Anglo-Chinese Calendar 1850

AN

ANGLO-CHINESE CALENDER

FOR 1850.

72

73

74

75

75

76

77

78

80

81

2*** * ** * **** ***** 2

84

87

89

90

95

102

CONTENTS.

 

Chinese Cycle of sixty years.. Page 3 Steam communication between

Chinese Astronomical Terms... Eclipses of the sun in 1850.... Chinese Chronological characters Averages of Thermometer, &c. . Calender, English, Chinese and

Parsee..

Parsee chronology and æra.... Brief Geographical Description

of the Eighteen Provinces.... Description and Divisions of the Dependencies of China Proper List of the principal officers in the

Chinese Government. Grades of the Nine Ranks..... Principal Chinese Festivals... Register of Occurrences in Chi- na from Sept. 1848 to Dec. 1849 Chinese Weights and Moneys... Canton Linguists' Fees.... Rates of Postage from Hongkong Post-office Notification.. Steamers in China..........

Tables for converting Taels into

Dollars, and vice versa.

4 China, India, and England... 5 Rates of fight per steamers. 5 Overland Route via Trieste. 7 Masonic Lodges in China....

Scale of arges for storage in

the Le-tse Packhouse.. 20 Members and Committee of Bri-

tish Chamber of Commerce. 21 Insurance Ofices in China..

List of Pro tant Missionaries in

China. Roman

40

.49

at Ho

56 Prices of 58 List of I. List of R 63 Diplomat

Chin 66 Gover 68 Gov

65

69.Li 69 Cc

!A!

70

{ic' Establishments

ons at three Ports s at Amoy.

s at Shanghái..

stablishments in

Macac. Hongkong.. hts at Canton. ouses &c. in China ist of Foreigners

CAN'

t

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE

No. 2, Mingqua's Hong.

1850.

REPOSITORY,

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AN

ANGLO-CHINESE CALENDAR

FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD

1850,

CORRESPONDING TO THE YEAR IN THE CHINESE CYCLE ERA

4487,

OR THE 47TH YEAR OF THE 75th cycle oF SIXTY;

BEING THE 30TH YEAR OF THE REIGN OF

H. 1. M. TẢUK WẢNG.

CANTON:

PRINTED AT THE OFFICE OF THE CHINESE REPOSITORY.

No. 2, Mingqua's long.

1850.

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8

THE CHINESE CYCLE OF SIXTY YEARS,

Commences with the 61st year of the Emperor Hwangtí,

or 2637 years before Christ.

1844

乙巳

1845

1854

1855

甲子 甲戌

甲申

甲午

甲寅 甲辰

1804

1814

1824

1834

乙丑乙亥乙酉

乙未

1805

1815

1825

1835

丙寅|丙子|丙戌

丙申

1206

1816

1826

1836

丁卯丁丑 丁亥

丁酉

1807

1817

1827

1837

戊辰|戊寅| 戊子戊戌

1800

1818

1828

1838

已巳| 已知|已丑| 己亥

1809

1819

1829

1839

庚午庚辰庚寅庚子

1810

辛未

1811

壬申

1812

癸酉

1813

1820

辛巳

1921

壬午

1822

癸未

1823

1830

1940

辛辛丑

1831

壬辰

1832

癸巳

1833

1341

壬寅

1342

1843

丙午

1846

丙辰

1856

丁丁已

1847

戊申

1848

己酉

1849

庚戌

1850

辛亥

1851

壬子

1852

癸丑

1853

1857

戊午

1858

己未

1859

庚申

1960

1861

壬戌

1862

癸亥

1863

The Chinese year is luni-solar, comprising twelve lunar mort'is, to which an intercalary month is added, when requisite to preserve correspondence with the solar year. When, during a lunar month, the sun does not enter any sign of the Zodiac, thit month is inter- calary, and the year contains th rteen months.

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FESTIVALS, ANNIVERSARIES, &c.

Jan.

  Epiphany. Septuagesima 44 (Já Ash Wednesday... Feb. Good Friday,....

6 Ascension day......

May

9

27! Whit Bundalya ALT May 19 13 Trinity Sunday.......... May 26

March 29 Accession of Victoria, June 20

311

Easter Sunday: ... March 31 | Ist Sunday in Advent. Dec.

CHINESE TERMS, CALLED TSIEH.

uhm. pttle cold. (

1

15 in Capricorn,

Jan 南小寒

Jan. 20.

Tá-hán, great cold.i

Feb 4

Loh-ch'n, spring begins

Feb 19

✯ Yü-shwai, tain and water.

Mat. 6.

May. 21: April 5. April 20,

May 5.

May 91.

June 5.

+

June 21.

Ừ Ễ

July 7.

Hiá-khí, 1 sunmer solstice. Shu-shỹ, 'fatle heat.'

King-chi, insects excited. Chun-fan, 'vernal equinox. Tsing-ming, 'clear and bright. Kuh-y-grain raii

,

Lih-hiá,"summer þegins. J

VM

Su-myan, graid a Myde full, a Mang-chung, ' grain spiked.'

T. T in Afies

in Gemu.

01 in Cancer

in Aquarius

in Pistep

!

D

in Taurus.

Aug. 8.

Aug. 23.

Sep. 8

Sep. 23

Oct... 8.

Oct. 23.

Nov. 7.

Nov. 22.

Dec. 7.

*

July 23. ★ ☀ Tá-shú, 'great beat.

Bih-tsid, autumn begins."

Ghú-shú, ' cessation

Peh-lú,white dew?i

23Ts'iú-fan, antumnal equinox."

*

Han-lú, 'cold dew.":

C

Shwang-kiáng, frost, descends.'

Lih-tung, winter begins,totuulil.

Situ-sinèh, 'little snow,!:

Tá-siuch, 'great knów.'

Dec. 27. A = Tong-chí, ' winter solstice.

>

!!

in Libra.

#

T

in Scorpio.

1

in Sagittarius.

enters Capricorn."

1 in Lea T

of heat.'

in Vargo.

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>

I

ECLIPSES OF SUN IN 1850.

¿

I. There will be an annular eclipse of the Sun Feb. 12, central at Singapore, and visible in the morning at Canton; it commences in long 39° E.

    11. There will be a votal eclipse of the sun, Aug. 7th,'itivisible at Canton, but seem throughout the Pacifio. It commences in king! 463%E.

"

CHRONOLOGICAL CHARACTERS,

Of these, the Chinese haye several classes: the following are the most awelent and most generally used. They consist of two sets of characters, the pne of which, called Shik kin, the 'ten stems, or Shik kán, the 'ten stems,' or

++

igeleștial stemais includes ten character, vià

2 43 Kiska, 4 Z. Vik, a pig,

+

201

19

Káng 8 ‡ Sin, 91 Jin, 10

F Tien bán, the

Ting, 5 Kwei,

W6,6 - Ka

ז.

The other set, called +Shik-rh chí, 'the twelve branches,' and ›TE\cké, "terrestial branches,' consist of the following twelve characters;

Shin,

17

Tsz, 2

Chau, 3

Yin, 4

T

I

7 wa 8

Wi, 9

Yin, 4 Shin, 10

] Mau, 5 Mau, 5

Shin,

Sz",

||

Wa, 11

Siuh, 12]

Hái.

These characters are applied to years, months, days, and hours, as well as to the points of the compass. For chronological purpose's they have been combined so as to form a cycle of sixty, as represented in page 3. Kjau the first of the ten, is joined to tz', the first of the twelve, and read kiáh-tsz', which denotes the first year, mouth, &c. of the cycle. 'In the same manner gis and chau, the second of the two sets are united, and so on through the 'ten stems.' Then kiáh, the first of the ten, is joined to sigh, the 11th of the twelve, and in this knammer the conjunctioș în continued up to sixty, when the tenth of Abu 'stems,' and the twoth of the 'branches, come together, and the cycle recommences. The 30th year of Taukwang, which commences on the 12th of February 1859, is the 47th of the cycle of yours and is called Kang-sinh; the first moon of That year is the 15th of thẹ cycle of moons, and is called Wi-yin; and the lat day of the 1st moon is the 31st of the cycle of days, and is called Kiák-wh.

For hours (and also for the points of the compres) the 'twelve branches' are used singly. The civil day of twenty-four hours is divided into twelve periods of two hours Erch "called xhỉ shìn, which are designated by the characters of the twelve branches, in the following manner :

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11 to 1, or midnight,

tsz', Rat.

1 to 3-4th watch, H chau, Cow.

3 to 5-5th do

Il to 1 or noon, wi, Horse.

3 to 5.

1 to 3

·

f

yin, Tiger.

máu,

Rabbit.

5 to 7

wi, Sheep.

#shin, Monkey

西 yú, Cock.

5 to 7

17 to 9

}

7 to 11

shin, Dragon.

!

sz', Snake.

7 to 9-1st watch

1..

siuh, Dog!

7 to 11-2d do.hái, Boar.

   By prefixing to the characters the words Eching and kiáu, these twelve periods are divided into twenty-four hours: thus Eching-tsz' denotes midnight or 12 o'clock, and forwards to 1 o'clock; and

kiάu-tsz', denotes from 11 to 12 o'clock. The shí-shin, or two hour periods,

are divided into eight kih ||

signifies a quarter past

交辰二刻

or quarters. Chồng máu nên kiên IE Đ

six in the morning; and, kiáu-shin urh kih

the morning i

denotes half past seven o'clock.

The night from 7 o'clock in the evening to 5 in the morning is slao divided

into five kăng, or watches, 'each watch consisting of

two hours.

F X

sht-

t-shin, or

of

In reference to the compass, K2' ‚is the North, Wh the South, Mẫu thé East, and Yu the West; the other eight are intermediate points belleen these. The 'ten stems' and 'twelve branches are otherwise named after va rious animals; but are made use of in that

                      way chiefly by the Manchus and Mongols...

...

ין

The following characters, which are the names of twenty-eight constel

tions, are likewise employed to designate the days.

Kioh

Káng

Τί

Fáng

Sin

6. 尾 Wei

箕 Ki

Y T

22 # Taps

鬼 KWei

Lia

:

+

Tau

15. 奎

Kwei

Niú

16

23

10

Na

17

Wei

24.

Hn

18

12

Wei

19

13

Shih 20

14 壁 Peih

21

畢锴參

Peih

:

26 HỆ Cháng

Tsz'

27

Yih

# Teán

#

28

Chin

'Miu 25星 Sing.

These characters are applied in regular order to the days of the month. Four of them (those printed in italics) always mark the Christian Sabbath, while the others designate the week days respectively. January 1st, 1850, is designated by the 27th character yik, and February 12th, the 1st day of the Chinese year, is marked by the 13th character, shih See. Anglo-Chinese Calendar for 1841; Chinese Chrestomathy, page 388.

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AVERAGES OF THERMOMETER,

In Hongkong, Macao, Canton, Shanghai, and Ningpo.

Hongkong Macao, Canton. Shinghái, Ningpo.

Max.

JANUARY

Min.

Mean

Max.

FEBRUARY

Min.

នខ | ច

73

72

51

53

62

78

71

50

49

Mean

59

Max.

MARCH

Min.

Mean

828

80

48

66

67

اعلية

Max.

87.

AFRIL

Min.

49

Mean

71

Max.

MAY

Min

Mean

781

201

JUNËS DHE I

Max.

921

Min.

75

Mean

83

Max.

92

JULY

Min.

80

Meani

85

Max.

92

AUGUST

Min.

78

Mean

831

Max.

90

SEPTEMBER Min.

76

76

Mean 824

62

Max.

90

OCTOBER

Min.

Mean

80

Max.

85

NOVEMBER

Min.

61

Mean

Max:

DECEMBER

Min.

288 HENNA

72,6

Mean

63,6

នកថ្មី | នឌូ វុន | ខ | គួន មិនធ

S8 82€ 828 | 8=f24f2a2

634 57

*** GEN

74

62

29

36

43

78

60

38

32

53

46

44

66

55

88

64

75

90

74

83

94

8 79

90

834

88882 87 5 7 8:25

| 54

86,

.1 77

721

1.223] 253 282 | 688 | #88

43

38

401

42

45

46

59

82

64-

.65

74

73

86

789

1 78

96-

A 75

844

87

92

75

811

88

70

791

86

85

764

19180

57

· 661 h. 62

70

57

633

368 233 2ER

57

73

40

70

45

22382 343 888 8N3

72.

86

68

80

82

*39 989 848 28D 28R- 882 823 888 CFR | FER

451 351

401

55 45 50 1

62.

76

70

70

8841

78.1

85

79

83

81

75

78

64

70

E

73

67.1

83 883

62

58

60

47.

40

53

43

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OIDAIA WA JAHANG ZOTEL) Omul Munozovoli zl

JANUARY, 31 Days

Chinese XTLFth Fear Xth and XIIth Moons.

The weather, during this mondt, is dry, cold, and bracing-differing hut little,, if at all, from that of November and Depember The wind blowbyget nerally from the north, occasionally, inclining to the NE, or NW. A change to the south-which may be expected at intervals of 10 or 15 days, during the winter-causes considerable variation in the temperature of the atıros- phere.

K

Days of Days of month moon.

17

19

2 w

20

2K 221

5 $

23

6 S

7.

25

& t

9.w

07

06

()

Chronicle of events in China, &c..

t..

rit

Trade at Canton reopened, 1839: 18 )

HOJAY

Captain Gribble seized and brought to Canton, 1840. Lin Tsilisü imperial commissioner, 1839.

24 | Epiphany.

CA

ПЯТА

Forts at Chuenpi taken, with great slaughter,

1941.

26 Gunner of the Lady Hughes strangled, 1785.

27

7

British forces. visit Faughwá, 1842/ Ilipú arrived

in Canton, 1843.

First Sunday after Epiphany. TweLFTH MOON; Ji

11 f

12

30

13 S

t.

14im

2

115 t

3

00

01

sol

16 w 17't 18'f

   19 s 20'S 21 m 22

123 w |24 ft. 25 £

TZJDJA.

C. Marjoribanks, pres. E.-I. Co-left China, 1832.

Elliot and Kishen's treaty, ceding Hongkong, 1841. [Second Sunday after Epiphany.

02

HAROTOC

26.

14

24 m

16

29 t

30'w

ལས་

17

18

31 t

19

(Hongkong taken possession of, 1841. St. Paul's

church at Macao burnt, 1835. Interview between Kisheu and Elliot, 1841, .... Sep- tuagesima Sunday.....

Mande S

Loʻd, Saltoun leaves China with $3,000,000, of

rausom money.

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Days of month

JANUARY.

Barom. Mean, 30 22 ; max. 30.50 ; min. 30 00 Thermom, Mean at noon, 64, night, 50 ; max 74, min. 29.

Mean fill 64 inches; rainy days, average 34.

Rain.

Parce

Hördineed

1 5 month

Uimmerdad

Parce Sheushal 4th month

Teer.

MEMORANDA.

7- Virited in Sa Pagoda with 2 Jos. Bet

4. C. Bridgman--

Finished reading " 2 Friends", 78, p.

Went to bautoh

12- Stayed at Mr. Cleland's -

ft

7

2 w

8

8

ઇ t

9

4 f

10

10

59

11

[1

6 S

12

7 m

13

13

8 t

14

14

9 w

15

15

10 t

16

16

11 f

17

17

18

12 s

13 S

14 m

15

16 w

19

7 2 2 2 2 2

20

21

22

Refad Davies

to Whampoa

on

holiness - 14ff.

Wont by Pagoda with Lomis & piaght. Maje

+ 18 - Went to Pui Kong Village --

19

20i Canton.

2. Went to Computing Tract Meeting. Gille

21

Came

22 - Went to Canton. Bible translation Meet

Afai & Budhist priest call Capts Major & Belee made a virst t

    Magee Walk with Gillespie to Man Kong Read on. Reft. owen Tract Fic2 32 Finished Butler's Analogy & Bames Broa

17 t

23

23

18 f

24

24

19

25

25

20 S 26

26

21 m

27

27

22 t

23

23

23 w

29

29

24 t

30

30

6 month 5 month

25 f

1

1

26 s

2

2

27 S

3

29 m

29 t

5

30 w

6

23

Essa

4009

Went to Canton - Bible Meeting at Clela Gillespie moved to

my

Gillespie retur.id to Cunton.

31 t

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9

FEBRUARY, 28 Days.

Chinese XXIX-XXXth Year, XIIth and Ist Moons.

During the month the thermometer continues low; but the dry bracing old of the three preceding months is changed for a damp and chilly atmos- phere; the number of fine fair days is much diminished, and cloudy and foggy ones are more frequent in February and March than in any other months. The fog is sometimes so dense as to render objects invisible at a few yards' distance.

[Day of Day of

month. moon.

-

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Inhabitants of Hongkong declared to be British

subjects, 1841.

Sexagesima.

The Hyacinth enters the Harbor of Macao, 1840. Rebellion broke out at Lienchau, 1832.

Capt. Halcon, Span. envoy, arrived in Macao, 1840.

Snow fell in Canton, 1835. Shunchí died 1661.

Quinquagesima.

Kienlung died, 1795.

FIRST MOON, Chinese New YEAR.

2 {

I f

20

2

21

3 S

22

4 in

23

5 t

24

6 w

25

7 t

26

Sf

27

9 s

28

10 S

29

11 m 12 t

30

1

13 w

14 t

3

15 f

4

16 s

5

17 S

6

18 m 19 t

8

20 w

9

121 t

10

122 f

11

123 s

12

24 S

13

125 in

14

26 t

15

27 w

16

17

Empress of China died, 1840. Elliot's second in- terview with Kishen, 1841. Ash Wednesday.

Gov. Sii visits the U. S. ship Plymouth, 1849. Ports of Hongkong and Tinghái declared free, 1841. |First Sunday in Lent.

Boat of the Nenesis fired on at Wangtong, 1841.

Medical Missionary Society organized, Canton, 1838.

Hostilities with the English resumed, 1841.

Chusan evacuated by the British forces, 1841. 2d

Sunday in Lent.

Capt. Da Costa and lieut. Dwyer killed at Wang-

má-kok, 1849,

A Chinese executed before the factories, Canton,

1839. Bogue forts captured, 1841.

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Barom.

FEBRUARY,

Mean, 30.13; max. 30.50; min. 29.69.

Thermom. Mean at noon 57, night, 49; max. 78, min. 38.

Mean fall, 1.7 inches; rainy days, average 7.

Rain.

Days of month

Parsee Kudmone 6 month

Surya.

Parvee Shooshai

5 month

Ummeriad

MEMORANDA.

Mr French & Paddyman vind Weighed 159ills.

nu

at

10 - Math Cameron & Harvey spent the evening 11 Finished Hobson's Stationonry Chinese 7/8 M 13 Finished Harris' G. Commission, pp. 530 is Gilfilland, Gillesfice go to H. Kong

&

12

1 f

2 s

9

9

3 S

10

4 m

11

5 t

12

6 w

13

7 t

14

8 f

15

15

9 s 16

16

10 S

17

17

18

18

19

20

1 1 2 2 2

11 m

12 t

13 w

14 t

15 f

21

14

Read Jn Betttehein's letter. 30 pp.

Milne's N.1/cais tract, Chinx - 10pp Read fetter Shanghai Eng. Missioners, sch. 21; 8 M. 19 - Famshed Sai 9. Staunton on T pp. 6. 20 oth. Cremer & Durham breakfarted with me, 21 walk'd with Mr. Int & Missitarrant

Visited U.S. shif St. Mary's with 4 Chin Read Memons of thes. Rumsff & Broglie

             ff. 4. 25 Finish'd Lecturnes on Bunyan" by Cheers. 323

"

"

"Life of Naugh" "I

p-80 blast Study "Oven on blas - Waldstudy the 15 Attended Mrs. Whilden's funeral.

"Arab with a Chinese officer i

22

22

16 s

23

23

17 S

24

24

18 m

25

19 t

26

26

20 w

27

27

21 t 28

28

22 f

29

29

Visited

23 s

30

30

24 S

1

96th.

25 m

2

26 t

3

3

27 w

4

4

Sail of round heme Shain island in 5 hours from

23

5

5

17 month 6 month

เว

Brig

Finished "Life of C. Cuvier,

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5

10

MARCH, 31 Days.

י

Chinese XXXth Year, Ist and IId Moons.

   The weather in the month of March is also damp and foggy, but the tem- perature of the atmosphere becomes considerably warmer; to preserve things From damp, it is requisite to continue the use of fires and closed doors, which the heat of the atmosphere renders very unpleasant. From March till July and August, the thermometer steadily increases in height aud heat reaches its maximum degree.

Days of Days of

month

noon.

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

St. David's.

Sir Hugh Gough arrived at Whampoa, 1841.. Third Sunday in Lent. flipú died in Canton, 1843.

23 Napier's forts captured, 1841.

I f

18

2 s

19

3 S

20

4 m

5 t

22

6 w

7 t

24

8 f

25

9 8

****** & *28-~~

26

10 S

27

11 m 12 t

29

13 w 14 t 15 f

30

16 s

17 S

4

18 m 19 t

LO CO

5

6

Lin arrived in Canton, 1839.

British in Chinhái

and Ningpo attacked, 1842. · Fourth Sunday: British brig Ann lost on Formosa, 1842. Kishen goes a state's prisoner to Peking, 1841. Chinese custom-house closed at Macao, 1849, SECOND Moon.

Chinese forces at Tsz'kí routed, 1841.

> Macartney's embassy leaves China, 1794. Fifth

Sunday in Lent.

Canton under British guns, 1841:

Foreigners detained in Canton by Lin, 1889.

1

Armistice agreed upon at Canton, 1841. Gov.

Bonham lands at Hongkong, 1848.

British ship Sarah, first free trader, sailed, 1834. Kiying appointed commander-in-chief, 1842.

20 w

21 t

8

122 f

9

23 s

24 S

10

11

25 m 26 t

12

13

23456

127 w 14

128

15

29 f

16

130 s

17

18

Captain Elliot forced his way to Canton, 1839. Friend of China commenced, 1842. [Sixth Lady Day.

Sunday in Lents:

J

20,283 Chests of Opium surrendered, 1889. Rebellion broke out at Lienchau, 1832. Good Friday Sir John F. Davis leaves China, 1943.

1848:

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Day of month

110

MARCHI.

Mean, 30.17; maxim. 30.50; min. 29.95.

Thermom.. Mein at noon 72, night, (0); max. 82;. min. 44.

Mean fall, 24 inches; average rainy days, 6.

Parace Shenghai

6 month

| Burriyvar

MEMORANDA.

,

Finishid "Mitchells Astronomy" - "336 pp-

""Great Tanths in I Words". """Witherd Branch"

Concert at Dr. Parkers... th. Bins conduct "Read Rept of Din Helson's Hospital

30/1

12- Fimshit Capt. Locks Events in

China" - pp. 2 Steward of Ship Channing" missing. 4 Chinese friends dined with

Barom.

Rain

Kudaces 7 month

Mayher

I f

6

6

2 8

7

7

3 S

8

8 = Read

& Words. 947p-

4 m

9

9 F

u.

5 t

10

10

6 w

11

"t

12

8 f

13

13

98

14

14

10 S

15

15'-

Il m

16

12 t

17-

13 w

18

14 t

19

19

15 f

20

20

"

16 8

21

21

17 S

22

22

23

23

24

19 m 19 t'

25

20 w

21 t

26

24 S

25 m

26 t

27 w

28 1

*** && 2 2 8

27

28

29

30

18 month

2

Q &

3

Finishich "Night of Foil Pp. 118. 16- Raed Conversatom on Jamining the Youngch. 26. 17. Finish's Afats tracti 13. 18'll be Die. Bettle de

"

hemis kettl

tot sehe

229

Memon of A. R. Peters of 35 Chinese Almanac - ff: 14-

Want to Ragoda with In Legge Went to Pagoda mitt C Legge.

-

28 - Whampoa Bettel dedicated - Loomis sick 25 - Most to Whumpra pagoda will J. W. Will

26

27

28

S.

29 - Finished Advice to a tony Christion. pp. 160 30. - Hindered from putting up, the. Whilden's gra

month

1

wh

2- M. Whilden raild for America in E. Eller 3 Visited No

29 f

4

4

30 s

5

31 S

56

with M. Burns:

Finished P./J. King notes, pp-32

8 - 12 visiters to read Bible & converse Bathed op

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THE CHINESE CYCLE OF SIXTY YEARS,

Commences with the 61st year of the Emperor Hwangtí,

1804

or 2637 years before Christ.

甲申甲午甲辰

1824

1825

1855

甲子 甲戌

甲申

甲寅

1814

1834

1844

1854

乙丑

乙亥

乙酉乙未

1805

1815

1835

1845

丙寅

丙子

丙戌丙申

1816

1836

1846

丁丑 丁丑

1817

· 1837

1847-

1806

1807

戊辰

1808

已巳

1809

庚午

1810

丙戌丙申丙午

1826

丁亥丁酉 丁亥丁酉丁未

18x7

戊子|戊戌|戊申 戊寅|戊子

1319

1820

1818

己外

庚辰

辛未

辛巳

壬申

壬午

癸酉

癸未

1813

1823

1811

1812

1821

1922

1823

1838

1848

已丑己亥 己丑|己亥|己酉 己酉

1829

1839

1849

庚寅庚子 庚寅|庚子庚戌

1830

1940

1850

辛亥 辛辛丑 辛亥

1831

1341

1851

壬辰壬寅 壬辰壬寅|壬子

1832

1342

1852

癸巳癸 癸巳 癸 癸丑

1833

1843

1853

丙辰

1856

丁已

1857

戊午

1858

己未

1859

庚申:

1860

辛酉

1861

壬戌

1862

癸亥

1863

The Chinese year is luni-solar, comprising twelve lunar mort'is, to which an intercalary month is added, when requisite to preserve correspondence with the solar year. When, during a lunar month, the sun does not enter any sign of the Zodiac, that month is inter- calary, and the year contains th ́rteen months.

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FESTIVALS, ANNIVERSARIES, &c.

Epiphany.......

Jan. 6 | Ascension day......

May 9 Septuagesima.406 73hák 1927. Whit Bunday May

|!

Ash Wednesday.

Good Friday. Easter Sunday: ...

Feb.

19

13 | Trinity Sunday..... May 26 March 29 Accession of Victoria, June 20 March 31st Sunday in Advent. Dec.

ï

CHINESE TERMS, CALLED TSIEH.

HIN

Janu-him; "little cold,' {};

Jan. 20.

Feb 4

Tá-hán, great cold.! -

Lah-chan, Spring (begins

Feb. 19. FF] /K Yi-shwai, zain and water.'

Mat. 6.

Mar. 21:

April 5.

King-chin, insects excited.

Th'un-fan, vernal equinox. Tsing-ming, 'clear and bright.

April 20, 2 | Kuh-yii, (grain raiìd'

Lih-hi,, "syinmer begins,

J

Siau-mwin, grain a little full

151 in Capricorn,

in Aquarius

in Pister

in

T, JAT

!

in aura.

in Gemini.

Bih-tsid, utumn begins

Gaú-shú, cessation of heat.'

May 5.

May 21:

June 5. #

Mang-chung, ' grain, spiked.

June 1. Hà

Hia-chí 1 summer stustice.

July

Stu-shi, "fatle head.'

July 23.

Tá-shú, 'great heat.'

Aug. 8.

Aug. 23.

處著

Sep. 8

Sep. 23

Oct. 8.

Nov. 7.

- 4ļ、

Nov. 22.

Situ-sinèh, 'little snow.!:

Dec. 7.

Tá-siuch, 'great know.'.::

Peh-lú, white dew

Ts'iú-fan, * antumnal equinox.'

Han-lú, 'cold dew.';

Oct. 23.Shwáng-kiáng, 'frost, descends."

Lih-tung, winter begius,?tyli

012! in Cancer

A

11-1

in Leo T

in Vargo.

in Libra.

in Scorpio.

i

in Sagittarius.

Dục. 37 * solstice,

Dec. 27. Tung-chi, 'winter solstice.' enters Capricorn.

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.....

H

ECLIPSES OF SUN IN 1830.

1

**

    I. There will be an annular eclipse of the Sim Feb. 12, central at Singapore, and visible in the morning at Canton; it commences in long 39o E.

    • 11. There will be a hotal eclipse of the sun, Aug. 7th, invisible at Canton, but seen throughout the Preifio. It edmmences in 'kong! 103E.

CHRONOLOGICAL CHARACTERS.

Of these, the Chinese have several classes: the following are the maget awelent

and most generally used. They consist of two sets of characters, the pne of

十干

Shik kản, the 'ten stems,' or 天干 Tiew

    which, called Aquelestial stems; includes ten characters, viž

4 T

Len, the

2 43 Kind, 4 Z Xib, 8 ply Time, Ting, 6 w6,6 Ki

ודי

*# Káng 8 ✈ Sin, 9 ± Jin, 19 1⁄2 Kwri,

...

Shih-'rk chí, 'the twelve branches,' and consist of the following twelve characters ;

The other set, called

Mické, terrestial branches,

Tsz, 2

Chau, 3

Yin, 4

Yin, 4

Mau, 5 Mau, 5

Shin, Shin,

Sz

1.

Wa8Wi, 9

Wí,

Shin, 10

To, 11

F Siuh,12] Siuh, 12

Hái.

1

These characters are applied to, years, months, days, and hours, as well as to the points of the compass. For chronological purposes they have been combined so as to form a cycle of sixty, as represented in page 3. Kiau the first of the ten, is joined to tz', the first of the twelve, and read kiáh-tax', which denotes the first year, month, &". of the cycle. 'In the same manner gik and chau, thờ/second off the two sets are united, and so on through the 'ten steins.' 'Then kiáh, the first of the ten, is joined to siyh, the 11th of the twelve, and in this knander the conjunction la continued up to sixty, when the tenth of the "stems,' and the twoich of the 'branches,come together, and the cycle recommences. The 30th year of Tâukwang, which commences on the 12th of February 1859, is the 47th of the cycle of yours and in called Kang-sinh; the firet moon of That year is the 15th of the cycle of moons, and is called Wú-yin; and the lat day of the

1st moon is the 31st of the cycle of days, and is called Küúk-wh.

I

For hours (and also for the points of the compras) the 'twelve branches' are used wingly. The civil day of twenty-four hours is divided into twelve periods of two hours ́erch called shí shin, which are designated by the characters of the twelve brancher,

in the following manner :

41

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THE POTCA) Omali, wojovoll zl

JANUARY, 31 Days.-

Chinese XXLFth FearXIth and XIIth Moons.

   The weather, during this month, is dry, cold, and being-differing but little, if at all, from that of November and December. The wind blows get nerally from the north, occasionally, inclining to the NE, or NW. A change to the south-which may be expected at intervals of 10 or 15 days, during the winter-causes considerable variation in the temperature of the atmos phere.

13

F

06

TRAINERTİ

Days of Days of

month

moon.

4.

1.

19

2 W

20

3 t

4 F

28 22

5 $

10't

24

25

46

(3)

'res]!

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Hil

ПЭЛАМ

Trade at Canton reopened, 1839. () Captain Gribble seized and brought to Canton, 1840. Lin Tsihsü imperial commissioner, 1939.

Epiphany.

K

11/

JIЯTA

Forts at Chuenpí taken, with great slaughter,

1941.

13

26 Gunner of the Lady Hughes strangled, 1785.

27

11 f

29

12-9

30

13 S

14.

2

15 t

3

4

British forces. visit Faughwá, 1842/ I'lipú arrived

in Canton, 1843.

Jussie S

First Sunday after Epiphany. TWELFTH MOON; Ji.

anola)

16 w 17't 18'f

19 s

20'S

21

az=aca

09 ::、

TZUDUZ.

C. Marjoribanks, pres. E.-1. Co left China, 1832.

Elliot and Kishen's treaty, ceding Dongkong, 1841. [Second Sunday after Epiphany.

R

0:

>

яздотоо

24

25 £

26

14

$

15

16

29

17

30

18

19

(Hongkong taken possession of, 1841. St. Paul's

church at Macao bu̟rnt, 1835.

Interview between Kishen and Elliot, 1841 Sep- tuagesima Sunday.

Lo'd, Saltoun leaves China with $3,000,000, of

rausom money.

nate S

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Days of month

·

ft

7

2 w

8

3 t

9

y

4 f

10

10

5 s

11

6 S

12

7 m

13

13

8 t

14

14

9 w

15

15

10 t

16

16

Il f

17

17

12 s

18

13 S

19

19

14

m

20

20

15 t

21

21

16 w

17 t

23

19

200

18 f

24

25

20 S

26

21 m

27

22 t

23

29

23 w

29

29

24 t

30

30

6 month

month

JANUARY.

Barom. Mean, 30 22 ; már. 30.50 ; min. 30 00° Thermom, Mean at noon, 64, night, 50; wax 74, min. 29.

Mean fill 69 inches; rainy days, average 34.

Räin.

Parors

Hartimen

8 month inmerúnd

Parce Mbenshal

4th month

Teer.

MEMORANDA.

7- Fa

Virited in Ita Pagoda with 2 Des. Bal

4.6. Bridgman-

D

Finished reading " 2 Friends", 78.Mp.

11- Went to bouton

12- Stayed at Mr. Clelands-

Refad Loves

Whampoa

on holiness - 14ff.

Went tox Pagoda with Loomis & Profit. Maja

18 - Went to Pui Kong Village.

wi Went to Caputo, Tract Meeting. Gille

22

Went to Canton. Bible translation Meet 2. Afai & Budhist priest call.

23

24

Capts Major & Belee made a visit to 25- Walk with Gillespie to Mane Kong

26

Read

Tract

32

27 - Finished Butler's Analogy & Bames Essa

4004

Went to Canton-Bible Meeting at Clela Gillespie moved to

my

25 f

1

1

26 s

2

2

27 S

3

22 in

4

4

Gillespie returned to Canton.

29 t

30 w

31 t

7

7

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FEBRUARY, 28 Days.

Chinese XXIX-XXXth Year, XIIth and Ist Moons.

During the month the thermometer continues low; but the dry bracing old of the three preceding months is changed for a damp and chilly atmos- phere; the number of fine fair days is much diminished, and cloudy and foggy ones are more frequent in February and March than in any other months. The fog is sometimes so dense as to render objects invisible at a few yards' distance.

Day of Day of month.

moon.

2 723***NARA

25

26

1 f

20

2 8

21

3 S

22

4 in

5 t

24

6 w

7 t

8 f

9 s

28

10 S

29

Il m

30

12 t

1

13 w

2

14 t

3

15 f

4

16 s

5

17 S

6

18 m 19 t

*7

8

20 w 21 t

9

|22 f

11

23 s

12

24 S

13

125 in

14

26 t

15

27 w

16

23 t

17

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Inhabitants of Hongkong declared to be British

subjects, 1841.

Sexagesima.

The Hyacinth enters the Harbor of Macao, 1840. Rebellion broke out at Lienchau, 1832.

Capt. Halcon, Span. envoy, arrived in Macao, 1840.

Snow fell in Canton, 1835. Shunchí died 1661.

Quinquagesima. Kienlung died, 1795.

FIRST MOON, CHINESE NEW YEAR.

Empress of China died, 1840. Elliot's second in- terview with Kishen, 1841. Ash Wednesday.

Gov. Sii visits the U. S. ship Plymouth, 1849. Ports of Hongkong and Tinghái declared free, 1841. |First Sunday in Lent.

Boat of the Nemesis fired on at Wangtong, 1841.

Medical Missionary Society organized, Canton, 1838.

Hostilities with the English resumed, 1841.

Chusan evacuated by the British forces, 1841. 2d|

Sunday in Lent.

Capt. Da Costa and lieut. Dwyer killed at Wang-

má-kok, 1849.

A Chinese executed before the factories, Canton,

1839. Bogue forts captured, 1841.

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Barom.

FEBRUARY.

Mean, 30.13; max. 30.50 ; min. 29.69.

Thermom. Mean at noon 57, night, 49; max. 78, min. 38.

Mean fall, 1.7 inches; rainy days, average 7.

Rain.

Days of month

Parsee Kuna 6 month

Burray ver.

70

Parvee Shenshai

6 month

Ummerlad

MEMORANDA.

We French & Pragman winded me at Weighed 159ls.

10 - bleges Camera & therey spent the evening

    Harvey 11 Finished Hobson's stationomy Chinese 7.8 M 13 Finished Harris' G. Commission, pp. 530

Gilfilland Gillespie go to H. Kony

12

1 f

2 s

9

9

3 S

10

4 m

11

5 t

12

6 w

13

7 t

14

is

8 f

15

15

9 s 16

16

10 S

17

17

11 m

18

18

19

21

≈ 22 * *

12 t

13 w

14 t

15 f

16 s

20

22

2 *

14

Read In Bettle hainis letter. 30 pp. Milne's Nears to aut Chinese-

tract, 10pp

on

Read father Shanghai Eng missionnere pp. 21; 19 - Famshed Sie 9. Stanton

        πr $5 pp. 60 211th. Cremer & Dirham breakfasted with me

* 21 walked with Mes. that & Miss Tarrant -

pp. 4.

Virited U.S. shif St. Mary's with 4 Chines Read Memous of thes. Rumsfs & Broglie, 25 Finished Lectures on Bunyan by Cleemer. 320

"Life of Naugh""""

pa-80 "Owen on blas Study - 15.

     MX Attended Mrs. Whilden's funeral. Visited Brig

"Arab with a Chinese officer of

23

23

17 S

24

24

18 m

25

19 t

26

26

"

20 w

27

27

"

21 t

28

28

22 f

29

29

23 s

30

30

month 6 month

24 S

1

25 m

2

26 t

3

3

27 w

4

Sail'd rand hum Skan island in 5 howes from

28

5

5

гр.

Finished Life of C. Cuvier, 9644.

&

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10

MARCH, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, Ist and [Id Moons.

   The weather in the month of March is also damp and foggy, but the tem- perature of the atmosphere becomes considerably warmer; to preserve things From damp, it is requisite to continue the use of fires and closed doors, which the heat of the atmosphere renders very unpleasant. From March till July and August, the thermometer steadily increases in height aud heat reaches its maximum degree.

Days of Days of

month

2 8

inoon.

18

19

3 S 20

4 m 5 t

21

6 w

23

7 t

24

25

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

St. David's.

Sir Hugh Gough arrived at Whampoa, 1941. Third Sunday in Lent. Ílipú died in Canton, 1843.

Napier's forts captured, 1841.

;

8 f

9 9

10 S

II m

12 t

13 w

26

*** * *28

27

29

30

14 t 15 f

1

2

16 s

3

17 S

4

18 m

Lin arrived in Canton, 1839.

British in Chinhái

and Ningpo attacked, 1842. Fourth Sunday: British brig Ann lost on Formosa, 1842.

