Anglo-Chinese Calendar 1851 | Directory

AN

Anglo-Chinese CALENDER

FOR 1851.

CONTENTS.

Chinese Cycle of sixty years.... Page 3 Rates of freight per steamers. Chinese Astronomical Terms Eclipses of the Sun and moon in 1851-5 Chuese Chronological characters... Averages of Thermometer, &c................... Calendar, English, Chinese and

Parsee....

4 Rates of passage and freight between

Hongkong and Shanghai.

 

Parsee Chronology, &¤.................. Chinese Anecdotes...... Pagodas in and site Canton

Notices of Villages betwugh Canton

and Whampoa

Anecdotes of Filial Duty...... Account of Chinese Almanacs Chinese Proverbs

Lyt_of_the_principal officers in the

      Chinese Governinent Principal Chinese Festivals Weights in use among the Chinese Rates of Postage from Hongkong... Rates of Postage to U. States.........

sonic Lodges

le for converting Taels into Dol- rs, and vice versa..

Citon Langnist's fees.

Steam communication between Chi-

na, India, aud England...

5 Steamers in China, and rates of 7 freight......

8

Scale of charges in the Le-taune

Packhouse.....

32 Members of British Chamber of 33 Commerce at Canton..

Vinsurance Offices in China

of Protestant missionaries in "China.

67 Diplomatic Establishments in Chi-

na...

92

95

96

8 32 9 3 8 3

97

98

99

..100

57 Roman Catholic Missions at Hong-

64

kong...

.102

J03

105

.107

.109

109

112

71 Government of Macao 79 Government of Hongkong. 85|List of Residents at Amoy. 86 List of Residents at Shanghai.. 87 Members of the Chamber of Com- 87 merce at Shanghai.....

Residents at Canton and Whampoa....113 8 Commercial Houses in China.. ...118

phabetical List of Residents in China .

90

91Table of distances.................................................

.125

.134

CANTON:

PRINTED At the OFFICE OF THE CHINESE REPOSITORY,

THE

"No. 2, Mingqua's Hong.

1851.

AN

ANGLO-CHINESE CALENDAR

FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD

1851,

CORRESPONDING TO THE YEAR IN THE CHinese CYCLE ÆRA

4488,

or the 48th year of the 75th cyclE OF SIXTY;

BEING THE 1st YEAR OF THE REIGN OF

H. I. M. HIENFUNG.

CANTON:

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF the chineSE REPOSITORY.

No. 2, Mingqua's Hong.

1851.

1

3

THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1851 CORRESPONDS TO

The year 5611-12 of the Jewish era;

16

2604 since the foundation of Rome; 6564 of the Julian period;

1 267-68 of the Mohammedan era;

2598 of the era of Nabonasser;

2627 of the Olympiads;

*

"

M

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

"

2314-95 of the religious era of the Siamese;

"

*5-76 of American Independence;

12:20-21 of the Parsee era of Yezdejerd;

1213-14 of the civil era of the Siamese;

THE CHINESE CYCLE OF SIXTY YEARS,

Commences with the 61st year of the Emperor Hwangtí,

or 2637 years before Christ.

1844

乙巳

18 15

丙午

1855

丙辰

1856

甲子|甲戌

甲申

甲午

甲寅 甲辰

1804

1814

IS24

1834

1854

乙丑 乙亥乙酉

乙未

1805

1815

1825

1:35

丙寅 丙子|丙戌

丙申

1806

1816

1526

1-36

1846

丁 丁丑 丁亥 丁外

丁酉丁

1807

1317

1827

1-37

1847

戊辰|戊寅| 戊子

戊戌戊申

1808

1818

1628

己巳己多 己丑

已卂

1819

1829

} 1-39

1849

庚午庚辰|庚寅

1810

辛未

1811

壬申

1×12

1820

1830

辛巳辛

1921

1931

壬午壬辰

1822

1832

1838

1948

已亥| 己酉

庚子庚戌

1840

辛H

1841

壬寅

1842

癸酉

癸未

癸巳

1823

1233.

1843

1850

辛亥

1851

壬子

1852

癸丑

1853

丁巳

1857

戊午

1853

己未

1859

庚申

1860

辛酉

1861

壬戌

1862

癸亥

1863

     The Chinese year is luni-solar, comprising twelve lunar months, to which an intercalary month is added when requisite, to preserve correspondence with the solar year. When, during a lunar month, the sun does not enter any sign of the Zodiac, that month is inter- calary, and the year contains thirteen months. The eighth inoon of the present year is intercalated.

Jan.

Epiphany....

FESTIVALS, ANNIVERSARIES, &c.

Septuagesima....

Feb.

6 | Ascension day....... 16 Whit Sunday..

May 29

June 8

Ash Wednesday..

March 5

Trinity Sunday.

June 15

Good Friday....

April

18 | Accession of Victoria

June 20

Easter Sunday....

April 20 1st Sunday in Advent.

Nov. 30

THE TWENTY-FOUR

CHINESE SOLAR TERMS, CALLED TSIEII.

Jan. Jan. 20.

5.

Siáu-han, 'little cold.' Tá-hán, 'great cold.'

Sun 15° in Capricorn.

Feb.

4.

Feb. 19.

Lih-ch'un, 'spring begins.' Yü-shwui, 'rain and water.'

in Aquarius.

Pisces.

Mar. 6.

King-chih, 'insects excited.'

Mar. 21.

Ch'un-fan, vernal equinox.'

in Aries.

April 5.

Tsing-ming, 'clear and bright.'

April 20.

Kuh-yü, 'grain rain.'

in Taurus.

May 6.

Lih-hiá, ' summer begins.'

May 21.

Siáu-mwán, 'grain a little full.'

in Gemini.

June 5.

Mang-chung, 'grain spiked.'

June 21. D ′ Hiá-chí, ' summer solstice.

in Cancer.

July 7.

Siáu-shú, 'little heat.'

July 23.

Tá-shú, 'great heat.'

in Leo.

Aug. 8.

Lih-tsiú, autumn begins.'

Aug. 23.

Sep. 8.

Sep. 23. Oct. 8.

Oct. 23.

7.

**

Nov. 7. I

Nov. 22.

小雪

Dec. 7.

Dec. 27.

4

Chú-shú, cessation of heat.' Peh-lú, ' white dew.'

Ts'iú-fan, 'autumnal equinox.'

Hán-lú, cold dew.'

Shwáng-kiáng, 'frost descends.'

Lih-tung, 'winter begins.'

Siiu-siueh, 'little snow.'

Tá-siueh, 'great snow.'

in Virgo.

in Libra.

in Scorpio.

in Sagittarius.

Tung-chí, ' winter solstice.' Sun enters Capricorn.

-

}

5

ECLIPSES OF THE SUN AND MOON IN 1851.

I. A partial eclipse of the moon, Jan. 17th, invisible at Canton. II. There will be an annular eclipse of the Sun, Jan. 31, central at Hobart town, and invisible at Canton; it commences in long. 36° E., and lat. 32° 57′ S.

    III. A partial eclipse of the moon, July 12th, invisible at Canton, but seen in the South Pacific.

IV. There will be a total eclipse of the sun, July 28, invisible at Canton, but seen throughout North America and Europe. It com- mences in long. 137° 49′ W., and lat. 53° 43′ N.

CHRONOLOGICAL CHARACTERS.

    Or these the Chinese have several classes: the following are the most ancient and most generally used. They consist of two sets of characters, the one of

which, called + Shik kƐn, the "ten stems,' or

* celestial stems,' includes ten characters, viz :-

** Tien kán, the

Ping, 4T Ting, 5 Wú, 6 Kí.

Kwei.

|

Kiáh, 2 Z Yih, 3

7

Kang, 8 Sin, 9

Jin, 10

The other set, called

Ti chí, terrestial branches,

Shik-rk chi, the twelve branches,' and consist of the following twelve characters :-

Tax, 2 #Chau, 3 Yin, 1 Mau, 5

           † 4 M1 74 Wo, 8*wi,

未 9 Shin, 10

Ya, 11 ♬

Shin, 6

Sz`,

Hái.

Siuh, 12

These characters are applied to years, months, days, and hours, as well as to the points of the compass For chronological purposes they have been combined so as to form a cycle of sixty, as represented on page 3. Kinh, the first of the ten, is joined to isz', the first of the twelve, and rend kiák-19z', which denotes the first year, month, &c. of the cycle. In the same manner yik and chuu, the second of the two sets are united, and so on through the 'ten stems.' Then kiák, the first of the ten, is joined to sink, the 11th of the twelve, and in this manner the conjunction is continued up to sixty, when the tenth of the * stews,' and the twelfth of the ' branches,' coine together, and the cycle recom- niences. The 1st year of Hienfung, which coinmences on the 1st of February 1851, is the 48th of the cycle of years, and is called Sin-h ́i; the first moon of that year is the 27th of the cycle of moons, and is called Kang-yin; and the lat day of the 1st moon is the 25th of the cycle, and is called Wü-tsz".

For hours (and also for the points of the compass) the 'twelve brunches' are used singly. The çivil day of twenty-four hours is divided into twelve periods, of two hours, each called shí shin, which are designated by the characters of the twelve branches, in the following manner :-

11 to 1, or midnight,

1 to 3-4th watch, 3 to 5-5th watch

5 to 7

7 to 9

9 to 11

-

tsz,

Rat.

chau, Cow.

yin, Tiger.

máu, Rabbit.

6.

11 to 1 or noon, 4 wá, Horse.

1 to 3

*

-

-

3 to 5

5 to 7

-

-

·

-

7 to 9-1st watch

shin, Dragon.!

sz', Snake.

7 to 11-2d. do.

西

By prefixing to the characters the words Eching and

wi, Sheep.

shin, Monkey

yú, Cock.

siuh, Dog,

hái, Boar.

kiáu, these

twelve periods are divided into twenty-four hours: thus Eching-tsz' denotes midnight or 12 o'clock, and forwards to 1 o'clock; and

kiáu-

tsz', denotes from 11 to 12 o'clock. The shí-shin, or two hour periods, are divided into eight kih or quarters. Ching-máu yih kih E |

signifies a quarter past six in the morning; and kiáu-shin urh kih

denotes half past seven o'clock.

    The night from 7 o'clock in the evening to 5 in the morning is also divided into five kang, or watches, each watch consisting of one shí-shin, or of two hours.

In reference to the compass, Tsz' is the North, Wú the South, Miu the East, and Yu the West; the other eight are intermediate points between these. The *ten stems' and 'twelve branches' are otherwise named after various animals, ' but are made use of in that way chiefly by the Manchus and Mongols.

The following characters, which are the names of the twenty-eight lunar constellations, are likewise employed to designate the days.

Kioh

8

Tau

15

Kwei

22 # Tsing

2

Káng

9 A

4- Niá

16

La

23

Kwei

Τί

10 Na

17

Wei

24

Lig

4 房 Fáng

11 虚 Ha

18

Mẫu

.25星 Sing

5

Sin

12

危 Wei

19

Peih

26張 Chang

尾 Wei

13 室 Shih

20 Tsz'

27

Y.h

箕 Ki

14 壁 Peih

21. 參 Tsán

28 軫 Chin

These characters are applied in regular order to the days of the month. Four of them (those printed in italks) always mark the Christian Sabbath, while the others designate the week days respectively. January 1st, 1851, is designated by the 28th character chin, and February 1st, the 1st day of the Chinese year, is marked 1⁄4 the 3d character, ff. See Anglo-Chinese Calendar for 1841 ; Chinese Chrestomathy, page 388.

AVERAGES OF THERMOMETER

Is Hosenoso, Macao, Canton, Shanghai, and Ningro.

Hongkong. Macao. Canton. Shánghái. "Ning po

Months.

JANUAR

Max.

73

JANUARY

Min.

49

Mean

62

Max.

MARCH

FEBRUARY Min.

Mean

Max. Min. Mean

Max.

63

71

*** 8338** 213 *83 *** *** *3. 866 | 28% | 2**

42 243 28 828 878 | 808 | 818 | 228 | 288 | 38S | EES | DEN

72

53

29

634 57

78

38

82

55

APRIL

Min.

Mean

Max.

79

MAY

Min.

68

64

65

Mean

781

78

75

74

73

Max.

924

76

JUNE

Min.

75

70

Meani

70

Max.

JULY

Min.

91

79

96

88.

75

Mean

844

87

84

Max.

92

AUGUST

Min.

78

Mean

83#

811

SEPTEMBER

{{

Max.

30

Min.

78

Mean

82

794

N23 838

85

79

86

81

68

75

80

78

Max.

90

82

OCTOBER

Mid.

66

57

Mean

80

764 73

NOVEMBER

{

Max.

85

80

Min. Meani

57

40

72,6 661 62

SAS FAR

73

57

64

69

70

73

37

FAD FR2 878 827 832 870 CR7 827 822 662 298

62

36

43

60

32

46

71

**8 288 | 228 | 8A3] 232 388 | #82

43

38

401

451

55

42

45

54

77

45

46

59

93 998 895 8uYR 1228 1827 328 R2 SER 208

401

Max.

77

70

DECEMBER

Min.

47

24

67

45

38

Mean

63,6

634

53

+++

47

40

43

JANUARY, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, XIIth Moon.

   The weather, during this month, is dry, cold, and bracing-differing but little, if at all, from that of November and December. The wind blows ge- nerally from the north, occasionally inclining to the NE. or NW. A change to the south-which may be expected at intervals of 10 or 15 days, during the winter-causes considerable variation in the temperature of the atmos- phere.

Days of Days of

month

moon.

I w

29

2 th

1

3 f 4 s

5 S

6 m

7 tu

S w

2345-78

6

9 th

10 f

9

11 s

10

12 S

13 m

12

14 tu

13

15 w 16 th

14

15

17 f

16

18 s 19 S

17

18

20 m

19

121 tu

20

22 w 23 th 24 f

21

Chronicle of events în China, &c.

Trade at Canton reöpened, 1839.

(TWELFTH MOON Captain Gribble seized and

brought to Canton, 1840.

Lin Tsihsü imperial commissioner, 1839.

Second Sunday after Christmas. Epiphany.

Forts at Chuenpí taken, 1841.

Gunner of the Lady Hughes strangled, 1785.

British forces visit Funghwá, 1843. Ílipú arrived

in Canton, 1843.

First Sunday after Epiphany.

25 8

26 S

27 m

28 tu

29 w

30 th

31 f

C. Marjoribanks, pres. E. I. Co. left China, 1832. Second Sunday after Epiphany.

Elliot and Kishen's treaty, ceding Hongkong, 1841.

22 Death of Empress Dowager of Kiáking, 1850.

24

25

N** 2 ANR & A

26

30

Third Sunday after Epiphany. Hongkong taken possession of, 1841. St. Paul's church at Macao burnt, 1835.

Interview between Kishen and Elliot, 1841.

Lord Saltoun leaves China with $3,000,000 of

ransom money.

I

Days of month

9

JANUARY.

Barom. Mean, 30.22; max. 30.50; min. 30. 00 Thermon. Mean at noon, 64, night, 50; max. 74, min. 29. Rain. Mean fall 64 inches; rainy days, average 34.

Paromo

$ month

MEMORANDA.

}

De me with anlegge, faming & school Breakfast at the foldson's. Vinth Dr. Harla 9- Men't to Whampoa in Steamer thigh: Mint to Canton with Mefro Richads, Sinar 11-5 persons at P.Worship.

10

12 Finished reading, macdotes of Pharidence

The 13 Wint to Revision meeting & stayed at Br. K

Put crazy black man on

on board the Ma blants. Tea at M. Hunts. Loomis' s love fell.

1 w

7

2 th

3 f

9

4 s 10

5 8

11

6 in

12

7 tu

13

8 w

14

14

9 th

15

15

10 f

16

16

Il s

17

17

12 S

18

18

13 m

19

19

14 tu

20

20

15 w

21

16 th

22

17 f

23

18 s

24

19

S

25

25

20 m

26

26

21 tu

27

27

22 w

28

23 th

29

29

30

24 f

25 S

26 S

27 in

28 tu

29

w

.

CEENE & 2

3 persons at P. Worship Finished John's Gospel Chiver 88,

Marlis-

88/p/

76.

"

21 Chaming with Pond's Johnson & Ashmore arrived

mil Canton

23 - Hatted with Britshmore 24 Visited by 6 scholars from Shan Tring.

O persions at P. Worship. Hinished Best Pratom, off mm).

30

20

"

4.f.

ina at count. Pearson's". Lise Lottandish".

B.

225

Mont to Pagoda with Capts. Pearson, Budley, Wiler,

Shaving/4 ladince.

y

Virited by Budhist piest from Pa Chan. Bamboo Town burnt up. 300 shops.

6 month 5 month Richards returned to Canton.

12-

IA

P. 3-5 persons at 2. Worship_

3

4

5

Went to Canton, tiffin at Mr. M. spent

fat Dr. Balls

10

FEBRUARY, 28 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, Ist Meon.

    During the month the thermometer continues low; but the dry bracing cold of the three preceding months is changed for a damp and chilly atmos- phere; the number of fine fair days is much diminished, and cloudy and foggy ones are more frequent in February and March than in any other months. The fog is sometimes so dense us to render objects învisible at a few yards' distance. The prevailing winds are from the northeast and east, and are rather trying to foreigners from the quantity of moisture with which they are charged;| the thermometer does not give a just index of their chilliness.

   Day of ❘ Day of month.

moon.

Chronicle of events in Chiha. &c.

1 s

2 S 3 m

4 tu

5 w

6 th

7 f

8 s

9 S

10 m

10

11 tu

11

12 w

12

13 th

14 f

15 S

16 S

FIRST MOON, CHINESE NEW YEAR. Inhabitants of Hongkong declared to be British subjects, 1841.

Fourth Sunday after Epiphany.

The Hyacinth enters the Harbor of Macao, 1840. Rebellion broke out at Lienchau, 1632.

Capt. Halcon, Span. envoy, arrived in Macao, 1840.

Snow fell in Canton, 1835.

|Fifth Sunday after Epiphany.

Kienlung died, 1795.

Ash Wednesday,

13 {

2345678 - O - POPR78 * * *

14

15

16

17 m

17

18 tu

18

19 w

19

20

20 th i 21 f

Shunchí died, 1661.

Empress of China died, 1840. Elliot's second in-

terview with Kishen, 1841.

Gov. Sü visits the U. S. ship Plymouth, 1849.

Ports of Hongkong and Tingbái declared free,

1841-Septuagesima.

Boat of the Nemesis fired on at Wangtong, 1841.

21 Medical Missionary Society organized, Canton, 1838

22 s

29

23 S

23

24

124 m

25 tu

26 w

27 th

27

25

26

2228

Hostilities with the English resumed, 1841.

Sexagesima.

Chusan evacuated by the British forces, 1841.

Capt. Da Costa and lieut. Dwyer killed at Wang má-kok, 1849. Death of Táukwáng, reigner

30 years, 1850.

A Chinese executed before the factories, Canton,

1839. Bogue forts captured, 1841.

Barom.

FERRUARY.

Mean, 30.13; max. 30.50 ; min. 29.69.

Thermom. Moan at noon 37, night, 49; max. 78, min. 38.

Mean fall, 17; inches; rainy days, average 7.

Rain.

Day of

month

MEMORANDA.

&. 2014.

Weighed 150 llis

ailors,

rest of. Row between dr

From Sea Witch & Renk damaged $70,00. 5 Soila

2 S

9

9

N.

3 m

10

10

4 t

5 w

12

12

6 t 13

13

7 f

14

8 a

15

15

9 S 16

16

10 m

17

17-

Il t

19

18

19

12 w

13 t

19

20

* * * * * *

14 f

21

15 S

16 S

17 m

22

23

14 Wint to Canton. Stay'd at Dr. Ball's. Sinished reading Matt. in Chinese 801 Perkins Destora 510. 14 persons at P. Worship- Teacher Long ingan work.

20

21- Dr. Ball. Mr. B. 4. & Roberts retirand from H. Breakfasted at th. Brickle's with the. Stever 18 persons of R. Worship

22

24- Want to Canton with Capts. Amit & Sp 25-Dined at Dr. Hobson's. Spent night at Br. Fr

ellisson meeting are the Loomis-

at Dr. Balls 27 Tea' at Bethell with

26-

24

18 t

25

19 w

26

20 t

27

21 f

28

28

22

29

23 S

24 m

25 t

26 w

30

30 21 persons at P. Worship

7 month 6 month

- QR CO

1

2

8

: Met Mr. Forbes &y omitted a good d

27 t

4

4

28 f

5

5

12

MARCH, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, IId Moon.

   The weather in the month of March is also damp and foggy, but the tem- perature of the atmosphere becomes considerably warmer; to preserve things from damp, it is requisite to continue the use of fires and closed doors, which the heat of the atmosphere renders very unpleasant. From March till July and August, the thermometer steadily in creases inheight, until the heat reaches its maxiinum degree.

Days of Days of

month

moon

I s

29

2 8

30

3 m

1

4 tu

2

5 w

3

6 th

7 f

5

8 s

6

9 S

10 m

11 tu

9

10

12 w 13 th 11 14 f 12

15 8 13

16 S 14

17 m 15

16

18 tu 19 w 17

20 th

18

21 f

19

22 8

20

22

23

22 7 **** 2 2 2 2

25

S 21

24 m 25 tu

  26 w 27 th

28 f

29 8

30 S

31 m

24

29

26

27

28

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

St. David's.

Sir Hugh Gough arrived at Whampoa, 1841.

Quinquagesima.

SECOND MOON.

flipú died in Canton, 1843. Ash Wednesday.

Napier's fort captured, 1841.

First Sunday in Lent.

Lin arrived in Canton, 1839. British in Chinhái

and Ningpo attacked, 1842.

British brig Ann lost on Formosa, 1842.

Kishen goes a state's prisoner to Peking, 1841. Chinese custom-house closed at Macao, 1849. Seamen's Bethel at Whampoa dedicated, 1850. Chinese forces at Tsz'kí routed, 1841. Second Sunday in Lent.

Macartney's embassy leaves China, 1794. Canton under British guns, 1841.

Foreigners detained in Canton by Lin, 1839.

Armistice agreed upon at Canton, 1841. Gov.

Bonham lands at Hongkong, 1848.

Ship Sarah, first British free trader, sailed, 1834. Kiying appointed commander-in-chief, 1842.

Third Sunday in Lent.

Friend of China commenced, 1842.

Lady Day.

20,293 chests of opium surrendered, 1839.

Bishop of Victoria arrives at Hongkong, 1850.

Sir John F. Davis leaves China, 1848. Fourth

Sunday in Lent.

Day of month

13

MARCH.

Barum. Menn, 30 17; maxim. 30.50; min. 29.95. Thermom. Mean at noon 72, night, 60; max. 82; min. 44.

Mean fall, 24 inches; average rainy days, 6.

Rain.

Parare

7 month May her

-

23

Parse Sherehal 6 month

Barryver

MEMORANDA.

the

6 + Visited th. Bird wrthy 44 Chinese tea at M. 7-xil perspers et B. Worshif Doom's preact

favernell

Loomis & Richards saild in Sea" for N. Yor

ser,

Finirld reading Matt. in Chinese - 60%,

Dined at Dr. Holson's

me

5 Chinese friends Meses it to dined with

at P. Worship. French peach'd as sfamily railed in the Fear West

".

1hs. Stevens

1 s

6

2 S

3 in

8

4 t

9

5 w

10

10

6 t

11

7 f

12

12

8 s 13

13

9 S

14

14 20

10 u 15

15

16

16

12 w

17

13 t

18

18

14 f 19

19

15 s

20

20

16 S 21

17 m

22

22

18 t

23

23

19 w

24

24

20 t 25

25

21 f

26

26

27

23 S

28

24 m

25

26 w

27 t

28 f

29 s

30 S

222

29

30

Lone

17- Finish'd reading Le Compter Letter - 300, "Old Sea Captain - 130.

"

Went to Cunton. Drined at Dr. Balls

Da. Ball preached at Bothel.

21.-10 persons at O. Norship. Dr. Ball,

Visited. la. Cowper with Lo Lening & for

27-Finish'd reading Winslow on Declension _ pp. : 28 will. Bruner fueled at Bother-

P. Worthi 29 25 blines fall. Burns to to Li 30 Jill. m

M. Rosseau come to my

8 month 7 month

123 44

1

2

3

ט ::

5

Went with

t

house.

Read Lifes of Janeway & forkyn.//.43

21 Chinese at P. Worship. French at Be

A 023,

14

APRIL, 30 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, IIId Moon.

   The thick fogs which begin to disappear towards the end of March are in April seldom if ever seen. The atmosphere, however, continues damp, and rainy days are not unfrequent. At the same time, the thermometer gradually rises, and the nearer approach of the sun renders that heat more perceptible. In this and the summer months, southerly winds generally prevail; frequently however, they veer to the eastward, and prevail more from that direction, occasionally coming from the south and southwest at Macao and its vicinity.

Days of Days of

month.

moon.

Chronicle of events in China, &q.

1 tu

30

2 w

1

3 th

4 f

3

5 s

4

LA

5

THIRD MOON.

Confucius died, æt. 72, B. c. 420. Queen of Portugal born, 1819.

Kwoh Siping strangled at Macao for selling opium,

1838.

Sir John Davis makes an arrangement with Ki-

ying, 1847. Fifth Sunday in Lent.

6 S

7 m

6

8 tu

9 w

8

10 th

9

11 f 10 12 s

B S 12

Kíying appointed imperial commissioner, 1842. H. B. M. Commission return to Canton, 1837.

Palm Sunday.

Yihshán, Lungwan, and Ki Kung arrive in Canton

1841.

14 m

13

15 tu

14

16 w

15

17 th

16

18 f

17

Good Friday.

19 s 13

20 S 19

21 m 20

21

First steamer, the Forbes, reaches China, 1830. Easter Sunday.

E. I. Company ceased to trade with China, 1834. Schooner Emma attacked near Chuenpí, 2 En- glishmen killed, 1849.

St. George.

22 tu

23 w

22

24 th

23

25 f

24

26 s

25

27 S 26

28 m

Low Sunday.

27.

29 tu 28

30 w

29

1

15

Day of!

month.

LO

Barom. Thermon. Rain.

Parece Kadees 8 month Abda

APRIL.

Mean 30.03; max, 30.25; min. 29.85. Mean at noon, 77, night, 66 ; max. 86; min. 56. Mean fall, 5.6 inches; average rainy days. 10.

Parace Bhenska.i

7 manth

Mayber

MEMORANDA.

1- Reed Everetts Entegy on J.2. Ader 687/1 8- Teacher Chan llegan to work. 9 Went to Pó Lo with Mr. Wyms

to Lan Tou

...

M. Burns preachd at Bethell £25 Chinese at P. Worship,

13- Mr.

daying

visited

15 -- Weighid 145 lles.

1 tu

2 w

3 th

9

4 f

10

10

5

S

11

6 S

12

12-

7 m

13

8 tu

14

14

9 w

15

10 th

16

11 f

17

17

12 s

18

18

13 S

19

19

14 m

20

20

15 tu

21

16 w

22

22

17 th

18 f

19 s

20 S

21 m

22 tu

23 w

23

24

25

2 * * * * * 2

26

27

28

29

30

Reynard & 2 other shi

18 Finished reading Morse's Soulidy-270%

16

30 persons at Chinese meeting

Mr. Burns &

Agong

amisted of meeting

21 - Visited Bethel with 6 Sai this gentlemen. Weigh- Budhist Priest called at the Bird's 23 + Vin't from Geo. B. Goolden.-

24 Went to Revision at Canton

ne

"Civil Magistratranter

Ayad Stoons

fed For one to return allay in Atrak

15 250 32 went both at sozing maghed at Bethe

thegan to cook for life. Ortached 265 peurons at P. Worship.

Finished reading Life of Lady Colquhorm Mr. 30

27

28- Stay at M. Mrs.

20 Want to Whampoa with Ms. Md & lay

Walk'tan Dany's Beland with this. 189. Dent Chinese teacher Chan returned.

30

" month 8 month|

24 th

25 f

1

1

26 8

2

2

27 S

3

28 m

4

4

3

Finished two years in Clima. pp. 2 $30 Chinese at P. Worship. M. French at Ber EM. Van Harper & 2 Dutchmen called-

16

MAY, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, IVth Moon.

   In this month the heat is fully set in, and it is-particularly in Canton- often oppressive, the more so from the closeness of the atmosphere, the winds being usually light and variable. This is the most rainy month in the year, averaging fifteen days and a half of heavy rain; cloudy days without rain, however, are of frequent occurrence, and one half of the month averages fine sunny weather.

Days of Days of

month

moon.

1 th

1

2 f

3 s

S

5 m

5

tu

6

7 w

8 th

8

9 f

9

10 s

10

11

12 m 12

13.tu

13

14 w

14

15 th

15

16 f

16

17 s

17

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Famine in Kiángnán, Chehkiáng, and Húpeh, 1832. The Hongkong Gazette commenced, 1841. FOURTH MOON.

Second Sunday after Easter.

British troops evacuate Ningpo, 1842.

18 8 18

19 m

19

20 tu

20

21 w

21

22 th 23 f

22

23

24

CEN N N N HHN ~ NI Z 265)

Third Sunday after Easter.

(E. I. Co.'s garden demolished by lieut.-governor , Chú, 1831.

British forces arrive off Chápu, 1842.

(Chápú carried by storm, 1842. Fourth Sunday

after Easter.

British ships at Canton attacked, 1841. The deli- very of the 20,283 chests opium completed, 1839. Foreign factories pillaged, 1841.

Queen Victoria born, 1818.

25 |{

26

27

Canton surrounded by British forces, 1841. Roga-

tion Sunday.

The city of Canton ransomed for six millions of

dollars, 1841.

Ascension Day, Holy Thursday.

|A Congregational Association formed in Canton, 1846.]

24 s

25

26

8

m

= B

27 tu

28 w

23

  29 th 30 f

29

30

17

    Day month

of

1 th

I

Barom

Thermom Ruin.

Parose Kudmees 9 mouth

Add. r

MAY.

Mean, 29.92, max, 30.10; min. 29 80. Mean at noon, 78; night, 72; max. 88, min. 61. Mean fall, 11.8 in. ; average rainy days, 15).

Parwee Shenshi 8 munth Abula.

1

7

MEMORANDA.

Merghed May the Long age- pp. 88

Language

Read Bushnell en

Mr. Harlow ill

10-20 Clisere at P. Worship. Preactid at Bethel.

88pp.

gent night at M. & W. Williams. - 16-1th. Roussan left in the "Horatio"" 17-120 persons at Chinese Meeting - Williams mate of Horatio Scan

M

2 1

3 s

9

9

4 S

10

5 mi

11

]]

6 tu

12

12

7 w 13

13-

Read Zaccheusi.

8th

1

14

14

9 f

15

15

I0 s

16

11 S

:

17

12 w IS

18

BB tu 19

19-

14 w

20

20

15 th

21

16 f 22

22

17 s❘ 23

23

18 S 24

19 m 25

20 tu 26

26

21 W 27

27

22 th

23 f

29

29

30

30

25 S

26 m

27

muwi

28 w

21-1

24

Read Rev P Cooke on Beneficence 87 th f. W. Fisher on C. Civilization 28pfe, Stor's Sermon

Read Worcester's Sennon." Weapons of Wayfor ty - Gilfillan breached at Bethel

20 Chinese at P. Wonship.

25-Dined with Capt. Adams of Ship Maria'

John W moved to ship Maria.

28

28

10month 9 month

"out to Canton with Jorm 12 Jour.r.

Tea at Bethel

Weight 13

outs: 14 Chiuse at P. W costripe

• Gulled with H. Harlow at English likify

"Oriental"

I

18

JUNE, 30 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, Vth Moon.

The month of June is also a very wet month, although, on an average, the number of rainy days is less than in the other summer months. The ther- mometer in June rises several degrees higher than in the month of May, and falls but little at night-it is this latter circumstance, chiefly, which causes the exhaustion often felt in this region from the heat of summer-no opportunity being afforded for regaining strength.

  Day of ❘ Day of month. ¡ moon.

1 S

2

2 m

3

3 tu

4

4 w

5 th

6 f

7 s

8 $

9 m

10

10 tu

11

11 w 12

14 s

15

15 S

16

16 m

17

17 tu 18

18 w

19

19 th 20

20 f

21

21 s

22

3333

23

เค

Ε

23

24

24 tu

25

25 w

26

26 th 27

Chronicle, of events in China. &c.

Sunday after Ascension.

Lord John S. Churchill died off Macao, 1840.

Kíying arrived in Canton, 1843.

Mr. Summers released from Macao, 1849. Pentecost.

Portuguese prohibited trading at Canton, 1640.

***Hongkong, 1841. Russian and Chinese treaty, 1728. Capt Elliot

appointed chief sup. of British trade, 1836. British troops arrived before Wúsung, 1842. Trini-

ty Sunday.

Wúsung taken, 1842.

Shanghái occupied by British forces, 1842. {Macartney's embassy arrived, 1793.

accession, 1837.

Victoria's

Sir J. J. Gordon Bremer arrived in the Wellesley,

1840.

Port of Canton blockaded by English forces, 1840.

First S. after Trinity.

The destruction of 20,283 chests of opium com- pleted by Lin at the Bogue, 1839. Kíying visits Hongkong, 1843.

1849.

Fall of Trinity Church at Shánghái, 18$9. Midsum-

mer day. St. John's.

Treaty of Nanking exchanged at Hongkong, 1843.

Queen Victoria crowned, 1837.

27 f

28

28 8 29

29

| Sixth Moon.

Second Sunday after Trinita

Barom.

19

JUNE,

Mean height, 29.83; max. 30).00 ; min. 29.75. Thermom. Mean at noon 85, night, 79; max. 90, min. 74.

Mean fall, 11 din; average rainy days, 9.

Ruin.

 Parine Kutunees 10 month

Drigh

8

Parone Bhenshai month Adler.

MEMORANDA.

8 to torinese mestone Hot day and

Day of

month

1 S

2 m

9

9

3 t

10

10

4 w

5 t

12

12

6 f

13

13

7

8

14

14

15

15 No Chin

16

16

8 S

9

E

10 1

11 w

12 t

13 f

14 S

15 S

4479 -

17

18

19

20

21

22

2 2 2 32 &

16 m

17 t

24

18 w

Finished the leis commal & pp. 5%

Helier's != read Distant Hills, Allegomis.50

"Kings Merengues"

nese

Meeting-hot.

17y. We came to board with me 18 Villa. Hasion went to Hongkong, 19 +9 = turned to Ship Maria_

20

21

M. 72.

it

22 - 22 puson at C. Wordlich - M. Burn Surachd at.

23

Led Inde, endent on i!larriage": "Ray intronsite" 24- Mint to Canton - Stayd mith M Benena

- Br 25 Letter from W. Howland at P.l.ffice - Day!!!

Read" Balon of the Covenant" 40 pp.

; (.' Hariowy Colder came up

to Whumpe

20 Soth.. toulier preached it Bethel 12 pers

meeting.

29

30 Chinese

11 month 10 month)

19 t

26

26

20 f

27

27-

-

21 s $28

28

22 S

$29

23 m

30

24 t

1

25 w

2

2

26 t

3

3

27 f

29 B

29 S

6

1-

Want to Revision Stayed at M.))!! Road Shadow of the cross 48pp. thin shed reading "Incarnation". finishd

i

الله

He huis Jonmalt bat,

2

Finish'd read Congre Psalms & Hymen ff. 32.

Leeting.

m

20

JULY, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, VIth and VIIth Moons.

   During July-which is the hottest month in the year--the average height of the thermometer is 83° in the shade, at noon, both at Canton and Macao. This month is subject to frequent and heavy showers of rain, and-as is also the month of August-to storins of thunder and lightning. The winds, with very little variation, blow steadily during the whole month from the south or southwest.

Days of Days of

month

moon

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

I tu

3

2 w

4

3 th

5

4 f

5 s

6 S

7 m

9

11

8 tu 10 9 w 10th } 1 f

12

13

678

12 s

13 S

14

15

14 m

16

15 tu

17

16 w 17 th

18

19

13 f 20

19 s

21

20 S

22

21 m

23

Ramadan commences.

The Blonde visited Amoy, 1840. Treaty of Wánghiá signed, 1844.

The Rev. Dr. Milne arrived in Macao, 1811. Tinghái first taken, 1840.

Bark Troughton plundered by pirates, 1835. Third

Sunday after Trinity. Gov. Da Cunha dies at Macao, 1850.

Lin Weihi killed, 1839. Queen's Road chapel at

Hongkong dedicated, 1842.

Riot, and several Chinese shot in Canton, 1846.

The Yangtsz' kiing blockaded, 1840. Amherst's embassy arrived, 1816.

Admiral Maitland arrived in the Wellesley, 1838.

First English ship reached China, 1635. Fourth

Sunday after Trinity.

Lord Napier and suite arrived, 1834. British trade reopened, 1842.

Dutch envoys arrived at Peking, 1656. Grand Canal blockaded, 1842.

Fifth Sunday after Trinity.

Tyfoon, 1841. Chinking fú carried by storm, 1842.

22 tu

23 w 24 th

25 f

26 s

27 S

28 m

29

30 w 31 th

བོ་ྒ ྂ-བལ

A attack on a party at Yiitáu in Henam, 1846. A second tyfoon this year, 1841.

Birth Sunday after Trinity.

SEVENTH Moon.

