Administrative Reports - 1937



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1937

Table of Contents

1 Geography, including Climate and History

2 Government

3 Population and Births and Deaths

4 Public Health

5 Housing

6 Production

7 Commerce

8 Wages and Cost of Living

9 Education and Welfare institutions

10 Communication and Transport

11 Banking, Currency, Weights and Measures

12 Public Works

13 Justice and Police

14 Legislation

15 Public Finance and Taxation

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances (Missing)

A(2) Audit office

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

G(1) Registrar of Trade Marks

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prisons

M Medical and Sanitary

M(1) Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 








Chapter I.

GEOGRAPHY, INCLUDING CLIMATE AND HISTORY.

The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 114° 5′ and 114° 18′ E. The island is about eleven miles long and two to five miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 32 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available for cultiva- tion.

2. The island of Hong Kong was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nanking in August, 1842. The charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843. The Kowloon peninsula and Stonecutter's Island were ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Peking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in July, 1898, the area shown as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years. The total area of the Colony including the New Territories is about 390 square miles.

3. The importance of Hong Kong has grown with the increase of China's trade with foreign countries. It is now in respect of tonnage entered and cleared one of the largest ports in the world. It is the most convenient outlet for the produce of South China as well as for the incessant flow of Chinese emigration to the Netherlands East Indies, Malaya and else- where. It is also the natural distributing centre for imports into China from abroad.

4. The Colony is not primarily a manufacturing centre, the most important of its industries being those connected directly or indirectly with shipping, such as dock and warehouse, banking and insurance undertakings. Sugar refining and cement manu- facture are also major industries, and in recent years considerable quantities of knitted goods, electric torches and batteries, and rubber shoes have been produced and exported.

5. The climate of Hong Kong is sub-tropical, the winter being normally cool and dry and the summer hot and humid; the seasons are marked by the prevalence of the S.W. monsoon in summer and the N.E. monsoon in winter. The temperature seldom rises above 95° F. or falls below 40° F. The average rainfall is 85.16 inches, May to September being the wettest months. In spring and summer the humidity of the atmosphere

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is often very high, at times exceeding 95% with an average over the whole year of 79%. The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period."

6. The rainfall for 1937 was 82.50 inches. The mean tem- perature of the air was 73.3° against an average of 71.9°. The maximum gust velocity of the wind was greater than 125 m.p.h. from N.E. on September 2nd.

7. Government:-Sir Andrew Caldecott left the Colony on the 16th of April having been appointed Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Ceylon. The Hon. Mr. N. L. Smith administered the Government until the arrival on the 28th of October, of His Excellency Sir Geoffry Northcote, the new Governor.

+

8. Official Visits.-General Yu Han-Mow, Commander-in- Chief of the 4th Route Army and Pacification Commissioner for Kwangtung, visited the Colony and paid an official call on the Governor on the 8th of March. General Wu Teh-Chen, newly appointed Civil Governor of Kwangtung, paid an official visit to the Colony on the 12th of April.

9. Public Works.-During the year three major public enterprises were finished and declared open. The Governor, Sir Andrew Caldecott, on the 18th of January officially inspected the new prison on Stanley Peninsula, which has accommodation for 2,000 prisoners. On January the 30th the Governor unveiled a tablet at the Jubilee Reservoir, Shing Mun. The reservoir took four years to complete and has a capacity of 3,000 million gallons. The dam, 285 feet high, is the highest in the British Empire. The Queen Mary Hospital, a granite-faced structure standing 500 feet above sea-level in open country on the south side of the island, was opened on April the 13th. 546 beds and the most modern equipment are provided in this hospital, which replaces the old Government Civil Hospital and the Victoria Hospital.

10. Communications.-Three new passenger air-services were inaugurated during the year. On the 6th of May the Pan- American Airways commenced a passenger service from Manila to Hong Kong. On the 1st of December this service was extended to San Francisco. On the 29th of June Eurasia Airways extended their Peiping-Canton passenger service to Hong Kong.

A telephone service between Hong Kong and Hankow was made available to the public on the 20th of March providing a further link in the telephonic communication between the Colony and the interior of China.

11. Commissions.-A Commission was appointed by the Officer Administering the Government on the 7th of October to inquire into the sinking of Chinese fishing junks off the Chilang Lighthouse on the 22nd of September.

12. The Coronation.-The Coronation of His Majesty King George VI was celebrated on the 12th of May. In the early morning the Officer Administering the Government (The Hon. Mr. N. L. Smith) held a review of the combined services at Happy Valley. The parade consisted of over 2,500 members of His Majesty's forces in the Colony, and

and was witnessed by approximately 100,000 people.

At noon a meeting of the Legislative Council was held at which members signed a Loyal Address which was sent to Their Majesties.

2,000 guests attended a Reception and Ball at Government House in the evening. General illuminations, a silver Dragon and a Chinese lantern procession were other features of the celebrations.

13. Sino-Japanese Hostilities.-On the 7th of July hostilities broke out between China and Japan. During the ensuing months much of the trade bound for the interior of China was diverted through Hong Kong. Wharves and godowns remained crowded until the end of the year. The first refugees from Shanghai arrived in Hong Kong on the 17th of August. At the shortest notice approximately 4,800 non-Chinese refugees were accommodated in four Refugee Centres, in hotels and in private houses. It was not considered safe for women and children to return to Shanghai until late in December.

14. The Typhoon.--On the 2nd of September the most disastrous typhoon in local history passed over the Colony. At the height of the storm the barometer fell to 28.298 inches and it is estimated that a wind velocity of 167 m.p.h. was reached. Vast damage was done to property in all parts of the Colony, but by far the greatest sufferers were the Chinese fishing com- munity. Information was received of 1,361 native boats being sunk and it can only be presumed that many thousands of seafaring people were drowned. No fewer than 27 steamers of various sizes were sunk or driven ashore.

15. Decorations.-Among the Honours conferred by His Majesty during the course of the year, were:—

K.C.M.G.-H.E. Sir Andrew Caldecott, Kt., C.M.G.,

C.B.E.

O.B.E.-Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg, M.C. (Civil Division).

The Coronation Decorations were awarded as follows:

C.M.G.-H.E. The Officer Administering the Govern-

ment, Mr. N. L. Smith.

Kt. Mr. V. M. Grayburn.

O.B.E. (Civil Division)-Mr. D. L. King.

M.B.E. (Military Division)-Capt. H. Westlake, D.C.M. M.B.E. (Civil Division)-Mrs. J. M. King.

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Chapter II.

GOVERNMENT.

The Government is administered under Letters Patent of 14th February, 1917, and Royal Instructions of the same and subsequent dates, by a Governor aided by an Executive Council, composed of six official and three unofficial members, and by a Legislative Council composed of nine official and eight unofficial members. Prior to 1928 the numbers of the Legislative Council members were seven and six respectively. The six official mem- bers of the Executive Council are the Senior Military Officer, the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney General, the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Financial Secretary, all of whom are members ex-officio, and the Director of Public Works, appointed by the Governor. The three unofficial members, one of whom is Chinese, are appointed by the Governor. The six official mem- bers of the Executive Council are also members of the Legislative Council; the other three official members of this Council, who are appointed by the Governor, are the Inspector General of Police, the Harbour Master and the Director of Medical Services. Of the unofficial members of the Legislative Council two are appointed by the Governor on the nomination respectively of the Justices of the Peace and of the Chamber of Commerce; the Governor also appoints the remaining members three of whom are Chinese. Appointment in the case of unofficial members is for five years for the Executive and four years for the Legis- lative Council.

2. The Urban Council composed of five official and eight unofficial members has power to make by-laws under the Public Health (Food) Ordinance, the Public Health (Sanitation) Ordin- ance, the Public Health (Animals and Birds) Ordinance, the Hawkers Ordinance and Factories and Workshops Ordinance in matters appertaining to public health, subject to an overriding power in the Legislative Council.

3. There are a number of advisory boards and committees such as the Board of Education, Harbour Advisory Committee, Labour Advisory Board, etc., composed of both official and unofficial members. They are frequently consulted and are of much assistance to the Government.

4. The English Common Law forms the basis of the legal system, modified by Hong Kong Ordinances of which an edition revised to 1923 has been published. A further revised edition was commenced during 1937. The law as to civil procedure was codified by Ordinance No. 3 of 1901. The Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act 1890 regulates the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in Admiralty cases.

5. The daily administration is carried out by the twenty- eight Government departments, all officers of which members of the Civil Service. The most important of the

are

...

purely administrative departments are the Secretariat, Treasury, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Post Office, Harbour, the Imports and Exports, Police and Prisons Departments. There are seven legal departments, including the Supreme Court and the Magistracies. Two departments, Medical and Sanitary, deal with public health, one, Education, with education; and one, the largest of all the Government departments, Public Works, is concerned with roads, buildings, waterworks, piers and analogous matters.

6. An important change in the system of Government during 1937, was the creation of the post of Financial Secretary in place of the former Colonial Treasurer, with а view to reorganizing the financial administration of the Colony generally.

Chapter III.

POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

The estimated civilian population at mid-year 1937, based upon the arithmetical increase in population between the Census periods of 1921 and 1931, amounted to 1,006,982. Of this figure 984,400 or ninety-eight per centum were Chinese. Excluding Chinese, who do not register, 6,444 aliens were registered in the Colony at the end of the year and it is therefore estimated that there are approximately 16,138 Non-Chinese British subjects. Forty-eight per centum of the estimated Non- Chinese population resides in Kowloon and New Kowloon, the latter being primarily a residential area. In view of the Sino- Japanese conflict which has driven a large number of refugees to Hong Kong the estimate of 1,006,982 is considered to be within the region of thirty per centum below the actual popu- lation. The population distributed into the main districts of the Colony is shown in the following tabije:-

Island of Hong Kong.

Non-Chinese

Chinese

Kowloon Peninsula.

Non-Chinese

Chinese

New Territories.

Non-Chinese

Estimated at mid-year 1937.

9,847 437,982

10,887 339,366

476

Chinese

107,052

Maritime.

Non-Chinese

1,372

Chinese

100,000

Total Non-Chinese

22,582

Total Chinese

984,400

Totals

1,006,982

6

Registration of births and deaths is compulsory and is governed by the Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance, No. 21 of 1934.

Births. There was a large increase in the number of births registered in the year under review. Whereas in 1936 the figure was 27,383 (530 Non-Chinese), in 1937 the number of births registered was 32,303 (692 Non-Chinese) an increase of 4,920. This is attributed to the increase in the population due to large numbers of refugees seeking shelter in Hong Kong and to the desire of Chinese residents to register births with a view to claiming British nationality. The number of late registrations after twelve months totalled 744 in 1937 and 272 in 1936. The crude, uncorrected birth-rate for 1937 was 32.1 per thousand of the mid-year population.

The following table provides means for comparing with 1936 the number of males and females born:

Males

Females

Totals

1936.

1937.

15,064

17,559

12,319

14,744

27,383 32,303

Deaths. Once again the Sino-Japanese conflict caused some increase to registration figures, but in addition a severe typhoon which struck the Colony on the 2nd of September and a serious cholera epidemic earlier in the year resulted in known deaths of 490 and 1,082 persons respectively.

as

In 1937 the number of deaths amounted to 34,635 against 25,380 in 1936, to which must be added 11 and 17 respectively for deaths among the Forces of the Crown. The crude, uncorrected death-rate was estimated at 34.4 per thou- sand living, the corresponding figure for 1936 being 25.8.

Male deaths exceeded female as shown in the following table:

1936.

1937.

Males

14,681

20,233

Females

10,683

14,392

Unknown

16

10

Totals

25,380

34,635

7

Some 11,620 Chinese and 30 Non-Chinese deaths of infants under one year of age were registered in 1937. The infant mortality rates showed some improvement over the previous year as may be seen from the following table:-

Non-Chinese

Chinese

1936.

1937.

37

46

372

376

Still-births in 1937 numbered 913 and 976 in 1936.

;

Chapter IV.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

It would appear from first sight that public health in the Colony received a serious set-back in 1937 when the number of deaths registered exceeded the 1936 figure by 9,255. When, however, (a) the sudden increase in the population due to refugees leaving Shanghai and other parts of China, (b) the cholera epidemic, and (c) the typhoon are taken into considera- tion the reason for the set-back will be better appreciated.

Malaria.-During the year 696 civilians died from malaria, an increase of 193 over the year 1936. The ratio of deaths from malaria to deaths from all causes remained practically the same for both years.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

Plague. No case of plague has been reported during the last eight years. A proportion of the daily number of rats collected was sent to the Public Mortuary for examination. Deratisation of ships was carried out by the Port Health Branch. Ninety-one deratisation and eighty-eight exemption certificates were issued.

Cerebro-spinal fever.-Some 157 cases were notified in 1937 as compared with 123 cases in 1936. The number of deaths was eighty-eight and sixty-five respectively.

Cholera.-The Colony suffered a severe epidemic from this disease during the year. On the 22nd July, the first case was reported and by the 31st of December 1,082 persons had died of the disease. In all 1,690 cases were reported giving a mortality rate of sixty-four per centum.

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In view of the small amount of accommodation available at the Infectious Diseases Hospital, it was necessary to reopen part of the old Government Civil Hospital in order to cope with the 1,299 cases treated. Over a quarter of a million anti- cholera inoculations were administered free by hospitals, public dispensaries and the St. John Ambulance Association and Brigade.

Smallpox. Out of a total of 129 cases reported during the year, thirty-seven were notified in April. There were ninety- four deaths as compared with sixteen in 1936.

Preventive measures against smallpox included the vaccina- tion of some 443,021 persons with lymph prepared in the Gov- ernment Bacteriological Institute.

Some sixty cases were segregated in the Infectious Diseases Hospital at Kennedy Town.

Pulmonary tuberculosis.-Ranking high among the causes of death, 3,061 deaths from pulmonary tuberculosis were recorded during the year.

Schemes for improving the housing conditions of the poorer classes are under consideration and, should these materialize, it is anticipated that they may have a definite influence upon the incidence of this disease.

Dysentery.-On 5th February this disease was declared notifiable by Order of the Governor-in-Council. From that date 576 cases were notified of which 316 proved fatal.

Enteric fever.-Sporadic. cases of enteric fever were notified during the year. There was a total of 464 cases with 176 deaths, a slight increase over the previous year which was no doubt attributable in part to the influx of refugees.

Diphtheria. There was a noticeable reduction in the figures for the year as only 308 cases and 148 deaths were notified, whereas in 1936 the figures were 375 and 214 respec- tively.

Leprosy.-Cases of leprosy were cared for by Government at the Kennedy Town Tung Wah Leper Settlement and there were thirteen deaths recorded during the year.

Diseases of the Respiratory System. (Non-tuberculous).- These diseases accounted for 10,380 deaths and occupied the first place in the list of causes of deaths during 1937. The overcrowded housing conditions, associated with the exceedingly common and filthy habit of expectorating, provide sufficient explanation for the prevalence of this group of diseases.

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THE DUMPING OF THE DEAD:

To avoid paying burial fees, and, in the case of infectious diseases, to evade the cleansing of their houses by the Health Authorities, the poorer members of the Chinese community con- tinued to dump dead bodies in the streets. In 1937 the Police found 1353 of these bodies.

HOSPITALS.

The Queen Mary Hospital which was built to replace the old Government Civil Hospital was formally opened on the 13th April. This hospital has accommodation for 546 beds and cots, 138 of which have been allotted to the three clinical units of the Hong Kong University.

The total number of in-patients admitted was 5,566 which includes 191 maternity cases. The daily average of general in-patients was 289. 4,631 general in-patients were treated by Government officers, and 229, 275 and 240 by the Medical, Surgical and Gynaecological Units of the University Staff respectively. Sixty-three per centum of the in-patients admitted were of Chinese nationality. The Casualty Department treated 1,933 out-patients (new cases). Some 295 deaths took place amongst in-patients.

The Government Civil Hospital was closed on the 30th of June after all patients had been transferred to the Queen Mary Hospital. General in-patients numbered 2,693, whilst 469 maternity patients were also treated, giving a daily average of 197. Deaths in in-patients amounted to 172.

When this hospital was closed a portion of it, "C" Block, was renovated to accommodate the out-patients department. 21,246 new cases were treated in the Government Civil Hospital and in "C" Block during the year. The building at the Queen's Road entrance to the hospital functioned throughout the year and was used exclusively for special out-patient clinics as follows:-

"

New cases.

Medical University Unit

1,624

Surgical University Unit

4,459

Gynaecological University Unit

1,890

Eye Clinic (Government)

3,126

Venereal Diseases (Government)

1,811

Total

12,910

10-

The Kowloon Hospital is situated on the mainland and stands in a medical reserve of over thirty acres. There are ninety-seven beds in the general blocks and thirty-four in the maternity block. The out-patients department as in previous years increased its activities.

The following summary shows the work carried out during 1937 as compared with 1936.

In-patients.

1936

1937

General

Maternity

Daily average.

General

Maternity

Operations under general

anaesthesia

Out-patients

3,367

3,706

1,137

1,372

104

101

23

22

1,033

1,322

66,193 101,709

Some 334 deaths took place in in-patients.

The Victoria General and Maternity Hospital which pos- sessed forty-six general and twenty-six maternity beds in two separate blocks, was closed on the 7th of June.

During the period 1st January to 7th June the hospital accommodated 199 general, and 30 maternity cases. The daily average for the general block was twenty-four and for the maternity block three women and three children. There were no deaths. The number of out-patients treated was 542.

The Mental Hospital had a daily average of seventy patients although it was designed to accommodate only thirty-two patients. The hospital is used mainly as a temporary abode for mental cases, Chinese and Europeans being repatriated to their respective countries. 149 lunatics were transferred to Canton in 1937. Some fifty-one cases remained from 1936 and 359 were admitted in 1937. Seventy-one cases were discharged as cured, sixty-two as relieved and fifty-two as not improved. There were twenty deaths.

The Government Infectious Diseases Hospital is situated at Kennedy Town on the western outskirts of Victoria. It contains only twenty-six beds which have been proved to be inadequate to accommodate the more serious types of infectious diseases. 1,299 cases of cholera, sixty cases of smallpox and eight cases

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of chickenpox were treated during 1937 at the Infectious Diseases Hospital and at the old Government Civil Hospital taken back temporarily into use.

Tsan Yuk Hospital.-Formerly financed and managed by the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee this hospital was presented to the Government on the 1st January, 1934.

There are sixty beds of which fourteen were reserved for gynaecological cases until the Queen Mary Hospital was opened. During the year 2,096 maternity patients were treated. There were 1,934 deliveries, six maternal deaths, thirty-three infant deaths and eighty-three still-births.

The gynaecological unit treated 140 cases and performed sixty-nine operations. Only one death was recorded during the year. Ante-natal, gynaecological and infant welfare clinics were held by the obstetrical and gynaecological unit of the Hong Kong University where some 952, 572 and 2,109 cases respectively were treated or advised. This included new and old cases.

Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital. As these premises had been condemned for the treatment of acute infectious diseases, they were used as a settlement for lepers, the patients. being treated by the Government Medical Officer in charge of the Infectious Diseases Hospital. The cost for maintaining the inmates, thirty cents per leper per day, is paid by the Govern- ment to the Tung Wah Committee. The number of lepers admitted during the year under review amounted to 167, having remained from 1936.

The record for 1937 was as follows:

Transferred to Sheklung Leper Settlement,

Kwangtung, China

Discharged

Discharged at own request

Absconded

Died

Remaining at end of year

49

6

14

35

11

62

ten

is

The Chinese Hospitals.-These hospitals, the Tung Wah and Tung Wah Eastern situated on the Island and the Kwong Wah in Kowloon, are managed by the Tung Wah Committee, a charitable organization which receives a subsidy from Government. A Chinese Medical Officer, at tached to the staff of the Medical Department, stationed in each hospital. Patients are given the choice of receiving herbalist treatment or treatment by Western medicine; but gradually, with the aid of energetic directors, the illiterate and poorer classes of the local Chinese public are becoming enlightened and the majority now prefer the Western treatment, 16,175 in-patients received treatment by Chinese herbalist medicine and 81,794 were treated by Western methods. Opera- tions performed during the year numbered 1,837.

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In the out-patients departments 462,864 and 116,468 cases were dealt with by Chinese treatment and Western methods respectively.

TREATMENT OF OPIUM ADDICTS.

Opium addicts, all Chinese, were treated as in previous years at the Government Civil Hospital until it was replaced by the Queen Mary Hospital, and at the Tung Wah Eastern Chinese Hospital. Treatment in the Government institutions was under the supervision of Professor W. I. Gerrard, O.B.E., of the University Medical Unit, and eighteen patients were cared for in 1937.

Chinese Western-trained graduates, under the general supervision of a Government Visiting Medical Officer, treated 430 cases in the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

Chapter V.

HOUSING.

In recent years some evidence has been shown amongst the artizan class of the Colony of a quickening social consciousness and the resultant desire to avail themselves of improved housing accommodation wherever such is made available. The unskilled labouring classes, however, are still found densely packed in tenement houses deficient in light and air. This class of labour has to find its habitat as close as possible to the scene of its labour, with the result that the western part of the City of Victoria, which houses the native business quarter and closely adjoins the portion of the harbour handling the traffic from the West River and Chinese Coast Ports, is seriously overcrowded.

2. These conditions which were being slowly mitigated by the rebuilding of properties which from time to time were con- demned for reasons of structural defects are now being more rapidly appeased by the operation of the Buildings Ordinance, 1935, which came into force on the 1st January, 1936. Over- crowding amongst the labouring class is still however prevalent.

3. The housing of the Colony is all privately owned, and control is maintained by the operation of the Buildings Ordin- ance, 1935, the provisions of which also mould the character of the housing. Generally the houses are built back to back in rows and are separated by a scavenging lane. These houses vary in height from two to four storeys according to the width of the street on to which they front, whilst the average height per storey is twelve feet, a minimum being controlled by the

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In the out-patients departments 462,864 and 116,468 cases were dealt with by Chinese treatment and Western methods respectively.

TREATMENT OF OPIUM ADDICTS.

Opium addicts, all Chinese, were treated as in previous years at the Government Civil Hospital until it was replaced by the Queen Mary Hospital, and at the Tung Wah Eastern Chinese Hospital. Treatment in the Government institutions was under the supervision of Professor W. I. Gerrard, O.B.E., of the University Medical Unit, and eighteen patients were cared for in 1937.

Chinese Western-trained graduates, under the general supervision of a Government Visiting Medical Officer, treated 430 cases in the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

Chapter V.

HOUSING.

In recent years some evidence has been shown amongst the artizan class of the Colony of a quickening social consciousness and the resultant desire to avail themselves of improved housing accommodation wherever such is made available. The unskilled labouring classes, however, are still found densely packed in tenement houses deficient in light and air. This class of labour has to find its habitat as close as possible to the scene of its labour, with the result that the western part of the City of Victoria, which houses the native business quarter and closely adjoins the portion of the harbour handling the traffic from the West River and Chinese Coast Ports, is seriously overcrowded.

2. These conditions which were being slowly mitigated by the rebuilding of properties which from time to time were con- demned for reasons of structural defects are now being more rapidly appeased by the operation of the Buildings Ordinance, 1935, which came into force on the 1st January, 1936. Over- crowding amongst the labouring class is still however prevalent.

3. The housing of the Colony is all privately owned, and control is maintained by the operation of the Buildings Ordin- ance, 1935, the provisions of which also mould the character of the housing. Generally the houses are built back to back in rows and are separated by a scavenging lane. These houses vary in height from two to four storeys according to the width of the street on to which they front, whilst the average height per storey is twelve feet, a minimum being controlled by the

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8. Some progress was made in the work of the Housing Commission and from the study of data collected a draft report was prepared for consideration by the Commission.

Chapter VI.

PRODUCTION.

Hong Kong is the port for South China, and the greater part of the large volume of goods that pass through it is in transit between South China and other parts of the world, including North and Middle China. The Colony itself produces comparatively little, though the shipbuilding, cement, rope, tin and sugar refining, rubber shoe and cotton knitting industries are not unimportant. Mining has been developed in recent years and agriculture is widely practised throughout the New Territories. Rice and vegetables are grown, and there is con- siderable poultry farming, but in insufficient quantities to supply the needs of the urban populations of Victoria and Kowloon. The cultivation is in the hands of the Chinese villagers. Sea fishing is an important industry, but here again local supplies have to be augmented by importation from outside.

2. Reports on the principal industries for the year 1937 are given below:-

Refined Sugar. World sugar prices continued to advance in the early part of 1937, and, after a period of uncertainty as to the outcome of the quota arrangements decided upon at the World Sugar Conference in London in April, 1937, quotations again advanced in company, at last, with general commodity prices. There was a very marked increase in quotations, and business generally, in the Far East early in June when the sugar selling organization in Java naised its limits as a result of its newly strengthened position.

A surplus of sugar available over and above the U.S.A. import quota resulted in an attempt to sell Philippine sugar in Hong Kong, but this danger to the market was ended, after only a few deliveries had been completed, by the threat of action under the terms of the International Sugar Agreement.

The Kwangtung sugar mills did not all go into active pro- duction in conditioning imported sugars as in the previous year but confined their activities to crushing local cane only. Their total output was thus considerably reduced during 1937.

چیز

The start of hostilities in North China in July and the subsequent spread of fighting to most important markets in China resulted in a breakdown in normal trading. Considerable quantities of distressed sugar were landed in Hong Kong and

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the

this greatly depressed local prices until it had slowly gone into consumption. After the absorption of this cheap sugar, quota- tions late in the year rallied. A gain over the whole year of more than 30% in terms of raw sugar prices indicates success of world-wide attempts to establish more remunerative price levels. The volume of trade has been greatly curtailed as the effects of the Sino-Japanese conflict have been more keenly felt with the passage of time, but eastern markets have been spared the additional disruptive effects of wildly fluctuating exchange rates, such as were threatened by the devaluation of the guilder in 1936...

The outlook for 1938 is extremely uncertain, depending on the march of political events in the world as a whole and the Far East in particular.

Cement. Total imports of cement into the Colony during the year amounted to 1,201,440 piculs and exports to 1,615,806 piculs. As in previous years the bulk of the exports went to British Malaya. Large quantities were imported from Japan during the early part of 1937 but after the outbreak of Sino- Japanese hostilities supplies from this source ceased. As a result there was a very keen demand for the product of the local factory which has lately been operating at full capacity Cement from Indo-China was imported in large quantities and found a ready market at advanced prices.

:

.: Preserved Ginger.-Local prices fluctuated during the year from $15-$21 per picul for cargo ginger and from $22 - $26 for stem ginger. Exports were well maintained to all markets as will be noted from the following comparative figures of values of quantities exported:-

To United Kingdom

Australia

1936.

1937.

$1,064,099

$1,107,427

408,059

346,913

Holland

281,206

202,578

""

U.S.A.

236,030

142,717

Other Countries

364,575

301,331

"

$2,353,969

$2,100,966

Knitted, Woven & Made-Up Goods.-Local knitting and weaving factories and factories making up garments from imported cloth enjoyed fairly profitable trading conditions during 1937, exports to Empire markets showing notable in- creases as a result of Imperial Preference and (in the case of woven goods) quota regulations imposed by many Empire countries on cloth which is not "spun, woven and finished within the Empire". Local weaving factories, to obtain the

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Burma, Siam and Ceylon, and considerably increased quantities were shipped to these countries in 1937. The total value of exports to all countries in 1937 amounted to $3,670,609.

Exports of batteries were also well maintained, the principal purchasing countries and values of quantities taken being as follows:-Netherlands East Indies ($415,695), Burma ($302,921), Malaya ($274,260), Ceylon ($231,491), Other Countries ($616,589), Total ($1,840,956).

Tin—Although slightly larger quantities of locally refined tin were shipped to Europe and the United States of America, the total volume of exports from Hong Kong during 1937 ($22,207,686) was about 15 per cent lower than in 1936 due to the decreased consumption in North China following the out- break of hostilities there. The price was subject to wide fluctuations. The highest level was H.K.$265 per picul in March and the lowest H.K.$155 per picul at the end of the year.

:

LardThe total value of lard exported during 1937 amounted to 94,290 piculs valued at $4,057,026, of which 83,507 piculs valued at $3,632,764 was taken by the United Kingdom. The year closed with unfavourable prospects for business in 1938 as the United Kingdom Government has ruled that, to qualify for Imperial Preference, lard must be produced from pigs bred within the Empire. Most of the lard manu- factured in Hong Kong is from the fat of pigs which are imported here from China.

Shipbuilding: During the year the Colony's shipyards had under construction seven passenger ships, one cargo vessel, one naval sloop, one tug, one waterboat, six lighters and five launches, a total of twenty-two vessels of 14,078 tons gross.

Chapter VII.

COMMERCE.

1 The combined values of imports and exports of mer chandise in 1937 increased by 35.0% as compared with 1936, and 70:5% as compared with 1935, in terms of local currency. In terms of sterling the total visible trade of the Colony increased by 32.2% in 1937 as compared with 1936 and by 9.0% as compared with 1935, (Details are given in Table 1).

2. Imports of merchandise totalled $61 (£38.1) millions in 1937 as compared with $452.4 (£28.5) millions in 1936, and $365.0 (£35.3) millions in 1935; whilst exports totalled $467:3 (£28.8) millions in 1937 as compared with $350.9 (£22.1) millions in 1936, and $271.0 (£26.1) millions in 1935.

18

3. In terms of local currency imports of merchandise in 1937 increased by 36.4% as compared with 1936, and 69.1% as com- pared with 1935; whilst exports increased by 33.2% in 1937 as compared with 1936, and 72.4% as compared with 1935.

4. In terms of sterling values imports of merchandise in- creased by 33.7% in 1937 as compared with 1936, and 7.9% as compared with 1935; whilst exports increased by 30.3% in 1937 as compared with 1936, and 10.3% as compared with 1935. (It should be noted that the average T.T. rate of exchange on London was 18. 2.d. in 1937; 18. 3.d. in 1936; and 1s. 11.d. in 1935).

5. It is estimated that the quantum of the import trade increased by 42.2% in 1937 as compared with 1936, and 53.3% as compared with 1935, but, of necessity, the volume of the import trade cannot be calculated accurately on account of the lack of a suitable unit of quantity and the fact that many commodities imported are declared by value only.

6. The following countries increased their shares of the import trade in 1937 as compared with 1936: China, United Kingdom, U.S.A., French Indo-China, Australia and Belgium; whilst increased shares of the export trade were credited to British Malaya, French Indo-China, U.S.A. and Netherlands East Indies. (Details are given in Table II).

7. It will be seen from Table III that there were increased imports in 1937 of the following groups of commodities as com- pared with 1936:-Live animals, building materials, chemicals. and drugs, Chinese medicines, dyeing and tanning materials, foodstuffs and provisions, fuels, hardware, liquors, manures, metals, minerals and ores, nuts and seeds, oils and fats, paints, paper and paperware, piece goods and textiles, railway mate- rials, tobacco, wearing apparel and sundries, the only groups showing a decrease being machinery and vehicles. There were increases in all groups of exports with the exception of live animals, machinery, railway materials and vehicles.

-

8. Total movements of Treasure amounted to $781.6 millions in 1937 as compared with $216.5 millions in 1936. Imports totalled $386.4 millions in 1937 as compared with $72.7 millions in 1936, and exports $395.2 millions as compared with $143.8 millions. (Details are given in Table IV).

9. Average T.T. opening rates of exchange during the year 1937 were:-London: 1/2. ; France: 765.7/8; U.S.A.: 30.1/2; Shanghai: 102.7/16; India: 81.11/16; Singapore: 52.9/6; Japan: 105.13/16; Java: 55.3/16.

10. Wholesale prices in the Colony showed an increase of 27.2% in 1937 as compared with 1936 and an increase of 68.3% as compared with 1935. Increases were recorded in each of the four groups of commodities, viz., Foodstuffs, Textiles, Metals and Minerals, and Miscellaneous Articles.

page is a



19

Table I.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 1931-1937.

(in £'s & $'s millions).

IMPORTS.

1931.

1st Quarter ...£ 9.0

1932. 1933. 1934. 1935.

11.9 8.5 7.1

$186.9 170.7 132.8 95.8 2nd Quarter ...£ 8.7 10.2.

1936. 1937.

9.0

6.3 8.1

97.3

98.2 131.7

8:5

7.1

10.7 7.4 9.5

$180.1

164.7

126.1

99.7

94.0

114.1 154.8

3rd Quarter...£ 9.0

9.3

8.5

8.1

8.1

6.6 10.5

$182.3

142.4

122.1

106.6

79.5

106.7 169.8

4th Quarter ...£ 11.8

9.6. 8.4

9.4

7.5 8.2 10.0

$188.4

146.2

119.9 113.8

94.2 133.4 160.8

Total ......£ 38.5

$737.7

41.0 33.9 31.7 35.3 28.5 38.1

624.0 500.9 415.9

365.0 452.4 617.1

EXPORTS.

1931.

1932. 1933. 1934.

1935.

1936. 1937.

1st Quarter ...£ 6.8

8.8 6.8

5.8

6.9.

4.9 6.5

$140.1

127.0

105.3

77.5

74.8 76.0 105.7

2nd Quarter...£ 6.4

7.1

7.2

5.7

7.7

5.6

7.0

$132.5

115.3

106.2

79.6

67.9

87.5

113.2

3rd Quarter ... 6.5

7.2

6.6

6.1

5.8

5.1

7.0

$130.6

110.0

95.5

80.5

56.6

81.5 113.8

4th Quarter ...£ 9.2

7.9

6.8

7.2

5.7

6.5 8.3

$138.7

119.6

96.1

87.5 71.7 105.9

134.6

Total ......£ 28.9

31.0

27.4 24.8 26.1 22.1 28.8

$541.9 471.9 403.1 325.1 271.0 350.9 467.3

NOTE:Average rate of exchange 1931-1s. Oåd.

1932-1s. 3 d.

1933-1s. 41d.

1934-1s. 6d.

1935-1s. 11d.

1936-1s. 3d.

1937=1s. 21d.

20

Table II.

DISTRIBUTION OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF MERCHANDISE

BY COUNTRIES ($'000's omitted).

A.-IMPORTS.

1936.

1937.

%

$

%

China

152,041

33.6 211,321

34.2

Japan

58,039 12.8

58,044

9.4

N. E. Indies

38,334

8.5 46,915

7.6

United Kingdorn

29,008

6.4

46,732

7.6

U. S. A.

32,181

7.1

51,776

8.4

French Indo-China

25,760

5.7

40,779

6.6

Siam

29,780

6.6

22,652

3.7

Germany

23,618

5.2

30,898

5.0

British Malaya

7,352

1.6

9,125

1.5

India

5,755

1.3

6,424

1.0

Australia

9,114

2.0

13,351

2.2

Belgium

6,599

1.5

9,991

1.6

All Other Countries

34,769 7.7

69,056

11.2

Summary.

United Kingdom

29,008 6.4

46,732

7.6

British Dominions and

Possessions

29,911

6.6

China

All Other Countries

152,041

241,390

52,916 8.6

33.6 211,321 34.2

53.4

306,095 49.6

Total British Empire

58,919 13.0

99,648 16.2

Total Foreign

393,431 87.0 517,416

83.8

Grand Total

452,350 100.0 617,064 100.0



2

21

Table II,-Continued.

B.-EXPORTS.

1936.

1937.

%

$

%

China

149,739

42.7

190,401

40.7

British Malaya

25,767

7.3

39,800

8.5

French Indo-China

17,370

5.0

24,004

5.1

Japan

17,955

5.1

19,780

4.2

Macao

13,001

3.7

17,096

3.7

Siam

14,506

4.1

14,173

3.0

U. S. A.

28,436

8.1

41,129

8.8

Kwong Chow Wan

10,586

3.0

9,735

2.1

N. E. Indies

9,722

2.8

15,559

3.3

Philippines

11,500

3.3

13,208

2.8

India

4,819

1.4

5,360

1.1

All Other Countries

47,464 13.5

77,078

16.7

Summary.

United Kingdom

13,282

3.8

20,874

4.5

British Dominions and

Possessions

48,295 13.7

71,067 15.2

China

149,739

42.7

190,401 40.7

All Other Countries

139,549

39.8

184,981 39.6

Total British Empire

61,577

17.5

91,941 19.7

Total Foreign

289,288 82.5 375,382 80.3

Grand Total

350,865 100.0

467,323 100.0

22

Table III.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY MAIN GROUPS OF COMMODITIES

($'000's omitted).

Imports.

Exports.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

Animals, Live

8,042

8,821

134

88

Building Materials

6,635

8,027

3,513

4,677

Chemicals & Drugs

5,408

9,973

3,441

6,536

Chinese Medicines

20,265

22,118

13,761

17,045

Dyeing Materials.

4,736

8,170

3,636

5,310

Foodstuffs

་་་..

123,411 155,343 91,912

118,637

Fuels

11,033

16,012

396

540

Hardware

3,937 6,915

3,072

5,217

Liquors

3,379

4,061

894

1,399

Machinery

9,060

8,866

9,947

4,861

Manures

8,886

13,348

10,221 11,807

Metals

41,032

67,391

36,973

44,570

Minerals & Ores

2,812

12,775

8,485

17,503

Nuts and Seeds

6,566

9,360

4,047

5,793

Oils and Fats

39,994

72,985

33,090

60,992

Paints

1,750

2,297

1,430 1,769

Paper and Paperware

13,417

16,089

7,894

10,443

Piece Goods

67,675

76,842

40,069

46,519

Railway Materials

84

1,068

1,155

873

Tobacco

5,891

8,150

4,321

7,415

Treasure

72,728 386,449 143,815

395,227

Vehicles

6,584 6,224 7,970

5,932

Wearing Apparel

Sundries

4,123 4,448 12,591 19,684

57,631 77,781 51,913 69,712

Total

.... 525,079 1,003,513 494,680 862,549

Table IV.

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OF TREASURE.

Imports.

Exports.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

$

$

Bank Notes

22,545,864

80,111,618 24,756,807

18,178,291

Copper Cents

193,279

421,037

234 1,294,773

Gold Bars

Gold Coins

3,656,465 11,112,926 33,217,868

10,979,127

331,109

760,049 2,567,141

Gold Leaf

5,849

45,288

277,420

22,446

Silver Bars

H.K. Silver Dollars

Chinese Silver Dollars

Other Silver Dollars

Silver Sub. Coin

740,496 135,339,484 17,201,873 87,519,955

7,586

6,448,118

356,132

551,304

25,876

5,985,968

176

49,176,000

403,000

45,241,301 152,676,901

2,975,093 262,617,500

15,345,501 5,129,465

Total

72,728,408 386,448,955 143,815,433 395,226,524

Table V.

WHOLESALE PRICE CHANGES.

<

(1922=100) ·

Groups.

1932. 1933. 1934. 1935. 1936. 1937.

Foodstuffs

Textiles

126.5 113.4

94.3

85.4

113.3

136.2

125.2

97.0

85.9

74.2

99.4 117.7

Metals

128.1 107.8

97.4

79.8

107.2

146.1

Miscellaneous

109,7

95.7

88.5

72.3

92.5

124.4

Average

122.4

103.5

91.5

77.9

103.1

131.1

:

24

Chapter VIII.

WAGES AND COST OF LIVING.

The favourable rate of the local dollar which remained steady throughout the year undoubtedly helped the local indus- tries.

Factories which produced goods for the Empire markets i.e. hand electric torches, rubber shoes, dry battery cells, cork and felt hats and artificial silk goods had a very good year. Taking all the local industries together a great improvement was made.

Piece work

The system of payment remained the same. was the general rule in the lower grades of work of the light industries and in all mass production work. This system seemed to be the most satisfactory to the employers and the employed. Daily pay remained the rule for skilled male labour.

New industries sprang up, such as the manufacture of tooth brushes, gas masks and their component parts, and fertilizer from street refuse. Weaving and knitting factories, and also torch and battery factories, showed а marked increase in numbers.

There was a considerable improvement in employment. The heavy industries did a great deal towards this. Female labour, too, had a good year. In cigarette, torch, weaving and knitting factories, in all of which female labour predominates, the available space for workers was fully occupied.

Most of the factories worked full time. In a number of cases larger and better premises were taken over and much modern machinery installed.

or dis-

No trouble was experienced in respect of wages or missals.

The The number of factories increased by more than one third, from 541 to 731. 241 new factories opened, whilst only 51 closed down.

was

After allowing for seasonal fluctuations, there was a slight average rise in the prices of the commodities included in the cost of living index up to July, the last normal month before the outbreak of Sino-Japanese hostilities. But this rise very uneven. While meat, vegetables, clothes and shoes prices rose, firewood and oil prices fell substantially. After July prices climbed rapidly to a peak (average) in late September, at levels between 20% and 70% above the corresponding figures for 1936, with the exception of tea and oil prices which rose about 10%. After September prices fell off about 15% in relation to the corresponding figures for 1936.

7

25

The price of rice varied between 20% and 33% above the corresponding figures for 1936, but in 1937 the peak price for the year was reached in August as opposed to December in 1936. The sharp rise in price which occurred in the latter half of 1936 proved largely permanent. The absolute variation during the year (25%) was about the same as in 1936 (23%) but, as in 1937 the interval between the two was two months as compared with eleven months in 1936 (the minimum being prior in both cases), the change was more keenly felt. Figures

are:

Per 100 catties. (average of 4 grades).

1937

June

August

Variation.

$ 7.31

$ 9.16

25%

1936

February

December

$ 5.90

$ 7.27

23%

AVERAGE RATES OF WAGES FOR LABOUR.

Building Trade:-

Locomotive Drivers

$1.30 to $1.80 per day.

Carpenters

0.80

1.30

""

ii

21

Bricklayers

0.80

1.30

Painters

0.80

1.30

"}

3"

Plasterers (including Shanghai

Plasterers)

1.00

1.50

"}

27

Scaffolders

1.00

1.50

Labourers (male)

0.60,, 0.80

"

(female)

0.40

0.50 ""

Working hours 9 per day. Time and a half paid for over- time. Free temporary sleeping quarters provided on the build- ing site and communal messing at cheap rates.

:

27

Female Workers in Factories:·

Cigarette making

$0.20 to $0.70 per day.

Knitting factories

0.20

0.45

Perfumery

0.20

0.40

2.2

Confectionery

0.20

0.40 22

Electric hand torch factories

0.20

0.30 "J

22

Electric hand torch battery

factories

Working hours from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.

One hour off at mid-

day. Overtime from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at day rates.

Domestic Servants:-

0.15

0.35

""

:

Employed by Chinese

$ 7.00 to $20.00 per month.

Employed by Europeans...... 15.00,

Gardeners

40.00

15.00

30.00

""

>>

With free lodging, and, with Chinese employers, generally free board.

NOTE:

-The rates of pay of Government employees are much the same as those of a similar category in private employ.

Transport coolies

$0.60 to $0.70 per day.

Coal coolies

0.55

27

Ricksha coolies

0.60

0.70

37

72

17

Chapter IX.

EDUCATION AND WELFARE INSTITUTIONS.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

These are either schools where the medium of instruction is English or mostly English or schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese. The former, seventeen in number, are known as "English" schools, the latter, of which there are four, as "vernacular" schools.

28

2. Of the four English schools, classed as "secondary" schools in the Table below, two are Anglo-Chinese schools for boys and one for girls. These three schools have primary departments. The fourth school, the Central British School which is a mixed school, has no primary department. Of the ten English schools, classed as "primary"

"primary" schools in the Table, three are mixed schools preparing for the Central British School. In this group are also four "District" schools, includ- ing one for Indian boys and three "Lower Grade" schools, two of which are in rural districts. In those English schools which are attended by Chinese the study of English and of Chinese is carried on side by side, the pari passu system requiring that promotion shall depend on proficiency in both languages.

3. Of the three Government Schools classed as "vocational” one is the Junior Technical School which was opened in February, 1933, the other is the Evening Institute which is attended by persons desirous of receiving instruction for the most part germane to their day time occupations. The Trade School was opened in February 1937.

4. Of the four Government vernacular schools one has a seven years' course and includes a Normal department. There is also a normal school for women teachers and a normal school on the mainland which aims at providing vernacular teachers for rural schools. As explained in the Report for the year 1936, the alteration in the status of Un Long School has proceeded according to plan and this school is now classified as "Verna- cular".

GRANT-IN-AID AND SUBSIDIZED SCHOOLS.

5. There are fifteen Grant-in-Aid English Schools, and three Grant-in-Aid Vernacular Schools. Of the former, seven are schools for boys and eight are for girls.

6. One English school for girls has a primary department only, and one an infant department only. The remaining schools classed in the table below as "secondary" schools have primary departments as well as the upper classes.

7. Munsang College, Kowloon City, received a grant of $6,000.

8. The vernacular Grant-in-Aid Schools are schools for girls and classed in the Table as "secondary" schools.

9. The 283 subsidized schools are all vernacular schools.

=29

UNAIDED, SCHOOLS.

UNAIDED

10. In 1937 there were 724 unaided vernacular schools with 46,139 children and 129 unaided English schools with 6,325 children.

1937.

Table showing number of schools and scholars for the year

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

CLASS OF INSTITUTIONS.

GRANT-IN-AID AND SUBSIDIZED

SCHOOLS.

UNAIDED

SCHOOLS.

No. of Institu- tions.

No. of

No. of

On

On

Institu-

Roll.

Roll.

Institu-

On Roll.

tions.

tions.

ENGLISH-

Secondary,

4 2,272

14 7,341

5

877

Primary,

10 1,751

2

255

117

4,983

Vocational,

3

1,061

7

465

Total,

17

5,084

16

7,596

129 6,325

VERNACULAR :--

Secondary,

1

240

3❘ 1,080

Primary,

1

100

283 19,738

723 45,837

Vocational,

2

219

1 472

1

302

Total,

4

559

287 21,290

724 46,139

Total No. of Institutions

Total on Roll

1,177

86,993

N.B.-Kindergarten boys attending Grant-in-Aid Schools for girls are

not shown separately.

/

30

THE UNIVERSITY.

11. The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under a local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.

12. The University hostels are three in number-Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall and May Hall. There are also three recognized hostels for men, St. John's Hall, Morrison Hall and Ricci Hall, and one-St. Stephen's Hall for women. No university hostel at present exists for women students.

13. The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building. Additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicile. The latest additions to the buildings are a School of Chinese Studies, the cost of which was borne by Mr. Tang Chi Ngong a local Chinese merchant and banker, and a Chinese Library named after the late Mr. Fung Ping Shan who provided a sum of $100,000 for the building and $50,000 as an endow- ment fund for its maintenance; also a School of Surgery and a new Engineering Laboratory named after a former Governor, Sir William Peel. In 1936 a first class gymnasium was added to the University buildings. The entire cost of this building and its equipment was the generous gift of Mr. Eu Tong Sen, one of the leading Chinese in the Colony.

14. The income of the University for 1937 amounted to $1,018,116 of which $404,902 was derived from endowments and $350,000 from Government. Messrs. John Swire & Sons, Ltd., gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and subsequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockefeller Institute has endowed the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000. The annual expenditure in 1937 amounted to about $1,021,278.

15. The University includes the three faculties of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognized as equivalent thereto.

16. The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree of M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D. and M.S. are awarded on examinations but are subject to the proviso that every candidate for the degrees shall produce evidence of special post-graduate experience in the subject which he presents. The degrees above mentioned are recognized by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

31

-----

. 17. The Faculty of Engineering provides a four years' course in practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, mechanical or electrical engineering. The degree for post- graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).

18. The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce, a department of Chinese studies and a department for training teachers. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

19. With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard which is in all three faculties that of a British University degree-external examiners are, in all faculties associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

20. The degree of LL.D. is granted honoris causa.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

21. The following are the best known Charitable Institutions.

French Convent Orphanage. Italian Convent Orphanage. Maryknoll Convent, Kowloon.

St. Louis Industrial School.

Po Leung Kuk-Chinese.

Taipo Rural Orphanage School.

Society of Precious Blood Hospital.

Industrial Home for the Blind, Pokfulam.

Home for Aged Poor, Kowloon.

La Calvaire Home for Aged Poor, Happy Valley.

Eyre Refuge.

Salvation Army Home.

Industrial School, Aberdeen.

RECREATION AND ART.

22. Most of the schools contrive to hold annual sports either on their own grounds or on grounds. generously lent by local cricket and football clubs. Lawn tennis, football, swim- ming, volley ball and basket ball continue to increase in popularity. Cricket is played at a few schools. Physical train- ing is given by qualified instructors. Art is taught in the Government British schools by trained art mistresses.

shipping

32

Chapter X.

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT.

The external communications of Hong Kong are excellent both by sea and by telegraph, cable and radio. As regards the former, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the Blue Funnel Line, the Messageries Maritimes, and several other British and foreign companies maintain regular passenger and freight services between Hong Kong and Europe. The trans-Pacific communications are well served by the Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd., the Dollar Line, the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and other steamship lines. To Australia three steamship companies, the Eastern and Aus- tralian, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and Australian and Oriental maintain regular passenger and freight services. In addition there are direct sailings to Africa, South America, and to New York. There is frequent and regular communication between Hong Kong and other Far Eastern ports in India, Java, Straits Settlements, Formosa, Indo-China, Japan and the China coast. Local steamship communication is by river steamer from Hong Kong to Canton and the West River ports with several sailings daily. In addition there is a vast traffic between Hong Kong and the adjacent provinces of China by junk and sampan.

2. The total shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1937 amounted to 73.257 vessels of 37,830,760 tons which compared with the figures for 1936 showed a decrease of 10,314 vessels and 3,900,256 tons. Of the above, 33,782 vessels of 36,191,724 tons were engaged in foreign trade as compared with 40,626 vessels of 40,063,663 tons in 1936. There was a decrease in British ocean-going shipping of 294 vessels and 234,162 tons. Foreign ocean-going vessels showed a decrease of 1,162 vessels and 2,105,107 tons. British river steamers showed a decrease of 487 vessels and 622,960 tons. Foreign river steamers showed a decrease of 781 vessels and 315,086 tons. In steamships not exceeding 60 tons em- ployed in foreign trade, there was a decrease of 1,405 vessels. with a decrease in tonnage of 35,962 tons. Junks in foreign trade showed a decrease of 2,715 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 558,662 tons. In local trade (i.e., between places within the waters of the Colony), there was a decrease in steam launches of 363 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 12,406 tons. Junks in local trade showed a decrease of 3,107 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 15,911 tons.

3. The Eastern Extension Australasia and China Telegraph Company (British) by means of three cables to Singapore, one direct and one each via Labuan and Cape St. James respectively,

33

provides good connections with Europe via India, with Austra- lasia, and with the other British Colonies and Possessions.

By their cable to Manila connection is made with the direct Ameri- can cable, thence to San Francisco. Two cables to Shanghai, belonging respectively to the Eastern Extension and to the Great Northern (Danish) Companies, via Foochow and Aanoy respec- tively, give a good connection with Shanghai, North China, Japan and Russia; the system of the Great Northern Telegraph Company gives a good service to Europe via Asiatic Russia.

4. The Government operates commercial radio services with direct communication to the Chinese stations in Shanghai, Foochow, Amoy, Swatow, Canton, Yunnanfu, Hankow and via Hankow to inland places in China, to Macao, Formosa, French Indo-China, Siam, Philippines, Dutch East Indies, British North Borneo, via Manila to Europe, America, etc. and via Malabar to Australasia, Europe, etc.

5. The revenue collected by the Radio Office during the year from radio telegrams amounted to $975,459, an increase of $298,913 on the amount collected in 1936. Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $1,464. The total Revenue from the telegraph service amounted to $976,923. Ship Station Licences yielded $1,600, Amateur Transmission Station Licences $300, Broadcast Receiving Licences $102,232, Dealers' Licences. $2,800, Examination Fee for Operators' Certificates of Pro- fiçiency $270 and Limited Licences $2,550.

6. The number of paid radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 236,401 consisting of 2,923,162 words against 167,883 consisting of 1,630,029 words in 1936 and 234,477 were received, consisting of 2,999,469 words against 194,973 consisting of 2,112,835 words.

7. In addition to the paid traffic figures given above the wireless Service is responsible for the reception of time signals daily from Bordeaux, Rugby, Malabar and Nauen, for the transmission of time signals to ships in the China Sea, the reception of press messages amounting to 516 messages or 360,609 words from Rugby, the collection and distribution of meteorological traffic, 13,844 messages (754,500 words) having been forwarded, and 24,238 messages (1,304,558 words) having been received, the reception and dissemination of distress, piracy and navigation messages, the transmission and reception of Government messages, etc.

8. A telephone service between Hong Kong and Canton, a distance of 110 miles, is in operation. During 1937 a telephone service between the Colony and Hankow was inaugurated.\

9. Mails. The number of mail receptacles of Hong Kong origin despatched during the year was 44,416 as compared with 41,681 in 1936-an increase of 2,735, the number received was, 53,153 as compared with 48,672-an increase of 4,481.

tile

34

10. Receptacles in transit, including those to and from British and Foreign Men-of-War, numbered 163,888 as against 146,126 in 1936 an increase of 17,762.

11. Registered Articles and Parcels.-The number of regis- tered articles handled amounted to 886,262 as compared with 660,866 in 1936-an increase of 225,396.

12. The figures for insured letters were 12,268 and 12,540 respectively a decrease of 272.

13. Parcels, ordinary and insured, which were dealt with reached a total of 188,626 as against 164,482 in 1936-an increase of 24,144.

14. The Railway may be said to have experienced the most eventful year in its history. Abnormal occurrences,

in chronological order, were a disastrous fire on the up through fast train in January resulting in the death of 84 persons; a major derailment of the same train twelve days later; record passenger traffic during the Ching Ming festival in April and the Coronation celebrations in May; linking-up of the Canton- Hankow and the Canton-Kowloon Railways in August; the sub- sequent introduction of a working agreement for through goods traffic between Kowloon and Hankow; use of all available space on the Railway Reclamation at Kowloon for storing cargo originally destined for Shanghai but diverted to Hong Kong owing to Sino-Japanese hostilities; intensive damage to track and the total suspension of traffic for 10 days caused by a record typhoon in September; and lastly, the intensive bombing of the Chinese Section of the line from October to December which caused dislocation of traffic, damage to rolling stock and the ultimate cancellation of the through morning and mid-day passenger trains.

15. Receipts and net operating revenue were $1,331,468.73 and $436,935.30 respectively, as against $1,245,469.16 and $454,733.00 the previous year. Since revenue was reduced by $193,000 due to the loss of both Shum Chun Casino traffic and foreign express train haulage, and expenditure was increased by more than $113,000 through the two causes mentioned in the following paragraph, the results can be considered as being very satisfactory.

16. Operating expenditure was $894,533.43 compared with $790,736.16 in 1936. The increase is due to heavy repair work necessitated by the disastrous typhoon, which cost the Railway $80,883.12, and also to the higher price of coal. The operating ratio declined from 65.49% to 67.18% due to these causes.

17. The track on both sections was well maintained, al- though continued bombing caused serious delays to traffic for the last 24 months of the year.

36

24. Communication between the island and the mainland is maintained by a number of ferry services; the most important of which are the Star Ferry between Kowloon Point and pier near the General Post Office, and the combined vehicular and passenger service of the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Com- pany between Jordan Road, Kowloon, and Jubilee Street,

Victoria.

Chapter XI.

BANKING, CURRENCY, WEIGHTS & MEASURES.

The Colony is well served by banking institutions, including branches of English, American, French, Netherlands, Japanese and Chinese banks. Besides the fourteen banks which are members of the Clearing House, there are several Chinese Banks and many native Hongs do some banking business. There are no banks which devote themselves specially to agricultural and co-operative banking. The Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation also conducts the business of the Hong Kong Savings Bank on usual savings bank principles. The credit and repute of the Colony's financial institutions are high and it is satisfactory to know that ample encouragement and support are available to finance any possible demand.

2. The Currency of the Colony which was formerly based on silver underwent very important changes at the end of 1935. The unit of currency is the Hong Kong dollar, divided into 100 cents. Under the former regime its exchange value fluctuated with the price of silver; but since the passing of the Currency Ordinance 1935, on the 5th December, 1935, the value of the dollar is controlled by an Exchange Fund, which has power to buy and sell foreign exchange, and has taken over the silver formerly held against their issues by the note-issuing banks, in return for certificates of indebtedness against which the Fund may hold bullion, foreign exchange or approved securities. At the 30th June, 1937 (the latest date for which figures have been made public) the Fund had issued Certificates of Indebtedness to the value of $152,652,579 equivalent to £9,342,020 at the middle market rate on that day, 1/2; and the total assets of the Fund amounted to £10,316,240.

The legal tender currency of the Colony is now as follows:-

(a) Bank notes, the excess of which over the fiduciary issue of each bank is now backed by certificates, not by silver as formerly:-

At 31.12.37.

(i) Chartered Bank of India, Australia & China ...$ 25,172,604

37

(ii) Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking Corporation...$199,689,793 (iii) Mercantile Bank of India

$ 5,175,570

(b) Government $1 notes, of which $3,900,000 have been issued.

(c) 10 cent and 5 cent cupro-nickel coins.

(d) 1 cent copper coins.

(e) The silver dollars and .800 fine silver sub-coin (10 cent and 5 cent pieces, and a few 50 and 20 cent pieces) which have either remained in circulation in the Colony or filter back into it from the mainland of China, are still legal tender in the Colony (sub-coin only up to an amount of $2.00).

During 1937, which may be regarded as the first year of normal operation of the Exchange Fund, the exchange value of the Hong Kong dollar was maintained with great steadiness at about the level established in the latter part of 1936. The official rate quoted by the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation for the sale of sterling varied between a maximum of 1/239 in January and February and a minimum of 1/212 in July; and for the last four months remained unchanged at 1/21. Market rates were usually a fraction higher.

3. The weights and measures in use in the Colony are defined in the Schedule to Ordinance No. 2 of 1885. They consist of the standards in use in the United Kingdom and of the following Chinese Weights and Measures:-

and

1 fan (candareen)=0.0133 ounces avoirdupois.

1 tsin (mace)=.133 ounces avoirdupois.

1 leung (tael)=1.33 ounces avoirdupois.

1 kan (catty)=1.33 pounds avoirdupois.

1 tam (picul)=133.33 pounds avoirdupois.

1 chek (foot)=143 English inches divided into 10 tsün

(inches) and each tsun into ten fan or tenths.

Chapter XII.

PUBLIC WORKS.

During the year under review the operations of the Public Works Department were carried out, under a Head Office Staff, by eleven sub-departments, namely the Accounts and Stores,

88

Architectural, Buildings Ordinance, Crown Lands and Surveys, Drainage, Electrical, Port Development, Roads and Transport, Valuations and Resumptions, Waterworks Construction and Waterworks Maintenance offices.

2. The European staff comprised 149 officers and the non- European approximately 638.

3. The following is a summary of works carried out during the year:

BUILDINGS.

4. Works completed were:-Queen Mary Hospital with Staff Quarters; Wanchai Market; Wholesale Market at Kennedy Town; Stanley Market; Postal Kiosk at Stanley; Wireless Telegraph Station at Hung Hom; Sports Pavilion at Central British School; Kam Wah Street Latrine; Shelter and Car Park at Garden Road; Car Shelters at Stanley Prison; Ta Ku Ling Police Station; Latrine at Tsun Wan Market; Barricades to Police Stations in the New Territories and the demolition of the old Central Market, old Wanchai Market and Queen's Gardens.

5. Works under construction were:-Government Stores and Workshops; additional block of flats at Stanley Prison and the new Central Market.

6. In addition to general maintenance numerous minor alterations, improvements and additions were executed to Government Buildings during the year and repairs of varying magnitude were carried out to practically all Government Build- ings damaged by a severe typhoon on the 2nd of September.

COMMUNICATIONS.

7. Works completed were:-Cutting and filling of the section of road adjoining Inland Lots Nos. 3685 & 3686, Blue Pool Road; widening of that portion of Garden Road between the Lower Peak Tram Station and the Helena May Institute; raising the first section of Electric Road to new Town Planning levels; Magazine Gap Road was widened and a Car Park constructed at the junction of this road with Bowen Road; surfacing of Sai Kung Road from Sam Tack Road to Field Cottage site; improvements to Sha Tin Pass Road; road to Smuggler's Pass and road from Au Tau to Shek Kong.

8. Works under construction were:-Widening and sur- facing of Customs Pass Road; surfacing of Sai Kung Road from Field Cottage site to Customs Pass Road; strengthening of bridges at Tsun Wan, Tsing Lung Tau, Tai Lam Chung (small bridge); rebuilding of a large bridge at Tai Lam Chung; surfacing of road to Smuggler's Pass and approach road to Tsun Wan Cemetery.

39

DRAINAGE.

9. In Hong Kong, new main sewers and storm water drains to a length of 5,361 feet and new open channels of varying sections to a length of 717 feet were laid. In addition, 188 feet of existing nullah was decked over and 142 feet of main storm water drain previously inverted was completed. In Kowloon, New Kowloon and New Territories, new main sewers and storm water drains to a length of 6,414 feet, and new open channels of varying sections to a length of 528 feet were laid. Nullah walling was constructed to proper height and parapet walling built for a length of 500 feet.

was

10. Anti-Malarial work was continued in Hong Kong by the letting of two new contracts, one for an area between the two reservoirs at Aberdeen, the other in the vicinity of Pokfulam between the Queen Mary Hospital and Sandy Bay. Although these contracts were not let until late in the year good progress was made on preliminary work and excavation, and at Aberdeen area 300 feet of main channel was constructed. A 3,000 gallon reservoir with a "De Villiers" automatic syphon sluice erected near Mount Cameron Road, and minor channelling was laid near Inland Lot No. 2441, Victoria Road. In Kowloon, several short lengths of channelling were laid as requested by the Government Malariologist. In New Kowloon, working on training the stream-course west of New Kowloon Inland Lot No. 1969 at Ngau Shi Wan was commenced in November. length of 150 feet of 36" diameter channel was completed. Filling to the amount of 1,200 cubic yards was also completed and an area of 300 super yards was turfed.

WATER WORKS.

A

11. On the maintenance side the following works were carried out:-

12. In Hong Kong the following lengths of new mains were laid to improve distributions:-120 feet of 15′′, 287 feet of 10′′, 1,105 feet of 6", 144 feet of 5′′, 2,271 feet of 4′′, 2,211 feet of 3′′, 904 feet of 2". 3,624 feet of subsidiary mains were laid in back lanes. The Stanley Water Supply Scheme was com- pleted. Construction of a 50,000 gallon covered service reser- voir for Repulse Bay commenced.

13. In Kowloon and New Kowloon the following lengths of mains were laid:-1,367 feet of 12", 1,724 feet of 6′′ and 3,607 feet of subsidiary mains in back lanes.

14. In the New Territories mains were laid as follows: 5,907 feet of 4′′ at Tsun Wan, 780 feet of 3′′ at Taipo and 364 feet of subsidiary mains in back lanes.

40

15. The Jubilee Reservoir at Shing Mun was taken over from the Consulting Engineers on 1st May. Certain defects in Pineapple Pass Dam were discovered in September and were referred to the Consulting Engineers whose final decision had not been received at the close of the year.

16. The disastrous typhoon of 2nd September caused only minor damage to Water Works.

17. During the year experimental waste detection work was carried out and reports were submitted to Government with a view to the establishment of a permanent waste detection branch.

:

18. On the construction side the following works were carried out:

19. The laying of the first section of the second 24′′ diameter trunk main from the Shing Mun Valley between Shek Lai Pui Service Reservoir and Waterloo Road was completed and brought into use in July.

20. The total length of main laid was 16,876 feet of which 16,286 feet consisted of new pipes.

21. The third section of the rapid gravity filters for the Shing Mun Valley Scheme was completed and brought into use in July. With the completion of this section, which deals with five million gallons per day the total filtration capacity of the plant is now fifteen million gallons per day. Provision has been made for the addition of a further five million gallons per day at a future date.

22. The following works in connection with a general ex- tension of the Water Works and described in Sessional Paper No. 3/1937 were approved by the Secretary of State: -supply to Albany; supply to Peak Road; new Cross Harbour Pipes; rapid gravity filters at Eastern; Kowloon Tsai Service Reservoir and Supply Mains thereto; Distribution-Island and Mainland and Shing Mun Valley Scheme Catchwaters.

23. Of the above a contract was let in October for the first section of the Shing Mun Catchwaters, on which good progress was made. Pipes and specials were ordered through the Crown Agents for the Cross Harbour Pipes. Of the remain- ing items work was mainly restricted to preliminary investigations, designs, detailed estimates and the preparation of contract documents.

RECLAMATIONS.

24. At North Point and Kennedy Town, areas of about 0.75 acres and 1 acre respectively were reclaimed by free deposits of building debris. At Kun Tong an area of about 2 acres has now been reclaimed by the depositing of town's refuse by the Urban Council.

"

41

25. Extensive repairs were carried out to piers and seawalls which were damaged in the typhoon of 2nd September. At Lai Chi Kok a length of 750 lineal feet of seawall was recon- structed.

ELECTRIC WORKS.

26. Wireless:-Aerial systems were renewed and improved at Cape D'Aguilar Transmitting Station. The re-broadcasting receiver at Victoria Peak was improved, and special aerials were erected. A Lamson pneumatic tube was installed to faci- litate communication between the Royal Observatory and the Kowloon Wireless Telegraph Station. A new receiver and several new batteries were fitted at Water Police Stations. An experimental transmitter of increased power was constructed for alternative broadcast programmes and one new lattice work mast was erected.

27. Hospital apparatus from the Government Civil Hospital was removed, repaired and installed at Queen Mary Hospital.

28. Lighting, power and telephones:-Lights, fans, lifts, telephones and bells in Government Buildings were maintained in good order. Two submarine cables were repaired. Lines were run, and telephones fitted in various offices and hospitals, and alarm bells were fitted in hospitals and gaols.

29. Work on new electrical installations at the following places was in hand:-Queen Mary Hospital; Wanchai Market; Stanley Village Market; Victoria Gaol and Guards' Quarters at Wyndham Street; Government Civil Hospital; Stanley Prison; Kennedy Town Market; Western Market; new Broadcasting Station; Central British School; Kowloon City Police Station and new Wireless Station Hung Hom. Improvements and additions were carried out in forty-seven buildings in Hong Kong and fifteen in Kowloon.

30. One cross harbour submarine cable was laid.

BUILDINGS ORDINANCE OFFICE.

31. The volume of new building work coming under the jurisdiction of the Buildings Ordinance, 1935, showed a slight decrease in comparison with the figures for 1936.

32. Plans for alterations and additions to existing buildings again comprised the major part of plans deposited. There was an increase in the number of European houses but a decrease in the number of Chinese tenement type houses dealt with. Buildings of a non-domestic character showed an increase.

33. The large increase in the cost of building material which occurred toward the middle of the year was reflected in a marked falling off in the number of plans deposited during the -last quarter.

42

a

34. Plans were approved for the following more important works:-Demolition of slum property and rebuilding of a block of modern Chinese type houses, Lyndhurst Terrace and Gage Street; Chinese Restaurant, Wing Lok Street and Bonham Strand West; Chinese Restaurant, Queen's Road West and Possession Street; Super Service Station, Arsenal Street; block of eighteen Chinese houses, Gloucester, Jaffe and Canal Roads; a block of ten Chinese houses, Morrison Hill Road; European flats Nos. 74 to 76 Macdonnell Road; a block of twelve Chinese houses, Wanchai Road; St. Stephen's Junior School, Stanley; three Godowns, King's Road; New Wharf, Taikoo; Biscuit Factory, Electric Road; Roman Catholic Chapel, Pokfulam; four blocks Chinese Quarters, Dairy Farm, Pokfulam; Printing Factory, King's Road; Ice Store and Garage for Dairy Farm Company, Canton Road; two large Godowns, Canton Road; Pea-nut Oil Factory, Castle Peak Road; block of four Chinese houses, Lai Chi Kok Road; a block of ten Chinese houses, Lai Chi Kok Road; a block of twelve Chinese houses, Reclamation Street; Chinese Restaurant, Shanghai Street; large Godown, Saigon Street; a block of three European houses, Taipo Road; Brewery, Tsun Wan Marine Lot No. 5; eleven European houses, Argyle Street; two blocks of European flats, (comprising in all twelve flats) with garages, Argyle Street; five storey block of flats, Austin Road and Avenue; one pair of European houses, Austin Road; La Salle Junior School, Boundary Street; Cinema Theatre, Carpenter Road; three European houses, Grampian Road; Church, Hillwood Road; Church and School, Kak Hang Tsun Road; China Light and Power Company Sub-Station, Ma Tau Chung Road; Cracker Factory extension, Pak Tai Street; two pairs European houses, Prince Edward Road; three storey Godown, Pak Tai Street; New Power Station, Tai Wan; a block of twelve Chinese houses, To Kwa Wan Road; Factory for Hong Kong Dairy Supply Company, Waterloo Road.

35. Buildings of importance completed were:-Chinese Restaurant, Wing Lok Street and Bonham Strand West; a block of European flats, Robinson Road; Cold Storage Building, Dairy Farm Company, East Point; Sisters' Quarters, St. Paul's Hospital, Causeway Bay; Church and Hall, Causeway Bay; fourteen Chinese houses, Gloucester, Marsh and Jaffe Roads; eighteen Chinese houses, Gloucester, Stewart and Jaffe Roads; Office Building, 10 Queen's Road Central; Office Building, 9 Queen's Road Central; Hong Kong Electric Company Sub- Sitation, Chiu Lung Street; Carmelite Sisters' Convent, Stanley; Garden and Swimming Pool, Repulse Bay; three Godowns, King's Road; European type flats, "Hill Crest" The Peak; Printing Factory, King's Road; Private Hospital, Kiu Kiang Street; large extension to Weaving Factory, Un Chau Street; two large Godowns, Hong Kong and Kowloon Wharf and Godown Company, Canton Road; a block of twelve Chinese houses, Reclamation Street; large Godown, Hong Kong and Kowloon

43

Wharf and Godown Company, Saigon Street; Girls' School, Hau Pui Loong; Church, Waterloo Road; Maryknoll Convent School, Waterloo Road and Boundary Street; Chinese Christian Church, Ma Tau Chung Road; School, Church and Priests' Quarters, Kak Hang Tsun Road.

36. Occupation permits were issued for 116 Chinese tene- ment houses, of these forty were erected in Kowloon and seventy-six on the Island. Occupation permits issued for fifty- seven European type houses, of these thirty-eight were erected in Kowloon and nineteen in Hong Kong.

37. The number of water flushed sanitary installations approved amounted to 1,843.

38. Twelve fires causing structural damage were reported. In a fire which occurred at Nos. 21 to 25 Sa Po Road, the building was completely gutted. The building was a three storey structure with wooden floors, stairs and roofs without egress to roofs. Four of the inmates were burned to death.

39. During the typhoon of 2nd September a conflagration broke out at Nos. 181 to 137 Connaught Road West. The buildings were of the early tenement type, and with the excep- tion of two houses, the roofs, floors and stairs were of wooden construction. Egress to roofs was provided. Practically all the wooden floors and stairs collapsed, but little damage was done to walls. Several lives were lost, but as the ground floors were flooded by heavy seas from the harbour, the cause of death could not be ascertained.

40. It is noted that fires in houses of reinforced concrete construction were confined mostly to the floors in which the outbreak occurred, and in the majority of cases resultant damage was slight.

41. Nineteen collapses were reported, eleven of which occurred as a result of the very severe typhoon experienced on the 2nd September. The total casualties for the year due to collapses amounted to two. A serious accident occurred during the operation of a piling plant on Kowloon Inland Lot No. 3871, Canton Road. The accident was attributed to an exceptionally severe and sudden gust of wind, which caused the plant to overturn. Six people were killed and several injured.

42. Three landslips occurred as a result of the heavy rains. One casualty occurred as the result of a quantity of overhanging decomposed granite and boulders falling on to a shed at Tai Kok Tsui (Kowloon Quarry No. 14).

44

43. Plans were approved for the construction of a seawall and the reclamation of an area comprising 2,137,000 square feet at Tsun Wan Marine Lot No. 8. Preparation work only was carried out.

44. The Chinese Cemeteries in Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon were maintained in good order and provision was made for additional burial spaces. An area at Hammer Hill was gazetted as an urning ground, and preliminary survey work was carried out with a view to making this area available in 1939, by which time it is expected Aplichau will be unable to accommodate any additional urns. Very few burials took place at Ho Man Tin or Cheung Sha Wan, the main volume going to No. 7 Cemetery (Customs Pass). Chai Wan Cemetery is rapidly approaching saturation point, and it was found neces- sary to gazette a new area (Chai Wan Extension) which is in course of formation. Usual maintenance and minor works were executed in Kai Lung Wan and Mount Caroline Cemeteries.

Chapter XIII.

JUSTICE AND POLICE.

1. THE COURTS OF HONG Kong.

The Supreme Court of Hong Kong consists of a Chief Justice and one or more other judges. At present there is one Puisne Judge and one other Judge for the purpose of Appeals.

2. The jurisdiction of the Court is regulated by a number of Ordinances but generally it may be said that the Court exercises a Summary Jurisdiction in all actions where the claims do not exceed $1,000 and an Original Jurisdiction in all actions where the claims exceed that amount.

3. In addition to the above the Court exercises Admiralty, Probate, Divorce, Bankruptcy, Lunacy, Criminal and Appellate Jurisdiction.

4. The following is a brief summary of litigation and matters dealt with during the year 1937:-

1,582 actions were instituted in the Summary Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgments were given totalled $212,915.00.

172 actions were instituted in the Original Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgments were given totalled $328,632.87.

44

43. Plans were approved for the construction of a seawall and the reclamation of an area comprising 2,137,000 square feet at Tsun Wan Marine Lot No. 8. Preparation work only was carried out.

44. The Chinese Cemeteries in Hong Kong, Kowloon and New Kowloon were maintained in good order and provision was made for additional burial spaces. An area at Hammer Hill was gazetted as an urning ground, and preliminary survey work was carried out with a view to making this area available in 1939, by which time it is expected Aplichau will be unable to accommodate any additional urns. Very few burials took place at Ho Man Tin or Cheung Sha Wan, the main volume going to No. 7 Cemetery (Customs Pass). Chai Wan Cemetery is rapidly approaching saturation point, and it was found neces- sary to gazette a new area (Chai Wan Extension) which is in course of formation. Usual maintenance and minor works were executed in Kai Lung Wan and Mount Caroline Cemeteries.

Chapter XIII.

JUSTICE AND POLICE.

1. THE COURTS OF HONG Kong.

The Supreme Court of Hong Kong consists of a Chief Justice and one or more other judges. At present there is one Puisne Judge and one other Judge for the purpose of Appeals.

2. The jurisdiction of the Court is regulated by a number of Ordinances but generally it may be said that the Court exercises a Summary Jurisdiction in all actions where the claims do not exceed $1,000 and an Original Jurisdiction in all actions where the claims exceed that amount.

3. In addition to the above the Court exercises Admiralty, Probate, Divorce, Bankruptcy, Lunacy, Criminal and Appellate Jurisdiction.

4. The following is a brief summary of litigation and matters dealt with during the year 1937:-

1,582 actions were instituted in the Summary Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgments were given totalled $212,915.00.

172 actions were instituted in the Original Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgments were given totalled $328,632.87.

45

Two actions were instituted in the Admiralty Jurisdiction.

403 grants were made, or grants of other courts sealed, in the Probate Jurisdiction.

Eight Petitions for Divorce were filed during 1937 and Decree absolute pronounced in two cases.

291 persons were indicted in the Criminal Jurisdiction of whom 229 were convicted.

38 appeals were lodged in the Appellate Jurisdiction 34 of which were disposed of during the year.

Four Criminal appeals were lodged and disposed of during the year.

5. The lower civil courts are the land courts in the Northern and Southern districts of the New Territories, with jurisdiction over land cases in those districts, and the small debts courts of the same two districts. In these courts the District Officers

sit to hear land and small debts cases.

6. The lower criminal courts are the magistrates' courts, two for Hong Kong island, and a small area on the main and opposite Shaukiwan, two for Kowloon, including the whole area south of the Kowloon hills, and one each for the two districts of the New Territories, in which the District Officers are the magistrates.

7. The following figures show the amount of work done by

the lower courts in 1937: —

Civil:-

District Officer North,

Land Court

Small Debts Court

District Officer, South,

Land Court

Small Debts Court

91 cases.

87

209 cases.

41

Criminal:

*

Hong Kong Magistracy, two courts

Kowloon Magistracy, two courts

District Officer, North, one court

District Officer, South, one court

38,091 cases.

30,220

1,881

508

هریه

47

cell accommodation for 1,598. Lai Chi Kok Branch Prison for males was closed down on 28.1.37. Victoria Gaol was closed down on 26.9.37 and all prisoners were transferred to Hong Kong Prison at Stanley. The transfer of all male prisoners was completed on 26.9.37. The other prison is the female prison situated at Lai Chi Kok.

13. The total number of persons committed to prison in the year 1937 was 17,088 as compared with 16,106 in 1936. The daily average number of prisoners in the prisons in 1937 was 2,493. The highest previous average was 1,917 in 1936. Over 85% of prisoners admitted are persons born outside the Colony.

14. The health of the prisoners generally was well main- tained in the prisons.

15. The discipline in the prisons was good.

16. Prisoners are employed at printing, bookbinding, shoemaking, tinsmithing, matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, weaving, gardening, laundry work, cleaning and minor repairs to buildings. The bulk of the Government printing and book- binding is done in Hong Kong Prison.

IV. REMAND HOMES.

17. During the year 221 boys underwent sentences of detention for various crimes at the Remand Home for Juveniles (Boys), not under Prison administration and 69 girls underwent detention at the Remand Home for girls. The boys are given instruction in elementary reading and writing, as well rattan work, which teaches them a trade. The girls are given employment in house-work, laundry, and making and mending clothes. There are recreation facilities at both Homes.

in

There are also four Probation Officers, two males and two females.

Lady visitors attend the Female Prison twice weekly to instruct long sentence prisoners in needle work.

18. Visiting Justices inspect and report on the prisons every fortnight.

Chapter XIV.

LEGISLATION.

1. Twenty-eight Ordinances were passed during the year 1937. These and also the Regulations, Rules, By-Laws and other subordinate legislation enacted during 1937 are published

48

in a separate volume by the Government Printers. The twenty- eight Ordinances comprised two appropriation, three replace- ment, one incorporation, one consolidation, seventeen amend- ment and four which were new to the Colony.

2. The Appropriation Ordinance (No. 23) applied a sum not exceeding $26,338,340 to the public service for the year 1937 and Ordinance No. 10 appropriated a supplementary sum of $782,310.80 to defray the charges of the year 1936.

3. Of the three replacement Ordinances-

(1) The Hong Kong Government Service (Levy on Salaries) Ordinance (No. 2), which replaced the corresponding 1936 Ordinance, reduced the percentage deductions on salaries for the first half of 1937 and gave power to the Legislature by re- solution to continue, reduce or abandon the percentage deduc- tions during the second half of the year, and in addition made provision for the exchange conversion rate.

(2) The Pharmacy and Poisons Ordinance, 1937 (No. 8), which replaced the Pharmacy and Poisons Ordinance, 1916 (No. 9), followed closely the provisions of the Pharmacy and Poisons Act, 1933.

(3) The Factories and Workshops Ordinance, 1937 (No. 18) replaced the corresponding 1932 Ordinance. This Ordinance transferred the office of Protector of Labour from the Secretary for Chinese Affairs to the Chairman of the Urban Council and enacted certain new provisions to meet modern requirements.

4. Ordinance No. 28 provided for the incorporation of the Procurator in Hong Kong of the Irish Province of the Order of Franciscans Minor. The Ordinance followed the usual lines in such cases.

5. The Forestry Ordinance, 1937 consolidated and to some extent extended the existing Ordinances relating to forests, trees and plants.

6. The seventeen amending Ordinances covered a wide range of subjects, namely-Telecommunication (No. 1), Pensions (No. 3), Watchmen (No. 4), Deportation (British Subjects) (No. 5), Advertisements Regulation (No. 6), Public Health (Sanita- tion) (No. 7), Currency (No. 9), Printers and Publishers (No. 12), Stonecutters Island (No. 13), Motor Spirit (No. 14), Or- dinance and Regulations of Hong Kong (1937 edition) (No. 15), Life Assurance Companies (No. 16), Full Court (No. 17), Naval Establishment Police (No. 19), Magistrate's (No. 20), Merchant Shipping (No. 22), Interpretation (No. 26).

7. The Ordinances new to the Colony were:

(1) Stores Pier (North Point) and Additional Pipe Lines

Ordinance (No. 21).

49

(2) Sterling Salaries Conversion Ordinance (No. 24). (3) Public Officers (Change of Style) (No. 25).

(4) Law Revision Ordinance (No. 27).

Ordinance No. 21 provisionally authorised the Director of Public Works to construct a pier projecting into the Harbour and to lay two additional cross-Harbour pipe lines; No. 24, while repealing the Hong Kong Government Service (Levy on Salaries) Ordinance, 1937 (No. 2), made provision for converting the ster- ling salaries of Government officers for the year 1938 at a rate similar to the rate applicable in 1937; No. 25 changed the style of Inspector General of Police and Deputy Inspector General- of Police and Police Probationer to Commissioner of Police, Deputy Commissioner of Police and Police Cadet respectively and authorised the Legislative Council by resolution to make additional alterations in the style of public officers at any time; Ordinance No. 27 gave effect to certain amendments found necessary in the preparation of the revised Ordinances (1937 edition).

8. The subordinate legislation covered a wide range of subjects including.-

Air Navigation, Adulterated Food and Drugs, Asiatic Emigration Boarding House, Betting Duty, Births and Deaths Registration, Buildings, Cremation, Crown Rents (Apportion- ment), Dangerous Drugs, Defences (Firing Areas), Dentistry, Emergency Regulations (Cholera), Ferries, Forestry, Hawkers, Hong Kong (Coinage), Lighting Control, Liquors, Marriage, Merchant Shipping, Midwives, Naval Volunteer, New Territories Public Health (Sanitation), Nursing and Maternity Homes. Registration, Public Health (Animals and Birds). Pensions, Pharmacy and Poisons, Places of Public Entertainment, Pleasure Grounds and Bathing Places, Post Office, Prisons, Public Health (Food), Public Health (Sanitation), Quarantine and Prevention of Disease, Rating, Registration of Imports and Exports, Rope Company's Tramway, Telecommunication, Tram- ways, Vaccination, Vehicles and Traffic, Volunteer and Watch-

men.

Chapter XV.

PUBLIC FINANCE & TAXATION.

The following tables show the Revenue and Expenditure for the five years 1933 to 1937 inclusive.

Revenue. Expenditure. Surplus. .$32,099,278 $31,122,715 $ 976,563

29,574,286 31,149,156

Deficit.

1933

1934

$1,574,870

1935

28,430,550

28,291,636

138,914

1936

30,042,984 29,513,520

529,464

1937

33,196,368 32,111,222 -1,085,146

50

2. The revenue for the year 1937 amounted to $33,196,368, being $4,436,118 more than estimated, and $3,153,384 more than the revenue obtained in 1936.

3. All subheads under Duties exceeded the estimate by $1,210,411. Of this sum $682,203 was on account of Tobacco, representing the increased activities of local manufacturers on the closing down of North China factories through abnormal con- ditions in China. The temporary increase in population due to the influx of refugees from China accounted for the increase of $133,404 under Locally Manufactured Liquor, and certain smaller increases under Import Duty on Liquor and Spirits. Less tonnage accounted for a decrease of $11,224 under Light Dues. Receipts from Opium Monopoly exceeded the estimate by $64,770 accounted for by the increased population. Assessed Taxes were greater than the estimate by $314,066. This was due to the greater demand for accommodation during the latter half of the year by the abnormal influx of refugees, and for the same reason Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents were higher by $123,856. Two large estates were the main causes of an increase in Estate Duty of $183,251. Due to an improvement in general business conditions Stamp Duties brought in $130,186 more than anticipated. Post Office receipts also showed an increase of $1,204,596, principally due to an expansion of the Air Mail Services and large sales of the Coronation Issue of postage stamps, while increased postage rates also contributed.

Receipts from the Kowloon Canton Railway were $197,790 greater than estimated. Of this figure the linking up of the Canton-Kowloon and Canton-Hankow Railways accounts for some $120,000, and some $40,000 more in rents was derived from the storage of goods originally consigned to Shanghai but landed in Hong Kong. The closing down of the casino at Shum Chun, however, adversely affected the passenger traffic receipts from that source to the extent of over $70,000.

4. The expenditure for the

the year 1937 amounted to $32,111,222 being $147,938 less than estimated and $2,597,702 more than the expenditure in 1936.

5. Ordinary expenditure amounted to $30,600,924, Public Works Extraordinary to $1,510,298. Personal Emoluments amounted to $12,895,932, being $822,984 less than the estimated figure of $13,718,916 due to the operation of the Levy on Salaries Ordinance No. 17 of 1936 which was repealed on 1st July, 1937.

Other Charges amounted to $4,575,527, being $69,539 less than estimated.

6. Debt. The Public Debt of the Colony consists of two issues: The 4% Conversion Loan raised in 1933 amounting to $4,838,000, the Sinking Fund of which, established in 1934, amounted on 31st December, 1937, to £54,325.6.11. Secondly,

>

}

51

the 34% Dollar Loan raised in July, 1934. Bonds to the amount of $14,000,000 were issued at 99% producing $13,860,000. This Loan is redeemable by drawings at par in each of the twenty-five years commencing in 1935 at the annual rate of one twenty-fifth of such issue. During each of the years 1935, 1936 and 1937 $560,000 was so redeemed thus reducing the amount outstanding to $12,320,000. Ordinance No. 11 of 1934 governs this issue and authorizes the Governor to borrow up to a total of $25,000,000. The total public debt of the Colony on 31st December, 1937, amounted to $17,158,000.

7. The Assets and Liabilities of the Colony on the 31st December, 1937, are shown in the following statement:-

LIABILITIES.

ASSETS.



Deposits:-

Advances:

Miscellaneous

220,148.51

Contractors and

Pending Re-im-

Officers Deposits..

447,749.26

Insurance Com-

bursements from

31% dollar loan. 10,263,484.30

Pending Re-im-

panies

1,563,341.62

bursements from

proposed new loa

56,783.30

Miscellaneous De-

posits

Building Loans

337,922.63

1,339,709.71 Imprest Account



9,420.17

Subsidiary Coin

120,625.00

House Service

Trade Loan Out-

Account

31,007.47

standing....

295,493.00

Suspense Account,

84,285.42

ment Fund

Government House

& City Develop-

Exchange Adjust-

Unallocated Stores,

(P.W.D.)

486,938.40

839,704.12 Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)

121,552.45

Note Issue Account :-

ment

23,934.73

Current

Account. $ 513,870.4:

Trade Loun Reserve..

338,689.27

Fixed

Deposit..

3,000,000.0

3,513,870.42

Praya East Re-

Nickel Coinage

clamation

108,280.35

Account :-

Current

Coal Account

10,404.98

Sterling

Account. $ 338,517.70

Investment

Crown Agents-

Account.

1,290,336.8

Overdraft

7,026.69

1,678,854.57

Cash Balance:

Note Security Fund..

3,513,870.42

Accountant-

General

1,547,810.91

Nickel Coinage

*Joint Colonial

Security Fund

1,678,854.57

Fund

2,436,302.53

Fixed Deposits:

Total Liabilities..

9,902,573.19

General...$ 1,050,000.00 Insurance

Excess of Assets

Companies 1,563,341.62 Miscellaneous 118,018.07

over Liabilities

14,002,278.11

Total.........$ 23,904,851.30

2,731,359.69

Total........ $ 23,904,851.30

* Joint Colonial Fund £151,000 Os. Od.

8. Main Heads of Taxation.-The largest item of revenue is derived from the assessment tax, the sum of $5,914,066 being collected in 1937. This represents 17.82% of the total revenue or 18.10% of the revenue exclusive of land sales. The rates vary from 15% to 17% on the annual value of property and are for police, lighting and water services, etc. Port and Harbour Dues comprising Light Dues and Buoy Dues brought in the sum of. $625,684.

9. Duties on intoxicating liquors realized $2,291,167, tobacco $4,432,203, postage stamps and message fees $3,254,396. A considerable sum is also derived from the opium monopoly, land revenue, stamp duties including estate duties and other fees. Land Sales during the year realized $528,464. The receipts of the Kowloon-Canton Railway which was completed in 1910 amounted to $1,297,940.

10. Customs Tariff.-There is an import tariff on all liquor, tobacco and light oils imported into the Colony for sale or use therein. There is no export tariff. The sale of opium is a Government Monopoly, and all importation of opium other than by the Government is prohibited. The importation of Dangerous Drugs is regulated in accordance with the terms of the Geneva Convention. Arms,

Arms, ammunition, explosives and dangerous goods are subject to the normal Harbour and Police Regulations in regard to storage and movement. A special Foreign Regis- tration fee of 20% of the value of a motor vehicle is payable in respect of any vehicle not produced within the British Empire.

11. The duties on imported liquor range from $0.80 per gallon on beer to $1.50 on Chinese liquor and to $13 on sparkling European wines. A 50% reduction in duty is allowed in respect of brandy grown or produced within the British Empire.

12. The duties on tobacco range from $0.90 per lb. on the lowest taxed unmanufactured tobacco to $2.60 per lb. on cigars. A reduction in duty is allowed to tobacco of Empire origin and/or of Empire manufacture.

13. A duty of 30 cents per gallon is payable on all light oils imported into the Colony.

14. Excise and Stamp Duties.A reduction in duty is allowed on beer and Chinese type spirits manufactured in the Colony.

15. Stamp Duties are imposed on various instruments and where a consideration is involved are mainly ad valorem. The following are examples of the duties charged:-Affidavits, Statutory Declarations, etc., $3; Bills of Exchange (inward) and Cheques, 10 cents; Bills of Lading, 15 cents when freight is under $5, 40 cents when freight is $5 or over; Bond to secure

1

53

ގ

the payment or repayment of money, 20 cents for every $100 or part thereof; Conveyance on sale, $1 for every $100 or part thereof; Mortgages, principal security, 20 cents for every $100 or part thereof; Life Insurance Policy, 25 cents for every $1,000 insured; Receipts, 10 cents for amounts over $20; Transfer of Shares, 20 cents for every $100 of market value.

16. No Hut Tax or Poll Tax is imposed in the Colony.

54

Appendix.

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS OF GENERAL INTEREST RELATING TO

TITLE.

HONG KONG,

PRICE.

AGENTS FOR SALE.

$

Sessional Papers (Annual)

Blue Book (Annual)

Ordinances-Ball's Revised Edit- ion (In 6 Volumes) 1844-1923.

Regulations of Hong Kong 1844-

1925

Ordinances and Regulations

(Annual)

Administration Reports (Annual)

Estimates (Annual)

Government Gazettes (Weekly).

Meteorological Bulletin (Month-

ly)

Hong Kong Trade and Shipping

Returns (Monthly).

Do. (Annual)

Hansards (Annual)

Historical & Statistical Abstract of the Colony of Hong Kong 1841-1930.

The Hong Kong Naturalist

(Quarterly)

2.00 Colonial Secretariat and

Government Printers.

3.00 Colonial Secretariat, Govern- ment Printers and Crown Agents for the Colonies, London.

Do.

90.00

30.00 Colonial Secretariat.

3.00 Colonial Secretariat, Govern- ment Printers and Crown Agents.

5.00 Colonial Secretariat.

3.00 Government Printers.

.50 Government Printers and

Crown Agents.

10.00 Government Printers.

per

annum

2.00 Government Printers and

Crown Agents. 2.00

Do.

5.00 South China Morning Post,

Hong Kong.

4.00 Colonial Secretariat.

2.00 Hong Kong University.

515

Appendix,-Continued.

TITLE.

PRICE.

AGENTS FOR SALE.

$

Hong Kong: A Guide Book .....

Hong Kong: Around and About, by S. H. Peplow & M. Barker.

1.00 Kelly & Walsh, Ltd. and Brewers' Bookshop, Hong

Kong.

5.00

Do.

Hong Kong-Birth, Adolescence

& Coming of Age

18/-

Do.

Echoes of Hong Kong & Beyond

by L. Forster

1.50

Do.