Kishen goes a state's prisoner to Peking, 1841. Chinese custom-house closed at Macao, 1849, SECOND MOON.

Chinese forces at Tsz'kí routed, 1841.

Macartney's embassy leaves China, 1794. Fifth

Sunday in Lent.

5 Canton under British

LA CO

[19.t

6

20 w

7

21

8

9

23

10

24 S

11

25 m

12

26 t

13

14

128

15

29

16

30 s

17

31

18

guns, 1841:

Foreigners detained in Canton by Lin, 1889. Armistice agreed upon at Canton, 1841.

Bonham lands at Hongkong, 1848.

Gov.

British ship Sarah, first free trader, sailed, 1834. Kiying appointed commander-in-chief, 1842. S Captain Elliot forced his way to Canton, 1839. Friend of China commenced, 1842,.. [Sixth

Sunday in Lents

Lady Day.

20,283 Chests of Opium surrendered, 1889. Rebellion broke out at Lienchau, 1832. Good Friday Sir John F. Davis leaves China, 18481

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Barom.

110

MARCH.

Mean, 30.17; maxim. 30.50; min. 29.95.

Thermom. Mein at noon 72, night, G0); max. 82; min. 44.

Mean fall, 24 inches; average rainy days, 6.

Rain

    Day of month

bengkaj

7 mouth

Mayhor:

I f

6

6

2 8

7

7

3 S

8

4 m

9

9

5 1

10

10.

6 w

11

7 t

12

8 f

13

9 8

14

14"

10 S

15

16

11 m

12 t

13 w

14 t

15 f

16 s

17 S

13 m

17

18

1 1 1 & 2 2

''MEMORANDA.

Finishid "Mitchells Astronomy"

"

3.36 pp

94 pfen

"Read" Great Tauths in I Words"-

"""Witheid Bronych"

M. Concert at Dr. Parkers... th. Browns conduct Read Rept of Tin Helson's Hospital

зорл

12 Fish's Capt. Locks Events in China" - pp. 2

Steward Nands dined with

Shif "Channing"

24 Chinese

15" Finishit "Night of Soil pp-118. 16- Read Converstom on Training the Young Jr. 26. 17. Finishid Afats tracts

35

1911 Que's Bettle nais katte 12 John

Memon of A. R. Peters th Chinese Almanac

19

19

20

20-

21

21

22

22

23

24

25

#

447229

14-

Want to Ragada mith Be Lovy 23 - Went to Pagoda mitt i Legge. 24 - Whampoa Bottel dedicated - Loomis sick 25 - Went to Whampoa pagoda with 8. W. Will

26

-

S.

Finished Advice to a Yong Christian. th. 160 30. Hindered from putthaly upe, iber. Wilden's

19 t

20 w

21 t

26'

4

22 f

27

27

23

28

28

24 S

29

29

25 m

30

26 t

1

1

27 w

2

2

28 1

3

29 f

4

4

30 s

5

31 S

8 month 7 month

ט 45

56

the.

is gra

Mr. Whilden raild for America in E. Eller

with M. Burns.

3 Winter, J. King quotes, pp- 32

Finished

"8 - 12 visiters to read Bible & converx Battel of

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1

APRIL, 30 Days.

XXXth Year, Ild and IHd Moons.

    The thick fogs which begin to disappear towards the end of March are in April seldom if ever seen.. The atmosphere, however, continues damp, and rainy days are not unfrequent. At the same time, the thermomerer gradually rises, and the nearer approach of the sun renders that heat more perceptible. In this and the summer months, southerly winds generally prevail; frequently however, they veer to the eastward.

Days of Days of

moon

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

10 w

11 t 12 f

month.

1 m

2 t

20

3 w

21

4 t

5 f

6 8

789

7 S

m

27

227** * *****

19

23

24

25

26

28

29

13 s

2

14 S

3

Confucius died, æt. 72, B. c. 429. Queen of Portugal born, 1819.

Kwoh Siping strangled at Macao, 1838.

The emperor's annual ploughing. Sir John Davis

makes an arrangement with Kíying, 1847.

Low Sunday.

Kíying appointed imperial commissioner, 1842. H. B. M. Commission return to Canton, 1837. THIRD MOON.

}

Yishan, Lungwan, and Kí Kung arrive in Canton.

1841. Second Sunday after Easter.

15 m

4

16 t

5

17 w

6

18 t

19 f

8

First steamer, the Forbes, reaches China, 1830.,

20 s

9

21 S

10

Third Sunday after Easter.

"

22 m

11

=

E. I. Company ceased to trade, with China, 1834. Schooner Emma attacked near Chuenpí, 2 Eng- lishmen killed.

23 t

12

24 w

13

St. George.

25 t

14

26 f

15

27 8

16

130

וח

17 Fourth Sunday after Easter.

18

19

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Barom.

H

APRIL.

Mean 30.03; max. 30.25; min. 29.85,

Thermom. Mean at noon, 77, night, 68 ; max. 86; min. 56. Mean fall, 5.63 inches; average rainy days, 10.

Rain.

Parose

Days of Kul

Parson Shemshal 7 month

Mayber

MEMORANDA.

•M. Concert at for Parkers-

1.

9- Kirit from 4 Maps Han of Sie Chan villag 10-Foodh tea with Dr. Lever at his chop

Finished Dean's tract on Truth

23/pn Saw morship at the tombs in Pak Jeng-

on Long Jemmy

12- Called

month

8 month Abda

I m

7

2 t

8

3 w

9

4 t

10

5 f

1!

11

6 s

12

7 S

13

13

8 m

14

14

9

15

15.

10 w

16

16

17

17

12 f

18

18

13 8 19

19

14 S

20

20

21

21

= = =

15 in

16 t

17 w

14

23

2 2 3 2 3

24

30

Strz went to Macao.

"

in

Whampoa.

Finished L. Richmond's Letters. pp. 200. Tea at Bether with Loomis & Her

Went to Lin Fid Pagoda anith M Went to Canton with d. Wa

Flimistid Bingham's S. Islands./p. 615. Read Dr. Cox's Sermon phen 23 Read this Chronicle = p/ 10.

239a3

24

25

+45

26 Shif "Flavius saild for S. Islands. 27-25 at P. Worship - 2-232 o'clock_140

20 kneeled in prayer

of M

Read Kept of $. B. 6. F.lt for 1848 pager 60

34 - Sick at home - Visit from + yé &

18 t

19 f

25

20 s

26

21 S

27

22 m 28

28

23 t

29

29

24 w

25 1

1

26 f

2

2

27 s

3

3

23 S

29

30 t

6

9 month month

Loomis & Ly soon started. for Ningpo-

• 10 at P. Worshith. Bridginan precesfit at Bat 5- Went to Canton with Bridgman, retterned with Se 1 - Visit from from did. Mr. Ping & the Cambr

old

6

+

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M.

Google

112

MAY, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, IIld and IVth Moons.

In this month the heat is fully set in, and it is-particularly in Canton-often Toppressive, the more so from, the closeness of the atmosphere, the winds being usually light and variable. This is the most rainy month in the year, averag- ing fifteen days and a half of heavy rain; cloudy days without rṣin, however, are of frequent occurrence, and one half of the month' averages fine sudny

weather.

Days of Days of month.

moon.

I w

20

2 t

21

3 f

22

4 9

23

5 8

24

6 m

25

7 t

26

8 w

27

9 t

10 f

29

11 s

30

12 8

13 m

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Famine in Kiángnán, Chehkiáng, and Húpeh, 1832,

The Hongkong Gazette commenced, 1841.

|Rogation Sunday.

British troops evacuate Ningpo, 1842.

28 Ascension Day-Holy Thursday.

E. I. Co.'s garden demolished, by lieut-governor Chú, 1831. Fourth Moon. Sunday after As-

cension.

14 t

15 w

16 t

17 f

18 8 19 S

20 m

10

21 t

122 w

23 24 f

234597 - 12345

25 s 26 S

27 m 28 t

16

17

29 w

18

30

19

BL f

20

British forces arrive off Chípú, 1842.

Chápú carried by storm, 1842. Whitsunday-Pentecost.

British ships at Canton attacked, 1841. The delir-

ery of the 20,283 chests opium completed, 1839.) Foreign factories pillaged, 1841.

Queen Victoria born, 1818.

|Canton surrounded by British forces, 1841.

Trinity Sunday.

The city of Canton ransomed for six millions, 1841.

A Congregational Association formed in Canton, 1846 'Chinese Repository commenced, 1832.

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Barom.

12

MAY.

Mean, 29.92; max. 30.10; min. 29.80.

Thermom. Mean at noon 78; night, 72 ; max. 88, min. 61.

Mean fall, 11.8 in.; average rainy days, 15.

Rain.

Days of month

1 w

Parce Kuituees 9 month

Ackler.

00

5476

Parene Rhenshai 8 month

Alla.

MEMORANDA.

Read 6. Repartoy for theit th 30.

8 - Fapishid Fortress Wanderings. fp. 106.

ૐ ન

9 - Asz returned -

10Megno French Worship

at P.

2 t

3 f

9

4 s

10

5 S

11

6 m

12

12

7 t

13

13 -

8 w

14

14

9 t

15

15

10 f

16

16

11 s

17

17

12 S

18

18

13 m

19

19

14 t

20

20

21

21

22

17 f 23

23

13 s

24

24

19 S

25

20 m

26

21 t

27

27

22

28

28

23 1

29

15 w

16 t

24 f

དྷ་ྒཨྰཿཁཝཱ

E & SEN

W

29

25 s

26 S

27 m

281

29 w

9

Raaaa

..

M. Concert at Dr. Partheis

the evening with

pamphlet on + 4 x 43. Read fog has her pact on Elijah. Chinese. th. 2

Finished

tea mith M. Cooper & Cost. Wordlen

"First is the "Excellent Woman sh- 75.

boys in A. M. et P. Worship &

30 persons at P. Mr.

scholars ran awa

away

Interview with 4 relatives of scholars,

any prove

25 18 persons at P. Worship. th. Bring the ke 126 - whome hiring effing returned to school.

39

1

"Plissions" pp. 2

the. Mny

at all.

Mission Meeting Atul & Yong he returned to school Rev. Mackay arrived at Whampoa

10 mouth 3 month th. Place bagged lodging & food.

2-35 Persons at P. Wons high it Chic

In danger from roles

5 S

20

3

4

5

30 t

6

31 f

7

7

Tea with hast & thr. Mickle th. Place began to board mithi

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me

· 13

JUNE, 30 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, IVth and Vth Moons.

The month of June is also a very wet month, although, on an average, the number of rainy days is less than in the other summer months. The ther- nometer in June rises several degrees higher than in the month of May, and falls but little at night-it is this latter circumstance, chiefly, which causes the exhaustion often felt in this country from the heat of summer-no op- |portunity being afforded for regaining strength.

Days of Days of

month.

moon.

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

1 s

21

2 S

22

3 m

23

4

24

5 w

25

6 t

26

7 f

27

8 s

28

9 S

29

10 m

1

11 t

2

12 w

3

13 t

4

14 f

15 s

16 S

17 m

567899

12

16

First Sunday after Trinity.

Lord J. S. Churchill died off Macao, 1840.

Kiying arrived in Canton, 1843.

Mr. Summers released from Macao, 1849.. Second Sunday after Trinity.

FIFTH MOON.

Portuguese prohibited trading at Canton, 1640,

Sir Le F. Senhouse died at Hongkong, 1841.

Russian and Chinese treaty, 1728. Capt Elliot]

appointed chief sup. of British trade, 1836. |British troops arrived before Wúsung, 1842. Wúsung taken, 1842.-Third S. after Trinity.

Shanghái occupied by British forces, 1842.

Macartney's embassy arrived, 1793. Victoria's

accèssion, 1837.

Sir J. J. Gordon Bremer arrived in the Wellesley,

1840.

Port of Canton blockaded by English forces. 1840.

The destruction of 20,283 chests of opium com- pleted by Lin at the Bogue. 1839. Kíying visits Hongkong, 1843. Fourth S. after Trinity. Midsummer day.

17 Treaty of Nanking exchanged at Hongkong, 1843.

Queen Victoria crowned, 1838.

Expedition to China arrived, 1840. Fifth Sunday

after Trinity.

18 t

19 w

· 10

20 t

11

21 f

22 s

13

23 S

14

24 m

15

125 t

   26 w 127 t

18

28 f

19

29 s

20

30 S

21

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13

JUNE.

Days of month

8

Barom.

Mean height 29.88; max.

.30.00; min. 29.75, Thermom. Mean at noon, 85, night, 79; max. 90; min. 74.

Mean fall, 11.1in.; average rainy days, 9.

Rain.

Pare Kudimen 10 month

Drigh

Puree Shenabai

1 month

Adder.

MEMORANDA.

Ang ships as Reward in Brig Frotic for Calip

9 14 persons at P. Worship

2 S

9

3 m

10

10

4 t

11

11

5 w

12

12

6 t

13

13

7 1

14

14

8.

15

15

9 S

16

16

10 ກາ 17

17

11 t

18

19

20

20

21

12 w

13 t

2 2 2 2

14 f 21

15 8

22

23

30

Mr. Gigs called at schoolroom-

M.-G

17 persons at P. Worshipe

Rev. Maclay went to & kong

Went to Bamboo Town mitte Ms. Hot & Me 18+ Weighed 185 lbs.

19 - Sent Keetsgn & Achor as steward book of B. Ern

22

Disnerd Aiin to Valparaiso

Roopt. all

Exhibited M. Lantern at Amoon's house- Read 33° Reft. of. A. Bilu Sporet. 401

2:3 14 Persons at P. Warship. 24 at alle Ann

28

d

"

Brettel

Birou tegen to board with a

(Tea with P. Mihelf Wilker, Jones, Waiting. 29 Went with My Bram to Kim Shan 30-12 at P. Worship. M

16 S

17 m

24

24

18 t

25

25 E

19 w

26

26

20 t

27

27

21 f

28

22 8

29

23 S

24 m

25 t

2

26 w

3

3

27 t

4

4

23 f

5

5

29 s

6

6

30 S

7

7

|11 month 10 month

1

2 Exhibited M. Lantern on Bethel

12 persons at R Warship.

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:14

JULY, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, Vth and VIth Moons.

During July-which is the hottest month in the year-the average height of the thermometer is 88° in the shade, at noon, both at Canton and Macao. This mouth is subject to frequent and heavy showers of rain, and-as is also the month of August-to storms of thunder and lightning. The winds, with very |little variation, blow steadily during the whole month from the south or south-|

wets.

Day of Day of

month.

moon.

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

The Blonde visited Amoy, 1840.

Treaty of Wánghiá signed, 1844.

{

The Rev. Dr. Milne arrived in Macao, 1811.

The Morrison sailed for Japan, 1837. 26 Tinghái first taken, 1840.

27

1 m

22

2 t

23

3 w

24

4 t

25

5 f

6 s

7 S

28

& m

29

9 t

1

10 w

2

12 f. 13

4

5

A

14 S

Bark Troughton plundered by pirates, 1835.

Lin Weihí killed, 1839. Queen's Road chapel at| Hongkong dedicated, 1842. Sixth Sunday after Trinity.

|Riot, and several Chinese shot in Canton, 1846.

SIXTH MOON.

The Yangtsz' kiáng blockaded, 1840. 34mberst's embassy arrived, 1816.

15 m 7

164 "

.. 17

B

18 t 10

19 f

120 s

12

21. S 13

22 m

'14'

15

24 w

16

25 t

17

126 f

27 s 28 S 20

29 m

31

130

22

131 w

23

Admiral Maitlandearrived in the Wellesley, 1838. First English ship Teached China, 1635. Seventh Sunday aften Prinity.

Lord Napier and suite, arrived, 1834. British trade reopened, 1841.

Dutch enabys)arrived at Beking, 1656. Grand Canal blockaded, 1842.

5 Tyfoon) 1841. Chipkiáng, fú carried by storm,

1842. Eighth Sunday after Trinity.

A murderous attack on a party at Yiitáu in Ho-

nam, 1846.

18 second tyfoon this year, 1841.

19

Ninth Sunday after Trinity. Hon. A. H. Everett died, 1847.

Gov. Lin and Tang sentenced to banisment, 1941.

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Days of

month

Barom.

14

JULY.

Mean height, 29.83; max. 30; min. 29.60. Thermom. Mean at noon 88, night, 81; max. 94; min 79.

Mean fall, 7.74 in.; average rainy days, 10.

Rain.

PATSUS Kuhneos 11 month

Buimon

Parsec Shenahni

10 mouth

Deich.

D

9

MEMORANDA.

Went to buster with the. Syms & Ship Barn "Dr. Balks infant daughter died. 10 Exhibited M. Lonton A Capt Adores, Mate & 82 11-Dimed with 20 gentlemen at the Hunts chosen 12-J. Brown went to board on Antelope

14

17

13 - Went to Lan Tan with M. Bens 15 present at P. Warship - 15 J. Rown sailor removed to Antelop 16 Femiked Reading Parwelt Philafly 244

Exhibited M. Lantern at Clinchem Hong 19. M. Lantern at Shah Kong-coffin shop- 20 Finished Memoirs of alles. Herman pp. 310

No "meeting, attended funeral & rainy 22 Finished "bornin's Prychology: pp=4369-

19

I m

2 t

9

3 w

10

4 t

5 f

12

6 9

13

7 S

14

8 m

15

9 t

16

10 w

17

18

12 f

19

13 s

20

14 S

21

15 m

22

16 t

17 w

24

24

13 t

25

25

19 f

26

26

20 8

27

27

21 S

28

22 m

29

30

23 1

21

23

Read Theil asoft stuchy of Language Pp. 13.

"Lamartine" intelle Chalmers

Filing

mith diarrhea theat.

23-14 at I! Worship

29

1- 23

A

25

3 Mases Him from Sin Chan called- 3:311 Finish'd Mohat's S. Africa Mr-406 12 month 11 month Loomis retiand to Whampoa

2

-10

3 Read Chinese trast on Gospel pof...

24 w

25 t

26 f

3

27 8

28 S

5

5

6

29 m

30 t

31 w

461 00

6 persons at P. Worship. Furnishid Life of Polloh. H.36. Sysoon at Whampoa -

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15

AUGUST, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, Vlth and VIIth Moons.

During this month the heat is as oppressive generally as in the month of July-often indeed it is more so, although the thermometer sually ustands lower. Towards the close of the month, when summer begins to break up, the wind odonsianally weers, from southeast to north and northwest. Tyfoons peldon oder earlier than the first of this month, or later than the end of Sep

J. ふ

month. moon.

1 t

af

2.f 3

25

Jub 48

•Chronicle of Events in China, &c.

Chinese, Periodical commenced, by Mr. Gutzlaff, 1833. Dr. Morrison died at Canton, æt. 53, 1834.

26 Wyfoon, paron 28.10, 1832

27.

British fleet arrived before Nanking, 1842. Tenth

Smiddagi aféen. Trinity

•20 A tyfoom, 4825. Minton made prisoner, 1840.

7 w

8

1

9-f

SEVENTH MOON:

Batavia taken by the Finglish, 1811. British squad- if the Pey ho, 1840.

ron

10. 3. pH, Pottinger ud Sir W: Parker arrive, 1841.

Captain Elliot entered the Pei ho, 1840. Eleventh

Sunday after Trinity.

S

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13

14.

15,

16 f

174 British prisoners executed on Formosa, 1842.

W

Optimistiquers - Hi-ngan and Húsungah arrived,

1832) )4gn. J. W. Davis arrives, 1848,

Twelfth Sunday after Trinity.

Barrier at Macao, attacked 1840.

14. Sif H. Pottinger landed in orgkong, 1841.

Gov Amark-assassinated, 1849.

22′13′′

15

.16.

17

9.

17 s 18 S

10

11

19 m

12

20

13

21.w

23, f

S.

25 S

18

26 m

19

27 t

20

28 w

21

29 t

22

30 f

S

[China, 1841. Attack on the Black Joke, 1839. Capt. Elliot leaves Brit: Chàm, Coin, formed, 1835. PassalhaŎ fort ta- ken by the Portuguese, 1849.-13th S. after T.

British Teave Macho, 1939: Amoy taken, 1841.

Treaty of Nanking signed, 1842. 23Conference at Tientsin, 1849.

[rison died, 1843. Hon. J. R. Mor-

24 Three sons at,one birth, Whampoa, 1832,

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15

AUGUST.

30;

Days of month

2 f

Barom. Mean, height 29 85 in. max.

min. 29.55

Thermom. Mean at noon, 85, night, 78; max 90, min. 75.

Mean fall 9.9 in.; average rainy dayu, 124.

Rain.

Parsee Kuchonen 12 month

Expanded

9

10

3 8 11

Parce Bhenthal 11 month

Bummon.

MEMORANDA.

me-

98. At Lowes begin to host with 10 Revision Committee met at shorty Hong 11 & M Lansen wont & brig Eaglend

Read & tracker on 10 Commands, Chinen sp Char. Follows began to board with my

17- D. Olyfligent den. arrived at Leenton__

4 S

12

12

5 m

13

13

6 t

14

14

7 w

15

15

8 t 16

16

9 f

17

10 8

18

18

11 S

19

19

12 m

20

20.

13 t 21

14 w

223

21

22

15 t

23

23

24

Mr. Packey, My Roberts & Wife, Mid Baker

arrived

25

24 Went to Canton

25

26

20 persons at P. Worship ith: Misted...

Mimon meeting at the Bridgman's.

30 bunchies bred repon at1⁄2 be month

50 cts. a meal for 5 men

12 months.

1

16 f

17 s

18 S

19 m

20 t

21 w

22 t

23 f

24 5

25 S

26 m

26

27

27

23

28

29

29

* * * * ? ::

5 Gawthaw. Intercalary dars -

8

30

2

3

4

5

27 t

1 month

28 w

1

29 t

2

30 f

3

31 8

4

2

C. Fellows shiped on & Lunean.

3-20 pestent at P. Worship & 13 Aunaches 4 This I. Russell agroned in Blenheim Rear 5 Finished "Gesins of Italy. Mr. 332.

6. Fellows returned from S. Luman Finished reading Milers Life H. 549

88 Lights & 2 of 9. Fife W. 269.

6

9.

77

*

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Google

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20

16

SEPTEMBER, 30 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, VIIth and VIIIth Moons.

    In the month of September, the monsoon is entirely broken up, and north- erly winds begin to blow, but with very little alleviation of the heat. This is the pecind most exposed to the description of hurricanes called tyfoons, the range of which extends southwards over about one half of the Chinese sea, aud northward to the cost of Japan. Thay, have appeared with the greatest severity in the gulf Tonquin.

Days of Days

monh

moon.

1 S

25

2.m

26

27

4 w

5 t

Ne f

29

S

9 m 10 t

Il w

13 14 s

9

10

11

15 S

16 m IN SR

18 w W 19 t £30 f.

14

tia

Chronicle of events of China, &c.

In when thait

• & ofad might wond)

Tyfoon, 1848, Isabella Robertson foundered. 14th

Sunday after Trinity.

Kiáking died, 1820.

Dr. Morridonerivanton, 1807. Attack on

Kaulung by capt. Elliot, 1839.

Guard of Marines landed in Canton, 1834. EIGHTH ...MOONA.

Imogen

Huggeng and Andromache pass the Bogue, 1834.

Jewish ara, year 5611, commences.

15th Sunday after Trinity.

News of the treaty of peace reached Hongkong, 1842.

Imogene and Andromiche anchored at Whampoa,

1834.

Taukwáng born, 1782. Canton Press begun, 1835.

Bilbaino burut, 1839

1839,

R. Thom died at Ningpo, 1846.

The Kite, capt. Noble, lost in the Yángtsz', 1840.

16th Sunday after Trinity. Captain Anstruther seized, 1840.

Steamer Malagascar borit, 1841.

16 Steamer Tardiñe wrived, 1835. 47 +17th Sunday, after Trinity,

18

21

22 S

23

124

19

25%w

20-

126 t

21

Nerbudda lost on Formosa, 1841.

.-22. Cammissioner Lju degraded, 1840.

23

24

Morrison Education Society organized, 1836. Michaelmas Day 18ths Sunday after Trinity.

30 m 25.

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Days of

-mont'i

་ ་

Barom

1ፀ

SEPTEMBER.

    Mean height 2).Šần.; max +30-104 min 29.70, Thermom. Mèan at noon, 83, night, 76 ; max. 88, min, 70.

Mean fall, My pink, average rainy days, 10.

Rain.

Peram Kulmeed

1 intb

Pa...

12 m

Ferrenken. | Expunda..

IS 5

3 t

6

MEMORANDA.

10 3 pesino at religious service

(randing Ghapel Studies ff.393

12.

4 w

13

5 t

9

14

6 f

10

15

7 3

16

8 S

12

9 m

10

13 T

L

17 25 persons at P. Worship.

1318

14

15

16

19- Went to Pd do wouth M. Kepler. Nen 21-Bakfastest at Bethel with Mrs. Happer & olle Walked round city with Mr. Keeler.

20

21

17 23 Want & Fa Si mult Brown, Wilkinson &

23

21-20 persons et P. Worship. M. Dan Mot Thamp 25 - Meses Parker, Holison & French returned Hi-Tea at the Hunts. Went to Whampoa town.

148

18

15 S

16

20

17

21

13 w

27

23

23

30

19 t

20 f 24

s

22 S 26

23 10

24 t

25 W

27.1

23 s

27.

29

2 month

Finisha",

Finist's reading Mamers is of Japanese - pp. 4

13--11 persons at P. Worship = Read Honolulu Friend

BIT

coff

+-- Went to Payoda with Keeler. Aulick Whit Nearly caftrized in a best with ths. Ball &

M. Lobschied visited

I month!

2

29 S

30 m

ist laertisement of a proble

8123 persons

Temple handlill on

se

Worship

4

house }

my

house

by Google

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17

OCTOBER, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, VIIIth and IXth Moons.

Northerly winds prevail throughout this month, occasionally veering to north- east or northwest; but the temperature of the atmosphere is neither so cold nor so dry as in the following months; neither does the northerly wind blow so constantly southerly and easterly winds tervening every now and then. The winter usually gets in with three or four days of light drizzling rain.

Days of Days of

month. moon.

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

I t 26 Tinghái retaken, 1841.

2 w

27

3 t

28

4 f

5 8

10

S

Rev. J. A. Gonçalves died, 1841.

NINTH MOON.rved as

Alexander H. Everett, commissioner of U. S. A.

, arrived, 1847. 19th Sunday after Trinity. Supplementary Treaty signed at the Bogue, 1843. Chinh it Taken, 1844 1

Lord Napier died at Mação, 1834, and J. F. Davis

succeeded as Chief Superintendent.

Halley's comet observed in Canton, 1835.

1389Ningpo occupied by British forces, 1841. 20th

Sunday after Trinity:

Yukien, imperial commissioner in Chehkiáng,

committed suicide, 1841.

14 m

15 t

11

16 W

17 t.

13

18 f

14

19 s

15

20 S

16

2345 0

12

1 m

17

122 t

123 w

24 t

25 f

126 s 27 S

22

23

23 m

25

80 w

26*

A

18.

Nemesis and Phlegethon go to Yüyáu, 1841. 21st|

Sunday after Trinity.

19 58 piratical vessels destroyed by Capt. Hay, 1849. 20-Treaty of Whampoa between France and China

21

In Canton, 1200 houses and 3 factories burnt, 1843. 23d Sunday after Trinity.

Terranova executed by the Chinese, 1822. Admiral

Collier died at Hongkong, 1849.

31 t

27

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|Days of month

17

OCTOBER.

Barom. Mean height, 30.1 in.; max. 30.20 ; min. 29.50 Thermom. Mean at noon, 77, night, 69 ; inax 85, min. 57.

Mean fall, 5.5 in.; average rainy days, 5.

Rain.

Kulunees

8 month Arumit.

Shenalial 1 mouth Fever ten

MEMORANDA.

 kee in 11 # Visited Sing Handbill of temple taken down

• Read Funeral Sermon of illaer. Walserth 40%

History of Virginia

9.

Zab

Xh. 50.

. " Premsley, Rat Palmen Alle 13. 102% Vase Ciration

i t

5

2 w

6

6

3 t

7

4 f

8

8

"

5 s

9

6 S

10

7 m 11

11

8 t

12

9 w

13

13

10 t

14

14

11 f

15

15

12 s

16

16

13 S

17

14 m

18

15 t

19

HIRO 7 2 2

2 2 2 3 2 +

20

21

22

16 w

17 t

18

f

19 s 23

20

S

21 m

22 1

24

25

With

Review of. 4.2. Ada

Apr.

28

12 and naming of Healingy day Ah. 25

went to Bright 60th.

Beecher went to Canton

Bage

Went to leanton Revision Meeting- Firited Lif Tak font

17-12 at P. Worship

18

J. Beicher returned from Cinton 20 Stoned at Qui Kong village,

19

21

22

Went to leanton, say lodged at M

25 tea at Mh. It

23

28 11 Persons at P. Washif 25 Meanned Palhau jagode 1402 ft. by J. 26 Went to Canton fuith, M. Killer.

Road Maria Pole ph

     Louis, St Morst to Pagoda myth Lormes. haft Better Buskey ele 150st, high

sold 5 passengers

28-

26

23 w

27

27

24 t

25 f

29

29

26 s

30

30

3 month

month

27 S

1

1

Jame

Went to Pak

-20 persons at P. Worship.

148.

28 m

&

29 t

3

3

30 w

4

4

31 t

5

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Google

18

*

NOVEMBER, 30 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, 1Xth and Xth Moons.

The month of November, and the two following are the most pleasant in tifel year, at least to the feelings of persons from the morn northern cliritës. ough the thermometer is not often below 40, and seldomi so low as 30 de- grees, the cold of a Chinese winter is often very severe. Ice sometimes forms about que eighth of an inch thick→is is usually in December ør January,

Day of Day of

month.

moon.

18

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

2

2

#!

20

1 f

28

S

3

5 t

29* Factories in Canton burpt, 1822. ¡

(-29 war junts destroyed at Chuenpí; ¡1839. 23d

Sunday after Trinity. !

30

1

TRNTH MOON. Anglo-Chinese college commenced

Malacca, 1818.

-J

11

I we

6 w 3 Trice agreed on at Canton, 1840. Mohammedan

year 1267 commences!

7.1

ان

* 51

2 81

1. 17

(Sir Andrew Ljungstedt died, Macao, 1835. 24th

Sunday after Trinity:

Earthquake at Shanghái, 1847.

# bl

14

Tel

Shángái opened to commerce, 1843. 25th S. after

New empress succeeds, 1834.

Į

7 t

4

R f

5

U. S. ship Peacock arrived, 1832.!

6

ib S

..

12 t

9

IB w

10

14 t

15 f

12

16 s

13

17 S 14

Frinity,

   18:M 19ì

15

16

20 w

17

21 t

18

|22 f

19

123.s

-20

31

25 m

22

26 t

23

127 w

21

28 t

25

29 f

26

30 s

27

St. Andrew's.

19

Captain Elliot returned from the Pei ho, 1840.

In Canton, 1400 buildings burnt, 1835. 26th Sunday after Trinity.

2.09

General Chamber of Commerce formed in Canton,|

1836.

T

Kishen arrived at Canton, 1841. Society, DU.

Knowledge formed at Canton, 1834.

7 08

15

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Barom.

18

NOVEMBER.

       Meaf height: 30.16ĩa., max. 30:59, hin. *9 95. Thermom. Mean at noon, 67; night. 57; max. 80, min. 40.

Mban fél, 2.4fin. javerage rainy days, 3.

Ram.

Days of

uronth

If

PATE Holol

8 une th

Arjelent.

MEMORANDA.

T

6. Beecher went to Canton with _ of t

-

4-12 persons at P. Worship

Beecher shipt on Carthage". Soft Roper.

10. Walkid romand lasanton will be. Food of Sph

thu came as con thtown sch 12 - Virited, Jean & Bathed with 6 tranht

Asz went Tea with Capt. spring

Parser Kikorea

3

Khon Lak

6

2 s

7

3 S

4 m

9

9

5 t

10

6 w

11.

H

7 t

12

8 f

13

9 s

14

14

10 S

15

11 m

16

16

12 t

17

17

18

18

19

13 w

14 t

15 f

16 8

17 S

13 m

19 t

20 w

21 t

22 f

23 s

24 S

25; m

26

27 w

23 t

29 f

30

S

a

19

20

21

23

2 2 2 2 ***

2 2 2 8 2

13

Sz, ha Shan village. Motives-300

1::

11 - Finished reading Mandhir 15-18 at by thick scientions pp. 7

20

21

22

23

24

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

ined at Dr. Hobson's

Went to Whampoa with the Roberts Yors high illis Be 19 persons at @ Worship 1952 rotund. Walked with Mis Rigdis B.

1 Dane's In

2's - Returned to Canty with this thin B

25

26

27

ligion hectic

→ Finished Lyet, & visit to theflate 54% 29-18 persons at P. Warship to tea.

28

30

4 month 3 month.

1

2

I

2

3

Dr. Thonton came

Went to Honam temple with Capt. Men of dy

Walked round Canton with Dr Thornton Visited Bethel with Dr. Thomton- 1 with. French escorted Miss this: Ball to Cane 3- Tea with Capt. Spring on the "fea"

4

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19

DECEMBER, 31 Days.

Chinese XXXth Year, Xth and XIth Moons.

The months of December and January are remarkably free from rain, the average fall in each month being under one inch, and the average number of rainy days being only three and a half. . On the whole, the climate of Canton |(and more especially that of "Masao) may be considered superior to that of

most other places situated between the tropics.

Days of Bayo

month

m

Chronicle of events in China, &c.

Confucius Toff, BC: 562, Hingan's sister made

emprest1833, 1st Sandwy in Advent.

Xavier died on Sinshan, -1552.

3Seizure

Seizure bf opiam at Canton, 1938.

4 WEDBETH MOON:

2

4

2S foreigners killed at Wang-chuk-kí, 1847.

British trade stopped for ever."

18

f

3

ཎོ།

4

8 S 9 m

10 t

servant leares China, 1830.

E. 1. Co.'s fast

Brisk consulate at Cautós burnt in a riot, 1842. 2d Sunday after Advent.

المدند.

دالت

11 w

12

M

15 $

16 m

13

17 t

14

13 w

15

129

16

20

17

21 s 22.S

18

19

23 m

20

21

22

26

23

27

128**

S

30 m 31 t

temed execution and riot, in Canton, 1838. The flag of Mance relaisted in Canton, 1832.

All Catholic priests hot Portuguese) expelled * Macao, 1838. 3d Sunday after Advent.

Sir Hugh Gough, and the Eastern Expedition, leave

Chitia, 1842.

St. Thomas.

4th Sunday after Advent.

Christmas day."

i

Mr. Stanton released from prison by the Chinese, 1840.

First Sunday after Christmas.

E. I. Company chartered, 1690.

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Barom.

19

DECEMBER.

Mean height, 30.23 in ; max. 30.35 ; min. 30.15. Thermom. Mean at noon 62, night, 52; max. 70; min 45.

Mean fall, 0.93 in.; average rainy days, 34.

Kules

4 month

Toor,

67

Parvee

8 b nahi

3 month Khrad.

Rain.

Pune

Days of inonth

IS

2 m

7

3 t

8

8

4 w

9

9

5 t

10

10

6 f

11

73

12

12

8 S

13

13-

14

m

14

15

15

16

10

11 w

12 t 17

MEMORANDA.

15 persons at As White Bro. Bridgman

Adenaly himself prom

Watched day & night with Be Bridgman

died. 33, A. M.

Bro. J. C. Bridgman frencial.

Bo. Be

Spoke in Chinese at Mr. Roberts & Ball's

16- Returned to Whampoa from Canton 17 -Vinted Sea Witch with 6 Chinese. The at M. & Went to Pak Shan Orange grove A thief whift in San Chan Street

Sommen hat ill no

13 f

18

19

14 8 19

19

15 S

20

20

16 m

17 t

21

21

22

13 w

19 t

23*** &AR?

22 +

23

24

24-

20 f 25

25

21 s

26

26

22 S

27

27

23 m

28

23

29

30

5 month

30 month

26 t

27 f

2

28 s

3

29 S

4

30 m

5

5

31 t

6

24 t

25 w

-

meeting Sick in bed with fever & aque-

Able to sit up grandfather visited my Visited Dr. Smith, Bethel by tea with Mr. Cooper Went to leoniton, returned in

unwell-

evening

No meeting Bout Tea at th. Hunt's Capt Regan, M. Ar Arvind at Ph. Lagger Started for Hongkong in Fart Bout

• Dr. Balfours dights baptized

Walk'd round barston let in 1851

Dig by

84

PARSEE CHRONOLOGY.

i

   The era adopted by the Parsees is called the Era of 'Yezdejērd, and commences a. p. 632, the year of the accession of! Yezdejerd III. to the throne of Persist, and the game in which that kingdom was attached by the Arabs: Whe Sassonian dynasty terminated by the successive defeats of this monarch in 686, and afterwards in 641, and his expulsion from the country. There are two modes of tal- culating this æra adopted by the Parsees, which differ only in ope month; the Ķudmées reckon time as given in the the first column ju this Calendar, the Rasmees or Shenshai date it one mouth later as given in the second-column, commencing their year September 27th. The intercalation of five days at the end of the 12 months of 80 days to`colmplete the year of 365 days is a very ancient mode, intro- 'duced by and adopted from the Chaldeans, by the Persians, Medes, Egyptians, Grecians, Roms; and Mexicans,, among all of whom they were observed with mirth and feasting. They are collectively called Grothuws by the Parsees, at each one has its own haine,

• as pebbono konooud, beejoo oustonud, leejowo uppuntomud, chothorough khustuther and pachqor vestøyest.

***The year a. D. 1850 corresponds to the year 1219 of this æra, ending August 27th, or September 26th, when the year 1220 com-

miences.

1

sil

(

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:

BRIEF GEOGRAPHICAL DESCRIPTION

OF THE

PROVINCES AND DEPENDENCIES

OF THE CHINESE EMPIRE.

Province of Chihlí.

# or as it is algo called Peh Chibli

CHIALI

                      ✰ has had its northern boundaries grently extended ; the name Cikikli do, notes that it is the superintending province. This region was aus ciently called Yù and Yen, and is now the capital province of the empire. The seacoast forms the boundary from Shantung province to the Great Wall, which for a short distance divides Chiblí. Thence a palisade is the separating line to the river Hwang hot. This river marks the northern boundary of the province from the palisade to its source among the peaks of the Inner Hing-agu

Then the boundary runs nearly due eam and west in lat. 42° 30′‍′N. The western boundary running mearly north and south extends over more than seven and a half degrees of latitude, and divides Chihlí from Shánsí and Hon1n. The western parts of the province are flat and slope towards the sea, but the country towards Shánsí rises and is billy There are two lakes in the east and south divisions of the province. The Grand Canal passes through the east part, and falls into the Pei ho in lat. 39° 11′ N. and long. §° 48′ E of Peking. The Pei ho takes its rise a little beyond the Great Wall, and disembogues into the gulf of Pehchihlt. It has no tides but flows very rapidly. The entrance to the Pei ho is rather shallow, in consequence of a bar which stretches for a considerable distance into the sea.

