to him.

Art. III.—The Treaty signed at Tientsin on the 27th June, 1858, shall be faith-

fully placed in execution in all its clauses immediately after the exchange of the

i ratifications referred to in the preceding Article, subject to the modifications introduced

by the present Convention.

Art. IV.—Article IV. of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin, by which His Majesty the

Emperor of China undertook to pay to the French Government an indemnity of two

million Taels, is annulled and replaced by the present Article, which increases the

amount of the indemnity to eight million Taels.

It is agreed that the sum already paid bv the Canton Customs on account of the

sum of two million Taels stipulated by the Treaty of Tientsin shall be considered as

having been paid in advance and on account of the eight million Taels referred to in

• the present Article.

The provisions of the Article of the Secret Treaty of Tientsin as to the mode of

• payment of the two million Taels are annulled. Payment of the remainder of the sum

of eight million taels to be paid by the Chinese Government as provided by the present

Convention shall be made in quarterly instalments consisting of one-fifth of the gross

Customs revenues at the ports open to foreign trade, the first term commencing on

the 1st October of the present year, and finishing on the 31st December following.

This sum, specially reserved for the payment of the indemnity due to France, shall be

• paid into the hands of the Minister for France or of his delegates in Mexican dollars

or in bar silver at the rate of the day of payment.

COXVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

A sum of five hundred thousand Taels shall, however, be paid on account i»

advance at one time, and at Tientsin, on the 30th November next, or sooner if the-

Chinese Government judges it convenient.

A Mixed Commission, appointed by the Minister of France and by the Chinese-

Authorities, shall determine the rules to be followed in effecting the payment of the-

whole of the indemnity, the verification of the amount, the giving of receipts, and in

short fulfilling all the formalities required in such case.

Art. V.—The sum of eight million Taels is allowed to the French Government to

liquidate the expenses of its armament against China, as also for the indemnification

of French subjects and proteges of France who sustained loss by the burning of the-

factories at Canton, and also to compensate the Catholic missionaries who have

suffered in their persons or property. The French Government will divide this sum

between the parties interested, after their claims shall have been legally established,

ia satisfaction of such claims, and it is understood between the contracting parties

that one million of Taels shall be appropriated to the indemnification of French subjects-

or proteges of France for the losses they have sustained or the ti-eatment to which

they have been subjected, and that the remaining seven million Taels shall be applied

to the liquidation of the expenses occasioned by the war.

Art. VI.—In conformity with the Imperial edict issued on the 20th March, 1856,

by the August Emperor Tao Kwang, the religious and charitable establishments which

have been confiscated during the persecutions of the Christians shall be restored to

their proprietors through the Minister of France in China, to whom the Imperial

Government will deliver them, with the cemeteries and edifices appertaining to them.

Art. VII.—The town and port of Tientsin, in the province of Pechili, shall be-

opened to foreign trade on the same conditions as the other towns and ports of the

Empire where such trade is permitted, and this from the date of the signature of the

present Convention, which shall be obligatory on the two nations without its being

necessary to exchange ratifications, and which shall have the same force as if it were-

inserted word for word in the Treaty of Tientsin.

The French troops now occupying this town shall, on the payment of the five-

hundred thousand taels provided by Article IV. of the present Convention, evacuate

it and proceed to occupy Taku and the north-east coast of Shantung, whence they

shall retire on the same conditions as govern the evacuation of the other points

occupied on the shores of the Empire. The Commanders-in-Chief of the French force

shall, however, have the right to winter their troops of all arms at Tientsin, if they

judge it convenient, and to withdraw them only when the indemnities due by the*

Chinese Government shall have been entirely paid, unless the Commanders-in-*Chief

shall think it convenient to withdraw them before that time.

Art. VIII.—It is further agreed that when the present Convention shall have

been signed and the ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin exchanged, the French

forces which occupy Chusan shall evacuate that island, and that the forces before

Peking shall retire to Tientsin, to Taku, to the north coast of Shantung, or to

the town of Canton, and that in all these places or in any of them the French

Government may, if it thinks fit, leave troops until such time as the total sum of

eight million taels shall have been fully paid.

Art. IX.—It is agreed between the high contracting parties that when the

ratifications of the Treaty of Tientsin shall have been exchanged an Imperial edict

shall order the high authorities of all the provinces to permit any Chinese who wishes-

to go to countries beyond the sea to establish himself there or to seek his fortune, to

embark himself and his family, if he so wishes, on French ships in the ports of the

empire open to foreign trade. It is also agreed, in the interest of the emigrants, to

ensure their entire freedom of action and to safeguard their rights, that the competent

Chinese authorities shall confer with the Minister of France in China for the making

of regulations to assure for these engagements, always voluntary, the guarantees of

morality and security which ought to govern them.

TEEATY BETWEEN FEANCE AND CHINA 83

Art. X.—It is well understood between the contracting parties that the tonnage

•dues which by error were fixed in the French Treaty of Tientsin at five mace per ton

'for vessels of 150 tons and over, and which in the Treaties with England and the

United States signed in 1858 were fixed at four mace only, shall not ‘exceed this

same sum of four mace, and this without the invocation of the last paragraph of

Art. XXXII. of the Treaty of Tientsin, which gives to France the formal right to

claim the same treatment as the most favoured nation.

The present Convention of Peace has been made at Peking, in four copies, on the

:25th October, 1860, and has been signed by the respective plenipotentiaries.

TREATY OE PEACE, FRIENDSHIP, AND COMMERCE

BETWEEN PRANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Tientsin, 9th June, 1885

The President of the French Eepublic and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

each animated by an equal desire to bring to an end the difficulties which have

:,given rise to their simultaneous intervention in the affairs of Annam, and wishing to

-re-establish and improve the relations of friendship and commerce which previously

existed between France and China, have resolved to conclude a new Treaty to further

-the common interest of both nations on the basis of the preliminary Convention

-signed at Tientsin on the 11th May, 1884, and ratified by an Imperial decree of the

13th April, 1885.

For that purpose the two high contracting parties have appointed as their Pleni-

potentiaries the following, that is to say •.—

The President of the French Republic, M. Jules Patenotre, Envoy Extraordinary

and Minister Plenipotentiary for France in China, Officer of the Legion of Honour,

Grand Cross of the Swedish Order of the Pole Star, &c., &c.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung-chang, Imperial Commissioner,

Senior Grand Secretary of State, Grand Honorary Preceptor of the Heir Presumptive;

Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Ports, Governor-General of the Province

of Chihli, of the First degree of the Third Order of Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Assisted by Hsi Chen, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamen,

President of the Board of Punishments, Administrator of the Treasury at the Ministry

of Finance, Director of Schools for the Education of Hereditary Officers of the

Left Wing of the Yellow Bordered Banner ;

And Teng Chang-su, Imperial Commissioner, Member of the Tsung-li Yamen,

Director of the Board of Ceremonies ;

Who, having communicated their full powers, which have been found in good

and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—France engages to re-establish and maintain order in those provinces of

Annam which border upon the Chinese empire. For this purpose she will take the

necessary measures to disperse or expel the bands of pirates and vagabonds who

endanger the public safety, and to prevent their collecting together again. Nevertheless,

- the French troops shall not, under any circumstances, cross the frontier which separates

84 TREATY BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA

Tonkin from China, which frontier France promises both to respect herself and to

guarantee against any aggression whatsoever.

On her part China undertakes to disperse or expel such bands as may take refuge

in her provinces bordering on Tonkin and to disperse those which it may be attempted

to form there for the purpose of causing disturbances amongst the populations placed

under the protection of France ; and, in consideration of the guarantees which have

been given as to the security of the frontier, she likewise engages not to send troops

into Tonkin.

The high contracting parties will fix, by a special convention, the conditions under

which the extradition of malefactors between China and Annam shall be carried out.

The Chinese, whether colonists or disbanded soldiers, who reside peaceably in

Annam, supporting themselves by agriculture, industry, or trade, and whose conduct

shall give no cause of complaint, shall enjoy the same security for their persons and

property as French proteges.

Art. II.—China, being resolved to do nothing which may imperil the work of

pacification undertaken by France, engages to respect, both in the present and in

the future, the Treaties, Conventions, and Arrangements concluded directly between

France and Annam, or which may hereafter be concluded.

As regards the relations between China and Annam, it is understood they shall

be of such a nature as shall in no way injure the dignity of the Chinese empire or

give rise to any violation of the present Treaty.

Art. III.—Within a period of six months from the signature of the present

Treaty commissioners appointed by the high contracting parties shall proceed to the

spot in order to define the frontier between China and Tonkin. They shall place

landmarks wherever necessary to render the line of demarcation clear. In those

cases where they may not be able to agree as to the location of these landmarks or on

such rectifications of detail as it may be desirable to make, in the interest of the two-

nations, in the existing frontier of Tonkin, they shall refer the difficulty to their

respective Governments.

Art. IV.—When the fi’ontier shall have been agreed upon, French or French

proteges and foreign residents of Tonkin who may wish to cross it in order to enter

China shall not be allowed to do so unless they shall have previously provided them-

selves with passports issued by the Chinese frontier authorities on the requisition of

the French authorities. For Chinese subjects an authorisation given by the Imperial

frontier authorities shall be sufficient.

Chinese subjects wishing to proceed from China to Tonkin by the land route

shall be obliged to provide themselves with regular passports, issued by the French

authorities on the requisition of the Imperial authorities.

Art. V.—Import and export trade shall be permitted to French or French-

protected traders and to Chinese traders across the land frontier between China and

Tonkin. It shall, however, be carried on through certain spots which shall be

settled later, and both the selection and number of which shall correspond with the

direction and importance of the traffic between the two countries. In this respect

the Regulations in force in the interior of the Chinese Empire shall be taken into

account.

In any case, two of the said spots shall be marked out on the Chinese frontier,

the one above Lao-kai, the other beyond Lang-son. French traders shall be at

liberty to settle there under the same conditions, and with the same advantages, as

in the ports open to foreign ti’ade. The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of

China shall establish Custom-houses there, and the Government of the French Republic

shall be at liberty to maintain Consuls there whose powers and privileges shall be

identical with those of Agents of the same rank in the open ports.

On his part, His Majesty the Emperor of China shall be at liberty, with the

concurrence of the French Government, to appoint Consuls in the principal towns of

TEE ATT BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA 85

Art. VI.—A special code of Regulations, annexed to the present Treaty, shall

define the conditions under which trade shall be carried on by land between Tonkin

and the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, of Kwang-si, and of Kwang-tung. Such

Regulations shall be drawn up by Commissioners, who shall be appointed by the

high contracting parties, within three months from the signature of the present

Treaty.

All goods dealt with by such trade shall be subject, on import and. export

between Tonkin and the provinces of Yunnan and Kwang-si, to duties lower than,

those laid down by the present tariff for foreign trade. The reduced tariff shall

not, however, be applied to goods transported by way of the land frontier between

Tonkin and Kwang-tung, and shall not be enforced within the ports already open

by Treaty.

Trade in arms, engines, supplies, and munitions of war of any kind whatsoever

shall be subject to the Laws and Regulations issued by each of the contracting

States within its own territory.

The export and import of opium shall be governed by special arrangements to

be inserted in the above-mentioned code of Regulations.

Trade by sea between China and Annam shall likewise be dealt with by a separate

code of Regulations. In the meanwhile, the present practice shall remain unaltered.

Art. VII.—With a view to develop under the most advantageous conditions the

relations of commerce and of good neighbourship, which it is the object of the present

Treaty to re-establish between France and China, the Government of the Republic

shall construct roads in Tonkin, and shall encourage the construction of railways

there.

When China, on her part, shall have decided to construct railways, it is agreed

that she shall have recourse to French industry, and the Government of the Republic

shall afford every facility for procuring in France the staff that may be required. It

is, moreover, understood that this clause shall not be looked upon as constituting an

exclusive privilege in favour of France.

Art. VIII.—The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty and the Regula-

tions to be agreed upon shall be liable to revision after an interval of ten complete

years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty. But

in case six months before it expires neither one nor other of the high contracting

parties shall have expressed a wish to proceed to a revision, the commercial stipula-

tions shall remain in force for a fresh period of ten years, and so further in like

manner.

Art. IX.—As soon as the present Treaty shall have been signed, the French

forces shall receive orders to retire from Keelung and to cease search, &c., on the high

seas. Within one month from the signature of the pi'esent Treaty the Island of

Formosa and Pescadores shall be entirely evacuated by the French troops.

Art. X.—All stipulations of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions

between France and China, which are not modified by the present Treaty, remain in

full force.

The present Treaty shall be ratified at once by His Majesty the Emperor of China,

and after it shall have been ratified by the President of the French Republic the

exchange of ratifications shall take place at Peking with the least possible delay.

Done in quadruplicate at Tientsin, this ninth day of June, one thousand eight

hundred and eighty-five, corresponding to the twenty-seventh day of the fourth moon

of the eleventh year of Kwang-Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] Patenotre.

[l.s.] Hsi Chen.

[l.s.] Li HtiNG-CHANcn

[l.s.] Teng Chang-su.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

JOINTLY DETERMINED ON BY FRANCE AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, 25th April, 1886

l'Tremulated from the French Text]

Whereas in Article VI. of the Treaty between the President of the French Re-

(public and His Majesty the Emperor of China, signed the 9th day of June, 1885, it is

.stated that “ Regulations for the conduct of overland trade between Tonkin and the

Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Kwang-si, and Kwang-tung shall be jointly discussed and

concluded by Commissioners appointed by the two Powers, and will form a supple-

ment to the present Treaty”; and whereas in Article X. of that Agreement it is

; set forth that “ provisions of former Treaties and Regulations agreed to by France

and China, except in so far as they are modified by the present agreement, will continue

•to retain their original validity,” the two high contracting parties have for this

purpose named as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

The President of the French Republic, G. Cogordan, Minister Plenipotentiary

of France to China, Officer of the Legion of Honour, Knight of the Order of the Crown

of Italy, &c., &c., together with E. Bruwaert, Consul of the first class, Assistant

Commissioner for Treaty negotiations, Knight of the Order of Gustav of Sweden, and

of the Order of Leopold of Belgium ;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li, Grand Preceptor of the Heir Ap-

parent, Grand Secretary of State, Superintendent of Trade for the Northern Seaboard,

Joint Commissioner of Admiralty, Governor of Chihli, and a member of the first

degree of the Third Order of the Hereditary Nobility, with the title of Sou-yi;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, and

found them to be in due form, have concluded the following Articles:—

Art. I.—In accordance with the terms of Article V. of the Treaty of the 19th

June, 1885, the high contracting parties agree that for the present two places shall

be opened to trade, one to the north of Langson and the other above Lao-kai. China

will establish Custom-houses there, and France shall have the right to appoint

Consuls, who shall enjoy all rights and privileges conceded in China to the Consuls

. of the most favoured nation.

The work of the Commission charged with the delimitation of the two countries

not being completed at the time of the signature of the present Convention, the place

to be opened to trade north of Langson shall be selected and determined in the

course of the present year by arrangement between the Imperial Government and the

representative of France at Peking. As to the place to be opened to trade above

Lao-kai, this will also be determined by common accord when the frontier between

the two countries shall have been defined.

Art. II.—The Imperial Government may appoint Consuls at Hanoi and at

Haiphong. Chinese Consuls may also be sent later on to other large towns in

Tonkin by arrangement with the French Government.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER Sf

The agents shall be treated in the same manner and have the same rights and

privileges as the Consuls of the most favoured nation in France. They shall maintain

official relations with the French, authorities charged with the Protectorate.

Art. III.—It is agreed, on the one side and the other, that in the places where

Consuls are appointed the respective authorities will facilitate the installation of these

agents in suitable residences.

Frenchmen may establish themselves in the places opened to trade on the frontier

of China under the conditions set forth in the Articles YII., X., XL, XII., and others

of the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858.

Annamites shall enjoy in these places the same privileged treatment.

Art. FV".—Chinese shall have the right of possessing land, erecting buildings,

opening commercial houses, and having warehouses throughout Annam.

They shall receive for their persons, their families, and their goods the same-

protection as the most favoured European nation, and, like the latter, may not be made

the object of any ill-treatment. The official and private correspondence and telegrams

of Chinese officials and merchants shall be freely transmitted through the French

postal and telegraphic administrations.

Frenchmen will receive from China the same privileged treatment.

Art. Y.—Frenchmen, French proteges, and foreigners residing in Tonkin may

cross the frontiers and enter China on condition of being furnished with passports.

These passports will be given by the Chinese authorities at the frontier, on the

requisition of the French authorities, who will ask for them only for respectable

persons; they will be surrendered to be cancelled on the holder’s return. In the case

of those who have to pass any place occupied by aborigines or savages, it will be

mentioned in the passport that there are no Chinese officials there who can protect

them.

Chinese who wish to come from China to Tonkin by land must in the same

way be furnished with passports granted by the French authorities on the requisition

of the Chinese authorities, who will ask for them only on behalf of respectable

persons.

The passports so granted on the one side or the other shall serve only as titles

to travel and shall not be considered as certificates of exemption from taxes for the

transport of merchandise.

Chinese authorities on Chinese soil and French authorities in Tonkin shall have

the right to arrest persons who have crossed the frontier without passports and send

them back to their respective authorities to be tried and punished if necessary.

Chinese residing in Annam may return from Tonkin to China on simply

obtaining from the Imperial authorities a pass permitting them to cross the

frontier.

Frenchmen and other persons established in the open places on the frontier may

travel without passports, to a distance of 50 li (578 metres to the li) around such

places.

Art. VI.—Merchandise imported into the places opened to trade on the frontier

of China by French merchants and French proteges may, after payment of the import

duties, be conveyed to the interior markets of China under the conditions fixed by

Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, and by the general rules of

the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs with regard to import transit passes.

When foreign merchandise is imported into these places a declaration shall be

made at the Custom-house of the nature and quantity of the merchandise, as well as

of the name of the person by whom it is accompanied. The Customs authorities will

proceed to verification, and will collect the duty according to the general tariff of the

Imperial Maritime Customs, diminished by one-fifth. Articles not mentioned in the

tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent, ad valorem. Until this duty has

been paid the goods may not be taken out of the warehouses to be sent away and soldi1

A merchant wishing to send foreign merchandise into the interior shall make a

fresh declaration at the Custom-house, and pay, without reduction, the transit dues

fixed by the general rules of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

After this payment the Customs will deliver a transit pass which will enable the

carriers to go to the localities mentioned in the pass for the purpose of disposing of

-the said merchandise.

Under these conditions, no new duties will be levied at the interior barriers or

ilelrin stations.

Merchandise for which transit passes have not been obtained will be liable to all

the barrier and leliin duties imposed upon indigenous products in the interior of the

country.

Art. VII.—Merchandise bought by Frenchmen and persons under French

.protection in the interior markets of China may be brought into the open places on

the frontier, for the purpose of being from thence exported to Tonkin, under the

conditions fixed by Rule VII. annexed to the Treaty of the 27th June, 1858, with

regard to the transit of merchandise for export.

When Chinese merchandise for export arrives at these places, declaration

shall be made at the Custom-house as to the nature and quantity of the merchandise,

as well as the name of the person accompanying it.

The Customs authorities will proceed to verification.

Such of this merchandise as shall have been bought in the interior by a merchant

furnished with a transit pass, and which consequently has not paid any lehin

or barrier duty, shall in the first place pay the transit duty fixed by the general

tariff of the Chinese Maritime Customs.

It shall then pay the export duty, diminished by one-third. Articles not named

in the tariff will remain subject to the duty of 5 per cent, ad valorem.

After payment of these duties the merchandise will be allowed to pass free, and

to be sent beyond the frontier.

The merchant who, not being furnished with a transit pass, has bought goods

in the interior, shall pay the duties levied at the barriers and lekin stations; receipts

shall be delivered to him, and on arriving at the Custom-house he shall be exempted

from payment of the transit dues on presentation of these receipts.

French merchants and persons under French protection importing or exporting

merchandise through the Customs offices on the frontiers of Yunnan and Kwangsi,

and Chinese merchants importing or exporting merchandise to or from Tonkin,

will not have to pay any toll on their carriages or beasts of burden. On the navigable

water-courses on the frontier, vessels may, on the one side and the other, be subjected

to the payment of tonnage-dues, conformably to the rules of the Maritime Customs

of the two countries.

As regards the provisions of the present Article and the preceding one, it is

agreed by the high contracting parties that if a new Customs tariff should be

established by common accord between China and a third Power, for trade by land

on the south-western frontiers of the Chinese Empire, France shall obtain the

application of it.

Art. VIII.—Foreign merchandise which, not having been sold within a period

of thirty-six months after having paid the import duty at one of the Chinese frontier

Customs stations, is forwarded to the other frontier Customs station, shall be

examined at the first of these stations, and if the wrappings are found intact, and

rf nothing has been disturbed or changed, a certificate of exemption for the amount

of the first duty collected will be given. The bearer of this certificate will deliver it

to the other frontier station,, in payment of the new duty which he will have to pay.

The Customs may in like manner give bonds which will be available for payment of

duties at the Custom-house by which they are issued any time within three years.

Money will never be returned.

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general rules ofand

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the certificates

Neither willoritbonds given toat

be allowed

present there, in payment of duties, the quittances delivered by the frontier Customs

on the farst payment. As to transit dues, conformablv to the rules in force at the

TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

open ports, when once they have been p3-id, bonds or exeniption certificates will never

be given in respect of these.

Art. IX.—-Chinese merchandise which, after having paid transit and export dues

at one of the frontier Customs stations, may be sent to the other frontier Customs-

station to be sold, shall be subjected on its arrival at the second station only to a'

payment—called a re-importation duty—of one-half the export duty already collected.

The merchandise conformably to the rules established in the open ports may not be'

transported into the interior by foreign merchants.

If this Chinese merchandise be transported to one of the open ports of China, it

will be assimilated to foreign merchandise, and shall pay a new import duty in full,

conformably to the general tariff of the Imperial Maritime Customs.

This merchandise will be allowed to pay transit duty on being sent into the in--

terior. Chinese merchandise imported from a Chinese seaport into an Annamite port

in order to be transported to the land frontier and then to re-enter Chinese territory

will be treated as foreign merchandise and will pay the local import dues. This-

merchandise will be allowed to pay the transit duty on being sent into the interior.

Art. X.—Declarations to the Chinese Customs must be made within thirty-six

hours of the arrival of the goods under a penalty of Tls. 50 for each day’s delay; but

the fine shall not exceed Tls. 200. An inexact declaration of the quantity of the goods,

if it is proved that it has been made with the intention of evading payment of the

duties, will entail upon the merchant confiscation of his goods. Goods not provided

with a permit from the chief of the Customs, which are clandestinely introduced

by by-ways, and unpacked or sold, or which are intentionally smuggled, shall be-

entirely confiscated. In every case of false declaration or attempt to deceive the

Customs as regards the quality or the real origin or real destination of goods

'for which transit passes have been applied the goods shall be liable to con--

fiscation. The penalties shall be adjudged according to the conditions-and proce--

dure fixed by the Rules of 31st May, 1868. In all cases where confifecation shall

have been declared, the merchant shall be at liberty to recover his goods on payment-

of a sum equivalent to their value, to be duly settled by arrangement with'the Chinese

authorities. The Chinese authorities shall have every liberty to- devise measures to-

be taken in China, along the frontier, to prevent smuggling.

Merchandise descending or ascending navigable rivers in French, Annamite, or

Chinese vessels will not necessarily have to be landed at the frontier, unless there is-

an appearance of fraud, or a divergence between the nature of the cargo and the •

declaration of the manifest. The Customs will only send on board the said vessels-

agents to visit them.

Art. XI.—Produce of Chinese origin imported into Tonkin by the land frontier

shall pay the import duty of the Franco-Annamite tariff. They will pay no export"

duty on leaving Tonkin. The Imperial Government will be notified of the new

tariff which France will establish in Tonkin. If taxes of excise,-of consumption, or

of guarantee be established in Tonkin on any articles of indigenous production,

similar Chinese productions will be subjected, on importation.', to equivalent taxes.

Art. XII.—Chinese merchandise transported across Tonkin from one of the

two frontier Customs stations to the other, or to an Annamite port to be from thence

exported to China, shall be subjected to a specific transit duty which shall not exceed-

two per cent, of the value. At the point where' it leaves Chinese territory this

merchandise will be examined by the French Customs authorities on the frontier,

who will specify its nature, quantity, and destination in a certificate which shall be

produced whenever required by the French authorities during its transport across

Tonkin, as well as at the port of shipment.

In order to guarantee the Franco-Annamite Customs against any possible fraud,

such Chinese produce, on entering Tonkin, shall pay the import duty.

A transit permit will accompany the goods to the place of leaving the country,

whether this be the port of transhipment or the land frontier, and the sum paid by

the proprietor of the merchandise will, after deducting the transit dues, be then

restored to him in exchange for the receipt delivered to Mm by the Tonkin Customs,'-

.90 TRADE REGULATIONS FOR THE TONKIN FRONTIER

Every false declaration or act evidently intended to deceive the French admini-

stration as to the quality, quantity, real origin, or real destination of merchandise

.on which the special treatment applicable to Chinese products traversing Tonkin in

•transit is asked, will entail the confiscation of such merchandise. In every case

where confiscation has been declared, the merchant shall be free to recover his goods

on payment of a sum equivalent to their value, which shall be duly determined by

an arrangement with the French authorities. .

The same rules and the same transit duty will be applicable in Annam to Chinese

merchandise despatched from a Chinese port to an Annamite port in order to get to

the Chinese frontier Customs by crossing Tonkin.

Art. XIII.—The following articles, that is to say, gold and silver ingots, foreign

money, flour, Indian meal, sago, biscuits, preserved meats and vegetables, cheese,

butter, confectionery, foreign clothing, jewellery, plated ware, perfumery, soaps of all

kinds, charcoal, firewood, candles (foreign), tobacco, wine, beer, spirits, household

.stores, ship’s stores, personal baggage, stationery, carpeting, cutlery, drugs, foreign

medicines, and glassware, shall be verified by the Chinese Customs on their entry

.and clearance; if they are really of foreign origin and intended for the personal

use of foreigners, and if they arrive in moderate quantity, a duty exemption certificate

will be given which will pass them free at the frontier. If these articles are withheld

from declaration or the formality of an exemption certificate, their clandestine intro-

duction will render them subject to the same penalty as smuggled goods.

With the exception of gold, silver, money, and luggage, which will remain exempt

from duty, the above-mentioned articles destined for the personal use of foreigners

.and imported in moderate quantity, will pay, when they are transported into the

interior of China a duty of 2-2- per cent, on their value.

The Franco-Annamite frontier Customs shall collect no duty on the following

.articles of personal use which Chinese carry with them, either on entering or leaving

Tonkin, that is to say, money, luggage, clothes, women’s head ornaments, paper,

thair pencils, Chinese ink, furniture, or food, or on articles ordered by the Chinese

Consuls in Tonkin for their personal consumption.

Art. XIV.—The high contracting parties agree to prohibit trade in and trans-

port of opium of whatsoever origin by the land frontier between Tonkin on the one

side and Yunnan, Kwang-si, and Kwangtung on the other side.

Art. XV.—The export of rice and of cereals from China is forbidden. The

import of these articles shall be free of duty.

The import of the following articles into China is forbidden :—Gunpowder, pro-

jectiles, rifles and guns, saltpetre, sulphur, lead, spelter, arms, salt, and immoral

publications.

In case of contravention these articles shall be entirely confiscated.

If the Chinese authorities have arms or munitions bought or if merchants

receive express authority to buy them, the importation will be permitted under the

special surveillance of the Chinese Customs. The Chinese authorities may, further-

more, by arrangement with the French Consuls, obtain for the arms and munitions

which they wish to have conveyed to China through Tonkin exemption from all the

.Franco-Annamite duties.

The inti'oduction into Tonkin of arms, munitions of war, and immoral publica-

tions is also prohibited.

Art. XVI.—Chinese residing in Annam shall be placed under the same condi-

tions, with regard to criminal, fiscal, or other jurisdiction, as the subjects of the most

favoured nation. Law-suits which may arise in China, in the open markets on the

frontier, between Chinese subjects and Frenchmen or Annamites shall be decided in

:a Mixed Court by Chinese and French officers.

With reference to crimes or offences committed by Frenchmen or persons under

French protection in China, in the places opened to trade, the procedure shall be in

conformity with the stipulations of Articles XXXIII. and XXXIV. of the treatv of

the 27th June, 1858.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1887 91

Art. XVII.—If in the places opened to trade on the frontier of China, Chinese

deserters or persons accused of crimes against the Chinese law shall take refuge in

the houses or on board the vessels of Frenchmen or persons under French protection,

the local authority shall apply to the Consul, who, on proof of the guilt of the accused,

shall immediately take the necessary measures in order that they may be given upr

and delivered to the regular course of the law.

Cliinese guilty or accused of crimes or offences who seek refuge in Annara shall,

on the request of the Chinese authorities and on proof of their guilt, be sought for,

arrested, and extradited in all cases where the subjects of the countries enjoying the

most liberal treatment in the matter of extradition might be extradited from France.

Frenchmen guilty or accused of crimes or offences, who seek refuge in China,

shall, at the request of the French authorities and on proof of their guilt, be arrested

and delivered up to the said authorities to be tried according to the regular process

of law.

On both sides all concealment and connivance shall be avoided.

Art. XVIII.—In any difficulty not provided for in the preceding provisions-

recourse shall be had to the rules of the Maritime Customs, which, in conformity

with existing Treaties, are now applied in the open towns or ports.

In case these rules are insufficient the representatives of the two countries

shall reier the matter to their respective Governments.

In accordance with the terms of Article VIII. of the treaty of the 9th June,

1885, the present stipulations may be revised ten years after the exchange of the'

ratifications.

Art. XIX.—The present Convention of Trade, after having been ratified by the'

Governments, shall be promulgated in France, in China, and in Annam.

The exchange of the ratifications shall take place at Peking within one year from1

the date of the signature of the Convention, or earlier if possible.

Done at Tientsin, in four copies, the 25th April, 1886, corresponding to the 22nd

day of the third moon of the twelfth year of Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] G. Cogordan.

„ [l.s.] E. Bruwaert.

„ [l.s.] Li Hung-chang.

CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 18S7"

[Translated from the Chinese Text]

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and the President of the French’

Republic, desiring to strengthen the commercial relations between the two countries,

and also to ratify and give effect to the Treaty signed at Tientsin on the 25th April,

1886, have appointed Plenipotentiaries to take the necessary steps thereto. H.I.M.

the Emperor of China has specially appointed H.I.H. Prince Ching, and H.E. Sun

Yu-wen, member of the Tsung-li Yamen and Vice-President of the Board of Works.

The President

ex-Minister of theof Interior,

the Republic has appointed

and Minister His Excellency

Plenipotentiary Constans,

in China. Who,Deputy,

having

exchanged their full powers and established their authenticity in due form, have

agreed on the following Articles:—

Art. I.—Such Articles of the Treaty signed at Tientsin as are not affected by this-

Convention shall on the exchange of the ratifications be put in force at once.

<92 CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1SH7

Art. II.—Whereas it was agreed by the Treaty of 1886 that Lungchow iu Kwaugsi

and Mengtzu in Yunnan should be opened to trade, and whereas Manghao, which

lies between Paosheng and Mengtzu, is in the direct road between the two places by

water, it is agreed that this also should be opened to trade on the same conditions as

the other ports, and that a deputy of the Consul at Mengtzu shall be allowed to

reside there.

Art. III.—In order to develop the trade between China and Tonkin as rapidly

as possible the tariff rules laid down in Articles VI. and VII. of the Treaty of 1886

are temporarily altered, and it is agreed that foreign goods imported to Yunnan and

Kwangsi from"Tonkin shall pay 70 per cent, of the import duties collected by the

-Customs at the Coast Ports in China, and that produce exported from China to Ton-

kin shall pay 60 per cent, of the export duties in force at the Treaty Ports.

Art. IV.—Chinese produce which has paid import duties under Art. XI. of the

Treaty of 1886, and is transported through Tonkin to a port of shipment in Cochin-

China, shall, if exported thence to any other place than China, pay export duties accord-

ing to the Franco-Annamite tariff.

Art. V.—Trade in Chinese native opium by land is allowed on payment of an

export duty of Tls. 20 per picul, but French merchants or persons under French pro-

tection may only purchase it at Lungchow, Mengtzu, and Manghao, but no more than

Tls. 20 per picul shall be exacted from the Chinese merchants as inland dues. When

opium is sold the seller shall give the buyer a receipt showing that the inland dues

have been paid, which the exporter will hand to the Customs when paying export duty.

It is agreed that opium re-imported to China by the Coast Ports cannot claim the

privileges accorded other re-imports of goods of native origin.

Art. VI.—French and Tonkinese vessels other than men-of-war and vessels

carrying troops and Government stores plying on the Songkat and Caobang Rivers

between Langshan and Caobang shall pay a tonnage due of 5 candareens per ton at

Lungchow. but all goods on board shall pass free. Goods may be imported to China

by the Songkat and Caobang Rivers or overland by the Government road, but until

-the Chinese Government establishes Custom-houses on the frontier goods taken

overland must not be sold at Lungchow until they have paid duty there.

Art. VII.—It is agreed that should China enter into treaties with regard to com-

mercial relations on her. southern and south-western frontiers all privileges accorded

by her to the most favoured nation are at once without farther formality accorded to

France.

Art. VIII.—The above Articles having been agreed to and translated into

•Chinese, H.I.H. the Prince on behalf of China and H.E. the Minister on behalf of

France have signed duplicate copies and affixed their seals hereto.

Art. IX.—When the ratifications of this Convention and of the Treaty of 1886

-shall have been exchanged they shall be put in force as if they were one Treaty.

Art. X.—The ratifications of the Convention shall be exchanged at Peking

when the assent of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China and of His Excellency

dhe President of the French Republic shall have been signified.

Signed at Peking on the 26th June, 1887.

E. CONSTANS.

Pkince Chi’ng.

Son Yu-wen.

ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND

CHINA

Signed at Peking, 20th June, 1895

Art. I.—It is agreed, to assure the policing of the fiontier, that the French

‘Government will have the right of maintaining an agent of the Consular order at

Toughing opposite Monkay on the frontier of Kwantung. A further regulation

-will determine the conditions under which these should be exercised in accordance

with the French and Chinese authorities and the communal police of the Sino-

Annamite frontier.

Art. II.—Article II. of the Convention, signed at Peking, June 26th, 1887, is

modified and completed as follows:—It is agreed between the high contracting

parties that the town of Lungchow in Kwangsi and that of Mengtse in Yunnan

are open to French-Anuamite commerce. It is intended besides that the port

open to commerce on the river route of Laokay to Mengtse will no longer be

Manhao, but Hokow, and that the French Government have the right of maintaining

at Hokow an agent under the Consul at Mengtse, at the same time the Chinese

Government can maintain a Customs agent.

Art. III.—It is agreed that the town of Szemao in Yunnan shall be open !o

Trench-Annamite commerce, like Lungchow and Mengtse, and that the French

Government will have the right as in the other open port of maintaining a Consul

; .at the same time that the Chinese Government can maintain a Customs agent. The

’ local authorities will emplov themselves to facilitate the installation of the French

I -Consul in the proper residence. Frenchmen and protected French subjects may

I -establish themselves at Szemao under conditions of the Articles VII., X., XI., and XII.,

and others of the Treaty of June 27th, 1858; also by Article III. of the Convention of

i April 25th, 1886. Goods destined for China can be transported by the rivers,

| particularly the Loso and the Mekong as well as by land routes, and particularly by

; the Mandarin-road, which leads either from Mongle or Ipang to Szemao and Puerh,

I -the duties which these goods will be subject to being paid at Szemao.

Art. IV.—Article IX. of the Commercial Convention of April 25th, 1886, is

modified as follows:—(1) Chinese goods in transit from one of the other four towns

i open to commerce on the frontier, Lungchow, Mengtse, Szemao, and Hokow, in

i passing by Annam, will pay on leaving the reduced duties of four-tenths. A

-special certificate will be delivered stating the payment of this duty, and destined

-to accompany the goods. When they have come to another town they shall be

exempt from payment and import duty. (2) Chinese goods which shall be exported

from the four above-named localities and transported to Chinese ports, maritime

| or fluvial, open to commerce, shall be freed on leaving the frontier by payment of

| the reduced export duty of four-tenths. A special certificate will be delivered

j stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods. When

they shall arrive at one of the ports, maritime or fluvial, open to commerce, tuey

shall be freed the half-duty of re-importation in conformity with the general

I rule for all such goods in the maritime or fluvial ports open to commerce.

(3) Chinese goods which shall be transported from Chinese ports, maritime or

fluvial, open to commerce, by way of Annam, towards the four above-named

localities, shall be freed on leaving of all duty. A special certificate will be

94 ADDITIONAL CONVENTION BETWEEN FRANCE AND CHINA, 1895

delivered, stating the payment of this duty, and destined to accompany the goods.

When they shall have arrived at one of the frontier Customs they shall be freed-*

on entry by half duty of re-importation based on the reduction of four-tenths.

(4) The Chinese goods above mentioned, accompanied by the special certificate

above mentioned, shall be, before passing the export Customs, or after passing

Customs re-importation, submitted to the regulations governing native Chinese-

goods.

Art. Y.—It is understood that China, for the exploitation of its mines in the-

provinces of Yunnan, Kwangsi, and Kwangtung, will address itself, in the first

instance, to French commerce and engineers, the exploitation remaining otherwise

subject &) the rules and the edicts by the Imperial Government which affects-

national industry. It is understood that railways already in existence or projected

in Annam can, after mutual agreement, and under conditions to be defined, be

prolonged on Chinese territory.

Art. VI.—Article II. of the Telegraphic Convention between France and China,

signed at Chefoo, December 1, 1888, is completed as follows:—D.—A union shall be-

established between the secondary prefecture of Szemao and Annam by two stations*

which , shall be Szemao in, China and Mu,ang Hahin in Annam, midway between

Laichow and Luang Prabang. The tariff shall be fixed in conformity with Article

VI. of the Telegraphic Convention of Chefoo.

Art. VII. —It is agreed that the commercial stipulations contained in the present

Convention being of a special nature, and the result of mutual concessions deter-

mined by the necessities of the relations between Lungchow, Hokow, Mengtse,

Szemao, and Annam, the advantages which result therefrom cannot be invoked by

the subjects and protected subjects of the two high contracting parties, but on these

points as well as on the fluvial and land ways here determined of the frontier.

Art. VIII.—The present stipulations shall be put in force as if they were in-

serted in the text of the additional Convention of June 26th, 1887.

Art. IX.—The terms of former Treaties, Agreements, and Conventions between

France and China not modified by the present Treaty remain in full force. The pre-

sent complementary Convention shall be ratified immediately by His Majesty the

Emperor of China, and after it has been ratified by the President of the French

Kepublic the exchange of ratifications shall be made at Peking with the least delay

possible.

Done at Peking in four copies, June twentieth, one thousand eight hundred and

ninety-five, corresponding to the twenty-eighth day of the fifth moon of the twenty-

first year Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) A. Gerard.

„ Chino.

GERMANY

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

Signed in the German, French and Chinese Languages at Tientsin,

2nd September, 1861

Ratifications Exchanged at Shanghai, \4dh January, 1863

Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation between the States of the German

•Customs Union, the Grand Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-

Strelitz, and the free Hanseatic Towns of Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one

part, and China on the other part.

His Majesty the King of Prussia, for himself, as also on behalf of the other

members of the German Zollverein, that is to say:—The Crown of Bavaria, the

Crown of Saxony, the Crown of Hanover, the Crown of Wurtemburg, the Grand

Duchy of Baden, the Electorate of Hesse, the Grand Duchy of Hesse, the Duchy

of Brunswick, the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg, the Grand Duchy of Luxemburg, the

Grand Duchy of Saxony, the Duchies of Saxe-Meiningen, Saxe-Altenburg, Saxe-

Coburg Gotha, the Duchy of Nassau, the Principalities Waldeck and Pyrmont,

the Duchies Anhalt, Dessau, Koethen, and Anhalt Bernburg, the Principalities

Lippe, the Principalities Schwarzburg Sondershausen and Schwarzburg Budolfstadt,

Reuss the Elder Line, and Reuss the Younger Line, the Free City of Frankfort, the

Grand Baillewick Meisenheim of the Landgravate Hesse, the Baillewick Hamburg

of the Landgravate Hesse, also the Grand Duchies Mecklenburg-Schwerin and

Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Senates of the Hanseatic Towns, Lubeck, Bremen, and

Hamburg, of the one part, and His Majesty the Emperor of China of the other part,

being sincerely desirous to establish friendly relations between the said States and

China, have resolved to confirm the same by a Treaty of Friendship and Commerce,

mutually advantageous to the subjects of both high contracting parties, and for that

purpose have named for their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Majesty the King of Prussia, Frederick Albert Count of Eulenburg,

Chamberlain, His Majesty’s Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary,

Knight of the Red Eagle,Knight of St. John, etc., etc., etc.; and His Majesty the

Emperor of China, Cheong-meen, a member of the Imperial Ministry of Foreign

Affairs at Peking, Director-General of Public Supplies, and Imperial Commissioner ;

and Chong-hee, Honorary Under-Secretary of State, Superintendent of the three

Northern Ports, and Deputy Imperial Commissioner, who, after having communicated

to each other their respective full powers, and found the same in good and due form,

have agreed upon the following articles:

Art. I.—There shall be perpetual peace and unchanging friendship between the

contracting States. The subjects of both States shall enjoy full protection of person

and property.

Art. II.—His Majesty the King of Prussia may, if he see fit, accredit a diplomatic

agent to the Court of Peking, and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, in like

manner, if he see fit, nominate a diplomatic agent to the Court of Berlin.

The diplomatic agent nominated by His Majesty the King of Prussia shall also

represent the other contracting German States, who shall not be permitted to be

represented at the Court of Peking by diplomatic agents of their own. His Majesty

the Emperor of China hereby agrees that the diplomatic agent so appointed by His

Majesty the King of Prussia may, with his family and establishment, permanently

reside at the capital, or may visit it occasionally, at the option of the Prussian

Government.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. III.—The diplomatic agents of Prussia and China shall, at their respective-

residences, enjoy ..the privileges, and immunities accorded to them by international law

Their persons, their families, their residence, and their correspondence shall be held

inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their own officers, courtiers,

interpreters, servants, and attendants* without any kind of molestation.

All expenses occasioned by the diplomatic missions shall be borne by the respective-

Governments.

The Chinese Government agrees to assist His Prussian Majesty’s diplomatic

agent, upon his arrival at the capital, in selecting and renting a suitable house and!

other buildings.

Art. IY.—-The contracting German States may appoint a Consul-General, and

for each port or city opened to foreign commerce a Consul, Vice-Consul, or Consular'

Agent, as their interests may require.

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese authorities, and

enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the Consular officers of the most favoured

nations.

In the event of the absence of a German Consular Officer, the subjects of the

contracting German States shall be at liberty to apply to the Consul of a friendly

Power, or in case of need to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall use all efforts

to secure to them the privileges of this Treaty.

Art. V.—All official communications addressed by the diplomatic agents of Hi»

Majesty the King of Prussia, or by the Consular officers of the contracting German

States, to the Chinese authorities, shall be written in German. At present and until

otherwise agreed, they shall be accompanied by a Chinese translation; but it is hereby

mutually agreed that, in the event of a difference of meaning appearing between the

German and Chinese texts, the German Government shall be guided by the sense-

expressed in the German text.

In like manner shall all official communications addressed by the Chinese autho-

rities to the Ambassadors of Prussia, or to the Consuls of the contracting German.

States, be written in Chinese, and the Chinese authorities shall be guided by this-

text. It is further agreed that the translations may not he adduced as a proof in-

deciding difference.

In order to avoid future differences, and in consideration that all diplomatists of

Europe are acquainted with the French language, the present Treaty has been executed

in the German, the Chinese, and the French languages. All these versions have the

same sense and signification; but the French text shall be considered the original

text of the Treaty, and shall decide wherever the German and Chinese versions differ.

Art. YI.—The subjects of the contracting German States may, with their

families, reside, frequent, and carry on trade or industry in the ports, cities, and towns

of Canton, Swatow or Chao-chow, Amoy, Foochow, Ningpo, Shanghai, Tangchow or

Chefoo, Tientsin, Newchwang,Chinkiang, Kiukiang; Hankow, Kiungchow (Hainan),

and at Taiwan and Tamsui in the Island of Formosa. They are permitted to

proceed to and from these places with their vessels and merchandise, and within

these localities to purchase, rent, or let houses or land, build, or open churches,,

churchyards, and hospitals.

Art. VII.—Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German States'

may not enter other ports than those declared open in this Treaty. They must not,,

contrary to law, enter other ports, or carry on illicit trade along the coast. All vessels-

detected in violating this stipulation shall, together with their cargo, be subject to-

confiscation by the Chinese Government.

Art. VIII.—Subjects of the contracting German States may make excursions in

the neighbourhood of the open ports to a distance of one hundred li, and for a time

not exceeding five days.

Those desirous of proceeding into the interior of the country must be provided

with a passport, issued by their respective Diplomatic or Consular authorities, and

countersigned

be exhibited. by the local Chinese authorities. These passports must upon demand

TREAT7 BETWEEN- PRUSSIA AND CHINA 9T

The Chinese authorities shall be at liberty to detain merchants and travellers

subjects of any of the contracting- German States, who may have lost their passports

until they have procured new ones, or-to convey them to the next Consulate, but they

shall not be permitted to subject them to ill-usage or allow them to be ili-used.

It is, however, distinctly understood that no passport may be given to places at

present occupied by the rebels until peace has been restored.

Art. IX.—-The subjects of the contracting German States shall be permitted to

engage compradores, interpreters, writers, workmen, sailors, and servants from any

part of China, upon a remuneration agreed to by both parties, as also to hire boats for

the transport of persons and merchandise. They shall also be permitted to engage-

Chinese for acquiring the Chinese language or dialects, or to instruct them in foreign

languages. There shall be no restriction in the purchasing of German or Chinese books.

Art. X.—Persons professing or teaching the Christian religion shall enjoy fulh

protection of their persons and property, and be allowed free exercise of their religion.

Art. XI.—Any merchant-vessel of any of the contracting German States arriving

at any of the open ports shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take

her to port. Tn like manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties, and

is ready to take her departure, she shall be permitted to select a pilot to conduct her

out of port,.

Art. XII.—Whenever a vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States

has entered a harbour, the Superintendent of Customs may, if he see fit, depute one

or more Customs officers to guard the ship, and to see that no merchandise is

smuggled. These officers shall live in a boat of their own, or stay on board the ship,

as may best suit their convenience. Their salaries, food, and expenses shall be defrayed

by the Chinese Customs authorities, and they shall not be entitled to any fees whatever

from the master or consignee. Every violation of this regulation shall be punished

proportionally to the amount exacted, which shall be returned in full.

Art. XIII.—Within twenty-four hours after the arrival of the ship, the-

master, unless he be prevented by lawful causes, or in his stead the supercargo or the-

consignee, shall lodge in the hands of the Consul the ship’s papers and copy of tlm

manifest.

Within a further period of twenty-four hours the Consul will report to the

Superintendent of Customs the name of the ship, the number of the crew, her

registered tonnage, and the nature of the cargo.

If owing to neglect on the part of the master the above rule be not complied

with within forty-eight hours after the ship’s arrival he shall be liable to a fine of

fifty Dollars for every day’s delay; the total amount of penalty, however, shall not

exceed two hundred Dollars.

Immediately after the receipt of the report, the Superintendent of Customs shall

issue a permit to open hatches.

If the master shall open hatches and begin to discharge the cargo without said)

permit, he shall be liable to a fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, and the goods

so discharged without permit shall be liable to confiscation.

Art. XIV.—Whenever a merchant, a subject of any of the contracting German

States, has cargo to land or ship, he must apply to the Superintendent of Customs for-

a special permit. Merchandise landed or shipped without such permit shall be subject

to forfeiture.

Art. XV.—The subjects of the contracting German States shall pay duties on

all goods imported or exported by them at the ports open to foreign trade according

to the tariff appended to this Treaty ; but in no case shall they be taxed with higher

duties than, at present or in future, subjects of the most favoured nations are liable to.

The commercial stipulations appended to this Treaty shall constitute an integral

part of the same, and shall therefore be considered binding upon both the high con-

tracting parties.

Art. XVI.—With respect to articles subject to an ad valorem duty, if the

German merchant cannot agree with the Chinese officers as to their value, then each

party shall call in two or three merchants to examine and appraise the goods, and

4

TKEATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

the highest price at which any of these merchants may declare himself willing to

purchase them shall be assumed as the value of the goods.

Art. XVII.—Duties shall be charged upon the net weight ot each article; tare

■therefore to be deducted. If the German merchant cannot agree with the Chinese

officers on the exact amount of tare, then each party shall choose from among the

goods respecting which there is a difference a certain number of chests or bales,

which being first weighed gross, shall afterwards be tared and the tare fixed accord-

ingly. The average tare upon these chests or bales shall constitute the tare upon the

whole lot of packages.

Art. XVIII.—If in the courses of verification there arise other points of dispute,

which cannot be settled, the German merchant may appeal to his Consul, who will

communicate the particulars of the differences of the case to the Superintendent of

•Customs, and both will endeavour to bring about an amicable arrangement. But

the appeal to the Consul must be made within twenty-four hours, or it will not be

attended to.

As long as no settlement be come to, the Superintendent of Customs shall not

enter the matter at issue in his books, in order that a thorough investigation and the

final settlement of the difference be not prejudiced.

Art. XIX.—Should imported goods prove to be damaged, a fair reduction of

duty shall be allowed, in proportion to their deterioration. If any disputes arise,

they shall be settled in the same manner as agreed upon in Art. XVI. of this Treaty

having reference to articles which pay duty ad valorem.

Art. XX.—Any merchant vessel belonging to one of the contracting German

States having entered any of the open ports, and not yet opened hatches, may quit

the same within forty-eight hours after her arrival, and proceed to another port, with-

out being subject to the payment of tonnage-dues, duties, or any other fees or charges;

but tonnage-dues must be paid after the expiration of the said forty-eight hoars.

Art. XXL—Import duties shall be considered payable on the landing of the

-goods, and duties of export on the shipping of the same. When all tonnage-dues and

duties shall have been paid, the Superintendent of Customs shall give a receipt in full

(port-clearance), which being produced at the Consulate, the Consular officer shall

then return to the captain the ship’s papers and permit him to depart on the voyage.

Art. XXII.—The Superintendent of Customs will point out one or more bankers

authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the duties on his behalf. The

receipts of these bankers shall be looked upon as given by the Chinese Government

itself. Payment may be made in bars or in foreign coin, whose relative value to the

Chinese sycee silver shall be fixed by special agreement, according to circumstances,

between the Consular officers and the Superintendent of Customs.

Art. XXIII.—Merchant-vessels belonging to the contracting German States of

more than one hundred and fifty tons burden shall be charged four mace per ton;

merchant-vessels of one hundred and fifty tons and under shall be charged at the

rate of one mace per ton.

The captain or consignee having paid the tonnage-dues the Superintendent of

Customs shall give them a special certificate, on exhibition of which the ship shall be

exempted from all further payment of tonnage-dues in any open port of China which

the captain may visit for a period of four months, to be reckoned from the date of

the port clearance mentioned in Art. XXI.

Boats employed by subjects of the contracting German States in the conveyance

of passengers, baggage, letters, articles of provisions, or articles not subject to duties

shall not be liable to tonnage dues. Any boat of this kind, however, conveying

merchandise subject to duty, shall come under the category of vessels under one

hundred and fifty tons, and pay tonnage-dues at the rate of one mace per register ton.

Art. XXIV.—Goods on which duties have been paid in any of the ports open to

foreign trade, upon being sent into the interior of the country, shall not be subject to

any but* transit duty. The same shall be paid according to the tariff now existing,

and may not be raised in future. This also applies to goods sent from the interior

ot the country to any of the open ports.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

All transit duties on produce brought from the interior to an}' of the open ports,

or importations sent from any of the open ports into the interior of China, may be-

paid once for all.

If any of the Chinese officers violate the stipulations of this Article by demanding

illegal or higher duties than allowed by law, they shall be punished according to

Chinese law.

Art. XXV.—If the master of a merchant vessel belonging to any of the

contracting German States, having entered any of the open ports, should wish to land

only a portion of his cargo, he shall only pay duties for the portion so landed. He

may take the rest of the cargo to another port, pay duties there, and dispose of the

same.

Art. XXVI.—Merchants of any of the contracting German States, who may have

imported merchandise into any of the open ports and paid duty thereon, if they desire

to re-export the same, shall be entitled to make application to the Superintendent of

Customs, who shall cause examination to be made to satisfy himself of the identity of

the goods and of their having remained unchanged.

On such duty-paid goods the Superintendent of Customs shall, on application of

the merchant wishing to export them to any other open port, issue a certificate

testifying to the payment of all legal duties thereon.

The Superintendent of Customs of the port to which such goods are brought

shall, upon presentation of said certificate, issue a permit for the discharge and

landing of them free of all duty, without any additional exactions whatever. But if,

on comparing the goods with certificate, any fraud on the revenue be detected,

then the goods shall be subject to confiscation.

But if the goods are to be exported to a foreign port, the Superintendent of

Customs of the port from which they are exported shall issue a certificate stating

that the merchant who exports the goods has a claim on the Customs equal to the

amount of duty paid on the goods. The certificate shall be a valid tender to the

Customs in payment of import or export duties.

Art. XXVII.—No transhipment from one vessel to another can be made without

special permission of the Superintendent of Customs, under pain of confiscation of

the goods so transhipped, unless it be proved that there was danger in delaying the

transhipment.

Art. XXVIII.—Sets of standard weights and measures, such as are in use at the

Canton Custom-house, shall be delivered by the Superintendent of Customs to the

Consul at each port open to foreign trade. These measures, weights, and balances

shall represent the ruling standard on which all demands and payments of duties are

made, and in case of any dispute they shall be referred to.

Art. XXIX.—Penalties enforced or confiscations made for violation of this

Treaty, or of the appended regulations, shall belong to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXX.—Ships-of-war belonging to the contracting German States cruising

about for the protection of trade, or being engaged in the pursuit of pirates, shall be

at liberty to visit, without distinction, all ports within the dominions of the Emperor

of China. They shall receive every facility for the purchase of provisions, the

procuring of water, and for making repairs. The commanders of such ships shall

hold intercourse with the Chinese authorities on terms of equality and courtesy.

Such ships shall not be liable to payment of duties of any kind.

Art. XXXI.—Merchant vessels belonging to any of the contracting German

States, from injury sustained, or from other causes, compelled to seek a place of

refuge, shall be permitted to enter any port within the dominions of the Emperor of

China without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties on the goods,

if only landed for the purpose of making the necessary repairs of the vessel, and

remaining under the supervision of the Superintendent of Customs. Should any such

vessel be wrecked or stranded on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities shall

immediately adopt measures for rescuing the crew and for securing the vessel and

cargo. The crew thus saved shall receive friendly treatment, and, if necessary, shall

be furnished with means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

4*

100 TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. XXXII.—If sailors or other individuals of ships-of-war or merchant

vessels belonging to any of the contracting Q-erman States desert their ships and take

refuge in the dominions of the Emperor of China, the Chinese authorities shall, upon

due requisition by the Consular Officer, or by the captain, take the necessary steps for

the detention of the deserter, and hand him overto the Consular officer or to the captain.

In like manner, if Chinese deserters or criminals take refuge in the houses or on

board ships belonging to subjects of the contracting German States, the local Chinese

authorities shall apply to the German Consular officer, who will take the necessary

measures for apprehending the said deserter or criminal, and deliver him up to the

■Chinese authorities.

Art. XXXIII.—If any vessel belonging to any of the contracting German States,

while within Chinese waters, be plundered by pirates, it shall be the duty of the

■Chinese authorities to use every means to capture and punish the said pirates, to

recover the stolen property where and in whatever condition it may be, and to hand

the same over to the Consul for restoration to the owner. If the robbers or pirates

■cannot be apprehended, or the property taken cannot be entirely recovered, the

Chinese authorities shall then be punished in accordance with the Chinese law, but

they shall not be held pecuniarily responsible,

Art. XXXIY.—If subjects of any of the contracting German States have any

occasion to address a communication to the Chinese authorities, they must submit

the same to their Consular officer, to determine if the matter be just, and the lan-

guage be proper and respectful, in which event he shall transmit the same to the proper

authorities, or return the same for alterations. If Chinese subjects have occasion to

address a Consul of one of the contracting German States, they must adopt the same

course, and submit their communication to the Chinese authorities, who will act in

like manner.

Art. XXXY.—Any subject of any of the contracting German States having reason

to complain of a Chinese must first proceed to the Consular officer and state his

grievance. The Consular officer, having inquired into the merits of the case, will

endeavour to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a Chinese have reason to

complain of a subject of any of the contracting German States, the Consular officer

shall listen to his complaint and endeavour to bring about a friendly settlement. If

the dispute, however, is of such a nature that the Consul cannot settle the same

amicably, he shall then request the assistance of the Chinese authorities, that they

may conjointly examine into the merits of the case, add decide it equitably.

Art. XXXYI.—The Chinese authorities shall at all times afford the fullest

protection to the subjects of the contracting German States, especially when they are

exposed to insult or violence. In all cases of incendiarism, robbery, or demolition,

the local authorities shall at once dispatch an armed force to disperse the mob, to

apprehend the guilty, and to punish them with the rigour of the law. Those robbed

or whose property has been demolished shall have a claim upon the despoilers of

their property for indemnification, proportionate to the injury sustained.

Art. XXXVII.—Whenever a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China fails

to discharge the debts due to a subject of one of the contracting German States, or

fraudulently absconds, the Chinese authorities, upon application by the creditor, will

do their utmost to effect his arrest and to enforce payment of the debt. In like

manner the authorities of the contracting German States shall do their utmost to

enforce the payment of debts of their subjects towards Chinese subjects, and to bring

to justice any who fraudulently abscond. But in no case shall either the Chinese

Government or the Government of the contracting German States be held responsible

for the debts incurred by their respective subjects.

Art. XXXVIII.—Any subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China, having

committed a crime against a subject of one of the contracting German States, shall be

apprehended by the Chinese authorities and punished according to the laws of China.

In like manner, if a subject of the contracting German States is guilty of a

c-mc against a subject of His Majesty the Emperor of China, the Consular officer

shall arrest him and punish him according to the laws of the State to which he belongs.

TREATY BETWEEN PRUSSIA AND CHINA 101

Art. XXXIX.—All questions arising between subjects of the contracting German

States in reference to the rights of property or person shall be submitted to the

jurisdiction of the authorities of their respective States. In like manner will the

Chinese authorities abstain from interfering in differences that may arise between

subjects of one of the contracting German States and foreigners.

Art. XL.—-The contracting parties agree that the German States and their

subjects shall fully and equally participate in all privileges, immunities, and ad-

vantages that have been, or may be hereafter, granted by His Majesty the Emperor

of China to the government or subjects of any other nation. All changes made in

favour of any nation in the tariff, in the Customs duties, in tonnage and harbour

dues, in import, export, or transit duties, shall, as soon as they take effect, imme-

diately, and without a new Treaty, be equally applied to the contracting German States

and to their merchants, shipowners, and navigators.

Art. XLI.—If in future the contracting German States desire a modification of any

stipulation contained in this Treaty, they shall be at liberty, after the lapse of ten years,

dated from the day of the ratification of this Treaty, to open negotiations to that effect.

Six months before the expiration of the ten years itmustbe officiallynotifiedtotheChinese

Government that modifications of the Treaty are desired, and in what these consist.

If no such notification is made the Treaty remains in force for another ten years.

Art. XLII.—The present Treaty shall be ratified and the ratifications be exchanged

within one year, dated from the day of signature, the exchange of the ratifications to

take place at Shanghai or Tientsin, at the option of the Prussian Government. Im-

mediately after the exchange of ratifications has taken place, the Treaty shall be brought

to the knowledge of the Chinese authorities, and be promulgated in the capital and

throughout the provinces of the Chinese Empire, for the guidance of the authorities.

In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of the high contracting

Powers, have signed and sealed the present Treaty.

Done in four copies, at Tientsin, this second day of September, in the year of

our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding with the Chinese

date of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung,

(Signed) [l.s.] Count Eulenbubg.

„ [l.s.] Chong Meen.

