Administrative Reports - 1931



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1931

Table of Contents

1 Geography, including Climate and History

2 Government

3 Population and Births and Deaths

4 Public Health

5 Housing

6 Production

7 Commerce

8 Wages and the Cost of Living

9 Education and Welfare institutions

10 Communication and Transport

11 Banking, Currency, Weights and Measures

12 Public Works

13 Justice and Police

14 Legislation

15 Public Finance and Taxation

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

A(2) Audit office

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

G(1) Registrar of Trade Marks

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prisons

M Medical and Sanitary

M(1) Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 






T

ANNUAL REPORT ON THE SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC

PROGRESS OF THE PEOPLE OF THE COLONY

' OF HONG KONG DURING THE YEAR 1931.

CHAPTER

CONTENTS

PAGE

I GEOGRAPHY, INCLUDING CLIMATE AND HISTORY.....

1

II

GOVERNMENT

III POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS

3

4

IV PUBLIC HEALTH

6

V HOUSING

10

VI PRODUCTION

13

VII COMMERCE

14

VIII

WAGES AND THE COST OF LIVING

.. 18

IX

EDUCATION AND WELFARE INSTITUTIONS

21

X COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT

24

XI BANKING, CURRENCY, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES

28

XII

PUBLIC WORKS

29

XIII JUSTICE AND POLICE

31

XIV

LEGISLATION

34

XV PUBLIC FINANCE AND TAXATION

36

Chapter I.

GEOGRAPHY, INCLUDING CLIMATE, AND HISTORY.

The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22° 9′ and 22° 17′ N. and longitude 114° 5′ and 114° 18′ E. The island is about eleven miles long and two to five miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 28 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available for cultivation.

2

2. The island was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nanking in August, 1842. The charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843. The Kowloon peninsula and Stonecutter's Island were ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Peking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in June, 1898, the area known as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years.

The area of the New Territories and Islands is about 345 square miles.

3. The importance of Hong Kong has grown with the increase of China's trade with foreign countries. It is now in respect of tonnage entered and cleared one of the largest ports in the world. It is the most convenient outlet for the produce of South China as well as for the incessant flow of Chinese emigration to the Netherlands East Indies, Malaya, and elsewhere. It is also the natural distributing centre for imports into China from abroad.

4. The Colony is not to any extent a manufacturing centre, its most flourishing industries being those connected directly or indirectly with shipping, such as dock and warehouse. banking and insurance undertakings.

5. The climate of Hong Kong is sub-tropical, the winter being normally cool and dry and the summer hot and humid; the seasons are marked by the prevalence of the S.W. monsoon in summer and the N.E. monsoon in winter. The temperature seldom rises above 95°F or falls below 40°F.

The average rainfall is 85.50 inches, May to September being the wettest months. In spring and summer the humidity of the atmosphere is often very high, at times exceeding 95% with an average over the whole year of 77%. The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period.

6. The rainfall for 1931 was 80.39 inches. The mean temperature of the air was 72°.4 against an average of 71°.9. The maximum gust velocity of the wind was at the rate of 136 m.p.h. from E.N.E. on August 1st, when a typhoon passed within 50 miles to the S.W. of Hong Kong.

7. Amongst the principal events of general interest in the year 1931 may be mentioned the visit to the Colony in February of the British Economic Mission to the Far East under the chairmanship of Sir Ernest Thompson, and the visit of the Currency Commission under the chairmanship of Mr. W. F Clegg sent out by the Colonial Office in April to report on th Colony's currency problems,

}.

A

3

8. There were two disasters entailing serious loss of life. One was a railway accident caused by a wash out' as a result of a cloudburst on the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway on April 20th, when eleven persons were killed. The other was the murder by a mob of six inmates of a Japanese household on September 26th during the anti Japanese riots.

9. The decennial census was held on 7th March. The population was found to be Hong Kong Island, 410,921, Kowloon 264,675, New Territories 98,905, Afloat 75,250, Total 849,751

10. On September 1st the trunk telephone line between Hong Kong and Canton was formally opened by His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E.

11. The honours conferred by His Majesty the King on residents of Hong Kong included:-

K.C.M.G. Sir William Peel,

:

K.B.E.

Knight Bachelor: Sir William Hornell, C.I.E., Vice

Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong.

O.B.E. (Military Division): Major H. B. L. Dowbiggin,

H.K.V.D.C.

O.B.E. Mr. E. W. Carpenter, Assistant Director of

Public Works.

Chapter II.

GOVERNMENT.

The Government is administered under Letters Patent of 14th February, 1917, and Royal Instructions of the same and subsequent dates by a Governor aided by an Executive Council, composed of six official and three unofficial members, and by a Legislative Council composed of nine official and eight unofficial members. Prior to 1928 the numbers of the Legislative Council members were seven and six respectively. The six official members of the Executive Council are the Senior Military Officer, the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney General, the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Colonial Treasurer, all of whom are members ex-officio, and the Director of Public Works, appointed by the Governor. The three unofficial members, one of whom is Chinese, are appointed by the Governor. The six official members of the Executive Council are also members of the Legislative Council; the other three official members of this Council, who are appointed by the Governor, are the Inspector General of Police, the Harbour Master, and the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services. Of the unofficial members of the Legislative Council two are appointed by the Governor on

}.

A

3

8. There were two disasters entailing serious loss of life. One was a railway accident caused by a wash out' as a result of a cloudburst on the British Section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway on April 20th, when eleven persons were killed. The other was the murder by a mob of six inmates of a Japanese household on September 26th during the anti Japanese riots.

9. The decennial census was held on 7th March. The population was found to be Hong Kong Island, 410,921, Kowloon 264,675, New Territories 98,905, Afloat 75,250, Total 849,751

10. On September 1st the trunk telephone line between Hong Kong and Canton was formally opened by His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E.

11. The honours conferred by His Majesty the King on residents of Hong Kong included:-

K.C.M.G. Sir William Peel,

:

K.B.E.

Knight Bachelor: Sir William Hornell, C.I.E., Vice

Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong.

O.B.E. (Military Division): Major H. B. L. Dowbiggin,

H.K.V.D.C.

O.B.E. Mr. E. W. Carpenter, Assistant Director of

Public Works.

Chapter II.

GOVERNMENT.

The Government is administered under Letters Patent of 14th February, 1917, and Royal Instructions of the same and subsequent dates by a Governor aided by an Executive Council, composed of six official and three unofficial members, and by a Legislative Council composed of nine official and eight unofficial members. Prior to 1928 the numbers of the Legislative Council members were seven and six respectively. The six official members of the Executive Council are the Senior Military Officer, the Colonial Secretary, the Attorney General, the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Colonial Treasurer, all of whom are members ex-officio, and the Director of Public Works, appointed by the Governor. The three unofficial members, one of whom is Chinese, are appointed by the Governor. The six official members of the Executive Council are also members of the Legislative Council; the other three official members of this Council, who are appointed by the Governor, are the Inspector General of Police, the Harbour Master, and the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services. Of the unofficial members of the Legislative Council two are appointed by the Governor on

the nomination respectively of the Justices of the Peace and of the Chamber of Commerce; the Governor also appoints the remaining members three of whom are Chinese. Appointment in the case of unofficial members is for five years for the Executive and four years for the Legislative Council.

2. The Sanitary Board composed of four official and six unofficial members has power to make bye laws under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance in matters appertaining to public health, subject to an overriding power in the Legislative Council.

3. There is a number of advisory boards and committees, such as the Board of Education, Harbour Advisory Committee, Labour Advisory Board etc. composed of both official and unofficial members. They are frequently consulted and are of much assistance to the Government.

4. The English Common Law forms the basis of the legal system, modified by Hong Kong Ordinances of which an edition revised to 1923 has been published. The law as to civil procedure was codified by Ordinance No. 3 of 1901. The Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act 1890 regulates the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in Admiralty cases.

5. The daily administration is carried out by the twenty- eight Government departments, which are officered exclusively by members of the Civil Service. The most important of the purely administrative departments are the Secretariat, Treasury, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Harbour, Post Office, Imports and Exports Office, Police and Prisons departments. There are seven legal departments, amongst these being the Supreme Court and the Magistracies. Two departments, the Medical and Sanitary, deal with public health; one, the Education, with education; and one, the largest of all the Government depart- ments, the Public Works, is concerned with roads, buildings, waterworks, piers and analogous matters.

6. There have been no changes in the system of Govern- ment in the year under review.

!

Chapter III.

POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

The Census taken in March 1931 gave figures which except in the case of the New Territories were considerably below the estimates made during the previous year. In the case of the urban population the method adopted for estimation was that of multiplying the total houses in a district by an average figure

1

the nomination respectively of the Justices of the Peace and of the Chamber of Commerce; the Governor also appoints the remaining members three of whom are Chinese. Appointment in the case of unofficial members is for five years for the Executive and four years for the Legislative Council.

2. The Sanitary Board composed of four official and six unofficial members has power to make bye laws under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance in matters appertaining to public health, subject to an overriding power in the Legislative Council.

3. There is a number of advisory boards and committees, such as the Board of Education, Harbour Advisory Committee, Labour Advisory Board etc. composed of both official and unofficial members. They are frequently consulted and are of much assistance to the Government.

4. The English Common Law forms the basis of the legal system, modified by Hong Kong Ordinances of which an edition revised to 1923 has been published. The law as to civil procedure was codified by Ordinance No. 3 of 1901. The Colonial Courts of Admiralty Act 1890 regulates the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court in Admiralty cases.

5. The daily administration is carried out by the twenty- eight Government departments, which are officered exclusively by members of the Civil Service. The most important of the purely administrative departments are the Secretariat, Treasury, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Harbour, Post Office, Imports and Exports Office, Police and Prisons departments. There are seven legal departments, amongst these being the Supreme Court and the Magistracies. Two departments, the Medical and Sanitary, deal with public health; one, the Education, with education; and one, the largest of all the Government depart- ments, the Public Works, is concerned with roads, buildings, waterworks, piers and analogous matters.

6. There have been no changes in the system of Govern- ment in the year under review.

!

Chapter III.

POPULATION AND BIRTHS AND DEATHS.

The Census taken in March 1931 gave figures which except in the case of the New Territories were considerably below the estimates made during the previous year. In the case of the urban population the method adopted for estimation was that of multiplying the total houses in a district by an average figure

1

6

7. The deaths registered among the civilian population numbered 18,799, giving a crude death rate of 24.08 as compared with 21.87 for the previous year.

Death rate

Estimated

per mille

Year.

Deaths.

population. population.

1931 Chinese

18,566

761,149

24.39

Non-Chinese

231

12

19,522

11.83

16,082

741,500

21.68

Non-Chinese

186

""

19,000

9.79

1930 Chinese

S. The number of deaths of infants under one year was: Chinese 7,443, non-Chinese 24. If the figures for Chinese births registered represented the total births, which they do not, the infantile mortality figure for the Chinese would be 617.42 as compared wiih 557.5 in the previous year. The infantile mortality figure among the non-Chinese was 61.85 as compared with 74.08 in 1930.

Chapter IV.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

In the absence of some general system of registration of sickness the only sources of information available for gauging the state of the public health in this Colony are the returns relating to deaths, the notifications of infectious disease and the records of the Government Hospitals and Chinese Hospitals.

2. Judging from the death returns the health of the Colony was not so good as in the previous year. The crude death rate was 24.88 per mille as compared with 21.38 the revised rate for 1930. Respiratory diseases accounted for 42.25 per cent of the total deaths, the percentage for 1930 being 38.95.

3. The principal diseases causing death were broncho- pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchitis, pneumonia, infantile diarrhoea and diarrhoea.

4. The overcrowded houses combined with the expectorating habits of the Chinese furnish sufficient explanation for the prevalence of respiratory troubles.

5. Pulmonary Tuberculosis.-This disease ranks second to broncho-pneumonia as the principal cause of death. It is probable that some of the cases of the latter were tubercular in

origin. The total number of deaths was 1,983, that for 1930 being 1,994. The death rate per mille was 2.60 as compared with 2.62 for the previous year. It is estimated that for every death there are at least ten persons suffering from open tuber- culosis which means that during the year under discussion there were 20,000 cases, each spreading infection.

6. There are no sanatoria and no infirmaries other than the Chinese Hospitals where poor tuberculosis patients could find shelter and treatment and where at least they would cease to be a danger to others. During the year the Tung Wah Hospital provided 36 beds. It is hoped that when the new Government Civil Hospital is built there will be accommodation for a number of cases of this disease.

7. Malaria.-Malaria which in the early days of the Colony was the chief cause of sickness and of death has disappeared from the thickly populated urban districts as a result of efficient drainage. It still persists in the suburbs and in the rural areas. The cases admitted to the Government Hospitals numbered 586 of which 8 or 1.36 per cent died. In the Chinese Hospitals there were 1,001 admissions with a case mortality rate of 25.57 per cent.

8. The total number of deaths attributed to this disease was 452, giving a death rate of 0.60 per mille population. The lowness of the rate is, of course, due to the fact that the majority of the population, being outside the radius of flight of malaria carrying anophelines, is not subject to risks of attack.

9. The Medical Officer in charge of Kowloon Mortuary reports that in 399 consecutive bodies sent to the Mortuary for examination 97 or 24.25 per cent had spleens twice the normal size or larger.

10. During the year the Malaria Bureau continued its researches and co-operated both with the Military Authorities and the Public Works Department.

11. It is pleasing to be able to report that during the investigations carried out by the Bureau the staff experienced no opposition from the local Chinese; on the contrary both aduits and children showed great interest in the proceedings and were eager to help This is very satisfactory for there were those who predicted that there would be considerable opposition on the part of the people, especially those of the New Territories.

12. Infectious Diseases.-There was no serious epidemic of infectious diseases during the year under discussion. There were a number of cases or diphtheria with evidence indicating that the source of infection was a local dairy. Pasteurisation of the milk had satisfactory results.

13. Smallpox.--Smallpox which manifests itself every year during the winter months was represented by a few sporadic cases only. There were in all 15 cases and 8 deaths as compared with 270 cases and 249 deaths in 1930. In February the Sanitary Board rescinded its resolution of 1917 whereby cases of smallpox were permitted to be treated in their houses. Following the rescission there was a mass meeting of the Chinese at the Tung Wah Hospital where vigorous protests were made against the decision.

14. During the year the vaccination campaign was continued, valuable assistance being afforded by the St. John Ambulance Brigade whose officers established booths in the streets, and carried out an active propaganda advocating vaccination and revaccination with excellent results. In the last four years there have been 981,241 vaccinations, a number exceeding the present population as enumerated by the Census.

15. The General Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee recommended that the dispensaries should take a more active part in propaganda work. ́Arrangements were made for the Government Medical Department to co-operate by supplying material for the Committee's use.

16. Among the Chinese the opinion is prevalent that the results of treatment of smallpox by Chinese methods are superior to those by Western methods. An analysis of the statistics of (a) the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital where the majority of cases receive Chinese treatment and of (b) the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital, where

where Western treatment only is provided shows that this view is not correct. Calculating on the figures for the last 20 years the death rate in the Tung Wah was 46.77 per cent of the cases treated and that in the Government Hospital 14.33 per cent.

17. Plague.-Plague as an epidemic disease has disappeared from Hong Kong and the same may be said of South China. The whole truth concerning the factors which have caused this disappearance is not known. The disappearance from Hong Kong may be, and probably is, to a certain extent due to the sanitary measures which have been and are being taken but this cannot be the case in many of the Chinese towns where the conditions are as they have always been.

18 There were no cases reported in the Colony during either 1931 or 1930.

19. Systematic rat catching and periodical cleansing of houses were carried out during the year. The total number of rats collected was 157,828, of which 11,520 were taken alive as compared with 141,286 and 6,756 in 1930. The number of floors cleansed was 196,912, the number in 1930 being 180,952,

10

J

Organisation, a purely Chinese body. These institutions which are assisted by Government are under inspection by the Govern- ment Medical Department. Each has as its medical super- intendent a Chinese Medical Officer who is paid by Government.

29. The Medical Staff consists of Western-trained Chinese doctors and Chinese herbalists. The patient is given his choice of treatment.

HOSPITAL

No. NO. TREATED 1931 No. TREATED 1930.

of

beds Western Chinese Western Chinese

Medicine Medicine Medicine Medicine

Tung Wah,.....

460

5,704 5,246 5,296 5,548

Tung Wah Eastern,..... 195

2,185 1,345

1,796

854

Tung Wah Infectious

Diseases,

60

73

Kwong Wab, .....

325

8,204 2,283

7,026

2,751

Chapter V.

HOUSING.

In recent years some evidence has been shown amongst the artizan class of the Colony of a quickening social consciousness and the resultant desire to avail themselves of improved housing accommodation wherever such is made available. The unskilled labouring classes, however, are still found densely packed in tenement houses deficient in light and air. This class of labour has to find its habitat as close as possible to the scene of its labour, with the result that the Western part of the City of Victoria, which houses the native business quarter and closely adjoins the portion of the harbour handling the traffic from the West River and Chinese Coast Ports, is seriously overcrowded.

2. These conditions are being slowly mitigated by the rebuilding of properties which from time to time are condemned for reasons of structural defects. This process of elimination is however, too slow to create any appreciable improvement. The legislation now being contemplated, which calls for the

T

13

Chapter VI.

PRODUCTION.

Hong Kong is the port for South China, and the greater part of the large volume of goods that pass through it is in transit either to or from South China and other parts of the world, including North and Middle China. The Colony itself produces comparatively little, though the shipbuilding, cement, sugar refining and cotton knitting industries are not unimportant. Neither agriculture nor mining are carried on to any great extent, though the former is practised throughout the New Territories. Rice and vegetables are grown, and there is considerable poultry farming, but in insufficient quantities to supply the needs of the urban populations of Victoria and Kowloon. The cultivation is in the hands of the Chinese villagers. Sea fishing is an important industry, but here again local supplies have to be augmented by importation from outside.

2. Reports on the principal industries for the year 1931 are given below:

Refined Sugar.-The year opened with large stocks in China. which had been rushed in prior to the enforcement of higher Customs Duties as from 1st January. Later, when business was resuming normal proportions, the floods in the Yangtsze Valley led to a diminished off-take. The embroglio in Manchuria also induced nervousness on the part of buyers, new orders being confined to immediate needs.

3. Preserved Ginger.-It is estimated that 3,000 tons more of preserved ginger was exported to Europe in 1931, as compared with the previous year, the increase being due to favourable exchange and lower rates of freight. The demand from the United States of America continued to decline owing to industrial depression and its reaction on purchasing power, particularly in respect of luxury commodities. Total value of exports of preserved ginger from Hong Kong in 1931 amounted to $2,347,375.

4. Cement.-There was a fair demand for locally manu- factured cement during the first nine months of 1931. During the last three months of the year, the demand exceeded the supply due to the greatly reduced importation of the Japanese product. The Green Island Cement Company were, however, able to deal to a large extent with the increased demand owing to their having recently installed an entirely new All-British Plant.

5. Rope Making. The demand for locally manufactured rope during 1981 was normal and no special features were met with in this industry.

14

6. Hosiery.--The turnover in locally manufactured knitted goods during 1931 was fairly satisfactory. The increased China tariff has adversely affected local factories which depended on the China market, but business in hosiery with India, Egypt, South America, the Philippines, Netherlands East Indies and South Africa has correspondingly improved. Total value of exports from Hong Kong in 1931 amounted to nearly $2,500,000.

7. Flashlight Torches and Batteries. These are manu- factured in numerous local factories and owing to low labour costs and consequent low price they are in growing demand locally and for export. Exports during 1931 amounted to the value of $1.4 millions (torches) and $1 million (batteries).

8. Shipbuilding.-Six ocean going vessels and twenty smaller craft were built in local dockyards during 1931.

Chapter VII.

COMMERCE.

Despite the continued world-wide trade depression, and several other adverse factors more intimately affecting the commercial welfare of Hong Kong, trade returns compiled by the Statistical Office show that conditions in 1931 were, if anything, slightly better than in the year 1930, the total value of imports of merchandise amounting to $737.7 millions, an increase of $87.7 millions, while exports totalled $542 millions, an increase of $42 millions.

2. Only nine months' figures are available for the year 1930, and it is on the basis of these figures that the value of the total trade for that year has been liberally estimated.

3. Several factors other than the general depression in world trade combined to prevent any appreciable recovery in trade, chief among which were the following:-

(1) The continued low purchasing value of the silver

currencies of Hong Kong and China;

(2) internal political troubles in China;

(3) serious floods in South China during the earlier part of the year, and in North China during the latter part of the year;

14

6. Hosiery.--The turnover in locally manufactured knitted goods during 1931 was fairly satisfactory. The increased China tariff has adversely affected local factories which depended on the China market, but business in hosiery with India, Egypt, South America, the Philippines, Netherlands East Indies and South Africa has correspondingly improved. Total value of exports from Hong Kong in 1931 amounted to nearly $2,500,000.

7. Flashlight Torches and Batteries. These are manu- factured in numerous local factories and owing to low labour costs and consequent low price they are in growing demand locally and for export. Exports during 1931 amounted to the value of $1.4 millions (torches) and $1 million (batteries).

8. Shipbuilding.-Six ocean going vessels and twenty smaller craft were built in local dockyards during 1931.

Chapter VII.

COMMERCE.

Despite the continued world-wide trade depression, and several other adverse factors more intimately affecting the commercial welfare of Hong Kong, trade returns compiled by the Statistical Office show that conditions in 1931 were, if anything, slightly better than in the year 1930, the total value of imports of merchandise amounting to $737.7 millions, an increase of $87.7 millions, while exports totalled $542 millions, an increase of $42 millions.

2. Only nine months' figures are available for the year 1930, and it is on the basis of these figures that the value of the total trade for that year has been liberally estimated.

3. Several factors other than the general depression in world trade combined to prevent any appreciable recovery in trade, chief among which were the following:-

(1) The continued low purchasing value of the silver

currencies of Hong Kong and China;

(2) internal political troubles in China;

(3) serious floods in South China during the earlier part of the year, and in North China during the latter part of the year;

J

15

(4) increased Chinese tariffs which were enforced on January 1st, and which were later strengthened by an additional impost of 10% on practically all imports for flood relief purposes;.

(5) the abandonment of the gold standard by Great Britain in September, causing a sudden rise in sterling exchange which dealers found difficult to assimilate;

(6) further depreciation of Australian currency;

(7) the Sino-Japanese dispute which resulted in a serious boycott of Japanese goods in October, and which persisted with increasing intensity until the end of the year, when there were no indications at all of any early resumption of trade with Japan.

4. Serving as it does as an entrepot for the distribution of Far Eastern, and in particular Chinese trade, it will be readily understood that the Colony is peculiarly sensitive to any reactions in China, with which country it is closely allied both geographically and commercially, and it follows, therefore, that a return to anything approaching normal conditions is almost entirely dependent on a greatly improved state of affairs in China

5. As stated above, the sterling value of Hong Kong currency appreciated rapidly in sympathy with the decline in the value of the pound sterling, but this rapid appreciation caused considerable confusion in the market, and the full benefit to exporters in Great Britain was not reflected in Hong Kong trade figures.

6. Taken in conjunction with the Chinese boycott of Japanese goods, however, there was a distinct revival in the import trade from Great Britain in the piece-goods group. In the last quarter of the year imports of piece goods from Great Britain accounted for 30.4% of the total as compared with 18.9% in the corresponding quarter of 1930, while the Japanese share of this trade amounted to only 7.6% as compared with 31.6%.

7. The seriousness of the effect of the boycott can be seen from the fact that during the last quarter of 1931, the total imports from Japan were valued at only $8,018,000 (£515,000), as compared with $22,450,000 (£1,388,000) in the last quarter of 1930, the chief recessions being in the piece-goods group which fell from $10.2 millions to $2.6 millions, and the foodstuffs group (chiefly marine products) which declined from $4.4 millions to $.9 million.

16

8. During the year exchange fluctuated from an average of 111316d. in January to 1s. 53d. in December, and with a view to the better illustration of the trend of the trade of the Colony the following tables have been prepared in terms both of sterling and local currency :---

Imports (in £'s & $'s millions).

1923.

1924.

1925.

1930.

1931.

1st Quarter

£ 14.7

19.3

16.3

X

9.0

$130.7

165.4

139.7

X

186.9

2nd Quarter

£ 15.2

17.1

14.5

9.2

8.7

$131.5

144.0

128.9

131.3

180.1

3rd Quarter

£ 14.3

19.2

$127.1

161.7

پسینہ پسینہ

X

10.1

9.0

X

156.8

182.3

4th Quarter

£ 17.8

16.5

X

10.3

11.8

$155.3

136.6

X

167.4

188.4

Total

£ 62.0

72.1

30.8

29.6

38.5

$544.6

607.7 268.6

455.5

737.7

Exports (in £'s & $ ́s millions).

1923.

1924.

1925.

1930.

1931.

1st Quarter

£ 13.9

18.3

15.2

X

6.8

$123.5

156.8

130.3

X

140.1

2nd Quarter

£ 16.3

15.2

14.1

7.4

6.4

$140.9

128.0

125.3

105.9

132.5

3rd Quarter

£14.0

14.6

X

$124.4 122.9

X

7.3

113.7

6.5

130.6

4th Quarter

£ 17.2

15.5

$150.1

128.3

X X

8.5

9.2

137.2

138.7

Total

£ 61.4 $538.9

63.6 29.3

28.9

536.0 255.6 356.8 541.9

x No statistics available from July 1925 to March 1930.

Note: Average rate of exchange 1923-2s. 3zd.;

23.2

1924-2s. 41d.;

1925-28. 31⁄2d.;

1930=1s. 31d.;

1931-1s. 03d.

18

Wholesale Price Changes.

10. During the year 1931 commodity prices in Hong Kong showed increases of 29.8% as compared with the year 1924, 36.6% as compared with the base period of 1922, and an average index figure for all articles slightly more than double that for the year 1913.

11. As compared with the year 1922 world wholesale prices fell approximately 30%, and the increases in the Hong Kong index figures were almost entirely due to the depreciation of local currency which averaged 2s. 6d. in 1922, 28. 44d. in 1924, and 1s. 03d, in 1931.

12. The sterling value of Hong Kong currency showed an upward trend in the last quarter of the year following the cessation of gold exports from Great Britain, this being reflected in a slight fall in prices.

13. The following table shows the course of price changes since 1913.

1913 1922 1924 1931

Foodstuffs Textiles

Metals...

Miscellaneous.

73.6 55 1

Average all Articles.

1st. 2nd 3rd 4th Qtr. Qtr. Qtr. Qtr.

100.0 | 106.1

144.3144.1

100.0 112.5 | 135.8 | 147.9

63.2 | 100.0 61.2 | 100.0

102.3 |140.9 | 138 5 106.3 125,4 | 129.7

143.7

147.3142.2 143.1 128 7 123,5

| 143.8 |143.3 | 138.2 127.5118.6125.5

64.0 100.0 | 106.8 136.6 139.8 140.4 133.2 | 132.7

Chapter VIII.

WAGES AND THE COST OF LIVING.

A great proportion of the workers in Hong Kong are paid on a piece work basis and in some trades are engaged and paid on curiously complicated systems involving payment of a bonus or a share in the yearly profits.

2. Trade has been dull for the greater part of the year and wages have, so far as can be ascertained, tended downwards. The building trade however, has been unusually busy as the result of a building boom and the development of newly reclaimed areas. The price of the cheaper grades of rice which is the staple food of the lowest paid workers, has not increased and remains at an average of five to eight cents per lb. The price of fire-wood which is also an important item to the poorer classes remains the same. There has been no apparent move- ment in house rents.

f

:

21

Chapter IX.

EDUCATION AND WELFARE INSTITUTIONS.

Government Schools.

These are either schools where the medium of instruction is English or mostly English or schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese. The former, sixteen in number, are known as "English" schools, the latter of which there are three as "Vernacular" schools.

2. Of the four English schools, classed as "secondary" schools in the Table below, two are Anglo-Chinese schools for boys and one is for girls. These three schools have primary departments. The fourth school, the Central British School which is a mixed school, has no primary department. Of the twelve English schools, classed as "primary" schools in the Table below, four are mixed schools preparing for the Central British School. In this group are also four "District" schools, including one for Indian boys and four "Lower Grade" schools, three of which are in rural districts. In those English schools which are attended by Chinese the study of English and of Chinese is carried on side by side; the pari passu system requiring that promotion shall depend on proficiency in both languages.

3. Of the three Government Vernacular schools one has a seven years course and includes a Normal department. There is also a Normal school for women teachers and a Normal school on the mainland which aims at providing Vernacular teachers for rural schools.

4. The Technical Institute, classed in the Table below as "vocational", is attended by persons desirous of receiving instruction for the most part germane to their daytime

occupations.

Grant in Aid and Subsidized Schools.

5. There are twelve Grant-in-Aid English Schools, and four Grant-in-Aid Vernacular Schools. Of the former, six are schools

for boys and six are for girls.

6. One English school for boys and one for girls have primary departments only. The remaining ten, classed in the Table below as "secondary" schools, have primary departments as well as the upper classes.

7. The Vernacular Grant-in-Aid Schools are schools for girls and are classed in the Table as "secondary" schools.

8. The 296 subsidized schools are all Vernacular schools.

22

Unaided Schools.

9. In 1931 there were 617 unaided Vernacular schools with 30,423 children and 122 unaided English schools with 7.401 children.

TABLE SHOWING NUMBER OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOLARS FOR

THE YEAR 1931.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS

GRANT IN AID AND UBSIDIZED SCHOOLS

UNAIDED SCHOOLS

CLASS OF INSTITUTIONS

No. of Institu-

No. of

On Roll

On

Institu-

No. of Institu-

On

Roll

Roll

tions

tions

tions

ENGLISH -

Secondary,

Primary,..

Vocational,.

4

2,336

10

4,580

1

160

12

1,757

2

398

121

7.241

}

686

Total,..........

17

4,779

12

4.978

122

7,401

VERNACULAR :--

Secondary,

1

262

1

1,002

Primary..........

296

:

19,3981

617

30,423

Vocational,

2

204

1

146

Total,......................

3

466

301 0,546

617

30,123

Grand Total of No. of Institutions. Grand Total of No. on Roll

The University.

1,072 68,593

10. The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under & local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.

11. The University hostels are three in number--Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall and May Hall. There are also three recognized hostels for men, St. John's Hall, Morrison Hall and Ricci Hall. No University hostel at present exists for women students.

>

23

12. The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building. Additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicile. The latest addition to the buildings is a School of Chinese Studies, the cost of which was borne by Mr. Tang Chi Ngong a local Chinese merchant and banker.

13. The annual income of the University for 1930 amounted to about $892,000 of which about $290,000 was derived from endowments and $390,000 from Government. Messrs. John Swire & Sons Ltd. gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and subsequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockefeller Institute has endowed the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000. The Government Grant was increased in 1930 from $90,000 to $390,000 to enable the University to meet its increased financial obligations due mainly to the fall in exchange. The annual expenditure in 1930 amounted to about $846,000.

14. The University included the three faculties of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognized as equivalent thereto.

15. The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree of M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D., and M.S. are awarded on examinations but are subject to the proviso that every candidate for the degree shall produce evidence of special post-graduate experience in the subject which he presents. The degrees above mentioned are recognized by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

16. The Faculty of Engineering provides a four years course in practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B. Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, mechanical or electrical engineering. The degree for post- graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).

17. The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce and a department for training teachers. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

18. With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard which is in all three faculties that of a British University degree-external examiners are, in all wulties, associated with the internal examiners in all annet final examinations. In the Faculty of Engineering, but l in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

19. The degree of LL.D. is granted honoris causa

24

Charitable Institutions.

20. The following are the best known Charitable Institutions.

French Convent Orphanage.

Italian Convent Orphanage. Maryknoll Convent, Kowloon. St. Louis Industrial School. Po Leung Kuk-Chinese. Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Society of Precious Blood Hospital.

Home for Aged Poor, Kowloon.

La Calvaire Home for Aged Foor, Happy Valley. Eyre Refuge.

Salvation Army Home.

Industrial Home for the Blind, Pokfulam,

Recreation and Art.

21. Most of the schools contrive to hold Annual Sports either on their own grounds or on grounds generously lent by local Cricket and Football Clubs. Some schools are granted free use of Government Bathing Beaches for four afternoons a week during the Bathing Season. Lawn Tennis, Football, Swimming, Volley Ball and Basket Ball continue to increase in popularity. Cricket is played at a few schools. Physical training is given by qualified instructors. Art is taught in the Government British Schools by Trained Art Mistresses.

Chapter X,

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT.

The external communications of Hong Kong are excellent both by sea and by telegraph, cable and radio. As regards the former, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the Blue Funnel Line, the Messageries Maritimes, and several other British and foreign companies maintain regular passenger and freight services between Hong Kong and Europe. The trans-Pacific communications are well served by the Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd., the Dollar Line, the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and other steamship lines. To Australia three steamship companies, the Eastern and Australian. Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and Australian and Oriental maintain regular passenger and freight services. In addition there are direct sailings to Africa, South America, and to New York. There is frequent and regular communication between Hong Kong and other Far Eastern ports in India, Java, Straits

24

Charitable Institutions.

20. The following are the best known Charitable Institutions.

French Convent Orphanage.

Italian Convent Orphanage. Maryknoll Convent, Kowloon. St. Louis Industrial School. Po Leung Kuk-Chinese. Victoria Home and Orphanage.

Society of Precious Blood Hospital.

Home for Aged Poor, Kowloon.

La Calvaire Home for Aged Foor, Happy Valley. Eyre Refuge.

Salvation Army Home.

Industrial Home for the Blind, Pokfulam,

Recreation and Art.

21. Most of the schools contrive to hold Annual Sports either on their own grounds or on grounds generously lent by local Cricket and Football Clubs. Some schools are granted free use of Government Bathing Beaches for four afternoons a week during the Bathing Season. Lawn Tennis, Football, Swimming, Volley Ball and Basket Ball continue to increase in popularity. Cricket is played at a few schools. Physical training is given by qualified instructors. Art is taught in the Government British Schools by Trained Art Mistresses.

Chapter X,

COMMUNICATION AND TRANSPORT.

The external communications of Hong Kong are excellent both by sea and by telegraph, cable and radio. As regards the former, the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Co., the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, the Blue Funnel Line, the Messageries Maritimes, and several other British and foreign companies maintain regular passenger and freight services between Hong Kong and Europe. The trans-Pacific communications are well served by the Canadian Pacific Steamships Ltd., the Dollar Line, the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and other steamship lines. To Australia three steamship companies, the Eastern and Australian. Nippon Yusen Kaisha, and Australian and Oriental maintain regular passenger and freight services. In addition there are direct sailings to Africa, South America, and to New York. There is frequent and regular communication between Hong Kong and other Far Eastern ports in India, Java, Straits

25

M

Settlements, Formosa, Indo-China, Japan and the China coast. Local steamship communication is by river steamer from Hong Kong to Canton and the West River ports with several sailings daily. In addition there is a vast traffic between Hong Kong and the adjacent provinces of China by junk and sampan.

2. The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1931 amounted to 107,262 vessels of 44,150,021 tons which, compared with the figures of 1930, shows an increase of 13,172 vessels and an increase of 1,959,409 tons. Of the above 51.801 vessels of 41,933,748 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 49,609 vessels of 40,511,650 tons in 1930. There was an increase in British Ocean-going shipping of 113 vessels and an increase of 183;239 tons. Foreign Ocean-going vessels show a decrease of 735 vessels and a decrease of 87,901 tons. British River Steamers showed an increase of 865 vessels and an increase of 705,564 tons. Foreign River Steamers showed an increase of 678 vessels and an increase of 222,413 tons. In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there was an increase of 885 vessels with an increase in tonnage of 187 tons. Junks in Foreign trade showed an increase of 386 vessels and increase of 398,596 tons. In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there was a decrease in Steam Launches of 1,895 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 61,250. Junks in Local Trade show an increase of 12,875 vessels and an increase of 598.561 tons.

an

3. The Eastern Extension Telegraph Company (British) by means of three cables to Singapore, one direct and one each via Labuan and Cape St. James respectively, provides good connections with Europe ria India, with Australasia, and with the other British Colonies and possessions. By their cable to

Manila connection is made with the direct American cable, thence to San Francisco. Two cables to Shanghai, belonging respectively to the Eastern Extension and to the Great Northern (Danish) Companies, via Foochow and Amoy respectively, give

good connection with Shanghai, North China, Japan and Russia and the system of the Great Northern Telegraph Company gives a good service to Europe via Asiatic Russia.

4. The Government operates a commercial radio service with direct communication with Chinese stations, Siam, and the Dutch East Indies. Indirect commumeation between Hong Kong and Europe is maintained via Manila and the United States of America.

5. The revenue collected by the Radio Office during the year from radio telegrams amounted to $679,028.51, an increase of $247,637.83 on the amount collected in 1930. Advices of vessels signalled at the Lighthouses yielded $1,224.80. Semaphore messages $10.15. The total Revenue from the Telegraph Service amounted

Service amounted to $680,263.46. Ship Station Licences yielded $1.506-25, Amateur Transmission Station

28

Chapter XI.

BANKING, CURRENCY, WEIGHTS & MEASURES.

The Colony is well served by banking institutions. are sixteen principal banks doing business in the Colony who are members of the Clearing House, and in addition several Chinese banks and numerous native Hongs deing some portion of banking business. There are no banks which devote them- selves specially to agricultural and co-operative banking. The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation also conducts the business of the Hong Kong Savings Bank on usual savings bank principles.

2. The Currency of the Colony is based on silver and is governed by the Order. in Council of 2nd February, 1895. The dollar, which is normally in circulation and which is legal tender to any amount, is the British Dollar of 900 millesimal fineness and weight 26.957 grammes (416.00 grains). Silver subsidiary coins of the value of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents and one cent pieces in bronze are also legal tender up to the value of two dollars. for silver and one dollar for bronze. Bank notes issued by The Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank, The Chartered Bank and The Mercantile Bank are also in circulation, the estimated amount issued at the end of 1931 being $154,631,822.

3. The weights and measures in use in the Colony are defined in the Schedule to Ordinance No. 2 of 1885. They consist of the standards in use in the United Kingdom and of the following Chinese Weights and Measures:-

and

1 fan (candareen)=0.0133 ounces avoirdupois

1 tsin (mace) 0.133 ounces avoirdupois

1 leung (tael)=1.33 ounces avoirdupois

1 kan (catty)=1.33 pounds avoirdupois

1 tam (picul)=133.33 pounds avoirdupois

1 chek (foot)=14ğ English inches divided into 10 tsun (inches) and each tsun into 10 fan or tenths.

29

Chapter XII.

PUBLIC WORKS.

The activities of the Public Works Department are carried out under the Head Office Staff by eleven sub-departments, viz:-Waterworks, Construction; Waterworks, Maintenance; Drainage; Architectural and Maintenance of Buildings; Electrical and Wireless Telegraphy; General Works, Roads and Transport; Buildings Ordinance; Port Development; Crown Lands and Surveys; Valuation and Resumptions; and Accounts and Stores. The European staff comprises 153 officers and the Asiatic 529.

2. Buildings. The following were the principal works completed during the year:--A Printing Shop at Victoria Gaol; Quarters for Wireless Operators at Victoria Peak; Latrine and Bathhouse on Praya East; Latrine and Urinal at Davis Street (30 seats); block of six flats for Married Warders at Lai Chi Kok Prison; Kowloon Tong Market; School at Un Long; and Quarters for Forestry Reserve, Tai Po. In addition the following works were under construction during the year: No. 2 Police Station; Market at Sai Ying Pun; Market at Praya East Reclamation; Maternity Block at Kowloon Hospital; Kowloon British School Site; and Female Frison at Lai Chi Kok...

3. Communications.-The following works were com- pleted:-Road from Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay, section 70 feet wide, opposite M.Ls. 430 and 431; Tong Mi and Kowloon Tong, filling in areas; reclamation at Kai Tak; and Castle Peak Road, section from Cheung Sha Wan to Lai Chi Kok to Town Planning Layout (60 feet wide). The following works were under construction:-Chatham Road extension; filling in area North West of Nan Chang Street; filling in area West of Tai Po Road; and Refuse Dump at Cheung Sha Wan. The erection of Hangar at Kai Tak was under construction and was nearly completed by the end of the year. Portions of Nathan Road and Lai Chi Kok Road were reconditioned and strengthened with 7′′ reinforced cement concrete surfacing. Alterations to the traffic arrangements at Tsim Sha Tsui were completed. The surfacing of roadway to the Kai Tak Aerodrome was commenced.

..

4. Drainage.-New sewers and storm water drains in Hong Kong were constructed to a length of 6,186 feet. Improvements were effecied to the main sewer in Aberdeen Valley. Stream courses were trained to a length of 263 feet. New sewers and storm water drains in Kowloon were constructed to a length of 12,682 feet. New sewers and storm water drains in New Kowloon were constructed to a length of 15,471 feet. One side wall and invert North of Camp, Shamshuipo and Un Long Nullahs and Improvements were completed.

5. Water Works.--Two steel balance tanks were erected at West Point Filters. The reconstruction of Bowen Road Conduit. between Tai Tain Tunnel and Stubbs Road was completed. 15,923 feet of water mains of varying sizes were laid in Hong Kong and 11,096 feet in Kowloon.

30

6. The Aberdeen Scheme Fipe Line (8,620 linear yards in length) and the connecting tunnel were completed. The Aberdeen Upper Dam was completed and opened on December 15th by His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E. The First Section of the East Catchwater and the Outfall Section of the West Catchwater were completed and the 1st Section of the West Catchwater was commenced. Partial demolition of the Lower Aberdeen, or old Paper Works Dam was commenced. The Upper and Lower Pumping Stations and Depot were completed and occupied. The new Rapid Gravity Filter Plant at Elliot, four million gallons per day capacity, was completed and brought into use. The Aberdeen Scheme was brought into use and the water taken into supply on August 1st, one year and nine months after commencement of the works.

7. The 3" Fanling supply main was duplicated for a length of 6,900 feet. Further trial pits at Shing Mun Gorge Dam Site were sunk for the Consulting Engineer who visited and inspected them early in the year and reported favourably on the site. The site was later opened up over a considerable width and one of the Consulting Engineers again inspected and reported favourably. The Hong Kong Public Gardens Service Reservoir, the last item of the 1st Section of the Shing Mun Scheme, was commenced and good progress was made. The Kowloon Byewash Reservoir was completed and brought into use, forming a link between the Shing Mun Scheme and the older works.

8. Reclamations.-At Tsat Tze Mui a reclamation of about

2 acres was carried out. An area of 1 acres approximately has been reclaimed for traffic adjoining the ferry pier under construction at Jordan Road. The China Light and Power Co. reclaimed an area of about five acres at To Kwa Wan. The reclamation at Cheung Sha Wan was extended by further dumping of Sanitary Department refuse; the total of the area now formed amounts to about twelve acres.

9. Piers.The piers at Wilmer Street, Mongkok, Sham- shuipo, and the pier in structural steel for the Hung Hom Government Store were completed. A commencement was made with the two piers, one on the mainland and one on the island, for the Vehicular Ferry.

10. Electrical Works.-The installation of an additional 100 line switchboard was completed at the Kowloon Government Telephone Exchange, and a new broadcast transmitter was obtained from England and installed at Cape D'Aguilar. In addition electric light and power installations were fitted to certain Government buildings, and the Government's lighting and telephone systems maintained.

11. Buildings Ordinance Office.-Activity continued in all classes of building work throughout the Colony. European residences to the number of 232 were completed during the year. The number of Chinese houses completed was 1,144.

31

12. On the Praya East Reclamation, 360 Chinese tenement houses were completed during the year, while over 200 more were in course of erection. It is noticeable that the improved type of Chinese tenement house which is now being erected has brought with it a demand for modern sanitation, and where sewer facilities exist and an independent and adequate water supply is available, it is now common practice for all new houses to be fitted with a flush system.

13. Several large buildings of a semi-public nature were completed during the year including banking premises, theatres, buildings of a scholastic and religious nature and hospitals. Industrial buildings included knitting factories, canning factories, and an extensive reconstruction of the Green Island Cement Company's premises at Hok Un.

14. A concrete wharf 800 feet in length and 48,000 square feet in area was in course of construction opposite K.M.L. 11, Kowloon Point. A timber pier opposite K.M.L. 90, To Kwa Wan was completed.

15. Reclamations were completed at N.K.I.L. 971, Castle Peak Road, area in square feet 24,750; and at Tsun Wan M.L. 4, area in square feet 74,900. A reclamation was in progress at I.L. 2918, Shaukiwan Road, area in square feet 102,700.

Chapter XIII.

JUSTICE AND FOLICE

I. The Courts of Hong Kong.

The Supreme Court of Hong Kong consists of a Chief Justice and one or more other judges. At present there is one other judge.

2. The jurisdiction of the Court is regulated by a number of Ordinances but generally it may be said that the Court exercises a Summary Jurisdiction in all actions where the claim does not exceed $1,000 and an Original Jurisdiction in all actions where the claim exceeds that amount.

3. In addition to the above the Court exercises Admiralty, Probate, Bankruptcy, Lunacy, Criminal and Appellate Jurisdiction.

4. The following is a brief summary of litigation and matters dealt with during the year 1931:—

1,777 actions were instituted in the Summary Jurisdic- tion and the amounts for which judgment was given totalled $238,617.47.

32

336 actions were instituted in the Original Jurisdiction and the amounts for which judgment was given totalled $1,406,802.11.

15 actions were instituted in the Admiralty Jurisdiction. 318 grants were made in the Probate Jurisdiction. 80 persons were indicted in the Criminal Jurisdiction of whom 57 were convicted

11 Appeals were lodged in the Appellate Jurisdiction 8 of which were heard during the year.

5. The lower civil courts are the land courts in the Northern and Southern districts of the New Territories, with jurisdiction over all land cases in those districts, and the small debts courts of the same two districts. In these courts the District Officers sit to hear land and small debts cases.

6. The lower criminal courts are the magistrates' courts, two for Hong Kong island and a small area on the mainland opposite Shaukiwan, one for Kowloon, including the whole area south of the Kowloon hills, and one each for the two districts of the New Territories, in which the District Officers are the magistrates.

7. The following figures show the amount of work done by the lower courts in 1931:·

Civil:

-

District Officer North,

Land Court

Small Debts Court

District Officer South,

Land Court

36 cases.

83 cases.

180 cases.

48 cases.

Small Debts Court

Criminal:

Hong Kong Magistracy, two courts....

22,628 cases.

Kowloon Magistracy, one court

District Officer North, one court

:

District Officer, South, one court

15,289 cases. 655 cases.

159 cases.

II. The Police.

8. The Police Force of the Colony is under the control of the Inspector General of Police who is assisted by one Deputy Inspector General and eight Superintendents. The force consists of four Contingents, European, Indian, Chinese (Cantonese) and Chinese (Weihaiwei). The strength of the different Contingents is as follows:

Europeans Indians

Chinese (Cantonese) Chinese (Weihaiwei)

244

680

585

261

J

33

In addition the Police Department controls the Anti-Piracy Guards, a force consisting of thirty-one Russians and twenty- eight Indian Guards, together with six European Sergeants, eight Indian Sergeants and ninety-five Weihaiwei Chinese Constables, who are included in the Police strength. The Anti-Piracy Guards are employed and paid for by Shipping Companies for service in the China Seas.

9. Further, the department engages and supervises 1,129 Indian and Chinese watchmen who are paid by private individuals for protection of private property.

10. The waters of the Colony are policed by a fleet of ten steam launches and three motor boats which employ a staff of two hundred and forty-four Chinese under European officers.

11. There were 5,284 serious cases of crime in 1931 as against 5,681 in 1930, a decrease of 397 or 7.5%. There was a decrease of 56 cases in house breaking, of two in burglaries and of 228 in larcenies. Murder showed a decrease of four cases; robberies an increase of 23 cases, a total of 79 cases as against 56 cases in 1930. There were 17,444 minor cases in 1931 as against 19,250 in 1930; a decrease of 1,806 cases or 9.3%.

III. Prisons.

12. There are two prisons in the Colony. Victoria Gaol in Hong Kong is the main prison and includes a section for females. This prison is built on the separate system, but segregation is difficult owing to lack of space and accommodation. It contains cellular accommodation for 644 only and prisoners often have to sleep in association through unavoidable overcrowding. There is a branch prison at Lai Chi Kok near Kowloon, with accom- modation for 480 prisoners. In this establishment all the prisoners sleep in association and only selected prisoners are sent there as the prison was not originally built as a prison. It was converted from a Quarantine Station in 1920, temporary use pending the building of a new prison. A new general prison is to be commenced in 1932. A new female prison is in course of construction near the Lai Chi Kok Branch Prison.

for

13. The total number of persons committed to prison in the year 1931 was 6,767 as compared with 6,493 in 1930. The daily average number of prisoners in the prisons in 1931 was 1,102. The highest previous average was 1,189 in 1927. Over 90% of the prisoners admitted are persons born outside the Colony.

14. The health of the prisoners generally was well main- tained in the prisons. The diet scales were revised and new dietaries approved as from May, 1931. The new dietaries have

for proved satisfactory from a medical point of view.

34

15. Owing to reconstruction at Victoria Gaol the prisoners were overcrowded in the workshops at the beginning of the year and there was a certain amount of trouble, but the general conduct steadily improved after the new diets were approved and when the new shops were completed. The agitation in Victoria Gaol was reflected in Lai Chi Kok but the measures adopted restored discipline, which is now good in both prisons.

16. Prisoners are employed at printing, bookbinding, tinsmithing, matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, gardening, laundry work, cleaning and minor repairs to buildings. The bulk of the Government printing and bookbinding is done in Victoria Gaol.

17. A small separate ward is reserved in Victoria Gaol for Juveniles who are kept as far as possible apart from other prisoners. The daily average number of Juveniles in 1931 was 4.5.

A school-master attends daily to instruct them. In 1929 the daily average was high and a separate hall was set aside at Lai Chi Kok for Juveniles, but the number is now so small that it has been found more expedient to deal with them in Victoria Gaol.

18. With the coming into operation of the Juvenile Offenders' Ordinance No. 1 of 1932 and the Industrial and Reformatory Schools Ordinance No. 6 of 1932, it is anticipated that the number of juvenile prisoners will in future be practically nil. These Ordinances provide for the establishment of juvenile courts, probationary officers, industrial and reforma- tory schools and modes of correction, other than imprisonment. for young offenders.

19. Police Magistrates may, under the provisions of the Magistrates Ordinance No. 3 of 1890, give time for the payment of fines.

20. Lady visitors attend the Female Prison twice weekly to instruct the prisoners in hand-work and to impart elementary education.

21. Visiting Justices inspect and report on both prisons every fortnight.

Chapter XIV.

LEGISLATION.

Forty Ordinances were passed during the year 1931. These and also the Regulations, Rules, By-laws and other subsidiary legislative enactments are published in a separate volume in blue book form by the Government Printers. forty Ordinances comprised two appropriation. two replacement. two incorporation, two consolidation, thirty amendment and two Ordinances which were new to the Colony.

The

34

15. Owing to reconstruction at Victoria Gaol the prisoners were overcrowded in the workshops at the beginning of the year and there was a certain amount of trouble, but the general conduct steadily improved after the new diets were approved and when the new shops were completed. The agitation in Victoria Gaol was reflected in Lai Chi Kok but the measures adopted restored discipline, which is now good in both prisons.

16. Prisoners are employed at printing, bookbinding, tinsmithing, matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, gardening, laundry work, cleaning and minor repairs to buildings. The bulk of the Government printing and bookbinding is done in Victoria Gaol.

17. A small separate ward is reserved in Victoria Gaol for Juveniles who are kept as far as possible apart from other prisoners. The daily average number of Juveniles in 1931 was 4.5.

A school-master attends daily to instruct them. In 1929 the daily average was high and a separate hall was set aside at Lai Chi Kok for Juveniles, but the number is now so small that it has been found more expedient to deal with them in Victoria Gaol.

18. With the coming into operation of the Juvenile Offenders' Ordinance No. 1 of 1932 and the Industrial and Reformatory Schools Ordinance No. 6 of 1932, it is anticipated that the number of juvenile prisoners will in future be practically nil. These Ordinances provide for the establishment of juvenile courts, probationary officers, industrial and reforma- tory schools and modes of correction, other than imprisonment. for young offenders.

19. Police Magistrates may, under the provisions of the Magistrates Ordinance No. 3 of 1890, give time for the payment of fines.

20. Lady visitors attend the Female Prison twice weekly to instruct the prisoners in hand-work and to impart elementary education.

21. Visiting Justices inspect and report on both prisons every fortnight.

Chapter XIV.

LEGISLATION.

Forty Ordinances were passed during the year 1931. These and also the Regulations, Rules, By-laws and other subsidiary legislative enactments are published in a separate volume in blue book form by the Government Printers. forty Ordinances comprised two appropriation. two replacement. two incorporation, two consolidation, thirty amendment and two Ordinances which were new to the Colony.

The

36

Emergency Regulations, Estate Duty, Rating, Prisons, Nurses, Hong Kong University, Stamps, Dogs, Public Places, Telephones, Wild Birds, Asiatic Emigration, Supreme Court, Places of Public Entertainment, Bills of Sale, Bankruptcy, Probates, Births and Deaths, Cemeteries, Public Health and Buildings, Trade Marks, Female Domestic Service, Pawnbrokers, Prospect- ing and Mining, United Kingdom Fatents, Waterworks, Motor Spirit, Entertainment Tax, Gunpowder and Fireworks, Money- lenders, and Volunteers.

9. Factory legislation and legislative provision for com- pensation for accidents, sick pay and old age pensions such as obtains in the United Kingdom has not been adopted in the Colony where the labour population is mainly alien and fluctuates, coming from or returning to China according to the demand for its services.

Chapter XV.

PUBLIC FINANCE & TAXATION.

The following tables show the Revenue and Expenditure for the five years 1927 to 1931 inclusive.

Revenue. Expenditure.

Surplus.

Deficit.

1927

$21,344,536

$20,845,065

$499,471

1928

24,968,399

21,230,242

3,788,157

1929

23,554,475

21,983,257

1,571,218

1930

27,818,474

28,119,646

$301,172

1931

33,146,724

31,160,774

1,985,950

2. The revenue for the year 1931 amounted to $33,146,724 being $5,657,965 more than estimated and $5,328,250 more than the revenue obtained in 1930.

3. Increased Duties on liquor and tobacco account for $1,750,000 of the increase and higher rates of Port and Harbour Dues for $400,000. The assessed taxes (rates) were raised by 4% and resulted in an increase of about $1,600,000 in 1931 over the figures for 1930. Increased Stamp Duties and an Entertain- ment Tax brought in a further $1,100,000 and increased Postage Rates $660,000. Land Sales were also up to the extent of. $300,000.

4. The expenditure for the year 1931 $31,160,774, being $1,372,919 more than $3,041,128 more than the expenditure in 1930.

amounted estimated

to and

5. Substantial savings were effected in the Harbour Depart- ment, Medical Department, and Sanitary Department by deferring the purchase of new equipment and reducing the maintenance work to a minimum.

37

6. On most other heads, however, the expenditure exceeded the estimate mainly as a result of the fall in exchange-the estimates being based on a rate of 1s./4d. 1 dollar whereas the Treasury rate averaged 1s./-id. 1 dollar.

7. Debt.-The total amount of sterling debt outstanding at the close of 1931 was £1,485,782.16.5; the sinking fund for its redemption amounting to £707,585. There is also the 1927 Public Works Loan of $4,927,000; the sinking fund for which amounted at the end of 1931 to £89,975.

8. The Assets and Liabilities of the Colony on the 31st December, 1931, are shown in the following statement:

LIABILITIES.



C.

ASSETS.

C.

DEPOSITS :-

Contractors and

Officers Deposits...

Suitors Fund

415,261.81 590,712.07

ADVANCES:

On account of

Future Loan

Purchase of three

Locomotives for

2,611,171,02

Chinese Section

1,451.91

Kowloon-Canton

Miscellaneous De-

posits...

Postal Agencies Suspense Account

Exchange Adjustment.. Trade Loan Reserve Praya East Reclamation Coal Account

Crown Agents-Over-

draft....

923,010.85

Railway

332,099.29 Miscellaneous

1,045,389.41 Building Loans

142,642.83 | Imprest Account.....

2,672.68 Subsidiary Coin

!

1,357.16 INVESTMENTS :—

Surplus Fund

mittances..

3,484,014.01

447,468.26 83,036.70

1,053,924.31

6,330,31

1,296,805.90

1,363,434.80

Crown Agents Re-

41,588.44

Trade Loan Out-

standing

1,232,579.76

Unallocated Stores,

(P. W. D.),..................

Unallocated Stores,

517,248.14

(Railway)

163,545.31

Lorry Haulage Account

1,743.26

Total Liabilities ... 6,065,768.53

CASH BALANCE :-

Treasurer

3,588,678.89

* Joint Colonial

Excess of Assets over

Liabilities

11,347,629.47

Fund.. Fixed Deposits

2,303,999.99

1,828,999.92

Total...... 17,413,398.00

Total $ 17,413,398.00

* Joint Colonial Fund £159,000 0s. Od.

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR THE

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR TH}

Estimates,

Heads of Revenue.

1931.

Light. Dues

Licences and Internal Re-

venue

not otherwise

specified -

Fees of Court or Office,

Payments for specific

Actual Revenue

to 31st December,

1931.

$

$

C.

648,740

658,337.36

Revenue for

same period of preceding

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads of Expendi

year.

C.

329.313.46

$

(.

329,023.90

18,558,075

20,934,568.19

6,169,266.40

4,765,301.79

purposes,

and

Reim-

bursements in Aid

2,285,102

2,621,425.94 2,113,862.02

507,563.92

Post Office

1,360,000

2,035 938.60

1,375,207.08

660,731.52

Kowloon-Canton Railway -

948,550

1,095,098.77

973,128.63

121,970.14

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses -

1,432,420

1,587,942.43 1,541,895.52

46,046.91

Interest

1

133,000

224,450.46

390,799-73

Miscellaneous Receipts -

622,872

811,144.04 2,060,103.05

$3

C.

166,339.27

1,248,959.01

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

25,988,759

29,968,915.79 || 24,953,575.89

6,430,638.18

1,415,298.28

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

1,500,000 3,177,807.94 2,864,897.03

312,910.91

TOTAL

27,488,759 33,146,723-73 27,818,472.92 6,743,549.09 1,415,298.28

Deduct

Net

1,415.298.28

$5,328,250.81

H. E. the Governo: Cadet Service Senior Clerical and

counting Staff Junior Clerical Ser Colonial Secretary's and Legislature Secretariat for Cl

Affairs

Treasury -

Sou

Audit Department District Office, Nor

Do., Communications :-

(a) Post Office (b) Do. W Telegraph Se Imports & Exports ( Harbour Departme Do.

Service

Royal Observatory- Fire Brigade Supreme Court - Attorney General Crown Solicitor's O Official Receiver - Land Office

Magistracy, Hong I

Do., Kowlo Police Force- Prisons Departmen Medical Departmer Sanitary Departme Botanical and Fo Department - Education Departn Public Works D

ment

Public Works, Rec

Do., Extraor Kowloon-Canton R Defence :-

(a) Volunteer D.

Corps (b) Military Con

tion

Miscellaneous Serv Charitable Services Charge on Accou

Public Debt- Pensions

TOTAL

Appendix A.

RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1931.

E AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER, 1931.

Estimates,

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1931.

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1931.

Expenditure

for same period of preceding year.

Increase.

Decrease.

SA

C.

$

C.

C.

G.

C.

H. E. the Governor

155,890

170,605.97

150,450.32

Cadet Service

566,221

636,078.97

517,813.61

20,155.65 118,265.36

Senior Clerical and Ac-

counting Staff -

334,113

341,045.84

323,756.12

17,289.72

Junior Clerical Service

916,050

871,431.71

860,645.52

10,786.19

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

60,625

68,228.05

68,438.19

210.14

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

19,629

21,308.45

18,896.25

2,412.20

Treasury

54,635

71,280.57

34,189.06

37,091.51

Audit Department

72,604

81,080.71

67,919.44

13,161.27

District Office, North -

24,317

22,958.36

24,844.96

Do.,

South -

12,340

11,041.82

13,752.61

1,886.60 2,710.79

Communications :-

(a) Post Office

408,405

406,215.36

353,689.84

52,525.52

(b) Do. Wireless

Telegraph Services-

149,961

148,677.96

129,997.69

18,680.27

Imports & Exports Office -

871,194

1,031,294.48

903,181.60

128,112.88

Harbour Department

1,164,394

962,648.12

999,605.03

36,956.91

Do.

Air

Service

154,568

26,691.12

93,896.70

67,205.58

Royal Observatory-

71,012

74,137.85

54,133.40

20,004.45

Fire Brigade

326,479

305,016.77

315,431.08

10,414.31

Supreme Court -

173,354

185,316.02

173.796.86

11,519.16

Attorney General

47.226

50,632.92

47.400.55

3,232.37

Crown Solicitor's Office

50,322

55.252.64

47,911.93

7,340.71

Official Receiver -

18,631

20,711.14

23,163.87

2,452.73

166,339.27

Land Office

36,754

42,163.90

38,368.71

3,795.19

Magistracy, Hong Kong

-

2,399

1,990.37

1.961.55

28.82

'Do.,. Kowloon

2,190

1,892.66

2,085.55

192.89

Police Force-

2,710,962

2,768.161.31

2,569,664.42

198,496.89

1,248,959.01

1,415,298.28

Prisons Department

Sanitary Department

Botanical and Forestry

Department -

Education Department Public Works Depart-

ment

Public Works, Recurrent- Do., Extraordinary- Kowloon-Canton Railway Defence:

713.369

778.119.73

677,585.16

100,534.57

Medical Department

1,446,585

1,336.923.89

1,186,249.73

150,674.16

954,276

851,751.65

868,949.89

17,198.24

-

119.587 1,739,708

116.683.84

120,191.99

3,508.15

1,797,557.94 1,662,169.33

45,388.61

2,038,928 2,306,678.48 2,033,300.08 1,536,150 1,581,926.75 1,564,118.43

273,378.40

17,808.32

2,500,000

2,374,931.99

2,850,498.83

475,566.84

947,547

879,211.25

826,495.47

52,805.78

(a) Volunteer Defence

Corps

103,660

97,083.26

93,842.05

3,241.21

(6) Military Contribu-

tion

4,784,290

4,932,598.36

3,863,769.31

1,068,829.05

Miscellaneous Services

1,490.955

2,211,125.69

1,733,444.10

477,681.59

Charitable Services

142,295

174,585.90

135,186.50

39,399.49

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

1,638.230

,894,290.79 1,588,117.82

Pensions -

1,228,000

1,541,441.41

1,080,821.99

306,172.97 460,619.42

1,415,298.28

TOTAL

29,787,855

Deduct

Net

31 160,774.00 28,119,645.54 3,659,431.64 618,303.18

618,303.18

$3,041,128.46

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1931.

LIABILITIES.

:

:

Deposits :-

Contractors and Officers

Deposits

Suitors Fund

Miscellaneous Deposits

Postal Agencies

Suspense Account

Exchange Adjustment

Trade Loan Reserve

Praya East Reclamation

Coal Account

Crown Agents- Overdraft...

...

Total Liabilities

:

:

:



C.

ASSETS.

S

c.

Advances :-

On account of Future Loan

3,484,014.01

415,261.81

590,712.07

2,611.171.02

1,451.91

923,010.85

332,099.29

1,045,389.41

142,642.33

Purchase of three Locomotives for Chinese Section Kowloon- Canton Railway

Miscellaneous

Building Loans

Imprest Account ..

Subsidiary Coin ...

Investments :-

† Surplus Funds

447,468.26

...

:

:

:

:

:

.:..

83,036.70

1,053,924.31

6,330.31

1,296,805.90

1,363,434.80

2,672.68

Crown Agents Remittances

41,588.44

1,357.16

Trade Loan Outstanding

1,232,579.76

Unallocated Stores, (P.W.D.)

517,248.14

Unallocated Stores, (Railway).

163,545.31

Lorry Haulage Account

1,743.26

Cash Balance :-

6,065,768.53

Treasurer

:

:

*Joint Colonial Fund

...

Excess of Assets over Liabilities

11,347,629.47

Fixed Deposits

Total

$

17,413,398.00

Total...

:

:

:

es

* Joint Colonial Fund £159,000 Os. Od.

3,588,678.89

2,303,999.99

1,828,999.92

$

17,413,398.00

Invested as follows:-

AMOUNT OF STOCKS, &c.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE.

MARKET VALUE.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

London County Council,

(1945-85)

41% Stock.

Natal, (1929-49)

... 3%

£ 10,137.14. 0

7,600. 0. 0

£9,137. 2. 0

5,646. 7. 0

(88) £8,971.17. 3

(69)

5,244. C. 0

Newcastle Corporation,

(1945-55)

Queensland, (1940-60)

41%

5%

"

Treasury Bond, (1932-4)

41%

10,000. 0. 0

29,009.16.10

50,972. 9. 5

9,600. 0. 0

(90)

9,000. 0. 0

28,719.14.11

(73)

21,177. 3. 6

50,993. 9.11

(971) 49,698. 3. 2

£ 107,720. 0. 3

£ 104,096.13.10

£94,091. 3.11

Appendix A (1)

REPORT ON THE FINANCE FOR THE YEAR 1931.

The Revenue for the year amounted to $33,146,724 and he Expenditure was $31,160,774. Revenue therefore exceeded Expenditure by $1,985,950. The approved estimated revenue for the year was $27,488,759 while the revised figure was $31,204,368, an increase of $3,715,609. The actual revenue therefore exceeded the revised estimate by $1,942,356 of which $877,000 was due to Land Sales and $480,000 to the increased scale of Liquor and Tobacco Duties imposed in September. The approved estimate of expenditure for the year was shown as $29,787,855 and the revised estimate amounted to $31,152,500 or $8,274 below the actual expenditure.

2. The following statement shows the Revenue and Ex- penditure for each of the years of the last decade:-

Year.

Revenue.

Expendi-

ture.

Surplus.

Deficit.

$

$

$

$

1922...... 22,291,065 18,563,003 3,728,062

1923...... 24,783,763 21,571,905 3,211,858

1924...... 24,209,640 26,726,423

2,516,788

1925...... 23,244,366 28,266,818

5,022,452

1926...... 21,131,582 23,524,716

1927..... 21,344,536 20,845,065

1928...... 24,968,399 21,230,242 3,738,157

1929...... 23,554,475 21,983,257 1,571,218

2,393,134

499,471

1930...... 27,818,473 28,119,646

301,173

1931...... 33,146,724 31,160,774 1,985,950

REVENUE.

3. The largest individual item of revenue is derived from the assessment tax, the sum of $5,814,017 being collected in 1931. This represents 17.5% of the total revenue or 19.4% of the revenue exclusive of land sales. Stamp duties (including estate duties) follow with $3,679,088,

A. (1) 2-

4. In the following table the actual revenue for the yea 1931 is compared with the revenue of the previous year and with the Estimates for 1931.

Heads of Revenue.

Actual 1930

Estimates Actual

1931

1931

Light Dues

Licences and Internal Revenue not

otherwise specified

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimburse- ments in Aid......

$ C. 329,313.46

C.

648,740

$ 658,337.36

16,169,266,40 18,558,075 20,934,568.19

Post Office.......

Kowloon-Canton Railway

Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses

Interest

Miscellaneous Receipts

2,113,862,02 2,285,102 2,621,425.91

1,375,207.08 1,360,000 2,035,938.69

973,128.63) 948,550 1,095,098.77

1,541,895.52 1,432,420 1,587,942,43

390,799.73 133,000 224,460.46

2,060,103.05 622,872 811,144.04

Total (exclusive of Land Sales!...... 24,953,575.89

Land Sales, (Premia on New Leases) ... 2,864,897.03

25,988,759 29,968,915.79

1,500,000 3,177,807,91

Total..........

$27,818,472.92 27,188,759 33,146,723.73

5. Each Head of Revenue showed an increase over the Esti- mates for 1981 and with the exception of Interest and Mis- cellaneous Receipts over the Revenue for 1930. The principal increases over the amounts as estimated were as follows:-

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

Entertainment Tax

(This is the first year of the tax, a new Cinema Theatre was opened in March).

Assessed Taxes

$ 34,574

$ 149,016

(Owing to building development).

Liquor Duties

(Duties on all imported liquor were placed on a sterling basis in February and duty on beer also increased).