     The provinces in China are divided into districts and departments called fú, ting, chau and hien. A fú is a large portion or depart- ment of a province under the general control of one civil officer immediately subordinate to the figury, or lieutenant-governor. A ting is a division of a province smaller than a ƒ, and either like it guverned by an officer immediately subject to the heads of the

5

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provincial government, or else forming a subordinate part of a fi. In the former case it is called chih-li . i. e. under the direct

rule of the provincial government; in the latter case it is simply called ting. A chau is a division similar to a ting, and like it either independent of any other division, or forming part of a fú. The difference between the two consists in the government of a ting resembling that of a fú more nearly than that of a chau does; that of a chau is less expensive. The ting and chau of the class to which the term chih-lí is attached, may be denominated in common with the fú, departments or prefectures; and the term chihli may be rendered by the word independent. The subordinate ting and chau may both be called districts. A hien, which is also a district, is a small division or subordinate part of a department, whether of a fú, or of an independent chau or ting. Each fú, ting, chau and hien, possesses at least one walled town, the seat of its government, which bears the same name as the department or district to which it per- tains. The province of Chihlí contains eleven fú, six chau depart- ments, three ting districts, seventeen chau districts, and one hundred and twenty-four hien districts; it is compared in size with England and Wales united, or with the states of Michigan, Illinois or Arkansas in the United States.

Peking, the capital of the empire, is si'uated in this province in a sandy plain about twelve miles west of the Pei ho, and about a hundred miles west-north-west of its mouth, in latitude 39° 54′ 13′′ N. and longitude 116° 27′ E., or nearly on the parallet of Samar- kand, Erzroom, Naples and Philadelphia. The entire circuit of the walls and suburbs is reckoned to be about twenty-five miles, and the area at twenty-seven square miles. The average estimate of the population makes it about two millions. The place is otherwise called Shuntien fú. The seat of government was not permanently established here until A. D. 1411. The name given it on Chinese maps is King-sz', Capital of the Court. The city is divided into two portions including the northern portion or Tartar city, and the southern portion or Chinese city. In the former is the Kin ch'ing, or Prohibited city, which contains the Imperial Palace, and is about one mile square.

Besides the metropolis, Chihlí contains several other large cities, among which Pauting fo, the residence of the governor of the province, and Tientsin fő, the entrepôt of trade which comes through the Grand Canal and the Pei ho coast-wise, are the most important.

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ין

23

The former lies about eighty miles south-west of the capital on the great road leading to Sháusí.

Tientsin fi is the largest port on the coast above Shang- hái, and the only one of importance not open to foreign trade. The difficulties of entrance, however, almost preclude the access of foreign yessels, and it would thus be of little avail for trade if it were thrown open. It is especially important as being the terminus of the Grand Canal, where all the produce and taxes for the use of the capital are brought. The trade is quite extensive. More than five hundred junks arrive annually from the southern ports of China, and from Cochinchina and Siam. Near the mouth of the Pei ho is the town of Takú, noticeable as the spot where the first interview be- tween the Chinese and English plenipotentiaries was held on the breaking out of the war in 1840. At the mouth of the river, 18 miles from Tungkń, is the city of Tungchau, where all boats unload their passengers aud cargoes, proceeding by a broad avenue twelve miles long to the capital.

There are several lakes in this province; the Tungting the Taluh-tseh 大陸澤, and the Ning-tsin peh 寧省油

in the south-western part connects with the last and the Pei ho through the river Hu-to

                  The Pei ho or White River, is the largest stream between the Yellow River and the Great Wall, and with a branch called the Sángkien ho

drains all that part of the plain east of Shansí, and south of the edge of the table land. There are besides those, the Chang and the Chin

rivers.

Tsz'yá, the Jeh, Lwán

Province of Shantung.

Shantung i. e. East of the Hills, anciently called Tsí and Lú, is a mountainous country,Ithe coast being bold and well indented. The whole surface of the province is intersected by rivers at no great distance from each other. It is bounded north and east by the sea, -west by Chiklí, and south by Kiángsí. The Tátring ho is the largest river in the province. The Grand Canal commences at Lintsing chau ; from this point north to Tientsin, the communication is along the -channel of a branch of the Pei Ho. The native maps point out numerous harbors and bays, which ́are almost unknown to foreigners. Shántung is about six times the size of Wales in Great Britain, or the same as that of Georgia.in the United States.

!

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The capital of this province is Tsfrín fú in lat. 36° 44′ 24′′ N. and long. 117° 07′ 30′′ E. The city of Kiuhfau hien, distinguished as being the birthplace of Confucius is situated in this province ; here the Chinese have erected various monuments to the mémory of the sage. One of the most important towns is Lintsing chau on the Yü ho at its junction with the Grand canal in lat. 36° 57′ 15′′ N., and long. 115° 55 E. This place is the dépôt for much of the pro" duce brought on the Canal, and is consequently a rendezvous för fleets of boats and barges. The city of Tangchau fú, lying on thẻ northern shore of the promontory, has some trade with Liáutung and Corea, but the commerce of Shántung is less than that of thè other maritime provinces.

  The rivers of this province are the Tatsing ho, Siáutsing ha, Kü-lái ho, Muh ho, ho, Weiho in the east,

   Eid and Weiho in the western part of the province, and several other small rivers. In the southern part is a lake called the Tuð shan Lake. One of the highest mountains in China, called Ti shan, is situated dear the provincial capital. It is a rendezvous for devotees, and every sect has there its temples and idols, scattered about its sides, in which priests chant their prayers, and practice thousand superstitions to attract pilgrims to their shrines.

Shansi

Province of Shánsí.

         ie. West of the Hills, anciently known by the names of Tsin and Chau, is bounded on the east by Chilli and Ho- nán; on the south by Honán; on the west by Shénsí, and on the north by Chahar in Mongolia, from which the Great Wall divides it. The whole western and half of the southern boundary are formed by the Yellow River. The province is nearly in the form of a

  · parallelogram, of which the river is one of the longest sides. Shándí Dis mountainous, has no lakes, but numerous rivers. The Yellow

river runs for 180 miles through the province.

#

> > The capital of Shánsí, Tüyuen fú, lies on the eastern bank of the Fan ho in lat. 37° 53′ 30′′ N and long. 142° -30′ 30′′ E. The city is populous, and contains manufactures of felt carpets.

Another city about equal to the capital in size and importance is Pingyang fúé in lut. 36° 06′ N. and long. 111° 33′ E. ... ·| Besides these there are but few cities worthy of note in this province, which holds a middling position with the other provincos of China.

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25

    Besides the Yellow river, which forms a part of its boundary, the province is intersected by several smaller rivers, among which are the Hü-to River, which flows easterly into the Pei ho in Chihli, thẻ Tsin K and the Fan ho whicħ pass from north to south near the centre of the province, and empty into the Yellow river. The Sángkien ho drains the northern part of Shansi near the Wall, in that region are some lakes.

Shánsí is remarkable as being the original seat of the Chinese people; and many of the places mentioned, aud scenes recorded in their ancient annals, are found within its borders.

Province of Honán.

Hanani. e. South of the River, anciently called Yen and Yü, the central region of China, borders to the north on Chiblí, Shansi and Shantung, south upon Húpeh, east upon Kiángnán (Kiángsi and Ngánhwui), and west upon Sheusi, Its greatest limite to the north, are lat. 37°; to the south 31° 30′; to the west 6° 20 west of Peking; and to the east 25′ east of Peking. The northern part stretches into the provinces of Chihli and Shantung. The Yellow river runs through its whole breadth, The rivers in the north are the Cháng Ho, and Wei Ho; in the south there

is the Hwái tho the Ko ho, the Shaho with several othere which flow eastward into Ngánhwui. The Lobho is thẹ largest tributary of the Yellow R. on the south. The capital Kái, fung fú lies near the Yellow river, and has been submerged two ar three times by its overflowing.

Káifung fu, the capital of Honán, is situated in lat. 34° 52′ 05′′ N, and long. 114° 33′ E., 'about a league from the southern bank of thẹ Yellow river, whose bed is here elevated above, the adjacent coun- try, and consequently in danger from the freshes and bursting away of the river's banks. This city is noted as the principal seat of the Jews in China, of whose preseut coudition and numbers little, is known; aud also as the capital of Fuhhí the founder of the Chinese monarchy.

+

The city of Honán having the same name as the province, is in fat. 34° 43′ 15 N. and long. 112' 27′ 40′′ E, . The Chinese formerly believed it to be in the middle of their empire. Tangfung hien in ́this departmeut is famous for the tower built there by the celebrated #stronomer Chukung. This person lived more than a thousand years ›before Christ, and the Chinese ascribe the mariner's compass to him.

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   The province of Honán on account of its fine climate and fertile soil, has been called by the Chinese Chung Hưá, the Central Flower, It has been also denominated the Garden of China,

Provinces of Kiáng sú and Ngánhwui., The provinces of Kiángsú and 'Ngánhwui were formerly united under the name af Kiángnán; the territory thus formed is bounded north by Shintung and Honán; south by Kingsí and Chehkiảng; on the east by the Yellow Sea; on the west by Húpeh and Húuán. The country extends from lat. 29° to 35° 8′ N. and from 5° 10′ east of Peking to 1° 30′ west. The rivers are mostly tributary to the Yángtsz' Kiáng, or to the river Hwái. Those that flow into the last come from Honîn, and run to the southeast. Mountains are seen in the southern part of the province; and the ranges form the highlands on each side of the Great River, where many of the streams have their sources. The coast is low and flat. The country for ten miles intand is alluvial soil. The only island along the seacoast of any height is Táishín, to the north of the Yellow River, in lat. 34° 40′; and this is intersected by a double ridge of hills. The province is about half as large as Spain.

   The city of Nanking, or Kiángning fú the former capital of the empire, lies in låt. 32° 04′ 40′′ N. and long.' 118° 47 E., at the dis- tance of 2445 li from Peking. It contains t he celebrated porcelain tower, called by the Chinese the Requiring Favor Monastery, built A. D. 1430; and is the most remarkable edifice of the kind in China. It is also noted as the place of signing the Treaty between the Chinese and English at the termination of the late war in 1842. Like Peking it is divided into two portions, one inhabited by the Chinese, and the other by Manchus. Its population has been estimated at 400,000. Though it has lost much of its ancient grandeur, it is ́stifl' one of the most important cities of the empire, and is distin- guished for the extent and variety of its manufactures, for its scholars and learning.

i

In the same province is the city of Sáchau in lat. 31° 23′ 25′′: N., 'and long. 120′ 251 E., 2720 li from Peking, and a famous city in China for luxury and the arts. The population is reckoned to be not far 'from two millions. The city is situated on islands lying in Great Lake, 'and is surrounded by a wall about ten miles in length. The Chinese regard it as one of their richest and most beautiful cities, and con- cerning this city and Hangehau fu in Chehking have a saying that

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27

   "above is Paradise, and below are Sú and Háng." It is distin- guished for the variety and number of its manufactures, the splendor of its buildings, the elegance of its tombs, the picturesque scenery of its waters and gardens, the politeness and intelligence of its ių babitants, and the beauty of its women.

The largest seaport in Kiángsú is Shánghái, which is already place of considerable foreign trade, aud promises erelong to becomę one of the leading emporia in Asia. It lies on the north shore of the Wúsung River, about fourteen miles from its month in lat, 31° 10′ N. and long. 121° 30′ E., at the junction of the Hwangpú with it, and by means of both streams communicates with Sáchau, Sung- king, and other large cities on the Grand Canal; while by the Yáng-tsz' kiáng it receives produce from Yunnáu and Sz'chuen. Shánghái is a walled town three miles in circuit, and having exten- sive suburbs. The city stands in a wide plain of extraordinary fertility, and intersected by numerous streamlets affording the meaus of navigation and communication.

The province of Ngánhwui, was so named by combining the first words in its two largest cities, Ngánking fú and Hwuichau fú, and forms the southwestern half of Kiángnán. It is rather larger than Kiángsú, and less of its surface is covered with water. Its produc tions and manufactures, the surface and high cultivation of the coun try, and character of the people, are very similar to those of Kiángsú, but the cities are less celebrated.

f

The provincial capital Ngánking fú, lies on the northern shore of the Yángtsz' kiáng in lat. 30° 37′ 10′′, N. and long. 117° 04′ 13′′ E. The streets are described as being, very narrow, and their shops un. attractive, the best being for the sale of horn lanterns and porcelain.

Hwuichau fú in the south-eastern part of the province, in lat. 29° 59′ 20′′ N. long. 118° 28′ 20′′ E., is celebrated for its excellent manufactures of ink and lackered-ware, which are sent to all parts of the empire.

T

    Fungyángfú (the Rising Phenix), a town lying northwest of Nán- king on the river H vái, in lat. 32° 55′ 30′′ N. and long. 117° 29′ 56* E. was intended by Hungwú. the founder of the Ming dynasty, to have been the capital of the empire instead of Nanking, and was thus named in anticipation of its future splend ›r.

    The principal rivers which flow through this territory are the Yang- tsz' kiáng and Yellow River. Beside these are the Hwai E, Ko Salt, Sinváng and various smaller rivers. In Kiángsú are the lung. sin, Kauyu, and Tai lakes, and the Tsan lake in Nganhwui.

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7

Kidngsi

Province of Kiúngsi.

}

i. e. West of the River, extends from lat. 244? to 30° 10′ N., and from long 2o E. to 3o W. of Pekingį; bounded north by Húpeh and Ngánhwui; east by Chehkiing and Fuhkien; soutli by Kwangtung; and west by Hunin. Its shape is irregular, lying north-east and south-west, with ranges of mountains dividing it froin Kwangtung and Fuhkien. On the northeastern border, the Yangtex kiáng leaves the province, after a course of about eighty miles along its northern froutier. The country is hilly and fertile. The whole of this province is formed by the basin of the R. Kán; its capital Nán, chẳng fü lies in the northern part of the province, near the Poyang lake. Its area is about the size of Virginia in the United States, of twice the size of Portugal. Its situation renders it an important province, for whoever has possession of the capital and towns along the shores of the lake, can command the commerce from north to south and along the Yángtsz' kiáng; it might be called the Key Province.

Nanchang fu, the capital of Kiángså, fies near the southern shore of the Poyang fake in lat. 28° 37′ 12" N. long. 115° 48′ 17′′ E. The city walls are six miles in circuit, and accessible by water from all sides. The trade of this city is chiefly in porcelain.

Jíuchaú fú is situated on the northern shore of the river Po which at little distance from this place empties into the Poyáng lake. The town of Kingteh chin, where are collected the most skillful workmen in porcelain, is very densely populated, and reckoned to contain ́about five hundred furnaces for the manufac- ture of the ware. This mart still supplies all the fine porcelain used in the country, and the small amount of fancy-ware now ex- ported to Europe and America.

Nrking fá is situated on the west side of the Poying lake. Near the place is the vale of the White Deer in the Lü hills, celebrated as being the place where Chú Hi, the great commentator upon Confu- cius lived and tanght, in the twelfth century. It is a place of pilgrims age for the Chinese literati of the present day, who esteem the works of this philosopher next to their ancient classics.

The principal rivers in this province are the Kan king, made by the junction of the Chang

Ya ho. Fu

Yin ho汝河 Fú

and Kung rivers; the

and Siúrivers: these all unite with

the Poyang Lake in the north part of the province.

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29

Province of Fuhkien.

     Fukkien, anciently called Min, borders towards the north upon Chehkiáng, south upon Kwangtung, east upon the Ocean and the Formosa Channel ; and towards the northwest on Kiángsí. It extends from lat. 25° 35′ to 25° 47′ N. from long. 0° 22′ W. to long. 4° E. of Peking (Forinosa not included). The province is very mountainous. Its seacoast abounds with harbors, many of them spacious and safe ; the whole coast is mòre indented than any other maritime province. Not far from the main are several islands, the principal ones are Namoa, Yungshan, Hiámun (Amoy), Kinmun(Quemoy), and Háitán. The Min is the chief river; its branches extend over half the pro- vince, and unite in one channel below the city of Fuhchau. Nearly every branch of the Min has its fountain head within the boundaries of the province. Its area is about the same as that of the state of North Carolina.

     The capital of this province is Fubchau fú, or Hokchiú hú, as it is called by the inhabitants; it is situated in lat, 26° 5' N. and long. 119* 20′ E. on the north side of the Min, thirty-four miles from its mouth, and nine from Pagoda Island where the ships anchor. The city lies in a plain, through which the river runs, about three miles from the bauks. Suburbs extend from the walls to the river, and stretch along on its sides. They are connected with each other and a small islet in the river, by a stone bridge four hundred and twenty paces long, repising on forty solid stone piers on the northern side, and on nine similar ones on the south. The bridge is lined with sheps. The city has some inland coinmerce, and is distinguished for the number of its literati. The population of the city and suburbs has been reckoned at 600,000. The island in the river is densely settled by a trading population of 20,000.

Amoy, or Hiámun, is the most important and best known port in the province, and 140 years ago was the seat of a large foreign com- merce. It is a mart in the district of Tung-ngán, belonging to the department of Tsivenchau, situated in lat. 24° 40′ N. and long. 119° 20′ E., upon the south-western corner of the island of Amoy at the mouth of the Lung kiáng, or Dragon river, lea ling up to Cháng- chau fú. The island itself is about forty miles iu circumference, and contains about 120 villages, besides the city.

     The entire circuit of the city and suburbs is about eight miles, containing a population of 180,000, while that of the island is estimat.

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  ed at 100,000 more. Few cities are more favorably situated for access than Amoy, but its water communication with the interior is not so commodious. The harbor is one of the best on the coast.

   Taiuenchau fú, or Chinchew, ranks next to Fuhchau fú in wealth, and political importance.

   Beside the Min and its tributaries, there are but few rivers, worthy of note; two of the largest are the Tung ki and the Tá-shi✯✯, each of them having many smaller branches; the Lung ki 龍溪 near Chángchaur, and the Peb-shwui R. *

in the northeast, are the only other rivers of note. There are no lakes.

Province of Chehkiáng.

   Chehkiáng is of a circular form, extending from lat. 29° 30′ to 31° 20′ N. and from long 1° 48′ to 6° 30′ E. of Peking, and includes under its jurisdiction all the islands of the Chusan Archipelago. On the north it is bounded by Kiángsú; east by the sea; south by Fuh- kien; and west by Kiángst and Ngánhwui. The country is in general hilly. The rivers of the province are numerous, and most of them have an easterly course. The chief river is the Tsientang kiáng, a navigable river, near the mouth of which· Hángchau, the capital is situated. Further to the south, the Ngau kiáng and Nán kiáng flow into the sea. Its coasts are studded with islands, which extend as far as the Yangtsz' kiáng. The most important is the Chusan group, consisting of seventeen or eighteen islands, the largest of which, Chau shán, or Boat island, gives its name to the whole. It is the smallest of the eighteen provinces, and its area corresponds to that of Ohio, or a little larger than that of Ireland or Portugal.

Hángchau fú, the capital of this province, lies in the northern part, about two miles from the Tsientáng, on a plain, and forty or fifty miles from the mouth of the river. It is 3200 lá from Peking in lat. 32° 20′ 20′′ N. and long. 120° 07′ 34′′ E. Ouly a moiety of the inhabitants reside within the walls of the city, the suburbs and the waters around them supporting a large population. A portion of the space within the walls is divided off for the accommodation of the Mánchú garrison, which consists of 7000 troops. The governor- general of Chehkiáng and Fuhkien resides here, and also the go. vernor of the province, which, with their courts and troops, in addi- tion to the great trade passing through it, render it one of the most important and richest cities in the empire. In its population, luxury,

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wealth, and influence, Hángchau rivala Súchau, and for excellence of manufactures and beauty of position probably exceeds it. This city was the metropolis of the country during the latter princes of the Sung dynasty. It maintained its splendor during the sway of the Mongols, but began to decline when Hungwú made Nánking his capital. The manufactures of silk are those for which it is most celebrated abroad.

    The city contains among other public buildings a mosque, bearing an inscription in Arabic, stating that it is a temple for Museulmen when traveling, who wish to consult the Koran. There are also several others in the city, it being the stronghold of Islamism in China. This city is the same as the famous Kinsai mentioned by Macao Polo. Its population is estimated at more than a million.

    Ningpo fú is the next important eity to Hnágchau in consequence of its foreign relations. It is well situated for trade and influence at the junction of three streams in lat. 29° 55′ N. and long. 121° 22′ E.' The river thus formed called Tátsieh (erroneously written Tahiáb), flows on to the ocean eleven and a half miles distant. Its population has been estimated at from one fourth to one third of a million, or even more including all the suburban and floating inhabitants. It is moreover an ancient city, and its anpals afford very full informa- tion upon subjects which interest the Chinese antiquarian.

    The circumference of the walls is about five miles. The govern- ment of the city is in the hands of a prefect, who also oversees the whole department. An intendant of circuit, superior to the prefect, has an office in Ningpo; but the immediate superintendance of the city is in the hands of the district magistrate of Kin, assisted by a police and military force. The most striking building in the city is the Tien-fung ták, or Celestial-Offering Pagoda, or Tower of Ningpo; a hexagonal seven-storied building, upwards of 160 feet high, which, according to the annals of the city, was first erected 1100 years ago, though during this period it has been destroyed and rebuilt several times. Its preservation is considered necessary to protect the fortunes of the city. The most elegantly furnished edifice in the city is a temple dedicated to the popular goddess Má Tsúpú, the Amphitrite of Chinese mythology; it was founded by Fuhkien men in the 12th century, but the present structure was erected in 1690, and largely endowed through the liberality of its patrons.

    Chinhái is a district town at the month of the river Tatsieh, in lat. 30° N. and long. 120° 40′ E. It is so situated by nature and fortified

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  by art as completely to command the passage. Its environs were, the scene of a severe engagement between the Chinese and English. in Oct. 1841, on which occasion a great slaughter was committed upon the imperial troops.

The Chusan archipelago belongs to the department of Ningpo, and forms a single district, of which Tinghái is the capital. The district town of Tinghái lies in lat. 30° N. and long. 122° 54′ E. in the valley, of Yungtung, half a mile from the beach. It is connected with the shipping by a causey running from the gate to the suburb of Tá Tautau, where is the custom-house and principal landing-place, and by two canals deep enough for boats. The plain of Tinghái is about 24 miles from east to west, and the ridges of hills which define it are from 400 to 650 feet high. The suburb of Táutau ́runs along the beach, forming a long street off which the shipping lies. The harbor of Tinghái is one of the best on the coast, and accessible by three: or four passages. The tides rise and fall at times 12 feet, but; ordinarily 6 or 7 feet. The island of Chusan contains eighteen of the twenty-four chưáng or townships in the district, each of which is under the direction of constables, police-men, village elders, and assessors of taxes, who are responsible to the district magistrate.

The island of Puto and a few smaller ones are independent of the jurisdiction of the magistrate of Tinghai, being ruled by the abbot of the head monastery. This establishment, and that on Golden Is. land in the Yangtsz' kiáng, are among the richest and most exten- sively patronized of all the monasteries belonging to the Budhists in China. The island of Puto is narrow, 3§ miles in length, and lies 11⁄2 miles from the eastern point of Chusan. It is covered with sixty monasteries, pavilions, temples, and other buildings, appropriated to religious uses, in which at least 2,000 priests chant the praises of their gods.

   The district towns of Funghwa and Tsz'kí, lying west of Ningpo, were the scenes of skirmishes between the English and Chinese in December 1841, when large bodies of imperialists were routed and driven back upon Hángchau fú.

   A town of considerable importance and trade in this province is Chapú in the department of Kiahing. It lies about fifty miles up the coast north-west from Chinhái, across Hángchau bay, and is connected with that city through a luxuriant plain by a well paved causeway about thirty miles long. Chapu is the port of Hángchau, and the only one in China whence trade is carried on with Japan. In

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size it is next to those of Shanghái and Tientsin. It was attacked, and much injured by the British forces in May, 1842, but abandoned immediately after the engagement.

South-west from Chapú lies the old town of Canfú, called Kanpu by the Chinese, which was was once the port of Høngchau, but is now- deserted. This place is mentioned in the voyages of two Arabian travelers in the ninth century, as the chief port of China where all shipping centred. Mention is also made of it in the travels of Marco Polo, Canfu was destroyed by insurrectionists, which catastrophe drove away the foreign trade from it to Canton, where it afterwards remain- ed; and what trade bas since arisen has gone to Chapú.

The rivers in Chehkiáng like those in Kiángsí, have their rise in the province; and as might be inferred from the position of the hills, their course is generally short and the currents rapid. Fourteen principal streams are enumerated, of which the Tsientang is the most important.

Provinces of Húpeh and Húnán.

    Húkwáng, now divided into Húpch and Húnán, is bounded north by the province of Honán; south by Kwangtung and Kwangsi; east by Ngánhwui and Kiángsí; and west by Shensi, Sz'chuen, and Kweichau; it extends from lat. 24° 45′ to 33° 20′ N. and from long. 0° 20' to 8° W. of Peking. It is divided by the Yangtz' kiáng into two provinces, the northern and largest of which is called Húpeh, the southern Hunan. The Yangtsz' kiáng in its serpentine course receives the Hán kiáng. There are several rivers which flow into the great depression near the city of Hányáng, and the lakes in this part are very numerous, and have given the name to the province. The area of the united province is about that of Ger- man Austria and Prussia, or that of S. Carolina, Georgia and Ala- bama united.

    The capital of Húpeh, Wúcháng fú, lies on the Yángtsz' kiáng, where the river Hán joins it, and opposite to Hányáng fú. It is situated in lat. 30° 34′ 50′′ N. and long 114° 13′ E. These two cities together with the suburb of Hankan, below the latter, probably present in connection with the shipping before them, one of the largest assemblages of houses and vessels, inhabitants and sailors, to be found anywhere in the world; London and Yedo alone can compete with it. The number of vessels of the largest size exceeds ten thousand, while the multitude of small craft and ferry-boats

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moving about is much greater. hundred miles from the sen, is sufficient for the largest ships.

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The Yangtsz' kiáng, nearly five here a league broad, with depth

   Among the other cities in this province is Kingchau in lat. 30° 26′‍40′′ N. long. 112° 04′ 50′′ E., and one of the most important from its position on the Yangtsz' kiáng where it enters the Lake country, a farge garrison is maintained here. Siáng-yáng fú on the river Hán in fat. 32° 05′ N., and long. 113′ 05′ 16′′ E. is celebrated in ancient Chinese history.

The capital of Húnán, Chángshá fú lies in the north-east part, on the river Siáng in lat. 28° 12′ N. long, 112° 49′ 57′′ E. Every pre- fecture of the province is accessible by water from it through the lake. Yohchau fú, on the eastern side of the lake at the junction with this river, is the thoroughfare for all goods passing up and down the King. The surface of this and other lakes is enlivened by fishing-boats of various forms, some of them carrying cormorants ;. by large rafts carrying houses upon them, in which numerous families find a home; and by oddly shaped vessels transporting passengers and merchandise in different directions. Pirates infest both the lakes and streams, who do not confine themselves to depredations upon the water, but land and levy black mail upon the villages, The city of Chángshá is said to have been the place where the festi- val of Dragon Boats originated. In the south-western parts of the province, aboriginal hill tribes exist, who not seldom prove a source of trouble to the imperial government. An insurrection broke out in that region and in Kwangtung in 1832, which caused the governors of the two provinces much trouble to quell it, and cost the governor- general of Kwangtong his office.

The Yangtsz' kiáng passes through the southern part of Hópeh; the Hán kiáng, and its numerous tributaries, flow into it on the north, and the Tsingkiáng on the south; these with some small streams flowing into the Great river, are the rivers of Húpeh. The Siang, Yueu and Tsz kiáng, with many branches, are in Hunan. The Tungting the largest lake in China, lies in the northeast part of Hunan. In the southern part of Lupeh are the Jakes

Sankáng 三岡, the Yangsông 楊桑, the Liángtsz' 梁子,the Bútau, and the Sántái, Lakes, with numerous other small ones.

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Provinces of Shensi and Kánsuh.

Shemsi (west of the Paw) aud Kánsuk, previous to the reign of Kienlung, formed but one province. The territory thus formed ex- sends from lat. 32° to 40′ N., and long 5o 5′ to 17° W. of Peking. It borders to the north upon Inner Mongolia, to the south upon Húpah and Sz'chuen; to the east upon Shání, and to the west upon Mongolia and Soungaria. The Great Wall runs along its northeru frontiers. Several mountain ridges pass through Sbensí. The

Yellow river flows along the Great Wall, crossing it twice before entering Mongolia. The Wei Hog one of the largest rivers in China, flows into the Yellow River in lat 34° 40′. The Loh ho are two large tributaries of the

洛河 and Wáting ho無定河

same falling into it further north.

'The capital of Shensi, Sí.ngán fú, situated in lat. 34° 16′ 45′′ N. long. 108° 57′ 45′′ E. is renowned as the metropolis of the empire in the Tang dynasty, and is still much the largest city in this part of the country, containing some remains of its former grandeur. This eity is celebrated abroad as the place where an ancient monu. ment of the Nestorian missionaries in China was discovered. The governor-general of this and Kansub province resides here, having under his control a large body of troops. Of the remaining towns, Hánchung fú in the west, on the Hán river is the largest. Its latitude is 32° 56′ 10′′ N. long. 107° 12′ 25′′ E. The city of Yülin fú in lat. 38° 18′ 08′′ N, and long, 109° 22′ 30′′ E. is the station of a force to overrule the Mongols beyond the Great Wall, and receive the peltry brought in from that region.

    The capital of Kánsuh is Lánchau fú in lat. 36° 08^ 24" N. and long 103° 55′ E. on the south side of the Yellow River. At Síning fú, in lat. 36° 39′ 20′′ N. long. 100° 48′ E. the governor of Koko-nor has his residence. Ninghia fû in the north-east part of the provonce in lat. 38° 32′ 40′′ N. and long, 106° 07′ 30′′ E. is the largest town on the borders of the desert. The pass called Kiayü kwán is gradually rising in importance from its being the first settlement when coming in from the desert. Duties are levied here, and a garrison maintain. ed. West of this pass lie the towns of Barkoul, Hami, Turfan, and Oroumtsi, with other settlements, ruled partly by Chinese officers, and partly by the chieftains of the various tribes. Oroumtsi is more than two thousand miles from Peking, and the communication be. tween them is constant,

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Province of Sz'chuen.

Sz'chuen is the westernmost and largest of the Chinese provincës ; it extends from lat. 25° 57′ to 33° N. and froin long. 6° 50′ to 15° 43 W. of Peking. It borders to the north upon Shensí; to the south upon Yuunán and Kweichau; to the west upon the territory of the Koko-nor Tartars, and to the east upou Hókwáng. The Yaugisz' kiáng and its large tributaries traverse this province; the largest is on the west; the Min h, the To and the Pei, with their branches, water the eastern parts. Its area is nearly equal to that of all the Eastern and Middle states in the United States, or about that of Spain.

the Yá-lung kiáng鴉聼江

   Chingtú fú, the capital of Sz'chuen, lies on the Min river in lat. 30° 40′ 41′′ N. and long. 103' 101′ E. near the centre of the province in a well watered plain. It was once a city of note, but suffered so much by the Manchu conquest that it has not regained its former splendor. The environs of this city are well watered, and brought under a high state of cultivation. The city of Páuning fú is situated on the north bank of the Kiáling, in lat. 31° 32′ 24′′ N. long. 105° 58′ 30′′ E.

· Sung-ngán fú the most northern, and one of the most important cities in the province, is in lat. 32° 22 N. and long. 104° 35′' E. Kweichau fú is situated in the most eastern part of the province.

Province of Kwángtung.

   Kwangtung, i. e. the Broad East, also called Yueh-tung, extends from lat. 20 13′ to 25° 34′ north, and borders to the north upon Kiángsí and Fuhkien; south upon the ocean; east upon Fuh- kien; west upon Húnán, Kwángsí and Cochinchina, from which it is separated by the Ngánnán river. The Nán ling chain of moun- tains runs along its northern boundaries, and the Meiling mountain, through which a road is cut. The principal islands along the coast are Hainan, and the Ladrone group off the mouth of the Canton river. The island of Hainán is mountainous, extends about fifty leagues in a N. E. and S. W. direction, and is about thirty-five leagues in breadth. Its northwest and west coasts are skirted with shoal banks extending six or seven leagues from the shore. There are several fine harbors on the south coast. The island of Namoa is thirteen miles in length, and about three in breadth. The eastern point of the island is in lat. 23° 28′ N. and long. 116° 59′ 30′′ E; it has two mountains connected by a low isthmus. The province is

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Well watered. The chief river is called the Chú kiáng (Pearl river), on which Canton is situated. East of Canton is the Tung 'kiẳng; to the west is the Sí king, and north is the Peh kiẳng or North R. Chiuchau fú is a considerable city on the Hán kiáng

in the east of the province.

Canton, or Kwángchau fú, the provincial capital lies on the north bank of the Pearl River in lat. 23° 8′ 10′′ N. and long. 113° 14′ 30′′ E., nearly parallel with Havana, Miskat and Calcutta; its climate is however colder than that of either of those cities. The word Canton is a corruption of Kwangtung, derived in English from Kamtom, the Portuguese mode of writing it. The citizens them- selves usually call it Kwangtung Sang-ch'ing, i. e. the Kwángtung Provincial Metropolis, or simply Sung-ching. Another name is the City of Rams, and a third the City of Genii, both derived from an- cient legends. It lies at the foot of the White Cloud Hills along the low banks of the river, about seventy miles north of Macao in a direct liue, and ninety north-west of Hongkong. The population is estimated at somewhat less than a million.

Fatshán is a large town without walls on a branch of the Pearl River, twelve or fourteen miles above Canton. Its manufactures and trade are extensive, and it is said to contain more people and houses than Canton itself. It is about ten miles in circumference, and is reckoned to contain a million of inhabitants. This city and Canton are often designated together by their citizens as the Two Boroughs.

The island of Hongkong belonged originally to the province of Kwangtung. The peninsula of Macao is still within its jurisdiction. The island of Shangchuen or Sancian where Xavier died, belongs to this province. Lilies south-west of Macao about thirty miles, and is sometimes visited by devout persons from that place.

The city of Shauchau fú iu the northern part of the province, in lat, 24° 55′ N. long, 113° 08′ 30′′ E., and Shauking fú on the Pearl River west of Canton, in lat. 23° 04′ 48′′ N, long 112° 04′ E. are among the most important cities of the province. The latter was formerly the seat of the provincial authorities, until they were or. dered to remove to Canton to keep the foreigners under control. Nánhung chau situated at the head of navigation on the North River, where goods cross the Meiling'in fat. 25° 11′′58′′ N. and lòng. 113° 55′ 10′′ E is a town of some hote," It is said that fifty thousand porters obtain a livelihood by transporting packages, passengers and

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merchandise over the pass to and from this town and Nánugần fó in Kiángsí.

;

This province is well watered. The Si kiáng

I and Peh

1

kiáng, i. e. the West and North rivers unite at Sánshwui, a few miles west of Canton, forming the Chú kiáng or Pearl river, which flows by Canton, Near Whampoa, the Tung kiáng or East river," joins it, and their united waters disembogue at the Bogue. The West river takes its rise in Yunnan, and drains the northern part of Kwangsí, while through the North river all the superfluous waters in the north and western parts of the province flow off, and through the East river those in the northeastern districts. Canton is thus easily accessible from all parts of the province. Many small streams dis- charge their waters into the ocean along the whole southern coast.

Province of Kwángsí

Kwángst, formerly called Yuehsi, extends from lat. 21° 50′ 15′′ N., and long. 4° 10′ to 12° W. of Peking. It borders to- wards the north upon Kweichau and Hóuán; east upon Kwángtung,

west upon Yunnán, and south upon Kwăngtung and Cochinchina.

Brass pillars mark the boundary. The chief river is the Sí kiáng 西江。

or West R. and its numerous branches, many of which annually overflow their banks.

The capital of Kwángst is Kweilin fú in lat. 25° 13′ 12′′ N. long. 110° 13′ 50 E., and lies on the Kwei or Cassia river (whence it's name), which is a branch of the West river. It is described as a poorly built city, situated in the most rugged part of the province, surrounded by canals and branches of the river, destitute of any edifices worthy of notice, and having no great amount of trade.

Wúchau fû is the name of another town on the same river, at its junction with the Lung kiáng or Dragon river, where uniting they form the West River, in lat. 23° 29′ N. and long. 110°51′ 15′′ E. It is the largest trading town in the province. ' All the export trade and import trade of the province passes through it. The Lung, Yuh, and Sz' are the principal rivers in this province.

Province of Yunnan.

Yunnán, extends from lat. 21° 40′ to 28° N.; and from long. 1041° tn 18° 50′ W. of Peking. It borders towards the north upon Sz'. chuen; towards the east on Kweichau and Kwangsí; west upon

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Tibet and Burmah; south upon Burmah, Siam, and Cochinchina. Yunnán is separated from Sz'chuen on the north by the Yáng- tez' kiáng. The Lántsáng kiáng and Nánting kiáng are both rivers of considerable breadth, and disembogue themselves, the former into the gulf of Cambodia, as the Meikom R, and the latter at Bangkok as the Meiuam R. In the centre of the province are four lakes. The largest lake, L. Tien is about thirty miles long. The mountains are

bold and steep. The area of this province is nearly that of Italy, or not far from that of Louisiana and Arkansas united.

Yunnan fú the capital of Yunnán, lies upon the north shore of Jake Tienin lat. 25° 06′ N. long. 102° 51′ 40′′ E., and is a town of note, deriving its political importance from its trade with other parts of the country through the Yángtsz' kiáng, and with Burmab.

Tálí fó, situated on the lake called Urh hái

in the western part, is in lat. 25° 44′ 24′′ N. and long. 100° 21′ 50 E.

Province of Kweichau.

Kweichan (i. e. the Honorable District) extends from lat. 24° 40′ to 29* N. and from long. 7° 17′ to 12° 36′ W. of Peking. It borders towards the north upon Sz'chuen, south upon Kwangsí and Yun- nán; east upon Húnán, aud west upon Sz'chuen. It is a wild monitainous country. There are several large rivers, which inter- sect the province, such as the Wú kiáng I or Black river, the Chingkí ho, and the Shin ho.