,, [l-s,] Chong Hee.

Sepaeate Aeticle

In addition to a Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation concluded this

day between Prussia, the other States of the German Customs Union, the Grand

Duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the Hanseatic towns of

Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg of the one part, and China of the other part, which

Treaty shall take effect after exchange of the ratifications within twelve months from

its signature, and which stipulates that His Majesty the King of Prussia may

nominate a diplomatic agent at the Court of Peking with a permanent residence at

that capital, it has been covenanted between the respective Plenipotentiaries of these

States that, owing to and in consideration of the disturbances now prevailing in China,

His Majesty the King of Prussia shall wait the expiration of five years after the

exchange of ratifications of this Treaty before he deputes a diplomatic agent to take

up his fixed residence at Peking.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have hereunto set their signa-

tures and affixed their seals.

Done in four copies at Tientsin, this second day of September, in the year of our

Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date

of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed) [l.s.] Count Eulenbueg.

[l.s.] Chong Meen.

[l.s.] Chong Hee.

102 SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

Separate Article

In addition to a Treaty of Amity, Commerce, and Navigation, concluded

between Prussia, the other States of the German Customs Union, the Grand Duchies

of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and Mecklenburg-Strelitz, and the Hanseatic towns of

Lubeck, Bremen, and Hamburg on the one part, and China on the other part:

It has been separately agreed that the Senates of the Hanseatic towns shall have

the right to nominate for themselves a Consul of their own at each of the Chinese

ports open for commerce and navigation.

This Separate Article shall have the same force and validity as if included word

for word in the above-mentioned Treaty.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this present

Separate Article and affixed their seals.

Done in four copies at Tientsin, the second day of September, in the year of our

Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, corresponding to the Chinese date

of the twenty-eighth day of the seventh moon of the eleventh year of Hien Fung.

(Signed) [l.s.] Count Eulenburo.

„ [l.s.] Chong Meen.

„ [l.s.] Chong Hee.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY

AND CHINA, 1880

Ratified IQth September, 1881

[Translated from the German Text]

His Majesty the German Emperor, King of Prussia, &c., in the name of the

German Empire, and his Majesty the Emperor of China, wishing to secure the more

perfect execution of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, have, in conformity with

Article XLI. of that Treaty, according to the terms of which the High Contracting

German States are entitled, after a period of ten years, to demand a revision of the

Treaty, decided to conclude a Supplementary Convention.

With this view they have appointed their Plenipotentiaries—viz., His Majesty

the German Emperor, King of Prussia, etc., his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister

Plenipotentiary, Max August Scipio von Brandt; and His Majesty the Emperor

of China, the Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen, the Secretary of State, etc., Shen

Kue-fen ; and the Secretary of State, etc., Chin Lien ;

Who, after communicating to each other their full powers, and finding them in

due form, have agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art. I.—Chinese Concession.—The harbours of Ichang, in Hupei; Wuhu, in

Anhui; Wenchow, in Chekiang; and Pakhao, in Kwangtung, and the landing-places

Tat'ung and Anking in Anhui; Huk‘ow, in Kiangsi; Wusueh, Luchikow, and Shah-

shih, in Hukuang, having already been opened, German ships are in future also to

be permitted to touch at the harbour of Woosung, in the province of Kiangsu, to take

in or discharge merchandise. The necessary Regulations are to be drawn up by the

Taotai of Shanghai and the competent authorities.

German Concession.—In the event of special regulations for the execution of

concessions which the Chinese Government may make to foreign Governments being

attached to such concessions, Germany, while claiming these concessions for herself

and for her subjects, will equallv assent to the regulations attached to them.

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA 103

Art. XI. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, is not affected by this

regulation, and is hereby expressly confirmed.

Should German subjects, on the strength of this Article, claim privileges, immu-

nities, or advantages which the Chinese Government may further concede to another

Power, or the subject of such Power, they will also submit to the regulations which

have been agreed upon in connection with such concession.

Art. II.—Chinese Concession.—German ships, which have already paid tonnage

dues in China, may visit all other open ports in China, as well as all ports not Chinese,

without exception, without being again obliged to pay tonnage dues, within the given

period of four months.

German sailing-vessels which remain in the same Chinese harbour for a longer

period than fourteen days shall only pay for time over and above this period half of

the tonnage dues stipulated by Treaty.

German Concession.—The Chinese Government shall have the right of appointing

Consuls to all towns of Germany in which the Consuls of other States are admitted,

and they shall enjoy the same rights and privileges as the Consuls of the most

favoured nation.

Art. III.—Chinese Concession.—The Chinese Commissioner of Customs, and the

other competent authorities, shall, after agreeing upon the necessary regulations,

themselves take measures for the establishment of bonded warehouses in all the open

ports of China in which they are required in the interests of foreign commerce, and

where local circumstances would admit of such an arrangement being made.

German Concession.—German ships visiting the open ports of China shall deliver

a manifest containing an exact statement as to the quality and quantity of their cargoes.

Mistakes which may have occurred in the manifests can be rectified in the course of

twenty-four hours (Sundays and holidays excepted). False statements as to the

quantity and quality of cargo are punishable by confiscation of the goods and also by

a fine, to be imposed upon the captain, but not to exceed the sum of Tls. 500.

Art. IY.—Chinese Concession.—The export duty on Chinese coal, exported by

German merchants from the open ports, is reduced to 3 mace per ton. In those

ports in which a lower duty on the export of coal has already been fixed upon the

lower duty remains in force.

German Concession.—Any one acting as pilot for any kind of craft whatever

without being furnished with the regulation certificate is liable to a fine not to

exceed Tls. 100 for each separate case.

Eegulations with a view to exercising a proper control over sailors are to be

introduced with the least possible delay.

Art. Y.—Chinese Concession.—German ships in want of repairs in consequence

■of damages sustained within or without the port are not required to pay tonnage

dues during the period necessary for repairs, which is to be fixed by the Inspectorate

of Customs.

German Concession.—Ships belonging to Chinese may not make use of the

German flag, nor may German ships make use of the Chinese flag.

Art. VI.—Chinese Concession.—In the event of German ships, no longer fit for

sea, being broken up in any open port of China, the material may be sold without

any import duty being levied upon it. But if the materials are to be brought ashore

a “permit of discharge” must first be obtained for them from the Customs Inspec-

torate, in the same manner as in the case of merchandise.

German Concession.—If German subjects travel into the interior for their own

pleasure without being in possession of a passport issued by the Consul and stamped

by the proper Chinese authority, the local authorities concerned are entitled to have

them taken back to the nearest German Consulate, in order that the requisite

supervision may be exercised over thorn. The offender is, in addition to this, liable

to a fine up to 300 Taels.

Art. YII.—Chinese Concession.—Materials for German docks are free of duty.

A list of articles which may be imported free of duty in conformity with this

stipulation is to be drawn up and published by the Inspector-General of Customs.

104 SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

German Concession.—Passes issued to German subjects for conveying foreign

merchandise into the interior, as well as passports for the purpose of travelling

issued to German subjects, are only to remain in force for a period of thirteen Chinese

months from the day on which they were issued.

Art. VIII.—The settlement of the question relating to judicial proceedings in

mixed cases, the taxation of foreign merchandise in the interior, the taxation of

Chinese goods in the possession of foreign merchants in the interior, and intercourse

between foreign and Chinese officials are to become the subject1 of special negotiations,

which both Governments hereby declare themselves ready to enter upon.

Art. IX.—All the provisions of the former Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861,

which have not been altered by this agreement, are hereby confirmed anew, as both

parties now expressly declare.

In the cases of those Articles, on the other hand, which are affected by the

present Treaty, the new interpretation of them is to be considered as binding.

Art. X.—The present Supplementary Convention shall be ratified by their

Majesties, and the ratifications exchanged at Peking, within a year from the date of

its signature.

The provisions of the agreement come into force-on the day of the exchange of

the ratifications.

In witness whereof the plenipotentiaries of both the High Contracting Powers

have signed and sealed with their seals the above agreement in four copies, in the

German and Chinese texts, which have been compared and found to correspond.

Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and

eighty, corresponding to the twenty-first day of the second moon of the sixth year

of Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [l-s.] M. von Brandt.

„ [L.S.] Shen Kue-Fen..

„ [L.S.] Chtno Lien.

Special Stipulations to the Supplementary Convention

For the sake of greater clearness and completeness, it has seemed fitting to

append a number of special stipulations to the Supplementary Convention.

The following stipulations must be observed by the subjects of both the

contracting parties, in the same way as the stipulations of the Treaty itself. In

proof whereof the Plenipotentiaries of the two States have thereto set their seals and

signatures:—

in the1.—In accordance

province with the

of Kiangsu, newly-granted

German ships shallprivileges

be at libertyfor theto-port

takeof inWoosung

and to

unload there merchandise which is either intended for Shanghai or comes from

Shanghai; and for this purpose the competent authorities there shall have the right

of devising regulations in order to prevent frauds on the taxes and irregularities of

every kind ; which regulations shall be binding for the merchants of "both countries,T

German merchants are not at liberty to construct landing-places for ships, merchants

houses, or warehouses at the said place.

in the—An experiment

Chinese to ascertain

open ports whether

shall first bondedat warehouses

be made Shanghai. canForbethisestablished

purpose

the Customs Director at the said place, with the Customs Inspector-General, shall

forthwith draw up regulations suitable to the local conditions, and then the said

Customs Director and his colleagues shall proceed to the establishment of such bonded

warehouse.

. 3-—H

written any from

permit goodsthefound on board

Customs Officea isGerman

required,ship,arefornot the discharge

entered in the whereof

manifest.a

SUPPLEMENTARY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA 105

this shall be taken as proof ©f a false manifest, no matter whether a certificate of

the reception of such goods on board, bearing the captain’s signature, be produced

or not.

4. —If a (German ship, in consequence of damages received in on

Chinese ports, or outside thereof, needs repair, the time required for such repair

shall be reckoned in addition to the term after the lapse of which tonnage-dues are

to be paid. The Chinese authorities have the right to make the necessary arrange-

ments for this purpose. But if it appears therefrom that this is only a pretext and

a design to evade the legal payments to the Customs, the ship therein concerned shall

be fined in double the amount of the tonnage-dues whereof it has tried to evade the

payment.

5. —No ships of any kind which belong to Chinese subjects are allo

use of the German flag. If there are definite grounds for suspicion that this has

nevertheless been done, the Chinese authority concerned is to address an official

communication thereon to the German Consul, and if it should be shown, in con-

sequence of the investigation instituted by him, that the ship was really not entitled

to bear the German flag, the ship as well as the goods found therein, so far as they

belong to Chinese merchants, shall be immediately delivered over to the Chinese

authorities for further disposal. If it be ascertained that German subjects were

aware of the circumstances, and took part in the commission of the irregularity, the

whole of the goods belonging to them found in the ship are liable to confiscation,

and the people themselves to punishment according to law.

In case a German ship carries the Chinese flag without authority to do so, then,

if it be ascertained through the investigation made by the Chinese authorities that

the ship was really not entitled to bear the Chinese flag, the ship, as well as the

goods found therein, so far as they belong to German merchants, shall be imme-

diately delivered over to the German Consul for further disposal and the punishment

of the guilty. If it be shown that German owners of goods were aware of the cir-

cumstance and took part in the commission of this irregularity, all the goods belong-

ing to them found in the ship shall incur the penalty of confiscation by the Chinese

authorities. The goods belonging to Chinese may be immediately seized by the

Chinese authorities.

6. —If on the sale of the materials of a German ship which, from

ness, has been broken up in one of the open Chinese ports, an attempt be made to

mix up with them goods belonging to the cargo, these goods shall be liable to con-

fiscation, and, moreover, to a fine equal to double the amount of the import duty which

they would otherwise have had to pay.

7. —If German subjects go into the interior with foreign goods, or

the passes or certificates issued to them shall only be valid for thirteen Chinese

months, reckoned from the day of their issue, and after the lapse of that term must no

longer be used. The expired passes and certificates must be returned to the Customs

authorities in whose officiail district they were issued in order to be cancelled.

N.B.—If a pleasure excursion be undertaken into regions so distant that the

term of a year appears insufficient, this must be noted on the pass by reason of an

understanding between the Consul and the Chinese authority at the time it is issued.

If the return of the passport be omitted, no further pass shall be issued to the

person concerned until it has taken place. If the pass be lost, no matter whether

within the term or after its expiration, the person concerned must forthwith make a

formal declaration of the fact before the nearest Chinese authority. The Chinese

official applied to will then do what else may be necessary for the invalidation of

the pass. If the recorded declaration prove to be untrue, in case the transport

of goods be concerned, they will be confiscated ; if the matter relate to travelling,

the traveller will be taken to the nearest Consul, and be delivered up to him for

punishment.

8. —Materials for German docks only enjoy, in so far as they

employed for the repair of ships, the favour of duty-free importation in open ports.

The Customs authority has the right to send inspectors to the dock to convince

106 SUPPLEMENTAEY CONVENTION BETWEEN GERMANY AND CHINA

themselves on the spot as to the manner and way in which the materials are being

used. If the construction of a new ship be concerned, the materials employed for

this, in so far as they are specially entered in the import or export tariff, will be

reckoned at the tariff duty, and those not entered in the tariff at a duty of 5 per

cent, ad valorem, and the merchant concerned will be bound to pay this duty

subsequently.

Any one who wishes to lay out a dock is to get from the Customs office a gratis

Concession certificate, and to sign a written undertaking, the purport and wording

whereof is to be settled in due form by the Customs office concerned.

9.—Art. XXIX. of the Treaty of the 2nd September, 1861, shall be applicable

to the fines established by this present Supplementary Convention.

Done at Peking the thirty-first March, one thousand eight hundred and eighty,

corresponding with the twenty-first day of the second month of the sixth year of

Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] M. von Brandt.

„ [l.s.] Shen Kue-Fen.

„ [l.s.] Chino Lien.

The Prince of Kung and the Ministers of the Tstjng-li Yamen

to Herr von Brandt

Kwang Hsu, 6th year, 2nd mouth, 21st day.

(Peking, March 31st, 1880.)

With regard to the stipulation contained in the second Article of the Supple-

mentary Convention concluded on occasion of the Treaty revision, that German

sailing-ships which lie for a longer time than fourteen days in Chinese ports shall

only pay for the time beyond that term the moiety of the tonnage dues settled

by Treaty, the Plenipotentiaries of the two contracting parties have agreed and

declared that the said stipulation shall first of all be introduced by way of trial,

and that in case, on carrying it out, practical difficulties should arise, another stipula-

tion may be put in its place on the basis of a renewed joint discussion by both

parties.

Protocol

The undersigned, who have been expressly empowered by their Government to

make the following arrangements, have agreed that the term settled by the Pleni-

potentiaries of the German Empire and of China in the Supplementary Convention

concluded at Peking on the 31st March this year, for the exchange of the Batifica-

tion of the Convention, shall be prolonged till the 1st December, 1881.

The other stipulations of the Supplementary Convention of the 31st March, this

year, are not affected by this alteration.

In witness whereof the undersigned have subscribed with their own hands and

affixed their seals to this Agreement, in two copies of each of the German and

Chinese texts, which have been compared with each other and found to correspond.

Done at Peking the twenty-first August, one thousand eight hundred and eighty,

corresponding with the sixteenth day of the seventh month of the sixth year

Kwang Hsu.

(Signed) [l.s.] M. von Brandt.

„ [l.s.] Shen Kue-Fen.

[l.s.] Chino Lien.

„ [l.s.] Wang Neen-Shou.

„ [l.s.] Lin Shu.

[l.s.] • Chung Li.

THE KIAOCHOW CONVENTION

I. —His Majesty the Emperor of China, being desirous of preserving

good relations with His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, and of promoting an

increase of German power and influence in the Far East, sanctions the acquirement

under lease by Germany of the land extending for 100 li at high tide (at Kiaochow).

His Majesty the Emperor of China is willing that German troops should take

possession of the above-mentioned territory at any time the Emperor of Germany

chooses. China retains her sovereignty over this territory, and, should she at any

time wish to enact laws or carry out plans within the leased area, she shall be at

liberty to enter into negotiations with Germany with reference thereto; provided

always that such laws or plans shall not be prejudicial to German interests. Germany

may engage in works for the public benefit, such as water-works, within the territory

covered by the lease, without reference to China. Should China wish to march troops

or establish garrisons therein she can only do so after negotiating with and obtaining

the express permission of Germany.

II. —His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, being desirous, like t

certain other countries, of establishing a naval and coaling station and constructing

dockyards on the coast of China, the Emperor of China agrees to lease to him for the

purpose all the land on the southern and northern sides of Kiaochow Bay for a term

of ninety-nine years. Germany is to be at liberty to erect forts on this land for the

defence of her possessions therein.

ITT.—During the continuance of the lease China shall have no voice in the

government or administration of the leased territory. It will be governed and

administered during the whole term of ninety-nine years solely by Germany, so that

the possibility of friction between the two Powers may be reduced to the smallest

magnitude. The lease covers the following districts:—

(a)—All the land in the north-east of Lienhan, adjacent to the north-eastern

mouth of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from the north-eastern comer of

Yintao to Laoshan-wan.

(6.)—All the land in the south-west of Lienhan, adjacent to the southern mouth

of the Bay, within a straight line drawn from a point on the shore of the Bay bearing

south-west by south from Tsi-pe-shan-to.

(c.)—Tsi-pe-shan-to and Yintao.

{d.)—The whole area of the Bay of Kiaochow covered at high-water.

(e.)—Certain islands at the entrance of the Bay which are ceded for the purpose

of erecting forts for the defence of the German possessions. The boundaries of the

leased territory shall hereafter be more exactly defined by a commission appointed

jointly by the Chinese and German Governments, and consisting of Chinese and

German subjects. Chinese ships of war and merchant-ships, and ships of war and

merchant-ships of countries having treaties and in a state of amity with China shall

receive equal treatment with German ships of war and merchant ships in Kiaochow

Bay during the continuance of the lease. Germany is at liberty to enact any regula-

tions sbe desires for the government of the territory and harbour, provided such

regulations apply impartially to the ships of all nations, Germany and China included.

IV.—Germany shall be at liberty to erect whatever lighthouses, beacons, and other

aids to navigation she chooses within the territory leased, and along the islands and

coasts approaching the entrance to the harbour. Vessels of China and vessels of

other countries entering the harbour shall be liable to special duties for the repair

and maintenance of all lighthouses, beacons and other aids to navigation which

Germany may erect and establish. Chinese vessels shall be exempt from other

special duties.

108 RAILWAY AND MINING CONCESSION

Y.—Should G-ermany desire to give up her interest in the leased territory before-

the expiration of ninety-nine years, China shall take over the whole area, and pay

Germany for whatever German property may at the time of surrender be there-

situated. In cases of such surrender taking place Germany shall be at liberty to lease

some other point along the coast. Germany shall not cede the territory leased to any

other Power than China. Chinese subjects shall be allowed to live in the territory

leased, under the protection of the German authorities, and there carry on their avoca-

tions and business as long as they conduct themselves as peaceable and law-abiding:

citizens. Germany shall pay a reasonable price to the native proprietors for whatever

lands her Government or subjects require. Fugitive Chinese criminals taking refuge

in the leased territory shall be arrested and surrendered to the Chinese authorities for

trial and punishment, upon application to the German authorities, but the Chinese

authorities shall not be at liberty to send agents into the leased territory to make-

arrests. The German authorities shall not interfere with the lekin stations outside

but adjacent to the territory.

THE RAILWAY AND MINING CONCESSION

linesI-of railway in—The

Shantung. The Chinese

first willGovernment sanctionsand

run from Kiaochow the Tsinan-fu

constructionto by

the boundary of Shantung province via Wei-hsien, Tsinchow, Pashan, Tsechuen and

Sniping. The second line will connect Kiaochow with Chinchow, whence an extension,

will be constructed to Tsinan through Laiwu-hsien. The construction of this extension

shall not be begun until the first part of the line, the main line, is completed, in

order to give the Chinese an opportunity of connecting this line in the most advan-

tageous manner with their own railway system. What places the line from Tsinan-fu

to the provincial boundary shall take in en route is to be determined hereafter.

II- shall be formed,

Company —In orderattowhatever

with branches carry outplaces

the above-mentioned

may be necessary, railway

and work

in this Company both German and Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to invest

money if they so choose, and appoint directors for the management of the undertaking.

by a III-

future conference—All

of German and Chinese arrangements in connection

representatives. The with the Govern-

Chinese works specifie

ment shall afford every facility and protection and extend every welcome to representa-

tives of the German Railway Company operating in Chinese territory. Profits-

derived from the working of these railways shall be justly divided pro rata between,

the shareholders without regard to nationality. The object of constructing these

lines is solely the development of commerce. In inaugurating a railway system in

Shantung Germany entertains no treacherous intention towards China, and under-

takes not to unlawfully seize any land in the province.

. IV-—The

mining propertyChinese Government

for a distance of 30shall allow

li from eachGerman

side ofsubjects to hold and

these railways anddevelop

along

the whole extent of the lines. The following places where mining operations may

be carried on are particularly specified along the northern railway from Kiaochow to

Tsman, Weihsien, Pa-shan-hsien and various other points; and along the Southern.

Kxaochow-Tsinan-Chinchow

be invested in these operationsline, and

Chinchow-fu, Luiwuhsien,

arrangements etc. Chinese

for carrying on the capital may

work shall

hereafter be made by a joint conference of Chinese and German representatives.

All German subjects engaged in such works in Chinese territory shall be properly

protected

fairly and between

divided welcomedChinese

by the and

Chinese

Germanauthorities and allaccording

shareholders profits toderived shall beof

the extent

THE UNITED KINGDOM AND GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA 109-

the interest they hold in the undertakings. In trying to develop mining property

in China, G-ermany is actuated by no treacherous motives against this country, but

seeks alone to increase commerce and improve the relations between the two countries.

If at any time the Chinese should form schemes for the development of Shantung,

for the execution of which it is necessary to obtain foreign capital, the Chinese

Government, or whatever Chinese may be interested in such schemes, shall, in the-

first instance, apply to German capitalists. Application shall also be made to-

German manufacturers for the necessary machinery and materials before the manu-

facturers of any other Power are approached. Should German capitalists or manu-

facturers decline to take up the business the Chinese shall then be at liberty to obtain

money and materials from sources of other nationality than German.

This convention requires the sanction of His Majesty the Emperor of China and

His Majesty the Emperor of Germany. When the sanction of His Majesty the

Emperor of China reaches Berlin the agreement approved by His Majesty the

Emperor of Germany shall be handed to the Chinese Ambassador. When the final

draft is agreed to by both parties four clean copies of it shall be made, two in Chinese

and two in German, which shall be duly signed by the Chinese and German Minister

at Berlin and Peking. Each Power shall retain one Chinese copy and one German

copy, and the agreement shall be faithfully observed on either side.

Dated, the fourteenth day of the second moon of the twenty-fourth year of

Kwang Hsu. (March 6th, 1898.)

AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED KINGDOM AN3>

GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA

October 16th, 1900

Ho. 1

The Marquess op Salisbury to Count Hatzfeldt

Foreign Office, October 16th, 1900.

Your Excellency,

I have the honour to inform you that Her Majesty’s Government approve the-

Agreement, annexed hereto, which has been negotiated between your Excellency and

myself with regard to the principles on which the mutual policy of Great Britain

and Germany in China should be based.

I have, etc.,

(Signed) Salisbury.

Inclosure in Ho. 1

Agreement Signed on the 16th October, 1900

Her Britannic Majesty’s Government and the Imperial German Government,

being desirous to maintain their interests in China aud their rights under existing

Treaties, have agreed to observe the following principles in regard to their mutual

policy in China:—•

1. It is a matter of joint and permanent international interest that the ports on

the rivers and littoral of China should remain free and open to trade and to every

other legitimate form of economic activity for the nationals of all countries without

110 THE UNITED KINGDOM AND GERMANY RELATIVE TO CHINA

distinction; and the two Governments agree on their part to uphold the same for

all Chinese territory as far as they can exercise influence.

2. Her Britannic Majesty’s Government and the Imperial German Government

■will not, on their part, make use of the present complication to obtain for them-

selves any territorial advantages in Chinese dominions, and will direct their policy

towards maintaining undiminished the territorial condition of the Chinese Empire.

3. In case of another Power making use of the complications in China in order

to obtain under any form whatever such territorial advantages, the two contracting

parties reserve to themselves to come to a preliminary understanding as to the

eventual steps to be taken for the protection of their own interests in China.

4. The two Governments will communicate this Agreement to the other Powers

interested, and especially to Austria-Hungary, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and

the United States of America, and will invite them to accept the principles recorded

in it.

No. 2

Count Hatzfeldt to the Marquess of Salisbury

{Translation)

German Embassy, London,

October 16th, 1900.

My Lord,

I have the honour to inform your Excellency that my Government have con-

curred in the following points agreed to between your Excellency and myself:—

The Imperial German Government and Her Britannic Majesty’s Government,

being desirous to maintain their interests in Chiini and their rights under existing

Treaties, have agreed to observe the following principles in regard to their mutual

policy in China:

1. It is a matter of joint and permanent international interest that the ports

•on the rivers and littoral of China should remain free and open to trade and to

every other legitimate form of economic activity for the nationals of all countries

without distinction ; and the two Governments agree on their part to uphold the

same for all Chinese territory as far as they can exercise influence.

2. The Imperial German Government and Her Britannic Majesty’s Govern-

ment will not, on their part, make use of the present complication to obtain for

themselves any territorial advantages in Chinese dominions, and will direct their

policy towards maintaining undiminished the territorial condition of the Chinese

Empire.

3. In case of another Power making use of the complications in China in

order to obtain under any form whatever such territorial advantages, the two

oontracting parties reserve to themselves to come to a preliminary understanding as

to the eventual steps to be taken for the protection of their own interests in China.

4. The two Governments will communicate this Agreement to the other

Powers interested, and especially to Austria-Hungary, France, Italy, Japan, Russia,

and the United States of America, and will invite them to accept the principles

recorded in it

With the highest respect, etc., etc.,

(Signed) Hatzfeldt.

RUSSIA

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

Signed, in the Russian, Chinese, and French Languages,

at St. Petersburg, 12th February, 1881

Ratifications exchanged at St. Petersburg, 19th August, 1881

[Translated from the French Text]

His Majesty the Emperor and Autocrat of all the Russias and His Majesty the-

Emperor of China, desiriug to regulate some questions of frontier and trade touching

the interests of the two Empires, in order to cement the relations of friendship

between the two countries, have named for their Plenipotentiaries, to the effect of

establishing an agreement on these questions:—

His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias: His Secretary of State Nicholas

de G-iers, Senator, actual Privy Councillor, directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign

Affairs, and his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to His Majesty

the Emperor of China, Eugene de Buzow, actual Councillor of State.

And His Majesty the Emperor of China: Tseng, Marquess of Neyong, Vice-

President of the High Court of Justice, his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister

Plenipotentiary to His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, furnished with special

powers to sign the present Treaty in quality of Ambassador Extraordinary :—

The above-named Plenipotentiaries, furnished with full powers, which have been

found sufficient, have agreed upon the following stipulations:—

Art. I.—His Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias consents to the re-

establishment of the Chinese Government in the country of Hi, temporarily occupied

since 1871 by the Russian Armies. Russia remains in possession of this country

within the limits indicated by Article VII. of the present Treaty.

Art. II.—His Majesty the Emperor of China engages to decree the proper

measures to shelter the inhabitants of the country of Ili, of whatever race and to

whatever religion, they belong, from all persecution, in their goods or in their persons,

from acts committed during or after the troubles that have taken place in that country,

A proclamation in conformity with this engagement will be addressed by the

Chinese authorities, in the name of His Majesty the Emperor of China, to the popula-

tion of the country of Ili, before the restoration of this country to the said authorities.

Art. III.—The inhabitants of the country of Ili will be free to remain in the

places of their actual residence as Chinese subjects, or to emigrate to Russia and

to adopt Russian dependence. They will be called to pronounce themselves on the

subject before the re-establishment of Chinese authority in the country of Ili, and a

delay of one year, from the date of the restoration of the country to the Chinese

authorities, will be accorded to those who show a desire to emigrate to Russia. The

Chinese will oppose no impediment to their emigration or to the transportation of

their moveable property.

Art. IV.—Russian subjects possessing land in the country of Ili will keep their

rights of property, even after the re-establishment of the authority of the Chinese

Government in that country.

This provision is not applicable to the inhabitants of the country of Ili who

shall adopt Russian nationality upon the re-establishment of Chinese authority in

this country.

112 TEEATY BETWEEN EUSSIA AND CHINA

Eussian subjects whose lands are situated without places appropriated to

Eussian factories, in virtue of Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851, ought

to discharge the same taxes and contributions as Chinese subjects.

Art. Y.—The two Governments will appoint commissioners of Kuldja, who will

proceed to the restoration on the one part, to the resumption on the other, of

the administration of the province of Hi, and who will be charged, in general, with

the execution of the stipulations of the present Treaty relating to the re-establish-

ment, in this country, of the Chinese Government.

The said commissioners will fulfil their commission, in conforming to the

understanding which will be established as to the mode of restoration on the one

part and of resumption on the other, of the administration of the country of Hi,

between the Governor-General of Turkestan and the Governor-General of Shansi and

Kansuh, charged by the two Governments with the high direction of the affair.

The resumption of the country of Hi should be finished within a delay of three

months or sooner, if it can be done, dating from the day of the arrival at Tashkend

of the functionary who will be delegated by the Governor-General of Shansi and

Kansuh to the Governor-General of Turkestan to notify to him the ratification and

the promulgation of the present Treaty by His Majesty the Emperor of China.

Art. VI.-—The Government of His Majesty the Emperor of China will pay to

the Eussian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover

the expenses occasioned by the occupation of the country of Hi by the Eussian troops

since 1871, to satisfy all the pecuniary claims arising from, up to the present day, the

losses which Eussian subjects have suffered in their goods pillaged on Chinese

territories, and to furnish relief to the families of Eussian subjects killed in armed

attacks of which they have been victims on Chinese territory.

The above-mentioned sum of nine millions of metallic roubles will be paid within

the teim of two years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present

Treaty, according to the order and the conditions agreed upon between the two

•Governments in the special Protocol annexed to the present Treaty.