$ 816,838

Motor Spirit Duties

A (1) 3

(The duty of 15 cents per gallon was raised to 25 cents per gallon in September).

Opium Monopoly

(The prices of Grade 2 were increased in February and the price of Kamshan Opium in October).

Stamp Duties

(Heavy dealings in stocks and shares. Low dollar demanded more stamps on Bills of Exchange which are assessed ad valorem).

Tobacco Duties

(Duties placed on a sterling basis im February).

75,359

$ 319,724

$ 206,087

$ 564,522

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PUrposes,

AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID.

Deeds Registration

25,675

(Activity in land transactions).

Gunpowder Storage

$5

10,014

(More storage required).

Official Receiver's Commission

$

17,106

(Two large liquidations and one large

bankruptcy).

Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents...... $ 203,912

(More meters installed and general building development).

Water Service Fees

79,404

(General building development and in- creased charges).

POST OFFICE.

Message Fees

$ 350,263

(Increased traffic and extension of services).

Postages

$ 325,675

(Postal rates were increased from 1st April, 1931).

A (1) 4

$ 128,373

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY,

Passenger Service

(Increase in fares and number of pas- sengers).

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY, LAND AND HOUSES.

Buildings

(Lower exchange consequently higher dollar rent from Government Officers).

Lands not leased

$

25,500

$ 57,318

(More permits for encroachments issued)

Leased Lands

$ 37,236

INTEREST.

(Increase in number of Crown Leases).

Interest

(The estimate was prepared on the as- sumption that the amount provided for expenditure from surplus balances would be spent. This was not the case consequently more interest was received from short term investments than anticipated.)

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS.

Condemned Stores

(Variable revenue).

Other Miscellaneous Receipts..........

(Variable revenue).

$ 91,460

$

21,755

$ 34,986

Widows & Orphans' Pensions Contributions $ 119,764

(Lower exchange consequently higher dollar contributions).

Overpayments in Previous Years

(New subhead. Formerly these receipts were deducted from their respective Expenditure subheads).

LAND SALES.

Premia on Leases

(More sales and increased

increased premia received).

33,838

$1,677,807

A (1) 5

6. A list of the alterations and additions in General Taxation, Postage Rates and of the increases and adjustments in Licence Fees and other Receipts during the year 1931 is shewn in the following Schedule.

Heads.

Old Fees.

Effective

New Fees,

from.

Duties.

Import Duty on

Intoxicating Liquors.

As per scale of duties pub- lished in Government Gazette Extraordinary of 15th October, 1926. Government Notification No. 558.

The same with exception

of beer, porter,

cider

perry and stout raised from 40 cents to 60 cents per gallon and placed on a sterling basis in accordance with the resolution published in Government Notification No. 98.

19.2.31

Import Duty on

Spirituous

Liquors.

Import Duty on Motor Spirits.

Import Duty on

Tobacco.

Nil.

Ordinance 4 of 1930 :— 15 cents per gallon.

Resolution passed by the Legislative Council 19th June, 1930-

Unmanufactured

tobacco

Unstripped 75 cents and

84 cents. Stripped 90 cts. and $1.

Manufactured tobacco :-

Deduction of 10 cents per

19.2.31

gallon for locally distill- ed spirits abolished.

$10 per gallon reckoned

on sterling basis.

17.9.31

Increased to 25 cents.

17.9.31

reduced to :-

50 cents and 56 cents. 60 cents and 66 cents.

19.2.31

Cigars Cigarette

Other

$2.00

$1.50

1.00

0.75

1.00

0.75

reckoned on sterling basis. Subsequently by resolution published in Government Notification No. 584 increased to :-

Unmanufactured tobacco :-..

Unstripped 70 cents and

79 cents.

Stripped 84 cents and

93 cents.

Manufactured tobacco :-

17.9.31

Cigars

Cigarettes

Other

$2.00

0.90

0.90

Heads

Old Fees

Port & Harbour Dues.

Light Dues....

.....

Buoy Rents

A (1) 6

New Fees.

Effective from.

2 cts. 5/6th cts.

4 cts. 11⁄2 cts,

1.1.31.

$8.00 $6.00 & $4.00

$16.00 $12.00 & $8.00

1.1.31.

Licences and Internal Revenue.

(A)—Licences,

Dangerous Goods

(Fireworks)

do. (Gunpowder) Game

$10.00 25.00

$100.00

29.10.31.

250.00

29. 0.31.

10.00

25.00

31. 8.31.

Money Changers

50.00

100.00

27. 9.31.

do. (N.T.)

10.00

25.00

27. 9.31.

Opium Monopoly

Kam Shan Opium

3 taels

60.00

3 taels

70.00

Grade 2 Opium

1 tael

14.50

1 tael

17.00

.36

5.32

11

2 mace

3.40

19

.18

2.66

6 candareens

1.10

19

27

.06 .03

.89

.55

#1

.45

19

Pawnbrokers

A. Central district of Vic-

toria.

27. 8.31.

..$1,500

B. Elsewhere on the Island of Hong Kong and its dependencies and in Kowloon and New Kowloon $1,000

C. Elsewhere in New Ter-

ritories

$400

A. City of Victoria west of Sookunpoo Nullah, and Kowloon and New Kowloon west of Rail- way as far as and in- cluding Shamshuipo.

$2,500

B. City of Victoria and

areas west of Sookun- poo Nullah to the War Department land east of A Kung Ngan and also Aberdeen and Ap- lichau and Kowloon and New Kowloon east of the Railway as far as and including Kow- loon City & Kai Tack, $2,000

C. Elsewhere on the Island of Hong Kong and the remainder of New Kowloon .....$1,000

D. The remainder of the

....

..

New Territories.

$ 500

– ▲ (1) 7 —

Heads.

Old Fees.

Tobacco

Tobacco (Haw-

kers)

Vehicles:

$ 4.00

4.00

New Fees.

Effective

from.

$ 8.00

1.10.31

8.00

Motor Car not

exceeding 15

cwt

16.00

24.00

27. 9.31

Do.,

exceed-

ing 15 cwt but

not exceeding

30 cwt.....

24.00

36.00

*

Do., exceed- ing 30 cwt... Motor Cycle

Solo....

48.00

72.00

91

12.00

18.00

>:

Do.,

with side

16.00

24.00

car

>>

Motor, public

cars

Seating tax

5.00

Seating tax

10.00

27

1.00

2.00

27

24.00

48.00

Motor Drivers,

learners

Handtrucks

(B)—Internal

Revenue,

Assessed Taxes

(Rates)

Existing rates

Increased by 4%

"

Existing percentages

Revised to 17%, 16%, & 15%

1. 1.31 1. 7.31

New item

1. 1.31

Entertainment

Tax

Stamp Duties;

(including Est-

ate Duties :) Bills of Lading. Cheques & re-

ceipts

10 cents. and 30 cents.

15 cents. & 40 cents.

1. 1.31

Estate Duties...

5 cents. 500 to 1,000 $ 1.00 1,000 to 10,000 2.00 10,000 to 100,000 3.00

10 cents.

1. 1.31

500 to

5,000$ 1%

5,000 to

10.000 2

10,000 to

25,000 3

25,000 to

50,000 4

19

50,000 to

100,000 5

>

100,000 to 250,000 5.00 250,000 to 500,000 5.50. 500,000 to 750,000 6.00 750.000 to 1,000,000 6.50

100,000 to

200,000 6,

0000041

"

*

Excess

Water

Supply and Meter Rents.

1,000,000 to 1,500,000 7.00 1,500,000 to 2,500,000 7.50 2,500,000

8.00 inches 6.00

200,000 to 400,000 to 600,000 to 800,000 to 1,000,000 10 1,000,000 to 2,000,000 11 2,000,000

400,000 7,

600,000 8,,

800.000 9,

99

""

12"

8.00

4. 9.31

8.00

10.00

19

11.00

14.00

"1

13.00

16.00

11

11

20.00

25.00

"

2

27.00

35.00

.

重命

3

39.00

50.00

"

"

60.00

75.00

严量

11

Heads.

Fees of Court or

Office, &c.

Births & Deaths

Old Fees.

À (1) 8

New Fees.

Effective from.

Registration

Graded

Graded higher

16.10.31

Boundary Stone..

Graded

Do.

6.11.31

Court

Increased by

25%

17.7.31

Earth & Stone

Permits, N. T.

per junk to

p. m.

cut earth......

4 workmen

$5.00 $1.00

I

p, m.

$10.00

1.9.31

4 workmen

$ 2.00

1.9.31

Medical Examina-

tion of 'Emi- grants...

Vaccination fee Emigration

20 cents 50 cents

now inclusive

$ 1.00

1.8.31

Miscellaneous :-

Permits

for

carrying long

loads

Permits for cars to use closed roads

Permits for cars to use closed roads

New item

$ 2.00

27.9.31

Do.

(permanent)

$20.00

Do.

Do. (temporary) $ 2.00

Do.

Permits

for

trucks to use

closed roads..

Do. (permanent)

$20.00

Do.

Permits

for

trucks to use

closed roads..

Money Lenders...

Triennially

Do. (temporary) $ 2.00

$10.00 Annually

Do.

$50.00

16.10.31.

Motor Drivers, Lerner Exam- ination

Motor Ambul-

Per trip irrespective of Inside boundaries of

auce

boundaries

$3.00

Official

Certi-

$ 5.00

27. 9.31,

Victoria, Kowloon & New Kowloon $ 5.00

14.9.31

Outside do. do. $10.00

ficates. Colonial

Veterinary

Surgeon's

Certificate

of

Health on ex-

port of animals

other

than

cattle

per head

$ 5.00

31.7.31

Heads.

Official

tures

Signa-

Trade Marks

Registration ...

Water Services ...

Old Fees.

A (1) 9

Effective

New Fees.

from.

$2.00

$5.00

2.10.31

Increased by about 100%

1.9.31

New item

(B)-Receipts.

Police Services...

Prisoners'

Subsistence (debtors)

Slaughter Hous-

$8 & $2.00

$20 & $ 3.00

1.9.31

25 cents

$ 2.00

22.10.31

es (Cattle)

50 cents.

60 cents.

1.10 31

Slaughter Hous

es (Sheep)

10 cents.

35 cents.

Slaughter Hous

es (Swine)

(D)-Sales.

10 cents.

40 cents.

...

Timber (Loan of

Plants)

6 cents

Post Office.

8 cents.

1.9.31

Postage:

Letters, Places in the Colony

Letters, U. K. and British Possession ... Letters, Empire

via Suez. Letters, Empire via Siberia. Letters, Macao,

China.

Letters,

For-

eign Places.

Postcards,

Places in the Colony.

2 cent for each oz or part

of oz.

Govt Notification 137 of

27.3.31.

3 cents.

12 cents per oz.

4 cents for each oz or

part of oz.

12 cents per oz.

20 and 10 cents.

4 cents.

10 cents for 1st oz and 6 cents for each additional

Oz.

1 cent



20 and 10 cents.

2 cents.

Postcards, U.K.

and British

Empire.

4 cents

$ cents.

Postcards,

Macao.

Postcards,

I cents

2 cents.

China.

2 cents

1.4.31



- A (1) 10

Heads.

Old Fees.

New Fecs..

Postcards, Foreign

countries.

Printed papers. Commercial

papers.

Small Packets.

Minimum rate for packets :- containing

commercial

papers. containing

printed

papers.

Registration fee

Insurance ......

Rent of Govt. Property, &c.

4 cents

2 cents

10 cents for 1st ten ozs. &

2 cents for each addi- tional 2 ozs

32 cents for Ist eight ozs. and 8 cents for eacli additional 2 ozs.

10 cents

4 cents

10 cents for each postal

packet. 25 cents

8 cents.

4 cents.

20 cents.

50 and 15 cents.

20 cents.

8 cents.

20 cents.

40 cents per £12 or gold

fcs. 300.

Lands Not Leas-

ed :-

(Quarry Per-

mits)

Misc. Receipts.

"Other" Supervi-

sion etc. on footpaths & drains & Pri- vate Street Improve- ments........

Inspection of

Nursery

Stock.

for 4 men

$1.00

Effective

from

$5.00

1.9.31



For work under$500

20%

Under $100 25%

1.9.31

$500 to 1,000

10,

$100 to

500 20%

..

$1,000 and over

5,

$500 to 1000 15%

$1,000 and over 10%

Not exceeding 20 bales

$5.00

21 to 250 bales $10.00 Exceeding 250 bales $20.00

24.7.31

J1

"Other" supervi-

sion:

Trenches (H.K.

Telephone Co.)

25%

1.9.31

10%

25,1

(H. K. Elec-

10,,

tric (o.)...

25,

"

,, (China Light

11

& Power Co.)

(H.K. Tram-

way Co)...

(Gas Co.)

various-

10,

25

??

12

10

25 11

33,

1

(1) 11

Heads.

Old Fees.

New Fees.

Effective from

Great Northern

Telegraph Co.,

$100 to $1000

10%

$100 to $ 500

20%

1.9.31

Eastern Exten-

500 to 1,000

15 17

"

Over $1000

5 11

Dairy Farm Co.

for

sion....

Supervision fees for work done

individuals...

Over

1,000

10,

Under

100

25%

Under $500

20%

$100 to $ 500

20

$500 to $1000

10

""

private

500 to 1,000

15

Over $1000

5

Over

1,000

10

House Service

Labour

33%

Over all charge 333 1,

**

""

work

Materials

20

7. The Resolution placing Liquor and Tobacco Duties on a sterling basis is worded as under:-

"Provided that the dollars and decimals thereof stated in the table shall be conventional dollars reckoned as the equivalent of one shilling and eight pence sterling; and that consequently to arrive at the actual amount payable in Hong Kong currency the conventional dollar stated in the Table shall be multiplied by 20 and divided by a figure settled by the Colonial Treasurer from time to time representing the average opening selling rates for the previous month of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Banking Corporation for demand drafts on London and until so settled the figure shall be 11.37."

EXPENDITURE.

8. The expenditure for the year amounted to $31,160,774 against an estimate of $29,787,855 an increase of $1,372,919. The total sum of $31,160,774 is made up as follows:

Ordinary Expenditure

$28,785,843

Extraordinary Expenditure, Public Works 2,374.931

Ordinary Expenditure for the year was $28,785,843 against $25,269,147 in the preceding year showing an increase of $3,516,696.

+

- Á (1) 12

9. In the following table actual expenditure for the year 1931 is compared with the expenditure of the previous year and with the Estimates for 1931,

Heads of Expenditure.

Actual 1930

Estimates, 1931

Actual 1931

c.

$ c.

H. E. the Governor

150,450.32

155,890

170,605.97

Cadet Service

517,813.61

566.221

636,078.97

Senior Clerical and Accounting

Staff

323,756.12

334,113

341,045.84

Junior Clerical Service

860,645.52

916,050

871,431.71

Colonial Secretary's Office and

Legislature

68,438.19

60,625

68,228.05

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

18,896.25

19,629

21,308.45

Treasury...

Audit Department

District Office, North

South

Do, Communications:-

(a) Post Office

(b) Do. Wireless Telegraph Services

Imports and Exports Office

34,189.06

54,635

71,280.57

67,919,44

72,604

81,080.71

24,841.96

21,317

22,958.36

13,752.61

12,340

11,041.82

353,689.84

408,405

406,215.36

129,997.69

149,961

148,677.96

903,181.60

871,194

1,031,294.48

Harbour Department

999,605.03

1,164,394

962,648.12

Do.

Air Service...

93,896.70

154.568

26,691.12

Royal Observatory

54,133.40

71,012

74,137.85

Fire Brigade

315,431,08

326,479

305,016.77

Supreme Court

173.796.86

173.354

185,316.02

Attorney General ...

47.400.55

47,226

50,632.92

Crown Solicitor's Office

47.911.93

50,322

55,252.64

Offical Receiver

23,163.87

18.631

20,711.14

Land Office

38,368.71

36,754

42,163.90

Magistuacy, Hong Kong

1,961.55

2,399

1,990.37

Do.. Kowloon

2,085.55

2,190

1.892.66

Police Force

2,569,664.42

2,710,962

2,768,161.31

Prisons Department

677,585.16

713,369

778,119.73

Medical Department

1,186,249.73

1,446,585

1,336,923.89

Sanitary Department

868,949.89

954,276

851,751.65

Botanical & Forestry Department

120,191.99

119,587

116,683.84

Education Department

1,662,169.33

1,739,708

1,707.557.94

Public Works Department...

2,033,300.08

2,038,928

2,306.678.48

Do.

Recurrent

1,564,118.42

1,536,150

1,581,926.75

Do.

Extraordinary

2,850,498.83

2,500,000

2,374,931.99

Kowloon-Canton Railway

826,405.47

917,547

879,211.25

Defence:-

(a) Volunteer Defence Corps

93.842.05

103,660

97,083.26

(b) Military Contribution

3,863,769.31

4,784.290

4,932,598.36

Miscellaneous Services

1,733,444.10

1,490,955

2,211,125.69

Charitable Service

135,186,50

142,295

174,585.90

Charge on Account of Public

Debt

1,588,117.82

1,638,230

1,894,290.79

Pensions...

1,080,821,99

1,228,000 1,541,441.41

Total

28,119,645.54

29,787,855 31,160,774.00

A (1) 13 —

10. Comments on the more important items showing in- creases and decreases over the estimates are given below.

Decreases.

JUNIOR CLERICAL SERVICE

$ 44,618

(Vacancies in staff).

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT

(Annual overhauls and repairs generally were cut down. Conversion of Commercial Moor- ings was not proceeded with so rapidly. Replacement of boilers to two launches and purchase of new launch for Sanitary De- partment were suspended).

HARBOUR DEPARTMENT, AIR SERVICES

(Annual subsidy to Flying Club reduced by $15,000. Subsidy to Commercial Aviation $50,000 not required and grant of $60,000 to Flying Club inserted in the Estimates erroneously).

MEDICAL DEPARTMENT

(Economical measures and lower contract prices accounted for a saving of $17,758 in provisions for patients. Equipment of the maternity block, Kowloon cost $23,475 less than expected. Maintenance of Lunatics at Canton and the grant to the Sheklung Leper Asylum accounted for $10,954. Vacancies in office and leave reduced the amount requir- ed under Personal Emoluments and Convey- ance allowances by $18,193 and $6,513 respectively).

SANITARY DEPARTMENT

(Vacancies in staff reduced the amount re- quired under Personal Emoluments by $28,084. A saving of $15,354 was made on the 33 Subheads under "Other Charges". In- stead of four light draft lighters and two sail- ing junks being purchased only one lighter and one junk were bought, a decrease of $24,000. In addition the purchase of two motor cars and two motor vans estimated at $30,000 was postponed).

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

(Of this amount the sum of $28,456 was saved under Personal Emoluments due to vacancies unfilled).

$201,745

$127,876

$109,661

$102,524

$ 32,150

A (1) 14



KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY.

(The new locomotives being fitted with super- heaters and feed water heaters and further а better quality of coal resulted in a reduction of $38,722 in the amount estimated for coal. In addition general savings under "Other Charges" amounted to $20,474. Post- ponement of works under "Special Expendi- ture" including Sheung Shui Station exten- sion ($38,479) reduced the amount required under this head by $60,934. On the other hand the derailment at mile 9 and washout to the embankment in April cost $51,110).

PUBLIC WORKS EXTRAORDINARY

Increases.

(Many works provided for in the Estimates were curtailed or cut out in order to eco- nomise).

CADET SERVICE

(Due entirely to the fall in exchange).

TREASURY

(Salaries accounted for $6,266 and $10,451 was spent more than estimated in the pur- chase of Revenue stamps owing to increased duty and the larger demand from the public).

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS OFFICE

(The purchase of raw opium cost $156,071 more than anticipated owing to the fall in the dollar).

POLICE FORCE

(The following subheads were exceeded owing to exchange Personal Emoluments $32,370, Ammunition $6,635, Fassages $40,242. In addition a motor emergency unit was bought at a cost of $10,662. The principal savings were Clothing $11,886, Bedding $3,406, Con- veyance allowances $3,353, Rations for In- dian Police $7,808. and Expenses of Anti Piracy Guards $5,478).

PRISONS

(Of this increase $49,204 was due to a revised and improved scale of rations for prisoners and $6,445 to an increase in the price of gas).

$ 68,335

$125,068

$ 69,857

$ 16,645

$160,100

$ 57,199.

$ 64,750

M

A (1) 15

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

(Personal Emoluments cost $268,924 more than estimated. Economies were effected in nearly all the subheads under "Other Charges" but these were counterbalanced by an excess of $22,938 on Radio stores owing to increased traffic and $78,098 in the purchase of a Broadcast transmitter).

PUBLIC WORKS RECURRENT

(Owing to economy requirements work was greatly curtailed on general maintenance re- sulting in savings amounting to $234,132. On the other hand the Typhoons during the year cost $90,833 more than provided in the estimates. $146,926 was spent in addition to the amount originally voted on water meters due to the large demand and the increase in the price of gas accounted for $34,057).

DEFENCE.-Military Contribution

(Balance of contributions in respect of the year 1930 paid when the final figures for the year were known).

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES

(Transport of Government Servants cost $189,742 more than estimated owing to the low rate of exchange and to the fact that the original vote was somewhat under-estimated. The rise in exchange towards the end of the year caused the dollar value of sterling se- curities and short term investments as at 31st December to require adjustment for the balance sheet costing $385,961. The actual market depreciation in sterling of sterling se- curities forming the investments on account of surplus balances amounted to £10,005- 9s.-11d. or $144,986 and this sum was also written off. Expenses in connection with the Currency Commission amounted to $35,201).

CHARITABLE SERVICES

(A special grant of $20,000 was made to the Flood Relief Fund of China).

$267,750

>

$ 45,776

$148,308

$720,170

$ 32,290

CHARGES ON ACCOUNT OF PUBLIC DEBT

$256,060

(The whole of this increase is due to the fall in exchange).

PENSIONS

$313,441

(For the most part this is due to the fall in exchange).

A (1). 16

11. STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES ON

DECEMBER, 1931.

LIABILITIES.

THE 31ST

C.

ASSETS.

$

C.

DEPOSITS :-

Suitors Fund

Contractors and

On account of

Officers Deposits...

415,261.81

590,712.07

ADVANCES -

Future Loan ... 3,484,014.01 Purchase of three

Locomotives for

posits

2,611,171.02

Chinese Section

1,451.91

Kowloon-Canton

923,010.85

Railway

Miscellaneous De-

Postal Agencies

Suspense Account

Exchange Adjustment..

Trade Loan Reserve

Praya East Reclamation Coal Account

Crown Agents-Over-

draft.......

332,099.29 Miscellaneous

1,045,389.41 Building Loans

142,642.33 | Imprest Account..........

2,672.68 Subsidiary Coin

447,468.26

83,036.70

1,053,924.31

6,330.31

1,296,805.90

1,357.16 INVESTMENTS :-

Surplus Fund

1,363,434.80

Crown Agents Re-

mittances...

41,588.44

Trade Loan Out-

standing

1,232,579.76

Unallocated Stores,

(P. W. D.),.....

517,248.14

Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)

163,545.31

Lorry Haulage Account

1,743.26

CASH BALANCE :-

Total Liabilities... 6,065,769.53

Treasurer

3,588,678.89

* Joint Colonial

Excess of Assets over

Fund......

2,303,999.99

Liabilities

11,347,629.47

Fixed Deposits

1,828,999.92

Total......$17,413,398.00

* Joint Colonial Fund £159,000 0s. Od.

Total $ 17,413,398.00

12. The excess of Assets over Liabilities on the 1st January 1930 was $9,361,679. On the 31st December 1931 this sum had increased to $11,347,629; the difference of $1,985,950 is the ex- cess of revenue over expenditure as recorded in paragraph 1 of this Report.

T



A (1) 17

13. The Crown Agents had a small overdraft on current account at the end of year of £93. 13s. 2d. The balance of moneys not required to meet current requirements was lent to the Joint Colonial Fund which amounted to £159,000 and is shown in the above statement as $2,303,999. This fund is drawn on from time to time as required by the Crown Agents.

14. The cash balance of $3,588,678 with the Treasurer in- cluded $1,295,643 held by the Official Receiver on account of Companies Liquidation and Bankruptcy. This letter figure also forms part of the sum of $2,611,171 shewn under Miscellaneous Deposits as a Liability.

15. The Surplus Fund $1,363,434 represents the market value of the stocks as at 31st December 1931 and was invested as follows:

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &C.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE. MARKET VALUE.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

London County Council,

(1945-85)

.41% Stock.

Natal, (1929-49)

..3%

£ 10,137.14. 0 7.600, 0, 0

£ 9,137. 2.0 (881)

5,646. 7. 0 (69)

Newcastle Corporation,

(1945-55)

.41%

Queensland, (1940-60) ...5 %

10,000. 0. 0 29,009.16.10

Treasury Bond, (1932-4) 43%

50,972. 9. 5

9,600. 0. 0(90) 28,719.14.11 (73) 50,993. 9.11 (973)

£8,971.17. 3 5,244. 0. 0

9,000. 0. 0

21,177. 3. 6

49,698, 3. 2

|£ 107,720, 0. 3 | £104,096.13.10

£94,091. 3.11

ADVANCE ON ACCOUNT OF FUTURE LOAN.

16. This money has been expended as under :—

Aberdeen Water Scheme................

$1,868,983.12

Aerodrome

740,331.42

Shing Mun Valley Scheme 1st Section...

367,961.85

Filters

J

""

3)

88,831.34

Vehicular Ferry

417,906.28

$3,484,014.01

— Á (1) 18 —

17. During the year the Unallocated Stores varied as under :-

Balance at 31st December

1930.

1931.

Public Works Department $546,580 $517,248

Kowloon Canton Railway... 141,811 163,545

688,391 680,793

SUBSIDIARY COIN.

18. The amount shown in the Statement was made up as

under.

50 cents

20

10

373.50

124,521.40

1,169,339.70

5

15

copper

1,696.30

875.-

$1,296,805.90

19. A new one cent piece was coined during the year and put into circulation on the 1st December. The new piece is of mixed metal (bronze) weighing grains 62.5 (Grammes 4.050) and is much smaller than the old one cent piece which weighs grains 115.75 (Grammes 7.501). Its appearance met with warm ap- proval by the public and it was necessary immediately to indent for further supplies. The nominal amount of Subsidiary Coin in circulation was $17,924,370.

TRADE LOAN.

20. Thirteen loans were paid off reducing the number out- standing at the end of the year to nineteen amounting to $1,232,579.76. Up to the 31st December 1931 $14,323,990.91 of the amount of $15,633,582.97 outstanding had been recovered. It was again found necessary in three cases to resort to enforce- ment of securities. Power of sale was duly exercised as favour- able opportunities arose, the principal sums lent were fully recovered, overdue interest being foregone.

21. The Working Account or Reserve to which interest is credited increased by $154,382.09 to $1,045,389.41 and is now only $187,190.35 short of the Capital Account at the end of the year.

}

A (1) 19

22. The following table shews the position as at 31st Decem- ber, 1931:-

Loans issued since 16th November, 1925 on

approved securities

Less Redemptions effected during the years

$15,633,582.97

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

Total.

*

$2,604,930.00

4,845,879.76

3,403,560.02

1,356,536.86

1,280,842.65

832,241.62

14,323,990.91

$ 1,309,592.06

Less amount written off as irrecoverable

Total of Loans outstanding on 31st December

1931

77,012.30

$ 1,232,579.76

Interest in arrears on 31st December 1926

117,369.42

31st

1927

""

206,818.64

31st

""

1928

19

321,121.10

31st

1929

416,237.93

31st

"

1930

""

398,641.94

31st

1931

12

307,152.89

Total number of Loans issued since 16th November, 1925-302

Less number redeemed in 1926

34

1927

85

39

"

""

1928

87

""

""

1929

29

"}

**

27

1.)

་ ་

1930

1931

35

13

283

Number of Loans outstanding on 31st December 1931..............

19

- A (1) 20

PUBLIC DEBT.

23. The inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amounted to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund stood at £761,447 as against £719,664 at the end of 1930.

24. The Public Works Loan (Ordinance No. 14 of 1927) amounted to $4,927,000. $3,000,000 of this loan was issued locally at par on November 1st 1927. The second issue was made on November 1st 1928 at a premium of 3%-Bonds to the nominal value of $1,927,000 being allotted. The Sinking Fund amounted to £98,036 as against £75,749 at the end of 1930.

NOTE CIRCULATION.

25. The local circulation of notes and specie in Reserve of the three banks having authorized issues were as follows at 31st December:

Notes in Circulation

Specie in Reserve

Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking

Corporation

Chartered Bank of India Australia

and China...

$128,738,801 $112,000,000

22,483,681

8,300,000

Mercantile Bank of India Limited

3,409,400

1,350,000

Total............ $154,631,882 $121,650,000

EXCHANGE.

26. The average monthly rates for sterling and Shanghai

taels were as follows:

January

February

11.844 74.698

་ ་

11.027 76.053

March

April

11.774 76.579

11.768 77.342

May

11.556 78.169

June

11.475 79.108

July

1/-.040 78.895

August

11.524 79.169

September

1/-.212 77.891

1

October

1/2.492 76.741

November

1/4.200 75.300

December

1/5.181 74.612

~ ▲ (1). 21

The opening rate of the year on January 2nd was 1s./03d., the closing rate on December 31st was 1/55/16" The lowest rate quoted during the year was 10d. on 14th February and the highest rate 1/513 on the 8th December.

GENERAL.

27. The estimates for the year were based on $1.1s./4d. and a deficit of approximately $2,300,000 was budgeted for. To reduce this deficit it was decided that the basis of conversion of sterling salaries into dollars should be altered, half being con- verted at the Treasury rate of exchange and half at is./6d. to the dollar. The adoption of this plan was estimated to effect a saving of $388,000 in the expenditure reducing the deficit to $1,912,000. The opening rate of exchange for 1931 was however 1s./0d. to the dollar and it was estimated that the fall in the dollar from 1s./4d. to 1/- would increase expenditure during 1931 by $1,838,000 allowance having already been made for the payment of salaries in the manner indicated. Steps had there- fore to be taken both to reduce expenditure and to increase revenue. The Estimates were accordingly pruned to the extent of $950,000 and extra revenue was obtained by the following increases.

Opium prices raised as from 13/2/31 estimated

to produce

Liquor duties from 19/2/31 estimated to produce Tobacco duties from 19/2/31 estimated to produce Postal Rates from 1/4/31 estimated to produce...

$166,000

350,000

928,000

150,000

The effect of these proposals was estimated to bring the deficit back to the original figure of $1,912,000 (allowing for 20% Military Contribution on the extra revenue).

28. The dollar actually dropped on the 14th February 1931 to 10 d. the lowest point reached. Meanwhile the question of increasing licences, fees and other receipts was explored. The result of this may be seen by referring to the table given earlier in this report. The revenue was well maintained and at the end of the half year $2,068,007 more than one half of the original estimate of $27,488,759 for the whole year had been obtained.

29. In normal times the revenue of Hong Kong comes in steadily throughout the year. There is no period shewing a heavy excess over any other period. The following figures show the collections during each Quarter of 1931.

1st Quarter

2nd 3rd

*

4th

$7,942,445

$7,869,941

$8,089,384

$9,244,952

$1,372,929.

~ A (1) 22.

This

Land Sales owing to the continued building development brought in a total of $3,177,807 or $1,677,807 over the Estimate. is second to the record year of 1923 when $3,488,797 was re- ceived. Expenditure was restricted to services absolutely es- sential to the administration of the Colony and notwithstand- ing the low dollar the original estimates were only exceeded by England's departure from the gold standard in September made a considerable difference to Hong Kong and reduced the dollar equivalent of the Colony's sterling commit- ments during the last quarter. This helped materially. In ad- dition the payment of officers on sterling salaries on the half and half principle mentioned above, saved the Treasury approximately $1,100,000 throughout the year.

30. Remittances from abroad continued to flow into the Colony during 1931 but not to the same extent as in 1929 and 1930. Bankers fixed deposit rates at the beginning of the year were about 2% for renewals of year money. No interest was paid on new short money. In October 2% and in special cases a little more was again obtainable for 12 months. There is still a large amount of surplus funds in the Colony available for in- vestment. The silver dollars which in 1930 appeared to be a serious embarrassment have now been absorbed. The coins have to some extent gone into circulation in replacement of dollar notes which are no longer issued but by far the greater part has been absorbed in the silver reserve of the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank whose note issue has shewn an expansion com- mensurate with public demands.

31. Trade as a whole in Hong Kong may be described as about the same with a quieter tendency. From statistics how- ever, the import trade would appear to have been slightly better than in 1930. The export trade did not shew any signs of increasing in spite of the low dollar. The political troubles in China were added to by serious floods during the earlier part of the year in the Southern Provinces and later on by the over- flowing of the Yangtse River causing disease and famine and finally the Chinese tariffs were increased. A feature worth recording was the boycott of Japanese goods during the last quarter of the year. The effect of this was a large falling off in imports from Japan which together with the higher dollar during the last three months deflected the trade in piece goods to the United Kingdom. It is indeed a source of satisfaction to record how well Hong Kong has stood up against world depression and

unrest.

1

A (1) 23

32. The year from a Treasurer's point of view has been most difficult and arduous. A shilling dollar in January and every prospect of a very large deficit by December called for the greatest care in expenditure. The subsequent increases in taxa- tion especially in the many minor licences and fees as enumer- ated earlier in this report were not done without a great deal of care and consideration.

THE TREASURY,

Hong Kong, 5th May, 1932.

EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

Appendix A (2).

REPORT TO THE DIRECTOR OF COLONIAL AUDIT

ON THE AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF

HONG KONG.

1931.

Subject to the comments contained in this report the accounts generally have been satisfactorily kept and rendered and the existing regulations appear to provide reasonable account- ing protection against irregularities and fraud.

2. The Annual Statements were received from the Treasurer on 29th July 1932. This is somewhat later than last year and a corresponding delay has been incurred in submitting this report.

3. The relation between the excess of assets over liabilities of the years 1930 and 1931 is established thus:-

Excess of Assets 31st December 1930... $ 9,361,679.74 Revenue 1931

Expenditure 1931

33,146,723.73

42,508,403.47

31,160,774.00

Excess of Assets 31st December 1931... $11,347,629.47

4. The comparison of the revenue and expenditure for the year with the approved Estimates and with previous years is dealt with fully in the Treasurer's Report (Enclosure "L") and in the detailed statements (Enclosures "C" and "D"). No further comment would appear to be necessary.

AUTHORITY FOR EXPENDITURE 1930.

(Para. 6-1930 Report.)

5. The final formal authority for the 1930 Expenditure was provided by Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance No. 14 of 1931.

1931.

6. The Estimates for the year were passed by the Legislative Council in Ordinance No. 19 of 1930 and received telegraphic approval of the Secretary of State on 6th January, confirmed by C. O. Despatch No. 39 of 30th January 1981.

A (2) 2

7. Expenditure supplementary to the Estimates, shown as provisionally voted in the Appropriation Account, was submitted in detail to the Finance Committee and duly adopted by the Legislature.

All items of supplementary expenditure have received the sanction of the Secretary of State with the exception of the items included in a Supplementary Schedule of Additional Provision which was submitted to the Secretary of State as an enclosure to the Governor's Despatch of the 7th June 1932 for which approval is awaited.

8. The Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance No. 25 of 1932 was passed by the Legislature on 19th August 1932 thus providing complete authority for the expenditure of the year.

ESTIMATES.

(Paras. 9/12-1930 Report.)

9. The Estimates were prepared in the same form as those of the previous year with the exception that there was added to each head a Summary which included the cost of those officers who are paid out of the three 'omnibus' heads.

This is an improvement but its value is somewhat discounted by the ruling that the distribution of the Clerical Staff shown in the Appendices 1 and 2 to the Estimates was not to be taken as a definite allotment to departments.

10. Instructions have since been received that future Estimates are to be prepared in accordance with Colonial Regulation 227 showing as far as possible the total estimated cost of each department.

STATEMENT OF ASSETS & LIABILITIES.

Contractors and Officers' Deposits

Suitors' Fund.....

Miscellaneous Deposits

$415.261.81

590,712.07 2,611,171.02

Total

DEPOSITS.

$3,617,144.90

>

(Para, 32-1980 Report.)

11. It is still not possible to give a complete certificate of the correctness of these figures. The total of the three sums shown under the heading "Deposits" agrees with the balance in the main ledger but no detailed list is available showing exactly to whom the Government is liable for the first and third items.

A (2) 3

12. The inauguration of the card system for Miscellaneous Deposits Bearing Interest has taken longer than was expected and until it is completed the position remains unchanged from last year.

13. The question was first raised by this department in January 1931. Though in April 1932 it was reported that the cards were ready for audit it was still found quite impossible to reconcile the entries on these cards with those of the deposit ledgers and considerable efforts were made both in the Treasury and the Audit to bring this matter to a satisfactory conclusion.

14. At one time the Treasurer was of opinion that the total liability on account of deposits would be in excess by some $1,000 of what would actually be required but further investiga- tion has, however, proved the case to be otherwise and the latest information is that the main ledger liability is $291 short of what is shown in the deposit books and cards.

15. The item Suitors' Fund" agrees in total and in detail with the books kept by the Registrar, Supreme Court.

UNCLAIMED DEPOSITS.

16. Included in the main total under Miscellaneous Deposits is a balance of $1,706 on account of deposits made by Post Office Box-holders. Of this amount $906 represents deposits the return of which were not claimed by box-holders when ceasing to rent a box and is an accumulation extending over 15 years and under Colonial Regulation 340 should have been written off to revenue. 'The question was taken up with the Postmaster General and, as a result, the $906 has since been transferred to Revenue.

Other balances remaining unclaimed for 5 years or over were reported to the Treasurer and $3,406 has, as a result, reverted to Revenue.

POSTAL AGENCIES--$1,451.91.

the

17. This item represents the sale of Hong Kong stamps overprinted 'China' and is due to the Imperial Post Office which. for many years maintained, under the supervision of Hong Kong Post Office, Postal Agencies at various Chinese Ports. With the cession of Wei Hai Wei in 1930 the last of these agencies was closed.

18. The reduction of this liability from $12,043.91 at 31st December 1930 is, however, due mainly to the raising during the year of a debit against the Imperial Post Office in connection with certain money order transactions covering several years. Acceptance of this debit by the Imperial Authorities has not yet been notified and the question is being kept in view by query.

A (2) 4

SUSPENSE ACCOUNT-$923.010.85.

19. Included in the balances leading to this net liability is the sum of $926,276.87 on account of Military Contribution. The position with regard to this liability was explained in paragraphs 45/6 and Enclosure "Q" of last year's report and is unaltered.

EXCHANGE ADJUSTMENT—$332,099.29.

20. This figure should represent the difference between the dollar cost price of the Sterling Investments and Sterling Funds held on 31st December 1931 and their dollar value as standing in the books on that date.

In accounting for exchange fluctuations the procedure laid down by the Secretary of State in his despatch No. 431 of 26th November 1925 has, however, not been followed and this liability is consequently incorrect and affects the final balance of Assets and Liabilities.

21. The essential feature of the Secretary of State's despatch was that 'book' profits or losses due to conversions of sterling amounts, for purposes only of record in the accounts, should be kept entirely distinct from the profits or losses occurring on actual sterling transactions. The former were to be dealt with in this account "Exchange Adjustment" the balance of which should be carried forward each year to form a reserve to meet 'book' fluctuations; the latter in the "Exchange" account, which account is closed at the end of each year by transferring the balance to revenue or expenditure.

22. Departure from this system has resulted in :-

(a) A charge being made against an expenditure vote in excess of what was actually required (Financial Message 191)

(b) A charge being made against an expenditure vote to cover 'book' losses, provision for which should have been reserved in the Exchange Adjustment Account (Financial Message 193)

(c) No provision being carried in the Exchange Adjustment Account for the fluctuations in the dollar value of the Joint Colonial Fund holdings at the end of the year (£159.000).

23. The examination of the final accounts brought the sub- ject under considerable discussion and correspondence and finally it was submitted to Government that correcting adjustments should be passed, based on figures prepared in this department. before the closing of the accounts for June 1932. This course. a precedent for which occurred in 1926, has been approved by His Excellency the Officer Administering the Government.

24. To go further into detail here would unnecessarily com- plicate this report but copies of the queries, correspondence and rulings will be forwarded to you in due course under separate

cover.

..

A (2) 5

TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT.

(Paras. 52/6-1930 Report.)

25. This account is now incorporated in the main Treasury Accounts and no separate statements have been submitted but a summary of the transactions to date is included in the Treasurer's report (paragraphs 20/22). A reconciliation between

the Assets and Liabilities Statements of 1930 and 1931 is attached for reference (Enclosure "J").

26. In three instances it was considered advisable for the Government to exercise its power of sale and though in each case the principal sum was recovered recourse had to be made to the general authority of the Secretary of State to write off the out- standing interest. In one further instance a balance of $600 of the Principal sum had to be written off.

27. Under the general authority there was written off during the year

'Principal

Interest &c.

$600

$37,138.38

At the close of the year (Loans Outstanding stood at $1,232,579.76 and the Reserve at $1,045,389.41.

The securities on outstanding loans have been inspected.

28. A further $51,629.66 in respect of Interest charged has since (in 1932) been written off on account of a redemption in 1931, where it was considered advisable to accept terms offered by private treaty.

PRAYA EAST RECLAMATION- -$142,642.33.

(Paras. 57/8-1930 Report.)

29. The accounts of this work having been incorporated in the main Treasury Account in January 1981 this amount now represents the estimated cost of the uncompleted work for which the Government has accepted liability.

COAL ACCOUNT $2,672.68.

(Paras. 29/30-1930 Report.)

30. The settlement of the discrepancy referred to has already been reported to you. This year's liability represents outstand- mg accounts due to the Contractors less the value of the stock of coal actually on hand on 31st December 1931.

ADVANCES.

ON ACCOUNT OF FUTURE LOAN-$3,484,014.01. (Para. 22-1930 Report.)

A (2) 6

31. This item is made up of expenditure on the following works:

Shing Mun Valley Scheme Aberdeen Valley Scheme Vehicular Ferry

Aerodrome

$ 456,793.19

1,868,983.12

417,906.28

740,831.42

all of which have received the sanction of the Secretary of State and the Legislature.

CHINESE LOCOMOTIVES--$447,468.26. (Para. 24-1930 Report.)

32. No repayment was made during the year towards the cost of the three locomotives purchased for the Chinese Section nor was any interest thereon received. Interest outstanding on 31st December 1931 amounted to $41,034.33.

33. The remaining advances are of a routine nature and call for no comment.

UNALLOCATED STORES (RAILWAY)—$163,545.31.

34. This amount exceeds by $13,545.31 the standard stock authorised by the Secretary of State whose covering approval has since been obtained.

UNALLOCATED STORES (P.W.D).)—$517,248.14.

35. This is within the standard stock specially authorised by the Secretary of State for this year ($550,000). The usual statements of reconciliation between the value of actual stocks and this figure are forwarded.

CASH BALANCE

$3,588,678.89.

36. Of this sum $47,790.68 represents cash actually held in the Treasury at the close of business on 31st December 1931. being revenue collected by various departments on that day after banking hours and remitted to the Treasury. This sum should have been checked by the Annual Board of Survey (Colonial Regulation 311) but this being the first year in which such cash had been brought into the Treasury (para, 21, 1930 Report) it was omitted. The attention of Government will be drawn in due course to this in time for the 1932 Board to be warned that their check should be strictly in accordance with the Regulation.

37. Reference was made at some length in last year's report to the existence at the end of the year of a considerable amount of money under government control which was not reflected in the Balance Sheet and explanation of this was given in para- graphs 13 to 21.

}

A (2) 7

The position has considerably improved in 1931 and with the few exceptions referred to below the Statement of Assets and Liabilities may this year be taken as a complete account of the moneys in control of Government Officers on 31st December.

38. For instance, it was reported (para. 20) that certain Government Accounts through which considerable amounts passed were not incorporated at all in the Treasury books. During the year this has been remedied and the balances on 31st December of those accounts referred to have been included in the Assets and Liabilities with one exception, namely, $43,741.69 which was held by the Official Receiver in respect of a liquidation account; special circumstances led to its exclusion from the balance sheet and the account will probably close during the year.

39. All departments were instructed to remit their collections to the Treasury before the close of business, on 31st December and, again with one exception, these instructions were followed. $4,450 collected by the Post Office in 1931 for Box-holders Fees in respect of the year 1932 was not paid into the Treasury until that year, and the amount does not therefore appear in the Colony's Cash Balance at the end of the year.

DEPARTMENTAL BANK ACCOUNTS.

(Paras. 16/19—1930 Report.)

40. Consequent on the issue of a Treasury Circular definite improvement was shown in the keeping of the departmental bank accounts though at the end of the year one department had overdrawn its account by writing salary cheques against a remit tance from the Treasury which had not actually been paid in by the department.

41. The general position as regards these bank accounts, however, remains practically unaltered. The Honourable Treasurer advised the Government that the reduction of the number of bank accounts was a matter to be proceeded with slowly and he was unprepared to recommend for the present any serious reduction in their number. Consequently it is again necessary to point out that a considerable amount of money was charged in the year's accounts which had not in fact been disbursed.

42. In order to ascertain to what extent this existed an inspection was made by officers of this department of the Treasur- r's and all departmental Cash Books as soon as possible after the close of the year. This inspection took one or two days nd it is therefore not possible to give exact figures as they tually stood at the close of business on the last day of the ear but the amount was well in excess of $150,000. This mount does not include Outstanding Cheques which naturally cannot be avoided and are a correct charge against the date

A (2) 8

43. During a discussion raised by instructions from the Secretary of State on the question of the interest received on the monthly balances at the Bank it was pointed out by the Bank that while the cheques drawn by the Treasury amounted to over 10,000 a year those drawn by outside departments amounted to over 30,000, thus showing that only about one quarter of the payments are actually made by the Treasury. With the exception of the Kowloon Canton Railway none of these departments are recognised as sub-accountants.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS.

(Paras. 41/44—1930 Report.)

44. The audit of Personal Emoluments has again needed special attention, on this occasion due to the ruling of the Secretary of State that the gravity of the local financial situation demanded special conversion rates for the payment of sterling salaries. It was decided that from 1st January all sterling salaries should be converted as to half at the rate of 1/6 to the dollar and half at the Treasury rate for the month and by this means a saving of over $1,000,000 was effected.

45. Claims for exemption from this ruling arose and two officers were specially exempted by the Secretary of State from the operation of this ruling while two other officers were ex- empted under local authority. Further, at the instance of this department the Secretary of State was asked to give a ruling on other points which presented difficulty e.g. :-the conversion rate for vacation leave spent in the Colony, sick leave, absence on duty in other Colonies, &c.

46. Later in the year more favourable rates of conversion were conceded to those officers who had dependants in a gold currency country.

Thus there were being used simultaneously three methods of conversion in the salaries of sterling paid officers.

SUITORS FUND ACCOUNTS.

47. After consultation between officers of the Treasury, the Supreme Court and the Audit Department an Ordinance (34/1931) was introduced which, together with Rules made by the Chief Justice, has considerably simplified the system of these accounts by transferring from the Treasurer to the Registrar of Supreme Court the immediate responsibility for keeping the in- dividual ledger accounts which, though individually of small amount, are very numerous. The Registrar will be responsible for all payments out of court and the present cumbrous system of having these payments made in the Treasury will cease and will save much time, alike to the public and the accounting officials. The Registrar will be working on an imprest and his transactions will be incorporated monthly in the Treasury books by Journal Entry.

The Ordinance came into force on 1st January 1932.

A (2) 9

CHINA COMPANY FEES.

(Paras. 37/39-1930 Report.)

48. The annual local inspection of the books of the Registrar of Companies Shanghai was made during the year and the accounts audited up to 30th September 1931. The revenue from this source for the year was $151,639.24.

49. As a result of this inspection the question of the loss to revenue occurring by reason of exchange was again submitted for discussion, on this occasion with satisfactory result.

It was found after all that no amendment to the Ordinance was necess- ary to ensure that the Hong Kong Government obtained its revenue in full and in future payment will only be accepted by the Registrar at Shanghai in such an amount of Shanghai currency as will on conversion into Hong Kong currency produce the amount prescribed in the schedule to the Ordinance.

50. Unfortunately the discussion extended over some months and a final decision was not reached until many of the companies concerned had already paid their fees for the year 1932 and it was therefore necessary to postpone carrying the ruling into effect until 1933.

KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY.

51. A copy of the Annual Report of the Railway is for- warded as Enclosure "K" and full comparisons of the revenue and expenditure with the Estimates and with previous years are contained therein.

52. It was arranged that from 1st January 1931 the Manager should be a sub-accountant of the Treasury. This arrangement has worked well and has considerably reduced the work of all departments concerned.

58. Mileage charges in respect of the engines referred to in paragraph 32 above have been collected monthly by deduction from the payment by this Government of the balance due to that Section on Joint and Through Traffic Receipts.

54. Continuous audit of the accounts has been maintained during the year and surprise surveys of Stations, Cash, &c. were made on nineteen occasions with satisfactory result.

CONTRACTS FOR PUBLIC WORKS.

55. In paragraph 51 of last year's report reference was made to the adoption of a form which would enable the various terms of each contract to be watched by the Executive Engineer. The introduction of this check appears to have had successful results. In practically all cases the fullest information has been available for audit purposes. Over $20,000 covering 9 Contracts was deducted in penalties during the year and a further

6.200 is awaiting recovery.

A (2) 10

SECRETARIAT FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS.

56. A number of semi-public accounts of institutions and funds, many of them of a charitable nature, are kept under the supervision of the Honourable Secretary for Chinese Affairs and their balance sheets published as annexures to the Annual Ad- ministrative Report of that officer. It was ruled in 1924 that the special nature of these accounts placed them "outside the accounts of the Colony, except in so far as the Treasury acts as banker'.

The duties of this department are therefore confined to ascertaining that such amounts as are published in the balance sheets as being in the hands of the Colonial Treasurer are correctly shown in the Treasury books.

57. Both for the years 1930 and 1931 certain of these accounts showed as being in the Treasury considerable amounts, such as Fixed Deposits, Advances, Stock, &c. which were not in fact held by the Treasurer and did not appear in his books.

The question was taken up with the department and with the Treasury and agreement has been reached as to the actual holdings for which the Treasurer is responsible, and the dis- crepancy should not recur.

ARREARS OF REVENUE.

58. The position with regard to Arrears of Revenue is as follows:

Of the $418,692.76 arrears outstanding on 31st December 1981 $380,925.06 had been paid. by 15th June 1932, $16,614.16 had to be written off leaving $21,159.54 still to be collected.

STORE ACCOUNTS.

59. The Committee appointed to enquire into the general store accounting of the Colony presented their report to Govern- ment and submitted in great detail new store regulations for adoption by all departments. These have been approved by Government and though their mere volume may prove somewhat alarming to the store clerks of the various offices they have re- moved from this department the responsibility for maintaining & continuous survey of Government stores and should secure that essential portion of the accounting-the link between stores and cash. It was these two points that were mainly responsible for the matter being brought to notice by this department last year.

SURPRISE SURVEYS.

60. Surprise Surveys of Cash, Stamps and Stores have been made throughout the year, as reported in the monthly returns, with satisfactory results.

I

A (2) 11

QUERIES.

61. Three hundred and forty-three queries were issued on the accounts for the year of which one hundred and eleven related to revenue and two hundred and thirty-two to expendi- ture or stores. With the exception of those enumerated in Enclosure "N" all have been settled. Among the larger amounts recovered were $416.00 and $514.29, undercollections of Import Duties, and $2,071.89 in respect of a passage incorrectly charged to Government Funds.

GENERAL.

62. No material departure has been made from the approved Programme of Work but I must again record that the audit is being conducted with the barest minimum of clerical staff and that in no instance can the percentage of test examination be made with reasonable safety lower than it already is.

63. The reduction of staff, made during a period of emer- gency, is still in effect and the present position is that in spite of the recognised increased volume of accounts to be examined the junior clerical staff allotted to this department is numerically the same as it was ten years ago.

31st August, 1932.

P. L. COLLISSON, Auditor.

*

3

J

Appendix B.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1932-1933.

By Order of His Excellency the Governor-in-Council a New Valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $35,071,566 to $37,457,725, an addition of $2,386,159 or 6.80 per cent.

2. The following table gives a comparison of the Assess- ments for the year 1931-1932 and 1932-1933 :

District.

Valuation Valuation 1931-1932.

Increase.

Per cent.

1932-1933.

The City of Victoria

24,197,119

25.240.914

1,043.795

4.31

Hong Kong Villages

Kowloon

New Kowloon

2,776,382 2,905,269 6,712,790 7,597,230 1,385,275 1,714,312

128.887

4.64

884.440

13.18

329,037

23.75

Total

35,071,566 37,457,725 2,386,159

6.80

3. The increase in the valuation of the City of Victoria is partly due to the great amount of building that has been carried out on the new Praya East Reclamation, augmented by the Gloucester Building, the King's Theatre Building, the National City Bank and the re-opening of the old King Edward Hotel Building, now called the Chung Tin Building.

4. In the areas included under "Hong Kong Villages" there has been considerable building activity at Wongneichung, including the Jockey Club's Stables, and also at Tai Hang and Tunglowan.

5. In the case of Kowloon the increase is partly due to new flats at Kowloon Point, Chinese tenement houses at Mong Kok and the new buildings at the Cement Works.

6. In New Kowloon there has been a remarkable development at Shamshuipo which now extends right up to the Taipo Road, and a certain amount of building has taken place at Kowloon City on the new layout.

7. The total increase of $2,386,159 is the largest increase that has been made in any year, with the exception of the 1925-26 assessment, which reflected the great increase in property values due to the building boom of 1924-1925,

B 2

8. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 297 monthly, as compared with 132 last year.

9. During the year ending 30th May, 1932, 2,113 Interim Valuations were made as follows:-

CITY OF VICTORIA.

ELSEWHERE.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable Value.

New or rebuilt tenements

and tenements structur- .

ally altered

474

1,308,785

1,200 1,322,961

Assessments

cancelled,

tenements resumed,

pulled down or being

in other respects not rateable....

117

405,630 322 304,408

Number and Increase.

591

903,155 1,522 1,018,553

Year.

Rateable Value.

10. This is the largest number of interim valuations made in any year except in the period ending with the general valuation for the year 1925-1926.

11. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hong Kong from 1922-1923 to 1932-1933

inclusive:

Percentage of In- crease in Rateable Value as compared with previous year.

Increase as compared with

previous year.

$

$

%

1922-1923

19,805,929

1923-1924

21,059,700

1,253,771

6.33

1924-1925

22,147,951

1,088,251

5.16

1925-1926

27,287,862

5,139,911

23.20

1926-1927

27,998,237

710,375

2.60

1927-1928

29,016,439

1,018,202

3.64

1928-1929

30,395,447

1,879,008

4.75

1929-1930

31,617,566

1,222,119

4.02

1930-1931

33,069,602

1,452,036

4.59

1931-1932

35,071,566

2,001,964

6.04

1932-1933

37,457,725

2,386,159

6.80

B 3

12. In the ten years from 1922-1923 to 1932-1933 the rateable value of the Colony has increased by $17,651,796 or 89.12 per cent.

13. The large development on the Praya East Reclamation has had the effect of drawing a number of tenants from various parts of the City, with a consequent steadying tendency on the rentals of flats. It is remarkable how the rows of new houses on this reclamation have gradually filled up, the ground floors, however, being more difficult to let than the upper floors. The demand for housing accommodation is much stronger than that for trade premises.

THE TREASURY,

30th May, 1932.

EDWIN TAYLOR, Treasurer & Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1931.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

(Tables I-III).

The Government Revenue derived from all sources during the year was $18,771.59 and the Government Expenditure was $135,424.22.

2. As is evidenced by the numerous tables attached to this report, much of the work of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs is concerned with the administration of funds that may be called semi-official. The Revenue in these cases is in very large part a matter of voluntary subscription by the Chinese Community and outside the Government Estimates, with Expenditure at the discretion of the Department.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table IV).

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897

Ordinance No. 21 of 1929

Ordinance No. 6 of 1893

Ordinance No. 1 of 1923

Ordinance No. 22 of 1929

Ordinance No. 2 of 1865

3. The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was twelve of whom none was found as compared with twenty-eight and two in 1930.

4. Nine names were added to the list of girls under bond. The number of names on the list on December 31st was forty.

5. At the beginning of the year some 4,000 girls were on our books as registered Mui Tsai. Throughout the year constant vigilance has been maintained in order that the declared policy of the Government may be strictly carried out. As a further means to this end, an officer from the Police was seconded in July for exclusive duty under the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Mui Tsai Inspector. In October two Cantonese ladies, with a knowledge of English, were selected from a considerable number of candidates for two new appointments as Female Inspectors of Mui Tsai, working under the immediate direction

the Mui Tsai Inspector.

C 2

6. This step, which was advocated by the District Watch Committee, has proved to be of great value. The ladies, who are very diligent and take an interest in their work, visit the homes of every registered Mui Tsai and get in touch with the families.

7. Details of every visit are recorded, unreported changes of addresses are investigated, due payment of wages is enquired into and where necessary cautions are given.

8. The general public is well aware of the importance attached by Government to the proper care of Mui Tsai, and from time to time we have received communications, which are always immediately followed up. A number of such anonymous communications proved to be baseless, and were probably prompted by spite, but in some cases they led to the discovery of an unregistered Mui Tsai.

9. During the year thirty-nine prosecutions were brought under the Mui Tsai Ordinance with thirty-eight convictions. These prosecutions, which included one for non-payment of wages, were mainly for employment of unregistered Mui Tsai. No case arose for prosecution of an employer on the ground of ill-treating a registered Mui Tsai.

10. The help of the Fo Leung Kuk and the Salvation Army Home has again been ungrudgingly given to this department.

11. It should also be recorded that a happy co-operation has existed between this department and the Society for the Protection of Children in cases of hardship, arising from poverty or any other cause, in which children have been affected.

12. Under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance (4 of 1897) fifteen prosecutions were brought with eighteen convictions These were cases of harbouring or procuring.

13. Under Section 45A of Ordinance 2 of 1865, twenty-four cases were brought on charges connected with trafficking in minors and thirty-two convictions were obtained.

14. For a fuller report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk, see Annexe A of this report.

EMIGRATION.

(Ordinance 30 of 1915).

(Tables V and VI).

15. Emigration, both of Assisted Emigrants and of Women and Children, showed a marked decrease as compared with the year 1930, see Tables V and VI.

C 3

16. In the case of women and children (including males under the age of 16) the decrease was from 37,661 to 18,122 passed by the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. These figures were influenced by the quota system enforced in Malaya.

17. Twenty-nine women were detained for enquiries as compared with thirty-six in 1930.

18. Assisted emigration was mainly confined to Muntok and Deli in the Dutch East Indies. It showed a total decrease from 8,316 to 3,817, passed by the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Of these 3,817, 502 did not sail, so the total actual figure was 3,315.

19. A striking feature which may suitably be noted under this heading of Emigration was the very large number of persons repatriated from Malaya, and to some extent from British North Borneo, who passed through the hands of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The totals were 23,637 from Penang, 3,482 from Singapore, and 1,195 from Sandakan. Every one of these repatriates was met and arrangements made to house them while in Hong Kong and send them on, with passages paid and & sum of money in hand, to their homes in the country. This work could not have been done without the willing and capable co-operation of the Tung Wah Hospital to whom a debt of gratitude is due. Some of the batches of repatriates numbered over 1,000 at one time and it says a great deal for the Tung Wah Hospital organization that the work was smoothly carried through. The expenses of such work are of course charged to the repatriating Government.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES.

(Ordinance 23 of 1917). (Table VII).

20. During the year nine convictions were obtained under the ordinance as compared with ten in 1930. These convictions were mainly for failing to keep the register properly and having excess of boarders.

PERMITS.

(Ordinance 1 of 1845).

(Ordinance 22 of 1919).

21. 2,381 permits to fire crackers were issued, of which 1,664 were for weddings and the remainder for birthdays, shop openings, etc. Seventy-four permits were issued for theatrical performances.

22. Other permits issued were twenty-five for religious ceremonies and five for processions.

- C 4

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1888).

23. Forty-four books were registered during the year as compared with thirty-six in 1930.

REGISTRATION OF NEWSPAPERS.

(Ordinance 25 of 1927 and 1 of 1930).

24. The number of Registered Chinese papers existing on December 31st was thirty-one, of these twenty-one were register- ed during the year.

DISTRICT WATCH FORCE.

(Ordinance 23 of 1930). (Table VIII).

25. The District Watch Committee met on fifteen occasions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In addition four meetings at which His Excellency the Governor presided were held at Government House. The following gentlemen served on the committee throughout the year.-

Mr. Lei Yau-tsun, C.B.E.,

Hon Sir Shouson Chow, Kt.,

Mr. Tong Yat-chun,

Mr. Lo Cheung-shiu,

Mr. Wong Iu-dung,

Mr. Li Yik-mui.

Mr. To Sz-tun,

Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall,

C M.G.,

Mr. Li Po-kwai,

Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., Mr. Wong Tak-kwong,

26. The Committee, in common with the whole Colony, suffered a very great loss by the death of Mr. Fung Ping-shan. He had served upon it continuously for more than eleven years, and his lovable personality is much missed in its councils.

27. Mr. To Sz-tun after ten years of valued service resigned in December.

28. The Hon. Mr. Chu Tsun-nin and Mr. Lo Man-kam were appointed to the Committec.

29. Messrs. Lo Man-kam and Chan Tin-shan retired on the expiration of their year of office and were succeeded by Messrs. Leung Pat-u and Tam Woon-tong.

30. At the end of the year the District Watch Force consisted of 138 men. Eight members of the force were dis- missed, nine resigned, and one died; eighteen new men were recruited during the year.

C 5

31. Inspector J. Murphy was in charge of the force throughout the year. The post is an arduous and responsible one involving as it does the control almost single handed of a considerable body of men, the duties of liaison officer between the Police and District Watch, and the detailed supervision of the activities of the detective branch. Inspector Murphy's work throughout the year was of a very high standard, and he showed himself to be exceptionally well fitted for this important task.

32. The total number of police court cases secured by members of the force was 867 as compared with 845 in 1930.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE.

(Table IX to Table XXI).

Ordinances 31 of 1930 and 10 of 1908.

35. The following gentleinen served on the Committee for

1931:

Mr. Ngan Shing-kwan,

Mr. Ko Leung-ching,

Mr. W. N. Thomas Tam,

Mr. Wong Man-chau,

Mr. Chan Lim pak,

Mr. Chung Yuk-hing,

7

Mr. Lam Cheuk-ming, Mr. Lau Ping-chai, Mr. Pun Hiu cho, Mr. Wong U-hau, Mr. Chan Kam-po, Mr. Tam Kit-sang, Mr. Au Tsz-shiu,

Mr. Chan Tseung-oi,

Mr. Chan Hung-tseung,

Mr. Ho Kan-chong.

Mr. lu Tak-chung, Mr. Kwok Kang-ching, Mr. Ho Sai-man, Mr. Wong Fik-chuen, Mr. Kong Sui-ying, Mr. Wong Kam-pui, Mr. Wong Chi-po,

Mr. Pun Pik-lun, Mr. Chan Sing-chiu,

34. In 1931 the

1931 the consolidated and revised Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance (No. 31 of 1930) came into force, and in accordance with its terms the three large Chinese Hospitals- the Tung Wah Hospital, the Kwong Wah Hospital and the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital-were brought under the control of a single enlarged Committee. Arduous labour has been involved in the rearrangements consequent upon this unification: and great credit is due to the members of the Committee and the Chairman, Mr. Ngan Shing-kwan, for the manner in which they have faced the task. The change has already been justified and carries the approval of the Community: and it can confidently be expected to result in a growing efficiency of control and in increased economy of management. For a detailed report on the work of the Tung Wah Hospital in 1931, sce Annexe B of this report.

C 6

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

(Tables XXII to XXV).

35. There are nine "Chinese Public Dispensaries" situated in the populous centres on both sides of the Harbour, and two Maternity Hospitals (the Tsan Yuk in the West, and the Wantsai Hospital in the East) which are an important part of the Dispensaries Organisation. There is an annual Government grant of $2,000, and the Dispensaries and Hospitals are built on land granted by the Government: further the Government finds one Medical Officer in charge of Chinese Hospitals and Dis- pensaries, and three Assistant Medical Officers (Ladies) to supervise the medical work. Otherwise all the eleven institutions are financed by the Chinese Community and are managed by Chinese Committees with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Chairman of the General Committee.

36. An enormous and ever-increasing number of sick, too poor to pay for doctor's fees or buy proper medicine, are successfully reached. In the three big hospitals the patient can choose between Western and Chinese methods of treatment, but here in the Dispensaries he is treated only by Western methods and with the best drugs procurable bought from the Government Central Medical Stores. Lady doctors treat the gynaecological cases once a week in eight of the Dispensaries.

37. The reconstructed and enlarged Dispensary on the Yaumati water-front, which caters largely for the floating popula- tion, was nearing completion at the end of the year, and an entirely new Dispensary at Kowloon City, on a central site granted by Government, is in process of construction.. The Dispensaries at Shaukiwan, Aberdeen and Wanchai are also in excellent buildings of their kind. The Central Dispensary has been enlarged. Instruments for small minor operations and tooth forceps are being added to each Dispensary, and each will in time have its own microscope, especially for differentiating the Malarias which form a big percentage of the cases treated.

38. Each Dispensary acts as a focus for Propaganda- breaking down prejudices against "Foreign" Medicines and Methods of Treatment.

39. The Dispensaries undertake the removal also of corpses to mortuaries, and they supply coffins.

40. Sick, too serious for outpatient treatment, are removed by the Dispensaries to hospital.

41. For summary of work done in the Dispensaries, see Table XXII.

1

- C 7

TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

(Table XXVI).

42. This Hospital is a part of the organisation financed. and managed by the Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee. Its proximity to the University has made it a convenient centre for the training of Medical Students in residence, and an arrangement has been made under which the Committee recognises this fact and welcomes the voluntary assistance of the University Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology (Dr. R. E. Tottenham) who is in effect in direct or supervising charge of all the patients in the Hospital. The arrangement is to mutual advantage but it may be that the extra cost to the Committee of medicines and supplies, due to the use of the Institution as a training school, will need consideration in the near future. Dr. S. K. Lam is the Chinese Public Dispensary Doctor residence.

in

43. There are sixty beds--forty-seven Maternity and thirteen Gynaecology.

Admissions 1931.....

1930.

Deliveries.

1931

1,248

1980

1,251

1,323

1,826

Still-births.

Maternal Deaths.

46

3

69

44. The clinical work in the outpatient department is carried on by the staff of the Assistant Visiting Medical Officer, Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries.

45. In addition to ordinary gynaecological cases there are special clinics for Ante-natal, Infant Welfare and Venereal Disease.

WANCHAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

46. During 1931 this hospital as the result of the initiative and energy of Messrs. Wong Kwong-tin and Li Jow-san has been remodelled and enlarged. Consequently patients, not being able to enter there went elsewhere and statistics fell off. The reconstructed Hospital was opened towards the end of the year and the extra accommodation and improved equipment will be of great benefit to a crowded neighbourhood. Dr. Ho Ko-tsun is in charge.

47. There are twenty-two beds. Eighty-three cases were admitted in the year and delivered. No deaths occurred during 1931.

-

C 8

CLINICS.

48. Twenty-one clinics are held in the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries in a week:--

14 Gynaecological clinics.

3 Antenatal clinics.

3 Infant Welfare clinics.

1 V. D. Clinic.

49. The clinics held in the various hospitals and dis- pensaries are increasing in number and size and are advancing according to modern tendencies elsewhere. The separation of certain diseases into clinics is economical and very satisfactory in many other ways. The advantages to the community in general are being felt as one of the outstanding advantages of clinics is either in prevention of disease or treatment in the early stages.

50. The clinics are run by the resident staff of the various hospitals and dispensaries and by the staff of the Visiting Medical Officer. Much of the success of the clinics is due to the co-operation which exists amongst the various members of the staff.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XXVII).

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND,

(Table XXVIII).

51. This is controlled by a Committee consisting of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Chairman and the Chinese Members of Executive and Legislative Councils.

YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE.

(Table XXIX).

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXX).

TRANSLATION.

