Administrative Reports - 1932



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1932

Table of Contents

1 Geography, including Climate and History

2 Government

3 Population and Births and Deaths

4 Public Health

5 Housing

6 Production

7 Commerce

8 Wages and the Cost of Living

9 Education and Welfare institutions

10 Communication and Transport

11 Banking, Currency, Weights and Measures

12 Public Works

13 Justice and Police

14 Legislation

15 Public Finance and Taxation

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

A(2) Audit office

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

G(1) Registrar of Trade Marks

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prisons

M Medical and Sanitary

M(1) Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 






ANNUAL REPORT ON THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC

PROGRESS OF THE PEOPLE OF THE COLONY

OF HONG KONG DURING THE YEAR 1932.

CHAPTER

CONTENTS

PAGE

I GEOGRAPHY, INCLUDING CLIMATE AND HISTORY

1

II GOVERNMENT

III POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS

3

4

IV PUBLIC HEALTH

V HOUSING

5

11

VI PRODUCTION

VII COMMERCE

14

15

VIII WAGES AND THE COST OF LIVING

19

IX ÉDUCATION AND WELFARE INSTITUTIONS

21

X COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT

24

XI BANKING, CURRENCY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

28

XII PUBLIC WORKS

29

XIII JUSTICE AND POLICE

32

XIV LEGISLATION

35

XV PUBLIC FINANCE AND TAXATION

38

Chapter I.

GEOGRAPHY, INCLUDING CLIMATE, AND HISTORY

The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 114° 5′ and 114° 18′ E. The island is about eleven miles long and two to five miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 28 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available

cultivation.

for

2

2. The island of Hong Kong was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nanking in August, 1842. The charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843. The Kowloon peninsula and Stonecutter's Island were ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Peking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in June, 1898, the area known as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years. The total area of the Colony including the New Territories is about 390 square miles.

3. The importance of Hong Kong has grown with the increase of China's trade with foreign countries. It is now in respect of tonnage entered and cleared one of the largest ports in the world. It is the most convenient outlet for the produce of South China as well as for the incessant flow of Chinese emigration to the Netherlands East Indies, Malaya, and else- where. It is also the natural distributing centre for imports into China from abroad.

4. The Colony is not primarily a manufacturing centre, the most important of its industries being those connected directly or indirectly with shipping, such as dock and warehouse, banking and insurance undertakings. Sugar refining and cement manufacture are also major industries, and in recent years considerable quantities of knitted goods, electric torches and batteries, and rubber shoes have been produced and exported.

5. The climate of Hong Kong is sub-tropical, the winter being normally cool and dry and the summer hot and humid; the seasons are marked by the prevalence of the S.W. monsoon in summer and the N.E. monsoon in winter. The temperature seldom rises above 95°F or falls below 40°F.

The average rainfall is 85.62 inches, May to September being the wettest months. In spring and summer the humidity of the atmosphere is often very high, at times exceeding 95% with an average over the whole year of 77%. The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period.

The mean

6. The rainfall for 1932 was 91.47 inches. temperature of the air was 72°.2 against an average of 71°.9. The maximum gust velocity of the wind was at the rate of 79 m.p.h. from E.N.E. on September 17th, when a typhoon passed within 200 miles to the S. of Hong Kong.

7. There were no outstanding events of general interest during the year. The first British Empire Products Fair in Hong Kong was opened by His Excellency the Officer Adminis tering the Government, the Hon. Mr. W. T. Southorn C.M.G., on 23rd May. The Fair which was held in the grounds and

cn the first and second floors of the Pensinsula Hotel was open for two days and was an unqualified success. There was an acute water shortage during the earlier part of the summer and for some weeks the mains were turned on for only one and a half hours in the morning and for a similar period in the evening. Fortunately heavy rains early in June eased the situation, and the rainfall for the year slightly exceeded the annual average.

The War Memorial Hospital was formally opened by His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E., on 16th March.

8. During the absence on leave of His Excellency the Governor Sir William Feel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E., from 6th May to 16th November the Honourable Mr. W. T. Southorn, C.M.G., administered the Government.

Chapter II.

GOVERNMENT.

The Government is administered under Letters Patent of 14th February, 1917, and Royal Instructions of the same and subsequent dates by a Governor aided by an Executive Council, composed of six official and three unofficial members, and by a Legislative Council composed of nine official and eight unofficial members. Prior to 1928 the numbers of the Legis- lative Council members were seven and six respectively. The six official members of the Executive Council are the Senior Military Officer, the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney General, the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Colonial Treasurer, all of whom are members ex-officio, and the Director of Public Works, appointed by the Governor. The three unofficial members, one of whom is Chinese, are appointed by the Governor. The six official members of the Executive Council are also members of the Legislative Council; the other three official members of this Council, who are appointed by the Governor, are the Inspector General of Police, the Harbour Master, and the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services. Of the unofficial members of the Legislative Council two are appointed by the Governor on the nomination respectively of the Justices of the Peace and of the Chamber of Commerce; the Governor also appoints the remaining members three of whom are Chinese. Appointment in the case of unofficial members is for five years for the Executive and four years for the Legislative Council.

2. The Sanitary Board composed of four official and six unofficial members has power to make bye laws under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance in matters appertaining to public health, subject to an overriding power in the Legislative Council.

4

3. There is a number of advisory boards and committees, such as the Board of Education, Harbour Advisory Committee, Labour Advisory Board etc. composed of both official and unofficial members. They are frequently consulted and are of much assistance to the Government.

4. The English Common Law forms the basis of the legal system, modified by Hong Kong Ordinances of which an edition revised to 1923 has been published. The law as to civil procedure was codified by Ordinance No. 3 of 1901. The Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act 1890 regulates the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in Admiralty cases.

5. The daily administration is carried out by the twenty- eight Government departments, which are officered exclusively by members of the Civil Service. The most important of the purely administrative departments are the Secretariat, Treasury, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Harbour, Post Office, Imports and Exports Office, Police and Prisons departments. There are seven legal departments, amongst these being the Supreme Court and the Magistracies. Two departments, the Medical and Sanitary, deal with public health; one, the Education, with education; and one, the largest of all the Government depart- ments, the Public Works, is concerned with roads, buildings, waterworks, piers and analogous matters.

6. There have been no changes in the system of Govern- ment in the year under review.

Chapter III.

POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

Variation in population in Hong Kong is more dependent on immigration and emigration than on births and deaths. Movements to and from the Colony are influenced by events in China and owing to the large numbers who come and go daily it is impossible to give more than a very rough estimate of the actual population.

2. The following table shows the estimated population for the Colony for the middle of 1932.

Non-Chinese (mostly resident in Victoria and

Kowloon)

Chinese in Victoria

Chinese in Hong Kong Villages

Chinese in junks and sampans

Chinese in Kowloon and New Kowloon..

Chinese in New Territories

Total

19,984

364,279

43,513

273,244

100,000

99,776

900,796

4

3. There is a number of advisory boards and committees, such as the Board of Education, Harbour Advisory Committee, Labour Advisory Board etc. composed of both official and unofficial members. They are frequently consulted and are of much assistance to the Government.

4. The English Common Law forms the basis of the legal system, modified by Hong Kong Ordinances of which an edition revised to 1923 has been published. The law as to civil procedure was codified by Ordinance No. 3 of 1901. The Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act 1890 regulates the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in Admiralty cases.

5. The daily administration is carried out by the twenty- eight Government departments, which are officered exclusively by members of the Civil Service. The most important of the purely administrative departments are the Secretariat, Treasury, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Harbour, Post Office, Imports and Exports Office, Police and Prisons departments. There are seven legal departments, amongst these being the Supreme Court and the Magistracies. Two departments, the Medical and Sanitary, deal with public health; one, the Education, with education; and one, the largest of all the Government depart- ments, the Public Works, is concerned with roads, buildings, waterworks, piers and analogous matters.

6. There have been no changes in the system of Govern- ment in the year under review.

Chapter III.

POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

Variation in population in Hong Kong is more dependent on immigration and emigration than on births and deaths. Movements to and from the Colony are influenced by events in China and owing to the large numbers who come and go daily it is impossible to give more than a very rough estimate of the actual population.

2. The following table shows the estimated population for the Colony for the middle of 1932.

Non-Chinese (mostly resident in Victoria and

Kowloon)

Chinese in Victoria

Chinese in Hong Kong Villages

Chinese in junks and sampans

Chinese in Kowloon and New Kowloon..

Chinese in New Territories

Total

19,984

364,279

43,513

273,244

100,000

99,776

900,796

3. During the year 2,975,258 persons entered and 2,827,449 persons left the Colony, making a daily average of 8,129 arrivals and 7,728 departures. The daily average for 1931 was 7,094 arrivals and 7,660 departures.

4. Registration of Births and Deaths is the rule in the urban districts but in the New Territories generally registration has not been enforced; therefore, in computing birth rates and death rates the population of the New Territories should not be taken into account.

5. The number of births registered was:

Chinese Non-Chinese

13,166

431

6. The deaths registered among the civil population number 19,829 giving a crude death rate of 24.74 per mille as compared with 24.08 for the previous year.

Estimated Death rate per

Non-Chinese

Chinese

Deaths.

Population. mille population.

283

19,546

19,984 781,036

14.16

25.02

7. The number of deaths of infants under one year was Chinese 6,916, non-Chinese 38. If the figures for Chinese births represented the total births, which they do not, the infantile mortality figure for the Chinese would be 525.28 as compared with 617.42 in the previous

The infantile mortality figure among non-Chinese was 97.93 as compared with 61.85 in 1931.

year.

Chapter IV.

PUBLIC HEALTH,

In the absence of some general system of registration of sickness, the only sources of information available for gauging the state of the public health in this Colony are the returns relating to deaths, the notifications of infectious diseases and the records of hospitals. Judging from the death returns the health of the Colony was not quite so good as in the previous year. The crude death rate was 24.74 per mille as compared with 24.08 for 1931.

2. Respiratory diseases accounted for 43.05 per cent of the total deaths; the percentage for 1931 was 42.25. The principal diseases causing death were broncho-pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchitis, pneumonia, infantile diarrhoea and diarrhoea.



6

3. The overcrowded houses, the expectorating habits of the people, and poverty furnish sufficient explanation for the pre- valence of respiratory troubles.

4. Pulmonary Tuberculosis. This disease continues to rank second to broncho-pneumonia as the principal cause of death. It is probable that some of the cases of the latter were of tuber- culous origin.

5. The total number of deaths was 2,042; that for 1931 was 1,983. The death rate per mille was 2.54 as compared with 2.60 for the previous year.

6. There is need for more hospital or infirmary accommoda- tion for tuberculosis patients, especially for those of the poorer classes.

7. Malaria.-Owing to efficient drainage methods this disease has disappeared from the greater part of the urban districts. It still persists, however, in the suburbs and in the rural areas. There are parts of the New Territories where the spleen rate exceeds 75 per cent.

§. Malaria not being a notifiable disease the incidence figures are unknown. The cases admitted to the Government Hospitals numbered 334 as compared to 586 in the previous year. The percentage of deaths to cases admitted was 3.29. Among the Chinese Hospitals there were 942 admissions with a case mortal- ity rate of 19.42 per cent.

9. The total number of deaths attributed to this disease was 455, giving a death rate of 0.56 per mille over the whole popula- tiou. The low death rate is, of course, due to the fact that the great bulk of the population residing in the drained urban area is not subject to risks of infection. If figures for local districts were available it would be found that in some areas the incidence and death rates were very considerable.

10. The Medical Officer in charge of the Kowloon Mortuary reports that among the 288 bodies of 7 years of age and over which were examined 111 or 40 per cent of the whole had spleens which were equal to or exceeded twice the normal size.

11 During the year the Malaria Bureau continued its in- vestigations into the life history, habits and carrying powers of the local anophelines. The results obtained were both interest- ing and instructive. As in previous years there was no obstruc- tion from the local Chinese; on the contrary they took an interest in the proceedings and showed their eagerness to be of assistance. The Chinese Inspectors have shown both ability and zeal.

7

12. The Bureau co-operated fully with the Military Authori- ties and with the Public Works Department.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

13. During the year there were reported 241 cases of cholera, 233 cases of smallpox, 207 cases of cerebro-spinal fever, 205 cases of diphtheria and 202 cases of enteric.

14. Cholera. The Hong Kong epidemic was part of the pan- demic which affected most of the ports and large inland towns of China. The first cases were those of two immigrants from Canton. Thereafter there were daily notifications.

15. The outbreak which commenced on the 18th June lasted until the third week in September. Altogether there were 241 cases of which 22 were imported. The cases treated at the In- fectious Diseases Hospital numbered 202. The number of deaths among those treated was 99, giving a case death rate of 49.1 per cent.

16. Early in the outbreak the Director of Medical and Sani- tary Services went to Canton for the purpose of arranging with the Health Authorities of that city for a scrutiny of all passengers about to leave for Hong Kong with the view to apprehending those showing cholera symptoms.

17. The following measures were adopted:

------

(1) Special provisions were made at the Infectious Dis- eases Hospital for the reception and treatment of cases. Extra staff was taken on and an agreement made with the Tung Wah Hospital Authorities for cooperation, for the loan of their Infectious Diseases Hospital, and for the employment of a number of their nurses and dressers under the supervision of the Government Medical staff.

(2) The boats and trains from Canton and the boats from Macao were subjected to inspection on arrival. (3) Vaccine was prepared at the Bacteriological In- stitute and arrangement made for the free examina- tion of all specimens submitted.

(4) Free vaccination was offered to all the hospitals and arrangements made for the vaccination of the medi- cal staff, the Police Force, the Military Establish- ment and others.

(5) Special attention was paid to the water supply and

to the sale of fresh fruits and vegetables.

(6) Close cooperation was maintained between the Medical Department, the Sanitary Department, the Police and the Railway Department.

8

18. For the treatment of cases all the methods advocated by modern authorities were made use of but in spite of the most careful attention the death rate was 49.1 per cent.

19. Smallpox.-Every year in the cold season this disease. manifests itself in outbreaks which are sometimes sporadic, some- times epidemic. Whatever the prevalence there is always a tendency for the morbidity rate to decline or disappear with the advent of summer. In the year under review there were 212 cases and 175 deaths.

20. The rescission last year of the Sanitary Board's resolution of 1917 authorising the exemption of smallpox cases from isolation under certain conditions did not, as some had supposed, result in a diminution of the notification rate and an increase of concealment. If anything there was a greater tendency for the cases to seek hospital treatment.

21. The vaccination compaign was continued and during the year 276,424 persons were vaccinated. Valuable assistance was afforded by the St. John Ambulance Brigade and by the Chinese Public Dispensaries. Both bodies engaged in active propaganda and through their efforts many were persuaded who otherwise would have kept aloof. The various sections of the Brigade again carried out street vaccination with excellent results.

22. The Chinese have a preference for vaccination in the spring as being the auspicious season, and for a month or two after Chinese New Year the Chinese Public Dispensaries are crowded with children waiting to be done.

23. The majority of Chinese still hold the opinion that the herbalist treatment of smallpox gives better results than the methods adopted by practitioners qualified in Western medicine. An analysis of the statistics of (a) the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital where only herbalist treatment is carried out, and (b) the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital where west- ern treatment only is provided shows that this view is not correct. Calculating on the figures for the last 23 years the case death rate at the Tung Wah was 46.63 per cent while that at the Government institution was 14.86 per cent.

24. Plague. For the last three years no cases of plague have been reported in Hong Kong. The disappearance of this disease not only from this Colony but from the greater part of China and its decline throughout the world are due to factors which are not understood.

25. Systematic rat-catching and periodical cleansing of houses were carried out throughout the year. The total number

of rats collected was 174,239 of which 12,792 were taken alive, as compared with 157,829 and 11,520 in 1931. The number collected each year shows that there is no diminution in the rat population. All the rats collected were sent to the Public Mort- ary for examination. None were found infected.

26. Cerebro-spinal Fever.-Coincident with a sharp epidemic in Macao and one of milder nature in Canton there was an out- break of cerebro-spinal fever in Hong Kong which was sporadic in character. Altogether 207 cases were reported with 122 deaths. 61 cases were treated in Kennedy Town Infectious Dis- eases Hospital of which 26 died. No special foci of infection were discovered and few instances where one could trace the source of infection.

27. Sera manufactured at the Bacteriological Institute was used therapeutically both in Hong Kong and in Macao.

28. Diphtheria. With regard to diphtheria there is little to be said. The cases were sporadic and the sources of infection were seldom discovered.

29. Enteric. What has been said of diphtheria applies to enteric. The incubation period being so long and the possible sources of infection so numerous there is little chance of tracing in any case the source of infection.

THE DUMPING OF THE DEAD.

30. The number of bodies reported by the police as dumped was 1,427 as compared with 1,295 in 1931. In an endeavour to stop this practice chambers for the deposit of corpses have been established at all the Chinese Public Dispensaries. In some cases the top of the table is so arranged that the weight of a body on it closes an electric circuit which rings a bell in the caretaker's room. So far the chambers have not been an un- qualified success and dumping in the street at dead of night continues to happen.

THE GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

31. The Hospital consists of three blocks and contains 225 beds in 23 wards. About one half the accommodation has been placed under the care of the clinical professors of the University who have been gazetted respectively Surgeon, Physician and Obstetric Physician to the Hospital.

The number of inpatients in 1932 was 4,876 as compared with 4,744 in the previous year.

32. Attendances at 47,627 (43,196 in 1931). part of the work of this University.

10

the Outpatient Department numbered Exclusive of the V.D. clinic, the greater department is done by the staff of the

33. Attached to the hospital is a Maternity Hospital of 21 beds. There were 885 cases in 1932 and 796 in 1931. With the exception of a few cases attended by the Government Medical Officers all the cases were under the care of the University Pro- fessor and his assistants.

MENTAL HOSPITAL.

34. Situated close to the Government Civil Hospital is the Mental Hospital which is under the direction of the Medical Officer in charge of the Government Civil Hospital. There are separate divisions for European and Chinese. The European section contains 14 beds and the Chniese section 18 beds. This hospital is mainly only a temporary abode for mental cases, those of Chinese nationality being sent to Canton, and those of other nationalities repatriated to their respective countries. There were 307 cases in 1932 and 322 in 1931.

GOVERNMENT INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL.

35. This hospital situated on the Western outskirts of the City of Victoria is the only Government Institution of its kind for the whole Colony. Formerly a Police Station it contains only 26 beds. Two hundred and eight-one cases were admitted in 1932 as compared with five cases in 1931.

KOWLOON HOSPITAL.

36. Situated on the mainland this hospital has 84 beds and 8 cots. During 1932 the number of patients treated was 2,132, the number for 1931 was 1,855. In the second half of the year operations commenced on the erection of a new general diseases ward, a nurses hostel and quarters for a second Medical Officer.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

(Government aided).

37. The Chinese Hospitals.-Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern and Kwong Wah-are hospitals which are maintained by the Tung Wah Charity Organisation, a purely Chinese body. These institutions, which are assisted by Government. are under inspec- tion by the Government Medical Department. Each has as its Medical Superintendent a Chinese Medical Officer who is paid by Government. The Medical staff consists of Chinese Medical Officers, qualified in Western Medicine, and Chinese Herbalists.

?

11

The patient is given his choice of treatment.

No. TREATED

No.

HOSPITAL

of

No. TREATED

IN 1932

IN 1931

Chinese

Chinese

beds Western Her- Western Her- Medicine balist Medicine balist

Medicine

Medicine

Tung Wah,.....

500 7,800 5,287

5,704 5,246

Tung Wah Eastern,..... 195

Kwong Wah,

318

3,338 1,928 2,185 1,345

9,717 3,462 8,204 2,283

39. Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital.-Situated in Kennedy Town and adjacent to the Government Infectious Dis- eases Hospital is the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital, an institution containing 30 beds where 60 patients could be accommodated at a pinch. The treatment here is left almost entirely to the herbalists.

During the year there were 77 patients, as compared with 9 in the preceding year.

Chapter V.

HOUSING.

In recent years some evidence has been shown amongst the artizan class of the Colony of a quickening social consciousness and the resultant desire to avail themselves of improved housing accommodation wherever such is made available. The unskilled labouring classes, however, are still found densely packed in tenement houses deficient in light and air. This class of labour has to find its habitat as close as possible to the scene of its labour, with the result that the Western part of the City of Victoria, which houses the native business quarter and closely adjoins the portion of the harbour handling the traffic from the West River and Chinese Coast Ports, is seriously overcrowded.

12

2. These conditions are being slowly mitigated by the rebuilding of properties which from time to time are condemned for reasons of structural defects. This process of elimination is however, too slow to create any appreciable improvement. The legislation now being contemplated, which calls for the provision of reasonable yard space, when made operative, will hasten the removal or reconstruction of much of the old property. This whilst providing improved housing conditions, will no doubt mean increased cost of living to the labouring classes.

3. Hitherto, the hostility of the property owning class to the introduction of legislation requiring additional open space and per se reducing the earning power of the property has been the chief obstacle in obtaining improved conditions. It can, however, be recorded that this spirit of obstruction is less evident today as a result of education, and of the example set by some of the better class of realty companies whose blocks of tenement houses compare not unfavourably in essential respects with modern European practice.

4. The housing of the Colony is all privately owned, and control is maintained by the operation of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, the provisions of which also mould. the character of the housing. Generally the houses are built back to back in rows, separated by a scavenging lane six feet in width specified by the Ordinance. These houses vary in height from two to four storeys according to the width of the street on to which they front, whilst the average height per storey is twelve feet, a minimum being controlled by the Ordinance. The houses built prior to the 1903 Ordinance covering the greatest part of the native quarter are of depths varying from forty feet to eighty feet, with often less than 100 square feet of open space provided within the curtilage of the lot. After the passing of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance No. 1 of 1903, the amount of open space per house to be allowed within the boundaries of each lot is governed, and falls under two main heads, viz:-(a) houses built on land bought prior to the passing of the Ordinance in 1903, where The open space must not be less than one fourth the area of the site and (b) houses built on land bought subsequently where the minimum is raised to one third of the area. plan the usual frontage of each house is fifteen feet (a dimension owing its origin more to early structural limitations than to economics) and a depth of about thirty-five feet, whilst each storey consists of one large "room" with a native type kitchen in the rear. This room is then subdivided by thin partitions seven feet high into three cubicles each of which may accom- modate a family. A latrine is built at ground floor level, one to each house irrespective of the number of occupants, and is common to all.

On

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5. Structurally the earlier houses are of blue bricks (c) native manufacture having a very low structural value) and timber, (usually China fir which is extremely susceptible to the ravages of white ants). Lately, however, reinforced concrete and better quality bricks have been used.

6. In the City of Victoria the major defect of housing is due to lack of town planning, but since a large proportion of the City was erected in the early days of the Colony, when town planning was little practiced even in Europe, the conditions to-day are a heritage, the elimination of which involves immense sums of money, and probably considerable opposition if attempted on a large scale.

7. Generally many of the old houses suffer from defects which are attributable to the Ordinance of that time. Passed in 1903 the measure was framed to meet existing conditions, both structurally and hygienically as they were then understood and practiced. But, viewed in the light of modern practice and knowledge, many of its provisions are found to be lax and the following are the main resultant defects:

Note:

(a) The open space is insufficient, especially with regard to earlier houses, i.e. those built on land purchased prior to 1903.

(b) Latrine accommodation is insufficient.

(c) Staircases are too narrow and steep, and often

unlighted.

(d) Means of escape in case of fire insufficient.

(b) In the case of new buildings where owners are able to provide by means of a well or otherwise an adequate water supply, flush sanitation is now usually provided on each floor. This is one of the most important steps forward in sanitation that has been achieved.

(c) and (d) have been provided for by recent amendments of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, which call for any new staircases in tenement houses to be of fire-proof construction, with alternate means of egress to all floors more than twenty three feet above the footpath. The remarks above apply more particularly to the housing of the wage-earning Asiatics. The housing for the wealthier classes is provided for by modern flats three or four storeys high, and in the suburban areas by detached or semi-detached houses usually two storeys high which may be occupied separately or as flats.

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8. A new Buildings Ordinance has been drafted, which will eliminate many of the present defects and demand a higher standard generally, whilst the building owners are themselves realising the advantages of modern constructional methods. Town planning improvements are being carried out wherever possible in Hong Kong whilst the development of Kowloon is proceeding according to a definite lay-out.

Chapter VI.

PRODUCTION.

Hong Kong is the port for South China, and the greater part of the large volume of goods that pass through it is in transit either to or from South China and other parts of the world, in cluding North and Middle China. The Colony itself produces comparatively little, though the shipbuilding, cement, sugar 1 fining and cotton knitting industries are not unimportan Neither agriculture nor mining are carried on to any great extent, though the former is practised throughout the New Territories. Rice and vegetables are grown, and there is considerable poultry farming, but in insufficient quantities to supply the needs of the urban populations of Victoria and Kowloon. The cultivation is in the hands of the Chinese villagers. Sea fishing is an im- portant industry, but here again local supplies have to be augmented by. importation from outside.

2. Reports on the principal industries for the year 1932 are given below:

Refined Sugar. The enormously increased duty on sugar imported into China (which now amounts to 130 per cent of the c.i.f. value) has imposed such a heavy financial burden on dealers that their operations have been greatly curtailed. Business dur- ing 1932 was on a hand to mouth basis, but even so sugar dealers at the end of the year were facing with some trepidation the January, 1933, Chinese New Year Settlement which was very difficult for them in view of heavy credits extended to clients in the interior of South China. Business with Manchuria has prac- tically ceased, Japanese refined sugars having practically mono- polised that market.

Cement. There was a large demand for cement throughout the year, the market being flooded by the Japanese product which was sold at prices against which it was difficult for other cement manufacturers to compete.

Rope. A restricted demand and keen competition were the special features met wtih in this industry during 1932.

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8. A new Buildings Ordinance has been drafted, which will eliminate many of the present defects and demand a higher standard generally, whilst the building owners are themselves realising the advantages of modern constructional methods. Town planning improvements are being carried out wherever possible in Hong Kong whilst the development of Kowloon is proceeding according to a definite lay-out.

Chapter VI.

PRODUCTION.

Hong Kong is the port for South China, and the greater part of the large volume of goods that pass through it is in transit either to or from South China and other parts of the world, in cluding North and Middle China. The Colony itself produces comparatively little, though the shipbuilding, cement, sugar 1 fining and cotton knitting industries are not unimportan Neither agriculture nor mining are carried on to any great extent, though the former is practised throughout the New Territories. Rice and vegetables are grown, and there is considerable poultry farming, but in insufficient quantities to supply the needs of the urban populations of Victoria and Kowloon. The cultivation is in the hands of the Chinese villagers. Sea fishing is an im- portant industry, but here again local supplies have to be augmented by. importation from outside.

2. Reports on the principal industries for the year 1932 are given below:

Refined Sugar. The enormously increased duty on sugar imported into China (which now amounts to 130 per cent of the c.i.f. value) has imposed such a heavy financial burden on dealers that their operations have been greatly curtailed. Business dur- ing 1932 was on a hand to mouth basis, but even so sugar dealers at the end of the year were facing with some trepidation the January, 1933, Chinese New Year Settlement which was very difficult for them in view of heavy credits extended to clients in the interior of South China. Business with Manchuria has prac- tically ceased, Japanese refined sugars having practically mono- polised that market.

Cement. There was a large demand for cement throughout the year, the market being flooded by the Japanese product which was sold at prices against which it was difficult for other cement manufacturers to compete.

Rope. A restricted demand and keen competition were the special features met wtih in this industry during 1932.

15

Preserved Ginger.-World economic depression adversely affected business during 1932 in spite of considerably lower prices. The total value of exports from Hong Kong in 1932 amounted to $1,400,000 as compared with $2,400,000 in 1931.

Knitted Goods.-The turnover in locally manufactured knitted goods (hosiery and singlets) was considerably less than in 1932 owing to unfavourable exchange considerations which were the exact reverse of those obtaining in 1931 when local factories were able to export at very low prices owing to their raw materials having been bought at less than replacing cost at the time of export. The total value of exports of singlets in 1932 amounted to $5,700,000 and that of hosiery, $1,700,000.

Flashlight Torches and Batteries.-The manufactures of local factories are still in good demand, particularly from India, Java and other countries with large native populations. The approximate total value of exports in 1932 amounted to $1,200,000 (batteries) and $1,000,000 (torches).

Rubber Shoes.-Locally manufactured rubber shoes are be- ing exported in growing quantities. The rubber is imported from the Straits Settlements and the canvas from America and the United Kingdom. Low labour costs here enable local manufac- turers to compete successfully with shoes of Japanese and Straits Settlements manufacture. The total value of exports in 1932 amounted to over $2,000,000.

Shipbuilding.-Four ocean-going vessels and twenty-six smaller craft were built in local dockyards during 1932.

Chapter VII.

COMMERCE.

Although it cannot be claimed that the general economic situation of the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1932 showed any visible improvement as compared with the previous year. statistics of the Import and Export trade reveal that the situation was not an unsatisfactory one, taking into consideration the heavy contraction in international trade, and, in particular. the Chinese boycott of Japanese products which seriously affected the trade statistics of the Colony.

2. The declared value of Imports of merchandise in 1932 amounted to $624.0 millions (£41.0 millions), as compared with $737.7 millions (£38.5 millions) in 1931, while Exports were valued at $471.9 millions (£31.0 millions) as compared with $541.9 millions (£28.9 millions) in 1931.

16

3. Calculating in terms of Hong Kong currency, Imports declined by 15.4%, and Exports by 12.9% but sterling values showed increases of 6.5% and 7.3% respectively, on account of the appreciation in the value of exchange on other than gold standard countries.

4. In regard to the quantum of trade, it is estimated that there was a decline of from 7 to 10%.

5. Great Britain still further increased its share of the Import trade, accounting for 9.4% in 1930, 10.6% in 1931 and 12.3% in 1932, while the Japanese share fell successively from 12.3%, 9.3% to 3.4%. China, French Indo-China, Siam, India. and Australia also increased their proportions.

6. Both imports and exports of Piece Goods and Textiles declined in 1932 as compared with 1931, total imports being valued at $107.3 millions as compared with $131.7 millions, and exports at $66.9 millions as compared with $75.8 millions.

7. The United Kingdom's share of the import trade in piece goods and textiles increased from 32.6% to 38.6%, while the Japanese share receded from 19.1% to 7.0%.

8. Imports of Building Materials fell from $15.3 millions to $12.9 millions; Chemicals and Drugs from $8.3 to $6.6; Chinese Medicines from $28.9 to $19.2; Dyeing and Tanning Materials from $8.9 to $6.0; Foodstuffs from $241.4 to $211.8; Hardware from $5.5 to $5.2; Liquors from $4.6 to $3.7; Machinery and Engines from $9.2 to $6.1; Manures from $13.4 to $11.0; Metals from $44.6 to $38.5; Nuts and Seeds from $8.9 to $7.0; Oils and Fats from $54.3 to $52.2; Paints from $2.7 to $2.5; Paper and Paperware from $16.2 to $15.7; Tobacco from $12.9 to $9.5; Wearing Appearel from $6.3 to $4.4; Sundries from $90.3 to $71.5. Fuels, Railway Materials and Vehicles showed very slight increases.

9. Values of Exports showed a decline in each group. Building Materials fell from $9.6 millions in 1931 to $8.7 millions in 1932; Chemicals and Drugs from $4.6 to $4.1; Chinese Medi- cines from $16.5 to $13.6; Dyeing and Tanning Materials from $6.5 to $5.0; Foodstuffs from $201.2 to $185.2; Fuels from $3.0 to $2.5; Hardware from $3.0 to $2.8; Liquors from $1.5 to $1.0; Machinery and Engines from $2.2 to $1.6; Manures from $16.3 to $11.0; Metals from $34.6 to $30.2; Minerals and Ores from $2.0 to $0.9; Nuts and Seeds from $6.2 to $5.6; Oils and Fats from $43.4 to $37.1; Paints from $2.6 to $2.1; Paper and Paperware from $11.4 to $10.3; Piece Goods and Textiles. from $75.8 to $66.9; Railway Materials from $0.44 to $0.43; Tobacco from $10.1 to $7.9; Vehicles from $2.2 to $1.5; Wearing Apparel from $13.7 to $12.8; and Sundries from $74.8 to $60.2.

17

10. The average rate of exchange for the year was is. 32d. as against 1s. Od. in 1931.

Imports (in £'s & $'s millions).

1923. 1924. 1925.

1930. 1931. 1932

1st Quarter

£ 14.7 19.3 16.3 $130.7 165.4 139.7

* 9.0 11.9

* 186.9 170.7

2nd Quarter

£ 15.2 17.1 14.5 $131.5 144.0 128.9 131.3

9.2

8.7 10.2 180.1

164.7

3rd Quarter

£ 14.3 19.2

$127.1

* 10.1

9.0 9.3

161.7

*

156.8 182.3

142.4

4th Quarter

£ 17.8 $155.3

16.5

136.6

*

*

10.3

11.8

9.6

167.4

188.4

146.2

Total

£ 62.0 72.1 30.8 29.6 $544.6 607.7 268.6 455.5

38.5 41.0

737.7 624.0

Exports (in £'s & $'s millions).

1st Quarter

1923. 1924. 1925. 1930.

£ 13.9 18.3 15.2 $123.5

1931. 1932.

* 6.8

156.8 130.3

*

140.1

3.8

127.0

2nd Quarter

£ 16.3 15.2 14.1 $140.9

7.4

6.4 7.1

128.0 125.3

105.9 132.5

115.3

3rd Quarter

£ 14.0

14.6

*

7.3

6.5

7.2

$124.4 122.9

*

113.7

130.6

110.0

4th Quarter

£17.2 15.5 $150,1 128.3

*

8.5

9.2

7.9

*

137.2

138.7 · 119.6

Total

£ 61.4 $538.9

63.6 29.3 23.2 28.9 31.0

586.0 255.6 356.8 541.9 471.9

*No statistics available from July 1925 to March 1930.

Note:-Average rate of exchange 1923=2s. 34d;

1924=2s. 41d;

1925=28. 34d;

1930=1s. 34d;

1931-1s. 02d;

1932-1s. 32d.

18

TREASURE MOVEMENTS.

A considerable increase was shown in 1932, mainly on account of heavy transfers of Silver Subsidiary Coin from

Canton to Shanghai.

IMPORTS.

EXPORTS.

1931

1932

1931

1932

$

Bank Notes

1,047,045

673,264

3,132,004

1,797,085

Copper cents

56,037

6,370

2,708,417

45,903

Gold Bars

6,842,100

19,508,290

50,656,676

63,715,586

Gold Coins

270,400

80,000

8,280,762

5,787,931

Gold Leaf

672,914

83,333

1,293,506

277,028

Silver Bar

.37,710,863

34,365,025

40,155,252

14,883,01$

H.K. Silver Dollar

1,099,341

2,564,512

10,000

40,000

Chinese Silver

.13,937,264

3,256,166

10,461,979

11,709,712

Other Silver Dollar

154,220

*

Silver Sub. Coins

4,266,956

24,735,443

260,460 4,754,824

138,657

41,618,911

Total

..66,057,140 85,272,403 121,773,880 140,013,831

United Kingdom

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 1931 AND 1932

(excluding treasure)

British Dominions and

Possessions

China

All other countries

IMPORTS.

EXPORTS,

1931

1932

1931

1932

$

$

78,251,178 76,905,373 5,247,416 3,162,248

57,402.155 56,752,665 57,662.739 42,607,978 200,421,159 169,993,076|| 295,001,702|| 279,818.847 401,666,167 320,396,186 184,137.981 145,970,638

Total British Empire

135,653,333 | 133,658,038

62,910,155 46,070,221

Total Foreign

602,087,326| 490,389,562 | 479,139,683| 123,789,485

Grand Total

737,740,659 624,047,600 | 542,049,838 | 461,859,706

*Not fully recorded,

19

WHOLESALE PRICES CHANGES.

Wholesale prices in Hong Kong during the year 1932 showed a decrease of 10.4% as compared with 1931, and increase of 14.6% as compared with 1924, 22.4% as compared with the base period of 1922, and 91.2% as compared with

1913.

There were decreases in each of the four groups in 1932 as compared with 1931: Foodstuffs declining by 12. 3%, Textiles by 7.8%, Metals and Minerals by 9.1% and Miscellaneous Items by 12.5%.

The following table shows the course of price changes since 1913 :-

1st 2nd 3rd 4th 1915. 1922. 1924. 1931. 1932. Qtr. Qtr. Qtr. Qtr.

73.6 100.0 106.1 144.3 126.5 129.6 130.1 124.9 121.4 55.1 100.0 112.5 135.8 125.2 135.6 128.5 118.8 117.8 63.2 100 0 102.3 140.9 128.1 137.0 138.2 121.8 115.4

64.2 100.0 106.3 125.4 109.7 125.7 109.9 103.2 100.2

Foodstuffs

Textiles

Metals

Miscellaneous

Average of all

Articles...... 64.0 100.0 106.8 136.6 122.4 132.0 126.7 117.2 113.7

Chapter VIII.

WAGES AND THE COST OF LIVING.

A great proportion of the workers in Hong Kong are paid on a piece work basis and in some trades are engaged and paid on curiously complicated systems involving payment of a bonus or a share in the yearly profits.

2. Trade was again dull for the greater part of the year and wages have, so far as can be ascertained, tended down- wards. The building trade however, was still very busy, for though the peak of the land boom had been passed early in the year the resultant effect on building had not become apparent by the end of the year. The price of the cheaper grades of rice which is the staple food of the lowest paid workers, has not increased and remains at an average of five to eight cents per lb. The price of fire-wood which is also an important item to the poorer classes remains the same. There has been no apparent movement in house rents.

3. The European resident, unlike the local labourer, purchases many articles of necessity which are imported from countries with sterling or gold currencies. He is therefore affected by variations in the exchange value of these currencies as expressed in terms of the silver dollar. During the year under review these variations were not sufficiently great to affect noticeably the prices of imported articles.

20

AVERAGE RATES OF WAGES FOR LABOUR.

Building Trade:-

Carpenters

Bricklayers

Painters

$1.15 per day.

1.10 " 1.10

"

Plasterers

Scaffolders

Labourers (male)

(female)

1.10 ??

??

1.70

""

""

0.80

"

0.50

Working hours, nine per day. Time and a half paid for over- time. Free temporary quarters provided on the building site and communal messing at cheap rates.

Shipbuilding and Engineering:—

Electricians Coppersmiths

Fitters

Sawmillers

Boilermakers

Sailmakers

Blacksmiths

Turners

Patternmakers

Labourers

$1.45 to $1.80 per day.

1.20 to

1.80

0.80 to

1.80

23

"

1.00 to

1.40

""

1.00 to

1.50

17

1.00 to

1.50

0.80 to

1.20

1.00 to

1.40

""

1.00 to

1.40

21

""

0.50 to 0.80

>>

Over-time-time and a half. Night work-double time.

Transport Workers:-

Tram drivers

conductors

Bus drivers

conductors

$36 to $45 per month.

30 to 39

"}

50 per month.

20 to 25 per month.

Working hours, nine per day. Free uniform. Bonus at end

of year.

Railway Workers (Government)

Engine drivers

Firemen

Guards

Signalmen

Station Masters

Booking Clerks

Telephone operators

Female Workers in Factories:

Cigarette making

Knitting factories

Perfumery

Confectionery

$540 to $1,000 per annum.

330 to

600 to

480 1,000

27

600 to

1,000

??

1,100 to

1,800

39

600 to

1,000

""

480 to

1,000

"

$0.40 to $0.80 per day.

0.20 to 0.55

0.20 to 0.50 0.20 to

21

0.60

J

p.m.

One hour off at mid-

at day rates.

Working hours from 7 a.m. to 5

day. Over-time from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.

21

Domestic Servants :-

Employed by Chinese

Employed by Europeans Gardeners

$7.00 to $20.00 per month. 15.00 to 40.00

15.00 to 30.00

With free lodging, and with Chinese employers, generally free board.

NOTE: The rates of pay of Government employees are much the same

as those of a similar category in private employ.

AVERAGE RETAIL PRICES OF FOODSTUFFS, ETC.

1931.

1932.

Rice (3rd. grade)

8.6 cents per cattie.

8.4 cents per cattie.

Fresh fish

25

31.5

"

"

""

Salt fish

32

34.6

"

22

""

""

""

Beef

49

48

""

2

""

""

Pork

53

55

>>

35

24

Oil

23

24.2

""

33

>>

Firewood

10

for 7 catties. 10

for 8 catties.

13

Chapter IX.

EDUCATION AND WELFARE INSTITUTIONS.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

These are either schools where the medium of instruction is English or mostly English or schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese. The former, sixteen in number, are known as "English" schools, the latter of which there are three as "Vernacular" schools.

2. Of the four English schools, classed as "secondary" schools in the Table below, two are Anglo-Chinese schools for boys and one for girls. These three schools have primary departments. The fourth school, the Central British School which is a mixed school, has no primary department. Of the eleven English schools, classed as "primary" schools in the Table below, three are mixed schools preparing for the Central British School. In this group are also four "District" schools, including one for Indian boys and four "Lower Grade" schools, three of which are in rural districts. In those English schools which are attended by Chinese the study of English and of Chinese is carried on side by side; the pari passu system requiring that promotion shall depend an proficiency in both languages.

3. Of the three Government Vernacular schools one has a seven years' course and includes a Normal department. There is also a Normal school for women teachers and a Normal school on the mainland which aims at providing Vernacular teachers for rural schools.



22

4. The Technical Institute, classed in the Table below as "vocational", is attended by persons desirous of receiving instruc- tion for the most part germane to their daytime occupations.

GRANT IN AID AND SUBSIDIZED SCHOOLS.

5. There are thirteen Grant-in-Aid English Schools, and four Grant-in-Aid Vernacular Schools. Of the former, seven are

schools for boys and six are for girls.

6. One English school for girls has a primary department only. The remaining schools classed in the table below as "secondary" schools have primary departments as well as the upper classes.

7. Munsang College, Kowloon City, received a grant of $6,000.

8. The Vernacular Grant-in-Aid Schools are schools for girls and are classed in the Table as "secondary" schools.

9. The 295 subsidized schools are all Vernacular schools.

UNAIDED SCHOOLS.

10. In 1932 there were 614 unaided Vernacular schools with 31,978 children and 116 unaided English schools with 6,687 children.

1932.

Table showing number of schools and scholars for the year

CLASS OF INSTITUTIONS

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS

GRANT IN AID AND UBSIDIZED

UNAIDED SCHOOLS

SCHOOLS

No. of Institu- tions

No. of

On

On

Institu-

Roll

Kol

tions

No. of Institu- tions

On

Roll

ENGLISH :-

Secondary,

Primary,.

Vocational,

2,387 1,759

13* 5,861

10

160

I

210

106

5,027

632

Total,....

16

4,778

14

6,071

116

6,687

VERNACULAR :--

Secondary,

251

4

1,118

Primary,

295

20,005

614

31.978

Vocational,

2

205

130

Total,.

3

456

300 21,253

611

31,978

Total No. of Institutions

1,063

Total On Roll

71,223

*This includes Ying Wa College whose primary department receives

a Grant-in-Aid.

23

THE UNIVERSITY.

11. The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under a local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.

12. The University hostels are three in number-Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall and May Hall. There are also three recognized hostels for men, St. John's Hall, Morrison Hall and Ricci Hall. No university hostel at present exists for women students.

13. The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building. Additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicle. The latest additions to the buildings are a School of Chinese Studies, the cost of which was borne by Mr. Tang Chi Ngong a local Chinese merchant and banker, and a Chinese Library named after the late Mr. Fung Ping Shan who provided a sum of $100,000 for the building.

14. The income of the University for 1932 amounted to about $1,080,180.60 of which about $494,000 was derived from endow- ments and $375,000 from Government. Messrs. John Swire & Sons Ltd. gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and sub- sequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockefeller Institute has endowed the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000. The annual expenditure in 1932 amounted to about $916,500.

15. The University includes the three faculties of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognized as equivalent thereto.

16. The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year

course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree of M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D. and M.S. are awarded on examinations but are subject to the proviso that every candidate for the degrees shall produce evidence of special post-graduate experience in the subject which he presents. The degrees above mentioned are recognized by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

17. The Faculty of Engineering provides a four years course in practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, mechanical or electrical engineering. The degree for post- graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).

18. The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce, a department of Chinese studies and a department for training teachers. The course is in

all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

24

19. With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard--which is in all three faculties that of a British Univer- sity degree-external exeminers are, in all faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

20. The degree of LL.D. is granted honoris causa.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

21. The following are the best known Charitable Iistitutions.

French Convent Orphanage. Italian Convent Orphanage. Maryknoll Convent, Kowloon. St. Louis Industrial School.. Po Leung Kuk--Chinese. Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Society of Precious Blood Hospital.

Home for Aged Poor, Kowloon.

La Calvaire Home for Aged Poor, Happy Valley.

Eyre Refuge.

Salvation Army Home.

Industrial Home for the Blind, Pokfulam.

RECREATION AND ART.

22. Most of the schools contrive to hold Annual Sports either on their own grounds or on grounds generously lent by local Cricket and Football Clubs. Some schools are granted free use of Government Bathing Beaches for four afternoons a week dur- ing the Bathing Season. Lawn Tennis, Football, Swimming, Volley Ball and Basket Ball continue to increase in popularity. Cricket is played at a few schools. Physical training is given by qualified instructors. Art is taught in the Government British Schools by Trained Art Mistresses.

Chapter X.

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT.

The external communications of Hong Kong are excellent both by sea and by telegraph, cable and radio. As regards the former, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the Blue Funnel Line, the Messageries Maritimes, and several other British and foreign companies maintain regular passenger and freight services between Hong

24

19. With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard--which is in all three faculties that of a British Univer- sity degree-external exeminers are, in all faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

20. The degree of LL.D. is granted honoris causa.

CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

21. The following are the best known Charitable Iistitutions.

French Convent Orphanage. Italian Convent Orphanage. Maryknoll Convent, Kowloon. St. Louis Industrial School.. Po Leung Kuk--Chinese. Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Society of Precious Blood Hospital.

Home for Aged Poor, Kowloon.

La Calvaire Home for Aged Poor, Happy Valley.

Eyre Refuge.

Salvation Army Home.

Industrial Home for the Blind, Pokfulam.

RECREATION AND ART.

22. Most of the schools contrive to hold Annual Sports either on their own grounds or on grounds generously lent by local Cricket and Football Clubs. Some schools are granted free use of Government Bathing Beaches for four afternoons a week dur- ing the Bathing Season. Lawn Tennis, Football, Swimming, Volley Ball and Basket Ball continue to increase in popularity. Cricket is played at a few schools. Physical training is given by qualified instructors. Art is taught in the Government British Schools by Trained Art Mistresses.

Chapter X.

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT.

The external communications of Hong Kong are excellent both by sea and by telegraph, cable and radio. As regards the former, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the Blue Funnel Line, the Messageries Maritimes, and several other British and foreign companies maintain regular passenger and freight services between Hong

25-

Kong and Europe. The trans-Pacific communications are well served by the Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd., the Dollar Line, the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and other steamship lines. To Australia three steamship companies, the Eastern and Australian, Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and Australian and Oriental maintain regular passenger and freight services. In addition there are direct sailings to Africa, South America, and to New York. There is frequent and regular communication between Hong Kong and other Far Eastern ports in India, Java, Straits Settlements, Formosa, Indo-China, Japan and the China coast. Local steamship communication is by river steamer from Hong Kong to Canton and the West River ports with several sailings daily. In addition there is a vast traffic between Hong Kong and the adjacent provinces of China by junk and sampan.

2. The total shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1932 amounted to 104,115 vessels of 43,824,906 tons which, compared with the figures of 1931 shows a decrease of 3,147 vessels and a decrease of 325,115 tons. Of the above 52,359 vessels of 41,794,005 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 51,801 vessels of 41,933,748 tons in 1931. There was an increase in British Ocean-going shipping of 180 vessels and an increase of 660,846 tons. Foreign Ocean-going vessels show a decrease of 539 vessels and a decrease of 837,918 tons. British River Steamers showed an increase of 95 vessels and an increase of 41,474 tons. Foreign River Steamers showed a decrease of 199 vessels and a decrease of 11,035 tons. In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there was an increase of 83 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 6,609 tons. Junks in Foreign trade showed an increase of 938 vessels and an increase of 13,499 tons. In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there was an increase in steam launches of 710 vessels and an increase in tonnage of 22,399. Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 1,415 vessels and a decrease of 207,771 tons.

3. The Eastern Extension Telegraph Company (British) by means of three cables to Singapore, one direct and one each via Labuan and Cape St. James respectively, provides good connections with Europe via India, with Australasia, and with the other British Colonies and possessions. By their cable to Manila connection is made with the direct American cable, thence to San Francisco. Two cables to Shanghai, belonging respectively to the Eastern Extension and to the Great Northern (Danish) Companies, via Foochow and Amoy respectively, give a good connection with Shanghai, North China, Japan and Russia; the system of the Great Northern Telegraph Company gives a good service to Europe via Asiatic Russia.

4. The Government operates a commercial radio service with direct communication with Chinese stations, Siam, Indo-China, Formosa and the Dutch East Indies. Indirect communication

26

between Hong Kong and America is maintained via Manila and between Hong Kong and Europe via Manila or Dutch East Indies.

5. The revenue collected by the Radio Office during the year from radio telegrams amounted to $680,032.58, an increase of $1,004.07 on the amount collected in 1931. Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $1,259.40. The total Revenue from the telegraph service amounted to $681,291.98. Ship Station Licences yielded $1,750.00, Amateur Transmission Station Licences $204.50, Broadcast Receiving

Receiving Licences $20,679.50, Dealers' Licences $2,239.00 and Examination Fee for Operators' Certificates of Proficiency $66.00.

6. The number of paid radio-telegrams forwarded during the year was 194,782 consisting of 1,607,233 words against 214,274 consisting of 1,694,362 words in 1931, and 179,382 were received, consisting of 1,653,046 words against 184,183 consisting of 1,690,206 words.

7. In addition to the paid traffic figures given above the wireless Service is responsible for the reception of time signals daily from Bordeaux, Rugby, Malabar and Ñauen, for the trans- mission of time signals to ships in the China Sea, the reception of press messages amounting to 365 messages or 198,526 words from Rugby, the collection and distribution of meteorogical traffic, 6,583 messages 216,787 words having been forwarded, and 17,083 messages 293,502 words having been received, the reception and dissemination of distress, piracy and navigation messages, the transmission and reception of Government mess- ages, etc.

8. A telephone service between Hong Kong and Canton, a distance of 110 miles is in operation,

9. Mails. The number of mail receptacles of Hong Kong origin despatched during the year was 47,615 as compared with 48,748 in 1931-a decrease of 1,133; the number received was 51,324 as compared with 52,568-a decrease of 1,244.

10. Receptacles in transit, including those to and from British and Foreign Men-of-War, numbered 183,822 as against 210,217 in 1931-a decrease of 26,395.

11. Registered Articles and Parcels.-The number of regis- tered articles handled amounted to 748,676 as compared with 806,733 in 1931-a decrease of 58,057.

12. The figures for insured letters were 18,595 and 19,522 respectively an increase of 927.

13. Parcels, ordinary and insured, which were dealt with reached a total of 228,253 as against 382,170 in 1931-a decrease of 153,917.

28

23. Communication between the island and the mainland is maintained by a number of ferry services; the most important of which are the Star Ferry between Kowloon Point and a pier near the General Post Office, and the Hong Kong and Yaumati Ferry Company between Yaumati and a pier also centrally situated on the sea front of the island. The number of passengers carried by these two ferry companies in 1932 is estimated at 39,640,709.

Chapter XI.

BANKING, CURRENCY, WEIGHTS & MEASURES.

The Colony is well served by banking institutions. There are sixteen principal banks doing business in the Colony who are members of the Clearing House, and in addition several Chinese banks and numerous native Hongs doing some portion of banking business. There are no banks which devote them- selves specially to agricultural and co-operative banking. The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation also conducts the business of the Hong Kong Savings Bank on usual saving bank principles.

2. The Currency of the Colony is based on silver and is governed by the Order in Council of 2nd February, 1895. The dollar, which is normally in circulation and which is legal tender to any amount, is the British Dollar of 900 millesimal finess and weight 26.957 grammes (416.00 grains). Silver subsidiary coins of the value of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents and one cent pieces in bronze are also legal tender up to the value of two dollars for silver and one dollar for bronze. Bank notes issued by The Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank, The Chartered Bank and The Mercantile Bank are also in circulation, the estimated amount issued at the end of 1932 being $153,611,605.

3. The weights and measures in use in the Colony are defined in the Schedule to Ordinance No. 2 of 1885. They consist of the standards in use in the United Kingdom and of the following Chinese Weights and Measures: —

and

1 fan (candareen)=0.0133 ounces avoirdupois

1 tsin (mace)=0.133 ounces avoirdupois

1 leung (tael)=1.33 ounces avoirdupois

1 kan (catty)=1.33 pounds avoirdupois

1 tam (picul) = 133.33 pounds avoirdupois

1 chek (foot)=143 English inches divided into 10 tsun (inches) and each tsun into 10 fan or tenths

29

Chapter XII.

PUBLIC WORKs.

During the year under review the operations of the Public Works Department were carried out under a Head Office Staff by eleven sub-departments. The European Staff comprised 155 officers and the Asiatic Staff, 557.

2. Buildings.-The following works were completed during the year-A new No. 2 Police Station; Market at Sai Ying Pun; Chair Coolie Shelter at Barker Road; Temporary Fire Station at Wanchai; Hut for Police at Bay View Police Station; Garage for the Prison Department in Arbuthnot Road; Altera- tions at the Government Civil Hospital to provide office accom- modation and an Isolation Ward; Blanket Store at the Central Police Station; Female Prison at Lai Chi Kok; Postal Kiosk at Kowloon City; Market at Praya East Reclamation; Latrine at Possession Point; and Motor Cycle Garages at Sheung Shui. In addition the following works were under construction during the year:-Crematorium at Kai Lung Wan Cemetery; Extension of the offices of the Public Works Department; Additions to Kowloon Hospital comprising a new Ward Block; Block of Quarters for Nurses and a House for a second European Medical Office; Venereal Diseases Clinic at Kowloon; New Cattle Lairage at Ma Tau Kok Cattle Depot; Wireless Broadcasting Station at Kowloon and a Medical Welfare Centre in the New Territories. In addition to general maintenance numerous minor alterations and improvements to Government Buildings were also executed during the year.

3. Communications.-The following works were completed: -6" cement concrete foundation with sand-carpeting at Des Voeux Road Central from Centre Street to Western street; 6′′ cement concrete foundation for granite setts at Connaught Road, west of Centre Street; Surfacing of Peak Road with non-skid cement surfacing; 4" tar macadam on Island Road eastward of Stanley Gap; Chatham Road extension; Widening Sai Kung Road north of Aerodrome; portions of Nathan Road, Prince Edward Road and Lai Chi Kok Road were reconditioned and strengthened with 7" re-inforced cement concrete surfacing; bottoming and surfacing laid on Chatham Road from junction with Gascoigne Road to Cooke Street; filling in area north of Nan Chang Street; surfacing Lin Ma Hang-Sha Tau Kok Road; improving and strengthening main roads chiefly between Castle Peak and Ping Shan; diversion of Taipo Road near 5 milestone; surfacing and tarpainting road to "Texaco" installation at Tsun Wan; reconditioning Sha Tau Kok Road between Fanling and Kwanti Race Course. The following works under construction: -1st Section of New 75' Road al between Causeway Bay and Ming Yuen; Refuse Dumps at Cheung Sha Wan and Sung Wong Toi; Children's Playground, Cox's Road; the Strengthening and improvement of road surfaces in the New Territories was continued, an additional 4"

were

30

new

of macadam being laid and tarpainted between the 11 and 12 milestone-Castle Feak Road, and at Mei Po. Approximately 11 miles of tarpainting was carried out in addition to work, to preserve previously strengthened portions. Approxi- mately 311 miles of road surfaces in the Colony were satis- factorily maintained. Work on the Wong Ma Kow Road was suspended owing to resiting the New Gaol.

4. Drainage.-New sewers and storm water drains. were constructed in Hong Kong to a length of 3,034 feet. Improve- ments were effected to the main sewer in Aberdeen Valley. Short lengths of channelling were done in various districts. New sewers and storm water drains were also constructed in Kowloon to a length of 10,471 feet, and open nullahs were decked-over to a length of 864 feet and in New Kowloon, the length of new sewers and storm water drains which were constructed was 20,150 feet. Nullah walling was built to a length of 746 feet, and parapet walling to a length of 874 feet. Various minor works were carried out in the New Territories. In connection with the anti-malarial campaign work was begun at Mount Parker, Stanley, Sookunpoo and Lyeemun, and streams were trained to lengths of 4,250 feet as channels, 1,577 feet as culverts, and 200 feet as walled nullah.

5. Water Works.-In Hong Kong the following lengths of new mains were laid to improve the distribution system:-1,706 feet of 12". 900 feet of 8′′, 972 feet of 7", 2,070 feet of 6", and 2,181 feet of smaller sizes. 4,207 feet of subsidiary mains of 11"-3′′ diameter were laid in back lanes. During the water shortage 17,700 feet of temporary wrought iron piping were laid and 335 temporary street fountains were fixed in congested areas in the city. The first section of the Aberdeen West Catchwater was completed and the second section survey commenced. The partial démolition and reconstruction of the Aberdeen Lower Dam was completed and

was completed and a considerable quantity of silt removed from the Reservoir basin. The reconstruction of the Main Outfall Nullah and existing Road Bridge at the Paper Mills, Aberdeen, was commenced. The Access Road to the Aberdeen Lower Dam was completed except for surfacing. In Kowloon and New Kowloon the following lengths of new mains were laid to improve dis- tribution:-1,020 feet of 18", 1,895 feet of 15", 1,120 feet of 12", 145 feet of 10′′, 1,200 feet of 8′′, 6,020 feet of 6′′, and 2,305 feet of smaller sizes. 17,439 feet of subsidiary mains of small diameter were laid in back lanes. 10,521 feet of temporary wrought iron piping were laid and 155 temporary street fountains were fixed during the water shortage. 4,750 feet of 6′′ main were laid from Sam Tack Road to the new Hangar at the Aerodrome. The construction of a new concrete In the service reservoir on Yaumati Hill was commenced. New Territories 4,700 feet of 4" piping were laid at Fanling as part of the scheme to improve this supply. A new concrete service reservoir of 110,000 gallons capacity was constructed at Taipo.

31

6. Universal meterage was adopted and 5,187 meters were fixed in the Colony during the year.

Of this total 2,286 were installed in the Rider Main Areas leaving about 3,268 to be fixed in these areas in 1933.

7. Further borings were taken at the site of the Gorge Dam and the results forwarded to Messrs. Sir Alexander Binnie, Son

Son and Deacon, the Consulting Engineers who commenced preparatory work in connection with the construc- tion of this Dam. The Access Road to the site of the Dam was commenced. The 2nd Section of Rapid Gravity Filters

at Shek Lai Pui was completed and brought into use.

8. The Hong Kong Public Gardens Service Reservoir together with 1,460 feet of 24" supply main and 1,268 feet of 18" distribution main were nearly completed.

9. Reclamations.-At Tsat Tze Mui a further eight acres was reclaimed making a total of approximately ten The reclamation at Cheung Sha Wan was continued bringing the total area now formed to about fourteen acres.

10. Piers. Construction was completed on the ferry pier situated in front of the Fire Station Building between Queen Victoria Street and Jubilee Street. The ferry pier at Jordan Road was also completed at the end of the year.

11. Electrical Works.-The following works were completed during the year:-An underground telephone cable was laid to replace the aerial route between Victoria Gap and Gough Hill Police Station; a 50 line Telephone Switchboard at Taipo Police Station; thirty-five buildings were rewired; an electric power cable was laid at Wanchai Garage; electric light and power installations were fitted to D.O./North's Quarters, Sha Tin Police Station, Taipo Police Station, Tsun Wan Police Station, Sheung Shui Police Station, Taipo Land Bailiffs' Quarters and Au Tau Police Station; the broadcast transmitter was trans- ferred from Cape D'Aguilar to Hung Hom. In addition to minor works the usual maintenance of telephones and Wireless Stations etc. was carried out.

12. Buildings Ordinance Office.-The boom in the building industry which was manifest during the year 1931 was main- tained throughout the year under review although a slight falling off in the total number of plans submitted for new works occurred. A satisfactory feature in the development has been the number of factories and industrial buildings completed and in course of erection. Impetus in religious works, social welfare and educational interests is reflected in the construction of many fine buildings amongst which should be noted: Church and Schoolrooms at High Street and Western Street; Chapel and School at Shaukiwan; School and Quarters for Salesian Society on Island Road; Chinese Library at

32

University: Po Leung Kuk (Walfare Home for Women) Leighton Hill Road; La Salle College in Boundary Street; Churches in Prince Edward Road and Austin Road; Chapel in Sai Kung Road and a Nunnery at Ngau Chi Wan. Theatres completed during the year numbered three and three others are at present under construction. Buildings of an improved Chinese tenement type comprise the bulk of the work under- taken but it is satisfactory to note that there is an increasing proportion of good class European type residences, mostly of a detached or semi detached character. The districts wherein the latter form of development is most in evidence continue to be the areas adjacent to Prince Edward Road in Kowloon and Wong Nei Chong Valley in Hong Kong. European type residence to the number of 309 were completed during the year. The number of Chinese houses was 1,121.

13. On the Praya East Reclamation 254 Chinese houses with modern sanitation to all floors were completed. More important buildings at present under constructions on this area comprise the Seamen's Institute, the Royal Naval Canteen and a large Chinese hotel.

14. The introduction of water flush sanitary appliances is now common practice in all classes of buildings where facilities for obtaining independent water supplies exist. The number of water flush appliances fitted during the year was 5,572.

15. Nineteen fires occurred causing structural damage to properties which necessitated action by the Public Works department. The most serious occurred at Aplichau Island where fourteen houses were gutted, fortunately without loss of life. A fire involving the destruction of two houses with the consequent loss of eight lives and injury to seven persons occurred at Pei Ho Street, Kowloon. The houses affected were three-storeyed buildings with wooden floors and a combined wooden staircase to both houses.

in

ft.

16. A concrete wharf 800 ft. in length and 48,000 sq. area opposite K.M.L. 11 and a concrete pier at Great George Street, 53 ft. long and 2,750 sq. ft. in area were completed during the year.

17. Reclamations in progress during the year were:-I.L. 2918, Shaukiwan Road, covering an area of 102,700 sq. ft. and 138,664 sq. ft. at K.M.L. 52, To Kwa Wan.

Chapter XIII.

JUSTICE AND POLICE.

I. THE COURTS OF HONG KONG.

The Supreme Court of Hong Kong consists of a Chief Justice and one or more other judges.. At present there is one other judge.

32

University: Po Leung Kuk (Walfare Home for Women) Leighton Hill Road; La Salle College in Boundary Street; Churches in Prince Edward Road and Austin Road; Chapel in Sai Kung Road and a Nunnery at Ngau Chi Wan. Theatres completed during the year numbered three and three others are at present under construction. Buildings of an improved Chinese tenement type comprise the bulk of the work under- taken but it is satisfactory to note that there is an increasing proportion of good class European type residences, mostly of a detached or semi detached character. The districts wherein the latter form of development is most in evidence continue to be the areas adjacent to Prince Edward Road in Kowloon and Wong Nei Chong Valley in Hong Kong. European type residence to the number of 309 were completed during the year. The number of Chinese houses was 1,121.

13. On the Praya East Reclamation 254 Chinese houses with modern sanitation to all floors were completed. More important buildings at present under constructions on this area comprise the Seamen's Institute, the Royal Naval Canteen and a large Chinese hotel.

14. The introduction of water flush sanitary appliances is now common practice in all classes of buildings where facilities for obtaining independent water supplies exist. The number of water flush appliances fitted during the year was 5,572.

15. Nineteen fires occurred causing structural damage to properties which necessitated action by the Public Works department. The most serious occurred at Aplichau Island where fourteen houses were gutted, fortunately without loss of life. A fire involving the destruction of two houses with the consequent loss of eight lives and injury to seven persons occurred at Pei Ho Street, Kowloon. The houses affected were three-storeyed buildings with wooden floors and a combined wooden staircase to both houses.

in

ft.

16. A concrete wharf 800 ft. in length and 48,000 sq. area opposite K.M.L. 11 and a concrete pier at Great George Street, 53 ft. long and 2,750 sq. ft. in area were completed during the year.

17. Reclamations in progress during the year were:-I.L. 2918, Shaukiwan Road, covering an area of 102,700 sq. ft. and 138,664 sq. ft. at K.M.L. 52, To Kwa Wan.

Chapter XIII.

JUSTICE AND POLICE.

I. THE COURTS OF HONG KONG.

The Supreme Court of Hong Kong consists of a Chief Justice and one or more other judges.. At present there is one other judge.

33

2. The jurisdiction of the Court is regulated by a number of Ordinances but generally it may be said that the Court exercises a Summary Jurisdiction in all actions where the claim does not exceed $1,000 and an Original Jurisdiction in all actions where the claim exceeds that amount.

3. In addition to the above the Court exercises Admiralty, Probate, Bankruptcy, Lunacy, Criminal and Appellate Juris- diction.

4. The following is a brief summary of litigation and matters dealt with during the year 1932:

2696 actions were instituted in the Summary Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgment was given totalled $497,567.28.

399 actions were instituted in the Original Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgment was given totalled $1,307,871.47. 25 actions were instituted in the Admiralty Jurisdiction. 443 grants were made in the Probate Jurisdiction.

118 persons were indicted in the Criminal Jurisdiction of whóm 83 were convicted.

7 appeals were lodged in the Appellate Jurisdiction 5 of which were heard during the year.

5. The lower civil courts are the land courts in the Northern and Southern districts of the New Territories, with jurisdiction over all land cases in those districts, and the small debts courts of the same two districts. In these courts the District Officers sit to hear land and small debts cases.

6. The lower criminal courts are the magistrates' courts, two for Hong Kong island and a small area on the mainland cpposite Shaukiwan, one for Kowloon, including the whole_areu south of the Kowloon hills, and one each for the two districts of the New Territories, in which the District Officers are the magistrates.

7. The following figures show the amount of work done by the lower courts in 1932:-

Civil:-

District Officer North,

Land Court

50 cases.

Small Debts Court.

128 cases.

District Officer South,

Land Court

200 cases.

Small Debts Court.

14 cases,

35

prison at Lai Chi Kok near Kowloon, with accommodation for 480 prisoners. In this establishment all the prisoners sleep in association wards and only selected prisoners are sent there as the prison was not originally built as such. It was converted from a Quarantine Station in 1920, for temporary use pending the building of a new prison. A new female prison at Lai Chi Kok was opened on 19th April. A new general prison has been approved and site preparations will be commenced in 1933.

13. The total number of persons committed to prison in the year 1932 was 7,793 as compared with 6,767 in 1931. The daily average number of prisoners in the prisons in 1932 was 1,114. The highest previous average was 1,189 in 1927. Over 90% of prisoners admitted are persons born outside the Colony.

14. The health of the prisoners generally was well maintained in the prisons.

15. The discipline in all three prisons was good

16. Prisoners are employed at printing, bookbinding, tin- smithing, matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, gardening, laundry work, cleaning and minor repairs to buildings. The bulk of the Government printing and bookbinding is done in Victoria Gaol.

ers.

17. A small separate ward is reserved in Victoria Gaol for Juveniles who are kept as far as possible apart from other prison- The daily average number of Juveniles in 1932 was 3.7. A school-master attends daily to instruct them. In 1929 the daily average was high and a separate hall was set aside at Lai Chi Kok for Juveniles, but the number is now so small that it has been found more expedient to deal with them in Victoria Gaol.

18. Police Magistrates may, under the provisions of the Magistrates Ordinance No. 41 of 1932, give time for the payment of fines.

19. Lady visitors attend the Female Prison twice weekly to instruct the prisoners in hand-work and to impart elementary education.

20. Visiting Justices inspect and report on the prisons every fortnight.

Chapter XIV.

LEGISLATION.

Forty-three Ordinances were passed during the year 1932. These and also the Regulations, Rules, By-laws and other subsidiary legislative enactments are published in a separate

36

volume by the Government Printers. The forty-three Ordin- ances comprised two appropriation, one replacement, two incorporation, eleven consolidation, twenty one amendment, and six Ordinances which were new to the Colony.

2. The Appropriation Ordinance (No. 29) applied a sum not exceeding $27,585,142 to the public service for the year 1933, and Ordinance No. 25 appropriated a supplementary sum of $1,818,307.78 to defray the charges of the year 1931.

3. The replacement Ordinance was the Industrial and Reformatory Schools Ordinance (No. 6) which is closely modelled on the English law and the Straits Settlements Ordinance No. 47, with only such modification as were considered necessary to suit local conditions.

4. Ordinance No. 16 incorporated the directors for the time being of the Chinese Young Men's Christian Association of Hong Kong, and Ordinance No. 17 incorporated the members for the time being of the Council of St. Stephen's College, Hong Kong. These Ordinances followed the usual lines adopted in such cases.

5. The following Ordinances, viz. Estate Duty (No. 3), Opium (No. 7), Pensions (No. 21), Factories and Workshops (No. 27), Dangerous Drugs (No. 31), Police Force (No. 37), Prisons (No. 38), Companies (No. 39), Summary Offences (No. 40), Magistrates (No. 41), and Registration of United Kingdom Patents (No. 42) consolidated and in some cases amended the existing law on these subjects. Of these, the Pensions Ordinance (No. 21) is based on the recent pension enactments of similar Colonies, and replaces the former procedure under which pensions, retired allowances and gratuities in respect of the public service were granted by order and in accordance with the directions of the Secretary of State for the Colonies. The Companies Ordinance (No. 39) enacts the provisions of the Companies Act, 1929, (19 & 20 Geo. V. c. 23) as far as they are applicable to local circumstances, and incorporates certain local provisions formerly in force. In the Police Force Ordinance (No. 37), the Summary Offences Ordinance (No. 41), and the Magistrates Ordinance (No. 40), certain provisions were re-arranged and all three Ordinances. were enacted to come into force together on 1st January, 1933.

6. The Ordinances new to the Colony were the Juvenile Offenders Ordinance (No. 1), based on a Home model, which with the Industrial and Reformatory Schools Ordinance (No. 6, paragraph 3 supra.) incorporated the recommendations of ટો committee appointed to report on the measures required for the institution of Juvenile Courts in the Colony; the Employment of Young Persons at Sea Ordinance (No. 13), which applied to the Colony the convention adopted by the International Labour Convention of the League of Nations on 9th July, 1920 on this

37.

are

subject; the City Hall Resumption Ordinance (No. 22), the Minimum Wage Ordinance (No. 28), which provides for fixing minimum wages in occupations where the wages paid unreasonably low, and so carries out the obligations arising from Article 421 of the Treaty of Versailles in respect of the International Labour Convention; the Empire Preference Ordinance (No. 32), which supports as far as local circumstances permit the conclusions of the Ottawa Conference; and the Divorce Ordinance (No. 35), modelled on the Straits Settlements Ordinance No. 123, with variations, notably the definition of a Christian marriage or its equivalent, derived from Nachimson's case (1930 P. 217) Brinkley's case (15 P.D. 76) Hyde's case (1 P. & M. 130) and Bethell's case (38 Ch. D. 220), which was considered the appropriate basis of jurisdiction of this kind in a largely non-Christian Colony, and the inclusion of a provision enabling a wife to found her petition on adultery alone or on certain grave offences

7. The twenty-one amending Ordinances covered a wide. range of subjects such as Po Leung Kuk Incorporation (No. 4), Chinese Temples (No. 5), Medical Registration (No. 8), Vaccination (No. 9), Employers and Servants (No. 10), Military Stores (Exportation) (No. 11), Births and Deaths Registration (No. 12), Importation and Exportation (No. 14), United Kingdom Designs (Protection) (No. 15), Vagrancy (No. 19), Liquors (No. 20), Merchant Shipping (No. 23), Crown Solicitors (No 24), Foreshore and Sea Bed (No. 26), Waterworks (No. 30), Supreme Court (Admiralty Procedure) (No. 33), Marriage (No. 34) and Frotection of Women and Girls (No. 43).

8. In the case of Ordinances No. 1 (Juvenile Offenders), No. 6 (Industrial and Reformatory Schools), No. 27 (Factories and Workshops), No. 35 (Divorce), No. 31 (Dangerous Drugs) and No. 33 (Supreme Court Admiralty Procedure) the date of commencement will be determined by Proclamation after notice of non-disallowance has been received.

wide

9. Similarly, the subsidiary legislation covered a range of subjects, including Merchant Shipping, Tobacco. Liquors, Air Navigation, Importation and Exportation, Vehicles and Traffic, Gunpowder and Fireworks, Dogs, Crown Fees, Post Office, Vaccination, Licensing, Eating-houses, Markets, Crema- tion, Aerated-water Manufactories, Laundries, Bakehouses, Food-preserving Establishments, Dairies, Dangerous Drugs, Passports, Nurses Registration, Wireless Telegraphy, Emergency Regulations, Prisons, Advertisements, Prevention of Disease, Dangerous Goods, Public Places, Ferries, Places of Public Entertainment, New Territories, Waterworks and Merchandise Marks.

10. Legislative provision for compensation for accidents, sick pay and old age pensions such as obtains in the United Kingdom has not been adopted in the Colony where the labour

38

population is mainly alien and fluctuates extensively, coming trom or returning to China according to the demand for its

services.

Chapter XV.

PUBLIC FINANCE & TAXATION.

The following tables show the Revenue and Expenditure for the five years 1928 to 1932 inclusive.

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Expenditure. Surplus. Deficit

$24,968,399 $21,230,242 $3,738,157

23,554,475 21,983,257

1,571,218

27,818,473

28,119,646

$301,173

33,146,724

31,160,774 1,985,950

33,549,716

32,050,283

1,499,433

2. The revenue for the year 1932 amounted to $33,549,716 being $441,794 less than estimated but $402,992 more than the revenue obtained in 1931.

3. Duties on imported liquor and tobacco were less than estimated as they are on a sterling basis and were reckoned on an exchange rate of $1-1/- whereas the average rate throughout the year was over 1/3. Assessed Taxes show a normal increase due to expansion but large decreases were shown by the Opium Monopoly of $685,774 and in Stamp Duties of $280,799. A con- siderable increase amounting to $298,439 was shown under Water Excess and Meter Rents due to general building develop- ment and to the institution of universal meterage. Land Sales were less than estimated to the extent of $379,341.

to

4. The expenditure for the year 1932 amounted $32,050,283 being $2,931,378 less than estimated but $889,509 more than the expenditure in 1931.

5. Ordinary expenditure amounted to $29,082,423, Public Works Extraordinary to $1,967,860 and a sum of $1,000,000 was paid to the Admiralty as part payment for the surrender of the Naval Arsenal and Kellett Island. Large savings resulted under Personal Emoluments, compared with the amounts inserted in the Estimates, on account of the higher exchange prevailing throughout the year. Changes in personnel and vacancies in office also reduced the amount but most of this under-expenditure amounting to $2,480,875 was due to the rise in the sterling value of the dollar. Under Other Charges savings were also effected amounting to $479,605. Expenditure on Public Works Extra- ordinary fell short of the original estimate by $205,685 but $378,820 more than estimated was expended on recurrent main- tenance and improvements.

38

population is mainly alien and fluctuates extensively, coming trom or returning to China according to the demand for its

services.

Chapter XV.

PUBLIC FINANCE & TAXATION.

The following tables show the Revenue and Expenditure for the five years 1928 to 1932 inclusive.

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Expenditure. Surplus. Deficit

$24,968,399 $21,230,242 $3,738,157

23,554,475 21,983,257

1,571,218

27,818,473

28,119,646

$301,173

33,146,724

31,160,774 1,985,950

33,549,716

32,050,283

1,499,433

2. The revenue for the year 1932 amounted to $33,549,716 being $441,794 less than estimated but $402,992 more than the revenue obtained in 1931.

3. Duties on imported liquor and tobacco were less than estimated as they are on a sterling basis and were reckoned on an exchange rate of $1-1/- whereas the average rate throughout the year was over 1/3. Assessed Taxes show a normal increase due to expansion but large decreases were shown by the Opium Monopoly of $685,774 and in Stamp Duties of $280,799. A con- siderable increase amounting to $298,439 was shown under Water Excess and Meter Rents due to general building develop- ment and to the institution of universal meterage. Land Sales were less than estimated to the extent of $379,341.

to

4. The expenditure for the year 1932 amounted $32,050,283 being $2,931,378 less than estimated but $889,509 more than the expenditure in 1931.

5. Ordinary expenditure amounted to $29,082,423, Public Works Extraordinary to $1,967,860 and a sum of $1,000,000 was paid to the Admiralty as part payment for the surrender of the Naval Arsenal and Kellett Island. Large savings resulted under Personal Emoluments, compared with the amounts inserted in the Estimates, on account of the higher exchange prevailing throughout the year. Changes in personnel and vacancies in office also reduced the amount but most of this under-expenditure amounting to $2,480,875 was due to the rise in the sterling value of the dollar. Under Other Charges savings were also effected amounting to $479,605. Expenditure on Public Works Extra- ordinary fell short of the original estimate by $205,685 but $378,820 more than estimated was expended on recurrent main- tenance and improvements.

39

6. Debt.-The total amount of sterling debt outstanding at the close of 1932 was £1,485,732.16.5, the sinking fund for its redemption amounting to £832,751. There is also the 1927 Public Works Loan of $4,927,000; the sinking fund for which amounted at the end of 1932 to £125,792.

7. The Assets and Liabilities of the Colony on the 31st December, 1932, are shown in the following statement:-

LIABILITIES.

CA

C.

ASSETS.



C.

DEPOSITS:

Contractors and

Office s Deposits

468,375.00

ADVANCES:-

On account of

Future Loan

Purchase of three

Suitors Fund

558,260.25

Locomotives for

4,920,364.85

Chinese Section

Miscellaneous De-

Kowloon

Canton

posits......

3,828,592.95

Railway...

387,468.26

Miscellaneous

85,205.52

Insurance Compan-

ies

Building Loans

1,030,781.45

1,539,050.00

Imprest Account.

6,776.47

Subsidiary Coin

1,225,592.08

Suspense Account

976,782.27 House Service

Account

5,740.22

Exchange Adjustment

285,083.27

Investments:-

Trade Loan Reserve... 1,081,487.12

Surplus Funds

1,682.784.92

Trade Loan

Out-

Praya East Reclama-

standing

752,751.50

tion

124,657.26

Coal Account

1,966.81

Unallocated Stores,

(P.W.D.).

469,073.88

Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)...

172,327.81

Cash Balance :-

Crown Agents...

10,916.39

Treasurer...

Total Liabilities... 8,862,288.12

4,340,066.04

* Joint

Colonial

Fund.....

3,486,117.64

Excess of Assets over

Fixed Deposits:-

Liabilities

12,847,062.24

Insurance

General ...$1,592,366.52

Companies 1,539,050.00

3,131,416.52

Total... .$ 21,709,350.36

Total..

$ 21,709,350.36

*Joint Colonial Fund £231,500.,Os.,Od.

1

40

8. Main Heads of Taxation. The largest item of revenue is derived from the assessment tax, the sum of $6,332,066 being collected in 1932. This represents 18.9% of the total revenue or 19.7%, of the revenue exclusive of land sales. The rates vary from 15% to 17% on the annual value of property and are for police, lighting and water services, etc. Port and Harbour Dues comprising Light Dues ond Buoy Dues brought in the sum of $811,860.

9. Duties on intoxicating liquors realized $2,387,257, tobacco $3,476,137, postage stamps and message fees $1,964,593. A considerable sum is also derived from the opium monopoly, land revenue, stamp duties including estate duties and other fees. Land Sales during the year realized $1,370,658. The receipts of the Kowloon Canton Railway which was completed in 1910 amounted to $1,295,789, a considerable increase being shown under Passenger Service.

10. Customs Tariff.-There is an import tariff on all liquor, tobacco and light oils imported into the Colony for sale or use therein. There is no Export tariff. The sale of opium is a Government Monopoly, and all importation of opium other than by the Government is prohibited. The importation of Dangerous Drugs is regulated in accordance with the terms of the Geneva Convention. Arms, ammunition, explosives and dangerous goods are subject to the normal Harbour and Police Regulations in regard to storage and movement. A special Foreign Registration fee of 20% of the value of a motor vehicle is payable in respect of any vehicle not produced within the British Empire.

11. The duties on imported liquor range from $0.60 per gallon on beer to $1.20 on Chinese liquor and to $10 on sparkling European wines and perfumed spirits. The duties are collected on a sterling basis, the conventional dollars in the tariff being converted at a rate which is varied from time to time according to the market rate of exchange between the local dollar and sterling. A 50% reduction in duty is allowed in respect of brandy grown or produced within the British Empire.

12. The duties on tobacco range from $0.70 per lb. on the lowest taxed unmanufactured tobacco to $2 per lb. on cigars. The duties are collected on a sterling basis in the same manner as the liquor duties.

13. A duty of 25 cents per gallon is payable on all light oils imported into the Colony.

14. Excise and Stamp Duties.-The same duty is imposed on liquors (mainly Chinese type) manufactured in the Colony as on imported liquors.

-41-

15. Stamp Duties are imposed on various instruments and where a consideration is involved are mainly ad valorem. The following are examples of the duties charged:-Affidavits, Statu- tory Declarations, etc., $3; Bills of Exchange (inward) and Che- sues, 10 cents; Bills of Lading, 15 cents when freight under $5, 40 cents when freight over $5; Bond to secure the payment or repayment of money, 20 cents for every $100 or part thereof; Conveyance on sale, $1 for every $100 or part; Mortgages, prin- cipal security, 20 cents for every $200 or part; Life Insurance Folicy, 25 cents for every $1,000 insured; Receipt, 10 cents for amounts over $20; Transfer of Shares, 20 cents for every $100 of market value.

16. No Hut Tax or Poll Tax is imposed in the Colony.

20th May, 1933.

W. T. SOUTHORN,

Colonial Secretary.

42

-

Appendix.

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS OF GENERAL INTEREST RELATING TO HONG KONG,

Title

Price

Agents for sale

$

Sessional Papers (Annual)

Blue Book (Annual)

Ordinances-Ball's Revised Edit- ion (In 6 Volumes) 1814-1923. Regulations of Hong Kong 1844-

1925

Ordinances and Regulations

(Annual)...

Administration Reports (Annual)

Estimates (Annual)

Government Gazettes (Weekly)

Meteorological Bulletin (Month-

ly)

Hong Kong Trade and Shipping

Returns

(Monthly)....

2.00 Colonial Secretariat and Go-

verment Printers.

3.00 Colonial Secretariat, Govern- ment Printers and Crown Agents for the Colonies, London.

90.00

Do.

30.00 Colonial Secretariat.

3.00 Colonial Secretariat, Govern- ment Printers and Crown Agents.

3.00 Colonial Secretariat and Go-

vernment Printers.

Do.

3.00

.50 Government Printers and

Crown Agents.

10.00 Government Printers.

per

annum

2.00 Government Printers

Crown Agents.

and

Do.

(Annual)

Hansards (Annual)

Historical & Statistical Abstract of the Colony of Hong Kong 1841-1930.

2.00 5.00

Do.

South China Morning Post,

Hong Kong,

4.00 Colonial Secretariat.

The Hong Kong Naturalist

(Quarterly).

2.00

Hong Kong University.

Hong Kong: A Guide Book......

1.00

Kelly & Walsh, Ltd.,

Hong Kong.

Hong Kong: Around and About,

by S H. Peplow & M. Barker.

5.00

Do.

A Hong Kong Sketch Book, by

S. A. Sweet....

2.50

Do.

History of Hong Kong by Eitel.

Out of Print.

Sections on Hong Kong will be found in the annual "China Year Book" published by the North China Daily News and Herald Ltd. Shanghai (London Agents Simpkin Marshall Ltd. price $20.00, and the annual "Directory and Chronicle of China, Japan etc." published by the Hong Kong Daily Press at Hong Kong Price $12.00 and obtainable at their London office at 53, Fleet St. for £2.

TAI SHAN

MA CHAU

113

52'

E

LONG.

OF GREENWIGH.

MAP OF HONG KONG AN

NAM TAU SHANG

SOWAN HA

SHUI WAN TAU

WAN TEMPLE

NSIN

NGON

(SUN ON)

HAU HOI WAN OR DEEP BAY

TAI SHUI HANG

CASTLE PEAK

LUNG KU TAN

1918

LUNG KU

0

SHA CHAL

CHU LU KOK

CASTLE

PEAK

MA WAN

PAK MONG

SHA LO WAN

TUNG WAN

SRAM WAL

MA WAN CHUNG

P.STUNG CHEUNG

LAN

TAU

LAK TAU PEAK

P.S

RO CHU TAN

NÁY CHUNG

SHUI HAU

3066

PUI O

SHA TAU

SAN TIN

TO CANTON→→→→

1 PO KAK

SHAM CHUN

TA KU LING

LO W

LO WU

CHAU

SHEUNG SHU OP.S.

SHE U HUI

FAN LING

MAI PO

GOLF CLUB

CHUK YUN

PING SHAN

UN LONG

P.S MAGNETIC OBSERVATORY

AU TAU

SAN HUI

P.S.

TẠI LÀM CHUNG

TSING CHAU

I PAKS

TAI KCK

CHEUNG SHA AN

HUNG SHUI

MAN KOK

CANTON

SH:

TAJ PO

HUL

LOON

- KAY TIN

WUN TU

TSING I

WAN 1

KAP SHUI MUN PASS

TAI MO SHAN

3141

LOK LO

TSUEN WAN

.S.

F

16

LAI CHI KOX

KOWL

SHAM SHUI PO

STONE CUTTERS I.

P.S.

P.S.

YAU MA TI



KAD I CHAU

0

P.S

GREEN 1.

PING CHAU

CHAU KUNG

NI KU CHAU

WEST LAMMA CHANNEL

MONG TUNG WAN

CHUNG HAU

CHEUNG CHAU

SUN

SALA CHAU

TALA CHAU



SCALE OF MILES

KÓW LOOK

PRO

VICTORIA

VICTORIA

PEAK

180S

P.S.

OBSER TSIM SHA TSU

HAR

HONG

ABERDEEN

DEEP WATER B.

EAST LAMMA CHANNEL

TA: WAN

SOK KU WAN

LAMMAI.,

1

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

22 9' N

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE I

Estimates,

Actual Revenue

Revenue for

Heads of Revenue.

1932.

to 31st December,

same period of preceding

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads of

year.

1932.

C.

$3

C.

Duties

7,890 000

6,597,852.02

6,206,720.52

Port and Harbour Dues

793,000

811,859.55

813,922.44

Licences and Internal Re- venue not otherwise specified - -

16,234,110 16,503,769.86 15,799,939.99

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific

purposes,

and Reim- bursements in Aid

Post Office



C.

391,131.50

712,829.87

2,122,100 2,296,227.87 2,151,527.47

144,700.40

2,340,000

1,964 593.10

2,035,938.60

Kowloon-Canton Railway

1,100,000

1,295,789.20 1,095,098.77

200,690.43

ᏎᎯ

C.

2,062.89

71,345.50

H. E. the Cadet Serv Senior Cl

countin Junior Cle Colonial Se and Leg Secretariat

Affairs Treasury - Audit Dep District Of

Do.,

Communic.

(a) Post (b) I Teleg Imports & Harbour D Do

Royal Obs Fire Briga Supreme C Attorney G Crown Soli Official Re Land Office Magistracy

Do.,

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses -

1,407,300

1,527,965.37 1,432,057.64

95,907.73

Police For

Interest

150,000

313,252.04 224,460.46

88,791.58

Prisons De

Miscellaneous Receipts -

205,000 867,748.88 231,957.90

635,790.98

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

32,241,510 32,179,057.89 29,982,623.79

2,269,842.49

73,408.39

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

1,750,000 1,370,658.40 3,164,099.94

1,793,441.54

Medical D Sanitary D Botanical

Departi Education Kowloon-C

Defence :-

(a) Volu Corf () Milit

tion

Miscellanec Charitable Charge on

Public I

Pensions Public W

ment - Public Wor

Do.,

TOTAL

Expenditur plus Bal

33.991,510 33,549,716.29 33,146,723.73 2,269,842.49

1,866,849.93

Te

Deduct

1,866,849.93

Appendix A.

L RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1932,

ENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1932.

Estimates,

2.

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1932.

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1932.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding year.

Increase.

Decrease.

$

C.

C.

€0

C.

C.

C.

1.50

$

C.

H. E. the Governor

209,720

165,697.86

Cadet Service

755,321

554,240.58

170,605.97 636,078.97

4,908.11

81,838.39

Senior Clerical and Ac-

counting Staff -

409,634

302,843.48

341,045.84

38,202.36

2,062.89

Junior Clerical Service

973,480

932,571.81

871,431.71

61,140.10

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

78,946

60,372.93

68,228.05

7,855.12

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

27,938

28,607.63

21,308.45

7,299.18

7.87

Treasury

115,580

92,138.35

71,280.57

20,857.78

Audit Department

97,954

59,883.07

81,080.71

21,197.64

District Office, North -

26,867

22,005.73

22,958.36

952.63

Do.,

South -

13,644

11,151.33

11,041.82

109.51

Communications:

2.40

(a) Post Office

448,592

457,655.03

406,215.36

51,439.67

(b) Do. Wireless

Telegraph Services-

Imports & Exports Office -

156,604

152,214.25

148,677.96

3,536.29

802,437

695,074.02 1,031,294.48

336,220.46

71,345.50

Harbour Department

1,298,865

1,020,734-07

962,648.12

58,085.95

Do.