Hong Kong-the Riviera of the

Orient

1.00

Do.

Travellers Map of Hong Kong...

.10

Do.

Picturesque Hong Kong

1.25 Brewers' Bookshop.

The Tourist Guide 1936

1.25

Do.

The Dollar Directory 1938

1.00

Do.

A Hong Kong Sketch Book ....

2.50 Kelly & Walsh, Ltd.

Hilly Hong Kong

1.00

Do.

Glimpses of Hong Kong

1.00

Do.

Sections on Hong Kong will be found in the annual "China Year Book" published by the North China Daily News and Herald Ltd., Shanghai (London Agents Simpkin Marshall Ltd.) price $20.00, the annual "Directory and Chronicle of China, Japan etc." published by the Hong Kong Daily Press at Hong Kong, Price $12.00 and obtainable at their London office at 53, Fleet St., for £2, and "Comacrib China & Hong Kong Manual", price $35.00 (Brewers' Bookshop).

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR

ANNUAL COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPEN{

Estimates,

Actual Revenue

Revenue for

same period

Heads of Revenue.

1937.

to 31st. December,

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads

of preceding

year.

1937.

$

C.

Duties

-

6,415 000

7,625,411.42

Port and Harbour Dues

635,000 625,684.20 538.284-39

$

C.

6,928,672.06

$

$

C.

696,739.36

H. E. tl Colonial

and

12,600.19

Secretar

Affai

Treasur

venue

purposes, and

bursements in Aid

not otherwise

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific

Reim-

Licences and Internal Re-

specified -

13,188,600 14,192,267.74 13,837,182.66

355,085.08

Audit C

District

Do

Commu

(a) P

(b)

Te

2,397,500 2,660,076.47

2,261,116.21 398,960.26

Imports

Harbour

Post Office

2,049,800 3,254,396.09

2,058,885.99

1,195,510.10

Royal C

Kowloon-Canton Railway - 1,100,150

1,297,940.29

1,245,469.16

52,471.13

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses -

1,641,200

1,725,848.68 1,632,973.99

92,874.69

Fire Bri Suprem Attorne Crown $ Official Land Of Magistra

Do., Police F

Prisons

Medical

Sanitary

Interest

96,500

92,560.15

193,291.21

100,731.06

Botanica

Depa

Educatio

Kowloor

Miscellaneous Receipts -

1,030,500 1,193,719.34 977,877.69

215,841.65

Defence

(a) V

C

(b) N:

(c) M

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)- -

ti

28,554,250 32,667,904.38 29,773,753-36 3,007,482.27

113,331.25

Miscella Charitab

Charge

Publ

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

206,000

528,463.72 269,230.50

259,233.22

TOTAL

28,760,250 33,196,368.10 30,042,983.86 3,266,715.49

113,331.25

Deduct

$ 113,331.25

Nett

$3,153.384.24

Pensions

Public

ment Public V

Do.,

Appendix A.

RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1937.

VENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1937.

Estimates,

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1937:

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1937.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding year.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

C.

H. E. the Governor

196,786

194,814.98

148,206.83

46,608.15

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

347,553

297,082.33

298,056.67

974.34

12,600.19

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

166,682

130,757:37

139,948.00

9,190.€3

Treasury -

292,474

301,692.79

249,412.48

52,280.31

Audit Department

124,473

121,973.02

103,475.36

18,497.66

District Office, North -

90,742

75,107.19

76,712.39

1,605.20

Do., South -

55,213

48,189.50

48,207.58

18.08

Communications :-

(a) Post Office

819,432

787,756.06

497,480.28

290,275.78

(b) Do. Wireless

Telegraph Services-

183,956

181,934-17

162,473.44

19,460.73

Imports & Exports Office -

486,782

458,006.78

428,609.81

29,396.97

Harbour Department -

1,136,235

1,035,967-77

1,071,595.55

35,627-78

Do.

Air

Service

70,148

51,930.16

41,303.58

10,626.58

Royal Observatory-

85,635

83,970.09

71,416.17

12,553.92

Fire Brigade

30,797

328,892.56

293,162.54

35,730.02

Supreme Court -

260,412

234,819.59

227,937.26

6.882.33

Attorney General's Office

78,065

79,864.88

66,665.52

13,199.36

Crown Solicitor's Office

63,000

57,718.06

44,532.29

13,185.77

Official Receiver's Office -

25,745

21,270.10

24,884.40

3,514.30

Land Office

-

65,930

67.992.54

51,649.56

16,342.98

Magistracy, Hong Kong

Do., Kowloon

Police Force -

71,886

74,494.80

62,112.57

12,382.23

70,002

51,766.36

56,870.92

5,104.56

3,288,226

3,109,696.18

2,830,635.56

279,060.62

Prisons Department

1,018,559 1,021,593.04

884,851.02

136,742.02

Medical Department

-

-

Sanitary Department-

2,140,665 2,018,137.4+ 1,081,939

1,584,327.25

433,810.19

1,009,439.35

929,189.28

80,250.07

100,731.06

Botanical and Forestry

Department -

141,189

132,193:47

125.355.53

6,837-94

Education Department

2,138,140

2,034,562.00

1,861,899.93

172,662.07

Kowloon-Canton Railway

766,300

831,129.04

726,173.59

104.955.45

Defence:

(a) Volunteer Defence

Corps

158,369

153,373.62

137.707.79

15,665.83

(b) Naval Volunteer

Force-

42,914

39,220.86

32,296.18

6,924.68

(e) Military Contribu-

tion

5,379,660

113,331.25

Miscellaneous Services

1,632,830

Charitable Services

-

182,927

5,586,415.34 1,628,719.69 214,920.04

4,281,239.94

1,305,175.40

1,485,702.98

143,016.71

183,635.87

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

Pensions

Public Works Depart-

ment

Public Works, Recurrent-

1,371,231 2,200,000

1,371,230.98 2,559,809.79

1,390,831.00

2,287,745.64

31,284.17

272,064.15

19,600.02

2,584,733 2,436,112.31 1,486,500 1,768,369.96

2,245,004.29 1,309,311.51

191, 108.02 459,058.45

30,617,130 30,600,924.21 26,460,620.56

Do., Extraordinary 1,642,030 1,510,298.07

4,216,038.56

3,052,899.52

75,734.91

1,542,601.45

TOTAL

113,331.25

32,259,160 32,111,222.28 29,513,520.08 4,216,038.56

1,618,336.36

Deduct

Nett

$1,618,336.36

www

$ 2,597,702.20

Estimates,

Heads of Revenue.

1937.

Actual Revenue

to 31st. December,

1937-

Revenue for same period of preceding

year.

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads of Exp

C.

c.

$

$

C.

Duties

6,415 000

7,625,411.42

6,928,672.06

696,739.36

Port and Harbour Dues

635,000

625,684.20

538.284.39

12,600.19

Licences and Internal Re-

venue

not

specified -

otherwise

Fees of Court or Office,

Payments for specific

purposes, and Reim- bursements in Aid

Post Office

13,188,600

14,192,267.74

13,837,182.66

355,085.08

2,397,500 2,660,076.47 2,261,116.21

398,960.26

2,049,800 3,254,396.09 2,058,885.99 1,195,510.10

Kowloon-Canton Railway -

1,100,150 1,297,940.29 1,245,469:16

52,471.13

Rent of Government Pro-

perty,

Land and Houses

1,641,200 1,725,848.68 1,632,973.99

92,874.69

H. E. the Gov Colonial Secret and Legisla

Secretariat fo

Affairs

-

Treasury - Audit Departr District Office,

Do., Communicatio (a) Post Off (b) Do.

Telegrap Imports & Exp Harbour Depa

Do.

Se

Royal Observ Fire Brigade Supreme Cour Attorney Gene Crown Solicito Official Receiv Land Office Magistracy, H Do., K

Police Force- Prisons Depart

Medical Depar

Interest

96,500

92,560.15 193,291.21

Miscellaneous Receipts -

1,030,500

1,193,719.34 977,877.69 215,841.65

100,731.06

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

28,554,250 32,667,904.38 29,773,753.36 3,007,482.27

113,331.25

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

206,000 528,463.72 269,230.50

259,233.22

TOTAL

$

28,760,250 33,196,368.10 30,042,983.86

23rd February, 1938.

Deduct

Nett

3,266,715.49

113,331.25

$

113,331.25

$3,153.384.24

Sanitary Depa Botanical and Departmen Education De Kowloon-Cant Defence :-

(a) Volunte

Corps (b) Naval

Force- (c) Military

tion

Miscellaneous Charitable Ser Charge on A

Public Deb

Pensions Public Work

ment - Public Works,

Do.,

Ext

TOTAL

Appendix A.

HONG KONG.

FINANCIAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1937,

From the point of view of Government finance the main feature of the year 1937 was the passing of the acute financial stringency of the previous two years. The Estimates provided for a deficit of $3,498,910, revenue being put at $28,760,250 and expenditure at $32,259,160. In the actual result revenue exceeded the estimate by $4,436,118 and with a small saving of $147,938 over estimated expenditure a surplus of $1,085,146 was realised. The surplus of assets on 31st December, 1937, was $14,002,278 a much more satisfactory figure than was anti- cipated when the Estimates for 1937 were prepared in the Autumn of 1936. The deficits then anticipated for 1936 and 1937 would have reduced the surplus of assets to about $8,000,000.

2. This satisfactory result was achieved almost entirely by an expansion in existing sources of revenue; no new or increased taxes were imposed during the year. General conditions of trade in China, which had already shown signs of improvement in 1936, improved steadily in the first half of 1937 and Hong Kong shared in the general greater activity of trade. The improve- ment in the financial outlook was therefore sufficient to enable the salary levy to be removed with effect from the 1st July, 1987. During the latter part of the year the general improvement in economic conditions in the Far East was brought sharply to an end by the outbreak of hostilities between China and Japan but the immediate financial effect upon Hong Kong was beneficial. Large numbers of refugees from Shanghai and South China came into the Colony while the practical cessation of trade with the interior of China through Shanghai resulted in an increased volume of trade passing through Canton and other Southern Coast ports, a large part of which was conducted via Hong Kong. Figures of China's trade for the last five months of the year show that while there was a very considerable reduction in the total trade a much large percentage of it passed through Hong Kong with a resultant increase in the actual trade of the Colony with China.

8. As a result both of the greater activity and of the increase in population, which has been estimated at as much as 25%, practically all the sources of revenue showed substantial increases. The receipts from rates were higher owing to the smaller number of vacant tenements, these having sunk from nearly 3,000 in January to under 1,000 in December. Liquor

A 2

and tobacco duties also showed substantial increases while many minor items such as entertainment tax and the royalties payable on gross receipts by omnibus and ferry companies reflected the increase in population. Details of the variations in individual items of revenue are shown in the attached report by the Accountant-General.

4. As regards expenditure, details of which are also given in the Accountant-General's report, the total was very close to the original estimate. Larger savings would have been realised but for the unexpected expense occasioned by the disastrous typhoon of September 2nd and additional expenses caused by the Cholera epidemic which visited the Colony in the late summer and by various supplementary expenditure in connection with refugees and other items arising out of the Sino-Japanese hostilities. The sum of $1,510,298 expended on Public Works Extraordinary during the year was somewhat less than the amount budgetted for and was in fact the lowest for some years. This was due to the fact that the Estimates were prepared at a time when it was still necessary to observe the strictest economy, while extra work occasioned by the repair of typhoon damage necessitated the postponement of various works. On the other hand in addition to the sums spent out of revenue on Public Works Extraordinary a total of $1,113,999 was spent from loan funds.

5. As already noted the surplus of assets over liabilities at the end of the year was $14,002,278. The greater part of this, i.e. $10,320,268, was advanced to loan funds pending reimburse- ment from the issue of the remainder of the 34% Dollar Loan; but total cash resources ignoring deposits earmarked for special funds amounted to $5,034,113.

LOANS.

6. As regards loans the position remains that of the $25,000,000 authorized by the Dollar Loan Ordinance, 1934, $14,000,000 has been issued. The balance of $11,000,000 is available for issue when the funds are required, expenditure being advanced from general surplus balances in the meanwhile as already noted. This system is being continued for the present as the liquid resources available appear sufficient to meet the immediate needs but the necessity of issuing the remainder of the loan as soon as circumstances require is kept in mind.

CURRENCY.

7. The currency situation remained stable during the year. The Exchange rate continued to be controlled by the operations of the Exchange Fund set up under the Currency Ordinance, 1935, and fluctuations in the rate during the year were small. The Treasury average rates for each month are as follows: —

January February

..1/2 7/8 .1/2 7/8

March

.1/2 7/8

April May.....

June

A 3

..1/2 7/8

July

..1/2 7/8 ..1/2

..1/2 11/16

August

.1/2 11/16

September

1/2 7/8

October

.1/2 7/8

1

November

.1/2 7/8

December

.1/2 7/8.

As will be seen after falling to a low point in July exchange rose slightly and remained very steady for the whole of the rest of the year. During this period there was a steady demand for Hong Kong dollars owing to events in China and the total note issues of the three note issuing banks and of the Government one dollar notes increased during the year as follows:

Government $1 Notes

Chartered Bank of I. A. & C.

31.12.37 $ 8,625,000 25,172,604 199,689,793

31.12.36 $ 2,300,000

22,756,888

H.K. & S. B. C.

124,863,771

Mercantile Bank of India, Ltd.

4,091,508

5,175,570

$154,012,167

$233,662,967

8. A statement of the position of the Exchange Fund was made in October as follows:

The Exchange Fund set up in December, 1935, took over, in accordance with Ordinance 54 of 1935, the silver which had to be delivered under that Ordinance; it also purchased during the first few months of its operation substantial quantities of exchange which were offered on the local market. It has since both bought and sold exchange as has been found necessary.

The silver taken over by the Fund was sold and the monies so obtained and exchange bought by the Fund constitute assets against the liabilities represented by Certificates of Indebtedness issued by the Treasurer to the Banks.

On June 30th last the Certificates of Indebtedness outstand- ing amounted to $152,652,579, which is equivalent to £9,342,020 at the rate of 1/2 11/16, the middle market rate on that day; the total assets of the Fund amounted to £10,316,240 of which 62.97% was invested in gilt edged sterling securities and 35.91% was held in cash or on deposit in London at call or short notice. The balance 1.12% represented silver.

A 4

ex-

9. The year under review is interesting as being the first year during which our managed currency has functioned free of of speculative influences. The result has amply justified the abandonment of silver as an absolute standard. In 1935 change was 1/8 in January, 2/6 in April, 1/11 in September and 1/3 in December. In 1936 exchange opened at 1/3, remained fairly steady till June and then gradually declined to 1/27, at which level speculative operations practically ceased and the market settled down to rates that throughout 1937 have shown no more than normal trade fluctuations within very narrow limits. The steadiness of exchange has promoted confidence in foreign trade dealings and enabled merchants to take a longer view of their commitments than was possible when trading prospects were subject to the vagaries of the Silver Market. Equally important has been the stability of the Chinese National Dollar. In 1935 the Colony experienced not only violent exchange fluctuations in currencies based on gold but was faced by equally disturbing fluctuations in exchange on China that was nominally functioning on the same silver standard and on a similar silver dollar as Hong Kong.

10. Subsidiary Coinage.-In consequence of the counter- feiting to which the cupro-nickel 10 cent and 5 cent coinage has been exposed since its introduction in November, 1935, it was decided with the advice of the Royal Mint authorities to replace the cupro-nickel with a new issue of nickel coins some- what larger in size and having a security rim specially designed to defeat ordinary methods of counterfeiting. Up to the end of 1937 new security rim nickel coins to the face value of $292,500 had been put into circulation concurrently with the cupro-nickel issue. It is the intention to withdraw the latter as supplies of the new coins become available.

In addition to a small quantity of silver coin still in active circulation the following amounts of subsidiary coin circulation on the 31st December, 1937:

were

Face Value.

in

Cupro-Nickel

10 cents

$1,500,000

5

50,000

"1

>>

Security Rim Nickel

10

262,500

>1

5

30,000

##

*

ADMINISTRATION.

11. During the year a change in the general system of financial administration was brought into operation. As part of a general change in the financial organization of Colonial Governments the Colonial Treasurer has been replaced by an officer having the title of Financial Secretary who forms a part of the Colonial Secretariat. The detailed administration and accounting work connected with receipts and expenditure hast been entrusted to an officer under the title of Accountant- General who is in direct charge of all ordinary Treasury work. ·

A 5

The Financial Secretary has also ceased to hold the offices of Assessor, Estate Duty Commissioner and Collector of Stamp Revenue formerly held by the Colonial Treasurer. Mr. E. Taylor, Colonial Treasurer, departed on leave prior to retirement on 25th March, 1937, and Mr. W. J. Carrie acted as Colonial Treasurer until the 15th July, 1937. I assumed office as Financial Secretary and Colonial Treasurer on the 16th July, 1937, and the new arrangements were brought gradually into operation during the latter part of the year, the following new appointments being made:-

Mr. T. Black, formerly Accountant, Treasury, to be Accountant-General with effect from the 1st November,

1937.

Mr. J. Ring, formerly First Assistant Assessor to be

Assessor, and

Mr. D. Kelvin-Stark, Cadet Officer, Class II, to be Collector of Inland Revenue, Estate Duty Commissioner and Collector of Stamp Revenue with effect from 1st January, 1938.

12. Reports by the Accountant-General on the Accounts for 1937 and by the Superintendent of Inland Revenue on the work of his Department are appended. The Report of the Assessor will be submitted as usual after the completion of the Assess- ment for 1938/39.

S. CAINE,

Hong Kong, 20th April, 1938.

Financial Secretary.

A

A 6

REPORT ON THE ACCOUNTS FOR THE YEAR, 1937.

1. The Revenue for the year amounted to $33,196,368 and the Expenditure totalled $32,111,222 resulting in a surplus on the year's working of $1,085,146.

is

The Revenue and Expenditure for the past ten years shown in a chart which appears herein as Financial Return

No. 1.

2. The original estimates provided for a total revenue of $28,760,250 against an expenditure of $32,259,160, forecasting a working deficit of $3,498,910 for the year under review.

3. The accumulated surplus on December 31st, 1937, stood at $14,002,278 compared with $12,917,132 at the close of the previous year.

A Statement of Assets and Liabilities appears as Financial Return No. 2.

4. Revenue.-The actual revenue collected during 1937 was $4,436,118 in excess of the estimate. Of this excess $1,210,411 was on account of Duties, all subheads of which showed con- siderable increases. The most important was $682,203 in respect of Tobacco Duties and was mainly owing to the closing down of North China factories with consequent increased activity in the local tobacco industry.

The abnormal increase in population was responsible for the greater part of the improvement in many items of revenue, particularly import duties on liquor, assessed taxes and opium monopoly. The considerable increase in royalties collected from the various transportation services was entirely due to the influx of refugees from China. A heavy increase in Postal Revenue, $1,204,596 was brought about by several factors-the breakdown of the cable company's services during the fighting in Shanghai diverted considerable business to the Radio Telegraph Office. The expansion of air mail services, increased postage rates, and the phenomenal sales of the Coronation Stamp issue contributed largely to the excess under this head.

A comparison of the revenue with the estimate and with the previous year's revenue appears as Financial Return No. 3. The principal increases are briefly indicated in Financial Return No. 4 and a chart is included as Financial Return No. 5 showing the fluctuations in the various heads of revenue during the past ten years.

5. Expenditure.-The expenditure for the year was $147,938 less than the Budget provided. Personal Emoluments amounted to $12,895,932, being $822,984 less than the estimated figure of $13,718,916; chiefly as a result of the Levy on Salaries which operated for the first half of the year.

?

A 7-

Other Charges amounted to $4,575,527 showing a saving of $69,539.

A sum of $1,510,298 was expended on Public Works Extra- ordinary.

The expenditure is compared with the original estimate and with the previous year's expenditure in Financial Return No. 6. The allocation of expenditure under the various heads during the past five years is shown in Financial Return No. 7.

6. Loan Works.-Expenditure on loan works authorized by Ordinance No. 11 of 1934 during the year 1937 amounted to $1,057,215 which was met by an advance from surplus balances. The total expenditure up to December 31st, 1937, was $24,123,484, details of which are shown in Financial Return No. 8.

Expenditure amounting to $56,788 on account of certain additional works which it is proposed to charge to a new Loan was financed by an advance from surplus revenue. Particulars of the expenditure are given in Financial Return No. 9.

7. Trade Loan Account.-The loans outstanding after writing off all irrecoverable and bad debts amounted to $295,493. A sum of $500,000 was transferred during the year to Revenue from the Reserve Account which now stands at $333,689 and is more than sufficient to cover existing loans.

Financial Return No. 10 shows the position at the close of the year.

8. Public Debt.-The annual contribution of $166,911 to the 4% Conversion Loan Sinking Fund was as usual invested in sterling securities. A sum of $560,000 was expended in redeeming 34% Dollar Loan Bonds at par in accordance with the terms of the Ordinance governing this issue.

It was found unnecessary to issue during 1937 any of the remaining $11,000,000 of Bonds authorized by the Ordinance. The works covered by this Loan were financed by an advance from the surplus revenues of the Colony without difficulty,

A statement of the Colony's Funded Public Debt outstanding on 31st December, 1937, is shown in Financial Return No. 11.

9. The following Financial Returns are intended to show the 1937 results in comparison with the estimates and with the results of previous years.

1. Chart of actual revenue and expenditure for the years

1928 to 1937.

2. Statement of Assets and Liabilities on 31st December,

1937,

- A 8

..

3. Actual Revenue compared with estimate and with

previous year.

4. Principal increases and decreases in Revenue.

5. Chart showing fluctuations of Revenue under Heads

during past ten years.

6. Actual expenditure compared with estimate and with

previous year.

7. Percentages on the various Heads of Expenditure to the

total for the past five years.

8. Statement of Expenditure on 31% Dollar Loan Account

at 31st December, 1937.

9. Statement of Advances on Loan Works pending re-

imbursement from proposed new Loan..

10. Statement of Trade Loans as at 31st December, 1937.

11. Statement of Funded Public Debt outstanding on the

31st December, 1937.

T. BLACK,

Accountant-General.

THE TREASURY,

Hong Kong, 13th April, 1938.

:

Million Dollars.

35

w w w w wers

30

32

29

28

27

26



A 9

Graph of Actual Revenue & Expenditure

for the Years 1928

1900

1937

1929+

0261

विविधिक

M

49332

25

24

23

Revenueri

20

21

119367

Financial Return No. 2

A 10

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON THE

31ST DECEMBER, 1937.

LIABILITIES.

$

ASSETS.



DEPOSITS:

ADVANCES:

Contractors and

Officers Deposits.

447,749,26

Insurance Com-

panies

1,563,341.62

Miscellaneous

Deposits

House Service

Account

loan

1,339,709.71

Building Loans

Imprest Account

31,007.47

Subsidiary Coin

Miscellaneous

Pending Reim- bursements from 31% dollar loan. Pending Reim- bursements from proposed new

220,148.51

10,263,484.30

56,783.30 337,922.63

9,420.17 120,625.CO

Trade Loan Outstand-

ing

Government

House

295,493.00

& City Develop-

Suspense Account

· 84,285.42

ment Fund

839,704.12

Unallocated Stores,

(P.W.D.)

486,938.40

Unallocated Stores,

Exchange Adjustment

23,934.73

(Railway)

121,552.45

Note Issue

Trade Loan Reserve.

338,689.27

Account:

Praya East Reclama-

tion

Current

Account... 513,870.42)

108,280.35

Fixed Deposit 3,000,000.00)

3,513,870.42

Coal Account

10,404.98

Nickel Coinage

Crown Agents-

Current

Overdraft

7,026.69

Sterling

Note Security Fund.

Account:

Account...$ 388,517.76

Investment

3,513,870.42

Account... 1,290,336.81

1,678,854.57

Nickel Coinage

Cash Balance::

Security Fund

1,678,854.57

Accountant-General.

1,547,810.91

Joint Colonial Fund.

2,436,302.53

Total Liabilities...

Fixed Deposits:-

9,902,573.19

General ....$1,050,000.00 Insurance

Excess of Assets over

Liabilities

14,002,278.11

Total......$ 23,904,851.30

Companies 1,563,341.62 Miscellaneous 118,018.07

2,731,359.69

Total......$ 23,904,851.30

* Joint Colonial Fund £151,000 Os. Od.

}

A 11

Financial Return No. 3

ACTUAL

ESTIMATES

ACTUAL

HEADS OF REVENUE

1936

1937

1937

Actual

PERCENTAGE OF REVENUE

Estimates Actual

1936

1937

1937

$

$

%

%

%

1. Duties

6,928,672.06

6,415,000

7,625,411.42

23.00

22.30

22.98

2. Port & Harbour Dues

638,284.39

635,000

625,684.20

2.13

2.21

1.88

3. Licences and Internal Revenue not otherwise specified

13,837,182.66

13,188,600

14,192,267,74

45.94

45.85

42.77

4. Fees of Court or Office, Pay- ments for Specific Purposes and Re-imbursements in Aid...

2,261,116.21

2,897,500

2,660,076.47

7.51

8.34

8.01

5. Post Office

2,058,885.99

2,049,800

3,254,396.09

6.85

7.13

9.80

6. Kowloon-Canton Railway

1,245.469.16

1,100,150

1,297,940.29

4.15

3.82

3.91

7. Rent of Government Property,

Land and Houses

1,632,973.99

1,641,200

1,725,848.68

5.42

5.71

5.20

8. Interest

193,291.21

96,500

92,560.15

.65

.34

.27

9. Miscellaneous Receipts

977,877.69

1,030,500

1,193,719.34

3.45

3.58

3.59

Total, (exclusive of Land Sales) $ 29,773,753.36

28,554,250

32,667,904.38

99.10

99.28

98.41

10. Land Sales (Premia on New

Leases)

269,230.50

30,042,983.86

206,000

28,760,250 33,196,368.10

528,463.72

.90

.72

1.59

100.00

100.00

100.00

Financial Return No. 4

The principal increases in Revenue over the amounts estimated were as follows:-

Estimated

$

Actual

$

Increase

$

1.-DUTIES.

Import Duty on Liquor

930,000

1,257,763

327,763

Tobacco

""

>>

3,750,000

4,432,203

682,203

Duty on Locally Manufactured Liquor

900,000

1,033,404

138,404

Explanatory Remarks

More consumption due to increase of population on account of the Abnormal conditions in China.

do

3.-LICENCES & INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

- A 12

-

Opium

250,000

314,770

64,770

Increased sales.

· Vehicles Motor

232,000

280,935

48,935

Increased fees.

B.-INTERNAL REVENUE.

Assessed Taxes

5,600,000

5,914,066

Estate Duty

1,200,000

1,383,251

183,251

Stamp Duties

2,000,000

2,130,186

130,186

Water Excess Supply & Meter Rents

1,775,000

1,898,856

314,066 Fewer vacant tenements &

less arrears. Two large estates.

Improvement in general

business conditions.

123,856 More metered services and

increased consumption.

A.-LICENCES.

The principal increases in Revenue over the amounts estimated were as follows:

4.-FEES OF Court or OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

AND RE-IMBURSEMENTS IN AID.

A.-FEES.

Estimated

$

Actual

Increase

Explanatory Remarks

Medical Examination of Emigrants

150,000

237,054

87,054 Increased emigration to Malaya.

Sunday Cargo-working permits

70,000

134,356

64,356 Diversion of Shanghai car- goes to Hong Kong.

5.-POST OFFICE.

Message Fees

630,000

976,923

346,923 Breakdown of Competing Service.

Postage

1,400,000

2,254,351

854,351

Air mails, coronation stamps and increased rates.

6. KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY MAIN LINE.

R3. Goods Service, Goods Foreign Line

41,000

161,409

120,409 Abnormal China.

conditions in

R7. Profits on Central Mechanical Works, Home Line

150

12,786

12,636

More work performed.

R8. Rents, Home Line

9,300

49,923

40,623

All storage occupied.

ون

Increase

Explanatory Remarks

The principal increases in Revenue over the amounts estimated were as follows:

Estimated

Actual

A 14

7.-RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY LAND & HOUSES.

$

$

$

Buildings

92,000

113,536

21,536

Lower exchange.

Leased Lands (Crown Rent ex. of N.T.)...

580,000

596,477

16,477

Fewer arrears.

Markets

361,000

390,536

29,536

New market at Kennedy Town.

9.-MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.

Condemned Stores

15,000

50,680

35,680 More condemned stores sold & better prices obtained.

Royalty payable by the China Motor Bus Co., Ltd.

96,000

128.708

32,708 More passengers carried.

Royalty payable by the Kowloon Motor Bus Co., Ltd.

114,500

140,991

26,491

do

Realization of Sterling Fund

30,848

30,848 Profit on realization of investment.

10.-LAND SALES.

Premia on New Leases

206,000

528,464

350,926 More Land sold.

}

Financial Return No. 5

!

A 18 ----

CHART Showing fluctations of Revenue under various Heade

Ipasditen vejal si

10

8.

12

MILLJONS

J

T

V

}

16

12

CHART Showing flucta ons

of Revenue under various Heade

10

8

6

2

1

A

کھے

1928 1930 19 3 2

1922



MP

1633

VERA

1



Pdr

Harbour D

BELU

1930

1929

ERA

1

Licenc

193

1

2

O

1928

TOTETET

200

22

bcbr

Posti

Railway

1933

£9332 1937

1232

CD

roperty

1883

ox

1934

4931



Ꭸ .

Financial Return No. 5

MILLIONS

18

{

16

A 18 -

12

CHART Showing fun



bus

of Revenue inden various Heade

e past ten vejairst

14

B

10

00

6



&

L.

જેન

51-167

1932

1932

nada

"

18267

1

#

2. Pori

1979

1931

1933

Q



2

Fees of

Uğurt ar Office

1928

1932

+

Post

Jinice

لامـ

1929

19314

1

1937

6

8

.00

6. Kowloon

Rent

[Railway

Property

1929

1937

79013

2931351

7937

Int

राह

3

Ip.

nd Sales



12

4930

:

36

1935 937

+

1825

vist

161267

bur

4/9/313

GES

જા

1928

1

1932

TEBKA

19

2

1937

192

1930

Railwa

best

2902

493135

22

1932

ogra 1937

31

ને

Sales

The principal decreases over the amounts as estimated were as follows:

2.-HARBOUR DUES.

Light Dues

3.-LICENCES & INTERNAL REVENUl

NOT OTHERWISE SPECFIED.

A.-LICENCES

Estimated

Actual

$

$

510,000

498,776

Decrease

Explanatory Remarks

$

11,224 Less tonnage

Hawker

90,000

70,934

19,066

Fewer licences issued

Liquor

370,000

301,679

68,321

Fewer licences & over- estimated.

4.-FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES

AND RE-IMBURSEMENTS IN AID.

A.-FEES

China Companies

210,000

165,703

44,297

Fewer Companies registered due│ to situation in Shanghai.

- A 15 —

Court

85,000

70,276

14,724

Fewer distraints, & writs

Deeds Registration

76,000

62,557

13,443

of execution issued. Fewer land transactions.

Survey of Steam ships

B.-RECEIPTS.

130,000

116,118

13,882 Fewer surveys.

80,000

58,411

21,589 Fewer animals slaughtered.

Slaughter Houses, Mautaukok

6. KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY

MAIN LINE.

R1. Passenger Service, Passengers, Home

Line

345,000

273,633

71,367

Closure of Shum Chun Casino.

Financial Return No. 6

A 17-

In the following table the actual expenditure for the year 1937 is compared with the expenditure for the previous year and with the estimates for 1937:-

Heads of Expenditure.

Actual 1936,

Estimates, 1937.

Actual 1937.

C.

$

c.

His Excellency the Governor Colonial Secretary's Office and

148,206.83

196,786

194,814.98

Legislature

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

298,056,67

347,553 297,082.33

139,948.00 166,682 130,757.37.

Treasury

Audit Department

District Office, North

249,412.48 292,474 103,475:36 124,473

301,692.79

121,973.02

76,712.39,

90,742

75,107.19

Do.,

South

48,207.58

55,213

48,189.50

Communications:-

(a) Post Office

497,480.28

819,432

787,756.06

(b) Do. Wireless Telegraph

Service

162,473.44

183,956

181,934.17

Imports and Exports Office

428,609.81

486,782

458,006.78

Harbour Department

1,071,595.55

1,136,235

1,035,967.77

Do.

Air Service

41,303,58

70,148

51,930.16

Royal Observatory

71,416,17

85,635

83,970.09

Fire Brigade

293,162,54

311,797

328,892.56

Supreme Court

227,937.26

260,412

234,819.59

Attorney General's Office

66.665.52

78,065

79,864.88

Crown Solicitor's Office

44,532.29

63,000

57,718.06

Official Receiver's Office

24,884.40

25,745

21,270.10

Land Office

51,649.56

65,930

67,992.54

Magistracy, Hong Kong

62,112.57

71,886

74,494.80

Do., Kowloon

56,870.92

70,002

51,766.36

Police Force

2,830,635.56

3,288,226

3,109,696.18

Prisons Department

884,851.02

1,018,559 1,021,593.04

Medical Department

1,584,327.25

2,140,665

2,018,137.44.

Sanitary Department

929,189.28

1,081,939 .1,009,439.35

Botanical & Forestry Department...

125,355.53

141,189

132,193.47

Education Department

1,861,899.93

2,138,140 2,034,562.00

Kowloon-Canton Railway

726,173.59

766,300

831,129.04

Defence:-

(a) Volunteer Defence Corps

137,707.79

158,369

153.373.62

(b) Naval Volunteer Force (c) Military Contribution

32,296.18

42,914

39,220.86

4,281,239.94

5,379,660

5,586,415.34

Miscellaneous Services

1,485,702.98

1,632,830

1,628,719.69

Charitable Services

183,635.87

182,927

214,920.04

Charge on Account of Public

Debt

1,390,831,00

1,371,231

1,371,230.98

Pensions

2,287,745.64

2,200,000 2,559,809.79.

Public Works Department

Do.,

Recurrent

2,245,004.29 2,584,733 2,436,112.31 1,309,311,51 1,486,500 1,768,369.96

|26,460,620,56| 30,617,13030,600,924.21

Do.,

Extraordinary

3,052,899.52 1,642,030 | 1,510,298.07

TOTAL...

29,513,520.08 32,259,160 32,111,222.28

- A 18

Financial Return No. 7

DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL EXPENDITURE FOR 5 YEARS 1933-1937.

Head.

Service.

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937

%

%

% % %

1. His Excellency the Governor.

.53

.50

.51

.50

.61

2.

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

.90

.91

.93

1.01

.93

3.

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

.57

.46

.45

.47

.41

4.

Treasury.

.92

.76

.73

.85

.94

5.

Audit Department

.36

.33

.32

.35

.38

-

6 7.

District Offices

8.

Post Office and Wireless

.36 .35 .37 .42

.38

Telegraph Services

2.07

9.

Imports and Exports Office..

2.33

1.93 2.11 2.24 3.02

1.17 1.15 1.45 1.43

10.

Harbour Department and

Air Services

3.26

11.

Royal Observatory

3.30 3.61 3.77

.20 .19 .20 .24

3.39

.26

12.

Fire Brigade

.99 1.05 .94

.99

1.02

13-19. Legal Departments

1.78

1.76 1.60

1.81

1.83

20.

Police Force

9.12 9.01 8.61

9.60

9.68

21.

Prisons Department

2.74 2.66 2.64

3.00

3.18

22.

Medical Department

4.54 4.83 4.96

5.37

6.28

23.

Sanitary Department

3.29

3.38 3.26 3.15

3.14

24. Botanical and Forestry Dept. 25. Education Department

.41

26.

27.

Kowloon-Canton Railway Defence

.41

6.00 5.72 6.02 6.31 6.34

2.85 3.18 3.26 2.46 2.59

.42

.42

.41

28.

Miscellaneous Services

29.

Charitable Services

30.

Public Debt.

31.

Pensions ....

32..

Public Works Department

33. Public Works Recurrent

***

34.

18.72 16.76 17.34 15.08 18.00

4.83 6.29 6.01 5.04 5.07

.58 .53 .81 .62 .67

3.91 3.96 4.99 4.71 4.27

6.03 5.61 5.49 7.75 7.97

7.14 7.40 6.84 7.61 7.59

4.99 5.40 4.91 4.44 5.51 Public Works Extraordinary.. 10.58 12.15 9.90 10.34 Naval Arsenal Yard and

4.70

Kellet Island

Total

1.62

100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00 100.00

Financial Return No. 8

- A 19-

31% DOLLAR LOAN ACCOUNT.

AUTHORIZED BY ORDINANCE No. 11 of 1934.

Statement of Expenditure at 31st December, 1937.

Head.

Expended up to 31st December, 1936.

Expended during 1937.

Expenditure Total up to 31st December,

1937.

1. Aberdeen Valley Water Scheme..

2. Shing Mun Valley Water

Schemes :-

2,555,702.78

$3

2,555,702.78

(a) 1st Section

636,765.59

636,765.59

(b) 2nd Section :

(1) Preliminary Works

36,718.84

36,718.84

(2) Filters

120,045.23

120,045.23

(3) Gorge Dam

8,262,230.72

388,223.77

8,650,454.49

(4) 2nd Cross Harbour Pipe

173,348.32

173,348.32

(5) 2nd 24′′ Trunk Main

...

240,714.44

31,004.93 271,719.37

(6) 3rd

Rapid Gravity

Filters

204,669.99

68,995.56 273,665.55

3. Vehicular Ferry

4. New Gaol at Stanley

5. Tytam Tuk Catchwaters

1,907,966,94

3,484.03 1,911,450.97

3,534,930.96 322,156.29 3,857,087.25

689,386,55

689,386.55

6. Air Port :—

(a) Aerodrome

(6) Air Port and Seaplane

Slipway

20,485.92

20,485.92

754,186.59 Cr.21,731.61

732,454.98

(c) Wireless Telegraph Station

64,172.79 44,603.79

108,776.58

7. Redemption of 3% Inscribed

Stock

3,864,942.97

3,864,942.97

8. New Market :-

(a) Central Market

(b) Wholesale Market

Total

34,840.73

185,638.18

34,840.73

185,638.18

23,066,268.63 1,057,215.67 24,123,484.30

Of the total expenditure up to 31st December, 1937, $10,263,484.30 has been charged against surplus balances pending the issue of the remainder of the loan authorized. ·

Financial Return No. 9

-

- A 20-

LOAN WORKS.

ADVANCES PENDING RE-IMBURSEMENT FROM PROPOSED NEW LOAN.

Works.

Head 1.-NEW MARKETS:-

(a) Central Market

Head 2.-WATER WORKS:

(a) Supply to Albany

*

Expenditure up to 31st December, 1937.

$

1,521.19

(b) Supply to Peak Road

1,505.06

(c) Cross Harbour Pipes

4,859.07

(d) Rapid Gravity Filters Eastern

(e) Kowloon Tsai Service Reservoir

3,053.93

(f) Supply main to Kowloon Tsai Service

Reservoir

(g) Distribution Island

1,368.61

(h) Distribution Mainland

4,221.91

(i) Shing Mun Valley Scheme Catchwaters.

40,253.53

Total

$

56,783.30

Financial Return No. 10

- A 21-

STATEMENT OF TRADE LOANS AS AT 31ST DECEMBER, 1937.

Loans issued since 16th November, 1925 on

approved securities.

.$ 15,633,582.97

Less redemptions effected up to

31st December, 1936

1937

.$ 14,951,019.17

3,307.00

14,954,326.17

679,256.80

Less amount written off as irrecoverable

383,763.80

Loans outstanding on 31st December, 1937

$

295,493.00

Interest in arrears on 31st December, 1937

$

Total number of Loans issued since 11.11.1925

302

Less number redeemed up to 31.12.37

299

Number of Loans outstanding on 31.12.37.

3

110,548.69

:

Financial Return No. 11.

Statement of Funded Public Debt or Loans borrowed for Fixed Periods outstanding on the 31st December, 1937, and of the Accumulated Sinking Fund at the same date.

Designation of Debt or

Loan.

Legal

Authority.

Amount

Outstanding.

SINKING FUND.

Nominal Value.

Cost Price.

Market Value.

Amount of Stocks, &c.

£

s. d.

£

s. d.

Hong Kong

4%

Conversion

Ordinance

No. 15 of

1933.

4,838,000 British Guiana (1960) 3% Stock

19,009 9 2

18,724 6 4

£ s. d.

*18,724 6 4

Commonwealth of Australia (1950/52) 31% Stock

4,792 6 8

5,000 0 0

(98) 4,900 0 0

11,980 13 1

Funding Loan (1956/61) 21% Stock.

12,847 11 3

(90) 11,562 16 1

5,358 5 2

New Zealand (1949/54) 31% Stock Northern Rodesia (1950/70) 5% Stock Sierra Leone (1954) 3% Stock

5,523 19 7

(99) 5,468 149

805 13 6

12,875 17 10

956 4 8

12,734 18 1

(116xD)934 11 8

*12,734 18 1

Hong Kong

31% Dollar Loan.

Ordinance No. 11 of

1934.

12,320,000 Repayable annually at the rate of 1/25th of the total nominal value $14,000,000 of the bonds issued...

* No quotation

£56,062 11 4

£54,546 14 0

£54,325 6 11

Appendix A (2).

REPORT TO THE DIRECTOR OF COLONIAL AUDIT ON THE AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF HONG KONG FOR THE YEAR 1937.

1. The accounts of the Colony of Hong Kong for the year ended 31st December, 1937, have been examined by the local Audit Department.

A.-MANNER IN WHICH THE ACCOUNTS HAVE BEEN KEPT

AND RENDERED.

2. Subject to the observations contained in this report, the accounts were submitted for audit promptly and were satis- factorily kept and rendered. The accounts of the Colony were closed about the end of February, 1938.

3. The annual statements were received from the Ac- countant-General between the dates 23rd February, 1938, and the 22nd June, 1938. The Draft Appropriation Account (Detailed Statement of Expenditure) was received on the 12th July, 1988, and the Reconciliation Statement etc. of the Public Works Department was submitted on the 22nd June, 1938.

4. Very few misallocations were disclosed by audit examina- tion, the number being 14 only. A statement showing mis- allocations discovered too late for adjustment appears as Appendix "A" to this report.

for.

5. Expenditure appears to have been adequately vouched

6. Queries.

The queries raised on the 1937 accounts comprised :—

62 relating to Expenditure

90 relating to Revenue

Appendix "A"

Appendix "B"

Total

152

Eight queries remained unsettled at the date of this report. Details regarding these are given in Appendix “B”.

There are no unsettled queries relating to the 1936 accounts.

A (2) 2 -

7. The amount of revenue or over-expenditure recovered as a result of the 1937 queries amounted to $742.23, while the undermentioned recoveries were effected as a result of audit submissions:

Overpayment on Passage

""

17

.£21- 2-0d.

....£ 6-17-2d. (Or £6-5-7d)

The Award of Pension to a widow of contributor who was sentenced to death was challenged by Audit.

a

The Law Officers of the Crown later ruled that no pension was payable under Ordinance 15/1908.

Recovery

(Less $100 Ex gratia payment to

widow.)

$359.78 p.a.

8. Among the larger recoveries due

to

Audit Queries

were:

Vaccination fees not charged Undercharges on Safety Certificates Undercharges Sunday Working Permits

.$ 82.40

22.50

25.00

43.75

Overpayment travelling expenses Overpayment Money Order Claim

Undercharges Vaccination Fees

92.64

29.77

52.00

9. Audit Queries have been replied to with commendable promptitude.

B.-SUFFICIENCY OF EXISTING CHECKS AGAINST FRAUD.

10. Subject to the comments contained in this report, and as far as has been ascertained at present, the existing regula- tions and accounting instructions appear to afford sufficient pro- tection against fraud.

11. In accordance with Colonial Regulation No. 300 a Board of Survey was appointed to check the cash, bank balances, and revenue stamps, in the hands of the Accountant-General at the end of the year, and these were reported as having been found correct.

Post Office stocks were also surveyed by a Board at the close of the year, and no discrepancies were reported.

12. With regard to the latter survey however it was brought to notice by audit that the Board had carried out a test survey only of certain portions of the stocks held by Counter Shroffs. It has since been arranged that future annual surveys of these stocks shall be carried out in detail.

-A (2) 3.

13. The internal check in the Accountant-General's office appears to be satisfactory and vouchers submitted to audit bear signs of adequate scrutiny and check. The insignificant number of queries that audit found necessary to raise gives considerable support to these findings.

14. The question of the adequacy or otherwise of internal checks in other departments will be reviewed during the current year.

15. Securities provided by Public Officers.

The securities supplied by Public Officers in respect of the pccuniary responsibility attached to their offices in accordance with General Order No. 364 and Colonial Regulation No. 301, have been inspected by audit and found to be in order.

C.-ANNUAL ABSTRACT Account.

16. Receipts.

The total Revenue for the year 1937

including Land Sales, was Compared with an estimated amount of ...

Thereby exceeding the estimate by

$ 33,196,368

28,760,250

$ 4,436,118

17. The main variations, as compared with the Estimates, occur under the following Heads:

Duties

Head.

Licences and Internal Revenue

Fees of Court etc.

Post Office

Land Sales

More than Estimated.

$ 1,210,411

1,003,667

262,576

1,204,596

322,463

18. The actual revenue for the year 1937 exceeded that of the preceding year by $3,153,384.

19. Payments.

The expenditure for the year 1937, includ-

ing Military Contribution was

$ 32,111,222

While the Estimates provided for

32,259,160

Showing under-expenditure of

.$

147.938

A (2) 4 -

20. Savings, as compared with the Estimates, occur under

25 heads, while the estimated provision was

10 heads, the more important of the latter being:-

(1) Defence-

Head.

Military Contribution

(2) Charitable Services

(3) Pensions

(4) Public Works Recurrent

exceeded under

Excess.

$206,755

31,993

359,809

281,869

21. The excess under Military Contribution is due to the fact that the revenue for the year was considerably greater than anticipated.

22. Reasons for the variations between the actual and estimated figures of both revenue and Expenditure are given in the Annual Report of the Accountant-General for the year 1937.

23. The actual expenditure for 1937 exceeded that of the previous year by $2,597,702.

D.-AUTHORITIES FOR EXPENDITURE, 1937.

24. Details of the various authorities obtained to cover the expenditure for the year 1937 are given below:

(i) Estimates.-($32,259,160). The expenditure for the year 1937 of a sum of $25,508,269, representing the total estimated requirements of the Colony for that year, but exclud- ing the probable contribution to the Imperial Government in aid of Military Expenditure ($5,379,660), and the estimated charges on account of Public Debt ($1,371,281), was authorized by the Legislature on 7th October, 1936 (Hansard 1936 pps. 242--275).

The Estimates were approved by the Secretary of State vide his telegram dated 16th December, 1936, and confirmed by Colonial Office despatch No. 4 of 4th January, 1937.

(ii) Appropriation Ordinance (No. 42 of 1936).-Legalized the expenditure of $25,508,269 on the Public Service of the Colony for the year 1937, but in accordance with local custom excluded provision for the estimated expenditure in connection with the Military Contribution, and charges on account of the Public Debt. Expenditure on these two services is apparently held to be covered by existing legislation.

Notice of non-disallowance of this Ordinance was published vide Government Notice No. 1003 of 21.12.36.

(ii) General Warrant.-Signed by the Governor on 4th January, 1937.

- A (2) 5

(iv) Quarterly Returns of Additional Provision.

1st Quarter-Financial Messages Nos. 1 and 2. 7, approved by Secretary of State vide despatch No. June, 1937.

2nd Quarter-Financial Messages Nos. 3-5. approved by Secretary of State vide despatch No. September, 1937.

Items 1- 222 of 17th

Items 8-36 386 of 21st

Items 37-63

3rd Quarter-Financial Messages Nos. 6-7. approved by Secretary of State vide despatch No. 492 of 29th November, 1937.

4th Quarter-Financial Messages Nos. 8-10. Items 64- 176 approved by Secretary of State vide despatch No. 598 of 25th May, 1938.

4th Quarter. (Supplementary).-Financial Messages No. 1- 2. Items 177-205. Not yet approved by the Secretary of State.

(v) All items included in the Financial Messages referred to above were covered by Special Warrants and received the Sanction of the Legislature.

(vi) Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance ($774,321.44) (No. 7 of 1938) covering all excesses on Heads, was passed by the Legislature on 28th July, 1938, and received the Governor's assent. Notice of non-disallowance has not yet been received from the Secretary of State.

25. Loan Expenditure. 31% Dollar Loan 1934. (Ordin- ance No. 11 of 1934).

The total net expenditure incurred during 1937 which is chargeable to this loan is $1,057,215.67.

26. Since the date of the previous Audit Annual Report transfers between items detailed in the Schedule, in accord- ance with Section 3 (2), of the Ordinance, were made on the following occasions:-

(1) First Revision.-Sanctioned by Legislature on 26th May, 1937. Approved by Secretary of State vide Telegram No. 76 dated 9th April, 1937.

(2) Second Revision.-Sanctioned by Legislature on 29th September, 1937. Approved by Secretary of State vide his Telegram No. 280 of 24th December, 1937.

(3) Third Revision.-Sanctioned by Legislature on 7th

July, 1938.

of State.

Not yet approved by Secretary

Ă (2) 6

27. Authorities for 31% "Dollar Loan" Expenditure, 1937.

The total actual expenditure incurred during the year 1937 under the items detailed in the Schedule has been covered as follows:-

(1) $1,673,731.37 by Resolution of the Legislature on 29th September, 1937. Approved by Secretary of State vide Telegram No. 280 of 24th December, 1937, and

(2) $50,454.49 being excess expenditure on the Gorge Dam received the approval of the Legislature on 7th July, 1938. Secretary of State's approval not yet seen.

28. Expenditure on additional works to be charged to a Proposed New Loan.

On the 29th September, 1937 the Legislative Council passed a Resolution approving the carrying out of certain additional works at an estimated total cost of $3,396,000 of which $176,000 would be chargeable to the accounts of the current year. It was agreed that the expenditure should in the first instance be charged as advances from the Colony's Surplus Funds pending the raising of a loan. The Secretary of State's approval for the above was obtained vide his telegram No. 280 of 24th December, 1937.

29. The actual expenditure to the 31st December, 1937, on these works was $56,783.30.

E.—AUTHORITIES FOR EXpenditure 1936.

30. Recurrent.-Notice of non-disallowance of the Supple- mentary Appropriation Ordinance in respect of expenditure for the year 1936 (Ordinance No. 10 of 1937) was published vide Government Notice No. 787 in Gazette No. 52 of 5th November, 1937.

31. Loan Expenditure.

An excess expenditure of $239,103.69 in 1936 on Head 2, Shing Mun Valley Water Scheme-b (3) Gorge Dam, which was reported by the Director of Colonial Audit to the Secretary of State as not having been authorized by the Legislature, has now received the covering approval of that body by a Resolu- tion on 7th July, 1938.

32. All 1936 expenditure is therefore now covered by the requisite authorities.

F.-COLLECTION OF REVENUE.

33. As far as has been ascertained the systems employed for the collection of revenue have proved generally to be satis- factory, and moneys becoming due to Government are being promptly and efficiently collected.

·A (2) 7-

34. Royalties payable by Transport Companies.

Head 9. Miscellaneous Receipts. Under Licences issued by Government to certain private Transport Companies, royalties or percentages become payable, which are based upon the gross annual receipts of the companies concerned. For the purpose of verifying the accuracy of the payments made, monthly statements of gross receipts and royalty payments, each certified by a firm of Auditors approved by Government, are submitted to the Accountant-General.

35. For a considerable time, however, the Auditor's certi- ficates in respect of the returns rendered by one Company have been qualified owing to the non-production for audit of an essential book of account viz. a Cash Book. The matter is receiving the attention of Government.

36. Arrears of Revenue.

According to returns rendered by Departments, the total arrears of revenue, as at 31st December, 1937, amounted to $302,635.71 of which $291,550.22 was collected by the 31st March, 1938. The previous years' figures were $676,542.43 and $513,126.93 respectively. The 1937 figures therefore shew a substantial improvement when compared with those for 1936.

37. Of the 1937 arrears the sum of $3,599.52 has been either written off or cancelled, leaving a balance outstanding as at 31st March, 1938 of only $7,485.97, as against $53,571.42 at the same date last year.

38. A detailed statement, showing the arrears of each class of revenue as at 31st December, 1937, and the 31st March, 1938 respectively, appears as Appendix C to this report.

39. "Writing off" of Revenue.

Under General Order 296 (2) the Treasurer is authorized to write off arrears of revenue not exceeding $50 in each case, but it has been brought to notice by Audit that hospital fees, and in some instance fines, have been written off by the officers responsible for their collection; and that the requisite authority for this could not be traced. The matter has now been referred to the Secretary of State.

G.-EXPENDITURE.

40. The control over expenditure appears generally to be satis- factory. It was however necessary on one occasion, for audit to bring to notice that the estimated provision for the cost of postage stamps had been considerably exceeded, and, contrary to the provisions of Colonial Regulation No. 265 (b), it was not until several months after the excess expenditure had been included in the accounts that steps were taken to obtain the

Appendix "C"

A (2) 8 -

requisite sanction for it. The explanation given was that the application for a supplementary vote had been postponed until the exact amount of the final excess could be more accurately ascertained, but that in future more prompt action would be taken to obtain sanction for an excess over any sum voted by the Legislature.

41. A Cincular (No. 3 of 11th January, 1938) has recently been issued by Government, regarding the control of expendi- ture, which "inter alia" draws the attention of Heads of Departments to the necessity for obtaining prior approval for all expenditure, and also prohibits them, without first obtaining approval, from entering into any commitment which may be likely to cause an immediate or future excess on a vote having regard to the expenditure that would normally have to be met from it.

42. Awards of Pensions and Gratuities.

The calculations of awards of Civil and Police Pensions and Gratuities made under the laws of the Colony, and also Pensions payable under the Widows' and Orphans' Pensions Ordinance (No. 15 of 1908) have been verified by Audit.

43. Losses of Public Money.

The following losses of Public Money were reported during the year:

(1) Loss by robbery of a bag containing cash and cheques intended for the payment of salaries of the staff of the Victoria Hospital. The Secretary of State approved of the write off af the cash loss viz. $1,074.30.

(2) The sum of $358.74 was found missing from the safe of a Shroff employed in the Public Works Department. The amount of the shortage was transferred from the Shroff's deposit account, and Government agreed that the resulting de- ficiency in his security should be restored by means of contribu- tions from salary at the rate of $30.00 a month. No charge to Public funds was therefore necessary.

(3) An office attendant absconded with $12.00 with which he was instructed to pay a bill for advertising. A warrant for his arrest was issued and the loss was written off under the authority of Government.

were

(4) Defalcations by a shroff employed in the Radio Branch of the Post Office, resulting in 12 loss to Government of $4,461.12, came to light during the year. The frauds reported to the Secretary of State who gave his approval for the "write off" (vide C. O. Despatch No. 455 of 29.4.37). This fraud is also referred to in paragraph 36 of the 1936 Audit Report.

A (2) 9

44. Expenditure on Secret Service.

In accordance with instructions issued by the Governor, to which the Acting Auditor raised no objection, expenditure under Head 20. Sub-head 28 Secret Service" is now being accepted

on the certificate of the Commissioner of Police.

45. Military Contribution.

The amount payable to the Military Authorities under Ordinances No. 1 of 1901 and 43 of 1935 has been verified by Audit, a statement showing how the amount is arrived at is attached (Enclosure N.). The assessment for the year 1937 is $5,662,767.81 as compared with $5,166,629.38 for the previous

year.

46. Public Debt.

H.-LOAN ACCOUNTS.

The Public Debt of the Colony as at 31st December, 1937, amounted to $17,158,000.

47. The 4% Conversion Bonds (Ordinance No. 15 of 1933) amounted to $4,838,000 while the market value of the invest- ments of the accumulated Sinking Fund at the end of the year totalled £54,325-6-11d. The Sinking Fund accounts maintained locally have been checked with the accounts rendered by the Crown Agents.

48. The amount outstanding on account of the Hong Kong 31% Dollar Loan raised under Ordinance No. 11 of 1934 was reduced to $12,320,000; Bonds to the value of $560,000 having been redeemed during the year in accordance with Section 5 of the Ordinance.

49. The cancelled bonds and interest coupons due to the redemption were checked by the Audit Department, while the interest paid to Bond-holders was supported by the Surrendered Coupons which were forwarded for Audit.

50. Shing Mun Valley Water Scheme.

The $50,000 Imprest which had been issued to the Resident Engineer, and which was referred to in paragraph 26 of the Audit Report for 1936, was closed on the 1st April, 1937, and thereafter all payments that became necessary were made by the Treasurer.

51. The manner in which the Construction Plant and surplus stores, which had been purchased for the scheme, were being disposed of after its completion, has on more than one occasion been the subject of adverse comment by Audit. It was contended by this department that, on the completion of the works, all the plant and stores should have been taken over

A (2) 10-

immediately by the Public Works Department, and that that Department should have assumed complete responsibility for their custody and the accounting for of receipts from sales.

52. Further the arrangement which permitted the Resident Engineer, to dispose of the plant, which was of considerable value, on a commission basis, and without requiring any Gov- ernment department to exercise supervision and control over the matter is, in the opinion of Audit, open to objection. It is also contrary to the usual Government method of disposal of surplus stores. It must also be noted that after the scheme had been completed the Resident Engineer could in no sense be considered a Government official.

53. The apparent failure to issue in the first instance any special instructions regarding the method of accounting for moneys received from sales was unfortunate. That definite ac- counting instructions were necessary, and close supervision was desirable, became evident after certain accounting irregularities regarding the disposal of proceeds of the sales of plant had been accidently disclosed during an audit of the Imprest Account.

54. The first move in the taking over of the plant by Government was apparently made in January of the present year, when Audit was informed that it would be transferred to the Public Works Department, but that the Resident Engineer would retain first call on it for remedial work which it had been found necessary to undertake at the Pineapple Pass Dam. It was also stated that he would continue to have the right to sell plant on commission provided that no sales at less than catalogue prices were effected without Government approval.

55. At a later date however Government for various reasons considered it advisable to defer its transfer to the Public Works Department.

56. A question regarding the apparent non-payment of hire charges for a derrick forming part of the Shing Mun plant, which it appears was loaned some time ago by the Resident Engineer to a private company, has not yet been explained to the satisfaction of Audit.

57.

I.-STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

The excess of Assets over liabilities at the

31st December, 1937 was

As compared with at the end of the

previous year

$ 14,002,278.11

12,917,132.29

Showing an increase of

$ 1,085,145.82

A (2) 11

-

58. Assets.

Cash $1,547,810.91.-This sum was composed of Bank balances totalling $1,519,834.35 and cash balances held by the undermentioned departments:-

Accountant-General

Medical

Supreme Court

Official Receiver

59. Verification of Cash Balances etc.

$27,462.79

400.25

.51

53.01

(a) Bank Certificates have been produced in support of the balances of the various Bank Accounts, but no Cash Certi-

ficates other than those rendered by the Heads of the depart- ments concerned have been seen for the Cash Balances held in the offices of the last three departments mentioned in the, previous paragraph. The reason for this is that Boards had not been appointed to survey the cash of these departments at the close of the year.

(b) In the case of the Accountant-General's department the Members of the Board appointed to survey the balances omitted to record, on the certificate rendered, the amount of cash found, although they reported it correct.

60. The existence of the Cash Balances and Sinking Fund Investments etc. held by the Crown Agents has been verified with the certified statement received from the Comptroller and Auditor-General.

61. Fixed Deposits.

The receipts obtained from

from the Banks for amounts appearing under this head have been examined by Audit.

62. Advances Miscellaneous. ($220,148.51).

This shows an increase of $145,703.05 over the 1936 figures, the difference being more than accounted for by the sum of $154,450.24 which is shown as outstanding under the heading "Shanghai Refugee Committee." There is however a sum of $14,117.37, being recoveries from Refugees, which appears in the Colony's accounts as a "Deposit" and therefore may be set off against the above advance account. The net sum advanced on behalf of Shanghai Refugees is recoverable from the Imperial Government.

63. It has been verified that no advances have been out- standing for an unduly long period. A detailed statement of advances is attached. (Enclosure E.)

64. Advances-Pending Re-imbursement from a proposed new loan. ($56,783.30).

A (2) 12-

The above represents the amount expended on additional works the cost of which it is proposed to meet from a new loan. The authority for the expenditure is given in paragraph 28 of this report.

65. Building Loans. ($337,922.63).

This represents the outstanding amount of loans, mostly to Government officials, made for the purpose of building their own residences. The balance of this account at the end of the previous year was $846,060.70. The greater part of the reduc- tion is due to the repayment of a loan of $500,000.

66. Trade Loan Outstanding ($295,493.00).

A statement (Enclosure M.) giving details of the Trade Loans outstanding as at 31st December, 1937 is attached. These Lcans are secured by mortgages to Government, but it will be observed that the total amount of the unpaid loans is more than covered by the Trade Loan Reserve. The latter amounted to $336,689.27 on the same date, although the sum of $500,000 was transferred from Reserve to Revenue (Head 9 Miscellaneous Receipts) in June, 1937, as provided for in the 1937 Estimates. Reference to a proposed transfer from Trade Loan Reserves was made in paragraph 11 of the 1935 Audit Report and is also dealt with in the Director of Colonial Audit's better No. 3458/1 of 22.10.37. The amount of Trade Loan interest outstanding on 31st December, 1937 was $110,548.69 as compared with $112,748.69 at the end of the previous year.

67. Unallocated Stores (P.W.D.) ($486,938.40).

The book value of these stores at the end of the previous year was $529,595.63. A statement (Enclosure K) showing how reconciliation has been effected between the balance of this account in the books of the Accountant-General, and that shown in the Public Works Department records, is submitted herewith. This statement, and also the Stock Sheets, have been verified by Audit.

68. Maximum balance of Public Work Department Stock.

In a despatch, No. 113 of 17th March, 1937, the Secretary of State approved of a sum of $700,000 being fixed for the year 1937 as the standard stock of the Public Works Department, other than for stores allocated for particular works.

69. Unallocated Stores (Railway) ($121,552.45).

The maximum standard stock fixed for the Kowloon-Canton Railway (British Section) is $175,000 (Secretary of State's despatch No. 255 of 30th June, 1933) and this figure was not exceeded in 1937. A statement showing how reconciliation has been effected between the amount shown in the Accountant- General's books and the departmental records is forwarded (Enclosure L). This statement, also the Stock Sheets, have been examined by Audit,

- A (2) 13

70. Note Issue Account-($3,513,870.42).

Nickel Coinage Account ($1,678,854.57).

The existence of these assets has been verified by audit. Of the balance, of the Nickel Coinage account the sum of $1,290,336.81 was invested, the securities being held by the Crown Agents for the Colonies.

71. These investments were revalued in accordance with Colonial Regulation 275. The revaluation showed a net-loss of £26. which was met from the "Nickel Coinage Security Fund.”

72. Deposits:-

LIABILITIES.

Contractors and Officers Deposits Insurance Companies

Mascelaneous Deposits.

$447,749.26

1,563,341.62

1,339,709.71

$3,350,800.59

A Statement (Enclosure F), prepared by the Accountant- General, which supplies details of the balances of the individual accounts from which the above totals are arrived at, is submitted.

and Ac-

73. Deposits-Reconciliation of departmental and countant-General's balances.

The following items included in the statements of deposits have each been reconciled with departmental records by one of the following methods:-

(a) Austracting balances shown in departmental records and comparing their totals with Treasury figures. This was done by Audit.

(0) Comparison with detailed statements rendered by

departments at the request of audit.

(c) Reconcizations made by departments at Audit request. Statements signed by Heads of Departments concerned certifying the correctness of the balances have been accepted by Audit.

Official Receiver:

Bankruptcy Account

Companies Liquidation A/c.

Registrar, Supreme Court:

Official Administrator

Official Trustee Suitors' Fund

$ 4,180.89

4,519.59

13,862.20

23,882.47

13,384.50

A (2) 14-

Official Receiver:

Bankruptcy A/c. (bearing interest)

$62,753.42

Companies Liquidation A/c. (bearing

interest)

97,132.95

Bankruptcy

29,923.62

Deposits bearing interest:

Contractors

Goverment Servants

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous Deposits

Security A/c non-Railway staff

265,218.00

182,531.26

87,005.43

199,813.13

86,882.99

57.80

Security A/c.. Railway Staff

Water Consumption & Meter Rent Deposits:

Hong Kong

Kowloon & N. T.

Tender Deposits

Box Holders Deposits Post Office

Clerks, Shroffs & Postmen's Securities

Customs duties on parcels

Drainage and Street and Lane Surface

Estate of Deceased Policemen

Fire Brigade Motor Drivers Securities Footpath & Drain Connections General Works Miscellaneous Imprest of Private Street etc. Kowloon Tong Water Supply Land Sales Deposits Military Pill Boxes

Military Roads etc. Military

"1

13

Military Works etc.

Police Benevolent Fund

Police Dental Treatment

78,370.00

66,747.47

7,755.00

2,070.20

173.00 1,857.53

5,947.17

14,073.09



524.00

10,430.77

6,941.81

1,838.55

8,117.33

2,000.00

2,000.00

2,000.00

5,987.93

627.64

3,543.02

Police Officers Securities

Service Connection etc.

Wireless School Fees, Deposits

Family Remittances

Military Demolition Chamber

Drainage Extension and Connections

Approach Road to Tsum Wan etc.

374.00 4,796.50

243.28

187.36

20.00

25,478.67

1,100.00

1,134.73

2,686.20

74. Deposits-Insurance Companies. ($1,563,341.62).

In accordance with Ordinances No. 11 of 1907 and No. 32 of 1917. Insurance Companies operating in the Colony are required to deposit certain securities with the Registrar. The

- A (2) 15-

sum mentioned above represents merely the value of Fixed Deposit receipts so lodged, and appears on both sides of the Colony's Balance Sheet, but it is doubtful whether this inclusion is really necessary. On the other hand the fact that securities have been lodged with the Crown Agents by Local Banks as security for their Note Issues, is not shown by the Balance Sheet.

75. Transfer of Deposits to revenue.

With reference to Colonial Regulation No. 330 it was sug- gested by audit that all Deposits under the control of Depart- ments should be scrutinized at the close of each financial year and that any balance which could not be considered a liability to the Colony should be transferred to revenue. The Treasurer replied that this would be done.

76. Praya East Reclamation ($108,280.35).

This liability represents the cost of work still to be com- pleted.

77. Exchange Adjustment. ($23,934.73).

This has been verified by audit. It represents the difference between the cost price, of sums placed in the Joint Colonial Fund and on an Imprest of £150 held in Australia, and the December Exchange Rate.

J.-STORES ACCOUNTS.

78. Manner in which the accounts have been kept.

The stores accounts of the Colony have generally been kept in a satisfactory manner and call for little comment.

79. Boards of Survey.

In accordance with Colonial Regulation 344, the usual Annual Boards of Survey were held after the close of the year to inspect and report on all Government Stores. No major dis- crepancies were reported.

80. Losses of Stores by theft.

A number of cases were reported during the year in which small items of Government property had been lost by theft. Where it was considered the persons responsible for their custody had taken insufficient care to prevent such losses their salaries were surcharged.

81. Medical Stores.

The accounts of the main Medical Store have for a number of years been reported on adversely by audit, and although the system employed has on more than one occasion been revised,

A (2) 16

results have not been up to expectations. A recent inquiry into the system in force revealed it to be most cumbersome and unsatisfactory, and it was also found that the records kept by the Apothecary in respect of drugs received by him for compounding mixtures etc. were found to be quite inadequate to ensure proper control, or to allow of a satisfactory check being made by audit. These stores accounts were also referred to in paragraph 44 of the Audit Report for the year 1936.

82. Draft regulations for the medical store, intended to improve the existing system of accounting and to provide for better control, have been drawn up by the Auditor. The department concerned is giving the matter suitable attention.

83. Local Purchases of Drugs, etc.

It would appear also that the quantity of drugs etc. purchased locally is unnecessarily large and that local purchases might be reduced considerably by means of better organisation.

84. Local Purchases of Motor Vehicles.

As

the

The necessity for the local purchase of a motor vehicle for the Hong Kong Volunteer Force was questioned by Audit. a question of principle was involved the matter was referred to the Colonial Office, and after further correspondence on subject the Secretary of State laid down conditions under which local purchases would be permitted, but stipulated that in all cases a tender should in the first instance be called for from the Crown Agents.

K.-GENERAL.

85. Exchange Fund Accounts.

These accounts have been examined by the Audit Depart- ment to the 31st December, 1937, the results being entirely satisfactory. The Balance Sheet as at that date has been transmitted by Government to the Secretary of State.

86. At the end of the year Certificates of Indebtedness amounted to $182,319,502, which is equivalent to £11,394,969 at the rate of 1s. 3d. to the Hong Kong Dollar. The total assets of the Fund at the same date amounted to £12,313,938-12-4d. which was composed of cash, placed on deposit in London at call or short notice, totalling £4,493,605-1-7d. (36.5% of the total) and Investments valued at £7,820,333-10-9d. (63.5%).

87. The existence of the above assets has been verified by the Controller and Auditor General whose certificate has been examined by audit and agreed with the local records.

88. Currency Accounts.

The accounts and records maintained in connection with the issue of Currency Notes (authorized under Ord. 42 of 1935) and Nickel and Subsidiary coinage have been subjected to audit by this Department.

A (2) 17

89. In accordance with Colonial Office despatch of 16th December, 1936 draft Currency Rules were drawn up and sub- mitted to the Secretary of State for approval vide Hong Kong despatch No. 762 of 22nd December, 1937. These Rules were considered by the Secretary of State to be generally satisfactory, but certain points of detail have yet to be settled.

90. The destruction of Currency Notes, which is carried out by a Board of Officers specially appointed for that purpose, was usually witnessed also by a member of the Audit Depart- ment.

91. Official Trustee's Accounts.

In order to remedy what Audit considered to be a long standing accounting defect in the books of the Official Trustee, new ledger accounts of Trusts were opened and an Investment ledger was introduced as from the beginning of the year.

92. China Company Fees.

A local audit examination of the Registrar of Companies. Accounts at Shanghai covering the period July 1986-April, 1938 has recently been carried out. The net revenue accruing from this source, exclusive of the revenue derived from Stamp fees, for the year amounted to $165,703, as compared with $170,966 for the previous year. No Audit Officer visited Shanghai during 1937 owing to difficult conditions prevailing there at that time.

93. Hospital Fee Deposits.

An improved procedure for the accounting of deposits on account of Hospital fees les recently been introduced.

94. Programme of Work.

With the exception of the final Division Sheets of the Kowloon-Canton Railway for the last quarter of 1937 and a few minor Post Office accounts, all of which are not yet available for audit, the Programme of Work as approved by the Director of Colonial Audit has been completed. There has been material departure from the approved Programme.

95. Local Audit Inspections.

In addition to the routine examinations of accounts (includ- ing store accounts) at departmental headquarters, a surprise inspection has been made of cash balances and stamp stocks etc. at all Government offices in the Colony.

96. A continuous audit has been maintained on the accounts of the Railway, Harbour Master, Imports and Exports Depart- ment, and the Public Works Department (Unallocated Stores), as well as on the accounts of the Accountant-General.

- A (2) 18

97. Post Office-Specimen Stamps.

Specimen postage stamps of British possessions and of foreign countries belonging to the Postal Union, which are sent to the Postmaster-General from time to time by the authorities at Berne, have now been classified and mounted in albums. In accordance with instructions from the Director of Colonial Audit these stamps and albums will be subjected to audit examination.

L.-OUTSTANDING QUESTIONS ON 1936 REPORT.

non-

98. Estate Duty.-With reference to paragraph 37 of the 1936 Audit Report, regarding acquisition by Government of a property in lieu of payment of Estate Duty and the recording of the transaction in the Colony's accounts, it appears that no progress has been made with regard to the sale of the property in question. The assessed duty on the estate amounted to $20,384 and the corresponding revenue head has not yet received credit for this sum. The matter has again been brought to the notice of Government..

99. Suspense Accounts. Shing Mun Locomotives.

The detailed statement of Suspense accounts as at the 31st December, 1936 which was submitted with the Audit Report for the year 1936, included a Debit balance of $609.62 in respect of the above. This represented expenditure held in Suspense incurred in reconditioning locomotives, ex Shing Mun plant, which were taken over by the Railway. The account was ad- justed in January 1937, the Resident Engineer in charge of the scheme accepting the debit.

100. Audit Report 1936.

The Audit Report for the year 1936 was laid before the Legislature on the 15th December, 1937.

101. Outstanding questions not affecting the accounts.

There are no outstanding questions of importance, other than those mentioned in the report, which do not affect the accuracy of the accounts.

102. Kowloon-Canton Railway.

A copy of the Manager's report for 1937 of the British Section of the Kowloon Canton Railway which was received by Auditor on 28th July, 1938, is forwarded (Enclosure R.). The accounts have been regularly rendered and satisfactorily kept.

103. The final division sheets of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts have been audited to the end of September, 1937. These have been accepted by both adminis- trations.

- A (2) 19-

104. The October Division Sheets have only recently been received from Canton and have therefore not yet been submitted for audit, while those for November and December have not yet been received. The delay in rendering these statements can be attributed to the difficulties which have to be contended with by the Cantonese Authorities.

105. Surveys of the Cash Balances etc. at the

at the Railway Head Office, Railway Stations, and Stores, were made during the year and call for no comment..

revenue as

106. It was brought to notice by Audit that in some cases money owing to the Railway had been treated as soon as it had been earned, but in the other cases it had not been treated as revenue, until collected. It has now been agreed that all revenue will be credited in the Railway ledgers when earned, thus enabling a complete reconciliation to be made with cash payments and amounts outstanding.

107. The net profit on the Operating Account of the Railway for the year was $436,935.30 while that for the previous year amounted to $454,733.00. This shows a reduction of $17,798.00 as compared with 1936, but is due to the fact that $80,883.12, being the extent of the damage caused to the Railway by the Typhoon of September 1987, was charged to the Operating Account of the year 1937.

O. MISCELLANEOUS.

108. New Form of Colonial Accounts.

It

The new system of Colonial Government Accounting as described in Colonial Circular despatch of 25th November, 1937, has not yet been adopted by the Hong Kong Government. is understood that the matter is under correspondence with the Secretary of State.

109. Staff.

Mr. P. L. Colisson, O.B.E. Auditor proceeded on leave on 20th March, 1937, and retired on pension as from 26th November, 1937.

Mr. T. Dakin, acted as Auditor from 20th March, 1937 to 26th April, 1938.

28th July, 1938.

A. POLLARD,

Auditor.

Appendix A.

List of Errors of Classification revealed too late for adjustment in 1937.

ACTUAL ALLOCATION.

Query No.

1937.

Amount

Revenue or

Head No.

$

Expenditure

72 R.

150.00

Revenue

CORRECT ALLOCATION.

Title.

Revenue or

Expenditure

Head No.

Title.

7

Rent of Government Property Revenue Sub-Head Quarries.

4

70 R.

3.00

Revenue

Post Office-Postage.

Revenue

48 E.

27.56

Expenditure

28/42

Miscellancons Service Sub-Expenditure

21/6

Head Stationery, Prison Dept.

Fees of Court (A) Fees. Sub-Head Earth & Stone.

Fees of Court (A) Fees. Deeds Registration.

Prisons-Clothing for Prisoners,

50 E.

3.00

Expenditure Cr. 21/8

Prisons, Sub-liead Fuel.

Expenditure Cr. 21/21 Prisons-Transport.

All the above have been admitted by the Accountant-General.

A. POLLARD,

Auditor.

A (2) 20 -

7. 6. 38.

A (2) 21

Appendix "B".

STATEMENT OF OUTSTANDING QUERIES.

Query Number.

Date first issued.

Subject

Department Concerned

51 E

53

333

18. 3. 38

21. 4. 38

Incorrect Acting Pay

Incorrect Rent Allowance

Imports & Exports.

Medical Dept.

40 R

15. 11. 37

61

26. 1. 38

69

12. 2. 38

38

80

2. 5. 38

88

16. 6. 38

90

90

11. 7. 38

Discrepancies in Air Mail

Charges

Receipt not issued for

fine

irregular syste.n re Ping

Shan Memorial

Gunpowder Storage Fee-

unsupported by voucher

Omission of Rent Roll Items from Statement of Collections

Details of Deposit Secur- ity Account of non Pailway Staff on An- nual Statement

General Post Office.

Kowloon Magistracy.

District Office North.

Harbour Dept.

District Office, North.

Kowloon Canton

Railway.

A. POLLARD,

Auditor.

12. 7. 38.

Appendix C.

COLONY OF HONG KONG.

Detailed Statement of Outstanding Revenue for the Year, 1937.

Heads and Sub-Heads.

1.-DUTIES.

Import Duty on Motor Spirit

2.-PORT & HARBOUR DUES.

Light Dues

Buoy Dues

3.-LICENCES & INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

Arrears on

31.12.37.

Collected

up to

31.3.38.

Amount Written off as Irrecoverable.

Amount

cancelled.

Balance

Outstanding.

Remarks.

567.30

567.30

14,126.95

2,220.00

14,126.95

2,220.00

1.17 Warrant issued. 94.50

(A) Licences.

Chinese Passenger Ship

Forestry, N. T.

Ga.ne

Liquor

Miscellaneous

75.00

75.00

361.20

294.20

67.00

125.00

125.00

228.33

228.33

155.00

118.00

37.00

Pawnbrokers

500.00

500,00

Vehicles, Other

16.00

16.00

(B) Internal Revenue,

Assessed Taxes (Rates) (New Territories) Water Excess Supply & Meter Rents

24,790.70

24,050.34

6.00

102.36

632.00

602.43

601.26

4,356.80

4,262.30

(C) Fines & Forfeitures.

Fines

777.50

89.00

3.00

Building Covenant Fines

965.82

733.48

49.70

232.34

635.80

Carried forward.

49,868.03

48,007.16

113.00

384.40

1,363.47

— A (2) 22 -

-

Heads and Sub-Heads.

Appendix C,-Contd.

Collected

Arrears on

31.12.37.

up to

31.3.38.

Amount

Written off as Irrecoverable.

Amount

Outstanding.

Remarks.

cancelled.

Balance

$



$

$

49,868.03

48,007.16

113.00

384.40

1,363,47

Brought forward..

4. FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES, AND

REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID:—

(A) Fees.

Air Services

556.00

556.00

Analysis

700.00

700.00

Boundary Stones & Survey Fees

3,286.00

2,658.00

628.00 Fees for boundary stones not met will be collected by the Land Officer at the time of issuing the Crown Leases.

44.10 $33.90 paid on 6.4.38.

Ce nctery

89.00

89.00

Court

44.10

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen

1,550.35

1,550.35

Medical Examination of Emigrants

5,992.00

5,992.00

Motor Ambulance

5.00

5.00

Official Signatures

5.00

Registry

:

28.00

28.00

Sunday Cargo-working Permits

2,062.50

1,862.50

5.00

200.00

Survey of Steam-launches

52.50

52.50

Survey of Steam Ships

8,688.75

8,688.75

Watchmen's Ordinance

337.20

337.20

Water Service

595.00

595.00

Carried forward..

73,859.43

71,116.46

118.00

584.40

2,040.57

A (2) 23

Appendix C,-Contd.

Collected

Heads and Sub-Heads.

Arrears on

31.12.37.

up to

31.3.38,

Amount Written off as Irrecoverable.

Amount

cancelled.

Balance

Outstanding.

Remarks.

$

$33

&

$

Brought forward......

73,859.43

71,116.46

118.00

584.40

2,040.57

4.-FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS| FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES, AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID:-

(B) Receipts.

Bacteriological Examinations

182.65

182.65

Fumigating and Disinfecting Fees

1,362.32

1,362.32

Medical Treatment

7,241.00

6,399.14

136.19

107.30

598.37 -.80 cts, error cancelled.

(C) Reimbursement in Aid.

Bonded Warehouse Supervision

645 38

645.38

Consultants Fees

805.00

755.00

50.00

(D) Sales.

Prison Industries

48 05

48.05

Publications

2.00

2.00

6. KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY.

Traffic Receipts Various Sub-heads

275.23 Paid 1st April.

7.-RENT OF GOVERNMENT, PROPERTY LAND AND HOUSES:-

Buildings

Lands Not Leased (Permits for Encroachment &c.)

108,647.34 108,372.11

500.00

500.00

8,063.28

6.247.86

Carried forward..

201,356,45

194,985.59

187.00

491.19

1,628.42

2,965.50

2,914.17

— Ā (2) 24

Heads and Sub-Heads.

Appendix C,-Contd.

Arrears

31.12.37.

Collected

on

up to

31.3.38.

Amount

Written off as Irrecoverable.

Amount

'cancelled.

Balance

Remarks.

Outstanding.

$

$

$

$

$

201,356.45

194,985.59

491.19

2,965.50

2,914.17

7.-RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY

Brought forward..

LAND AND HOUSES:--

Leased Lands (Crown Rent exclusive of N. T.). Leased Lands (Crown Rent, X. T.)

81,563.81

79,353.39

16,777,68

14,355.06

57.50

24.00

2,152.92

2,398.62

Piers

245.00

245.00

Pineapple Land Leases

90.73

29.40

61.33

8.-INTEREST:

374.90

374.90

9.-MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS:-

Overpayments in Previous Years

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

10.-LAND SALES:-

Premia on New Leases

Total

13.79

13.79

2,116.85

2,096.59

20.26

96.50

$302,635.71

96.50

$291,550,22

$552.52

$3,047.00

$7,485.97

The figures for the previous year were

$676,542.43 $513,126.93 $109,844.08

$53,571.42

THE TREASURY,

HONG KONG,

23rd April, 1938.

T. BLACK,

Accountant-General.

A. POLLARD,

Auditor.

18. 7. 38.

- A (2) 25

-:

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE

YEAR 1938-1939.

By order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the tenements in Hong Kong, Aplichau, Kowloon and New Kowloon has been made. The new Rateable Value amounts to $35,502,622 as compared with $34,208,734 last year, an increase of $1,293,888 or 3.78 per cent.

2. The following table gives a comparison of the Assessments for the year 1937-1938 and 1938-1939.

District.

Valuation Valuation 1937-1938. 1938-1939.

Inc.

Increase.

%

City of Victoria

20,804,547

21,346,621

542,074

2.61

H. K. Villages

3,572,778

3,828,927

256,149

7.17

Kowloon

New Kowloon

7,704,446 8,118,336

2,126,963 2,208,738

413,890

5.37

81,775

3.84

34,208,734

35,502,622 1,293,888 3.78

3. The increase in the valuation of the City of Victoria compares with a decrease of $506,467 last year, and is due to interim valuations of new and improved property, including notably Holland House, and to some improvement in rateable values.

4. The increase under Hong Kong Villages is due to scat- tered building, storage land and some increase in rateable values. Last year there was an increase of $125,652.

5. In Kowloon the increase compares with a decrease of $35,821 last year. It is due partly to new flats, Chinese tenement houses, godowns and storage land, and partly to improved rateable values.

B 2

6. The increase in New Kowloon compares with an decrease of $18,390 last year, and is due mainly to further building of European dwellings and Chinese tenement houses on the new lay-out near Kowloon City, to factory buildings, and the Chinese tenement houses in Shamshuipo.

7. During the 1937-1938 rating year, refunds of rate were granted for vacant floors of tenements where the owners had elected at the last Annual Valuation to obtain this concession.

8. The number of floors reported and found vacant averaged 842 per month compared with 2,070 last year, while the number of all classes of tenements each under one assessment reported and found vacant averaged 411 per month compared with 936 per month last year. Thus the total vacancies averaged 1,253 per month compared with 3,006 per month last year. For April this year the total number of tenements and floors found vacant was 283 compared with 2,595 last year. This great reduction is due to the influx of refugees from China since August, following the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese hostilities.

9. During the year ending 30th April, 1938, 1,067 Interim Valuations, as compared with 1,283 in the previous year, were made as follows:

:-

CITY OF VICTORIA REST OF COLONY

Rateable No. Value.

No.

Rateable Value.

$

$

New or rebuilt tenements and tenements struc- turally altered

328 785,340 387 519,371

Assessment

cancelled,

tenements. resumed,

pulled down or being

in other respects not rateable

157

474,303 195 201,992

Number and Increase

485

311,037 582 317,379

-B 3-

10. The following comparative statement shows the Rate- able Value of the Colony of Hong Kong from 1928-1929 to 1938-1939 inclusive:

Rateable

As compared with previous year.

Increase. Decrease.

Year.

Value.

$

%

%

Increase. Decrease.

1928-1929 30,395,447|

1929-1930 31,617,566 1,222,119

4.02

1930-1931 33,069,602 1,452,036

4.59

1931-1932 35,071,566 2,001,964

6.04

1932-1933 37,457,725 2,386,159

6.80

1933-1934 38,941,273 1,483,548

3.96

1934-1935 38,641,856,

299,417

0.77

1935-1936 36,374,100|

2,267,756

5.87

1936-1937 34,643,760|

1,730,340

4.76

1937-1938 34,208,734,

435,026

1.26

1938-1939 35,502,622| 1,293,888

3.78

11. In the ten years from 1928-1929 to 1938-1939 the rate- able value of the Colony has increased by $5,107,175 or 16.80 per cent.

12. If the interim valuations are deducted from the new total valuation of the Colony, the increase this year is 1.95 per cent as compared with a decrease of 2.13 per cent last year.

13. The influx of refugees from China has led to a rapid decrease in vacant tenements of all classes. While a few fancy rents have, as a result, been obtained, and the rents of certain classes of property, notably the lower priced European and semi- European types of dwellings, have shown a more or less general increase, the bulk of the Chinese tenement property, both in the City and the outlying districts, has shown little or no increase in rents generally.

B 4

The increase in the rateable value this year shows the turning point in the greatest and most prolonged decrease in rental values that has taken place in the Colony for at least the last fifty years. It is estimated that the fall in rents averaged some 25%, though many rents fell by as much as 50%.

It may be as well to mention here that fancy rents and also rents that are only likely to be maintained temporarily cannot be taken as the basis for assessing rateable values, which have to be based upon the rent at which the tenement might reasonably be expected to let, (under certain conditions), from year to year.

Assessor's Office,

29th April, 1938.

J. RING,

Assessor.



Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1937.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I to III).

The Government Revenue derived from all sources during the year was $19,530.00 and the Government expenditure was $130,757.37.

2. As is evidenced by the numerous tables attached to this Report, much of the work of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs is concerned with the administration of funds that may be called semi-official. The Revenue in these cases is in very large part a matter of voluntary subscription by the Chinese Community and outside the Government Estimates, with Expenditure at the discretion of the Department and of the various Committees concerned.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1865)

(Ordinance 6 of 1893)

(Ordinance 4 of 1897)

(Ordinance 1 of 1923)

3. The number of girls reported missing to the Po Leung Kuk during the year was four, none of whom were found.

4. Sixteen girls were put under bond this year, and thirty- one were released from their bonds; the total number of girls under bond at the end of December was thirty-four.

5. The Muitsai Inspectorate consisted of one European male Inspector, and two Chinese Lady Inspectors. The two Lady Inspectors paid a total of 3,103 visits to the homes of registered muitsai, besides doing a great deal of extra work with the European Inspector investigating numerous cases involving unregistered muitsai and other girls. The influx of Chinese. (refugees and others) since the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese war considerably increased the work of the Inspectorate."

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6. At the beginning of the year the number of registered muitsai was 1,584, but by the end of December they had been reduced to 1,396. The 188 cancellations are accounted for as follows:

Died

Absconded

Left Colony permanently

Married

Restored to parents or relatives

Earning their own living

Removed from the register

5

5

'17

32

50

36

23

20

Remaining with the employer as a member

of the family

Fifty of the registered muitsai are attending school, their fees being paid by the employers.

7. Sixty-one persons were prosecuted under the Female Domestic Service Ordinance (1 of 1923) in respect of fifty-eight girls. In all eighty-three charges under this and other enact- ments were preferred as follows:

(1) Ill-treatment of unregistered muitsai

5

(2) Ill-treatment of child under 16 years (3) Common assault

4

4

(4) Keeping an unregistered muitsai

38

(5) Bringing an unregistered muitsai into the Colony. 13

(6) Failing to report the intended removal from the

Colony of a registered muitsai

2

(7) Failing to report change of address of a registered

muitsai

3

(8) Failing to report the intended marriage of a

registered muitsai

9

(9) Failing to report taking into employment of a

registered muitsai

4

(10) Failing to report the death of a registered

muitsai

1

83

Seven cases were discharged, in eight cases

defendants

were cautioned, in six cases defendants were bound over, one case was withdrawn, and one case was remanded 'sine-die'.

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8. At the beginning of the year the former Victoria Home was closed, and the pupils transferred either to the new C.M.S. school 'Heep Yunn', or else to the 'Rural Home and Orphanage' near Taipo. During the year two girls were sent to the Heep Yunn school, four to the Rural Home, and fifteen to the Salva- tion Army Home.

9. From the 2nd to the 13th February a Conference of the Central Authorities in Eastern Countries was held under the auspices of the League of Nations at Bandoeng, Java, on Traffic in Women and Children in the East, at which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs represented the Government of Hong Kong. In March the Majority and Minority Reports of the Muitsai Commission were received. As one result of the Conference and the Reports, applications were invited for a new post of Lady Assistant to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs; it was intended that she should take over administrative charge of all the work concerning the protection of women and girls in this office. In December it was also announced in the leading local English and Chinese newspapers that applications would be received for three extra Lady Inspectors: these had not been. finally chosen by the end of the year.

10. Under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance (4 of 1897) there were three prosecutions, and five persons were con- victed. There were also seventeen prosecutions, and twenty- nine persons convicted on charges of trafficking in minors (Ordinance 2 of 1865, Offences against the Person).

11. For the first time a lady, Mrs. Tam, has served on the Po Leung Kuk Committee this year. For a fuller account of the Po Leung Kuk work see Annexe A.

EMIGRATION.

(Ordinance 30 of 1915).

(Tables IV and V).

12. The number of Assisted Emigrants was 7,564, as com- pared with 6,242 in 1936.

13. The number of women and children emigrants was 83,539 as compared with 44,443 in 1936.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.

(Ordinance 23 of 1917).

(Table VI).

14. Class V Ku Li Kun was deleted by Government Noti- fication No. 52 of 1936 and Class VI Ku Kung Ngoi U was deleted by Government Notification No. 621 of 1937.

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15. At the end of the year there were 157 Boarding Houses of all classes as against 493 at the end of 1936. During the year 10 new licences were taken out and 7 licences were cancelled.

16. One conviction was obtained under the Ordinance as compared with 4 in 1936.

PERMITS.

(Ordinance 40 of 1932).

(Ordinance 22 of 1919).

17. 3,383 permits to fire crackers were issued, of which 2,644 were for weddings and the remainder for birthdays, shop- openings, etc. Sixty-six permits were issued for theatrical performances.

18. Other permits issued were twenty-five for religious ceremonies and twenty-nine for processions.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1888).

19. Fifty-two books were registered during the year as compared with forty-three in 1936.

REGISTRATION OF NEWSPAPERS.

(Ordinances 25 of 1927 and 1 of 1930).

20. The number of registered Chinese newspapers on December 31st was thirty-nine of which five were registered during the year.

DISTRICT WATCH FORCE.

(Ordinance 23 of 1930).

(Tables VII & VIII).

21. The District Watch Committee met on eleven occasions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In addition three meetings at which His Excellency the Governor presided were held at Government House. The following gentlemen served on the Committee throughout the year:-

Mr. Li Yau-tsun, C.B.E.

Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt.·

Mr. Wong Iu-tung.

Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall, C.M.G., LL.D.

Mr. Li Po-kwai.

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$

Dr. S. W. Tso, C.B.E., LL.D.

Hon. Mr. T. N. Chau, C.B.E.

Hon. Mr. Lo Man-kam.

Mr. Wong Ping-sun.

Mr. Tang Shiu-kin, M.B.E.

Mr. Sum Pak-ming.

Mr. Tam Woon-tong.