52. The total number of translation made in the depart- ment during 1931 was 1,675 as compared with 1,501 in 1930. 508 of these were from Chinese into English and 1,167 from English into Chinese. In addition a large number of transla- tions made in other Government departments were sent to this office for revision.

+

از

C 9

LABOUR.

General:

53. Labour conditions in the colony during 1931 were quiet. Union activities have been directed mainly along routine lines and there has been an absence of agitation. Wages have maintained a level in most cases unchanged from that of the previous year.

54. The demand for labour in the building trade was well notintained.

Disputes and Strikes:

55. In January this office helped to settle a dispute arising out of certain extra work required from some 200 coolies employed on construction work near Shek Li Pui.

56. In September the sawyers applied for an increase of wages, and after protracted discussions, in which this office assisted, an agreement was signed in December by the majority of the masters giving a small increase. Some of the masters did not agree and the year closed with the affairs of this union still somewhat unsettled, though work has not been interrupted.

57. The Barbers' Union was proscribed in October on account of activities which bore no relation to the barber's art.

58. The most difficult negotiations of the year turned round the petition of the Coal Coolies for an increase in wages. The details of these negotiations and of the circumstances of the trade are too complicated to be set forth in this Report, but it was found that without increasing the rates paid by the majority of the merchants to the chief contractors, the actual coolies at the bottom of the scale would still be enabled to receive a reasonable increase on their daily wage, by means of readjustments in intermediate links of the chain of employ- ment.

59. The new arrangement came into force on January 1st, 1932.

60. Invaluable assistance was given by Mr. Li Yau-tsun, C.B.E., during these negotiations, in which this office kept in close touch with the Secretary of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce.

61. Throughout the year the assistance of the Chinese General Chamber of Commerce was freely given to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs in any matter in which its help and advice were sought.

C 10

Cost of living of poorer classes:

62. Since October 1927 this office has made monthly inquiries into the retail costs of a number of commodities essential to the life of the poorer classes, including articles of food and clothing and firewood. The average percentage increase between 1930 and 1931 as deduced from the reports made by the District Watch Force was found to be 2.91%.

FACTORIES.

(Table XXXI).

were

63. General:-Trade continued dull for the greater part of the year and many factories were working below their full capacity. The knitting and hosiery trades, however, fairly busy and a large number of factories have sprung up in these trades during the past year. Amongst new factories are also to be noted a large and up-to-date canning plant (a branch of a firm already established at Amoy) and a new silk weaving mill. The silk weaving factory is the first of its kind in the Colony and the local work-people are being instructed by experts from North China. Both artificial and real silk cloth is being made, and as the factory is modern and well equipped, it should prove a valuable addition to the industries of the Colony. A new felt-hat factory has started during the year as well as a number of small factories for the manufacture of electric torches and flash-lamps. The electric torch trade is a thriving one. The articles made are cheap and of good quality and a large export business is done in these goods. The Sino- Japanese company formed last year to manufacture gramophone records has proved unable to with-stand the strain of recent events, and the partnership has been dissolved. The company is to be reformed under purely Chinese control.

64. Child Labour:-The number of children employed in factories shows no tendency to increase and it would appear that Chinese factory owners are now beginning to realise that child labour can be dispensed with. No European firms employ children under the age of fifteen years.

65. Prosecutions :-Ten prosecutions were instituted during the year by this department. Nine were for breaches of the regulations concerning the employment of women at night. (Ordinance 22 of 1922). One was for a breach of the regulations concerning obstruction of fire exits (Ordinance 3 of 1927). The factory owners in all cases were Chinese. Convictions were obtained in each case with fines ranging from $25 to $100.

66. Accidents: -The total number of accidents in factories was seventy-two of which five were fatal, as compared with seventy-five (seven fatal) for the preceding year. The ship- building yards were responsible for a large proportion of the

- C 11

accidents and most of these were due to falls from staging or into ships' holds. Only two accidents concerned women, the compulsory fencing of machinery having reduced the risk of scalping accidents which were formerly so frequent amongst women in knitting factories. A separate table is appended showing the number of accidents occurring in each industry.

67. Legislation:-No further additions have been made to the industrial legislation of the Colony during the year, but the rapid spread of small factories occupying tenement floors in the residential areas has rendered imperative the need for more effective control, and the question of registration of factories and workshops is being considered as a first step towards this object.

CHINESE TEMPLES.

(Ordinance 7 of 1928).

(Tables XXX1 and XXXIII).

vo. Muen ume and trouble was required after the Ordin- ance was passed Το reauce the accounts of the thirty-10ur Temples concerned and une connected General Charities Fund account to regular order. Ine accounts of many of the Tempies neeuca ciarincation: laoifties incurred before the date of the Orumance—someumes outside the stricter limits set by the Orumance-nad to be examined and dealt with; the amount to be anowed for standing charges (including customary payments en account of schools, Temple restivals and God's purundays) required settlement, and it was essential that at this stage the questions arising should be viewed with as much sympany as possible for those who had hitherto had the unchecked nanuling or the Temple Revenues. By July 1st, 1951, 10 was possible to reduce the accounts to order: entering generally the sum of $44,949 as spent by that date and since 1928 out of Temples Revenues on objects proper to the General Charities Fund.

69. The Temples Committee then reviewed the financial position of each separate Temple and made allocations to the General Charities Fund of sums totalling $90,000 which sum has since been applied under the authority of the General Charities Fund Committee to the enlargement and improvement of the Wantsal Chinese Public Dispensary Maternity Hospital, and of the Yaumai Chinese Public Dispensary: and further to the construction of an entirely new building as a Chinese Public Dispensary in Kowloon City.

·

70. By the community as a whole the Ordinance, one of a rather unusual nature, has been welcomed. It has resulted in no interference with religion or with customary observances, but fortune telling of the crystal gazing type-which was becom- ng a serious menace-is no longer openly practised. The policy of keeping the Temples in good repair out of their own resources

C 12



is understood and appreciated, while the sums available for the common festivals are known; and the general satisfaction can to some extent be credited with the steady increase of Temple Revenues.

the

71. As a matter of general interest, it may be added that while some Temples own property, the Revenue for the most part and as a rule is derived from the sale by auction of the rights of Temple Keeper" for a period of years, usually three. The Keeper charges tees for the performance of services and ceremonies, and has the monopoly of the sale of the joss paper, joss sucks, candies and so forth required. And he not In- requently in addition receives donations from worshippers to whom the Temple has brought good fortune. The value of the Temples varies very widely, the highest rent now received being $18,700 a year, and the lowest $100.

72. The following gentlemen served on the Chinese Temples Committee during the year :-

(a) lion. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt., Hon, Dr. R. H.

Kotewall, C.M.G., Hon. Dr. S. W. Tsc, O.B.E.,- Chinese members of the Legislative Council.

(b) Mr. Li Yau-tsun, C.B.E.,-Representative of the

District Watch Committee.

(c) Mr. Wong Kwong-tin, Mr. T. N. Chau,-Chinese

members of the Sanitary Board.

(d) Mr. Ngan Shing-kwan-Chairman of the Tung Wah

Hospital Committee.

(e) Mr. Tam Woon-tong-Senior member of the Po

Leung Kuk Committee.

(f) Mr. Lau Ping-chai-Chairman of the Kwong Wah

Hospital Committee.

(g) Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

73. The Committee met on three occasions at the Secre- tariat for Chinese Affairs.

74. The following contributions were made during the year 1931:

$ 90,600.00 to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund for erection of Yaumati, Wantsai and Kowloon City Dispensaries.

$ 15,000.00 to Tung Wah Hospital.

$

600.00 to Hunghom Chinese Public Dispen-

sary.

$ 2,000.00 to Kwong Wah Hospital in aid of the

funds towards the expenses of the free maternity ward.

C 13

75. Temples taken over by the Committee during the year included the following:-

Tin Hau Temple, Hoi Chung Sham Island, Tokwawan. Mo Tai Temple, Shamshuipo.

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo.

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo.

Tin Hau Temple. Shamshuipo.

76. The Committee also advanced $2,000.00 to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund for the construction of the Wantsai Maternity Hospital.

77. During the year four convictions for keeping un- registered Chinese temples were obtained.

STAFF.

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

78. Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secretary from 1st January to 22nd April and went on leave from 11th Septem- ber to 8th November. During these periods Mr. A. E. Wood acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

14th April, 1932.

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 14

1931.

ANNEXE A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to snelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women ́ ́. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

The

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, two lady teachers, seven ainahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee.

Committee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m., the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung huk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children and Chinese family life generally. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents and relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent.

In addition to the annual Committee there is a Board of Permanent Direction, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

The following gentlemen were re-elected in April to serve as Managing Committee for the year:-

Mr. Tam Woon-tong,

Mr. Au Shiu-cho,

Mr. Ho I-cheong,

Mr. Lam Kau-mau,

Mr. Chan Kam-po,

Mr. Lam Yam-chuen,

Mr. Chan Kim-tong,

Mr. Ip King-fan,

Mr. Iu Tak-chung.

Mr. Chan Hing-wa.

Mr. Lai Tai-kai,

J

:

- C 15

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1931, was 35 and during the year 366 persons were admitted as against 480 in 1930. The circumstances of ad- mission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

Two women and girls were admitted under warrant and 364 were admitted without warrant. Thirty-three were lost children, twelve were accompanied by parents or guardians, and thirty- six were maid-servants or "mui-tsai" who had left their employers.

On leaving the Kuk 159 women and girls were restored to husbands or other relatives, nineteen were sent to charitable institutions in China, one was given in adoption, one married, 112 released (three released under bond), twenty-one sent to Convent or Refuge and five died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was forty-eight.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Mr. A. G. Coppin and the Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment. The average monthly number of inmates was forty-seven.

Seventy-three cases of sickness were sent to the Tung Wah Hospital for treatment and of these five died.

Mrs. R. H. Kotewall and Mrs. S. W. Tso paid regular visits of inspection during the year, and took a great interest in the sewing, embroidery and other handiwork of the girls. The development of this line of activity owes a great deal to Mr. Tam Woon-tong and his colleagues on the committee. Mrs. Tam Woon-tong also gave valuable assistance. An exhibition of handiwork took place in March and was opened by Lady Peel, whose sustained interest in the Kuk is much appreciated.

The question of moving the Kuk from its old site and rebuilding it in a new and improved form in more suitable surroundings had been under consideration for some years, but it was not until 1930 that Mr. Tam Woon-tong and his colleagues on the current annual Committee made a determined attack on the problem. A spacious site of two acres not far from the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital was granted by the Government with the approval of the Secretary of State, and Mr. Tam and his colleagues were brilliantly successful in raising funds for building and endowment.

The foundation stone of the new Kuk was laid by H. E. the Governor in March, 1931, and by the end of the year the building was approaching completion. The response of the community to the persuasive efforts of Mr. Tam and his

C 16

J

colleagues was very generous, and no less than $170,000 was subscribed, including munificent donations of $30,000 each from Sir Robert Ho Tung and Mr. J. E. Joseph, and $10,000 each from Lady Ho Tung and Mrs. Lam Fook-chi. This sum will cover the cost of the building and leave a balance of some $70,000 for endowment.

In April, 1931, Mr. Tam and his colleagues, to whom the warm thanks of the community are due, were re-elected in a body for a second year of office. This unprecedented step was taken to secure continuity of effort in order to bring this important work to a successful conclusion, and has been abundantly justified by the result.

April 14th, 1932.

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

President.

I, AU SHIU CHO, a member of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1931, marked "A" and signed with my name on the 12th February, 1932, is а true statement, and I make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the saine to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act 1835.'

紹初

Declared by the declarant AU SHIU CHO at Victoria, Hong Kong, the 12th February, 1932, through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yam Ko having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly inter- preted the contents of this document of the said declarant and that he would faithfully interpret the contents of this document to the said declarant and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered unto him.

Before me,

A. E. WOOD,

Justice of Peace.

C 17

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarant AU SHIU CHO and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to him.

Declared at the Secretariat for

Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong.

This 12th February, 1932.

LUK YAM KO.

Before me,

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs

and Justice of Peace.

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1931.

Property Investment

Assets.

.$20,000.00

Liabilities.

Nil.

At current account with TAI CHAN Shop

and The YIK ON Bank

3,193.51

$23,193.51

This is the statement 'A" referred to in the Declaration of

AU SHIU CHO declared before me this 12th day of February, 1932.

區紹初

A. E. WOOD,

Justice of Peace.

C 18

Annexe B.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

In the Tung Wah Hospital private wards and second class wards, and wards for thirty-nine Tuberculosis cases, have been opened, as well as new Nurses Quarters with Lecture Room and Dining Hall.

At the Kwong Wah Hospital a new modern building with thirty-two beds was opened on the 30th, December by His Excellency the Governor. A new Operating Theatre, complete with every modern appliance, will soon be ready to supplement the present one.

Two new wards, each with room for sixteen patients, which were formally opened in December, 1930, have come into use at the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital one for Medical cases under Western treatment and the other for Maternity patients.

These three large hospitals all supported by Chinese residents in the Colony, are managed by a single Committee which receives an annual Government grant, and the Senior Chinese Medical Officers are paid by the Government.

Tung Wah Hospital.

There has been a steady and ever-increasing number of patients in this Hospital and the year 1931 beat all former records in outpatients.

Inpatients (Genera!).

Western treatment.

Chinese treatment.

Total.

1931

5.704

5,246

10,950

1930

5,296

5,548

10,844

Inpatients (Maternity)

Still-births.

1931

1930

1,679

308

1,928

354

Deaths.

Brought in dead.

1931

1930

2,314

1,618

2,165

1,501

There were 900 operations including many major ones.

C 19

Outpatients (General).

Western treatment. Chinese treatment.

Total.

1931

57,063

184,997

242,060

1930

25,463

202,482

227,945

Eye Clinic.

Baby Clinic.

1931

1930

14,277 12,262

1,48€

2,523

A great many patients come to the Tung Wah Hospital from outside the Colony attracted by its fame and its unstinted charity.

A large proportion of the deaths in the Hospital occur within twenty-four hours of admission. It is a dumping ground for dying people who wish to avoid postmortems. 388 were brought in moribund.

The number of vaccinations shows no increase but this is accounted for by the establishment of new Vaccination Stations outside.

Inspite of some falling off in Inpatients, the Outpatients in 1931 numbered 29,878 more than in 1930.

The new rooms added in 1931 to the Hospital made no appreciable difference till towards the end of the year.

The number of patients who choose their own herbalists to treat their complaints is still large, but most of these were not suffering seriously. For anything of importance they are learning by experience to put themselves in the hands of a scientifically trained doctor.

The X-ray Department continues to justify itself and the gross income rose from $1,331.00 in 1930 to $1,688.00 in 1931.

Kwong Wah Hospital.

General beds 234. Maternity beds fifty-nine. Thirty-two in the new Tuberculosis ward.

This Hospital does for Kowloon and the Peninsula what the Tung Wah Hospital does for the island of Hong Kong.

The accommodation cannot keep pace with the growth in population. Kowloon has considerably more than doubled itself during the last ten years, and overcrowding in the Hospital is unfortunately only too common. .

C 20

The staff consists of a Senior Resident Medical Officer (Dr. Cheung Kung San), whose salary is paid by the Government, and two Junior Medical Officers (Dr. Tang Yee Yuen and Dr. Lan Shiu Wah), paid by the Directors.

There are also а number of Chinese Herbalists, who practise Chinese medicine and are paid out of Hospital funds.

The patients, on admittance, can choose whether they desire treatment on Western or Chinese lines.

Inpatients.

Western treatment,

Chinese treatment. Total.

1931

8,204

2,381

10,585

1930

7,026

2,751

9,777

(including 3,097 maternity)

Outpatients.

1931

1930

51,600

90,755

142,100

(including 436 gynaecology)

45,536

94,755

140,291

Eye cases also markedly increased and these were cared for by Dr. Basto. There were 3,650.

Vaccinations numbered 1,670.

There was an Infant Welfare Clinic every Monday and 948 babies were seen. The Ante-natal Clinic still remains small, only 117 cases. There were 3,057 labours.

Major operations under general anaesthesia amounted to 157. In 1930 there were 179.

The number of deaths in hospital were 3,060. Figures of deaths in these Chinese Hospitals are apt to be misleading, as many sick are brought in when relatives think death is certain and nothing more can be done for them.

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

It serves

This Hospital continues to do very good work. the useful purpose of reminding the older foundation--the Tung Wah-what it is possible for a Chinese Hospital to be. Every- thing is new and clean and it had the advantage of starting fresh in up-to-date buildings.

The staff consists of Government Medical Officer, Dr. Phoon Seck Weng, and two Junior Doctors appointed by the Directors of the Tung Wah.

The total number of beds is 195.

7

C 21

Inpatients.

Western treatment. Chinese treatment, Maternity. Total.

1931

1930

2,185

1,796

1,345 854

667

4,197

472

3,122

Outpatients.

Western treatment. Chinese treatment.

Total.

1931 1930

12.471

45,931

58,402

8,764

45,436

54,200

Major Operations.

Under General Anaesthesia.

1931

1930

116

103

Vaccinations.

273

235

1931

1930

Twelve new nurses in 1931 were enrolled for training in the Hospital.

There has been a marked increase in the number of children admitted and a ward of six beds is now set apart as a Children's Ward.

There has been a decrease in the number of cases in the Private Wards but this was due to the increase in the charges from $2.50 to $4.00 a day.

There is improvement in the health of the general staff, and there are now very few cases of Malaria since prophylactic doses of Quinine were instituted and mosquito nets supplied to the nurses.

The deaths in 1931 numbered $27. A large number of these died within twenty-four hours after admission

Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital.

This is an Infectious Diseases Hospital run in connection with the Tung Wah. Practically all the cases who go there, go because they prefer native methods of treatment. The accommodation is good, with plenty of room, and the wards detached and connected by covered ways.

There are thirty iron beds but as many more could be taken in on bed boards. At present only small-pox cases apply for admission.

Nine cases were admitted there in the year. Four died. One case remained over from 1930.

1

Table A.

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1931 and the

arrangements made regarding

them.

January, 1931,

In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

Admitted during the year,

Total,

Kuk on the 31st Decem- Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1931,

to

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs Committed under Warrant from

the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from

Singapore and Bangkok.

Sent with their own consent

by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants. ·

Total.

Էս

:..

...

:

14

こう

1

35

182

20

12

36

366

:

31

N

3

4

++

35

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband, Placed in charge of parents and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent, or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

109

196

20

95 38

13

37

401

114

16

...

6 19

7

52

3

152 1921

}

1

5

со

48 366

158| 26 | 28

3

1

8 | 52 | 401

C 22

Table B.

PO LEUN KUK

+

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1931.

RECEIPTS.



EXPENDITURE.

C.



C.

C 23

Balance from previous year,.....................

4,724.33

Subscriptions

Yue Lan Celebrations, West Point,

By the Elected Committee :-

(see Table C),.

Balance:

9,700.00

1,503.74

Guilds,

4,449.00

On Deposit,

2,000.00

Tai Wo & A. Fong Photo-

graphers,

750.00

At Current Account,..

1,193.51

Theatres,

850.00

3,193.51

7,552.74

Interest:

On Mortgage......

450.00

On Current Account,.

166.44

616.44

Total..

12,893.51

Total..

12,893.51

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Au Shin Cho, Member of the Board of Direction.

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from 1st January to 31st December, 1931.

C 24 -

RECEIPTS.

EXPENDITURE.

SA

C.

Balance from previous year,

65.64

Decorations,

Received from Permanent Board,.

9,700.00

Food,

55.50

2,802.14

Miscellaneous Receipts,

7.86

Light and Fire,

1,107,54

Premium on bank notes,

21.70

Miscellaneous,...

933.00

Passage Money,

96.56

Petty Expenditure,

11.70

Printing,

234.73

Repairs,

107.11

Stationery,

123.03

Telephone,

117.00

Insurance,

103.24

Wages,

3,943.66

9,635.21

159,99

Balance,

Total.....$

9,795.20

Total,.

9,795.20

- C 25

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1930 AND 1931.

Personal Emoluments*

Other Charges.

1930.

$125,711.78

1931.

$130,841.70

Conveyance Allowances.

Incidental Expenses

Library

Grant to District Watch Fund

1,440.00

1,440.00

927.90

1,019.72

199.73

122.80

2,000.00

2,000.00

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges

$130,279.41 $135,424.22

** Includes Officers of Cadet, S. C. & A. and J. C. Services."

:

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1930 AND 1931.

Licences and Internal Revenue not

otherwise specified.

Chinese Boaring House Licences.....

Emigration Passage Brokers Licences... Forfeitures

1930.

1931

$17,298.67 $16,309.33

1,400.00 479.00

1,200.00

909.20

Fees of Court or Office.

Certificates to Chinese Procceding to

Foreign Countries

450.00

200.00

Official Signatures

90.00

106.00

Interest.

Interest accrued on Official Account

with the Bank

62.39

16.06

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Total

396.00

31.00

$20,176.06 $18,771.59

C 26

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS,

Year.

*Personal Emoluments

and Other Charges.

Special Expenditure. Expenditure

Total

Total Revenue.

1922...... 62,617.04

62,617.04

15,514.50

1923......

72,407.12

72,407.12

16,777.69

1924...... 57,173.08

57,173.08

18,716.08

1925...... 67,184.59

67,184.59 15,741,94

1926...... 68,496.98

68,496.98

19,740.62

1927...... 76,979.90

120

77,099.90 22,318.25

1928...... 73,738.41

73,738.41 20,040.53

1929...... 78,121.08

78,121.08 16,828.36

1930......

130,279.41

130,279.41 20,176.06

1931...... 135,424.29

135,424.29

18,771.59

** "Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services attached

to department."

!

Table IV.

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them in 1931.

Permitted to leave,

Restored to husband,

Sent to native place,

Sent to Refuge or Convent,.

Prostitutes.

1

1

Emigrants.

Total.

1

1

Total,

2

2

i

Ở 27

C 28

Table V.

Number of Female Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under

"The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915",

during the year 1931.

Women and Children 1931.

Total Women

and Children

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

1930.

Macassar

312

64

172

548

907

Straits Settlements and

F.M.S.

8,720

1,749

2,018

12,487

27,522

Dutch Indies

80

20

48

148

34

Belawan Deli

237

63

105

405

929

British North Borneo

426

100

127

653

1,635

Honolulu

108

32

58

198

173

United States of America..

189

54

276

519

324

South America

11

2

5

18

2

Mauritius and Re-Union...

119

16

57

192

509

Australia

5

3

8

16

India

65

10

27

102

82

South Africa

32

Vancouver

110

32

111

253

174

Batavia

1,343

236

634

2,213

4,717

West Indies

8

Sourabaya

3

1

4

Rangoon

80

25

Port Elizabeth

Callao

Billiton

2

Victoria

16

2

Seattle

58

15

105

༄།། [།ྒུཎྜ

151

274

10

65

4

3

23

41

68

178

177

11,884

2,422

3,816

18,122

37,661

- C 29

Table VI.

NUMBER OF ASSISTED EMIGRANTS.

Rejected.

Year.

Examined. Passed.

Un- willing. S.C.A.

at

Rejected Rejected

by

Total

Percentage

rejected. Doctor.

of rejection.

1930,

8,413 8,316

23

52

22

97

1.15

1931,

4,297 3,817

16

*456

00

480

11-17

*This number includes those who failed to appear for the final examination.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1931.

Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to

be cured

Native districts of Assisteä Emigrants passed.

West River

414

East River

1,763

North River

39

Canton

421

Delta

380

Kwong Sai

425

Southern Districts

344

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiangsi)

31

Total

3,817

C 30

Table VI,-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound,

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1930.

1931.

British North Borneo

Dutch Indies :-

Muntoh

4,487

3,185

Samarinda

Billiton

Singkep

60

Macassar

ཙུ།

44

Belawan Deli

2,542

299

India

Samoa

270

264

Soloman Islands

2

Ocean Island

Nauru

Mombasa

385

537

34

4

Sydney

Manila

1

9

10

Total

8,316

3,817

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, according to the language spoken gives the following figures:--

Cantonese

2,848

Hakka

297

Hoklo

304

Southern Mandarin (mostly from

Kwong Sai and Hunan)

201

Hainanese

167

Total

3,817

Table VII.

Chinese boarding house licence returns under the Boarding House Ordinance, No. 23 of 1917.

1

Class.

I II IV V

VI VII Total.

No. in existence at beginning

of 1931

.2 65 10 269

311 88 745

No. in existence at end of

1931

.2 62 7 252

301 91 715

C 31

Table VIII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1931.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

C.

""

To Balance,

Contributions, (Victoria $60,592.02 and Kowloon $13,232.49)....

108,694,84

Wages and Salaries :-

73,824.51

men,..

Detectives,

Chief District Watchmen, Assistant Chief District Watch-

1st Class District Watchmen,... 8,822.29

$ c.

3,324.00

2,178.00 ....10,336.00



C.

""

Grant by Hong Kong Government,.......

2,000.00

2nd 3rd

"1

12

19

""

""

""

··

14,554.53 2,197,92

41,412.74

19

Payment to District Watchmen for

Special Services,

2.028.00

Miscellaneous :--

Cooks,..

,, Fines,...

202,50

Coolies,

1,073.07 840.00

Messengers,

96.00

2,009.07

""

House Rents,

996.00

Office Staff:-

""

Interest on Hong Kong Government

Public Works 6% Loan,

Manager,

2,280.CO

Collectors,

Writer,

180.00 1.176.00 22.00

1,378.00

Interest on Fixed Deposits

1,250.00

""

Total,.....

44,799.81

Interest on Current Account,

550.33

""

Other Charges:

Allowance to Detectives,

2,029.34

Medal Allowance,

1,267.10

Rent allowance.

2,428.00

Conservancy Allowance,.................

64.00

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

1,031.50

Electric charges,

1,129.79

Stationery and Printing,.....

527.65

Uniform and Equipment,

1,521.65

Furniture,

260.00

Rents of Telephone,

480.00

Repairs and Fittings,

20.10

Crown Rent,

7.00

Premium on Fire Policies,

426.84

Gratuities and Rewards,

2,713.50

Reconstruction of District

Watchmen Quarters (Tai- pingshan),

8,893.15

Sundries,

1,090.56

23,890.18

Pensions :-

Ex. C.D.W. Tsui Cheuk and others,.....

Total Expenditure,.........

7,288.50

75,978.49

Balance,

115,847.69

Total,

$

191,826.18

Balance in Colonial Treasury :—

Total,

.$

191,826.18

!

Hong Kong Public Works 6% Loan, Cash $

.$38,000.00

37,687.69

Fixed Deposits (Treasury)

30,000.00

Advance to C.D.W.s.

160.00

Fixed Deposits (Hong Kong Bank)

10,000.00

Total,.......

115,847.69

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

A. G. CLARKE,

Asst. Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

KO CHUNG WOON,

Manager, D.W.F.

Hong Kong, 31st December, 1931.

Examined and found correct.

LI YAU TSUN

WONG TAK KWONG

Members of

District Watchmen Committee.

Receipts.

C 32

Table IX.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

CASH ACCOUNT 1931.

$

C.

Expenditure.

$

C.

Cash account from last year:

Tung Wah Hospital account Tung Wah Eastern Hospital Kwong Wah Hospital

Man Mo Temple Emergency Fund

Maternity Hospital

$153,414.28

95,513.20

Current account with Tung Wah Eastern

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

$108,553.15

Do.

.15,244.85

Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

93,317.21

1,100.28

Do.

Man Mo Temple

46,190.01

94,989.50

Do..

Emergency Fund

407.75

3,623.72

Do.

Maternity Hospital

4,080.80

$363,885.83

Provisions for staff

17,414.74

Salaries for staff

57,250.19

Hospital

90,274.90

Provisions for sick rooms

43,456.67

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

139,357.95

Sick room sundries

17,264.95

Do.

Man Mo Temple

44,830.54

Hospital sundries

9,353.19

Do.

Maternity Hospital

4,216.97

Chinese drugs

35,044.81

Do.

Emergency Fund ...

2,279.75

Western drugs

17,091.20

Rents from House property

107,332.45

Repairs

4,137.85

Subscriptions collected from steamers

4,540.82

Destitutes and Patients' passages

424.30

Annual subscriptions of Hongs

9,415.00

Repairs to landed property

1,667.10

Annual subscriptions from wealthy persons

7,550.00

Lights

11,134.85

Subscriptions and donations

19,577.00

Insurance

2,027.06

Subscriptions from charitable persons

12,230.81

Crown rent and taxes

16,937.70

Special contributions for supply of medicines,

Grant to Old Men's Asylum, Kowloon

200.00

quilted clothing, coffins and shrouds

4,925.40

Sundries for coffin home and burial ground

681.13

Government Grants

8,000.00

Building costs

9,919.70

Government Grants for coffins

10,000.00

Small-pox Hospital expenses

719.14

Amount received from Government on account

Stamps, stationery and advertisements

5,726.27

of Western medicines

2,500.00

Grant to Fong Pin Hospital

1,000.00

Grant from Man Mo Temple

2.500.00

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital

3,767.10

Contributions from Theatres

2,200.00

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital

5,563.76

Subscriptions from coffin home.

4,590.00

Burial of bodies by Government Mortuary

2,898.29

Interest on loans and deposits

23,470.20

Coffins for bodies buried by Government

Premium on notes and discount on goods

Mortuary

4,552.16

purchased

2,266.45

Interest on deposits

6.078.61

Fees from Patients

7,232.48

Advanced for purchase of landed property

Rents from Coffin home

17,495.00

Sale of medicines & kitchen refuse, boat-hire

in San Mi Year BALANCE

157,150.00

248,080.32

& rent from red cross ambulance

18,617.96

Rent from Yat Pit Ting and Wing Pit Ting Rent from iron burner

1,960.00

1,536.00

Receipts for meals supplied to returned

emigrants

19,254.50

Total

$932,040.01

$932,040.01

The balance of $248,080.32 consists of the following credit balances:-

Tung Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

Kwong Wah Hospital

Emergency Fund

Maternity Hospital

Total

.$166,297.58 92,470.89

46,049.65

96,861.50

3,809.89

$405,489.51

from which must be deducted the following debit balances :

Man Mo Temple

$

259.19

Amount advanced in San Mi Year

for purchase of land

157,150.00

157,409.19

$248,080.32

Audited the Hospital Accounts in Chinese for particulars please see my Report in Chinese in the Balance Sheet Book of the Hospital.

NGAN SHING KWAN, W. N. THOMAS TAM,

LI TUNG, Auditor.

} Directors.

Hong Kong, 31st March, 1932.

(FOR PARTICULARS SEE SEPARATE SHEET ATTACHED)

INCOME.

€ 33

Table X.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT 1931.

$

C.

EXPENDITURE,

$

CA

C.

Funds brought forward from 1930

ORDINARY

Subscriptions:

$153,414.28

MAINTENANCE

Provisions :—

Food for staff

$17,414.74

Food for sick room

43,456.67

60,871.41

Annual subscriptions from Hongs $ 9,415.00

Surgery and Dispensary:

Subscriptions collected on

Chinese drugs

35,044.81

steamers

4,540.82

Western drugs

17,091.20

Subscriptions from charitable

52,136.01

persons

12,230.81

Establishments:-

Subscriptions from wealthy

Light

11,134.85

persons

7,550.00

Insurance

2,027.06

Subscriptions and donations

19,577.00

Repairs

4,137.85

53,313.63

Repairs to hospital property

1.667.10

Grants:-

Sick room expenses

17,264.95

Government

8,000.00

Small pox hospital expenses

719.14

Government for coffins

10,000.00

Coffin home and burying

Government western medicine

2,500.00

ground expenses

681.13

Man Mo Temple

2,500.00

Crown rent and taxes

16,937.70

23,000.00

54,569.78

Special contributions:-

Salaries, wages, &c.:

For Mortuary expenses

4,590.00

Staff salaries

57.250.19

From Theatres

2,200.00

Sundries

9,353.19

For supply of medicines, quilted

clothing, coffins & shrouds....

66,603.38

4,925.40

Appeals, grants, &c.:

11,715.40

Investments:

Destitutes & Patients' passages.. Old Men's Asylum Kowloon....

424.30

200.00

Rents from house property

107,332.45

Fong Pin Hospital

1.000.00

Rents from coffin home

17,495.00

1,624.30

Rents from Yat Pit Ting and

Miscellaneous :

Wing Pit Ting

1,960.00

Stationery, &c.

5,726.27

Rents from iron burner

1,536.00

Burial of bodies by Tung

Interest

23,470.20

Wah Hospital

3,767.10

151,793.65

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung

Other Receipts:-

Wah Hospital

5,563.76

Premium on notes & discount

Burial of bodies by Government

on goods purchased

2,266.45

Mortuary

2,898.29

·

Fee from Patients

7,232.48

Coffins for bodies buried by

Sale of medicines, kitchen

Government

4,552.16

refuse, boat-hire & rent from

red cross ambulance

Interest on Depósits

6.078.61

18,617.96

28,586.19

28,116.89

EXTRAORDINARY

EXTRAORDINARY



Receipts for meals supplied to

Building costs

returned emigrants

19,254.50

19,254.50

BALANCE

9,919.70

166,297.58

Total

Hong Kong, 31st March, 1932.

>

$440,608.35

Total

$440,608.35

Audited the Hospital Accounts in Chinese for particulars please see my Report in Chinese in the Balance Sheet Book of the Hospital.

NGAN SHING KWAN, W. N. THOMAS TAM,

Directors.

LI TUNG,

Auditor.

Table XI.

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1931.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

in account with Kwong Wah Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1930 $ 15,244.85 By amount paid during 1931 amount received during 1931

"}

139,357.95

Balance

""

$108,553,15

46,049.65

$ 154,602.80

$154,602.80

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Man Mo Temple.

To credit balance brought forward from 1930 $ 1,100.28 By payments made during 1930 amount received during 1931

$ 46,190.01

Balance

44,830.54

259.19

$ 46,190,01

$ 46,190.01

C 34

Table XI-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1931.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Emergency Fund.

To credit balance brought forward from 1930 $ 94,989.50

amount received during 1931

94,989.50

2,279.75

By payments made during 1931 Balance

$

$ 97,269.25

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Maternity Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1930 $ amount received during 1931

3,623.72

4,216.97

By payments made during 1931

Balance

7,840.69

407.75

96,861.50

$ 97,269,25

**

4,030,80

3,809.89

7,840.69

35

Table XI-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1931.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1930 $ 95,513.20 By payments made during 1931 amount received during 1931

""

$ 93,317.21

92,470.89

90,274.90

Balance

""

$ 185,788.10

$ 185,788.10

BUILDING FUND

To amount advanced by Tung Wah Hospital in 1931

$157,150.00

By amount paid for purchase of land and boundary stones.

$ 157,150.00

Audited the Hospital Accounts in Chinese for particulars please see my Report in Chinese in the Balance Sheet Book of the Hospital.

Hong Kong, 30th March, 1932.

LI TUNG, Auditor,

NGAN SHING-KWANĮ Directors.

W. N. THOMAS TAM

36

1.

1

Table XII.

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1931,

:

Balance from last year's account,... Balance with Tung Wah Hospital at end of last year... Current account with Tung Wah Hospital.

$ 64.905.83

95,513,20

Balance left with Tung Wah Hospital at end of last year,

95,513.20

93,317.21

Government Grant,

25,000.00

Government Grant for western medicine,

Grant from Chinese Temples,

Subscriptions from wealthy persons.

2,500.00

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital..

Salaries to staff,

Provisions for staff,

90.274.90

22,020.61

6,723.14

15,000.00

50.00

>>

sick room,

9.060.38

Sundry expenses for sickroom,

4,737.55

"

Charitable persons,.

40,090.97

hospital,.

4,191,92

Interest on loans and deposits,.................

5,152:50

Chinese medicine,

15,104.45

Fees from Patients and rents of rooms,

10,895.28

Western medicine,.

8,179,10

Rents from landed property....

1,423.33

Repairs &c.......................

7,011,47

Premium on notes and discount on goods purchased, ... Sale of kitchen refuse, patients' ricksha hire, &c.,

644,53

Lights,

2,291,90

Crown rent,

Burial expenses.

Stationery, Stamps and Advertisements, Coffins...

4,115.67

1.00

3,187.52

1

37

Water account,

Coal.......

Sundry expenses for branch establishment for giving free medical advice and free medicine.

Porcelain portraits of subscribers of sums of 2500 or Balance in hand,

over,

2,236.21

520.05

147.50

3,950.40

7.720.09

257.75

71,831.84

$ 356,784.75

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts, for particulars see my Report in Chinese.

Hong Kong, 10th March, 1932.

LI TUNG, Auditor. NGAN SHING KWAN W. N. THOMAS TAM

$ 356,784.75

}

Directors.

INCOME.

C 38

Table XIII

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL Income and Expenditure Account 1931.

EXPENDITURE.

Account brought forward from 1930

$ 169,419,03

ORDINARY.

ORDINARY.

Maintenance :—

Provisions for staff

Subscriptions:—

sick room..

1:

$6,723.14 9,060.38

Subscriptions from wealthy persons...... $

from charitable persons... 40,090.97

50.00

$ 15,783.52

Surgery and Dispensary :-

40,140.97

Chinese drugs

15,104.45

Grants :--

Western drugs

8,179.10

Government

25,000.00

23,283.55

for Western medicine

2.500.00

Establishments :-

Chinese temples

15,000.00

Light

4,115.67

42,500.00

Repairs, &c.

7,011.47

Investments:-

Sick room expenses

4,737.55

Interest

Rents

5.152.50 1,423.33

Crown rent

1.00

15,865.69

6,575.83

Salaries, &c.—-

Other receipts :-

Staff salaries

22,020.61

Fees from patients and rents of rooms... 10,895.28 Premium on potes and discount on

Hospital sundries..

4,191.92

26,212.53

goods purchased

644.53

Miscellaneous :-

Sale of kitchen refuse and patients,

Stationery, stamps and advertisements

3,187.52

ricksha hire, &c.

2,291.90

Coffins...

2.236.21

13,831.71

Water

147.50

Burial expenses...

520.05

Coal.

3,950.40

Porcelain portraits of subscribers of

$500 or over

257.75

10,299.43

Branch Establishment for giving free

medical advice and medicine.......

7,720.09

Balance

173,302,73

$272,467.54

$272,467.54

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL In Account with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount received from Tung Wah Hospital in 1931......... 93,317.21

Balance

92,470.89

Balance brought forward from 1930.

Amount paid Tung Wah Hospital in 1931

$ 95,513.20

90,274.90

$ 185,788.10

$185,788.10

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts, for particulars see my Report in Chinese.

LI TUNG,

Auditor,

Hong Kong, 10th March, 1932.

}

L.

Receipts.

Table XIV.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account 1931.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

C.

To Balance from Account 1930..

1,100,28

By Donation to Tung Wah Hospital Expenses of Free School

2,500.00

29,862.78

Rent of Temple property

17,020.62

Repairs to properties and Schools

817.05

1

Police rates Crown rent and Insurance

Rent from temple keeper

6,589.92

premium

2,564,68

Water Rates

319.75

39

Government grant to schools

6,120.00

Advertisements

17.05

Government grant to the free school of

Building cost for erection of the free school premises in Wanchai Reclamation

8,462.60

Tin Hau Temple

480.00

Miscellaneous payments

1,166.10

Miscellaneous receipts.

620.00

Return of Government grant to the free School of the Tin Hau Temple...

480.00

Amount received from the Hung Shing - Temple Fund.....

14,000.00

Balance

259.19

Total,..

46,190.01

Total,

.$

46,190.01

!

Receipts.

To Balance brought forward from 1930

"}

Interest on deposits

;

Table XV.

Emergency Fund Account 1931.

Amount.

C.

94,989.50

2,279.75

Payments.

Amount.

By Payments made during 1931

Balance

C.

407.75

96,861.50

Total,.

97,269.25

Total,.

97,269.25

C 40

-

:

Table XVI.

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital for 1931.

Receipts.

To Balance brought forward from 1930

Rent of Hospital Property.

Interest

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$

C.



3,623.72

By Repairs to properties

148.50

4,130.00

Crown rent, police rates and Insurance.

682.30

86.97

""

Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, rent for the four quarters 1931

3,200.00

Balance,

3,809.89

Total,

7,840.69

Total,

7,840.69

Revenue.

C 42

Table XVII.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE BREWIN CHARITY DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Amount.

$

C.

Expenditure.

Amount.

$

C.

To Balance from 1930

,, Subscriptions from Directors, Tung Wah

Hospital and Kwong Wah Hospital, 1930. Subscription from Directors, Tung Wah

Hospital, 1931

188,965.53

By Charity for Widows and Orphans

10,552.40

65.00

23

Subscription to Old Men's Home

2,400.00

1,900.00

J

Salary for Accountant, Mr. Chan Yik Wan..

100.00

1

Subscription from Committee, Po Leung

Kuk, 1981

11

Interest from Mr. Chan Tsat for mortgage

12

Interest from Messrs. Lo Wu Ching and

others for mortgage

225.00

Salary for Clerk, Mr. Wong Shut Ming

60.00

780.00

Interest from Mr. Li Sze Ngai for mortgage..

780.00

""

Stamps

8.50

2,160.00

17

21

Interest from Messrs. Lau Yung Yan and

Tsoi Yung Chun for December Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for mortgage.. Interest from Mr. U Nga Ping for mortgage. Interest from Mr. U Nga Ping for mortgage

Conveyance expenses for collecting interest

etc.

10.00

135.00

1,456.00

Printed matters by the Hing Shing

10.00

3,183.72

Balance

190,642.30

of house No. 66, Bonham Strand Interest from Mr. Lau Kwai Nam for

71.87

mortgage

660.00

Interest from Mr. Kwok Hung Fuk for

12

mortgage

790.57

Interest from Mr. Lo Luk for mortgage

644.54

Interest from Mr. Ho Nai Hing for mortgage

360.00

""

Interest on War Bonds of Hong Kong

600.00

""

Interest on current account with Shanghai

Bank

394.62

Cash from Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

12

for Shin Siu Sze

84.00

Interest on fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze

with Shanghai Bank

27.35

Wrong payment by Hongkong and Shanghai

Bank out of the funds of the Tung Wah Hospital

500.00

Total

$203,783.20

Total

By fixed deposit with Messrs. Chan Tsat & Li Sze Ngai on mortgage of two houses in Temple Street

Mr. Lo Wun Ching and others on mortgage of four houses in Temple Street

7;

*

Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage of house property in Wanchai Road

J

7)

"

"

Mr. Mr. U Nga Ping on mortgage of two houses in Bonham Strand

Mr. Kwok Hung Fuk on mortgage of house property in Bonham Strand Mr. Lo Luk on mortgage of house property in Whitefield

17

"

1)

War Bonds of Hong Kong

""

fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank

21

with Mr. Ho Nai Hing on mortgage of house property in Jervois Street

deposit of Sat A. Li with Wing Hing Bank (after deducting five dividends amounting to $185.25) current account deposits with Shanghai Bank

deposit with Tung Wah Hospital

Total

$203.783.20

$16,000.00

24,000.00

16,000.00

45,000.00

15,000.00

8,500.00

10.000.00

1,394.73

40,000.00

134.85

14,541.91

70.81

$190.642.30

(Sgd.) NGAN SHING KWAN,

CHAN LIM PAK, Directors, Tung Wah Hospital.

!

RECEIPTS.

€ 43

Table XVIII.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Cash Account 1931.

C.

PAYMENTS.

$

C.

Balance brought forward from previous year Government Grant

Government Special Donation

32,468.43

8,500 00

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital

139,357.95

Salaries for Hospital staff.

24,553.19

25,000.00

Provisions for staff..

9.426.83

Government Donation for Western drugs Government Donation for giving free coffins.... Current account with Tung Wah Hospital....

2,500,00

Hospital sundries

3,436.43

7,000.00

Provisions for patients

17,044.48

109,553.15

Sick room expenses...

3,632.78

Subscriptions from charitable persons and yearly

Charcoal

1,211.51

subscriptions

19,184.87

Chinese drugs

15,708.61

Subscriptions from Ko Shing, Tai Ping, Lee and Po

Hing Theatres

Western drugs..

15,048.32

4,858.00

Lights

Donations from A Fong & Tai Woo Photographers... Donations from Old Yaumati Chinese Public Dis-

750.00

Telephone rent

pensary

5.634.70

Stationery, stamps and advertisements Water

8,634.49

492.00 3,380.16

464.50

Sale of Chinese medicine

Miscellaneous income

Payments by in-patients and for drugs

Amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs

Special Fund to Income & Expenditure A/C... Subscription received for rebuilding Hung Shing

Temple

Subscription received for erecting the Tsin Li

Ting

Rent from temple and wharf...

Interest and house rent collected in respect of Free

Chinese Drugs Special Fund...

Subscriptions received for rebuilding Operating

Room and Segregation Room..

Various deposits received

654 39 3.512.55

Furniture and repairs

1,368.51

Coffins

5,181.54

16,495.14

Burial of bodies from Hospital Mortuary

597.80

Burial of bodies from Yaumati Public Mortuary.....

$51.60

13,103.60

Burial of bodies from Old Men's Asylum..

36.40

Grave stones

125.60

2.000.00

Crown rent

11.50

Temples

685.50

3,200 00

Bedding and clothing for patients

1,436.51

7,190.40

Building work in connection with extension of

Maternity Hospital.

344.00

15.661.08

Building work in connection with Hung Shing

Temple

1,837.50

24.514.53

Building work in connection with Operating

3,060.00

Room & Segregation Room......

28,613.65

Amount paid on account of Free Chinese Drugs

Special Fund....

15.661.08

Western Medicine utensils

1,381.92

Surgical Instruments

1,843.50

Various deposits returned Balance

2,550.00

1,504.98

$304.140.84

$ 304.140.84

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts for particulars see my Report in Chinese.

LI TUNG,

Auditor.

Hong Kong, 14th March, 1932.

INCOME.

-

C 44

Table XIX.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL

Income and Expenditure Account 1931.

EXPENDITURE,

C.

C.

Balance from previous account including $1,415.26 advanced for building of Hung Shing Temple,...

A.-ORDINARY.

A. MAINTENANCE.

31,126,33

Provisions:-

Staff,

Patients.......

.$ 9,426.83 17.044.48

26,471.31

To amount transferred from Free Chinese Drugs

Special Fund,

Dispensary:-

13,403.60

Chinese drugs,

Rent from Temple and Wharf,

7,190.40

Western drugs,

15,708 61 15,048,32

Government Grant (General),

.$ 8,500.00

30,756,93

do. for Western drugs,... do. for free coffins,

2,500.00

Establishment:-

7,000.00

Lights,

6.634.49

18,000,00

Furniture and repairs,

1,386.51

Subscriptions

Sick room expenses,.

3,632,78

Charitable persons,

19,184.87

Charcoal,

1,211.51

Entertainments:-

Telephone rent,..

492.00

Ko Sbing, Tai Ping, Lee and Po Hing Theatres,..

4,858.00

Water,

464.50

Donations —

Sundries,

3,436.43

A Fong and Tai Wo Photographers,...

750.00

Crown rent,

11.50

Old Yaumati Public Dispensary,

5,634.70

Western Medicine utensils,..

1,381.92

6,384.70

Surgical Instruments.......

1,843.50

Patients Payments :—

Bedding and clothing for patients,

1,436.5!

In and Out Patients,

Chinese drugs sold,

16,495.14 654.39

21,931.65-

Salaries :-

17,149.53

Hospital staff,

24,553.19

Other receipts :-

Miscellaneous income...........

3,512.55

MISCELLANEOUS.

Stationery, stamps & advertisements,

3,380.16

B.-EXTRAORDINARY.

Temples,.

685.50

Coffins,

5,181.54

Donations:-

Burial of bodies,

597.80

Government Special donation.

25,000.00

Burial of bodies from Yaumati,.

551.60

Burial of bodies from Old Men's

Asylum,

36.40

Grave stones,..

125.60

Balance,

10,558.60 31,838.30

$ 146,109.98

$ 146,109.98

Hong Kong, 14th March, 1932.

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts, for particulars see my Report in Chinese,

L1 TỪNG,

Auditor.

1,429.78

438.30

351.00

38.40

13,403.60

64,761.80

$ 80,422,88

Table XX.

FINANCIAL POSITION OF THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL

Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount left deposited with Tung Wah Hospital

at end of 1930,

Subscriptions

Interest,

Rents,

from charitable persons,

C.

64,761.80

Crown rent and taxes,..

Repairs,.....

200.00

Rent collector's remuneration,.

4,680.08

Sundry expenses,

10,781.00

Transferred to Kwong Wah Hospital for free

gift of Chinese Medicine,

Balance,.

$ 80,422.88

C 45

Current Account with Tung Wah Hospital.

Amount deposited with Tung Wah Hospital at end of 1930,

Amount paid to Tung Wah Hospital during 1931,

$

C.

15,244.85

139,357.95

$ 154,602.80

$

C.

Amount received from Tung Wah Hospital,...

Balance with Tung Wah Hospital at end of 1931,

108,553,15

46,049.65

$ 154,602.80

Table XX,-Continued.

Kwong Wah Hospital in Account with Hang Shing Temple Reconstruction Fund.

Amount of compensation received from the

$

C.

Amount advanced by Kwong Wah Hospital in previous year,

Building work by Sham Hing Contractors, Foreman's remuneration,

Furniture and sundries,

Hongkong Government,

2,000.00

Balance (ie. amount overdrawn on Kwong Wah Hospital),

1,252.76

Stone Tablet,

3,252.76

Kwong Wah Hospital in Account with Maternity Hospital Fund.

$

..

1,415.26

1,550.00

60.00

175.50

52.00

3,252.76

$

C.

$

C.

Balance from last account,

7,468.81

Porcelain portraits of subscriters, Balance,

344.00

7,124.81

7,468.81

$

7,468.81

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts, for particulars see my Report in Chinese.

LI TUNG,

Hongkong, 14th March, 1932.

Auditor.

C 46

www.c

1.

Table XXI.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Fund for Building Operating Room and Segregation Room.

To Balance from previous account subscriptions received during the year

7,795.80

24,514.53

Building work by Kin Cheong Contractors Architects fee..

$ 25,075.20

1,310.00

Toilet fixtures

1,762.00

Porcelain portraits for subscribers

To subscriptions received

$ 32,310.33

Furniture..

Sundries

Balance

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Tsin Li Ting Building Fund.

$ 3,200.00 In hand

26.75

395.20

44.50

3,696.68

32,310.33

$ 3,200.00

€ 47

To Balance of last year's account..

,, deposit from Shung Shing Tong.

""

""

Tseung Kee

Yow Kee

"}

""

"2



Kin Cheong

Table XXI,-Continued.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

In Account with Various Deposits.

$ 2,437,60

By deposit repaid to Ho Ling Nam...

520.00

Tseung Kee

"

20.00

"

Kin Cheong

20.00

Balance

97

2,500.00

$ 5,497.60

#

Ver

30.00

20.00

2,500.00

2,947.60

$ 5,497.60

C 48

3

T

Table XXI,-Continued.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

Summary.

Liabilities.

Assets.

Fund for rebuilding Operation Room and Segrega- tion Room in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital. Maternity Hospital Fund in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital

3,696.68

Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund in cash... $1,504.98 Kwong Wah Hospital General Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital

46,049,65

7,124.81

Various deposits with Kwong Wah Hospital...... Chinese drugs Special Fund in cash with Kwong Wah Hospital.

2,947.60

Free Chinese Drugs Special Fund deposited with Tung Wah Hospital

64,761.80

64,761.80

Debit balance due by Hung Shing Temple Reconstruction Fund.

1,252.76

Tsin Li Ting Building Fund

3,200.00

Balance

31,838.30

$113,569.19

$113,569.19

Audited the Hospital's Chinese Accounts, for particulars sec my Report in Chinese.

NGAN SHING KWAN,

W. N. THOMAS TAM,

Directors.

LI TUNG,

Auditor.

Hong Kong, 14th March, 1932.

Table XXII.

Summary of work done in the Dispensaries during 1931.

PATIENTS.

Dispensaries.

New

Cases.

Old

cases.

L'atients

Certific-

ates of

removed

Corpses i

Patients

sent to

removed

to Hosp.

Applica-

Dead

Infants

Vaccin-

to Hosp.

tion for

causes

of death.

Hospital.

by

Ambu-

or Mor-

coffius.

brought

to Dis-

ations.

lance.

tuary.

pensary

Gynaeco-

logical

cases

seen by

Lady

Doctor.

Č 50

Central

13,483

14,452

14

6

42

40

27

2,600

275

Eastern

9,712

10,290

8

18

142

42

274

2,994

669

Western

12,866

11,822

36

31

401

401

357

3,400

1,038

Harbour and

Yaumati

30,427

30;138

76

. 17

44

.198

1.96

5,606

2,044

Shaukiwan

27,287

26,507

18

59

5

7

193

4,546

1,878

Shamshuipo

10,908

2,750

91

158

153

6,027

781

Hung Hom

11,460

3,360

50

96

43

190

185

2,035

710

Aberdeen..

4,773

4,987

36

233

699

Kowloon City...

8,503

5,750

112

57

24

124

105

2,550

Total for 1931...

129,419

110,056

300

375

178

1,165

490

1,490

29,991

8,094

Total for 1930...

122,395

98,385

301

417

201

1,078

391

1,304

25,242

5,966

Receipts.

C 51

Table XXIII.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1931.

$

C.

$

C.

3

Expenditure.

$

C.

$

3

""

To Balance

>>

Grant by Government.....................

Grant from General Chinese

Charities Fund....

Donation from :-

Tai Ping Theatre Ko Shing Theatre Lee Theatre Subscription, Land

.....

900.00

79,149.57 9,500.00

90,600.00

By Maintenance of Dispensaries:-

Victoria

Harbour and Yaumati

Shaukiwan

Kowloon City..

Aberdeen...

300.00

250.00

""

17,770.85

Harbour.....

10,423.90

""

Shaukiwan

906.45

""

""

Kowloon City

1,012.50

Aberdeen

1,719.05

"J

33,282.75

Donation towards the Fund for

Subscription in aid of the Fund

of Maternity Hospital, West Point.....

Part payment to Contractor:-

W. S. Engineering & Con- truction Co. for erection of Kowloon City Dispen- sary.

33,168.71

9,005.70

10,020.34

5,355.14

7,107.53

61,657.42

1,000.00

19,957.62

""

erection of Eastern Maternity Hospital, Wanchai, from Mr. Wu Hi-tong..

5,000.00

Messrs. Ho Ngok Lau and

others

4,000.00

9,000.00

""

Advance from Pak Tai Temple,

Wanchai, for erection

of

""

Wanchai Maternity Hospital.

2,000,00

Fees from the Wanchai Mater-

""

nity Hospital

233.80

Interest :-

""

On Hong Kong 6% Public

Works Loan

660.00

""

Fixed Deposit

2,450.00

Current Account

202.25

""

3,312.25

Tai Tack Shing for erection of Harbour and Yaumati

Dispensary.....

19,461.22

Hang Sun & Co. for erection of Wanchai Maternity Hospital,...

17,931.50

57,350.34

Fees for Architects for prepar- ing plans ete. for Harbour and Yaumati and Kowloon City Dispensaries and Eas- tern Maternity Hospital, Wanchai, Pensions

2,482.80 1,035 00

Total

LI YAU TSUN,

Member of Committee,

:

$227,078.37

!

>>

Balance :-

>>

On Fixed Deposit in Hong

Kong & Shanghai Bank-

ing Corporation

40,000.00

On Fixed Deposit in Col-

onial Treasury

15,000.00

On Hong Kong 6% Public

Works Loan,

In Cash

Advance to Dispensaries

Clerks

Total.......

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

11,000.00

37,412.81

140.00

103,552,81



$227,078.37

Receipts.

Table XXIV.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1981.

Expenditure.

C.

C.

>>

To Subscriptions etc..

Grant from General Chinese Charities Fund.

1,752.00

600.00

By Balnace...

1,080.42

">

Donation from :-

Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

2,034.00

Po Hing Theatre,...

Scavenging Contractor, ......

808.00

2,294.50

3,102.50

,, Payment through Local Committee

2,799.16

".

Deposit by Scavenging Contractor

Balance at Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

300.00

139.08

Total,...

5,913.58

CHUNG IU SON,

LI KIT TSUN,

Chairman.

Accountant.

Total,

5,913.58

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

}

}

Table XXV.

SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1931.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

C.

""

>>

To Balance

Grant by Government.

Donation from Mr. U Hon Chau for Per-

mission to hold theatrical performances

at Shamshuipo

7,182.63

2,500.00

By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs,

2,983.00

Payment through Local Committee,

3,681.91

"}

Rents from eight houses at Shamshuipo,

302.00

2,200.00

Balance :-

""

...

At Colonial Treasury

$2,096.00

With Local Committee

$3,423.72

5,519.72

Total,

WONG IU TUNG,

12,184.63

AU TO NAM,

Accountant.

Chairman

Total,

12,184.63

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

52

Receipts.

Table XXVI.

WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1931.

C.

Expenditure

JA

>>

>>

To Balance

Grant by Government Subscription

3,381.51

By Salaries

6,530.00

5,000.00

Drugs

4,856.35

1,133.00

Furniture

41,65

Donation from :-

Bedding

58.30

77

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund.... Chinese Recreation Ground Fund.

1,000.00

Food for Patients, pupils and mid-

...

1,200.00

wives etc.,

5,488.21

Rent of houses purchased with Tung Wah Hospital Jubilee Dona- tion

Stationery and Printing

181.80

Gas and Electricity

1,451.66

3,200.00

Repairs and Fitting

335.00

6,533.00

Water Account

611.75

Fees paid by patients in

the

Telephone (Sub. Exchange).

11.00

Hospital

9,012.00

Washing

1,366.39

""

Money paid by pupils etc,, in the

Crown Rent

Hospital for their food and rents

924.00

Miscellaneous

1.00

1,400.02

77

Fees paid by patients who had

venereal diseases

679.70

Interest

39.42

"

Balance with Colonial Treasury

Total..

S. W. TSO,

Chairman.

25,569.63

Total.

C.

22,833.13

2,736.50

25,569.63

E. R. HALLIFAX

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 54 -

1.

Receipts.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1931.

| Amount. ]

Payments.

A mount.

$

..

C.

To Balance,

59,596.16

By Motor car hire

3.00

"

Interest from Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank,

219.65

""

77

Interest from Mr. Ngan Kit Hing,

1,650.00

Wages from Hon. Dr. S. W.

Tso for refilling vaults,

330.00

>>

Sale of 191 lots,

10,290.00

""

Stone Embankment,.

2,865.00

ל -

""

99

Rent of telephone,

Repairs to embankment, and the roads, etc. and supply of 100 pieces of number stones by Yeung Tam Kee,...... Printed matters by the Nam Wah & Co.,

Wages for Ma Shu-hoi & Yuen Cheung gardeners, Wages for Pun Yan Chin and Chau Wan Kok, Preparing plan by Architect Little, Adams and Wood, Flower pots, manure, scythes, bamboo brooms, etc., Account book by Kwong Fuk Hing & Co.,

189.00

11,038.78

3.00

1,502.50

480.00

50.00

111.64

.40

,, Registration fees paid in by Dr. S. W. Tso for transfer

of lots

""

Stamps,

23.00

Rent of wharf,

1.00

""

10.00

Crown Rent,...............

3.00

--19

Sale of two lots under the characters of Kwo and Chi,

""

2,481.50

Erection of a ceremonial structure by Messrs. Wing Yick & Co.,

1,400,00

Printed matters by Ki Nga & Co Rates for getting water from river, Balance,

?

5.70

2,00

62,629.29

Total,.

$

77,442.31

Total,.

77,442.31

By deposits with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bauk,

the Tai Yick Bank,

99

""

Cash,

.....$ 22,385.84 40,000.00

243.45

$ 62,629.20

S. W. TSO, Secretary,

T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.

Examined and found correct,

LI PO KWAI,

Anditor.

C 55

Receipts.

Table XXVIII,

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

Receipts and Expenditure, 1931.

To Balance,

-37

Rent of Stalls,

Interest on money deposited in Treasury,......

Payments.

C.

C.

6,604.23

By Wages of Watchmen, etc.,

""

Water Account,

872.00

434.75

3,607,80

??

Consumption of Gas,

294.75

""

Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital,

1,200.00

117.19

Lime Washing,

90.00

Miscellaneous,

24.49

Balance,

7,413.23

Total,

10,329.22

Total,

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

10,329.22

€ 56

:

!

RECEIPTS.

Table XXIX.

YAUMATI PUBLIC SQUARE.

Receipts and Expenditure, 1931.

#

C.

PAYMENTS.

SA

$

To Balance.......

"}

Rent of Stalls

3,297.11

By Wages of Watchmen, etc.

792.00

7,947.00

Water Account..

866.75

""

Interest

on

>>

money deposited in

>>

Lights

1,316.64

Treasury

83.67

Crown reut

1.00

>>

Miscellaneous

Balance

11.48

8,339.91

Total,.

11,327.78

Total,..

.$ 11,327.78

E. R. HALLIFAX, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 57

Receipts.

Table XXX.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1931.

Payments.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

"}

in Colonial Treasury,

Passage Money received,

Meney left by Wong Han,



Deposit in aid of one Mok Lin,



C.

v

3

C.

C 58

$6,250,00

952.05

By Gratuity to a girl for being married,

2.00

לי

Passages to destitutes,.

196.90

7,202.05

Gratuities to destitutes,

120.73

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

50.00

"2

109.50

49.15

""

""

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

160.00

Hawker's Licences to destitute persons,

25.00

""

100.00

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

....$6,250.00

10.00

in Colonial Treasury,

932.85

$ 220.00

7,182.85

28.78

248.78

Miscellaneous Receipts,

>>

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

"}

" on money deposited in Treasury,

Total,

$

7,719.48

Total,

$7,719.48

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Industry.

C 59

Table XXXI.

Accidents in Factories 1931.

Accidents due to

Scalds

Machin-

ery.

Falls etc.

and Burns.

Fatalities.

Total No. of

Accidents.

Shipbuilding and

Engineering

8 (2)

13 (2)

2

4

23

Oil Installations Sugar Refineries

5

5

7

10

1

18

Knitting Factories

3

3

Cement Works

Rope Works

6 (1)

10

16

3

Hat Factories

1

Rubber Factories

1

10 10 00

3

Total.....

34

35

3

5

72

The figures in parenthesis denote fatalities and are included in the total.

}

Receipts.

C 60

Table XXXII.

CHINESE TEMPLES FUND.

Statement of Accounts ending 31st December, 1931.

cts.

ets.

Expenditure.

$ cts.

$cts.

-"

To Balance....

Rent from Temple Keepers of:-

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. Kwun Yum Temple, Chewanshan.

155,538.72

...

22,245.00 890.00

Pak Tai Temple, Wantsaí,

1,888.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

758.00

Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati......

5,900.00

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwan

1,929.50

Fook Tak Che Temple, Shaukiwan...........

500.00

By Maintenance of Chinese Schools in

Kowloon City

Grants to:-

""

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for 1931 The Kaifong of Hunghom for the expenses

of the free school in Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

Ngai Lo Shi (ex-temple keeper of the Yi

Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay.) Ping Chau Free School

4.441.19

400.00

1,200.00

95.00

250.00

To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan.

30.00

Sheung Tai Temple, Matauchung.

358.00

Committee of the Tin Hau Temple, Kow-

loon City

70.00

Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi...

699.92

2,015.00

Tin Hau Temple, Tokwawan....

165.00

""

Expenses for holding theatrical per-

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island..

3,200.00

formance at :-

Kwun Yum Temple. Hungaom........... Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay.... Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chaù Island.. Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichung. Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen..

4,310.00

Kowloon City

600.00

743.75

Ma Tau Chung

50.00

466.00

Cheung Chau Island

1,400 00

175.50

652.60

Aplichau

Shatin

850.00

300.00

613.75

Ping Chau Island.

121.00

Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hunghom.

209.75

Aberdeen

300.00

Che Kung Temple, Shatin......

2,356.00

Shamshuipo

292.49

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau......

1,834.75

3,913.49

Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau

415.00

Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung..

75.00

Pak Tai Temple, Matauwai.

Tin Hau Temple, Hoi Chung Shum

Island, Tokwawan

22.00

Annual subscription to Confucius Society

for expenses of the Free School at Yuk Hu Kung, Wanchai

520.00

2,00

29

Repairs to:-

Shing Wong Temple, Bridges Street,

500 00

Mo Tai Temple. Shamshuipo...

155.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo

216.00

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City Chuk Neung Temple, Kowloon City Tin Hau Temple, Shamshuipo

2,195.75

80.00 118.00

Sam Tai Tsz Temple, Shamshuipo

2,500.88

2,393.75

Pak Tai Temple, Shamshuipo

100.00

"

Refund of security to temple keepers of:-

53,911.40

House Rents :-

19

Property of Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City Kwun Yum Temple, Chewanshan Fook Tak Che Temple, Shaukiwan

3.360.00

294.00

79.25

City.

788.00

Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi.................

67.48

Property of Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan.

747.12

1,535.12

99

Compensation & Resumptions from Public

Works Department of :-

Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom... Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichung Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen

922.00

148.75

130.50

122.75

5,124.73

Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung........ New Kowloon Survey District Inland

Lot No. 5145.....

400.00

"

3,254.60

??

3,651.60

59

Grant from Education Department for Chinese Public School in Kowloon City

1,500.00

19

Interest :-

On Fixed deposit......

On Current account.

2.520.00 559.17

29

3 079.17

"

Refund to Tung Wah Hospital on account

of the Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati................ Advertisement for tender of temple keepers. Grant to Cheung Chau Kaifong for settling the outstanding accounts of electric charges Advance to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund for the reconstruction of the Wantsai Maternity Hospital Transfer to General Chinese Charities Fund Expenses for removing the Tin Hau Deity

from Kowloon Tong to Yaumati

Crown Rent

Water account

Fee for boundary stones

Stamp duty on crown lease............................................

99

""

Salary

Stationery and printing

Balance in Treasury

27,312.29 33.75

800.00

2,000.00 127,537.25

1.50

57.37

37.50

25.00

30.00

120.00

9.80 42,846.39

219.219.01

Total...........

Total..........

219,219.01

LI YAU TSUN,

Member of Committee.

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

- C 61

Table XXXIII.

GENERAL CHINESE CHARITIES FUND.

Statement of Accounts from 1st July to 31st December, 1931.

Receipts.

$

C.

C.

Expenditure.

ਮੁੰਡੇ

C.

ch

C.

3

To Surplus money transferred from :--

Kwun Yum Temple, Chi Wan Shan. Tam Kung Temple, Shauki wan ... Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay! Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

ך *

...

Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichong Fook Tak Che Temple, Shaukiwan. Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen

Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau... Shing Wong Temple, Bridges

Street

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan

Grant from Hong Kong Government

Interest:-

On Fixed Deposit

Current Account

""

6,184.46 4,802.80

903.00

6,233.42

3,086.00

1,435.62

856.28 1,171.00 1.034.59 3,639.86 4,542.00

By Grants to:-

وو

Kwong Wah Hospital in aid of the funds towards the expenses of the free Maternity Ward for

1931

Chinese Public Dispensary Sham-

shuipo

Kwong Wah Hospital for expenses. Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

for expenses

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund for the erection of the Yaumati, Wantsai and Kowloon City Dis- pensaries

Tung Wah Hospital for expenses... Chinese Public Dispensary, Hung-

hom

Stationery and printing.

2,000.00

2,500.00 25,000.00

7,500.00

299.50

1,361.84

90,600.00 15,000.00

1,671.25

202.00

600.00

143,200.00

400,00

89,326,38

39

Salary

90.00

888.25

11.80

127,537.25

""

Cheung Chau Kaifong (for the

1,400.00

35,000,00

Balance

"7

19,282.61

1,013.43 433.73

1,447.16

purpose of wiping out the debts.)

LI YAU TSUN,

Member of Committee.

Total.

163,984.41

Total.....

163,984.41

E. R. HALLIFAX,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

1

Appendix D.

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER AND DIRECTOR OF AIR SERVICES FOR THE YEAR 1931,

Air Services

CONTENTS.

Bunker Coal shipped

Crews, Nationality of

Emigration and Immigration

Examination of Pilots

:

:

:

Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers..

Gunpowder Depôt...

Junks

PAGE.

9

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

3

4

4

LO

5

2

2

4

3

3

4

:

:

:..

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

F:

:.

:

:

:

:

Launches...

Lighthouses and Signal Stations...

Mercantile Marine Office

Marine Magistrate's Court

Marine Courts of Enquiry

Marine Surveyors' Office

Moorings

Outstations

Passenger Trade

Port Facilities...