    Kweiyang fú the capitai is situated near the centre of the province in lat. 28° N. and long. 106° 36′ 10′′ E. It is the smallest provinciat capital of the eighteen, its walls not being more than two miles in circumference. The other chief towns or departments are all of them of inferior note. There are many military stations in the southern portions of Kweichau, at the foot of the mountains, intended to restrain the unsubdued Miśutsz' who inhabit them.

The chief rivers of Kweichau are the Wú, or Black River,

the Chihshwai or Red-water, and the Tsingshwui

赤水

or Clear-water R.

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Areq inkbano16

Provinces. Capitals.

STATISTICAL:

SHOWING THE AREAS,'

༈[ * ,*; OF THE EIGHTEEN,

اعدة

Pope Asra

square Population, to sq.:8,2)

of Land

miles.

mide cultivation.

under try

Chihlí,

Peking

59,949 |27,990,871 473

13,143,837,

Shantung, Tsinán fú,

65,104 28,958,764/515

19,421,081

Shansi,

Taiyuen fu,

55,268

14,004,210253

Honán,

Káifung fu,

Kiángs,

Nanking,

92,661

Ngánhwui, Ngánking fú,

{

65,104|23,037,171|353 37,843,501774

6,591,724

14,456,407

18,797,689

34,168,059,

6,762,418

Kiangsí,

Nanchang fú,

72,176

30,426,999 421

9,585,412

Fuhkien,

Fuhchau fú,

53,480

| 14,777,410 276

2,565,417

Chehkiang, Hángchau f',

39,150

26,256,784 617

9,195,754

Húpeb,

Wuching, fil

[Honan,

144,770)

37,370,098 317

11,337,269

Changchau fú,

18,652,507

6,245,759

Shensi,

Sing in fü,

fő,

10,207,256

154,008

Kansuh,

Lánchau fu,

15,193,135 164

5,047,420

3,556,626

Sz'chuen,

Chingtú fi,... - 166,800 |21,435,678|128

9,182,933

Kwangtung, Kwangchau fil 79,446 - |·18,147,030 214

6,576,658

Kwangs!, Kweilin fű,

78,250 7,313,895 93

1,748,012

Yuunán,

Yunnan f

107,969

5,561,320 51

1,389,996

Kweichau, Kweiyang fú,

64,554 | 5,288,219 82

513,835

Total

|297,999 367,632,907 283 141,119,347

DEPENDENCIES OF THE CHINESE EMPIRE.

The portions of the Chinese empire beyond the limits of the Eighteen Provinces, though of far greater extent, are comparatively of minor importance. Their vast regions are peopled by races whose languages are mutually unintelligible, and whose tribes are held together under the Chinese sway rather by interest and recip- rocal hostilities or dislike, than by force. European geographers have termed all that space lying north of Tibet to Siberia, and east of the Tsungling to the Pacific, Chinese Tartary; while the coun-

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41

TABLE

REVENUE, DIVISIONS, &c.,

..

PROVINCES.

Sent to the Emperor

Land ter in taels of Silver.

Total

Revenue Money.

in taels. in taels.

P

|C T

De Dr. De Die Dis.

Shik* of pars park [part- triddo, ¡licts.

Rice.

ments | menće | mente

Dis-

tricte.

1,334,457 1,925,650 1,939,941

3,396,165 3,930,513 2,730,736 353,973 10 2,990,675 3,530,647|2,702,25 169,240 9 3,164,758 3,420,940' 2,441,110 221,242 9 3,116,826 6,475,690 2,564,728 1,401,273 8 1,174,1101,174,110

776,173

1,878,682 2,719,4881,602,431 1,074,490 1,202,590 1,055,109

5

795,863 13

10

2,914,946 2,532,327 2,287,346

66,600 11

4,174,110 1,282,598

776,173

96,934| 10

882,745 924,302 944,422

96,214

1,653,700 2,206,351

306,336

280,652 380,889] 1,062,644

9

681,094 602,800

1,364,364|1,477,497

719,307

9

1

11 6 3

2

17 124

96

10 3

85

97

A

3], :62

50

47

231

75

62

13557

76

60

3 64

73

51

7

11 114 79

47

416,399 516.149] 275,559

12 3

316

39

209,552 471,464 188,927 227,666 14 3 4 5 27 181,268 131,938 52,346

5 13 34 27,854,023 35,016,023 22,445,5733,429,955 182 18 67 45 143 1235

A Skik is 160lbs. Avoirdupois.

tries, west of the Tsungling or Belur Tag to the Aral Sea, have been collectively called Independent Tartary. Both these names should be erased from all maps of those regions, bọth because their jahabi- tants are neither all Tartars, or Mongols, or Túrks, and because the. native names and divisions are more definite thap a single compre- hensive ope. Such names as Manchuria, Mongolia, Songaria, and Turkestan, derived from the leading tribes dwelling in those coun- tries, are more definite, though these are not permanent, owing to the migratory, changeable habits of the people, nor are they the names

1

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42

by which the inhabitants themselves call them. From their ignorance of scientific geography, the Chinese have no general designations for extensive countries, long chains of mountains, or devidus rcivers, but apply many names, where if they knew more they would be content with one. The united area of these countries amounts tồ 3,951,130 square miles, or a little more than all Europe; the areas of each can not be exactly given. Manchuria contains about 700,000 square miles; Mongolia between 1,300,000 and 1,500,000; I'lí about 1,070,000; and Tibet from 500,000 to 700,000 square miles. These countries, it may be added, have divisions and capitals in the same manner as the provinces, though these can not be regarded as definite- ly settled.

Manchuria.

   Manchuria comprises all the most eastern portion of the high table land of Central Asia, and lies between latitudes 42° and 58° N, and longitudes 120° and 142° E. It is bounded on the north by the Yablonoi-khrebet or Outer Hingngan

Mis., which sepa-

rate it from the Russian province of Yakoutsk; east by the Channel of Tartary and sea of Japan; south by Corea and the gulf of Peh- chihli; south-west by the Great Wall; west by Mongolia and the luner Hing-ngán or Sialkoi mountains; and north-west by the Ker- lon river and Daourian mountains. The limits between it and Mongolia are marked by a palisade running northeast for more than two degrees to Songari river, and down that stream to latitude 46°, and thence by its branch the Khailar, north-westerly to the Sialkoi, and north to the Daourian ranges. Only a small portion of this vast region has ever been traversed by Europeans, and most of it is a wilderness. It is estimated that the population may be more than 2,000,000 in all, though it has not been accurately determined by a regular census. It is ruled by boards and generals at the garrisons. Manchuria is comprised mostly within the valleys of the Songari and Sagalien rivers in the north, and the Liáu river in the south. There are three principal mountain chains, the Sih-hih-tih in the south- eastern part, the Yablonoi-khrebet in the north, and the Inner Hing. ngan range in the west. The southern extremity of the Sih-hih-tih range bears the name of Cháng Peh shin, or Long White mountains, The whole country north of the Long White mountains is drained by the Sagalien (which has also the names Amur, Kwantung

and Hehlung

kiáng) and its tributaries. The source of this

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43

river is in lat. 30° N. long, 110' E. It is here called the Ornon. Ių its course it is joined by the Ingoda, Argun A†, Songari fa✯E, Noune, and Hourha, and after the junction with the latter, takes the name of Kwantung, which receiving many small and one large stream, the Usuri, empties into the Gulf of Sagalien in lat. 53° N. and long. 143 E. Its entire length is nearly 2,200 miles, and the area of the country drained by it is about 900,000 square miles.

There are three considerable lakes in Manchuria, the Huron F

貝爾

and Pirou the west of the Sialkoi, and the Hinkai

倫 興凱

nor in the valley of the Usuri. Southeast of the Desert and

north of the Great Wall is the Síra-muren or Liáu river. This is

joined by the Hwang Ho in Shingking, and after a course of 400 miles empties into the gulf of Liautung. The Yáhluh runs along the northern frontiers of Corea.

Manchuria is divided into three provinces, Shing king,

Kirin 吉林 and Tsitsihar 齊齊哈爾

kiáng

                         or Heh lung kiáng. The capital of Manchuria is Moukden; its Chinese name is Fung- tien ff. It is also known by the name of Shingking. It lies in lat. 41° 404.N. and long 123° 37′ E. on a branch of the Liáu, about 500 miles northeast from Peking. The town is surrounded by a wall about ten miles in length, inclosing another wall which separates the emperor's residence from the town. This part of the city is three miles in circumference. The palace and the buildings connected with it, the government offices and courts, and the grounds within it, are all arranged on a plan similar to those at Peking. It was called Moukden, which signifies flourishing, by the Manchu monarchs in 1631, when they made it the seat of their government, and the empe- rors have since done everything in their power to enlarge and beautify it, but with only partial success.

     The town of Hingking, sixty miles east of Moukden, is one of the favored places in Shingking, from its being the family residence of the Manchu monarchs and the burial-gound of their ancestors. It is pleasantly situated in a mountain valley, and the tombs are upon a mountain three miles north of it called Tsz'yun shán. The circuit of the wall is about three miles.

     Kinchau is the port of Moukden, fifteen leagues from it, and carries on a considerable trade in cattle, pulse and drugs. The harbor is described as shallow and exposed to southern gales. - Kaicháu, an- other port lying on the east side of the Gulf, possesses a better harbor, but is not so much froqueuted. Most of the other towns in Shing-

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king have no claim to any higher appellation than that of garrisons or hamlets. Funghwang ting" is 'the frontier town on the east lying near the Yähluh kiáng, and commjanding all the trade with Corea which must pass through' it.

The Province of Kirinor Grin, comprises all the country hortheast of Shingking, bordering on the sea 'df Japan and gulf of Tartary. This extensive region is thinly settled by Manchus, and by tribes having affinity with them. They have been called the Kiching Tartars, and Yripi Tartars, and other names by Du Halde. 'Twe› Ghailiks and other tribes on the coast are hardly known to the Chinese geographers, aut are completely independent, 22 at pealt van

ן

   Kirin is divided into three ruling ting departments, or command- eries, viz., Kirin ula, or the gaṛrison of Kirin, Petuné or Pedné, and Changchun ting. Of these. Kirin is the largest, it is situated ou the Songari in lat. 43° 45′ N, and long. [26° 25′ E

Ninguta lying east of Kirim, upon the river Hourha in lat. 44° 59′ N, and long 125° 10′ E, is the largest town in the province.

J..

   The island of Tarakai or Sagalien lies off the mouth of the Kwan- tung,, extending about 600 miles from lat. 46° to 54° and varying from twenty-five to one hundred miles in width. It area is about 30,000 square miles. ! །*

F

   The chief town in the commandery of Petuné lies on the Songari near its junction with the Sagalien ip lat. 45° 10′ N., and long. 124° 40 E. It is inhabited by troops and persons banished from China for crime. It is a place of considerable trade.

   The commandery of Cháng-chun is small. It lies west of Kirin and south of Petuné. Altchoucu and Larin are two garrisoned towns in Ki- rin, which have attracted some of the trade on the Songari and Amur,

The province of Tsi-tsi-har, or Hehlung kiáng, comprises the north- west part of Manchuria, extending 400 miles from east to west, and about 1200 from north to south. Its area is about 200,000 square miles. It is divided into six commanderies, viz., Tsi-tsi-har, Hulan, Puteh, Merguen, Sagalien ula and Hurun-pir, whose officers have control over the tribes within their limits. Sagalien ula, or Hehlung kiáng ch'ing, on the river of that name, is the chief town in the northeast districts, and is used by the government of Peking as a penal settlement,

C

   Tai-tsi-har, the capital of the province, lies on the river Nonni in lat. 47° N., and long, 1231⁄2 E., and is a place of some trade, resorted to by tribes near the river. It was built in 1692 by Ķinghi to overawe the neighboring tribes.

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.48

Mongolia.

Mongolia is the first in order of the colonies, by which are meant those parts of the empire under the control of the Li-fan yeun, or Foreign Office. It comprises the regions lying between lats. 35° and 52° W. aud longs. 82° and 123 E. Its length is about 1700 miles, and 1000 miles its greatest breadth, inclosing an area of 1,400,000 square miles. The population is estimated at two millions. "The chief mountains of this region are, 1.' The Altai, or Kin shẩu

1

金山 and its various subordinate chains, extending eastward under the names of Tángnú Khangai and Kentel

✡. Khangai, 肯特 as far as the banks of the Sagalien, where the range is de-

flected northward and joins the Yablonoi-khrebet. 2. The Al

Shan and In Shán ranges, which commence in lat. 42° N.

and long. 107° E., and curve N. N. E. and northward as far as the Sagalien in lat. 53° N., where they join the Altai.

!

!

The rivers of Mongolia are numerous chiefly in the north,

                                 beg longing to the basins either of the Irtish or Sagalien. Of the former are the Selenga, 色楞格 Orkhon 鄂爾坤 and Tola土拉

    which unite and flow into lake Baikal. The Kerlon and Onon flow, northeast through Mongolia. In the south are the Sira-mureu and its branches which unite in the Liáu river, besides several rivers in the region of Koko Nor. The chief lakes south of the desert are the Koko Noror Azure Sea, and the Oling and Dzaring near the sources of the Yellow River. Cobdo, in the north-west, abounds in lakes, the principal being the Upsa Nor and Altai Nor on the east, Alak Nor on the south, and ĺki-aral, near which lies the town of Cobdo.

Inner Mon-

Outer Mon-

The principal divisions of Mongolia are four; viz. 1. golia, lying between the Wall and south of the Desert. 2. golia, between the Desert and the Altai mountains, and reaching from the Inner Hingngán to the Tieushán. 3. The country about Koko Nor, between Kausuh, Sz'chuen aud Tibet. and 4. The de- pendencies of Uliasutai, lying northwest of the Kalkas khanates. The whole have been included under the name of Tartary. The three tribes the Kalkas, the Tsakhars and Sounites, now constitute the great body of Mongols under Chinese rule.

The divisions of Inner Mongolia are not marked with any distincts ness, the nomads which inhabit it wandering about with their flocks for pasturage within the limits prescribed by the Chinese. The whole

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416

a

region is divided amongst six corps and twenty-four tribes, which are again placed under forty-nine standards, commanded by hereditary princes. Outer Mongolia, a yast region of deserts, mountains, plains and valleys, is partitioned among four khans, under whom are many officers, The Tsetsen khanate lies the most easterly, next jp Tai-tsi- har; the Tuchétu khanate, the largest of the four, extends across from Russia towards Peking; southwest of it is the the region of the Sain-noin Kalkas,; and northwest of it lies, the Dzassaktu khanate, the least important of the whole,

191

P

1

West of these two last, between longs, 84° and 96° E, and reaching north as far as Russia, lie the divisions of Uliasútai and its dependen- cies, Cobdo, and the Tangnu Mis., where twenty-five tribes of Hie Uliánghai, or Uriyangkit, Kalkas live. This region is fittle known to Europeans, and sparsely inhabited. The superintending officer lites at Uliasutai on the R. Selenga.

1.

27/

The largest town in Mongolia is Kurun, situated in the Tuchétu khanate in lat. 48° 20′ N., long. 1071° E., on the Tola river, a branch of, the Selenga.

The trade with Russia is carried on at Kiakáta, a hamlet on a creek of the same name, lat. 50° 21 N., and long. 100° 23′ E., close to the border, the boundary line marked by granite columns running between it and Mai-mai Chin on the Chinese side.

   The province of Tsinghai, or Koko Nor, is not included in "Mon- golia by European geographers, nor in the Chinese statistical works is it comprised within its limits. The inhabitants are however most- ly Mongols, and the government is conducted on the same plan as that over the Kalkas tribes further north. This region is known in the histories of Central Asia under the names of Tangont, Sifan, Turfan, &c. On Chinese maps it is called Tsinghai, but in their books is named St Vũ or Si Yih, i. e. Western Limits. Within its limits there are several large lakes, of which the ́Azure Sea is the largest. This country is occupied by the Eleuths, Tourbeths, Tour- gouths, Hoshoits, Kalkas and other tribes, and governed by a Manchu general residing at Síning fú in Kánsuh. The capital Sining fú is situated in lat. 36° 39′ N. and long. 100° 48' E. Barkoul or Chitisi fú in lat. 43° 40′ N., long. 94o E., is the most important place in the department. A thousand Manchus and three thousand Chinese guard the post.

Oroumtsi, or Tih-hwá chau, in lat. 43° 45′ N., long 89° E., is the westernmost department of Kansuh, and divided into three districts:

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Ili.

IL is nearly equal in extent to Mongolia. It extends from lat. 36* to 49° Ñ., and from long. 71° to 96* E. It is divided by the Tien Shan or Celestial Md., into two parts called Lú or Circuits, viz., the Tien-shin Peh Lu and the Tien-shan Nán Ló.

TIEN-SHAN PEH-LU is divided by the Chinese into three com- manderies.flí on the west, Tarbagatai on the north, and Kúr-kara usu on the east between Ili and Oroumtsi in Kansuh. The govern- ment is under the control of military officers residing at ĺlí. This city, called by the Chinese Hwiyuên ching, and Gouldja or Kuldsha and Kura by the natives, lies on the north bank of the Ílí river, in lat. 43° 46′ N. and long. 821° E. The number of inhabitants is about 50,000. The two remaining districts, Tarbagatai and Kúr-kara usu are sinall compared with fli. The chief town of the former is called Toguchuk by the Kirghis, and Suitsing ch'ing by the Chinese. At this post there are about 2500 Manchu and Chinese troops. Kur- kara usu lies on the river Kúr, north-east from Kuldsha. It is called Kingsui ch'ing by the 'Chinese. The total population of this country. is estimated at less than two millions.

    TIEN-SHAN NAN-LU was named Sin Kiang by Kienlung, and has been called Little Bokhara, and Chinese or Eastern Turkestan by fo- reigners. This is the country of the Eight Mohammedan cities," which are named as follows: Harashar, Ushi, (incluing Sairim and Bai), Oksu, Khoten, Yarkand, Kashgar and Yingkeshar.

    Harashar lies on the Kaidu river, in lat. 42° 15' N. long. 87° E.. Kurli lies south-west of Harashar on the Kaidu, and Bukur is two hundred miles west of Kurli.

    Kuché, one hundred miles west of Bukur, is lat 41° 37′ W. long. 8255′ E., is a larger and more important city than Harashar.

Ushi lies in the valley of the Okṣu in lat., 41° 35′ N. long. 77° 50 E. It is said to contain 10,000 inhabitants. In Chinese it is called Yungning ching.

    Kashgar is situated on the Kashgar river in lat. 39° 25' N. long. 75° E. This place is the emporium of the commerce of Central Asia. It's population is estimated at '80,000.

Yarkand or Yerkiang, which may be termed the capital of the Southern Circuit, lies on the river of that name in lat. 38° 19' N. and long. 76° 10′ E.

Khoten, called fichi on Chinese maps, is situated on the sou theru side of the Desert in an extensive plain on the Khoten river in

:

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t

48

lat. 37° N. and long. 80° E. The town of Karakash Jies a few miles northwest, and is said by traders to be the capital rather than fichi. The principal rivers of the country of Ili are the Tarim, Kara-kash, Khoten, Yarkand, Kashgar, fli, Yamanyar, Kaidu and Charituz. Besides them there are numerous smaller streams. The important lakes are the Dzaisang,, Kizilbash, Kaltar, Alak-tukul, Temurtu, Bostang, Baba or Mapa-hissa, Yechil-kul or Green lake, and lake, Sairim.

Tibet.

*

   TIBET the third great division of the Chinese colonies is less known than ĺlí, but its area is hardly less extensive. The Chinese call the country Si Tsáng, and divide it into Tsien Tsáng

and Hau Tsáng, i. e. Hither and Farther Tibet.

   Hlassa the capital of Tibet, is situated on the Dsangtsu, about twelve leagues from its junction with the Yaru-tsangbu in lat. 29° 30' N., and long. 91° 40′ E. and is the largest town in this part of Asia. This city is the head-quarters of Budhism, and the hierarchy of lamas, who by means of the dalai-lama, and his subordinate the kú- taktu, exercise priestly control over nearly all Mongolia as well as Tibet. There are numerous convents in and near it.

                        The popula- tion of H'lassa is conjectured to be 24,000. That of the province is reckoned by Csoma at about 650,000

   The capital of Tsáng or Farther Tibet is Zhikatsé-jung or Teshu-h'lumbu, twenty-six miles west of H'lassa, the monastic resi- dence of the teshu-lama or banchin-erdeni.

But the country

LADAK is the name of a third division of Tibet. is not subject to China. Leh, its capital, is situated in lat. 44° 10′, N. long. 77° 45 E.

   The largest river in Tibet is the Dzangbu, Erechumba or Yaru- tsangbu. Its tributaries on the north are numerous, and among them the Wauk-tsangbu and Dzangtsu are the largest. Naka, Djadak, Dogh, Wei-tsu, Lautsan kiạng are the names of some of the other more important rivers. The Yih or Iki, Paha, Chapu, Sangbu, Tarok, Dsisak, Rab, Siranlosa, Tenkiri, Bouka, Kura, Sangri, Ravanḥrad, Yamo-rouk, Pangkung and Wular, are the names of the principal lakes.

The government of Hither Tibet is in the hands of the dalai- lama and his hierarchy, overseen by Chinese residents. Further Ti- bet is ruled by the teshu-lama, assisted by a resident from Peking.

!

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LIST

OF THE PRINCIPAL OFFICERS IN THE

GENERAL GOVERNMENT,

AND IN THE PROVINCES OF CHINA.

|銓壽山偲湯阿恩

NAME OF COURT.

OFFICE.

INDIVIDUAL..

Tsungjiu foo,

Controller.

Tsaetseuen,

Sub-controller.

Jinshow,

IMPERIAL HOUSE |

do

Chunshan,

宗人府

OFFICE OF THE

HOLD. r;

       Not. This court would be mor properly placed under the bes of Loud Misropolitan, but th Red Book having pinced it to the Cofmencement of the civil list, thal order in here fallowed.

Nuy. Ko,

內閣

THE CABINET.

Dep. sub-controller Meënsze,

do

Meënhiun,

Chinese assistant. Hwang Tsantang,

Chief minister.

Muhchangah,

穆彰

do

Pwan Shegăn,

do

Keying,

do

卓秉

Chỗ Pingtien,

Asst. chief minister. Keshen,

Ke Tseuntsaou,

Hosihpun, 和

Kingking,

do

Minister.

Tsinglin,

do

Yihshan,

do

do

do

|Suylin,

do

do

Ho Yushing,

do

!

do

do

Vacánt.

Le Keatwan,

;

台藻麐山本慶麟 承端儀愼

何裕承

李嘉端

Yě Kin-e, 葉覲儀

Chay Kihchin, 車克慎

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60

NAME OF COURT.

Le Poo,

吏部

THE BOARD OF

Civil. Office,('

1:27

RANK.

President.

Wǎnking,

INDIVIDUAL.

4G J Kea Ching,

Vice-president.Hwashon,

do

How Tung,

5 do 217 Minghinn, 21 Ɑ. A

a.

do

Chúng Pen

文慶 賈

花沙納

Ke Tseuntsdou,

A

Hoo Poo,

戶部

Superintendent.

Pwan Shegăn,

潘世恩

President.

Saeshangah,

賽尙阿

THE BOARD of

REVENUE. Janjan i

do

Vice-president.

Ahlingah,

臺 阿靈阿

do

do

Fuhtse,

do

݂ܵܝ

Jo

Le Poo,

禮部

The Board OF

RITES.

་་

Ping Poo,

兵部

THE BOARD OF

WAR.

Hing Poo,

刑部

THE BOARD of

PUNISHMENTS.

President.

do1t

Chaou Kwang,

Choo Fungpéaou,

Hwuy Fung,

Sun Suychin,

趙光

慶楨納桐訓苖恩阿藻阿光濟標豊珍順駿林藩英昌烺常元慶熙阿祥慶培

孫吳曾

【廣國耆保元瑞

Wú Chungtseuen, 吳鐘駿

Vice-president.

Leënshun,

do

do

do

Kwanglin,

Isäng Kwohfan,

Superintendent. Keying,

་་

President.

do

Paouchang,

Wei Yuenlang, j

Vice-president. Suychang,

do

do

do

Superintendent.

President.

do

Vice-president.

Sun Poouyuen, 孫花

Taouking,

Taelie,

Alihtsingah, 阿勒清

Le Chinyew,

Tseuenting,

Chow Tsoopei, Chow

*

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周祖培

Google

NAME OF COURT.

OFFICE.

do

do

Kung Poo,

INDIVIDUAL.

'Séuen Chun,

桓春

......Chau Pingyen,趙炳言

Superintendent. Măhohangah, 穆彰

President.

工部

T'ihtáogyǐh,

特登額

The BoarD OF

da

Two Showteën,

杜受

PUBLIC WORKS.

Vicerprdsident. Gănbwa,

do

i

do

do

Chiw Foogǎn,

Lingkwei,

Dang. Wanchang... 彭

Superintendbot. Saeshangali,

春言阿額田華恩桂章

Lefan Yuen,

理完

COURT OF

FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

ין

President. Keibluntae,

da

Supernumerary Lamuhhwan

Vice-president. Megnsán,

Yihyuh,..

奕毓

[pogahappo.

·拉木棍布札布

Vice-president.

Tooohǎ yuen,

Censor.

Pehseup,

都察完

do

THE CENSORATE.

| Wang. Kwangyin, 王廣

Deputy-censor. Hoshua,

和淳

Tungching sze,

通政司

COURT OF APPEAL|

Tale she,

大理寺

COURT OF ADJU-

:

DICATION.

Shingking, or

盛京

MouKDEN.

do

t.

Le Han

do

...dg

President.

do

>

President..

Shooyuen,

Hwnig Tsanyang, 黄賫湯

Wănsuy,

文瑞

| Ching Tingkwei 程桂

Weijin,

Chaou Tsau,

Commander in chief Yihhing,

Lt. General.

Lohwoo,

Commander in chief Weishihna,

偻仁 ...

邵燦

奕興

樂斌

倭什訥

吉林

.

It.-gen, at. Kirin. Shingk wei,

盛桂

Keihlin,

Digitized by Google

↑ 52

NAME OF

PROVINCE.

KIRIN.

OFFICE.

Lt.-gen. Ningoota. Pantih,

INDIVIDUAL.

Lt.-gen. at Petuné. Weikihtsinggih,

Lt. gen. at Sansing. Elihtungah,

Lt.-gen. at Altchuka Săpingah,

Hiblungkeäng, Commander in chief Yinglung, I Lt-gen. Sagalien ula. Tsing-an,

Lt.-gen. Tsitsihar. Kihsinggih,

TSITSIBAR.

Chifle,

直隸

. Leang Keing,

兩江

Comprising

1 KEANGSoo.

2 GANHWUY.

3 KEANGSE.

Lt.-gen. Merguen. Woolingah,

Governor General. Naurhkinggih,

Governor-general... Luh Keënying,

Governor of the rivers Yang E-tsăng, .

1st. Keangsoo.

班迪

薩炳 阿

英隆

清安

克星 烏凌額

Governor at Súchau Foo Shingleun, U

General of Nanking Seanghow,

Lt. General.

Hwuymeih,

Literary Chancellor Tsinglin,

Grain Commissioner. Shin Chhouyun,

Salt commissioner. Chow Keyun,

Treasurer of Nanking Yang Wanting,

Naval com-in-chief. Yew Poh,

楊以

袢厚

靑廳

*

周新

尤渤

慶瑞

1.

麟桂

王植

羅惇衍

Treasurer of Soochow Ching Hwan to *

foo

Judge. Kingsuy,

Grain commissioner Ne Leängyaou,

Int, of cirenit of Soo, Linkwei,

Sung and Tae.

Mag. of Shanghai. Vacant.

2. Ganhway.

Governor. Wang Chih,

Literary Chancellor Lo Tunyen,

3. Kängse.

Governor.. |Fei Kaeshow, 費開緩

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NAME OF

PROVINCE.

Min-Chě.

閩浙

Comprising

1. CHEKEANG.

2. FUHKEEN.

OFFICE.

INDIVIDUAL.

Literary Chancellor Sun Paouyuen,

Governor-General. Lew Yunko,

1. Chěkeảng

.

· Governor.

Woo Wanyung,

Gen. of Hangchow. |Yihseäng,

Literary Chancellor Chaou Kwang,

Treasurer. Wang Pulseun,

π

劉韻珂

#

越光

江本

Judge.

Tseäng Weiyuen,

.... Int. of Circuit of Ning, Hienling,

Shaou, and Tae.

咸齡

Prefect of Ningpo. Lo Yung,

葉堃

Hook wang,

湖廣

Comprising

1. Hoopth.

2. HOONAN

District magistrate of Yeh Kwan,

Kin.

District magistrate of Wang Chingkeae, E

Chinhae.

Naval com.-in-chief of Shenlũh, ·'|

Chčkeäng.

2. Puhkeen.

Governor.

Gen. of Fühchow and Yusuy,

Collector of customs. Tungtun,

|Lt.-gen., Fühchow.

+蘿鏞

·善祿

Seu Keyu,"

徐繼畬

3裕

東純

| Chin Kingkeae,

Literary chancellor Pang Wänchang,

'Treasurer.

Naval com-in-chief of Tŭh Chinpeaou,

Chekcang at A moy.

General of Formosa Leu Hanggan,

Intendant of Hing She Weilun,

Tseuen, Yung.

Collector of Customs Turhsun,

at Amoy.

Colonel at Amoy, Chin Kaehwuy,

Haifang at Amoy, Lew Chingheën,

Governor General. Yutae,

1. Houpih,

Governor, ¡Lo Yaouteen, Literary chancellor Lung Kesuy,

Treasurer. "Tang: Shoo-e,

彭陳竇呂史都陳劉 蒩慶桭恆渭爾開承裕 繞啟樹

羅龍

裕泰

0

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NAME OF

PROVINCE.

RANK.

河南

Honan.

Sirantung.

山東

Shanse.

山西

Shen Kan,

陝甘

Comprising

1 SHENSE.

2 KANSUH.

Judge.

2. Hoonan.

Governor,

Treasurer,

Governor.

General in chief

INDIVIDUAL.

[Chun Show,

| Fun Tihhing.

椿壽

德馨

Wan Kungchin, 萬貢珍

Pwan Toh,

潘鐸

Literary chancellor Yu Changtsan, 俞長贊

Treasurer, | Yen Leängheun,嚴良訓

Governor and general Seu Tsihshun, 徐

Vin-chief.

Literary chancellor Fun Yuke,

Treasurer,

馮譽

Lew Yuenhaou,

Governor and general Le Chechang,

in-chic f.

Literary chancellor Lung Yuenhe,

Treasurer, Chunasuto, 兆

兆那蛋

Governor-general. Pooyentae,

布彥

馨珍 鐸 贊訓醇驪灏昌僖圖泰培泰

Literary chancellor Wang Tsoopei,王祖培

|Commander in-chief (Tölihhantae, 札勒罕泰

1. Shense.

Governor.

Treasurer.

2. Kansuh.

Chang tseäng ho,張祥河

「Chang Tashuu, 常大凉

:

Treasurer,

Wăn Yuseung

温予巽

Ele.

伊犁

General-in-chief. Săyingah,

Counsellor at Tarbá-

薩迎阿

奕山

錫拉布

Counsellor. Yihshán,

|Chingkae,

gatae. Sub-counsellor at

Seihläpoo,

Kashgar.

Resident at do.

Shootsingah,

舒清阿

Resident at Kooché. Tihiseuen,

Resident at Aksoo. |Shoohingah,

舒興阿

德全

Resident at Khoten. Tihlihkihnema,德勒克呢嗎

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PROVINCE.

Wooloomühtse

烏魯木齊

Oroumtbi.

Wae Mangkoo,

外蒙古

OUTER MONGOLIA.

'Szechuen,

四川

Leäng Kwang,

兩廣

Comprising,

I. KWANGTUNG.

2. KWANGSE.

F

OFFICE.

General.

Tat of

Yahshoo,

Resident at Hami. Kingyun,

Resident at Koorun Yuming,

Governor-general. Keshen,

INDIVIDUAL:

Literary chancellor. Che Tsingyen, Treasurer. Woo Chinyih,

Governor-general. Seu Kwangtsin,

1. Kroangtung.

Chivernor. Yě Mingchin,

Col. commanding "Kwanshow,

gov.-general's brigade.

Literary chancellor.Tseuenking, Collector of customs. Mingshen,

er-in-chief at Canton. Mühtihgăn,

General & command-

Lt-general Tartar

Woolantae,

troops

毓書

慶的

玉明

清理

葉名

"穆

烏蘭泰

名昆明特蘭東名栢星光易馮壽汝愚李元應超 明 善彥棫縉 琛壽慶善恩泰額香貴源宸棠沅祺誠淸榮培椙礼

玉 琦淸振廣

郭超

Lt-general of Chinese 16gantunggih,

Admiral (at the

troops.

Bague).

Treasurer.

Judge.

Hung Mingheang,

Pihk wei,

Leäng Singyuen, 梁星

Grain commissioner Hwan Kwangshin,

District magistrates in Kwangchow

n' foo.

Prefect of Canton.

Yib Tang,

Nanhae heën.

Fung Yuen,

Pwanyu heën.

Showke,

Shunteh heën.

Koh Jooching,

Tsunghwa heen.

Seay Yutsing,

Lungmun heën.

Sinning heën.

Tsangching heën,

Heängshan heen. Tungkwan heën.

Le Ying, Yu Yuenpei,

Leu Yingchoo, Ko Chaoufan, Kew T'saeying,

I

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Sanshway heén.

Tsingyuen heen.

PROVINCE.

OFFICE.

Sinhwui heën.

INDIVIDUAL.

Hoo Seäng,

胡湘

文焌

馬映

Wan Tsun,

Ma Yangkeae,

Singan heën.

Wang Mingting, E

Iwa heën.

Mingchaoutae,

明兆台

2. Kwangse.

דיי

Governor,

Yun-Kwei,

| Ching Tsoochin,鄭祖琛

Naval and military Min Chingfung,

commander-in-chief. 1

Literary chancellor, Chow Heoseun,&F

Treasurer,

Chang Yuntsaou,

林則

則徐

雲貴

1. Yunnan.

Governor.

I YUNNAN,

Treasurer,

Judge,

Comprising

Governor-general. Lin Tsihseu,

Ching Yuětsae, 程矞采

2 KWEICHOW. Literary chancellor. Sun Yuhk wei,

高毓光普

Chaou Kwangtsoo,

Pootae,

.1:

2. Kweichow..

Governor. Keanu Yungtseen,

Literary chancellor, Ung Tungshoo,

普泰

#

'Treasurer. Lo Pingchang, 駱秉章

A

THE NINE RANKS.

The grades of officers in the Chinese government are distinguish- ed by various insignia into nine ranks, the officers in each of which are subdivided into principal and secondary, the order of precedence being according to these ranks, and civilians going before military

The insignia are here given.

ken.

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     Civilians of the first rank wear a precious ruby or transparent red stone; a stork is embroidered on the back and breast of the robe, and the girdle claap of prehnite set in rubies; military men differ only in having a unicorn instead of a stork, their buttons and clasps being the same as civilians. On common occasions, red coral but- tons are worn. The chief ministers belong to the principal; and the presidents of the Boards, censors, and guardians of the heir ap parent, to the secondary.

Civilians of the second rank wear a red carved coral button, a robe embroidered with a golden pheasant, and a girdle clasp of gold set in rubies; the fion is emblazoned on the military. The secondary guardians of the prince, governor-generals, and vice-presidents of the Boards, belong to the principal; ministers in the Cabinet, Hanlin,' governors, and treasurers of provinces, to the secondary.

     Civilians of the third rank carry a sapphire, and one-eyed pea- cock's feather, a robe; with a peacock worked on the breast, and clasp of worked gold; military officers have a leopard instead of peacock. Deputy censors, presidents of the courts, and provincial. judges are principal; salt commissioners are secondary.

Civilians of the fourth rank are distinguished by a blue opaque. stone, a crane on the breast, and a clasp of worked gold with a silver button; military officers carry a tiger intead of a crane. Vice-pre- sidents of the courts, and intendants of circuit are principal; pre- fects and superintendents of some subordinate courts, are secondary. Civilians of the fifth rank are denoted by 'a'crystal 'button, a silver pheasant on the breast, and a clasp of plain gold with a silver button;" the bear is the escutcheon of military men. Sub-prefects and pre- fects of inferior chau departments, chí-chau in Chihlí, and heads of some courts, are principal; readers in the Hanlin yuen, and assist"| ants to the intendants of circuit, are secondary.

1

     Civilians of the sixth rank wear an opaque white shell button, a blue plume, an egret worked on the breast, and a mother-of-pearl, clasp; military men bear a pien, or little tiger. District magistrates in Chihli, and secretaries of officers are principal; chí-chau, magis- trates are secondary.

Civilians of the seventh rank have a plain gold button, à partridge on the breast, and a clasp of silver; a rhinoceros designates 'the' military, as it also does the next in rank. District magistrates be- long to this rank.

}

The eighth rank wear a worked gold button, a quail on the breast and a clasp of clear, horn. Assistant district magistrates and sub-: secretaries belong to this rank.

Members of the ninth rank are distinguished by a worked silver but-: ton, a sparrow on the breast, and clasp of buffalo's horn ; military men are marked by a sea-horse embroidered on the robe. Jailers, vil- Jage elders, district treasurers, &c., belong to the lowest rank.

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#

"

PRINCIPAL FESTIVALS OBSERVED BY THE

CHINESE.

* Jan. 1st 18504-XIth noon; 16th day. Festival of Kwányin. She has three during the year, all of which are observed by the people.

1

Ancient festival of the prince and his Also of the Julai Budha.

1:

11

   Jan. 20th-X11th moon, 8th day. officers going on the annual hunt.

   Feb. 4th.-Xith mo, 23d day Leih, chun term, or festival of spring. This day, the period of the sup reaching the 15th degree in Aquarius, is one of the chief days of the C'hinese calendar, and is celebrated with great pomp as well by the government as by the people...... In every capital city, there are made, at this ›period; two clay images, a man and a buffalo. The day pre- vious to, the festival, the chifa or chief city magistrate, goes out to ying chun, meet spring } on which occasion childén are carried about on men's shoulders, each wying with his neighbor in the gorgeousness and fancifulness of the children's dresses. The following day, being the day of the festival, the pre-i. fect again appears as priest of Spring, in which capacity he is, for the day, the first man in the province. Hence the chief officers do not move from home on this day. After he has struck the buffalo with a whip two or three times, in token, of commencing the labors of agriculture. the populace then stone the image, till they break it, in pieces,, The festivities continue ten days in some parts of the country, but the degree of ceremony attending, this festival differs greatly among the Chinese, i

1 11

}

4.