Hon. A. II. Everett died, 1847.

Gov. Lin and Tang sentenced to banishment, 1841.

Day of month

21

JULY.

Barom height, 29 83; max. 30; min 29 60.

Thermom. Mean at noon 88, night, 81 ; max. 94 ; min. 79.

Mean fall, 7.74 in.; average rainy days, 10.

Ruin.

Parure Ku liners ilipooth Buiniquo

Parce Shenahal

10 month D. isti.

MEMORANDA.

1 t

8

2 w

9

9

3 t

10

10

4 f

5 8 12

12

6 S

13

7 ID 14

vastid Dixon's seur indforsica. Wfr 426

room he

13. Noche met gratum is 14 finished reading "Celinist? revid in cart" pp. Went to Canton. Unwell with 4

8 t

15

15

9 w

16

16

10 t

17

17

Il f 18

18

12 s

19

19

13 S❘ 20

20

14 m

21

21

15 t

22

22

16 w

23

17 t

24

18 f

25

19 9

26

26

20 S 27

27

21 m

28

29

29

23 w

30

30

24 t

25 f

2

3

3

26 s

27 S

23

29 t

1 30 w

m

Finished "Origin & Pragues of Language si

ind Aucdotes for the tamil fp. 36

1. trench readid at Bethet. As thinese misting on account of heat & illness Frank' Hronts Birth Day - Weight 128 162 striel," with Caft & this. Brewste

Jan

25 Virin. I gode with Maty colden.

12 month 11 month

LA

=

6

Chinese meeting

person nesent. mond "Land of sinim sip. 73 wht to Canton part way in takin telines &

na mill bupt & Mer bothay of the rad

End Yowned of the Pilgrime."

169

handler Habrion's sunt right al Brekhart at Bether with thitharion

22.

AUGUST, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, VIIth and VIIIth Moons.

   During this month the heat is as oppressive generally as in the month of July-often indeed it is more so, although the thermometer usually stands lo wer.

      Towards the close of the month, when summer begins to break up, the wind occasionally veers from southeast to north and northwest. Tyfoons seldom occur earlier than the first of this month, or later than the end of Sep.

Days of Days of |

month.

2

Q 60

moon.

1 f

5

6

3 S

7

4 m

5 tu

8

9

6 w 10

12

7 th

8 f

9 s

10. S

14

11 m 12 tu

13 w

14 th

15 f

13

15

16

17

13

19

16 s 20

17 S

18 m

19 tu

20 w

21

22

1 407 A 828 3 1*27 8 2

23

24

21 th

25

26

28

22 f

24 S

25 m

26 tu

29

30

27 w 28 th 2

1

29 f

3

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Chinese Periodical commenced, by Mr. Gutzlaff, 1833. Dr. Morrison died at Canton, æt. 53, 1834. Tyfoon, barom. 28.10, 1832.

(North China Herald commenced, 1850. Seventh

Sunday after Trinity.

British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842.

A tyfoon, 1835. Mr. Stanton made prisoner, 1840.

Batavia taken by the English, 1811. British squad-

ron arrived off the Pei ho, 1840.

Sir H. Pottinger and Sir W. Parker arrive, 1841.

Eighth Sunday after Trinity.

Captain Elliot entered the Pei ho, 1840.

174 British prisoners executed on Formosa, 1842.

Commissioners Ilí-ngan and Húsungah arrived,

1832. Hon. J. W. Davis arrives, 1848.

Ninth Sunday after Trinity.

{ Barrier at Macao attacked, 1840.

Lowrie killed by pirates, 1847.

Rev. W. M.

Sir H. Pottinger landed in Hongkong, 1841. Gov. Amaral assassinated, 1849.

Attack on the Black Joke, 1939. Capt. Elliot

leaves China, 1841. 10th S. after Trinity. Brit. Cham. Com. formed, 1835. Passalhaŏ fort ta-

ken by the Portuguese, 1849.

British leave Macao, 1839. Amey taken, 1841. EIGHTH MOON.

Parsee year 1221 commences.

Treaty of Nanking signed, 1842. Hon. J. R.

Morrison died: 1843.

23

AUGUST.

Barom. Mean height, 29.85 in.; max. 30; min. 29.55 Thermom. Mean at noon, 85, night, 78; max. 90, iniu. 75.

Mean fall 9.9 in. ; average rainy days, 124.

Rain.

Pure

Days of Kadmons

Partne Olenabaj

11 month Bummus.

MEMORANDA.

Finished reading "Chanets, of the Family fof 141. 3 Whinese at meeting. It. Hallow its

hot

ned out Bether with M. Hailon M. Gynte haff died with gout & dropsy- 18-14 Chinese at P. Worstick. Wy

must Read memoir of 6.4. Porter M. 84 "wet to canton. Hayd at Mrs For Finan 21- - Stay'd at Bether Breatinasted with lin.

month

12 month

Espundad

if |

9

9

2 s

10

3 S

4 m

12

12

5 tu

13

13

6 w

14

14

7 th

15

15-

8 f

16

16

9 8

17

10 S

11 m

781

17

18

19

12 tu

20

13 w

14 th

2223

21

22

15 f

23

23

16 6 24

24

17 S 25

25

18 m

26

26

19 tu 27

27

20 w 28

28

21 th

29

1

22 f 30

23 8

24 S

25 m

26

tu

27 w

28 th

5 Gawthaw, Intercalary day

23

19

20

29

30

12 month

2

5

1

6

6 alimen

6 times at & Horship is done th Ted with Capt Ropes

Finish

on

the Fenelon".

met wering at (Dr. Parker's. Night at //i. tight lission meeting at Dr. Ball pered welding Day on the Will + 200pp Visited White Squall & 28hips with stati in Breakfast with Capt. Ropes of the Fene so whines at ? Worship.. ur messing Finished Packers Exercises in Grammar ff. Spant mint at W. Dined at #adison 135 € We is Red

Tex with Wuht. Nervol of Brig Argyle

24

SEPTEMBER, 30 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, VIIIth and Intercalary Moon.

In the month of September, the monsoon is entirely broken up, and north- erly winds begin to blow, but with very little alleviation of the heat. This is the period most exposed to the description of hurricanes called tyfoons, the range of which extends southwards over about one half of the Chinese sea, and northward to the coast of Japan. They have appeared with the greatest severity in the gulf of Tonquin.

Days of Days of

month

moon.

1 m

6

2 tu

7

W

4 th

9

5 f

10

6 s 11

7 8

12

8 m

9 tu

10 w

I th

315 6

16

12 f 17

13 s 18

14 S

19

20

15 m 16 tu 21

17 w

18 th

22

23

19 f 24

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Tyfoon, 1848, the Isabella Robertson foundered. Kiáking died, 1820.

Dr. Morrison arrived in Canton, 1807. Attack on

Kaulung by capt. Elliot, 1839.

Guard of Marines landed in Canton, 1834.

Imogene and Andromache pass the Bogue, 1834.

{Imogene and 4 after the

12th Sunday after Trinity.

News of the treaty of peace reached Hongkong, 1842.

Imogene and Andromache anchored at Whampoa,

1834

Táukwing born, 1781. Canton Press begun, 1835.

Bilbaino burnt, 1839.

R. Thom died at Ningpo, 1846, 13th Sunday

after Trinity.

The Kite, capt. Noble, lost in the Yángtsz', 1840. Captain Anstruther seized, 1840;

Steamer Madagascar burnt, 1841.

20 s

25

26

Steamer Jardine arrived, 1835.

ter Trinity.

14th Sunday af-

23

878333 8 248-~ ~

21 S

22 m

23 tü

21

25 th

26 f

27 s

28 §

50

E

INTERCALARY Eighth MooM.

Nerbudda lost on Formosa, 1841.

Commissioner Lin degraded, 1840. Jewish year

5612, commences.

Morrison Education Society organized, 1836. 15th

Sunday after Trinity.

Imas Dase

Days of

Barom

25

SEPTEMBER.

Mean height, 29.91 in ; ninx. 30 10; mín. 29.70 Thermom. Mean at noon, 83, night, 76; max. 85, min. 70. Rain. Menu fall, 10 94 in. ; average rainy days, 10.

Parce Kuinnes

month ile (month

2 tu

3 w

4 th

5 f

Pervenkro

Parece Shenghai 12 math Empusdad

MEMORANDA.

310 Vint from Capt&etten Cathery & chilidir.

quwalk with Capt Watson

2 = 2

11

16

1

1:3 Fook tea & spent might at the Bether. 1:3 + Mr & Mrs. Tarrant called

{"calls"

Dr. Bow:

/

"the

15- Finind reading 8. B. Taylors life. 1,33,

Follission of the Church"

using it. 2 Chinese services 20410 prosent Went to Canton weight 135 lbs.

"Name" with Capt. Cothey, Watson de Messe Bird & Harlon h

20

9

69

10

15

7 S

18

8 m

12

17

9 tu 13

IN

(0) *

14

19

11 th

15

12 f

16

13 s

17

14 S

15 m

16 tu

20

21

22

9221 =

19

17 w

18 th

19 f

23

1

!

Fine

on

21 - Prayer Munting at Dr. Babes. Stand at 617 ":: - Finished "Shooking" in Chinese - pfen 32 18:3-208,10 Chinese at P. Worship....

24

26

-Tea on ship Naomi unth elles. Gothay

27 Fight & prayer day. Meeting it Happer's- Beckhart mitt Da Holison

20 ×

24

29

21 S

22 m

23

24 w

+

དྨེམསྶགྒt ཐ སྨཱ་ཐཱཧྨཆེ

25 30 30 810 at Chinese meeting

26

27

28

25 th 29

30

26 f

2

1:

6 (swrtham. Interealary dayu

month 1 monthi

27 s

28 S

2

30% 20 at Chinese meeting

20

OCTOBER, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, Intercalary and IXth Moons.

   Northerly winds prevail throughout this month, occasionally veering to north- east or northwest; but the temperature of the atmosphere is neither so cold nor so dry as in the following months; neither does the northerly wind blow so constantly-southerly and easterly winds intervening every now and then. The winter usually sets in with three or four days of sight drizzling rain.

1

Days of Days of

month

moon.

  I w 2h 8

3px

tu

11.

13

14

8 w 9th 15

10 f

16

11917

128

་་་

20

13

t 19

14 tu

15 w 16 th

21

00

17 f

23

18

24

AN

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Tinghái retaken,,1841; - ..

Rev. A. Gonçalves died, 1841.

16th Sunday after Trinity. A.H. Everett commff

4

commissioner of U.S. A. arrived, 1847.

Supplementary Treaty signed at the Bogue, 1843. Comhái Taken 1841.

Lord Napier, died at Macao, 1834.

Halley's comet observed in Canton, 1835. 17th

Sundays after Trinity.

Ningpo occupied by British forces, 1841.

Yukien, imperial commissioner in Chehkiáng,

committed suicide, 1844,

19 S 25

20 m

21 tu

18th Sunday after Trinity

26 Strs. Nemesis and Phlegethon go to Yüyáu, 1841.

27

22 w 23 th

28

24 f

25 s

26 5

27 m

28 tu

29 w

30 th

31f

22

29

2

4

10

6

70

77

58 piratical vessels destroyed by Capt. Hay, 1849.

NINTH MOON. Treaty of Whampoa between France

and China signed, 1844.

In Canton, 1200 houses and 3 factories burnt, 1843.

19th Sunday after Trinity.

Mohammedan year 1268 commences.

Terranova executed by the Chinese, 1822. Admiral

Collier died at Hongkong, 1849.

Day of

month

Barom.

27

OCTOBER.

Mean height, 30.1 in. ; max. 30.20; min. 29.50. Thermom. Mean at noon 77, night, 69; max. 85; min. 57.

Mean fall, 5.5 in.; average rainy days, 5.

Ruin.

Paras Kodmes 3 gooth Afarbest.

I w

5

2 t

3 f

4 s

CO

Paro Shenzhai

1 month

Feverdeen.

7

7

8

5 S

9

6 in

10

10-

71

11

11

8 w

12

12

9 t

13

13

14

10 f

12 S

13 m

19 S

20 m

21

2 W

23

15

16

18

- ཐྭཱ - ལྤཝེཧྨཟླུམྨཀྑཔཏཐཱདྷནམཾ

MEMORANDA.

fork & paitor of N. Caratina callof in the Heighede

evenin

Ship "Matilda"

Went & Canton Stay's at Mas- Sex prith bottlingon's deficie dead, writ Worship in

Jea

130-

revie

the

French. He Low, Mary Bill, the 11 returns from -150 Shops bount is lianton near Factorie

14- West to Cia, ton

15

16-

17

18

fith M.

th. Bradley Hay's at tehinese worshi

20% of Chinese

Miry heft 130 the

19 Want to ti te Pagoda with th. Bradl Finish wet reading Parton's Sketche, pfi # Wint to kanton-Spent night at the Rolie

ކ

123--15 $10 favoris et P. Worship ._

14 t

15 w

19

16 t

20

20

17 f

21

21

18 3

22

23

24

24

25

25

26

27

24 f

25 8

26 S

27 m

2

29 w

30 t

3

3

4

30

29

Stay Ladyed at the Bether with the

20 108 10 persons at P. Worthing

30

3 month 2 month]

Want to to Ii with the. Bradley. It

Wills Rolivets -

A. Berkellary Ball' married. Str

28

NOVEMBER. 30 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, IXth-and Xth Moons:

    The month of November, and the two following are the most pleasant in the year, at least to the feelings of persons from the more northern climates. Though the thermometer is not often below 40, vnd seldom so low as 30 de- green, the cold of a Chinese winter is often very severe. Ice sometimes forms about one eighth of an inch thi this se`usualty in December or January:

  Day of Day of mónth. ↑ indah.

^]...

2.5

10

3 m

4 tu

12

5 w 13

6 th

14

7 f

15

8's

16

9 S

17

10 m

18

11 ta

19

12 w

20

13 h

2A

14 f 29

15 9

23.

16 S

17 m

18 tu

26

19 w

27

20 th

28

21 f 29

22 8

30

23 S

24 m

25 tu

26 w

27 th

28 f

29 5

30 S

001

cr

8

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Factories in Canton burnt, 4822. 20th Sunday

after Trinity.

.

29 war junks destroyed at Chuenpí, 1839.

Anglo-Chinese college commenced at Malacca, 1818.

Truce agreed on at Canton, 1840.

U.S."ship Peacock arrived, 1832. 21st Sunday after Trinity.

Sir Andrew Ljungstedt died, Macao, 1835.

Earthquake at Shanghái, 1847.

22d Sunday after Trinity.

Shanghai opened to commerce, 1843. New empress succeeds, 1834.

Captain Elliot returned from the Pei ho, 1840.

7

TENTH MOON. In Canton, 1400 buildings burnţ,

1835. 23d Sunday after Trinity.

}

General Chamber of Commerce formed in Canton,

1836.

Kishen arrived at Canton, 1841. Society D. U.

Knowledge formed at Canton, 1834.

St. Andrew's. First Sunday in Advent.

29

Day of month

Barom.

NOVEMBER.

Mean height, 30 16; in.; max. 30.55; min. 29.95. Thermom. Mean at noon 67 ; night, 57; max. 80), min. 40.

Mean fall, 241⁄2 in; average rainy days, 3.

Rain.

Parece Kudmees $ month Khordad.

Parace Shenshai

2 month Ardebest.

MEMORANDA.

-15 persons at P. Worship Mh. Harlow began to board at if thinits 9 Went to Frenchtown with M. Bradley-

Ms. Rosa applied for and brympathy - 11- Walked with Mr. Rose to small pagoda 12 Tea at By. Hobson's myth in defeefmily.

10

1 s

6

6

2 S

7

7

3 m

8

8

4 t

9

5 w 10

6 t

7 f

12

B.

13

23

13

9 S

14

10 m

15

15

"

Il t

16

16

12 w

17

17

13 t

19

19

2 2 2 2 ***

14 f

15 8

16 8 21

17 m

19 t

19 w

20 t

21 f

$

Pedy's at M. Roberts Brickfort at Dom Balko

14 Fick in bed with farmer the fox

"

"

Mr Riana lefi Harlow & Bradley

ea

13 Ir. Bradley swild in N. Carolina. for 19-Fick in bed. Maps Ford & Mashow ca

konvalescing.

Gettail, grindey

the couper

Iying

on

f li

visited Barthel & the Comp

B

Went to Canton, Lind with th. Pei

20

20-

21

"/

22

22

23

23

21

24

25

26

26

22

27

23 S

28

28

29

29

30

24 m

25

26 w

* 1 & 2 2

25- Started for Hongking in Fast Boot. on Digestion 21

27 Visited Herscheley

Freund Dr. Lunge wach Visited title. Hanlier, Dirid with Bhp. Smith, Md. Wade, is

30

4 month 3 month he tenid in steamer to Wham four-

27 t

28 f

3

29 s

4

1

2

3

-

-Translated ship charter for dhe, Ronse Attended Revision - Lodged at Roi

30

DECEMBÉK, 31 Days.

Chinese Ist Year, Xth and XIth Moons,

The months of December and January are remarkably free from `rain, the averages fall in each month being under one inch, and the average number of Tainy days being only three and a half. On the whole, the climate of Canton (and more especially that of Macao) may be considcred superior to that of most other places situated between the tropics.

Days of Days of

month.

moon.

9

2. tu

10-

3 w

4 th

12

5 f

13

14.

8 186

9 tu 10 w 11 th

12 f 13

14 S

15 m

16 tu

17 w 18 th

19 f

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Confucius born, B. c. 560. Xavier died on Sáhstán, 1552.

Seizure of opium at Canton, 1838.

Six foreigners killed at Wang-chuh-kí, 1847.

British trade stopped "for ever." E. I. Co.'s last

servant leaves China, 1839.

British consulate at Canton burnt in a riot, 1842.

2d Sunday after Advent.

122 Attempted execution and Mot, in Canton, 1838. 2021 The flag of France rehoisted in Canton, 1832. 23 3d Sunday after Advent.

245

28

289

20 s

278

21 8 289

22 m

23 tu

24 w

25 th

26 f

27 s

28 8

29 m

30 tu

31 w

All Catholic priests (not Portuguese) expelled

Macao, 1838.

Sir Hugh Gough, and the Eastern Expedition, leave

China, 1842.

St. Thomas. 4th Sunday after Advent. ELEVENTH MOON.

Christmas day.

Mr. Stanton released from prison by the Chinese, 1840 First Sunday after Christmas.

30 E.-I. Company chartered, 1690.

Day of month

1 m

2 tu

Barom. Thermom. Rein.

Pume Kudrees 4 month

Teet.

6

31

DECEMBER, ....

Mean height, 30.23 in ; max. 30.35 ; min. 30 15. Mean at noon, 62, night, 52; max. 70; min. 45. Mean fall, 0.93 in.; average rainy days, 34.

Pare Shrash I 3 month Khordad.

MEMORANDA.

Revision meeting. Ledged at. Roberts -Started for Sai Heming Arrived at Sai Heung-

1:

7

3 w

4 th

9

9

5 f

10

10

6.

=

7 S

12

12

OD

m

13

13

9 tu

14

14

10 w 15

15

11 th 16

16

12 f

17

17

13 8

18

18

14 S

19

7 8 9

15 m

20

16 tu 21

Left Sai Hewing via hoopes. Bethell ro Arrived at Whampoa -

19-20 & 6 persons at P. Momohis

French reached at the Bethel 20 - Visited Mr. Many of Sof war "Saratoga " 21 ~ Went to Revision. Lodged at Pro Drobe

17 w 22

22

18 th

23

23

19 f

24

24

20 s

21

S

22 m

23 tu

25

* N N N N

26

Visited ship Grace M. Vegy for Californi Ass started for home. Achime began to 25. Went to board at Mr. Couplers

de faining house - No Chinese meeting Leth. Haflary read English prayers at Be

Capt. Cresty 27 Visited slut flying love! 28- Went to Revision - Lodged at Rot 39 - Mission Meeting

26

29

30

27

28

24 w

29

25 th

30

26 f

27

28 S

3

3

29 m

month 5 month

Signe pela fitis evidence at alle bemit from Mr. Crypis to my novely

Interpreted

6420 pusons at Chinex service

$ +100 boats & 4000 solotiers passed Whampoa te Ko

34

PARSEE CHRONOLOGY.

The æra adopted by the Parsees is called the Era of Yezdejerd, and commences A. D. 632, the year of the accession of Yezdejerd III. to the throne of Persia, and the same in which that kingdom was attacked by the Arabs : the Sassanian dynasty terminated by the successive defeats of this monarch in 636, and afterwards in 641, and his expulsion from the country. There are two modes of calculating this æra adopted by the Parsees, which differ only in one month; the Kudmees reckon time as given in the first column in this Calendar, the Rusmees or Shenshai date it one month later as given in the second column, commencing their year September 27th. The inter- calation of five days at the end of the 12 months of 30 days to complete the year of 365 days is a very ancient mode, introduced by and adopt- ed from the Chaldeans, by the Persians, Medes, Egyptians, Grecians, Romans, and Mexicans, among all of whom they were observed with mirth and feasting. They are collectively called Gawthaws by the Parsees, but each one has its own name, as pellow honooud, beejmo oostooud, teejow uppuntomud, chotho vough khustuther, and packmor vestoyest. - The year A. D. 1751 corresponds to the year 1220 of this æra, euding August 37th,.or September 26th, when the year 1221

commences.

Rat

   The lunar year commencing App is the 1213th of the civil era of the Siamese and Burmese, alfd that beginning May 30th, is the 4394d of their religious year, computed from the death of Budha. The Japanese, Coreans, and Cochinchinese follow the Chinese sexagenary cycle, in calling the present year sin-hai

but each of these nations dates events from the commencement of the reigns of their respective monarchs.

TABLE OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM.

[Time of rota-Time of revolu- on round' tion round the

NAMES.

miles.

Mean di ameter in Mean distance English From the sun

Light

and heat,

their axes

the earth

Sun

(being I.

H. M. S.

D. H. M. $

-A

The Sun,

883,246

25 14

8 0

Mercury,.

3,294

37,000,000 | 10.

528.

87 23 15 13

6,67

Venus,

7,687

68,000,000 0 23

21 22

224 16 49 10)

1,91

The Earth,

7,912

95.000,000 0 23

56 4

365 6 9 12

1

The Moon,

2,180

95,000,000 27 7

43 12

365 6 9 12

1

Mars,

4,189

144,000,000 1 0 37 22

686 23 30 351

0,43

Vesta,

988-

224.340,600

unknown. |

1,325 11 38 24||

Iris,

Junknown

226,000,000

144

1,327 23 22 41

Hebe,

44

230,000,000

1,375 nearly.

Flora,

44

240,000,000

1.469 18 37 19

   Astræa, Juno,.

246,000.000

1,512 nearly.

0,16

1,425 253,598,700

1,593 1 36 28|

·

33

CHINESE ANECDOTES TO INCULCATE A MORAL.

A Large Mouth.

other.

44

One man said,

Two men were telling stories with each "There's a man in our village, whose head reaches to heaven while he stands on the ground." The other said, There's a man in our village large than that; bis upper lip reaches to the clouds, and his lower lip lies on the ground." The other asked, "Where's his body then?" "I have only seen his big mouth," rejoined the latter.

Moral---This last certainly had the thickest cheeks-i. e. no shame.

I didn't see him !

     A foolish lictor was once carrying a criminal to the magistrate's office, who was a Budhist, and as he was starting on his way, lest he' should forget his things and his errand, he carefully noted them all' in two sentences to say over to himself, viz.:-

44

Bundle, umbrella, cangue, Warrant, priest, and I."

As he went along, he repeated these two line every step to him-. self. The priest, seeing his character, got him drunk, then shaved: his hair off, and put the cangue on him, and stealthily fled. - Ọn com- ing to, the lictor said, "Let us wait till I examine whether everything - be right. Bundle and umbrella are here." Feeling on his neck, "the cangue is here too," he says, " and so is the warrant." All at once, half scared, he cries, "Haiya! I don't see the priest !" but just then rubbing the top of his head, he exclaims with glee, "The priest' is still here, but after all I do'nt see myself."

      Moral.-You will say what a fool this man is, but do you know that meṇ show as much folly in blindly running hither and thither in the parsnit of gain all their days, and never studying themselves; till at last, when their plans and life are scattered in the darkness of death, they come to them... selves? This is even greater folly than the lictor's.

The Blinking Cat.

A grimalkin, with eyes half shut, sat mewing and squalling, when two rats seeing her a long way off, said to each other,

"The old cat is becoming reformed; she is saying her prayers to-day; we can go

34

out without fear." They had just left their hole, when puss made a spring and seized one of them, devouring him bones and all. The other jumped back to her fellows, saying, "I just said she had half shut her eyes, and was saying her prayers, and now would have a better heart, and do well; who would have thought she would just then snap up one of us, not even leaving his skull!"

   Moral.-Some will say prayers to do wickedness, and others do no wick- edness even if they do not say prayers.

Beat him half Dead.

   A rich old man one day spoke to a covetous fellow, "I will give you a thousand taels, if you will let me beat you to death." The man thought a good while, and replied, "Will you give me five hundred taels for beating me half dead?"

   Moral. Men brave the winds and waves for money, and often lose their lives, but I guess this man would not just hit it, and only be half killed.

Lacking Rice and a Bed.

   A poor man was boasting to a number of friends, "My family is not so very rich, but I have all sorts of things in it ;" and he began counting them over with his fingers, adding, "There is wanting only the imperial car and phœnix chariot." "There are all kinds of eata- bles too, the only things wanting are a dragon's heart and a phoenix's liver." A boy standing by, knitting his brow, rejoined, "There's no bed in the house, for we sleep on a pallet of straw, and we did'nt have a kernel of rice to-day; and now you're telling these lies before the world." The man lifting up his eyes, added, "Very true, just so; I forgot; there's everything in the house we want, except a phoenix's liver, a dragon's heart, some rice for supper, an imperial car, the phoenix chariot, and a bed to sleep on."

   Moaal. To be poor is not ridiculous, but to be poor and lie so about it is contemptible.

Brothers buying a Pair of Boots.

   Two brothers bought a pair of boots which it was agreed they should wear together. On bringing them home, the younger brother put them on and wore them every day, so that his elder brother had no part of the wear, with which he was not at all pleased, and so got up nights to wear them, going without sleep. The boots in a little while were quite worn out, when the younger

"Let us buy a new pair of boots." The other, knitting his brow, said, "No, unless you will let me sleep nights; if I can sleep, you can do it."

said,

   Moral.-The proverb saith, "In a leaky ship, or on a lean horse, people all fare alike, and get no pity."

35

A priestly Answer.

     A man once went to a temple to cast lots, and asked a Táu priest to divine for him. The priest said, "First lay down the money for the incense, and then the response will be good; but if there be no cash, the answer will not be at all to your liking."

     Moral-If people have no money, who will ever give them a merry an- swer?

Looking at an Album.

A military man, dressed in cotton robes and boots, was visiting at a monastery, the priests of which did not observe much ceremony towards common men. The officer remarked to them, "I see every- thing is very meager and poor in your establishment; if you lack the means for repairing and cleaning it up, you had better bring the temple album, and I will put down something for that purpose." The priest, much pleased, forthwith presented him with a dish of tea, and treated him with the utmost politeness. The visitor wrote in the album four large characters in a row, tsungtuh pú-páng (i. e. the governor-general's): the priest, seeing it was such a high dignitary traveling incognito, became alarmed and made his obeisance with bent knee. He then took up the pencil, and added underneath the title, piau-hiá tso ying kwán-ping (ie. lieutenant-general of the left division). The priest, finding his guest was a soldier, became red with anger, and rose up from his knees. On seeing him add, hí shí sánskih (i. e. gladly contributes thirty), down he went again on his knees, suppos- ing it would be thirty taels of silver; but when he saw him write wan- tsien (i. e. cash), he got up again from his knees, and turned his head away to hide his angry face at such niggardliness.

· Moral.-At first he's no manners, because there's no money;

Then he's civil as pie when he scents out the honey; Now he bows for fear of power,

Then he kneels for hope of more :

All men are pretty much like this.

The man who was anxious about his two-hundredth birthday. An old man, both rich and honorable, whose sons aud grandsons filled his hall, had a large crowd of guests assembled around his door to congratulate him upon his hundredth birthday; but he knit his eyebrows as if he was unhappy, till the crowd asked him what he was grieving at amidst the general joy. "I am not anxious about anything," said he; "only I was thinking that on the anniversary of my two hundredth birthday, there will be many hundreds and thou- sands more guests, and how shall I be able to remember them all?"

Vanal Han sille thus to borrow troublet

36

Deducting two Taels a; Night.

   There was a kind old man, who took pleasure in charitable acts, who one wintry night saw a man sheltering himself under his eaves, and invited him into his house. A glass of warin spirits cheered him up, and he remained through the night, but owing to the snow the host made him stay that day and the next, when the weather clear- ed up.

As he was about to go, he begged of the old man the loan of a knife; taking it up, he said to him, "We did not know each other before, but I am going to destroy this body in order to requite your great kindness." The old man much surprised, stopped him; You would greatly injure me by such a deed, for to have a man die in my house without any reason will waste twelve taels or more money, besides all the trouble." The rogue replied, "I avail of your suggestion; it will not be well to have so much annoyance, just get the twelve taels for me, and I will go.' The old man, greatly provoked, aroused the whole neighborhood with his objurgations, but in order to appease him, gave hiin six taels, sighing as the wretch was going, "Who would have thought I should ever meet such an unconscionable man?" "You do'nt call yourself unreasonable," rejoined the chap, "but say that I am so ; now if you had but a good heart, you would not only have kept me the three nights, but would not have deducted two taels for every night I stopped here, from what I should have cost you if I had used the knife."

-

11.

   Moral. We regard this man as very ungrateful thus to requite the kind- ness shown him, but how many people there are in the world like him! Men are placed in positions of power, honor, influence, and emolument by imperial bounty, who never think of the favors they have received, but requite these benefits by injuring the people, destroying their property, and weakening the authority of the monarch. Parents rear their children with infinite lahor, anxiety, and expense, and how often these sons regard them as enemies, and embitter their declining years with unnatural ingratitude.

"Leaving me only that Wretched Beggar."

   Cháng and Lí were once walking together, when seeing a rich old man coming in his sedan with many slaves, Ching pulled his com- panion aside within a doorway to hide themselves, saying, "The man in that sedan is my hear relative, and if I do not retire from his presence, he will needs get out of it to salute me, which would be very troublesome and inconvenient to him." Lí replied, "Of course, then, you ought to step aside." Going on, in a little while, they saw a man on horseback, followed by many runners whose dress and cap were well arranged; . and Cháng again pulled his friend aside into a

37

doorway, observing, "The gentleman on horseback has been my in- timate friend from boyhood, and if I meet him it will cause him great trouble, for he will certainly stop and get off his horse to salute me." "To be sure then, you ought to withdraw," said Lí. They then both went on, and soon saw a beggar, with tattered garments, and torn cap, bawling out as he came up. Lí, pulling Cháng, and turning aside into a doorway, said, "This miserable beggar is my near rela- tive and intimate friend, and I wish to avoid him, for if he sees me, he will not be at all ashamed of me." This surprised Cháng, whọ said, "Why do you have such sort of friends?" Lí said, "You pick out all the rich and good for your friends, and leave only the empty handed beggars to annoy me, what else can I do?"

Moral. This general practice of currying favor with the rich, and inducing men to despise the low, is very mean: how much more base, when persons lie about it!

The man who wished to be changed into a father.

     An old rich man called his debtor to his house, and told him, " Yoy barebacked beggar; you've nothing with which you can pay me; swear to me how you will repay me in the coming world, and I wiḤ burn the account, and not ask for anything." The mau said, "Į should wish to be changed into a horse, that your honor might ride me till I had paid the whole debt." Upon this, the old man assented; and taking up the bill burned it. Another oue of his debtors com- ing in afterwards, and saying, "I should like to become an ox, and plough the fields, or drag the harrow for my lord, till ny debt was cancelled," he likewise burned his account. Sometime after this, one of his largest debtors remarked to him, that he should like to be changed into his father that he might liquidate his debt. "You not only owe me considerable money, which you will not repay," said the old man, rather provoked, "but you also wish to urge me to de- part from right; what justice is there in this ?"

Just hear me,"

rejoined the man; "I owe you a great amount, and instead of being metamorphosed into a horse or an ox in the next world to repay you, I wished much rather to become your father; the care and labor of a life, without regarding myself, might perhaps accumulate many fields and houses, which I should not think of enjoying myself, but would joyfully give them over to you.

Would not this be settling your debt?"

38

   Moral. When persons have spendthrift children, who dissipate their wealth like "boiling water or melting snow," snch conduct as this old man's is explainable; but it is painful to see an old man growing so foolish.

A dumb Man speaking.

   A certain beggar feigned dumbness, and begged for alms in the streets and markets, pointing with one finger to his clap-dish, and with the other hand to his lips, grunting, Ah! Ah! One day he got two cash, with which he bought whiskey, and drinking it up, said, "Give me a little more whiskey." The rumseller said,

"You come

in here constantly, and have never been able to talk; how is it you can speak to-day?" "I got no money other days, what should make me talk; but I got two cash to-day, and now of course 1 can say something."

Moral. Money nowadays will make most men speak.

Brothers cultivating a Field together.

   Two brothers were partners in cultivating the same field, and when the time of harvest came, and the younger was about dividing the grain, the elder said, "You and I are good brothers, but if we take this petty carefulness about our portions, I am afraid observers will say we are measuring and estimating everything to the loss of harmony and propriety. Let me take the upper part of the grain this year, and you the lower straw part, while next year you can take the upper part, and I will take the lower; and thus alternate year by year." The younger assented. Next year, in the spring, the younger remarked to his brother that it was time to set out the rice shoots, to which he replied, "That is true, but I hear that it is going to be a very dry season this year, and I am decided to plant taro this spring; besides, you agreed to take the upper half of the crop this year, and I the lower part, alternating year by year, which we considered a fair division; and now you must not alter the ar- rangement."

Moral. Those who scheme only for their own benefit and never think of others, are plenty everywhere, and even friends offend each other in this manner; "but who can tell whether Venerable Heaven will let you trifle so with rectitude ?"

39

PAGODAS IN AND NEAR CANTON.

THE term pagoda, now usually applied to the lofty hexagonal storied towers common near Chinese cities, is said to be derived from the Sanscrit word bhagavati, or 'holy house.' By the Portuguese and French writers, the word is still used to designate temples of all kinds in India, Siam, and China; the lofty, storied pagodas being called towers. Many of the temples in India have lofty pyramidal structures attached to them, as in the famous pagoda at Tanjore, and the applica- tion of the term to the Chinese structures was casy and appropriate. English writers, however, have looked chiefly to the towers in China as resembling the Hindu buildings, while continental travelers seem to have paid more regard to the general purposes of the latter establish- inents, and called the temples in this country pagodas. This distinc- tion needs to be attended, to in reading books on China, for a large proportion of the pagodas in China have no temples attached to them. Whether the táh or Chinese pagoda is derived from the Indian structure, or is an original conception of the builders of this country, is a question which has been discussed at some length; we are inclined to think that it is indigenous, and that even the unimagina- tive Chinese architect would have produced something better than the simple nine-storied pagoda if he had tried to imitate the ornate pyrami- dal edifice of the Hindu. The similarity between the two is too slight, and the purposes for which they were erected too unlike, to lead us tò suppose that one was copied from the other. The Chinese táh is. somewhat connected with the Budhist faith, and a few still have mo- nasteries near them; but they are so much more closely related to the geomantic notions of this people, that they are not now much associated with the Budhists. The remark of Rev. Mr. Milne, in refer- ence to the Tower of Ningpo, "that the presence of such an edifice not only secures to the site the protection and favor of heaven if it already bears evidences of enjoying it, but represses any evil influences that may be native to the spot, and imparts to it the most salutary and felicitous omens," at once explains their purpose, and discloses the motive which has impelled the Chinese to erect such apparently use- less buildings.

40

The number of pagodas in China is unknown, and there is some variety in their height and mode of construction, while their general aspect is marked with the same uniformity that attaches to everything architectural in this country. De Gaignes has given drawings of seven, which he visited in his journey to Peking; the highest among them was near Káutáng chau in Shántung, and was eleven stories high. This writer seems at a loss to account for the fact that those erected. near small towns are lower and smaller than those in cities, and sup- poses there may be some proportion demanded by usage between the size of the pagoda and the town; but the difference is owing probably entirely to the greater wealth of the city. This author mentions one of seven stories near Yángchau fú in Kingsú nearly uniform in size to the top, the stories of which were merely divided by three rows of black bricks. He also speaks of many pagodas of five and seven stories in height:-indeed no district town or prefecture is considered to be complete without one of these felicitous structures, and they are probably as numerous as the district towns, though in many cases a cheap brick edifice of five stories is made to insure whatever cf good luck the táh can bring. According to the Chinese local topography. of Kwangchau fú, there is a pagoda in very district in this prefecture, except Hwa hien.

The following account of the pagodas in the vicinity of Canton by à visiter to one or two of them, we introduce in connection with the preceding general observations, assured that our readers will be in- terested in its notices of these structures, which are such prominent objects of sight and curiosity to every one who comes up the Pearl river to the City of Rams.