Registry of Shipping

Revenue and Expenditure

Shipping Report

Sunday Cargo Working

Trade

Yaumati Slipway and Coaling Depôt

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

10

5

5

LO

3

7

3

:

:

10

5

ลง

2

6



D 2

The year 1931 showed a further increase in the amount of shipping using the Port of Hong Kong, the largest increase being in British River Steamers. Details of the comparison between the years 1930 and 1931 will be found in Table II.

2. The increase in Foreign Going Shipping entering and clearing was 1,422,098 tons and in Local Shipping 537,311 tons, a total of 1,959,409 tons.

3. British Ocean Going Shipping has increased by 183,239 tons while British River Steamers show an increase of 705,564 tons. The Junk trade also shows large increases, 398,596 tons in Foreign Going junks and 598,561 in Local trade junks.

4. The River Steamer trade has increased considerably. The greater demand for carriage of both goods and passengers stimulated some owners into putting into commission vessels they had laid up, and in other cases to make more frequent sailings. Table VIII shows the cargo and passengers reported to this office as being carried by River Steamers.

5. The Junk trade shows an increase in tonnage of almost half a million tons, the increase being divided fairly equally between Foreign going junks and junks in the Local trade, see Tables IX to XI. The increase in Foreign trade is mainly due to larger imports of firewood and timber, and carrying bridge material to Canton. The local trade increase is almost solely caused by increased building activity and consequent demand for more sand, lime etc.

6 In steamships not exceeding sixty tons employed in Foreign trade there is an increase of 885 vessels with an increase in tonnage of 187 tons. In Local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease of 1,895 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 61,250 tons. Details of launches entered and cleared are shown in Tables XII and XIII.

7. On the 31st December, 1931, there were two hundred and seventy eight Steam Launches and one hundred and eighty six Motor Boats employed in the harbour Of these, three hundred and ninety seven were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, twenty seven Steam Launches and seventeen Motor Boats belonged to the Colonial Government, three Steam Launches belonged to the Imperial Government, and fifteen Steam Launches and five Motor Boats to the Naval Authorities. There were also thirteen Motor Boats owned for pleasure and private purposes. Seventeen Class I licences, ten Class II licences and eighty Class III licences were issued during the year.

8. Four Coxswains' Certificates were suspended for incompe- tence or negligence in performing their duties.

9. Six hundred and eighty engagements and six hundred and ninety one discharges of Coxswains and Engineers were recorded.

}

D 3

10 The Passenger trade and the numbers of Emigrants departing from and arriving at this port are shown in Tables XIX to XXV.

11. Details of Bunker Coal and Oil shipped will be found in Table XXVI. The figures show a large increase in coal consump- tion and a decrease of five thousand tons of Oil Fuel.

12. The nationality of crews in British and Foreign ships. entered and cleared is shown in Table VII.

13. During the year twenty ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and sixteen Certificates of Registry cancelled. Two hundred and eleven documents were dealt with in connection with the Acts and the fees collected amounted to $2,168 as compared with $1,526 in 1930,. Details are shown in Table XVII

14. 40,384 seamen were engaged and 39,432 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year.

15. Forty distressed seamen were received and admitted to the Sailors' Home and Boarding Houses. Of these seven were sent to England, two to Vancouver B.C., three to Bombay, nine to Calcutta, two to Singapore, one to Iloilo, one to Foochow, two to Shanghai, one to Canton, eleven obtained employment and one died in hospital.

16. $956.14 was expended on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.

17. A statement of the surveys and examinations carried out by the Government Marine Surveyor and his staff is set out in Table XXVII. The vessels surveyed totalled 375,760 tons gross as compared with 366,310 tons during 1930.

18. Of the one hundred and twenty seven Hong Kong Passenger Certificates issued during 1931, ninety nine were issued to British ships and twenty eight to Foreign ships.

19. The Passenger Certificates were issued for the following

trades

Class 1A Foreign Going

Class 1 Foreign Going (Coasting and Far

Eastern trade)

Class III River Trade

83

35

20. Twenty two vessels totalling 165,031 tons gross were surveyed and granted Bottom Certificates during the year.

21. Seven hundred and forty three cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during 1931 as compared with seven hundred and ninety two in 1930.

D 4

The principal offences were:

(a) Carrying excess passengers.

(b) Mooring within 100 yards of low water mark in

prohibited hours.

(c) Boarding ships without permission.

(d) Breach of conditions of Passenger boat licence by

carrying cargo.

(e) Leaving port without a clearance

22. During the year four Marine Courts of Enquiry were held.

On the 7th January, 1931, to enquire into the circum- stances attending the stranding of the British S. S.

Kutsang."

66

On the 22nd September, 1931, to enquire into the circum- stances attending the sinking of the British S. S. “Kwong Sang.”

On the 3rd November, 1931, to enquire into the circum- stances attending the stranding of the British S. S. "Kaiapoi."

On the 15th December, 1931, to enquire into the circum- stances attending the stranding of the British S. S.

Planorbis,'

>>

23. Examinations for Certificates of Competency as Masters, Mates and Engineers were held under Board of Trade Regulations. Seven candidates were examined for Master and one passed, three candidates were examined for First Mate and two passed. Forty two candidates were examined for Engineer First Class and ten passed. One candidate was examined for First Class motor endorsement and passed and one candidate for First Class Steami Endorsement failed. Thirty four candidates were examined for Engineer Second Class and thirteen passed. One candidate was examined for Second Class Motor Endorsement and failed.

24. Under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899, ninety two candidates were examined for Certificates as Coxswain and eighty four passed, one hundred and thirteen candidates were examined for Certificates as Engineer and ninety two passed.

25. Twenty three licences as Pilot were renewed during 1931.

26. One thousand two hundred and sixty six Sunday Cargo Working Permits were issued during the year as compared with one thousand two hundred and forty one during 1930.

27. Lighthouses and Signal Stations functioned satisfactorily throughout the year. Details of vessels reported and messages sent etc., are shown on Table XXIX.

1

D 5

28. The fortnightly reliefs to the lighthouses were delayed six times owing to bad weather, four times at Gap Rock and twice at Waglan.

29. The Aga Lights are now seventeen in number and have worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

30. Government moorings were used during 1931 as follows:

A Class 4,174 days

B Class 5,840 days

C Class 2,040 days

31. In addition they were used by Naval vessels and transports for twenty seven days. Work on the reconversion of the harbour moorings continued at intervals during the year. On the 31st of December, 1931, the following moorings were in position A Class nineteen, B Class twenty five and C Class eight, a total of fifty two including fourteen special Typhoon A Class moorings. Permission was granted for the maintenance of fifty four private buoys and moorings and the fees received amounted to $2,407.08.

32. The Revenue and Expenditure of the department are shown on Tables XXX to XXXIII. The large increases under Revenue are mainly the result of the increased rate of Light Dues and the increased charges for the use of Government Buoys. These increased charges came into force on 1st January, 1931.

33. Increases were also made in the charges for the Engage- ment and Discharge of seamen and for the storage of explosives at the Government Gunpowder Depot. The amounts of Light Dues collected on different classes of vessels are shown in Table XXXIV.

34. The increases in Expenditure were due to the lower ex- change rate prevailing and consequent increase in Personal Emoluments and increase in prices of materials.

35. The Harbour Master's Outstations at Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, etc, issued 32,838 licences, etc., and collected $120,091 revenue as compared with 28.828 licences and $112,103 during 1930. Details are shown in Tables XXXV and XXXVI.

36. There was a large increase in the amount of Gunpowder and Explosives stored in the Government Gunpowder Depot during 1931.

37. During the year the charges for storage of Arms at the Depot were revised and put into force.

38. Details of the quantities of explosives, etc., received into and delivered from the Depot are shown in Table XXVIII.

D 6

39. The Government Slipway and Coaling Depot at Yaumati was kept busy throughout the year in routine slipping and fueling of Government craft. A great number of minor repairs are carried out at the Slipway while the craft are being slipped with a con- sequent saving of time and cost.

40. 10,030 tons of Coal, 33,374 Gallons of Kerosene, and 25,083 Gallons of Petrol were received at the Depot during the year and 9,620 tons of Coal, 32,758 Gallons of Kerosene and 24,396 gallons of Petrol were issued. 2,415 tons of Oil Fuel were received and issued.

41.

Government launches were slipped eighty times at regular intervals during the year and the slip was occupied three hundred and sixteen days.

42. During the year a committee was appointed by Govern- ment to enquire into the number, use and running of Government launches. The Committee inter alia endorsed the policy of the Harbour Master in the matter of fuel for launches and agreed that the present arrangements for repairs to launches are satisfactory. They also agreed to the present allowances of stores and recommended constant checking and supervision.

43.

A short summary of the facilities offered by the port of Hong Kong is given at the end of this report.

G. F. HOLE,

Harbour Master.

26th February, 1932.

D 7

FACILITIES OF THE PORT OF HONG KONG.

The Harbour of Hong Kong forms a natural anchorage for a great number of vessels. During the typhoon season there are special moorings and anchorages to which vessels can move with immunity from danger The Harbour Department operates a thoroughly up-to-date salvage tug, which is always available to assist shipping during typhoon weather. There are available the latest type of steam fire-floats, and the harbour is efficiently patrolled day and night by water police launches. Competent pilots are available to meet vessels at either entrance of the harbour by day or by night.

(6

2. All the Buoys in the Harbour are owned by the Govern- ment. There are 52 in all, 19 "A" Class for vessels 450 to 600 feet long, 25 B" Class for vessels 300 to 450 feet long, and 8 "C" Class for vessels less than 300 feet long. The charges are $16, $12 and $8 per day respectively.

3. The wharf and godown companies have berthing accommo- dation for eleven vessels up to 650 feet in length. Maximum depth of water alongside the wharves is 36 feet L.W.O.S.T.

4. Fresh water pipes are laid alongside and one berth is piped for oil fuel.

5. Three public warehouse companies have a storage capacity of 500,000 tons, of which 300,000 tons is on the mainland at Kow- loon Point, adjacent to wharves, and 200,000 tons in Victoria on the island of Hong Kong, on the Harbour front. There are numerous native-owned warehouses of small capacity in both Kowloon and Hong Kong.

6. Both groups of wharves at Kowloon Point have rail connec- tion with the Kowloon-Canton Railway, giving direct rail commun- ication with Canton. There are daily sailings by coasting com- panies' ships carrying cargo and passengers to all river and coast ports of Southern China, and to ports in the Far Eastern trade, as well as almost daily departures by ocean steamers to overseas ports

7. Ample bunkering facilities are provided by private stocks of coal averaging 60,000 tons, of which about one third is North China coal, and the remainder Japanese and Formosan.

8. The average stock of fuel oil for commercial bunkering is 55,000 tons. One oil company has berthing facilities for two vessels, and another company for one vessel alongside the oil installation, with a water depth of 28 feet and 23 feet L.W.O.S.T. respectively. Delivery can be given up to 600 tons an hour from wharf and 350 tons an hour from lighters.

D 8

9. There are two large Dock companies with dry docks cap. able of taking vessels up to 750 feet on the blocks. The docks have depth on the sills up to 34 feet 6 inches H. W.O.ST. In addition, there are five patent slipways capable of handling ships up to 325 feet in length and 3,000 tons displacement. There are several smaller yards mostly owned by Chinese, dealing with repairs to small craft and light work.

10. The principal dock companies have adequate facilities for the construction of ships of large tonnage, and for the prompt effecting of extensive repairs. There is also a thoroughly up-to- date salvage plant, and tugs are available.

11. A Waterboat Company, drawing its water from the Government reservoirs, has a fleet of eight vessels carrying from 230 to 270 tons each.

12. The Harbour has a depth ranging from 24 to 78 feet L. W. O. S. T. The rise of Tide is about 8 feet 0. S T.

13. There are no Tonnage Dues.

14 The Government imposes Light Dues of 4 cents per Registered ton on vessels entering the Port. A charge of $75 to $350 for ships of 400 to 5,000 tons, and over, is made for permission to work cargo on Sundays.

15. A large number of motor-boats, steam launches and sam- pans are available for communication between ships at buoys and the shore. A frequent service of ferry launches is maintained. between Hong Kong Island and all parts of the mainland.

16. The Government maintains a Commercial Wireless Telegraph Station at Cape D'Aguilar which has an average day range of 350 miles, and a night range of 700 miles. Continuous watch is kept.

;

D 9

Air Services.

Further progress has been made in the development of the Airport of Hong Kong. The surface of the Aerodrome at Kai Tak has been completely levelled and is now ready for spot turfing. The turfing has already been started. The Hangar has been completed and will be occupied early in 1932. The annexes containing the offices and workshops are expected to be ready in April, 1932.

2. There have been eleven hundred flights of Civil Aircraft totalling three hundred flying hours during the year. Only one accident has occurred, a student damaged a seaplane when alight- ing but fortunately escaped without injury.

3. Two Certificates of Airworthiness have been issued and continuous inspection of all Civil Aircraft in service or under repair has been carried out.

4. Two examinations for "A" Pilots licences have been held, both candidates passing.

Four "A" Pilots licences have been issued and three renewed.

Two "B" Pilots Licences were issued.

Four Certificates of Registration of British Aircraft were issued and 5 cancelled.

*

5. Three Pilots on long distance flights have stopped at Hong Kong during the year. Messrs. Burlin and Moench from Paris to Tokyo, Mr. and Mrs. Day from London to Shanghai and Mr. Brophy, Amoy to Canton.

6. The Hong Kong Flying Club at the end of the year had fifty two flying members and fifteen associate members. Of these nine hold "A" Pilots Licences and two "B" Pilots Licences.

G. F. HOLE, Director of Air Services.

26th February, 1932.

FOREIGN TRADE.

Table I.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1930.

1931.

D 10

No. of

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Ships entered,

6,012

9,422,071

479,901

6.494

9,869,932

501,566

British Ships cleared,

5,998

9,405,024

476,426

6,494

9,845,966

498,247

Foreign Ships entered,

5,016

9,450,955

315,775

4,987

9,502,018

324,934

Foreign Ships cleared,

5,022

9,427,156

315,667

4,994

9,510,605

324,578

Steamships under 60 tons entered,

3,154

101,928

38,133

3,604

102,116

45,072

Steamships under 60 tons cleared,

3,172

102,251

38,266

3,607

102,250

44,933

Junks entered,

10,562

1,289,693

166,546

10,722

1,468,119

177,581

Junks cleared,

10,673

1,312,572

167,761

10,899

1,532,742

179,458

Total of all Vessels entered,.

24,744

20,264,647

1,000,355

25.807

20,942,185

1,049,153

Total of all Vessels cleared,.

24,865

20,247,003

998,120

25,994

20,991,563

1,047,216

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, in Foreign Trade,

49,609 40,511,650

1,998,475

51,801

41,933,748

2,096,369

LOCAL TRADE.

Steam Launches entered,

12,266

402,532

146,930

11,317

371,871

135.293

Steam Launches cleared,

12,267

402,499

146,940

11,321

371,910

135,172

Total Launches entered and cleared,

24,533

805,031

293,870

22,638

743,781

270,465

Total Junks entered,

9,921

438,389

100,284

16,360

737,311

176,954

Do.

cleared,

10,027

435,542

100,481

16,463

735,181

180,675

Total Junks entered and cleared,

19,948

873,931

200,765

32,823

1,472,492

357,629

Total Local Trade (Launches & Junks) entered and cleared,

44,481

1,678,962

494,635

55,461

2,216,273

628,094

Grand Total, (Foreign & Local Trade)

94,090 42,190,612

2,493,110

107,262

44,150,021

2.724,463

;

:

Table II.

Comparison between the years 1930 and 1931 of all shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony :-

D 11

1930

1931

DECREASE

INCREASE

CLASS OF VESSELS

No.

Tonnage

No.

Tonnage

No. Tonnage No. Tonnage

British Ocean Going,..

Foreign Ocean Going,..

.་་་་་

4,721

7,749

11,357,605 4,834 11,540,844 17,993,202 7,014 17,905,301

113

183,239

735

87,901

British River Steamers,...

7,289

7,469,490 8,154 8,175,054

865

...

705,564

Foreign River Steamers,..

2,289

884,909 2,967

1,107,322

678

222,413

Steamships under 60 tons,,

6,326

204,179 7,211

204,366

:.

:

Foreign Trade Junks Foreign Trade, ......

21,235

2,602,265 21,621 3,000,861

:

:

:

885

187

386

398,596

Total Foreign Trade,....

49,609

40,511,650 51,801 41,933,748

735

87,901

2,927 1,509,999

Steamlaunches Local Trade,...

24,533

805,031 22,638

743,781

1,895

61,250

...

Junks, Local Trade,

19,948

873,931 32,823

Grand Total,

94,090

42,190,612 |107.262

1,472,492

44,150,021

12,875

598,561

2,630 149,151

15,802 2,108,560

Net,

13,172 1,959,409

( D 12 )

Table III.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1931.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

COUTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Australia & Pacífic Islands including New Zealaq d, ..

16

81,624

3,063

23 84,116

2,008

39

165,740 5,071

British North Borneo,.....

49

113,369

4,758

26

64,189

1,511

75

177,558 6,269

Canada,

26

293,206

13,723

4

10,992

124

30

304,198

13,847

Ceylon,

India, including Mauritius,

99

354,110 13,287

101

319,286

5,698

200

673,396

18,985

South Africa,

7

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

73

139,928

19,209 566

7,251

1

472

46

8 19,681

612

United Kingdom,...........

141

744,584 16,088

China,

1,418

19

(River Steamers),

3,060

2,063,927 | 121,631

3,082,387 |196,848

"

(Steamships under 60 tons),

"

(Junks),

Denmark,

15

39 70,531 3,014

35 189,940 4,453

1,363 1,660,098 78,094

645 217,720 38,101

3,421 97,230 43,179

10,092 1,374,676 | 168,211

665

112

210,459 10,265

176 934,524 20,541

2,781 3,724,025 199,725

3,705 3,300,107

234,952

77,224

Europe (not specially mentioned),

11

41,843

843

33

125,277 1,550

44

France,

6

20,472

420

41

267,142

7,552

47

Formosa,

17

24,376

712

159

181,512 8,331

176

Germany,

2

10,755

147

94

Holland,

12

54,314

1,237

7

Italy,

French Indo-China,................

165

Japan,

143

Macao,

5

4,461

198,416 11,934

684,087 20,918

250

"

(River Steamers),

1,018 1,005,652

58,823

440,443 8,196

37,765 421

29 130,244 3,459

298 357,047 19,311

444 1,726,614 34,671

31 7,318 670

842 337,176 31,925

3,421 97,230

10,092 | 1,374,676

15 77,224

665

167,120 2,393

287,614 7,972

205,888 9,043

96 451.198 8,343

19 92,079 1,658

29 130,244 3,459

463 555,463 31,245

587 2,410,701 55,589

36 11,779

920

1,860 1,342,828

43,179

168,211

**

(Steamships under 60 tons),



183

4.886 1,893

183

11

(Junks),

630

93,443 9,370

630

90,748

4,886 1,893

93,443

4

9,370

Netherland East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

Russia in Asia,

Si am,

CO

20,059

402

188

614,866 17,409

197

634,925 178,11

32

313,852 13,265

99

646,895 13,454

131

960,747 26,719

11

65.023

84 128,457

1,005

7,544

7

34,841

306

18

99,864 1,311

156

167,790 10,898

240

296,247 18,442

South America,

14

Sweden,

United States of America,

90 405,821 6,851

71.905 1,352

15 56,387 519

278 1,604,228 31,193

14

71,905 1,352

15 56,387

368 2,010,049 38,044

519

TOTAL,

6,494 9,869,932 501,566

19,31311,072,253 547,587 25,807 20,942,185 (1,049,153

D 13

Table IV.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS CLEARED IN THE

TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1931.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Bunker

Oil. Coal.

Fuel

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Oil.

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand

29

101,172 3,759

1,480

2,363

31

107,260 3,455

British North Borneo,

49

118,213 4,781

1,240

2,970

12

31,041

173

445

Canada,

25

280,981 13,064

2,700

Ceylon.

India including Mauritius,..

82

South Africa,

3

307,657 11,915

293

1,030

17,800

127

433,262

8,076

Straits Settlements & F. M. S.,.............................

89

9,492

188,741 8,894

7

United Kingdom,...........

75

457,545 12,249

7,163 8,451

3,620 3,320

80

China,........

1,438 2,157,491 | 120,474

9:

(River Steamers),

3,059 | 3,082,033 | 196,790

7,933 62,991

435 81,987

19

(Steamships under 60 tons),

:

(Junks),

:

23,827

204,136 4,583

40 232,576 5.527

1,466 1,884,644 82,466

640 215,499 37,945

3,428 97,466 £3,069

10,330 | 1,449,223 |171,643

507

855

8,877 37

20

17

Denmark,

Europe, (not specially mentioned)

14

:

63,389 506

3,684

49

20

87,128 1,308

1.

France,

26

196,949 6,506

1.

:

Formosa,

18

36,889

887

70

950

140

193,312 8,322

130

1,

Germany,

30

135,816 2,298

500

52

249,046 4,922

Holland.

1

3,550

66

26

4

19,263

257

Italy,

1

1,220

88

330

27

116,439 3,007

Franch, Indo-China,

188

237,471 13,293

200

34,447

380

Japan,

188

Macao,

6



(River Steamers), .

$79,403 23,562 14,250

4,602

261

1,017 | 1,004,982 58,776

17,875

523,955 21,554

340 1,474,943 29,436

150

37,

7,

16

31

9,691

763

9

13,258

840

356,927 31,863 3,202.5

1,i

""

(Steamships under 60 tons),

179

4,784 1.864

(Junks),

569 83,519 7,815

Netherlands East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

Russia in Asia,

6

32

17

Siam,

South America,

Sweden,

United States of America,...

Total,

61 299,531 5,640 12,300 5,410

64949,845,966 | 498,247 62,217 | 265,972

22,352

177,693 10,408 1,110 38,5

32 162,436 3,206

224

7 28,611

249 1,473,174 29,367 5,589 12,3

240

19,500 11,145,597|548,969 28,590.5 214,5

11,148

309,266 12,583

92,104

1,339

79 119,975 6,931 8,320 12,764

255

1,040

141 490,451 14,015 3,410

9,1

950

134

...

752,601 15,635 4,589

C

5

251

1

149

D 13

Table IV.

NAGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG

TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1931.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

TED.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

land

29 101,172 3,759 1,180 2,363

31 107,260 3,455

1,975

60

211,432 7,214 1,480 4,338

49 118,213 4,781

1,240 2,970

12

31.041

473

415

110

61

149,254 5,254 1,685 3,080

25

280,981 13,064

2,700

25

:

280,981

13,064 2,700

:

:

82 307,657

11,915 1,030

17,800

127 433,262

8,076

:

2,700

209

3

9,492 293

:

7

23,827

507

89

188,741 8,894 7,163 8,451

80

75

457,545 12,249 3,620 3,320

1,438 2,157,491 120,474

3,059 | 3,082,033 196,790

7,933 62,991

435 81,987

204,136 4,583

40 232,576 5,527

1,466 1,884,644 82,466 8,877

640 215,499 37,945

3,428

855

5,660

169

740,919 19,991

10 33,319

800

392,877 13,477

1,030 20,500

8,018 i4,111

7

115

690,121 17,776

3,620

3,327

37,442

2,904

4,042,135202,920

16,810 | 100,433

20,189 3,699 3,297,532 231,735

435 102,176

97,466 43,069

17,002

3,428 97,466 43,069

:

10,330 | 1,419,223 | 171,643

14

63,389

506

1

3,684

49

20

87,128

1,308

26

196,949

6,506

:

:

10,330 1,449,223 171,643

100

14 63,389 506

1,590

21

90,812 1,357

:

:

:

17,002

100

1,590

1,280

26

196,949

6,506

...

1,280

18 36,889 887

70

950

140 193,312 8,322

130 1,076

158

230,201 9,209

200

2,026

30

135,816 2,298

500

:

52 249,046

4,922

82

384,862 7,220

500

1

3,550

66

26

4

19,263

257

5

:

22,813

323

26

1

1,220

88

330

27

116,439 3,007

28

117,659 3,095

330

188

237,471 13,293 200 34,447

380 523,955 21,554 150 37,278

568

*

188

879,403 23,562

14,250

17,875

340 | 1,474,943 29,436

7,025

761,426 34,847

528 | 2,354,346 52,998

350

71,725

14,250

24,900

6

4,602 261

16

31

9,691

763

9

566

1,017 1,004,982

58,776

13,258

840

336,927

31,863 3.202.5

1,544

37 14,293 1,024

1,857 1,341,909 90,639 3,202.5

9

582

14,802

:

179

4,784 1.864

613

179

4,784 1,864

613

:

569

83,519 7,815

569

83,519 7,815

6 11,148

32 309,266 12,583

17 92,104 1,339

255

1,040

141

490,451 14,015 3,410

9,169

147

501,599 14,270 3,410

10,209

950

134 752,601 15,635 4,589

670

166

1,061,867 28,218 5,539

670

5

22,352

:

251

150

22

114,456 1,590

150

79 119,975 6,931 8.320

12,764

149 177,693 10,408 1,110 38,512

228

297,668 17,339 9,430 51.276

32

162,436 3,206 224

32

162,436 3,206 224

7 28,611

...

240

7

28,611

240

61 299,531 5,640 12,300 5,410

64949,845,966 | 498,247 62,217 265,972 19,500 | 11,145,597 548,969 | 28,590.5|214,573 25,994 |20,991,563 1,047,216 90,807.5 | 480,545

249 1,473,174 29,367 5,589 12,300

310

1,772,705 35,007 17,889 17,710

....

D 14

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at PORTS in the

COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1931.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,416

5,781,893

245,895

River Steamers,

"

4,078

4,088,039

255,671

American,

316

1,625,175

32,347

Chinese,

614

401,280

13,786

22

River Steamers, ...

1,310

506,900

63,139

"

Junks,

10,722

1,468,119

177,581

Danish,

114

276,669

6,987

Dutch,

281

990,021

28,039

French,.

187

542,620

23,173

Italian,

52

232,613

6,023

Japanese,

1,253

3,347,757

100,880

Norwegian,

457

764,894

25,877

Portuguese,

47

24,639

4,018

River Steamers,

167

45,826

6,680

German,

132

578,331

12,128

River Steamers,

10

2,170

210

""

Swedish,

Belgian,

Panamanian,.......

Latvian,

Steamships under 60

tons trading to Ports outside the Colony,

3,604

102,116

45,072

TOTAL,

25,807

20,942,185

1,049,153

28

102,591

913

5

16,082

210

13

43,978

478

1

472

46

;

D 15

J

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at PORTS in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1931.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,418

5,758,951

242,681

River Steamers,

4,076

""

4,087,015

255,566

American,......

328

1,640,654

32,677

Chinese,

612

397,522

31,246

22

River Steamers,

1,304

505,167

62,958

Junks,

10,899

1,532,742

179,458

Danish,

144

277,052

6,866

Dutch,

285

1,010,773

27,726

French,.

186

541,398

22,633

Italian,

52

232,613

5,981

Japanese,

1,250

3,324,503

83,970

Norwegian,

459

769,421

25,892

Portuguese,

48

25,597

4,077

""

River Steamers,

166

45,089

6,640

German,

133

577,887

12,102

River Steamers,

10

2,170

210

55

Swedish,

Belgian,

Panamanian,

Latvian,.

Steamships under 60

tons trading to Ports

3,607

102,250

44,933

outside the Colony,...

TOTAL,......

25,994

20,991,563

1,047,216

28

102,591

948

5

16,082

210

14

44,086

442

D 16

Table VII.

NATIONALITY OF CREWS.

OTHER EURO-

VESSELS.

BRITISH

ASIATICS.

PEANS AND AMERICANS.

1930. 1931. 1930. 1931. 1930. 1931. 1930. 1931.

British, 6,012 6,494 53,597 53,184 8,009 8,048 418,295 440,334

Foreign, 5,016 | 4,987 | 1,314 1,661 54,962 55,912 259,499 267,361

Total,

11,028 11,481 54,911 54,845 62,971 63,960 677,794 707,695

BRITISH SHIPS

FOREIGN SHIPS

BRITISH

1930.

1931.

1930.

1931.

बोल

%

%

%

%

Percentage of British

crew.

11.16

10.60

00:41

00:51

Percentage of crew

Other Europeans and

Americans

01.66

01.60

17.40

17.20

Percentage of crew

Asiatics

87.18

87.80

82.19

82.29

Total

100.00

100'00

100.00

100'00

-

L

D 17

Table VIII.

The River Steamer Trade compared with 1930

Year.

Import. Tons.

Export. Tons.

Passengers.

1930..

298,017.00

481,885.00 2,758,306

1931..

335,057.50

573,392.50 3,125,604

Table IX.

JUNKS.

IMPORTS.

1230.

1931.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage

Foreign Trade

10,562 1,289,693

10,722 1,468,119

Local Trade

9,921 438,389

16,360 737,311

Total.....

20,483 1,728,082

27,082 2,205,430

EXPORTS.

1930.

1931.

Junks.

Tonnage. Junks. Tonnage.

Foreign Trade

10,673 1,312,572

10,899 1,532,742

Local Trade

10,027 435,542

16,463 735,181

Total...

20,700 1,748,114 27,362 2,267,923

Table X.

TOTAL NUMBER, TONNAGE, CREWS, PASSENGERS, AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) ENTERED IN THE COLONY

OF HONG KONG, FROM PORTS ON THE COAST OF CHINA AND MACAO, IN THE YEAR 1931.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves-

Tons. Crew.

Tons.

sels.

Passen-

ger's,

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo.

Tons.

Canton,.

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

1,939

305 62,435 5,867 3.932 578,661 77,807 211 31,975 2,630

115,649 16,394

25,2221,339301,528

25,447

1,644

363,963 31,314

25,222

62,824

224,273 1,947 256,006 33,362 5,900 5,879

834,667111,169

68,724

224,273

22,092 419 61,468 6,740 90,055 206 5,516 1,548

630

93,443 9,370

22,092

2,145

121,165 17,937

90,055

West Coast,

106

10,112 1,784

1,821 318 44,769

6,007

424

54.881 7,791

1,821

Total, 1931,...

6.493

798,832 104,482

62,824

363,463 4,229 669,287 73,099

5,900

10,722 1,468,119 177,581

68,724

363,463

Total, 1930,

6,769

735,874 102,244 48,900

310,9143,793 553,819

64,302 476 10,562

1,289,693 [166,546 166,516

49,376

310,914

- D 18

www.

:

Table XI.

TOTAL NUMBER. TONNAGE, CREWS, PASSENGERS. AND CARGOES OF JUNKS (FOREIGN TRADE) CLEARED IN THE COLONY of Hong Kong, FOR PORTS ON THE COAST OF CHINA AND MACAO, IN THE YEAR 1931.

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

gers.

Passen- Cargo, Ves- sels.

Passen-

Tons. Crew.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

tons.

gers.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

tous.

Canton,

2,252 491,736 41,956

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,..

4,443 656,610 89,286 544 79,456 7,424 1,382 33,951 10,059

68,930

468,077 10 6,064 362,121 1,045 |122,435

186

2,262

497,800 42.142

468,077

14,284

5,900

5,488

779,045 | 103,570 74,830

362,121

57,228 25 4,063

391

569

83,519 7,815

57,228

...

16,032 771 81,849

7,961

:

2,153 115,800 18,020

16,032

West Coast,

387

54,354 7,467

47,782 40 2,224

444

427 56,578 7,911

47,782

Total 1931,

9,008

1,316,107 156,192

68,930

951,240 1,891 216,635 23,266

5,900 | 10,899 1,532,742 179,458 74,830

951,240

Total 1930,

8,576

1,118,074 142,177

51,214

760,537 | 2,097 |194,498

25,581

730 10,673 |1,312,57 2 | 167,761 51,944

760,537

- D 19 —

PLACES.

Table XII.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1931.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1931, ...

Do.,

Outside the Waters of the Colony

Vessels.

TOWING.

Tonnage.

Crews,

Passengers.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

NOT TOWING.

Crews.

TOTAL.

751

12,680

1930, ...

505

7,409

9,415 5,377

658

106

10,566

359,191

127,884

349,102 10,083 11,317 371,871 135,293 11,761 393,117 141,553 341,136 9,034 12,266 402,532 146,930

349,760

10,083

341,242

9,034

Canton,

373 9,140|| 4,312

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,

Other places,

293 8,282 4,124

69 1,650

58 | 2,281

671

1,231 37,689 17,143 1,171

:

:

:

141

5,278 1,753

117 4,955 1,662

514 14,418 6,065

650

114

3,236 | 1,222

84 2,534 933

:

:

:

:

:

:

410 13,237 5,786

183 4,886 1,893

142 | 4,815| 1,583

:

1,124 27,071 |12,602| 1,447

487 2,355 64,760 29,745 2,618

487

Total,..

2,024 59,042 26,900 1,171 1,580 43,074 18,172 1,447

487 3,604 102,116 45,072 2,618

45,072

487

D 20

:

Table XIII.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared in the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1931.

· D 21

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Vessels.

Ton- Crews. Passen-

Cargo

nage.

gers.

Bunker

Coal.

Ton-

Vessels.

Crews.

nage.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Bunker

Coal

¡Vessels.

Tou-

nage.

Passen-

Bunker

Crews.

Cargo,

gers.

Coal.

Within the Waters of theColony, 1931, Do., 1930,

1,015 16,679 10,116 683 1,003 18,888 10,772 218

960 10,306 355,231 125,056 350,035 973 11,264 383,611 136,168 339,616

3,078 5,290 11,321 371,910

4,594 6,558

12,267 402,499

135,172

146,910

350,718

3,078

6,250

339 834

4,594

7,531

...

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Canton,.....

349 8,875 4,042

584 2,248

187 6,132 2,180

999

918

536|15,00 536 15,007 6,222

1,583 3,166

West River,

301 8,646 4,201

569 4,601

97 | 4,221 | 1,351

220

1,034

141

398 12,867 5,552

220

1,603 4,742

Macao,

80 1,895

791

370

99 2,889 1,073

243

179 4,784 1,864

613

:

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,

2,495 69,919 32,130 1,171

51 1,822

576

:

:

413

91| 3,002| 1,016

765

142 4,824 1,592

1,178

1,714 48,681 22,520 | 1,171

6,166

638 16,087 7,183| 1,002

154 1,750 2,352 64,768 29,703 2,173

154 7,916

|

| | 1,153 13,798 1,112 32,331 |12,803 1,225 2,187 | 3,817 3,607 102,250 44,933 2,396 3,340 17,615

D 22

Table XIV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches Entered at each

Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year 1931.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels.

Tonnage.

Vessels. Tounage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

Cheung Chau,

366

15,111

366

15,111

562

32,017

562

32,017

Saikung,

17

473

17

Stanley,

Tai O,......

108

2,900

108

Tai Po,

13

329

Deep Bay,

Tsuen Wan,

Victoria,

6,494 9,869,932

484 17,771 30,519 11,638,847

...

13

484

...

17.771

37,013 21,508,779

...

473

2,900 329

Total,

6,494

9,869,932

32,069 11,707,448

38,563 21,577,380

Table XV.

Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches Cleared at

each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year, 1931.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels.

Tonnage. Vessels.

Tonnage.

Aberdeen, Cheung Chau,

Saikung,

Stanley,

Tai O,........

Tai Po,

Deep Bay, ..

Tsuen Wan, Victoria,



...

6,494 9,845,966

366

15,178

366

15,178

544

27,662

544

27,662

17

471

17

471

108

2,898

108

2,898

13

328

13

328

...

484 17,770 30,824 11,714,221

484

17,770

37,318 21,560,187

Total,...

6,494 9,845,966

32,356 11,778,528

38,850 21,624,494

:

D 23

Table XVI.

Table showing total Shipping of all classes at the Port of Houg Kong during the years 1911 to 1931.

YEAR.

TOTAL TONNAGE TOTAL TONNAGE

ALL CLASSES.

OCEAN GOING

TOTAL TONNAGE

OCEAN GOING BRITISH

1912

36,735,149

16,372,290

7,779,970

1913

37,742,982

17,722,168

8,449,533

1914

36,756,951

16,913,914

8,321,692

1915

33,884,919

14,381,808

7,358,586

1916

36,381,457

13,728,092

6,868,743

1917

33,827,325

12,289,548

5,168,058

1918

29,518,189

9,745,469

3,627,576

1919

35,615,169

14,467,847

6,842,024

1920

40,122,527

17,574,636

8,351,084

1921

43,420,970

20,064,611

9,247,198

1922

46,566,764

21,971,162

9,688,891

1923

53,402,239

25,894,058

11,222,141

1924

56,731,077

27,874,830

11,844,752

1925

49,520,523

23,653,774

9,866,820

1926

43,796,436

21,314,696

9,257,417

1927

44,127,161

25,700,164

9,660,440

1928

44,883,765

26,894,395

10,792,701

1929

47,186,181

28,285,741

11,151,152

1930

42,190,612

29,350,807

11,357,605

1931

44,150,021

29,446,145

11,540,844

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Table XVII.

Return of Ships Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1931.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Rig.

Build.

Where and when built.

Remarks.

1. Shell XI,.

154,055

244

Nil

Clinker.

Hong Kong.

.1930 First Registry (New Vessel).

2. Paul Beau,

153,506

1,054

N.II. P. 118

None.

Cie Francaise

53

tes France...{

3. Taikoo No. B2,

154,056

161

4. Svale,

121,210

1,354

N.H.P. 153.6

Not

Schooner

""

Hong Kong.

.1930

Dumbarton

"}

.1905 |

5. Sun U,

154,057

41

43.6

19

Hong Kong..

6. Wusueh,

154.058

1,731

530

Not

51

15

7. Licorne,

154,059

14

11.9

Carvel,

"}

""

..1931 |

.1931

..1914

de Nav Nan-1903 |

Formerly unregistered vessel owned by Portuguese Subject.

First Registry (New Vessel).

Formerly unregistered vessel and under Norwegian Flag as "Svale" ex "Lama" First Registry (New Vessel).

First Registry (Formerly unregistered vessel owned by French Subject).

8, Wing Lee,

95,869

651

210

Schooner.

Clinker. Scotland

25

1896

Formerly under Portuguese Flag as "Wing Lee" ex "Hai Mun"

9. Wo Ping Yat,

154,040

253

20.5

In & Out. London

1919

10. Wo Ping Yce,

154.041

253

20.5

1919

:

..

"

"

11. Sealark V,

154,060

8

2.13

12. Pegasus,

154,061

2,128

318

""

13. Shell,

154,062

214

Ketch

Not rigged

Nil

Carvel.

Clinker.

Hong Kong..... 1931

Hong Kong..

14. Kamona,

101,486

903 N.H.P. 117

Schooner.

}}

15. Kaituna,

120,467 1,208

200

F. & A.

Sunderland

"

}}

16. Eclipse,

154.063 5,860

755

Schooner,

Greenock

""

"

17. Shun Chih,

101,741

1,283

193

F. & A.

Dundee

};

18. Tai Sam Ho 3,

154,061

129

43.56

Nil

>>

Hong Kong.

.1931

19. Tung Cheong,.

153,582

284

Nil

"}

..1923

20. Hoi Lee,

154,065

716

N.H.P. 226

Schooner.

Ireland.

"1

Vessel converted into Motor Ship and regis- tered anew.

First Registry (New Vessel).

Camden, N. J....1913 | Formerly under American Flag as " Vesta ".

Grangemouth

1930

First Registry (New Vessel).

.1901 | Registry transferred from Wellington, N. Z. .1904 | Registry transferred from Dunedin, N.Z. 1931 First Registry (New Vessel).

1902 Formerly under Chinese Flag as "Shun Chih" ex "Melusia,'

First Registry (New Vessel).

Formerly unregistered vessel and under Por- tuguese Flag as "Tung Cheung" ex "Ying Tung”

11

.1916 | Formerly under Latvian Flag as "Hoi Lee"

ex "Sitges

""

""

- D 24 -

Table XVIII.

Return of Registers of Ships Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the Year 1931.

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build.

When and where built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Taikoo No. B2,

120,995

206

3.

1. 1907.

2. Luk Ho,

123,073 242

3, Nam Sang

115,794

2,591

13. 4. 1907. 13. 11. 1924.

Nil.

1:

Clinker. Shanghai

31

Hong Kong

1906

1899

Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). do.

4. Wusueh,

154,058

1,731

25. 4. 1931.

F. & A.

Schooner.

Not.

Govan

.1902

Hong Kong

.1931

5. Wo Ping Yat,

154,040

244

14. 1. 1930.

Not rigged In & Out. London

1919

6. Wo Ping Yee,.

154,041

244

14. 1. 1930.

"

"

7. La Conference,

127,002

14

15.

1, 1909,

Carvel.

8. Hing Wah,

154,006

24

21. 3. 1927.

Schooner.

Clinker.

9. On Man,

154,007

175

6. 4. 1927.

None.

Carvel.

.1919 Hong Kong 1908 Canton 1923 Unknown about 1885

Sold to Foreigners (Japanese Subjects). Transferred to Port of London. Registry anew. Vessel converted into a Motor Ship.

do.

་་་

Sold to Foreigners (German Subjects). Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects). do.

10. Arabestan ex Arma-

nestan,

11. Kwong Sang,

113,715 3,230 115,883 1,428

18. 7. 1922. 13. 11. 1924,

Schooner.

Clinker.

Yoker.

..1902

Sold to Foreigners (Japanese Subjects).

F. & A.

Schooner.

Newcastle-on-Tyne

12. Wai Shing,

118,278] 1,170

13. San Ning,

14. Ko Chow,

15. Calulu,

16. Sarvistan,

139,563 582

137,695 350

13. 11. 1924. 16. 12. 1926. 3. 12. 1915.

1902

1903

,

Nil.

""

Hong Kong

Ship totally lost on 10. 8. 1931. Sold to Foreigners (Chinese Subjects).

.1916

do.

1915

do.

""

139,019 2,674

16.

9. 1925.

Schooner.

Flensburg

1907

do.

143,175

4,845

23.

1. 1923.

Geestemunde ...1899

19

""

Sold to Foreigners (Japanese Subjects).

D 25

D 26

Table XIX.

Passenger Trade for the Port for the year 1931:-

No. of Ships.

Passengers.

Emigrants.

Arrived. Departed. Returned. | Departed.

British Ocean-going,

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers,

4,834 316,377 243,786 136,632 44,486

7,014 315,152 249,483 147,258 56,383

8,154

1,274,336 | 1,440,405

Foreign River Steamers,

2.967 213,527

197,336

Total,.

22,969 | 2,119,392 2,131,010 283,890 100,869

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade.

Junks, Foreign Trade,..

7,211

21,621

2,618

68,724 74,830

2,396

Total, Foreign Trade,

51,801

2,190,734 2,208,236

283,890 100,869

Steam-launches, Local Trade,. 22,638 349,760 350,718

Junks, Local Trade,....

32,823

7,649

7,944

Total, Local Trade,

55,461 357,409 358,662

Grand Total,

107,262 2,548,143 | 2,566,898

283,890 100,869

1.

Table XX.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, during the year 1931.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

PORTS.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F'.

M.

F.

M.

F. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Australia,

913

916

913

2

916

British Borneo,

1,445

437 107

83 2,072

::

1,445

437

107

83 2,072

Dutch Borneo,

2

I

5

I

2

I

1

5

Calcutta,

931

89 33

12 1,068

934

89

33

12

:.

1,068

Cuba (Havana),

13

1

14

13

1

14

Canada,

5,475

112

80

25 5,692

171

14

12

198 5,646

126

92

26

5,890

Chile,

5

5

5

Dutch Indies,

¡19,020

2,910j 1,386

651 23,967 19.020| 2,910|1,386

651

23,967

Fiji,

57

58

57

1

58

Honolulu,

21

13

Mauritius,

384

75

00 10

41 4,670

394 118

64 5,246 4,691

407

122

70

5,290

26

10

495

384

75

26

10

495

New Caledonia (Noumea),

11

11

11

11

New Zealand (Dunnedin),

23

23

23

23

Nauru Island,

16

16

16

16

New Guinea (Raboul),

39

39

39

39

Ocean Island,

7

7

7

7

Panama,

297

14

2

318

297

14

2

318

South Africa,

260

48

10

2 320

260

48

10

O

2

320

South America, .

5

::

5

5

5

...

Rangoon,

569

Samoa Island,

207

: :

81

43

17 710

207

71

11

2

8+

640

92

45

17

794

207

207

...

...

:

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

1,965

315

143

81| 2,504| 1,965

315

20,317 | 8,513 | 2,314 | 1,647|32,791 11,523 3,770 | 1,452

965 17,710 31,840 12,283

143

3,766 2,612

81

2

2

Tahiti,

11

1

12

2

11

2,504

50,501

2

1

12

5 5,708 330 227

60 6,325 5,712

330 228

60 6,330

:

Straits Settlements,..

Salvador (San Salvodor),

United States of America,

Total 1931,

Total 1930,

|30,693 | 9,371 2,620 1,802 44,486 (43,451 7,761 3,346 1,825 56,383 74,144 17,132 5,966 8,627 | 100,869 63,202|20,314 6,342 | 3,722 |93,580 |70,677|14,441 | 7,156 | 3,046 | 95,320 133,879 34,755 13,498 6,768|188,900

Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, Total Passengers by British Ships,....

Excess of Passengers by Foreign Ships,

i

43,451 | 7,761 3,346 | 1,825 (30,693 | 9,371 2,620 1,802

54,383

41,486

11,897

- D 27 -

Table XXI.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895.

60,360

1900. 1905. 1910. 1915. 66,961 73,105 88,452 109,110

1920.

84,602

1925.

129,004

1930.

235,141

Table XXII.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1921 to 1930 inclusive.

- D 28 —

· Whither bound.

1922. 1923. 1924. 1925.

1926. 1927. 1928. 1929. 1930. 1931.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,

Other Ports, Males, Other Ports, Females,

39,616 52,011 58,051 10,740 13,573 17,631 50,356 65,584 75,682

78,505 127,863 158.788|129,089 113,036 88,498 35,606 19,047 29,422 43,620 40,652 33,480 32,887 14,895

97,552157,285 | 202,408 | 169,741 | 146,516 |121,385

50,501

44,109 48,773 49,427 3,928 5,867 4,750

Total,

48,037

Grand Total,

59,242 83,185 87,421 81,007 67,515 50,368 98,393 120,224 |129,859 | 140,534 216,527 | 285,593 |257,162 |227,523 188,900 | 100,869

40,198 54,506 75,003 77,815 73,426 58,879 44,504 2,784 4,736 8,182 9,606 7,581 8,636 5,864 54,640 54,177 42,982

:

Table XXIII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, during the year 1931.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

i

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

1.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

- D 29

:

Australia

... .....

1,634

52

56

30

1,772

673

30

20

12

735

2,307

82

76

42

2,507

Bangkok,

1,447

548

367

204

2,566

3,391

770

604

413

5,181

4,841

1,318

971

617

7,747

British Borneo,..

1,444

313

192

133

2 082

174

40

23

16

253

1,618

353

215

149

2.335

Bombay (India),

73

23

10

7

113

73

23

10

7

113

Canada,

6,395

640

493

271

7,799

1,543

149

96

46

1,834

7.938

789

589

317

9,633

Calcutta,

1,314

1,367

899

563

7,143

43

20

3

72

4,357

1,387

905

566

7,215

Continent of Europe,

319

52

21

11

403

2,588

408

287 151

3,434

2,907

460

308

162

3,837

Dutch Indies,

་་་

36,947

5,329 | 4,349 | 2 539

49.164

36,947

5,329 | 4.349

2,539

49,164

Honolulu,

1,604

129

106

64

1,903

1,604

129

106

64

1,903

Rangoon,

2,079

448

218

153

2,898

836

150

110

70

1,166

2,915

598

328

223

4,063

Mauritius,

120

16

18

11

165

120

16

18

11

165

Mexico,

10

...

...

10

10

10

South Africa,

277

62

46

27

412

101

62

26

26

215

378

124

72

53

627

South America,

15

10

8

8

41

162

77

33

27

299

177

87

#1

35

340

Straits Settlements,

76,699

17,415 | 10,473 | 6,286 | 110,873

42,143

8,770 4.832 |3,101

58,846 | 118,842

26,185

15,305 | 9,387 | 169,719

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

10,439

2,307 | 1,205

734

14,685

10,439

United States of America,

359

55

44

20

478

7,392

897 712

347

9,348

7,751

2,307 1,205

952

734

14.685

756

367

9,826

Total 1931,

95,102

20,978 | 12,835 | 7,717 | 136,632 |108,122

19,161 12,419 |7,556 | 147,258 | 203,224

40,139 | 25,251

15,278 | 283,890

Total 1930,

86,245

16,919 9,926 |5,584 |118,674

80,617

12,678 |6,979 | 4,188 |104,462 | 166,862

29,597

16,905 | 9,772 | 223,136

Total Number of Passengers by Foreign ships.

108,122

19,161

12,4197,556

147,258

British

>>

"}

33

11

Excess of Passengers by Foreign ships

95,102

20,978 | 12,835 | 7,717

136,632

10,626

Table XXIV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895.

104,118

1900. 1905. 1910. 109,534 137,814 146,585

1915.

151,728

1920.

100,641

1925,

129,106

1930.

181,227

Table XXV.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1921 to 1930 inclusive.

- D 30

Where 'rom.

1922.

1923. 1924. 1925.

1926.

1927. 1928. | 1929,

1930. 1931.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

Total,.

74,694 58,800 65,047 52,220 10,950 7,186 9,216 8,671 85,644

72,194

14,761

113.507 | 100,116 23,189 20,577

97,960 |120,964 |134,147

23,117 28,960 35,572

65,986 74,263 60,891

86,955 136,696 |120,693|121,077149,924 | 169,719

Other Ports, Males,..

Other Ports, Females,

52,596

307

·Total,

57,903

50,374 51,031

4,742 4,900

55,116 55,931

Grand Total,

27,888 36,886 38,360 58,515 55,412 2,843 62,803 94,331 4,820 6,044 8,639 8,901 10,409 19,840 30,731 41,706 44,104 67,154 64,313 73,212 |114,171 143,517 | 121,102 |130,194 91,622 | 128,661 181,100 | 187,847|185,390|223,136 | 283,890

D 31

Table XXVI

Bunker Coal and Oil shipped during 1931.

EXPORTS.

1930.

1931.

Class.

No.

Coal Tons.

Oil Tons.

Coal

Oil

No.

Tons,

Tons.

Steamers,

6,234

268,629 99,761

River Steamers,

4,786

98,562

5,932

3,062 5,556 116,978 3,637

321,060 93,881

Total,

11,020

367,191

102,823 11,488

438,038 97,518

&

Year.

1930

125

35

Table XXVII.

Comparative Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department for 3 years ending 31.12.31.

Surveys for

Passenger Certificate Surveys for Load-

line Certificate.

Surveyors for Bottom Certificate. Surveys for

Emigration Licence.

Measurement of Tonnage for British

Registry.

Measurement of Tonnage, not for British Registry.

Inspection ation of Light & Sound Signals.

& Certific-

Examination of Boiler Designs.

Surveys of Boilers during Construction.

Surveys of Govern- ment Land Boilers.

Surveys of Launches for plying Licences. Surveys of Govt.

Launches & Harbour Buoys, etc.

Ships' Plans Exam- ined.

Inclining Experi-

ments.

New Lifeboats

Surveyed during construction.

New Buoyant Appar- atus Surveyed during construction.

Life jackets Inspect- ed and Stamped.

Engineers Examined B. O. T. Certificates.

Engineers Examined Local Certificates.

Estimated Total



109

15

24

1931

127

47

22

125

11

26

23

17

1929

126

32

3

107

20

34

22

20

12

10

729

1,242

260

34

56

101 20,363

64

87

6,560

6

17

17

23

715

256

96

256

19

45

239 29,271

93

92

7,242

23

717

730

131

14

49

179 17,040

79

113

6,536

Number of Visits in

connection with

Surveys.

78 a

-

D 33

-

Table XXVIII.

Government Gunpowder Depôt.

During the year 1931 there has been stored in Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island :—

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do.. Government owned,. Cartridges, privately owned,..

Do., Government owned,.

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

Do.,

Government owned,

Non-explosives, privately owned,.

Do.,

Government owned,

Total,

No.

Approx- imate

of Cases. Weight.

lb.

505

21,104

12,673 | 1.163,718

76

8,664

6,415 413,887

41

1,546

910 249,117

34 1,370

20,654 | 1,859,406

During the same period there has been delivered out of

the Depôt :--

For Sale in the Colony :-

Gunpowder,

Explosive Compounds,

Cartridges,

Non-explosives,

For Export-

Gunpowder,....

Cartridges,

Explosive Compounds,

Non-explosives,

Government owned

Gunpowder,

......

No.

Approxi-

mate

of Cases.

Weight.

lb.

82

5,084

214

1,621

2,189 115,819

...

22 11,921

1,320 1,098.742

3,252200,787 741 197,261

Cartridges,

41

5,164

Explosive Compounds,

18

636

Delivered to be destroyed: -

Cartridges,

Explosive Compounds,

Gunpowder,

Non-explosives,

14

1,400

27

2,300

34

1,370

87

25,230

Total,.......

18,074 1,657,302

09 19

D 34

Table XXVIII,—(Continued).

On the 31st December, 1931, there remained as follows:

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,

Cartridges, privately owned,

No. of Cases.

Approxi-

mate Weight.

ib.

401

14,700

524

61,387

Do., Government owned,

35

3,500

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,515

94,981

Do.,

Government owned,

23

910

Non-explosives, privately owned,

82

26,626

Do.,

Government owned,

...

Total,..

2,580 202,104



:

LIGHTHOUSE OR SIGNAL

STATION

Gap Rock,

Waglan,

Green Island,

Table XXIX.

Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

VESSELS

SIGNALLED

MESSAGES

SENT

MESSAGES

RECEIVED

PERIODS

OF FOG

PERIOD

DIAPHONE

SOUNDED

FOG

SIGNALS

TYPHOON

AND

FIRED

NON-LOCAL

SIGNALS

HOISTED

978*

4,273

561

168 hours

-----

1,080

30 mins.

3,975

4,666

1,034

640 hours

641 hours

50 mins.

35 mins.

1,673

437

55

Kowloon Signal Station,

3,930

* Including 334 bý flash lamp.

......

- D 35 —

141

D 36

Table XXX

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1930 and 1931.

A. Harbour Department.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1930 Amount 1931

$

C.

* Personal Emoluments.

505,175.74

$ C. 566,084.63

Other Charges :—

Coal and Oil Fuel for Launches

204,564.41

267,921.30

Conveyance and Motor Allowances.....

3,671.34

3,351.39

Electric Fans and Light........

1,584.82

1,413.13

Examination Fees

1,470.00

940.00

Expenses of numbering Boats

1,176.87

1,259.57

Fees to unofficial members of Marine

Court

80.00

160.00

Incidental Expenses

1,374.76

674.55

Moorings for Harbour Craft & Rock

and Fairway Buoys

2,236.20

1,956.14

Raising renewing & repairing moor-

ings of Ocean S. Ships

19,430.64

14,958.30

Rent of Offices

6,490.00

5,530.00

Repairs minor improvements & Stores

for Launches & Boats

149,907.85

122,994.06

Stores & Equipment for Lighthouses.

9,536.51

10,739.90

Sundry Stores

2,313.03

2,206.55

Steam Launch Hire & Transport

929.14

316.25

Uniforms...

6,114.50

4,860.53

Slipway at Yaumati maintenance

3,173.48

1,701.03

Chain for moorings....

16,779.90

Coal for Offices

3,568.17

3,393.35

Rent Light & Water Allowances for

Slipway Staff..

2,694.31

2,542.83

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges C. F..........

..... | 942,271.67 1,013,003.51

* Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting and Junior Clerical Services.

D 37

Table XXX.-(Continued.)

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Amount 1930 Amount 1931

$ c.

C.

Brought Forward

942,271.67

1,013,003.51

SPECIAL

EXPENDITURE.

Electrifying Typhoon Signals at Gap

Rock and Waglan

1 New Motor Launch for G. M. S.

Department......

496.55

*

7,700.00

1 Pressure Gauge Testing Machine...

782.77

1 Duplicator

370.52

200.00

1 Fuller Bakewell Spiral Slide Rule...

87.83

2 Reversible A Class Buoys

4,300.00

2,500.00

1 Safe for Deputy Harbour Master.

350.00

Training Expenses of G. M. Ss. in

England

8,511.48

6,756.32

Conversion of Commercial Moorings

(152,000.00 Spread over 2 years).

98,599.82

19,500.00

Cust Rock Beacon.....

400.00

Repairs to R. T. "Kansing "

17,190.00

Tachometer for G. M. S. Department...

85,57

Instruments for G. M. S. Department...

968.83

Expenses of Sending Officers to attend

conference at Simla

Vickem Oil Seperator & Purifier with Storage and Settling Tanks ...

Total Special Expenditure.....

6,778.79

1,238.76

138,788.97

38,028.27

Total A.-Harbour Department...

1,081,060.64

1,051,031.78

* To Complete.

D 38

Table XXXI

Comparative Statement of Expenditure 1930 and 1931 B. Air Services.

Sub-head of Expenditure.

Personal Emoluments *

Other Charges:-

Upkeep of Aerodrome

Amount 1930 Amount 1931



C.

3,826.99

C.

11,624.38

Incidental Expenses

Annual Subsidy to Flying Club

23 60

55.99

46.11

10.75

30,000.00

15,000.00

Total Personal Emoluments and

Other Charges

33,896.70

26,691.12

Special Expenditure: -

Initial Grant to Flying Club,

60,000.00

Total Special Expenditure

Total B. Air Services

60,000.00

93,896.70

26,691.12

*From 9th August to 31st December only.

D 39

Table XXXII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1930 and 1931.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount

1930.

Amount 1931.

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

""

$

..

C.

149,956.38658,337.36

Special Assessment, Ord. 10 of 1899, 179,357.08

2. Licences & Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :-

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,

114,199.75 121,701.60

1,605.00

17,368.72

1,530.00 16,175.90

546.00

333.00

67.40

71.50

972.40

757.10

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., from the New Ter-

37,199.75

37,082.25

ritories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

11,283.25

13,082.00

Motor Spirit Duties........

33.08

138.98

Steam-launch Licences, &c.. Ordinance

12,433.90

13,219.10

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from

the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements-

in Aid:-

Court Fees,

72.40

12.90

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...........

34,396.00

45,437 51

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

2,932.50

2,120.00

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

79,889.00

155,585.08

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord. 10 of 1899,

14,024.47

20,014.30

Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,..

128,885.90

96,966.10

Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Publications, Sale of, Ord. 1 of 1889, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

8,014.00

10,208.00

740.00

658.50

1,526.00

2,168.00

Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

12,120,00

12,605,00

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899.

65,425.33

67,548.50

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

1 of 1891,

133,275.00

146,575.00

Registration of Air-craft,

40.00

40.00

Interest,

66.25

Carried forward,..

1,006,429.56 1,422,367.68

D 40

Table XXXII,—Continued.

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1930 and 1931.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Brought forward,....

Amount

Amount

1930.

1931.

$

c. $

C.

1,006,429,56 1,422,367,68

4. Miscellaneous Receipts

Sale of condemned stores,

13,595.00

10,380.00

Royalties Wireless Telegraphy,................

50.00

Widows & Orphans Pension Contribution, Other Miscellaneous Receipts :- Pilot Licences Ord. 3 of 1904,

44 36

230.00

170.00

Engagement of Masters and Engineers

of Steam Launches......

328.00

339.50

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

63.26

277.69

Total,

$1,020,740.18 1,433,534.87

Table XXXIII.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure and Revenue for last

ten years.

Year.

Personal (*) Emoluments

Special

Total

and Other

Expenditure. Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

Charges.

$

C.

c. $

C.

$

C.

1922

280,625.57

30,091.79

310,717.36

857,576.04

1923

300,484.95

16,510.00

316,994.95

925,643.02

1924

318,412.04 304,983.88

623,395,92

997,530.74

1925

451,396.05

381,737.06

833,133.11

878,118,83

1926

571,004.36 84,766.87

655,771,23

820.888.39

1927

653,618.99 21,641.10

675,260.09

1,000,229.80

1928

696,497.98 99,733.94 1929 744,194.35 1930 942,271.67 1931 1,013,003.51

796,231.92

68,259.67 138,788.97

812,454.02

1,081,060.64

973,283.46 1,010,061,97 1,020,741.02

38,028.27 1,051,031.78

1,433,534.87

!

(*) Includes Officers of Senior Clerical and Accounting

and Junior Clerical Services attached to Department.

1

J

Table XXXIV.

Light Dues were collected during the year 1931 as follows:-

* Special Assessment.

Class of Vessels.

No. of

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per tou.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

- D 41

C.

ረ.

Ocean Vessels,

Do.

Steam-launches,

5,826

14,454,757

4 cents.

578,378.41

Nil.

..

578,378.41

*134

350,736 1

3,507.36

1 cent.

3,507.36

7,014.72

22

2,673

89,765 4

3.590.60

Nil.

3,590.60

Do.

*2

44 1

. 44

1 cent.

44

88

River Steamers,

5,506

4,590,047 1

1호

Do.

(Night),.

*10

6,838

3

68,850.71

22.74

Nil.

...

68,850.71

34.19

56.93

""

Do.

(Day),

*58

53,413

Nil.

Loko

445.11

445.11

Total, 14,209

19,545,600

$654,350.26

* Out standing account of December 1930 collected in January 1931.

$3,987.10

$658,337.36

D 42

Table XXXV.

Licences issued and Revenue collected at Harbour Master's out

Stations.

Station.

Licences Issued.

1930

1931 Revenue Revenue Collected. Collected.

Licences Issued.

Increase. Decrease.

Shaukiwan,

4,624

$ 17,545.50

*

$18.983.80

5,728

Aberdeen,..

7,125

17,633.80

18,198.15

7,289

$ 1,438.30 564.35

Stanley,

941

1,739,10

1,828.10

1,005

$9.00

Yaumati,

4,829

42,169.50

† 43,118.75

5,762

649.25

Cheung Chau,

3,921

13,378.05

16,972.85

5,157

3,594.80

Tai O,

2,095

4,390.75

5,431.55

2,396

1,040.80

Tai Po,

2,001

5,620.75

4,969.90

1,685

Sai Kung,.

773

2.163.75

1,987.00

841

$ 650.85 226.75

Longket,

913

2,377.45

3,112.45

1,138

Deep Bay,

848

Lantao,

758

2,489.65 3,682.85 2,295.25 1,855.60

1,219

735.00 1,193.20

618

439.65

28,828 $112,103.55 $120,091.00 32,838

$ 9,304.70

$ 1,317.25

Nett Increase,

$7,987.45

* Excluding Dispensary Fees $1,716.50

>>

"}

4,138.70

Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1931 a total number of 978 vessels were signalled and reported including 334 by Flash lamp.

4,273 messages, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, were sent by W/T, 561 messages were received inclu- ding weather reports.

There were 168 hours and 30 minutes of fog, and fog signals were fired 1,080 times.

The fortnightly reliefs were delayed 4 times owing to bad weather.

!

Table XXXVI.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1931. (Under Table U, Section 39, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

LICENCES.

LICENCE

Books.

DUPLICATE BOAT RE- SPECIAL LICENCES.

FEES.

PAINTING

PERMITS.

Licence Books,

Boat Repainting,

Special Permits,

Passenger Boats, Classes A & B,

:

4,222

...

$ 4,303.00

2,612

Lighters, Cargo and Water Boats,

2,087

...

:

:

:

Other Boats Class IV,

14,364

Fish Drying Hulks,

65

:

:

:

:

:.

...

5,947

1,346

Duplicate Licences, ...

14

...

:.

:

:

:.

1,486.75

336.50

13,923.00

52,696.25

48,400.60

:

:

541.50

14.00

TOTAL,

19,128

4,222

14

5,947

1,346 ' $121,701.60

- D

43

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS & EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1931.

I. LIQUOR.

1. The net revenue collected was $2,416,838.94 as com- pared with $1,689,948.52 for 1930 The increase to a great extent was due to duty on imported liquor being collected on a sterling basis, the dollar being taken as equivalent to one shilling and eight pence, and the actual amount of duty payable in local currency varying with a factor which was altered from time to time as the sterling market rate of the dollar fell or rose. The rebate of ten cents per gallon on Chinese spirit locally distilled was withdrawn. The number of gallons of Chinese spirit paying duty increased by 124,000. Part of the increase on European type of liquor was due to the prevention of a long continued fraud referred to below.

2. Frauds.-Bogus Exports.

A serious fraud was dis- covered in January, 1931, which consisted in drawing out of bond, without payment of duty, wines and spirits which were ostensibly to be exported, but which actually never left the Colony. Suspicion has attached to certain transactions of this. kind for a long time but all efforts to detect the offenders failed until this year. It is believed that these frauds have been going on for many years and may have cost the revenue nearly $200,000 a year.

Steps have been taken to prevent similar frauds in future.

3. Faking samples in the laboratory. The laboratory attendant was caught by the Monopoly Analyst faking samples, in such a way that the result of the examination after distillation by the Analyst was a few per cent. in favour of the importer. The Revenue lost in two ways. Unjustified refunds of duty

were made in the cases where the results were found below the standard strength, on which the preliminary collection of duty is made; and any spirit which was really stronger than the standard paid less than the correct amount. It is difficult to assess the annual loss, it was probably about $20,000, ali in respect of Chinese spirit imported from the North of China. A comparison of the results obtained immediately after the discovery in respect of spirit which was already in warehouse or on the way to the Colony, with the previous results, showed that the fraud had caused a difference of about 5 to 7 per cent. in

E 2

strength in favour of the importer. principally concerned were not renewed.

The licences of those

4. Distilleries. The production of local distilleries on which duty was paid increased by 284,000 gallons. Most of the dis- tilleries have installed various types of pot-stills in accordance with the new Regulations. Provided that the type of still afforded due protection to the Revenue, the distiller was left to instal what type he pleased. All the stills were made locally. Some were quite elaborate and produced very good results; but bad workmanship and inferior material in some cases caused a great deal of trouble, and the final cost was probably more than the cost of the imported articles. The Monopoly Analyst and the various European Revenue Officers in charge devoted a considerable amount of their time gratuitiously to teaching the running staff how to handle the stills. The chief fault was trying to distill too rapidly with too fierce a fire, in order to get through the day's work before the usual time for closing down. The distillery staffs have now become well acquainted with the proper methods of control, and the smoother working of all distilleries is anticipated with confidence. The introduc- tion of a more modern type of still has been gradually achieved after some years of hard work on the part of all officers concern- ed. It has definitely been demonstrated that the more modern type requires less coal and labour and less space, whilst it extracts and collects practically all the alcohol from the fermented material treated. At the same time it affords a better protection to the Revenue, and to the owner himself, against constant petty leakages. An end has been put to the inefficient Chinese type of still, and the distilleries in the Colony are now conducted in a much more sanitary manner than hitherto, officers having the power to insist on the premises being kept clean. There is no doubt that much of the spirit imported from outside is produced under most insanitary conditions.

5. Chinese Imported Spirit.-After the placing of duty on a sterling basis on 19th February, the import of the cheaper kinds of Chinese type spirit practically ceased, though the special products of the North of China continued to be imported in fair quantities. Chinese rice spirit continued to be imported from Kong Moon, and Chan Chuen, there being a slight prejudice against locally produced rice spirit. Part of this may be due to the prevalent adulteration in liquor shops, cheaper molasses spirit being blended in, and the result sold as genuine rice spirit and at much the same price. Part is due to a feeling that good spirit cannot be made from any still not of ancient Chinese design. It is also probable that the insanitary conditions under which production in China is carried on adds the much prized 'bouquet' of musty antiquity, which is said to be lacking from much of the Hong Kong produced spirit.

E. 3

6. Private Warehouses. As the result of the fraud referred to in para. 2 above, supported by the discovery that one of the licensed warehouses had a secret sliding panel in the ware- house wall, by which admission could be gained when the warehouse was secured by a revenue lock, and by another case in which an export of 70 jars of alleged high strength spirit was found to be pure water, the Executive Council advised the abolition of the system of private licensed warehouses. In the new Liquor Ordinance passed in December this advice was given effect to. The proposal aroused the expected opposition from the trade. But it was not apparently realised that storage of dutiable goods in warehouses belonging to the importer, with- out proper Customs control or examination was almost unique, and not in accordance with strict Customs practice at Home and elsewhere. Finally the Government granted an extension of private warehousing privileges for six months from January 1st, 1982, and also offered to consider applications from approved firms provided they undertook to reimburse the Government for special European supervision, and provided the warehouses were otherwise suitable. Most of the present premises are unsuitable from the fact that the entrances are not on public thoroughfares.