Air

Service

52,807

11,545.84

26,691.12

15,145.28

Royal Observatory-

88,160

68,184.87

74,137.85

5,952.98

>.43

Fire Brigade

363.965

297,080.17

305,016.77

7,936.60

Supreme Court -

209,300

172,095.89

185,316.02

13,220.13

Attorney General

50,190

38,717.16

50,632.9%

11,915.76

Crown Solicitor's Office

70,668

65,003.76

55,252.64

9,751.12

Official Receiver -

24,641

18,806.12

20,711.14

-73

Land Office

48,604

37,135.93

42,163.90

1,905.02 5,027.97

Magistracy, Hong Kong

2,274

2,088.09

1,990.37

97.72

·58

1.98

Do., Kowloon

Prisons Department

Medical Department Sanitary Department - Botanical and Forestry

Department -

Education Department Kowloon-Canton Railway Defence:

2,117

1,733.12

1,892.66

Police Force-

3,075,359

2,520.708.37

2,768,161.31

159.54 247,452.94

942,910

765.777.56

778,119.73

12,342.17

-

1,628,764

1,285.571.04

1,336,923.89

51,352.85

-

1,033,504

846,286.83

851,751.65

5,464.82

129,070

117,200.45

116,683.84

516.61

2,046,096

1,745,983.64

1,707,557.94

38.425.70

959,025

873,466.90

879,211.25

5,744.35

(a) Volunteer Defence

Corps

132,949

110,261.35

97,083.26

13,178.09

(b) Military Contribu-

.49

73,408.39

tion

6,366,567

6,569,239.47

4,932,598.36

1,636,641.11

Miscellaneous Services

1,452,481

1,580,943.65

2,211,125.69

630,182.04

Charitable Services

175,762

169,926.51

174,585.90

4,659.39

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

1,973,307

1,666,704.81

1,793,441.54

Pensions

1,708,000

1,545,269.52

1,894,290.79 1,54 ›441.41

227,585.98

3,828.11

Public Works Depart-

ment Public Works, Recurrent-

2,335.114 1,521,800

2,116,882.14 1,900,619.99

2,306,678.48 1,581,926.75

189,795.34

318,693.24

Do., Extraordinary

31,808.116 2,173,545

33.981,661

29,082,423.32 1,967,860.20

31,050,283.52

28,785,842.01 2,223,600.18

2,374,931.99

1,927,018.87

407,071.79

31,160,774.00

2,223,600.18

2,334,090.66

Expenditure from Sur-

plus Balances

1,000,000

1,000,000.00

1,000,000.00

.49

1,866,849.93

TOTAL

34.981,661

32,050,283.52 31,160,774.00 3,223,600.18 2.334,090.66

-93

Deduct

2,334,090.66

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR

FOR THE

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR TH

Estimates,

Heads of Revenue.

1932.

Actual Revenue

to 31st December,

1932.

Revenue for

same period of preceding

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads of Expend

year.

$

c.

$

C.

$ C.

Duties

7,890 000

6,597,852.02

6,206,720.52

391,131.50

Port and Harbour Dues

793,000

811,859.55

$13,922.44

Licences and Internal Re- venue not otherwise specified -

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reim- bursements in Aid

Post Office

16,234,110 16,503,769.86

15,790,939.99

712,829.87

2,122,100

2,296,227.87

2,151,527.47

144,700.40

2,340,000

1,964 593.10

2,035,938.60

Kowloon-Canton Railway -

1,100,000

1,295,789.20 1,095,098.77

200,690.43

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses -

1,407,300

1,527,965.37 1,432,057.64

95,907-73

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts -

150,000

313,252.04 224,460.46

88,791.58

205,000 867,748.88 231,957.90 635,790.98



C.

2,062.89

71,345.50

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

32,241,510 32,179,057.89 29,982,623.79 2,259,842.49

73.408.39

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

1,750,000 1,370,658.40

3,164,099.94

1,793,441.54

H. E. the Governo Cadet Service Senior Clerical an

counting Staff Junior Clerical Se Colonial Secretary and Legislatur Secretariat for (

Affairs Treasury -

So

Audit Departmen District Office, No

Do., Communications :

(a) Post Office (b) Do. V Telegraph S Imports & Export: Harbour Departm

Do.

Servi

Royal Observator Fire Brigade Supreme Court - Attorney General Crown Solicitor's Official Receiver - Land Office Magistracy, Hong Do., Kowl

Police Force- Prisons Departme Medical Departm Sanitary Departm Botanical and I

Department - Education Depart Kowloon-Canton Defence :-

(a) Volunteer Corps

(b) Military C

tion

-

Miscellaneous Ser Charitable Servic Charge on Acco

Public Debt- Pensions - Public Works

ment Public Works, Re

Do., Extrac

Expenditure fro plus Balances

TOTAL



33,991,510 33,549,716.29 33,146,723-73

2,269,842.49 1,866,849.93

Deduct

Net

1,866,849.93

$ 402,992.56

ΤΟΤΑΙ.

RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1932.

UE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1932.

Estimates,

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1932.

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1932.

Expenditure for same period of preceding

year.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

C.



c.

C.

ᎾᎯ

C.

H. E. the Governor

209,720

165,697.86

170,605.97

4,908.II

50

Cadet Service

755,321

554,240.58

636,078.97

81,838.39

Senior Clerical and Ac-

counting Staff -

409,634

302,843.48

341,045.84

38,202.36

2,062.89

Junior Clerical Service

973,480

932,571.81

871,431.71

61,140.10

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

78,946

60,372.93

68,228.05

7,855.12

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

27,938

28,607.63

21,308.45

7,299.18

87

Treasury

115,580

92,138.35

71,280.57

20,857.78

Audit Department

97,054

59,883.07

81,080.71

21,197.64

District Office, North -

26,867

22,005.73

22,958.36

952.63

Do.,

South -

13,644

11,151.33

11,041.82

109.51

Communications :-

40

(a) Post Office

448,592

457,655.03

406,215.36

51,439.67

(b) Do. Wireless

Telegraph Services-

156,604

152,214.25

1+8,677.96

3,536.29

Imports & Exports Office -

802,437

695,074.02

1,031,294.48

336,220.46

71,345.50

Harbour Department -

1,298,865

1,020,734.07

962,648.12

58,085.95

Do.

Air

Service

52,807

11,545.84

26,691.12

15,145.28

Royal Observatory-

88,160

68,184.87

74,137.85

5,952.98

43

Fire Brigade

363,965

297,080.17

305,016.77

7,936.60

Supreme Court -

209,300

172,095.89

185,316.02

13,220.13

Attorney General

50,190

38,717.16

50,632.92

11,915.76

Crown Solicitor's Office

70,668

65,003.76

55,252.64

9,751.12

Official Receiver -

24,641

18,806.12

20,711.14

73

Land Office

48,604

37,135.93

42,163.90

1,905.02 5,027.97

Magistracy, Hong Kong

2,274

2,088.09

1.990.37

97.72

Do., Kowloon

2,117

1,733.12

1,892.66

Police Force-

3,075,359

2,520.708.37

2,768,161.31

159.54 247,452.94

·58

Prisons Department

942,910

765.777.56

778,119.73

12,342.17

Medical Department

1,628,764

1,285.571.04

1,336,923.89

51,352.85

.98

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry

Department -

Education Department

1,033,504

846,286.83

851,751.65

5,464.82

129,070

117,200.45

116,683.84

516.61

2,046,096

1,745,983.64

1,797,557-94

38.425.70

Kowloon-Canton Railway

959,025

873,466.90

879,211.25

5,744.35

Defence :-

(a) Volunteer Defence

Corps

132,949

110,261.35

97,083.26

13,178.09

(b) Military Contribu-

.49

73,408.39

tion

6,366,567

6,569,239.47

+1932,598.36

1,636,641.11

Miscellaneous Services

1,452,481

1,580,943.65

2,211,125.69

630,182.04

Charitable Services

175,762

169,926.51

174,585.90

4,659.39

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

1,973,307

1,666,704.81

1,894,290.79

227,585.98

1,793,441.54

Pensions -

1,708,000

1,545,269.52

1,541,441.41

3,828.11

Public Works Depart-

ment

2,335.114

2,116,882.14

2,306,678.48

189,795.34

Public Works, Recurrent-

1,521,800

1,900,619.99

1,581,926.75 318,693.24

31,808.116

29,082,423.32

28,785,842.01

2,223,600.18

1,927,018.87

Do., Extraordinary

2,173,545

33.981,661

1,967,860.20

2,374,931.99

407,071.79

31,050,283.52

31,160,774.00

2,223,600.18

2,334,090.66

19

Expenditure from Sur-

plus Balances

1,000,000

1,000,000.00

1,000,000.00

+49

1,866,849.93

TOTAL

34.981,661

1.93

Deduct

-

32,050,283.52 31,160,774.00

3,223,600.18 2.334,090.66

2,334,090.66

اة ال

56

Net

$889,509.52

Appendix A (1)

HONG KONG.

REPORT ON THE FINANCES FOR THE YEAR 1932.

The Revenue for the year amounted to $33,549,716 and the Expenditure was $32,050,283. Revenue therefore exceeded Expenditure by $1,499,433. The approved estimated revenue for the year was $33,991,510 while the revised figure was $33,152,674, a decrease of $838,836. The approved estimate of expenditure for the year was shown as $34,981,661 including the sum of $1,000,000 from surplus balances, and the revised estimate amounted to $32,687,500 or $637,217 above the actual expenditure.

2. The following statement shows the Revenue and Expenditure for each of the years of the last decade:-

Year.

Revenue.

Expendi

Surplus.

Deficit.

ture.

$

€€

$

$

1923...... 24,783,763 21,571,905 3,211,858

1924...... 24,209,640 26,726,423

2,516,788

1925...... 23,244,366 28,266,818

5,022,452

1926...... 21,131,582 23,524,716

1927...... 21,344,536 20,845,065

1928...... 24,968,399 21,230,242

2,393,134

499,471

3,738,157

1929...... 23,554,475 21,983,257

1,571,218

1930...... 27,818,473 28,119,646

301,173

1931...... 33,146,724 31,160,774

1,985,950

1932.... 33,549,716 32,050,283 I

1,499,433

REVENUE.

3. Included in the total revenue for the year of $33,549,716 were two abnormal credits, viz., $222,873 and $238.794. The first of these items is a re-imbursement from loan account in respect of the salaries of officers employed on

works.

:

funds

were

A (1) 2-

on

These salaries were in the first instance charged against expenditure to safeguard the pension rights of the officers concerned. From the date of the passing of the new Pension Ordinance, 24th June 1932, the salaries are being charged on which the officers against the respective loan works are employed. The second item represents the appreciation which has taken place in the market value of the sterling funds invested on account of surplus balances. These

written down

31st December 1931 by £10,005. 9s. 11d. or $144,986. The rise in trustee stocks during the year brought up the value of £15,799.6s.3d. or $238,794 and this amount had to be written on to revenue in order to show the stocks in the balance sheet at the market price ruling on 31st December 1932 To obtain a fair comparison of the normal revenue for 1932 with that of 1931 these two amounts should be deducted when the figures would be $33,088,049 for 1932 and $33,146,724 for 1931. The former figure compares with $33,152,674 which was the revised estimate of revenue for 1932. If allowance therefore is made for these credits the normal revenue for 1932 of $33,088,049 would compare with the expenditure for 1932 of $32,050,283.

4. The largest individual item of revenue is derived from the assessment tax, the sum of $6,332,066 being collected. This represents 18.9% of the total revenue or 19.7% of the revenue exclusive of land sales.

5. In the following table the actual revenue for the year 1932 is compared with the revenue of the previous year and with the estimate for 1932.

Heads of Revenue.

1

Actual 1931

Estimates 1932

Actual

1932

Duties..

Port & Harbour Dues

Licences and Internal Revenue not

otherwise specified

Fees of Court or Office. Payments for specific purposes, and Reimburse- ments in Aid....

Post Office.....

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts

Total (exclusive of Land Sales)... Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases)...

Total.....

C.

6,206,720.52 813.922.44

15,790,939.99

7,890.000 793,000

16,234,110:16,503.769.86

C.

C.

6.597.852.02

$11,859.55

2 151.527.47| 2.035.938.60

2.122,100 2.296,227.87 2.340,000

1,964,593.10

1,095,098.77 1,100,000

1,295,789.20

1,432.057.64

1,407,300

1.527.965 37

224.460.46 231,957.90

150,000

313,252.04

205,000

867.748.88

29.982.623.79)

32,241,510 32.179.057.89

3,164,099 94

1.750.000 1,370,658.40

$33,146,723.73 33,991,510 33,549,716.29

A (1) 3-

6. With the exception of "Duties" "Post Office" and "Land Sales" each Head of Revenue showed an increase over the Estimates for 1932. In regard to "Duties" this was to be expected as liquor and tobacco duties were reckoned on the basis of $1=1s. whereas the average rate throughout the year was over ls. 3d. The decrease in Post Office revenue as com. pared with the Estimate is due to the failure to materialise of an anticipated increase in radio telegraphy and to a heavy decline in parcel post particularly to Great Britain and China, the introduction of tariffs in the former country acting adversely. Less activity in land transactions caused a decline in the number of sales and the amount realised is $379,341 short of the estimate.

7. Mention should also be made of two items under Licences, &c., which show large decreases in spite of the fact that the total collected under this Head was $270,000 over the estimate. The Opium Monopoly was estimated to yield $3,000,000. In 1931 more than this was received, but sales have decreased continuously throughout the year 1932 and the revenue collected was $685,774 less than the estimate. The other item was Stamp Duties. The estimate for this was $2,800,000 but the amount realised was only $2,519,201 or $280,799 short of the estimate while no less than $3,010,443 was collected in 1931. The large decrease was due to stagnation in the stock market and also to higher sterling exchange as bills of exchange being assessed ad valorem required lower valued stamps. The years 1931 and 1932 are not properly comparable under this class of revenue as there is no doubt that 1931 was abnormal; stock exchange, land transactions, agreements, mortgages, &c., all being exceptionally numerous.

8. The principle increases over the amounts as estimated were as follows:-

Licences and Internal Revenue not Otherwise Specified :-

Estimate. Actual.

Increase.

$

$

$

Liquor Licences

400,000

514,707

114,707

Increased rates from 1st

January 1932

Vehicles Motor

160,000

198,978

38,978

Vehicles Other

41,500

57,846

16,346

Motor Drivers

28,000

42,311

14,311

Increased fces accounted

for the 1st two items and

more licensed drivers for the

third

A (1) 4-

Estimate.

$

Actual. Increase.

$

$

Assessed Taxes

Due to Building develop- ment

Bets and Sweep Tax

A new item and difficult

to estimate

Estate Duty

Three large estates

ac-

counted for almost $500,000

of the increase

.6,200,000 6,332,065

132,065

250,000 323,684 73,684

700,000 1,227,047 527,047

Water Excess and Meter Rents 1,020,000 1,318,439 298,459

General building develop-

ment and the institution of

universal meterage

Fees of Court or Office Payments for Specific Purposes

and Reimbursements in Aid:

Estimate.

Air Service Fees

Actual. Increase.

$

$

14,204

14,204

A new item owing to the

opening of Hong Kong as

an air port

Court Fees

75,000

95,988

20,988

Increase in filing fees

Crown Leases

15,000

44,520

29,520

Result of land sales

Gunpowder Storage

19,000

54,107

35,107

Large consignments stored

for longer periods

Public School

240,000

252,042

12,042

Increased fees in some

schools

Water Service

23,000

45,464

22,464

More metered services

Wei Hai Wei Prisoners Main-

tenance

A compounded payment for liability for total cost of maintenance and repatriation

15,000

15,000

A (1) 5

Kowloon Canton Railway.

Passenger Service

Increase in the number of passengers owing to

to the accelerated express train service. 1st and 2nd class fares were also increased in November.

Estimate.

Actual. Increase.

$

$

$

892,500

1,068,796

176,296

Rent of Government Property, Land and Houses.

Estimate.

$

Actual. Increase.

$

$

Lands Not Leased

220,000

279,207

59,207

Increase in the number

of permits issued

Markets

300,000

331,334

31,334

Two new markets opened during the year

Interest

Interest.

Estimate. Actual. Increase.

$ 150,000

$

$

313,252 163,252

Interest due in 1931 on the Joint Colonial Fund was temporarily witheld and paid in 1932. The actual expenditure for the year both ordinary and on loan account was short of the estimate. Hence larger sums than anticipated were available for short term

investments

A (1) 6



Miscellaneous Receipts.

Overpayments in previous years

$222,873 of this item represents re-imbursement from loan account in respect of salaries of officers em- ployed on loan works

Appreciation of Sterling

Securities

Difference in market value

Estimate.

Actual. Increase.

$

$

$

8,000

234,444

226,444

238,794

238,794

between 31/12/31

and

31/12/32 of investments on

account of surplus balances

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

100,000

291,902 191,902

Exchange transactions ac-

counted for $179,551.

9. A list of the alterations

and additions in General

Taxation, Postage Rates and of the increases and adjustments in Licence Fees and other Receipts during the year 1932 is shown in the following Schedule.

Heads.

Duties.

Old Fees.

New Fees.

Effective from.

Import Duty on

Liquor.

(Brandy).

Licences and Internal Revenue.

(A.)—Licences.

Air Services

Arms (Possess &

Carry)....

Auctioneers

(Temporary)

Chinese Under-

takers

on

$6.00 per gallon

all Brandy, Gin, Rum, Whisky and other Spirit- uous Liquors..............

$3.00 per gallon ou all brandy consigned from and grown or produced in the British Empire.

Graded.

20.10.32

1.2.32

$10.00.

1.1.32

$25.00 per week.

2.2.32

$20.00...

$25.00....

Heads.

Old Fees.

A (1) 7-

New Fees.

Effective from

Dangerous Goods

(Kerosene Oil N.T.)

$2.00.

Not exceeding

40 gallons $5.00

500

5.00

21

500 to 1,000

10.00



1,000 to 2,000

20.00

11

2.000 to 4,000

40.00

Exceeding 4,000 gallons

$100.00

17.4.32

(Kerosene Oil).... $100.00.

Not exceeding

500 gallons $10.00

500 to 1,000

15.00

97

1,000 to 2,000

20.10

17

2,000 to 4,000

40.00

""

Exceeding 4,000 gallons

$100.00

1.4.32

(Inflammable Li-

quids

(other than Ke-

rosene .....................

Hawkers

(Steamship)

(Native Craft)..

$100.00.

Not exceeding

500 gallons $10.00

500 to 1,000

15.00

1,000 to 2,000

20.00

""

2,000 to 4.000



40.00

Exceeding 4,000 gallons

$100.00

1.4.32

$24 00...

$4.00.

2 2.32 2.2.32

Liquor

(Chinese Liquor

Shop)

Graded.

Graded Higher...

1.1.32

Liquor:

(Chinese Res-

taurant).

(do. )......

Graded

Graded Higher................

$50.00 for premises in N.T. which possess a Chinese Liquor Shop Licence in respect of the same pre- mises

1. 1. 32

14.3.32.

Steam Launch:

(Motor Boat

Permits)......

Vehicles. Motor:

(Special Licen- sing Fees-- Foreign Ke- gistration)...

$5.00 p,m.

20% of the value of any motor vehicle not of Em- pire Production (Vid. No. 32 of 1932.)

1. 8. 32.

13.10.32.

Heads

Old Fees

(B)--Internal Revenue.

Stamp Duties:

(Practitioners'

fees)

-A (1) 8-

New Fees.

Effective from.

$25.00

$50.00

1. 1. 32.

Water Excess

Supply and

Meter Rents

(Fire Service)

Graded

Graded Higher

1. 1. 32

Fees of Court or

Office, &c.

(A)-Fees.

Air Services

(Registration & Inspection)...

(Fee for use of aerodrome for the departure of any air- craft granted by the Gov- ernor under the provisions of para. (2) of Article 27 of the Ordin- ance........

(Housing Fees).

Court (Bankrupt-

cy)....

Engagement and

Discharge of

Foreign Sca-

men.........

Official Certifica-

tes (Medical

Examination

of Air Pilots)

Graded

Graded

1. 2. 32

$40.00...

Graded

Graded under a revised scale of fees and per- centages.....

35 Cents...、

$1.00

29.4. 32.

1. 2. 32.

10.11.32.

1. 1. 32.

Graded

1. 2. 32.

Graded

Graded Higher.....

1. 1. 32.

Passport........

(B)-Receipts.

Bacteriological ...

Graded

Graded Higher

1. 1, 32.

Medical Treat-

ment (Fees,

Hospitals)

do.

do.

do.

(Radiological

Examinations)

do.

do.

do.

Heads.

Old Fees.

A (1) 9

www.

New Fees.

Effective from.

Police Services... $8.00 per day

Additional 2 hours or por- tion thereof $5.00. In- dian Police per period of 8 hours $5.00. Mini- mum charge $5.00, above 8 hours, half periods will be charged for, i.e. $2.50 for 4 hours. Chinese Police for period of 8 hours $3.00. Minimum $3.00, above 8 hours. half periods will be charged for, i.e. $1.50 for 4 hours

(D)- Sales.

Publications (Air

Log Books)

Graded

12.2.32.

1.2.32.

Post Office.

Postage

4 cents letters to Macao

5 cents

and China Proper ex- cluding Sinkiang, Mon- golia & Tibet.

2.6.32.

Postage

(Air

Mail)

Graded

1.2.32.

Kowloon Canton Railway.

Rent for laying cable on Rail- way Land from Hung Hom to Lowa and 2 depots stores at Shatin Fanling

and

Rent of Govern-

ment Property

Land & Houses.

Lands Not Leased

(Bathing Shed Permits)

$10.00 per mile of the length of the row of telegraph poles and 1 cent per sq. ft. of areas occupied

Varying

(Petrol Pumps).

Graded

Doubled

1.1.32.

Repulse Bay up to 300 sq. ft. $50.00 and 10 cents per sq. ft. in excess; Stanley and Castle Peak up to 300 sq. ft. $25.00 and 5 cents per sq. ft. in excess of 300 sq. ft. Elsewhere $10.00

Doubled....

1 4.32.

1.1.32.

A (1) 10

10. As a result of the Ottawa Conference it was decided that, although the Free Trade conditions of Hong Kong give few openings for reciprocity, motor vehicles provided an opportunity for adopting the principle of preference. A general import duty, although possible, might have interfered with the entrepôt trade which it is so desirable to encourage in the Colony and it was decided that effect should be given to the principle at the time of registration for use in the Colony. It was therefore enacted by Ordinance No. 32 of 1932 that motor vehicles which are not Empire products should be subject to a special licence fee on first registration of an amount equal to twenty per cent of the value, including cost, insurance and freight of such vehicle, on its arrival in the Colony after deduction of the value of the tyres and of any spare wheels or other spare parts. It will be seen therefore that foreign motor vehicles may be stored in the Colony and re-exported without tax but immediately they are sold for use in the Colony the special licence fee becomes payable.

Expenditure.

11. The expenditure for the year amounted to $32,050,283 against an estimate of $34.981,661 a decrease of $2,931,378. The total sum of $32,050,283 is made up as follows:-

Ordinary Expenditure

$29,082,423

Extraordinary Expenditure Public Works....... 1,967,860

Part payment to the Admiralty for surrender of the Naval Arsenal Yard and Kellett Island

1,000,000

Ordinary Expenditure for the year was $29,082,423 against $28,785,843 in the preceding year showing an increase of $296,580.

12. In the following table the actual expenditure for the year 1982 is compared with the expenditure of the previous year and with the estimates for 1932.

A (1) 11

Heads of Expenditure.

Actual 1931

Estimates, 1932

Actual 1932

$

C.

$

$

0.

His Excellency the Governor Cadet Service

170,605.97

209,720

165,697.86

636,078.97

755,321

554,240.58

Senior Clerical and Accounting

Staff

341,045.84

409,634

302,843.48

Junior Clerical Service

871,431.71

973,480

932,571.81

Colonial Secretary's Office and

Legislature

68,228.05

78,946

60,372.93

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

21,308,45

27.938

28,607.63

Treasury...

71,280.57

115.580

92,138.35

Audit Department

81,080.71

97,054

59.883.07

District Office, North

22,958.36

26,867

22,005.73

Do, South

11,041.82

13,644

11,151.33

(4)-Post Office

406,215.36

448,592

457,655,03

(B)- Do. Wireless Telegraph

Services

148,677.96

156.604

152,214.25

Imports and Exports Office

1,031,294.48

802,437

695.071.02

(A)- Harbour Department

962.648.12

1,298,865

1,020,734.07

(B)-

Do. Air Service...

26,691.12

52.807

11,515.81

Royal Observatory

74,137.85

8-160

68,184.87

Fire Brigade

305,0 6.77

363,965

297,080.17

Supreme Court

185.316.02

209:00

172 095.89

Attorney General's Office

50.632.92

50,190

38.717.16

Crown Solicitor's Office

55,252 64

70.66%

65.003.76

Prison Department

Official Receiver's Office Land Office

Magistracy, Hong Kong Do.. Kowloon ...

Police Force ...

Medical Department

Sanitary Department

Botanical & Forestry Department

Education Department

Kowloon-Canton Railway

...

(4)-Volunteer Defence Corps...

(B)-Military Contribution

20,711.14

24.641

18.806.12

42,163 90

48,601

37.135.93

1,990.37

2,27+

2,088.09

1. 92.66

2117

2,768,161.31

778.119.73

1,336,923.89 851,751.65

3,075,359

942,910

1,628,764

1,033,504

116,6×3,84

129,070

1.733.12

2,520.708.37

765,777.56

1.285,571.04

846,286.83 117.200.45

1,707.557 91

2,046.096

1,745 983 64

879,2 1.25

959.025

97,083.26

132.949

4,932.598.36

6,366,567

Miscellaneous Services

...

2,211,125.69

1,152.481

873,466.90 110.:61.35 6,569.239.47 1 580.943.65

Charitable Services

174,585.90

175,762

169,926.51

Charge on Account of Public

Debt.

1,894,290 79

1.973.307

1,666,704.81

Pensions...

...

1,541,441.41

1,708,000

1,545,269.52

Public Works Department..

2,306.678.48

2,335,1.4

2,116.882.14

Do.

Recurrent

1,581,926.75

1,521,800

1.900,619.99

28,785,842.01

31,808,116

29,082,423.32

Public Works Extraordinary

2,374 931,99

2,173,545

1.967.860.20

31,160,771.00

33,931,661

31,050,283.52

Expenditure from Surplus

Balances...

TOTAL...

1,000,000 1.000.000.00

31,160,774.00

34,981,661 32,050.283.52

A (1) 12

13. Only five heads of Expenditure were exceeded:-

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

due to the appointment of a Chinese writer to fill a post left vacant since 11th November 1930 for which no provision was made in 1932 Estimates.

Post Office

due to transit charges being paid in gold.

Defence (b) Military Contributions

The excess revenue over the Estimates for 1931 required a further payment in respect of that year when the final figures were known. The payment was made in May 1932.

Miscellaneous Services

The cost of Government servants passages required $87,734 more than estimated. Ex- penses in connection with the Anti-Japanese riots in the previous year cost $30,738.

Public Works Recurrent

It was decided during the year to supplement the amounts provided in the Estimates so as to allow the Director of Public Works further funds for maintenance and by a resolution of Council dated 30th June $389,500 over and above the sum voted in the appropriation Ordinance was placed at his disposal.

$669.63

$9,063.03

$202,872.47

$128,462.65

$378,819.99

There were of course increases and decreases over the estimates on the subheads of the various heads and comments on the more important of these are given below:-

DECREASES.

Imports and Exports Office.

Owing to higher exchange $57,939 was saved on the purchase of raw opium and $5,378 on packing expenses due to decreased sales.

Harbour Department and Air Services.

Coal cost $89,281 less than the estimates owing to lower contract rate and $28,171 was saved on repairs and improvements to launches and boats owing to lower prices due to keen competition. The subsidy of $30,000 to the Flying Club was also not paid.

Fire Brigade.

A (1) 13

The motor turntable estimated to cost $60,000 was not fully paid for, the sum of $27,490 lapsing at the end of the year.

Police Force.

Higher exchange reduced the expenditure on ammuni- tion by $5,335, on clothing and accoutrements by $33,348. Higher exchange and fewer passages than estimated resulted in a saving of $54,222 on Police Officers' transport.

Prisons Department.

A saving of $5,815 was made on clothing for the staff and of $9,004 on prisoners' clothing due to the higher exchange. The price of coal also accounted for a decrease of $6,491 in fuel. A new Linotype machine and a book sewing machine were obtained during the year on which a saving of $11,557 was made due to the higher dollar.

Medical Department.

Bedding and clothing also Medicines &c. showed decreases of $11,816 and $36,162 due to higher exchange.

Sanitary Department.

Exhumation costs were lower by $7,358 and $15,028 was saved on the vote for 2 motor vans.

Kowloon Canton Railway.

A

A saving of $22,186 in coal resulted from the use of superheated locomotives and a lower contract price. new boiler for a 2-6-4 type Locomotive cost only $21,010 against $32,400 estimated owing to the sterling cost being less than anticipated and to higher exchange.

Charitable Services.

The full provision of $27,392 voted for sundry Charitable Allowances was underspent by $8,386 owing to higher exchange.

Charge on Account of Public Debt.

Savings of $235,258 and $66,963 for interest and sinking fund respectively were made owing to higher exchange.

Pensions.

Out of $1,708,000 provided only $1,545,270 was spent, the saving of $162,730 was due to higher exchange.

Public Works Department.

Owing to less work being accomplished than anticipated $11,411 was saved on Harbour Surveying.

Post Office and Wireless.

-A (1) 14 -

INCREASES.

Carriage of Mails cost $159,925 or $44,925 more than the estimate due to transit charges being paid in gold.

Imports and Exports Office.

Six Government opium shops were opened in October and the initial expenses and cost of maintenance amounted to $11,860 for which no provision was made in the Estimates.

Crown Solicitor's Office.

An excess of $13,348 over the provision of $2,000 under legal expenses was due to costs in a Privy Council

case.

Medical Department.

Provisions for patients cost $27,850 more than the sum of $120,000 estimated owing to higher contract prices and more patients.

Miscellaneous Services.

Owing to congestion in the gaol printing shop more work had to be put out to the Government printers and the estimate for this was overspent by $16,233. The Government Gazette cost $5,500 more than estimated owing to the large number and size of Ordinances. The vote of $400,000 for Government Servants passages was underestimated and required supplementing by $87,734. The costs of the Anti-Japanese riots of 1931 were for the most part paid in 1932 amounting to $30,738. Compensa- tion to Mr. Noel Instone Brewer amounted to $14,065. Expenses in connection with police preventive measures due to the Sino-Japanese conflict cost $11,129.

Public Works Department.

The severe drought of 1932 required emergency services entailing the laying down of water pipes and erection of stand pipes in the populous parts of the City costing $56,922. A broadcast transmitter, $6,576, and Wireless telegraphy instruments, $23,838, were bought during the year, no provision having been made when the estimates were prepared owing to financial stringency at that time.

Public Works Recurrent.

The total provision under this head was supplemented to the extent of $389,500 by a resolution of Council dated 30th June and more maintenance work could therefore be carried out. The principal increases over the amounts

A (1) 15

originally provided occurred in Maintenance of Buildings $42,184, Maintenance of roads and bridges in and outside the City $21,206, Maintenance of Water-works City $35,296, Maintenance of Water-works Kowloon, $14,054, Dredging Foreshores, $5,539, Maintenance of roads and bridges in the New Territories $18,729. The provision of $121,800 for the purchase of water meters was exceeded by $245,254 owing to the adoption of universal meterage added to normal expansion.

Public Works Extraordinary.

More work was carried out on the rubble mound at North Point involving an increase of $24,987. The improvement of main roads in Kowloon for motor traffic cost $25,522 more than the provision. More road condition. ing at Shataukok was undertaken during the year involving $13,962 over the estimate. The following are some of the items which were not inserted in the original estimates but provided by supplementary votes during the year. Purchase of House No. 525 The Peak $48,000, Free connection in Rider main areas $15,475, Additions to Kowloon Hospital $19,852, Improving and Strengthening main roads New Territories $47,566, Improvements to Taipo Water-works and Fanling Water-works $9,954 and $6,793 respectively.

A (1) 16

14. Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31s December 1932.

LIABILITIES.

$

ASSETS.

C.

C.

DEPOSITS:

Contractors and

Office s Deposits

468,375.00

ADVANCES :-

On account of

Future Loan

Purchase of three

Suitors Fund

558,260.25

Miscellaneous De-

posits....

3,828,592.95

Railway..

Locomotives for Chinese Section

Kowloon Canton

4,920,364.85

387,468.26

Miscellaneous

85,205.52

Insurance Compan-

Building Loans

1,030,781.45

ies

1,539,050.00 Imprest Account.

6,776.47

Subsidiary Coin

1,225,592.08

Suspense Account

976,792.27 House Service

Account

5,740.22

Exchange Adjustment

285,083.27

Investments:-

Trade Loan Reserve... 1,081,487.12

Surplus Funds

1,682.784.92

Trade Loan Out-

Praya East Reclama-

tion

standing

752,751.50

124,657.26

Coal Account

1,966.81

Unallocated Stores,

(P.W.D.).....

469,073.88

Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)...

172,327.81

Cash Balance :

Total Liabilities... 8,862,288.12

Treasurer...

Crown Agents..

* Joint

10,916.39

4,340,066.04

Colonial

Fund.......

3,486,117.64

Excess of Assets over

Fixed Deposits:-

General ...$1,592,366.52

Liabilities

|12,847,062.24

Insurance

Companies 1,539,050.00

3,131,416.52

Total ...

.$ 21,709,350.36

Total.....$ 21,709,350.36

*Joint Colonial Fund £231,500.,Os.,Od.

15. The excess of Assets over Liabilities on the 1st January 1932 was $11,347,629. On the 31st December 1932 this sum had increased to $12,847,062 the difference of $1,499,433 is the excess of revenue over expenditure as recorded in paragraph 1 of this Report.

A (1) 17 --

16. The balance of moneys not required to meet current requirements was lent to the Joint Colonial Fund which amounted to £231,500 and is shown in the above statement as $3,486,118. This fund is replenished by remittances from the Treasury and is drawn on from time to time as required by the Crown Agents.

17. The cash balance of $4,340,066 with the Treasurer in- cluded $847,056 held by the Official Receiver on account of Com- panies Liquidation and Bankruptcy. This latter figure also forms part of the sum of $3,828,593 shewn under Miscellaneous Deposits as a liability.

18. The Surplus Fund $1,682,785 represents the market value of the stocks as at 31st December 1932 and was invested as follows:

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &C.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE. MARKET VALUE.

STERLING INVESTMENTS.

India, (1936-38)

Kenya. (1950).

Natal, (1929-49).

(1945-55)

Newcastle Corporation,

.51% Stock.

.41%

11

...3 %

.43%

New Zealand, (1932-34)...5 % Bonds.

Queensland, (1940-60) ...5 % Stock. Union of South Africa,

(1933-43)....

..5%

5,000. 0. 0

£ 17,046.15.10 £ 17,482. 8. 3 (107)£18,325. 6. 0

4.734.17. 1 (107)

5,350. 0. 0

7,600. 0. 0

5,646. 7. 0 (92)

6,992. 0. 0

10,000. 0. 0

9,600. 0. 0 (106)

10,600. 0. 0

20 000. 0. 0 29,009.16.10

20,000. 0. 0

19,769. 7. 0 |(102)

20.400. 0. 0

28,719.14.11 |(103)

29,880. 2. 9

20,000.18. 0 ((101)

20,200. 0.0

£108,656.12. 8 £105,953.12. 3

£111,747. 8. 9

ADVANCES.

19. On account of Future Loan.

This money has been expended as under:

Aberdeen Water Scheme

Aerodrome

.$2,274,470.32

370,229.21

New Gaol at Wong Ma Kok

46,579.78

Shing Mun Valley Scheme 1st Section

570,380.37

Shing Mun Valley Scheme 2nd Section:-

Preliminary Works

36,642.45

Filters

120,045.23

Gorge Dam

85,597.93

Vehicular Ferry

1,416,419.56

$4,920,364.85

A (1) 18

20. Purchase of three locomotives for the Chinese Section Kowloon-Canton Railway.

The Chinese Section commenced paying off this advance in July this year at the rate of $10,000 per month and the original amount outstanding has been reduced from $447,468.26 by $60,000 to $387,468.26.

21. under: *

During the year the Unallocated Stores varied as

Balance at 31st December

Public Works Department... Kowloon-Canton Railway

1931 $517,248 $469,074

1932

163,545

172,328

TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT.

$680,793 $641,402

22. During the course of the year, further reductions in the amount of loans outstanding were made by the redemption of eleven loans amounting to $451,828.26 and, by 31st December, only eight loans amounting to $752,751.50 were outstanding. Of the original issue of $15,633,582.97, the sum of $14,775,819.17 has now been accounted for.

Irrecoverable amounts written off during the year total $125,803.01, and of this figure, $28,000.00 represents Capital and the remainder overdue interest which had been accumulating over a long period. Efforts made for its recovery were abortive. Total capital now written off amounts to $105,012.30. The Reserve account showed a steady increase during the year and now exceeds the Capital account by $328,735.62,

The following table shows the financial position as at 31st December, 1932:-

---

Loans Issued since 16th November, 1925 on

approved securities

Less Redemptions effected during the years

$15,633,582.97

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

$2,604,930.00

4,845,879.76

3,403,560.02

1,356,536.86

1,280,842.65

832,241.62

451,828.26

14,775,819.17

Less amount written off as irrecoverable

Total of Loans outstanding on 31st Decem-

857,763.80 105,012.30

ber, 1932

$752,751.50

A (1) 19

Interest in arrears on 31st December, 1926

$117,369.42

31st December, 1927

"

206,818.64

93

"

31st December, 1928

321,121.10

"

19

31st December, 1929

416,237.93

""

31st December, 1930

398,641.94

99

31st December, 1931

307,152.89

31st December, 1932

209,087.15

""

Total number of Loans issued since 16th November, 1925 ... 802

Less number redeemed in 1926...

34

1927.

85

"1

19

21

1928..

87

"

19

""

1929.

29

"2

""

"}

1930..

35

""

1931.

13

""

"

""

1932...

11

19

22

294

Number of Loans outstanding on 31st December, 1932 ......

PUBLIC DEBT.

23. The inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amounted to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund stood at £832,751 as against £761,447 at the end of 1931.

The Public Works Loan (Ordinance No. 14 of 1927) amounted to $4,927,000. $3,000,000 of this loan was issued locally at par on November 1st 1927. The second issue was made on Novem- ber 1st 1928 at a premium of 3%- Bonds to the nominal value of $1,927,000 being allotted. The Sinking Fund amounted to £125,792 as against £98,036 at the end of 1931.

NOTE CIRCULATION.

24. The local circulation of notes and specie in Reserve of the three banks having authorized issues were as follows at 31st December:

Note in Circulation.

Specie in Reserve.

Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking

Corporation

Chartered Bank of India, Australia

and China

$130,222,853 $112,000,000

21,058,643

8,300,000

Mercantile Bank of India Limited

2,330,109

1,350,000

Total

$153,611,605 $121,650,000

A (1) 20

EXCHANGE.

25. The average monthly rates for sterling and Shanghai taels were as follows:

January

February

March

April

May June

July

August

September

October

November

December

1/4.991 74.725

1/5.176

74.887

1/4.036 73.895

1/2.756 74.191

1/2.834 74.935

1/3.058

75.833

1/3.173 76.50

1/3.826 75.467

1/3.995

75.441

1/3.959 75.75

1/4.183 75.783

1/3,370

76.161

The opening rate of the year on January 4th was 1/5/16d., the closing rate on December 31st was 1/3. The lowest rate quoted during the year was 1/2gd. on 14th April and the highest rate 1/51d. on the 22nd February.

GENERAL.

26. The estimates for the year were based on $1=1s/- and the budget was estimated to balance with a small surplus of $9,849. The sum of $1,000,000 being part payment to the Ad- miralty for the surrender of the Naval Arsenal Yard and Kellet Island was to be met from accumulated balances. The final figures for the year however including the above payment showed an excess of Revenue over Expenditure of $1,499,433. Exchange helped in this. The monthly rates for sterling are shewn in the preceding paragraph from which it will be seen that on no occasion did the dollar fall below 1/23d. while the average rate through- out the year was 1/33. Large savings were made under Personal Emoluments compared with the amount's inserted in the esti- mates. Provision was made for $13,809,382 for this service but only $11,328,506.81 was expended. Vacancies in office and changes in personnel accounted for some of this underexpenditure but by far the greater part can be ascribed to the rise in the sterling value of the dollar. Under "Other Charges" large sav- ings were also effected, the total provision being $4.800,817 whereas only $4,321,212.56 was expended. The amount spent under Public Works Extaordinary fell short of the original estimate by $205,685 notwithstanding the fact that an extra sum of $346,950 was placed at the disposal of the Director of Public Works by a resolution of Council dated 30th June 1932. On the other hand the excess under "Public Works Recurrent" over the original estimate was $378,820 an extra sum of $389,500 having by the same resolution been voted for general main- tenance items

A (1) 21-

27. The receipts from "Opium Sales" fell considerably short of the estimate, the deficit amounting to $685,774, This source of revenue continues to decline and although the estimate for 1933 has been reduced by $500,000 compared with 1932 it is quite probable that there will be a further shortfall in 1933 of $500,000.

28. The receipts from Estate duties were much higher than usual, many more items having been dealt with, and in addition three large estates brought in $496,142.

29. Remittances from abroad practically ceased at the end of 1931. Bankers' fixed deposit rates throughout the year were about 2% for renewals of year money. No interest was paid except in special cases on new short money.

There is still a very large amount of surplus funds in the Colony available for invest-

nient.

30. Trade was stagnant, but statistics of the Imports and Exports Trade do not reveal such an unsatisfactory position as might have been imagined taking into consideration the large contraction in international trade. Hong Kong merchants were overstocked with piece goods bought when the dollar was low and now find themselves unable to dispose of these resulting in a number of bankruptcies.

31. National Cash Registers were installed in the Treasury in May and hand written receipts discontinued except for deposits. It had for some years been found impossible to write out receipts for rates at the time of payment and in order not to keep the public waiting these receipts were drawn cut beforehand for each rate due and signed by a responsible officer subsequently when the money was tendered. Admittedly this was a bad system but it was the only practical way of dealing with the problem and even so, at rush periods, the public were kept waiting and many declined to wait and went away without their receipts. The number of receipts has, however, increased recently to such an extent that unless a larger staff and more accommodation were provided, even the old system would have broken down. Two registers were purchased and as many as 2,200 receipts have been issued in one day. This is exceptional but with the increase in the number of water meters due to universal meterage, to which must be added normal development, the time will come when the issue of such a large number of receipts will be of frequent occurrence and the purchase of a third machine essential.

The Treasury,

Hong Kong, 25th April, 1933.

EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

Appendix A (2).

REPORT TO THE DIRECTOR OF COLONIAL AUDIT ON THE AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF HONG KONG, 1932.

Subject to the comments contained in this report, the accounts for the year under review were satisfactorily kept and rendered, and except as hereinafter mentioned the system of accounting appears to provide sufficient checks against irregularity and fraud.



2. The Appropriation Account was received on the 21st June 1933, and the Trade Loan and Public Works Department Statements on the 27th July, 1933.

3. A reconciliation statement of the Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December 1932 is submitted:

The Revenue for the year amounted to

$33,549,716.29

and the Expenditure to

32.050,283.52

The excess of Revenue over Expenditure

being

$1,499,432.77

The Balance standing to the credit of the

Colony on 31.12.31 was

11,347,629.47

resulting in an excess of Assets over

Liabilities on 31.12.32 of

$12,847,062.24

4. The actuai Revenue

for

the vear

amounting

to

$33,549,716.29 fell short of the Estimates by $441,793.71, and the actual Expenditure of $32,050,288.52 was $2,981.377.48 less than the estimated figure of $34.981.661 00.

A detailed comparison of the estimated and actual Revenue and Expenditure will be found in the Statements in Enclosures

A. and B.

EXPENDITURE 1931.

5. With reference to paragraph 7 of the 1981 Annual Report. the Supplementary Schedule of Additional Provision for 1931 Expenditure was approved by the Secretary of State in his Desptach No. 358 of the 12th of October 1932.

A (2) 2

ESTIMATES 1932.

6. The Estimates for the year were passed by the Legislature in Ordinance No. 31 of 1931, and received the approval of the Secretary of State in his telegram No. 4 of 7th January 1932. and covering authority in Colonial Office Despatch No. 48 of 15th February 1932.

SUPPLEMENTARY EXPENDITURE,

7. The Supplementary Expenditure for the year, shown as provisionally voted in the Appropriation Account, was duly submitted to the Finance Committee and passed by the Legislature.

With the exception of Items 152/167, which were forwarded for approval in the Governor's Despatch No. 322 of 2nd June. 1933, all items of Supplementary Expenditure have received the approval of the Secretary of State.

SUPPLEMENTARY APPROPRIATION ORDINANCE.

8. The Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance No. 11 of 1933 was passed by the Legislature on 15th June, 1933 and submitted to the Secretary of State in the Governor's Despatch No. 357 of the 20th June, 1933.

STATEMENT OF ASSETS & LIABILITIES.

Liabilities.

DEPOSITS.

(Paras. 11-14. 1931 Report).

Contractors & Officers

Miscellaneous

$ 468,375.00

$3,828,592.95

9. The question of the reconciliation of these deposit figures. which as stated in paragraph 13 of the 1931 Report was first raised in January 1931, was finally settled in March of the current year.

In October 1932 approval was given for the writing off of a sum of $271.26 which was stated by the Treasurer to be the result of errors in Transfers in previous years.

In March of the current year a further discrepancy of $200 was brought to light due to a clerical error in the reconciliation statement compiled in October.

A. (2) 3

As a result of these adjustments the final figures appearing in the Assets and Liabilities Statement agree with the balance as shown in the Treasury books.

A reconciliation of the Deposits Bearing Interest was effected in February, 1933.

SUITORS FUND DEPOSITS, $558,260.25.

10. This figure was reconciled with the Registrar's accounts at the Supreme Court in total and in detail.

INSURANCE COMPANY DEPOSITS, $1,539,050.00.

11. In previous years these deposits have not been included in the accounts of the Colony; but in view of the fact that under Ordinance No. 32 of 1917 Insurance Companies, carrying on business in the Colony, have to deposit certain sums in cash in an approved bank in the name of the Registrar of Companies, it was pointed out by this Department that such monies were in the custody of the Government and should therefore be included in the Colony's accounts.

12. Of the above figure of $1,539,050.00, $212,000.00 was deposited by Life Insurance Companies, the Fixed Deposit Receipts being lodged with the Colonial Treasurer.

The balance of $1,327,050.00 was deposited by Fire and other insurance Companies, the Deposit Receipts in the name. of the Registrar being kept by the Banks concerned who issued 'Safe Custody' Receipts to the Registrar.

13. As the result of a conference with the Colonial Treasurer and Registrar of Companies, it was decided, that in order to maintain adequate control over these cash deposits, no release of any such deposit should be effected without the authority both of the Colonial Treasurer and the Registrar of Companies.

14. The liability of $1,539,050.00 was verified with the relevant documents.

SUSPENSE ACCOUNT, $976,782.27.

15. This sum has been verified with the Treasury Accounts, and it is understood that it is to be transferred to the Generali Revenue of the Colony during the current financial year.

ADJUSTMENT OF EXCHANGE, $285,083.27.

16. The Adjustment of Exchange Account, which was incorrect in 1931 as reported in paragraph 20 of the Auditor's Report on the accounts for that year, remained incorrect during the financial year under review owing to the non-observance of the procedure laid down by the Secretary of State.

A (2) 4

A statement showing the position of this account on the 31st December 1982 is submitted as Enclosure C.

During the year transfers were made from the Adjustment of Exchange Account to the Exchange Account.

At the close of the financial year a sum was transferred from the Exchange Account to the Adjustment of Exchange Account for the purpose of obtaining the correct balance in the latter account.

Transfers between these two accounts are irregular.

TRADE LOAN, $752,751.50.

17. The total amount of capital redeemed during the year amounted to $451,828.26. It will be observed in the Treasurer's report on the finances for the year 1932, paragraph 22, that it is stated that eleven loans were redeemed. Actually nine loans were redeemed, in addition to which two fire insurance premiums which had been paid for by the Government were recovered from mortgagors. This explains the discrepancy between the Treasury Trade Loan Statement (Enclosure D.)

(Enclosure D.) and the Treasurer's report.

Under general authority there was written off during the year $28,000.000. At the close of the year loans outstanding amounted to $752,751.50, and the Reserve to $1,081,487.12

The securities have been examined.

TRADE LOAN RESERVE, $1,081,487.12.

18. A Statement is enclosed (E.) showing the position of this account at the 81st December 1932. A comparison of this statement with the Treasury figures appearing in the Annual Statement of Revenue and Expenditure revealed a discrepancy of $938.01 which has since been adjusted. Audit Query No. 81/R is enclosed.

PRAYA EAST RECLAMATION, $124,657.26.

19. This liability represents the estimated cost of the uncompleted work and has been verified in conjunction with the Treasury account.

Assets.

ADVANCES.

ON ACCOUNT OF FUTURE Loax, $4,920,864.85.

20. A statement is enclosed showing the apportionment of this expenditure between the various loan works.

A (2) 5

It will be observed from the statement that as late as the 15th June, 1933, a Resolution was passed in the Legislative Council authorizing excess expenditure of $37,639.55 in respect of the financial year 1932.

There remains a further sum of $58,487.20 which has not yet been authorized by the Legislature.

A statement of this account is submitted as Enclosure F.

CHINESE LOCOMOTIVES, $447,468.26.

(Para. 32. 1931 Report).

21. The figure of $447,468.26, representing the cost of three locomotives purchased for the Canton-Kowloon Railway which appeared under this Head in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities for 1931, was reduced during the year under review to $387,468.26, the Chinese Section having repaid $60,000.00.

ADVANCES AND REPAYMENT OF ADVANCES.

22. It will be seen from the Summary of Advances and Repayment of Advances that a credit balance of $446.40 against Purchase of Motor Vehicle Plates was brought forward from 1931. This sum represented profit on the sale of the plates and was transferred to revenue in February 1932.

BUILDING LOANS AND IMPREST ACCOUNTS.

23. Advances on account of Building Loans and Imprest Accounts were of a routine nature and require no comment.

SUBSIDIARY COIN, $1,225,592.08.

24. This figure has been verified with the Treasurer's accounts.

The question of accounting in connection with Subsidiary Coin in transit from the United Kingdom is referred to in a subsequent paragraph.

HOUSE SERVICE ACCOUNT, $5,740.22.

25. This sum of $5,740.22 represents accounts not settled during the financial year, and is reconciled as follows:

$4,021.21 on account of unpaid bills for non-Government work, and the balance of $1,719.01 represents the value of stores and labour used at the end of the financial year for which bills were not sent out until 1933.

A (2) 6

INVESTMENTS.

SURPLUS FUNDS, $1,682,784.92.

26. The Investments were revalued at the end of the financial year in accordance with the Secretary of State's instructions contained in his Despatch of 8th October 1930.

UNALLOCATED STORES.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY, $172,327.81.

(Para. 34. 1931 Report).

27. This amount exceeded by $22,327.81 the authorized maximum of $150,000.00.

The Secretary of State's covering approval for the excess has been sought in the Governor's Despatch No. 284 of 16th May 1933.

UNALLOCATED STORES.

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT, $469,073.88.

(Para. 35. 1931 Report).

28. The value of the Standard Stock authorized by the Secretary of State in his Despatch No. 60 of 25th February 1932 was $550,000.00 as representing six months supply of stores.

The value of the stock in hand at the end of the year under review was less than this amount by $80,926.12.

The usual statements reconciling the Public Works Depart ment figures with the Treasurer's accounts are forwarded.

COAL ACCOUNT ASSET, $1,966.84.

(Para. 30. 1931 Report).

29. This figure has been reconciled with the Harbour Master's books, and is arrived at as follows:

Actual amount of Coal in stock at the

Government Depot, Yaumati on 31.12.32.

348.364 Tons @ purchase price

Less amount due to the Contractor

$5,020.01

3,053.17

$1,966.84

A (2) 7

CASH BALANCES, $4,340,066.04.

(Para. 36. 1931 Report).

30. Of this sum, $84,520.87 was Revenue collected on the last day of business in 1932 by the Treasury and other departments, and was examined by a Board of Survey appointed by the Governor.

The Board reported that they had examined the Treasury cash, bank balance and stamps.

31. With reference to paragraph 38 of the report for 1931, the account of $43,741.69 held by the Official Receiver in respec of a Liquidation Account which, on account of special circum- stances, had not been included in the Statement of Assets and Liabilities, was reduced at the close of the financial year to $2,928.18.

ARREARS OF REVENUE.

32. The Statement of Outstanding Revenue has been checked with the Account Books of the various Departments.

The sum of $2,043.85 is under query as having been omitted from the return.

UNCLAIMED DEPOSITS REVERTING TO REVENUE.

33. Under Section 4 of the Unclaimed Balance Ordinance of 1929, a sum of $13,751.50 was transferred to the General Revenue of the Colony.

Of this sum $10,000.00 represented a deposit in respect of a road construction contract made in 1922.

SUITORS FUND,

(Para. 47. 1931 Report).

34. The new system of accounting, whereby the Registrar of the Supreme Court makes his disbursements from this Fund through a Treasury Imprest, has been found to work satisfactorily throughout the year.

CHINA COMPANY FEES.

(Para. 48 1931 Report).

35. The annual local inspection of the Registrar of Com- panies' Account at Shanghai was made during the year and the accounts were audited to the 30th September 1932.

The observations made during the examination of the accounts were satisfactorily settled.

The revenue from this source for the year was $166,031.43.

A (2) 8

IMPERIAL POST OFFICE.

36. The monthly Accounts Current with the Imperial Fost Office have been audited to the 31st December, 1932, and accepted by the Imperial Post Office.

The stock of Imperial Postal Orders in the custody of the Postmaster General Hong Kong, has been checked and verified.

POSTAL AGENCIES.

(Paras. 17/18. 1931 Report).

37. The accrued debt of $9,600, which was made against the Imperial Post Office in 1931 on account of exchange profits covering several years, was disallowed by the Imperial Post Office and recredited to the Agency Account in August 1932. The latter account was closed in September 1932, the balance of $12,383.13 being remitted to London, and a formal acknow- ledgement thereof received in November.

The balance of unsold stamps surcharged "China" was sent to London in September 1932, but no acknowledgement or quittance thereof has as yet been received.

SECRETARIAT FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS.

(Paras. 56/57. 1931 Report).

38. A number of semi-public accounts of Institutions and Funds, many of them of a charitable nature, are kept under the supervision of the Honourable the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, and their balance sheets published as annexures to the annual administrative report of that officer. It was ruled in 1924 that the special nature of these accounts placed them "outside the accounts of the Colony, except in so far as the Colonial Treasurer acts as banker".

The duties of this Department are therefore confined to ascertaining that such amounts as are published in the balance sheets as being in the custody of the Treasurer are correctly shown in the Treasury books.

The amounts so shown in the aforesaid balance sheets have been checked with the Treasury books and found to be correct.

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

(Paras. 51/54. 1931 Report).

39. A copy of the Annual Report of the Manager of the Railway is forwarded as enclosure H. and full comparisons of the revenue and expenditure with the estimates for 1932 and with the revenue and expenditure of previous years are contained therein.

A (2) 9

The arrangement whereby in 1931 the Manager became a sub-accountant

of

the Treasurer has worked satisfactorily

throughout the year.

40. Mileage charges in respect of the engines referred to in paragraph 21 have been collected monthly by a deduction from the payment by this Government of the balance due to the Canton-Kowloon Railway on Joint and Through Traffic Receipts.

41. As referred to in paragraph 21 of this report, between 1st July and 31st December six monthly cash instalments of $10,000 each were paid by the Canton-Kowloon Railway in part payment of the Advance on account of the purchase of the three locomotives.

42. The Traffic Receipts reached the highest figure yet attained, namely $1,295,789.20 which is $200,690.43 over the Receipts of the previous year. The traffic continues to increase.

43. The final division sheets of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic Receipts between the two Administrations have been audited to the 31st of December 1932, and have been accepted by the two Administrations.

SUSPENSE ACCOUNT.

44. The Suspense Account Summary of Receipts and Pay- ments for the year 1932 forwarded as Enclosure K. shows a debit balance, on the 31st December, 1932, against the Kowloon- Canton Railway, British Section, of $13,240.37, and is accounted for as follows:-

Petrol supplied to Government Servants during November and December 1932, the accounts for which were paid for in 1933

. $ 461.56

Cash collected on 31.12.32 after Banking hours

and paid in on 3.1.33

5,330.35

Bills receivable on account of Services rendered

during the year under review

7,448.46

$13,240.37

This sum appears in the General Balance Sheet of the Railway on page 28 of the Manager's Report for the year 1932, as a Working Asset "Home Line". This procedure is in accordance with the accounting practice operative by the two sections of the Railway.

A (2) 10

STORE ACCOUNTS.

(Para. 59. 1931 Report).

45. The printed copy of the New Store Regulations has not been received by this Department. The various store accounts have generally been well kept, and have been examined to the 31st December.

Eleven Surprise Surveys of Stores were made by this Department during the year.

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.

46. In the detailed Statement of Revenue under Head 9. Miscellaneous Receipts, there appear abnormal increases over the Estimates on account of:-

(1) Overpayments in Previous Years

(2) Appreciation of Sterling Securities (3) Exchange Account

which seem to require elucidation.

$222,873.00

.$238,794.00

$179,551.00

47. The increase of $226,444.91 in (1) includes a sum of $222,873.13, which is shown as being a reimbursement from Suspense Account on account of a future Loan, in respect of salaries etc. of officers employed on loan works.

was

Under the Pension Minute operative prior to the passing of the Pension Ordinance of the 24th June, 1932, it considered that the officers' pension rights were vulnerable, and it was by the above method proposed to protect them.

48. This reimbursement formed the subject of Audit Query No. 161/E of 1932 which is enclosed. Of the sum of $222,873.13, $67,282.51 was on account of the officers' salaries etc. for the period 1st January, 1932 to 23rd June, 1932, and was incorrectly credited to "Overpayments in Previous Years".

49. With regard to the increase of $238,794.40 appreciation of Sterling Securities, this was the result of the revaluation of Sterling Securities in accordance with the Secretary of State's instructions contained in Colonial Office Despatch of the 8th of October, 1930, the appreciation being carried to Revenue.

THE EXCHANGE ACCOUNT.

50. The figure of $179,551.00 has been verified with the Treasury accounts. The correctness of this sum which represents the balance of the Exchange Account at the close of the year. and which has been carried to the general revenue of the Colony, must be accepted with reservations in view of the transactions which have passed through the Adjustment of Exchange Account, and of the question as to how the loss on the Sterling Contract has been accounted for,

A. (2) 11

WIRELESS LICENCE FEES.

51. A surprise survey by this Department revealed that 167 ten-dollar licences for the year 1933 had been issued and paid for on 30th-31st of December, 1932, and dated 1st January 1933 (Sunday). Of the total sum of $1,670 collected, $1,060 was paid into the General Post Office No. 2 bank account, being returned by cheque to the Wireless Licence Office on 3rd January 1933. The balance of $610 was held in cash by the Officer in Charge of the Wireless Licence Office.

The $1,670 should have been paid into the Government Account on the last day of business in 1932.

DEPARTMENTAL BANK ACCOUNTS.

(Para. 41. 1931 Report).

52. The position as regards these bank accounts remains unaltered, and in view of the remarks made in the Report for 1931

it is again necessary to point out that a considerable amount of money was charged in the year's accounts which had not in fact been disbursed", it appears necessary to deal with this subject. The Board of Survey on the Treasury referred to in paragraph 30 of this report, reported that they found a total sum of $84,520.87 in cash, also a sum of $531,499.28 in partly or wholly drawn up cheques represent- ing disbursements in respect of 1932 and not yet completed. These purported disbursements are shown as final expenditure in the Treasury accounts for 1932, and it appears irregular that a financial system should obtain which permits such a state of affairs. In a subsequent paragraph it will be explained that certain items of expenditure that appear as final entries in the Treasury accounts were in fact subsequently embezzled.

CONTRACTS FOR PUBLIC WORKS.

(Para. 55. 1931 Report).

53. A visible improvement has been made in the control of these contracts, and it is essential that strict control should not be relaxed.

One case occurred, however, on which this Department had to make submissions to the Government. On a contract which should have been completed on the 27th April, 1931, extensions first of six months then of three months were granted. Early in July, 1932, the contractors were warned that up to the 31st May 1932 they had become liable to a fine of $1,260, but on the 3rd December, 1932, the work having been completed on the 28th November, 1932, the fine up to the 31st May was rescinded and a retrospective extension of time granted. A penalty of $1,820 only was enforced instead of a penalty of $5,740.

A (2) 12

As a result of the Audit Submission, it has been laid down that in any future cases the covering authority of the Govern- ment should be sought where a fine has been imposed and it is desired to cancel it, and that efforts should be made to avoid retrospective extensions of time.

EXCHANGE CONTRACT.

54. During the year the Government suffered a loss of $314,447.62 on a sterling contract for remittances to the Crown Agents for the Colonies. The Government has been requested by this Department to obtain the Secretary of State's covering approval for making forward sterling contracts, as this is a departure from the recognized Treasury practice. In connection with the loss on this contract, the Government has also been requested by this Department to ask the Treasurer how he has shown this loss in his accounts, but no reply has been received.

Further, there does not appear to have been any notification to this Department of the signing of this contract.

SUSPENSE ACCOUNT.

SUBSIDIARY COIN IN TRANSIT ACCOUNT.

55. Two sums, £36.5.3 and £32.18.10 appear in this account at the termination of the financial year. These sums represent final disbursements by the Crown Agents on account of freight on consignments of silver and copper. Although this expenditure was incurred in 1932 it was not allocated against any head of final expenditure, but was placed in the Suspense Account. This is incorrect, as it should have been charged to final expenditure in the financial year in which it was incurred.

SUPPLEMENTARY VOTES.

56. The attention of the Government has been drawn by this Department to several Supplementary Votes, which were approved by the Legislature and Secretary of State.

It was stated at the time when the Votes were applied for that the excess expenditure would be met from savings on other sub-heads of expenditure.

The savings, however, did not accrue.

POLICE DEPARTMENT.

THEFT FORM THE CHARGE ROOM, CENTRAL POLICE STATION,

$920.75.

57. In the latter part of December the Chinese Constable who had been on special Charge Room duty for many years was found to have absconded, and the sum of $920.75 to be missing from the Charge Room Safe.

The money is being refunded.

A (2) 13

CENTRAL POLICE STATION ACCOUNTS OFFICE.

EMBEZZLEMENT OF $8,252.

58. A shroff employed in the Accounts Office of the Police Department failed to report for duty after the Chinese New Year holidays (January 1933), and subsequent investigations disclosed that he had before his departure misappropriated various sums of money amounting, so far as has been established, to a total loss of $8,252.

The matter has been reported to the Secretary of State in the Governor's Despatch No. 299 of 15th May.

It might be considered that as this embezzlement occurred ir. January, 1933, it would hardly touch upon the accounts of the previous financial year, but unfortunately such is the case, for of the amount embezzled a sum of $517.87 was shown as final expenditure in the Treasurer's accounts for December, and had been passed to the Police Department for disbursement iu that month. Also a sum of $3,000 which had been paid into the Police Department as deposits during 1932 was misappro priated.

OPIUM MONOPOLY.

59. The revenue derived from the sales of prepared opium during the year shows a decrease of $685,770.75 on the estimated revenue for the year. The decrease of the sales as compared with the previous year is accounted for by decrease of taels 35,862.36 Hong Kong Prepared Opium, and taels 8,626 Kamshan Opium.

In 1931 at the Bangkok Opium Conference it was agreed as a matter of economy and for the better control of the Opium Traffic to have all opium for sale in Hong Kong prepared and packed in Singapore, and also to discontinue in Hong Kong the practice of the sale of opium through Licensed or Authorized Sellers. The Sellers were to be replaced by Government Opium Shops which would be in the charge of a Government Servant, who would sell only for consumption off the premises.

Six of the shops were opened late in 1932. Part of the Hong Kong stock of Raw Opium was transferred to Singapore in December 1932, and the balance of the Raw Opium stock together with the whole of the Hong Kong Prepared Opium stock was to be transferred early in 1933.

The stock of Kamshan Opium, which is a superior quality of opium and which has been manufactured at the Government factory since 1914, has not been transferred to Singapore.

A (2) 14

LIQUOR DUTIES.

60. In September, 1931, under the Liquor Ordinance No. 36 of 1931, Toilet and Medicinal Preparations and in fact any Alcoholic Liquids except Denatured Spirit, became dutiable. The duty was fixed at $10 per gallon for all such liquids containing over 10% of alcohol,

By a Resolution passed in the Legislative Council on the 17th day of March, 1932, under section 39 of the Liquor Ordinance, 1931, the duty of $10 per gallon on Medicated Spirits containing under 60% of alcohol was modified. accordance with the recognized practice, drawback was allowed on export.

In

It was very quickly found, however, that this mehod of collection of duty was far from satisfactory and left a loophole whereby the public revenue might suffer considerable losses. The flat rate of duty per gallon was therefore abandoned in June 1932, and by a Resolution passed in the Legislative Council under section 39 of the Liquors Ordinance, 1931, on the 30th day of June, 1932, it was resolved that the duty on such Medicated and Perfumed Spirits containing not more than 24% of alcohol by weight should be assessed for duty at $1.20 per gallon, and for every one per cent of additional alcoholic strength by weight 5 cents per gallon.

This new system of assessing the duty appears to be working satisfactorily.

THE FACTOR.

61. In February 1931 the Government decided, owing to the depreciation of the dollar, to assess the duties on Liquor and Tobacco on a Gold Unit or a Factor basis. This Unit or Factor was based on a 1s. 8d. dollar.

In order to arrive at the correct amount payable in Hong Kong currency for the duties on Liquor and Tobacco, which are laid down in dollars in the respective schedules of the Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances, such duties in dollars shall be multiplied by 20 (1s. 8d.) and then divided by a figure settled by the Colonial Treasurer. This figure represents the average opening selling rates of the previous month of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank for demand drafts on London.

It can therefore be recognized that owing to the fluctuation of the Hong Kong dollar the Factor varies proportionately.

The Factor, which is operative for a quarter, has been found to complicate the payment of drawbacks.

A (2) 15

PUBLIC REVENUE PROTECTION ORDINANCE.

62. It was necessary during the year for an Order to be made by His Excellency the Governor under the Public Revenue Protection Ordinance restricting withdrawals from Bond (vide Government Notification No. 313 Government Gazette No. 23 of the 23rd May 1932).

CROWN AGENTS FOR THE COLONIES.

CASH AND INVESTMENTS.

63. Certificates of the Comptroller and Auditor-General have been received for all Assets held by the Crown Agents. on behalf of this Government, on the 31st December, 1932.

SURPRISE SURVEYS.

64. Surprise Surveys of Cash, Stamps etc. have been made throughout the year, as reported in the Quarterly Returns, with satisfactory results.

QUERIES.

65. Two hundred and sixty-three queries were issued on the accounts for the year, of which ninety related to revenue and one hundred and seventy-three to expenditure and stores. With the exception of those enumerated in Enclosure G. ail have been settled.

Among the larger amounts recovered and payments stopped due to Audit submissions were £72 on account of a passage, Rs.521.13.11 on account of overpaid salary, and $409.64 on an undercollection of Import Duties, etc.

GENERAL.

66. No material departure from the approved programme of work has been made.

The work of this Dpeartment has been greatly increased during the past year owing to

to the new methods of the calculation of duties, the Shing Mun Gorge Dam Accounts etc. etc.; all of which, in view of the reduction of staff referred to in paragraphs 62 and 63 of the report for 1931, makes the audit of the Accounts increasingly difficult to contend with.

If Audit is to be carried out satisfactorily, an increase of staff in the near future will be necessary.

T. DALLIN, Acting Auditor.

Victoria, Hong Kong.

27th July, 1933.

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR

1933-1934.

By Order of His Excellency the Governor-in-Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased

been increased from $37,457,725 $38,941,273 an addition of $1,483,548 or 3.96 per cent.

to

2. The following table gives a comparison of the Assessments for the year 1932-1933 and 1933-1934:

District.

Valuation Valuation 1932-1933. 1933-1934.

Increase.

Per cent.

$

The City of Victoria

25,240,914

25,568,498

327,584

1.29

Hong Kong Villages Kowloon New Kowloon

2,905,269

3,204,447

299,178

1.03

7,597,230 8,207,351

610.121

8.04

1,714,312 1,960,977

246,665

14.39

Total

37,457,725 38,941,273 1,483,548

3.96

3. The increase in the valuation of the City of Victoria is mainly due to new buildings on the Praya East Reclamation and would have been much greater but for the tendency to reductions of rental in a number of localities.

4. Under Hong Kong Villages the increase is mainly due to the new development at Wongneichung.

5. In Kowloon the increase is due to new Chinese tenements and semi-European flats in Mongkok, European flats and houses on Prince Edward Road and European flats at Kowloon Point.

6. In the case of New Kowloon the increase is largely due to Chinese tenement houses in Shamshuipo and some further building at Kowloon City on the new layout.

7. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 439 monthly, as compared with 297 last year.

B 2

8. During the year ending 26th May 1933, 2,422 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

CITY OF VICTORIA. REST OF COLONY.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable. Value.

New or rebuilt tenements

and tenements structur-

ally altered

510

996,544 1,435

1,381,927

Assessments

cancelled,

tenements resumed,

pulled down or being

in other respects not rateable

145

312,226 332 334,796

Number and Increase.

655

684,318 1,767 1,047,131

9. This is the largest number of interim valuations made in any year except in the period ending with the general valuation for the year 1925-1926, and is 309 more than last year.

10. The following comparative statement shows the Rate- able Value of the Colony of Hong Kong from 1923-1924 to 1933-1934 inclusive :-

Year.

Rateable Value.

Increase as compared with previous year.

Percentage of In- crease in Rateable Value as compared with previous year.

$

€A

%

1923-1924

21,059,700

1924-1925

22,147,951

1,088,251

5.16

1925-1926

27,287,862

5,139,911

23.20

1926-1927

27,998,237

710,375

2.60

1927-1928

29,016,439

1,018,202

3.64

1928-1929

30,395,447

1,379,008

4.75

1929-1930

31,617,566

1,222,119

4.02

1930-1931

33,069,602

1,452,036

4.59

1931-1932

35,071,566

2,001,964

6.04

1932-1933

37,457,725

2,386,159

6.80

1933-1934

38,941,273

1,483,548

3.96

B 3-

11. In the ten years from 1923-1924 to 1933-1934 the rateable value of the Colony has increased by $17,881,573 or 85 per cent.

12. The demand for office and shop accommodation in the centre of the City remains strong, as it does also for European style dwellings in suitable situations on the Island.

13. The rapid development of the Praya East Reclamation together with over building in other parts of the Colony and the depression have led to there being a number of vacant flats and shops scattered throught the Chinese portions of the City, and, as a result, a demand for reduction of rent in these areas has commenced. Unless the world depression continues, however, it is not anticipated that this condition will remain for long.

TREASURY,

26th May, 1933.

EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer & Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1932.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I-III).

The Government Revenue derived from all sources during the year was $17,344.03 and the Government Expenditure was $130,880.54.

2. As is evidenced by the numerous tables attached to this report, much of the work of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs is concerned with the administration of funds that may be called semi-official. The Revenue in these cases is in very large part a matter of voluntary subscription by the Chinese Community and outside the Government Estimates, with Expenditure at the discretion of the Department.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Ordinance No. 21 of 1929.

Ordinance No. 6 of 1893.

Ordinance No. 1 of 1923.

Ordinance No. 22 of 1929.

Ordinance No. 2 of 1865.

3. The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was four of whom none was found as compared with twelve and none in 1931..

4. Twenty-one names were added to the list of girls under bond. The number of names on the list on December 31st

was fifty-five.

At

5. Inspector Fraser and his two Assistant Chinese Lady Inspectors have worked with conspicuous loyalty and diligence throughout the year on work in connection with Mui Tsai. 5,184 visits were paid to the homes of registered Mui Tsai. the beginning of the year the total number of Mui Tsai was 3,743; and at the end of the year this had been reduced by 555 to a total of 3,188. This very considerable reduction is mainly accounted for by permanent departures from the Colony, restora- tion to relatives and marriage,

- C 2

6. Fifty-five prosecutions were brought under the Mui Tsai Ordinance with fifty-four convictions. These prosecutions in- cluded forty-three cases of keeping unregistered Mui Tsai, five cases of bringing unregistered Mui Tsai into the Colony, two cases of illtreatment of registered Mui Tsai, two cases of illtreat- ment of unregistered Mui Tsai and three cases of non-payment of wages.

7. Under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, five cases were brought and eleven persons were con- victed. These were cases of harbouring or procuring.

8. Under Section 45A of Ordinance 2 of 1865, Offences against the Person, four cases were brought on charges connected with trafficking in minors, and nine persons were convicted.

9. For a fuller report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk, see Annexe A of this report.

EMIGRATION.

(Ordinance 30 of 1915). (Tables IV and V).

10. Malaya continued to repatriate Chinese in considerable numbers, but this department is not in a position to give the total numbers thus repatriated to Hong Kong during the whole of 1932. The reason for this is that in June the Malayan Gov- ernment started a new system of repatriation directly through the shipping companies instead of through this department and the Tung Wah Hospital. Up to June, so far as this department is concerned, the repatriation figures were

5,874 from Penang

368 from Singapore

325 from Sandakan and

676 from French Indo-China.

11. The emigration of Assisted Emigrants showed a further fall. In 1930, the total number passed was 8,316. In 1931 it fell to 3,817, and in 1932 the total was 1,602.

12. Similarly the emigration of women and children showed a marked decrease, from 18,122 in 1931 to 11,482 in 1932.

13. Forty-five women were detained for enquiries as com- pared with twenty-nine in 1931.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.

(Ordinance 23 of 1917). (Table VI).

14. During the year four convictions were obtained under the ordinance as compared with nine in 1931. These convictions were mainly for failing to keep the register properly and having excess of boarders.

- C 3

PERMITS.

(Ordinance 1 of 1845).

(Ordinance 22 of 1919).

15. 3,013 permits to fire crackers were issued, of which 2,171 were for weddings and the remainder for birthdays, shop openings, etc. Forty-four permits were issued for theatrical per- formances.

16. Other permits issued were twenty-four for religious cere- monies and five for processions

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1888).

17. Twenty-one books were registered during the year as compared with forty-four in 1931.

REGISTRATION OF NEWSPAPERS.

(Ordinances 25 of 1927 and 1 of 1930).

18. The number of Registered Chinese papers existing on December 31st was twenty-nine, of these eleven were registered during the year.

DISTRICT WATCH FORCE.

(Ordinance 23 of 1930).

(Table VII).

19. The District Watch Committee met on thirteen occasions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In addition two meetings at which His Excellency the Governor presided were held at Government House. The following gentlemen served on the Committee throughout the year:-

Mr. Lei Yau-tsun, C.B.E.,

Hon. Sir Shouson Chow,

Kt.,

Mr. Tong Yat-chun,

Mr. Lo Cheung-shiu,

Mr. Wong Iutung,

Mr. Li Po-kwai,

Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, o.B.E.,

Mr. Li Yik-mui,

Mr. Wong Tak-kwong,

Hon. Mr. Chau Tsun-nin,

Mr. Lo Man-kam.

Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall,

C.M.G.,

20. Mr. Leung Pat-u retired on the expiration of his year of office and was succeeded by Mr. Ngan Shing-kwan. Mr. Tam Woon-tong continued to hold office for another year.

C 4

21. At the end of the year the District Watch Force consisted of 140 men, as against 138 at the end of 1931. During 1932 fourteen members of the force were dismissed, five resigned, seven retired with a gratuity, three died, and thirty-one new men were recruited.

22. Inspector J. Murphy was in charge of the Force until May and his place was then taken by Inspector F. W. Shaftain who maintained the very high standard of Inspector Murphy in discharging this important task. The post is an arduous and responsible one involving as it does the control almost single handed of a considerable body of men, the duties of liaison officer between the Police and District Watch, and the detailed super- vision of the activities of the detective branch.

23. The total number of police court cases secured by mem- bers of the force was 1,084 as compared with 867 in 1931.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE.

(Tables VIII to XXII).

(Ordinances 31 of 1930 and 10 of 1908).

24. The following gentlemen served on the Committee for

1932:-

Mr. Chan Lim-pak, Mr. Lam Yam-tsuen, Mr. Tam Shiu-hong, Mr. Ng Hung-nam, Mr. Chan Yu-tin, Mr. Kong Tsz-ming, Mr. Ha Chung chau, Mr. Chan Wah-man, Mr. Chan Chung-yuet, Mr. Ho Tit-wan, Mr. Yik Iu-ting,

Mr. Tsing Yat-ting, Mr. Wong Shek-ki,

Mr. Chan Lan-fong, Mr. Chan Tai-kau, Mr. Tsang Po-ki, Mr. Fung Pak-lok, Mr. Chan Shing-foon, Mr. Sham Heung-lam, Mr. Pun Kan-nam, Mr. Tse Wai-ting, Mr. Wong Hak-king, Mr. Tsoi Wai-hung, Mr. Ma Man-fai, Mr. Chau Hip tai.

25. This was the second year of operation under the con- solidated and revised Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance (No. 31 of 1930). The amalgamation of all three Hospitals,-the Tung Wah, the Kwong Wah, and the Tung Wah Eastern,-under the unified control of a single Committee has had an excellent effect.

26. Apart from the detailed medical work of the Hospital, of which a report will be found in Annexe B, Mr. Chan Lim Pak and his fellow Directors had a year of strenuous activity on which they may look back with justifiable pride.

C 5

27. Funds amounting to more than $400,000 were raised under the auspices of the Tung Wah Hospital for Shanghai refugee work, and were forwarded to the Kwong Shiu Kung Sho in Shanghai.

28. Two new wings, completing the existing scheme for the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, were added and opened by His Excellency the Governor in December. The cost was met from funds specially raised by the Directors themselves without draw- ing on the funds of the Hospital.

29. With the approval of the Secretary of State the site of the old Po Leung Kuk, which had been originally granted by the Crown for Tung Wah Hospital purposes, is to be utilised for the erection of houses or shops. These will be built by the Hospital and the rents derived from them will be devoted to Hospital maintenance expenses. The cost of running these three Hospitals is mounting year by year, as improvements and exten- sions are made, and forms a serious problem for the Directors. It is hoped that some $20,000 annually will be derived from this utilisation of the old Po Leung Kuk site and the scheme was already in hand by the end of the year.

30. The useful work done by the Hospital in maintaining free schools for poor children in various parts of the Colony was carried yet another step further by the establishment in Wanchai of a new Girls' School, to accommodate fifty-two pupils.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

(See Annexe B and Tables XXIII to XXVI).

TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

(Table XXVII).

31. This Hospital is a part of the organisation financed and managed by the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee. Its proximity to the University has made it a convenient centre for the training of Medical Students in residence, and an arrange- ment has been made under which the Committee recognises this fact and welcomes the voluntary assistance of the University Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Dr. R. E. Tottenham) who is in effect in direct or supervising charge of all the patients in the Hospital. The scope of the work of this valuable Hospital is steadily tending to increase, and there are signs that we have already reached the limit of its suitable expansion as part of the Chinese Public Dispensary organisation. Attention is now being directed to the question whether it would not be to the general advantage if Government were to accept the Hospital as a gift from the Chinese Public Dispensary organisation, and thereafter be entirely responsible for its maintenance and possible further development.

C 6

32. In addition to the Inpatient Section, for which there are sixty beds, there is also an Outpatient Department which is divided into four sections, each functioning once a week. All patients are examined and treated by a Government Lady Medi- cal Officer. These clinics are all worked in close co-operation with the Chinese Public Dispensary's Gynaecological clinics held in various parts of the Colony,

33. The four sections are as follows:

(a) A gynaecological clinic for the diagnosis and treat-

ment of diseases peculiar to women.

(b) Venereal Disease Clinic.

(c) Antenatal Clinic.

(d) Infant Welfare Clinic.

34. Number of cases attending Outpatient Department:-

Clinic.

New

cases.

Return Total Total Visits. 1932. 1931.

(a) Gynaecological

623

386

1,009

1,038

(b) Venereal Diseases

652

1,581

2,233 1,603

(c) Antenatal

142

86 228

239

(d) Infant Welfare

503

1,344 1,847 1,783

WANCHAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

35. This Hospital, which is also part of the Chinese Public Dispensary organisation, had been reconstructed and enlarged in 1931, and it worked with increased capacity in 1932, to the great benefit of the population of the Eastern District including some from Shaukiwan and some from boats.

36. The number of beds was raised from twenty-two to thirty-one, and there were 842 admissions, with no deaths, 790 births and thirty-seven still-births. In addition, a gynaecological outpatient clinic was held by a Government Lady Doctor once a week, with a total of 365 new cases and 355 old cases.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XXVIII).

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXIX).

37. This is controlled by a Committee consisting of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Chairman and the Chinese Members of Executive and Legislative Councils.

19832

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YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE.

(Table XXX).

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXXI).

Translation.

38. The total number of translations made in the department during 1932 was 1,208 as compared with 1,675 in 1931. 500 of these were from Chinese into English and 708 from English into Chinese. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government departments were sent to this office for revision.

General:

LABOUR.

39. Labour conditions in the Colony during 1932 were quiet. The level of wages has been mainly unchanged, but unemploy- ment has been more marked. The building trade, however, showed considerable activity.

Disputes and Strikes :

40. In February trouble occurred in a silk-weaving factory employing a number of Shanghai workmen. After investigation by this department, it was arranged that the management should pay expenses of repatriation to Shanghai.

41. In August a dispute arose in connection with the Chinese Compositors' Union. Detailed enquiries were made by this department with regard to hours of work and allowance for food and other points affecting compositors in local Chinese newspaper offices.

42. A more serious dispute took place in September arising out of a petition for increase of wages made by employees in junk building and caulking establishments at Cheung Sha Wan, Aber- deen and Shaukiwan. A number of men went on strike and scme new men from outside the colony were taken on. There was, however, no unanimity either among the workers or the employers, and some of the latter granted increases while others refused. The time chosen for an application for increase of wages seems to have been inopportune in view of the general dullness of trade.

43. The help of this department was also sought in the matter of a dispute between masters and men in the cake-baking trade. As usual some interesting details were revealed in con- nection with the mysteries of the trade, and an amicable settle- ment was reached in due course.

C 8

Cost of living of poorer classes :

44. The average percentage increase between 1931 and 1932 in the retail costs of food, clothing and firewood appears to have been a fraction over 1%.

FACTORIES.

(Table XXXII).

45. Trade remained dull throughout the year and the factories of the Colony were working at much below their full capacity. Some were on half time only (a most unusual thing for this Colony) and all were on short time with much depleted staffs. Complaints were general from factory owners as to the harmful effect of high tariffs and the dumping of cheap goods. The import duties imposed in recent years by the Government of China has had the effect of practically closing the China market to Hong Kong manufacturers and they have been compelled to seek other markets, notably in the Dutch East Indies and the Straits Settlements. For a time these southern markets filled the gap caused by the loss of the China trade, but the depression in these countries with the consequent return to China of large numbers of unemployed labourers, has now lessened the demand for such articles of local manufacture as cotton socks and singlets, rubber shoes and Chinese foodstuffs. In spite of the trade slump, however, the number of factories in the Colony continues to increase. In the electric torch trade for instance, there are now seventeen factories, whereas in the previous year there were but six. Knitting and weaving factories have also increased in number in spite of many failures, and together with the confectionery and perfumery factories afford occupation for large numbers of women and girls.

46. The number of children (that is, persons under the age of sixteen years) employed in factories shows no tendency to increase and unless there should be a sudden boom in trade with a demand for large numbers of learners, there is no reason to fear any movement towards the old conditions when the factories were staffed mainly by children. Chinese factory owners now realise that child labour is not economically cheap. No European firms employ children under the age of fifteen years.

47. Prosecutions.-The slackness of trade is reflected in the reduction in the number of cases where women and children were found working during prohibited hours at night. Only two cases occurred where prosecution was necessary, as against ten the previous years. Convictions were secured in each case with fines of $85 and $50 respectively.

48. Legislation.-A further important step forward in the industrial legislation of the Colony was taken with the passing of the Factories and Workshops Ordinance No. 27 of 1932. This

C 9

new Ordinance consolidates under one heading all the regulations governing factories and workshops, and besides affording scope for further expansion, it carries the important new regulation requiring all factories and workshops to be registered at the office of the Factory Inspectorate. This registration of factories has been urgently needed for many years and may be expected to lead to an improvement in general factory conditions and the gradual disappearance of the more undesirable type of tenement house factory.

A

49. Accidents.-The total number of accidents in factories during the year was ninety-one of which five were fatal, as com- pared with seventy-two (five fatal) for the preceeding year. large proportion of the accidents occurred in the shipbuilding yards, most of them being due to falls or to injury from falling materials. There was again a welcome freedom from the scalp- ing accidents which were formerly so frequent among women workers in the knitting factories. A separate table is appended showing the number of accidents occurring in each industry.

CHINESE TEMPLES.

(Ordinance 7 of 1928).

(Tables XXXIII & XXXIV).

50. The following gentlemen served on the Chinese Temples Committee during the year :--

(a) Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt., Hon. Dr. R. H. Kote- wall, C.M.G., Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, 0.B.E., Hon. Mr. T. N. Chau-Chinese members of the Executive Council and of the Legislative Council.

(b) Mr. Li Yau-tsun, C.B.E.,-Representative of the

District Watch Committee.

(c) Mr. Wong Kwong-tin, Mr. M. K. Lo,-Chinese

members of the Sanitary Board.

(d) Mr. Chan Lim-pak, Chairman of the Tung Wah

Hospital Committee.

(e) Mr. Tang Shiu-kin, Senior member of the Po Leung

Kuk Committee.

(f) Mr. Chan Wah-man, Representative of the Directors of the Tung Wah Hospital who are residents of Kowloon or New Kowloon.

(g) Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

51. The Committee met once at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

– C 10

52. The following contributions were made during the year 1932:

$5 500.00 to Hong Kong Society for the Protection of

Children.

$23,000.00 to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund. $38,671.46 to Tung Wah Hospital.

$ 1,200.00 to Cheung Chau Kaifong for charitable

activities.

53. The following temples were taken over by the Committee during the year 1932:-

Hau Wong Temple, Tai O.

Kwan Tai Temple, Tai 0. Hung Hom Shrine.

STAFF.

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

54. Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secretary from 6th May to 16th November, and went on leave from 17th November to 7th December. During these periods Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

10th April, 1933.

A. E. WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Č 11

Annexe A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1932.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women". The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

2. There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, two lady teachers, seven amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. The Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m., the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children and Chinese family life generally. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents and relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent.

3. In addition to the annual Committee there is a Board of Permanent Direction, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

4. The following gentlemen were elected in April to serve as Managing Committee for the year:

Mr. Tang Shiu-kin, Mr. Ho Wah-shang, Mr. Chan Shiu-hing, Mr. Yan Tit-yu, Mr. Lam Cheuk-ming, Mr. Pun Hiu-cho,

Mr. Lau Ping-chai,

Mr. Lei Heung-kuk, Mr. Kan Tat-choi, Mr. Wong Iu-nam, Mr. Au Tsz-shiu, Mr. Chau Ping-wun.

5. The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1932, was fifty-two, and during the

year 500 persons were admitted as against 366 in 1931. The circumstances of admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

C 12

6. Five hundred women and girls were admitted without warrant. Twenty-five were lost children, sixty-one were accom- panied by parents or guardians, and seventy-two were maid- servants or "mui-tsai" who had left their employers.

7. On leaving the Kuk 203 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, fifteen were sent to charitable institutions in China, fifteen were given in adoption, three married, 235 released (eleven released under bond), twenty sent to Convent or Refuge and seven died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was fifty-three.

8. The institution suffered a great loss in the death of Mr. A. G. Coppin, who for over twelve years had been one of its Visiting Justices. Mr. Coppin had always taken a keen and sympathetic interest in this work, and his untimely death is deplored. His place as Visiting Justice was filled by Mr. M. T. Johnson, and the Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, 0.B.E., has also continued to serve in this capacity throughout the year.

The average monthly number of inmates was seventy.

9. Ninety-eight cases of sickness were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital for treatment and of these seven died.

10. Mrs. R. H. Kotewall and Mrs. S. W. Tso paid regular visits of inspection during the year, and took a great interest in the sewing, embroidery and other handiwork of the girls.

11. The great event of the year was the opening of the new Po Leung Kuk at Leighton Hill Road. The foundation stone had been laid by His Excellency the Governor in March, 1931; and on March the 5th 1932, the completed building was opened by Lady Peel. His Excellency was unfortunately prevented by illness from being present, but his speech was read aloud by the Colonial Secretary. This speech paid a warm tribute to the work of the Po Leung Kuk and in particular to Mr. Tam Woon-tong and his colleagues who had held office for two successive years in order to bring to completion the splendid new building.

12. The new Committee with Mr. Tang Shiu-kin as its Chairman assumed office in April. It fell to them to see the new building through its first year of active use, and by degrees several further improvements have been introduced of which perhaps the most notable is the provision of a qualified Chinese nurse and a well-stocked dispensary. In addition regular visits are paid by a medical officer from the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

10th April, 1933.

A. E. WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs, President.

C 13

We, AU SHIU CHO and HO WAHI SANG, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1932, marked "A" and signed with our names on the 24th February, 1933, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act 1835`.

區紹初

何華生

Declared by the declarants, AU SHIU CHO and HO WAH SANG at Victoria, Hong Kong, the 24th February, 1933, through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yam Ko having also first declared that he had truly distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document of the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faith- fully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto them.

Before me,

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Justice of Peace.

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants AU SHIU CHO and HO WAH SANG and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them. Declared at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong, this 24th day of February, 1933.

Before me,

Luk Yam Ko.

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs and Justice of Peace.

C 14

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1932.

Assets.

Liabilities.

Deposit at current account with the

Bank of East Asia

$ 7,241.16

Nil.

Balance of Special Fund for erection of the New Po Leung Kuk, carried forward from the previous year and now deposited with

Bank of East Asia

10,429.82

$17,670.98

This is the statement "A" referred to in the Declaration of Au Shiu Cho and Ho Wah Sang declared before me this 24th day of February, 1933.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Justice of Peace.