22. Messrs. Peter H. Sin and Ng Yiu-wan retired on the expiration of their year of office as ex-Chairman of the Tung Wah Hospital and Po Leung Kuk Committees respectively and Mr. W. N. Thomas Tain, as ex-Chairman of the Po Leung Kuk Committee, succeeded to serve on the Committee. The Hon. Dr. Li Shu-fan, on being appointed as a member of the Legis- lative Council, also served on the Committee.

23. The Force was maintained at its full authorised strength namely:-5 Head District Watchmen, 6 Assistant Head District Watchmen, 26 Detectives and 103 Uniformed Men.

24. During the year two members of the Force died and six were dismissed. Recruits were obtained for the eight vacancies.

25. Inspector E. J. Ellis remained in charge throughout the year.

26. The efficiency of the Force in 1937 deserves special mention. Whilst the work as regards both civil inquiries and criminal cases was greatly increased, discipline was well main- tained. The number of successful prosecutions, 2067, was a third more than that of last year, the previous highest. This was entirely due to increases in cases of larceny and receiving, the aggregate of other cases remaining practically stationary.

27. Comparative figures of all cases for the last three years are attached (Table VIII).

28. There was a large increase in civil inquiries, owing chiefly to the demand for passport visas consequent on the Sino- Japanese War and to applications for certificates of nationality for Hong Kong born British seamen born in Victoria or Kowloon.

29. During the Coronation the Force did good work in arresting pickpockets and other thieves. A letter of appreciation for its services in this connection was received from His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

30. Discipline was good. There were 6 dismissals as com- pared with 3 and 12 in 1936 and 1935 respectively and 52 departmental reports as compared with 47 and 75 in the same

years. One first class, two second class, and three third class medals for long service were awarded, and three men received special commendation.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE.

(Tables IX to XIV).

(Ordinances 31 of 1930 & 10 of 1908).

31. The following gentlemen served on the Committee for 1937:

Mr. Chau Shiung,

Dr. Li Cho-yau,

Mr. Kong Chi-nai,

Mr. Chan Lai-chan,

Mr. Lam Pat-nam,

Mr. Li Shau-nam,

Mr. Fung Tsz-ying,.

Mr. Wong Ching-yau,

Mr. Sin Hon-yat,

Mr. Tong Yau-chun,

Mr. Lam Yuen-fong.

32. A detailed report on the medical work of the Hospital, by the Visiting Medical Officer, will be found in Annexe B.

33. The typhoon which occurred in the night of September 1st-2nd, caused much suffering especially among the boat population and in the villages where the type of building is less substantial than in the city. About 2,000 boats were sunk or badly damaged. Losses of boats and personal property in respect of which claims were allowed totalled over $210,000.

34. The Tung Wah Hospital undertook the work of relief and raised nearly $9,800 by voluntary subscriptions including $4,600 realised by a flag day and $470 from a fund opened for the purpose by the South China Morning Post.

35. Grants of over $20,500 of which Government con- tributed $10,885, were made to sufferers. Further sums of $4,115, making $15,000 in all, were granted by Government towards similar claims put forward by the District Officer North and to cover further claims which might come in.

I

I

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36. Shortly after the start of the Sino-Japanese War move- ments for the relief of war sufferers started in the Colony. Organisations sponsored by responsible people were first in the field and permission to circulate collection books and to solicit subscriptions in the streets was granted to several of these. Unknown and irresponsible organisations, however, quickly appeared and the use of public places for collection by such organisations had to be prohibited. Applicants in such were informed of the existing facilities for relief subscription provided by the Tung Wah Hospital.

BREWIN CHARITY FUND.

(Tables XV and XVI).

-

37. The formation of this Fund was suggested by Mr. A. W. Brewin, Registrar-General 1901-1912, for the assistance of widows and orphans, and of disabled workmen. A considerable sum was collected for the purpose in 1910 and in October 1911 a formal Trust Deed was signed laying down the conditions for the administration of the Fund. The Tung Wah Hospital was made trustee of the Fund.

38. The full objects of the Fund as set out in the Deed are to provide for the benefit of any Chinese widows and orphans resident in the Colony who may become destitute and of Chinese workmen employed in the Colony who may become incapacitated for work by reason of old age or sickness or who may have been permanently disabled by any accident.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

(See Annexe B and Tables XVII to XXI).

WANCHAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

(See Annexe B).

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XXII).

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXIII).

39. The Chinese Recreation Ground in Hollywood Road is controlled by a Committee consisting of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Chairman and the Chinese Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils.-

.

40. The Ground consists of a large concrete-surfaced open space which contains several pavilions and is bordered by sixty substantially-built stalls or rather small shops which are let by

- C 8

tender to refreshment caterers, barbers, book-sellers, letter- writers, etc., and the income, when expenses have been deducted, is devoted to Chinese charities.

In the typhoon of September 2nd, slight damage was done to eighteen stalls.

YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE.

(Table XXIV).

41. The Yaumati Public Square is also administered by the Chinese Recreation Ground Committee on the same lines as the Chinese Recreation Ground. The Chief difference is that there is no open space, the whole of the Square being occupied by stalls, fifty-nine in all, most of which sell cooked food.

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXV).

TRANSLATION.

42. The total number of translations made in the Depart- ment during 1937 was 969 as compared with 875 in 1936. 659 of these were from Chinese into English and 310 from English into Chinese. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government departments were sent to this office for

revision.

LABOUR.

General.

43. Large numbers of skilled and semi-skilled labourers have been absorbed into the heavy industries the prosperity of which was maintained throughout the year except for the building trades where there was a slight setback. Along with this there naturally followed the absorption of unskilled labour.

44. There has also been great demand for casual labourers principally for loading and unloading ships.

45. The building trades have not had a very full year. There have been no large building projects apart from the com- pletion of Stanley prison and Queen Mary Hospital.

46. Mention should be made of the road making gangs which have been busily employed, mostly on War Department work.

47. Unfortunately the latter part of the year saw a large influx of male labourers who will remain unemployed until they are able to return to China.

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48. The employment of women stood at an even higher level than that of men, as prosperity was most marked in the light industries where the majority of employees are women. Most of the factories run by female labour are unable to accommodate any more workers.

49. Unemployment among New Territory seamen continued at about the same level as last year. Some relief was afforded by the development of the Marsman Mining Concession at Shing Mun, and by the increased activity of the Hume Pipe Com- pany's business at Tsun Wan and of the Hong Kong Brewery at Sham Tseng, both of which employ local New Territory labour.

50. 301 further certificates of Nationality and Identity were issued to seamen during the year, making 1,035 up to the end of the year.

Disputes and Strikes.

51. There were no strikes during the year and the only labour trouble which occurred was a minor dispute about the repatriation of certain Northern Chinese employed at the Chung Hwa Book Co. The Secretariat's proposals for repatriation were promptly accepted.

52. The number of individual disputes, as measured by those brought to the Secretariat for arbitration, increased some- what but none were serious.

Cost of Living of Poorer Classes.

53. The Sino-Japanese War caused a serious rise in the cost of living. Up to July 31st there was a light average rise after allowing for season, in the commodities included in the cost of living index. But this rise was very uneven. Whilst meat, vegetables, clothes and shoes rose in varying degrees, firewood and oil fell substantially. After July prices climbed rapidly to a peak in late September, at levels between 20% and 70% above the corresponding figures for 1936 with the exception of tea and oil which rose about 10%. After September prices fell off about 15% of the 1936 figures but were still in December 15% to 20% above the figures for 12 months earlier. The price of rice varied between 20 and 33% above the corresponding figures for 1936.

FACTORIES AND WORKSHOPS.

(Table XXVI).

54. The industrial improvement, which began last year, was maintained. Except in the case of sauce and peanut oil, which were affected by the war in China, the supply of raw materials was ample throughout the year. There was a very large output

1.

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of goods destined for the Empire Market notably electric hand torches, dry cell batteries, confectionery, rubber shoes and boots, cork and felt hats and men's shirts. The hostilities in China caused an increased local output of cigarettes and of educational books for Chinese.

55. As a result of the increased activity there has been an increased tendency to overcrowding. Several concerns have erected new premises and others have been advised to do so. Among new industries are the manufacture of toothbrushes, the conversion of house and street refuse to land fertiliser and the production of gas masks and their chemical constituents.

56. The Heavy Industries did well. Shipyards were especially benefited by the severe typhoon. There was prac- tically no employment of children under the minimum age of 14. No permits were granted for the employment of women on night work, and several prosecutions for this were instituted.

57. Working conditions were generally good. There were no strikes and employers were found ready to cooperate with the Government in the provision of safety and other welfare

measures.

58. 241 factories opened and 51 closed, the total increasing from 541 to 731.

con-

59. Legislation. An ordinance (No. 18 of 1937) to solidate the law relating to Factories and Workshops was enacted to come into operation on January 1st, 1938, and conformably to the terms of the Ordinance the Inspectorate of Factories is transferred to the department of the Urban Council from that date.

60. Accidents. The total number of accidents reported was 129 with 17 fatal, an increase of 55 and 12 respectively over 1936.

61. The increase was mostly among shipyard workers, the numbers of whom also greatly increased.

62. Prosecutions.-During the year there were 17 prosecu tions for employing females and young persons during prohibited hours. Convictions were obtained in all cases.

CHINESE TEMPLES.

(Ordinance 7 of 1928).

(Tables XXVII and XXVIII).

63. The following gentlemen served on the Chinese Temples Committee during the year:-

(a) Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall, C.M.G., LL.D., Hon. Mr. T. N. Chau, C.B.E., Hon. Mr. M. K. Lo, and Hon. Dr. Li Shu-fan-Chinese Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils.

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(b) Mr. Tang Shiu-kin, M.B.E.-Representative of the Dis-

trict Watch Committee.

(c) Hon. Dr. Li Shu-fan, Mr. W. N. Thomas Tam and Mr. B. Wong-Tape-Chinese Members of the Sanitary Board.

(d) Mr. Chau Shiu-ng-Chairman of the Tung Wah Hos-

pital Committee.

(e) Mr. Au Shiu-cho-Chairman of the Po Leung Kuk Com-

mittee.

(f) Dr. Li Cho- yau-Representative of the Directors of the Tung Wah Hospital who are residents of Kowloon or New Kowloon.

(g) Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

64. The Committee met twice at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

65. The following contributions were made from the Temples Fund during the year 1937:-

$ 8,000.00 to the Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund. $21,174.19 to the Tung Wah Hospital.

$ 200.00 to Passage Money Fund.

$

500.00 to St. John Ambulance Brigade for the expenses

of Haw Par Hospital.

$ 500.00 to the Society for the Protection of Children.

$

200.00 to the Children's Playground Association.

$ 1,200.00 to Home for the Aged.

$ 300.00 to St. John Ambulance Brigade.

THE CORONATION.

66. The outstanding event of the year was the celebration of the Coronation of H.M. King George VI.

67. The organisation of the Chinese celebrations was placed in the hands of the Chinese Festivities Committee under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The main celebrations consisted of Dragon and Lantern Processions by day and by night; in addition a Dragon and Centipede exhibition was organised at Caroline Hill and five Arches 60 feet high were erected along the processional route. The processions were smaller than those of the Silver Jubilee but quality was strongly emphasised and popular appreciation was all that could be

C 12

P

desired. The work of preparation lasted four months. Animal models and 'ting', miniature rooms with grouped figures, were obtained from the specialising districts of Kwongtung, and troupes of minstrels were engaged from Swatow and Amoy. 6,300 persons assisted in the Day Procession and 4,000 in the Night Procession. Assistance both in time and money from merchants, shops and guilds was eagerly offered, and it was only the needs of organisation and theatrical effect that lent limits to the scale of the displays. It is estimated that 80,000 people visited the Colony to witness the celebrations and that their expenditure locally amounted to one million dollars.

68. The Day Processions took place on the 12th, 13th and 14th May, the Night processions on the 13th and 14th only. On the 12th the weather was cloudy, with some rain. On the 13th and 14th the sky remained overcast but there was no rain. The heat was thus moderated throughout and there were few cases of exhaustion. The following is a brief outline of the celebrations.

DAY PROCESSION.

69. The exhibits were contributed by thirteen guilds and other bodies and the total cost was $70,000. 6,300 persons took part in the procession which, starting at 9 a.m., took 24 hours to pass a given point and eight to nine hours to complete the whole route of about nine miles.

70. The chief exhibits were a silver dragon 275 feet long and a gold and many-coloured dragon some 250 feet long. Supporting features were two animated tigers, seven animated lions, numerous historic tableaux with girl actresses, companies of minstrels playing music peculiar to their districts, a company of jesters on stilts, paper models of birds and animals, and flags and banners of every form and colour. At various places portions of the procession would stop and displays appropriate to that particular portion would be given. The manipulation of the dragons, tigers and lions, a difficult and much appreciated art, was greatly enjoyed by the spectators.

NIGHT PROCESSION.

71. This commenced at 7.30 p.m. and finished about 1.00 a.m., the route being similar to that of the Day Procession. The total cost was about $27,000 and twenty-three guilds and other bodies contributed.

72. It is difficult to note special features in what was in the opinion of many the most artistic procession ever held in Hong Kong. The use of Kitson lamps instead of candles for the chief exhibits undoubtedly added to the effect but the careful emphasis on quality by the selection of the best source of supply, for example Tung Koon for the "Tings', Tai Leung for the huge fishes and Foochow for the 'cloud' dragon, was also important.

4

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73. The procession was headed by some 200 huge fishes, the product of Tai Leung craftsmen, each 10 to 20 feet in length, and illuminated by countless oil lamps. Following these were many-coloured Tings from Tung Koon, bands of minstrels from Swałow and Amoy, and numerous tableaux. The latter included Large pictures of His Majesty the King and Her Majesty the Queen in their Coronation Robes suitably framed in rich silk gauze. Among other tableaux were twelve Chinese cinema stars, a feature which naturally proved a great draw. rear were three huge dragons which measured 280, 220, and 120 feet respectively, and a most life-like centipede, 100 feet long. The two larger dragons were of golden gauze. The smallest of the three was a "cloud" dragon from Foochow whose whole length, owing to the arrangement of its myriad lights, changed colour at every movement. The centipede was manned by expert acrobats; from its mouth issued fire, its eyes shot beams of light, and the constant turnings and windings of its body were so realistic that it evoked lusty applause wherever it went.

74. Along the route of the processions were erected five. floral arches each sixty feet high and lit with coloured electric lights.

:

75. At the close of the celebrations a Dragon and Centipede exhibition was held at Caroline Hill. This realised $2,444.13 which was distributed to charities.

76. Among those who assisted in the displays special mention must be made of Mr. Ho Kom Tong, 0.B.E., the Chair- man of the Processions Sub-Committee, to whose initiative and organising ability the success of the processions was largely due, and of Messrs. Ip Lan Chuen and Tse Ka Po, the Vice- chairmen of the Processions Sub-Committee. This Sub-Com- mittee, of fifteen members, met for two or three hours daily for several months.

77. During the celebrations invaluable assistance was rendered by the Police (both regular and reserve), the St. John's ambulance, the Boy Scouts, and the District Watchmen. It was largely owing to these bodies that there were no disorders and no serious accidents during the processions. Without doubt the celebrations were la complete success both as a source of pleasure befitting the occasion and as an expression of the civic pride of the Chinese population.

ABERDEEN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

(Table XXIX).

78. The School has been built to accommodate 300 boys, 50 of whom are nominated by Government, 150 by the Execu- tive Committee and 100 by the Salesian Society, managers of the School. With the exception of Government nominees, candidates for admission must possess a parental residential

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J

qualification of five years residence in the Colony. Pupils are divided into two categories, students and artisans. The minimum age for admission of students is eight years and the minimum age for apprenticeship is fourteen years. Students follow the Government school programme for vernacular schools and no boy is permitted to be apprenticed to a trade until he has completed the fourth year Primary course. Artisans who have been apprenticed continue their general studies concurrent- ly with their vocational training. Pupils are accepted twice a year in February and September. The length of the artisan apprenticeship course is three to five years. School fees are $150 per annum and these include board, lodging, uniform and tuition.

79. The annual distribution of prizes was held in the school building on the 9th December. His Excellency the Governor very kindly consented to be present, and, before giving away the prizes, unveiled a bronze bust of the late Mr. Fung Ping Shan which, with that of Sir Robert Ho Tung, stands at the entrance to the main hall. Visitors were invited to inspect the school workshops and an exhibition of work done by the pupils attracted much interest.

80. During the year part of the playground was covered in for use in bad weather.

81. The following gentlemen served on the Executive committee during the year:

(a) Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

(b) Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall, C.M.G., LL.D.-Representative of the Chinese Members of the Executive and Legislative Councils.

(c) Mr. Li Yau-tsun, C.B.E.-Representative of the District

Watch Committee.

(d) Mr. Chau Shiu-ng-Chairman of the Tung Wah Hospital

Committee.

(e) Mr. Au Shiu-cho-Chairman of the Po Leung Kuk

Committee.

(f) Mr. Li Sing-kui-Chairman of the Chinese General

Chamber of Commerce.

(g) Hon. Dr. Li Shu-fan-Chinese Representative on the

Sanitary Board appointed by the Governor.

(h) Sir Robert Ho Tung-Appointed by the Governor.

(i) Rev. Father Braga and Rev. Father Bernardini—-

Members of the Salesian Society.

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STAFF.

SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS.

82. Mr. R. A. C. North was appointed a delegate to the Conference on Traffic in Women in the Far East held at Bandoeng, Java, from 23rd January to 28th February. Mr. B. C. K. Hawkins acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs during his absence. From 16th April to 27th October Mr. North acted as Colonial Secretary and Messrs. R. A. D. Forrest and E. H. Williams acted successively as Secretary for Chinese Affairs from 16th April to 9th September and from 10th September to 27th October, respectively.

29th April, 1938.

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

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Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WORK OF THE PO LEUNG KUK FOR THE YEAR 1937.

(Tables A, B and C).

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the preservation of virtue". The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service they have continued to support it.

2. The staff consists of a Chinese matron, two lady teachers, one nurse, seven amahs, one shroff and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee, and in addition a new special Drill Instructress, Miss Lam Tsz-lai, who has helped this year's Committee carry out their plans for giving the girls in the Kuk more outdoor exercise. She instructs them in physical training, and also supervises their volley-ball (another innovation) besides helping teach the singing classes. The improved health of the inmates is very apparent. A determined effort has also been made to deal with the problem of skin- diseases, and beri-beri; the continual influx of new inmates drawn from the poorest classes makes this very difficult.

A new isolation room has been prepared, and this year arrangements have been made for regular weekly visits by the Lady Visiting Medical Officer.

3. The Committee have also opened a new garden on the west side of the Kuk as a playground specially for the younger children, and have acquired a further stock of children's toys. On the occasion of the Coronation of His Majesty King George VI, a special outing for all the inmates of the Kuk was arranged to a floor of a house where the Chinese processions could be seen and enjoyed.

4. The Po Leung Kuk Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m., the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in all cases affecting women and children and Chinese family life generally. It corresponds, when necessary, with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents and relations cannot be traced, the Com- mittee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent.

1

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5. In addition to the annual Committee there is a Board of Permanent Direction, which serves to maintain continuity of policy and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

6. The following were elected in April to serve a.s the Managing Committee for the year:--

Mr. Au Shiu-cho,

Mr. Luke Oi-wan,

Mr. Lo Tung-fan,

Mrs. Tam Woon Tong,

Mr. Chan Cheuk-man,

Mr. Cheung Lan-chau, Mr. Kwok Lam-pat, Mr. Tsang Hin-hung, Mr. Wong Chipo,

Mr. Li Kwok-ying.

7. The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on January 1st, 1937, was seventy-one and during the year 465 persons were admitted as against 615 in 1936. The circum- stances of admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

8. Four hundred and sixty-five women, girls and children were admitted without warrant. Thirty-one were lost children. Fifty-one were accompanied by parents or guardians and sixty- two were maidservants or Muitsai who had left their employers.

9. On leaving the Kuk 184 persons were restored to husbands or other relatives, one hundred and two were sent to charitable institutions in China, five were given in adoption, 112 were released after enquiries, eight were released under bond, and seventeen were sent to a School, Convent or Refuge in the Colony. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was ninety-six.

10. Four cases of sickness were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital, eighty-three to the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, three to the Queen Mary Hospital and three to the Small Pox Hospital, for treatment and of these ten died.

11. Dr. S. W. Tso, C.B.E., and Lieutenant-Colonel H. B. L. Dowbiggin, O.B.E., continued to serve as Visiting Justices through- out the year.

12. Mrs. M. K. Lo was appointed Lady Visitor to fill the vacancy caused by the death of the late Mrs. R. H. Kotewall. She and Mrs. S. W. Tso paid regular visits of inspection during the year.

C 18

- M

Annexe B.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

1. The Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries are institutions established by the Chinese for the benefit of the poor of Chinese nationality. Intended to be additional to, not in substitution of, the Government Hospitals they serve a very useful purpose not only in the matter of medical relief but also in that of health education.

2. During the year 47,969 cases were seen of which 46,849 were new patients and 8,888 persons were vaccinated in the three Hospitals.

3. There are three general hospitals each with maternity wards attached, one maternity hospital and nine public dis- pensaries.

They are maintained by subscriptions from the public, by donations from the Chinese General Charities Fund and by direct grants from Government. They are controlled by Chinese Committees which work in close co-operation with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

4. In the three big hospitals the patient can choose be- tween Western and Chinese methods of treatment, but in the Maternity Hospitals and Dispensaries Western Medicine only is practised. Government Lady Doctors hold gynaecological clinics in each of the dispensaries once or twice a week.

5. Both Hospitals and Dispensaries are subject to inspection by the Government Medical Department. There are five officers of the Department whose duty it is to visit the various institu- tions and to give advice and assistance. These officers work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS.

6. The Tung Wah Hospital situated in the centre of the most thickly populated area in Victoria was first occupied in 1873. The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital situated at the extreme east end of Victoria was opened in 1929. The Government gave the sites and with grants of money assisted in the erection of the buildings. The Kwong Wah Hospital situated in the Central District of Kowloon was built in 1911 to meet the needs of those resident in the peninsula. The funds for its erection were raised by public subscription.

7. In administrative control of the three hospitals is the Tung Wah Committee, a body of Chinese gentlemen elected each year by the subscribers.

C 19

T

8. Originally intended for the accommodation and treat- ment of those Chinese whose fears and prejudices against Western Medicine prevented their applying for relief at the Government Hospitals, these hospitals at a later period intro- duced and encouraged scientific methods. As prejudice dis- appeared and confidence grew the demand for Western Medicine has increased until now the number of in-patients being treated by this method is almost double that which still pins its faith to Chinese medicine.

9. The activities of the Chinese Hospitals include:

(a) The care of the sick and treatment by Western methods or Chinese methods according to the wishes of the patients.

(b) Maternity benefits and infant welfare by Western

methods only.

(c) Vaccination.

(d) Health propaganda.

(e) Assistance to the destitute.

(f) The provision of coffins for and the burial of the dead.

10. Excellent work was done by the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries in the Inoculation Campaign against Cholera. Of a grand total of 218,351 inoculations given by twenty-seven institutions in the Colony, no less than 89,319 were given by the Tung Wah Hospitals and Chinese Dispensaries.

Cholera Inoculations at Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries.

Tung Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

7,774

9,717

Kwong Wah Hospital

Central Chinese Public Dispensary

6,605

4,498

Eastern

"}

12,815

Western

4,506

""

Shaukiwan

19

Aberdeen

1

6,865

3,060

1)

22

Harbour & Yaumati Public Dispensary

10,731

Shamshuipo

10,184

Hung Hom

5,477

""

29

Kowloon City

7,087

>>

Total

89,319

C 20

11. From August onwards both the Tung Wah and the Kwong Wah Hospitals were very overcrowded. This is at- tributable firstly to an increase of the population resulting from the influx of refugees, and, secondly, a number of the Canton Hospitals were taken over by the Military, and others closed for lack of funds, with the result that a proportion of the sick found their way to this Colony.

In addition to this the Tung Wah Hospital and to a larger extent the Tung Wah Eastern and Kwong Wah Hospitals were handicapped by accommodating a large number of Chinese refugees in their verandah in their administrative blocks.

In December a block of the old Government Civil Hospital was loaned by the Government to the Tung Wah for the accom- modation of refugees to relieve the congestion.

12. Each of the three Chinese Hospitals has a good operating theatre where operations are performed daily, many of which are major operations.

13. In charge of the medical side (Western) of each hospital is a Medical Superintendent, a graduate of the University, whose salary is paid by Government, and who is a member of the Medical Department.

THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

14. The year 1933 witnessed the demolition and reconstruc- tion of a considerable portion of this institution. Established in 1873 and added to from time to time it had become a confusing assemblage of buildings some of which were much below the standard required in a modern hospital or infirmary. As men- tioned in the 1933 annual report many of the wards were old, dark, and in some respects insanitary, but they provided shelter, food and medical attendance for many sufferers who would otherwise have had no means of relief.

15. Nothing short of demolition and reconstruction could make the place satisfactory. There were, of course, sentimental objections to the demolition of the fine old assembly hall where year after year the directors had met and discussed the problems confronted them but space was very limited and it was not possible to retain the old hall and at the same time erect a building which would meet the requirements of the situation. It was decided, therefore, to raze the hall and the insanitary buildings and construct in their place a six storey modern hospital incorporating in it a new assembly hall.

16. The New Block, which was opened to receive patients early in 1934, contains accommodation for 144 beds. The whole hospital now has accommodation for 448 beds. It is hoped to replace the remaining out-of-date buildings as funds become available.

C 21

17. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Officer of the Government Medical Department and three Resident Medical Officers whose salaries are paid by the Hospital. There are in addition a number of Chinese Herbalists who practise Chinese Medicine for the benefit of those who prefer that treatment.

18.

In-patients (General).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1937

10,221

8,397

18,618

(including 2,134 maternity cases)

1936

11,285

5,723

17,008

(including 2,034

maternity cases)

19. There were 1,088 operations including 196 major cases.

20.

Out-patients (General).

Western

Chinese

Total.

treatment..

treatment.

1937

39,875

186,530

226,405

1936

33,486

165,370

198,856

21.

Eye Clinic.

1937

16,274

1936

16,996

22.

Baby Clinic.

1937

492

1936

1,726

23.

Vaccinations.

1937

1936

24.

1937

1936

5,962

4,196

Deaths.

Brought in dead.

4,336

918

3,326

990

25. A large proportion of the deaths in the Hospital occur within 24 hours of admission. The sick poor go there to die. Those brought in dead include bodies sent from ships in harbour, from neighbouring hospitals, from the Public Dispensaries and from private houses. All are taken to the Tung Wah for the benefit of free coffining and free burial.

- C 22

THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

26. This hospital does for Kowloon and the Peninsula what the Tung Wah and the Tung Wah Eastern do for the Island of Hong Kong. There is official accommodation for about 320 beds; of which 229 are for general diseases, 40 are for tuber- culosis cases and 57 are for maternity cases. private wards including 7 for maternity cases.

There are

18

27. The accommodation cannot keep pace with the growth in population. Kowloon has considerably more than doubled itself during the last ten years. No patient is turned away for want of room and in both medical and surgical wards it is common to find two in a bed and others sleeping on the floor.

28. The staff consists of a Senior Resident Medical Officer whose salary is paid by the Government, and three Assistant Medical Officers paid by the Directors.

29. There are also a number of Chinese Herbalists who practice Chinese medicine and are paid out of Hospital funds.

30. The patients on admittance, can choose whether they desire treatment on Western or Chinese lines.

31.

In-patients (General).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1937

15,552

5,215

20,767

(including 4,040

maternity cases)

1936

13,328

4,436

17,764

(including 4,173

maternity cases)

32. There were 602 operations including 213 major ones.

33.

Out-patients (General)

Western

treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1937

48,396

203,946

252,342

1936

48,106

182,813

230,919

34. There were 1,176 eye cases as compared with 3,661 for the previous year.

35. There were 2,050 vaccinations as compared with 1,450 in 1936.

C:23

36. The number of deaths in hospital was 6,043, of which 3,813 were admitted in a serious condition and died within 24 hours. 1,823 bodies were brought in for burial.

37. There is a small laboratory where facilities are available for ordinary routine microscope examination.

38. A children's clinic is held twice a week. The attend- ance numbered 8,045 as compared with 7,812 in 1936.

39. There is also an antenatal clinic held once a week in the Maternity Block. The number of cases seen was 271.

THE TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

40. This hospital was built in 1929. It is situated in the eastern part of the City of Victoria overlooking the Sookunpoo Valley playing-fields. It has modern, fittings and equipment. All the wards have through ventilation and there is a modern well-lighted operating theatre. There is accommodation for 239 beds, of which 196 are for general, 15 for maternity and 28 for tuberculosis patients.

41. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Officer whose salary is paid by Government, and two Assistant Medical Officers appointed by the Directors.

42. As in the other Chinese Hospitals, patients on admis- sion can choose whether they wish to be treated by the Western- trained Medical Officers or the Chinese Herbalists.

43.

In-patients (General).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1937

6,021

2,563

8,584

(including 887 maternity cases)

1936

6,320

2,715

9,035

(including 1,210

maternity cases)

44. There were 147 operations including 25 major ones.

45.

Out-patients (General).

Western

treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1937

28,197

72,388

100,585

1936

..... 36,569

62,849

99,418

46.

1937

C 24

Vaccinations.

876

532-

1936

47. Two wards have been set aside (one male and one female) for patients who are able to make some payment but who cannot afford a private room. The charge in these wands is $1.40 per day including food and medicine. Each patient can, if he desires, bring in an attendant to help in looking after him. There are fourteen beds in the Male Ward and eight in the Female.

48. There are twenty-four small private wards where the inclusive fee per day is $3.00. The wards are popular.

49. A ward of twelve beds has been reserved for the treat- ment of opium addicts. During the year 430 patients were treated. The course of treatment is usually complete within fourteen days. The cost is defrayed by Government.

The treatment consists of autogenous serum injections and general stimulants.

50. Deaths in 1937 numbered 2,262. A large proportion of these (853) died within 24 hours of admission. 683 bodies were brought in for burial.

51. An eye clinic was started in September and 118 cases were treated. This clinic is held every Wednesday afternoon.

52. From 11th August to 9th September a ward was set aside for cholera convalescent cases which were transferred from the Infectious Diseases Hospital.

THE WANCHAI OR EASTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

53. This hospital is run in conjunction with the Eastern Dispensary. It is in charge of a Western-trained Chinese Doctor and continues to provide most satisfactory and efficient service for this densely populated district.

54. The total number of beds is 31, and the number of admissions 907. There were three maternal deaths during the year.

THE CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

a

55. The origin of the Chinese Public Dispensaries was movement made in 1904 by certain leading Chinese citizens especially Messrs. Fung Wa-chun, Lau Chu-pak and Ho Kom- tong, with the help and encouragement of Mr. A. W. Brewin, then Registrar-General. This movement began in the hope of coping with the scandal of the abandonment of dead bodies in the streets.

C 25

56. In 1905 two depots were established, the Western and the Eastern. In immediate charge of each depot was a Chinese doctor qualified in Western medicine who was assisted by an English-speaking clerk.

57. In 1909 the Government gave the movement public support and encouragement and the Committee became the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee under the Chairmanship of the Registrar-General, now the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

58. It was declared at the time that the work of the depots or dispensaries was not hospital work and that the Chinese doctors employed were simply to diagnose disease and not to treat it. However, treatment centres were needed, and treat- ment, commenced in a small way, gradually developed until now the principal function of the dispensaries is medical relief. But in addition to the ordinary work of the clinic and dispen- sary

these institutions serve as depots where the poor may apply for assistance in matters connected with:

(a) The removal of patient to hospital.

(b) Certification as to the cause of death.

(c) Removal of corpses to mortuaries.

(d) Supply of coffins and arrangements for burial.

(e) The registration of births.

(f) Vaccination.

59. There are now nine Chinese Public Dispensaries, five on. the Island of Hong Kong and four in Kowloon. The Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital, which was formerly administered by the Committee of the Chinese Western Dispensary, was handed over to Government as a gift on January 1st, 1934.

60. One of the Dispensaries is housed in rooms attached to a temple. Another, at Aberdeen, consists of two rented shops temporarily adapted for the purpose. Gradually up- to-date buildings are taking the place of the temporary ones. The Dispensaries at Shaukiwan, and Wanchai are excellent buildings of their kind, as are those on the Kowloon side at Yaumati, Kowloon City and Shamshuipo.

was

61. This latter is housed in a new building which opened on 26th October, 1936. Designed on modern lines it affords ample accommodation for the large clientele which attends daily.

C 26

62. Bacteriological investigations have been carried out by the Government. Bacteriologist for the various dispensaries. The work has consisted largely in the examination of blood films for malaria and throat swabs for Diphtheria. The number of Malarial cases diagnosed microscopically are as follows:-

Benign Tertian

Sub

Quarter

Mixed

2 J

Type Unknown

1,304

736

351

53

210

2,654

63. A gynaecological clinic is held by one of the Government Lady Medical Officers once or twice a week at each of the Dispensaries.

64. Each dispensary has a room attached to it where dead bodies can be received for transport to the mortuaries pre- liminary to burial. Coffins are provided free.

65. On 11th March, 1936, a beginning was made with a Public Dispensary in Stanley Village replacing and continuing a privately operated dispensary under the auspices of St. Stephen's College. This is additional to the nine dispensaries referred to in paragraph 59. The premises are part of a temple building. No collections have so far been made in Stanley itself, and expenses are defrayed from the Aberdeen Dispensary funds.

.

C 27

INDEX.

Po Leung Kuk.

Number of Women, Girls and Children admitted Statement of Receipts & Expenditure (Jan.-Mar.). Statement of Receipts & Expenditure (Mar.-Dec.). Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure

TABLE.

A.

B.

C.

I

II

and

III

Comparative Statement of Revenue, 1936 and 1937. Comparative Statement of Expenditure

Revenue for last ten years

Number of female passengers and boys examined.

Emigration.

and passed

Number of Assisted Emigrants

District Watch Force.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure

Chinese Boarding House Licence Returns

IV

V

VI

VII

VIII

Comparative statement of cases obtained

Tung Wah Hospital and Man Mo Temple.

Income and Expenditure Account of the three

Chinese Hospitals

Balance Sheet of the three Chinese Hospitals Income and Expenditure Account of the Man Mo

Temple

Balance Sheet of the Man Mo Temple Comparative Expenditure under certain headings

at the three Chinese Hospitals

IX

X

ΧΙ

XII

XIII

Comparative number of cases treated at the three

Chinese Hospitals

XIV

Brewin Fund.

Income and Expenditure Account

XV

Balance Sheet

XVI

Chinese Public Dispensaries.

Summary of work done during the year

XVII

Summary of work done during 1936-1937

XVIII

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure

XIX

Statement of Accounts of the Shamshuipo

Dispensary

XX

Statement of Accounts of the Hunghom Dispensary. Chinese Permanent Cemetery: Statement of Accounts. Chinese Recreation Ground: Statement of Accounts Yaumati Public Square: Statement of Accounts Passage Money Fund

XXI

XXII

XXIII

XXIV

XXV

Accidents in Factories

XXVI

General Chinese Charities Fund

XXVII

Chinese Temples Fund

XXVIII

Aberdeen Industrial School: Statement of Accounts

XXIX

Table A.

Number of Women, Girls and Children, admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1937 and the arrangements made regarding

them.

consent

from Singapore & Sandakan.

Sent with their own

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

Committed under Warrant from the Emigration Office.

Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway girls.

Total.

In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1937

Admitted during the year

Total

Remaining in the Po Leung Kuk on the 31st December, 1937

1

1

1

53

282

8886

335

64

Released after enquiries.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husbands.

Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institution in China or employed as doniestic servants.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Case under consideration.

Total.

8

5

4

71

16

1

15

6

21

56 31 51

24

24 465

96

7 17

152

96

21 64 36 51 28 536- 112 8 17 167

1 7 19 4 19

96

I

1 1 2 3 26 71

16

4

70

465

102

17

5 21

2 10 96

536

|

1

- C 28

Table B.

· PO LEUNG KUK

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 23rd March, 1937.

C 29

RECEIPTS.

$

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

Balance from previous year

16,253.47 Wages

$ 1,437.00

Food for Staff

270.21

Subscriptions:-

Food for inmates

357.64

Rice

437.21

Rent from House Property..$ 892.00

Traffic expenses

135.03

Subscriptions from Guilds...

2,425.00

Repairs

92.95

Sale of Hand Work

95.75

Passage Money

32.25

Wages left by Chan Kuen, Muitsai, deceased

Fuel

311.05

35.85

Light and Power

208.88

Deposit by Mok Wai Yung.

268.75

Drugs

18.30

Contributions to Festivals...

220.00

Water

229.29

Miscellaneous

30.75

Telephone

32.25

3,968.100 and Salt

94.50

Interest on Current Account

Total

Advertisement

75.02 Printing

Miscellaneous

Balance

20,296.59

77.55

25.35

402.67

4,162.13

16,134.46

Total

CA

20,296.59

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Chan Kam Po and Luk Oi Wan, Members of the Board of Directors.

Table C.

PO LEUNG KUK

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 24th March to 31st December, 1937.

RECEIPTS.

$

C.

EXPENDITURE.



Handed over by previous Committee

Subscriptions: ——

16,134.46

Wages

Food

.$ 4,412.70

4,461.76

Fuel

968.37

Repairs

975.23

Grant by Hong Kong

Government

Traffic Expenses

479.41

$7,000.00

Water Account

468.74

Rent from house property... 2,636.00

Subscriptions from Guilds... 1,433.50

Crown Rent and Rates

370.78

Clothes for Inmates

286.98

Yim Fong and A. Fong

Light and Power

653.61

Photographers

450.00

Telephone

96.75

Yue Lan and other celebra-

Coronation Celebrations

255.85

'tions

840.00

Printing and Stationery

339.22

Sale of hand work

30.00

Passage Money

44.15.

Miscellaneous

16.98

Medical Apparatus and Drugs.

147.40

12,406.48 Material for Hand Work

82.15

Miscellaneous

1,031.31

15,074.41

Interest on current account

Total

83.03

Balance

13,549.56

28,623.97

Total

28,623.97

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Chan Kam Po and Luk Oi Wan, Members of the Board of Directors.

30-

C 31

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1936 AND 1937.

1936.

Personal Emoluments

$137,510.85

1937.

$125,913.86

Other Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

1,231.00

1,511.75

Electric Fans and Light

1,098.96

Incidental Expenses

945.26

727.78

Library

187.89

109.32

Rent of Public Telephone

87.75

Transport

73.00

Special Expenditure.

Gestetner Duplicator

995.00

Typewriter

313.00

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges

$139,948.00

$130,757.37

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1936 AND 1937.

Licences and Internal Revenue

not otherwise specified.

1936.

1937.

Chinese Boarding House Licences....$24,263.00

Emigration Passage Broker Licences.

$17,648.00

1,230.00

1,410.00

Fees of Court or Office.

Certificates to Chinese Proceeding to

Foreign Countries

300.00

200.00

Miscellaneous

764.00

129.00

Official Signatures

75.00

80.00

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Condemned Stores

53.75

33.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

30.00

Total

.$26,685.75

$19,530.00

C 32

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

*Personal

Emoluments

Year.

and Other Charges.

Special Expenditure.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

1928.....

73,738.41

73,738.41

20,040.53.

1929...... 78,121.08

1930....... 130,279.41

78,121.08 16,828.36

130,279.41 20,176.06

1931...... 135,424.29

135,424.29

18,771.59

1932.... 130,880.54

1933..... 175,321.51

1934....

1935.... 127,624.04

130,880.54

17,344.03

175,321.51 16,347.60

141,831.49

141,831.49 17,618.75

127,624.04 13,329.67

1936....... 139,948.00

139,948.00

26,685.75

1937..... 129,449.37

1,308.00

130,757.37

19,530.00

* Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services attached

to department.

C 33

wwwww..com

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under "The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915",

during the year 1937.

Women and Children 1937.

Total Women

and

Women Girls Boys Total

Children

1936.

Macassar

307

109

197

613

387

Straits Settlements and F.M.S.| 53,894

9,865

9,575 73,334

37,317

Dutch Indies

277

84

169

530

299

Belawan Deli..

388

109

184

681

404

British North Borneo

1,626

509

680

2,815

1,503

Honolulu

114

34

39

187

214

United States of America

205

75

225

505

401

South America

94

32

39

165

165

Mauritius & Reunion

139

26

70

235

190

Australia

46

32

62

140

37

India

116

36

South Africa

60.

13

888

82

234

169

52 125

47

Vancouver

145

8

137

290

273

Batavia

1,161

213

440

1,814

1,412

Sourabaya

344

76

115

535

438

Rangoon

541

202

338

1,081

969

Billiton

2

0

2

13

Victoria

15

2

36

53

49

Seattle ......

59,515 11,451 12,573 | 83,539

41

26

131

198

157

44,443

- C 34

Table V.

NUMBER OF ASSISTED EMIGRANTS.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Un- willing.

Rejected Rejected

at

S.C.A. Doctor.

by

Total

Rejected.

Percentag

of Rejection

1936,

6,505 6,242 2

1937,

7,750

7,564

3

263

4.04

52

186

2.4

*This number includes those who failed to appear for the final examination

NATIVE DISTRICTS OF ASSISTED EMIGRANTS PASSED.

West River

East River

North River

Canton

Delta

Kwong Sai

Southern Districts

827

1,538

205

132

271

4,335

256

Total

7,564

C

C 35



Table Y.-Continued.

DESTINATION OF ASSISTED EMIGRANTS.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1936.

1937.

Dutch Indies:

:

Muntok

2,859

5,979

Billiton

2,371

1,188

Gavutu

5

Ocean Island

558

16

Nauru

320

343

Mombasa

2

3

Sydney

2

2

Melbourne

22

Rabaul

6

Sandakan

121

Total

6,242

7,564

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, according to the language spoken gives the following figures:

Cantonese

5,445

Hakka

1,688

Hainanese

431

Total

7,564

Table VI.

Chinese boarding house licence returns under the Boarding House Ordinance No. 23 of 1917.

Class.

1 II IV



VI VII Total

No. in existence at begin-

ning of 1937

1

68 2

102

237

83 493

No. in existence at end of

1937

1 73 2

81 157

MAC pogar

C 36

Table VII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District

Watchman Fund for the year 1937.

Receipts.

"To Balance

1)

Contributions (Victoria:-

$

EA

C.

Expenditure

$

C.

130,378.10

Wages and Salaries:-

Chief District Watchmen

Assistant Chief District

2,880.00

Watchmen

Detectives

3,474.00

10,704.00

$

C.

$44,678.11 + Kowloon: $13,955.39)

Grant by Hong Kong Government

58,633.50

1st Class District Watchmen... 15,379.14

Zud 3rd

91

100.00

"

"

13,412.80 495.58

46,345.52

Miscellaneous:-

House rents

Rent for permission to erect an iron gate on s.s. 2 of Section A on I.L. 680, for 1937 (West Point D. W. Quarters)

Interest on Hong Kong Govern- ment 4% Conversion Loan

""

Payment to District Watchmen

for special services

2,468.00

Cooks Loonies

Messenger

Fines

78.00

Office Staff:-

Manager

525.90

Collectors

1,104.00 840.00 96.00

2,040.00

180.00 1,176.00

1,356.00

Total

49,741.52

Other Charges:-

Rent allowance

3,134.18

1.00

Allowance to Detectives

2,201.00

Medal allowance

1,288.00

Conservancy allowance

42.00

Conveyance allowance, &c.

772.84

...

1,520.00

Electric charges

955.33

Telephone rentals

597.00

""

Interest on Fixed Deposits

900.00

Stationery and printing

481.03

Uniform and equipment

259.55

Ammunition ·

226.40

Interest on Current Account

750.99

Repairs and fittings

343.49

Crown Rent

20.11

Premium on Fire Policy

426.84

Gratuities and rewards

3.650.50

Sundries

1,010.99

15,409.26

Pensions:

:

Ex. C.D.W. Fung Fong and others

Total Expenditure

3,038.32

68,189.10

Balance

127,166.39

Total

195,355.49

:

Total

195,355.49

Balance:

Hong Kong Government 4% Conversion Loan.$ 38,000.00

Cash

Fixed Deposits (H. K. & Sh. Bk.)

Fixed Deposits (Treasury)

Advance to C. D. Ws.

49,006.39

10,000.00

30,000.00

160.00

Examined and Found correct.

S. W. TSO.

泉右李

Members of D. W. Cee.

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

Hong Kong, 31st December, 1937.

Total

$127,166.39

R. A. C. NORTH

S. C. A.

R. J. MINNITT,

A. S. C. A.

KO CHUNGWOON,

Manager, D.W.F.

[

C 37

Table VIII.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE NUMBER OF CASES OBTAINED BY

THE DISTRICT WATCH FORCE FOR THE LAST THREE YEARS.

Offence.

1935.

1936.

1937.

Murder .....

1

1

Robbery

1

3

Burglary (or Arms)

7

1

Larceny

512

769

1,123

Larceny from person

181

225

364

Receiving stolen goods

17

26

53

Unlawful possession

102

129

165

Trafficking in children (or

kidnapping)

2723

21

17

Breach of Women and Girls

Ordinance

Muitsai (Female Domestic

Service Ordinance)

27

13

8

2223

7

1

Obtaining by false pretences.

18

18

26

Disorderly conduct

60

54

30

Loitering

9

7

21

Coinage offences

15

14

8

Deportation

82

104

77

Revenue offences

184

124

114

Gambling

48

29

38

Miscellaneous

39

26

14

Total

1,347

1,567

2,067

:

i

C 38

Table IX.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL, KWONG WAH HOSPITAL AND TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

Income and Expenditure Account for the year ended 31st December, 1937.

INCOME.

Tung Wah Kwong Wah

Tung Wah Eastern

Total

EXPENDITURE.

Tung Wah

Kwong Wah

Tung Wah Eastern

Total

Government Grant:-

for General Expenses

for Free Coffins

$ 8,000.00 $33,500.00 $ 25,000.00

$ 66,500.00

10,000.00

7,000.00

Salaries & Wages Staff Provision

Uniform for Staff

$ 53,841.92

15,642.86

605.30

$ 31,800.29

$ 29.577.37 $115,219.58

10,131.83

10,180.43

35,955.12

585.09

454.09

1.644.48

17,000.00

for Western Medicine

2,500.00

2,500.00

Telephone Rent

1,430.97

476.40

903.05

2,870.42

for Opium Ward

2,500.00

2,040.00

7,500.00

Rates & Taxes

18,042.01

1,453.18

271.32

19,766.51

2,040.00

Insurance Premium

591.48

591.48

.

Subscriptions & Dona-

tions:-

Stationery & Printing

2,871.36

2,170.31

2,289.49

7,331.16

Individuals

47,931.53

9,420.40

17,349.95

Water Accounts

6,885.25

204.90

2,125.70

9,215.85

74,701.88

Lights:-

Theatres & Photo-

Electric

4,353.72

4.081,46

2,224.89

10.660.07

graphers

960.00

2,260.00

3,220.00 Gas

5,592.99

2,059,58

1,886.50

9,539.07

Chinese Public Dispen-

Interest on Deposits

424.42

424.42

sary

2,293.30

2,293.30

Repairs-

from Temple Fund

8,000.00

8,000.00

Hospital Buildings

4,063.11

1,278.71

3,000.63

8,342.45

other Subscriptions

2,322.06

8,897.85

11,219.91

House Property

2,163.02

*198.73

110.80

2,472.55

Coffin Home

168.97

168.97

Interest

11,173.25

2,680.00

1,787.50

15,640.75

Ambulance Expenses

2,729.21

766.67

Rents:-

Inpatient Provision

43,902.22

17,432.96

898.87

12,843.96 74,179.14

4,394.75

House Property

105,127.02

3.970.40

1,689.31

110,786.73

Out-Patient Clinic

3,002.98

3,002.98

Coffin Home

18,502.30

18,502.30 Cost of Medicine:-

Chinese

39,124.40

46,417.45

29,278.65 114,820.50

Yat Pit Ting &

Western

19,301.88

19,953,68

13,890.86 53,146.42

Wing Pit Ting

1,700.00

1,700.00

Coal:-

Iron Burners

1,521.00

951.00

2,472.00 for boiling Medicine

for hot water

3,156.21

1,859.66

1,724.06

6,739.92€

1,078.03

347.97

2,525.32

3,951.32

Receipts from Private and

Maternity Ward Patients.

12,262.06

Nurses for food supplied...

Sales of Chinese Medicine.

4,091.07

16,287.23 16,934.98

1,066.00 1,690.70

688.52

45,484.27 Winter Clothings,

Quilts & Sheets:-

2,756.70

4,779.59

for Destitutes.

855.12

855.12

for Inpatients

2,036.40

* 1,940.99

-3,030.45

7,007.84

Ambulance

1,685.50

2,322.00

1,125.00

5.132.50

Burial Charges:

Cost of Coffins

19,334.74

15,986.28

-3,879.48

39,200.50

Proceeds of Flower day

5.103.89

5.103.89

Burial Expenses

3,537.15

Tombstones

856.48

3,095.40 778,70

541.94 110.95

7,174.49

1,746.13

Proceeds of Theatrical

Performances

3,193.85

3,193.85

Sundry. Expenses:-

Ward

11,458.02

Miscellaneous Receipts

14,733.59

3,311.15

2,106.51

20,156.25

Hospital

9,002.57

4,692.38 3,478,10

3,806.27. 4,657.01

19,956.67

17,137.68

Excess of Expenditure

over Income

26,742.32

74,042.87 52,991.12

Small Pox Hospital

153,776.31 Bad debts written off

2,470.02

2,470.02-

1,974.61

1,974.61

$277,554.44 $171,190.72 $133,215.07 $581,960.23

$277,554.44 $171,190.72 $133,215.07 | 8581,960,23



...

C 39

Table X.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL, KWONG WAH HOSPITAL AND TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

Balance Sheet as at 31st December, 1937.

Liabilities.

1. SUNDRY CREDITORS:

(a) Deposits

(b) Trade Accounts

$67,034.47

20,511.96

(c) Hong Kong & Shanghai

Banking Corporation. 53,835.39

2. SPECIAL FUNDS:

$

Assets.

1. CASH IN HAND

2. SUNDRY DEBTORS

3. STOCK IN HAND

141,381.82

(a) Chinese medicine ...$16,724.88

(b) Western medicine



5,834.26

14,510.88

2,829.57

19,554.45

(a) Kwong Fook Chi Free

Girl School

$11,720.79

4. INVESTMENTS:

(b) Brewin Fund

2,905.96

(c) Chinese Medicine

Fund

(a) House Property...$1,550,000.00

65,761.80

(d) Relief Funds

128,371.53

(e) Emergency Fund

78,717.93

(f) Emergency Fund

Interest accrued

20,213.35

5. HOSPITAL APPLIANCES

(b) Mortgages

133,000.00

(c) Mortgages (Posses-

sion entered)

100,000.00

1,783,000.00

25,676.95

3. STAFF PENSION FUND

4. SPECIAL REPAIR FUND

307,691.36

1,964.18

2,394.43

6. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE:

(a) Property rent accrued

9,241.50

5. GENERAL RESERVE

Less loss for the year...

$1,558,162.56

153,776.31

1,404,386.25

$1.857.818.04

$1,857,818.04

Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

Sd.

CHAU SHIU NG,

Chairman.

Sd.

C. N. KONG,

Director.

I report that I have audited the above Balance Sheet with the Books, Accounts and Vouchers of the Hospitals. Such Balance Sheet is, in my opinion, properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the state of the Hospitals' affairs as at 31st December, 1937, according to the best of my information and the explanations given to me and as shown by the Books of the Hospitals. I have obtained all the information and explanations I have required.

Hong Kong, 30th March, 1938.

Sd. CHAU YUT U,

Auditor.

Table XI.

MAN MO TEMPLE.

Income and Expenditure Account for the year ended 31st December, 1937.

40

INCOME.

$

EXPENDITURE.



Rent:

House Properties

Temple

$18,087.95

4,246.75

Amount brought forward from last year... Subscription to Tung Wah Hospital Free School expenses

1,655.23

2,500.00

18,523.92

17,334.70

Government subsidy to Free Schools

Repairs to House Properties and Free Schools

1,527.54

7,575.00

Miscellaneous Receipts

Rates, Crown Ren't and Insurance

2,791.91

344.37

Excess of expenditure over Income

Water account

1,041.18

4,190.31

Miscellaneous expenses

1,404.60

$29,444.38

$29,444.38

LIABILITIES.

Table XII.

MAN MO TEMPLE.

Balance Sheet as at 31st December, 1937.

$

ASSETS.

Tung Wah Hospital

4,190.31 | House Properties

General Reserve

$143,300.00

Less Loss as per Income & expenditure account

4,190.31

139,109.69

$143,300.00

$

€A

143,300.00

$143,300.00

Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital,

Sd. CHAU SHIU NG,

Chairman.

:

Sd. C. N. KONG, Director.

I have audited the foregoing Balance Sheet with the books and vouchers and find it to be in accordance therewith.

Sd. CHAU YUT U, 'Auditor.

Hong Kong, 21st April, 1938.

- C 4!

C 42

Table XIII.

The following table shows the comparative expenditure under certain headings at Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital during 1937. (For full details of income and expenditure see Tables IX and X).

Hospitals.

Salaries and wages.

Food for staff and patients.

Western

Chinese

Medicine. Medicine.

l'ung Wah Hospital

$

$

53,841.92

$

$ 59,545.08 19,301.88 39,124.40

Kwong Wah

Hospital.... 31,800.29

27,564.79 19,953.68 46,417.45

Tung Wah

Eastern Hospital

29,577.37 23,024.39

13,890.86 29,278.65

Total

$ 115,219.58 | 110,134.26

53,146.42 114,820.50

L

Table XIV.

The following table shows the comparative numbers of cases treated at Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, during the year 1937.

Western Medicine. Chinese Medicine.

Mater-

Hospitals.

nity

Vaccina- Eye tions. Clinic.

Baby Deaths. Clinic.

In- Out- In- Out- patients. patients. patients. patients.

Cases.

Tung Wah Hospital... 10,194 39,875 7,892❘ 186,530 Kwong Wah Hospital 11,429 39,175 5,215 203,946 Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

2,134

3,928 16,274 1,739

4,372

4,003

2,050

1,176

8,045

6,014

5,266 28,197

3,335 72,388

884

876

118

2,209

Total

26,889 107,247

16,442 462,864 7,021

6,854.

17,568

9,784

12,625

43

1936.

Table XV.

BREWIN FUND.

Income and expenditure Account for the year ended 31st December, 1937.

INCOME.

1936.

EXPENDITURE.

$

¢

7,099.52 Interest

7,556.09

$10,212.11

Gratuities

8,927.40

1,295.54 Rent

1,385.42

210.00 Salaries

210.00

1,258.11 Subscription

1,006.94

27.60 Petty Expenses

28.04

796.54

(Deficit)

Surplus of Income over Expenditure

783.01

$10,449.71

$9,948.45

$10.449.71

$9,948.45

Table XVI.

BREWIN FUND.

Balance Sheet as at 31st December, 1937.

LIABILITIES.

ASSETS.

$

Deposit

1,649.19

House Properties

47,841.00

Current

Account with the

Mortgages

98,000.00

Mortgagors

149.30

Mortgages (Possession entered)

36,132.58

General Reserve...$189,231.51

Accounts Receivable

1,556.00

Current

Add Profit for

the year

Account with the Tung Wah Hospital

2,905.96

783.01

190,014.52

H.K. & Shanghai Bank:-

Current Account. $2,850.04

Fixed Deposit ... 1,649.19

4,499.23

Cash in hand

1,378.24

$191,813.01

$191,813.01

Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital,

Sd. CHÁU SHIU NG, Chairman,

Sd. LI TSOO YIU, Director.

I have audited the above Balance Sheet with the Books and Vouchers of the Fund and have obtained all the information and explanations I have required. The accounts due from the Mortgagors in relation to Mortgages (Possession entered) amounting to $6,909.40 have not been incorporated in the above Balance Sheet owing to the fact that there is very little chance of recovering same. Moreover, the value of the properties held as security against these mortgages is somewhat below the amount of Principal. Subject to the foregoing I am of the opinion Fund. that the Balance Sheet is properly drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct statement of the affairs of the

Sd. CHAU YUT U,

Auditor.

Hong Kong, 7th March, 1988.

Table XVII.

Summary of work done in the Chinese Public Dispensaries during 1937.

PATIENTS.

Dispensaries.

New

Cases.

Old

Cases.

Patients

removed

to

Corpses

removed

Dead

Infants

Gynaecological cases seen by Lady Doctor.

to

by

Ambu-

lance.

Hospitals Hospital

brought

to Dis-

or Mor-

tuary.

pensary.

New

Cases.

Old

Cases.

C 46

Central

37,157 30,786

12

84

3

49

29

:

29

6,405

389

670

Eastern

20,368

24,980

8

00

15

62

Western

30,900

17,555

69

32

21

30

28

308

3,621

503

850

434

6,046

Shaukiwan

32,888 50,568

18

125

2

52

345

7,394

861

1,391

Aberdeen

9,323

.9,545

Nil

119

Nil

. Nil

2,251

303

350

Harbour and

:

Yaumati

51,033

41,275

90

00

77

181

175 9,137

1,233

1,923

Shamshuipo

41,372

31,842

8

46

A

298

279

15,351

962

1,576

Hung Hom

16,003 6,083

56

175

7

206

204

6,358

418

477



Kowloon City

25,545

26,893

61

164

18

30

293

5,130

587

1,133

Total for 1937

264,589

238,527,

322

837

66

858

:

2,067

61,693

5,256

8,370

Total for 1936

252,444 222,383

247

659

34

108

1,632

57,251

5,183

7,972

71

Gynaecological cases seen by Lady Doctor.

Table XVIII.

Summary of work done in the Chinese Public Dispensaries during 1936 1937.

PATIENTS.

Dispensaries.

New

Cases

Old

Cases.

cause of death.

Certificates of

Patients sent

to Hospital.

Patients

removed

to

Corpses

removed

to

Hospital

by

Ambu-

lance.

Hospital

or Mor-

tuary.

Applications

for coffins.

Dead

Infants

brought

to Dis-

pensary.

-

Vaccinations.

New

Cases.

Old

Cases.

C 47 -

Central

.1936... 42,032 30,495

5

83

1937.. 37,157 30,786

12

84

Eastern

.1936.. 18,733

23,412

12

1937...

20,368 24,980

15

Western

.1936...

29,426 20,367

47

12

13760

14

49

37

62

26

Shaukiwan

1937..

.1936..

30,900 17,555

69

32

21

30

30,113 51,643

16

87

1937... 32,888 50,568

18

125

19588A

45

5,449

299

675

29

6,405

389

670

227

5,030

582

929

308

3,621

503

850

396

5,585

434

6,046

...

255

6,733

.902

1.228

345

7,394

861

1,391

Aberdeen

.1936... 8,960

1937...

9,690

9,323 9,545

123

119

∞ IN

...

...

1,447

309

282

...

2,251

303

350

Harbour and

Yaumati

.1936...

48,694 35,272

40

91

1937.. 51,033 41,275

90

77

6

CO CO

3

136

10,290

1,347

1,920

181

175

9,137

1,233

1,923

Shamshuipo

.1936... 38,698 30,550

3

45

5

225

13,807

889

1,583

Hung Hom

1937... 41,372 31,842 .1936... 16,000 3.030.

8

46

70

118

Kowloon City

1937... 16,003 .1936.. 19,780 17,924 1937.. 25,545

6.083

56

175

62

88

5

25,893

61

164

21768

298

279

15,351

962

1,576

3

186

4,340

346

383

206

204

6,358

418

477

18

162

4,570

513

972

30

293

5,130

587

1,133

Total for ..1936.. 252,444 222,383 Total for 1937.. 264,589 238,527

247

659

34

108

1.632

322

837

66

858

::

57,251

5,183.

7,943

2,067

61,693

5,256

8,370

.....

"To Balance

""

""

"

""

""

Receipt.

C 48

Table XIX.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1937.

Grant by Hong Kong Govern-

ment

Grant from General Chinese

Charities Fund

Donation from:

$

C.

$

Expenditure.

51,980.14 By Salaries to staff

turers of Health Cam-

Salaries to 7 Street Lec-

12

9,500.00

8,000.00

15

1,200.00

1,000.00

1,000.00

Ko Shing Theatre

120.00

""

120.00

Prince's Theatre.

Taiping Theatre

Pei Ho Theatre

Lee Theatre

Subscriptions:-

Land (Victoria City)

Harbour

Shaukiwan

Kowloon City

Aberdeen

Fees from Eastern Maternity

Hospital, Wanchai

House rents paid by Man

Wah School, Shaukiwan..

Sales of Bottles, etc.

"?

""

??

**

Government Grant to

12,988.80

Shamshuipo Dispensary.. 2,500.00

Donation from Po Hing

Theatre to Hunghom

400.00

3

$

44,969.35

paign

350.00

Conveyance allowance

to

doctors and clerks

1,439.96

Rent allowance to clerks

"

and shroffs

Pensions

Gratuities to coolies and

messengers for Chinese. New Year

660.00

780.00



181.00

10

House rents for Aberdeen

9,674.80

Dispensary

624.00.

1,667.55

Food for patients in East-

:

1,461.50

ern Maternity Hospital.

1,814.33

500.00

Cost of drugs

18,782.87

29,732.65

""

Motor services for delivery

of drugs

439.40

2,399.50

Water Account

334.50

Crown Rents

142.06

12

600.00 169.73

27

Electric and gas charges

1,552.42

j

Telephone rentals

1,077.50

Stationery, printing and

advertisement

1,777.79

Cost of bottles, etc.

195.38

Uniform, shoes etc. for

coolies & messengers

521.50

"

Beddings for Eastern Ma-

ternity Hospital

166.60

600.00

Repairs

949.34

3,500.00

Instrument

60.00

7,000.00

Sundries

1,422.07

>>

10,000.00

Balance:

19

17,000.00

Hong Kong Government]

On Fixed Deposit

40,000.00

Loan.

440.00

Cash

168.05

On Fixed Deposit

1,200.00

Advance to C. P. D.

On Current Account

26.10

Clerks

140.00

1,666.10

51,308.05

Total

124,548.12

Total

124,548.12

Dispensary

Donation from General

Chinese Charities Fund

to Hunghom Dispensary.

Loan from General Chinese

Charities Fund

Loan from Yaumati Public

Square Fund

Interest:

""

On Hong Kong Govern-

ment 4% Conversion

و,

4% Conversion Loan. 11,000.00

泉右李

Member of Committee.

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

23rd April, 1938.

Table XX.

SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1937.

Receipt.

$

Ø

Expenditure.

$

To Balance

2,830.73 | By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

3,083.38

Grant by Hong Kong Government

2,500.00

Payment through local Committee

3,877.89

Rents from 8 houses at Shamshuipo

.2,000.00

Balance-at Secretariat for Chinese

Subscriptions

28.50

Affairs

1,941.62

Sale of Bottles, etc.

151.34

Balance with Local Committee

1,392.32

Total

8,902.89

Total

8,902.89

WONG IU Tung,

Chairman.

IP WAI SHING.

Accountant.

Receipt.

To Balance

"1

Subscriptions, etc.

Donation from:—

Po Hing Theatre

Table XXI.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1937.

$

¢

Expenditure.

$

4,209.55 By Payment

through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

2,173.55

1,305.30

""

Payment through local Committee

3,944.44

$ 400.00

Balance:

3,330.00

Affairs

At Secretariat for Chinese

With Local Committee.. 3,366.34

600.00

4,330.00

9,844.85

Total

.$ 360.52

3,726.86

9,844.85

Scavenging Contractor

General Chinese Charities Fund

Total

LO YUET CHO,

Chairman.

WONG PIK CHI,

Accountant.

C

:

C 51

Table XXII.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1937.

Receipt.

Amount.ne

Payment.

¢

62,765.42 By Rent of telephone

Cost paid for removal of telephone Wages for Yuen Cheung and gardeners Wages for Pun Yan Chiri and Chau Wan Kok etc. Repairs to the embankment, the Ti Chong

Wong Temple, the roads, the wharf and the supply of numbered stones by Yeung Tam Kee

Flower pots, scythes, manure, and water

buckets, etc.

Account books purchased from the Kwong Fuk

Hing Shop

To Balance

''

Interest from Hong Kong

and Shanghai Bank

""

205.15

Interest from fixed deposit on mortgage of houses

Wages from Dr. S. W. Tso

for refilling vaults

1,944.00

208.00

77

Money collected and hand-

ed in by Dr. S. W. Tso on account of registra- tion fee for probates and letters of administration.

Sale of 230 lots, including costs of embankments

16.00

15,530.00

??

Sale of the spare ground of

the Cemetery

4,451.71

19

Printed matters by the Wing Hang Shop Printed matters by the St. Louis Industrial

School

Stationery supplied from the Yau San Shop Fares paid to Hong Kong Hotel Garage for use

of motor cars

Payment made to Mr. Fung Chun for cost of a

plan in connexion with the renovation of Ti Chong Wong Temple

Payment to Mr. Shum Kwong Yuet as fee for drawing up of a pair of scrolls inscribed at the Chinese Permanent Cemetery

Stamps

Rate for getting water from river

Crown Rent of wharf

"

Crown Rent of "Pai Lau"

Crown Rent of the Cemetery

>"

Cost for making roads leading up to the Tsun

Wan Cemetery

""

Amount.

$

¢

189.00

12.00

1,580.00

480.00

37,757.99

85.33

1.53

13.50

12.00

6.05

18.61

400.00

42.00

18.00

2.00

1.00

2.00

1.00

4,154.59

Purchase of land to the extent of about 100

sq. ft. at Tsun Wan through the District Officer, South

Compensation paid to Chan Tsun for removal

of a grave at Tsun Wan Balance

50.00

30.00

40,263.68

Total

$

85,120.28

Total

.$

85,120.28

"

By deposit with Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank

fixed deposit on mortgage of house No. 2A,

High Street

$12,205.07

8,000.00

77

fixed deposit on mortgage of house No. 8A,

Babington Path

20,000.00

Cash

58.61

"

$40,263.68

S. W. TSO, Secretary.

T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.

Examined and found correct,

(Sd.) IP LAN CHUN,

Auditor

Receipt.

Table XXIII.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

Receipt and Expenditure, 1937.



¢

Expenditure.



:

To Balance

t

Rents of stalls

Interest

on

Treasury

money deposited

in

4,889.16 By Contributions to Aberdeen Industrial

14,744.81

86.70

School

13,000.00

Wages of watchmen, etc.

976.00

Water account

108.50

Consumption of gas

297.00

124

""

Renovation and repairs of stalls

2,024.00

Miscellaneous

19.96

Balance

3,300.21

Total

19,720.67

Total

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

19,720.67

Receipt.

:

To Balance Rents of stalls

Interest on money

Treasury

+

Table XXIV.

YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE. Receipt and Expenditure, 1937.

deposited

in

$

Expenditure.



School

2,545.64 By Contribution to Aberdeen Industrial

11,297.47

2,000.00

} }

Loan to Chinese Public Dispensaries

90.16

Fund

10,000.00

Wages of watchmen, etc.

1,019.00

Water Account

259.89

Electric lights

88.44

Repairs

Crown Rent

11.00

1.00

Miscellaneous

Balance

26.64

527.30

Total

13,933.27

Total

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

13,933.27

Table XXV.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1937.

Receipt.

$

Expenditure.

$

To Balance on Fixed Deposits....$6,250.00) in Colonial Treasury.

"

By Passage etc. to destitutes

109.35

101.41

6,351.41

Subscription to Alice Mem- orial Hospital

50.00

>>

Subscription to Eyre Dioce-

Grant from General Chinese Charities

Fund

Miscellaneous receipts

Interest on Fixed Deposits....$ 125.00

Interest on money deposited

in Treasury

200.00

62.99

""

""

san Refuge

85.00]

135.00

Balance on Fixed Deposits...$6,250.00

in Colonial Treasury.

248.92

6,498.92

Total

3.87

128.87

6,743.27

Total

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

6,743.27

:

Industries.

L

Knitting & Weaving Factories

Table XXVI.

Accidents in Factories-1937.

Accidents due to

Total No.

Machinery

Falls

Electric

shock

Falling

objects

Burns &

scalds

Drowning!

Mis-

cellaneous

of

Accidents

Fatalities

1 (1)

1

1

1

1 (1)

1

1

(1)

ee

2

39 (7)

| | | | |

2 (1)

3

8

1

(1)

1

18 (1)

3 (3)

77

12

1

Feather Sorting Factories

Cement Works

Soap Factories

Shipbuilding Yards

Rope. Works

Steam Laundries

Engineering & Metal Works

Quarries

1

Rubber Shoe Factories

1

Oil Installations

1

1

Printing Works

Public Utility Works

Sugar Refineries

Breweries & Distilleries

Canning Factories

Sweet Factories

Cork Factories

Ginger Factories Cigarette Factories

2

1.

1

1

1

27 (2) 49 (8)

3 (1) 26 (2)

6 (1)

3 (3)

15

129

17

The Figures in parenthesis denote Fatalities and are included in the total.

C 55 -

Receipts.

C 56

Table XXVII.

16

GENERAL CHINESE CHARITIES FUND

Statement of Accounts from 1st January to 31st December, 1937.

$

c.

Expenditure.

$

c.

ن

$ c.

To Balance

11

Surplus money transferred from:

Che Kung Temple, Shatin

Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City Hau Wong Temple, Tai O Hung Shing Temple, Wantsai Hung Shing Temple, Yaumati

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City Kwong Fook Che, Tai Ping Shan. Kwun Yum Temple, Yaumati Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom. Kwun Yum Temple, Che Wan

Shan

Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo..... Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo Shing Wong Temple, Bridges St. ... Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong

Toi

17,128.26 By grants to:--

10,000.00

100.00 72.00

Tung Wah Hospital for expenses. Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

for expenses

21,174.19

8,000.00

1,321.80

836.75

7,000.00

S.C.A. Passage Money Fund St. John Ambulance Brigade for the expenses of Hau Par Hospital

200.00

500.00

2,611.96

Hong Kong Society for the Pro-

5,144.00

tection of Children

500.00

300.00

Children's Playground Association

200.00

Home for the Aged, Kowloon

400.00

City

1,200.00

100.00

St. John Ambulance Brigade

300.00

2,150.00

350.00 2,900.00

800.00 100.00

3,259.68

400.00

Tam Kung Temple, Wong Nei

Chung

700.00

Tung Wah Hospital for expenses 8,000.00 Tung Wah Hospital for Kwong

Wah Hospital for expenses... 33,500.00 Tung Wah Hospital for Tung Wah

Eastern Hospital for expenses 25,000.00 Tung Wah and Kwong Wah Hos-

pital for Free Burials Tung Wah, Kwong Wah & Tung|

Wah Eastern Hospital for medicine

17,000.00

7,500.00

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

1,250.00

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

350.00

for expenses

9,500.00

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan

150.00

Chinese Public Dispensary, Sham-

Tin Hau Temple, Wong Nei

Chung

shuipo

2,500.00

100.00

Po Leung Kuk for expenses

7,000.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay.

1,600.00

110,000.00

200.00

42.196.19

Transfer of interest from Chinese

Temples Fund

$77.05

Grant from Hong Kong Govern-

ment

110,000.00

Amount refunded by Chinese

Public Dispensaries Fund

8.000.00

Tai O Kaifong for the upkeep of

a fire-engine for 1937 Cheung Chau Kaifong towards

the cost of water-proof fit- tings for the street lamps Cheung Chau Kaifong for the expenses of the Kaifong Fong Pin Sho for the last quarter of 1936 and the 1st quarter of 1937

72.00

200.00

100.00

Amount loaned to Chinese Public

37

Interest

300.99

Dispensaries Fund

15,000.00

Salary

180.00

Balance

20,976.30

Total

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

178,602.49

Total

178,602.49

TANG SHIU KIN,

Member of Committee..

C 57

Receipts.

Table XXVIII.

CHINESE TEMPLES FUND.

Statement of Accounts from 1st January to 31st December, 1937.

$

C.

C.

Expenditure.

$

C.

C.

To Balance

Rent from Temples Keepers of:-



Che Kung Temple, Shatin

Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City Fook Tak Che, Shaukiwan

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City

Hau Wong Temple, Tai O Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau Hung Shing Temple, Yaumati Hung Shing Temple, Wanchai Kwun Yum Temple, Yaumati Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom Kwun Yum Temple, Che Wan Shan

40,595.63 By maintenance of Chinese Public School in

Kowloon City

5,176.14

1.750.00

Grants to:-

""

163.75

Chinese Public Dispensary, Hunghom for

436.00

the year 1937

600.00

11,587.50

362.00

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for 1937 The Kaifong of Hung Hom for the

300.00

810.00

836.75

expenses of the Free School in Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

1,200.00

1,321.80

Ping Chau Free School

200.00

5,144.00

Committee of Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon

370.00

City

70.00

2,750.00

2,370.00

922.00

Expenses for holding theatrical perform-

Kwong Fook Che, Tai Ping Shan

2,611.96

ances at:

Mo Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

787.50

Kowloon City

500.00

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

.335.00

Aplichau

400.00

Pak Tai Temple, Hung Hom

202.25

Cheung Chau Island

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island,

2,000.00

Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai

1,400.00

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung

4,077.05

286.00

Ma Tau Chung

Shamshuipo

Shatin

Tai O

1,000.00

50.00

300.00

300.00

120.00

Shing Wong Temple, Bridges Street Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

2,873.92

2,670.00

Annual subscription to Confucius Society

260.00

235.50

42.50

for expenses of the Free School at Yuk Hui Kung, Wantsai

520.00

1,350.00

2

Repairs to:-

Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi

571.00

Tin Hau Temple, Wong Nei Chung

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau

27.00

60.00

50.00

Tam Kung Temple, Wong Nei Chung

Che Kung Temple, Shatin

273.00

700.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

255.50

Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo

1.600.00

Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island

207.60

To Ti Temple, Lan Kwai Fong

123.00

Tin Hau Temple, Hoi Chung Island,

To Kwa Wan

2.00

Tin Hau Temple, Tsing I Island

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom Pak Tai Temple, Hung Hom Fook Tak Che, Shaukiwan

54.00

88.50

4.00

590.00

175.00

45.00

37.00

35.00

Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati

3.259.68

Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi

70.00

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay

Tam Kung Temple, Wong Nei Chung

43.00

282.50

50,001.76

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay

26.00

House Rents:-~

Mo Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

68.00

Property of Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon

Tin Hau Temple, Stanley

1,000,00

City

The Free School, Kowloon City

928.00

Property of Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan...

225.98

1,153.98

Grant from Education Department for

Chinese Public School, Kowloon City.

29

"1

The Free School, Wanchai

Transfer to General Chinese Charities Fund Refund of Deposits as Security to the

110.60 190.00

2,861.10

46,173.24

Interest

23

1,440.00 585.59

Temple Keepers of:--

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City Kwun Yum Temple, Che Wan Shan Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island Shing Wong Temple, Bridges Street

3.180.00

877.05

7.50

255.00

35.00

163.00

51.30

125.00

4,693.85

Total

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

93,776.96

י

Cost of sinking a well and installing a pump at Yuk Hui Kung Temple,

Wanchai

602.50

Grant to Tai O Kaifong towards the cost

of repairing the Causeway there Cost of building a kitchen for the Mo Tai

Temple, Shamshuipo

200.00

375.62

21

**

Rent in respect of Nos. 33 & 35 Bridges Street (Shing Wong Temple) from 3.5.37 - 2.12.37 at $160.00 p.m.

Rent in respect of No. 4 Lan Kwai Fong (To Ti Temple) from Jan. to Dec., 1937 at $5.00 per month

Fee for fixing one power meter at Yuk

Hui Kung, Wantsai.

,, Architect fee for preparing a plan for the reconstruction of the Tin Hau Tem-

1,120.00

60,00

2.00

"1

*

ple, Stanley

Advertisement

Water Account

Crown Rent

Rate

Stationery and printing

Meter Rental

Balance

Total

30.00

206.70

154.57

95.89

68.00

50.50

18.00

29.328.85

93,776.96

TANG SHIU KIN,

Member of Chinese Temples Committee.

Receipt.

Table XXIX.

ABERDEEN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1937.

1

$

Expenditure.

To Balance

Contributions from Chinese

Recreation Ground Fund. $13,000.00

Contributions from Yau-

mati Public Square Fund. 2,000.00

--S

Subscriptions

1,351.58 By Maintenance allowance to the School

Management

''

Erection of an ambulatory.$1,030.00|

Less proceeds of sale of

22,500.00

old materials

600:00

15,000.00

430.00

890.00

Travelling expenses for students

126.80

School fees

''

$ 6,510.00

Crown Rents

47.00

Less refund

100.00

Water meter rentals and fire service

6,410.00

installation

91.00

"}

Advertising and printing

108.80

Total

28,651.58

Miscellaneous

Balance

Total.

52.50

295.48

28,651.58

R. A. C. NORTH,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER AND DIRECTOR

OF AIR SERVICES FOR THE YEAR 1937.

The year 1937 showed a further decrease in the amount of shipping using the Port of Hong Kong. Details of the com- parison between the years 1936 and 1937 will be found in Table II.

2. Foreign-going shipping entering and clearing showed a net decrease of 6,844 vessels and 3,871,939 tons, while local shipping showed a decrease of 3,470 vessels and 28,317 tons.

3. British ocean-going shows a decrease of 294 in numbers with a decrease of 234,162 tons.

4. Foreign ocean-going shows a decrease of 1,162 in numbers with a correspondingly large decrease of 2,105,107 tons. This is due to the complete paralysis of Chinese shipping, and the large decrease of Japanese shipping due to the Sino-Japanese conflict.

5. The River-steamer trade shows a decrease of 1,268 vessels and 938,046 tons, due to the cessation of Chinese sailings during the latter part of the year, and the temporary closing of the Canton River.

6. The Junk trade in Tables IX to XI shows a decrease in numbers and tonnage in both Foreign and local trade. The decrease may be attributed to the Sino-Japanses conflict.

7. In steamships not exceeding 60 tons there is a decrease in both numbers and tonnage. Details of launches entering and clearing are given in Tables XII and XIII.

8. On the 31st December, 1937, there were 242 launches and 174 motor boats employed in the harbour; of these 341 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 25 steam launches and 23 motor boats belonged to the Colonial Government, two steam launches and one steel motor barge belonged to the Imperial Government and 20 steam launches and four motor boats belonged to the Naval Authorities. There are also a number of motor yachts and motor boats owned for pleasure and private purposes.

D 2

Of the 341 licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 171 were licensed for Class I, 59 for Class 11 and three for Class III.

9. 486 engagements and 492 discharges of coxswains and engineers were recorded.

10. The passenger trade and the number of emigrants de- parting from and arriving at this Port are shown in Tables XXII to XXVIII.

11. Details of bunker coal and oil fuel shipped will be found in Table XXIX. The figures show an increase in coal consump- tion of 41,124 tons with a decrease of 18,657 tons in fuel oil.

12. The nationality of crews in British and Foreign ships is shown in Table VII.

13. 19 ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts and 18 certificates of registry were cancelled. Details are given in Tables XX and XXI. The fees collected amounted to $1,119.00 as compared with $879.00 in 1936.

14. 30,921 seamen were engaged and 31,725 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships as compared with 28,717 engaged and 28,370 discharged in 1936.

15. 216 seamen were received and admitted to the Sailors' Home and boarding houses, of these the following were repatriated as distressed British seamen :-50 to the United Kingdom, 38 to Singapore, 22 to Shanghai, 16 to Calcutta, four to Victoria, B.C., one to Colombo, one to Port Said, one rejoined ship, one taken over by the Finnish Consul, 32 re-employed in ships being signed on Articles and 50 obtained employment in the Colony.

16. $6,145.12 was expended by the Harbour Master on be- half of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed

seamen.

17. The Mercantile Marine Assistance Fund Committee held

three meetings during the year. 13 cases were investigated, nine were granted temporary relief. One officer was repatriated to the United Kingdom and the wife of an officer who died was granted a passage home. Two refused relief.

The total sum disbursed during the year was $9,588.24.

18. A statement of the surveys and examinations carried cut by the Government Marine Surveyor and his staff is set out in Table XXX. The vessels surveyed for passenger certificates totalled 92 of 374,896 tons gross as compared with 108 of 436,699 tons gross in 1936, showing a decrease of 16 vessels and 61,803

tons.

,

D3



19. 45 vessels were surveyed at Taikoo Dockyard, 26 at Kowloon Dockyard, two at W.S. Bailey's Dockyard, eight at Cosmopolitan Dockyard, eight at Chinese shipyards and three in Japan.

20. The following is a comparison of tonnage and nation- alities of the various vessels granted passenger certificates at Hong Kong during the year 1937.

76 vessels of 339,423 tons gross.

British Norwegian Danish

10

"

24,462

3

7,763

""

>>

Chinese

3

3,248

""

21

21. Passenger certificates were issued for the following trades:

Passenger & Safety. International Voyages. 18

እን

""

""

Short

34

21

Coasting Voyages

20

River Trade

2

River Trade

18

Class III

22. Four vessels totalling 23,145 tons (gross) were surveyed and granted bottom certificates during the year as compared with seven vessels of 67,973 tons (gross) in 1936.

23. 72 passenger vessels and 54 cargo ships were surveyed for radiotelegraphy certificates during the year as compared with 61 passenger vessels and 38 cargo vessels in 1936.

24. 95 vessels of which 49 were British and 46 Foreign were surveyed for emigration certificates during the year as compared with 91 in 1936.

25. 36 vessels were surveyed for load lines during the year as compared with 41 in 1936. Of these 20 were British vessels registered in Hong Kong and 16 Chinese.

26. 98 new lifeboats and 519 units of standard buoyant apparatus were surveyed during construction at the makers' works during the year as compared with 31 and 598 respectively in 1936.

27. 16,330 new lifejackets were examined and stamped at the makers' works during the year as compared with 11,195 in 1936.

28. 610 surveys were carried out on steam launches and Motor boats during the year as compared with 631 in 1936.

D 4

29. There was one Marine Court of Inquiry held during the year:

On the 9th and 10th of November to inquire into the circumstances attending the

the loss of the British S. S. "KAITANGATA" on the 25th October, 1937, whilst on a voyage from Hong Kong to Haiphong.

30. 455 cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during the year.

The principal offences were:

(a) Boarding ships without permission of the Master. (b) Making fast to ships whilst underway without per-

mission of the Master.

(c) Dredging in the Harbour without a permit.

(d) Lying inshore during prohibited hours without a

permit.

(e) Dumping rubbish into the Harbour without a permit.

31. Examinations for certificates of competency as masters, mates and engineers were held under Board of Trade regulations.

20 candidates were examined for master, 13 passed, 12 candidates were examined for first mate and eight passed. There were no candidates for second mate's certificate.

Nine candidates were examined for first class engineer's certificate (ordinary) and four passed. Six were examined for second class engineers certificate (ordinary) all passed. One candidate was examined for first class engineers' certificate (motor) and failed.

Two candidates were examined for first class engineer (ordinary) endorsement, all passed. Eight candidates were examined for first class motor endorsement, seven passed, one failed but was granted second class motor endorsement.

32. Under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899, 62 candidates were examined for certificates as coxswain and 48 passed. 91 were examined as engineer, 78 passed and 13 failed.

33. There were no applications for examination for Pilots. licences but 24 licences were renewed.

34. 2,738 Sunday cargo working permits were issued during the year of which 211 were used for working from midnight to 6 a.m., 995 from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and 345 from 6 p.m. to mid- night, the remainder being returned as unused and cancelled.

35. Lighthouses and signal stations, a total of 22, continued to work satisfactorily throughout the year.

- D 5

36. The Aga Light apparatus at Green Island was remodelled and fitted with a sunvalve which came into operation on the 1st January, 1937.

37. The following alterations were made to the lighted buoys at the western entrance of the Harbour:

The North central fairway buoy was altered to a red buoy with flashing red light every five seconds.

The South central fairway buoy was altered to a black buoy with flashing white light every five seconds.

38. During the typhoon of the 1st to 2nd of September the Cheung Chau passage beacon was demolished. The beacon is now being reconstructed and will come into operation again during 1938.

39. The fortnightly reliefs to Lighthouses were delayed once at Waglan, and once at Gap Rock owing to bad weather and seven times owing to no tug being available.

40. Table XXXII gives details of vessels signalled &c. at the lighthouses and signal stations.

41. Government moorings were used during the year as follows:-

A. class

B. class

C. class

3,396 days.

5,631 days.

510 days.

In addition they were used by Naval vessels and transports for 18 days.

On the 31st December the following moorings were in position.

A. class 17, B. class 27 and C. class 4, a total of 48 includ- ing 11 special typhoon A. class moorings. Permission was granted for the maintenance of 42 private buoys and moorings and the fees received amounted to $2,520.

42. The revenue and expenditure of the department are shown in Table XXXIII and XXXIV. Light dues this year show a decrease of $20,152. This must be attributed to less tonnage visiting the port.

43. Increases are shown under a number of sub-heads, the largest being under the headings Gunpowder storage, Emigration, Surveys, Sunday cargo-working permits and Air Services.

- D 6. -

44. Details of licences, etc. issued and revenue collected may be found in Tables XXXVII and XXXVIII.

45. The Government slipway and coaling depot at Yaumati was kept busy throughout the year in routine slipping, repairing and fuelling of Government craft.

46. 8,546 tons of coal were received and 8,501 tons were delivered.

Seven tons of Welsh coal were delivered.

8,800 gallons of kerosene were received and 8,114 gallons were delivered.

9,600 gallons of petrol were received and 9636 were delivered-this included deliveries from stock on hand at end of 1936.

2,537 tons of bunker fuel oil were received and delivered.

123 tons of power diesel oil were received and 112 tons were delivered.

47. Government launches were slipped aggregating seventy nine times at regular intervals during the year and the slip was occupied 328 days.

48. The typhoon of the 1st to 2nd September did consider- able damage to shipping in general. Twenty-eight sea going ships including the Government rescue tug KAU SING, parted their cables and were blown ashore. Native craft suffered severely, 1,361 junks, cargo boats, etc. were reported sunk and 600 seriously damaged.

The loss of life in sea going ships was limited to one European master of a Chinese river steamer and four Chinese

seamen.

The loss of life in native craft was at first estimated at about 11,000, but is now reported to be 2,565.

49. A short summary of the facilities offered by the Port of Hong Kong is attached.

15th March, 1938.

G. F. HOLE,

Harbour Master.

-D? -

AIR SERVICES, 1937.

1. The Civil Airport has completed its first full year of work since removal to the western end of the airport.

2. New air services were inaugurated, notably Pan American Airways from San Francisco operating weekly, started on April 23rd-and the Eurasia Aviation Corporation inaugurated their thrice weekly run to and from Peiping on June 29th.

Figures for the year's working are given in the accompanying tables XLII to XLV.

The disturbances in North China caused dislocation of the China National Aviation Corporation service to Shanghai which had been running regularly thrice weekly until August, and Eurasia re-organised their routes to Central China and increased their services to deal with the growing traffic. China National Aviation Corporation re-commenced operations late in the year with land planes to Central China.

3. On 2nd September a typhoon demolished the mooring pontoon, marine terminal and seriously damaged the slipway and nullahs making extensive repairs and replacements necessary. The shadow bar floodlight was destroyed and the D/F mast was brought through the roof of the hangar-the latter are being replaced.

4. The Far East Flying Training School were fully occupied with both flying and engineering pupils taking the courses; 1,864 hours flying being carried out (an increase of 61% on 1936) and 10 engineering pupils gained Government Certificates on completion of their two year course.

Six officers on the Reserve of The Royal Air Force carried out their annual training with the School.

The Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps annual training was completed.

612 hours flying were carried out under contract to the Army.

5. The revenue and expenditure of the department are shown in Tables XXXIX to XLI.

15th March, 1938.

G. F. HOLE, Driector of Air Services.

M

~ Ꭰ Ꮛ .

FACILITIES OF THE PORT OF HONG KONG.

The Harbour of Hong Kong forms a natural anchorage for a great number of vessels. During the typhoon season there are special moorings and anchorages to which vessels can move with immunity from danger. There are available the latest type of steam fire-floats, and the harbour is efficiently patrolled day and night by water police launches. Competent pilots are available to meet vessels at either entrance of the harbour by day or by night.

2. All the Buoys in the Harbour are owned by the Govern- ment. There are 48 in all, 17 "A" Class for ships from 450 ft. to 600 ft. in length, 27 "B" Class for ships from 300 ft. to 450 ft. in length, and 4 "C" Class for ships of less than 300 ft. in length. The charges are $16, $12 and $8 per day respectively.

3. The wharf and godown companies have berthing accom- modation for 12 vessels from 650 to 750 feet in length. Maximum depth of water alongside the wharves is 36 feet L.W.O.S.T.

4. Fresh water pipes are laid alongside.

5. Three public Warehouse companies have a storage capacity of 522,000 tons, of which 322,000 tons is on the mainland at Kowloon Point, adjacent to wharves and 200,000 tons in Victoria on the island of Hong Kong, on the Harbour front. There are numerous native-owned warehouses of small capacity in both Kowloon and Hong Kong.

6. Both groups of wharves at Kowloon Point have Rail con- nection with the Kowloon-Canton Railway, giving direct Rail communication with Canton. There are daily sailings by coast- ing Companies' ships carrying cargo and passengers to all river and coast ports of Southern China, and to ports in the Far Eastern trade, as well as almost daily departures by ocean steamers to overseas ports.

7. Ample bunkering facilities are provided by private stocks of Coal averaging 60,000 tons, of which about one third is North China Coal, and the remainder Japanese and Formosan.

8. The average stock of Fuel Oil for Commercial bunkering is 55,000 tons. One oil company has berthing facilities for 2 vessels and another company for 1 vessel alongside the Oil installation, with а water depth of 28 feet and 23 feet L.W.O.S.T. respectively. Delivery can be given up to 600 tons an hour from wharf and 350 tons an hour from lighters.

D 9

9. There are two large Dock Companies with Dry Docks capable of taking vessels up to 750 feet on the blocks. The Docks have a depth on the sills up to 34 feet 6 in. H.W.O.S.T. In addition there are five Patent slipways capable of handling ships up to 390 feet in length and 4,000 tons displacement.

There are several smaller yards mostly owned by Chinese, dealing with repairs to small craft and light work.

10. The principal Dock Companies have adequate facilities for the construction of ships of large tonnage, and for the prompt effecting of extensive repairs. There is also a thoroughly up-to-date salvage plant, and tugs are available.

11. A Waterboat Company, drawing its water from Govern- ment reservoirs, has a fleet of eight vessels and there are three other smaller companies operating five vessels, carrying from 200 to 270 tons each.

12. The Harbour has a depth ranging from 24 to 78 feet L.W.O.S.T. The rise of Tide is about eight feet. O.S.T.

13. There are no Tonnage Dues.

14. The Government imposes Light dues of two and four-tenth cents per ton on all Ocean ships, and nine-tenth of a cent per ton on all River steamers which enter the waters of the Colony. The Sterling value of the above rates at $1-1s./8d. is converted back into dollars at the average opening selling rate on London for the previous month.

15. Charges for permission for ships of 400 to 5,000 tons, and over, to work cargo on Sunday are as follows:

From Mid-night to 6 a.m.

$25 to $ 87.50

From 6 a.m. to 6 p.m.

$50 to $175.00

.$25 to $ 87.50

From 6 p.m. to M.N.

16. A large number of Motor-boats, Steam Launches and Sampans are available for communication between ships at buoys and the shore. A frequent service of Ferry Launches is maintained between Hong Kong Island and all parts of the mainland, and also a Vehicular Ferry service from Hong Kong to Kowloon.

17. The

Government maintains a Commercial Wireless Telegraph Station at Cape D'Aguilar which has an average day range of 500 miles, and a night range of 1,500 miles. Continuous watch is kept.

1

Table I.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

D 10

1936.

1937.

FOREIGN TRADE,

No. of

No. of

Tons.

Crews.