Art. VII.—The western portion of the country of Hi is incorporated with

Eussia, in order to serve as a place of establishment for the inhabitants of this country

who shall adopt the Eussian dependence and who, by this action, will have had to

abandon the lands which they possessed there.

The frontier between the possessions of Eussia and the Chinese province of Hi

will follow, starting from the mountains Bedjin-taou, the course of the river Khorgos,

as far as the place where this river falls into the river Hi, and, crossing the latter,

will take a direction to the south, towards the mountains Ouzoun-taou, leaving to

the west the village of Koldjat. Proceeding from this point it will follow, whilst

being directed to the south, the delineation fixed by the Protocol signed at Tchugtu-

chack in 1864.

Art. VIII.—A part of the frontier line, fixed by the protocol signed at Tchugtu-

chack in 1861, at the east of the Lake Zaisan, having been found defective, the two

Governments will name commissioners who will modify, by a common agreement, the

ancient delineation in such a manner as to remove the defects pointed out and to estab-

lish an effective separation between the Kirghiz tribes submitted to the two Empires.

To the new delineation will be given, as much as possible, an intermediate direc-

tion. between the old frontier and a straight line leading from the Kouitoun hill

towards the Saour hills, crossing the Tcherny-Irtysh.

Art. IX.—The commissioners to be named by the two contracting parties will

proceed to place posts of demarcation, as well on the delineation fixed by the

preceding Articles VII. and VIII., as on the parts of the frontier where posts have

not yet been placed. The time and the place of meeting of these commissioners

shall be fixed by an understanding between the two Governments.

The two Governments will also name commissioners to examine the frontier

•and to place posts of demarcation between the Eussian province of Perganah and

"the

for the base part

western of thework

of their Chinese provincefrontier.

the existing of Kashgar. The commissioners will take

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA 113

Art. X.—The right recognised by the Treaties of the Russian Government to

nominate Consuls to Hi, to Tarbagatai, to Kashgar, and to Ourga is extended, from

-the present time, to the towns of Souteheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. In the

following towns : Kobdo, Uliassoutai, Khami, Urumtsi, and Goutchen, the Russian

Government will establish consulates in proportion to the development of commerce,

and after an understanding with the Chinese Government.

The Consul of Soutcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan will exercise consular

-functions in the neighbouring districts, where the interests of Russian subjects

demand their presence.

The dispositions contained in Articles V. andVL of the Treaty concluded at Peking

in 1860, and relative to the concession of land for the houses for the consulates,

for cemeteries, and for pasturage, will apply equally to the towns of Sbutcheou

(Tsia-yu-kwan) and of Turfan. The local authorities will aid the Consul to find

provisional habitations until the time when the houses of the consulates shall be built.

The Russian Consuls in Mongolia and in the districts situated on the two slopes

of the Tien-shan will make use of, for their journeys and for their correspondence,

-the postal institutions of the Government, conformably to the stipulations of Article

XI. of the Treaty of Tientsin and of Article XII. of the Treaty of Peking. The

■Chinese authorities, to whom they will address themselves for this purpose, will lend

them aid and assistance.

The town of Turfan not being a locality open to foreign trade, the right of

establishing a consulate will not be invoked as a precedent to obtain a right analogous

-to the ports of China for the provinces of the interior and for Manchuria.

Art. XL—Russian Consuls will communicate, for affairs of service, either with

the local authorities of the town of their residence, or with the superior authorities

of the circuit or of the province, according as the interests which are respectively

epnfided to them, the importance of the affairs to be treated of, and their prompt

expedition shall require. As to the rules of etiquette to be observed at the time

of their interviews and, in general, in their relations, they will be based upon the

■respect which the functionaries of two friendly Powers reciprocally owe each other.

All the affairs which may arise on Chinese territory, on the subject of commer-

cial or other transactions, between those under the jurisdiction of the two States,

will be examined and regulated, by a common agreement, by the Consuls and the

Chinese authorities.

In lawsuits on commercial matters, the two parties will terminate their difference

amicably by means of arbitrators chosen by one side and the other. If agreement

is not established in this way, the affair will be examined and regulated by the

authorities of the two States.

Engagements contracted in writing, between Russian and Chinese subjects,

relative to orders for merchandise, to the transport of it, to the location of shops,

of houses, and of other places, or relating to other transactions of the same kind,

may be presented for legalisation by the Consulates and by the superior local

administrations, who are bound to legalize the documents which are presented to

them. In case of non-execution of the engagements contracted, the Consul and the

Chinese authorities will consult as to the measures necessary to secure the execution

of these obligations.

Art. XII.—Russian subjects are authorized to carry on, as in the past, trade

free of duties in Mongolia subject to China, as well as in places and aimaks where

there is a Chinese administration, as in those where there is none.

Russian subjects will equally enjoy the right of carrying on trade free of duties

in the towns and other localities of the provinces of Hi, of Tarbagatai, of Kashgar,

of Urumtsi, and others situated on the slopes north and south of the chain of the

Tien-shau as far as the Great Wall. This immunity will be abrogated when the

development of the trade necessitates the establishment of a customs tariff contorm-

able to an understanding to be come to by the two Governments.

Russian subjects can import into the above-named provinces of China and

-export from them every description of produce, of whatever origin they may be;

114 TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

They may make purchases and sales, whether in cash, or by way of exchange; they

will have the right to make their payments in merchandise of every description.

Art. XIII.—In the places where the Russian Government will have the right

to establish consulates, as well as in the town of Kalgan, Russian subjects may

construct houses, shops, warehouses, and other buildings on the lands which they

will acquire by means of purchase, or which may be conceded to them by the local

authorities, conformably to that which has been established for Hi and Tarbagatai,

by Article XIII. of the Treaty of Kuldja of 1851.

The privileges granted to Russian subjects in the town of Kalgan, where there-

will not be a consulate, constitute an exception which cannot be extended to any

other locality of the interior provinces.

Art. XIV.—Russian merchants who may wish to dispatch merchandise from

Russia, by land, into the interior provinces of China, can, as formerly, direct it*

by the towns of Kalgan and Tungchow, to the port of Tientsin, and from there to

the other ports and interior markets, and sell it in those different places.

Merchants will use this same route to export to Russia the merchandise-

purchased, as well in the towns and ports above named as in the interior markets.

They will equally have the right to repair, for matters of trade, to Soutcheou

(Tsia-yu-kwan), the terminal point of the Russian caravans, and they will enjoy

there all the rights granted to Russian trade at Tientsin.

Art. XV.—Trade by land, exercised by Russian subjects in the interior and

exterior provinces of China, will be governed by the Regulations annexed to the-

present Treaty.

The commercial stipulations of the present Treaty, as well as the Regulations

which serve as a supplement to it, can be revised after an interval of ten years has-

elapsed from the date of the exchange of ratifications of the Treaty; but if, in the

course of six months before the expiration of this term, neither of the contracting

parties manifest a desire to proceed to the revision, the trade stipulations as well as

ths Regulations will remain in force for a new term of ten years.

Trade by sea route of Russian subjects in China will be subject to the general

regulations established for foreign maritime commerce in China. If it becomes

necessary to make modifications in these regulations, the two Governments will

establish an understanding on this subject.

Art. XVI.—If the development of Russian overland trade provokes the necessity

of the establishment, for goods of export and import in China, of a Customs tariff,

more in relation than the tariffs actually in force to the necessities of that trade,,

the Russian and Chinese Governments will proceed to an understanding on this

subject, by adopting as a base for settling the duties of entry and exit the rate of

five per cent, of the value of the goods.

Until the establishment of this tariff, the export duties on some kinds of teas of

inferior quality, actually imposed at the rates established for the tea of superior

quality, will be diminished proportionately to their value. The settling of these

duties will be proceeded with, for each kind of tea, by an understanding between the

Chinese Government and the envoy of Russia to Peking, within the term of one year,

at the latest, from the date of the exchange of the ratifications of the present Treaty.

Art. XVII.—Some divergencies of opinion having arisen hitherto as to the

application of Article X. of the Treaty concluded at Peking, in 1860, it is

established by these presents that the stipulations of the above-named Article,

relative to the recoveries to be effected, in case of theft and the harbouring of

cattle beyond the frontier, will be for the future interpreted in this sense, that at

the time of tho discovery of the individuals guilty of theft or the harbouring of *

cattle, they will be condemned to pay the real value of the cattle which they

have not restored. It is understood that in case of the insolvency of the individuals

guilty of theft of cattle, the indemnity to be paid cannot be placed to the charge of-

the local authorities. |

ilaws The frontier

of their authorities

country of the twoguilty

the individuals Statesofwill

theprosecute

harbouringwithof allorthe

theftrigour of the

of cattle^

TREATY BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA 115

and should take the measures in their power for the restitution to whom they

belong of cattle diverted, or which may have passed the frontier.

The traces of cattle turned aside or which may have passed the frontier may be

indicated, not only to the guards of the frontier posts, but also to the elders of the

nearest villages.

Art. XVIII.—The stipulations of the Treaty concluded at Aigoun the 16th May,

1858, concerning the rights of the subjects of the two Empires to navigate the Amoor,

the Sungari, and the Oussouri, and to carry on trade with the populations of the

riverine localities, are and remain confirmed.

The two Governments will proceed to the establishment of an understanding

concerning the mode of application of the said stipulations.

Art. XIX—The stipulations of the old Treaties between Russia and China, not

modified by the present Treaty, remain in full vigour.

Art. XX.—The present Treaty, after having been ratified by the two Emperors,

will be promulgated in each Empire, for the knowledge and governance of each one.

The exchange of ratifications will take place at St. Petersburg, within a period of

six months counting from the day of the signature of the Treaty.

Having concluded the above Article, plenipotentiaries of the two contract-

ing parties have signed and sealed two copies of the present Treaty, in the Russian,

Chinese, aud French languages. Of the three texts, duly compared and found in

.agreement, the French text will be evidence for the interpretation of the present

Treaty.

Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, eighteen hundred and eighty-

■one. ,

(Signed) [l.s.] Nicolas de Giers.

,, [l.s.] Eugene Butzow.

„ [l.s.] Tseng.

Protocol

In virtue of Article VI. of the Treaty signed to-day by the Plenipotentiaries of

the Russian and Chinese Governments, the Chinese Government will pay to the

Russian Government the sum of nine millions of metallic roubles, designed to cover

the expenses of the occupation of the country of Hi by the Russian troops and

to satisfy divers pecuniary claims of Russian subjects. This sum shall be paid

within a period of two years counting from the day of the exchange of the ratifica-

tions of the Treaty.

Desiring to fix the mode of payment of the aftermentioned sum the undersigned

have agreed as follows:—

The Chinese Government will pay the equivalent of the sum of nine millions of

metallic roubles in pounds sterling, say, one million four hundred and thirty-one

thousand six hundred and sixty-four pounds sterling two shillings to Messrs.

Baring Brothers & Co. in London, in six equal parts, of two hundred and thirty-

eight thousand six hundred and ten pounds sterling thirteen shillings and eight-

pence each, less the customary bank charge which may be occasioned by the transfer

of these payments to London.

The payments shall be scheduled at four months’ distance the one from the

other ; the first shall be made four months after the exchange of the ratifications of

the Treaty signed to-day, and the last two years after that exchange.

The present Protocol will have the same force and value as if it had been

inserted word for word in the Treaty signed to-day.

In faith of which the Plenipotentiaries of the two Governments have signed the

present Protocol and have placed their seals to it.

Done at St. Petersburg, the twelfth of February, one thousand eight hundred

and eighty-one.

REGULATIONS EOR THE LAND TRADE BETWEEN

RUSSIA AND CHINA

Art. I.—A trade by free exchange and free of duty (free trade) between Russian

and Chinese subjects is authorised within a zone extending for fifty versts (100 li) on

either side of the frontier. The supervision of this trade will rest with the two

Governments, in accordance with their respective frontier regulations.

Art. II.—Russian subjects proceeding on business to Mongolia, and to the

districts situated on the northern and southern slopes of the Tian-shan mountains

may only cross the frontier at certain points specified in the list annexed to those

regulations. They must procure from the Russian authorities permits in the Russian

and Chinese languages, with Mongolian and Tartar translation. The name of the

owner of the goods, or that of the leader of the caravan, a specification of the goods,

the number of packages, and the number of heads of cattle may be indicated in the

Mongolian or Tartar languages, in the Chinese text of these permits. Merchants,

on entering Chinese territory, are bound to produce their permits at the Chinese

post nearest to the frontier, where, after examination, the permit is to be counter-

signed by the chief of the post. The Chinese authorities are entitled to arrest

merchants who have crossed the frontier without permit, and to deliver them over to

the Russian authorities nearest to the frontier, or to the competent Russian Consul,

for the infliction of a severe penalty. In case of the permit being lost, the owner is

bound to give notice to the Russian Consul, in order that a fresh one may be

issued to him, and inform the local authorities, in order to obtain a.temporary

certificate which will enable him to pursue his journey. Merchandise introduced

into Mongolia and the districts situated on the slopes of the Tian-shan, but which

have found no sale there, may be forwarded to the towns of Tientsin and Sou-

tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan), to be sold or to be sent farther into China. With regard

to the duties on such merchandise, to-the issue of permits for its carriage, and to

other Customs formalities, proceedings shall be taken in accordance with the following

provisions.

Art. III.—Russian merchants forwarding goods from Kiachta and the Nertchinsk

country to Tientsin must send them by way of Kalgan, Dounba, and Toun-tcheou.

Merchandise forwarded to Tientsin from the Russian frontier by Kobdo and

Kouihoua-tchen is to follow the same route. Merchants must be provided with

transport permits issued by the Russian authorities, and duly vised by the competent

Chinese authorities, which must give, in the Chinese and Russian languages, the

name of the owner of the goods, the number of packages, and a description of the

goods they contain. The officials of the Chinese Custom-houses situated on the road

by which merchandise is forwarded will proceed, without delay, to verify the number

of the packages, and to examine the goods, which they will allow to pass onwards,

after fixing a visa to the permit. Packages opened in the course of the Customs

examinations will be closed again at the Custom-house, the number'of packages

opened being noted on the permit. The Customs examination is not to last more

than two hours. The permits are to be presented within a term of.six months

at the Tientsin Custom-house to be cancelled. If the owner of i the goods finds

this term insufficient, he must at the proper time and place give notice to the Chinese

authorities. In case of the permit being lost the merchant must give notice to the

authorities who delivered it to him to obtain a duplicate and must for that purpose-

TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA ll?-

mate known the number and date of the missing permit. The nearest Custom-

house on his road, after having ascertained the accuracy of the merchant’s declara-

tions, will give him a provisional certificate, accompanied by which bis goods may

proceed on their journey. An inaccurate declaration of the quantity of the goods,

if it be proved that it was intended to conceal sales effected on the road, or to escape

payment of duty, will render the merchant liable to the infliction of the penalties laid

down by Art. VIII. of the present regulations.

Art. IV.—Russian merchants who may wish to sell at Kalgan any portion of

the goods brought from Russia must make a declaration to that effect to the local

authorities within the space of five days. Those authorities, after the merchant has'

paid the whole of the entrance duties, will furnish him with a permit for the sale of

the goods.

Art. V.—Goods brought by Russian merchants by land from Russia to Tientsin

will pay an entrance duty equivalent to two-thirds of the rate established by the

tariff. Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay in that

town the same duties and be subject to the same regulations as at Tientsin.

Art. VI.—-If the goods left at Kalgan, having paid the entrance duties, are not

sold there, their owner may send them on to Toun-tcheou, or to Tientsin, and the

Customs authorities, without levying fresh duties, will repay to the merchant one-third1

of the entrance duty paid at Kalgan, a note to that effect being made on the permit

issued by the Kalgan Custom-house. Russian merchants, after paying transit dues,

i.e., one-half of the duty specified in the tariff, may forward to the internal markets

goods left at Kalgan which have paid the entrance dues, subject only to the general

regulations established for foreign trade in China. A transport permit, which is to

be produced at all the Custom-houses and barriers on the road, will be delivered for

these goods. Goods not accompanied by such permit will have to pay duty at the

Custom-houses they pass, and lelcin at the barriers.

Art. VII.—Goods brought from Russia to Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) may be

forwarded to the internal markets under the conditions stipulated by Art. IX. of

these Regulations for goods forwarded from Tientsin destined for the internal

market.

Art. VIII.—If it be ascertained, when the Customs examination of goods brought

from Russia to Tientsin takes place, that the goods specified in the permit have been

withdrawn from the packages and replaced by others, or that their quantity (after

deducting what has been left at Kalgan) is smaller than that indicated in the permit,

the whole of the goods included in the examination will be confiscated by the Customs

authorities. It is understood that packages damaged on the road, and which, con-

sequently, have been repacked, shall not be liable to confiscation, provided always

that such damage has been duly declared at the nearest Custom-house, and that a

note to such effect has been made by the office after it has ascertained the untouched

condition of the goods as at first sent off. Goods concerning which it is ascertained

that a portion has been sold on the road will be liable to confiscation. If goods

have been taken by by-ways in order to evade their examination at the Custom-

houses established on the routes indicated in Art. III., the owner will be liable to a

fine equal in amount to the whole entrance duty. If a breach of the aforesaid

regulations has been committed by the carriers, without the knowledge or connivance

of the owner of the goods, the Customs authorities will take this circumstance

into consideration in determining the amount of the fine. This provision only applies

to localities through which the Russian land trade passes, and is not applicable to

similar cases arising at the ports and in the interior of the provinces. When goods

are confiscated the merchant is entitled to release them by paying the equivalent of

their value, duly arrived at by an understanding with the Chinese authorities.

Art. IX.—On the exportation by sea from Tientsin to some other Chinese port

opened to foreign trade by Treaty of goods brought from Russia by land, the

Tientsin Customs will levy on such goods one-third of the tariff duty, in addition to

the two-thirds already paid. No duty shall be levied on these goods in other ports.

Goods sent from Tientsin or the other ports to the internal markets are subject to

4 IS TRADE REGULATIONS BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA

,transit dues (i.e., half of the tariff duty) according to the general provisions laid

down for foreign trade.

Art. X.—Chinese goods sent from Tientsin to Russia by Russian merchants

must be forwarded to Kalgan by the. route indicated under Art. III. The entire

.export duty will be levied on these goods when they leave the country. Nevertheless,

re-imported goods bought at Tientsin, as well as those bought in another port and

forwarded in transitu to Tientsin to be exported to Russia, if accompanied by a

.Customs receipt for the export duty, shall not pay a second time, and the half

re-importation duty (coasting duty) paid at Tientsin will be repaid to the merchant

if the goods upon which it has been paid are exported to Russia a year from

•the time of such payment. For the transport of goods in Russia the Russian Consul

will issue a permit indicating in the Russian and Chinese languages the name of the

.owner of the goods, the number of packages, and the nature of the goods they

contain. These permits will be vised by the Port Customs authorities, and must

.accompany the goods for production when they are examined at the Custom-houses

,ou the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. will be observed as to the term

within which the permit is to be presented to the Custom-house to be cancelled, and

as to the proceedings in case of the permit being lost. Goods will follow the route

indicated by Article III., and are not to be sold on the road; a breach of this rule will

render the merchant liable to the penalties provided for under Article VIII. Goods

will be examined at the Custom-houses on the road in accordance with the rules laid

down under Article III. Chinese goods bought by Russian merchants at Sou-tcheou

(Tsia-yu-kwan), or brought by them from the internal markets to be forwarded to

Russia, on leaving Sou-tcheou for Russia, will have to pay the duty leviable upon

goods exported from Tientsin, and will be subject to the regulations established for

that port.

Art. XI.—Goods bought at Toun-tcheou, on leaving that place for Russia by

land, will have to pay the full export duty laid down by the tariff. Goods bought at

Kalgan will pay in that town, on leaving for Russia, a duty equivalent to half the

tariff rate. Goods bought by Russian merchants in the internal markets, and brought

to Toun-tcheou and Kalgan to be forwarded to Russia, will, moreover, be subject

to transit dues, according to the general rules established for foreign trade

in the internal markets. The local Custom-houses of the aforesaid towns after

levying the duties will give the merchant a transport permit for the goods. For

goods leaving Toun-tcheou this permit will be issued by the Dounba Customs

authorities, to whom application is to be made for it, accompanied by payment of

the duties to which the goods are liable. The permit will mention the prohibition

to sell goods on the road. The rules given in detail in Article III. relative to permits,

the examination of goods, etc., will apply in like manner to goods exported from the

places mentioned in this Article.

Art. XII.—Goods of foreign origin sent to Russia by land from Tientsin, Tour-

tcheou, Kalgan, and Sou-tcheou (Tsia-yu-kwan) will pay no duty if the merchant

produces a Customs receipt acknowledging payment of the import and transit duties

on those goods. If they have only paid entrance duties the competent Custom-house

will call upon the merchant for the payment of the transit dues fixed by the tariff.

Art. XIII.—Goods imported into China by Russian merchants, or exported by

them, will pay Custom duties according to the general tariff for foreign trade with

China, and according to the additional tariff drawn up for Russian trade in 1862.

Goods not enumerated in either of those tariffs will be subject to a 5 per cent.

ad valorem duty.

Art. XIV.—The following articles will be admitted free of export and import

duty: Gold and silver ingots, foreign coins, flour of all kinds, sago, biscuits,

preserved meats and vegetables, cheese, butter, confectionery, foreign clothes,

jewellery and silver plate, perfumery and soaps of all kinds, charcoal, firewood,

handles of foreign manufacture, foreign tobacco and cigars, wine, beer, spirits,

household

u a stores and utensils to be used in houses and on board ship, travellers’

og ge, official stationery, tapestries, cutlery, foreign medicines, glassware, and

AGREEMENT BETWEEN RUSSIA AND CHINA 119

ornaments. The aforementioned articles will pass free of duty on entering and on

leaving by land; but if they are sent from the towns and ports mentioned in these

regulations to the internal markets they will pay a transit duty of 2| per cent, ad

valorem. Travellers’ luggage, gold and silver ingots, and foreign coins will, however,

not pay this duty.

Art. XY.—The exportation and importation of the following articles is prohibited

under penalty of confiscation in case of smuggling: —Gunpowder, artillery ammuni-

tion, cannon, muskets, rifles, pistols, and all firearms, engines, and munitions of

war, salt, and opium. Russian subjects going to China may, for their personal

defence, have one musket or one pistol each, of which mention will be made in the

permit they are provided with. The importation by Russian subjects of saltpetre,

sulphur, and lead is allowed only under special licence from the Chinese authorities,

and those articles may only be sold to Chinese subjects who hold a special purchase-

permit. The exportation "of rice and of Chinese copper coin is forbidden. On the

other hand, the importation of rice and of all cereals may take place duty free.

Art. XVI.—The transport of goods belonging to Chinese merchants is forbidden

to Russian merchants attempting to pass them off as their own property.

Art. XVII.—The Chinese authorities are entitled to take the necessary measures

against smuggling.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 12th-24th February, 1881.

(Sighed) [l.s.] Nicolas de Giees.

„ [l.s.] Eugene Butzow.

„ [l.s.] Tseng.

Peotocol

The undersigned Nicolas de Giers, Secretary of State, actual Privy Councillor

directing the Imperial Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Tseng, Marquess of Neyong,

Vice-President of the High Court of Justice, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister

Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor of China to His Majesty the Emperor

of Russia, have met at the hotel of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to proceed to the

exchange of the acts of ratification of the Treaty between Russia and China, signed

at St. Petersburg, the 12/24 February, 1881.

After perusal of the respective instruments, which have been acknowledged textu-

ally conformable to the original act, the exchange of the act ratified by His Majesty

the Emperor of Russia the 4/16 August, 1881, against the act ratified by His Majesty

the Emperor of China the 3/15 May, 1881, has taken place according to custom.

In faith of which the undersigned have drawn up the present proces-verbal, and

have affixed to it the seal of their arms.

Done at St. Petersburg, the 7th August, one thousand eight hundred and eighty-

one. (Signed) [i-.s.] Nicolas de Giees

„ [l-s.] Tseng.

UNITED STATES

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES OE AMERICA

AND CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Tientsin

18th June, 1858

Ratifications exchanged at Pehtang, 16th August, 1859

The United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire, desiring to maintain

firm, lasting, and sincere friendship, have resolved to renew, in a manner clear and

positive, by means of a Treaty or general Convention of Peace, Amity, and Commerce,

the rules which shall in future be mutually observed in the intercourse of their

respective countries; for which most desirable object the President of the United

States and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for their

Plenipotentiaries, to wit: the President of the United States of America, William B

Reed, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to China; and His

Majesty the Emperor of China, Kweiliang, a member of the Privy Council and

Superintendent of the Board of Punishments, and Hwashana, President of the Board

of Civil Office and Major-General of the Bordered Blue Banner Division of the

Chinese Bannermen, both of them being Imperial Commissioners and Plenipotenti-

aries: And the said Ministers, in virtue of the respective full powers they have received

from their Governments, have agreed upon the following Articles :—

Art I.—There shall be, as there has always been, peace and friendship between

the United States of America and the Ta-Tsing Empire, and between their people

respectively. They shall not insult or oppress each other for any trifling cause, so as

to produce an estrangement between them; and if any other nation should act

unjustly or oppressively, the United States will exert their good offices, on being

informed of the case, to bring about an amicable arrangement of the question, thus

showing their friendly feelings.

Art. II.—In order to perpetuate friendship, on the exchange of ratifications by

the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate of the United States, and

by His Majesty the Emperor of China, this Treaty shall be kept and sacredly guarded

in this way, viz.-. The original Treaty, as ratified by the President of the United

States, shall be deposited at Peking, the capital of His Majesty the Emperor of China,

in charge of the Privy Council; and, as ratified by His Majesty the Emperor of China,

shall be deposited at Washington, the capital of the United States, in charge of the

Secretary of State.

Art. III.—In order that the people of the two countries may know and obey the

provisions of this Treaty, the United States of America agree, immediately on the

exchange of ratifications, to proclaim the same and publish it by proclamation in the

Gazettes where the laws of the United States of America are published by authority;

and His Majesty the Emperor of China, on the exchange of ratifications, agrees

immediately to direct the publication of the same at the capital and by the Governors

of all the provinces.

Art. IV.—In order further to perpetuate friendship, the Minister or Commis-

sioner, or the highest diplomatic representative of the United States of America in

China, shall at all times have the right to correspond on terms of perfect equality and

confidence with the officers of the Privy Council at the capital, or with the Governor-

General of the Two Kwang, of Fohkien and Chekiang, or of the Two Kiang ; and

whenever he desires to have such correspondence with the Privy Council at the capital

he shall have the right to send it through either of the said Governors-General, or by

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 121

general post; and all such communications shall be most carefully respected. The

Privy Council and Governors-General, as the case may be, shall in all cases consider

and acknowledge such communications promptly and respectfully.

Art. Y.—The Minister of the United States of America in China, whenever he has

business, shall have the right to visit and sojourn at the capital of His Majesty the

Emperor of China and there confer with a member of the Privy Council or any other

high officer of equal rank deputed for that purpose, on matters of common interest

and advantage. His visits shall not exceed one in each year, and he shall complete'

his business without unnecessary delay. He shall be allowed to go by land or come

to the mouth of the Pei-ho, in which he shall not bring ships-of-war, and he shall

inform the authorities of that place in order that boats may be provided for him to go

on his journey. He is not to take advantage of this stipulation to request visits to

the capital on trivial occasions. Whenever he means to proceed to the capital he

shall communicate in writing his intention to the Board of Bites at the capital, and

thereupon the said Board shall give the necessary direction to facilitate his journey,

and give him necessary protection and respect on his way. On his arrival at the

capital he shall be furnished with a suitable residence prepared for him, and he shall

defray his own expenses; and his entire suite shall not exceed twenty persons

exclusive of his Chinese attendants, none of whom shall be engaged in trade.

Art. VI.—If at any time His Majesty the Emperor of China shall, by Treaty

voluntarily made, or for any other reason, permit the representative of any friendly

nation to reside at his capital for a long or short time, then, without any further

consultation or express permission, the representative of the United States in China

a shall have the same privilege.

Art. VII.—The superior authorities of the United States and of China in

9 corresponding together shall do so on terms of equality and in form of mutual

D communication (chau-hwui). The Consuls and the local officers, civil and military,

i in corresponding together shall likewise employ the style and form of mutual

£ communication (chau-hwui). When inferior officers of the one Government address

the superior officers of the other they shall do so in the style and form of memorial

(shin-chin). Private individuals, in addressing superior officers, shall employ the

style of petition (pin-ching). In no case shall any terms or style be used or suffered

which shall be offensive or disrespectful to either party. And it is agreed that no

present, under any pretext or form whatever, shall ever be demanded of the United

States by China, or of China by the United States.

Art. VIII.—In all future personal intercourse between the representative of

the United States of America and the Governors-General or Governors the interviews

shall be had at the official residence of the said officers, or at their temporary resi-

dence, or at the residence of the representative of the United States of America,

whichever may be agreed upon between them; nor shall they make any pretext for

declining these interviews. Current matters shall be discussed by correspondence

so as not to give the trouble of a personal meeting.

Art. IX.—^Whenever national vessels of the United States of America, in cruising

along the coast and among the ports opened for trade for the protection of the com-

merce of their country, or the advancement of science, shall arrive at or near any

of the poi ts of China, the commanders of said ships and the superior local authorities

of government shall, if it be necessary, hold intercourse on terms of equality and

courtesy, in token of the friendly relations of their respective nations ; and the said

vessels shall enjoy all suitable facilities on the part of the Chinese Government in

procuring provisions or other supplies, and making necessary repairs. And the

United States of America agree that in case of the shipwreck of any American vessel

and its being pillaged by pirates, or in case any American vessel shall be pillaged or

captured by pirates on the seas adjacent to the coast, without being shipwrecked, the

national vessels of the United States shall pursue the said pirates, and if captured

deliver them over for trial and punishment.

Art. X.—The United States of America shall have the right to appoint Consuls

and other commercial agents for the protection of trade, to reside at such places in the

122 TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

dominions of China as shall be agreed to be opened, who shall hold official intercourse

and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese Government (a Consul or a

Vice-Consul in charge taking rank with an intendant of circuit or a prefect), either

personally or in writing, as occasion may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal

respect And the Consuls and local officers shall employ the style of mutual

communication. If the officers of either nation are disrespectfully treated, or aggrieved

in any way by the other authorities, they, have the right to make representation of

the same to the superior officers of their respective Governments, who shall see that

full inquiry and strict justice shall be had in the premises. And the said Consuls and

agents shall carefully avoid all acts of offence to the officers and people of China.