C 15

Annexe B.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

The Chinese Hospitals and the Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions which have been established by the Chinese for the benefit of the poor of Chinese race.

2. The hospitals were originally intended to give accommod- ation and treatment to those Chinese whose fears and prejudices against Western medicine prevented their applying for relief at the Government Hospitals. The Tung Wah Hospital, situated in the centre of the most thickly populated area in Victoria, was first occupied in 1873. The Kwong Wah Hospital was built in Kowloon in 1911 as an extension of the Tung Wah. Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, another branch of the Tung Wah, situated in an open space in the East of Victoria, was opened in November 1929. The Government gave the sites and with grants of money assisted in the erection of the buildings.

The

3. In administrative control of the three hospitals is the Tung Wah Committee, a body of Chinese gentlemen elected each year by the subscribers.

4. The activities of the Chinese Hospitals include inter alia:

(a) The care of the sick and treatment by Western methods or Chinese methods according to the wish of the patients.

(b) Maternity benefits and infant welfare by Western

methods only.

(c) Vaccination.

(d) Health propaganda.

(e) Assistance to the destitute.

(f) The provision of coffins for and the burial of the dead.

5. Much progress has been made in all departments of the hospitals during the last few years. These improvements

include:

(a) The appointment of University graduates as full

time Resident Medical Officers.

(b) The foundation of training schools for female nurses. (c) Extensions and improvements in the male nursing

section.

(d) The establishment of clinical laboratories.

(e) The provision of radiological apparatus.

(f) The establishment of up-to-date operating theatres.

(g) The purchase of motor ambulances.

(h) Improvements in the accommodation for patients. (i) Improvement in quarters for the staff.

-C 16

6. Today each of the three Tung Wah Hospitals has a good operating theatre where operations are performed daily, many of which are major in character.

7. The Chinese Public Dispensaries, nine in number, are situated in the most thickly populated districts in Hong Kong and on the mainland. Originally they were not started to fulfil their present useful purpose.

This has been in the nature of an evolution and from quite small beginnings. At the time of a Plague Epidemic when the panic-stricken people were almost as much afraid of the sanitary cleaning squads as they were of the plague, and bodies were being dumped in the streets, a Committee of Chinese gentlemen suggested that various centres be occupied under the care of Western trained Chinese Doctors, and at the expense of the Charitable Community where dead bodies could be received, and where the clerk-in-charge of the centre could go with the Sanitary coolies to the infected houses and calm the fears of the inhabitants and explain to them the need of such action. At first there were only two centres- Eastern and Western, and later the Central. The Dispensaries are foci for the dissemination of knowledge concerning the causes of disease, the means of spread, and the value of Western drugs and modern methods.

8. Each Dispensary is controlled by a separate Committee of Chinese gentlemen who work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. Responsible to the Committee and in direct charge of the Dispensary is a Chinese Medical Practitioner quali- fied in Western Medicine. He is assisted by an English-speaking Chinese clerk, and there is a staff of dressers and coolies.

9. In addition to the ordinary work of the polyclinic and dispensary these institutions serve as depots where the poor may apply for assistance in matters connected with:-

(a) The removal of patients to hospital.

(b) Certification as to the cause of death.

(c) Removal of corpses to mortuaries.

(d) Supply of coffins and arrangements for burial.

(e) The registration of births.

() Vaccination.

VISITING MEDICAL OFFICERS FOR CHINESE HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

10. Both Hospitals and Dispensaries are subsidised by Government and are subject to inspection by the Government Medical Department. There are four officers of the Department whose duty it is to visit the various institutions and to give advice and assistance. These officers work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 17

11. The year has been marked by a general increase in patients at all the Dispensaries. Equipment has been improved and new instruments purchased. All the Dispensaries now have complete sets of tooth forceps: and sufferers from toothache are no longer forced to seek the services of itinerant dentists with their antiquated methods and septic instruments.

12. There have been no noteworthy extensions in building during 1932 in either the Tung Wah or the Kwong Wah Hospitals though the need for such are more than ever pressing.

13. The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, however, has now been fully completed. His Excellency, the Governor, opened in December six new wards each capable of accommodating fourteen patients, and with all the necessary equipment.

14. These three large hospitals, all supported by Chinese residents in the Colony, and now managed by a single committee, receive an annual Government grant; and the salary of the Senior Chinese Medical Officer in each is paid by the Govern- ment.

15. Besides these there are two Maternity Hospitals-the Tsan Yuk a really model institution, and up-to-date in every particular, in the crowded Western area; and the Eastern, in Wanchai, which is very efficient and run with faultless aseptic methods.

16. Five of the nine Public Dispensaries are on the island of Hong Kong and four on the Kowloon side. They are main- tained by contributions from the Chinese Community, assisted by a small Government grant.

17. An enormous and ever-increasing number of sick, too poor to pay for doctor's fees or buy proper medicines, are success- fully reached. In the three big hospitals the patient can choose between Western and Chinese methods of treatment; but here, in the Dispensaries, he is treated only by properly qualified Chinese Doctors Western trained and with the best drugs pro- curable bought from the Government Central Medical Stores. Government Lady Doctors treat the gynaecological cases once a week and in some of the dispensaries twice a week.

18. Two of the Dispensaries are still housed in rooms attached to temples. Another that at Aberdeen-consists of two rented shops temporarily adapted for the purpose. Gradually, entirely new and up-to-date buildings are taking the place of the older premises. New Dispensaries have been opened, during the year, in Yaumati and Kowloon City. The Dispensaries at Shaukiwan and Wanchai are also excellent buildings of their kind. The Western Dispensary has been completely renovated

nd much improved.

C 18

19. Besides instruments for small minor operations which are being gradually added to the Dispensaries, two of them have now their own microscope, and it is hoped that all will have these in time. They are specially for differentiating the malarias which form a big percentage of the cases treated.

20. The Dispensaries, among their other activities, under- take the removal also of corpses to mortuaries and they supply coffins.

21. Sick, too serious for outpatient treatment, are removed by the Dispensaries to hospital.

THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

22. There has been a steady and ever increasing number of patients in this Hospital but the year 1932 saw for various reasons fluctuations in some departments.

Inpatients (General).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment. Total.

1932

5,918

5,086

11,004

1931

5,704

5,246

10,950

Inpatients (Maternity).

1932

1,560

1931

1,679

Still-births.

67

63

Deaths.

Brought in dead.

1932

1931

1,869

1,013

2,314

1,618

There were seven hundred and one operations including

many major ones.

Outpatients (General).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment. Total.

1932

34,095

185,273

219,368

1931

57,063

184,997

242,060

Eye Clinic.

Baby Clinic.

1932

1931

13,022

1,103

14,277

1,486

C 19

23. A great many patients come to the Tung Wah Hospital from outside the Colony attracted by its fame and its unstinted charity.

24. A large proportion of the deaths in the Hospital occur within twenty-four hours of admission. The sick poor go in to die there. Relatives bring in their dying when they wish to avoid postmortems. Six hundred and forty-nine were brought in moribund.

25. Those 'brought in dead' include bodies sent from ships in harbour; and from neighbouring hospitals; and from the Public Dispensaries; and also from private houses.

26. The number of vaccinations does not increase on account of new Vaccination Stations established outside.

27. Though the number of patients who choose their own herbalists to treat their complaints is still too large, most of these are not suffering seriously. For anything very important they learn by experience to put themselves in the hands of a scientifically trained doctor.

28. The X-ray Department continues to justify itself.

THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

29. General beds 231. Maternity beds 51. 16 beds in the new Tuberculosis ward. Private wards 12.

30. This Hospital does for Kowloon and the Peninsula what the Tung Wah Hospital does for the island of Hong Kong.

31. The accommodation cannot keep pace with the growth in population. Kowloon has considerably more than doubled itself during the last ten years. No patient is turned away for want of room and in both medical and surgical wards it is common to find two in a bed, and others sleeping on the floor.

32. The staff consists of a Senior Resident Medical Officer, whose salary is paid by the Government, and three Junior Medical Officers. Before the year 1932 there were only two Juniors.

33. There are also a number of Chinese Herbalists, without any recognised qualification, who practise Chinese medicine and are paid by Hospital funds.

34. The patients, on admittance, can choose whether they desire treatment on Western or Chinese lines.

C 20

Inpatients.

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1932

1931

8,973 8,204

2,839

11,712

2,283

10,487

(including

maternity)

1932

1931

Outpatients.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

97,398

137,935

Western treatment.

40,537

(including

gynaecology)

51,600

90,500

142,100

35. Eye cases were cared for by Dr. Basto till he went on leave. There were 2,520 cases.

36. Vaccinations numbered 1,873.

37. There was an Infant Welfare Clinic every Monday and 1,062 babies were seen. The Ante-natal Clinic still remains small, only seventy-one cases. There were 3,327 labours. In 1931 there were 3,245. Still-births were 183.

38. Major operations amounted to 255. In 1931 they were 157.

39. The number of deaths in hospital was 3,573. Figures of deaths in these Chinese Hospitals are apt to be misleading, as many sick are brought in when relatives think death is certain and nothing more can be done for them.

THE TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

40. This Hospital continues to do very good work. It serves the useful purpose of reminding the older foundation-the Tung Wah-what it is possible for a Chinese Hospital to be. Every- thing is new and clean and it had the advantage of starting fresh in up-to-date buildings.

41. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Officer paid by Government, Dr. Phoon Seck Weng, and two Junior Medical Officers appointed by the Directors of the Tung Wah.

42. The total number of beds was one hundred and ninety- five.

- C 21

43. The one hundred and ninety-five beds in use during 1932 were added to at the end of the year by eighty-four new ones, which will make a total of two hundred and seventy-nine. These eighty-four beds comprise seventy beds (five wards) for general cases and fourteen (one ward) for maternity cases.

44. Actually these numbers are augmented by canvas beds placed in the wards when the pressure of the cases is great.

Inpatients.

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Maternity. Total.

1932

2,690

1,872

588 5,150

1931

2,185

1,345

667

4,197

Outpatients.

Western

Chinese

treatment.

treatment. •

Total.

1932

16,012

46,283

62,295

1931

12,471

45,931

58,402

Major Operations.

Under General Anaesthesia.

1932

1931

1932

1931

159

116 Vaccinations.

414

273

45. Thirteen nurses were about to sit for the Midwives Board Examination after a period of three years training.

46. The number of children admitted continues to increase, and there is now a new Children's Ward of fourteen beds.

47. The number of cases in the private wards which showed a decrease after the fees were raised from $2.50 to $4.00 has given signs of improvement again since the charge was made $3.00 a day, including food and medicine.

48. There is improvement in the health of the general staff, and there are now very few cases of Malaria since prophylactic doses of Quinine were instituted and mosquito nets supplied to

the nurses.

49. The deaths in 1932 numbered 1,163. A large proportion of these died within twenty-four hours after admission.

C 22

The Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital.

50. This is an Infectious Diseases Hospital run in connection with the Tung Wah. The accommodation is good, with plenty of room and the wards detached and connected by covered ways. All cases of smallpox are treated by Chinese herbalist because of lack of facilities for treating the disease on Western lines and there are no quarters for nurses.

51. There are thirty iron beds, but as many more patients could be taken in on bed boards. At present only smallpox cases apply for admission.

52. Seventy-six cases were admitted there in the year Forty-four died. One case remained over from 1931.

53. Though normally only smallpox patients are sent to this Hospital, it was employed during the months of August and September for cholera cases. The Tung Wah Hospital thea supplied the whole staff and assisted the Government to fight the disease.

Table A.

arrangements made regarding them. Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1932 and the

:

:.

...

15

N

9

19

5

52

10

1

2

2

17

52

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from Singapore and Bangkok.

Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or guardians.

Runaway maid-servants,

Total.

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of

husband.

Placed in charge of parents

and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

January, 1932,

In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

Admitted during the year,

Total,

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1932,

331

100

t-

4

25

61

72

500

215 10

346

7❘ 10

31

2

14

36

500

13186 13 14 5 3 5 3

66 79

552

225

11

13190] 15 | 20

3

753

7 53 552

12

6

53

·C 23

Table B.

Po LEUNG KUK

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1932.

RECEIPTS.

C.

C.

EXPENDITURE.

€9

C.



C.

C 24

Balance from previous year,........

Subscriptions:-

3,193.51

By the Elected Committee :-

Yue Lan Celebrations, West

Point,

1,588.81

(see Table C),

Balance :-

14,900.35

Guilds,

3,710.50

Yim Fong & A. Fong Photo-

On Deposit,

2,000.00

graphers,

625.00

Theatres,

600.00

At Current Account,

5.241.16

Grant by Hong Kong Govt.

7,000.00

7,241.16

Rent from House property.

4,098.70

Miscellaneous

114.70

Cash deposit from Industrial Department......

1,087.54

18,825.25

Interest :-

122.75

22,141.51

On Current Account,..

Total.....$

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Au Shiu Cho and Ho Wah Sang, Members of the Board of Direction.

Total.

$

22,141.51

C 27

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

*Personal

Year.

Emoluments Special

and Other Expenditure. Expenditure. Charges.

Total

Total Revenue.

1923......

72,407.12

72,407.12 16,777.69

1924...... 57,173.08

57,173.08 18,716.08

1925...... 67,184.59

67,184.59 15,741.94

1926...... 68,496.98

68,496.98 19,740.62

1927...... 76,979.90

120

77,099.90

1928...... 73,738.41

22,318.25

73,738.41 20,040.53

1929...... 78,121.08

1930...... 130,279.41

78,121.08

130,279.41 20,176.06

16,828.36

1931...... 135,424.29

135,424.29 18,771.59

1932.....

130,880.54

130,880.54 17,344.03

"Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services attached

to department."

C 28

Table IV.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under

"The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915", during the year 1932.

Women and Children 1932.

Total Women

and Children

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

1931.

Macassar

177

59

96

332

548

Straits Settlements and

F.M.S.

4,875

849

1,069

6,793

12,487

Dutch Indies

20

101

174

295

148

Belawan Deli

181

54

82

317

405

British North Borneo

72

69

96

237

653

Honolulu

164

29

44

237

198

United States of America..

147

42

199

388

519

South America

13

1

5

19

18

Mauritius and Re-Union...

95

25

123

192

Australia

13

7

20

8

India

88

31

55

174

102

South Africa

4

4

8

Vancouver

72

24

82

178

253

Batavia

1,179

210

334

1,723

2,213

Sourabaya

183

38

77

298

4

Rangoon

110

36

61

207

151

Billiton

4

Victoria

9

Seattle

27

2 6

7

18

41

82

115

178

7,550

1,508

2,424

11,482

18,122

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1932.

C 25

RECEIPTS.

C.

Expenditure.



Balance from previous year,

159.99

Decorations,

C.

10.50

*

C.

Received from Permanent Board,.

14,900.35

Food,

3,503.40

Miscellaneous Receipts,

36.52

Light and Fire,

1,686.06

Premium on bank notes,

23.00

Miscellaneous,.......

2,013.53

l'assage Money,

327.75

Petty Expenditure,

363.34

Printing,

60.00

Repairs,

22.30

Stationery,

147,34

Telephone,

126.00

Medical Apparatus and Drugs,..

885.70

Wages,

5,047.80

Water Account,

810.50

Balance,

15,004.22

115,64

Total.....

15,119.86

Total,

15,119,86

C 26

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Personal Emoluments*

Othed Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

$130,841.70 $128;379.93

1,440.00

1,337.05

Library

Incidental Expenses

Grant to District Watch Fund...

1,019.72

986.83

122.80

176.73

2,000.00

+

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges

$135,424.22 $130,880.54

**Includes Officers of Cadet, S. C. & A. and J. C. Services.”

Transferred to Miscellaneous Services.

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Licences and Internal Revenue

not otherwise specified.

Chinese Boarding House Licences

$16,309.33

$15,996.33

Emigration Passage Brokers Licences.

1,200.00

1,000.00

Forfeitures

909.20

10.00

Fees of Court or Office.

Certificates to Chinese Proceeding to

Foreign Countries

200.00

150.00

Miscellaneous

8.00

Official Signatures

106.00

115.00

Interest.

Interest accrued on Official Account

with the Bank

16.06

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Condemned Stores

14.70

Other Miscellaneous Receipts..

31.00

50.00

Total

$18,771.59

$17,344.03

C 29

Table V.

NUMBER OF ASSISTED EMIGRANTS.

Rejected.

Year.

Examined. Passed.

Un- willing.

Rejected Rejected

at S.C.A.

by Doctor.

Total rejected.

Percentage

of rejection.

1931,

4,297 3,817

16 *456

480

11-17

1932,

2,017 1,890

1

120

127

6.3

*This number includes those who failed to appear for the final examination.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1932.

Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to be cured 6.

Native districts of Assisted Emigrants passed.

West River

East River

North River

101

257

24

Canton

1,002

Delta

178

Kwong Sai.

223

Southern Districts

88

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiangsi)...

19

Total....

1,890

1

C 30

Table V-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1931

1932

Dutch Indies:

Muntok

Singkep

3,185

1,263

44

Belawan Deli

299

3

Samoa

Soloman Islands

Ocean Island

264

1

163

Nauru

Nombasa

Sydney

Manila

New Hebrides

Total..

448

CO HA

4

4

9

5

10

3

3,817

1,890

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, according to the language spoken gives the following figures:-

Cantonese

1,112

Hakka

501

Hoklo

124

Southern Mandarin (mostly from Kwong Sai and Hunan) Hainanese

97

56

1,890

Table VI.

Chinese boarding house licence returns under the Boarding House Ordinance, No. 23 of 1917.

Class.

No. in existence at beginning of

1932

No. in existence at end of

1932

I II IV V VI VII Total.

.2 62 7 252 301 91 715

.2 58

2 219 301 87 669

C 31

Table VII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1932.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

c.

ée

C.

*A

C.

""

To Balance,

Contributions, (Victoria $59,440.07 and Kowloon $18,456.02).....

115,847.69

Wages and Salaries :--

Chief District Watchmen,

3,381.00

Assistant Chief District Watch-

77,896.09

men,. Detectives,

2,223.00 ..10,615.00

1st Class District Watchmen,... 8,134.37

""

Grant by Hong Kong Government,...

2,000.00

2nd 3rd

33

""

Payment to District Watchmen for

Special Services,

"

52

15,138,30 2,988.22

42,479.89

2,419.00

Miscellaneous :-

Cooks,..

,, Fines,

100,50

Coolies,

Messengers,

1,104.00 840.00 96.00

""

House Rents,

996.00

Office Staff:-

""

Sales of unserviceable stores

5.00

Manager,

Collectors,

""

Interest on Hong Kong Government

Public Works 6% Loan,

2,280.00

Total.....

2,040.00

180.00 1,176.00

1,356.00

45,875.89

Interest on Fixed Deposits

1,200,00

Other Charges

Interest on Current Account,

670.55

Allowance to Detectives,

2,032.00

>>

Medal Allowance,

1,218.00

Rent Allowance,

2,347.20

Conservancy Allowance,....

54.00

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

1,315.12

Electric Charges,

1,012.83

Rents of Telephone,

468.00

Stationery and Printing,

569.72

Uniform and Equipment,

2,174.18

Furniture,

53.70

Repairs and Fittings,

1,067.30

Reconstruction of District

Watchmen Quarters,

1,977.00

Crown Rent,

7.00

Premium on Fire Policies,

426.84

Gratuities and Rewards,

5,046.00

Photos for D.W.s,

Sundries,

37.80 995.89

20,802.58

Pensions :-

Ex. C.D.W. Tsui Cheuk and others,

Total Expenditure,.......

Balance,

3,966.00

70,644.47

132,770,36

:

Total,........ $ 203,414.83

Total,

.$

203,414.83

Balance -

Hong Kong Public Works 6% Loan,.. Cash $

.$38,000.00

54,610.36

Fixed Deposits

Advance to C.D.W.s.

Fixed Deposits

Total,......

.........

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

A. G. CLARKE,

Asst. Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

KO CHUNG WOON,

Manager, D.W.F.

Hong Kong, 31st December, 1932.

10,000.00

160.00 30,000.00

132,770.36

Examined and found correct.

WONG TAK KWONG

Members of

District Watchmen Committee.

1

Receipts.



C 32

Table VIII.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

CASH ACCOUNT 1932.

$

C.

Expenditure.

C.

Cash account from last year:

Tung Wah Hospital account

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital Kwong Wah Hospital

$166,297.58

Debit balance due by Man Mo Temple from

92,470.89

46,049.65

Do.

Emergency Fund

96,861.50

Maternity Hospital

3,809.89

$405,489.51

Do.

Current account with Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

157.710.66

Do.

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

82,979.60

Do.

Do.

Man Mo Temple

34,698.45

Do.

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

Man Mo Temple Emergency Fund Maternity Hospital

last year Land Purchasing Fund

last year

$

259.19

157,150.00

90,033.37

169,539.84

33,188.71

2,893.80

3,907.77

Do.

Maternity Hospital

4,436.44

Do.

San Mi Year Land

Do.

Emergency Fund

2,324.68

Purchasing Fund...

33,778.89

Do.

Do.

Po Leung Kuk Site

Do.

Po Leung Kuk Site

Re-building Fund...

1,800.00

re-building Fund....

5,002.25

San Mi Year Land

Provisions for staff

17,908.41

Purchasing Fund...

520.00

Salaries for staff

59,890.73

Rents from House property

105,588.25

Provisions for sickroom & destitute persons

36,216.20

Subscriptions collected from steamers

1,793.24

Sick room sundries

16,846.12

Annual subscriptions of Hongs

9,177.00

Hospital sundries

9,022.39

Annual subscriptions from wealthy persons

7,250.00

Chinese drugs

31,632.80

Subscriptions and donations

12,322.50

Western drugs

19,883.95

Subscriptions from charitable persons

65,636.91

Repairs

Special contributions for supply of medicines,

Destitutes and Patients' passages

quilted clothing, coffins and shrouds

3,760.50

Repairs to landed property

9,289.54 557.15 1,127.92

Government Grants

8,000.00

Lights

13,979.69

Government Grants for coffins

10,000.00

Insurance

1,828.31

Amount received from Government on account

Crown rent and taxes

17,057.36

of Western medicines

2,500.00

Grant to Old Men's Asylum, Kowloon

200.00

Grant from Man Mo Temple

2,500.00

Sundries for coffin home and burial ground

508.47

Contributions from Theatres

2,000.00

Building costs

190.00

Subscriptions from coffin home

4,730.00

Small-pox Hospital expenses

1,047.41

Interest on loans and deposits

19,672.97

Stamps and stationery

4.402.13

Premium on notes and discount on goods

Grant to Kwong Wah Hospital

2,500.00

1.450.06

purchased

Grant to Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

16,500.00

7,895.05

Grant to Fong Pin Hospital

1,000.00

Fees from Patients

17,522.50

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital

3,692.17

Rents from Coffin home

Sale of medicines & kitchen refuse, boat-hire

Burial of bodies by Government Mortuary

2,209.C7

& rent from red cross ambulance

13,796.30

Interest on deposits

6,382.81

Rent from Yat Pit Ting and Wing Pit Ting Rent from iron burner

2,300.00

1,911.00

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital Coffins for bodies buried by Government

6,397.63

Receipts for meals supplied to returned

3,303.70

Mortuary BALANCE

5,234.42

211.820.22

emigrants

Total

$993,069.32

Total

$993,069.32

The balance of $211,820.22 consists of the following credit balances:

Tung Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

Kwong Wah Hospital

Emergency Fund

Maternity Hospital Man Mo Temple

$183,912.28

80,641.71

38,995.88

96,292.38

4,338.56

1,250.55

$405,431.36

3,202.25

193,611.14

$211,820.22

from which must be deducted the following debit balances :

San Mi Year Land Purchasing Fund... $190,408.89 Po Leung Kuk Site Re-building Fund

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

LI TUNG, Auditor.

} Directors.

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933,

CHAN LIM PAK, LAM YAM TSUN,

(FOR PARTICULARS SEE SEPARATE SHEET ATTACHED)

INCOME.

C 33

Table IX.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT 1932.

$

C.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

Funds brought forward from 1930

$166,297.58

MAINTENANCE

Provisions:

Food for staff

$17,908.41

ORDINARY

Food for sick room

36,216.20

$54,124.61

Subscriptions:

Annual subscriptions from Hongs 9,177.00

Subscriptions collected on

steamers

Surgery and Dispensary:--

Chinese drugs

$31,632.80

Western drugs

19.883.95

1,793.24

51,516.75

Subscriptions from charitable

Establishments :-

persons

65,636.91

Light

13,979.69

Subscriptions from wealthy

Insurance

1,828.31

persons

7,250.00

Repairs

9,289.54

Subscriptions and donations

12.322.50

Repairs to hospital property

1,127.92

96,179.65

Sick room expenses

16,846.12

Grants:

Small pox hospital expenses

1,047.41

Government

8,000.00

Coffin home and burying

Government for coffins

10,000.00

Government for western medicine

2,500.00

ground expenses

Crown rent and taxes

508.47

17,057.36

Man Mo Temple

2,500.00

61,684.82

23,000.00

Salaries, wages, &c.:-

Special contributions :

Staff salaries

59,890.73

For Mortuary expenses

4,730.00

Sundries

9.022.39

From Theatres

2,000.00

68,913.12

For supply of medicines, quilted

clothing, coffins & shrouds....

Appeals, grants, &c. :-

3,760.50

Destitutes & Patients' passages..

557.15

10,490.50

Kwong Wah Hospital..

2,500.00

Investments:

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital...

16,500.00

Rents from house property

105,588.25

Old Men's Asylum Kowloon..

200.00

Rents from coffin home

17.522.50

Fong Pin Hospital

1,000.00

Rents from Yat Pit Ting and

20,757.15

Wing Pit Ting

2,300.00

Miscellaneous:

Rents from iron burner

1,911.00

Stationery, &c.

4,402.13

Interest

19,672.97

Burial of bodies by Tung

146,994.72

Wah Hospital

3,682.17

Other Receipts:-

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung

Premium on notes & discount

Wah Hospital

6,397.63

on goods purchased

1,450.06

Burial of bodies by Government

Fee from Patients

7,895.05

Mortuary

2.209.67

Sale of medicines, kitchen

Coffins for bodies buried by

refuse, boat-hire & rent from

red cross ambulance

Government

5,234.42

13,796.30

Interest on Deposits

6,382.81

23,141.41

28,308.83

EXTRAORDINARY

EXTRAORDINARY

Receipts for meals supplied to

returned emigrants

Building costs

3,303.70

BALANCE

Total

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

$469,407.56

Total

190.00

183,912.28

$469,407.56

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

CHAN LIM PAK, LAM YAM TSUN,

Directors.

LI TUNG,

Auditor.

Table X.

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1932.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

in account with Kwong Wah Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1931 $ 46,049.65 | By amount paid during 1932 amount received during 1932

82,979.60

$ 129,029.25

Balance

>>

$ 90,033.37

38,995.88

$ 129,029.25

To amount received during 1932

C 34

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Man Mo Temple.

$ 34,698.45 | By amount overdrawn in previous year payments made during 1932 Balance

""

259.19

33,188.71

1,250.55

$ 34,698.45

$ 34,698.45

Table X-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1932.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Emergency Fund.

To credit balance brought forward from 1931 $ 96,861.50

""

amount received during 1932

2,324.68

By payments made during 1932 Balance

"

$99,186.18

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Maternity Hospital.

2,893.80

96,292.38

$ 99,186.18

To credit balance brought forward from 1931 $

""

amount received during 1932

3,809.89 | By payments made during 1932 4,436.44 Balance

8,246.33

$ 3,907.77 4,338.56

*A*

8,246.33

35

Table X-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1982.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL,

in account with Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1931 $92,470.89 amount received during 1932

By payments made during 1932 Balance

157,710.66

"

$ 250,181.55

$169,539.84

80,641.71

$ 250,181.55

SAN MI LAND PURCHASING FUND

C 36

To rent collected during 1932.

"}

Balance

520.00

190,408.89

$ 190,928.89

By amount overdrawn in previous year ,, payments made during 1932

$ 157,150.00

33,778.89

$ 190,928.89

Table X-Continued.

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1932.

PO LEUNG KUK SITE RE-BUILDING FUND

To proceeds of sale of old materials

Balance.

,,

$

$

1,800.00 By payments made during 1932 3,202.25

5,002.25

5,002.25

$

5,002.25

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

LI TUNG, Auditor,

CHAN LIM PAK,

Directors.

LAM YAM TSUN,

37

.

Table XI.

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1932,

Balance from last year's account,...

Balance with Tung Wah Hospital at end of last year...

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital,

Grant from Tung Wah Hospital,

Government Grant,

$ 71.831.84

92.470.89

Balance left with Tung Wah Hospital at end of last year,

169,539.84

16,500.00

Salaries to staff,

25,000.00

2,500,00

35

"

sick room,

17,000.00

100.00

11



32,035.35

4,486.00

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital,.

Provisions for staff,

Sundry expenses for sickroom,

Chinese medicine,

Western medicine,...

hospital,.

7,971.92

Repairs &c.....

.....

2.061.67

Lights,

58,420.00

Crown rent,

634.87

...

2,287.61

Stationery, Stamps and Advertisements, Coffins,..

Burial expenses..

Government Grant for Western Medicine,

Grant from Chinese Temples,

Subscriptions from wealthy persons,

39

Charitable persons,.

Interest on loans and deposits,...

Fees from Patients and rents of rooms, Rents from landed property,..

...

Subscriptions towards erection of the two wings Premium on notes and discount on goods purchased, Sale of kitchen refuse, patients' ricksha hire, &c.,

$ 502,840.02

Water account,

Coal,

Building expenses for the two wings..

$ 92,470.89 157,710.66

24,832.13

7,305.47

10.320.52

5,732.35

4,716.81

15,000.37

8,107.62

9,127.30

5,098.03

1.00

2,107.42

2,938.51

442,77

552.25

4.684.40

60,592,94

Sundry expenses for branch establishment for giving free medical advice and free medicine, Porcelain portraits of subscribers of sums of $500 or

9,249.59

over,

Balance in hand,.

257.25

81,591.74

$ 502,840.02

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

LI TUNG, Auditor.

LAM YAM TSUN,

CHAN LIM RAN; } Directors.

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

INCOME.

Table XII.

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL Income and Expenditure Account 1932.

EXPENDITURE.

C 39

Account brought forward from 1931

$173,302,73

ORDINARY.

ORDINARY.

Maintenance :-

Provisions for staff

$7,305.47

Subscriptions :-

10,320.52

Subscriptions from wealthy persons...... $ 100.00

$ 17,625.99

19

from charitable persons... 32,035.35

Surgery and Dispensary :-

32,135.35

Chinese drugs

15,000.37

Grants :--

Western drugs

8,107.62

Government

25,000.00

23,107.99

for Western medicine

2.500.00

Establishments :-

Grant from Tung Wah Hospital

16,500.00

Light

5,098.03

Chinese temples

17,000.00

Repairs, &c.

9,127.30

61,000.00

Sick room expenses

5,732.35

Investments:-

Interest

Crown rent

1.00

4,486.00

19,958.68

Rents

2,061.67

Salaries, &c. :—

6,547.67

Staff salaries

Other receipts :-

Hospital sundries..

Fees from patients and rents of rooms... Premium on notes and discount on

7,971.92

Miscellaneous :-

goods purchased

634.87

Stationery, stamps and advertisements

Sale of kitchen refuse and patients,

Coffins...

ricksha hire, &c.

··

2,287.64

Water

....

10,894.43

Burial expenses..

Coal.

Porcelain portraits of subscribers of

$500 or over

Branch Establishment for giving free medical

advice and medicine

24,832.13

4,716.81

29,548.94

2,107.42

2.938.51

552.25

442.77

4,684.40

257.25

10,982.60

Balance

$283,880.18

9,249.59

173,406.39

$ 283,880.18

Table XII,-Continued.

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL In Account with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount received from Tung Wah Hospital in 1932. Balance

$ 169,539.84

80,641.71

Balance brought forward from 1931. Amount paid Tung Wah Hospital in 1932

$ 92,470.89

157,710.66

To subscriptions received

Balance..

$ 250,181.55

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL

In Account with the Fund for Building the two Wings.

$ 250,181.55

58,420.00

2,172.94

By amount paid for building work

60,592.94

$ 60,592.94

60,592,94

!

Table XII,-Continued.

FINANCIAL POSITION OF THE TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

Cash balance as per Cash account

Credit balance with Tung Wah Hospital

Debit balance due by Fund for building of the two Wings

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

$ 81,591.74

80,641.71

2,172.94

$ 164,406.39

LI TUNG,

Auditor.

CHAN LIM PAK,Į LAM YAM TSUN, Í

Directors.

C 41

Receipts.

Table XIII.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account 1932.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

C 42

C.

To Rent of Temple property

19,206.00

By Donation to Tung Wah Hospital

2,500.00

Rent from temple keeper

7,338.65

Expenses of Free School

22,935.58

Government grant to schools

5,625.00

Repairs to properties and Schools

2,336,81

Miscellaneous receipts.

28.80

Police rates Crown rent and Insurance premium

3,417.47

Amount received from the Hung Shing Temple Fund.

2,500,00

Water Rates

613.50

Miscellaneous payments

1,385.35

Amount overdrawn in previous year

259.19

Balance

1,250.55

Total,..

$

34,698.45

Total,...

34,698.45

Receipts.

Table XIV.

Emergency Fund Account 1932.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

C.

To Balance brought forward from 1931

96,861.50

Passage money for 172 destitutes,

2,893.80

ני

Interest on deposits

2,324.68

Balance

96,292.38

Total,.

99,186.18

Total,.

99,186.18

C 43 -

Table XV.

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital for 1932.

Receipts.

To Balance brought forward from 1931

Rent of Hospital Property.......

Interest on deposits

Total,

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$

C.

$

3,809.89

By Repairs to properties and water rates.

48.37

4,345.00

""

Crown rent, police rates & Insurance.

659.40

91.44

""

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, rent for the four quarters 1932

3,200.00

Balance,

""

4,338.56

8,246.33

Total,

8,246.33

Revenue.

C 45

Table XVI.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE BREWIN CHARITY DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$

c.

$

C.

""

""

;

>>

"7

Interest from Mr. Lo Wun Ching for

To Balance from 1931

""

Subscriptions from Directors, Tung Wah

Hospital, 1932

Subscription from Committee, Po Leung

Kuk, 1932

Subscription from Mr. Lau Yuk Wan, being

refund of auditor's fee

Subscription from Directors, Tung Wah Hospital, to make good the balance of the gratuity for Sat A Li that was lost through the bankruptcy of the Wing Hing Bank

Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for mortgage.. Interest from Mr. U Nga Ping for mortgage. Interest from Mr. Chan Tsat for mortgage... Interest from Mr. Li Sze Ngai for mortgage.. Interest from Mr. Lau Yung Yan for

mortgage

Interest from Mr. Ho Nai Hing for mortgage Interest from Mr. Kwok Hung Fuk for

mortgage

mortgage

50.00

190,642.30

1,700.00

By Charity for Widows and Orphans

9,970.40

"

Subscription to Old Men's Home

2,400.00

325.00

91

Salary for Accountant, Mr. Chan Yik Wan..

100.00

Salary for Clerk, Mr. Wong Shut Ming

Stamps

60.00

10.00

Auditor's fee for Mr. Lau Yuk Wan

50.00

وو

134.85

1,344.00

Gratuity to Sat A Li

320.10

2,587.44

720.00

720.00

Refund to Tung Wah Hospital on account

of 1931

500.00

1,620.00 2,160.00

21

431.22

90.00

2"

Interest from Mr. Lo Luk for mortgage

594.96

Interest from Mr. Ip Shau for mortgage

360.00

Balance of gratuity to Sat A Li that was lost through the bankruptcy of the Wing Hing Bank but has been made good by subscription from Directors, Tung Wah Hospital

Conveyance expenses for collecting interest,

etc.

134.85

27

Interest from Ng Yan Chan for mortgage...

320.00

Cash from Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

Printed matters by the Hing Shing

""

for Shin Siu Sze

84.00

Interest on current account with Shanghai

Balance

9.60

10.00

190.792.35

Bank

145.64

Interest on War Bonds of Hong Kong Interest on fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze

with Shanghai Bank

300.00

27.89

Total

$204,357.30

Total

By fixed deposit with Messrs. Chan Tsat & Li Sze Ngai on mortgage of houses Nos. 7 and 19, Temple Street

"

>>

Mr. Lau Yung Yan on mortgage of houses Nos. 13, 15 and 17, Temple Street..

Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage of house property in Wanchai Road

21

19

17

1

""

""

""

Mr. U Nga Ping on mortgage of houses Nos. 54 and 56, Bonham Strand

Mr. Lo Luk on mortgage of house No. 82, Whitfield

Mr. Ho Ngai Hing on mortgage of house property in Jervois Street

Mr. Ip Shau on mortgage of house No. 136, Hollywood Road

Mr. Ng Pan Chan on mortgage of house No. 103, Queen's Road, Central

Hong Kong Public Works Loan

fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank

current account deposits with Shanghai Bank

11

deposit with Tung Wah Hospital

Total......

CHAN LIM PAK,

LAM YAM TSUN,

$204,357.30

$16,000.00

18.000.00

16,000.00

45,000.00

8,500.00

40,000.00

10,000.00

20,000.00

10,000.00

1.422.62

5,357.45

512.28

$190,792.35

Directors, Tung Wah Hospital.

RECEIPTS.

C 46

Table XVII.

:

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Cash Account 1932.

0.

PAYMENTS.

CA

C.

Balance brought forward from previous year. Government Grant

Government Special Donation

Government Donation for Western drugs Government Donation for giving free coffins.. Current account with Tung Wah Hospital.... Grant from Tung Wah Hospital

1,504.98 8,500 00

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital

$2,979.60

Salaries for Hospital staff.......

27,497.31

25,000.00

Provisions for staff..

10.119.46

2,500.00

Hospital sundries

3,562.58

7,000.00

Provisions for patients

19,831.07

90,033.37

Sick room expenses.....

3,816.93

2,500.00

Charcoal

1,178.48

Subscriptions from charitable persons and yearly

subscriptions

Chinese drugs

17,043.38

35,187.35

Western drugs..

16.003.34

Subscriptions from Ko Shing, Lee and Po Hing

Lights

7,889.81

Theatres

3,130.00

Telephone rent

478.00

Donations from A Fong & Yim Fong Photographers Donations from Old Yaumati Chinese Public Dis-

625.00

Stationery, stamps and advertisements Water

2,102.77

1,355.25

pensary

5,070.00

Furniture and repairs

4,162.69

Sale of Chinese medicine

593.27

Coffins

5,€83.99

Miscellaneous income

681.56

Burial of bodies from Hospital Mortuary

735.70

Payments by in-patients and for drugs

18,646.81

Burial of bodies from Old Men's Asylum...

23.80

Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs

Special Fund to Income & Expenditure A/C... Amount received from Hung Shing Temple

Burial of bodies from Yaumati Public Mortuary...

609.75

12,361,51

Grave stones

336.00

Crown rent

12.50

Account

390.00

Temples

6.791.40

Amount received from Shui Yuet Kung Account Rent from temple and wharf..

1,307.60

Bedding and clothing for patients..

1,859.43

7,190.40

Rent from Ambulance and iron burner

2,009.50

Interest and house rent collected in respect of Free

Paid in connection with Maternity Hospital Building work in connection with Tsin Li Ting.. Paid in connection with Ambulance

69.73

3,200.00

509.77

Chinese Drugs Special Fund...

14,358.40

Building work in connection with Operating

Subscriptions towards Segregation Room

200.00

Various deposits received

700,00

Room & Segregation Room...... Amount paid on account of Free Chinese Drugs

3,239,30

Cost of meals supplied to nurses

2,414.00

Special Fund....

14.358.40

Western Medicine utensils

126.00

Surgical Instruments

1,212.24

Various deposits returned. Balance

700.00 4,415.07

$ 241,903.75

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

LI TUNG, Auditor.

$ 241,903.75

CHAN LIM PAK, LAM YAM TSUN.

Directors.

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

INCOME.

C 47

Table XVIII.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL

Income and Expenditure Account 1932.

EXPENDITURE.

C.

C.

Balance from previous account including $1,252.76 advanced for building of Hung Shing Temple, ...

A. MAINTENANCE.

31,838.30

Provisions:-

Staff.

A.-ORDINARY.

Patients...

.$10,119.46 19,831.07

29,950.53

Payment for meals supplied to nurses,

2,414.00

Dispensary:-

To amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs

Chinese drugs,

17,043.38

Special Fund,

12,361.51

Western drugs,

16,003.34

Rent from Temple and Wharf,

7,190.40

33,046.72

Rent from ambulance and iron burner,

2,009.50

Establishments :-

Government Grant (General),

.$ 8,500.00

Lights,

7.889.81

--

do.

for Western drugs,...

2,500.00

Furniture and repairs,

4,162.69

do.

for free coffins,

7,000.00

Sick room expenses..

3,816.93

18,000.00

Charcoal,

1,178.48

Subscriptions:-

Telephone rent,.

478.00

Charitable persons,

35,187.35

Water,

1,355.25

Entertainments :--

Sundries,

3.562.58

Ko Shing, Lee and Po Hing Theatres,

3,130.00

Crown rent,

12,50

Donations -

Western Medicine utensils,

126.00

A Fong and Yim Fong Photographers, Old Yaumati Public Dispensary,

625.00

Surgical Instruments,......

1,212.24

5,070.00

Bedding and clothing for patients,

1,859.43

5,695.00

25,653.91

Patients Payments :-

Salaries :-

In and Out Patients,

Chinese drugs sold,

18,646.81 593.27

Hospital staff,

27,497.31

19,240.08

MISCELLANEOUS.

Other receipts :

Miscellaneous income,....

681,56

Stationery, stamps & advertisements.

2,102.77

Temples,.

6,791.40

Coffins,

5,683.99

B.-EXTRAORDINARY,

Burial of bodies,

735.70

Burial of bodies from Yaumati...

609.75

Donations:

Burial of bodies from Old Men's

Government Special donation, Tung Wah Hospital Donation,

25,000.00 2,500.00

Asylum,

23.80

Grave stones,

336.00

27,500.00

Payments in connection with am-

bulance

509.77

16,793.18

Balance,

32,306.05

$ 165,247.70

$ 165,247.70

Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report.

LI TUNG, Auditor.

CHAN LIM PAK, Directors. LAM YAM TSUN, Í

Table XIX.

FINANCIAL POSITION OF THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL 1932.

Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount left deposited with Tung Wah Hospital

at end of 1931,

Subscriptions from charitable persons,

Interest,

Rents,

C.

Crown rent and taxes,..

64,761.80

Repairs,....

1,200.00

Rent collector's remuneration,

3,786.40

Sundry expenses,

9,372.00

Transferred to Kwong Wah Hospital for free

gift of Chinese Medicine, Balance,

$ 79,120.20

Current Account with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount deposited with Tung Wah Hospital at end of 1931,

Amount paid to Tung Wah Hospital during 1932,

$

C.

46,049.65

82,979.60

$129,029.25

Amount received from Tung Wah Hospital,...

Balance with Tung Wah Hospital at end of 1932,

$

C.

1,466.04

192.70

297.00

41.15

12,361.51

64,761.80

$ 79,120.20.

$

C.

90,033.37

38,995.88

$ 129,029.25

Table XIX,-Continued.

Kwong Wah Hospital in Account with Hung Shing Temple Account.

Credit amount carried forward,

$

390.00 Rent received from temple keeper,

Kwong Wah Hospital in Account with Maternity Hospital Fund.

Balance from last account,

7,124.81

Paid for stone tablet,. Balance,

7,124.81

wong Wah Hospital in Account with Shui Yuet Kung Account.

Kw



390.00

C.

69.73

7,055.08

7,124.81

Credit amount carried forward,.

$

1,307.60

Rent received from temple keeper,..................................

1,307.60

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts particulars as per my Chinese Report. LI TUNG, Auditor.

CHAN LIM PAK, LAM YAM TSUN, Directors.

Hongkong, 8th March, 1933.

C 49

Table XX.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Fund for Building Operation Room and Segregation Room.

To Balance from previous account

39

subscriptions received during the year

To Ealance from previous account

3,696.68

200.00

Building work by Kin Cheong Contractors Installation of lights

$ 2,595.00

345.00

Installation of water service.

Porcelain portraits for subscribers ..... Furniture..

Sundries

148.00

40.50

106.00

Balance

4.80

657.38

3,896.68

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Tsin Li Ting Building Fund.

$ 3,896.68

C 50

$ 3,200.00

Paid Kin Cheong Contractors for construction costs

$ 3,200.00

To Balance of last year's account...

77

deposit from Yuen Ping Luen

Table XX,-Continued.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Various Deposits.

$ 2,947,60

By deposit repaid to Ynen Shau Shau..

700.00

Balance

}}

3,647.60

$

700.00

2,947.60

$ 3,647,60

Table XX,—Continued.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Summary.

Liabilities.

Fund for rebuilding Operation Room and Segrega-

Assets.

tion Room in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital. $ 657.38 Maternity Hospital Fund in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital.

Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund in cash... $ 4,415.07 Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund deposited

with Tung Wah Hospital

38,995.88

7,055.08

Various deposits with Kwong Wah Hospital.

2,947.60

Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital.

64,761.80

Chinese drugs Special Fund in cash with Kwong

Wah Hospital.

64,761.80

Debit balance due by Hung Shing Temple Reconstruction Fund.

1,252.76

Hung Shing Temple account

390.00

Shui Yuet Kung

1,307.60

Balance

52

32,306.05

$109,425,51

Audited the Hospital Chinese Accounts, particulars as per my Chinese Report.

LI TUNG, Auditor.

$ 109,425.51

CHAN LIM PAK, LAM YAM TSUN, Directors, Hong Kong, 8th March, 1933.

C 53

Table XXI.

The following table shows the comparative expenditure under certain headings at Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital. (For full details of income and expenditure see Tables IX, XII & XVIII.

Hospital.

Salaries and wages.

Food for staff and patients.

Western Chinese Medicine. Medicine.

Tung Wah Hospital

59,890.73

54,124.61 19,883.95 31,632.80

Kwong Wah Hospital

27,497.31

29,950.53 16,003.34 17,043.38

Tung Wah

Eastern Hospital

24,832.13 17,625.99 8,107.62 20,929.24

Total......$ 112,220.17 101,701.13 43,994.91 69,605.42

Table XXII.

The following table shows the comparative numbers of cases treated at Tung Wah Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital during the year 1932.

Western Medicine.

Chinese Medicine.

Hospitals.

Mater- Vaccinat- nity

Eye

ion

Clinic

Baby

Clinic

Deaths.

Cases.

In- Out-

patients. patients.

In-

Out- patients. patients.

C 54

Tung Wah Hospital

6,231 19,970

5,296

185,273

1,560

2,525

13,022

1,103

2,396

Kwong Wah Hospital

9,689

40,537

3,167

97,398

3,327

1,879

2,520

1,062

3,573

Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

2,697

16,012

1,872

46,283

581

414

1,167

Total

18,617

76,519

10,335

328,954

5,468

4,818 15,542

2,165

7,136

Table XXIII.

Summary of work done in the Dispensaries during 1932.

PATIENTS.

Patients

Certific-

ates of

Corpses

removed

Patients

sent to

removed

to Hosp.

Applica-

to Hosp.

tion for

causes

Hospital.

by

or Mor-

coffins.

Ambu-

lance.

tuary.

Dead

Infants

brought

to Dis-

pensary

Vaccin-

ations.

Dispensaries.

New

Cases.

Old

of death.

cases.

Gynaeco-

logical

cases

by Lady

M.O's.

C 55-

Central

15,436

14,108

8

47

47

21

2.827

451

Eastern

10,701

10,287

6

6

13

48

48

244

3,936

720

Western

12,649

10,284

40

36

374

374

340

4,890

Harbour and

Yaumati

39,750

34,632

83

29

61

175

173

8,105

2,055

Shaukiwan

26,468

26,054

21

49

1

3

3

203

5,178

1,597

Shamshuipo

14,669

6,168

115

170

157

8,330

1,209

Hung Hom

11,260

2,940

73

126

30

149

143

2,170

674

Aberdeen......

5,461

6,021

82

...

535

348

Kowloon City.

11,769

8,743

89

94

41

124

112

1,904

349

Total for 1932...

148,163

119,137

312

501

190

1,090

472

1,398

37,875

7,403

Total for 1931...

129,419

110,056

300

375

178

1,165

490

1,490

29,991

8,094

* Gynaecology cases at Western Dispensary treated at the Tsan Yuk Hospital next door.

Receipts.

C 56

Table XXIV.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1932.

$

C.

C.

Expenditure.

$ C.

$

C.

To Balance

""

""

Grant by Hong Kong Govern-

ment

Grant from General Chinese

Charities Fund......................

Donation from :-

Ko Shing Theatre Lee Theatre

,, Subscription, Land

103,552.81

9,500.00

23,000.00

By Maintenance of Dispensaries:-

Victoria

Harbour and Yaumati

Shaukiwau

Kowloon City......

Aberdeen..

32,513.78

13,201.34

8,655.12

10,777.82

6,067.30

71,215.36

300.00

200.00

17,582.30

Harbour..

10,697.90

Shaukiwan

1,119.70

23

19

Kowloon City

955.40

Aberdeen

580.00

""

31,435.30

25

Donation towards the Fund for

وو

erection of:

Eastern Maternity Hospital,

Wanchai

2,337.50

Harbour & Yaumati Dis-

pensary

1,432.60

""

Advance from Yaumati Public

Square Fund.....

3,770.10

4,000.00

"2

Fees from Eastern Maternity

27

Hospital, Wanchai.

2,329.30

Refund of advance to Yaumati

""

Interest :-

""

On Hong Kong 6% Public

"

Works Loan

Fixed Deposit

Current Account

660.00

Final payment to Contrac-

tors :-

Tai Tak Shing for erec- tion of Harbour and Yaumati Dispensary ... W.S. Engineering and Construction Co. for erection of City Dispensary........... Hang Sun & Co. for erec- tion of Wanchai Mater- nity Hospital

Kowloon

Fees for Architects for prepar- ing plans, etc. for Kowloon City Dispensary

Salaries to Lecturers of Health

Campaign

Public Square....

Pensions

Balance:

5,000.00

15,537.05

950.00

21,487.05

760.00

1,782.11

4,000.00

1,070,00

1,200.00

On Fixed Deposit

40,000.00

248.26

On Fixed Deposit

15,000.00

2,108.26

On Hong Kong 6% Public

Works Loan,

11,000.00

On Cash with Colonial

Treasury

13,241.25

Advance to Dispensaries

Clerks

140.00

Total

LI YAU TSUN,

Member of Committee.

:

$179,695.77

Total......

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

79,381.25

$179,695.77

Receipts.

Table XXV.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1932.

Expenditure.

57

C.

C.

To Subscriptions, etc......

Donation from :—

1,271.60

By Balance..

159.08

>>

Po Hing Theatre,.............

$ 638.00

Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs...

2,034.00

Scavenging Contractor, ......

3,000.00

3,638.00

>>

Payment through Local Committee

3,258,68

""

Deposit by Scavenging Contractor

Balance at Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

300.00

914.50

"" Balance with local Committee

672.34

Total,...

6,124.10

Total,.

6,124.10

LEUNG CHUNG MAN, Chairman.

LI KIT TSUN,

Accountant.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Receipts.

Table XXVI.

SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1932.

Expenditure.

$

C.

To Balance..

5,519.72

""

Grant by Government

2,500.00

By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

3,060.00

>>

Subscription

8.15

,, Payment through Local Committee,

3,409.48

>>

Donation from Chu Sham Wing for Per-

at Shamshuipo

mission to hold theatrical performances

,, Rents from eight houses at Shamshuipo

Balance :-

300.00

At Secretariat for Chinese

2,800.00

Affairs

..$1,836.00

With Local Committee

$2,822.39

4,658.39

Total,

11,127.87

11,127.87

AU TO NAM,

· Accountant.

Total,..

WONG IU TUNG,

Chairman.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

58

Receipts.

Table XXVII.

WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1932.

$

Expenditure

c.

$

C.

C 59

""

To Balance

Subscription

2,736.50 By Salaries

1,217.60

Drugs

7,240.00

3,284.73

Donation from :-

Furniture

49.50

""

Chinese Recreation Ground Fund.

1,200.00

Bedding

139.90

Rent of houses purchased with Tung Wah Hospital Jubilee Dona-

Stationery and Printing

162.35

Clothing and uniform

111.00

tion

3,200.00

5,617.60

Food for Patients, pupils and mid- wives in the Hospital.

5,499.56

>>

Grant by Hong Kong Government...

5,000.00

Crown Rent

1.00

Fees paid by patients in

the

Water Account

503.00

""

Hospital

Hospital for their food and rents

10,114.70

Telephone (Sub. Exchange)..

10.00

Money paid by pupils, etc., in the

Gas and Electricity

1,687.97

871.00

Washing

1,699.53

""

Fees paid by patients who had venereal diseases

Miscellaneous

1,229.90

1,046.50

21,618.44

Interest

35.43

Balance with Colonial Treasury

3,803.29

Total...

25,421.73

S. W. TSO,

Chairman.

Total.

25,421.73

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

.

RECEIPTS.

Table XXX.

YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE.

Receipts and Expenditure, 1932.

$

c.

PAYMENTS.

$

C.

To Balance.

"1

Rent of Stalls

8,339.91

By Wages of Watchmen, etc.

892.00

7,906.30

Water Account.

668.50

""

Interest

on

>>

money deposited in

"5

Lights

1,143.48

Treasury

173.67

Crown rent

1.00

>>

Refund of loan to the Chinese Public

"

Dispensaries Fund

4,000.00

""

Loan to the Chinese Public Dispen- saries Fund

4,000.00

Miscellaneous

22.90

ور

Balance

13,692.00

""

Total,...$

20,419.88

Total,..

20,419.88

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Table XXXI.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1932.

Receipts.

€9

Payments.

c.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

""

in Colonial Treasury,

.$6,250.00

932.85

Gratuities to destitutes,

7,182.85

>>

"

>>

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

$ 187.50

""

By Passages to destitutes,.

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

Hawker's Licences to destitute persons,

94.00

93.70

50.00

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

167.50

8.00 89

19

>>

on money deposited in Treasury,

21.83

">

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

.$6,250,00

209.33

""

in Colonial Treasury,......

728.98

6,978.98

Total,

7,392.18

Total,

A. E. WOOD,

$ 7,392.18

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Table XXXII.

ACCIDENTS IN FACTORIES, 1932.

ACCIDENTS DUE TO

Fatalities

Industry

Machinery

Falls

Falling

Body

Burns and

Scalds

Total No. of

Accidents

Explosions

Sawmill

Brickworks..

Knitting Factories

1

Match Factory

1

Engineering Works

2

(1)

Rubber Factory

2

...

Quarry

1

1

...

Tannery

1

1

Printing Works...

1

Sugar Refinery

1

3

...

Cement Works

1

2

3

Glass Works

1

Oil Installations..

3

1

3

Shipyard

9 (1)

22

12 (3)

Perfumery

1

Total

30

32

23

3

1

::

6

7

6

1

7

1

4

46

1

1

5

сл

91

The Figures in parenthesis denote Fatalities and are included in the total.

C 64-

Receipts.

C 65

Table XXXIII.

CHINESE TEMPLES FUND.

Statement of Accounts from 1st January to 31st December, 1932.

$ cts.

cts.

Expenditure.

VA

cts.

$ cts.

To Balance.....

42,846.39

By Maintenance of Chinese Public School in

Kowloon City

4,624.53

""

Rent from Temple Keepers of:-

Grants to:-

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City.

18.700.00

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island......

5,900.00

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for 1932 The Kaifong of Hunghom for the expenses

400.00

Pak Tai Temple, Wantsai,

3,186.00

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo

2.500.88

of the free school in Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

1,200.00

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan Che Kung Temple, Shatin................. Kwun Yum Temple, Hung Hom Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichung. Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau...... Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo

2,910.50

Ping Chau Free School

200.00

2,356.00

3,787.00

Committee of the Tin Hau Temple, Kow.

loon City

70.00

1,780.00

1,870.00

1,167.80

Expenses for holding theatrical per-

1,135.00

formance at:-

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay..

1,500.00

Kowloon City

600.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

1,218.00

Ma Tau Chung

50.00

Hau Wong Temple, Tai O

1,553.30

Cheung Chau Island

1,400.00

Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati..

13,056.70

Kwun Yum Temple, Tai Shek Ku,

Yaumati...

5,187.90

Hung Shing Temple, Tai Kok Tsui Kwong Fook Che, Tai Ping Shan.. Hung Shing Temple, Queen's Road East

1,509.50

1,054.66

Shamshuipo

862.70

Aplichau

Shatin

Ping Chau Island. Aberdeen

Tai O

700.00

300.00

121.00

300.00

290.00

200.00

Mo Tai Temple. Shamshuipo........

711.10

3,961,00

Fook Tak Che Temple, Shaukiwan.... Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi.. Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island..

671.00

"

Annual subscription to Confucius Society

645.00

466.00

for expenses of the Free School at Yuk Hu Kung, Wanchai.

520.00

Kwun Yum Temple, Chewanshan. Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau Tin Hau Temple, Tokwawan......... Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen

503.00

415.00

19

Repairs to:-

301,00

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City

274.00

527.00

Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung

140.00

Shing Wong Temple, Bridges Street,

500.00

Che Kung Temple, Shatin

650.00

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo Sheung Tai Temple, Matauchung....

375.00

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo

20,00

308.50

Tin Hau Temple, Shamsbuipo

110.00

Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City. Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung.. Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hunghom.. To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan.

175.50

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

22.00

125.00

£50,00

30.00

Tin Hau Temple, Hoi Chung Shum

Island, Tokwawan

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau

Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi..........

Fook Tak Che. Shaukiwan..

720.00

590.00

174.90

137.00

2.00

Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hunghom

30.00

75,571.04

Hau Wong Temple. Tai O .

202.77

House Rents :-

Kwun Yum Temple, Che Wan Shan

375.00

Property of Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon

City..

3,445,67

687.90

Refund of security to temple keepers of:

Property of Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan.

838.25

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan

41.25

Property of Mo Tai Temple, Shamshuipo.

175.60

Che Kung Temple, Shatin..

589.00

1,701.75

Pak Tai Temple, Wantsai.

472.00

1,102.25

39

13

S.D.I. Lot 5145

Grant from Education Department for Chinese Public School in Kowloon City

Proceeds of sale of superstructure on :-

**

Transfer to General Chinese Charities Fund

62,036.15

1,380.00

Advertisement

19

201.80

Crown Rent

99

66.32

Water account

"

39.50

S.D.I. Lot 5420

Interest.

1'0.00 75.00

Stationery and printing

18.00

!་

Stamp duty on crown lease...

30.00

185.00 354.96

11

Ex-gratia payment to temple keeper of

Hau Wong Temple, Tai

70.00

Courts fees refunded to Crown Solicitor

in connection with the Che Kung Temple, Shatin..

64.50

Balance

""

44,486.42

Total..........

122,539.14

Total..........

122,539.14

LI YAU TSUN,

Member of Committee.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Receipts.

C 66

Table XXXIV.

GENERAL CHINESE CHARITIES FUND.

Statement of Accounts from 1st January to 31st December, 1932.

*

C.

c.

Expenditure.

A

C.

CA

C.

To Balance

Surplus money transferred from :-- Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay Fook Tak Che Temple, Shaukiwan. To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon

City...

099.00

481.87 28.50

17,977.15

19,282.61 By Grants to:-

Tung Wah Hospital for expenses... Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

for expenses

Hong Kong Society for the Pro-

tection of Children....

38,671.46

23,000.00

500.00

137.35

Pak Tai Temple, Hung Hom Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

60.75

2,030.00

Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi

527.71

Kwun Yum Temple, Chi Wan Shan.

583.00

Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

1,771.90

Tung Wah Hospital for expenses... Tung Wah Hospital for Kwong

Wa Hospital for expenses.. Tung Wah Hospital for Tung Wah Eastern Hospital for ex- penses

8,000.00

33,500.00

25,000.00

Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai

1,430.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

1,681,32

Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichong

1,204.35

Tung Wah and Kwong Wah Hos-

pital for Free Burials.. Tung Wah, Kwong Wah & Tung

17,000.00

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau

1,032.90

Shing Wong Temple, Bridges

Street

Wah Eastern Hospital for Med- icine

7,500.00

500.00

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen

145.50

for expenses

9,500.00

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan Wong Tai Sin, Kowloon City...... Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon Tsai ... Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau.................. Tin Hau Temple, Wong Nei Chnng Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon Tong... Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo. Mo Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

481.34 3,146,32

226.47

122.25

Chinese Public Dispensary Sham-

1,500.00

shuipo

2,500.00

166.50

1,407.40

Tsan Yuk Hospital for expenses Po Leung Kuk for expenses.....

5,000.00

7,000.00

313.50

115,000.00

48.50

405,59

99

Salary

180.00

>>

178,20

Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati

13,056.70

Shui Yuet Kung, Yaumati

5,187.90

Hung Shing Temple, Tai Kok Tsui

1,509.50

Kwong Fook Che, Tai Ping Shan..

1,054.66

Cheung Chow Kaifong ($600 for rent of a dispensary & maternity wards for 1 year & $600 for cost of exhumation of 300 sets of remains)

Balance

وو

Hung Shing Temple, Wantsai

862.70

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

Interest from Temples Fund....

1,200.00 577.32

62,036.15

Subscriptions from Theatres

Grant from Hong Kong Government

Interest

2,500.00

115,000.00

493.14

Total......

199,311.90

Total......

35

LI YAU TSUN, Member of Committee.

1,200.00

20,760,44

199,311.90

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER AND DIRECTOR OF AIR SERVICES FOR THE YEAR 1932.

Air Services

CONTENTS.

:

:

:

PAGE.

9

3

3

3

:

:

4

5

2

5

3

4

4

:

:

:

:

:

:

..

:

:

:

:

:

:

Bunker Coal shipped

Crews, Nationality of

Emigration and Immigration

Renewal of Pilots Licences

Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers ..

Gunpowder Depôt...

Junks

Launches...

Lighthouses and Signal Stations...

Mercantile Marine Office

Marine Magistrate's Court

Marine Courts of Enquiry

Marine Surveyors' Office

Moorings

Outstations

Passenger Trade

Port Facilities...

Registry of Shipping

Revenue and Expenditure

Shipping Report

Sunday Cargo Working

Trade

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

5

6

3

7

3

:..

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

Yamati Slipway and Coaling Depôt...

2

5

2

10

5

...

2

6

D 2

M

The year 1932 showed a slight decrease in the amount of shipping using the Port of Hong Kong, the largest decrease being in Foreign Ocean Going Steamers. Details of the comparison between the years 1931 and 1932 will be found in Table II.

2. Foreign Going Shipping entering and clearing showed an increase of 558 vessels with a decrease of 139,743 tons net, while Local Shipping showed a further decrease of 185,372 tons.

3. The largest decrease was in Japanese Shipping-a decrease of 1,113,226 tons entered and cleared as compared with 1931. This was caused mainly by the anti-Japanese boycott during the year under review.

4. British Ocean Going Shipping has increased by 660,846 tons while British River Steamers show an increase of 41,474 tons.

5. The River Steamer Trade continued to increase, with more frequent sailings on all routes. Table VIII shows the cargo and passengers reported at this office as having been carried by River Steamers.

6. The Junk Trade given in Tables IX to XI shows a small increase in numbers and tonnage for those in Foreign Trade with a decrease in respect of Local Trade. The increase in Foreign Trade is due to increased Imports and Exports, and the decrease in Local Trade can be accounted for by some of the junks being employed in Foreign trade.

7. In Steamships not exceeding sixty tons employed in Foreign trade there is a small increase in number with a decrease in tonnage which is accounted for by smaller launches being used for towing purposes.

Details of launches entered and cleared are shown in Tables XII and XIII.

8. On the 31st December, 1932, there were 277 launches and 195 motor boats employed in the harbour. Of these, 404 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 27 steam launches and 18 motor boats belonged to the Colonial Government, three steam launches belonged to the Imperial Government and 15 steam launches and five motor boats to the Naval Authorities. There were also eleven motor boats owned for pleasure and private pur- poses. 28 Class I licences, 20 Class II licences and 81 Class III licences were issued during the year.

9. The Certificates of five Coxswains were suspended for incompetence or negligence in performing their duties. Two Coxswain's and one Engineer's Certificates were cancelled by order of the Governor in Council.

10 854 engagements and 861 discharges of Coxswains and Engineers were recorded.

D 3

11. The Passenger trade and the numbers of Emigrants departing from and arriving at this port are shown in Tables XXII to XXVIII.

12. Details of Bunker Coal and Oil shipped will be found in Table XXIX. The figures show an increase of 42,836 tons in coal consumption and a decrease of 33,297 tons of Fuel Oil.

13. The nationality of crews in British and Foreign ships entered and cleared is shown in Table VII.

14. During the year eighteen ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and seventeen Cer- tificates of Registry cancelled. Details are shown in Tables XX and XXI 228 documents were dealt with in connection with the Acts and the fees collected amounted to $2,862 as compared with $2,168 in 1931.

15. 32,683 seamen were engaged and 31,831 seamen were discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships. during the year as compared with 40,384 engaged and 39,432 discharged in 1931.

16. Forty-five distressed seamen were received and admitted to the Sailors' Home and Boarding Houses. Of these sixteen were sent to England, four to Calcutta, three to Singapore, one to Canton, one deported by the Police to Canton and twenty obtained employ-

ment.

17. $918.06 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.

18. A statement of the surveys and examinations carried out by the Government Marine Surveyor and his staff is set out in Table XXX. The vessels surveyed totalled 430,512 tons gross as compared with 375,760 tons in 1931.

19. Of the 120 Hong Kong Passenger Certificates issued during the year, 105 were issued to British ships and 21 to Foreign ships.

20. Passenger Certificates were issued for the following

trades:

Class 1A Foreign Going

Class 1 Foreign Going (Coasting and Far

Eastern trade)

Class III River Trade ...

18

...

81

30

D 4

21. Eight vessels totalling 114,222 tons gross were surveyed and granted Bottom Certificates during the year.

22.

487 cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during 1932 as compared with 743 in 1931.

The principal offences were:-

(a) Carrying excess passengers.

(b) Mooring within 100 yards of low water mark in

prohibited hours.

(c) Boarding ships without permission.

(d) Breach of conditions of Passenger boat licence by

carrying cargo.

(e) Leaving port without a clearance

23. During the year three Marine Courts of Inquiry were held :-

On the 30th March, 1932, to inquire into the circum- stances attending the collision between the British S.S. "Sui Tai." and the Chinese S. S. "Venezia".

On the 3rd August, 1932, to inquire into the circum- stances attending the collision between the S. S. "Tin Yat" and the Steam Tug "Edith ".

On the 6th December, 1932, to inquire into the circum- stances attending the collision between the British S.S. "Tai Lee" and the Chinese S.S. "Yuet On".

24. Examinations for Certificates of Competency as Masters, Mates and Engineers were held under Board of Trade Regulations. Eighteen candidates were examined for Master and ten passed, eight candidates were examined for First Mate and four passed and one candidate was examined for Second Mate and passed. Forty five candidates were examined for Engineer First Class and seventeen passed, five candidates were examined for First Class Motor Endorsement and four passed and one candidate for Second Class Motor Endorsement and passed. One candidate was examined for First Class Steam endorsement and failed. Twenty- five candidates were examined for Engineer Second Class and fourteen passed. Two candidates were examined for Engineer (Motor) Second Class and one passed.

25. Under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899, 120 candi- dates were examined for Certificates as Coxswain and 93 passed. 148 candidates were examined for certificates as Engineers and 118 passed.

26.

Twenty-two licences as Pilot were renewed during 1932. One was surrendered on account of old age.

D 5

27. 1,064 Sunday Cargo Working Permits were issued during the year as compared with 1,266 during 1931.

28. Lighthouses and Signal Stations functioned satisfactorily throughout the year. Details of vessels reported and messages sent etc., are shown on Table XXXII.

The fortnightly reliefs to the lighthouses were delayed on eight occasions, five times at Gap Rock and three at Waglan.

29. The Aga Lights (including Green Island) numbering seventeen continued to work accurately and continuously through- out the year.

30. The Beckwith Bell Fog Signal at Lam Tong Island has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

31. Government moorings were used during 1932 as follows::

A Class 3,897 days

B Class 7,299 days

C Class 1,290 days

In addition they were used by Naval vessels and transports for seventeen days. Work on the reconversion of the harbour moorings was completed on the 30th June, 1932, when four new B Class mornings were laid down.

On the 31st December, the following moorings were in position, A Class nineteen, B Class twenty nine and C Class eight, a total of fifty six including fourteen special Typhoon A Class moorings. Permission was granted for the maintenance of forty- seven private buoys and moorings and the fees received amounted to $2,740.00.

32. The Revenue and Expenditure of the department are shown in Tables XXXIII and XXXIV. The main increase is under Government Gunpowder Depot Storage, which is due to larger consignments of explosives and arms being stored for long periods. Details of the quantities of explosives, etc., received into and delivered from the Depot are shown in Table XXXI.

33. A decrease is shown under Sunday Cargo,Working due to fewer permits being issued to vessels.

34. A further decrease is shown under Emigration fees con- sequent on the continued falling off of Emigration to the Straits Settlements.

D 6

35. The Harbour Master's Outstations at Shaukiwan, Aber- deen, etc., issued 32,041 licences, etc., and collected $124,115.56 as compared with 32,838 licences and $120,091.00 during 1931. Details are shown in Tables XXXVII and XXXVIII.

36. The Government Slipway and Coaling Depot at Yaumati was kept busy throughout the year in routine slipping and fueling of Government craft.

37. 8,756 tons of coal were received and 8,969 tons were delivered (including deliveries from stocks at end of 1931). 20 tons of Welsh Coal were delivered to No. 3 Fire Float from existing stocks. 2,294 tons of oil fuel were received and delivered. 41,792 gallons of kerosene were received and 39,508 gallons were delivered. 25,500 gallons of petrol were received and 25,666 were delivered.

38. Government launches were slipped, aggregating seventy- seven times at regular intervals during the year and the slip was occupied two hundred and ninety days.

39. A short summary of the facilities offered by the port of Hong Kong is given at the end of this report.

27th February, 1933.

G. F. HOLE,

Harbour Master.

-D7-

FACILITIES OF THE PORT OF HONG KONG.

The Harbour of Hong Kong forms a natural anchorage for a great number of vessels. During the typhoon season there are special moorings and anchorages to which vessels can move with inmunity from danger The Harbour Department operates a thoroughly up-to-date salvage tug, which is always available to assist shipping during typhoon weather. There are available the latest type of steam fire-floats, and the harbour is efficiently patrolled day and night by water police launches. Competent pilots are available to meet vessels at either entrance of the harbour by day or by night.

2. Buoys in the Harbour are owned by the Government as follows 19 "A" Class for vessels 450 to 600 feet long, 29 “B” Class for vessels 300 to 450 feet long, and 8 "C" Class for vessels less than 300 feet long. The charges are $16, $12 and $8 per day respectively.

3. The wharf and godown companies have berthing accommo- dation for eleven vessels up to 650 feet in length. Maximum depth of water alongside the wharves is 36 feet L.W.O.S.T.

4. Fresh water pipes are laid alongside and one berth is piped for oil fuel.

5. Three public warehouse companies have a storage capacity of 500,000 tons, of which 300,000 tons is on the mainland at Kow- loon Point, adjacent to wharves, and 200,000 tons in Victoria on the island of Hong Kong, on the Harbour front. There are numerous native-owned warehouses of small capacity in both Kowloon and Hong Kong.

6. Both groups of wharves at Kowloon Point have rail connec- tion with the Kowloon-Canton Railway, giving direct rail commun- ication with Canton. There are daily sailings by coasting com- panies' ships carrying cargo and passengers to all river and coast ports of Southern China, and to ports in the Far Eastern trade, as well as almost daily departures by ocean steamers to overseas ports.

7. Ample bunkering facilities are provided by private stocks of coal averaging 60,000 tons, of which about one third is North China coal, and the remainder Japanese and Formosan.

8 The average stock of fuel oil for commercial bunkering is 55,000 tons. One oil company has berthing facilities for two vessels, and another company for one vessel alongside the oil installation, with a water depth of 28 feet and 23 feet L.W.O.S.T. respectively. Delivery can be given up to 600 tons an hour from wharf and 350 tons an hour from lighters.

- D 8

9. There are two large Dock companies with dry docks cap- able of taking vessels up to 750 feet on the blocks. The docks have depth on the sills up to 34 feet 6 inches H. W.O.S.T. In addition, there are five patent slipways capable of handling ships up to 325 feet in length and 3,000 tons displacement. There are several smaller yards mostly owned by Chinese, dealing with repairs to small craft and light work.

10. The principal dock companies have adequate facilities for the construction of ships of large tonnage, and for the prompt effecting of extensive repairs. There is also a thoroughly up-to- date salvage plant, and tugs are available.

11. A Waterboat Company, drawing its water from the Government reservoirs, has a fleet of eight vessels carrying from 230 to 270 tons each.

12. The Harbour has a depth ranging from 24 to 78 feet L. W. O. S. T. The rise of Tide is about 8 feet 0. S T.

13.

There are no Tonnage Dues.

14. The Government imposes Light Dues of 4 cents per Registered ton on vessels entering the Port. A charge of $75 to $350 for ships of 400 to 5,000 tons, and over, is made for permission to work cargo on Sundays.

15. A large number of motor-boats, steam launches and sam- pans are available for communication between ships at buoys and the shore. A frequent service of ferry launches is maintained between Hong Kong Island and all parts of the mainland.

16.

The Government maintains а Commercial Wireless Telegraph Station at Cape D'Aguilar which has an average day range of 350 miles, and a night range of 700 miles. Continuous watch is kept.

}

D 9

Air Services.

Further progress has been made in the development of the Airport at Hong Kong. The surface of the Aerodrome at Kai Tak has been completely levelled and spot turfed. The Hangar and annexes were completed early in 1932, and are extensively occupied, flood lights have been fitted to the interior of the Hangar to allow for night operations. It is anticipated that flood lighting of the Aerodrome will be completed during the year 1933.

2. There have been 1785 flights of Civil Aircraft totalling 870 hours, during which 1185 Passengers were carried. Only one accident has occurred, a Pilot damaging a Land Plane when alighting, but escaping without injury.

3. One Hong Kong Certificates of Airworthiness has been issued and thirty six Air Ministry Certificates of Airworthiness have been validated for the Colony and continuous inspection of all Civil Aircraft in service or under repair has been carried out.

Eleven examinations for "A" Pilots licences have been held, all candidates passing.

4.

Twelve "A" Pilots licences have been issued and five renewed.

One "B" Pilots Licence has been issued and two renewed.

Thirty-six Certificates of Registration have been issued and twenty six cancelled.

5. Twenty-four Aircraft entered the Airport and sixty-nine were cleared during the year.

6. Six Pilots on Long Distance flights have stopped at Hong Kong during the year. F. R. Loring, Madrid to Manila, Fraulien von Erzdorf, Japan to Sourabaya, Von Gronau on a World tour, Captain Dickson, Shanghai to South Africa, Colonel Nogues (first Air Mail) from Hong Kong to Paris, Mr. Smith-Reynolds, Egypt to Hong Kong.

7. The Hong Kong Flying Club has, owing to unforeseen circumstances, temporarily suspended operations.

S. The Revenue and Expenditure of the department are shown in Tables XXXIX to XLI.

The increase in the revenue is due to housing and landing fees being charged throughout the year consequent on the comple- tion of the Hangar at Kai Tak,

The expenditure figures are exclusive of any salary for the Director who as Harbour Master is paid from Harbour Department votes. The cost of Public Works services also is not included, in accordance with the general practise in departmental reports.

G. F. HOLE, Director of Air Services.

27th February, 1933.

FOREIGN TRADE.

Table I.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1931.

1932.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

No. of

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Ships entered, British Ships cleared,.

6,494

9,869,932

501,566

6,633

10.214,674

508,120

6,494

9,845,966

498,247

6,630

10,203,544

505,606

Foreign Ships entered,

4,987

9,502,018

324,934

4,626

9,093.104

305,162

Foreign Ships cleared,

4,99 1

9,510,605

324.578

4,617

9,070,566

307,044

Steamships under 60 tons entered,..

3,604

102,116

45,072

3,638

98,620

45,584

Steamships under 60 tons cleared,.

3,607

102,250

44,933

3,656

99,137

45.789

Junks entered,

10,722

1,468,119

177,581

11,122

1,493,061

177.039

Junks cleared,

10,899

1,532,742

179,458

11,437

1,521,299

181,269

Total of all Vessels entered,.

25.807

20,942,185

1,049,153

26,019 20,899,459

1,035,905

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

25,994

20,991,563

1,047,216

26,340 20,894,546

1,039,716

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Foreign Trade, .....

51,801

41,933,748

2,096,369

52,359 41,794,005

2,075,621

LOCAL TRADE.

Steam Launches entered,

11,317

371,871

135,293

11,674

382,976

137,028

Steam Launches cleared,

11,321

371,910

135,172

11,674

383,201

137,133

Total Launches entered and cleared,

22,638

743,781

270,465

23,348

766,180

274,161

Total Junks entered,

16,360

737,311

176,954

14,080

629,154

148,115

Do.

cleared,

16,463

735,181

180,675

14,328

635,567

142,943

Total Junks entered and cleared,

32,923

1,472,492

357,629

28,408 1,264,721

291,058.

Total Local Trade (Launches & Junks) entered and cleared,

55,461

2,216,273

628,094

51,756 2,030,901

565,219

Grand Total, (Foreign & Local Trade)

107,262

44,150,021

2,724,463

104,115 43,824,906

2,640,840

!

Table II.

Comparison between the years 1931 and 1932 of all shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony :-

D 11-

1931

1932

DECREASE

INCREASE

CLASS OF VESSELS

No.

Tonnage

No.

Tonnage

No. Tonnage

No.

Tonnage

British Ocean Going,.

4,834

11,540,844 5,014 12,201,690

180

660,846

Foreign Ocean Going,.

7,014

17,905,301

6,475 17,067,383

539 837,918

British River Steamers,.

8,154

8,175,054

8,249 8,216,528 i

95

...

41,474

Foreign River Steamers,.....

2.967

1,107,322 2,768

1,096,287

199

11,035

Steamships under 60 tons,.

7,211

204,366 7,294

197,757

6,609

83

Junks, Foreign Trade,

21,621

3,000,861 22,559

3,014,360

938

13,499

Total Foreign Trade,.......

51,801

41,933,748 52,359 41,794,005

738

855,562 1,296

715,819

Steamlaunches, Local Trade,

22,638

Junks, Local Trade,

32,823

743,781 23,348 766,180 1,472,492 28,408 1,264,721

710

22,399

4,415 207,771

Grand Total,

107,262

44,150,021 104,115 43,824,906

5,153 1,063,333 2,006 738,218

Net,

3,147 325.115

D 12

TABLE III.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1932.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

COUTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand,

32

British North Borneo......

F

47

Canada,

34 315,583

112,102 3,494

110,116 4,265

13,996

26

24

1

87,366 2,103

58,338 1,138

3,571

23

58 199,468 5.597

71

35

168,451 5,403

349,154 14,029

L

Ceylon,

:

:

India, including Mauritius,

132

441,967 15,274

98

303,976

6,390

South Africa,

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

54

22,415

108,666 5,435

650

8

:

33

Unite Kingdom,

150

805,131 18,276

China,

""

(River Steamers).

1,440 2,172,059 121,758

3,152 3,117,005203,033

"

(Steamships under 60 tons), ·

(Junks).

Denmark.

11

91,376 2,321

26

152,907 3,925

1,142 | 1,563,209 71,030

625 323,878 30.493

3,325 90,752 42,248 3,325

10,471 1,390,961 168,832 10,471

56,795

432

Il

Europe (not specially mentioned),

7

27,055

412

31

110,026

1,404

38

230 745,913 21,664

22.415 650

87 200,012 7,756

176 958,038 22,201

2,582 3,740.268 195,788

3,777 3,440,833 233,526

90.752 42.243

1,390,961 163,832

56.795

137,031 1,816

432

France,

8

33,568 579

37

256,762 6,937

45

Formosa,

14

10,380

407

147

154,868 7,595

Germany,

2

11,616

153

76

Holland,

36,178

718

8

Italy,

25

:

French Indo-China,

215

..

272,201 15,751

322

Japan,

149

741,268 22,503

418

Macao,

3

2,235

155

34

(River Steamers),

971

988,020

55,270

759

(Steamships under 60 tons),

313

11

(Junks).

651

318,920 1,308

11717

161,216 4,145

393,391 19,537

1,621,541 31,782

12,228 889

224,395 28,120

7,868 3.336

102,097 9,207

78

360,566

435

17

290.33) 7,516

161 165,248 8,002

6.461

77,925 1,153

25

161,216

4,145

!

37

Netherland East Indies,

14

28,591

599

177

Philippine Islands,

38

346,474

Russia in Asia,

6

37,014

12,290

501

96

6

Siam,

80

127,750

7,242

226

South America.......

:

539,339 16,704

665,712 14,776

29,768 256

258,421 15,040

53,262

191

12

306

891

Sweden,

15

60,051

492

15

537 665,595 35,338

567 2,362,809 54,285

14,463 1,044

1,730 1,212,415 83,390

313

7,868 3,336

651 102,097 9,207

567,930 17.303

131 1,012,186 27,066

66.782 757

386,171 22,282

53,262

60,051

!

891

492

United States of America,

68 317,247 5,359

25t 1,515,041 28,936

322 1,832,288 34,295

TOTAL,

6,633 10,214,674 508,120 19,386 10,684,785 528,785 26,019 20,899,459 1,036,905

D 13

Table IV.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY

TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1932.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tous.

Crews.

Fuel Bunker Oil. Coal.

Vessel-

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand

32 104,857 3,386

4,167

British North Borneo,

42

96,070 3,889

400

3,190

19

32 110,650 2,529

53.998

70 3,090

64

844

600

240

61

Canada,

32

326,495 12,619

1,623

1,760

Ceylon.

:

:

32

:

India including Mauritius.......

105

360,685 14,312

192 20,395

125

428,124

7,809

South Africa,

4

11,662

357

1,135

1

4,553

60

:

T:

3,750

230

Straits Settlements & F. M. S.,......................

60

130,364

United Kingdom,.

72

452,867

China,..

1.498

".

(River Steamers),

3,156 3,123,443 | 203,033

6,204 3,978 7,530

13,506

1,110 3,330

2,388,473 | 122,755 7,950 75,453

575 77,305

>

(Steamships un ler 60 tons),

:

11

(Junks),

Denmark,

Europe, (not specially mentioned)

France,

Formosa,

Germany,

Holland.

:

:

:

:

46 113,908

39 225,714 5,357

1.239 1,833,006 79,981

624 323,374 30,493

3,343 91,284

3,287

30 3,366

106

111

9,977 47,575 2,737

202: 15,633 3,780

12,456

:

22,677

3,343

10,699 1,414,652 | 171,234

:

10,699

14 67,196

516

11

13!

58,571

$33

1,500

13

23

213,383

6,158

930

28

15

14,057

456

570

50

139

138,560 7,527

45

440

154

44

228,293

3,747

1,315 1,330

52

252,354 4,118

900

96

:

:

Italy,

French, Indo-China,

Japan,

1

1,220

76

115

216

275,106 15,687 865

39,872

193

933,616 25,289 8,860

19,685

Macao,

13

(River Steamers),

";

(Steamships under 60 tons),

3

2,235

147

40

970

988,060 55,270

12,957

19,851

21 123,740 3,331

392 ! 569,868 22,485

258 1,122,060 22,487

37 14,465 1,085

760 224,640 28,120

214

10

22

133 39,262

603

550 6,170

451

52 1,325

2.994 2,340

40

1,730

:

313

7,853 3,311

988

313

(Junks),

Netherlands East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

:

738

106,647 10,035

738

13 31,585

632

1,810

149

440,708 14,141 2,130 11,407

162

40

Russia in Asia,

674

Siam,

78

327,703 12,266

45,887

122,443 7,167 9.310 8,880

310

500

134

820,019 17,756

500 1,065

174

850

235

South America,

275,337 15,463 2,532 56,419

29 162,619 3,153

313

29

Sweden,

9

299

United States of America,.................

48

238,423 4,134 4,706 1.480

218

35,105

1,278,763 28.553 2,642 3,618

9

266

Total,

6,630 10,203,544 505,606 41,764 281,834

19,710 10,691,002 | 534,110 22,457 222,705

26,340

D 13

Table IV.

AGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG

TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1932.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

ED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews,

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oii.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker

Coal.

1

32 101,857 3,386

4,167

32

110,650

2,529

70

3,090

64

215,507 5.915

70

7,257

42

96,070 3,889

400 3,190

19

53,998

844

600

240

61

150,063 4,733 1,000

3,430

32

326,495 12,619 1,623

1,760

32

:

326,495 12,619 1,623

1,760

:

:

:

:

105

360,685

14,312

192

20,395

125

428,124 7,809

4

11,662

357

1,135

1

4,553

60

:

:

:

3,750

230

5

60

130,364

6,204 3,978

7,530

46

113,908 3,287

30

3,366

106

72

452,867 13,506

1,110 3,330

39

1,498

2,388,473 | 122,755

7,950 75,453

1.239

3,156 | 3,123,443 | 203,033

575 77,305

624

225,714 5,357

1,833,006 79,981

323,374 30,493

111

9,977

202

47,575

15,633

2,737

788,809 22,121

16,215

241,272 9,491

678,581 18,863

4,221,479 196,736

3,790 3,116,817 233,526

192

417

24,145

1,135

4,008 10,896

1,110 3,330

17,927 123,028

777 92,938

3,343

91,284 42,456

:

22,677

3,343 91,281 42,456

22,677

10,699 1,414,652 | 171,234

10,699

1,114,652 | 171,234

:

14

:

67,196

516

:

:

11

67,196

540

:

:

:.

:

13 58,571

833

1,500

13

58,571

838

1,500

28

213,383 6,158

:

:

930

28

213,383

6,153

:

:

930

15

14,057

44

456

570

50

139

133,560 7,527

45

440

154

212,617 7,933

615

490

228,293 3,747 1,315

1,330

52

252,354 4,148

900

96

1

216

1,220

275,106 15,687

76

115

21

865

39,872

392

19,851

123,740 3,381

569,868 22,485

244

:

:

10

22

480,647 8.195 1,315

19,851 241

124,980 3.457

2,230

:

10

115

3

193 933,616 25,289

147

8,860

19,685

258

1,122,060 22,487

2,235

40

37

14,465 1,085

970

988,060 55,270

12,957

760

224,640 28,120

2.994

:

313

7,853 3,311

133 39,262

550 6,170

52 1,325

2,340

988

608

451

738

106,647 10,035

13 31.585

632

1,810

149

440,708 14,141 2,130

40 327,703 12,266

310

500

134

820,019 17,756

500

11,407

1,065

844,974 38,172

2,055,676 47,776 9,410

40 16,700 1,232

1,730 1,212,700 $3,390 2,991

313

7,853 3,341

738 106,647 10,035

162 472,293 14,773 2,130

174 1.147,722 30,022 810 1,565

993

79,134

25,855

52

1,365

15,297

988

13,217

8 45,887

674

850

8

674

78

122,443 7,167 9.310 8,880

235

29

275,337 15,463 2,532 56,419

162,619 3,153

313

45,887

397,780 22,630 11.842 65,299

850

29

162,619 3,153

35,105

299

9 35,105

299

48

238,423 4,134 4,706 1,480

218

1,378,763 28,553 2,642 3,618

266 1,617,186 32,687 7,348 5,098

6,630 10,203,544 | 505,600 41,764 281,834 19,710 10,691,002 | 534,110 22,457 222,705 26,340 20,894,546 1,039,716, 64,221504,539

- D 14

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at PORTS in the

COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1932.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,.

2,510

6,109,649

249,817

River Steamers,

4,123

4,105,025

258,303

American, Chinese,

290

1,578,626

31,929

570

403,753

.32,094

""

River Steamers,

1,162

498,004

52,163

Junks,

>>

11,122

1,493,061

177,039

Danish,

133

323,039

8,110

Dutch,

270

932,978

27,437

French,

218

625,198

24,701

Italian,

47

287,089

7,809

Japanese,

939

2,779,927

65,372

Norwegian,

586

936,357

35,192

Portuguese,

34

19,343

2,744

""

River Steamers,

180

41,155

5,568

German,

120

531,842

9,947

River Steamers,

42

99

9,114

882

Swedish,

21

93,788

777

Belgian,

Panamanian,..

Latvian,

Siamese,

Chilean,

6:12

8

28,590

305

167 3,834

15

117

Steamships under 60

tons trading to Ports outside the Colony,...

3,638

98,620

45,584

TOTAL,

26,019 20,899,459

1,035,905

- D 15-

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at PORTS in the

COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1932.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,504

6,092,041

247,303

River Steamers,

4,126

4,111,503

258,503

American,.

288

1,577,043

35,505

Chinese,

572

402,224

30,811

River Steamers,

1,160

197,366

52,163

Junks,

11,437

1,521,299

181.269

Danish,

133

323,235

8,383

Dutch,

269

933,822

27,528

French,

217

625,072

25,037

Italian,

46

275,562

7,210

Japanese,

937

2,779,107

66,116

Norwegian,

582

930,302

35,802

Portuguese,

36.

19,602

2,953

River Steamers,

181

41,317

5,568

""

German,

119

530.371

---9,868-

River Steamers,

43

9,331

882

Swedish,

24

93,788

790

Belgian,

Panamanian,

----28,590

295

Latvian,.

Chilean,

2

3,834

133

Steamships under 60

tons trading to Ports outside the Colony, ...

3,656

99,137

45,797...

TOTAL,......

26,340

20,894,546 1,039,716

- D 16

Table VII.

NATIONALITY OF CREWS.

OTHER EURO-

VESSELS.

BRITISH

PEANS AND AMERICANS.

ASIATICS.

1931. 1932. 1931. 1932. 1931. 1932. 1931. 1932.

British, 6,494 6,633 53,184 53,812 8,048 2,209 440,334 452,099

Foreign, 4,987 4,626 1,661 1,838 55,912 57,859 267,361 245,465

Total.