Vessels.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British Ships entered,

5,528

9,352,027

473,404

5,147

8,935,444

453,758

British Ships cleared,

5.537

9,323,444

475,625

5,137

8,882,905

450,807

Foreign Ships entered,

4,431

9,539,023

302,528

3,484

8,342,148

275,591

Foreign Ships cleared,

4,447

9,535,338

305,663

3,451

8,312,020

273,857

Steamships under 60 tons entered,

2,739

73,085

34,799

2,034

52,886

25,722

Steamships under 60 tons cleared,

2,748

69,160

34,969

2,048

53,397

25,981

Junks entered,

7,379

1,053,903

116,638

6,189

801,465

59,665

Junks cleared,

7,817

1,117,683

120,694

6,292

811,459

61,477

Total of all Vessels entered,

20,077

20,018,038

927,369

16,854 18,131,943

814,736

Total of all Vessels cleared,

20,549

20,045,625

936,951

16,928 18,059,781

812,122

Total of all Vessels entered & cleared, in Foreign Trade,

40,626

40,063,663

1,864,320

33,782

36,191,724 1,626,858

LOCAL TRADE.

Steamlaunches entered,

9,848

332,723

116,148

9,645

324,510

113,465

Steamlaunches cleared,

9,894

334,402

116,588

9,734

330.209

113,897

Total Launches entered and cleared,

19,742

667,125

232,736

19,379

654,719

227,362

Junks entered,

11,483

498,296

113,014

9,936

331,259

85,611

Junks cleared,

11,720

501,932

112,837

10,160

653.058

93,456

Total Junks entered and cleared,

23,203

1,000,228

225,851

20,096

984,317

179,067

Total Local Trade (Launches & Junks) entered & cleared,

42,945

1,667,353

458,587

39,475

1,639,036

406,429

Grand Total, (Foreign & Local Trade),

83,571

41,731,016

2,322,907

73.257

37,830,760 2,033,287

Table II.

Comparison between the years 1936 and 1937 of all Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony:-

INCREASE.

D 11

1936

1937

DECREASE.

CLASS OF VESSELS.

British Ocean Going,

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage. 4,616 11,943,751 4,322 11,709,589

No. Tonnage.

No. Tonnage.

294

234,162

Foreign Ocean Going,

British River Steamers,

6,449

Foreign River Steamers, Steamships under 60 tons, ..

2,514

5,487

Junks, Foreign Trade,

Total Foreign Trade,

Steamlaunches, Local Trade

Junks, Local Trade,

Grand Total,

6,364 18,025,915 5,202 15,920,808 6,731,720 5,962 6,108,760 1,048,446 1,733 733,360 142,245 4,082 106,283 1,405 15,196 2,171,586

40,626| 40,063,663

19,742 667,125

23,203 1,000,228

83,571 41,731,016

1,162 2,105,107

487

622,960

· 781

315,086

35,962

15,911 73,257 37,830,760 10,314 3,900,256

12,481 1,612,924 2,715 558,662 33,782 36,191,724 6,844 3,871,939 19,379 654,719 363 20,096 984,317 3,107

12,406

Net,

10,314

3,900,256

Table III,

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS ENTERED

AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1937.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

COUNTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Australia & Pacific Islands including

New Zealand

36

121,915

4,159

35

British North Borneo

45 115,737

3,615

20

Canada

47

407,261

15,449

India including Mauritius

102

361,923

13,777

62

South Africa

3

9,492

239

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

42

79,091

4,533

K24224

120,687

2,656

71

242,602

6,815

56,054

875

65

171,791

4,490

5

19,310

377

52

426,571

15,826

199,002

4,832

164

560,925

18,609

68,460

3,237

25

77,952

3,476

84,994

3,435

84

164,085

7,968

United Kingdom

132 714,493

16,955

20

111,050

2,565

152

825,543

19,520

China

1,121 1,948,261

107,859

958

1,855,641

84,82

2,079

3,803,902

192,688

"3

(River Steamers)

1,896 | 1,736,485

135,306

616

311,546

34,828

2,512

2,048,031

170,134

(Steamships under 60 tons)

1,813

46,780

23,454

1,813

46,780

23,454

""

(Junks)

5,957

Denmark

1

118

Europe, Not specially mentioned

11

61,418

875

87385

768,833

56,537

5,957

768,833

56,537

34

16

80,023

612

· 17

80,141

646

19

58,695

735

30

120,113

1,610

France

37

253,195

6,638

D 12

37

253,195

6,638

Formosa

7

5,503

323

99

127,261

6,007

106

132,764

6,330

Į

Germany

11

52,028

762

100

518,268

8,670

111

570,296

9,432

Holland

40

181,063

2,558

28

147,576

2,864

68

328,639

5,422

Italy

36

226,853

6,473

36

226,853

6,473

French Indo-China

224

326,888

17,646

156

162,764

10,386

380

489,652

28,032

Japan

188

825,922

24,090

441

1,625,436

34,051

629

2,451,358

58,141

Macao

1

84

38

10

5,941

387

11

6,025

425

""

(River Steamers)

1,089

1,324,049

84,629

255

57,209

7,762

1,344

1,381,258

92,391

(Steamships under 60 tons)

221

6,106

2,268

221

6,106

2,268

(Junks)

232

32,632

3,128

232

32,632

3,128

Netherland East Indies

10

23,712

512

111

397,895

12,117

121

421,607

12,629

Philippine Islands

35

290,832

11,753

99

568,768

11,280

134

859,600

23,033

Russia in Asia

1

62

1

62

Siam

42

62,151

3,872

99

107,712

6,869

141

169,863

10,741

South America

5,144

37

19

103,067

1,790

20

108,211

1,827

United States of America Sweden

63 281,874

4,737

170

1,044.461

20.976

233

1,326,335

25,713

8

30,280

278

8

30,280

278

TOTAL

5,147

8.935.444

453,758

11,707

9,196,499

360,978

16,854 18,131,943

814,736

COUNTRIES TO WHICH

Table IV.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS

CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1937.

D 13-

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Fuel Oil.

Bunker

Coal.

Australia & Pacific Islands including

New Zealand

40

ته

122,872 4,195

10,103

5,130

20

77,280

2,089

British North Borneo

39

3,360

60

93,995 3,224

200,152

6,284

387

10,103

9,450

14

31,001

8,490

687

Canada

28

1,500

53

291,691

12,428

124,996

3,911

387

2,850

1

2,694

10,950

30

29

India including Mauritius

112

400,987

294,385

14,490

12,458

9,230

129

459,341

2,850

8,505

250

South Africa

5

15,862

2,937

241

860,328

360

22,995

250

18

61,019

12,167

1,923

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

25

4,685

23.

53,595

76,881

2,618

140

2,283

6,635

62

4,685

123,112

United Kingdom

5,097

85

107

7,904

87

595,857

15,269

176,707

20,890

7,715

225

3,240

14,539

33

194,305

4,734

140

China

1,165

2,117,816

109,679

790,162

2,775

20,003

98,759

20,890

922

1,857,128

""

(River Steamers)

1,889

82,739

3,240

5,720

35,641

2,037

1,724,814

135,306

3,974,944

192,418

333

44,429

8,495

608

307,601

34,828

134,400

""

(Steamships under 60 tons)

1,374

7,588

2,497

2,032,415

170,134

1,707

1,839

47,586

52,017

23,786

""

(Junks)

1,839

47,586

23,786

6,077

780,199

Denmark

57,971

6,077

780,199

57,971

14

Europe, Not specially mentioned

72,955

548

14

72,955

548

13

48,789

499

France

J

450

13

48,789

499

450

33

235,831

6,303

850

Formosa

11

14,897

1,100

33

235,831

6,303

850

518

2,235

114

154,941

1,100

6,827

515

520

Germany

125

10

43,478

169,838

7,345

515

748

2,755

460

49

301,948

Holland

6,269

v,450

59

345,426

7,017

12

61,099

6,910

739

Italy

12

61,099

739

19

French Indo-China

170,253

5,900

500

2,420

19

251

393,353

170,253

17,941

5,900

500

70

42,399

2,420

275

Japan

418,932

15,510

70

25,987

526

205

976,141

812,285

26,036

20,124

33,451

140

29,020

312

Maçao

1,246,382

68,386

26,686

5,190

2

13,280

517

1,440

2,222,523

149

52,772

25,314

298

42,300

11

7,322

488

430

""

(River Steamers)

1,088

.13

8,762

1,323,412

637

84,629

728

11,820

254

57,004

7,762

30

}}

(Steamships under 60 tons)

39

976

1,342

1,380,416

92,391

30

209

5,811

12,796

(Junks)

2,195

209

5,811

2,195

215

31,260

Netherland East Indies

3,506

215

21

Philippine Islands

42

Russia in Asia

Siam

South America

United States of America Sweden

45

52

3 & 32

31,260

60,443

1,089

5,221

3,506

96

386,815

11,530

180

3,860

117

314,679 13,159,

75,107

447,258

12,619

180

220

6,890

142

769,746

9,081

15,113

330

1,730

184

1,084,425

28,272

550

2,995

8,620

203

31

4

2,995

4,026

203

31

15,052

95

102,848

6,724

28,850

140

177,955

10,750

43,902

31

169,621

3,346

9

400

31

262,466 4,893

169,621

1,000

3,346

9

400

740

161

956,857

18,481

460

213

1,219,323

23,374

1,460

740

34,201

297

9

34,201

297

TOTAL

5,137 8,882,905 450,807 56,042

293,858 11,791

9,176,876 361,315

15,594

150,068

16,928 | 18,059,781

812,122

71,636

443,926

D 14

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE AND CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at PORTS in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1937.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,162 5,874,910 233,823

River Steamers,

2,985

3,060,534 219,935

American,

159

1,101,762

24,147

Chinese,

394

533,502

31,957

River Steamers,

871

368,755

42,590

Junks,

6,189

801,465

59,665

Danish,

117

340,169

6,775

Dutch,

228

887,259

27,051

French,

187

611,597

21,683

Italian,

57

411,066

13,177

Japanese,

671

2,178,901

51,799

Norwegian,

535

977,698

33,785

Portuguese,

79

44,746

6,838

German,

138

739,293

13,837

Swedish,

20

77,613

669

Belgian,

Panamanian,

14

45,661

706

Greek,

7

19,154

259

Russian,

10

5

2,995

265

Honduras,

1

468

26

Hungarian,

1

1,509

27

Steamships under 60 tons)

trading to ports outside the Colony,

2,034

52,886

25,722

TOTAL,

16,854 18,131,943

814,736

.

D 15

Table VI,

NUMBER, TONNAGE and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at PORTS in the

COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1937.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,160

5,834,679 230,872

River Steamers,

2,977

3,048,226 - 219,935

American,

159

1,106,062

23,629

Chinese,

363

490,311

30,737

River Steamers,

862

364,605

42,590

21

Junks,

6,292

811,459

61,477

Danish,

117

340,169

6,740

Dutch,

227

888,942

27,909

French,

187

611,597

21,504

Italian,

57

400,599

12,582

Japanese,

672

2,186,791

51,415

Norwegian,

539

985,454

34,016

Portuguese,

78

44,095

6,787

German,

137

738,376

13,716

Swedish,

20

77,613

662

Panamanian,

19

53,280

978

Belgian,

Greek,

7

19,154

265

Russian,

5

2,995

265

Honduras,

1

- 468

32

Hungarian,

1

1,509

30

Steamships under 60 tons)

trading to ports outside

2,048

53,397

25,981

the Colony,

TOTAL,

16,928 18,059,781

812,122

D 16

Table VII.

NATIONALITY OF CREWS.

OTHER EURO-

VESSELS.

BRITISH.

ASIATICS.

1936. 1937. 1936. 1937.

PEAN AND AMERICANS.

1936. 1937. 1936. 1937.

5,528 5,127 48,404 44,616 3,073 1,512 421,927 407,630

4,431 3,484 1,235| 682 58,720 66,292 242,573 208,617

British,

Foreign,

Total,

9,959 8,611 49,639 45,298 61,793 67,804 664,500 616,247

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

%

%

%

%

Percentage of British

crew,

10.22

09.83

00.41

00.25

Percentage of crew,

other Europeans and

Americans,

00.65

00.33

19.41

24.05

Percentage of crew,

Asiatics

89.13

89.84

80.18

75.70

Total

100.00

100.00

100.00

100.00

D 17

Table VIII.

The River Steamer Trade 1936 & 1937.

Year.

Import Tons.

Export Tons.

Passengers.

1936,

250,405

283,821

2,694,983

1937,

296,887

324,771

2,853,830

Table IX.

JUNKS.

IMPORTS.

1936.

1937.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Foreign Trade

7,379 1,053,903

6.189 801,465

Local Trade

11,483 498,296

9,936 331,259

Total

18,862 1,552,199

16,125 | 1,132,724

EXPORTS.

1936.

1937.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Foreign Trade

7,817 | 1,117,683

6,292 811,459

Local Trade

11,720

501,932

10,160 653,058

Total

19,537 1,619,615 16,452 1,464,517

Table X.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, PASSENGERS AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) ENTERED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG, FROM PORTS ON THE COAST OF CHINA AND MACAO IN THE YEAR 1937.

18

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Vessels. gers. Tons.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo,

gers.

Tons.

Canton

584 142,168 5,574

56,037 421 110,775 4,272

1,005

252,943 9,846

56,037

West River

2,999

Macao

88

703

397,300 37,941 44,616 237,987

8,019

419 60,190 4,750

3,418

457,490 42,691 44,616 237,987

3,518

1.44 24,613 2,425

232

32,632 3,128

3,518

East Coast

****

1,461 51,986

3,183

34,996

20 3,037 698

1,481

55,023 3,881

34,996

West Coast

53

3,377

119

2,391

53

3,377

119

2,391

Total

5,185

602,850 47,520 44,616 | 334,929

1,004 198,615 12,145

6,189

801,465 59,665 44,616 | 334,929

Table XI.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREws, PassengerRS AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG, FOR PORTS ON the Coast of CHINA AND MACAO IN THE YEAR 1937.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Fassen- Cargo, gers. Tons.

Vessels. Tons Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo, gers. Tons.

Canton

1,051

260,840 10,987

231,057

West River

2,606

...

331,510 | 31,673 | 40,325 120,615

826

Macao

186

28,245

3,068

20,860

East Coast

1,390

62,840 3,327

5,508

119

74 4,053 550

114,238 10,388

29 3,015 438

5,963

1,125 264,893 11,537 40,325 231,057

3,432

445,748 42,061

120,615

215

31,260 3,506

20,860

926

1,509

68,803 4,253

5,508

****

West Coast

11

755

120

561

11

755

120

561

...

Total

D 19

5,244

684,190

49,175 40,325 | 378,601

1,048 127,269 12,302

6,292

811,459 61,477 40,325 378,601

Table XII.

Statement of Licensed Steam Launches ENTERED in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1937.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

PLACES.

Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo. Vessels. Tonnage. Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo. Vessels. Tonnage Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Do..

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1937.

1936.

1,035 | 16,499 9,072 398 1,084 19,540 | 11,324 170

628

8,610 308,011 | 104,393 |220,813 8,764 |313,183 | 104,824 247,154

2,493

9,645 | 324,510 113,465 |221,211

3,121

3,157

9,848 332,723 | 116,148 247,324

3,157

20

Outside the Waters of the Colony:-

Canton

609 16,116 7,071

75

1,780

788

684 17,896 7,859

}

West River

315 10,699 4,455

80

22

928

286

705

49

337 11,627 4,741

705

129

Macao

74 1,547 787

147

4,559 1,481

165

94

221

6,106 2,268

94

East Coast

Other Places

66

1,791 726

58

1,617

638

124

3,408 1,364

543 10,570 7,881

58

125

3,279 1,609

1,390

71

668 13,849 9,490 1,448

71

Total

1,607 40,723❘ 20,920

58

80

427 12,163 4,802

2,095 214

2,034 52,886 | 25,722 2,153

294

Table XIII.

Statement of Licensed Steam Launches CLEARED in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year, 1937.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

PLACES.

Vessels

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels

Ton

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Bunker

Cargo.

Coal.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1937. 1,322 20,480 11,984 1936. 1,387 24,334 14,462

Do.,

178

54

45



933 8,412 309,729 101,913 215,32411,549 4,285 9,734 330,209 113,897 215,502 11,603 5,218 1,409 8,507 310,068 102,126241,884 3,494 5,176 9,894 334,402 116,588 241,929 3,494 6,585

21

Outside the Waters of the Colony:-

Canton

662 17,610 7,737

5,395 3,850

3222

678 337

|

305

694 18,288

8,074

5,395 4,155

West River

312 |10,613 | 4,398

856 5,307

25

25 942 301

587

59

200

337 11,555 4,699 587

915 5,507

Macao

East Coast

Other Places

70 1,412

786

200

139 4,399 1,409

1

315

186

209 5,811 2,195

315

386

85 2,332

596 11,801 8,472

910

776

45

1,308

495

406

130 3,640 1,405

1,182

78

2,517

82 2,302 1,136 1,480

61

286

678 14,103 9,608

1,558

61 2,803

Total

1,725 43,768 22,303

78 6,251 12,650

323 9,629 3,678 2,067

435 1,383 2,048 53,397 25,981

2,145 6,686 14,033

D 22

Table XIV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches ENTERED at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong

during the year, 1937.

STATION.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen

352 22,632 352 22,632

Cheung Chau

356

15,299

356

15,299

Saikung

190

4,685

190

4,685

Tai O

51

2,912

51

2,912

Tsuen Wan ..

389

24,764 389

24,764

Victoria

5,147 8,935,444 18,271 9,404,580 23,418 18,340,024

Total

5,147 8,935,444 19,609 9,474,872 24,756 18,410,316

Table XV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches CLEARED at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong

during the year, 1937.

STATION.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen

Cheung Chau

Saikung

Tai O

Tsuen Wan

Victoria

144 22,116 144 22,116

250

16,766

250

16,766

190

4,685

190

4,685

51

2,912

51

2,912

389

24,764

389

24,764

5,137 8,882,905 18,779 9,705,294 23,916 18,588, 199

Total

5,137 8,882,905 19,803 9,776,537 24,940 18,659,442

D 23

Table XVI.

Table showing total Shipping of all classes at the Port of

Hong Kong during the years 1918 to 1937.

TOTAL TONNAGE

YEAR.

TOTAL TONNAGE TOTAL TONNAGE ALL CLASSES. OCEAN GOING.

OCEAN GOING

BRITISH.

1918

29,518,189

9,745,469

3,627,576

1919

35,615,169

14,467,847

6,842,024

1920

40,122,527

17,574,636

8,351,084

1921

43,420,970

20,064,611

9,247,198

1922

46,566,764

21,971,162

9,688,891

1923

53,402,239

25,894,058

11,222,141

1924

56,731,077

27,874,830

11,844,752

1925

49,520,523

23,653,774

9,866,820

1926

43,796,436

21,314,696

9,257,417

1927

44,127,161

25,700,164

9,660,440

1928

44,883,765

26,894,395

10,792,701

1929

47,186,181

28,285,741

11,151,152

1930

42,190,612

29,350,807

11,357,605

1931

44,150,021

29,446,145

11,540,844

1932

43,824,906

29,269,073

12,201,690

1933

43,043,381

29,368,877

12,014,232

1934

41,914,022

28,905,526

12,035,087

1935

43,473,979

30,706,571

12,510,998

1936

41,731,016

29,969,666

11,943,751

1937

37,830,760

27,630,397

11,709,589

Tons.

1918

1919

- D 24

Table XVII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING TOTAL SHIPPING ALL CLASSES

1918-1937.

57,000,000

56,000,000

55,000,000

54,000,000

53,000,000

52,000,000

51,000,000

50,000,000

49,000,000

48,000,000

47,000,000

46,000,000

45,000,000

44,000,000

43,000,000

42,000,000

41,000,000

40,000,000

39,000,000

38,000,000

87,000,000

36,000,000

35,000,000

34,000,000

33,000,000

32,000,000

31,000,000

30,000,000 29,000,000

!

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

-1927

·8761

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

37,830,760

D 25

Table XVII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH

AND FOREIGN ENTERED AND CLEARED 1918-1937.

Tons.

31,000,000

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

30,000,000

29,000,000

28,000,000

27,500,000

27,000,000

26,500,000

26,000,000

25,500,000

25,000,000

24,500,000

24,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

14,000,000

13,500,000

13,000,000

12,500,000

12,000,000

11,500,000

11,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9,500,000

27,630,397

8,000,000

7,500,000

7,000,000

6.500.000

6,000,000

5,500,000

5,000,000

4,500,000

4,000,000

3,500,000

1918

1919

1920

Tons.

24.500.000

24.000.000

23,500,000

23.000.000

22.500.000

22.000.000

21.500.000

21.000.000

20.500.000

20,000,000

19.500.000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18.000.000

17.500.000

17.000.000

16,500,000

16.000.000

15,500,000

15.000.000

14.500.000

14.000.000

13.500.000

13.000.000

12,500,000 12.000.000

11.500,000

11,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9.500.000

9,000,000

8.500.000

11,709,589

1921

1922

1923

1924

D 26

Table XIX.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH ONLY, ENTERED AND CLEARED 1918-1937.

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

Table XX.

Return of Ships Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1937.

D 27

Name of Ship.

Official Registered Horse Power No. Tonnage.

Rig.

Build.

Where and

When built.

Remarks

1. Chin Tong Kong

152,098

281

Nil

2. Hoi Ma

3. Island Trader

"Bremerhaven❞

159,457

17

B.H.P. 16

Junk

ex

159,458

959

Estimated

Not

Carvel do.

Clinker Vegesack

N.H.P. 106

4. Taikoo Cheong

159,459

10

B.H.P. 220

Not

Carvel Hong Kong

Clinker Hong Kong ...1922 Formerly owned by British & Chinese

subjects "Chin Tong Kong' "Septentrio'

...1937 1st. Registry (New Vessel)

.1920 Formerly under the German Flag as "Bremerhaven"

...1937 1st. Registry (New Vessel)

ex

5. Tung Hsing

159,460

N.H.P. 5

Cutter

do.

do.

...1937

⚫ do.

6. Fei Lim

159,455

7

do.

do.

do.

...1936

do.

do.

do.

7. Fu Tau Shan ex

159,426

B.H.P. 40

do.

Canton

"Sam Hay I"

2

.1934 Formerly owned by Japanese & Chinese subjects as "Sam Hay I".

8. Muliama

159,461

384

N.H.P. 76

Not

Clinker Hong Kong ...1937 1st. Registry (New Vessel)

9. Fei Loong

159,462

9

B.H.P. 18

Cutter

Carvel

do.

...1937 do.

do.

10. Highwayman

159,463

10

B.H.P. 25

do.

11. Leana ex "Tapti'

144,397

2,915

N.H.P. 653

Not

do.

Clinker Rostock

do.

...1937

do.

do.

12. Punai

159,464

8

B.H.P. 6

Yawl

13. Moamoa

159,465

296

B.H.P. 460

14. Gwyn

159,466

11

B.H.P. 40

Carvel Hong Kong Not Clinker Nil Carvel

.1914 Registry transferred from London. ...19371st. Registry (New Vessel)

do.

..1937

...1936

do.

do.

do.

15. Bou Regreg

153,733

182

N.H.P. 32

Pole Mast Clinker

16. Yanawai

159,467

225

N.H.P. 70

Nil

do.

17. Sai Kong

159,468

49

B.H.P. 80

Nil

Carvel

do.

18. Tai Yu Shan

159.469

59

B.H.P. 160

Nil

do.

do.

19. Tai Koo

159,470

126

N.H.P. 268

Not

Clinker

do.

do. Dartmouth ....1925 Registry transferred from Gibraltar. Hong Kong ...1937 1st. Registry (New Vessel) ...1917 1st. Registry.

...19191st. Registry (formerly unregistered vessel known as "Kwong Sai”). ...19371st. Registry (New Vessel)

do.

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Ships Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1937.

Reason of Cancellation.

- D 28

Name of Ship.

Official No. Tonnage.

Registered

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build.

Where and When built.

1. Cheong Lee

153,584

3

2. Chief Capilano

145,168 6,791

25. 3.1925

21. 2.1928

3. Going

137,687

11. 6.1915

4. Anjou

135,014

354

25. 7.1923

None

5., Pak Wan Shan

153,567

50

30.10.1924

None

6. Hau Hoi I

151,417

54

13. 1.1921

None

Carvel

do.

7. Taikoo Cheong

128,716

12

30. 7.1912

nil

do.

do.

8. Hai Ning

153,543

840

5. 5.1924

Schooner Clinker

9. Hop Sang

114,748

1,359

13.11.1924

F. and A.

America

Glasgow

Schooner

10. Kaituna

120,467

1,208

17. 9.1931

do.

11. Taikoo Koong

133,231

14

30. 7.1912

nil

12. Kwong Fook Cheung.

152,106

538

26. 5.1923

None

do.

do. Carvel Hong Kong ...1911| Clinker

None Carvel Hong Kong Schooner Clinker Guslemunde Chinese Carvel Hong Kong sail

Clinker Nantes do. Hong Kong

...1923 Transferred to Chinese registry. ...1917 Sold to Foreigner (Philippino subject). ...1915 Abandoned as a total loss.

.1899 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese subject). ...1924 Sold to Foreigners (Chinese subjects). ...1916 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese subject). ...1909 Vessel broken up.

.1896 Sold to Foreigners (Philippino subjects). .1901 Abandoned as a total loss.

Sunderland ....1904 Sold to Foreigners (Chinese subjects).

do.

do.

...1923 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese subject).

13. Hoi Ma

159,457

17

22. 1.1937

Junk

Carvel

do.

14. Fei Lim

159,455

7

12. 7.1937

Cutter

do.

do.

15. Snipe

154,010

17

13. 8.1927

Chinese do.

do.

16. Kaitangata

125,625

1,202

10. 3.1930

F.and A. Clinker Sunderland

Schooner

17. Gwyn

159,466

11

18.10.1937

18. Praesident

102,240

767

29. 1.1901

nil

Barque

Carvel Hong Kong Wood Staranger

.1937 Sold to Foreigner (Philippino subject). ...1936 Registry transferred to London. ...1904 Totally wrecked.

...1907 Totally lost.

...1936 Sold to H. K. Naval Volunteer Corps. ..1875 Register noted under authority of the Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen, London.

-

D 29

Table XXII.

Passenger Trade for the Port for the year 1937.

Passengers.

Emigrants.

Class of Vessels.

No. of Ships.

Arrived. Departed. Returned Departed

British Ocean Going,

4,322

287,291 293,193

43,204 | 128,781

Foreign Ocean Going,

5,202

301,934 283,820

58,425 103.544

British River Steamers,

5,962 1,333,784 1,230,673

Foreign River Steamers,

1,733 143,477 145,896

Total,

17,219 | 2,066,486 1,953,587 101,629 232,325

Steamlaunches, Foreign Trade, 4,082 2,143 2,145

Junks, Foreign Trade,

12,481 46,616 40,323

Total, Foreign Trade. 33,782 2,115,245 1,996,055 101,629 232,325

Steamlaunches, Local Trade,

19,379

221,211 215,502

Junks, Local Trade,

20,096

5,337 5,267,

Total Local Trade,

39,475 226,548 220,769

Grand Total,

73,257 2,341,793 2,216,824 101,629 232,325

Table XXIII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1937.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

D 30

PORTS.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total

M. F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Australia

746

13

Africa

72

13

כא כא

17

13 789

24

10

4

5

94

77

24

7

15

47

39

770

23

21

113

149

37

12

22

14

828

*9

207

British East Africa

9

3

1

12

.9

31

12

Portuguese, East Africa

21

1

British Borneo

7,279

1,513

419

335 9,546

531

150

51

Dutch Borneo

142

40 22]

12

216

41

143

23

21

11

10

23

46

12

778

7,810 1,663

470

381

10,324

13

146

441

25)

14

229

Calcutta

1,250

159

80

46 1,535

1,250

159

80

46

1,535

Canada

3,261)

2561

127

56

3,700)

2451

14

14

པ་

1]

274

3,506

270

141

57

3,974

Cuba (Havana)

I

51

1

52

51

1

52

Dutch Indies

103

16

1

122 23,572 4,155 2,004

912 30,643 23,675

4,171

2,C05|

914

30,765.

Fiji

671

2

Honolulu

295

88

38

802

72

671

2

2

1

72

- 25

446 211 112

Madagscus Island (Tamatave)

109

Į

1131 252 33

Mauritius

37

11

Mexico

New Guinea (Raboul)

New Zealand (Dunedin)

69

10

58

14

допами

6

1

53 285 130

61

297

18

apac

32

19 374

506

200

70

44

820

1

292

361

37

405

35

511

322 141

36

564

5

326

297 18

326

3

כא

921

69

14

92

10

10

Nauru Island

300

300

300

Ocean Island

16

16

16

111

111

10

300

16

Panama (Balboa)

642

76

16

742

642 76

16

8

742

Rangoon

7,498 1,540

647

375 10,060

664

166

48

32

910

8,162 1,706

695

407 10,970

Rodriguez

8

7

Sumatra (Bel. Deli)

Straits Settlements

Tahiti

80

1931 661 39,031 46,551 8,715 18

27

99

United States of America

Total for 1937

Total for 1936

90

131 299 2,803 713 236 128 6,826 101,123|26,769 24,537 5,784

61 96 2,401 3051 187 60,648 50,304 10,117 7,712 128,781 58,866 30,459 8,463 43,774126,450 4,930 3,767 78,927|46,267|19,967 4,897 Total passengers by British Ships

""

Foreign

Excess of passengers by British Ships

8 3 2,996 779 263 141 4,179 61,574 65,800 71.088 14,499 11,310 162,697 80 18 1 99 74 2,967 2,491 30 193 741 3,063 5,756 103,544 119,514 80,763 18,580 13,468 232,325 3,116 74,243 90,037 46,422 9,827 6,883 153,170

60,648 50,304|10,117| 7,712 128,781 58,866 30,459 8,463 5,756 103,544

1,78219,84 1,654 1,956 25,237

3

31

21

7

3

21

3,880

4,484

Table XXIV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1900 to 1935 inclusive.

1900.

66,961

1905. 1910. 1915. 73,105 88,452 109,110

Table XXV.,

1920.

1925. 1930. 1935. 84,602 129,004 235,141 99,104

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1928 to 1937.

D 31

Whither bound.

1928.

1929.

1930.

1931.

1932.

1933.

1934. 1935.

1936.

1937.

Straits Settlements, Males,

129,089

Straits Settlements, Females,

40,652

113,036 88,498 35,606 13,618 33,480 32,887 14,895 7,169

14,767

8,769

55,803-

35,517

69,793 56,629 80,299 37,188 45,096 82,398

Total,

169,741

146,516

121,385

50,501

20,787

23,536

91,320

106,981 101,725

162,697

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

77,815

73.426

58 879

9,606

7,581

8,636

44 504

5 864

30,149 29,151

34.406

4,703

4,828

6,258

35,559 43,235 57,795 6,975 8,210 11,833

Total,

87,421

81,007

67,515

50,368

34,852

33,979

40,664

42,534 51,445 69,628

Grand Total,

257,162

227,523

188,900

100,869

55,639

57,515

131,984

149,515 153,170 232,325

Table XXVI.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China during the year 1937.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

D 32 -

PORTS.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F. M. F.

M.

F. M.

F.

Australia

288

9 11

5

313

288

9

11

51

313

Bangkok

752

192

102

65

1,111 5,153

1,191|

604|

517

7,465

5,905 1,383

706

582

8,576

British Borneo

815

311

156!

130

1,412

4'

2

1!

7

819 313

157

130

1,419

Dutch Borneo

3

3

1

11

61

11

9

4

5

4

22

Bombay

30

Calcutta

4,126 1,853

808

618

7,405

Canada

243

93

48! 21

405

65

க8

12

49

30

12

5

2

49

| 4,126

1,853

808

618

7,405

5

1

72

308

98

49

22

477

Continent of Europe

148

331 14

13

208

598

174

66

38

876

746 207!

80

51

1,084

Delagoa Bay

90

22

15

10

137! 90

22

15

10

137

Dutch Indies

12,918 3,002 2,387 1,823

20,130 12,918 3,002 2,387

1,823

20,130

Honolulu..

35

9

2

2

48

35

9

2

2

48

Mauritius

89 21

17

136 89

21

17

9

136

Rangoon

South Africa

2,010 587, 431 304

3,332 1,128

383

270

158

1,939, 3,133

9701

701

4621

5,271

413

129

70

46!

658 413

129

70

46

658

South America

81

56

12

10

Straits Settlements Sumatra (Belawan Deli).. U. S. A.

17,062 6,216 3,242 2,487

Total for 1937

Total for 1936

25,447 9,297, 4,816 3,644| 30,503 10,172) 6,008 4,499,

29,007 12,297 4,338 2,368 1,838 3,391 1,162 665 528

· 981

· 37 9

43,204 36,396 10,544 6,493 4,992 51,182 43,753 11,649 8,091 5,966

Total number of passengers by Foreign Ships British

>>

58,425 61,843 19,841 11,309 8,636 101,629 69,459 74,256 21,821 14,099 10,465 120,641

36,396 10,544 6,493 4,992 25,447 9,297 4,816 3,644||

58,425

43,204

159 20,841 29,359 10,554

81

56

12 10

159

5,610 4,325 5,746 3,391 1,162 665 528 151 98 371 9

49,848

5,746

7

151

"

>>

32

Excess of passengers by Foreign Ships

10,949 1,247 1,677| 1,348 15,221

Table XXVII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1900 to 1935 inclusive.

1900.

109,534

1905.

187,814

1910.

146,585

1915.

151,728

1920.

100,641

1925. 1930. 129,106 181,227

1935.

176,707

Table XXVIII.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1928 to 1937.

Whither bound.

1928.

1929.

1930.

1931.

1932.

1933.

1934.

1935.

1936.

1937.

D. 33

Straits Settlements, Males,

100,116

Straits Settlements, Females,

97,960 120,964 134,147 20,577 23,117 28,960 35,572

98,606

30,011

51,303 40,881 42,148 18,107 13,677 14,649

46,389 34,969 18,806 14,879

Total,

120,693

121,007

149,924 | 169,719

128,617

69,410

54,558

56,797 65,195 49,848

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

58,515 55,412 62,803 94,331 85,690 8,639 8,901 10,409 19,840 18,089

58,218 47,847 44,477 41,966 38,183 13,505 11,289 11,146 13,480 13,598

Total,

67,154

64,313 73,212 114,171 103,779 71,723 59,136 55,623

55,446 51,781

Grand Total,

187,847

185,390 223,136 283,890 232,396 141,133 113,694 112,420

120,641 101,629

- D 34

Table XXIX,

Bunker Coal and Oil shipped during 1937.

EXPORTS.

Class.

1936.

1937.

Coal

Oil

Coal

No.

No.

Oil

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

Tons.

Steamers,

5,499 337,989

54,291

4,749 379,113

69,899

River Steamers,

4,485 83,470

1,124

3,839 64,813

1,737

Total,

9,984 421,459 55,415

8,588 443,926

71,636

D 35

www

Table XXX,

Comparative Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department for 3 years ending

31/12/37.

YEAR.

ITEM.

1935. 1936. 1937.

Surveys for Passenger and Safety

Certificate including Radio

19

61

74

Surveys for Passenger Certificate

93

47

18

Surveys for Safety Radio Telegraphy

Certificates

16

38

54

Surveys for Loadline Certificate

40

41

36

Surveys for Bottom Certificate

4

7

4

Surveys for Emigration Licence

102

91

95

Measurement of Tonnage for British

Registry

Measurement of Tonnage not for

British Registry

16

14

28

6

7

03

2

Measurement of Tonnage for Suez

Canal

I

4

Measurement of Tonnage for Panama

Canal

1

Inspection and Certification of Light

and Sound Signals

11

16

Inspection and Certification of Life

Saving Appliances

11

Machinery and Boiler Plans

45

==

14

94

2255

24

20

85

Surveys of Boilers during Construc-

tion

2

3

Surveys of Government Land Boilers.

39

49

53

Surveys of Launches for plying

Licences

666

631

610

Surveys of Government Launches

and Harbour Buoys, etc.

1,413

1,400

1,510

Ships' Plans Examined

405

232

238

Inclining Experiments

11

New Lifeboats Surveyed during Con-

struction

9

31

98

New Buoyant Apparatus Surveyed

during construction

727

598

519

Lifejackets Inspected and Stamped... Lifebuoys Inspected and Stamped Engineers Examined B.O.T. Certi-

ficates

15,085

11,195

16,330

250

680

586

47

39

26

Engineers Examined Local Certi-

'ficates

128

121

91

Estimated Total Number of Visits in

connection with Surveys

5,618

5,528

5,117

:

- D 36

Table XXXI.

During the year 1987, there has been stored in the Govern-

ment Gunpowder Depót, Green Island:-

No.

Approxi-

of

mate

Cases.

Weight.

ibs.

Gunpowder, privately owned

674

32,339

Government owned

49

2,437

Cartridges, privately owned

14,722

1,685,159

Explosives, privately owned

22,126

2,344,634

Government owned

505

30,775

Non-explosives, privately owned

385

104,235

During the same period there has been delivered out of the

Depót.

No.

Approxi-

of

mate

Cases.

Weight.

For Sale in the Colony:

lbs.

+---

Gunpowder

31

775

Cartridges

1,678

572,635

Explosive Compounds

7,470

743,194

Non-explosives

6

3,126

For Export:

Gunpowder

264

15,864

Cartridges

11,942

1,043,098

Explosive Compounds

11,279

1,457,213

Non-explosives

369

100,359

Government owned:-

Gunpowder

14

737

Explosive Compounds

296

20,061

On 31st December, 1937, there remains as follows:

No.

Approxi-

of

mate

Cases.

Weight.

lbs.

Gunpowder, privately owned

369

15,700

Cartridges, privately owned.

Explosives, privately owned

Government owned

Government owned

35

1,700

1,102

69,426

3,377

244,227

209

10,714

Non-explosives, privately owned

10

750

Table XXXII.

Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

TYPHOON &

LIGHTHOUSE OR SIGNAL STATION.

VESSELS

SIGNALLED.

MESSAGES MESSAGES SENT.

PERIODS

RECEIVED.

OF FOG.

HOURS FOG

SIGNALS

SOUNDED.

FOG

SIGNALS

NON-LOCAL

FIRED.

SIGNALS

HOISTED.

Gap Rock,

883*

2,842

585

29

174

1,075

Waglan,

Green Island,

3,283+

3,842

939

54

406

G

1,565

201

130

Kowloon Signal Station.

2,714

*

Including 194 reported by Flash Lamp.

+ Including 1,035 reported by Flash Lamp.

8

74

D 37

D 38

Table XXXIII.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1936 and 1937.

A.-HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1936 Amount 1937

$

$

540,983.32

587,685.85

*Personal Emoluments

Other Charges:-

Chain Cable

5,456.23

Coal and Oil Fuel for Launches

199,574.16

172,161.09

Coal for Offices

...

4,429.29

4,649.25

Conveyance Allowances

5,047.37

4,903.02

Drawing Materials, G.M.S. Office...

359.03

354.84

Electric Fans and Light

1,181.02

1.299.13

Examination Fees

1,380.00

.600.00

Expenses of numbering Boats

1,320.22

1,497.39

Fees

to

unofficial members of

Marine Court

60.00

Incidental Expenses

.2.448.56

3,029.41

Launch Moorings and Buoys

Navigational Moorings & Buoys...

2,196.55

7,966.00

Ocean Steamship Moorings and

Buoys

17,147.03

19,746.00

Rent Light & Water Allowances

for Slipway Staff

3,243.00

3,189.00

Rent of Public Telephones

542.85

Repairs, Minor improvements and Stores for Launches & Boats

132,267.31

181,730.71

Slipway at Yaumati, Maintenance... Stores & Equipment for Lighthouses.) Transport

1,928.10

2,059.02

12,338.52

11,676.38

Uniforms

413.12 4,891.57

533.59

5,481.32

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges C.F.

931,148.17 1,014,620.58

Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting staff and Junior

Clerical Services.

D 39

Table XXXIII,-Continued.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1936 and 1937,-Contd.

A. HARBOUR DEPARTMENT.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1936 Amount 1937

$

¢

Brought forward

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

New Engine to H. D. 8.

931,148.17 1,014,620.58

8,900.00

Conversion of Old Police Launch 1

1,172.00

Safe for Green Island

150.00

New Engine for Kau Sing Motor Boat

3,500.00

Hire of Tugs for Lighthouse Reliefs..

7,625.19

New Police Launch No. 9

9,250.00

New Police Launch No. 1

127,225.15

Repairs to Green Island Light

2,640.00

New Light for Lan Tau

601.95

Gestetner for G.M.S. Office

680.00

Transfer of Boiler from H.D.I. to

"Aldecoa"

50.28

Total Special Expenditure-

140,447.38

21,347.19

Total A. Harbour Department

1,071,595.55 1,035,967.77

:

J

- D 40

Table XXXIV.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1936 and 1937.

Amount

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

1936.

1937.

$

$

Ø

1. Motor Spirit Duties,

227.60

116.10

2. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899... Buoy Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899.

518,928.39

498,776.20

119,356.00

126,908.00

3. Licences and Internal Revenue

not otherwise specified:

Boat Licences, Ord. 10 of 1899...

117,967.50

121,963.50

Chinese Passenger Ship Licences,

Ordinance 1 of 1889

1,290.00

1.425.00

Fines

9,275.96

7.453.21

Forfeitures

275.00

2,215.00

Fishing Stake and Net Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899

13.80

23.00

Fishing Stake and Net Licences,

from the New Territories, Ord.

· 10 of 1899

673.00

881.80

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of

1899

29,415.25

29,950.75

Junk Licences, &c., from the

New Territories, Ord. 10 of

1899

12,604.50

12,203.25

Steam-launch

Licences, &c.

Ord. 10 of 1899

14,301.50

14,188.00

4. Fees of Court or Office, Payments

for specific purposes & Reimburse-

ments-in-Aid:

Court

61.80

Engagement and Discharge of

Seamen, Ordinance 10 of 1899:

45,480.27

50,490.05

Examination of Masters, &c.,

Ord. 10 of 1899

2,115.00

1,397.50

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10

of 1899

38,078.75

62,122.00

Medical Examination of Emi-

grant Ord. 1 of 1889

164,046.00

237,054.10

Official Signatures, Ord. 1 of 1889.

9,555.00

10,975.00

Publications, Sale of, Ord. 1 of

1889

359.90

546.80

Registry Fees (Merchant Ship-

ping Act), Ord. 10 of 1899

879.00

1,119.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Cer-

tificates, Ord. 10 of 1899

13,962.50

16,466.25

Survey of Steamships, Ordin-

ance 10 of 1899

82,720.79

116,118.51

Sunday Cargo Working Permits,

Ord. 1 of 1891

75,637.50

134,356.25

Miscellaneous

Carried forward

117.15

945.44

1,257,280.36 1,447,756.51

Ꭰ 41

Table XXXIV,—Continued.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1936 and 1937.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

Amount

1936.

1937.

Brought forward

1,257,280.36 1,447,756.51

7. Rent of Government Property:-

Lands not Leased

Buildings

Rent of Government Furniture

341.30

341.30

8.19 176.52

9. Miscellaneous Receipts:

Sale of condeinned stores

1,734.60

2,441.50

Overpayments Previous Years. Other Miscellaneous Receipts:- Pilot Licences Ord. 3 of 1904 Engagement of Masters and

Engineers of Steam Launches. Other Miscellaneous Receipts

49.20

225.26

400.00

120.00

230.00

243.00

128.50

25.00

....

|1,260,348.67 1,451,152.57

Total

Table XXXV.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue for

last ten years.

Personal (*)

Year.

Emoluments

and Other

Special

Total

Total

Expenditure. Expenditure. Revenue.

Charges.

$

¢

1928

1929

696,497.98 744,194.35

99,733.94

68,259.67

1930

942,271.67

1931

1,013,003.51

1932

998,861.44

1933

653,318.32

1934

921,624.49

1935

1936

811,331.20 146,756.02 931,148.17

1937.

1,014,620.58

973.283.46 812,454.02 1,010,061.97

138,788.97 | 1,081,060.64 | 1,020,741.02 38,028.27 1,051,031.78 1,433,534.87 106,930.50 1,105,791.94 1,445,435.64 44,678.65 997,996.97 1,256,924.71 54,985.26 976,609.75 1,210,355.51 958,087.22 1,079,677.53 140,447.38 1,071,595.55 1,260,348.67

21,347.19 1,035,967.77 1,451,152.57

(*) Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting and Junior Clerical Services attached to Department.

1930 and 1931 include figures for Air Services.

$

¢

$

796,231.92

- D 42

Table XXXVI,

Light Dues were collected during the year 1937 as follows:

Class of Vessels.

No. of Trips.

Rate Tounage. per ton.

*

Fees Collected.

Ocean Vessels

Commission on Bahama

Dues

Steam-launches

River Steamers

Total

*

4,839 13,983,394 2.4/10g 453,032.51

1,969.86

1,442

46,396 2.4/10¢

1,503.98

3,914

3,485,351

9/10

42,269.85

10,195 17,515,141)

498,776.20

Charged under Notification No. 147 of 1933.

Table XXXVII.

Licences issued and Revenue collected at Harbour Master's Out Stations:

Stations.

1936

1936 Licences Revenue

Issued. Collected.

$$$

1937 Revenue Collected.

$

1937

Licences Increase. Decrease.

Issued.

$

Shaukiwan

6,116

18 586.25

*19,186.00

6,470 599.75

Aberdeen

6,564

17.004.00

16,036.35

6,272

967.65

Stanley

720

1,133.55

1,176.40

659

Yaumati

4,298

32,617.50

†33,812.00

4,436

42.85 1,194.50

Cheung Chow...

5,629

16,605.90

15,001.25

5,081

1,604.65

Tai O

2,423

5 302.05

5,480.85 2,501

178.80

Taipo

1,926

5,786.10

6,904.40 2,464

1,118.30

Saikung

906

1,997.25 1,326.75

682

670.50

Longket

1,661

4,003.80 5,057.55 1,777

1,053.75

Deep Bay

1,780

4,403.00 3,919.50

1.290

483 50

Lantau

623

1,972.55

1,364.40

524

608.15

Lok Ma Chau...

350

940.60 1,957.35 690 1,016.75

Total:.....

32,996 110,352.55 | 111,222.80 | 32,846 | 5,204.70

4,334.45

Net increase:-

870.25

Excluding Dispensary Fees

+

??

.$1,729.80 3,265.50

Table XXXVIII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and fees Collected during the year 1937. (Under Table U. Section 39 of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

LICENCES.

LICENCE

BOOKS.

DUPLICATE

LICENCES.

BOAT RE- SPECIAL PAINTING. PERMITS.

FEES.

4,094

Licence Books

Boat Repainting

Special Permits

Passenger Boats, A. & B. Classes

2,155

Lighters, Cargo & Water Boats

1,876

Other Boats, Class IV

15,725

Fish Drying Hulks

68

Duplicate Licences

Total

19,824

*

Including $10.00 for one Duplicate Licence Book.

$4,103.00*

5,683

1,420.75

1,254

313.50

11,875.25

50,753.75

52,880.75

566.50

49

49.00

4,094

49

5,683

1,254 $121,962.50

-- Ꭰ 44

Table XXXIX.

B.-AIR SERVICES.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1936 and 1937.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Personal Emoluments

Amount 1936 Amount 1937

$

29,251.45

40,937.37

Other Charges:-

Electric Fans and Light

680.79

1,465.06

Flying Fees for Staff

2,470.42

2,475.00

Incidental Expenses

4,104.15

284.30

Rent of Public Telephone (Supt. of

Aerodrome)

117.00

Upkeep of Buoys

190.00

263.80

Upkeep of Motor Car

499.81

1,076.85

Upkeep of Motor Roller

45.12

38.16

Upkeep of Aerodrome

2,900.44

3,795.04

Upkeep of Fire Engine

420.32

195.89

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges

40,562.50

50,648.47

Special Expenditure:-

Instruments and Books, for

Examinations

491.08

82.41

Medical Equipment for Crash Room

423.51

Equipment for Control Tower

24.00

pection Department

Equipment for Aeronautical Ins-

1 New Typewriter

452.77

299.00

Purchase of Ambulance

250.00

Total Special Expenditure

741.08 1,281.69

Total B.-Air Services

41,303.58 51,930.16

D 45

Table XL.

B. AIR SERVICES.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1936 and 1937.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

1936.

Amount

1937.

$

¢

3. Licences and Internal Revenue

not otherwise specified:

Air Services

400.00

580.00

4. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes and Reim- bursements in aid:

Air Service Fees

11,601.60

25,341.70

Total

12,001.60 25,921.70

Table XLI.

B. AIR SERVICES.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue for

the year 1930 to 1937.

Personal (1).

Year.

Emoluments and Other

Special

Total

Total

Expenditure. Expenditure. Revenue.

Charges.

$

$

1930 (2) 33,896.70

60,000.00

93,896.70

1931

26,691.12

26,691.12

40.00

1932

11,457.04

88.81

11,545.85 14,344.00

1933

13,899.75

1934

40,191.51 10,765.85

13,899.75 6,850.00

50,957.36 10,265.00

1935

52,891.10

10,708.69

63,599.79

7,411.10

1936

40,562.50

741.08

41,303.58

12,001.60

1937

-50,648.47:

1,281.69

51,930.16

25,921.70

(1) Does not include the Salary of the Director which is charged to

A.-Harbour Department.

(2) February, 1930,

Countries whence arrived.

Air Craft.

BRITISH

Passengers.

Crew.

Goods, Mails and

excess luggage

tons.

Table XLII.

Number, tonnage, cargo, passengers, and crews of aircraft arriving at airports in the Colony of Hong Kong from each country in the year 1987.

Aircraft tonnage.

Air Craft.

Mo

Passengers.

FOREIGN

Crew.

Goods, Mails and

excess luggage

tons.

China

Manila (Philippines).Į

290 1,579

788

122

2,084

290 1,579

788

122

2,084

36

292

225

11

670

36 292 225

11

670

French Indo-China...

65

49

130

17

335

F

6

23

72

12

58 137

17

358

Aircraft tonnage.

Air Craft.

Total

65 49 130

17

335 333 1,880 (1,020

133

2,777

398 1,929 1,150

150

3,112

Passengers.

TOTAL

Crew.

excess luggage

Goods, Mails and

tons.

A ircraft tonnage

D 46

China

Manila (Philippines).

Countries to which departed.

1

1

Air Craft.

Passengers.

Table XLIII.

Number, tonnage, cargo, passengers, and crews of aircraft departing at airports in the Colony of Hong Kong

to each

country in the year 1937.

BRITISH

FOREIGN

N

Crew.

Goods, Mails and

excess luggage

tons.

French Indo-China..

66

75

132

11

336

1

Total

67

75 134

11

337

328 1,681

666

Aircraft tonnage.

Air Craft.

Passengers.

Crew.

Goods, Mails and

excess luggage

tons.

Aircraft tonnage.

Air Craft.

TOTAL

Passengers.

Crew.

excess luggage

Goods, Mails and

lous.

1

291 1,450

781

375

2,097

292 |1,450

783

375

2,098

36

231 217



670

36 231 217

670

1

67

75

133

11

337

383

2,768

395 1,756 1,133

394

3,105

Aircraft tonnage.

— D 47 —

Table XLIV.

Number, tonnage, cargo, passengers, and crews of aircraft of each nation arriving at airports in the Colony of Hong Kong in the year 1936 and 1937.

NATIONALITY OF

AIRCRAFT.

British

Chinese

German

American

French

...

Czechoslovakia

ARRIVING.

Aircraft.

Passengers.

Crew.

Goods, Mails, and Aircraft Tonnage. excess Luggage.

1936.

1937.

1936. 1937.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

52

65

37

65

292

77

3235

49

113

130

6.5

17

217.0

335

1,581

125

784

0.4

122

275.0

2,092

112

6

9.0

37

19

292

4

227

11

22.50

671

1

2

2

3

7.75

6

1

3

6

1

1

1

1.00

1

1

2

1

1

1.25

D 48

Java

Filipino

Total

123

398

135

1,929

256

1,150

6.9

150

533.50 3,112.00

{

Latvia

Table XLV.

Number, tonnage, cargo, passengers, and crews of aircraft of each nation departing from airports in the Colony of Hong Kong in the year 1936 and 1937.

nes KAMENA SA ANIMAGIN

D 49

DEPARTING

NATIONALITY OF AIRCRAFT.

Aircraft.

Passengers.

Crew.

Goods, Mails, and Aircraft Tonnage. excess Luggage.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

1936. 1937.

1936.

1937.

51

67

41

75

65

289

94

1,448

112

36

15

54

231

2

1

1

British

Chinese

German

American

French

Czechoslovakia

Latvia

Java

Filipino

N

Total

121

395

154

1,756

255 1,133

2.9

394

531.50 3,105.00

113

134

2.7

11

216.00

337

125

716

0.2

375

275.00 2,090

6

9.00

4

277

8

22.50

670

3

7.75

6

HQ

1

2

1

1.25

Licences for Pilots

Licences for Navigators

Licences for Ground Engineers Certificates of Registration

Heavier-than-air craft

Table XLVI.

Licences or Certificates issued.

Year ended

1935.

Year ended

1936.

Year ended

1937.

31st December, 31st December, 31st December,

Number of Licences or Certificates

current on

31st December,

1937.

39

13

18

27

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

3

1

4

5

D 50 -

2

Nil

2

5

Lighter-than-air craft

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Certificates of Air-worthiness

Heavier-than-air craft

5.

1

6

4

Lighter-than-air craft

Nil

Nil

Nil

Nil

Licences for Aerodromes

Nil

Nil

1

1(Govt.)

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND

EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1937.

I. LIQUOR.

1. There was an increase in the net revenue collected of $213,156.62 as compared with 1936. Just over half of this increase is accounted for by increased receipts from native type liquors, the additional sums paid by local distilleries amounting to $87,788.95, and in respect of imports of Chinese and Japanese type liquors to $23,667.07.

2. The rates of duty remained unchanged as compared with 1936 and the general increase in receipts is therefore directly ascribable to increased consumption of duty paid liquors. In respect of European type liquors, the increase is probably due partly to the increase in population following the Shanghai troubles and partly to improved economic conditions. The in- crease in consumption of native liquor is probably due mainly to the enormous influx of refugees from the war areas, though the excellent work of the preventive staff in the suppression of illicit distillation has been a definite factor. In this connexion it is noteworthy that the increase in revenue from local distil- leries amounts to almost 12% as compared with 1936.

3. An increase in the receipts from local consumption of spirit of wine has again to be recorded. It is largely due to the continued prosperity of local perfumery manufacturers.

4. An intensive campaign was waged during the year against illicit distillation, and the officers concerned are to be commended for the excellent results achieved. No less than 183 illicit stills were found as compared with 99 in 1936. Those who participate in the illicit traffic displayed remarkable ingenuity in their endeavours to avoid the attentions of Revenue Officers. They adopted the practice of burying fermenting material, leaving it underground until fermentation was complete, and then unearthing it for distillation under cover of darkness. The most ingenious trick discovered was the burial of a large vessel of fermenting material in a Chinese burial ground. Made up as a grave complete with headstone, it was with great trepidation that the Revenue Officer investigated it to discover the deception.

- E 2

5. Again Tai Pak and Yee Pak on Lantau Island accounted for a considerable number of the illicit still seizures, but other islands, especially Tsing Yee, and the more inaccessible hillsides also contributed their quota. Arrests in such cases are the exception as a watch is kept for the approach of a Revenue party. The constant raids on Tai Pak and Yee Pak have had their effect in a general lowering of the previously high level of prosperity there; it is believed that the villagers at one time subsisted almost entirely on the proceeds of their illicit activities.

6. Seventy-two illicit stills were found in urban tenements. The increase in illicit distillation in urban areas is disturbing, as detection is dependent on information received. Hitherto, how- ever, the rewards payable for such information seem to be adequate.

7. There was a considerable decrease in the amount of illicit liquor seized during the year. A good deal of the illicit traffic was in previous years centred on Cheung Chau, and the stationing of two Chinese Revenue Officers on that island in March has had a good effect. Other contributing causes have been the decreased number of ships entering the Colony from China and also the increase in the price of rice in that country which has tended to make distillation less profitable. It is understood also that the Chinese authorities with a view to conserving food supplies have restricted the use of rice for dis- tillation.

II. TOBACCO.

8. The total consumption of tobacco of all kinds for all purposes showed an increase of 1,774,857 lbs., as compared with 1936. The corresponding increase in the amount of duty paid was $2,173,224.10. On the other hand the amount of drawback paid in respect of tobacco manufactured locally and re-exported increased by $1,807,539.67 to $2,169,480.24, an increase of almost 500%.

9. These figures speak for themselves. There has been an enormous increase in the local manufacture of cigarettes for export, and the Colony has now captured much of this trade. that was formerly centred at Shanghai. At least one large local cigarette factory has been working day and night for months, and heavy demands have been made on the staff of the depart- ment in the way of overtime.

10. The increase in the net revenue amounts to $365,272.23, attributable again to increased population and improved economic conditions.

11. The amount of clean tobacco leaf imported in 1937 again increased, being double the 1936 figure. It is clear that importers are finding it cheaper to have the leaf stripped in Macao before importation.

E.3

12. The increase in the number of dutiable cigarettes seized is accounted for mainly by one large seizure of 176,500 locally manufactured cigarettes which had been exported on drawback to Macao and re-imported. In the latter half of the year it was cheaper to buy duty-paid cigarettes locally than to smuggle in from neighbouring territories, a state of affairs which has probably resulted from the Sino-Japanese hostilities. Old habits die hard, however, and it is rare for a day to pass without a seizure of dutiable tobacco on a river steamer from Canton or Macao.

III.-MOTOR SPIRIT.

13. The revenue received in accordance with the provisions of the Motor Spirit Ordinance shows an increase of $104,214.98, or approximately 15%, as compared with 1936. The rate of duty remained unchanged so that the increase is again attributable to improved economic conditions.

14. Satisfactory arrangements were made with the Director of Air Services during the year for the supply of duty-free petrol to aircraft on departure from the Colony.

IV.-OPIUM.

15. The total amount of prepared opium sold during the year amounted to 22,168.80 taels, an increase of 43% over last year's total. The sales of the luxury brand, Kamshan opium, actually decreased by almost 27% but this decrease was more than offset by a jump of approximately 75% in the sales of Singapore opium.

16. It is believed that a number of factors have contributed to this phenomenal increase. Among them have been the reduction in price referred to in the 1936 report, and the intro- duction in that year of a slightly different blend which has apparently commended itself to the taste of local consumers. Moreover, the price of illicit opium rose considerably during the year with the result that Government opium now sells at a more competitive price. It is noteworthy that sales increased enormously during the two months immediately following the seizure of illicit opium referred to later in paragraph 20 of this report.

17. A continued decrease in the sales of Kamshan opium is to be expected in view of the fact that this brand is sold only to a limited and decreasing number of registered smokers. The decrease in 1937 is however rather more than anticipated and is probably to be accounted for to some extent by the smokers transferring to the cheaper Singapore brand.

E 4

18. The amount of illicit raw opium seized during the year was only 23,149 taels as compared with 68,373 taels in 1936. The seizures of Chinese raw almost doubled, 17,123 taels as compared with 9,652 taels, but those of Iranian raw shrank by almost 90%, 6,021 taels as compared with 58,711. On the other hand, 31,979 taels of prepared opium were seized as compared with 19,851 taels in 1936.

19. On the whole, these figures, coupled with the increased sales of Government opium, seem to indicate that there was a shortage of illicit opium during the year.

20. One large seizure of illicit opium is worthy of special mention. A total of 8,006 taels was found on the sea bed off Lamma Island outside Hong Kong harbour on the 14th September. In watertight containers were found 4,100 taels of Chinese raw opium, 1,200 taels of Iranian raw opium, and 2,706 taels of Kwong Chow Wan and Red Lion prepared opium. The site of the dump had been carefully buoyed.

21. Four large dumps of opium believed to be destined for local consumption were found. One of 900 taels of Chinese raw opium was found on the hillside above Deep Water Bay; another of 1,800 taels at Deep Bay; the third, found by the roadside at Aberdeen, consisted of 1,230 taels of Kwong Chow Wan prepared opium and 1,630 taels of Chinese raw opium; and the fourth, consisting of 960 taels of Iranian raw opium and 650 taels of Chinese raw opium, was found on the shore of Aplichau island.

22. Practically all the remaining seizures were found under circumstances which indicated that the opium was for export. The largest was one of 5,284 taels of Red Lion prepared opium on the S.S. Willy about to depart for Singapore.

23. The retail price of illicit prepared opium increased considerably during the year, being in the neighbourhood of $6.50 per tael for the Chinese variety; the price of raw opium more than doubled.

24. This rise in price has hastened the process of displace- ment of opium divans by heroin divans which has been going on slowly for some years. The opium divan which does not also provide facilities for heroin smokers is now a rarity.

V.-HEROIN.

25. During 1937 a total of 3,936,230 heroin pills, 1,329.1/10 ozs., and 200 grains of heroin, and 102 ounces of admixture containing heroin was seized.

26. No less than 93 heroin pill factories were found; arrests were made in respect of 66 of these. In two out of these 66 the pills found contained no heroin and those arrested were released, but in the remaining 61, sentences totalling 177 years and 11

>

E 5

months hard labour were meted out to 71 persons. In addition, one juvenile was sent to the Remand Home for six months and thereafter to an Industrial Home for four years. All these cases were, in accordance with the policy commenced in 1936, tried at the Criminal Sessions and not summarily before a magistrate.

27. Altogether there were 316 arrests for the possession of heroin pills with 213 convictions, 37 arrests for possession of heroin with 25 convictions and 2 for importing heroin with 2 convictions. Over three thousand flats or floors were raided to achieve these results.

28. Two men were sentenced at the Criminal Sessions for importing heroin, one a Japanese, the other a northern Chinese. Both were arrested on the S.S. "Hupeh" on her arrival from the north on the 4th January. The Japanese had in his posses- sion 724 ounces of heroin concealed in the false back of a trunk, in his bedding and clothing, and in tins of fish. He received ten years hard labour on charges of importing and of possession. The Chinese, who had 228 ounces, received seven years hard labour on the same charges.

29. One Chinese was sentenced to five years hard labour for the possession of 47 ounces of heroin, and to a further 14 years for attempting to bribe a Revenue Officer. The drug was found concealed in the false backs of chairs and sofas. A northern Chinese, who was about to be tried at the Criminal Sessions for the possession of 104 ounces of heroin which he was believed to have imported, absconded and forfeited his bail of $12,500.

30. Two factories among the 93 found are perhaps worthy of special reference. In one at No. 3 Fung Wong Terrace, 2nd floor, were found 266,000 pills, and work had been going on there for three or four months prior to discovery. No arrests were made. The other at No. 67 Connaught Road West, 2nd floor, contained 256,600 pills, and three males were arrested. Each was sentenced to three years hard labour. It had been in operation for two or three weeks.

31. It is noteworthy that during the year many of the red pills seized were found to contain no heroin. It seems probable that the demand for pills became so great that heroin supplies were insufficient, and pills similar in all respects to the usual red (heroin) pill but containing no heroin were accordingly placed on the market. No charge of course, lay against the possessors of such pills.

.

32. The number of heroin divans has, it is to be feared, increased enormously during the year and they are to be found all over the urban areas. The keepers of these places are usually of a very low type and are paid miserable wages to look after the divans and to go to prison if caught. Their families. are supported by their backers during their stay in gaol. They never divulge the identities of their employers, even if they know them. Pills are kept on the premises only in sufficient quantity for the day's requirements.

E 6

VI. OTHER DANGEROUS DRUGS.

33. One seizure of one-tenth of an ounce of morphine, with three seizures of a total of 142,731 morphine pills, were made during the year; there were also two seizures of cocaine, a male Chinese in one case receiving a sentence of five years hard labour for being in possession of 175 ounces of the drug. The other seizure of one ounce of cocaine was made together with that of the 47 ounces of heroin referred to in paragraph 29; no charge was preferred in respect of the cocaine seizure or in respect of the seizure of 17 ounces of crude brucine and 91 ounces of brucine admixture made simultaneously. Brucine, a poison but not a dangerous drug, is a usual ingredient of heroin pills.

VII. THE NEW TERRITORIES.

34. The Revenue Station at Sheung Shui maintained its usefulness and will probably prove of even greater value when road transport with Canton develops. Smuggling across the frontier decreased considerably towards the end of the year owing to causes which have already been outlined.

35. The number of heroin pills seized in the district was double the number seized in 1936. Here, as in the urban districts it is remarkable how quickly the habit spread when it had once been introduced.

VIII. CERTIFICATES OF ORIGIN.

36. It falls to the Imports and Exports Department to issue Certificates of Origin in respect of consignments of goods produced locally for export. Some idea of the magnitude and increasing importance of this branch of the work, necessitated by Imperial Preference, Anti-dumping, and Quota enactments in many parts of the world, may be gathered from the fact that the number of Certificates of Origin issued rose from 11,891 in 1936 to 19,088 in 1937.

37. The procedure hitherto in force has been to require factories to register, and to admit officers from this department to inspect the process of manufacture at reasonable hours. In respect of each consignment the manufacturer makes a Statutory Declaration that the goods have been manufactured in his registered factory, and the Certificate issues if the results of inspections show that the requisite percentage of the finished value of the goods is the result of processes carried out in the Colony.

38. This procedure had to be modified in one important respect during the year, when the Imperial Government decided that certain goods, principally piece goods, should be admitted to countries of the Empire in accordance with Imperial Pre- ference and Textile Quota enactments only if they had been "spun, woven and finished" within the Empire.

- E7-

39. This decision had far-reaching effects. In the field of administration, it necessitated the certification of every consign- ment of piece goods by a recognised accountant, paving the way for similar certification in the future in other fields in which 100% Empire content is not obligatory.

40. The new Imperial policy had a remarkable effect in Hong Kong Previously local weaving factories had used Japanese cotton yarn almost exclusively, and there were many complaints about the quality and price of the Indian product. With the outbreak of hostilities in China, however, imports of Japanese yarn practically ceased, while at the same time the quality of the Indian yarn improved and its price dropped. The net result is that cotton piece goods locally manufactured from Indian yarn are now competing on favourable terms in many countries of the Empire.

41. The position as regards artificial silk piece goods is not as good. The only result of the new policy hitherto has been to bring to a complete standstill the local silk-weaving industry. Manufacturers are ready enough to use Empire yarn in place of Japanese yarn, but at the end of the year Empire yarn was practically unobtainable at any price.

42. The total number of factories on the register at the end of the year was 334, as compared with 278 at the end of 1936. A table of the Certificates of Origin issued in respect of the various types of goods manufactured is given in the Appendix.

IX.-TRADE STATISTICS.

43. In the annual report on trade statistics for the year 1936 improved conditions in the Colony were predicted and the note of optimism was fully justified as is illustrated by the trade. returns for the year 1937. The total visible trade of the Colony in 1987 increased by 35.0% in terms of local currency, and by 32.2% in terms of sterling, as compared with the year 1936. Imports and exports of merchandise during 1937 amounted to a total value of $1,084.4 millions (£66.9 millions) as compared with $803.3 millions (£50.6 millions) in 1936.

44. During the final quarter of 1937 a certain amount of cargo originally destined for North China ports was diverted to the Colony on account of the Sino-Japanese hostilities, and a considerable proportion of it remained in storage at the end of the year, although a certain quantity, which cannot be estimated, was ultimately disposed of locally and included in local trade returns accordingly. In assessing the relative trade returns for 1936 and 1937 it should be borne in mind that the records do not include transit or transhipment cargoes and, therefore, do not include cargoes originally destined for North China ports which were stored in local godowns at the end of the year. It will be seen, therefore, that the increased trade enjoyed by the Colony during 1937 was not entirely due to diverted imports.

E 8

45. There were exceptional movements of Treasure during the year: imports totalled $386.4 millions, and exports $395.2 millions; largely consisting of Chinese silver dollars and silver subsidiary coin.

46. Despite the large increase in the trade of the Colony during 1937 there was a decreased movement of vessels entering and leaving the port, arrivals totalling 15,893 as compared with 18,202 in 1936, and sailings 15,890 as compared with 18,716. The decrease was mainly due to fewer coasting movements on account of the Sino-Japanese hostilities in the latter part of the year.

47. In order to estimate with greater accuracy the increase or decrease in the actual volume of the trade of the Colony, than is possible by a statement of value only, an index figure was constructed taking the year 1931 as a base. For the purposes of this index number some 185 articles were selected, including the commonest which could be enumerated by quantity. The comparison is given below:-

1931 100

By Quantity.

By Value.

1932

92.3

84.6

1933

89.1

67.9

1934

74.8

56.4

1935

78.1

57.0

1936

84.2

61.3

1937

119.7

83.6

19th April, 1938.

E. W. HAMILTON,

Superintendent, Imports & Exports.

E 9

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE FOR LAST THREE YEARS.

1935.

1936.

1937.

$

$

Personal Emoluments (1)

.262,743.44

321,591.63

363,839,82

Other Charges:--

Advertisements

Binding Permits

120.00

120.00

19.58 120.00

Torches & Batteries

167.68

38.40

225.46

Conveyance & Motor Allowances

4,702.72

4,819.44

4,843.34

Elec. Light, Fans & Heating

384.53

249.09

1,382.12

Gas for Laboratory

142.74

132.99

166.06

Incidental Expenses

426,60

344.76

442.82

Laboratory Stores

452.31

604.17

717.83

Liquor Labels, Printing

1,843.00

1,488,00

1,795.00

Office Cleaning Materials

280.84

189.28

174.47

Overtime Allowance for Clerical Staff

221.25

222.50

297.75

Rent of Public. Telephone

103.17

Rent of Staff Quarters in N. T.

1,680.00

1,680.00

1,680.00

Revenue. Reward Fund

Stationery, &c.

116.46

52.80

52.95

Transport

Uniforms & Equipment

Opium:-Incidental Expenses

Preparation & Carriage

Purchase of Raw Opium, &c.

***

Purchase of Govt. Prepared

1,354.37

1.037.57

4,916,87

4,259.41

60.00

970.23

1,296.13

25,037.35

35,202.00

825.54 3,461.01

~

15.68 20,123.54 31,750.00

Opium

23,786.38

Transport

32.00

24.00

22:00

Expenses of 13 Govt. Opium

Shops

12,249 59

23,536.31

17,880.80

Statistical Branch:-

Book Binding

131.55

132.00

120.00

Cleaning Materials

76.10

84.83

77.90

Elec. Light & Heating

399.58

390.90

308.61

Forms & Registers

503.00

Incidental Expenses

127.68

156.88

198.44

Miscellaneous Stationery

8.45

10.74

3.54

Printing of Reports

6,216.00

Transport

104.96

Uniforms for Coolies & Messengers...

121.05

6,910.00 77.44 111.50

6,858.00

77.97

87.38

Total Other Charges

62,786.91

107,018.18

93,830.96

Special Expenditure:-

Purchase of a Long Carriage

Typewriter

Total Special Expenditure

Total

336.00

336.00

.325,530.35

428,609.81

458,006.78

FOOTNOTE:-(1) Includes Officers of Cadet, S. C. & A Staff & Junior Clerical

Service.

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE FOR LAST THREE YEARS.

1935.

1936.

1937.

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

$

$

$

$

Duties:

Liquor Duties

Motor Spirit Duties

Tobacco Duties

Licences & Internal Revenue:- Liquor Licences

$

1,868,914.06 1,806,645.23 2,261,915.14 2,166,854.58 2,504,330.70 | 2,393,904.53 663,771.82 695,298.75 809,022.49 799,303.73 2,812,244.06 2,703,865.54 4,428,459.304,066,518.73 | 6,601,683.40 4,432,203.16

663,248.27

697,766.10

- E 10

183,650.00

183,650.00

176,009.17

176,009.17

162,115.84

162,115.84

Motor Spirit Licences

3,605.00

3,605.00

3,650.00

3,650.00

3,860.00

3,860.00

Opium Monopoly

361,713.55

352,713.55

435,733.81

432,026.11

317,789.60

*314,769.60

Tobacco Licences

72,138.50

72,138.50

73,293.00

73,293.00

72,359.50

72,359.50

Fines & Forfeitures:

Forfeitures

531.78

31.78

23.15

23.15

77.92

77.92

Fees of Court or Office: Official Signatures Fees

6,498.00

6,498.00

14,432.00 14,432.00

3,700.00

3,700.00

Official Certificates

21,229.00

21,229.00

Miscellaneous Receipts:-

Other Miscellanous Receipts

4,201.36

4,198.86

4,831.40

4,831.40

4,572.77

4,572.77

Total

5,972,268.13 5,796,594.73 8,096,113.07 7,632,936.89 10,500,741.22 (8,208,096.05

**

Less Opium Expenses shown in Table 1-$69,792:02—Net $244,977.58.

E 11

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE & REVENUE

FOR LAST THREE YEARS.

Personal (1)

Emoluments

Year.

and Other

Special Expenditure.

Total Expenditure. Revenue.

Total

Charges.

1935

325,530.35

1936

428,609.81

1937

457,670.78

336.00

325,530.35 5,796,594.73 428,609.81 7,632,936.89 458,006.78 8,208,096.05

(1) Includes Officers of Cadet Service, S. C. & A. Staff and Junior Clerical

Service attached to Department.

Table IV.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

European Type Liquor.

Class of Liquor.

Gallons.

Amount of Duty

collected.

$

¢

Ale, Beer, Cider and Stout,

338,831

271,064.40

Beer (Local),

109,646

76,751.92

Brandy,

11,631

116,305.10

Brandy (Empire),

2,360

11,797.54

Whisky,

29,889

298,886.99

Gin and Cocktail,

17,715

177,262.75

Rum,

2,418

24,179.53

Champagne and Sparkling Wine,

2,244

29,169.48

Claret,

2,584

12,920.78

Port Wine,

5,786

34,717.85

Sherry, Madeira and Malaga,

4,237

25,423.06

Vermouth,

2,691

13,454.78

Liqueur,

2,308

30,009.03

Spirits of Wine,

28,010

157,984.10

Spirituous Liquor,

14.558

36,157.15

Miscellaneous,

6,677

33,386.12

Difference on over-proof,

fractions and arrears of duty...

7,984.25

Total

581,585

1,357,454.83

Note:-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

E 12

Table V.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Chinese and Japanese Liquor.

Native Spirits not more than 25%

of alcohol by weight

Native Spirits over 25% of alcohol by weight

Northern Spirits over 25% of alcohol by weight)

Northern Spirits not more than 25% of alcohol by weight

Liquor Amount of

Amount of

distilled

duty

Imported Liquor.

Total Amount of

duty.

collected.

duty collected.

C.

C.

locally. collected.

Gallons. $ C. Gallons.

619,808 929,712.00 39,685 69,448.18

999,160.18

13,856 26,940.24

7,203)

102,686.26 129,626.50

29,902ļ

Japanese Sake

2,126 14,900.52

8,515 3,188.67

14,900.52

3,188.67

Total

$1,146,875.87

Note:-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

Table VI,

SUMMARY OF REVENUE COLLECTED FROM LIQUOR DURING

THE YEAR 1937.

$

¢

Duties on European Type Liquor

1,163,313.58

Duties on Spirituous Liquor

194,141.25

Duties on Chinese and Japanese Liquor

1,146,875.87

Brewery Licence Fees

400.00

Liquor Dealer's Licence Fees

31,000.00

Distillery Licence Fees

500.00

Chinese Spirits Shop Licence Fees

127,820.84

Chinese Liquor Importer's Licence Fees Alteration Fees

2,800.00

95.00

Total

$2,666,446.54

Refund of Liquor Duties

Net Total

110,426.17

$2,556,020.37

.

E 13

Table VII.

RETURN OF DUTY PAID ON TOBACCO FOR THE YEAR 1937.

Class of Tobacco.

lbs.

Duty.

$

Cigars

9,309

24,203.40

Cigarettes

309,856

495,814.26

European Tobacco

17,556

31,425.24

Chinese Prepared Tobacco

13,634

19,087.60

Clean Tobacco Leaf

46,204

57,755.00

Raw Tobacco Leaf (Empire)

286,735

258,061.50

Raw Tobacco Leaf (Non-Empire)

5,195,690

5,715,259.00

Snuff

43

Total

77.40

$6,601,683.40

(1) Duty Paid on Tobacco for the year

$6,601,683.40

Less Drawbacks

2,169,480.24

Net Revenue

$4,432,203.16

(2) Licence fees.

Retailer's

Squatter's

$59,673.00

4,168.00

Importer's

4,900.00

Manufacturer's

2,400.00

Licensed Warehouse

1,000.00

Miscellaneous

339.77

$72,480.77

NOTE: Fractions of a pound are not shown in this table.

"

E 14

Table VIII.

MOTOR SPIRIT DUTIES 1937.

Motor Spirit Duties

Licensed Warehouse Licence Fees Importer's Licence (General) Fees

Importer's Licence (Special) Fees Retailer's Licence Fees

MOTOR SPIRIT.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Licensed Warehouse Licences

Importer's Licences (General)

Importer's Licences (Special) Retailer's Licences

.$ 799,303.73

1,750.00

1,500.00

300.00

310.00

$803,163.73

Table IX.

TOTAL AMOUNT OF PREPARED OPIUM SOLD

DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Kam Shan Bangal Opium

Singapore Opium

7

15

3

62

3,528.CO taels

18,640.80

11

Total

22,168.80 taels

Table X.

STATEMENT OF OPIUM TRANSHIPPED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

From Bushire via Bombay

To Macao

Turkish

Iranian

Total

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

500

500

500

500

w

E 15

Table XA,

STATEMENT OF OPIUM IN TRANSIT DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Turkish

Iranian

Total

Chests.

Chests.

Chests.

From Istanbul viâ Portsaid

754

754

To Dairen við Kobe

To Yokohama

Total

600

600

154

154

754

754

Table XI.

CONTRABAND SEIZED BY REVENUE OFFICERS IN HONG Kong and

KOWLOON, 1937.

(1) Opium.

Prepared Raw

(2) Arms.

Ammunition

(3) Tobacco.

Cigars

Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

(4) Liquor.

Chinese Spirit European Wine

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin

Morphine

Cocaine

Heroin Pills

(6) Miscellaneous.

Illicit Stills

Brucine & mixture

Small Craft confiscated Counterfeit Coins Counterfeit Coins

Unmanifested Cargo.

Copper Cents

Silver Ingots

Wolfram Ore

Seizures.

30,888.9 taels

200

21,174.5 taels

91

1,400 rounds

1

100

1

188,410

19

5,826 lbs.

215

1,442 gallons

gallon

193

1

.1,271-3/5 ounces

1/10 ounce

19

1

176 ounces

2

..3,729,116 pills

213

154 stills

120

108 ounces

1

18

17

3,452 (10¢ pieces) 7

3,810 (5 pieces) 2

560 lbs.

1

112 packages 1

1,016 lbs.

E 16

Table XIA.

ANNUAL REPORT OF CONTRABAND SEIZED BY REVENUE OFFICERS

IN NEW TERRITORIES, 1937.

1. Opium.

Prepared Raw

Seizures.

19.95 taels 277.4

29

15

>>

2. Arms.

Revolvers

& Ammunition Dagger

3. Tobacco.

Cigars Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

Tobacco Leaf

1 piece

1

5 rounds 2 pieces

2

145 pieces.

6

7,882

19

459.95 pounds

5歳

110

1

4. Liquor.

Chinese Spirit

237.9 gallons

89

5. Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills

7,233 pills

00

8

6. Miscellaneous.

Illicit Stills

Table XIB.

29 stills

23

CONTRABAND Seized By THE POLICE.

Chinese Tobacco

Tobacco

Cigarettes

Chinese Spirits

Raw Opium (Chinese and Iranian)

Prepared Opium (2nd and 3rd grade)

635.06 pounds

3 ounces

76,300

599.34 gallons

1,838.7 taels

1,063.36

??

E 17

Table XII.

PROSECUTIONS BY IMPORTS & EXPORTS DEPARTMENT IN

HONG KONG & KOWLOON, 1937.

Arrests. Convictions. Bail Estreated.

(1) Opium.

Possession

259

234

12

Boiling

11

8

Exporting

2

(2) Arms.

(3) Tobacco.

Possession Cigars

1

""

Cigarettes..

Chinese

5

13

1

3

2

Tobacco..

209

180

18

Importing

1

Unlicensed Selling

3

2

(4) Liquor.

Possession Chinese

Spirit

207

165

Co

3

Possession Stills

106

74

Distilling

90

59

Destruction of

Evidence

3

1

1

Unlicensed Selling

3

2

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Possession Heroin

37

25

1

Importing Heroin

Possession Morphine.. Possession Cocaine

2 4 2

2

1

1

Possession Heroin

Pills

302

205

3

(6) Miscellaneous.

Counterfeit Coin

Unmanifested Cargo.. 19

Total

7

6

16

GD

3

1,273

986

43

E 18

Table XIIA.

ANNUAL REPORT OF PROSECUTIONS BY IMPORTS & EXPORTS

DEPARTMENT IN NEW TERRITORIES.

1.937.

Arrests. Convictions. Bail Estreated.

1. Opium.

Possession

2. Arms.

Illegal Possession

3. Tobacco.

Possession cigarettes..

46

44

3

3

1

1)

Chinese

Tobacco.. 110

103

2

Unlicensed selling

18

17

1

....

4. Liquor.

Chinese Spirits

89

76

N

Possession Illicit Stills

and Fermenting Materials

28

12

5. Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills

14

6. Miscellaneous.

Charge for Assaults...

2

2

Breach Deportation

Ordinance

Charge for Gambling

5

and Bribery

Total

5

1

1

317

272

10

5

Сл

E 19

Table XIII.

Fines and Forfeitures collected by the Courts under Opium, Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances.

Hong Kong Magistracy

Kowloon

71

District Office, North

District Office, South

For Opium

REWARDS PAID.

$ 9,857.51

8,205.45 1,840.40

976.40

$20,879.76

$34,750.007

For Drugs, Liquor & Tobacco &c. ... 20,715.51

Table XIV.

$55,465.51

ANNUAL RETURN OF OPIUM & DANGEROUS DRUG SEIZURES

FOR THE YEAR 1937.

No. of Cases. Quantity in Tacls.

Raw Opium.

Chinese

149

17,128

Iranian

51

6,021

Total

200

23,149

Prepared Opium.

Red Lion

64

17,398

Wuchow

3

9

Canton

8

129

Kwong Chow Wan

24

13,707

Doubtful

401

736

Total

500

31,979

Opium Dross

54 taels.

Opium Water

23

4 gallons.

Opium Admixture

122 taels.

Dangerous Drugs.

Diacetylmorphine Pills

chloride

Diacetylmorphine Hydro-

Diacetylmorphine Admix-

ture

Morphine Pills

Morphine Hydrochloride Cocaine Hydrochloride

405

28

THI Q

1

3,936,230 pills.

1,329 1/10 ounces and 200 grains.

102 ounces. 142,731 pills.

1/10 ounce.

176 ounces.

E 20

Table XV.

ANNUAL RETURN OF MAJOR SEIZURES OF OPIUM FOR THE YEAR 1937.

Place of Seizure.

Sampan 1698V, Victoria Harbour Hillside above Deep Water Bay 4-6 Gordan Road, ground floor

S.S. Chichibu Maru, Victoria Harbour Boat 4300D, Tsun Wan Boat 60P, Tsun Wan

Boat 60P, Tsun Wan

S.S. Wing Wah, Victoria Harbour S.S. Ixion, Victoria Harbour

Sampan, 4926W, Causeway Bay South Bay, Hong Kong

Deep Bay, Hong Kong

Sea-bed, Shaukiwan

S.S. Nanking, alongside Kowloon Godown

Wharf

M.S. Willy, Victoria Harbour Road-side, Aberdeen, Hong Kong

Road-side, Aberdeen, Hong Kong Junk 4303, Victoria Harbour

S.S. Javanese Prince, Victoria Harbour

87 Bonham Road

S.S. Van Heutz

S.S. Woolgar

Sea Shore, Aplichau Island Sea Shore, Aplichau Island Sea-bed, Lamma Island

Sea-bed, Lamma Island

Sea-bed, Lamma Island

Kind of Opium.

Taels.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

1,150

Chinese, Raw

900

Red Lion, Prepared

900

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared ...|

995

Destination indicated by Circumstances

of Seizure.

For export. Hong Kong.

Australia.

U. S. A.

Red Lion, Prepared

1,050

For export.

Iranian, Raw

1,440

For export.

Red Lion, Prepared

960

For export.

Chinese, Raw

2,240

Hong Kong.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

2,500

U. S. A.

Red Lion, Prepared

1,990

For export.

Red Lion, Prepared

500

Chinese, Raw

1,800

Straits or Java.

Hong Kong.

Red Lion, Prepared

600

Straits or Java.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

1,150

Australia.

Red Lion, Prepared

5,284

Singapore.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

1,230

Hong Kong.

Chinese, Raw

1,630

Hong Kong.

Chinese, Raw

780

Hong Kong.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

1,000

U. S. A.

Chinese, Raw

735

Red Lion, Prepared

1,929

Hong Kong. Singapore.

Red Lion, Prepared

1,000

Australia.

Iranian, Raw

960

Hong Kong.

Chinese, Raw

650

Hong Kong.

Chinese, Raw

4,040

Hong Kong.

Iranian, Raw

1,200

Hong Kong.

Kwong Chow Wan, Prepared

2,406

Hong Kong.

E 21

Table XVI.

IMPORTATION OF DANGEROUS DRUGS DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Codeine as Alkaloid

Codeine in preparation

Ethylmorphine containing

Ethylmorphine, in preparations containing

Medicinal Opium, in preparations containing

Medicinal Opium

Cocaine as alkaloid, salts and preparations containing

Morphine as alkaloid, salts and preparations containing...

Dicodide, in preparations containing

Eukodal, in preparations containing

Table XVII.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Brewery Licence

Dealer's Licence

Liquor.

Kilos.

3.125

0.200

0.460

0.424

18.616

3.649

2.818

1.201

0.026

0.022

Licensed Warehouse Licence ....

Chinese Liquor Shop Licence (excluding New Territories).

Chinese Liquor Importer's Licence

Restricted Grocer's Licence

Distillery Licence:-

(a) Hong Kong and Aplichau

(b) Kowloon, South of Kowloon Hills (c) New Territories, North

(d) New Territories, South

Tobacco.

+234

1

31

1

202

28

29

13

Importer's Licence

46

Retailer's Licence:

(a) $30.00

1,227

(b) $20.00

1,039

(c) $5.00 (including 43 @ $10.00 fee increased

from June)

394

(d) Nominal Fee $1.00

18

2,678

Squatter's Licence $8.00

401

Delivery Cookies Licence $8.00

120

521

Licensed Warehouse Licence

Manufacturer's Licence

4

16

Type of goods manufactured.

E 22

Table XVIII,

CERTIFICATES OF ORIGIN.

Number of factories

registered on 31/12/36.

Number registered during 1937.

Number removed

from register during 1937.

Number of factories registered on 31/12/37.

Number of Certi- ficates of Origin

Issued.

Aerated water & prop. med. Batteries for flashlamps Bulbs for flashlamps

Camphorwood & teakwood

boxes

1

1

Canning & preserving

Cigarettes and Cigars

12

3

8.

14

1

N

14

607

3

135

со

∞ 27 2

14

412

1

15

378

3

Clothing, i.e. tailored suits...

*

Confectionery and biscuits...

Cosmetics and perfumery..

9

N N

4

23

11

424

Dyeing cloth

(0

Dyeing paper

1

1

Embroidery

1

1

Feather dusters

1

Firecrackers

1

1

54

Flashlights

16

17

991

Garments, shirts, ties, rain-

coats

27

9



28 3,315

Glass bottles and jars

2

3

10

Handkerchiefs

1

*

Hardware

2

Hats and Caps

7

917

Hurricane lamps

1

1

53

Ink

1

Ivoryware

3

3.

18

Knitted goods

47

12

59 6,653

Leather and art. leather

goods

* Included in Garments.

12.

10

5

17

572

- E 23

Table XVIII.-Contd.

CERTIFICATES OF ORIGIN,-contd.

Type of goods manufactured.

|

ра

7

107

88

Number of factories registered on 31/12/36.

Number registered during 1937.

Number removed

from register during 1937.

Number of factories

registered on 31/12/37.

Number of Certi- ficates of Origin

Issued.

Lard and dried meats Mosquito destroyers

Mirrors

Noodles and macaroni

721

2 00

44

49

1

Oil, groundnut

2

Paint, varnish and lacquer.

2

1

1

2

171

2

22

wear

Pencils and crayons

Printing paper and cartons

etc.

Printing, silk

Rattan and seagrass ware......... 20 Rope

Shoes, leather, misc., foot-

Shoes, rubber

1

1

1 w

3

4

Hand N

2

3

82

1

3

18

321

1

15

4

|

5



1

23

833

Soap

String

Sugar refining

422 -

4

1,709

2

2

13

1

28

Thread

1

1

Toothpicks

1

Towels and napkins

2

1

3

во

Umbrellas

10

1

11

306

Vermillion

4

4

Piece goods

15

CO

6

21

697

Beer

Cement

Clay

Granite

2

1

Totals

278

72

122

16

334 19,088

E 24-

Table XIX.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF NUMBERS OF DECLARATIONS RECEIVED AND

ITEMS ENTERED THEREFROM IN 1936 AND 1937.

Declarations.

Items.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

January

38,760

46,643

85.819

101,247

February

42,878

38.164

93,379

81,194

March

49,763

55,429

106,732

123,187

April

46,375

53,303

97,836

121,100

May

47,663

53,192

102,088

116,901

June

47,760

53,741

100,375

116,271

July

46,496

52,534 95,677

113,338

August

45,358

48,432

96,998

106,092

September

50,771

38,032

110,604

84,913

October

52,414

28,472

117,318

68,830

November

53,184

42.441 120,912

93.785

December

53,219

44,007 118,062

99,962

Total

574,641

554,390 1,245,800 1,226,919

Average

47,887

46,199 103,817 102,243

Table XX.

NUMBER OF MANIFESTS RECEIVED DURING 1937.

Ocean.

River.

Junk.

Total.

January

1,032

950

1,236

3,218

February

902

774

1,095

2,771

March

1,029

937

1,313

3,279

April

1,045

893

1,117

3,055

May

1,015

932.

1,214

3,161

June

1,006

870

1.294

3,170

July

975

842

1,086

2,903

August

990

857-

934

2,781

September

776

491

430

1,697

October

639

312

455

1.406

November

710

496

714

1,920

December

750

498

1,174

2,422

Total

10,869

8,852

12,062

31,783

Average per

month

906

737

1,005

2,648

- E 25

Table XXI.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF NUMBER OF MANIFESTS RECEIVED

IN 1936 AND 1937.

Inward.

Outward.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

Ocean

5,974

5,302

6,267

5,567

River

5,454

4,442

5,520

4,410

Junk

6,774

6,149

6,929

5,913

Total

18,202

15,893

18,716

15,890

1936.

1937.

Grand Total

36,918

31,783

Average per month

3,077

2,648

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG,

FOR THE YEAR 1937.

I-GROUNDS, BUILDINGS AND INSTRUMENTS.

The Beckley anemograph at Victoria Peak was seriously damaged in the typhoon of September 1-2; repairs were com- pleted and the instrument was again brought into use on 24th December.

II-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS.

2. Automatic records of the temperature of the air and évaporation were obtained with the resistance thermometers and thread recorder. Direction and velocity of the wind were recorded with Beckley and Dines-Baxendell anemographs, rain- fall by a Casella pluviograph, sunshine by a Campbell-Stokes universal recorder and barometric pressure by a Marvin baro- graph. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature and cloud were made hourly, and of the direction of cloud motion every three hours. Observations of pilot balloons were made with a Watts 14 inch prismatic theodolite at 9, a.m. and 3 p.m. when conditions were favourable

3. The principal features of the weather in 1937 were:-

(a) an excess of temperature, the year being the war- mest since 1915. The mean temperature was above normal in every month, and the mean for the year was 78.3 deg. F against a normal of 71.9 deg. (b) the destructive typhoon of September 2nd. The typhoon passed close to the south side of Hong Kong Island on a WNW track between 3 and 4 a.m. the Observatory the minimum barometer reading, reduced to mean sea level, was 28.298 inches, which is the lowest recorded since observations commenced in 1884. Several gusts exceeded 125 m.p.h., and it seems probable that the typhoon was the most violent which has ever visited the Colony.