On the arrival of a Consul duly accredited at any port in China, it shall be the duty

of the Minister of the United States to notify the same to the Governor-General of

the province where such port is, wko shall forthwith recognize the said Consul and

grant him authority to act.

Art. XI.—All citizens of the United States of America in China, peaceably

attending to their affairs, being placed on a common footing of amity and good-

will with subjects of China, shall receive and enjoy for themselves and everything

appertaining to them the protection of the local authorities of Government, who shall

defend them from all insult or injury of any sort. If their dwellings or property be

threatened or attacked by mobs, incendiaries, or other violent or lawless persons, the

local officers, on requisition of the Consul, shall immediately despatch a military force

to disperse the rioters, apprehend the guilty individuals, and punish them with the

utmost rigour of the law. Subjects of China guilty of any criminal act towards citizens

of the United States shall be punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws

of China, and citizens of the United States, either on shore or in any merchant vessel,

who may insult, trouble, or wound the persons or injure the property of Chinese, or

commit any other improper act in China, shall be punished only by the Consul or other

public functionary thereto authorized, according to the laws of the United States. Ar-

rests in order to trial may be made by either the Chinese or United States authorities.

Art. XII.—Citizens of the United States, residing or sojourning at any of the

ports open to foreign commerce, shall be permitted to rent houses and places of

business or hire sites on which they can themselves build houses or hospitals,

churches, and cemeteries. The parties interested can fix the rents by mutual and

equitable agreement; the proprietors shall not demand an exorbitant price, nor shall

the local authorities interfere, unless there be some objections offered on the part ot

the inhabitants respecting the place. The legal fees to the officers for applying their

seal shall be paid. The citizens of the United States shall not unreasonably insist

on particular spots, but each party shall conduct themselves with justice and

moderation. Any desecration of the cemeteries by natives of China shall be severely

punished according to law. At the places where the ships of the United States

anchor, or their citizens reside, the merchants, seamen, or others can freely pass and

re-pass in the immediate neighbourhood; but in order to the preservation of the

public peace, they shall not go into the country to the villages and marts to sell their

goods unlawfully, in fraud of the revenue.

Art. XIII.—If any vessel of the United States be wrecked or stranded on the

coast of China and be subjected to plunder or other damage, the proper officers of the

Government, on receiving information of the fact, shall immediately adopt measures

for its relief and security; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment, and

be enabled to repair at once to the nearest port, and shall enjoy all facilities for

obtaining supplies of provisions and water. If the merchant vessels of the United

States, while within the waters over which the Chinese Government exercises

jurisdiction, be plundered

civil and military, by robbers

on receiving or pirates,

information thenshall

thereof, the arrest

Chinesethelocal

said authorities

robbers or

pirates, and punish them according to law, and shall cause all the property which can

be recovered to be restored to the owners, or placed in the hands of the Consul. If

by reason of the extent of territory and numerous population of China it shall in any

case happen that the robbers cannot be apprehended, and the property only in part

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 123r

recovered, the Chinese Government shall not make indemnity for the goods lost; but

if it shall be proved that the local authorities have been in collusion with the robbers,

the same shall be communicated to the superior authorities for memorializing the"

Throne, and these officers shall be severely punished and their property be confiscated

to repay the losses.

Art. XIV.—’The citizens of the United States are permitted to frequent the ports-

and cities of Canton and Chan-chau, or Swatow, in the province of Kwangtung; Amoy,

Foochow, and Tai-wan in Formosa, in the province of Fuhkien; Ningpo in the province’

of Chekiang; and Shanghai in the province of Kiangsu, and any other port or place'

hereafter by Treaty with other powers or with the United States opened to commerce;

and to reside with their families and trade there, and to proceed at pleasure with their

vessels and merchandise from any of these ports to any other of them. But said vessels

shall not carry on a clandestine or fraudulent trade at other ports of China, not declared

to be legal, or along the coasts thereof; and any vessel under the American flag violating

this provision shall, with her cargo, be subject to confiscation to the Chinese Govern-

ment ; and any citizen of the United States who shall trade in any contraband article’

of merchandise shall be subject to be dealt with by the Chinese Government, without

being entitled to any countenance or protection from that of the United States; and

the United States will take measures to prevent their flag from being abused by the’

subjects of other nations as a cover for the violation of the laws of the Empire.

Art. XV.—At each of the ports open to commerce, citizens of the United States

shall be permitted to import from abroad, and sell, purchase, and export all merchan-

dise of which the importation or exportation is not prohibited by the laws of the Empire.

The tariff of duties to be paid by the citizens of the United States, on the export and

import of goods from and into China, shall be the same as was agreed upon at the

Treaty of Wanghia, except so far as it may be modified by Treaties with other nations,

it being expressly agreed that citizens of the United States shall never pay higher

duties than those paid by the most favoured nation.

Art. XVI.—Tonnage duties shall be paid on every merchant vessel belonging to

the United States entering either of the open ports at the rate of four mace per ton of

forty cubic feet, if she be over one hundred and fifty tons burden; and one mace per

ton of forty cubic feet if she be of the burden of one hundred and fifty tons or under,

according to the tonnage specified in the register; which, with her other papers, shall,

on her arrival, be lodged with the Consul, who shall report the same to the Commis-

sioner of Customs. And if any vessel, having paid tonnage duty at one port, shall

go to any other port to complete the disposal of her cargo, or being in ballast, to

purchase an entire or fill up an incomplete cargo, the Consul shall report the same to

the Commissioner of Customs, who shall note on the port-clearance that the tonnage

duties have been paid, and report the circumstance to the collectors at the other

Custom-houses; in which case the said vessel shall only pay duty on her cargo, and

not be charged with tonnage duty a second time. The collectors of Customs at the

open ports shall consult with the Consuls about the erection of beacons or light-

houses, and where buoys and lightships should be placed.

Art. XVII.—Citizens of the United States shall be allowed to engage pilots to'

take their vessels into port, and, when the lawful duties have all been paid, take them

out of port. It shall be lawful for them to hire at pleasure servants, compradores,

linguists, writers, labourers, seamen, and persons for whatever necessary service, with

nassage or cargo-boats, for a reasonable compensation, to be agreed upon by the*

parties or determined by the Consul.

Art. XVIII.—Whenever merchant vessels of the United States shall enter a port,

the Collector of Customs shall, if he see fit, appoint Custom-house officers to guard

said vessels, who may live on board the ship or their own boats, at their convenience.

The local authorities of the Chinese Government shall cause to be apprehended all

mutineers or deserters from on board the vessels of the United States in China on

being informed by the Consul, and will deliver them up to the Consuls or other officers

for punishment. And if criminals, subjects of China, take refuge in the houses, or on-

board the vessels of citizens of the United States, they shall not be harboured, but

.124 TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

.shall he delivered up to justice on due requisition by the Chinese local officers,

addressed to those of the United States. The merchants, seamen, and other citizens

,of the United States shall be under the superintendence of the appropriate officers of

their Government. If individuals of either nation commit acts of violence or disorder,

use arms to the injury of others, or create disturbances endangering life, the officers of

-the two Governments will exert themselves to enforce order and to maintain the

public peace, by doing impartial justice in the premises.

Art. XIX.—-Whenever a merchant vessel belonging to the United States shall

cast anchor in either of the said ports, the supercargo, master, or consignee, shall,

within forty-eight hours, deposit the ship’s papers in the hands of the Consul or

person charged with his functions, who shall cause to be communicated to the Super-

intendent of Customs a true report of the name and tonnage of such vessel, the number

..of her crew, and the nature of her cargo, which being done, he shall give a permit for

her discharge. And the master, supercargo, or consignee, if he proceed to discharge

the cargo without such permit, shall incur a fine of five hundred Dollars, and the goods

so discharged without permit shall be subject to forfeiture to the Chinese Government.

But if a master of any vessel in port desire to discharge a part only of the cargo, it

shall be lawful for him to do so, paying duty on such part only, and to proceed with

the remainder to any other ports. Or if the master so desire, he may, within forty-

eight hours after the arrival of the vessel, but not later, decide to depart without

breaking bulk; in which case he shall not be subject to pay tonnage or other duties

or charges, until, on his arrival at another port, he shall proceed to discharge cargo

when he shall pay the duties on vessel and cargo, according to law. And the tonnage

duties shall be held due after the expiration of the said forty-eight hours. In case

of the absence of the Consul or person charged with his functions, the captain or

. supercargo of the vessel may have recourse to the Consul of a friendly Power; or, if

he please, directly to the Superintendent of Customs, who shall do all that is required

■ to conduct the ship’s business.

Art. XX.—The Superintendent of Customs, in order to the collection of the

proper duties, shall, on application made to him through the Consul, appoint suitable

..officers, who shall proceed, in the presence of the captain, supercargo, or consignee

to make a just and fair examination of all goods in the act of being discharged for

•importation, or laden for exportation, on board any merchant vessel of the United

States. And if disputes occur in regard to the value of goods subject to ad valorem

duty, or in regard to the amount of tare, and the same cannot be satisfactorily

. arranged by the parties, the question may, within twenty-four hours, and not after-

wards, be referred to the said Consul to adjust with the Superintendent of Customs.

Art. XXI.—Citizens of the United States who may have imported merchandise

into any of the free ports of China, and paid the duty thereon, if they desire to

re-export the same in part or in whole to any other of the said ports, shall be entitled

to make application, through their Consul, to the Superintendent of Customs, who,

in order to prevent fraud on the revenue, shall cause examination to be made, by

suitable officers, to see that the duties paid on such goods as are entered on the Custom-

house books correspond with the representation made, and that the goods remain

with their original marks unchanged, and shall then make a memorandum in the

port-clearance of the goods and the amount of duties paid on the same, and deliver

the same to the merchant, and shall also certify the facts to the officers of Customs

at the other ports; all which being done, on the arrival in port of the vessel in

which the goods are laden, and everything being found, on examination there, to

correspond, she shall be permitted to break bulk, and land the said goods without

being subject to the payment of any additional duty thereon. But if, on such

examination, the Superintendent of Customs shall detect any fraud on the revenue in

-the case, then the goods shall be subject to forfeiture and confiscation to the Chinese

Government. Foreign grain or rice brought into any port of China in a ship of

.the United States, and not landed, may be re-exported without hindrance.

Art. XXII.—The tonnage duty on vessels of the United States shall be paid on

their being admitted to entry. Duties of import shall be paid on the discharge of the

TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

goods, and duties of export on the lading of the same. When all such duties shall

have been paid, and not before, the Collector of Customs shall give a port-clearance,

and the Consul shall return the ship’s papers. The duties shall be paid to the shroffs

[ authorized by the Chinese Government to receive the same. Duties shall be paid and

j received either in sycee silver or in foreign money, at the rate of the day. If the

j Consul permits a ship to leave the port before the duties and tonnage dues are paid

I he shall be held responsible therefor.

Art. XXIII.—-When goods on board any merchant vessel of the United States

1 Tin port require to be transhipped to another vessel application shall be made to the

Consul, who shall certify what is the occasion therefor to the Superintendent of

Customs, who may appoint officers to examine into the facts and permit the

•transhipment. And if any goods be transhipped without written permits, they shall

'be subject to be forfeited to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXIV.—Where there are debts due by subjects of China to citizens of the

United States, the latter may seek redress in law; and, on suitable representation being

•made to the local authorities through the Consul, they will cause due examination in

the premises, and take proper steps to compel satisfaction. And if citizens of the

TJnited States be indebted to subjects of China, the latter may seek redress by

representation through the Consul, or by suit in the Consular Court; but neither

■Government will hold itself responsible for such debts.

Art. XXV.—It shall be lawful for the officers or citizens of the United States to

employ scholars and people of any part of China, without distinction of persons, to

teach any of the languages of the Empire, and assist in literary labours, and the

persons so employed shall not for that cause be subject to any injury on the part

either of the Government or individuals; and it shall in like manner be lawful for

citizens of the United States to purchase all manner of books in China.

Art. XXVI.—Relations of peace and amity between the United States and China

being established by this Treaty, and the vessels of the United States being admitted

to trade freely to and from the ports of China open to foreign commerce, it is further

agreed that, in case at any time hereafter China should be at war with any foreign

nation whatever, and should for that cause exclude such nation from entering her

ports, still the vessels of the United States shall none the less continue to pursue their

commerce in freedom and security, and to transport goods to and from the ports of

the belligerent Powers, full respect being paid to the neutrality of the flag of the

United States, provided that the said flag shall not protect vessels engaged in the

transportation of officers or soldiers in the enemy’s service, nor shall said flag be

fraudulently used to enable the enemy’s ships, with their cargoes, to enter the ports

of China :; but all such vessels so offending shall be subject to forfeiture and confisca-

tion to the Chinese Government.

Art. XXVII.—All questions in regard to rights, whether of property or person,

; arising between citizens of the United States in China, shall be subject to the

y jurisdiction and be regulated by the authorities of their own government; and all

controversies occurring in China between citizens of the United States and the

subjects of any other government shall be regulated by the Treaties existing between

the United States and such governments respectively, without interference on the

part of China.

Art. XXVIII.—If citizens of the United States have special occasion to address

any communication to the Chinese local officers of Government, they shall submit the

■same to their Consul or other officer, to determine if the language be proper and

respectful, and the matter just and right, in which event he shall transmit the same

to the appropriate authorities for their consideration and action in the premises. If

subjects of China have occasion to address the Consul of the United States they may

address him directly, at the same time they inform tbeir own officers, representing the

■case for his consideration and action in the premises; and if controversies arise

between citizens of the United States and subjects of China, which cannot be amicably

; settled otherwise, the same shall be examined and decided conformably to justice and

equity by the public officers of the two nations, acting in conjunction. The extortion

120 ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

of illegal fees is expressly prohibited. Any peaceable persons are allowed to enter

the Court in order to interpret, lest injustice be done.

Art. XXIX.—The principles of the Christian Religion, as professed by the

Protestant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good,

and to do to others as they would have others to do to them. Hereafter those who

quietly profess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on

account of their faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese

convert, who, according to those tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles

of Christianity, shall in no case be interfered with or molested.

Art. XXX.-—The contracting parties hereby agree that should at any time the

Ta-Tsing Empire grant to any nation, or the merchants or citizens of any nation, any

right, privilege, or favour, connected either with navigation, commerce, political or

other intercourse, which is not conferred by this Treaty, such right, privilege, and

favour shall at once freely enure to the benefit of the United States, its public officers,

merchants, and citizens.

The present Treaty of Peace, Amity, and Commerce shall be ratified by the

President of the United States, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate,

within one year, or sooner, if possible, and by the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing

Empire forthwith; and the ratifications shall be exchanged within one year from the

date of the signature thereof.

In faith whereof we, the respective Plenipotentiaries of the United States of

America and of the Ta-Tsing Empire, as aforesaid, have signed and sealed these

presents.

Done at Tientsin, this eighteenth day of June, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and fifty-eight and the Independence of the United States

of America the eighty-second, and in the eighth year of Hien Fung, fifth moon, and

eighth day.

[l.s.] William R. Reed.

[l.s.] Kweiliang.

[l.s.] Hwashana.

[Appended to the foregoing Treaty are Tariff and Rules identical with those

annexed to the British Treaty of Tientsin.]

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

Signed, in the English and Chinese Languages, at Washington,

28th July, 1868

Ratifications Exchanged at PeMng, 23rd November, 1869

Whereas, since the conclusion of the Treaty between the United States of America1

and the Ta-Tsing Empire (China) of the 18th June, 1858, circumstances have

arisen showing the necessity of additional Articles thereto: the President of the

United States and the August Sovereign of the Ta-Tsing Empire have named for

their Plenipotentiaries: to wit, the President of the United States of America,

William R. Seward, Secretary of State; and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

Anson Burlingame, accredited as his Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipo-

tentiary, and Chih-kang and Sun-chia-ku, of the second Chinese rank, associated

high Envoys and Ministers of his said Majesty; and the said Plenipotentiaries, after

having exchanged their full powers, found to be in due and proper form, have agreed

upon the following Articles —

Art. I.—His Majesty the Emperor of China, being of the opinion that in making

concessions to the citizens or subjects of foreign Powers, of the privilege ©f residing

ADDITIONAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA 127

on certain tracts of land, or resorting to certain waters of that Empire, for purposes

of trade, lie has by no means relinquished his right of eminent domain or dominion

over the said lands and waters, hereby agrees that no such concession or grant shall

be construed to give to any Power or party which may be at war with or hostile to

the United States, the right to attack the citizens of the United States, or their

property, within the said lands or waters: And the United States for themselves

hereby agree to abstain from offensively attacking the citizens or subjects of any

Power or party, or their property, with which they may be at war, on any such tract

of land or water of the said Empire. But nothing in this Article shall be construed

to prevent the United States from resisting an attack by any hostile Power or party

upon their citizens or their property.

It is further agreed that if any right or interest in any tract of land in China,

has been, or shall hereafter be, granted by the Government of China to the United

States or their citizens for purposes of trade or commerce, that grant shall in no

event be construed to divest the Chinese Authorities of their right of jurisdiction

over persons and property within said tract of land except so far as the right may

have been expressly relinquished by Treaty.

Art. II.—The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China,

believing that the safety and prosperity of commerce will thereby best be promoted,

agree that any privilege or immunity in respect to trade or navigation within the

Chinese dominions which may not have been stipulated for by Treaty, shall be subject

to the discretion of the Chinese Government, and may be regulated by it accordingly,

but not in a manner or spirit incompatible with the Treaty stipulations of the parties.

Art. III.—The Emperor of China shall have the right to appoint Consuls at

ports of the United States, who shall enjoy the same privileges and immunities as

those which are enjoyed by public law and Treaty in the United States by the Consuls

of Great Britain and Russia, or either of them.

Art. IV.—The 29th Article of the Treaty of the 18th June, 1858, having stipulated

for the exemption of the Christian citizens of the United States and Chinese converts

from persecution in China on account of their faith, it is further agreed that citizens

of the United States in China of every religious persuasion, and Chinese subjects in

the United States, shall enjoy entire liberty of conscience, and shall be exempt from

all disability or persecution on account of their religious faith or worship in either

country. Cemeteries for sepulture of the dead, of whatever nativity or nationality,

shall be held in respect and free from disturbance or profanation.

Art. V.—The United States of America and the Emperor of China cordially

recognize the inherent and inalienable right of man to change his home and allegiance,

and also the mutual advantage of the free migration and emigration of their citizens

and subjects respectively from the one country to the other for the purposes of curiosity,

of trade, or as permanent residents. The high contracting parties, therefore, join in

reprobating any other than an entirely voluntary emigration for these purposes.

They consequently agree to pass laws, making it a penal offence for a citizen of the

United States, or a Chinese subject, to take Chinese subjects either to the United

States or to any other foreign country; or for a Chinese subject or citizen of the

United States to take citizens of the United States to China, or to any other foreign

country, without their free and voluntary consent respectively.

Art. VI.—Citizens of the United States visiting or residing in China shall enjoy

the same privileges, immunities, or exemptions in respect to travel or residence as may

there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. And,

reciprocally, Chinese subjects visiting or residing in the United States shall enjoy

the same privileges, immunities, and exemptions in respect to travel or residence as

may there be enjoyed by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation. But

nothing herein contained shall be held to confer naturalization upon citizens of the

United States in China, nor upon the subjects of China in the United States.

Art. VII.—Citizens of the United States shall enjoy all the privileges of the

public educational institutions under the control of the Government of China; and,

reciprocally, Chinese subjects shall enjoy all the privileges of the public educational

128 IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S.& CHINA

institutions under the control of the Government of the United States, which are

enjoyed in the respective countries by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured

nation. The citizens of the United States may freely establish and maintain schools

within the Empire of China at those places where foreigners are by Treaty permitted

to reside; and, reciprocally, Chinese subjects may enjoy the same privileges and

immunities in the United States.

Art. VIII.—The United States, always disclaiming and discouraging all prac-

tices of unnecessary dictation and intervention by one nation in the affairs or domestic

administration of another, do hereby freely disclaim and disavow any intention or

right to intervene in the domestic administration of China in regard to the construc-

tion of railroads, telegraphs, or other material internal improvements. On the other

hand, His Majesty the Emperor of China reserves to himself the right to decide the

time and manner and circumstances of introducing such improvements within his

dominions. With this mutual understanding it is agreed by the contracting, parties

tnat, if at any time hereafter his Imperial Majesty shall determine to construct, or

cause to be constructed, works of the character mentioned within the Empire, and

shall make application to the United States or any other Western Power for facilities

to carry out that policy, the United States will in that case designate or authorize

suitable engineers to be employed by the Chinese Government, and will recommend

to other nations an equal compliance with such applications; the Chinese Government

in that case protecting such engineers in their persons and property, and paying,

them a reasonable compensation for their services.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed this Treaty and

thereto affixed the seals of their arms.

Done at Washington, the twenty-eighth day of July, in the year of our Lord one-

thousand eight hundred and sixty-eight.

[l.s.] (Signed) William H. Seward. [l.s.] (Signed) Chih Kang,

[l.s.] „ Anson Burlingame. [l.s.] „ Sun Chiaku.

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN

THE UNITED STATES AND CHINA

Signed at Peking, in the English and Chinese Languages,

on the 17th November, 1880

The Immigration Treaty

Whereas, in the eighth year of Hieu Fung, Anno Domini 1858, a Treaty of Peace

and Friendship was concluded between the United States of America and China, and

to which were added in the seventh year of Tung Chi, Anno Domini 1868, certains

supplementary Articles to the advantage of both parties, which supplementary Articles-

were to be perpetually observed and obeyed; and

Whereas the Government of the United States, because of the constantly in-

creasing immigration of Chinese labourers to the territory of the United States, and

the embarrassments consequent upon such immigration, now desires to negotiate a

modification of the existing Treaties which will not be in direct contravention of their

spirit; now, therefore, the President of the United States of America appoints James

B. Angell, of Michigan; John F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of

South Carolina, as bis Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty

the Emperor of China has appointed Pao Chun, a member ofHis Imperial Majesty’s

Privy Council and Superintendent of the Board of Civil Office, and Li Hung Tsao, a

member of His Imperial Majesty’s Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipo-

tentiary ; and the said Commissioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined

IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE IT. S. & CHINA 129-

their full powers, aud, having,discussed the points of possible modifications in existing

Treaties, have agreed upon the following Articles in modification:—

Art. I.—^Whenever, in the opinion of the Government of the United States, the

coming of Chinese labourers to the United States, or their residence therein, affects,

or threatens to affect, the interests of that country, or to endanger the good order of

any locality within the territory thereof, the Government of China agrees that the

Government of the United States may regulate, limit, or suspend such coming or

residence, but may not absolutely prohibit it. The limitation or suspension shall be

reasonable, and shall apply only to Chinese who may go to the United States as

labourers, other classes not being included in the limitation. Legislation in regard

to Chinese labourers will be of such a character only as is necessary to enforce the

regulation, limitation, or suspension, of immigration, and immigrants shall not be

subject to personal maltreatment or abuse.

Art. II.-—Chinese subjects, whether proceeding to the United States as traders

or students, merchants, or from curiosity, together with their body and household

servants, and Chinese labourers who are now in the United States, shall be allowed

to go and come of their own free will and accord and shall be accorded all the rights,

privileges, immunities, and exemptions which are accorded to the citizens and subjects

of the most favoured nations.

Art. III.—If Chinese labourers, or Chinese of any other class, now either

permanently or temporarily residing in the territory of the United States, meet with

ill-treament at the hands of any other persons, the Government of the United States

will exert all its power to devise measures for their protection, and secure to them the

same rights, privileges, immunities and exemptions as may be enjoyed by the citizens

or subjects of the most favoured nation, and to which they are entitled by Treaty.

Art. IV.—The high contracting Powers, having agreed upon the foregoing

Articles, whenever the Government of the United States shall adopt legislative

measures in accordance therewith, such measures will be communicated to the

Government of China, and if the measures, as effected, are found to work hardship

upon the subjects of China, the Chinese Minister at Washington may bring the

matter to the notice of the Secretary of State of the United States, who will consider

the subject with him, and the Chinese Foreign Office may also bring the matter to

the notice of the U.S. Minister at Peking and consider the subject with him, to the

end that mutual and unqualified benefit may result. In faith whereof, the Plenipo-

tentiaries have signed and sealed the foregoing at Peking, in English and Chinese,

there being three originals of each text of even tenor and date, the ratifications of

which shall be exchanged at Peking within one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking, this 17th day of November, in the year of our Lord one thousand

eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, t^nth moon, fifteenth day.

Signed and sealed by the above-named Commissioners of both Governments.

The Commercial Treaty

The President of the United States of America and His Imperial Majesty the-

Emperor of China, because of certain points of incompleteness in the existing Treaties

between the two Government s, have named as their Commissioners Plenipotentiary:

The President of the United States of America, James P>. Angell, of Michigan; John

F. Swift, of California; and William H. Trescott, of South Carolina, as his Com-

missioners Plenipotentiary; and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has

appointed Pao Chun, a member of His Imperial Majesty’s Privy Council and Super-

intendent of the Board of Civil Office; and Li Hung Tsao, a member of His Imperial

Majesty’s Privy Council, as his Commissioners Plenipotentiary; and the said Com-

missioners Plenipotentiary, having conjointly examined their full powers, and having

discussed the points of possible modification in existing Treaties, have agreed upon

the following Additional Articles:—

Art. I.—The Governments of the United States and China, recognizing the

benefits of their past commercial relations, and in order to still further promote such

5

130 IMMIGRATION AND COMMERCIAL TREATIES BETWEEN THE U. S. & CHINA

relation between the citizens and subjects of the two Powers, mutually agree to give

the most careful and favourable attention to the representations of either as such

special extension of commercial intercourse as either m ij desire.

Art. II.—The Governments of China and of the United States mutually agree

and undertake that Chinese subjects shall not be permitted to import opium in any

of the ports of the United States, and citizens of the United States shall not be

permitted to import opium into any of the open ports of China, or transport from one

open port to any other open port, or to buy and sell opium in any of the open ports in

China. This absolute prohibition, which extends to v ssels owned by the citizens

or subjects of either Power, to foreign vessels employed by them, or to vessels owned

by the citizens or subjects of either Power and employed by other persons for the

transportation of opium, shall be enforced by appropriate legislation on the part of

China and the United States, and the benefits of the favoured nation clauses in

existing Treaties shall not be claimed by the citizens or subjects of either Power as

against the provisions of this Article.

Art. III.—His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China hereby promises and

agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage dues or duties for imports or ex-

ports or coastwise trade shall be imposed or levied in the open ports of China upon

vessels wholly belonging to citizens of the United States, or upon the produce, manu-

factures, or merchandise imported in the same from the United States, or from any

foreign country, or upon the produce, manufactures, or merchandise exported in the

same to the United States, or any foreign country, or transported in the same from

•one open port of China to another, than are imposed or levie 1 on vessels or cargoes

-of any other nation, or on those of Chinese subjects. The United States hereby pro-

mises and agrees that no other kind or higher rate of tonnage duties and dues for

imports shall be imposed or levied in the ports of the United States upon vessels

wholly belonging to the subjects of his Imperial Majesty, coming either directly or

by way of any foreign port from any of the ports of China which are open to foreign

trade to the ports of the United States, or returning therefrom either directly or by

way of any foreign port to any of the open ports of China, or upon the produce,

manufactures, or merchandise imported in the same from China, or from auy foreign

-country, than are imposed or levied on vessels of any other nations which make no

discrimination against the United States in tonnage dues or duties on imports,

-exports, or coastwise trade, than are imposed or levied on vessels and cargoes of

citizens of the United States.

Art. IV.—When controversies arise in the Chinese Empire between citizens of

the United States and subjects of His Imperial Majesty, which need to be examined

and decided by the public officer of the two nations, it is agreed between the

Governments of the United States and China that such cases shall be tried by the

proper official of the nationality of the defendant. The properly authorized official

of the plaintiff’s nationality shall be freely permitted to attend the trial, and shall

be treated with the courtesy due to his position. He shall be granted all proper

facilities for watching the proceedings in the interest of justice, and if he so desire

he shall have the right to be present and to examine and to cross-examine witnesses.

If he is dissatisfied with the proceedings, he shall be permitted to protest against

them in debate. The law administered will be the law of the nationality of the officer

trying the case.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed the

foregoing, at Peking, in English and Chinese, there being three originals of each text,

of even tenor and date, the ratifications of which shall be exchanged at Peking within

one year from the date of its execution.

Done at Peking, this seventeenth day of November, in the year of our Lord one

thousand eight hundred and eighty, Kuang Hsu sixth year, tenth moon, fifteenth day.

(Signed) James B. Angell. (Signed) Pao Chust.

„ John F. Swift. ,, Li Htjng-tsao.

„ William H. Trescott.

IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE

UNITED STATES OE AMERICA AND CHINA, 1894

Ratifications Exchanged at Washington, 7th December, 1894

Whereas, on the 17th of November, a.d. 1880, and of Kwang Hsu, the sixth

year, the tenth month, and the 15th day, a Treaty was concluded between the United

States and China for the purpose of regulating, limiting, or suspending the coming

of Chinese labourers to and their residence in the United States, and, whereas the

Government of China, in view of the antagonism and much deprecated and serious

disorders to which the presence of Chinese labourers has given rise in certain parts

of the United States, desires lo prohibit the emigration of such labourers from

China to the United States; and, whereas the two Governments desire to co-operate

in prohibiting such emigration and to strengthen in many other ways the bonds of

relationship between the two countries; and, whereas the two Governments are desirous

of adopting reciprocal measures for the better protection of the citizens or subjects

of each within the jurisdiction of the other; now, therefore, the President of the

United States has appointed Walter Q. Gresham, Secretary of State, as his

Plenipotentiary, and his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China has appointed

Yang Yui, Officer of ti e Second Kank, Sub-director of the Court of Sacrificial

Worship and Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, and the said

Plenipotentiaries having exhibited their respective full powers, found to be in due

form and good faith, have agreed upon the following Articles:—

Art. I.—The high contracting parties agree that for a period of ten years

beginning with the date of the ratifications of this Convention, the coming, except

under the conditions hereinafter specified, of Chinese labourers to the United States

shall be absolutely prohibited.