11,481 11,259 54,845 55,650 63,960 60,068 707,695 697,564

BRITISH SHIPS

FOREIGN SHIPS

BRITISH

1931.

1932.

1931.

1932.

do

%

%

%

%

Percentage of British

crew.....

10.60

10.59

00:51

00.60

Percentage of crew,

Other Europeans and

Americans

01.60

00:43

17.20

18.96

Percentage of crew,

Asiatics

87.80

88.98

82.29

80.44

Total

100.00

100'00

100.00

100.00

Year.

D 17

Table VIII.

The River Steamer Trade 1931 & 1932.

Import. Tons.

Export. Tons.

Passengers.

1931..

335,057.50

573,392.50 3,125,604

1932......

286,693.00

571,462.00 3,213,593

Table IX.

JUNKS.

IMPORTS.

1931.

1932.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Foreign Trade

Local Trade

10,722 1,468,119

16,360 737,311

11,122 1,493,061

14,080 629,154

Total....

27,082 2,205,430

25,202 2,122,215

EXPORTS.

1931.

1932.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks. Tonnage.

Foreign Trade

10,899 1,532,742

11,437 1,521,299

Local Trade

16,463 735,181

14,328 635,567

Total...

27,362 2,267,923

25,765 2,156,866

Table X.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, PASSENGERS, AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) ENTERED IN THE COLONY

OF HONG KONG, FROM PORTS ON THE COAST OF CHINA AND MACAO, IN THE YEAR 1932.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Ves. gers. Tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,..

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

West Coast,.

304 73,683 5,401 3,227 456,008 61,707 97 14,299 1,337

24,140 | 2,230 | 449,259

41,546

2,534

522,942 46,947

24,140

63,723

187,016 1,859 | 222,638

29,310

2,845

5,086

678,646 91,017 66,568

187,016

8.829 554 87,798

7,870

651

102,097 9,207

8,829

2,034

99,363 16,365

72,710

254

16,364 2,130

2,288

115,727 18,495

72,710

71

7,414 1,170

1,577 492 66,235

10.203

563

73.649 11,373

1,577

D 18

Total, 1932,.

5,733

650,767 85,980

63,723

294,272 | 5,389 | 842,294

91,059

2,845

11.122

1,493,061 | 177,039

66,568

294,272

Total, 1931,

6,493:

798,832 |104,482 62,824

363,463 | 4,229 669,287

73,099 5,900

10,722 1,468,119 | 177,581

177,581 68,724

363,463

Table XI.

TOTAL NUMBER. TONNAGE, CREWS, PASSENGERS, AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG, FOR PORTS ON THE COAST OF CHINA AND MACAO, IN THE YEAR 1932.

C'argo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels.

Tons,

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves- tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

tous.

Canton,

2,958

565.675 54,378

West River,

3,755 523,221 71,941 67,613

625,381

336,943 |1,028 |130,161

9

964

130

2.967

566,639 54,508

625,381

14,261

3.534

4,783

653,382 86,202

71,147

336,943

Macao,

692

102,465 9,521

74,986 46 4,182

514

738

106,647 10,035

74,986

East Coast,..

1.810

43,322 12,876

West Coast,

559

78.502 11,279

19,211 564 72,281

72,801 16 526

6,243

2.374

115,603 19,119

19,211

126

575 79,028 11,405

72,801

D 19

Total 1932,

9,774

1,313,185 159,995

67,613 | 1,129,322 |1,663 | 208,114 21,274

3,534

11,437 | 1,521,299 | 181,269

71,147 1,129,322

Total 1931,

9,008 1,316,107 | 156,192

68,930

951,240|1,891 216,635 23,266

5,900

10,899 1,532,742 | 179,458 74,830 951,240

PLACES.

TOWING.

Table XII.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1932.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Vessels.

NOT TOWING.

Tonnage.

Crews.

Passengers.

Cargo, Tons.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1932,

822

13,860

8,339

548

10,852

369,116

128,689

314,217

Do.,

1931,

751 12,680

7,409

658 10,366 359,191 127,884 349,102 10,083

5,500 11,674 382,976 137,028 11,317 371,871 135,293

314,765 5,500 349,760 10,083

Outside the Waters of the Colony :—

Canton,

1,179 29,384 13,371

169 4,908 1,918

:

West River, ...

282| 9,143| 4,266

49 1,870

662

10

Macao,

77 1,591 794

236 6,277 2,542

:

:..

:

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,.

53 1,813 642

897 25,652 13,315

2,488 67,583 32,388

25

432

73 2,455

623 15,527 7,185 2,516 1,150 31,037 [13,196 | 2,526

889

1,348 34,292 15,289

331 11,013 4,928

313 7,868 3,336

...

14

126 4,268 1,531 25

:

:

:

116 1,520 41,179 20,500 2,948

116

116 3,638 98,620 45,584 2,987

116

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Crews.

TOTAL.

Passengers.

Cargo,

Tons.

- D 20

Table XIII.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1932.

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews. Passen-

Cargo.

gers.

Bunker

Coal.

Ton-

Vessels.

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Bunker

Coal.

Vessels.

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Bunker

Coal.

Do.,

Within the Waters of theColony, 1932, 1931,

1,328 21,883 13,836 1,015 16,679 10,116

590

683

1,081

960

10,346 361,321 123,297 313,506 3,308 10,306 355,231 125,056 350,035 3,078

5,283 11,674 383,204 137,133 314,096 3,308 6,364 5,290 11,321 371,910 135,172 350,718 3,078 6,250

Outside the Waters of the Colony :—

D 21

936 23,430 10,632

277 8,994 4,248

:

1,068❘ 7,513

1,591 4,553

436 11,511 4,895

786 3,696 1,372 34,941 15,527

1,854 11,209

156 3,309 1,664

607

...

49 1,746

157 4,544 1,677

608

18 313

105

326 10,740 4,856

18 1,904 4,658

381

313 7,853 3,341

988

59 2,099 740

1,210 32,878 16,805

25

680

...

71 2,399 834

:

:

701

130 4,498 1,574 25

1,381

440

4,497

305 8,227 3,694 2,984

932 1,515 41,105 |20,499 3,424

5,129

Total,

2,638 70,710 34,089

70,710 8

11,708

5,815 | 465 2,659 17,850 1,018 28,427 11,708 3,002 1,099 5,815 3,656 99,137 45,797 3,467 3,758 23,665

Canton,....

West River,.

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

D: 22

Table XIV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches Entered at each

Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year 1932.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels. Tonuage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

Saikung,

Stanley,

Tai O,......

535

16,406

535

16,406

419

20,271

419

20,271

10

423

10

423

47

1,483

47

...

1,483

Tai Po,

Deep Bay,

...

Tsuen Wan,

Victoria,

6,633 10,214,674

312 15,149 28,505 11,161,587

312 1

15,149 35,138 21,376,261

Total,



6,633 10,214,674

29,828 11,215,319

36,161 21,429,993

Table XV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches Cleared at

each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year 1932.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

Saikung,

Stanley,

541

16,695

541

16,695

416

19,962

416

19,962

10

423

10

423

:

Tai O,..

47

1,483

47

1,483

Tai Po,

...

Deep Bay,

Tsuen Wan,

Victoria,

6,630 10,203,544

312 15,149 29,056 11,173,720

312

15,149

35,686 21,377,261

Total,...

6,630 10,203,544

30,382 11,227,432

37,012 21,430,976

D 23

Table XVI.

Table showing total Shipping of all classes at the Port of Hong Kong during the years 1913 to 1932.

TOTAL TONNAGE

TOTAL TONNAGE TOTAL TONNAGE

YEAR.

ALL CLASSES.

OCEAN GOING

OCEAN GOING BRITISH

1913

37,742,982

17,722,168

8,449,533

1914

36,756,951

16,913,914

8,321,692

1915

33,884,919

14,381,808

7,358,586

1916

36,381,457

13,728,092

6,868,743

1917

33,827,325

12,289,548

5,168,058

1918

29,518,189

9,745,469

3,627,576

1919

35,615,169

14,467,847

6,842,024

1920

40,122,527

17,574,636

8,351,084

1921

43,420,970

20,064,611

9,247,198

1922

46,566,764

21,971,162

9,688,891

1923

53,402,239

25,894,058

11,222,141

1924

56,731,077

27,874,830

11,844,752

1925

49,520,523

23,653,774

9,866,820

1926

43,796,436

21,314,696

9,257,417

1927

44,127,161

25,700,164

9,660,440

1928

44,883,765

26,894,395

10,792,701

1929

47,186,181

28,285,741

11,151,152

1930

42,190,612

29,350,807

11,357,605

1931

44,150,021

29,446,145

11,540,844

1932

43,824,906

29,269,073

12,201,690

35,000,000

34,000,000

33,000,000

32,000,000

31,000,000

30,000,000

29,000,000

Tons.

D 24

Table XVII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING TOTAL SHIPPING ALL CLASSES

1913-1932.

57,000,000

56,000,000

55,000,000

54,000,000

53,000,000

52,000,000

51,000,000

50,000,000

49,000,000

48,000,000

47,000,000

46,000,000

45,000,000

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

44,000,000

43,000,000

42,000,000

41,000,000 40,000,000

39,000,000 38,000,000!

37,000,000 36,000,000

43,824,906

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

Tons.

30,000,000

D 25

Table XVIII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH AND FOREIGN ENTERED AND CLEARED 1913-1932.

29,000,000

28,000,000

27.500,000

27,000,000

26,500,000

26,000,000

25,500,000

25,000,000

24,500,000

24,000,000

23,500,000 |

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15.000,000

1500,000

14.000,000

13,500.000

13,000,000

12,500,000

12,000,000

I1,500,000

I 1,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9,500,000

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

8161

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

6761

1930

1931

1932

29,269,073

D 26

Table XIX.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH ONLY, ENTERED AND CLEARED.

Tons.

24,500,000

24,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

14,000,000

13,500,000

1913

1914

1915

9161

1917

8161

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

13,000,000

12,500,000 12,000,000 11,500,000

I 1,000,000 10,500,000

10,000,000

12,201,690

9,500,000

9,000,000

8,500,000

8,000,000

7,500,000

7,000,000

6,500,000

6,000,000

5,500,000

5,000,000

4,500,000

4,000,000

3,500,000

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Table XX.

Return of Ships Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1932.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Rig.

Build.

Where and when built.

Remarks.

1. Megaera

120,158

152

2.

Chinthe

154,066

62

3. Tarcoola

89,450 1,658

N.H.P. 123.5

277

None

Not

Schooner.

Clinker.

Belfast

Hong Kong

"}

Willington

4. Hoi Fook

154,067

217

B.H.P. 110

Nil

"

5. Hoi Kong

154,068

217

110

Nil

"

""

"J

6.

Wandsworth Works 137,809

2,795

N.H.P. 470

Schooner. Isherwood

7.

Pulpit Point...

149,732

5.208

666

Clinker.

Clinker.

"

Greenock. Port Glasgow...1926

Quay on lyne Hong Kong..

1896 | Registry transferred from Shanghai. 1932 First Registry (New Vessel).

1902 | Registry transferred from Port Adelaide.

.1931

..1931

Formerly under the German Flag as Hoi Fook".

Formerly under the German Flag as “Hoi Kong

1916 | Registry transferred from London.

do.

8.

Plume

149,709

5,208

666

1926

do.

"}

}}

"}

9.

Voco

149,960

5.205

666

.1927

do.

"}

,f

10.

Zahra

149.944

312

158.5

F. & A.

"}

Schooner,

11. Yarraville

160.395

5,205

666

Schooner.

Govan

Port Glasgow

1927

do.

1928

du.

12.

Vacuoline

160,633

5,223

630

...1929

do.

"

13.

Cherub

154,069

B.H.P. 6

Cutter

Carvel.

Hong Kong..

1931

First Registry (New Vessel).

14.

Monsoon

154,070

1931

;;

"

First Registry.

15.

Artemis

154,071

1932

33

First Registry (New Vessel).

16. Typhoon

154,072

"



1927

"

First Registry.

17. Cranley

154,073

16

B.H.P. 95

Nil

Clinker.

1931

do.

18. H. Stanley

154,074

19

72

Nil

.1932

do.

"

""

1

D 27

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Ships Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the Year 1932.

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build,

Where and

when built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Satanta,

127,433

3,35+

26.

2. Belle I,

128,706

14

3. Chip Yat,........

153,589

27

19.

4. Shabonee,

132,076 3,230

5. Ng Ho,

123,082

157

4. 1917.

18. 8. 1911.

5. 1925.

26. 4. 1917. 27. 6. 1907.

Schooner.

Nil.

None.

Schooner.

Clinker.

ད་

Carvel.

Clinker.

Carvel.

Shanghai

6. Tai Tsat,

116,047

376

9. 9. 1904.

None.

Clinker.

Hong Kong

7. Wah Sing Ton,

154,039

14

19. 12. 1929.

Not.

Carvel.

Canton

8. Shell XI,......

154 055

244

6. 1. 1931.

Nil.

Clinker.

Hong Kong

1930

9. Hoi Lee ex Sitges,.

154,065

716

23. 12, 1931.

10. Taikoo No. B1,

120,996

206

3. 1. 1907.

Schooner.

Nil.

Ireland

1916

"

争夺

Shanghai

1906

West Hartlepool..1908 Hong Kong 1896

Sunderland

...

1911

1913

1896

1893

1920

Sold to Foreigner (Japanese Subject). Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). Sold to Foreigner (Chinese citizen). Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). Sold to Foreigner (Chinese Subject). do. Registry transferred to the Port of Sydney. Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). do.

11. Coquet,

154,052

29

10. 12. 1930.

Schooner.

Carvel

Hong Kong

19.30

Sold to Foreigner (American Subject).

12. Cheong Shing,

120,648

1,256

13. 11. 1924.

Clinker,

Newcastle

on Tyne

13. Taikoo No. B5,

127,014

33

28. 12. 1909,

Nil.

Carvel.

Hong Kong

1905

1909

Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). do.

14. Chinthe,

154,066

62

2.

5. 1932.

Not,

Clinker.

""

15. Lips....

133,253

164

18.

6. 1914.

Nil.

"

་.

16. Tong On,

152,109

42

14.

6. 1923.

17. Sai Ning..

153,560

164

8.

9. 1924.

Schooner.

None.

"1

Carvel.

1932 Registry transferred to the Port of

Rangoon.

1914 Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). .1903 Sold to Foreigners (Portuguese Subjects).

1909

do.

D 28

D 29

Table XXII.

Passenger Trade for the Port for the year 1932:----

No. of Ships.

Passengers.

Emigrants.

Arrived. Departed. Returned. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers,

5,014

6,475

342,892 236,300 111,141 22,419

264,026 198,809 121,252 33,220

8,249 1,317,237 1,432,770

Foreign River Steamers,

2,768 227,925 235,661

Total,

22,506 2,152,080 2,103,540 232,396

55,639

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade,

Junks, Foreign Trade,

7,294 2,987 3,467

22,559 66,568 71,147

Total, Foreign Trade,

52,359 2,221,635 2,178,154 232,396

55,639

Steam-launches, Local Trade,.| 23,348 314,765 314,096

Junks, Local Trade,...

28,408 18,311 16,653

Total, Local Trade,

51,756 333,076 330,749

Grand Total,..

104,115 2,554,711 2,508,903 232,396

55,639

Table XXIII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1932.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

A

·D 30-

Australia,

615

2

4

1 622

615

2

4

622

British Borneo,

949

319

92

64 1,424

949

319

92

Calcutta,

811

104

60

35 1,040

841

104

3999

64

1,424

60

35

1,040

Cuba (Havana),

6

6

32

1

BB

38

1

39

...

Canada,

3,250

97

79

Dutch Indies,

Fiji,

70

: : :

29 | 3,455

126

17

11

156 3,376

114

90

31

3,611

15,459 2,456| 1,077

544 19,536 15,459| 2,456| 1.077

544

19,536

70

70

70

Honolulu,

62

42

14

125 464 170

47

25

706

526 212

61

32

831

Mauritius,

378

68

21

472

378

68

21

472

New Zealand (Dunedin).

39

1

40

39

40

Nauru Island,

410

410

410

410

New Guinea (Raboul),

54

ลง

2

57

54

2

57

Ocean Island,

146

146

146

146

:

Panama,

304

24

6

Co

334

304

24

334

Rangoon,

711

170

74

32

987

9

720

170

74

32

996

South Africa,

100

12

10

122

100

12

10

:

122

South America, -

31

31

31

31

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

965

181

73

52

1,271! 965

· 181

73

52

1,271

Straits Settlements,....

7,041 4,380 1,161

Tahiti,

3

766 13,348 4,784 | 1,720| 12

632

303 7,439,11,825 6,100 1,793 1,069 20,787

3

United States of America,

West Indies Island,

45

7

45 3,279 198

218

41 | 3,736 | 3,324 198

218

41

12

3,781

7

7

...

Total 1932,

14,764 | 5,199 | 1,517

Total 1931,

|30,693 | 9,371| 2,620

939 22,419 25,422 4,767 2,064 1,802|44,486|43,451| 7,761| 3,346| 1,825 |56,383 74,144 17,132 5,966

967 33,220 40,186 | 9,966| 3,581

1,900 55,639

3,627 | 100,869

Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, Total Passengers by British Ships,..

25,422 4.767| 2,064

|14,764 | 5,199| 1,517

967 33,220 939 22,419

Excess of Passengers by Foreign Ships,

10,801

Table XXIV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895. 1900. 1905. 60,360 66,961 73,105

1910. 1915. 88,452 109,110

1920.

84,602

1925.

129,004

1930.

235,141

Table XXV.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1923 to 1932 inclusive.

- D 31

Whither bound.

1923,

1924. 1925.

1926.

1927. 1928. 1929. 1930.

1931.

1932.

Straits Settlements, Males,

52,011

58,051

78,505 127,863 | 158,788 |129,089 |113,036

88,498

35,606

13,618:

Straits Settlements, Females,

13,573

17,631

19,047 29,422 43,620 40,652 33,480 32,887 14,895 7,169

Total,

65,584

75,682

97,552 157,285 202,408 169,741 |146,516 |121,385

50,501

20,787

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

48,773

49,427 40,198 54,506 5,867 4,750

75,003 77,815 73,426 58,879 2,784 4,736 8,182 9,606 7,581 8,636 5,864

44,504

30,149

4,703

Total,

54,640

54,177 42,982 59,242 83,185 87,421 81,007

67,515 50,368

34,852

Grand Total,

120,224

129,859 |140,534 | 216,527 | 285,593 | 257,162 | 227,523 188,900 | 100,869

55,639

Table XXVI.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1932.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

D 32

Australia

1,281

40

54 30

1,405

200

39

22

19

280

1,481

79

76

49

1,685

Bangkok,

1,132

368

188 119

1,807

5,728

1,386

799

562

8,475

6.860

1,754

987

681

10,282

British Borneo,..

851

506 260

146

1,763

851

506

260

146

1,763

Bombay (India),

3

3

...

Canada,

5,704

464 403

256

6,827

1,853

250

153

100

2,356

7,557

714

556

356

9,183

Calcutta,

2,787

795 521

315

4,418

2,787

795

521 315

4,418

Continent of Europe,

529

95

49

23

696

4,103

494 375 181

5,153

4,632

589

424

204

5,849

Dutch Indies,

33,426

4,5914,268 2,579

44,864

33,426

4,5914,268 | 2,579

44,864

Honolulu,

420

40

34

24

518

420

40

34

21

518

Mauritius,

26

IC

42

26

5

5

42

:

Ocean Island,

289

289

289

289

:

Rangoon,

2,051

432

284

192

2,962

463

97

93

ཁྐྲ་

57

710

2,517

529

377

249

3,672

South Africa,....

142

48 45

40

275

12

12

154

48

45

40

287

:

:

South America,

85

29

29

25

168

18

18

103

29

29

25

186

Straits Settlements,

59,748

15,0339,406 | 6,066

90,253

25,805

5,9223.647 | 2,990

38,364

85,553

20,955 13,0539,056 | 128,617

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

7,863

1,756 | 1,026

878

11,523

7,863

1,756 | 1,026 878 11,523

·

United States of America,

223

5

10

1

239

7,257

778

623

318

8,976 7,480

783 633 319

9,215

Total 1932,

74,851

17,820 11,254 7,219111,144

87,151

15,35311,0407,708 121,252 | 162,002

33,173 | 22,294

14,027 232,396

Total 1931,

95,102

20,978 12,835 7,717 | 136,632 | 108,122 19,161 12,419 7,556 | 147,258 | 203,224

40,139

25,254 15,273283,890

Total Number of Passengers by Foreign ships.

87,151

15,353

11,040 7,708121,252

British

74,851

17,820 11,254 | 7,219 | 111,144

Excess of Passengers by Foreign ships

10,108

Table XXVII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895.

104,118

1900.

109,534

1915.

1920.

100,641

1925.

129,106

1930.

181,227

1905. 1910. 137,814 146,585 151,728

Table XXVIII.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1923 to 1932 inclusive.

D 33

Where from.

1923.

1924. 1925.

1926. 1927. 1928. 1929. 1930. 1931.

1932.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

58,800

65,047 52,220 7,186 9,216 8,671

72,194 |113.507 | 100,116 14,761 23,189 20,577

97,960 | 120,964 |134,147 23,117 28,960 35,572

98,606

30,011

Total,..

65,986 74,263 60,891

86,955 | 136,696 | 120,693 121,077 | 149,924 | 169,719 | 128,617

Other Ports, Males,...

Other Ports, Females,

Total,

Grand Total,.

50,374 51,031 27,888 36,886 38.360 58,515 55,412 4,742 4,900 2,343 4,820 6,044 $,639 8,901 55,116 55,931 30,731 41,706 44,404 67,154 64,313 121,102 | 130,194

62,803 94,331 85,690 10,409. 19,840 18,089 73,212 | 114,171 | 103,779

91,622 128,661181,100 187,847 | 185,390 |223,136 | 283,890 | 232,396

D 34

Table XXIX

Bunker Coal and Oil shipped during 1932.

EXPORTS.

1931.

1932.

Class.

No.

Coal Tons.

Oil Tons.

No.

Coal Tons.

Oil Tons.

Steamers,

5,932

321,060

93,881 5,737

372,639 60,450

River Steamers,

5,556

116,978

3,637 5,510

108,235 3,771

Total,

11,488

438,038

97,518

11,247

480,874 64,221

Year.

Table XXX.

Comparative Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department for 3 years ending 31.12.32.

Surveys for

Passenger Certificate Surveys for Load-

line Certificate.

Surveyors for Bottom Certificate.

Surveys for

Emigration Licence.

Measurement of Tonnage for British

Registry.

Measurement of

Tonnage, not for

British Registry.

Inspection & Certific-

ation of Light & Sound Signals.

Machinery & Boiler Plans.

Surveys of Boilers during Construction.

Surveys of Govern- ment Land Boilers.

Surveys of Launches for plying Licences. Surveys of Govt.

Launches & Harbour Buoys, etc.

Ships' Plans Exam- ined.

Inclining Experi-

ments.

New Lifeboats

Surveyed during construction.

New Buoyant Appar- atus Surveyed during

construction.

Life jackets Inspect- ed and Stamped.

Engineers Examined

B. O. T. Certificates.

Engineers Examined

Local Certificates.

Estimated Total

Number of Visits in

connection with

1930

125

35

109

15

24

17

17

17

23

715

256

256

19

45

239 29,271

93

92

7,242

1932

129

56

1931

127

4.7

22

125

11

26

23

У

8

23 717

717

730

131

14

49

179 17,040

89

79

9

15

18

64

10

27

732

1,091

153

17

15

82 17,275

79

148

6,355

113

6,536

Surveys.

D 36

Table XXXI.

Government Gunpowder Depôt.

During the year 1932 there has been stored in Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island :--

of

No. Approx-

imate

Cases. Weight.

lb.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,.. Cartridges, privately owned,......

Do., Government owned,. Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

Do.,

Non-explosives, privately owned...

642

21,934

12,048 35

1.300,747

3,500

10,538 | 641,507

Government owned,

23

910

1,338 386,508

Do.,

Government owned,

Total,

24,624 2,335,106

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt :-

No.

Approxi-

of

Cases.

mate Weight.

lb.

For Sale in the Colony :

Gunpowder,

30

904

Cartridges,

185

16,650

Non-explosives,

Explosive Compounds,

For Export :-~

999

68,672

Gunpowder,...

110

Cartridges,

7,112

3,300 524,017

Explosive Compounds,

7,723

461,595 795242,469

Non-explosives,

Government owned :—

Explosive Compounds, Cartridges,

5 13

50

918

Total,........

16,972 1,318,575

D 37

Table XXXI,-(Continued).

On the 31st December, 1932, there remained as follows:-

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

No. Approxi-

of

mate

Cases.

Weight.

tb.

502

17,730

Cartridges, privately owned,

Do.,

Government owned,

4,750 760,080

22

2,582

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,816

111,240

Do.,

Government owned,

18

860

Non-explosives, privately owned,

543 144,039

Do.,

Government owned,

Total......

7,651 1,036,531

Table XXXII.

Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

TYPHOON

LIGHTHOUSE OR SIGNAL STATION

VESSELS

SIGNALLED

MESSAGES MESSAGES SENT

RECEIVED

PERIODS

OF FOG

PERIOD

DIAPHONE

SOUNDED

FOG

SIGNALS

FIRED

AND

NON-LOCAL

SIGNALS

HOISTED

Gap Rock,

Waglan,

Green Island,

989*

4,334

575

119 hours

50 mins.

4,083†

4,220

1,034

1,638

442

113

Kowloon Signal Station,

3,691

* Including 245 by flash lamp.

386 hours 421 hours

55 mins.

+ Including 1216 by flash lamp.

746

129

D 38

D 39

Table XXXIII

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1931 and 1932.

A. Harbour Department.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1931 Amount 1932

* Personal Emoluments..

$

C.

566,084.63

$ 536,517.10

C.

Other Charges:-

Coal and Oil Fuel for Launches

267,921.30

247,718.15

Coal for Offices

3,393.35

4,391.74

Conveyance and Motor Allowances...

3,351.39

4,844.63

Electric Fans and Light.........

1,413.13

1,831.36

Examination Fees

940.00

1,050.00

Expenses of numbering Boats

1,259.57

1,332.78

Fees to unofficial members of Marine

Court

160.00

120.00

Incidental Expenses

674.55

1,338.40

Moorings for Harbour Craft & Rock

and Fairway Buoys

1,956.14

1,470.00

Raising renewing & repairing moor-

ings of Ocean S. Ships

14,958.30

6,198.00

Rent of Offices

5,530.00

5,730.00

Rent Light & Water Allowances for

Slipway Staff................

2,542.83

2,535.75

Repairs, Minor improvements & Stores

for Launches & Boats

122,994.06

161,828.97

Slipway at Yaumati, Maintenance

1,701.03

2,675.14

Stores & Equipment for Lighthouses.

10,739.90

10,117.80

Sundry Stores .

2,206.55

2,490.71

Transport

316.25

460.67

Uniforms

4,860.53

6,210.24

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges C. F..........

1,013,003.51

998,861.44

* Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting staff and Junior Clerical Services.

D 40

Table XXXIII.-(Continued.)

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1931 Amount 1932

C.

C.

Brought Forward

1,013,003.51

998,861.44

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

Instruments for G.M.S. Department... New Launch to replace No 11 Police..... New Internal parts for No 6 Police

Launch

Replacement of Motor in Launch H.D.9 New Boiler for S.L. S.D. 2

New Boiler for S.L. No 2 Police................ Special repairs to S.D. 2

968.83

800.79

13,305.32

6,500.00

8,340,00

7,460.00

11,488.20

7,450.00

Spare parts for Dixon Bros. Hutchin-

son Kerosene Motor

904.94

One reversible harbour buoy A Class..... Conversion of Commercial Moorings

($152,830.00 spread over 3 yrs.). New Water Boat for Tai O Station...

New Furnace & Combustion Chamber

to Police Launch No 5

Electric Radiator for Junk Office,

Yaumati

Training Expenses for 1 G. M. S. in

England

1 Duplicator

2,500.00

2,180.00

19,500.00

39,627.48

350.00

4,590.00

83.48

6,756.32

3,850.29

200.00

Tachometer for G.M.S. Department...

85,57

Expenses of Sending Officers to attend conference at Simla

6,778.79

Vickem Oil Separator & Purifier with Storage and Settling Tanks

1,238.76

Total Special Expenditure

38,028.27

106,930.50

Total A.-Harbour Department

1,105,791.94

1,051,031.78

D. 41

P

Table XXXIV.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1931 and 1932.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount 1931.

Amount 1932.

c.

C.

1. Motor Spirit Duties,

2. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899 :-

Special Assessment, Ord. 10 of 1899, Buoy Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

3. Licences & Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from

the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

138.98

658,337.36

143.25

649,147.55

155,585.08 162,712.00

.

121,701.60 121,355.71

1,530.00

1,170.00

16,175.90

12,171.44

333.00

575.48

71.50

41.40

757.10

912.00

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., from the New Ter-

37,082.25

39,489.50

10 of 1899,

ritories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

4. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements-

in Aid:-

Court Fees,

13,082.00

12,284.00

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

13,219.10

15,054.25

12.90

82.60

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.

45,437.51

50,767.64

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

2,120.00

2,627.50

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899,

20,014.30

54,107.45

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,....

96,966.10

86,680.90

Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889,

10,208.00

13,600.00

Publications, Sale of, Ord. 1 of 1889,

658.50

633.30

Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

2,168.00

2,862.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

12,605.00

13,230.00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899....

67,548.50 75,836.00

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,

146,575.00 127,925.00

Miscellaneons,

117.15

Carried forward, ...........

|1,422,327.68'1,443,526.12

D 42

Table XXXIV,-Continued.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1931 and 1932.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount 1931.

Amount 1932.

Brought forward,..

$

c. $ C.

1,422,327.68 1,443,526.12

5. Miscellaneous Receipts :-

Sale of condemned stores,

10,380.00 1,110.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts :-

Pilot Licences Ord. 3 of 1904,

170.00

110.00

Engagement of Masters and Engineers

of Steam Launches.............

339.50

427.50

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

277.69

262.02

Total,..

$1,433,494.87 1,445,435.64

Table XXXV.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue for last

ten years.

Year.

Personal (*)

Emoluments

Special

Total

Total

C.

$

16,510.00

1923

and Other Charges.

$

300,484.95

Expenditure. Expenditure. Revenue.

1924 318,412.04 304,983.88

C. $

C. $5 C.

316,994.95

925,643.02

623,395.92

997,530.74

1925

451,396.05 381,737.06

833,133.11

878,118,83

1926

571,004,36 84,766.87

655,771.23

820.888.39

1927

653,618.99

21,641.10

675,260.00

1,000,229.80

1928

696,497.98

99,733.94

796,231.92

973,283.46

1929

744,194.35

68,259.67

812,454.02

1,010,061,97

1930

942,271.67

138,788.97

1,081,060.64

1,020,741.02

1931

1,013,003.51

38,028.27 1,051,031.78 1,433,534.87

1932

998,861.44 106,930.50

1,105,791.94 1,445,435.64

(*) Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting

and Junior Clerical Services attached to Department.

1930 & 1931 include figures for Air Services.

D 43

Table XXXVI.

Light Dues were colected during the year 1932 as follows:-

Class of Vessels.

No. of Trips.

Rate

Fees

Tonnage.

per ton. Collected.

Ocean Vessels,

Steam-launches,

River Steamers,

C.

5,698 14,492,098 4 cents. 580,083.92

2,793

86,599 4

""

3,463.96

5,233

4,373,305 | 1

65.599.67

Total,...

13,724 18,952,002

$649,147.55

wp.com

D 44

Table XXXVII.

Licences issued and Revenue collected at Harbour Master's out

Stations.

"

Station.

Licences Issued.

1931

1932 Revenue Revenue Collected. Collected.

Licences Issued.

Increase. Decrease.

Shaukiwan,

5,728

$ 18,983.80 * $19,702.00 5,711

$718.20

Aberdeen,...

7,289

18,198.15

19,757.15

7,159

1,559.00

Stanley,

1,005

1,828.10

1,543.50

776

$284.60

Yaumati,

5,762

43,118.75

† 46,034.50 5,059

2,915,75

Cheung Chau,

5,157

16,972.85

17,152.96 5,636

180.11

Tai O,

2,396

5,431.55

4,867.25 2,382

564.30

Tai Po,

1,685

4,969.90

6,304.80 2,087

1.334.90

Sai Kung,..

841

1,987.00

2,766.50 1,050

829.50

Longket,

1,138

3,112.45

2,521.35 1,039

588.10

Deep Bay,

1,219

3,682.85

1,800.40

597

1,882.45

Lantao,

618

1,855.60 1,662.15

545

193.45

32,838 $120,091.00 $ 124,115.56 32,041

$7,537.46

$3,512.90

Nett Increase,

$ 4,024.56

* Excluding Dispensary Fees $1,796.00



"

""

4,440.70

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1932.

I. LIQUOR.

The net revenue collected was $2,461,497.68 as compared with $2,416,838.04 in 1931. The decrease of over $50,000 in duties on European Type Liquor was accounted for partly by the rise in exchange and the consequent diminution of the figure of the factor. Duties on Spirituous Liquor increased by approximately $168,000 owing to the new duties, imposed in September 1931, but of this amount $116,022.44 was paid to firms manufacturing perfumes and medicines for Export on Drawback. The number of gallons of Chinese Spirit paying duty was 1,118,126.

2. Frauds. During 1932 no frauds either outside or inside the office were discovered and this is no doubt due to the measures taken during 1931. The usual smuggling upon the water front continued and considerable ingenuity was displayed by the smugglers. One consignment of drums of black paint from Macao proved to contain, instead of paint, arrack with which had been mixed Chinese ink powder which could subsequently be separated with ease from the arrack. The volume of smuggled liquor however is chiefly produced by cumulative totals of innumerable petty cases representing a gallon or even less.

3. Local Distilleries.-The amount of spirit upon which duty was paid by local distilleries increased by approximately 110,000 gallons. This increase was largely due to the system of control which has been brought into force in recent years. The improved type of still has in most cases proved satisfactory, though a considerable amount of trouble has developed owing to faulty materials being used in their construction. The distilleries themselves are certainly in a more sanitary condition than they have been for the last twenty years though there is still room for improvement.

4. Chinese Imported Spirit.-There was a small decrease in the amount of Northern Spirit imported for local consumption and a large decrease in import from South China. The decreases were probably due to some extent to adverse trade conditions and also to increased competition from spirit distilled in Hong Kong.

E 2

5. Private Warehouses.—On 30th June, 1932 the extension of private warehousing privileges for six months, of which mention was made in last year's report, expired. The change over to bonded warehouses took place very smoothly on the whole and seems to be working well. It will no doubt work even better when further experience has been obtained by the various staffs con- cerned. One firm has availed itself of the offer of the Govern- ment referred to last year, and now has special European supervi- sion of its private bonded warehouse, for the cost of which service it reimburses the Government.

6. European Liquor.-A fair increase in the number of gallons paying duty was shown under most classes of European Liquors. This is partly due to the discoveries of frauds mentioned in the 1931 report, and also to the fact that some Duty Paid Liquor is purchased in Hong Kong to be taken elsewhere. Ex- ports and Ships Stores applications are all now carefully scrutinised and it is extremely difficult to obtain Duty Free Liquor.

7. New Duties.-In March the method of assessing duty on Medicines was amended to a four point scale based upon the alcoholic strength of the medicine, but this proved unsatisfactory and in June the system was completely changed, and the basis on which duties are assessed on Native Spirit was adopted. This is 5 cents per gallon for each 1% of alcoholic strength with a minimum charge of $1.20 per gallon for liquors containing 24% of alcohol and under.

In October effect was given to the Ottawa Agreement and the Duty on Empire Brandy was halved.

8. Local compounders of perfumes etc. continue to export on drawback but the business has fallen off considerably owing to the effects of the slump in the Straits and Java and to high tariffs elsewhere. Bulk exports to China still continue but the quantity being so exported is decreasing owing to prohibitive tariffs.

II. TOBACCO.

9. On 1st October, 1932 this Department took over the licensing of Street Squatters from the Police Department. All Tobacco Retailers in the Colony are now under the direct control of the Superintendent of Imports and Exports, in accordance with the requirements of the Tobacco Ordinance, No. 39 of 1931. All the licences issued by the Police have, with few exceptions, been renewed, but it is not proposed to issue any new licences of this class. At the time of writing the number of licences which have been issued is 681, which includes 92 issued to cover delivery, but not sale, of tobacco and cigarettes by the coolies employed by manufacturers and wholesalers.

E 3

10. There has undoubtedly been a great increase in the smuggling of Chinese Smoking Tobacco in 1932, and the total amount seized by the united exertions of the Revenue and Police Departments was 10,961 lbs. the great majority of which came from adjacent Chinese Territory.

III.-MOTOR SPIRIT.

11. The collection of duty on Motor $660,216.89 as against $425,359.45 in 1931. due to the increased use of motor transport.

IV. OPIUM.

Spirit realized The increase is

12. The price of prepared and Kamshan opium remained un- changed in 1932. The net financial result was $2,314,226.25 as compared with $3,019,724.02 in 1931. The decrease was not unexpected and was due partly to the increase in the price made in 1931, which operated throughout the year, but also to the world-wide trade depression which during the year under review made its effects felt in the Colony.

13. Sources of Illicit Opium. (A)—Prepared Opium :-Macao again remained the chief source from which prepared opium was smuggled into the Colony, and frequent seizures were made on steamers which run only between Macao and Hong Kong. It was rumoured that considerable quantities were being smuggled into Macao from Kwong Chow Wan but no definite proof of this came to light.

14. On 9th July a European was arrested when about to land from the Kashima Maru and 2,400 taels of Red Lion Opium were found in his baggage. It was discovered that he had left the Colony for Singapore a fortnight before with the intention of smuggling the opium ashore at that port. As, however, he appeared to be without satisfactory means of subsistence he had been promptly deported with his baggage unexamined.

15. Later in the year information was received that a con- signment of opium was to be smuggled into the Straits Settle- ments on the S.S. "Corfu". Search failed to locate it in the Colony but on information cabled to Singapore, the Authorities there arrested a woman of apparently Polish nationality, who was sentenced to two years rigorous imprisonment.

16. (B) Raw Opium.-There were no seizures of Persian Opium in the year under review. As in 1931 there was vague information about an illicit shipment from Bushire, but careful investigations show reason to suppose that, even if this was correct, none of the opium found its way into the Colony.

- E 4

17. During the year 32,662 taels of Chinese Raw Opium were seized and of this a fair proportion was found on passengers arriving by train from Canton. The figures for the mainland are interesting as 4,243 taels were seized in 1932 as compared with 675 in 1931 and 799 in 1930.

18. Reports show that the crops in Yunnan and Fukien have been very heavy and as a result the price of Raw Chinese Opium in Wuchow is said to be $1.20 to $1.30 per tael, Chinese sub-coin.

19. General. During the year steps have been taken to put into effect the various recommendations made at the Bangkok Opium Conference of November, 1931. Arrangements have been made for the direct exchange of quarterly reports with other interested Governments, as well as the routine ones which were already being supplied.

20. A noteworthy innovation in the controlled sale of Opium in the Colony has taken place as a result of the Conference's recommendations. As an experiment, six opium shops have been opened under direct Government control and at Government expense, and a corresponding reduction has been made in the number of salaried retailers. Should the scheme work satisfac- torily, steps may be taken to extend it.

21. The greatest change resulting from the conference is one which will actually take place in February 1933, when the Hong Kong stock of opium will have been transferred to Singapore, and supplies of Singapore-packed opium will be sub- stituted for that at present on sale. The many arrangements necessitated by this change have been perfected during the later part of the year under review.

22. There is no change to report with regard to the opium situation in Canton.

23. A Census of the number of purchasers of Government Opium, on the lines of that taken in December, 1931, was taken in 1932 and the figures showed an average of 1,334 as against 3,512 in 1931. The reduction reflects in some measure the large fall in the revenue derived from the sale of opium to which reference has already been made, but it should be reiterated that such average is only one of purchasers, and does not in any way give a clue to the number of smokers.

24. At the end of 1932, 181 registered smokers of Kamshan Opium were in possession of Opium passbooks as against 148 who were registered at the end of January 1931. Reference to that year's Report however shows that the number had stood at 231 in 1930 and the present increase is due to the return to the Colony of some smokers who failed to renew their books in 1931 owing to absence.

E 5

25. Action was taken against opium divans on the same lines as during the previous year, and the amount of opium found therein showed an increase.

26. As in 1931 many women were among those convicted of smuggling and upon the water-front their activities are increasing, as are those of juvenile smugglers whose cases present a most difficult problem owing to their youth.

27. As a consequence of the opening of the six Government Opium shops, to which reference has already been made, the number of salaried retailers was reduced from sixty two to thirty one, who remained to serve the country districts and those suburban areas which are situated some distance from a Govern- ment shop.

V.-DANGEROUS DRUGS.

28. The practice of smoking Heroin Pills seems to be on the increase; 55,132 Heroin Pills were seized by the Police and Revenue Department during the year under review. The pills were of two types, one of which appeared to be manufactured in Shanghai and the other in South China. They are smoked extensively and the League of Nations is causing investigations to be made as to the effect of smoking them.

29. There were no outstanding seizures of Dangerous Drugs in 1932-one small packet of Morphia Hypodermic Tablets from Shanghai was seized and one person was convicted for illicit dealings in Liquid Extract of Coca.

VI. LEGISLATION.

30. The revision of the Opium Ordinance which was taken in hand in 1931 resulted in Ordinance No. 7 of 1932, which amended and consolidated the law relating to opium and provided for the recommendations of the Bangkok Conference. It became law upon the 8th April, 1932. Later in the year it was found necessary to amend the proviso which permitted, under special permit, export of Government Opium totalling in all not more than five mace for each day of a voyage by a bona fide traveller. It was found that the privilege was abused, and accordingly it was cancelled. Other small amendments, including the insistence on cash purchases only, were made as the subsequent institution of the Government Opium Shops showed them to be necessary. These were em- bodied in the Ordinance.

31. In Ordinance No. 14 of 1932, which extended the power of the Department under the Importation and Exportation Ordi- nance, No. 32 of 1915, an important advance in legislation as regards cargo was made. The practice of carrying cargo not entered upon the manifest had been prevalent for many years, and, under the nick-name of "pidgin cargo", had been regarded

E 6

as a perquisite of the Chinese Staff of vessels engaged in the coastal traffic. Since the substantial increase of the duties levied by the Chinese Government, this pidgin cargo had afforded a useful method of smuggling goods into China. The

The new Ordinance, which makes the carrying of such cargo

or the attempt to cause it so to be carried illegal, not only strengthens the hands of the local Companies in dealing with the evil, but aiso evinces the determination of the Government of the Colony to co-operate, so far as lies reasonably within its power, with the Chinese Maritime Customs in preventing smuggling from the Colony into a neighbouring friendly country.

32. With reference to the new type of Chinese Spirit Shop licence which was introduced in 1931, the cheaper fee has proved beneficial to the Chinese Grocers in the poorer districts, and sixteen such licenses were issued in the year under review.

VII. TRADE STATISTICS.

33. The Statistical Branch completed its second full year since its re-opening in the first half of 1930. The initial difficulties of organization and training of clerks having been overcome, the work of the office ran smoothly and was considerably lessened by a new system of loose-leaf entry which was inaugurated at the beginning of the year. In its earlier stages the Statistical Office had cause for complaint in regard to the lack of co-operation by importers and exporters, but during the year 1932 business. houses cooperated more loyally and seemed to realize more fully the value of accurate trade statistics. This is reflected in the gradually decreasing number of queries which have to be sent out the monthly average for 1932 was less than 1,500 compared with over 2,000 in 1931. There is still room for improvement however, and much time and trouble would be saved if importers and exporters would take steps to ensure that declaration forms are filled in more strictly in accordance with the Classification List. In this connection acknowledgement should be made, as last year, of the good offices of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce and the Chinese Chamber of Commerce, who from time to time called the attention of their members to their obligations under the regulations of the Imports and Exports Ordinance.

34. There was an increased demand, both locally and from abroad, for the published reports, and, despite an additional requisition placed with the Government Printers, stocks were exhausted in several instances. It is regretted that the annual edition for 1931 is now out of print, and, in view of the continued demand for this volume, the Printers have been instructed to ensure that a sufficiently large number of copies of the 1932 edition is printed to meet the anticipated demand. As in 1931 summaries of the trade of the Colony were furnished to the local

E 7

press monthly, prior to the date of publication of the returns. These summaries seem to be much appreciated. The demand for advance or special information has increased somewhat during the past year.

35. The premises in Beaconsfield Arcade gave further cause for anxiety as to their safety on account of their dilapidated condition. It has now been decided that a move to new premises in Johnston Road, formerly occupied by the Seamen's Institute, will be made early in 1933. Since these premises are com- paratively inaccessible to the great majority of business firms it is proposed to establish a central receiving office for the receipt of declarations and manifests. The change over from the present to the new premises may cause some little delay until the new routine is finally adjusted, but the co-operation of the business firms will do much to minimize this.

20th February, 1933.

E. W. HAMILTON, Superintendent of Imports & Exports.

E 8

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

$

$

Personal Emoluments (1).

293,320.59

301,251.60

Other Charges:-

Advertisements

33.00

Binding Permits.............

120.00

120.00

Candles and Batteries

297.00

288.46

Cleansing Materials & Washing

286.97

357.77

Conveyance & Motor Allowances

4,861.18

3,977.44

Electric Light, Fans & Heating

97.81

49.70

Incidental Expenses

411.33

502.88

Laboratory Stores

621.97

686.64

Liquor Labels, Printing

1,580.62

1,999.75

Office Cleaning Materials..

187.73

280.46

Overtime Allowance for Clerical

Staff

176.50

324.75

Revenue Reward Fund.......

5,000.00

Stationery, &c.

145.08

254.85

Transport

1,218.99

1,442.28

Uniforms for R.Os & Messengers

7,331.88

7.331.58

Opium: Electric Fans & Light

324.35

374.98

Fuel

9,467.25

6,167.27

Incidental Expenses...

82.42

57.40

Miscellaneous Stores..

573.71

489.71

Packing Expenses

8,428.68

10,621.04

Purchase of Raw

Opium, &c.

706,071.06

462,060.50

Rent of Quarters for

Staff

1,200.00

1,200.00

Repairs & Renewals...

27.35

4.30

Transport

792.85

772.00

Note: (1) Includes Officers of Cadet, S.C. & A. and Junior.

Clerical Services.

E 9

Table I.-Continued.

Statistical Branch :-

1931

1932

Book Binding

123.00

134.75

Incidental Expenses..

156.91

123.40

Cleaning Materials ...

51.24

57.70

Miscellaneous Station-

ery

87.76

16.30

Printing of Reports...

7,542.00

8,250.00

Forms & Registers

13,974.00

12.00

Elec. Light & Heating

395.17

390.72

Uniforms for Coolies and Messengers

57.05

5.00

Expenses of six Government

Opium Shops

11,860.75

Total Other Charges:-

766,724.86

525,214.38

Special Expenditure:-

Purchase of Launch

51,931.40

Additional Locks....

689.94

27

Motor Car

3,281.38

""

"

Total Special Expenditure:-

52,621.34

3.281.38

Total:

$1,112,666.79 $829,747.36

Duties:

Liquor Duties

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1931 AND 1932.

Motor Spirit Duties

Tobacco Duties

Licences & Internal Revenue :

Liquor Licences

Motor Spirit Licences

Opium Monopoly

Tobacco Licences

Fines & Forfeitures: Forfeitures

Fees of Court or Office :-

Official Signatures Fees

Miscellaneous Receipts:-

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Total

- E 10

1931

1932

Gross

Net

Gross

Net

$

$

$

$

2,444,980.68

2,416,888.94

2,588,751.68

2,461,497.68

429,046.45

425,359.45

668,180.56

660,216.89

4,016,274.46

3,364,522.13

3,899,156.27

3,476,137.45

199,483.33

199,483.33

222,037.50

222,037.50

3,017.50

3,017.50

3,050.00

3,050.00

3,069,564.60

3,019,724.02

2,353,481.10

2,314,226.25

50,081.25

50,081.25

86,241.33

86,241.33

557.22

557.22

1,058.00

1,058.00

2,220.00

7,283.49

7,278.58

5,512.30

1

10,221,346.98

9,487,920.45

9,828,630.74

2,220.00

5,512.30

9,231.139.40

E 11

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE

FOR LAST TWO YEARS.

Total

Total

Expenditure. Expenditure. Revenue.

Personal* Emoluments

Specal

Year.

and Other

Charges.



1931

1,060,045.45

52,621.34 1,112,666.79 9,487,920.42

1932

826,465.98

3,281.38

829,747.36 9,231,139.40

*Includes Officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services attached to

department.

Table IV.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

European Type Liquor

Class of Liquor.

Gallons.

Amount of Duty

collected.

$ cts.

Ale, Beer, Cider and Stout......

330,497

246,427.04

Rrandy

18,540

137,773.53

Whisky

32,473

240,257.09

Gin and Cocktail

17,433

129,286.91

Kum

3,040

22,487.12

Champagne and Sparkling Wine

2,141

26,472.04

Claret

3,011

11,581.92

Port Wine

6,872

33,955.15

Sherry, Madeira and Malaga.

3,656

18,225.13

Vermouth

5,562

20,609.22

Liqueur

2,255

27,938.33

Spirits of Wine

17,612

151,492.85

Spirituous Liquor

7,661

38,156.02

Miscellaneous

6,550

24,400.23

Difference on over-proof,

fractions and arrears of duty

4,094.47

Total

457,303

$1,133,157.05

NOTE :-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table

E 12

Table V.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Chinese and Japanese Liquor.

Liquor Amount of

Amount of

distilled

duty

locally, collected,

Imported liquor.

duty collected.

Gallons.

$ C. Gallons.

Total amount of duty collected.

C.

$

C.

Native

Spirits

not more than 25% of alcohol

by weight...

943,380 1,130,304.19

46,707

68.847.82 1,199.152.01

Native Spirits

over 25% of

alcohol by

weight

57,641 84,573.45

30,907

Northern spirits

over 25% of

› 165,208 97

249,782.12

alcohol by

weight....

39,491

Sake

...

3,660

5,410 20

5,410.20

Difference

on

over-Strength,

fractions

and

arrears of duty

:

1,250.00

Total.....

1,455,594.63

Note:-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

Table VI.

SUMMARY OF REVENUE COLLECTED FROM LIQUOR DURING

THE YEAR 1932.

$

cts.

Duties on European Type Liquor

943,508.18

Duties on Spirituous Liquor

189,648.87

Duties on Chinese and Japanese Liquor

1,455,594.63

Licensed Warehouse Fees

1,500.00

Liquor Dealer's Licence Fees

28.000.00

Distillery Licence Fees

1,275.00

Chinese Spirits Shop Licence Fees

186,062.50

Chinese Liquor Importer's Licence Fees

5,200.00

Total

2,810,789.18

Refund of Liquor Duties

127,254.00

Net Total ...

$2,683,535.1

E 18

Table VII.

RETURN OF DUTY PAID ON TOBACCO FOR THE YEAR 1932.

Class of Tobacco.

lbs.

Duty.

$

cts.

Cigars

9,668

Cigarettes

673,067

24,015.31 752,354.29

European Tobacco

16,157

18,060.29

Snuff

9

10.60

Chinese Prepared Tobacco

26.117

29,193.58

Clean Tobacco Leaf

29,965

Raw Tobacco Leaf

3,501,618

31,261.88 3,044,260.32

Total

(1) Duty Paid on Tobacco for the year

Miscellaneous fees

(2) Licence fees.

Retailer's

Squatter's

Gross Revenue

Less Drawbacks

Net Revenue

Importer's

Manufacturer's

Licensed Warehouse

$3,899,156.27

$3,899,156.27

$

2,203.06

$3,901,359.33

$ 423,018.82

$3,478,340.51

$

69,898.00

$

5,360.00

$

6,950.00

$

3,033.33

1,000.00

86.241.33

NOTE:Fractions of a pound are not shown in this Table.

E 14

Table VIII.

MOTOR SPIRIT DUTIES 1932.

Motor Spirit Duties......

$660,216.89

Licensed Warehouse Licence Fees

1,500,00

Importer's Licence (General) Fees

900.00

Importer's Licence (Special) Fees

300.00

Retailer's Licence Fees

350.00

Total: ·-----

MOTOR SPIRIT.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Licensed Warehouse Licences

Importer's Licences (General)

Importer's Licences (Special)

Retailer's Licences

Table IX.

$663,226.89

6

9

3

70

TOTAL AMOUNT OF PREPARED OPIUM SOLD DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Hong Kong Bengal Opium.....

Kamshan Bengal Opium......

112,496.44 Taels

16,269.00

19

Total

128,765.44 Taels

E 15

Table X.

STATEMENT OF OPIUM TRANSHIPPED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Persian

Chests.

Total Chests.

From Bombay

775

775

"

Hamburg

137

137

Total

912

912

Persian

Total

Chests.

Chests.

To Keelung

Dairen

12

Macao

Total

Table XA.

215

215

200

200

497

497

912

912

STATEMENT OF OPIUM IN TRANSIT DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Turkish Persian Chests. Chests.

Total

Chests.

From Port Said

367

367

Hamburg

409

100

509

Total

776

100

876

To Yokohama

Dairen

Keelung

409

409

342

342

25

100

125

Total

776

100

876

E 16

Table XI.

CONTRABAND SEIZED BY REVENUE OFFICERS.

(1) Opium.

Prepared

Raw

Opium dross

Revolvers

(2) Arms.

Rifles

Ammunition

(3) Tobacco.

Cigars

Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

Seizures.

21625.5 taels 337

29674.6

338

وو

97

11

17

1

1

92

2

112

42200

4

.255160

16

6738 lbs.

223

(4) Liquor.

European Spirit ....

1.33 gallons

2

Spirits of Wine

506

gallons

4

Chinese Spirit

4199

gallons 175

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills...

(6) Miscellaneous.

Lottery Tickets Illicit Stills

Illicit distilling apparatus Forged $10 Bank Notes Forged $5 Bank Notes Perfumed Spirit

Steam Launch confiscated Small Craft confiscated....

Table XIA.

29643

12

257

2

2)

21

17

1f

11

1

29

118

ounces 3

1

28

1

28

CONTRABAND SEIZED BY POLICE.

Chinese Tobacco

European Tobacco

4,223 1

lbs.

lb. 10 ozs.

Cigarettes

.58,516

Cigars

174

Chinese Spirits

877

gallons.

Diluted Spirits of Wine

140

gallons.

Other Contraband.

Seized by Railway :

Chinese Tobacco

9

lbs.

Chinese Spirits

4.

gallons.

E 17

Table XII.

PROSECUTIONS BY IMPORTS AND EXPORTS DEPARTMENT.

Arrests. Convictions. Bail Estreated.

(1) Opium.

Possession

565

458

Boiling

22

18

Importing

3

1

Exporting

4

1

8111

60

(2) Arms.

Illegal Possession

1

1

(3) Tobacco.

Possession Cigars

6

4

Possession Cigarettes...

13

11

2

Possession Chinese Tob.

179

157

14

Importing

2

1

Unlicensed selling

5

4

(4) Liquor.

European Wine

Spirits of Wine

2 3

1

1

3

1

Chinese Spirit

109

96

Distillery Offence

2

1

Importing

10

5

4

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills

(6) Miscellaneous.

Lottery tickets

Forged Bank Notes

Total

7

5

1

N N

2

2

2

2

932

768

86

E 18

Table XIII.

Fines and Forfeitures collected by the Courts under Opium, Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances.

Hong Kong Magistracy

Kowloon Magistracy

District Office, North

District Office, South

Total

$20,098.26

9,328.35

2,695.00

300.00

$32,421,61

Rewards Paid.

For Opium, Drugs, Liquor & Tobacco

$54,024.00

Table XIV.

CLASSIFIED LIST OF OPIUM SEIZURES, 1932.

No. of Seizures.

Raw Opium:-

Chinese

Persian

Taels Seized.

472

32,662

Nil.

Nil.

472

32,662

Prepared Opium :-

Macao

74

14,937

Canton

32

336

Kwong Chow Wan

3

1,459

Shanghai

2

630

Wuchow

67

2,915

Doubtful Amoy

294

976

70

475

21,323

Opium Water

19

7 gallons

Opium Dross

18

.00

94 taels

Yaumati Shelter, Boat 3076Y.

Place of Seizure.

Steam Launch Washington Unno. Boat, Y.M.T. Shelter Steam Launch Tomijima Maru 309 Lockhart Road, Gr. Fl. Yaumati Shelter.

S.S. Tilawa..

S.S. Kaitangata

Canton Steamer Wharf,

S.S. Commendare Henri Riviere

12 Landale Street, 1st floor

Steam Launch Vancouver

Sea Bed, Victoria Harbour

Sea Wall, Quarry Bay

Yaumati Typhoon Shelter (Boat 3285Y)

Sea Bed, North Point

S.S. Chung On, Hing Kee Wharf

Tung On Wharf

S.S. Kinshan

Sea Bed, Tai Ku Chau

Lighter 3702V

Ex. S.S. Kashima Maru

Table XV.

CHIEF SEIZURES OF OPIUM, 1932.

Kind of Opium.

Taels.

Destination.

Chinese Raw

640

Local

do.

1,030

Local

Kwong Chow Wan & S'hai Prep. Chinese Raw

1,462

Local

1,580

Local

do.

970

Local

do.

2,864

Singapore

do.

1,399

Samarinda

do.

1,050

Local

do.

557

Local

do.

1,200

Local

Kwong Chow Wan Prepared

1,000

Export

Chinese Raw

1,640

Local

Macao Prepared

802

Local

do.

520

Local

do.

850

Export

Chinese Raw

930

Local

do.

1,130

Local

do.

1,890

Local

Macao Prepared

1,000

Export

Wuchow Prepared

967

Chinese Raw

556

Export

Local

Macao Prepared

2,400

- E 19 -

Had been exported to Singapore in a pas- senger's baggage. Passenger was not allowed to land and was returned H.K. Opium found on landing in II.K. Export

to

S.S. Hang Sang..

S.s

Tin Tung

5 Wharf, Kowloon Godown

Chinese Raw

736

do.

504

Local

Kwong Chow Wan Prepared

505

U.S.A. or Canada

Macao Prepared

1,300

Straits via Borneo

Hond. Est floor

do.

900

Local

E 20

Table XVI.

IMPORTATION OF DANGEROUS DRUGS DURING THE YEAR 1932.

lbs. 02. grs.

Preparations containing Ethyl Morphine Hydro-

chloride

Preparations containing Morphine Morphine Salts

Cocaine Salts

Heroin Hydrochloride

Nepenthe

Tincture of Opium Concentrated

Opium (Powdered)

4 220

7

10

6

Table XVII.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Dealer's Licence

Licensed Warehouse

Liquor.

Chinese Wine & Spirit Shop (excluding New

Territories)

Chinese Liquor Importer's Licence

Distillery Licence:

(a) Hong Kong and Aplichau

(b) Kowloon, South of Kowloon Hills

(c) N.T. North including Chun Wan & Hang

Hau

(d) Islands of N.T. South.

5

10 2

28

12

283

88

52.

10

6

23

Tobacco.

Importer's Licence.

70

Retailer's Licence:

(a) $30.00

1,407

(b) $20.00

1,265

(c) $ 5.00

523

3,195

Squatter's Licence $8.00

584

Delivery Coolies Licence $8.00

86

670

Licensed Warehouse

4

Manufacturer's Licence.

31

E 21

Table XVIII.

STATISTICAL OFFICE.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF NUMBERS OF DECLARATIONS RECEIVED AND ITEMS ENTERED THEREFROM IN 1931 AND 1932.

Declarations

Items

1931

1932

1931

1932

January

57,111

48,547

132,016

112,257

February

41,765

39,910

96,459

95,806

March

63,967

55.266

154,255

120,544

April

59,700

50,041

140,311

107,805

May June

58,547

50,869

130,017

103,373

59,770

49,077

132,297

98,792

July

59,033

46,987

131,282

93,649

August

55,196

52,300

126,622

102,346

September

55,951

48,902 128,327

101,097

October

58,196

53,300

130,911

111,602

November

54,806

53,600

124,569 112,731

December

56,800

52,100 126,268 108,267

Total:

680,842

600,899 1,553,334 1,268,269

Average: --

56,737 50,075 129,444 105,689

Table XIX.

STATISTICAL OFFICE.

NO. OF MANIFESTS RECEIVED DURING 1932.

Ocean

River

Junk

Total

January

February

March

1,048

1,057

2,162

4,267

876

912

1,528

3,316

1,063

1,011

2,205

4,279

April

May

1,054

1,061

1,827

3,942

1,049

1,039

1,937

4,025

June

1,005

1,005

1,391

3,401

July

998

1,033

1,447

3,478

August

983

1,089

1,421

3.493

September

934

1,070

1,647

3,651

October

1,039

1,058

1,867

3,964

November

1,055

1,096

1,582

3,733

December

1,076

1,111

1,940

4,127

Total:-

12,180

12,542

20,954

45,676

Average per month

1,015

1,045

1,746

3,806

E 22

Table XX.

STATISTICAL OFFICE.

COMPARATIVE TABLE OF NUMBER OF MANIFESTS

RECEIVED IN 1931 AND 1932.

Inward

Outward

1931

1932

1931

1932

Ocean

6,103

5,935

6,356

6,245

River

6,307

6,252

6,315

6,290

Junk

7,388

10,161

8,924

10,793

Total:

19,798

22,348

21,595

23,328

1931

1932

Grand Total

41,393

45,676

Average per month

3,449

3,806

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG,

FOR THE YEAR 1932.

1.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

Early in the year it was decided to build separate quarters for the Director, and to utilise the present quarters as additional office and library accommodation. Plans are in preparation and the work will probably be completed during the coming year.

II.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS.

2. As in former years, automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet bulb thermograph, and the direction and velocity of the wind with Beckley and Dines-Baxendell anemographs. Rainfall is recorded by a Nakamura Pluviograph, sunshine by two Campbell- Stokes universal recorders, and barometric pressure by a Marvin barograph. Eye observations of barometric pressure, tempera- ture and cloud are made hourly, and the direction of cloud motion every three hours. Observations of pilot balloons are made with a Watts 11 inch prismatic theodolite at 9h. a.m. and 3h. p.m. when conditions are favourable.

3. The principal features of the weather in 1932 were:—

(a) A drought lasting from the beginning of the year until 3rd February.

(b) The absence of typhoons seriously affecting the Colony.

No measurable amount of rain fell between 28th December, 1931, and 3rd February, 1932, inclusive. The rainfall in October and November was also below normal. In spite of these dry periods, the total rainfall for the whole year was slightly above normal, owing to heavy rainfall in June and July.

4. The tracks of 21 typhoons which occurred in the Far East during the year 1932 are given in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December. The only typhoons producing winds of gale force in Hong Kong were those of 21st July and 17th Sep- tember. The first, passing about 150 miles to the south of Gap Rock, produced a gust velocity at the Observatory of 67 m.p.h. from E. at 21h. 19m. on 21st July. The second, passing on an almost identical track, produced a gust velocity at the Observatory of 79 m.p.h. from E.N.E. at 8h. 00m. on 17th September,

F 2-

In the following table the monthly rainfall at the Observatory is compared with other records in the Colony.

Month.

Obser- Police

Station vatory |(Kowloon). (Taipo).

*Matilda Botanical Hospital

(Hong

Gardens (Mount

Kellet,

Fanling.

Kong).

Hong

Kong).

inches. inches.

inches.

inches. inches.

January,

0'000

0'00

Ο ΟΙ

0.04

0'00

February,

2535

3°c8

2.75

2.49

2.96

March,...

2.200

1.16

1.83

157

0-54

April,

3.700

5:05

3.60

2.62

3°42

May,

2.510

3.81

2'22

0'95

2.30

June,

25°290 20.78

22.55

17.98

14.63

July,

25710

26.33

27.58

21.50

19.86

August,

20.885

14'97

23°27

2171

1655

September,....

4.340

4.89

442

4'14

5-66

October,

0*085

0'15

Ο ΟΙ

0*23

0.72

November,

0*100

0.60

0.04

0.13

0.80

December,

4115

4.88

4'29

4'70

Year

91'470

85070

92858

72°24

*

Record incomplete.

III.—PUBLICATIONS.

5. The results of the observations and records referred to in II (2) are published monthly in the Meteorological Bulletin. With the year under review this publication will cease and the results will be published in annual volumes.

F 3

A monthly abstract of meterological observations is published in the Government Gazette and copies are supplied to any firm or individual requiring them, and a monthly seismological bulletin is issued and distributed to other observatories.

6. A weather map of the Far East for 6 a.m. of 120th meridian time, is constructed daily, and forecasts are issued for the following districts:-

A Shanghai to Turnabout.

B Turnabout to Hong Kong.

C Hong Kong and neighbourhood.

D Hong Kong to Hainan.

E Northern China Sea.

The map, weather report and forecast are exhibited at the Hong Kong and Kowloon ferry piers, the Harbour Office, Tele- graph offices and the General Post Office. The weather map may be purchased by the public at a subscription rate of $15 per annum. There were 41 subscribers in 1932. A weather map for 2 p.m. is also prepared, but is not published. Morning and after- noon weather reports and forecasts, together with observations made at 10h. a.m. and 4h. p.m., are published in the local press.

IV.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

7. The telegraph companies continue to transmit twice daily free of charge meteorological observations from Vladivostock, Japan, Shanghai, Formosa, Indo China and the Philippines. The number of meteorological broadcasts by radio is steadily in- creasing, and the direct radio services of Shanghai (sent person- ally by Rev. Fr. Gherzi, S.J.), Indo China, Formosa, Amoy, Swatow, Sandakan and Pratas Island are extremely valuable. Extra observations at half cable rate are also obtainable from a number of stations by the courtesy of the telegraph companies.

8. Weather Telegrams from ships by Radio :-The following table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately).

Month.

F 4

British (including H.M. Ships).

H.M. Ships

in Port.

Other National- ities.

Total.

messages.

January,

120

255

31

841

80

135

231 1231

February,

122

216

24 531 59

93

205

840

March,....

119

195

18

со

137 64 109

201

441

April,

131

192

15

125 55 91

201

408

May,

120

200 14 137

651 102

199

439

June,

186

302

16

126

63 115

265

543

July,

150

283

8

125

72

120

230

528

August,

IIO

178

I 2

ΙΙΟ

63 113

185

401

September,

127

250

I I

116

80 125

218

491

October,

145

252

18

168

91 150 254

570

November,

118

218

14 149

67 125 199

492

December,

86

151

I I 139 72 127 169

417

[ 1932,

1534

2692 192 2704 831 1405 2557

6801

1931,

1827

Totals

1930,

1515

4176 444 10098 829 1432 3100 15706

3117 414 8464 695 1234 2624 12815

L 1929,

794

2549 310 1285 748 1982 1752 5816

F 5

9. Weather forecasts, storm warnings and time signals are distributed by radio telegraphy as detailed in the "Notice to Mariners" issued by this Department: Storm warnings to Hong Kong and vicinity are also given by means of the Local and Non-Local Signal codes. A telegraphic adaptation of the Non- Local Code is used for issuing warnings by cable to places outside the Colony.

10. The following table gives the results of the weather forecasts for the past 5 years. The methods of analysis are described in the 1918 Report.

Year.

Complete Success.

Partial

Partial

Success. Failure.

Total Failure.

1927

70

1928

66

1929

70

1930

65

1931 1932

67

71

NGAYAU ala

N W W NW N do

%

%

0/

%

26

28

31

30

27

+32 +MN

4

3

2

4

оо оооооо

11. Local signals, day and night, have been hoisted during the past 5 years according to the following table.

Warning Signal.

Signal

Signals 2-9

Year.

Number of times.

Number of hours

Number of

times.

displayed.

Number of hours

displayed.

58

No. 10 Bombs.

Number

of times fired.

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

13 IN 200

I

IO

3

28

5

88

93

ΙΟΙ

IN CM of in

2

2

46

I

3

37 88

1

104

V.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS, TREATY PORTS, ETC.

12. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 112 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 5,111 days observations, have been used for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for 1931 were 134 and 7,843.

-

F.6

VI. MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

13. The following table gives the annual values of the magnetic elements in 1932.

Declination (West)....

Dip (North)...

0° 43′ 16′′

30° 33′ 8′′

0.37545.

Horizontal Force (C.G.S. Unit) ...

A detailed record of the results obtained at the Au Tau Magnetic Station during 1932 is now in the press.

VII. TIME SERVICE.

14. The timeball is dropped at 10h. a.m. on Sundays and public holidays, 10h. a.m. and 1h. p.m. on Saturdays, and 10h. a.m. and 4h. p.m. on other days. Time signals are given from 8h.55 to 9h. p.m. each night by means of lights which are extinguished every second, except for periods marking the minutes and half minutes.

15. The timeball was dropped successfully 659 times. There was one failure, on 22nd April at 10h. a.m., when it fell 35 seconds early owing to an electrical fault. The ball was not raised on 8th April at 10h. a.m., owing to faults on the external line, and on 17th September at 10h. a.m, and 4h. p.m. owing to a typhoon gale.

The error of the timeball due to accumulated clock error did not exceed Os.3 throughout the year.

16. Observations of the radio time signals emitted by Nauen at 8h. a.m. have been made daily, whenever possible, during the year, and utilised for clock regulations.

17. Clocks. Cottingham and Mercer 507 (Sidereal) and Leroy 1,350 were in use throughout the year.

Observations with the transit instrument for 1931 and 1932 are given in the following table:---

1931 1932

Transits

Level determinations

861

1,007

442

512

Azimuth determinations (mark)... 34

16

Azimuth determinations (transit

of circumpolar stars).. Collimation determinations (mark) 38

164

216

42

F 7

VIII. MISCELLANEOUS.

18. Seismographs. The seismographs have been kept in good order during the year. 430 earthquakes were recorded com- pared with 386 in 1931. The seismograms have been forwarded. to the International Seismological Committee, Oxford.

19. Upper Air Research. Observations of 343 pilot balloons were made during the year and the results of meteorological ascents by the R.A.F. were communicated to the Observatory. It is hoped to complete an analysis of the upper air data collected from 1921 to 1932.

20. Lithography. A small amount of lithographic work has been done for the Colonial Secretary and the Government Marine Surveyor.

21. Staff. Mr. T. F. Claxton, Director since 1912 went on leave on 26th March, retiring from the service on 8th July. Mr. C. W. Jeffries was appointed Director and Mr. B. D. Evans Assistant Director on 9th July. The vacancy caused by these promotions was filled by the appointment of Mr. G. S. P. Hey- wood, B.A.,B.Sc. (Oxon.) as Professional Assistant. Mr. Heywood arrived in the Colony and assumed duty on 10th August.

22. Expenditure. The annual expenditure on the Observa- tory, for the past 10 years has been as follows:-

Year.

Personal Emoluments

Special

Total

Total Revenue.

and other Expenditure. Expenditure. Charges.

C.

C.

$

$

C.

1923

38,495.23

27.35

38,522.58

116.20

1924

41,011.48

11,627.01

52,638.49

14.00

1925

41,955.51

41,955.51

79.20

1926

42,566.65

12,341.74

54,908.39

34.20

1927

47,253.17

145.24

47,398.41

30.50

1928

47,292.33

272.70

47,665.03

506.10

1929

48,282.63

48,282.63

530.50

1930

68,696.59

1,670.07

70,366.66

506.80

1931

76,037.81

76,037.81

735.00

1932

69,518.23

69,518.25

598.00

23 In the following table the expenditure and revenue for

1931 is compared with that for 1932.

F 8 -

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE

1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Personal Emoluments..

67,813.51 61,360.31

Other Charges.

Books and Postage

291.04

327.25

Electric Light and Power

648.28

586.54

Gas

77.06

106.28

Incidental Expenses.

128.48

68.90

Laboratory Expenses

1,482.02

1,269.03

Maintenance of Lithographic Plant

320.78

269.28

Maintenance of Time Service..

87.35

43.70

Maintenance of Magnetographs...

1,008.03

816.28

Meteorological Telegrams

755.72

866.75

Printing

2,887.25

3,254.00

Subscription towards cost of printing In-

ternational Upper Air Observations...

208.70

141.70

Transport

125.06

176.54

Uniforms

204.53

231.67

Total Other Charges

Total Royal Observatory

8,224.30

8,157.92

$76,037.81 69,518.23

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE

1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Fees of Court or Office, Sale of Publications 735.00

598.00

F 9

24. Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Directors of the Weather Services of the Far East, the Chinese Maritime Customs, and the Commanders of all ships for the observations forwarded during the year, to the Telegraph Companies for continuing to forward observations free or at reduced rates, to all institutions and individuals who have con- tributed to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for the efficient performance of their duties during a year of many departmental changes.

15th February, 1933.

C. W. JEFFRIES,

Director

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1932.

ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

399 actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1932 as against 336, in 1931, 166 were disposed of during the year and 52 were settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 121 and 35 respectively in 1931.

2. The claims amounted to $3,917,040.12 as against $3,296,262.04 in 1931.

3. The debts and damages

damages recovered amounted $1,307,871.47 as against $1,406,802.11 in 1931.

to

4. The fees collected amounted to $22,099.00 as against $15,411.40 in 1931.

SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

5. 2,696 actions were instituted during the year, as against 1,777 in 1931.

6. The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or with- drawn 464: Judgment for the plaintiff 1,647, Judgment for the defendant 64, Nonsuit 0; Struck off, dismissed or lapsed 66, and pending 455, as against 433, 896, 56, 0, 68 and 324 respectively in 1931.

7. The claims amounted to $862,885.51 as against $486,336.93, in 1931 and the amounts recovered were $497,567.28 as against $238,617.47 in 1931.

S. The number of rent distress warrants issued was 1,936 representing unpaid rents amounting to $448,739.85 of which $56,581.36 was recovered by enforced sales in 607 warrants; as against 1,428, $225,597 33 and $53,000.10 respectively in 1931.

9. 1,260 warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 910 in 1931 and the remaining warrants were cancelled or otherwise disposed of,

10. The fees collected amounted to $29,238.00 as against $20,924.85 in 1931.

CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

11. There were 99 cases and 118 persons committed for trial at the criminal sessions, as against 47 and 80 respectively in 1931.

-

G 2

12. Of the 118 persons indicted, 83 were convicted, 15 were acquitted and 20 were not proceeded against. In 1931 the figures were respectively 80, 51, 26 and 3.

APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

13. 7 appeals were lodged during the year.

14. 4 were dismissed, 1 was allowed, 1 was settled, and 1 is pending.

ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

15. 25 actions were instituted during the year.

16. 3 were settled, 10 are pending and judgment was given in 12 cases.

17. The fees collected amounted to $2,201.25 as against $632.75 in 1931.

PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

18. 443 grants were made by the Court being:-

Probate

Letters of Administration

165

278

443

19. The figures in 1931 were respectively 141 and 177.

20. Court fees amounted to $33,325.99 and Official Adminis- trator's commission to $6,216.98. The figures in 1931 were $22,346.70 and $2,915.33 respectively.

21. During the year there were 88 deceased estates accounts on the Court books. The cash balance was $36,071.94.

22. 50 accounts were closed during the year and 58 new accounts were opened. No estate was transferred to trust account.

OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

23. The number of trust estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 22. The invested funds totalled $201,123.20 and the cash balance $10,302.59. One trust was wound up during the year, and one new trust was opened.

24. The amount of commission collected was $171.19 as against $228.91 in 1931.

G 3

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

25. On the 31st December there were 705 companies on the Hong Kong register, of which 66 were in course of liquidation, and 31 struck off the register.

26. During the year 84 new companies were put on the register. No company was transferred from the Hong Kong to the Shanghai register.

27. The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $166,031.43, and those in respect of other companies to $21,958.00 The fees for licences to keep local registers amounted to $3,559.34.

28. One firm was registered under the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnerships Ordinance, 1912.

29. Deposits to the total value of $3,916,666 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

FEES, REVENUE. COMMISSION, &C.

30. The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $325,052.69 as against $258,862.02 in the previous year.

ACCOUNTING SYSTEM.

31. On the 1st January a new system was introduced for payments out of Court from the Suitors' Funds Account. Formerly the person entitled to payment was required to obtain a written "direction" from the Registrar and to present this at the Treasury. Under the new system payment out is made at the Registry.

32. During the year 1932 a total of $470,664.56 was paid out at the Registry and 2,594 members of the public were saved the dual visit to the Treasury as well as to the Registry.

33. In addition to serving the convenience of the public the system has been the means of saving much reduplication of work in the Registry and Treasury.

STAFF.

34. Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg assumed duty as Registrar on 14th November, 1932.

T. M. HAZLERIGG,

Registrar, Supreme Court.

8th March, 1933.

G 4

Table showing total number of cases dealt with and expendi- ture and revenue of the Supreme Court, 1923-1932.

Total number

Year.

of cases dealt Expenditure.

with.

Revenue.

$

C.

$ C.

1923

962

128,838.62

*69,955.20

1924

1,549

136,136.69

*89,624.99

1925

1,908

150,698.14

*121,606.20

1926

3,416

133,680.40

*117,252.61

1927

2,267

141,493.29

*96,254.96

1928

2,330

165,114.93

*101,624.20

1929

2,303

167.632.95

*102,876.25

1930

2,016

218,933.24

*95,560.75

1931

2,113

240,030.30

*97.773.74

1932

3,095

231,828.63

*155,461.92

*Not including amounts paid for fees in respect of licences to keep local registers and China Companies fees-in 1932 $169,590.77.

Appendix G (1).

REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL RECEIVER AND REGISTRAR

OF TRADE MARKS AND LETTERS PATENT

FOR THE YEAR 1932.

BANKRUPTCY.

New Business.

Forty-two petitions were presented during the year, fifteen by creditors, and twenty-seven by debtors. The assets collected amounted to over $397,000.00. The liabilities, as estimated by the debtors, exceeded $991,000.00.

2. A feature of the year under review has been the more frequent resort to bankruptcy of clerks, and other small salaried employees hopelessly involved with money lenders, for relief. Provided that such debtors retained their employment, and agreed to make a reasonable contribution from their salaries for the benefit of their creditors, it has been the practice not to oppose a receiving order on the ground of absence of the necessary assets for division among unsecured creditors, under section 8 (1) of the Bankruptcy Ordinance.

Fees.

3. The fees received for Official Receiver's commission, and possession fees, amounted to $14,021.17. Possession fees were, for the first time, paid direct by this office to revenue, instead of through the Registrar, Supreme Court, and are therefore in- cluded.

Discharges.

4. Four discharges were granted during the year, all subject to suspension, one for two years, one for one year, one for six months, and one for three months. No applications for discharge were refused.

Rules.

5. New bankruptcy rules were made by the Chief Justice, and approved by Legislative Council on the 10th November. They came into force on the 1st January, 1933.

Companies Winding-Up.

6. One compulsory winding up order was made during the year, and an order sanctioning a scheme of arrangement was made in another case.

i

G (1) 2

7. Comparative figures for the years 1931 and 1932 are

given below:-

COMPANIES LIQUIDATION.

BANKRUPTCY.

Year.

Petitions for

winding up.

Winding up Orders.

Total Number

of Petitions.

Creditors'

Petitions.

Petitions.

Debtors'

Total Number of Receiving Orders.

Public Examina-

tions.

Adjudications.

Arrangement.

Schemes of

withdrawn.

Petitions

Petitions

dismissed.

consolidated.

Petitions

1932

1931

2 1 42 15 27 31 26

3 2 22 14 8

16

00

Year.

Discharges

granted.

Receiving Orders

rescinded.

Adjudications annulled..

28

12

:

:

Official

Assets for dis- tribution.

Estimated Liabilities.

Fees in Receiver's Stamps.

Com-

mission.

4

2

Possession Fees.

Co

6

1

ลง

2

Unclaimed Balances transferred

to

General Revenue.

c.

C.

C.

C.

c.

1932

4

1

397,638.09

991,452.64

5,550,20 12,805.17 | 1,216

574.26

1931

7

1

877,619.72 2,170,526.88 2,995.50 24,106.34

1,096.28

REGISTRATION OF TRADE MARKS.

Revenue.

8. The revenue derived from the registration of trade marks showed an increase over that for the preceding year. This is accounted for by the fact that the increased scale of fees in- troduced on the 1st September, 1931 was in force throughout the whole period under review, as the number of applications for registration decreased by about twelve per cent.

Opposed Registrations.

9. Nine applications for registration were opposed during the year and, in every case, the applications for registration were

i

G (1) 3

withdrawn without formal hearing. There was no case of an appeal from the Registrar's decision.

Total No. of Total No. of

applications for

Year.

Registration of

trade marks.

Total amount of

fees.

registration

certificates

granted.

1932

445

421

$18,978.46

1931

509

451

$16,793.84

REGISTRATION OF LETTERS PATENT.

Revenue.

Owing

10. There were only six patents registered here as against twenty-one in 1931; particulars of these are given below. to the increase in fees, the decrease in revenue was only very small.

Year.

Total Number of Patents registered.

Total amount of

fees.

1932

1931

6

21

$114.00

$121.00

11. A consolidating and amending Ordinance, No. 42 of 1932, was passed during the year.

Total Revenue and Expenditure.

12. The following are totals of revenue and expenditure for the department for the years 1932 and 1931 respectively, (includ- ing the salaries of officers of the Junior Clerical Serivce):-

1932

1931

Revenue.

$33,113.63

$41,021.18

Expenditure.

$29,732.60

$34,702.62

E. L. AGASSIZ,

Official Receiver and Registrar

of Trade Marks and Letters Patent.

Hong Kong, 29th March, 1933.

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE HONG KONG AND KOWLOON MAGISTRACIES FOR THE YEAR 1932.

Hong Kong.

Mr. W. Schofield acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner throughout the year.

2. Mr. E. H. Williams acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 31st January. Mr. E. I. Wynne-Jones acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 1st February to the end of the year.

3. The number of cases was 19,155 as compared with 22,631 in 1931.

Kowloon.

4. Mr. J. A. Fraser acted as Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 25th September.

5. Mr. H. R. Butters acted as Police Magistrate from 26th September to the end of the year.

6. The number of cases was 14,418 15,289 in 1931.

as compared with

7. Table I shows the expenditure of the two Magistracies for the years 1931 and 1932, including the cost of all officers in the departments who belong to the Cadet, Senior Clerical and Accounting, and Junior Clerical Services.

8. Table II shows the Revenue of the two Magistracies for the same years.

9. Table III shows their revenue and expenditure for the last ten years in comparative form.

10. Table IV gives an Abstract of Cases under cognizance of the Magistrates' Courts during the years 1931 and 1932 in comparative form. The number of offenders. previously convicted who were sentenced during the year is shown and the number of offenders who were placed under Police supervision in addition to their sentences is given.

H 2

11. Table V is an analysis of the 'convicted and sentenced' column in Table IV, showing the penalties inflicted under each of the eight main heads of crime in that table. The number of offenders previously bound over whose bonds have been enforced on committing a breach of the conditions of the bonds is also shown.

12. Table VI is a return of boy juvenile offenders brought before the Hong Kong and Kowloon Magistrates' Courts during the year 1932, giving their ages, the offences committed by them and sentences imposed.

13. Table VII is a return of girl juvenile offenders, giving information similar to that in Table VI.

14. Table VIII gives the number of writs issued from the two Magistracies during the years 1931 and 1932.

15. Table IX is an abstract of all cases brought before the Hong Kong and Kowloon Magistrates' Courts during the last ten years. Figures for juvenile offenders under each head for 1932 are added.

16. Table X shows the work done by the Magistrates sitting as Coroners.

GENERAL.

17. The separation of juveniles from adults referred to in last year's report was continued during 1932. Pressure of work makes it at present impossible to take the cases of juveniles entirely apart from those of adults. The Juvenile Offenders Ordinance passed in the year under report will, when put in force, effect a great change in the arrangements for the trial of this class of offender.

18. Proceedings were taken under the Extradition Acts against two persons, and under the Fugitive Offenders Act against one person, for crimes committed outside the Colony. The two former were both committed to prison to await the orders of H.E. the Governor: the latter was discharged.

19. Summonses under the Married Women (Desertion) Ordinance, 1905, in Hong Kong numbered three as against one in 1931. In each case an order was made. In Kowloon these summonses numbered eight as against four in 1931. In five of them orders were made.

21st April, 1933.

W. SCHOFIELD, First Police Magistrate.

H 3

Table I.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1931 and 1932.

HONG KONG.

1931

1932

$69,065.62 $72,452.49

Personal Emoluments (1)

OTHER CHARGES.

Electric Fans and Light

178.47

146.56

Fees for Interpretation

105.00

96.00

Incidental Expenses

371.66

493.37

Uniform for Messengers

129.60

127.52

Vehicle hire for serving Summonses

149.60

136.70

Total

.$69,999.95 $73,452.64

KOWLOON.

1931

1932

$38,110.53 $37,178.95

Personal Emoluments (1)

OTHER CHARGES.

Electric Fans and Light

410.63

395.48

Fees for Interpretation

135.00

51.00

Incidental Expenses

381.12

319.18

Uniform for Messengers

131.55

122.29

Vehicle hire for serving Summonses......

10.00

Total

$39,178.83 $38,066.90

(1) Includes officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., and J. C. Services.

H 4

Table II.

Comparative statement of Revenue, 1931 and 1932.

HONG KONG.

1931

1932

Fines

Fees

Forfeitures

$103,852.48 $ 89,404.91

422.24

254.78

31,899.18

18,966.14

Miscellaneous Receipts (Surplus cash).

5.00

Interest

21.88

(1)

Foor Box

Arms Fine Fund

712.62

674.38

25.00

260.00

Revenue Reward Fund

31,243.12

20,098.26

Total

KOWLOON.

$168,181.52 $129,658.47

1931.

1932.

Fines

$64,556.80

$58,689.95

Fees

236.30

210.30

Forfeitures

9,231.50

6,269.79

Miscellaneous Receipts

Interest

2.25

4.80

Poor Box

412.72

394.24

Arms Fine Fund

110.00

822.30

Revenue Reward Fund

11,916.95

9,316.35

Total

$86,466.52

$75,707.73

(1) Interest credited to Treasury Account.

H 5

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

HONG KONG,

Personal

(1)

Year.

Emoluments

and other Charges.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

1923.

$50,158.91

$50,158.91

$184,926.15

1924

46,483.94

46,483.94

202,054.25

1925.

45,177.50

45,177.50

161,432.20

1926.

38,623.18

38,623.18

194,263.87

1927.

41,840.97

41,840.97

185,977.80

1928.

41,090.41

41,090.41

113,304.92

1929.

43,508.15

43,508.15

95,333.04

1930..

70.167.87

70,167.87

86,738.45

1931.

69,999.95

69,999.95

136,913.40

1932.

73,452.64

73,452.64

109,300.21

KOWLOON.

1923.

1924.

1925.

1926.

Figures not available.

1927.

1928..

1929.

1930..

$21,222.57

$21,222.57

$74,374.82

1931.

40,697.67

40,697.67

1932..

38,066.90

38,066.90

86,466.52 75,707.73

(1) Includes officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., & J. C. Services

attached to the department.

:

-

- H 6 —

×

Bound over without further penalty.

Table IV.

THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEARS 1931 AND 1932.

HONG KONG.

Sumber of Male and Female Adult Defendants under each Head.

Committed for trial at the

Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

F.

To answer any

charge.

M.

F.

Previously

convicted.

M.

898

58

F.

Under police supervision.

M.

::

4

20

5

F.

32

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

31

14

16

M.

14

!1

15

98

1

...

15

18

13

N

:

F.

3

...

7

020

:

10

14

3

∞ 2

::

6

:.

M.

F.

M.

38

92

1

1

:

3

5

1

2

1

5

2

11

...

2

43

4

...

...

7

1

1

...

35

44

5

1

:

...

:

1

16

1

1

11

19

1

4

2

***

...

1

1

...

::

:

10

2

14

21

36

2

101

220

12

+

...

1

:

1

:

11

2

1

25

25

8

38

11

:

10

25

::គ

2

ԷԿ

1

1

2

:

:

12

14

1

1

97

120

...

:

...

:

:

29

F

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of

charges.

Total No. of Defendants.

M.

H 6

Table IV.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRA

HONG KONG.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Female

Convicted and sentenced.

F.

Total.

M.

Discharged.

F.

Total.

M.

Committed for

trial at the Supreme Court.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

(a) — Against their property.

1. Larceny: Simple

829

935

818

950

646

697

6

Co

655

703

122

127

122

131

1

Stealing from the person

180

214

169

187

143

170

1

144

171

25

13

1

25

14

...

Embezzlement and fraudulent

conversion

53

76

51

74

28

44

30

44

44

17

Robbery

11

7

14

8

1

1

งง

16

18

16

...

...

7

7

Piracy

1

1

...

Burglary and housebreaking

101

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

Receiving and possession of stolen goods

451

2. Arson

3. Malicious damage

4. Forgery

ཿ སྱཱ རྞ ། སྦྲུ

127

110

140

82

110

83

114

20

14

20

14

5

10

6

13

4

4

11

11

39

42

40

46

31

28

31

28

6

12

2

8

15

599

481

631

211

252

25

14

236

266

222

296

10

12

232

308

1

...

:

24

23

5. Other offences

18

2888

20

30

22

23

23

25

22

21

11

22

11

6

7

11

15

1

11

16

10

17

96

13

66

13

71

15

10 10

10

5

2

4

15

:.

:

(b)—Against their persons.

1. Homicide

2. Iii-treatment and grievous harm

3. Common assault

4. Kidnapping

5. Sexual offences

6. Other offences

4

11

16

12

152

196

179

226

24

14

33

...

1

14

ཋལླཧྨསྶཀྑུསྶ

10

...

5

102

120

24

11

21

1

12

1

277

5

11

+

108

127

30

47

17

10

10

2

1

2

14

::

31

3

སོ ྋ ུ ཁྭ ལ

1

2

48

10

13

5

...

E

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c)—Against the Crown and Government.

1. Currency offences

15

22

19

21

2. Sedition, intimidation and breach of

emergency regulations.