7. European Liquor.-An unexpected increase was shown under most heads, especially in the more expensive and highly taxed classes, due wholly to the discoveries mentioned in para. 2 above. The increase in price due to the fall in exchange, the general depression, and the increase of duty as a result of the collection being put on a sterling basis, would naturally have led to a considerable decrease in the amount of duty collected. This actually happened in the case of the cheaper liquors such as beer, claret and vermouth; beer losing 13 per cent. and claret losing 23 per cent. Against this the more heavily taxed spirits showed a gain of 12 per cent., and even the highest duty class champagne and liqueurs showed a slight increase. A better result still would have been shown had not Christmas sales been exceptionally dull and duty-paid stocks been kept exceptionally low, owing to an impending reduction in duty due to the rise in exchange.

8. New Duties.-In September perfumed and medicated spirits and toilet preparations containing more than ten per cent. of alcohol were added to the schedule of dutiable liquors. There were large stocks in the Colony at the time, hence the amount collected was comparatively small. Although stocks were not taxed some retailers at once added the new duty. which they had not paid, to the price charged to their customers.

9. Local compounders of perfumes, toilet articles and medicated spirits, using imported spirits of wine on which they

E 4

have paid duty, receive drawback on exports calculated according to the percentage of spirits of wine contained in their prepara- tions.

10. In the case of firms which had already established bottling and packing establishments in China owing to the increased Chinese Import Tariff, arrangements were made, where- by they could add their secret mixtures to spirits of wine in bond, and export the mixture in bulk. Complaint has been made that it was the imposition of the new duties here which forced firms to establish bottling and packing establishments outside the Colony. This complaint is quite unjustiñed as the new arrangements had already been made sometime before the new duties were introduced here.

II. TOBACCO.

11. Duties collected amounted to $3,364,522.13 net as against $2,620,074.17 net for last year. No true comparison can however be made, because the collection of duties was placed on a sterling basis in February, and the duties themselves were raised in September, after having been lowered on the introduction of the sterling basis of collection. Considering that the prices were greatly advanced owing to the fall in exchange, the collection must be considered most satisfactory; the weights on which duty was paid being only slightly less than in 1930. There was a great deal of smuggling of Chinese made tobacco, and seizures increased considerably. A large amount of this smuggling was across the Shan Chun River into the New Territories, and many seizures were made there by the Police The local cigarette factories were fully employed.

III.-MOTOR SPIRIT.

12. The collection on motor spirit remained steady at $425,358.95. The duty was increased by ten cents per gallon in September. The installation of the Texas Oil Co. at Tsun Wan was completed during the year.

IV. OPIUM.

13. The prices of prepared opium were slightly increased in February to compensate partially for the fall in exchange, and the price of Kamshan opium was again raised towards the end of the year.

As was anticipatel sales decreased, but less than might have been expected, and the net financial result was $3,019,724.02 as compared with $2,835,286.90 in 1930.

14. Sources of Illicit Opium. (A) Prepared Opium.-Macao remained the chief source from which prepared opium was smuggled into the Colony, supplying 61 per cent. out of the total seized. With one exception this was all of the Red Lion brand. The exceptional case was a seizure of Lam Kei Hop

J

brand in brass five tael tins.

E 5

The die with which the tins were embossed was evidently a new one, and had been little used, whilst the lettering was different from that hitherto encountered. Enquiries made by the Macao Government were unsuccessful, as the joss-stick dealer, who had been shipping this opium to his agent in Hong Kong packed in cases of joss-sticks, at once closed down on being warned of the seizure here. Another scheme for importing Red Lion brand in soy barrels in consign- ments of soy was discovered; but not before several shipments had got through. A large number of invoices from the Macao firm was seized giving an address, but the Macao Authorities were unable to discover the firm concerned. It is certain that few steamers leaving Macao for Hong Kong did not bring prepared opium. This was mostly dumped into the sea near Cheung Chow Island, and recovered by small fishing boats specially engaged. The opium when retrieved was generally taken to sampans moored inside the typhoon shelter at Yaumati whence it was brought ashore in small quantities, as required, by women and children.

15. The name of Kwong Chow Wan was once again frequently mentioned as the source from which the American market was being supplied. It is significant that while only prepared opium from the Saigon Regie factory was

on sale there, Kwong Chow Wan ceased to be of importance in the prepared opium market, and was rarely heard of.

16. An interesting discovery was made in a house outside the Eastern entrance of the Harbour, A complete boiling and packing outfit was seized, and numbers of new empty five- tael tins stamped "555", as well as the dies for stamping the marks and material and tools for making the tins. A large number of documents seized showed that about 200 taels had been boiled every night over a considerable period. The mixture included four to eight pounds of Persian opium, 20 to 30 taels of opium dross and the remainder Chinese opium. Such tins had never been seized here, and other administrations to whom samples were sent reported that they had never encountered them. It was finally proved that the house was the same house which was the scene of an attempted case of extortion from an opium dealer on the part four Chinese Revenue Officers at the end of 1929. Little opium was seized as the material was always brought in at midnight by sampan, accompanied by the staff of boilers and brass workers.

17. (B) Raw Opium.-Persian opium was seized in un- usually large quantities at the beginning of the year immediately after the arrival of the S.S. Toyo Maru VI at Macao and S.S. Tjinnoun at Whampoa. Both of these ships had cleared with opium from Bushire, the latter having stated openly that Canton was the destination of the opium. The export labels of the Canton Opium Suppression Bureau were found on a

...

E 6

large amount of the opium seized.

The S.S. Tjinnoun was purchased here at the end of 1930 as the Sagara Maru and sent to Canton to be registered in the name of a Chinese owner. She has changed her name this year to "Vatie" but is alleged to be under the same ownership, and still used occasionally for the same business. She is however also employed in ordinary trade to and from Canton.

18. As the year closed a good deal of information was received that certain opium, shipped secretly from Bushire, had reached the vicinity of an island 40 miles to the south of this Colony, and had there been transhipped into junks, and that some had been landed at Macao. Investigations were still in hand at the end of the year.

There

19. The usual amount of Chinese raw opium was seized coming from all the possible sources of supply, but especially from Canton. It is noteworthy that no opium which could definitely be identified as new crop was encountered. would appear to have been a heavy carry-over of old stock; this was confirmed in a letter from a large opium dealer in Kwong Sai Province, which was seized on the person of an opium dealer.

20. General. The Opium Conference in the Far-East, agreed on under the 1925 Geneva Convention, was held at Bangkok in November. The Colony was represented on the British Delegation by Mr. D. W. Tratman, C.M.G., of the Colonial Secretariat; the writer (Mr. J. D. Lloyd) was also called in to assist at the request of the British Delegate.

21. The opium position in Canton was little affected by the change of Government which took place. The head of the Opium Suppression was soon replaced after a short interregnum, during which the former administrative staff carried on.

22. The opium crops in Yunnan and Fukien were reported to have been very good and the extent of country under opium above the average. Nevertheless the local price seems to have kept very steady, which may have been due to a strong demand from the Shanghai market, which it was proposed to meet by the direct shipment of 500 tons of Yunnan opium via French territory, a project which is reported to have failed.

23. In December a census was taken of the number of purchasers of Government opium; the daily average was found to be 3,512, the number varying little from day to day. Be- sides these the number of registered licensed and rationed purchasers of Kamshan opium on December 31st was 231. It is to be remarked that the purchaser of opium is very often not the same person as the eventual smoker. Thus any scheme of registration can at best be only a registration of the

E7-

purchasers. It is usual for supplies for family houses, shops, clubs, hotels and restaurants to be purchased by servants. In the same way if Government opium was ever wanted in a coolie house or employees' quarters, the usual way would be for the manager of the establishment to send out a servant and purchase for the whole staff. Kamshan opium is invariably purchased by servants. It is proposed to continue the census of purchasers of Government opium every year in December. This is the system followed in the Netherlands Indies in all the large centres of the Chinese population.

24. The number who had renewed their pass-books for Kamshan opium before the end of January was 148 out of a total of registered smokers of 231 showing that the balance had left the Colony either temporarily or permanently.

25. Action was taken against a few of the larger divans, in order to give a general warning that such were illegal. It was found that the extent of the business transacted was much in excess of the average of four years ago.

In many cases over ten pipes were seized, formerly four to five constituted a large sized divan.

26. A great number of women were convicted for smuggling, and the numbers remained so high that many had to be re- leased before the expiry of their sentence in order to relieve the congestion in the female prison. Several arrests were made of small children who were carrying opium from ships and sampans. After an attempt to discover their parents, generally unsuccessful, they were usually released, as it would have been a mere waste of time to have taken them before the Court. Most of these children had been specially schooled to say nothing, or to give quite misleading information. It is apparent that carrying opium round the streets has now become a regular occupation of many of the children of the lower classes.

27. The number of retail shops was reduced to sixty-two of which sixteen were in the country districts or on distant islands. According to the 1981 census figures, forty-six shops- serve 723,272 Chinese living in urban and suburban districts, and sixteen shops serve 98,157 Chinese living in country dis- tricts or on islands.

V.-LEGISLATION.

28. The Liquors and Tobacco Ordinances were consolidated and slightly amended and became law in December. Particular attention was paid to rendering the two ordinances as identical as possible; since the two original ordinances had been passed various small divergencies had crept in, which were very difficult in practice for officers to keep in mind, when taking action under either ordinance. The schedules of licence fees were revised and the amounts increased in view of the fall in exchange.

29. A new

E 8

was

type of Chinese Spirit Shop licence introduced at a reduced fee for the benefit of Chinese Grocers, who in the poorer districts sell as a side line the cheaper kinds of spirit. Hitherto such shops have had to pay the full licence fee, which was a very heavy burden.

30. Revision of the Opium Ordinance was also taken in hand, but had not been finally aproved by the end of the year. Apart from consolidation the object was to bring the law into accord with the opium position as it is today, embodying such of the recommendations of the League of Nations Commission as had been approved by the Conference at Bangkok.

VI. TRADE STATISTICS.

31.-The Statistical Branch completed its first full year, since its re-opening. With the co-operation of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce and the Chinese Chamber of Commerce there has been considerable improvement in the way the returns have been rendered, and the average number of queries sent out every month has been somewhat over 2,000, as compared with over 4,000 during the first year. The month- ly reports have been published before the end of the ensuing month with great regularity. It is believed that considerably greater accuracy was attained than in 1930, as the staff became more thoroughly trained and returns were more accurately rendered. A summary of each month's report has been furnished to the press, as soon as the report was in the hands of the printers. Close touch was maintained with the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce and every assistance required was furnished; lists of importers and exporters of particular articles were furnished frequently.

32. The structural stability of the old building in which the office is housed again gave rise to some anxiety, and the verandahs on the East side were found to be unsafe, and were removed. Routine instructions have been given that the office is to be vacated at once as soon as the No. 9 Typhoon signal is hoisted.

33. The demand for the monthly report from outside the Colony has slightly increased, but demand for the report locally still remains rather meagre. There is a small demand locally for advance information in respect of special commodities.

34. A wholesale Index Number was calculated month by month and quarterly averages were published. It was found inadvisable to publish month by month, as in off seasons chance consignment of a special brand of a certain article appearing by itself will show a false sudden movement, while

a

E 9

It

J

a quarterly average evens out such exceptional quotations does not appear to be clearly understood that a "wholesale' Index Number is not the same thing as a "retail" Index Num- ber or a "Cost of Living" Index Number, a mistake which has. occurred in press references. Investigations were carried out as to the possibility of constructing a Retail Index Number, but it was soon found that there was very considerable variation in retail prices for the same article; due to differences in rent, overhead charges, and exchange contracts. It was also found impossible to construct a "Cost of Living" Index Number. Accuracy would require at least three classes for each racial group represented in the cosmoplitan population of the Colony. The "Cost of Living" Index compiled at Home often gives rise to misleading ideas, it being forgotten that the index is based on the cost of living for an average working man's family of the class known as "unskilled labour".

35. If the Hong Kong Index Number is compared with that of the Board of Trade, after being converted to the same base year, it will be seen that the Hong Kong number is considerably higher, and that this is not due solely to the fall in exchange. In the case of food-stuffs, obtained locally or from China, there has been a marked and continuous rise in prices over a number of years. A higher scale of living amongst the Chinese population generally has also led to a rise in prices of Chinese produced goods. Since 1914 the cost of many

articles of food obtained from China has doubled.

12th February, 1932.

J. D. LLOYD,

Superintendent, Imports & Exports.

E 10

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1930 AND 1931.

1930

1931

$

Personal Emoluments*

276,484.09 293,320 59

Other Charges:-

Advertisements

30.50

33.00

Binding Permits

120.00

120.00

Candles and Batteries

421.06

297.00

Cleansing Materials and Washing

300.00

286.97

Conveyance and Motor Allowances...

4,646.80

4,861.18

Elect. Light Fans and Heating

90.02

97.81

Incidental Expenses

495.00

411.33

Laboratory Stores

898.03

621.97

Liquor Labels, Frinting

1,797.09

1,580.62

Office Cleaning Materials

231.75

187.73

Revenue Reward Fund

Stationery, &c.

247.06

145.08

Transport

1,609.28

1,218.99

Uniforms for R. Os. & Messengers...

4,935,13

7,331.88.

Overtime Allowances for Clerical Staff.

233.00

176.50

Opium-Elec. Fans & Light

385.75

324.35

Fuel .......

11,714.74

9,467.25

Incidental Expenses

43.34

82.42

Miscellaneous Stores

758.00

573.71

Packing Expenses

14.689.25

8,428.68

Purchase of Raw Opium,

&c.

Rent of Quarters for Staff.

Repairs & Renewals

Transport

647,132.16 706,071.06

1,200.00 1,200.00

167.80

27.35

851.30

792.85

E 11

Table I,-Continued.

Statistical Branch:-

Book Binding

72.50

123.00

Incidental Expenses

151.16.

156.91

Cleaning Materials

88.33

51.24

Miscellaneous Stationery..

242.84

87.76

Printing of Reports

2,760.00

7,542.00

Forms & Registers

7,215.00,

13,974.00

Central Receiving Office...

Chinese

Statistical

2,559.20

Elec. Light & Heating.....

232.45

395.17

Uniforms for Coolies &

Messengers

57.05

Total Other Charges: 706,318.54 766,724.86

Special Expenditure:-

Furchase of Launch

51,931.40

""

Additional Locks

11

689.94

Total Special Expenditure:-

52,621.34

Total:

$982,802.63 $1,112,666.79

*Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services.

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1930 & 1931.

1930

Gross

Net

Gross

1931

Net

-E 12-

$

Licences & Internal Revenue:

Liquor Duties

Liquor Licences Motor Spirit Duties

Motor Spirit Licences Opium Monopoly Tobacco Duties

Tobacco Licences

Forfeitures

1,705,816.14

1,689,948.52

2,444,980.68

208,766.67

208,041.67

199,483.33

2,416,838.94 199,483.33

145,528.49

145,528.49

429,046.45

425,359.45

2,555.00

2,555.00

3,017.50

3,017.50

2,887,711.90

2,835,286.90

3,069,564.60

3,019,724.02

3,042,828.12

2,619,912.33

4,016,274.46

3,364,522.13

46,777.00

46,777.00

50,081.25

50,081.25

77.27

77.27

557.22

557.22

Fees of Court or Office:-

Official Signatures Fees

786.00

786.00

1,058.00

1,058.00

Miscellaneous Receipts:-

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

3,172.28

8,155.28

7,283.49

7,278.58

Total

8,044,018.87

7,552,068.46 10,221,346.98

9,487,920.42

E 13

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE

FOR LAST TWO YEARS.

Personal*

Emoluments

Year

and Other Charges.

Specal Expenditure.

Total

Total

Expenditure. Revenue.

1930

982,802.63

982,802.63 7,552,068.46

1931

1,060,045.45

52,621.34 1,112,666.79 9,487,920.42

*Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Service attached to

department.

Table IV.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1931.

European Type Liquor

Class of Liquor.

Gallons.

Amount of Duty collected.

$

cts.

Ale, Beer, Cider and Stout.

336,580

305,380.77

Brandy

11,921

108,898.09

Whisky

22,732

212,771.59

Gin and Cocktail

13,287

123,492.57

Kum

1,817

16,615.70

Champagne and Sparkling Wine

3,298

50,515.23

Claret

2,872

13,321.21

Port Wine

5,356

32,060.31

Sherry, Madeira and Malaga..

2,219

13,583.75

Vermouth

4,831

22,360.03

Liqueur

1,870

29,504.04

Spirits of Wine

2.705

43,256.98

Spirituous Liquor

1,335

21,406.84

Miscellaneous

4,952

22,662.77

Difference on over-proof,

}

fractions and arrears of duty

43.35

Total

415,775

$1,015,873.16

NOTE :-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table

E 14

Table V.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Chinese and Japanese Liquor.

Native

Liquor Amount of

distilled

duty locally. collected.

Imported liquor.

Amount of duty collected.

Total amount of duty collected.

Gallons.

$ C.

Gallons.

C.

C.

Spirits

not more than

25% of alcohol

by weight

859,669 1,020,025.57

108,101

167,978.83 1,188,004,40

Native Spirits

over 25% of

alcohol by

weight

30,525 46,331,58

22,754

Northern spirits

over 25% of

181,614.11 227,945.69

alcohol

by

weight....

42,187

Sake

4,300

7,877.14 7,877,14

Difference on

over-Strength,

fractions and

arrears of duty

5,246,50

Total

33.79

5,280,29

1,429,107.52

Note -Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

Table VI.

SUMMARY OF REVENUE COLLECTED FROM LIQUOR DURING

THE YEAR 1931.

cts.

Duties on European Type Liquor

994,466.32

Duties on Spirituous Liquor

21,406.84

Duties on Chinese and Japanese Liquor

1,429,107.52

Licensed Warehouse Fees.

6,000.00

Liquor Dealer's Licence Fees

30,500.00

Distillery Licence Fees

3.208.33

Chinese Spirits Shop Licence Fees

155,275.00

Chinese Liquor Importer's Licence Fees

4,500.00

Total

$2,644,464.01

Refund of Liquor Duties

28,141.74

Net Total

$2,616,322.27

E 15

Table VII.

RETURN OF DUTY PAID ON TOBACCO FOR THE YEAR 1931.

Class of Tobacco.

lbs.

Duty.

$

cts.

Cigars

11,470

Cigarettes

727,583

29,822.00 851,272.11

European Tobacco

12,112

14,171.04

Snuff

8

9.36

Chinese Prepared Tobacco

36,218

42,375.06

Clean Tobacco Leaf

33,034

36,073.13

Raw Tobacco Leaf

3,343,911

3,042,551.76

Total

$4,016,274.46

(1) Duty paid on Tobacco for the year

$4,016,274.46

Miscellaneous fees

4,573.58

Gross Revenue

$4,020,848.04

Less Drawbacks

651,752.33

Net Revenue

$3,369,095.71

(2) Licence fees.

Retailer's

Importer's

Miscellaneous fees

Licensed Warehouse

Total

$

$

45,254.25

ང་

39

#

NOTE: Fractions of a pound are not shown in this Table.

3,975.00

552.00

300.00

50,081.25

E 16

Table VIII.

MOTOR SPIRIT DUTIES 1931.

Motor Spirit Duties

$425,358.95

Licensed Warehouse Licence Fees

1,312.50

Importer's Licence (General) Fees

1,000.00

Importer's Licence (Special) Fees

300.00

Retailer's Licence Fees

405.00

Total

MOTOR SPIRIT.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1931.

$428,376.45

Licensed Warehouse Licences

Importer's Licences (General)

10

Importer's Licences (Special)

3

Retailer's Licences

81

Table IX.

TOTAL AMOUNT OF PREPARED OPIUM SOLD DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Hong Kong Bengal Opium

Kamshan Bengal Opium

148358.8 Taels

24885.0

Total

173243.8 Taels

E 17

Table X.

STATEMENT OF OPIUM TRANSHIPPED DURING 1931.

Persian

Chests.

Total Chests.

From Bombay

900

900

Total

900

900

Persian

Total

Chests.

Chests.

To Keelung

Dairen

Macao

Total

Table XA.

300

300

100

100

500

500

900

900

STATEMENT OF OPIUM IN TRANSIT DURING 1931.

Turkish Persian

Total

Chests. Chests.

Chests.

From Port Said

260

260

Hamburg

200

200

Total

260

200

460

To Yokohama

10

10

Dairen

100

100

ܕ܂

, Keelung

150

200

350

Total

260

200

460

E 18

Table XI.

CONTRABAND SEIZED BY REVENUE OFFICERS.

(1) Opium

Prepared

Raw

(2) Arms.

Revolver

Ammunition

(3) Tobacco.

Cigars

Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

Seizures

25,517 Taels

347

36,212 Taels

198

1

1

110

I

58,253

3

.735,283

40

6,926 lbs.

180

(4) Liquor

European Spirit

409 Gallons

3

Spirits of Wine

1,399

7

27

Chinese Spirit

3,297

118

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills

5,338

6

(6) Miscellaneous.

Lottery Tickets

Unstamped Letters

Launch Confiscated

Small Craft confiscated

7,913

107

1

7

2217

Table XIA.

CONTRABAND SEIZED BY POLICE.

Chinese Tobacco

European Tobacco

Cigarettes

Cigars

Tobacco Leaf

Chinese Spirits

European Liquor

OTHER CONTRABAND.

Seized by Railway :-Chinese Tobacco

""

1,838 lbs. 51

.43,010

75

42 lbs. 1,076 gls.

35 gls.

Harbour Officer:-Chinese Spirits. Post Office Launch:-Chinese

Spirits

Railway-Chinese Spirits

40 lbs.

4 gls.

31 gls.

2 gls.

E 19

Table XII.

PROSECUTIONS BY IMPORTS & EXPORTS DEPARTMENT.

(1) Opium.

Possession

Boiling

Dealing

(2) Arms

Illegal Possession

(3) Tobacco.

Bail

Arrests. Convictions. Estreated.

669

502

96

9

.7

2

2

1

Possession Cigars

1

1

Cigarettes

29

24

4

Chinese Tobacco

133

122

7

Unlicensed selling

N

I

(4) Liquor.

European Wine

3

2

1

Spirit of Wine

14

7

Chinese Spirit

71

61

5

Distillery Offences

11

7

Wine & Spirit shop offences...

13

12

(5) Dangerous Drugs.

Heroin Pills

2

(6) Miscellaneous.

Lottery Tickets

4

an

3

Unstamped Letters

2

2

Total

968

754

116

E 20

Table XIII.

FINES & FORFEITURES COLLECTED BY THE COURTS UNDER OPIUM, LIQUOR & TOBACCO ORDINANCES.

Hong Kong Magistracy

Kowloon Magistracy

District Office, North

District Office, South

Total

$31,295.26

11,776.95

1,806.80

520.00

$45,399.01

REWARDS PAID.

For seizures of contraband

$64,552.53

Table XIV.

CLASSIFIED LIST OF OPIUM SEIZURES 1931.

Number of Seizures. Taels Seized,

RAW OPIUM:

Chinese

Persian

PREPARED OPIUM:-

338

22,994

10

19,146

Total

348

42,140

Macao

105

21,124

Wuchow

59

2,137

Canton

73

813

Kwong Chow Wan

3

3,494

Shanghai

1

320

*Doubtful

242

6,491

Total

482

34,379

OPIUM SOLUTION

9

11 pints

1

1.

*With the exception of 5,065 Taels, Mark, Lam Kei Hop, most of this is prepared Chinese Opium, a certain amount being boiled locally.

}

Table XV.

CHIEF SEIZURES OF OPIUM, 1931.

- E 21 -

Place of Seizure.

Kind of Opium.

Taels.

Destination.

S.S. New Mathilda

S.S. Tonkin

Chinese, Raw

2,757

Local

do.

4,560

Local

S.S. Nam Peng

do.

1,070

Local

Sui Cheong Lighter, Victoria Harbour

do.

960

Local

S.S. Kwong Tung

Persian, Raw

2,40;!

Local

S.S. Sui Tai

do.

1,920

Local

S.S. Hai Yang

do.

2,640

Swatow or Amoy

S.S. Deli Maru

do.

1,440*

Export

S.S. Kwai Chow

do.

2,880

China some coast port.

Boat 665 V

do.

7,680

Export

S.I. Chi Kwong

Macao, prepared

1,200

Local

Tai Fung Shop, 9 Gilman St, H, K.

do.

900

Straits

S.S. Sun Kwok Hing

do.

700

Local

S.S. Olderkerk

do.

1,480

Straits or Java

S.S. Tinhow

do.

1,500

Export

S.S. Pong Tung

do.

2,900

Saigon or Straits

S.S. Chuen Chow

do.

820

Local

American Express Co.'s Office in

Hong Kong

do.

2,800

S.S. Solviken

do.

1,600

Singapore

Singapore

Cheung Sha Wan

do.

1,382

Local

S.S. Graciosa

do.

600

Saigon

Sampan A2128V

do.

5,065

U.S.A. or Canada

Yuen On Wharf Sampan A3036V Sampan at Mongkok R. F. A. Pearleaf Sampan 3461W Sampan 3470W

do.

835

Local

Kwong Chow Wan, prepared

3,245

U.S.A. or Canada

Chinese, Raw

830

Local

Prepared, Macao

999

Straits

Chinese, Raw

500 Local

do.

670

Local

E 22

Table XVI.

Hydrochloride

Preparations containing Morphine

IMPORTATION OF DANGEROUS DRUGS DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Preparations containing Ethyl Morphine

lbs. 02. grs.

6

2

Morphine Salts

Cocaine Salts

CO

Heroin Hydrochloride

Nepenthe

10

Tincture of Opium Concentrated

35

Opium (Powdered)

2

1

Table XVII.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Liquor.

Dealer's Licence

Licensed Warehouse

Chinese Wine & Spirit Shop (excluding New Territories)

Distillery Licence:-

(a) Hong Kong and Aplichau

(b) Kowloon, South of Kowloon Hills

30

24

283

6

2

(c) N. T. North including Chun Wan and Hang

Hau

11

(d) Islands of N. T. South

8

27

Tobacco.

Importer's Licence

84

Retailer's Licence:-

(a) $20.00

(b) $10.00 (c) $ 5.00

Licensed Warehouse

Manufacturer's Licence

1,491

1,516

520

3,527

4

23

E 23

Table XVIII.

STATISTICAL OFFICE.

No. OF DECLARATIONS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR 1931

AND NO. OF ITEMS ENTERED.

January

February

March

April

May June July

August

September

October

November

December

Declarations.

Items.

57,111

132,016

41.765

96,459

63,967

154,255

59,700

140,311

58,547 130,017

59,770 132.297

59,033 131,282

55,196 126,622

55,951

128,327

58,196 130,911

54,806 124,569

56,800 126,268

Total

680,842 1,553,334

Average per month

56,737 129,444

The average number of declarations received in 1930 was 45,595; and items entered 109,217.

January

February

Table XIX.

STATISTICAL OFFICE.

No. OF MANIFESTS RECEIVED DURING 1931.

Ocean. River. Junk. Total.

1,031

1,090 1,385

3,506

1,009

896 1,234

3,139

March

1,057

1,130

1,461

3,648

August

April

May June

July

September

1,002

1,143

1,468

3,613

1,008 1,209

1,351

3,568

1,051

1,138

1,185 3,374

1,073

1,124 1,138

3,335

1,034 1,052 1,003

3,089

1,039

1,025

1,270

3,334

October

November

December

1,007

944

1,457

3,408

1,049

869

1,718

3,636

1,099 1,002

1,642

3,743

Total

12,459 12.622 16,312 41,393

Average per month

1,038 1,052 1,359 3,449

Appendix F.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG,

FOR THE YEAR 1931.

I.-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

1. The grounds were kept in order by the Forestry Depart- ment, with the assistance of the Observatory coolies. Small repairs to Buildings were carried out by the Public Works Department.

2. Magnetic Station at Au Tau.-Apparatus for controlling the range of temperature in the magnetograph house has been received from England, and will be installed when power is available from the mains of the China Light and Power Co. It is promised in the summer of 1932.

3. Underground Chamber for Seismographs and Clocks.---- The range of temperature in the Underground Chamber was 10°.3 (F) in 1931, as against 11°.6 (F) in 1930 and 9°.7 (F) in 1929. The relative humidity was usually above 95% between April 18 and September 2. The absolute range during the year was 38% in 1931, as against 46% in 1930 and 45% in 1929.

3

4. In the following table the mean monthly temperature and humidity in the Underground Chamber are compared with the temperature and humidity in the Open Air.

4

- F 2

Mean Monthly Temperature and Relative Humidity in the Underground Chamber and in the Open Air during the year 1931.

In Underground Chamber.

In the Open Air.

Month

Excess of Under- ground Chamber over Open Air.

о

%

O

January,

73°2

614

February,. 717

61.3

March,..... 70°1

80

63-6

April,

717

91

70°9

May,

74'2

95

77°0

June,

-6.8

96

81-4

.

July.....

78.7

96

827

August....

79'5

95

82.7

September 80'4

93

81.2

October,

79°2

81

74'4

November, 77'2

79

70'4

December, 74'5

78

63.3

Temper-Relative Temper- Relative ature Humidity ature Humidity

2388

∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞ ∞o o A

Temper- Relative ature Humidity

6.5 0.8

2.8

%

%

75

+11.8 +104

+ !

00 10

+6

14

81

4.0

+ 15

83

312

+ 12

0.8

66

+48 + 6.8

+ 12 +14 + 13

72

+11.2

Range,... 10'3

214

II.-METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

5. All the meteorological instruments were maintained in good order throughout the year.

6. The thermometers in use were compared with Kew Standard No. 647 in summer and winter.

7. The working of the electric hammer on the Nakamura Pluviograph was tested daily at 11h.

8. The Beckley and Dines Baxendell Anemographs were oiled and the orientation of the vanes was checked once a month. The Dines Baxendell instrument continues to work satisfactorily, except at very low velocities when its action is uncertain. The mounting of the Dines instrument, which had become badly corroded, was replaced by the P.W.D. in August. The scale value was tested on October 30 and November 3 In the follow- ing table the results are compared with those obtained in 1927.

Miles.

F 3

Scale value of Dines Anemograph.

1927

Millimetres on sheet.

1931

I

0.8

0.6

2

1'5

13

3

2.4

2.I

4

3'4

3'1

5

4'5

4'3

6

5.6

5'6

7

6.8

7:0

8

8.1

8.5

9

9'5

ΙΟΙ

10

11.0

11.8

20

26.1

26.8

40

56°2

56.8

63

86-4

86.9

80

116.5

116.9

100

146.6

147'0

120

176*7

177'0

In determining the scale value for velocity up to 10 m.p.h. the U tube was tilted about 80° from the vertical, to obtain sufficient change in the water level for a given velocity.

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1930 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1931-

F 4

Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemograph cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure

Tube Anemograph.

Factor (Dines Beckley).

÷

3

Month.

Mean 1910-1930.

1931.

January,

February,

March,

April,.

1-96

2:08

2.00

2'08

2:06

2.16

2°09

2.17

May,

2.19

2'20

June,

2.12

2.15

July,

2*24

2.14

August,.

2°23

2.28

September,

2.21

2:29

October,...

2013

2.23

November,

2.03

2.19

December,..

1.95

2.20

Year.

2.10

2.18

III.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

9. Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet-bulb thermograph, and the direction and velocity of the wind with a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Nakamura Pluviograph and the amount of sunshine by two Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorders. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of Hong Kong Standard Time, and of terrestrial radiation. at midnight and at 6 a.m. (from 1930, January 1). The character and direction of motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self-registering maximum and minimum thermometers. Observations of pilot balloons are made with a Watts 11 inch "Coudé" theodolite at about 9h. a.m. and 3h. p.m., except when the base of the clouds is lower than Victoria Peak (1800 ft.)

10. Principal features of the Weather in 1931:-The principal features of the weather in 1931 were:

(a) Typhoons passing near the Observatory on August

1, August 17 and September 2, respectively,

3

— F 5 —

(b) Barometer abnormally high in July and abnormally

low in August.

(c) Rain to the extent of 3.48 inches on December 9,

the middle of the dry season.

(d) Wind velocity abnormally low in July, abnormally high in August, and steadily above normal from March to June.

11. Barometric pressure was considerably below normal in February and very considerably below in August (the lowest on record). It was considerably above in July. The mean pressure for the year at station level (109 feet above sea-level) was 29.828 ins., as against 29.850 ins. in 1930 and 29.842 ins. for the past 48 years. The highest pressure was 30.399 ins. at 9h. 15m, a.m. on January 9, as against 30.340 ins. in 1930 and 30.509 ins. for the past 48 years.

The lowest pressure was 29.078 ins. at 5h. Om. p.m. on August 16, as against 29.175 ins. in 1930 and 28.590 ins. for the past 48 years.

12. The temperature of the air was moderately above normal in February and November and moderately below in October. The mean temperature for the year was 72°.5, as against 72°.4 in 1930 and 71°.9 for the past 48 years. The highest temperature was 94°.0 at 3h. 47m. p.m, on August 25, as against 92°.9 in 1930 and 97°.0 for the past 48 years. The lowest temperature was 40°.3 at 7h. 18m. a.m. on January 10, as against 41°.2 in 1930 and 32°.0 for the past 48 years.

13. The rainfall was moderately above normal in April and September, and moderately below normal in June and July. It was considerably below normal in October and considerably above in December. A drought occurred from October 22 to December 6. During this period only 1:04 inch of rain occurred, of which 0.93 inch fell on November 11. 4.14 inches were measured from December 7 to 11, after which date no rain fell until 1932, February 4, except on December 26-7, when 0.41 inch was measured.

14. The total rainfall for the year was 80.39 inches as against 96.08 inches in 1930 and 85.50 inches for the past 48 years. The greatest fall in one civil day was 3.58 inches on December 9, as against 7.96 inches in 1930 and 21.02 inches for the past 48 years. The greatest fall in one hour was 2.55 inches at 9 p.m. on April 19, as against 2.36 inches in 1930 and 3.96 inches for the past 48 years.

15. The wind velocity was moderately above normal in April and considerably above in August (the greatest on record). It was considerably below in July (the lowest on record, except in 1916). The negative and positive waves of wind velocity in July and August corresponded to positive and

>

- F 6

negative waves of atmospheric pressure. The mean wind velocity for the year was 12.4 m.p.h., as against 10.9 m.p.h. in 1930 and 12.4 m.p.h. for the past 48 years. The maximum velocity for one hour, as recorded by the Beckley anemograph was 94 m.p.h. at noon on August 1, as against 66 miles in 1930 and 108 miles for the past 48 years. The maximum gust velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell anemograph, was at the rate of 136 m.p.h. from E.N.E. at 11h. 47m. a.m. on August 1, (the greatest on record) as against 83 m.p.h. in 1930 and 130 m.p.h. for the period 1910-30.

16. The relative humidity was considerably above normal in February and moderately above in May, September and Decem- ber. It was moderately below normal in March, July and November and considerably below normal in October. The mean for the year was 79%, as against 78% in 1930 and 79% for the past 48 years. It frequently exceeded 95% in spring and summer. The lowest for the year was 29% at Oh. 45m. p.m. on March 13, as against 26% in 1929 and 12% for the past 48 years.

17. Rainfall at five Stations.-In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1931 at the Observatory is com- pared with the fall at the Police Station (Tai Po), the Botanical Gardens (Hong Kong), The Matilda Hospital (Mount Kellet), and Fanling.

Matilda

Month.

Station (Kowloon). (Taipo).

Obser- Police

vatory

Botauical Hospital

Gardens

(Hong

Kellet,

(Mount Fanling.

Kong).

Hong

Kong).

inches. inches.

inches.

inches.

inches.

January,

0'325

0:08 0'33

0°30

0'20

February,

0*550

1°C2

0'74

055

0.87

March,...

37175

3.35

4'06

3778

2.52

April,

8.930

18.43

8.90

9:30

16.12

May,

I 2'000

8-46

14°32

10'22

9:40

June,

11.600

23'91

12 14

6.98

15.26

July,

9.860 1115

1194

10*95

10:28

August,

14'270

11.88

13.64

13.54

12.84

September,..

13°430

12°53 1482

13715

13.31

October,

0730

2.87 0.66

0'47

0'52

November,

0'965

2.15 0'78

108

1.70

December,

4'555

5°55 483

471

4'19

Year

80.390

101 38

87.16

75'03

87.31

- F 7 —

18. Floods. The railway embankment at Shatin was wash- ed away by floods on April 20.

The

follows:

heaviest

rainfall

occurred

at the Observatory as

Period 1931.

Amount.

2. h.

d.

h.

April.. 19 May June

19

6

88

16 to 20 16

inches.

5.21

to

20 17

4.11

22 22

to

26 12

7:17

July Aug.

b.

9

4

to

15 16

6:56

4

to

1 19

2.71

Aug.

12

3

to

14 9

4.18

Aug.

16 0

to

17 13

4.07

Sept..

2 8

to

13

4.99

UODENONE Duration.

hours.

22

2 55

0.97

0.89

0.95

Greatest fall

in 1 hour.

Amount.

inches.

Time.

d. h.

༴?? ༤

April...19 21 May ...20 June...26

2

July...15 14

0.82

Aug.

15

1:01

Aug....13

7

33

0:51

Aug....16

18

36

0.66

Sept. 2 21

to 9 4

3.30

2

2-03

Dec.

9 4

Dec.

The greatest fall in one minute was 0.83 inch at 12h. 12m. on May 31.

19 Typhoons.-The tracks of 19 typhoons which occurred in the Far East during the year 1931 are given in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December.

20. A typhoon passing about 30 miles to the S.W. of Hong Kong, on August 1, produced a gust velocity at the Observatory of 136 m.p.h. from E.N.E. at 11h. 47m. The lowest barometer reading, reduced to sea-level and standard gravity, was 29.134 inches at 17h. on the 16th. A second, passing about 60 miles to the east of the Observatory, produced a strong gale at Gap Rock but only a fresh breeze at the Observa- tory. A third, passing between Gap Rock and Hong Kong on September 2, produced a gust velocity at the Observatory of 94 m.p.h. from S. by E. at 21h. 00m. The lowest barometer reading, reduced to sea-level and standard gravity, was 29.186 inches at 14h. 55m.

IV.-PUBLICATIONS.

21. Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East, for 6 a.m. of the 120 meridian time, is constructed daily and lithographed at the Observatory. Isotherms have been included since March 6. On the verso of the map is printed the morning weather report, from 40 to 50 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, Korea, Borneo and the Philippines, and a weather forecast for the following districts:—

1. Formosa Channel.

2. S.E. Coast of China between Hong Kong and

Lamocks.

3. Hong Kong to Gap Rock.

4. S. Coast of China between Hong Kong and Hainan.

F 8



22. This publication is exhibited on notice boards at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry Piers, the Harbour Office, at the offices of the Cable Companies and at the General Post Office. It may

be purchased by the general public at a subscription rate of $15 per annum. During the year 38 com- panies etc. subscribed for 48 copics. The weather report and forecast, and all storm warnings, are telephoned to Stonecutters Wireless Station for transmission to H.M. ships on the China Station.

23. A weather map for 2 p.m. of the 120 meridian time is also constructed daily. It is not published, but an evening weather report and forecast, based thereon, is sent to the morning papers and exhibited on the notice boards.

24. Meteorological observations made at the Observatory at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m, are published in the local press,

25. The emission in plain language of meteorological observatons in the Far East ceased on May 31, and the follow- ing routine was substituted on June 1.

(a) The 2200* observations from 20 stations, in the Far East are broadcast, in the 1929 International Code, `at 0400 by Stonecutters Wireless Station (GYF) on short wave (8430 kes) and simultaneously on long wave (113 kcs). Reports from ships and upper air observations are added.

(b) The 0600 observations are similarly broadcast at

1200.

(c) The synoptic message is followed by a "general inference" coded by means of the Non-Local Storm Signal Code, adopted at a Conference of Directors of Far Eastern Weather Services held at Hong Kong in 1930, with a few words in plain language if

necessary.

(d) Then follows a weather forecast for the five dis-

tricts:-

Shanghai to Turnabout

Turnabout to Hong Kong Hong Kong to Gap Rock Hong Kong to Hainan Straits North China Sea

(e) Typhoon warnings are given in the "general in-

ference".

(f) The "general inference" and weather forecasts for the five districts are also broadcast in plain language by V.P.S. on 500 kcs. at 0400 and 1200 and repeated on 103 kcs. at 0500 and 1300.

*All times are G.M.T.

F 9

(g) The "general inference" and a weather forecast for the district 'Hong Kong to Gap Rock' is broad- cast in plain language by ZBW on 845 kcs. telephony at 0500 and 1200.

(h) Storm warnings are broadcast by VPS on 500 kcs. and by ZBW on 845 kcs. telephony on receipt, and at the two subsequent hours. They are also broad- cast as above at every hour when a typhoon is de- finitely threatening the Colony.

(i) Shanghai and Manila storm warnings are broadcast by VPS on a 500 kcs. spark on receipt, and repeated after an interval of ten minutes. They are similarly broadcast by ZBW on 845 kcs. telephony when the Hong Kong local typhoon signals are hoisted.

V.--WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

26. Daily Weather Telegrams. In addition to the ordinary 0600 and 2200 G.M.T. observations, which the Cable Companies. transmit free of charge, the 0300 and 0900 observations were received at half rates from the following stations:

*Shanghai

Gutzlaff Amoy Macao.

27. The 0700 and 2300 G.M.T. observations from Fort Bayard, Phu-lien, Tourane, Cape Padaran and Cape St. James, and the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T. observations from the above. and about 12 other stations in Indo-China, are received from Phu-lien on short wave. This service is very valuable and ensures the early receipt of the observations, and at regular hours, namely:--at 0115, 0400, 0830 and 1015 G.M.T. It also

the expense of obtaining the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T. observations by cable.

28. Other valuable services are the 0600 and 2200 G.M.T. observations on 23 metres S.W. from Yangtze Ports, and several stations in N.E. China and Korea sent personally by Father Gherzi, S.J. of the Zi-Ka-Wei Observatory, and the 2100 G.M.T. observations from Pelew, Yap, Saipan and Ponape, sent on 286 kcs. from the Pelew Observatory at 0200 G.M.T.

29. The 0600 and 2200 observations from Hoihow are received by W/T occasionally.

30. The following new W/T services are much appreciated. 0600-2200 observations from Amoy, since February 2. 0300-0900--2100 observations from Taihoku, since June 8. 0600-2200 observations from Swatow, since July 3. 0600---2200 observations from Sandakan, since Aug. 1,

F 10

31. On October 28 the Director of the Weather Bureau of the Dutch East Indies announced that a wireless station had been erected at Tarempa, in the S. China Sea, and that meteorological observations from this station would be sent to Hong Kong in due course.

32. This service has been instituted at the request of the Hong Kong Government in connection with the supply of weather forecasts to aviators. No observations have yet been received.

33. I am informed that observers are being trained at Shanghai for a proposed meteorological reporting station on the Paracels; but no details as regards installation or date of opening such a station are to hand.

34. The Meteorological Authorities at Pratas continue to send, daily, with commendable regularity and promptitude, their 0300, 0600, 0900 and 2200 G.M.T. observations and the 2200 observations from some Philippine stations. They also send hourly observations during the passage of a typhoon,

35. Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hong Kong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phu-lien, Sharp Peak and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippine Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station nearer the typhoon centre. On request, the Director of the Taihoku Observatory sends extra weather telegrams from the two stations in Formosa nearest to the centre during the passage of a typhoon.

36. Weather Telegrams from Ships by Radio.-The follow- ing table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received, and the number of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately): -

T

Mouth.

- Fii

British (including

H.M. Ships).

H.M. Ships

in Port.

Other National- ities.

Total

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

No. of ships.

No. of

messages.

January,

100

208

29176

66

IIO 195 1494

February,

88

191

28 1001

44

76

160

1268

March,.

73

149

36 1191

46

66

155

1406

April,

114

244

37 1074

51

82

202

1400

May,

92

203

34 994

78 49

175

1275

June,

183

444

45

611

54

100

282

1155

July,

194

440

40

592

63

105

297

1137

August,

217

September,

193

473

to to

504 46 639 76

126

339

1269

48

5531

82 142

323

1168

October,

227

540 42

605 107 185 376

1330

November,

196

480

30 807 104

206

330

1493

December,

150

300

29 855

87 156266

1311

4176 444 10098 829 1432 3100 15706

f 1931,

1827

1930, ......1515

Totals

1929,.

794

2549 310 1285 748 1982 1752

L 1928,

789

3117 414 8464 695 1234 2524 12815 5816

2645 203 1202 588 1893 1580 5740

37. It will be seen that the number of British ships sending these messages increased from 1929 in 1930 to 2271 in 1931. The number of ships of other nationalities increased from 695 to 829.

F 12

38. Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of com- parison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather sub- sequently experienced are given below, together with the results for the previous five years:

Year.

Complete Partial Success. Success.

Partial

Total

Failure.

Failure.

1926

1927

1928

66

1929

1930

1931

67

de NOVOMD

%

%

%

%

72

26

70

26

31

3

70

28

2

~ W + N

2

65

31

4

30

3

do оооооо

39. The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force and weather. Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.

40. The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

41. Storm Warnings.-The symbols of the China Seas Non- Local Storm Signal Code are displayed on Kowloon Signal Hill and on the roof of No. 49 Godown of the Hong Kong & Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co.

42 The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of the code:-Shanghai, Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Phu-lien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan and Singapore. 146 storm warnings were sent in 1931. 134 were received from Manila and 181 from Zikawei. The corresponding numbers in 1930 were 111, 113 and 209 respectively.

43. No occasion arose to warn the Central Weather Bureau, Poona, of the passage of typhoons across Indo-China in a wester- ly direction.

44. No alteration in the arrangements for the display and dissemination of local Storm Signals was made during the year.

F 13

45. In the following table are given the number of times and number of hours the Local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1927-1931.

Warning Signal.

Signals 2-9

Year.

Number of times.

Number of hours displayed.

Number

Number of times.

of hours displayed.

Signal

No. 10 Bombs.

Number

of times fired.

1927

8

169

1928

I

ΙΟ

1929

3

28

1930

88

1931

93

+WNN+

4

61

1

2

58

2

46

I

37

4.

88

46. The figures in the above table include the number of and number of hours the Local signals were hoisted in each hoisted.

47. The warning signal indicates that a depression or typhoon exists which may possibly affect the locality. Signals 2-8 indicate that a gale is expected at Hong Kong. Signal No. 9 indicates that gale is expected to increase. Signal No. 10, accompanied by three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds, indicates that wind of typhoon force is anticipated.

VI.-METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS,

TREATY PORTS, ETC.

48. Logs received. In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 134 ships operating in the Far East.

These logs, respresenting 7,843 days observations have been utilised for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the 1930 were 192 and 10,273.

49. Comparison of Barometers.-The corrections to ships' barometers are usually obtained by comparing their readings while at Hong Kong with those of the Observatory Standard. Occasionally ship captains bring their barometers to the Observa- tory to be compared with the Standard.

F 14

VII. MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS,

50. From the beginning of 1928 magnetic horizontal force, declination and dip have been determined at the Au Tau Station weekly, when possible. The instruments used are a magnetome- ter by Cook, Troughton & Simms, No. 31, and an earth inductor by the Cambridge Instrument Co. C65818. In the following table are given the annual values of the magnetic elements in 1931 as derived from 52 determinations:-

Declination (West)

Dip (North)

Horizontal Force (C.G.S. Unit)

Vertical Force (C.G.S. Unit)

Total Force (C.G.S. Unit)

0° 43′ 3

30° 34' 4

0.37522

0.22164

0.43574

51. From 1931 January 1, Greenwich Mean Time has been adopted for all magnetic observations and tabulations.

52. Records from the declination, horizontal force and vertical force instruments were obtained throughout the year with but minor gaps, due chiefly to the burning out of the electric recording lamps and occasional adjustments.

53. On January 19 new base-line mirrors, obtained from England, were fitted to the horizontal force and declination instruments. The mirrors were cemented to small brass plates held by light springs against three screws, which protrude through the back-plates of the magnet boxes of the two instruments. The base-line mirrors were aligned as closely as possible with the recording mirrors of the magnets, and the three screws were so spaced that suitable adjustment of the base- line mirrors could be made without difficulty.

54. The installation of the new base-line mirror has removed all anomalies in the value of the declination base-line; permitting satisfactory hourly tabulations, of declination through- out the year. Values of the base line are given in the following table.

F 15

Values of Declination Base-Line Derived from the means of five consecutive weekly determinations.

1

/

January,

.....22

74.2

July,

2

76.6

29

74°2

9

76'7

16

76·8

February,

5

74'3

23

76.8

I 2

74'2

30

77°0

19

74°2

August,

6

77°0

25

74'I

14

77°0

20

March,.............

77°0

5

744

2.7

77'1

12

74'6

19

74.8

September,

3

77°0

ΙΟ

77'1

26

74'9

17

77°2

April,

2

75°0

24

77'1

9

75'1

October,

I

77'2

16

75°3

9

77'1

24

75'7

15

76.9

22

76.8

May,

I

75'7

29

76.8

7

76.0

November,

5

76.7

14

76'2

I 2

76.8

2 I

76.4

17

76.8

28

76.5

24

76.7

December,

76.5

June,

4

76'5

S

76.3

I I

76.6

15

76.0

17

76.6

22

75'7

25

76.5

29

75'4

55. A time drift in the horizontal force and vertical force records, which appears to be due to a weakening of the quartz fibres rather than a reduction in the moment of the magnets, has made the determination of the temperature co-efficients a matter of great difficulty.

56. It is expected that a supply of alternating current from the mains of the China Light & Power Co. will be available about the middle of 1932. With this power it is hoped to keep the temperature of the recording room nearly constant. The time drift of both instruments can then be accurately determined..

57. Attempts to increase the sensitivity of the vertical force instrument failed, owing to the system becoming unstable before the desired sensitivity had been reached. On April 2 the magnet-system was removed from the instrument and

- F 16

carefully examined. It was found that the magnets were ap- preciably asymmetrical with respect to the mirror.

This was

remedied with satisfactory results. On April 7, 10 and 28 attempts were made to eliminate the temperature co-efficient; but without complete success. The co-efficient has been greatly reduced, however.

58. The following table gives temperature data for the magnetograph room during the year 1931.

Month.

Temperature.

Daily Range.

Maximum. Minimum.

Mean, Maximum. Minimum. Mean,

Absolute.

о

о

о

о

O

о



January,

74.3

60'5

67'7

5.5

0.8

I'2

February,

740

60'2 66.1

3.3

0.6

0'7

March,

75°0

63°1

69'1

4.2

0'1

1.2

April,........

82.6

70'7

76.2

3.5

0.6

1'0

May,

874

80'3

83.1

2'5

017

I'I

June,

89'0

83°1

86.0

2.8

0.6

1*1

July,

90*7

85.8

88.7

2.2

0'9

13

August,

90°2

84.2

87.7

2.3

0.6

15

September,

89.6

82.0

87.2

3'7

0.8

1.3

October,

84.8 76.2

79*7

2.8

0'5

17

November,...... 78'4 73'0

75.6

2.7

0*2

1'3

December,...... 75'1

64°2

69.9

4'2

0*3

I'2

F 17

59. The following table shows the magnetic character of the year 1931 at Hong Kong.

Month

Day.

ооо качество

о

о

HO

ооо

1 2

O

Jan.

Feb.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

Ι

1 2 3 4 5 6 7∞ ao

10

I I

I 2

оо

70

13 14

15

16

17

18

19

20

a o

21

22

+36700

23

24

25

26

27

~ N

28

29

N N N

30

31

O

O

2

I

I

I

оо

I

I

I

I

I

2

I

ооо

O

I

I

I

I

0=clam. 1=disturbed. 2-very disturbed.

VIII-TIME SERVICE.

-register failed.

60. Time Ball.-The time ball on Kowloon Signal Hill is dropped at 10h. and 16h. daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10h. and 13h, and on Sundays and holidays when it is dropped at 10h, only (120th Meridian Time). The ball is hoisted half mast at the 55th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the correct time it is lowered 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.

F 18

61. Time signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory radio mast. The lights are extinguished momentarily every second from 20h. 55m. to 21h. except at the 28th, 29th, 54th, 56, 57th, 58th and 59th seconds, of each minute. The 21h. signals were repeated at midnight on December 31, the last signal indicating the close of the year 1931. The hours refer to Hong Kong Standard Time (8 hours east of Greenwich).

62. The time ball was dropped successfully 660 times. On August 1st at 10h. and 13h. and on September 2nd at 16h. the time ball was not raised owing to typhoon gales. The ball was not raised on December 11th at 16h. owing to an electrical fault.

63. The error of the time ball was Os.5 on one occasion, Os.4 on eleven occasions; on all other occasions the ball fell with an error of Os.3 or less.

64. The probable error of the time ball in each month of the past five years is given in the following table.

Probable Error of the Time Ball,

Month.

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

January,

±0·14

0·13

±0.10 +0·10

±0.10

February,

•12

•10

•10

13

•12

March,

.11

•10

•10

•12

•20

April,

·10

.10

•10

*16

•16

May,

•14

•10

•10

·15

•12

June,

•13

'20

•10

'14

•14

July,

•10

*11

•10

·10

·10

August,

*12

•20

·12

12

·14

September,

•10

∙11

10

·10

·10

October,

· 11

·11

•10

.11

•10

November,..

•10

•10

11

.10

·10

December,

•13

12

14

.10

•10

Means.......

+0·12 +0.12

+011 ±0.12 +0.12

-F 19-

65. Time Signals by Radio Telegraphy.-In addition to the time signals given by the time ball, and on the radio mast, signals are broadcast at 10h. and 21h. by radio-telegraph, via Cape d'Aguilar. Particulars of the programme are given in Government Notification No. 322 of the 1st June, 1928.

66. Observations of the radio time signals emitted by Nauen at 8h. a.m. Hong Kong Standard Time, have been made daily, whenever possible, during the year. They have been utilised for clock regulation during cloudy weather.

67. Transit Instrument.-Routine transit and level observa- tions were made by the Chinese computers throughout the year. The Collimation and Azimuth determinations, and occasional transit observations, were made by the Chief and First Assistants.

68. The number of observations in the years 1930 and 1931 were as follows:-

Transits

1930 1931

1078

861

Level determinations

546

442

Azimuth determinations (mark)..

42

34

Azimuth determinations (transit of

circumpolar stars)

238

164.

47 38

Collimation determinations (mark)

69. Clocks Sidereal Clock Cottingham and

and Mercer, No. 507, has been in use as the Observatory Standard throughout the year.

Its performance was again marked by a steady increase of losing rate until September when the rate of increase became more rapid and the daily rate became unsteady. On October 12 the clock was dismantled for cleaning. The oil was found to have thickened in several of the pivot holes, but the pivots and teeth were in excellent condition. The electrical contact to actuate the remounting mechanism showed signs of wear and of sparking having taken place. The clock was re- assembled the same day and a new condenser placed across the terminals of the remounting contact. Its performance has since been very satisfactory. An increase of losing rate is again shown; probably due to a small leakage of the clock

case.

70. The Leroy Mean Time Clock, No. 1350, was used for dropping the time ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the Post Office, the Telephone Co., and the Eastern Extension Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10h, and 16h. by the electric regulating apparatus. The daily rate of the pendulum is kept below 0.5s. by the addition or withdrawal of weights. The Dent Mean Time Clock, No. 39740, is held in readiness as a substitute for Leroy No. 1350. It was not required for this purpose in 1931.

F 20

IX.-MISCELLANEOUS.

71. Seismograph.-No alterations

were made to the seismograph during the year. New needle points were fitted as required. 386 earthquakes were recorded during the year 1931 as against 320 in 1930. The seismograms have been for- warded to the President of the International Seismological Committee, Oxford, to be dealt with.

72. Local Earthquake.-An earthquake shock was felt at Hong Kong on September 21. No damage occurred. The origin was about 60 miles to the east of Hong Kong.

73. Upper Air Research.-356 balloon ascents were made during the year. 33 meteorological flights were made by officers of the R.A.F. Tephigrams were constructed from the observa- tions thus obtained and the weather during the subsequent 24 hours noted thereon. It is hoped that a discussion of a large number of these tephigrams will be a considerable aid to weather forecasting in the future.

74. The results of the pilot balloon observations have been forwarded monthly to the Secretary of the International Com. mission for the exploration of the upper air.

75. The Washington Weather Bureau has been supplied, monthly, with Upper Air Wind Rose Data for 750, 1500 and 3000 metres above Hong Kong.

76. The following days were selected by the International Commission as days for International ascents:-February 9-14, June 15-20 and October 13-15. February was chosen as the "International Month". Balloon ascents were made on June 15-20 and October 13-15. The sky was completely overcast from February 9-14.

77. The Postmaster General was unable to accede to my request that watch should be kept for the experimental short wave emission from Paris on July 11, 18 and 28.

78. Lithographic work. The following lithographic work was done at the Observatory for other departments.

(a) Forms for tenperature charts for the Government

Civil Hospital.

(b) Plan to accompany Game Licenses ordinance. (c) Plan of arrangements for Armistice Day celebrations. (d) Map of Hong Kong for the Dominions Office and

Colonial Office List.

(e) Maps of shipping routes for the Harbour Depart- ment, required in connection with draft rules relating to life saving appliances for passenger ships.

F 21

79. Visitors.-The Rev. Father Louis Froc. S.J. for many years Director of the Zikawei Observatory, passed through Hong Kong on August 18 on retirement, and was welcomed by the Rotary Club of Hong Kong. Mr. Ch'en Pin-jen, Director of the Meteorological station at Yunnan Fu, visited the Observa- tory on May 2. Parties of students from the Middle Light School, Canton, from the Y.W.C.A., Hong Kong, and from the Senior Class of the Central British School, Kowloon, visited the Observatory on April 10, May 30 and June 9, respectively.

80. Staff. No change occurred in the European or Local staff during the year.

81. Expenditure.--The annual expenditure on the Observa- tory, for the past ten years has been as follows:-

Year.

Personal Emoluments

and other Charges.

Special

Total

Total

Expenditure. Expenditure.

Revenue.

C.

C.

$

C.

$ C.

1922

36,771.18

1,578.92

38,350.10

25.60

1923

38,495.23

27.35

38,522.58

116.20

1924

41,011.48

11,627.01

52,638.49

14.00

1925

41,955.51



41,955.51

79.20

1926

42,566.65

12,341.74

54,908.39

34.20

1927

47,253.17

145.24

47,398.41

30.50

1928

47,292.33

272.70

47,565.03

506.10

1929

48,282.63

48,282.63

530.50

1930

68,696.59

1,670.07

70,366.66

506.80

1931

76,037.81

76,037.81

735.00

F 22

82 In the following table the expenditure and revenue for 1930 is compared with that for 1931.

Comparative Statement of Expenditure

1930 and 1931.

Personal Emoluments

1930

1931.

62,051.40 67,813.51

Other charges.

Books and Postage

199.95

291.04

Electric Light & Power

389.45

648.28

Gas

89.97

77.06

Incidental Expenses

93.44

128.48

Laboratory Expenses

1,037.56

1,482.02

Meteorological Telegrams

967.97

755.72

Printing

2,570.50

2,887.25

Transport

111.08

125.06

Maintenance of Lithographic Plant

235.33

320.78

Maintenance of Time Service

93.16

87.35

Maintenance of Magnetographs

666.33

1,008.03

Uniforms

56.24

204.53

Subscription towards cost of printing

International Upper Air Observations.

Total Personal Emoluments & Other

Charges

135.21 208.70

$68,696.59 $76,037.81

Special Expenditure.

Renovation of Time Service Switchboard...

Meteorological Conference

Total Department

155.44

1,514.63

70,366.66 76,037.81

Comparative Statement of Revenue 1930 and 1931.

1930

1931.

Fees of Court or Office, Sale of Publica-

tions

506.80

735.00

3

F 23

83. Acknowledgments.-Acknowledgments are here made to the Naval Authorities for their co-operation in securing daily observations from H.M. Ships and for meteorological flights by officers of the R.A.F., to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Maritime Customs Authorities, for daily observations by cable and radio-telegraphy, and extra observations during typhoon weather; to the Telegraph Com- panies for transmitting the majority of the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by radio-telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Observatories and Institutions, and private persons, who have presented their publications to the Library, and to the Observatory staff for the efficient manner in which they have carried out their respective duties, particularly to Mr. B. D. Evans, First Assistant, who under- took much extra work during the absence on leave of Mr. C. W. Jeffries, Chief Assistant, from June 30 to February, 9, 1932.

16th February, 1932.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director,

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME ·

COURT FOR THE YEAR 1931.

ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

1. 336 actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1931 as against 286 in 1930, 121 were disposed of during the year and 35 were settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 130 and 63 respectively in 1930.

2. The claims amounted to $3,296,262.04 as against $4,082,633.31 in 1930.

damages recovered amounted to

3. The debts and damages

$1,406,802.11 as against $1,783,917.76 in 1930.

4. The fees collected amounted to $15,411.40 as against $13,532.15 in 1930.

SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

5. 1,777 actions were instituted during the year, as against 1,730 in 1930.

6. The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or with- drawn 433: Judgment for the plaintiff 896, Judgment for the defendant 56, Nonsuit 0; Struck off, dismissed or lapsed 68, and pending 324, as against 437, 882, 50, 7, 61 and 293 respectively in 1930.

to

7. The claims amounted $486,336.93 as against $481,966.36 in 1930 and the amounts recovered were $238,617.47 as against $243,061.61 in 1930.

+

8. The number of rent distress warrants issued was 1,428 representing unpaid rents amounting to $255,597.33, of which $53,000.10 was recovered by enforced sales in 483 warrants; as against 1,535, $228,175.37 and $87,150.72 respectively in 1930..

9. 910 warrants were withdrawn on settlement between the parties, as against 977 in 1930 and the remaining warrants were cancelled or otherwise disposed of.

10. The fees collected amounted to $20,924.85 as against $20,775.16 in 1930.

CRIMINAL JURISDICTION..

11. There were 47 cases and 80 persons committed for trial at the criminal sessions, as against 53 and 78 respectively in 1930.

G 2

12. Of the 80 persons indicted, 51 were convicted, 26 were acquitted and 3 were discharged. In 1930 the figures were respectively 78, 53, 32 and 11.

13.

APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

11 appeals were lodged during the year.

14. 4 were dismissed, 4 were allowed, and 3 are pending.

ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

15. 15 actions were instituted during the year.

16. 2 were settled, 2 withdrawn, 8 are pending and judg- ment was given in 3 cases.

L

17. The fees collected amounted to $632.75 $306.70 in 1930.

as against

PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION.

18. 318 grants were made by the Court being:

Probate

Letters of Administration .....

141

177

318

19. The figures in 1930 were respectively 145 and 167.

20. Court fees amounted to $22,346.70 and Official Adminis- trator's commission to $2,915.33. The figures in 1930 were $17,367.25 and $691.45 respectively.

21. During the year there were 74 deceased estates accounts on the Court books. The cash balance was $13,393.04.

22. 44 accounts were closed during the year and 52 new accounts were opened. No estate was transferred to trust account.

OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

23. The number of trust estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 22. The invested funds totalled $200,109.60 and the cash balance $8,842.95. No trust was wound up during the year, and no new trusts were opened.

24. The amount of commission collected was $228.91 as against $122.40 in 1930.

1

G 3

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

25. On the 31st December there were 621 companies on the Hong Kong register, of which 63 were in course of liquidation.

26. During the year 81 new companies were put on the register and 39 struck off. One company was transferred from the Hong Kong to the Shanghai register.

27. The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amounted to $151 639.24, and those in respect of other com- panies to $20,253,20.

28. No firm was registered under the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnerships Ordinance, 1912.

29. Deposits to the total value of $4,051,666 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

FEES AND COMMISSION.

30. The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $100,869.24 as against $95,560.75 in the previous year.

STAFF.

31. His Honour Sir Joseph H. Kemp Kt., C.B.E. was absent on leave from 1st January, 1931 until 23rd April, 1981, and resumed duty on 25th April, 1931.

32. His Honour Mr. J. R. Wood, Puisne Judge, acted as Chief Justice from 1st January, 1931 until 24th April, 1931, and proceeded on leave on 25th April, 1931; absent on leave until 31st December, 1931.

33. Mr. R. E. Lindsell, Police Magistrate, acted as Fuisne Judge from 14th February, 1931 until 31st December, 1931.

34. Mr. P. Jacks, Land Officer acted as Puisne Judge from 1st January, 1931 until 14th February, 1931.

35. Mr. C. D. Melbourne, Acting Registrar, was on leave in the Colony prior to retirement, from 1st January, 1931 until 24th April, 1931, and proceeded on retirement on 25th April, 1931.

23rd March, 1932.

E. P. H. LANG, Registrar, Supreme Court.

G 4

Table showing total number of cases dealt with and expendi- ture and revenue of the Supreme Court, 1922-1931.

Year.

Total number of cases dealt with.

Expenditure.

Revenue.

$

C.

1922

827

126,424.34

*60,448.59

1923

962

128,838.62

*69,955.20

1924

1,549

136,136.69

*89.624.99

1925

1,908

150,698.14

*121,606.20

1926

3,416

133,680.40

*117,252.61

1927

2,267

141,493.29

*96,254.96

1928

2,330

165,114.93

*101,624.20

1929

2,303

167,632.95

*102,876.25

1930

2,016

218,933.24

*95,560.75

1931

2,113

240,030.30

97,773.74

*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of licences to keep local registers and China Companies fees by the Registrar- of Companies under the Companies Ordinances, 1911 and 1925.

Appendix G (1).

REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL RECEIVER AND REGISTRAR

OF TRADE MARKS AND LETTERS PATENT

FOR THE YEAR 1931.

BANKRUPTCY.

New Business.

The

1. Twenty-two petitions were presented during the year. The assets collected amounted to over $877,000.00. estimated liabilities exceeded $2,000,000.00.

Fees.

2. The fees received for the Official Receiver's commission amounted to $24,106.34. This total is in excess of any previous annual total, the nearest approach to it being in the year 1928, when the fees amounted to $20,080.40. The result is largely accounted for by the fact that two of the companies which were wound up compulsorily during the year had considerable assets for realisation and distribution, and one bankruptcy involved an exceptionally large amount.

Discharges.

3. Seven discharges were granted during the year. Three of these were unconditional, and the remainder subject either to the debtor consenting to judgment for a part of his unpaid liabilities, or agreeing to make further payments for the benefit of his creditors out of his after-acquired property. No applications for discharge were refused.

Bankruptcy Ordinance.

4. A new bankruptcy Ordinance, No. 10 of 1931, was passed during the year, and came into force on the 1st of January, 1932

Companies Winding-Up.

5. Two compulsory winding-up orders were made during the year, and an order for voluntary winding up under supervision was made in one case in which a compulsory order had been applied for.

G (1) 2

6. Comparative figures for the years 1930 and 1931 are given

below:

COMPANIES LIQUIDATION.

BANKRUPTCY.

Year.

Petitions for

winding up.

Winding up Orders.

Total Number

of Petitions.

Creditors'

Petitions.

Debtors'

Petitions.

Total Number of Receiving Orders.

Public Examina-

tions.

Adjudications.

Arrangement.

Schemes of

Petitions

withdrawn.

Petitions

dismissed.

Petitions

consolidated.

1931

3

2

1930

1 1

Year.

Receiving Orders granted.

rescinded.

Discharges

Adjudications annulled.

1931

7

1

1930

6.

22

2 23

14

20 14

Assets for dis- tribution.

со

8

16 8 12

50

6

12

Co

12

:

:

2

N

:

Estimated liabilities.

Fees in Stamps.

Official Receiver's

Unclaimed balances transferred

Com- mission.

to General Revenue.

C.

|877,619.72 [2,170,526.88

C.

$39

e.

C.

C.

2,995.50 | 24,106-34

1,096.28

$30,536.39 3,796,001.67

5,225 25 11,651.13

793.92

REGISTRATION OF TRADE MARKS.

Revenue.

7. The revenue derived from the registration of trade marks showed an increase over that for the preceding year. This is accounted for by the increased scale of fees payable, which was introduced as from the 1st of September.