"It was a cloudy fresh morning in the month of May, when I left Whampoa in company with a friend to visit the Second Bar Pagoda. The tide was in our favor, and as we rapidly drifted by the ships, and found ourselves beyond Blenheim Reach and going down the river, the boatmen began to throw out hints of the proximity of pirates, river thieves, and other evilminded people ; but not a word would we hear of all their misgivings; after a couple of hours' rowing we left the boat in a creek at the foot of the hill on which the pagoda stands, and went ashore at a farmhouse. The workmen in this establishment were a hearty set of fellows, and received us with loud protestations of good- will, asking us a variety of questions, and replying to our inquiries with much good humor. Their dwellings and the buildings for stor- ing the grain, and the farming utensils, were arranged on two sides of a well made threshing-floor, about two hundred feet long. Many

41

boats, apparently connected with the farmstead, lay in the creek, pro- tected by a stout fence of wattles from marauders going up and down the river. The whole boat population came into the floor, and after a few friendly words, we left them to proceed on our way. In passing through an avenue of fine plantain trees, which lay between the floor and the hill, I was led to observe the sagacity of the Chinese in planting this succulent vegetable in a spot where it would have plenty of nourishineat in the driest weather, at the same time that its roots served to strengthen the bank, and its fallen leaves manure the adja- cent fields.

"The pagoda stands on a bluff hill of old red sandstone; the side towards the river is quite precipitous, a narrow path leading up to the top. About half the way up this path, we reached a ledge a rod or more broad, and came to more quarries similar to those at the base, but much more extensive. These excavations showed that the Chi. nese were well acquainted with cutting out freestone. Myriads of tons had been removed, and the wails had been in most cases left perpen- dicular; iu their general aspect, they strongly reminded me of those at Silsilis on the Nile, though here the effects of moisture and vegetation had concealed most of the rubbish.

     "As we mounted the brow of the hill, the landscape began to open upon us, and to increase in beauty as well as extent, so that by the time we had reached the foot of the pagoda, we were fully repaid for the toilsome ascent, and the discomfort of getting wet and missing our path. The pagoda stood alone; not a building, nor anything was near to show that habitations had ever clustered around it; while the old citadel wall a few rods off indicated that this hill had not always been thus lonely. The larger portion of the hill was covered with plats of vegetables and a few fields of rice, raised for the most part ou numerous terraces, which gave the impression of former agricultural Jabors far greater than the present.

"We mounted by the stairs in the walls to the eighth story, meeting here a disjointed human skeleton, the remains of some poor wretch who had probably gone up in this lonely tower to die. The prospect around us was magnificent and picturesque in a high degree. From our lofty point of view, Lintin I. and the city of Canton were both visi- ble, and the pagodas at Whampoa and Canton stood like guardians of the Inner Land. On the east, lay the wide expanse of the Pearl river, here called the Sea of Lions, and more than a mile wide; its further shore was once the scene of mortal strife during the late with England ; and its now peaceful waters were once illuminated by the lurid flames

42

  and explosion of the ship Chesapeake, on which and the raft before it, the Cantonese had fondly trusted for defense against the invaders. South, the barren hills about the Bogue shut out most of the prospect; but on the west and southwest, a plain stretched farther than the eye could reach, rendered picturesque by a succession of rice-grounds and other fields, villages embosomed in groves, and canals and rivulets run- ning in every direction, whose course was apparent in many cases only by the masts and sails of boats peeping out of the rice fields; the whole showing the industry and thrift of the people. Hills bounded the horizon on the north, affording a pleasing transition from the plains in the other direction. Probably more than a hundred villages were in sight, and it was a melancholy reflection that all their industrious inhabitants were ignorant of the God who had spread out this fair expanse of fertility and beauty for their use.

"The stillness around us was the more pleasant in contrast to the noise of the Factories at Canton, and the feeling of repose which this quiet induced was deepened by the sight of the deserted citadel just below us, suggesting the toil and cares of its former human inmates- now all gone. Curiosity was excited to learn something of this ruin, and on since looking into a local topography, I find a few notes respecting it and the pagoda, (usually called the Lien-hwá táh, or Water Lily pagoda,) which may interest other visitors, as they have me.

   "The Shih Li (Stone Whetstone) hill is about a li east of Golden Goose hill; it is 2000 cubits or so high, 10 li broad each way, and surrounded by water, which runs by it on each side, this hill rising abruptly in the centre. Below it is the Sea of Lions, and on its east is a stone precipice, rising high and steep, which resembles a lion in its form; in its bosom is a cave in which tix or seven men can be seated, and a rill runs many hundred feet down it; shis hill thus forms the defense of the Bogne. At this place there is a cliff called Kin-láng, or the Variegated Porch, because it can be paced along like a corridor for a hundred paces or more, and visitors go there and sit, sometimes getting their garments wet by the spray of the streamlet. The geomancers say that it is by five [hills like] beasts which here lock up and obstruct the flow of the waters, that the great sea is warded off from the entrance-a circumstance of great importance to the good luck of the capital. In the time of the Ming dynasty, Páng and Koh, two scholars in the district of Nánhái, took upon then to require rental of this hill, and invited traders to come and cut stone, which wounded the pulse of the ground, and caused sorrow and evil to the literary people around. In the year 15€6, five kijin of the district, named Lí, Liú, Lin, Liáng, and Tsui petitioned the government to prohibit the quarrying of stone, and then they erected a pogoda of nine stories on the summit, called Shih-lior Stone Whetstone pagoda ; it is situated below Whampoa I. and above Tiger 1. In the days of Kánghi,

43

when the coast people were removed into the interior, this place was fixed on as a limit, and a brick citadel was accordingly erected on the boundary line, with a camp and signal-fire tumuli; is now called the Lien-kưá ching, or Lily Flower citadel. Since the second year of Tsungching, in AD, 1 330, for a period of a hundred and more years, the quarries in this hill had been repeatedly opened and shut up ; but latterly miscreants of the place in combination with the traitorous merchant Láu, surreptitiously got stone there as they pleased, the underlings of government receiving bribes therefor, and preventing any one from interfering-thus making the leak in the dam still wider. But in the 29th year of Kienlung, A.D. 1765, Doctor Ling and others petitioned their excellencies the provincial officers, who ordered two tablets to be erected, one in the citadel on the hill and the other in the literary chancellor's office in Canton, prohibiting stone to be taken from the quarries.'

     "From this it appears that this ruin is connected with one of the strangest freaks of despotism recorded in Chinese annals-that of ordering all the inhabitants of the coast to remove thirty miles into the interior to escape the ravages of a pirate from whom the imperial forces could not protect them. This event happened about 1665, so that this wall has stood not far from 180 years; not a vestige of the fire tumuli spoken of are to be seen, nor did we find the tablet ordering the quarries to be shut up, though perhaps a little search might bring it to light. The area inclosed by this wall is a few square rods, and several piles of brick in it, covered with weeds, show where buildings once stood. The pagoda is built of brick throughout; one beam stretches across the eighth story to support a pillar which once projected beyond the top several feet, and was intended to call down good influences from heaven. The total height is 150 feet. It would be a difficult affair to reach the top, and I suspect none of the numerous visitors whosenames are cut in the walls at the lookout window have ever under taken it.

     "At the southern part of the hill is a somall cave, and a solitary Budhist, in the true ascetic spirit of his faith, has taken up his abode in it with a number of gilded idols, whom he serves. The inhabitants of a small town on the southwest no doubt furnish him food and praise enough for his support and encouragement in addition to the produce of his own gardening, to make his life comfortable. Not far from his cell is a singular well or shaft sunk in the rock about forty feet, but though there is water in it, one can not be sure it was dug for a well ; perhaps this is the place where the stone cutters wounded the pulse of the ground,' as the preceding account mentions.

"We returned to our boat by a path which wound around the inland :

clane of the hill Quieving the varios

44

presence of foreigners in this region on shooting excursions after the wild fowl which abounds in these low grounds, has rendered the in- habitants well acquainted with them, so that no one who is disposed need hesitate to refresh himself with a visit to the Second Bar Pagoda.

"As we approached Whampoa, its pagoda formed a prominent object of view, and as it is equally known by name with the other, I make a short extract from the same topography in explanation of its erection. Like that it is built of brick in an octagonal form, but the walls are thicker, and the stairs do not ascend regularly, but are cut in alternate flights on opposite sides. The floors or timbers which mark- ed the several stories inside, and connected these stairways, have long since disappeared, so that now it is necessary to bring a stout plank to lay across from window to window as one goes up, pulling it up after as the ascent is made. The pagoda rests upon a substantial stone plinth, each of its eight sides being marked with one of the mystical diagrams of Fuhhí-in the eyes of the builders, doubtless considered to be essential to the prosperity of the building. It is finish- ed off circularly inside instead of angularly to correspond to the outside; the height is not far from 180 feet. The native account of the Hái Ngáu táh for the Whampoa Pagoda is as follows:- In the southeastern part of the district of Pwányü thirty lt from Canton an island rises out of the river, about a hundred cubits high, having ether hillocks on it, like guitars in shape. In the reign of Wanlih of the Ming dynasty, A. D. 1598, Kwoh Fi, Wang Hioh-tsang, and Yang Sui-yun, officers of the Imperial Banqueting House, requested permission of the lieutenant- governor and treasurer to build a nine storied pagoda, which standing prominently in the midst of the waters, would greatly add to the view. They named it Hải-ngáu táh, or the Sea Whale pagoda; on the north a hall was built for Shangtí, and on its side a monastery called the Hái-ngáu sz'. The governors Tai Yáu and Chin Tá-ko, with the two fúyuen Kú and Liú, also subscribed for its erection.'.

66

   "The buildings here mentioned are now deserted by the priests, and so dilapidated, that they are hardly inhabitable; while the grounds about them, the walls, gateways and everything else, shows neglect. and poverty-weeds having taken the place of flowers, and disorder of neatness and regularity. Ruin and solitude seem to be more in harmony, however, with these relics of olden time, and notwithstanding the zeal of some devout people, it is likely that the pagoda and its precincts will gradually become more neglected and ruinous, though it does not show symptoms of immediate falling.

From the Whampoa pagoda the Halfway pagoda stands in a wes- terly direction, by the side of a small creek, called Lob creek by the

45

   seamen, through which they sometimes pass to shorten their way in going up to Canton. This pagoda is surrounded by fields and habita- tions, and has not the neglected air of the other two, though like them its brick walls are crumbling, and low shrubbery on the projecting rooflets shows the progress of dilapidation. Its stairways are built like the Whampoa pagoda, and it is about the same height. I also subjoin a short extract coucerning the Chik Káng táh from the same work which has furnished the preceding :-

     "The Red Stone Knoll is more than ten li south of Canton; it is red like cinnabar. The geomancers says there is a precious thing below it. In the days of the Tang dynasty, a man from the Fú-nán kingdom

(Annám ?) wished to buy it for ten thousand pieces of money, but the prefect replied, 'It is the hill which protects the southern region, and can not be parted with.' In the reign of Tienki of the Ming dynasty (A.D. 1621-28) Li Shi-wan, a scholar of the district of Nánhái, took the lead in building a pagoda on the top of it in order to protect the river entrance to the prefecture and city; it is commonly called the Chik Kang tahor Red Knoll pagoda. There was once a Budhist temple and pavilion to the God of Lite- rature near it, and scholars often collected there to study and write, but these are now all destroyed."

'In 1837, the gentry of Canton circulated a subscription paper for the purpose of raising funds to repair and beautify this and the Wham- poa Pagoda, but all their zeal only about a thousand dollars were rais- ed, with which the progress of decay was somewhat delayed. The reasons for this appeal to the piety of their countrymen are set forth in the following circular issued at the time :-

"Fellow-countrymen! The region of country southeast of the provincial city, on account of its water-courses, has an important influence on the for- tunes of the inhabitants. From an examination of old records it appears, that the pagoda on Pachau, and the adjacent temple dedicated to the mon- sters of the sea, were built in the twenty-fifth year of Wanleih (1598); and that the pagoda at Chihkáng, and the temple there consecrated to the god of letters, were founded in the reign of Tienki (about 1621); all these structures have had a most happy influence on everything around them, causing the number of literati to be very numerous, and the productions of the soil most abundant. Recently, however, the winds and the rains, driving furiously, have broken down the tops of the pagodas, and laid the temples in ruins, and injur- ed even their foundations. Their appearance now is very unsightly; they ought to be repaired, in order to secure the return of happy and prosperous times. The pagoda on the north of the city, which rises five stories high and has its walls painted red, a color which is from its very nature productive of fire, ought also to be repaired, and painted with some other color. Already we have obtained the permission of their excellencies, the governor in council,

46

to proceed with the contemplated repairs, and also recommendatory papers in which they advise the people to assist in accomplishing this work. It being an affair which greatly concerns both our honor and prosperity, we have a right to expect, fellow-countrymen, that you will heartily coöperate, joyfully and promptly contributing, little or much according to your ability, so that by, our united efforts the repairs may be soon undertaken, and the buildings rise again to their former splendor! Then, according to your deeds of merit, the gods will send prosperity, and your glory and virtue will be become great beyond comprehension. A special solicitation.'

   "The two pagodas within the walls of the city of Canton are not as conspicuous to persons coming up the river as their height would indicate, in consequence of the intervening city walls, masts, flagstaffs, &c., which partly hide them. They are seen to good advantage, how- ever, from the hills north of the city. The Kwáng táho Plain Pagoda, as it is commonly called, is remarkable, as it shows the wealth and power of the Mohammedans in Canton at the time it was erected, about a thousand years ago. The Mohammedans still reside in its neighborhood, and maintain a mosque for their religious services, which surrounds the base of the pagoda, it rising like a minaret from the centre. The Manchú garrison is also stationed in this quarter. The account of the Plain Pagoda given in the Kwángchau Chi is very meager, but I insert it :-

   "The Hwai Shing szor Remembering-the-Holy Monastery, is situated within the city, and was built during the Táng dynasty by fo- reigners; it can be ascended by circuitous stairs. It is 165 cubits high. In the days of Ming, Abdallah, a foreign officer lived here with seventeen families. On the summit was a golden cock, which turned with the wind, and every year the foreigners used to go up to the top of it during the fifth and sixth moons about four o'clock in the morning, and call out with a loud voice, praying to the weathercock. In 1388, a tyfoon threw down the golden cock, which was carried to the imperial treasury, and a copper one put up in its place; this was thrown down, and a [wooden] gourd put up, which was again thrown down in 1670.

   "If this notice is complete as regards it serection, it shows that the structure must be very solidly built, to have resisted the effects of climate and time; and though a few shrubs can be seen growing on the upper part, it is not ruinous. Not far from it stands the Hwá táhor Flowery Pagoda, as it is called for distinction's sake, but as no foreigner can go in and see these erections, I can only give the native account, from which it appears that the Flowery Pagoda is a very ancient edifice, though not so old as its fellow :-

"The Tsing Wei sz'

(i. e. Placid Intelligence Monastery) is

situated in the northwest part of Canton, under the jurisdiction of the Nanháj magistrate. In the time of the Eastern Hán (A.D. 25-190), the Longevity Monastery was erected on the spot, and a neice of the Imperial house of Liú dwelt there as a nun. In the reign of Tåtung (A.D. 537), the lama Tányü erected a pagoda here to hold a relic, and called the edifice the Precious Dig- nified Monastery ; this was recorded in a tablet put up about the year 620 by Wang Poh. In 988, the name was changed to Taing Wei; at this date the pagoda was dilapidated. About the year 1090, Lin Siú, the deputy district magistrate of Páukí in Shensí, took the lead in giving funds for rebuilding it. He had fixed the limits of the ground, when a god appeared to him in a dream and told him to make the place broader; so he made it 45 cubits broad; on digging, he came to an ancient well, and found nine rings spread around the wall just where he had measured to build, and a huge tripod in which were discovered three swords and a mirror shining as bright as a newly buried Bud- ha's tooth; under these the foundations of the old pagoda were recognized. He collected laborers and procured tiles, and raised it 207 cubits, calling it the Tsing Wei monastery and Thousand Budhas' Pagoda. In the reign of Shaushing (A.D. 1095), the minister Sú Tungpo coming here called the monastery the Six Banians; and in 1374, half of it was taken down to erect a granary ; two years after, the abbot Kienyü built a Budhist temple on the east side of the pagoda, and changed the gate of the monastery to the east, ordering the priest Kin-pien to fast there very strictly. At present, the monastery receives the rental of about 240 acres. Next to the Kwáng-háu sz,' or Bright Filial monastery, this is the most ancient in Canton.'

"A native friend tells me that the baniaus mentioned in this notice still exist, but I suppose this assertion is to be taken like the legend given of the mulberry tree near Cairo, under which the Virgin rested when she came into Egypt from her flight out of Judea-namely, that other bunian trees stand where they did; for since the famous poet Sú Tungpo came to Canton, it has been sacked twice, and almost burned to ashes. These trees are, I think, cherished for the sake of the poet, aud it is pleasant to find that in China too, genius can hallow spota in the eyes of posterity. The Hưá tảh is a good deal out of repair, and the citizens are no longer allowed to ascend it as formerly to enjoy the prospect, lest accidents occur.

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These five are all the pagodas visible when ascending the Pearl river, but according to the same work from which I have before quoted, there are fifteen others in this department alone, of which I have seen only the one near Hiáugshán town, a lofty spire nearly 200 feet high perched on a hill fully 500 feet above the river, and forming one of the most conspicuous objects in that region. On asking a na- tive friend the reason why none have been built during the present dynasty, he says the fung-shwui doctors, or geomancers, now decry.

48

  them as bringing ill luck, and that they have gone out of fashion in these days. People now erect wan tábor literary pagodas, three stories high, and dedicated to the God of Literature, whose im- age is usually found enshrined in them. This, he remarks, indicates the literary taste of the present day, but I tell him I think it proves the poverty and want of spirit of the people nowadays to be content with a wan pih or mere writing-pencil, which it is modeled after and usually called, while their ancestors put up solid structures two hundred feet high, and calculated to last a thousand years."

NOTICES OF THE VILLAGES

BETWEEN CANTON AND WHAMPOA,

AND IN THE VICINITÝ OF WHAMPOA.

I-Villages on the North side of the River.

Lip-tak. This village is built on both banks of a deep creek which runs up from the north side of the river. In front of the village stands a stone fort named Tung-un Páu-toi

the surname Li 李

from which the Barrier runs across the river to the opposite shore. Some of the guns are brass pieces, weighing from 4000 to 5000 lbs. Lip-tak contains between 6000 and 7000 inhabitants, principally of There are also a few families of the surnames Leung, and Lau . There are but few shops in the village, most of the inhabitants being farmers, or engaged in trade at the provincial city. There are twelve or more ancestral halls, eight schools on the east side of the creek, and two on the west.

of Lam

2.

Ching-kái

This is the first village east of Lip-tak. It is approached by a stone walk, along the bank of a small creek. The number of inhabitants is 2000, who are mostly engaged in agricul ture. There are no shops in the village, all the buildings being family residences of ancestral nalla. The principal surnames are Sin and Li, the members of the Li clan have three ances- tral halls, and those of the Šín, two. There are only two schools, One containing fourteen boys, the other six.

+

49

Tong-há Hu# or the market-place of Tong-há

village, where markets are held nine days in each month, lies nearly opposite the Whampoa Pagoda. It has forty shops, a few dwelling- houses, a school of fourteen boys, and one temple. There are here four or five kilns for burning lime from oyster shells.

Tong-há Village

is situated about one mile from the river, and is approached by a winding stone-walk from the bank. There are 4000 inhabitants of the surnames Chung

and Leung

Pún Lí

           Farming is the principal occupation of the in- habitants. A government salt dépôt is stationed here to supply the

neighborhood.

Che-pi

Chepi車

A village opposite Whampoa Pagoda, having from 8000 to 10,000 inhabitants of the surnames Sú Leung

and Wong. There are top, ancestral halls and ten schools; seven large kilns for burning brick and tiles, and a government salt dépôt, are also attached to the village. There are but few shops, the houses being principally family residences.

    Tung-pd. This market town is directly opposite the Whampoa Pagoda, and five minutes walk from Ché-pí. There are more than two hundred shops, two schools, several gambling shops, and ten furnaces for making lime. The village is approached from the river by a stone walk, 300 yards in length. At its termination near the village, a high granite bridge is thrown over the creek.

"Lite-

    Shek-kong. A market place opposite the east end of Whampoa island. There are 500 inhabitants, a Man táp, or rary Pagoda," fifty shops, and one school of fourteen boys. A number of the inhabitants are engaged in the fisheries below the Bogue. In October, 1849, a party of marines from an English man-of-war, aided in extinguishing a fire in this village which destroyed thirty or forty buildings. This generous deed is still remembered by the villa- gers with gratitude.

Mau-kong茅岡 Mau-kong

A cluster of hamlets one mile north of Shek- kong. There are 4000 inhabitants, principally of the surname of Chau, mostly employed in farming. There are two schools, and several ancestral halls. In the neighborhood of the village are many pleasant walks.

II.-Villages on Whampoa Island.

Pi-pú Chau is situated near the centre of Whampoa

е

e early)

the close

Ün

50

  Island, east of the Pagoda; there are about 4000 inhabitants, principally of the surnames of Tsu and Cheng. The major- ity are farmers, or engaged in business at the provincial city; the Tsü clan reside on the north side of the village, the Cheng clan on the south. Each clan has ten or more ancestral halls. There are twenty schools; the buildings are principally family residences. From the landing-place on the south shore, there is a granite walk to the door of the Pagoda.

Wong-po This town, called by foreigners "Whampoa

黄浦 Town," is one mile east of Pi-pá Chau village, and has from eight to nine thousand inhabitants.

The principal surnames are Fung, Leung, U and Li The Fung clan, which now numbers about 4000, came from Nanking, and settled at Whampoa during the Ming dynasty, There are from twenty to thirty schools, and several costly ancestral balls belonging to each clan. The buildings on the street parallel with the river are mostly occupied by compradors, and others employed by the foreign shipping. Many wealthy persons reside in this town, who have amassed property by their trade with foreigners; the prin- cipal landing-place is a granite wharf twelve feeX in width, leading

day and the

新洲

from the shore to the old custom-house office. On the low hills be- tween Whampoa and På chau village are extensive burying grounds. San Chau, or New Town. A market village built in 1847 at the eastern point of Whampoa, for the convenience of trade with foreign shipping. There are 200 small buildings beside those in the dock-yards formerly owned by Amoon. Only a hundred of these shops are now occupied. The population is about 600, not including those living in boats. There are two schools, but no temple or ancestral hall, the inhabitants having come from various parts of the province to engage in trade. The shops rented are occupied by persons of thirty-two different trades. The rent of shops is from one to four dollars per month.

III.-Villages on Dane's Island.

   Cheung-chau Market. This cluster of small buildings, called by foreigners "Bamboo Town," is built on the N. E. shore of Dane's island. Number of inhabitants about 1500, not including boat population. There are 200 shops, most of which are occupied, three temples, one school, and a custom-house office. Articles of Chinese manufacture sought by seamen are for sale in the shops.

Cheung-chau Upper

is on the S. W. side of Dane's

t

51

island, about one mile distant from "Bamboo Town." It is approach- ed on the west side by a stone walk 540 yds. in length from the river to the village gate. There are 2500 inhabitants, principally of the surname of Tsang; five schools, about twenty shops, ten ancestral halls, and one temple. A small three story pagoda stands outside of the village on the west side. The greater part of the villagers are employed in agriculture; a few are traders at the provincial city.

Cheung-chau lower

A village on Dane's island about

a quarter of a mile south of Bamboo Town. It was first settled in the Sung dynasty. There are now 2,000 inhabitants of the surnames Tsang and Tang There are six ancestral halls, twelve shops, three schools, and a small three story pagoda. Between this village and Bamboo Town are several bongs of the Chinchew merchants who formerly did business in Macao; the villagers are accustomed to see foreigners, and are civil in their deportment.

IV. French Island.

There

    Kam-tengor Golden Tripod, is the only village on French Island, and is called "French Town" by foreigners. There are five thousand inhabitants, of the surname Ling, with a few hun- dreds of the surnames Léung Lau

and I'm

                  嚴 are ten or more ancestral halls, fifteen schools, fifty shops, and eight establishments for manufacturing sugar from the sugar cane. The dwelling-houses are built more substantially, and the exterior finished more neatly than in other Chinese villages. Many of the villagers retain considerable ill will towards foreigners. One of the burying places for foreigners is northwest from this village on a hill over- looking the river.

V.-Villages on Lun-tau Island.

    Pak-shán. A village directly south of the Whampoa nine story Pagoda, situated on an island south of Whampoa Island. The access to the village is by a graveled walk three quarters of a mile in length from the river to a stone bridge. On each side of the walk are groves of orange, laichí plantain, and wongpí trees, watered by artificial canals. The number of inhabitants is 2,000, principally of the surname Mok; a few families of the surname Im 嚴 The village is divided into two clusters of houses-viz., eastern and west- ern. There are ten ancestral, halls, three schools, and three shops. The villagers are princpally farmers, or engaged in foreign trade. They are all civil, and a few friendly and hospitable.

Lun-tau

52

e·2,000 inhabitants

A village nearly south from Whampoa Pagoda, and separated from Pak-shán by several high hills, over which there is a narrow path from village to village. There are of the surname Lai with a few famílies of the clan Mok The village contains ten ancestral halls, three temples, seven schools for boys, one for girls, and forty shops. There is a mud fort east of the village mounting thirty guns, with a garrison of one hundred men; six of the guns are of enormous size.

VI.-Kún-chau Island.

   Kún-chau, a village on the south side of the second island, derectly north of Whampoa Pagoda. There are 2,200 inhabitants of the surname of Chan. It contains three ancestral halls, three schools, and three temples. The village is built on the sides and summit of a hill, gradually rising from the river's side, the streets are poorly paved. The villagers are employed in agriculture, are civil in demeanor, and kindly disposed. There are three boys in the vil- lage who are deaf and dumb; the eldest of whom, aged 12 years, is quite a skillful draughtsman.

VII. ---Villages on Siú Kuk-wai

.

Chek-hom. The landing place is opposite the S.W. corner of French Island, from thence a path bordered by fields of peas and other vegetables, leads to the village about a third of a mile distant. There are 1,800 inhabitants, mostly of the surname Léung

, also a few families of the Lam and Uclans. There are three ancestral halls, two temples, twelve shops, and four schools. The villagers are principally farmers, quiet and friendly in their demeanor.

Kwok-ká long 郭家廊 an inland village, situated near the

  centre of the island of Siú Kuk-wai, one mile or more south east from Kún-chau. There are 1,000 inhabitants of the surname of Kwok

   . In the village are several ancestral halls and two schools; also several artificial fish ponds. The walls of the houses are mostly built of earth, and the streets are filthy. The inhabitants are principally farmers, and are civil and hospitable.

Nám-pò, a village on the island of Siú Kuk-wai, east of Kún-chau. The path from the landing to the village gate is 500 yds. in length, leading through a grove of laichí and large banyan

trees.

There are 600 inhabitants of the surname 'Ng. The vil-

$

53

age contains three ancestral halls, two temples, one school, and five shops. It was settled near the close of the Ming dynasty. The vil- lagers are principally quiet and civil farmers. One of the old residents, who wears a flowing beard full fifteen inches in length, speaks a little English, and has visited Bombay, Ceylon, and Calcutta.

Nám-teng a village on the southwest side of Siú Kuk-wai

南亭 island, about one mile south of Pak-teng by land. There are 4,000 inhabitants of the surnames Kwan Sung and Wong; half

of whom belong to the Kwán clan, which has an ancestral hall near the landing-place, 150 ft. wide in front;-surrounded by a brick wall near the hall, is a three storied pagoda. The Sung clan live in a cluster of houses west of them, and number 1,000; the Wong clan live on the east, in a small hamlet apart by themselves. Each of these last have two ancestral halls. There are but four schools in the village, and twenty or thirty shops. The inhabitauts are far- mers, friendly and civil.

Pak-tang. A village on the island of Siú-kuk Wai, about half a mile southwest of Kún-shán. It has 6,000 inhabitants, of the surnames Leung Chan and Chui, ten ancestral balls, three temples, ten schools, and fifty shops; a number of the dwelling-houses have oyster shell walls. The ancestral hall of the Leung clan at the entrance of the village, and one of the Chan clan on the south side, are the best built of the halls; each is 150 ft. wide in front The hall of the Léung clan has a door tablet which was made in the reign of the Emperor Manlik, a. d. 1573. The town is divided into two bamlets, The one nearest Kun shán is named the other Long-mi. The inhabitants are mostly employed in agriculture, quiet in their demeanor, and civil in their deportment to strangers. Large cultivated fields spread beyond the south and west sides of the village.

Chung-hau

Pak-nai Chung

village on the island of Siú-kuk Wai, about half a mile west of San-tsú, on the opposite side of the river.

There are 4000 inhabitants of the surnames Fok Kwán A SiúWong and Lai. Many of the villages are employed in manufacturing oil from the groundnut. There are in the village ten or more ancestral halls, ten schools, two temples, and one three storied Pagoda. Some of the dwelling-houses are neatly built, and from the highest window in the Pagoda the village has a fine appear. The villagers are civil, but not accustomed to see foreigners, Púi-kong, a village on the island of Siú Kuk-wai, south-

ance.

54

west from French island, and nearly south from Whampoa town. It has 3000 inhabitants of the surnames of Shiú Pún and Leung. The inhabitants are principally farmers, but there are several literary graduates among them, the number of scholars being large for such a retired village. There are half a dozen ancestral halls, seven schools, and eight or ten shops. The stone path from the landing to the village is 1100 yards in length. Not much can be said for the villagers as regards their goodwill towards foreign- ers; there are many opium smokers, and not a few lawless fellows among them.

San-háng

A small village on the island Siú Kuk-wat west from French island. It is approached from the river by a stone walk 400 yards in length. There are 300 inhabitants of the surname of Léung. One ancestral hall, one school, but no shops. There are two brothers aud a sister in this village who were born deaf and dumb, the eldest is twenty years of age. The inhabitants are prin- cipally farmers and are rather poor.

Sz-ká shán

H. A village on the island of Siú Kuk-wai,

north east from Tai-shek tau. There are 1,000 inhabitants of the

Tang

surnames Sung contains five ancestral halls manufactories, but no shops.

Yan and 'Ng. The village

and one school; four ground-nut oil The dwelling-houses are poorly built, and much dilapidated. The people however are friendly and hos- pitable. The shortest way of access is to land at Chek-hòm wharf, and follow a gravel walk which leads to the village.

Tái-lóng. A village on the island of Siú Kuk-wai, about 800 yds. south from Kún-shán, from which village a narrow path leads to it through fields of sugar-cane, rice, and vegetables. The path commences in Kunshán at the public hall, and leads up a gradual ascent to Tai-long. There are 1600 inhabitants of the surname of Lai, three ancestral halls, and two temples. In the village are six schools, and one sugar mill in which a dozen bullocks are employed to drive the stones. There are half a dozen shops, the people being principally farmers, very civil and friendly in their treatment of strangers.

Tai-páng. A village on the island of Siú Kuk-wai, about half a mile S. W. of San-háng. There are 1000 inhabitants of the surnames Wong Li and Lam, three ancestral halls, one school, two shops, one temple in which three Budhist priests re- side. The inhabitants are principally tillers of the soil-civil and

55

good natured in their behavior. There is one deaf mute in the vil- lage. Strained honey is sold here at 10 cts. per catty.

Tai-shek tau

             A large village S. W. from Blenheim Reach-opposite the market town of San-tsd,-on the island of Siú Kuk-wai. There are 7000 inhabitants of the surnames Lam # Wong and Luk; the first, the most numerous, came from Fuhkien during the Sung dynasty. The are fifteen or more ancestral halls, five temples, ten schools, and about twenty shops. The in- habitants are farmers, or engaged in the manufacture of pea-nut oil. The ground-nuts are not only raised in the neighborhood of the vil- lage, but are brought from other districts in the province and from the province of Kwongsai.

VIII.-Villages on Tai Kuk-wai.

Shá-lú V. A village south from Blenheim Reach on Tái Kuk- wai. It is approached by a granite walk 900 yds. in length from the landing to the village gate. The principal surnames are Wat Li Sú There are 5,000 inhabitante, twelve ancestral halls, eight schools, twenty shops, and a three story Pagoda in the west side of the village, built six years ago at a cost of $700. The villagers are principally engaged in farming and fishing.

    Tung-pin tan. A village on Túi Kuk-wai adjoining Shá-lú on the south side. The principal surname is Li . There are about 1800 inhabitants, two schools, several well built ancestral halls, two temples, and thirty shops. The people are civil and friendly.

Pák-tong há. A village south from Blenheim Reach on Tái Kuk-wai-the second village from Shá-lú. The principal sornames are Lau and Li. There are 2500 inhabitants, many of whom are employed in the salt junks. There are two temples, one three story pagoda, twenty or thirty shops, and five schools.

   Tai-hái từ A village on Tái Kuh-oai, the fourth village from Shá-la wharf. The principal surnames are Lau From Pák-tóng to Tái-kải, it is 450 yds.

Sai-kü

and Li

A village on Tái Kuk-wai, the fifth from Shá-lú

wharf, and one mile distant by the road. The principal surnames are

Lau Wong Pún

and Ho J. There are 4,000 inhabi-

tants, eight schools, and fifty or more shops. The distance from

Tái-kái to Sai-hü is 450 yds. by the path.

San-tso A market town 8. W. from Blenheim Reach,

新造

on Thi_Knkomi

It is the residence of the chief magistrate of the

50

township of Kautong Sz'. There are 6000 inhabitants, and ten schools. The principal surnames are Lai and Wan. A market is

held every five days.

Shi-tau

A village on Tai-kuk Wai a short distance west.

of San-tsú. It has 4000 inhabitants of the surnames Hán

羅,

Lo

   蔣 Tséung and Chan. There are fifty shops, several tem- ples, and sereral establishments for the preparation and sale of beans,

that are grown in large quantities in the neighborhood. A ferry

boat-runs regularly to Nám-teng on the opposite side of the river.

Shek-sz' Tau

A village on Tai-kuk-wai, southeast from the Second Bar Pagoda. It has a population of about 6000, of the surname of Chan. There are ten schools, upwards of one hundred shops, and several large ancestral halls. A market is held here four days in each month. A winding creek, opening into the river below the Pagoda, leads to the village. The villagers are not accustomed to foreigners, and some of the lower class do not hesitate to treat them rudely.

These thirty-eight villages all belong to the townships of Lukpo and Káutong, but do not comprise all the villages within the limits of these two townships. The district of Púnyü, which extends from Canton to the Bogue, is subdivided into four sz' or townships, besides the region near the capital itself. Each of these townships is presided over by a tsun-kím sz', or supervisor of townships, to whom is com- mitted the regulation of general affairs relating to the wellbeing of the villages.

        He communicates and consults with the gentry and elders of each village, and reports upon taxes and other matters to the district magistrate. The total population of the thirty villages, according to the estimate of the inhabitants themselves, is about 117,000, the great majority of whom are engaged in agricultural pursuits. The land is very fertile, much of it producing three crops annually, the third one being usually a crop of vegetables transplant- ed into the field after the second crop of rice has been reaped in November. The total number of schools is reckoned at 222, includ- ing three for girls; the average attendance is probably about 15 to each school.

ANECDOTES OF FILIAL DUTY.

>

THESE instances of filial duty are very celebrated among the Chi- nese, and have done much to assist parents aud teachers in enforcing parental authority. All of the persons lived in ancient times, and their deeds have furnished many illustrations to poets and painters, and encouragement to the most humble in practicing obedience. It will be noticed that the practical character which runs through Chinese morals is seen in these anecdotes-almost every instance exhibiting some simple way in which love to parents can be shown.

The Filial Piety that influenced Heaven.

YC SHUN, the son of Koo Sau, had an exceedingly filial disposition: his father, however, was stupid, his mother perverse, and his younger brother Siang very conceited. His actions are related in the Shang Shoo, in the Chung Yung, and in the works of Mencius. Those who speak of him say, that Shun cultivated the hills of Leih (in the pro- vince of Shansi), where he had elephants to plough his fields, and birds to weed the grain. So widespread was the renown of his virtue, that the emperor Yau heard of him, and sent his nine sons to serve him, and gave to him two of his daughters in marriage; and after- wards resigned to him the imperial dignity.

          Affection showed in tasting Soups and Medicines. THE emperor Wăn of the Han dynasty, the third son of his father Kautson, was appointed prince over the country of Tại.

                                      His own mother Poh was queen-dowager, and Wăn was sedulous in his atten- dance upon her. She was ill for three years, during which time his. eyelids did not close, nor was the girdle of his dress unloosed; and she took none of the soups and medicines prepared for her till he had tasted them. 'This benevolence and filial affection was heard of throughout the empire.

           Gnawing her Finger pained his Heart DURING the Chau dynasty there lived a lad named Tăng Tsan (also called Tszeyu), who served his mother very dutifully. Tsing was in the habit of going to the hills to collect faggots; and once, while he

59

was thus absent, many guests came to his house, towards whom his mother was at a loss how to act. She, while expecting her son, who de- layed his return, began to gnaw her finger. Tsăng suddently felt a pain in his heart, and took up his bundle of faggots in order to return home; and when he saw his mother, he kneeled and begged to know what was the cause of her anxiety. She replied; 'There have been some guests høre, who came from a great distance, and I bit my finger in ̈ order to arouse you to retura to me.'