Art. II.—The preceding Article shall not apply to the return to the United

States of any registered Chinese labourer who has a lawful wife, child, or parent in

the United States or property therein of the value of $1,000, or debts of like amount

due to him and pending settlement. Nevertheless, every such Chinese labourer

shall, before leaving the United States, deposit, as a condition of his return, with

the Collector of Customs of the district from which he departs, a full description in

writing of his family or property or debts as aforesaid, and shall be furnished by

the said Collector with such certificate of his right to return under this Treaty as

the laws of the United States may now or hereafter prescribe, and not inconsistent

with the provisions of the Treaty; and should the written description aforesaid be

proved to be false, the rights of return thereunder, or of continued residence after

return, shall in each case be forfeited. And such right of return to the United

States shall be exercised within one year from the date of leaving the United

States; but such right of return to the United States may be extended for an

additional period, not to exceed one year, in cases where by reason of sickness or

other cause of disability beyond his control such Chinese labourer shall be rendered

unable sooner to return, which facts shall be fully reported to the Chinese Consul

at the port of departure, and by him certified to the satisfaction of the Collector of

the port at which such Chinese subject shall land in the United States. And no

such Chinese labourer shall be permitted to enter the United States by land or sea

without producing to the proper officer of the Customs the return certificate herein

required.

5*

132 IMMIGRATION PROHIBITION TREATY BETWEEN THE IT. S. & CHINA

Art. III.—The provisions of the Convention shall not affect the right at present

enjoyed by Chinese subjects, being officials, teachers, students, merchants, or

travellers for curiosity or pleasure, but not labourers, of coming to >the' United

States and residing therein. To entitle such Chinese subjects as are above described

to admission into the United States they may produce a certificate either from their

Government or from the Government of the country where they last resided, vised

by the diplomatic or consular representative of the United States in the country or

port whence they depart. It is also agreed that Chinese labourers shall continue

to enjoy the privilege of transit across the territory of the United States in the

-course of their journey to or from other countries, subject to such regulations by

the Government of the United States as may be necessary to prevent the said

privilege of transit from being abused.

Art. IY.—In pursuance of Article III. of the Immigration Treaty between the

United States and China, signed at Peking on the 17th day of November, 1880, it is

hereby understood and agreed, that Chinese labourers or Chinese of any other class,

either permanently or temporarily residing in the United States, shall have for the

protection of their persons and property all rights that are given by the laws of the

United States to citizens of the more favoured nations, excepting the right to

become naturalized citizens. And the Government of the United States reaffirms

its obligations, as stated in the said Article III., to exert all its power to secure the

protection to person and property of all Chinese subjects in the United States.

Art. Y.—The Government of the United States having, by an Act of Congress,

approved May 5th, 1892, as amended and approved November 3rd, 1893, required all

Chinese labourers lawfully within the United States, before the passage of the

first-named Act, to be registered, as in the said Acts provided, with a view of

affording them better protection, the Chinese Government will not object to the

•enforcement of the said Acts, and reciprocally the Government of the United States

recognises the right of the Government of China to enact and enforce similar laws

and regulations, for the registration, free of charge of all labourers, skilled or

unskilled (not merchants, as defined by the said Acts of Congress), citizens of the

United States in China whether residing within or without the Treaty Ports. And

the Government of the United States agrees that within twelve months from the

date of the exchange of the ratifications of this Convention, and annually thereafter,

it will furnish to the Government of China registers or reports showing the full

name, age, occupation, and number or place of residence of all other citizens of the

United States, including missionaries residing both within and without the Treaty

Ports of China, not including, however, diplomatic and other officers of the United

States residing or travelling in China upon official business, together with their

body and household servants.

Art. VI. —This Convention shall remain in force for a period of ten years,

beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications, and if six months before

the expiration of the said period of ten years neither Government shall have formally

given notice of its final termination to the other, it shall remain in full force for

another like period of ten years.

In faith whereof, we, the respective Plenipotentiaries, have signed this

Convention and have hereunto affixed our seals.

Done, in duplicate, at Washington, the 17th day of March, a.d. 1894.

Walter Q. Gresham,

Secretary of State.

Yang Ytti,

Chinese Minister to the United States.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED

STATES AND CHINA

Signed at Shanghai, 8th Octobek, 1903

[Translation']

The United States of America and His Majesty the Emperor of China, being

animated by an earnest desire to extend further the commercial relations between

"them and otherwise to promote the interests of the peoples of the two countries, in

view of the provisions of the first paragraph of Article XI. of the Einal Protocol

signed at Peking on the 7th day of September, a.d. 1901, whereby the Chinese Gov-

ernment agreed to negotiate tho amendments deemed necessary by the foreign

Governments to the Treaties of Commerce and Navigation and other subjects concern-

ing commercial relations, with the Object of facilitating them, have for that purpose

named as their Plenipotentiaries:—

The United States of America, Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to China; John Goodnow,

Consul-General of the United States of America at Shanghai, John F. Seaman, a

Citizen of the United States of America resident at Shanghai;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Lu Pai-huan, President of the Board

of Public Works: Sheng Hsuan-huai, Junior Guardian of the Heir Apparent,

formerly Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works; Wu Ting Fang,

Senior Vice-President of the Board of Commerce;

Who, having met and duly exchanged their fall powers, which were found to be

in proper form, nave agreed upon the following amendments to existing Treaties of

Commerce and Navigation previously concluded between the two countries, and upon

the subjects hereinafter expressed connected with commercial relations, with the

object of facilitating them.

Art. L—In accordance with international custom, and as the diplomatic

representative of China has the right to reside in the Capital of the United States,

and to enjoy there the same prerogatives, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed

by the similar representative of the most favoured nation, the diplomatic representa-

tive of the United States shall have the right to reside at the capital of His Majesty

the Emperor of China. He shall be given audience of His Majesty the Emperor

whenever necessary to present his letters of credence or any communication from the

President of the United States. At all such times he shall be received in a place

and in a manner befitting his high position, and on all such occasions the ceremonial

observed toward him shall be that observed toward the representatives of nations on

a footing of equality, with no loss of prestige on either side.

The diplomatic representatives of the United States shall enjoy all the preroga-

tives, privileges and immunities accorded by international usage to such representatives,

and shall in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar representatives

of the most favoured nation.

The English text of all notes or despatches from United States officials to

Chinese officials, and the Chinese text of all notes or despatches from Chinese officials

to United States officials shall be authoritative.

Art. II.—As China may appoint consular officers to reside in the United States

and to enjoy there the same attributes, privileges and immunities as are enjoyed by

consular officers of other nations, the United States may appoint, as its interests may

134. COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

require, consular officers to reside at the places in the Empire of China that are now

or that may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They shall hold

direct official intercourse and correspondence with the local officers of the Chinese

Government within their consular districts, either personally or in writing as the case

may require, on terms of equality and reciprocal respect. These officers shall be

treated with proper respect by all Chinese authorities, and they shall enjoy all the

attributes, privileges and immunities, and exercise all the jurisdiction over their

nationals which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation the

most favoured in these respects. If the officers of either Government are disrespect-

fully treated or aggrieved in any way by the authorities of the other, they shall have

the right to make representation of the same to the superior officers of their owns

Government, who shall see that fall inquiry and strict justice be had in the premises.

And the said consular officers of either nation shall carefully avoid all acts of offence

to the officers and people of the other nation.

On the arrival of a Consul properly accredited at any place in China opened to

foreign trade, it shall be the duty of the Minister of the United States to inform the

Board of Foreign Affairs, which shall, in accordance with international usage, forth-

with cause the due recognition of the said Consul and grant him authority to act.

Art. III.—Citizens of the United States may frequent, reside, and carry on trade,

industries and manufactures, or pursue any lawful avocation, in all the ports or

localities of China which are now open or may hereafter be opened to foreign trade

and residence; and, within the suitable localities'at those places which have been or

may be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners, they may rent or purchase

houses, places of business and other buildings, and rent or lease in perpetuity land

and build thereon. They shall generally enjoy as to their persons and property all

such rights, privileges and immunities as are or may hereafter be granted to the

subjects or citizens of the nation the most favoured in these respects.

Art. IY.—The Chinese Government, recognising that the existing system of

levying dues on goods in transit, and especially the system of taxation known as

lekin, impedes the free circulation of commodities to the general injury of trade,

hereby undertakes to abandon the levy of lekin and all other transit dues throughout

the empire and to abolish the offices, stations and barriers maintained for their

collection and not to establish other offices for levying dues on goods in transit.

It is clearly understood that, after the offices, stations and barriers for taxing goods

in transit have been abolished, no attempt shall be made to re-establish them in any

form or under any pretext whatsoever.

The Government of the United States, in return, consents to allow a surtax, in

excess of the tariff rates for the time being in force, to be imposed on foreign goods

imported by citizens of the United States and on Chinese produce destined for export

abroad or coastwise. It is clearly understood that in no case shall the surtax on.

foreign imports exceed one and one-half times the import duty leviable in terms of

the final Protocol signed by China and the Powers on the seventh day of September,

a.d. 1901; that the payment of the import duty and surtax shall secure for foreign

imports, whether in the hands of Chinese or foreigners, in original packages or other-

wise, complete immunity from all other taxation, examination or delay; that the total

amount of taxation, inclusive of the tariff export duty leviable on native produce for

export abroad shall, under no circumstances, exceed seven and one-half per cent.

ad valorem.

Nothing in this Article is intended to interfere with the inherent righl, of China

to levKeeping

J such other

thesetaxes as are notprinciples

fundamental in conflict inwithview,

its provisions.

the high contracting parties

have agreed upon the following method of procedure:

The Chinese Government undertakes that all offices, stations and barriers of

whatsoever

be permanentlykind for collecting

abolished on lekin, duties,railways

all roads, or such likeanddues on goodsinin the

waterways transit, shall

nineteen

Provinces of China and the three Eastern Provinces. This provision does

to the native Customs offices at present in existence on the seaboard, at open ports not apply

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA 135

where there ar

of China embracing the nineteen Provinces and the three Eastern Provinces.

Wherever there are offices of the Imperial Maritime Customs, or wherever such

may be hereafter placed, native Customs offices may also be established, as well as at

any point either on the seaboard or land frontiers.

The Government of the United States agrees that foreign goods on importa-

tion, in addition to the effective five per cent, import duty as provided for in the

Protocol of 1901, shall pay a special surtax of one and one-half times the amount of

the said duty to compensate for the abolition of leTcin, of other transit dues besides

lekin, and of all other taxation on foreign goods and in consideration of the other

reforms provided for in this Article.

The Chinese Government may re-cast the foreign export tariff with specific

duties as far as practicable, on a scale not exceeding five per cent, ad valorem; but

existing export duties shall not be raised until at least six months’ notice has been

given. In cases where existing export duties are above five per cent., they shall

be reduced to not more than that rate. An additional special surtax of one-half the

■export duty payable for the time being, in lieu of internal taxation of all kinds, may

be levied at the place of original shipment, or at the time of export on goods exported

either to foreign countries or coastwise.

Foreign goods which bear a similarity to native goods shall be furnished by the

Customs officers, if required by the owner, with a protective certificate for each pack-

age, on the payment of import duty and surtax, to prevent the risk of any dispute in

the interior.

Native goods brought by junks to open ports, if intended for local consumption,

irrespective of the nationality of the owner of the goods, shall be reported at the

native Customs offices only, to be dealt with according to the fiscal regulations of the

Chinese Government.

Machine-made cotton yarn and cloth manufactured in China, whether by foreigners

at the open ports or by Chinese anywhere in China, shall as regards taxation be

on a footing of perfect equality. Such goods upon payment of the taxes thereon

shall be granted a rebate of the import duty and of two-thirds of the import surtax

■paid on the cotton used in their manufacture, if it has been imported from abroad,

and of all duties paid thereon if it be Chinese grown cotton. They shall also be free

of export duty, coast-trade duty and export surtax. The same principle and pro-

•cedure shall be applied to all other products of foreign type turned out by machinery

in China.

A member or members of the Imperial Maritime Customs foreign staff shall be

selected by the Governors-General and Governors of each of the various provinces of

the Empire for their respective provinces, and appointed in consultation with the

Inspector-General of Imperial Maritime Customs, for duty in connection with native

•Customs affairs to have a general supervision of their working.

Cases where illegal action is complained of by citizens of the United States shall

be promptly investigated by an officer of the Chinese Government of sufficiently high

rank, in conjunction with an officer of the United States Government, and an officer

of the Imperial Maritime Customs, each of sufficient standing; and, in the event of

it beyig found by the investigating officers that the complaint is well founded and

loss has been incurred, due compensation shall be paid through the Imperial Mari-

time Customs. The high provincial officials shall be held responsible that the officer

guilty of the illegal action shall he severely punished and removed from his post. If

the complaint is shown to be frivolous or malicious, the complainant shall be held

responsible for the expenses of the investigation.

When the ratifications of this Treaty shall have been exchanged by the high

-contracting parties hereto, and the provisions of this Article shall have been accepted

by the Powers having Treaties with China, then a date shall be agreed upon when

the provisions of this Article shall take effect, and an Imperial Edict shall be

published in due form on yellow paper and circulated throughout the Empire of

China setting forth the abolition of all lekin taxation, duties on goods in transit,

COMMERCIAL TREA.TY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

offices, stations and barriers for collecting the same, and of all descriptions of internal

taxation on foreign goods, and the imposition of the surtax on the,import of foreign

goods and on the export of native goods, and the other fiscal changes and reforms

provided for in this Article, all of which shall take effect from the said date. The

Edict shall state that the provincial high officials are responsible that any official

disregarding the letter or the spirit of its injunction shall be severely punished and

removed from his post.

Art. V.—The tariff duties to be paid by citizens of the United States on goods

imported into China shall be as set forth in the schedule annexed hereto and made

part of this Treaty, subject only to such amendment and changes as are authorised

by Article IV. of the present Convention, or as may hereafter be agreed upon by the

present high contracting parties. It is expressly agreed, however, that citizens of

the United States shall at no time pay other or higher duties than those paid by the

citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Conversely, Chinese subjects shall not pay higher duties on their imports into the

United States than those paid by the citizens or subjects of the most favoured nation.

Art. VI.—The Government of China agrees to the establishment by citizens of the

United States of warehouses approved by the proper Chinese authorities as bonded

warehouses at the several open ports of China, for storage, re-packing, or preparation

for shipment of lawful goods, subject to such needful regulations for the protection

of the revenue of China, including a reasonable scale of fees according to com-

modities, distance from the Custom-house, and hours of working, as shall be made

from time to time by the proper officers of the Government of China.

Art. VII.—The Chinese Government, recognising that it is advantageous for

the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign

as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprises, agrees, within one year

from the signing of this Treaty, to initiate and conclude the revision of the existing

mining regulations. To this end China will, with all expedition and earnestness, go

into the whole question of mining rules; and, selecting from the rules of the United

States and other countries, regulations which seem applicable to the condition of

China, will recast its present mining rules in such a way as, while promoting the

interests of Chinese subjects and not injuring in any way the sovereign rights of

China, will offer no impediment to the attraction of foreign capital nor place foreign

capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally accepted

foreign regulations ; and will permit citizens of the United States to carry on in

Chinese territory mining operations and other necessary business relating thereto,

provided they comply with the new regulations and conditions which may be imposed

by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the

renting of mineral land, and the payment of royalty, and provided they apply for

permits, the provisions of which in regard to necessary business relating to such

operations shall be observed. The residence of citizens of the United States in

connection with such mining operations shall be subject to such regulations as shall

be agreed upon between the United States and China.

Any mining concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be

subject to their provisions.

Art. VIII.—Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the

Imperial Maritime Customs to citizens of the United States within three weets of

the presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive such

drawback certificates, and they shall be receivable at their face value in payment of

duties of all kinds (tonnage dues excepted) at the port of issue; or shall, in the case

of drawbacks on foreign goods re-exported within three years from the date of

importation,

at the port ofbeissue,

redeemable by theofImperial

at the option Maritime

the holders thereof.Customs

But inif,full in ready money

in connection with

any application for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an

attempt to defraud the revenue, the applicant shall be dealt with and punished in

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the case of detected stipulations

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revenue.in In

the case

Treatytheofgoods

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haveArticle

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COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA 137

from Chinese territory, then the Consul shall inflict on the guilty party a fine to be

paid to the Chinese Government.

Art. IX.—Whereas the United States undertakes to protect the citizens of any

country in the exclusive use within the United States of any lawful trade-marks,

provided that such country agrees by Treaty or Convention to give like protection to

citizens of the United States :—

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such protection in the

United States for its subjects, now agrees to fully protect any citizen, firm or corpora-

tion of the United States in the exclusive use in the Empire of China of any lawful

trade-mark to the exclusive use of which they are entitled in the United States, or

which they have adopted and used, or intend to adopt and use as soon as registered,

for exclusive use within the Empire of China. To this end the Chinese Government

agrees to issue by its proper authorites proclamations having the force of law, for-

bidding all subjects of China from infringing on, imitating, colourably imitating, or

knowingly passing off an imitation of trade-marks belonging to citizens of the United

States, which shall have been registered by the proper authorities of the United States

at such offices as the Chinese Government will establish for such purpose, on payment

of a reasonable fee, after due investigation by the Chinese authorities, and in com-

pliance with reasonable regulations.

Art. X.—The United States Government allows subjects of China to patent theii

inventions in the United States and protects them in the use and ownership of such

patents. The Government of China now agrees that it will establish a Patent Office.

After this office has been established and special laws with regard to inventions have

been adopted it will thereupon, after the payment of the legal fees, issue certificates

of protection, valid for a fixed term of years, to citizens of the United States on all

their patents issued by the United States, in respect of articles the sale of which is

lawful in China, which do not infringe on previous inventions of Chinese subjects,

in the same manner as patents are to be issued to subjects of China.

Art. XI.—Whereas the Government of the United States engages to give the

benefits of its copyright laws to the citizens of any foreign State which gives to the

citizens of the United States the benefits of copyrights on an equal basis with its own

citizens:—

Therefore the Government of China, in order to secure such benefits in the United

States for its subjects, now agrees to give full protection, in the same way and

manner and subject to the same conditions upon which it agrees to protect trade-

marks, to all citizens of the United States who are authors, designers or proprietors

of any book, map, print or engraving especially prepared for the use and education

of the Chinese people, or translation into Chinese of any book, in the exclusive right

to print and sell such book, map, print, engraving or translation in the Empire of

■ China during ten years from the date of registration. With the exception of the

books, maps, etc., specified above, which may not be reprinted in the same form, no

work shall be entitled to copyright privileges under this Article. It is understood that

Chinese subjects shall be at liberty to make, print and sell original translations into

Chinese of any works written or of maps compiled by a citizen of the United States.

This Article shall not be held to protect against due process of law any citizen of the

United States or Chinese subject who may be author, proprietor or seller of any

publication calculated to injure the well-being of China.

Art. XII.—The Chinese Government having in 1898 opened the navigable

Inland waters of the Empire to commerce by all steam vessels, native or foreign, that

may be specially registered for the purpose, for the conveyance of passengers and

lawful merchandise, citizens, firms and corporations of the United States may engage

in such commerce on equal terms with those granted to subjects of any foreign Power.

In case either party hereto considers it advantageous at any time that the rules

and regulations then in existence for such commerce be altered or amended, the

'Chinese Government agrees to consider amicably, and to adopt such modifications

thereof as are found necessary for trade and for the benefit of China

138 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA

The Chinese Government agrees that, upon the exchange of the ratifications of

this Treaty, Mukden and Antung, both in the province of Sheng-king, will be opened

by China itself as places of international residence and trade. The selection of

fitting localities to be set apart for international use and occupation, and the regula-

tions for these places set apart for foreign residence and trade shall be agreed upon

by the Governments of the United States and China after consultation together.

Art. XIII.—China agrees to take the necessary steps to provide for a uniform

national coinage which shall be legal tender in payment of all duties, taxes and other

obligations throughout the Empire of China by the citizens of the United States as

well as Chinese subjects. It is understood, however, that all Customs duties shall

continue to be calculated and paid bn the basis of the Haikuan Tael.

Art. XIY.—The principles of the Christian religion, as professed by the Pro-

testant and Roman Catholic Churches, are recognised as teaching men to do good

and to do to others as they would have others do to them. Those who quietly pro-

fess and teach these doctrines shall not be harassed or persecuted on account of their

faith. Any person, whether citizen of the United States or Chinese convert, who,

according to these tenets, peaceably teaches and practises the principles of Chris-

tianity shall in no case be interfered with or molested therefor. No restrictions shall

be placed on Chinese joining Christian Churches. Converts and non-converts, being

Chinese subjects, shall alike conform to the laws of China; and shall pay due respect

to those in authority, living together ixi peace and amity; and the fact of being con-

verts shall not protect them from the consequences of any offence they may have com-

mitted before or may commit after their admission into the Church, or exempt them

from paying legal taxes levied on Chinese subjects generally, except taxes levied and

contributions for the support of religious customs and practices contrary to their

religion. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by the native authorities

of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects; nor shall the native authorities make any

distinction between converts and non-converts, but shall administer the laws without

partiality so that both classes can live together in peace.

Missionary societies of the United States shall be permitted to rent and to lease

in perpetuity, as the property of such societies, buildings or lands in all parts of the

Empire for missionary purposes and, after the title deeds have been found in order

and duly stamped by the local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be

required for carrying on their good work.

Art. XY.—The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform

its judicial system and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, the

United States agrees to give every assistance to this reform, and will also be prepared to

relinquish extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the

arrangements for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XYI.—The Government of the United States consents to the prohibition

by the Government of China of the importation into China of morphia and of instru-

ments for its injection, excepting morphia and instruments for its injection imported

for medical purposes, on payment of tariff duty, and under regulations to be framed

by China which shall effectually restrict the use of such import to the said purposes.

This prohibition shall be uniformly applied to such importation from all countries.

The Chinese Government engages to adopt at once measures to prevent the manu-

facture in China of morphia and of instruments for its injection.

Art. XYII.—It is agreed between the high contracting parties hereto that all

the provisions of the several Treaties between the United States and China which

were in force on the first day of January, a.d. 1900, are continued in full force and

effect except in so far as they are modified by the present Treaty or other Treaties to

which the United States is a party.

The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years beginning with

the date of the exchange of ratifications and until a revision is effected as hereinafter

provided.

It is further agreed that either of the high contracting parties may demand

that the Tariff and the Articles of this Convention be revised at the end of ten years

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND CHINA 139

from the date of the exchange of the ratifications hereof. If no revision is demanded

before the end of the first term of ten years, then these articles in their present form

shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years reckoned from the end of

the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

The English and Chinese texts of the present Treaty and its three Annexes have

been carefully compared; but, in the event of there being any difference of meaning

between them, the sense as expressed in the English text shall be held to be the

correct one.

This Treaty and its three Annexes shall be ratified by the two high contracting

r-ties in conformity with their respective constitutions, and the ratifications shall

exchanged in Washington not later than twelve months from the present date.

In testimony whereof, we, the undersigned, by virtue of our respective powers,

have signed this Treaty in duplicate in the English and Chinese languages, and have

affixe ’

October in the year of our Lord one

thousand nine hundred and three, and in the twenty-ninth year of Kuang Hsu eighth

month and eighteenth day.

Annex I.

As citizens of the United States are already forbidden by Treaty to deal in or

handle opium, no mention has been made in this Treaty of opium taxation.

As the trade in salt is a Government monopoly in China, no mention has been

made in this Treaty of salt taxation.

It is, however, understood, after full discussion and consideration, that the col-

lection of inland duties on opium and salt and the means for the protection of the

revenue therefrom and for preventing illicit traffic therein are left to be administered

by the Chinese Government in such manner as shall in no wise interfere with the

provision of Article IY. of this Treaty regarding the unobstructed transit of other

goods.

Annex II.

Article IY. of the Treaty of Commerce between the United States and China of this

date provides for the retention of the native Customs offices at the open ports. For the

purpose of safeguarding the revenue of China at such places, it is understood that the

Chinese Government shall be entitled to establish and maintain such branch native

Customs offices at each open port within a reasonable distance of the main native

Customs offices at the port, as shall be deemed by the authorities of the Imperial

Maritime Customs at that port necessary to collect the revenue from the trade into

and out of such port. Such branches, as well as the principal native Customs offices

at each open port, shall be administered by the Imperial Maritime Customs as pro-

vided by the Protocol of 1901.

Annex III.

The schedule of tariff duties on imported goods annexed to this Treaty under

Article Y. is hereby mutually declared to be the schedule agreed upon between the

representatives of China and of the United States and signed by John Goodnow for

the United States and Their Excellencies Lii Hai-huan and Sheng Hsiian-huai for

China at Shanghai on the sixth day of September, a.d. 1902, according to the Proto-

col of the seventh day of September, a.d. 1901.

PORTUGAL

PROTOCOL, TREATY, CONVENTION AND AGREEMENT

BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

Art. I—A Treaty of Friendship and Commerce with the most favoured nation

clause will be concluded and signed at Peking.

Art. II.—China confirms perpetual occupation and government of Macao and

its dependencies by Portugal, as any other Portuguese possession.

Art. III.—Portugal engages never to alienate Macao and its dependencies without

agreement with China.

Art. IV.—Portugal engages to co-operate in opium revenue work at Macao in the-

same way as England in Hongkong.

Done at Lisbon, the 26th March, 1887.

Henbique de Babbos Gomes.

James Duncan Campbell.

The Tbeaty

Ratifications Exchanged at Peking 28th April, 1888

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, and His-

Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, desiring to draw closer and to consolidate the-

ties of friendship which have subsisted for more than three hundred years between.

Portugal and China, and having agreed in Lisbon on the 26th day of March, 1887, 2nd.

day of 3rd moon of the 13th year of the reign of the Emperor Kwang Hsu, through

their representatives, on a Protocol of four Articles, have now resolved to conclude a

Treaty of Amity and Commerce to regulate the relations between the two States;

for this end they have appointed as their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal, Thomas de Souza Roza, his

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to the Court of Peking, Knight of

the Order of Nossa Senhora de Conceicao de Villa Vicosa, Grand Cross of the Order of

the Rising Sun of Japan and of the Crown of Siam, Commander of the Order of Charles

II. and of Isabella the Catholic of Spain, and Knight of the Iron Crown of Austria ;

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, His Highness Prince Ching, Pre-

sident of the Tsung-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior

Vice-President of the Board of Public Works;

Who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers and

found them to be in good and due form, have agreed upon the following Articles

Art. I.—There shall continue to exist constant peace and amity between His Most

Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China,

whose respective subjects shall equally enjoy in the dominions of the high contracting

parties the most complete and decided protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—China confirms in its entirety the second Article of the Protocol of

Lisbon, relating to the perpetual occupation and government of Macao by Portugal.

It is stipulated that Commissioners appointed by both Governments shall proceed

to the delimitation of the boundaries, which shall be determined by a special Con-

vention ; but so long as the delimitation of the boundaries is not concluded, every-

thing in respect to them shall continue as at present, without addition, diminution, or

alteration by either of the parties.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA 141

Art. III.—Portugal confirms the third Article of the Protocol of Lisbon, relating,

to the engagement never to alienate Macao without previous agreement with China.

Art. XV.—Portugal agrees to co-operate with China in the collection of duties on

opium exported from Macao into China ports, in the same way and as long as England

co-operates with China in the collection of duties on opium exported from Hongkong.

The basis of this co-operation will be established by a Convention appended to

this Treaty, which shall be as valid and binding to both the high contracting parties

as the present Treaty.

Art. V.—His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint an.

Ambassador, Minister, or other diplomatic agent to the Court of His Im-

perial Majesty the Emperor of China, and this agent, as well as the persons of his

suite and their families, will be permitted, at the option of the Portuguese Govern-

ment, to reside permanently in Peking, to visit that Court, or to reside at any other

place where such residence is equally accorded to the diplomatic representative of other

nations. The Chinese Government may also, if it thinks fit, appoint an Ambassador^

Minister, or other diplomatic agent to reside at Lisbon, or to visit that Court when

his Government shall order.

Art. VI.—The diplomatic agents of Portugal and China shall reciprocally enjoy

in the place of their residence all the prerogatives and immunities accorded by the

laws of nations; their persons, families, and houses, as well as their correspondence

shall be inviolate.

Art. VII.—The official correspondence addressed by the Portuguese authorities to

the Chinese authorities shall be written in the Portuguese language accompanied by

a translation in Chinese, and each nation shall regard as authoritative the document

written in its own language.

Art. VIII.—The form of correspondence between the Portuguese and the Chi-

nese authorities will be regulated by their respective rank and position, based upon

complete reciprocity. Between the high Portuguese and Chinese functionaries at the

capital or elsewhere, such correspondence will take the form of dispatch (Chau-hoei);

between the subordinate functionaries of Portugal and the chief authorities of the

provinces, the former shall make use of the form of exposition (Xen-chen) and the

latter that of declaration (Cha-hsing) ; and the subordinate officers of both nations

shall correspond together on terms of perfect equality. Merchants and generally all

others who are not invested with an official character shall adopt, in addressing the

authorities, the form of representation or petition (Pin-ching).

Art. IX.—His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal may appoint

Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, or Consular Agents in the ports or

other places Vhere it is allowed to other nations to have them. These functionaries

will have powers and attributes similar to those of the Consuls of other nations,

and will enjoy all the exemptions, privileges, and immunities which at any time the

consular functionaries of the most favoured nation may enjoy.

The Consuls and the local authorities will show to each other reciprocal civilities

and correspond with each other on terms of perfect equality.

The Consuls and acting Consuls will rank with Taotais, Vice-Consuls, acting

Vice-Consuls, Consular Agents and interpreters-translators, with Prefects. 'Ihe

Consuls must be officials of the Portuguese Government, and not merchants. The

Chinese Government will make no objection in case the Portuguese Government

should deem it unnecessary to appoint an official Consul at any port and choose to

entrust a Consul of some other nation, for the time being, with the duties of Portu-

guese Consul at that port.

Art. X.—All the immunities and privileges, as well as all the advantages con-

cerning commerce and navigation, such as any reduction in the duties of navigation,

importation, exportation, transit or any other, which may have been or may be here-

after granted by China to any other State or to its subjects, will be immediately extended

to Portugal and its subjects. If any concession is granted by the Chinese Govern-

ment to any foreign Government under special conditions, Portugal, on claiming the

142 TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINa.

same concession for herself and for her own subjects, will equally assent to the condi-

tions attached to it.