Fel Oth+ Xith moon) 24th daya The god of the furnace ascends tol heaven to report upon the conduct of the family to the Gemný August Shangtí; hence people pay their adorations to that deity, and sié tatu, thank the 'furnace. Tins popular superstition, though not peculiar to any class, seems most closely allied to the Tâu sect.

1

..

Feb. 11th.-X1fth mɔon, 30th day. All the gods descend to the earth. Feb. 12th.-Ist moon, 1st day. Yuen tán, the first morning, or new year's day. The period of new year is almost the only time of universal holiday, in China, Other times and seasons are regarded,only, by a few, or by particular. classes, but the new year is accompanied with a general cessation from bus- iness. The officer, the merchant and the laborer, all equally desist from work, and zealously engage in visiting and feasting,occasionally making offerings at the temples of those deities whose peculiar aid they wish to implore. Gdverns ment offices are nominally closed for about ten days before, and twenty days after new year; during which period none but very important business is transacted. On the last evening of the old year, all tradesmen's bills and small debts are paid.' This is perhaps the reason why it is called chú seik, "the evening of dismissal."

T

27

Feb. 13th.-Ist moon, 2d day. Ché Tá-yuen shwái; a deified warrior.

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|_ Feb. 17th.-Ist moon, 6th day. Ting-kwáng, a Budhist sage, born.

ין

Feb. 18th-1st moon, 7th day.-Jin jih, 'ınan day.' The first ten days of the year are named after various aniınals, 'fowl-day,' dog-day,' &c, of which -the seventh, 'raan-day,' is the greatest. Serne persons have supposed thero was an obscure or ancient reference in these days to the order followed at the creation.

     Feb. 20th.-Ist moon, 9th day. Yuh-bwáng Shángti's birthday; this deity is the highest-of the Táu sect.

     Feb. 21st. -Lst moon, 10th day. Wú tú shin kiun, five lares of the household; they are this day placed on the ground in various quarters of the house for its protection; and the ceremony is repeated on the tenth of the four following mouths.

· Feb. With.--Ist moon, 15th day.-Shái-tang, or feast of lanterns, so called by Europeans. At night all classes illuminate the temples, shops, &c, with fanciful lanterns, and assemble at convivial parties, called lantern feasts. Offerings of lanterns are made at the temples of the gods. This festival is

· observed at Canton by merely hanging a lantern before the shop or house, ›

March 24.-Ist moon, 19th day. Cháng-chun, a celebrated physician

· born; deified by the Táuista. ' His shrine is placed in doctor's shops,

March 4th.-Ist uioon, 21at day. Two images of children are placed behind

· the doors of dwellings for protecting it, and increasing the prosperity of the inmaten; they are called Shen tadi tunglsz".

     March 15th.-I§d moon, 2d day. The household gods born. Thèse úře called Tú tú, and Fub-shia, gods of happiness ; they include all classm of

    · household deities. At this period plays are performed at the public offices, and in the streets ; while rockets and other fireworks are let off.

¡

     March 16th.--Id moon, 3d day. Wancháng tí-kiun, god of learning born. His image is placed in the temples of Confucius and the offices of literary magistrates ; scholars worship bim.

+

March 19th.--IId moon, 6th day. Tung-wá Tí-kiun born; a god of the Tau sect.

March 26th.--IId moon, 13th day. Hongshing, god of the south ses, barn.

·This is a southern deity, whose worship is chiefly confined to Capton, where it is celebrated with much pomp and display. Same day, the birthday of -Yoh Fi, a faithful minister of the Sung dynasty.

>

     March 28th.-Ild moon, 15th day. Léukiun born. Läukjum, called also Láŋ-taz", an ancient sage, and the founder of the Táu sect, was partly contem- porary with Confucius. The latter in his youth took lessons from Lautsṛ' on the subject of sacrificial rites. The principal deities of the Tau sect are-)

→Sán tsing, three pure ones,-Shángti, a supreme ruler, subordinate to those three, and an infinity of inferior gods, and deified men.

April-About the middle of this month, on a fortunate day in the 3d moon, the grand agricultural ceremony is performed, at Peking by the emperor and bia ministers, and in all the provinces by the head officers of the government.

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  The ceremony consists in holding a plough, highly ornamented, which is kept for the purpose, while the bullock which drags it is led over a given 'space. The rule is that the emperor plough three furrowe ; the princes, five; and the high ministers, nine. These furrows are, however, so very short, that the last four monarchs of the present dynasty have altered the ancient rule laid down by the predecessors of Confucius, ploughing four furrows, and returning again over the ground. The ceremony finished, the emperor, and his ministers repair to the terrace for inspecting the agricultural labors; and remain till the whole field has been ploughed by husbandmen. The emperor

· often appoints a proxy.

; April 1st.-IId moon, 19th day. Kwányin's birthday; she is the great

goddess of the Budhists.

*:

April 5th. Ild moon, 23d day. Tsing-ming term,-festival of the tombs. At this period of the year the Chinese everywhere repair to the tombs with

· offerings of food, which after the spirits of the deceased ħave fed on the spir- ¡itual portion, they themselves partake of. The weather at this time being usually fine, the weeds and dirt are cleared away from the tombs, and any repairs requisite in the brick work are made.

!

April 7th.-Ild moon, 25th day. Hiuen-tien shing fű, birthday of the father of the Shángti of the Sombre Heavens; a god of the Tau sect.

April 14th.-IIId moon, 3d day. Haen-tien Shángti, the Supreme Ruler of the sombre heavens; the festival of the second deity of the Rationalists. This day is also the festiva! of Peh ti, god of the North Pole.

'・・ April 25th.-IIId moon, 14th day. Chung-yáng Wú tấu borti.

April 26th.-IIId moon, 15th day Hiuen-tán Yaen-shwai born ; worshiped in households. I-ling Tái-tí born; a celebrated physician worshiped by sick persons.

|_ April 29th.-IIId moon, 18th day. Haur-tí Niángniáng, the goddess of earth. May 1st.-IIId moon, 20th day. Tez2-sun Niáng-niáng, the goddess of (children, worshiped by those who wish children.

1

May 4th.-IIId moon, 23d day. Tien hau, or the Queen of heaven, born. This female deity was a native of Fuhkien ; and has become the goddess of ́sailors, who are mostly of that province. Her temples are numerous, and her

worship is costly,

May 19th.-IVth moon, 8th day. Sán kiái shing-yé, or holy lords of the 'three borders; worshiped in the yards or courts of houses to propitiate the powers of nature.-Same day is the festival of the present Budha, Shih-kiá *Ju-lái.

וני

   May 25th.-IVth moon 14th day. Lúshin yángshing, one of the eight genii (also calleď Lútung ping.

May 26th.-IVth moon, 15th day. Chung-li tsu-sz3, one of the eight genii. May 28th.-IV moon, 17th day. Kin-hwa fú-jin; women worship her when their children have the small póx.

May 29th.--1Vth moon, 18th day.... Wa-to sięnsz', a celebrated physician, spoken of in the Sán Kwoh Chi; worshiped by the sick.

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May 31st.-IVth moon, 20th day. Yen-kwáng Shing-mú, Holy Mother of Bright Eyes; a goddess worshiped by the blind, and those with diseased eyes. June 8th.-IVth moon, 29th day. Yoh Wáng, king of Medicine; the Esculapius of Chinese mythology.

     June 10th.-Vth moon, Ist day. ` Nán-kih Tá-ti, the Great Ruler of the South Pole; a god of the Rationalists.

     June 14th.--Vth moon, 5th day. Festival of dragon boats, called in Chi- nese, Twán-wú or Twán-yáng, and also Tien-chung. On this day, may people race backwards and forwards, in long narrow boats, which being va- riously painted and ornamented so as to resemble dragon^, are called lung chuen, 'dragon boats." From the narrowness of the boat", and the number of persons on board, there being sometin es from sixty to eighty paddles, it not unfrequently happens that several of the boats break in two; so that the festivities seldom conclude without the loss of several lives. Tradesmen's accounts are cleared off at this period.

    July 14th.-VIth moon, 6th day. Sai i-fuh, festival of Airing Clothes. July 1st.--VIth moon, 13th day. Lú-pán, the god of Carpenters and Ma- Bons. Tsing-shin lung-wang, God of Wells and dragon-king, worshiped by sailors and others, to avert calamity and storms.

July 24th.-VIth moon, 16th day. Wángling kwánshing; a deified states- man worshiped for averting punishment.

July 27th.-Vith moon, 19th day. Assumption of Kwanyin; she ascends to heaven.

July 31st.-Vith moon, 23d day. God of Fire born. This deity is fre- quently propitiated by exhibitions of plays. In China there are no regular the- aters; sheds are erected in the streets, and a platform being raised about four feet above the ground, the spectators all stand in the street in front; the expenses are paid by private subscription, usually, of several merchants. Gentlenen have them also at their own houses, where in some instances there are substantial buildings erected for the performance of the players, and the accommodation of persons invited to see the play. Even in th's case, an open space is left for the free admission of the people.--Also Kwáu shing tái tí, God of War born; Má wáng-shing, the God of horses, worshi ed to avert disease from horses, and by horsemen to become skillful in equestrian feats. Aug. 8th.-VIIth moon, 1st day. Sháu-í, or Burning Clothes festival. At this period, which lasts fifteen days, clu hes made of various colored papers are burnt, that they may so pass to the invisible world, for the benefit of de- ceased relatives. Prayers also are recited and food offered, chiefly for those who have been drowned at sea. This festival is much observed by the people of Fuhkien province. The custom arises from a tradition respecting a young man who obtaine l admission to Tartarus, and brought his mother fom then :e. Ang. 14th.-VIIth moon, 7th day. Sháng kung sien uti, the fe nale genii of the seven palaces descend; a festival observed by won n, who worship these fairies to avert disease, and get skill in dom stie work.

     Ang: 29th.-VIIth moon, 224 day, Tuang-fuh Tedi-shin, god of Happiness and Wealth; placed in niches at the doors of whops, This deity, the Plutus ́

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of the Chinese, is seldoın carved into an image, but a piece of paper is pasted on the back of a niche near the door; the shrine is called tsü páu táng, i. e. Hall of Collected Values.

Aug. 31st.-VIIth moon, 24th day. Tú ching hwang shing, festival of the municipal deity, worshiped by officers and people; he night be termed the Palladium Deity, as he has a temple in every city in China.

Sep. 5th.-VIIth moon, 30th day. Ti-tsang wáng shing, a deified Budhist, worshiped for remission of sins.

This

   Sep. 6th.--VIIIth moon, 1st day. Autumn festival commences. festival continues from the 1st to the 16th of the moon; during which period families visit and feast with each other, and friends interchange presents of moon cakes. These are round white cakes, with figures of men and women painted on them; they derive their name from a legend of an emperor of the Táng dynasty, who being led one night to the palace of the moon, saw there a large assemblage of female divinities, dancing and playing on instruments of music; on his return he instituted plays in commemoration of it.

Sep. 7th.-VIIIth moon, 2d day. Shé-tuh tá-wáng, great Prince of the Agricultural Gods.

Sept. 8th. VIIIth moon, 3d day. Sz'-ming tsáu kiun, the lord who orders the prince of the furnace; worshiped to preserve the health of the household.

Sep. 10th.-VIIIth moon, 5th day. Lui-shing Tá-tí, god of Thunder. Sept. 20th.-VIIIth moon, 15th day. Chung-tsiú, mid-automn. This being the middle day of autumn, is the chief day of the autumn festival ; oblations are made to the moon on this day. On the following day, young people amuse themselves by 'pursuing the moon; it is also called ho yuch, congra- tulate the moon. On the evening of this day, every householder and boatman raises a lantern upon the tip of a high pole from the highest part of his house or vessel, on which is inscribed king ho chung lsiú, joyfully congratulate the middle of autumn. From the greater display of lanterns made, the festival is usually called at Canton by foreigners, the Feast of Lanterna.

Oct. 5th.-IXth moon, 1st day. Nán tau sing-kiun, Starry god of the South pole, descends; this god belongs to the sect of Rationalists.

Oct. 5th to 13th.-Xth moon, 1st to 9th day. The nine gods of the Great Bear descend; worshiped by the Rationalists, and generally also by the peo- ple, tradesmen, and others, for peace. This period is usually chosen for wor- shiping wandering spirits, as well as these gods; the rites are called Tá tsiáu. Oct. 13th.-IXth moon, 9th day. Tau-mú yuen kiun, Mother of the Dipper; a goddess adored to obtain happiness. This day is also observed as a time to visit the graves, and for children to fly kites; it is called from this, táng káu, ascending on high.

   October. It is in this month, on a fortunate day of the 9th moon, that the empress, either personally, or by proxy, accompanied by a train of princesses and honorable ladies, repairs to the altar sacred to the discoverer of silkworms. After sacrificing, the empress with golden, and the princesses with silver mplements, collect mulberry leaves to feed the imperial silkworms. They

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then wind off some coccoons of silk, and so end the ceremony. This very ancient festival is considered as the counterpart of the agricultural one observed by the imperor in the spring.

Oct. 21st.-IXth moon, 17th day. Sien-fung yé-yé, lord of the Front Spear ; worshiped to obtain success and profit in life and business.

Nov. lat.-IXth moon, 28th day. Wá-kwáng Tái-tí, god of Fire; wor- shiped by all classes with greatparade to preserve houses and shops from fire. Nov. 4th.-Xth moon, 1st day. Tung-hwang Tá ti, Eastern August Great ruler; a god of the Rationalists.

Nov. 18th.-Xth moon, 15th day. Tau shin Liú Sz', god of Small Pox; his name was Liú, and he is accommodated with a niche in other temples.

Nov. 30th.-Xth moon, 27th day. Peh-kih Tsz'-wi. Also Wú Yoh Wú Ti, the festival of the gods of the Five Hills and the Five Rulers, names of five places and five deities collectively worshiped. The Five Hills are Tái shán in Shantung, Hang shán in Húnán, Hwá shán in Shensí, Hang shán in Chihli, and Sung shán in Honán. The Five Rulers are the Azure, Red, Yellow, White, and Black, Shángti.

Dect. 17th.--XIth moon, 4th day. Confucius born; his festival is observed by officers of government and scholars, who repair to his temple.

Dec. 20th.--XIth moon, 17th day.-Oneto Fub the present Budha.

REGISTER OF PRINCIPAL OCCURRENCES IN CHINA from SEPT. 1848, TO DEC. 1849.

Aug. 31st. A severe tyfoon was experienced on the coast of China, many lives being lost, and much damage being done to the shipping at Hongkong, Macao, Cumsingmoon and Whainpoa.

   Disturbances having arisen in the Shántung province were suppressed. The Emperor visits the tombs of his ancestors in the west.

Several districts in Shántung and Shánsí having suffered sundry calamities are exempted from the payment of taxes.

Páucháng is appointed president of the Board of War.

     Sept. 21. J. N. A. Griswold Esq. receives appointment as consul of the United States at Shánghái.

Library and reading rooms instituted at Victoria in Hongkong.

     Sept. 28th. Lütsin, intendant of Sháuking, is disgraced and sent in chains to Canton.

Oct. 6th. An interview took place between the American and Chinese commissioners at one of Howqua's suburban residences. There were present on the part of the Chinese, governor-general Sii, the lieut-g

                                    -governor, with Tung and other dignitaries; and on the part of the Americans, H. E. John W. Davis, Commissioner to China, Dr. Parker, Secretary of Legation, Mr.' Forbes, Consul at Canton, commodore Geisinger and Capt. Glynn, with several officers of the ships of war Plymouth and Preble.

     November 16th. The first attempt was made of transporting grain by sea from Shanghai to Tientsin.

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64

   Dec. 19th. A Portuguese lorcha engaged in convoying Chinese junks` from Shanghái, was attacked by pirates and barnt.

A rebellion broke out among the Mohammedans in Yunnan and Kweichau, which Lin Tsehsii, the governor-general of the provinces, is sent to suppress. Jan. 4th, 1849. The abolition of the cassia monopoly effected upon the réquisition of the British merchants of Canton.

Frb. 8th. A great fire occurred at Kweilin, the capital of Kwangsi pro- vince. Upwards of 7,000 houses and shops were destroyed, including the official residence of the governor. Many persons perished.

   Feb. 17th. A conference took place between H. E. Mr. Bonham, the British, and H. E. 'Sü, Chinese plenipotentiaries in Anson's Bay on board the flag ship Hastings.

Feb. 25th. Two British officers, Capt. Da Costa and Lient. Dwyer were murdered in the neighhorhood of Wong-ma-kok on the south side of the island of Hongkong.

   March 5th. The Chinese custom-house at Macao was abolished by order of the governor.

April 5th. John Bowring LL. D. arrives at Canton, as British Consul. A notification is published announcing that the Chinese government, hav- ing declined to carry into effect the stipulations entered into between the British Plenipotentiary, and Keying, two years previously, it is directed by Her Majesty's government that no British subjects shall for the present at- tempt to enter the city.

   A communication was addressed by the gentry and literati of Canton to the British Plenipotentiary, warning him of the consequences of attempting. to force his way into the city.

April 22d. The English cutter Emma engaged in smuggling opium be- tween Cumsingmoon and Canton, was attacked by Chinese, and two of the crew killed.

   The United States ship Preble returns from Japan, whither she had been, dispatched by Commodore Geisinger for the purpose of bringing away some men belonging to the Lagoda, an American whaler.

   June 8th. Mr. Summers having been imprisoned at Macao by order of the governor, was forcibly released by Capt. Keppel of H. M. S. Meander.

Aug, 22d. The governor of Macão, Senhor do Amaral was assassinated by the Chinese.

Sept. 17th. The steam ship Medea attacked a piratical fleet at Tienpak, destroying several vessels and many of their men. Various other expedi- tions were undertaken about this time against the pirates infesting the coasts of China, all of them being completely successful, destroying large numbers of vessels, and killing or capturing several thousands of pirates.

Sept. 25th. The Rev. J. Lowder, Episcopal clergyman at Shanghai, while bathing at the island of Púto, was drowned,

   Extensive correspondence was carried on about this time between the Council of Macao and the Chinese government, concerning the assassination of Governor Amaral, and the surrender of his head and hand.

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WEIGHTS IN USE AMONG THE CHINESE.

In China, most unmanufactured articles are sold by weight, not ex- cepting liquids, wood, silk, cloth, grain, and live stook. Grain is however retailed by measure. The minor decimal weights are used in weighing bullion, pearls, precious stones, valuable drugs, &c. There are three instruments for weighing, viz., the balances, steel- yards, and money scales. Balances are used for weighing large suins of money; standard weights are furnished by the Board of Re- venue at Peking, from 100 taels down to one cash, made of brass. The steelyard is made of wood, marked off into catties, mace, &o.; the largest of them will weigh two or three peculs; it is called dotchis by foreigners, a word corrupted from tok-ching, to weigh. The counterpoise is usually a piece of stone, and so common is its use, that no one goes to market without carrying a dutchin. The money soales are merely a small ivory yard like the dutchin, used to weigh money, pearls and small things.

     The chih (cubit, cevid, or Chinese foot) fixed by the Mathema- tical Board at Peking is 13.125 English iuclies; that used by trades- men at Canton varies from 14.625 to 14.8! inches; that employed by the engineers of public works is 12.7 inches, and that by which distance is usually measured is 12.1 nearly. At Canton, an English, yard or må is reckoned at 2 chik 4 tsun, which makes the English- foot equal to 8 tsun. 'l'he chip is reckoned in the new tariff at 14.1 English inches, which is about the average length of this measure in Canton; this rate makes the chẳng to be 141 inches, or 344 yds.;. the usual length of a chúng in Canton, is a very little over 4 yds., though some of them are but a little over 11 feet. The foor-rule of" tailors is called pải tsien chih, and the shorter one of masons chau- tung chih. The chứng varies according to the chih.

The weights known among the Chinese are as follows:

I kernet of millet (→) is one

10 skú

10 lui

or kernels make one

make one 銖 chi;

lui;

黍 shý:

24 chú

chủ

make one tail jy liáng:

16 taels make one cally kin;

2 catties make one yin:

30 cutties make one

kiun;

100 catties make one pecultán (lit. a load);

120 catties make one stone

shih.

     The money weights are liang, tien, fan, li, or taels, macè, cânda- reens, and cash, decreasing in a decimal proportion; the proper coin called cash is named tșien, because it originally weighed a mace.

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CANTON LINGUISTS' FEES.

The following SCALE OF LINGUISTS' FEES, adopted at a GENERAL MEETING of the CANTON BRITISH CHMBER OF COAMMERCE, held on the 16th of September, 1847, and agreed to by the Linguists' Establishments, CHING-HO, KWAN-HO, TAE-HO, HO-SANG, and SHUN-WO, came into operation at Canton on 17th September, 1847.

The FEES ON IMPORTS to be paid by CONSIGNEES; on EXPORTS, by the ACTUAL SHIPPERS, whether Foreigners or Chinese; and on SHIPS by the AGENT for the VESSEL.

66

IMPORTS.

EXPORTS.

ARTICLES.

Fee.

Þer Chop of

ARTICLES.

Fee. Per Chop of

Raw Cotton, Bombay...

$6

100 Bales

Tea

86

300 chests

Bengal...

$6

110

Raw Silk and Silk Piece Goods..

86

""

100 peculs

Madras

$6

110

Nankeens, brown and blue.

86

20,000 pieces

""

""

Cotton Yarn...

$6

80 bls. of 400 lbs

Alum, Cassia Lignea, Buds and Oil,

Shirtings and other Cotton Goods.

86

4,000 pcs. 40 yds

China and Galangal Root, Bam-

Bombazetts, Camlets, Lastings, and

boo and Rattan-ware, Camphor,

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Long Ells...

Spanish Stripes & other Broadcloths

Metals,-Iron, Lead, Spelter, Steel,

Copper, Tin Plates, and all

other Metals,..

Agar-Agar, Betel-nut, Bicho-de-

Mar, Cloves, Cutch, Cochineal,

86 1,400 pieces

$6

840

""

$6

300 pecula

Chinaware, Copper-ware, Fire-> $6 300 peculs works, Hartall, Lacquered ware,

Paper, Rbubarb, Star Aniseed and

Aniseed Oil, Tobacco, Vermilion,

Other Articles in proportion.

Ebony, Flints, Fishmaws, Gam-

SHIPS.

bier, Gums, Hides, Pepper, Putchuck, Rattans, Saltpetre,

#6

300 peculs

On each Ship reporting inwards,

86

Sandalwood, Sapan, and Red- wood, Smalts, Window and

exceeding 150 tons register

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Broken Glass, -

Rice

....

Other Articles in proportion.

$6

600

67

68

LIST OF THE RATES OF POSTAGE CHARGEABLE ON A SINGLE LETTER, AND ON A NEWSPAPER, BETWEEN HONGKONG AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES, OR BRITISH COLONIES, WHEN FORWarded vid SOUTHAMPTON.

On a

Countries to which prepayment in Hongkong is compulsory. letter.

Brazil

Buenos Ayres and Monte Video. Spain,

Mexico, New Granada, and Cuba Canary Islands.....

Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores

s. d

under oz. 3

.....

11

3

3

11 "

"

17

19

"

"

"

19

19

FOREIGN WEST INDIES, viz:-Gaudaloupe, Martinique, Hayti, Porto Rico, St. Croix, St. Eustatius, St. Martin and St. Thomas, United States of America,

Chili, Peru, and Honduras..................... Portugal and Spain, niả Gibraltar. Baden.....

Wurtemburg..

Saxony

Bavaria...

Sweden...

19

"

"

11

19

"

under † oz.

*

2

02-87

Co

2 0 1 10

A news- paper.

Letterrate

11

11

11

+

1

1 10

11 *

2 3

"

41

34

11 **

*12

#

19

13

2 10

*

19

10

Free.

*

5

19 ท

21

"

Sardinia and Southern Italy.

Austria and Austrian Dominions

The East Indies, Singapore, Penang, Aden,

and Suez.

Venezuela

Valparaiso and Callao.

Panama

The Continent of Europe viá Marseilles, Bata-

via, and Alexandria.

The five consular ports in China, Macao,

Manila, and New Zealand

under ez.

0

2

19

11

91

3

4d.

" "

3

2d.

11

17

19

Id.

"

0

1d.

"" 19 $

3

British Colonies and foreign countries to which prepayment

Russia..

  Prussia Denmark.

is optional.

Hanover, the Duchy of Brunswick, and Lubec. The Duchy of Oldenburg.....

Canada, New Brunswick, Prince Edward's le. Nova Scotia (port and town of Halifax ex- cepted), Jamaica (port and town of Kingston excepted), and Berbice

Newfoundland, Bermuda, port and town of Ha- Hifax in Nova Scotia, British West Indies, in- cluding port & town of Kingston in Jamaica Holland and Heligoland..

Breineo and Hamburg

Belgium...

France.

Malta....

Gibraltar.....

Ceylon

Letter Tuta

under 1 oz.

2

2

"

17 19

1 10

"

70196

"1

"

under oz.

"1 97

14 "

19 19 "

"

17

2 2 Free.

с

e

11 11

11

H

19

under 1 02.

39 js

under oz. 1

11 " #

2.

E 10

5

1 10

"

"" .11 "

The United Kingdom, við Southampton, prepayment óptional. Charge upon a letter not exceeding 4 ounce.

do.

do.

do. 1 ounce.

Letters and Newspapers for the United Kingdom vid Mar- seilles cannot be prepaid in Hongkong.

  * The British Rate is chargeable on every half oz., but the Foreign Rate is chargeable on a Letter under ₫ oz. in weight, and additional Rate must be charged for cach i oz.

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60

POST-OFFICE NOTIFICATION.

Relating to Postage between China and the United States.

A Postal Convention has been concinded between Her Majesty's Govern- nient and the United States of America, under which it in agreed that the 8ra POSTAGE ON LETTERS transmitted between the two Countries shall, in future, be fixed at eightpence the Half Onuce, whether conveyed by British or United States Packets, and that such postage shall belong to the country by which the packet conveying the letters is furnished.

By this convention it is further agreed, that letters from British colonies and possessions addressed to the United States, passing in transit through the United Kingdom, shall be delivered to the United States post-office free of all British Postage, whether packet or inland; and that in like manner, letters posted in the United States, addressed to British Colonies and possessions, and intended to pass in transit through the United Kingdom, shall be delivered to the British post-office free of all United States postage, whether packet or inland. All letters posted at this office intended to be forwarded through the United Kingdoin to any part of the United States by British Packet, will be subjected to a postage of one shilling and eightpence the half ounce, instead of two shillings as beretsfore; and upon such letters as may be intended to be con- veyed between the United Kingdom and the United States by packets belong- ing to the United States, the rate will be one shilling only, the half ounce (being the present charge from Hongkong to Great Britain), as the packet postage from England to the United States, as well as the United States inland rate, will be collected in the United States.

NEWSPAPERS addressed to, and received from, the United States, passing in transit through the United Kingdom, whether conveyed by British or by United States packets, are to be charged with a British rate of one penny each. For the present, all letters and newspapers addressed to the United States, will be forwarded from England by British packets unless specially addressed "to be forwarded by United States packets."

       It is to be understood, that the abovementioned rates apply only to letters and newspapers for the United States intended to bo forwarded from Hong- kong viá Southampton; and that any correspondence rià Marseilles, will be liable to the rates of postage chargeable by that route from Hongkong to Great Britain in addition to the sea rate from the United Kingdom to the United States.

By order of his Lordship, the Post-master General, THOMAS HYLAND.

ནཾ, དནཾརཱ,

STEAMERS IN CHINA.

The Peninsular & Oriental Steam NAVIGATION Company have one steamer in the waters of China, called the "CANTON;" she has no regular days for running, but plies between Canton, Maco, and Hongkong, as circumstances require, or takes trips up and down the coast. Her accommodations are good. The agents are J. A. Olding, Esq. in Hongkong, M. Fischer Esq. in Canton, and Jonn Middleton, Esq. in Mação,

CANTON & HONGKONG STEAM PACKET COMPANY.

120 Shares, £250 EACH. "Canton," CAPT. W. SOAMES, 139 Tous, 90 Horse power. "Hongkong," Capt. N. HiLL, 140 Tons, 90 Horse power.

AGENTS-AUGUSTUS CARTER, HONGKONG, SPENCER COMPTON, 'CANTON, and PATRICK STEWART, MACAO.

FARES-From CANTON to MACAO OF HONGxoso, Eight Dollars.

From HONGKONG to Macao,

Five Dollars.

An American Steamer, the SPARK, has recently been brought to China, from New York, and will soon run on the Pearl River and to the outer anchorages.

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70'

Table for Converting Dollars into Taels.

Amt.

Cents.

Tls. 715 a 1000 dla.

'T's. 717

TL. 720 $1300 e.ush

1000 dia.

Amount.

715 taels per

1000 din. to a dolla

1000 dollars.

717 taels per 1000 dollars.

m

се

mc c

me o

Cash.

Dollars.

T. m. c. c.

T. m. c. c.

007

007

007

13

,49

0.378

0.350

720 taels per 1000 dollars.

T. m. c.

0.352

દરેક

2

014

014

014

26

,60

0.357

0.858

0.360

3 021

021

021

39

,75

0.537

0.536

0.54

4

028

029

028

52

0.715

0.717

0.72

5 035 035

036

65

1.430

1.434 1.44

6 042 043

043

78

3

2.145

2.151 2.16

7

049

050

050 91

2.860 2.868 2.88

8

056

057

057 104

3.575 3.585 3.60

9 064 064

064

117

4.290

4.302 4.32

10 071 071

072-

130

7

5.005

5.019

5.04

11 078 078

079

143

5.720

5.736

5.76

12

085

085

086

156

9

6.435

6.453

6.48

13 092

093 093

169

10

7.150

7.170

7.20

14 099

100

100

182

11

7.865

7.887

7.92

15

106

107

108 195

12

8.580

9.604

8.64

16

113

114

115

208

13

9.295

9.321 9.36

17 121

121 122

221

14

10.010

10.038 10.08

18

128

129

129

234

15

10.725

10.755 10.80

19

135

136

136

247

16

11.440

11.472

11.52

20

142 143

144

260

17

12 155

12.189

12.24

21

149 150 151

273

18

12.870

12.906

12.96

22

156

157 158

2-6

19

13.585

13.623 13.68

23 163

164 165

299

20

14.300

14.340

14.40

24

170 171

172 312

21

15.015

15.057

15.12

25 178 179

180 325

15.730

15.774

15.84

26 185

186

187

338

23

16.445

16.491

16.56

27

192 193 194

351

24

17.160

17.208

17.27

28 199

200 201

364

25

17.875 17.925

18.00

29

206 30 213 214 216

207 208-

377

30

21.450

21.510

21.60

390

40

28.600 29.680

28.80

31

220

221 223

403

50

35.750

35.850

36.00

32

227

229 230

416

60

42.900

43.020 43.20

33 234 236 237

429

75

53.625

53.775 54.00

34

242

243 244

442

80

57.20

57.36

57.60

35 249

250 252

455

90

64.35

64.53

64.80

36 | 256

257 259 468

100 71.50

71.70

72

37 263

264 266 481

150107.25

107.55

109

270

272 273 494

546

559

38 39 277 279 280 507

i

40 284 286 288 520 41 291 293 295 533 42

299*

300 302 43 306 307 309

44 313 315 316 572 45 320 .322 324 583 329331 | 598

46

327

1000 715.00 717.00 720

200143.00 143,40 || 144

300 214.50

215.10 216

*400 | 286.00

286.80

238

500 |357.50

358.50

360

600 429.00

430.20

432

700 |500.50

501.90

504

800572.00

573.60

576

900 1643.50

645.30 648

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71

Table for Converting Taels into Dellars.

715 tela

717 tarla

A mount.

720 Laela

for 1000 dis, for 1000 dola. for 1000 dol

Amount.

•$1$ marla per 1000 dollars.

717 tmels per 1000 dollars.

720 tarla per 1000 dollara.

ma, cand.

C. m.

c. m.

c. m.

T. m. c.

D

cente

D. conte

D. conta

1

013

013

013

0.47

0.657

0.655

0.652

2

027

027

027

0.48

0.671

0.669

0.666

3

041

041

041

0.49

0.685

0.683

0.680

4

055

055

055

0.50

0.699

0.697

1.694

5

069

069

069

0.72

1.006

1.004

1.000

6

093

083

083

1 Lael

1.398

1.394

1.389

7

097

097

097

2

2.797

2.789

2.777

8

111

111

111

3.

4.195

4.184

4.166

9

125

125

125

4

5.594

5.578

5.555

10

139

139

133

5

6.993

6.973

6.944

11

153

153

152

6

8.391

8.369

8.333

12

168

167

166

9 790

9.762

9.722

13

181

181

180

8

11.188

11.157

11.111

14

195

195

194 9

12.587

12.552

12.500

15

209

209

207

10

13.986

13.947

13.888

16

223

221

11

15.384

15.341

15.277

17

237

237

235 12

16.783 16.736

16.666

18

251

251

249

13

13.181

19.131

18.055

19

265

265

263

14

19.580

19.525

19.443

20 279

278

277

15

20.979

20.920

20.833

21

293

592

291 16

22.377

22.315

22.222

22 307

306

305 17

23.776

23.709

23.611

23

321

320

319 18

25.174

25.104

25.000

335

334

333 19

26.573

26.499

26.388

349

348

346 20

27.972

27.894

27.777

363

362

360 21

29.370

29.288

29.166

27 377

376

374

30.769 30.683

30.555

391

390

388 23

32.167 32.078 31.944

495

404

402 24

33.566

33.472

33.333

30

419

418

416 25

+

34.965 34.867

+

34.722

31 433

432

430

30

.41.958

41.840

41.666

32

447

446

444 40

55.944

55.783

55 555

461

460

459 50

69.930 69.735

69.444

475

474

472 75

104.895| 104.602

104.166

35 489

488

485 90

125.874| 125.520

125.000

36

503

502

499

100

139.860

139.470

138.888

37

517

516

513 | 150

209.790 | 209.205

208.332

531

530

527 200

279.720 278.940

277.777

544

543

541 300

416.580

418.410

416.666

40

559

557

555400

559 440 | 557.880

555.555

41

573

571

569 500

699.300, 697.350

694.444

42 537

585

583 600

838.160, 836.820

833.333

43

601

599

597 700

979.020, 976,290

972.222

44

615

613

611 800

|1118.880 1115,760| 111.111

45

629

627

624 900

|1258.741 1255.320|1250,000

46 643

641

638 1000 |1398.601 1394,700|1388,888

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72

Steam Communication

between China, India, Malta, and England.

GENERAL RATES OF PASSAGE.

General rates of passage. Steam communication of passengers, goods and parcels between Hongkong and Singapore. Penang, Ceylon, Madras, and Bombay, also via Egypt, Malta, and England, by the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Com- pany's Steamers.

Description or class of

accommodation.

For ladies and gentlemen

   traveling singly. A berth in the general cabins

throughout,

For a gentlemen and his

wife traveling together. Occupying one of the general cabins to Ceylon, and a berth each separately, in the general cabins between Ceylon and Eugland, or Calcutta.

Children with their parents. Not exceeding two years, Free (except expense of transit through Fgypt, and stewards' fees)

Above 2, and not exceeding

5

years

Above 5, and not exceeding

10 years

Servants of passengers.

From Hongkong to

I

Singa- Pe. Cey- Ma-

pore. nang Ion.

P

-

Bom-

dras.

bay. & Cal.

Suez.

Malta.

Eng- land.

88 | 8 155

168 298

$

$

$

B

365

451

643

288 336 596 730 902

-

48

林街

710,40 734,40

1286

1420,80 1468,80

10 12

15

17

24

50

100 122 150

224

243,20 305,20

72

84

149 182 225

329

363,60 | 427,60

Male

European

> Female

Male

36

Native

Female

Second class & deck passengers.

Second class passengers

First Deck, victualed by ship. 72 81

Second class deck, victualing 48

themselves

6 22 82£6

48

56

100 122 150

210

48

56 100 122 150

231,62 271,60

75

191 113

157

173,80 223,80

36

412

75

191 113

96

112

200

244 300

434

479,60 567,60

149

182 225

314

56 100 122 150

210

   In addition to the abovementioned Rites to Milla and England, the expense of Transit through Egypt will be charged at the Company's Offices, at the time of secur- ing the Passage, for account of the Egyptian Government, in conformity with the sub- joined extract from the

TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION TARIFF.

A Lady, Gentleman, or Child above ten years.

A Child of five years and under ten............

A Child of two years and under five.

A Child under two years... ·

A European Female Servant.

A European Man Servant or Mechanic.

A Native Female Servant.

A Native Man Servant on a Dromedary or Donkey...

$57.60

38.40

28.80

Free.

48.40

38.40

38.40

19.20

   Passengers will have to pay to the Egyptian Government in addition, 168, per cwt. for the conveyance through Egypt for First Class Passengers, of all Baggage ex- ceeding 2 cwt, and for Children, Servants, and 2d Class Passengers of all exceeding Fewt. Wines, Spirit, Beer, Soda Water, and Hotel expenses, are also charged for separately.

Payment to be made in Spanish dollars.. A reduction of one quarter passage money both ways will be made in favor of those who take tickets for the voyage to Ceylon and back. For extra accommodation, an additional sum will be charged. Passengers to England, desirous of remaining a month in Egypt, or at any of the ports en route, at which the Company's Steamers touch, will be allowed to proceed in the following

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steamers without additional payment, provided they give notice of their intention at the time of engaging their passage.

The above rates include stewards' fees and table, wines, &c., &c., for cabin pasen- gers, with 3 cwt. of personal baggage. For servants, a d 2d class passengers, provisions without wines, and l¡ cwt. of baggage. Bedding, linen, and all requisite furniture, are provided at the Company's expense, together with the attendance of experienced male and female servants.

      No package of baggage should exceed 80lb. in weight. The dimensions most con- venient for transporting across the desert on the camels, and therefore strongly recommended, are, length 2 feet 3 in., breadth 1 foot 2 in., depth 1 foot 2 inches.

All heavy or bulky baggage must be shipped on the day previous to sailing. Passengers taking articles of merchandise in their baggage will incur the risk of seizure by the customs authorities in Egypt; and as the allowance of baggage is on a liberal scale, and the freight on parcels moderate, it is hoped that none will convey parcels or packages belonging to other persons, to the prejudice of the Company's interests.