35

14

44

3. Unlawful societies

1

2

4. Trespass and damage on Crown Land...

46

71

67

105

2 2285

7

14

2

14

10

7

:

:

5



10

:

18

17

12

17

12

26

:

6

1

27

...

22

47

69

6

256

53

94

13

21

4

22

2

13

626

...

5. Theft and damage of public stores

1

1

...

...

...

1

6. Misconduct by Government officers,

15

17

14

19

10

10

1

10

4

10

...

7. Opium and Revenue offences

1,008

983

1,136

1,017

842

746

137

171

979

917

130

71

19

13

149

84

8. Dangerous drug and goods

24

23

28

23

15

20

15

20

13

13

3

9. Other offences

42

31

42

35

35

11

19

35

30

6

2

2

6

...

Carried forward,..

3,116

3,553 3,349 3,753 2,282

2,420

196

264

2,478

2,684

690

702

37

42

727

744

21

36

F.

L

- H 7-

Table IV,-Continued.

OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEARS 1931 AND 1932. Hong Kong,-Continued.

the Number of Male, and Female Adult Defendants under each Head.

31

Bound over without further penalty.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pending Orders of H.E. the Governor.

Previously convicted.

Under police supervision.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour,

To answer any charge.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

31 1932

1931

1932 1931 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931, 1932 1931 1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

727

744

21

36

1

1

1

2

101

220

12

25

8

00

38

97

120

29

:

:

Co

...

2

17

25

3

200

1031

15

:

9

2

:

1.

:

:::

38

63

12

21

176

41

49

63

286

797

427

357

64

30

1

295

645

4

1

2

3

87

44

131

204

11

25

3,078

34

51

:::

...

13

34

::

22

89

109

~

...

...

:::

...

1

:

4

1

B

24

188

26

4

3

شات

.2

7

15

4

1

7

7

207

353

26

66

148

366

26

29

...

2

I

Figures not available,

:

:

H 7-

Table IV,-Continu

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTI

Hong Kong,-Continu

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, and Fem

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for tria

the Supreme Cour

17

~ -

3

25

10 00

8

1

:

M

F.

Total.

M.

F.

Total.

M.

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931 1932

1931

1932

1931 1932

1931 1932 1931 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

Brought forward,

3,116 3,553 3.349

3,753

2,282

2,420

196

264

2,478 2,684

690

702

37

42

727

744

21

36

1

(d) ~ Against Public Justice.

1. Escape and breach of prison.....................

2

2

2

2

2

2

...

:

2. Returning from banishment

89

127

99

127

93

118

3

3. Perjury

4. Bribery

5. Other offences

: ;

22

22

14

:

:

96

8

118

1

2

:

14

9

2

...

:

:

:..

:

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of

charges.

Total No. of Defendants.

177

16

9

3

అణ

22∞

20

14

12

15

1031

(e)—Against the Public peace.

1. Breach of the peace.....

3. Other offences

(f)—Against trade.

142

146

245

2. Unlawful possession of arms...........................................

13

25

916

345

119

143

7

34

126.

10

20

6

7

:

;

:

:

:

1. Trade marks infringement...

17

29

15

27

14

12

2. Employers and workmen offences

8

1

* 8

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

10 30 1

15

:

511

192

523

219

461

148

18

5

479

153

36

54

У

38

63

2. Brothels, and procuration of women

85

264

90

260

19

32

59

205

78

237

8

7

14

12

21

3. Lotteries and gambling

433

663

1,552

1,355

1,354

1,237

21

73

1,376

༠ ལ ་

1,310

172

39

+

5

176

44

4. Offences against public health

430

་ ་ ་ ་ ་་

338

427

343

305

270

73

10

378

280

38

62

11

1

49

63

5. Street hawkers offences

5,566 4,450

4,822

4,222

4,209

3,137

326

285

4,535

3,422

259

573

27

224

286

797

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers

8. Drunkenness

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature

10. Dangerous driving of vehicles

11. Vagrants and stowaways

12. Unlicensed or unmuzzled dogs

13. Other offences

3,912

3,024

3,795

3,027

3,349

2,659

19

11

3,368

2,670

427

354

3

427

357

399

330

461

332

392

299

5

3

397

302

64

29

64

30

12

12

5

12

12

4

...

4,191

1-16

4,134

4,412

4.138

4,106

3,489

8

3

4,114

3,492

295

612

295

645

95

143

95

139

91

139

91

.4

1

30

50

37

51

35

46

1

35

47

2

3

2

3

540

242

531

242

441

198

3

444

198

87

44

87

44

2,678 1,456 2,770 1.456

2,358 1,103

262

124

2,620

1,227

111

188

20

16

131

201

11

Total,

22,631 19,155 23.312 20,030 19,707 15,431

1,002

1,018 20,709 16,449

2,219

2.755

106

323

2,325

3,078

34

51

3. Food and drugs offences

4. Other offences

(g)—Against Public Morals and Police.

1. Begging and touting

* 5 defendants ordered to pay wages.

Bound over without further penalty.

To answer any

charge.

Previously convicted,

Witnesses punished for making false charge or giving false evidence.

::

::

Police Supervision.

::

6

ඊ.ප

19

F.

M、

F.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

31

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931 1932

1931 1932

1931

1932

1931 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

-

H 8-

IV,-Continúed.

ICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEARS 1931 AND 1932.

Kowloon.

Male and Female Adult Defendants under each Head.

for

rt.

Committed to Prison or

Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

::

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

M.

::::::

:

IC N

45

32

8

45

2

2

}

وت

2

10

10

2

84

:

:

62

2 +

4

61

co

:

:

6

90

12

2

::

23

I

1

9

:

:

N

:

145

114

10

29

69

1

1

:

:

...

+

...

...

76

4

5

:

:

140

:

1

:

:

:

26

:

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of

charges.

Total No. of Defendants.

M.

Convicted and sentenced.

F.

-

H 8-

Table IV,-Conti

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGI

Kowloon.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and F

Total,

M.

Discharged.

F.

Total.

M.

Committed for

trial at the Supreme Court.

F.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS,

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931 1932

1931 1932

(a) — Against their property.

1. Larceny: Simple

950 1,140

1,003

1,111

838

825

10

Stealing from the person

86

118

96

116

83

76

:

Embezzlement and fraudulent

conversion

43

58

54

63

41

37

نات

29

818

854

94

167

83

76

29

41

40

14

ོཁ་

Robbery

20

10

23

16

Piracy

:

Burglary and housebreaking

55

41

60

37

ཡབ

49

:

Demanding with menaces

6

6

False pretences and cheating

42

25

38

2+

...

51

28

28

*

18

Receiving and possession of stolen goods

381

487

404

501

170

189

221

2. Arson

3. Malicious damage

25

16

4. Forgery.

5. Other offences.

+ ∞

13

33

32

16

223

:

30

16

12

10

3

8

2.

14

51

28

...

30

19

9

172

198

16

12

+

8

14

00

00

:

:

216

:.

13

2

5

276

17

~

8

284

98

172

30

11

g

20

6

1

6

5

5

218

00 00

7

:

2

...

+

:

772

13

17

2

:

(b)—Against their persons.

1. Homicide

5

13

3

2. Ill-treatment and grievous harm.

18

21

19

20

3. Common assault

179

164

211

203

82

4. Kidnapping

19

24

22

30

16

ཨལྤ༤

6

81

15

5. Sexual offences

...

6. Other offences

30

60

29

72

12

36

77620

225

83

83

16

20

***

40

9006

45

497

11

19

47

10

40

46

6

10

16

7210

♡♡

21

16

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c) - Against the Crown and Government,

1. Currency offences, weights and measures, etc.

8

ос

7

10

4

2

7

3

1

2

3

90

:

ست

:

:

2. Sedition, intimidation and breach of

emergency regulations

11

13

3. Unlawful societies

3

8

4. Trespass and damage on Crown Land.

87

58

93

** ** **

7

}

7

1

2

N

:

:

6

6

:

61

35

21

4

82

39

10

12

11

5. Theft and damage of public stores

194

...

6. Misconduct by Government officers

9

9

9

12

8

7

1

8

3

7. Opium and Revenue offences

8. Dangerous drugs and goods

9. Other offences

308

325

884

396

309

289

24

53

333

342

48

45

نات

2

15

3

51

48

་ ་་་་

21

19

2.1

19

15

12

16

12

9

9

14

15

12

9

12

9

2

Q2

Carried forward,

2,324

2,641

2,568

2.783

1,766

1,712

69

122

1,835

1,834

500

690

14

26

514

716

32

28

28

:

:

:

:

:

7

-H9

e IV,-Continued.

LICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEARS 1931 AND 1932.

loon,-Continued.

f Male and Female Adult Defendants under each Head.

Bound over without further penalty.

Previously convicted.

·To keep the peace and be of good behaviour,

To answer any charge.

Witnesses punished for making false charge or giving false evidence.

Police Supervision.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

17.

F.

M.

1.

M.

F.

931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

- 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

145

114

9

10

29

76

4

5

140

1

26

:

:

:

:

:

ial at the

urt.

:::::

Committed to Frison or Detained pending Orders of H. E. the Governor.

:

:

...

179

94

13

:

32

AN

:

10

9

0 10

:

:

35

က

7

1

10

...

106

3

1

co

:

221

6

35

15

13

16

1

}

346

219

24

45

46 |

162

6

16

Included in g 13.

LO

5

296

15

* Included in other offences unspecified.

:

:

27

Classification of Offences.

Total No of

charges.

Total No. of Defendants.

Convicted and sentenced.

Brought forward,..

(d) ---Against Public Justice.

- H 9

Table IV,--Cont:

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGIS

Kowloon,-Contir

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male and Fe

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Ma

F.

Total.

M.

F

Total

M.

F.

1931 1932

2.324 2,641

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932*

1931

1932

2,568 2,783

1,766 1,712

69

122

1,835 1,934

500

690

14

26

514

716

32

28

1. Escape and breach of prison

2. Returning from banishment.

3. Perjury

4. Bribery

106

117

106

117

104

106

2

3

3

19

14

19

15

13

9

5. Other offences

...

(e)- Against the Public peace.

1. Breach of the peace.

274

201

468

400

2. Unlawful possession of arms

7

36

99999

239

193

от

37

5

23

33333

...

3. Other offences

:

:

:

(f)—Against trade,

1. Trade marks infringement

2. Employers and workmen offences

3. Food and drugs offences.

4. Other offences

(g)—Against Publio Morals and Police,

1. Begging and touting †

2. Brothels, and procuration of women

3. Lotteries and gambling

4. Offences against public health.

5. Street hawkers offences

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers

8. Drunkenness *

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature

10. Dangerous driving of vehicles

11. Vagrants and stowaways

12. Unlicensed or unmuzzled dogs ‡

13. Other offences

14. Other offences unspecified..

...

}

Total,.

:

15

68 2

12

:

22

63

28-

13

*62

12

}

co

3

106

109

2

13

11

+

3

17

30

244

5

210

32

46

95

26

1

:

18

10

7

10

CO

62

2-

1

25

27

11

1

1

11

:

...

:

co

32

50

1

11

00



170

181

157

13

170

...

131

142

140

154

61

23

67

112

128

135

4

10

LO

∞ ∞

9

18

တက

888

205

1,288

842

1,250 795

2

1,252 802

35

40

35

40

462

415

502

447

392

349

48

24

440

373

61

56

1

10

62

66

3,682

2,796

7,852 3,756 7,130 3,313 5,309

2,609 2,776 2,544 2,495 *2,198

73

764

3,386 6,073

346

814

18

217

364

1,031

...

...

...

5

2,496 2,203

275

340

279

341

+++

56

24

112

91

102

85

102

85

10

6

10

6

4,920

365

41

5,028

374

46

3.999

280

383

4

4,382 281

546

71

70

23

}

24

20

1

1

616

72

1

21

...

...

...

...

15,301

14,418

16,804

15,242 13,764 11,295

650

1.079

14,414

12,374

1,823

2,113

113

270

1,936

2,383

32

£3

* 1931 Figures for Juveniles not available.

† Included in g 5.

H 10

Table V.

Hong Kong.

1 in respect of Certain Classes of Offences during the Years 1931 and 1932 Adults only.

Against the Crown and

Against Public Justice.

Government.

Offences of a Public Nature.

Against the Public Peace.

Against Trade.

Against Public Morals and

Police.

Other Offences.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F

M.

F.

M.

F.

931

1:32

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

: 1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

400

258

64

106

7

541

590

81

108

3

26

28

93

122

:

:

حت

13

31

15

12

18

14

17

12

14,161

11,(51

484

513 2,044

904

257

116

624

511

47

82

225

$9

5

5

:

:

10

:

...

:

:

:

:

14

15

10

2

ԷՋ

7

:

1

:

N

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

:

:

19

88

95

1

:

:

:

:

$29

28

:

:..

:

:

N

12

LO

5

LC

LO

5

2

:

:

2

72

92

123

30

10

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

87

99

13

20

29

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:..

:

:

:

:

: :

:

:

1

30

741

640

158

209

36

1

13

51

1

:.

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

:

:

4

:

:

996

912

149

228

103

134

229

268

21

70

12

22

12

15,573

12,258

691

808

2,402

1,163 į

266

132

H 10

Table V.

Hong Kong.

Return of Punishments awarded at Magistracy in respect of Certain Classes of Offences du

Offences against Individuals.

Punishments,

Number of persons punished.

Description.

Against their Property.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Against their Persons.

F.

M.

Against the Crown and Government.

F.

M.

Against

Justic

1931 1932 1931 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1:32

· 1931

1932

1931

1932

Fined

16,693 | 12,339

828

762

42

53

17

10

11

43

13

400

258

64

106

5

7

Imprisoned in default

1,631 1,430

149

204

209

199

14

8

12

26

1

541

590

81

108

3

Imprisoned without option

1,184

1,415

16

19

919

1,111

13

Imprisoned and birched

21

26

20

26

:

:.

Expelled from the Colony

4

10

...

:

:

:

:

3833

26

2

26

28

93

122

:

:

:

:

:

10

:

Sentenced to house of Detention

29

28

:

:

Bound over to be of good behaviour

68

196

30

43

13333

150

13

CO

Convicted and cautioned

817

746

168

225

13

37

Bound over and fined

116

146

33

4

Bound over and ordered to pay compensation

2222

6

Bound over, ordered to pay compensation and fined

12

:

Bound over and imprisoned

7

:

:

:

Bound over to keep peace

147

151

20

35

21

Fined and ordered to pay compensation

10

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

**

:

2

1

40

12

10

3

30

46

Q

:

2

:

Co

เง

15

2

14

10

2

Q

:

7

1

10

:

:

40

.9

Bound over to come up for judgment

41

Co

37

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Enforcement of bonds.

11

...

...

Total

...

20,761 16,571 1,197

1,312

1,268

1,630

44

48

168

194

22

26

996

912

149

228

103

134

· H 11 -

Table V,--Continued.

Kowloon.

stracy in respect of Certain Classes of Offences for the years 1931and 1932 Adults only.

I

1

Offences of a Public Nature,

Against the Crown and Government.

Against Public Justice.

Against the Public Peace

Against Trade.

Against Public Morals and Police.

Other Offences.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

: 1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932

1931

1932



حت

185

144

28

17

11

5

130

22

2

171

203

14

40

2

25

70

53

14

3

103

106

2

3

13

12

1

7

22

4

4

10 457 8,007

465

646

13

19

1

876

:

:

1

:

: +

:

:

:

:.

...

:

:

1

3

75

75

1

10

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2



:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

T

:

1

:

:

F.

5

36

13

6

32

46

:

49

85

10

35

:

:

:

+

:

:

:

1,092

103

272

9

80

40

2

7

:

:

:

...

1

+

+

36

:

:

1

1+

:

:

21

1

2

1.262

1,343

97

239

16

20

1

5

:

:

:

:

:.

:

+

2

:

:

.:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

4

179

58

:

24

2424

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

15

2

:

29

;

490

442

50

72

126

116

3

5

439

338

18

58

30

79

2

12,714

10,513

673

1,168

47

44

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1932.

REGISTRATION.

,—an increase of 164

During the year 6,345 instruments were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844,—— on the preceding year.

2. The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1932 was 135,419.

3. The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

4. The total consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions registered in the Land Office amounted to $126,666,179.09 particulars of which are shewn in Table II.

CROWN LEASES.

5. 938 Crown Leases were issued during the year, as against 517 in the previous year-an increase of 421—particulars are set out in Table III.

6. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

FEES.

7. The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $151,554.25 being an increase of $32,956.25 on the preceding year. Table IV shews the Monthly

Revenue.

8. Land Registration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $10,327.50 and Crown Lease Fees to $90.00.

9. The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table V.

10. Table I shews that the number of deeds registered during the year 1932 has only been exceeded once, whilst the number of Crown leases granted constitutes a record. Table V shews that 1932 was a record year. This was mainly due to the large number of Crown leases which were granted.

+

I 2

GRANTS OF LAND.

11. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 1,019 acres 1 Rood and 14-1/10 poles, of which 929 Acres, 1 Rood and 34-4/5 poles were dealt with by the District Officers.

12. Particulars of grants, surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages W 1 and 2 of the Blue Book for 1932.

SURRENDERS.

13. 122 surrenders of land required for public purposes (including surrenders under Contracts of Exchange) were pre- pared and registered in the Land Office, the total consideration for those required for public purposes amounting to $3,563.20.

STAMP DUTIES.

14. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted to $611,093.90-an increase of $2,281.20,

15. Stamp Duties on Probates and Letters of Administration registered amounted to $853,819.06-an increase of $698,405.42.

CROWN RENTS.

16. The number of lots entered on the Hong Kong and Kowloon Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VI-was 8,029, an increase of 905 on the preceding year.

17. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $698,060.79 -an increase on the preceding year of $21,930.75.

18. The number of lots entered on the Village Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VII-was 3,160-a decrease of 65 on the preceding year. This decrease was due mainly to resump. tions in Ma Tau Wei Village.

19. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,600.05— a decrease of $126.50 as compared with the preceding year.

20. The total Crown Rents amounted to $699,660.84—an increase of $21,804.25 on the year 1931.

21. The increase was occasioned mainly by the sale and grant of new lots in Kowloon and New Kowloon,

I 3

DOCUMENTS,

22. 2,104 miscellaneous documents were prepared in the Land Office during the year being an increase of 718 on the year 1931; viz:—

(a) 938 Crown Leases (with Counterparts).

(b) 758 Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Verandahs and Balconies over Crown Land.

(c) 122 Surrenders of land required for public purposes,

street improvements and private Exchanges.

(d) 265 Agreements for leases, exchanges, surrenders

and Permits.

(e) 20 Memorials of Re-entry.

(f) One Deed of Covenant relating to Scavenging Lane.

STAFF.

23. Mr. Philip Jacks was appointed an additional Judge of the Supreme Court from 9th to 20th May, 1932, and 21st July to 1st August, 1932.

24. Lt.-Col. F. Eaves, D.S.O., acted as Land Officer from 9th to 20th May and from 21st July to 1st August, 1932.

10th March, 1933.

PHILIP JACKS,

Land Officer.

- I 4

Table I.

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1923 тo 1932.

Year. Instruments registered.

Crown Leases granted.

1923

6,837

209

1924

6,000

90

1925

4,226

178

1926

4,360

250

1927

4,628

196

1928

4,798

235

1929

4,250

242

1930

5,517

874

1931

6,181

517

1932

6,345

938

Table II.

CONSIDERATION ON INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THe Land OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1932.

No. of Lots

Description of

Instruments.

Number registered.

or portions,

Total

of Lots

Consideration.

affected.

$

C.

Assignments

2,109

2,400

50,873,965.14

Mortgages and Transfer of

Mortgages

1,635

2,219

46,153,151.87

Reassignments and Certi

ficates of Satisfaction

1,189

1,630

28,943,019.28

Surrenders

122

184

3,563.20

Judgments and Orders of

Court

71

159

281,994.85

Miscellaneous Documents.

1,077

1,437

410,484.75

Probates and Letters of)

Administration, (Stamp Duties $353,819.06)

142

464

Total

6,345

8,493 $126,666,179.09

I 5

Table III.

CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Hong Kong

KOWLOON

New Kowloon

TOTAL

Marine

Inland

Rural Building

Garden Lots

Shaukiwan Inland

Ah Kung Ngam Lots

Chung Hom Bay

Aplichau Inland

Kowloon Inland

Kowloon Permanent Pier

Tsun Wan Marine

25279 13 2 2 2

Tsun Wan Permanent Pier

New Kowloon Inland

Tsun Wan Inland

2

383

1

1

1 1 225 938

Table IV.

RETURN OF MONTHLY REVENUE PAID IN STAMPS TO THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1932.

Searches

Copy Documents

Crown

Month.

Registration

Lease

Total.

of Deeds.

and Certi- fications.

Fees.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

January February

9,120.00

615.00

1,350.00

11,085.00

7,523.00

593.50

1,620.00

9,736.50

March

7,627.00

747.00

3,930.00

12,304.00

April

7,424.00

880.75

3,930.00

12,234.75

May

7,603.00

623.00

3,000.00

11,226.00

June

7,786.00

625.00

3,090.00

11,501.00

July

8,042.00

747.25

2,310.00

11,099.25

August

7,365.00

824.00

3,900.00

12,089.00

September

8,189.00

714.00

5,160.00

14,063.00

October

9,479.00

992.50

7,020.00

17,491.50

November

9,610.00

699.25

5,910.00

16,219.25

December

8,567.00

728.00

3,210.00

12,505.00

Totals:

98,335.00 8,789.25 44,430.00

151,554.25

$151,554.25

1932 Total

118,598.00

1931 Total

$ 32,956.25

Increase,

Ì 6

Table V.

FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1923 to 1932.

Searches

Year.

Registration of Deeds.

and Copies Grants of

Total.

of Docu-

Leases.

ments.

$

C.

C.

$

C.

1923

109,671.00

7.280.00 6,680.00

123,631.00

1924

93,304.00

5,824.25 2,470.00

101,598.25

1925

65,068.00

4,778.75 5,210.00

75,056.75

1926

65,843.00

4,443.00 7,635.00

77,921.00

1927

67,115.00 5,050.50 5,442.00

77,607.50

1928

72,815.00

6,640.00 6,630.00

86,085.00

1929

63,478.00

}

5,498.50 7,100.00

76,076.50

1930

84,339.00

7,043.75 25,472.00 116,854.75

1931

94,054.00

7,254.00 17,290.00

118,598.00

1932

98,335.00

8,789.25 44,430.00

151,554.25

I 7

Table VI.

HONG KONG AND KOWLOON RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Victoria Marine Lot

385

81,653.03

Praya Reclamation Marine...

Lot

59

Inland Lot

2,806

5,388.39 252,087.13

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

3

18,914.00

Inland Lot

14

4,052.00

Victoria Farm Lot

8

401.55

Garden Lot

49

1,501.00

Rural Building Lot

231

44,297.58

Aberdeen Marine Lot

579.16

Inland Lot

Aplichau Marine Lot

Inland Lot

83

1,097.60

24

152.84

40

263.48

Shaukiwan Marine Lot

10

2,308.00

Inland Lot

223

4,739.57

Stanley Inland Lot

4

4.00

Pokfulum Dairy Farm Lot

4

2,682.00

Kowloon Marine Lot

57

48,841.00

Inland Lot

2,076

123,350.61

Garden Lot

1

1.00

1

Hung Hom Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Sheko Inland Lot

Tai Tam Inland Lot

Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

2

6,140.00

155

9,240.00

4

17.00

1

1.00

1

1.00

3

18,938.00

Inland Lot

1,720

58,511.35

Farm Lot

7

Rural Building Lot

1

287.50

42.00

12

Tai Po Inland Lot

10

838.00

Fan Ling Lot

2

1,900.00

Sheung Shui Lot

918.00

Ping Chau Farm Lot

225.00

Mining Lot

2

1,590.00

Tsun Wan Marine Lot

5

4,376.00

Inland Lot

11

1,806.00

New Kowloon Dairy Farm Lot

16

834.00

Tsing I Marine Lot

1

Total

8,029

82.00

$698,060.79

A

I 8

Table VII.

VILLAGE RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown

Rent.

$

C.

Aberdeen

Pokfulam

Tai Hang

157

Ah Kung Ngam

Shaukiwan

22522

17

68.50

24

28.25

633.50

18.25

27

15.00

Ma Tau Wei

3

7.50

Hau Pu Loong

12

44.00

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

16

67.00

Little Hong Kong

1

2.00

Tong Po

1

2.50

Stanley

9

18.00

Tytam

1

3.50

Tytam Tuk

3

2.50

Shek O

8

23.00

Chung Hom Bay

1

.50

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road

Victoria

1

3.00

Aplichau

42

75.00

Telegraph Bay

13

43.50

Little Hong Kong

1,577

280.25

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chai Wan

315

68.00

182

36.00

723

125.80

Total

3,160

1,600.05

I 9

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF MARRIAGES

FOR THE YEAR 1932.

MARRIAGES.

The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 265 (of which 122 were between Chinese persons) as compared with 228 (and 104) respectively in 1931—an increase of 37. Particulars are given in Table I.

FEES.

2. The total amount of Fees received under the Second Schedule of the Marriage Ordinance, 1875, was $3,198.97 as compared with $2,705.00 in 1931-an increase of $493.97. Particulars are shewn in Table II.

10th March, 1933.

PHILIP JACKS,

Registrar of Marriages.

Table I.

(1) Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE, 34.

(a) At Licenced

Places of

10.

Public Worship.

(b) At the Office of (c) At other places.

the Registrar of

Marriages.

23.

1.

(2) Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE 231.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

156.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages.

75.

I 10

Table II.

FEES RECEIVED DURING 1932.

Fee.

Total Fees.

243 Certificates of Notice

(Registrar's Certificates)

@

$1.00

243.00

2 Searches

(a

$1.00

2.00

47 Certified Copies

@

$1.00

47.00

1 Certified Copy

@

$1.45*

1.45

1 Certified Copy

@

$1.02*

1.02.

11 Licences to Registrar of Marriages to issue his Certificates

@ $10.00

110.00

36 Special Licences

@ $50.00

1,800.00

99 Marriages at the Office of the

Registrar

@ $10.00

990.00

1 Miscellaneous Document..

@ $4.50

4.50

Total

$3,198.97

*Excess receipts over Statutory fees due to Exchange.

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1932.

DEPARTMENT OF DISTRICT OFFICE, NORTH.

STAFF.

Mr. T. Megarry went on leave on the 5th April, 1932, and was succeeded as District Officer by Mr. E. H. Williams.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

2. Tables I, II (a), II (b) and II (c) show comparative details of the expenditure and revenue of the department for the years 1931 and 1932. Revenue from the district in the form of duties on liquors and tobaccos is not included, being paid to the Im- ports and Exports Department.

3. The total revenue shews an increase of about $13,000 principally under the headings of Kerosene Oil Licences, Forestry Licences, Matshed Fermits and Buildings.

4. Table III shows a comparative statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Department for the last ten years.

MAGISTRACY.

5. Tables IV to VIII show the details of cases heard during the year by the District Officer in his capacity as Police Magis- trate and Judge of the Small Debts Court. Table VII gives the returns of offences committed by boys and girls. The small number of such cases tried is remarkable and reflects credit on the parents.

6. The number of Police cases heard shews an increase over the already high figures of 1931. This is mainly due to the increase in revenue offences, smuggling of wine and tobacco into the district from Chinese territory by land and sea being rife.

7. The number of traffic cases is double that for 1931 and is largely due to the increase in the number of summonses against the drivers of lorries for carrying passengers for hire.

8. Fourteen persons were committed for trial during the year as against none in 1931. Four were committed for return- ing from banishment and the remainder for armed robbery, kidnapping or bribery.

J.2

9. The number of small debt cases heard and distress war- rants issued (Table VIII) is average. The figures for the last five years shown in the table are in excess of these but may be accounted for by the fact that they include one or two years dur- ing which exceptionally large numbers of such cases were heard.

10. Twenty six cases of deaths in unusual circumstances were reported to the Police Magistrate and Coroner during the year. Five death enquiries, one with jury, and four without jury were held.

LAND OFFICE.

11. Complete details of the work of the Land Office are shewn in Table IX. The number of memorials registered in the Land Registry was 3,286 as against 3,510 in 1931 and the amount of stamp duty received for such registration was $6,850.70 against $4,992.70 in 1931.

12. Sales of Crown Land for agriculture shew a decrease on the figures for last year, 140.83 acres being sold for this purpose as compared with 300.12 in 1931.

13. The demand for building sites for shops and houses con- tinues unabated. A number of bungalow sites were sold near the Castle Peak and Cafeteria beaches during the year. Some bungalows were completed and others were in process of erection. Building at Un Long shews great progress, particularly on the south side of the main road where a row of shops has been practically completed, and before long work will be started on the second row. A large area of foreshore has been reclaimed near British Shataukok and the building of shops on this area is nearly completed. A further area of foreshore was also sold for the same purpose. Some building sites have been sold at Taipo, for the erection of dwelling houses rather than shops.

14. Table X shows the allocation of assistance from the Local Public Works vote during 1932. The requests for assist- ance, however, far exceeded the sum available.

15. Eleven new licences for forestry areas were issued during the year as against thirty-two in 1931. The total area under forestry licences at the end of 1932 was 40,681.60 acres as against 40,355.80 acres at the end of 1981. A large part of this area is. however, very thinly planted and the trees are of poor descrip- tion, the object of some villagers in acquiring forestry licences being to monopolise the grass-cutting within their reserve rather than to plant pine-trees.

16. There were 327 licences to cultivate pineapple plan's current at the end of the year as against 230 at the end of 1931; the area under cultivation increasing from 76 acres in

J 3

1931 to 122 acres in 1932. This growth is said to be due to the arrival of the ex-Shing Mun villagers who are now persuading their neighbours to take up this form of land-cultivation. The price dropped from $4 to $2 per picul after the passing of regulations during the cholera epidemic forbidding the sale of sliced fruit, pineapple being largely sold cut-up. Efforts so far have failed to persuade persons to start a canning industry in this District. Those who might be expected to undertake it state that there is insufficient fruit grown during the year to supply a factory. They are also not hopeful of being able to compete successfully with the factories in Hong Kong, Kowloon and Canton.

GENERAL.

17. Rainfall for the year was average though no heavy rain fell until June and in consequence the first rice crop was poor. The second crop was very good and this probably accounts for the remarkable promptitude with which Crown Rent was paid, a sum of $45 only being outstanding in a sum of $93,882.59.

18. The year was considered fairly good for the fisheries industry but it is claimed that profits made were not large owing to the high cost of kerosene used in bright light fishing and also the heavy customs duty payable on the export of dried fish into China.

19. The electric light supply has been extended to Sheung Shui, Fanling and Un Long. Before very long it will have reached Castle Peak and Shataukok. It is proving very popular in the market-towns but few villages are, as yet, using electricity.

20. The telephone service is not availed of to any great extent by the Chinese in the District. The majority of them being people with small means they doubtless consider the rates too high.

21. Work was in progress on the building of a storage tank for water at Taipo Market and when completed should bring a very welcome increase in pressure in the mains. Un Long still awaits a proper water-supply but it is expected that before very long some move will be made in this direction. At present it is dependent on a number of small wells which are situated well outside the market and which are not very clean.

22. The Annual Agricultural Show was held at Sheung Shui on 3rd and 4th December, 1932 and was opened by the Honour- able Colonial Secretary Mr. W. T. Southorn, C.M.G. The num- ber of exhibits was slightly less than last year but, generally speaking, they were of a high standard. The farmers appear to be taking greater interest in producing better food-products and large numbers of them attended the Show.

J 4

23. In conclusion I desire to record my thanks to the leading elders of the District for their continued loyal co-operation and advice in settling disputes both between individuals and between village communities.

30th March, 1933.

E. H. WILLIAMS,

District Officer, North.

J 5

Table I.

Personal Emoluments*

Other Charges. Conveyance Allowances

1931

$56,377.20

1932

$53,497.20

1,416.94

1,483.22

Incidental Expenses

409.92

580.72

Local Public Works

1,090.00

2,910.00

Transport

593.14

1,347.08

Scavenging

746.30

1,247.01

Uniform

379.54

383.76

Upkeep of Grounds of Island House...

228.60

215.00

Total Other Charges....

4,864.44

8,166.79

Total department

$61,241.64 $61,663.99

*Includes officers of Cadet & Junior Clerical Services attached

to the department.

Table II A.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE

DISTRICT OFFICER IN 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Crown Rent, (Leased Lands)

$93,223.04

$93,837.59

Kerosine Oil Licences

571.83

2,248.50

Chinese Wine & Spirit Licences

3,598.91

3,486.65

Pawnbrokers' Licences

1,350.00

1,500.00

Money Changers' Licences

296.00

300.00

Fines

4,677.00

4,920.00

Fines (Land Sales)

84.70

1,048.36

Fines Reward Fund..

1,806.80

2,695.00

Forfeitures

411.98

288.00

Forfeitures (Land Sales)

85.00

.55.00

Distress Warrants (Crown Rent)

110.00

84.00

Distress Warrants (S. D. C.)

23.00

15.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts.

398.54

36.00

Forestry Licences

4,035.58

8,136.33

Permit to cut Earth &c.

4,001.00

5,515.34

Grave Certificates

27.50

14.00

J 6

Table II A,-Continued.

Pineapple Land Leases Matshed Permits

228.21

368.58

2,885.51

4,130.27

Permit to Occupy Land

2,284.46

3,404.38

Stone Quarry Permits

Stone Quarry Leases

Ferry Licences

Certified Extracts

Sunprints

Land Sales..

Stamps for Deeds

621.00

1,421.00

250.00

9.00

9.00

223.00

211.00

140.00

240.00

36,582.35

34,583.97

4,992.70

6,850.70

Boundary Stones

397.50

282.00

Deposits not available

3,180.76

2,485.21

Buildings

25.00

1,500.00

Crown Leases

60.00

30.00

Tobacco Retailers Licences

1,615.00

1,695.00

Court fees

Nil

22.95

Widow & Orphan's Pension Contribu-

tion

Nil

38.04

Poor Box

Nil

67.27

$168,195.37 $181,519.14

Table II B.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS, 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

Treasury (Mining Licences)..

$ 250.00

$

250.09

Land Office (Crown Rent)

3,518.00

3,656.00

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,)

1,937.00

2,766.50

(Sai Kung.

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,)

4,969.90

6,305.20

(No. 1 Launch.)

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,)

3,582.85

1,800.40

(No. 2 Launch.)

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,)

3,112.45

2,524.35

(No. 4 Launch.)

Total

$17,370.20 $17,302.45

NOTE: Revenue collected by Imports and Exports Department

is not included.

J 7

Table II C.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM

NORTHERN DISTRICT, 1931 AND 1932.

By District Office

By Other Departments

$168,195.37 $181,519.14

17,370.20

17,302.45

$185,565.57 $198,821.59

*This figure does not include Revenue collected by Imports and Exports

Department.

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

Personal*

Emoluments

and other Charges.

Special Expenditure.

Total

Total

Expenditure.

Revenue. †

$

$

1923

39,315.73

39,315.73

306,554.01

1924

34,099.79

34,099.79

252.344.41

1925

38,891.05

38,891.05

160,669.66

1926

37,990.97

37,990.97

162,402.42

1927

43,059.90

43,059.80

161.548.83

1928

46,339.30

150.80

46,490.10

134,140.18

1929

46,371.85

46,371.85

138,810.28

1930

61,273.56

61,273.56

168,511.80

1931

61,241.64

61,241.64

185,565.57

1932

61.663.99

61,663.99

198,821.59

*Includes Officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services attached to

department.

+ Includes revenue collected in the district by other departments

except Imports and Exports Department,

Table IV.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1932.

TAI PO.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male & Female Defendants under each Head.

Classification of Offences.

Total No.

of

Total No.

of

Charges.

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

ants.

Defend-

Bound over without further Penalty.

To keep the

Committed

for trial

Discharged.

at the

Supreme

Court.

Previously

convicted.

M.

F. Total

M.

F.

Total M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

peace and be of good behaviour.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a) Against their Property.

*

1. Larceny (simple).....

25

28

19

Stealing from the person

N

2

Embezzlement

and

Fraudulent

conversion

Robbery

6

Burglary and Housebreaking

6

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

5

200-10

10

-HXON N

92

19

2

1

:

2

7

3

00 00 00

2

2

Receiving and possession of stolen

goods

19

25

3. Malicious damage

2

5. Other offences

10

12

2-2

13

2

15

1

1-2

10

03 10

:

4

10

7

2

1

2

...

29

16

20

9

2

I

10

· 12

6

6

4

Carried forward..

121

158

71

17

88

41

3

44

(b) Against their persons,

2. Il-treatment & grievous harm..

3. Common assault

4. Kidnapping

-

6. Other offences

1

t

...

13

1

2

1

J 8 -

2

14

3

Q

Table IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1932.

TAI PO,-Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male & Female Defendants under each Head.

Classification of Offences.

Total

No. of

Total

No. of

Convicted

Charges.

Defen-

dants.

and

Sentenced.

Committed

for trial

Discharged.

at the

Bound over

without further l'enalty.

To keep the

peace and be of good behaviour.

Previously convicted.

Supreme

Court.

M.

F. Total M.

F.

Total

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F

121

158

71

17

88

41

بات

44

2

14

3

2

Brought formard.

OFFENCES OF A FUBLIC NATURE.

(c) Against the Crown and Government.

1. Currency offences

1

I

I

4. Trespass and damages on Crown Land

15

19

12

6. Misconduct by Government officers 7. Opium and Revenue offences.. 8. Dangerous drug and goods..... 9. Other offences

1

2

198

320

242

8

7

2224 00

6

Co

18

1

1

2

41

283

33

4

37

2

2

22

(d) Against Public Justice.

2. Returning from banishment

4. Bribery

5. Other offences

Carried forward..

.....

15

15

11

11

I

4

3

1

1

371

535

349

67

416

80

888

4

:

J 9-

3

4

1

15

12

2

14

21

4

Table IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER CognisancE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1932. TAI PO,-Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male & Female Defendants under each Head.

Classification of Offences.

Total

No, of

Tetal

No. of

Convicted

and

Defen-

Charges.

Sentenced.

dants.

Discharged.

Committed

for trial

at the

Supreme

Court.

Bound over without further Penalty.

To keep the

peace and be of good behaviour.

Previously convicted.

— J 10-

F

M.

F.

Total

M.

F. Total

M. F.

M.

F.

M. F.

Brought forward.

371

535

849

67

116

80

8

88

12

14

21

(e) Against the Public Peace.

1. Breach of the peace...

1

4

2. Unlawful possession of arms

11

15

10

3 Other offences

1

NO-

2

N

:

3

:.

(1) Against trade.

2. Employers and workmen offences.

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

(g) Against Public Morals and Police,

1. Begging and touting



1

2

N

3. Lotteries and gambling

16

47

43

Q

45

4. Offences against public health

1

1

1

1

5. Street hawkers offences..

13

16

14

1

15

2

I

6. Obstruction

7. Offences with fire crackers.

3

3

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature 10. Dangerous driving of vehicles...

13. Other offences

418

418

329

2

··

33

51

སྨིཾ ༠༢ ུ

2

1

I

329

89

89

15

2

42

43

6

2

Total...

872

1,097

797

72

869

184

11

195

12

**

16

37

Table V.

TAI PO, New Territories.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of Certain Classes of Offences during the Year 1932.

Punishments.

Offences against Individuals

Offences of a Public Nature.

J 11 -

Number of

Persons

Punished.

Description.

Against their Property.

Against their Person.

Against the

Against

Crown and

Public

Government.

Justice.

Against

Against the Public Morals! Public Peace. and Police.

Other

Offences.

M. F.

M. F.

M.

F. M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F. M. F

M. F.

Fines

616

38

Imprisoned in default

116

31

Imprisoned without option..

64

36

* 100

2

13

1

322

4 164

19

:

92

29

2

5

11

10 00 -

1

387

3

44

6

486

:

:

F:D

Bound over to be of good

behaviour

13

13

2

Convicted and cautioned..

30

Bound over and fined

5

1

5

...

Bound over, ordered to pay compensation and fined... Bound over to keep peace Fined and ordered to pay compensation

a 30

Co

3

~

p

2

5

10

:

:

:

:

མ;

:

21

...

...

2

Total......

861

75 44

3

47

12

269

48

11

14

1 414

3

62

11

Years.

Total

Number

of Cases.

Table VI.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of Five Years.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

CASES, HOW Disposed of, and the Number of Male and FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD,

Committed

for Trial

at Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or

detained

pending Or- der of His

Ordered to find Security.

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha- viour, and to answer any Charge.

Excellency

the Governor.

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

Did not appear

absconded

Escaped before being brought for trial at

the Magistracy.

Escaped,

Punished for preferring False Charge or giving False

Undecided.

Total Number of Defendants.

Testimony.

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

J 12-

M.

F.

J. M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

M.

F.

J.

M.

1.

J.

J. M.

F.

J.

M.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

1928

484

376

37

150

108

4

115

11

645

157

:

1929

477

437

50

110

18

1

10

7

558

75

1930

629

580

65

194

20

2

10

785

94

1931

655

549

71

17

165

21

32

1932

882

797

72

13

184

11

1

12

2

16

:

:

:

:

:

746

96

23

1,009

88

20

Total

3,127

2,739

295

80 803

178

7

18

183

82

3,743

510

43

A ver-

age

per

625.4

547.8

59.

15

160.6

35.6

1.4

3.6

1.

36.6

6.4

Year,

748.6

102.

21.5

4

Discharged or Order made.

5

2 3 4

Table VII.

Return of Juvenile Offenders brought before the Taipo Police Magistrate's Courts, during the Year 1932.

A.—Boys.

Convicted and Sentenced.

Bound Over,

Fines.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Convicted and Cautioned,

Classification of

Offenders.

Total

No. of

Defen-

dants.

Caned in Court.

I

2

10

~

3

1

Co

:

::

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

~

:

&..

:

:

:

**

:

3

4

:

:

:

::

:

1 1

:

+

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

Simple larceny

3

Receiving Stolen Pro-

perty

1

...

Setting fire to Govern-

ment Plantation

2

21

Common Assault Trespassing on Crown

Land Possession of dutiable tobacco.

ភា

Total

(1) Age under 10,

19

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

1

2

10

5

(3) Over 12 and under 14. (4) Over 14 and under 15,

Gambling

5

Driving bicycle with.

out light

1

10

J

:

13

:

:

:

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

...

:

:

TA.

:

J 14

B.-GIRLS.

Classification of Offences.

Total No. of Defendants.

Convicted and Cautioned.

Possession of raw

opium

1

1

2

3 4

(1) Age under 10.

(2) Over 10 and under 12. (3) Over 12 and under 14.

(4) Over 14 and under 15. (5) Over 15 and under 16.

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

Table VIII.

SMALL DEBTS COURTS.

10

5

1932 Average from

1927-1931.

128

206

15

65

Heading.

No. of Sales,

Permits, Li- cences, etc.

No. of Lots.

Area in Veres.

C.

€0

€9-

Sales of Land for Agriculture

Building

180

888888

99 167

7148

106.30

198

6.08

528.00

"}

Kerosine godown.

1

1

.03

3.00

"}

Threshing floors...

27

27

.59

3.40

Building and garden ..

15

16

7.65

654.50

,,

Garden...

4

4

1.10

90.20

Garden and Orchard

2

2

5.27

5.30

Orchard

2

14.42

14.50

>>

""

Fish pond & Salt padi.

1

69.35

69.40

C.

9.472.16

15,517.00

9.00

297.00

3,667.00

572.00

572.00

1,091.00

694.00

75

75

15

""

""

""

""

Brick storing ground.

1

1

4.90

24.50

1,065.00

""

Conversions

161

4.42

345.00

160.81

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture

1

3

15.87

31.80

10

73

166

118.40

318.25

5

""

"}

>>

other purposes.

3

3

273.48

877.00

5

>>

Agriculture

367

548

262.73

848.36

1

>>

other purposes.

7

7

37.35

1,328.97

1

Extensions

Exchange

19

19

2.23

220.50

1,467.00

75

1

1

.05

5.00

Nil.

Re-entries

10.62

49.76

Surrenders

70

5.72

134.70

Resumptions

72

148.71

297.54

3,510.11

Stone Quarry Permits

115

1,421.00

Permits to cut Earth, etc....

323

5,515.34

Matshed Permits

887

14.14

4,130.27

Ferry Licences...

5

Forestry Licences

597

40,681.60

Pine-apple Land Leases

327

122.86

9.00

8,136.33

368.58

1

10

Grave Certificates

29

14.50

Deeds Registered & Fees

...

:

3,286

6,850.70

J 15 -

Increased Annual Rent.

Decrease of Annual Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees,

etc.

*

S

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

J 16

Table X.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1932.

New Works.

Making a path of cement concrete to the Clerks' Quar-

ters at Tai Po

Repairs.

$

110.00

Bridge at Lam Tsun

29.15

Removal of a pond wall at Castle Peak

355.00

Path from Kam Tin to Wong Toi Shan

400.00

Bridge near Lo Uk Tsun, Ha Tsun

330.85

Main street at Tai Po old Market

500.00

Well at Siu Hang

100.00

Path from Tai Kau to Siu Kau

50.00

Bund near Lai Chi Wo

125.00

Total.....

$2,000.00

J 17

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE

YEAR 1932.

B. SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

STAFF.

Mr. J. S. MacLaren went on leave on 5th May and was succeeded as District Officer South, by Mr. B. C. K. Hawkins.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

2. Figures for expenditure and revenue are given in Tables I-III. Revenue collected by the department is set out under appropriate heads in Table II (a) and shows an increase of $5,393.60 over the 1931 figure. This increase is mainly account- ed for by increased returns from sales of Crown Land, Forestry Licences, and fees for stone and earth (including sand) permits.

3. Table II (b) shows revenue collected by other departments and II (c) gives, for purposes of comparison, the total revenue of the district collected during past two years, exclusive of the revenue collected by the Imports and Exports department.

4. The grand total contained in Table II (c) shows an in- crease of $92,321.80 over the 1931 figures, an increase which is almost entirely due to increased returns from Village Rates and Crown rent for inland lots.

5. Table III contains a comparative statement of Expendi- ture and Revenue of the department for the last ten years.

MAGISTRACY.

6. Tables IV to VIII show details of the cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

7. The figures show a decrease in the number of police cases in 1932 as compared with 1931. There were few serious offences and no cases were committed for trial in the Supreme Court.

8. Table VI shows the number of Juvenile Offenders dealt with in the District Office South Court in 1932.

9. Ten cases of deaths in unusual circumstances were report- ed to the Police Magistrate during the year. Two death inquiries (without Jury) were held.

J 18

LAND OFFICE.

10. Complete details of the work of the land office are given in Table X. The increase in the demand for building and agricul- tural land foreshadowed in the annual report for 1931 was realised in 1932. Ninety two sales of land covering 19.74 acres took place during the year as compared with 62 sales covering 9.8 acres in 1931. The demand was fairly constant throughout the yaer and there is reason to believe that it will continue in 1933.

11. The number of memorials registered was 1266, as against 1253 in 1931 but the amount received in registration fees was only $2.00 more than in the previous year.

12. Forestry licences decreased in number from 119 to 112, the marked increase in revenue under this head was due to licence fees being raised.

13. The effect of the tenfold increase of monthly fees for sand permits, which was put into operation in September, 1931, is clearly shown by the decrease in the number of permits issued from 447 to 249. In spite of the increased fee, however, it has been found necessary to continue the system of placing a limit on the number of permits for any one beach at a given time.

14. The demand for permits for bathing matsheds was as strong as ever and there are now very few available spaces left unoccupied.

Nine new permits were issued during the year bringing the total up to 124.

GENERAL

Agriculture.

15. On the whole the district may claim to have enjoyed a fair measure of prosperity during 1932.

16. At one time the first rice crop was in danger of failure owing to the drought; rain, however, fell just in time and ultimately two very fair crops were produced.

17. Sweet potatoes and vegetables generally seem to have done quite well though some complaints have been received from the Tsuen Wan district.

18. It has been a very bad year for pineapples, the wet weather of June, July and August coinciding with the short pineapple harvest season.

J 19

Fisheries.

19. A very poor season indeed; reports from all districts, with the exception of Lamma, are unanimous in condemning the 1932 season as one of the worst for many years.

20. The Wong Fa catch in particular was most disappointing. All the various fishing communities have suffered to some extent but Tai O has been hit hardest by this failure.

Ferries.

21. The Hong Kong and New Territories ferry Company has continued to give satisfaction throughout the year. The ferries have been run in strict accordance with schedule but it was found necessary slightly to increase the fares on the Hong Kong- Tai O run.

Registration of Births and Deaths.

22. The police stations of Tai O, Cheung Chau and Tsuen Wan are registry offices for their respective districts. Registra- tion in Tai O and Cheung Chau has been, all things considered, fairly satisfactory and there is no doubt that the people of these districts are rapidly outgrowing their distrust of the innovation. In Tsuen Wan, however, results have been disappointing and it appears probable that it will be necessary to have recourse to prosecution of offenders in order to bring home to the people the necessity of complying with the law.

Sanitation.

23. The scavenging coolies engaged at Hang Hau, Tsuen Wan and Tai O have been doing good work and there is a marked improvement in the cleanliness of these villages. Small street repairs and drainage works have been carried out at Cheung Chau and Hang Hau with a view to facilitating the work of the Scavengers and provision has been made in the 1933 estimates for more extensive repairs in Tsuen Wan, Hang Hau and Tai O.

24. The three most potent enemies of sanitation in the larger villages are lack of space, lack of water and lack of co- operation on the part of the inhabitants.

25. The first of these can best be met by making reclamations to give room for expansion, the second by providing adequate systems of water supply and the third by gradual education of the villagers.

Reclamations.

26. The year 1932 opened full of promise but unfortunately the promise has not been fulfilled. Of the three reclamations by private enterprise, foreshadowed in the last annual report. not one has materialised.

J 20

27. The Cheung Chau reclamation by a syndicate of Cheung Chau merchants has definitely been abandoned, and the reclama- tions at Tsuen Wan and Tai O have not yet emerged from the preliminary stages. It is to be hoped that the end of 1933 will see them well on the road to completion.

Water Supply.

28. A scheme for a water supply at Tsuen Wan has been approved and will be put in hand in 1933.

Hygiene.

29. A great impetus has been given to the spread of Western medicine throughout the district by the introduction of the Government travelling dispensary, which visits villages on the mainland, and by the weekly visits of a Medical Officer to Cheung Chau and Tai 0. The people are eager to receive treatment and it is already noticeable that they are more kindly disposed towards suggestions for the improvement of sanitary conditions in the villages.

30. The New Territories Benevolent Society and the St. John Ambulance Association have established branches at Tsuen Wan and Cheung Chau and a Government midwife has been stationed at Tai O.

31. A dispensary, the gift of a private individual, is in course of erection at Sham Tseng and should be completed in 1933,

Tai 0.

32. The general prosperity of Tai O is largely dependent upon the success of the fishing season. This year unfortunately the fishing season was a poor one and the Wong Fa catch was exceptionally bad. This has led to a scarcity of money in the village and a consequent depression of trade.

33. The following table gives a rough estimate of fish caught and prices obtained :—

Wong Fa Ma Yau

Herrings

Shrimps

Price per picul.

4,000 piculs. $18.00

360

24.00

3,500

17.00

""

1,000

6.00

The Wong Fa catch is 6,000 piculs less than in 1931, and, though the shrimp catch is 500 piculs greater, the price has dropped from $21 to $6 per picul,

J 21

34. Rice and vegetable crops were not so good as in 1931 but the smallness of the area under cultivation renders this a matter of secondary consideration.

35. The salt trade on the other hand has had a good year. Approximately 12,760 piculs of salt were produced, nearly double the 1931 output, most of which was exported.

36. There has been a certain amount of building and several schemes for future development are under consideration. The reclamation at the mouth of the creek, mentioned in the 1931 report, has been delayed but there is hope that it will be started early in 1933.

37. Tai O has again been free from any serious outbreak of fire. The fund for purchasing more modern fire fighting equip. ment is growing steadily and there should be sufficient money to ensure the purchase of a Lowrev Turbo pump in 1934.

Lamma.

38. Very good returns were obtained from the sale of cattle, pigs, poultry and eggs. The two rice crops were both good and the grass cutters had a fair season, most of the grass being sold to Aberdeen boat breamers.

39. The fishing industry reports a fair season, better than 1931, an especially good trade having been done in shrimp. paste.

Cheung Chau.

40. Cheung Chau continues to hold its place as the most progressive and thriving village in the southern district.

41. The fishing season was a failure but in spite of this the village shows signs of having prospered in 1932.

42. Very good crops and prices were obtained by the veget- able gardeners and all stalls in the market have been rented throughout the year.

43. Stone to the value of $2,900 was obtained from the quarry leased to Li Shing Kee and was used both for local works and for export.

44. The Shun Fung distillery has shut down but the Kwong Lung Shing distillery reports good business.

45. A certain amount of building and a good deal of rebuild- ing has taken place but most unfortunately the projected re- clamation by a syndicate of Cheung Chau merchants has fallen through.

J 22

46. This is particularly to be deplored because development in Cheung Chau is hampered at every turn by lack of space and there is urgent need of more ground to enable the village to expand.

47. The question of a proper water supply requires early attention. The two new wells opened in 1931 have proved too brackish for drinking purposes and the island is becoming in- creasingly dependent upon Lantau for its drinking water.

48. There was one serious outbreak of fire during the year, damage done being estimated at $30,000.

The fire engine was in good condition and was efficiently handled but proved too small to cope with so large a fire.

Tsuen Wan.

49. On the whole this district has had a fairly satisfactory year.

50. Both rice crops were good the second crop especially being of excellent quality. Vegetable gardeners report a fair year but complain of trouble with insect pests which has led to a slight decrease in production. Pineapple plantations have had a bad season, but sweet potatoes have done well and have found a ready market.

51. Bean curd manufacturers and local distilleries report good steady business; white lead production has had a fair year but the production of red lead has ceased altogether and there has been a further decline in the business done by the Sandal- wood Mills.

52. The Texas Oil Company's installation at Sham Pak Tsin has had a full year's work and has found employment for a quantity of local labour.

53. There has been considerable building activity in the neighbourhood of Tsuen Wan. Two or three large residential houses are in process of construction and there are signs of an increase in industrial activity in the near future.

54. The Brewery at Sham Tseng has been completed and it is anticipated that brewing will start fairly early in 1933.

55. A scheme for reclamation, by private enterprise, of a portion of the foreshore of Tsuen Wan Village is under considera- tion and it is hoped that this work will be commenced in 1933.

- J 23

56. The erection by Government of a new market has been postponed till next year when it should be possible advantageous- ly to combine this work with the reclamation.

57. Tsuen Wan's most urgent need, however, is a proper water supply. Funds have been provided in the 1933 estimates and it is hoped that the end of next year will see the village fully equipped with street fountains. It need hardly be said that the provision of this water supply will go far towards solving some of the most troublesome details of village sanitation and hygiene.

58. Two fires are reported from this district. The first at Tsuen Wan involved some stacks of hay and, when discovered, had gained too great a hold to be extinguished. The second at the Texas Oil Company's installation was successfully dealt with by the Company's fire fighting apparatus.

Special Event.

59. The Empire Products fair which was opened on the day before Empire day contained a New Territories section in which New Territory vegetables, poultry and fish were displayed for sale.

60. Produce was procured from Tsuen Wan, Tai O, Cheung Chau and Lamma and was purchased from the farmers at market prices. Subsequently a grant of money was voted by the Fair Committee and this was expended on seeds, fertiliser, lime, etc: which were distributed among the farmers of the district.

61. The Kai Fong of the various villages concerned rendered invaluable help in obtaining the produce and in organising the payment of the farmers and the distribution of the seeds.

28th March, 1933.

B. C. K. HAWKINS,

District Officer South.

J 24-

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1931 AND 1932.

Personal Emoluments

Other Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

Incidental Expenses

Local Public Works

Scavenging

Transport

Uniforms

Total Other Charges

Total Department

1931

1932

†$33,604.56 |*$38,461.92

626.67

660.00

159.92

124.00

960.00

830.00

1,317.00

793.74

537.42

137.58

143.31

$ 2,677.91

$36,282.47

$ 3,611.73 $42,073.65

Includes Officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services.

** Includes salary, May to November, of one Cadet Officer on leave.

Table II (a).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER, 1931 AND 1932.

Land Sales

1931 $ 3,383.26

Boundary Stones

Earth and Stone Permits

Forestry Licences

Forfeitures

Fines

Crown Leases

Legal Costs

Deeds Registration Fees

354.00 4,660.00

1,686.18 70.80 3,856.79 3,474,80 60.00

1932 $ 6,535.81

308.00

7,044.00

2,879.20 352.00 3.401.93

1

3.476.80

60.00

96.00

43.00

Miscellaneous Fees

129.25

100:50

Crown Rent

25,977.53

23,498.62

Matshed Permits on Crown Land...

2,039.00

4,134.35

Permits for Temporary Structure on

Private Land

813.00

943.00

Permits to occupy Land

906.89

611.60

Pineapple Land Leases

901.38

709.75

Market Fees

1,498.12

1,597.32

Leases of Stone Quarries.

91.75

127.05

Miscellaneous Licences

275.00

Interest on Deposit Account

32.82

Other Miscellaneous Receipts..

402.72

155.00

Poor Box.....

2.99

22.96

Building Covenant Fines.

101.66

61.35

Fines (Reward Fund)

520.00

300.00

Arms Fines

226.65

41.94

Total

$51,285.59

$56,679.19

J 25

Table II (b).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS, 1931 AND 1932.

Treasury, (Village Rates)

(Crown Rent for Inland

Lots)

(Quarries in New Kowloon)

Sanitary Department, (Eating House

Licence Fees)

Police Department, (Licence Fees)

Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues, Stake-

nets)

Total

1931

$217,982.00 $295,263.17

1932

68,362.36 78,495.59

9,839.59 7,668.38

470.00

33,268.00

420.00

37,363.00

27,842.85 25,482.86

$357,764.80 $444,693.00

NOTE: Revenue collected by the Imports and Exports depart-

ment is not included.

Table II (c).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM SOUTHERN DISTRICT, 1931 and 1932.

By District Office

By Other Departments

Total

1931

1932

$ 51,285.59 $ 56,679:19

357,764.80 444,693.00

$409,050.39 $501,372.19

NOTE: Revenue collected by the Imports and Exports depart-

ment is not included,

..

J 26

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE

FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

* Personal

Emolu-

ments and Other Charges.

Special Expendi-

Total

Total

Expendi-

Revenue

ture.

ture.

$

c.

1923

26,383.16

75.80

1924

28,087.75

1925

25,329.74

1626

25,946.68

1927

24,646.74

1928

23,111.62

1929

23,776.34

1930

39,410.90

1931

36,282.47

1932

42,073.65§

$

C.

$

C.

26,458.96

28,087.75

357,204.33

375,391.16

25,329.74

197,553.89†

25,946.68

217,870.87+

24,646.74

236.276.02

23,111.62

226,196.22†

23,776.34

246,273.31†

39,410.90 308,180.80

36,282.47

409,050.39†

42,073.65

501,372.19†

* Includes officers of Cadet and Junior Clerical Services attached to depart-

ment,

This figure does not include revenue collected by other departments

except the Imports and Exports Department.

§ Includes salary, May to November, of one Cadet Officer on leave.

Table IV.

Abstract of cases under cognisance of the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office, South during the year 1932. how disposed of, and the number of Male and Female Defendants under each Head.

Cases,

Classification of Offences.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

Total No.

Total No.

of

Charges.

of

Defen-

dants.

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed

for trial at the Supreme Court.

Bound over to

keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Bail

Estreated.

M

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

(a) Against their Property.

Burglary

Common Law Offences

Illegal Pawning.

Larceny by Servant.

Larceny (simple)...

13

Obtaining money by false pretences

3

221-00 co

13

10

3

(b) Against their person.

Assault

11

19

Harbouring a married woman and

Adultery

2

to to

1

1

1

3

11

6 00 00

-:

::

30 ON LO

1

3

1

1

12

27

110

14

28

9

7

70

91

78

t

Sexual Offences

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE. (a) Against the Crown and Government, Dangerous Goods Offences.

Opium Offences

Revenue Offences.

(b) Against Public Justice,

Deportation

(c) Against Public Morals and Police, Gambling Offences

Hawking

Other Offences

:

:

39

33

M. Male,

F.

Female,

Total...

* 143

272

133

II

:

:

:

:

:

::

:::

4

16

:

— J 27 -

68

:

68

Table V.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain Classes of Offences at District Office, South

during the year 1932.

Punishments.

Offences against Individuals.

Offences of a Public Nature.

Number of

Against Against

Description.

Persons

Their

Punished.

Property.

Their

Person.

Against The Crown

and

Government.

Against

Public

Justice.

Against Public Morals] and Police.

Other

Offences.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

Fined

88

Imprisoned in default.

28

Peremptory imprisonment

17



Bound over to keep peace and to be of good behaviour.

16

1

Total.

15

:

=

11

:

149

12

15

2

19

M. Male.

:

2

M.

F.

.M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

'

2

00

:.

12

:

1

F.:

=

Female.

:

20

2

58

18

1

:

:

21

ما

2 81

J 28

1

10

Table VI.

:

:

:

Discharged or Order made.

Bound Over

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

To come up for Judgment.

Convicted and Cautioned.

5

ATT

1

3

4 5

I

2

3 4

5

2 3

:

4

Previously convicted.

20

:

1

:

:

(4) Over 14 and under 15.

(5) Over 15 and under 16.

Return of Juvenile Offenders brought before the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office, South during the year 1932.

n

A.-Boys.

Imprisoned.

2

M

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

(2) Over 10 and under 12.

(3) Over 12 and under 14.

Convicted and Sentenced.

Caned in Court.

Caned and Bound Over.

Fined.

1 2 3

2 3 + 5

}

2

4

Classification of Offence

Total

No. of

Defen-

dants.

Opium Offence

:

:

:.

:

:

(1) Age under 10,

:

:

:

:

B.-GIRLS.

Nil.

...

J 29

Table VII.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURT during a period of Five Years.

CASES, HOW Disposed of, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed

for Trial

Years.

Total

Number

of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

at Supreme

Court.

1

2

4

6

Committed to Prison or

detained

pending Or- der of His

Excellency the Governor.

Ordered to find Security

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha- viour, and to

Did

not

appear

and absconded.

Escaped before being brought for

trial at the Magistracy.

Escaped.

Punished for

preferring False Charge

or giving False|

!

Total

Undecided.

Number of

Defendants.

Testimony.

answer any

Charge.

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

Z.

M.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F

M.

M.

F.

M.

F',

M.

F.

1928

89

143

27

15

6

1

2

164

35

206

24

1929

133

165

21

34

3

220

21

1930

197

158

18

47

N

1931

159

164

15

50

1932

125

133

11

39

7

1

15

2

16

68

232

20

256

16

:

Total

708

763

92

185

18

9

51

6

70.

Aver-

age

per

140,6

152.6

18.4

37

8.6 1.8

Year.

M.

Male.

10.2

1.2

F

Female.

:

1,078

116

215.6

23.2

P

J 31

Table VIII.

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

1931

1932

Cases heard

48

14

Writs of Execution

12

9

Table IX.

CORONER'S RETURN FOR THE YEAR 1932.

Number of Burial

Orders issued.

Number of Death Enquiries held

with Jury.

Number of Death

Enquiries held without Jury.

Nil.

Nil.

2

Table X.

No. of

Amount

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Sales,

No.

Area

of

of

of

Headings.

Permits,

of

in

Crown

Crown

Licences, Lots.

Acres.

Rent.

Rent.

Premia,

Fees, &c.

paid for

Resump-

Term

of

&c.

tion of

Land.

years.

- J 32-

3

C.

3

€9

Land Sales for Buildings..

66

66

4.42

422.00

4,080.81

75

""

"}

Agriculture..

26

201

15.32

17.00

1,754.00

75

Conversion..

11

11

.30

32.50

124.00

Stone Quarry Leases..

6

5.18

127.05

1

Permits to occupy Land

7

23.60

52.50

5

Permits to occupy Land (Annual).

106

40.92

559.10

I

Matshed Permits on Crown Land

761

6.57

4,134.35

Permits for Temporary Structure on Private Land

177

1.80

943.00

1

Earth and Sand Permits...

249

7,044.00

Forestry Licences

112

14,387.46

2,879.20

1

Pine-apple Licences

387

230.43

709.75

10

Deeds Registered

1,266

3,476.80

Resumptions

292

23.57

520.56

6,825.73

Surrenders

Re-entries

30

1.86

17.18

Reversion

159

19.82

94.01

J 33

Table XI.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1932.

Improvements and Repairs.

Road in Cheung Chau European Reservation,

Cheung Chau

Side-channels at Hang Hau

Channel at Hang Hau

Side-channels at Cheung Chau

Un-expended

$ 150.00

35.00

520.00

125.00

170.00

Total...

$1,000.00

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1932.

GENERAL.

The year 1982, in regard to law and order, was quiet. There was a decrease of 1,655, compared with 1931, in the total number of cases reported to the Police, but the decrease was in Minor offences. There was an increase of 423 in "Serious' offences. The details are given in paragraph 19. The developments of the Sino-Japanese dispute called for continuous vigilance in the Colony throughout the year. Events in Shanghai in January and February gave occasions to the local population here to indicate their sympathies by extravagant use of fire-crackers, but no disorder occurred. On March 4th, one police officer was molested in Mong Kok Tsui district, and another officer in Quarry Bay district, but in each instance the crowds dispersed on arrival of Police reinforcements. At various times during the year Police routine beat dutics were diverted to picquet and patrol duties as a precautionary measure. In this connection the Emergency Unit in Kowloon (formed in 1931) ard the re-organised Emergency Unit of the Police Reserve proved their value.

SPECIAL EVENTS.

2. Bomb explosion near St. John's Cathedral.—On March 30th, a coolie TSOI YUEN employed at the Cathedral was sitting or standing near the boundary wall overlooking Murray Parade Ground. In some manner he disturbed a bomb which must have been lying among the shrubs. An explosion occurred. The coolie received severe injuries from which he died. He never recovered sufficiently to give an account of the affair. The bomb was of crude design-the main container being an oatmeal tin. Investigations failed to trace its origin. Police incline to the opinion that Chinese communists are responsible for it.

Murder of Indian Constable.-At 3.15 a.m. on April 5th, 1.P.C. B120 Jawala Singh was alone on beat duty on the border of Sham Shui Po district. He stopped a Chinese suspect and proceeded to search the man. A struggle occurred during which the suspect obtained possession of the constable's revolver and shot him. The suspect escaped before police assistance arrived. The constable died on May 1st from his injuries.

K 2

Murder of Compradore to Messrs. Butterfield & Swire.-On June 17th occurred the most senational tragedy of the year. It was the work of a madman. A Chinese, CHAN FOOK, nephew of Mr. Woo Hay Tong, shipping compradore of Messrs. Butterfield & Swire, walked into the Compradore's Department, and engaged Mr. Woo Pak Luk in heated argument. Suddenly he drew an automatic pistol and shot and killed Mr. Woo Pak Luk on the spot. He then turned the weapon on Mr. Woo Hay Tong, wounding him. This wound eventually proved fatal. The mad- man then dashed from these premises to the Japanese Consulate where he injured two Japanese clerks by pistol shots. They eventually recovered. He then shot himself through the heart. Enquiries showed CHAN FOOK had been brooding over a sup- posed family grievance and his mind had become unhinged.

Opium Smuggling Affray.—On August 28th, a Chinese police detective (P. C. C404 Leung Hoi Shing) attempted to smuggle some opium from a river steamer. He was challenged on leaving the wharf by a Chinese Revenue Officer. The detec- tive drew his revolver and a short shooting duel ensued in which the detective and an Indian Police Sergeant were wounded, though not seriously.

Agitation against Japanese goods.-A fracas occurred in Yau- mati district on September 10th, which appeared to herald anti- Japanese activity. A gang of hooligans set upon a hawker whom they accused of selling Japanese goods. They then proceeded to certain Chinese shops, and on the same excuse, damaged an amount of goods. Police were quickly on the scene and effected several arrests. This ended the matter. Enquiries proved that the incident arose from rivalry between certain hawkers, and no: from any concerted movement by local inhabitants.

Piracy of S.S. Helikon.-This, the only piracy on a British ship during the year, occurred on October 14th about 80 miles South of Gap Rock when on a voyage from Hong Kong to Saigon. The pirates succeeded in eluding the police search before the vessel left Hong Kong. The ship carried no guards or means of defence. The pirates belonged to the Bias Bay neighbourhood. Details are given in paragraph 3.

Murder at Victoria Gap on February 18th, 1932.-This case is noteworthy in that successful Police investigatious ably led by C.D.I. Reynolds brought to justice a desperate gang of murderers. On February 8th, the same gang had committed a brutal murder in Kowloon, but the case was a mystery until the enquiries in the Victoria Gap murder proved that the same gang was responsible for both crimes. Three men were sentenced to death and the fourth was sentenced to imprisonment for life on the charge of sending a letter demanding money with menaces. At the con- clusion of the case the Judge commended the work of C.D.I. Reynolds and described the case as one of the most complicated and intricate within his experience. These were the first con- victions in the Colony for murder since the year 1929.

K 3

The Cheng Kwok Yau murder case.―This case aroused much interest in the Colony. The accused belonged to a wealthy family, and the case was of the very rare kind in which the murderer directing a hired assassin is brought to justice. Cheng Kwok Yau, aged 21, hired an assassin to shoot George Fung on March 24th. Cheng, in a trial lasting from 26th April, till 14th September, 1932, was convicted and sentenced to death, but the sentence was eventually commuted. The actual assassin was arrested and tried in Shanghai.

Visit of representatives of Canton Police.-December 2nd marked a further stage in the cordial relations and co-operation existing between the Hong Kong and Canton Police Forces. On that day, for the first time, a party of twenty Canton Police arrived in acceptance of an invitation from the Hong Kong Police to a football contest. The Canton team showed its prowess by defeating the Hong Kong Police team, and a combined Police. team drew with a combined Chinese Civilian team. Opportunity was taken to show the visitors the sights of the Colony and to entertain them at dinner on the 3rd and 4th December.

Censorship of Cinematograph films.-In July arrangements were concluded with the British Film Distribution Company, Gloucester Building, for the censorship of all films to be carried out in the Company's Studio. Up to that time, the various censors appointed by Government had been under the necessity of visiting different theatres to censor Cinematograph pro- grammes. Moreover, the extension of hours during which per- formances were given had caused Censors a good deal of incon- venience.

The British Film Distribution Company installed new pro- jectors and a "Talkie" apparatus in their Studio, which is in a central position and very well appointed. The apparatus is of the most modern type, and the results given are highly satisfactory. The Company places the Studio at the disposal of censors at any hour required between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.

During the year the total number of reels censored was

6,539.

PIRACY.

3. The only piracy on a British Ship during the year occurred on the 14th of October, when the British passenger steamer 'Helikon", 1,220 tons, was pirated on the high seas near HIE CHI Bay about 80 miles south of Gap Rock when on a voyage from Hong Kong to Saigon. The "Helikon" belongs to the Wo Fat Shing Company. She had wireless, but no guards or grilles and no scheme of defence, excepting one Greener gun without ammunition, the property of Captain Anderson, who, at the time, was on home leave. She carried two 1st class European passen- gers, 8 Chinese 2nd class and 379 Chinese deck passengers. Four Chinese passengers were kidnapped, and two deck passengers

K 4 ---

jumped overboard and were presumably drowned. No one was injured although two shots were fired. The officers' belongings and the cargo were not touched, but the passengers' baggage was ransacked and property to the approximate value of $3,600.00 was taken off by a junk which was waiting near Cheland Light. When the pirates had been in possession of the ship about twenty- four hours they ordered the crew to paint out the name of the ship on the bow and side and also to paint the yellow funnel black. There were about twelve pirates altogether, and they boarded the ship as passengers in Hong Kong. On the 20th October Chinese soldiers under Major Tsoi Tang Fai intercepted a fishing boat attempting to land at U TAI CHOW Harbour in WAI YEUNG District. On being called upon to stop, four persons were seen to jump overboard and it is not known what became of them. A search of the boat revealed four leather trunks containing loot from the S.S. "Helikon", but the pirates have not been arrested.

Four piracies on junks were reported as against one attempted piracy in 1931. On the 12th May, Cargo Junk No. T5914H was pirated near SAMUN by six men armed with rifles, who landed with their loot valued at $570.00 at Sing Chai near SAMUN. No shots were fired and no person injured. On the 8th June, Cargo Boat No. 4174 was boarded near SAN WEI by six men armed with knives. They stole property value $205.00 and landed at SAN MEI. Nobody was injured. On the 10th August, Fishing Junk No. 1726.0 was boarded by four men armed with firearms off Lantau. They transferred property value $294.00 to their own boat and it is not known where they landed. One of the crew of the pirated junk was wounded. On the 10th November six men, one of whom was armed with a knife, boarded Cargo Boat No. 4847W off TAM SHUI and transferred property value $334.00 to their own boat: Nobody was injured.

Compared with 1931, there was a decrease of one case in the number of piracies on ships, and an increase of three cases in the number of junk piracies.

POLITICAL BUREAU.

4. During the year under review the working of the Bureau has been much facilitated by the increase of staff allowed. This has enabled it to watch successfully the general activities of the Communist Party in Hong Kong. Information gathered from time to time indicates that this year has been a very lean year for the Communists here. This may be accounted for by the suc cessful action taken against all branches of the Far Eastern Com- munist Party situated in Shanghai, Canton, Indo-China and the Straits Settlements. As a result, the Hong Kong Communist Party has had to rely mainly on its own efforts to support itself, though meagre funds have periodically been obtained from Shang- hai,

K 5

There were no Communist demonstrations of a serious nature throughout the year. Immediately prior to some of the more important anniversaries, Police succeeded in seizing quantities of inflammatory documents, without doubt intended for distribution upon those anniversaries. Numerous raids were carried out, and many communists of varying grades of importance were arrested, and subsequently banished. No strikes or serious labour troubles due to communist agitation occurred.

THE NEW TERRITORY.

5. The frontier generally was quiet during the year. On December 29th, a band of four men, undoubtedly from Chinese Territory, committed a double murder at Ping Tse, Sheung Shui District. The gang failed in its original object of robbery and retreated to Chinese Territory again. Friendly relations have been maintained with the Chinese Authorities throughout the

year.

There have been several armed clashes in Chinese Territory between Chinese Customs Officers and smugglers of goods from British Territory. In one case a band of robbers was engaged as escort to the smugglers and took part in the fight.

There were four murders and nine robberies during the year.

ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.

6. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1932:.

Nationality:

of Casualties.

Europeans...

251

11

3

5

5

2

15

Indians

726 69

6

7

9

9

31

Chinese

877 133

6

6

40

52

104

Water Police

244

17

3

7

7

20

Total... 2,098 230

18

21

61

70

170

K 6.

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:-

4 Superintendents.

7 Assistant Superintendents.

1 Probationer.

2 Accountants.

3 Storekeepers.

1 Police Secretary.

3 Stenographers.

24 Clerks.

10 Telephone Clerks.

70 Interpreters.

145 Messengers and coolies.

2 Shroffs.

ACTUAL STRENGTH ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1932.

Euro-

peans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Total.

Present

220

632

834

1,686

Sick or Absent on

leave

30

94

9

133

Excess over Estimates.

9

9

Vacancies

1

34

35

Total......

251

735

877

1,863*

*Not including Water Police.

CONDUCT.

7. The conduct of the European Contingent was good. The total number of reports against them was 74 as against 103 in 1931. The conduct of the Indian Contingent was very fair. There were 706 reports as against 906 in 1931. The behaviour of Chinese (Cantonese) was very fair. There were 1,043 reports as against 1,177 in 1931. The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (Wei Hai Wei) was fair. There were 488 reports as against 516 in 1931. The conduct of Water Police was very fair. There were 261 reports, a decrease compared with 1931, of 62.

K 7-

HEALTH.

8. Admissions to Hospitals during the past three years are as follows:

1930.

1931.

1932.

Nationality. Establish- Admis-

ment.

sions.

Establish- Admis-

ment. sions.

Establish- Admis-

ment.

sions.

Europeaus Indians

261

167

269

173

251

132

750

563

747

481

726

152

Chinese

786

201

901

247

877

158

The figures for Malaria among Police in the New Territories during the last four years are :—

186 cases.

1929

1930

1931

1932

182

32

93

"}

108

>

MUSKETRY COURSES.

9. The following Table gives the results of Musketry Courses fired during the year.

Contingent

Month

Number of men who fired

Marksmen

Results

1st Class

2nd Class

3rd Class

Fail

Europeans

Indians

December 606

January 224 including 6 Su-

perintendents 63 65 76 20 115 173

9/11

267 31

Wei Hai Wei

Indian Guards ...

183

""

61

5 33

56 76 13

3 23 19 14 2

K 8

GREENER Gun Course.

10. A Greener Gun Course was held during the year 1932 with the following result

Results

Department Month

Number of persons who fired

Pass

Fail

Indian Guards, November Gaol Staff.

63

57

REVOLVER COURSES.

11. The following Revolver Courses were fired during the year 1932.

Contingent

Month

Number of persons who fired

Results

Pass

Fail

April

Europeans

224 including 9 Su- perintendents

224

October

225 including 11 225

""

[ April

28

28

Russians

October

27

27

March

631 including 1 Su-

Indians

perintendent

631

August

592

592

Jy

(March

12

12

Indian Guards

August

29

29

Cantonese

May

544

544

Sept.

557

557

Wei Hai Wei

May

155

155

1 Sept.

133

133

June

65

65

Water Police

October

63

63

The possible score in all cases was 120 points, and the number of points required to pass was 50%, i.e., 60 points.

K 9-

REVOLVER COURSES (Other Departments).

12. The following Courses were fired during the year 1932.

Results

Department

Month

Number of persons who fired

Pass

Fail

District Watch-

men

June

127

112

15

European Re-

venue Officers, October

11

7

4

Chinese Re-

venue Officers

17

14

3

""

European War-

ders

Indian Warders November

"

106

European

A pril

Officers

Fire Brigade

October

9980

43

26

17

55

51

1

7

1

The possible score in all cases was 120 points, and the mumber of points required to pass was 50%, i.e., 60 points.

FINGER PRINT DEPARTMENT.

13. Through the courtesy of the Indian Government and Punjab Police, an Indian constable was trained in finger print work in 1931-1932 at the Indian Bureau in Phillaur. He began work in the Hong Kong Bureau on the 18th November, 1931.

A summary of work executed in this Department for the year 1932 is as follows:-

Year.

Number of finger prints examined,

Number of persons identified.

Number of records filed.

under Deportation

Ordinance.

Number of convictions

Number of convictions under Market Ordinance.

1932

18,249

4,516

12,669

271

3,660

1931

15,391

3,529

9,047

222

1,324

Increase...

2,858

987

3,622

Total number of records on file 143,556.

49

2,336

K 10

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUB-DEPARTMENT.

14. The total number of photographs taken of scenes of serious crime and accidents throughout the year was thirty-nine.

The total number of copies of photographs issued was 3,493.

PASS OFFICE.

15. During the year 1932, thirty-nine persons of various nationalities, other than Chinese, Indians and Japanese were put before the Courts for the following offences :

Vagrancy Stowaways

Passport

21

9

10

The number of foreign destitute dealt with during the year was forty-seven.

DISCHARGE PRISONERS, DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS.

16. Table IV gives the number dealt with by the Records Office during the year 1932. A large increase of 5,796 or 58% is shown. This increase is almost entirely accounted for by the 5,580 unemployed repatriated from Singapore in 1932 as a result of depressed conditions in Malaya.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

17. During the year the following number of recruits were passed out of the School, European Police 16, Indians 18, Cantonese 69, Wei Hai Wei 46, Indian Prison Guards 30, Indian Special Guards 26, District Watchmen 22, Seamen 14.

Fifteen promotion examinations were held in 1932.

Special courses were given to twenty Chinese probationary detectives. 120 "D" Contingent anti-piracy guards were given "refresher courses". 42 members of the Police Reserve were trained and passed out in knowlegde of Police duties, and 12 passed in "Refresher" course. 17 sergeants and constables of the "E" (Russian) Contingent underwent a course in English Colloquial: 14 qualified. 25 underwent a course in Shantung dialect. 10 Wei Hai Wei police were trained and passed in knowledge of Traffic Regulations.

FIRST AID.

18. European Contingent:-All European Officers, except four, have qualified. Two of the four were on leave. One Officer has three certificates; twenty-six officers have two certifi- cates.

K 11

Indian Contingent:-All Officers, except thirteen, have qualified. Of the thirteen, nine are now taking the course. Three are on leave in India. P.S. B136 Mohamed Din passed with distinction in 1926, has since obtained two further certifi- cates. He has been First Aid Instructor to the Indian Contingent since 1927. Forty-one Officers have obtained two certificates,

Cantonese Contingent:-All Officers have qualified. hundred and fifty-four have obtained two certificates.

One

Wei Hai Wei Contingent:-All Officers have qualified except a certain number of Anti-Piracy Guards and these are expected to qualify by the end of July 1933.

:

(Recruits under training are not included in the above figures although about 40% of the Recruits have qualified.)

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1932.

19. The total number of cases reported to the Police during the year 1932 was 21,071 as against 22,728 in 1931 being a decrease of 1,655 or 7.2%. The average for the last five years is 21,896.

There were 5,707 serious cases in 1932 as against 5,284 in 1931 an increase of 423 or 7.4%. There was an increase of 4 cases in House-breaking. 19 Burglaries, 186 Larcenies and 13 Murders. Robberies decreased by 9 cases. The number of Robberies during 1932 was 70 cases distributed as follows:

23 cases in Hong Kong, 33 in Kowloon and 14 in the New Territories as against 79 cases in 1931.

There were 15,364 minor cases during 1932 as against 17,444 in 1931, a decrease of 2,080 or 11.9%.

Details are given in Table V.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

20. The estimated value of property stolen during the year 1932 was $714,205.52 as against $552,273.93 during 1931, an increase of $161,931.59 or 22.6%. The average for the last five years is $747,534.97. The value of property recovered during the year 1932 was $85,836.29 or 12% of the property stolen, as against $88,451.09 or 16% of the property stolen during 1931. Included in the sum of $714,205.52 shown in the estimated value of property stolen are 17 cases of Larceny by Servant, 1 case of Larceny by Bailee, 16 cases of Embezzlement, 2 of Larceny by Partner and 5 of Fraudulent Misappropriation. The amounts involved in each of these cases were all well over a thousand dollars; the largest being $106,539.00 and $60,000.00 under "Larceny by Servant". The total value of property stolen in these 41 cases was $360,219.00 or 49% of the total amount stolen

K 12

P

LOST PROPERTY.

21. A summary of the number of articles lost and recovered with their value is given below:-

Articles

Value

Year.

reported

lost.

Articles re- covered and found but not

Value of

articles

lost.

found.

reported lost.

1932

441

$38,101.06

125

$ 3,718.96

1931

320

52,486.93

167

5,418.61

GUARDS OFFICE.

22. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties dur- ing the year 1932:

Nationality.

Establishment.

Enlistment.

Deaths.

Resignations

through sickness.

Resignations

through

expiration of service.

Dismissals.

Total number of Casualities.

Russian Guards

33

Co

Indian Special Guards

105

26

Chinese (Wei Hai Wei).

Guards

84

:

:

Indian Watchmen

459 155

3

Chinese (Cantonese)

Watchmen

37

7

:

:

:

:

3

4

13

1

15

14

14

124

27

154

:

Total.......

718 194

1

137

42

181

Special Guards.-During the year, 8 Special Guards were sent to Castle Peak, 10 to Ta Ku Ling and 7 to Lin Ma Hang to replace Regular Police.

Anti-Piracy Work.-Twenty-six units of Anti-Piracy Guards were supplied to the British India Steam Navigation Company, and eighteen units were supplied to the Indo-China Steam Navi- gation Company on the run Hong Kong-Singapore. Twenty-one units were supplied to the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company

K 13

on the run Hong Kong-Shanghai. The China Navigation Com- pany was supplied with permanent units on twelve ships. During the month of October, the Indo-China Steam Navigation Com- pany gave up one unit. These men were then drafted to Emer- gency Unit, Kowloon.

(A Unit comprises the N.C.O. and six men of a Guard). Conduct.-Police Watchmen: Discipline throughout the year was very fair. There were 465 defaulters.

Special Guards:

Total defaulters 36.

Russian Contingent: Total defaulters 10. victed in Singapore for possession of Opium.

Two were con-

Wei Hai Wei Contingent: Total defaulters 57. Seven were charged before Police Magistrate.

ARMS.

23. There were forty-four seizures during the year of which thirty-two were Charge cases and twelve no Charge cases.

There were no seizures of note during the year. Table VI gives detail of Arms and Ammunition seized during the year.

GAMBLING.

24. There were 290 successful gambling cases for 1932 as against 182 in 1931. There were 3 cases in which no conviction was obtained. There were 89 Lottery cases compared with 62 in 1931. In four cases no conviction was obtained.

MENDICANTS.

25. 447 mendicants were charged before Magistrate.

14

20

10

8

19

""

released

sent to Tung Wah Hospital. sent to Canton.

sent to S.C.A.

1 mendicant was sent to Amoy.

1

1

sent to Macau,

died in cells on 30th June.

807 mendicants were sent to Deep Bay.

Included in the 807 sent to Deep Bay, there were 447 who were charged and convicted as beggars before Police Magistrate, and sent away on discharge from Gaol. A considerable number

of these mendicants returned to Hong Kong more than once after they had been sent away during the year.

26 habitual mendicants were deported under warrant for a period of ten years.

– K 14

DEAD BODIES.

26. The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the streets and elsewhere during the last five years :-

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

Victoria,

358

706

418

366

382

Kowloon,

1,077

1,072

669

738

884

Harbour,

139

164

126

115

79

Elsewhere,

106

91

103

76

82

Total,........

1,680

2,033

1,316

1,295

1,427

Sex.

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

Male...

137

149

Adults

Female...

27

33

38

86

107

40

22

17

13

! Unknown

6

Male ......

855

1,015

643

664

713

Children... Female ... Unknown

643

807

533

489

614

18

29

32

18

41

Total.........

1,680

2,033

1,316

1,295

1,427

DOGS ORDINANCE.

27. The muzzling order was cancelled on the 4th March, 1932, but this did not affect the restrictions on movement of dogs within the Colony.

234 dogs were destroyed in 1932 as compared with 288 in

1931.

1931 1932

Dogs Licensed

3,900 2,964

Dogs Licensed (free).

30

35

Dogs Impounded

92

30

Dogs Destroyed

288

234

LICENCES.

28. Table VII shows the numbers of different licences issued

during the year.

K 15-

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

29. The following table shows weights and measures ex-

amined during the year.

Weights and Measures examined,

1932.

Correct.

Incorrect.

Total.

Foreign Scales

147

4

151

Chinese Scales

728

10

738

Yard Measures

308

308

Chinese Foot Measures

420

420

Total,..

1,603

14

1,617

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance :-

Number of Cases.

11

Convictions.

11

DANGEROUS GOODS.

Fines.

$395.00

30. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

8

Convictions.

8

TRAFFIC.

Fines.

$675.00

31. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Section 3-Ordinance 40 of 1912):-

Year.

Prosecu- Convic- With-

tions. tions.

drawn.

Dis- charged.

Re-

manded.

Total amount of fines

1932...... 6,502

6,106

202

119

75

$ 36,249 50

1931...... 7,274

6,786

191

130

167

$ 33,320.00

Manslaughter

i

1932......

1

1931......

- K 16

The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers was 1,445 as against 1,420 in the year 1931. The total number of persons passed as Motor Drivers was 1,239 as against 1,116 in the year 1931,

The total number of accidents reported was 1,134 as against 1,080 in the year 1931. The total number of fatal accidents was 61 as against 62 in the year 1931.

The total number of Public Motor Vehicles examined and passed fit for public use was 3,733 as against 3,002 in the year 1931. The total number of public Motor Vehicles examined and found unfit for public use was 617 as against 690 in the year 1931.

The total number of Commercial Motor Vehicles examined and passed fit for commercial use was 4,995. The total number of Commercial Motor Vehicles examined and found unfit for commercial use was 1,186.

The total number of motor driver's licences suspended dur- ing the year was eighty-five as against forty-seven in the year 1931. The total number of motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was ten as against eleven in the year 1931.

MOTOR PATROL SECTION.

32. Arising from the Retrenchment programme of 1931, a motor patrol section was established in Hong Kong Island and on the Mainland. In Hong Kong Island the section is based on the Central Police Station, in Kowloon on Yaumati Station. Ten new solo machines arrived from England and the sections began duty on July 1st. In Hong Kong two, and in Kowloon one, European sergeants are on motor patrol throughout the twenty-four hours. They act in both a preventive and supervi- sory capacity. They patrol outlying districts and check up men on beat and patrol duties in urban and rural areas, as laid down in tabulated patrols.

POLICE MOTOR VEHICLES.

33. The number of Police motor vehicles is as follows:-

Motor Vans

6

Motor Cars

2

Motor Cycles (Dogs Cages)

Combinations (Motor Cycles)

12

Solo Motor Cycles

13

K 17

EMERGENCY UNITS.

34. Both Emergency Units performed very useful work throughout the year, especially by assisting with extra patrols at certain periods when special Police precautions were taken in anticipation of possible trouble.

The "Calls" and fees collected by the Units are as follows:-

"Calls" Fees for Special Services.

Hong Kong Unit... 131

Kowloon Unit

113

$7,944.00

$ 681.00

MEDALS AND COMMENDATIONS.

35. His Majesty the King was graciously pleased to approve the award of the King's Police Medal to Chief Inspector Peter Grant. His Excellency the Governor was pleased to award medals and commendations to Members of the Force for meritor- ious services rendered during the year as under:-

1st Class Medal

2nd Class Medal

1

3rd Class Medal

4th Class Medal

2

10

11

Commendations

36 The following annexes are appended:--

A. Report on Police Reserve.

B Report on the Street Boys' Club.

(*

Report on the Water Police.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector General of Police.