Opposed Registrations and Appeals.

8. Nine applications for registration of trade marks were opposed during the year. In one case the application to register was withdrawn, in two cases the oppositions were withdrawn,

ד־



G (1) 3

One opposition

and in one case the opposition was abandoned. is pending, and four have been adjourned sine die.

Year.

Total No. of applications for Registration of

Total No. of

registration

certificates

Total amount of

fees.

trade marks.

granted.

1931

509

451

$16,793.84

1930

612

432

$11,635.31

REGISTRATION OF LETTERS PATENT.

Revenue.

Particulars of the revenue

9. An increased scale of fees for registration of Patents was introduced as from the 1st October. under this heading are given below:-

Year.

Total Number of Patents registered.

Total amount of

fees.

1931

1930

21

· 16

$121.00

$140.50

TOTAL REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

10. The following are tables of revenue and expenditure for the department for the years 1931 and 1930 respectively, (including salaries of officers met from the Junior Clerical Service vote) :-

Revenue.

Expenditure.

1931

$41,021.18

$34,702.62

1930

$23,426.94

$36,231.08

E. L. AGASSIZ,

Official Receiver and Registrar

of Trade Marks and Letters Patent.

Hong Kong, 22nd March, 1932.

Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE HONG KONG AND KOWLOON MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1931.

Hong Kong. Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as First Police Magis- trate and Coroner from the 1st January to 12th February.

2. Mr. W. Schofield acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 13th February to 6th December and from the 21st December to the end of the year.

3. Mr. A. W. G. H. Grantham acted as First Police Magis- trate and Coroner from 7th to 20th December during the absence of Mr. W. Schofield (on sick leave).

4. Mr. E. H. Williams acted as 2nd Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 22nd November and from 30th November to the end of the year.

5. Mr. A. W. G. H. Grantham acted as Second Police Magistrate from the 23rd to 29th November during the absence of Mr. E. H. Williams (on leave).

6. The Number of Cases was 22,631 as compared with 21,461 in 1930.

7. Kowloon. Mr. H. R. Butters acted as Police Magistrate from the 1st January to 24th February.

8. Mr. E. W. Hamilton acted as Police Magistrate from 25th February to 17th July.

9. Mr. J. A. Fraser acted as Police Magistrate from 18th July to the end of the year.

10. The Number of Cases was 15,289 as compared with 16,572 in 1930.

11. It was decided during the year to alter the form of this report. Instead of adding together the figures for Hong Kong and Kowloon, as in former years, each table will be duplicated, showing the figures separately, while those for the District Magistracies will be separately presented by the officers concern- ed; this will make it possible to compare the distribution of cases between the Magistracies. At the same time, the tables them- selves have been entirely recast in order to make them more informative and increase their statistical value.

12. Table I shows the expenditure of the two Magistracies for the years 1930 and 1931, including the cost of all officers in the departments who belong to the Čadet, Senior Clerical and Accounting, and Junior Clerical Services.

13. Table II shows the revenue of the two Magistracies for the same years.

14. Table III shows their revenue and expenditure for the last ten years in comparative form.

H 2

15. Table IV corresponds to Table III in the 1930 report; but the writs issued during the year are shown in a separate table, No. VI, the list of offences has been re-classified and en- larged, the number of offenders previously convicted who have been sentenced during the year is shown, and under each head the number of juvenile offenders, i.e., those believed by the Magistrates to be under 16, is given. The figures for juveniles and for previously convicted offenders could not be collected in the Kowloon Magistracy, and those for the latter column in the Hong Kong Magistracy report should be accepted only with reserve, as they are certainly under-estimated. Before August 1931 previous convictions were not always noted on depositions.

16. Table V corresponds to Table II in the 1930 report, and is an analysis of the 'convicted and sentenced' column in Table IV, showing the penalties inflicted under each of the eight main heads of crime in that table. The number of penalty headings has been increased. Here again the figures for juvenile offenders in Kowloon could not be collected.

17. Table VI gives the number of writs issued by the two Magistracies, and corresponds to part of Table III in the 1930 report.

18. Table VII corresponds to Table V in the 1930 report, and is an abstract of all cases brought before the various Magistrates' Courts of the Colony during the last ten years.

19. Table VIII shows the work done by the Magistrates sitting as Coroners.

General.

20. During the year an attempt was made, so far as the existing state of the law allowed, to provide special treatment for juveniles by separating them from adult offenders in court and keeping them, if not on bail, in a side room instead of in the cells, by not putting them in the dock, and by hearing their cases, if possible, before or after adult offenders had been dealt with.

21. Proceedings were taken against five fugitive offenders during the year for crimes committed outside this Colony. They have been entered in Table IV under the headings to which their alleged crimes belong.

22. Summonses under the Married Women (Desertion) Ordinance, 1905, in Hong Kong numbered one as against one in 1930. In this case no order was made. In Kowloon these summonses numbered four as against one in 1930. In four of them orders were made.

W. SCHOFIELD, First Police Magistrate.

26th May, 1932.

ཅར་

H 3

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1930 AND 1931.

Hong Kong.

1930

1931

Personal Emoluments (1)

$69,275.82

$69,065.62

OTHER CHARGES.

Electric Fans and Light.....

Fees for Interpretation

Incidental Expenses

Uniform for Messengers

Vehicle hire for serving Summonses

Total

Personal Emoluments (1)

$

$

$

186.90

74.00

395.45

$

$

178.47

105.00

371.66

128.00 $ 129.60

107.70 $ 149.60

$70,167.87 $69.999.95

Kowloon.

1930

1931

$19,151.82

$38,110.53

OTHER CHARGES.

Electric Fans and Light...........

$

430.45 $ 410.63

Fees for Interpretation

$

118.00

$ 135.00

Incidental Erpenses

$

496.57

$

381.12

Uniform for Messengers

$ 144.28

$ 131.55

Vehicle hire for serving Summonses

$

35.25

10.00

Total

$20,376.37 $39,178.83

(1) Includes officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., and J. C. Services.

Fines

Fees

H 4

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE, 1930 AND 1931.

Hong Kong.

1930

1931

$ 74,947.21 $103,852.48

$

431.84 $ 422.24

$ 11,131.50 $ 31,899.18

5.00

$ 95.12 $ 21.88

$3

132.78

712.62

306.00

25.00

Forfeitures

Miscellaneous Receipts (Surplus cash) $

Interest

Poor Box

Arms Fine Fund..

Revenue Reward Fund

Fines

Total

Kowloon.

$ 27,153.24 $ 31,243.12

$114,197.69 $168,181.52

1930

1931

$ 55,838.95 $ 64,556.80

Fees

Forfeitures

Miscellaneous Receipts

Interest

Poor Box

Arms Fine Fund....

Revenue Reward Fund

$ 47.35

236.30

$ 5,780.84 $ 9,231.50



$

20.01 $

2.25

$ 48.22 $ 412.72

$

2,515.00 $ 110.00-

10,124.45 $ 11,916.95

Total

$ 74,374.82 $ 86,466.52

H 5

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

Hong Kong.

(1)

Personal

Emolu-

Year.

ments

and other

Special

Expendi-

ture.

Total

Expendi-

ture.

Total

Revenue.

Charges.

1922.

$51,880.03

Nil

$51,880.03 $159,928.50

1923.

50,158.91

Do.

50,158.91

1924.

46,483.94

Do.

1925.

45,177.50

Do.

1926.

38,623.18

Do.

184,926.15 46,483.94 202,054.25 45,177.50 161,432.20 38,623.18 194,263.87

1927.

41,840.97

Do.

41,840.97 185,977.80

1928.

41,090.41

Do..

41,090.41 113,304.92

·1929.

43,508.15

Do.

43,508.15 95,333.04

1930..

70,167.87

Do.

70,167.87

86,738.45

1931......

69,999.95

Do.

69,999.95

136,913.40

Kowloon.

1922.

1923.

1924.

1925.

1926.

Figures not available.

1927.

1928.

1929.

1930..

$21,222.57

Nil

1931.

40,697.67

Do.

$21,222.57 $74,374.82

40,697.67

86,466.52

(1) Includes officers of Cadet, S.C. & A., & J. C. Services attached

to the department.

- H 6

Table IV.

STRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Hong Kong.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or

Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

Bound over without further penalty.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

To answer any

charge.

Previously convicted.

Witnesses punished for making false charges or giving false evidence.

41

19

F.

J.

Total.

M.

F.

J.

Total.

M.

F.

J.

· M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

F.

J.

31

686

22

122

1

17

161

25

2

27

2

2

32

17

1

18

1

1

7

7

5

88

20

20

2

2

31

6

2

8

25

7

243

222

10

236

1

1

25/

6

11

10

10

14

4

4

a a

5

5

113

30

32

17

10

22200

5

1

2

9

5

7

17

26

+

7



53

13

27

4

3

16

...

1

1

2

ONCO IN

10

+

4

137

13

992

130

19

149

¡5

13

13

35

6

196

84

2,162

700

37

10

737

21

:

38

1

10

ON

3

1

1

Co

11

2

A

35

:

1

1

3

:

7

128

12

27

J1

1

:

1

:

12

1

101

...

:

...

:

:

:

:

Classification of Offences.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a)- Against their property.

Total No. of

charges.

Total No. of

Defendants.

H 6

Table IV.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEA

Hong Kong.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for

trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to

Prison or Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

Bound over without fu

To keep the peace and be of good

behaviour.

M.

J. Total.

M.

I.

J.

Total.

M.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

1. Larceny:

Simple

829

870

646

31

686

22

Stealing from the person

180

191

143

1

17

161

25

122

27

Embezzlement and fraudulent

38

10

2

conversion

53

56

28

2

2

32

17

18

Robbery

11

14

1

7

7

Piracy

1

Burglary and housebreaking

101

116

82

1

88

...

20

...

20

Demanding with menaces

6

4

4

2

...

2

False pretences and cheating

39

...

41

31

31

6

2

8

Receiving and possession of stolen goods

451

502

211

25

243

222

10

236

2. Arson

3. Malicious damage

24

34

4. Forgery

23

23

***

1

21

1

3

25

11

11

2

11

10

10

5. Other offences

18

18

13

1

14



(b)~Against their persons.

1. Homicide

4

+

2. Iii-treatment and grievous barm

11

12

5

5

3. Common assault

::

152

201

4. Kidnapping

24

37

5. Sexual offences

1

6. Other offences

1

27;:

102

5

113

30

32

17

3

2010 201

:

:

1

35

5

3

5

حمد

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE. (c)-Against the Crown and Government.

1. Currency offences

15

19

7

2

10

2. Sedition, intimidation and breach of

:

emergency regulations..

35

53

17

17

26

...

27

3. Unlawful societies

+

4. Trespass and damage on Crown Land..

46

72

17

53

13

16

248

5. Theft and damage of public stores

}

...

1

6. Misconduct by Government officers.

15

15

10

10

+

4

7. Opium and Revenue offences

100%

1,166

842

137

13

992

130

19

149

8. Dangerous drug and goods

9. Other offences

24

28

15

15

13

13

42

42

35

35

:

...

6

6

Carried forward,...,

3,116

3,529 2,282 196

84

2,622

700

37

10

737

21

128

12

27

H 7

Table IV,-Continued.

OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS; DURING THE YEAR 1931. Hong Kong, -Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

ed and

iced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained peu- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

Bound over without further penalty.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Previously convicted,

To answer any

charge.

J.

rotal. M.

.F.

J.

Total.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

E

81

2,562

700

334

37

10

737

21:

200

96

8

00

:

:

19

145

16

1

17

3

14

Witnesses punished for making false charges or giving false evidence.

8:

Ꭻ .

· M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

123

12

27

1

101-

89

13

****

1.

3

482

36

38

78

4

12

112

:ཤེ ༠ -༠༢

::

1,387

172

2

178

386

38

49

4,617

259

27

10

296

3,369

4 27

427

3

4

5

24

3

+

2

399

64

64

12

4,114

295

295

139

35

2

2

414

87

87

...

...

34 2,654

111

20

2

133

275

20,984 2,219

106

24

2.349

31

207

26

33

9

143

9

:

Classification of Offences.

Brought forward,

· (d)—Against Public Justice.

Total No. of

charges.

Total No. of

Defendants.

H 7

Table IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS; DURING THE YI Hong Kong,-Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for

trial at the Supreme Court,

Committed to Prison or Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

Bound over without

To keep the peace

and be of good

behaviour.

M.

F.

J.

Total.

M.

F.

J.

Total.

M.

F.

3,116

3,529

2,282

196

81

2,562

700

37

10

737

21:

1. Escape and breach of prison....

2. Returning from banishment

3. Perjury

4. Bribery

2

2

2

·

89

99

93

3

96

9

9

8

8

...

5. Other offences

}

2

1

4

:

(e)-Against the Public peace.

1. Breach of the peace..

142

2. Unlawful possession of arms.

13

279

11

119

19

145

16

17

6

7

3

3. Other offences

...

(f)-Against trade.

1. Trade marks infringement...

2. Employers and workmen offences

3. Food and drugs offences

4. Other offences

(g)—Against Public Morals and Police.

1. Begging and touting

2. Brothels, and procuration of women

17

74



7412

14

14

1

1

1

...

1

1

...

...

2

I

J.

M.

F.

S:

Ꭻ .

M.

F.

J.

123

12

27

:

$9

13

511

572

461

85

...

90

19

3. Lotteries and gambling

433

1,586

1,354

4. Offences against public health

430

445

305

5. Street hawkers offences

5,566

5,680

4,209

326

22529

482

36

2

38

6

:

78

8

12

12

1,387

172

2

178

8

386

38

11

49

112

1,617

259

27

10

296

Obstruction

3,912

3.911

3,349

19

3,369

427

427

7. Offences with fire crackers

399

472

392

2

399

64

64

8. Drunkenness

12

12

12

12

9. Traffic offences of a technical nature

4,491

4,494

4,106

4,114

295

295

10. Dangerous driving of vehicles

146.

146

139

139

11. Vagrants and stowaways

30

37

35

35

12. Unlicensed or unmuzzled dogs

540

510

441

3

444

87

87

...

13. Other offences

2,678 2,855 2,358

262

34 2,654

111

20

2

133

11

Total,

22,631

24,797 19,707 1,002

275

20,984

2,219

106

24

2.349

31

207

26

33

:

H 8

Table IV,-Continued.

I OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Kowloon.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

icted and

tenced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pen- ding Orders of H.E. the

Governor.

Bound over without further penalty.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

Previously convicted.

To answer any

charge.

3

Witnesses punished for making false charges or giving false evidence.

J*

Total.

M.

F.

J. *

Total.

M.

F.

J.*

M.

F.

J.*

M.

F.

J. *

M.

F.

J. *

M.

F.

J.*

M.

F.

J. *

848

94

£3

9

4)

4

98

9

:

oo no

:

oo co

...

20

:

51

00

8

30

5

5

172

216

2

218

:

16

13

32

13

N

2

4

::

9

7

83

40

40

16

1

6

19

2

O N

:

45

2

2

24

:

:

:

3

7

2

:

:

:

:

2

21

82

10

:

...

8

1

1

11

1

24

333

48

15

9

12

2

192

69

1,835

500

614

32

:

:

2

84

10

2

:

145



20

20

:

Classification of Offences.

Total No.

charges.

of

H 8

Table IV,-Continued.

ABSTRACT OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING 1

Kowloon.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head

Convicted and sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for

trial at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pen-

ding Orders of H.E. the

Bound ove

To keep the p and be of go

Total No. of

Defendants.

Governor.

behaviour.

M.

F.

J. *

Total.

M.

F.

J. *

Total.

M.

F.

J. *

M.

F'.

J.*

M.

F.

950

1,003

838

86

96

83

43

54

41

20

:

:

55

仙桃

23

60

51

42

38

28

381

404

170

25

32

16

6

B

4

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a)~Against their property.

1. Larceny: Simple.

Stealing from the person

Embezzlement and fraudulent

conversion

Robbery

Piracy

Burglary and housebreaking.

Demanding with menaces

False pretences and cheating

Receiving and possession of stolen goods

2. Arson

3. Malicious damage

4. Forgery.

5. Other offences..

(b)—Against their persons.

1. Homicide

2. Ill-treatment and grievous harm..

3. Common assault

4. Kidnapping

5. Sexual offences

6. Other offences

:

10

848

94

83

9

*>>

4}

00 20

NN

:

51

00

30

5

172

216

...

16

13

4

2

4

:

4

98

9

18

:

9

18

19

6

7

6

179

211

82

83

40

19

*****

22

...

16

16

5

30

29

12

19

:

oo on



5

218

20

1

...

13

22

40

6

::

26

OFFENCES CF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c)— Against the Crown and Government.

1. Currency offences

8

7

1

2. Sedition, intimidation and breach of

4

3

:

:

:.

emergency regulations

=

11

13

7



...

2

*

3. Unlawful societies

3

4. Trespass and damages on Crown Land.

:

87

93

61

5. Theft and damage of public stores

P

21

82

10

1

11

6. Misconduct by Government officers

9

.9

8

7. Opium and Revenue offences

308

384

309

24

333

48

3

8. Dangerous drug and goods

51

24

24

15

15

9

9. Other offences

9

14

12

12

2

Carried forward,

2,324

2,568

1,766

69

1,835

500

14

:

514

32

* Figures for Juveniles not available.

:

:

:

:

45

2

2

:

2

4~

19

84

145

{

-

- H 9

Table IV,-Continued.

OF CASES UNDER COGNISANCE OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS DURING THE YEAR 1931. Kowloon,—Continued.

Cases, how disposed of, and the Number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

ed and

iced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the

Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison or Detained pen. ding Orders of H. E. the

Governor.

Bound over without further penalty.

To keep the peace and be of good behaviour.

To answer any charge.

Previously

convicted.

Witnesses punished for making false charges or giving false evidence.

J.*

Total. M.

1,835

F.

J. *

Total.

M.

F.

J. *

M.

F.

J.*

M.

F.

J.*

M.

500

14

514

32

:

145

:

9

ཝཱམི

F.

J.

M.

F.

J. *

M.

F.

J. *

29

:

1

106

13

:

244

5

:

10

1

11

:

⠀ ⠀ ⠀* ⠀

:

4

32

32

I

1

351

...

128

4

5

1,252

35

35

440

61

62

3,386

346

18

364

:

...

...

2,490

275

279

102

10

10

4,382

546

70

616

14,414 1,823

113

1,936

32

* Figures for Juveniles not available.

:

...

:

179

13

6 ::

...

...

15

316

2+

† Included in g õ.

:

2

I

༄།ཝ

:

:

:

...

:

Appendix I.

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1931.

REGISTRATION.

During the year 6,181 instruments were registered under the provisions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844,- -an increase of 664 on the preceding year.

2. The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1931 was 129,074.

3. The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

4. The total consideration on sales. mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions registered in the Land Office amounted to $137,746,898.57 particulars of which are shewn in Table II.

CROWN LEASES.

5. 517 Crown Leases were issued during the year, as against 874 in. the previous year-a decrease of 354 particulars are set out in Table III.

6. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I. The year 1930 was abnormal owing to the issue of a great number of Leases at Kowloon Tong and the Praya East.

FEES.

7. The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $118,598.00 being an increase of $1,743.25 on the preceding year. Table IV shews the Monthly

Revenue.

8. Land Registration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $8,467.50 and Crown Lease Fees to $90.00.

9. The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table V.

10. It will be seen from Tables T and V that the figures for the year 1931 have only been exceeded on one occasion.

I 2

GRANTS OF LAND.

11. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 1,094 acres 3 Roods and 8-2/10 poles, of which 712 Acres, 3 Roods and 35-2/10 poles were dealt with by the District Officers.

12. Particulars of grants surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages W 1 and 2 of the Blue Book for 1931.

SURRENDERS.

13. Sixty one surrenders of land required for public purposes (including surrenders under Contracts of Exchange) were prepared and registered in the Land Office, the total consideration for those required for public purposes amounting to $6,175.50.

STAMP DUTIES.

14. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted to $608,812.70.

15. Stamp Duties on Probates and Letters of Administra- tion registered amounted to $155,413.64.

CROWN RENTS.

16. The number of lots entered on the Hong Kong and Kowloon Crown Rent Roll--as shewn in Table VI-was 7,124 an increase of 603 on the preceding year.

17. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $676,130.04 -an increase on the preceding year of $52,698.38.

18. The number of lots entered on the Village Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VII was 3,225-a decrease of 16 on the preceding year.

19. The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,726.55 -a decrease of $27 as compared with the preceding year.

20. The total Crown Rents amounted to $677,856.59—ar increase of $52,671.38 on the year 1930.

21. The increase was occasioned mainly by the sale of new lots, and to a certain extent by the revision of Crown Rents in a few cases on re-grant after re-entry,

I 3

DOCUMENTS.

22. 1,386 miscellaneous documents were prepared in the Land Office during the year, being a decrease of 357 on the year 1930; viz:—

(a) Five hundred and seventeen Crown Leases (with

Counterparts).

(b) Four hundred and sixty three Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Verandahs and Balconies over Crown Land.

(c) Sixty one Surrenders of land required for public. purposes, street improvements and private Exchanges.

(d) Two hundred and ninety four Agreements for

leases, exchanges, surrenders and Permits.

(e) Eleven Memorials of Re-entry.

STAFF.

23. Mr. P. Jacks resumed duty as Land Officer on his return from leave on 19th December.

24. Mr. L. R. Andrewes was appointed Assistant Land Officer on 3rd December to relieve Lt. Col. F. Eaves who was on vacation leave.

15th, January, 1932.

PHILIP JACKS,

Land Officer.

I 4

Table I.

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1922 TO 1931.

Year. Instruments registered.

Crown Leases granted.

1922

4,146

207

1923

6,837

209

1924

6,000

90

1925

4,226

178

1926

4,360

250

1927

4,628

196

1928

4,798

235

1929

4,250

242

1930

5,517

874

1931

6,181

517

Table II.

CONSIDERATION ON INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Description of

Instruments.

Number registered.

No. of Lots or portions

of Lots affected.

Total Consideration.

C.

Assignments

2,479

2,929

60,260,937.82

Mortgages and Transfer of

Mortgages

1,404

1,952

42,652,200.00

Reassignments and Certi-

ficates of Satisfaction

1,301

1,627

33,998,003.24

Surrenders

61

122

6,175.50

Judgments and Orders of

Court

44

64

165,436.01

Miscellaneous Documents.

780

1,079

664,066.00

Frobates and Letters of)

Administration, (Stamp

112

231

Duties $155,832.14)

Total

6,181

8,004 $137,746,898.57

- I 5

Table III.

CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Hong Kong

KOWLOON

New Kowloon

TOTAL

Marine

Inland

Rural Building

Garden Lots

Dairy Farm

Shaukiwan Inland

Aberdeen Inland

Hung Hom Inland

Kowloon Inland

New Kowloon Marine

Tsun Wan Inland

New Kowloon Inland

Dairy Farm

Permanent Piers

Sheung Shui Inland

1 173 4 1 4 3 2

1 232 2 6 83 3 1 1 517

Table IV.

RETURN OF MONTHLY REVENUE PAID IN STAMPS TO THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1931.

Searches

Month.

Registration of Deeds.

Copy Documents

Crown

Lease

Total.

and Certi- fications.

Fees.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

$

C.

January February

9,195.00

754.75

1,350.00

11,229.75

7,501.00

443.00

540.00

8,484.00

March

.7,065.00

569.75

900.00

8,534.75

April

7,111.00

644.50

1,020.00 .

8,775.50

May

7,075.00

602.00

990.00

8,667.00

June

7,237.00

540.00

900.00

8,677.00

July

8,455.00

577.00

1,080.00

10,112.00

August

7,704.00

623.00

900.00

9,227.00

September

7,927.00

703.75

1,380.00

10,010.75

October

8,460.00

602.00

2,200.00

11,262.00

November

8,091.00

494.00

3,330.00

11.915.00

December

8,233.00

700.25 2.700.00

11,633.35

Totals:

$94,054.00 7,254.00 17,290.00

118,598.00

$118,598.00 116,854.75

1931 Total.

1930 Total.

$ 1,743.25

Increase.

Ï 6

Table V.

FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1922 to 1931.

Searches

Year.

Registration of Deeds.

and Copies Grants of

Total.

of Docu-

Leases.

ments.

C.

C.

$ c

C.

1922

65,407.00

4,683.50

5,550.00

75,640.00

1923

109,671.00

7,280.00 6,680.00

123,631.00

1924

93,304.00 5,824.25

2,470.00

101,598.25

1925

65,068.00

4,778.75 5,210.00

75,056.75

1926

65,843.00

4,443.00

7,635.00

77,921.00

1927

67,115.00

5,050.50 5,442.00

77,607.50

1928

72,815.00 6,640.00 6,630.00

86,085.00

1929

63,478.00

5,498.50 7.100.00

76,076.50

1930

84,339.00

7,043.75 25,472.00

116,854.75

1931

94,054.00

7,254.00 17,290.00

118,598.00

I 7

Table VI.

HONG KONG AND KOWLOON RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

C.

Victoria Marine Lot

385

81,751.34

Praya Reclamation Marine.....

Lot

59

Inland Lot

2,554

5,388.39 247,357.49

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

3

19,024.00

Inland Lot

13

4,190.00

Victoria Farm Lot

8

401.55

Garden Lot

47.

1,419.00

Rural Building Lot

220

41,849.58

Aberdeen Marine Lot

5

579.16

Inland Lot

Aplichau Marine Lot

Inland Lot

80

1,092.20

24

152.84

40

263.48

Shaukiwan Marine Lot

10

2,310.00

22

Inland Lot

Stanley Inland Lot

Pokfulum Dairy Farm Lot

Kowloon Marine. Lot

Hung Hom Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Sheko Inland Lot

Tai Tam Inland Lot Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

.99

Inland Lot

219

4,276.50

4.00

4

2,682.00

57

48,841.00

Inland Lot

Garden Lot

1,730

118,887.01

1

1.00

2

6,140.00

153

8,966.00

3

9.00

1

1.00.

1

1.00

3

18,938.00

1,440

49,214.00

Farm Lot

7

287.50

"

Rural Building Lot

Tai Po Inland Lot

42.00 700.00

Fan Ling Lot

1,900.00

Sheung Shui Lot

918.00

Ping Chau Farm Lot

225.00

Mining Lot

2

1,582.00

Tsun Wan Marine Lot

4

4.134.00

Inland Lot

11

"

1,806.00

New Kowloon Dairy Farm Lot

15

714.00

Tsing I Marine Lot

1

82.00

Total

7,124

$676,130.04

I 8 -

Table VII.

VILLAGE RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown

Rent.

$

C.

Aberdeen

18

70.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

157

633.50

Ah Kung Ngam

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

27

15.00

Ma Tau Wei

66

124.00

Hau Pu Loong

13

49.50

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

16

67.00

Little Hong Kong

1

2.00

Tong Po

1

2.50

Stanley

9

18.00

Tytam

1

3.50

Tytam Tuk

2.50

Shek O

23.00

Chung Hom Bay

1

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road

Victoria

1

3.00

Aplichau

42

75.00

Telegraph Bay

13

43.50

Little Hong Kong

1,577

280.25

Shek O

Hok Tsui

Chai Wan

315

68.00

182

36.00

723

125.80

Total

3,225

1,726.55

L

I 9

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF MARRIAGES FOR THE YEAR 1931.

MARRIAGES.

The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 228 (of which 104 were between Chinese persons) as compared with 187 (and 85) respectively in 1930-an increase of 41. Particulars are given in Table I.

FEES.

2. The total amount of Fees received under the Second Schedule of the Marriage Ordinance, 1875, was $2,705 as compared with $2,059.00 in 1930-an increase of $646.00. Particulars are shewn in Table II.

15th January, 1932

PHILIP JACKS, Registrar of Marriages.

Table I.

(1) Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE, 36.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

7.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages. 28.

(2) Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE 191.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

145.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages. 46.

(3) MARRIAGES UNDER ARTICULO MORTIS ORDINANCE 1893 Sec. 2.

1.

I 10

Table II.

FEES RECEIVED DURING 1931.

Fee.

Total Fees.

195 Certificates of Notice

(Registrar's Certificates)

@

$1.00

195.00

12 Searches

@ $1.00

12.00

37 Certified Copies

@ $1.00

37.00

1 Certified Copy

(Fee Remitted)

3 Licences to Registrar of Marriages

to issue his Certificates

@ $10.00

30.00

34 Special Licences

@ $50.00

1,700.00

2 Special Licences

(Fee Remitted)

73 Marriages at the Office of the

Registrar

1 Marriage at the Office of the

Registrar

@ $10.00

730.00

(Fee Remitted)

Total

$2,705.00

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE

YEAR 1931.

A. DEPARTMENT OF DISTRICT OFFICE, NORTH.

STAFF.

Mr. E. I. Wynne-Jones went on leave on the 27th March, 1931, and was succeeded as District Officer by Mr. T. Megarry.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

2. Tables I, II (a), II (b) and II (c) show comparative details of the expenditure and revenue of the department for the years 1930 and 1931. Revenue from the district in the shape of duties on liquors and tobaccos is not included, being paid to the Imports and Exports Department.

3. Almost every item of revenue shows an increase over the previous year; this is especially marked in the case of premia for the sale of Crown Lands.

4. Table III shows a comparative statement of the revenue and expenditure of the Department for the last ten years.

MAGISTRACY.

5. Tables IV to VII show the details of the cases heard during the year by the District Officer in his capacity as Folice Magistrate and Judge of the Small Debts Court.

6. The number of Police cases heard was again higher than the record of 1930, but this was due to increase of offences connected with revenue rather than any increase in the number of crimes against the person or property.

7. Though the vehicular traffic over the roads in the district is steadily increasing, it is noteworthy that the number of traffic cases decreased from 236 in 1930 to 198 in 1931.

8. There were only four minor cases of unauthorized possession of arms during the year, all of which were dealt with summarily.

9. The dangerous goods offences were mostly cases of unlawful possession of dynamite, detonators, and fuses by fisherfolk who use these goods to dynamite fish.

10. No offenders were committed for trial during the year. Several murders with robbery as apparent motive were per- petrated, but the offenders were not traced,

J 2

11. There were no cases heard of armed robbery during the year; there was one case of assault with intent to rob an old woman in a railway tunnel. The defendant was convicted and sentenced to six months imprisonment with hard labour.

12. The drop in the numbers of small debts cases heard and distress warrants issued (Table VII) may be a reflection of increased solvency and plenitude of money in the District.

13. Thirty-two cases of deaths in unusual circumstances were reported to the Police Magistrate during the year. Seven death inquiries, one with jury, and six without jury were held.

LAND OFFICE.

14. Complete details of the work of the Land Office are shown in Table VIII. The number of memorials registered in the Land Registry was 3,510 against 3,383 in 1930 and the amount of stamp duty received for registration of memorials was $4,992.70 against $4,833.80 in 1930.

15. There was a marked increase in the sales of Crown Land for agriculture during the year, 300.12 acres being sold for this purpose as compared with 106.70 acres in 1930.

16. The demand for building sites for shops and dwelling houses both European and Chinese continues strong. Large developments are in progress at Un Long, where sites have at last been made available for a row of large shops on the south side of the main road after protracted negotiations with private owners of parts of the sites, who have now been bought out by persons desiring to develop the area. A large area of the foreshore at Un Long creek, close to the market places, is also in process of reclamation for the commercial purposes of this important centre of New Territory trade. A big shop-building development is also pending on foreshore to be reclaimed near British Sha Tau Kok. At Tai Po Market on the foreshore adjoining the main road a large area has been sold to the China Light and Power Co. on which the Company's headquarters and works for the New Territories are about to be erected.

17. A new 21 years' block lease of the Oyster Beds in Deep Bay at a reassessed rental was granted during the year, after a long and tedious inquiry into the financial position and system of sub-tenure of these Beds.

18. Table IX shows the allocation of assistance from the Local Fublic Works vote during 1931. A great deal of good may be done by this vote for irrigation, communications, and the repair of storm damage in the district, and it also encourages the people to do something for themselves,

——

J 3

$

19. Thirty-two new licences for forestry areas were issued during the year as against one in 1930. This is an encouraging sign of the realisation by the villagers of the economic, if not aesthetic, value of pine plantations. The total area under forestry licences at the end of 1931 was 40,355.80 acres as against 33,544.00 acres at the end of 1930.

20. There were 230 licences to cultivate pineapple plants current at the end of the year as against 156 current at the end of 1930. A new impetus has been given to this form of agriculture in the district by the arrival of the ex-Shing Mun villagers and the high price obtained for this fruit during the season; an average of $5 per picul being obtained.

GENERAL.

21. Rainfall is one of the most important considerations for an agricultural community, and fortunately in the year 1931 the district had the largest total fall for the last six years, which in addition fell most regularly and at the most propitious times for the crops.

As a result both rice crops were excellent. and the ensuing prosperity was illustrated by the unusually prompt payment of Crown Rent.

22. Rain also brought disaster: a cloud-burst on the 20th April, 1931, among other devastation to roads, bridges and irrigation dams over a large area, washed out a section of the Kowloon-Canton Railway at Ma Niu Shui and caused the wreck of a passenger train with the loss of eleven lives.

23. The year was not too good for the fisheries industry in Tolo Harbour and Mirs Bay because of a persistent strong easterly wind during the Autumn, which prevented most of the boats from putting far out to the open sea.

24. The electric light supply reached Tai Po Market at last at the end of November; most of the town is consuming the supply and it is proving a great boon to the district. In 1932 the supply will be taken out to the Fan Ling, Un Long and Castle Peak Districts.

25. The year 1931 saw also the laying of the long distance telephone cable to Canton through the district and there are now sub-exchanges for branch lines to subscribers at Tai Po and Fan Ling.

26. The payments of compensation to the ex-Shing Mun villagers were completed towards the end of the year. This troublesome transplanting has thus now been finally accomplish- ed, and the villagers are settled down comfortably in their new homes.

J 4

27. The St. John Ambulance Brigade was granted during the year the use of some vacant Government houses at Kam Tin for the purpose of a Children's Welfare Centre. Both there and in another temporary station at Fanling the Brigade is achieving most successful and beneficial results, by inducing the mothers to have their children attended to medically and given a better chance in life. The District is exceedingly grateful to Sir Robert and Lady Ho Tung for their recent provision of land and money to establish and endow an up-to-date Children's Hospital and Welfare Centre in the heart of the District near Fan Ling.

28. In conclusion I desire to record my thanks to the leading elders of the District for their continued loyal co-operation and advice in settling disputes both between individuals and between village communities.

29th February, 1932.

T. MEGARRY, District Officer, North.

=

L

Personal Emoluments*

- J 5

Table I.

1930.

1931.

$52,138.13 $56,377.20

Other Charges.

Afforestation

1,969.70

Nil..

Conveyance Allowances.

1,663.06

1,416.94

Incidental Expenses

397.43

409.92

Local Public Works

3.237.75

1,090.00

Transport

599.91

593.14

Scavenging

753.60

746.30

Uniform

294.98

379.54

Upkeep of Grounds of Island House....

219.00

228.60

Total Persona' Emoluments & Other

Charges

$61,273.56 $61,241.64

Special Expenditure

*Includes Officers of Cadet, & J. C. Services.

Table IIA.

Nil.

Nil..

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1930 AND 1931.

1930.

Crown Rent, (Leased Lands)

$90,617.70

1931. $93,223.04

Kerosene Oil Licences

560.01

571.83

Chinese Wine & Spirit Licences

3,933.33

3,598.91

Pawnbrokers' Licences

1,200.00

1,850.00

Money Changers' Licences

230.00

296.00

Fines

4,651.00

4,677.00

Fines (Land Sales)

30.00

84.70

Fines Reward Fund

1,734.00

1,806.80

Forfeitures

170.72

411.98

Forfeitures (Land Sales)

54.68

85.00

J 6

Table IIA,—Continued.

Distress Warrants (Crown Rent)

974.00

110.00

Distress Warrants (S.D.C.)

52.00

23.00

Arrears of Revenue

822.22

Nil

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

881.53

398.54

Forestry Licences

4,061.35

4,035.58

Permits to Cut Earth &c.

1,095.00

4,001.00

Grave Certificates

21.25

27.50

Pineapple Land Leases

207.75

228.21

Matshed Permits

2,323.06

2,885.51

Permits to Occupy Land

1,774.33

2,284.46

Stone Quarry Permits

606.00

621.00

Stone Quarry Leases

Nil

250.00

Ferry Licences

9.00

9.00

Certified Extracts

195.00

223.00

Sunprints

155.00

140.00

Premia on Crown Land

24,736.87

36,582.35

Stamps for Deeds

4,833.80

4,992.70

Boundary Stones

203.00

397.50

Deposits not Available

5,716.10

3,180.76

Buildings

107.50

25.00

Crown Leases

60.00

60.00

Tobacco Retailers Licences

Nil

1,615.00

$152,016.20 $168,195.37

Table IIB.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS, 1930 AND 1931.

1930.

1931.

Treasury (Mining Licences)

$1,000.00

$250.00

Land Office (Crown Rent)

2,844.00

3,518.00

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,

Sai Kung)

2,163.75

1,937.00

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,

No. 1 Launch)

5,620.75

4,969.90

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,

No. 2 Launch)

2,489.65 3,582.85

Harbour Office (Harbour Dues,

No. 4 Launch)

2,377.45

3,112.45

Total

$16,495.60 $17,370.20

J 7

Table IIC.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM NORTHERN DISTRICT, 1930 AND 1931.

By District Office

By Other Departments

Total

$152,016,20

$168,195.37

16,495.60*

17,370.20*

$168,511.80 $185,565.57

*This Sgure does not include Revenue collected by Imports and Exports

Department.

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

Personal* Emoluments

Special

Tota!

and other Charges.

Expenditure. Expenditure.

Total Revenue.t

$

$

$

1922

40,898.74

40,898.74

159,191.56

1923

39,315.73

39,315.73

280,848.64

1924

34,099.79

34,099.79

209,105.18

1925

38,891.05

38,891.05

141,862.65

1926

37,990.97

37,990.97

139,773.95

1927

43,059.80

43,059.80

127,251.02

1928

46,339.30

150.80

46,490.10

118,826.48

1929

46,371.85

46.371.85

121,902.53

1930

61,273.56

61,273.56

152,016.20

1931

61,241.64

61,241.64

168,195.37

*Includes Officers of .Cadet and Junior Clerical Services attached to

department.

i Does not include revenue collected in the district by other departments

Table IV.

Abstract of cases under cognisance of the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office North during the year 1931. Cases, how disposed of, and the number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under cach Head.

Classification of Offences.

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Total No.

of

Charges.

Total No.

of

Defend-

Bound over to

keep the peace

ants.

and be of good behaviour.

M.

P.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F'.

J.

M.

F.

Ꭻ .

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a) Against their Property.

Larceny (simple)..

Larceny from the persons

Burglary and House breaking

Larceny in dwelling houses

Larceny or embezzlement by servants...

Obtaining property by false pretences...

Receiving and possession of stolen goods Malicious damage

42

5

تاب

28

24261

656274621

N

22

12

1

1

N

J 8-

Common Law

(b) Against their persons,

Assaults

BB

Wounding and causing grievous harm... Causing danger to life

งะ

62

20

9

2*

13

22

3

22

2

I

1

Forcible taking or detention of persons.

Dangerous goods offences

OFFENCES OF A FUBLIC NATURE. (c) Against the Crown and Government. Forgery offences

2

2

2

15

18

13

I

Revenue offences

135

132

77

Opium offences.

35

37

19

Other offences

89

176

116

130

31

16

16

136

~

15

26

:

CO

2

21

9

8

(d) Against Public Justice.

Deportation .....

Bribery

2

Q~

9

1

1

(e) Against Public Morals and Public.

Arms

5

4

1

Traffic offences

198

199

144

53

Gambling

28

105

78

23

بات

Other offences

15

18

11

5

2

Total.

655

865

549

71

17

165

21

to

:

32

Other Offences Against Public Justice.

Table V.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain Classes of Offences at District Office North during the year 1931.

Punishments

Offences against Individuals.

Offences of a Public Nature.

י

M.

F..

J.

M.

F.

J.

Description.

Number of Persons Punished,

Against Their Property.

Against Their Person.

Against The Crown and Government.

Against Public Morals and Police.

M.

F

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F, J.

M.

F.

Fined,.

371 42

1

13

:

Imprisoned in default,..

113

29

1

1

1

:

:

Peremptory imprisonment,

63

37

} 1

Co

:

:.

Bound over with or with- out sureties,

32

1

24

Caning,

1

:

:

:

:

:

135

37

7

220

89

27

15

:

:

2

:

Total...

582 75

17

51

49

6

2

235

64

237

M-Male. F-Female. J-Juvenile.

:

10

10

9

:

Table VI.

ABSTRACT OF CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of Five Years

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Committed

for Trial

Committed to Prison or

detained

pending Or- der of His

Excellency

Ordered to find Security

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha. viour, and to

Did

not appear

and absconded

Escaped

before being brought for trial at the

Magistracy.

Escaped,

Punished for preferring False Charge

or giving False Testimony.

Total

Undecided.

Number of Defendants.

Years.

Total

Number

of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

at Supreme Court.

the Governor.

answer any

Charge.

ลง

5

8

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

20

21

J 10

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1926

329

289

21

128

20

43

10

480

39

1927

809

246

33

98

21

13

1928

484

376

37

150

108

1929

177

437

50

110

18

1

1930

629

580

65

194

23

20

1

2

Total

2,228

1,928

206

680

175

39

3

:

:

:

:

92

6

115

10

10

7

:

:

:

:

:

:

449

:

:

:

:

:

60

:

:.

:

270

41

A ver-

445.6

385.6 41.2

136

35

7.8

Year,)



54

8.2

:

:

:

:

:

645

157

558

75

:

:

785

94

2,917

425

:

583.4

85

85

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

– Ĵ li —

Table VII.

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

Average from

1931.

1926-1930.

83

212

18

65

· Heading.

No. of Sales,

Permits, Li- cences, etc.

No. of Lots.

Table VIII.

Area in Acres.

$

Increase of

Annual Rent.



Decrease of Annual Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees, etc.

$

Amount paid for Resump- tion of Land.





Sales of Land for Agriculture

101

150

135.00

249.15

"}

Building

169

177

7.93

684.00

Orchards

10

15.80

16.20

9.853.93

16,817.00

1,313.00

75

""

...

""

Threshing floors

42

42

.94

5.20

483.55

"}

Garden...

10

11

6.27

313.10

""

""

Agriculture & fish pond

165.02

165.90

3,038.00

4,709.00

""

Kerosine store

.09

11.00

70.00

"

13

Lime Kiln

.06

1.20

56.00

""

Conversions

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture

159

4.67

310.00

135.87

"}

2

4

60.81

104.15

10

50

149

143.27

197.11

5

""

""

334

517

235.63

796.80

1

}}

other purposes.

7

8

37.67

91.19

1

...

Extensions

Re-entries

Surrenders

...

Resumptions

Stone Quarry Permits

Permits to cut Earth, etc....

18

18

.15

12.85

106.00

75

328

24.29

107.42

56

6.08

40.92

30

3.50

3.88

446.72

93

621.00

...

418

Matshed Permits

922

12.33

4,001.00

2,885.51

Ferry Licences...

5

Forestry Licences

589

589

40,355.80

Pine-apple Land Leases

230

230

76.07

Grave Certificates

57

Deeds Registered & Fees.

3,510

9.00

4,035.58

228.21

27.50

4,992.70

1

10

...

J 12 -

Term of Years.

-

J 13

Table IX.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1931.

Allocation of assistance.

Path from Sam To Hang to Shek Tau Ho, Lam Tsun. $

45.00

One dam across the stream near Ta Ku Ling..

60.00

One dam across the stream near Hung Shui

225.00

Four dams and one bridge across the stream near

Wun Yiu

400.00

Two dams and one bridge across the stream near

Shan Mi

410.00

One bridge across the stream near Lam Tsun

860.00

Total

$2,000.00

J 14

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1931.

B. SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

STAFF.

Mr. W. Schofield was transferred to the Magistracy on 12th February and Mr. E. W. Hamilton acted as District Officer South in addition to his other duties until Mr. J. S. MacLaren took over on 25th February. Mr. MacLaren remained in charge for the remainder of the year with the exception of a brief period of absence from 9th to 20th November when Mr. R. A、 D. Forrest acted as District Officer.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

2. The figures for expenditure and revenue are given in Tables I-III. The revenue collected by the office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table II(a) and amounts to $51,285.59 as compared with $46,715.94 in 1930. This substantial increase is chiefly accounted for by larger returns from Land Sales, Fines, Deeds Registration Fees, and Permits to obtain Earth and Stone. The last-named item includes sand permits.

3. Table II(b) shows the revenue collected by other Depart- ments, and Table II(c) gives for purposes of comparison the total revenue from all sources for the past two years exclusive of the revenue collected in the District by the Imports and Exports Department.

4. The grand total contained in Table II(c) shows an advance of approximately 33% on last year's figures, an increase which is almost entirely due to the very material rise in Village Rates.

MAGISTRACY.

5. Tables IV to VII contain details of the cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

6. The figures show a decrease in the number of police cases in 1931 as compared with 1930. There were few serious offences and only one case was committed for trial in the Supreme Court.

7. The substantial increase in the amount received as fines may be attributed to an increase in the number of sand-stealing cases, and the imposition of heavier penalties for this offence The closing of many sand-beaches and further restriction of

-J 15-

permits have made stolen sand an easily unarketable commodity, and sand thieves have given the Water Police much trouble during the past year. There is good reason to believe that these miscreants are aided and abetted in this unlawful practice by building contractors, and the alacrity with which fines are paid would seem to confirm this supposition.

8. There was an average number of Sinall Debts cases, mostly bankruptcy cases, and in twelve cases it was found necessary to issue writs of execution.

LAND OFFICE.

9. The number of sales of land and other transactions affecting land which took place during the year are set forth in Table VIII.

10. While there were actually fewer sales of Crown land in 1931 the marked increase in the amount received as premia shows that the transactions covered larger and more valuable areas than those dealt with in 1930.

11. There are indications of an impending increase in the demand for both agricultural and building land, and many applications which were received towards the end of the year had to be held over until 1932.

12. The number of memorials registered was 1,253 as compared with 1,769 in 1930. The great increase under the heading Registration Fees is accounted for by the large number of Conveyances on sale for high considerations.

13. The rapid denudation of sand-beaches continues to cause grave concern, the more so as the demand for sand for building purposes remains unabated. As a further protective, measure a tenfold increase in the monthly fee for sand permits was put into effect in September; as a result there has been & very substantial increase in the receipts from this source.

sites were

14. Thirty-two additional bathing-matshed allotted during 1931 bringing the total up to 115. The demand for sites has been exceptionally keen and almost every available spot on the approved beaches is now occupied.

GENERAL.

15. Agriculture. Reports from the various outstations show that the District enjoyed a fair measure of prosperity during 1931. Heavy rains and typhoons did considerable damage to the rice crops, particularly in the Tsuen Wan area, but this loss was counterbalanced by good crops of vegetables and sweet- potatoes, and satisfactory returus from the sale of cattle, pigs, and poultry.

J 16

16. Fisheries. Foor catches were obtained by the fishing population except at Tai O which again had a record season. The bulk of the daily catch at Tai O is sent to Hong Kong by ferry and sold to Hong Kong fish-dealers.

17. Ferries. The Hong Kong and New Territories Ferry Company continues to give satisfaction. Ferries are running in strict accordance with the approved time-table and there are no complaints of irregularities of service. Some difficulty has been experienced in landing cargoes at Tai O in rough weather; arrangements have now been made for the ferry to anchor at Po Chu Tam when high seas make the Tai O anchorage unsuitable.

18. Registration of Births and Deaths. The addition of all Police Stations in the District to the list of approved Registries has provided means for the application of Ordinance 7 of 1896, in a modified form, to the New Territories. The Elders of the District have been consulted, and their assistance in inducing villagers to register has been invoked.

19. Sanitation. The inclusion of a scavenging vote amcunting to $1,600 in the Estimates for 1932 to provide funds for street-scavenging in Hang Hau, Tsuen Wan, and Tai O may be regarded as a definitely progressive measure. Scavenging coolies have been engaged to start work early in 1932, and the Kaifongs of these villages have promised to add their quota to the scavenging fund and to assist in supervising cperations. Street repairs have been effected at Hang Hau which should facilitate this work, and Tai O should show a gradual improve- ment, but the difficulties of cleaning Tsuen Wan are aggravated by the broken condition of the streets and a serious shortage of water. The lack of water in this neighbourhood both for drinking and street-cleansing purposes is a serious problem which will only be solved when funds are available to provide a supply from Shing Mun sources.

20. It will be interesting to observe the effect which the introduction of this scavenging scheme will have on the general attitude of the villagers towards sanitary improvements; much of the success of the scheme will depend on the co-operation of householders in providing receptacles for rubbish, and in refraining from throwing all waste matter into the gutters as at present.

21.

Reclamations. Considerable progress has been made towards the solution of the major problem of Reclamations. As outlined in last year's Report a syndicate of Ch'eung Chau merchants has applied for permission to reclaim a large area at Ch'eung Chau between the Government Pier and the Hung Shing Temple. Unforeseen difficulties delayed the submission of this scheme for. Government approval in 1931, but plans and draft proposals are now ready, and it is hoped that approval

-Ĵ 17. J

will be obtained, and a start made, early in 1932. An application for permission to reclaim another area at Ch'eung Chau has been received from a second party and is now under considera- tion. As the future prosperity of Ch'eung Chau depends largely on expansion, by reclamation, the outlook at the moment may be described as most promising. In Tai O and Tsuen Wan the need for expansion has been no less apparent. Funds have been provided in the 1932 Estimates for the erection of a new market at Tsuen Wan; this market will be built on reclaimed land if the sum voted is sufficient to cover the cost of a small reclamation.

22. Tai O. Business generally was good. The fishing fleet had a most successful season and prices were higher than in previous years. The following table gives a rough estimate of the fish caught and the prices obtained :-

Fish. Wong Fa Ma Yau Herrings Shrimps

Piculs. Price per picul.

10,000

500

4,000 500

$17.00

23.00

19.00

21.00

23. The output of salt was 7,090 piculs as compared with 17,000 piculs in 1930. This serious decline in output is said to have been due to the heavy rains which fell throughout the Summer and flooded the salt-pans.

24. The completion of a block of seven houses on a site near the market has greatly improved the appearance of this part of the village. Further development is about to take place in this vicinity, and the unsightly matsheds which block the entrance to the creek will shortly be removed.

25. Tai O still lacks a serviceable fire-engine, but schemes have been devised which will allow for the gradual accumulation of funds, which should, in a few years, be sufficient to cover the cost of a Lowrev Turbo Pump.

26. Cheung Chau. This Island seems to have prospered during 1981; the two distilleries, the Shun Fung and the Kwong Loong Shing, did good business; vegetable-gardeners obtained good prices for their produce, and all the market stalls were occupied.

27. The shortage of drinking water continues to cause the inhabitants considerable discomfort. Two new wells were opened during the year but only brackish water is obtainable from these sources. Fresh water is brought from Lantao by water-boats but few can afford to pay the prices asked for these limited supplies.

28. The addition of a very substantial cinema theatre to the list of its attractions is a further proof of the enterprise of this progressive township. Only Chinese films will be shown.

J 18

29. The new fire-engine is kept in good condition and is used daily to pump up water for street-cleaning purposes. There were no outbreaks of fire during the year and the firemen who were engaged to look after the new engine have not yet had a chance to test their skill.

30. Stone to the value of $2,500 was obtained from the quarry which is leased to Li Shing Ki. Some of this stone was used locally but the bulk of it was exported.

31. Tsuen Wan.

Vegetables and sweet potatces did well but rice crops were poor and pineapples show only average returns. There has been a decline in the business done by sandalwood mills, and the production of red and white lead has practically ceased.

32. The Texas Company's Installation at Sam Pak Tsin is now in full working order.

33. Work is proceeding on the Brewery at Sham Tseng and it is expected that the building will be completed in 1932.

34. Fairly good business is reported by the Asia Coal and Briquetting Company which has its Factory at Yau Kam Tau.

35. The China Light & Power Company has completed the overhead Cable line from Tai Po to Tsuen Wan and many of the shops and houses in Tsuen Wan are now supplied with electric light.

36. Lamma. Very good returns were obtained from the sale of cattle, pigs, and poultry, and rice crops were fairly good. Grass was plentiful and large quantities were sold to the boat- breamers in Aberdeen.

37. Ping Chau. The recent boom in building has resulted in a great increase in the demand for lime and all lime-kilns have been working at full pressure throughout the year.

38. Special Events. His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel, K.C.M.G., K.B.E. paid three official visits to the District during the year and met the Elders at Ch'eung Chau, Tai O, and Tsuen Wan. His Excellency discussed with the Elders various problems affecting the welfare of these villages.

10th March, 1932.

J. S. MACLAREN, - District Officer, South.

J 19

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, 1930 AND 1931.

1930.

1931.

Personal Emoluments*

$33,888.82 $33,604.56

Other Charges.

Conveyance Allowances

1,001.93

626.67

Incidental Expenses

135.76

159.92

Transport

1,322.73

793.74

Uniforms

115.25

137.58

Local Fublic Works

2,924.41

960.00

Afforestation

22.00

Total Other Charges

Total Department

$ 5,522.08 $ 2,677.91 $39,410.90 $36,282.47

*Includes officers of Cadet, & J. C. Services.

Table II(a).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE

DISTRICT OFFICER, 1930 AND 1931.

1930.

1931.

$ 1,324.45 $ 3,383.26

Land Sales

Boundary Stones

55.00

354.00

Permits to obtain Earth and Stone

1,432.00

4,660.00

Forestry Licences

1,579.78

1,686.18

Forfeitures

Fines

225.00

70.80

2,586.50

3,856:79

Deeds Registration Fees

2,776.50

3,474.80

Crown Leases

30.00

60.00

Legal Costs

58.00

96.00

Miscellaneous Fees

129.25

Crown Rent

26,261.14

25,977:53

Matshed Permits on Crown Land

1,565.80

2,039.00

Permits for Temporary Structure on

Private Land

517.00

813.00

Permits to occupy Land

809.94

906.89

Pineapple Land Leases

626.40

901.38

Market Fees

1,473.92

1,498.12

Leases of Stone Quarries

Interest on Deposit Account

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Poor Box

Compensation in lieu of Rates Fines (Reward Fund)

Arms Fines

70.00

91.75

215.11

32.82

196.68

402.72

2.99

297.86

101.66

4,612.36

520.00

226.65

Total

$46,715.94 $51,285.59

J 20

Table II(b).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS, 1930 AND 1931.

Treasury, (Village Rates)

91

"

(Crown Rent for Inland Lots) (Quarries in New Kowloon). (Eating House Licence Fees).

Police, (Licence Fees) Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues,

1930.

1931.

$123,943.26 $217,982.00

87,722.64 8,402.41

68,362.36

9,839.59

235.00 21,097.50

470.00

33,268.00

Stakenets)

Total

20,064.05 27,842.85

$261,464.86 $357,764.80

Table II(c).

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM SOUTHERN DISTRICT, 1930 AND 1931.

By District Office

By Other Departments

Toal

Table III.

1930

1931.

$46,715.94 $ 51,285.59

261,464.86* 357,764.80*

$308,180.80 $409,050.39

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

† Personal

Emolu-

ments and

Special Expendi-

Total Expendi-

Total

Revenue

Other Charges.

ture.

ture.

C.

C.

1922

22,043.92

1923

26,383.16

75.80

1924

28,087.75

1925

25,329.74

1626

25,946.68

1927

24,646.74

1928

23,111.62

1929

23,776.34

1930

39,410.90

1931

36,282.47

$

$

C.

22,043.92

308,644.71

26,458.96 | 357,204.33

28,087.75 | 375,391.16

25,329.74 197,553.89*

25,946.68 | 217,870.87*

24,646.74 236.276.02

23,111.62

226,196.22*

23,776.34 246,273.31*

39,410.90 308,180.80*

36,282.47

409,050.39*

*This figure does not include Revenue collected by the Imports and

Exports Department.

+Includes officers of Cadet and J. C, Services attached to department.

Table IV.

Abstract of cases under cognisance of the Police Magistrate's Court at District Office South during the year 1931. how disposed of, and the number of Male, Female and Juvenile Defendants under each Head.

Classification of Offences.

Discharged.

Committed for trial at the Supreme Court.

Cases,

Bound over to

Total No.

Total No.

of

Charges.

of

Defen.

Convicted

and

Sentenced.

ke. p the peace

dants.

and be of good behaviour.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F.

J.

M.

F. J.

OFFENCES AGAINST INDIVIDUALS.

(a) Against their Property.

Larceny (simple)...

19.

21

21

Demanding money with menaces

2

Common Law Offences

2

Receiving stolen property

(b) Against their person.

Assault

Kidnapping

Sexual Offences

Wounding

OFFENCES OF A PUBLIC NATURE.

(c) Against the Crown and Government.

Forgery Offences..

Revenue Offences..

Opium Offences

Dangerous Goods Offences.

(d) Against Public Justice.

Deportation

(e) Against Public Morals and Police.

Hawking

Obstruction

Other Offences

Gambling

12

22-2

}

2

2

13

7

1904-00

10

2204

1

93

30 30 UT NO

...

1

1

3

159

102

15

5:::

1

B

34

9

Total.

159

252

166

15

50

}

w

...

:

:

11

:

4

2

15

Q

- J 21-

Offences of a Public Nature.

Table V.

Return of Punishments awarded in respect of certain Classes of Offences at District Office South during the year 1931.

Offences against Individuals.

F. J.

Against

Number of

Description.

Persons

Punished.

Against

Their

Property.

Against

Their

Person.

The Crown

and

Government.

Against

Public

Justice.

Against

Other

Public Morals] and Police.

Offences.

Punishments.

M.

F'.

J.

M.

I'. J. M. F. J.

"

-

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

2

10

18

:

:

:

:

:

:

M. F. J. M. F. J. M. F. J. -M.

24

:

:

:

00

77 13

15

:

:

178 | 16

30

15 1

30

...

Fined

88 14

Imprisoned in default...

49

Peremptory imprisonment

26

Bound over with or without sureties

15

2

...

Total.

00

:.

:

:

:

:

:

3

:

:

:

:

M=Male. F=Female. J = Juvenile.

1

4

2

J 22 -

:

:

99

15

Table VI.

ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during a period of Five Years.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE PRISONERS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Years.

Total

Number

of Cases.

Convicted and Punished.

Discharged.

2

3

10

Committed

for Trial

at Supreme

Court.

Committed

to Prison or detained

pending Or- der of His Excellency the Governor

Ordered to find Security

To keep the Peace, to be of Good Beha-

Did not appear

and absconded

Escaped before being brought for

trial at the Magistracy.

Escaped.

Punished for preferring False Charge or giving False Testimony.

Total

Undecided.

Number of Defendants.

viour, and to

answer any

Charge.

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

11:5

20

21

J 23

M.

F.

M.

F.

M. F. M.

F.

M.

F.

M. M. F.

M.

M.

F.

M. F. M.

F.

1927

196

218

19

38

12

3

272

34

1928

89

143

27

15

1

1929

133

165

21

34

1930

197

153

18

47

00

Q

1931

159

164

15

50

7

1

Total

774

848

100

184

26

17

Aver-

age

per

154.8 169.6

20

36.8

5.2

3.4

Year.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

15

1

2

2

43

Co

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

164

:

35

:

:

:

:

:

206

24

220

21

232

20

1,094

134

8.6

1.6

4

218 8

26.8

:

:

Cases heard

Writs of Execution

- 24 J

-

Table VII.

SMALL DEBts Court.

1930.

1931.

42

48

1

12

Table VIII.

No. of

Increase

Decrease

Amount

Sales,

No.

Area

of

of

of

Headings.

Permits,

of

in

Crown

Crown

Licences,

Lots.

Acres.

Premia,

Rent.

Rent.

Fees, &c.

&c.

Amount

paid for

Resump-

tion of

Land.

Term

of

years

-- Ĵ 25 —

C.

C.

Land Sales for Buildings.

48 48

1.71

164.50

1,929.60

C.

"}

Agriculture...

14

31

8.09

11.40

1,134.00

75

75

LOK

Conversion..

11

13

.42

39.50

141.84

Stone Quarry Leases..

2

1.60

91.75

Permits to occupy Land

137

59 62

906.89

1

Matshed Permits on Crown Land

759

6.62

2,039.00

1

Permits for Temporary Structure on Private Land.

163

1.61

813.00

1

Earth and Sand Permits...

447

4,660.00

Forestry Licences

119

15,480.66

1,686.18

1

Pine-apple Licences

411

241,36

901.38

10

Deeds Registered

1,253

3.474.80

Resumptions

310

27.47

437.50

7,040.75

Surrenders

15

.49

34.00

Re-entries

43

3.34

47.26

Reversion

48

4.91

34.08

- J 26

Table TX.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS. 1931.

Improvements and Repairs.

Road in Cheung Chau European Reservation,

Cheung Chau

$150.00

School at Tai Wan, Lamma Island

170.00

Stream at Tsuen Wan

Street in Hang Hau

Un-expended

300.00

340.00

40.00

Total

$1,000.00

Appendix K.

HONG KONG POLICE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1931.

Serious crime showed a welcome reduction in 1931, with the exception of kidnapping of children which increased to a somewhat alarming extent during the early part of the year. Thanks to the special measures adopted for its suppression, the second half of the year showed a marked improvement which appears to be maintained. Petty crime showed an increase in larcenies, but otherwise does not call for any special comment. Generally speaking, the year would have been considered a good one, had it not been for the serious Anti-Japanese outbreak at the end of September which was accompanied by rioting, a certain amount of looting of shops storing Japanese goods and the dastardly murder of a Japanese family at Tsang Foo Villas in the Kowloon City District. The only other items of special interest were the visit of Their Majesties the King and Queen of Siam on the 31st March on their way to the United States of America and on their return early in October; the death under suspicious circumstances of Douglas Carstairs, Manager of the Navy, Army and Air Force Institute; and an armed robbery and kidnapping of a newly arrived settler in the Sheung Shui District at Kung Leng, New Territories, in July (a crime somewhat similar to the one at On Lok Tsun, Fanling in 1929); and two piracies on steamers outside Hong Kong waters, though in neither case had the steamer started from Hong Kong.

2. The following special matters during 1931 call for com- ment :-

(a) Owing to retrenchment following the considerable drop in the dollar, the strength of the Police Force was reduced by about one hundred and fifty men, including twenty British Officers.

(b) The formation of an Emergency Unit in Kowloon on the lines of the Hong Kong Emergency Unit which performed such excellent work during the Anti-Japanese disturbances.

(c) Certain increases in the strength of Stations, notably Wanchai (No. 2 Police Station). In this district most of the Japanese shops are situated, and the Praya East reclamation has been almost completely covered with new buildings.

(d) The report of the Committee appointed to consider the establishment of Juvenile Courts. The report favoured the early establishment of such Courts, with a Remand Home under the care of the Police. These recommendations have been adopted, and the necessary legislation has since been passed,

K 2

3. The first signs of active disorder in connection with the anti-Japanese movement appeared on 23rd September, when shortly after 9 p.m. an attack was made on Japanese shops in Wanchai District, and eight of them were damaged. There were no further disorders on that night. On Thursday the 24th, conditions remained quiet during the day but in the evening there were signs of rowdyism in Wanchai but nothing serious happened. On Friday the 25th September, there were a num- ber of attacks on Japanese individuals in the Central and East- ern Districts, but the crowds dispersed rapidly on arrival of the Emergency Unit or the special Police picquets which had been put out on the 24th September. On Saturday morning the 26th, apart from a few isolated attacks on Japanese in the streets, the situation appeared quieter, but just after mid-day a fresh attack was made on Japanese shops in Wanchai, a num- ber of which were badly damaged. Following on this further outbreak, steps were taken to call on the Military for assistance and troops were held in readiness to turn out both in Victoria, Shaukiwan and Kowloon. Kowloon had remained entirely quies- cent until Friday evening the 25th September when a demon- stration took place outside Yaumati Police station where a Japan- ese had taken refuge from a hostile crowd. The situation in Kow- loon became distinctly worse during the late afternoon of the next day and it was deemed necessary to call out the Military, and seven platoons of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders were requisitioned to support the Police in Yaumati, Mong Kok, Sham Shui Po and Kowloon City Districts. Police and soldiers were being stoned from a safe distance from verandahs, windows and open spaces by large crowds who started looting any shop suspected of having Japanese goods. Attacks were also made on isolated Europeans. It was eventually found necessary to open fire on the mob in the Sham Shui Po District. Two rioters were shot and one was severely wounded in the arm. The crowds then began to disperse, but not before a dastardly murder had been committed in an isolated Villa at Po Kong, a mile from Kowloon City where six out of the eleven inmates were brutally done to death. In Victoria, the Military were not actually called out on the night of the 26th September, as the Police were able to suppress such disturbances and minor riot- ing as occurred. As a result of the rioting in Kowloon, it was considered advisable to attach Military picquets to the principal Police Stations in Hong Kong and on the mainland from the 27th September onwards to the 10th October (the double Tenth, the anniversary of the setting up of the Republic of China) when they were withdrawn. On Sunday the 27th September, there was no serious rioting except at Hung Hom, where a mob collect- ed and commenced to loot a shop. By Tuesday the 29th Sept- ember, the populace had settled down again, and though a very careful watch was kept until after the 10th October, there were no further signs of disorder, and the Colony very soon resumed its normal aspect. Six Rioters were killed and twenty-five injured and over one hundred persons were arrested in Victoria

- K 3

and Kowloon respectively, and sentenced to various terms of imprisonment for rioting, inciting to disorder or for attacks on Japanese.

4. The only piracy on a British ship during the year occurred on the 20th November, when the British cargo steamer "Han- yang", 1207 tons, was pirated on the high seas near Namoa Island, twenty miles North-east of Swatow on a voyage from Shanghai to Hong Kong. The "Hanyang" belongs to the China Navigation Company and is not on any regular run. Being a cargo boat, she had no grilles and no guards, the only defence. being six Winchester Rifles and six revolvers. No passengers, of whom there were about one hundred, were kidnapped and no one was injured. The pirates ransacked the officers' and pas- sengers' cabins and persons, and removed cargo, the whole loot being valued at approximately fifty thousand dollars. The cargo was taken ashore into a bay on the west of Namoa Island by boats which came off from the shore. The pirates obtained tickets through some unknown guarantor who could not be traced, as all the tickets and guarantees were removed by them. It is surmised that the pirates numbered fifteen in all. On receipt

of the information concerning this piracy the Commodore dis- patched a destroyer, H.M.S. "Sterling to the scene from Hong Kong. The Commander of the destroyer got in touch with the Chinese Authorities at Amoy, and took off Chinese troops, who succeeded in capturing a number of the pirates, and re- covered a large quantity of loot and some of the ship's arms.

5. One attempted piracy on junk was reported as against two piracies in 1980. In this case, the pirate junk was captured by H.M.S. "Sterling", and twelve Chinese males were charged with 'Attempted Piracy" and convicted by Jury, but were dis- charged on an appeal being lodged before the Full Court. After their discharge, the accused were seen by Folice to leave the Colony.

6. During the period under review, local efforts to promote Communist organizations continued to receive the attention of the police department, and the strength of the sub-department which deals with this subject, has been increased. Information obtained tends definitely to show that close connections exist between Communist organizations in countries bordering on the Eastern coast of Asia, and that such organizations are to some extent financed and directed by Bolshevist sources.

7. There were no serious attempts during the year to hold open demonstrations, and there were no serious labour troubles due to Communist agitation. A large number of raids were carried out by Police, and a number of Communist agitators arrested were subsequently banished. The only serious event anarking the intensity of the efforts made by Communist agitators was the murder in March of a man reported to be a Canton Anti-Communist agent, who was shot dead in Jubilee Street.

K 4

8. On the frontier the year was generally very quiet and friendly relations were maintained with the Chinese Authorities.

ESTABLISHMENT RETURN.

9. Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1931:·

Nationality.

Europeans... 269 9

3

Indians

747

2

Chinese...

891 60

18

718

22

23

Water Police

244 26

5

7285

5

22

20

55

39

82

15

25

Total... 2,151 95

7

41

57

79 184

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments, also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:

5 Superintendents.

6 Assistant Superintendents.

1 Police Probationer.

2 Accountants.

3 Storekeepers.

1 Police Secretary.

23 Clerks.

10 Telephone Clerks.

70 Interpreters.

128 Messengers and coolies.

2 Shroffs.

ACTUAL STRENGTH ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1931.