Clad in a single Garment he was obedient to his Mother. DURING the Chau dynasty lived Min Sun (afterwards known as Tsze Hien), who in early life lost his mother. His father subsequent-. ly married another wife, who bore him two children, but disliked Min., In winter she clothed him in garments made of rushes, while her own, two children wore cotton clothes. Min was employed in driving his father's chariot, and his body was so cold that the reins dropped from his hands, for which carelessness his father chastised him; yet he did not vindicate himself [but bore the injury in silence]. When his father knew the circumstances, he determined to divorce his second wife; but Sun said, 'Whilst mother remains, one son is cold; if mother departs, three sons will be destitute.' The father desisted from his purpose; and after this, the mother was led to repentance, and became a good and virtuous parent.

He carried Rice for his Parents.

In the Chau dynasty lived Chung Yu, named also Tszeloo, who; because his family was poor, usually ate herbs and coarse pulse; and he also went more than a hundred le to procure rice for his parents. Afterwards, when they were dead, he went south to the country of T800, where he was made commander of a hundred companies of chariots; there he became rich, storing up grain in myriads of meas- ures, reclining upon cushions, and eating food served to him in nu- merous dishes; but sighing, he said, ' Although I should now desire to eat coarse herbs and bring rice for my parents, it cannot be !'

      With sports and embroidered Garments he amused his Parents. In the Chau dynasty there flourished the venerable Lai, who was very obedient and reverential towards his parents, manifesting his dutifulness by exerting himself to provide them with every delicacy. Although upwards of seventy years of age, he declared that he was not yet old; and usually dressed himself in party-colored embroidered

69

   garments, and like a child would playfully stand by the side of his parents. He would also take up buckets of water, and try to carry them into the house; but feigning to slip, would fall to the ground, wailing and crying like a child and all these things he did in order to divert his parents.

:

With Deer's Milk ke supplied his Parents.

In the time of the Chau dynasty lived Yen, who possessed a very filial disposition. His father and mother were aged, and both were afflicted with sore eyes, to cure which they desired to have some deer's milk. Yen concealed himself in the skin of a deer, aud went deep into the forests, among the herds of deer, to obtain some of their milk for his parents. While in the forests the hunters saw him, and were about shooting at him with their arrows, when Yen disclosed to them his true character, and related the history of his family, with the reasons for his conduct.

He sold himself to bury his Father.

DURING the Han dyasty lived Tung Yung, whose family was so very poor, that when his father died he was obliged to sell himself in order to procure money to bury his remains. After this he went to another place to gain the means of redeeming himself; and on his way he met a lady who desired to become his wife, and go with him to his master's residence. She went with Tung, and wove three hun- dred pieces of silk, which being completed in two months, they returned home; and on the way, having reached the shade of thẹ cassia tree where they met before, the lady bowed and ascended upwards from his sight.

.

He hired himself out as a Laborer to support his Mother. In the time of the Ifan dynasty lived Kiang Kih, who when young, lost his father, and afterwards lived alone with his mother. Times of commotion arising, which caused them much distress, he took his mother on his back and fled. On the way, he many times met with companies of robbers, who would have compelled him to go with thein and become a baudit, but Kiang intreated them with tears to spare him, saying that he had his aged mother with him; and the robbers could not bear to kill him. Altering his course, he came into the district of Hiápei, extremely impoverished and reduced, where hẹ hired himself out and supported his mother; and such was his dili- gence that he was always able to supply her with whatever she

personally required

60

He fanned the Pillow and cooled the Mat.

In the Han dynasty lived Hwang Hiáng, who when only nine years old, lost his mother, whom he loved so ardently and remembered so strongly, that all the villagers praised his filial duty. He was employ- ed in the severest toil, and served his father with entire obedience. In summer, when the weather was warm, he fanned and cooled his father's pillow and bed; and in winter, when it was cold and chilly, with his body he warmed the coverlet and mat. The magistrate sent him an honorary banner as a mark of distinction.

The Gushing Fountain, and the Frisking Carp.

In the Han dynasty lived Kiang She, who served his mother with perfect obedience; and his wife Pang also fulfilled her mother-in- law's commands without the least reluctance. The old lady loved to drink of the water from the river, distant from the cottage six or seven le, and Pang was in the habit of going stealthily after it and handing it to her. She was also fond of carp, and when it was obtained, deeming herself not able to consume alone what her children with great toil and trouble continually prepared for her, usually invited some of the neighbors to feast with her. By the side of the cottage there suddenly gushed out a fountain, the taste of whose waters was like that of the river; and which daily produced two living fishes. These were taken out by Kiang She and prepared for his mother.

He carved Wood and served his Parents.

  DURING the Han dynasty lived Ting Lan, whose parents both died when he was young, bdfore he could obey and support them, and he reflected that for all the trouble and anxiety he had caused them, no recompense had yet been given. He then carved wooden images of his parents, and served them as if they had been alive. For a long time his wife would not reverence them; but one day, taking a bod- kin, she in derision pricked their fingers. Blood immediately flowed from the wound; and seeing Ting coming, the images wept. He ex- amined into the circumstances, and forthwith divorced his wife.

For his mother's Sake he buried his Child.

  In the days of the Han dynasty lived Koh Keu, who was very poor. He had one child three years old; and such was his poverty that his mother usually divided her portion of food with this little one. Koh says to his wife, "We are so poor that our mother cannot be support- ed, for the child divides with her the portion of food that belongs to

61

    but a mother once gone will never return." His wife did not venture to object to the proposal; and Koh immediately dug a hole of about three cubits deep, when suddenly he lighted upon a pot of gold, and on the metal read the following inscription: "Heaven bestows this treasure upon Koh Keu, the dutiful sou ; the magistrate may not seize it, nor shall the neighbors take it from him."

He seized the Tiger and saved his Father.

In the Han dynasty lived Yang Hiang, a lad of fourteen years, who was in the habit of following his father to the fields to cut grain. Once a tiger seized his father, and was slowly carrying him off, when Yang, although he had no iron weapon in his hand, anxious for his father and forgetting himself, quickly ran forward and seized the tiger by the neck. The beast let the prey fall from his teeth and fled, and Yang's father was thus saved from injury and death.

He collected Mulberries to support kis Mother.

DURING the Han dynasty lived Trae Shun, whose father died when he was young, and who served his mother very dutifully. It happen- ed that during the troubles of the times, when Wangmang was plot- ting to usurp the throne, there were years of scarcity, in which he could not procure food, and Trae was compelled to gather mulberries, which he assorted, putting them into two vessels. The red eyebrow- ed robber saw him and inquired why he did thus. Tsae replied, 'the black and ripe berries 1 give to my mother, while the yellow and unripe ones I eat myself.' The bandit admired his filial affec- tion, and rewarded him with three measures of white rice, and a leg of an ox.

He laid up the Oranges før his Mother, Lua Tsetu, a lad six years old, who lived in the time of Han, and in the district of Kewkiáng, once met the celebrated general Yuen Shub, who gave him a few oranges. Two of them the lad put in his bosom, and when turning to thank the giver, they fell out on the ground; which the general seeing, says, Why does my young friend, who is now a guest, put the fruit away in his bosom?' The youth bowing replies, 'My mother is very foud of oranges, and wished, when I returned home, to present them to her.' "At this answer, Yuen was much astonished.

On hearing the Thunder ne wept at the Tomb.

In the country of Wei, lived Wang Lau, a very dutiful child; whose mother, when alive, was much afraid of thunder. After her death.

: 62

her grave was dug in the hilly forest; and whenever it blew and rain. ed furiously, and Wang heard the sound of the chariot of the goddess Hohiang rolling and thundering aloug, immediately he hastened to the grave, and reverently kneeling with tears besought her, saying, Low is here, dear mother, do not be alarmed.' And afterwards, whenever he read in the Book of Odes, this sentence ; 'Children should have deep and ardent affection for their parents, who have endured so much anxiety in nourishing them,' the tears flowed abundantly at the 'régollection 'of his mother.

S

He wept to the Bamboos, and Shoots sprung up.

Mand Tsung, who lived in the Tsin dynasty, when young lost his fátlier. His mother was very sick ; and one 'winter's day 'she longed !to takte a soup made of bamboo sprouts, but 'Măng could not procure any. At last he went into the grove of hamboos, clasped the trees with his hands, and wept bitterly. His fitial affection moved nature, and the ground slowly opened, sending forth several shoots, which he ga- 'thered and carried home. He made a soup with them, of which his "mother ate, and immédiately recovered fröm her malady.

He slept on the Ice to proòure'the Carp.

Duaing the Tsin dynasty lived Wang Tsiang, who early 'Idst his -mrother, and his stepmother Choo had no affection for him. His father, also, hearing many evil reports against him, in course of time (c)ceased to regard him with kindness. His mother was in the babit of -eating fresh fish at her meals, 'but winter coming, the ice bound up the rivers. Wang uhloosed his clothes, and went to sleep on the ice in order to seek them; when suddenly the ice opened of "itself, and 'a brace of carp jumped out, which he took up and carried to his moth- er. The villagers hearing of the occurrence, were surprised, and að- 'mired one whose filial duty hád Induced such an unusual thing.

Woo Măng fed the Musketver.

Woo Măng, a lad eight years of age, who lived under the Tsin dy- nasty, was very dutiful to his parents. They were so poor that they 'could not afford to furnish their beds with musketo-curtains; and -every summer's night, myriads of musķetoes attacked thein unre- strainedly, feasting upon their flesh and blood. Although there were so many, yet Woo would not drive them away; lest they should go to his parents, and annoy them. Such was his affection for his parents!

6:3

He tosted Ordure, and his Heart was grieved.

In the southern Tse country lived Yu Kienlow, who wax a magistrate over the district of Looking. He had not been in office ten days, when he was suddenly alarmed with a great distress of mind, accom- panied with a violent perspiration, on which be immediately resigned. his office, and returned kome.

When he arrived he found that his

    father had been sick two days. The physician said, that he could know whether the patient would be better or worse by his stools,. which, if bitter, would indicate a favorable turn. Yu made the experiment and found them sweet, which grieved his inmost heart; and in the evening he prostrated himself before the god of the North Star, imploring that he might die instead of his father.

She suckled her Mother-in-law unweariedly.

    DURING the Tang dynasty, the grandmother of Tsuy Channan, lady Tang lived with her mother-in-law, Changsun, who was so aged that' all her teeth were lost. This honorable lady every day carefully made her toilet, and went into her aged relative's apartment, and suckled her; by which means, the old lady's life and strength were prolonged many years, although she could not eat so much as a grain of rice. One day she was taken sick, and calling all her descendants around her, she said, 'Hearken! I have no means of recompensing the virtue of my daughter-in-law, but I request that the wives of all my children will serve her with the same affection and respect that she has shown to me.'

He resigned his office to seek his Mother

In the Sung dynasty lived Choo Shauchang, whose mother Lew, when he was seven years of age, because she was hated by his father's wife, left the family; and mother and son did not see each other for about fifty years. It was during the reign of Shintsung, that Choo resigned his official station and went into the Tsin country, and there made an engagement with his family, ' that he would not return until he had found his mother.' He then traveled into Tungehow, where he discovered his mother, who, at that time was aged upwards of seventy years.

He ronahed his mother's Utensils.

In the reign of Yuenyew of the Sung dynasty, Hwang Tingkien filled the office of prefect. He was of a very dutiful disposition, and although he was houorable and renowned, yet he received his mother's commands with the utmost deference. Every day he cleaned her utensils, with his own hands; nor for one moment did he ever omit

the duties of a filial son

nerfari

64

THE CHINESE ALMANAC.

The origin and history of ALMANACs, and even the etymology of the word, are involved in obscurity. Some derive it from the Arabic ́ almanach, "to count," and others from the German almonat, the piece of wood on which it is said the Saxons used to carve the courses of the Moon. Several splendid English almanacs of the 14th century still exist in manuscript, in the British Museum. Almanacs were in general use in Europe, soon after the invention of printing. They were so mischievous in France, from the pretended prophecies they con- tained, that in 1579, Henry III. issued an edict forbidding the inser- tion of any predictions as to civil, state, or private matters. It is singular that the earliest English almanacs were printed in Holland, on small folio sheets. From an early period till within a few years, the almanacs of most countries have contained predictions of the weather, earthquakes, political events, or lists of lucky and unlucky days for certain purposes: for example, to buy, sell, marry, take medicine, etc. At one time they abounded in religious matter, at another in astrologi- cal superstitions, and at others in the genealogies of princes, etc. At present they are becoming every year more full of statistical mat- ter. The "British Almanac" and its "Companion," and especially the "American Almanac," are invaluable repositories of facts on almost every subject. In Germany, almanach is the name given to "annuals" like those known in America as "souvenirs," etc. 'The first almanac of any note, published in the United States, was com- menced by Franklin in 1733, and continued till 1758. It is known as "Poor Richard's Almanac." The circulation of this soon rose to 10,000 a year. In 1749, it was embellished by some rude illustra- tions. The maxims and sentiments that gave it such wonderful popularity for that day, were collected and published through Europe, Sayings of Poor Richard." Some of the best of them are

as the

such as,

"

"Take this remark from Richard, poor and lame,

Whate'er's begun in anger, ends in shame."

"Some men grow mad by studying much to know

But who grows mad by studying good to grow?" "Against diseases here, the strongest fence

Is the defensive virtue, Abstinence."

"What maintains one vice, would bring up two children." "A mob is a monster, witu heads enough, but no brains." "Plough thorough and deep while sluggards sleep,

And you shall have corn to sell or to keen."

f

     Ju the dmanacs of the Chinese, nearly as much diversity exists șa in those of western nations. But in one thing the Chinese alma. naos are all alike, and in this they resemble too the older almanacs of the west,-we mean, in the astrological ascription to each day of auspicious or baneful influences over the actions of men. In this character, the imperial almanacs, circulated by the government through all its dominions and tributary kingdoms, shares in common, with books addressed to the most superstitious of the people. The government of China thus gives the full weight of its authority to the idle belief, that the planets, of which in its astronomical works it acknowledges the earth to be a companion, can exert so powerful and mysterious an influence over the world, as to affect the success- of the undertakings and actions of every individual. It sanctions a belief, involving this absurdity, that two persons engaged in like undertakings, baring selected each the same auspicious period, and acting, consequently, under the same astral iufluences, may neverthe- less come off, the one fully successful, the other utterly foiled. But the governinent has not alone given the weight of its own authority to such unreasonable notions; it has, when European astronomers were yet in employ at Peking, required of them to attach their signa- ture to the astrological (as well as to the astronomical) tables of the almanac. This was acknowledged by one of these Europeans to Mr. Barrow, when at Peking, during Lord Macartney's embassy, and de- rives confirmation from the fact, that much greater faith is placed by the Chinese in astrological predictions worked according to the "Eu- ropean method," than in any others, and that to a superiority of this nature several of the popular almanacs consequently pretend.

The imperial almanac contains, in its smaller form about twenty, in its larger form about fifty, leaves. Upon the first leaf of the farger edition, is a table of the twenty-four zodiacal periods observed by the Chinese, marking the moment of the sun's passage over the first and the fifteenth degrees of each sign of the Zodiac, calculated for the meridian af Peking. The second leaf is occupied by a table of the more important stellary aspects, as auspicious or the reverse, to particular acts or undertakings. Thus one is auspicious to all acts, and destructive of every baneful influence; a second is auspicious to the presenter of memorials, to the officer newly entering upon his duties, to the happy couple contracting a marriage; a third and a fourth are baneful to the same parties; a fifth is prejudicial to the bather; a sixth to the general who leads out his army; and a seventh to the gardener who plauts or grafts under its influences. The third

GG

leaf contains an astrological diagram, intelligible, as M. Klaproth has remarked, only to those who may choose to be at the pains of exploring deeply the astrological reveries of China. After these fol- low two large tables occupying thirty-one leaves, which show the moment of sunrise and sunset, and the times of commencement of the zodiacal half-monthly periods, in each province and dependency of China. The ephemeris follows next, occupying twelve or thirteen leaves, according to the number of lunar months into which the cur- rent year may be divided. The details of the ephemeris comprise the cyclic characters by which eàch day is distinguished, the moon's quarters, the places of several stars, the anniversaries of births and deaths of emperors and empresses during the reigning dynasty, and finally the particulars of what ought, and what ought not to be done' on each day. A table of 120 years, to show the age of an individual born in any year of the cycle,-to which is joined another table of astral influences, completes this book, of which the Chinese govern- ment is so proud, that it can not confer on any nation a more gracious gift than a copy of it.

.

   The almanacs in common use have many additional items, gener- ally of the same nature as the preceding. That for the 1st year of Hienfung has a sitting effigy of the young emperor on the title-page, with the mystic emblem of the yin and yáng in his hand, to show that he rules over the world. The distich,

A new prince has mounted the height,

May the age flourish, and the year be fruitful;

is inscribed near it.

Among the additions usually given may be mentioned, drawings of the 28 lunar constellations, their names and auspicious or malign influences, and how much they affect human beings. Sixty forms of charms-succeed them, with twelve pictures of children, and tables to calculate the horoscope of their births, according as they are born at such an hour of the twenty-four; lists of festivals, birthdays of gods, and sometimes a geographical notice of the provinces of China, are given in addition.

67

COMMON CHINESE PROVERBS.

Not to distinguish, properly between the beautiful and ugly, is like attach- ing a dog's tail to a squirrel's body.

    An avaricious man, who can never have enough, is as a serpent wishing to swallow an elephant.

    While one misfortune is going to have another coming, is like driving a tiger out of the front door, while a wolf is entering the back. The tiger's cub can not be caught without going into his den. To paint a snake and add legs. (Exaggeration.)

To sketch a tiger and make it a dog, is to imitate a work of genius and spoil it.

A fierce wolfish man is like the scathed branchless trunk of a tree.

To ride a fierce dog to catch a lame rabbit. (Useless power over a contemptible enemy.)

To attack a thousand tigers with ten men; (to attempt a difficulty with incommensurate means.)

To cut off a hen's head with a battle-axe; (unnecessary valor.)

    To cherish a bad man is like nourishing a tiger; if not well fed he will devour you: or like rearing a hawk; if hungry he will stay by you, but fly away when fed.

Human joys are like the skippings of a sparrow.

   To instigate a villain to do wrong, is like teaching a monkey to climb trees. To catch a fish and throw away the net;-not to requite benefits. To take a locust's shank for the shaft of a carriage ;- set to do important work.

-an inefficient person

  A pigeon sneering at a roc;-a mean man despising a prince. To climb a tree to catch a fish, is to talk much and get nothing.

To test one good horse by judging the portrait of another.

As a fish out of water so is a poor homeless man.

The fish sports in the kettle, but his life will not be long.

Like a swallow building her nest on a hut, is an anxious statesman. Like a frog in a well is a man of small thoughts.

Like a crane among hens is a man of parts among fools.

Like a sheep dressed in a tiger's skin is a superficial scholar.

  Like a cuckoo in a magpie's nest, is one who enjoys another's labor. To hang on the tail of a beautiful horse; (to seek promotion.)

Do not pull up your stockings in a melon field, or arrange your hat under a peach tree, lest people think you are stealing.

An old man marrying a young wife is like a withered willow sprouting. By a long journey we know a horse's strength; so length of days shows a man's heart.

Let us get drunk to-day whilę we have wine; the sorrows of to-morrow may be borne to-niorrow.

If the blind lead the blind, they will both go to the pit.

Good iron is not used for nails, nor are soldiers made of good men. A fair wind raises no storm.

A little impatience subverts great undertakings.

Vast chasins can be filled, but the heart of man is never satisfied.

 The body may be healed, but the mind is incurable. When the tree falls the monkeys flee.

The tiger does not walk with the hind.

Trouble neglected becomes still more troublesome.

Wood is not sold in the forest, nor fish at the pool.

   He who looks at the sun is dazzled, he who hears the thunder is deafened. (Not come too near the powerful.)

He desires to hide his tracks, and walks on the snow.

He seeks the ass, and lo! he sits upon him. An illiterate person is like a dry inkstone. Speak not of others, but convict yourself.

A man who has a tongue may go to Peking.

A man is not always known by his looks, nor the sea measured by a bushel ̧ A gem is not polished without rubbing, nor is a man perfected without trial. Ivory does not coine from a rat's mouth.

If a chattering bird be not placed in the mouth, vexation will not sit between the eyebrows.

Prevention is better than cure.

For the emperor to break the laws is one with the people's doing so. Doubt and distraction are on earth, the brightness of truth in heaven. Punishment can oppose a barrier to open crime, laws can not reach to 'secret offenses.

   Wine and good dinners make abundance of friends, but in time of adver- sity not one is to be found.

   Let every man sweep the snow from before his own doors, and not trouble himself about the hoarfrost on his neighbor's tiles.

   Better be upright with poverty than depraved with abondance. He whose virtue exceeds his talents is the good man; he whose talents cxceed his virtues is the fool.

Though a man may be utterly stupid, he is very perspicuous when repre- hending the bad actions of others; though he may be very intelligent, he is duil enough when excusing his own faults: do you only correct yourself on the same principle that you correct others, and excuse others on the same principle you excuse yourself.

   In making a candle we seek for light, in reading a book we seek for reason; light to illuminate a dark chamber, reason to enlighten men's hearts

If I do not debauch other men's wives, my own will not be polluted. Better not be than be nothing.

The egg fights with the rock;-hopeless resistance.

One thread does not make a rope; one swallow does not make a summer.

89

To be fully fed and warmly clothed, and dwell at ease without learning, is little better than a bestial state.

    A woman in one house can not eat the rice of two. (A wise woman does not marry again.)

Though the sword be sharp, it will not wound the innocent.

Sensuality is the chief of sins, filial duty the best of acta.

Prosperity is a blessing to the good, but to the evil it is a curse.

     Instruction pervades the heart of the wise, but can not penetrate the ears of a fool.

The straightest trees are first felled; the cleanest wells first drunk up. The yielding tongue endures; the stubborn teeth perish.

Old age is like a candle in the wind, easily blown out.

The blind have the best ears, and the deaf the sharpest eyes.

     The horse's back is not so safe as the buffalo's. (The politician is not só secure as the busbandman.)

A wife should excel in four things, virtue, speech, person, and needlework. He who is willing to inquire will excel, but the self-sufficient man will fail Anger is like a little fire, which if not timely checked may burn down a lofty pile.

Every day can not be a feast of lanterna.

Too much lenity multiplies crime.

    If you love your son, give him plenty of the cudgel; if you hate him, cram him with dainties.

When the mirror is highly polished, the dust will not defile it; when the heart is enlightened with wisdoin, impure thoughts will not arise in it.

     Do not consider any vice as trivial, and therefore practise it; or any virtue as unimportant, and therefore omit it.

A stubborn wife and stiffnecked sou no laws can govern.

He is my teacher who tells me my faults, my enemy who speaks my virtues He has little courage who knows the right and does it not.

To sue a flea, and catch a bite ;-the results of litigation.

    Would you understand the character of a prince, look at his ministers ; or the disposition of a man, observe his companions; or that of a father, first mark his son.

    The fame of good deeds does not leave a man's door, but his evil acts are known a thousand miles off.

The advantages of good laws are to be found only in their strict observance. A virtuous woman is a source of honor to her husband, a vicious one disgraces him.

    'The original tendency of man's heart is to do right, and if well ordered will not of itself be mistaken.

    They who respect themselves will be honored, but disesteeming ourselves we shall be despised.

The light of one star illumines the mountains of many regions, so one unguarded expression injures a whole life of virtue.

70

THE EMPEROR HIENFUNG.

The reigning monarch over the Chinese empire is the seventh emperor of the present Tsing, or Pure Dynasty. His reign com- menced Feb. 26th, 1850, on the demise of his father Táukwáng, but out of respect to his memory, the first year of his reign was not to be reckoned until Feb. 1, 1851. His majesty is in his 21st year, having been born in August, 1831. The words Hienfung mean Complete Prosperity, and have been selected for the style of his reign; it is called the Kwoh Háu, or National Designation, and is not considered as the personal_name of the monarch, but rather the name of his reign; though among foreigners it is usually used as the personal appellation of the monarch.

His present majesty is the 244th emperor who has ruled over the blackhaired race of Hán, during a period of 4702 years, being an average of 191 years to each monarch. The present is the 28th dynasty, and its first monarch began to reign in 1644.

Inaugural Proclamation of the Sovereign upon his succeeding to the Empire by the ordinance of Heaven.

   Our Great and Pure (Ta-Tsing) Dynasty has continued the subject of He- aven's most parental affection. Its mighty foundation was laid in ancient times by our great progenitors Tai-tsu and Tai-tsung: the whole of China was brought under the single rule of the first of the Imperial line: our other ancestors, the Sainted, the Immotal, the Exalted, and the Humane, each like his predecessor excelled in virtue, and shed an influence of renovation [upon men], increasing the glory of the Empire and blending its parts harmoniously together; and our late Father now departed, during the thirty years that he has held the reins of government, has sat late in his robes, and has eaten when the moon was past, diligently aiming at perfection of rule From his own distinguished merit, and the conduct of his statesmen, the Court commanded respect. The richness of his bounty extended to all parts of his dominions, insomuch that there was tran- quillity within and beyond their frontiers, and the black-haired flock was be holden to it for their happiness.

   Thus might it have been hoped that his illustrious years would be greatly prolonged, and that blessings would be continued to him for evermore; but on the afternoon of the 14th of the 1st moon, having appointed us his heir-apparent, he sped upwards on the Dragon to be a guest on high, and the [charge of the] spiritual vessel devolved on our insignificant person.

   When we called to mind our own insufficiency, profound was our fear that we should not be equal to the task, until we bethought us of the counsels be- queathed by the Holy Ones, and of the trust imposed on us by His Majesty, our late father; and as the Throne committed to us could not long remain unfilled, we put constraint upon the grief we so sincerely feel, and reverently obey the word that is passed. Upon the 26th of the 1st moon we shall therefore solemnly announce our accession to Heaven, to Earth, to our Ancestors, to the Spirits celestial and terestrial and the gods of land and the grain. Let the ensuing year be the first of HIEN-FUNG.

We look upward, hoping to continue what was admirable in our predecessors, and clasp our breast with feelings of awe and earnest solicitude. And whereas at the time of promulging our inaugural proclamation, our bounty should extend to all our kindred, all things that it is fitting we should do are stated in order below. This great bounty have we extended to our dominions upon succeeding to the Throne. Oh! then, do ye Princes and ministers, civil and military, aid us in the service we have undertaken, that we may add stability to the mighty Jine the succession of which has devolved upon us. Let each one give evidence of his fidelity, aiding us by his counsels [to the attainment of] perfection; that boundless blessings may be manifested to this realm for thousand million of years. Let this be published throughout the Empire, that all may be informed thereof.

71

LIST

OF THE PRINCIPAL OFFICERS IN THE

GENERAL GOVERNMENT,

AND IN THE PROVINCES OF CHINA.

NAME OF COURT.

OFFICE.

INDIVIDUAL.

Tsungjin fú,

Controller.

Tsáitsiuen,

宗入府

Sub-controller.

OFFICE OF THE

Jinshau,

IMPERIAL House-

do

Chunshán,

HOLD.

Dep. sub-controller. Mienchuh,

do

Mienhiun,

仁春綿綿葆彰世耆 銓壽山岫勲醇阿恩艹

Chinese assistant. Wan Päushun, 溫 溫葆

Chief minister.

Nui Koh,

do

內閣

THE CABINET.

do

do

Muhchangah,

| Pwán Shingan,

Kiying,

|Choh Pingtien, 卓秉

Aast. chief minister. Kishen,

Ki Tsiuntsáu, 邟

和色

向靑奕色德

藻磨山本齢

錫裕嘉杜克

齡承端副愼

do

Minister.

Tsinglin,

do

|Yihshán,

do

Hosihpun,

do

Tehling,

do

do

Sihling,

do

|Ho Yushing,

Vacant.

錫齡

何裕承

do

|Lí Kiatwán,

do

|Tú Kiáu,

do

Ché Kihchin, 車克

President.

NAME OF COURT.

Lí Pú,

東部

THE BOARD OF

CIVIL OFFICE..

RANK.

Hú Pú,

do

Vice-president.

do

do

do

Superintendent.

Wănking,

Hia

Ching,

Sui Cháng,

| Hau Tung,

|Minghiun,

Cháng Fei,

INDIVIDUAL.

Choh Pingtien,

Saishángah,

|Kí Tsiuntsáu,

Ahlingah

Kwei Chícháng,

文慶

文賈瑞侯明張秉向靈芝福鳳惠瑞 慶楨常相訓冇恬阿藻阿昌濟標豐珍 卓賽祁阿朱

戶部

President.

Tag Board OF

REVENUE.

dọ

Vice-president.

do

do

do

LiPé,

禮部

President...

Hwui Fung,

THE BOARD OF

do

Sun Suichin,

孫瑞珍

Rites

Fuhtsi,

Chú Fungpiáu, k

朱鳳

do

do

Vice-president. Lienshun,

| Wú Chungtsiuen, 吳鐘

Suilin,

do

Tsang Kwohfán, 會

Ping Pú,

Superintendent.

Kiying,

兵部

President.

Pehstin,

THE BOARD OF

WAR.

do

Wei Yuenláng, 魏

do

do

| Kingki,

do

|Chiukwáng,

Hing Pú,

刑部

Vice-president. Nganhwa,

Sun Páuyuen, 孫葆

Superintendent. Ahlihtsingah, 阿勒请阿

THE BOARD OF

President.

|Chin Fú-ngin,

陳孚

PUNISHMENTS.

do

Tsuenking,

全质

Vice-president. Chau Tsúpei,

周祖培

NAME OP COURT.

Minister.

.73

INDIVIDUAL.

OFFICE.

Siuen Chun,

恒春

Kung Pú,

工部

President.

Tihtángyih,

do

| Hwáng Tsanting, 黄贊湯

Superintendent. Muhchaogah,

穆彰阿

特登額

THE BOARD OF

do

Tú Shautien,

杜受出

PUBLIC WORKS.

do

do

Lingkwei,

do

|

Lifan Yuen,

Superintendent. Saishangah,

理藩完

President.

Kihluntai,

Court of

Vice-president.

Miensan,

Foreign AffAIRS

do

Yibyuh,

Vice-president. Kwánglin,

Ung Sintsun,

Pang Wănchang,彭

翁心

吉倫

綿

奕毓

阿泰森毓布

Supernumerary. Bankw 拉木棍布札布

Vice-president.

patchaguo

Censor.

|Hwáshénah,

花沙納

Waug Kwangyin,王廣

Ticbah yuen,

都察完

do

THE CENSORATE

Deputy-censor.

Hoshun,

do

Li Han,

do

do

Tungching sz',

President.

• Hehteh-ho,

Wansui,

Ching Tingk wei,程庭

赫特賀

淳菡瑞生賀

通政司

Court of APPEAL

Tali sz'

大理寺

President.

do

Lo Shunyen,

羅惇衍

Weijin,

偻仁

do

Cháu Tsan,

邵燦

Commander in chief Yihhing,

奕典

Court of Adju-

DICATION.

Skingking or

盛京

MOUKDEN.

Keiblin,

吉林

Ia.-gen. at Kirin. Shingkwei,

10:

Lt. General.

Lohwú,

樂斌

Commander in chief, Weishiḥna,

倭什訥

盛桂

NAME OF

PROVINCE.

KIRIN.

74

OFFICE.

Lt.-gen. Ningúta. Pántih,

INDIVIDUAL.

班迪

Lt.-gen. at Petuné. Weikibtsinggeh,

Lt.-gen. at Sansing. Elihtungah,

Lt.-gen. atAltchuku Sapingah,

Hehlungkiáng, Commander in chief Yinglung,

Lt-gen. Sagalien ula Tsing-án,

TSITSIHAR. Lt.-gen. Tsitsihar. Kehsinggeh,

Lt:-gen. Merguen. Wulingeh,

Chihli,

直隸

Governor General. Narkinggeh,

Mayor of Shuntien. Choh Pingtien,

Liang Kiáng, Governor-general. Luh Kienying, Governor of the rivers Yang E-tsǎng,

兩江

Comprising

I Kiangsu.

2 NGANHWUI.

3 KIANGSÍ.

1st. Kiángsú.

Governor at Súchau Fú Shinghiun,

General of Nanking|Siánghau,

Lt. General.

Hwuimib,

Literary Chancellor Tsinglin,

Grain commissioner Shin Cháuyun,

Salt commissioner. Cháu Kíyun,

Treasurer of Nauking Yang Wanting,

Naval com-in-chief. Sua Yanhung,

Treasurer of Sachau Lí Chángyuh,

foo.

Judge.

Lienying,

Grain commissioner Ní Liángyáu,

Int. of circuit of Sú, Linkwei,

Sung and Tái.

2. Ngánhwui.

Governor.

Wang Chih,

Literary Chancellor Lí Kiásui.

Treasurer.

3. Kiángsí.

Governor.

H

薩炳阿

清安

烏凌

**

楊以增

A

青藝

孫雲

李障

倪良

麟桂

王植

李嘉

Tsiáng Wanking, 蔣文慶

Fei Kaishau, 費開緩

75

NAME OF

PROVINCE.

Min-Cheh

閩浙

Comprising

1. CHEHKIANG.

2. FUHKIEN.

OFFICE.

INDIVIDUAL.

Literary Chancellor Cháng Fií,

Governor-General. Liú Yunko,

1. Chehkiáng

Governor. Wú Wanyung,

Gen. of Hangchau. Yihsiáng,

Literary Chancellor Wú Chungtsung,

張芾

劉韻珂

吴文鎔

Treasurer. Wang Punsiun, 汪

Judge.

奕湘

W

Hwáng Tsunghan, 黄宗漢

Int of Circuit of Ning Hienling,

Sháu, and Tai.

Prefect of Ningpo. Lo Yung,

District magistrate of

Kin.

Vacant

咸齡

雞鏞

Hikwang.

湖廣

Comprising

1. Húpin.

2. HÚNAN.

District_magistrate of

Chunhae. | Wang Chingkii, 王承楷

Naval com.-in-chief of Shenluh,

Chehkiêng.

2. Fuhkien.

Governor.

Gen. of Fuhchau and Yusui,

Collector of customs.

Lt.-gen., Fuhchau. |Tungshun,

Literary chancellor Hwang Toántáng,

裕瑞

善祿

Sü Kiyu,

徐繼畬

東純

慶端

呂恆安

Vacant

都爾遜

陳開

Treasurer. Kingtwán,

Naval com-in-chief of

Chehkiang at Amoy Ching Kautsiáng,

General of Formosa LügHang-ngan,

Intendant of Hing.

Tsuen, Yung.

Collector of Customs Turhsun,

at Amoy.

Colonel at Amoy, Chin Kaihwni,

Haifang at Amoy, Liú Chinghien,

Governor General. Yutái,

1. Húpeh

Governor Kung Yu,

Literary chancellor Tú Xán,

Treasurer. Liu Tsungkwáng,

龔裕

NAME OF

PROVINCE.

RANK.

76

INDIVIDUAL.

2

Judge.

Chun Shau,

椿壽

河南

Honan.

Sh'ntung.

山東

Shinsí.

山西

Shen Kan,

陝甘

Comprising

1 SHENSI.

2. Húnan.

Governor,

Treasurer,

Loh Pingchang, **

Wan Kungchin,萬貢珍

General in chief

Pwán Toh,

Literary chancellor Yü Chángtsán,

**

1

Treasurer, Yen Liánghiun,嚴良訓

Governor and general Chin Kiugkiai,

in-chief.

Literary chancellor Fung Yükí,

Treasurer, Liú Yuenhau,

Governor and general Chanasútu,

in-chief.

Literary chancellor Hú Suilan,

Treasurer, Tsiáng Weiyuen,

Governor-general. Kishen,

Literary chancellor Wú Fuhnien,

Commander in-chief Chahlihhantai,

2 KANSUH.

1. Shensi,

*flí.

伊犁

Governor.

Treasurer.

2. Kansuk.

Treasurer,

馮譽驥

劉源灝

G

胡瑞澜

蔣霨

琦善

吳福年

Chúng Tsiángho, 5

(Ching Táshun,常大淳

Chíng Tsihhing, 張集馨

General-in-chief. Sahyingab,

Counsellor.

Yihshan,

薩迎阿

Counsellor at Tarba-Chalafantai,

gatae.

Sub-counsellor at

Kashgar.

Resident at do. Shútsingah,

Resident at Kúché. Chingfang,

Resident at Aksu. Tutahpú,

Vacant.

Resident at Khoten. Tehlehkihnema,

舒清阿

承芳

圖塔布

S

PROVINCE.

OKOUMTS1.

烏魯木齊

OUTER MONGOLIA

外蒙古

Sz'chuen,

四川

OFFICE.

General.

Yuhshoo,

Resident at Hami. Kingyun,

Resident at Koorua Yühming,

INDIVID'AL.

Governor-general. Sü Tsihshun,

Literary chancellor. Chí Tsingyen,

Treasurer. Wú Chinyih,,

Lióng Kwang, Governor-general. Sü Kwingtsin,

1. Kwangtung.

兩廣

Comprising,

Governor.

1. KWANGTUNG.

2. KWANGSI.

Col. commanding

gov.-general's brigade.

毓書

玉明

徐澤

徐支吳徐

Yeh Mingchin, 葉

Hingyen,

Literary chaucellor. Hü Náichau,

Collestor of customs. Tsangwei

General & command. | Muhtehngan,

ler-in-chief at Canton.