At

4. The tracks of 21 typhoons which occurred in the Far East in 1987 are given in plates which will be included with the Meteorological Results for 1937, now in the press. The following table gives a summary of the meteorological data published monthly in the Government Gazette during the

year:

F 2-

Temperature.

Humidity.

1937

Month.

Absolute Mean

Mean Absolute

Max. Max.

Mean.

Rel. Abs.

Min.

Min.

Wind.

Cloud- Sun- Rain. iness. shine.

Direction. Velocity.

%

ins.

hrs.

%

ins.

m.p.h.

January

76.1 66.3

61.6

58.0

48.5

79 0.44

72

139.7

2.765 E by N

12.4

February

78.5

66.2

61.2

57.5

45.9

78 0.44

77

103.1

0.310

ENE

10.7

March

81.2

68.6

64.7

61.4

51.0

89

0.55

93

53.0

3.445

E by N

15.7

April

86.3 76.4 71.8 68.6 59.7

86

0.67

78

131.2

2.260

E

12.8

May

89.7

84.0 78.8

75.2

70.8

84

0.83

73

159.2

11.120

E by S

10.4

June

90.0 85.8 81.4

78.3

71.0

85

0.91

85

120.213.265 SE by S

9.9

July

91,5 88,0' 82.7

78.8

75.0

84 0.93

61

237.6 19.315 SE by E

7.1

August

93.0

86.1 82.2

79.0

75.9

86 0.94

84

125.2

14.355 SE by E

13.5

September

90.6 87.0 82.1

78.9

74.9

82

0.90

59

208.2

12.525 E

11.3

October

89.0

82.5 77.5

73.5

62.

72 0.69

41

268.0

1.500 NE by E

11.8

November

84.1 76.5

70.8

66.7

53.2

71

0.55

55

182.7

1.035

ENE

9.9

December

76.8

70.0

65.0

61.1

52.7

76

0.47

59

166.0

0.605 E by N

10.7

Mean, Total or Extreme

93.0 78.1

73.3

69.7

45.9

81

0.69

70 1894.1 82.500

82.500 E by N

11.3

}

F 3

5. In the following table the monthly rainfall at the Observatory is compared with other records in the Colony.

Matilda

Obser-

Police

Botanical

Hospital

Gardens

Month.

vatory

Station

(Mount

(Kowloon) (Taipo).

(Hong

Kellet,

Fanling.

Kong).

Hong

Kong).

inches. inches.

inches.

inches.

inches.

January

2.765

1.90

2.90

2.27

2.02

February

0.310

0.51

0.19

0.36

0.53

March

3.445

2.59

2.97

3.27

2.09

April

2.260

3.89

1.41

1.38

3.99

May

11.120

15.12

12.44

12.01

8.24

June

13.265

9.48

13.39

12.40

6.60

July

19.315

16.33

19.63

15.74

13.07

August

14.355

24.63

14.29

12.03

16.30

September

12.525

13.64

8.90

6.73

13.94

October

1.500

2.83

1.16

1.35

2.42

November

1.035

1.24

1.99

1.48

0.35

December

0.605

0.67

0.69

0.88

0.64

Year 1937

82.500

92.83

79.96

69.90

.70.19

During the year raingauges have been installed at the Police Stations in Cheung Chau, Sai-Kung, Lok ma-Chau and Ping Shan.

III. PUBLICATIONS.

6. The following publications have been made during 1937:

Magnetic Results, 1936.

Meteorological Results, 1936.

The Typhoons of August 16-17, 1936 & September

1-2, 1937.

The following are in the press:-

Magnetic Results, 1937.

Meteorological Results, 1937.

;

A monthly abstract of meteorological observations is published in the Government Gazette and copies are supplied to any firm or individual requiring them, and a montlily seismological bulletin is issued and distributed to other observa- tories.

7. A weather map of the Far East for 6 a.m. of 120th meridian time is constructed daily and forecasts are issued for the following districts:-

A. Shanghai to Turnabout.

B. Turnabout to Hong Kong.

C. Hong Kong and neighbourhood. D. Hong Kong to Hainan.

E.

Northern China Sea.

1

1

F 4

A

The map, weather report and forecast are exhibited at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry piers, the Harbour Office, Telegraph Offices and General Post Office. The weather map inay be purchased by the public at a subscription rate of 15 dollars per annum. There were 30 subscribers in 1937 weather map for 2 p.m. is also prepared but it not published. Morning and afternoon weather reports and forecasts, together with observations made at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., are published in the local press.

IV.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

8. The Telegraph Companies continue to transmit twice daily, free of charge, meteorological observations from Vladivo- stock, Japan, Shanghai, Formosa, Indo China and the Philip- pines. Meteorological broadcasts by radio and the direct radio services of Sicawei and Pratas Island are extremely valuable. Extra observations at half cable rate are also obtainable from a number of stations by courtesy of the Telegraph Companies.

9. Weather Telegrams from ships by Radio:-The follow- ing table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received and the number of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately.)

Month.

British (including H.M. Ships).

H.M. Ships

No. of ships.

No. of messages.

No. of

in Port.

ships.

No. of

Other National-

ities.

Total.

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of messages.

No. of ships.

No. of messages.

January February March

214

326

8

74

159

251

10

106

134 214

65

April May

160 256

101

128 188

96

June

94 143

77

July

123

190

8

126

August

137 203

11

117

September

131 223

8

106

October

199 312

7

101

November

215 359

7

83

December

180 290

8

82

**UEFA LONG

97 156

319

556

74 122

243

479

80 129

222

408

76

112

245

469

86

128

223

412

63 98

164

318

84 143

215

459

96 198

244

518

90

150

229 479

90 197

296

610

95 145

317

587

85

121

273

493

1937

1936

Totals

1935

1934

1896 3049 1795 2864 128 1851 3117 129

1874 2955 100 1134 1016 1699 115 1575 1001 1568

2990 5788

3012 6192

1612 935 1519

1652 892 1551

2853 5995

2872 6320

:

F 5-

10. Weather forecasts, storm warnings and time signals are distributed by radio telegraphy as detailed in the Notice to Mariners issued by this Department. Storm warnings to Hong Kong and vicinity are also given by means of the Local and Non-local Signal Codes. A telegraphic adaption of the Non- local Code is used for issuing warnings by cable to places outside the Colony.

11. Local signals, day and night, have been hoisted during the past 5 years according to the following table.

Warning Signal.

Siguals 2-9.

Year.

Number of

times.

Number of hours displayed.

Number of

times.

Number of hours displayed.

Signal No. 10 Bombs.

Number of times fired.

1933

5

62

6

75

1934

177

1

80

1935

86

3

60

1936

5

93

1937

10

5

80

38

5

77

1

10

5

53

1

V-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS,

TREATY PORTS, ETC.

12. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 125 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 7689 days observations have been used for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for 1936 were 131 and 8662.

VI. MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

13. The Magnetic Station at Au Tau has been kept in action throughout the year, and the results of the observations are now in the press.

F 6

VII. TIME SERVICE.

14. Clocks Cottingham and Mercer 507 (Sidereal) and Leroy 1350 were in use throughout the year. The necessary astronomical observations for the determination of the error of the former were obtained each evening (weather permitting) by the local staff. Observations of the radio time signals emitted by Nauen have been made daily whenever possible during the year and utilised for clock regulation.

15. Time Signals were given throughout the year by radio from 9.55 a.m. to 10. a.m. each morning and 8.55 p.m. to 9 p.m. each evening. Dots of about 0.1 second duration were transmitted at each second except for periods marking the minutes and half minutes. The evening programme was duplicated by three white lights (vertical) on the radio mast, the lights being extinguished each second in accordance with the radio programme.

Hourly signals were sent to the General Post Office, Radio Studio, Railway, the associated Telegraph Companies and the Telephone Company.

The errors of the time signals have been published monthly in the Government Gazette.

IX.-MISCELLANEOUS.

16. Aviation service.-Commencing on 18th May a senior officer and a Chinese assistant have been stationed at Kaitack aerodrome daily during the forenoon. A synoptic chart of the Far East, on which is also all available information concerning upper winds, is prepared and exhibited in the aerodrome, and the officer is available for consultation by departing pilots. An hourly weather report is broadcast daily, usually from 0600 to 1600 Hong Kong Standard Time, and is communicated directly to the Imperial Airways plane during its weekly flight from Indo China to Hong Kong. A route forecast is also furnished to the pilot on his return flight to Indo China.

17. Seismographs.-The seismographs have been kept in good order throughout the year. 398 earthquakes were recorded, compared with 342 in 1936. The seismograms have been for- warded to the International Seismological Committee, Oxford.

18. Upper Air Research.-Observations of 526 pilot balloons were made during the year. Details of the flights will be included in Meteorological Results for 1937.

19. Lithography.-Lithographic work for other departments was undertaken as follows:

Electrical Dept.

Colonial Secretariat

Medical Dept.

Radio Forms

2,100

Map of Hong Kong

1,000

Shing Mun Map

600

F7-

20. Mr. B. D. Evans was absent on leave from 6th March to 8th December, during which period Mr. G. S. P. Heywood acted as Assistant Director. Mr. Heywood also acted as Director from 19th September to 13th October, during my absence from the Colony. Miss C. E. Newton resigned her post as Office Assistant on October 14th, and was replaced by Miss J. G. Weller on 25th November.

Expenditure.-The annual expenditure on the Observa-

tory for the past 10 years has been as follows:-

Year

Personal Emoluments & Other Charges.

Special

Total

Total

Expenditure Expenditure Revenue

1928

47.292.33

272.70 47,565.03

506.10

1929

48.282.63

48,282.63

530.50

1930 68,696.59

1,670.07

70,366.66

506.80

1931 76,037.81

76,037.81

735.00

1932

69,518.23

69,518.23

598.00

1933

63,165.42

63,165.42

600.00

1934

59,327.62

1,259.57

60,587.19

529.00

1935 56,333.76

56,333.76

488.00

1936

71,416.17

71,416.17

612.40

1937 83,631.91

338.08

83,969.99

458.00

22. In the following table the expenditure and revenue for

1936 is compared with that for 1937.

F 8-

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, 1936 and 1937.

1936



65,159.61

1937

$

Personal Emoluments

76,661.85

Other Charges.

Electric Light and Power

1,013.66

787.86

Gas

125.04

87.03

Incidental Expenses

94.42

430.77

Maintenance of Instruments & Plant

2,293.37

2,608.45

14

Postage

123.45

162.77

Printing

2,242.00

2,368.50

Rent of Public Telephone

117.00

Subscription to International' Meteorological

Organisation

77.42

80.00

Transport

135.72

192.50

Uniforms

151.48

135.18

Special Expenditure

Typewriter

Total, Other Charges

Total, Royal Observatory

338.08

6,256.56 7,308.14

71,416.17 83,969.99

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE, 1936 AND 1937.

1936

1937



612.40

Fees of Court or Office, Sale of Publications.

458.00

23. Acknowledgements are here made to the Directors of the Weather Services of the Far East, the Chinese Maritime Customs, and the Commanders of all ships for the observations forwarded during the year, to the Telegraph Companies for con- tinuing to forward observations free or at reduced rates, to the Police and other rainfall observers at out-stations, to all institutions and individuals who have contributed to the Library and to the Observatory Staff for the efficient performance of their duties. Special acknowledgements are due to the staffs of the Gap Rock and Waglan lighthouses for co-operation during the approach of typhoons, and for assistance to the aviation service.

Royal Observatory,

12th February, 1938.

C. W. JEFFRIES,

Director.

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT, OFFICIAL TRUSTEE, OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR AND REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES FOR THE YEAR 1937.

SUPREME Court.

ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

172 civil actions were instituted as against 236 in 1936.

The monetary claims amounted to $1,021,619.10 as against $3,115,962.95 in 1936.

The fees collected amounted to $13,647.25 as against $15,789.25 in 1936.

SUPREME COURT.

SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

1582 actions were instituted as against 1753 in 1936.

The monetary claims amounted to $382,578.91 as against $460,474.71 in 1936.

2080 Distraints for Rent were issued representing unpaid rents amounting to $263,122.88 as against 1923 and $325,095.64 respectively in 1936.

The fees collected amounted to $24,530.00 as against $25,390.25 in 1936.

SUITORS' FUNDS.

out.

$245,510.90 was paid into Court and $243,530.94 was paid

CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

240 persons were committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions of whom 192 were convicted. One defendant failed to appear and a Bench Warrant was issued for his arrest. His bail was estreated.

G 2

-

(a) Criminal.

APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

There were 4 appeals against conviction on indictment and 29 appeals against conviction by magistrates.

(b) Civil.

There were 9 appeals.

ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Only 2 actions were instituted.

The fees collected amounted to $142.00 as against $259.50 in 1936.

PROBATE JURISDICTION.

327 grants (115 Probates and 212 Letters of Administration) were made by the Court.

76 grants by other British Courts were sealed, making a total of 402 grants compared with 456 in 1936.

Of the above number of Letters of Administration 4 grants were made to the Official Administrator, whose commission amounted to $1,622.64 as against $1,049.78 last year.

Court fees in respect of all grants amounted to $28,238.60 as against $28,186.90 last year.

DIVORCE JURISDICTION.

8 petitions were filed resulting in the grant of 2 decrees absolute; 1 petition was dismissed and 5 petitions were pending at the end of the year.

The fees collected amounted to $426.50 as against $194.00 in 1936.

OFFICIAL TRUSTEE.

The number of trust estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 21. The invested funds totalled $141,643.24 and £1,850. 0. 0. producing an income of $18,104.99. 4 new trusts were opened.

The amount of commission collected was $123.60 as against $62.10 in 1936. Several are charitable trusts and therefore not liable for commission.

COMPANIES REGISTRY.

71 new companies were registered bringing the total number of companies on the registers of this office at the end of the year up to 939, of which 722 were locally incorporated. The remain- ing 217 were incorporated outside the Colony but carry on business within the Colony.

G 3

26 companies were removed from the Register by reason of the cessation of their business.

The fees collected from the above 939 companies amounted to $20,813.00.

The fees collected for licences to companies to keep branch registers outside the Colony amounted to $2,233.91.

The fees collected from the Registrar of Companies at Shanghai in respect of "China" companies amounted $165,703.17.

to

The grand total of all fees collected is $188,750.08 as against $189,928.11 in 1936.

BILLS OF SALE.

31 Bills of Sale were registered during the year as against 38 in 1936.

REVENUE.

(FEES, COMMISSION, ETC.)

The total fees collected during the year amounted to $292,146.35 as against $299,595.71 in 1936.

PERSONNEL.

Mr. C. G. Alabaster O.B.E., K.C. acted as Chief Justice from 26th June 1937 until 3rd August 1937 during the absence from the Colony of His Honour Sir A. D. A. MacGregor Kt. K.C.

Mr. C. G. Alabaster O.B.E., K.C. acted as temporary additional judge from 4th August 1937 until 10th August 1937.

Mr. C. G. Alabster O.B.E., K.C. was appointed temporary additional judge on the 30th August 1937 to be called upon whenever and as often as his services may be required by the Chief Justice for the purposes of the Full Court Ordinance 1933.

Mr. L. R. Andrewes acted as Registrar of the Supreme Court, Registrar of Companies, Official Trustee and Official Administrator from 8th February, 1937 until 27th October 1937 during the absence on furlough of Mr. E. P. H. Lang.

Mr. L. R. Andrewes was appointed Official Receiver in Bank- ruptcy and Registrar of Trade Marks and Patents on the 9th October 1937.

Mr. J. P. Murphy was appointed Deputy Registrar of the Supreme Court and Deputy Registrar of Companies on the 6th February 1937.

E. P. H. Lang,

Registrar, Supreme Court.

Official Trustee, Official Administrator,

Registrar of Companies..

- G 4

Table I.

Ten year comparative Table (1928-1937) showing the expenditure and revenue of the Supreme Court including the Companies' Registry.

Year.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

1928

$165,114.93

$101,624.20

1929

167,632.95

102,876.25

1930

218,933.24

95,560.75

1931 .

240,030.30

97,773.74

1932

231,828.63

155,461.92

1933

244,996.00

170,422.62

1934

249,032.71

164,026.32

1935

192,180.67

156,291.09

1936 1937

227,937.26

126,469.10

234,819.59

124,209.27

Note: The fees in the Revenue column do not include the fees paid direct to the Treasury by companies in respect of licences to keep Branch Registers outside the Colony nor do they include the fees paid by the Registrar of Companies at Shanghai to the Treasury in respect of "China" companies.

Table II.

Table of fees received in the Hong Kong Companies Registry 1932-1937.

Number of local Number of new

Amount of

Year.

companies on

companies

the Hong Kong

registered

fees collected.

register.

each year.

1932

674

84

$21,958.00

1933

722

94

25,298.20

1934

722

66

19,813.00

1935

713

59

19,273.20

1936

697

55

16,801.50

1937

722

71

20,813.00

Appendix G (1).

REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL RECEIVER AND

REGISTRAR OF TRADE MARKS AND

PATENTS FOR THE YEAR 1937.

BANKRUPTCY

AND

COMPANIES WINDING-UP

..

New Business.

1. Fourteen petitions in bankruptcy were presented during the year, nine by creditors and five by debtors, as against a total of thirteen petitions in the previous year.

2. Two companies winding-up petitions were filed. Of these one was dismissed, and in the remaining case a com- pulsory winding-up order was made. In the previous year three petitions were filed, of which one was dismissed, and in the remaining two cases compulsory winding-up orders were made.

3. The total assets brought to credit during the year under review amounted to $540,319.07. The total amount of assets paid out amounted to $517,581.44. These figures, which include both bankruptcies and companies liquidations, show a decrease of $142,418.63 and $30,772.78 respectively on comparison with the figures for 1936. The liabilities as estimated by debtors in cases where the petitions were presented during the year 1937, amounted to $1,699,114.46. A table of comparison appears overleaf.

4. Three salaried employees filed bankruptcy petitions during the year as compared with one in the year 1936. Other failures for the year under review included a commission agent, manufacturers of preserved ginger, earthenware dealers, a ship- yard, grocers, a broker, a journalist, hosiery mills, a timber firm, a bank, and an insolvent estate of a deceased merchant.

G (1) 2

Fees.

5. The Official Receiver's commission amounted to $19,306.57 showing a decrease of $26,388.75 compared with the previous year. The commission in 1936 was abnormally high because of the failure of the Bank of Canton Ltd. In 1937 there were no large failures. Possession fees collected by the Official Receiver and paid to the Registrar of the Supreme Court amounted to $1,128.00 as against $1,220.00 for 1936.

Discharges.

6. Four bankrupts were discharged during the year, one discharge was absolute, one was subject to suspension for one month, one to suspension for three months, and one was subject to consent to judgment for $1,000.00. No applications for discharge were refused.

General.

.

7. During the year under review dividends were paid in twenty four cases. In only one of these cases was the petition filed in 1937. In seven estates the court granted releases to the Official Receiver from trusteeship. The court made eight orders for destruction of books no longer required. There are nine cases in bankruptcy in which bankrupt salaried employees pay instalments and it is customary to pay dividends on account as soon as the assets are sufficient to pay ten per cent.

Staff.

8. Mr. J. J. Hayden, Official Receiver, was transferred to Kenya and promoted to the bench. He left the Colony on 6th March 1937. Mr. L. R. Andrewes was appointed Official Receiver on the 9th October 1937, and Mr. J. B. Prentis acted as Official Receiver during the interval.

9. Comparative figures for the years 1936 and 1937 are given below.

COMPANIES LIQUIDATION.

BANKRUPTCY.

Year.

1937...

2 1 14 9

LO

5

14

1

8

11

0

1

0 0

1936...

קא

3

2

115

13

12

1

6

0

1

6

0

2

1 0

Year.

Discharges

granted.

Receiving orders rescinded.

Adjudications

annulled.

Assets brought to credit.

G (1) 3

Watchmens'

Possession Unclaimed fees collected

balances

Receiver's by Official transferred

Official

Estimated Fees in

liabilities.

Court.

Com-

Receiver &

mission.

paid to Registrar

to General Revenue.

Sup. Ct.

$

C.

C.

c. $

C.

C.

$

C.

1937

4

1

0 540,319.07 1,699,114.46 2,023.50 19,306.57

1,128.00

4,597.74

1936

6

1

2 682,737.70 1,588,587.96 2,864.40 45,695.32

1,220.00

3,572.60

REGISTRATION OF TRADE MARKS.

Revenue.

10. The revenue derived from the registration of trade marks showed an increase of $1,555.00 over that for the preceding year. This was due to a larger number of applications for registrations of trade marks and of assignments of trade marks; also a larger number of certificates of registration were granted.

Opposed Registration.

11. Five notices of opposition to the registration of trade marks were filed during the year. Of these, one is now rending. three were withdrawn, and one was abandoned.

Year.

Total No. of Total No. of applications registration

for registration. granted.

Total No. of

Total No. of trade

certificates

i

renewals.

makes assigned.

Total amount of fees.

1937

380

330

203

200

$20,843.00

!

1936

319

282

312

170

$19,288.00

G (1) 4

REGISTRATION OF LETTERS PATENT.

12. The revenue derived from this source amounted to $110.00 as against $259.00 in 1936. The decrease is due to fewer registrations.

Year.

Number of Registration

patents.

fees.

Other fees. Total fees.

1937

$80.00

$30.00

$110.00

1936

21

$170.00

$89.00

$259.00

TOTAL REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

13. The following are totals of revenue and expenditure for the department of the Official Receiver and Registrar of Trade Marks and Letters Patent for the years 1936 and 1937 respectively, (the expenditure including personal emoluments of officers in the Junior Clerical Service):

----

Revenue.

Expenditure.

1936..

.$70,034.92

$24,884.40

1937.

$45,985.31

$21,270.10

This shows a net profit of $24,715.21 for 1937 against a net profit of $45,150.52 for 1936 being a decrease of $20,435.31, due principally to there being no very large liquidations or bank- ruptcies in 1937.

L. R. ANDREWES,

Official Receiver and

Registrar of Trade Marks & Patents.

Hong Kong, 4th March, 1938.

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE HONG KONG AND KOWLOON

MAGISTRACIES FOR THE YEAR 1937.

HONG KONG.

1. Mr. W. Schofield acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st January to the 21st October.

Mr. R. A. D. Forrest acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 22nd October to the end of the year.

Mr. K. Keen acted as Second Police Magistrate and Coroner from 1st January to 22nd August.

Mr. S. F. Balfour acted as Second Police Magistrate and Coroner from 23rd August to 24th October.

Mr. R. Edwards acted as Second Police Magistrate and Coroner from 25th October to the end of the year.

The number of cases was 38,091 as compared with 37,044 in 1936.

KOWLOON.

2. Mr. Q. A. A. Macfadyen acted as Police Magistrate and Coroner, Kowloon, from 1st January to 19th March.

Mr. E. Himsworth acted as Police Magistrate and Coroner, Kowloon, from 20th March to 26th October.

Mr. K. Keen acted as Police Magistrate and Coroner, Kowloon, from the 27th October to the end of the year.

Mr. E. Himsworth acted as Second Police Magistrate and Coroner, Kowloon, from 1st January to 15th February.

Mr. K. M. A. Barnett acted as Second Police Magistrate and Coroner, Kowloon, from 16th February to the end of the year.

The number of cases was 30,220 as compared with 25,249 in 1936.

·H 2

GENERAL.

3. Table I shows the expenditure of the two Magistracies for the years 1936 and 1937, including the cost of all officers in the departments who belong to the Cadet, Senior Clerical and Accounting, and Junior Clerical services.

4. Table II shows the collections of the two Magistracies for the same years.

5. Table III shows their revenue and expenditure for the last ten years in comparative form.

6. Table IV gives an abstract of Cases under cognizance of the Magistrates' Courts during the years 1936 and 1937 in comparative form. The number of offenders previously convicted who were sentenced during the year is shown and the number of offenders who were placed under Police Supervision in addition to their sentences is given. Orders made for confis- cation of unmanifested cargo, etc. are also shown.

7. Table V is an analysis of the "convicted and sentenced" column in table IV, showing the penalties inflicted under each of the seven main heads of crime in that table. The number of offenders previously bound over whose bonds have been enforced on committing a breach of the conditions of the bonds is also shown.

8. Table VI is a return of boy juvenile offenders brought before the Hong Kong and Kowloon Magistrates' Courts during the years 1936 and 1937 giving their ages, the offences committed by them and the sentences imposed.

9. Table VII is a return of girl juvenile offenders, giving information similar to that in table VI.

10. Table VIII gives the number of writs issued from the two Magistracies during the years 1936 and 1937.

11. Table IX is an abstract of all cases brought before the Hong Kong and Kowloon Magistrates' Courts during the last ten years.

12. Table X shows the work done by the Magistrates sitting as Coroners.

13. The number of bonds enforced during the year is also shown in tables IV, VI, VII, and IX.

- H 3-

14. Proceedings were taken under the Extradition Acts against five persons for crimes committed outside the Colony. Of these one was committed to prison to await the Order of H.E. the Governor and the others were discharged.

15. Summonses under the Separation and Maintenance Order Ordinance, 1935, in Hong Kong numbered four as against five in 1936. Order was made in one of them. In Kowloon these summonses numbered five as against four in 1936. In one of them order was made.

16. The year under report marked a fresh high level in the number of persons before the court both in Hong Kong and in Kowloon; 40,391 and 31,169 respectively as against 37,974 and 26,172 in 1936.

17. In Hong Kong revenue and expenditure again show increases, while in Kowloon last year's tendencies are reversed; revenue has risen and expenditure declined.

18. In table IV the following sub-heads show important increases; simple larceny, increased by nearly 1,000 cases; stealing from the person; robbery; receiving and unlawful possession; trade mark infringement; food and drug offences; offences against public health; and street hawkers offences. In Kowloon, increases are shown not only under the heads of larceny and receiving but under obstruction, begging and offences against public health.

Decreases in both courts appear in opium and drug offences, returning from banishment, traffic offences (except in Kowloon) and dog summonses.

A very large proportion of the increase in receiving and possession is accounted for by the numerous cases of unlawful possession of tree wood, brought from September, 1937 onwards, after the typhoon.

19. In the Juvenile Courts, similar trends can be observed, in the increase of offences against property and of hawkers offences, principally hawking newspapers without a licence, which has since July almost superseded the selling of vegetables as the mainstay of the child breadwinner. It even seems to have attracted the young tobacco smugglers on the water front, for defendants in such cases have sunk from 39 to 9, and the same decline occurred in Kowloon where, however, larcenies and hawking offences have also declined. Girl hawkers, who number 9 out of 10 girl offenders, have increased both sides of the harbour.

ز

H4

20. A noteworthy feature of 1937 was the large number of bonds enforced. This is partly due to more offenders having been bound over in that year.

Binding over is resorted to chiefly for simple larceny, unlawful possession, assault and breach of the peace, and begging. In Kowloon, where binding over was less frequent, bonds enforced numbered one-third of the bonds entered into. In Hong Kong the proportion was only one-ninth.

21. The Aberdeen Industrial School was filled up during the year, so that other means of reformation of juveniles had to be tried. Fines were more frequent, because they could be paid, thanks to profits on newspaper sales.

22. The probation officers did very valuable work, and made possible the successful functioning of the juvenile courts and remand homes.

1st. April, 1938.

H. R. BUTTERS,

First Police Magistrate.

- H 5

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, 1936 AND 1937.

HONG KONG

1936.

$61,152.00

1937.

$73,174.00

Personal Emoluments

OTHER CHARGES.

=

Electric Fans and Light

177.00

201.00

Fees for Interpretation

112.00

173.00

Incidental Expenses

300.00

353.00

Transport

269.00

173.00

Uniform for Messengers

99.00

66.00

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

Law Book

Typewriter

Total

67.00

288.00

$62,109.00

$74.495.00

KOWLOON.

1936.

1937.

Personal Emoluments (1)

$55,748.00

$50,341.00

OTHER CHARGES.

Electric Fans and Lights

428.00

366.00

Fees for Interpretation

31.00

69.00

Incidental Expenses.

447.00

448.00

Uniform for Messengers

98.00

97.00

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

Law Books

119.00

158.00

One Typewriter

288.00

Total.......

$56,871.00

$51,767.00

(1) Includes officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., and J. C. Services.

i

{

7

H 6-

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF COLLECTIONS 1936 AND 1937.

Fines

Fees

Forfeitures

HONG KONG.

1936.

1937.

$ 72,861.00

$ 64,983.00

624.00

266.00

12,011.00

29,980.00

100.00

30.00

Liquor (Temporary permit)

Arms forfeitures

Poor Box

665.00

1,490.00

Arms Fine Fund

260.00

50.00

Revenue Reward Fund

16,414.00

9,858.00

Total

$102,935.00

$106,657.00

Fines

Fees

Forfeitures

Poor Box

Arms Fine Fund

Revenue Reward Fund

KOWLOON.

1936.

1937.

$38,771.00

$51,394.00

70.00

184.00

4,829.00

7,286.00

198.00

772.00

502.00

10.00

10,465.00

8,205.00

30.00

66.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Total

$54,865.00

$67,917.00

H 7

-

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE

FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

HONG KONG.

Personal Emoluments

Year.

Special

and other charges.

Total Expenditure. Expenditure. Revenue.

Total

1928

41,090.00

41,090.00

113,305.00

1929

43,508.00

1930

70,168.00

43,508.00 95,333.00 70,168.00 86,738.00

1931

70,000.00

1932

73.453.00

1933

69,259.00

115.00

109,300.00 69,374.00 126,559.00

70,000.00 136,913.00 73,453.00

1934

78,151.00

64.00

78,215.00 139,210.00

1935

60,297.00

51.00

60.348.00

84,836.00

1936

62,109.00

62,109.00

85,596.00

1937

74,140.00

355.00

74,495.00 95,259.00

KOWLOON.

1928

Figures not available.

1929

1930

$21,223.00

$21,223.00 $61,687.00

1931

40,698.00

40,698.00

74,027.00

1932

38,067.00

38,067.00 65,175.00

1933

32,405.00

32,405.00 75,592.00

1934

38,746.00

38,746.00 63,168.00

1935

37,772.00

1936

1937

56,752.00

51,321.00

717.00

119.00

446.00

56,871.00

38,489.00 48,363.00

43,700.00

51,767.00 58,930.00

ABSTRACT OF

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Total No. of

charges. Defts.

Convicted and sentenced.

297

469

Embezzlement and fraudulent

61

12

Piracy

Burglary and house breaking

116

2. Arson

4. Forgery

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

Receiving and possession of stolen

goods

Larceny by servant

3. Malicious damage

5. Other offences

(b)-Against their persons.

1. Murder

2. Manslaughter

3. Ill-treatment and grievous harm

4. Common assault

14

73

86

42

259 589

8 ༐ཀྐུཋཎྜ ཙྪིཥྛཿ །༈ཙྪིཾ

༄༅།ༀ

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS

(a)—Against their property.

1. Larceny: Simple

Stealing from the person

conversion

Robbery

M.

F.

Total.

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936

1,699 2,5321,709 2,657 1,116 1,757

19

299 478

262 431

31,1351,760. 105

262 431

28

969 2,606 986 2,715

ཙ©།ཤྲྰིཥ

ྂ」 ིི

61

34

25

19

25

19

28

12

45

129 125

15

24

80 108

92 109

།།ཐཱ ཙྪཾ།

2

113

120

113

2

9

13

9

13

4

60

61

60 61

10

368 1,516

50

284

4181,800

211

49

62

2

1

51

63

7

30

43

16

32

16

32

43

46

16

19

16

19

14

263

621

· 195

490



197

497

32

3

4

6

4

5. Kidnapping

ཨ་ྒུ།

3

2

3

| |

24

55

43

18

13

230

165 245

187

93

75

1

6. Sexual offences

6

6

4

3

7. Other offences

19

12

33

13

12

35422

1

11951

14

12

97

76

37

1

7

19

එය

3

6

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(a)-Against the Crown and Govt.

+

1. Passport and aliens registration

offences

81 112

89

119

2. Weights and measures offences

24

4

18

3. Currency offences

46

4. Sedition and intimidation

1

3

∞ co co co

62

96

13

9

26

3

837-

62

101

1

13

H

30

1

1

5. Unlawful societies

6. Trespass and damage on Crown Land

249

261

293

287

143

172

18

13

161

185

5.

7. Misconduct by Government officers....

3

3

3

3

1

3

8. Opium offences

695

529

698

9. Dangerous drug offences

10. Tobacco and Liquor offences

11. Other offences

579 343 330 364 412 207 548 589 535 612 383 463 124

88 177 90 173 85 149

563

461

213

༄ག།

66

39

645

500

49

30

256

243

87

507 550

1376

3:

5:

2

85 151

Carried forward

6,0158,943 6,190 9,459 3,851 6,182

347

4774,199 6,659

70

90

"...

- H 8

Table IV.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE

HONG KONG.

Cascs, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Female Adult Defendants under each

victed and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to prison or detained pending orders of H.E. the Governor.

Bound over without fu

To keep the peace and be

of good behaviour.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937

1936 1937 1936

1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1

757

19

31,1351,760, 105 147

1

1

106 148

31

262

431

28

36

28

36

19

25

19

28

2

28

2

24

2828

24

2+

1 10

21

113

120

113

2

13

9

13

4

10

61

60

61

10

25

992

2

9

1

4

10

2

12

25

Co

11

| | | | | |

335 679

2

5

6

7

1

1

6

6

1

428

516

62

108

50

284

418 1,800

2

1

51

63

ཀླུ་

211

308

18

20

229

328

7

6

2

9

6

32

19

490

2

|ا۔

16

32

8

2

10

9

16

19

14

14

6

19

2

7

197 497

32

64

32

64

1

3

128

3

15

191

424

102

108

17

32

1

1

3

1

1

21

48

5

35122

13

75

1

1888

11

12

11

36

37

37

1262

25

2

2

2

1

12

5

1125

T

19

14

12

97

76.

37

1:

3

21

4

19

6:

4

∞ ∞ ++

5

18

98

97

96

13

STI

10

5

62 101

24

18

1

13

3

CO LO

24

18

5

3

с бо

5

7

30

7

3

3

11

~

3

1

1

2

2

172

18

13

161

.185

54

49

8

1

3

1

461

66

39

213

49

463

124

149

8888888

645

500

39

53

8

30 256 243

53

94

15

87

507 550

19

85 151

2

,182

347

4774,1996,659

703

985

སྶ།ཚོ

41

22

CO

189

045 2

62

1242

55

1

2

47

54

68 112

25

53

11

24

50

4

22

1

71

56

774 1,041 72

118

16

1

เด

5

1

9811-

1 11

41

37

20

1

BIO

10

3

2

3

2

11

1

1

750 1,346 137 133

RING THE YEARS 1936 AND 1937.

under each Head.

er without further penalty.

Under Police supervision.

Previously convicted.

Bonds enforced.

Order made.

eace and be

laviour.

To come up for judgment.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

.936

1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936

1937

1936 1937

1936 1937

21

5 126

64

5

1

15

1

2

4

20

298

14

162

314

26

90

Be

1

114

118

60

4

| |

1

1

10

5

1

11

11

1 111

1

12

12

5

1

5

1

2

102

108

42

33

22

2

1

34

131

6

51

3

1

1

13

2

| | |

1

1

1

1

10

5

10

60

2

16

1

20

2

2

|

137

2

8



3

1

co

3

a

22

3

3

133

226 131

12

36

26

Q

2

2

12

17

3

9

3

4

3

31

2

3

x.com

54

52

334 652

Co

3

126

196

-

3

10

3

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNI

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Total No. of

charges.

Defts.

Convicted and sentenced.

Brought forward

(d)—Against Public Justice.

Cascs, h

Dischar

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936

6,015 8,943 6,190 9,459 3,851 6,182 347

1937

477

1936 1937

4,198 6,659

1936

1937 1936 1

703

985

71

1. Escape and breach of prison

2

2

2:

2. Returning from banishment

433

355

433

356 413

328

5

417

333

3. Perjury

1

4. Bribery

18

25

5. Other offences

6

12

8:

12:

200

49

Q

∞ 1

2324 O

9

1

4

(e) Against the Public peace.

1. Breach of the peace

124

80

2. Unlawful possession of arms

16

18

3. Other offences

888

263

178

14

15

0898

6

|

6

I

1

50

56

3

57

59

15

28

10

10

3

crã

3

5

1

I

1856

(f)-Against trade.

1. Unmanifested cargo

73

29

8:

18

3:

15

co

2. Stowing away

12

14

13

16:

12

16

3. Trade Marks infringement

21

44

21

44

16

4. Employers and workmen offences

5

4

-

5. Food and drugs offences

24

24

62

63

63

63

45

சுக

13

45

M

3

18

12

16

16

།།སྨིཾ

22

3

13

10

47

45

17

1

10

5

1

655.

312

326 253 326 253

6. Other offences

2

(g)-Against Public Morals and Police.

1. Begging and touting

2. Brothels and procuration of women..

3. Lotteries and gambling

4. Offences against public health

5. Street hawkers offences

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers

394 386 1,024 1,924 850 1,228 850 1,245 705 951 27 14,927 16,635 14,992 16,647

9,459 11,261 2,858 3,035 12,817 14,296 1,877 1,873 3,001 2,205 3,001 2,205 2,707 1,871 18

371 170 371 170 332 127

659 326

246

150

31

277

158 307 116

28

8:

19 315

232

323: 251

928 1,792 61

69

989 1,861 29

61

36

732 987 112

244

775

4

2,725 1,875 269

330

6

1

333 127 38

43

8. Drunkenness

7

16

7:

18:

5

18

5

18:

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature. 10. Dangerous driving of vehicles

5,871

4,936 5,869 4,939 5,520 4,401 133 138 134 138 129

6

15

124

10 00

5,526 4,416 342 511

129

127

3

11. Vagrants

25

31

25

43

23

39

23

39

1

12. Unlicensed and unmuzzled dogs

267

199

267

199 210

137

9

213

146 53

48

13. Mui Tsai offences of a technical nature

58

45

59

45.

6

18

53

24

6

14. Ill-treatment of Mui Tsai

3

5

1

4

1

1

15. Other offences

2,120

403 2,135 423 1,563 229 97 121

1,660 350 394

54

18

Total

35,800 36,560 36,772 38,781 26,241 27,823 3,835 4,040 30,076 31,863 4,191 4,372

929

(1) Confiscation of unmanifested cargo.

(2) To pay costs

(3)

(4):

H

Table IV.-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURINC

HONG KONG.—Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Female Adult Defendants under ‹

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the detained pending orders

Supreme Court.

Committed to prison or

of H.E. the Governor.

Bound over wi

To keep the peace an

of good behaviour

Convicted and sentenced.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

936 1937 1936 1937

3,851 6,182 347 477

1936 1937 1936

1937

1936 1937

4,198 6,659. 703

985

71

56

1936 1937 1936

774 1,041 72

1937 1936 1937

1936 1937

1935

1937

118

16

1

5

1

|

413 328

5

39995

50

56:

10

| |

1

417

2

333

9

3

9

12

1

1

CO LO

10

|—

1

11181

13

3

57

59

10:

1

1

856

10m

1

15

28

3

18

3

5

3

8888

28

5

1

3

}

3

15

3

18:

12

16

12

16

6

16

13:

45

45

5

10 110 00

800 34

}

16 15

13

3

5

1

22

15

22

10

1

47

11

45 11

17

12

17

1 1 1 1 1

| | │

| | | | |

1111

I

M.

F.

1936 1937 1936 1

750 1,346 137

11111

157

11

111

83

2

11111



1 1 033

1

1

246

8:

150 31

19

8

277 158 307

116

28

25

335

141

315

232

323

8

21

1

251

3

3

2

928 1,792 61

69

989 1,861 29

61

33

62

705 951

27

36

732

1

987

112 244

5

117

252

9,459 11,261 2,858 3,035 12,317 14,296 1,877 1,873

2,707 1,871 18

4 2,725 1,875 269 330

333 127 38

5

18

43

5,526 4,416 342 511

129 127

775

464 2,652 2,337

5

275 330

332

127

1

5

18:

5,520 4,401

6

15

111

38

43

1

10

129

124

3

3

8

ON

342

521

2

10

23

39:

23

39

4

2

210 137

213

146 53

48

5.

54

52

18

53

24

3

12

1

1,563 229 97 121 1,660 350 394

54

18

220

6

8

412

62

#2228

4

53

15

26,241 27,8233,835 4,040 30,076 31,863 4,1914,372

929

596 5,1204,968

99

134

16

5

1

1

2 -

32

co

3

957 1,477

174

cargo.

(3) To pay wages.

(4) 2 to pay maintenance, 12 to redeem articles under Pawn Broker's Ord.

NG THE YEARS 1936 AND 1937.

r each Head.

without further penalty.

and be iour.

To come up for

Under Police

supervision.

Previously convicted.

Bonds enforced.

Order made.

judgment.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936

1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936

1937

133

226 131

12

26

54

52



334 652

4

6

כס

126

196

Į

2

3

8

1

wa

I

1

2

31

16

2

10

5

7

CO LO

1

111

[11

| | | | |

111

111

3

4 143 298 151

21

3

3

24

32

54

52

11

152

12

1

།8།། །

111

22

22

329

2

111

111

111

22

| | |

1

9

| | |

111

(6) 4 (6) 4*

(1) 66 (1) 11*

(2)

(3) 2 (3) 4

| 1

| | |

1 11

12

5

1

3

(5) 48

521 808

9

17 126

200

3

122

26

(5) 1 to pay maintenance, 47 to redeem articles under Pawn Broker's Ord. etc. (6) Confiscation of arms.

* No arrest

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Total No. of

charges.

Defts.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a)—Against their property.

1. Larceny and attempted larceny:

Simple Larceny

M.

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1

1,499 2,326 1,471 2,275 1,102 1,

Stealing from the person

153 289 158

292 137

Embezzlement and fraudulent conversion

14

44

11

32

6

Robbery

29

16

47

23

3

Piracy

Burglary and house breaking

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

Receiving and possession of stolen goods 1,122 1,702 1,192 1,799

Larceny by servant

ន。៩ |

76

133

70

151

61

16

8

20

7

65

40

40

26

483

{

55

65

57

44

2. Arson

3. Malicious damage

9

4

12

3

4. Forgery

1

31

1

15

1

5. Other offences

211

394

209 412 147

(b)-Against their persons.

1. Murder

2. Manslaughter

3. Ill-treatment and grievous harm

4. Common assault

5. Kidnapping

6. Sexual offences

7. Other offences

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c)-Against the Crown and Govt.

1. Passport and aliens registration offences

2. Weights and measures offences

3. Currency offences

4. Sedition and intimidation

5. Unlawful societies

6. Trespass and damage on Crown Land

7. Misconduct by Government officers

8. Opium offences

9. Dangerous drugs

10. Tobacco and Liquor offences

11. Other offences

Carried forward

3

9

8

5

2

5

10

13

11

22

922

148

169

205

233

39

7

4

8

5

7

6

6

6

34

48

35

54

HAAA

14

82

1000 20

5

8

55

10:00 10

1232

5

1

8

2

65

36

19

+80

4

2

513

5

!

1

61

76

83

96

56

5

3

5

3

418

309

495

375

363

163 106 214

129

113

318 288 296 241

172

250 299 281 338 173

4,772 6,4745,009 6,684 2,997 4,

H 10

Table IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNİSANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES

KOWLOON.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Female Adult De

Total No. of Total No. of

charges.

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Defts.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to detained pend

of H.E. the

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

LS.

1936

1937

1936 1937

1936 1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936

1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1

1,499 2,326 1,471 2,275 1,102

1,617

26

321,1281,649

123

161

8

131

166

153 289 158

292 137 264

2

137 266

16

18

1

1

17

19

*sion

14

44

11

32

24

6

25

4

4

4

4

29

16

47

23

3

3

13

8

13

8

30

14

76

133

6

16

68

65

oods 1,122 1,702 1,192 1,799

62

55

| ខ |

70

8

40

65

4

9

4

31

1

211

394

209

58985 999

61

136

2

61

138

9

11

9

11

20

7

17

7

17

40

26

32

1

26 33

9

9

483

837

112

183

595 1,020

465

598

23

488

621

44

37

4

4

48

41

10

1

11

1

3

8

3

8

4

1

4

1

14

1

15

147

316

6

5 153 321

28

44

29

50

3

5

00 10

9

I

2

10

13

11

22

14

148

169

205

233

74

7

4

8

5

1500

44

3

7

34

48

355

6 $

6

2

54

14

16

13

21

جرحت

3

29

7

10

239

3

1

1

2

5

15

1

1

37

15

31

52

3

12236

2

6

Co

RE.

7

вить с

3

1

11~

51

H

1

ences

Į

5

8

82

55

1242

5

1

8

2

65

36

19

489

H

H

1

2

2

11

2

6

21

17

14

2

10 -

5

10

2

19

7

21

10

1

1

5

1

4

d

61

76

83

96

56

65

9

15

65

80

11

11

1

11

12

3

5

3

5

3

5

I

3

5

418

309

495

375

363

309

53

42

416

351

61

17

13

7

74

24

163 106

214

129

113

71

28

13

141

84

42

28

18

60

39

318 288 296

241 172

146

76

61

248 207

28

24

4

10

32

34

250 299 281 338 173 229

51

38 224 267

36

67

4

4

40

71

11

4,772 6,4745,009 6,684 2,9974,246

379

428 3,3764,674

918 1,066

83

93 1,001 1,159

78

38

7

4

-

TES' COURT DURING THE YEARS 1936 AND 1937.

It Defendants under each Head.

ted to prison or 1 pending orders

the Governor.

Bound over without further penalty.

Police Supervision.

Previously convicted.

Bonds enforced.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

To come up for judgment.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

37 1936 1937 1936

1937 1936 1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

| | |

52

2

194

390

18

18

14

11

4

6

1

6

CO

8

1

339 724

1

42

132

1

11

35

13

100

1

1

2

3

18

75

1

4

10

5

1

94

115

25

2

98

105

2

23

3

3

11

1

Co

8

T

4

5

1

106

85

21

16

2

3

117

173

21

1

228

22

32

1

1

7

2

6

10

11

6

25

25

358

565

51

46

། །ནྡྷ

2

11

120

1

131

| | | | | │

10

5

| | | | | | |

16

1

3

3

25

26

23

542

1,194

7

7

53

151

1

=

2.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER

Cases, how dispo

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Total No. of

charges.

Defts.

Convicted and sentenced.

Disci

M.

F.

Total.

M.

1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936

4,772 6,474 5,009 6,684 2,997 4,246

379

428 3,3764,674

9181,066

83

Brought forward

(d)—Against Public Justice.

1. Escape and breach of prison

2. Returning from banishment

3. Perjury

4. Bribery

5. Other offences

(e) Against the Public peace.

1. Breach of the peace

2. Unlawful possession of arms

3. Other offences

1

1

317

292

317

292

293

265

9

7

302 272

|



3

11

3

12

1

10

1

1

11

1

146

291

146

293

111

253

19

28

130

281

7

128

8888888

37

៩៖

94 311

194

45

36

24

43

29

138

87

147

25

24

8

61

126

12

5

6

1

895

50

42

26

61 126

361

2966

13

18

14

15

18

848

1

(f)—Against trade.

1. Unmanifested cargo

2. Stowing away

3. Trade Marks infringement

4. Employers and workmen offences

5. Food and drugs offences

6. Other offences

(g)-Against Public Morals and Police.

1. Begging and touting

2. Brothels and procuration of women

3. Lotteries and gambling

4. Offences against public health

5. Street hawkers offences

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers

8. Drunkenness

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature 10. Dangerous driving of vehicles 11. Vagrants

12. Unlicensed and unmuzzled dogs

13. Mui Tsai offences of a technical nature 14. Ill-treatment of Mui Tsai

15. Other offences

Total

6

5

4

5

15

17

26

30

25

29

25

12

8

10

4

2

18

2

18

16

16

25

10

25

10

8

23

8

37

41

39

41

30

35

2

32

36

2922

15125

6223

327 340 327 105 154 448 780 387 680 418 839 421 831 337 655 7,0098,1077,043 8,148 3,919 4,740 3,897 4,840 4,008 4,835 2,666 3,047 9981,465 3,6644,512 250 224

346 253 346 252 289 229

470 677

486

699

203

276

23

34

226

310

55

36

344 248 285

71

49

319

334

32

97 419

777

3

7 340

662

75

168

2,649 3,043 6,568 7,783

287 218 148

76

10

10 299 239

46

13

1

4

6

4

6

3

5

3

5

81 135

3,127 3,407 3,096 3,338 2,901 3,129

134

13

170

154

84

126

80

1

1 127

81

7

3

285

178 275

178

188

122

31

30

219 152

45

23

7

10

10

11

12

3

2

8

11

10

3

2

3

3

3

1

3

1

1,006 1,615 1,025 1,611 730 1,180

104 112

834 1,292 102 275

52

22,721 27,937 23,644 28,886 15,613 19,470 4,362 5,361 19,975 24,831 2,043 2,261

383

18

312,914 3,160

figures included in 6 other offences (1)

- H 11 -

Table IV, Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT DU

Total No. of Defts.

Convicted and sentenced.

KOWLOON,-Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Female Adult Defendants undı

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to prison or detained pending orders of H.E. the Governor.

To ke

of

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1936 1937 1936 1937

5,009 6,684 2,9974,246

1936

379

1937 1936 1937

4283,376 4,674

1936 1937

918 1,066 83

1936

1937 1936 1937

931,001 1,159

1936 1937 1936

1937

1936

1937

1936 1937

1936

78 33

7

117

1

1

1

317

292

293 265

7

302

272

6

3

12

1

10

1

1

11

146

293

111

253

19

28

130

281

7

311

194

45

36

43

29

៩៨

24

༈༙

8

87 147

61 126

7

6

6

14

1

1

11

11

LO ON

5

6

2

1

885

50

42

13

18

1

14

26

9

61

126

15

64

14

3

18

1

15

465

22

17

7

3

18

5

28228

26

30

25

10

18

25

10

23

39

41

30

2288

CCO ZADA

1

29

25

12

16

8

35

2

16

8888888

23

32

36

COCOA BO

4

5

29

8

11

HKHON LO

6223

6

2289?

3

| | | | │

| | |

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 ∞∞N LO

5

486 699 203

276

23

34 226 310

55

36

327 344 248

285

71

49

319 334

3

అణ

6

3

61

39

3

3

6

4

448 780 387 680

32

97 419 777

23

1

* 23

3

421 831 337 655

3

7 340 662

75

168

1

76

169

7,043 8,148 3,919 4,740 2,649 3,043 6,568 7,783 4,0084,8352,666 3,047 998 1,4653,664 4,512

346 252 289 229

287 218

148

134

435

352

250 224

76

99 326

323

10

10 299 239

46

13

47

4

6

3

5

3

5

།།

13

3,096 3,338 2,901 3,129

13

312,9143,160

170

154

1

24

171

178

135

84

126

80

1

1 127

81

7

3

7

3

275 178

188

122

31

30

219

152

45

23

7

52

26

11

12

3

2

8

8

11

10

2

3

3

3

1

3

1

2

7301,180

1,0251,611

23,644 28,886 15,613 19,470 4,362 5,361 19,975 24,831 2,043 2,261

104 112

834 1,292

102 275

52

9 154 284

383

386 2,4262,647

92

55

535

res included in 6 other offences (1)

| | |

| | | | │

187

2

13

9

4

339

COURT DURING THE YEARS 1936 AND 1937.

efendants under each Head.

Bound over without further penalty.

prison or ing orders jovernor.

Police Supervision.

Previously convicted.

Bonds enforced.

To keep the peace and be

of good behaviour.

To come up for judgment.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M..

F.

M.

F.

936

1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936

1937

1936

117

173

21

25

358

565

51

46

1937 1936 1937

23

1936

26

1936 1937

542 1,194

1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

7

7

3833

53

151

1

2

111

110

187

111

*52

1

| | | | | │

24

14

10

19

| |

1

3

10 ma

5

3

10

2

│ | │

3

2

││ | ││

།ཆི། |

197

253

6

1

19

84

1

6

Co

111

1 1 1

| | ! | | |

| | | | | │

18

2

6

170

287

27

39

1

2

2

3

3

1.

1

2

1 X

5

26

3

11

3

13

13

20

18

3

338

320

78

56

618 879 108

94

38

22233

1

22

1

1

67

174

8

20

1

2

111

83

223

8

18

1

1

| | |

| | | | │- │

| ││ │││

8

com



16

3

1

338

63

5

1

8431,754

29

29 157

447

11

25

H 1

Table

Punishments.

HoNG 1

Return of Punishments awarded at Magistracy in respect of Certain ·

Offences against Individuals.

Number of Persons

Punished.

Against their

Description.

Property.

Against their Persons.

M.

F.

M.

#.

M.

F.

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

19

Fined

Imprisoned in default

Imprisoned without option

Imprisoned and birched

To be sent back to country

Expelled from the Colony

Sentenced to House of Detention

Bound over to be of good behaviour

19,407 19,840 2,638 3,170

32

110

16

32

34

42

2

2 :

4,3644,428

994 761 645 1,744

42

251

30

21

11,

2,131 3,075

37

341,519 2,551

16

8

35

14

3

36

85

36

84

1

T

117

6

21

23

21

24

41

|

685 1,317

140

132

5821,202

108

120

9

13

1

Bound over and fined

Bound over and ordered to pay compensation

22

29

4

-

11

5

1

15

13

3

5

1

11

8

Bound over, ordered to pay co.npensation, and fined



2

6

1

2

6

1

Bound over and imprisoned

18

7

3

1

14

Bound over to keep peace

257 147

34

10

8

95

59

2

Imprisoned until Court rises

209

170 161

69



2

4

Bound over to come up for judgment

Enforcement of bonds

298 151

24 32 201 120

11

23

8

7

(26) (200)

(3) (23) (193)

(3)

Total

*

8 1, 27,496 29,447 4,033 4,215 3,025 5,848 Figures under "Enforcement of bonds" are excluded, as they have already been included in figures u

249 193 439

180

17

- H 12

Table V.

HoNG KONG,

Certain Classes of Offences during the Years 1936 AND 1937 Adults only.

Offences of a Public Nature.

r

Against the Crown

and Government.

F.

M.

F.

Against Public Justice.

Against the

Public Peace.

Against Trade.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937

1936 1937

1936

1937

Against Public Morals and Police.

M.

F.

1936 1937

2

370 398

82

58

14

31

23

3

43

85

2

3 18,893 19,168

2,532 3,072

11,0561,036

174

102

3

6

12

10

1

16

12

2,602 1,599

773 406

3

35 118

10

5

13 417

325

5

5

10

5

7

8

or

5

112

55

5

1

2

27

21

2

1

I

44

51

24

10

1

6

1

11

24

1

2

1

16

4

1

3

1



(3) (3)

8 1,552 1,631 286 189 425 348

in figures under "Fined" or "Imprisoned".

|-

........

CO

1

|

1

J

|

94

1

2

ap

3

20

38

1

1

3

1

43

43

1

19

3

T

1

2

150

79

30

T

1

C3

1

2

5 218 151

37 12

73

108

3

6

1

1

209

167

161

62

69

16

12

6

(4)

Į

3 21,954 21,181 3,491 3,559

H 13.

Table V,-Co,

Punishments.

KOWLOON.

Return of Punishments awarded at Magistracy in respect of Certain Classe

Offences against Individuals.

Description.

Fined

Imprisoned in default

Imprisoned without option

Imprisoned and birched

Number of Persons Punished.

Against their Property.

Against their Persons.

Aga

an

M.

F

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

1936 1937 1936 1937

10,309 13,139 3,077 4,474

3,704 3,939 1,232 780

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936

1937 1936 1937

1936 1

45

862 1,495

62

25

37

11

28

2

235 6

102

139

10

17

6

645

1,515 2,163

38

581,069 1,586

15

24

21

34

4

8

32

29

91

28 91

1

26

25

26

1

1

Expelled from the Colony

Sentenced to House of Detention

1

Bound over to come up for judgment

618

879

108

94

323

559

32

45

5

4

30

Bound over to be of good behaviour

74

74

153

9

25

5

77

7

9

22

22

1

2

Bound over and fined

27

50

50

4

32

10

18

1

19

10

11

1

1

Bound over and ordered to pay compensation

14

4

10

Bound over, ordered to pay compensation and fined

2

2

1

Bound over and imprisoned

3

82:

1

17

49

12

16

1

1

Bound over to keep peace

264 167 69

31

103

71

20

16

1

Imprisoned until Court rises

Fined and ordered to pay compensation

Enforcement of bonds

}

157

Total

*

447 11

16,742 20,695 4,554 2,515 2,399 3,939

25

51 150

1

2

1

-

2

181

283

181

204

33

40 944 8

*

Figures under "Enforcement of bonds" are excluded, as they have already been inclu

- H 13



Table V,-Continued.

KOWLOON.

of Certain Classes of Offences during the Years 1936 AND 1937 Adults only.

Offences of a Public Nature.

.heir

Against the Crown

S.

and Government.

Against Public Justice.

Against the Public Peace.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Against Trade.

Against Public Morals and Police.

M.

F.

M.

F.

936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937

1936

1937

1936 1937

1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937 1936 1937

2

6

235 269

92

86

11

14

8

10

24

12

4

1

47

60

2

19,349 12,694 2,858 4,333

4

6 645

540

125

80

66

233

9

19

57

35

1

30

35

1,895 1,584 975 536

4

8

32

.28

2

9

328

281

11

7

44

106

2

3

17 128

4

1

T

I

|

1

I

I

I

35

25

-

23

30

2

19

2

1

18

2

3

10

5

1

215

310

46

48

1

2

3

29

16

3

5

21

35

10

11

1

LO

5

1

11

8

1

1

1

20

20

16

1

1

1

6

1

158

96

49

14

2



-

83 223

8

18

1

1

-

40 944 844 238 176 490 529

40

36 337

284

62

26

85

33

already been included in figures under "Fined" or "Imprisoned"

-

-

10

3

20

72

2

5

97

2 11,543 14,798 3,890 4,952

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER AND REGISTRAR

OF MARRIAGES FOR THE YEAR 1937.

PART I.-LAND OFFICE.

REGISTRATION.

1. During the year 3,347 instruments were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844,-a decrease of 615 compared with the preceding year.

2. The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1937 was 156,365.

3. The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

4. The total consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions registered in the Land Office amounted to $42,927,837.70, particulars of which are shewn in Table II.

CROWN LEASES.

5. 742 Crown Leases were issued during the year, as against 638 in the previous year-an increase of 104. Particulars are set out in Table III.

6. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

FEES.

7. The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $96,286.50, being a decrease of $3,280.25 on the preceding year. Table IV shews the Monthly Revenue.

8. Land Registration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $6,030.45, and Crown Lease Fees to $60.00.

I 2

9. The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table V.

GRANTS OF LAND.

10. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 709 acres 1 rood and 38.4 poles, of which 633 acres, 1 rood and 12.8 poles were dealt with by the District Officers.

11. Particulars of grants, surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages U 2 and 3 of the Blue Book for 1937.

SURRENDERS.

12. 41 surrenders of land required for public purposes (including surrenders under Contracts of Exchange) were pre- pared and registered in the Land Office.

STAMP DUTIES.

13. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted to $174,650.25 a decrease of $80,172.30.

CROWN RENTS.

14. The number of lots entered on the Hong Kong and Kowloon Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VI-was 11,004 an increase of 458 on the preceding year.

15. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $703,899.90 --an increase on the preceding year of $23,138.38.

16. The number of lots entered on the Village Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VII was 1,955 a decrease

of 5 on the preceding year.

17. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,325.80 -a decrease of $7.10 as compared with the preceding year.

18. The total Crown Rents amounted to $705,225.70 an increase of $23,131.28 on the year 1936-mainly due to the re-grant of lots after re-entry.

DOCUMENTS.

19. 1,232 miscellaneous documents were prepared in the Land Office during the year, being an increase of 116 compared with the year 1936; viz:

(a) 742 Crown Leases (with Counterparts).

(b) 333 Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Verandahs and Balconies over Crown Land.

(c) 41 Surrenders of land required for public purposes,

street improvements and private Exchanges.

(d) 54 Agreements for exchanges and surrenders. (e) 52 Memorials of Re-entry.

(f) 10 Deeds of Covenant relating to Scavenging Lane.

¿

I 3

Table I.

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1928 to 1937.

Year. Instruments registered.

Crown Leases

granted.

1928

4,798

235

1929

4,250

242

1930

5,517

874

1931

6,181

517

1932

6,345

938

1933

5,152

721

1934

4,441

673

1935

4,044

503

1936

3,962

638

1937

3,347

742

Table II.

CONSIDERATION ON INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Description of

Instruments.

Number

No. of Lots or portions

Total

registered. of Lots

Consideration.

affected.

$

¢

Assignments

999

1,196

14,040,092.22

Mortgages and Transfer of

Mortgages

815

1,145

15,763,021.77

Reassignments and Certi-

ficates of Satisfaction

781

969

12,901,678.96

Surrenders

41

65

2,830.65

Judgments and Orders of

Court

55

135

20,339.36

Miscellaneous Documents..

531

1,052

190,874.74

Probates and Letters of

Administration, (Estate

Duties and Interest

$1,313,939.57)

Total

125

316

3,347

4,878 42,927,887.70



Marine

- I 4.

Table III.

CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Hong Kong

Kowloon

New Kowloon

Total

Inland

Permanent Pier

Garden

Rural Building

Shaukiwan Inland

Aberdeen Inland

Kowloon Marine

Kowloon Inland

New Kowloon Inland

New Kowloon Dairy farm

Sheungshui Inland

347

SH

10

1 201 170

Table IV.

1

742

RETURN OF MONTHLY REVENUE PAID IN STAMPS TO THE LAND

OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Month.

Registration

Searches, Copy

Crown

Documents,

Lease

Total.

of Deeds.

and Certi-

Fees.

fications.

$

بھر کرو

عزیزم

January

4,345.00

478.00

3,300.00

8,123.00

February

3,929.00

572.00

1,800.00

6,301.00

March

4,260.00

394.25

2,640.00

7,294.25

April

3.961.00

422.00

4,110.00

8.433.00

May

4,050.00

376.00

4.710.00

9,186.00

June

5,093.00

408.00

11,090.00

16,591.00

July

3,625.00

327.00

3,150.00

7,102.00

August

4,128.00

2,699.25

1,980.00

8,807.25

September 3,437.00

1,707.75

1,110.00

6,254.75

October

3,156.00

383.50

810.00

4,849.50

November 3,756.00

458.50

2,540.00

6,754.50

December 4,147.00

413.25

2,520.00

7,080.25

Totals

47,887.00

8,639.50

39,760.00

96,286.50

99,566.75 1936 Total.

96,286.50 1937 Total.

3,280.25

Decrease.

I 5

Table V.

FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1928 to 1937.

Searches,

Registration and Copies Grants of

Year.

of Deeds.

of Docu-

Leases.

Total.

ments.

$

$

$



$

1928

72,815.00

6,640.00 6,630.00

86,085.00

1929

63,478.00

5,498.50 7,100.00 76,076.50

1930

84,339.00

7,043.75 25,472.00

116,854.75

1931

94,054.00

7,254.00 | 17,290.00

17,290.00 118,598.00

1932

98,335.00

8,789.25 44,430,00 151,554.25

1933

81,508.00 8,547.25 36,810.00 126,865.25

1934

67.345.00 6,863.25 35.850.00

110,058.25

1935

61,133.00 6,811.50 25,270.00

93,214.50

1936

59,310.00

6,296.75 33,960.00

99,566.75

1937

47,887.00 8,639.50 39,760.00

96,286.50

-I 6.

Table VI.

HONG KONG AND KOWLOON RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

Victoria Marine Lot

426

72,654.23

"

Praya Reclamation Marine

Lot

28

858.91

Inland Lot

4,268

234,104.26

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

3

Inland Lot

13

Victoria Farm Lot

Garden Lot

18,946.00 4,024.00 401.55 2,110.00

11

Rural Building Lot

288

53.076.76

Aberdeen Marine Lot

579.16

Inland Lot

Aplichau Marine Lot

Inland Lot

82

1,150.50

20

113.88

44

281.48

17

Shaukiwan Marine Lot

Stanley Inland Lot

10

2,308.00

Inland Lot

Pokfulam Dairy Farm Lot

Kowloon Marine Lot

230

5,105.30

52.00

4

2,712.00

55

50,920.80

Inland Lot

2,921

129,796.72

Garden Lot

1

1.00

95

Hung Hom Marine Lot

3

6,590.00

Inland Lot

Sheko Inland Lot

157

9,256.00

6

33.00

Tai Tam Inland Lot

1

1.00

Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

1

1.00

3

18,938.00

Inland Lot

2,299

66,348.35

""

Farm Lot

2

36,00

Rural Building Lot

1

42.00

Tai Po Inland Lot

8

702.00

Fan Ling Lot

1,898.00

Sheung Shui Lot

1,304.00

Mining Lot

2,670.00

Tsun Wan Marine Lot

6

12,436.00

Inland Lot

16

2.604.00

وو

New Kowloon Dairy Farm Lot

20

1,134.00

Tsing I Marine Lot

1

76.00

Ping Shan Inland Lot

1

634.00

Total

11,004

$703,899.90

I 7

Table VII.

VILLAGE RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description

No. of Lots.

Total Crown

Rent.

Aberdeen

15

43.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

156

632.50

Ah Kung Ngam

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

27

15.00

Hau Pui Loong

12

44.00

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

14

57.00

Tong Po

1

2.50

Tytam Tuk

3

2.50

Chung Hom Bay

1

.50

Chinese Joss House Boron Road

Victoria

1

3.00

Telegraph Bay

12

33.50

Little Hong Kong

175

68.60

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chai Wan

Stanley

326

74.00

123

26.80

723

125.80

315

115.60

Total

1,955

$1,325.80

- I 8

PART II.-MARRIAGE REGISTRY.

MARRIAGES.

The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 421, (of which 236 were between Chinese persons) as compared with 375 (and 219) respectively in 1936-an increase of 46. Particulars are given in Table I infra.

FEES.

2. The total amount of Fees received under the second schedule of the Marriage Ordinance 1875, was $3,226.16 as compared with $3,168.00 in 1936—an increase of $118.16. Particulars are shewn in Table II. The increase is mainly accounted for by the greater number of marriages solemnized at the Office of the Registrar.

3. The number of Marriages solemnized and the total amount of fees collected each year during the past ten years are shewn in Table III.

Table I.

(1) Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE, 14.

(a) At Licensed Places of

Public Worship.

3.

(b) At the Office of the Registrar of Marriages.

11.

(2) Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE, 405.

(a) At Licensed Places of

Public Worship.

221.

(b) At the Office of the Registrar of Marriages.

184.

(3) Marriages in ARTICULO MORTIS, 2.

(Ordinance No. 3 of 1893 Section 2.)

At No. 33, Fuk Wa Street, ground floor, Shamshuipo, 1.

At No. 238, Nathan Road, Kowloon, 1.

I 9

Table II.

FEES RECEIVED DURING 1937.

418 Certificates of Notice

11 Searches

(Registrar's Certificates)

75 Certified Copies

1

"

Copy

12 Licences to Registrar of Marriages to issue his Certificates under

Section 9 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1875

1 Licence to R. of M. to issue his Certificate under Section 6 of Foreign Marriage Ord. 1903

14 Special Licences

195 Marriages at the Office of the

Registrar

1 Miscellaneous

Total

Total

Fee.

Fees

$

$1.00

418.00

$1.00

11.00

$1.00

75.00

$1.37*

1.37

@ $10.00

120.00

@ $10.00

10.00

(@)

$50.00

700.00

$10.00

1,950.00

$0.79

0.79

* Excess receipt over statutory fee due to exchange.

Table III.

Year.

No. of Marriages

solemnized.

$3,286.16

Total amount of Fees collected.

$ ¢

1928

236

2.558.00

1929

225

2,440.75

1930

187

2,059.00

1931

228

2,705.00

1932

265

3.198.97

1933

283

2.440.00

1934

325

3.327.90

1935

368

3,197.00

1936

375

3,168.00

1937

421

3,286.16

-I 10

PART III-GENERAL.

STAFF.

Mr. W. J. Lockhart-Smith was on leave during the whole year. Mr. N. B. M. Whitley was on leave from 6th March, 1937 to 8th December, 1937. He was transferred to the Colonial Secretary's Office on his return from leave on 9th December, 1937. Mr. John Whyatt acted as Assistant Land Officer and Deputy Registrar of Marriages from 18th March, 1937 to 25th June, 1937, Mr. W. Aneurin Jones acted as Assistant Land Officer and Deputy Registrar of Marriages from 26th May, 1937 to 31st December, 1937.

14th March, 1938.

T. S. WHYTE-SMITH,

Land Officer and

Registrar of Marriages.

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR

THE YEAR 1937.

A.-NORTHERN DISTRICT.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

1. Appendices I and II show some comparative details of the expenditure and revenue from the District in 1936 and 1937. The drop in expenditure on "Local Public Works" was not due to a decrease in the demand. On the contrary, the devastation wrought by the great typhoon of September the 2nd caused requests for assistance far in excess of the sum allotted for the year, $1,500. Unfortunately none of the works of repair was complete before the end of the year, so that the vote lapsed. The decrease in expenditure on "Transport" was due to a change in accounting for the cost of railway travel by officers of the Department on duty, whereby the Railway, not the Department, bore this cost.

2. The decrease in revenue of over $5,000, as compared with 1936, was chiefly due to a drop in "Land Sales", which were lower than in any year since 1927. This is attributed partly to tightness in the money market owing to feelings of insecurity generated by present troubles in the Far East, and partly to the fact that nearly all the flat Crown Land in the District has now been sold, so that what remains needs more than ordinary capital to develop, as orchards or building sites.

The slight decrease in the Crown Rent collected is explained chiefly by loss of rent in respect of the land resumed for the Pat Heung Aerodrome and the road leading to it. In spite of a slight decrease in the number of "Chinese Wine and Spirit Licences", there was an increase in the revenue under this head, due to a discovery by the District Officer that the Restaurants had been paying $25 too little each. Building development at Tai Po and Yuen Long accounts for the increase in the Rates collected, and an increase of nearly 200 in the number of persons summarily convicted by the Magistrate accounts for the increase in the "Fines" paid. If the typhoon had not necessitated the grant of many free "Permits to cut earth, etc.' a greater improvement would have been shown under this head.

-J2-

Estate Duty, on estates valued at over $2,000, was collected in the New Territories for the first time, and yielded over $650 on estates wholly within the District, in addition to duty collected on estates composed only partly of property within the District. This figure does not appear in Appendix II, as the duty is paid into the Treasury.

MAGISTRACY.

3. Appendices IV to VIII show details of the cases; both criminal and civil, heard by the District Officer sitting as magistrate during the year.

The previous record for the number of cases heard was again broken by an increase of over 10% Offences of smug- gling dutiable spirit and tobacco, and opium and heroin, were again most numerous, amounting to over a quarter of the total. Defendants who admit the charge of possession of dutiable spirits or tobacco nearly always give as their excuse that they bought it for their own consumption, and the plea that the spirit was bought for a sick cow is sometimes advanced. The smugglers seem to trust largely to luck, as they not uncommonly carry nothing but dutiable goods, though a covering of vegetables or cloth is most usual. Several illicit stills were discovered and broken up, but distilling undoubtedly continues in inaccessible parts of the country. Most of the drug divans prosecuted were in Yuen Long.

There was a big increase in the number of offences against property, chiefly in the form of larcenies, committed mostly by destitute vagrants from China, or casual labourers dismissed from mines or other big undertakings. Chickens and ducks were the most common subjects of larceny, several of the thieves making a practice of catching chickens with a little grain as bait, and a sack. The articles stolen were nearly always sold, not consumed, by the thief. Detectives made some smart arrests in these cases, livestock occasionally being returned to the owners before they had missed it.

There was a slight decrease in the number of offences against the Vehicles and Traffic Regulations, including a marked decrease in the number of convictions for dangerous driving. The increased volume of traffic consequent on the opening of the new road into China is however expected to cause an increase in the number of prosecutions under these Regulations.

Omissions to licence or muzzle dogs were much less common than in 1936, but at least one case of rabies was discovered.

J 3

There was the usual crop of assaults- -a courtfull of band. aged heads and righteously indignant voices. The causes were usually trivial-a gambling debt of a few cents, a pail of water more or less accidentally knocked over, a woman's quarrel. In one case an infuriated father, using formidable fighting irons, set about his spendthrift hefty son, who asked for a large loan to go and enlist for a soldier. A potentially murderous quarrel over water rights between two villages was luckily nipped in the bud. By prearrangement the men of both villages met after breakfast in the nearest market town, on market day, to have it out with carrying poles. The police arrived in sufficient forcé to separate the contestants before much blood had been shed. Three men from each village were promptly (comparatively) heavily fined, the Elders lectured, the site of the dam in question visited, and the dispute (which was of at least 10 years' standing) settled, for the time being.

Towards the end of the year a civil-and-military forage contractor was the victim of several cases of arson by setting fire to his rice-straw stacks in various parts of the district. Steps taken by the Police, the contractor, and the District Officer were however successful in stopping what threatened to become a general practice, though only one of the culprits was caught.

4. In 41 cases the accused were committed for trial to the Supreme Court, as against 22 in 1936. These comprised 16 cases of robbery, 9 of coinage offences, 7 of homicide, 5 of possession of arms, 3 of returning from banishment, and 1 of throwing corrosive fluid.

In one ease a man of 44 was attacked in an isolated spot, and robbed of $65, by two companions who were ostensibly taking him to Sai Kung to buy wolfram. They left him for dead in a little cave; but he recovered, and managed to get to Sha T'in Police Station, several miles away, and make a report sufficiently coherent to lead to the early arrest of the culprits in Kowloon. At the Criminal Sessions each was sentenced to 5 years hard labour.

The acid above-mentioned was thrown at a waitress, a town girl, at Yuen Long by one of a group of men who resented her having, on a previous occassion, scolded them for drinking more tea than they had paid for. Luckily she escaped permanent disfigurement.

Of the homicides one was a case in which an old woman was strangled by her adopted son and a woman accomplice. In another case a foki of a large isolated trading depot on Deep Bay, suspecting (wrongly, it turned out) that a boat approaching on a stormy night contained robbers, fired several shots at it with a shot gun, killing one man. The depot had been success- fully robbed on previous occasions. The foki was sentenced at the Criminal Sessions to 7 years hard labour, for manslaughter, and the depot lost its arms licence.

J 4

5. There were 58 cases of deaths in unusual circumstances reported to the Police Magistrate as coroner during the year, and 11 Death Inquiries were held, 8 with Jury and 3 without, as against 3 in 1936.

One of these Inquiries revealed the typical courage of the local people in pursuing a course which they consider to be just. 5 well-armed robbers overpowered the occupants of two small fishing boats. As they were rowing off with their booty, their victims, although outnumbered by 5 to 3, counter-attacked with a stick of dynamite. In the subsequent mêlée the robbers' boat was upset, and 3 of them were killed with fish-spears and wooden rowlocks, while one of the fishermen was fatally shot. One of these fishermen had previously lost a hand in an accident with dynamite.

In 2 cases chicken thieves from over the border in the middle of the night were pursued by villagers and assaulted so severely that they died within a few hours. In each case the jury's verdict was: justifiable homicide.

A village bully who had done little honest work in years was set upon as he was returning from a midnight raid on oyster-beds, and fatally wounded. The jury's verdict was "killed by a person or persons unknown, in circumstances "amounting to murder or manslaughter.'

""

An Indian Policeman on midnight patrol with two of his fellows in summer suddenly shot one of them and fired several more shots wildly before shooting himself.

A boatman at Tai Po was electrocuted when his mast came into contact with the power line across the water. The jury's verdict was: misadventure. The China Light and Power Company lost no time in raising the line to a perfectly safe height.

Two women hung themselves in their homes: one old, who did it in a fit of temper, and the other young, owing to depression at her failure to bring up two sons whom she had borne, and to her physical inability to do the hard work expected of her. In both cases the verdict was: suicide.

Another old woman died of natural causes, but an inquiry had to be held, as villagers accused her adopted son, a half-bred negro, and his wife of poisoning her.

Inquiries were held into 2 fatal accidents on the highway, and in each case the jury's verdict was: misadventure.

6. There was a further decrease in the number of Small Debts cases, but 21 distress warrants were issued, as against 19 in 1936.

}

J 5

7. 7 cases of fire were reported by the Police to the Magistrate, of which 2 were in Yuen Long, 2 in Tai Po Market, 1 in Ping Shan, 1 in Sheung Shui and 1 in Lok Ma Chow. In 3 of these cases the property concerned was insured. In no case was foul play suspected.

LAND AND AGRICULTURE.

8. Statistics regarding the sale, etc., of Crown Land are shown in Appendix IX.

The marked decrease in the sale of Crown Land for agricul- ture or building has been mentioned under "Expenditure and Revenue" above. The comparatively modern demand to buy land to plant orchards was maintained, though it was not so strong as in 1936. New

New "village-type" houses go up steadily here and there, often with emigrants' money. The number of mnatshed permits, 1175, was the highest ever issued. There is a strong demand from immigrant Hakka from Waichow for permission to put up matsheds in the western half of the District, in areas near the main road, for making bean-curd. Each demand is investigated by the Police, as matshed dwellers show a greater tendency to crime than the regular inhabitants.

There was a diminution in the number of registered memorials of mortgages, conveyances, etc., and in the fees paid therefor.

The value of land increased. So did the number of concrete-post-and-barbed-wire fences, to which deprecatory re- ference was made in the report for 1936.

Appendix X shows the allocation of funds to assist public works undertaken by the people themselves. The reason for the large unexpended balance is given under "Expenditure and Revenue" above. Chik Kang is at the head of Long Harbour, and Tai Long is on Fung Bay.

Owing to insufficient rain in the early stages the first crop

of rice was poor. But the second was admittedly good. Rice prices, partly due to the shortage in Canton, were satisfactory, averaging about $6 a picul. Lichees were scarce owing to high winds occurring when they were in flower, but prices were good. Winter fruit of course suffered severely from the typhoon. Pineapples suffered from the

occurrence of cold weather comparatively late in the year. Prices were normal. Every winter sees more land planted with vegetables. These did well, and prices were satisfactory, the market for tomatoes. especially, being less disappointing than in 1936. Wheat and barley were grown on an experimental scale.

J 6



The end of the year saw the Agricultural Association's new building, presented by Mr. J. E. Joseph, nearly completed, and planting started in the surrounding experimental garden. The Tai Po Rural Orphanage for girls was finished and occupied, and huts built for boys nearby.

The fine wide road from Au T'au Police Station through Kam T'in to the Pat Heung Aerodrome was completed, and 'buses run to Kam T'in. Much progress was made with the widening and surfacing of the existing Frontier Road, as far as San Uk Ling, and with the construction of a new branch road thence to the frontier at Man Kam To. This road already carries much traffic. A good start was made with the very welcome widening of the road and bridges between Fan Ling and Tai Po, and with the construction of new bridges on the main road near So Kun Wat and Tai Lam Ch'ung. Progress was made in the elimination of one of the hair-pin bends near the Kowloon reservoir.

The new Police Sub-Station at Ta Ku Ling, on the Frontier Road, was completed. It houses two European officers, and has involved an increase in the establishment in this District.

After long delay the cinema theatre at Tai Po Market was finished the first permanent theatre in the District. But films are not proving very popular, and actors of flesh and blood will probably prevail. The best seats cost 20 cents.

The Christian Brothers completed their fine large building on the lower slopes of Castle Peak. The site commands excep- tionally beautiful views, both intimate and distant, and it would not be surprising to find their enterprising example followed by others.

The Tai Po Government School moved to breezier and more spacious rented quarters in a new block of flats near the China Light and Power Company's reclamation at Tai Po Market.

The telephone and power companies added several short extensions to their lines, following normal building development. In addition the China Light and Power Company ran a power line, accompanied by a telephone, to the mine at Lin Ma Hang, and the Hong Kong Telephone Company connected the Pat Heung Aerodrome with their system, via Fan Ling.

The big farms, producing for the Hong Kong and Kowloon market, are believed to have had a satisfactory year, apart from

damage wrought by the typhoon.

J 7

THE TYPHOON.

9. The typhoon of September the 2nd will long be remembered in the eastern part of this District, where it caused much damage and suffering.

Throughout the District matsheds, and houses in a poor state of repair, together with hundreds of trees, were laid low. Orchards suffered severely, as did telephone and power lines, and buildings generally were damaged.

The damage done by wind alone was not, however, so extra- ordinary as to make this typhoon memorable here. Unfortuna- tely the height of the gale coincided with a very high tide, so that the swollen waters of Mirs Bay were driven with double force westward up those narrow arms of the sea, Starling Inlet, Tolo Harbour, and Tide Cove, whence they had no outlet. The sea rose, about 2-5 a.m., in places 20 and more feet higher than it had been known to rise for many decades. The resultant damage was astonishing. All along the coast from the head of Tide Cove to Tai Po Market, and round the head of Tolo Harbour to Plover Cove, and all round the shores of Starling Inlet, railway embankment, roads, bridges, paths, piers, and bunds were breached and broken up, and buildings overthrown. At Tai Po Old Market most of the houses, over sixty of them, were swept down by a flood which rolled on as far as the doorsteps of Tai Po T'au, over half a mile inland, carrying bat- tered human beings, cattle, pigs, dogs, ducks, chickens, and debris with it. The remaining buildings were all badly damaged. In Plover Cove, Shuen Wan and the surrounding hamlets suffered similarly, the great bund-path there being almost wholly overthrown, and the flood moving on with weight sufficient to crush most of the houses even at Shan Ha Wai, nearly half a mile inland. All the big bunds on Starling Inlet suffered similarly, and the sea's incursions there were just as deep, demolishing over thirty houses, and damaging many others.

Even if the flood had risen in daylight there must have been casualties, as it rose swiftly, and was aggravated by a raging sea and tearing wind. Coming as it did in the middle of the night, casualties were heavy: over 300 in the whole District, including about 170 at Tai Po and about 100 at Sha T'au Kok.

Of the boats belonging to the boat-people about an eighth were lost, and many more badly damaged. Probably half their gear was lost, and none of it remained undamaged. An even greater proportion of the boats belonging to farmer-fishermen, living ashore, were lost.

J 8

For a few days parts of the District were without light or water, and communications of every kind were seriously inter- rupted. It happened, too, that the Land Bailiff, Tai Po, and the Officer in Charge, Tai Po Police Station, were unavoidably absent in hospital.

The road between Kowloon and Yuen Long was cleared of obstructions by noon next day-a fine achievement on the part of the Roads Sub-Department, Public Works Department.

Energetically and enterprisingly led by the Assistant Superintendent, well supported by the Divisional Inspector and the scavenging contractor, the Police of all ranks and conting- ents did excellent work at Tai Po in getting the dead buried, animal corpses burned, and obstructions cleared. In this work they had the most welcome assistance of a Sanitary Inspector and squad of about ten Sanitary Department coolies, sent out by the Chairman of the Urban Council. At Sha T'au Kok the Officer in Charge of the Police Station displayed initiative in doing the same kind of work, and in arranging for a supply of rice and peanut oil from Kowloon which broke a ring at Sha T'au Kok Market who had greatly raised the price of these two commodities.

H.E. the Officer Administering the Government visited Tai Po by car, via Castle Peak, on the evening of the 4th of September.

As usual, the China Light and Power Company lost no time in repairing the power lines, and the Water-works Sub-Depart- ment, Public Works Department, were equally prompt in restor- ing water to Tai Po.

Just as a shortage of rice at Tai Po Market threatened, lorries started to trickle through, from Kowloon. Full road traffic was not possible until the 8th of September, and the railway was out of commission until the 13th.

The Government Dispensary and Maternity Hospital at Tai Po was uninhabitable for over a month, during which time out-patients were treated in a temporary dispensary, while maternity cases were visited in their own homes.

*

Villagers rendered homeless got shelter and food from relatives or neighbours. General permission for the erection of matsheds without formality of any kind was given. The survivors from Tai Po Old Market were nearly all mere tenants of the houses there, coming originally from China, whither many of them soon returned. The remainder lived on friends made in the course of their residence locally, were sheltered by the Heung Yi Kuk in schools, or, in the last resort, begged. The boat-people fell back on the fish-dealers, and the Heung Yi Kuk, but their women and children begged for food at meal times, a sad plight for such sturdily independent people.

J 9

There was

never any threat of public disturbance, and, after the first hours of despair, the marvellous recuperative power of the Chinese began to appear. The spirit of the boat people, especially, was wonderful; the survivors seemed thank- ful for their escape, complained but little, and began to set about repairs.

For this, lack of materials, tools, and every form of capital, was an obvious handicap. The boat-building and repairing sheds at Tai Po, Shuen Wan, and Sha T'au Kok had entirely disappeared, with heavy loss of life. Extraordinary help was obviously necessary, so the District Officer let it be generally known that he would register applications for monetary assis- tance, at the same time hinting that small loans only, intended to help overcome immediate difficulties, would be granted. A great press of applicants of course followed, whose applications were registered in the form in Appendix XI. Great care was taken in this registration. Every application in the Tai Po area was investigated by the District Officer. In the Sha T'au Kok and Sha Tin areas applications were noted by the Officers in Charge of the Police Stations, and forwarded to the District Officer, who checked them as best he could.

On the 8th of September an advance of $1,000 was obtained from Government, and by the 11th $1,300 had been distributed in the form of cash grants amounting to $140, and loans amounting to $1,160, divided among 53 families, comprising 340 persons. The cash grants were small, and were given chiefly to refugees from Tai Po Old Market to enable them to return to their original homes in China. The loans involved repayment by small instalments, over a period of twenty months, starting on the 15th of the third moon this year. Each recipient signed a receipt. In assessing each family's award, stress was laid not so much on the losses suffered as on the number of persons left to support, and the means left to support them. Special encouragement was given to the boat builders at Tai Po and Sha T'au Kok to start all over again.

In the meantime Mr. W. T. Stanton, a resident in this District, had generously started a fund (see Appendix XII) for the relief of the distressed in the Tai Po and Sha T'au Kok areas, and Government had consented to allow the District Officer to administer it. The fund was generously supported, almost exclusively by Europeans, and closed on the 12th of November at $2,004.63.

Registration of applications continued until the 18th of October, when the number of families still to be assisted stood at 253, comprising 1,367 persons, and the further awards recommended at $3,735.50. The balance required was con-

J 10

sidered with the vote for the whole of the Colony, which was only recently approved. At the same time Government decided that there were to be no loans, only cash grants. When all has been paid out the sum of $5,035.50 will have been divided among 306 families, of 1,367 persons, the largest family being 40 strong, and the smallest 1: the largest grant $100, and the smallest $2.

To assist the people to repair their bunds, paths and other communal works, the Government contributed $2,000, and approved the grant of free permits for sand, stone, and earth, the equivalent of about $600 revenue. Not all the repairs are yet completed.

The gentry of Tai Po contributed $265 for burial expenses of the victims at Tai Po.

The Botanical and Forestry Department did their best to collect all wild wood, the property of the Government, blown down, but permission was in many cases given to villages to clear away fallen wood and use it for their own consumption, and much was inevitably stolen. This unfortunately led to a habit of wood-stealing, encouraged later in the year by high prices following the interruption of the supply from Kwangsi and Kwangtung.

MINING.

10. The output of iron and of wolfram from The New Territories Mining Company's mine at Ma On Shan was greater than in 1936.

Great progress was made by Hong Kong Mines, Limited, with their mine at Lin Ma Hang, where many buildings have been put up,

and modern machinery installed. Fourteen Europeans and a Chinese doctor are permanently employed there, together with nine Indian watchmen (Government men) and about 450 Chinese skilled and unskilled workers. Many of these are Shantung men, and there is a sprinkling of workmen from Kwangsi. The miners suffered severely from malaria, which caused some deaths. There were some Police Court cases of larceny or assault, and a few small disputes over wages.

The Company started to improve the surface of the Frontier Road between San Uk Ling, where it diverges to the new bridge over the frontier, and the Mine.

11. The Governor in Council made Regulations for the protection of the health of labourers employed in the New Territories, by which what are commonly called "coolie lines" are brought under the control of the Director of Medical Services.

J 11

GENERAL

12. Fish sold better than in the two previous years, and the dealers were further encouraged by a reduction in the duty on dried fish entering China. The oyster business also showed an improvement.

13. The rainfall at Tai Po was nearly 93 inches, as against an average for the last ten years of 84 inches. August accounted for nearly 25 inches. At Fanling Golf Club only 70 inches fell. Next year statistics for the rainfall at Ping Shan Police Station will be available. The rainfall there is believed to be con- siderably less than at Tai Po, and probably less than at the Golf Club, Fanling.

14. The health of the inhabitants was on the whole good, not being seriously affected by any epidemic outbreak of disease. The Police suffered more from malaria than in 1936. There was a slight decrease in the number of registered births, but an increase in the number of registered deaths, not wholly accounted for by the death-roll of the typhoon.

15. The influx of refugees due to abnormal conditions in China was not such as to cause a "problem", and rents did not rise as much as in Kowloon or Hong Kong.

16. Local unemployment was slightly relieved by the op- portunities offered by the Lin Ma Hang Mine and by expansion of the establishment of Chinese in the Royal Engineers, and the enlistment of Chinese in the Royal Artillery.

The large body of unemployed seamen continued their attempts, corporate and individual, to get jobs in ocean-going ships, without much success. A man will spend a surprisingly large sum to get one of these jobs.

17. The Coronation was widely celebrated, with great joy. For several nights Tai Po and Yuen Long Markets were brilliantly lit, and thousands of people came to enjoy themselves in these important centres. The China Light and Power Com- pany were especially congratulated on the effects achieved in Yuen Long by lighting the trees. Tai Po, Yuen Long, and Sai Kung, where the Officer in Charge of the Police Station showed much enterprise in making the most of the materials entrusted to him including, it is understood, liberal use of every form of alarm signal, all had firework displays, but the theatres at Tai Po and Yuen Long were the greatest attraction. The theatre matshed at Tai Po was said to be the tallest ever put up in the New Territories, and was extraordinarily beautiful in shape. Many of the smaller places were brightly lit, including Shan Ha Wai, at Sha T'in, the Land Offices at Tai Po and Ping Shan, and Sha T'au Kok, Shek Wu Hui, Kam T'in, Ha Tsuen, and Castle Peak. Strafford House, Tai Po, was most properly flood-lit.

J 12

18. Twenty-six boats took part in the dragon boat processions in the Yuen Long area.

19. The District Officer, as "father and mother of the people", dealt with 48 disputes concerning women and children, and 19 miscellaneous disputes. In most of these, as indeed. in all matters in connection with which their help was sought, the Elders of the Heung Yi Kuk and the Hop Yik Company gave as always their wise and willing assistance.

14th Appril, 1938.

J. BARROW,

District Officer, Northern District.

J 13

Appendix I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE BY THE DISTRICT

OFFICE IN 1936 AND 1937.

1936

1937

Personal Emoluments*

$69,959.25

$69,692.85

Other Charges

Conveyance Allowances

1,569.51

1,769.51

Electric Light and Fans

141.00

170.41

Incidental Expenses

495.37

437.69

Local Public Works

1,185.00

490.00

Transport

903.16

377.06

Scavenging

1,735.72

1,729.02

Uniform

267.17

245.65

Upkeep of Grounds of Island House...

242.01

195.00

Special Expenditure

Maps

214.20

nil

Total other charges

$6,538.94

$ 6,414.34

Total special expenditure

214.20

nil

Total department

$76,498.19

$76,107.19

*Includes officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services attached

to the Department.

J 14.

Appendix II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER IN 1936 AND 1937.

1936

1937

Crown Rent (Leased Lands).

$ 97,758.98 $ 94,931.99

Kerosene Oil Licences

2,222.09

2,130.00

Chinese Wine and Spirit Licences

1,481.25

1,806.25

Pawnbroker's Licences

Motor Spirit Licences.

Money-Changers' Licences

1,500.00

1,250.00

5.00

300.00

250.00

Assessed Taxes (Rates) N.T. North Fines

6,859.65

4,009.70

Fines (Building Conv.)