Euro-

peans.

Indians. Chinese.

Total.

of Casualties.

Present

232

643

817

1,692

Sick or Absent on

leave

23

Excess over Estimates.

ཚ:

54

77



Vacancies

14

50

74

138

Total.

269

747

891

1,907*

*Not including Water Police.

K 5

CONDUCT.

10. The conduct of the European Contingent was good. The total number of reports against them was one hundred and three as against one hundred and eleven in 1930. The conduct of the Indian Contingent was very fair. There were nine hundred and six reports as against one thousand one hundred and fifty six in 1930. The behaviour of Chinese (Cantonese) was very fair. There were 1,177 reports as against 1,392 in 1930. The be- haviour of the Chinese Contingent (Weihaiwei) was fair. There were five hundred and sixteen reports as against six hundred and sixty-five in 1930. The conduct of the Water Police was satis- factory. There were three hundred and twenty three reports, a decrease compared with 1930, of twenty-three.

11. His Excellency the Governor was pleased to award Medals and Commendations to members of the Force for meritor- ious services rendered during the year as under :-

One First Class Medal

One Second

""

""

Two Third

Ten Fourth

Ten

Commendations.

HEALTH,

12 Admissions to Hospital during the past three years are as follows:

1929.

1930.

1931.

Nationality. Establish- Admis. Establish- Admis-

ment.

sions.

ment.

sions.

Establish- Admis-

ment.

sions.

Europeans Indians

253

114

261

167

269

173

739

582

750

563

747

481

Chinese

774

357

786

201

901

247

13. The health of the Police in the New Territories was very good, and there was little malaria compared with previous years. The figures for malaria during the last four years are:-

1928

193 cases.

1929

186

22

1930

182

1931

93

K 6

MUSKETERY & REVOLVER COURSES 1931.

14. No musketery courses were held during the year 1931.

REVOLVER COURSES.

"A" Contingent-Europeans.

15. Two revolver courses were held during the year 1931.

1st Course-March, 1931.

Total fired, including 8 Superintendents, 226, all passed. 2nd Course-November, 1931.

Total fired, including 8 Superintendents, 221, all passed.

"B" Contingent-Indians.

16. Two revolver courses were held during the year 1931.

1st Course-April, 1931.

Total fired

661, all passed.

2nd Course-September, 1931.

Total fired

650, all passed.

"C" Contingent-Cantonese.

17. Two revolver courses were held during the year 1931.

1st Course-May, 1931.

Total fired

577, all passed.

2nd Course-December, 1931.

Total fired

552, all passed.

"D" Contingent-Wei Hai Wei.

18. Two revolver courses were held during the year 1931.

1st Course-May, 1931.

Total fired

2nd Course December, 1931.

Total fired

139, all passed.

165, all passed.

"E" Contingent-Russians.

19. One revolver course was held during the year 1931.

Total fired

29, all passed.

- K 7-

WATER POLICE SEAMEN (CANTONESE).

20. Two revolver courses were held during the year 1931.

1st Course-June, 1931.

Total fired

63

Passed

52

Failed

11

2=

2nd Course December, 1931.

Total fired

63

Passed

48

Failed

15

DISTRICT WATCHMEN (CANTONESE).

21. The annual revolver course was held in July, 1931.

Total fired Passed

Failed

121

119

2

EUROPEAN REVENUE OFFICERS.

22. One revolver course was held in November, 1931.

Total fired

11, all passed.

CHINESE REVENUE OFFICERS.

23. One revolver course was held in December, 1931.

Total fired

Passea

Failed

EUROPEAN WARDERS.

16

14

2

24. One revolver course was held in November, 1931.

Total fired

Passed

Failed

INDIAN WARDERS.

53

43

10

25. One revolver course was held in December, 1931.

Total fired

Passed

Failed

13

7

6

- K 8

EUROPEAN FIRE BRIGADE OFFICERS.

26. One revolver course were held during the year 1931.

Total fired

5, all passed.

27. The possible score in all cases was 120, and the number of points required to pass the test was 50%, i.e. 60.

28. Cruising launches equipped with Vickers machine guns fire a half-yearly course, and launches Nos. 2-4 which are equip- ped with 3-pounder guns fire a fortnightly practice with Morris tube, and an annual course with 3-pounder ammunition.

FINGER PRINT DEPARTMENT.

29. A summary of work executed in this Department for the year 1931 is as follows:

Year.

Number of finger prints examined.

Number of

persons

identified.

Number of records filed.

Number of convictions

under

Deportation

Number of convictions under

Markets

Ordinance.

Ordinance.

1931

15,391

3,529

9,047

222

1,324

1930

14.814

3,896

10,826

237

1,575

Increase..

Decrease...

577

367

1.779

15

251

Overhaul of Finger Print Bureau:-Number of old records destroyed 667.

Approximate number of records on file 135,403.

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUB-DEPARTMENT.

30. The total number of photographs taken of scenes of serious crime and accidents throughout the year was seventeen. The total number of copies of photographs issued was 2,163.

PASS OFFICE.

31. During the year 1931, fifty-five persons of various nationalities, other than Chinese. Indians and Japanese were put before the Courts for the following offences:

Vagrancy Stowaways Passport

25

19

11

32. The number of foreign destitutes dealt with during the year was 57.

K 9

DISCHARGED FRISONERS, DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS.

33. Table IV gives the number dealt with by the Records Office during the year 1931.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

34. During the year the following number of recruits were passed out of the School, European Police 17, Indian 58, Can- tonese 19, Weihaiwei 30, Indian Prison Guards Indian 10, Special Guards Indian 12, District Watchmen 38, Seamen 21.

35. Eleven promotion examinations were held in 1931.

36. Special courses were given to five Chinese probationary detectives. Seventy-six "D" contingent anti-piracy guards were given "refresher" courses. Forty members of the Police Reserve were trained and passed out in the knowledge of Police duties, and twelve commenced a "refresher" course. Seven- teen sergeants and constables of the "E" (Russian) contingent underwent a course of drill, eighteen qualified in a course of English colloquial, and eight continued the course in 1932. underwent a course in the Shantung dialect.

Ten

37. Forty-four European, 294 Indian, 241 Cantonese and 50 Weihaiwei Police officers were trained in First Aid work.

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1931.

38. The total number of cases reported to the Police during the year 1931 was 22,728 as against 24,931 in 1930, being a decrease of 2,203 or 8.8%. The average for the last five years is 22,570.

39. There were 5,284 serious cases in 1931 as against 5,681 in 1930, a decrease of 397 or 7.5%. There was a decrease of 56 cases in House Breaking, 2 Burglaries and 228 Larcenies. Murder showed a decrease of four cases. Robberies increased by twenty-three cases, viz. twenty cases in Hong Kong, four in Kowloon and one decrease in the New Territories. The number of robberies for 1931 was thirty-five cases in Hong Kong, thirty- seven in Kowloon and seven in the New Territories, a total of seventy-nine cases as against fifty-six cases in 1930.

40. There were 17,444 minor cases in 1931 as against 19,250 in 1930, a decrease of 1,806 cases or 9.3%. The decrease is chiefly under the following headings-Hawking, Opium and Forestry Offences."

Details are given in Table V.

K 10

-----

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

41. The estimated value of property stolen during the year 1931 was $552,273.93 as against $1,426,688.88 in 1930, a de- crease of $874,414.95 or 61.2%. The average for the last five years is $727,152.54. The value of property recovered during the year 1931 was $88,451.09 or 16% of the property stolen as against $72,640.46 or 5% of the property stolen in 1930, an increase of 11% in ratio between the property stolen and pro- perty recovered. Included in the sum of $552,273.93 shown in the estimated value of property stolen are ten cases of Larceny by Bailee, thirteen cases of Larceny by Servant, sixteen cases of Embezzlement, one case of Larceny by Partner, and one.case of Fraudulent Misappropriation. The amounts involved in each of these cases were all well over a thousand dollars; the largest being embezzlement of $12,626.66 and larceny by partner of $14,424.13. The total value of property stolen in these cases was $143,265.00 or 26% of the total amount stolen.

LOST PROPERTY.

42. A summary of the number of articles lost and recovered with their value is given below:

Year..

Articles reported lost.

Value

lost.

Articles re- covered and found but not

Value of

articles

found.

reported lost.

1931

320

$52,486.93

1930

323

26,460.09

167 139

$ 5,418.61

3,217.00

PIRACY.

43. Table VI shows the number of piracies committed in adjacent waters during the year. Compared with 1930, there is a decrease of one case in the number of junk piracies.

44. Twenty three sets each of anti-piracy guards were sup- plied to the British India Steam Navigation Company and the Indo-China Steam Navigation Company on the run Hong Kong- Singapore. Nineteen sets were supplied to the Canadian Pacific Steamship Company on the run Hong Kong-Shanghai. The China Navigation Company was supplied with permanent guards on twelve ships.

ARMS.

45. There were twenty arms seizures during the year, of which fourteen were charge cases and six no-charge cases. There were no seizures of note during the year. Table VII gives details of arms and ammunition seized during the year.

L



K 11

GAMBLING.

46. There were 182 successful gambling cases for 1931 as against 119 cases in 1980. There were two cases in which no conviction was obtained; one of these cases was discharged on an appeal before the Full Court. There were sixty-two Lottery cases compared with sixty in 1930. Only in one case was no

conviction obtained.

MENDICANTS.

47. During the year 1931, 968 mendicants were arrested and dealt with as follows:-

364 Mendicants were charged before Magistrate.

31

17

4

released.

Sunt to Tung Wa Hospital.

set to Canton.

1 Mendicant was sent to Kong Mun.

1

32

19

sent to Wu Chau.

1

sent to Mental Hospital.

913 Mendicants were sent to Deep Bay.

Included in the 913 mendicants sent to Deep Bay, are the 364 mendicants who were charged and convicted as beggars before Police Magistrates, and sent away on discharge from Gaol. Also a considerable percentage were sent out of the Colony on several occasions. During the past year, seven persistent beggars were each banished for a period of ten years.

DEAD BODIES.

48. The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the streets and elsewhere during the last five years:

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

Victoria, Kowloon,

367

358

706

418

366

801

1.077

1,072

669

738

Harbour.

87

139

164

126

115

......

Elsewhere,

112

106

91

103

76

Total,..

1.317

1.680

2,033

1,316

1,295

K 12

Sex.

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

Male

121

137

Adults

Female...

10

27

གང

149

33

! Unknown

1

383

:

86

107

22

17

Male

670

$55

1,015

643

664

Children... Female...

169

643

807

533

489

Unknown

46

18

29

32

18

Total,......

1.317

1,680

2,033

1,316

1,295

DOGS ORDINANCE.

49. The muzzling order was cancelled on the 10th June, and was again brought into force with effect from the 6th August, 1931.

50. Two hundred and eighty-eight dogs were destroyed in 1331 as compared with three hundred and ninety-three in 1930.

Dogs Licensed

Dogs Licensed (free)

Dogs Impounded..

Dogs Destroyed

1930. 1931.

3,700 3,900

31

30

79

92

393

288

LICENCES.

51. Table VIII shows the numbers of different licences issued during the year.

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

52. The following table shows weights and measures examined during the year.

Weights and Measures. examined.

1931.

Correct.

Incorrect.

Total.

Foreign Scales

144

2

146

Chinese Scales

571

15

586

Yard Measures

367

367

Chinese Foot Measures

586

586

Total,....

1,668

17

1,685

- K 13

53. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Weights and Measures Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

9

Convictions.

DANGEROUS GOODS.

Fines.

$250

54. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

5

Convictions.

Fines.

5

$220

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

55. The following prosecutions were instituted under the Traffic Regulations (Section 3-Ordinance 40 of 1912):-

Year.

Prosecu- Convic- tions. tions.

With- drawn.

Dis- charged.

Re- manded.

Total amount of fines

1931......

7,274

6,786

191

130

167

$ 33,320

1930......

7,310

6,852

205

180

73

$ 23,942

Manslaughter

1931......

1930......

1

1

5. The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers during the year was 1,420 as against 1,401 in the year 1930. The total number of persons passed as Motor Drivers during the year was 1,116 as against 1,152 in the year 1930.

57. The total number of accidents reported during the year was 1,080 as against 1,244 in the year 1930. The total number of fatal accidents during the year was sixty-two as against fifty- nine in the year 1930.

58. The total number of Public motor vehicles examined and passed fit for public use during the year was 3,002 as against 2,729 in the year 1930. The total number of Public Motor vehicles examined and found unfit for public use during the year was 690 as against 691 in the year 1930.

K 14

59. The total number of motor driver's licences suspended during the year was forty-seven as against seventy-four in the year 1930. The total number of motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was eleven as against one in the year 1930.

60. The report on the Police Reserve is contained in Annexe A, and the report on the Street Boys' Club in Annexe B.

19th February 1932.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector General of Police.

K 15

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE 1930 AND 1931.

Personal Emoluments (1)

1930.

1931.

$2,190,828.35 $2,409,409.63

Other Charges

Ammunition

$

21,482.33

25,635.68

Upkeep of Arms

2,563.51

1,867.76

Bedding

7.438.64

3,593.90

Burial of Destitute dead..

218.82

300.00

Cleansing Materials and Washing

487.06

517.97

Clothing and Accoutrements

105,016.46

98,113.59

Coal for Barracks

10,102.26

9,784.77

Conveyance and motor allowances

11,080.64

9,246.46

Coolie Hire

3,096.69

2,485.30

Disinfectants

2,367.57

1,914.70

Grants to Villages in N. T. in aid

of Village Scout Scheme......

2,640.00

2,611.29

Identification of Criminals

76.00

117.60

Incidental Expenses

5,784.09

9,573.74

Incidental Expenses, P. T. S....

475.23

Interpretation Fees..

300.10

210.00

Light and Electric Fans..

39,286.24

40,856.34

Mess Utensils

2,299.71

1,469.53

Passages

183,170.45

190,242.97

Petrol Oil &c. for Police Motor

Cars and Cycles

4,224.46

7,009.89

Photography

3,316.69

3,298.95

Rations for Indian Police

55,641.92

62,191.68

Rent of Stations

16,941.60

5,835.00

Repairs to Police Motor Cars and

Cycles

6,916.30

5,771.98

Rewards

1,720.00

1,400.00

Rent of Married Police Quarters

6,000.00

7,640.00

Secret Service

10,017.81

10,765.50

Small Stores

7,683.91

9,443.81

Subsistence of Prisoners

2,465.06

2,545.56

Telegrams

683.61

1,180.97

Transport

9,965.36

7,142.31

Expenses of Anti-Piracy Guards

18,521.29

Total Other Charges

$ 523,462.52 $ 541,288.54

K 16

Table I.--Continued.

Special Expenditure

1930.

1931.

Handcuffs

$ 2,393.30

Emergency Unit Van

7,923.05

10,662.82

1 Motor Car

6,565.59

1 Motor Car

3,809.00

4 Motor Cycle Combinations......

4,077.61

1 Solo Motor Cycle

818.00

Mosquito Net Poles

1,963.30

1 Light Motor Van

4,000.78

1 Photostat

5,743.44

1 Motor Boat

1,110.00

Range Repairs

118.45

Traffic Light

1,385.57

Special Course of Instruction for

Police Officers

Gestetner Duplicator

453.69

1,300.00

Total Special Expenditure.......

38,404.07 $ 13,920.53

Total Police Department

$2,752,694.94 $2,964,618.70

(1) Includes Officers of Cadet, S. C. & A., & J. C. Services.

K 17

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE 1930 AND 1931.

Head of Revenue collected by Police Department.

Licences and Internal Revenue.

1930.

1931.

Arms Licences,

3,610.00 $

9,600.00

Carriage, Chair &c. Licences,

314,824.97

Dangerous Goods Licences,

2,738.01

2,705.83

Dog Licences,

11,205.00

12,765.00

Forfeitures,

3,772.99

2.792.83

Hawkers' Licences,

85,080.00

113,655.00

Money Changers' Licences,

10,430.00

12,111.00

Motor Spirits Duties,

782.40

2,567.25

Theatrical Licences,

2,654.00

4,672.00

Vehicle Motor Licences,

157,622.72

Vehicle Motor Drivers Licences,

Vehicle Other Licences,..

34,739.25

64,514.00

Vehicle Other

Licences,

Drivers &c.

4,590.60

Fees of Court or Office &c.

Motor Ambulance Fees,

4,422.00

7,963.00

Miscellaneous Fees,

3,270.00

Official Signatures,

2,344.00

3,232.00

Police & Other Stores,

2,922.23

2,055.86

Police Services,

16,482.50

26.082.90

Sick Stoppages from Police Force.

4,186.80

4,415.05

Watchmen's Ordinance,

4,475.20

10,139.40

Miscellaneous Receipts.

Blake Pier Tickets

559.38

529.88

Condemned Stores, &c.,. . .. . .t. . .

5,709.21

2,866.28

Contribution for Anti-Piracy Escort, Other Miscellaneous Receipts, ...

130,773.06

10,970.53

220.00

Total

$ 487,169.22 $ 613,882.91

K 18

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE OF POLICE DEPARTMENT FOR LAST TEN YEARS.

*

Personal Emoluments

and Other Charges.

Special Expenditure.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue

1922

$1,437,540.26

$ 96,231.50

$ 1,533,771.76 $ 376,346.78

1923

1,597,336.58

36,510.56

1,633,847.14

349,859.11

1924

1,832,755.05

45,193.64

1,877,948.69

389,176.19

1925

1,775,062.61

137,981.30

1,913,046.91

375,782.40

1926

1,746,395.89

96,905.35

1,843,301.24

374,548.54

1927

1,848,625.56

26,839.12

1,875,464.68

393,556.72

1928

1,994,940.02

110,898.88

2,105,838.90

448 771.85

1929

2,027,716.87

57,247.03

2.084,963.90

463,148.21

1930

2,714,290.87

38,404.07

2,752,694.94

487,169.22

1931

2,950,698.17

13,920.53

2,964,618.70

613,882.91

* Includes Officers of Cadet, S.C. & A. & J. C. Services attached to Dept.

NATURE OF OFFENCE,

K 20

Table V.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1931.

A-SERIOUS OFFENCES.

Charged cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

Charged cases.

Cases without charge.

Total cases.

1930.

1931.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

Arms,

35

6

Assault (Serious),

45

6

CO CO

41

10

5

15

66%

10

:

51

16

1

17 94%

2

10

1

Assault with intent to rob,

3

3

6 100%

6

Burglary,

29

69

98

31

65

96 33%

36

Coinage Offences,

16

16

11

11 100%

12

...

Deportation,

238

238

219

219 100%

219

Embezzlement,

27 56

83

15

57

72 20%

12

House and Godown Breaking,

48

118

166 45

110

155 30%

2

48

Intimidation and Extortion,..

6

6

6

6

100%

Kidnapping,

44

5

49 26

4

30

86%

35

Larceny,.

2,053 1,674 3,727 1,938 1,561

3,499

55%

8

21,898

:

Larceny from Dwelling Houses,

77 540 617

102

517

619 16%

1

1 113

Larceny on Ships and Wharves,

77 40 117

60 52

112 53%

60

Manslaughter,

3

5

1

1 100%

::

Murder,

10

12

22

4

13

17 23%

1

1

Murder, (Attempted),

1

1

1

1 100%

Obtaining by False Pretences,.

54

33

87

54

31

85 63%

Receiving,

143

143

158

158 100%

Robbery,..

8

48

56

19

60

79

24%

Women and Girls,....

21

21

3

3 100%

Other Serious Offences,

123

11. 134

61

22

83 53%

60

212

1

...

43

145

22

2

Total,......

3,060 2,621 5,681 2,785 2,499 5,284

|

22

22

701

4 2,747

1

Chinese.

VALUE OF

PROPERTY

STOLEN.

VALUE OF

PROPERTY

RECOVERED.

Se



7,414.13

...

1,401.76

4 112,797.29 6,015.00 16,268.19 2,328.30

6

12

157209,016 74 | 41,450.94 11 116,914.39 25,004,74 6 21,297.20

3,261.50

1

14

...

12 13,995.26

2,772.92

51

188.50

188.50

31 32,517.92

1,858.43

...

25 21,864.31

4,169.00

314 552,273.93 88,451.09

73.93

.

Decrease

Increase

:

1930

1931

:

:

Year.

Number of Persons Banished

from Hong Kong.

Total number of men handled by Records Office. Year 1931=9,874

""

1930=8,207

Persons

Discharged from Gaol

and dealt with.

— K 19 —–

Table IV.

RECORDS OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR 1931.

Singapore Banishees received and

sent on.

Singapore Vagrants received and

sent on.

Rangoon Banishees received and

sent on.

1,355

2,848

1,279

991

1,612

2,328

2,181

1,384

2,074

1,285

16

Nil

14

116

Dutch East Indies and Deli Sumatra

received and sent on.

520

2

6

257

902

393

39

789

116

Increase 1,667



.....

Borneo Banishees received and

sent on.

Ocean Island received and sent on.

Asiatic Petroleum Company.

NATURE OF OFFENCES.

K 21

Table V.

B.-MINOR OFFENCES.

Charged cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

Charged cases.

Cases without

charge.

Total cases.

1930.

1931.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

Indians.

Chinese.

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Assault,

357

357 311

Damage to Property,

19

19 36

311 | 100%

36 100%

LO

73

367

6

1

32

45

8

Dangerous Goods,

29

29 28

28 100%

:..

::

28

LQ 00 00

Drunkenness,.

Forestry Offences,

25

25

22

22 100%

7

3

13

350

350

169

169 100%

237

7

...

...

Gambling,..........

368

368 607

607 100%

3,130

67

Hawking Offences,.

11,282

11,282 8,984

8,984 100%

8,846

250

...

Lottery Offences,

223

223 217

217 100%

244

18

...

Mendicants,

158

158 391

391 100%

440

10

Merchant Shipping Ordinance,

749

749

689

689 100%

1,151

36

...

Morphine,

2

2

2

2) 100%

1

2

Nuisances,

647

647 1,139

1,139 | 100%

1

1,134

35

Opium,

938

938

759

759 100%

914

103

...

Revenue,

464

464

565

565 100%

569

56

Rogue and Vagabond,

29

29

51

51 100%

55

4

...

Stowaways,

50

50

46

46 100%

25

5

85

1

...

Unlawful Possession,

355

355

270

270 100%

235

51

:.

Vagrants,

42

42 31

31 100%

32

6

...

Vehicles and Traffic,.

1,633

1,633 1,305

1,305 100%

1

2

1,299

29

...

Women and Girls,

188

188 278

Other Miscellaneous Offences,

1,342

1,342 1,544

278 100%

1,544 100%

284

13

...

25

8 2,115

1

117

Total,.

19,250

19,250 17,444

17,444

100

31 21,180

7

852

...

Grand Total,..

22,310| 2,621 |24,931 20,229 2,499 22,728

122

:

35 23,927

8

3] 1,166

...

:

...

-€

...

...

VALUE OF

PROPERTY

STOLEN.

VALUE OF

PROPERTY

RECOVERED

C.

::



K 22

Table VI.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1931.

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

Place of Occurrence.

Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks

1931.

10th Jan.

....

S.S. "Hsin Ning" China Merchants. S.N. Co.

22nd Nov.

S.S. "Hanyang" British Ship Master. Capt. Harris Walker.

Honghai Bay.

Near Turnabout Island between

Shanghai and Amoy 15 Miles N.E. of Swatow.

1577

$87,278.02

Nil

4

First information received by radio. No information as to number of Pirates or quantity of cargo and personal effects stolen. No Guards on this vessel and nobody injured in piracy.

Firates took ship to Namao Island. No Guards carried and no per- sons injured or kidnapped.

M

K 23

Table VI,-Continued.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1931.

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

Place of Occurrence.

Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks

1931.

4th Jan.

Wing Shun Lee, Master of Cargo Junk No. 206V.

Ping Hoi off Pedro Blanco.

12

Nil

Nil

This was a piratical attack and the pirates chased the Wing Shun Lee junk and fired shots at her on the High Seas, but before the pirates had overtaken her the S.S. Hang Sang went to her assistance and stood by until H M.S. Sterling arrived, No property was stolen and no one was injured.

- K 24

Table VII.

ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING THE YEAR 1931,

In Store on Dec. 31st 1931.

Description of Arms.

Arms Seized.

Origin.

Ammunition Seized.

Origin.

Winchester Rifles

Arms.

Ammunition.

British

Rifles Various

German Rifles

Mauser Pistols

1

German

Auto Pistols

6

5 German 1

10

186

German

39

8.539

1

7

German

2

11,764

310

75,433

U.S.A.

2

U.S.A. 221

Revolvers

Luger Pistols

Thompson sub. M. G.

1222

Unknown

10

498

Unknown 277

23

6,121

86

15,118

27

U.S.A.

K 25

Table VIII.

Licences issued during the year:-

1930.

1931.

Public Jinrikshas

1,398

1,216

Private Jinrikshas

798

729

Public Chairs

440

440

Private Chairs

76

69

Drivers and Bearers

14,980

11,788

Truck licences

747

630

Motor cars (Livery)

439

427

Motor cars (Private)..

1,574

1,822

Motor Drivers (Cars & Cycles)...

4,157

4,957

Motor cycle (Licences)..

581

523

Money Changers

213

207

Pawnbrokers

144

150

Auctioneer Licences

4

3

Billiard Tables and Bowling Alleys

5

4

Marine Stores..

38

42

Game Licences

342

379

Hawkers

Dangerous Goods

Poisons

12,498

13,137

915

1,014

16

15

K 26

Annexe A.

REPORT ON HONG KONG POLICE RESERVE FOR 1931.

The Hong Kong Police Reserve organisation has remained unchanged throughout the year.

2. The total strength of the Force shows an increase of twelve members, relative figures are appended hereto for pur- poses of comparison. Although there has been a considerable increase in the number of recruits to various units, there have been several resignations, dismissals, etc. as a result of careful 'weeding out' of inactive members from the Flying Squad and Chinese Company.

The strength of the Contingent is as follows:--

1931

1930

Chinese Company

74

72

Indian Company

47

48

Flying Squad

47

46

Sharpshooters Company

49

89

Total

217

205

3. Five commendations were earned by members of the Reserve during the period under review.

4. Training has been continued on similar lines to those employed in previous years, and vastly improved attendance and keenness has been recorded amongst recruits to all Units.

5. Life Saving instruction has been given to members of Units, and most useful and at the same time interesting in- struction has been given to the Chinese Company in Jujitsu, by Police Sergeant R. J. Hunt, whose voluntary services in his spare time are greatly appreciated. It is hoped that further instruction in this art may be arranged for the members of the Reserve Emergency Unit (late Sharpshooter Company) during 1932.

6. The Reserve has supplied contingents on the usual cere monial occasions-His Majesty the King's Birthday and on Armistice Day 1931, and in addition, on the two occasions on which His Majesty the King of Siam passed through the Colony special squads were on duty.

K 27

7. The entire available strength of the Reserve was made available, and was on duty three days prior to the Proclamation of a State of Emergency by His Excellency the Governor as a result of Anti-Japanese disturbances at the end of September, 1931: and following the proclamation, the Reserve was on duty continuously from 18.00 to 24.00 hours until October 17th, 1931, after which date they were left at 24 hours' notice for duty.

8. The keenness displayed by all members of the Sharp- shooter Company, and the manner in which they dealt with disturbances to which they were called, reflect great credit on both the individuals and on the Officer Commanding. The strength of this Unit shows signs of increasing considerably in the near future, and it is hoped that improved training facilities will be made available to them during this year. There is no doubt that in disturbances such as those which have occurred during 1931, this unit is ideally constituted for the role of auxi- liaries to the Regular Police who are so extremely hard pressed with alarms on such occasions.

9. The Special Constabulary remains divided into thirteen sections, by nationality of members, and has a total strength of one hundred and fifty-six men.

10. The Essential Services Register, has been corrected from time to time in accordance with information obtained from firms concerned, but considerable difficulty has been experienced in securing from them the data necessary for the complete and up-to-date compilation of such a record.

Annexe B.

REPORT ON STREET BOYS' CLUB FOR 1931.

The membership of the Club is now twenty-four as against twenty-five in January, 1930.

2. During the year three boys who were over age were allowed to resign on obtaining permanent employment, one boy ran away, one boy was expelled for misconduct and one was enlisted as a Chinese Member of the Hong Kong Police Force.

3. During the past year five boys joined the Club, three of whom were taken from the Tung Wah Hospital and one from the Society for the Protection of Children. Three boys have obtained permanent employment as shoe blacks and appear to be doing extremely well. One boy obtained permanent employ- ment as a Billiard room attendant at Police Headquarters. Four ther boys are employed as Police Messengers. Three boys are Lowkers and hold free licences for that purpose.

K 28

4. There are ten boys at St. Louis Industrial School.

5. The funds of the Club on 31st December, 1931, amounted to $466.69. Each boy is expected to save a proportion of his income, the total of such savings during the year amounted to $507.72 an increase of $210.88.

6. During the summer months the boys went swimming at their leisure. At the Police Annual Aquatic sports held in Sept- ember, 1981, five boys entered for the Messengers race and the first three places were again secured by members of the club, YEUNG CHEUNG being first for the third year in succession.

7. Hot baths are provided for the boys at Police Head- quarters during the winter months.

8. Games, Drill and Gymnastic classes were held twice a week during the year at the Chinese Y.M.C.A. except during the month of April and for the summer vacation when the classes were suspended.

9. Members of the Club now regularly attend the education- al classes held three times a week at No. 40 Hollywood Road. Their progress is considered very satisfactory by the Teacher.

10. At the request of the Honourable Inspector General of Police Dr. Douglas Laing of the Education Department gave a course of four lectures on Hygiene to members of the Street Boys' Club. The lectures dealt with the elementary rules of cleanliness and health. The boys showed much interest in the lectures and a considerable number of Chinese Police Constables voluntarily attended each lecture. A letter of thanks was sent to Dr. Laing.

11. In August the boys at St. Louis Industrial School were taken to Macao for Summer Camp, free passage tickets being generously supplied by Hong Kong and Macao Steamboat Co.

12. Several small improvements for the benefit of members of the Club have been carried out at the Club Premises which remain at No. 40 Hollywood Road, 3rd floor. Through the kind interest of Mrs. Southorn a quantity of pot plants were given to the Club which the members greatly appreciated. Police Sergeant Fung Kam remains in charge and resides on these premises. He maintains discipline and attends to the welfare of the members. The conduct of members remains good

K 29

13. During the past year the following ladies and gentlemen have visited the Club premises and taken a great interest in the welfare of the boys which they in turn greatly appreciated :- Hon. Inspector General of Police, Mrs. Wolfe, M.B.E., Mrs. Southorn, Mr. and Mrs. T. H. King, Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg, M.C., Hon. T. N. Chau, Mr. Tang Shiu Kin, Mrs. Tang, Mr. M. K. Lo, Mrs. Lo, Mr. Lam Chee Ming, Mr. Ngan Shing Kwan and Mrs. Ngan.

14. On several occasions the boys were given boxes of cakes and pastries through the generosity of Mrs. Southorn. The "Busy Bee" working party per Mr. Maughan also kindly sent cakes. This interest is much appreciated by the boys.

K 30

REPORT OF THE CHIEF OFFICER, HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1931.

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE.

The expenditure of the Fire Brigade for the year 1981 was $305,016.00, including special expenditure amounting to $66,248.00, as against $315,481.00, including special expenditure amounting to $99,833.00, in 1930.

2. The revenue of the Brigade for the year amounted to a grand total of $9,269.50 obtainable from the following sources :-

$4,22.00 for 1930, an increase of $0.07%.

Motor Ambulance Service

Theatre and Special duties

$7,963.00 as against

$1,306.50 as against

$1,503.00 for 1930, a decrease of 13.07%.

STATIONS AND EQUIPMENT.

3. No new stations were erected during the year.

4. The new Motor Fire float, which was under construction in 1930, was completed, and delivered to the Fire Brigade on the 16th May following very satisfactory speed trials, engine and pumping tests.

5. Three 2-gallon Fire Snow fire extinguishers were added to the equipment of the Brigade.

6. All vehicles and fire floats were satisfactorily overhauled during the year. All other appliances

All other appliances and equipment were examined and tested every month.

7. The number of pedestal hydrants and ball hydrants was increased respectively by three and twenty-three during the year; the total number of hydrants now being 1,315 viz:-

Hong Kong (pedestal hydrants) (including Peak)

115

Kowloon (pedestal hydrants)

90

Hong Kong (ball hydrants) (including Peak)

720

Kowloon (ball hydrants) (including New Territories).

.. 390

Total

.1,315

The above hydrants were regularly inspected every quarter.

:

K 31

FIRES, LOSS OF LIFE AND RESCUES.

8. Fatalities at fires amounted to thirty-one in all. Thirteen persons were burned, and three fatally injured, at a fire which occurred in a four-storeyed building in Staunton Street.

Eight' persons were trapped on the upper floor of a carpenter's shop and tenement dwelling in Pottinger Street, the bodies of six of the victims being found in the ruins of the kitchen in the rear of the upper floor, while two others succumbed to their injuries. Four persons perished as a result of a fire which occurred in a small improvised cockloft in a salt-dealer's shop in Chinese Street, Central. At this fire three persons were rescued by means of Brigade appliances. The remaining fatalities occurred at two fires in Kowloon; two persons being burned to death in a matshed fire in the remote district of Kau Lung Tsai, the third resulting from a man's clothing becoming ignited while handling methylated spirits with a naked light.

9. Twenty-five persons lost their lives as a result of collapses and landslides, while fifteen persons were extricated alive. Of the above the most serious landslides occurred at Shek Li Pui (New Territories) on the 9th March and the Railway disaster near Shatin on the 20th April when the loss of life was six and eleven persons respectively.

CALLS.

10. The number of calls received during the year totalled 199, actual fires 133, chinney fires 30, collapses 7, landslides 3 and false alarms 26. Compared with the previous year (1930) there was an increase of thirteen calls. Fifty-one were received by fire alarm, one hundred and four by telephone, nineteen by the Police and twenty-five from messengers.

11. Of the false alarms, eight were maliciously given, five were given with good intent, and thirteen were due to electrical faults.

FIRE INSPECTION WORK.

12. The following inspections were made by the Brigade and reported upon during the year:-

Theatres and Cinemas

Hotels and Restaurants

Garages

Petrol Stores and Installations........

Dangerous Trades and Special risks

Inflammable structures

210

78

211

137

226

41

K 32

FIRE INSPECTION WORK,-Continued,

Premises used for Offensive trades

13

Miscellaneous Stores

29

Factories

Schools

18

11

Premises installed with fire hydrant

services (other than those mentioned above)

Other inspections

51

49

Total......

1,074

237 Chemical Fire Extinguishers located in various buildings were tested and recharged by the Brigade during the year.

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.

13. Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 329, com- prising altogether 3,418 hours.

14. During the anti-Japanese disturbances, 25th to 27th September, the Brigade was called out on seven occasions to assist the Police in dealing with rioters in Kowloon.

LEGISLATION.

15. An Amendment of the Public Entertainment Regulation Ordinance (No. 22 of 1919) was passed which called for (i) Special fire precautions relating to cinematograph operation and cinemato- graph films and (ii) a Proscenium wall and fire-resisting Safety Curtain to be provided in all buildings in which a permanent stage is provided.

AMBULANCE SERVICE.

16. The work of the Motor Ambulance Service attached to the Fire Brigade continues to increase as the figures in the follow- ing summary show. Compared with the number of cases attend- ed in the year 1922 viz. 1,185-the first complete year after the introduction of Motor Ambulances-the total for the year under review were 3,872-an increase of 226%.

The distance run during 1930 was 26,111 miles

K 33

SUMMARY OF CASES ATTENDED.

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

2,637

3.187

3,282

3,289

3,709

3.872

Thanks to the generous assistance of the St. John Ambulance Brigade, the motor ambulance service was further strengthened during the year by the addition of two new Ambulances which H.E. the Governor was pleased to accept on loan from the Brigade for public service on the 9th July and 6th October respectively. As a result the number of motor ambulances now maintained by the Government is seven, viz. four in Hong Kong and three in Kowloon.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Chief Officer, Fire Brigade.

Hong Kong, 23rd February, 1932.

HONG KONG -

Central Kennedy Town. Wanchai... Shaukiwan

Gough Hill

KOWLOON :-

Tsim Sha Tsui Mong Kok...................... Un Long (N. T.) Yaumati.

Table I.

Stations and Plant, 31st December, 1931.

Stations.

Flant.

Full Stations.

Sub-Stations.

Totals

2

6

1

11

1

2

...

...

Motor Fire

Tenders.

21

Motor Fire

Engines (pumps)

Motor Turntable

Ladders.

Motor Trailer

pumps.

Motor Fire

Cycles.

Fire Escapes.

30

7

1

Fire Floats.

31

Motor

Ambulances.

K 34

Ma

K 35

Table II.

Summary of Estimated Monopoly Loss by Fire for the year 1931.

Not Exceeding

Exceed-

Month

Under $500

ing

Total

$5,000

$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000

$

January.....

1,334 500

1,500 3,450

7,000

13,784

February...

40

9,800

9,840

March

130

500

1,500 3,000

5,130

April

360

766 1,400

11,000

13,526

May

5

15

June

34 577

July...

575

:

August

234 700

:

:..

:

:

:.

17,350

17,961

575

934

September..

200

6,000

6,200

October

656

1,900

15,000 17,556

November.. 1,255 750 950

5,000

10,000 17,955

December

791

7,800 13,000 21,591

Total... 5,614 3,0271,716 6,300 19,250 89,150 $122,027

¡Time of

Date

Call

1931

Address.

(Hours)

Table III.

SUMMARY OF MOST SERIOUS FIRES DURING YEAR, 1931.

Fire extinguished by

Business.

Hyd-

Eng-

rants

ines

Fire

Floats

Jan. 3

02.01 208 Wing Lok Street.

Dried meat Factory.

4

June

9

21.30 35 Staunton Street.

Joss paper and fire- cracker shop and dwellings.

1

Oct.

27

17.25 60 & 58 Woosung Street, Frivate.

Yaumati.

3

Nov. 8

03.4642 Pottinger Street, Victoria.

Carpenter's shop and dwellings.

2

Damage.

- K 36-

A building of 4 floors about 60 x 20 ft. (used as shop, store, offices and dwellings); two upper floors and contents severely damaged by fire and roof off, floor and contents under damaged by water.

A building of 4 floors about 50 x 14 ft. (used as shop, store and dwelling); two upper floors and contents severely damaged by fire, heat, smoke and water; floors and contents under damaged by water and dirt.

burned to death. Four (Three since

Six males and seven females females severely injured by jumping into street. dead).

Two buildings each of 4 floors, covering an area of about 50 x 30 ft.; two upper floors and contents severely damaged by fire and water; floor and contents under damaged by water and dirt. (Adjoining and communicating).

A building of 4 floors about 45 x 15 ft. (used as carpenter's shop, store and dwelling) gutted and roof off.

Two males and four females burned to death. Two males severely injured (since dead).

Year.

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS FOR THE YEAR 1931.

The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for 1930 were as follows :---

Convicted by Ordinary Courts Debtors

On remand or in default of finding surety

Total.

1930.

1931.

5,624

5,921

73

44

796

802

6,493 6,767

2. Fifty-three boys were admitted as Juveniles i.e. under sixteen years of age, during the year with sentences varying from five days detention to twelve months hard labour. Of this number twenty-three only were treated as Juvenile Offen- ders; the others in the opinions of the Superintendent and Medical Officer being over sixteen years of age. In three cases corporal punishment was awarded by courts in addition to sen- tences of imprisonment.

3. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 21.8 as compared with 22.8 for 1930.

4. 266 prisoners were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories against 260 for the previous year.

5. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past ten years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong:-

Estimated

population.

Number of

convicts.

Percentage

of

population.

Daily

average

number of

prisoners.

1922

662,200

259

*039

787

119

1923

681,800

294

*043

861

126

1924

799,550

345

*043

1,066

133

1925

874,420

394

*045

1,116

*128

1926

786,920

409

*052

1,054

•134

1927

890,400

392

*044

1.189

*136

1928

1,075,690

352

*033

1,071

·100

1929

1,075,690

331

·031

1.075

·100

1930

1,143,510

256

*022.

1,175

·103

1931

* 849,751

202

*024

1,102

*130

*From 1931 Census. Population in previous years over estimated.

to

Precentage

population.

L 2

VICTORIA GAOL (MALE PRISON).

6. 14,929,770 forms were printed and issued to various Government departments and 82,210 books bound or repaired, as compared with 14,091,535 forms and 77,701 books in 1930. During the year type to the value of $2,300.00 was cast.

7. Other industries in the Prison included matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, tinsmithing, painting, laundering, shoe- making, netmaking and basketmaking; and the necessary upkeep work of cooking, cleaning and minor building repairs.

8. The new Printing Shop was opened in July and gave a much needed, but still insufficient, increase of workshop accommodation.

9. The Gaol was again overcrowded.

10. Prisoner 169 in attempting to escape on 16th April fell from the roof of E Hall and was killed. Two prisoners

They were recaptured.

escaped on 13th August.

VICTORIA GAOL (FEMALE PRISON).

11. This prison was also again overcrowded. The new female prison at Lai Chi Kok is however nearing completion and will be occupied before the summer of 1932.

12. During the year English and Chinese resident ladies continued to visit the Prison to instruct the women in sewing, raffiawork, &c., and to give them elementary education. The prisoners are attentive and the results gratifying. The visiting ladies' voluntary and willing work is greatly appreciated by the administration.

LAI CHI KOK PRISON.

13. Garden work continues to give useful employment. Other work done at Lai Chi Kok, apart from the necessary routine duties of cooking, cleaning, etc. included string and net making, basket and broom making and grass matmaking. Coir mat- making was successfully introduced in 1930 and the bulk of this work is now done at Lai Chi Kok.

GENERAL.

.14. 807 punishments were awarded for breaches of prison discipline as compared with 388 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in forty seven cases for prison offences.

15. Fifty eight prisoners were whipped by order of courts,

L 3

16. In both male Prisons during the early part of the year there was considerable discontent and insubordination much of which was attributed to outside influence, the attitude of the prisoners in Victoria Gaol being reflected at Lai Chi Kok. There was however a marked improvement when better facilities for supervision were provided by the new Printing Shop and general workshop, and at the end of the year discipline had been restored to normal.

17. The conduct of the female prisoners was uniformly good.

18. The new dietary recommended by the Food Committee appointed in 1930 was approved and brought into force on 19th May. The Prison medical officers are of opinion that the diets are entirely satisfactory. There have been no general com- plaints from prisoners since the introduction of the new scales.

19. The health of the prisoners generally was well main- tained.

20.

very good.

The conduct of the Staff, with some exceptions, was

21. The general health of the Staff was good.

22. Mr. F. A. Hopkins was appointed Assistant Super- intendent of Prisons on 30th January on transfer from Cyprus.

23. Mr. F. A. Hopkins acted as Superintendent of Prisons from 10th October to 2nd November during the absence of Mr. J. W. Franks on duty in Malaya.

24. The Rev. H. Wells, 9.B.E., who had been associated with the Department for over 25 years as visiting chaplain left the Colony in January on retirement. The work of the Rev. Mr. Wells was voluntary and ungrudging and his services have been missed by both the staff and prisoners with whom his relations were always most cordial and helpful.

25. During the year the Department also lost the services. of an efficient and valued officer in Chief Warder McLeod who left on 7th November prior to retirement on pension after com- pleting thirty-five years Prison Service in Hong Kong.

5th April, 1932.

(SD.) J. W. FRANKS, Superintendent of Prisons.

Table I.

RETURN SHOWING THE EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR THE YEAR 1931.

EXPENDITURE.

$

REVENUE.

Pay and allowance of officers including Uniform, etc.

534,822,81

Earning of prisoners

Victualling of prisoners..

149,204.11

Debtors' subsistence

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

55,317.56

Naval subsistence

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

38,775.25

Consulate, Amoy

Military Authorities

Total

778,119.73

To Balance

1930

$677,585.16

Total

Average annual cost per prisoner $558.13, in 1930 $460.15, and in 1929 $317.43.

*

c.

163,062.93

291.00

95.60

171.15

37.10

614,461.95

$778,119.73

L 4-

L 5

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Revenue for the past 10 years.

Cost

Year. Expenditure. Revenne. of prisoners'

maintenance.

Average cost per prisoner.

*

C.

$ C.

C.

C.

1922......

291,175.12

126,124.62

165,050.50

209.72

1923......

1924...... 375,158.14 121,664.03

1925...... 462,827.14

1926..... 472,337.42

1927....

493,398.88

324,698.26 117,302.22

207,396.04

240.88

253,137.11

237.56

122,221.20 340,605.84 305.20

148,667.08

322,640.12

306,11

154,929.44

338,469.44

284.67

1928...

485,147.89

160,272.50

324,875.39

303.34

1929....

1930......

512,591.65

171,355.24 341,236.41

317.43

-677,585.16

136,908.08 540,677.08

460.15

1931..

778,119.73

163,062.93 615,056.80

558.13

>

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1931.

1

2

ลง

3

4

5

6

7

Value of

Value of

Value of

Nature of

Industry.

stock on

haud

January 1st

1931.

Value of

materials

purchased.

Total Dr.

articles

manufactur- ed or work

done for

payment.

Value of

work

done for

stock on

Value of

Earnings

hand

Total Cr.

Difference

between

gaol or other

December

Departments. 31st, 1931.

columns

3 and 7.

L 6

C.

..

C.

C.

C.

C.

C.

Oakum,

Coir,

Netmaking,

5,368.40

195.50

Tailoring,

8,476.15

5,113.56

290.14

23,018.53,

10,481,96

3,976.45

3,749.00

4,865.20

12,590.65

2,108.69

485.64

375.15

21.37

252.50

31,494.68

106.75

25,178.01

9,694.00

649.02

34,978.76

163.38

3,484.08

Rattan,

107.60

545.95

653.55

.50

911.30

26.50

938.30

284.75

Tinsmithing,

44.05

1,761.46

1,805,51

55.46

4,192.10

63.20

4,310.76

2,505.25

Carpentering,

2,066.40

5,048.93

7,115,33

293.70

5,614.67

2,334.40

8,242.77

1,127.44

Grass-matting,

10.40

128.00

138.40

498.60

24.40

523.00

384.60

Shoemaking,

679.20

4,436.11

5,115,31

129.55

6,719.93

334.00

7,183.48

2,068.17

Laundry,

247,90

1,913.18

2,161.08

11,740.35

75.00

11,815.35

9,654.27

Printing and

Bookbinding,...

61,767.00

71,557.30

133,324.30

1,392.27

213,299.51

59,783.73

274,475.51

141,151.21

Photography,

300.50

1,690.27

1,990.77

1.00

1,871.36

249.50

2,121.86

131.09

Total,......$

79,263.10

115,503.43

1,766.5 194,766.53

6,330.83

278,796.20

77,702.43

357,829.46

163,062.93

Paid into Bank during 1931, which sum includes $261.91 for work executed in 1930, $6,681,23.

Value of work executed during 1931 for which payment was deferred to 1932, $482.89.

HONG KONG

MEDICAL & SANITARY

REPORT

FOR THE YEAR 1931

BY

A. R. WELLINGTON

Director of Medical and Sanitary Services.

SECTION

M 3

INDEX.

CONTENTS

PAGE

7

16

INTRODUCTION

I.--ADMINISTRATION

11.-PUBLIC HEALTH:

A. General Remarks

*.

B. Communicable Diseases:

(a) Mosquito-borne Diseases

(b) Infectious Diseases:

(1) Non-Notifiable

(ii) Notifiable

(c) Helminthic Diseases

25

26

28

29

30

34

C. Vital Statistics:

(a) General Population

34

(b) Non-Chinese Population

35

(c) European Officials.

39

1II.-HYGIENE AND SANITATION :-

A. General Remarks-Administration

39

B. Freventive Measures against:-

(a) Insect-borne Diseases

40

(b) Epidemic or acute infectious diseases:

(i) Plague

41

(ii) Smallpox

42

(iii) Cholera, Dysentery, Enteric

43

(c) Tuberculosis

43

(d) Helminthic Diseases

43

SECTION

M 4

INDEX,-Continued.

CONTENTS

C. General Measures of Sanitation:-

FAGE

(a) Domestic cleanliness

49

(b) Scavenging

44

(c) Conservancy and sewerage

44

(d) Drainage

45

(e) Water Supplies

45

(f) Clearance of bush and undergrowth...........

45

(g) Sanitary inspections

D. School Hygiene

45

46

E. Labour Conditions

F. Housing and Town Planning

48

48

G. Food in relation to Health and Diseases:

(a) Inspection and control of food supplies..

51

(b) Deficiency diseases

51

(c) Slaughter Houses, Markets and Dairies.

52

52

(d) Training of Sanitary Personnel

IV.--PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINISTRA-

TION:

A. General

53

B. Quarantine

54

1

C. Emigration

54

D. Vaccination

55

?

E. Tables I, II, III, IV, and V

56-58

SECTION

M 5-

INDEX,-Continued.

CONTENTS

V.---MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE:

FAGE

A. Ante-natal and Infant Welfare Centres

59

B. Midwives

59

C. Maternity Hospital Accommodation:

(a) Government (G.C.H. and Victoria)

61

(b) Chinese (Tung Wah, Kwong Wah,

Tung Wah Eastern, Tsan Yuk, and Wanchai)

VI. HOSPITAL, INSTITUTES, ETC. :—

A. Government Institutions:-

Government Civil Hospital

62

63

383

Victoria Hospital

66

Kowloon Hospital

66

Government Dispensaries

67

Venereal Diseases Clinics

X-Ray Department

2 888

68

70

B. Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries:-

Tung Wah Hospital

72

Kwong Wah Hospital

72

Chinese Public Dispensaries (9 in all)

72

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

73

Infectious Diseases Hospitals

79

M 6

INDEX,—Continued.

SECTION

CONTENTS

VII.--FRISONS AND ASYLUMS :-

A. Prisons

B. Mental Hospital

VIII-METEOROLOGY

IX. SCIENTIFIC:

A. Bacteriological Institute

B. The Public Mortuaries :

(a) Public Mortuary, Victoria

PAGE

79

82

82

84

84

84

85

85

(b) Public Mortuary, Kowloon

X.-THE NEW TEKRITORIES-PUBLIC

HEALTH & SANITATION.....

86

APPENDIX A.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT BACTERIOLOGIST

91

APPENDIX B.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT MALARIOLOGIST

103

APPENDIX C.-REPORT OF THE GOVENMENT

ANALYST

117

APPENDIX D.-REPORT ON MEDICAL,

SURGICAL, AND OBSTETRICAI.

AND GYNAECOLOGICAL

UNITS, UNIVERSITY OF

HONG KONG

126

APPENDIX E.-GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS—

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

APPENDIX F.-CHINESE HOSPITALS—

133

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

133

APPENDIX G.-MORTUARIES-RETURN OF

DISEASES

146

J

M 7

Appendix M.

ANNUAL MEDICAL REFORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1931.

INTRODUCTION.

Geographical Features.

In order to give a clear impression of the Public Health conditions obtaining in Hong Kong it is necessary first to describe the situation of the Colony, its geographical features, its climate, the nature of the population, the housing conditions and the bearing old Chinese traditions, beliefs, and customs, have on the question of co-operation with the authorities in the promotion and preservation of the Public Health. It is also desirable to indicate the various organisations which together make up the Public Health machinery.

2. The Territory under British jurisdiction includes the Colony Proper, namely, the Island of Hong Kong with the Peninsula of Kowloon, and the New Territories. In this Report the term Colony means the Colony Proper. The area of the Island is 32 square miles-that of Kowloon is 2 2/3rd. square miles while the New Territories have approximately 300 square miles.

3. Situated between 22°-9′ and 22°-37′ North Latitude the area under discussion is just within the northern limits of the tropics. It is in fact practically on the same level as Calcutta. It may be said to form the lower extremity of the left bank of the estuary of the Canton River, at the head of which is the city of Canton and on an island in which stands the Portuguese Colony of Macao.

4. Topographically, the Island of Hong Kong and the Peninsula of Kowloon may be described as a series of granite ridges separated by narrow valleys and having here and there flat areas facing the sea. The New Territory is of similar formation with some fairly wide valleys towards the north and west. The features are such that flats suitable for town sites are few in number and limited in extent. In the Island the only level of any size is that on which the city of Victoria stands and this does not cover more than one square mile. With regard

to Kowloon, not more than one half is flat and convenient for street formation.

The Climate.

5. Situated just within the northern limits of the tropics and occupying an insular position immediately south of the great land mass of China, Hong Kong's climate is very materially

M 8

influenced by the direction of the prevailing winds. The North East Monsoon blows from November until April and during this period the weather is dry and cool and invigorating. From May until October, the season of the South West Monsoon, the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot, muggy and enervating. July, August, and September are marked by atmospheric disturbances which now and then culminate in typhoons or cyclones accompanied by blinding sheets of rain.

6. The mean annual temperature is 72°F. During the summer months the average temperature is 87°F. and there is little variation throughout the twenty-four hours. Situated on the north side of the Island the city of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze, which is cut off by the mountains behind the town. During the winter months the range of temperature is from 70°F. to 45 ̊F. with an average 66 ̊F. necessitating for comfort the wearing of warm clothes and the provision of fires in the houses. Frost is practically unknown.

7. The average yearly rainfall is 85.72 inches. As might be expected most of the rain falls in the summer months.

Population and its distribution.

8. Hong Kong which depends for its prosperity on its trade with China has three fourths of its population concentrated in the cities of Victoria and Kowloon whien may justly be aescribed as one city divided into two by the harbour. Outside this city there is little of commercial importance and Hong Kong as a Colony might almost be termed the city and port of Greater Hong Kong.

9. With regard to the numbers, except in census years, there are no accurate statistical figures, the great movement to and from the Colony and the faculty with which the border is crossed preventing accurate checking. Hong Kong being the principal entrepôt for South China and its harbour one of the pusiest in the world, everyday on an average 5,000 to 6,000 individuals pass to and from China by river steainer or by rail and there are others who arrive and depart by junks or smaller vessels. During times of political unrest in China many thousands from the mainland sojourn in the Colony, some of whom return to their homes when conditions are more settled, others remaining attracted by the opportunities offered for em- ployment.

10. According to the Census taken on March 7th, 1931, the civil population of the whole of the territory under British juris- diction was 840,473, of which 374,683 were in Victoria and 263,020 in Kowloon and New Kowloon.

11. There are over 20,000 local boats registered at the Har- bour Office, the occupants of each of which vary in number froin four to forty according to the size and character of the craft. The Harbour authorities believe the population to be 150,000 and certainly 100,000 cannot be an over-estimate.

L

M 9

12. Of the total population 96 per cent are Chinese.

Accord- ing to the Census Report one third of the whole were born in the Colony. The remainder are mostly those who have come from China attracted by the facilities offered for employment. Many return to their native towns or villages when too ill or too old for labour. Through this exodus the death rate in the Colony is considerably lower than it otherwise would be.

13. The masses are working people belonging to what is commonly described as the coolie class. The Chinese of the upper classes, many of whom have received a western education, are mostly engaged in commerce but there are among them a number of professional men including both lawyers and doctors.

Housing Conditions.

14. 'The site on which Victoria stands is a narrow strip of land 4 miles long by 1/5th. to 2/5ths. of a mile broad lying at the northern foot of the mountain and separating it from the sea.

The total area of available space is about one square mile or 1/32nd. of that of the whole island. Limited in front by the sea and behind by the steep slopes of the mountain there remains hardly an inch of space which has not been occupied for one purpose or another.

15. That portion of the town where the working classes reside and described in the Census Report as 'Health Districts 4, 5, 6, 6A, 7, 7A, 8 (restricted), 9, and 10A (restricted), forming the lower part of the town fronting on Victoria Harbour' has an area of roughly 200 acres and in this space nearly 200,000 individuals find accommodation giving a density of approximately 1,000

per acre.

16. The conformation of the site with its rapid rise of land near the sea-shore led in the early days to the erection of houses on the narrow strip of land near the harbour and extending a little way up the lower slopes of the mountain the houses being separated by narrow lanes and alleyways. When the population was small and the houses only one and two stories in height, the situation was not unsatisfactory. As the population increas- ed the houses were heightened to four and five stories without any corresponding widening of the spaces separating them.

17. Year by year the population continued to increase, im- inigration being accelerated by unrest in China. Victoria was the centre of trade and therefore the centre of attraction. There was little room to build further accommodation and the new comers had to squeeze into the already overcrowded premises. Rooms were divided into cubicles which to a certain extent pro- vided privacy but which interfered both with lighting and ven- tilation.

M 10

18. In some houses there are tiers of bunks placed against the walls, in others the rooms are divided into cubicles or cabins each measuring perhaps eight feet by eight feet and having parti- tions 6 feet in height. These cabins are not the temporary abodes of persons on a voyage but the more or less permanent homes of the people. There is little or no room for kitchens, and latrine accommodation is often limited to pail closets on the roofs of the buildings.

19. Year by year the Sanitary Department and the Building Authority have made efforts to improve the situation and with a considerable amount of success both as regards palliative and radical treatment. The task almost sisyphean in itself, was rendered more difficult by paucity of water and by opposition put forward both by property owners and the occupiers

20. It goes without saying that the maintenance of a satis- factory standard of sanitation under such conditions is a most difficult problem and one which cannot be solved without the willing co-operation of the people. One thing is certain, so long. as buildings are over-crowded and insanitary, no amount of ex- ternal sanitation will give immunity from disease.

21. With regard to Kowloon the case is different. This city which is comparatively new has been laid out in accordance with modern town planning principles.

Influence of traditional beliefs.

22. The traditional beliefs of the uneducated Chinese as to the cause of diseases, the means of spread and the factors which affect its course are so at variance with modern teaching, that there is little change of promoting voluntary co-operation between them and the authorities in the matter of the prevention and control of disease until they can be brought to understand the true nature of the problems and are conscious of the usefulness of the measures advocated. The proximity of China and the constant intercourse makes it harder to overcome prejudices than is the case in countries further afield. The greatest hope lies in propaganda and education. However leaders of opinion in China and leaders of Chinese thought in Hong Kong are making vigorous efforts to promote public health and public welfare along lines which have proved successful in the Occident, and the outlook is far more hopeful than was the case a few years ago when Chinese thought on matters of health was unduly swayed by old traditions and theories.

Quarantine impractical between Hong Kong and the River Ports,

23. So closely related are Hong Kong, Canton, Mac and the River Ports in the matter of trade, and such is the amount of traffic both human and goods which pass between them that. up-to-date it has been found impossible to devise any system of

تو

M 11

quarantine which would effectually safeguard one city against introduction of disease from the other and, at the same time preserve that freedom of commercial movements on which these cities depend for prosperity. It has been deemed best to treat them as forming one unit, as suburbs the one of the other, and to strive for a working agreement between the various health organisations to the end that some means, other than imposing restrictions against a whole port, may be found to prevent the spread of infection.

The Organisation for the promotion and maintenance of the Public Health.

24. The Colony has no 'municipality' in the ordinary accept- ed sense of the term, the Governor himself being head of the city and head of the port. A Legislative Council takes the place of a Municipal Council and the Colonial Heads of Depart- ment perform the duties which in a municipality would be per- formed by Municipal Heads of Department.

25. The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services is the official adviser to Government on all Medical and Sanitary matters and is the officer responsible to Government for the Public Health of the Colony. Under his direction come the Government Hospital Organisation, the Inspection of Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Dispensaries, the Medical Inspection of Schools, the Bacteriological Institute, the Analytical Laboratory, Anti-malarial Activities, Vaccination and Quarantine and Port Health Work.

26. The principal Ordinances which have effect in matter of Hygiene and Sanitation are:-

I. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which re- sembles the English Public Health Act of 1875 and which deals with Infectious Diseases of humans and of animals, the wholesomeness of foods for human con- sumption, abattoirs, markets, dairies, food factories and food shops, nuisances, scavenging and cleansing, drainage, sewerage and sewerage disposal, latrines, urinals and water closets, factories, workshops, laundries and offensive trades, buildings, their siting, design and construction, wells and pools.

II. The Water Works Ordinance.

III. The Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance.

IV. The Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance,

V. The Boarding House Ordinance.

VI. The Summary Offences Ordinance.

M 12

27. The Sanitary Department is responsible for the carrying cut of the provision of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance except in so far as it refers to buildings, drainage and sewerage, wells and pools, which are dealt with by the Public Works De- partment. The Sanitary Department also deals with the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance, and the Births and Deaths Registra- tion Ordinance. The Boarding House Ordinance, which controls lodging houses, boarding houses and hotels, is under the authority of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. The Summary Offences Ordinance is the concern of the Police.

28. The Sanitary Department which is distinct from the Medical Department has at its head a Senior Cadet Officer whose title is Head of the Sanitary Department. The staff under his administrative supervision includes:—

(i) Two European and one Chinese Health Officers (second-

ed from the Medical Department).

(ii) Two Veterinary Surgeons.

(iii) Fifty-six Sanitary Inspectors.

29. There is a Sanitary Board composed of officials and non- officials whose powers and responsibilities are laid down in the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which acts as an adviser to the Head of the Sanitary Department and of which the Head of the Sanitary Department is Chairman, This body has no direct control over the Sanitary Staff.

30. The functions and control of the Sanitary Board and Sanitary Department as determined by the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance are limited to:-(a) the Island of Hong Kong: (b) the Peninsula of Kowloon; and (c) that portion of the New Territories which is adjacent to Kowloon and which is known as New Kowloon.

31. The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services has no status under any of the above Ordinances and no authority over any of the staff of the Sanitary Department.

Transport of the sick.

32. Motor Ambulances, garaged at the Fire Station, are controlled by the Police and Fire Department. Hand Ambulan ces are operated by the Sanitary Department. The Tung Wah Hospital and the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital each has a motor ambulance of its own and so has the St. John's Ambulanc: Brigade.

M 13

Medical Relief.

33. The following table shows the principal institutions affording medical relief.

Accom- modation.

Authority in Control.

Medical Department.

""

""

Government Institutions:

Government Civil Hospital 246 beds

Victoria Hospital

Kowloon Hospital

Peak Hospital

Infectious Diseases

Hospital

Gaol Hospital

Taipo Dispensary

Un Long Dispensary

Chinese Benevolent

Institutions :·

74

58

20

17

888

38

26

30

ི ི།

The Tung Wah Hospital

460 beds

The Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

"

21

"

""

Tung Wah Committee

(Chinese).

The Kwong Wah Hospital.

The Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital

195 "" 325

J

60

22

The Tsan Yuk Maternity

Hospital

57

The Chinese Eastern

Maternity Hospital

The Chinese Public Dis-

pensaries (9 in number)

Mission Hospitals:-

"

Special Chinese Com

mittee.

31

""

12

Alice Memorial &

Affiliated Hospitals

126 beds

Matilda Hospital

50

13

The French Hospital

110

The Italian Hospital

18

""

for each.

دو

London Missionary

Society.

Special Committee. French Mission.

Canossian Mission.

M 14

Medical Education,

34. The Faculty of Medicine of the University of Hong Kong provides a six year course in premedical and medical sciences leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery which are awarded on examination. Most of the clinical teaching is carried out at the Government Civil Hospital where 100 beds have been placed under the care of the professors of surgery, medicine and obstetrics who have been appointed res- pectively Surgeon, Physician and Obstetric Physician to the hospital.

35. The degrees of the Medical Faculty are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

36. Courses of training for nurses and midwives have been established at a number of hospitals in the Colony. Examina- tions are held for midwives and certificates issued by the Mid- wives Examination Board.

St. John Ambulance Brigade and Association.

37. The St. John Ambulance Brigade which holds a strong position in the Colony and which does excellent work both in the training of personnel and in the performance of first aid duties, renders valuable assistance to the authorities, especially with regard to vaccination. Several of the Government Medical Officers hold commissions in this body.

38. The St. John Ambulance Association which is an organi- sation distinct from the Brigade confines its activities to teaching first aid and issuing certificates after examination to successful candidates./

Progress with regard to Re-organisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services,

39. The Public Health Committee formed for the purpose of examining the proposals made by the D.M.S.S. for reorganisa- tion of the Medical and Sanitary Services continued to function and during the year two Bills were completed, one to amend the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance and the other to amend the Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance.

M 15

40. The principal object of both bills was to make the D.M.S.S. the responsible authority. The Registration of Births and Deaths Bill was submitted to the Legislative Council and passed with the proviso that it should become law on the 1st January, 1932. The Sale of Food and Drugs Amendment Bill has not yet come before Government.

41. Progress was made in the preparation of a Buildings Bill to take the place of the building sections of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

42. As in the previous year the low value of the dollar continued to retard progress in matters connected with reorgan- isation. The posts of Senior Health Officer and of two Health Officers remained unfilled and the first mentioned was cut out of the Estimates for 1932. The Dispensary Launch intended for work among the 100,000 floating population was not built and was deleted from the Estimates of 1932. The Motor Travelling Dispensary intended for work in the New Territories was only sanctioned late in the year and the chassis arrived towards the end of December.

43. The Retrenchment Commission which had been appoint- ed to advise regarding the possibility of retrenchment made enquiry into the organisation, functions and workings of the Medical Department early in the year. It found that the Depart- ment was not over staffed, and that more, rather than less health activities should be carried out in the Colony.

- M 16-

SECTION I.

ADMINISTRATION.

STAFF.

44. The total authorised establishment of the Medical Department for the year 1931 was as follows:-

Head Quarters Staff.

Director of Medical and Sanitary Services

Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary Services ...

1

1

Health Division.

Senior Health Officer

Health Officers

Chinese Health Officer

Medical Officer for Schools

Chinese Medical Officer for Schools

School Nurses

Port Health Officers and Inspectors of Emigrants

Chinese Port Health Officers

Vaccinators

1*

5†

1

1

1

3

12

EN N

2

2

Medical Division.

Senior Medical Officer

1

Medical Officers

8

Chinese Medical Officers

House Officers

Assistant Visiting Medical Officer to Chinese

Hospitals and Dispensaries.

Part-time Interpreter to Assistant Visiting Medical

Officer to Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries...

Radiologist

Radiographer

Masseuses

*Post vacant during the year.

12 Posts vacant.

$1 Post vacant.

1

1

1

1

2$

M 17

Bacteriological Institute and Research Division.

Bacteriologist

Assistant Bacteriologist

Class 1 Laboratory Assistant

Class VI Laboratory Assistants

Malariologist

Assistant to Malariologist

1

1

1

4

1

1

Inspectors

Division of Chemical Analysts.

Analyst

Assistant Analysts

Class II Assistant Analysts

Sampler

1

3

2

1

Apothecaries and Dispensers.

Apothecary

1

Assistant Apothecaries

2

Dispensers

Apprentice Dispensers

45

4

5

Nursing Staff

Principal Matron

1

Matrons

4

Home Sister

1

Tutor Sister

1*

X-Ray Sister

Nursing Sisters

Charge Nurse

Staff Nurses

Probationer Nurses

Charge Dressers

Staff Dressers

Probationer Dressers

Head Attendant, Mental Hospital

Assistant Attendant, Mental Hospital

Female Attendants, Mental Hospital Wardmasters

Widwives

*Post vacant during the year.

1

44

1

12

23

5

5

1

1

2

3

7

Accountant

Clerk Class II

Clerks Class III

Clerks Class IV

Clerks Class V

Clerks Class VI

Clerk Special Class

Stenographer

M 18

Clerical Staff.

1

1

3

5

9

1

Other Officers.

Steward

Assistant Steward

Linen Maid

Office Attendants, Messengers, Ward-boys,

Amahs, Coolies etc.

Principal Changes in Personnel.

1

1

1

281

45. The following were the principal changes which took place during the year:-

Dr. W. B. A. Moore--Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary Services acted as Director of Medical and Sanitary Services during the absence on leave of Dr. A. R. Wellington from 10th April to 28th October.

Dr. D. J. Valentine-Medical Officer acted as Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary Services from 22nd April to 28th October in addition to his own duties as Medical Officer in Charge, Victoria Hospital and acted as Director of Medical and Sanitary Services from 29th October to the end of the year.

Dr. J. P. Fehily-Second Health Officer of Port and Inspector of Emigrants acted as Health Officer of Port and Inspector of Emigrants during the absence on leave of Dr. B. H. Mellon from 20th January to 11th November.