Lt.-general Tartar Wúlantai,

troops.

徐廣

葉名琛

許乃

穆特

烏蘭

Lt.-general of Chinese Tohgautunggih,托恩東

troops.

Admiral (at the | Hung Minghiáng, 洪名香

Bogue).

Treasurer.

Judge.

Pihkwei,

Kí Suhtsáo, 祁宿藥

Grain commissioner Wang Tsangkien, 王增謙

Prefect of Camon. Cháng Pehkwei,張百

Nanhai hien.

Fung Yuen,

Deputy of same. Chin Íchí,

Pwanyu hien.

焦沅

陳宜

Ching Chinghiun, 程承訓

Shauki,

Deputy of same.

Shunteh hien.

Tsunghwa hien.

Lungman hien.

District magistrates in Kwangchau

fu.

Sinning hien.

Kwoh Jüching,

Sié Yutsing,

Hau Yungfung,

[Chin Kili.

Li Yingchú,

Tsangching hien.

Hiángshan hiền.

'Kiú Tsaiving.

'Tum kwan bien

Lin Pingking,

郭汝

謝愚溝

候榮封

陳起禮

呂 應

劉丙

邱才穎

78

PROVINCE.

Yun-Kwei,

雲貴

OFFICE.

|Sinhwui hien.

Sanshwai hien.

Tsingyuen hien. Sin-ngan hien. Hwa hien.

2, Kwangsi.

Governor,

INDIVIDUAL.

Hú Siáng,

Wan Tsun,

Ma Yangkiai,

Kí Changkiun,

Cháng Tsungloh, G

胡湘

| Ching Tsúchin,鄭祖琛

Naval and military Min Chingfung, if a

commander-in-chief,

Literary chancellor, | Sun Tsiángming, 孫鏘鳴

Treasurer,

Cháng Yuntsáu, 3

Governor-general. Ching Yuehtsai, 程矞采

Comprising

1 YUNNAN,

|Cháng Jihching,張日晸

張亮

2 KWEICHAU. Literary chancellor. Chin Kingsung,

1. Yunnan.

Governor.

Treasurer,

Judge,

2. Kweichau.

Governor.

Cháng Liángkí, 3 *#

Liáng Singyuen,梁星原

Kiáu Yungtsien,

喬用

翁同書

Literary chancellor. Ung Tungshú,

Treasurer.

Wa Sihfan,

吳式芬

The work from which these names are obtained is called Tsin-

shin Tsiuen-shú or Complete Book of the Girdle-

搢紳全書

wearers.

It is the Red Book of the Chinese government, and by an unusual coincidence with similar catalogues in western countries, has a red cover. It is published quarterly in four duodeci- mo volumes, with movable characters and combinations of characters, and contains the names of every officer down to magistrates chief clerks, according to the latest information possessed at the capital. An army and navy list is sometimes added in two thin volumes. According to the list, there are in the provinces, 11 governor-gene- rals, 15 governors, 19 treasurers, 18 judges, 17 literary chancellors, 184 prefects, 212 inferior prefects, and 1305 district magistrates; in all 1781. But in addition to these, the number of intendants, sub- prefects, deputy district magistrates or tso-táng, officers over town- ships, and special deputies, is more than as many more.

PRINCIPAL Festivals observed BY THE

CHINESE.

     Dec. 19th 1850-X[th moon, 16th day. Festival of Kwányin. She has three during the year, all of which are ɗɔwerved by the people.

Jan. 9th, 1851.-XIIth moon, 8th day. Ancient festival of the prince and his officers going on the annual hunt. Also of the Jülái Budha.

     Jan. 25th.-XIIth moon, 24th day. The god of the furnace ascends to heaven to report upon the conduct of the family to the Perfect August Shangti; hence people pay their adorations to that deity, and sié tsáu, 'thank the furnace.' This popular superstition, though not peculiar to any class, seems most closely allied to the Táu sect.

Jan. 31st.-XIIth moon, 30th day. All the gods descend to the earth. Feb. 1st.-lst moon, 1st day. Yuen tán, the first morning, or new year's day. The period of new year is almost the only time of universal holiday in Chins. Other times and seasons are regarded only by a few, or by particular classes-but the new year is accompanied with a general cessation from bu- siness. The officer, the merchant and the laborer, all equally dexist from work, aud zealously engage in visiting and feasting,-occasionally making offerings at the temples of those deities whose peculiar aid they wish to implore. Govern- ment offices are nominally closed for about ten days before, and twenty days after newyear; during which period none but very important business is transacted. On the last evening of the old year, all tradesmen's bills and small debts are paid and inability to pass this time of settlement injures a man's credit, and usually results in insolvency; while too, the custom, by compelling an annual settlement of accounts prevents many failures. This is perhaps the reason why it is called chú seik, 'the evening of dismissal.'

Feb. 2d.-lst moon, 2d day. Ché Tá-yuen shwái; a deified warrior. Feb. 4th.-Ist moon, 4th day. Leih chun terin, or festival of spring. This day, the period of the sun reaching the 15th degree in Aquarius, is one of the chief days of the Chinese calendar, and is celebrated with great poinp as well by the government as by the people. In every capital city, there are made, at this period, two clay images, a man and a buffalo. The day pre- vious to the festival, the chifű or chief city magistrate, goes out to ying chun, meet the spring; on which occasion childen are carried about on men's shoul- dern, each vying with his neighbor in the gorgeousness and fancifulness of the children's dresses. The following day, being the day of the festival, the pre- fect again appears as the priest of Spring, in which capacity he is, for the day, the first man in the province. Hence the chief officers do not move from hoine on this day. After he has struck the buffalo with a whip two or three timen, in token of commencing the labors of agriculture, the populace then stone the image, till they break it in pieces. The festivities continue ten days in soine parts of the country, but the degree of ceremony attending this

+

;

i

80

festival differs greatly in different parts of China; in Canton it is not attended with much display.

*

Feb. 6th.-1st moon, 6th day. Ting-kwáng, a Budhist sage, born.

  Feb. 7th.-1st moon, 7th day.-lin Jih, 'man day.' The first ten days of the year are named after various animals, 'fowl-day,' dog-day,' &c., of which the seventh, 'man-day,' is the greatest. Some persons have supposed there was an obscure or ancient reference in these days to the order followed at the creation.

  Feb. 9th.-Ist moon, 9th day, Yuh-hwang Shángti's birthday; this deity. is the highest of the Táu sect.

6 Feb. 10th.-Ist moon, 10th day. Wú tú shin-kiun, five lares of the household; they are this day placed on the ground in various quarters of the house for its protection; and the ceremony is repeated on the tenth of the four following Juonths.

Feb. 15th.-Ist moon, 15th day.-Shái-tang, or feast of lanterns, so called by Europeans. At night all classes illuminate the temples, shops, &c., with fanciful lanterns, and assemble at convivial parties, called lantern feasts. Offerings of lanterns are made at the temples of the gods. This festival B observed at Canton by merely hanging a lantern before the shop or house.

  Feb. 19th-Ist moon, 19th day. Cháng-chun, a celebrated physician born; deified by the Tauists. His shrine is placed in doctor's shops.

Feb. 21st-Ist inoon, 21st day. Two images of children are placed behind the doors of dwellings for protecting it, and increasing the prosperity of the inmates; they are called Shen teái tungtex'.

March 4th.-Ifd moon, 2d day. The household gods born. These are called Tú tí and Fuh-shin, gods of happiness; they include all classes of household deities. At this period plays are performed at the public offices, and in the streets; while rockets and other fireworks are let off.

March 5th.-Ild moon, 3d.day. · Wancháng tí-kiun, god of learning born. His image is placed in the temples of Confucius and the offices of literary magistrates; scholars worship him.

· March 8th.-IId moon, 6th day. Tung-wá Ti-kiun born; a god of the Tau sect.

  March 15th. Ild moon, 13th day. Hungshing, god of the south sea, boru This is a southern deity, whose worship is chiefly confined to Canton, where it is celebrated with much pomp and diaplay. Same day, the birthday of Yoh Fi, a faithful minister of the Sung dynasty.

March 17th.-IId moon, 15th day. Láukiun horn. Láukiun, called also Láu-tsz", an ancient sage, and the founder of the Tàu sect, was partly contem- porary with Confucius. The latter in his youth took lessons from Láutsz' on the subject of sacrificial rites. The principal deities of the Tau sect are-Sán tsing, three pure ones,- Shángti, a supreme ruler, auhordinate to those three, and an infinity of inferior gods, and deified men.

April.-About the middle of this month, on a fortunate day in the 3d moon, the grand agricultural ceremony is performed, at Peking by the emperor and his ministers, aird in all the provinces by the head oûlicers of the government.

The ceremony consists in holding a plough, highly ornamented, which in kept for the purpose, while the bullock which drags it is led over a gives space. The rule is that the emperor ploughs three furrows; the princes five; and the high ministers, nine. These furrows are, however, so very short, that the later monarchs of the present dynasty have altered the ancient rule laid down by the predecessors of Confucius, ploughing four furrows, and returning again over the ground. The ceremony finished, the emperor and his ministers repair to the terrace for inspecting the agricultural labors; and remain till the whole field has been ploughed by husbandien. The emperor often appoints a proxy.

March 21st-Ild moon, 19th day. Kwányin's birthday; she is often called the Goddess of mercy, and is the great goddess of the Budhists. There are supposed to be more temples erected to this idol in Canton than to any other. March 27th.-Ild moon, 25th day. Hiuen-tien shing fű, birthday of the father of the Shángti of the Sombre Heavens; a god of the Tau sect.

April 4th.-IIId moon, 3d day. Hiuen-tien Shangti, the Supreme Rnter of the Sombre Heavens ; the festival of the second deity in the pantheon of the Rationalists. This day is also the festival of Peh ti, god of the North Pole. April 5th.-IIId moon, 4th day. Tsing-ming term,-festival of the tombs. At this period of the year the Chinese everywhere repair to the tombs with offerings of food, which after the spirits of the deceased have fed on the spir- itual portion, they themselves partake of. The weather at this time being ́usually fine, the weeds and dirt are cleared away from the tombs, and any

repairs requisite in the brickwork are made.

April 15th.-IIId moon, 14th day. Chung-yang Wú tan born. April 16th.-Hild woon, 15th day. Hinen-tan Yuen-shwai born; worshiped in households. I-ling Tai-ti born; a celebrated physician worshiped by sick persons.

April 19th.--IIId moon, 18th day. Hau-ti Niangniang, the goddess of earth. April 21st.-IIId moon, 20th day. Taz'-sun Niang-niang, the goddess of children, worshiped by those who wish children.

    April 24th.-IIId moon, 23d day. Tien hau, or the Queen of Heavan, born, This female deity was a native of Fuhkien; and has become the goddess of sailors, who are mostly of that province. She corresponds in many respects to the Amphitrite of the Greeks, though some of her names and attributes seem to have been derived from the Virgin Mary. Her temples are uumer- ous, and her worship is costly.

    May 8th.-IVth moon, 8th day. San kiai shing-yé, or Holy Lords of the three borders; worshiped in the yarda or courts of houses to propitiate the powers of nature.-Same day is the festival of the present Budha, Slil-kia Ju-lai.

    May 14th.-IVth moon, 14th day. Lúshin Yangshing, one of the eight genii, also called Lútung ping.

May 15th.-IVth moon, 15th day. Chung-li tsu-sz', one of the eight genii. May 17th.-IVth moon, 17th day. Kin-hwa fù-jin; women worship her

·

when their children have the small pox. A temple to this goddess is situat- ed opposite the Factories in the suburb of Honam.

   May 18th.-IVth moon, 18th day. Wa To sienaz', a celebrated physician, spoken of in the San Kwoh Chí; worshiped by the sick.

May 20th.-1Vth moon, 20th day. Yen-kwáng Shing-mú, Holy Mother of Bright Eyes; a goddess worshiped by the blind, and those with diseased eyes. May 28th.-IVth moon, 28th day. Yoh Wáng, king of Medicine; the Esculapius of Chinese mythology.

   May 31st-Vth moon, 1st day. Nán-kih Tá-tí, the Great Ruler of the South Pole; a god of the Rationalists.

   June 4th.-Vth moon, 5th day. Festival of dragon boats, called in Chi- nese, Twán-wú or Twán-yáng, and also Tien-chung. On this day, many people race backwards and forwards, in long narrow boats, which being va- riously painted and ornamented so as to resemble dragons, are called lung chuen, 'dragon boats.'‚From the narrowness of the boats, and the number of persons on board, there being sometimes from sixty to eighty paddles, it not unfrequently happens that several of the boats break in two; so that the festivities seldom conclude without the loss of several lives. The magistrates endeavor to repress the ardor of the people by issuing their prohibitions, but the people are led on by the excitement. The races are attended by thousands, and the rowers are inspirited by the sound of drums and pipes; these noises are supposed to terrify cvil spirits and ward off disease, so that the sports are attended with double zest when sickness prevails. Tradesmen's accounts are cleared off at this period.

July 4th.-VIth moọn, 6th day. Sai í-fuh, festival of Airing Clothes. It is a tradition that clothes aired on this day are not liable to be injured by insects. July 11th.-VIth moon, 13th day. Lú-pán, the god of Carpenters and Ma- sons. Tsing-shin Tung-wang, God of Wells and Dragon-king, worshiped by sailors and others, to avert calamity and storms.

July 14th-VIth moon, 16th day. Wángling kwanshing; a deified states- man worshiped for averting punishment.

July 17th.-Vith moon, 19th day. Assumption of Kwanyin; she ascends to heaven.

י

July 21st.-Vith moon, 23d day. God of Fire born. This deity is fre- quently propitiated by exhibitions of plays. In China there are no regular the- aters; sheds are erected in the streets, and a platform being raised about four feet above the ground, the spectators all stand in the street in front ; the expenses are paid by private subscription, usually, of several merchants. Gentlemen have them also at their own houses, where in some instances there are substantial buildings erected for the performance of the players, and the accommodation of persons invited to see the play. Even in this case, an open space is left for the free admission of the people.-Also Kwán-shing Tai-ti, God of War born. Má Wáng-shing, the God of Horses, worshiped tò aveṛt disease from horses, and by horsemen to become skillful in equestrian feats. July 28th.-VIIth moon, Ist day. Sháu-i, or Burning Clothes festival. At

63

this period, which lasts fifteen days, clothes made of various colored papers are burnt, that they may so pass to the invisible world, for the benefit of de- ceased relatives. Prayers also are recited and food offered, chiefly for those who have been drowned at sea. This festival is much observed by the people of Fuhkien province. The custom arises from a tradition respecting a young man who obtained admission to Tartarus, and brought his mother from thence. Aug. 3d.-V11th moon, 7th day. Sháng kung sien nü, the female genii of the seven palaces descend; a festival observed by women, who worship these fairies to avert disease, and get skill in domestic work.

     Aug, 18-VIIth moon, 22d day. Tsang-fuh Teái-shin, god of Happiness and Wealth; placed in niches at the doors of shops. This deity, the Plutus of the Chinese, is seldom carved into an image, but a piece of paper is pasted on the back of a niche near the door; the shrine is called trú páu tăng, i. e. Hall of Collected Values.

     Aug. 20th.-VIIth moon, 24th day. Tú chỉng hwáng shing, festival of the municipal deity, worshiped by officers and people; he might be termed the Palladium Deity, as he has a temple in every city in China.

Aug. 26th.-VIIth moon, 80th day. Ti-tuang wáng shing, a deified Budhist, worshiped for remission of sins.

Aug. 27th-VIIIth moon, 1st day. Autumn festival commences. This festival continues from the lat to the 16th of the moon ; during which period families visit and feast with each other, and friends interchange presents of moon cakes. These are round white cakes, with figures of men and women painted on them; they derive their name from a legend of an emperor of the Tàng dynasty, who being led one night to the palace of the moon, saw there a large assemblage of female divinities, dancing and playing on instruments ́of music; on his return he instituted plays in commemoration of it.

Aug. 28th-VIIIth moón, 2d day. Shé-tuh Tá-wáng, great Prince of the Agricultural Goda.

Aug. 29th.

           VIIIth moon, 3d day. Sz'-ming teáu kiun, the Lord who orders the Prince of the Furnace; worshiped to preserve the health of the household. |_ Aug. 31st-VIIIth moon, 5th day. Lui-shing Tá-tí, god of Thunder.

     Sept. 10th.-VIIIth moon, 15th day. Chung-tsiú, mid-antumn. This being the middle day of autòma, is the chief day of the automu festival; oblations are made to the moon on this day. On the following day, young peoplẹ amuse themselves by 'pursuing the moon, it is also called ko yuch, congra- tulating the moon. On the evening of this day, every householder and boatman raises a, lautern upon the tip of a high pole from the highest part of his house or vessel, on which is inscribed king ho chung triú, 'joyfully congratulate the middle of autumn.' From the greater display of lanterns made, the festival is usually called at Canton by foreigners, the Feast of Lanterns.

Oct. 24th--IXth moon, 1st day. Nán tau sing-kiun, Starry god of the South Pole, descends ; this god belongs to the sect of Rationalists.

     Oct. 24th to 31st.-Xth moon, lat to 9th day. The nine gods of the Great Bear descend; worshiped by the Rationalists, and generally also by the peo- ple, tradesmen, and others, for peace. This period is usually chosen for wor-

84

shiping wandering spirits as well as these gods; the rites are called Tá tsiâu. They are in Canton, among the most showy idolatrous ceremonies. Three or four streets combine, and ornament the streets with chandeliers, puppets, figures and scrolls, and fit up a room for religious exercises to appease the wandering kivei.

  Nov. 1st-IXth moon, 9th day. Tau-mú yuen kiun, Mother of the Dipper; a goddess adored to obtain happiness. This day is also observed as a time to visit the graves, and for children to fly kites; it is called from this, tang kau, 'ascending on high.'

   November. It is in this month, on a fortunate day of the 9th moon, that the empress, either personally, or by proxy, accompanied by a train of princesses and honorable ladies, repairs to the altar sacred to the discoverer of silkworms. After sacrificing, the empress with golden, and the princesses with silver implements, collect mulberry leaves to feed the imperial silkworms. They then wind off some coccoons of silk, and so end the ceremony. ` This very ancient festival is considered as the counterpart of the agricultural one observed by the emperor in the spring.

Nov. 9th.-IXth moon, 17th day. Sien-fung yé-yé, lord of the Front Spear worshiped to obtain success and profit in life and business.

Nov. 20th.-IXth moon, 28th day. Wa-kwang Tai-ti, god of Fire; wor- shiped by all classes with great parade to preserve houses and shops from fire.

   · Nov. 23d.~Xth moon, 1st day. Tung-hwang Tá ti, Eastern August Great Ruler; a god of the Rationalists.

4

   Dec. 8th.-Xth moon, 15th day. Tau shin Liú Sz,' god of Small Pox; his name was Liú, and he is accommodated with a niche in other temples,

Dec, 20th,-Xth moon, 27th day. Peh-kih Tsz'-wi. Also Wú Yoh, Wá Ti, the festival of the gods of the Five Hills and the Five Rulers, names of five places and five deities collectively worshiped. The Five Hills are Tái shan in Shantung, Hang shan in Húnan, Hwa shan in Shensi, Hang shan in Chibli, and Sung shan in Honan. The Five Rulers are the Azure, Red, Yellow, White, and Black, Shángli.

Dec. 22d.--The tung chi, or winter solstice, a festival observed by all classes; it is also called chẳng chỉ tsich, or the time when the long days come, because then the sun begins to return, and the days grow longer. Officers go in state to worship the emperor's tablet, and the people adore their lares. Dec. 26th.-XIth moon, 4th day. Confucius born; his festival is observed by officers of government and scholars, who repair to his temple.

Jan. 7th.-XIth moon, 17th day.-Ometo Fuh, the present Budha.

85

WEIGHT'S IN USE AMONG THE CHINESE.

In China, most unmanufactured articles are sold by weight, not ex- cepting liquids, wood, silk, cloth, grain, aud live stock. Grain is however retailed by measure. The minor decimal weights are used in weighing bullion, pearls, precious stones, valuable drugs, &c. There are three instruments for weighing, viz., the balances, steel- yards, and money scales. Balances are used for weighing large sums of money; standard weights made of brass, are furnished by the Board of Revenue at Peking, from 100 taels down to one cash. The steelyard is made of wood, marked off into catties, mace, &c.; the largest of them will weigh two or three peculs; it is called dutchin by foreigners, a word corrupted from tok-ching, to weigh. The counterpoise is usually a piece of stone; so common is its use, that no one goes to market without carrying a dotchin. The money scales are merely a small ivory yard like the dotchin, used to weigh money, pearls, and small things.

The chih (cubit, covíð, or Chinese foot) fixed by the Mathema- tical Board at Peking is 13.125 English inches; that used by trades- men at Canton varies from 14.625 to 14.81 inches; that employed by the engineers of public works is 12.7 inches, and that by which distance is usually measured is 12.1 nearly. At Canton, an English yard or má is reckoned at 2 chih 4 tsun, which makes the English foot equal to 8 tsun. The chih is reckoned in the new tariff at 14.1 English inches, which is about the average length of this measure in Canton; this rate makes the chẳng to be 141 inches, or 3†† yds.: the usual length of a cháng in Canton is a very little over 4 yds, though some of them are but a little over 11 feet. The foot-rule of tailors is called pái tsien chih, and the shorter one of masons chau tung chih. The cháng of these craftsmen varies according the chik.

The weights known among the Chinese are as follows:-

1 kernel of millet (→) is one

一粒忝)

10 skú or kernels make one 紫

10 lui 24 chú

make one

make one tdel

16 taels make one catty

lui ;

chú, or pearl;

2 catties make one yin;

shú:

liáng or 14 oz. avoirdupois. kin or 1. avoirdupois.

30 catties make one 釣kiun;

100 catties make one pecul

120 catties make one stone

tán (lit. a load), weighing 1334 lbs. av.

shik.

The money weights are liáng, tsien, fan, lí, or taels, mace, canda- reens, and cash, decreasing in a decimal proportion; the copper coin called cash is named tsien, because it originally weighed & mace.

LIST OF THE RATES OF POSTAGE CHARGEABLE ON A SINGLE LETTER, AND ON A Newspaper, BETWEEN HONGKONG AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES,JOR BRITISH COLONIES,

WHEN FORWarded viå SOUTHAMPTON.

On a A news.

Countries to which prepayment in Hongkong is compulsory. | letter.

Brazil..

Buenos Ayres and Monte Video......... Spain,

Mexico, New Granada, and Cuba,.. Canary Islands

.........under oz.

19

"9

""

"9

19

19

99

""

11

""

19 "}

3

20 20 09 09 GO GO to

d

1752 1∞ Z

8

paper.

Letter rate

" J

"

"}

**

7

11

19

99

"

2

3

19

Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores... FOREIGN WEST INDIES, Viz-Gaudaloupe, Martinique, Hayti, Porto Rico, St. Croix, St. Eustatius, St. Martin and St. Thomas, United States of America, by British packet,,,

do by American do. Chili, Peru, and Honduras.....

do

do

Portugal and Spain, viá Gibraltar. Baden....

Wurtemburg.

Saxony..

Bavaria..

Sweden..

"

"

"1

99

"

19

"

དངངངསྲིང

..under oz.

99

11 11

" งง

""

8

10

"1

1

#

19

1 10

91

2

3

"1

"

"

3

Sardinia and Southern Italy...

Austria and Austrian Dominions...

The East Indies, Singapore, Penang, Aden,

and Suez

Venezuela

Valparaiso and Callao

Panama....

The Continent of Europe vid Marseilles, Ba-

tavia, and Alexandria.......

The Five Consular ports in China, Macao,

Manila, and New Zealand.....

19

19

11

11 19

under oz.

*

Free.

19

19

"2

11

""

"

17

99

"

233

""

4d.

2d.

19

""

1

0

ld.

11 99 0

+

1d.

British Colonies and foreign countries to which prepayment|

Russia.........

Prussia....

is optional.

under oz.

"

under

""

"

11 งา

Denmark.

Hanover, the Duchy of Brunswick, and Lubec. The Duchy of Oldenburg..

Canada, vid Halifax, New Brunswick, Prince Edward's is. and Nova Scotia, Newfound- land, Bermuda, Halifax and British West Indies, including Kingston in Jamaica,................ Canada via United States,..

22-1

"1

19

70299

10

2

Letter rate

"

12

"1

19

0

Free.

"

" 11

Berbice and Jamaica, (Kingston excepted,) Holland and Heligoland...

**

11

11 "1

Bremen and Hamburg..

Belgium....

under oz.

France...

11

+

"

Malta....

under

""

Gibraltar.

11

do.

do.

Ceylon

The United Kingdom, vid Southampton, prepayment optional. Charge upon a letter not exceeding ounce..

No half ounces are reckoned above one ounce, all fractious being charged an additional ouner. Letters and Newspapers for the United Kingdom via Murseilles cannot be prepaid in Hongkong.

* The British Rate is chargeable

222-22 mm - 1

1d. Free.

0

11

1

8

19

0

1 10

} 5

11

1 10

1

0

11

1

do. 1 ounce..

- ט

0

""

2 0

"

8%

POST-OFFICE NOTIFICATION.

Relating to Postage between China and the United States.

A Postal Convention has been concluded between Her Majesty's Govern, ment and the United States of America, under which it is agreed that the SEA POSTAGE ON LETTERS transmitted between the two Countries shall, in future, be fixed at eightpence the Half Ounce, whether conveyed by British or United States' Packets, and that such postage shall belong to the country by which the packet conveying the letters is furnished.

By this convention it is further agreed, that letters from British colonies and possessions addressed to the United States, passing in transit through the United Kindom, shall be delivered to the United States post-office free of all British Postage, whether packet or inland; and that in like manner, letters posted in the United States, addressed to British Colonies and possessions, and intended to pass in transit through the United Kingdom, shall be delivered to the British post-office free of all United States postage, whether packet or inlund. All letters posted at this office, intended to be forwarded through the United Kingdom to any part of the United States by British Packet, will be subjected to a postage of one shilling and eightpence the half ounce, instead of two shillings as heretofore; and upon such letters as may be intended to be con- veyed between the United Kingdom and the United States by packets belong- ing to the United States, the rate will be one shilling only, the half ounce (being the present charge from Hongkong to Great Britain), as the packet postage from England to the United States, as well as the United States inland rate, will be collected in the United States.

NEWSPAPERS addressed to, and received from, the United States, passing in transit through the United Kingdom, whether conveyed by British or by United States packets, are to be charged with a British rate of one penay each. For the present, all letters and newspapers addressed to the United States, will be forwarded from England by British packets, unless specially addressed "to be forwarded by United States packets.'

     It is to be understood, that the abovementioned rates apply only to letters and newspapers for the United States intended to be forwarded from Hong- kong vid Southampton; and that any correspondence vid Marseilles, will be liable to the rates of postage chargeable by that route from Hongkong to Great Britain in addition to the sea rate from the United Kingdom to the United States.

By order of his Lordship, the Post-master General, THOMAS HYLAND.

MASONIC LODGES.

There are three Masonic Lodges in China.

SAMUEL RAWSON, Provincial Grand Master.

ROYAL SUSSEX LODGE, No. 735, AT CANTON.

NORTHERN LODGE OF CHINA, AT SHANGHAI

ZETLAND LODGE, A'T HONGKONG.

Tla. 790 | 1800 casts

Amt.

Cents.

88

Table for Converting Dollars into Taels.

"TW, 715° Tla. 717

a 1000 dis. Ja 1000 die. a 1009 dh. to a dollar

Amount.

715 tacks par 1000 dollars.

moc

mee

mcc

Cash.

Dollars.

T. m. c. c.

17 tacle per 1000 dollars.

T. m. c c.

007

007❘ 007

13

,49

0.378

0.350

720 teals per 1000 dollars.

T. m. c.

0.352

2 014

014 014

26

,50

0.357

0.358

0.360

3 021

021 021

39

,75

0.537

0.536

0.54

028

028 028

1

0.715

0.717

0.72

5

035

035 036

2

1.430

1.434

1.44

042

043

043

778

3

2.145

2.151 2.16

049 050

050

91

4

2.860

2.868

2.88

056 057 057 104

3.575 3.585

3.60

9

064

064 064 (17

4.290 4.302 4.32

10

071 071 072 130

5.005 .5.019 5.04

11

078 078

079 143

5.720

5.736

5.76

12 085

085 086

156

9

6.435

6.453

6.48

13 092

093 093

169

10

7.150

7.170

7.20

14 099

100 100

182

11

7.865

7.897

7.92

15

106

107

108 195

12

8.580

8.604 8.64

16

113 114

115 208

13

9.295

9.321

9.36

17

121

121

122 | 221

14

10.010

10.038

10.08

18

128

128 129 234

15

10.725

10.755

10.80

19

135

136 136 247

16

11.440 11.472

11.52-

20

142

143

144 260

17

12.155 12.189 12.24

21

149

150

151 | 273

18

12.870

12.906

12.96

22

156

157 158 286

19

13 585

13.623

13.63

23

163

164 165 299

20

14.300

14.340 14.40

24

170

171 172 312

21

15.015

15.057

15.12

25 178 179 180

325

22

15.730

15.774

15.84

26 185 186 187 338

16.445

16.491

16.56

27 192 193 194

351

24

17.160

17.208]: 17 27

28 199 200 201

364

25

17.875 17.925

18.00

29 206 207 208 377

30

21.459

21.510

21.60

30 213 214 | 216 | 390

40

28.600 28.680

28.80

31

220 221 223 403

50

35.750 35.850

36.00

32 227

229 230 416

60

42.900 43.020 43.20

33 234

236 237 429

75

53.625 53.775 54.00

34 242

243 244 442

80

57.20

57.36

57.60

35 249 *250 252 455

90

64.35

64.53

64 80

36 256 257 259

463

100 71.50,

71.70. 72

37 263 264

266

481

150 | 107.25

107.55

108

33 270 272 273

494

200 | 143,00

143.40 144

39 40. 284 286

277 279 280

507

300 |214.50

215.10

216

238

520

400 286.00

286.80

1:288

41 291 293 295

533

500 | 357 50

359.50

360

42 299 300 302 546

600 | 429,00

(43).20 432

43 306

307 309 44 313 315 316 45 320

322 324 46 327 329 331 598

559

700 500.50

501.90 504

572

800572.00

573.60 576

535

900 643.50

645.30 648

1

1000715.00

717.00 720

715 tamla 717 taels.

196 tarla.

Amount.

|for 1000 vila. [for 1000 dois, for 1000 dola

ma. cand

T. m. c.

Table for Converting Taels into Dollars.

717 tuels per

1000 dollár.

720 taela per 1000 dollara.

D. cents

715 els per 1000 dollám.

D.

conto

D. cents

013

013

013

0.47

0.657

0.655

0.652

2345 ON

027

027

027

0.43

0.671

0.669

0.666

041

041

041

0.49

0.685

0.683

0.680

055

055

055

0.50

0.699

0.697

0.694

069 069 069

0.72

1.006

1.004

1.000

6

083

063

083

1 ud

1.398

1.394 1.3-8

7

097

097

097

2

2.797

2.789

2.777

S

111

111

3

4.195

4.183

4.166

9

125

125

125

5.594

5.578 5.555

10

139

139

138

6.993

6.973 6.944

153

163

152

6

8.391

8.368

8.333

12

168

167

166

9.790

9.762

9.722

13

181

181

180

11.188

11.157

11.111

14

195

195

194

9

19.587

12.552

12.500

15

209

209

207

10

13.936

13.947

13.888

18

223

223

221

11

15.394

15.341

15.277

17

237

237

235

12

16.783

16.736

16 666

18

251

251

249

13

18 181

18.131

18.055

19 265

265

263

14

19.580

19.525

19.443

20

279

278

277

15

20.979

20.920

20.833

21

293

292

291

16

22.377

22.315

22.222

22 307

306

305

17

23.776 23.709

23.6111

23

321

320

319

18

25.174

25.104

25 000

24

335

334

333

19

26.573 26.499

26.388

25

349

348

346

20

27.972

27.894

27.775

26

363 362

360

21

29.370

29.288

29.166

377

376

374

22

30.769

30.623

30.555

€29 391 390

389

23

32.167

32.079

31.944

29

405 404

402

24

33.566

33.472 33.333

30 419 418 416

25

34.965

34.867

34.722

31

433 432

430

30

41.958

41.840

41.666

32

447 446 444

40

55.944

55.788

55.555

461 460 4.58

50

69.930

69.735

69.444

475 474

472

75

104.895 104.602|| 104.160

489 488 485

90

503 502 499

100

517 516 513

150

531 530 527

200

39

544 543 541

300

40

559 557 555

400

125.874 125.520|||125.00 139.860 | 139 470|138.888 209 790' 209.205|208.332 219.720 278.940- 277.777. 419.580 41.410 416.666 559.440 557.890 555.555

41

573 571 569

500

42 587 535 5-3

600

43 44 615 613 611

691 599 597

700,

800

45

629 627

624

900

46

643 641 638

1000

699.300 697.350 694.444) 833.160 836.820 | 833.50€ 979 "2 | 97 5,299 | 972.22% 1118.880 1115.760 1258.741 125 0 1250.000 (1398.601 [1394.700. 1388.888

12

93

Canton Linguists' Fees.

   The following SCALE of LINGUISTS' FEES, adopted at a General MEETING of the CANTON BRITISH Chamber of Commerce, held on the 16th of September, 1847, and agreed to by the Linguists' Establishments, Ching-ho, Kwan-HO, TAE-HO, Ho-sang, and Shun- wo, came into operation at Canton on 17th September, 1847.

The FEES On Imports to be paid by Consignees; on Exports by the actual SHIPPERS, whether foreigners or Chinese; and on SHIPS by the AGENT for the vessel.

IMPORTS.

EXPORTS.

ARTICLES.

Fee.

Per Chop of

ARTICLES.

Fee.

Per Chop of

Raw Cotton, Bombay....

$6

100 Bales

Tea.

86

300 chests

"

Bengal. Madras

86 100 86 100

">

Raw Silk & Silk Piece

Goods..

$6

100 peculs

Cotton Yarn

Shirtings and other

86 80 bls. of 400]

lbs

Nankeens, brown & blue Alum, Cassia Lignea,

$6

20,000 pieces

Cotton Goods.....

86 4,000 pcs. 40 yds.

Bombazette, Camlets,

Lastings, Long Ells..

86

Spanish Stripes & other

Broadcloths.. ·

86

840

"

Metals, Iron, Lead, Spelter, Steel, Cop- per, Tin Plates, and all other Metals.......... Agar-Agar, Betel-nut, Biche-de-Mar, Co- chineal, Cloves, E- bony, Flints, Fishm- aws,Gambier,Gums, Hides, Pepper, Put- chuck, Rattans, Sal- tpetre, Sandalwood, Sapan, & Redwood,

1,400 pieces

$6 300 peculs

86 300 peculs

Smalts, Window &

Broken Glass,.

Rice...

86

Other Articles in pro-

portion.

སྐྱ

600

naware,

Buds and Oil, China and Galangal Root, Bamboo and Rattan- ware,Camphor, Chi- Copper- ware, Fireworks. Hartall, Lacquered ware, Paper, Rhu- barb, Star Aniseed and Aniseed Oil, Tobacco, Vermilion J Other Articles in propor-

tion.

SHIPS.

On each ship reporting inwards, exceding 150 tons register.

$6 300 peculs

$6

90

Steam Communication

between China, India, Malta, and England.

GENERAL RATES OF PASSAGE,

General rates of passage. Steam communication of passengers, goods and parcels between Hongkong and Singapore, Penang, Ceylon, Madras, and Bombay, also via Egypt, Malta and England, by the Peninsular and Őriental Steam Navigation Company's Steamers.

From Hongkong to

(During the months from December to August, inclusive.)

Description or class of

accommodation.

For ladies or gentlemen

traveling singly.

A berth in the general cabins

throughout,

For a gentleman and his

wife traveling together, Occupying one of the general cabins to Ceylon, and a berth each separately, in the general cabins between Ceylon and England, or Calcutta

Children with their parents. Not exceeding two years. Free (except expense of transit through Egypt, and stewards' fees)

Skige Pe Cey- Ma- pre. Dang. Jon

dras.

Bora-

bay Surs. & Cal.

Malta.

Eng-

Jaud.

$

$

$

$

155 168 298

365

451

643

710,40 734,40

310 336 596

I

Above 2, and not exceeding 52

5 years

Above 5, and under10 years

Servants of passengers,

730

902

1286

1420,80 1468,80

10

12

15

17

24

56 100 122 150

224

248,20 305,20

77

84 149

192 225

329

363,60 427,60

Male

52

European

Female

52

Native

Male & Female

*8*

56 100 122 150

56

100 122 150 39 42 75 91 113

210

231,60 271,60

157

173,8 223,80

SF $88

Becond class & deck passengers.

China Line only.

Second class passengers

-

104

182 225 314

112 200 84 149

52 56 100 122 150 210

First Deck, victualed by ship. 77 Second class deck, victualing

themselves

|Natives of India, first class

250 250 finding themselves.

     In addition to the abovementioned rates to Malta and England, the expense of transit through Egypt will be charged at the Company's Offices, at the time of secur- ing the passage, for account of the Egyptian Government, in conformity with the sub- joined extract from the

TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION TARIFF.

A Lady, Gentleman, or Child above ten years.

A Child of five years and under ten-

A Child of two years and under five.