· 180.20

Fines Reward Fund

815.00

7,738.71 5,744.99 337.06 1,840.40

Forfeitures

318.00

:.

709.00

Forfeitures (Land Sales)

190.00

164.00

Distress Warrant (Crown Rent &

Small Debt's Court)

237.00

243.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts.

16.00

8.00

Forestry Licences

7,198.43

7,675.58

Permit to cut earth, etc.

2,725.26

3.649.65

Grave Certificates

8.75

7.00

Pineapple Land Leases

.534.79

519.66

Matshed Permits

4,971.60

5,370.40

Permit to occupy land

2,986.99

3,129.30

Stone Quarry Permits

1,588.00

1,404.00

Ferry Licences

6.00

6.00

Certified Extracts

200.00

182.00

Sunprints

140.00

70.00

Land Sales

16,274.90

8,774.27

Stamps for Deeds

4,614.20

4,374.00

Boundary Stones

210.00

Piers

60.00

95.51

Crown Leases

90.00

30.00

Tobacco Retailer Licences

1,255.00

1,065.00

Court Fees or Miscellaneous Fees

4.80

5.70

Arms Fines

290.00

245.00

Legal Cost

7.00

32.10

Poor Box

22.16

95.91

Overpayment in Previous Year

Mining Royalties

Official Signature

3.00

Total

$159,080.75 $153,887.48

Note:

1937

Mining Licences

nil

Prospecting Licences

Mining Royalties

$3,425.70

nil were paid in

Hong Kong.

Crown Rent

4,768.00

$8,193.70

J 15

Appendix III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE

FOR THE LAST TEN YEARS.

Year.

Personal* Emoluments

Special

Total

and other Charges.

Expenditure. Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

1928

46,339.30

150.80

46,490.10

117,383.48

1929

46,371.85

46,371.85

120,580.97

1930

61,273.56

61,273.56

146,300.10

1931

61,241.64

61,241.64

165,014.61

1932

61,663.99

61,663.99

179,033.92

1933

67,216.42

67,216.42

195,021.92

1934

67,365.49

67.365.49

169,816.21

1935

60,061.01

60,061.01

151,919.41

1936

76,493.19

214.20A

76,712.39

159,080.75

1937

76,107.19

76,107.19

153,887.48

*Includes Officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services attached to

the Department.

Note. Only money expended or collected by the District Office is

included in the above table and no account is taken of revenu collected by other departments or expenditure by them, or expenditure on Public Works, Police, Medical, Educational and other services.

AFor Maps.

Total No.

Classification of Offences.

Total No.

of

Charges.

Convicted

of

Defend-

and Discharged.

Appendix IV.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS AT TAI PO AND PING SHAN DURING THE YEAR 1937.

at the

Bound over without further Penalty.

Committed

for trial

Sentenced.

ants.

Supreme

Court.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Convicted

and

Cautioned.

Police

Supervi-

Previously Convicted.

sion.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.



228

9

260

197

34

1

9

9

11

20

21

2

61

M. F.

62

1

16

911

15-11

1|728

50 16 71

(a) Against their Property.

1. Larceny (simple)

Stealing from the person Embezzlement

conversion

Robbery

and Fraudulent

Burglary and Housebreaking

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

18∞ ∞ O

21

Receiving and possession of stolen

goods

126

148

Arson

1

3. Malicious damage

3

4

4

18

21

11

462

11

1243

487

585

322

29

88

5. Other offences

(b) Against their persons.

1. Homicide

2. Ill-treatment & grievous harm Common assault

43

6. Other offences

18

571200

60

25

TOOK

7

22

8

Oarried forward

} │ │

1

1

| | | |

| | | ~ || |

| | | |

|00| |

0.110

Pal

1

21

~111

5

2

1

133

7 22

2 57

1122

0110

1

9

- J 16-

ابراا

78

1

Appendix IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER CognisanCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS AT TAI PO AND PING SHAN DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Total No.

Classification of Offences.

Total No.

of

of

Defend-

Charges.

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

Committed

for trial

Discharged.

at the

ants.

Supreme

Court.

Bound over without further Penalty.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Convicted

and

Cautioned.

Police

Supervi-

Previously Convicted.

sion.

M. F. M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F. M.. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward

487

585

322

29

133

22282

2

57

11222

1

1

78

I

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c) Against the Crown & Government.

|

52

21

2

1. Currency offences

11

11

1



4. Trespass and damages on Crown Land

6. Misconduct by Govt. officers

7. Opium and Revenue offences

461

8. Dangerous drug and goods

9. Other offences

22222

14

8

5

1

LO

1

1

1

496

335

116

30

35

39

28

1

9

1

ایا

1

1

11

26

29

24

1

2

ľ

(d) Against Public Justice.

1. Escape and breach of Prison

2. Returning from banishment

77

4. Bribery

5. Other offences

HETO

1

1

77

4

4

9

9

1826

31

כא

כא

2

Carried forward

1,119

1,266

795

156

180

11

34

2

73

133

13

2

11

I

J 17 -

1

68

3

2

205

242

:

Appendix IV,-Concluded.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS AT TAI PO AND PING SHAN DURING THE YEAR 1937.

Classification of Offences.

Total No.

of

Charges.

Total No.

of

Defend-

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

Committed

for trial

Discharged.

at the

ants.

Supreme

Court.

Bound over without further Penalty.

To keep the

peace and be of good behaviour.

Convicted

and

Cautioned.

Police

Supervi-

Previously Convicted.

sion.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Brought forward

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.-Contd.

1,119.

1,266 795 156 180

11 34

2

723

13

الله

2

11

205 24

(e) Against the Public Peace.

1. Breach of the peace

28

90

2. Unlawful possession of arms

11

16

3. Other offences

8

9

200

800

24

co

6

00 LO NO

(f) Against trade.

(g) Against Public Morals and Police.|

3. Lotteries and gambling

47

274 238

4. Offences against public health

8

5. Street hawkers offences...

59

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers

2

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature

366

10. Dangerous driving of vehicles

2

12. Unlicensed or unmuzzled Dogs

106

106

13. Other offences

125

127

នីទីសទី២ ១ ២

5

59

HO

LO

31

1

2

2

367

330

24

2

2

92

5

102

13

6

Total

N

5

མ་

333

39

1,881

2,334

1,661

190

266

13

I│

38

8888

2

115

10

1

13

15

25

23

22

22

1

1

1

1122

כא

3

| │ ││

74

24

287

24

J 18-

Appendix V.

TAI PO and PING SHAN, New Territories.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of Certain Classes of Offences during the Year 1937.

Punishments.

Description.

J 19

Offences against Individuals.

Offences of a Public Nature

Number of

Persons

Punished.

Against their Against their Property.

Against the

Against

Crown and

Person.

Government.

Public

Justice.

Against the Against

Public Peace.

PublicMorals

Other

Offences.

and Police.

889 829 as

4 225

M.

M.

F.

M.

958

59

16

20

582

11

119

སྙ

M.

M.

F.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F.

124 236 17

∞ 1 ∞

40

30

1

352

108

22

1

21

6

286

100

5

1

2

71

245

8 709

13

11

19

8823

13

115

21





1 1

14

2

15

2

1

14

44

2

1

כא

1

11

2

2

2

13

22

11

6

1

23

8

3

כא

2

1

I

Ad

1

Fines

Imprisoned in default

Imprisoned without option... Bound over to be of good behaviour

Convicted and cautioned Bound over and fined Bound over, ordered to pay

compensation and fined.... Bound over to keep peace.... Bound over and ordered to pay compensation

Total

1,793 215

323

26

53

14

410

124

78

4 74 18 746 15

109

14

Appendix VI.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS at TAI PO and PING SHAN during a period of Five Years.

CASES, HOW disposed of, and the NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Years.

Total

Number

of Cases.

Committed for

Convicted and

Trial at

Discharged.

Punished.

Supreme

Court.

Ordered to find Security.

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Behaviour, and to answer any Charge.

Convicted and Cautioned.

Total Number of Defendants.

J 20

1

2

3

4

5

7

8 9

10

14 15 16

25

25

26

27

228

29 30

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M. F. J. M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

1933

1,238 1,251

103

196

1934

1,451 1,237

117

272

1935

1,675 1,484 102

5

202

222

6

20

16

1936

1,854 1,521

132

13 197

7

3

22

1937

1,881 | 1,661

190

11 266

13

1

39

Total

8,099 7,154

644

39 1,133

88

21

105

∞ 2 2 88

8

52

:

2

98

898

14

67

9

5

σ7

כ כא

1,507

137

16

56

1 1,652

150

16

29

86

8

:

5 1,886

165

14

100 13

59

31,899

158

19

2

115

23

22

כא

3

2,103

231

12

4

432

88

:

8

223

17

9 9,047 841

77

Aver-

age

1,620 1,431

129

8 227 18

21

1

86

18

2

45

3

19

2 1,809 168

15

per

Year,

Appendix VII.

Return of Juvenile Offenders brought before the Police Magistrate's Courts at Tai Po and Ping Shan during the year 1997.

A.-Boys,

Classification of Offenders.

Total No. of

Defendants.

1

Convicted & Sentenced

Committed to Remand Home

Fines (Inflicted on Parents)

N

3

4

5

LO

· Stealing from person

1

I

I

Possession of Tobacco

1

1

1

Possession of Wine

Being found on enclosed premises

1

Setting fire to grass stacks

1

1

2

3

4

5

LO

1

Committed to Industrial School

1

2

3

4

5

LO

1

1

Total

8

1

1

2

1

1

(1) Age under 10.

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

(3) Over 12 and under 14.

(4) Over 14 and under 15.

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

1

J 21

I

Appendix VII.

Return of Juvenile Offenders brought before the Magistrate's Courts at Tai Po and Ping Shan during the year 1937.

B.-GIRLS.

Classification of Offenders.

Total

No. of

Defen-

dants.

Fine (inflicted on parents)

1

~

3

LO

Discharged or Order made.

1

2

כא

Committed to Salvation Army Home for Women & Girls.

4

5

1

2

כא

4

5

Possession of Wine

2

Possession of Tobacco

2

Total

4

(1) Age under 10.

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

1

!

}

J

22

1

1

I

1

(3) Over 12 and under 14. (4) Over 14 and under 15.

Appendix VIII.

1

1

1

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

1

1

I

SMALL DEBTS COURTS.

1937

Average from 1932-1936

87

158

21

47

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

Appendix IX.

No. of

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Heading.

Sales

Permits,

Licences,

etc.

No. of

Lots.

Area in

acres.

of

of

of

Annual

Annual

Premia,

Rent,

Rent,

Fees, etc.

$

C.

$

C.

Amount

paid for

Resump-

tion of

Land.

C.

Sales of Land for Agriculture

44

60

16.72

21.90

5.

>>

>>

Building

77

80

1.07

143.00

>>

""

""

"

& garden

1

1

.03

6.00

Orchard

13

15

27.88

29.80

2,115.00

1,131.00

150.00

3,052.00

""

>>

>>

""

"

19

""

& garden

Į

& agriculture

.75

.80

82.00

"

">

>>

>>

>>

Garden & agriculture

1

|

>>

>>

>>

Threshing floor

.21

.80

103.00

Garden

.64

56.40

865.00

""

55

Conversions

Permits to occupy land for Agriculture

89

2.23

261.00

26

2

4.40

19.77

290.27

63.00

€2.90

"

>"

""

>>

102

177

126.64

748.90

-}

""

"

"}

""

>>

}}

Other purposes

وو

وو

33

""

""

Agriculture

358

534

267.26

2,144.28

""

23

""

Other purposes

13

14

58.62

110.22

Extensions

10

10

.19

20.10

Exchanges

1

1

.35

.35

3346

986.00

Re-entries

334

19.28

158.77

Surrenders

19

1.69

33.95

Resumptions

8

.41

.83

178.62

Stone Quarry permits

85

1,404.00

Permits to cut Earth, etc.

351

3,649.65

Matshed permits

1,175

19.70

5,370.40

Ferry Licences

4

6.00

Forestry Licences

563

563

38,377.90

Pine-apple land Leases

522

522

173.22

Grave Certificates

12

7,675,58

519.66

7.00

Deeds registered and fees

3,326

4,374.00

Term

of

years.

Zar-ogoPaaalalaaaa

1

10

J 23-

J 24

Appendix X.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1937.

ALLOCATION OF ASSISTANCE.

NEW WORKS.

Dam across the stream near Wun Iu

70.00

Bridge and path between Chik Kang and Tai Long ....

100.00

REPAIRS

Dam across the stream at Lam Tsun

30.00

Bund near Yuen Long

150.00

Bund near Shek Po

40.00

Path between Yuen Long and Lo Wai

50.00

School at San Tong

20.00

Path at Tai Kiu

30.00

Un-expended

1,010.00

Total......

$ 1,500.00



J 25

Serial No.:

Appendix XI.

TYPHOON RELIEF.

Name

Sex

Age

Family's District:

Dialect spoken

:

Details of family:

Where living at time of typhoon:

Occupation

Extent of human loss suffered :

Extent of other loss suffered

Extent & nature of assistance sought:

Further Remarks

Award:-Cash grant of $.......

Loan of $......

To be repaid in instalments of $........

1st repayment on 15th of 3rd Moon, 1938.

No interest.

..a Moon.

D.O., N.D.

37.

J 26

Appendix XII.

Extract from the "South China Morning Post" of the 7th of September, 1937.

CORRESPONDENCE.

TYPHOON SUFFERERS.

(To the Editor, S.C.M. Post).

Sir,-Having regard to the suffering and misery caused by the typhoon to the inhabitants of the Taipo and Sha Tau Kok areas, both afloat and ashore, I ask that you accept the enclosed cheque for $200 as a contribution towards a fund directed at the assistance of these unfortunate people. Perhaps the District Officer North might be good enough to direct the administration. of such a fund.

I am writing you rather than to the District Officer direct as I feel there are undoubtedly others like myself who want to help and if they see a fund has been established they will come forward with contributions. I am sure other New Territories residents who have daily opportunities to admire the fortitude of our hard-working neighbours will wish to help them in this extraordinary calamity.

W. T. Stanton.

(We shall be pleased to accept and acknowledge contribu- tions-Ed., S. C. M. Post.)

Appendix J (1).

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR

THE YEAR 1937.

SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

STAFF.

Mr. K. Keen took over from Mr. G. S. Kennedy-Skipton on 23rd August and was relieved by Mr. J. S. MacLaren on 29th October. He was in charge till 22nd November when Mr. G. S. Kennedy-Skipton acted as District Officer. From 1st December onwards Mr. S. F. Balfour was in charge.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

2. Tables I to III show comparative details of the expenditure for the years 1936 and 1937.

3. The actual Revenue collected by the department, as given in Table II, exceeds the previous year's total by $12,991.86, chiefly owing to more sales of building and garden lands in the district. Rates for the urban area of Tsun Wan started from June and contributed appreciably towards the revenue of the department.

4. Table III shows a comparative statement of Expenditure and Revenue of the department for the last ten years.

MAGISTRACY.

5. Tables IV to VIII show the details of the cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and Judge of the Small Debts Court.

6. The number of Police cases dealt with (Table VII) shows an increase in 1937 by 134 as compared with the previous year. There was a heavy increase in larceny cases and other serious crimes were also in the ascendant.

- J.(1) 2-

7. There were 9 cases committed for trial at the Supreme Court during the year. Five cases of Armed Robbery (four at Cheung Chau and one at Tin Ha Wan, Hang Hau) and one Murder case at Po Toi occurred during the year. One case of Possession of Arms, one Deportation case and one Forgery case were also heard by the Magistrate for committal. A great number of cases of unlawful possession of wild wood and of tree- cutting were brought before the Magistrate.

8. There was 1 Juvenile Offender in 1937 as against 9 in 1936 (Tables VI (a) and (b)).

9. The number of Small Debts Cases decreased by 10 and the number of Writs of Execution increased by i as compared with 1936.

10. 21 cases of deaths in unusual circumstances were reported to the Police Magistrate during the year. 2 Coroner's Enquiries were held, one with Jury and the other without Jury.

LAND OFFICE.

11. Table X shows the work of the Land Office during the year 1937. 80.66 acres were sold, yielding premium to the amount of $18,578 as against 37.05 acres and $6,035.90 in 1936. This heavy increase is chiefly due to the opening up of Hang Hau as a residential district served by a motor road and also to a keen demand for agricultural land.

12. The number of memorials registered was 1,057 as compared with 1,007 in 1936 and the revenue from registration shows a consequent rise.

13. The acreage held under Forestry and Pineapple Licences decreased slightly despite the fact that the year 1936 had seen a change for the better..

GENERAL.

Agriculture.

14. The district, as a whole, may claim to have enjoyed a fair measure of prosperity during the year, in face of the horrors of war in China. The typhoon of 2nd September did considerable damage to the crops and various sea-walls and bunds in the district were badly damaged. Vegetable crops were good. The first rice crop did well but the second crop was partly destroyed by the typhoon above-mentioned. The firewood and beancurd industries fared about the same as last year. Cattle, pigs and poultry were reported satisfactory. Prices generally were high.

Fisheries.

15. Catches this year were successful. The Wong Fa and Herring catches were particularly good and prices were high.

:

.

J (1) 3

Transport.

16. The Hong Kong and New Territories Ferry Company maintained a regular schedule throughout the year. The Tsun Wan line did badly for the 5th year in succession owing to more buses being put on the New Territories run.

Registration of Births and Deaths.

17. 691 births and 905 deaths in all were registered at Tsun Wan, Cheung Chau and Tai O as against 668 and 671 respectively for 1936. There were no prosecutions during the year.

Sanitation.

A modern

18. The scavenging work has been satisfactorily maintained in Cheung Chau, Tai Ō, Hang Hau and Tsun Wan. latrine was built near the new market at Tsun Wan. taker is in regular attendance.

Hygiene.

A care-

19. The Government medical service was maintained, consisting of a travelling dispensary on the mainland, routine visits by a Medical Officer to the islands, and resident midwives with dispensaries at Tai O and Sham Tseng.

20. The Haw Par Hospital in Cheung Chau run by St. John's Ambulance Brigade and the St. John's Ambulance clinic at Tsun Wan did good service. 30,115 cases were dealt with by the former and 14,658 by the latter as against 37,990 and 15,602 respectively in 1936.

Tai 0.

21. Business conditions in Tai O are generally dependent upon the success of the fishing season. This year the fishing season was good with higher prices for the catches.

22. The following table gives approximately the figures of fish catches landed at Tai O.

Catch.

Price per picul.

1936.

1937.

1936.

1937.

Ma Yau

400 piculs.

500 piculs.

$15.00

$20.00

Herring

650

1,000

$13.00

$15.00

23

""

Wong Fa

12,000

14,000

$ 9.50

$14.00

??

Shrimps

1,500

800

$ 5.50

23

25

$ 7.00

J (1) 4

23. Pigs, cattle and poultry did well. All of these were consumed locally. The rice crop was rather poor.

24. The total output of salt for the year was 17,200 piculs- an advance of 3,700 piculs over last year. Prices were well sustained.

Lamma Island.

25. Cattle had a fair year. Pigs, rice and vegetable crops also did well. There was a severe epidemic of gapes among poultry. The fishing industry was fair but the shrimp industry showed a slight decrease on previous year.

Cheung Chau and Southern Lantau.

26. Conditions were fair. The fishing industry, the main- stay of Cheung Chau, did well. The prices were a great deal higher than last year. Other items, lime kilns at Ping Chau excepted, also did well. Vegetables had a good year and both crops at Lantou Island were reported satisfactory.

27. The stalls in Cheung Chau Market were not all occupied during the year. Business was generally bad.

28. A fire broke out in Tung Wan, Cheung Chau, damage being estimated at about $11,000. Considerable damage was caused during the typhoon of 2nd September.

Tsun Wan.

29. Conditions in Tsun Wan were generally good. Pine- apples had a very bad year but vegetable crops, firewood, pigs, cattle etc. did well.

30. The Hume Pipe (Far East) Company, the Texas Oil Company and the Hongkong Brewery were busy throughout the vear. A new water catchment for the Shing Mun Reservoir was being built, giving work to about 500 people.

31. There was an increased number of new buildings erected in Tsun Wan. Three new blocks of modern flats were built near the new market, consisting of 27 tenement flats. Further building is expected in the neighbourhood. Land values con- tinue very high.

S. F. BALFOUR,

District Officer, South.

19 March, 1938.

J (1) 5

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1936 AND 1937.

1936.

1937.

Personal Emoluments

*$34,566.77

*$36,290.57

Other Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

490.58

617.31

Incidental Expenses

192.42

195.83

Lighting

185.92

732.48

Local Public Works

2,750.00

1,800.00

Rent of Offices

7,800.00

6,200.00

Scavenging

1,530.45

1,524.00

Transport

623.59

534.07

Uniforms

67.85

95.24

Special Expenditure.

Typhoon Damage to Offices

Total Department

200.00

$48,207.58

$48,189.50

* Includes Officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services.

J (1) 6

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER, 1936 AND 1937.

1396.

1937.

Fines

$

711.66

$ 1,266.23

Building Covenant Fines

91.43

89.93

Forfeitures

150.75

185.00

Forestry Licences

2,411.80

2,188.40

Miscellaneous Licences

248.00

280.00

Assessed Taxes (Rates)

858.56

Earth and Stone Permits

616.50

589.00

Legal Costs

111.00

112.00

Boundary Stones and Survey Fees...

166.00

138.00

Crown Leases.

60.00

30.00

Miscellaneous Fees

156.25

157.70

Deeds Registration Fees

1,336.60

1,656.45

Leased Lands

* 24,238.40

* 23,599.95

Pineapple Land Leases

568.97

447.68

Bathing Matshed Permits

5,932.55

5,785.95

Matshed Permits

890.60

842.70

Temporary Structure on Private

Land

874.00

853.00

Permit to Occupy Land

484.50

431.20

Miscellaneous Permits

400.75

715.25

Stone Quarries

375.00

125.00

Market Fee

5,100.06

4,753.41

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

81.28

Premia on New Leases

6,119.80

18,743.53

Revenue Reward Fund

632.21

976.64

Arms Fine Fund

95.00

Poor Box

29.55

48.94

Total

$51,882.66

$64,874.52

* 1. Actual Collections, including normal arrears for previous year.

2. Amount due on 1936 Rent Roll

$26,452.47

including $2,670 remitted for Salt Pan No. 2 and $1,022 waived for re-entry on Salt Pan No. 4.

Amount due on 1937 Rent Roll

$26,922.68

including $3,170 remitted for Salt Pan No. 2.

J (1) 7

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF THE DISTRICT OFFICE FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

* Personal

Emoluments

Special

Total Expenditure

Total Revenue

Collected

and Other Expenditure. of the

Charges.

Department. Department.

by the

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

1928

23,111.62

23,111.62

39,279.47

1929

23,776.34

1930

39,410.90

1931

36,282.47

·1932-

42,073.65§

1933

47,116.68

:

:

:

:

23,776.34

40,870.41

39,410.90 46,715.94

36,282.47 51,285.59

42,073.65

56,679.19

47,116.63 62,282.58

1934

41,790.00

1935

43,911.09

:

:

...

41,790.00

63,912.43

1936

48,207.58

43,911.09 53,658.04

48,207.58 51,882.66

1937

47,989.50

200.00 48,189.50

64,874.52

* Includes Officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services

attached to department.

§ Includes salary, May to November, of Cadet Officer on leave.

J (1) 8-

Table IV.

Abstract of Cases under cognisance of the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office, South during the year 1937

Cases, how disposed of, and the number of Male and Female defendants under each Head.

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Total No. of Convicted and Charges. Defendants. Sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court

Bound over to keep the peace

and be of good! behaviour.

Bail Estreated.

M. F. J. M. F.

J. M. F. J. M. F. J. M.

F. J.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

148 12 1 10

(a)—Against their Property.

Larceny (Simple)

152

186

Robbery

6

Forgery

2

False Pretences

1

Stealing from Person

Larceny from Dwelling House...

Receiving Stolen Property

412258

2

3

4

(b) Against their Person.

Assault (Common)

25

32

11

Assault (Bodily Harm) Murder

1

1

1

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(a)-Against the Crown and Govt.

Dangerous Drugs

Dangerous Goods

Opium Offences

Revenue Offences

55

аны

1

111

65

84

76

54

1103

6

TATE:

1 1 1 1

(b) Against Public Justice.

Deportation

8

7

(c) Against Public Peace.

Unlawful Possession of Arms....

5

7

4

(d)-Against Public Morals and Police.

Gambling Offences

16

Hawking Offences

38

Other Offences

70

Sand-stealing

9805

2268

60

15

49

22

76

45 16

13

13

2001

4243

། ལ

2

12

1

Total

11 1

2

9

|

!

| | | │

}

11001

I

1111

11 11

| | | |

487

659

402 58 1

45 13

M. - Male

F.=Female.

}

13

Į

111

111

111

1

18-

32

29 10

J.=Juvenile.

1

1

11600000

36

}

6211

78

10

:

1

Table V.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain Classes of Offonces at District Office, South during the year 1937.

PUNISHMENTS

Offences against Individuals.

Offences of a Public Nature.

No. of

Description.

Persons

punished.

Person.

Against their Against their Against the Property.

Against

Crown and

Public

Against

Public

Government.

Justice.

morals and

Police.

Other

Offences.

M. F. J.

M.

F. J. | M.

F. J.

M. F. J.M.

F.

Ꭻ .

M. F. J. |M.

F. J.

Fined

244 43 1 84

34 6

615

1

84 13

Επ

}

94 20

I

Imprisoned in default

208 28

T

75

1

74 11

2

10

2

Peremptory imprisonment

Bound over to keep peace and to be of good behaviour

82

828

7

63

1

Q

1

2

3

1

2

6

CO

22

46

10

2

CO

3

34 13

-

11

2

1

4

I

7

4

8

1

2

6

Total

568 91 1183 13 1

M. Male.

10 3

I

168 26

-

17

5

114 23

76

21

F.

Female.

J. =Juvenile.

J (1)

9 -

Simple

Larceny...

1

Table VI, (a).

Return of Juvenile Offenders brought before the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office, South

during the year 1937.

A.-BOYS.

Convicted and Sentenced.

Caned in

Court.

Caned and bound over.

Fined

2 3 4

5

1 2 3 4 5 1 2

3

Bound Over.

To keep the

Imprisoned.

peace and be

of good behaviour.

To come up

for

Convicted

and

Cautioned

Discharged

or

Previously convicted

Bail

Estreated.

Order made.

judgment.

23

4 5 1 2

3

5

2

3

5 1 2

3

4

5

1

2

3

4

5

1 2 3

4 5

1

2

3

4

5

-

(1) Age under 10.

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

(3) Over 12 and under 14.

(4) Over 14 and under 15.

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of

Dedendants.

1

Convicted and Sentenced.

Table VI, (b)

· B.-GIRLS.

To come up

for

judgment.

Imprisoned.

5 1 2

3

H

51

Bound Over.

To keep the peace and be

of good behaviour.

N

Co

4 5

H

Q

Caned in

Court.

Caned and bound over.

Fined

N

3 4

5 1

2 3 4 5 | 1

2

Co

3

H

NI

L.

M

H

Yo

Convicted

and

Cautioned.

Discharged

or

Order made.

N

3

45 1

~

(1) Age under 10.

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

(3) Over 12 and under 14.

(4) Over 14 and under 15.


5

1

Previously convicted

Bail

Estreated.

a

----

19

5 1 2 3

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

10

J (1) 11-

Table VII.

Abstract of Cases brought under Cognizance of the Police Magistrate's Court during a period of Five Years.

Cases, how disposed of, and the number of Male and Female Prisoners under each Head.

Order to find

Security.

J

(1) 12

Total

Years.

of

Cases.

Convicted and Punished,

Committed for trial at

Committed to

Escaped before

Punished for

Prison or detained

Discharged.

Supreme

Court.

pending Order of His Excellency the Governor.

To keep the peace,

to be of good

Did not appear and absconded.

being brought for trial at

preferring False

Escaped,

behaviour and

the Magistracy,

Charge or giving False

Undecided

Total Number

of Defendants.

Testimony.

to answer any

charge.

1

2

3 4

5 6

8

9

10

11...

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33

M.

F.



Ꭻ .

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

Ꭻ .

M.

F.

}

437

7

1933.

276 259

3

97

2

I

Co

3

30

2

48

I

710

B

1934.

521

535

10

3

81

2

3

16

75

494

22

52

2 333

12

3

co

1935,

402

367

29

|

49

1936.

374 371

26

6

44

H

10

20

Co

88

1

523

35

9

1

1937.

508 397

56

1

36.

7

9

32

15

94

13

568

91

1

I

Total...

2,081 1,929

124

10

307

17

2

19

120

23

[

T

357

14

1

I

I

I

2,732

178

13

Average

per

416.2 385.8

24.8

2

61.4

3.4

.4

3.8

I

I

24

4.6

I

71.4

2.8

.2

T

1

I

Į

I

[

I

I

I

546.4

35.6

2.6

Year.

M. = Male.

F. - Female.

J. =Juvenile.

J (1) 13

Table VIII.

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

Table IX.

1396.

1937.

51

41

25

26

CORONER'S RETURN FOR THE YEAR 1937.

No. of Burial Orders issued.

No. of Death Enquiries held with Jury.

No. of Death Enquiries held without Jury.

1

1

1

Table X.

No. of Sales,

Area

Increase of

Decrease of

Permits,

Headings.

Licences,

No. of

Lots.

in

Crown

Acres.

Rent.

Rent.

Crown

etc.

A

C.

Amount of

Premia,

Fees, &c.

Amount

paid for

Resumption

Term of

Years.

of Land.

C.

ཡ་

J (1) 14 -

Land sales for Buildings (a) to

local villagers

107

107

1.78

192.00

372.00

75

Land sales for Buildings (b) to

non-local persons

29

29

3.43

391.00

7,313.00

75

Land sales for Agriculture (a) to

local villagers

9

Co

2.03

2.55

260.00

75

Land sales for Agriculture (b) to

non-local persons

29

29

Land sales for Cemeteries

2

Conversion

10

10

220

70.38

71.80

10,325.00

75

8.04

7.00

308.00

75

.41

41.00

165.53

75

Stone Quarry Leases

1

.45

100.00

Permits to occupy Lands (5 years)|

3

7.30

56.50

(Annual)

126

74.18

· 381.50

"

"

""

Matshed Permits on Crown Land.

694

6.39

Bathing Matshed Permits

238

2.12

865.60

5,881.15

2 2 2 2PRIBILL

1

5

1

1

1

Permits for Temporary Structures

on Private Lands

187

1.86

863.00

1

Earth and Stone Permits

129

589.00

Forestry Licences

120

Pineapple Licences

281

12,755.09

168.76

2,552.50

507.11

Deeds Registration Fees.

1,057



1,656.45

Resumption

72

2.16

11.10

3,882.90

Re-entries

101

4.97

138.51

Surrenders

6

.63

10.10

Miscellaneous Licences.

171

324.00

Permits

148

715.00

Fish Pond Leases

2

2.42

26.20

Salt Pan Lease

1

1

21.42

1,050.00

15

1155

J (1) 15-

Table XI.

BIRTH AND DEATH REGISTRATION.

(COMMENCED IN 1932).

Births. Deaths.

Total.

1933

875

376

1,251

1934

976

452

1,428

1935.

398

554

1,492

1936

668

671

1,339

1937

691

905

1,596

Table XII.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS 1937.

IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS.

Road in Cheung Chau European Reservation, Cheung

Chau

$

150.00

....

Paths on Lantau Plateau

100.00

School at Tsing Yi

407.00

Well at Cheung Chau

400.00

Street Repairs at Tai O

200.00

Street Paving and Channelling at Hang Hau

200.00

Repairs to Bund at Tsing Yi

215.00

Repairs to Latrine at Cheung Chau .......

75.00

Repairs to Bridge at Tung Chung

3.00

Repairs to Causeway at Tai O

Un-expended

50.00

*200.00

Total

$ 2,000.00

* This sum

was approved by Finance Committee to cover cost of

repairing the damage caused to the District Office, South, by the typhoon of the 2nd September, 1937.

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

FOR THE YEAR 1937.

GENERAL.

1. The year 1937 was an exceptionally heavy one for the Police Force. In the early part of the year the Colony received several distinguished visitors in whose interest additional pre- cautionary measures were taken. The Coronation festivities entailed much extra work on nearly all ranks, but the ready co-operation of the public lightened the task of Police.

2. On July the 7th the Sino-Japanese conflict broke out, bringing many complications. Police concentrated on efforts to prevent any untoward incidents between local residents. They received ready co-operation from Chinese and Japanese resid- ents alike. I take this opportunity to pay tribute to the restraint and tact displayed by both communities. The Police Reserve performed voluntary duty at night during November and December in order to release a number of Regular Police for special duties. It is satisfactory to record that only a few very minor incidents occurred.

3. The disastrous typhoon of September 1st and the Cholera Epidemic are dealt with under separate headings.

This

4. In 1936 there was a serious increase in larcency. increase has persisted, though in a less degree, during 1937. There were 12,434 serious crimes in 1937, as against 9,038 in 1936, an increase of 37 per cent. (See paras. 58 and 59.) With only a nominal increase in the strength of the Force, the percentage of arrests and convictions was fully maintained in the increased total. There were 150 convictions at Sessions as against 114 in 1936. The prisons continued to be overcrowded.

5. A record amount of Revenue was collected by the Department ($945,357).

6. An analysis of traffic accidents is set out in Table VIII. Most accidents arise from want of caution while pedestrians walk or run across streets.

7. Ten more Chinese probationary Sub-Inspectors were recruited during the year. There have been some casualties among the ten recruited in 1936. Despite early difficulties I believe these officers will be a success as they come to realise more fully the necessity of strict integrity and development of

self reliance.

- K 2 -

8. A new sports ground in Kowloon was earmarked for the Force by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Govern- ment This is a notable event, and should meet a long-felt want. It was not possible to start levelling and preparing the ground till 1937. In Upper Levels and Kowloon City Stations an available room was set aside as a recreation room for Asiatic Police. This is an experiment. Up to the present the men have had only their rather crowded barrack rooms when in Station off duty.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

9. Visits.-On March the 8th, His Excellency General Yu Han Mow, Pacification Commissioner of Kwang Tung, accom- panied by his staff, arrived in the Colony en route to Canton from Nanking. His Excellency remained in the Colony for two days, during which period he attended various functions.

10. On March the 24th, His Majesty's Ambassador to China, His Excellency Sir Hughe Knatchbull-Hugessen, K.C.M.G., accompanied by Lady Knatchbull-Hugessen and their two daughters, arrived in Hong Kong with his staff during the course of a tour in South China. The party remained in the Colony for four days and left for Macau on 28th March, 1937.

11. On April the 4th, His Excellency Dr. H. H. Kung, Finance Minister of China, arrived in the Colony on his way to England as China's representative to the Coronation of His Majesty King George VI.

12. On April the 12th, General Wu Teh Chen arrived en route to take up his appointment as Chairman of the Kwang Tung Provincial Government. He left for Canton on April the 14th.

13. Special Police arrangements were made for each of these visits and no untoward incident occurred.

14. Departure of Sir Andrew Caldecott.-His Excellency Sir Andrew Caldecott, K.C.M.G., accompanied by Lady Caldecott, left the Colony on April the 16th to take up his appointment as Governor of Ceylon. His departure was marked by a full repre- sentative parade of Services, guards of honour being supplied by the Royal Navy, Royal Air Force, Seaforth Highlanders and Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps. Police turned out 285 officers of all contingents for control of the crowds and traffic.

15. Coronation Celebrations.-On May the 12th, 13th and 14th, Hong Kong celebrated the Coronation of His Majesty King George VI.

16. On May the 12th, at 7 a.m., a Naval, Military and Air Force Review was held at Happy Valley. Large crowds gathered at Happy Valley and on the route taken by the troops, to view this.

K3

17. Other items of interest which attracted huge crowds to the Colony were the day and night processions organised by the various Chinese Guilds; illuminations, flood-lighting, firework displays and night flying.

18. It is estimated that from the 10th to the 14th May, about 85,250 persons entered the Colony to view or to take part in the festivities. 54,327 persons were recorded as having entered by river steamers, launches and junks, and 30,920 by the Kowloon-Canton Railway.

19. Throughout the celebrations every available member of the Police and Police Reserve was called out for duty. All leave over this period was stopped, and the men had to work long hours under trying conditions controlling traffic and pedestrians. The Criminal Investigation Department devoted special efforts to rounding up pick-pockets and criminals of this type and so to protect the crowds of sightseers.

20. The complete absence of untoward incidents or serious accidents is a great tribute to the general public who showed good humour and willing response to Police control.

21. The Police are much indebted to the Chairman and members of the Chinese Processions Committee for their helpful co-operation in adjusting their arrangements to traffic require-

ments.

22. Letters of appreciation of the work done by Police were received from His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government and Mr. Ho Kam Tong, Chairman of the Corona- tion Celebration Chinese Processions Committee.

23. "Dojima Maru" Disaster. At 8 p.m. on the 17th May, 1937, the steam launch "Dojima Maru", owned by the Osaka Shosen Kaisha, which was lying alongside Queen's Pier embark- ing passengers for the S.S. "Rio de Janeiro Maru", suddenly blew up with a terrific explosion. Of the 48 persons on board- all males-4 members of the crew and 27 Japanese passengers were killed outright, while 2 Japanese subsequently died in hospital; a total death roll of 4 Chinese, and 29 Japanese pas- sengers.

24. Police and Fire Brigade were quickly on the scene and, with assistance rendered by passers-by and several medical practitioners who came to the scene, the wounded, totalling 15, were sent to the Government Civil Hospital. The dead were removed to the Mortuary. Men from His Majesty's Navy also rendered great assistance in the rescue work.

25. An enquiry was held by the Senior Police Magistrate sitting with a special jury. Expert evidence established that the explosion was due to the boiler of the launch bursting through fatigue of a steel strip with which the boiler had been

- K 4

repaired in 1924, and that such fatigue would not be apparent to a Surveyor at his routine inspection. The jury returned verdict of "Death by Misadventure" and commended the Coxswain Tang Fu, of the motor-boat "Fuk Wo", for rescue work. He subsequently received a Belilios Medal.

26. Shooting Incident.-At 09.00 hrs. on July the 2nd, Police Sergeant A.61 Scott, the Police Armourer, was found shot dead in the Armourer's shop at Police Headquarters. Investigations revealed that Sergeant Scott was examining a defective revolver which had been sent to him for expert opinion. No one was in the Armourer's shop at the time of the incident and at a coroner's enquiry, a verdict of "Accidental Death" was returned.

27. Collapse.-On May the 23rd, a pile-driving machine collapsed at Kansu Street, Yaumati. The cause of the accident was apparently due to a sudden strong gust of wind during a heavy rainstorm. Seven Chinese persons were killed outright or died from injuries received. A verdict of "Death by Mis- adventure" was afterwards returned by a Coroner's jury.

28. Cholera Epidemic.-In July 1937, the Colony was visited by a serious Cholera Epidemic. The Police Force was called upon to assist the Health Services in their arrangements to combat the disease. Police were on duty at the Railway Station and wharves. All incoming passengers were medically examined and inoculated before being allowed to enter the Colony. Sixteen inoculation centres were opened and Police controlled the very large crowds who availed themselves of this free service. Special action was taken against hawkers selling certain foodstuffs likely to spread disease.

29. During the epidemic 1,081 persons, including 2 Euro- peans, died of the disease. P.C.D.202 Pi Chi Hui was unfor- tunately one of the victims. The Police Force was congratulated by His Excellency the Governor for services rendered during the epidemic.

30. Typhoon.-During the night of September the 1st and 2nd the Colony experienced its most disastrous typhoon in thirty years. The blow commenced early in the evening of September the 1st and reached its climax between 2 a.m. and 4 a.m. on the morning of September the 2nd, No. 10 Typhoon Signal being hoisted at 02.25 a.m. At one period the wind velocity was reported to have reached 164 miles per hour. Police were on duty in all districts during the whole of the typhoon and many plucky rescues were effected. Police on duty on the sea front, tied together by ropes, rescued some 70 persons who were isolated on various wharves, including the entire crew of the S.S. "An Lee" whose stern had been swept high and dry on to Connaught Road Central.

K 5-

2

31. The passengers and crew of the S.S. "Kwang Chow", which was wrecked on Chau Kung Island, were rescued and taken aboard No. 1 Police Launch. At the height of the typhoon a very severe fire occurred at Nos. 131-139, Connaught Road Central, in which 31 persons were killed or drowned. The task of clearing this outbreak was extremely dangerous owing to the gale and to the flooded condition of the streets and the sea front where the fire was situated. Splendid rescue was performed at the fire by Police from No. 7 Station.

work

32. Casualties were reported from every Police District. The most severe were at Taipo where the typhoon was accom- panied by a tidal wave which extended for a quarter of a mile inland. Much damage was done to the railway track over a distance of 7 miles. 147 houses were totally destroyed and 85 partially in the large rural village of Taipo Market. In this district 168 bodies were recovered and buried under the super- vision of Police.

33. The district of Sha Tau Kok was also seriously affected. A large portion of the local fishing fleet was wrecked and the crews drowned. In addition 31 houses collapsed and 143 houses were partially destroyed. Over 70 bodies were buried by Police in this district.

34. Sai Kung district had 23 deaths and Sha Tin district 10 deaths.

35. Shipping in the harbour suffered very severely, 27 steamers drifted and went ashore out of control, as well as a large number of steam launches. The most serious groundings

were:

S.S. "Asama Maru"

S.S. "Conte Verde"

S.S. "Talamba"

aground at Sai Wan Bay.

aground at Sai Wan Bay. aground at Lyemun.

36. The S.S. "Van Heutz", carrying 1,260 passengers, was wrecked on Green Island. All passengers were rescued later by ferries of the Hong Kong & Yaumati Ferry Co.

37. Considerable superficial damage was caused throughout the Colony, the most important being the partial destruction of the main New Territories road between Sha Tin and Taipo.

38. There were no Police casualties with the exception of shock and burns sustained by the Inspector in Charge of the Mong Kok District who, during rescue work, accidentally trod upon a live electric cable.

39. Police Launches Nos. 6, 7 & 9 were extensively damaged when blown from their moorings on to the Yaumati breakwater. Considerable damage was done to police stations, particularly

·K 6-

Cough Hill, Taipo and Sha Tau Kok. At Taipo, the Govern- ment garage containing the Ambulance, Fire Brigade Tender and Police Patrol Van, was completely demolished and the vehicles wrecked.

40. In connection with rescue work performed by Police, 4 officers received letters expressing the approbation of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. 2 officers were commended by His Excellency the Governor, 12 were commended and 67 awarded merit anarks by the Commissioner of Police.

41. The total casualties reported in all Police Districts

were:

Males.

Females.

Children.

Killed

Drowned

43

82

66

130

103

124

Total Deaths Injured

173

185

190

2

Grand Total 574

=*

42. Air Raids Precautions.-Practice Black-Outs were held on the 23rd March and the 9th December to test the extent to which the Colony could be darkened without undue inter- ference with the normal life of the public. Both practices were successful, the second practice being, as might be expected, even more successful than the first. The Black-Outs did not give rise to accident or any noticeable inconvience to the public.

SINO JAPANESE CONFLICT.

43. In July, following the Lukuchiao incident, fighting on a large scale broke out between Chinese and Japanese forces in North China. This grew into a state of undeclared war between the two countries, and in August hostilities broke out in Shang- hai. In consequence Hong Kong experienced a large influx of European refugees, mainly women and children, from the dis- turbed areas.

44. A committee, with an administrative officer of the Hong Kong Government as chairanan, was formed, with the object of assisting these refugees. Two Asst. Superintendents of Police served on this committee. Centres were established to accom- modate refugees who had nowhere else to go and persons without means were maintained at Government expense. Between 19th and 31st August over 4,000 persons arrived in the Colony from Shanghai and the North, and all ships carrying refugees were met by members of the Committee. Police co-operated throughout, and were called upon to perform various duties in connection with the refugees. Foreign consuls also gave helpful co-operation in dealing with their own nationals. Most of the refugees left the Colony before the end of the year.

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45. A large influx of Chinese refugees also occurred parti- cularly during September and October when over 20,000 arrived after hostilities, in the shape of air raids, had spread to South China. The Tung Wah Hospital assisted in making arrange- ments for a number of these refugees and after the first panic had died down a great many returned whence they had come.

46. The Colony remained fortunately free from anti- Japanese disturbances. With the approval of Government the Commissioner of Police approached the Consul-General for Japan, in regard to the protection of Japanese residents. The Consul-General readily acquiesced to the Police plan for volun- tary concentration of Japanese residents in convenient centres. Arrangements were successfully carried out and remained in force for some months. There were no untoward incidents. Many Japanese pursued their normal occupations by day and returned to the concentration centres by night. A large number of Japanese left the Colony for Japan during September.

47. Special Police were detailed for the protection of con- centration centres. Normal Police duties were reorganized to provide picquets and additional Police protection in the most important areas.

SPECIAL EVENT (CRIME).

48. A feature of the statistics of the year under review has been the prevalence of robberies on boats. The increase in this particular form of outrage can be attributed almost entirely, to the present political situation, in so far as, goods which previous- ly were carried by launches and ships of the river and coastal type, had to be carried by junks and fisherman-boats, owing to the disruption of normal services. These small boats, usually unarmed, proved an easy prey to persons evilly disposed, for whereas in the past it was impossible for a small number of men to operate from a small fishing boat against a steam launch or coastal vessel, they could do so against boats similar to their own, with promise of considerable gain.

49. Robberies of this type are particularly difficult to deal with successfully. They usually occur a considerable distance from land. The victimised boat is in most cases deprived of all means of propulsion and the robbers return immediately to Chinese territory, which is usually their headquarters. Here often they dispose of the stolen property before Police receive the report of the robbery.

50. Murder.-On the 28th of February, 1937, the Fire Brigade received a call to a fire at No. 323, Reclamation Street, 3rd floor. On arrival at this address a heap of burning charcoal was found on the floor among which was a human body. Examination showed that the body was bound hand and foot. Police were called and enquiries showed that neighbours, at- tracted to the floor by the smoke, had found a man on the floor who attempted to frustrate any attempts on the part of the

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neighbours to enter the floor. In the confusion which followed the arrival of the Fire Brigade, this man disappeared. Enquiries at once instituted and as a result of which a Chinese male named Chiu Yuk Fai came under suspicion. Every effort was made to locate this man and he was eventually arrested on the 2nd of March, 1937. Keys found in his clothing were found to fit a lock found among the burning charcoal. A note addressed to his wife was found, the tenour of which indicated that he was in great trouble. Chiu Yuk

Chiu Yuk Fai denied having committed murder but admitted that he had lured a Chinese female, Cheung Yuk Ching, to the aforementioned address and watched her strangled by a Chinese male, whom he had hired to render her unconscious in order that certain documents in her posses- sion might be obtained. Jewellery found on Chiu Yuk Fai was identified as being the property of Cheung Yuk Ching (deceased). Chiu Yuk Fai was charged with murder and at the April Criminal Sessions was sentenced to death.

51. Murder.—At about 21.10 hrs. on the 13th of May, 1937, Mr. Chan Sze alias Chan Lai Chun, Manager of the Sincere Company, Hong Kong, and one of the Colony's best known business men, alighted from a bus in Prince Edward Road, Kowloon. He proceeded to cross the road in the direction of his home, when a Chinese male ran out from under the verandah and fatally stabbed him in the back. Police enquiries were instituted and it was suspected that the murder was the work of a hired assassin. Working on this principle, Police pursued enquiries which led to the arrest of two Chinese males who admitted having taken part in procuring the assassin. Further enquiries led to the arrest of two other Chinese males, one of whom was the actual murderer. The two men first arrested, later gave evidence for the Crown, while the latter two were charged with "Murder" and "Being an Accessory before the Fact", respectively. On the 13th of September, 1937, Au Hing, charged with "Murder', was sentenced to death while Li Fook Chong, charged as "An Accessory" was acquitted. It is believed that a business dispute provided the motive for this brutal murder.

52. Armed Robberies.—On the 4th of June, 1937, as a result of enquiries, a gang of 7 Chinese males was arrested and a quantity of arms and ammunition seized.

It was found, upon further investigation that this gang was responsible for the following outrages:-

(i) Armed Robbery at Wong Chuk Hang village,

Aberdeen on 9th May, 1937.

(ii) Armed Robbery at No. 1237, Canton Road, Ground

Floor, on 14th May, 1937.

(ii) Armed Robbery at No. 121, Wellington Street, on

1st June, 1937.

All the robbers were sentenced at Sessions to terms of imprisonment, varying in severity according to their respective roles.

*.

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53. Bomb Explosion.-On the 5th of August, 1937, a package was delivered at No. 6, Tung Fong Street, Kowloon, by an unknown Chinese male, and the receipt was obtained for same. This address was occupied by Ng Tit Chow, his wife and family. In the process of being opened the parcel suddenly exploded, fatally injuring Ng Tit Chow, and slightly injuring three other persons standing nearby. Police have so far, failed in their attempts to solve this outrage. It is believed to have been an act of revenge by parties who had been swindled by the deceased.

54. Murder and Suicide.-At 20.55 hours on the 13th of August, 1937, 3 Indian Police Officers-P.C.B.449 Kaka Singh, P.C.B.309 Arjan Singh and P.C.B.629 Kehar Singh-set out from Tai Po Police Station on a patrol to Tai Mei Tuk Village. The journey to the village is alleged to have been uneventful but on arrival there and whilst resting under a tree, I.P.C.B.309 Arjan Singh suddenly and without warning, opened fire with his rifle on I.P.C.B. 449 Kaka Singh, killing him instantly. He next turned his rifle upon I.P.C.B.629 Kehar Singh but neither of the two shots fired in the latter's direction found their mark. Whilst fleeing from the scene, I.P.C.B.629 Kehar Singh heard five more rifle shots. It appears that I.P.C.B.309 Arjan Singh then shot himself. He was found lying dead near the door of a villager's house, several of the occupants of which had very narrow escapes from death by rifle bullets. Enquiries proved that I.P.C.B.449 Kaka Singh and I.P.C.B.309 Arjan Singh had, in the past, money dealings. These are believed to have been the motive for the crime.

55. Murder. On the 5th of October, 1937, Police received a report from the Kwong Wah Hospital to the effect that 2 Chinese females had been admitted to that institution suffering from food poisoning. Enquiries led Police to No. 163 Tung Choi Street, 1st floor, from which address the 2 females had been admitted to hospital. At this address an elderly Chinese male was found, also suffering from the effect of poisoning. He also was removed to hospital. All three later succumbed and examination showed Arsenic presence in the bodies. A Chinese male, Li Fuk Yue was suspected and arrested on the 5th of October, 1937. He was charged with "Murder" and sentenced to death at the November Criminal Sessions. It is believed that a recent quarrel which Li Fuk Yue had with one of the female inmates of the above address prompted him to put Arsenic in the food which was eaten by other members of the household.

56. Bomb Explosion.-On the evening of the 30th of November, 1937, a bomb of the Mills type was thrown into the ground floor of No. 36, Connaught Road Central. The bomb exploded with little force and no damage was done. These premises are occupied by a firm, who, it is alleged, was dealing in Japanese goods. It is believed that the bomb was thrown by a member or members of a Chinese Anti-Japanese organisation.

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CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH,

57. Summary of Crime.-The total number of cases (except summonses) dealt with by the Police during 1937, was 55,722 as against 46,587 in 1936, being an increase of 9,135 or 19%.

58. There were 12,434 serious crimes in 9,038 in 1936, an increase of 3,396 or 37%. creases in the following:

Burglary

House-Breaking

1937 as against There were

were in-

124

86

Intimidation & Extortion

Kidnapping

Larceny

1

3

2,925

Larceny in Dwelling

Larceny on Ships & Wharves

Manslaughter

Murder Attempted

174

62

6

2

Obtaining by False Pretence

48

Receiving

108

Robbery

41

Other serious offences

27

Decrease:

Breach of Arins Ordinance

12

Serious Assault

30

Assault with Intent to Rob

4

Coinage Offences

48

Deportation

106

Embezzlement

Murder

Women & Girls Ordinance

2

1

There were 102 cases of robbery distributed as follows:

Hong Kong Island

37

Kowloon

37

New Territories South

4

New Territories North

24

K 11

59. The following table indicates the number of serious crimes for the whole Colony, 1932-1937.

Year.

Charge No Charge Cases.

Total

Cases.

Cases.

Property Property

Stolen. Recovered.

1932

3,284.

2,509

5,743

$735,605 | $ 73,021

1933

3,377

2,253

5,630

764,492

67,469

1934

3,480

2,069

5,549

363,436

50,551

1935

4,322

2,051

6,373

576,203

42,704

1936

6,234

2,804

9,038

303,497

69,739

1937

8,169

4,265

12,434

531,190 115,829

60. The following table indicates the number of crimes classified as Outrages, which have been reported to the Police during the last 5 years:

Year. Hong Kong Kowloon. N.T.S. N.T.N.

Total.

1933

30

37

6

21

94

1934

28

43

4

1935

27

37

25

20

95

34

102

1936

27

40

6

16

89

1937

43

55

29

131

See graph on page 12.

21

18

15

12

1937

GRAPH SHOWING OUTRAGES FOR 1935-6-7.

JAN..

FEB.

MAR. APR. ΜΑΥ JUNE JULY AUG. SEPT. OCT.

NOV.

DEC.

K 12

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61. There were 43,288 minor cases in 1937 as against 37,549 in 1936, an increase of 5,739 or 15%-

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN & PROPERTY RECOVERED.

62. The estimated value of property stolen during the year 1937 was $531,190 as against $303,497 in 1936, an increase of $227,693 or 75%. The average for the last 5 years is $507,763. The value of property recovered during the year was $115,829 or 21% of the property reported stolen as against $69,739 or 22% of the property stolen in 1936.

LOST PROPERTY.

63. A summary of the number of articles lost or recovered during the year with their value is given below:---

Year.

Articles reported lost.

Value lost.

Articles recovered or found, but not

reported lost.

Value of articles found.

1936

308

$36,372

1937

516

$45,959

ARMS.

22 23

70

$719

78

942

64. There were 40 seizures of Arms during the year, of which 26 were "Charge" cases and 14 were "No Charge" cases. The figures for 1936 were 42 and 11 respectively.

There were no seizures of note during the year. Table VI gives details of Arms and Ammunition seized.

GAMBLING.

65. There were 161 successful Gambling raids during the year 1937, as against 109 in 1936. Convictions were obtained in every case.

There were 19 successful Lottery raids, as against 16 in 1936. Convictions were obtained in all cases.

CRIMINAL SESSIONS CASES.

66. During the year there were 150 cases in which convic- tions were obtained at the Criminal Sessions, as against 114 in 1936 und 100 in 1935...

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DEPORTATION OFFICE.

67. Table IV gives the number of persons dealt with by the Deportation Office during the year. A general increase of 5,573 is shown. This is largely due to the large number of destitute refugees in the Colony who commit petty offences and are deported.

MISSING CHILDREN.

68. During the year, 260 children under the age of 15 years, were reported missing. Of this number 160 have been found, mostly strayed or run away from home.

PIRACY.

69. There were no Piracies of ships reported during the year.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

70. The following table shows weights and measures examined during the year 1937:-

Weights & Measures examined.

Correct. Incorrect.

Total.

Foreign Scales

127

12

139

Chinese Scales

940

22

962

Yard Measures

195

11

206

Chinese Foot Measures

100

100

Total

1,362

45

1,407

71. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights & Measures Ordinance:

Number of Cases

Convictions

Fines

22

17

$260.00.

DANGEROUS Goods.

72. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance during 1937:-

Number of Cases

Convictions

Fines

9

$910.00.

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SPECIAL BRANCH.

73. Communist activity in the Colony during the year was directed almost entirely against Japanese imperialism and no activities of an anti-British nature were observed. After the outbreak of Sino-Japanese hostilities in August, 1937, this anti-Japanese movement became even more marked and a united front to resist Japan was formed between the Chinese communist Party and the Kuomingtang. As in former years a considerable quantity of Communist and anti-Japanese literature was received through the post.

74. Towards the end of the year a number of organisations sprang up in the Colony designed to check the activities of Chinese "traitors", to boycott Japanese goods, and to collect war relief funds. There was also a noticeable increase of activity by labour groups in the Colony. These activities were the outcome of the Sino-Japanese hostilities and no serious demonstration or disturbances were caused.

Immigration and Passport Office.

75. During the year 1937, there were 114 persons of various nationalities, other than Chinese, put before the Courts for the following offences:-

Passports

Stowaways

Vagrancy

61

17

36

The number of destitutes dealt with during the year was 52.

Registration of Persons Office.

76. During the year, 7,235 persons registered with this office, 19 registered persons died and 5,605 left the Colony. 14 aliens acquired British naturalisation. There were 58 convictions for breaches of the Ordinance. On 31st December, 1937, there were 6,444 registered aliens in the Colony. The increase of registra- tions compared with 1936 was due to the large number of re- fugees from Shanghai and other parts of China, who came to Hong Kong to escape the Sino-Japanese hostilities.

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FINGERPRINT DEPARTMENT.

77. A summary of work executed in this department during 1987 is as follows:

No. of slips

Year.

No. of slips No. of persons No. of slips

searched. identified.

added to

filed.

Bureau

during 1937.

1937....

23,906

6,964

19,922

12,558

1936....

15,704

4,698

16,017

11,319

Increase

over 1936.

8,202

2,266

3,905

1,239

78. During the year 768 persons were dealt with under the Deportation Ordinance. Of these 481 were arrested solely as suspected banishees, and 287 were arrested for other offences and later found to have returned from banishment. Of the total number, 36 were dealt with at Criminal Sessions, 714 by Police Magistrate, and 18 were discharged owing to their having been banished on the wrong form, i.e. Form 7 instead of Form 7A. These persons were later banished on the correct form. During the year 543 Criminal Records were created, making a total of 914 in the Bureau on 31st December, 1937. The total number of records in the files in the Bureau at the end of 1936 totalled 151,789. Out of that number 2,000 were destroyed being persons with clear records for 15 years or more. During 1937, there were 12,558 new records added to the Bureau making a total on record of 162,347 on 31st December, 1937.

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUB-DEPARTMENT,

79. The total number of photographs taken of scenes of serious crime and accidents throughout the year was 40.

80. The number of copies of photographs issued was 3,849 made up as follows:

For Criminal Investigation Department

(including Special Branch)

For Court

For other Departments

CENSORSHIP OF CINEMATOGRAPH FILMS.

3,226

246

377

81. During the year, 5,317 reels and 293 trailers were censored at the Hong Kong Preview Studio. Thirty-eight reels were submitted to the Appeal Board.

.

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THE NEW TERRITORY.

82. There were 35 cases of outrage in 1937 as against 16 in 1936.

No Charge no Conviction. Total. Charge. conviction.

Murder

Murder & attempted Armed Robbery

Manslaughter

Armed Robbery

Armed Robbery &

Wounding

Armed Highway Robbery..

Attempted Armed

2

1

Convicted

of Mans-

laughter.

خر

1

1

2

2

2

10

1

1

3

(1 pending)

Robbery

3

1

Unarmed Robbery

1

1

2

Armed Robbery at sea....

7

1

Total

22

5

8

35

83. The increase is partly due to a revision of procedure. by which robberies in waters adjacent to the territories were investigated by C.I.D., N.T. (N) and classified under the station at which the report was made. Such cases formerly investigated by and classified under the Water Police. There were 9 such cases during the year.

84. There were 14 cases in which the work of gangs from Chinese Territory was established. The majority of these occurred in Ping Shan District, and adjacent waters of Deep Bay and Mirs Bay. 9 of these cases occurred at sea. Representa- tions to the Chinese Authorities at Nam Tau in November resulted in the dispersal of the gangs and the arrest of a suspected robber. The most outstanding case occurred on January 19th when a gang of 18 armed robbers from Chinese Territory attacked and robbed five boats anchored off Yung Long Wan, Ping Shan.

K 18

85. Outrage cases by districts were as follows:

Sai Kung

Sha Tin

. Tai Po

Sha Tau Kok

Sheung Shui

nil.

2

Lok Ma Chau

2

3

Au Tau

5

3

Ping Shan

16

86. On January 9th, an employee of a trading depot at Yung Long Wan, Ping Shan District, fired on and fatally wounded a boatman approaching the shore in rough weather at night. He was convicted of Manslaughter and sentenced to 7 years Hard Labour.

87. Outstanding cases during the year included:-

(a) An attack by 5 armed robbers from Chinese Territory on a fishing boat at Double Island, Mirs Bay on January 23rd. The occupants retaliated and killed 3 of the robbers. One complainant subsequently died of bullet wounds inflicted by the robbers.

(b) The arrest and conviction in Chinese Territory of 2 armed men who robbed a man in British Territory on February 23rd.

(c) The strangulation of an aged Chinese woman at Shun Wan, Tai Po on February 25th. One Chinese male and a female charged with Murder were convicted of Mans- laughter and heavily sentenced.

88. Four cases of armed highway robbery reported during the year were successfully investigated and convictions obtained.

89. On August 13th, P.C.B. 509 Arjan Singh while on patrol ran amok, shot and killed another member of the patrol P.C.B. 449 Kaka Singh, at Tai Mei Tuk Village, Tai Po District. After firing a number of shots into a house. P.C.B. 309 committed suicide. Failure to settle a longstanding debt owed to him by P.C.B. 449 was the cause of P.C.B. 309's derangement.

90. The Frontier was manned for observation by Police from December 20th to 24th in anticipation of an influx of refugees from Chinese Territory due to possible operations by Japanese troops in South China.

91. A number of cases of arson of straw stacks belonging to a Military and Civil Contractor occurred towards the end of the year. He was maliciously accused in the Chinese press of supplying straw to Japanese interests. Investigations disclosed that the underlying reason for the outbreaks arose from competition with other commercial interests established in the districts concerned. The perpetrators were not discovered.

K 19

92. Good relations have been maintained during the year with neighbouring Chinese Officials, and visits exchanged.

93. On December 19th two Officials of the Japanese Con- sulate General, accompanied by two British Military Officers were assaulted by a crowd of coolies in British Territory at Sha Tau Kok Market, after one of the Japanese had been observed taking photographs in Chinese Territory. The party escaped with minor injuries.

a

94. On December 11th, a Japanese destroyer seized Chinese Maritime Customs Cruiser at Yung Long Wan, Deep Bay, British Waters after firing several shells at it.

95. During the year there were 3 cases of possession of arms in which 3 loaded revolvers and 2 rifles were seized and 5 Chinese males convicted.

96. Sixty-seven banishees were arrested in the New Terri- tories (North) during the year and convicted.

97. There was a marked increase in larcenies during the year. 305 cases were reported involving the loss of property valued at $15,908.00 of which $2,283.00 was recovered. Embezzlement cases accounted for unrecovered property amount- ing to $8,752.00. 249 convictions were obtained in 249 charge cases as against 173 convictions in 175 charge cases, out of a total of 242 reported cases in 1936. Detectives worked very satisfactory.

98. A new Sub-Station at Ta Ku Ling, commenced in December 1936, was completed in October, 1937 and taken into use. The Station built on modern lines, provides accommodation for 2 European single Lance Sergeants, 28 Indian Police and 3 detectives. The previous strength of the old Station was 14 Indian Police. The increase in strength was partly provided for by the transfer of European Officers and 6 Indian Police from the main Station at Sheung Shui.

99. Patrol Vans were supplied at Tai Po, Ta Ku Ling and Au Tau towards the end of the year. Their use together with the reorganisation of patrol schedules in all districts, should result in increased efficiency.

100. There was a further increase of sickness among Police during 1937. Cases rose from 241 in 1936 to 403 in 1937, of which 207 were cases of fever as against 162 in 1936. The major increases of sickness were at Tai Po, Sha Tin, Lin Ma Hang, Ta Ku Ling and Au Tau Stations.

101. The disastrous typhoon of September 2nd caused severe damage both to Government and private property, and to communications, cattle and crops. Losses among the fishing populations were extremely heavy. The most extensive damage

K 20

occurred in Tai Po District where the old Market was almost entirely demolished by an unprecedentedly high sea. Sha Tau Kok, Sha Tin and Sai Kung districts also suffered heavily. The total death roll exceeded 300 reported cases. The majority were unidentified, and were buried by Police. All ranks worked exceptionally well. One Officer received His Excellency the Governor's Commendation, two Officers were commended by the Commissioner of Police and 18 Officers received meritorious mention for rescue work and devotion to duty.

ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.

102. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1937:-

Nationality.

Establishment of the Force.

Enlistments.

Deaths.

Europeans

267

Indians

817

15

15

1

5

4

2

57

6

14

18

7

Chinese

1,029 64

10

18

19

Water Police

255

19

4

6

5

5

...

Total 2,368 155 17

15

35

45

45

33

33

12

45

53

20

2 4 1 2

130

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments. also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:

Inspector General of

Police and Deputy Inspector General of Police.

Superintendents.

Superintendents.

Assistant

Probationers.

Accountants.

Store Supervisor.

Storekeepers.

Police Secretary.

Stenographers.

Clerks, Shroffs.

Telephone Clerks.

Interpreters.

Messengers and Coolies.

N

со

2

a

2

1

37 10 79

154

- K 21

103. ACTUAL STRENGTH ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1987.

Europeans Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Present

242

705

1,002

1,949

Sick or Absent on

leave

27

98

20

145

Excess over

Estimates

2

2

Vacancies

14

7

21

Total

269

803

1,022

2,094*

*Not including Water Police.

CONDUCT.

104. The conduct of the European Contingent was satisfac- tory. The total number of reports against them was 62 as against 51 in 1936.

The conduct of the Indian Contingent showed an improve-

There were 400 reports as against 519 in 1936.

inent.

The conduct of the Chinese Contingent (Cantonese) was satisfactory. There were 871 reports as against 1,201 in 1936.

The Conduct of the Chinese Contingent (Wei Hai Wei) was satisfactory. There were 122 reports as against 182 in 1936.

The conduct of the Water Police improved. There were 236 reports in 1937, compared with 435 in 1936.

2

HEALTH.

105. Admissions to hospitals during the past three years are as follows:

1935

1936

1937

Nationality.

Establish- Admis- Establish- Admis- Establish- Admis

ment.

sion.

ment.

sion.

ment.

sion.

Europeans

261

159

265

221

267

185

Indians

776

540

803

746

817

795

Chinese

978

322

1,014

389

1.029

273

K 22

108. The figures for fever among Police in the New Ter- ritories during the last four years are:

1934

1935

1936

1937

150 cases.

105 .

""

183

246

""

MUSKETRY COURSES.

107. The following table gives the results of the Musketry Courses fired during the year.

The following indicates the classification used:-

Marksmen 75%, 1st class 60%, 2nd class 50%. Failures- less than 50% of the total possible obtainable.

Results.

Contingent.

Month.

No. of

men

fired.

Marksmen.

1st Class.

2nd Class.

Failures.

Rounds used

(Approx.)

Europeans

Indians

Wei Hai Wei Indian Guards

January.

131 25 63 42 1

6,000

Cancelled owing to shortage of ammunition.

Russians

January.

12

2 6 4 Nil.

400

108. The following were the winners of the Rifle and Revolver Championship for the year 1937: --

European Rifle Championship...P.S.A. 130 Pennell.

Indian Rifle

22

...(Not fired owing to shortage

of ammunition).

Wei Hai Wei Rifle

European Revolver

Indian Revolver

...(Not fired owing to shortage

of ammunition).

...Inspector Hopkins.

...Sub-Inspector Ali Moham-

med.

Chinese & Wei Hai Wei,.........P.C.D. 263 Liang Ching Lin.

K 23

GREENER GUN COURSES.

109. Greener Gun Courses were held during the year with

the following results:-

No. of

Results.

Department. Month.

Rounds

men

fired.

Passed. Failed.

used.

Chinese

Water Police... March.

74

73

1

370

Police

Watchinen...... February. 315

305

10

945

WINCHESTER RIFLE COURSES.

Chinese

Water Police...August.

65

57

8

1,800

Police

Watchmen...

March.

315

272

43

*2,000

* Short Course.

REVOLVER COURSES.

110. The following Revolver Courses were fired during the

year. :—

Contingent.

Month.

No. of persons fired.

Results.

Rounds used Passed Failed (approx.)

June.

Europeans

229 including 10 Superintendents.

229 Nil.

7,000

December. 238 including 9 238 Nil.

7,300

Superintendents.

Russians

March. October.

42

Indians

May.

658

November.

661

Indian Guards

(April,

73

November.

69

Cantonese

(April,

660

August.

679

Wei Hai Wei

April.

248

August.

252

Water Police

April. {August.

65

65

** H* 38 ON 28 £2

A EN 90 22 28 se

Nil.

1,100

Nil.

1,100

658 Nil.

17,100

661 Nil.

17,100

71

67

22

1,900

1,850

659 1

17,100

679

Nil.

17,300

248

Nil.

6,000

251

1

6,000

65 Nil.

1,600

65 Nil.

1,600

K 24

111. REVOLVER COURSES (OTHER DEPARTMENTS).

Results.

No. of

Rounds

Department. Month.

Men

used.

fired.

Passed. Failed.

District

Watchmen..... May

99

96

3

2,400

N.B.-1. No other Departments fired as Musketry was discontinued owing to duties being engaged in Japanese protection work.

2. The third course for all Contingents, i.e. Officers who failed to reach 1st Class Marksman's in the first and second course, (approximately 60%), did not fire.

BISLEY MEETING.

112. Members of the Police Force entered in several Team and Individual events at the Second Bisley Meeting of the Hong Kong Rifle Association, held in April 1937..

113. Results were generally successful, police winning altogether 3 silver cups, 14 silver and bronze medals and 17 cash prizes.

114. Outstanding successes were gained in the Revolver competitions, the Individual Revolver Championship being won by Sergeant Perkins.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

115. During the year the following number of recruits were passed out of the School:-

European Police

Prob. Chinese Sub-Inspectors

Indian Police

Cantonese Police

Wei-hai-wei Police

Russian Police

Seamen

15

9

60

55

3

13

7

District Watchmen

116. Eight promotion examinations were held in 1937.

K 25

117. Special training was given to eighteen Chinese Proba- tionary detectives. One hundred and eighty-five "D" Contingent Anti-Piracy Guards were given "Refresher Course". Three members of Emergency Unit Reserve and forty-four Indian and Chinese members of the Police Reserve were trained in knowledge of Police Duties and thirty-three passed. The remaining four- teen continue their course in 1938. Ten members of the "E" (Russian) Contingent returned to P.T.S. for a "Refresher Course". Three "E" (Russian) Constables underwent a course in "English Colloquial” and all qualified. All members of the Force were trained in Anti Gas drill.

FIRST AID.

118. The following table shows the number of men in each Contingent who attended First Aid Classes and obtained 1st and 2nd Certificates during the year ending 31st December, 1937:-

Contingent.

First Certificate.

Second Certificate,

Europeans

24

25

Indians

52

61

Cantonese

49

53

Wei-hai-wei

20

Total

125

159

119. The following shows the number of men in each Contingent who have qualified in First Aid or otherwise on or before 31st December, 1937:-

Continuing

1st

Contingent. Total

2nd Certs. Certs.

3rd

instruction

Certs.

in 1938.

Europeans

304

120

180

3

1

Indians

911

289

562

60

Cantonese

836

313

486

37

Wei-hai-wei

320

184

126

10

Total

2,371

906 1,354

3

108

K 26

AIR RAID PRECAUTIONS.

120. The following shows the total number of men who were trained in Anti Gas Course before or during 1937:

Total Qualified Qualified Strength. in 1936. in 1937.

Not yet

Total.

Qualified.

Europeans

262

215

32

247

15

*Indians

853

250

175

425

428

+Chinese

1,393

368

658

1,026

367

Female

Searchers

22

4

4

8

14

Messengers

& Station

Coolies

154

36

20

56

98

Total

2,684

873

889

1,762

922

* Includes Indian Special & Anti Piracy Guards.

+ Includes Clerks, Interpreters, Telephone Clerks, Wireless operators, Members of the Water Police and European & Chinese cooks on Police launches.

121. The course of training is spread over four days. The first three days are occupied with instruction in characteristics and effects of Gases, respirators and their use, protective equipment, decontamination of clothing and allied matters. On the fourth day the candidates are tested by a European officer, and given practical demonstration in a Gas filled chamber.

The nature of War Gases and their effects has been included in all First Aid lectures to Police. The Anti Gas Course has also been included as part of the training for recruits at the Police Training School.

LIFE SAVING CLASSES.

122. Instructional classes in Life Saving were held during the summer with successful results.

123. The Commodore again kindly granted facilities for practices and tests to be held off Stonecutters Island.

Contingents.

European

Indian

RESULTS.

Certificate & Bronze Medallion.

4

12

Total

16

K 27

124. The total number of officers now holding Awards for proficiency in Life Saving are:-

Chinese Indian

Europeans Indians Chinese

Police Reserve

Police Reserve

Total

39

95

15

9

6

164

GUARDS OFFICE.

125. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties during the year.

Nationality.

Establishment.

Russian Guards,

Indian Special Guards . ·74+

Chinese (Wei Hai Wei)

Guards

Indian Police Watchmen

122

Chinese (Cantonese)

Watchmen

Total

Enlistment.

Death.

Resignation.

Dismissal.

41*

3

2

242

23

I

84

3

52

1223

152

3

8

39

Į

2

Invalided.

Total Casualties.

Strength on 31.12.1936.

2

25

25

222 223

42

73

126

8

4

67

443

50

137

263

6 85

47

6

144

821

*Includes three attached to C.I.D., P.H.Q.

+ Interchangeable with and drawn from regular duties.

No fixed establishment; recruited as required.

126. Anti Piracy Work: Twenty-six units of Anti Piracy Guards of One European Sergeant and nine Indian Special Guards were supplied to the British India Steam Navigation Company and nine units to the Indo China Steam Navigation Company, on the Hong Kong-Singapore run.

127. Ten units of one British Sergeant and twelve Russian Guards were supplied to the Canadian Pacific Steamship Com- pany on the Hong Kong-Shanghai run.

-K 28-

128. During the annual overhaul of the Canadian Pacific vessels, the Russian Guards normally employed by the Company were drafted temporarily to the Police Training School for refresher courses.

129. The China Navigation Company retained permanent guards of one Russian Sergeant and six Wei-hai-wei Guards on 18 vessels between Shanghai, Hong Kong and Singapore. This Company retained altogether 20 units for this work to enable reliefs to be carried out.

130. The Indo-China Steam Navigation Company retained permanent guards of one Russian Sergeant and four Wei-hai-wei men each on two vessels between Hong Kong and Shanghai.

MENDICANTS.

131. During the year, 2,903 mendicants were dealt with by the Police, and repatriated at a cost of $1,685.00 Of this number, 584 were charged and convicted before the Courts.

132. The figures for the past five yaers were:

1933

1934

1935 1936 1937

Dealt with

774

665

654

902

2,903

Convicted

619

295

259

596

584

Banished

80

80

99

99

32

Of the total number sent away 264 were traced as having been sent away previously.

In addition to above, 32 persistent beggars were banished from the Colony for 10 years.

DEAD BODIES.

133. The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the streets and elsewhere during the last five years:

Locality.

1933

1934 1935 1936 1937

Victoria

357

289

214

270

327

Kowloon

881

679

708

690

856

Harbour

47

27

52

46

69

Elsewhere

62

61

64

85

101

Total

1,347 1,056

1,038

1,091

1,353

- K 29

Sex.

1933 1934

1935

1936

1937

Male

15

19

4

4

Adults.

Female

10

3

2

5

1

Unknown

1

1

{Male

722

564

544

573

745

Children. Female

558

444

444

480

574

Unknown

41

26

44

28

28

Total

1,347 1,056 1,038

1,091 1,353

DOGS AND RABIES.

134. As a precaution against rabies, the muzzling order was rigidly enforced throughout the year.

rabies in Tai Po, New Territory.

There were two cases of

1936.

1937.

Hong Kong| New

& Kowloon Territory]

Total

Hong Kong| New & Kowloon Territory

Total

Dogs licensed

3,093

497 3,590

2,709

417

3,126

Dogs licensed (free).

40

260

300

42

179

221

Dogs impounded

69

69

Dogs destroyed

56

197

253

88888

88

83

233

316

LICENCES.

135. Table VII shows the number of different licences issued during the year.

TRAFFIC.

136. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Section 3—Ordinance 40 of 1912):

Year

Prosecu- Convic- With

Dis- tions. tions. drawn. charged.

Remanded.

Total amount of fines.

1937 6,908 6,474

1936 7,679

237

125

72

$27,214.55

7,241

290

113

35

$28,238.45

MANSLAUGHTER.

1937

1

1936

1

ลง

1

1

K 30

137. The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers during the year was 860 as against 1,036 in the year 1936. The total number of persons passed as Motor Drivers during the year was 811 as against 869 in the year 1936.

138. The total number of accidents reported during the year was 2,589 as against 2,483 in the year 1936. The total number of persons killed was 81 as against 75 in the year 1936.

139. The total number of Public Motor Vehicles examined and passed fit for public use during the year was 4,713 as against 4,458 in the year 1936. The total number of Public Motor Vehicles examined and found unfit for public use during the year was 652 as against 500 in the year 1936.

140. The total number of Commerical Motor Vehicles examined and passed fit for commercial use during the year was 7,698 as against 7,400 in the year 1936. The total number of Commercial Motor Vehicles examined and found unfit for commercial use during the year was 1,395 as against 1,876 in the year 1936.

141. The total number of motor driver's licences suspended during the year was 71 as against 107 in the year 1936. The total number of motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was 3 as against 7 in the year 1936.

142. During 1937 the following amendments to existing traffic regulations were made:-

(1) A 30 M.P.H. speed limit was made in built up areas. (2) Queen's Road, except between Arsenal Street and

Murray Road, was made a 20 M.P.H. control.

(3) Silent Zones were commenced.

(4) A 2 hour limit was made for certain car parks.

(5) Motor licence fees were increased.

POLICE MOTOR VEHICLES.

143. The number of Police Motor Vehicles is as follows:

Motor Vans (including 2 motor dog vans)... 11

Motor Cars

Combinations (Motor Cycles)

Solo Motor Cycles

5

9

14

144. Table VIII gives a classification of vehicles accidents

and their causes.

-K 31.

EMERGENCY UNITS.

145. The Emergency Units in Hong Kong and Kowloon were kept busy throughout the year.

The Sino-Japanese situation called for many extra duties and special picquets.

146. The Emergency Unit (Hong Kong) increased its establishment by two squads of Indians (making a total of seven squads instead of five), on taking over the Gaol Clearing Station on the 27th of September, 1937. This is the administra- tive block of the old Victoria Gaol. The whole of the Emergency Unit (Hong Kong) is now quartered there. In addition to its ordinary duties, the Unit supplies Guards and Escorts for convicted prisoners to Hong Kong Prison at Stanley.

147. The Calls and Fees for the Hong Kong and Kowloon Units increased considerably from the previous year.

Calls. Fees collected.

Year.

Hong Kong Unit

1936

95

$2,893.00

Hong Kong Unit.

1937

139

$4,059.50

Kowloon Unit

1936

73

$2,127.50

Kowloon Unit

1937

141

$3,494.50

MEDALS.

148. His Excellency the Governor was pleased to award medals and commendations to members of the Force for long or meritorious services as under:

Colonial Police Long Service Medal

30

Colonial Police Long Service Medal:-

1st Bar

15

2nd Bar

4

Hong Kong Police Silver Medal

1

His Excellency the Governor's Commenda-

tion

2

149. The following Annexes are appended:-

A. Report on the Water Police,

B. Report on the Police Reserve,

C. Report on the Street Boys Club,

D. Report on the Remand Home for Juvenile

Offenders (Boys),

E. Report on the Remand Home for Juvenile

Offenders (Girls).

1938.

T. H. KING,

Commissioner of Police.

- K 32

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1936 AND 1937.

1936.

Personal Emoluments*

$2,357,419

1937.

$2,577,894

Other Charges.

Ammunition

12.688

14,349

Upkeep of Arins

4,101

2,878

Bedding

3,463

4,926

Burial of Destitute dead

226

364

Cleansing Materials and Washing

361

207

Clothing and Accoutrements

75,145

80,775

Coal and Gas

32,506

Coal for Barracks

9,709

Conveyance allowances

9,665

10,375

Coolie Hire

2,362

2,409

Disinfectants

1,765

1,759

Expenses of Anti-Piracy Guards

26,953

21,353

Grants to Villages in N.T. in aid of

Village Scout Scheme

480

480

Identification of Criminals

165

196

Incidental Expenses

4,606

6,500

Interpretation fees

161

146

Light and Electric Fans

54,082

33,595

Medals

170

635

Mess Utensils

913

462

Passages

92,989

130,399

Petrol Oil etc. for Police Motor Cars

and Cycles

9,186

8,581

Photography

3,926

3,695

Rations for Indian Police

58,109

61,730

Remand Home for Juvenile Offenders

5,318

4,811

Rent of Stations and Married Police

Quarters

30,339

24,879

Repairs to Police Motor Cars and

Cycles

4,972

7,008

Rewards

7,585

4,090

Secret Service

11,356

14,014

Small Stores

6,881

7,357

Special Course of Instruction

231

318

Subsistence of Prisoners

5,034

6,447

Telegrams and long distance telephone

calls

759

503

Telephones

698

Transport

15,261

11,061

$

458,961

$

499,506

*Includes Officers of Cadet, S.C. & A. & J.C. Services.

-K 33.

Table I.-Continued.

1936.

Special Expenditure.

Safety First Campaign

846

Spare parts for 3 Pdr. Guns

Police Telephone Pillar

Tear Gas Equipment

Typewriters

25 .38 Short Revolvers



1937.

2,095

1,779

Revision Water Police Mannual

200

Motor Transport New Territories

13,359

Police Van

4,328

80 303 Rifles & Bayonets

8,113

35 303 Rifles & Bayonets

3,046

Anti Gas Equipment

77

7,489

Total Special Expenditure

14,258

32,296

Total Police Department

.$ 2,830,638

$ 3,109,696

K 34

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1936. AND 1937.

HEAD OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY POLICE DEPARTMENT.

1936.

Duties.

Motor Spirit

6,602

1937.

7,496

Licences and Internal Revenue.

Arms Licences

25,955

23,460

Auctioneers Licences

2,150

1,350

Billiard Table Licences

800

1,300

Dangerous Goods Licences

18,147

20,325

Dogs Licences

17,452

22,710

Forfeitures

2,562

2,785

Game Licences

4,200

4,625

Liquor Licences, N.T.

3,740

4,300

Marine Store Dealers' Licences

9,910

10,080

Miscellaneous Licences

7,690

8,215

Money Changers' Licences

15,130

15,780

Pawnbroker Licences

148,530

159,875

Theatrical Licences

4,216

5,398

Vehicles, Motor Licences

183,509

280,934

Vehicles, Motor Drivers Licences

46,062

49,080

Vehicles, Other Licences

46,331

61,313

Vehicles, Other Drivers Licences

2,265

2,352

Vehicles, Motor Special Licensing

Fee, Foreign Registration

33,849

58,989

Fees of Court or Office, &c.

Blake Pier Tickets

289

137

Contributions for Anti-Piracy Escorts.

119,527

128,710

Film Censoring Fees

5,604

5,504

Miscellaneous Fees

8,431

8,985

Motor Ambulance Fees

7,730

10,700

Official Signature Fees

9,080

9,370

Police and other Stores

2,420

1,147

Police Services

13,817

17,237

Sick Stoppages from Police Force

3,907

4,694

Watchmen's Ordinance

11,018

12,480

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Condemned Stores, &c.

4,117

2,880

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

5,045

2,347

Overpayments in previous years

2,649

849

$ 772,734

$ 945,857

K 35

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

*Personal Emoluments



Year.

and other

Special Expenditure.

Total Expenditure.

Total

Revenue.

Charges.

1922

1,994,940

110,899

2,105,839

448,772

1929

2,027,717

57,247

2,084,964

463,148

1930

2,714,291

38,404

2,752,695

487,169

1931

2,950,698

13,921

2,964,619

613,883

1932

2,684,983

27,255

2,712,239

706,387

1933

2,813,617

22,915

2,836,532

697,684

1934

2,776,379

31,670

2,808,049

903,258

1935

2,425,442.

. 10,330

2,435,772

860,629

1936

2,816,380

14,258

2,830,638

772,734

1937

3,077,400

32,296

3,109.696

945,357

*Includes Officers of Cadet, S.C & A., & J.C., Services

attached to Department.

Year.

Hong Kong

Deportees.

Gaol Discharges.

Singapore Deportees.

Sarawak

""

Singapore Vagrants.

Table IV.

DEPORTATION OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR, 1937.

1936

1937

2,953 6,294

649

649

37

2,569 9,297 646

6

511

127

6.

536

115

4

Increase

3,003

25

Decrease

384

3

28

12

N

Dutch East Indies & Deli Undésirables.

Rangoon Deportees.

2

1

Mauritius Deportees.

D

Sandakan Deportees.

393

3586

I

974-

431

123

2,903

1,400

158

1,929

696

35

Ocean Island

Deportees.

Asiatic Petroleum

Co. Labourers.

Mendicants.

Hong Kong

order of the Court.

Persons sent away by

Hong Kong Police

Supervisees.

Total number of persons dealt with for 1936

12,141

Total number of persons dealt with for 1937

17,714

General Increase

5,573

Ex-Soldiers of 19th

Route Army.

- K 36-

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

1936.

- K 37

Table V.

A.-SERIOUS OFFENCES.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR of 1937.

1937.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

Chinese.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

€A

VALUE OF VALUE OF

PROPERTY

STOLEN.

PROPERTY

RECOVERED

Arms

60

64

391

13

52

Assault (Serious)

44

4

48

17

1

25%

18 5.5%

31

16

17

2

Assault with intent to rob

91

9

5

5 100%

4

2.

Burglary

57

80

137

106)

155

261 59%

127

1. 28,251.08

4,371.19

Coinage Offences

70

701

22

22 100%

24

1

Deportation

848

848

742

742 100%

727

14

Embezzlement

19

39

58

18

32

50

64%

1

16

44,740.55

House and Godown breaking

98

126

224

145

165

310

53%

174

3 19,265.06

820.00

5,002.07

Intimidation and Extortion

2

3

3 100%

3

1

Kidnapping

81

11

11 100%

12

Larceny

4,395

2,207

6,602

6,197

3,330

9,527 34%

3 6,378

2

Larceny from Dwelling house

51

189

240

64

350

414 83%

1

67

Larceny on Ships and Wharf

90

74

· 164

130

96

226 42%

1

137

Manslaughter

1

7

11

2

13

15%

7

Murder

11

16

9

5

14 35%

7

Murder (attempted)

1

1

2

50%

1

Obtaining by False Pretences

110

16

126

140

34

174 19%

134

Receiving

258

258

366

366 100%

328

229 200,840.26

3 91,505.87] 16,828.14 613,889.72 2,669.92

6. 1,600.00

12 16,124:78 962.90 70

51,768.07

Robbery

19

37

56

40

57

97 58%

42

35 37,392.70 4,519.75

Women and Girls

4

4

3!

3 100%

2

1

Other Serious Offences

81

16

97

100

241

124 19%

~

94

2

30 77,580.28 28,887.00

Total

6,234

2,804 9,038

8,169

4,265 12,434|

8

9 8,332

10

· 3

435 531,190.30 115,829.04

C.

MINOR OFFENCES.

*

1936

K 38

Table V.

B.-MINOR OFFENCES.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR OF 1937.

Charged Cases.

Cases without charge.

Total Cases.

1937.

Charged Cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total Cases.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

PERSONS CONVICTED.

Europeans.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

Indians.

Chinese..

*A

VALUE OF VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN.

PROPERTY RECOVERED

Assault

Brought forward

Damage to Property

6,234

2,804

668

9,038 668

8,169

4,265 12,434)

8

9 8,332

5

3

435 531,190.30 115,829.04

563

563

32

32

43

43

72

2 842

79

47

3

Dangerous Goods

27

27

26

26

31

2

Drunkenness

11

11

26

26

21

5

Forestry Offences

1,184

1,184

3,026

3,026

3,238

44

Gambling

182

182

292

292

2,912

41

Hawking Offences

-26,075

26,075

29,986

29,986

29,490

518

Lottery Offences

103

103

71

71

78

3

Mendicants

1,156

1,156

1,062

1,062

1,067

37

Merchant Shipping Ordinance

524

524

534

534

2

1,180

34

Morphine

479

479

425

425

1

399

140

Nuisances

605

605

626

626

667

31

Opium

I

885

885

640

640

776

48

Revenue

1,042

1,042

972

972

998

74

Rogue and Vagabond

181

181

321

321

31

349

24

Stowaways

26

26

29

29

11

1

36

1

Unlawful Possession

344

344

504

504

491

51

Vagrants

18

18

33

33

32

Vehicle and Traffic

2,288

2,288

2,209

2,209

2223

6

12

2,215

9

Women and Girls

759

7591

795

795

791

14

Other Miscellaneous Offences

960

960

1,105

1,105

81

6 1,131

57

Total

37,549

37,549 43,288

43,288

170

22 46,743

5

10

Grand Total

43,783

2,804 46,587 51,457 4,265 55,722

178

31 55,075

10

2 1,210

5 1,645 531,190.30 115,829.04

C. $5

C.

- K 39

Arms seized.

Origin.

Description of Arms.

Table VI.

ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING 1937.

In Store on 31.12.37.

Ammunition

Origin.

seized.

Arms.

Ammunition.

Winchester Rifles

Rifles (Various)

Shot Gun

2

HHNN

1

American

4

1

American

32

French

Unknown

110

Unknown

94

Unknown

Air Gun

German Rifles

Chinese

N

Mauser Pistols

German

German

2

399

German

27

Auto Pistols

1

German

1

German

34

1

French

99 Rds.

1

Belgium

2

Unknown

72

Revolvers (Various)

4

Belgium

455

Unknown

Belgium

30

French

2

Spanish

Unknown

565

Unknown

4

American

1,867

American

250

British

P

84

Lugar Pistols

Thompson Sub-Machine Gun..

Lewis Gun, Savage

- K 40

Table VII.

The following table shows the number of licences issued during the years 1936 and 1937:-

Arms

Arms Dealers

Auctioneers

Auctioneers (Temporary)

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys

Conductors

Dance Halls

1936.

1937.

1,516

1,446

9

3

2

14

6

3

4

....

341

305

6

7

Dance Halls (Temporary)

1

5

Dangerous Goods

1,280

1,419

Game

197

180

Marine Stores

27

27

Massage Establishments

13

11

Money Changers

157

161

Motor Cars (Livery)

493

523

Motor Cars (Private)

3,267

3,463

Motor Vans and Lorries

689

706

Motor Car International Permits

9

5

Motor Drivers (Cars and Cycles)

8,156

8,599

Motor Drivers (International)

254

290

Motor Cycles

284

233

Pawnbrokers

65

68.

Places of Public Entertainment

80

Poisons

106

156

Printing Presses

261

268

Private Chairs

38

59

Private Jinrickshas

364

278

Public Chairs

280

250

Public Jinrickshas

1,026

965

Tricycles

993

1,129

Trucks

15

16

Vehicle Drivers and Bearers

7,788

7,983

Cause of Accident.

K 41

Table VIII,

CLASSIFIED TABLE OF CAUSES OF ACCIDENTS LEADING TO THE INJURY OF P

Motor Buses.

Private Cars.

Public Cars.

نسر

Motor Lorries.

Tram Cars.

Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowl

F.N.F. F. N.F. F. N.P. F. N.F. F. N.F. F.N.F.

F. N.F. F. N.F.

F.

N.F. F.N

8 13

122 4

39

2.

Walking or running in front

of a moving vehicle

6

17

I

Leaving or boarding a moving

vehicle.

1

11

10

5

71

Stepping off footway.