6th April, 1933.

K 18

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1931 AND 1932.

1931

1932

$2,409,409.63 $2,259,219.81

Personal Emoluments*

Other Charges.

Ammunition

$

25,635.68 $ 10,164.58

Upkeep of Arms

1,867.76

4,613.69

Bedding

3,593.90

3,767.12

Burial of Destitute dead....

300.00

431.00

Cleansing Materials and Washing

517.97

495.20

Clothing and Accoutrements

98,113.59

54,351.33

Coal for Barracks

9,784.77

11,164.27

Conveyance and motor allowances

9,246.46

9,272.55

Coolie Hire

2,485.30

2,492.69

Disinfectants

1,914.70

2,289.30

Grants to Villages is N.T. in aid

of Village Scout Scheme......

2,611.29

1,320.00

Identification of Criminals

117.60

125.70

Incidental Expenses

9,573.74

4,577.35

Interpretation Fees

210.00

234.82

Light and Electric Fans.

40,856.34

43,782.05

Mess Utensils

1,469.53

774.39

Passages

190,242.97

115,778.02

Petrol Oil &c. for Police Motor

Cars and Cycles

7.009.89

7,639.51

Photography

3,298.95 .

4,273.66

Rations for Indian Police

62,191.68

61,855.04

Rent of Stations

5,835.00

5,132.00

Repairs to Police Motor Cars and

Cycles

5,771.98

4,716.50

Rewards

1,400.00

1,995.00

Rent of Married Police Quarters

7,640.00

7,010.73

Secret Service

10,765.50

14.280.90

Small Stores

9,443.81

8,794.39

Special Course of Instruction

337.08

Subsistence of Prisoners.....

2,545.56

3,224.79

Telegrams

1,180.97

1,417.67

Transport

7,142.31

12,389.31

Expenses of Anti-Piracy Guards

18,521.29

27,062.92

Total Other Charges

$ 541,288.54 $ 425,763.56

* Includes Officers of Cadets, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services.

K 19

Table I,-Continued.

Special Expenditure.

1931

1932

Emergency Unit Van

10,662.82 $

Range Repairs

118.45

Traffic Light

1,385.57

Special Course of Instruction for

Police Officers

453.69

Gestetner Duplicator

12 Bicycles

13 Motor Cycles

1,300.00

1,044.71

12,319.25

Traffic Lights

1,981.50

12 pairs Handcuffs

224.26

40 Revolvers

3,676.76

250 Quick Loaders for Revolvers

836.96

Police Reserve Motor Emergency

Unit-

2,725.00

Greener Riot Guns

4,447.05

Total Special Expenditure

$ 13,920.53 $ 27,255.49

Total Police Department............ $2,964,618.70 $2,712,238.86

K 20

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1931 AND 1932.

HEAD OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY POLICE DEPARTMENT.

1931

1932

Duties.

Motor Spirit

Licences and Internal Revenue.

$ 2,567.25 $ 3,300.40

Arms Licences

Dangerous Goods Licences

$ 9,600.00

$ 35,691.67

2,705.83

14,031.50

Dogs Licences

Forfeitures

12,765.00

11,898.00

2,792.83

6,014.92

Hawkers' Licences

113,655.00

89,161.00

Money Changers' Licences

12,111.00

18,950.00

Theatrical Licences

4,672.00

2.531.00

Vehicle, Motor Licences

157,622.72

198,978.42

Vehicle, Motor Drivers Licences.

34.739.25

42,311.00

Vehicle, Other Licences

64,514.00

57,846.00

Vehicle, Other Drivers Licences.

4,590.60

3,410.40

Miscellaneous Licences

1,035.00

Liquor Licences, N.T.

5,025.00

Special Licensing Fees, Foreign

Registration

6.429.87

Fees of Court or Office &c.

Blake Pier Tickets

529.88

490.94

Contributions towards Anti-Piracy

Escorts

130,773.06

115,204.68

Film Censoring Fees

5,584.80

Miscellaneous Fees

3,270.00

12,734.50

Motor Ambulance Fees

7,963.00

11,295.00

Official Signatures

3,232.00

5,665.00

Police & Other Stores..

2,055.86

1,847.13

Police Services

26,082.90

32,729.20

Sick Stoppages from Police Force

4,415.05

4,360.85

Watchmen's Ordinance

10,139.40

10,773.80

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Condemned Stores, &c.

2,866.28

2,187.98

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

220.00

3,709.40

Overpayments in previous years

3,189.71

Total

$613,882.91

$706,387.17

K 21

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF POLICE

DEPARTMENT FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

*

Personal

Emoluments

and Other

Charges.

Special Expenditure. Expenditure.

Total

Total

Revenue

1923

$ 1,597,336.58

$ 36,510.56

$ 1,633,847.14

$ 349,859.11

1924

1,832,755.05

45,193.64

1,877,948.69

389,176.19

1925

1,775,062.61

137,981.30

1,913,046.91

375,782.40

1926

1,746,395.89

96,905.35

1,843,301.24

374,548,54

1927

1,848,625.56

26,839.12

1,875,464.68

393,556.72

1928

1,994,940.02

110,898.88

2,105,838,90 448.771.85

1929

2,027,716.87

57,247.03

1930

2,714,290.87

38,404.07

1931

1932

2,950,698.17

2,684,983,37

13,920.53

27,255.49

2,084,963,90 463,148.21 2,752,694.94 487,169.22 2,964,618.70 613,882.91

2,712,238.86

706,387.17

* Includes Officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., & J.C. Services attached to Department.

Year.

Number of Persons Banished

from Hong Kong.

Persons

Discharged from Gaol

and dealt with.

Singapore Banishees received and

sent on.

Singapore Vagrants received and

sent on.

1931

1,612

2,328

2,181

1,384

86

2,074

1932

1,919

2,747

1,764

1,452

206

1,875

Decrease

417

Increase

307

419

68

120

-K 22 -

Table IV.

Records Office Annual Report for the Year 1932.

Rangoon Banishees received and

sent on.

Dutch East Indies and Deli Sumatra

received and sent on.

Borneo Banishees received and

sent on.

Ocean Island received and sent on.

Asiatic Petroleum Company.

199

43

64

www.

13

3

5,580

Total Number of Men Handled by Records Office, Year 1932......

15,660

"

1931..

9,874

Increase...

5,786

Mauritius Banishees received and

sent on.

116

78

Nil

Nil

73

73

14

5,580

Singapore S.C.A. Repatriates

received and dealt with.

NATURE OF OFFENCE.

K 23

Table V.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1932.

A-SERIOUS OFFENCES.

Charge cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

Charge cases.

Cases without charge.

Total cases.

1931.

1932.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.



VALUE OF VALUE OF

PROPERTY

STOLEN.

5



PROPERTY

RECOVERED.

Arms,

10

Assault (Serious),

16

LO1

5

15

57

9

17

18

9

a a

Assault with intent to rob,

6

6

:

Burglary,

31

65

96

53

115

163

66 86%

27 66%

5 100%

31%

4

LO

:

Coinage Offences,

11

11

26

26 100%

Deportation,

219

219

273

273 100%

...

Embezzlement,

15

57

72

20 56

76 26%

::

House and Godown Breaking,.

45

110

155 64 119

183

35%

3

...

55

I

16

4

61

...

25

273

16

70

:

...

:

:

Intimidation and Extortion,.

6

6

7

7 | 100%

Kidnapping,

26

4

30 14

14 100%

Larceny,

1,938 1,561 3,499 2,192 1,493 3,685

59%

6

Larceny from Dwelling Houses,

102 517 619 107

529

636 16%

C4

Larceny on Ships and Wharves,

60

52 112 63

41

104

60%

103

69

19

2,161

4

...

21,488.34 5,362.84

4 83,717.99 6 17,392.72

7

177 382,815.03 13 94,332.18

8,113.57

3,646.20

...

...

57,385.14

15,425.21

1,590.07

Manslaughter,

1

1

2

5

60%

...

...

Murder,

4

13

17

21

30 30%

5

80.00

Murder, (Attempted),

1

2 100%

2

Obtaining by False Pretences,

54

31

85

47

23

70 32%

2

Receiving,

158

158 184

184 100%

22

43

7

12,085.35

1,242.23

169

2

1

45

145.00

Robbery,...

19

60 79 18

47

65 27%

20

...

...

13 24,200.48]

145.00

1,039.60

Women and Girls,..

3

8 100%

16

3

...

Other Serious Offences,

61

22 83 63 10

73 86%

45

1

1

21

69,834.86

Total,.

2,785 2,499 5,284 3,233 2,474 5,707

:

228

3,182

4

2

329 714,205.52 85,836.29

14,205.

C.

NATURE OF OFFENCES.

K 24

Table V.

B.-MINOR OFFENCES.

VALUE OF

PERSONS CONVICTED.

PERSONS DISCHARGED.

PROPERTY STOLEN.

Charge cases.

Cases without charge.

Total cases.

Charge cases.

Cases without charge.

Total cases.

1931.

1932.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.



C.

VALUE OF PROPERTY

RECOVERED



Assault,

311

311

341

341

100%

4

1

369

2

49

Damage to Property,

36

36

13

13 100%

3

7

Dangerous Goods,

28

28

24

24 100%

23

Drunkenness,

22

22

19

19 100%

12

3

5

:.

Forestry Offences,

169

169 273

273 100%

...

1

351

7

***

Gambling,

607

607

386

386 100%

2,023

84

Hawking Offences,.

8,984

8,984 8,699

8,699 100%

8,699

225

Lottery Offences,

217

217

223

223 100%

229

21

Mendicants,

391

391

395

395 100%

463

8

Merchant Shipping Ordinance,

689

689

386

386 100%

744

15

...

Morphine,

2

2

15

15 100%

13

2

Nuisances,

1,139

1,139

394

394 100%

400

16

Opium,

759

759

825

825 | 100%

1

962

76

Revenue,

565

565

606

606 | 100%

1

615

18

Rogue and Vagabond,

51

51

78

78 100%

80

11

Stowaways,

46

46

22

22 100%

со

8

75

2

2

Unlawful Possession,

270

270

294

294 100%

258

57

Vagrants,

31

31

30

30 100%

25

6

Co

Vehicles and Traffic..

1,305

1,305

803

803 100%

2

806

20

Women and Girls,

278

278 384

384 100%

370

26

...

:

Other Miscellaneous Offences,.

1,544

1,544 1,154

1,154 100%

13

19 1,684

1

3

93

Total,...

17,444

17,444 15,364

15,364

68

32 18,146

5

3

739

Grand Total,....

20,229 2,499 20,229 18,597 2,474 21,071

96

32 21,328

9

5 1,068 714,205.52 85,836.29

K 25

Table VI.

ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING THE YEAR 1932.

In Store on 31st Dec., 1932.

Description of Arms.

Arms Seized.

Origin.

Ammunition

Seized.

Origin.

Arms.

Ammunition.

Winchester Rifles

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Chinese

Į

German Rds. 394 British Rds.

441

8,657

Rifles Various

6

Unknown 5

871

Unknown Rds.

36

4

German Rifles

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

Mauser Pistols

17

German

1,868

German

12

11,795

Auto Pistols

6

American 1

180

French

7

318

63,300

French

1

German

46

German 1

Belgian

44

Belgian 2

American

11

Unknown 1

Unknown

72

Revolvers

23

Belgian

3

898

German

5

31

7,643

American 10

Belgian

200

British 1

British

648

Spanish

3

Unknown

45

Unknown 11

Luger Pistols

Nil.

Thompson Sub-Machine Guns

Nil.

Nil.

Nil.

85

16,962

Nil.

Nil.

K 26

Table VII.

Licences issued during the year:-

1931

1932

Public Jinrikshas

1,216

1,208

Private Jinrikshas

729

679

Public Chairs

440

438

Private Chairs..

69

61

Drivers and Bearers

11,788

14,634

Truck licences

630

424

Motor cars (Livery)

427

452

Motor cars (Private)

1,822

2.322

Motor Drivers. (Cars & Cycles)

4,957

5,398

Motor cycle (Licences)

523

483

Money Changers

207

189

Pawnbrokers

150

138

Auctioneer Licences

3

4

"

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys

4

4

Marine Stores

42

41

Game Licences

Hawkers

Dangerous Goods

Poisons

379

264

13,137

11,561

1,014

989

15

37

- K 27

Annexe A.

REPORT OF THE HONG KONG POLICE RESERVE FOR THE YEAR 1932.

The organisation of the Hong Kong Police Reserve has remained unchanged during the year with the exception of the unit previously known as the Sharp Shooters Company, which is now known as the Emergency Unit Reserve.

2. An addition to the equipment of the Force has taken the form of a Riot Van, supplied by the Hong Kong Government, which has added very considerably to the facilities for training members of this unit.

3. The Headquarters of the Hong Kong Police Reserve were transferred during the year from Central Police Station to the new No. 2 Police Station at Wanchai, where very much im- proved accommodation has been made available.

4. The total strength of the Force shows a slight increase. The relative figures are given below for purposes of comparison. There have been several resignations due to transfers, and to the inability on the part of certain members to spare the time which their voluntary service requires.

Recruiting, however, has been satisfactory, particularly in the Chinese Company, whose strength shows an increase of ten members.

1932.

1931..

Chinese Company..

82

72

Indian Company

47

47

Flying Squad.

46

47

Emergency Unit Reserve

43

46

Total

218

212

5. Training has been continued on similar lines to those employed in previous years, and it is satisfactory to record the continuance of the improved attendance and keenness amongst members.

Duties have been performed from time to time as auxiliary to the Regular Police, and Contingents have been supplied on the usual ceremonial occasions namely, the Birthday of His Majesty the King, and on Armistice Day, 1932.

K 28

Annexe B.

STREET BOYS' CLUB, ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1932.

The membership of the Club is now twenty-five as against twenty-four in January, 1931,

2. During the year two boys were allowed to resign on obtaining permanent employment, four absconded, and one boy was dismissed for misconduct while employed as a Police messen- ger. Five boys joined the Club, four of whom were recommended by the Police Magistrate and one by the Hong Kong Society for the Protection of Children. Three boys have obtained permanent employment as messengers. One is an apprentice tailor in the employ of Messrs. Tung Hing. Eight boys earned a living by hawking.

3. There are ten boys in St. Louis Industrial School.

4. The funds of the Club on 31st December, 1932, amounted tc $2,485.82. The Club is much indebted to the Hon. Mr. T. N Chau for collecting and forwarding subscriptions amounting to $2,500 for maintenance of the Club. A generous donation of £50 was received from Miss Stephen, Peking, through Messrs. Deacons, Hong Kong. Each boy is expected to save a proportion of his income, the total of such savings during the year amounted to $519.83.

5. During the summer months the boys went swimining at Kennedy Town Bathing beach once a week. The Police Van was used to convey them there. At the Police Annual Aquatic sports held in September, 1932, eight boys entered for the Police Messengers' race and the first three places were again secured by members of the Club, Yeung Cheung being first for the fourth year in succession.

6. Hot baths are provided for the boys at Police Head- quarters during the winter months.

7. Games, Drill, and Gymnastic classes were held twice a week during the year at the Chinese Y.M.C.A. except during the months of July and August, the summer vacation, when the classes were suspended..

8. Members of the Club now regularly attend the Chinese and English classes held three times a week at No. 40 Hollywood Road. Their progress has been fairly satisfactory.

9. The Club premises still remain at No. 40 Hollywood Road, 3rd floor. Police Sergeant, Fung Kam, remains in charge and resides on the premises. He maintains discipline and attends to the welfare of the members. The conduct of the members was good. Acting Sub Inspector Armitt efficiently supervised the Club during the year and devoted much time in the interests of the members.

10. On several occasions the boys received boxes of cakes and fruits through the generosity of Mrs. Southorn, Mrs. Wolfe. Mrs. T. H. King and Mr. Deakin. Shuttlecocks were also kindl presented to the Club by Mrs. Murdoch.

These gift-

greatly appreciated.

K 29

Annexe C.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

The following return shows the Establishment and casualties of the Water Police during the year 1932 :-

Nationality.

Chinese

244 18

4

7

22

CONDUCT.

2. The conduct of the Chinese Staff of the Water Police shows improvement. There were 261 reports in 1932 as com- pared with 323 in 1931.

There were 129 men against whom no defaulter reports were made during 1932.

ACCIDENTS.

3. There were eleven Accidents to Police Launches in 1932 as compared with nine in 1931. As a result of enquiries held by the Harbour Master into these cases, five coxswains and two Engineers were dealt with departmentally. In four cases the Water Police staff was found free from blame.

CRUISING LAUNCHES.

4. During the year, Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 4 Launches underwent an annual survey and overhaul. No. 1 Launch, which is very old, was extensively repaired, but cannot be rendered fully efficient as she is suitable only for 'protected waters'. No. 2 has been fitted with a new boiler, and her efficiency has been considerably increased. Nos. 2, 3 and 4 Launches are fitted with Wireless sets which give satisfactory service.

HARBOUR LAUNCHES.

5. The Harbour Launches Nos. 5, 6, 8 and 14 are in a satis- factory condition. Nos. 7 and 9 are old and their efficiency is decreasing.

J

1

- K 30

MOTOR BOATS.

6. Motor Boats Nos. 10, 11 and 12 continue to give useful Service. A new No. 11 is in course of construction. Nos. 10 and 12 are old and their efficiency is decreasing.

MUSKETRY.

7. The Chinese deck staff of the Cruising launches are given regular practices with revolvers and Winchester rifles. All Win- chester rifles are in a bad condition through age, and are due to be replaced during 1933. A half yearly Vickers Gun course was fired on the four Cruising Launches. Nos. 2, 3 and 4 Launches fired one three-pounder gun course during the year.

}

K 31

REPORT OF THE CHIEF OFFICER, HONG KONG

FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1932.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

The expenditure of the Fire Brigade for the year 1932 was $297,080.17, including special expenditure amounting to $56,025.17, as against $305,016.00 including special expenditure amounting to $66,248.00 in 1931.

2. The revenue of the Brigade for the year amounted to a total of $12,648.00 derived from the following sources:-

Motor Ambulance Service

$11,295.00 as against

$7,963.00 for 1931, an increase of 41.8%

Theatre and Special duties

$ 1,353.00 as against

$1,306.50 for 1931, an increase of 3.6%.

STATIONS AND EQUIPMENT.

3. A new temporary Fire Station was erected in Wanchai during the year to replace the old Temporary Fire Station which, as a result of road developments, had to be removed.

No new permanent stations were erected during the year.

4. The following appliances were supplied during the year and added to the equipment of the Brigade :—

(a) One Motor General Service Tender.

(b) One Drilling Machine for engineering workshop. (c) One Turbine Fire Pump (500/600 g.p.m.) to replace

obsolete pump on No. 8 Motor Fire Engine.

A new Motor Turntable Water Tower and fire escape which was ordered during the year is nearing completion, and will be delivered early in 1933.

5. All vehicles and fire floats were satisfactorily overhauled during the year. All other appliances and equipment were ex- amined and tested every mouth.

K 32

6. The number of pedestal hydrants was increased by forty- seven while the number of ball hydrants was decreased by twenty- eight during the year; the total number of hydrants now being 1,334 viz.,

Hong Kong (pedestal hydrants) (including Peak)...... Kowloon (pedestal hydrants).....

151

101

702

Hong Kong (ball hydrants) (including Peak)...........................

Kowloon (ball hydrants) (including New Territories 380

Total.....

1,334

The above hydrants were regularly inspected every quarter.

FIRES, LOSS OF LIFE AND RESCUES.

7. Fatalities at fires amounted to sixteen in all. Four per- sons were burned to death at a fire which occurred in a four- storeyed building, used as cotton-quilt manufacturers and tene- ment dwelling, in Shanghai Street. One person, aged 70, was burned to death in a shed at Sheung Shui Wai, New Territories. Two persons perished as a result of the explosion and fire on the S.S. "Chip Sang" when loading benzine at Lai Chi Kok. Fight persons were burned to death while four others succumbed to their injuries at the fire which occurred in two adjoining three- storeyed buildings in Pei Ho Street, Sham Shui Po. At this fire ten persons were rescued by means of Brigade appliances. The remaining fatality occurred at a fire in Canton Road where, in addition, five persons were seriously injured and two persons were rescued by means of Brigade appliances.

8. Two persons lost their lives as a result of collapses and landslides, while eleven persons were extricated alive. Of the above the most serious was the collapse of two buildings in Yat Fu Lane, West Point, where one boy was killed and seven other persons partially buried by the debris.

CALLS.

9. The number of calls received during the year totalled 262, actual fires 201, chimney fires 21, collapses 6, landslides 3 and false alarms 31. Compared with the previous year (1931) there was an increase of sixty-three calls. Sixty-five were received by fire alarm, one hundred and forty-nine by telephone, fifteen by Police and thirty-three from messengers.

· 10. Of the false alarms, seven were maliciously given, eleven were given with good intent, and thirteen were due to electrical faults,

K 33

FIRE INSPECTION WORK.

11. The following inspections were made by the Brigade and reported upon during the year:--

Theatres and Cinemas

177

Hotels and Restaurants

213

Garages

201

Petrol Stores and Installations...

216

Inflammable Structures...

40

Timber Yards

23

Miscellaneous

1,301

Total...

2,171

290 Chemical Fire Extinguishers located in various Government buildings were tested and recharged by the Brigade during the

year.

12. Thirteen prosecutions, resulting in fines amounting to $1,225.00 altogether, were undertaken by the Brigade during the year for contraventions of various Ordinances legislating for safety against fire.

LEGISLATION.

13. Regulations under Section 16 of the Gun-powder and Fireworks Ordinance, No. 14 of 1901, were promulgated on the 18th March for the better storage of fireworks and maintenance of premises in which fireworks are stored.

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.

14. Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 454, com- prising altogether 2,722 hours.

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

15. The work of the Motor Ambulance Service attached to the Fire Brigade still continues to increase as the figures in the following summary show. Compared with the number of cases attended in the year 1922-the first complete year after the introduction of Motor Ambulances-the total for the year under review shows an increase of 272%.

The distance run during 1932 was 31,635 miles.

K 34

SUMMARY OF CASES ATTENDED.

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

3,187

3,282

3,289

3,709

3,872

4,418

ANNUAL DISPLAY.

15. The Annual Display of the Brigade which included the finals of certain Competition Drills took place in the compound of the new No. 2 Police Station, Wanchai, on the 6th December and was witnessed by H. E. the Governor and a large number of the public.

Hong Kong, 6th March, 1933.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Chief Officer, Fire Brigade.

HONG KONG –

Central ....... Kennedy Town..

Wanchai.

Shaukiwan Gough Hill

KOWLOON:-

Tsim Sha Tsui ..... Mong Kok............................ Un Long (N. T.) Yaumati....

Totals

2



i

1

I

Table I.

Stations and Plant, 31st December, 1932.

Stations.

Fant.

Full Stations.

Sub-Stations.

~ w

N

312

-

Motor Fire

Tenders.

Motor Fire

Engines (pumps)

Motor Turntable

Ladders.

Motor Trailer

pumps.

Motor Fire

Cycles.

Fire Escapes.

سط

2

2

2

4

3

7

Fire Floats.

Motor

Ambulances.

-K 35

K 36

Table II.

Summary of Estimated Monetary Loss by Fire for the year 1932.

Not Exceeding

Exceed-

Month

Under $500

ing

Total

$5,000

$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000

$

January..... 2,071

873 4,600

321,271 328,815

February... 240

33,250 33,490

March

497

750

5,700 3,000 13,000 22,947

April

110

1,000

:

1,110

May

85 750

:

11,000

11,835

June

262

262

July.

444

1,000 2,000 3,000

7,500

13,944

August

2

7,500

7,502

September..

608

600

1,500

2,708

October

886 700

3,000

34,250

38.836

November.. 788 525 1,000 8,300 11,500

20,000 42,113

December.. 1,392

1,800 6,000 4,000 130,000 143,192

Total...

7,385 3,325 5,673 28,100 24,500 577,771 $646,754

Table III.

SUMMARY OF MOST SERIOUS FIRES DURING YEAR, 1932.

Fire extinguished by

Time of

Dale

1932

Call

Address.

Business.

(Hours)

Hyd-

Eng-

rants

ines

Fire

Floats

Jan. 9 20.34

188 Shanghai Street, Yaumati.

Cotton Quilt

Manufacturer.



2

Damage.

- K 37 -

A building of four floors about 45 x 15 ft. (used as Workshop, store, and tenement dwelling) and severely damaged by fire, heat, smoke and water.

One male and three females burned to death.

contents

A building of four floors about 65 x 17 ft. (used as shop, offices, store and dwelling). Rear half of building gutted and roof off, rest of building and contents severely damaged by fire, water, dirt and breakage.

A range of fourteen buildings of two and three floors and a number of timber and matshed buildings covering an area of about 350 x 250 ft. (used as shops, offices, stores and dwellings) and contents severely damaged by fire and mostly fallen down.

Two buildings each of two floors covering and area of about 30 x 30 ft. (used as shops and dwellings), and contents destroyed by fire and roofs off. (adjoining and communicating).

Jan. 12

03.40 134 Bonham Strand West,

Chinese Medicine dealers.

4

1

Jan. 14

00.14 Main Street, Aplichan. Chinese Medicine dealer.

1

1

Mar. 30

23.12 45 & 46 Main Street, Aberdeen.

Rice and Grocery Merchant.

1

1

>

Table III,--Continued.

SUMMARY OF MOST SERIOUS FIRES DURING YEAR 1932.

Fire Extinguished by

Time of

Date

1932

Call

(Hours)

Address.

Business.

Hyd- Eng-

rants ines

Fire

Floats

July 15

08.52 Lying at Oil Instal-

S.S. "Chip Shing".

1

1

lation Wharf, Lai Chi Kok.

July 31

02.58 131 & 129 Pei Ho

Street, Shum Shui Po.

Bakers and Con- fectioners.

2

3

Aug. 5

22.32 102 & 100 Yee Kuk Street, Shum Shui Po.

Joss Paper Manu facturers.

1

3

Damages.

[

K 38

1

A cargo vessel of 1,199 tons gross, loading Benzine. Sixty six cases of benzine out of a total of 1,758 cases in No. 2 hold destroyed by explosion and fire, rest of contents damaged by water and breakage. Hull and bulk-heads of No. 2 hold damaged by heat and distortion.

One male killed. Three males injured by burns.

Two buildings each of three floors covering an area of about 120 x 45 ft. (used as bakery, shops and tenement dwellings) and contents severely damaged by fire and roofs off. Facades of Nos. 133 & 135 damaged by fire (adjoining).

Two buildings each of three floors covering an area of 60 x 50 ft. (used as workshops, stores and tenement dwellings). First and second floors and contents severely damaged by fire, ground floors and contents by water,

Two males and one female injured by jumping from first floor into street before arrival of Brigade.

:

Table III,—Continued,

SUMMARY OF MOST SERIOUS FIRES DURING YEAR 1932,

Fire Extinguished by

Date

1932

Time of

Call

Address.

Business.

(Hours)

Hyd-

rants

Eng- Fire

ines

Floats

Oct. 13

20.045 New Market Street. Importers and

Exporters.



2

Damage.

K 39

A building of four floors about 60 x 15 ft. (used as shop, offices, stores and dwelling). Three upper floors gutted and part of roof off, ground floor and damaged by water.

contents

A range of buildings of four floors, about 60 x 40 ft. (used as shops, stores and tenement dwellings) and contents severely damaged by fire and roof off.

One female burned to death, eight persons injured, two females rescued by means of Brigade appliances.

A range of buildings covering an area of about 400 x 100 ft. (used as Boat Building sheds, Soy Factory, Preserved Fruit Factory, shops and dwellings) severely damaged by fire and partial collapse.

A range of wooden shed buildings (used as dwellings, machine shops, workshops and stores) and contents and timber severely damaged by fire, heat and water and mostly fallen down, and several stacks of timber, covering an area of about 450 x 350 feet damaged by fire and heat.

Nov. 9 02.09 972 Canton Road,

Rattan ware dealer.

3

2

Mong Kok.

Dec. 12

00.55 Cheung Chau Island.

Dried grass dealer.

1

1

Dec. 15 00.49

Shanghai Street, Mong Kok.

Wing Hing Timber

3

Yard.

Year.

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1932.

The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for 1931 were as follows:

Convicted by Ordinary Courts. Debtors

On remand or in default of finding surety

Total.......

1931 1932

5,921

6,361

44

53

802

1,379

6,767 7,793

2. Thirty eight boys were admitted as Juveniles i.e. under sixteen years of age, during the year with sentences varying from two days detention to eight months hard labour. Of this number twenty only were treated as Juvenile Offenders; the others in the opinion of the Superintendent and Medical Officer being over sixteen years of age.

3. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 19.9 as compared with 21.8 for 1931.

4. 269 prisoners were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories against 266 for the previous year.

5. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong.

Estimated

population.

Number of

convicts.

Percentage

of

population.

Daily

average number of

prisoners.

Precentage

1923

681,800

294

*013

861

*126

1924

799,550 345

*043

1,066

133

1925

874,420 394

*015

1,116

•128

1926

786,920 409

*052

1,054

*134

1927

* 890,400

392

⚫044

1,189

*136

1928

*1,075,690 352

*033

1,071

*100

1929

*1,075,690

331

•031

1,075

•100

1930

*1,143,510 256

*022

1,175

•103

1931

† 849,751

202

*024

1,102

*130

1932

900,796

173

*019

1,114

*124

*Probably overestimated.

Census of 1931.

to

population.

L 2

VICTORIA GAOL (MALES).

6. 18,576,579 forms were printed and issued to various Gov- ernment departments and 88,677 books bound or repaired as compared with 14,929,770 forms and 82,210 books in 1931. During the year type to the value of $1,877.00 was cast.

7. Other industries in the Prison included matmaking, tailor- ing, carpentering, tinsmithing, painting, laundering, shoemaking, netmaking and basketmaking, and the necessary upkeep work of cooking, cleaning and minor building repairs.

8. The Gaol was again overcrowded.

9. The workshop accommodation is inadequate.

LAI CHI KOK PRISON (MALES).

10. Garden work continues to give useful employment. Other work done at Lai Chi Kok, apart from the necessary routine duties of cooking, cleaning, etc. included string and net making, basket and broom making and grass matmaking. Coir matmaking was successfully introduced in 1930 and the bulk of this work is now done at Lai Chi Kok.

11. Two prisoners escaped, one on 3rd April and one on 13th April. They have not been recaptured.

FEMALE PRISON LAI CHI KOK.

12. The new Female Prison at Lai Chi Kok was opened in April. Provision has been made for the scgregation of long sentence prisoners, short sentence prisoners and persons commit- ted but not convicted. This Prison has supplied a long felt want and although it is only intended as a temporary measure pending the building of a permanent Female Prison at Stanley, it is a model establishment of its kind and is a step in the right direction for the better accommodation of prisoners in Hong Kong.

13. The administration has again to thank the visiting ladies, both English and Chinese, for their valuable services in giving free instruction and elementary education to the prisoners. Now that the prison is at Lai Chi Kok many of these ladies have to travel a long way to attend. That they do so regularly and will- ingly is a proof of their continued interest. It is difficult to estimate the results of their efforts as the majority of the prisoners in whom they are interested are banished for terms of 5 years and upwards, but their visits are much appreciated and it is to be hoped that the Lady Visitors' endeavours assist the women to become useful members of society on their release.

L 3-

GENERAL.

14. 603 punishments were awarded for breaches of prison discipline as compared with 807 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in sixteen cases for prison offences.

15. Forty six prisoners were whipped by order of courts.

16. The discipline in all three prisons was good.

17. The health of the prisoners generally was well main- tained.

18. The conduct of the Staff, with some exception, was very good.

19. Two European warders at Lai Chi Kok committed suicide by shooting themselves while temporarily insane, and one European warder died from natural causes.

20. The general health of the Staff was good.

21. Improved quarters for Indian bachelor junior officers were rented in February near the Prison.

22. The Matron's quarters attached to the old Female Prison were converted into satisfactory sleeping quarters for 8 Indian officers.

23. Medical reports on the Prisons will be found in the annual report of the Hon. D.M.S.S. but I would like to record that during the epidemic of cholera not a single case occurred in the prisons, and I much appreciate the hard work put in by the Prison Medical Staff in taking measures to prevent the epidemic attacking the prisoners, especially in Victoria Gaol, which was so overcrowded that an outbreak of cholera therein might have led to considerable mortality amongst the inmates.

24. Chief Warder West left the Colony in October prior to retirement in July 1933. Mr. West was Chief Warder for 14 years. He was an able and trusted officer whose services will be missed.

25. The site for the new gaol at Stanley was approved in December.

8th March. 1933.

J. W. FRANKS, Superintendent of Prisons.

- L 4

-

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1931 and 1932.

Personal Emoluments*

1931

1932

492,599.87 453,659.74

Other Charges.

Arms and Ammunition

249.92

238.66

Conveyance Allowance to Superinten-

dent

600.00

600.00

Cleaning & Sanitary Materials

5,069.48 5,755.47

Clothing & Shoes for Staff

17,833.93

15,184.19

Clothing for Prisoners..

17,987.90 12,995.90

Executioners Fees

Nil.

150.00

Fuel

29,445.32

41,508.18

Furniture

740.76

795.32

Grants to Chaplains.............

1,200.00

1,200.00

Gratuities to Prisoners

1,152.00

1,135.00

Incidental Expenses

2,410.94 2,204.50

Light

20,802.76 11,170.53

Materials for Remunerative Industries

4,774.29

5,880.32

Materials for Repairs and Renewals..............

10,019.09

9,631.80

Photography

1,690.27

1,923.66

Rations for Indian Warders

14,652.48

14,666.33

Rent of Quarters for European Warders

15,459.30

9,124.30

Rent of Quarters for Indian Warders...

5,120.00

6,310.00

Subsistence of Prisoners..

149,204.11

161,670.90

298,412.55 302,145.06

Total Other Charges

Special Expenditure.

Linotype Composing Machine

Booksewing Machine

Hydro Extractor

Total Special Expenditure...

14,489.97

7,352.46

2,463.85

24,306.28

Total Prison Department

*Includes officers of J. C. Service.

791,012.42 780,111.08

-

L 5

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1931 AND 1932.

Head of Revenue collected by Prison Department.

Fees of Court or Office.

1931

1932

Prisoners Subsistence

594.85 1,596.70

Prison Industries

6,681.23 7,693.04

Estimated value of prison labour

163,062.93 197,795.80

Total..

170,339.01 207,085.54

Table III.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue of Prison Department for the last 10 years.

*Personal Emoluments and Other Charges

Special Ex- penditure

Total Expenditure

Total Revenue including esti- mated value of

prison labour

1923 $324,698.26

Nil

$324,698.26

$121,509.50

1924

375,158.14

$8,204.56

383,362.70

126,448.03

1925

460,813.31

2,013.73

462,827.04

126,623.61

1926

475,950.09

3,218.46

479,168.55

153,727.28

1927

500,203.68

636.90

500,840.58

160,417.44

1928

493,271.58:..

Nil

493,271.58

166,024.55

1929

514,267.37 ..7,264.36

521,531.73

179,307.54

1930

659,899.39 29,693.50

689,592.89

144,550.53

1931 791,012.42

Nil

791,012.42

170,339.01

1932 755,804.80 24,306.28

780,111.08.

207,085.54

*Includes officers of J. C. Service.

Table IV.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1932.

L 6

H

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

Value of

Value of

Value of

Nature of

stock on

Industry.

hand

January 1st

1932.

Value of

materials

purchased.

articles

Value of

work

stock on

Value of

Earnings.

Total Dr.

.

manufactur- ed or work

done for

payment,

done for gaol or other Departments.

hand

Total Cr.

Difference

December

between

columns

31st, 1932.

3 and 7.

C.

€9

c.

$

C.

$

c.

$

$

C.

$

Coir,

Netmaking,

.......

Tailoring,

4,865.20

252.50

9,694.00

3,949.60

294.97

8,814,80

547.47

3,633.72

3,997.84

3,339.68

10,971,24

2,156.44

174.35

48.20

479.00

701.55

154.08

19,393.41

29,087.41

131.60

26,154.44

6,664.40

32,950.44

3,863.03

Rattan,

26.50

510.00

536.50

801.70

47.20

848.90

312.40

Tinsmithing,.

63.20

2,178.95

2,242.15

119.65

4,598.90

104.80

4,818.35

2,576.20

Carpentering,

2,334.40

3,967.21

6,301.61

262.84

6,464.54

1,270.40

7,997.78

1,696.17

Grass-matting,

24.40

160.00

184.40

514.00

37.50

551.50

367.10

Shoemaking,

334.00

3,174.62

3,508.62

102.80

5,193.62

660.00

5,956.42

2,447.80

Laundry,...

75.00

3,898.56

3,973.56

13,340.20

1,680.00

15,020.20

11,046,64

Printing and

Bookbinding,...

59,783.73

84,199.34

143,983.07

2,365.91

260,225.07

54,395.81

316,986.79

173,003.72

Photography, ...

249.50

1,923.66

2,173.16

.74

Total,......$

77,702.43

123,650.32

201,352.75

6,791.61

2,223.20

328,556.71

121.44

2,345.38

172.22

68,800.23

399,148.55

197,795.80

Paid into Bank during 1932, which sum includes $482.89 for work executed in 1931, $7,693.04. Value of work executed during 1932 for which payment was deferred to 1933, $491.48.



HONG KONG

MEDICAL & SANITARY

REPORT

FOR THE YEAR 1932

BY

A. R. WELLINGTON

Director of Medical and Sanitary Services.

-

M 3

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

Page

7

17

SECTION.

INTRODUCTION

I. ADMINISTRATION

II. PUBLIC HEALTH:-

Part I.-Vital Statistics :·

(a) Population

(b) Births & Deaths Registration

(c) Birth Statistics

(d) Death Statistics

&NNN

26

27

27

27

(e) Vital Statistics of European Civilian

Population

30

Part II.-Health Conditions:

(a) General remarks

31

(b) Mosquito-borne diseases

32

(i) Malaria

32

(ii) Dengue

34

(iii) Filariasis

34

(c) Infectious Diseases

34

(i) Tuberculosis

35

(ii) Leprosy

36

(iii) Smallpox

37

(iv) Plague

38

(v) Cerebro-spinal fever

39

(vi) Cholera

40

(vii) Enteric

43

III. HYGIENE AND SANITATION :-

A. General Remarks-Administration

B. Preventive Measures against:-

(a) Insect-borne Diseases

44

45

(b) Epidemic or acute infectious diseases:

45

ސ

M 4

INDEX.

SECTION.

CONTENTS.

Page

(i) Plague

46

(ii) Smallpox

47

(iii) Cholera, Dysentery, Enteric, etc.

48

(c) Tuberculosis

48

(d) Helminthic Diseases

49

C. General Measures of Sanitation :-

(a) Domestic cleanliness

49

(b) Scavenging

49

(c) Conservancy and sewerage

50

(d) Drainage

50

(e) Water Supplies

50

(f) Clearance of bush and undergrowth....

50

(g) Sanitary inspections

51

(h) Common Lodging Houses

51

D. School Hygiene

52

E. Labour Conditions

55

F. Housing and Town Planning

56

59

888

59

60

G- Food in relation to Health and Diseases:

(a) Inspection and control of food supplies (b) Slaughter houses, Markets and Dairies. (c) Deficiency diseases

(d) Measures taken to spread knowledge

of Hygiene and Sanitation...

(e) Training of Sanitary Personnel

IV. PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINIS-

TRATION:

A. General

www.

60

61

B. Emigration

888883

62

63

C. Vaccination

63

D. Tables I, II, III, IV, V, VI.

64

SECTION.

- M 5

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

V. MATERNITY & CHILD WELFARE:

Page

A. Maternity Hospital Accommodation

B. Midwives

888888

67

68

C. Ante-natal and Infant Welfare Centres

69

D. Government Infant Welfare Centre

E. Tung Wah Infant Welfare Centre

28

69

71

F. Tsan Yuk Infant Welfare Centre

71

G. Alice Memorial Infant Welfare Centre

71

VI, HOSPITALS, INSTITUTES, ETC.:

A. Government Institutions :

Government Civil Hospital

72

Victoria Hospital

75

Kowloon Hospital

76

Venereal Diseases Clinics

78

X-Ray Department

80

Government Dispensaries

81

Government Infectious Diseases Hospital.

82

B. Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries :--

Tung Wah Hospital

84

Kwong Wah Hospital

86

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

87

Tung Wah Smallpox Hospital

88

Tsan Yuk Hospital

89

Wanchai or Eastern Maternity Hospital...

90

Chinese Public Dispensaries (9 in all)

90

VII. PRISONS AND ASYLUMS:-

A. Prisons

VIII. METEOROLOGY

93

96

390

SECTION.

IX. SCIENTIFIC:

M 6

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

Page

A. Bacteriological Institute

B. The Public Mortuaries:

-

(a) Public Mortuary, Victoria

(b) Public Mortuary, Kowloon

X. THE NEW TERRITORIES-PUBLIC

HEALTH & SANITATION

98

99

99

88888

101

APPENDIX A.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT BACTERIOLOGIST

110

APPENDIX B.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT MALARIOLOGIST

126

APPENDIX C.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

157

MENT ANALYST

APPENDIX D.-REPORT ON UNIVERSITY

CLINICAL UNITS AT

THE GOVERNMENT CIVIL · HOSPITAL

APPENDIX E.-GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS-

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

APPENDIX F.-CHINESE HOSPITALS—

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

APPENDIX G.-MORTUARIES-RETURN OF

DISEASES

APPENDIX H.-REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS

& DEATHS

166

175

175

189

196

Appendix M.

ANNUAL MEDICAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1932,

INTRODUCTION.

Geographical Features.

In order to give a clear impression of, the Public Health conditions obtaining in Hong Kong, it is necessary first to des- cribe the situation of the Colony, its geographical features, its climate, the nature of the population, the housing conditions and the bearing old Chinese traditions, beliefs, and customs, have on the question of co-operation with the authorities in the promotion and preservation of the Public Health. It is also desirable to indicate the various organisations which together make up the Public Health machinery.

2. The Territory under British_jurisdiction includes the Colony Proper, namely, the Island of Hong Kong with the Penin- sula of Kowloon, and the New Territories. In this Report the term Colony means the Colony Proper. The area of the Island is 32 square miles-that of Kowloon is 2 2/3rd. square miles while the New Territories have approximately 300 square miles.

3. Situated between 22° 9′ and 22° 37′ North Latitude the area under discussion is just within the northern limits of the tropics. It is in fact practically on the same level as Calcutta. It may be said to form the lower extremity of the left bank of the estuary of the Canton River, at the head of which is the City of Canton and on an island in which stands the Portuguese Colony of Macao.

4. Topographically the Island of Hong Kong and the Penin- sula of Kowloon may be described as a series of granite ridges separated by narrow valleys and having here and there flat areas facing the sea. The New Territory is of similar formation with some fairly wide valleys towards the north and west. The features are such that flats suitable for town sites are few in number and limited in extent. In the Island the only level of any size is that on which the City of Victoria stands and this does not cover more than one square mile. With regard to Kowloon, not more than one half is flat and convenient for street formation.

M 7

M 8

The Climate.

5. Situated just within the northern limits of the tropics and occupying an insular position immediately south of the great land mass of China, Hong Kong's climate is very materially influenced by the direction of the prevailing winds. The North East Monsoon blows from November until April and during this period the weather is dry and cool and invigorating. From May until October, the season of the South West Monsoon, the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot, muggy and enervating. July, August, and September are marked by atmospheric disturbances which now and then culminate in typhoons or cyclones accompanied by blinding sheets of rain.

6. The mean annual temperature is 72°F. During the sum- mer months the average temperature is 87°F. and there is little variation throughout the twenty-four hours. Situated on the north side of the Island the City of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze,

which is cut off by the mountains behind the town. During the winter months the range of temperature is from 70°F. to 45°F. with an average 66°F. necessitating for comfort the wearing of warm clothes and the provision of fires in the houses. Frost is practically unknown.

7. The average yearly rainfall is 85.72 inches. As might be expected most of the rain falls in the summer months.

Population and its distribution.

8. Hong Kong which depends for its prosperity on its trade with China has three fourths of its population concentrated in the cities of Victoria and Kowloon which may justly be described as one city divided into two by the harbour. Outside this city there is little of commercial importance and Hong Kong as a Colony might almost be termed the city and port of Greater Hong Kong.

9. With regard to the numbers, except in census years, there are no accurate statistical figures, the great movement to and from the Colony and the facility with which the border is crossed preventing accurate checking. Hong Kong being the principal entrepot for South China and its harbour one of the busiest in the world, everyday on an average 5,000 tọ 6,000 individual pass to and from China by river steamer or by rail and there are others who arrive and depart by junks or smaller vessels. During times of political unrest in China many thousands from the main- land sojourn in the Colony, some of whom return to their homes when conditions are more settled, others remaining attracted by the opportunities offered for employment.

M 9

10. The total civil population of the Colony is estimated to exceed 900,000, of which some 400,000 reside in the City of Victoria; 280,000 in the town of Kowloon, over 100,000 on boats in the waters of the Colony and the remainder in villages.

11. There are over 20,000 local boats registered at the Har- bour Office, the occupants of each of which vary in number from four to forty according to the size and character of the craft. The Harbour Authorities believe the population to be 150,000 and certainly 100,000 cannot be an over-estimate.

12. Of the total population over 97 per cent are Chinese. According to the Census Report one third of the whole were born in the Colony. The remainder are mostly those who have come from China attracted by the facilities offered for employment. Many return to their native towns or villages when too ill or too old for labour. Through this exodus the death rate in the Colony is considerably lower than it otherwise would be.

13. The masses are working people belonging to what is commonly described as the coolie class. The Chinese of the upper classes, many of whom have received a western education, are mostly engaged in commerce but there are among them a number of professional men including both lawyers and doctors.

Housing Conditions.

14. The town plans of Victoria and Kowloon are widely different the former may be described as old fashioned and irregular, the latter as modern and regular.

sea.

15. The site on which Victoria stands is a narrow strip of land 4 miles long by 1/5th. to 2/5ths. of a mile broad lying at the northern foot of the mountain and separating it from the The total area of available space is about one square mile or 1/32nd. of that of the whole island. Limited in front by the sea and behind by the steep slopes of the mountain there remains hardly an inch of space which has not been occupied for one purpose or another.

16. That portion of the town where the working classes reside and described in the Census Report as 'Health Districts 4, 5, 6, 6A, 7, 7A, 8 (restricted), 9, and 10A (restricted), forming the lower part of the town fronting on Victoria Harbour' has an area of roughly 200 acres and in this space nearly 200,000 in- dividuals find accommodation giving a density of approximately 1,000 per acre.

17. The conformation of the site with its rapid rise of land near the sea-shore led in the early days to the erection of houses on the narrow strip of land near the harbour and extending a little way up the lower slopes of the mountain the houses being

M 10

separated by narrow lanes and alleyways. When the population was small and the houses only one and two stories in height, the situation was not unsatisfactory. As the population increased the houses were heightened to four and five stories without any corresponding widening of the spaces separating them.

18. Year by year the population continued to increase, immigration being accelerated by unrest in China. Victoria was the centre of trade and therefore the centre of attraction. There was little room to build further accommodation and the new-comers had to squeeze into the already overcrowded pre- mises. Rooms were divided into cubicles which to a certain extent provided privacy but which interfered both with lighting and ventilation.

19. In some houses there are tiers of bunks placed against the walls, in others the rooms are divided into cubicles or cabins each measuring perhaps eight feet by eight feet and having parti- tions 6 feet in height. These cabins are not the temporary abodes of persons on a voyage but the more or less permanent homes of the people. There is little or no room for kitchens, and latrine accommodation is often limited to pail closets on the roofs of the buildings.

20. Year by year the Sanitary Department and the Building Authority have made efforts to improve the situation and with a considerable amount of success both as regards palliative and radical treatment. The task almost sisyphean in itself was

· rendered more difficult by paucity of water and by opposition put forward both by property owners and the occupiers.

21. It goes without saying that the maintenance of a satis- factory standard of sanitation under such conditions is a most difficult problem and one which cannot be solved without the willing co-operation of the people. One thing is certain, so long as buildings are overcrowded and insanitary, no amount of external sanitation will give immunity from disease.

22. Within the last few years some 70 acres have been added to the eastern section of the town by reclamation from the sea. This locality which is known as the Praya East Reclamation has been laid out in accordance with modern town planning princi- ples, with wide streets, short lots and back-lanes. The greater part of it is now covered with dwelling houses which satisfy sanitary requirements. The density here is not more than 300 per acre.

23. Kowloon which is a comparatively new city has been town-planned on up-to-date lines with straight broad streets and back lanes. During the intercensus period 1921-1931 it increased in population 113.06 per cent. It is still rapidly growing and in a few years will equal Victoria or even exceed it. According to the census the density of population is 300 per acre.

M 11

Influence of traditional beliefs.

24. The traditional beliefs of the uneducated Chinese as to the cause of diseases, the means of spread and the factors which affect its course are so at variance with modern teaching that there is little chance of promoting voluntary co-operation between them and the authorities in the matter of the prevention and control of disease until they can be brought to understand the true nature of the problems and are conscious of the useful- ness of the measures advocated. The proximity of China and the constant intercourse make it harder to overcome prejudices than is the case in countries further afield. The greatest hope lies in propaganda and education brought to the homes through public health nurses working as district visitors or in infant welfare centres and school welfare centres.

Propaganda which does not arouse the interest of the other and her children has little practical value. However, leaders of opinion in China and leaders of Chinese thought in Hong Kong are making vigorous efforts to promote public health and public welfare along lines which have proved successful in the Occident, and the outlook is far more hopeful than was the case a few years ago when Chinese thought on matters of health was unduly swayed by old traditions and theories.

Quarantine impractical between Hong Kong and the River Ports.

25. So closely related are Hong Kong, Canton, Macao and the River Ports in the matter of trade, and such is the amount of traffic both human and goods which passes between them that up to date it has been found impossible to devise any system. of quarantine which would effectually safeguard one city against introduction of disease from the other and at the same time preserve that freedom of commercial movements on which these cities depend for prosperity. It has been deemed best to treat them as forming one unit, as suburbs the one of the other, and to strive for a working agreement between the various health organisations to the end that some means, other than imposing restrictions against a whole port, may be found to prevent the spread of infection.

The Government Organisation for the promotion and maintenance of the Public Health.

26. The Colony has no municipality' in the ordinary accept- ed sense of the term, the Governor himself being head of the city and head of the port. The functions of a Municipal Council are included in the functions of the Legislative Council. The Colonial Heads of Department perform the duties which in a municipality would be performed by Municipal Heads of Depart-

ment.

M 12

27. The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services is the official adviser to Government on all medical and sanitary matters and is the Officer responsible to Government for the Public Health of the Colony. Under his direction come the Government Hospital Organisation, the Inspection of Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Dispensaries, the Medical Inspection of Schools, the Bacteriological Institute, the Analytical Laboratory, Anti-malarial Activities, Vaccination, Quarantine and Port Health Work, Social Hygiene Work, Maternity and Child Welfare Work, and the Registration of Births and Deaths.

28. The Sanitary Department which is distinct from and independent of the Medical Department has at its head a lay- man, an officer of the Cadet Service. This Department does the work usually performed by the Health Department of a Munici- pality and in addition deals with all matters connected with scavenging and conservancy. Attached to this department are Medical Officers of Health who are seconded from the Medical Department, two Veterinary Surgeons and fifty-six European Sanitary Inspectors.

29. There is a Sanitary Board composed of officials and non- officials whose powers and responsibilities are laid down in the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 and which acts as an advisory body to the Head of the Sanitary Department who is ex-officio chairman of the Board. The Board has no direct control over the Department. The functions and powers of the Board and the Department are limited to the Colony and to that portion of the New Territories adjacent to Kowloon which is known as New Kowloon.

30. The present machinery for the promotion of the Public Health is complex in that responsibility for the organisation of energy both for the cure and the prevention of disease is divided among a number of units, governmental and non-governmental, which operate more or less independently of one another.

Public Health Laws and their administration.

31. The principal Ordinances which have effect in matter of Hygiene and Sanitation are:-

I. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which resembles the English Public Health Act of 1875 and which deals with Infectious Diseases of humans and of animals, the wholesomeness of foods for human con- sumption, abattoirs, markets, dairies, food factories and food shops, nuisances, scavenging and cleansing, drainage, sewerage and sewerage disposal, latrines, urinals and water closets, factories, workshops, laun- dries and offensive trades, buildings, their siting, design and construction, wells and pools.

M 13

II. The Waterworks Ordinance.

III. The Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance.

IV. The Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance,

V. The Boarding House Ordinance.

VI. The Factories and Workshops Ordinance.

VII. The Summary Offences Ordinance.

32. The Public Works Department is the Authority under the Waterworks Ordinance.-The Sanitary Department is respon- sible for the carrying out of the provisions of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance except in so far as it refers to buildings, drainage and sewerage, wells and pools, which are dealt with by the Public Works Department. The Sanitary Department also deals with the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance. The Boarding House Ordinance, which controls lodging houses, boarding houses and hotels, and the Factory and Workshops Ordinance are under the authority of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance is administered by the Medi- cal Department. The Summary Offences Ordinance is the con- cern of the Police.

Transport of the Sick.

33. Motor Ambulances, garaged at the Fire Station, are con- trolled by the Police and Fire Department. Hand Ambulances are operated by the Sanitary Department. The Tung Wah Hospital and the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital each has a motor ambulance of its own and so has the St. John Ambulance Brigade.

Medical Relief.

34. Provision of medical relief is furnished by the Govern- ment, by Chinese Benevolent Institutions and by Christian Missions.

M 14

35. The following table shows the principal institutions affording medical relief to the civil population:-

Accommo- dation.

Authority in Control.

Government Institutions:-

Government Civil Hospital.

246 beds.

Medical Department.

Victoria Hospital

74

*1

Do.

Kowloon Hospital

{

84 beds and 8 cots.

}

Do.

26 beds.

Do.

Gaol Hospital..

30

Do.

""

Do.

Do.

Do.

Infectious Diseases Hospital

Taipo Dispensary

Un Long Dispensary.

Wanchai Maternity & Infant

Welfare Centre

Chinese Benevolent

Institutions:-

The Tung Wah Hospital

The Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

The Kwong Wah Hospital.... The Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital

The Tsan Yuk Maternity

Hospital

The Chinese Eastern Mat-

ernity Hospital

The Chinese Public Dis-

pensaries (9 in number)

Mission Hospitals:-

Alice Memorial & Affiliated

Hospitals...

Matilda Hospital.

460 beds.

Chinese Committee.

279

Do.

325

Do.

"}

60

Do.

">

57

""

31

22

Special Chinese Committee.

Do.

Do. for each.

126 beds.

50

""

110

War Memorial Hoapital................

998

""

18

""

50

12

The French Hospital

The Italian Hospital

London Missionary Society.

Special Committee. French Mission. Canossian Mission. Special Committee.

M 15

J

Non-Government Organisations engaged in Public Health Work.

36. In addition to the Government organisation there are in the Colony a number of Benevolent Societies and Associations whose activities in the cause of public health are of great benefit to the community. The chief among these are:-the Tung Wah Hospital Charity, the Chinese Public Dispensaries, the various Missionary Societies, the Children's Aid Society, the St. John Ambulance Association, the St. John Ambulance Brigade, the New Territories Medical Benevolent Association, the Y.W.C.A. and the Y.M.C.A.

37. A description of the Tung Wah Hospital and the Chinese Public Dispensaries will be found in the body of the report.

38. The St. John Ambulance Association teaches first aid and home nursing and issues certificates after examination to success- ful candidates. Many hundreds of certificates have been issued.

39. The St. John Ambulance Brigade which is distinct from the Association is a body which practises in the field the theory taught by the latter. The Brigade which holds a strong position in the Colony does excellent work both in the training of personnel and in the performance of first aid duties. In the New Territories it has established a number of medical centres

staffed by full time nurses. The Brigade renders valuable assistance to the Government especially with regard to vaccina. tion and propaganda.

Medical Education.

40. The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong provides a six year's course in premedical and medical sciences leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery which are awarded on examination. Most of the clinical teaching is carried out at the Government Civil Hospital where 100 beds have been placed under the care of the professors of surgery, medicine and obstetrics who have been appointed respectively Surgeon, Physician and Obstetric Physician to the hospital. The degrees of the Medical Faculty are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

41. Courses of training for nurses and midwives have been established at a number of hospitals in the Colony. Examina- tions are held for midwives and certificates issued by the Mid- wives Examination Board.

Progress with regard to the Reorganisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services.

42. During the year the Government forwarded to the Sani- tary Board for information and comment the recommendations contained in the report of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services on "The Need for Reorganisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services.'

M 16

43. The following is a summary of the recommendations made:

(1)

That the present cumbersome and inconvenient Public Health and Buildings Ordinance be split into a number of Ordinances each dealing with its own particular sphere of public health activities.

(2) That the Sanitary Department confine its attention to sanitation in its restricted sense and deal with town cleansing, scavenging, conservancy, etc., etc.

(3) That the Medical and Health Department consist of five branches, viz., medical, health, laboratory, quaran- tine, and veterinary, all under one administrative head, the Director of Medical and Health Services.

(4) That the urban areas of Victoria and Kowloon be divided into health districts of approximately 100,000 inhabit- ants each under a District Health Officer who, in his own district, would be responsible for:-

(a) Registration of Births and Deaths and compilation.

of statistics.

(b) House visiting and public health propaganda and

education.

(c) Maternity and Child Welfare.

(d) School Welfare.

(e) Industrial Welfare.

(f) Dispensary treatment for disease.

(g) Food control.

(h) Antimosquito measures.

(i) Infectious disease control.

(5) That there be a Public Health Advisory Board whose duty it would be to consider all matters of public health importance and advise Government on matters of public health policy.

(6) That there be hospital accommodation to the extent of one bed per 300 population for general cases and one bed per 3,000 population for infectious disease cases. (7) That there be a motor travelling dispensary for the New

Territories, Northern Division.

(8) That there be a dispensary launch for the needs of the

100,000 who live in boats.

44. The Sanitary Board accepted all the recommendations with the proviso that the Sanitary Board should be expanded and perform the functions of the proposed Public Health Advi- sory Board.

45. The Public Health Committee having been dissolved the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services was instructed to con- fer with the Attorney General in order that legislation prepared on the lines recommended in the report might be submitted to Government. At the end of the year legislation was still in course of preparation,

-

M 17

SECTION I.

ADMINISTRATION.

STAFF.

46. The total authorised establishment of the Medical De- partment for the year 1932 was as follows:

Head Quarters Staff.

-

Director of Medical and Sanitary Services

Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary Services...

1

1

Health Division.

Health Officers

Chinese Health Officer

Fort Health Officers and Inspectors of Emigrants

Chinese Port Health Officers

3*

122

Venereal Diseases Officer

Medical Officer for Schools

1

1

Dispensaries

Chinese Medical Officer for Schools

Lady Medical Officer for Infant Welfare

Visiting Medical Officer for Chinese Hospitals and

Assistant Medical Officer for Chinese Hospitals

and Dispensaries

Interpreter Infant Welfare Centre

Infant Welfare Nurse

School Nurses

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

Vaccinators

12

Medical Division.

Senior Medical Officer

1

Medical Officers

8

Chinese Medical Officers

9

House Officers

3

Radiologist

1

Radiographer

1

Masseuses

2

Investigative Division.

Government Bacteriologist

Assistant Bacteriologist

*1 Post vacant.

1

1

Class I Laboratory Assistant

M 18

1

4

1

1

4

Class VI Laboratory Assistants

Malariologist

Assistant to Malariologist

Inspectors

Division of Chemical Analysts.

Government Analyst

1

Assistant Analysts

3

Class II Assistant Analysts

2

Sampler

1

Apothecaries and Dispensers.

Apothecary

1

Assistant Apothecaries

Dispensers

24

Apprentice Dispensers

5

Nursing Staff.

Principal Matron

1

Matrons

4

Home Sister

1

Tutor Sister

1

X-Ray Sister

Nursing Sisters

Charge Nurse

Staff Nurses

Probationer Nurses

Charge Dressers

Staff Dressers

Probationer Dressers

Head Attendant, Mental Hospital

Assistant

""

12

Female Attendants, Mental Hospital

1

42

1

23

18

5

9

4

1

1

2

Wardmasters

Midwives

2

7

Clerical Staff.

Accountant

1

Stenographer

1

Clerk Class II

Clerks Class III

Clerks Class IV

Clerks Class V

M 19

Clerks Class VI

Clerk Special Class

Other Officers.

Steward

Assistant Steward

Linen Maid

Office Attendants, Messengers, Ward-boys, Amahs,

Coolies, etc.

3

6

8

1

1

1

..304

PRINCIPAL CHANGES IN PERSONNEL.

47. The following were the principal changes which took place:-

Dr. A. R. Wellington returned from leave and resumed the Directorship of Medical and Sanitary Services on 1st January, 1932.

Dr. D. J. Valentine, Medical Officer, acted as Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary Services in the absence on leave of Dr. W. B. A. Moore from 15th March until the end of the year.

Dr. J. P. Fehily was appointed Health Officer of the Port and Inspector of Emigrants from December 1931.

Mr. Jackson, Assistant Analyst, acted as Government Analyst from 10th June until 31st August.

Mr. V. C. Branson, Assistant Analyst, acted as Government Analyst from 1st September until the end of the year.

Appointments:-Dr. L. 0. Hunter was appointed Lady Medical Officer on 7th January.

Dr. Au King was appointed Chinese Medical Officer for Schools on 7th September.

Dr. A. R. S. D. McElney was reappointed Assistant Visiting Medical Officer to Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries on 1st November.

Dr. L. O. Pringle was appointed Medical Officer on 15th December.

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M 20

Transfers:-Dr. T. W. Ware, Medical Officer, was trans- ferred to Second Health Officer of Port and Inspector of Emigrants on 21st September.

Dr. R. S. Begbie, Health Officer, was transferred as Assist- ant Bacteriologist on 3rd March.

Resignation:-Dr. A. R. S. D. McElney resigned on 31s.

March.

Dr. D. Laing resigned on the 6th September.

Retirement-Miss E. Johnston, Peak Hospital Matron, retired on 1st September.

Death:—I regret to have to record the death of Mr. E. R. Dovey, Government Analyst, who died on the 9th June.

LIST OF ORDINANCES AFFECTING THE PUBLIC HEALTH

ENACTED DURING THE YEAR.

48. The Ordinances affecting the public health which were enacted during the year were :—

(i) The Births and Deaths Registration Amendment Ordin-

ance.

(ii) The Vaccination Amendment Ordinance.

(iii) The Public Health and Buildings Amendment Ordin-

ance.

(iv) The Nurses Registration Amendment Ordinance.

49. EXPENDITURE FOR 1931 AND 1932 COMPARED.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS including

officers of the Senior Clerical & Accounting Staff and Junior Clerical Service attached to the Medical Department

1932.

1931.

$941,117.07

$985,606.10

OTHER CHARGES.

A.-Staff.

Conveyance and Motor

Allowances

12,388.00

11,986.63

Transport

1,073.08

527.00

Rent of Premises for Dispensaries, Infant Welfare Centre, Garage, and V. D. Centre (Kowloon).

2,616.00

1,844.00

M 21

B.-General.

1932.

1931.

Artificial Limbs

$

12.66

$

Bedding and Clothing

12,183.44

16,270.62

Board for 3 House Medical Officers

1.089.00

1,095.00

Board and Lodging for 6 Pupil

Midwives

Books

Cleansing Materials

Dental treatment

576.00

552.00

363.91

405.30

5,566.14

5,480.40

3,118.50

1,811.50

Fuel and Light

53,649.81

46,875.46

Upkeep of hospital equipment

11,676.50

9,863.30

Grants to Protestant and Roman

Catholic Chaplains for Religious

Services

1,800.00

1,800.00

Incidental Expenses

2,685.99

2,071.03

Maintenance of lunatics at Canton

5,749.98

9,045.57

Medical Comforts

664.23

2,440.43

Medicines, Surgical Appliances

and instruments

53,837.72

60,394.75

Provisions for patients

147,850.10

112,241.15

Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern

and Kwong Wah Hospitals

Medicines

7,500.00

Upkeep of X-Ray Apparatus......

11,840.18

6,648.19

Ventilation of Operating Theatre..

47.85

391.70

Washing

15,910.78

16,198.91

Expenses of Courses of Study

and attendance at Medical

Congresses

2,180.54

5,195.92

Upkeep of Travelling Dispensary..

726.50

*Bonuses to Chinese Public,

Dispensary Licentiates and

Clerks for vaccination of

children and registration of births

3,466.20

I

C.--Office of Health Officer of Port.

Conveyance Allowances

324.85

149.34

Incidental Expenses, etc

398.97

393.88

Uniforms

186.29

*Payment of bonuses taken over from the Sanitary Department 1st Jan.

M 22

D. Bacteriological Institute.

1932.

1931.

Animals and Fodder

6,188.86

4,081.10

Anti-rabic work

425.15

425.35

Apparatus and Chemicals

1,458.85

1,450.84

Books and Journals

98.36

143.70

Conveyance Allowances

233.50

448.78

Fuel and Light

1,722.51

1,439.78

Incidental Expenses

788.60

720.05

Preparation of Vaccines, Serum,

etc.

1,682.76

1,878.81

Uniforms

468.91

371.12

Mortuaries, Victoria and Kowloon.

Conveyance Allowances

Fuel and Light

Uniforms

18.00

18.00

74.96

64.67

116.26

132.16

Malaria Bureau.

Conveyance and Motor Allowance.

1,506.15

1,431.61

Equipment

1.631.97

1,804.92

Anit-Malarial Field Work

1,036.94

313.41

Incidental Expenses

295.22

157.00

Uniforms

509.59

311.96

E-Government Laboratory.

Apparatus and Chemicals

3,641.79

2,183.00

Books and Journals

184.38

204.55

Conveyance Allowances

Fuel and Light

Incidental Expenses

287.74

572.33

707.19

544.59

242.40

190.61

Uniforms

154.96

176.78

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges:

$1,316,575.34 $1,325,353.30

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M 23

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE

1932.

1931.

Electric Refrigerators

.$

870.30 $

4,433.00

Replacement of launch for Health

Officer of Port

13,420.00

Travelling Dispensary

1,912.39

7,269.68

Equipment for Venereal Diseases

Clinic

3,906.51

Microscope for Bacteriological

Institute

794.19

Equipment for Maternity Block,

Kowloon Hospital

Installation of Standard power

plugs for X-Ray Work

25,724.34

1,056.55

Total Special Expenditure

Total Medical Department

$

6,689.20 $ 52,697.76

.$1,323,264.54 $1,378,051.06

50.

REVENUE FOR 1932 AND 1931 COMPARED,

1932.

1931.

Medical Treatment

$ 105,040.87 $ 107,976.57

Miscellaneous

150.00

340.00

Bacteriological Examination

14,840.60

7,482.82

Chemcial Analyses

30,714.00

19,295.50

Bill of Health

11,508.00

11,196.00

Medical Examination of Emigrants

86,680.00

96,966.10

Official Certificates

665.00

Births and Deaths Registration.

7,275.50

Consultants Fees

3,290.00

Total

260,163.97 $243,256.99

$Registration of Births and Deaths taken over from the Sanitary

Department on 1st January.

M 24

51. EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR THE PAST TEN YEARS.

Personal Emoluments

Special

Total

Year.

& Other Charges.

Expenditure. Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

1923......

400,708.42

1,053.34

401,761.76

182,354.18

1924.........

498,362.56

4,520.33

502,882.89 205,598.37

1925......

548,703.64

75,537.46

624,241.10

194,547.75

1926

701,717.93

34,451.05

736,168.98

255,070.19

1927....

721,623.32

16,409.47

738,032.79

307,744.48

1928.......

808,412.61

23.37

808,435.98

306,347.62

1929.....

878,058.19

17,061.08

895,119.27

299,524.51

1930........ 1,172,791.22

51,305.06

1,224,096.28

267,887.66

1931.......

1,325,353.30

52,697.76 1,378,051.06 243,256.99

1932.......

1,316,575.34

6,689.20 1,323,264.54 260,164,87

Total

$8,372,306.53 $259,748.12 $8,632,054.65 $2,522,496.62

52. In drawing comparisons between the expenditure and révenue of different years it should not be forgotten that the Hong Kong dollar is based on silver and its value rises and falls with the price of that metal. Most of the European officers draw sterling salaries and the bulk of the drugs, dressings and instru- ments are obtained from England and paid for in sterling. With the exchange at a shilling, the number of dollars expended on sterling priced material, is double what it would have been had the exchange been two shillings to the dollar.

RATIO OF EXPENDITURE ON MEDICAL AND SANITARY SERVICES TO TOTAL REVENUE FROM ALL SOURCES.

53. The total revenue of the Colony from all sources was es- timated at $33,991,510.00.

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M 25

54. Because of the overlapping which occurs when a work serves both a utilitarian and a sanitary service it is impossible to assess exactly the amounts which have been spent for purely medical and sanitary purposes. Including all water works and drainage works as sanitary works the following (which include the salaries of the P.W.D. staff concerned) shows the commit- ments as laid down in the Estimates for 1932.

Expenditure by Medical Department

19

.$1,666,815.00

1,183,784.00

32

Sanitary Department

''

Public Works Department ......... 1,250,000.00

Folice Department

Subsidies to Charities

19

Total

2,300.00

175,762.00

$4,278,661.00

55. Ratio of expenditure on Medical and Sanitary Services

4,278,661 12.59 per cent. 33,991,510

to total revenue

=

56. If the expenditure on Water Works be not taken into account the ratio is 10.87 per cent. As explained in paragraph 54 above these figures are approximate only.

4

M 26

SECTION II.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

PART 1.-VITAL STATISTICS.

Civil Population.

57. The estimated civil population for the whole of the terri- tories under British jurisdiction at the middle of the year was 900,812, of which 880,812 or 97.73 per cent was Chinese and 20,000 or 2.27 per cent non-Chinese. The distribution was as

follows:-

Urban area of Victoria:

Europeans and Americans

Other non-Chinese races

4,000

5,500

Chinese

364,279

373,779

Villages of Hong Kong

Europeans and Americans

300

Non-Chinese other than Europeans.

100

Chinese

43,513

43.913

417,692

Total for Hong Kong Island

Urban Area of Kowloon including New Kowloon :—

Europeans and Americans

4,480

Other non-Chinese Races

5,600

Chinese

273,244

Total for Kowloon & New Kowloon...

283,324

Junks and Sampans:-

Chinese

100,000

New Territories exclusive of New Kowloon : Europeans and Americans

20

Chinese

99,776

99.796

Total civil population

900,812

58. During the year 2,368,340 persons entered and 2,392,340 left the Colony by river steamer and by railroad, making a surplus of emigrants over immigrants by these routes of 24,000, Fuller details are as follows:

Arrived.

Departed.

River steamer

1,545,162

1,668,431

Railway

823,178

723,909

Ocean going steamers

606,918

435,109

Total

2,975,258

2,827,449

M 27

The above does not represent the total movement between Hong Kong and the neighbouring provinces for there are many who arrive and depart by junk or sampan. It is estimated that on an average some 7,000 arrive and 7,000 depart daily.

Births and Deaths Registration.

59. The Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance has since 1911 applied to the whole territory under British jurisdic- tion but until this year no action was taken to enforce it in the New Territories where registration of both births and deaths was the exception rather than the rule.

60. Death registration in the Colony proper being a necessary preliminary to a permit to bury, it may be taken for granted that practically all deaths are registered. Bodies found dumped or abandoned in the streets and open spaces, and they are not a few, are taken to the Public Mortuaries where they are ex- amined by the Medical Officer who fills in the necessary certif- cates which go through the Coroners' hands to the Registrar. All certificates of death are scrutinized by the Medical Officer of Health.

61. It has been found very difficult to obtain anything like complete registration of births and a considerable number of births, especially those of females, are never reported. Every facility is offered for registration and the Chinese are more and more coming to realise its benefits.

Births.

62. The births registered as having occurred in the Colony

were:

Chinese Non-Chinese

Total

13,166 431

13,597

Deaths.

63. The deaths registered among the civilian population of the Colony (including New Kowloon but excluding the remainder of the New Territories) was 19,829, giving a crude death rate of 24.74 as compared with 24.08 for the previous year.

64.

Year

Deaths

Estimated population

Death rate per mille population

1932

Chinese ...

19,546

781,036

25.02

Non-Chinese

283

19.984

14.16

1931

Chinese ...

18,566

761,149

24.39

Non-Chinese

231

19,522

11.83.

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M 28

65. The principal diseases causing deaths were:-

Percent-

Disease.

No. of deaths.

age of total

Death rate

deaths.

per mille population.

1932 1931

Eroncho-pneumonia

2,588

13.05

3.23

3.61

Pulmonary tuberculosis....

2,042

10.29

2.52

2.60

Pneumonia

1,912

9.64

2.38

1.46

Bronchitis

958

4.83

1.12

2.59

Diarrhoea (infantile).

1,282

6.47

1.60

2.13

Diarrhoea (over one year).

1,169

5.80

1.40

1.48

Dysentery

296

1.44

0 36

0.34

Nephritis

720

3.60

0.89

Heart disease

heart

failure.

534

2.69

0,66

0.48

Beri-beri

483

2.43

0.59

0.91

Malaria

455

2.29.

0.56

0.59

Notifiable Diseases :-

Smallpox.

175

0.88

0.21

0.012

Enteric

83

0 41

0.10

0.08

Diphtheria

81

0.40

0,10

0.07

Cerebro-spinal

meningitis

122

062

0.15

0.02

Cholera

156

0.78

0.19

Plague......

}

-M 29

66. Death Clock showing percentages of total deaths caused by different diseases:

13.05%

10.29%

9 64%

4.83%

TUBERCULOSIS

PULMONARY

BRONCHO-

DNEUMONIA

LOBAR

DNEUMONIA

5·8%

EXPERATORY

BRONCHITIS

DIARRHOEA

(OVER ONE YEAR)

DIARRHOEA

(INFANTILE)

OTHER

DISEASES

37.5%

6 47%

DYSENTERY

BERI BERI

MALARIA HEART DISEASE

NEPHRITIS

1·4%

2·43%

2·29%

2·69% 3.6 %

M 30

Infantile Mortality.

67. The numbers of deaths of infants under one year were:

Chinese

Non-Chinese

6,916

38

If the figures for the Chinese births registered represented the total births, which they do not, the infantile mortality rate for this race would be 525.28 as compared with 617.42 which was the equally incorrect rate for the previous year. Allowing that only one third of the births are registered this would still mean a very high infantile mortality figure.

The mortality rate among the non-Chinese was 97.93 as compared with 61.85 in 1931.

The Dumping of the Dead.

68. The following table shows the number of unknown dead. bodies found by the Police in the streets and elsewhere during the last five years:—

1928

1929

1930

1931 1932

Victoria

358

706

418

366

382

Kowloon

..1,077

1,072

669

738

884

Harbour

139

164

126

115

79

Elsewhere

106

91

103

76

Total

.1,680

2,033

1,316

1,295

1,427

92 per cent of the bodies dumped are children the majority being infants. The number for males exceeds that for females.

Vital Statistics of European Civilian Population.

69. The Europeans and Americans resident in the Colony numbered 8,800, of whom 6,800 were British. The majority of Europeans and Americans are treated by private practitioners when ill and figures are not available for calculating incidence rates.

There were 283 deaths among the 8,800, giving a death rate of 14.1 per mille.

M 31

-

Vital Statistics of European Officials.

70. Number of Europeans (excluding temporary

school mistresses)

Average number on leave

Average number resident in the Colony

Number invalided during 1932:--

(a) when on leave at home

(b) in the Colony

Number died during 1932 :

897

73

824

1

4

5

(a) on the way home

1

(b) in the Colony

12

(c) when on leave at home

1

14

PART II-HEALTH CONDITIONS.

General Remarks.

71. In the absence of some system of registration of sickness the only sources of information available are the death returns, the returns of notifiable diseases, and the figures furnished by the Government Hospitals and the Western clinics of the Chinese Hospitals. The number of deaths recorded indicates very cor- rectly the deaths which have taken place in the Colony but the figures regarding general diseases are only a fraction of the whole and too much importance should not be placed on deduc- tions made from them. Though the educated Chinese appreciate the value of Western medicine the bulk of the population still pin their faith to the old fashioned Chinese decoctions and, when ill, seek advice from one or other of the many empiricists or herbalists who practise in the Colony. A number of those who enter the Government Hospitals do so only after they have made full trial of Chinese Medicines and when their disease is well advanced.

72. Year by year, however, the value of Western medicine becomes more and more appreciated. Proof of this is the ever- increasing number who attend the outpatient departments of Government Hospitals or seek admission to the wards. Another proof is the success of the Infant Welfare Clinic which was opened in Wanchai on 25th April and which has become so popular that there is need of further accommodation.

M 32

73. Judging from the death returns the health of the Colony was not so good as in the previous year. The crude death rate was 25.02 per mille as compared with 24.39 the rate for 1931.

74. Respiratory diseases accounted for 43.05 per cent of the total deaths, the percentage for 1931 being 42.25.

75. The principal diseases causing death were broncho- pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchitis, pneumonia, in- fantile diarrhoea and diarrhoea.

76. The overcrowded houses combined with the expectorat- ing habits of the Chinese furnish sufficient explanation for the prevalence of respiratory troubles.

77. One of the most important events in the public health year was the communication to the Sanitary Board of the re- commendations of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services for the reorganisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services of the Colony, and the debate on the subject by that Body.

78. The Sanitary Board agreed with all the recommend- ations except those bearing on the Sanitary Board and Public Health Advisory Board. They recommended that there be one Board for both objects,

Mosquito-borne Diseases.

79. The mosquito-borne diseases of the Colony are Malaria, Dengue and Filariasis. None of these are notifiable diseases and complete incidence figures are not available.

Malaria.

80. In the early days of the Colony malaria in Victoria was the chief cause of sickness and death and in 1844, coincident with the breaking of the soil for the formation of Queen's Road. the chief arterial road of the town, malaria became such a scourge that there were serious thoughts of abandoning the island.

81. Here as in Malaya disturbances of the soil often result in the formation of small collections of water which for reasons unknown attract the malaria mosquito and in which they deposit their eggs. The breaking of the soil is not a direct cause of malaria but a predisposing factor in a chain of events which favour the spread of the disease.

82. It would seem also that here as in Malaya the danger areas are not the large swamps and paddy fields remote from the hills, but collections of water within half a mile of the latter. Why it is so we do not know, but spring water which not yet

M 33

lost its sparkle does have an attraction for Anopheles minimus and Anopheles jeyporiensis which in this country are the most potent carriers of malaria. Such water may be in seepages, springs, pools or streams or it may be from the irrigation water for wet cultivation on the hill sides or in the valleys in the vicinity.

83. The most malarious areas are, therefore, those in or near the hills. Unless carefully watched and carefully controlled works in the vicinity of the hills which involve disturbance of the soil such as roads, railways, or waterworks are nearly always attended by high sickness and death rates among the labour forces employed. In Malaya this was especially the case when the soil was of granite formation and the same applies in Hong Kong.

84. Today owing to efficient drainage there is practically no malaria in the thickly populated portion of either Victoria or Kowloon. In the outskirts and more open parts the disease still persists and in certain rural areas both on the island and main- land it is very prevalent.

85. Malaria not being a notifiable disease few figures are available to measure the actual extent of incidence throughout the Colony and New Territories.

On the hospital returns and on the returns furnished by certain government departments, such as the Police, it is possible to base a guess as to whether the disease is on the increase or decrease generally, but that is all.

86. The cases admitted to Government Hospitals numbered 465 of which 13 or 2.8 per cent died. In the Chinese Hospitals there were 943 admissions, of which 187 or 19.8 per cent died.

Among those admitted to the Government Hospitals there were 226 tertian, 177 aestivo-autumnal, and 5 quartan infections.

87. The cases admitted to the Government Hospitals during the last eight years are as follows:

1925

1.112

1926

970

1927

670

1928

185

1929

653

1930

535

1931

585

1932

465

M 34

88. The incidence among the police of the New Territories

for the same period was:—

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1,205

877

428

278

265

258

148

55

1932

89. Many of the Police Stations are screened and every man is provided with a mosquito net. Prophylactic quinine is issued and the living rooms are regularly sprayed with an insecticide in an endeavour to kill any adult mosquitoes they may be pre- sent. The police on night patrols are of course liable to infection.

90. The total number of deaths attributed to malaria was 455, giving a death rate of 0.56 per mille for the Colony. The lowness of the rate is, of course, due to the fact that the great majority of the population living in the drained urban areas are outside the zone of flight of malaria carrying anophelines and, therefore, not subject to risks of attack.

Dengue.

91. There was no epidemic of this disease during the year and only a few cases came under the notice of the Medical Officers.

Filariasis.

92. Researches carried out by the Malariologist show that this disease is far more prevalent than was supposed. An in- fection rate of 12 per cent was noted in one area. A ful description of the investigations will be found in the Malario- logist's Report. In spite of the number infected there are very few cases showing symptoms of elephantiasis.

Infectious Diseases.

93. The infectious diseases of the Colony may, for con- venience, be classed into those which are notifiable and those which are not.

94. The most important of the non-notifiable infectious dis- eases are Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Leprosy.

:

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95. The notifiable diseases are Plague, Cholera, Smallpox, Yellow Fever, Typhus Fever, Cerebro-Spinal Fever, Enteric Fever, Para-typhoid fever, Relapsing Fever, Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, Puerperal Fever and Rabies (human and animal).

96. Responsibility for reporting a case of notifiable disease lies with the legally qualified medical practitioner attending a case, or, in the absence of such, on the occupier or keeper of the premises or on the nearest male relative living on the pre- mises, or in default of such relative on any person in charge of or in attendance on the sick person. Reports are to be made to the Medical Officer of Health or to the Officer in charge of the nearest Folice Station.

97. In actual fact practically the only reports received by the Medical Officer of Health are:

(a) those from qualified medical practitioners.

(b) from the Medical Officer in charge of hospitals.

(e) from the Medical Officers in charge of the Public Mort- uaries where bodies have been taken for inspection and disposal.

98. The Health Authorities when they do discover a case of infectious disease have no power to remove it to hospital unless the patient or his guardian consents, or unless a Magistrate makes an order for removal.

Tuberculosis.

99. Pulmonary Tuberculosis ranks second to broncho pneu- monia as the principal cause of death. The total number of deaths was 2,042, that for 1931 being 1,983. The death rate per mille was 2.52 as compared with 2.60 for the previous year. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the majority of cases is a disease which unfits the individual for the active exercise of his employ- ment months or even years before death supervenes. Because of the tendency of those unable to work and earn a living to leave Hong Kong for their villages in China the deaths reported form an incomplete index of the prevalence of the disease.

100. The number of cases of disease is unknown but reckon- ing 10 for each death the total comes to over 20,000.

101. There is nothing to add to what has already been said with regard to this infectious malady. There is no sanatorium or home for the care of those who have contracted infection and the victims continue to struggle against their affliction under conditions which leave little hope for recovery.

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Leprosy.

102. Though leprosy is a notifiable disease very few cases are ever notified and the number of cases in the Colony is still a matter of conjecture. Assuming the rate of incidence in the neighbouring country to be at least one per mille population, the number of lepers in Hong Kong and the New Territories cannot be less than 500.

193. To many this figure will appear to be an exaggeration, nevertheless, it is accepted by all those who are authorities on the subject and who have taken the trouble to make the necessary enquiries. Assuming that one third of the population is Hong Kong born one third of this number or 166 are lepers for which the Colony is responsible. There is no leper asylum in the Colony.

164. Lepers who are not British subjects are prohibited from entering the Colony and any such who find entrance may be deported. Lepers who are Chinese subjects are sent to Canton whence they proceed to Shek Lung where there is an official asylum of the Kwang Tung Government the direction of which is entirely in the hands of the Catholic Mission. During the year the Hong Kong Government paid to the Mission a donation of $2,500.

Notifiable Infectious Diseases.

105. The number of cases of infectious disease notified dur- ing the year and those notified in 1931 were :—

Bubonic Plague

Cholera

Smallpox

Diphtheria

Enteric

Paratyphoid

1932

1931

.0)

241

212

15

205

231

202

214

3

Relapsing Fever

Cerebro-spinal fever

207

25

Typhus

Yellow Fever

Puerperal Fever

7

19

Rabies (human)

Rabies (animal)

1

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Smallpox,

106. Every year during the winter months this disease mani- fests in outbreaks which are sometimes epidemic and sometimes sporadic to disappear with the advent of summer.

107. Evidence collected by the League of Nations, Singapore Health Bureau, from countries in Asia extending from Baghdad on the west to Japan on the east shows that the season of greatest prevalence commences about November and declines about March to disappear during the next two months. What causes this disappearance is not clear. It cannot be temperature alone, for in Southern India and Ceylon and Malaya it is always hot. Humidity is probably the potent factor for the commence- ment of the hot weather often coincides with the commencement of the rainy season.

108. During the year 248 cases were reported of which 129 were notified through the Medical Officers in charge of Mortuaries, that is after death had occurred. The total number of deaths was 175. Allowing for a case death rate of 25 per cent for all ages in this well vaccinated Colony the real number of cases was 175 x 4 or 700. If this be the true figure then 64.5 per cent of the cases evaded discovery by the sanitary authorities and went through the various stages of this very infectious disease in one or other of the overcrowded tenement houses.

109. Of the 129 mortuary cases many were corpses dumped in the street at night and conveyed to the Mortuary next morn- ing by the Police. The total number of dumped bodies was 1,427 so that the claim that the chief cause of dumping is concealment of infectious cases for fear of the attention of the Sanitary Au- thorities cannot be substantiated. It is, however, true that fear of punishment for concealment is one cause of dumping.

110. That a child should not be vaccinated until it has passed its second Chinese New Year is a belief prevalent among the local people, and immediately after the New Year the dispensaries are crowded with mothers bringing their infants to be done. A child born just after New Year is thus two years of age before it is vaccinated. In spite of the law requiring children to be vaccinated within six weeks of birth many remain undone until the so-called propitious period, and thus there is always in the Colony sufficient suitable soil for the growth and develop- ment of the smallpox virus.

111. The concealment of cases, the dissemination of the virus by formites and contacts and the existence of a sufficiency of suitable soil explains the continuance of smallpox despite the number of vaccinations which are done yearly.

112. The total number vaccinated during the year under review was 279,420 as compared with 154,451 in 1931 and 244,789 in 1930.

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113. The number of cases treated in the Government In- fectious Diseases Hospital where Western methods only are prac- tised was 8 with 2 deaths. The case death rate was 25 per cent. The number of cases treated in the Tung Wah Infectious Dis- eases Hospital by Chinese methods was 77 with 44 deaths. The case death rate was 57 per cent.

114. During the last 21 years 288 cases were treated at the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital by western treatment with a death rate of 14.2 per cent. During the same period at the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital 1,249 cases were treated by Chinese herbalists methods with a death rate of 46.8 per cent.

These figures should convince any open minded person that the supposed superiority of Chinese treatment over Western treatment is a myth.

115. During the year immune calf serum was given to a number of patients at the Government Infectious Diseases ́ Hospital in the hope that it would favourably influence the course of the disease. In two severe cases the result appeared to be beneficial but the number of cases was not sufficient to draw definite conclusions.

116. The fear expressed by some of the Chinese that the withdrawal by the Sanitary Board of the privilege granted to the people of keeping the sick in their houses would result in increas- ed concealment has not been realized. On the contrary, the figures show a decrease.

Plague.

117. For the last three years no case of plague, human or rodent, has been reported in the Colony. The disease has dis- appeared from Hong Kong and the same may be said of South China. The rat population is much the same as it was and so far as we know there is no change in quantity or quality in the flea population. The sanitary conditions in Hong Kong are generally better than they were but in the majority of Chinese towns there is little change. We must accept the fact that the rise and fall in plague figures has not been satisfactorily explained. We know that plague is primarily a disease of rats communicated to man through the rat flea, but we have to admit that we know little of the reason for the rise and fall in the incidence of disease among rodents.

4

118. Many attempts have been made to show a relation be- tween meteorological conditions and plague prevalence. Otten of Java records that his findings with reference to meteorological conditions are just the opposite to the findings of observers in British India. The truth appears to be that though meteorologi- cal conditions do have a distinct bearing on the life histories of rats and fleas, the most important factor in the plague problem

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is the relation between the tissues of the rat and the bacillus pestis. Where the former offers a favourable medium for the growth of the latter and for enhancement of its virulence there plague flourishes; where the conditions are reversed there is a diminution in virulence and a corresponding decline in both in- cidence and death rates. But concerning the natural causes which have an influence on the resistance of the rat or the virulence of the plague organism little is known.

119. The value of a continuous anti-rat campaign lies in the carly information it affords of an epidemic and because of this rats are being regularly caught and examined.

120. In spite of the continuous campaign against them, owing to the rapidity with which they multiply and the ease with which they enter and leave the Colony, there still is and probably always will be a sufficiency of rats and rat fleas in the Colony to light up and maintain an epidemic if the Gods so will it.

Cerebro-Spinal Fever.

121. The discase appeared in the neighbouring Portuguese Colony of Macao early in March. It is supposed to have been introduced by refugees from North China. It soon assumed epidemic form there and during the two months the outbreak lasted there were 600 cases with a mortality of 58 per cent.

There were only 1 instances where two cases occurred in the same house and only one instance where there were four cases. Schools, hotels, colleges, and barracks were almost en- tirely unaffected and there was no case where infection spreadi from patient to those in attendance.

122. On 26th March news was received from Canton of a serious epidemic there.

123. Considering the extent of communication between Macao, Canton and Hong Kong and the overcrowded condition of the working class area here, fears were entertained of the possi- bility of widespread and serious epidemic. The Government infectious Diseases Hospital was, therefore, opened and arrange- ments made to meet any emergency.

124.

There was no epidemic properly speaking. On 31st March two cases were reported, and thereafter daily until about the middle of May cases were reported.

125. All cases were lumbar punctured and all received in- tradural injection of immune serum prepared from local strains of the meningococcus.

126. Altogether there were 61 cases and 26 deaths.

127. No house had more than one case and the disease never spread from cases to those in attendance.

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Cholera.