A Child under two years.

A European Female Servant. -

A European Man Servant or Mechanic.

A Native. Female Servant...

A Native Man Servant on,a dromedary or donkey...

$57.60

38.40

28.80

Free.

48.40

38.40

38.40

19.20

     Passengers will have to pay to the Egyptian Government in addition, 168. per cwt, for the conveyance through Egypt for First class Passengers, of all baggage ex- ceeding 2 cwt., and for children, servants, and 2d class Passengers, of all exceeding 1 cwt. Wines, spirits, beer, soda water, and hotel expenses, are also charged for separately.

91

  Rates of Passage Money from India and China to England by the Steamer foaving Calcutta in the months of October, November, and December, and corresponding ones leaving Hongkong in the inonths of September, October, and November, has been reduced as follows: A Gentleman occupying Gentleman's general accommodation throughout.... $700.80 A Lady occupying Lady's general accommodation throughout.

CHILDREN WITH THEIR PARENTS.

Five years and under ten.........

Two

"

five..

Under two years (no berth provided).

'European Servants, Female. ·

"

SERVANTS of PASSENGERS.

739.20

$355.20 278.40 Free.

$278.00

288.00

211.20

192.20

Native

1

H

"}

Male. Female. Male.

The expense of transit through Egypt is included in the above rates of passage Money. Payment to be made in Spanish dollars, or an equivlaent according to the market value of the Coin tendered. ́A reduction of one quarter passage money both ways will be made in favor of those who take tickets for the voyage to Ceylon and back. For extra accommodation, an additional sum will be charged. Passengers to England, desirous of remaining a month in Egypt, or at any of the ports en route, at which the Company's Steamers touch, will be allowed to proceed in the following steamers without additional payments, provided they give notice of their intention at the time of engaging their passage.

   The above rates include stewards' fees, and table, wines, &c., &c., for cabin passen. gers, with 3 cwt. of personal baggage. For servants and 2d class passengers, provisions without wines, and I cwt. of baggage. Bedding, linen, and all requisite furniture, are provided at the Company's expense, together with the attendance of experienced male and female servants.

No package of baggage should exceed 80lb. in weight. The dimensions most con- venient for transporting across the Desert on the camels, and therefore strongly recom- mended, are, length 2 feet 3 in., breadth 1 foot 2 in., depth 1 foot 2 inches.

   All heavy or Bulky baggage must be shipped on the day previous to sailing. Passengers taking articles of merchandise in their baggage will incur the risk of seizure by the customs authorities in Egypt; and as the allowance of baggage is on a liberal scale, and the freight on parcels moderate, it is hoped that none will convey parcels or pack- ages belonging to other persons, to the prejudice of the Company's interests.

The Company do not hold themselves liable for damage or loss of baggage, nor for delays arising from accident, from extraordinary or unavoidable circumstances, or from the employment of the vessels in H. M. mail service.

Charge for dogs $48,00; 25 cents a day for food, and expenses in Egypt.

N. B. Passengers not proceeding after securing berths, to forfeit half passage money.

J. A. OLDING, Agent.

TRIESTE ROUTE.

THE AUSTRIAN LLOYD'S STEAMERS, continue to ply between ALEXANDRIA and TRIESTE as under, viz :-

The direct, leaving Trieste the 28th of each month, arrives at Alexandria about the 2d or 3d of the following month, and starts for Trieste from Alexan- dria, 18@ 24 hours after the arrival there of the Indian Passengers by the Calcutta steamer, except on occasions when the latter arrives at Suez behind time. A steamer of the same Company leaves Alexandria every alternate Thursday for Smyrna, where it meets the steamers of the Levant Line, by means of which, communication is kept up as previously through Syra with Constan- tinople, Trieste, Greece, &c.

Fares direct to Trieste £18, including table money. Fare viâ Smyrna £13.4, without table money. Passengers intending to avail themselves of the Trieste Route should book to Suez only.

For further particulars apply to

Messrs. WM. PUSTAU & Co.:

Agents at Canton and Hongkong for the Imperial Royal Privileged Austrian Lloyd's Steam Navigatioa Company. N. B. There are now so many Railroads open through Germany, that Lon- don may be reached from Trieste in 6 days with comfort, and at an expense of about £10 or £12.

92

Rates of Freight.

     Rates of freight per Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company's Steamers from Hongkong, including half per cent. Egyptian transit duty on cargo shipped tỏ

·Malta or England.

Description

of goods.

How charged.

Measurement goods, per ton of 40

cubic feet..

Measuring 1 foot and under, parcel

Do. above 1 foot, not over 2, do.

"

$

England. Malta. Bues.

$ $

144,00

Madras,

Calcutta, Ceylon. Sraka. BonLay,

106,00 85,00 40,00 30,00 20,00

5,00 4,00 3,00 2,50 2,00

7,00 5,50 4,00

3,25 2,75

Do. Do.

"

"

"}

3, do. 4, do.

Jewelry, Musk, and

At the rate 4,75 specified per ton 5,00

4,00 5.00

4,50

4,00

valuable articles of a

similar description

Ad valorem

per cent.

Treasure, gold and silver do. do.

{

3,00

3,00 2,50 2,25

2,00

1,00

2,25

2,25

2,00 1,00

0,75

0,50

Silk to England, per ton of 40 cubic feet

96

96

Silk Piece Goods,

..do. do.

$125

125 125 3,00

2,50

1,50

Quicksilver, Ad valorem per cent

3,00

2,50

1,50

Gold Leaf,

.do. do.

1,00

.75

China Cash,

per pecul

0.90

Copper to India, $1.50 per pecul.

     The within mentioned rates to England apply only to shipments exceeding in value 8960; for those under that value, the following charges will be made, viz ----

On Gold and silver, in sums not exceeding·· On Sums from $240 to.

On On

"1

"

480 to.... 720 to..

$480, 4 per cent

$210, 5 per cent

720, 34 960, 3

"

"

"

The above will be deliverable at the Company's Offices, subject to a small charge for clearing and conveying to London.

During the S. W. monsoon, from the 1st April to the 31st of October, the Rates to India will be increased on silks and quicksilver 1 per cent, and treasure ↑ per cent; and to Ceylon and the Straits, on silks and quicksilver † per cent, and on treasure † per cent. Parcels under a quarter of a cubic foot measurement will be taken through to Eng- land at $1,50, $2,00, and $2.75 each; all above that measurement, at the following graduated scale, including all charges to Southampton, except Transit Duty, on packages exceeding $20 value.

4 Inches (cubic) $3,50 5 Inches (cubic) $3,75

3 Inches (cubic) $3,00

2

"

"

4,00

4,33 8

5,11

10

""

"

#

"

"

"

5,50 11

"

n

"

4,66

"

6,00

6,50 "

1 Foot

Single packages when not coming under this Parcel Tariff, or for which Bills of Lading are required, will be charged to Ceylon $5,25, and to Madras, Calcutta and Bombay, $6.75.

For every additional cubic inch measurement, 50 cents will be charged; and if the package weighs more that 2016. to the cubic foot, an additional 25 cents per pound will be charged for the additional weight. This is applicable to general cargo consisting of small packages which might per Tariff be taken at parcel rates.

Parcele not to exceed 100t6, weight, or 5 cubic feet measurement.-All packages under 5 cubic feet will be charged at parcel rates.

     All parcels will be cleared through the Custom-house at Southampton, and forward- ed to their ustimate destination by the PENINSULAR & ORIENTAL STEAM NAVIGA- TION COMPANY, to whom the Duty with all other Charges incurred in England must be paid.

Goods shipped to England or Malta must be packed in non-susceptible coverings, as wood, tarpaahn, &c., and the value and contents declared at time of shipment.

Extract from a Circular.

RESPECTING PACKING AND SHIPPING GOODS for England, By the P. and O. St. Nov. Co's Steamers.

The managing Directors have issued instructions to the Agents in India and China to afford every possible facility to the shippers of goods by this Company's vessels, with an anxious desire that such conveyance shall be made advantageously available,

.94

The Agents have positive orders not to receive on board this Company's Steamers, in future, goods that are not properly secured, to undergo the several transhipments between England, India, and China, as well as the transit across the Desert.

   Although the managing Directors are aware that great difficulty is always experienced in overcoming long-established customs and confirmed prejudices (more especially in China), they hope, by the cordial co-operation and assistance of the merchants here and shippers abroad, to render the conveyance of valuable merchandize by this route secure from damage.

   To effect this, the managing Directors suggest that silk and silk piece- goods be packed in bales; and whereas the inner coverings of these now consist simply of coarse white cotton, over which are several layers of thick paper, the outward wrapper being of thin matting only-they would further suggest that the under covering be wax-cloth, or some fabric impervious to wet; and the bale, in no instance, should exceed 100 lbs. weight, to insure dispatch with the mails through Egypt.

Supposing the silk piece-goods to be packed in cases, they should be more carefully made, and of much greater strength than those at present used.

The trifling additional expense, by the alteration of packing, the managing Directors believe would be more than amply compensated by the perfect order in which the goods would arrive; but to meet any objection that can be advanc ed on this head, the managing Directors are willing to allow two additional cubic feet to a ton for goods that shall be certified to be so packed.

Aug. 8th 1850.

(Signed) JAMES BARBER, Superintendent.

Rates of Passage Money

between Hongkong and Shanghai,

Also (when touching at them) the Intermediate Ports, by the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company's Steamers.

FROM HONGKONG TO

FROM SHANGHAI TO

CLASS OF PASSENGER.

Amoy.

Vingpo an Vingpo | Amoy.

Shanghai

Hong- kong.

75.00 $150.00 $40.00 $120.00 $150.00

10.01.

24:09 50.00

75.00 20.00

12.00

60.00 75.00

40.0 50.00

18.00

32.00 10.00

30.0

38.00

A LADY OF Gentleman occupying

a berth in the General Cabins CHILDREN, under 10 years of age

CUROPEAN SERVANTS,

HINESE PASSENGERS, Victualec

by ship, Payment to be made at port of Embarkation, in Spanish Dollars Current at such port.

:

Bed-

Passengers. A reduction of one quarter passage money both ways will be made in favor of those who take tickets for the voyage from Hongkong to Shanghai and, back. The rates of passage money will be proportionately increased according to the class of accommodation required. The above rates include stewards' fees, table, wines, &c., for first-c ass passengers. ding, linen, and all requisite cabin furniture are provi ed in the steamers at the Company's expense, together with the attendance o experienced servants. Each first-class passenger allowed to carry one native servant free, all above that number will be charged for as native passengers. Passengers not em- barking after engaging passage, to forfeit, half the amount of passage money.

95

Passengers will be expected to comply with the regulations established on board the Steamers, for the general comfort. No berth or cabin is to be occupied by a passenger without application to the Agent on shore, or the

Purser on board.

}

Baggage. First-class passengers are allowed 3 cut. of Personal Baggage free of freight, and children and servants 14 cwt. each. A passenger taking a whole cabin will be entitled to take in the Steamer, free of freight, one-half more baggage than the regulated allowance. The charge for conveyance of extra baggage, should there be room in the vessel, will be the same as that made for cargo.

          All baggage must be shipped on the day previous to sailing, except carpet-bags or hat-boxes, and small packages of the same description. Passengers taking parcels or articles of merchandise in their baggage will' incur the risk of detention for freight by the Company's Agents. No trunks, boxes, or portmanteaus allowed in the saloon or cabins. Charge for dogs,

five dollars each.

** All parties concerned are requested to take notice, that the Company will not hold themselves liable for any damage or loss of luggage, baggage, or pas- sengers' goods or parcels, nor for detention or delay in the delivery thereof, arising from accident or from extraordinary or unavoidable circumstances.

HONGKONG, June 1st, 1850.

J. A. OLDING,-Agent.

RATES OF FREIGHT BETWEEN Hongkong and ShangHAI,

and from Shanghai to India and England, by the P. and O. St. Nav. Co.'s Steamers.

GOODS.

N. E. Monsoon

S. W. Monsoon

"

"

to Straits, per ton of 40 cubic ft..

Opium, per chest.

Parcels, under 2 feet measurement, each. Silk, fine, raw, per bale -

Oct. 20-Ap 20 Ap 20-Oct. 20

$8,00

$6,00

2,00

2,00

2,25

3,25

(30,00

40,00

to India

55.00

65,00

"

"

to England

Common, raw...

"

"}

Tea and measurement goods. ·

Treasure, to Hongkong ad valorem per cent

106,00

106,00

By special agreement.

"

to Shanghai

to Straits

"

to India

"

J

to England

Jewelry, musk, &c. I per cent, over treasure rates.-

to England ad valorem per cent.

Silk Piece Goods, to Hongkong","

to Straits

to India

"

to England, per ton of 40 cubic feet.

$150

Payment to be made at the port of shipment in Spanish dollars current at such port. The Company will not hold themselves respousible for wrong delivery, unless each: package is distinctly marked and numbered, and has its port of consignment legibly written on the outside.

The Company will not be answerable for Damage arising from bad packing, or the cases not being sufficiently strong for the Overland Route. Packages intended for transit_through_Egypt should not greatly exceed 120lb in weight.

     Treasure for England the Company will undertake to deliver at the Bank of England, and that for Canton at the Factories.

96

STEAMERS IN CHINA.

CANTON & HONGKONG STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 120 Shares, £250 rach.

"Canton," CAPT. W. SOAMES, 139 Tons, 90 Horse power. "Hongkong," Capt. N. Hill,

140 Tons, 90 Horse power.

_AGENTS-GEO. LYALL & Co. Hongeong. SPENCER COMPTON, CANTON, and PATRICK STEWART, MACÃO.

These Vessels, the HONGKONG and CANTON, run regularly between HONGKONG and CANTON every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from both places, starting at 8 A. M. punctually-the boat of Monday from Hongkong and of Friday from Canton calling at MA- CAO, on which days she starts at 7 o'clock. On other days, the vessels call at Macao or Cumsingmoon if inducement offers; and on Wednesday they are always available for cargo.

Fares-From Hongkong to Canton, and from Canton to Hongkong or Macao......... From Hongkong to Macao,...

Chinese Passengers,..

$8. $5.

$1 each.

Double Tickets enabling parties to leave Canton for Macao only, on Friday, and return by the boat of the following Monday, can be obtained for $12; and to leave Hongkong for MACAO on Monday and return on Friday, for $8.

SCALE OF FREIGHT,

PER HONGKONG AND CANTON STEAM PACKET COMPANY'S STEAMERS.` Treasure and Precious Stones; } per cent ad valorem.

Long Cloths,

Do.

Velvets,

Yarn,

·

Embroidered

Woollens, Long Elis,

Camlets,

Other Woollens,

Cornelians,

Wine and Spirits,

·

14 cent per Piece.

2 11* **

-

24 "

-

25 cents per pecul.

99.

per piece.

"

19

50

50'

2.00

Ivory,

Cow Bezoar and Gyms,

Beer,

Tea,

3.50 0.30 i

Do. under 1 ton,

0.50

19

++

Drugs and Oil,

Raw Silk,

Chowchow Cargo,

19

21.

$1.50 per Hhd.

Silk Piece Goods,

Quicksilver,

Vermilion and Brass Leaf.

"

13

per bale of 6 Pieces. per Bundle.

$3 00 per Chest.

0.50 † 3 doz. Case, $2 per Hhd., $3 ☞ Pipe.

0.50 6

"9

Ton of 400 feet.

"

"

"

chest, 20 cents ☞ ¦ chest, 8 cents a box.

30

     20 0.40 pecul case, 25 cents a half pecul Case. 1.50 per bale or case.

4.50 per ton (or 50 cents @ $1.50 per case.) 0.50 per Box.

0.25

GEO. LYALL & Co. Agents H. &. C. S. P. Company. ¡

Hongkong, 7th May, 1850.

97

      The Peninsular & Oriental Steam NAVIGATION COMPANY has one steamer on the river of Canton, called the " CANTON," Captain T. Jamieson; she has no regular days for running, but plies between Canton, Macao, and Hongkong, as circumstances require, or takes trips along the coast. Her accommodations are good. The agents are J. A. Olding, in Hongkong, M. FISCHER in Canton, and John Middleton, in Macao.

    A small American Steamer, the "SPARK," Capt. Woodberry, runs on the Pearl River and to the outer anchorages, but has no stated days for making passages.-A. VEIGAS, agent in Canton.

The charges for passages in these steamers is the same as in the II. & C. St. Packet. Co.'s Steamers.

SCALE OF CHIArges for storing gooDS IN THE LE-TSUNE PACKHOUSE, HOÑAN.

    The following Fire Insurance Companies will accept risks against fire:-

Alliance, London. Agents in China, Messrs. Jardine, Mathebon & Co. Imperial,

Globe, Sun, and Phœnix.

Imports.

Messrs. Neave & Co.

"

cepts.

5 bale

per

5 per pecul

per month.

Raw Cotton..

'T'in, Copper, &c....

....

Lead, Steel, Iron..........

3 p.

""

Ginseng, Gums, Cloves, &c....

5 p.

Sandalwood and other woods..

4 p

Rattans, Betel-not, Rice, Pepper, &c..

3 p.

Cotton Yarn....

5 p.

Camlets, Long Ells, Lastings, & c..

15 per bale

15 p.

Spanish Stripes, &c.............(6 pieces)............ Longcloths, Cambrics, Chintzes, &c....

after lat month

20 to 30 pieces...

{40 to

40 to 60

Exports.

Raw Silk..

Tea, Chest

Half Chest Boxes.

"

80 and upwards.

per piece 10 per bale 20 per

30 per

25 per.. bale

3 each

""

2 eich

"

1 each

"

"

After the 1st month

0% jo topompas vje

per cent.

Laying down, weighing, and examining Tea, 5 candareens per pecul. Chop-boats seut down to Whampoa for cargo with servants in charge.

SPENCER COMPTON, Proprietor.

10

98

LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE CANTON BRITISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

STEPHEN PONDER, Chairman. JOHN DENT, Deputy Chairman. SPENCER COMPTON, Secretary.

Messrs. George Barnet & Co. Mr. Francis B. Birley. Messrs. Blenkin, Rawson & Co. Chalmers & Co.

"

The Commercial Bank of India.

Messrs. Dallas & Co.

"

Dent & Co.

Dirom, Gray, & Co.

Gibb, Livingston, & Co.

Gilman & Co.

"1

Holliday, Wise & Co.

11

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Mr.

Levin Josephs.

Messrs. D. Kennedy & Co.

Mr.

Lindsay & Co.

 James L. Man. Messrs. Neave & Co. The Oriental Bank. Messrs. Reiss & Co.

""

"

Ripley, Smith & Co.

Pestonjee Framjee Cama & Co. David Sassoon, Sons & Co. Turner & Co.

W. H. Wardley & Co.

99

Insurance Offices in China.

Offices.

Limits.

Agents.

Asiatic Marine Insurance Office.. Imperial Fire Insur. Office, London.

$40,000

Neave & Co.

£10,000

Canton Insurance Office..

$100,000

Bombay Insurance Society...

60,000

Bengal Insurance Society....

50,000 { Jardine, Matheson,

Reliance Marine Insurance Office.

Alliance Fire Assurance Company of London.......first class risk

second do

Royal Insurance (Fire) Co. of

Liverpool...

Indian and China Marine Insurance

Office of Calcutta......

Risk by Steamers.

Union Insurance Society of Canton Bombay Insurance Company ... Forbes & Co.'s Const. Insur. Fund Alliance Insurance Company of Cal-

cutta....

40,000

& Co.

£10,000

8,000

$25,000

Sykes, Schwabe &

Co.

£10,000 › Gilman & Co. $35,000

75,000

40,000 > Dent & Co. 20,000

25,000 > Russell & Co.

Oriental lusur. Company of Calcutta

20,000

London Assurance House..

Dent, Beale & Co.

Equitable Insurance Society...

40,000

Amicable Insurance Office of London

25,000

Lindsay & Co.

Imperial Marine Insurance Co. of

Bombay....

50,000

Augustine Heard &

Western Indian Insurance Society..

30,000

Co.

Harbor risk.

40,000

Bombay Merchants Insurance Co.. Risk per Steamers.

Bombay Cama Insurance Com-

30,000 › P. & D. Nesserwan- 45,000 jee Camajee & Co. Ruttonjee H. Cama-

30,000

pany.

Eastern Insurance Company.

jee & Co.

45,000

Pestonjee Framjee

Akbar Insurance Company.

40,000

Cama & Co.

Oriental Insurance Society of Bom-

bay......

12,500 F. B. Birley.

Risk by Steamers

25,000

Rathbones,

Wor-

Colonial Life Insurance Co......

thington & Co.

1

100

LIST OF PROTESTANT MISSIONARIES

IN CHINA, WITH THE NAMES OF THE SOCIETIES TO WHICH THEY BELONG.

Names of the Missionary Societies, and the period when they first sent laborers to the Chinese.

1. The London Missionary Society, 1807.

2. The American Board of Commissioners for For. Mis. 1929. 3. The Rhenish Missionary Society, Barmen, Prussia, 1832. 4. The American Baptist Missionary Union, 1834.

5. The Board of the Prot. Episcopal Ch. in the U. S. A. 1835. 6. The Church Missionary Society (England), 1837.

 7. The Board of For. Mis, of the Presby. Ch. in the U. S. A. 1837. 8. The English General Baptist Missionary Society, 1845. 9. The Evangelical Mis. Society of Basle (Switzerland), 1846. 10. The Board of For. Mis. of the Southern B ptist Convention,

U. S. A. 1846.

11. The Mis. Soc, of the Sabbatarian (Baptist) Ch.; U. S. A. 1847, 12. The Mis. Soc, of the Methodist Epis. Ch. in the U. S. A. 1847: 13. The For. Mis. Soc. of the Presbyterian Ch. in England, 1847. 14. The Methodist Episcopal Church of the Southern States, 1848, 15. The Swedish Missionary Society, 1849.

   The Netherlands Missionary Society sent out the Rev. Charles Gutzlaff in 1827; his connection with it was dissolved in 1835. It has had no other missionary to the Chinese.

"hos-

   The Medical Missionary Society in China was established in Feb. 1833. Its sole object has been to afford medical missionaries pitals, medicines, and attendants," without " support or remunera- tion" for their services.

PROTESTANT MISSIONAries at present laborING FOR THE CHINESE, WHEN SENT, AND IN CONNECTION WITH WHAT SOCIETY.

CANTON.

E. C. Bridgman, D D. and fam., Shang. 1829 Amer. Board Com.

S. W. Williams, and fam.,

1833

Rev. Dyer Ball, M. D. and fam.,

1838

(Printer) (Dispensary)

*Rev. James G. Bridgman,

1843

Samuel W. Bonney, licentiate,

1845.

Rev. Peter Parker, M. D.

1834 Ophthalmic Hospitali

Benjamin Hobson м. B. and fam..

1839 Lond. Mis. Soc.

Rev. Andrew P. Happer M. D. and fam.,

1844

Rev. John B. French,

1846

Amer. Pres. Board.

Rev. William Speer, absent

1846

-

Rev. Issachar J. Roberts, and fam.,

1836 Am. Bap. S. Con,

Miss Baker.

+

Rev. Wm. C. Burns,

1850

""

1847 Soc. of Pres. Ch. E.

Mr. Peirce -Ex Alethoclist.

101

HONG KONG,

Rev. William Dean,

Rev. John Johnson,

1834 Am. Bap, Miss. Un. 1848

Jaines Legge D. D. and fam.,

1847 1844

"1

"

(Hospital) --

Ms. Här

""

(Printer)

H. J. Hirschberg M. R. c. 8. Lond, Richard Cole and family,

Rer. Theodore Hamberg,

Rev. Rudolph Lechler,

Rev. Ferdinand Ģenaehr,

Rev., Wilhelin Lobscheid aberat

Rev. R. Krone,

Carl Vogel.

1839 Lond. Mis, Soc.

1846 Ev. Mis. Soc. of B.

1847 "

1847

""

"

1848 › Rhenish Mis. Sọc.

1850 Cassel in Germany

1887 Amer. Bd. Com.'

AMOY.

Rev. Elihu Doty and sam.

Rev. John V. Ñ.'Talmage and fam.

1847

""

"

Wm. Young and/fam.,

1835

Rer. John Stronach, (nt Shánghái)

1837

Rev. Alex. Strọnach and fain.

James llop, M. D. and fam., Rev. T. Gilfillan,

James H, Young M.DA

Likes Sarah Hervil SURCHAU.

Rev. Stephen Johnson, and family. Rev. Lyman B. Peet and fam., Rev. Seneca Cummings and fam., Rev. Caleb C. Baldwin and fam., Rev. William L. Richards, Rev. Justus Doolittle and fam. Rev. M. C. White, Rev. J.D. Collins,

Rev. R. S. Maclay, and family Rev. A. Elquist.

Rev. William Welton, M. D.

1837 Lond. Mis. Soc. 1848.

1848 J

1850 Soc. of Prés. Ch. E.

1833

Rov Coule

1839

1848

1.

Dr. Miler

1848

› Amer. Bd. Com. Jack

"

Returne

1848 Returmeil 1840

freturn

1847 Meth. Epis. U. S. A! 1847

1848

1849 Swedish Miss. Soc. 1850 Church Miss. Soc. 1850

""

1844 Amer. Pres. Bd.

Rev. John D. Jackson.

NINGPO.

Rev. M. S. Culbertson and fam.,

Rev. R. Q. Way and fam.,

1844 "

"

""

D. B. McCartee, M. D.

1844

Rev. J. W. Quarterman,

1846

""

Rev. H. V. Rankin and family,

1849

"

M. S. Coulter and family,

1849

(Printer)

Rev. WA Martin and fam.

1850

Rev. S. N. Martin and fam.

1850

Rev. J. T. Goddard and family,

  Dan. J. Macgowan. M. D. and family, Rev. Ed. C. Lord and fam.,

Rev. Thos. H. Hudson,

Joseph Hudson, Assistant.

Rev. R. H. Cobbold,

Rev. W. A. Russell,

Rev. S. Gough.

19

1839 Am. Bap. Miss." U. 1843 (Dispensary)

1847

19

11

:

1845 Eng. Gen. Bap. S. 1845 "

1848

""

1848 Ch. Miss. Soc.

1850

102

SHANGHAI,

Rev. W. H. Medhurst D. D. and fam., W. Lockhart, M. R. c. s. and fam., Rev. Win. C. Milne and fam.,

1817)

1838 | (Hospital)

1839

Rev. W. Muirhead and fam.,

1847

Lond. Mis. Soc.

A. Wylie,

1847

Rev. Joseph Edkins,

1848

(Sup't of press.)

Miss Philip,

1850

Rt. Rev. W. J. Boone D. D. and fam.,

1837

Rev. E. Syle and fam.,

1845

Miss Jones,

1845

Am. Epis. Bd.

1850

Miss Tenney,

Miss Fay Rev. J. Lewis Shuck and fam.

Rev. George Pearcy and family, Rev. M. T. Yates and fam., Rev. C. Carpenter and fam., Rev. Nathan Wardner and sam., Rev. C. Taylor, м. D. and fam., Rev. B. Jenkins and fam., Rev. Thos. McClatchie and fam., Rev. John Hobson and family, Rev. J. K. Wight and fam.,

Summers

1836

1847 Bap. South Con. 1847

1847 Sabbat. Soc. U. S.A. 1847

1848 Methodist Epis.'

} 1848( Church South 1344 Church Mis. Soc. 1849 }

1849 Amer. Pres. Bd.

""

SOCIETIES.

London Mis. Society

SUMMMARY.

Canton.

Hong-

Fur

kong.

Amoy.

Shang- Ning-

Total.

chau.

hai.

po.

3

5

6

15

6

లులు: : :

13

3

5

Am. Board of Commissioners Rhenish Mis. Society Am. Baptist. Mis Union Church Mis. Society Eng. Epis. Church of U. S. A. Pres. Board of U. S. A. Eng. General Baptist Soc. Evan. Soc. of Basle. Southern Bap. Con. U. S. A. Sabbatarian Bap. Soc. U. S. A. Meth. Ep. Church of U. S. A. Meth. Ep. Ch. South, U. S. A Presb. Church in England Swedish Missionary Soc. Unconnected

-

Total at all ports

Societies engaged

Missionaries

-

3

:~

CON

2

3

:00

8

3

4

...

2

2

...

...

: ܗ:

12

10 8 | 12 | 15 |

18 | 75

American. English. Swedish Swiss. German. Total.

8 43

25

1

15

2

3

74

ROMAN CATHOLIC ESTABLISHMENTS AT HONGKONG. Rt. Rev. Theodorus A Forcade, Vicar apostolic of Japan, and pro-prefect aposto-

lic of Hongkong.

Rev. John Fenouil. Rev. Louis Bounard.

Rev. Felix McMahon.

Rev. Prudence Girard.

Rev. Napoleon F. Libois, Procureur général de la Société des Missions Ftran-

geres. Pierre Monicou, Assistant.

Rt. Rev. Joseph Rizzolati, Vioar Apostolic of Húkwóng.

Very Rev. Fr. Anthono Feliciani, Procureur of the Propaganda Fide. Rev. Lewis Ambrois. Vice urocureur Box

103

Diplomatic Establishments in China.

Her Britannic Majesty's Superintendency of Trade, and ConsulAR ESTABLISHMENTS.

At Hongkong.

His Excellency SAMUEL G. BON-S H. B. M. Plenipotentiary and

HAM,

Hon. A. R. JOHNSTON,

Rev, Charles Gutzlaff, absent

T. F. Wade.

    Mr. Fred E. Harvey Mr. W. Woodgate Mr. Joao Hyndınan Mr. G. S. Morrison

{

Chief Superintendent of Trude. Secretary and Registrar. Chinese Secretary.

Assistant Chinese Secretary. First Assistant. Second Do.

3d Clerk.

4th Clerk.

At Canton.

John Bowring, LL. D. Adam W. Elmslie, Esq. Thomas T. Meadows, Esq. Mr. J. T. Walker, Mr. Horace Oakley, Alexander Bird, Esq.

G. G. Sullivan, Esq. John Backhouse, Esq. Martin C. Morrison, Esq. Mr. Frederick L. Hertelet, Charles A. Winchester, M.D. Mr. W. H. Pedder.

R. B. JACKSON, Esq.

C. A. Sinclair, Esq.

D. B. ROBERTSON, Esq. J. A. T. Meadows, Esq. Mr. Patrick Hague,

Rutherford ALCOCK, Esq

William Connor, Esq.

Consul. Vice Consul. Interpreter.

Senior Assistant. Junior Assistant. Consular Agent, Whampoa.

At Amoy.

Consul.

Vice Consul, absent.

Interpreter.

First Assistant,

Second Do. & medical attendant.

Clerk.

At Fuhchau.

Consul.

absent.

Interpreter in charge.

At Ningpo.

Vice Consul.

Acting Interpreter.

Senior Assistant.

At Shánghái.

Walter H. Medhurst, jr. Esq

Consul.

Vice Consul,

Interpreter.

Mr. F. H. Hale, Senior Assistant & medical attendant. (absent.);

Mr. Frank Parish,

Mr. W. H. Fittock,

Acting Senior Assistant, Junior Assistant.

104

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES.

Rev. Peter Parker, M. D.

R. B. Forbes, Esq.

F. T. Bush, Esq. R. P. De Silver, Esq.

Charles W. Bradley, LL. D.

John N. A. Griswold, Esq. Thomas Hunt, Esq.

Chargé d'affaires, Secretary of Legation, and Chinese Interpreter. Vice Consul at Canton. Consul at Hongkong.

,;

Consul & Naval Storekeeper, Macao.

Consul at Amoy.. Consul at Shanghai. Consular agent at Whampoa.

FRENCH

LEGATION.

ALEXANDRE FORTH-ROVEŇ.

A. de Codrika,

Leon Pages,

Jules Zanolle,

Arthur Smith,

Joze M. Marques,

H. G. I. Reynvaan, Esq

G. E. Haskell, Esq.

Robert Jackson Esq.

M. de Montigny,

M. B. Edán.

M. de Kleskowski,

1:

Envoyé de France en Chine, absent Acting Envoyá:

Secretaire.

Chancelier.

I.

Attache de la legation. Interpreter.

Vice Consul at Canton,

Agent Consulaire at Hongkong.

Agent Consulaire at Amoy.

Consul at Shanghái, and acting

Consul for Ningpo.

Chancelier.

Interpreter at Shanghái.

SPANISH LEGATION.

Don SINIBALDO DE MAS,

Don Juan Bumtista de Sandoval, Don Jozé de Aguilar, Don Juan Lecaroz, James Tait, Esq.

Sr. Jozé Vicente Jorge,

Robert Browne, Esq. Gideon Nye, Jr. Esq. . W. W. Parkin, Esq. John Burd, Joseph Jardine, Esq. Alexander Calder, Esq. John Dent, Esq. T. C. Beale, Esq. Richard Carlowitz, Esq. William Pustan, Esq. Sr. A. A. de Melló, Camillo Lelis de Souza,

Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary. Secretary of Legation absent } Attachés & students.

}

Vice Consul at Amoy. Spanish Consul at Macao.

Consul for Netherlands.

Constil for Chili.

Consul for Peru:

Danish Consul, Hongkong. Acting Danish Consul, Canton.. Acting Danish Consul, Shanghái. Partuğu.se Consul at Canton, Portuguese Consulat Shánghái. Consul for Prussia aud Saxony.

·Consular agent for Austria. Brazilian Consul,,

t

Vice Consul for Brazil at Mucao.

J

+

105

Government of Macao.

   D. Jeronimo Jozé de Matta, Bishop. M. de Siqueira Pinto, Chief Justice. Joaŏ A. Tavaris, Commandante. J. F. d'Oliveira, Vereador. L. Marques, Procurador.

Miguel Pereira Simoens, Fiscal.

Governor's Department.

   Antonio Jozé de Miranda, Secretary to government. Jeronimo Pereira Leite, A. D. C. to the governor. Jozé Carlos Barros, Jozé Franco.

Dom. Jeronimo Jozé de Matta, Bishop.

Clerks.

Rev. Braz de Mello, Secretary to the Bishop.

Joaŏ A. Tavaris, Commandante.

J. B. Goularte, Provisionary Commandante.

   Dr. Joao Damasceno C. dos Santos, Attorney-gencral. P. J. da Silva Loureiro, Harbor Master.

D. J. Barradas, Postmaster.

M. de Siqueira Pinto, Judge.

Judiciary.

Joao Batista Gomes, Substitute of the Judge. Francisco da Silveira, C. de O. de C. Registrar. Miguel F. Telles,

Thomas de Aquino Migueis,

Autonio Rangel, Accountant.

} Clerks.

Council of Government.

M. de Souza, Treasurer, Ludivino Simoens.

Camillo Lelis de Souza, Judges. I. Simoens.

Municipal Chamber.

Jono Jozé Vieira,

Felippe Vieira,

J. F. d'Oliveira,

A. Carlos Brandao

Vereadores.

Thos. J. de Freitas Procurador.

Maximiano da Roza,

Pedro da Roza, }

Chinese Department.

L. Marques, Procurador.

Clerks.

   Joao R. Gonsalves, Interpreter. Florentino dos Remedios Do.

Jeronimo da Luz,

Do.

Joaquim Xavier,

Do.

B. Simoens,

} Clerks.

Pio de Carvalho,

Revenue Department.

Miguel P. Simoens Fiscal

} Acc'ts.

Justices of the Peace.

Candido Ozorio.

Antonio Jozé da Rocha.

Autonio Rangel, Clerk.

Treasury.

Miguel de Souza,

}

Treasurer.

Francisco de Nozueira, Clerks.

Assessors.

Dr. J. D. C. dos Santos. Joao Lourenço d'Almeida. Fran. A. P. de Silveira. Miguel Maher.

A. A. de Silva, Scerclary.

Joao Victorino da Silva. Angelo A. da Silva, Clerk.

Resident Merchants, &c.

A. A. de Mello.

Florencio de Cruz. Joao C. Pereira. Albino A. de Silva. Antonio Manoel Pereira.

Domingos Tavares. Antonio Carlos Brandao. Evaristo Lopes.

- Barboza, M. J.

Bernardo E. Carneiro.

J. A. Pereira.

Francisco Placé.

Bernabé Govea.

Camillo Lelis de Souza.

J. A. Ozorio.

  Carlos Jozé Caldeira, C. Ozorio & Co.

Watch and Clock Makers. Candido Ozorio.

Carlos Vicente da Rocha.

Claudio 1. da Silva.

Francisco da Silva,

Francisco P. Xavier.

Cypriano Antonio Pacheco.

Domingos Pacheco. Esteban Garetta. Emigdio Jozé do Rozario. Felippe Vieira.

  Francisco Peres de Silva. Innocencio A. dos Remedios. Joao J. dos Remedios.

M. A. dos Remedios. F. H. de Azevedo. E. Q. dos Remedios. I. dos Remedios. J. d'Assis Fernandez. J. J. Borges.

Joao B. Gomes.

C. Gracia.

Joao Maria da Silva. Jozé Bernardo Goularte.

     JoaŎ Jozé da Silva. Jozé Vicente Jorge.

I. Peres da Silva. Izidoro d'Almeida. Antonio M. Pereira.

106

Lino Lopes. Pedro Lopes.

Manoel J. do Rozario. Jozé Maria de Fonçeca.

Jozé de Sá.

Jozé Manoel de Jezus Jozé Francisco d'Oliveira. Jozé Simao dos Remedios. - Jozé de Lemos. Lourenço Pereira.