The Company do not hold themselves liable for damage or loss of baggage, nor for delays arising from accident, from extraordinary or unavoidable circumstances, or from the employment of the vessels in H. M. mail service.

Charge for dogs $18,00 ; 25 cents a day for fool, and expenses in Egypt.

N. B. Passengers not proceeding after securing berths, to forfeit half passage money,

                                     J. A. OLDING. Hongkong, July 20, 1847.

Rates of Passage Money from India and China to England by the Steamer leaving Calcutta in the months of October, November, and December, and corresponding ones leaving Hongkong in the months of September, October and November, has been reduced as follows:

A Gentleman occupying Gentleman's general accommodation throughout........... $700.60 A Lady occupying Lady's general accommodation throughout..

CHILDREN WITH THEIR Parents.

Five years and under ten...

Two

"

"

"

five.

Under two years (no Berth provided)..

European Servants, Female......

"

"

Native

+

"

Male.. Female. Male.

SERVANTS Of PamengerRO.

739.20

$355.20 278.40 Free.

$278.00

288.00

211.20

192.20

    The expense of transit through Egypt is included in the above rates of passage Money.

RATES OF FREIGHT.

     Rates of freight per Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company's Steamers from Hongkong, including half per cent. Egyptian transit duty on cargo shipped to Malta or England.

Description

of goods.

Measurement goods, per ton of 40

cubic feet Measuring 1 foot and under, pr. parcel

Do. above 1 font. not over do.

Do. Do.

2

"

"

"

"

How charged.

Madras,

England. Malta, Buez.

Cakota, Bouhay.

Ceylon. Btraka

144.00 105.00 85.00

40.00

30.00 20.00

5.00 4.00

3.00

2.50

2.00

7.00 5.50

4.00

3.25 2.75

"

"

3, do. 4, do.

At the rate

4.75

4.00

3.00

specified per ton

5.00

5.50

4.00

}

3.00 - 3.00 2.50 2.25

2.00 1.00

2.25

2.25 2.00 1.00 per Measurement as above 3.00

0.75 0.50

2.50

1.50

300

2.50

1,50

·

do. do.

per pecul

1.00

75

50

90

Jewelry, Musk,"and Sad valorem

valuable articles of a

aimilar description per cent. Treasure, gold and Silver do. do.

Silk Piece Goods, do. do.

+

Silk to England per ton of 40 cubic feet. 896 Quicksilver, Aď valorem per cent

Gold Leaf,

China Cash,

     The within mentioned Rates to England apply only to shipments exceeding in value $960; for those under that value, the following charges will be made, viz :-

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On Gold and silver in sums not exceeding,·

On Sums from $210 to......

On On

"1

17

:>

480 to............. 720 to..

   The above will be deliverable at the Company's Offices, subject for clearing and, conveying to London.

$240, 5 per cent $480, 4 per cent

720, 34 "" 960, 3 to a small charge

During the S. W. monsoon, from the 1st April to the 31st of October, the Rates to India will be increased on silks and quicksilver 1 per cent, and treasure & per cent; and to Ceylon and the Straits, on Silks and Quicksilver & per cent, and on Treasure & per cent. Parcels under a Quarter of a Cubic Foot measurement will be taken through to En- gland at $1.50, $2.00, and $2.75 each; at and above that measurement, at the following graduated scale, including all charges to Southampton, except Transit Duty, on packages exceeding $20 value.

3 Inches (cubic) $3.00

4 Inches (cubic) $3,50

5 Inches (cubic) $375

6

"}

7

"

4.00 5.11 10 6.50

7

"

"

4.33 8 5.50 11

4.66

}}

**

"?

"

6.00

"

"

1 Foot

For every additional Cubic Inch measurement, 50 cents will be charged; and if the package weighs more than 2016. to the cubic foot, an additional 25 cents per pound will be charged for the additional_weight.

    Parcels not to exceed 10076. weight, or 5 cubic feet measurement.-All packages under 5 cubic feet will be charged at parcel rates.

All parcels will be cleared through the Custom-House at Southampton, and forward- ed to their ultimate destination by the PENINSULAR & Oriental SteAM NAVIGA- TION COMPANY, to whom the Duty with all other Charges incurred in England must be paid.

Goods shipped to England or Malta must be packed in non-susceptible coverings as wood, tarpaulin &., and the value and contents declared at time of shipment

    Single Packages, when not coming under this Parcel Tariff, or for which Bills of Lading are required, will be charged to Ceylon $5,25, and to Madras, Calcutta and Bombay, $61.

TRIESTE ROUTE.

    THE AUSTRIAN LLOYD'S STEAMERS, continue to ply between ALEX- ANDRIA, and TRIESTE as under, viz.

The Direct leaving Trieste the 28th of each month arrives at Alexandria about the 2d or 3d of the following month, and starts for Trieste from Alexandria, 18 to 24 hours after the arrival there of the Indian passengers by the Calcutta Steamer, except on occasions when the latter arrives at Suez behind time.

A steamer of the same Company leaves Alexandria every alternate Thurs day for Smyrna, where it meets the steamers of the Levant Line, by means of which communication is kept up as previously through Syra with Constantino- ple, Trieste, Greece, &c,

Fares direct to Trieste, £18 including table money.

Do. via Smyrna, £13.4 without Do. Do.

    Passengers intending to avail themselves of the Trieste Route, should book to Suez only.

{

    For further particulars apply to Messrs. WM, PUSTAU & Co., Agents at Canton and Hongkong, for the Imperial Royal Privileged Austrian Lloyd's Steam Navigation Company.

N. B. There are now so many Railroads open through Germany, that London may be reached from Trieste in 6 days with comfort, and at an ex ̧ ́ pense of about £10 to £12.

1

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MASONIC LODGES.

There are three Masonic Lodges in China, SAMUEL RAWSON is Provincial Grand Master. 1. ROYAL SUSSEX LODGE, No. 735. AT CANTON. 2. LIST OF officers IN THE NORTHERN Lodge

OF CHINA, AT SHANGHAI.

Worshipful Muster,

Past-Master,

Senior Warden,

Junior Warden,

Senior Deacon,

Junior Deacon, Secretary,

Treasurer,

Inner Guard,

Tyler,

Archibald Dunlop.

H. D. CARTWRIGHT

C. D. MACKENZIE, R. ELLICE

GEORGE STRACHAN.

Richard ASPINALL, John MILLER.

3. ZETLAND LODGE, AT HONGKONG.

SCALE OF CHARGES FOR STORING GOODS IN. THE LE-TSUNE PACKHOUSE, HONAN.

    The following Fire Insurance Companies will accept risks against fire.

Alliance, London, Agents in China, Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Imperial,

Globe, Sun, and Phoenix.

Imports.

Raw Cotton.

Tin, Copper, &c...

Lead, Steel, Iron.

Messrs. Macvicar & Co.

cents.

5 per bale per month, 5 p. pecul

""

3 թ.

11

"

...

5 p.

4 p. 3 p.

"

"

17

Ginseng, Gums, Cloves, &c.. Sandalwood and other woods..

                                                  ...... Rattans, Betel-uut, Rice, Pepper, &c... · Cotton Yarn.....

Camlets, Longells, Lastings, &c...... Spanish Stripes, &c.....(6 pieces).... Longcloths, Cambrics, Chintzes &c.... after 1st month 20 to 30 pieces....

Exports.

Raw Silk.. Tea, Chest..

"

40..

60 80 and upwards.

5 p. 15 per bale

15 p.

10

per piece. per bale 20 per

"

30 per

25 p. bale

"

3 each

2 each

1 each

Half Chest.

...

Boxee...

After the lat month

("je wegɔnpaj vyu

per cent.

    Laying down, weighing, and examining Tea, 5 candareens per pecul. Chop-boats sents down to Whampoa for cargo with servants in charge.

SPENCER COMPTON, Proprietor.

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LIST OF MEMBERS OF THE CANTON BRITISH -

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.

Messrs. George Barnet & Co.

""

Blenkin, Rawson & Co.

The Commercial Bank of India.

Messrs. Dallas & Co.

Dent & Co.

"

"

Dirom, Gray, & Co.

11

Gibb, Livingston, & Co.

""

Gilman & Co.

Holliday, Wise & Co.

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Mr. Levin Josephs.

Messrs. Kennedy, Macgregor & Co.

""

"

Lindsay & Co.

Macvicar & Co.

Mr. James L. Man.

Messrs. Henry Moul & Co.

The Oriental Bank.

Messrs. Rathbones, Worthington & Co.

""

"

Reiss & Co. ·

Ripley, Smith & Co.

Pestonjee Franjee Cama & Co.

David Sassoon, Sons & Co.

Turner & Co.

D. F. CAMA.

A. DUNLOP.

COMMITTEE FOR 1949.

S. PONDER, Chairman.

JOHN DENT, Deputy Chairman.

ROBERT ELLICE.

W. F. GRAY.

J. HOLLIDAY.

J. JARDINE.

D. KENNEDY.

JOHN SKINNER.

T. W. L. MACKEAN.

SAMUEL RAWSON.

JAMES WORTHINGTON.

SPENCER COMPTON, Secretary.

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INSURANCE OFFICES IN CHINA.

Ofices.

Asiatic Marine Insurance Office.. Imperial Fire Insur. Office London. Canton Insurance Office... Bombay Insurance Society...... Bengal Insurance Society,.. Reliance Marine Insurance Office. Alliance Fire Assurance Company of

London..... first class risk Do. Do. second do. Royal Insurance (Fire) Co. of

Liverpool.....

Indiau and China Marine Insurance

Risk by Steamers.

Limits. Agents.

850,000 Macvicar & Co. £10,000 ( $100,000 60,000

50,000 { Jardine, Matheson, 40,000 & Co.

£10,000

8,000

£10,000 Sykes, Schwabe, &

Co.

Office of Calcutta..

$25,000 Gilman & Co.

35,000

Union Insurance Society of Cauton Bombay Insurance Company...

75,000

40,000

Dent, & Co.

Forbes & Co.'s Const. Insur. Fund

20,000

Alliance Insurance Company of Cal-

cutta..

25,000

Oriental Insur. Company of Calcutta.

20,000

Russell & Co.

Bombay Royal Exchange Insurance

Company...

25,000

Loudon Assurance House..

Dent, Beale & Co.

Equitable Insurance Society..

40,000

Amicable Insurance Office of London

Lindsay & Co.

25,000

Imperial Marine Insurance Co. of

Bombay.............

59,000

30,000 P. & D. Nesserwan- 45,000 ( jee Camajee & Co.

Ruttonjee H. Cama-

Western Indian Insurance Society..

Do.

Do. Harbor risk. Bombay Merchants Insurance Co... Do. Do Risk per Steamer. Bombay Cama Insurance Com-

      pany.. Eastern Insurance Company....... 45,000

30,000 ( jee & Co. 45,000 }

Pestonjee Framjee

Cama & Co.

30,000

Augustine Heard &

Co.

40,000

12

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78

LIST OF PROTESTANT MISSIONARIES

AT THE SEVERAL PORTS OF CHINA, WITH THE

NAMES OF THE SOCIETIES TO WHICH THEY BELONG.

Names of the Missionary Societies, and the period when

they first sent laborers to the Chinese.

1. The London Missionary Society, 1807.

2. The American Board of Commissioners for For. Mis, 1829. 3. The Rhenish Missionary Society, (Barmen, Prussia,) 1832. 4. The American Baptist Missionary Union, 1834.

5. The Board of the Prot. Episcopal Ch. in the U. S. A. 1835. 6. The Church Missionary Society (England) for Africa and

the East 1837.

7. The Board of For. Mis. of the Presb. Ch. in the U. S. A. 1837. 8. The English General Baptist Missionary Society, 1845.

9. The Evangelical Mis. Society of Basle (Switzerland). 1846. 10. The Board of For. Mis. of the Southern Baptist Convention.

U. S. A. 1846.

11. The Mis. Soc. of the Sabbatarian (Baptist) Ch., U. S. A. 1847. 12. The Mis. Soc. of the Methodist Epis. Ch. in the U. S. A. 1847. 13. The For. Mis. Soc., of the Presbyterian Ch. in England. 1847. 14. The Methodist Episcopal Church of the Southern States, 1848. 15. The Swedish Missionary Society, 1849.

  The Netherlands Missionary Society, in 1827, sent out the Rev. Charles Gutzlaff; his connection with it was dissolved in 1835. It has had no other missionary to the Chinese.

The Medical Missionary Society in China was established in Feb. 1838. Its sole object has been to afford medical missionaries, hospitals, medicines, and attendants," without "support or remu- neration" for their services.

44

PROTESTANT MISSIONARIES AT PRESENT LABOREA

WHEN SENT, and in connection WITH WHẤT

CANTON.

Rev. E. C. Bridgman, D. D. and fam.,

CHINESE,

TY.

S. W. Williams, and fam.,

Rev. Dyer Ball, м. D. and fam.,

Rev. James G. Bridgman,

Samuel W. Bonney, licentiate,

1833

1838

1829 Amer Joard Com.

(Printer) (Dispensary)

1843 99.

1845

Rev. Andrew P. Happer M. D. and fam., 1844 Amer. Pres. Board.

Rev. John B. French,

Rev. William Speer, absent

Rev. Issachar J. Roberts, absent, Rev. B. W. Whilden and fam.,

Retd Benjamin Hobson M. D. and fam.,

Rev. William Gillespie,

*Rev. John F. Cleland and family,

Rev. Thomas Gilfillan,

Amoy =

1846 " 1846

11

""

"

1836 Am. Bap. S. Con.

1849

1839 Lond. Mis. Soc.

1844

"

"

1846

""

"

"

1848

"

"

"2

Rev. Peter Parker, M. D. Ophthalmic Hospital.

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79

HONGKONG.

Rev. James. Legge D. D. and fam., H. J. Herschberg M. R. c. 8. Lond. Richard Cole and family, Rev. William Dean, Rev. John Johnson, Rev. Theod. Hamberg, Rev. Rudolph Lechler, Rev. Ferdinand Genaehr, Rev. Wilhelm Lobscheid,

Rev. Wm. C. Burns,

Rev. A. Elquist,

Rev. CJ. Fast,

" Krone-

AMOY.

Rev. Wm. Young and fam.,

1839 Lond. Mis. Soc. 1847 (Hospital) L. M. S. 1844 Sup't of the Press. 1834 Am. Bap. Mis. Un. 1848

""

1847 Ev. Mis. Soc. of B. 1847

"

""

1847 Rhenish. Mis. Soc. 1848

"

1947 Soc. of Pres. Ch. E.-Canton

1849 Swedish Miss. Soc.

1849

1850 & Mis". Soc. of B

1835 Lond. Mis. Soc.

!

   Rev. John Stronach, (at Shanghái) Rev. Alex. Stronach and fam.,

James Hisslop, M. D.and fam., Rev. Elihu Doty and fam., Rev. John

N. Talmage, absent,

PURCHAU

Rev. Stephen Johnson, and family Rev. Lyman B. Peet and sam., Rev. Seneca Commings and fam., Rev. Caleb C. Baldwin and fam., Rev. William L. Richards, Rev. M. C. White,

Rev. J. C. Collins,

Rev. R. S. Maclay, & Family.

" Doolittle

NING PO

Rev. M. S. Culbertson and fam.,

Rev. R. Q. Way and fam.,

D. B. McCartee, M. D.

Rev. J. W. Quarterman,

Rev. J. K. Wight and family, Rev. H. V. Rankin and family,

M. S. Coulter and family,

Rev. J. T. Goddard and family,

Dan. J. McGowan, M. D. and family

Rev. Ed. C. Lord and fam.,

Rev. Thos. H. Hudson,

Joseph Hudson, Assistant.

Rev. William Jarrom and famn.,

Rev. R. H. Cobbold,

1838 11 1836

""

"

""

1848

"

11

Resigned

1837 Amer. Bd. Com.

1847

"

"

1851-

1833) 1846

1847 > Amer. Bd. Com. 1847 1847

1847 Meth. Epis. U. S. A.

1847 1848

""

**

"

1844 Amer. Pres. Bd.

1844

"

"

1844 (Dispensary)

1846 "" 1849

1849 " 1849

"

""

(Printer)

1839 Am. Bap. Miss. U. 1843 11

1847

11

"

"

1845 Eng Gen. Bap. S. 1845 "

"

+1

1245

19

"

1848 Ch. Miss. Soc.

Rev. W. A. Russe!!,

Miss Aldersey,

2 "Martins.

SHANGHAI.

Rev. W. H. Medhurst D. D. and fam., W. Lockhart, M. R. C. S. and fam.,

1848

1838

1850

"

1817 Lond. Mis. Soc.

1838 (Hospital)

"}

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80

Miss Tenney

Rev. Wm. C. Milne and fam.,

Rev. W. Muirhead, and fam., Rev. Joseph Edkins,

"

1839 Lon. Mis. Soc.

1847

1848 "

"

"

A. Wylie, (Sup't of press).

1847 "1

"

**

Rt. Rev. W. J. Boone D. D. and fam.,

1837 Am. Epis. Bd.

1845

""

""

1845

"

"

**

Miss Jones,

1845

"

Rev. E. Syle and fam.,

Miss Morse, absent,

Rev. J. Lewis Shuck and fam. Rev. George Pearcy and family, Rev. M. T. Yates and fam., Rev. C. Carpenter and fam., Rev. Nathan Wardner and fam., Revs C. Dylor, MB and fans., Rev. B. Jenkins and fam., Rev. T. Thos, McClatchie and fam., Rev. William Hobson and family,

SOCIETIES.

London Mis. Society Am. Board of Commis. Rhenish Mis. Society Am. Bap. Mis. Un. Church Mis. Soc. Eng. Epis. Ch. of U. S. A. Pres. Board of U. S. A. Eng. Gen. Bap. Soc.

Evan. Soc. of Basle South Bap. Con. U. S. A. Sabbath Bap. Soc. U. S. A. Meth. Ep. Ch. of U. S. A. Meth. Ep. Ch. Sou. A. S. U. Presb. Ch. in England Swedish Missionary Soc. Unconnected

Total at all ports

1836 Bap. South Con.

1847 1847

"

"1

""

1847 Sabbat. Soc. U.S.A. 1847

90

1948 Methodist Epis. 1848 ( Church South. 1844 Church Mis. Soc. 1849 ""

2.4

chau. po.

ani

20

SUMMARY.

Canton.

Hong- kong.

Amoy.

Fuh- Ning-

1

Shang-

Total.

hai,

4 3

6

17

12

3

5

2

2

10.

2

2

15| 12 |

3

నిలు: :

8 | 14 | 17 | 72

American. English. Swedish Swiss. German. Total.

Societies engaged

Missionaries

8

4

1

1

15

42

24

2

2

71

ROMAN CATHOLIC ESTABLISHMENTS AT HONGKONG.

Rt. Rev. T. A. Forcade, D. D. Bishop.'

Rev. John Fenouil.

Rev. Joseph Ching.

Rev. Felix McMahon.

Rev. Prudence Girard.

Rev. Louis Bounard.

   Rev. Napoleon F. Libois, Procureur général de la Société des Missions Etrangeres. Pierre Monicou. Assistant.

F. Joseph Rizzolati, Roman Catholic Bishop.

Very Rev. Fr. Anthono Feliciani, Procureur of the Bonda

Rev. Lewis Ambrose, Vice Procureur.

Fide.

Rev.

Buffa.

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81

Articles.

Mutton,

Beef,

120 to

"

Pork

11

11

Ham, Chinese

19

"

Lard,

120

Prices of the Principal Provisions at three perts in China.'

In this list the average has been taken as newly as it could be ascertinned.

Canton.

Shanghai.

Amoy.

cash per catty 280 to 300 90 to 120 128 to 144

150 | 100 to 130 80 to 116

9999

39939

to

110 to 144

80

150

to 90

3:00

120

136

20 to 25

90

128 to 114!

"

Capons,

200 to 300

144

11

Fowls,

140 to

,

Chickens,

156 to

150 160

60 to 100 136

19

"

Ducks,

120 to

"

19

Geese,

108 to

"

"

136 100 to 210 130 | §¡ to 2 apiece]

60 to

100

50 to

100

Doves,

cash

each 160

to

180 60

150 to 220

Milk,

Fish, fresh

Eggs, hen's and duck's

cash per catty83 to

7 to

8

6 to 7

་་

,,

90

50 to

112 to

200

30

to

683

6 to 10

60

40 to 50 a bottle

"

"

Shrimps,

160 to

180

30

19

99

Crabs,

96 to

260

"

Oysters,

84

to 140

"

"

Tomatoes,

21

to 30

""

Beans,

36 to 40

30

"1

"

Greens,

20 to 24

"

17

Mustard, greens,

8 to 12

19

19

Sweet potato,

12 to 21

12

11

Yams,

15 to 30

| 1991

2° 23

20 to 96

15 to 90 20 to 40

20 to 36

to

40

to

53

30

to 40

16

20 to 90

36

30 to 40

"1

Taro,

10 to 15

19

Turnip,

"

Onione,

5 to 6 30 to 36

6 to 8:

191

12 to 20

28

""

11

Ginger,

24 to 32

97

Bamboo sprouts,

41

""

Chestnuts,

to 63

·60 to 70 48

***

14 to

16

24

40

to 64

36

to 56

19

Oranges, mandarin,

70 to 90

19

coolie,

50 to 70

44 to 72

19

11

Grapes,

190

"

Pumeloes,

to each 100

210280

2

to 320

72 to

"

"

Pears,

11

Plantains,

19

99

Peaches,

n

Persimmons,

11

Plume,

"

Ground nuts,

Sugar,

ཋཔཋཆྱེ

15

110 to 130

18 to 30

12

45

to 30

to 25

to

52 60 to 100

32

"

pingfa,

110 to 120 128 to 130

"

11

Molasses,

*

Oil, vegetable

11

11

Vermicelli,

11

Charcoal

14 to

19

11

Rice,

30 to 35

Wheat-flour,

1 1

8 2*3 8 23

I

84 to 88

24 47

25

to 32

to 56

to 50 20 to 15

64 to 130

to 90

36 to

48

2 7 2** 197S

160

1.

T

14 to 16

to 26

£200 48 to

23

34

52

Exchange for Öne dollar,

1,350

1,550

1,575.

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82

RESIDENTS AT AMOY.

British Consulate

TH. Layton and family. 5.

John Thompson.

Ship Pathfinder.

F. L.. Hertslet and family.

James Milne, Commander.

C. A. Winchester M. D. and fam. James Bradshaw, 1st Officer.

John Backhouse.

M. C. Morrison.

W. H. Pedder.

Syme, Muir & Co.

F. D. Syme, England.

J. D. Muir.

R. E. Wilson.

James Tait.

C. W. Bradley.

Eneas J. Mackay Jacinto Royos.

Robert Jackson.

R. Smith.

:

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

James Milne, Resident Agent.

RESIDENTS

British Consulate.

Rutherford Alcock and family.

D. B. Robertson.

W. H. Medhurst, jr.

F. H. Hale.

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

J. R. Rowe. 2d.

Dent & Co.

Charles J. Priestman Res. Agent.

Henry Helms.

Ship Lord Amherst.

C. J. Priestman. Commander.

W. W. Fysk 1st Officer.

?

John Giles 2d

Schooner Royalist.

W. R. Browning, Commander. Frank Wm. Reid 1st Officer.

Rev. E. Doty and family. Rev. A. Stronach & family. Rev. Wm. Young and family. James Hisslop M. B. and family.

AT SHANGHAI.

Ilolliday, Wise, & Co.

John Wise absent.

Charles E. Bateson. Antonio dos Santos.

Sykes, Schwabe, & Co.

Adam Sykes, absent. Edward Burton. A. Connolly.

A. G. Dallas.

J. Macandrew.

C. Wills.

C. S. Matheson.

J. B. Ross.

Blenkin, Rawson, & Co.

A. F. Croom and family.

H. D. Cartwright.

F. A. Layton.

Phillips, Moore & Co.

A. Lewis. p. p.

Watson & Co.

J. P. Watson.

A. Thorne.

Augustine Heard & Co.

C. A. Fearon. W. N. Piccope. E. Deacon.

Nicholas Baylies,

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Google

Gilman, Bowman & Co.

A. Bowman.

J. Rusden. E. M. Smith.

Dirom, Gray, & Co.

W. W. Dale and family.

H. M. M. Gray. D. D. Lewin.

Macvicar & Co.

Henry H. Kennedy. Julius Saur.

L. Helbling.

J. Bennet.

Lindsay & Co

William Hogg. G. F. Green.

A. I. Young.

Rathbones, Worthington & Co.

Thomas Moncreiff.

Charles Maltby. William Broughall.

83

Gibb, Livingston & Co.

J. D. Gibb.

R. Aspinall. R. B. Ullet.

Hargreaves & Co.

W. Thorburn.

J. L. Maclean.

Wolcott, Bates & Co.

Henry G. Wolcott.

F. D. Williams. D. O. Clark.

Thomas Ripley & Co.

C. Shaw.

J. H. Winch.

J. Bland.

W. Shaw.

Wetmore & Co.

R. P. Saul. S. P. Goodall. J. Wilks, Jr.

Russell & Co.

J. N. A. Griswold.

A. Johnston.

Andrea Holtz.

Edward Cunningham. H. Fogg & Co.

J. Crampton.

C. W. Spooner. P. W. Graves.

Turner & Co.

Alex. Macculloch.

R. F. 'Thorburn. John Scarth.

Reiss & Co.

James Withington. A. Fincham. W. Potter.

Dent, Beale, & Co.

T. C. Beale. John Bowman.

J. C. Smith. Edward Webb. J. S. Baptista.

H. Fogg.

T. J. Birdseye.

Bull, Nye & Co.

W. F. Robinson.

J. T. Hut:leston.

Mackenzie, Brothers & Co.

K. R. Mackenzie.

C. D. Mackenzie.

J. White and family.

|J. Mackrill Smith and family,

James Hooper.

British Chamber of Commerce. J. MacDonald, Secretary.

John Miller.

:

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David Sassoon, Sons, & Co.

Meer Sassoon Mostiu.... Isaac Reuben.

Eleazer Abraham. Cooverjee Bomanjee.

P. F. Cama & Co.

Nowrojee Nesserwanjee.

Sorabjee Pestonjee.

  Dossabhoy Hormusjee. Framjee Sapoorjee Lungrana. Maloobhoy Donghersee.

Kirk and Irons.

Thomas Kirk, James Irons.

Sillar, Brothers.

David Sillar,

John C. Siillar.

D. Rémi, Watchmaker.

B. Edan.

A. Bidet.

Bach and Aroné,

Jacques Ároné,

M. L. Potter, Pilot.

84

Hubertson & Co.

Geo. F. Hubertson.

David Sillar.

P. F. Richards & Co. Storekeepers

P. F. Richards.

D. Charnley,

Edward Hall, Baker.

James Weatherly.

W. R. Adamson, -

W. H. Medhurst D. p. and fam. W. Lockhart M. R. C. S. and fain. Rev. Wm. C. Milue and fain. Rev. W. Muirhead and fam; Rev. B. Southwell and fam. Rev. Joseph Edkins. A. Wylie.

Rt. Rev. W. J. Boone D. D. & fam. Rev. Ed. Syle and family. E. C. Bridgman D. D. and family. Rev. J. Lewis Shuck and family. Rev. George Pearcy and family Rev. M. T. Yates and family. Rev. C. Carpenter and family. Rev. N. Wardner and family. Rey. C. Taylor and family. Rev. B. Jenkins and family. Rev. T. McClatchie and family. Rev. William Hobson and family.

DIPLOMATIC ESTABLISHMENTS IN CHINA.

HER BRITANNIC MAJESTY'S Superintendent of Trade AND CONSULAR ESTABLISHMENTS.

At Hongkong.

His Excellency SAMUEL G. BON-

HAM,

Hon. A. R. Johnston, Rev. Charles Gutzlaff, absent T. F. Wade,

Mr. William Connor, (absent) Mr. Fred E. Harvey Mr. W. Woodgate Mr. Joaŏ Hyndman

Mr. G. S. Morrison

{

H. B. M. Plenipotentiary and Chief Superintendent of Trade. Secretary and Registrar. Chinese Secretary.

Assistant Chinese Secretary. First Assistant. Acting First Assistant. Acting Second Do, 3d Clerk. 4th Clerk.

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Jous BowniNG, LL. 1. Adam W. Elmslié, Esq. Thomas T. Meadows, Esq. Mr. J. T. Walker,

Mr. E. F. Giles,

Mr. Horace Oakley, Alexander Bird,

85

At Canton,

Consul.

Vice Consul.

Interpreter.

Senior Assistant.

(absent)

Junior Assistant.

Consular Agent, Whampoa.

At Amoy.

    Temple H. Layton, Esq. John Backhouse, Esq. Martin C. Morrison, Esq. Mr. Frederick 'L. flertalet, Charles A. Winchester, M. D. Mr. W. l. Pedder,

    R. B. JACKSON, Esq. William R. Gingell, Esq.

G. G. Sullivan Esq. C. A. Sinclair, Esq. Mr. Patrick Hague,

Retherford Alcock; Esq. D. B. Rabertson, Esq. Walter H. Medhurst, jr. Mr. F. H. Hale,

Mr. Frank Parish,

Consul,

Vice Consul: Interpreter..

First Assistant.

Second Do. & medical attendant. · Clerk.

At Fuhchau.

Consul. Interpreter.

At Ningpo.

*

Consul. Interpreter. Senior Assistant.

At Shanghái.

Consul.

Vice Consnt.

Interpreter.

♣ enim Assistant. (absent.) Acting senior așsistant.

LEGATION OF THE UNITED STATES.

His Excellency Journ W. DAVIS,Commissioner of the U.S. A. tó

Rev. Peter Parker, M. D.

R. B. Forbes, Esq.

F. T. Bush, Esq.

    Charles W. Bradley, LL. D. John N. A. Griswold, Esq. R. P. De Silver, Esq.

China,

Secretary of Legation, Canton.

Vice Consul at Canton.

Consul at Hongkong.

Consul at Amay.

Consul at Shanghai.

Consul & Naval Storekceper, Macao.

FRENCH

LEGATION.

ALEXANDRE FORTH-ROUIN,

Leon Pages,

Jules Zanolle,

Henry Da Chesno,

Joze M. Marques,

Envoyé de France en Chine.

Secretaire,

Chancelier.

Elève Consul.

Interpreter.

13

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H. G. I. Reynvaan, Esq. G. E. Haskell, Esq Robert Jackson, Esq.

M. de Montigny,

M. de Kleskowski,

SPANISH

Don SINIBALDo de Mas,

Don Juan Bamtista de Sandoval, Don Juan A. Lopez de Ceballos, Don Jozé de Aguilar, Don Juan Lecaroz, James Tait, Esq. Sr. Jozé Vicente Jorge,

Robert Browne, Esq. W. W. Parkin, Esq. Clement D. Nye, Esq. John Burd, Joseph Jardine, Esq. Alexander Calder, Esq. John Dent, Esq. T. C. Beale, Esq. Richard Carlowitz, Esq. William Pustau, Esq. Sr. A. A. de Mello,

Camillo Lelis de Souza,

86

Vice Consul at Canton.

Agent Consulaire at Hongkong." Agent Consulaire at Amoy. S Consul at Shanghái, and

Acting Consul for Ningpo... Interpreter at Shanghai.

LEGATION.

{

Envoy Extraordinary and

Minister Plenipotentiary. Secretary of Legation. Diplomatic attaché. (absent) } Attachés & students.

Vice Consul at Amoy. Spanish Consul at Macao.

Consul for Netherlands. Consul for Peru at Canton. Vice Consul for Chili. Danish Consul, Hongkong. Acting Danish Consul, Canton. Acting Danish Consul, Shánghái.

Portuguese Consul at Canton. Portuguese Consul at Shánghái. Consul for Prussia and Saxony. Consul for Austria.. Brazilian Consul.

Vice Consul for Brazil at Macao.

PAPERS PUblished in CHINA.

   BOLETIM DO GOVERNO, Official paper of the Government of Macao, Price $12 perannum. Weekly, on Wednesdays.

   CANTON COMMERCIAL LIST. F. F. de Cruz, Editor and Publisher. Canton, Daily. Price $2 a month.

The CHINA MAIL. Andrew Shortrede, Editor and Publisher. Pottinger St. Hongkong. Weekly, on Thursdays. Price $12 yearly. The CHINESE REPOSITORY, S. W. Williams, Publisher, Canton. Issued at the end of every month, Price $3 per annum. The FRIEND OF CHINA and HONGKONG GAZETTE. John Carr, Editor and Publisher. Semi-weekly, Wednesdays and Satur- days. Price $12 per annum.

The HONGKONG REGISTER. W. H. Mitchell, Editor, and Robt. Strachan, Publisher, No. 17, Queen's Road. Weekly, on Tues- days. Price $12 per annum; including the monthly Overland Re- gister, $15 per annuin.

The VICTORIA DAILY ADVERTISER & SHIPPING LIST." Hongkong, Published by W. H. Franklyn. Daily. Gratis, supported by its advertisements.

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$7

GOVERNMENT OF MACAO

D. Jeronimo Jozé de Matta, Bishop.

Joaquim Antonio de Moraes Carneiro, Chief Justice.

Ludgerio Joaquim de Faria Neves, Major.

Felippe Vieira, Judge.

Thomas Jozé de Freitas, Procurador.

Miguel Pereira Simoens, Fiscal.

Governers Department.

Antonio Jozé de Miranda, Secretary to government.

Jeronimo. Pereira Leite, A. D. C. to the governor.

Jozé Carlos Barros, } Clerks.

Jozé Franco.

Dom. Jeronimo Jozé de Matta, Bishop.

Rev. Braz de Mello, Secretary.

Bernardo d'Araujo Roza, Acting Commandant.

Dr. Jono Damasceno C. dos Santos, Attorney-general. P. J. da Silva Loureiro, Harbor Master.

D. J. Barradas, Postmaster.

Judiciary.

    J. A. de Moraes Carneiro, C. de O. de C. Judge. Joao Batista Gomes, Substitute of the Judge. Francisco da Silveira, C. de O. de C. Registrar. Miguel F. Telles,

Thomas de Aquino Migueis, } Clerks.

Antonio Rangel, Accountant.

Municipal Chamber.

}

Camillo Lelis de Souza, Judges. JoaĎ Jozé Vieira, Felippe Vieira,

J. F. d'Oliveira.

A. Carlos Brandao

Council of Government. ·

Revenue Department.

F. J. Marques, Treasurer. Miguel P. Simoens, Fiscal.

J. Victorino da Silva, Accountant.

Vereadores. Jozé Joaquim de Azevedo.

Ludivino Simoens.

Thos. J. de Freitas Procurador.

Maximiano da Roza, Clerks. Pedro da Roza,

Chinese Department.

Thos. J. de Freitas, Procuradır. Joað R. Gonsalves, Interpreter. Florentino dos Remedios Do. Jeronimo da Luz,

I. Simoens.

Justices of the Peace.

Joao Lourenço de Almeida, Antonio Jozé da Rocha.

Antonio Rangel, Clerk.

Treasury.

F. J. Marques, Treasurer. Miguel de Souza,

Francisco da Costa, Clerks.

Do.

Joaquim Xavier,

Do.

B. Simoens, Clerk.

Pio de Carvalho,

Assessors.

Dr. J. D. C. d "s Santos.

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J. F. d'Oliveira.

i

   Guilherme Francisco Bramston. Joao Victoring da Silva. Angelo A. da Silva, Clerk.

A: A, de Mello.

Florencio de Cruz. Joao C. Pereira. Albino A. de Silva. Autonio Manoel Pereira.

Domingos Tavares. Antonio Carlos Brandao. Evaristo Lopes.

Bernardo E. Carneiro.

JA. Pereira.

Francisco Placé.

Bernabé Govea.

Camillo Lelis de Souza.

J. A. Ozorio.

C. Ozorio & Co.

Watch and Clock Makers.

Candido Ozorio.

Carlos Vicente da Rocha.

Claudio I. da Silva.

Francisco da Silva.

Francisco P. Xavier.

Cypriano Antonio Pacheco.

    Domingos Pacheco. Emigdio Jozé do Rozario. Felippe Vieira.

Francisco Beres de Șilva. Guilherme F. Bramston.

    Cypriano A. de Chagas. Janoceucio A. dos Reinedios. Joao J. dos, Remedios. M. A. dos Remedios..

F. II. de Azevedo,

E. O. dos Remedios. I. dos Remedios.

Joao B. Gonies.

C. Gracia

Joao Maria de Silva.

Jozé Bernardo Gularte.

Joao Jozé de Silva, Jozé Vicente Jorge.

1. Peres da Silva. Izidoro d'Almeida. Antonio M. Pereira.

Lino Lopes.

Pedro Lopes.

Manoël J. do Rozario. Jozé Maria de Fonçeca.

Jozé de Sá.

Jozé Manoel de Jezus. Jozé Francisco d'Oliveira; Jozé Simaŭ dos Remediós.. Jozé de Lemos. Lourenço Pereira.

;

A. de Mirandá. Angelo A. da Silva. C. da Rocha. F. de' Cunha. L. de Cunha.

Lourench Marques,

E Marques. V

A. Marques.

Manoel Jozé Barboza.

Manoel Pereira.

Felippe. A. Ozario.

Pedro Marques.

Esteban Garretta,

Thos. J. de Freitas Dispersary.

E. Marçal.

Jozé da Silva..

Jozé Severo.

Vicente C. da Rocha, Sen. Vicente C, da Rocha, Jr... John Smith.

Honorio Marçal. Joaquim Barradas.

L. Carvalho and family.

R. P. De Silyer, US. Consul.

Lino de Alnteida..

J. A. Durran,

Patrick Stewart and family. James P, Sturgis.

George Chinnery, M. R. A.

Landscape and Miniature 'Païnter John Middleton and family. Benjamin Seare ånd family. Heerjeeboy Rustomjee.

Hormusjee Cowasjee, · Pallanjee Dorabjee. T. B. Watson and family.

Francisco Soares. Antonio de Eça.

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1

GOVERNMENT OF HONGKONG. ›

H. E. SAMUEL G. BONHAM, C. B., Governor, Commander-in-chief Vice-Admiral, Plenipotentiary, and Chief Superintendent of Trade. C. B. Teesdale, liet, II. M. 83d Regt. Á. D. C. to H. E. the

Governor.

Hon. Major-gen. William Staveley, c. B., Lieut.-Governor and Com

mander of the forces.

Hon. Major W. Caine, Colonial Secretary and Auditor-General. Hon. A. R. Johnston, Secretary and Registrar. Hon. John W. Hulme, Chief-Justice.

Hon. W. T. Mercer, Culonial Treasurer.