Art XE.—Portuguese subjects are allowed to reside at, or frequent, the ports of

China opened to foreign commerce and there carry on trade or employ themselves

freely. Their boats may navigate without hindrance between the ports open to foreign

commerce, and they may import and export their merchandise, enjoying all the rights

and privileges enjoyed by the subjects of the most favoured nation.

Art. XII.—Portuguese subjects shall pay import and export duties on all mer-

chandise according to the rates specified in the tariff of 1858, adopted for all the other

nations; and in no instance shall higher duties be exacted from them than those paid

by the subjects of any other foreign nation.

Art. XIII.—Portuguese subjects are permitted to hire any description of boats

they may require for the conveyance of cargo or passengers, and the price of said hire

will be fixed by the contracting parties alone, without interference by the Chinese

Government. No limit shall be put to the number of boats, neither will it be per-

mitted to any one to establish a monopoly of such boats or. of the service of coolies

employed in the carriage of merchandise.

Should contraband articles be on board any such boats, the guilty parties shall

immediately be punished according to law.

Art. XIV.—Portuguese subjects residing in the open ports may take into their

service Chinese subjects, and employ them in any lawful capacity in China, without

■restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government; but shall not engage them for

foreign countries in contravention of the laws of China.

Art. XV.—The Chinese authorities are bound to grant the fullest protection to

the persons and to the property of Portuguese subjects in China, whenever they may

be exposed to insult or wrong. In case of robbery or incendiarism, the local autho-

rities will immediately take the necessary measures to recover the stolen property, to

terminate the disorder, to seize the guilty, and punish them according to the law.

■Similar protection will be given by Portuguese authorities to Chinese subjects in the

1 ossessions of Portugal.

Art. XVI.—Whenever a Portuguese subject intends to build or open houses,

shops or warehouses, churches, hospitals, or cemeteries, at the Treaty ports or at

other places, the purchase, rent, or lease of these properties shall be made out accord-

ing to the current terms of the place, with equity, without exaction on either side,

without offending against the usages of the people, and after due notice given by the

proprietors to the local authority. It is understood, however, that the shops or ware-

houses above mentioned shall only be allowed at the ports open to trad§, and not in

any place in the interior.

Art. XVII.—Portuguese subjects conveying merchandise between open ports

shall be required to take certificates from the Superintendent of Customs such as

are specified in the regulations in force with reference to other naliqnalities.

But Portuguese subjects, who, without carrying merchandise, would like to go

to the interior of China, must have passports issued by their Consuls and connter-

signed by the local authorities. The bearer of the passport must produce the same

when demanded, and the passport not being irregular, he will be allowed to proceed

and no opposition shall be offered, especially to his hiring persons or vessels for the

carriage of his baggage or merchandise.

If he be without a passport, or if he commits any offence against the law, he

shall be handed over to the nearest Consul of Portugal to be punished, but he must

not be subjected to an oppressive measure. No passport need be applied for by

persons going on excursions from the ports open to trade to a distance not exceeding

100 li and for a period not exceeding five days.

The provisions of this Article do not apply to crews of ships, for the due restraint

of whom regulations will be drawn up by the Consul and the local authorities.

Art. XVIII.—In the event of a Portuguese merchant vessel being plundered

by pirates or thieves within Chinese waters, the Chinese authorities are to employ

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA 14*

their utmost exertions to seize and punish the said robbers and to recover the stolen

goods, which, through the Consul, shall be restored to whom they belong.

Art. XIX.—If a Portuguese vessel be shipwrecked on the coast of China, or be

compelled to take refuge in any of the ports of the Empire, the Chinese authorities^

on receiving notice of the fact, shall provide the necessary protection, affording

prompt assistance and kind treatment to the crews and, if necessary, furnishing them

with the means to reach the nearest Consulate.

Art. XX.—Portuguese merchant vessels of more than one hundred and fifty

tons burden will pay tonnage dues at the rate of four mace per ton ; if of one hundred

and fifty tons and under they shall be charged at the rate of one mace per ton. The

Superintendent of Customs shall grant a certificate declaring that the tonnage dues

have been paid.

Art. XXL—Import duties shall be paid on the landing of goods; and export

duties upon the shipment of the same.

Art. XXII.—The captain of a Portuguese ship may, when he deems convenient,

land only a part of his cargo at one of the open ports, paying the duties due on the

portion landed, the duties on the remainder not being payable until they are landed

at some other port.

Art. XXIII.—The master of a Portuguese ship has the option, within forty-

eight hours of his arrival at any of the open ports of China, but not later, to decide

•whether he will leave port without opening the hatches, and in such case he will not

have to pay tonnage dues. He is bound, however, to give notice of his arrival for

the legal registering as soon as he comes into port, under penalty of being fined in

case of non-compliance within the term of two days.

The ship will be subject to tonnage dues forty-eight hours after her arrival in

port, but neither then nor at her departure shall any other impost whatsoever be

exacted.

Art. XXIV.—All small vessels employed by Portuguese subjects in carrying

passengers, baggage, letters, provisions or any other cargo which is free of duty,

between the open ports of China, shall be free from tonnage dues; but all such vessels

carrying merchandise subject to duty shall pay tonnage dues every four months at

the rate of one mace per ton.

Art. XXV.—Portuguese merchant vessels approaching any of the open ports

will be at liberty to take a pilot to reach the harbour; and likewise to take a pilot to

leave it, in case the said ship shall have paid all the duties due by her.

Art. XXVI.—Whenever a Portuguese merchant ship shall arrive at any of the

open ports of China, the Superintendent of Customs will send off one or more

Custom-house officers, who may stay on board of their boat or on board of the ship

as best suits their convenience. These officers will get their food and all necessaries

from the Custom-house, and will not be allowed to accept any fee from the captain

of the ship or from the consignee, being liable to a penalty proportionate to the

amount received by them.

Art. XXVII.—Twenty-four hours after the arrival of a Portuguese merchant

ship at any of the open ports, the papers of the ship, manifest, and other documents,

shall be handed over to the Consul, whose duty it will be also to report to the

Superintendent of Customs within twenty-four hours, the name, the registered

tonnage, and the cargo brought by the said vessel. If, through negligence or for

any other motive, this stipulation be not complied with within forty-eight hours

after the arrival of the ship, the captain shall be subject to a fine of fifty Taels for

each day’s delay over and above that period, but the total amount of the fine shall

not exceed two hundred Taels.

The captain of the ship is responsible for the correctness of the manifest, in

which the cargo shall be minutely and truthfully described, subject to a fine of five

hundred Taels as penalty in case the manifest should be found incorrect. This fine,

however, will not be incurred if, within twenty-four hours after the delivery of the

manifest to the Custom-house officers, the captain expressed the wish to rectify any

error which may have been discovered in the said manifest.

144 TEEATY BETWEEN POETUGAL AND CHINA

Art. XXVIII.—The Superintendent of Customs will permit the discharging of

the ship as soon as he shall have received from the Consul the report drawn up in due

form. If the captain of the ship should take upon himself to commence discharging

without permission, he shall be fined five hundred Taels and the goods so discharged

shall be confiscated.

Art. XXIX.—Portuguese merchants having goods to ship or to land will have

to obtain a special permission from the Superintendent of Customs to that effect,

without which all goods shipped or landed shall be liable to confiscation.

Art. XXX.—No transhipment of goods is allowed from ship to ship without

special permission, under penalty of confiscation of all the goods so transhipped.

Art. XXXI.—When a ship shall have paid all her duties, the Superintendent

-of Customs will grant her a certificate and the Consul will return the papers, in order

that she may proceed on her voyage.

Art. XXXII.—When any doubt may arise as to the value of goods which by the

Tariff are liable to an ad valorem duty, and the Portuguese merchants disagree with

the Custom-house officers as regards the value of said goods, both. parties will call

two or three merchants to examine them, and the highest offer made by any of the

said merchants to buy the goods will be considered as their just value.

Art. XXXIII.—Duties will be paid on the net weight of every kind of merchandise.

Should there be any difference of opinion between the Portuguese merchant and the

Custom-house officer as to the mode by which the tare is to be fixed, each party will

choose a certain number of boxes or bales from among every hundred packages of

the goods in question, taking the gross weight of said packages, then the tare of each

of the packages separately, and the average tare resulting therefrom will be adopted

for the whole parcel.

In case of any doubt or dispute not mentioned herein, the Portuguese merchant

may appeal to the Consul, who will refer the case to the Superintendent of Customs;

this officer will act in such a manner as to settle the question amicably. The appeal,

however, will only be entertained if made within the term of twenty-four hours ; and

in such a case no entry is to be made in the Custom-house books in relation to the

said goods until the question shall have been settled.

Art. XXXIV.—Damaged goods will pay a reduced duty proportionate to their

■deterioration; any doubt on this point will be solved in the way indicated in the

clause of this Treaty with respect to duties payable on merchandise ad valorem.

Art. XXXV.—Any Portuguese merchant who, having imported foreign goods

into one of the open ports of China and paid the proper duties thereon, may wish to

re-export them to another of the said ports, will have to send to the Superintendent

of Customs an account of them, who, to avoid fraud, will direct his officers to examine

whether or not the duties have been paid, whether the same have been entered on the

books of the Customs, whether they retain their original marks, and whether the

entries agree with the account sent in. Should everything be found correct, the same

will be stated in the export permit together with the total amount of duties paid, and

all these particulars will be communicated to the Custom-house officers at other ports.

Upon arrival of the ship at the port to which the goods are carried, permission

will be granted to land without any new payment of duties whatsoever if, upon

any fraud bethey

examination, are found

detected, to be the

the goods mayidentical goods;bybut

be confiscated theifChinese

during Government.

the examination

Should any Portuguese merchant wish to re-export to a foreign country any

goods imported, and upon which duties have been already paid, he will have to make

his application in the same form as required for the re-exportation of goods to

another port in China, in which case a certificate of drawback or of restitution of

duties will be granted, which will be accepted by any of the Chinese Custom-houses in

payment of import or export duties.

Foreign cereals imported by Portuguese ships into the ports of China may be

re-exported without hindrance if no portion of them has been discharged.

they may XXXVI.—The Chinese authorities

deem the most convenient to avoidwill adoptor atsmuggling.

fraud the ports the measures which

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA 145

Art. XXXVII.—The proceeds of fines and confiscations inflicted on Portuguese

subjects, in conformity to this Treaty, shall belong exclusively to the Chinese

• Government.

Art. XXXVIII.—Portuguese subjects carrying goods to a market in the interior

of the country, on which the lawful import duties have already been paid at any of

the open ports, or those who buy native produce in the interior to bring to the ports

on the Yang-tsze-kiang, or to send to foreign ports, shall follow the regulations

. adopted towards the other nations.

Custom-house officers who do not comply with the regulations, or who may exact

more duties than are due, shall be punished according to the Chinese law.

Art. XXXIX.—The Consuls and local authorities shall consult together, when neces-

• sary, as to the construction of Light-houses and the placing of Buoys and Light-ships.

Art. XL.—Duties shall be paid to the bankers authorized by the Chinese Govern-

ment to receive them in sycee or in foreign coin, according to the official assay made

. at Canton on the 15th July, 1843.

Art. XLI.—In order to secure the regularity of weights and measures and to

avoid confusion, the Superintendent of Customs will hand over to the Portuguese

Consul at each of the open ports standards similar to those given by the Treasury

Department for collection of public dues to the Customs at Canton.

Art. XLII.—-Portuguese merchant ships may resort only to those ports of China

which are declared open to commerce. It is forbidden to them, except in the case of

force majeure provided for in Article XIX., to enter into other ports, or to carry

on a clandestine trade on the coast of China, and the transgressor of this order shall

be subject to confiscation of his ship and cargo by the Chinese Government.

Art. XLIII.—All Portuguese vessels despatched from one of the open ports of

China to another, or to Macao, are entitled to a certificate of the Custom-house, which

will exempt them from paying new tonnage dues, during the period of four months

reckoned from the date of clearance.

Art. XLIV.—If any Portuguese merchant ship is found smuggling, the goods

smuggled, no matter of what nature or value, will be subject to confiscation by the

Chinese authorities, who may send the ship away from the port, after settlement of

all her accounts, and prohibit her to continue to trade.

Art. XLV.—As regards the delivery of Portuguese and Chinese criminals, with

the exception of the Chinese criminals who take refuge in Macao, and foi whose

extradition the Governor of Macao will continue to follow the existing practice, after

the receipt of a due requisition from the Viceroy of the Kwangs, it is agreed that,

in the Chinese ports open to foreign trade, the Chinese criminals who take refuge at

the houses or on board ships of Portuguese subjects shall be arrested and delivered

to the Chinese authorities on their applying to the Portuguese Consul; and likewise

the Portuguese criminals who take refuge in China shall be arrested and delivered

to the Portuguese authorities on their applying to the Chinese authorities; and by

neither of the parties shall the criminals be harboured nor shall there be delay in

delivering them.

Art. XLVI.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties to this

Treaty may demand a revision of the Tariff, and of the commercial Articles of this

Treaty, at the end of ten years; but if no demand be made on either side within six

months after the end of the first ten years, then the Tariff shall remain in force for

ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding ten years ; and so it shall be,

at the end of each successive ten years.

Art. XLVII.—All disputes arising between Portuguese subjects in China with

regard to rights, either of property or person, shall be submitted to the jurisdiction

of the Portuguese authorities.

Art. XLVIII.—Whenever Chinese subjects become guilty of any criminal act

towards Portuguese subjects, the Portuguese authorities must report such acts to the

Chinese authorities in order that the guilty be tried according to the laws of China.

TREATY BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA

If Portuguese subjects become guilty of any criminal act towards Chinese subjects,

the Chinese authorities must report such acts to the Portuguese Consul in order that

the guilty may be tried according to the laws of Portugal.

Art. XLIX.—If any Chinese subject shall have become indebted to a Portuguese

subject and withholds payment, or fraudulently absconds from his creditors, the

Chinese authorities shall use all their efforts to apprehend him and to compel him to

pay, the debt being previously proved and the possibility of its payment ascertained.

The Portuguese authorities will likewise use their efforts to enforce the payment of

any debt due by any Portuguese subject to a Chinese subject.

But in no case will the Portuguese Government or the Chinese Government be •

considered responsible for the debts of their subjects.

Art. L.—Whenever any Portuguese subject shall have to petition the Chinese

authority of a district, he is to submit his statement beforehand to the Consul, who

will cause the same to be forwarded should he see no impropriety in so doing,

otherwise he will have it written out in other terms, or decline to forward it.

Likewise, when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to petition the Portuguese

Consul he will only be allowed to do so through the Chinese authority, who shall

proceed in the same manner.

Art. LI.—Portuguese subjects who may have any complaint or claim against

any Chinese subject, shall lay the same before the Consul, who will take due

cognizance of the case and will use all his efforts to settle it amicably. Likewise,

when a Chinese subject shall have occasion to complain of a Portuguese subject, the

Consul will listen to his complaint and will do what he possibly can to re-establish

harmony between the two parties.

If, however, the dispute be of such a nature that it cannot be settled in that

conciliatory way, the Portuguese Consul and Chinese authorities will hold a joint

investigation of the case, and decide it with equity, applying each the laws of his own

country according to the nationality of the defendant.

Art. LII.—The Catholic religion has for its essential object tbe leading of men

to virtue. Persons teaching it and professing it shall alike be entitled to efficacious

protection from the Chinese authorities ; nor shall such persons pursuing peaceably

their calling and not offending against the laws be prosecuted or interfered with.

Art. LIII,—In order to prevent for the future any discussion, and considering

that the English language, among all foreign languages, is the most generally

known in China, this Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, is written in Por-

tuguese, Chinese, and English, and signed in six copies, two in each language. All

these versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen to be any

divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions, the English

text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. LIV.—The present Treaty, with the Convention appended to it, shall be

ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves and

His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China. The exchange of the ratifications shall

be made, within the shortest possible time, at Tientsin, after which the Treaty,

with the Convention appended, shall be printed and published in order that the

functionaries and subjects of the two countries may have full knowledge of their

stipulations and may fulfil them.

In faith whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

and have affixed their seals thereto.

Done in Peking, this first day of the month of December in the year of Our Lord

Jesus Christ one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the

Chinese date of the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of

Kwang-Hsu.

[l.s.] (Signed) Thomas de Souza Roza.

[Chinese Seal] Prince Ch’ing.

Signatures of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Sun-iu-uen.

CONVENTION BETWEEN PORTUGAL AND CHINA 147

Convention

It having been stipulated in the Art. IV. of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce,

concluded between Portugal and China on the 1st day of the month of December,

1887, that a Convention shall be arranged between the two high contracting parties

in order to establish a basis of co-operation in collecting the revenue on opium ex-

ported from Macao to Chinese ports, the undersigned Thomas de Souza Roza, Envoy

Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of His Most Faithful Majesty the King

. of Portugal and the Algarves, in special mission to the Court of Peking, and His

'Highness Prince Ching, President of the Tsuug-li Yamen, and Sun, Minister of

the Tsung-li Yamen and Senior Vice-President of the Board of Public Works, Min-

isters Plenipotentiary of His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China, have agreed

on the following Convention in three Articles:—

Art. I.—Portugal will enact a law subjecting the opium trade of Macao to the

•following provisions:—

1. —No opium shall be imported into Macao in quantities less than one ch

2. —All opium imported into Macao must, forthwith on arrival, be repor

•the competent department under a public functionary appointed by the Portuguese

- Grovernment, to superintend the importation and exportation of opium in Macao.

3. —No opium imported into Macao shall be transhipped, landed, stored, re

•from one store to another, or exported, without a permit issued by the Superintendent.

4. —The importers and exporters of opium in Macao must keep a register,

ang to the form furnished by the Grovernment, showing with exactness and clearness

the quantity of opium they have imported, the number of chests they have sold, to

whom and to what place-they were disposed of, and the quantity in stock.

5. —Only the Macao opium farmer, and persons licensed to sell opium a

will be permitted to keep in their custody raw opium in quantities inferior to one chest.

6. —Regulations framed to enforce in Macao the execution of this law

. equivalent to those adopted in Hongkong for similar purposes.

Art. II.—Permits for the exportation of opium from Macao into Chinese ports,

, after being issued, shall be communicated by the Superintendent of Opium to the

- Commissioner of Customs at Kung-pac-uan.

Art. III.—By mutual consent of both the high contracting parties the stipula-

tions of this Convention may be altered at any time.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed and sealed this

Convention.

Done in Peking this first day of December in the year of Our Lord Jesus Christ

one thousand eight hundred and eighty-seven, corresponding to the Chinese date of

t the seventeenth day of the tenth moon of the thirteenth year of Kwang Hsu.

[l.s.] (Signed) Thomas de Souza Roza.

[Chinese Seal] Prince Ch’ing.

Signature of the Chinese Plenipotentiaries. Sun-iu-uen.

Agreement

The basis of the co-operation to be given to China by Portugal in the collection

of duties on opium conveyed from Macao to Chinese ports, having been fixed by a

Convention appended to the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, concluded between

• China and Portugal on the 1st December, 1887, and it being now convenient to come

to an understanding upon some points relating to the said co-operation as well as to

fixed rules for the treatment of Chinese junks trading with Macao, Bernardo Pinheiro

< Correa de Mello, Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty in

148 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

Peking, duly authorized by His Excellency Thomas de Souza Roza, Chief of the said

Mission, and Sir Robert Hart, k.c.m.o., Inspector-General of the Chinese Imperial

Maritime Customs, provided with the necessary instructions from the Chinese-

Government, have agreed on the following:

1. —An office under a Commissioner appointed by the Foreign

the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs shall be established at a convenient spot on

Chinese territory, lor the sale of opium duty certificates, to be freely sold to merchants

and for such quantities of opium as they may require. The said Commissioner will

also administer the Customs stations near Macao.

2. —Opium accompanied by such certificates, at the rate of no

Taels per picul, shall be free from all other imposts of every sort, and have all the

benefits stipulated for by the Additional Article of the Chefoo Convention between

China and Great Britain on behalf of opium on which duty has been paid at one of

the ports of China, and may be made up in sealed parcels at the option of the purchaser.

3. —The Commissioner of Customs responsible for the mana

Customs stations shall investigate and settle any complaint made by Chinese mer-

chants of Macao against the Customs stations or revenue cruisers ; and the Governor

of Macao, if he deems it advisable, shall be entitled to send an officer of Macao to

be present and assist in the investigation and decision. If, however, they do not

agree, a reference may be made to the Authorities at Peking for a joint decision.

4. —Junks trading between Chinese ports and Macao, and their c

be subject to any dues or duties in excess of those leviable on junks and their cargoes

trading between Chinese ports and Hongkong, and no dues whatsoever shall be de-

manded from junks proceeding to Macao from ports of China, or coming from Macao

to ports in China, over and above the dues paid, or payable, at the ports of clearance

or destination. Chinese produce which has paid Customs duties and leMn tax before

entering Macao may be re-exported from Macao to Chinese ports without paying

Customs duties and leJcin tax again, and will be only subject to the payment of the

tax named Siao-hao.

In witness whereof, this agreement has been written in Portuguese and English

and signed in duplicate at Peking this the first day of December, 1887.

(Signed) Bernardo Pinheiro Correa de Mello,

Secretary of the Special Mission of His Most Faithful Majesty.

(Signed) Sir Robert Hart,

Inspector-General of Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA

AND PORTUGAL

Signed at Shanghai, November, 1904

Art. I.—The Treaty of Amity and Commerce between China and Portugal

dated the first day of December, 1887 (17th day, 10th moon, 13th year of Kwang Hsu),

continues in force except in so far as modified by the present Treaty.

Art. II.—Portugal accepts the increase in the import duties stipulated for in

Article YI. of the Peking Protocol of 7th September, 1901, from the date of the ratifica-

tion of this Treaty. Portugal will enjoy the privileges of the most favoured nation,

and in no case shall Portuguese subjects pay higher or lower duties than those paid by

the subjects of any other foreign nation. Article XII. of the Treaty of First Decem-

ber, 1887, is therefore rendered null and void.

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

Art. III.—The duty and lekin on foreign opium will continue as provided for

in existing Treaties. The Grovernraent of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to con-

tinue as heretofore to co-operate with the Government of His Imperial Chinese

Majesty in the collection of the duty and lekin on opium exported from Macao to

China, and also to co-operate in the repression of smuggling in accordance with the

Treaty and Special Opium Convention of 1st December, 1887. In order to render this'

co-operation effective, it is clearly stipulated that all opium imported into Macao

shall, on arrival, be registered at the Special Government Bureau provided for this

purpose, and the Portuguese Government will take the necessary steps in order to

have all this opium stored under its exclusive control in a depot from which it will be

removed as required by the demands of trade. The quantity of opium required for

consumption in Macao and its dependencies will be fixed annually by the Government'

of Macao in agreement with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs

referred to in Article II. of the above-mentioned Convention, and under no pretext;1

will removal from the Portuguese Government depot be permitted of any quantity of

opium for local consumption in excess of that fixed by the said agreement, and neces-

sary measures will be taken to prevent opium removed from the depot for re-export

to any port other than a port in China being sent fraudulently to Chinese territory.

The removal from the depot of opium for export will not be permitted except

on production of proof that such opium has already paid all dues and duties leviable’

thereon by China. The rules for the carrying out of this Article shall be arranged by

delegates from the Government of Macao and the Chinese Imperial Maritime Customs;

Art. IY.—Such steps as are necessary for the repression of smuggling in the

territory and waters of Macao shall be taken by the local Portuguese Government in

concert with the Commissioner of the Imperial Maritime Customs, and- similar

steps in the Chinese territory and waters near Macao shall be taken by the Imperial

Maritime Customs in concert with the Portuguese Government of Macao. This co-

operation is intended to render such steps effective on all points in respect of which co-

operation is needed, and to avoid at the same time any injury to the sovereign rights

of either of the high contracting parties. Special delegates from the local Government

of Macao and the Imperial Maritime Customs shall proceed to fix the respective zones

of operations, and shall devise practical means for the repression of smuggling.

Art. Y.—With a view to the development of trade between Macao and neigh-

bouring ports in the Kwangtung Province, the high contracting parties have agreed

as follows:—

1. —Portuguese steamers desirous of proceeding for the purposes of

Macao to any of the ports of call and passenger stages on the West Eiver,

enumerated in the Special Article of the English-Burmah Convention of 1897, and

Article X. of the British Treaty of Commerce of 1902, shall be permitted to do so,

provided they comply with the Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by

the two high contracting parties.

2. —Steamers specially registered for trade under the Inland Wa

Navigation Rules shall be permitted to ply between Macao and places in the Depart-

ment of Kwang-chow-fu other than those mentioned in Section 1, provided they

report to the Kungpei-kuan Customs for examination of cargo and payment of duties

in accordance with Special Regulations to be framed for this purpose by the two high

contracting parties. Such vessels may engage in all lawful trade, including the tow-

age of junks and conveyance of passengers and cargo, subject to the regulations for

the time being in force.

The privileges hereby granted are granted on the express understanding that

Special Regulations shall be framed defining in detail the conditions under which

such traffic may be carried on. Until then, the said Regulations have been agreed

upon and published, the Article shall not become operative; and subsequently only

on compliance with the said Regulations.

Art. YI.—Portugal having the right of most favoured nation treatment, it is

clearly stipulated that any advantages China may think fit to grant to any nation in

150 . COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

the importation of agricultural products, specially wines and oil, or in the importa-

tion of industrial products, specially woollen and cotton goods and preserved food-

stuffs, shall be extended to similar Portuguese goods on exactly the same conditions.

It is also clearly understood that Portuguese wine of all kinds proved by means

of certificate of origin, issued by Portuguese Consuls, to have been imported from

Portugal, direct or otherwise, shall when their alcoholic strength exceeds 14° pay

the duty leviable according to the annexed tariff on wines exceeding 14° of alcholic

strength. Wine passed through the Chinese Customs under designation “ Port

Wine ” shall not be entitled to the benefit of this Article unless accompanied by a

certificate of origin as above.

Art. YII.—Portuguese subjects may frequent, reside at, and carry on trade,

industries and manufactures, and pursue any other lawful avocation in all the ports

and localities in China which have already been or may hereafter be opened to

foreign residence and trade ; and wherever in any such ports or localities a special

area has been or may hereafter be set apart for the use and occupation of foreigners,

Portuguese subjects may t herein lease land, erect buildings, and in all respects enjoy the

same privileges and immunities as are granted to subjects of the most favoured nations.

Art. VIII.—Whereas China, with the object of reforming its fiscal system,

proposes to levy a surtax in addition to the tariff duties on all goods passing through

the Custom-houses, whether maritime or inland and frontier, in order to make good

the loss incurred by the complete abolition of lehin, the Portuguese Government agrees

that foreign goods imported into China by Portuguese subjects shall on entry pay

an import surtax equivalent to one and a half times the duty fixed by the Import

Tariff as now revised, and that Chinese produce exported abroad by Portuguese sub-

jects shall pay export duties, inclusive of the tariff export duty, not exceeding seven

and a half per cent, ad valorem, provided always that such import surtax and export

duties have been accepted by all the Powers having Treaties with China. With

regard to the produce tax, consumption tax, and excise, as well as the duties on native

opium and salt, leviable by China, Portugal further agrees to accept the same

arrangements as shall be agreed upon between all the Treaty Powers and China. It

is, however, understood that the commerce, rights, and privileges of Portugal shall

not, in consequence of this undertaking, be placed in any way at a disadvantage as

compared with the commerce, rights, and privileges of any other Power.

Art. IX.—Drawback certificates for the return of duties shall be issued by the

Imperial Maritime Customs to Portuguese subjects within twenty-one days from the

date of presentation to the Customs of the papers entitling the applicant to receive

such drawback certificates. These certificates will be accepted at their face value by

the Customs authorities at the port of issue in payment of duties of all kinds, ton-

nage dues excepted; or shall, in the case of drawbacks for duty paid on foreign

goods re-exported abroad within three years from the date of importation, be

redeemable in full in ready money by the Imperial Maritime Customs at the port of

issue, at the option of the holders thereof. But if, in connection with any applica-

tion for a drawback certificate, the Customs authorities discover an attempt on the

part of a Portuguese subject to defraud the revenue, he shall be liable to a fine not

exceeding five times the amount of the duty whereof he attempted to defraud the

Customs, or to a confiscation of the goods. In case the goods have been removed

from Chinese territory, then the Consul shall inflict on the guilty party a suitable

fine to be paid to the Chinese Government.

Art. X.—China agrees to herself establish a svstem of uniform national coinage

and provide for a uniform national currency, which shall be freely used as legal

fender in payment of all duties, taxes, and other obligations by Portuguese subjects

as well as by Chinese subjects in the Chinese Empire. It is understood, however,

that all Customs duties shall continue to be calculated and paid on the basis of the

Haikwan Tael.

Art. XI.—-The Government of His Most Faithful Majesty agrees to the prohibi-

tion by the Chinese Government of the importation into China of morphia and of

instruments for its injection, on condition, however, that the Chinese Government

COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL lot

will allow the importation of morphia and of instruments for its injection for medical

purposes by Portuguese doctors, chemists, and druggists, on payment of the

prescribed duty and under special permit which will only be granted t<> an intending

importer upon h s signing at the Portuguese Consulate a suitable bond undertaking

not to sell morphia except in small quantities and on receipt of a requisition signed

by a duly qualified foreign medical practitioner. If fraud in connection with such

importation be discovered by the Customs authorities the morphia and instrument

for its injection will be seized and confiscated, and the importer will be denied the

right to import these articles.

Art. XII.—The Chinese Government recognizing that it is advantageous for

the country to develop its mineral resources, and that it is desirable to attract foreign'

as well as Chinese capital to embark in mining enterprise, agrees to revise its exist-

ing mining regulations in such manner, by the selection of those rules in force in'

other nations which seem applicable to conditions in China, that the revision, while

promoting the interests of Chinese subjects and in no way prejudicing the sovereign

rights of China, will offer no impediment to the employment of foreign capital, nor

place foreign capitalists at a greater disadvantage than they would be under generally

accepted foreign regulations, and will permit Portuguese subjects to carry on in

Chinese territory mrning operations and other necessary business relating thereto,

provided they comply with the new regulations and conditions which will be imposed

by China on its subjects and foreigners alike, relating to the opening of mines, the

renting of mineral land, and payment of royalty, and provided they apply for permits,

the provisions of which, in regard to necessary business relating to such operations,

shall be observed. The residence of Portuguese subjects in connection with such

mining operations shall be agreed upon between Portugal and China. Any mining

concession granted after the publication of such new rules shall be subject to these

provisions.