A. de Miranda. Angelo A. da Silva. C. da Rocha. F. da Cunha. L. da Cunha. Lourenço Marques.

E. Marques. A. Marques.

Manoel. Pereira.

Felippe A. Ozorio.

Pedro Marques.

:

Thos. J. de Freitas, Dispensary.

E. Marçal.

Jozé da Silva.

Jozé Severo.

Vicente C. da Rocha, Sen. Vicente C..da Rocha, Jr.

John Smith.

Honorio Marçal.

Joaquim. Barradas.

R. P. De Silver, U. S. Consul.

Lino de Almeida,

J. A. Durran.

Patrick Stewart and family. James P. Sturgis, George Perkins,

George Chinnery, M. R. A.

Landscape and Miniature Painter. John Middleton and family. Benjamin Seare and family. Heerjeeboy Rustomjee. Hormusjee Cowasjee. Pallanjee Dorabjee. T. B. Watson and family,

Aptonio de Eça. Wm. Allanson and family, John Fitzpatrick, J. Villarte,

107

Government of Hongkong.

H. E. SAMUEL G. BONHAM, C. B., Governor, Commander-in-chief, Vice-Admiral, Plenipotentiary, and Chief Superintendent of Trade. C. P. Teesdale, lieut. II. M. 83d Regt. A. D. C. to H. E. the

Governor.

Hon. Major-Gen. William Staveley, c. B., Lieut.-Governor and Com-

mander of the forces.

Hon. Major W. Caine, Colonial Secretary and Auditor-General. Hon. A. R. Johnston, Secretary and Registrar. Hon. John W. Hulme, Chief-Justice.

Hon. W. T. Mercer, Colonial Treasurer, absent. Hon. Joseph F. Edger, Members of Council.

Hon. David Jardine.

COLONIAL SECRETARY'S OFFICE. Hon. Major Caine, Colonial Secretary Rev. C. Gutzlaff, Chinese Sec. (absent.) L. D. Almada e Castro, Chief clerk. J. M. d'A. e Castro. 2d clerk, H. F. Hlance,

3d Do.

Audit OFFICE.

Ilon. Major Caine, Auditor General. E. Morgan, Clerk.

          COLONIAL TREASURY. Hon. W. T. Mercer, Treasurer, abs. R. Rienaecker, Accountant, and act. Tr. J. Hare, Assistant.

Messrs. May and Caldwell, Assessors

and Collecters.

SURVEYOR GENERAL'S OFFICE. *C St. Geo. Cleverly, Surveyor Gen.

J. C. Power, Acc't & clerk of Registry.||

ECCLESIASTICAL.

Rt Rev. the Lord Bishop of Victoria. Rev. V. J. Stanton, Chaplain, absent. Rev. Edw. T. R. Moncrieff, LL.D., act- ing colonial chaplain, domestic chap- lain to the Bishop, &- Senior Tutor in St. Paul's College.

M. C. Odell, B. A. Junior Tutor, and

private sec. to the Bishop,

J. Holderness,

Chun Kwang Instructors.

FC Drake, Clerk and Sesto i

SUPREME & VICE ADMIRalty Court.

Hon. J. W. Hulme Chief Justice {& Commissary.

Hon. P. I. Stirling, Attorney General. W. Gaskell, Queen's Proctor R. Dundas Cay, Registrar. W. H. Alexander Deputy Registrar &

Surrogate.

G. A. Trotter, Clerk, to Chief Justice. J. Smithers, Clerk, Usher & Bailiff. John Crook, Under Bailiff.

Ng Fungshan, Chinese Clerk & Shroff

POLICE ESTABLISHMENT. C. B. Hillier, Chief Magistrate. C. G. Holdforth Sheriff W. H. Mitchell, acting Sheriff & Pro-

vost marshal.

absent.

Charles May, Superintendent of police. D. R. Caldwell, Assistant Dc. J. Collins, M. Quin,

G. Clifton.

Clerks.

Thomas Mitton, Jailor. Sylvester Marshall, Sheriff's Officer.

HARBOR MASTER'S OFFICE.

Lieut. W. Pedder, R. N. Harbor Mas-

ter and Marine Magistrate.

E. R. Michell, Assistant.

REGISTRAR GENERAL'S OFFICE. Charles May, Off"g. Registrar General. A. Grandpré, Clerk.

Woo Apat, Chinese Clerk.

C. B. Hillier.

CORONERS.

C. G. Holdforth. absent.

CIVIL HOSPITAL.

Wm. Morrison, Colonial Surgeon. Alberto Botelho, Dispenser.

John F. Dainty.

POST OFFICE

T. Hyland, Postmaster.

R. H. Crakanthorp, Chief Clerk. T. W. Marsh 2d Clerk absent. John Hudson, 3d Do..

J. F. E. Wright, 4th Do.

J. B. Remedios, in charge at Canton.

ROYAL ENGINCER'S OFFICE.

108

Lieut. St. Andrew St. John. S. H. Mathews, Clerk of Works. George Burgoyne, Foreman of Works. H. C. Smith, Clerk.

ORDNANCE OFFICE.

absent

Henry St. Hill, Ordnance Storekeeper. Theo. S. Ford, Ist Clerk. Joseph Cameron, 2d Clerk.

Herbert Clarke, 3d Clerk.

John J. Blight,

Thomas Irwin,

F. C. P da Silveira,

J. A. Brooks,

J. R. Prattent,

John McClaren

· Temporary Clerks

Officers of the 59th Regt.

Colonel A H. Trevor:

Major G. F. F. Baughey.

Captain A. C. Barmester.

W. W. Lodder.

-Gordon.

"

19

""

F. Fuller.

Captain W. Bridges. Lieut. J. De Montmorency. G. Neucomen.

""

L

"

J. King.

J. Leyne.

Stanton Senior.

"9

C. S. Baker.

19

"1

J. Lleyd.

C. F. Chadwick.

"1

J. S. P. Clarke.

19

99

J. G. Chapman.

Ensign H. Kean.

"

F. A. Trevor

S. J. J. Burns. Paymaster, Urquhard.

Doctor Powell.

"

Gorronge.

ROYAL ARTILLERY,

Lt.-col Eyre, Commanding. || Capt. E. H. Fisher. Lieut. J. R. Lugg.

19

D. Jones.

R. Thornton, As. Surg. S. Spencer, Sergeant Major.

COMMISSARY.

J. W. Smith Assistant Commissary Gen. C. W. Eichbaum, { Dep. Asst. J. W. Fagan, } Com. General. ·

NAVAL YARD, WEST POINT. Capt. C. Parker, Naval Storekeeper. Geo: Dewar, Chief Clerk, absent. W. D. Hickson, 2d Do.

J. E. Churcher, 3d Do.

Ev Liddall, }

W. Boxer,

J. Trery

Storemen.

Wm. Cunningham Coopers

1. Hill

A. Speneer, Clerk.

NAVAL.

H. E. Sir FRANCIS AUSTIN, rear admiral, in command of the India & China

station.

Captain C. Austin, H. M. ship Hastings.

Commander,

-Rice.

Sir William Price, Flag Lieutenant

John Hickley, First Lieutenant. John Weber, Second

William Johnson, Third

William Curens, Fourth

"1

109

British Consulate.

Residents at Amoy.

G. G. Sullivan and family.

John Backhouse.

M. C. Morrison.

F. L. Hertslet

absent.

C. A. Winchester M. D. and fam.

W. H. Pedder.

Robert Jackson.

R. Smith.

Eneas J. Mackay

C. W. Bradley, Jr.

Schooner Royalist. W. R. Browning, Commander. Frank Wm. Reid, 1st Officer.

    Jardine, Matheson, & Co. Robert McMurdo, Resident agent. John Thompson.

Ship Pathfinder.

R. McMurdo, Commander. J. R. Rowe, Ist Officer.

Syme, Muir & Co. F. D. Syme, England, J. D. Muir.

R. E. Wilson.

L. J. Guttierez. Wm. Cornabé.

Tait & Co.

James Tait.

C. W. Bradley.

Dent & Co.

Henry Helms, Resident Agent.

Ship Lord Amherst.

H. Helms, Commander. W. W. Fysk, 1st Officer.

)

Rev. E. Doty and family. Rer. A. Stronach & family. Rev. Wm. Young and family. James Hisslop M. B. and family? Rev. J. V. N. Talmage & family. Rev. Thomas, Gilfillan. James H. Young, м D.

Residents at Shanghai.

British Consulate.

Rutherford Alcock and family.

William Connor and family. W. H. Medhurst, jr.

Frank Parish.

W. H. Fittock.

C. de Montingny, consul.

French Consulate.

M. Klezkowski, interpreter. B. Edan, chancelier.

North China Herald Office.

H. Shearman and family

A. J. H. de Carvalho.

C. de Rozario. -

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

A. G. Dallas,

J. Macandrew. Charles Wills. C. S. Matheson. J. B. Ross.

||Blenkin, Rawson, & Co.

A. F. Croom and family.

William Kay and family. F. A. Layton. J. P. Jordan.

Oriental Bank.

E. Langley.

B. Hancock.

Sykes, Schwabe, & Co.

G. S. Spreckley. A. Connolly.

J. T. H. Trautman. James Crossley!

Watson & Co.

J. P. Watson.

A. Thorne.

Augustine Heard, & Co. ›...

C. A. Fearon,

W. N. Piccope.

E. Deacon.

F. Foster,

Nicholas Baylies and family.

Gilman, Bowman & Co.

A. Bowinan.

J. Rusden.

E. M. Smith.

Dirom, Gray, & Co.

D. Potter.

H. M. M. Gray. D. D. Lewin.

..

Schith, Kennedy & Co.

Henry H. Kennedy, abs. H. C. R. Macduff.

Julius Saur. G. J. Bennets.

Lewis Helbling.

Lindsay & Co.

+

William Hogg and family.

George F. Green.

James Hogg.

A. J. Young.

Rathbones, Worthington & Co.

Thomas Moncreiff.

W. S. Brown.

Charles Maltby. William Broughall..

Russell & Co.

J. N. A. Griswold.

W. G. Pierce.

P. W. Graves. P. J. Loureiro Jr. F. Loureiro.

Wetmore & Co.

O. E. Roberts.

J. Wilks, Jr.

1101

Dent, Beale, & Co.

T. C. Beale.

John Bowman.

J. Caldecott Smith. Edward Webb. J. S. Baptista.

Turner & Co.

Alex. Macculloch.

R. F. Thorburn. Nohn Scářth. ›

Gibb, Livingston & Co.

J. D. Gibb. A. Tilby. E. Halton.

V

Hargreaves & Co. W. Thorburn. W. Hargreaves.

J. L. Maclean.

Wolcott, Bates & Co.

Henny G. Wolcott, abs.

F. D. Williams.

#

Graven Wilson. D. O. Clark.

T. P. Cardeiro.

Thomas Ripley ̈& Co......

C. Shaw,

J. H. Winch. J. Bland.

W. Shaw.

Holliday, Wise, & Co.

Roger Jacson.

Charles Waters. Antonio dos Santos.

Reiss & Co.

James Withington.

A. Fincham. W. Potter.

Bull, Nye & Co.

W. W. Parkin.

W. F. Robinson. S. Maitland. J. T. Huttleston.

Mackenzie, Brothers & Co. K. R. Mackenzie. C. D. Mackenzie.

W. G. Aspinall.

Bugelin.

#

J. M South & Co.

J Mackrill Smith and fanuly, D. O. King.

James Hooper.

11. Fogg & Co.

11. Fogg,

T.J. Birdseye.

Bach and Aroné.

Jacques Aroné,

Bach absent.

James White and family.

Jolin Miller, Andioneer.

    British Chamber of Commerce. W. R. Adamson, Secretary.

G. Strachan, Architect'. ·

R. A. Brine, Auctioneer,

111

Kirk and Irons. Dispensary.

Thomas Kirk. James Irons.

George Mottley. J. B. Locke,

Sillár, Brothers.

David Sillar. John C. Siillar.

|D. Rémi, Watchmaker.

A. Bidet.

J. Wright, Cabinet-maker.

Hubertson & Cp.

Geo. F. Hubertson.

John Cassels.

P. F. Richards & Co. Storekeepers.

P. F. Richards. *:

A. Holtz. J. White.

C. M. Donaldson & fam. ship chandler, Edward Hall and family, Baker.

James Macdonald.

F. G. Husun.

L. Tarmohmed.

David Sassoon, Sons & Co.

Isaac Reuben. Eleazer Abraham. Meer Sassoon Moshu.

P. F. Cama & Co.

J. Bozanjee. B. Muncherjee. Nowrojee Nesserwanjee.

Sorabjee Pestonjee. Cooverjee Bomanjee.

Framjec Sapoorjce Lungrana. N. M. Lungrana.

Dossabhoy Hormusjee. Maloobhoy Dongheray.

Hall and Murray, Physicians.

   G. R. Hall, m. n. and family J. 1. Murray M. D.

James Wetherly,

W. H. Medhurst D. D. and fam. W. Lockhart my R. C. S. and fam. Rev. Wm. C. Milne and fam. Rev. W. Muirhead and fain. Rev. Joseph Edkins/.

A. Wylie.

Rev. John Stronach.

Rt. Rev. W. J. Boone D D, and fam. Rev. Ed. Syle and family.

1 •

Rev. T. McClatchie and family. Rev. John Hobson and family.

1

}

Rev. J. Lewis Shuck and family. Rev. George Pearcy and family. Rev. M. T. Yates and family.

Rev. C. Carpenter and family. Rev. N. Wardner and family.

Rev. C. Taylor and family. Rev B. Jenkins and family. E. C· Bridgmań D. D. and family. Rev. J. K. Wight and family.

112

MEMBERS OF THE

CHAMBER OF COMMerce at sHANGHAI.

MESSRS. JARDINE, Matheson, & Co.

BLENKIN, Rawson, & Co.

:

""

""

DIROM, GRAY, & Co.

""

HOLLIDAY, WISE, & Co.

"

GILMAN, BOWMAN, & Co.

""

RATHBONES, WORTHINGTON, & Co.

""

SYKES, SCHWABE, & Co.

""

MACKENZIE, BROTHERS, & Co.

TURNER & Co.

"

""

SMITH, KENNEDY, & Co.

HUBERTSON & Co.

"

HARGREAVES & Co.

""

LINDSAY & Co.

21

WATSON & Co.

11

WETMORE & Co.

"

Mr. J. MACDONALD.

1

"

W. R. ADAMSON.

f

ÇOMMITTEE.

A. F. CROOM, Chairman.

H. C. R. MACDUFF, Vice Chairman. IỈ. R. MACKENZIE.

W. HOGG,

A. G. Dallas.

'T, Moncrieff.

D. POTTER.

A. BOWMAN.

W. R. ADAMSON, Secretary.

}

}

1131

Residents at Canton.

J

DANISH Hone.

(Near the Gate)

W. D. Lewis & Co, W. D. Lewis.

NEW HONG.

No. 2.

Marciliano da Silva

B. Pereira,

F. F. Marques. A. B. da Roza.

A. J. Vieira.

No. 3.

Jacob Hassan,

Ayub Ebrahim.

Sardarkban Jaferkhan.

Dildarkhan Goolabkhan.

Abdolvayad Mohmed.

Allureka Versey.

Ebrahim Shaik Hoosen.

801-KE. No. 3.

Office of the Canton Commercial List.

F. F. de Cruz.

C. de Cruz.

Joao da Costa,

No. 4.

A. Viegas.

F. de Mello.

J. G. Ribeiro.

No. 5.

A. C. Brandao and family.

E. Lopes,

OLD FRENCH Нoxo.

No. 1.

Robert Browne & Co.

Robert Browne.

No. 2.

Bovet, Brothers, & Co.

Louis Bovet.

Fritz Bovet.

Henri Vaucher,

No. 3.

Pestonjee Framjee Cama & Co.

Mauackjee Nanabhoy:

Pestonjee Merwanjec Eranee. Cowarjee Pestonjee. Framjee Edujee.

Hapoojee Pallanjee Rapjee,

Dhunjeebhoy Muncherjee,

Dinshaw Merwanjee. Nowrosjee Nesserwanjee,

No. 4.

Noor Mohamed Datoobhoy & Co.

Khan Mohamed Datoobhoy.

Alladin Remjee.

No. 5.

Ameerodeen & Jafferbhoy,

I

Ameerodeen Abdool Latiff: - ΤΑ

Jafferbhoy Budroodin.

Framjee Burjorjee.

No. 6.

P. & D. N. Camajee & Co.

Pestonjee Nowrojee Pochajee, abs. Dorabjee Nesserwaxjéo Camajee. abs.

Office of the Canton Daily Advertiser. Rustomjee Framjee Mehte

Jozé V. Barras,

·L. J. Jezus.

(Near the river.)

Rev. A. Horsburgh.

Muncherjee Nesserwanjee, R. Pestonjee Cawperwala. Shaikally Mearally.

Burjorjee Sorabjee.

Rev. William C. Burns.

SPANISH HONG.

No 7.

Fazul Damany.

Casimbhoy, Nathaphoy & Co.

Jeraz Munjee.

Hurjee Jamal.

Mitahbhey.

Jamsetjee N Exchye..

Bimjee Canjee.

Ludda Chatoo.

15-

Gangjee Goolam Hoosain,

Mohamed Pudmdy Muscatee, Hassam Fakira.

No. 7

Abdoolally Ebrahim & Co.

Abdoolally Rujabally, Bhoy meali Mohomedally,

I

114

No. 74.

Mohamed Ally Motabhoy & Co..

Shaik Tayeb Furjoolabhoy.

Cumoorden Meerjee.

Tar Mohamed Nanicy,

No. 8.

Nanjee Yacoob,

Ladah Kakey,

Mohamed Syan,

No. 9.

R. & D. Ruttunjee, Rustumjee Ruttanjee. Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee,

Jamsetjee Ruttunjee,

NEW FRENCa Hong.

No. 2.

R. McGregor.

No. 3.-Acow's Hotel.

No. 4.

(Facing the river.)

B. Kenny M. D. and family.

F. do Rozario

Vaucher, Frerès.

Fritz Vaucher.

Constant Borel.

MINGQUA'S HONG.

Billiard Rooms & Masonic Lodge.

A. R. B. Moses.

No. 1.

No. 2.

   Office of the Chinese Repository. S. Wells Williams and family.

No. 2.

Carvalho & Co.

L. Carvalho and family.

C. F. Carvalho,

|Rev. M. Guillermin.

No. 3.

No. 4.

Byramjee Coverjee Bhabha.

Cowasjee Eduljee Cumbatta.

No. 5.

Limjee Jamsetjee & Co.

Jalbhoy Cursetjee.

Rustomjee M. Nalearwala.

Rustomjee Jalbhoy.

MINGQUA's Outside New HONG.

No. 1.

W. Buckler.

W. O. Comstock.

No. 2.

|George Urmson & family.

No. 3.

Shumsoodim Shujawoodin & Co. Shujawoodin Tyabjee. Shaik Davood,

Jeewabhoy Abdoolally, Yusufbhoy Furjoolla, Unverally.

No. 4.

W. Pustau & Co.

[William Pustau.

C. Brodersen,

W. Probat.

No. 5.

Nesserwanjee Byramjee Fackerajee. Burjorjee Rustomjee Mody.

No. 3. Moul & Co.

George Moul.

No. 6.

No. 5.

ĮG. T. Siemssen.

8. A. Seth and family.

A. & G. L. Agabeg.

No. 7.

No. 6.

G. L. Agabēg,

A. L.

Agabeg,

No. 7.

Joseph Tinawy,

Mingqua's New Hong.

No. 1.

Carlowitz, Harkort, & Co."

Richard Carlowitz.

L. Wiese.

Rev. P. Parker, M. D. and family.

AMERICAN HONG. No. 1.

Olyphant & Co.

H. M. Olmsted. Frederick A. King.

E. N. Hitchcock. N. T. da Costa,

No. 2. Post Office.

J. B. dos Remedios, Clerk.

Antonio F Vandenberg,

  M. J. d'Aquino. J. E. d'Aquino,

No. 3.

Ripley, Smith & Co.

Philip W. Ripley and family, Henry H. Smith.

Robert Ellice.

PoW HUN Hose.

No. 1.

Lindsay & Co.

F. Chapman,

H. D. Margesson,

No. 2.

Cursetjee Jamsetjes Butiwalu,

Baley Mohamed Kanjee.

Meer Mohamed Tukey.

Aga Mohamed Ally.

Hormusjee Jamasjee Nadershaw,

No. 3.

Hormasjoe Framjee & Co.

Pestonjee Dinsha wjee,

Hormusjee Rustomjee Daver,

Sapoorjee Byramjee,

Dinshawjes Framjes Casa,

No. 5.

Cowasjee Sapoorjee Lungrana, Muncherjee Sapoorjee Lungrana, Aderjce Sapoorjee Goozratee, Pestonjee Jamsetjee Motiwalla, Rustomjee Pestonjee,

Dadabhoy Jamsetjes Dulackow, Merwanjee Eduljee,

No 6

Dent & Co

John Dent,

M W Pitcher,

William H Luce,

G Anderson,

Nicholas de St. Croix,

Imperial Hono Nos 1 and 2 Wetmore & Co

William Moore, G H Lamson,

Thomas Gittins, Henry Davis,

John B Goodridge,

Samuel Robertson,

W Shepard Wetmore, M Simoens,

James D Hunter,

115

No 3

JL Man & Co

James L Man,

|S. Mackenzie,

S. Marjoribanks, Surgeon,

J L Pereira,

No 5

D Kennedy & Co

David Kennedy,

C A Koch,

No 6

Gibb, Livingston, & Co.

WP Livingston,

John Skinner,

J M Wright,

George Gibb,

SWEDISH Hore. Nos 1, 2, and 3 Russell & Co.

R B Forbes,

Robert 8 Sturgis, Edward Cunningham,

F Reiche, J Crampton, C W 8pooner, A H Bancroft, 8 Rangel, J Rangel,

Gustav Norleen,

T Walsh.

No 4

Sword, Purdon & Co

James Purdon,

OLD ENGLISH Hone.

No 1

Nye, Parkin & Co

Gideon Nye, Jr Clement D Nye,

Edmund A Stüll, JP Van Loffelt, ECH Nye, Thomas Pyke, F A Seabra,

No 2· Dallas & Co

Stephen Ponder,

Frederick Booker, J. J. d'Oliveira,

No. 3.

Jamieson, Edger & Co. Richard Rothwell.

No. 4.

Wilkinson & Sanddri.

Alfred Wilkinson.

E. J. Daniell.

No. 6.

Wolcott, Bates & Co. Schwemann & Gó. D. W. Schwemann." William Dreyer. M. de Souza..

No. 6. Gilman & Co.

R. J. Gilman, A. R. Hudson,

W. H. Vacher, George de St. Croix. C. W. Hudson. A. B. da Roza,''

CHOWCHOW HONG.

No. 1

Dadabhoy Pestonjee, & Ca ¦¦

Pestonjee Dadabhoy,

Merwanjee Dadabhoy Wadia, Jummoojee Nesserwanjee,

Sorabjee Nowrojee Wadia. absent

Hormusjee Nesserwanjee Pochajee, Dossabhoy Bajonjée,

Dadabhoy Hosunjée,

Heerjeebhoy, Ardaseer. & Co.

Ardaseer Rustomjee

Eduljee Cursetjee,

.1.

Aspundearjee Tamooljee,

D. P. & M. Pestonjee,

Dadabhoy Pestonjee,

Zoll No. 2.

116

* No. 41:

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer Bhanjah & Co. N. A. Bhanjah, absent; i Jamsetjee Eduljee.

Framjee Bomanjee Bhundara,

No. 5.

Khan Mohomed Habibboy, ¦¦ Thanabhoy Allana, -- Mohamed Goveer, Sumsøedin,

I

NEW Enokion FiCTORY. ON THE WEST SIDE.

No. 179% u

H. B. M. Consulate. John Bowring, LL. b. Adam W. Elmslie. Thomas T. Meadows. J. T. Walker: Horace Qakley,

Holliday, Wise, & Co. John Holliday and family.

Charles E. Bateson

George Dent

A. Dunlop.

No. 2. Oriental Bank.

Patrick Campbell.

Ndave & Co.

C. W. Murray. H. Murray.

No. 3.

George Barnet & Co.

William Barnet.

John Butt.

Bomanjee & Dorabjee,

Bomanjee Pustakia,

Dorabjee Byramjee,

Henry Moul & Co. (!

Henry Moul.

No. 4.. Fischer & Co.

)

Byramjee Rustomjee..

Pallanjee Nesserwanjee Patell.

No. 24.

Shircore & Mackertoom.

M. G Mackertoom.

C. Lucas.

No. 3.

 Cowasjee Pallanjee.. Cowasjee Framjee.

Sapoorjee Bomanjee, absent Pestonjee Rustumjes.

Agents of P. & 0. St. Nav: \Cd. /. Maximilian Fischer and family.

:

T

Dimier, Brothers & Co.

Charles Dimier.

Victor Bessières.

Commercial Bank of India.

J. E. Maclachlan.

H. Rutter.

M. Sichel.

No. 5. Reiss & Co,...

Thomas Everard. .

      David Sassoon, Sons, & Co. Abdalah D. Sassoon. R. D. Sassoon.

Jehangeer Framjes Busey. Solomon David.

Jacob Reuben. Merwanjes Dadabhoy.

No. 6.

Francis B. Birley, and family.

Arthur Smith.

H. R ilardie.'

Marciano da Silva.

}

117

No. 4.

Blenkin, Rawson & Co. S. Rawson and family. BACK HONLAP fortwright

F. F. Marques.

Chalmers & Co.

Patrick Chalmers.

James D. Park.

No. 5.

BA VAN ZEW; H: Wardley & Co. W. H. Wardley absent. Daniel H. Johnson,

ON THE EAST SIDE.

No. I.

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Joseph Jardine.

Alexander Perusvál ́

M. A. Macleod, absent A da Silveira.

Joba Williams.

James Whittall.

Direm, Gray '& Cò.

W. W. Dale & family.

Charles Ryder.

George Urinson.

D. W. Mackenzie, B. A. Pereira ..

No. 2.

absent

Canton British Chamber of Cammerce.

Spencer Compton. Sec.

Hongkong & Canton Steam Packet Co.

B. Compton, Agent.

Levin Josephs.

No. '3.

Augustine' Heard & Co.

John Heard.

Augustine Heard, Jr,

J. H Everett,

William Gilbert,

E. P. Parker,

W. Comstock, Jr.

E. L. Lança,

F. B. Johnson, C. raylor,

Ruttonjee H. Camajee &. Co. Dossabhoy Hormusjee Camajee,

Nowrojee Cursetjee,

D, Nesserwänjee Mody & Co. Nesserwanjee Bomanjee Mody, Ardaseer Nesserwanjee Mody, Framjee Nowrojee Taback.

Eduljee Framjee, Sons & Co. E Dhunjeebhoy Eduljee, Hormusjee Edaljee, Framjee Sapoorjče,

"

No. 6. Turner &

W. Walkinshaw, W. Hutchinson, M. de Carvalho,

KWANGLE 'HOYO

W. Melrose.

Lung-HING KAI. Rev. A. P. Happer and fantily; Rev. John B. Frénch,

1

Han-wa Law.

Rev. Dyer Ball and family,

TONGSHIK KÓK.

Rev.1. J. Roberts and family,

KUN-LE-PAU.

B. Hobson м, b. & fàmity

At

Whampoa.

A. Bird, British Consular Agent,

Rev. George Loomis, shaplain.

Samuel W. Bonney,

Dr. Smith,

Dr. Lewer,

Dr. Brice,

Ship Chandler, Ship Hygeia

Thomas Hunt & family,

M. O. Lima.*

C. Camper and Co. Skipwrights. 'l

John C. Cowper

A. W. Grosvenor,

3.

Cowper,

Charles Buckton, Ship-chandler.

|John Cooke, Šailmaker.

J. Rowe, Shipwright.

1

118

Commercial Houses in China.

WITH THE LIST OF THEIR PARTNERS AND ASSISTANTS,

AS NEAR AS THEY CAN BE ASCERTAINED.

Abdoolally Ebrahim & Co. Can.

Abdoolally Rujabally,

Bhoymeah Mohomedally.

Adamson, William R

sh

G. L. Agabeg,

Agabeg, A. and G. L. Can

A. L. Agabeg,

Ameerodeen & Jafferbhoy, Canton

Ameerodeen Abdool Latiff,

Jafferbhoy Budroodin

Framjee Burjorjee,

Bach & Aroné, sh

Jacques Aroné.

Bach abs.

Balfour, A. H. surgeon, Hongkong

Barnet & Co. George

George Barnet, (absent)

William Barnet

John Butt

Baylies, Nicolas, sh

Birley, Francis B.

Arthur Smith

H. R. Hardie.

Marciano da Silva

Can

Blenkin, Rawson, & Co. Can. and Sha

T. S. Rawson, England Samuel Rawson, Canton, Alexander F. Croom, Shănghái

Win Kay

sh.

Henry D. Cartwright Canton

F. A. Layton .

J. P. Jordan,

sh

Fraser Sinclair absent

F. F. Marques can

Bomanjee and Dorabjee, Can Bomanjee Pustakia, Dorajee Byramjee,

Bovet, Brothers & Co., Can

Louis Bovet,

Fritz Bovet,

Henri Vaucher.

Bowra, Humphreys, & Co. Hongkong|

C. W. Bowra.

Alfred Humphreys, absent.

W. A. Bowra.

|Browne, Robert, & Co. Canton, Agent Netherlands Trading Company.

Robert Browne,

Buckler, William, Canton

Buckton, Charles, Ship chandler, Wh.

Bull, Nye & Co. Shángkái,

Isaac M. Bull,

Gideon Nye Jr.

W. W. Parkin

New York,

Canton

Shang.

Clement D. Nye Canton

William F. Robinson,

S. Maitland,

John T. Huttletson

|Burd, John & Co., Hon.

John Burd,

Frederick H. Block,

Bush & Co. Hongkong.

F. T. Bush.

R. Rangel,

C. D. Williams,

G. S. Fox, G. L. Haskell, H. Anthon.

M. de Souza, Jr.

F. Barrados, M. de Santos,

C. Archibald,

J. Lerd,

Brine, R. A. Auctionee, Sh, Byramjee Cooverjee Bhabha, Can.

Cowasjee Eduljee,

Camajee & Co., P. & D. N. Can.

Pestonjee Nowrojee Pochajee, abr Dorabjee Nesser. Camajee, abs. Rustomjee Framjee Mehta,

Muncherjee Nesserwanjee, R. Pestonjee Cawperwala, Shaikally Mearally,

Camajee, Pochawjee & Co. Hon.

Camajee, Pochawjee,

119

Canton British Chamber of Commerce.[[Cursetjee Jamsetjee Butiwalu,

Spencer Compton, Sec.

Carlowits, Harkort & Co. Can.

Richard Carlowitz,

Bernhard Harkort, absent.

L. Wiese.

Carter & Co. Hon.

Augustus Carter,

Casimbhoy, Nathabhoy & Co.

Jeraz Munjee

Fazul Goolam Hossain, Bơm. Hurjee Jamal, Mitabbey,

Jamsetjce N. Echeye,

Chalmers & Co., Canton

Patrick Chalmers,

James Dickson Park,

China Mail, Newspaper, Hongkong.

Andrew Shortrede, Editor,

Andrew 8 Dixson,

W. R. Dalziel,

Francisco C. Barradas, Manoel L. Roza Pereira, Antonio de Fonçeca, Vicente F. Barradas, Joaquim M. da Silva, M. F. Barradas,

Jono J. de Bilva e Souza, Forriano da Roza,

Chinese Repository, Periodical, Canton 8. Wells Williams, Publisher. Commercial Bank of India, Can.

J. E. Maclachlan,

H. Rutter,

Compton, C. 8.

Fuhchau,

Compton, Spencer, Agent of H. & C.

Steam Packet Co.

Comstock, W. O.

can.

Cooke, John, Sailmaker, Whampoa. Cowasjee Pallanjee, Canton & Šk.

Cooverjee Bomanjee, skang. Sorabjee Pestonjee abs. Cowanjee Framjee, Sapoorjee Bomanjee, abs. Pestonjee Rustomjee,

Cowasjee Sapoorjee L. Can and Sh.

Muncherjee Sapoorjee Lungrana, Aderjee Sapoorjee Goozrattee. Pestonjee Jamsetjee Motiwalla, Rustomjee Pestonjee Motiwalla, · Dossabhoy Hormusjee, N. M. Lungrana,

Framjee Sapoorjee Lungrana. Dadabhoy Jamsetjee Dulackow Merwanjee Eduljee,

Cowper, J. C. & Co.

Shipwrights Whampoa.

A. W. Grosvenor,

J. C. Cowper,

Cowper,

Haley Mohamed Kanjec, Meer Mohamed Tukey,

Aga Mohamed Ally,

Hormusjee Jamarjee Nadershaw, Dadabhoy Burjorjee,

Rustomjee Burjorjee;

Dadabhoy Nesserwanjee Mody & Co.

Nesserwenjee Bomanjee Mody, Ardaseer Nesserwanjee Mody, Framjee Nowrojee Tabac, Dadabhoy Pestonjee & Co. Can.

Pestonjee Dadabhoy,

Merwanjee Dadabhoy Wadia, Jummoojee Nesserwanjee,

Sorabjee Nowrojee Wadia, absent. Hormusjee Nesserwanjee Pochajes Dossabhoy Bajonjee, Dadabhoy Hosunjee,

D. P. & M. Pestonjec, Can.

Dadabhoy Pestonjee, Dallas & Co. Canton.

William Dallas, England. George Coles,

Stephen Ponder, Cunton.

F. Booker,

J. J. d'Oliveira,

David Sassoon, Sons, & Co.

Abdalah David Sassoon, Canton. Elliao David Sassoen, Bombay. R. D. Sassoon,

Canton.

Jehangeer Framjee Buxey Can. Isaac Reuben,

Eleazer Abraham,

Meer Sassoon Moshee,

Solomon David,

Jacob Reuben,

Can.

Merwanjee Dadabhoy,

Davidson, William, Ningpo.

Sh.

England.

Hon.

Can.

Hon.

Dent & Co. Hongkong and Canton.

Wilkinson Dent, Archibald Campbell, John Dent, Edward Pereira, H. A. Ince, William Dent. M. W. Pitcher, Edward Reimers, Francis C. Chomley, James Trubshaw, T. C. Leslie,

SA

G. Anderson,

W. H. Luce,

Joaquim V. Caldas

Ignacio de A. Pereira, Č. J. Ozorio,

P. Marques,

Henry Helms, John Giles,

h

h

} Amoy.

Dent, Benle & Co. Shin hái,

Lancelot Dent, Europe. Thomas Chay Beale. John Bowman,

J. Caldecott Smith, Edward Webb, J. S. Baptista,

Donaldson, C. M. Ship-chandler, Sh. Dimier, Brothers & Co. ca.

C. Dimier,

Victor Bepsières.

Dirom, Gray, & Co. Canton and Sh.

R. Dirom

England.

W. W, Dale, Canton.

D. Potter, Sh.

W. F. Hunter, Bombay.

T. F. Gray.

C. Ryder, abs.

D. W. Mackenzie,

G. Urmson

H. M. M. Gray, Sh. D. D. Lewin,

Bartholomeo A. Pereira, c

Dorabjee Pestonjee Patell.

Pallanjee Dorabjee,

Can.

Dossabhoy & Co., P. & D. Can.

Dhunjeebhoy Dossabhoy,

Nowrojee Cursetjee,

Dadabhoy Sorabjee,

Duddell, George, Auctioneer, Hong.

C. A Freemantle,

R. Gutieres,

Duus, N. & Co, Hong,

Nicolay Duus,

A. Berenhart,

Eduljee Framjee, Sons, & Co.

Dhunjeebhoy Eduljee,

Hormusjee Eduljee,

Framjee Sapoorjce,

Emeny, W. Hon

Fazul Damiany,

Gangjee Goolam Hoosain,

Mohamed Pudmey Muscatee, Hassam Fakira,

Fischer & Co. Canton

Agents P. & O. Steam Nav. Co.

Maximilian Fischer,

Fletcher & Co. Hon.

Angus Fletcher, England.

Duncan Fletcher, Hong

George Findlay, abs.

A. Campbell,

Antonio M. Cortella

Fogg, H. & Co., Shánghai

H. Fogg

Thomas J. Birdseye

Framjee Jamsetjee, Hon.

Friend of China Newspaper, Hong.

William Tarrant, Ed.tor

S. V. Braga

120

P. de Rozario A. C. Azevedo

S. Simoens

P. Tavanez

Fryer, A. H. & Co., Hongkong

A. H. Fryer.

H. T. De Silver

J. Lemon

C

Gaskell, William, Solicitor, Hon.

H. J. Tarrant

Gibb, Livingston & Co.

Cả. Hồngkong, 4 tháng

li Eng.

T. A. Gibb

W. P. Livingston, Can.

John Skinner, Canton

T. Jones Gibb, Eng.

John D. Gibb

Shanghái

R. B. Ullet,

Hon.

William Ellis,

Hon.