       COLONIAL. Secretary's OFFICE. Hon. Major Caine, Colonial Secretary Rev. C. Gutzlaff, Chinese Sec. (absent. L. D'Almada e Castro, Chief Clerk. J. M. d'A. e Castro. 2d Clerk,absent. H. F. Hance,

3d Do.

A. Grandpré

4th "

G. W. Newman, Acting 2d

AUDIT OFFICE.

pro tem.

    Hon. Major Caine, Auditor General, E. Morgan, Clerk.

Colomal TREASURY.

Hon. W. T. Mercer, Treasurer. J. G. Comelate, Chief Clerk. R. Rienecker, Accountant. J. Hare, Assistant.

Messrs. May and Caldwell, Assessors

and Collecters.

      SURVEYOR General's ObFICE. C. St. Geo. Cleverly, Surveyor Gen Hon. G. Napier (absent) Clerk of Works J. C. Power, Acèt & Clerk of Registry.

ECCLESIASTICAL.

    Rev. V. J. Stanton, Colonial Chaplain, J. Summers, Preceptor Anglo-Chinese

school.

F. C. Drake, Schoolmaster, Clerk and||

Sexton.

HARBOR MAster's OfficE. Lieut. W. Pedder, R. N. Harbor Mas-

ter and Marine Magistrate. E. R. Mitchell, Assistant.

SOPRENE & Vice Admiralty Court

Hon. J. W. Hulnie & Commissury. Chief Justice

flon. P. I, Stirling, Attorney General. N. D'Esterre Parker, Proctor (ubsént), W. D'Esterre Parker, Acting Pròoctor. R. D. Cay, Registrar.

F. Smith Deputy Registrar & Surrogate G. A. Trotter, Clerk to Chief Justice. W. H. Alexander, Clerk of Works. E. L. Lança, Interpreter of Mulay &

Bengalee.

J. Smithers, Bailiff

Crook, Under Bailif.

Pujate Kstabiatustükr. C. B. Hillier, Chief Magistrate. C. G. Holdforth Adristant Do.

Sheriff, and Provost Maïshal. Charles May, Superintendent of Police, D. R. Caldwell, Assist. Do. J. Collins, Chief Clerk. M. Quin, Second (ørk.........). Thomas Milton, Jailor. Sylvester Marshall, Sheriff's Officer.

Cskokeks.

CB. Hillier. C. G. Holdforth.

REGISTRAR General's OffICE. Hon W. T. Mercer, Ofg. Registr Gent. A. Lena, Clerk (absent). 'Ng Ming-Tung, Chinese Clerk.

CIVIL HOSPITAL. Wm. Morrison, Colonial Surgeon. Alberto Botelho, Dispenser.

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POST OFFICE.

T. Hyland, Postmaster.

R. H. Crakanthorpe Chief Clerk.

W. T. Marsh

J. Hudson,

24 Clerk.

3d Do.

90

ROYAL ARTILLERY.

Lt.-col. Eyre, Commanding.

Capt. W. B. Young.

Capt. Fisher.

Lieut. Jones.

"1

Lugg.

J. H. E. Wright, 4th Do.

Royal EnginEER'S OFFICE. Lieut.-col. G. Phillpotts, Commanding

Engineer.

  Major Biscoe, Executive Engineer. Lieut. St. Andrew St. John.

"

Phillpotts.

Wm. Burgoyne,

S. H. Mathews,

Clerks of Works.

George Burgoyne, Foreman of Works. Joseph Cameron, Clerk.

ORDNANCE Office.

Henry St. Hill, Ordnance Storekeeper.

Theo. S. Ford Clerk.

John A. Blight,

J. A. Brooks,

D. Stevens,

J. R. Prattent,

F. C.P da Silveira,

8. Appleton,

COMMISSARY.

W. Smith Assistant Commissary Genl. C. W. Eichbaine, Dep. Asst. Com. G. J. W. Fagan, Clerk of Treasury.

NAVAL YARD, West Point. Capt. P. Parker, Naval Storekeeper. Walter. Burke.

Geo. Dewar, Chief Clerk absent. W. D. Hickson, 2d Do.

J. E. Churcher, 3d

E. B. Eaton.

4th.

E. Liddall, Storemen.

W. Boxer,

Temporary Clerks

J. Rink,

J. Dearle

Coopers.

List of RESIDENTS AT CANTON:

Danish Hong.

(Near the Gute) Schwemann & Co.

D. W. Schwemaṇn.

William Dreyer.

New Hong.

No. 3.

Hajee Elies Hussan.

Allureka Versey.

Romthala Versey

Ahmed Isaac.

Abdola Moladina.

Sedick Omar

Ramthola Ameer.

MoladinaNoorhahmed.

No. 1.

Khan Mohamed Habibhoy.

Jacob Hassan.

Veerjee Rahim.

Ayub Ebrahim.

Goolam Hoosam Chandoo.

Kakeebhoy Bahaderbhoy.

No. 2.

Ebrahim Soomar.

Nanjee Sah Mohamed.

Cursetjee Jamsetjee Botiwalą, Salley Mohamed.

Sucetmal Nuthoomull;

M. da Silvṛ.

Sardarkhan Jaferkhan. Dildarkhan Goolabkhan.

Abdolvayad Mohmed.

Ebrahim Shaik Hoosen.

Soi-ke.

No. 3.

Office of the Canton Commencial List. F. F. de Cruz.

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91

C. de Crus.

L. J. de Jesus.

J. L. Pereira.

da Roza.

R. Ewing and family.

No. 4.

No. 5.

No. 6.

A. Viegas and fam.

B. A. Pereira.

(Near the river.)

      Rev. John F. Cleland and fam Rev. William Gillespie. Rev. Thomas Gilfillan.

Spanish Hong.

Casimbboy, Nathabhoy & Co.

Jeraz Munjee. Hurjee Jamal. Moosah Hassam.

Bimjee Canjee.

Samjee Lalljee.

Ludda Chatoor.

Old French Hong.

No. 5. Ameerodeen & Jafferbhoy. Ameerooden Abdool Latiff. Franje e Burjorjev. Khumooredeen Nuverally. Cumerally Rumzaually. Alla Bux Dosunjee.

No. 6.

P. & D. N. Camajee & Co. Pestonjes Nowrojee Pochajes, Dorabjee Nesserwanjee Camajee. Rustomjee Framjee Mehta.

R. Pestonjee Cawperwala. Shaikally Mearally. Muncherjee Nesserwanjee.

No. 7.

Fazul Damany.

Gangjee Goolem Hossain. Mohamed Pudmey Muscatee.

Hassam Fakira.

S. A. Seth.

No. 74.

No. 7

Mohamed Ally Motabhoy.

Shaik Tayeb Furjoolabhoy. Cumoorden Meerjee.

New French Hong.

No. 1.

No. 2.

Robt. Browue & Co.

R. McGregor.

Robert Browne.

No. 3.

J. Boon.

Acow's Hotel.

No. 2.

No. 4.

Bovet, Brothers, & Co.

Louis Bovet.

Fritz Bovet.

Edouard Bovet.

No. 3.

Pestonjee Framjee Cama & Co.

Manackjee Nanabhoy.

D. F. Camajee.

Bomanjee Muncherjee.

Cowayjee Pestonjee.

Framjee Eduljee.

Bapoojee Pallanjee Runjee.

Dhunjeebhoy Muncherjee.

Cursetjee Rustomjee Erance.

Dinshaw Merwanjee.

(Facing the river.) Reynvaan & Co.

H. G. I. Reyn vaan.

H. Hyndman.

B. Kenny, н. p. and faine

F. do Rozario.

Vaucher, Frerès.

Fritz Vaucher.

Constant Borel.

Mingqua's Hong.

Billiard Rooms & Masonic Lodge

Burjorjee Edaljen.

No.

Mulloobhoy Dhongeray.

No. 1.

A. R. B. Moses.

No. 2.

Noor Mohamed Datuophoy & Co. Office of the Chinese Repository.

Khan Mohamed Datoobhoy.

S. Welle Williams and family.

J. V. Barros.

Digitized by Google

No. 3.

Lindsay & Co.

Frederick Chapinan. H. D. Margesson. E. Dale.

Mingqua's New Hong

No. 1.

Carlowitz, Harkort, & Co.

Richard Carlowitz.

L. Wiese.

No. 3.

Peerbhoy Yacoob.

Tarmohamed Naincey.

Ludda Kakey

Nanjee Yacoob.

W. D. Lewis.

No. 4.

Byramjee Coverjee. ·

Cursetjee Shavuxshaw.

No. 5.

Limjee Jamsetjef & Co.

Jalbhoy Cursetjee.

  Rustomjee M. Nalearwala. Rustomjee Jalbhoy. Muncherjee Jevunjee Mehtá.

Mingquà's outside. New Hong.

92

American Hong.

No. 1.

Olyphant & Co.

William H. Morss. Richard P. Dana. Frederick A. King.

William O. Bokee. David O. King. N. F. da Costa.

John Miller.

No. 2.

A. F. Vandenberg.

No. 3.

M. J. d'Aquino."

Ripley, Smith & Co.

Philip W. Ripley and family. Henry H. Smith.

Robert Ellice.

Powshun hong.

No. 1.

A. A. Ritchie & Co.

A. A. Ritchie.

H. M. Olmsted. J. Maɲnel Mär.

Charles Platt.

No. 3.

Hormysjee Framjee & Co.

Rustomjee Byrainjee. Dadabhoy Bazonjee.

Cursetjee Rustomjee -Daver.

Dinshawjee Framjee Casna.

No. 1.

W. Buckler.

Pestonjee Dinshawjee.

W. O. Comstock.

No. 3.

Shumsoodim Sejamoodin & Co.

Shaik Ahmed.

No. 4.

Shaik Davood.

W. Pustau & Co.

William Pustau.

C. Brodersen.

No.. 5.

Nesserwanjee Byramjée Fackerajee.

Aspenderjee Nessewranjee.

Burjorjee Rustomjee.

Dadabhoy D. Taleaca.

No. 6..

G. T. Siemsseŋ.

No. 7.

Rev. P. Parker. M. D.

R. & D. Rụttunjee.

Rustomjee Ruttunjee. Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee. Jansetjee Ruttunjee.

No. 4.

Heerjeebhoy, Ardaseer, & Co.

Ardaseer Rastoinjee.

Eduljee Cursetjee.

Aspundearjee Tamooljee.

D. P. & M. Pestonjee.

Dadabhoy Pestonjee. Manackjee Pestonjee, abs.

No. 5.

Cowasjee Sapoorjee Lungrana. Muncherjee Sapoorjee Lungrana, Pestonjee Jamseljce Motiwalla.

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    Rustomjee Pestonjer, Aderjee Sapoorjee,

    Dababhoy Jamsetjes Dułachow, Merwaujee Edaljee,

No. 6.

Dent & Co.

John Dent,

M. W. Pitcher, James Trubeħaw William H. Luce,

Imperial Hong.

Nos. 1. & 2. Wetmore & Co.

G. H. Lamson,

O. E. Roberts,

Thomas Gittins, Henry Davis, 8. H. Farnham, John R. Goodridge, M. Simoena,

James D. Hunter.

Charles R. Adaine.

No 3.

J. L. Man & Co.

James L. Man.

Post Office.

J. B. dos Remedion,

Clerk.

8. Marjoribanks, surgeon

J. L. Pereira.

No. 5.

     Kennedy, Macgregor & David Kennedy,

C. A. Kosh.

No. 6.

Gibb, Livingston, & Co.

W. P. Livingston, John Skinner.

J. M. Wright,

C. J. Ozorio,

Swedish Hong.

No. 1.

H. E. John. W. Davia.

   Nos. 2&3 Russell & Co.

R. B. Forbes.

E. A. Low.

Robert 8. Sturgis, E. Cunningham.

93

8. J. Hallam. F. A. Reiche W. G. Pierce, 8. Rangel, J. Rangel,

H. H. Warden.

George Perking.

No. 4.

Sword, Purdon & Co.

J. D. Sword,

James Purdon,

Edwin Houston.

Old English Hong.

No. 1.

Nye, Parkin & Co.

William W. Parkin, Clement D. Nye,

Timothy J. Durrell, J. P. Van Loffelt, E. C. H. Nye, Thomas Pyke,

F. A. Seabra.

No. 2.

Rathbones, Worthington, & Co. William Rathbone,

James Worthington,

G. Dent,

H. R. Hardie,

Jutias Kreyenhagen,

No. 3.

Jamieson, Edger & Co.

Richard Rothwell.

No. 4.

Wilkinson & Sanders.

Alfred Wilkinson.

No. 5.

Dallas & Co.

Stephen Ponder.

Frederick Booker, J. J. d'Oliveira

No. 6.

Gilman & Co.

R. J. Gilman,

A. Hudson,

W. A. Vacher, George de St. Croix.

Chowchow Hong.

No. 1.

Dadabhoy, Pestonjer & Co.

Jummoojee Nesseswanjec,

14

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94

Merwanjee Dadabhoy Wadia, Sorabjee Nowrojee Wadia.

Hormusjee Nesserwanjee Pochajes, Dossabhoy Bajonjee,

A A. de Encarnaçað.

No. 2.

Byramjee Rustomjee.

Pallanjee Nesserwanjee.

Sbirsore & Mackertoom,

M. S. Mackertoom

F. F. Marques.

M. de Carvalho,

No. 3.

Cowasjee Pallanjee.

Sapoorjee Bomanjee

No. 4.

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer Bhanjah & Co. Jamsetjee Eduljee.

Hormusjee Jamasjee Nadershaw, Manackjee Pestonjee Taback. Nesserwanjee Hor. Nadershaw,

No. 5.

Burjorjee Sorabjee.

Dadabhoy Burjorjee.

Rustomjee Burjorjee.

No. 6.

Maneckjee Bomanjee.

New English Factory.

ON THE WEST SIDE. No. 1.

H. B. M. Consulate.

John Bowring, LL. D. Adam W. Elmslie,

   Thomas T. Meadows. J. T. Walker.

Horace Oakley.

John A. T. Meadows.

Holliday, Wise, & Co.

John Holliday and family.

Charles Waters.

No. 2.

Oriental Bank.

Samuel Gray.

B. E. Hancock

 Macvicar & Co. W. W. Brown. H. Murray,

No. 3.

George Barnet & Co.

George Barnet.

William Barnet.

John Butt.

Henry Moul & Co.

Henry Moul.

Alfred Moul.

George Moul.

No. 4.

Fischer & Co.

Agent of P. & O. St. Nav. Co. Maximilian Fischer and family. Richard Gibbs. absent.

Dimier, Brothers & Co.

C. Dimier.

Commercial Bank of India.

J. E. Maclachlan.

H. Rutter.

M. Sichel.

No. 5.

Reiss & Co.

8. Mackenzie.

Thomas Everard.

David Sassoon, Sone, & Co. Abdalah D. Sassoon.

R D. Sassoon.

Jehangeer Framjee Buxey. Binjamin Eliah. Solomon David. Joseph Tinawy. Jacob Reuben.

:

Merwanjee Dadabhoy.

No. 6.

Francis B. Birley and family.

Arthur Smith.

Marciano da Silva.

ON THE EAST SIDE.

No. 1.

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

Joseph Jardine.

M. A. Macleod,

A. da Silveira. John Williams. James Whittall.

Dirom, Gray & Co.

William F. Gray,

C. Ryder,

George Urmson, C. W. McKenzie, B. A. Pereira.

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No. 2.

        C. 8. Compton & Co. Charles 8. Compton,

Canton British Chamber of Commerce.||

Spencer Compton. Sec.

Agent of the Hongkong and Canton St Packet Co.

C de Cruz

No. 3.

Augustine Heard & Co.

John Heard,

Joseph L. Roberts,

J. H. Everett, William Gilbert, Augustine Heard, Jr. W. Comstock D. P. Marques,

No. 4.

Blenkin, Rawson & Co.

8. Rawson and family.

E. Sinclair.

F. F. Marques.

Chalmers & Co.

No. 5.

Patrick Chalmers.

James D. Park.

W. H. Wardley.

Levin Josephs.

Eduljee Furdoonjee Khambata,

Ruttonjee H. Camajee & Co. Dossabhoy Hormusjee Camajee,

Dorabjee Framjee Colah, Nowrojes Cursetjee Liboovala,

Pallanjee Dorabjee Lalcaca.

D. Nasserwanjee Mody & Co. Nasserwanjes! Bomanjee Mody, Dhunjeebhoy_Hormuzjee Hakinna,

Muncherjee Frammurjee, Ardaseer Nesserwanjee Mody.

95

Eduljee Framjee, Sons & Co. Dhunjeebhoy Eduljøe, Dadabhoy Edlujee, Hormusjee Eduljee, Framjee Sapoorjee,

No. 6. Turner & Co.

T. W. L. Mackean,

W. Walkinshaw, M. de Carvalho,

Kwangle Hong.

W. Melrose.

Footae Hong.

Rev B. W. Whilden & family,

Lung-hing Kai.

Rev. A. P. Happer and family, Rev. John B. French.

Tung-Shik Kok. Rev. Dyer Ball and family.

Kum-le-fau. B. Hobson x. n. & family.

Brig Lyrn.

N. de St. Croix, William A. Harton

Whampoa.

A. Bird, British Consular Agent, abs.

Dr. Miller, acting.

Rev. George Loomis, chaplain. Samuel W. Bonney,

Dr. Smith,

Dr. Lewer,

Dr. Brice,

Thomas Hunt.

Ship_Chandler, Ship Hygeia. Henry L, Hepburn,

J. M. O. Lima.

Charles Buckton, Ship Chandler. John Cooke, Sailmaker. J. C. Cowper Shipwright. J. Rowe, Skipwright.

MACAO SODA WATER MANUFACTORY,

AND THE ALBION PRESS,

No. 61, Praya Grande.

     Aerated Lemonade and Soda Water may be had in any quantity at the shortest notice, at the usual rates charged in China.

Printing of every description executed with dispatch, and on pre- cisely the same terms charged in other establishments.

NB. The undersigned in now daily expecting the arrival of materials from England, when he will undertake to bind Account Books and Works of every description, and finish them precisely as those executed in Europe or America. Ruling of Paper, according to samples, will also be undertaken, and both on moderate terms.

JOHN SMITH.

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06

Commercial Houses in China.

WITH THE LIST OF THEIR PARTNERS AND ASSISTANTS,

AS NEAR AS THEY CAN BE ASCERTAINED. ›

Adams, Charles R. Canton

Adamson, William R sh

A meerodeen & Jafferbhoy, Canton Ameerodeen Abdool Latiff,

Framjee Burjorjee, Khumooredeen Buverally Gumerally Rumsanally Alla Bux Dosanjée

Anderson D. Hongkong: Bach & Aroné, ak

Jacques Aroné.

Balfour, A. H. surgeon Hongkong

Barnes D. J. Hongkong

Barnet & Co. George

George Barnet,

Williain Barnet

John Butt

Baylies, Nicolas, sh

Birley, F. B.

Arthur Smith

Marciano da Silva

Blenkin, Rawson, & Co. Can, and Shu

T. S. Rawson, England

Samuel Rawson, Canton, Alexander F. Croom, Shanghái

Henry D. Cartwright Sh F. A. Layton sh

Fraser Sinclair, o

F. F. Marques a

Bovet, Brothers & Co.,

Louis Bovet,

Fritz Bovet,

Edouard Bovet.

Bowra, Humphreys, & Co. Hongkong.

C. W. Bowra.

Alfred Humphreys, absent.

W. A. Bowṛa.

Browne, Robert, & Co. Canton,

Agent Netherlands Trading Company.

Robert Browne,

J. Boon

Buckler, William, Canton

Buckton, Charles,

Ship chandler, Wh.

Bull, Nye & Co. Shanghái,

Isaac M. Bull,

New York,

Gideon Nye Jr. New York Willian P Robinson, John T. Huttleston Burd, John & Co., Hon.

John Burd,

Frederick H. Block, Bush & Co., Hongkong

F. T. Busb.

J. C. Anthon, absent C. D. Williams, R. Rangel

J. S. Fox,

Charles H. Noyes,

G. E. Haskell,

H. Anthon.

Byramjee Cooverjee. Can.

Cursetjee Shavuzshaw, Burjorjee Sorabjee,

Camajee & Co., P. & D. N. Can

Pestonjee Nowrojee Pochajer, Dorabjee Nesserwanjee Camajee, Rustomjee Framjee Mehta,

R. Pestonjee Cawperwala, Shaikally Mearally, Muncherjee Nesserwanjee, Camajee, Pochawjee & Co. Hon.

Camajee,

Pochawjee,

Canton British Chamber of Commerce.

Spencer Compton, Sec.

*C. de Cruz,

Carlowitz, Harkort & Co. Can.

Richard Carlowitz,

Bernhard Harkort, absent.

L. Wiese.

Carter, Augustus, Hon.

Agent of Hongkong and Canton Steam Packet Co.

|| Casimbhoy, Nathabhoy & Co.

Jeraz Munjee

Fazul Goolam Hoosain, Bọm.

Harjee Jamal,

Moosah Hassam,

Chalmers & Co., Canton.

Patrick Chalmers,

James Dickson Park,

Digitized by

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97

!

China Mail, Newspaper, Hongkong, Andrew Shorterde, Editør,

Andrew 8. Dizson, W. R. Dalziel,

Francisco C. Barradea, Jozé M. da Silva,

Manoel L. Boga Pereira, Jono Braz Graçon, Athanasio A. de Fongecs, Vicente F. Barradas, Joaquim M. da Silva,

Chinese Repository, Periodical, Canton 8. Welle Williama Publisher.

José Vicente Barros. Commercial Bank of India, Can.

J. E. Maclachlao,

H. Rutter

Comstock, W. O. san

Compton & Co., C. 8., Canton

Charles 8. Compton.

Cooke, John, Sailmaker, Whampoa. Cowasjee Pallanjee. Canton & Sk.

Cooverjee Bomanjee, skung. Cowasjee Framjee, Sapoorjee Bomanjee,

Cowasjee Sapoorjee L. Can and Sh.

Muncherjee Sapoorjee Lungrama, Pestonjee Jamsetjee Motiwalk, Rustomjee Pestonjee Motiwalla, Dossabhoy Hormusjee. Framjee Sapoorjee Lungrana.} Sh Dadabhoy Jamsetjes Dulackow. Merwanjee Eduljee,

Cowper, J. C,

Shipwright, Wh.

Dadabhoy Burjorjee.

Rustomjee Burjorjee,

Byramjee Rustomjes,

Dadabhoy Nasserwanjse Mody & Co.

Nusserwanjee Bomanjve Mody,

Dhunjechboy Horinusje Hakinna Muncherjee Frammurjee,

Ardaseer Nesserwanjes Mody,

Dallas & Co, Canion.

William Dallas, England George Coles,

Stephen Ponder, Canton.

F. Booker.

David Sassoon, Sone, & Co.

Abdalah David Sassoon,

Ellino David Sassoon. Bembay.

R. D. Sassoon,

Jehangeer Framjee Buzey, Isaac Reuben,

Eleazer Abraham,

SA.

Meer Sassoon Mʊshu,

Converjce Bomanjee

Solomon Dayıd,

J. Tinawy,

Jacob Reuben, Binjamin Elite,

Merwanjee Dadabhoy,

Davidson, William, Ningpo.

Dent & Co. Hongkong and Canton,

Lancelot Dent,

Wilkinson Dent Archibald Campbell,

John Dent

Charles J. Braine, Edward Pereira,

Henry Dickinson, M. W. Pitcher, G. H. Schumacher, Francis C. Chomley, James Trubshaw, W. Leslie,

W. H. Luce,

Joaquim P. Caldas

} Europe.

Hon.

Hon.

Ignacio de A. Pereira, hon Charles J. Priestman Henry Holms

Dent, Beale & Co. Shánghái

Lancelot Dent, Europe. Thomas Chay Beale. John Bowman,

J. C. Smith,

Edward Webb,

J. S. Baptista,

} Amoy.

Dhunjeebhoy Framjee Casna, ca Dirom, Gray, & Có. Canton and Sh.

R. Dirom

England.

W. F. Gray, Canion. W. W. Dale, Skánghái D. Potter, absent

W. F. Hunter, } Bombay.

T. F. Gray.

C. Ryder, c

D. W. McKenzie,

G. Urmson, c

H. M. M. Gray,

D. D Lewin,

Så.

Bartholomeo A. Pereira.c

Dorabjee Pestonjee Patell. Can.

Pallanjee Dorabjee,

Dossabhoy & Co., P. & D. Can.

Dhunjeebhoy Dossabhoy,

Nowrojee Cursetjee, Dadabhoy Sorabjee,

Duddell, George, Auctioneer, Hong.

C. A. Freemantle,

R. Gutieres,

Daus N. & Co, Hong,

Nicolay Duus,

J. O. Barretto

Eduljee Framijer, Sona, & Co.

Dhunjeebhoy Eduljee,

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Dadabhoy Eduljee, Hormusjee Eduljee, Framjee Sapoorjee, Emeny, W. Hon.

Encarnaçao, A. L. d' Hon. Fischer & Co. Canton

Agent P. & O. Steam Nav. Co.

Maximilian Fischer,

Fletcher & Co., Hon.

Angus Fletcher, England. Duncan Fletcher, Hong. George Findlay,

Antonio M. Cortella, A. Campbell,

Fogg, H. & Co., Shánghái

H. Fogg.

Thomas J. Birdseye

H. W. Burdett, absent. Framjee Jamsetjee, Hon. Franklyn, W. H. Hong.

W. Revans,

H. Moore,

Fryer, A. H. & Co., Hongkong,

A. H. Fryer.

H. T. De Silver

Friend of China Newspaper, Hong.

John Carr, Editor,

Luiz M. be Azevedo, Antonio de Vidigal,

Gaskell, William, Solicitor, Hon.

H. J. Tarrant.

Gibb, Livingston & Co.

  Ca. Hongkong, 4 Shánghải. T. A. Gibb Eng.

W. P. Livingston, Can. John Skinner, Canton,

Thomas Jones, Hʊn.

John D. Gibb

Shanghai.

William Ellis,

Hon.

James M. Wright,

C

G. Gibb

Richard Aspinall,

R. B. Ullet,

Candido J. Ozorio.

A. Pinto,

C

ho

Gibbs, Richard Canton. absent

Gilman & Co.,

Canton

R. J. Gilman,

Aug R Hudson,

W. H. Vacher,

George de St Croix,

Gilman, Bowman & Co., Shánghái,

R. J. Gilınan c

A. Bowman,

J. Rusden Sh.

E. M. Smith.

Hall, Edward, Baker, Sh.

James Weatherley.

99**

Hargreaves & Co. Shanghai

William Thorburn

John L. Maclean.

Harton, William H.

Heard & Co. Augustine, Canton & Sh.

Augustine fleard, George B. Dixwell · John Heard, Joseph L. Roberts, J. 11. Everett, W. Gilbert, A. Heard jr. W. Comstock. P. Marquis C. A. Fearon,

}

Boston

W. N. Piccope 》 Shang. E. Deacon,

Herjeebhoy Rustomjee, Macao. Heerjeebhoy Ardaseer & Co. Can.

Heerjeebhoy Hormuzjee abs. Ardaseer Rustomjee,

Eduljee Cursetjee,

Aspendearjee Tamooljee,

Holgate, H., surgeon,

Sh.

Holliday, Wise & Co., Canton & Sk.

R. J. Farbridge. England, John Holliday, c John Wise, 3 absent

Charles Waters C Charles E. Batson Antonio dos Santos,,, Hongkong Register, newspaper.

Robert Strachan Proprietor. W. H. Mitchell, Editor,

James S. Dowell. Antonio H. Carvalho, Jozé H. Carvalho, C. D. Rozario,

Hongkong Dispensary. Jezuino da Roza Florencio de Souza,

Hongkong Club House,

Ninian Crawford, Sec.

Hormusjee Framjee & Co. Can

Rustomjee Byramjee, Dadabhoy Bazonjee,

Cursetjes Rustomjee Daver.

Pestonjee Dinshawjee,

Hubertson & Co. Shan

Geo. F. Hubertson.

David Sillur.

Hunt, Thomas Whampoa.

Henry L. Hepburn J. M. O. Lima. Hunter, James D. Canton. Iness, J. E. Hongkong, abs.

J. Carruthers.

Francisco de Sa.

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Jackson, Robert, Amoy

Richard Smith,

Jamieson, Edger, & Co. Hon and Ca.

Joseph F. Edger, Hong. G. Jamieson, Glasgow. John Gifford Calcutta.

Richard Rothwell, c R. B. Bherard, k

Jardine, Matheson & Co.

DO..

Hong, Canton, Amoy & Shanghai. Alexander Matheson, England. David Jardine, Hong. Joseph Jardine, Can

A. Grant Dallas, Shánghái.

A. C. Maclean, Hong kong.

M. A. Macleod,

C. F. Still,

J. B. Compton.

Albino P. da Silveira

Joze M. d'Outeiro J. A Barretto John C. Bowring, John A. Goddard, W. F. 8. Matheson. James Grant,

Floriano A. Rangel, Charles Will.

John B. Ross

John Currie,

Alexander Percival

ko

James Macandrew

John Wiliame

James Whittall

James Milne

John Thompson

Lewis, W. D. Conton.

Lindsay & Co. Hon, Sk and Canton.

H. H. Lindsay,

Crawford Kerr, Walter Davidson, W. Hogg,

F. Chapman, H. D. Margesson E. Dale G. F. Green, A. 1. Young A. G. Wiener Angelo Barradas, B. dos Remedios,

England,

Hong.

Lyall & Co. George, Hong.

George Lyall,

A. E. H. Campbell.

G. H. Head.

Mackenzie, Brothers & Co.

Kenneth R. Mackenzie, Charles D. Mackenzie,

Con

"

ko

sk

hong

ho

ko

McGregor, R. Auctioneer, Canton. MacEwen & Co. Hongkong

Alexander Wilson,

W. F. Ross.

- Mark wick, jr

Macvicar & Co., Hong, Sha, and Can.

John Macvicar,

D. L. Burn

Gilbert Smith,

Thomas D. Neave,

England,

W. C. Le Geyt. England

H. H. Kennedy,

W. W. Brown,

Ska

C

Amoy

T. C. Piccope, Julius Saur,

Sk

Johnston, Alexander, Shan.

A. Holtz,

Kennedy, Macgregor, & Co. Can.

David Kennedy,

Alexander C. Macgregor, Europe. George C. Bruce, absent

C. A. Koch,

Kenny, B. D. Surgeon, Canton.

Florencio do Rozario,

Kirk & Irons Shanghai Dispensary.

Thomas Kirk,

James Irons,

W. Locke,

Lewis Helbling,

John Ferguson,

G. J. Bennetts,

H Murray,

Joaquim de Campos P. Grandpré,

Man & Co. James L. Canton,

James L. Man.

Markwick, Charles

C

sh

ca

ko

ko

Government Auctioneer, Hong W. F. de Cruz

Meadows, Johu A. T. Canton,

Lapraik, Douglas, Watchmaker, Hong. Millar, John, ca

Donald Just,

G. 8. Just,

G. Napier,

Limjée Jamsetjer & Co. ca

  Limjee Jameetjee absent. Jalbhoy Cursetjee,

  Rustomjee Merwanjee Nalear. Rustomjee Jalbhoy,

Muncherjee Jevunjee Mehta.

Miller, John, Sk

Morrison, John G.

ko

Morison, William, Surgeon, Hon.

Moses, A. R. B. Can.

Moul & Co. Henry, Canton

Henry Moul,

Alfred Moul,

George Moul,

Murray, John Ivor, Surgeon, Wusung.

Digitized by

Google

*

Murrow, Y. J

Murphy, M,

L. E. Murrow,

100

hon

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer Bhanjah & Co. Nesserwanjo Arduweer B. absent Jamsetjee Eduljes,

Hormusjee Jamasjee Nadershaw, Manackjer Pestonjee Taback, Nesserwanjee Hor. Nadershaw, Nesserwanjee Byramjee Fackerajee,

Aspenderjee Nesserwanjec, Burjorjee Rustomjee, Dadabbey D. Lalosca,

Noor Mohamed Dhatoobhoy, & Co.,

Khan Mohamed Dhaťoobhoy. Mulloobhoy Dhongerny

Noronha, D. Printer, Hon.

Antonio Fonceca,

Nye, Parkin, ♣ Co. Canton,

Gideon Nye, jr. New York. W. W. Parkin Clement D. Nye,

Olding, J. A.

Timothy Durrell, J. P. Van Loffeh,

E. C. H. Nye,

T. Pyke,

Francisco A. Seabra.

Agent P. & O. 3. N. Cv. Hon. W. R. Roone,

Olyphant & Co.

W. H. Morss,

R. P. Dana,

F. A. King,

W. Q. Bokee,

David O. King, N. T. da Costa,

Oriental Bank, Hong. Can. & Sh.

C. J. F. Stewart,

ko

Samuel Gray,

C

B. E. Hancock,

ca

Archibald Dunlop,

sh

P. Campbell,

Aa

Fred. Tozer.

Jozé M. de Noronha.

Parker, Norcott d'E. absent

William d'E. Parker,

Solicitor and Notary Public, Hon.

E. H. Pollard,

J. dos Remedios,

Perkins & Anderson, Shipwrights ko

D. O. Brown,

Pestonjee, D. P. & M. Ca.

Dadabhoy Pestonjec,

Maneckjee Pestonjee absent,

Pestonjee Framjee Cama & Co. Ca. Sh.

Manackjee Nanabhoy,

D. F. Camjer,

Bomanjee Muncherjee, Cowasjee Pestonjee, Framjee Eduljee,

Bapoojee Pallanjee Runjee, Dhunjeebhoy Mancherjee, Cursetjer Rustomjee Eranee, Nowrojee Nesserwanjec, sh Phillips, Moore & Co. Hong

J. Phillips Eon, E. Caben, Cohen,

Adolphus Lewis. Sh

Pustau & Co. Canton and Hon

William Pustaw,

8. Delerie, A

C. Brodersen,

Rathbones, Worthington & Co. C & S.

William Rathbones,

S. R. Rathbones,

Eng.

James Worthington, Can.

Thomas Moncrieff, Sh.

F. Duval, æðṣont

G. Dent, c

H. R. Hardie, c C. Maltby, Sh. W. Broughall, R.

Rawle, Drinker & CJ. Hongkong,

. B. Rawle, Sandwith Drinker,

S. P. Goodale,

J. Armstrong, D. L. Proctor,

A. Farquhar,

C. V. Menneeker,

Reiss & Co. Shẩn and Conton.

M. Sichel, Canton,

James Withington M.

S. Mackenzie, ca A. Finchain s

W. Potter, s Thomas Everard, e

Rémi, D, Watchmaker, Sh.

B. Edan,

A. Bidet,

Reynvaan & Co. Canton,

H. G. I. Reynvaæn,

Henrique Hyndman,

Richards, P. F. Storekeeper, sh James Mackenzie,

D. Charnley,

Rickett, John, Hon.

1

Ripley & Co., Thomas, Iken.

Thomas Ripley, England. Charley Shaw,

J. H. Winch

W. Shaw,

`Ripley, Smith, & Co. Conton.

Timothy Smith, England -

F:

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Philip W. Ripley, H. H. Smith, Robert Ellice,

Ritchie & Co. A. A., Canton.

A. A. Ritchie, Henry M. Olmsted, J. Manuel Mor, Charles Platt,

Russell & Co. Can & Sk.

Paul 8. Forbes

R. B. Forbes,

abs.

John N. A. Griswold. Sh.

E. A. Low,

R. 8. Sturgis,

E. Cunningham,

8. J. Hallam,

F. Reiche,

Segismundo Rangel,

Jayme Rangel,

C. W. Spooner,

James Crampton, 》 Sk.

P. W. Graves,

Rutherfurd, Robert, Hon.

J. C. V. Ribiero

Ruttonjee H. Camajee & Co. Can.

R. H. Camajee, Bom.

101

Dosbhoy Hormusjee Camajes,

Dorabjee Framjee Colah,

Nowrojee Cursetjee Liboovala,

Ruttunjee, R. & D. Canton,

Rustomjee Ruttonjee, Dhunjeebloy Ruttonjee, Jamsetjee Ruttunjee,

Schwemann, & Co, Canton,

1). W. Schwemann,

William Dreyer,

Scott & Co, William, Hon.

William Scott,

Adam Scott.

C. A. Ozorio jr.

Seare & Co, Benjamin, Mucao, Benjamin Seare,

Shircore and Mackertoom, Ca.

W. 8. Shircore Calcutta. M. 8. Mackertoom,

Siemanen, G. T. Canton,

Billar, Brothers. Sk

David Sillar,

John C. Sillar,

Smith, John, Macao.

H. Marçal.

J. Barradas.

Smith & Brimelow, Hon.

James Smith,

James W. Brimelow, L. F. Viera, Geoage Buchan,

Smith, J. Mackrill, Sh.

James Hooper.

8t. Croix, N. de, Canton. Stevens, D. Hon.

Stewart, Patrick, Macao,

Agent Hong, & Canton Št. Pkt.. Co. Strachan, George, sk Strachan, Robert, Hon. Sturgis, James P. Macao, Sykes, Schwabe & Co. Sh.

Benjamin Butlér, Manila,

Adam Syken, Shángkái, abs. Gustav C. Schwabe, Liverpool.

Andrew Connolly,

Edward Burton,

sh

Syme, Muir & Co. Hong 4 mong.

F. D. Syme, Eng.

J. D. Muir, Amoy, F. G. Angier.

R. C. Wilson

L. A. Rozario,

Sword, Purdon & Co. Canton,

John D. Sword,

James Purdon,

Edwin Houston.

Tait, James, Amoy

C. W. Bradley,

Jacinto Royos,

Epean J. Mackay.

Ao

Am.

ho

Turner & Co., Hongkong, Can. & Sh.

Thomas W. L. Mackean,

Patrick Dudgeon,

John Stewart,

ho

Eng.

Alexander McCulloch, Shan.

John H. Cannan

R. F. Thorbura,

J. Scarth,

E. N. Snow,

Sk

Shang,

Ao

W. Walkinshaw, Can.

W. Hutchinson,

ho

Manuel V. Marques, ko

M. de Carvalho, Can.

Vaucher, Frita, Canton,

Constant Borel.

Viegas A., Canton

1.. F. Viegas,

Warden, H. H. Canton,

Watson, T. Boswell, Surgeon, Macao,

Francisco Soares,

Antonio de Eça.

Watson & Co. Sh.

J. P. Watson,

A. Thorne,

Weiss, Charles, Hongkong,

F. Kupferschmidt.

Wetmore & Co. Canton & Shang.