128. The pandemic of cholera in China in 1932, of which the outbreak in Hong Kong formed but a part, commenced towards the end of April in Shanghai. Subsequently cases appeared in other ports and inland towns until by the end of the summer there was scarcely a province which had not been visited by the disease. It is reckoned there were over 100,000 cases with a general death rate of some 50 per cent.

129. Canton reported the first sporadic case during the week ended 21st May and the number of cases steadily increased and in the week ending 18th June there were 333 cases reported with 152 deaths.

130. Because of the gravity of the situation in Canton and the imminent danger of importing infection into Hong Kong through the thousands coming daily by steamer and railway it was recommended that all passengers travelling by these routes should be inspected on arrival.

131. The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services visited Canton and conferred with the Municipal Commissioner of Health in an endeavour to ascertain the exact situation and with a view to an understanding whereby passengers from Canton to Hong Kong would be subjected to scrutiny before embarkation.

132. Quarantine against Canton being impracticable for the reasons given in paragraph 25 it was decided by Government that the river boats should not stop at the quarantine anchorage for examination of passengers but go straight to the wharf where it would be the duty of the health staff to examine the passengers and to take the necessary action to ensure the thorough cleansing of all passenger decks, kitchens and lavatories.

133. The Port Health staff was increased by the addition of one Chinese Medical Officer and one Chinese Sanitary Inspector, and a number of the Government Vaccinators were detailed for duty with it.

134. It was arranged that the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital should be placed at the disposal of the Medical Depart- ment and that all patients entering the Chinese Hospitals should be subject to examination by the Medical Superintendent, a Western trained doctor.

135. The two Infectious Diseases Hospitals which are sit- uated adjacent the one to the other were staffed and equipped, and an Intelligence Bureau was established to give the latest news of any case to any enquirer.

136. A daily medical conference of the principal medical officers concerned was organised so that there might be complete coordination and cooperation and prompt action taken to meet all requirements.

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137. An extra supply of cholera vaccine was manufactured and supplies sent to the various hospitals for free inoculations to any who wished to be done.

138. The first cases to be reported were those of two immig- rants who arrived from Canton on the 20th of June. Thereafter there were daily notifications.

The following table shows the course of the epidemic:-

Date.

Weeking ending June 26th.......

Cases.

9

July 3rd...

45

10th..

21

37

17th...

15

1

14th..

21

31st..

43

19

August 7th...

27

14th.

12

21st..

9

28th...

8

Septembr 4th..

7

27

11th...

18th..

4

4

The greatest number in any one day was 16 on the 28th of June.

139. Of the 241 cases notified 22 were reported as imported. There were altogether 156 deaths, giving a case death rate of 64.73 per cent.

140. Experience proved that the examination at the wharf of ships and passengers arriving from Canton could only be done in a very cursory manner. As soon as the vessels were alongside four gangways were put into position and each in less than a minute contained a crush of humanity hurrying to the shore and by the end of ten minutes 400 out of the 500 carried had passed from ship to shore and from wharf to street.

141. With regard to the night boats the situation was much worse owing to the large number of passengers carried, the un- satisfactory lighting and the increased confusion. Because of the lateness of the hour many passengers remained on board until morning. Some slept in cabins, some in chairs, while others made themselves as comfortable as they could lying on the decks or tucked away in the cargo.

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M

142. The staff worked hard and conscientiously in their en- deavours to perform the duties that had been imposed upon them, but the conditions were such that it was impossible to carry out the programme laid down. The passengers could not be properly inspected and the decks, lavatories and kitchens could not be properly made clean.

143. Scrutiny of passengers arriving by train was carried out effectually and without inconvenience to passengers by agents travelling on the trains.

144. The Infectious Diseases Hospitals together furnished accommodation for 100 patients and there was room in the grounds for the erection of matsheds should this arrangement have proved insufficient.

145. The Government nursing staff was supplemented by the addition of three Chinese nurses and three Chinese dressers lent by the Tung Wah Authorities.

146. A Chinese Medical Officer was posted to the hospitals as a resident house surgeon,

147. The original idea was to treat Europeans and better class Asiatics in the Government Hospital and the Chinese of the coolie class in the Tung Wah. A European Medical Officer was placed in charge of the former, and a Chinese Medical Officer in charge of the latter.

It was soon found that no sharp line of division could be maintained between the two institutions and that both had to be treated as parts of one whole, the staff distributing their attention where occasion demanded

148. The maximum number accommodated in the hospitals in any one day was forty-one so there was ample room.

149. Every effort was made to give the patients and their friends the impression that this was a place for recovery and not a gaol. Arrangements were made for friends to keep in touch with the patients. Enquiries could be made at any time either by telephone or by person and visitors were allowed under proper precautions.

150. Each case received careful individual attention and the treatment given was that recommended by Sir Leonard Rogers and other recognised authorities.

151.

Chinese Japanese European

Cases death date

Cases

Death

178

98

55.05 per cent

1

100.00

2

0

0.00

"

Total

181

99

54.69 per cent

11

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152. Most of the cases admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital were transfers from one or other of the Chinese Hospi- tals. Some were sent in by other hospitals and by private practi- tioners, but there were some who personally asked to be admitted.

153. There were no complaints by either patients or friends, all seeming to realize that everything possible was being done for their benefit.

154. The work done by the Bacteriological Institute was as follows:

Vaccine prepared

37,536 c.c.

Vaccine issued 17,221 c.c. of which 12,278 c.c. went to hospitals and institutions, 2,700 e.c to the Military, 3,533 was sold in the Colony and 1,400 to Macao.

The total number of Bacteriological tests made was 431, of which 174 were positive.

155. The Government staff, both preventive, investigative and curative worked well and cooperated to the fullest extent. Their duties which were often arduous and at times dangerous were carried out cheerfully and without a hitch.

156. The Tung Wah Hospitals, viz., the Tung Wah, the Kwong Wah, and the Tung Wah Eastern, cooperated fully. The Tung Wah nurses and dressers lent for duty at Kennedy Town showed themselves capable and willing.

157. The Police detailed for duty with the Port Health staff were of great assistance, especially in searching ships at night and in putting some semblance of order into the mass of humanity which swarmed on to the wharves on the arrival of the boats. They were also useful for the prompt transport of ambulance cases.



158. The Railway Authorities did all in their power to assist and cooperate with the Health Authorities to the fullest ex- tent.

159. Taking all circumstances into consideration one can only say Hong Kong was lucky to escape so lightly.

Enteric.

160. The number of cases reported was 202 as compared with 214 for the previous year. All the cases were sporadic and as is usual in such the source of infection could not be traced. There is no evidence that any case contracted the dis- ease through the public water supply.

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SECTION III.

HYGIENE AND SANITATION.

161. The Sanitary Department which is distinct from the Medical Department and over which the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services has no authority deals with the greater part of the sanitation of the Colony. The head of the department is an officer of the Civil Service whose title is Head of the Sanitary Department.

162. The staff under his administrative supervision in- cludes:-

(i) Two European and one Chinese Health Officers seconded

from the Medical Department.

(ii) Two Veterinary Surgeons.

(iii) Fifty-six European Sanitary Inspectors.

163. There are no Asiatic Sanitary Inspectors but there are a number of interpreters and a large staff of subordinates.

are:

164. Included among the responsibilities of this department

(a) the prevention or mitigation of epidemic, endemic, con-

tagious, or infectious disease in humans and animals. (b) the prevention of disease caused by mosquitoes. (c) measures for ensuring the purity and wholesomeness of

foods during their preparation, storage and sale.

(d) the control of abattoirs, markets, dairies and bakeries. (e) the control of eating houses.

() town cleansing, scavenging and collection of nightsoil. (g) the disposal of the dead.

165. For the purpose of sanitary administration by the Sani- tary Department, the Island and the Peninsula have been divided into local sanitary areas, each with a sanitary office, and these in turn have been sub-divided into Health Districts each in charge of a Sanitary Inspector.

166. The City of Victoria including the Peak is divided into four sanitary areas and seventeen health districts. The villages on the south side of the island are in charge of one Inspector. Kowloon Peninsula has three health areas and seven health dis- tricts. It is estimated that on an average each Inspector has to deal with a population of 25,000, a very high figure for a tropical city, and especially for one so overcrowded as Victoria.

}

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167. The Sanitary Department has no jurisdiction in any part of the New Territories with the exception of the urban area next to Kowloon and known as New Kowloon.

168. The following general review of work done and progress made in matters of sanitation is, so far as the Sanitary Depart- ment is concerned, based on facts supplied by the Medical Officer of Health. The Annual Report of the Sanitary Department is issued independently by the Head of the Sanitary Department.

Preventive Measures Against Mosquitoes and Insect Borne Diseases.

169. The only law on the subject is the following by-law inade under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which is administered by the Sanitary Department:

'When the larvae of mosquitoes are found on any premises the Board may on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health or any Assistant Medical Officer of Health give notice to the owner or occupier of such premises to remove all accumulations of water from such premises or to take steps to prevent the recur- rence of the breeding places of mosquitoes in any such accumula- tions of water and such owner or occupier shall comply with such notice forthwith.'

This by-law does not apply to the New Territories.

170. There are no special Sanitary Inspectors engaged in anti-mosquito work and the anti-mosquito brigade consists of two overseers and a squad of oiling coolies.

171. The routine work of inspection of premises for the presence of mosquito breeding was carried out by the district inspectors. Oiling of pools and destruction of mosquito breeding. places was carried out by the anti-mosquito gangs.

172. The usual cutting of undergrowth in May and October was done in connection with the Botanical and Forestry Depart- ment as regards Crown Lands and with the Military Authorities, on military lands.

173. The Malaria Bureau of the Medical Department contin- ued to function throughout the year. The work done included:

(a) General survey of the Colony and New Territories for the purpose of ascertaining what species of mosquitoes exist and the life history of each.

(b) Research regarding insect borne diseases to determine the insects hosts and the conditions influencing the spread of infection.

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(c) Special investigation in malarious districts with a view

to the eradication of disease.

(d) Local mosquito surveys for the abatement of mosquito

nuisances.

(e) Co-operation with Government Departments, the Mili- tary, Naval and Air Forces, Public Companies and private individuals with regard to the investigation and eradication of malaria.

The teaching of mosquitology.

A full account of the activities of the Bureau will be found in the Appendix.

174. The information so far collected indicates that the principal agents in the spread of malaria are Anopheles minimus and Anopheles Jeyporiensis which breed in small pools and col lections of spring water subject to the influence of light and usually situated in areas which are hilly or undulating. Water in contact with newly opened earth in these regions is especially dangerous.

175. Jungle bush and undergrowth in so far as they provide shade to pools and collections of spring water, hinder rather than promote the spread of malaria.

176. The Public Works Department carry out all anti-malaria works on Crown Lands other than oiling. Each year a sum is inserted for the 'training of nullahs' and each year work to the limit of the sum sanctioned is carried out. There can be no doubt that the disappearance of malaria from the populated areas is to a large measure due to the excellent drainage works carried out by this department.

177. The Public Works Department and the Malaria Bureau co-operated to the fullest extent.

Preventive Measures against Plague.

178. In the campaign against plague the routine measures which have been in vogue since the disease was at its height were continued. They were :—

(a) Periodical cleansing of premises.

(b) Abolition of rat refuges such as ceiling, stair linings

and panellings.

(c) Destruction of rats.

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179. In the crowded areas where the houses are packed with humans and their belongings, the periodical cleansing of premises is a most important factor in the prevention of the spread of this disease. All the furniture, moveable fittings and household goods are removed from the rooms and cubicles and all floors and wood- work washed down with an emulsion of soap and kerosene oil. This is done either by the Sanitary staff or by the occupiers under the general supervision of the district inspector in addition ac- cummulated rubbish of all kinds is cleared away and the premises thoroughly searched for rat-holes. Altogether 211,657 floors were dealt with during the year.

180. Thirty members of the cleansing staff were employed in secting traps, bird liming boards, distributing barium carbonate baits, and collecting rodents which had been taken living or dead. By far the greatest number of rats were taken dead from the numerous rat reception bins or tins which are placed in con- venient situations throughout the two cities. The Chinese take exception to the rats being found on their premises by the Sani- tary staff, probably through fear of extra sanitary measures being taken against them, and it is not uncommon for them to kill the rodents found in the Government traps and to throw the carcases into the reception bins. The total number of rats collected was 174,239 of which 12,792 only were taken alive. All rats collected were sent to the Public Mortuaries for examination by the Medi- cal Officer in charge.

181. During the year no rats were found to be plague in- fected.

Preventive Measures Against Smallpox.

182. Under the Vaccination Ordinance all Public Vaccina- tors are under the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services who is Superintendent of Vaccination. As Registrar of Births. and Deaths the Director is responsible for ensuring the vaccina- tion of all children whose births are registered.

183. During the year 279,420 persons or nearly one third of the total population were vaccinated.

The following table shows the principal bodies engaged in vaccinating and the number of operations performed by each.

The Public Vaccinators

51,054

The Government Hospitals

2.997

The Chinese Public Dispensaries

37.875

The St. John Ambulance Brigade

187,494

Total

.279,420

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184. From the above it will be seen that the St. John Ambulance Brigade and the Chinese Public Dispensaries render- ed most valuable assistance in the attempt to control smallpox by vaccination.

185. Apart from vaccination little was done to prevent the spread of smallpox. At a maximum not more than 25 per cent of the cases were discovered during life and of these the great majority entered the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital where they were treated by herbalists and where the precautions against dissemination were far from satisfactory.

Preventive Measures against Cholera, Dysentery. Enteric, etc.

186. The measures which may be taken to prevent the spread of bowel diseases are those which prevent dissemination by water, by food and by flies. The Hong Kong public water though subject to certain risks of contamination at some of its several sources, is filtered and chlorinated and when it reaches the consumer it is of a high grade of purity.

187 The measures taken to preserve the wholesomeness of foods for sale and under preparation for sale are still far from satisfactory.

188. With regard to flies Hong Kong is comparatively free from these pests; the same cannot be said for New Kowloon within a mile of the refuse dump.

Preventive Measures against Tuberculosis.

189. The measures taken against Tuberculosis were:

(a) The periodical general cleansing of premises.

(b) Action to prevent the erection of unauthorised cubicles especially those which have defects in the matter of lighting, air space and ventilation.

(c) Action by the Building Authority to ensure the erection

of houses having a proper supply of lighting and ven tilation.

190. The overcrowded condition of the City of Victoria, its confined area, the difficulties presented by topographical features, and the absence of accommodation for evicted tenants make the question of hygienic housing of the populace one of extreme difficulty. The sanitary staff are working against great odds and they cannot hope to attain results such as are attained in other cities where the task is easier and the personnel larger. The wonder is not that so many contract tuberculosis but that so many escape.

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Preventive Measures against Helminthic Diseases.

191. With the exception of the action taken by the Veteri- nary staff at the Abattoirs there never has been any routine campaign against helminthic disease. Whatever be the percent- age of the population carrying ankylostomes very few cases of ankylostomiasis

come under the notice of the hospital authorities.

General Measures of Sanitation.

Domestic Cleanliness.

192. Every domestic building or part of a building occupied by the members of more than one family must, unless especially exempted by the Sanitary Board, be cleansed and limewashed throughout by the owner, to the satisfaction of the Board, not Jess than once in every year, and notice in writing that such cleansing and liwewashing has been completed shall be sent by the owner to the Secretary within three days after the date of completion.

193. It is the duty of the occupier of any domestic building to cause such building to be kept in a cleanly and wholesome condition and to see that the drains, traps, gratings, fall pipes, and sanitary fittings and appliances, are free from obstruction and in an efficient state of repair.

194. In Hong Kong there are 13,588 Chinese houses with 46,189 floors; in Kowloon there are 9,950 houses and 28,926 floors During the year 134.424 floors in Hong Kong and 77,243 floors in Kowloon were cleansed. During the cleansing process all the furniture is moved and the walls and floors washed down with kerosene ol emolusion.

195. Considering that cach inspector has to supervise a dis- trict with approximately 25,000 inhabitants, most of whom are ignorant of the rudiments of sanitation, the thoroughness of the cleansing operations is remarkable.

Scavenging.

196. Scavenging is carried out departmentally. There are twenty-one refuse lorries in use, fourteen being for Hong Kong and eight for Kowloon. 370 tons of refuse was collected daily and removed to the various refuse depots. The bulk of the refuse was ultimately disposed of by dumping in the sea at a distance from the city and in such a situation where the currents run in a direction away from the island. Some of the refuse from Kowloon was used to reclaim low-lying land near the sea-shore.

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Conservancy and Sewerage Disposal.

197. The collection and disposal of night-soil in the Colony is carried out partly by the bucket system and partly by water carriage. With regard to the bucket system arrangements are made with a contractor for the removal and disposal of excrement under conditions laid down by the Sanitary Board.

198. The excrement is removed by night from the latrines to a special fleet of junks which convey it up river to China where it is utilised as manure for the mulberry trees on which the silk worms feed.

199. Owing to the limitations of the water supply on the Island and the need for economy in the matter of consumption. it is necessary to restrict the number of water closets served by the public mains.

200. Where a sufficiency of water can be obtained from other sources, such as wells or streams, and the conditions other- wise are suitable, water closets are allowed. With regard to effluents, some enter the public sewers direct, some pass to biological tank systems to be treated before final discharge.

Drainage.

201. Drainage both surface and subsoil is controlled by the Public Works Department. $532,000 was entered in the 1932 Estimates for a programme which included drainage, training of nullahs and sewerage.

Water Supplies.

202. The water supplies of Hong Kong and Kowloon are in charge of the Water Works Branch of the Public Works De- partment.

203. All the water is surface water and most of it is collected from catchment areas which are free from ordinary risks of pollution. The water, after storage for a longer or shorter period in impounding reservoirs, is filtered in some cases by slowsand filters, in others by the rapid system, and finally it is chlorinated.

204. Routine examinations are carried out by the Govern- ment Bacteriologist and Government Analyst and the results furnished to the Water Authority. The results show that the water as supplied to the consumer is of excellent quality.

Clearance of Bush and Undergrowth.

205. Generally speaking in Hong Kong and the New Terri- tories bush and undergrowth is little in evidence except in those places where it has been planted and conserved. Routine cutting of superfluous undergrowth is carried out in May and October.

:

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Sanitary Inspections.

206. On the staff of the Sanitary Department there are 56 European Sanitary Inspectors but there are no Asiatic Inspectors and there are neither Health Visitors nor Public Health Nurses. Each Sanitary Inspector has for supervision a district with ap- proximately 25,000 inhabitants most of whom are ignorant of the very rudiments of sanitation. Under their supervision come tenement houses, lodging houses, places of common assembly, eating houses, bakeries, dairies, markets, laundries, etc., etc. it is physically impossible for these men to carry out the number of inspections necessary to ensure a proper standard of sanitation and much that should be done must necessarily be left undone. Work in connection with the routine cleansing of houses takes up much of the time of the Inspectors and there is little left for other necessary action.

207. Except in the matter of house cleansing matters are not satisfactory.

Common Lodging Houses.

208. Boarding Houses which include every place where any person is harboured or lodged for any kind whatsoever of hire or reward and where any domestic service whatsoever is rendered by the owner, lessee, principal tenant, occupier, or master to the person so harboured or lodged, but which do not include any boarding-house for non-Chinese, seamen within the meaning of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, are licensed and controlled by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under the Boarding House Ordinance.

209. They include hotels, common lodging houses, places where employers lodge their employees and the premises of socie ties within the meaning of the Societies Ordinance, where persons pass the night.

210. Under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance Common Lodging House' includes any house or part thereof or other permanent structure where male persons of the labouring, artizan or mechanical classes, not being members of the same family, to the number of ten persons or upwards are housed, but does not include a house or other permanent structure where- shopmen or domestic servants are housed by their employers.

211. Under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance the Sanitary Board is given power to make by-laws for the licensing, regulation and sanitary maintenance of Common Lodging Houses.

212. Sixteen by-laws have been made under this Ordinance one of which passes the power of registering the houses and licensing the keepers to the Secretary of Chinese Affairs.

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213. In practice the Sanitary Department report on the con- dition of the house and if declared sanitary the Secretary of Chinese Affairs, if he be satisfied, registers it and licenses the keeper.

214. As mentioned above Boarding House include a Common Lodging House. Over 700 Chinese Boarding House licences have been issued by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. They vary in class from 3rd class lodging houses to 1st class hotels.

School Hygiene.

215. According to the Census the number of persons between five and fifteen years of age was 141,709. The number of schools under inspection by the Education Department was 1,063 and the number of school children 57,301.

216. The School Inspection Branch of the Medical Depart- ment consists of: ----

Lady Medical Officer

1

School Nurses

> }

,

"

21

12

Chinese Medical Officer

217. Class of School.

Government Schools (English)

(Vernacular) 4

Grant in aid Schools (English) 12)

(Vernacular) 4302 Subsidised Schools (Vernacular) 296) Unaided Schools (English)

(Vernacular)

1

3

No.

No. of Pupils on roll.

16)

=

20

5,245

24,498

1201

27,558

617

Total

..1,059

57,301

1932

1931

218. Schools inspected

17

21

Entrants examined

.1,078

1,525

Defects found

581

706

Per cent defects in British Schools.... 35.7 Per cent defects in Anglo-Chinese

46.4

Schools

53.9

46.9

Reinspection of Children found to be defective.

Class of School. Year. reinspected. improved. improved.

No.

No.

British

.1932

121

47

Percentage 38.8 per cent.

.1931

140

65

46.4 27

""

Anglo-Chinese ....1932

943

519

55.03

91

......1931

1,354

633

46.07

,,

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219. In Hong Kong as elsewhere the School Medical Officers found their work greatly handicapped by the absence of school clinics where those who could not afford the services of a private practitioner and who required treatment could receive the neces- sary attention. Cards to hospitals and Chinese Public Dispen- saries did not meet the case. The children either did not attend or if they did attend refrained from making a second visit. The reasons for failure to take advantage of the opportunity of obtain- ing free advice and treatment are several. The natural dis-

inclination of the ordinary child to go alone to a hospital or dis- pensary, the lack of sympathy shown by the average Hospital subordinate unless tipped, the time taken up in transport and waiting for one's turn to be seen are all factors which tend to make the practice of treatment of school children at hospitals and Chinese Public Dispensaries a failure.

220. To have any chance of success the child must be treated in a clinic, conveniently situated, by the doctor and the nurse whom he knows and in whom he has confidence.

221. It was this situation which stimulated the school medi. cal officer to move for the creation of school clinics.

In Sept. ember 1931 a small room at the Ellis Kadorie School in the centre of the City of Victoria was fitted up as a minor ailment clinic. The use of the clinic was open to scholars from any school but it was soon found that, as a rule, it was attended only by those from schools within a comparatively short radius. Time and expense of transport prevented its use by those further afield. lt was no use at all to Kowloon. In October 1932 the second clinic was started at Yaumati School in Kowloon.

222. The paucity of the Medical Staff prevented full use being made of the clinics. The Ellis Kadoorie Clinic was open two mornings a week for any case attending; on Tuesday after- noons it was reserved for chest cases, and on Friday afternoons for ear cases. The Yaumati Clinic was open on Thursday after- noons only.

223. Altogether 1,286 examinations or treatments have been given at Ellis Kadoorie and 195 at Yaumati. The Clinic entailed an increase in the number of cases to be visited by nurses.

224. The largest percentage of defect is that of vision. Vision is tested on entry to school and in Class 5. Among en- trants 1,037 have been tested, of which 20 per cent showed slight defects and 13 per cent serious defects. In Class 5 there were 477 examined with 16 per cent slight and 12 per cent serious defects. Among scholarship holders there were 11.26 per cent of serious defects.

...

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Country schools show less bad vision, there being only 4.2 per cent of bad vision in several schools.

225. So far tests have only been made in Government Schools but it is believed that matters are no better in the vernacular schools.

226. The children are sent to an oculist and supplied with glasses. Up to October the number seen was 205, and glasses supplied in 265 cases.

227. With regard to other defects free treatment was offered at the school clinics, at the Government Hospitals and at the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

228. A large proportion of the Chinese children inspected required some dental treatment. There being no school dentist notices were issued to parents to take their children to private practitioners. A Government School Dentist is very much needed.

229. Arrangements have been made whereby children suffer- ing from adenoids and enlarged tonsils can receive operative treatment at the Government Hospitals.

230. With regard to home visiting the nurses paid 442 visits to the homes of 150 cases.

The nurses also take the children to hospital for X-ray ex- amination and for the first time of special treatments. This has been found to ensure better attendance and less fright on the part of both child and relatives.

Home conditions are usually found to be unhealthy, ignorance being often more of a drawback to healthy living than poverty, but there is much overcrowding.

231. With regard to infectious diseases the Medical Officer of Health notifies the School Medical Officer of any school cases reported to him and vice versa. According to the School Medical Officer most of the cases in British Schools are reported but only one tenth of those in other schools. When we have sufficient home visitors to educate the mothers as to the importance of the subject we will get notification but not before.

232. Respecting school premises and equipment all Govern- ment Schools were inspected and reports made. Considerable improvements were effected.

233. The Central British School and the Kowloon Junior School were too crowded. New premises are badly needed for the British children.

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234. Most of the subsidised schools and unaided schools, numbering altogether over 1,000, have not been visited owing to lack of staff. The majority of them consist of one or more rooms in an old or newer tenement house with inadequate closet accommodation. As a rule, the teachers welcome inspection and advice.

235. A most important part of the work done by this branch. was the teaching of hygiene. Lectures were given to Vernacular teachers.

236. Hygiene is a compulsory subject for English teachers and courses in this subject have been established at the Educa- t'on Department's Technical Institute.

237. During Empire Health Week a health exhibition was staged in the Hall at Ellis Kadoorie School and was well attended.

238. The School Medical Officer has established at head- quarters the beginnings of a health museum where are to be found posters, leaflets, pamphlets, lantern slides, etc., etc.

Labour Conditions.

239. There are no estates, plantations or mines and com- paratively few large factories. The majority of the urban labour- ing classes are engaged in matters connected with commerce. shipping or public works and the bulk of the remainder find em- ployment in shops or workshops or independent businesses. There is no need for recruitment of labour, the supply being sufficient to satisfy all demands.

240. Labourers find their own accommodation in the many tenements and lodging houses which exist in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

241. The Factories and Workshops Ordinance contains sec tions bearing on the health of factory workers. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance also contains sections bearing on the health of factory workers.

242. Ordinarily there are no special arrangements for the medical care of labourers other than the Government Hospitals, the Chinese Hospitals, the Chinese Dispensaries and the Mission Hospitals. The total number of third class beds in these in- stitutions available for general diseases are about 1,000 or 1 to 750 approximately.

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Anti-

243. Special arrangements have been made for the care of the labourers who will be engaged in the Shing Mun Water Works Scheme which will be in full swing next year. malaria precautions will be taken and hospital accommodation and medical supervision will be provided. The Medical Depart- ment will work in cooperation with the Engineering Authorities.

Housing and Town Planning.

244. There is no Town Planning Ordinance and Housing comes under that portion of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which is administered by the Public Works Depart- ment. There is little or no zoning in the older parts of Victoria and blacksmiths shops or even foundries are to be found in the midst of shop houses and domestic houses. The new reclamation in Victoria known as the Praya East has been laid out on modern lines with wide streets and backlanes. The greater part of Kowloon and New Kowloon has been planned on up to date principles. The zones recommended by the Town Planning Committee of 1923 are being adopted.

245. The following list shows some of the work done during the year by, or under the supervision of the Sanitary Depart- ment (items 1-4) and the building branch of the Public Works Department (items 4 to 8).

Nature of work.

1. Obstructions removed from open spaces........

No. of cases.

1931.

1932.

305

472

2. Obstructions to light and ventilation removed. 814

617

3. Rat holes stopped

..1,026

796

4. Water closets installed in private buildings...4,842

1,121

5. Houses demolished (domestic)

155

257

6. Houses demolished (non-domestic)

16

7. Houses erected (domestic)

.1.258

1,240

8. Houses erected (non-domestic)

21

25

246. The City of Victoria for the area it occupies is over housed and grossly over-populated. In certain districts a grea deal of improvement has been brought about but in some 201 acres where there are approximately 1,000 persons to the nere sanitary conditions are very bad indeed.

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247. The position as regards housing in Victoria has been explained in the introduction to this report. The situation is at the same time a sanitary problem, a social problem and an economic problem. Victoria is the centre of attraction for the stream of immigrants from China most of whom are poor people who live from hand to mouth. Accommodation is limited but the people must find shelter somewhere. A cubicle rents for ten dollars per month, a bed in the passage costs three to four dollars, food costs at least six dollars and the average earnings of a coolie do not exceed twenty dollars.

248. There is no space to build further houses and demolition means an increase of concentration in the houses that remain

249. One hopeful sign is that the people are being more and more attracted by Kowloon, Praya East and North Point where concentration is much less marked and where there is room for extension.

250. The following plan shows the dimensions of the model type of house designed by the Public Works Department. Provided there be sufficient space in front and behind in the way of street and back lane and provided the occupants keep the building clean and free from obstruction to light and ventilation there is no reason why they should not live a healthy life.

8

C

83/4

B

7/28

M 58

·6-

-17-0--

PLAN OF A FLOOR IN A NEW HOUSE

WITH CUBICLES

SCALE 1"=8FT,

M 59

FOOD IN RELATION TO HEALTH AND DISEASES.

Inspection and Control of Food Supplies.

251. The laws dealing with this subject are the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordin- ance both of which are administered by the Sanitary Department Stall-holders and hawkers who come under the Licensing Ordin- ance 1887 are licensed by the Police.

252. During the year the following samples were taken under the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance and subjected to analy- sis:-Milk 55, Butter 13, Lard 5, Sugar 2, Tea 6, Honey 1, Bread 27, Arrowroot 8.

One sample of tea and three samples of milk were below standard.

253. The following foodstuffs were seized under Section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance :---

Apricot jam 2,236 lbs. plum jam 1,413 lbs.; blackcurrant jam 624 lbs.; strawberry jam 5,650 lbs.; gooseberry jam 349 lbs. ; blackberry jam 186 lbs.; raspberry and apple jam 265 lbs.; flour

sacks; dry shrimps 1 bag; dates 1 case; fruit 2 baskets; tinned fish 15 cases; canned peas 200 cases; and various fruits 81 cases.

Markets, Slaughter Houses and Dairies.

254. Markets. The markets come under the Sanitary De- partment. There is urgent need for larger and better markets in the City of Victoria.

255. Slaughter Houses.--Siaughter houses and animal depots. are controlled by the Veterinary Branch of the Sanitary Depart- ment. There is a Government depot at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) for the reception of all cattle, sheep, swine and goats brought into the Colony for slaughter. The Government abattoirs are situated at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) and at Ma Tau Kok (Kowloon). There are Government controlled slaughter houses at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho.

256. Dairies.-There are a number of dairies in the Colony all of which are licensed by the Sanitary Board. On the south side of the Island there is a model dairy where milk is produced by stall fed cattle.

M 60

Deficiency Diseases.

257. The only information available regarding deficiency diseases is furnished by the death returns and returns of diseases furnished by the Government Hospitals and Chinese Hospitals. The hospitals deal with only a small proportion of the sick and the whole truth regarding the incidence of disease among the masses cannot be deduced from their figures. The death returns also are misleading in that the majority of cases were not treated by competent physicians prior to death and the Medical Officer examining a body in the mortuary, had no history to assist him in coming to a conclusion as to the cause of death.

258.

Beri-Beri. Polished rice is the staple food of the masses yet beri-beri is not epidemic and the deaths from this disease formed only 2.43 per cent of the total deaths. The total number of deaths recorded was 483 and the death rate per mille population 0.59. The total number treated in the Government Hospitals for this disease was 39, those treated in the Chinese Hospitals numbered 1,416.

259. Rickets.-No cases of rickets were admitted to either The Government or the Chinese Hospitals.

260. Scurvy.-No cases came to the notice of the Medical Authorities.

Measures taken to spread the knowledge of Hygiene and Sanitation.

261. The measures taken to spread the knowledge of Hygiene and Sanitation among the populace of Hong Kong have up to date been sporadic and patchy. Every year during 'health week' the Y.M.C.A. arranges for a series of lectures to be given. The St. John Ambulance Brigade from time to time spread the gospel concerning some particular subject. A number of the schools teach elementary bygiene. The Chinese Public Dispensaries arrange periodically for popular lectures to be given by their medical officers. The 'Schools' branch of the Medical Depart- ment have a small demonstration centre and the school medical officers and nurses give lectures and demonstrations. At the Infant Welfare Centre endeavours are made to instruct the mothers who attend.

262. Health instruction to serve any useful purpose must arouse and retain the interest of those for whom it is intended. With regard to the masses little of practical value can be accom- plished without the active assistance of the mothers of the families, and the quickest and surest way of obtaining the con- fidence of the mothers is through health centres where free medical advice and treatment form the primary attraction and

M 61

where the mothers make the acquaintance of tactful and sym pathetic skilled nurses who also act as home visitors. The second best means of influencing the mother is through the school clinic where her children are medically examined by the doctor and school nurse and where opportunity is taken to add propaganda tc advice.

263. At present the only Public Health Centres are the Chinese Public Dispensaries and the Government Infant Welfare Centre in Wanchai, there are no public health nurses or health visitors.

With regard to school medical work there are only two medical officers and three nurses for nearly 70,000 school children.

Training of Sanitary Personnel.

264. The Medical Officers of Health hold classes and give lectures. Courses in chemistry, physics and sanitary engineering were held at the Technical Institute of the Education Depart- ment. It is hoped in the coming year to arrange for classes in Biology at the Bacteriological Institute and Mosquitology at the Malaria Bureau.

265. Hong Kong is an examining centre for the Royal Sani- tary Institute and every year examinations are held for the Sani tary Inspectors Certificate and the Sanitary Science Certificate. Candidates come from Shanghai to take these examinations The results of the last test were very satisfactory.

M 62

SECTION IV.

PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINISTRATION.

GENERAL

266. Reckoned in terms of shipping tonnage, Hong Kong is one of the five greatest ports of the world. It is the principal commercial entrepot of Southern China and it is the terminus of steamship lines running between China, Japan, and North America.

267. In 1932, 5,014 British ocean-going steamers and 6,475 foreign ocean-going steamers entered and cleared the harbour. In addition there entered and cleared 11,017 river steamers, 7,294 launches, and 22,559 foreign trade junks. The total tonnage of vessels entering and clearing was 41,794,005.

268. The Medical Staff engaged in Port Health duties con- sists of two European Health Officers and two Chinese Medical Officers.

269. The work of the department includes:—

(a) Routine inspection of ships.

(b) Quarantine duty.

(c) Duty in connection with emigration.

(d) Vaccination.

270. The laws dealing with the subject of Quarantine and Port Health are contained in Table L of the Hong Kong Port Regulations, the Asiatic Emigration Ordinance and the Vaccina- tion Ordinance.

271. During the year 5,752 inward bound ocean-going vessels were boarded by the Health Officers. Of these 2,510 were on

the British register and 3,242 on the foreign register.

272. River steamers from Canton, Macao and West River Ports, also junks and small crafts were only visited when cases of sickness or death were reported.

273. During the year 316 special visits were made to ships for the purpose of examining persons suffering from infectious but non-quarantine diseases. 67 permits for the landing of corpses for burial were granted and 26 bodies were sent to the mortuary for post-mortem examination. 11 cases of leprosy were detected amongst Chinese passengers. 24 Chinese, 3 European and 1 Japanese lunatics arrived in the Colony during the year. Bills of Health numbering 1,943 were issued.

274. The number of vessels arriving in Quarantine was 1,215 with 183,055 passengers and crew personsel of 130,007. These figures show great increases over those for 1930 and 1931 and constitute a new record. All were examined and the passengers and crews of those vessels arriving from smallpox infected ports were vaccinated.

M 63

275. Excluding arrivals from Canton the total number of persons medically inspected during 1932 was 430,482 or an average of 1,179 examinations per day.

276. One hundred and two vessels were fumigated during the year. Fumigations are carried out by a private company but each operation is supervised by a Health Officer..

EMIGRATION,

277. The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915 re- quires that emigrant ships shall have:-

(1) Proper and sufficient living accommodation.

(2) Proper and sufficient sanitary requirements.

(3) Proper and sufficient hospital accommodation.

(4) A sufficient supply of drugs, medical equipment and

disinfectants.

278. It also makes provision for :-

(1) A proper diet scale.

(2) The prevention of the export of the unfit.

(3) The prevention of the export of infectious disease.

279. The Vaccination Ordinance 1923 requires that all emig. rants from the Colony shall be protected against smallpox by vaccination.

280. The duty of carrying out the sanitary and medical in- spection and for vaccinating those who are insufficiently protected falls on the Port Health Authorities.

281. Emigrants are classified as:-

(a) 'Free emigrants' or those who pay their own passages. (b) Assisted emigrants or those whose passages are paid

by their prospective employers.

(c) Women and children.

282. The total number of emigrants examined during the vear was 62,563 of whom 60,973 were free and 1,590 assisted. The number of rejections was 120.

283. Owing to the continued trade depression in Malava, the Government of that country further restricted the number of Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong and China. This restriction contributed largely to the reduction of total emigrants for the year to 62.563. This figure shows a very marked decrease in numbers of emigrants compared with 105,727 for 1931, 193,209 for 1930, 235,554 for 1929 and 288,745 for 1927.

VACCINATION.

284. The Government Vaccinators are members of the Port Health staff and work under the general supervision of the Port Health Officer. They are detailed for work at various centres and they assist where needed.

285. The number of vaccinations performed by three Officers at the centres was 51,054 of which 3,574 were emigrants.

M 64

Table I.

SHOWING EMIGRANTS PASSES AND REJECTIONS FOR 1932.

Port of Destination.

Passenger.

Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements

19,216

2,325

24

Canada

3,694

14,824

18

United States of America...

3,650

7,246

18

Honolulu

909

7

Dutch East Indies

22,070

10,909

19

British North Borneo

1,424

2,631

5

Shanghai and Japan....

6,748

I

Australia

659

2,277

13

South Sea Islands..

698

83

4

Manila

India

2,520

9,750

7

Pauama

344

2,588

2

Mauritius

472

76

Reunion

73

315

South Africa...

3

149

Havana....

37

1,655

Total

62,563

54,798

120

Table II.

SHOWING MONTHLY RETURNS OF EMIGRANTS, CREWS AND

REJECTIONS.

Month.

Ships Examined.

Pas-

sengers.

Crews. Rejected,

January

20

4,881

3,613

7

February

13

1,503

2,809

3

March

27

8,439

5.356

April....

34

8,888

5,571

19

May

23

6,402

4,119

9

June

25

5.289

4,119

9

July

24

5,295

+,790

19

August

28

3.895

4,798

4

September..

23

4,341

4,248

I 2

October..

26

5,436

4,951

8

November.

28

4.110

4,992

December

26

4,084

5,106

10 10

5

5

Total....

297

62,563

54.798

120

:

M 65

Table III.

SHOWING CAUSES OF REJECTION OF EMIGRANTS.

Diseases.

Skin Diseases:

Scabies

Tinea

No. Rejected.

19

1

1

Impetigo

Eye Diesases:

Trachoma

Infectious Diseases :-

Smallpox

Chicken-pox

Leprosy

Measles

Mumps

Phthisis

Fever

Beri-Beri

Syphilis

Scalp wound

Abscess

Catarrhal Jaundice

Fracture of humerus

Total

Table IV.

46

1

1

3

2

1

1

34

1

3

1

3

1.

1

120

Showing the number of ships detained in Quarantine with Ports of origin, causes, dates and periods of detention.

Name of Vessel.

From which Port.

Date of arrival in

Cause. Cases.

Quar- antine.

Date of departure from Quar-

antine.

Hai Ning

Foochow

Smallpox

1

31.1.32

31.1.32

Solviken

Pakhoi

do.

do.

do.

Tjisadane

A moy

do.

do.

1.2.32

Seistan

Saigon

do.

21.2.32

21.2.32

Sirdhana

Shanghai

do.

22.2.32

22.2.32

Tilawa

do.

do.

5.3.32

6.3.32

Tjisadane

do.

do.

14.3.32

14.3.32

do.

do.

Cholera

14.6.32

15.6.32

Kwong Tuug

Canton

Smallpox

29.6.32

30.6.32

Venezia

Macao

Cholera

18.7.32

20.7.32

Hikawa Maru

Shanghai

do.

25.7.32

25.7.32

Protesilaus

Yu Sang

do.

do.

24.7.32

25.7.32

Swatow

do.

4.8.32

4.8.32

M 66

Table V.

Showing the number of passengers, arriving in Quarantine each month, 1932.

crews

Mouth.

No. of Passengers.

and ships

No. of Crews.

No. of Ships.

January

12,957

12,009

99

February

26,167

12,681

118

March

34,241

19,916

160

April

18,060

14,716

132

May

7.710

4,523

45

June

7,446

8,150

64

July

16,912

15,384

141

August

23,371

19,581

203

September

24,396

18,076

172

October

11,795

7.971

81

November

December

Total

183,055

I 30,007

1,215

Table VI.

SHOWING QUARANTINE NOTIFICATIONS ISSUED BY THE HONG KONG

GOVERNMENT FOR 1932.

Port or Locality.

Disease.

Date of Notifica- tion.

Date of cancella-

tion.

Amoy

Smallpox

Dec. 17th 1931.

April 5th.

Shanghai

"}

Pakhoi

Jan. 8th 1932. Jan. 22nd 1932,

Sourabaya..

Saigon

Osaka

Shanghai

Cholera

Swatow

Amoy

"}

Tientsin

Newchwang

Wuchow..

Dairen

Hoihow

"

Foochow

Plague Smallpox Feb. 2nd 1932. May 17th 1932. June 8th 1932. July 5th 1932. July 7th 1932. July 6th 1932. July 18th 1932. Aug. 2nd 1932. Aug. 18th 1932. Sept. 3rd 1932. Sept. 2nd 1932.

Jan. 27th 1932.

"

::

91

May 27th.

June 2nd. October 12th. October 5th. October 26th. October 20th. October 22nd. August 24th. October 21st. September 26th.

October 28th.

May 6th. May 11th. February 11th.

J

286.

M 67

SECTION V.

MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL ACCOMMODATION.

Hospital.

Authority in control.

Beds.

Government Civil

Government Medical Dept.

21

Victoria

Do.

Do.

32

;

Peak

Do.

Do.

1

Tsan Yuk

Chinese Committee.

47

Wanchai

Do.

31

Tung Wah

De.

24

Tung Wah Eastern .....

Do.

18

Kwong Wah

Do.

59

Alice Memorial

London Mission.

14

St. Paul's

French Mission.

9

Canossa

Italian Mission.

1

Matilda

Board of Trustees.

8

War Memorial

Do.

6

Yeung Wo

Yeung Wo Directors.

6

Total.......

277

The maternity hospitals will be described under Section VI.

M 68

287. During the year in the New Territories three sma!! lying-in hospitals were established by benevolent bodies. In the Northern District the New Territories Medical Benevolent Asso- ciation opened a hospital in the village of Tsun Wan and the St. John Ambulance Brigade one in the Village of Kam Tin. In the Southern District the St. John Ambulance Brigade opened a ward at Cheung Chau.

MIDWIVES.

288. Under the Midwives Ordinance of 1910 'No one whose name is not on the Midwives Register inay practise midwifery habitually for gain or describe herself as one especially qualified to carry on the work of a midwife.'

289. Training Schools for Midwives have been established at the Alice Memorial, Tsan Yuk, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern. Kwong Wah and Government Civil Hospitals.

290. The course of training is as follows:

(a) for those who have less than two years general train- ing two years at a Maternity Hospital recognised as such by the Board.

(b) for those who have had two years training in general nursing one year at a recognised maternity hospital. (c) for those who have had four years training in general nursing six months at a recognised maternity hospital.

291. During 1932 thirty-six candidates satisfied the examin- ers and were registered.

292. The total number on the Midwives Register at the end of 1932 was 248 (211 in 1931).

293. There are seven midwives on the Government Medical Establishment whose services are free to those who cannot afford to pay a fee.

Three of these were detailed for duty in connection with the Chinese Public Dispensaries and four for duty in the New Territories. Of the four one was stationed at Tsun Wan, one at Un Long, one at Taipo and one at Cheung Chau.

294. During the year 1,296 cases were attended by Govern- ment midwives. The number in 1931 was 1,420. One of the reasons for the decline in number was the activities of the St. John Ambulance Brigade and the New Territories Medical Benevolent Association who stationed other midwives in the same villages.

295. Because of the Benevolent. Societies centre at Tsun Wan the Government midwife was withdrawn and transferred to the remote fishing village of Tai O.

are:

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ANTE-NATAL AND INFANT WELFARE CENTRES.

296. The ante-natal and infant welfare centres in the Colony

The Government Infant Welfare Centre, Wanchai.

The Tung Wah Hospital Centre.

The Tsan Yuk Hospital Centre.

The Alice Memorial Hospital Centre.

The Military Centre.

THE GOVERNMENT INFANT WELFARE CENTRE.

297. This centre which is the first established by Govern- ment occupies the ground floors of two adjacent shop houses which were rented for the purpose. It is situated at eastern end of Victoria in the area lately reclaimed from the sea in the district of Wanchai.

the

298. The premises consist of a waiting room communicating by a door in the party wall with the demonstration room, front part of the latter being partitioned off to form a small con- sulting room, the remaining small rooms comprise the crêche, the dispensary and the amah's quarters.

299. The staff consists of one Lady Medical Officer, one Chinese nurse, one interpreter, one dispenser and one amah. In addition the centre has had valuable assistance from a number of voluntary workers whose help has been greatly appreciated.

300. The Centre was opened to the public on Monday, the 25th of April. From its inception the attendances increased daily. The following table shows the monthly attendance figures.

Total attendance

Daily average

April (one week)

23

3.28

May...

319

12.84

June July... August September October

November December

383

15.95

445

17.80

563

21.65

599

24 12

:

667

26.68

647

25.88

675

27.00

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301. The total number of infants under supervision during the period of eight months was 767, and the total attendance 4,321.

302. It was found that the attendance varied greatly from day to day due principally to variations in the weather conditions: but a total of 49 infants was recorded on one day.

303. Of the 767 infants seen, 726 lived in the immediate neighbourhood of Wanchai. The remaining were brought from the following districts:

Central district Victoria

9

West Point

Shaukiwan

Boat population

Yaumati district Kowloon

Mongkok district Kowloon

9

3

7

5

1

Hung Hot district Kowloon

1

Kowloon City district Kowloon

3

Macao

1

Ng Chau (Kwangsi Province China)..

1

Total

41

364. The following were the most prevalent ailments:

Conjunctivitis (mainly gonococcal).

Bronchitis.

Gastro-enteritis.

Multiple boils.

Impetigo and other skin diseases

Thrush.

Congenital syphilis.

Rickets.

Broncho-pneumonia.

305. All cases which would ordinarily be treated in an Out- patient Department were treated at the Centre. A limited number of infants are kept at the Centre, five cots being allotted for this purpose.

Cases which required inpatient hospital treat- ment were recommended for admission to the hospital.

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306. To those who do not understand the local situation it is necessary to explain that advice without treatment offers little attraction to the Chinese mothers and an infant welfare centre in Hong Kong without facilities for treatment would be little patronised.

307. The majority of infants seen at the Centre for the first time were suffering from incorrect feeding in addition to the disease for which they were brought for treatment.

The feeding of infants who are not taking their mothers' milk present difficulties. In some cases the parents can only afford to buy an inferior quality of condensed milk and in others they cannot afford milk of any kind. Cases of poverty are referred to the Society for the Protection of Children who assist so far as their funds allow. The cooperation of this Society has been most valuable.

308. The Centre has been an unqualified success in its own district and there can be no doubt that similar institutions con- ducted on parallel lines would be popular in the other districts.

THE TUNG WAH INFANT WELFARE CENTRE.

309. The Hung Wah Infant Welfare Centre is held every Wednesday morning under the supervision of the Western trained medical officers. The babies are weighed and the mothers ad- vised concerning feeding and care of infants. The total number of attendances was 1,103, that for 1931 was 1,486.

THE TSAN YUK INFANT WELFARE CENTRE & ANTE-NATAL CLINICS.

310. The Infant Welfare Clinic which is held every Friday morning and which is conducted by one or more of the Govern- ment Lady Medical Officers is restricted to babies who have been born in the hospital. The number of new cases was 503 and the number of old cases 1,344. The average attendance per clinic was 35.5.

311. The antenatal clinics are not well attended. The Chinese look upon pregnancy as a normal occurrence and they come to the clinic only to find out the probable date of delivery.

THE ALICE MEMORIAL INFANT WELFARE CENTRE.

312. The Alice Memorial Infant Welfare Centre like that at the Tsan Yuk deals with babies who have been born in the hospi- tal. With regard to ante-natal there were 167 first visits by expectant mothers and 60 return visits. With regard to Infant Welfare activi ies there were 272 first visits and 478 return visits.

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SECTION VI.

HOSPITALS, INSTITUTES, ETC.

GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

313. The Government Hospitals are:-The Government Civil Hospital, the Victoria Hospital, the Kowloon Hospital, and the Infectious Diseases Hospital.

In addition there was the Peak Hospital which was main- tained by the Government as a nursing home where patients could be treated by private doctors. This hospital was closed on 31st March on the completion of the War Memorial Nursing Home, a non-govermnent institution of the same nature.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

314. The Government Civil Hospital, which was built in 1871 and which occupies a site in the middle of the most populous area, is the largest Government hospital in the Colony. It has accommodation for 246 patients, including the 21 maternity beds. which are in a Bungalow separated from the main buildings. The majority of the maternity beds and about 100 beds in the main building are under the control of the Clinical Professors of the Hong Kong University, who have been appointed respectively Physician, Surgeon, and Obstetric Physician to the hospital and who are responsible to the Director of Medical and Sanitary Ser- vices for the duties they perform in the hospital. They have also been appointed consultants to Government. The University Clinie do all the outpatient work except that connected with the Venereal Diseases Clinic which is attended to by the Government Venereal Diseases Specialist.

315. Dr. T. Newton was the Medical Officer in charge until 12th September when he was relieved by Dr. J. E. Dovey. Dr. G. H. Thomas and Dr. T. Z. Bau were assisting.

316. The number of inpatients, exclusive of those in the maternity block, was 4,876 (4,744 in 1931), of which 1,115 were treated by the University staff and 3,761 by the Government Medical Officers.

317. The 1,115 patients treated by the University staff were made up as follows:

Medical cases

Surgical cases

Gynaecological cases

523

462

130

318. The daily average number of inpatients was 197, that

for the previous year was 168.

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319. The nationality of the patients was:

European

Indian

Chinese

Russian

Other Asiatics

Total

341

985

.3,440

25

85

.4,876

320. A large proportion of the total patients receive treat- ment free of charge.

321. There were 333 deaths and of these 149 occurred within 24 hours of admission. The case death rate was 70.30 per mille

(75.4 per mille in 1931).

322. 915 major operations were performed (977 in 1931). Of these 515 were from the University Surgical Clinic. 80 from the University Gynaecological Clinic and the remaining 319 were performed by the Government Medical Officers.

323. There were 737 accidents of a nature so serious as to require treatment as inpatients (817 in 1931).

324. Police Wards.-The total number of admissions and deaths were as follows:

Admissions.

Deaths.

British

83

Russian ship guards

19

Indians

440

Chinese (Cantonese)

81

Chinese (Wei-hai-wei)

76

Total

699

325. The daily average number of Government Servants treated by the Government Medical Officers as outpatients was 28 (25 in 1931).

326. Outpatients Department. This department is open both morning and afternoon. The number of attendances, ex- clusive of Venereal Diseases cases, was 47,627 (43,196 in 1931). In addition there were 17,313 attendances for dressings (13,953 in 1931). The number of prescriptions dispensed was 52,838 (42,111 in 1931).

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MATERNITY BUNGALOW AT THE GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

327. The Bungalow has accommodation for twenty-one patients and is mainly for the use of Asiatic women.

328. There are three general wards with a total of sixteen beds, two private wards with two beds each and one isolation ward with one bed.

329. The majority of patients are under the care of the Professor of Obstetrics of the University he being at the same time Obstetric Physician to the Government Civil Hospital.

330. The admissions during the year were 870 (779 in 1931), making a total of 885 cases treated. There were altogether 776 deliveries of which 154 cases were under the care of the Govern- ment Medical Officers and 622 under the Professor of Obstetric and his Assistants.

The daily average number of patients in the hospital was 16 excluding infants.

331. The nationalities of the patients were as follows:

-

Portuguest

Japanese

Indians

Chinese

Total

2

22

42

.710

.776

332. The reports of the Professors in charge of the various University Cinics will be found in the Appendix,

THE MENTAL HOSPITAL.

333. The Mental Hospital which is an annex to the Govern- ment Civil Hospital has accommodation for 14 Europeans and 18 Asiatics.

334. This institution is intended for use only as a temporary abode for the mentally affected pending arrangements being made for their ransfer to Europe or Canton.

335. The Medical Officer of the Government Civil Hospital is in administrative charge.

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Patients.

336. Remaining from 1931

30

Admissions during the year

277

307

Discharged apparently cured

84

Discharged relieved

Transferred to the Canton Mental

63

Hospital

.113

Died

11

Remaining at end of 1931

36

307

Total

Daily average number of patients 37.9.

307

VICTORIA GENERAL AND MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

337. The Victoria Hospital which was originally built for the accommodation of women and children is now a general and maternity institution. Situated in the residential area well above the level of the town it has a clear view across the harbour of the territory on the opposite side. There are 42 general beds and 32 maternity beds, in separate blocks with entirely separate staff for each building.

338. Dr. D. J. Valentine was Medical Officer in charge at the commencement of the year until 15th March, with Dr. P. F. S. Court as Assistant Medical Officer. Dr. J. E. Dovey took over charge on 4th May on his return from leave. Dr. I. Newton took charge on 12th September relieving Dr. Dovey who was trans- ferred to the Government Civil Hospital.

339. During the year 646 cases were treated, 539 in the General Block and 107 in the Maternity Block. The patients treated in the General Block were men 101, women 247 and children 191. There were 60 deaths.

340. The daily average number of patients exclusive of maternity patients was 25.

:

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341. The nationality of those treated was:-

Europeans

Chinese

Other nationalities

Total

461

49

29

539

The Maternity Block.

342. The number of beds in this hospital is thirty-two.

343. The admissions during the year were 101. The total number of cases treated was 107.

344. There were 86 deliveries with two stillbirths. There was one case of twins.

345. The daily average number of patients was 4.3 mothers and 3.7 infants.

346. The Maternity Block is available for private patients who wish to be attended by their own doctors. Nineteen patients availed themselves of the privilege.

KOWLOON HOSPITAL.

347. This is situated on the mainland and at present consists of three blocks :

A. Block containing

28 beds

B. Block containing.

31 beds

M. Block containing

25 beds and 8 cots.

A. and B. Blocks cater for male patients and M, block for female patients. M. block which was opened on 1st April was built for maternity cases but so great was the need for accom- modation of general cases that it had to be used temporarliy as a general block.

348. This hospital is being enlarged year by year by the erection of additional blocks, the rate of extension being governed by the financial state of the Colony. It will ultimately be a 500 bed hospital.

349. During the year building operations were commenced on C. Block, a nurses hostel and quarters for the Assistant Medi- cal Officer. With the completion of C. Block the maternity block will be used for the purpose for which it was built.

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350. Dr. J. T. Smalley, Senior Medical Officer, was in charge during the year, assisted first by Dr. F. S. Court and then by Dr. J. B. Mackie. Dr. A. D. Wong was Chinese Assistant Medical Officer when he was succeeded by Dr. C. H. Luk.

351. The total number of cases treated in hospital was 2,132 as compared to 1,855 in 1931.

352. The nationalities were made up as follows:

Males.

Females.

Total.

Europeans

432

320

752

Chinese

.1,075

231

1,306

Others

53

21

74

Total

.1,560

572

2,132

353. The deaths numbered 135, 105 of these being males and 30 females.

354. The daily average number of patients was 65.7 (53.2 in 1931).

355. During the year 724 operations were performed under general anaesthesia (604 in 1931).

356. The number of Police admitted was as follows:

Europeans

72

Chinese

210

Indians

1

Outpatients Department.

357. The number of outpatients' visits recorded as compared with previous years were as follows:-

New cases

Old cases

Dressings

Total

1929.

1930.

1931. 1932.

9,987

9,471 9,731

10,447

3,197

3,029 5,333

7,167

3,086 5,482 6,833 8,111

.16,270 17,982 21,897 25,727

358. In addition 795 vaccinations were performed.

359. The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year was 12,377 (12,710 in 1931).

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VENEREAL DISEASES CLINICS.

360. Dr. J. A. R. Selby has been in charge of the Venereal Diseases Clinics during the year. Dr. (Miss) Lai and Dr. (Miss) Ruttonjee have assisted at the clinics for women. Mr. Collyer, assistant attendant at the Mental Hospital, has acted as European orderly at the male clínics.

361. All treatment is given free of charge.

362. Clinics are held daily as follows:

At the Government Civil Hospital.

Monday and Wednesday......10 a.m. for Chinese.

Tuesday

Thursday

Friday....

.10 a.m. and 5 p.m. for Europeans.

.10 a.m. for Indians.

.10 a.m. for women only.

At the Kowloon Hospital.

On Tuesday afternoons for males and on Friday afterno:ns for women.

363. The total number of cases treated was 2,881 as com pared with 1,966 in 1931.

The total number of attendances was 10,733 as compared with 6,393 in 1931.

364. The nationality and sex of those treated at the above clinics were as follows:

1932.

1931.

Male. Female. Male. Female.

Europeans

123

4

138

3

Chinese

.2,158

437

1,285

343

Indians

150

2

185

Japanese

7

11

1

Total

.2,438

443

1,619

347

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365. The diseases treated were as follows:

1932.

1931..

Male. Female. Male. Female.

Syphilis

.1,472

199

896

110

Chancroid

205

3

130

2

Gonorrhoea

331

86

325

121

Syphilis with

Gonorrhoea

108

96

74

57

Chancroid and

Gonorrhoea

9

11

Observation

249

59

164.

56

Other diseases

64

19

1

Total

.2,438

443

1,619

347

366. 2,567 specimens of blood were sent to the Bacteriologi- cal Institute for Wassermann test, the result being as follows:-

Positive

Doubtful

Negative

Total

1,527

241

799

2,567

367. 5,885 injections of N.A.B. and 222 injections of Bismuth were given to outpatients.

368. 54 cases of gonorrhoea received 327 treatments with diathermy in the Radiological Department with satisfactory results.

369. 24 beds were reserved for V.D. male cases in the G.C.H. and these were kept full throughout the year. There are at present no heds reserved for female cases and such are badly needed.

370. During the year an ad hoc clinic was in process of erection near the wharves at Kowloon and this should be com- pleted early in 1933.

Tsan Yuk Hospital V.D. Clinic.

371. A clinic for Chinese women suffering from venereal diseases was held weekly by the Government Lady Doctors, Mrs. McElney, Miss Lai and Miss Ruttonjee.

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372. 652 new patients were treated. There was a total of 2,253 attendances (1,603 in 1931).

373. The diseases treated were as follows:

Syphilis

Syphilis with gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea

Soft Chancre

No apparent disease.

Total

1931.

1932.

82

76

... 131

185

257

271

I

96

120

.567

652

374. 587 injections of N.A.B. were given.

375. 543 specimens of blood were sent to the Bacteriological Institute for examination with the following results:-

Positive

Negative

Doubtful

Total

250

254

39

543

376. Total number of smears taken 301 of which 229 were positive and 72 negative.

Gynaecological Clinics at the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

377. Once a week at each of the Chinese Public Dispensaries a 'Gynaecological' Clinic was held by one of the Government Lady Medical Officers. It is estimated that at least fifty per cent of the cases attending were suffering from Venereal Disease ir one or other form.

Hospital Outpatient Treatment.

378. Venereal cases were seen at the outpatient departments of the various hospitals and dispensaries..

X-RAY, MASSAGE AND ELECTRO-THERAPEUTIC

BRANCH.

379. Dr. Farr was in charge of this branch during the year. He was assisted by Mr. J. Skinner M.S.R., B.P.A. as Radio- grapher, Miss C. S. Mackenzie as X-Ray Sister, and Miss L. M.

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Siggins, C.S.M.M.G., B.P.A., as Masseuse and Electro-therapist. Miss M. H. Hughes C.S.M.M.G., B.P.A., as 2nd Masseuse and Electro-therapist arrived in the Colony on 10th February. Miss Siggins left the Colony on long leave on 9th April. Miss N. Hill C.S.M.M.G. was appointed par: time Assistant in August.

380. A start was made this year to train Chinese nurses in massage, etc., and Nurse Chun commenced training on 1st January. She made excellent progress but left for private reasons at the end of the year. The experiment showed that competent Chinese Nurses can be readily rained as masseuses.

381. The increase in the work of all branches noted in 1931 was maintained. The following table shows the figures for the three years 1930, 1931 and 1932.

1930.

1931.

1932.

Massage and electrical treatment

.3.934

6,239

9,498

Radiological examinations

.1,902

2,464

2,696

Films exposed

.3,309 3,653

4,521

382. Of the total radiological examinations 2,496 were done at the Government Civil Hospital Victoria and 200 at the Kowloon Hospital. Of the films exposed 4,202 were exposed at the Government Civil Hospital and 319 at Kowloon Hospital.

383. The above figures show that the amount of radiological work done in Victoria is twelve times that done in Kowloon. The reasons for this are that the Kowloon apparatus is old and constantly going out of order and the staff is concentrated at the Government Civil Hospital.

384. Considering that the population of Victoria is to that of Kowloon as 4 to 3, facilities for X-Ray work in Kowloon should be improved.

385. As in the previous year, considerable use was made of the radium lent to the hospital by the Committee of the Matilda Hospital.

GOVERNMENT DISPENSARIES.

386. The Dispensaries maintained by Government during the vear under review were the Taipo Dispensary and the Un Long Dispensary, both in the New Territories. Details with regard to these will be found in Section X which deals with the New Territories.

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THE GOVERNMENT INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL.

387. This was originally a Police Station but was adapted as a hospital and has accommodation for 26 beds in six wards. The hospital is situated very close to the extreme western end of the Island and next door to the Tung Wah Smallpox Hospital. It is admirably situated for is purpose being more or less isolated yet convenient for access by ambulance, by bus, or by launch.

388. During the year the hospital was under the charge of Dr. G. V. A. Griffith who supervised he work there in addition to his other duties.

389. During the year there were 281 admissions and 135 deaths. The following table shows the nature of the diseases and the cause of death,

Diseases

Admission

Death

Death Rate

Cerebro-spinal meningitis

61

26

42.6 per cent

Cholera......

200

103

515

""

Smallpox

6

2

33.3

Leprosy

6

3

33.3

During the cholera outbreak the hospital which is normally without any resident medical officer had resident one full time and one part time Chinese Medical Officers.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

390. The Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Dispensaries are institutions established by the Chinese for the benefit of the poor of Chinese nationality. Intended to be additional to, not in substitution of, the Government Hospitals they serve a very useful purpose not only in the matter of medical relief but in that of health education.

391. An enormous and ever-increasing number of sick too poor to pay a doctor's fee or to buy proper medicine, and unwill- ing or unable for one reason or another to a tend at a Govern- ment Hospital, are successfully reached.

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392. There are three general hospitals, one smallpox hospi- tal, two maternity hospitals and nine public dispensaries.

They are maintained by subscriptions from the public, by donations from the Chinese General Charities Fund and by direct grants from Government. They are controlled by Chinese Committees who work in close cooperation with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

393. In the three big hospitals the patient can choose be- ween Western and Chinese methods of treatment, but in the Maternity Hospitals and Dispensaries Western Medicine only s practised. Government Lady Doctors hold gynaecological clinics in each of the dispensaries once or twice a week.

394. Both Hospitals and Dispensaries are subject to inspec- tion by the Government Medical Department. There are four officers of the Department whose duty it is to visit the various institutions and to give advice and assistance. These officers work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS.

395. The Tung Wah Hospital situated in the centre of the most thickly populated areas in Victoria was first occupied in 1873. The Tung Wah Smallpox Hospital was established in 1902. The Kwong Wah Hospital was built in Kowloon in 1911 as an extension of the Tung Wah. The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, another branch of the Tung Wah, situated in an open space in the east of Victoria was opened in November, 1929. The Government gave the sites and with grants of money assisted in the erection of the buildings.

396 In administrative control of the four hospitals is the Tung Wah Committee, a body of Chinese gentlemen elected each year by the subscribers.

397. Originally intended for the accommodation and treat- ment of those Chinese whose fears and prejudices against Western medicine prevented their applying for relief at the Government Hospitals these institutions at a later period introduced and encouraged scientific methods. As prejudice disappeared and confidence grew the demand for Western medicine increased until now the number being treated by this method equals that which still pins its faith to the plasters and decoctions of the herbalists.

398. The activities of the Chinese Hospitals include.—

(a) The care of the sick and treatment by Western methods or Chinese methods according to the wish of the patients.

(b) Maternity benefits and infant welfare by Western

methods only.

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(c) Vaccination.

(d) Health propaganda.

(e) Assistance to the destitute.

(0 The provision of coffins for and the burial of the dead.

399. Much progress has been made in all departments of the hospitals during the last few years. These improvements in-

clude:-

(a) The appointment of University graduates as full time

Resident Medical Officers.

(b) The foundation of training schools for female nurses. (c) Extensions and improvements in the male nursing

section.

(d) The establishment of clinical laboratories.

(e) The provision of radiological apparatus.

V) The establishment of up-to-date operating theatres.

(9) The purchase of motor ambulances.

(h) Improvements in the accommodation for patients.

(i) Improvements in quarters for the staff.

400. Today each of the three Chinese Hospitals has a good operating theatre where operations are performed daily, many of which are major in character.

401. In charge of the medical side (Western) of each hospital is a Medical Superintendent, a graduate of the University, whose salary is paid by Government, and who is a member of the Medical Department.

THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

402. The Tung Wah Hospital was established is 1870 as a Chinese free hospital to be managed by Chinese directors under Government supervision. Added to from time to time it has now 460 beds of which 24 are for maternity patients.

403. Originally in the open it is now hemmed in by one of the most thickly populated districts of the Colony.

404. As the directors are reluctant to refuse admission to any deserving case and as the Colony possesses insufficient in- firmary accommodation for the number of decrepits in it, the Tung Wah is not only a hospital but a place of refuge for the eld and infirm. It is old, it is overcrowded and in some ways insanitary, but it provides shelter, food and medical attendance for many sufferers who would otherwise have none.

Its reconstruction was under consideration at the end of the year.

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405. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Officer of the Government Medical Department and three Resident Medical Officers whose salaries are paid by the Hospital. There are in addition a number of Chinese Herbalists who practise Chinese medicine for the benefit of those who prefer that treatment,

406.

1931

1982

1931

1932

Inpatients (General).

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

5,704

5,246

10,950

5.918

5,086

11,004

Inpatients (Maternity). Still-birth.

1,679

83

1,560

67

407. There were 701 operations including many major ones.

408.

Outpatients (General).

Western

Chinese

treatment.

treatment.

Total.

1931

57,063

184,997

242,060

1932

34,095

185,273

219,368

409.

Eye Clinic.

1931

14,277

1932

13,022

410.

Baby Clinic.

1931

1,103

1932

1,486

411.

Deaths.

Brought in deai.

1931

2,314

1,618

1932

1,869

1,013

412. A great many patients come to the Tung Wah Hospital from outside the Colony attracted by its reputation and by its charity.

413. A large proportion of the deaths in the Hospital occur within 24 hours of admission. The sick poor go there to die. 649 were brought in moribund as compared to 388 in 1931. Those brought in dead include bodies sent from ships in harbour, from neighbouring hospitals, from the Public Dispensaries and from private houses. All are taken to the Tung Wah for the benefit of free coffining and free burial.

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THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

414. This hospital does for Kowloon and the Peninsula what the Tung Wah and Tung Wah Eastern do for the island of Hong Kong. There is official accommodation for about 320 beds of which 231 are for general diseases, 16 are for tuberculosis cases and 59 are for maternity cases. There are 12 private wards.

415. The accommodation cannot keep pace with the growth in population. Kowloon has considerably more than doubled itself during the last ten years. No patient is turned away for want of rooni and in both medical and surgical wards it is com- mon to find two in a bed, and others sleeping on the floor.

416. The staff consists of a Senior Resident Medical Officer whose salary is paid by the Government, and three Junior Medical Officers paid by the Directors.

417. There are also a number of Chinese Herbalists, without any recognised qualification, who practise Chinese medieme and are paid out of Hospital funds.

418. The patients, on admittance, can choose whether they desire treatment on Western or Chinese lines.

419.

Inpatients.

1931

1982

Western

treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total

8,204

2,283

10,487

9,517

2,339

11,856

420. There were 255 major operations, the number for 1931 being 157.

421. There were 3,327 labours as compared with 3,245 in 1931. Still-births numbered 183.

422.

Outpatients.

Western

treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1931..

.51,600 (including

90,500

142,100

436 gynaecology)

1932...

.40,537

97,398

137,935

423. There were 2,520 eye cases as compared with: 3,650 for the previous year.

424. The number of deaths in hospital was 3,573. As in the Tung Wah, the number of deaths is influenced by many factors which have nothing to do with treatment in the hospital.

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425. As with the Tung Wah, while there was an increase in the number of inpatients over the previous year there was a decrease in the outpatients.

THE TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL.

426. This Hospital continues to do very good work. It serves the useful purpose of reminding the older foundation-the Tung Wah-what it is possible for a Chinese Hospital to be. Everything is new and clean and it had the advantage of starting fresh in up-to-date buildings.

427. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Officer paid for by Government, Dr. Phoon Seck Weng, and two Junior Doctors appointed by the Directors of the Tung Wah.

428. For the greater part of the year the official number of beds was 195. Actually these numbers were augmented by canvas camp beds where the pressure of cases was heavy. To- wards the end of the year the opening of the last new wing added another 84 beds, making a total of 279.

429. The 84 new beds comprise 70 for general cases and 14 for maternity. With the camp beds the total number which can be accommodated is at least 300.

#

430. The hospital is now completed and is a model of what charity hospital should be, viz., all space occupied without wasting and without overcrowding. Each bed in the general ward has 60 square feet of space only, but such is the plan of the ward and the arrangement of the beds that each of the latter has ample lighting and ventilation.

431.

Inpatients.

Western

Freatment.

Chinese treatment.

Maternity. Total.

1931

2,185

1,345

667

4,197

1932

2,690

1,872

588

5,150

432.

Major General Anaesthesia.

Under General Anaesthesia.

1931

1932

116

159

433.

Outpatients.

Western

Chinese

Total.

treatment. treatment.

1931

12,471

45,931

58,402

1932

16,012

46,283

62,295

Vaccinations.

1931

1932

273

414

M 88

434. The number of children admitted continues to increase and there is now a new children's ward of 14 beds.

435. The number of cases in the private wards, which show- ed a decrease after the raising of the fees from $2.50 to $4.00, showed signs of improvement after the rate had been reduced to $3.00. The fee includes both food and medicine.

436. There is improvement in the health of the general staff. and there are now very few cases of Malaria. since prophylactic doses of Quinine were instituted and mosquito nets supplied to the nurses.

437. The deaths in 1932 numbered 1,163 A large number of these died within 24 hours after admission.

438. At the end of the year thirteen nurses were about to sit for the Midwives Board examination after a period of three years training.

THE TUNG WAH SMALLPOX HOSPITAL

439. The Tung Wah Smallpox Hospital, erected in 1902 for the herbal treatmen: of smallpox cases, consists of six wards arranged in three two-storied blocks and faced by another group of three two-storied blocks intended for staff quarters and for administration purposes.

At a distance and separated by a yard are the kitchens, the servants quarters and the mortuary. The whole is contained in a large compound.

All the blocks are connected by covered ways.

440. This hospital at the time of its construction was con sidered to have all the requirements necessary for the proper treatment of smallpox cases by Chinese methods.

441. There was room for 60 cases without overcrowding but there was no arrangement for heating the wards and no water carriage system.

442. For some years this institution has been neglected with the result that the fabric is now in a very dilapidated condition.

443. Four years ago an attempt was made at renovation and various rooms in the service blocks were labelled respectively doctor's office, record room, laboratory and dispensary, but no use was made of any of the rooms and they remained unequipped and empty.

J

M 89

444. The staff consists of a Chinese coolie as a caretaker and an amah. There is no resident doctor and no clerk and there are neither dressers nor nurses.

445. A herbalist from the Tung Wah visits daily and pre- scribes infusions but there is no attempt at nursing. Certain hospital clothing is provided but the patients as often as not wear their own clothes.

446. This being considered a herbalist hospital it is seldom visited by any of the Western-trained Tung Wah staff, and for all practical purposes it is controlled by the caretaker and the berbalist. There being no trained staff resident and the control being such as it is there must be grave doubts regarding the efficiency of the disinfection processes and the means taken to prevent dissemination of disease by patients, contacts and for- mites.

447. 76 cases of smallpox were admitted during the year and one case remained from 1931, making a total of 77 cases. There were 44 deaths giving a case death rate of 57 per cent.

448. During the months of August and September this hospital was lent to the Government Medical Department for the accommodation of cholera cases.

THE TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL,

449. The Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital, which is part of the organisation financed and managed by the Chinese Public Dis- pensaries Committee, is situated in the most populous district of the town and next door to the Western Dispensary. Its proxim- ity to the University of Hong Kong has made it a convenient. centre for the training of Medical Students.

450. By an arrangement with the Committee the whole of the in-patient work is supervised by Dr. R. E. Tottenham, Pro- fessor of Obstetrics to the University.

451. The total number of beds is 60 of which 47 are reserved for maternity cases and 13 for gynaecological patients.

452. The total number of deliveries was 1,252 (1,248 in 1931) out of a total of 1,328 cases treated. There were 5 maternal deaths and 59 children were still born.

453. There is an out-patient department the clinical work in which is carried out under the supervision of Lady Medical Officers of the Government Medical Department. In addition to the treatment of ordinary gynaecological cases, special clinics. are held for ante-natal infant welfare and venereal diseases. These clinics have already been described.

M 90

THE WANCHAI OR EASTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

454. This hospital, which is connected with the Eastern Dis- pensary, is in charge of a Western trained Chinese Doctor. It was closed during the greater part of 1931 for extensive altera- tions and repairs. Greatly improved it was open during the whole of 1932. The total number of beds was 31. The number of admissions was 842. There were no maternal deaths. There were 37 still-births.

THE CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES

455. The origin of the Chinese Public Dispensaries was a movement made in 1904 by certain leading Chinese citizens to stop the practice of dumping dead bodies by providing receiving houses for the sick and for the dead which would act also as information bureaux where the poor could obtain advice and assistance in matters connected with:

(a) the removal of patients to hospital.

(b) certification as to cause of death.

(c) removal of corpses to mortuaries.

(d) supply of coffins and arrangements for burial. (e) the registration of births.

(f) vaccination.

456. In 1905 two depots were established. the Western and the Eastern, under a Committee, consisting of the Chairman of the Tung Wah Board of Directors and the two unofficial Chinese members of the Sanitary Board.

457. In immediate charge of each depot was રી

Chinese doctor qualified in Western medicine and his staff consisted of an English-speaking clerk and a number of subordinates.

458. In 1908 the movement ceased to be connected with the Tung Wah and the Committee became the Chinese Public Dis- pensaries Committee under the Chairmanship of the Registrar General, now the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

459. It was declared at the time that the work of the depôts or dispensaries was no hospital work and that the Chinese doctors employed were simply to diagnose disease and not to treat it. However, treatment centres were needed and treat- ment, commenced in a small way, gradually developed until now the principal function of the dispensaries is medical relief.

460. It is worthy of note that as far back as 1896 a Com- mission appointed by Government to advise regarding the Medi- cal Department recommended the establishment under Govern- ment control of dispensaries in different parts of Victoria and Kowloon. However, none were built and the Chinese Public Dispensaries todav occupy the positions which under other cir- cumstances would have been filled by departmental institutions.

M 91

461. There are now nine Chinese Public Dispensaries, five on the island of Hong Kong and four in Kowloon. The two original institutions have Chinese maternity hospitals adjacen: to them. the Tsan Yuk Hospital and the Wanchai Hospital.

462. Two of the Dispensaries are still housed in rooms attached to temples. Another, that at Aberdeen, consists of two rented shops temporarily adapted for the purpose. Gradually up-to-date buildings are taking the place of the temporary ones. The Dispensaries at Shaukiwan and Wanchai are excellent build- ings of their kind. The Western Dispensary has been renovated and much improved.

463. During the year new buildings were completed at Yau- mati and Kowloon City to take the place of the temporary accommodation hitherto in use. They are both great improve-

ments.

464. This year has been marked by a general increase in the patients of all the dispensaries. Equipment has been improved and new instruments purchased. Besides instruments for small minor operations two of the institutions have their own micro- scopes. It is hoped that in the near future all will be provided with microscopes which are very necessary for diagnosing and differentiating the malaria cases which form such a large per- centage of those attending.

465. Sick too serious for outpatient treatment were trans- ported to hospitals by means of ambulances.

466. As mentioned before, once a week at each of the Dis- pensaries a gynaecological clinic is held by one of the Government Lady Medical Officers. In some there are two clinics a week.

467. Situated in the most thickly populated districts they fulfil a most useful purpose, not only in the treatment of disease but also as foci for the spread of knowledge concerning the cause of disease, and as the means of spread of the value of Western drugs and methods both in prevention and cure. During the year very good propaganda work was done by four street orators appointed by the Committee.

168. Last but not least, each dispensary has a room attached to it where dead bodies can be received for transport to the mortuaries preliminary to burial. Coffins are provided free.

SUMMARY OF WORK DONE IN THE DISPENSARIES DURING 1932.

|Gynaecolo Vaccina- gical cases

Patients.

Certificate

Patients

Dispensaries.

New

cases.

Old

of causes

of death.

sent to

Hospital.

cases.

Patients Corpses removed to removed to Hospital by Hospital or Ambulance. Mortuary.

Applica-

tion for

Dead

infants

tions.

coffins.

brought to

Dispensary.

seen by

Lady

Doctor.

M 92

Central

15,436

14,108

47

47

21

2,827

451

Eastern.

10,701

10,287

6

6

13

48

48

244

3,936

720

Western

12,649

10,284

40

36

374

374

340

4,890

2,233*

Harbour & Yaunati

39,750

34,632

83

29

61

175

173

8,105

2,055

Shaukiwan

26,468

26,054

21

49

1

3

203

5,178

1,597

Shamshuipo

14,669

6,168

115

170

157

8,330

1,209

Hung Hom

11,260

2,940

73

126

30

149

148

2,170

674

Aberdeen

5,461

6,021

82

535

348

Kowloon City

11,769

8,743

94

41

124

112

1,904

349

Total for 1982.

148,163

119,287

312

501

190

1,090

472

1.398

87,875

9,636

Total for 1931

129,419

110,056

300

375

178

1,165

490

1,490

29,991

8,094

* Carried out at Tsun Yuk.

M 93

SECTION VII.

PRISONS.

469. The principal prison of the Colony is situated in Victoria, a branch prison being situated at Lai Chi Kok on the Kowloon side of the Harbour. The former has accommodation for 800 prisoners, the latter for about 500.



470. In April the New Female Prison with accommodation for 100 was opened and all female prisoners were transferred to it. Built on modern principles the building is roomy, well light- ed and well ventilated. The accommodation is in every way an improvement on that which could be allotted in Victoria Gaol, and far superior to that which the average prisoner is accustomed to at home.

471. During 1932 the general health in all three gaols con- tinued to be satisfactory.

year.

Victoria Gaol.

472. Dr. G. V. A. Griffith was Medical Officer during the

473. The total number of admissions was 7,286 (6,767 in 1931). Of these 7,135 were males and 149 females and 49 juveniles. 557 of those admitted were 50 years of age or over.

474. The daily average number of inmates was 655 (714 in 1931).

475. In the Gaol Hospital which has 30 beds 895 cases were treated. The daily average number of beds occupied was 23.30. 37 cases including 10 for X-Ray examination were removed to the Government Civil Hospital for treatment not available at the Gaol Hospital, while 2 cases were transferred to the Mental Hospital.

There were 10 deaths, of which 5 were from Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

476. Among the outpatients who numbered 8,798 the most important diseases were:-

Chronic opium poisoning

Scabies

Chronic Tuberculosis

Gonorrhoea

1.765

617

368

162

M 94

Haemorrhoids

140

Hernia

111

Syphilis

109

Chronic bronchitis

97

Tenea

91

Valvular disease of the heart

38

Leprosy

477. Five prisoners were released on medical grounds of which 4 were lepers.

478. During the year there were three executions.

Lai Chi Kok Prison.

479. Dr. F. S. F. Court was Medical Officer until March when he was relieved by Dr. J. B. Mackie.

480. The New Female Prison was opened on the 19th of April for the accommodation of all female prisoners in the Colony.

481. The daily average number of prisoners were

Men

Women

355

114

482. The health of the prisoners was very satisfactory both among the males and the females. There was a considerable reduction in the number of cases of malaria as compared with 1931.

483. The total number treated in the Gaol Hospital was 274 men and 50 women. The daily averages in hospital were 5.35 men and 2.26 women. The numbers of cases transferred to other hospital were Victoria Gaol Hospital 38, Kowloon Hospital 1, Government Civil Hospital 2, Mental Hospital 1.

484. The principal diseases were:

Malaria

Influenza

Bronchitis

Diarrhoea

Boils

93 cases.

53

J

22

21

19

13

Year.

Prisoners admitted to Victoria

Prison.

Admissions to Victoria Prison

Hospital.

Out-patients.

Total Number of

The following statistical Table shows totals, averages and percentages for the ten years 1923-1932 inclusive :----- STATISTICAL TABLES SHOWING TOTALS, AVERAGES AND PERCENTAGES IN COMPARISON WITH PRECEDING NINE YEARS.

Deaths due to disease at Vic-

toria Prison Hospital.

Prisoners in Lai Chi Kok

Prison.

Prisoners in Victoria Prison.

Daily Average Number of

Sick in Victoria Gaol Hospi-

tal.

1923.

5,051

327

19,324

10

187

674

7.1

52.90

6.47

1.05

0.20

1924,

7,382

402

16,381

7

228

838

10.1

44.14

5.44

1.20

0.09

1925.

6,339

580

18,603

28

303

813

14.0

50.90

9.15

1.72

0.44

1926.

6,654

585

6,129

10

300

754

19.8

16.78

8.79

2.56

0.15

1927.

7,740

355

7,891

14

421

774

9.01

21.62

4.59

1.16

0.18

1928.

5,756

337

13,787

4

329

742

13.43

37.70

5.85

1.81

0.06

1929.

5,779

586

12,678

14

331

744

24.44

34.73

10.14

3.28

0.23

1930.

6,493

892

9,840

1931.

6,767

1,048

7,989

6

ΟΙ

441

734

24.93

26.93

13.79

3.39

0.15

385

714

28.27

21.89

15.49

3.94

0.13

1932.

7,286

895

8,798

10

459

655

23,30

24.04

12.28

3.56

0.14

Out-patients.

Admissions

to Hospital to

Total Admissions to

Vic-

toria Gaol.

Rate % of

Daily Average in Victoria Gaol

Hospital to Daily Average

Prisoners

of

Gaol.

Victoria

in

Total Admissions to Victoria Deaths due to Disease, to

Gaol.

-

M 95

M 96

SECTION VIII.

METEOROLOGY.

485. Situated just within the northern limits of the tropics occupying an insular position immediately to the south of the great mass of China, Hong Kong's climate is very materially influenced by the direction of the prevailing winds.

486. The North East Monsoon blows from November to May and during this period the weather is dry, cool and invigorating. From May until October, the season of the South West Mon- soon, the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot.

487. The mean annual temperature is 72°F. During the summer months the average maximum temperature is 87°F. and there is little difference throughout the twenty four hours. Situated on the north side of the Island "he City of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze itself which is cut off by the mountain behind the town. During the winter months the range of temperature is from 70°F. to 45°F. with an average of 66°F.

488. A table is attached giving the means or totals of the meteorological data for the several months of the year 1932.

The data for this table were kindly supplied by the Director of the Royal Observatory Hong Kong.

METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

The following Table I gives the means, totals or extremes of the Metcorological Data for the several months of the year 1932.

M 97

Temperature.

Humidity.

Wind.

Barometer

Month.

Cloudiness. Sunshine.

Rain.

at M.S.L.

Absolute Mean

Mean.

Mean

Absolute

Rel.

Abs.

Direction.

Velocity.

Max.

Max.

Min.

Min.

ins.

p.c.

ins.

p.c.

hours.

ins.

Points.

Miles p.h.

January

30.26

73.9

65.7

60.4

56.0

43.3

64

0.34

39

219.9

0.000

E. by N

11.7

February

30.17

74.9

60.9

57.1

53.6

43.7

74

0.36

87

79.7

2.535

ENE

13.8

March

30.10

81.5

67.9

62.6

58.8

46.8

75

0.43

69

131.7

2.200

E. by N

12.6

April

29.96

85.7

75.2

71.1

67.6

62.2

86

0.65

85

93.6

3.700

E

12.1

May

29.85

89.3

85.8

81.1

78.0

75.1

84

0.88

68

225.5

2.510

SE

10.7

June

29.73

89.9

86.0

81.9

79.1

76.3

85

0.93

89

121.9

25.290

S. by E

8.3

July

29.73

89.7

85.8

81.7

78.2

75.1

84

0.90

79

189.9

25.710

ESE

12.5

August

29.75

90.9

86.5

82.0

79.0

74.0

83

0.90

73

195.5

20.885

SW by S

8.0

September

29.83

88.0

83.9

79.8

77.1

74.8

81

0.83

82

133.4

4.340

E. by N

15.2

October

30.00

85.9

80.7

76.1

72.8

66.2

71

0.64

67

153.7

0.085

ENE

11.6

November

30.08

81.1

75.4

70.3

66.4

54.4

70

0.52

57

176.1

0.100

ENE

11.1

December

30.18

78.5

67.7

62.7

58.5

47.0

68

0.40

57

166.3

4.115

ENE

12.4

Mean total

29.97

90.9

76.8

72.2

68.8

43.3

77

0.65

71

1887.2

91.470

E

11.7

or extreme

M 98

SECTION IX.

SCIENTIFIC.

A.-Bacteriological Institute.

489. The activities of the Institute include:

(a) the preparation of vaccine lymph.

(b) the preparation of sera.

(c) the preparation of bacterial vaccines.

(d) the preparation of rabies vaccine. (e) examination of pathological material.

(f) examination of waters, milks, etc., etc.

(g) medical research.

490. The Institute is under the charge of the Government Bacteriologist who is assisted by the Assistant Bacteriologist and four Laboratory Assistants.

491. Particulars of the work done during the year are con- tained in the Annual Report of the Bacteriologist which is appended.

B. The Public Mortuaries.

492. There are two public mortuaries, one being situated in Victoria and the other in Kowloon.

493. At these places for the reception of the dead are re- ceived:

(a) bodies from the Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Public

Dispensaries for diagnosis.

(b) bodies forwarded by Convents which have received them

either moribund or dead from relatives and friends.

(c) dumped bodies, that is to say, bodies which have been taken from the place of death under cover of the night and dumped in the streets or in the harbour to save the trouble and expense of burial. The great majority of these cases have died a natural death and there is no need for concealment.

(d) bodies sent by the Police for medico-legal examination. (e) bodies sent by the Medical Officer of Health for ex- amination for signs of infectious disease or for simple diagnosis.

- M 99

494. In all cases where a diagnosis cannot otherwise be made a sectio cadaveris is performed.

495. All dead rats collected by the Sanitary Authorities are taken to the mortuaries for examination with regard to plague.

496. The Public Mortuary, Victoria, is in charge of the Assistant Bacteriologist, but the Public Mortuary, Kowloon, is under a Medical Officer who has been detailed for this work in addition to his other duties.

497.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA.

Report on Post-mortem Examinations 1932.

Number of examinations performed

Male bodies examined

Female bodies examined

Sex unknown owing to advanced decomposition

Claimed bodies sent from hospitals, etc

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

2,616

1,223

1,391

2

106

2,510

2,612

Number of Chinese bodies examined

Number of Non-Chinese bodies examined

498. Bodies were received from the following sources:-

Victoria

Harbour Police

Shaukiwan District

Other Villages

Number of rats examined

Number found plague infected

499.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

Report on Post-mortem Examinations 1932.

2,492

19

72

33

.92,223

Nil.

Number of examinations performed

3,369

Male bodies examined

1,899

Female bodies examined

1,464

Bodies of unknown sex (indistinguishable)

6

Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals, etc

287

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

3,082

Number of Chinese bodies examined

3,360

Number of Non-Chinese bodies examined

9

M 100

Male. Female. Total.

626

2,322

Number of bodies under 2 years of age ...1,696

Number of bodies over 2 years of age 644 403 1,047

...

Bodies were received from the following sources:--

Kowloon District

Harbour Police

Number of rats examined

Number found plague infected

3,124

245

71,091

0

500. Dr. Uttley who was in charge during the greater part of the year reports that out of 288 consecutive bodies over 7 years of age 111 or 40 per cent had large spleens which would be palpable during life.

501. With regard to fluke diseases out of the 288 bodies examined 40 or 15 per cent had livers containing Clonorchis Sinensis. All infections were in adults and all but 2 in males.

M 101

SECTION X.

THE NEW TERRITORIES.

Public Health and Sanitation.

502. The New Territories comprise the mainland between Kowloon and the Sham Chun River and a number of islands including Lantau which is larger than Hong Kong. The main- land is so indented by bays, harbours and coves that it may be said to consist of a number of irregular peninsulas many of which are almost islands. Both mainland and islands are of similar geological formation, being barren granite hills or moun- tains separated by fertile valleys.

503. For administrative purposes the New Territories have been divided into two districts-North and South-each under a District Officer. The dividing line is the watershed which separates the waters flowing south into Hong Kong Harbour from those flowing north into Mirs Bay. Each district contains mainland and islands but the Northern is mostly mainland and the Southern mostly island.