1

3 1

10

Passing behind

a moving

vehicle

1

Falling from a vehicle

Running across streets

Playing games on streets

1

14

1

13 1

1

18

6

ลง

2

1

Į

14

12

2

72 1

40

1

Passengers on vehicle injured

in accident ·

1

[

1

1 2

9

I

I

|

1

*

43

6 4 38

4

18

7

47

7

4

3

11

7

33333

Drivers of vehicle injured in

accident

Other Causes

Q

7

(a) 1 (f)1 (2) 1

(b) 1 (g)1 (i) 2

Total accidents involving in-

juries

8

51 7

105

12

229 8 123

2

82

Total accidents (fatal, invol-

ving injury and without

256

1,032

injury)

276

1

12

|

Co

6

86

2

-

12

4

2

11

3

245

24

1

1

-

1

1

1

I

-

7

1

1

2

(c)

(d)

2 (h)1 (

2

223

21 11

79

13

70 13

135

518

194

1

}

}

!

(a) A motor bus mounted pavement, injuring two Chinese males.

(b) One private car mounted footpath, injuring 1 Chinese male and a female.

(c) A Chinese male was injured when he was jammed between a moving motor lorry and a st

(d) Four Chinese males were injured when a motor lorry overturned.

(e) A bicycle ran into a side channel, injuring two children sitting there.

(1) A Chinese male was crushed and fatally injured between the rear of a motor bus and a ;

(g) One rickshaw coolie whilst sitting on his rickshaw was fatally injured during a collision (h) A motor lorry mounted pavement, killing a child sitting alone there.

(i) Four persons when squatting in side channels were struck and injured by a motor lorry, (1) Que lorry passenger was struck and injured by branches of a tree when the lorry was pas

-K 41-

Table VIII.

NG TO THE INJURY OF PEDESTRIANS OR PASSENGERS IN VEHICLES.

otor Lorries.

Tram Cars.

Motor Cycles.

Pedal Cycles.

Rickshaws.

Totals.

Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon

Hong Kong

Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon Hong Kong Kowloon

N.F. F. N.F. F. N.F. F. N.F.

F. N.F. F. N.F.

F.

N.F. F. N.F. F. N.F. F. N.F. Fatal.

Non-Fatal.

38

4

18 7 47

1

11

T

7 6

7

86

1

1

17

1

9 2

25

29

29

1

3

2

2

2

2

1

12

4

Q

co

6

11 3

24

1

3

2

3

1

20

1

7

1

1

1

Q

2 (h)1

2

2

2

37

425

12

176

3

74

1

27

10

22

6

237

7

1

2

3

27

10

8

19

1

47

12

(e) 1

79 13 70 13

135

34

23 2

518

194

85

599

56

1

89

206

males.

nale and a female.

en a moving motor lorry and a stationary one.

verturned.

n sitting there.

1 the rear of a motor bus and a garage wall.

fatally injured during a collision between a private car and a motor bus.

ng alone there.

ck and injured by a motor lorry, 2 private cars and 1 motor bus.

of a tree when the lorry was passing under it.

155

I

2

2

112

3

10

La

5

(c) 77

1,117

10

}

23

22

2,589

(c) In the 77 fatal accidents, 81 persons were killed.

K 42

Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

1. The following return shows the establishment and casualties of the Water Police during the year 1937:-

Nationality.

Chinese

255 19

4 6

10

5

5 20

CONDUCT.

2. The conduct of the Chinese Staff of the Water Police was good. There were 236 reports in 1937 as compared with 435 reports in 1936.

There were 142 men against whom no defaulter reports were made during 1937.

ACCIDENTS.

As a

3. There were seventeen accidents involving Police Launches during 1937 as compared with sixteen in 1936. Seven of these were trifling, damage being negligible. In four cases it was found that Water Police Officers were not to blame. result of enquiries held by the Harbour Master, one European, four Coxswains and two Engineers were dealt with depart- mentally.

All the harbour launches with the exception of No. 14 sustained some damage during the typhoon of September 2nd, 1937. The crews behaved with courage and presence of mind, and managed to prevent any of the launches becoming total wrecks. They were commended by the Commissioner of Police.

CRUISING LAUNCHES.

4. During the year, No. 1 Launch underwent annual overhaul.

ļ

K 43

5. No. 2 Launch underwent a very extensive refit and was placed on the Tai Po Beat, replacing the old No. 1B Launch which has been transferred to the Harbour Department. All cruising launches escaped without damage in the typhoon of September 2nd, except No. 3 Launch which received very slight damage in collision with the S.S. Yuet On off Tsun Wan. No. 1 Launch was able to give assistance in taking off passengers and crew of S.S. "Kwang Chow" when she stranded on Chau Kung Island during the typhoon.

6. All Cruising Launches are now equipped with wireless and armed with 3 pdr. Guns.

HARBOUR LAUNCHES.

7. All six harbour launches are giving efficient service. All are fitted with search-lights, with the exception of No. 7 which is mainly used by Anti-Piracy searching staff.

8. Three beat launches and one General Patrol launch were kept in service day and night during the greater part of the year.

MOTOR BOATS.

9. Nos. 10 and 12 motor boats are giving good service on Special Harbour duties. No. 11 motor boat has proved very valuable on Shum Chun River patrol. Nos. 15 and 18 are stationed at Sai Kung and Tai O respectively. All motor boats are in good condition.

MUSKETRY.

10. A half yearly Machine Gun Course was fired on the four Cruising Launches. The 3 pounder guns crew of all cruising launches fired one 3 pounder course. Good results were obtained in these courses. Greener Guns and Winchester Rifles are supplied to cruising launches. The crews were trained regularly in the use of these arms, and fired an annual course in both with good results.

11. The Departament is indebted to the courtesy of the Naval Authorities for assistance in maintenance, supervision and practice with 3 pounder guns.

- K 44 -

Annexe B.

HONG KONG POLICE RESERVE (1937).

1. The organisation of the Hong Kong Police Reserve has remained unchanged during the year.

2. Strength. The strength of the Force shows an increase over the figures for the previous year, the total being 227. The various units are shown below, with comparison of the 1936 figures.

1936.

1937.

Chinese Company

76

85

Indian Company

72

75

Flying Squad

28

33

Emergency Unit Reserve

28

34

Total

204

227

3. The number of resignations received during the year, for various reasons totalled 17, the number of members struck off the strength totalled 1, and deaths nil, a grand total of 18. The number of new members enlisted was 41.

4. Appointments.-Mr. Abbas Khan, J.P., was appointed Hon. Commissioner Indian Company on 22nd November, 1937.

Mr. Feroz Ali was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Police (R) and to be in command of the Indian Company on 25th March, 1937.

5. Riot Van.-The-Riot Van was in constant use throughout the year in connection with training, and was on loan to the Regular Police for most of the time.

6. Commendations:-

Chinese Company.

P.C.R. 36 Ho Iu Nam-Three Commendations and One

Commended Service.

P.C.R. 20 Leung On Tai-Two Commendations.

P.C.R. 23 Kong Ka Yan-Commendation.

P.C.R. 5 Woo How Ching--Commendation.

L.S.R. 74 Albert W. L. Chong-Commendation.

Indian Company.

- K 45

P.S.R. 204 Abdul Karim-Commendation.

P.C.R. 211 S. Aras-Comnendation.

P.C.R. 223 Firdos Khan-Commendation.

P.C.R. 236 M. S. Dillon-Coinmendation.

P.C.R. 253 Mohamed Ahsan-Two Commendations and One

Commended Service Bar.

Flying Squad.

P.C.R. 303 D. Young-Commendation.

Emergency Unit, Reserve.

Inspector (R) M. V. Field-Commendation.

7. Training.-Training was continued on similar lines as in previous years, and it is satisfactory to record improved attend-

ance.

8. Special Training.-Gas Course, Search Patrols, Riot Drills and Defendu. The above special training were given to members of the Hong Kong Police Reserve by P.S.A. 190 Taylor and Inspector (R) M. V. Field.

9. Duties. Duties have been performed from time to time as auxiliary to the Regular Police, and Contingents have been supplied on the usual ceremonial occasions. Many other duties have also been performed i.e. H. M. the King's Birthday Review, and at the Annual Race Meeting.

- K 46

Annexe C.

ANNUAL REPORT ON THE STREET BOYS' CLUB FOR 1937.

1. The total membership at the end of December, 1937, was eleven. All the members are in regular employment with the exception of Lai Chiu who was formerly employed in the Police Store.

2. During the year, one member resigned, two absconded and two left the Club on marriage.

3. Four new members joined the club during the year.

4. Mr. Fu Fan Kau, the Club school teacher in English and Chinese, continued his keen interest and the members have shown their appreciation by good attendances at the classes during the year, though there was a slight falling off during the last two months.

5. During the summer months the members were taken to the Y.M.C.A. matshed, North Point, for swimming classes. The officials of the Y.M.C.A. kindly gave them the use of their club premises. Unfortunately the matshed was completely destroyed by the typhoon. An application was made to the Committee of the Chung Sing Bathing Club, Kennedy Town, for the use of their club and this was kindly granted. The members availed themselves of this opportunity and twice weekly the classes were well attended.

6. All the members who attended the swimming classes were able to swim.

7. Six members entered for the 50 yards race, open to Messengers and Street Boys' Club, at the Annual Police Aquatic Sports held at the Victoria Recreation Club on

on the 11th of September, 1937. The first two places were taken by members of the Club.

8. To commemorate the Coronation the members were granted expenses for a day's outing at Repulse Bay on June the 15th.

9. Lo Shu Wan, a member of the Club, was commended by Mr. Schofield at the Central Magistracy on the 8th of August, 1937, for his capture of a Chinese male Chan Yau at Connaught Road West near Western Street. The man was sentenced to two months H.L. for Larceny and Lo Shu Wan was granted a reward $10.00 by the Commissioner of Police.

10. The Chinese Y.M.C.A. again placed their Gymnasium at the disposal of the Club. Through the kind offices of the Directorate Games, drill and gymnastic classes were held twice weekly (except during the swimming season).

7

-K 47-

11. During the year, Mr. T. H. King, Mr. C. G. Perdue, Mr. A. R. S. Major and Mr. P. Grant paid periodical visits to the Club. Mr. Ho Chung U, Juvenile Probation Officer, visited the Club frequently and held discussions with the members.

12. During the year, gifts of cakes and fruits were frequent- ly received from many persons who maintain an interest in the Club. These gifts were highly appreciated by the boys.

13. The Club is in a good state of repair at present.

14. The members show a regrettable lack of interest in the Savings Bank. Some earn fair wages, but they make no attempt to save.

K 48

Annexe D.

REMAND HOME FOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS (Boys).

1. During the year 1,114 boys were sent into the Remand Home for the offences enumerated below:

Sentenced

Offence.

Arrested.

to

Detention.

Hawking

690

102

Larceny

206

65

Tobacco (Smuggling)

18

Opium and Heroin Pills

17

Selling Firework

1

Breach of Traffic Regulations

8

Gambling

10

Assaults

8

Wine Smuggling

Stowaways

2

Unlawful possession

10

Begging

44

15

Loitering

Breach of Forestry Regulations

Trespassing

Destitute and Wandering

Burglary, Housebreaking and Storebreaking.