James M. Wright,

Geo. Gibb

A. Tilby

Sh

Gilman & Co., Canton

R. J. Gilman c

Aug. R. Hudson

W. H. Vacher,

George de St Croix,

C. W. Hudson,

Á. B. da Roza,

Gilman, Bowman & Co. Shánghái

R. J. Gilman c

A Bowman,

A. Rusden, Sh.

E. M. Smith,

Hall, Edward, Baker Sh. James Wetherley

Hall and Murray Physicians, Sh.

G. R. Hall M. D.

J. I. Murray M. B.

Hargreaves & Co. Shánghải

William Thorburn

W. Hargreaves

John L. Maclean

Heard & Co. Augustine, Canton & Sh.

Augustine Heard,

George B. Dixwell

John Heard,

A. Heard Jr.

C. A. Fearon Sh.

J. II. Everett,

W. Gilbert,

E. F. Parker

W. Comstock Jr.

E. L. Lança

E Deacon

F. Foster.

Sh.

}

Boston

Herjeebhoy Rustomjee, Macao Heerjeebhoy Ardaseer & Co. Can. Heerjeebhoy Hormusjee abs, Ardaseer Rustomjee,

Eduljee Cursetjee,' Aspundearjee Tamooljee Holliday, Wise & Co. Cunton & Sh. R. J. Farbridge. England, John Holliday, c John Wise, Manila

Roger Jacson, Shan.

M

Charles E Bateson Canton

George Dent

Can.

Charles Waters -Shẳnghái. Antonio dos Santos

11

Hongkong Register, newspaper

Robert Strachan, Proprietor, Athanazio A. de Fonçeca Jozé H. Carvalho,

A. Rozorio,

Hongkong Club House,

R. H. Carvalho Sec. Hormusjee Framjee & Co. Can

Rustomjee Byramjee, (absent.) Pestonjee Dinshawjee, Hormusjee Rustomjee Daver, Sapoorjce Byramjee,

Dinshawjee Franjee Casna,

Hubertson & Co. Shan

Geo. F. Hubertson

John Cassels

Hunt, Thomas

Whampoa

J. M. O. Lima

Hunter, James D.

Canton

Francisco de Sa

Jackson, Robert,

Amoy,

Iness, J. E. Hongkong.

Richard Smith,

121

Alex. Perceval, Floriano A. Rangel,

John B. Ross,

Albino P. da Silveira

C. F. Still,

John Williams,

Charles Wills,

James Whittall,

Robert McMurdo,

John Thompson,

Josephs, Leven, Canton.

ca

h

Sh

C

ca

Sh

ca

Amoy

Just, Leonard jr. Watchmaker Hon.

G. S. Just,

Kennedy, D. & Co. Can. David Kennedy,

George C. Bruce, absent.

C. A. Koch,

Kenny, B. M. D. Surgeon, Canton.

Florencio do Rozorio,

Khan Mohomed Habibhoy,

Thanabhoy Allana, Mohamed Goveer,

Sumsoodin.

Kirk & Irons, Shánghải Dispensary.

Thomas Kirk,

James Irons,

J. B. Locke, George Mottley.

Kwangle Hong.

Y. J Murrow, James Stephenson,

Michael Murphy, L. E. Murrow, M. C. do Rozorio,

Jamieson, Edger, & Co. Hon and Can. Lane, Crawford, & Co. Hon.

Joseph F. Edger, Hong.

G. Jamieson, Glasgow.

John Gifford

Calcutta.

C

h

Richard Rothwell,

R. B. Sherard,

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

   Hong, Canton Amoy &- Shúnghái. Alexander Matheson, England. David Jardine,

Hong.

Joseph Jardine,

Can

A. Grant Dallas,

A. C. Maclean,

Shinghái. Hongkong

J. A. Barretto

ho

J. C. Baldwin

John C. Bowring,

J. B. Compton. John Currie, John Goddard,' Robert Jardine, M. A. Macleod, James Macandrew,

h

T. A. Lane,

Ninian Crawford,

Hong.

Lapraik, Douglas, Watchmaker Hong. Lewis, & Co. D. W. Canton.

Limjee Jamsetjee & Co. Can.

Jalbhoy Cursetjee,

Rustomjee Merwanjee Nalear. Rustomjee Jalbhoy.

Lindsay & Co Hon, Sh and Canton.

H. fl. Lindsay, Crawford Kerr,

Walter Davidson,

W. Hogg,

F. Chapman,

H. D. Margesson

George F. Green,

H. Reinhard,

ho

h

h

A. I. Young,

The

A. G. Wiener,

absent.

S

C. Matheson,

sh

W. F. S. Matheson,

ho

Joze M. d'Outeiro,

h

16

} England,

Hong.

J. Hogg,

Angelo Barradas, B. dos Remedios,

Lübeck & Co, A.

L. Aug. Lübeck,

J. A. Carvalho.

Hong:

S

Can

99

ho

sh

Hong

hong

s

ho

hu

Lyall & Co. George, Hong.

Agents of H. & Č. Steam Packet Co.

George Lyall,

A. E. H. Campbell.

C. H. Head.

Mackenzie, S. Canton.

Mackenzie, Brothers & Co. Sha.

Kenneth R. Mackenzie, Charles D. Mackenzie,

W. G. Aspinall,

McGregor, R. Auctioneer, Canton.

McEwen & Co.

Hongkong.

Alexander Wilson,

W. F. Ross.

R. Markwick, jr,

Man & Co. James L. Canton,

James L. Man.

Markwick, Charles,

Government Auctioneer, Hong W. F. de Cruz.

Marjoribanks, S. Surgeon, Canton.

J. L. Pereira,

Melrose, W.

Canton.

Middleton, John Macao.

Agent P. & 0. St. Nav. Co.

Miller, John, Auctioneer, Sh.

122

Mohamed Ally Motahhoy & Co. Can.

Shaik Tayeb Furjoolabhoy, Cumoorden Meerjee,

Morrison, John G.

ho

Morison, William, Surgeon Hon.

Moses, A. R. B.

Can.

Henry Moul,

Alfred Moul,

abs.

Moul & Co.

Moul & Co. Henry, Canton.

George Moul,

John Silverlock,

Neave & Co. Hon. and Can.

Thomas D. Neave, Hong.

C. W. Murray,

R. Gerard,

T. C. Piccope,

H. Murray,

J. P. Campos,

E. Campos,

Ca.

Ca

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer Bhanjah & Co.

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer B. Bom. Jamsetjee Eduljee. Framjee Bomahjee B.

Nesserwanjee Byramjee Fackerajee, Burjorjee Rustomjee Mody.

Noor Mohamed Dhatoobhoy, & Co.,

Khan Mohamed Dhatoobhoy, Mulloobhoy Dhongersy Shan Alladin Remsey,

Noronha, D. Printer, Hon.

R. E. Souza.

North China Herald, Newspaper, Sh.

Henry Shearman, Proprietor.

A. J. H de Carvalho; ́ C. E. de Rozario,

Shánghai.

Nye, Parkin, & Co. Canton.

Gideon Nye, jr. W. W. Parkin, Clement D. Nye,

Edmund A. Still, J. P. Van Loffelt, E. C. H. Nye,

·T. Pyke,

Francisco A. Seabra.

Olyphant & Co.

Can

H. M. Olmsted,

F. A. King,

J. M. Mur,

L. N. Hitchcock,

N. T. da Costa,

abs.

Oriental Bank, Hong. Can. and Shán. Charles J. F. Stewart, Manager,Hø

Samuel Gray, Acet.

Frederic Tozer, Dep. Acct.

Bruce Tyndall,

Jozé M. de Noronha,

} Clerks.

Archibald Dunlop, Manager, Can.

P. Campbell, Acct.

Edward Langley, Manager, Sk.

B. E. Hancock, Acct.

?

Perkins & Anderson, Shipwrights koj

D. O. Brown,

Perkins, George

Macao.

Pen. & Ori. Steam Navigation Co.

J. A. Olding Agent, Hon.

William R. Roose,

David Frayer, Venancio Gutieres. Max. Fischer, Agent, Can.

Pestonjee Framjee Cama & Co. Ca Sh.

Manaekjee Nanabhoy, P. Merwanjee Eranee,

sh

Bomanjee Muncherjee, sh Jamsetjee Bazonjee, Cowasjee Pestonjee,

Framjee Eduljee,

Bapoojee Pallanjee Runjee,

Dhunjeebhoy Muncherjee,

Dinshaw Merwanjee,

Nowrasjee Nesserwanjee, Sha

Phillips. Moore & Co. Hong.

J. Phillips. Hon.

B. C. Moore,

J. Cohen,

A. B. Oppenheimer,

E. Cohen, P. Cohen,

J. W. Lewis.

G. N. Michell.

Eng.

Manila.

Pustau & Co. Canton and Hon.

William Pustau,

8. Dellevie, ho

123

1

C. Brodersen, W. Probst.

Rathbones, Worthington & Co. Shan.

William Rathbone, S. G. Rathbone,

Eng.

James Worthington,

Thomas Moncrieff,

Sh.

W. S. Brown,

C. Malthy,

Sh.

W. Broughall,

Sh.

Rawle, Drinker & Co. Hongkong,

8. B. Rawle,

Sandwith Drinker,

C. V. Mennecken,

S. P. Goodale, abs.

J. Armstrong,

F. B. Meigs,

A. Farquhar,

Reiss & Co. Shản, and Canton.

M. Sichel,

Jaines Withington,

Canton.

sk.

Thomas Everard, Canton.

A. Fincham

W. Potter,

Rémi, D. Watchmaker, Sh.

Richards & Co. P. F. Storekeepers, Sh.]

A. Bidet,

A. Holtz,

J. White,

Rickett, John, Hon.

Ripley & Co., Thomas, Shár.

Thomas Ripley, England.

Charles Shaw,

 J. H. Winch, Joseph Bland, W. Shaw,

Ripley, Smith, & Co. Canton, Timothy Smith, England. Philip W. Eley, H. H. Smith,

Robert Ellice,

Russell & Co Can & Sh.

Paul S. Forbes New York. R. B. Forbes,

John N. A. Griswold. Sh.

abs.

E. A. Low,

R. S. Sturgis,

Edward Cunningham,

F. Reiche,

J. Crampton, C. W. Spooner, A. H. Bancroft, Segismundo Rangel, Jayme Rangel, W. G. Pierce, P. W. Graves, P. Loureiro Jr. F. Loureiro,

Rutherfurd, Robert, Hon.

J. C. V. Ribiero,

Sk.

Ruttonjee H. Camajee & Co. Can,

R. H. Camajee, Bom.

Dossabhoy Hormusjee Camajee, Nowrojee Cursetjee Liboovala,

|Ruttunjee, R. & D. Canton,

Rustomjee Ruttunjee,

Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee,

Jamsetjee Ruttunjee,

Schwemann & Co. Canton.

D. W. Schwemann,

William Dreyer,

M. de Souza,

Scott & Co. William, Hon.

William Scott,

Adam Scott.

C. A. Ozorio jr.

Beare & Co, Benjamin, Macao,

Benjamin Seare.

Seth, S. A.

Can.

Shircore and Mackertoom, Cu.

A. M. Shircore Calcutta. M. G. Mackertoom,

C. Lucas.

Siemssen, G. T. Canton,

Billar, Brothers.

David Sillar,

John C. Sillar,

Smith, John, Macao.

H. Marçal.

J. Barradas.

Sh.

Smith&Brimelow, Hon.

James Smith,

James W. Brimelow, abs

L. F. Vieira, George Buchan,

Smith, J. M. & Co.

J. Mackrill Smith,

D. O. King,

W. N. Piccope,

Smith, Kennedy & Co.

H. H. Kennedy,

H. C. R. Macduff,

Julius Saur,

G. J. Bennetts,

St. Croix, N. de, Canton.

Stewart, Patrick, Macao,

Sha

Sh

abs

Agent Hong. & Canton St. Pkt. Co.

Strachan, George,

Strachan, Robert,

Sturgis, James P.

sh

Hon.

Macao.

Sykes, Schwabe & Co. Sh.

Benjamin Butler, Manila,

Adam Sykes,

Gustav C. Schwabe, Liverpool.

G. S. Spreckley,

Andrew Connolly,

J. T. H. Trautman, James Crossley.

Sh

$

sh

Syme, Muir & Go. Hong & Amoy.

F. D. Syme,

Eng.

J. D. Muir,

F. G. Angier, R. E. Wylson,

1. J. Gutierres,

W. M. Cornabé,

124 1

Amoy,

ho

Sword, Purdon & Co. Canton,

James Purdon,

Tait & Co., Amay,.

James Tait,

C. W. Bradley,

Eneas J. Mackay.

A. Thorne,

Weiss, Charles, Hongkong, F. Kupferschmidt...

Am. Wetmore & Co. Canton & Shang./

8. Wetmore, jr. absent. De William Moore.

Turner & Co., Hongkong Can. & Sh.

Thomas W. L. Mackean,

Patrick Dudgeon,

abs..

Alexander McCulloch, Shan.

John H. Cannan,

h

E. N. Snow,

ko.

P.

Ryrie,

ho

W. Walkinshaw,

Car

CA...

Sh

Shang.

Can.

W. Hutchinson,

R. F. Thorburn, . J. Scarth,

Vandenberg, A F.

M. J. d' Aquino,

J. E. d'Aquino,

Vaucher, Feres, Canton.

Vaucher, Fritz

Constant Borel.

Viegas A., Canton.

F. de Mello,

Walsh, T.

Can.

Watson, T. Boswell, Surgeon, Macao.

Antonio de Eça.

Watson & Co. Sh.

G. H. Lamson,

O. E. Roberts,

Henry Davis, Thomas Gittins,

Shan

J. Wilks, jr. Shánghái... John B. Goodridge, Samuel Robertson, W. Shepard Wetmore,› M. Simoens,

White, James & Co. Skan.

James White,

Wilkinson & Sanders, Canton.

Alfred Wilkinson,

Charles Sanders, absent.

:1

Daniell, Dickinson & Co. London.

E. S. Daniell,

Wolcott, Bates & Co.

Henry G. Wolcott, R. Powell Saul, F. D. Williams, Craven Wilson,

!. sh..

abs.

D. O. Clark,

J. P. Cardeiro.

W. H. Wardley & Co.

Can.

W. H. Wardley

absent

D. H. Johnson,

C. Taylor,

F. B. Johnson,

J. P. Watson,

wwwww

i

125:

List of Foreign Residents in China.

    Errors will probably be found in the following list of names, but it is hoped they are not very numerous; it has been difficult to ascer- tain the names of those who reside afloat at the various anchorages, and many of them are probably omitted. The difficulty of making the list complete increases from year to year.

J

Abbreviations-Ca stands for Canton; wh for Whampoa; ma for Macao; ho for Hongkong; am for Amoy; fu for Fuhchau; ni for Ningpo; sh for Shanghái. P. c. and p. s. attached to a few names denote that they are police constables and police sergeants at Hong

kong.

"

Abdula Moladina i

Ca

Banados, H.

ho

Abdolally Rujabally

Bancroft, A H.

Ca

Abdolvayad Mohmed,

Bankier, Dr. R. A.'

ho

Adamson, WR

sh

Bapoojee Pallanjee Runjee^

Aderjee Sapoorjee,

ca

Baptista, J S..

1.4

sh

Aga Mohamed Ally

ca

Barmester, Capt. A. C. 59th

ho

Agabeg, G. L.

ca

Barnard, H.

ho

Agabeg, A. L.

ca

Barnet, George

mabs.

Ca

Aguilar, Jozé de

ma

Barnet, William

Alcock, R. and family

sh

Barradas, Angelo

Aldersey, Miss

ni

Barradas, Francisco C.

Alexander, W. H.

ho

Barradas, Manoel F.

ho

Alladin Remjee

ca

Barradas, Vicente F.

no

Allanson, William and family ma

Barras, Jozé Vicente

ca

Allureka Versey,

ca

Barretto, B. A.

ho

Almeida, Lino de

ma

Ambrose, Rev. Lewis

ho

Ameeroodeen Abdool Latiff ·

ca

Anderson, G.

ca

Angier, F. J.

ho

Anthon, R. Jr.'

ho

Aquino, J. E. d'

ca

Barretto, J. A. and family Barton, Dr. G. K. and fam Bateson, Charles E

Baughey, Major G. F. F. 59th `ho Bayles, Nicholas and family ..sh Beale; Thomas Chay

Bellamy, Capt.

J

ho

ho

ca

Aquino, Maximiliano J. d'

ca

Bennels, G. J.

Ardaseer Nesserwänjee Mody ca

Berenhard, A.

ho

Ardaseer Rustomjee

ca

Bessières, Victor

ca

Archibald, C.

ho

Bevan, W. F.

Armstrong J.

ho

Bhoymeah Mohomedally

Aronê, Jacques

sh

Bidet, A.

Aspinall, W. G..

sh

Bimjee Canjee

Aspundearjee Tamooljee

Bird, Alexander

Ayer, W. É.

ho

Birdseye, T. J.

sh

Ayub Ebrahim,

ca

Birley, F. B. and family

Azevedo, A. C...

ca

Blackhead, J.

ho

Azevedo, Felix H. de and fam. ho

Bland, J.

sh

Azevedo, Luiz M, de

ho

Blight, John A.

'ho

Backhouse, John

abs.

am

Block, Frederick H.

bo

Baker, Lieut. C. S.

59th

ho

Bomanjee Muncherjee

i

sh

Baldwin, Rev. C. C. and fåm ́

Bomanjee Pustakia

ca

Baldwin, J. C.

ho

Bonham, H. E. Samuel G & fam ho

Balfour, Doct. 'A. H. and fam.' ho Ball, Rev. Dyer, and family, Ballard, Samuel, and fam

Bonney, S. W.

ca

Booker, Freperic

ho

Boone, Rev. W. J. and fam.

sh

Borel, Constant

ca

Botelho, Alberto

ho

Bounard, Rev. Louis

ho

Bovet, Louis

ca

Bavet, Fritz

ca

Bowman, Adam

sh

Campos, E.

Campos, Joaquim de Cannan, John H

Ca meus, J

Carlowitz, Rishard

Carpenter, Rev. C and family sh

Bowman, John

sh

Carter, Augustus

Bowra, Charles, W,

ho

Cartwright, HQ

Bowra, William A.

bo

Carvalho, R. H. and fam

222286282

ho

ho

ho

ho

ca

ho

ca

ho

Bowring, John C.

ho

Carvalho, M. de

ca

Bowring, John LL. D.

08.

Carvalho, L. and fam

ca

Boxer, W.

ho

Carvalho, C. F.

ca

Bradley, Charles W. LL.

D.

am

Carvalho, J. A

ho

Bradley, Jr., C. W.

am

Carvalho, Jozé H and fam

ho,

Braga, Dr. João J.

ho

Carvalho, Antonio J, H.

sh

Braga, S: V.

ho

Cassels, John

sh

Braga, Manoel Roza,

¦ho

"Castro, L d' Almada e

hos

Brandao, A. D. and family

ca

Castro, J. M. d'Almada e

ho

Brice, D.

wh

Cay, R Dundas

ho

Bridges, Capt. W. 59th

יז

ho

Bridgman, E. C. D. v. and fam sh......

Chadwick, Lieut C. F. 59th Chalmers, Patrick - ¦¦

ho

C&

Brimelow, James W; .i

ho

Chapman, F

ca

Brine, R. A...

sh

Chapman, Lieut I G., 59th

ca

Britto, Jozé de and family

ho

Chinnery, George

ma

Brodersen, C.

a

Chomley, Francis C

ho

Brooks, J. A.

ho

Churcher, John E.

ho

Broughall, William

sh

Clark, DO

sh

Brown, Antonio, Tavern keeper ho

Clarke, Herbert

ho

Brown, D. O.

ho

Clarke, Lieut. J. §, P. 59th

ho

Brown, W. 8. ̧

sh

Cleeman, C.

ho

Browne, Robert

ca

Cleverley, C St. George & fam ho

Rrowning, W. R,

am

Cleverley, Osmund

ho

Buchan, Georgo

ho

Clifton, G. and fam

ho

Buckler, William

ca

Cobbold, Rev R H

ni

Buckton, Charles

wh

Codrika, A. de and fam.

ma

Bugelin

ho

Cohen, E.

ho

Buffa, Rev. F. Frangis

ho..

Cohen, C.

ho

Burd, Capt. John!

họ

Cohen, P.

ho

Burgoyne, George..

.ho

Cohen, I

ho

Burjorjee Eduljeo,

08:

Cole, Richard, and fam...

ho

Burjorjee Sorabjeé

Collins, J

ho

Burns, Rev. William C...

Collins Rev. J. C,

fu

Burna, Ensign S. J. J. 59th

sh

Compton, Charles S

fuh

Butt, John

Bush, F. T. and family/

Byramjee Covetjee Bhabha...... ea Byramjee Rustomjee

Byramjee Rustomjee Mudy:

Caine, Hon. Major William Caine, jr. George W

Caige, M. F. Innkeeper:

ho

Compton, J B

ho

ga.

Compton, Spencer

ca

ן

Comstock, jr, William

ca

ca

Comstock, W O

ca

ea

Connolly, A

sh

ha..

Connor, William and fam

sh

ho

Cooke, John

wh

ho

Cooverjee Bomanjee

ah

Calder, Alexander

sh

Cordeiro, Albano A. and fam` `ho

Caldas, Joaquim V.

! ho

Cordeiro, T. P.

sh

Caldwell, Daniel R.

ho

Cornabé, William

am

Camajee

ho

Cameron, Joseph

ho

Costa, Joao da

Campbell, Archibald and fam, ho

Costa, N, T. da.

Campbell, A. E; H.......

ho

Campbell, A.

bo

Campbell, Patrick

Cortella, Antonio M

Coulter, M. S. and fam. Cowasjee Eduljee Cum. call Cowasjee Framjee

..1 ►

ca

ho

Cowasjee Pestonjee,

Cowasjee Pallanjee,

ca

ca

Cowasjee Sapoorjee Lungrana

ca

Cowper, J. C.

wh

Drake, Francis C.

127

Dosabhoy Hormusjee Camajee ca Dossabhoy Bajonjee

Doty, Rev. Elihu and fam

in

ca

am

ho

Cowper,

wh

Drewett, A.

ho

Cox, Lieut J, Ceylon Rifles

ho

Dreyer, William

ca

Crakanthorp,

Richard H.

ho

Drinker, Sandwith, and fam.

ho

+

Crampton, J.

ca

Duddell, George

ho

Crawford, Ninian

ho

Dunlop, Archibald

ca

Crook, John

ho

Durran, J. A.

: ma

Croom, A F and fam

ch

Duus, N. and family

ho

Crossley, James

sh

Cruz, C. de

Cruz, F. F. de

ca

ca

Culbertson, Rev. M S. and fam

ni

Cummings, Rev. S. and fam

fa

Cumoorden Meerjee

ca

Cunningham, Edward

ca

Ebrahim Shaik Hoosen

Edan, B.

Edger, Hon. Joseph F. and fam ho Edkins, Rev. Joseph

sh

Eduljee Furdoonjee Khambata ho Eduljee Cursetjee,

Eichbaum, C. W.

ca

sh

ca

ho

Cunningham, William

ho

Eleazer Abraham

sh

Currie, John

ho

Elgquist, Rev. A.

fu

Dadabhoy Hosunjee

Dadabhoy D. Lalcaca

Dadabhoy Pestonjee

Cursetjee Jamsetjee Botiwala

Da Costa, M. D. Tavern Keeper ho

Dadabhoy Jamsetjee Dulackow ca

ca

Ellice, Robert

ca

Ellis, William

ho

ca

Elmslie, Adam W.

ca

ho

Emeny, W. and family ·

ho

ca

Encarnacao, Antonio L. d'

:

ho

Endicott, J. B.

cum

Dainty, John F.

ho

Everard, Thomas

ca

Dale, W W and family

ca

Everett, J. H.

ca

Dallas, A Grant

Bli

Eyre, lieut. col. R. A.

ho

Dalziel, W. R.

ho

Fagan, J. W.

ho

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Daniell, E. J.

ca

Fazul Damany,

ca

Davidson, Walter

ho

Fearon, Charles A.

sh

Davidson, William

ni

Feliciani, Rev. Anthono

ho

Davis, Henry

ca

Fenouil, Rev. John

ho

Dawson, Lieut. G. T. Cey. Rif. ho

De Montmorency Lieut J. 59th ho De Silva, Manoel, p. s. and fam De Silver, R. P.

De Silver, H. T.

Fenwick, Capt, N. Cey Rif.

ho

Fincham, A.

sh

ho

Findlay, George

abs.

ho

}

ma

Fischer, Maximilian, and fam.

}

ca

ho

Deacon, E.

Fisher, Capt. Royal Artillery

ho >

sh

Dean, Rev. William

Fittock, W. H.

ho

Fitzpatrick, John

sh >

ma

Dellevie, S.

ho

Fletcher, Duncan'

Dent, George

ca

Dent, John

Fogg, H.

ca

Dent, Wilkinson

Fonçèca, Antonio de

ho

sh

ho

abs

ho

Dent, William

Fongeca, Athanazio A. de & fam ho il

ho

Forbes, R. B.

ca

Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee

ca

Forcade, Rt. Rev T. A.

ho

Dhunjeebhoy Muncherjee

ca

Ford, Theo S.

ho

Dhunjeebhoy Eduljee

ca

Forth-Rouen, A.

abs

mna

Dickenson, Lieut. R. J Cey. Rif. ho

Foster, F.

sh

Dickson, Dr. Med. Staff.

ho

Fox, G S

ho

!

Dildarkhan Goolabkhan,

ca

Dimier, C.

Framjee Bomanjee Bhundara

ca

ca

Dinshaw Merwanjee,

Framjee Nowrojee Taback

..

ɔa

ca

Framjee Sapoorjee Lungrana

sh i

Dinshawjee Framjee Casna

Dixson, Andrew S.

Donaldson, C. M. and fam

Donaldson, P.

Doolittle, Rev Justus and fam fu

Dorabjce Byramjee

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ca

Framjee Jamsetjee

ho

ho

Framjee Eeuljee

I

ca

sh

Framjee Sapoorjee

ca

ho

Framjee Burjorjee

ca

Frayer, David

ho

ca

ca

Freemantle, C. A,

French, Rev. John B.

ho

ca

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Froget, Aloysio

ho

Fryer, A. H.

Hargreaves, W.

sh

ho

Harvey, F. E.

ho

Fryer, W.

1.

ho

Haskell, G. E.

ho

Fuller, Captain F. 59th

ho

Hassam Fakira

ca

Fysk, William W.

am·

Head, C. H.

ho

Gangjee Goolam Hoosain

ca

Heard, John

ca

>

Gareta, Esteban :

ma

Heard, jr. Augustine

ca

Gaskell, W. and family

ho:

Hedges, H. B.

ho

Genaehr, Rev, Ferdinand

ho

Gibb, T Jones

abs.

ho

Gibb, John D.

Heerjeebhoy Hormusjee abs.

Heerjeebhoy Rustomjee

ca

ma

#h

Helbling, Lewis

· sh

;

Gibb, George

Ca

Helms, Henry

am

Gifford, A.

ho

Gilbert, W. ...

Henning, Robert

bo

ca

Hertslet, F. L. and fam.

am

Gilfillan, Rev. Thomas

am

Hickson, W. D. I

ho

Gilman, Richard J.

ca

Hill, J.

ho

Gingell, W. R.

abs

fu

Hill, N. of Str. "Hongkong "

ho

Girard, Rev. Prudence

ho

Gittins, Thomas

ca

Goriō, C. J.

ho

Goodale, Samuel P.

abs ho

Goddard, Jolin

ho

Goddard, Rev. Jos. T. & fam

ni

Hillier, Charles B. and fam

Hirschberg, Dott. Hi J.,

Hitchcock, L. Ń.

Hobson, Rev. John and fam.

ho

ho

Hisslop, James, M. D. and fam am

ca

Hobson, B. M. D. and family.

ca

sh

Goodings, Robt. and fam.

ho

Hogg, James

sh

Goodridge, John B.

ca

Hogg, William, and fam.

sh

Gorringe, Asst Surgeon 59th

ho

Holderness, J.

ho

Gordon, Francis

P. C.

ho

Holdforth, C. G.

abs.

bo

Gordon Capt. 59th.

ho

Gough, Rev. S..

Holliday, John, and family'

Ca

ni

Holtz, Andrea

sh

Grandpré, A.

ho

Horsburgh, Rev. A.

ca

Graves, Pierce W.

sh

Hooper, James

Gray, H. M. M.

sh

Hormnsjee Cowasjee

Gray, Samuel

ho

Hormusjee Eduljee

sh

ma

ca

Gray, Lient. W. R.

Cey Rif.

ho

Hormusjee Jamasjee Nadershaw ca

Greaney, J.

P. C.

ho

Hormusjee Nesser Pochajee

ca

Green, George F.

sh

Hormusjee Rustomjee Daver

ca

Griswold, John N. Alsop

sh

Hubertson, G. F. §.

absent sh

Grosvenor, A. W.

wh

Hudson, Aug. R.

ca

Guillermin, Rev. M.

ca

Hudson, Joseph

Gutierres, Rufino

sh

Hudson, John and family

Gutierres, L. J.

am

Hudson, C. W.

Gutierres, Venancio,

ho

Hudson, Rev. T. H.

Gutierres, Querino

ho

Huffum, F. S.

Gutzlaff, Rev. Charles abs

ho

Hulme, Hon. John W. and fam ho

Hague, Patrick and family

ni

Hajee Elies Hussan,

ca

Hale, F. H.

Hall, Edward and family.

Hall, G. R. and family,

abs

sh

sh,

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Halton, E.

sh

Hamberg, Rev. Theodore

ho

Hutchinson, Wm.

Hance, Dr. H. F:

ho

Humphreys, Alfred abs.

Hunt, Thomas and family

Hunter, James D.

Hurjee Jamał

Hurst, Wm.

Huson, F. G.

Huttleston, J. Thomas ·

wh

Hancock, B.

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sh

Hyland, Thomas

Happer, Rev. A. P. and family ca

Hyndman, Henrique

Hardie, H. R.

ca

Hyndman, Joað

Hare, J.

ho

Ince, H. A.

Harkort, Bernhard,

abs

ca

Irons, James

Harland, Doct W. A.

ho

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Harris, R.

P. C.

ho

Harris, C.

ho

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Jacson, Roger

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Johnson, F. B.

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Lane, T. A.

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Kreyenhagen, Julius Krone, Rev. R.

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ho

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Lemon, J.

ho

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ho

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ca

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ma

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ho

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ca

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ni

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ca

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ho

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Matheson, C. S.

sh

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ca

Mathews, S. H. and fam

ho

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ca

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ho

Mur, J Manuel

abs

ca

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ni

Murphy, M

ho

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sh

Murray, John Ivor, M. D.

sh

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ho

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ca

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ca

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ca

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ho

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ho

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bo

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ho

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am

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ho

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ca

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ca

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ho

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ni

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sh

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ho

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abs

ho

Merwanjee Dadabhoy

ca

Noronha, Jozé M. de and fam

Noronha, D. and family

Merwanjee Dadabhoy Wadia

ca

Norris, George

Merwanjee Eduljee,

ca

Nowrojee Cursetjee,

Meveety, J. (Tuvern Keeper)

ho

Nowrojee Nesserwanjee

'a

h

Michell, E R

ho

Nowrojee Maneckjee Lungrana sh

Michell, George

ho

Noyes, C. H.

abs

ho

Middleton, & John, fam

ma

Nye, Clement D.

ca

Millar, Capt of Ft. William

ho

Nye, E. C. H.

Miller, John

sh

Nye, Jr. Gideon

Milne, Rev. W. C. and family

sh

Oakley, Charles

Mitabhey,

ca

Oakley, Horace

Mitchell, J.

ho

Mitchell, William¡H. and fam ho

Odell, B. A. M. C. Olding, J. A.

ho

ho

Mitton, Thos

ho

Mohamed Syan

ca

Oliveira, J. J. d'

Olmsted, Henry M.

3 3 2 3 2 2 78.

ca

ca

ho

ca

ca

ca

Outerio, Joze M. d'

ho

Rangel, Jayme

ca

Ozorio, Candido A.

ho

Rangel, Floriano A.

bo

Ozorio, Candido J.

ho

Pages, Leon

Rawle, S. B. and family

Pallanjee Dorabjee,

C&

Rakin, Rev. H. V. and fam.

Rawson, Samuél, and family

ni

ho

ca

Pallanjee Dorabjee Lalcaca

Reiche, F.

ca

Pallanjee Nesserwapjes

Reid, Frank W.

am

Parish, Frank

Park, James Dickson

ca

Parker, Capt. Charles R. N ho

Parker, Rev. P., s. u. and fam

ca

Reiners, Edward

Remedios, J. V. and family

Reinedios, J. B. dos

Remedios, J. J. and fam

ho

ho

ca

ho

Parkes, H. S.

abs

#h

Rémi, D.

sh

Parkin, W. W.

sh

Reynvaan, H. G. I.

ca

Pearcy, Rev. Geo. and fam

sh

Ribeiro, L. F. N. and fam

ho

Pearson, G., Lt. Ceylon Rifles.

ho

Ribeiro, J. G.

ca

Pedder, lieut. William

ho

Rice, J.

T. keeper

ho

Peerbhoy Yacoob

Pedder, W. I.

Peet, Rev. L. B. and fam

Penrose, Win. Puvern Keeper. ho Perceval, Alexander

am

Richards, Rev. William L.

fu

ca

Richards, P. F.

મા

fa

Richie, John

Tavern keeper

ho

Rickett, John, and family

ho

ea

Rienaeoker, R.

ho

Pereira, Ignacio de A. and frm ho

Pereira, Edward

ho

Pereira, J. Lourenco

.ca

Pereira, B. A:

ca

Ripley, Philip W., and family Rizios, A.

Rizzolati, Rev Joseph

Roberts, Rev. I. J. and family

ca

ho

ho

ca

Pereira, Manoel L. R.

tro

Roberts, J.

T. keeper

ea

Perkins, George

ima

Roberts, O. E.

sh

Perkins, George, and family

ho

Robertson, D. 8.

ni

Pestonjee Dinshawjee

ca

Robertson, Samuel

ca

Pestonjee Dadabhoy

ca

Robinson, William F.

sh

Pestonjee Merwanjee Eranee

Pestonjee Framjee Canra abs.

Pestonjee Jamsetjee Motiwalia ca

ca

Rodrick, Anthony

T.keeper

ho

ca

Rogul, V. R.

ho

Roose, William R

ho

Pestonjee Nowmjée.

Ross, J B

ch

Pestonjee Rustomjee

Ross, W and family

ho

Phillips, G. P..

ho

Rothwell, Richard'

ca

Philips, J.

Rowe, John

wh

Piccope, T. C.

ho

Howd, JR.

an

Pictope, W. N.

Roza, Foriano

ca

Pierce, Wm G.

Roza, A B da

Pinto, A.

Roza, Formino da ́

ho

Pitcher, M. W.

Rozorio, C F

■h

Pollard, E. H.

Rozetio, A

ho

Ponder, Stephen

Potter, M. L.

Potter, W.

Rozétío, Florencio do

ca

Rozorio, P D

ho

Rusden, J

sh

Potter, D.

Powell, 'Dr.

Prattènt, J. R.

Preston, W. J.

Probst, W.

Purdón, James

Pustau, William

کچھ

Russell, George

P. C.

ho

69th

Russell, Rev. W•★

Di

Power, J. C. and fam

Rustomjee Burjarjee,

Rustomjee Byramjee,

Rustomjee Jalbhoy

ca

CR

Pyke, Thomas

Quarterman, Rev. J. W.

Qumn, M.

Quin, Jaines

Rangel, Segismundo Rangel, R.

Rustomjee Merwanjee Nalear.

Rustomjee Pestonjse C.

1 02

Rastomjee Pestonjee Motiwalla ca

Rustomjee Ruttunjee,

Rustomjee Framjee Mohin

Rutherfurd, Robert

:

ho

Rutherford, Lieut. A. M. Cey, R. ho Rutter, Henry

ca

1$4

SUMMARY OF THE PRECEDING lists.

Total number of names in the alphabetical list of foreigners.. 1007.

Number of those who have their families.

Commercial Houses, or Agencies.....

Residents at Canton and Whampoa...

English.......

Parsees.

Moors, Arabs & C..........* ****

Americans..........

140

144

$298

88

69

4.1.

39

French, Germans, Swiss, Armenians, &c.

27

Portuguese...

34

Residents at Shinghai (mostly Euglish),

1,53

..

Residents at Ningpo.

22

Residents at Foħchau.

14

J

Residents at Amoy..

30

C

[ ?

1

TABLE OF DISTANCES IN STATUTE MILES.

'rom Canton to

Whampon, East end of Newtown.... First Bar....

Second 'Bar. do.......

...

Bogue. Lintin. ❤y ***

··

1):

Hongkong

.....

12, 14

f

From Macao to

!

1.5

J.B

J

£.

Who Dr Til

From Hongkong to

Macao SA

Camsingmoon??.

Macao, through Capsaimoon.. Do. South side of Lantao.. Gumsingmoon.e•

Amay 1664.. JU.........

Fühchau fo,.....

Ningpo....

01

Shanghái, through Formosa Channel

Do. east of Formosa I.

Manila...

Singapore.

41, .40

35

60%

J

.

912

1,033

1,326

770

1,680

Batavia..

2,157

Honolulu.

5,678

San Francisco, by Great Circle.

6,414

Do.

due beating...

....

7,514

From St. Francisco to Honolulu.

2,44