S. Wetmore, jr. absent. William Moore, absent G. H. Lamson,

15

Digitized by

Google

O. E. Roberts,

Henry Davis, Thomas Gittins, S. H. Farnham, John B. Goodridge, Sam. Robinson,

M. Simoens,

R. Powell Saul, Shanghái. J. Wilks. jr.

White, James & Co. Shan

.102

James White,

H. Lind, absent

Wilkinson & Sanders, Canton.

Alfred Wilkinson,

Charles Sanders, absent.

Wolcott, Bates & Co. Sh.

Henry G. Wolcott,

Edwards W. Bates, absent,

F. D. Williams,

D. O. Clark,

List of Foreign Residents in China.

Errors will doubtless be found in the following list of names, but it is hoped they are not very numerous; it has been difficult to ascertain the names of those who reside afloat af the various anchorages, and many of them are pro- bably omitted. The difficulty of making the list complete increases from year to year.

Abbreviations--Ca stands for Canton; wh for Whampoa ; ma for Macao ; ho for Hongkong; am for Amoy ; fu for Fuhchau; ni for Ningpo; sh for Shăng- hii; p. c. and p. s. attached to a few names denote that they are police consta- bles and police sergeants at Hongkong.

A rmstrong, H. lieut 95th

Aroné, Jacques

ho

Abdolvayad Mohmed, Abdola Moladina

ca

ca

Adams, Charles R

ca

Aspenderjee Nesserwanjee

Adamson, WR

sh

Aspinall, Richard

Aderjee Sapoorjee

ca

Aguilar, Jozé de'

ma

Ayub Ebrahim,

Ahmed Isaac

ca

Ainslie, Richard

P

C

ho

Alcock, R. and family

sh

Backhouse, John

Alexander, WH

Alla Bux Dosunjee

ho

Ca

Ball, Rev. Dyer, and family,

Allanson, William and family ma

Aspundearjee Tamooljee

Azevedo, Felis H. de and fam. ho

Azevedo, Luiz M de

Balfour, Doct. A H. and fam. ho

Ballard, Samuel and fam.

sh

ca

sh

ca

ca

ho

am

ca

ho

Allureka Versey,

ca

Bankier, Dr.

bo

Almeida, Lino de

ma

Bapoojee Pallanjee Runjee

ca

Ambrose, Rev. Lewis

ho

Baptista, J S

sh

Ameeroodeen Abdool Latiff

ca

Barnes, D J

ho

Anderson, Charles

ho

Barnet, George

ca

Anderson, D

ho

Barnet, William

ca

Anderson

ho

Barradas, M

ho

Angier, F I

ho

Barradas, Francisco

ho

Anthon, Joseph Cabs.

ho

Barradas, Vicente F

ho

Anthon, H.

ho

Barradas, Angelo

ho

Appleton, S

ho

Barros, Jozé Vicente

ca

Aquino, Maximiliano J. d'

Ca

Barretto, B A

ho

Ardaseer Nesserwanjee Mody. ca Ardaseer Rustomjee

Armstrong J.

Barretto, J. O.

ho

ca ho

Barry, James

P. C.

ho

Barton, Ch

ho

Digitized by

Google

103

Bateson, Charles E Baylies, Nicholas Beale, Thomas Chay Bellamy, Capt. Bennets, G

Bevan, W. F.

Bidét, A

Bimjee Canjee

Binjamin Eliah

Bird, Alexander

Birdseye, T. J.

Birley, FB and fam

Biscoe, Major V. J.

Bland, J

Blight, John A

Block, Frederick H

Bokbe, William O

Bomanjee Muncherjee

Booker, Frederic

11484248374324228382 483 462220CU¤¤82 32

ho

ca

·

Buffa Rev.

ho

Bunn, R. Qirmast. Ceylon Rfles ho

Burd, John

ho

Bargoyne, George

ho

Burgoyne, William

ho

ho

Burke, W.

ho

Burjarjee Eduljee

Burjorjee Rustomjee

Burjarjee Borabjee

Burley, A J

مط

sh

Burns, Rev. William C.

ho

Burton, Edward

sh

ho

Butt, John

ca

Bush, F. T. and family

ho

ho

Byramjee Coverjoe

ho

Byramjee Rustomjee

ca

Calder, Alexander

wh

ca

ho

Bovet, Louis

Bovet, Fritz

Ca

Bowman, Adam

wh

Bowman, John

Bowra, Charles W.

ho

Bowra, William A. abs.

ho

Carvalho, L. and fam

Bowring, John, LL. D.

ca

Boxer, W.

Carvalho, M. de

ho

Bradley, Charles W.

Carvalho, José H

LL. D

Carvalho, Antonio H

Bradshaw, James

am

Braga, João Roza

Castro, L d'Almado e

ho

Braga, Manoel Rozá

ho

Cay, R Dundas

Braine, Charles J and family

Brice, Dr.

Chalmers, Patrick

sh

Castro, J. M. d'Almado e abs

Ceballos, Juan A Lopez de

Champion Captain 95th Chapman, F

Bonham, H.E. Samuel G & fam ho

Bonney, 8 W.

Boob, J

    Boone, Rt. Rev. W. J. and fam sh Borel, Constant

Botelho, Alberto

Boughry, and fim., Major 59th ho

Bounárd, Rev Louis

Bovet, Edouard

Campbell, Archibald and fam

Campbell, P

Cannan, John H

| Carew, J. H. Captain 95th

Carlowitz, Richard

Carpenter, Rev. C and family sh Carr, John

Carruthers, John and fam.

Carter, Augustus and family Cartwright, H D

Caine, Hon. major William

Caldas, Joaquim P

Caldwell, Daniel R.

Cameron, J

Campbell, A. E. H.

Campos, Jaoquim de

4222222222842221)

ho

ho

ho

ho

Bridgman, E. C. D. D. and fam

Bridgman, Rev. James G

Brimelow, James W

Britto, Jozé de

Brodersen, C.

Brooks, J. A. and fam.

Broughall, William

Brown, Antonio, Tavern keeper ho

Brown, D O

Brown, W. Ward Browne, Robert Browning, W. R.

Bruce, George C. abs. Buchan, George Buckler, William Buckton, Charles

17 8 2 2 8 2 722 8 8 7 3 2 8 7

Chapman, Ensign 95th.

ho

ho

Charlton, Lt. 96th.

ho

Charnley, D

ho

Chinnery, George

ma

Chomley, Francis C

he

Churcher, John E.

ho

bo

Clark, D O

Clarke, Dr. Medical Staff.

Cleland, Rev. John F. & fam.

Clement, C. T., Lt. Cøy. Rifles, ho

Cleverley, C St. George

Cleverley, Capṭwin

ho

ho

ho

Clifton, Samuel and fam

ho

.ho

Cole, Richard, and fam.

ho

ca

Digitized by

Google

Collins, J

ho

Collins Mrs. and fam.

ho

Comelate, J. G.

ho

Compton, Charles 8

ca

104'

De Sa, Francisco

De i va, Manoel, P. S.

ho

ho

22

De Silva, F. P. and family. ho

De Silver, R. P.

ma

Compton, J B

ho

De Silver, H. T.

ho

Compton, Spencer

ກ້ວ

Deacon, É

sh

Comstock, W

ca

Dean, Rev. William

ho

Comstock, W. O.-

ca

Dearle, J.

ho

Connolly, A

sh

Delaney, Thomas

ho

Cooke, John

wh

Delevie, S

ho

Cooverjee Bomanjee

sh

Dennis, Captn. J. Fitz G.

ho

Cordeiro, Albanio A.

ho

Dent, George

ca

Cortella, Antonio M

ho

Dent, John

CA

Costa, N. T. da

ca

Dent, Wilkinson

abs

ho

Coulter, M. 8. and fam.

ni

Dent, William

ho

Cowan, Francis, P. C.

ho

Dhunjeebhoy Dossabhoy

ca

Cowasjee Pestonjee,

ca

Dhunjeebhoy Ruttunjee

ca

Cowasjee Pallanjee,

ca

Dhunjeebhoy Muncherjee

ca

Cowasjee Sapoorjee Lungrana

ca

Dhunjeebhoy Hormujee Hak.

ca

Cowper, J. C.

wh

Dhunjeebhoy Eduljee

си

Crakanthorpe, R H

ho

Dickson, Henry

ho

Crampton, J

sh

Dickson, Dr. Med. Staff.

ho

Crawford, Ninian · ·

ho

Dildarkhan Goolabkhan,

ca

Creevy, Wm.,

P. S.

ho

Dinshaw Merwanjee,

ca

Crook, James

ho

Dinshawjee Framjee Casna

ca

Croom, A F and fam

sh

Dimier, C.

ca

Cruz, C. de

ca

Dixson, Aadrew S

са

Cruz, W F de

ho

ca

Cruz, F F de

ca

са

Da Costa, M. D. Tavern Keeper ho

Dadabhoy Burjorjee

ca

Dadabhoy Eduljee

ca

Dadabhoy D. Talcaca

Dadabhoy Bazonjee

C&

Dadabhoy Pestonjee

ca

Dadabhoy Jamsetjee Dulackow ca

Dady, William

ho

Culbertson, Rev. M S and fam ni

Cumerally Rumzanally

Cumoorden Meerjee

Cunningham, Edward Currie, John

Cursetjee Eduljee

ca

ca

ca

ho

ca

Cursetjee Jamsetjee Botiwala ca Cursetjee Rustomjee Eranee ca Cursetjee Rustomjee Daver ca Cursetjee Shavuxshaw

ca

Dorabjee Framjee Colah

Dorabjee Pestonjee, Patell

sh

Dorabjee Nesserwanjee Cama. ca Dos Remedios, J. J. and fam. ho Dossabhoy Hormusjee, Dossabhoy Framjee Camajee Dossabhoy Hormusjee Camajeo ca Dossabhoy Bajonjee

Doty, Rev. Elihu and fam Dowdall, Lt. Adjt. 95th

ca

ca

am

ho

ho

ho

ca

ho

ma

ho

ho

sh

ma

ca

Dowell, J. S.

Drake, Francis C.

Dreyer, William

Drinker, Sandwith, and fam.

Du Chesne, Henri

Duddell, George

Dudgeon, P

Dunlop, Archibald

Durran, J. A.

Durrell, Timothy J

Dale, E

ca

Duus, N. and family

Dale, Thurstan

ho

Duval, Frank

abs

Dale, W W and family

sh

Eaton, E. B.

Dallas, A Grant

Dalziel, W, R

ho

Dana, Richard P

ca

Edan, B

Davidson, Walter

ho

Davidson, William

ni

Davis, H. E. John W.

Davis, Henry

ca

Ca

De Montmorency Lieut 95th

ho

Ebrahim Shaik Hoosen

Ebrahim Soomar,

Edger, Joseph F. and fam Edkins, Rev. Joseph

Eduljee Fudoonjee Khambata Eduljee Cursetjee,

Eichbaine, C. W.

ho

ca

ho

ca

ca

1 8 2 0 8 7 248 2

sh

ho

sh

ho

Digitized by

Google

      Eleazer Abraham Ellice, Robert

ca

Ellis, William

ho

Elmalie, Adam W.

ca

105

Gibb, John D Gibb, George Gibbs, Richard Gibson, E

ca

abs

ca

Elquist, Rev. A.

ho

Gilbert, W

Emeny, W. and fam.

ho

Giles, Edward F. abe

Encarnacao, Antonio L. d'

ho

Giles, John

Encarnaçað, A. A. d'

ca

Endicott, J. B.

cum

Everett, J. H.

Gillespie, Rev. William

Everard, Thomas

CA

Gilfillan, Rev. Thomas

Gillespie, Robert P. C.

Gilman, Richard J

ca

ho

ca

Ewing, R. and fam

ca

Gingell, W. R.

fu

Eyre, lieut.-col. R. A.

ho

Girard, Rev. Prudence

ho

Fagan, J. W.

ho

Gittins, Thomas

ca

Farnham, 8 H

co

Goodale, Samuel P

ho

Fazul Goolam Hoosain abs

ca

Goddard, John A

ho

Fazul Dumany,

Goddard, Rev. Jos. T & fam

ni

Fearon, Charles A.

sh

Goodings, Robt. and fam.

Feliciani, Rev. F. A.

bo

Goodridge, John B

Feneran, Lt. 95th.

ho

Goolam Hoosain Ebrahimjee,

Fenouil, Rev. John

ho

Fergusson, Doct. Andrew

ho

Fergusson, John

ho

Fincham, A.

sh

Gordon, Francis

Gordon, H. G. Ass. Surg. 95th ho

Goolam Hoosam Chandoo,

Gorringer, Asst. Surgeon 59th ho

P.C.

Findlay, George

ho

Gordon Surgeon 95th.

Fischer, Maximilian, and fam.

ca

Grandpré, A

Fisher Captn. Royal Artillery ho Fitzpatrick, John

Fletcher, Duncan

.

Graves, Pierce W

ma

Gray, Samuel

Fogg, H.

Fonceca, Antonio de

Fonceca, Athanasio A. de

Forbes, R. B.

Forcade, Rt. Rev.T. A.

Ford, Theo 8.

8428328

ho

Gray, W F

Greaney, J. P. C.

ho

Green, G F

ho

Grey, H M M

ca

Griswold, John N. Alsop

12 3 5 322222400244ƒ

ho

ca

Ca

ho

ho

ho

sh

ho

Gutierres, A

ho

ho

Gutierres, Candido

ho

Forster, H. Lieut. 96th

ho

Gutierres, Rufino

ho

Forth-Rouen, Alexandre & fam ma

Gutierres, Venancio

ho

Fox, John 8

ho

Gutierres, Querino

ca

Framjee Sapoorjee Lungrana

Framjee Jamsetjee

Framjee Eduljee

sh ho

Gutierres, Candido

ho

Gutzlaff, Rev. Charles

abs ho

Hague, Patrick

ni

Framjee Sapoorjee

Framjee Burjorjee

Franklyn, W H

Frazer, L. 95th.

Freemantle, Edmund A

French, Rev. John B

Fryer, A H

Fryer, W

Garvine, Henry

Fuller, Captain 59th Furst, Rev. C. 1. Fysk, William W.

    Gangjee Goolam Hoosain Garchi, Giovanni

Garcon, Joao Braz

Gaskell, W.

Genaehr, Rev. Ferdinand

am

8862228 2222 § 322222

ho

Hale, F. H.

ho

Ca

Hajee Elies Hussan,

ca Hall, Edward

Hall, Capt. of steamer Spark

ho

Hall, G. R. abs

Hallam, 8. J.

ca

ho

Hamberg, Rev. Theodore

ho

Hance, H F

ho

ho

Hancock, B E

ca

ho

Happer, Rev. A. P. and family ca

Hardie, H. R.

CA

Hare, J.

ho

Harkort, Bernhard

abs

ca

ho

Harland, Doct W. A.

ho

ho

Harris, George

ho

ho

Harton, W. H.

CR

ho

Harvey, F. E.

ho.

Digitized by

Google

Haskell G. E. Head, C. H. Heard, Jolm

Heard, jr. Angustine

Heerjeebbay Hormusjee abs

22083

Heerjeebeoy Rustomjer

Helbling, L.

106

Jamšëtjee Rustomjee Eranee, Jambetjee Ruttunjee

Jamsetjee Eduljee,

Jardine, Joseph

Jardifte, David

Jarroth, Rey. W.

Jehangeer Framjee Buxey

Ca

ca

Ca

ho

ni

Helm, Henry

Jenkins, Rev. B. and frim.

Henning, Robert

ho

Jeraz Munjee

Hepburn, Henry L.

wh

Johnson, Rev. John

ho

Herschberg, Doct. H. J.

ho

Johnson, Rev. S. and fath,

fa

Hertelet FL and fam

am

Johnston, A.

Hickson, W. D.

ho

Johnston, Hon. A. R.

Hill, and fam. P. C.

Jones, Thomas

ho

Hill, N. of Str. "

Hongkong

ho

Jones, Lieut. Royal Art.

ho

Hillier, Charles B and fam

ho

Josephs, Levin

ća

Hisslop, James, M. D. and fam um

Just, G. 8.

ho

Hobson, B. M. ". and family

Ca

Just, R.

ho

Hobson, Rev. Wm. and fam

sh

Juntttoojee Nesserwaħjee

Hogg, William,

| Jesus, L J de,

ca

Holdforth, C G

Kakeebhoy Bahadérbhby,

ca

Holgate, H.

Kennedy, David

ca

Holiday, John, and family

ca

Kennedy, Henry H.

sh

Holt, W. Quartr. Master 95th, he

Kennedy, K. M.

ho

Holtz, Andrea

sh

Kenny, B Doct and family

ca

Home, Dr. W. Med. Staff.

ho

Khan Mohamed Habibhoy abs cu

Hooper, James

sh

Khan Mohamed Datoobhoy

ca

Hormusjee Cowasjee

Hormusjee Eduljee

ca

King, William H.

Hormasjee Jamasjee Nadershaw ca

King, F. A.

Hormasjee Nesser. Pochajee

ca

Houston, Edwin

ea

Hubertson, G. P.

sh

Kirk, Thomas

Hudson, Aug. R.

ca

Khumooredeen Nuverally,

King, David O.

King, and fath. Lieut 59th

Kleskowski, M do

ca

Hudson, Joseph

ni

Koch, C. A.

Hudson, J.

ho

Kreyenhagen, Julius

Hudson, Rev. T. H.

ni

Kupferschmidt, P

Hulme, Hon. John W. and fam, ho

Lamson, George H

ca

Hurst, Wm.

ho

Lança, È L

ho

Hutchinson Wm.

ho

Lapraik, Douglas

ho

Huttleston, J. Thomas

sh

Layton, Temple H and fam

Humphreys, Alfred abs.

ho

Layton, F A

Hunt, T.

wh

Lecaroz, Juan

ma

Hunter, James D

Lechler, Rev Rudolph

ho

Hurjee Jamal

Hyland, T

ho

Lena, Alexander

Hyndman, Henrique

es

Leslio, W.

Hyndman, Jous

ho

Legge, Rev. James, " " & fam ho

Leslie Lt. J. A. Ceylon Rißer ho

abs ho

he

Howell, W. H.

Levin, E H

Irons, James

sh

Lewer, Dr.

Isane Reuben

sh

Lewin, D D

Jacob Hassan

ca

Lewis, A.

Jackson, Robert

Jacob Reubin

Jackson, R. B and family

Jackson, Robert

Jalbkoy Cursetjee,

R

Jamieson, T of str. "Canton "ho

Lewis, W D

Ca

fu

Lexis, William.

P. C.

ho

dm

Libois, Rev Napoleon F.

ca

P. C.

ho

Liddall, E.

Lima, J. M. O.

Limjee Jamsétjes.

ho

wh

Digitized by

Google

Livingston, W P

Livingston, J Gibbons

Lobscheid, Bev. Wilhelm Locke, W.

ho

Lockhart, William and family sh Loomis, Rev. George

Lord, Rev. E. C. and family Low, Edward A.

107

McDonald, & Mount T. Keeper. ho McDonald, J. Bourding Hous, họ MacDonald, J.

sh

McFarlane, J. Tavern Keeper ho

McGregor Dr.

McKenzie, C. W.

ho

ea

McKenzie, Robert

P. S.

ho

Mc Mahon, Rev. Felix

ho

Luce, William H.

Mc8wyney, P. C.

ho

Ludda Chatoor,

Ludda Kakey

Lugg, J. L. Royal Artillery.

ho

ho

R.

Mackenzie, C. D.

Mackenzie, 8.

     Mackertoom, M. 8. Maclachlan, J. E.

Maclchose, James

Maclean, A. C.

Maclean, J. L

Macleod, M. A.

Maloobhoy Donghersse Maltby, Charles

Man, James Lawrence

Maneckjee Bomanjce Maneckjee Nanabhoy

Maneckjee Pestonjee Taback

Mohamed Ally Motabhoy

Margesson, H. D.

3244 7 8 9 2 8778832278 ± 4 3 1 3 3 8 8 8

ho

Lyall, George

Lyons, Alexr. Tavern keeper Macandrew, J. Maoculloch, Alex.

Macgowan, D. J., x. D. & fam ni Macgregor, R. Mackay, Eneas J.

Mackean, Thomas W. L. & fam ho Mackenzie, D. W.

Mackenzie, Kenneth

Meade, J. Lt. Ceylon Rifes

Medhurst, W H. D. D. & fam, sh

Medhurst, jr, W. H.

Meer Sasson Moshu

Mello, A. A. de

Melvon John P. C.

ho

ho

ho

ca

ho

Meadows, Thomas T.

Meadows, John A. N.

Melrose, W

Mennecker C V

Mercer, Hon. W T

John

Milne, James

Minchin, Capto. 95th

Minchin, Lieut. 95th.

Merwanjee Dadabhoy

Mervanjee Dadabhoy Wadia CA

Merwanjee Eduljee,

Meufing, W. A.

Michaelroy

-

P. C.

Middleton, & John fam.

ho

Millar

ho

ma

ho

Millar 2d T. Lt. Ceylon Rifles. Ho

Millar, John

Miller, Dr

Miller,

am

Milne, Rev. W. C. and family sh

Mitchell J.

ho

ho

ho

Mitchell, William H. and fam ho

Mitchell George P. C.

ho

ho

33447118223332

Maneckjee Pestonjee

Mitchell, E R

ho

ho

Marçal, Honorio A.

ma

Mitton, Thos

bo

Marjoribanks Doct. Samuel

Mohamed Pudmey Muscates,

ca

Markwick, Charles

ho

Moladina Noorhahmed

Markwick, Jr.

ho

Moncrieff, Thomas

Marques, D P

CB

Monicou, Pierre

ho

Marques, F F

ca

Montigny, M. de

Marques, José M.

me

Moore, H

ho

Marques, Manoel V.

ho

Moore, William

abs

ca

Marsh, W T

ho

Moosah Hassam

ca

Marshall 8. (Sherif's Officer)

họ

Mas, H. E Don Sinibaldo de

ma

Morgan, Edward

ho

Morison, William, M. D.

and fum ho

Matheson, W. F. 8.

ho

Morris Mrs.

ho

Matheson, C. 8.

sb

Morrison, John G

ho

Mathews, I. H. and fam.

ho

Morrison, Martin C

am

Maveety, J. (Tavern Keeper)

ho

Morrison, George 8

ho

Maxwell, Lt. 96th.

bo

Morrison, W.

ho

May, C and fam

ho

Moras, W. H.

Ca

McCartee x. D,

D. B.

Moses, A. R. B.

ca

McClatchie, Rev. T. and fam sh

Moul, Alfred

Digitized by Google

ho

ho

Noor Mohamed Kamal

ca

Noor Mohamed Datoobhoy,

ca

ho

108

Moul, George Moul, Henry Muir, J. D.

Muirhead, Rev. W. and family sh

Muncherjee Sapoorjee Lung.

ca

Pedder, heut. William

ho

ca

Peerbhoy Yacoob

ca

am

Penrose, Wm. Tavern Keeper. ho

Percival, A.

ho

ca

Pereira, Ignacio de A

ho

Muncherjee Jevunjee Mehta

ca

Pereira, Edward

ho

Muncherjee Nesserwanjee,

ca

Pereira, J. Lourenco

ca

Muncherjee Frammurjee,

ca

Pereira, B. A.

Ca

Mur, J Manuel

ca

Pereira, Manoel L. R.

ho

Murray, John (vor, M. D. wusung

Murray, H

ca

Murrow, Y J

ho

Murrow, L. E.

ca

Mylius, Capt. R. Ceylon Rifles. ho

Nanjee Sah Mohamed

ca

Nanjee Yacoob

ca

Napier, Charles

ho

Phillips, Robt.

Napier, Hon. G

abs

ho

Phillips, J

Neave, Thomas D.

ho

Perkins, George and fam Perkins, George

"

Pestonjee Dinshawjee

Pestonjee Framjee Cama

Pestonjee Jamsetjee Motiwalla ca

Pestonjee Nowrojee Pochajee ca Pestonjee Rustomjee

Phillpotts, lieut-col. G. and fam ho

ho

CL(r)

ca

Ca

ca

ho

ho

Nesserwanjee Byramjee Fack.. ca Nesserwanjee Framjee,

Nesserwanjee Ardaseer Bhanja ca Nesserwanjee Bomanjee Mody ca Nasserwanjee Hormusjee N. ca Newman, G. W.

Newton, J. Surgeon C. Rifles Niel, R. & fam. Albion House

Noronha, Jozé M. de

ho

Pitcher, M. W. Platt, Charles Pollard, E. H.

Phillpotts, lieut. H.

ca

Piccope, W. N.

Piccope, T. C.

Pierce, Wm G

ho

sh

ho

.ca

ca

CE

ho

Ponder, Stephen

ca

Potter, M. L.

Potter, W.

Potter, D. abs

sh

Noronha, D.

ho

Powell, Dr.

ho

Norton, W. M.

ho

Power, J. C. and fam

ho

Nowrojee Cursetjee,

ca

Prattent, J. R

ho

Nowrojee Nesserwanjee

sh

Priestman, C. J.

am

Nowrojee Maneckjee Lungrana ca

Purdon, James

Ca

Noyes, C. H.

ho

Pustau, William

CL

Nye, Clement D.

ca

Pyke, Thomas

ca

Nye, E. C. H.

ca

Quarterman, Rev. J. W.

ni

Oakley,

Horace

ca

Quin, M

ho

Olding, J. A.

ho

Quin, James

ho

Oliveira, J. J. ď'

ca

Rains, Lieut. 95th.

ho

Olmsted, Henry M.

ca

Rangel, Segismundo

ca

Outeiro, Joze M. d'

Ko

Rangel, R.

ho

Ozorio, Candido J.

ca

Rangel, Jayme

CA

Pages, Leon

ma

Rangel, Floriano A.

ho

Pallanjee Dorabjee,

ma

Rankin, Rev. H. V. and fam.

ni

Pallanjee Dorabjee Lalcaca

ca

Pallanjee Nesserwanjee

ca

Rawle, S. B. and family

Parish, Frank

sh

Park, James Dickson

ca

Parker, Norcott d'E abs

ho

Reid, Frank W

Parker, W d'Esterre

ho

Parker, Capt. P.

ho

Rathbone, William

Rawson, Samuel, and family Reiche, F.

Reine, P. B. Major C. Rifles

Remedios, J. B. dos .

ca

ho

Ca

Ca

am

ho

ca

Parker, Rev. P., M. D. and fam ca

Rémi, D.

sh

Parkes, H. S abs

sh

Reynvaan, H. G. I.

ca

Parkin, W. W.

ca

Ribeiro, J. C. V.

ho:

Pearson G. Lt. Ceylon Rifles. ho Pedder, W. H.

Richards, P. F.

ch

am

Rickett. John, and family

ho

Digitized by

Google

109

Richards, Rev. William L.

fu

Saur, Julius, and family

Rienecker, R

ho

Scarth, John

sh

Ripley, Philip W. and family

ca

Schumacher, G. A.

ho

Risk, J.

ho

Schwemann, D. W.

ca

Ritchie, A. A.

ca

Scott, William

ho

Ritchie, John Tavern Keeper.

ho

Scott, Adam

ho

Rizios, A

ho

Scrymgeour, David

ho

Rizzolati, Rev. Joseph

ho

Seabra, Francisco A.

ca

Roberts, Rev. 1. J.

abs

ca

Seare, Benjamin and family

ma

Roberts, Joseph L.

ca

Sedick Omar

co

Roberts, O. E.

ca

Seth, 9. A.

ca

Robertson, D. B.

sh

Shaikally Mearally

ca

Robertson, George

bo

Shaik Tayeb Furjoolabhoy

ca

Robinson, William F.

sh

Shaik Davood

ca

Rocha, Jozé J.

ho

Shaik Ahmed

ca

Rodrick, Anthony

ho

Shaw, Charles

sh

Roiner, Henry

P. C.

ho

Shaw, W.

sh

Romthala Ameer

ca

Sherard, R. B.

ho

Romthala Versoy,

ca

Shortrede, Andrew

bo

Roose, William R.

ho

Shuck, Rev. J. L. and family sh

Ross, J. B.

sh

Sichel, M.

ca

Ross, W. F.

ho

Siemssen, G. T.

c3

Rothwell, Richard

ca

Sillar, John C.

sh

Rowe, John

wh

Sillar, D.

sh

Rowe, J. R.

am

Silva, Marciano da

Royos, Jacinto

am

Silva, Jozé M.

ho

Roza, Jezuino da

ho

Silva, Quentiliano da

ca

Rozario, Florencio do

ca

Silva, Ignacio M. da

ma

Rozario, L. A.

ho

Silveira, F C P de

مط

Rozario, C. E.

ho

Silviera, Albino de

ca

Rusden, J.

ch

Silviera, Albino P.

ho

Russell George

P. C.

bo

Simoens, Manoel

ca

Russell, Rev. W. A..

Di

Sinclair, Fraser

ca

Rustomjee Burjorjee,

C&

Sinclair, C. A.

ni

Rustomjee Byramjee,

co

Skinner, John

ca

Rustomjee Jalbhoy

ca

Smelt, C. T. 2d Lt. C. Rifles

ho

Rustomjee Merwanjee Nalear. ca

Smith, Dr.

wh

Rustomjee Pestonjee C.

CA

Smith, John and family

h

Rustomjee Pestonjee Motiwalla ca

Smith, Arthur

Ca

Rustomjee Ruttonjee,

ca

Smith, E M

sh

Rustomjee Framjee Mehta

ca

Smith, James

ho

Rutherfurd, Robert

ho

Smith, J. Mackrill and family sh

Rutter, Henry

ca

Smith, J. Caldecott

sh

Ryan, Mrs.

ho

Smith, H. H.

ca

Ryder, C.

ca

Smith, Frederick and fam

ho

Sadarkhan Jaferkhan

ca

Smith, Richard

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Sage, William

Dia

Smith, W and fam

ho

Salley Mohamed

ca

Samjee Lalljee,

Sanchez, Joze

Sanders, Charles

      Sandoval, Juan B. de abs Santos, Antonio dos Sapoorjee Bomanjee, Sargent, Lt. 95th.

Sassoon, Abdalah David Sassoon, R. David

Saul, R. Powell, and fam.

abs

ho

ca

са

sh

3 2 c ga 3 2 3 52

ca

Snow, E. N.

ho

ca

sh

Sorabjee Pestonjee

Solomon David

Smithers J. Clerk & Usher S. C. ho

Soames, Capt. of Str. Canton Soares, Francisco

Sorabjee Nowrojee Wadiah

Souza, Miguel de

Souza, Florencio de

Speer, Rev William

Spooner, C. W.

ho

ca

ma

ca

sh

ca

ho

ho

abs ra

sh

Digitized by

Google

St. Croix, Nicholas de

ca

St. Croix, George de

ca

110

Wadman, Edward Walkinshaw, W.

ni

ca

St. Hill, Henry

ho

Walker, J. T.

ca

St. John, St. Andrew, Lieut.

ho

Walker, J

ho

Stanton, Rev. Vincent & fam. ho

Walters, Col. 95th.

ho

Staveley, Hon. maj-gen. W.

ho

Ward, M. 2d Lt. C. Rifles

ho

Steele Thos. Tavern Keeper.

ho

Warden, H. H.

ca

Steedman, Rev. S. W.

ho

Wardley, W. H.

ca

Stevens, D.

ho

Stewart, Patrick, and family

ma

Warner, Mrs.

Still, C. F.

ho

Waters, Charles

Stirling, Hon. Paul I.

ho

Strachan, George

sh

Watson, J P

Strachan, Robert

ho

Stronach, Rev. Alex. & fam

am

Wardner, Rev. N. and fam

Watson, T Boswell, & fam.

Way, Rev. R. Q. and fam

Weatherly, James

sh

ho

ea

ma

sh

11

sh

Stronach, Rev. John

am

Webb, Edward

sh

Stuart, Charles J F

ho

Weiss, Charles

ho

Sturgis, James P.

ma

West, L.

sh

Sturgis, Robert S.

ca

Whilden, Rev. B W and fam

ca

Suacardo, Ricardo T. Keeper ho

White, James and fam

sh

Sucetmal Nuthoomull,

ca

White, Rev. M. C.

fit

Sullivan, G. G. and family

ni

Whittall, James

ca

Summers, James

ho

Widderfield, John

ho

Sword, John D.

abs

ca

Wiener, A. G.

ho

Swettenham, Lt. 95th.

ho

Wiese, L.

ca

Tait, James

Tarmohamed Naincey

Syle, Rev. E. and family

Talmage, Rev. John V. N. abs am

Tarrant, William

sh

Wight, Rev. J K & fam

ni

am

Wilks, jr. J.

sh

Wilkinson, Alfred

ca

ca

Wilkinson, Francis

ho

ho

Williams, C. D

ho

Tarrant, H J.

ho

Williams, John

P. C.

ho

Tattershall, Captn. C. R.

ho

Williams, FD

sh

Taylor, Rev. C. м/D. and fam.

sh

Williams, S. Wells and family ca

Teesdale, lieut. C. B.

ho

Williams, John

ca

Thompson, John

am

Wills, C.

sh

Thorburn, W

sh

Wilson, Alexander

ho

Thorburn, R. F.

sh

Wilson, R. E.

am

Thorne, A.

sh

Winiberg H. & fam. T. Keeper, ho

Tinawy, Joseph

ta

Winch, J. H

sh

Tozer, Frederick

ho

Winchester, C. A. and fam

am

Trotter, G. A.

ho

Wise, John

absent

sh

Trubshaw, James

ca

Withington, James

sh

Turner, James, Tavern Keeper ho

Wolcott, Henry G.

sh

Twynham, Lt. G. S.

ho

Woodgate, W.

ho

Ullet, R. B.

sh

Worthington, James

ca

Urmson, G.

ca

Wright, James M.

ca

Vacher, W. II.

ca

Wright, J. F. E.

ho

Vandenberg, AF

ca

Wylie, A.

sh

Van Loffelt, J. P.

ca

Yates, Rev. M. T. and family sh

Vaucher, Fritz

ca

Young, A. I.

sh

Veerjee Rahim

ca

Young, James H.

ho

Vidigal, Antonio de

ho

Young,

Viegas, A. and family

ca

Viegas, L.

ca

Young, Rev. W. and family

W. B. Capt. R. Artill. Young, James T. Keeper.

ho

ho

am

Viera, L. F.

ho

Ivanovitch, Stefano

ho

Wade, T. F.

ho

Zanolle, Jules

.ma

Digitized by

Google

111

SUMMARY OF THE PRECEDING LISTS.

    Total number of names in the alphabetical list of foreigners... 980 Number of those who have their families..

Commercial Houses, or Agencies..

Residents at Canton and Whampoa.

English.......

Parsees..

...

Moors, Arabs &c.

Americans....

French, Germans, Swiss, Armenians, &c.

Residents at Sbánghái (mostly English).

Portuguese...

Residents at Ningpo..

Residents at Fuhchau.

Residents at Amoy....

94

150

329

95

80

56

50

26

125

19

10

24

TABLE OF DISTANCES IN STATUTE MILES.

Measured by Lieut. G. V. Fox, U. S. N.

From Canton to

From Macao to

Whampoa, East end of Newtown.. First Bar..

Second Bar.

....

Bogue. Lintin. Hongkong

Macao..... Cumsingmoon.

Macao, through Capsingmoon. Do. South side of Lantao. Cumsingmoon

12

14

25

3:

69

98

17

44

41

40

Amoy

354

Fuhchau fú,.

5:3

·

Ningpo...

912

From Hongkong to-

Shanghái, through Formosa Channel

Do. east of Formosa I......

1,033

1,326

Manila....

770

Singapore......

1,680

Batavia.

2,157

Honolulu..

5,678

San Francisco, by Great Circle....

6,414

Do.

due bearing........ 7,514

From St. Francisco to Honolulu..

2,440

Digitized by Google

ENGLISH AND CHINESE CALENDAR FOR 1850, BEING THE THIRTIETH OF THE REIGN OF TAUKWANG.

Jan.

11&;

12&

1 &

Feb.

Mar.

12 m

2 m

April.

[ 2 &] 3 m

3 &

May.

June.

4 ml

4 & 5 m

5 &

6 &1

July.

6 m Aug.

Sep.

7 m

7& 8 m

8 &

Oct.

Nov.

&

Dec.

9 m

10 m

1 tu

If

2 20

2

2 s

3 th

3 S

3 S 20

235 t 24

15 tu 16 to 17 th 18 f

27*****

20

12 tu 13 2 14 th

19 22 60 SE LO LO EN 00 0

315 f 16 s 5 17 S 6 18 719 tu

8 20 20

9 21 th 10 22 f

24 th 12 24 S 13 25

11 m 28 112 tu 29

2 113 to 30 3 114 th 4 5

119 tu

1834 LO

2 13 m

3 H4 tu

4 05.w 5 16 th 6 17 ƒ

11 24 to

12 23 th 13 24 14 25

12.8**222222'

1 m

2 tu

3

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2228

es

211 m

2 S

22 2 tu 23 2 f

23

3 20

4 tu

6 th

1888-23

2 13 th

4 15

16 tu

9 6 m

117 20

10 17 tu

7 08 s

8 19 S

9 20 m 10 21 tu 11 22 20

789

7 18 tu

18 th

11 18 to

8 19 20

11

12 19 th

9 20 th

20 s

10

12.21 S

કળ

12 120 tu

13 20 f

13 121 20

11

13 [22 m

14 22 th

12 23 S

14 28 tu

13 24 m

15 24 20

12 25 th

14 25 tu

14 26 tu

15

26 tu

13 26 f

15 26 S

15 26 10

15 27 to

នន

16

27 w

14 278

16 27 m

16

th

26 J 18 27

16 25 th 17

17 28th 15 28 S

17 28 tu

17 28 ƒ

tu 17

129 ƒ

18 29 w

18 29 $

30 s

19 30 th

19 30 S

31 S 18

31 f 20

៩៩ ន∞∞

002728

1/6

15 5 123 f 16 24 s

17 25 S

14 21 15 22 S 17 24 tu

18 25 20

19 26 th

23 31 s

272**

********

• 2

1 th

24 3

10 m

-

13 tu

14 20 115 th 8 16 f

789

8 S

9 m

10 tu

[1] 20

12 th

6 13 ƒ 7 14 8

115 S

**25838-23T0078

1 8

2 m

3 tu

4 20

828

228

5

th

១៩ ឆន៨

68940

234

టిని

tc

225722

SHANEEFERERES.

6 10 S

11 m 12 tu

13 20 10 13

10 14 th

11 15 f.

11 14

12 15

13 16

£4 17

15

15

18 20

16 19 th 17 20 17 120 ƒ 19

18 21

20

22

201

21 124

22 25

44

10&

R25*

Digitized by

Google