Disorderly Conduct

Breach of Yaumati Ferry Regulations

7

1

1

2

1

27

~~~ || | || | °

3

Earth Removing Without Permit

Found in Enclosed Premises

Receiving Stolen Property

Enquiries

False Testimony

Committing a Nuisance

Importing Unmanifested Cargo

Counterfeit Coins

False Pretences

Wilful Damage to Remand Home Property.

Demanding Money with Menaces

Loitering with Bad Characters

14

26

2

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

4

1

1.

Total

.1,114

221

2. Of the 1,114 boys, 93 were dealt with as adults; one was transferred to Victoria Gaol; twenty-three were sent to Aberdeen Industrial School; and six were sent to the China Youths Society. On 705 occasions boys were remanded back to the Home for enquiries by the Probation Officers. Eight boys were serving a second term of Detention in the Home, and one boy for begging, served a fifth term in the Home. The general conduct of the boys was good. There were three attempts at escape during the year.

- K 49

3. The health of the boys generally was good. The follow- ing is the record of illness for the year:

Admitted to Hospital

Treated at the Home

19

58

470 boys were vaccinated, and 295 were inoculated against cholera, during the year. The Medical Officer visited the Home weekly and oftener as necessary.

4. Ninety-two boys were instructed in rattan-work during the year.

5. During the year a a number of ladies and gentlemen visited the Home at various times. Visitors included the following ladies and gentlemen connected with the Society for the Protection of Children:

Mrs. N. L. Sinith,

Mrs. J. Middleton-Smith,

Mrs. D. S. Robb,

Mrs. A. S. Gubbay,

Mr. G. P. de Martin,

Mr. J. T. Prior.

In special cases visits of parents of the boys were aiso permitted.

6. Mr. Cheung Lo Kau of the Chinese Y.M.C.A. visits the Home on Wednesdays and gives religious instruction to the boys. The two Probation Officers also give one hour's instruc- tion each week.

1 Chinese Lance

7. The staff of the Home includes Sergeant and 7 Chinese Constables. They escort the boys to and from the Courts, and when not so engaged, look after the boys in the Home and help to teach in the School. All these Police officers have long service and their conduct during the year was good.

8. The Probation Officers are mainly engaged in making enquiries about boys on remand, and in visiting boys on proba- tion. The Probation Officers make their reports personally to the Magistrates in charge of the Juvenile Courts.

K 50

Annexe E.

REMAND HOME FOR JUVENILE OFFENDERS (Girls).

1. 355 girls juvenile offenders were admitted to the Home during the year for the following offences:-

Hawking Mendicancy

In Possession of Opium & Heroin Pills In Possession of Dutiable Tobacco

In Possession of Dutiable Liquor Breach of Forestry Regulations Larceny

Coining Offence

Destitute & Wandering

Enquiries

In Possession of Dangerous Drugs

Receiving Stolen Money

Polluting Public Drinking Water Removing Pig-Wash during Prohibited.

Hours

Soliciting for Immoral Purposes

Removing Night Soil during Prohibted

Hours

Trespassing

Attempted Suicide

Total

263

8

12

6

1

2

14

4

1

1

1

3

1

1

1

355

2. Of this number, 24 were dealt with as adults, 4 trans- ferred to the Salvation Army Home and 69 were ordered Detention by the Magistrate for the following offences:-

Hawking

Mendicancy

In Possession of Dutiable Tobacco In Possession of Dutiable Liquor

Breach of Forestry Regulations

Larceny

Enquiries

In Possession of Dangerous Drugs Soliciting for Immoral Purposes

Total

46

6

1

1

6

3

69

3. Two girls were admitted to Hospital during the year. Many cases of scabies and numerous minor complaints were treated in the Home. The Medical Officer visited the Home weekly and at other times as required.

Appendix K (1).

REPORT OF THE CHIEF OFFICER, HONG KONG

FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1937.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

The expenditure of the Fire Brigade for the year 1937 was $328,892.56 (£20,555 15s 8d) including special expenditure amounting to $37,404.32 (£2,337 15s 5d) as against $293,162.54 (£18,322 13s 2d) including special expenditure amounting to $11,225.31 (£701 11s 8d) in 1936.

2. The revenue of the Brigade for the year amounted to $11,408.00 (£713 Os Od) derived from the following sources: --

Motor Ambulance service

.$10,700.00

(£668 15s Od) as against $7,730.00 (£483 2s 6d) for 1936, an increase of 38%.

Theatre and Special duties

.$708.00

(£44 5s Od) as against $510.00 (£31 17s 6d) for 1936, an increase of 38%.

ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.

3. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Brigade during the year 1937:-

Establishment of the Brigade.

Enlistments.

Deaths.

Resignations.

Invalided.

Retired on

Pension.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total number of Casualties.

Europeans

Indian

11

1

Chinese

244

25 1 4

10

10

25

Total

256

25

1

4

10

10

25

-K (1) 2

FLOATING STAFF.

Coxswains. Engineers.

Present

5

Stokers.

Seamen.

Total.

6

14

33

Actual Strength on the 31st December, 1937.

Europeans. Indian.

Floating

Chinese.

Total.

Staff.

9

1

228

32

270

Sick or

Absent on leave.

Vacancies..

Total

N

9

11

7

1

8

11

1

244

33

289

the whole quite

Discipline during the year was on

satisfactory.

STATIONS AND EQUIPMENT.

4. In March Government approved a recommendation that the reinforced concrete buildings, known as Andrew Harper Buildings, 745-747, Nathan Road, Kowloon should be rented as a Fire Station, instead of the unsatisfactory premises rented as Mong Kok Fire Station. The new premises were adapted in accordance with Brigade plans. Work was completed by May 1st. when the Brigade moved in. The old Mong Kok Fire Station was closed at the same time.

The staff and appliances from Sham Shui Po sub-station were transferred to the new premises. This sub-station was merged into Sham Shui Po Police Station affording a much needed increase of accommodation. The acquisition of the new premises enabled certain economies of staff, and provided additional married quarters for European Officers.

The new Station has the following features:

(1) Five bays for fire appliances.

(2) Three bays for ambulances.

(3) Space for accommodating the Brigade Workshop plant

and artisan staff.

(4) Accommodation for 60 Chinese Sub-Officers and men. (5) Three flats for European Officers Quarters.

.

- K (1) 3

Opportunity was taken to re-name certain of the Brigade Stations as follows:

ISLAND OF HONG KONG.

Wanchai Fire Station to be known as Eastern Fire Station..

Kennedy Town Fire Station to be known as Western Fire Station.

KOWLOON PENINSULA.

The new Fire Station at 745-747, Nathan Road, to be known as Kowloon Fire Station.

The Fire Station at Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui (formerly named Kowloon Fire Station) to be known as Terminus Fire Station.

5. The brick and concrete structure at Taipo, New Territory, which housed a Police Van, Fire Brigade tender with portable fire pump and one motor ambulance, was struck by a tidal wave during the severe typhoon on 2/9/1937 and collapsed, causing such damage to the vehicles that the ambulance and Police van were beyond repair. The portable fire pump escaped serious damage and the Fire Brigade tender was salvaged and repaired at a cost of $1,600. The ambulance is being replaced at the earliest possible date.

6. A new Dennis Motor Fire Engine fitted with 300/800 g.p.m. multi-stage Turbine Pump, and complete with first aid system and 50 ft. Ajax sliding-carriage Fire Escape was supplied in March, 1937, and added to the equipment of the Brigade.

The following vehicles were ordered during the year and will be supplied in 1938:

(a) A new Motor Water Tower and Fire Escape Chassis complete with turbine pump and first-aid equipment, to replace the No. 9 Appliance chassis, for the mounting of the existing 95 feet steel ladders.

(b) A new 23.5 H.P. Motor Ambulance to replace Ambulance No. 73 which was wrecked at Taipo in the typhoon of 2/9/1937.

7. All of the thirty-six vehicles now maintained by the Fire Brigade were regularly inspected during the year; fifteen of the vehicles were completely overhauled and repainted.

8. The old No. 3 Fire Float was sold on the 27/1/1937. 1 Engineer and 1 Seaman from the Floating Staff were retrenched.

K (1) 4

In addition to the annual overhaul, No. 1 Fire Float was provided with new water-ends at a cost of $6,000. No. 2 motor Fire Float was overhauled and slipped as required.

9. All other appliances and equipment were examined and tested every month.

10. The numbers of both Pedestal and Underground hydrants were increased by 17 and 18 respectively during the year; the total number of hydrants is now 1,489 viz:-

Pedestal hydrants:

Hong Kong (including Peak)

Kowloon

202

159

Underground hydrants:-

Hong Kong (including Peak)

730

Kowloon (including New Territories)

398

Total.....

1,489

All hydrants were inspected quarterly.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

11. Fires.

(a) One Chinese male, aged 35 years, died of suffocation and burns received at a fire at 125, Bonham Strand, East, on 20/1/1937.

(b) During the course of repairs to the oil tanker, s.s. Willy at Kowloon Docks on 23/2/1937, a fire and explo- sion occurred due to an unsuspected accumulation of oil in a disused oil pipe line. The use of naked lights resulted in the fire and explosion; four persons were removed to Hospital, one of whom died of severe burns.

(c) Called to extinguish a small fire which had broken out in a kitchen at No. 323, Reclamation Street, 3rd floor on 28/2/1937, the Brigade discovered,

Casualties.

Killed.

Injured.

1

1

3

- K (1) 5-

hidden under a partly burned wooden door, the partially incinerated body of a woman who had been bound and gagged. At the time of the arrival of the Brigade, the person responsible for the crime was on the scene, but escaped temporarily, and was arrested later. He was placed on trial at the Supreme Court and sentenced to death.

(d) Following a fierce fire in a tenement type of building at No. 23, Sha Po Road, Kowloon City, on the 22/5/1937, the charred remains of one Chinese male and three Chinese females were discovered in the debris.

(e) At the

the height of the disastrous

typhoon on 2/9/1937, the Brigade was called at 03.44 hours by the street fire alarms situated at Bonham Strand, West, and Eastern Street, and by Public telephone, to a fire which had broken out at 134, Con- naught Road, West. The Central Fire Station appliances and an appliance from Western Fire Station immediately responded to the call, notwithstanding the flooded nature of the streets, falling masonry, sign- boards and electric wires. Three ap- pliances became partially submerged on their way to the fire, the water putting the engines out of action. Three appliances were able to reach the scene. It was discovered that а fierce fire had already involved the large tenement houses, Nos. 133 & 134, Connaught Road, West, on the waterfront of the harbour, and was spreading rapidly eastward and west- ward. In spite of heavy seas which submerged the roads, the Brigade brought two pumps to work from nearby hydrants, but owing to the terrific wind force which at times reached over 130 M.P.H. the jets were converted into spray, twelve feet after

Killed. Injured.

1

4

K (1)

Killed.

Injured.

discharge from the nozzles. Owing to the buffetting of the large waves sweeping over the men, it became necessary for eight men to hold each delivery. Firemen and Police soon collected 15 bodies from the vicinity of the ground floors of the buildings involved. These bodies were, how- ever, swept away later by big waves which also nearly engulfed one of the fire appliances and compelled the withdrawal of the Brigade from the waterfront. Within an hour the fire had spread to involve the whole of the premises 131 to 137, Connaught Road, West, and was seriously threatening the many buildings in rear. The Brigade continued operations from adjoining roof-tops and lanes in rear of the burning buildings, the men working in these lanes being at times nearly submerged by the surging waves from the sea-front. At this stage of the fire Firemen and Police also concentrated on the removal of all persons and as much inflammable material as possible from adjoining buildings to prevent further fatalities and the spread of fire. The fire was

out of control from the time of the outbreak until 06.30 hours when the typhoon showed signs of abating. A Brigade call was then circulated, and with the receding of water in the streets it was possible to get two further motor pumps to work at the scene of the fire. The fire was then brought under control after one hour's work with nine deliveries. Only one charred body was recovered from the buildings, but it was reported that a total of 41 persons lost their lives; most of these fatalities were due to drowning when the inmates of the buildings endeavoured to escape down the staircases, the ground floors into which these staircases gave exit, being submerged to a depth of 4-5 feet......

41

K (1) 7

N

Features of this fire were that no ladders of any description could be used; it was almost impossible to stand up without support, and the veering wind which reached record force entirely prevented effective operations.

On the date of this typhoon the Brigade received 16 other calls.

(f) At a fire involving native type dwell- ings at Po Kong Village, near Kowloon City on 1/11/37: one Chinese male and one Chinese female were burned to death whilst one Chinese male and one Chinese female received burns from which they ultimately recovered.

12. Explosions.

(1) A sudden explosion, which was heard along the Central District water-front at about 20.00 hours on 17/5/1937 caused considerable alarm. The Brig- ade turned out all available Am- bulances and emergency tender.

On arrival at Queen's Pier it was dis- covered that a Japanese steam launch, "Dojima Maru" of the Osaka Shosen Kaisha had blown up whilst alongside the Pier. Bystanders in the vicinity were already searching for survivors. No. 2 Fire Float then arrived on the scene and with the aid of her search- light and dinghy assisted the search for survivors in the waters of the harbour near the pier. A survey of the scene revealed an indescribable sight, the pier being strewn with a large number of mutilated bodies and considerable wreckage from the launch. Twenty injured persons were at once removed to Hospital in the Brigade Ambulances and in a lorry which was commandeered on the spot. The force of the explosion was

Killed.

Injured.

2

K (1) 8

Killed.

Injured.

so great that two bodies were blown into the roadway 200 ft. away, whilst a third body was found on the 70 feet high roof of the Hong Kong Club, some 300 feet away. It was found later that the death roll was thirty- four, many of the bodies being hardly recognizable. At a Court of Enquiry on the disaster it was revealed that the boiler of the launch, which was recovered from the bottom of the harbour, was defective and had ex- ploded. Most of the victims of the disaster were emigrants from the Japanese Liner Rio-de-Janiero Maru lying in the harbour

13. Collapses and Landslides.

(1) During the course of piling a building site at Canton Road, Yaumati, on 23/5/1937 a sudden squall caused the breakage of the guy lines of a 70 feet high steel pile driver which, in its crash to the ground, demolished some nearby wooden shacks. Seven per- sons, including the foreman in charge of the pile driver, were killed and ten persons injured. The Brigade turned out with Appliances and Ambulances and extricated the dead and injured ...

(2) Following the collapse of two Chinese

houses at Un Long Market, New Territory, on 8/8/1937, two Chinese males and two Chinese females were extricated alive.

(3) Following a landslide at Foo Loong Quarry, Tai Kok Tsui, on 22/8/1937 one Chinese male, aged 29 years was extricated dead.

34

7

1



Total Casualties

20

10

4

92

39

K (1) 9

CALLS.

14. The number of calls received during the year totalled 175; actual fires 124, Chimney fires 22, collapses 8, landside 1, and false alarms 20. Compared with the previous year (1936) there was a decrease of 17 calls. Thirty-three were received by street fire alarms, eighty-seven by telephone, forty-five from Police and ten from messengers.

15. Of the false alarms, four were maliciously given, eight were given with good intent, and eight were due to electrical faults in the street fire alarm system:

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.

16. Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 643 compris- ing altogether 2,413 hours.

FIRE INSPECTION WORK.

17. The following inspections were made by officers of the Brigade and reported upon during the year:-

Theatres and Cinemas

Boarding Houses

202

108

Factories and Workshops

Garages

Licensed Premises (Liquor licences)

Eating Houses

460

121

79

142

Timber and Firewood Storages

79

Buildings (Government and Public)

89

High and Low Flash Inflammable Liquid Stores..

309

Petrol Pumps

149

Kerosene Stores in shops

783

Dangerous Goods Storages

370

Offensive Trades

11

Fireworks Storages

39

Neon Light Advertising Signs

475

Vernacular Schools

301

Dance Halls and Academies

26

Fire Service Installations

583

Miscellaneous Inspections

208

Total

4,534

The number of inspections carried out each month is shewr in Table IV.

-K (1) 10-

18. Twelve private fire-hydrant services were installed in various premises during the year. Two buildings with installa- tions were demolished during the year. There are now 255 such installations in the Colony. These were inspected, tested and reported upon during the year.

19. The sixteen Automatic Sprinkler Installations in the Colony were tested and reported upon during the year.

20. 357 Chemical Fire Extinguishers located in various Government buildings were tested and recharged by the Brigade during the year.

21. The total number of Dangerous Goods licences in force at the end of the year was 1,218 (fees $16,610.00) as against 1,214 licences (fees $14,790.00) for 1936.

22. One prosecution, resulting in a fine amounting to $30.00 was undertaken by the Brigade during the year for contravention of the Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

23. The eleven Motor Ambulances maintained by the Brigade attended altogether 7,451 cases during the year, and travelled 66,553 miles.

The undermentioned summary shows the number of cases attended and mileage during the past five years.

1937. 1936. 1935. 1934. 1933.

No. of cases attended

Distance run

(miles)

7,451 4,503 4,405 3,797 4,299

66,553 39,466 39,018 32,753 34,437

The large increase in cases and mileage run, as compared to previous years, is mainly attributable to the Cholera epidemic which was very severe during the months July-September.

As a result of the epidemic the Ambulance staff was called upon to perform considerably increased work. His Excellency, the Officer Administering the Government was pleased to express his satisfaction with the manner in which the additional work had been performed by the Ambulance staff.

':

-K (1) 11--

24. During the year the scale of charges for the use of the motor ambulances was revised as follows:

(a) $5.00 per journey not exceeding 15 miles.

(b) $10.00 per journey exceeding 15 miles.

Additional charges are made for transport across the harbour by vehicular or passenger ferries.

ANNUAL DISPLAY.

25. The Annual Display by the Brigade took place in the compound of No. 2 Police Station, Wanchai, in the presence of H.E. the Governor, Sir Geoffry Northcote, K.C.M.G., Lady Northcote, and a large number of distinguished visitors and spectators, on November 18th 1937. During the Display the finals of the following Competition Drills, were contested:

Competition.

Motor Escape Drill.

Motor Pump Drill.

Winner.

Eastern Fire Station "B" Team.

Central Fire Station "A" Team.

Hook Ladder Drill.

Central Fire Station "B" Team.

At the conclusion of the Display His Excellency, in presenting the prizes, complimented the Brigade on their smart- ness and efficiency, and later took the salute at the drive past of the appliances.

ANTI-GAS COURSE.

26. During the year all members of the Brigade attended a gas course, including entry into a gas chamber.

TRAINING OF CANTON FIRE BRIGADE PROBATIONARY OFFICERS.

27. By arrangement between the Government and the Com- missioner of the Kwong Tung Provincial Police Bureau, the Brigade carried out the training of ten probationary Chinese Officers for the Canton Fire Brigade. Following a three months duration the officers successfully passed an examination, at the conclusion of the course, and have since taken up their appointments at Canton. A letter of appreciation and thanks was received from the Commissioner for Kwong Tung.

28. During the year it became possible to provide a room. in Central Fire Station and in Kowloon Fire Station for use as recreation rooms for the Asiatic staff. Indoor games and Chinese newspapers are provided. The rooms have been well patronized by the men.

-K (1) 12 -

29. The Sino-Japanese conflict caused the evacuation of British women and children from Shanghai on 14/8/1937. The refugees included 17 wives and 19 children of Officers of the Shanghai Fire Brigade. Representatives of the Brigade met the ships on which they arrived and were able to render assistance by accommodating some of the women and children in officers quarters at the various Stations, and the remainder in a vacant suite of European quarters at Eastern Fire Station. The women and children returned to Shanghai in October and November, 1937. The Chief Officer in Shanghai, on behalf of the Shanghai Fire Brigade wrote to express the Brigade's sincere thanks for the services rendered.

T. H. KING,

Chief officer, Fire Brigade.

1938.

HONG KONG –

Central

Eastern

Western

Shaukiwan

Gough Hill

Aberdeen (including Apli- chau Island)

Hong Kong Float Berth

(Central District)

KOWLOON :-

Kowloon

Terminus

Un Long (N.T.)

Tai Po (N.T.) Cheung Chau Island

Tai O (Lan Tau Island)

Kowloon Float Mooring (Yaumati Typhoon Shelter)

Total

City Stations.

1

Table I.

STATION AND PLANT, 31ST DECEMBER, 1937.

STATIONS.

PLANT.

Rural District

Fire Float

1

1

1

1

Motor Fire

Engines (pumps)

Fire Escapes.

Motor Turntable

Ladders.

Motor Fire Tenders.

3

1

1

2

I

S S

I

5

7

2

11

5

TO

1

Fire Floats.

Motor Vans for

portable fire pump unit.

Motor Trailer or Portable motor pumps.

Motor Fire

Cycles.

Motor

Ambulances.

2000

G.P.M.

1

4000

G.P.M.

1

1

I

I

3

1

1

2

3

2

2

7

1

10

- K (1) 13

-K (1) 14 -

Table II.

SUMMARY OF ESTIMATED MONETARY LOSS BY FIRE

FOR THE YEAR 1937.

Month.

Rubbish

Burning Under

$500

Nil.

Not Exceeding.

Exceed. ing

Total

$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $5,000

$

$

January

101

(1)

(9)

February

150

600

(2)

(10)

(1)

March

$ 1,300 3,550 | 67,700

$

$

72,651

(1)

(1) (2)

(14)

I

3,300

4,050

(2)

(15)

397

(6)

Į

8,000

(1)

8,397

(7)

April

(1)

260 (3)

3,560

3.820

(1)

(5)

May

492

1

2,500

8,550

11,542

(4)

(1)

(1)

(6)

June

70

600

670

(7)

(1)

(8)

July

69

(4)

August

67

1,000

(7)

(1)

September ..

October

November



(1)

El el

(1)

}

1,035

(16)

118

(12)

373

(10)

1

(1)

800

3829

December

884

(1)

(7)

Total

(7)

4,016 (95)

69 (4)

8,706 12,500

22,273

(2)

(1)

(11)

I

121,190 122,225

(1)

(18)

16,540

16,658

(2)

(15)

I

44,655

45,828

(2)

(13)

884

(8)

309,067

(4)

(4) (10)

(124)

1,200 1,800 7,100 15,816 279,135

(2) (2)

The figures in brackets indicate the number of fires from which the

loss arose.

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1937.

The number of prisoners received into prison during the year, and the corresponding number for 1936 were as follows:-

Convicted by Ordinary Courts Debtors

1936.

14,801

1937. 15,711

50

49

1,328

16,106

17,088

On remand, or in default of finding surety. 1,255

Total

2. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 21.6 as compared with 15.9 for the previous year.

3.

894 prisoners were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories against 969 for the previous year.

4. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong.

Year.

Estimated population

Number

of

convicts.

Percentage

of

population.

1,075,690* 352 .033

Daily average number of prisoners.

of

Percentage

population.

1,071 .100 .100

1928

1929

1,075,690*

1930

1931

331 .031 1,143,510* 256 .022 849,751† 202 .024

1,075

1,175 .103

1,102 .130

1932

900,796

173

.019

1,114 .124

1933

922,643 162

.018

1,472

.160

(V.G.

839

1934

944,492

157

.017

L.C.K.

593

.170

F.P.

178

(V.G. 980

1935

966,341

217 .022

L.C.K. 642

.186

F.P.

174

¡V.G. 1,127

1936

988,190

297

.03

L.C.K.

600

.194

F.P.

190

H.K.P. 1,441

V.G.

794

1937

1,010,039

333

.033

.247

L.C.K.

27

F.P.

231

Probably overestimated.

Census of 1931.

L2

5. The following table shows the numbers of male and female prisoners on Dec. 31st serving sentences of various terms for each of the last five years.

Over 1 month.

Year.

One month or less.

and not exceeding 6 months.

Over 6 months & not

Over 2

Total.

exceeding 2 years.

years.

1933......

1934...

1937..

ME ME ME ME ME

256

F. 25

M. 310 M. 1,327

F. 41

F.

M. 133 F. 16

M.

637

F. 113

M. 864

1935......

1936......

M. 158

F. 44 F. 73

M. 193 M.

F. 52

M.

HESE E ZEZE

M. 252

F. 50

M. 345

ZE ZE ZE ZE ZE

F. 30

772

M.

362

F.

81

F:

41.

M.

965

M.

347

F. 94

F.

66

M.

318

105

F.

44

ME ME ME ME ME

M.

138

M: 1,210

F.

F.

183

M.

141

M. 1,508

F.

3

F. 150

M. 189

M. 1,516 F.

176

M. 283 12

M. 1,851 F. 197

M.

316

M. 2,271

F. 17

F.

208

The increase in the number of prisoners is chiefly due to a large number of convictions for larceny, hawking, and forestry offences. The olitical situation in China and the influx of rofugees is possibly the cause of many of the convictions.

14

HONG KONG PRISON & VICTORIA GAOL (MALE)

6. 20.068,100 forms were printed and issued to various Government departments and 125,157 books bound or repaired as compared with 18,756,343 forms and 88,002 books in 1936. During the year important printing work hitherto done by the Government Printers was satisfactorily performed by the Prison Printery.

7. Other industries included matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, tinsmithing, painting, laundering, shoemaking, netmaking and basketmaking. Prisoners were also employed on the usual routine upkeep work, including minor building repairs.

8. The prisons were as usual overcrowded.

9. The workshop accommodation of Victoria Gaol was inadequate but that of Hong Kong Prison is adequate under normal conditions.

10. The Hong Kong Prison at Stanley was opened in January and was then partly occupied. This prison was not fully occupied until September.

--



11. The Victoria Gaol was gradually depopulated during the year until the 26th September when it was entirely closed down.

12.

There was no escape or attempt to escape.

13. There were three executions during the year.

LAI CHI KOK PRISON.

14. Work done at Lai Chi Kok, apart from the essential routine duties of cooking, cleaning, etc., included string and netmaking, coir matmaking, basket and broom making, and grass matmaking. Garden work has been discontinued.

15. The Lai Chi Kok Prison was closed down on the 28th January.

16. There was no escape or attempt to escape.

FEMALE PRISON-LAI CHI KOK.

17. This prison was also overcrowded. Although constructed to accommodate 120 the numbers have frequently been over 250.

18. Female prisoners are employed chiefly on laundry work and mending. Other employment includes cooking,, weaving, envelope making and a little gardening.

19. Lady Visitors as hitherto attended regularly for instructional purposes. Sisters from the Italian Convent visited on Saturdays, and ladies of the Church Missionary Society on Sundays, to give religious addresses. The administration would again like to express thanks to all these ladies for their valued and gratuitous services.

GENERAL.

20. 437 punishments were awarded for breaches of prison discipline as compared with 430 for the preceding year.

21.

One hundred and eighty six prisoners were whipped by order of Courts, as compared with 63 in 1936.

22. There was a decrease in the number of prisoners convicted in the New Territory Courts (See paragraph 3).

23. Owing to overcrowding in the prisons 210 males were released before expiration of sentence. I was not found necessary to release any women prematurely.

L 4

24. The general behaviour of the prisoners and the discipline in all prisons was very good.

25. The health of the prisoners was satisfactorily maintained.

26. The conduct of the officers was on the whole exemplary.

27. The general health of the staff was good.

28. A Committee was appointed by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government to consider the recent increase in the number of prisoners in the Colony and to make recommendations in respect of such increase. The first meeting was held in the Post Master General's office at 3.30 p.m. on Tuesday the 29th June, 1937, subsequent meetings were held and a report was submitted to His Excellency the Governor.

29. Mr. J. W. Franks, O.B.E., Superintendent of Prisons, went on leave from the 17th April prior to retirement on pension.

30. Mr. F. A. Hopkins, Assistant Superintendent of Prisons, acted as 'Superintendent of Prisons as from the 17th April.

7th. March, 1938.

F. A. HOPKINS,

Acting Superintendent of Prisons.

L 5

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT FOR EXPENDITURE, 1936 and 1937.

1936.

1937.

Personal Emoluments

$ 472,020.40 $ 512,006.81

Other Charges

Arms and Ammunition

268.93

394.05

Conveyance Allowance to Superin-

tendent

900.00

600.00

Cleaning and Sanitary Materials

5,617.02

5,484.54

Clothing and Shoes for staff

14,512.60

16,030.87

Clothing for prisoners

20,345.71

37,844.88

Execution fees

150.00

Fuel

40,344.26

43,854.61

Grants to Chaplains

1,200.00

1,200.00

Gratuities to prisoners

551.00

882.00

Incidental Expenses

1,628.61

2,390.51

Light

11.450.05

13,060.41

Materials for Remunerative Indus-

tries

2.236.67

3,546.34

Materials for Repairs and Renewals

8.450.15

10.943.40

Photography

2,261.50

3,243.32

Rations for Indian Warders

14,745.17

14,919.89

Rent of Public Telephone

2,255.35

Rent of Quarters for European

Warders

7,293.83

1,068.35

Rent of Quarters for Indian Warders

10,080.00

3,956.00

Subsistence of prisoners

257,237.14

320,665.15

Transport

2,376.15

10,098.29

Upkeep and running Expense of

Motor Vans

1,331.83

1,339.56

Total Other Charges

402,830.62

493,927.52

Special Expenditure.

Typewriters

5 Vans

672.00 14,882.71

Bicycles

104.00

Linotype machine

10,000.00

Total Special Expenditure. 10,000.00

15,658.71

Total Prison Department

884,851.02

1,021,593.04

L 6

Table II,

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE, 1936 AND 1937.

Head of Revenue collected by Prison Department.

Fees of Court or Office.

Prison Subsistence

Prison Industries

Total

· 1936.

1937.

$ 1,335.00 $ 1,672.00

3,559.35

3,341.75

4,894.35

5,013.75

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF

PRISON DEPARTMENT FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS.

*Personal

Year.

Emoluments and Other Charges

Special Ex- penditure

Total Revenue

Total Expenditure

including esti-

mated value of

prison labour.

1928 $493,271.58

Nil $493,271.58

$166,024.55

1929 514,267.37 $7,264.36

521,531.73

179,307.54·

* 1930. 659,899.39 29,693.50

689,592,89

144,550.53

1931 791,012.42

1932 755,804.80 24,306.28

Nil

791,012.42

170,339.01

780,111.08

207,085.54

1933 809,652.58 44,220.70 853,873.28

217,492.17...

· 1934 804,758.42 25,040.29 829,798.71

1935

-1936 874,851.02 10,000.00 884,851.02

220,622.50

740,080.52 8,039.81 748,120.33

204,154.03

188,341.95

1937

1,005,934.33 15,658.71 1,021,593.04

189,550.10

Includes "officers of J. C. Service.

Table IV.

RETURN SHOWING VALUE OF INDUSTRIAL LABOUR FOR THE YEAR 1937.

Nature of Industry.

1

Value of

stock on

2

3

Value of

4

Value of

articles

5

6

Value of

7

8

Value of

work done

Stock on

hand

materials Total Dr. manufactured

for Gaol

hand

Total Cr.

Value of

earning

difference

January purchased.

or work

or other

December

done for

1st 1936.

payment.

Departments. 31st 1937.

between

columns

3 and 7.

$

$

$

$

$

$

Coir

2,773.11

2,337.30

Netmaking

360.00

152.80

5,110.41

512.80

1,376.90

131.60

2,593.07

2,690.45

6660.42

1550.01

210.20

314.23

656.03

143.23

Tailoring

7,257.45

30,061.55 | 37,319.00

42.75 37,335.81

6,344.80

43723.36

6404.36

Rattan

128.05

675.82

803.87

1.15

1,467.25

28.40

1496.80

692.93

Tinsmithing

758.20

5,368.26

6,126.46

41.06

9,718.76

815.27

10575.09

4448.63

Carpentering

639.97

1,985.58

2,625.55

127.50

4,778.64

438.36

5344.50

2718.95

Grassmatting

29.55

80.00

109.55

432.85

12:43

445.28

335.73

Shoemaking

1,434.10

2,704.09

4,138.19

105.65

5,180.80

1,238.60

6525.05 2386.86

Laundry

Printing & Bookbinding

313.40 77,940.7595,220.17 173,160.92

3,864.23

4,177.63

19,224.54

123.75

19348.29 15170.66

1,330.45 231,124.53 | 95,442.39 327897.37 154736.45

Photography

76.85 3,243.32 3,320.17

3,989.12

87.24 4076.36

756.19

Gardening

12.27

Weaving

82.32

54.42

242.32

66.69

324.64

66.69

66.69

452.49

78.25

530.74 206.10

Total

91,806.02 145,989.86 237,795.88

3,157.06 316,508.06 107,680.86 427345.98 189550.10

Paid into Bank during 1937, which sum includes $232.70 for work executed in 1936 $3,341.75 value of work executed during 1937 for which payment was deferred to 1938 $48.01

HONG KONG.

REPORT

OF THE

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

FOR THE YEAR

1937.

COLONY OF HONG KONG

MEDICAL FACILITIES MAP

REFERENCE

GOVT. HOSPITALS. NAVAL HOSPITALS.

N345678

MILITARY HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

PRIVATE HOSPITALS.

Govt. DISPENSARIES

✪ CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES

8 → ST. JOHN AMBULANCE Brigade DispeNSARIÉS

Govt. WELFARE CENTRES

UN LONG

10

GOVT. SOCIAL HYGIENE CENTRES

&

CASTLE PEAK

о

LAN TAU ISLAND

ΤΑΙ Ο

SHA TAU Kok,

LOK MA CHAU

SHEUNG SHUI

SAN TIN

KAM TIN

SHAM TSENG

D

FAN LING

TA! PO HUI

TAI PO

SAI KUNG

Tsun WAN

SHA TING

KOWLOON CITY

ABERDEEN

HONG KONG

STANLEY

Q

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

HONG KONG MEDICAL FACILITIES MAP

I ADMINISTRATION:-

Page.

FRONTISPIECE

A Staff

B Ordinances affecting the Public Health

C Finance

II PUBLIC HEALTH:-

GENERAL REMARKS:-

1

2

5

G 10

(i) General Diseases

6

(ii) Communicable Diseases

7

(a). Mosquito. and insect-borne diseases.

7

(b) Infectious diseases

8

10

(c) Helminthic diseases

VITAL STATISTICS:

(1) Chinese Population

10

(2) Non-Chinese Population

11

(3) European Officials

12

(4) Chinese Officials

13

III HYGIENE & SANITATION:-

(A) GENERAL REVIEW OF WORK DONE AND PROGRESS

MADE.

(1) PREVENTIVE MEASURES.

(i) Mosquito and insect-borne diseases.-

(a) Malaria

(b) Yellow fever, etc.

(ii) Epidemic diseases.-

(a) Plague

(b) Cholera

(c) Smallpox

14

15

15

15

16

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

Page.

(iii) Other diseases.-

(a) Leprosy

(b) Tuberculosis

(iv) Helminthic diseases.

(v) Diseases of animals

(vi) Seasonal prevalence of diseases

(II) GENERAL MEASURES OF SANITATION.

(a) Sewage disposal

18

18

19

19

19

20

(b) Refuse disposal

21

(c) Drainage

22

(d) Water supplies

22

(e) Clearance of bush and undergrowth.

26

(f) Domiciliary visiting and inspection. (g) Offensive trades.

26

26

(II) SCHOOL HYGIENE

27

(IV) LABOUR CONDITIONS

23

(V) HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING

30



(VI) FOOD IN RELATION TO HEALTH & DISEASE

32

(B) MEASURES TAKEN TO SPREAD THE KNOWLEDGE

OF HYGIENE & SANITATION

(C) TRAINING OF SANITARY PErsonnel

(D) RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK

IV PORT HEALTH WORK & ADMINISTRATION

35

36

36

37

Y MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE

40

VI HOSPITALS, DISPENSARIES & VENEREAL

DISEASES CLINICS

42

VII PRISONS & ASYLUM

VIII METEOROLOGY

38883

62

65

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

IX SCIENTIFIC:-

1. Report of the Bacteriological Institute

2. Report of the Malaria Bureau

Page.

67

29

79

3. Report of the Analytical Laboratory

85

4. Report of the University Professional Units.

96

APPENDIX,—

Return A. Medical, Health & Laboratory Service

Staff

107-109

Return B. List of Naval, Military, Government &

Private Hospitals, etc.

111-113

Appendix A. List of Diseases treated in Government

Hospitals

112-114

Appendix B. List of Diseases treated in Chinese

Hospitals

112-114

Appendix C. Report of Registrar-General of Births

& Deaths

132-134

Appendix D. Report on Work at Public Mortuaries..

149-151

ANNUAL MEDICAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1937.

I.-ADMINISTRATION.

A. (a) Staff-Medical, Health & Laboratory Divisions.

APPOINTMENTS.

European.

Medical Officer: Dr. P. B. Wilkinson.

Woman Medical Officer: Dr. (Mrs.) A. L. J. Dovey.

Nursing Sisters: Miss B. M. Auger, Miss J. A. M. Black, Miss S. Dempsey, Miss C. C. Denly, Miss H. E. Gray, Miss E. M. Hansey, Miss P. E. Keam, Miss W. N. M. Lambert- Baker, Miss J. Lees, Miss R. E. Low, Miss A. M. Mackie, Miss K. Marley, Miss M. K. Murray, Miss E. M. Pratt, Miss D. E. Purtell, Miss C. G. Y. Purves, Miss B. S. Robertson, Miss J. Smith, Miss D. H. Stockford, Miss D. C. Tall, Miss A. M. Thomas, Miss L. E. Turner, Miss B. M. Wansey, Miss G. Waugh, Miss D. E. M. Wilson.

Secretary:

Mr. R. W. H. Maynard.

Medical Officers:

Asiatic.

Dr. Lien Tsoong Kya, Dr. Tan Hee Choo,

Dr. Yeoh Guan Eng.

PROMOTIONS.

European.

Principal Matron: Miss S. F. Sutton.

Matron: Miss A. M. Davies.

Senior Sister: Miss A. M. Cullinan,

- M 2

RETIREMENTS & RESIGNATIONS.

Director of Medical Services: Dr. A. R. Wellington, C.M.G.

Government Consultant: Professor W. C. W. Nixon.

Principal Matron: Miss S. I. Summerskill.

Senior Sister: Mrs. B. E. Elliott.

Nursing Sisters: Miss F. Boullin, Miss E. O. Davis, Miss J. N. Edwards, Miss L. Lace, Miss J. Lenaghan, Miss B. M. Lockhart-Smith, Miss H. G. Mickel, Miss. K. M. Moore, Miss A. Munro, Miss M. B. M. Mustill, Miss S. M. Nobel, Miss L. M. Passey, Miss I. Russell, Miss M. W. Ward.

Asiatic.

Medical Officers: Dr. Cheah Keng Seng, Dr. Phoon Seck Wah, Dr. Phoon Seck Wing.

(b) Health Division.

APPOINTMENTS.

European.

Woman Medical Officer : Dr. (Mrs.) G. R. Nash.

RETIREMENTS & RESIGNATIONS.

Woman Medical Officer: Dr. (Mrs.) L. Fehily.

(c) Laboratory Division.

TRANSFERS.

European.

Assistant Analyst: Mr. J. L. Tetley to Imports & Exports

Office.

B. (a) Ordinances affecting the Public Health.'

The following is a list of Ordinances, Rules, Regulations, By-laws and Government Notifications affecting the public health or medical matters which were enacted, made or published during 1937:-

1. Ordinances

1. Public Health (Sanitation) Amendment Ordinance,

1937.

2. Pharmacy and Poisons Ordinance, 1937.

- M 3

2. Rules, Regulations & By-laws.

1. Adulterated Food and Drugs Regulations-amendment

to Regulation 4 (Government Notification 25).

2. Liquors Ordinance, 1931-Brewery Regulations made

thereunder (Government Notification 108).

3. Public Health (Food) Ordinance, 1935-Amendment of

By-laws (Food Shops) (Government Notification 169). 4. Cremation Ordinance, 1934-Amendment of Regula-

tions (Government Notification 200).

5. Adulterated Food and Drugs Ordinance, 1935—Amend-

ment of Regulations (Government Notification 218). 6. Emergency Regulations Ordinance 1922-Regulations for prevention and mitigation of cholera (Government Notification 541).

7. Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance, 1935-Domestic

Cleanliness and Prevention of Disease By-laws- By-law 11 relating to restriction on sale of certain foodstuffs (Government Notification 542).

8. Emergency Regulations Ordinance, 1922--Regulation prohibiting sale of Chinese dishes (Government Notification 576).

9. Emergency Regulations Ordinance, 1922-Regulation prohibiting sale of mussels (Government Notification 641).

10. Quarantine and Prevention of Disease Ordinance, 1936 Regulations for the supply of water to and from Water Boats and from Wharves (Government Notifica- tion 659).

11. Dangerous Drugs Ordinance, 1935-Repeal of Regula- tion 21 and Schedule II. (Government Notification 675).

12. Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance, 1935-Amend- ment of By-laws headed "Conservancy'. (Government Notification 679).

13. Pharmacy and Poisons Ordinance, 1936-Amendment to Regulation 1 relating to "Licences to Wholesale Dealers". (Government Notification 700).

14. Prisons Ordinance, 1932-Amendment of Prison Rules relating to duties of Medical Officer (Government Notification 745).

15. Dentistry Ordinance, 1914-Rescission of Regulation 4 of Dentistry Regulations (Government Notification 859).

M 4

16. Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance, 1935--Amend- ment of By-laws relating to scavenging (Government Notification 907).

17. Midwives Ordinance, 1910--Amendment of Regulations

Inade thereunder (Government Notification 911).

3. Government Notifications.

A

1. Government Notification 1-Shanghai place where

smallpox prevails.

2. Government Notification 76-Dysentery to be included

within the expression Infectious Disease".

3. Government Notification 142-Bangkok place where

cholera prevails.

4. Government Notification 110-Pakhoi place where smallpox prevails-rescission of order relating thereto.

5. Government Notification 201-Public Health (Sanita- tion) Ordinance, 1935-application of, to Tsing Yi Urn Cemetery.

6. Governinent Notification 208-Nursing and Maternity Homes Regulation Ordinance, 1936-exemption of Babington Hospital and Sanatorium.

7. Government Notification 310-Shanghai place where smallpox prevails-rescission of order relating thereto.

8. Government Notification 349-Public Health (Food) Ordinance, 1935-Markets-List of, markets closed.

9. Government Notification 410-Public Health (Animals and Birds) Ordinance, 1935-Prohibition of Importa- tion of equines from Macao and Canton.

10. Government Notification 425-Prisons Ordinance, 1932 -Order that "The Prison Ward" to be set aside for purpose of prison.

11. Government Notification 463-Bangkok place where

cholera prevails-rescission of order relating thereto.

12. Governinent Notification 485-Hoihow an infected port

where cholera prevails.

13. Government Notification 507-Public Health (Sanita- tion) Ordinance, 1935-application to Tsing Yi Urn Cemetery-cancellation of Government Notification 140 and Government Notification 201 relating thereto.

M 5

14. Government Notification 508-Public Health (Sanita- tion) Ordinance, 1935-application of, to Hammer Hill Urn Cemetery.

15. Government Notification 522-Public Health (Sanita- tion) Ordinance, 1935-application of, to extension Chai Wan Cemetery.

16. Government Notifications 647, 648, 649, 650 and 651-

Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance, 1935-Orders relating to removal of bodies.

17. Government Notification 674-Dangerous Drugs Or- dinance, 1935-declaration that Ordinance shall cease to apply to certain preparations.

18. Government Notification 676-Shanghai place where

cholera prevails.

19. Government

Notification

743-Hoihow an infected port where cholera prevails-rescission of order relating thereto.

20. Government Notification 761-Haiphong place where

cholera prevails.

21. Government Notification 762-Rangoon place where

plague prevails.

22. Government Notification 821-Public Health (Food) Ordinance, 1935-Declaration that Kennedy Town Wholesale Market shall be deemed to be a market within by-laws.

23. Government Notification 858-Rangoon place where

plague prevails-rescission of order relating thereto.

C. Finance.

Revenue earned by all divisions of the Medical Department during 1937 amounted to $455,232.42

$455,232.42 as compared with $338,866.09 in 1936. The total ordinary (recurrent) expenditure was $1,866,911.97, the corresponding expenditure for 1936 being $1,574,761.55. Special expenditure amounted to $151,225.47 and $9,565.90 in 1937 and 1936 respectively. The figures for special expenditure do not include the cost of buildings, hospitals, water supplies, etc., a very considerable item. The total expenditure on medical services rose from $1,584,327.25 in 1936 to $2,018,137.44 in the year under review.

- M 6

In order to obtain a more accurate picture of public health expenditure, it is necessary to include such items as water and drainage works, Urban Council cleansing services, etc., as shown in the following table of expenditure:-

Table I.

$

Motor Ambulance Service

31.135.60

Police Department

363.50

Public Works Department

1,935,282.08

Sanitary (Urban Council) Department

1,009,439.35

Subsidies to Charities

204,458.09

Medical Department

2,018,137.44



Total.....

.$5,198,816.06

The total revenue for the Colony from all sources in 1937 was $32,111,222.28; hence the expenditure on medical services formed 16.19 per centum of the general revenue.

II. PUBLIC HEALTH.

(A) GENERAL REMARKS.

(I) GENERAL DISEASES.

Three factors had a profound influence on public health in the Colony during 1937.

The most important of these was the outbreak of hostilities between China and Japan. Large numbers of refugees, both white and Asiatic, fled from the war zones and sought a haven in Hong Kong.

Special measures were taken by the Government and various voluntary agencies in an endeavour to cope with the situation and to provide food and shelter to those who had, in many cases, lost their all.

But, as might have been expected, the influx of mostly destitute and unemployed persons into an already congested urban area aggravated insanitary conditions and the number of deaths leaped up from a monthly average of 2,349 for the first seven months of the year to 4,070 in September, giving an average of 3,638 for the last five months of 1937. Many of these refugees arrived from districts in China where health services had become seriously disorganised and where, as a result, epidemic disease had been added to the horrors of the situation. It was not surprising, therefore, that Hong Kong

M 7-

suffered from a visitation of cholera. The disease appeared towards the end of July in which month thirteen cases were discovered. By the time the last victim came under observation in December, some 1,082 persons had lost their lives.

The third distressing occurrence of major importance which afflicted Hong Kong in 1937 was a particularly severe typhoon which devastated the Colony on the 2nd of September.

No accurate estimate of the actual loss of life is possible. Suffice it to say that some 490 bodies of persons who had been drowned or killed were picked up mainly on the foreshore at the eastern entrance to the harbour.

Owing to the lapse of time between deatli and the discovery of the bodies autopsies were impracticablé in many cases. Nearly three hundred of the dead were found in the New Territories, 166 of this number being found at Taipo where many houses collapsed as the result of the tidal wave.

On the other side of the picture, the opening of the Queen Mary Hospital on the 13th of April, 1937, constituted an event of outstanding importance in the history of the Colony, and, inore especially, in connection with the care of the sick and suffering and medical education.

This magnificent hospital of 546 beds with completely modern equipment in all departments, built at a cost of nearly four million dollars (£250,000), replaced the old Government Civil Hospital parts of which dated back over seventy years.

The new building fills a long felt want and enables clinical training to occupy its rightful place in medical education in this Colony.

The completion of the Shing Mun Jubilee Dam which allows of the impounding of three thousand million gallons of water served, as a landmark in the development of public health utilities in these territories.

(II) COMMUNICABLE DISEASES.

(a) Mosquito or insect-borne diseases.

Since the organisation of anti-malarial work under the auspices of the Malaria Bureau, a branch of the Laboratory Division, malaria has become a relatively unimportant disease in the urban areas. It still requires careful watching and control lest it gives rise to the outbreaks that preceded the establishment of the Bureau. The infection rate remains high in certain rural areas where lack of funds and local agricultural customs make remedial measures impracticable. The subject is dealt with in detail in the Report of the Malaria Bureau in Section IX, Scientific.

(i) Plague.

M 8-

(b) Infectious diseases.

Plague continues to remain absent from these territories, although reports are received from time to time of its existence in epidemic proportions in various parts of China, including the Fukien Province, Hainan, etc., and there is always a possibility of it reappearing with all the severity that accompanied the first historical outbreak of 1894. Infection has been absent since

1929.

(ii) Cholera.

Cholera was one of the legacies of disturbed conditions in the Far East. The disease was first recognised in July, although it is significant that notifications of dysentery had al- ready shown a marked increase in June. Bangkok had suffered from a severe epidemic during the first half of the year with 1902 cases and 989 deaths. During the first ten days of July over 100 cases were reported at Hoihow in South China, and on the 22nd of the month the body of a coolie who had died from cholera was landed at Hong Kong from the S.S. "Kwong Tung" coming from Hoihow. On the following day a student arrived fron Canton and died of the disease in Kowloon Hospital. Sporadic cases, totalling thirteen in all, were reported from various parts of Victoria in July. The disease became epidemic with alinost startling suddenness in August when nearly 1,100 cases were found-many refugees probably having brought the infection with them. In September rather over 500 cases occurred followed by an almost equally sudden drop to seventy- two in October, eight in November and a single one in December. Further details are given in "III Hygiene & Sanitation", suffice it to say that the outbreak affected 1,690 persons of whom 1,082 died, a mortality rate of sixty-four per centum.

(iii) Smallpox.

Cases of smallpox were notified in Hong Kong during every month of 1937 except October. The largest number for any single month were encountered in April. A second fastigium occurred in December and this heralded what proved later to be the most serious outbreak within living memory. The yearly total was 129 cases notified of which ninety-four died. There can be little doubt that many cases missed detection owing to successful concealment and to a quite ineffective system of house- to-house visits.

The yearly incidence of smallpox during the preceding fourteen years is of interest for purposes of comparison with that of 1937.

Table II.

Year

Cases

Year Cases

1923. 1924. 1925. 1926. 1927. 1928. 1929. 1320 913 66 49 149 616 977

1930. 1931. 1932. 1933. 1934. 1935. 1936.

270 15 248 566 153 61 23

M 9

S

(iv) Typhus.

Although rife in many areas in China, typhus was not recognised in Hong Kong during 1937.

(v) Cerebro-spinal fever.

Sporadic cases of cerebro-spinal fever were discovered throughout the year, forty-four out of a total of 157 being notified. in March. March and April are

March and April are the months of maximum prevalence. Eighty-eight or fifty-six per centuin of the patients died. The corresponding figures for 1936 were 123 cases and sixty-five deaths, a case mortality rate of fifty-three per centum. The average annual incidence over the quin-quennium 1932-1986 amounted to approximately 176.

(vi) Pulmonary tuberculosis.

As in past years pulmonary tuberculosis formed rather more than one out of eleven deaths from all causes. The overcrowded conditions under which the poorest and nost under-nourished members of the community live (associated with the exceedingly common and filthy habit of spitting in public places) provide ideal soil for the propagation of this disease, especially since the hospitalization of any but a very small proportion of infectious cases is at present unrealisable.

(vii) Dysentery.

Mention has been inade already of the significant rise in the notification of cases of dysentery which preceded the cholera epidemic of 1937. The greatest number of cases (111) were reported in October, a total of 576 being recorded for the whole. year. There was, fortunately, no repetition of the disastrous milk-borne outbreak of dysentery of the Shiga type in European · children which had claimed several victims in 1936.

(viii) Enteric fever.

July to October were the months of maximum prevalence of the enteric group of fevers. No doubt the refugee problem contributed to the increased incidence from 418 notified cases and 136 deaths in 1936 to 464 and 176 respectively in 1937.

(ix) Diphtheria.

During 1937 the major incidence of notified cases of diphtheria was recorded from November to March inclusive representing the colder winter months. In this instance an actual reduction took place, the figures for 1936 being 375 of which 214 proved fatal, whereas only 308 cases with 148 deaths were notified in 1937.

(x) Scarlet fever.

Scarlet fever is a rarity in Hong Kong, but eight cases were seen during the year.

-

M 10

(xi) Leprosy.

Little is known regarding the amount of leprosy in these territories, although various estimates have been made which tend to the belief that there may be upwards of a thousand or more sufferers from the disease. Until a systematic survey has been carried out by someone skilled in the diagnosis of the condition, the extent of the problem will remain an unknown quantity and provision of accommodation locally or elsewhere would be a matter of guesswork. The possibility is under consideration of eliciting the help of the British Empire Leprosy Relief Association in carrying out such a survey, and of sending the greater number of lepers to the Roman Catholic Settlement at Sheklung in Chinese territory. A daily average of thirty-two lepers were cared for by Government at the Kennedy Town Tung Wah Leper Settlement and forty-nine were sent to Sheklung in the Kwangtung Province of China during the year.

(c) Helminthic diseases.

Whatever may be the true incidence of helminthiasis in the community, the actual number of patients treated in the Government and Chinese hospitals in 1937 was negligible. Roundworm infection headed the list followed by hookworm and tapeworm. Thirty-six in-patients were treated for fluke.

VITAL STATISTICS.

(1) Chinese Population.

Owing to its intimate geographical relationship with South China and to the fact that Hong Kong is a free port with, practically speaking, no effective restriction on immigration or emigration, it is not possible to provide an accurate estimate of the general population. This factor applies even more markedly for the year under review during which a serious refugee problem developed as the result of the Sino-Japanese incident. No figures are of value regarding the actual number of persons who sought refuge in Hong Kong from the fighting in China, although an approximate estimate of 250,000-300,000 has been furnished. Based upon the arithmetical increase in population between the two Census periods of 1921 and 1981, the estimated population at mid-year 1937 amounted to 1,006,982, of whom nearly ninety- eight per centum were Chinese. No account is taken in this estimate of the numbers of refugees now resident in these ter- ritories. The distribution of the population as estimated in the various areas comprising the Colony is given in Table III.

Table III. Kowloon &

New

Island of

Hong Kong.

Kowloon.

New Territories.

Maritime. Totals.

Non-Chinese. 9,847

10,887

Chinese....... 437,982

339,366

476 107,052

1,372 100,000

22,582 984,400

Totals... 447,829 350,253

107,528

101,372 1,006,982

M 11

Registration of births and deaths is compulsory and is carried out under the directions of the Director of Medical Services who is also Registrar-General of Births & Deaths. Procedure is governed by The Births & Deaths Registration Ordinance, No. 21 of 1934, and valuable assistance is obtained from the Police Department and the staff of the Chinese Dispensaries. There are seven register offices in the Island of Hong Kong, four in Kowloon on the mainland and cleven in the New Territories and on certain of the larger islands.

Birth registration is still incomplete, partly as the result of ignorance or laziness and partly owing to a Chinese custom of postponing the event until the child is in its second year.

Against this, a tendency has shown itself since the com- inencement of disturbances in Far Eastern waters to endeavour to register births in Hong Kong as a preliminary step towards claiming British nationality, even when the evidence of local birth is of the most slender.

Births registered in 1937 showed an increase from 27,383 (530 Non-Chinese) in 1936 to 32,303* (692 Non-Chinese). The crude, uncorrected birth-rate for 1937 is calculated as 32.1 per thousand of the mid-year population. This compares with a rate of 27.8 for the previous year. Some 34,635 deaths werc registered in 1987 amongst the civilian population, an increase of 9,255 over the figure for 1936. (In addition, eleven deaths were recorded in the Forces of the Crown during the year.) is significant that the monthly average of deaths for the first seven months of the year was 2,349, whereas the monthly average for the last five months was 3,638-the refugee problem and typhoon being largely accountable. The crude, uncorrected death-rate for the civilian population is estimated at 34.4 per thousand living, the corresponding figure for 1936 being 25.8.

Still-births numbered 913 in 1937 and 976 in 1936.

It

Deaths in Chinese infants under one year of age numbered 9,905 in 1936 and 11,620 in 1937, the respective infant mortality rates being 372 and 376, post-registered births being deducted from the total Chinese births in making the calculation.

(2) Non-Chinese Population.

There were 692 births (387 male and 305 female) including late registrations in this section or 162 inore than in 1936. The crude birth-rate is estimated to be 30.6 per thousand living in 1937 as compared with 23.3 in 1936. ·

Non-Chinese deaths numbered 236 (apart from seventeen deaths in the Forces of the Crown) in 1936 giving a death-rate of 10.9 per thousand living. In the year under review the figures were 244 (excluding eleven deaths in the Forces) with a death- rate of eleven.

*Includes 744 post registrations after 12 months (705 Chinese, 39 Non-Chinese).

M 12

In spite, therefore, of the very definite deterioration in the health conditions prevailing amongst the Chinese inhabitants in 1937, there was little or no falling off in the health of the Non-Chinese elements. This may have been due to the fact that, generally speaking, the standard of living amongst the Non-Chinese elements was maintained. There were three still- births in the Non-Chinese community.

Deaths in infants of Non-Chinese nationality amounted to thirty as compared with nineteen in 1936-an infant mortality rate of forty-six, the rate for the previous year being thirty-seven.

Nearly seventy-seven per centum of the deaths in Non- Chinese were certified by medical practitioners who attended the deceased in life, whereas only fifty-eight per centum of Chinese deaths were similarly certified. Many of the uncertified deaths in Chinese were in respect of bodies of unknown persons deposited in the street.

Sick and invaliding rates are not obtainable in the case of the general Non-Asiatic population.

(3) European Officials.

Table IV furnishes data regarding the health of European officials during 1937 and affords means of comparison with the state of health of this section of the community in the preceding two years.

Table IV.

1935.

Total number of officials resident

Average number resident

1936. 1937.

900* 942* 940* 881+ 930t 918

Total number on sick list

396

453 453

Total number of days on sick list

5,908

7,144

6,134

Average daily number on sick list Percentage of sick to average number

resident

16

20

17

45%

49%

49%

Average number of days on sick list for

each patient

15

16

14

Average sick time (in days) to each

resident

7

8

7

Total number invalided

6

10

12

Percentage of invalidings to total

residents

Total deaths

Percentage of deaths to total residents... Percentage of deaths to total average

number resident

0.66% 1.06% 1.28%

5

7

3 0.55% 0.74% 0.32%

0.57% 0.75% 0.33%

* Figure given shows the total number of European officials who received salary in the Colony in December of corresponding year.

+ Figure given was arrived at by dividing the total number of European officials who received salary locally throughout the year by the number of months in the year.

M 13

The causes of death in 1937 were as follows:

(1) Carcinoma of liver,

cholaemia.

(2) Perforative appendicitis,

peritonitis embolism.

(3) Bullet wound of head,

laceration of brain.

Officials were invalided on the following grounds: ---

(1) Pulmonary tuberculosis.

(2) Sprue (2 cases).

(4) Secondary carcinoma following primary carcinoma of

uterus.

(5) Enlargement of the thyroid gland.

(6) Defective vision, neurasthenia,

general debility.

(7) A type of neuroses.

(8) Myocarditis.

(9) Hyperpiesia.

(10) Gastric ulcer.

(11) Colitis, progressive debility,

nervous exhaustion.

(12) Fracture of skull.

(4) Chinese officials.

No accurate data are available in respect of the sick, invaliding or death-rates of Chinese and other Asiatic officials during the year under review.

For further information on the subject of vital statistics reference should be made to Appendix C of this Report.

.

M 14-

III.-HYGIENE & SANITATION.

(A) GENERAL REVIEW OF WORK DONE AND

PROGRESS MADE.

(1)-PREVENTIVE MEASURES.

(i) Mosquito & insect-borne diseases.

(a) Malaria.

The surveys and research work carried out by the Malariologist and staff of the Malaria Bureau which was established in 1930 have borne fruit and malarial infection is now limited to rural areas and to the outlying parts of towns. Constant vigilance is, however, needed to ensure that there is no slackening up of anti-malarial activities in urban areas where it has not yet been found possible to intitute permanent drainage works requiring a minimum of maintenance.

The subject is being dealt with in detail in the Report of the Malaria Bureau in Section IX, Scientific, consequently it is not proposed to describe malaria preventive measures in this section.

Two points are, however, deserving of record.

Firstly, the number of cases of the disease admitted to Government hospitals increased during the last two years as may be seen from Table V.

Year.

Table V.

1931. 1932. 1933. 1934. 1935. 1936. 1937.

Cases of malaria

treated in hospitals. 585 465 475 457 384 581 677

Secondly, a not inconsiderable amount of breeding of the anopheline vectors takes place in paddy-fields and in land under wet cultivation. It is often undesirable on economic grounds to abolish this form of agricultural activity. At the same time the areas are too extensive with the staff and funds available to permit of treatment with Paris-green or other non-oily larvicide. As an alternative, advice is given in places infected with mosquitos for screening, spraying of the interiors of rooms with insecticide, and the use of bed nets and of prophylactic quinine.

Part of the former prison at Lai Chi Kok was mosquito- proofed during the year.



M 15

(b) Yellow Fever; etc.

Yellow fever is fortunately unknown in these territories and filariasis is relatively uncommon and may be quite symptomless and so need not invite special mention. Other diseases capable of being insect-borne are dealt with under separate heads.

(ii) Epidemic diseases. (a). Plague.

Systematic trapping of rats was carried out throughout the year, some 221,652 being trapped of which 16,375 were caught alive. It is not suggested that this has any influence on the rat population. On the other hand, a portion of each daily catch was taken to the public mortuaries where a morbid examination is made. Up to the present no staff has been available for taking and examining spleen smears, hence it is scarcely legitimate to affirm the presence or absence of P. pestis; although, in the absence of human cases, there is a certain aimount of presumptive evidence in its favour.

Periodical cleansing of dwellings was undertaken and the cominunity was encouraged to abolish rat-harbourages as far as possible and to render their premises unattractive to rats by protecting food-stuffs. Some 1313 rat holes on premises were sealed up during the year as compared with 1811 in 1936.

Measures aimed at preventing the introduction of plague by sea are referred to in the section dealing with Port Health Work and Administration.

(b) Cholera.

Reference has been made earlier in this Report to the serious outbreak of cholera which visited these territories in 1937. Preventive measures included the following:-

(a) Inspection and examination of all arrivals by train and boat, especially those coming from Canton and Macao;

(b) Isolation and treatment of sick;

(c) Mass inoculation;

(d) Legislation to minimise infection by food;

(e) Propaganda in press;

(f) Intensive house-to-house inspection and disinfection of

infected dwellings.

With regard to (a), all arrivals of river steamers at night were prohibited; vessels were examined under Police guard at the wharves; special measures were taken by the Port Health Authorities to ensure the effective cleansing of passenger decks, kitchens and lavatories after the passengers had disembarked; and passengers were examined on alighting from trains.

-M 16

As regards (b), the sick were originally tended at the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kennedy Town. Later, when the numbers increased so rapidly, they were accommodated in Block A of the old Government Civil Hospital-as many as 328 being under treatment there at the same time. In all 1401 cases were admitted and 776 died, a case mortality of fifty-five per centum.

In regard to (c), free inoculation was given at all hospitals, public dispensaries and at centres staffed by the St. Jolin Ambulance Association & Brigade. Over a quarter of a million inoculations were administered. Figures are not available as to the number of persons at risk. Of fifty-two cases known to have received anti-cholera inoculation twenty-five or forty-eight per centum died, whereas of 462 persons who had not received such protection as inoculation provides 306 or sixty-six per centum died.

As regards (d), regulations were made by the Governor-in- Council restricting the sale of certain foods and drinks.

Propaganda mentioned at (e) related to articles in the Press and in particular a pamphlet entitled "Precautions to be taken ́ to avoid Cholera" which was distributed generally and which was printed in the English and Chinese Press.

The sanitary inspectorate were requested to exercise increased vigilance.

The sanitary staff is inadequate and its organisation has been the subject of considerable criticism for years past by those best qualified to speak. There is little wonder that the epidemic broke with such suddenness upon the Colony under the con- ditions prevailing. Reference will be made later in this Report to the possible influence of methods of nightsoil and refuse dis- posal in vogue on the incidence and spread of acute intestinal disease.

(c) Smallpox.

Preventive measures against smallpox included vaccination, 443,021 persons being vaccinated at Government hospitals, Chinese public dispensaries and at centres established by St. John Ambulance Association & Brigade. This voluntary organis- ation has rendered very valuable assistance for many years past and the general public owe it a deep debt of gratitude. Vaccination of infants within six weeks of birth or of arrival in the Colony is compulsory under the Vaccination Ordinance and the necessary notices are handed to parents and guardians of children attending at the Register Offices to register the birth. In the absence of vaccination certificates in respect of such infants, reminders are sent by post.

M 17

Amongst a series of 28,461 births registered in the General Register Office and in the Chinese Public Dispensaries in 1937, some 21,232 infants were vaccinated by this means. Vaccination of school children is also compulsory and public vaccinators visited schools to offer their services.

Inmates of prisons, reformatories, refuges and similar institu- tions are also required to be vaccinated. Emigrants by boat from Hong Kong are subject to the compulsory clause. Vaccination of immigrants is also permissible under certain conditions, but has not been effected so far. The reasons for this are somewhat obscure, but relate to the desire that ships arriving in Hong Kong should suffer no delay of any sort from quarantine precautions, even though they may be actually importing cases of acute infectious disease or large numbers of unvaccinated passengers of the poorest class.

Lastly, vaccination is compulsory of persons whom the Health Authority has reason to suspect have been exposed to infection. This provision is valuable on theoretical rather than on practical grounds. Owing to the fact that the majority of the cases of smallpox during epidemic periods are "missed" or are found after death dumped into the streets, there are no means of ascertaining the addresses from which they were carried.

Lymph is prepared in the Government Bacteriological Institute under conditions which ensure a high standard of potency and low bacterial infection. Buffalo calves are used. The lymph is put up in metal containers each holding three cubic centimetres and capable of being used for about sixty insertions.

Cases of the disease were isolated at the Infectious Diseases Hospital, Kennedy Town when discovered; but nearly half the total number of cases notified were not found until after death.

In all, ninety-four deaths occurred in a total of 129. Such a high mortality rate is unlikely and it is much more probable that many "missed" cases occurred with unfortunate results. A more effectively organised sanitary inspectorate under the direct control of the Medical Officers of Health would prevent this state of affairs from taking place and should result in much avoidable suffering and loss of life from preventable disease. Disinfection of premises where cases were discovered or to which they could be traced was also carried out together with vaccination of contacts. Here again as the sanitary inspectorate had not been trained as public vaccinators time was lost-and contacts no doubt escaped-between the discovery of a case of smallpox and securing the services of a public vaccinator.

-M 18-

(iii) Other Diseases,

(a) Leprosy.

Apart from offering asylum to lepers at the Kennedy Town Settlement where the inmates come and go at will and sending a number of lepers who have come to the Colony from other parts of China to the Shek Lung Settlement in Chinese territory, no special measures were taken against the disease during the year.

The problem is bound up with the low standard of living in the poorest classes and until economic conditions, nutrition and environmental sanitation improve, it is unlikely that there will be any marked change in the incidence of the disease.

(b) Tuberculosis.

Efforts were made to provide accommodation for infectious cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in special wards at the Govern- ment and certain of the Chinese hospitals were room isolation at home was impracticable. It must be admitted, however, that the majority of "open" cases remain in close contact with the community and are only recognized at autopsy.

Provision of special institutions or of separate hospital accommodation for all persons suffering from the disease in a communicable form is an ideal to be aimed at, but one economically impossible to achieve at the present time.

In the meantime, energies are being directed on schemes. for improving the housing of the poorest classes and on investi- gation into the causes of malnutrition which exerts such a pro- found influence on the incidence of cases and their severity.

Legislation was drawn up during the year with a view to bringing about the compulsory pasteurization of milk, but the opposition succeeded in postponing this for the time being.

There is every reason to believe that this opposition is disappearing concurrently with a better appreciation of the subject by the general public and that the necessary legislation will be enacted in 1938.

The possibility of legislating against spitting in public places is also under consideration, a similar law having been enacted some years ago in Malaya where there is a large proportion of Chinese in the population. A further possibility relates to the carrying out of a survey by an experienced observer lent to the Medical Department by the National Association for the Prevention of Tuberculosis; but no definite arrangements have been made to date in this connection.

M 19

F

(iv) Helminthic diseases.

Preventive measures against helminthic diseases included the control of nightsoil and refuse see the relevant section-- war on flies, inspection of meat and foodstuffs. Little or no satisfactory organization exists in the New Territories for dealing with wastes and the more rural portions of the Urban Council Area in the Island and Kowloon. The markets and slaughter houses in the Urban Areas are under the supervision of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and have not yet been placed under the control of the Health Officers of the respective districts.

(v) Diseases of animals.

The Colonial Veterinary Surgeon reported the following details, inter alia, relating to diseases in animals for the period under review:

Live stock in the Colony on 31st December, 1937

Cows

Goats

Horses

Urban Council New

Total

Area

Territories

2,038

1,000

3,038

137

200

337

353

200

553

Swine number unknown.

Some 180 cattle, 265 dogs and 230 horses were examined and passed through quarantine during the year. These figures do not include animals ianported for slaughter or consigned to the Military Authorities. Tuberculosis was found in three cattle and one swine at the depots. There were three cases of glanders and two of anthrax. Twenty-nine animal brains were examined by the Government Bacteriologist and Negri bodies found in two.

(vi) Seasonal prevalence of diseases.

Owing to the influx of refugees following the outbreak of hostilities in the late summer of 1937, there was દી marked increase in the amount of morbidity and of mortality in the community; consequently it would not be justifiable to infer any definite seasonal prevalence. A very marked increase in deaths from all causes was recorded during the last five months

of the year.

J

M 20



(II)-GENERAL MEASURES OF SANITATION.

(a) Sewage disposal.

An increasing number of premises in the Urban Council Area were connected up with the public sewers or acquired septic tank installations during the year under review. The Public Works Department supervised the installation of water closets in 1,470 instances in private dwellings, the figure com- paring with 904 for the previous year. There still remain many houses and the vast majority of tenements and shop-houses which depend upon a bucket system for the disposal of nightsoil. Except in the case of the Peak District of Hong Kong and certain Government buildings, buckets are collected by coolies, mostly women, employed by contractors. There is no double- bucket system and the contents of house buckets are carried away in closed wooden receptacles during the hours of darkness, through the streets to a fleet of junks berthed along the water front. During 1937 there were seven stations on the Island of Hong Kong and five in Kowloon on the mainland.

The junks in question form part of the conservancy system owned by the Urban Council. When they have collected their quota of nightsoil in the steel-lined compartments of their holds, the junks are taken by sea to Gin Drinkers Bay. Here night- soil is baled out by anen standing shoulder deep in excreta into other junks owned by contractors. In nomnal times the

nightsoil is carried up the Canton River by the second fleet of junks and sold chiefly for the fertilization of the mulberry trees on which the silkworms feed.

Since the decline in the industry and particularly since Sino-Japanese hostilities made coastal shipping rather a pre- carious trade, there has been a tendency for the contractors owning the second fleet of junks to dispose of nightsoil to market gardeners and for fish ponds in the New Territories. This obviously constitutes a grave source of danger when it is remembered that typhoid and dysentery are common in Hong Kong and that outbreaks of cholera are also not of infrequent occurrence. Although a certain amount of revenue accrues from the sale of nightsoil to contractors in the way described, there is always a danger of the junks being unable to function owing to strikes in labour or to typhoons. The service was, in fact, seriously disorganised during the typhoon season 1937. For this reason, steps are being taken to investigate the possibility of drastically altering the system and to arrange for nightsoil to be dumped at stated places-usually public latrines

of

from which it will be carried away in sewers to the deep sea either direct when no danger to public health can be assured or after partial purification by the activated sludge process with the effluent passing over aeration beds.

- M 21.

In the rural areas and in certain outlying parts of the Urban Council Area, uncovered pig pits are used for receiving human excreta. Flies and mal-odours are the inevitable accom-

paniments.

The collection and removal of nightsoil is controlled by conservancy by-laws made under the Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance, No. 15 of 1935.

(b) Refuse disposal.

Refuse is collected from dustbins by the Sanitary Depart- ment of the Urban Council. The service is a twice daily one in the urban districts of Hong Kong and Kowloon and once daily in the Peak and outskirts of the purely urban areas. An appreciable proportion of the four hundred and eighty-four tons collected daily is carried in open baskets through the streets by women coolies who perform the service in return for being allowed to make use of remnants of food, etc., for pig wash. This private scavenging system possesses obvious draw- backs, especially during the summer months, since each coolie is accompanied by a cloud of flies some of which may detach themselves and enter premises along the route.

About three-quarters of the refuse is collected into covered Sanitary Department motor lorries of which twelve function in Hong Kong with about half that number in Kowloon. House- hold waste from these and that carried in open baskets is tipped into barges or dust boats five of which are stationed at various parts of the sea front in Hong Kong and four in Kowloon.

The dust boats lie alongside for several hours each day and are a prolific source of flies during the summer months.

They are taken by tugs, except when equipped with their own power, to a refuse disposal area established in the shallow waters of Kowloon Bay at Kun Tong. A considerable amount of land has already been formed in this way and should be valuable after consolidation for building purposes. The refuse is top-dressed with a foot or more of dredged sand and mud from the approaches to Hong Kong harbour. Once the filling area is reduced to reasonable proportions the fly nuisance at this dump should be very considerably lessened.

Spraying of insecticide in carried out on the dust boats before they return to their urban stations, but this is only partially effective and it is usual for many flies to be transported back. This nuisance has been lessened in some degree since coolies working on the dust boats were forbidden to comb the refuse for rags, etc., and to take these back in the boats return- ing from the disposal area. A second refuse dump is maintain- ed in swampy land near Aberdeen on Hong Kong Island.

- M 22

Only one public incinerator exists and is sited at Kennedy Town on the Island. Here dirty dressing from hospitals, con- demned carcasses and slaughter house waste are burned.

The refuse disposal system has certain definite objections from the public health standpoint, but it is capable of improve- ment and is certainly a degree better than the former arrange- ment under which all refuse was dumped at sea.

Incineration of all waste at one or more points on Hong Kong Island and in Kowloon and the New Territories with the utilisation of ash and incombustible material for filling reclaimable areas con- stitutes an ideal to be aimed for when financial considerations justify. It may be of interest to note that the existing system was seriously interrupted at the time of the typhoon. Two dust boat stations were completely demolished and others were severely damaged. In addition, one refuse barge was lost and three partially destroyed. Apart from the normal amount of refuse, some 1,500 tons resulted from the typhoon and took a week to clear.

Refuse barges may be out of action for four days at a time when the typhoon signal is raised and refuse has to be dumped at certain points along the shore during that period, a proceed- ing that has certain grave public health objections.

(c) Drainage.

As in previous years a comprehensive system of surface drainage was undertaken by the Public Works Department in 1937. In addition, a considerable amount of anti-malarial drainage was constructed in the neighbourhood of Kai Tak Aerodrome, in the proposed cantonment area at Kowloon Tong on the outskirts of Kowloon, and elsewhere.

(d) Water supplies.

Mention has been made earlier in this Report of the com- pletion of the Shing Mun Jubilee Dam supplying water to Kowloon and Victoria townships. As might be expected with water works installed over a long period of years, the type and efficiency varies somewhat.

The water supply of Hong Kong which is under the control of the Water Department of the Public Works Department is obtained from impounding reservoirs having a combined maximum capacity of 5,971 million gallons and a combined drainage area of 10,536 acres or nearly sixteen and a half square miles.

M 23

Storage particulars are as follows:

Table VI.

Name of reservoir

Locality

Capacity (million gallons)

Remarks

Tytam

Island

362

Gravitational

Tytam Byewash

Wongneichong

Aberdeen (Upper)

Pokfulam

22

30

""

173

66

17

Tytam (Intermediate)

196

""

Requires pump-

ing

Tytam Tuk

39

1,406

17

19

Aberdeen (Lower)

107

"

2,362

Total Island

storage

Kowloon

Mainland

353

Gravitational

Kowloon Byewash

186

11

Shek Li Pui

116

Jubilee (Shing Mun).

>>

2,921

Reception

33

3,609

www

Total mainland

2,362

storage Total Island

5,971

storage Total storage

The mainland, i.e. Kowloon and New Kowloon, is supplied solely from mainland sources. The Island is supplied partly from its own storage and partly from the mainland by way of two submarine mains.

M 24

Table VII shows the arrangements regarding filtration:-

Table VII.

Normal

Name of plant

capacity

Locality

(million

Remarks

gallons

per day)

Eastern

Island

2.6

Bowen Road

3.0

21

Albany

1.8

"}

Elliot

1.8

4.0

""

West Point

0.7

>>

Chai Wan

0.2

14.1

Slow sand with pre-filters

Paterson's rapid gravity

Slow sand only

Slow sand with pre-filters

Paterson's rapid gravity

Slow sand only

Total Island capacity

Shek Li Pui Mainland

15.0

Paterson's rapid gravity

Kowloon

3.0

Slow sand only

>>

18.0

Total Mainland capacity

14.1

Total Island capacity

32.1

Total capcaity

With the exception of supplies in the Pokfulam area of the Island all water from Government supplies is chlorinated after filtration. Chlorination is generally carried out by means of Paterson chloronomes.

The dosage of chlorine varies seasonally but averages about one half part per million.

Bacteriological results for 1937 were as follows: —

Samples

1,028

86

31

1,145

Table VIII.

B. coli communis

were absent in 50 c.c. (89.8%)

were above standard (B. coli absent in 10 c.c.)

(7.5%)

were below standard (2.7%)

Total number of examinations made (of filtered

water)



M 25

During 1937 consumption on the Island varied between twelve and nineteen million gallons per day and on the mainland between seven and a half and twelve million gallons per day.

Until last year periodical restriction of the supply was an annual occurrence particularly on the Island, but as storage was then practically doubled by the completion of the Jubilee Reser- voir, this unsatisfactory state of affairs is not so likely to happen in future, always provided funds for necessary exten- sions

forthcoming. Consumers are supplied generally through metered house services of which there are about 24,000; although public stand pipes are provided for those who are unwilling to pay for water by meter.

Present charges for water are as follows:

**

Two per centum on assessed value of premises;

fifty cents per 1,000 gallons (less fifteen per centum for prompt payment) for consumption in excess of a statutory free allowance based on the two per centum rate;

*one dollar per 1,000 gallons is charged for shipping

and construction supplies, and

thirty-five cents per 1,000 gallons for unfiltered

supplies.

A new Waterworks Ordinance involving revised charges for water is at present under consideration.

The average consumption per head per day amounts to about thirty-two gallons.

It is hoped that funds will be available shortly to enable Albany Service Reservoir to be covered and the unfiltered and unchlorinated water in the Pokfulam area to be adequately dealt with. Recommendations for the covering of the Albany Reser- voir were put forward by the late Professor Sir William Simpson sen't out to this Colony by the Secretary of State thirty-six years ago.

Although only just over one per centum of the Government pipe-borne water now remains untreated, it is unwise that even this relatively small proportion should serve lais a potential source of water-borne disease in a country subjected to periodical invasion by cholera and where large reservoirs of typhoid and dysentery are constantly at hand.

Note.-One Hong Kong dollar of one hundred cents varies in exchange value

but is often worth about one shilling and three pence.

- M 26-

(e) Clearance of bush and undergrowth.

In spite of a rainfall of over eighty inches during the year, clearance of bush did not represent a matter of any moment in the Colony.

(f) Domiciliary visiting and inspections.

-

House-to-house inspection forms part of the duties of the Health Officers and Sanitary Inspectorate, theoretically the Sanitary Inspectors being grouped round the Health Officers for this and other purposes. In actual practice the Sanitary Inspectors are not under the control of the Medical Officers of Health but under the Chairman of the Urban Council of Hong Kong, a quasi-municipal body which functions mainly as а cleansing department but which possesses limited powers and is without fiscal autonomy. The system is unsatisfactory from many points of view and strong representations have been made to Government to sanction a reorganization on up-to-date lines. It is over twelve years ago that Sanitary Inspectors were placed under the general control of the Medical Officers of Health in the United Kingdom (Sanitary Officers Ordinance, 1926). There are some hopes of this change being effected in 1938 this reform being long overdue and the present system militating against the health and well-being of the community.

It is estimated that, apart from premises occupied by Euro- peans and the larger banks, stores, etc., there are about 23,347 Chinese-type houses in the Urban Council Area of Hong Kong and Kowloon. The majority of these are of three storeys or floors. Some 220,713 floors were subjected to cleansing with kerosene oil emulsion during the year. Since each Sanitary Inspector is responsible for supervising a district containing 30,000 or more inhabitants, the majority of whom live under lamentably overcrowded conditions, domiciliary visiting which forms but a part of the duties of an Inspector can hardly be regarded as effective. This is borne out by the fact that numbers of cases of dangerous infectious disease, e.g., cholera, smallpox, etc., are "missed" and many fatal cases only seen in the mortuaries after being dumped in the streets.

Such a dangerous state of affairs could hardly exist with an adequate and effectively supervised inspectorate working under the direct orders of the Medical Officers of Health who are nominally responsible for the health of the town.

(g) Offensive trades.

Some 186 premises were licensed for offensive trade pur- poses in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

The list of different businesses comprised the following:- battery manufacture and manganese crushing 30, bone boiling and storing 20, chromium plating 5, cleansing and storing of sharks fins 31, fat boiling and soap manufacture 39, feather

- M 27

drying, cleaning and sorting 15, hair (including human) drying, cleaning and sorting 6, packing of skins and hides 1, pig roasting 22, rag sorting and picking 11, resin boiling 2, tanneries 4.

With the exception of the establishments dealing in sharks fins and pig roasting most of the trades mentioned above were confined to certain districts of the Urban Council Area set aside for the purpose.

Many of these undertakings are small and might be classed as house industries. In point of fact they are not infrequently carried on in premises designed as dwelling houses and not for commercial use. The battery industry which is of comparatively recent growth operates under conditions far from satisfactory owing to the primitive methods employed. Definite cases of poisoning with manganese have not so far been discovered, but it is more than likely that some of the ill-health suffered by the workers mostly women-is attributable to working in the dust- laden atmosphere of these factories.

The feather cleaning industry is equally unsatisfactory from the workers standpoint, especially as the labour roll is almost invariably made up of women and young girls. Attempts to insist upon the wearing of masks in the dust-laden atmosphere have failed and the only solution would appear to be the intro- duction of legislation to enforce mechanical cleaning.

(III)-SCHOOL HYGIENE.

The School Hygiene Branch of the Medical Department first came into being in 1925 when a Health Officer was specially allocated for this work. Four years later a Chinese Health Officer was appointed to assist. În 1933 a second Chinese Health Officer was added to the staff. The Branch is now made up of one European and two Chinese Health Officers, a part-time Lady Medical Officer and five Nurses.

The educational institutions in the Colony may be classified into three groups: -(1) Government schools, of which there are twenty-one with 5,643 scholars, (2) Grant-in-Aid schools, num- bering nineteen with 8,676 scholars, and (3) Private schools, which are termed 'vernacular' when teaching is in Chinese, or 'English' when teaching is in English. Of the private schools, 284 with 20,210 scholars were subsidised, and 853 with 52,464 scholars were unaided. The majority of schools in the last category are very far from being satisfactory from the hygienic standpoint.

Under the Education Ordinance, 1913, the Director of Education is empowered to refuse applications for registration and to remove the names of schools from the register if such are not "properly and efficiently carried on".

The School Hygiene Branch is responsible for the medical supervision of school children and for the inspection of schocl premises.

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(a) Medical supervision of scholars.

With the limited staff it is only possible for a small propor- tion of the school population to be medically examined.

In the period under review 5,802 medical examinations were carried out in eighteen Government schools, the remaining three Government educational institutions being of a special nature and not subject to medical inspection.

Some twenty-six per centum of the scholars examined were found to be suffering from defects of one kind or another, excluding dental or eye troubles.

Dental disease formed the largest group of defects met with. There is no School Dental Officer, consequently the persons affected have to seek private treatment.

Visual disorders came next in frequency, myopia accounting for nine tenths in this group. Myopia commonly develops between eleven and thirteen years of age and progresses through- out school life. Its incidence amounted to twenty-six per centum amongst scholars of all ages in the Government schools examined.

Pulmonary tuberculosis was detected or strongly suspected in seventeen out of 1,506 scholars examined for this condition, an incidence of just over one per centum.

Deformities of the chest and postural deformities of the spine were found to be common in entrants to Government schools.

Table IX gives some indication of the number of attendances of scholars at the various school clinics :-

Table IX.

Violet Peel Health Centre

100

Special Clinic for ears, nose & throat ...

396

Special Clinic for refraction

636

Yaumati School Clinic

670

Ellis Kadoorie School Clinic

978

Total

2,780

Seventy-six visits were paid by the School Nurses to the

homes of scholars for purposes of giving advice.

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It is of interest to note that in 1931 a charge varying from fifty cents on entrance to three dollars per annum was made payable by scholars attending Government schools. This fee entitles such scholars to obtain spectacles when these are prescribed at School Clinics. It also covers hospital fees for pupils admitted to hospital for operations on the tonsils and adenoids and the cost of exercises for the relief of squint. A Physical Training Supervisor was appointed in the Education Department during 1937 to organise schemes for physical train- ing in Government and other schools.

(b) Inspection of premises.

At the request of the Education Department a number of visits were paid to premises in the urban districts in order to report on their suitability for registration. Some 614 such visits were undertaken. In many instances premises were found to be used as schools before they had been inspected or registered. Many of such schools have been found to be very overcrowded, to possess inadequate lighting and ventilation, to lack simple furniture and to be deficient in latrine accommodation, water supply and proper means of refuse disposal.

The existing legislation needs strengthening on the subject of school hygiene and it is hoped that such additions or amend- ments as may be necessary will be enacted during 1938. Certain additional subordinate Health staff will be required to propagate the reasonable standards which it is proposed should be adopted.

It cannot be emphasised too strongly that by far the best method of teaching hygiene to scholars is by ensuring that the school premises themselves are satisfactory from the public health standpoint.

(IV)-LABOUR CONDITIONS.

Labour conditions suffered a definite deterioration during the latter half of 1937 owing to the tens of thousands of refugees from the areas affected by the Sino-Japanese incident, many of whom were practically destitute and sought to throw themselves into the labour market. Even in normal times labour is some- what too easily obtainable from the inexhaustible reservoir in China. This large surplus of labour was offset to a small extent by the establishing of factories by commercial interests who were no longer able to function in the troubled zones of Shanghai, Tientsin and other places in China. In addition, a number of small workshops caine into existence to supply uniforms and other equipment for the armies in China.

For the most part labourers are. paid on a piece-work basis. Wages vary widely, female workers in electric torch battery factories may earn as low a rate as fifteen cents per day, the normal rates for male and female labourers being from sixty to

M 30

seventy-five cents for the former and forty to sixty cents for the latter per day. Hours of work vary in the different trades and occupations but are usually about nine hours with overtime up to another four hours. Apart from Government activities the bulk of the labour is employed in house-building, ship- building and engineering, transport, market gardening, fishing, domestic and quasi-municipal service, and in factories and workshops.

Two mines are operated in the New Territories and employ about 600 labourers. In the Lin Ma Hang Mine satisfactory accommodation has been provided for labourers, but this is not the case with a Wolfram Mine up to the present time. There are no estates or plantations similar to those found in Malaya, Ceylon, and similar eastern colonies and dependencies.

A small but valuable piece of legislation was introduced during the year under review in the form of Regulations under the New Territories Regulation Ordinance, 1910.

This provided the Health Authorities in the New Territories with the power to require certain types of employers of labour to construct suitable housing accommodation for their labourers and to carry out anti-malarial measures in the area occupied by the proposed works. Owing to lack of liaison between the authorities concerned, works are not infrequently undertaken without any notification to the authorities and, hence, without satisfactory provision for the labourers employed.

It is unlikely that conditions of labour will show any marked improvement in Hong Kong until a Labour Code, possibly on the lines of that promulgated in the Federated Malay States several years ago, has been enacted laying down a

minimum wage, adequate housing, and so on.

(V)-HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING.

Housing in the Colony is controlled under the Buildings Ordinance, No. 18 of 1935.

The vast majority of the houses occupied by the labouring classes are built back-to-back with narrow frontages (governed originally by the length of China fir used) and often with con- servancy back-lanes six feet or more in width.

In many houses built prior to the Public Health & Buildings Ordinance, No. 1 of 1903, the open space provided within the plot boundaries is often less than 100 square feet in extent.

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Houses constructed subsequent to the passing of No. 1 Or- dinance of 1903 possess a larger open space; one quarter of the plot being reserved when the land was purchased before the Or- dinance came into force and one third in cases when the land was obtained after the passing of the Ordinance. The more usual type of older house is of three storeys, often with a cock loft to increase the accommodation, and has a frontage of sixteen to twenty-five feet, a depth of thirty-five to forty feet. The lower storey is often a shop. The upper storeys consist of one large room divided into three or more cubicles separated by partitions six or seven feet high, with a kitchen at the back. In the older houses there is but one latrine on the ground floor serving the whole house but those of more modern construction have a latrine on each floor. In some cases the approach lanes be- tween each group of houses have been built over by what is termed locally "riding floors", the lower storey serving as a thoroughfare occupied by hawkers, street sleepers, and littered with debris.

Lighting and ventilation, means of access to upper floors (and escape in case of fire) and sanitary accommodation in this type of house is very unsatisfactory.

Recent legislation enacted in the year previous to that under review seeks to rectify many of these defects and set a much higher standard for new buildings.

Not only are the majority of the houses in Victoria, at any rate of poorer type, arranged with little or no regard for the principles of town-planning but they are individually grossly overcrowded. This condition of overcrowding became still more aggravated in the latter half of 1937, chiefly owing to the influx of refugees but also to the conversion of dwelling houses into factories and schools to replace those destroyed or menaced in areas in China affected by the Sino-Japanese hostilities. The Administration is faced with very serious difficulties in dealing with this problem of housing and overcrowding and it is to be hoped that the Housing Commission appointed by the Govern- ment in 1935 will be able to devise a satisfactory solution.

The general sense of insecurity influenced private building during 1987 and a considerable reduction took place in the number of houses constructed in the urban areas.

With the exception of one or two reclaimed areas town planning is more or less non-existent in the Urban Council Areas of the Island and there is no legislation dealing with the subject apart from the question of zones for offensive trades.

On the other hand, some admirable town planning has been effected in Kowloon and New Kowloon on the mainland and this district presents a far simpler public health problem.

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The building branch of the Public Works Department is responsible for controlling building, the Health Division of the Medical Department serving in an advisory capacity.

The Sanitary Department which functions in the Urban Council Area only has little or nothing to do with housing other than, for example, the removal of obstructions. This is well shown in the subjoined table.

Table X.

Nature of work.

No. in No. in

1936.

1937.

By whom supervised.

1. Obstructions removed

from open spaces

615

1,240 Sanitary Dept.

2. Obstructions to light &

ventilation removed... 1,793

1,598

do.

3. Houses demolished

(domestic)

134

167 Public Works Dept.

4. Houses demolished

(non-domestic)

9

3

do.

5. Houses erected

(domestic)

205

160

do.

6. Houses erected

(non-domestic)

14

14

do.

7. Houses reconstructea

(domestic)

150

135

do.

8. Houses reconstructed

(non-domestic)

1

do.

(VI)-FOOD IN RELATION TO HEALTH & DIsease.

A large market of modern design was opened at Wanchai early in the year and a second smaller market at Stanley at the end of the year.

The demolition of the old Central Market in Victoria was commenced in September, 1937, in order to make room for a new structure. The retail stall-holders were accommodated in temporary stalls in the Western. Market and the whole-sale dealers in a new market, the Kennedy Town Wholesale Market.

Under the present rather anomalous organisation of the Sanitary Department vis à vis the Health Division of the Medical Department, health conditions in markets are under the supervision of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeons instead of under the Health Officers.

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Hawkers of foodstuffs in the public highways continued to present a public health problem, both as regards the methods of preparation of their wares and the means of protection-or lack of means-of foodstuffs from dust and flies.

In cases where a district was well-supplied with restaurants and eating shops, efforts were made to discourage hawking. The prevalence of diseases of the enteric type has been mentioned earlier in this Report, and the need for special care was of still greater importance during the summer of 1937 when cholera broke out. The sale of food (and drugs) is governed by the following legis- lation: :

(1) Adulterated Food & Drugs Ordinance, No. 8 of 1935. (2) Public Health (Food) Ordinance, No. 13 of 1935. (3) Hawkers Ordinance, No. 22 of 1935.

In addition, special ad hoc bye-laws were drawn up to meet the dangers resulting from the cholera epidemic and preliminary steps were taken to introduce compulsory pasteurization.

These bye-laws prohibited persons from selling cut or peeled fruit controlled by permit the sale of ice cream, non-aerated fruit juice or herbal drinks and certain jellies, uncooked fish, mussels, etc.

Under the Adulterated Food and Drugs Ordinance, Health Officers, Veterinary Surgeons and Sanitary Inspectors are authorised by the Urban Council, on the recommendation of the Director of Medical Services, to take samples and to submit them for analysis.

In Table XI below details of this work are given.

Table XI.

Food or drug.

Boracic ointment

No. of samples analysed.

4

38

4 37

Butter

Castor oil

Cheese

Coffee

Epsom salts

Glauber salts

5

Glycerine

4

Lard

16

Milk (fresh)

145

Milk (unsweetened evaporated)

22

Paraffin

4

Seidlitz powder

4

Tea

39

Water

1

M 34

Nine out of the 145 samples of fresh milk were found to be below the standard, the remaining articles on the list being satisfactory.

Foodstuffs seized and destroyed included:-condiments, 1,350 lbs., confectionery, 16,125 lbs., eggs, 100 lbs., fish, 20 lbs., flour, 22,280 lbs., fruit, 15,957 lbs., meat, 919 lbs., milk, 89 lbs., molasses, 500 lbs., and vegetables, 106,791 lbs.

Foodstuffs voluntarily surrendered and destroyed com- prised:-cheese, 18 lbs., cocoa, 43 lbs., coffee, 300 lbs., condi- inents, 252 lb., confectionery, 491 lbs., fish, 4,285 lbs., fruit, 1,445 lbs., jan, 6 lbs., neat, 3,350 lbs., sausages, 108 lbs., syrup, 19 lbs., and vegetables, 266 lbs.

There are two important dairy concerns in the colony, one European-owned on the Island somewhat unfortunately sited as regards the Queen Mary Hospital, and the second under Chinese management on the mainland. There are, in addition, about thirty small dairies owned by Chinese mostly on the mainland.

The daily production of fresh milk in 1937 amounted to about 1,700 gallons of which by far the larger proportion was produced at the European-owned dairy referred to above.

This concern has incurred considerable expenditure in recent years on pasteurization and bottling plants and when completely reorganised on modern lines should be in a position to produce milk free from tubercle bacilli, Br: abortus, the streptococcus causing mastitis, and other organisms giving rise to milk-borne infections.

Draft legislation was introduced during 1937 to make pasteurization of milk compulsory but met with considerable opposition. There is every possibility of the proposal becoming law in 1938 together with regulations covering bottling, steriliza- tion of containers, etc. As might be surmised milking in the majority of the small Chinese-owned cattle byres leaves a great deal to be desired and it is to be hoped that small owners of cattle will find it better to sell their products to one or other of the important and well-equipped concerns.

While on the subject of milk production mention should be made of a comparatively new enterprise, namely, the preparation of reconstituted milk and cream usually from New Zealand butter and skimmed milk powder. Legislation is pending to enforce pasteurization, clean bottling of these products and a standardization of their quality as regards milk fat and total solids other than fat. Dairies and milk shops are licensed and are subjected to periodical inspection.

The more important Government slaughter house is situated at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong Island) others are to be found at Ma Tau Kok on the mainland; and at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho on the Island.

M 35

Oxen are shot but humane slaughtering has not yet been extended to sheep, goats and pigs.

The numbers of animals dealt with at the abattoirs in 1937 were as follows:-Cattle 72,218, swine 390,519, sheep and goalts 18,502.

These activities are supervised by the Veterinary Branch of the Sanitary Department.

As might be expected in a territory where so large a pro- portion of the population subsist on very low wages and where a few cents makes all the difference between sufficient food and starvation or at least serious under-nutrition, certain deficiency diseases are commonly met with.

Osteomalacia, pellagra, rickets and scurvy are

are rarely recognised but beri beri, including the infantile variety, con- stitutes a serious problem and occasions much incapacity, ill- health and, in infants, not infrequently a fatal ending.

Out of a total of 34,635 deaths registered in 1937, 1,661 were attributed directly to beri beri, a ratio of nearly 48 per thousand deaths from all causes.

Much information of value is to be anticipated from the Nutrition Research Committee established to investigate nutri- tional problems in the Colony.

(B) MEASURES TAKEN TO SPREAD THE KNOWLEDGE OF HYGIENE & SANITATION.

Hygiene is one of the subjects on the curriculum in a large proportion of the schools. Unfortunately many schools suffer from such serious health deficiencies in the matter of light, ventilation and sanitary accommodation that lessons in hygiene possess little point.

Personal hygiene and mothercraft is taught to the women attending the maternal and child welfare centres and domestic hygiene by the Health Nurses when they visit the homes in the districts.

A reasonable standard of hygiene is aimed at in the homes of some seventy-six registered midwives which are inspected periodically by the Supervisor of Midwives (a woman doctor) and her staff. The better types of these serve as examples of how to maintain hygienic conditions in homes in the midst of the overcrowded areas.

It might be expected that the sanitary inspectorate should take an important part in instructing the general public in the advantages of living in reasonably hygienic surroundings and no doubt useful work may be done at times along these lines.

-M 36-

As has been stated, however, the sanitary inspectorate are not yet under the control of the Medical Officers of Health. In the meantime, there can be no doubt that a valuable source of public health propaganda is being largely wasted through lack of direction by those best qualified to give it.

Lectures on hygiene, first aid and kindred subjects are delivered by the officers of the Medical Department, by the staff of the Chinese Public Dispensaries, by the St. John Ambulance Association & Brigade and by other voluntary organizations.

Use is also made of the English and Vernacular press and of the Wireless Broadcasting system.

(C) TRAINING OF SANITARY PERSONNEL.

The Medical Officers of Health, the Malariologist and others are responsible for giving courses of instruction with practical demonstrations in sanitation, elementary entomology, sanitary engineering and allied subjects.

is

Until the Health Division of the Medical Department reorganised on proper lines the training of sanitary personnel will continue to suffer. No examination was held in Hong Kong under the auspices of the Royal Sanitary Institute for the Sanitary Inspectors' Certificate in 1937.

(D) RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

(1) Reorganisation. of Health Division on accepted lines with placing of sanitary inspectorate and subordinate staff under the direct supervision and control of the Medical Officers of Health- the scavenging of the Urban Council Area being carried out by a Cleansing Branch of the Sanitary Department.

(2) Increase in staff of Chinese and European Health Staff and appointment of a Deputy Director of Health Services to coordinate Health activities and to be available, if desired, as Professor of Public Health and Preventive Medicine in the University of Hong Kong.

(3) Substitution of sewerage system of nightsoil disposal for existing pan and barges and construction of sewers

for large sections of Kowloon, etc., where housing development is likely to take place.

(4) Overhaul of existing scheme of refuse disposal involving dumping, especially during times of typhoons.

M: 37

(5) Legislation to cover town planning, zoning and the pro- hibition of conversion of dwelling houses into factories.

(6) Slum clearance preceded by construction of healthy houses for the dispossessed on a sub-economic basis.

(7) Covering of Albany Road Reservoir and filtration and sterilization (by chloramine or other approved method) of pipe- borne water in Pokfulam area of Victoria.

(8) Formation of school dental department with Govern- ment Dental Surgeon.

(9) Inauguration of Chair in Public Health & Preventive Medicine in the University of Hong Kong.

(10) Provision of adequate accommodation for general diseases, infectious and mental diseases in the Kowloon Medical Centre.

(11) Establishment of model Health Centres in Eastern and Western Districts of Victoria, in Shamshuipo and Kowloon City Districts of Kowloon and at Taipo.

IV.—PORT HEALTH WORK & ADMINISTRATION.

con-

Hong Kong which is recognised as being one of the greatest ports in the world on the basis of shipping tonnage was siderably affected by the hostilities, although the decrease in shipping was compensated for to a certain extent by the temporary closure of Shanghai as an international port.

During the year under review 4,322 British ocean-going vessels entered and cleared the harbour as compared with 4,616 in 1936. To this number should be added 5,202 foreign ocean-going vessels which had amounted to 6,364 in the previous year.

River steamers, launches and foreign trade junks also saw an appreciable diminution, the figures for each class being 7,695, 4,082 and 12,481 respectively.

The tonnage fell from 40,063,663 in 1936 to 36,191,724 in 1937.

Some 4,775 inward bound ocean-going vessels were boarded by Port Health Officers.

Vessels from Canton, Macao and West River ports and smaller craft were visited when information was at hand of sickness or death. They were also inspected periodically by the Health Inspector with the object of encouraging a higher standard of cleanliness, and for purposes of deratisation.

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During the year 129 special visits were made to vessels as compared with eighty-six in 1936 to examine persons suffering from infectious but non-quarantinable diseases.

Thirty-three out of the thirty-six bodies landed from vessels were examined at the mortuary.

Bills of Health to the number of 1,611 were issued in Hong Kong. Their abolition has been urged in many parts of the world and there is some doubt as to their value in the Far East, more especially under the disturbed conditions existing at the moment.

Owing to the absence of any quarantine immigration station in Hong Kong it is not practicable to enforce observation ashore of passengers and crews. When the occasion arises observation has to be carried out on board at one or other of the two quarantine anchorages to which go vessels when arriving from ports declared "infected" within the meaning of the Inter- national Sanitary Convention of 1926. Eleven ships were detained in quarantine during 1937 and 485,629 persons were medically examined on arrival, making an average of 1,330 per day. All emigrants from the Colony are medically examined and, when necessary, vaccinated before departure.

Some 245,488 emigrants were so examined during the year of whom 239,188 were "free", that is to say they paid for their passages, and the balance were "assisted", their passages being paid by their prospective employers. Rejections numbered 1,153. Emigrants vaccinated were 116,208 in number.

The following table shows the number of emigrants leaving Hong Kong and the proportion proceeding to the Straits Settlements during the past five years.

Table XII.

1933

1934

1935

1936

1937

Average for period

To Strails

Settlements

20,324 86,192 102,674 101,499

165,177

95,173

Total to all

ports

64,181 138,240 158,300 164,077

245,488 154,057

Disinfection and deratisation of ships, an activity previously carried out by a private company, is now performed by the Fumigation Bureau of the Port Health Authority.

M 39

The plant consists of (1) a hulk, the ''Aldecoa", which provides facilities for the bathing of passengers and the dis- infection and disinfestation of their belongings in two steam disinfectors; (2) a barge equipped with a B-type Clayton machine; (3) an A-type Clayton machine, and (4) apparatus such as Dutch ovens and sprays. This equipment was added to in September, 1937, by a reconditioned launch with an A-type Clayton machine.

Deratisation and Deratisation Exemption Certificates issued in 1987 amounted to a total of ninety-one and eighty-eight respectively as compared with seventy-nine and fifty-eight in the previous year.

The sanitary control of aerial navigation, which had been rendered possible by the application of the International Sanitary Convention for Aerial Navigation to Hong Kong on the 1st of August, 1935, by legislation under the Quarantine and Prevention of Diseases Ordinance in the following year, was further strengthened by regulations governing aircraft pro- mulgated in the Government Gazette on the 17th of December, 1937.

Several new air services were inaugurated during the year and the following companies make regular calls at Hong Kong:-- Imperial Airways, Pan-American Airways, China National Aviation Corporation and the Eurasia Corporation.

No cases of infectious disease were discovered in passengers and crew arriving by air and no reports were received of such illness in persons who had left Hong Kong by air.

from

Some indication of the extent of air-traffic to and Hong Kong (Kai Tak Civil Airport) can be appreciated by reference to the following table:

Table XIII.

ARRIVALS

DEPARTURES

Nationality of Aircraft

Aircraft Passengers Crew

Aircraft Passengers Crew

British

65

49

130

67

75

134

Chinese

292

1,581

784

289

1,448

716

Other countries

41

299

236

39

233

283

Total

398

1,929

1,150

395

1,756

1,133

M 40

V.-MATERNITY & CHILD WELFARE.

The maternity hospitals under Government and voluntary control provided accommodation for 358 beds in 1937 of which the largest number were to be found in the Tsan Yuk Hospital (sixty beds) under the control of the Medical Department.

Beds were also available in a large number of maternity homes of which seventy-five were inspected during the year.

As from the 1st of January, 1937, the practice of midwifery habitually and for gain became a punishable offence, Wan P'os or handy women who had practised midwifery in Hong Kong for two or more years previously and who enrolled as midwives being exempted from this prohibition. As the result of this concession 111 Wan P'os' were enrolled in 1937. By degrees this type of untrained midwife will disappear in the same way as the "Sairey Ganips" in the United Kingdom.

By the end of the year 395 nanes were to be found in the Midwives Register.

Thirty-seven candidates satisfied the examiners at the examinations carried out under the auspices of the Midwives Board.

The Medical Department employs sixteen midwives who were located as follows:

Chinese Public Dispensaries at Aberdeen, Kowloon City, Shanshuipo, Shaukiwan, Stanley & Yaumati and at Govern- ment Dispensaries at Ko Tung, Sai Kung, Sham Tseng, Tai O, Tai Po and Un Long.

These midwives render free service to the poor in their own homes. They visit the ante-and post-natal mother and new born child for a period of seven days after birth.

Visits to expectant mothers numbered 2,528 and to puer- peral mothers 12,919. During the last-named 12,215 demon- strations were given to the mothers in the washing of their babies.

The 2,653 individual mothers visited were mostly cases of normal labour but included twelve abortions, twenty-two mis- carriages and premature births and thirty-seven still-births. In fifty-nine instances the mothers were taken by ambulance hospital, principally on account of delayed labour and usually after the Medical Officers from the various dispensaries had been called in.

to

Apart from deaths amongst these complicated cases, only one mother attended by the Government midwives died.



M 41

When not engaged in maternal and child welfare work the midwives assist in first aid work at the dispensaries.

Their work is overlooked by the Supervisor of Midwives who inspects their bags, quarters, records and investigates cases of complicated puerperium, the causes of deaths in infants and complaints preferred against them. Ante-natal and infant welfare work is carried on at a large number of centres including the Violet Peel Health Centre at Wanchai, Government Welfare Centre in Kowloon, Alice Memorial, Military, Tsan Yuk and Tung Wah Hospitals, Chinese Public Dispensaries, six Govern- ment Dispensaries in the New Territories (with the Govern- ment Travelling Dispensary) and at nine centres under the auspices of the St. John Ambulance Association and Brigade. At the Government centres at Kowloon and Wanchai the average daily attendances were seventy and seventy-seven respectively, the corresponding total attendances for the whole year being 23,858 and 22,339.

The average age of the infants at their first appearance at these two centres was just under three months.

a quarter of those seen were artificially fed.

Six per

Rather over

centurn of the 2,062 mothers whose blood sera were examined gave a positive Wassermann reaction.

Malnutrition and digestive disturbances, many of which were attributable to malnutrition in its widest sense, accounted for the majority of the attendances of infants, although only six cases of rickets were actually diagnosed.

Respiratory diseases came second in importance followed by conjunctivitis.

Thrush was common and was met with in 551 infants at the two centres. The soup kitchen at both centres continued to be patronised, eighty-two meals being given daily at the Wanchai Centre and half this number at Kowloon. During the summer a recipe for soya bean milk was obtained through the courtesy of Dr. Marian Yang of the Peiping First National School of Midwifery, since the cost of cow's milk is far beyond the means of the average mother of the poorer class.

This milk is made daily and has added to it certain quan- tities of sugar, dextrin and salt.

It is given to nursing mothers and infants who are fed at the centres. It is quite palatable and very similar to COWS milk in taste. Its content of vitamin B makes it a particularly valuable food for nursing mothers suffering from beri beri.

The Society for the Protection of Children continued to render valuable assistance by supplying milk and artificial feeds to mothers attending the centres who were found

by the Medical Officers to be too poor to afford these "luxuries".

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A special feature of 1937 consisted in the inoculation of 1,696 mothers and older children with cholera vaccine during the serious epidemic of that disease.

Home visits formed another activity of the centres and nearly two thousand were paid by nurses to the homes of babies attending.

Voluntary helpers were all too scarce at these centres, but special mention should be made of the devoted services of Mrs. D. Cuthbertson who has now, unfortunately, left the Colony.

A description of maternal infant welfare would be incom- plete without mention of the activities of the

the Hong Kong Eugenics League formed in April, 1936, which aims at giving advice to poor inarried women who have already had one or more children on how to limit and space their families.

Sessions were held weekly out of office hours at the Violet Peel Health Centre.

The number of mothers who were given advice on the spacing and limiting of their families amounted to 217. The number of pregnancies in this group was 1,142, an average of 5.3 per mother. Nearly one third of these pregnancies had ended in miscarriage, still birth or early death of the child born alive.

The average age of the mother attending the clinic was just under thirty years.

46

The following extract from the Report of the Eugenics League for 1937-38 is of interest: 'Before any mother is "instructed in contraception full medical history is taken and "careful examination performed by the doctor. By this means ‘a number of serious diseases have been detected in their early 'stages. Patients have been referred to the appropriate clinics 'for the treatment of venereal disease, tuberculosis and other "medical, surgical, obstetrical and gynaecological conditions."

VI. HOSPITALS, DISPENSARIES AND VENEREAL

DISEASES CLINICS.

A list of Naval, Military, Government Civil, Chinese and private hospitals and institutions is given in Return B to this Report. On this occasion it is only proposed to mention the more salient facts in connection with the hospital and dispen- sary services in the Colony.

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1.-Queen Mary and Government Civil Hospitals.

The outstanding event in the year as regards improved hospital facilities was the opening of the Queen Mary Hospital which replaced the old Government Civil Hospital built in 1874 and which was closed on the 30th of June, 1937.

The ceremony was performed by His Excellency Sir Andrew Caldecott, K.C.M.G., C.B.E., at that time Governor and Com- mander-in-Chief, on the 13th of April, 1937.

Situated on the south side of the Island in open surround- ings 500 feet above sea level, the new hospital commands an uninterrupted view of the sea and islands to the south and west.

The hospital was designed by the officers of the Public Works Department in consultation with the Medical Department and cost nearly four million dollars (Hong Kong) or a quarter of a million pounds sterling-(about £460 per bed).

It may be said to embody all the latest improvements in hospital construction. The buildings are planned on the vertical system with lifts to all seven floors.

Excellent lighting and ventilation facilities are afforded by the grouping of the five wings of the hospital in the form of an "H". The main entrance is in the centre of the building with a separate entrance on the north side for patients arriving by ambulance and a service entrance on the south side.

The roof is flat and so designed to permit of its use as an open air ward for patients suffering from tuberculosis and other conditions which benefit from sunlight and fresh air.

The main building and nursing staff quarters are of steel frame construction and quietness has been studied, the walls and floors being of sound-resisting material.

The hospital has accommodation for a total of 546 beds of which thirty-six are cots and thirty-two for maternity cases. An Isolation Wing consists of nine small wards with room for twenty-two cases.

About one quarter of the beds are allotted to the three clinical units of the Hong Kong University, namely the Medical, Surgical and Gynaecological and Obstetrical Units.

These beds are under the direct control of the Clinical Professors whose reports are contained in Section IX, Scientific, to this Report. The first patients were admitted from the Victoria Hospital on the 1st of May, 1937, and during the remainder of the month and in June all the patients were transferred to the new hospital from the old Government Civil Hospital.

M 44 -

More wards were occupied as stores and equipment became available and by the end of the year only two remained empty.

The typhoon of the 1st of September danaged the building to some extent and this delayed the full occupation of the top floor by two months whilst repairs were being effected.

Private practitioners were given the privilege of making use of the Maternity Wing for the treatment of their own cases and two took advantage of this during the year.

The following serves as a brief summary of the work carried out at the new Queen Mary Hospital and the old Government Civil Hospital in 1937:-

Table XIV.

Queen Mary

Hospital

Government Total for Civil Hospital

1937

(May-Dec.)

(Jan.-June)

In-patients: -

General

5,375

2,693

8,068

Maternity

191

469

669

Total

5,566

3,162

8,728

Daily average

296

209

253

Chinese

3,488

1,993

5,481

European

780

122

902

Indian

989

520

1,509

Russian

42

16

58

Other nationalities

76

42

118

Treated by Govern-

anent Officers

4,631

2,239

6,870

Treated by University

Staff

Medical

229

153

382

:

Surgical

275

213

488

Gynaecological

240

88

328

Nationality of maltern-

ilty cases-

American

1

1

British

43

43

Chinese

106

410

516

Indian

36

45

81

Japanese

3

13

16

Portuguese

1

1

2

Russian

1

1

J.

M 45

Queen Mary Hospital (May-Dec.)

Government Total for Civil Hospital

1937

(Jan.-June)

Operations--

By Government

Officers

443

217

660

By University staff.

637

402

1,039

Total

1,080

619

1,699

Deaths-

General in-patients.....

292

170

462

Maternity cases

3

2.

5

Total

295

172

467

Still-births

7

6

13

The number of in-patients dealt with in the principal Government hospitals on the Island in 1937 amounted to 8,728 as compared with 6,868 in 1936, the daily average rising from 219 to 249 in the same period.

Table XV.

Govt. Civil Hospital

Queen

Total in

Mary

Hospital

Govt. Civil Queen's Hospital & C. Block

1937

Road

Clinics

Out-patients (New cases)

General

1,933

21,246

23,179

Medical Univer-

sity Unit

1,624

1,624

Surgical Univer-

sity Unit

4,459

4,459

Gynaecological

University Unit..

1,890

1,890

Eye Clinic

(Government)

3,126

3,126

Venereal Diseases

(Government)

1,811

1,811

1,933

21,246

12,910

36,089

M 46

2.-Kowloon Hospital.

The Government general hospital accommodation on the mainland consists of one institution only-Kowloon Hospital. This building stands in a medical reserve over thirty acres in extent allowing for considerable growth in the future. It possesses ninety-seven beds for general purposes and thirty-four maternity beds.

1936.

In-patients numbered 3,706 as compared with 3,367 in

This figure was made up of 2,475 Chinese, 830 Europeans, thirty Indians and 371 persons of other nationalities. The daily average number of in-patients was 101.

Some 1,322 operations were performed

were performed under general anaesthesia during the year.

Deaths among in-patients amounted to 326.

The out-patient service at Kowloon Hospital continued to expand by leaps and bounds. Whereas in 1933 the number of persons dealt with was only 27,810, in the year under review it rose to 91,001. To this latter figure should be added 204 and 4,738 attending the ear, nose and throat and eye clinics respec- tively, and 5,766 attending the venereal diseases clinic, making a grand total of 101, 709.

1,372 patients were treated in the maternity block at Kowloon Hospital, a daily average of twenty-two for the thirty- four beds. Amongst these were 1,288 deliveries, eight maternal deaths and seventy-two stillbirths. The maternal mortality was due to three cases of eclampsia, two of post partum haemorrhage, two of puerperal septicaemia and one of toxaemia. Both Chinese and European women were encouraged to attend the ante-natal clinics at Kowloon Hospital and 696 availed them- selves of this service in 1937.

The average cost per patient per day for diets, provision, fuel, light and kitchen staff during 1937 was one dollar and four cents.

(A)

Before leaving the description of the work done at the Goverment General Hospitals mention should be made of two activities which have undergone considerable development in recent years.

M 47-

(a) Anaesthetics.

A full time Government Anaesthetist is employed and the number of anaesthetics administered by this officer and by other Government Medical Officers is detailed below:

Table XVI.

Government Anaesthetist

Other Medical Total

Officers

Government Civil Hospital... 300

172

472

Kowloon Hospital

341

970

1,311

Queen Mary Hospital

504

281

785

Victoria Hospital

84

18

102

Total

1,229

1,441

2,670

The various agents used in anaesthetising patients by the Government Anaesthetist are given in the following table:-

Table XVII.

Chloroform

34

Ether-alone or with ethyl chloride

537

Evipan

Ether with evipan

Nitrous oxide and oxygen.

Pentothal sodium

Spinal

Other methods

87

226

88

7

225

25

Total

1,229

Ether remains the most commonly used anesthetic in major surgery in Hong Kong. Evipan is, however, extensively employed for minor operative procedures and for induction in nervous patients.

The use of spinal anaesthesia has increased greatly and has proved most satisfactory. A six per centum solution of freshly prepared novocaine has given uniformly good results; but the anaesthesia produced can only be relied upon to last for about

M 48

one and a half hours. With a view to prolonging the effect several other methods have been tried. Pantocain L (Bayer) has been the most satisfactory, giving in a small series of twenty cases a duration of anaesthesia from two and a quarter to three and a half hours. The routine use of nitrous oxide is prohibited by its high cost.

(B)

(b) Radiology, Electro-therapeutics and Massage.

In addition to a full-time Radiologist, two Radiographers and two Masseuses and Electrotherapists were on duty during the year at the Queen Mary and Kowloon Hospitals, assisted in both cases by an X-Ray Sister.

A remarkable increase in the activities of this sub-depart- ment has taken place in the past five years, as is evidenced from the figures in the table given below:-

Massage and electrical

treatment

Radiological exainina-

tions

Films exposed

Table XVIII.

1933 1934 1935 1936 1937

10,579 12,947 18,077 10,465 11,775

3,076 3,991 4,897 5,511 6,690

5,477 8,208 8,577 9,193 12,784

The equipment was augmented during the year by the purchase of a dental X-ray apparatus.

A considerable economy was effected in the routine use of X-ray paper instead of films.

In August, 1937, at the request of the Trustees of the Granville Sharp Estate, the Medical Department took tem- porary custody of 442 milligrammes of radium. The radium was made available for use in the Government Hospitals under the supervision of the Radiologist and for loan to private practi- tioners.

With the twenty milligrammes already owned by the Department a considerable number of cases of malignant disease were able to be treated.

3.-Victoria General & Maternity Hospital.

This Government hospital situated in the Peak District of Hong Kong Island was closed on the 7th of June, 1937, follow- ing upon the opening of the Queen Mary Hospital. It possessed forty-six general and twenty-six maternity beds mostly reserved for Europeans.

M 49

During the five months of the year when the hospital was functioning some 229 cases were treated, 199 in the general wards and thirty in the maternity wards. The patients in the general block consisted of thirty-six men, fifty-four children and 109 women.

Of there, 194 were Europeans and five belonged to other races. The daily average of general hospital patients was twenty-four. Thirty women were admitted to the maternity wards which had an average of three adults and three infants during the period. Twenty-nine deliveries were recorded. The hospital was fortunate in having no deaths in the general wards and no maternal deaths.

Ante-natal and other cases seen in the out-patients depart- ment of the maternity block numbered 542.

Plans are under consideration for utilising the Victoria Hospital as a convalescent home, mainly for the children of Europeans living on the hot and damp lower levels on the Island and mainland.

4.-Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital.

This institution was originally erected and managed by the local Chinese community, but it was eventually considered desirable in the interests of the patients and of efficiency that Government should take over the building and that it should be regarded as a Government institution in future. This transfer was effected with the knowledge and active support of the Chairman and members of the Tung Wah Committee. The number of beds in the Tsan Yuk Hospital was sixty, of which fourteen were reserved for gynaecological cases until the Queen Mary Hospital was opened.

The table below presents the record for 1987.

Table XIX.

In-patients.

Remaining at end of 1936

Admissions in 1937

Total treated

Maternity cases

Deliveries

Maternal deaths

Infant deaths

Still-births

Maternal death-rate per 1,000 live births

Gynaecological cases

Death in gynaecological cases Operations in gynaecological cases

39

2,197

2,236

2,096

1,934

6

3.2

33

83

140

1

69

Out-patients.

Gynaecological

Ante-natal

M 50

Infant welfare

Totals

New

cases.

Return

visits.

Total attendances,

338

234

572

499

453

952

1,060

1,049

2,109

1,897

1,736

3,633

Attention is invited to the low puerperal mortality rate for a hospital which provides accommodation in the main for the poorest class of Chinese.

The average daily cost per patient in 1937 for diets, pro- visions, fuel, light and kitchen staff was fifty-two cents.

5.-Infectious Diseases Hospital.

The Infectious Diseases Hospital at Kennedy Town on the Island of Hong Kong was built as a Police Station and, no doubt, was of eminently suitable design for such purpose. The hospital is supposed to accommodate twenty-six beds in six wards. As might be expected such provision is entirely inade- quate and it is hoped that it will be found possible before long to erect a new hospital on the mainland with rather more than ten times the number of beds available at present.

During the cholera outbreak of 1937 it was found necessary to bring back into use a portion of the old Government Civil Hospital.

Since no repairs or renovations had been carried out in this hospital for a long time in view of its closure, the premises were far from satisfactory from the hygienic standpoint and for the safety of the staff.

In all, 1,299 cases of cholera, sixty cases of smallpox and eight cases of chickenpox were treated in the Infectious Diseases Hospital and in the reopened portion of the old Government Civil Hospital.

6.-Social Hygiene Centres.

During the year under review four Government venereal diseases clinics functioned, two on the Island-one at the Queen's Road (old Government Civil Hospital) Out-patient Departinent and one at the Violet Peel Health Centre, Wan- chai-and two in Kowloon-one close to the Docks and the second at Kowloon Hospital. Subsidiary clinics were also in operation at Taipo and Un Long in the New Territories.

M 51



Some idea of the extent to which use is made of the faci- lities for free medical advice and treatment at these social hygiene centres can be gathered by reference to the following tables.

Table XX.

New cases treated in 1937:-

Chinese European Indian

Others

Total

M.

f:

M. F.

M. F. M. F. M. F.

Queen's Road (old

1241 570

Government Civil Hospital)

1198 570 40

I

3

1

Violet Peel Health

Centre

1007

652 164

2

138

3 39

1348

657

Kowloon Docks (Tsimshatsui)

1663

480 450

96

1

19

2228

481

Kowloon Hospital

337 827 4 6

Co

CO

6

1

Taipo Centre

19

2

9

Un Long Centre

17

5

1

347 834

28

2

21

5

4241 2536 658 8 256

10

5

58

5213 2549

Table XXI.

Number of attendances in 1937:-

Chinese

European Indian

Others

Total

M. F. M. F. M. F.

M. F. M. F.

Queen's Road (old

Government Civil Hospital)

5386 2621 377

1

73

2

5838 2621

Violet Peel Health

Centre

3925 3325 1198 25 2436

20

87

5 7646 3375

Kowloon Docks (Tsimshatsui)

6163 2266 2789

1450 6

CO

51

8 10453 2280

Kowloon Hospital

1601 3177 106 22

45 1

1

1752; 3201

Taipo Centre

71 15

320

391

15

Un Long Centre

92

28

79

171

28

17238 11432 4470 47 4403 27 140 14 26251 11520

- M 52-

Full use was made of the twenty-four beds reserved for male cases of venereal disease at the old Government Civil Hospital and provision was made for the in-patient treatment of men, women and children suffering from venereal disease in the Queen Mary Hospital.

Some 13,055 injections of organic arsenic and 962 injections of bismuth preparations were given to out-patients.

The Health Officer, Social Hygiene, and his assistants examined 4,923 smears for gonococci and took 11,748 specimens of blood for the Wassermann test.

7.-Infant Welfare Centres.

These have been fully described in Section V, Maternity and Child Welfare, in this Report.

8.-Dispensaries in the New Territories.

Before detailing the position and activities of the medical services available in the New Territories, it might be profitable to give some information of a general nature concerning this

area.



The New Territories include about three hundred square miles of mainland between Kowloon and the Sham Chun River and a number of islands, the largest of which is Lantau. This area was leased by Great Britain for a period of ninety-nine years from 1898 from the Government of China. The territory lies outside the Urban Council Area and as yet possesses but a skeleton medical and health organisation.

The Public Health (Sanitation) Ordinance has not been applied to the New Territories, and the Labour Code introduced towards the end of 1937 can only be regarded as a gesture in the right direction.

The bulk of the community live under rural or semi-rural conditions not unlike those prevailing in South China as a whole. There are, in addition, three main concentrations of population at Taipo and Un Long on the mainland and at Cheung Chau, an island. Organised markets and a small number of scavengers are to be found in these three townships, but elsewhere environmental hygiene is practically unorganised and in the care of "village elders".

For medical purposes the New Territories are divided into Eastern and Western Districts, the range of hills running more or less north-south serving as a geographical boundary.

M 53

Details of estimated population and death-rates are given in the tables below.

Table XXII.

A.-WESTERN MEDICAL DISTRICT.

(1) Mainland

Estimated

Death-rate

population

Deaths

(mid-year 1937)

per thousand

Au Tau

13,497

416

30.8

Lok Ma Chau

4,846

104

21.5

Ping Shan

16,198

376

23.2

†Tsun Wan

6,338

210

33.1

(2) Islands

+Cheung Chau

14,980

419

28.0

†Lantau (Tai O)

9,409

280

29.8

(1) Mainland

+ Maritime population included.

Table XXIII,

B.-EASTERN MEDICAL DISTRICT.

Estimated

Death-rate

population

Deaths

(mid-year 1937)

per thousand

*Saikung

11,183

241

21.6

Sha Tau Kok

9,306

265

28.5

Sha Tin

4,465

135

30.2

Sheung Shui

11,807

270

22.9

Tai Po

14,902

456

30.6

* Includes Islands of Cheung Kwan O and Po Toi.

Lamma Island with an estimated mid-year population (in- cluding maritime) of 2,396 is not included in this table as births and deaths are not registered.

M 54

Medical services in the New Territories are supervised by a European Health Officer resident at Kowloon. This officer has under his direction two Chinese Medical Officers with head- quarters at Taipo and Un Long, a 1st Grade Dresser attached to a Travelling Motor Dispensary and a number of Nurse- Midwives who are posted to Government Welfare Centres and posts at Ku Tung (the Lady Ho Tung Welfare Centre), Sai Kung, Sham Tseng and Tai O.

In addition, a Chinese Medical Officer, Dressers and Anti- malarial Inspectors were in health and medical charge of 2,000 labourers at Shing Mun Dam until April, 1937, when the work on these waterworks was completed, and a Charge Dresser was attached to the workers at Pat Heung Aerodrome until the close of the year.

The table opposite represents a summary of the work done at the various Government medical centres in the New Ter- ritories during the year under review.

Apart from the dispensaries and welfare centres staffed by the Government Medical Department, valuable work is done by some nine units established by St. John Ambulance Association and Brigade. In one instance (Cheung Chau) the institution consists of a fifty bedded hospital built on modern lines where useful work is done handicapped somewhat by a lack of adequate supplies of uncontaminated water.

a

In a second case (Kam Tin), the Brigade maintains small cottage hospital actually improvised out of a group of single-storey Chinese dwellings. This is chiefly used for maternity cases.

Table XXIV.

Ku Tung

Welfare

Centre

Tai O

Sai Kung Taipo Un Long Travelling Dispensary Dispensary Dispensary Dispensary Dispensary

Total

New cases

3,903

1,775

2,476 5,720

5,634

6,264

25,772

Old cases

2,427

2,177

1,714

11,464

4,709

1,225

23,716

Maternity cases

152

89

122

{

85(d)

197

795

150(i)

Malarial cases

232

505

250

749

279

347

2,362

Vaccinations

1,062

730

491

2,129

1,372

1,189

6,973

Total

(d)

7,776

5,276

5,053

20,297

12,191

9,025

59,618

= on district, (i) = in dispensary.

M 55

M 56

The Director of the Ambulance has kindly provided the following details of the activities of the Brigade in 1937:--

Centres:-Haw Par Hospital, Tsuen Wan Hospital, Kam Tin Hospital, Ha Tsun Clinic, Fanling Clinic, Tun Mun Clinic, Takuling Clinic, Shataukok Clinic and Shatin Clinic.

Patients treated:-maternity 1,302, general 127,093.

Cost of service:-$26,444.

Since the early days of 1937 a large force of labourens have been employed at the Lin Ma Hang Lead Mine near Sha Tau Kok on the frontier between China and the New Territories.

The labour force suffered severely from malaria, twenty-six fatal cases occurring during the year. The health situation be- came so unsatisfactory that the management had to engage a Chinese Medical Officer and Dresser in July, 1937.

Owing to the siting of the labourers line in Chinese territory, the Hong Kong Government can exercise little or no control over the accommodation for the employees of the mine and over malarial conditions in the vicinity.

9.-Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries.

The Chinese Hospitals & Public Dispensaries were estab- lished, in some instances, over seventy years ago under the auspices of the Tung Wah, a charitable organisation with very wide ramifications over a considerable portion of South China. The "hospitals" were intended to serve several purposes: to provide accommodation for the sick poor, who desired Chinese herbalist treatment or treatment by Western medicine, for the old and decrepit to spend their last days under a friendly roof, and for the destitute and homeless. In other words, they com- bined the functions of the old Poor-law infirmary, the "Union workhouse, home for the aged, and Rowton House in the United Kingdom. On the other hand, the primary object of the Chinese Public Dispensaries was to provide places in various parts of the town at which the bodies of deceased persons could be deposited and handed over for burial by the Authorities instead of being dumped in the streets or into the harbour.

""

Little by little, keeping pace with the education of the poorer and illiterate sections of the community, efforts have been made to extend the scope of the dispensaries so that today, while still serving as public mortuaries, they also provide large sections of the population who cannot afford the fees of a private practitioner with the benefit of Western medicine treat- ment.

.

C

M 57

In the same way, the Chinese hospitals have catered for an increasing number of actually sick persons and the bulk of the bed accommodation is now given over to the use of patients desiring Western medicine. Many thousands of out-patients continue to receive herbalist treatment and many beds in the Chinese hospitals are occupied by persons who are supposed to the "treated" by herbalist doctors". The change over to Western treatment has been a slow process and has not been aided by the system in vogue at the Chinese hospitals which allows the question "Do you want Chinese or European medicine" to be addressed to every patient seeking admission. The unlettered coolie usually thinks of Western medicine in terms of operations since herbalists rarely, if ever, operate. He rather naturally choses the system with which he is familiar and, as it is "Chinese", which he imagines is the more appro- priate for him as a Chinese.

Assisted by enlightened Chinese directors of the Tung Wah Committee and by the cures effected by the Government and other Western medicine doctors working in these hospitals, there has been a gradual but definite increase in the proportion of patients seeking Western treatment. Unfortunately, the hospitals still preserve their other functions and a considerable number of persons find shelter and food in them who require nothing else and cannot be classed as patients by the greatest stretch of imagination.

Added to a real and very definite lack of hospital accom- modation (both in- and out-patient) for the poorer classes of the Chinese population of these territories-an estimated deficiency of upwards of at least a thousand beds-this practice results in dangerous overcrowding.

During inspections of the hospitals in question it is not at all an uncommon thing-aggravated, no doubt, by the influx of indigent refugees from areas affected by the Sino-Japanese hostilities to see two patients, old and young, in the same bed, five adult women in two beds pushed close together, patients lying all over the ward floor so as to render separation of types of disease and medical attention and nursing a matter of extreme difficulty. One particularly bad example of overcrowd- ing noted was sixty-one patients occupying a ward holding

twelve beds.

This distressing state of affairs is recorded partly to point to the need for urgent reform of the system and for the provision of a sufficiency of institutions of different types to meet the needs of the poorest elenients in the population, and partly in the hope and belief that, with the close cooperation of the Tung Wah Committee, the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs (whose officers show such great devotion to the interests of the Chinese community), the Medical Department and with financial sup- port from Government, the dawn of a new era in the care of the sick poor is breaking.

M 58

Western medical treatment only is given at the nine Chinese Public Dispensaries scattered over the Island and Kowloon.

Their history and functions have been well described in previous Annual Reports, consequently, it is only proposed to give some indication of the work done on this occasion by includ- ing Tables XXV and XXVI,

some

Of 218,351 inoculations against cholera given by twenty-seven institutions in the Colony during the epidemic in 1937, nearly ninety thousand were given at the Tung Wah Hospital and Chinese Public Dispensaries.

Table XXV.

SUMMARY OF WORK DONE IN THE CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES DURING 1937.

Gynaecological

Patients

Certifi-

cates of

Patients

Patients

removed

Corpses

removed

Dead

infants

cases.

Dispensaries.

cause of

sent to

death

to hosp. to hospital hospital. by ambu-

brought

Vaccina-

tions.

or mor-

to dis-

New

Old

issued.

lance.

tuary.

pensary.

New

cases.

cases.

cases.

Old

cases.

M 59

Central

37,157

30,786

12

84

3

49

29

6,405

389

670

Eastern

20,368

24,980

00

15

6

62

308

3,621

503

850

Western

30,900

17,555

69

32

21

30

.434

6,046

Shaukiwan

32,888

50,568

18

125

2

345

7,394

861

1,391

Aberdeen

9,323

9,545

119

3

2,251

303

350

Harbour & Yaumati

51,033

41,275

90

77

6

181

175

9,137

1,233

1,923

Shamshuipo

41,372 31,842

46

2

298

279

15,351

962

1,576

Hung Hom

Kowloon City

16,003 6,083

56

175

7

206

204

6,358

418

477

25,545 25,893

61

164

18

30

293

5,130

587

1,133

Total for 1937

264,589 238,527 322

837

66

858

2,067

61,693

5,256

8,370

Total for 1936

252,444

222,383 247

659

34

108

1,632

57,251

5,183

7,972

Table XXVI.

WORK DONE IN GYNAECOLOGICAL CLINICS OF CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES IN 1937.

- M 60 -

Average Attendance

No. of Clinics

Total Number

New Cases

Old Cases

per day

Dispensary

New

Old

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

1936

1937

Central

49

50

974

1,059

299

389

675

670

20

21

Eastern

Shaukiwan

Aberdeen

Yaumati

100

Shamshuipo

Hung Hom

95988 9

46

43

1,511

1,353

582

503

929

850

35

97

98

2,130

2,252

902

861

1,228

1,391

22

48

51

591

653

309

303

282

350

12

100

3,267

3,156

1,347

1,233

1,920

1,923

33

96

91

2,472

2,538

889

962

1,583

1,576

26

* 2 2 8 8

31

23

13

32

28

48

48

729

895

346

418

383

477

15

19

2 2 2 2 2 ∞ 2

Kowloon City

49

49

1,481

1,720

509

587

972

1,133

30

35

Kwong Wah Hospital

4.7

47

1,154

1,191

460

450

694

741

25

25

Total:-

580

577

14,309

14,817

5,643

5,706

8,666

9,111

24

26

26

In-patients.

M 61

Table XXVII.

Tung Wah. Tung Wah Kwong Wah. Totals

(Eastern).

Chinese treatment. 8,397

2,563

5,215

16,175

Western treatment. 10,221

6,021

15,552

31,794

Combined.......... 18,618

8,584

20,767

47,969

Operations

1,088

147

602

1,837

Deaths in hospital.

4,336

2,262

6,043

12,641

Brought in dead ...

918

683

1,832

3,433

Death-rate

per

1,000 in-patients.

233

264

290

264

Out-patients.

Chinese treatment. 186,530

72,388

203,946

462,864

Western treatment 39,875

28,197

48,396

116,468

Combined

226,405

100,585

252,342

579,332

Eye clinic

16,274

118

1,176

17,568

Baby clinic

492

8,045

8,537

Ante-natal clinic...

271

271

Anti-smallpox

vaccinations

5.962

876

2,050

8,888

The Tung Wah Group of Hospitals comprises the Tung Wah and Tung Wah (Eastern) Hospitals situated on the Island and the Kwong Wah Hospital in Kowloon on the mainland.

The figures relating to persons treated are deliberately separated from those relating to Government Hospitals for reasons which are no doubt apparent after a perusal of the earlier paragraphs in this section.

The official combined bed accommodation at these hospitals amounts to 1097. The actual number of in-patients not infrequently approaches twice this figure.

Table XXVII above gives some idea of the large volume of work done.

The old Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital (at Kennedy Town on Hong Kong Island) served as a refuge for lepers during 1937, the premises having been condemned for the treatment of acute infectious diseases. Lepers to the number of 167 (of whom only thirty were females) were admitted during the year, ten having remained from the end of 1936,

M 62

Their subsequent histories were as follows:-

Table XXVIII.

Discharged

Transferred to Sheklung Leper Settlement,

Kwangtung, China

49

Discharged at own request

14

Absconded without notice

35

Died

11

Remaining at end of 1937

62

Total

177

The inmates were under the care of the European Medical Officer in charge of the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital which adjoins the Leper Institution.

After the construction of a new infectious diseases hospital for the colony at the Kowloon Medical Centre, it is probable that a small nucleus of accommodation for lepers awaiting trans- fer to Sheklung will be maintained at the existing Government Infectious Diseases Hospital and that the dilapidated and dangerous premises at present occupied by lepers will be demolished.

In May, 1937, the medical care of the women and girls detained in the Po Leung Kuk Home on the Island was taken over by the Lady Visiting Medical Officer, Chinese Hospitals. Some 349 of the inmates of this home came under medical care, sixty-eight being transferred to hospital of whom seven died.

VII.-PRISONS AND ASYLUM.

1. PRISONS.

The principal prison in the Colony is the Hong Kong Prison. Stanley, on the Island where there is cell accommodation for 1,612 males.

The Female Prison is situated at Lai Chi Kok on the main- land and has accommodation for more than 100. The Male Prison at Lai Chi Kok was closed at the end of January, 1937, and Victoria Gaol was closed in September, 1937.

The total number of admissions to all prisons was 17,088; of whom 14,596 were males and 2,492 females. Of these 1,197 males were fifty years of age or over.

M 63

In Hong Kong Prison Hospital, Stanley, there is a hospital of fifty-seven beds with six cells for isolation cases and two padded cells. The Female Prison has nine beds for sick cases.

For cases which require special treatment there are prison wurds in the Queen Mary and Kowloon Hospitals.

Sixty-five cases were transferred to the Government Civil Hospital and Queen Mary Hospital (thirty-four for X-ray examination and electrical treatment) for treatment not available in the Prison Hospital. Ten cases were transferred to the Mental Hospital and one case of smallpox to Kennedy Town.

There were seventy-nine deaths amongst the male prisoners and three amongst the females. The causes of deaths are given in the subjoined table.

Typhoid

Table XXIX.

Males. Females.

Cholera

Pulmonary tuberculosis

Tubercular enteritis

Disseminated tuberculosis

Syphilitic aortitis

2

37

4

1

1

Septicaemia

Cerebral malaria

1

Meningitis

1

Aortic valvular disease

2

Chronic myocarditis

17

Acute myocarditis

1

Aneurysm

Bronchitis

Lobar pneumonia

Pneumonia

Cirrhosis of liver

Acute nephritis

Senility

Acute cardiac failure

Total

2

1

I

79

3

Seven male prisoners were released on medical grounds all of whom were lepers; five female prisoners were also released, three suffering from leprosy and two from pulmonary tuberculosis.

Prison.

M 64

Table XXX.

Total prisoners admitted.

Daily average

No. of inmates.

Total admissions to hospitals.

Daily average No. of prisoners to hospital.

Total out-patients.

Daily average number of out-patients.

Deaths.

Death rate, i ̧e. No. admissions to prison. of deaths to total

Victoria

H.K.

& Prison (male)

14,596 2,262 1,886

32.425,619

26.61 79 0.5

Lai Chi Kok (female). 2,492 231 369

9.4

7071 2.4

31

In addition to the male and female prisons in Hong Kong there are two remand homes, one for boys and another, under the supervision of the Salvation Army, for girls.

Forty-three boys were housed in the Remand Home for boys at the beginning of 1987. 1,114 were admitted during the year and forty-three were detained in the Home at the end of the year-apart from three boys in the Queen Mary Hospital.



The Home was visited by a Medical Officer once a week and the general standard of health was well maintained. Some 295 of the boys were inoculated against cholera and 470 vaccinated against smallpox. Scabies constituted the commonest complaint.

The Girls Remand Home accommodated 355 inmates during the year and their health was supervised by a Government Lady Medical Officer.

2. MENTAL HOSPITAL.

The Mental Hospital functioned as a separate institution after the closing of the old Government Civil Hospital in the summer of 1937.

The premises are designed to provide temporary accommoda- tion for patients pending their transfer to Canton, if Chinese, or to Europe and other countries in the case of other races.

M 65

The following table gives particulars of admissions and discharges during the year.

Table XXXI.

Remaining from 1936

Admitted during 1937

Total

51

359

410

Discharged-cured

71

-relieved

62

--not improved

52

149

Died

20

56

Transferred to Canton

Remaining at end of year

The daily average number of patients was rather over seventy. The hospital was designed to accommodate thirty-two patients at one time. It will be appreciated, therefore, that overcrowding and lack of adequate segregation of different types of patients inevitably occurs, clearly demonstrating the desir- ability for a new and larger institution.

¡

VIII. METEOROLOGY.

Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 140° 5′ and 114° 18′ E. It enjoys a sub-tropical climate with a hot and humid summer from May to September when the south-west monsoon blows and a cool, dry winter during the period of the north-east monsoon.

During the year under review the highest monthly average temperature was recorded in August-93° F.-and the lowest in January-76.1-the lowest absolute minimum, 45.9 F., being registered in February. July was the wettest month with 19.315 inches of rain and from May to September 70.58 out of the total of 82.5 inches of rain fell.

The relative humidity was highest in March when it reached ninety-three per centum and lowest in October with a figure of forty-one per centum. Reference has already been made in the text to the disastrous typhoon which struck Hong Kong on the 1st of September, 1937, with a wind velocity of over 160 miles per hour.

Further details are given opposite in Table XXXII.

:

Table XXXII.

The following table gives the means, totals or extremes of the meteorological data for the several months of the year 1937.

M 66

Wind.

Temperature.

Humidity.

Barometer

Month.

at M.S.L.

Mean.

Absolute Mean

Mean.

Mean Absolute

Cloudiness Sunshine.

Rain.

p.c.

Abs.

Direction. Velocity..

Max.

Max.

Min.

Min.

ins.

Rel.

ins.

f.c.

hours.

ins.

Points.

Miles p.h.

January

30.12

76.1

66.3

61.6

58.0

48.5

79

0.44

72

February

30.13

78.5

66.2

61.2

57.5

45.9

78

0.44

77

March

29.95

81.2

68.6

64.7

61.4

51.0

89

0.55

93

April

29.97

86.3

76.4

71.8

68.6

59.7

86

0.67

78

238

139.7

2.765

E/N

12.4

103.1

0.310

ENE

10.7

53.0

3.445

E/N

15.7

131.2

2.260

E

12.8

May

29.86

89.7

84.0

78.8

75.2

70.8

84

0.83

73

159.2

11.120

E/S

10.4

June

29.72

90.0

85.8

81.4

78.3

71.0

85

0.91

85

120.2

13.265

SE/S

9.9

July

29.70

91.5

88.0

82.7

78.8

75.0

84

0.93

61

237.6

19.315

SE/E

7.1

August

29.71

93.0

86.1

82.2

79.0

75.9

86

0.94

84

125.2

14.355

SE/E

13.5

September

29.89

90.6

87.0

82.1

78.9

74.9

82

0.90

59

208.2

12.525

E

11.3.

October

29.99

89.0

82.5

77.5

73.5

62.0

72

0.69

41

268.0

1.500

NE/E

11.8

November

30.07

84.1

76.5

70.8

66.7

53.2

71

0.55

55

182.7

1.035

ENE

9.9

December 30.10

76.8

70.0

65.0

61.1

52.7

76

0.47

59

166.0

0.605

E/N

10.7

Mean total}

29.93

93.0

78.1

73.3

69.7

45.9

81

0.69

70

1,894.1

82.500

E/N

11.3

or extreme

- M 67-

IX.-SCIENTIFIC.

1. GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

INTRODUCTORY,

(1) Administrative.-No changes are to be recorded under this head. No officers were on long leave, nor were there any additions to the existing staff.

(2) Buildings and equipment.—(a) During the latter part of the year the open verandah on both sides of the office was enclosed and thus incorporated into the building proper so as to add to the office space, which was far too small for the requirements of the Institute.

(b) No addition to the permanent equipment was made during the year.

(3) Library. The following book was added to the library:-

The Pathology of Internal Diseases, Wm. Boyd, 1935.

(4) Research. (a) Typhoid. An investigation into the presence of agglutinins against typhoid organisms in cases showing no clinical signs of the disease was continued. The sera for test were obtained from bloods sent from the Venereal Diseases Clinic for Kahn test, and should represent a good cross- section of the hospital population of Hong Kong. No European cases were included, the great majority being Chinese, with a proportion of Indians. The number tested totalled 229 cases; of these 224 showed no agglutination in the lowest dilution used, (1 in 50). Of the five cases showing some agglutination, one showed only a doubtful reaction in the lowest dilution against the 0 antigen and no agglutination at all against the H antigen. Another case showed doubtful 0 agglutination 1 in 50, with H agglutination in both 1 in 50 and 1 in 100. A third case showed 0 agglutination to 1 in 50 with H. agglutination to 1 in 100. The two remaining cases both showed no 0 agglutination at all with H agglutination to 1 in 50 only. Actually only cases two and three could have caused any difficulty in diagnosis as far as typhoid was concerned; such a diagnosis could not have been considered from the serological result in the other three. A further investigation will be carried out in 1938 on the Widal reaction as observed on cases showing an elevated temperature due to other known infection. The idea in this case is to deter- mine whether such cases show any non-specific agglutination in the dilutions used in our test, or whether residual agglutinins are stimulated by their infection to a significant extent.

M 68

(b) Syphilis. An interesting comparative study has been carried out on the recently described Ide precipitation test. One thousand sera have been tested in parallel with the Kahn; while close analysis of the results has not yet been made the following will give some idea of the results of the comparative study:

Table XXXIII.

Strong positive

Positive

Doubtful

Negative

Total

Kahn test.

Ide test.

214

133

}

243

347

384

141

44

51

609

565

1,000

...... 1,000

The results are classified so as to conform to the League of Nations scheme of reporting. It will be seen that there is a close measure of agreement. Moreover, a cursory examination of the results shows that a good many of the discrepancies occurred in treated cases and also in cases subjected to provocative injection of arsenicals.

It is proposed to carry out a further series of parallel tests on treated cases only. The complete results of the study will be published in due course.

(c) Trichinosis. During the year an investigation was under- taken designed to measure the amount of trichinosis prevalent among the poorer type of the population of Hong Kong. Diaphragms were obtained from adult bodies. at Victoria Mortuary for examination. The muscle was first finely ground in a neat grinder and then intimately mixed with a digesting mixture and placed in a water bath at 37°C. with frequent shaking.

In

The resulting material was filtered through wire gauge and examined for the characteristic cysts. A total of eighty-two diaphragins was subjected to treatment and examination. no instance were encysted larvae of trichinella spiralis found.. I understand that a similar study was recently undertaken in a laboratory connected with a Canton University, with similar results. Freedom from this infestation is probably to be at- tributed to the belief held by the Southern Chinese that leprosy may result from eating uncooked pork.

M 69

These results are in striking contrast to those obtained by workers in America, who have found a surprisingly high per- centage of infestation in bodies examined by them.

(5) General.—As usual the number of tests performed during the year constitutes a record, although the increase is not as great as has been the rule during past years. For the first time since being in charge of the Institute the writer has rather discouraged any enlargement of the field of our activities. With much regret it has been realized that there is a limit to the amount of work of which a non-expanding staff is capable and which can be carried out in our present quarters. It is a pity that this should be so but there seems little help for it under present conditions.

The cholera epidemic in the summer threw a great deal of extra work on the staff, both by way of stool diagnosis as well as in preparing and distributing prophylactic vaccine. Later in the year the appearance of smallpox cases in increasing numbers led to great increase in our lymph production in order to cope with a possible epidemic in 1938.

It is again a pleasure to record the highly satisfactory work of the staff of the Institute.

A. PROTOZOOLOGY AND HELMINTHOLOGY.

P

(1) Blood films for malaria.-Eight thousand nine hundred and seventeen films were examined for the presence of malarial parasites. Three thousand five hundred and eighty one con- tained parasites. This is in somewhat marked contrast to last year when there were four thousand and ninety two positives in eight thousand four hundred and eighty-one films examined; i.e., in the year under review there were fewer positives in more films,

A graph is interleaved showing the percentage relation of the different types of malarial parasites to each other month by month throughout the year, also the rainfall in inches. It shows beautifully the interesting relation which quartan bears to sub-tertain, both in the early as well as the later months of the year. The rather smooth curve of simple tertian shows well how comparatively little this type of infection is influenced by atmospheric conditions. This must be related (in some measure at least) to the well known tendency of simple tertian infection to chronicity and relapse.

#

1301

-

M 70-



Percentage.

Jan.

Feb.

Apr

June

M 70-

20

OV

Sape Verilan

4



- M 71-

(2) Filaria.-Thirty blood films were examined for filarial embryos-five only were positive.

(3) Faeces.-Two thousand four hundred and seven speci- mens of faeces were examined for parasites and the typical cytological picture of bacillary dysentery. An interesting finding is that of a case of infestation with balantidium coli. This is the first time that this parasite has been reported from this laboratory. Unfortunately it was impossible to obtain any information as to the place of origin of the patient owing to the fact that death occurred rapidly.

Table XXXIV.

EXAMINATION OF STOOLS FOR INTESTINAL PARASITES.

European Indian Chinese

Total

Ascaris

47

6

117

170

Clonorchis

3

101

104

Trichuris

15

4

Ankylostoma

++

10

23

42

24

31

Enterobius

vermicularis

1

1

~

2

Multiple infestation.

7

1

81

89

Balantidium coli

1

E. histolytica

Negative

7

14

629

89

1,236

1,954

Grand total

711

105

1,591

2,407

Multiple infestation of table above.

Eighty-nine cases

Ascaris

74

of multiple in-

Clonorchis

27

festation.

Trichuris

51

Ankylostoma

43

·M 72

B. SEROLOGY.

(1) Kahn reaction.-Sixteen thousand five hundred and eighty-one sera were tested. The results are shown in the table.

Table XXXV.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SERA FOR SYPHILIS.

European

Indian

Chinese

Total

M.

F.

M. | F.

M.

F.

Strong positive..

40 17

49

2 1,558

781

2,437

Positive

24

29

1 687

366

1,107

Weak positive... 14

1

Doubtful

14

ཚོ་སྐྱ

34

501

251

801

37

428 244

723

Negative

•558 52

740

16 5,173 4,974 11,513

Grand total 650

60 889 19 8,347 6,616 16,581

(2) Agglutination tests.-One thousand five hundred and

forty-six sera

organisms.

were

tested for agglutinins against various

Table XXXVI.

AGGLUTINATION TESTS.

European

Indian

Chinese

Organisms

Total

Doubt-

Pos. Neg.

Pos. Neg.

ful

Doubt-

ful

Pos. Neg.

Doubt-

ful

B. typhosus

15

80

20

5

4 17

3

325 1023 59

B. para A.

95

2

19

3

4 1344

B. para B.

95

5

1

20

3

2 1346

888

59

59

1539

Enteric fever type

undetermined

53

3333

B. melitensis

B. abortus

1

Weil Felix reaction.

Total for each race.

112

24

1410

1546

M 73-

C. BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

(1) Faeces.-Three thousand seven hundred and fifty-eight stools were cultured for pathogenic organisms. A large propor- tion of these were from cholera cases or suspects in the course of the cholera epidemic which occurred in the summer.

Table XXXVII.

STOOLS EXAMINED FOR ORGANISMS.

European Indian

Chinese

Organisms

Total

Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg.

19

1

7 290

317

....

B. typhosus

B. dysenteriae

(group)

389

61

1,264

1,714

""

(Flexner)

36



95

134

33

""

(Shiga)

(Schmitz).

8

11

16

17

V. cholerae

5 13

2 552 993

1,565

Grand total .... 45 421 3

64

678 2,547 3,758

(2) Sputum.-Six hundred and eighty-seven specimens of sputum were examined for infection with the tubercle bacillus.

Table XXXVIII.

SPUTA EXAMINED FOR TUBERCULOSIS.

European Indian Chinese

Total

Positive

24

10

140

174

Negative

70°

64

379

513

Grand total

94

74.

519

687

M 74

(3) Urine. One hundred and thirty-six urines were cultured for organisms.

(4) Urethral and cervical smears.-Six hundred and seven- teen urethral and cervical smears were examined for the presence of the gonococcus.

(5) Nasal and skin scrapings for M. leprae.-One hundred and fifty-four examinations of material from suspected leprosy cases were made. Fifty were positive.

(6) Throat swabs.-One thousand four hundred and fifty- four swabs were cultured for the presence of C. diphtheriae. The total number, as well as the number of positives is well below the figures recorded for 1936.

Table XXXIX.

THROAT SWABS EXAMINED FOR DIPHTHERIA.

European Indian Chinese

Total

Positive

96

1

240

337

Negative

469

639

1,117

Grand total

565

10

879

1,454

(7) Cerebro-spinal fluid.-Two hundred and thirty-two fluids were cultured for the meningococcus and other pathogenic organisms. The numbers of fluids infected with the menin- gococcus was somewhat higher than last year, but the figure is still within our usual endemic total.

Table XL.

CEREBRO-SPINAL FLUID EXAMINED FOR MENINGOCOCCI AND

OTHER ORGANISMS.

European Indian Chinese

Meningococcus

Pneumococcus

Streptococcus

Negative

Grand total

Total

92

92

15

15

5

5

5

1

114

120

10

5

1

226

232

M 75

(8) Friedmann test for pregnancy.-Ten Friedmann tests were carried out during the year.

(9) Miscellaneous tests. One thousand five hundred and twenty-three examinations of various kinds not listed otherwise were performed. This includes certain work of a research

nature:

229 B. typhosus agglutinations

1,000 Ide serological tests

82 Diaphragm digestions for trichinae

212 Other unspecified tests.

D.

PREPARATION OF VACCINE LYMPH.

The preparation of lymph was much accelerated this year. In addition to the low level of stocks held, the onset of hosti- lities in China and the presence of large numbers of refugees led us to build up a good reserve so as to be ready to cope with any demand which the presence of smallpox during the winter might very well call forth.

wias

The seed used was as before one generation removed from lapine, i.e., lapine, calf, seed. The yield on the whole good, although we had several calves which were not up to a good physical standard and consequently gave poor individual yields. Forty-eight calves were used and 7,411 g. of pulp was obtained; a yield of 154.39 g. of pulp per calf.

The technique in use at present has been strikingly success- ful in improving the yield of pulp and thereby lowering the cost of production of the finished lymph. This is attained without any loss of potency or other change in the quality of the lymph. We feel that we can hardly expect any further improvement in this respect for some time.

The appended table shows the yield of pulp year by year for the past few years.

Table XLI.

No. of calves

Date

scraped for pulp

Total pulp collected

Average yield per calf

1931

83

2,163 gms.

26.06 gms.

1932

122

4,160

34.09

"}

11

1933

148

5,787

39.10

J

1934

116

5,816

1935

nil

nil

1936

4

622

''

50.14 71

nil 155.50

""

""

1937

48

7,411

154.39 29

Amount of lymph prepared

28,065 c.c.

issued

22,651 c.c.

"J

1

12

in stock at end of year

18,477 c.c.

M 76

E. PREPARATION OF VACCINES AND SERA.

(1) Antimeningococcus serum.-Issue serum in 1937 totalled 9,120 c.c., a figure practically the same as in the previous year. The amount prepared was 15,850; this leaves in stock at the end of the year a total of 48,000 c.c. This is a somewhat large amount, but under present conditions in the Colony it may not prove too lange. Production is going on as usual.

(2) Gonococcus vaccine.-The amount issued for use at the Venereal Diseases Clinics was 10,420 e.c., a greater increase than total figures indicate, as more use is being made of the stronger vaccine (1,000 m per c.c.)

Total amount issued

1,000 million per c.c.

100

>>

"

10,420 c.c.

7,260 c.c.

3,160 c.c.

(3) Anti-rabic vaccine.-Twenty-nine animal brains were examined for Negri bodies. Two positive results were recorded.

Table XLII.

Treatment

Treatment

Nationality

completed

not completed

Total

Chinese

24

147

171

British

28

14

42

Portuguese

1

5

6

Japanese

* 3

Belgian

1

Indian

1

2

3

Italian

1

1

American

1

1

Danish

1

1

Anamite

1

1

Out-port

4.

Grand total

58

176

234

Total number of doses issued

1,810

M:77

(4) Autogenous vaccine.-Twenty autogenous vaccines were prepared. The appended table shows the amount of vaccines and serum issued during the year.

Table XLIII.

Vaccines and Serum

Gronococcus vaccine

T. A. B.

"}

Cholera

Autogenous

Amount issued

10,420 c.c.

1,020 ́c.c.

17,250 c.c.

''

Anti-meningococcus serum

20 vaccines

9,120 c.c.

F. EXAMINATION OF WATER AND MILK.

(1) Bacteriological analysis of water.-One thousand five hundred and thirty-eight samples of water from various sources, chiefly the pubac suppy, were examined during the year.

Table XLIV.

Unfiltered raw water

Filtered

>>

121

209

Filtered and chlorinated water from

service taps throughout the Colony. 1,154

Well water

Water from other than public supplies

Total

46

1,539

(2) Bacteriological analysis of milk.-One hundred and twenty-seven analyses of milk were carried out, chiefly by request of the M.Ö.H.

G. MEDICO-LEGAL INVESTIGATIONS.

Eighty investigations were carried out on materials furnished by the Police. The character of the examinations was as follows:

Blood stains

Seminal stains Miscellaneous

H. MORBID HISTOLOGY.

42

31

Two hundred and seventy-four tissue sections were prepared and examined histologically. Among them were fifty malignant tumours and fifty benign; of the remainder 125 represent surgical pathological conditions, and forty-nine organs from

post-mortem cases.

M 78

Table XLV.

ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL AND OTHER EXAMINATIONS.

Total

Total

Nature of examination

for

for

1937

1936

Agglutination

Reaction

B. Typhosus

22

Paratyphosus A

Weil Felix Reaction

B. Dysenteriae

Melitensis

B

1

1,539

1,435

4

7

1

1

Blood

Smears

"

Abortus

(Malaria

Filaria

Blood count, etc.

1

1

Serological Reaction for Syphilis

16,581

16,841

8,917

8,481

30

41

77

102

Cultural

Examinations

Naso-pharyngeal swabs (C.

Diphtheriae)

Spinal fluid (Meningococcus)

Faeces (Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc.)

1,454

2,058

232

281

3,758

824

Blood

1,478

1.435

Urine

136

185

Faeces

Intestinal Parasites

2,407

1,919

Occult blood

28

377

Tubercle Bacillus

10

8

Tissue Sections

274

296

Friedmann test for pregnancy

10

Miscellaneous

Examinations

(Sputa

Pus Urine

Smear for Gonococcus

M. leprae

Animals for Rabies

Medico-legal Examinations

Bacteriological Examination of Milk

Analysis of Water

Rideal Walkers Test of Disinfectants

Autogenous vaccine prepared

687

785

90

60

293

555

617

1,351

154

153

29

19

80

46

127

40

1,538

1,484

20

49

Miscellaneous

1,523

297

Total

42,096

38,797

A. V. GREAVES, M.B., (TOR.), M.C.P. & S. (Ont.), D.T.M., (Liverpool).

Government Bacteriologist.

M 79

2. ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MALARIA BUREAU

1937.

It has been customary for some years to compile a com- prehensive report on the activities of the Malaria Bureau since its inception in 1930 and such reports should be consulted by those interested in the malarial problem in Hong Kong.

2. The present report omits all references to the manifold activities of the Bureau and confines itself to new developments during 1937.

3. Some 696 (+three among the Forces of the Crown) deaths were ascribed to malaria, forming rather over two per centum of deaths registered from all causes. The corresponding figures for 1936 were 503 and just under two per centurn respec- tively..

4. Disturbance of soil has not been found to be a factor of any great consequence in increasing the number of breeding places of the important anophelines.

5. Night catching of anophelines in pigsties and cattle-byres was continued for the purposes of obtaining material for preciptin tests and dissections.

6. Identification of the species found gave the following results:

A. minimus, A. jeyporiensis var. candidiensis, A. maculatus, A. hyrcanus var. sinensis, A. fluviatilis, A. aitkenii var. bengalensis, A. splendidus, A. karwari, A. vagus, and A. lindesayi var. japonicus.

7. The first two species are responsible for serving as vectors in the major number of cases of malaria that occur.

1

A. maculatus, a malaria vector greatly to be feared in Malaya, is seldom found in dwellings in Hong Kong and (judging from precipitin tests) appears to be zoophyllic rather than homophyllic. Locally it has only been found infected with malaria in the Shing Mun area. The larvae of this species were met with along with those of A. (F) togoi in rock pools by the seashore on Cheung Chau Island. Samples of the water from these pools were submitted to the Government Analyst and were found to contain 0.06%, 0.08%, 0.09%, 0.17% chlorine as chlorides.



8. A. hyrcanus was obtained in large numbers from "screened" lines at Shing Mun and Pat Heung Camps; its infection rate was, as usual, low in comparison with that of

M 80

A. minimus, A. jeyporiensis, and A. maculatus. Pigment hitherto encountered in the oocysts has been considered to be that of the benign tertian parasite, but the oocysts found in one midgut contained somewhat coarse dark pigment. From pre- cipitin tests it appears to be zoophyllic for choice.

9. It is noteworthy that the catches of adult mosquitos at several stations were found to be far less numerous than those of preceding years owing to preventive work done.

10. Anti-malarial measures were carried out in many areas on the Island and mainland during 1937, and particular atten- tion was given to the following amongst other places:

(a) Shek O, (b) Tytan Tuk, (c) Stanley Gaol, (d) Repulse Bay, (e) Shouson Hill, (f) Aberdeen, (g) Mount Kellett, (h) Pokfulam (including Queen Mary Hos- pital), (i) Government Quarry North Point, (1) Kai Tak Aerodrome, (k) Kowloon Tong and surroundings, (1) Shing Mun Camp, and (m) Pat Heung Aerodrome.

11. The actual methods employed were rough train- ing of streams, ditching, stone drainage, and oiling. In a portion of one stream which was heavily strewn with boulders which it would have been difficult to move, stones of various sizes were packed between the boulders thus shutting out light from the

water.

-

12. Valuable work was also undertaken by the Bureau where mosquito nuisance was specially aggravated. C. fatigans, A. (S) albopictus, and A. (F) togoi were the species most frequently incriminated.

13. Four tables are appended. The first table gives details of nearly 12,000 anopheline larvae examined microscopically for identification purposes; the second relates to some 1,878 adults hatched out from larvae and pupae; the third summarises certain of the results of precipitin tests on bloods from mosquitos caught in various localities and in different shelters; while the fourth table gives a summary of systematic catches and dis- sections to ascertain the presence of malarial infection of anophelines caught at Pat Heung Camp in two "screened" lines. The numbers of A. minimus greatly exceeded those of 4. jey- poriensis even though rice fields abounded along the hill-foots. In addition, catching was also done in villages outside the half mile area around these lines. Of 1,550 anophelines obtained approximately 60% were A. hyrcanus, 20% A. minimus, 12% A. jeyporiensis, 7% A. tessellatus (a high rate for this species), and 1% A. maculatus.

M 81

A.

A.

A. hyrca-

Month.

nus

var.

maculatus.

minimus.

Table XLVI.

ANOPHELINE LARVAE EXAMINED MICROSCOPICALLY.

sinensis

A. jeypori-

ensis var.

candidi-

ensis.

A. aitkenii

A.

karwari.

var. ben-

galensis.

A.

A. lindesayi A. splendidus. var. japonicus.

Totals.

tessellatus.

January

1,622

317

348

33

1

3

2,325

February

132

3

135

March

343

1

344

April

153

55

20

62

63

353

May

473

61

3

23

12

59

631

:

June

121

95

19

235

July

97

97

August

148

148

11

307

September

221

24

245

266

October

1.693

596

366

17

2,938

299

November

755

328

61

4

1.447

359

December

916

461

1,206

2,942

Totals

6,674

1,822

2,271

139

925

13

122

30

11,999

i

M 82

Month,

A.

maculatus.)

A.

minimus.

A.

hyrcanus.

var.

sinensis.

Table XLVII.

ADULT MOSQUITOS HATCHED OUT FROM LARVAE AND PUPAE.

A. jey.

poriensis.

var.

candidiensis,

bengalensis.

A.

karwari.

A.

aitkenii.

A.

A.

var.

splendidus. tessellatus..

Totals.

January

133

28

29

1

191

February

66

6

1

73

March

60

1

61

April

19

4

9

9

41

May

49

51

June

17

15

1

23

17

75

July

12

12

August

48

44

12

104

September

64

2

66

October

402

63

45

6

516

November

101

30

8

1

5

145

December

113

109

245

76

543

Totals

1,084

245

389

1121

87

32

29

1,878

M 83

Table XLVIII.

RESULTS OF PRECIPITIN TESTS ON BLOOD TAKEN FROM MOSQUITOS

No.

Species.

CAUGHT AT VARIOUS PLACES.

No. with

positive

reactions.

Reactions positive to the serum of

Man. Dog. Pig Cattle Goat.

exa-

mined

Mixed.

Morning Catches in Squatters' huts Lai Chi Kok in which pigs were kept.

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis

A. hyrcanus

Totals

2

2

1

4

2

Night Catches in cattle-byres Dairy Farm, Pokfulam.

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis

A. maculatus..

2205

2

2

40

3 (cattle & goat)

2 I

40

40

A. hyrcanus

6

C. bitaenioryn-

chus

4

4

C. tritaenio-

rynchus

4

4

C. fatigans

21

20

20

A. (F)

neveoides

3

2

1 (cattle & goat)

Armigeres

obturbans

16

15

15

A. (S) albo-

pictus

2

2

2

Totals

101

97

93

4 (cattle & goat)

Night Catches in pig shelters (close to cattle-byres) Dairy Farm, Pokfulam.

A. maculatus..

A. hyrcanus

C. fatigans

00 01 00

8

2

8 2

Totals

18

18

8

-

18

38 37

37

Morning Catches in Squatters' huts Wong Chok Hang Village.

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis

C. fatigans

42

ལསྐྱ

2

2

42

38

3 (man & pig)

Armigeres

obturbans

M. (M) uni-

formis

3

со

3

3

Totals

94

93

89

3 (man & pig)

Night Catches in pigsties Wong Chok Hang Village.

A. maculatus..Į

32

31

31

A. hyrcanus 39

38

37

1 (man & pig)

A. tessellatus..

6

C. fatigans

37

37

36

(man & pig)

Armigeres

obturbans

45

44

44

M. (M) uni-

formis

17

7

7

Totals

166 163

161

2 (man & pig)

A. minimus

Morning Catches in Goat Pens Shing Mun Camp.

A. jeyporiensis

A. maculatus..

A. hyrcanus

A. (S) albo-

pictus

C. whitmorei...

Totals

*∞∞∞

96

96

63 62

8

27

σ co

6

62

NOTE: The salivary glands of all Anophelines were examined for

sporozoites, but none were found.

M 84

-

Table XLIX.

SUMMARY OF DISSECTIONS OF MOSQUITOS CAUGHT FROM PAT HEUNG AREA FOR MALARIAL INFECTION.

Number Number Number

Species.

Number Number

caught. dissected

with infected

with infected

with

Percen-

infected tage of

glands

only.

midgut glands & infection.

only. midgut.

A. minimus.......

521

454

2

11

2.86

A. jeyporiensis..

174

153

1

0.65

A. maculatus

1

1

A. hyrcanus

3,576

1,911

2

0.10

A. fluviatilis

29

29

A. tessellatus ..

LO

5

5

A. splendidus....

41

38

R. B. Jackson, M.D., B.Ch., D.P.H. (Dublin),

Government Malariologist.

- M 85

3. GOVERNMENT ANALYTICAL LABORATORY.

(1) The work of the Hong Kong Government Analytical Laboratory differs from that usually associated with a sub- department of this type, in that a very considerable amount of work usually done by consulting analysts, is carried out here, and for which fees are paid into the Treasury. This non- government work comes under two heads.

(a) Analyses of stores etc. for the Naval, Military, and Air Force Authorities, described below as semi-official work and for which, in the majority of cases, full fees are now charged.

(b) Analyses carried out for local firms and individuals in the Colony; the majority of which are the testing of exports of China produce, e.g., tin and oils, and for which full fees are charged.

The bills issued for this non-government work anounted in 1937 to $39,953.50 and this sum represents about of the cost of running the laboratory for the year.

The total value of the work done during the year both Government and non-government, amounted to $100.478.50. This was the highest ever recorded, despite the total cessation of lard samples towards the end of the year.

(2) The following tables show the nature of the work under the various heads.

Table L.

OFFICIAL Work.

(3) Official work-i.e. Government work.

:

1936. 1937.

Chemico-legal samples from the Police & Medical

Departments

333

351.

Food & drug samples under the Ordinance from

the Sanitary Department

196

337

Water samples from public supplies

2,104 1,834

Dangerous goods under the Ordinance, from the

Police Department & Fire Brigade.

Bio-chemical examinations, from the Medical

Department & University

58

3

222

287

Carried forward

2,913 2,812

M 86

Brought forward

Materials from various departments for testing:-

Oils from P.W.D.

1936. 1937.

2,913 2,812

11

Coals from P.W.D., Harbour Department &

K.C.R.

Building materials from P.W.D.

249

235

5

8

Foodstuffs from Medical Department, Police

Department, etc.

86

74

Pharmaceutical samples from Government

Apothecary

18

Chemicals from Medical Department, P.W.D.

etc.

22

16

Battery acids from P.W.D.

11

1

Minerals & metals

9

11

Septic tank effluents

Harbour waters

Miscellaneous samples

95

27

24

26

22

37

Total

3,454 3,274

as

The value of work done for Government Departments, determined under the Tariff of Charges (Government Notification No. 837 of 1932), was $60,525.00 as against $60,150.00 for 1936.

(4) A considerable amount of the official work comes under the heading of chemico-legal. Practically the whole time of the Government Analyst is spent on this work, and during the. year under review, owing to a large increase of toxicological examinations (including post mortem materials from seventy persons), the Senior Assistant Analyst had to give assistance on many occasions and to give evidence in several enquiries.

M 87

CHEMICO-LEGAL SAMPLES.

(5) The following table shows the nature of the work done under this head.

Table LI.

1936. 1937.

Toxicological examinations

199 236

Counterfeit coins & materials

78

11

Bombs & explosives

0

19

Articles for stain

14

18

21

fire enquiries

9

3

"1

connected with larceny

6

""

J9

""

forgery robbery with

0

29

8

20

11 3

8

10

violence

Dangerous goods

Other examinations

(6) The incidence of counterfeiting decreased considerably this year, and with the new nickel coins in circulation, which are much more difficult to counterfeit, a further decrease is to be expected.

(7) Investigations were carried out in connection with a fire. on the Kowloon-Canton Railway and also in connection with an explosion on a launch in the harbour. In both cases many lives were lost but in neither case could evidence of criminal intent be detected.

(8) The laboratory was consulted in connection with three bomb outrages during the year. In one case a parcel was delivered to a house by a private messenger. On attempt being made to open the parcel, it exploded, and the recipient received fatal injuries. As a result of investigation of the pieces, it was possible to construct a copy of the bomb, and the

copy was produced in Court. The bomb was exploded by means of an electrical contact firing a charge of black powder and broken glass, and was of very ingenious construction. The other two cases arose at the end of the year, due possibly to the Sino- Japanese incidents, and both bombs were of the Mills type filled with a picric acid-perchlorate-aluminium mixture.

(9) An examination was made of a bullet taken from the leg of a junk woman wounded by machine gun fire from a submarine. The bullet was of an incendiary type.

(10) Exhibits in connection with eight cases of robbery with violence were examined, in which the use was made of pepper for temporarily blinding the victims.

(11) Members of the laboratory staff attended Court on twenty-one occasions during the year.

M 88

(12) Toxicological Examinations.

Table LII.

NATURE OF POISON.

No. of samples.

No poison found

72

Opium

46

39

l'henolic or cresolic compounds

Barbituric acid derivatives

Codeine

Alkaloids of gelsemium elegans benth

Hydrocyanic acid

Chloral hydrate

Arsenic derivatives

Mercury

Lead

Ether

Corrosive acids

Santonin

Mydriatic alkaloids

Organic dyestuffs

Crude heroin hydrochloride

Alcohol in urine

Harmless materials submitted in connection

with poison cases

Total

1

6

6

25

2

2

19 N N N

4

2

1

1

9

7

236 samples

(13) An increase in the work is to be noted, suicide again accounting for the majority of the deaths. Opium is still the most common agent, but a very large increase in the use of poisons of the lysol type is to be reported.

(14) There were three cases of arsenical poisoning during the year. In one, the accused murdered three people by adding an aqueous infusion of native white arsenic to the water used for boiling rice. The second case was due to a woman accidentally drinking a similar infusion in mistake for water, with fatal results. A third case arose through a Dockyard employee drinking Atlas A solution in mistake for tea, also with fatal results.

(15) Gelsemium elegans Benth was again used on several occasions for suicidal purposes, with fatal results.

M 89

(16) An unusual case. was one in which a Chinese drank a mixture of Chinese wine and santonin, and then threw himself from the top floor of the China Building.

(17) Two cases of suicide by drinking strong acids occurred, the acids used being hydrochloric acid in one case and nitric acid in the other. In both cases the corrosive effect in the stomach wall was very marked. Corrosive sublimate was also taken in one case, and here again there was considerable corrosion of the stomach.

Food & Drugs.

(18) It has not been found possible, as was hoped, to increase the number of samples taken under the Ordinance, owing partly to shortage of staff here, and partly to the work in connection with cholera epidemic, which required the whole attention of the Urban Council Inspectors for some time. The following table gives details of the substances examined.

Table LIII.

No. of

No. found

No. found

Substance.

sample examined. genuine.

adul- terated.

Boracic ointment

4

4

0.

Butt