Art. XIII.—It being only right that, the shareholders of any joint stock com-

pany, or the partners in any commercial undertaking, should all be on a footing of

equality as regards division of profits and payment of obligations, according to the

partnership agreement or memorandum and articles of association, the Chinese

Government agrees that Chinese subjects joining with Portuguese subjects in the or-

ganisation of a joint stock company or commercial undertaking, legally constituted,

shall be liable to the fulfilment of the obligations imposed by said agreement or

memorandum and articles of association, and that Chinese Courts will enforce fulfil-

ment of such obligations, if a suit to that effect be entered; provided always that

their liability shall not be other or greater than that of Portuguese shareholders or

partners in the same company or partnership. Similarly Portuguese subjects who

invest their capital in Chinese enterprises shall be bound to fulfil the obligations

imposed by the partnership agreement or memorandum, and articles of association,

and their liability shall be the same as that of the Chinese subjects engaged in the

same undertaking. But as existing Treaty stipulations do not permit foreign mer-

chants to reside in the interior of China for purpose of trade, such joint stock com-

panies and commercial undertakings may be established in the interior by Portuguese

and Chinese subjects conjointly.

Art. XIY.—As Portugal affords protection to trademarks used by subjects of

any other nationality, provided a like protection is reciprocated for trademarks used

by Portuguese subjects, China, in order to obtain this protection for its subjects in

Portuguese territory, agrees to grant protection to Portuguese trademarks against

unlawful use, falsification or imitation by Chinese subjects. To this end the Chinese

Government will enact the necessary laws and regulations, and will establish

registration offices at which foreign trademarks may be registered on payment of

reasonable fees. Further, the Chinese Government agrees that, as soon as a Patent

Office has been established, and special laws with regard to inventions have been

adopted, it will, after payment of the prescribed fees, issue certificates, valid for a

fixed term of years, to Portuguese inventors, extending to their inventions the same

protection as shall be given to Chinese patents in Portugal, provided that such inven-

152 COMMERCIAL TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND PORTUGAL

-tions do not infringe on previous inventions by subjects of China. Any Chinese or

Portuguese subject who is the author, proprietor, or seller of any publication

injurious to the peace and good government of China shall be dealt with in accordance

with the laws of his own country.

Art. XY.—The Government of China having expressed a strong desire to reform

its judicial system, and to bring it into accord with that of Western nations, Portugal

agrees to give every assistance to such reform, and will also be prepared to relinquish

.extraterritorial rights when satisfied that the state of the Chinese laws, the arrange-

ments for their administration, and other considerations warrant it in so doing.

Art. XVI.—The missionary question in China demands, in the opinion of the

Chinese Government, careful consideration, so as to avert in the future troubles

which have occurred in the past. Portugal, as a nation specially interested in the

•protection of its Catholic missions in Chinese territory, agrees to join in a commission

to investigate this question and, if possible, to devise means for securing permanent

ipeace between converts and non-converts, should such a commission be formed by

• China and the Treaty Powers interested. No person, whether Portuguese subject or

Chinese convert who, according to the tenets of Christianity, peaceably teaches or

practises the principles of that religion, which aims at teaching men to do good, shall

be persecuted or harassed on account of his faith. But converts and non-converts,

being alike subjects of China, shall conform to her laws, and shall pay due respect

-to those in authority, living together in peace and amity; and the fact of his being

a convert shall protect no one from the consequence of any offence he may have

committed before or may commit after his admission into the Church, or exempt him

from paying legal taxes and contributions levied for the support of religious customs and

practices contrary to his faith. Missionaries shall not interfere with the exercise by

-the native authorities of their jurisdiction over Chinese subjects, nor shall the native

authorities make any distinction between converts and non-converts, but shall

administer the law without partiality, so that both classes may live together in peace.

Portuguese missions shall be permitted to rent and lease in perpetuity, as the

property of the mission, buildings or lands in all parts of the Empire for mission

purposes, and, after the title-deeds have been found in order and duly stamped by the

local authorities, to erect such suitable buildings as may be required for carrying out

their good work.

Art. XVII.—The present Treaty shall remain in force for a period of ten years

beginning with the date of the exchange of ratifications and until a revision is effected

as hereinafter provided.

It is further agreed that either of the two high contracting parties may

demand revision of the Tariff and the Articles of the Treaty six months before the

.end of ten years from the date of the exchange of ratifications thereof. If no re-

vision is demanded before the end of the first term of the ten years, then these Articles

in their present form shall remain in full force for a further term of ten years

reckoned from the end of the first term and so on for successive periods of ten years.

Art. XVIII.—In order to prevent in the future any discussion, this Treaty is

written in Portuguese, Chinese and English, and signed in six copies, two in each lan-

guage. All these versions have the same sense and meaning, but if there should happen

-to be any divergence in the interpretation of the Portuguese and Chinese versions,

the English text will be made use of to resolve the doubts that may have arisen.

Art. XIX.—The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Most Faithful Majesty

the King of Portugal and Algarves and His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of China.

The exchange of the ratifications shall be made within the shortest possible time,

and the Treaty

subjects will be printed

of the respective and published,

countries in knowledge

may have full order that oftheitsfunctionaries

stipulations and

and

may fulfil them.

In faith whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present Treaty

.a'd have affixed their seals thereto.

JAPAN

TREATY OE PEACE BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

Signed at Shimonoseki (Bakan), Japan, on the 17th April, 1895

Ratifications Exchanged at Chefoo, China, on the 8th May, 1895

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and His Majesty the Emperor of China-

desiring to restore the blessings of peace to their countries and subjects, and to*

remove all cause for future complications, have named as their Plenipotentiaries for

the purpose of concluding a Treaty of Peace, that is to say:—

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of

the Imperial Order of Paullownia, Minister-President of State, and Viscount Mutsu

Munemitsu, Junii, First Class of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Minister

of State for Foreign Affairs;

And His Majesty the Emperor of China, Li Hung Chang, Senior Tutor to the-

Heir Apparent, Senior Grand Secretary of State, Minister Superintendent of Trade

for the Northern Ports of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl of the

First Bank, and Li Ching Fong, ex-Minister of the Diplomatic Service of the Second

Official Bank;

Who, after having exchanged their full powers, which were found to be in good

and proper form, have agreed to the following Articles:—

Art. I.—China recognizes definitely the full and complete independence and

autonomy of Corea, and, in consequence, the payment of tribute and the perform-

ance of ceremonies and formalities by Corea to China in derogation of such independ-

ence and autonomy shall wholly cease for the future.

Art. II.—China cedes to Japan in perpetuity and full sovereignty the follow-

ing territories, together with all fortifications, arsenals, and public property thereon:—

(a.) The southern portion of the Province of Feng-tien, within the following

boundaries—

The line of demarcation begins at the mouth of the Biver Yalu, and ascends that

stream to the mouth of the Biver An-ping; from thence the line runs to Feng Huang •

from thence to Haicheng; from thence to Ying Kow, forming a line which describes

the southern portion of the territory. The places above named are included in the

ceded territory. When the line reaches the Biver Liao at Ying Kow it follow the

course of that stream to its mouth, where it terminates. The mid-channel of the

Biver Liao shall be taken as the line of demarcation.

This cession also includes all islands appertaining or belonging to the Province

of Feng Tien situated in the eastern portion of the Bay of Liao Tung, and in the

northern part of the Yellow Sea.

(5.) The Island of Formosa, together with all islands appertaining or belonging

to the said Island of Formosa.

154 TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

(c.) The Pescadores Group, that is to say, all islands lying between £he 119th

and 120th degrees of longitude east of Greenwich and the 23rd and 24th degrees of

north latitude.

Art. III.—The alignments of the frontiers described in the preceding Article, and

shown on the annexed map, shall be subject to verification and demarcation on the

spot by a Joint Commission of Delimitation, consisting of two or more Japanese and

two or more Chinese Delegates, to be appointed immediately after the exchange of

the ratifications of this Act. In case the boundaries laid down in this Act are found

•to be defective at any point, either on account of topography or in consideration of

good administration, it shall also be the duty of the Delimitation Commission to

rectify the same.

The Delimitation Commission will enter upon its duties as soon as possible, and

will bring its labours to a conclusion within the period of one year after appointment.

The alignments laid down in this Act shall, however, be maintained until the

ratifications of the Delimitation Commission, if any are made, shall have received

■the approval of the Governments of Japan and China.

Art. IY.—China agrees to pay to Japan as a war indemnity the sum of 200,000,000

Kuping taels. The said sum to be paid in eight instalments. The first instalment of

.50,000,000 taels to be paid within six months, and the second instalment of 50,000,000

itaels to be paid within twelve months, after the exchange of the ratifications of this

Act. The remaining sum to be paid in six equal annual instalments as follows : the

•first of such equal annual instalments to be paid within two years, the second with-

in three years, the third within four years, the fourth within five years, the fifth

within six years, and the sixth within seven years after the exchange of the ratifications

of this Act. Interest at the rate of 5 per cent, per annum shall begin to run on all

.unpaid portions of the said indemnity from the date the first instalment

falls due.

China shall, however, have the right to pay by anticipation at any time any or

all of said instalments. In case the whole amount of the said indemnity is paid

within three years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act, all

.interest shall be waived, and the interest for two years and a half, or for any less

period if then already paid, shall be included as a part of the principal amount of

the indemnity.

Art. Y.—The inhabitants of the territories ceded to Japan who wish to take up

their residence outside the ceded districts shall be at liberty to sell their real property

and retire. For this purpose a period of two years from the date of the exchange

of the ratifications of the present Act shall be granted. At the expiration of that

period those of the inhabitants who shall not have left such territories shall, at the

option of Japan, be deemed to be Japanese subjects.

Each of the two Governments shall, immediately upon the exchange of the

ratifications of the present Act, send one or more Commissioners to Formosa to effect

a final transfer of that province, and within the space of two months after the

exchange of the ratifications of this Act such transfer shall be completed.

Art. YI. —All Treaties between Japan and China having come to an end in

consequence of war, China engages, immediately upon the exchange of the ratifica-

tions of this Act, to appoint Plenipotentiaries to conclude with the Japanese Pleni-

potentiaries a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, and a Convention to regulate

frontier intercourse and trade. The Treaties, Conventions, and Regulations, now

subsisting between China and European Powers, shall serve as a basis for the said

Treaty and Convention between Japan and China. From the date of the exchange

of the ratifications of this Act until the said Treaty and Convention are brought

into actual operation, the Japanese Government, its officials, commerce, navigation,

frontier inte-conrse and trade, industries, ships and subjects, shall in every respect

be accorded by China most favoured nation treatment.

China makes, in addition, the following concessions to take effect six months

atter the date of the present Act: —

TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA 15&

1. The following cities, towns, and ports, in addition to those already opened

shall be opened to the trade, residence, industries, and manufactures of Japanese

subjects under the same conditions, and with the same privileges and facilities as

exist at the present open cities, towns, and ports of China.

(a.) Shashih, in the Province of Hupeh.

(b.) Chung King, in the Province of Szechuan,

(c.) Suchow, in the Province of Kiang Su.

(d.) Hangchow, in the Province of Chekiang.

The Japanese Government shall have the right to station Consuls at any or all

of the above-named places.

2. Steam navigation for vessels under the Japanese flag for the conveyance of

passengers and cargo shall be extended to the following places:—

(a.) On the Upper Yangtsze River, from Ichang to Chung King.

(b.) On the Woosung River, and the Canal, from Shanghai to Suchow and

Hangchow.

The Rules and Regulations which now govern the navigation of the inland waters

of China by foreign vessels, shall, so far as applicable, be enforced in respect

of the above-named routes, until new Rules and Regulations are conjointly

agreed to.

3. Japanese subjects purchasing goods or produce in the interior of China or

transporting imported merchandise into the interior of China, shall have the right

temporarily to rent or hire warehouses for the storage of the articles so purchased or

transported, without the payment of any taxes or exactions whatever.

4. Japanese subjects shall be free to engage in all kinds of manufacturing

industries in all the open cities, towns, and ports of China, and shall be at liberty to

import into China all kinds ot machinery, paying only the stipulated import duties

thereon.

All articles manufactured by Japanese subjects in China, shall in respect of

inland transit and internal taxes, duties, charges, and exactions of all kinds and also

in respect of warehousing and storage facilities in the interior of China, stand upon

the same footing and enjoy tbe same privileges and exemptions as merchandise

imported by Japanese subjects into China.

In the event of additional Rules and Regulations being necessary in connection

with these concessions, they shall be embodied in the Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation provided for by this Article.

Art. VII.—Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding Article, the evacua-

tion of China by the armies of Japan shall be completely effected within three

months after the exchange of the ratifications of the present Act.

Art. VIII.—As a guarantee of the faithful performance of the stipulations of

this Act, China consents to the temporary occupation by the military forces of Japan,

of Wei-hai-wei, in the Province of Shantung.

Upon the payment of the first two instalments of the war indemnity herein

stipulated for and the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and

Navigation, the said place shall be evacuated by the Japanese forces, provided the

Chinese Government consents to pledge, under suitable and sufficient arrangements,

the Customs Revenue of China as security for the payment of the principal and

interest of the remaining instalments of said indemnity. In the event of no such!

arrangement being concluded, such evacuation shall only take place upon the pay-

• ment of the final instalment of said indemnity.

It is, however, expressly understood that no such evacuation shall take place

until after the exchange of the ratifications of the Treaty of Commerce and:

Navigation.

Art. IX.—Immediately upon the exchange of the ratifications of this Act, all

prisoners of war then held shall be restored, and China undertakes not to ill-treat or

150 TREATY BETWEEN JAPAN AND CHINA

punish prisoners of war so restored to her by Japan. China also engages to at once

release all Japanese subjects accused of being military spies or charged with any

other military offences. China further engages not to punish in any manner, nor to

allow to be punished, those Chinese subjects who have in any manner been

. compromised in their relations with the Japanese army during the war.

Art. X.—All offensive military operations shall cease upon the exchange of the

ratifications of this Act.

Art. XI.—The present Act shall be ratified by their Majesties the Emperor of

Japan and the Emperor of China, and the ratifications shall be exchanged at Chefoo

on the eighth day of the fifth month of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding

to the fourteenth day of the fourth month of the twenty-first year of Kuang Hsii.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and

have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Shimonoseki, in duplicate, this seventeenth day of the fourth month

. of the twenty-eighth year of Meiji, corresponding to the twenty-third of the third

.month of the twenty-first year of Kwang Hsii.

[l.s.] Count Ito Hirobumi, Junii, Grand Cross of the

Imperial Order of Paullownia, Minister-President

of State, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the Emperor

of Japan.

[l.s.] Viscount Mtjtsu Munemitsu, Junii, First Class

of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure,

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Plenipotentiary

of His Majesty the Emperor of Japan.

[l.s.] Li Hung-Chang, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the

Emperor of China, Senior Tutor to the Heir Ap-

parent, Senior Grand Secretary of Northern Ports

of China, Viceroy of the Province of Chihli, and Earl

of the First Bank.

£l.s.] Li Ching-Fong, Plenipotentiary of His Majesty the

Emperor of China, Ex-Minister of the Diplomatic

Service, of the Second Official Rank.

TREATY OE COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION

Made at Peking, July 21st, 1896

# Hisresolved,

having Majesty inthepursuance

Emperor ofof the

Japan and Hisof Majesty

provisions theofEmperor

Article VI. the Treatyof signed

China

at Shimonoseki on the 17th day of the 4th month of the 28th year of Meiji,

.corresponding to the 23rd day of the 3rd month of the 21st year of Kwang-Hsii, to

. conclude a Treaty of Commerce and Navigation, have for that purpose, named as

-their Plenipotentiaries, that is to say:—

TEEATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN 157

His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, Baron Hayashi Tadasu, Shosbii, Grand

•Cross of the Imperial Order of the Sacred Treasure, Grand Officer of the Imperial

Order of the Rising Sun, Minister Plenipotentiary and Envoy Extraordinary; and

His Majesty the Emperor of China, Chang Yin-hoon, Minister of the Tsung-li

Yamen, holding the rank of the President of a Board and Senior Vice-President

of the Board of Revenue.

Who, after having communicated to each other their full powers, found to be

in good and due form, have agreed upon and concluded the following Articles :—

Art. I.—There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between His Majesty

the Emperor of Japan and His Majesty the Emperor of China, and between their

respective subjects, who shall enjoy equally in the respective countries of the high

contracting parties full and entire protection for their persons and property.

Art. II.—It is agreed by the high contracting parties that His Majesty the

Emperor of Japan may, if he see fit, accredit a Diplomatic Agent to the Court

of Peking and His Majesty the Emperor of China may, if he see fit, accredit a

Diplomatic Agent to the Court of Tokyo.

The Diplomatic Agents thus accredited shall respectively enjoy all the pre-

rogatives, privileges and immunities accorded by international law to such Agents,

and they shall also in all respects be entitled to the treatment extended to similar

Agents of the most favoured nation.

Their persons, families, suites, establishments, residences and correspondence

shall be held inviolable. They shall be at liberty to select and appoint their

own officers, couriers, interpreters, servants, and attendants without any kind of

molestation.

Art. III.—His Majesty the Emperor of Japan may appoint Consuls-General,

Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at such of the ports, cities, and

towns of China which are now or may hereafter be opened to foreign residence and

trade, as the interests of the Empire of Japan may require.

These officers shall be treated with due respect by the Chinese Authorities, and

they shall enjoy all the attributes, authority, jurisdiction, privileges and immunities

which are or may hereafter be extended to similar officers of the nation most favoured

in these respects.

His Majesty the Emperor of China may likewise appoint Consuls-General, Con suls,

Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents to reside at any or all of those places in Japan

•where Consular officers of other nations are now or may hereafter be admitted, and,

saving in the matter of jurisdiction in respect of Chinese subjects and property in

. Japan which is reserved to the Japanese Judicial Courts, they shall enjoy the rights

•and privileges that are usually accorded to such officers.

Art. IV.—Japanese subjects may, with their families, employes and servants,

•frequent, reside and carry on trade, industries and manufactures or pursue any other

lawful avocations in all the ports, cities and towns of China, which are now or may

hereafter be opened to foreign residence and trade. They are at liberty to proceed to

or from any of the open ports with their merchandise and effects, and within the

localities at those places which have already been or may hereafter be set apart for

-the use and occupation of foreigners, they are allowed to rent or purchase houses,

rent or lease land and to build churches, cemeteries and hospitals, enjoying in all

•respects the same privileges and immunities as are now or may hereafter be granted

•to the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation.

Art. V.—Japanese vessels may touch for the purpose of landing and shipping

passengers and merchandise, in accordance with the existing Rules and Regulations

concerning foreign trade there, at all those places in China which are now ports of

■call, namely, Ngan-ching, Ta-tung, Hu-kow, Wu-sueh, Lu-chi-kow and Woosung

and such other places as may hereafter be made ports of call also. If any vessel

should unlawfully enter ports other than open ports and ports of call in China or

carry on clandestine trade along the coast or rivers, the vessel with her cargo shall be

subject to confiscation by the Chinese Government.

158 TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

Art. VI.—Japanese subjects may travel, for their pleasure or for purpose o£

trade, to all parts of the interior of China, under passports issued by Japanese Consuls

and countersigned by the local authorities. These passports, if demanded, must be'

produced for examination in the localities passed through. If the passports be not

irregular, the bearers will be allowed to proceed and no opposition shall be offered

to their hiring of persons, animals, carts or vessels for their own conveyance or for'

the carriage of their personal effects or merchandise. If they be without passports or

if they commit any offence against the law, they shall be handed over to the nearest

Consul for punishment, but they shall only be subject to necessary restraint and in no

case to ill-usage. Such passports shall remain in force for a period of 13 Chinese

months from the date of issue. Any Japanese subject travelling in the interior'

without a passport shall he liable to a fine not exceeding 300 Taels. Japanese sub-

jects may, however, without passports go on excursions from any of the ports open>

to trade, to a distance not exceeding 100 Chinese li and for a period not exceeding

five ( ays. The provisions of this article do not apply to crews of ships.

Art. VII.—Japanese subjects residing in the open ports of China may take

into their service Chinese subjects and employ them in any lawful capacity without

restraint or hindrance from the Chinese Government or authorities.

Art. VIII.—Japanese subjects may hire whatever boats they please for the

conveyance of cargo or passengers and the sum to be paid for such boats shall be

settled between the parties themselves, without the interference of the Chinese-

Government or officers. No limit shall be put upon the number of boats, neither

shall a monopoly, in respect either of the boats or of the porters or coolies engaged

in carrying goods, be granted to any parties. If any smuggling takes place in

them the offenders will of course be punished according to law.

Art. IX.—The Tariffs and Tariff Rules now in force between China and

the Western Powers shall be applicable to all articles upon importation into

China by Japanese subjects or from Japan, or upon exportation from China

by Japanese subjects or to Japan. It is clearly understood that all articles, the

importation or exportation of which is not expressly limited or prohibited by the

Tariffs and Tariff Rules existing between China and the Western Powers, may be

freely imported into and exported from China, subject only to the payment of the

stipulated import or export duties. But in no case shall Japanese subjects be called

upon to pay in China other or higher import or export duties than are or may

be paid by the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation; nor shall any

article imported into China from Japan or exported from China to Japan, be

charged upon such importation or exportation, other or higher duties than are now

or may hereafter be imposed in China on the like article when imported from or

exported to the nation most favoured in those respects.

Art. X.—All articles duly imported into China by Japanese subjects or from

Japan shall, while being transported, subject to the existing Regulations, from one

open port to another, bo wholly exempt from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges

and exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, irrespective of the nationality

of the owner or possessor of the articles, or the nationality of the conveyance or

vessel in which the transportation is made.

Art. XI.—It shall be at the option of any Japanese subject desiring to convey

duly imported articles to an inland market, to clear his goods of all transit duties

by payment of a commutation transit tax or duty, equal to one-half of the import

duty in respect of dutiable articles, and two and a half per cent, upon the value in

respect of duty-free articles; and on payment thereof a certificate shall be issued

which shall exempt the goods from all further inland charges whatsoever.

It is understood that this Article does not apply to imported Opium.

Art. XII.—All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects in

China elsewhere than at an open port thereof and intended for export abroad, shall

in every part of China be freed from all taxes, imposts, duties, lekin, charges and

exactions of every nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties when

exported, upon the payment of a commutation transit tax or duty calculated at the

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN 159

rate mentioned in the last preceding Article, substituting export duty for import .

duty, provided such goods and produce are actually exported to a foreign country

within the period of 12 months from the date of the payment of the transit tax.

All Chinese goods and produce purchased by Japanese subjects at the open ports of

China, and of which export to foreign countries is not prohibited, shall be exempt

from all internal taxes, imposts, duties, lehin, charges and exactions of every

nature and kind whatsoever, saving only export duties upon exportation, and ail

articles purchased I»y Japanese subjects in any part of China, may also, for the

purposes of export abroad, be transported from open port to open port subject to

the existing' Rules and Regulations.

Art. XIII.—Merchandise of a bond fide foreign origin, in respect of which full

import duty shall have been paid, may at any time within three years from the date

of importation, be re-exported from China by Japanese subjects to any foreign

country, without the payment of any export duty, and the re-exporters shall, in

addition, be entitled forthwith to receive from the Chinese Customs drawback certi-

ficates for the amount of import duty paid thereon, provided that the merchandise

remains intact and unchanged in its original packages. Such drawback certificates

shall be immediately redeemable in ready money by the Chinese Customs Authorities

at the option of the holders thereof.

Art. XIV.—The Chinese Government consents to the establishment of Bonded

Warehouses at the several open ports of China. Regulations on the subject shall

be maile hereafter.

Art. XV.-—Japanese merchant vessels of more than 150 tons burden, entering

the open ports of China, shall be charged tonnage dues at the rate of 4 mace per

registered .ton ; if of 160 tons and under, they shall be charged at the rate of 1 mace

per registered ton. But any such vessel taking its departure within 48 hours after

arrival, without breaking bulk, shall be exempt from the payment of tonnage dues.

Japanese vessels having paid the above specified tonnage dues shall thereafter

be exempt from all tonnage dues in all the open ports and ports of call of China, for

the period of four months from the date of clearance from the port where the pay-

ment of such tonnage dues is made. Japanese vessels shall not, however, be required

to pay tonnage dues for the period during which they are actually undergoing repairs

in China.

No tonnage dues shall be payable on small vessels and boats employed by

Japanese subjects in the conveyance of passengers’ baggage, letters, or duty-free

articles between any of the open ports of China. All small vessels and cargo boats,

however, conveying merchandise which is, at the time of such conveying, subject

to duty, shall pav tonnage dues once in four months at the rate of 1 mace per ton.

No fee or charges, other than tonnage dues, shall be levied upon Japanese

vessels and boats, and it is also understood that such vessels and boats shall not be

required to pay other or higher tonnage dues than the vessels and boats of the most

favoured nation.

Art. XVI.—Any Japanese merchant vessel arriving at an open port of China

shall be at liberty to engage the services of a pilot to take her into port. In like

manner, after she has discharged all legal dues and duties and is ready to take her

departure, she sha.ll be allowed to employ a pilot to take her out of port.

Art. XVII.—Japanese merchant vessels compelled on account of injury sustained

or any other cause, to seek a place of refuge, shall be permitted to enter any nearest

port of China, without being subject to the payment of tonnage dues or duties upon

goods landed in order that repairs to the vessel may be effected, provided the goods

so landed remain under the supervision of the Customs authorities. Should any

such vessel be stranded or wrecked on the coast of China, the Chinese authorities

shall immediately adopt measures for rescuing the passengers and crew and for

securing the vessel and cargo. The persons thus saved shall receive friendly

treatment, and, if necessary, shall be furnished with means of conveyance to

the nearest Consular station. Should any Chinese merchant vessel be compelled on

account of injury sustained op any other cause to seek a place of refuge in the nearest

160 TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN

port of Japan, she shall likewise be treated in the same way by the Japanese

authorities.

Art. XVIII.—The Chinese authorities at the several open ports shall adopt such

means as they judge most proper to prevent the revenue suffering from fraud or

smuggling.

Art. XIX.—If any Japanese vessel be plundered by Chinese robbers or pirates,.

it shall be the duty of the Chinese authorities to use every endeavour to capture and

punish the said robbers or pirates and to recover and restore the stolen property.

Art. XX.—Jurisdiction over the persons and property of Japanese subjects in

China is reserved exclusively to the duly authorized Japanese authorities, who shall

hear and determine all cases brought against Japanese subjects or property by Jap-

anese subjects or by the subjects or citizens of any other Power, without the interven-

tion of the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXI.—If the Chinese authorities or a Chinese subject make any charge

or complaint of a civil nature against Japanese subjects or in respect of Japanese

property in China, the case shall be heard and decided by the Japanese authorities.

In like manner all charges and complaints of a civil nature brought by Japanese

authorities or subjects in China against Chinese subjects or in respect of Chinese

property, shall be heard and determined by the Chinese authorities.

Art. XXII.—Japanese subjects, charged with the commission of any crimes or

offences in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty, punished by the Japanese

authorities according to the laws of Japan.

In like manner Chinese subjects charged with the commission of any crimes or

offences against Japanese subjects in China, shall be tried and, if found guilty,

punished by the Chinese authorities according to the laws of China.

Art. XXIII.—Should any Chinese subject fail to discharge debts incurred to a

Japanese subject or should he fraudulently abscond, the Chinese authorities will do

their utmost to effect his arrest, and enforce recovery of the debts. The Japanese

Authorities will likewise do their utmost to bring to justice any Japanese subject

who fraudulently absconds or fails to discharge debts incurred by him to a Chinese

subject.

Art. XXIV.—If Japanese subjects in China who have committed offences or have

failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond should flee to the interior of

China or take refuge in houses occupied by Chinese subjects or on board of Chinese-

ships the Chinese authorities shall, at the request of the Japanese Consul, deliver

them to the Japanese authorities.

In like manner if Chinese subjects in China who have committed offences or

have failed to discharge debts and fraudulently abscond should take refuge in houses

occupied by Japanese subjects in China or on board of Japanese ships in Chinese

waters they shall be delivered up at the request of the Chinese authorities made te

the Japanese authorities.

Art. XXV.—The Japanese Government and its subjects are hereby confirmed in

all privileges, immunities and advantages conferred on them by the Treaty stipulations

between Japan and China which are now in force; and it is hereby expressly stipu-

lated that the Japanese Government and its subjects will be allowed free and equal

participation in all privileges, immunities and advantages that may have been or may

be hereafter granted by His Majesty the Emperor of China to the Government or

subjects of any other nation.

Art. XXVI.—It is agreed that either of the high contracting parties may'

demand a revision of the Tariffs and of the Commercial Articles of this Treaty at

the end of ten years from the date of the exchange of the ratifications; but if

no such demand be made on either side and no such revision be effected within six

months after the end of the first ten years then the Treaty and Tariffs, in their prei ent

form, shall remain in force for ten years more, reckoned from the end of the preceding

ten years, and so it shall be at the end of each successive period of ten years.

Art. XXVII.—The high contracting parties will agree upon Rules and

Regulations necessary to give full effect to this Treaty. Until such Rules and

TREATY BETWEEN CHINA AND JAPAN !6I

Regulations are brought into actual operation the Arrangements, Rules and

Regulations subsisting between China and the Western Powers, so far as they are

applicable and not inconsistent with the provisions of this Treaty, shall be binding;

between the contracting parties.

An. XXVIII.—The present Treaty is signed in the Japanese, Chinese and!

English languages. In order, however, to prevent future discussions, the Pleni-

potentiaries of the high contracting parties have agreed that in case of any

divergencies in the interpretation between the Japanese and Chinese texts of the

Treaty, the difference shall be settled by reference to the English text.

Art. XXIX.—The present Treaty shall be ratified by His Majesty the Emperor

of China and His Majesty the Emperor of Japan, and the ratification thereof shall

be exchanged at Peking not later than three months from the present date.

In witness whereof the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the same and

have affixed thereto the seal of their arms.

Done at Peking this