504. The area of the Northern District is roughly 200 square miles, that of the Southern District 100 square miles.

505. Two thirds of the Northern District can be reached by rail or road plus walking but the remaining third can only be reached by water. A great portion of the Southern District is only accessible by boat.

Population and its Distribution.

506. According to the Census 1931 the population of the Northern District was 73,678, that of the Southern District

24,479.

Northern District.

Police District.

Pingshan

Au Tau

Lok Ma Chau

Population.

12,660

12,877

4,377

Sha Tau Kok

Sheung Shiu

8,941

10,208

Taipo

12,684

Shatin

4,346

Saikung

7,585

Total

73,678

M 102

Southern District.

Police District.

Population.

Tsun Wan

5.335

Lantau

7,409

Ping Shan

1,713

Cheung Chau

5,477

Lamma Island

1,442

Po T'oi Group & Cheung Kwan O

3,086

Other Islands

17

Total

24,479

The Villages.

507. The population is grouped into villages situated mostly on the lower levels, the majority being on or near the coast. Some of the people are engaged in agriculture, others in fishing and others in commerce. Some of the villages are easy of access by rail, road or boat, but others are only reached after miles of walking.

508. The layout of the regular streets and lanes, in placed. The houses for the structures of brick or stone. two-storied buildings.

villages varies; in some there are others the houses are irregularly most part are small one-storied In the large villages there are

509. The rules and regulations governing village life are nowhere laid down in print but have been handed down from generation to generation. There are no heads of villages ap- pointed by and responsible to Government for the conduct of village affairs, but there are 'Village Elder' who are accepted as arbiters in petty disputes and who have acquired their positions through age, experience, wealth or family rank. These elders have no executive power and are regarded by the villagers and by Government as advisers only.

510. From time to time cooperative efforts are made for the good of the community-some contributing money, some materials and some labour. In this way the paving of streets or paths, the construction of a bridge or the digging of a village well is brought about.

Public Health Laws.

511. There are practically no public health laws in force in the rural areas of the New Territories. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance of the Colony does not apply and there is no power to ensure notification, isolation or disinfection of disease cases. The Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance was made applicable in 1911 but was until this year in most villages a dead letter. The vaccination Ordinance applies but there has never been any compulsory vaccination.

M 103

Sanitary History.

512. With regard to sanitary measures which are the concern of the District Officers, markets were constructed at Taipo, Cheung Chau and Un Long. In Taipo and Cheung Chau sani- tary organisations have been established consis.ing in the case of the former of a sanitary squad under a contractor, in the latter of a squad under the Market Committee appointed by the Kai Fong. In the other villages sanitary organisations have not yet been brought into being.

Past Medical History.

513. The history of medical efforts is as follows:- 1898-Territory taken over by the British.

1900 Dispensary established at Taipo and a Chinese M.O.

put in charge.

1901-Huts for lepers erected at Au Tau. 1911-Leper huts discontinued.

1911-Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance extended

to New Territories and Police Stations declared to be places for registration. The provisions of the Ordin- ance were never enforced.

1914-Government Midwife stationed at Un Long. 1915-Government Midwife stationed at Taipo. 1916-Government Midwife stationed at Tsun Wan. 1917-Government Midwife stationed at Cheung Chau. 1920-A non-Government Chinese Hospital established at Un Long. The Pok Oi as a herbalist treatment cen- tre and dying house.

1925-Un Long Dispensary established with a dresser in

charge.

1928-European M.O. appointed with part-time duties in

the New Territories.

1929 Proposals submitted by the Director of Medical and

Sanitary Services for:

(a) Motor Travelling Dispensary for Northern District. (b) Dispensary Launch for the Islands the boating population and those villages which can only be reached by water.

1930-Government appointed a Committee to make enquiries into the question of Sanitation and Registration of Births and Deaths in the New Territories.

Periodical visits of medical practitioners to the New Terri- tories arranged by the New Territories Medical Benevolent So- ciety and the St. John Ambulance Brigade.

1931-First Aid Stations established at Kam Tin and Fan

Ling by St. John Ambulance Brigade.

Medical Benevolent Society increases its activities.

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The staff of the Malaria Bureau did a considerable amount of investigation, making mosquito surveys, taking spleen census and making blood examinations for the presence of parasites. The reception given to the members of the staff demonstrated that there is no opposition to scientific investigation, provided the people understand the objects aimed at and are treated with ordinary tact and civility. Almost invariably they showed themselves interested in the proceedings and offered their co- operation.

The Position during 1932,

514. During the year medical relief continued to be dis- tributed by the Medical Department, the St. John Ambulance Brigade and the New Territories Medical Benevolent Society.

515. The Medical Department staff was as follows:-

1 European M.O. resident at Kowloon.

1 Chinese M.O. resident at Taipo.

1 Dresser resident at Un Long.

1 Midwife resident at Tai Po.

1 Midwife resident at Un Long.

1 Midwife resident at Tsun Wan.

1 Midwife resident at Cheung Chau.

516. There is dispensary at Taipo and another at Un Long in the Northern District. There are no dispensaries in the Southern District.

517. The Government Motor Travelling Dispensary

Dispensary con- menced working in June.

518. Early in the year the Government accepted from Sir Robert and Lady Ho Tung the generous gift of a plot of land near Ko Tung and a sum of $100,000 for the erection and upkeep of a welfare centre.

519. The generous offer of Mr. Ruttonjee to erect a dispen- sary at Sham Tseng and to hand it over when finished to the Government was also accepted.

520. Recommendations had been made by the D.M.S.S. for the establishment of Government dispensaries at Tsun Wan and Cheung Chau and provision had been entered for the same in the draft estimates. The provisions were deleted by the Esti- mates Committee on the ground that the Medical Benevolent Association had opened a dispensary and hospital in Tsun Wan and the St. John Ambulance Brigade a similar institution at Cheung Chau.

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521. When the new dispensaries are completed the Medical Department will have centres situated respectively in the east, north, west and south sections of the fifty mile road which circles the main portion of the New Territories mainland. These with the motor travelling dispensary should afford a good and sufficient. medical service for those parts of the territory which are within walking distances of the road and railway. The provision of motor dispensary launch next year will give medical relief to the islands and those parts of the mainland coast which are only readily accessible by sea.

Medical Officers visits.

522. During the year the Medical Officer visited all the villages of any size both in the Northern and Southern Districts to investigate the position obtaining in each and to form an opinion as to the need for medical attention. He was struck by the amount of malaria in some sections and its comparative absence in others. It is very prevalent in the hilly districts opposite the middle section of the Fanling Sha-Tau Kok Road and in those south of Un Long.

523. Tai 0.-Tai O, a fishing village of 5,000 inhabitants on the extreme north-west of Lantau Island, was visited once a week where all seeking treatment were treated at the local hall. A village elder was always present to see that the patients followed each other quickly and quietly. On an average 30-40 cases were seen each time. Malaria appears to be absent but venereal disease is prevalent.

524. Towards the end of the year a Government midwife was stationed in this village.

525. Sai Kung.-As far as possible weekly visits were paid to Sai Kung, a village on the east coast of the mainland and only easily accessible by sea. The regularity of visits depended on the police launch on which the M.O. was given passage.

526. Cheung Chau.-Cheung Chau was visited once a week where the M.O, cooperated with the St. John Ambulance Brigade seeing patients at the dispensary which had been established there by the Brigade. There was an average attendance of

35-40.

Births and Deaths Registration.

527. Early in the year arrangements were made whereby the Police Stations became the registry offices for Births and Deaths. It was decided to avoid prosecutions at first and to rely on

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propaganda and persuasion. At the end of the year it was found that the results in the large island villages of Cheung Chau and Tai O were good, in Tsun Wan the Southern District mainland village they were only middling while in the Northern District they were very poor.

The Government Travelling Dispensaries.

528. The Government Motor Travelling Dispensary was put on the road in 16th June. To avoid any semblance of competition with the philanthropic societies the villages where they had established dressing stations, etc., were avoided and attention concentrated on the villages and hamlets which had been left out. A Medical Officer and a dresser accompanied it on its rounds. There was a fixed itinerary and time table.

529. On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays it visited the western side of the district from San Tin to Shing Mun inclusive. On Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays it visited the eastern side, from Sha Tin to Sha Tau Kok and back to San Tin inclusive. In this way there was a minimum of mileage and overlapping and a maximum of hours of work in the villages.

530. The following table shows the results attained which are very encouraging considering that the philanthropic societies. occupied all the more important villages.

New

Month

Old Cases and

Total

Cases

Malaria Cases

Dressings

June 16th to 30th,

383

61

444

13

July...

1,404

469

1,873

36

August,

1,369

696

2,015

111

September,..

1,974

1,146

3,120

214

October,

1,686

1,184

2,870

181

November,

1,555

1,106

2,661

163

December,

1,687

1,039

2,726

139

Total..

10,058

5,651

15,709

860

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Taipo Dispensary.

531. The Taipo Dispensary occupies the ground floor of a shop house on the main road of the village, the upper floors serving as quarters for the medical officer and the midwife. The premises have ceased to be suitable for the purpose for which they are being used.

532. Dr. A. D. Wong relieved Dr. C. H. Luk as Chinese Medical Officer. In addition to running the dispensaries in this village and at Un Long Dr. Wong has been on duty with the travelling dispensary on three days each week.

533. Arrangements were made for the Government midwife to do duty at the dispensary as nurse in addition to her other duties.

534. The following table shows the extent of the work done during the year:—

New cases 3,390 of which 1,550 were females.

Old cases 4,668

Vaccination 1,345

Anti-cholera inoculation-167

Midwifery cases-81

535. There is great need for more appropriate and more ex- tensive premises.

Un Long Dispensary.

536. Like that at Taipo this dispensary occupies the ground floor of a shop type building, the upper floors being used as quarters for the dresser and midwife.

537. There was no resident medical officer to this institution the M.O. from Taipo visiting three times a week. Arrangements have been made to s ation a full time Chinese Medical Officer here in the coming year. As in Taipo the midwife acts as nurse

attendant in addition to her duties as a midwife.

538. The work done by this dispensary is as follows:-

Old cases

New cases

Vaccination cases

Midwifery cases

3,364

3,657

971

82

539. The need for more spacious dispensary premises at Un Long has long been apparent. During the year the elders of the villages in the neighbourhood asked the Government to take

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over the Pok Oi Hospital which for a number of years has been practically empty of patients serving chiefly as a residence for the local herbalist and the secretary to the Committee and as a meeting place for the last. It was hoped that it might have been possible to convert it into a district hospital under the Medical Department. However, the elders could not agree to the terms offered and the matter dropped.

540. Negotiations were commenced towards renting of three new shop houses which were in course of erection and which could with few alterations be converted into a centre containing a new and better dispensary and treatment station, a small hospital with a few beds and a medical officer's quarters. Satis- factory terms having been obtained the new centre will be opened early in 1933.

Police Stations.

541. Police Stations were visited at intervals by the M.O. i/c. N.T. With the exception of Tsun Wan where there is still a good deal of the disease Malaria has shown a gratifying de- The following are the incidence figures for the past

crease.

three years:

1930

258 cases

1931

148 cases

1932

135 cases.

Shing Mun Dam Site.

542: In November operations having commenced preparatory to building a dam at Shing Mun Gorge, investigations were made to ascertain the risks from malaria, it being understood that next year there would be a labour force of 1,000 or over resident.

543. Investigations made by the Malariologist showed that:-

(a) there existed numerous anopheline breeding grounds

and potential breeding grounds.

(b) the dangerous malaria carriers A. minimus, A. Jey-

poriensis and A. Maculatus were present.

(c) the spleen rate in Woo Hop village adjacent was 33

per cent.

(d) the road making coolies were already suffering rather

severely from malaria.

(e) a number of anophelines caught in the lines were

malaria infected.

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544. The Malariologist report was submitted to the Engineer In charge and arrangements made for cooperation in the fight against malaria.

545. It was agreed that the medical and entomological side of the problem should be controlled by the Medical Department and that the permanent drainage works should be done by the engineer.

546. It was resolved to erect a hospital and medical centre and to employ a Chinese Medical Officer, a dresser, also a gang for oiling and ditching. The sanitary side of the problem was put under the Malariologist and the treatment side under the M.O. i/c. N.T.

Voluntary Effort.

547. Both the New Territories Medical Benevolent Society and the St. John Ambulance Brigade extended their activities.

548. The Association opened a small maternity hospital at Tsun Wan and dressing stations at Castle Peak and at Shatin. It provided several par. time medical practitioners and for a period a full time doctor, it also provided nurse-midwives for its hospital and dressing stations.

549. The Brigade opened a Cottage Hospital for women and children at Kam Tin with accommodation for 12 maternity cases and six children and possessing a staff of three nurse-midwives. The dispensary was continued.

550. Dispensaries, dressing stations, or first aid stations were established at Un Long, San Tin, Fanling, l'ai Long, (Sha Tau Kok) and Tai Po, each with a resident nurse-midwife. A full time Chinese Medical Officer was stationed at Taipo and another part time practitioner was employed. In the Southern District a dispensary and midwifery ward was opened at Cheung Chau Island.

551. Altogether there were functioning in the New Terri tories during the year 11 voluntary aid centres with two full time meidcal officers and a number of part time medical practitioners and fiftten nurse-midwives.

26th June, 1933.

A. R. WELLINGTON,

D.M.S.S.

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APPENDIX A.

GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Report for the year 1932.

By A. V. Greaves, M.B., (Tor.), M.C.P.S. (Ont.) D.T.M. (Liverpool).

INTRODUCTORY.

(1) Administrative.-Dr. R. S. Begbie Assistant Medical Officer of Health was appointed to act as Assistant Government Bacteriologist. Dr. Begbie was confirmed in his appointment as from 3rd March, 1932.

(2) Buildings and Equipment.-No change of an important nature is to be recorded. A number of minor structural altera- tions, however, have been made which greatly increase the effi- cient working of the laboratory. In both general laboratory rooms ups.airs and downstairs the doors leading to the verandahs have been re-hung so as to open outwards, thus affording greatly increased space. The centrifuges have been moved into the media preparation room in place of two incubators which have been brought into the general laboratory in the space previously occupied by the centrifuges. The vaccine lymph grinder has also been removed into the media room. Increased shelf space has been provided in both downstair rooms which results in a corresponding clearing of the working desks and greatly improved working conditions.

A small research labora ory and microscope desk has been built into the alcove of the office of the Bacteriologist for his personal use; hitherto no working place was available for this officer except in the general laboratory which was awkwardly placed from the point of view of telephone, administrative work, elc.

A complete renovation of the buildings was carried out dur- ing the latter part of the year and minor repairs made. The resulting improvement in comfort and appearance is great.

The only addition to our equipment worthy of note is a new refrigerator. The other machine was already badly congested and the situation becoming acute in the early part of the year, a second was purchased. It has more than justified its existence already.

It is hoped that a new and modern centrifuge will soon be obtained to assist the present old type model and to enable high speed work to be carried out.



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(3) Library. The following additions were made to the library during the year:-

1. Approved Laboratory Technic, Kolmer and Boerner, 1931. 2. Guide To Human Parasitology, Blacklock and Southwell,

1931.

3. Tumours Of The Breast, Cheatle and Cutler, 1931.

4. Surgical Pathology Of The Female Generative Organs,

A. E. Hertzler, 1932.

5. A System of Bacteriology, Vol. 9, Medical Research

Council, 1931.

6. Report of the Laboratory Conference on the Serodiagnosis of Syphilis, League of Nations Health Organization Com- mittee, 1932.

7. Report of the Permanent Commission on Biological Standardization, League of Nations Health Organization Committee, 1932.

8. Individuality of the Blood In Biology and In Clinical

and Forersic Medicine, Leone La.tes, 1932.

(4) Publications:-"The Use of Takayama's Solution in the Identification of Blood Stains", by Dr. A. V. Greaves, Br. Med. Journal, 21st May, 1932.

(5) Research. It is a melancholy fact that research is prac- tically impossible under the conditions in which work is carried on at the Institute. The volume of routine work is so large in relation to the staff which has to handle is that there is little possibility of devoting the necessary thought and time to any problems except such as can be actually carried out along with routine work of a closely associa.ed nature. Also the absence of any clinical material, already referred to, severely limits the scope of such work. During the year the writer's attention has been largely devoted to attempts to improve the routine methods in use in the Institute and bring them into line with modern practice. Work of this nature is not of a kind that lends itself to record in an annual report and therefore cannot be detailed. Nevertheless a good deal has been done in this way. An investigation of the methods in use for estimating the concentra- tion of blood in solutions of blood stains was carried out and a useful method was devised for the purpose which has been incorporated into routine practice. A report of the method is in the press at the moment.

During the small epidemic of cerebrospinal meningitis which visited the Colony during the winter and spring a quantitative estimation of the total protein present in the spinal fluids of patients suffering from the disease was made with the hope of later correlating the information gained with other clinical facts. The method used was tha. of McNaught (Jr. lab. & Clin. Med.

M 112

16: No. 10, 999, 1931) and consists essentially of precipitating the proteins present by the addition of Tsuchiya's reagent and centrifugation in parallel with a similarly precipitated solution of known protein content, specially graduated conical centrifuge tubes being used. The level of the precipitate is then read and the figures substituted in a formula which gives the total protein present in mg. per 100 c.c. The protein content of 242 fluids was estimated in the present series and of 138 which were positive for the meningococcus the average proved to be 456.75 mg. per 100 c.c. (normal average according to McNaught 29 mg.). These and other data of a different nature have not yet been subjected to detailed analysis such as may reveal interesting relations. The cultures of meningococcus (Neisseria intracellu- laris) isolated during the epidemic were sub-cultured and the majoirty kept alive and towards the latter part of the year these were subjected to type analysis. The antisera used were obtain- ed from the Medical Research Council and consisted of Gordon and Murray's Types I, II, III and IV. The strains were sub- cultured for two or three months at least before the preparation of emulsions, except in a few instances in the early part of the epidemic. Emulsions were heated at 60°C. for one hour before the addition of 0.5% phenol. They were then kept for some months before being typed. The results may be seen in the accompanying table.

Total

Type Type

No. of Strains.

Type Type Indefinite.

Inagglu-

I

II

III

IV

tinable.

45

1

32

0

10

2

2.2%

0 71.1%

0

22.2%

4.4%

It will be noted that type III preponderates greatly to the complete exclusion of type II and IV. The agglutinating titre. of the strains placed in many instances among type III was so nearly equalled by that of type I that it is almost certain that some of them really belong to the closely allied type I, with which only one strain was positively identified. With regard to the 10 strains labelled as indefinite, most of these showed prac- tically equal agglutination with type I and type III antisera and it was thought better to place them in this group provision- ally. They are being further studied and it is expected that some of them at least will be found to belong definitely to type I. Two strains were found to be completely inagglutinable, although they are undoubtedly meningococci. It is possible that these may correspond to Dopter's para-meningococcus beta and gamma or the C and D types of Nicolle, Debains, and Jonan.

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The 45 strains studied form a practically complete cross- section of the epidemic, as they were maintained routinely throughout and such loss as of course occurred through death of cultures was similarly equally spread throughout the period. The results obtained by this study are being applied in the pre- paration of the antimeningococcic serum for the supply of which we are responsible.

An investigation is being carried out on the presence and localization of Negri bodies in the brains of rabbits inoculated with the "fixed" rabies virus used in the Institute.

The sup-

posed site of election of these bodies in certain areas of the mid- brain recently described by workers in South Africa is being subjected to test on a series of brains. The progress of this work is necessarily slow owing to the restricted supply of the material for study but it is being pursued steadily and the results will be reported in due course.

During the year all strains of B. dysenteriae Flexner obtain- ed by culture from stools were kept by subculture, and a begin- ning was made late in the year on their serological classification. The research planned consists of, firstly, eliminating all strains inagglutinable to a Flexner polyvalent serum, secondly, placing the remainder as far as possible among their particular type- group (V.W.X.Y. & Z. etc.) and finally, subjecting the inagglutin- ables and any doubtfully reacting strains to more detailed ex- amination in the hope of uncovering further Flexner strains of an antigenically separate type. Later, perhaps, any such strains encountered may be compared with those of a similar nature recently isolated and studied by Boyd in India. (Jr. R.A.M.C. 59: Nos. 4-5, 241 and 321, 1932).

(6) General. The "ques ion of the provision of increased room for the work of the Institute will have to be faced in the not far distant future. The steady and continuous increase in the volume of diagnostic work being done and the consequent expansion of the activities of the staff will demand this. Already one of the two main laboratories is far too congested for efficient work and there is absolutely no possibility of extra space being found. It must not be forgotten that exactly one quarter of our laboratory space was handed over to accommodate the Malaria Bureau about two years ago, so that the Institute is precisely that much worse off than it was at that time and this with almost double the amount of diagnostic work to be taken care of. Either the present building will have to be added to (and thus per- petuated) or else a new building in more suitable surroundings will have to be built for the purpose.

The isolated position of the Institute from the point of view of clinical material is an immense drawback. The absence of such contact robs us of much possibility of research, the lack of which results in a tendency towards an academic and detached

M 114

point of view which is distinctly bad for all concerned. Moreover the opportunity for checking the correct working of biological reagents by observation of patients and the clinical course of cases is impossible. I have had occasion to deplore this many times and it is a distinct handicap. It is to be hoped that the incorporation of a new Institute in the immediate vicinity of one of the hospitals will be seriously considered in the near future.

It is a pleasure to be able to record the efficient and loyal cooperation of the staff of the Institute. The high standard of scientific technique attained by them is a matter for congratula- tion and pride.

A. PROTOZOOLOGY AND HELMINTHOLOGY.

(1) Blood films for Malaria.-Eight hundred and ninety seven films were examined for the presence of malarial parasites.

The relatively high proportion of malignant tertian infections is again worthy of remark, being almos: double the number of the benign type. The unclassified group consists of cases in which parasites were found in the thick drop but not in the thin film and cases in which the thin film was so badly prepared that type diagnosis was impossible.

A careful watch has been kept in order to detect any para- sites conforming to the type described by Stephens and named plasmodium ovale; so far this has been without success.

A new method of staining has been used which appears to give sligthly better results than either Giemsa or Leishman used alone. It consists essentially of adding a few drops of undiluted Giemsa stain to the film immediately af er the addition of dis- tilled water to the Leishman stain. The result is a considerably sharpened Leishman picture. The exact amount of Giemsa to be used must be determined experimentally for the particular stain, as the limit consistent with a good result is rather narrow.

The value of the thick drop in demonstrating the presence of malarial parasites deserves emphasis. Many seem still to be unaware of the immense advantage offered by this procedure, and consequently it is not uncommon to receive only a thin film to be examined for parasites. The numerous occasions on which the thick drop shows parasites in every field and the thin film fails to show any (or at most one or two on prolonged search) is remarkable. One is forced to the obvious conclusion that a negative report on thin film is no guarantee that the patient is free of parasites, while on the other hand even a short ex- amination of a thick drop will enable a report to be given which has the strongest evidential value.

;

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It is a lamentable observation that the majority of thin films reaching the Laboratory are atrociously badly made and one wonders whether the Schools of Medicine pay sufficient attention to this small but important point in the technical equipment of their graduates.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD FILMS FOR MALARIA.

PARASITES,

EUROPEAN. INDIAN. CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Malignant Tertian.

20

2

99

121

Benign Tertian

17

3

49

69

Quartan

4

4

Unclassified

10

3

38

51

Negative

138

39

475

652

Grand Total

185

47

665

897

(2) Filaria.-Nine films were examined for filariasis; two of these were found to be positive. Judging by the work on filarial infection of mosquitoes being reported by the Malariologist, Dr. R. B. Jackson, it is quite possible that if night films were sent for examination more frequently the proportion of positives might be surprizingly high. In view of the intimate association of the late Sir Patrick Manson with filariasis, it would be most fitting if problems connected with this disease were investigated thoroughly in the place where his last work in the East was done.

(3) Faeces-Six hundred and ninety seven samples of faeces were examined for the presence of helminths and protozoa. Such examinations are noteworthy for the exiremely high infesta- tion rate with clonorchis the presence of ova of this parasite may almost be said to be the hall-mark of Hong Kong excreta.

B. SEROLOGY.

(1) Serological reaction for Syphilis.-Six thousand four hundred and forty two sera were subjected to test. As com- pared with previous years a great increase may be noted, due to the continued attention to Venereal Disease both in the. V. D. Clinic proper and in the hospitals of the Colony. The number of sera tested for the years 1929, 1930, 1931 and 1932 are respectively 1,741, 2,453, 4,266, 6,442.

During the course of the year the Kahn test was made the standard test of the Institute. A certain number of Wasser: mann tests are still carried out, however, at the instance of

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M

practitioners who are unfamiliar with modern work on precipita- tion tests. The personal experience of the writer extending over some years is in complete agreement with the results recorded at the last two Serological Congresses held under the auspices of the League of Nations at Copenhagen and Montevideo, at both of which the superiority of the Kahn test over the best of the Wassermann techniques used was clearly shown. All the diffi- culties of the Wassermann test are magnified many times by conditions of work in the tropics and the disparity between the two tests must thus become still greater in favour of the method employing fewer variables. A not inconsiderable point is the cheapness of the Kahn test. The cost of guinea pigs for com- plement where a large number of Wassermann tests is carried out is great and with a contracted budget such points assume added importance. The antigen used was prepared at the In- stitute and has been standardized for potency against the antigen prepared by Messrs. Parke, Davis & Co. The test itself is carried out strictly according to the technique laid down by Professor Kahn.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SERA FOR SYPHILIS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

M. F. M. F.

M.

F.

Strong positive.. 71

6 52

1 1,787 607

2,524

Positive

21

2

41

:

33.5 132

531

Weak positive...

17

36

2

1761

95

326

Doubtful

28

:

41

1

345 149 563

Negative

312

44 174

3 1,333 632

2,498

Grand total... 449

52 344

7

3,976 1,614 6,442

(2) Agglutination Tests.-The method of qualitative recep- tor analysis has been continued in the case of the typhoid group; the method is extremely satisfactory provided care is taken in the preparation of the necessary antigens. B. typhosus may be seen to be the cause of the great majority of infections in Hong Kong.

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AGGLUTINATION TESTS.

EUROPEAN.

INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

ORGANISMS.

Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg.

Pos. Neg.

B. Typhosus

62

125

3

B. Para. A.

2

185

B. Para. B.

8

179

B. Para. C.

B. Meletensis

3

B. Abortus

Weil Felix

reaction

2

2

:

∞ ∞ cr

209

465

869

1

673

869

15

659

869

...\

4

3

1

Grand Total

72 496

3

21

225 1,800

2,617

:

C. BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

(1) Faeces. Seven hundred and sixteen specimens of faeces were examined by culture for organisms of the enteric group and cholera.

The scarcity of Shiga infections is shown.

The small epidemic of cholera which visited the Colony during the summer is responsible for the large number of positive findings under this head.

Stools Examined for Organisms.

Organisms.

Typhoid grop... B. Dysenteriae (Flexner)...... B. Dysenteriae

(Group).. B. Dysenteriae

(Shiga)..

B. Cholerae .....

European.

Indian.

Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg.

:

69

Chinese.

Total.

Pos. Neg.

2 8

6

2 86

104

15

30

45

69

131

:

5

5

172 243

431

...

60

2

14

:.

2

Grand Total

19 82

209 398

716

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(2) Sputum.-Five hundred and seventy four sputa were examined for the presence of the tubercle bacillus.

EXAMINATION OF SPUTUM FOR B. TUBERCULOSIS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

Positive Negative.

19

19

91

129

82

46

317

445

Grand Total

101

65

408

574

(3) Urine.--One hundred and forty six specimens of urine were cultured for pathogenic organisms. In all cases a com- plete chemical and microscopic report was made in addition to the bacteriological.

(4) Urethral and cervical smears.-Four hundred and thirty eight smears were examined for the presence of the gonococcus. The majority of these smears were from the female V. D. Clinics.

(5) Nasal Scrapings.-Fifty six nasal smears were stained for the presence of Hansen's bacillus.

(6) Throat Swabs.-One thousand seven hundred and thirty swabs were cultured, of which three hundred and eighty two were positive for C. diphtheriae. There is again a great increase both in the number of examinations and positive cases. This is in part due to the epidemic which began at the end of 1931 and extended over January and February of this year. There is, however, a steady increase in the number of specimens forwarded for examination comparable to that noted in other departments of the Institute.

THROAT SWABS EXAMINED FOR DIPHTHERIA,

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

Positive Negative

282

1

99

839

19

490

382 1,348

Grand Total

1,121

20

589

1,730

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(7) Cerebro-spinal fluids.-Four hundred and sixty three specimens of cerebrospinal fluids were examined for the presence of the meningococcus. Two hundred and six of these gave posi- tive results, either on direct examination or on culture or by both methods.

As was pointed out in a previous paragraph the total protein content was estimated in practically all of the fluids received during the epidemic of cerebro-spinal meningitis during the early months of the year-the actual number of fluids in which this was performed was two hundred and forty two.

C. S. F. Examined for Meningococcus.

European. Indian. Chinese. Total.

:

Positive Negative

6 11

197

206

240

257

Grand Total

17

9

437

463

(8) Pus and other miscellaneous materials.—Twelve ex- aminations of pus from various lesions were made; they do not call for comment.

Eleven dog's brains were examined for Negri bodies; in no case was a positive result recorded.

D. PREPARATION OF VACCINE LYMPH.

The results of the activities in this department are as follows:

Number of calves vaccinated

Amount of lymph prepared

2

issued

19

remaining in stock

135

15,064 c.c.

.11,592,,

The amount of lymph issued is practically average.

.18,557

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The amount prepared is in excess of that of the previous year; partly because of the greater number of calves vaccinated and partly because of the greater yield of lymph obtained per calf.

Experiments were carried out to determine a method of vaccination which would produce a greater yield of lymph than had been heretofore obtained. It was hoped that the method advocated by Stuart and Krikorian (Ann Trop. Med. & Parasit. 24: No. 4, 527, 1930) would be an improvement, but it was abandoned after careful trial; in our hands it offered no advant- ages. Ultimately we adopted the simple expedient of spacing the lines of insertion definitely closer together than had been our previous practice. The result was quite satisfactory, as the figures for the year show a 20% increase in the yield of lymph obtained. This should materially lower the cost of production.

tests

The routine of bacteriological control of the finished lymph before issue has also been brought nearer to the ideal. In addition to previous procedures plate counts are now done and potency

on rabbits performed with graded dilutions. Through the kindness and cordial co-operation of the Medical Director and staff of the Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals we are now able to have potency tests performed on new-born babies on every batch of lymph before issue. At the present moment for this purpose we are using lymph of full strength as well as

a dilution 1 in 5 in each case. The possession of definite evidence of the potency of every batch of lymph issued is a valueable safeguard against possible loose criticism of our lymph as well as being a useful check on our own methods of production.

E. PREPARATION OF VACCINES AND SERA.

The work under this head has been very heavy for the year reported. This has been due chiefly to the epidemic of cerebro- spinal meningitis referred to in a previous paragraph which necessitated putting up and distributing large quantities of anti- serum. The stock of antiserum prepared and on hand in cold storage was adequate to meet the demands of the situation but we are left with the task of replenishing it to the previous figure with a view to the possibility of a similar demand at any time in the future. From the clinical data available it appears that the serum has been therapeutically efficacious.

The total amount issued was 29,360 c.c. Of this amount 6,240 c.c. was exported to Macao on the request of the health authorities there.

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Preparation of fresh serum had been in abeyance previous to the epidemic owing to the large stock on hand, so that only 7,350 c.c. was prepared during the year. This leaves us with approximately 30,455 c.c. in stock. Two ponies are being im- munized steadily at the present time for the production of serum, and a fairly large quantity should be accumulated in the coming year provided the disease remains in abeyance.

The opportunity has been taken to add new strains of virulent meningococci isolated during the progress of the epidemic to the strains maintained for the production of antiserum. This should do something to strengthen the antigenic value of our antiserum.

The preparation of gonococcus vaccine still shows a marked increase over previous years, as was predicted in last year's report; the amount being 4,370 c.c. This is nearly double the amount prepared in 1930. While the method of preparation has been slightly improved so as to give a higher yield this is still short of the ideal and further improvement is still being sought.

The epidemic of cholera was responsible for a large and sudden demand for anti cholera vaccine. We were able to fill all demands made in this connection and altogether 17,272 c.c. was supplied. Of this amount 1,476 c.c. was distributed outside the Colony.

The number of autogenous vaccines prepared shows a great increase over the previous year, namely 47 as against 26.

Anti-rabic vaccine was prepared for use in the Colony as usual. The method of preparation of the vaccine which had been in use for some years was revised and the method used in Ceylon, Malaya, India, etc. substituted in its place. The prepared vaccine consists of a 1% dilution of brain and cord substance in 0.5% carbolic saline. The dosage for the average adult case is 5 c.c. daily subcutaneously for 14 doses. The necessary fixed virus is maintained by regular passage through rabbits at fortnightly intervals.

One hundred and sixty one courses of treatment were in- stituted, but of this total only fifty-four completed the prescribed course. Actually one thousand five hundred and seventy doses were issued.

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The accompanying table shows the race incidence of cases and the distribution of completed and uncompleted treatments.

Race incidence of cases.

Treatment completed.

Treatment not completed.

British

22

9

Chinese

17

91

Indian

2

Portuguese

6

2

Eurasian

1

Spanish

1

:

Japanese

1

:

Norwegian

1

Unknown (outport cases)..

Total......

51

107

VACCINE.

AMOUNT ISSUED.

Gonococcus Vaccine

Staph. aureus

Plagne Vaccine

T. A. B. Vaccine.......

Cholera Vaccine

Antogenous Vaccine

Antimeningococcic serum

4,370 c.c.

25 ""

30

"

100

27

17,272

">

47 vaccines.

29,360 c.c.

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F. EXAMINATION OF WATER AND MILK.

(1) Bacteriological analysis of water supply.-One thousand four hundred and thir y three samples of water derived from the public water supply of the Colony were tested for bacteriological purity.

Samples were examined daily as heretofore and the results passed to the proper authorities.

The attached table gives the various sources from which the samples were obtained:

Unfiltered raw water

Filtered water

Water from service taps throughout the Colony

filtered and chlorinated

Well water

Water from other than public supplies

Total

120

121

1,15%

3

36

1,433

(2) Bacteriological analysis of milk.-One sample of milk was examined at the request of a private dairy.

G. MEDICO LEGAL INVESTIGATIONS,

The number of examinations carried out on behalf of the Department of Criminal Investigation continues to increase, and in the year under review is almost double that for the previous year. Fifty five articles of various kinds were examined.

Articles examined for presence of human blood

34

Articles examined for presence of semen

18

Articles examined for presence of both blood & semen..... 2 Articles examined for presence of type of hair

1

55

H. MORBID HISTOLOGY.

Two hundred and sixty four tissue sections were reported upon. One hundred and two of these were obtained at surgical operation from the hospitals or from private practitioners and the remainder forwarded by the medical officers of the Public Mortuaries of Victoria and Kowloon from post-mortem cases.

One hundred and sixty two were examined for general pathological diagnosis and one hundred and wo for type of tumours. Of the latter sixteen were benign and eighty six malignant.

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Analysis of Clinical and Other Examinations.

Nature of Examination.

Total

Total

for

for

1932.

1931.

B. Typhosus

869

898

Agglutination Reaction.

Paratyphosus A.......

869

898

B..

869

898

""

C.....

1

Weil Felix Reaction

B. Dysenteriae

3

1

1

Meletensis

4

3

17

Blood

Smears,

A bortus

Serological Reaction for Syphilis

Malaria Parasites..

Filaria

3

1

6,442

4,266

897

460

9

3

Blood count, etc.,

32

7

Faeces

Cultural

Examina-

Bacillus Diphtheria (Naso-

pharydgeal swabs)

1,730

1,354

tions.

Meningococcus

463

14

Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc., (Faeces)

716

132

Helminth ova

416

114

Amoeba of Dysentery

281

100

Occult blood

6

11

Tubercle Bacillus

2

5

Miscellaneous Examinations.

Tissue Sections.............

[ Sputa Pus Urine

Smear for Gonococcus

264

217

574

230

12

25

146

67

438

300

Smear for B. lepræ

56

73

Rat smears, spleen, etc., for B.

pestis

624

Animals for Rabies

11

12

Medico-legal Examinations

35

30

Bacteriological Examination of Milk

1

102

Bacteriological Analysis of Water

1,433

1,480

Rideal Walkers Test of Disinfectants

Autogenous Vaccine prepared

47

26

Filter candles sterilized for domestic

filters....

389

363

Identification of Rat Fleas.

251

Miscellaneous

171

465

Total.....

17,208

13,432

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BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Expenditure for 1931 and 1932.

1931.

1. Personal Emoluments

$44.487.41

1932.

$32.141.98

Other Charges.

29. Animals and Fodder

4,081.10

6,188.86

20. Anti-rabic Work

425.35

425.15

31. Apparatus and Chemicals

1,450.84

1,458.85

32. Books and Journals

143.70

98.36

33. Conveyance Allowances

448.78

233.50

34. Fuel and Light

1,439.78

1,722.51

35. Incidental Expenses

720.05

788.60

36. Prep. of Vaccine, Serum, etc. 37. Uniforms

1,878.81

1,682.76

371.12

468.91

Total

$10,959.53

$13,067.50

Special Expenditure.

53. Repair & Overhaul of Microscopes,

Bact. Inst

Electric Refrigerator

Microscope for Bact. Inst.

Total

Total Bact. Institute

$870.50

$794.19

$794.19

$870.30

$56.241.13

$46,079.78

Revenue for 1931 and 1932.

Bacteriological Examinations

1931.

$7,482.82

Expenditure and Revenue for past ten years.

Per. Emols. &

Special

Total

Other Charges.

Expen-

Expen-

diture.

diture.

1932.

$14.840.60

Total Revenue.

1923

$24,772.72

$ 24,772.72

$.2,939.20

1924

28,644,53

$459.29

29,103.82

4,752.12

1925

26,498.47

26,498.47

3,536.40

1926

29,982.11

9.70

29,991.81

7,220.41

1927

27,984.41

436.87

28,421.28

7,664,62

1928

34,643.40

23.37

34,666.77

6,635.23

1929

37,545.96

442.14

37,988.10

8,307.44

1930

55,239 81

55,239.81

7,384.03

1931

55,446.94

794.19

56,241.13

7,482.82

1932

45,209.48

870,30

46,079.78

14,840.60

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APPENDIX B.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE

MALARIA BUREAU.

For the year 1932. By

R. B. Jackson, M.D., D.P.H., Malariologist.

Staff.

The staff consisted of the Malariologist, Assistant to Malario legist, four probationer inspectors, one clerk and four coolies.

Work carried out during the year.

This was included under the following headings:----

(a) General mosquito survey of the Colony and New Terri- tories in order to determine what species existed, their life histories, and, as far as possible, their identifications in the larval and adult stages.

(b) A general investigation of malaria and other mosquito-

borne diseases.

(c) The catching of mosquitoes frequenting habitations, their identification, and, the dissections of such Anophelines as were found, for malarial infection.

(d) Investigations as to the prevalence of malaria in certain areas and the conditions under which it was existing. with a view to its abolition.

(e) Local mosquito surveys for the abatement of mosquito

nuisance.

(f) The teaching of mosquitology and the instruction of the probationers in this and other matters bearing on the subject.

(g) Co-operation with Government Departments, the Mili- tary, Naval and Air Forces, public companies and private individuals in

in the investigation and eradication of malaria.

(a) INVESTIGATION OF SPECIES AND THEIR LIFE HISTORIES.

Anophelines.

The number and species of the various larvae examined are given in Table V: Table VI gives the number and species of the imagines obtained from pupae collected, and from pupae obtained from the larger larvae. As in 1930 and 1931, the larvae of A.

J

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maculatus were by far the most frequently met with. When sought for, these can be obtained in large numbers throughout the seasons, and adults can be hatched out in the Laboratory at all times. This mosquito does not figure prominently in night or day catches as will be seen on reference to Tables VII, VIII, and IX; outdoor searches made near its breeding places have not been successful so far in obtaining any. Its larvae were occasionally found in unusual places, in water in a discarded Lucket, and in concrete basins. They were found in polluted streams, in one instance, a few inches below a dead frog in an advanced sate of decomposition. In December sixteen larvae of A. maculatus, and nineteen of A. minimus were found in a brick and cement tank on the site of the former Taikco Sanator- ium. A seepage from a rock was trickling into the tank. The site is approximately 1,200 feet above sea level, one mile as the crow flies from the nearest habitation and two and a half miles by road. No one had been living there for two years so that approximately to human dwellings would not appear to be es- sential to the existence of A. maculatus or A. minimus. Ravine streams met with on the Tytam path, over half a mile from human habitations have been selected for future investigations as to what species can be me: with in such situations. Repulse Bay, cattle, horses, and pigs are absent, yet larvae of A. maculatus and A. Minimus can be found, so that such animals

ould not appear to be necessary for these Anophelines.

Ai

Larvae of A. hyrcanus were the next most commonly met with. The adults were not obtained in large numbers either in day collections or in night catches except when the night catch- ing was done near a swampy area as will be mentioned later. It may be that this mosquito generally leaves soon after it has fed, and so would not be numerous in day collections. This matter requires further investigation. From the results of searches made in a swampy area this mosquito would appear to have special times for breeding.

Larvae of A. minimus were obtained in greatest abundance after the rains in rocky bedded boulder strewn streams, especially in the neighbourhood of the hills. They were also found in irrigation ditches. They have been found in such streams and ditches in highly cultivated, thickly populated areas, where a good deal of pollution should find its way into these water courses. These larvae do not thrive so well in captivity as do those of A. maculatus and A, hyrcanus, and adults are not so easily obtained from them. The larvae are not often found alone being mostly associated with either A, maculatus or A. hyrcanus or both, very ten only one or two larvae were met with in a considerable ngth of stream or ditch where numerous larvae of the other arieties were found. During the rainy season whilst good num- wers of the adults were being captured with the ovaries in an dvanced stage of development, very few larvae could be found the same area. These mosquitoes can be obtained during the

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day in huts thatched with palm leaf, but are difficult to get from the houses inhabited by Europeans and better class Chinese. except perhaps in dark corners and recesses. They have been captured in cow houses and pigsties in the New Territories. They are of the greatest importance as malaria carriers and also harbour filarial worms which are most likely derived from human

sources.

Larvae of A. jeyporiensis were met with in numbers only during the last quarter of the year. They have been found in hill streams like the preceding, but the great majority were obtained from grassy swamps. They have also been found in grassy seepages and in wet cultivation. Most of the adults were obtained by catching during the last quarter of the year. These mosquitoes have been found infected with malaria; filaria worms have also been found in them but not in an advanced stage of development.

Very few larvae of A. karwari, A. tesselatus, A. maculipalpis and A. aitkenii were encountered during the year. Unless careful examination is made there is considerable danger of confusing the larvae of A. maculatus, A. karwari, and A. maculipalpis. Some A. minimus larvae have go: poorly developed tergal plates but attention to other details will prevent a mistake. Some ten- tative feeding experiments on the human subject were made with A. hyrcanus, A. maculatus, A. minimus, and A. jeyporiensis, obtained from larvae hatched out in the Laboratory. The insects were kept in lamp glasses covered at both ends with mosquito netting, these were stood on damp lint. After hatching, the mosquitoes were allowed access to raisins for a day, later, by withholding the raisins, the majority could be induced to bite and take blood, in the case of A, maculatus, the raisins had to be withheld for two days but not so in the case of the others: A. hyrcanus fed most readily.

Culicines.

Larvae and adults of the following were obtained during the year. Aedes albopictus, togoi, japonicus, macfarlanei. C. quin- quefasciatus (fatigans), C. vishnui, C. bitaeniorhynchus, C. mimeticus, C. (Culicioymyia) pallidothorax, C. virgatipes, Armi- geres obturbans, Megarhinus splendens, Mansonia uniformis. Uranotaenia macfarlanei, a species of Uranotaenia and species of Lutzia. The following hitherto not recorded for Hong Kong have been met with and identified as Aedes niveus, Armigeres magnus. a species of Taeniorhychus, a species of Ficalbia (probably Fical- bia luzonensis) a species of Armigeres, probably Armigeres malayi. Specimens of these have been sent to Mr. Edwards the British Museum for his opinion. Two species of Cerato- pogoninae were identified by him as Culicoides anophelis (Edw.. and as Lasiohelia (probably L. stimulans de Meig.). The former has been caught on several occasions attached to A. minimus. the latter is the little dark fly which bites viciously in the hot

.

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weather. What appears to be a species of Culicoides has also been found on C. fatigans. Larvae found in a pitcher plant by Dr. Herklots were identified as those of Armigeres magnus, and a species of Culex. By hatching out single larvae and mounting the larval and pupal skins thrown off, endeavours were made to obtain as many specimens as possible of mosquitoes and the corresponding skins. It would seem by this method that other spotted wing species of Culex akin to Culex mimeticus are to be found in this part of the world. Mounts of the Culicine larvae in pure Carbolic ringed with Canada Balsam, have turned out most satisfactory.

Specimens of larvae have been received from Dr. Hu, Nan- king, and of mosquitoes from Dr. Li, Hangchow. Specimen . of mosquitoes and their larvae have been sent to Dr. F. W. Edwards, British Museum, Dr. W. V. King, Mosquito Investi- gations, Bureau of Science, Manila, to Major Covell and Captain Barraud (Malaria Survey of India, Kasauli), to Dr. Li, Bureau of Entomology, Hangehow, and Dr. Hu, Nanking.

(b) MOSQUITO-BORNE DISEASES.

Malaria.

From he results of the dissections of Anophelines done dur- ing 1932, it is seen that A. minimus is an important carrier in the Colony. During the last quarter of the year A. jeyporiensis was also found infected. It is hoped during the coming year to get a larger number of dissections done in the early months than were done in 1932 in order to ascertain with greater certainty how matters stand as regards the infection rate during this period. It would appear from the 1932 dissections that malaria is more prevalen in the second half of the year, no infected glands being found until the middle of June when over five hundred A. minimus had been dissected from a malarious area. If this is borne out by further research the incidence in the first half must be largely due to relapses and infections from the previous year. Records obtained from the R.A.M.C. authorities indicated as formerly, a much higher incidence for the second half of the year, forty-one fresh cases out of a total of forty-five fresh cases amongst British troops; eighteen out of twenty-four amongst Indian ́roops. The figures for Lai Chi Kok Gaol (male) which is close to a hill stream where A. minimus has been found, were eighty-seven cases of malaria for the year, sixty-six of which occurred from July onwards. The 1930 and 1931 figures show the same seasonal incidence. Amongst the Government servants (excluding coolies) ou of one hundred and fifty-one cases diagnosed as malaria, one hundred and thirteen occurred during the latter half of the year as was similarly found in 1930 and 1931.

Statistics for 1932 obtained from M.O.H. show that 455 deaths were ascribed to malaria in the Colony and New Territor- ies, these being 2.28 per cent of the to al deaths. The death

M 130

rate per thousand from malaria is given as .56. In certain areas where the majority of the population reside, extensive drainage has been largely carried out and in consequence there are, as a rule, no facilities for breeding of Anophelines but where such exist, as in suburban and rural areas on the Island and mainland. the occurrence of malaria can be reckoned on where the Anophe- line carriers flourish as is borne out by the investigations made in the past.

In Table I figures are given regarding hospi al admissions. supplied by, the Government Civil, Kowloon, Victoria, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok Gaol, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda, Alice Memorial, War Memorial, and the Yeung Wo Hospitals and their relations to admissions for malaria. The malaria admissions are also arranged according to quarters of the year and to method of diagnosis. As malaria is not a notifiable disease, rates cannot be given for the general popula- tion. The clinical diagnosis of malaria is not a satisfactory one.

In Table II statistics of cases treated, supplied by the following Dispensaries are shown: Tai Po, Un Long, Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, Hastern, Yaumati, and Hung Hom.

Table III deals with hospi al admissions of Government servants (excluding coolies) in relation to admissions for malaria.

Table IV is a similar table for the Police including Water Police. Certain stations are situa ed in areas where malaria is not likely to be contracted, others in rural areas where night patrol work adds to the risk of infection.

Table XIII gives the results of examinations of blood films for malaria made from prisoners admitted to Victoria Gaol. arranged in districts according to addresses supplied. The para- sites are no classified, as in the great majority of positive find- ings, the diagnosis could only be made from the thick films supplied, and could not be established from the thin films owing to the scantiness of the infections. The films were obtained through the cooperation of the M.O. Gaol and his staff, and were stained in the Laboratory of the Bureau.

Table XIV gives details as to results of examination of blood for malarial parasites in connection with investigations made in the corresponding localities.

Twenty-six children were examined on the Island, none had enlarged spleens. On the mainland two hundred and seventy eight were inspected, eighteen had enlarged spleens, or 6.47 per cent. Table XV gives details and localities.

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Records obtained from the R.A.M.C. authorities regarding incidence of malarial infection amongst the troops, British and Indian, are as follows, (relapses not being taken into account) :- British troops, number of cases of malaria contracted during the year was 45, of which one occurred in 1st. Quarter, 3 in 2nd. Quarter, 16 in 3rd. Quarter, 25 in 4th. Quarter. Calculated on an average strength of 2,271, the admission rate for the year was 19.82 per 1,000. Amongst the Indian troops there were 24 infections, of which there was none in 1st. Quarter, 6 in 2nd. Quarter, 10 in 3rd. Quar.er, 8 in 4th. Quarter. These work out for the year as 18.00 per 1,000 on an average strength of 1,389.

Dengue.

Ten cases were admitted to the Government Hospitals in 1932. No specimens of Aedes argenteus were met with, but Aedes albopictus were frequently encountered. This mosquito has been experimentally infected with dengue in other countries.

Filaria.

Two cases of disease due to filarial infection were reported from the Government Hospitals during the year. Whilst dis- secting an Anopheles minimus obtained from the Wong Chuk Hang Village area for malarial infection, a filaria worm was ob- served emerging from the head after it had been pulled off. On the thorax being teased out, more worms were observed. After- wards other A. minimus were found infected from this area. In consequence thick blood films were obtained from 106 residents in the locality; these were taken at 10 p.m. in the month of June. Microfilaria were found in 13 of these or 12.26 per cent, and malaria parasites in 6 or 4.62 per cent. One person harboured both kinds of parasites. Fractically all stages of development were met with in A. minimus, the earliest being a worm which having penetrated the midgut had become entangled in the tracheal tubes on the exterior. Sausage shaped forms were found in the thorax, also long motile forms, and long motile forms in the head. No worms were met with in the proboscis although frequently looked for, but these mosquitoes are usually only kept until midgut appears free from blood.

Complete developmen: of the alimentary canal. and the narrowing of the worm beyond the anus, has been observed in some of the specimens. Seven A. minimus have on dissection been found infected with malarial and filarial parasites. On thirteen occasions the worms have been found in the abdominal cavity of the insect. C. fatigans and A. jeyporiensis have also been found infected. In the case of the C. fatigans, the worms were all of the long motile variety, they were met with in thorax and head but not in proboscis. No long forms were found in A. jyporiensis. Results of dissections for filaria are shown in Table XII. Six thick films from one thousand five hundred and thirty

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seven gaol admissions contained microfilaria. These were taken in the day-time. Material consisting of thick blood films con- taining microfilaria, and preparations of filaria from the mos- quitoes, have been forwarded to Dr. R. Hoeppli, Peiping Union Medical College, for investigation and report.

(c) CATCHING AND DISSECTING OF ANOPHELINES FOR MALARIAL INFECTION.

(1) Wong Chuk Hang Village & Surroundings.

Night catching by trapping was done during January in an empty garage on the outskirts of the village where a spleen rate of 82 per cent had been obtained in 1931 by the Acting Malario- logist amongst 62 children examined in the locality. The in- vestigator slept upon a camp bed protected by a mosquito net, outside this was a larger mosquito ne: supported on four poles. This larger net had flaps in the sides weighted by rollers. When in use the flaps were rolled up. At intervals, the investigator got up, let down the flaps and searched for mosquitoes with an elec- tric torch. On 22nd January a visit was paid to the locality and five A. minimus gorged with blood were found in huts. These huts are thatched with palm leaf which also enters largely into the composition of the walls. Night catching was discontinued at the garage but was resumed again in May in a room of a house owned by Mr. Li who kindly placed it at the disposal of the Bureau, and the trapping apparatus was transferred there from the garage.

In July an I.P. tent was pitched near the house and a coolie engaged to look after it, sleep in it and catch mos- quitoes. Streams which had been found to harbour Anopheline larvae especially those of A. maculatus and A. minimus were close to and on all sides of the house and tent. Night catching was done on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of each week by the probationers in turn.

The tent was inspected on arrival at 8 p.m. to ascertain if the coolie were at his post and occasionally during the night. Catching was done at intervals until midnight in house and tent and the coolie then brought up his catching bottle and its con- tents to the house. Between midnight and dawn another catch was made and again before daylight. The coolie was provided with camp bed, mosquito net, alarm clock and electric torch: when not actually catching he remained inside the net. His blood has been examined on five occasions at monthly intervals: neither microfilaria nor malaria parasites were found, although these were present in local people. Mosquitoes with one or other of such infections have been captured by him in the tent from time to time, so that it would appear that A. minimus does not confine its visits to one habitation. The probationer on duty brought the results of the night catches to the Laboratory on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays mornings on other days of the week except Sundays and holidays, morning catches were

-

M 133

done by him between 9.30 and 12.30 a.m. and the results of the tent catches of the previous night obtained. Additional morning catches were done from time to time by the other probationers as well.

On reaching the Laboratory the mosquitoes were trans- ferred to small lamp glasses both ends of which were covered with netting. These were placed in a box the bottom of which was lined with lint always kept moist. Raisins were placed on top of the lamp glasses for the mosquitoes to feed upon. The box is provided with legs which stand in saucers containing a disinfectant to prevent ants gaining access.

The dissection were done by the aid of the binocular microscope in the usual manner. All positive results of dissections were submitted to the Malario- logist before being recorded.

Results of catches and dissections are shown in Tables VII, VIII, IX, X, XI. In this neighbourhood the best places for obtaining Anophelines in the morning catches, were in the palm leaf huts around the village; they were not so readily found in the village houses built of stone and roofed with by tiles. During one morning, two probationers spent the same time, one in searching huts, the other in searching village houses. Nineteen Anophelines were obtained from the huts, six from the houses. The Anophelines were most commonly met with on the dingy mosquito curtains, and some on the sides of the huts and beneath tables in dark corners. An uninhabited hut used as a tool shed was repeatedly searched but only on one occasion was an Ano- pheline found in it-an A. minimus, although they were fre- quently round in adjacent huts. No Anophelines were found in empty houses or in the tent if unoccupied the previous night. This would indicate that a blood meal and not shelter was the object of their frequenting habitations. Numerous pig sties were searched but harboured no Anophelines; these, however, have low walls and high roofs supported on pillars and would not be likely resting places. There were no cowsheds. A. minimus was the commonest Anopheline found in day and night catches, it was caught at all hours from dusk until dawn; in the last quarter of the year A. jeyporiensis was encountered in compara- tively large numbers. In most larval surveys the larvae of A. maculatus are in great majority especially when compar- ed with A. minimus, but in these catches the adults were scarce and that in an area where their larvae were numerous at all times. Few A. hyrcanus were captured but their larvae are not found abundantly in hill streams. It is proposed to move the tent closer to a swamp where their larvae have been obtained in large numbers and which is near habitations from which infected Anophelines have been obtained. The first infection recorded was in April, one oocyst 15 × diameter in an A. minimus, and the first sporozoites were met with also in an A. minimus in the middle of June. The inhabitants of the locality rendered every assistance and informed the investigators that malaria did not start until July, a statement which was confirmed in this instance by the results of the dissections of

M 134

the Anophelines. The question of Anopheline infection by monkeys does not arise as there are no monkeys at large on the Island and no captive monkeys in this locality. This point has been raised by Dr. R. Green in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine Vol. XXV, No. 6. The question also arises as to the mosquito infection being derived from birds (Mayne, Indian Journal Medical Research, 1928). None of the oocysts seen had the appearance described as the result of bird infection. The experiments of Russell in the Philippines do not lend support to this view as regards the local A. minimus (American Journal of Tropical Medicine, Vol. XI, No. 2, 1931).

The catching of such Anophelines as were obtained in this neighbourhood required a considerable expenditure of time and

energy.

(2) Hong Kong Volunteer Defence Corps Camp.

Members of the staff who were under canvas during six week ends in November and December obtained 43 Anophelines from tents between dusk and 10 p.m., 28 were A. hyrcanus, 7 A. jeyporiensis, 6 A. minimus, 1 A. maculatus, 1 A. tesselatus. None of these were found infected on dissection. There was swampy land adjacent likely to harbour A. hyrcanus,

(3) Woo Li Hop Village, and the adjacent matshed for road-making coolies.

The coolies were engaged in making a road to the Shing Mun Dam site, and were housed in a building composed of bamboo poles and palm leaf thatch known as amatshed. There has been a good deal of malaria amongst them and amongst the villagers. Searches were made at various times in the matshed, houses, cowhouses, and pigsties of the village, and the results are indicated in Table IX. The cowhouses are substantially built and dimly lighted, a torch light being required for the search. One investigator complained of having been bitten on three occasions in one morning. In some instances the cowhouses form part of the owners' dwelling, in others they are separate. The pigsties have walls reaching to the roof and are dark within. This has been the first opportunity of search- ing such buildings, and future results are likely to be interesting owing to the conditions of shelter different from the Wong Chuk Hang area. Infected mosquitoes were found in cowhouses but none so far in pigsties. The results of the dissections are found in Table XI.

(4) Kowloon Tong, Shaukiwan, Pokfulam, Ngau Tau Kok and Shek 0.

During visits to above places a few Anophelines were obtained in brief searches, but none were found infected.

M 135

(d) INVESTIGATIONS AS TO PREVALENCE OF MALARIA IN

CERTAIN AREAS.

These were continued at Kowloon Tong, others were com menced at Shek O, Lai Chi Kok Gaol, and Shing Mun Dam. Areas previously dealt with were again investigated with the object of obtaining certain information, namely the Ravine above Pokfulam Reservoir, Wong Chuk Hang locality between Aberdeen and Shouson Hill, the surroundings of the site for the new Government Civil Hospital, and a Ravine at Repulse Bay. Minor investigations were made at Barker Road where breeding places of A. maculatus were found; at Ngau Tau Kok where spleen rates were taken and a larval survey done; at Deep Water Bay where the blood of eleven servants at the Golf Club was examined and no malaria parasites were found, although hill streams are close by, however mosquito nets were in use and quinine was being issued.

Kowloon Tony.

The area investigated at Kowloon Tong extended half a mile outwards from the periphery of this Garden City and required as much time as would be needed for several ordinary surveys, owing to its extent. Kowloon Tong is approximately rectangular in shape, its long border being perpendicular to a range of hills which is parallel to and adjacent to a short border. Several streams flow down from these hills, and the majority soon finds their way into trained channels. Numerous larvae of A. maculatus and A. minimus have been found in these streams. Whilst little evidence of the prevalence of malaria was forthcoming from the portion remote from the hills, this was not the case in the neighbourhood of the hills. A spleen rate of 3:45% was obtained amongst the children of the cultivators in the neighbourhood, these, as a rule, resided at some distance from the hills as the narrow heads of the valleys do not afford much scope for growing crops.

for growing crops. For blood

examinations servants were considered to be the best material owing to their being less careful, as a rule, as to the use of mosquito nets and attention to adequate treatment of malaria when contracted. Thick blood films were taken from 187 servants living within quarter mile from the hill foot, 14 of these contained malarial parasites or 7.49%. Out of 160 films taken trom those living half mile and more from the hill foot, only I was found positive or 0.63%. In the blood films of 103 servants living between quarter mile and half mile from the hill foot, 5 infections were found or 4.85%.

Shek O.

Owing to complaints of malaria received, visits were paid to Shek Ŏ towards the end of the year and arrangements made for the making of a map of the area concerned. Larval surveys have been done and spleen rates taken of the village children.

M 136

in Old and New Shek O Villages. Two A. minimus were found in two houses of Old Shek O, but in New Shek O no mosquitoes were found in the village houses, which were searched as far as the temple on the occasion of the spleen survey. No mosquitoes were found in the cow sheds of the village but these were fairly weli lighted and ventilated. The blood of fifty servants were examined. One Club servant was actually suffering from malaria at the time and stated that he had been taking quinine, yet parasites were found without difficulty in the thick drop film, although none could be demonstrated in the thin film. During the course of erection of a new residence a considerable number of workmen had been housed in the locality. As the majority do not use mosquito nets, they may be considered an important factor in the introduction and spread of malaria where suitable Anophelines are present.

Lai Chi Kok Gaol,

Owing to the incidence of malaria there during the latter half of the year, a visit was paid to the Gaols for both male and female prisoners and the surroundings inspected. Arrange- ments have been made for a complete survey, in the meantime, certain recommendations have been proposed for consideration.

Shing Mun Dam.

Visits have been paid in November and December to the proposed camp site for the labourers who will be engaged at work on the Dam, and to the site for European residences. Larval surveys have been done around them. From investiga- tions made, there has been a considerable amount of malaria in the Village of Woo Li Hop and amongst the contractor's coolies, engaged on making the road to the Dam, who were housed close to the village; steps have been taken with a view to making the Dam site healthy. Results of examinations for enlarged spleens and malarial parasites are given in Table XV and XIV.

Repetition of Pokfulam Ravine Survey.

During August a larval survey was repeated in the upper part of the stream which flows into Pokfulam Reservoir and which lies in the ravine below the Peak Hotel and Peak Mansions. The stream was searched as far as its junction with the branch from Mount Austin Barracks and all the included tributaries as well. As in December 1931, very few Anopheline larvae were met with, only 12 A. maculatus in the whole area. It is hoped to repeat the survey in 1933 after the rains, as numerous potential breeding places were present, and malarial infections have been recorded from the locality.

;

M 137

Repetition of Surveys in Wong Chuk Hang Neighbourhood.

Larval surveys were done here from time to time.

A large ravine swamp on the outskirts was searched in March and about 2,000 larvae of A. hyrcanus collected. In August practic- ally no Anophelines were found at the head of this swamp which was carefully searched as far as a bund which runs across it and which is 165 yards from the origin. In November this part had been recently trenched for cultivation, very few Anopheline larvae were found. Below the bund, however, the swamp yielded 760 larvae of A. jeyporiensis, 269 A. hyrcanus in three mornings' search by two searchers. Some of this portion had been in rice cultivation and there was water in the rice stubble, larvae of A. jeyporiensis were found in this as well as in the uncultivated swampy portion. In a rushy patch which had been dug up by cultivators numerous larvae of Mansonia and some Taeniorphynchus were found but none in the undisturbed portions, these larvae do not usually appear near the surface as they obtain their oxygen from the roots of plants. During the rainy season adult A. minimus could be obtained from huts in this locality whose ovaries were in an advanced state of development. So far larvae of A. minimust have not been found in numbers in hill streams during that season so attempts were made to ascertain if they could be met with in more quiet waters. Two ponds close to the swamp above mentioned containing vegetation and fed by seepages were searched in July and August, no Anopheline larvae were found. They had also been searched in February and November. In February a few A. minimus larvae were met with and plenty of A. hyrcanus, in November larvae of A. hyrcanus, A. jeyporiensis and a few A. minimus were found. It would seem that larvae of A. hyrcanus and A. jeyporiensis are more plentiful at certain seasons. In December portions of the main strearn which flows through the area were seached. In one portion about 700 yards long, lying amongst the hills and receiving tributaries from them, 683 A. minimus larvae, 662 A. hyrcanus, 284 A. maculatus, 10 A. jeyporiensis were obtained. A portion 300 yards long after the stream had left the hills and was receiving no tributaries yielded 190 A. hyrcanus larvae and 6 A. minimus.

Repetition of Surveys around New G.C.H. site.

A

A complete survey had been done during the period of July 7th--August 7th, 1931 over an area of half mile radius. as indicated by the circle on attached map, the centre of the circle corresponding to the site. The only Anopheline larvae found, were those of A. maculatus and these in great abundance. spleen rate done by the Acting Malariologist resulted in the examination of 150 children and the finding of 22 enlarged spleens, a rate of 14%. Thick and thin blood films were taken from 21 servants living in houses along the Pokfulam Road situated near the site, but no malarial infection was found.

M 138

-

The places where the children resided are indicated by fractions with arrows leading from them. The denominator of the fraction indicates the number of children examined at the place, the numerator the number with enlarged spleens. If a line be drawn on the map from Sandy Bay to R.B.L. 2380, it will divide the circle into a small and a large sector, in the small sector 26 children were examined, 19 had enlarged spleens or 73.08%. In the large section 124 children were examined 3 of which had enlarged spleens or 2.43%. In 1932 a complete survey of the area was done during the period April 25th- May 20th; partial surveys were done in June, and in September, and a complete survey during December. 3878 A. maculatus larvae, 33 A. hyrcanus, 1 A. minimus, were found in the April and May survey; 245 A. maculatus in the June; 869 A. maculatus, 2 A. minimus in the September one, but at the end of the year 1615 A. maculatus larvae, 274 A. minimus. Practically all the larvae of A. minimus were found within the smaller sector of the circle (where the children with enlarged spleens were) one adjacent to it, elsewhere they occurred in small numbers. From this it would appear that A. maculatus is of no great importance as a carrier of malaria in comparision with A. minimus..

There does not appear to be any very obvious reason as to why A. minimus larvae should be found in one sector in comparative abundance and not in the other. From their origin as far as Pokfulam Road, the streams are of the usual type, boulder strewn, with rocky beds, flowing between the spurs of the ridge in their courses towards the sea, with bushes. shrubs and trees growing on the banks but as is usually in this Colony, in only a few places, providing sufficient shade to inhibit A. maculatus or A. minimus laying their eggs in the water. Between Pokfulam Road and the sea other factors come into play, as regards B and the tributaries on its left bank an dstreams C, D, E. In the lower part of B next to Sandy Bay the stream is used by laundry men for the daily washing of clothes, no larvae were found there, no doubt owing to the action of the soap on the water. Just above Victoria Road the branches on the left bank contain washing places. with the same results. From hence onward as far as stream E most of the land is cultivated by the Dairy Farm. On the slopes are several cattle byres and pig yards the drainage from these usually finds its way into a sump and is delivered daily into a system of irrigation ditches for the purposes of enriching the soil and only occasionally finds its way directly into the hill streams. The manure is stored in shelters with cement floors and is used for fertilizing purposes. Guinea grass (Panicum maximum) is grown for the use of the cattle. Very few A. minimus were found in these portions of the streams within the cultivated areas, but neither were they found in abundance above the Pokfulam Road except in a branch on the right bank of stream A. Below this road they were found in a branch

'M 139

-

on the left bank of A, and in most abundance in B. It is possible that A. maculatus can tolerate a higher degree of pollution than A. minimus and can flourish in pools and streams with a swifter current than A minimus can exist in.

Repetition of Repulse Bay area Survey.

A survey was made in a ravine at Repulse Bay during April, there had been a previous spell of dry weather and in this instance as many larvae of A. minimus were collected as of A. maculatus. Similar results were obtained in a previous survey done in 1930 after the rains.

(e) MOSQUITO NUISANCES.

Complaints as to above were investigated at Lai Chi Kok Gaol (female), the Peak District, Stubb's Road, Shek 0, St. John's Cathedral. Aedes albopictus was the culprit at the Cathedral, C. fatigans in the other localities. At the Peak the larvae of C. fatigans were found in abundance in the water in gully traps. There had previously been a prolonged spell of dry weather and consequently no flushing out of the gully traps by showers. At Shek O the larvae were found in the aerobic compartment of a a septic tank, other septic tanks examined in the locality were found to have both compartments covered with a thick scum and no larvae were found.

Mosquitoes captured and sent in by residents of Pokfulam were identified as C. fatigans although numerous breeding places of A. maculatus were in the vicinity, none of these figured in the catch. In this connection a complaint regarding biting insects was made by the Principal of Victoria Home, Kowloon. These were considered to belong to the Gamasidae and to be derived from birds nesting in the roof. Recommendations for dealing with the nuisance were made accordingly in all instances.

(f) INSTRUCTION OF PROBATIONERS AND TEACHING OF

MOSQUITOLOGY.

The instruction of the probationers was continued during the year.

As no local infections were forthcoming from the dissections made in the early months, material was obtained from Dr. Walch, Java, and Dr. Manalang of the Philippines for the purposes of demonstration. The probationers have now had considerable practice in the diagnosis of infected midguts and salivary glands. They can make permanent mounts and stained preparations of such. They can recognize microfilaria and malarial parasites in thick blood films. They can under- take permanent preparations of the hypopygia. They have had considerable experience in obtaining Anophelines for dissecting and in keeping them alive in the Laboratory until required. in the rearing of mosquitoes from larvae and in association of any particular larva and with the corresponding mosquito.

M 140

They have attained proficiency in the use of such instruments and appliances as the Range Finder, Abbe Drawing Apparatus. In obtaining of blood films from Chinese, in the examination of Chinese children for enlarged spleens, they have been of great assistance. Captain Gore, R.A.M.C., continued a course of instruction from the previous year.

(g) Co-OPERATION WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND PRIVATE

INDIVIDUALS,

Visits were paid to Lyemun with the Drainage Engineer. P.W.D., the R.A.M.C. and R.E. Staff, in connection with drainage schemes. Sookumpoo Valley was also visited with the Drainage Engineer. The side of the matsheds housing the coolies engaged on road making on the Stanley Peninsula was inspected with the Medical Officer, St. Stephen's College, and the position considered to be satisfactory. Visits were paid by the Staff to the New Service Reservoir at the Botanical Gardens opposite Government House, no breeding places were found. Shing Mun was visited with the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services and the Resident Engineer, Shing Mun Dam. Inspections were made of the drainage undertaken by the P.W.D. at Lyemun, Taipoo, Sookunpoo. and Stanley. Larvae and adults sent in by the Medical Officer, St. Stephen's College and by the Medical Officer of Health were examined and reports furnished. Papers on the subjects of mosquitoes and mosquito-borne diseases were written for "Caduceus" and the "Hong Kong Naturalist".

'

M 141

Table I.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS, 1932.

Govt. Civil, Kowloon Victoria, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok Gaol (male), Lai Chi Kok Gaol (female), Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda, Alice Memorial, War Memorial, and Yeung Wo Hospitals.

Govt. Civil Kowloon Admissions Admissions

Victoria Victoria Gaol Admissions Admissions

Nationality

causes

All Mala- All Mala-

ria causes ria

All Mala- All Mala- causes ria causes ria

Europeans

322

Indians

960

110

3 743 22

45

416

17

17

Chinese

3,329

68

1 275

49

3

852

12

Others

106

3

47

35

Nationality

Europeans Indians

Chinese

Others

Lai Chi Kok | Lai Chi Kok

Goal (M)

Admissions

Gaol (F) Admissions

Tung Wah Admissions

All Mala-

All Mala- All Mala- causes ria causes ria causes ria

Tung Wah Eastern Admissions

All Mala- causes ria

347

87

50

6 11.004 6835,150

61

:

Kwong Wah Admissions

Matilda Admissions

Alice Memorial Admissions

War Memorial Admissions

Nationality

All Mala- All Mala- causes ria causes ria

All Mala- causes ria

All Mala-

causes ria

Europeans

314

306

32

Indians

Chinese

12,856 198

2,146

57

7

Others....

:.

M 142

Nationality

Yeung Wo Admissions

All Mala- canses ria

Europeans Indians Chinese

Others...

23

1,519

SUMMARY OF ADMISSIONS.

Percentage of admissions

Nationality. All causes.

Cases of Malaria.

for Malaria.

Europeans...

2,141

106

4.95

Indians

986

111

11.25

Chinese...... 38,611

1,331

3.45

Others

192

7

3 64

Total ...... 41,930

1,555

3.70

MALARIA ADMISSIONS.

Diagnosed

During

microscopically.

Diagnosed clinically.

1st Quarter

2391

2nd

337

473

1,082

3rd

460

""

4th

519 J

>"

1,555

473

1,08%

1

J

M 143

Table II.

Patients treated at outdoor Dispensaries during 1932 at Tai Po, Un Long. Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, Eastern, Yaumati,

and Hung Hom.

Total

Malaria

Percentage of

Dispensaries.

patients

treated.

cases treated.

cases of Malaria treated to total

cases.

Tai Po

8,572

648

7.56

Un Long

7,021

116

1.65

Western Public

11,049

271

2.45

Kowloon City

11,633

1,758

15.11

Sham Shui Po

20,837

918

4.41

Shaukiwan

52,522

679

1.29

Aberdeen

11,482

187

1.63

Central

29,544

244

0,81

Eastern

20,368

230

1.13

Yaumati

75,362

2,082

2.76

Hung Hom

11,260

290

5.24

Total......

259,650

7,723

2.97

Malaria cases treated.

During

Diagnosed microscopically.

Diagnosed

clinically.

1st Quarter

1,000 1

2nd

1,497

"

167

7,556

3rd

2,437

77

4th

2,789 J

"

7,723

167

7,556

M: 144

Table III.

Government Employees Malarial Admissions.

Nationality.

Average No. of employees.

Malarial Admissions.

Malarial Admissions

per 1,000.

Europeans.

843

23

27.28

Indians

1,014

89

87.77

Chinese

3,696

39

10.55

Others

100

Total

5,653

151

26.71

During

1st Quarter

2nd

Malarial admissions.

Diagnosed microscopically.

Diagnosed clinically.

161

22

88

63

120

31

50 J

27

3rd

4th

>>

151

120

31

J

M 145

Table IV.

Police Strength Including Water Police & Malarial Admissions to Hospitals, 1932.

Stations.

Average Strength.

Malarial

Admissions.

Central & Guards Office

548

26

Upper Levels

83

Gough Hill

35

Central Fire Station..

85

Sai Ying Pun

92

Pokfulam

5

Aberdeen

16

Wan Chai No. 2

100

1

Bay View

14

Wong Nai Chung Gap..

5

Shaukiwan

IX

Stanley

5

Tai Tam Tuk

4

Quarry Bay

18

Yaumati

103

Sham Shui Po

40

Mongkok

42

Kowloon Water Works

1

Hung Hom

36

Kowloon City

36

Water Police...

Tsim Sha Tsui Tsun Wan..... Cheung Chau

27

74

12

18

12

Tai O...

20

Green Island....

1

:: Now i wa

2

Police Training School

133

6

Au Tau.

15

1

Castle Peak



1

Lok Ma Chau

12

4

Ping Shan

10

3

Sha Tin.......

Sai Kung Sha Tau Kok

Sheung Shui.....

Tai Po

9

2

II

2

13

2

16

7

18

Tai Ku Ling..

Lin Ma Hang

TOTAL......

1,697

112

12

8

M 146

-

Summary of admissions.

Nationality.

Strength.

Malarial Admissions.

Malarial Admissions

per 1,000.

Europeans..

217

7

32.25

Chinese

781

26

33.29

Indians

699

79

113.02

Total.........

1,697

112

66.00

During

1st Quarter 15

151

Malarial admissions.

Diagnosed microscopically.

Diagnosed clinically.

2ud

19

22

90

22

3rd

4th

37

""

Total...... 112

90

22

Table V.

Anopheline Larvae examined microscopically during 1932.

Month

A. ma-

culatus

A. hyr-

canus

A.

minimus

A.

karwari

A.

A. jeypo- A. macu-

aitkeni

riensis

lipalpis

January..

57

665

February.

1

169

19

March

325

2,216

56

April

1,638

194

142

May

3,388

185

158

June

473

61

35

1

July.

841

220

121

August

799

9

22

September

2,142

176

586

October

3,207

2,076

327

November.

640

1,598

324

December

1,553

1,448

1,099

A. tea-

selatus

Total

722

11

200

2

64

2,666

1,974

3,731

Total

15,064

9,017

2,889

1

2

ลง

570

1,182

830

2,904

48

31

5,689

1,496

235

4,059

4,335

1,854

34

1 28,862

M 147

Table VI.

Adult Mosquitoes hatched out from large larvae and pupae during 1932.

Month

A. ma-

culatus

A. hyr-

A.

canus

minimus

A

karwari

A.

aitkeni

riensis

A. jeypo- A. macu- lipalpis

A. tea-

selatus

Total

January.

10

46

51

February.

120

1

121

March

33

351

18

1

403

April

348

25

11

384

May

619

9

630

June

69

11

July.

227

30

August

184

6

September.

536

78

104

October

436

142

November,

112

63

December

261

269

164

ཪྻ ལ ུ ⇨—

113

1

278

192

718

37

20

635

10

121

2

309

63

757

Total

2,830

1,150

399

*2

186

23

1

4,591

M 148 -

Locality

Table VII.

Results of Night Catches of Anophelines, 1932,

SPECIES

A.

Jeyporiensis

A.

Hyrcanus

A.

Kawari

F

M

F

M

F

Month during which catching took place.

No. of nights when catching

A.

took place.

Maculatus

A.

Minimus

M

F

M

F

M

Garage at

January,

Wong Chuk

Hang Village.

:

2

Mr. Li's House

May

14

near Village.

June

13

6

July

12

1

N.B. No night

August.

15

1

10

catching dur-

September

12

ing February,

October

12

4

LOLOLA

14

1

2

33

27

11

1

3

4

March

and

November

14

3

4

April.

December

9

:

1

1

Tent near Mr. Li's House at Wong Chuk Hang Village.

May

June

July

August.

September

October

26

24

November

December

ÔNNNN

27

25

25

26

24

26475O LOCOT

20

1

2

42

I

1

7

02062

291

365

93

63

3

11

47

10

8

34

24

1

I

2

18

9

1

Total.

285

57

87

3

1,027

50

21

1

M 149 -

Locality.

Table VIII.

Result of Morning Catches of Anophelines, 1932.

Month during which catching took place.

A..

Jeyporiensis.

SPECIES.

A.

Maculatus.

A.

Minimus.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

A.

Hyrcanus.

F.

M.

F.

January

February.

22

2

1

2

27

2

1

March...

10

72

Wong Chuk Hang

April.

44

178

1

May

1

24

267

Village and

June

10

76

July

18

162

1

Surroundings.

August

13

250

1

September..

21

313

4

1

October

2

11

277

65

1

November

2

200

109

2

December

2

1

117

1

24

Total.

6

CO

157

1,961

7

211

8

-M 150 -

Table IX.

Mosquito caught at Woo Li Hop Village 1932.

Date.

Dwelling.

SPECIES.

A.

A.

Minimus.

Jeyporiensis.

A.

Maculatus.

A.

Hyrcanus.

M 151 -

November 25th

Matshed

5

LO

1

December 15th

Village houses

6

14

1

Matshed

Cowhouses

19

12

December 16th

Matshed.

1

3

2

1

Village house...

Cowhouses

26

21

4

7

December 28th

Village houses

1

5

Matshed

5

17

I

Pigsties.

1

5

M 152

Table X.

Records of total Dissections for Malarial Infection of Anophelines caught at Wong Chuk Hang Village and Vicinity during 1932.

No. with No. with No. with

Month

Species

No. dissected.

A. maculatus.

A. minimus..

January

A. jeyporiensis...

A. hyrcanus.

A. maculatus.

A. minimus.

222-7

February...

A. jeyporiensis....

A. hyrcanus

1

A. maculatus.

A. minimus...

48

March

A. jeyporiensis.

A. hyrcanus

A. maculatus...

April .....

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis...........

A. hyrcanus

May

June

July...

August...

A. maculatus.. A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis.. A. hyrcanus A. maculatus.. A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis.... A. hyrcanus

A. maculatus... A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis....

A. hyrcanus

A. maculatus..

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis...

A. hyrcanus

139

I

infected

infected

glands

midgut

infected glands and

Percentage infected.

only.

only.

midgut.

དྡྷསྶཡ སྶ ཨཊྛ ཡ

3

0.71

0.98

13

22

11

8.90

Co

15

A. maculatus..

A. minimus

11

11

ON

GI

7.30

7.04

September..

A. jeyporiensis..

4

A. hyrcanus

4

A. maculatus..

13

A. minimus.

270

October.....

A. jeyporiensis..

99

∞ 2

11

8.52

1.00

A. hyrcanus

6

A. maculatus..

11

A. minimus

224

10

November..

A. jeyporiensis....

133

15

10.71

6.77

A. hyrcanus

A. kawari

A. maculatus..

2

A. minimus

126

December...

A. jeyporiensis....

32

1.59

3.12

A. hyrcanus

A. maculatus..

...55

A. minimus

2,578

47

Total.....

A. jeyporiensis....

277

IGN

74

24

5.63

2

11

1

5.05

A. hyrcanus

24

A. kawari

1

=

- M 153

Table XI.

Records of total Dissections for Malarial Infection of Anophelines caught during 1932 at Woo Li Hop Village and Surroundings.

No.

No. with No. with

infected

infected

Month

Species.

No. with infected

Pereentage

dissected

glands

midgut

glands and

infected.

only.

only.

midgut.

A. maculatus

A. minimus.

5

November.

A. jeyporiensis...

1

A. hyrcanus

A. maculatus..

A. minimus

December.

A. jeyporiensis....

A. hyrcanus.

0449

8

54

74

16

Total

A. maculatus..

A. minimus

A. jeyporiensis... A. hyrcanus..

14.82 2.70

6330

8

59

2

13.56

75

2.67

16

M 154

Table XII.

Result of Dissections for Larval Filaria of Mosquitoes caught at Wong Chuk Hang Village and Surroundings during 1932.

Month.

Species.

No. dissected.

No. of infection.

Percentage

infected.

A. minimus

81

4 94

April....

A. jeyporiensis..

C. fatigans

79

A. minimus

245

5

2.04

May

A. jeyporiensis.

C. fatigans

18

A. minimus

304

13

4.27

June..

A. jey poriensis...

C. fatigans

140

3

2.14

A. minimus

517

9

1.72

July

A. jeyporiensis..

C. fatigans

84

1

1.19

August....

{

A. minimus

315

2.54

A. jeyporiensis...

C. fatigans

41

1

2.44

A. minimus

341

10

2.93

September..

A. jeyporiensis.

C. fatigans

21

A. minimus

270

ون

3

1.11

October.....

A. jeyporiensis.

C. fatigans

12

A. minimus

224

November..

A. jeyporiensis..

133

CO H

2.68

3.00

C. fatigans

18

A. minimus

126

1

0.79

December..

A. jeyporiensis..

32

I

3.12

C. fatigans

29

1

3.45

A. minimus

2,423

59

Total.....

A. jeyporiensis..

165

C. fatigans

442

༠༩ ི་

2.44

5

3.03

1.36

Table XIII.

RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF BLOOD FILMS (FOR MALARIAL PARASITES) FROM PRISONERS ADMITTED TO VICTORIA GAOL DURING 1932.

District

according to

address

City of Victoria

supplied.

Island of Hong Kong (excluding City of Victoria.)

Kowloon.

New Territories.

Total.

Films

Films

Films

Films

Films

Month.

examin-

examin-

examin-

examin-

examin-

ed.

positive.

ed.

positive.

ed.

positive.

ed. positive.

ed.

positive.

M 155

January

49

39

96

12

196

1

February.

60

33

100

201

March..

53

127

12

245

4

April

44

129

236

1

May

43

36

123

21

223

.

June

77

48

113

1

243

July..

40

28

66

4

10

144

4

August

43

48

107

I

206

September

43

39

128

October

47

30

1

173

November

36

13

1

185

December

29

22

170

7778

217

2

257

242

1

229

Yearly Total

572

2

433

4

1,517

21

117

4

2,639

31

Percentage

0.35

0.92

1.38

3.42

1.17

B

M 156

Table XIV.

Examination of Blood for Malarial Parasites during 1932.

No. of spe-

Locality.

Month in which speci- mens obtain- ed.

No. of spe-

cimens ob-

tained.

cimens found posi-

Percentage.

tive.

Wong Chuk Hang

Area

June

106

6

5.66

Deep Water Bay

September

11

Kowloon Tong :—

Upper Sector

July

187

4

7.48

Middle

Lower

"3

103

4.85

99

August

160

1

.62

Woo Lee Hop

Village and adja-

cent coolie line...

December

15

9

60.00

Shek O

December

50

9

18.00

Locality.

Table XV

Spleen Census of Children, during 1932.

No. of children

No. of children found with

Percentage.

Remarks.

examined.

enlarged spleens.

Ngau Tau Kok

60

10.00

On mainland.

Kowloon Tong area

203

3.45

On mainland.

Woo Lee Hop Village

15

33.33

On mainland.

Shek .........

25

Hong Kong Island.

Old Shek O..........

1

Hong Kong Island.

1

M 157

Appendix C.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

Report on the work done during the year 1932.

By

Mr. V. C. Branson-Government Analyst.

Before starting on the usual statement of the work done in this Department, it is necessary to report with regret the death of Mr. E. R. Dovey who was Government Analyst here for nearly 20 years. His death occurred in hospital in June and was a great loss to the Department.

The number of analyses performed during the year was 2,706 as against 2,720 in 1931. The following table shows the nature of the work done:·

1932.

1931

Chemical-Legal Examinations

146

166

Dangerous Goods

226

121

Food & Drugs

268

300

Biochemical Examinations

184

167

Water Samples

959

1,382

Building Materials

21

17

Oils

204

114

Pharmaceutical Analyses

17

Chemicals

79

47

Metals and Minerals

520

296

Miscellaneous

91

93

Total

2,706

2.720

M 158

__.com

CHEMICO-LEGAL AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS.

The work under this head done during the year included the following:-

1932.

1931.

Toxicological Examinations including

43 human stomachs

115

85

Articles for fire enquiries

5

10

Articles connected with corrosive fluid

throwing

0

12

Articles for stains

4

9

Counterfiet coin cases

7

5

Counterfeit coin materials

0

24

Bank Notes

1

2

Documents

0

3

Bombs and explosives

4

9

Stolen Goods

0

4

Dust

1

Well Water

4

0

Other examinations

6

0

A considerable amount of work was done in connection with the Victoria Gap murder case, also in connection with the two bomb explosions, one in Yaumati and the other near St. John's Cathedral. In both bomb cases it was possible to ascertain the nature of the explosive used.

Several children showed symptoms of poisoning after partaking of locally made sweetmeats, it was ascertained that excess of synthetic essences had been used and that the wrapping paper contained aniline dyestuffs which had taminated the sweets.

an

con-

During the summer a report was made that attempts were being made to poison wells in the Lok Ma Chau area, samples were taken and in no case was any poisonous matter found in the water. In this connection a specimen of suspicious nature. found in one of the wells, was sent for examination it was identified as a piece of carbolic soap, probably dropped in accidentally. Later in the year a specimen was sent from Hoihow. in connection with a similar scare, and in this case was found to be a mixture of starch and china clay.

M 159

TOXICOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

The list below gives the number and nature of work done under this head:

Nature of poison.

No poison found

Opium found

Adalin found

Alcoohol found Potassium cyanide found Hydrochloric acid found

Morphine found

Lysol found

Veronal found

Formaldehyde found

Barbituric acid found

Mercury found

Total

No. of Cases.

54 Cases.

21.

3

21

2

1

2

2

! !

1

91 Cases.

No outstanding cases occurred, the majority of the cases being suicide, opium again being the favourite means. In the case in which mercury was found, death was proved to be through natural causes. The deceased had taken calomel some time before death and mercury, equivalent to 1/3rd grain, was found in the walls of the stomach.

DANGEROUS GOODS.

154 samples coming under the heading of dangerous goods were submitted for examination during the year, the majority were samples of oil fuel, petrol and kerosene for use in H. M. Ships.

Samples of firecrackers were submitted by the police for presence of illegal constituents, and

and the usual bi-annual inspections were made of firecracker factories in Kowloon and New Territories and samples brought back for examination.

The holds and tanks of 72 steamers were examined for the presence of inflammable vapour by means of Clowes-Redwood apparatus.

FOOD AND DRUGS.

Two hundred and sixty-eight samples of food or drugs were examined during 1932. These comprised samples taken by Inspectors of the Sanitary Department under the Food and Drugs Ordinance, also commercial samples and samples from private persons.

-

M 160

Of the 118 samples examined under the Ordinance( 3 milks and 1 tea were found not to be genuine, the milk being diluted with water and the tea containing exhausted leaves.

Substance

No. of sam- ples examined

No. found genuine

No. found adulterated

Arrowroot

со

x

0

Bread

27

27

0

Butter.

13

13

0

Honey

I

1

0

Lard

10

Milk - fresh.

56

53

3

Sugar

2

2

0

Tea

6

ごい

1

Total..

118

114

4

The number of samples examined in 1932 was less than usual owing to the reduced staff during the summer months, but there is no doubt that the number of samples normally submitted for examination is very much too low considering the population of the Colony.

Taking reports, available here, of Public Analysts for the year 1931 the average annual number of samples per 100,000 of population is 458; this average is taken from the reports of Analysts of 6 English towns, 2 English counties, 1 London borough, 2 Crown Colonies and 2 Australian States. This number 458 would appear to be a fair estimate of the numb } necessary per 100,000 population to safeguard the purity of th public food and would indicate that the number submitted her per year should be in the neighbourhood of 3.000. This assuming the population of Hong Kong is 676,000, is leavin out the boat and New Territories population. In one of :: Crown Colonies for which figures are available, the populat:.. of which is about 413,000 the number of milks alone exami in 1929 was 935 and of butters 88.

M 161

The reason for the low figures in this Colony is due possibly to the state of the Regulations covering the sale of Food and Drugs. There is at present only one standard for foodstuffs laid down, i.e. that for fresh milk. Draft definitions or standards for the most important foodstuffs were submitted by the late Mr. E. R. Dovey in August 1927 and embodied in a new Food and Drug Bill printed in November 1930. Until this Bill becomes law, the present unsatisfactory state of affairs will

remain.

MINERALOGICAL ANALYSES.

A large increase in analyses under this head was shown during the year.

Metals

1932 1931

Minerals.

1932 1931

Tin

195

96

Coal

254

177

Nickel

0

1

Coke

1

0

Lead

2

Sulphur

2

Alloys...

Graphite

Bismuthite..

Chromite

Manganese..

Galena

Zinc Ore

Molybdenite

1

1