Dr. R. S. Begbie-Health Officer acted as Malariologist from 29th April to 10th December during the absence on leave of Dr. R. B. Jackson,

Promotions:-Dr. J. T. Smalley-Medical Officer was pro- moted to Senior Medical Officer on 1st January.

Dr. A. V. Greaves-Assistant Bacteriologist was promoted to Bacteriologist on 26th October,

M 19

Appointments--Dr. J. B. Mackie was appointed Medical Officer on 20th December, 1930 and arrived in the Colony on 20th January, 1931.

Dr. (Mrs.) A. R. S. D. McElney was appointed Assistant Visiting Medical Officer to Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries on 1st February.

Dr. H. L. Clift was appointed temporary Health Officer on 2nd November.

Mr. J. L. Tetley was appointed Assistant Analyst on 23rd January and arrived in the Colony on 26th February.

Resignation-Dr. (Mrs.) A. L. J. Dovey resigned on 31st

January.

Retirement-Dr. E. P. Minett retired on 25th October.

Invaliding :-Dr. B. H. Mellon was invalided on 18th December

The University Clinic and the Government Civil Hospital.

46. Dating from the 1st of April 1930 His Excellency the Governor appointed the Clinical Professors of the University (already consultants to Government) to be respectively Surgeon, Physician and Obstetric Physician to the Government Civil Hospital. Later it was arranged that from January 1932 each professor would receive from Government an allowance for the duties performed. The professors so far as their work in the Government Civil Hospital is concerned, hold the same rank and position they would hold were they Government servants and members of the Medical Department.

List of Ordinances Affecting the Public Health Enacted during the year.

47. The Ordinances affecting the public health which were enacted during the year were :—

(i) The Births and Deaths Registration Amendment

Ordinance.

(ii) The Vaccination Amendment Ordinance.

(iii) The Public Health and Buildings Amendment

Ordinance.

(iv) The Nurses Registration Ordinance,

48. The object of the Births and Deaths Registration Ordinance was principally to transfer the title of Registrar from the Head of the Sanitary Department to the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services.

M 20

49. The object of the Vaccination Amendment Ordinance was to impose a uniform period of six weeks as the period of grace permitted in the case of unvaccinated children. Hitherto there had been varying periods of grace ranging from one month to six months as well as a seasonal period of grace from the beginning of May to the end of September.

50. The object of the Public Health and Buildings Amend- ment Ordinance was to improve the machinery for the seizure and destruction of tainted, diseased or unwholesome food.

51. The object of the Nurses Registration Ordinance was to safeguard the public by ensuring that nurses shall be properly trained and examined before being registered. Also to establish a Nursing Board and a Register of Nurses, and to arrange for reciprocity with other countries.

52. EXPENDITURE FOR 1930 AND 1931.

Compared.

Personal Emoluments*

1930. $823,158.94

1931. $985,606.10

OTHER CHARGES

A.-Staff.

Conveyance and Motor Allowances.

Transport

Rent of Premises for Dispensaries

13,370.16

433.87

11,986.63

527.00

and Garage

1,278.50

1.344.00

B.-General.

Artificial Limbs

425.00

Bedding and Clothing

18,177.10

16,270.62

Board for 1 House Physician,

1 House Surgeon and 1 House

Obstetrician

1,095.00

1,095.00

Board and Lodging for 6 Pupil

Midwives

536.00

552.00

Books

631.64

405.30

Cleansing Materials

5,362.65

5,480.40

Dental Treatment

2,346.50

1,811.50

Fuel and Light

41,727.45

46,875.46

Carried forward

$908,542.81 $1,071.954.21

*Including officers of the Senior Clerical & Accounting Staff and Junior

Clerical Service attached to the Medical Department,

Brought forward

Furniture and Repairs to

M 21

1930.

1931.

$908,542.81 $1,071,954.21

Furniture

9,886.54

9,863.30

Grants to Protestant and Roman

Catholic Chaplain for Religious

Services

1,800.00

1,800.00

Incidental Expenses

2,415.72

2,071.03

Maintenance of lunatics at Canton.

12,606.73

9,045.57

Medical Comforts

2,471.36

2,440.43

Medicines, Surgical Appliances &

Instruments

69,599.82

60,394.75

Provisions for patients

109,638.63

112,241.15

Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern and Kwong Wah Hospitals Medicines

5,000.00

7,500.00

Upkeep of X-Ray Apparatus ....................

5,612.50

6,648.19

Ventilation of Operating Theatre...

454.00

391.70

Washing .....

15,567.07

16,198.91

Expenses of Courses of Study and attendance at Medical Con-

gresses

7,065.91

5,195.92

C.-Office of Health Officer of Port.

Conveyance Allowances

Incidental Expenses etc

277.16

340.72

D.-Bacteriological Institute.

149.34

393.88

Animals and Fodder

7,474.90

4,081.10

Anti-rabic Work

356.69

425.35

Apparatus and Chemicals

1,165.99

1,450.84

Books and Journals

132.93

143.70

Conveyance Ailowances.

360.00

448.78

Fuel and Light

1,223.73

1,439.78

Incidental Expenses

883.58

720.05

Preparation of Vaccines,

Serum etc.

1,769.78

1,878.81

Purchase of Horses

70.00

Uniforms

526.96

371.12

Mortuaries, Victoria and Kowloon.

Conveyance Allowances

18.00

18.00

Fuel and Light

52.36

64.67

Uniforms

145.08

132.16

Carried forward

$1,165,458.97 $1,317,462.54

M 22

1930.

1931.

Brought forward

.$1,165,458.97 $1,317,462.54

Malariologist Sub-Department.

Conveyance and Motor Allowances.

1,431.61

Equipment

Anti Malarial Field Work

1,530.57 1,739.71

1,804.92

313.41

Incidental Expenses

157.00

Uniforms

311.96

E-Government Laboratory.

Apparatus and Chemicals

2,741,45

2,183.00

Books and Journals

169.61

204.55

Conveyance Allowances

382.26

572.33

Fuel and Light

Incidental Expenses

446.64

544.59

244.76

190.61

77.25

176.78

Uniforms

Total Personal Emoluments and Other Charges

$1,172,791.22 $1,325,353.30

Special Expenditure.

Electric Refrigerators

8,725.99

4,433.00

Replacement of launch for Health

Officer of Port

14,720.00

13,420.00

Travelling Dispensary

7,269.68

Special Apparatus for Ultra-violet

Ray and Electrical Therapy.....

13,738.99

Special X-Ray Apparatus

13,800.08

Adjustment and Calibration of

Laboratory Instruments

320.00

Microscope for Bacteriological

Institute

794.19

Equipment for Maternity Block,

Kowloon Hospital

Installation of Standard power plugs

for X-Ray Work

25,724.34

1,056.55

Total Special Expenditure

51,305.06

52,697.76

Total Medical Department ...$1,224,096.28 $1,378,051.06

M 23

53. REVENUE FOR 1930 AND 1931.

Compared.

1930.

1931.

Medical Treatment

$100,324.23

$107,976.57

Fees Miscellaneous

110.00

340.00

Bacteriological Examination

7,384.03

7,482.82

Chemical Analyses

19,891.50

19,295.50

Bill of Health

11,292.00

11,196.00

Medical Examination of Emigrants

128,885.90

96,966.10

Total

$267,887.66 $243,256.99

54. EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR PAST TEN YEARS.

Personal

Year.

Emoluments Special

Total & Other Expenditure. Expenditure. Charges.

Total

Revenue.

1922.

$366,175.86

$5,606.06 $371,781.92 $186,485.32

1923......

400,708.42

1,053.34

401,761.76

182,354.18

1924.........

498,362.56

4,520.33

502,882.89

205,598.37

1925......

548,703.64

75,537,46

624,241.10

194,547.75

1926

701,717.93

34,451.05

736,168.98

255,070.19

1927.

721,623.32

16,409.47

738,032.79

307,744.48

1928.........

808,412.61

23.37

808,435.98

306,347.62

1929......

878,058.19

17,061.08

895,119.27

299,524.51

1930.........

1931.....

1,172,791.22

1,325,353.30

51,305.06

1,224,096.28

267,887.66

52,697.76 1,378,051.06

243,256.99

Total

$7,421,907.05 $258,664.98 $7,680,572.03 $2,448,817.07

M 24

55. In drawing comparisons between the expenditure and revenue of different years it should not be forgotten that the Hong Kong dollar is based on silver and its value rises and falls with the price of that metal. Most of the European officers draw sterling salaries and the bulk of the drugs, dressings and instruments are obtained from England and paid for in sterling. With the exchange at a shilling, as it was during a great part of 1931, the number of dollars expended on sterling priced inaterial, was double what it would have been had the exchange been 2 shillings to the dollar.

Ratio of Expenditure on Medical and Sanitary Services to Total Revenue from all Sources.

56. The total revenue from all sources $27,488,759.00.

was estimated at

57. Because of the overlapping which occurs when a work serves both a utilitarian and a sanitary service it is impossible to assess exactly the amounts which have been spent for purely medical and sanitary purposes. Including all water works and drainage works as sanitary works the following (which include the salaries of the P.W.D. staff concerned) shows the commit- ments as laid down in the Estimates for 1931.

Expenditure by Medical Department

Sanitary Department

$1,446,585.00

954,276.00

..... 1,540,458.00

Public Works Department

Police Department

Subsides to Charities

Total

2,300.00

142,295.00

$4,085,914.00

58. Ratio of expenditure on Medical and Sanitary Services

to total revenue

4,085,914

14.86 per cent.

27,488,759

59. If the expenditure on Water Works be not taken into account the ratio is 12.83 per cent.

M 25

SECTION II.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

GENERAL REMARKS.

60. One of the most important events of the year from the public health point of view was the Census which was taken on March the 7th. According to the Census figures the popula- tion of the City of Victoria was overestimated in 1930 by some- thing like 40 per cent and that of Kowloon and New Kowloon by 20 per cent. The floating population as counted numbered only 75,250 as compared with an estimate made for the middle of 1930 of 109,050.

61. The discrepancy in the urban figures is most disappoint- ing especially in view of the fact that for the last four years the estimates of urban population have been based on figures furnish- ed by a restricted census carried out each year by Inspectors of the Sanitary Department. The occupants of 100 houses in each of the 22 districts were counted and averages obtained. The estimated population of the district was the total of the houses multiplied by the average figure. Considering the movement of population it is difficult to conceive a more accurate method of estimation.

2. With regard to the floating population the estimates were made by multiplying the number of junks and sampans registered at the Harbour Office, some 20,000 odd, by an arbitrary figure of 5. The occupants of the boats vary from four to forty. The Superintendent of Census states that the fishing fleet and larger junks which had been in port during Chinese New Year were conspicuously absent on Census night. Taking everything into consideration the estimate for the floating population is probably nearer the actual facts than the census figures.

63. There are those who believe that the Census figures for the urban population understate the facts, it being alleged that numbers of the Chinese of the lower classes refused to enter their names on the forms supplied in an effort to avoid having details of themselves entered on official registers. There is, however, no proof of this for the chief enumerators for the census were the same Sanitary Inspectors who made the restrict- ed census for the estimates, and they would be in a better position than any other to know whether there had been any evasions.

64. The population having been overestimated in recent years it follows that real death rates for the Colony were con- siderably higher than those published in the Annual Reports and that the state of the Public Health was not so good as had been supposed. The crude death rate for 1930 was not 15.14 per mille as published but 21.38 per mille and the death rates for the various diseases were higher in proportion.

M 26

65. With regard to the prevalence of general or non-notifi- able diseases the only incidence figures available are the returns of the Government Hospitals and the 'Western clinics of the Chinese Hospitals details of which are found in Appendices O and E of this report. The figures are, however, only a fraction of the whole, and too much importance should not be given to deductions made from them. Though year by year the value of 'Western' or scientific medicine is becoming more and more appreciated by the Chinese, the bulk of the population still pin their faith to the time honoured decoctions prescribed by the numerous herbalists who practise in the Colony. There are no statistical figures to show either the nature of the diseases or the numbers treated by Chinese medicine.

66. In the absence of some general system of registration of sickness the only sources of information available for gauging the state of the public health in this country are the returns relating to deaths, the notifications of infectious diseases and the records of the above-mentioned hospitals.

67. The number of deaths recorded in Hong Kong indicates very correctly the deaths which have taken place in the Colony proper and in that portion of the New Territories known as New Kowloon. In the remaining portion of the New Territories there is no registration and records of the deaths are not available Because of the strong desire of the Chinese to be buried with their ancestors, and the consequent exodus of many who feel death approaching, the number of deaths registered is lower than would otherwise be the case.

68. Judging from the death returns the health of the Colony was not so good as in the previous year. The crude death rate was 24.88 per mille as compared with 21.38 the revised rate for 1930.

69. Respiratory diseases accounted for 42.25 per cent of the total deaths the percentage for 1930 being 38.95.

70. The principal diseases causing death were broncho- pneumonia, pulmonary tuberculosis, bronchitis, pneumonia, in- fantile diarrhoea and diarrhoea.

71. The overcrowded houses combined with the expector- ating habits of the Chinese furnish sufficient explanation for the prevalence of respiratory troubles.

Mosquito-borne Diseases.

72. The mosquito-borne diseases of the Colony are malaria. dengue and filariasis. None of these are notifiable diseases and complete incidence figures are not available.

73. Malaria.-In the early days of the Colony malaria was rampant, being the chief cause of sickness and death. Today owing to efficient drainage there is practically no malaria in the

M 27

thickly populated portions of Victoria or Kowloon. In the out- skirts and more open parts of the two towns malaria still persists and in certain rural areas both on the island and on the main- land there is a considerable amount. Further research has shown that here as in Malaya and the Philippines paddy fields and large wet areas on the flat are more or less harmless and that the real danger lies within mosquito flight distance of hill foots and valleys where collections of spring water in pockets, pools or streams form the breeding places of those anophelines which are the most potent carriers.

74. The cases admitted to the Government Hospitals num- bered 586 of which eight or 1.36 per cent died. In the Chinese Hospitals there were 1,001 admissions of which 256 or 25.57 per cent died.

75. Among the cases admitted to the Government Hospitals there were 483 tertians, 72 aestivo-autumnal and 3 quartans. The cases admitted to Government Hospitals for the last seven years are as follows:-

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1,142

970

670

485

653

535

586

76. The incidence among the police of the New Territories for the same period was

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1931

1,205

877

428

278

265

258

148

77. Many of the Police Stations are screened and every man is provided with a mosquito net. Prophylactic quinine is issued and the living rooms are regularly sprayed with an insecticide to kill any adult mosquitoes that may be present. The police on night beats are of course liable to infection.

78. The total number of deaths attributed to Malaria was 452. giving a death rate of 0.60 per mille population. The low- ness of the rate is of course due to the fact that the majority of the population being outside the zone of the malaria carrying anophelines are not subject to risks of attack.

!

M 28

79. The M.O. in charge Kowloon Public Mortuary reports that in 399 consecutive bodies sent to the mortuary for examina- tion 97 or 244 per cent had spleens twice the normal size or larger.

80. A number of localities outside the town are reputed to be malarious and these are being investigated.

81. During the year the Malaria Bureau continued its re- searches and cooperated with the Public Works Department and with the Military Authorities in the investigation and control of Malaria.

82. During investigations both in the Colony proper and in the New Territories the staff experienced no opposition from the local Chinese; on the contrary both adults and children showed great interest in the proceedings and were eager to help. This is very satisfactory for there were those who predicted that there would be considerable opposition on the part of the people.

83. The report of the Malariologist will be found in the Appendix.

84. Dengue. There was no epidemic of this disease during the year and only a few cases came under the notice of the Medical Officers.

85. Filariasis.-The disease exists but there are no figures on which to estimate incidence and death rates. Cases of ele- phantiasis are rare.

Infectious Diseases

86. The infectious diseases of the Colony may for conven- ience be classified into those which are notifiable under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and those which are not.

87. The most important of the non-notifiable infectious dis- eases are Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Leprosy.

88. The notifiable diseases are Plague, Cholera, Yellow Fever, Smallpox, Typhus Fever, Cerebro-spinal Fever. Enteric Fever, Para-typhoid Fever, Relapsing Fever, Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, Puerperal Fever and Rabies (human and animal).

89. Responsibility for reporting a case of notifiable disease lies with the legally qualified medical practitioner attending the case, or, in the absence of such, on the occupier or keeper of the premises, or on the nearest male relative living on the premises. or in default of such relative on any person in charge of or in attendance on the sick person. Reports are to be made to the Medical Officer of Health or to the Officer in charge of the rearest Police Station.

M 29

90. In actual fact practically the only reports received by the Medical Officer of Health are (a) those from qualified medical practitioners, (b) from the medical officers of hospitals, and (c) from the medical officers m charge of the Public Mortuaries where bodies dumped in the street by friends or relatives of the deceased have been taken for inspection and disposal.

91. The Health Authorities, when they do discover a case of infectious disease, have no power to remove it to hospital unless the patient or his guardian consents or unless a magistrate

makes an order for removal.

Non-notifiable Infectious Diseases.

92. Tuberculosis.-Pulmonary Tuberculosis ranks second to broncho-pneumonia as the principal cause of dealth. The total number of deaths was 1,983, that for 1930 being 1,994. The death rate per mille was 2.60 as compared with 2.62 for the previous year. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the majority of cases is a chronic and debilitating disease which unfits the individual for the active exercise of his employment months or even years previous to his death, It is, therefore, most probable that the death figures form an incomplete index of the prevalence of the disease in the Colony as many, who would have died here had they remained, returned to their native villages in China there to end their lives among their friends and relatives.

93. It is estimated that for every death there are at least ten persons suffering from open tuberculosis. As it is the habit among the lower classes of Chinese to expectorate freely without taking precautions, this means that there were in the Colony during the year under discussion 20,000 living incubators of dis- ease each adding his daily quota of microbes to the stock already existing. When it is realised that tuberculosis is more infectious and more deadly than leprosy the dangers of spread of infection become obvious.

94. There are no sanitoria and no infirmaries other than the Chinese Hospitals where poor tuberculosis patients could find shelter and treatment and where at least they would cease to be a danger to others.

95. During the year the Tung Wah Hospital which is situated in one of the most congested areas of Victoria provided 36 beds for the treatment of this disease.

96. It is hoped that when the new G.C.H. is built in the open on the sunny side of the island provision will be made for the accommodation of tuberculosis cases.

The

97. Leprosy.-Leprosy is a disease which is akin to tuber- culosis but which is far less infectious and far less lethal. number of lepers in the Colony is unknown but considering the

M 30

great and free exchange of population with China and the attrac- tions offered by Hong Kong it is most probable that the rate per mille population here is not less than anat in the neighbouring province of Kwangtung. In Japan the rate is 0.33 per mile,

Formosa 2.5 per muie, in Amoy 2 per mille, m French Indo- China 0.5 per mille, in Malaya 1 per mile, and in India 1 per mulle. In Kwangtung and Hong Kong it would be no over- estimate to state that it is 0.5 per mile. Estimating at this rate the number of lepers in the Colony and New Territory would · be at least 400. According to the Census 1/3rd. of the popula tion were born in the Colony. It would therefore appear that there may be 136 lepers for which the Colony is responsible.

98. Since 1910 there has been no leper asylum or leper settlement in either the Colony or the New Territories.

99. Lepers who are not British subjects are prohibited from entering the Colony and any such who find entrance may be deported. Lepers of Chinese nationality are sent to Canton and those who are British subjects may receive treatment at the out- patient sections of the Government Civil Hospital or at the Kowloon Hospital.

100. At Shek Lung in Kwangtung the Roman Catholic Mission maintains a leper asylum where are accommodated some 700 lepers among whom are 70 who stated that they came from Hong Kong. In the 1931 estimates provision was made for a subsidy to this Mission.

Notifiable Infectious Diseases.

101. The numbers of cases of infectious disease notified during the year and those notified in 1930 were :—

1931 1930

Bubonic Plague

Cholera

0

0

Smallpox

15

270

Diphtheria

231

95

Scarlet Fever

3

3

Enteric

214

221

Para-typhoid

3

3

Relapsing Fever

0

0

Cerebro-spinal Fever

25

20

Typhus

0

1

Yellow Fever :.

0

0

Puerperal Fever

19

15

Rabies (human)

Rabies (animal)

0

1

2

M 31

Smallpox.

102. Every year during the winter months this disease manifests itself in outbreaks which are sometimes sporadic some- times epidemic. Whatever be the prevalence there is always a tendency for the morbidity rate to decline or disappear with the advent of summer. Considering its high infectivity, its terrible. disfigurement and the frequency of fatalities, the indifference shown by the Chinese to the presence of cases in their midst is amazing. All Chinese know smallpox and the presence of a case in a crowded tenement house cannot escape the notice of the occupiers, but for some obscure psychological reason they refrain from reporting its presence to the authorities, and more often than not the first notification received by the Medical Officer of Health is that from the Mortuary where the body, dumped in the street at night, has been taken for diagnosis. The scle information received by the Health Authorities con- cerning the case is the sex of the deceased, the apparent age and the diagnosis. The name, the address, the number of con- tacts and the period during which the case has been a focus of infection are unknown.

103. After the 1916-1917 epidemic, in an endeavour to stop the practice of dumping and to encourage notification of cases, the Samtary Board passed a resolution that patients suffering from smallpox be allowed to be treated in their own houses provided that—

(a) all cases in the district be notified to the Medical Officer

of Health.

(b) all inmates of the houses be vaccinated.

(c) a notice be posted on the door of the house where the

patient is being treated.'

104. The results did not come up to expectation for the populace ignored the concession and continued their practice of concealing cases and dumping corpses.

105. During 14 years of trial, 1917-1930 inclusive, 5,428 cases and 4,711 deaths were brought to the notice of the M.O.H. The case mortality rate calculated from these figures was 86.79 per cent, much too high for a population which has no objection. to vaccination. The obvious explanation is that many cases escaped the notice of the authorities altogether. Allowing that the death rate was 50 per cent there were 10,856 cases. Less than 5 per cent of the cases were notified early, 25 per cent were notified when the cases were moribund, 40 per cent after death and 30 per cent escaped detection.

106. From time to time the M.O.H. reported as to facts and in 1930 the Board appointed a Committee under the D.M.S.S. to investigate and make recommendations. The Committee re- commended that the concession should be cancelled and in February 1931 the Board rescinded its resolution of 1917.

M 32

107. Following the rescission there was a mass meeting of the Chinese at the Tung Wah Hospital where vigorous protests were made against the action of the Sanitary Board.

108. Among the Chinese the opinion is prevalent that the results of treatment of smallpox by Chinese methods are superior to those by Western methods. An analysis of statistics of (a) the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital, where the majority of cases receive Chinese treatment, and of (b) the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital, where Western treat- ment only is provided, shows however that this is not the case. Calculating on figures for the last twenty years the death rate in the Tung Wah was 46.77 per cent and that in the Government Hospital was 14.33 per cent.

Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital

Government Infectious Diseases Hospital

Period

Cases Deaths

Rate per cent

Cases

Deaths

Rate per cent

1910 to 1930

1,240 580 46.77

286

41

14.33

109. With regard to 1931 the total number of cases brought to the notice of the authorities during the year was 15 as com- pared to 270 in 1930. There were eight deaths, nine cases were treated at the Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital, four of whom died giving a case mortality of 44.44 per cent. Two cases were treated at the Government Hospital both of whom re- covered.

110. During the year the vaccination campaign was con- tinued, valuable assistance being afforded by the St. John Ambulance Brigade whose officers established booths in the streets and carried out an active propaganda advocating vaccina- tion and revaccination with excellent results. Altogether 154,451 persons were vaccinated as compared with 244,789 in the prevous year.

111. In the last four years there have been 981,241 vaccina- tions, a number exceeding the present population as enumerated by the census.

112. The General Chinese Public Dispensaries Committee recommended that the dispensaries should take a more active part in propaganda work. Arrangements were made for the Government Medical Department to cooperate by supplying material for the Committee's use.

Plague.

113. No case of human or rat plague was reported during 1931.

M 33

114. Plague as an epidemic disease has disappeared from Hong Kong and the same may be said of South China. The whole truth concerning the factors which have caused this dis- appearance are not known. The disappearance from Hong Kong may be, and probably is, due in some degree to the sanitary measures which have been and are being taken but this cannot be the case in many of the Chinese towns where the conditions are as they have always been. The fact is the cause of the rise and fall in plague figures has not been satisfactorily explained. We know that plague is a disease of rats communicated to man through the medium of the rat flea, but we know little of the reason for the rise and fall in the incidence of the disease among rats or what natural causes have an influence on the virulence of the plague bacillus. In spite of the continuous campaign against them, owing to the rapidity with which they multiply, there still is and probably always will be a sufficiency of rodents in the Colony to light up and maintain an epidemic. The value of a continuous anti-rat campaign lies in the early information it affords of an epizootic.

115. The cases of Plague recorded in the Colony since the discovery of this disease in 1894 are given in the following Table:

Year

Cases.

Year.

Cases

1894

5,000

1913

408

1895

44

1914

2,146

1896

1.204

1915

144

1897

21

1916

39

1898

1.320

1917

38

1899

1,486

1918

266

1900

1.087

1919

464

1901

1.651

1920

138

1902

572

1921

150

1903

1,415

1922

1.181

1904

510

1923

148

1905

272

1924

1906

893

1925

1907

240

1926

1908

1.073

1927

1909

135

1928

1910

25

1929

1911

260

1930

0

1912

1.957

1931

Enteric.

116. The number of cases reported was 214 as compared with 221 for the previous year. All the cases were sporadic and, as is usual in such, the source of infection could not be traced. There is no evidence that any case contracted the dis- ease through the public water supply.



M 34

Diphtheria.

117. Diphtheria is endemic in Hong Kong. Towards the end of the year it assumed epidemic proportions, 87 cases being reported during the last ten days in December. The disease was wide-spread throughout the Colony and was much more prominent among the well-to-do classes and attacked persons of all ages with the exception of young infants. The fighting services were almost completely free with the exception of married officers and warrant officers living in private quarters.

118. The distribution of cases coincided with the distribution of milk supply of a certain dairy. The staff employed were· examined and eight carriers of Klebs-Loeffler Bacillus were dis- covered out of a total of 146.

119. Examination of the employees in other dairies in the Colony did not reveal the presence of any carriers.

120. The authorities of the dairy concerned took prompt action to pasteurise at 165°F. all milk distributed by them and the epidemic quickly subsided.

121. During the year altogether 231 cases were notified, the number for 1930 being 95. There were 57 deaths.

Helminthic Disease.

These

122. The hospital returns show 59 cases of ankylostomiasis, two cases of cestodes, and 23 cases of ascaris infection. figures are of no value in gauging the prevalence of helminthic diseases for they only represent the cases which were treated for worms alone. It is estimated that 75 per cent of adult Chinese harbour ascaris. It is probable that a considerable number have trematodes. Out of 252 adult bodies examined in the Kowloon Mortuary 28 or 11.11 per cent had livers containing clonorchis sinensis.

VITAL STATISTICS.

123. The registration of births and deaths is compulsory in the Colony but there is no registration in the New Territories. Births are registered at the Central Office in Victoria, at the Chinese Public Dispensaries and at the Police Stations at Aber- deen and Stanley. Deaths are registered at the Central Office. at the Kowloon Disinfecting Station and at a number of Police Stations.

124. Death registration being a necessary preliminary to a permit to bury it may be taken for granted that practically all deaths are registered. Bodies found 'dumped' or abandoned in the streets, and they are not a few, are taken to the Public Mortuary where they are examined by the Medical Officer in charge who fills out the necessary certificates and forwards them to the Coroner,

M 35

125. Birth registration is not universal and a considerable number of births, especially those of females, are never reported.

Population.

126. The Census having shown that the population for the last few years has been overestimated, in order to compare the figures for 1931 with those of 1930 it is necessary to make a revised estimate for the latter basing calculation on the census. The following table shows for comparison the 1931 census, the original 1930 estimate and the revised 1930 estimate:- -

Civil Population.

1931 Census Figures

Original Revised

1930 Estimate

1930 Estimate

Non-Chinese

19,369

19,000

19,000

Chinese in Victoria

358,351

592,100

355,400

Chinese in Hong Kong Villages.

41,156

47,000

40,000

Chinese in Kowloon & New

Kowloon

255,095

307,250

246,100

Chinese in Junks & Sampans

68,721

109,050

100,000

Chinese in New Territories

97,781

97,000

96,800

Total Civil Population

840,473 1,171,400

857,300

127. For the middle of 1981 the estimated civil population for the whole of the territories under British jurisdiction was 878,947. The distribution was as follows:-

Non-Chinese (mostly resident in Hong Kong

and Kowlcon)

19,522

Chinese in Victoria

$59,819

""

Villages of Hong Kong

41,740

Kowloon and New Kowloon

??

259,590

??

Junks and Sampans

100,000

780,671

"

New Territories

98,276

98,276

Total civilian population:-

878.947

M 36

-

128. During the year 2,881,479 persons entered and 2,796,222 persons left the Colony, making a daily average of 7,894 arrivals and 7,660 departures. The details are as follows:

Arrivals Departures

River steamers

Railway

1,487,863 1,637,741

690,745 587,816

Junks and sampans, etc

71,342

77,396

Ocean going vessels

631,529 493,269

Total: --

2,881,479 2,796,222

Births.

129. The births registered as having occurred in the Colony

were:-

Chinese

Non-Chinese

12,055

388

Total:

12.443

Deaths.

130. The deaths registered among the civilian population of the Colony (including New Kowloon but excluding the remainder of the New Territories) was 18,797 giving a crude death rate of 24 08 as compared with 21.37 for the previous year.

Year

Deaths

Estimated Death rate per population mille population

1931 Chinese

18,566

761,149

24.39

Non-Chinese

231

19,522

11.83

1930 Chinese

16,082

741,500

21.68

Non-Chinese

186

19,000

9.79

M 37

131. The following Table gives the deaths from the principal

diseases causing deaths:

Non-notifiable diseases

No. of Percentage Death rate

Deaths

of total

per mille

deaths

population

1931

1930

Broncho-pneumonia

2,749

14.62 3.61 2.63

Pulmonary tuberculosis

1,983

10.55 2.60 2.62

Bronchitis

1,976

10.51

2.59

1.99

Pneumonia

1,116

5.94

1.46

1.03

Diarrhoea (infantile)

1,623

8.63

2.13

1.92

Diarrhoea

1,130

6.01

1.48

0.85

Dysentery

264

1.41

0.34

0.27

Beri-Beri

Malaria

694

3.69

0.91

0.83

452

2.41

0.59 0.67

Heart disease and heart failure...

Notifiable Diseases

Smallpox

Enteric

Diphtheria

Cerebro-spinal fever

Plague

369 1.96 0.48 0.56

No. of Percentage Death rate Deaths

of total

per mille

deaths

population

1931 1930

8

0.4

0.012 0.32

70

0.37 0.08 0.13

57

0.30 0.07

0.05

16

0.08 0.02

0.01

0

0.00 0.00 0.00

Infantile Mortality.

132. The number of deaths of infants under one year were Chinese 7,443, Non-Chinese 24. If the figures for the Chinese births registered represented the total births; which they do not, the infantile mortality rate for this race would be 617.42 as compared with 557.5 in the previous year. The mortality rate among the non-Chinese was 61.85 as compared with 74.0 for 1930.

The Dumping of the Dead.

133. In spite of the fact that there was no epidemic during all but the last few days of the year the practice of dumping bodies continued. The number reported by the Police was 1,295 the number for 1930 being 1,316. In the absence of infectious lisease the argument so often advanced that dumping is practised

M 38

to avoid the inconveniences associated with disinfection and lime washing fails to carry weight. The following are the figures as supplied by the Police:--

District in which the bodies were found

Victoria

Kowloon

Harbour

Elsewhere

Number of bodies

366

738

115

76

1,295

6.1%

Total:

Adults

Children

Male Female

107

17

Male Female

664

489

Uncertain (decomposed)

Total

18

1,295

134. Death Clock showing percentages of total deaths caused

by different diseases :-

8.63%

3.69%

1%

10.55%

PULMONARY

TUBERCULOSIS

TUBERCULOSIS

NON-PULMONARY

BERI

BERI

INFANTILE

DIARRHOEA

DIARRHOEA

5.49%

PNEUMONIA

BRONCHO

PNEUMONIA

14.62%

DYSENTERY

14% 2.41%

MALARIA

OTHER

DISEASES

35.15%

BRONCHITIS

10.51%

M 39

Vital Statistics of General European Population.

135. The Europeans and Americans resident in the Colony were 7,000 of which 6,625 were British. The majority of Eu- ropeans and Americans are treated by private practitioners when ill and figures are not available for calculating incidence rates.

136. These were 84 deaths among the 7,000 giving a death rate of 12 per mille.

137. Vital Statistics of European Officials. Number of European Officials (excluding temporary school

mistresses)

Average number on leave

Average number resident in the Colony

Number invalided during 1931:—

(a) when on leave at home

877

155

827

1

(b) in the Colony

11

Total:-

12

Number died during 1931:-

(a) when on leave at home (b) in the Colony

1

6

Total:-

7

SECTION III.

HYGIENE AND SANITATION.

138. The Sanitary Department which is distinct from the Medical Department and over which the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services has no control deals with the greater part of the sanitation of the Colony. The head of the department is a Cadet Officer whose title is Head of the Sanitary Department.

139. The staff under his includes:-

administrative supervision

(i) Two European and one Chinese Health Officers

seconded from the Medical Department.

(ii) Two Veterinary Surgeons.

(iii) Fifty-six European Sanitary Inspectors.

M 40

140. There are no Asiatic Sanitary Inspectors but there are a number of interpreters and a large staff of subordinates.

141. For the purpose of sanitary administration by the Sanitary Department, the Island and the Peninsula have been divided into local sanitary areas, each with a sanitary office, and these m turn have been sub-divided into Health Districts each in charge of a Sanitary Inspector.

142. The City of Victoria including the Peak is divided into zour sanitary areas and seventeen health districts. The villages on the south side of the island are in charge of one Inspector. Kowloon Peninsula has three health areas and seven health districts. It is estimated that on an average each Inspector has to deal with a population of 25,000, a very high figure for a tropical city, and especially for one so overcrowded as Victoria.

143. The following general review of work done and progress made in matters of santitation is, so far as the Sanitary Depart- ment is concerned, based on facts supplied by the Medical Officer of Health. The Annual Report of the Sanitary Depart- ment 13 Issued independently by the Head of the Sanitary Department.

Preventive Measures Against Mosquitoes and Insect Borne

Diseases.

144. The only law on the subject is the following by-law made under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which is administered by the Sanitary Department:

"When the larvae of mosquitoes are found on any premises the Board may on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health or any Assistant Medical Officer of Health give notice to the owner or occupier of such premises to remove all accumulations of water from such premises or to take steps to prevent the recurrence of the breeding places of mosquitoes in any such accumulations of water and such owner or occupier shail comply with such notice forthwith.'

This by-law does not apply to the New Territories.

145. There are no special Sanitary Inspectors engaged in anti-mosquito work and the anti-mosquito brigade consists of two overseers and a squad of oiling coolies.

146. The routine work of inspection of premises for the presence of mosquito breeding was carried out by the district inspectors. Oiling of pools and destruction of mosquito breeding places was carried out by the anti-mosquito gangs.

147. The usual cutting of undergrowth in May and October was done in connection with the Botanical and Forestry Depart- ment as regards Crown Lands and with the Military Authorities on military lands.

M 41

148. The Malaria Bureau of the Medical Department continued to function throughout the year. The work done included-

(a) General survey of the Colony and New Territories for the purpose of ascertaining what species of mosquitoes exist and the life history of each.

(b) Research regarding insect borne diseases to determine the insects hosts and the conditions influencing the

spread of infection.

(c) Special investigation in inalarious districts with a view

to the radiction of disease.

(d) Local mosquito surveys for the abatement of mosquito

nuisances.

(c) Co-operation with

Government Departments, the Military. Naval and Air Forces, Public Companies, and private individuals with regard to the investigation and eradiction of malaria.

(f) The teaching of mosquitology.

149. The information so far collected indicates that the principal agents in the spread of malaria are Anopheles minimus. and Anopheles maculatus which breed in small pools and collections of spring water subject to the influence of light and usually situated in areas which are hilly or undulating. Water in contact with newly opened earth in these regions is especially dangerous.

150. Jungle bush and undergrowth, in so far as they provide shade to pools and collections of spring water, hinder rather than promote the spread of malaria.

151 The Public Works Department carry out all anti- malaria works on Crown Lands other than oiling. Each year a sum is inserted for the 'training of nuliahs' and each year work to the limit of the sum sanctioned is carried out.

There can be no doubt that the disappearance of malaria from the populated areas is to a large measure due to the excellent drainage works carried out by this department.

152. The P. W. D. and the Malaria Bureau co-operated to the fullest extent.

Preventive Measures Against Plague.

153. In the campaign against plague the routine measures which have been in vogue since the disease was at its height were continued. They were-

(a) Periodical cleansing of premises.

(b) Abolition of rat refuges such as ceilings. stair linings

and panellings.

(c) Destruction of rats,

M 42

154. In the crowded areas where the houses are packed with humans and their belongings, the periodical cleansing of premises is a most important factor in the prevention of the spread of this disease. All the furniture, moveable fittings and household goods are removed from the rooms and cubicles and all foors and woodwork washed down with an emulsion of soap and kerosene oil. This is done either by the Sanitary staff or by the occupiers under the general supervision of the district inspector. Altogether 196,812 floors were dealt with.

155. Thirty members of the cleansing staff were employed in setting traps, bird liming boards, distributing bariumcarbonate baits, and collecting rodents which had been taken living or dead. By far the greatest number of rats were taken dead from the numerous rat reception bins or tins which are placed in convenient situations throughout the two cities. The Chinese take exception to rats being found on their premises by the Sanitary staff, probably through fear of extra sanitary measures being taken against them, and it is not uncommon for them to kill the rodents found in the Government traps and to throw the carcasses into the reception bins. The total number of rats collected was 157,828, of which 11,520 only were taken alive. All rats collected were sent to the Public Mortuaries for examina- tion by the Medical Officer in charge.

>

156. During the year no rats were infected.

found to be plague

Preventive Measures Against Smallpox,

157. Under the Vaccination Ordinance all Public Vaccinators are under the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services who is Superintendent of Vaccination. As Registrar of Births and Deaths the Head of the Sanitary Department is responsible for ensuring the vaccination of all children whose births are registered

158. Vaccinations were performed by:—

(a) The Public Vaccinators.

(b) The Medical Officers in Government Hospitals.

(c) The Medical Officers in Chinese Hospitals.

(d) The Medical Officers at the Chinese Public Dispensaries. (e) The members of the St. John Ambulance Brigade under

the Assistant Commissioner.

Altogether 154,451 vaccinations were performed.

159. During the year the Sanitary Board rescinded its resolution of 1917 which allowed the home treatment of smallpox It is difficult to imagine anything more insanitary than a smallpox case running its course in the dark and ill-ventilated

cases.

M 43

cubicle of the average overcrowded tenement house of Hong Kong, and the Sanitary Board is to be congratulated on at last acting on the advice of the Medical Authorities in this matter.

Preventive Measures Against Cholera, Dysentery, Enteric, etc.

160. The routine measures against the spread of bowel di- seases with regard to the purification of public water supplies and the closing of wells continued. Measures regarding the purity and wholesomeness of foods for sale and under preparation for sale are still far from satisfactory.

Preventive Measures Against Tuberculosis.

161. The measures taken against Tuberculosis were- (a) The periodical general cleansing of premises. (b) Action to prevent the erection of unauthorised cubicles especially those which have defects in the matter of lighting, air space and ventilation.

(c) Action by the Building Authority to ensure the erection of houses having a proper supply of lighting and ven- tilation.

162. The overcrowded condition of the City of Victoria, its confined area, the difficulties presented by topographical features, and the absence of accommodation for evicted tenants make the question of hygienic housing of the populace one of extreme difficulty. The sanitary staff are working against great odds and they cannot hope to attain results such as are attained in other cities where the task is easier and the personnel larger. The wonder is not that so many contract tuberculosis but that so many escape.

Preventive Measures Against Helminthic Diseases.

163. With the exception of the action taken by the Veterin ary staff at the Abattoirs there never has been any routine campaign against helminthic disease. Whatever be the per- centage of the population carrying ankylostomes verv few cases of ankylostomiasis come under the notice of the hospital authorities.

GENERAL MEASURES OF SANITATION.

Domestic Cleanliness.

164. Every domestic building or part of a building occupied by the members of more than one family must, unless especially exempted by the Sanitary Board, be cleansed and lime washed throughout by the owner, to the satisfaction of the Board, not less than once in every year, and notice in writing that such cleansing and lime-washing has been completed shall be sent by the owner to the Secretary within three days after the date of completion.

M 44

165. It is the duty of the occupier of any domestic building. to cause such building to be kept in a cleanly and wholesome condition and to see that the drains, traps, gratings, fall pipes, and sanitary fittings and appliances, are free from obstruction and in an efficient state of repair.

166. In Hong Kong there are 13,294 Chinese houses with 44,410 floors; in Kowloon there are 9,156 houses and 26,355 floors. During the year 132,207 floors in Hong Kong and 64,545 floors in Kowloon were cleansed. During the cleansing process all the furniture is moved and the walls and floors washed down with kerosene oil emulsion.

167. Considering that each inspector has to supervise a district with approximately 25,000 inhabitants most of whom are ignorant of the rudiments of sanitation, the thoroughness of the cleansing operations is remarkable.

Scavenging.

168. Scavenging is carried out departmentally. There are twenty-two refuse lorries in use, fourteen being for Hong Kong and eight for Kowloon. 393 tons of refuse was collected daily and removed to the various refuse depots. The bulk of the refuse was ultimately disposed of by dumping in the sea at a distance from the city and in such a situation where the currents run in a direction away from the island. Some of the refuse from Kowloon was used to reclaim low-lying land near the sea-shore.

Conservancy and Sewerage Disposal.

169. The collection and disposal of night-soil in the Colony is carried out partly by the bucket system and partly by water carriage. With regard to the bucket system arrangements are made with a contractor for the removal and disposal of excrement under conditions laid down by the Sanitary Board.

170. The excrement is removed by night from the latrines to a special fleet of junks which convey it up river to China where it is utilised as manure for the mulberry trees on which the silk worms feed.

171. Owing to the limitations of the water supply on the Island and the need for economy in the matter of consumption. it is necessary to restrict the number of water closets served by the public mains.

172. Where a sufficiency of water can be obtained from other sources, such as wells or streams, and the conditions otherwi are suitable water closets are allowed. With regard to effluents some enter the public sewers direct, some pass to biological tank. systems to be treated before final discharge.

M 45

Drainage.

173. Drainage both surface and subsoil is controlled by the Public Works Department. $355,000 was entered in the Esti- mates, for a programme which included drainage, training of nullahs and sewerage.

Water Supplies.

174. The water supplies of Hong Kong and Kowloon are in charge of the Water Works Branch of the Public Works De- partment.

175. All the water is surface water and most of it is collected from catchment areas which are free from ordinary risks of pollution. The water, after storage for a longer or shorter period in impounding reservoirs, is filtered in some cases by slow sand filters, in others by the rapid system, and finally it is chlorinated.

176. Routine examinations are carried out by the Govern- ment Bacteriologist and Government Analyst and the results furnished to the Water Authority. The results show that the water as supplied to the consumer is of excellent quality.

Clearance of Bush and Undergrowth.

177. Generally speaking in Hong Kong and the New Terri- tories bush and undergrowth is little in evidence except in those places where it has been planted and conserved. Routine cutting of superfluous undergrowth is carried out in May and October.

Sanitary Inspections.

178. On the staff of the Sanitary Department there are 56 European Sanitary Inspectors but there are no Asiatic Inspectors and there are neither Health Visitors nor Public Health Nurses. Each Sanitary Inspector has for supervision a district with ap- proximately 25,000 inhabitants most of whom are igorant of the very rudiments of sanitation. Under their supervision come tenement houses, lodging houses, places of common assembly, eating houses, bakeries, dairies, markets, laundries, etc., etc. It is physically impossible for these men to carry out the number of inspections necessary to ensure a proper standard of sanitation and much that should be done must necessarily be left undone. Work in connection with the routine cleansing of houses takes up much of the time of the Inspectors and there is little left for other necessary action.

179. Except in the matter of house cleansing matters are not satisfactory.

180. During the year the inspectors carried out their usual routine inspections.

M 46

SCHOOL HYGIENE.

181. According to the Census the number of persons between five and fifteen years of age was 141,709. The number of schools under inspection by the Education Department was.1,063 and the number of school children 57,301.

182. The School Inspection Branch of the Medical Depart- ment consists of:-

Lady Medical Officer

Chinese Medical Officer

School Nurses

1

1

3

183. Class of School

No..

No. of pupils on roll

Government Schools (English)

16)

)= 20

5,245

(Vernacular)

4)

Grant in aid Schools (English) 12)

">

(Vernacular) 4)=302

24,498

Subsidised Schools (Vernacular) 286)

Unaided Schools (English)

=741

27,558

?

(Vernacular)

Total:-

1,063

57,301

1930 1931

184. Schools inspected

Entrants examined

18 1,364 1,525

21

Defects found

580

706

Per cent defects in British

Schools

34

46.4

Chinese Schools

43.5 46.4

Per cent defects in Anglo-

185. Reinspection of Children found to be defective.

Class of School

British

No.

No. Percentage reinspected improved improved

Year

1930

104

40

38.4 per cent.

1931

140

65

46.4

71

11

19

Anglo-Chinese

1930

$13

417

51.20,,

1

1931

1,354

633

46.07,,

?"

:

M 47

186. The largest percentage of defect is that of vision. The children are sent to an oculist and provided with glasses. With regard to other defects free treatment was offered at the Govern- ment Hospitals and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

187. A large proportion of the Chinese children inspected required some dental treatment. There being no school dentist notices were issued to parents to take their children to private practitioners.

188. Arrangements have been made whereby children suffer- ing from adenoids and enlarged tonsils can receive operative treat- ment at the Government Hospitals.

189. With regard to home visiting the three nurses paid 184 visits to homes to advise parents regarding the health of their children. Where hospital treatment is necessary the nurse often escorts the patient and the parent to the hospital.

190. In September a small room at the Ellis Kadoorie School was fitted up as a minor ailments clinic. From the opening until the end of the year there were 120 attendances. A number of cases of conjunctivitis and trachoma were treated at the clinic.

191. With regard to infectious diseases the M.O.H. notifies the School Medical Officer of any school cases reported to him. Among the pupils of the British and Anglo-Chinese Schools there were enteric 12 cases, diphtheria 11, chicken-pox 15, measles 5, whooping-cough 5, mumps 3 and scarlet-fever 1. In the verna- cular schools much improvement was experienced in notification, the total being 38 cases and 88 contacts. The previous year there were only three notifications. The diseases notified were enteric 18, diphtheria 10, measles 8, smallpox 1, and cerebro-spinal fever 1.

192. Notices were sent out giving advice regarding disinfect. ing of desks and property of infected children.

193. Respecting school premises and equipment all Govern- ment Schools were inspected and reports made. Considerable improvements were effected.

194. The Central British School and the Kowloon Junior School were too crowded. New premises are badly needed for the British children.

195. A most important part of the work done by this branch was the teaching of hygiene. Lectures were given to Vernacular teachers.

196. Hygiene is a compulsory subject for English teachers and courses in this subject have been established at the Education Department's Technical Institute.

M 48

197. The School Medical Officer has established at head- quarters the beginnings of a health museum where are to be found posters, leaflets, pamphlets, lantern slides, etc., etc.

LABOUR CONDITIONS.

198. There are no estates, plantations or mines and com- paratively few large factories. The majority of the urban labour- ing classes are engaged in matters connected with commerce, shipping or public works and the bulk of the remainder find employment in shops or workshops or independent businesses. There is no need for recruitment of labour, the supply being sufficient to satisfy all demands.

199. Labourers find their own accommodation in the many tenements and lodging houses which exist in Hong Kong and Kowloon.

200. There is no Factory and Workshop Ordinance but the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance contains sections bearing on the health of factory workers.

201. There are no special arrangements for the medical care of labourers other than the Government Hospitals, the Chinese Hospitals, the Chinese Dispensaries and the Mission Hospitals. The total number of third class beds in these in- stitutions available for general diseases are about 1,000 or 1 to 750 approximately.

HOUSING AND TOWN PLANNING.

202. There is no Town Planning Ordinance and Housing comes under that portion of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which is administered by the Public Works Depart- ment. There is little or no zoning in the older parts of the Colony and blacksmiths shops or even foundries are to be found in the midst of shop houses and domestic houses. Zones recom- mended by the Town Planning Committee of 1923 are being worked to in the new development areas on the mainland.

203. By inter-departmental arrangement the Medical Officer of Health scrutinises the plans of new buildings but there is nothing in the law which states this must be so.

204. The following list shows some of the work done during the year by the building branch of the P.W.D.

Nature of Work

1. Obstructions removed from open spaces

2 Obstructions to light and ventilation removed...

No. of cases

1931 1930

305

124

814 1,182

M 49

3. Rat holes stopped

1,026 769

4. Water closets installed in private buildings...... 4,842 2,211 5. Houses demolished (domestic)

6.

17

demolished (non-domestic)

7.

erected (domestic)

8.

22

erected (non-domestic)

155

50

16

13

1,258

983

21

18

205. The City of Victoria for the area it occupies is over- housed and grossly over-populated. In certain districts a great deal of improvement has been brought about but in some 200 acres where there are approximately 1,000 persons to the acre sanitary conditions are very bad indeed.

206. The position as regards housing in Victoria has been explained in the introduction to this report. The situation is at the same time a sanitary problem, a social problem and an economic problem. Victoria is the centre of attraction for the stream of immigrants from China most of whom are poor people who live from hand to mouth. Accommodation is limited but the people must find shelter somewhere. A cubicle rents for ten dollars per month, a bed in the passage costs three to four dollars, food costs at least six dollars and the average earnings of a coolie do not exceed twenty dollars.

207. There is no space to build further houses and demolition means an increase of concentration in the houses that remain.

208. One hopeful sign is that the people are being more and more attracted by Kowloon where concentration is much less marked and where there is room for extension.

209. The following plan shows the dimensions of the model type of house designed by the P.W.D. Provided there be sufficient space in front and behind in the way of street and back lane and provided the occupants keep the building clean and free from obstruction to light and ventilation there is no reason why they should not live a healthy life.

8

874

B

8

M 50

*

-170-

PLAN OF A FLOOR IN A NEW HOUSE

WITH CUBICLES

SCALE 1" 8 FT.

M 51

210. Boarding Houses which include every place where any person is harboured or lodged for any kind whatsoever of hire or reward and where any domestic service whatsoever is rendered by the owner, lessee, principal tenant, occupier, or master to the person so harboured or lodged, but which does not include any boarding-house for non-Chinese seamen within the meaning of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance are licensed and controlled by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

211. They include hotels, common lodging houses, places where employers lodge their employees and the premises of societies within the meaning of the Societies Ordinance, where persons pass the night.

212. There are a great number of these boarding houses ranging from high class hotels to lodging houses for rickshaw coolies.

FOOD IN RELATION TO HEALTH & DISEASES.

Inspection and Control of Food Supplies.

213. The laws dealing with this subject are the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordi- nance both of which are administered by the Sanitary Depart- ment. Stall-holders and hawkers who come under the Licensing Ordinance 1887 are licensed by the Police.

214. During the year the following samples were taken under the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance and subjected to analysis:-Milk 72, Condensed Milk 2, Cheese 14, Butter 2, Sugar 9, Tea 17, Chocolate 2, Bread 21. Biscuits 1, Flour 9, Tinned fish 11, Tinned Chicken 1. Thirty-two samples were found to be adulterated.

215. The following foodstuffs were seized under Section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance :-

Tinned vegetables 126 tins, tinned sardines 4 cases, tinned fruit 1 case, tinned food 2 cases, various meats and fruits 77 tins, cheese 3 cases, milk 7 tins, pork fat 8 baskets, sausages 1 basket, flour 3 sacks and biscuits 2 small baskets.

DEFICIENCY DISEASES.

216. The only information available regarding deficiency diseases is furnished by the returns of the Government Hospitals and Chinese Hospitals and the death returns. The Hospitals deal with only a small proportion of the sick and the whole truth as regards the incidence of disease among the masses can- not be deduced from their returns. The death returns are also misleading in that the majority of cases were not treated by competent physicians prior to death and the Medical Officer amining the body and forming a diagnosis had no history to assist him in coming to a conclusion as to the cause of death,

217. Beri-beri.

M 52

Polished rice is the staple food of the masses yet beri-beri is not epidemic and the deaths from this disease formed only 3.69 per cent of the total deaths. The total num- ber of deaths recorded was 694 and the death rate per mille population 0.78. The total number treated in the Government Hospitals for this disease was 68, those treated in the Chinese Hospitals numbered 1,360.

218. Rickets. No cases of rickets were admutted to either the Government or the Chinese Hospitals.

219. Scurvy.-Only one case came to the notice of the Medical Authorities.

Markets, Slaughter Houses and Dairies.

220. Markets.

The markets come under the Sanitary De. partment. There is urgent need for larger and better markets in the City of Victoria.

221. Slaughter Houses.-Slaughter houses and animal depots are controlled by the Veterinary Branch of the Sanitary Depart- ment. There is a Government depot at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) for the reception of all cattle, sheep, swine and goats brought into the Colony for slaughter. The Government abattoirs are situated at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) and at Ma Tau Kok (Kowloon). There are Government controlled slaughter houses at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho.

222. Dairies.-There are a number of dairies in the Colony all of which are licensed by the Sanitary Board. On the south side of the Island there is a model dairy farm where milk is produced by stall fed cattle.

Training of Sanitary Personnel.

223. The Medical Officers of Health hold classes and give lectures. Courses in chemistry, physics and sanitary engineering were held at the Technical Institute of the Education Depart- ment.

224. Hong Kong is an examining centre for the Royal Sanitary Institute and every year examinations are held for the Sanitary Inspectors Certificate, the Sanitary Science Certificate and the Meat and Food Certificate. Candidates come from Shanghai to take these examinations. The results of the last test were very satisfactory.

M 53

SECTION IV.

PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINISTRATION.

GENERAL.

225. Reckoned in terms of shipping-tonnage, Hong Kong is one of the five greatest ports of the world. It is the principal commercial entrepot of Southern China and it is the terminus of steamship lines running between China, Japan, and North America.

226. In 1931, 4,884 British ocean-going steamers and 7,014 foreign ocean-going steamers entered and cleared the harbour. In addition there were 11,121 river steamers, 7,211 launches, and 21,621 foreign trade junks. The total tonnage of vessels entering and clearing was 41,933,748.

227. The Medical Staff engaged in Port Health duties con- sists of two European Health Officers and two Chinese Medical Officers.

228. The work of the department includes:

(a) Routine inspection of ships.

(b) Quarantine duty.

(c) Duty in connection with emigration.

(d) Vaccination.

229. The laws dealing with the subject of Quarantine and Port Health are contained in Table L of the Hong Kong Port Regulations, the Asiatic Emigration Ordinance and the Vaccina- tion Ordinance.

230. During the year 5,916 inward bound ocean-going vessels were boarded by the Health Officers. Of these 2,41 were on the British register and 3,500 on the foreign register.

231. River steamers from Canton, Macao and West River Ports, also junks and small crafts were only visited when cases of sickness or death were reported.

232. During the year 203 special visits were made to ships for the purpose of examining persons suffering from infectious but non-quarantine diseases. 85 permits for the landing of corp- ses for burial were granted and 40 bodies were sent to the mortuary for post-inortem examination. Five cases of leprosy were detected amongst Chinese passengers. Twenty-four Chinese lunatics arrived in the Colony during the year. Bills of Health

utubering 1,904 were issued.

M 54

QUARANTINE.

253. Hong Kong has no quarantine station for ships' pas- sengers or crews. When segregation is necessary it is carried out on board ship at the quarantine anchorage. A limited number (26) of infectious cases can be accommodated at the Government infectious Diseases Hospital at kennedy Town but there is no room for contacts.

234. During the year only one vessel was detained in Quarantine. During medical examination of deck passengers on S.S. Tilawa' on December 30th, a case of smallpox was detected amongst the emigrants from Amoy. The vesser was allowed to sail on the following day, after vaccination of all passengers and crew and suitable disinfection of vessel had been carried out.

235. All vessels arriving from infected' ports and those having infectious or suspicious cases on board fly the 'Q' flag and go to the quarantine anchorage for examination.

236. The number of vessels arriving in quarantine was 387 with 58,007 passengers and a crew personnel of 40,426. All were examined and those from smallpox infected ports were vaccinated.

237. The total number of persons medically inspected during 1931 was 261,642 or an average of 717 examinations a day.

238. Ninety-three vessels were fumigated during the year. Fumigations are carried out by a private company but each operation is supervised by a Health Officer.

EMIGRATION.

239. The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915 re- quires that emigrant ships shall have:-

(1) Proper and sufficient living accommodation.

(2) Proper and sufficient sanitary requirements.

(3) Proper and sufficient hospital accommodation.

(4) A sufficient supply of drugs, medical equipment and

disinfectants.

240. It also makes provision for :-

(1) A proper diet scale.

(2) The prevention of the export of the unfit.

(3) The prevention of the export of infectious disease.

- M 55 -

241. The Vaccination Ordinance 1923 requires that all emigrants from the Colony shall be protected against smallpox by vaccination.

242. The duty of carrying out the sanitary and medical inspection and for vaccinating those who are insufficiently pro- tected falls on the Port Health Authorities.

243. Emigrants are classified as:

(a) Free emigrants' or those who pay their own pass-

ages.

(b) Assisted emigrants or those whose passages are paid

by their prospective employers.

(c) Women and children.

244. The total number of emigrants examined during the year was 105,727 of whom 102,284 were free and 3,443 assisted. The number of rejections was 270.

245. Owing to the continued trade depression in Malaya, the Government of that country further restricted the number of Chinese minigrants from Hong Kong and China. This restric tion contributed largely to the reduction of total emigrants for the year to 105,727. This figure shews a very marked decrease in numbers of emigrants compared with 193,209 for 1930, 235,554 for 1929 and 288,745 for 1927.

VACCINATION.

246. The Government Vaccinators are members of the Port Health staff and work under the general supervision of the Port Health Officer. They are detailed for work at various centres and they assist where needed.

247. The number of vaccinations performed by three Officers at the centres was 22,686 of which 4,811 were emigrants.

M 56

Table I.

SHOWING EMIGRANTS PASSES AND REJECTIONS FOR 1931.

Port of Destination.

Passenger.

Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements

50,095

3,094

106

Canada

5,846

14,610

42

United States of America...

6,330

9,165

37

Honolulu

5,334

...

5

Dutch East Indies

26,665

11,268

25

British North Borneo

2,072

2,609

! I

Shanghai and Japan..

4,838

Australia

910

2,077

19

South Sea Islands.

379

83

96

Manila

1.6

India

2,080

10,635

Chile

IO

Panama

318

355 1,854

Mauritius

495

Reunion

309

South Africa...

II

Havana

14

79

359

74

1,220

5

2

1

Salvador..

2

Saigon

3

Totals

105,727

57,482

270

Table II.

SHOWING MONTHLY RETURNS OF EMIGRANTS, CREWS AND

REJECTIONS.

Months.

Ships Fxamined.

Pas-

sengers.

Crews.

Rejected.

January

28

9,043

4.352

13

February

18

3,714

3.54

March

28

10,581

+.788

19

36 a

April....

29

12,199

5,435

29

May

31

13,246

5,309

39

June

27

10,388

4,603

36

July

31

10,757

5,607

37

August

28

6,395

4,886

21

September..

27

8,126

4.940

26

October

29

7,788

4,946

22

November.

24

6.092

4,536

10

December

25

7,398

4,539

I 2

Totals..........

325

105.727

57,482

270

M 57

Table III.

SHOWING CAUSES OF REJECTION OF EMIGRANTS.

Diseases.

Skin Diseases :-

Scabies

Tinea

Urticaria

Eye Diseases:

Trachoma

Tritis

No. Rejected

34

2

86

1

Infectious Diseases:

Smallpox

Cerebro-spinal Meningitis

Leprosy

1

1

1

Chickenpox

Mumps

1

1

Phthisis

Fever

4

115

Chanere

1

Chancroid

2

Syphilis

3

Tabes Dorsalis

1

Chronic Nephritis

1

Debility

5

Enlarged Spleen

3

Inguinal Adenitis

1

Connective Tissue Cellulitis

1

Tonsillitis

2

Ulcer

1

Ascites

1

Total

270

M 58

www

Table IV.

Showing the number of passengers, arriving in Quarantine each month, 1981.

crews

Months.

No. of Passengers.

No. of Crews.

and ships

No. of Ships.

January

14

50

I

February

644

1,578

March

602

1,087

April

739

1,162

18

May

1,495

1,435

20

June

4,711

2,272

23

July

12.570

6 161

66

August

8,404

4.133

44

September

7,763

6,236

50

October

14,684

11,091

November

3,442

3,390

+100 min m

84

32

December

2,939

1,831

18

Totals

58,007

40.426

387

Table V.

Showing Quarantine Notifications issued by the Hong Kong Government for 1931.

Port or Locality.

Disease.

Date and Number of Notification.

Date and Number of Cancellation.

Bangkok

Plague.

Saigon

Cholera.

Swatow

""

Pakhoi

Shanghai

...

Amoy

Plague.

Cholera.

Small-pox.

No. 51 of 29th January, 1931. No. 322 of 15th

May, 1931, No. 445 of 15th

July, 1931. No. 446 of 16th

July, 1931. No. 571 of 10th September, 1931. No. 798 of 17th December, 1931.

No. 271 of Ist May, 1931. No. 498 of 5th August, 1931. No. 512 of 13th August, 1931. No. 513 of 13th August, 1931. No. 712 of 19th November, 1931.

M 59

SECTION V.

MATERNITY & CHILD WELFARE. ANTE-NATAL AND INFANT WELFARE CENTRES.

Tsan Yuk Hospital.

248. An ante-natal clinic was started in April 1930. The number of patients treated in 1931 was 156 (129 in 1930) with 239 attendances (209 in 1930).

249. The Infant Welfare Clinic is only for babies born in the hospital. The number of babies brought to the clinic was 504 (589 in 1930) and the total number of visits 1,783 (2,894 in 1930).

Tung Wah Hospital.

250. The number of attendances at the Infant Welfare Clinic was 1,486 (2,523 in 1930).

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals.

251. The number of women treated at the Ante-natal Clinic was 110 with 120 attendances. Of these 110 women 70 returned and were delivered in the hospital.

252. The number of babies seen at the Infant Welfare Centre was 194 with 355 attendances (225 in 1930). All the babies attending the clinic were born in the hospital.

253. In addition to the above the Chinese Y.M.C.A. main- tains an Infant Welfare Centre and the Military Authorities have one for the benefit of the children of the European Garrison, which is in charge of a European Nursing Sister.

MIDWIVES.

254. Under the Midwives Ordinance of 1910 'No one whose name is not on the Midwives Register may practise midwifery habitually for gain or describe herself as one especially qualified to carry on the work of a midwife.'

255. Training Schools for Midwives have been established at the Alice Memorial, Tsan Yuk, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah and Government Civil Hospitals.

M 60

256. The course of training is as follows:

(a) for those who have less than two years general training two years at a Maternity Hospital recognised as such by the Board.

(b) for those who have had two years training in general

nursing one year at a recognised maternity hospital. (c) for those who have had four years training in general nursing six months at a recognised maternity hospital.

257. During 1931, forty eight candidates out of fifty two satisfied the examiners and were registered.

258. The total number on the Midwives Register at the end of 1931 was 211 (165 in 1930).

259. There are seven midwives on the Government Medical Establishment whose services are free to those who cannot afford to pay a fee. Four of these are stationed in the New Territories and three for duty in connection with the Chinese Public Dis- pensaries. All are supervised by a Government Lady Medical Officer.

260. During the year 1,420 cases (1,248 in 1930) were attended by Government midwives.

MATERNITY HOSPITAL ACCOMMODATION.

261. The total hospital accommodation for maternity cases is 259 and the number of women delivered in hospitals was 8,317 (8,866 in 1930).

Hospital.

Authority in Control.

Beds. Deliveries.

Government Civil

Government Medical Dept. 21

711

Victoria

32

88

19

Tsan Yuk

Chinese Committee

47

1,248

Waricha

31

83

11

"}

Tung Wah

Tung Wah Eastern

Kwong Wah

Alice Memorial

Matilda

24

??

>>

1,679

18

667

"

59

""

3,245

London Mission

14

481

Board of Trustees

30

Peak (Nursing Home)

Government Medical Dept.

1

7

St. Paul's (French) Canossa

French Mission

9

68

Italian Mission

1

10

Total

265

8,317

M 61

Maternity Bungalow at the Government Civil Hospital.

262. The Bungalow has accommodation for twenty-one patients and is mainly for the use of Asiatic women.

263. There are three general wards with a total of sixteen beds, two private wards with two beds each and one isolation ward with one bed.

264. The majority of patients are under the care of the Professor of Obstetrics of the University he being at the same time Obstetric Physician to the Government Civil Hospital.

265. The admissions during the year were 779 (775 in 1930), making a total of 796 cases treated, of these 141 were treated by the Government Medical Officers and 655 by the Professor of Obstetrics and his assistants.

266. The nationalities of the patients were as follows:

Europeans

Japanese

Indians

Chinese

Total:-

2

28

40

711

796

267. There were 711 deliveries. In sixteen cases the infants were stillborn and in twelve cases they died shortly after birth. There were three cases of twins.

268. There were five maternal deaths the causes being Pulmonary Embolism 2; Septicaemia 1; Ruptured Uterus 1; Uraemia 1.

269. The daily average number of patients in the hospital was thirteen excluding infants.

270. The annual report of the Professor of Obstetrics will be found in the appendix under the heading University Clinic.

The Victoria Maternity Hospital.

271. The number of beds in this hospital is thirty two.

272. The admissions during the year were 115. The total number of cases treated were 122.

273. There were 88 deliveries with one stillbirth. There was one case of twins.

M 62

274. Caesarean Section was performed in one case of con- tracted pelvis. Mother and child both did well.

275. There were no maternal deaths.

276. The daily average number of patients was.—

4.6 mothers and 3.9 babies.

277. The hospital is available for private patients who wish to be attended by their own doctors. Twenty patients availed. themselves of the privilege.

Chinese Maternity Hospitals.

278. There are two Chinese Maternity Hospitals each under the management of a Chinese Committee, and in addition there are maternity wards in each of the three hospitals under the management of the Tung Wah Hospital Committee. In all the hospitals maternity patients are treated by Western methods.

The Tsan Yuk Maternity Hospital.

279. The number of beds in this hospital is sixty and of these forty seven beds are reserved for maternity cases and thirteen for gynaecological patients.

280. The whole of the inpatient work of this hospital is supervised by Dr. R. E. Tottenham, Professor of Obstetrics to the University of Hong Kong. There is a resident Chinese Medical Officer.

281. The total number of deliveries vas 1,218 (1,251 in 1930) out of a total of 1,323 cases treated. There were three maternal deaths and 46 children were stillborn,

282. The clinical work in the outpatient department is carried out by the staff of the Government Visiting Medical Officer for Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries. In addition to the treat- ment of ordinary gynaecological cases, special clinics are held. for ante-natal, infant welfare and venereal diseases cases.

The Wanchai Maternity Hospital.

283. This hospital is connected with the Wanchai Chinese Public Dispensary. A Western-trained Chinese Doctor is in charge

284. During the year extensive alterations took place, in- creasing the accommodation from twenty two to thirty one beds.

285. Owing to the closing of the hospital during the altera- tions only 83 patients were treated (827 in 1930).

286. Seven children were stillborn. There were no maternal deaths.



M 63

The Tung Wah Hospital Maternity Wards.

287. Three wards containing a total of twenty four beds are reserved in the general hospital for maternity patients.

288. During the year there were 1,679 deliveries out of a total of 1,679 cases treated. There were no maternal deaths and 83 infants were stillborn.

The Tung Wah (Eastern) Hospital Maternity Wards.

289. There are 18 beds reserved for maternity patients. During the year there were 667 admissions and the same number of deliveries. There were five maternal deaths and 45 infants were stillborn.

The Kwong Wah Hospital Malernity Wards.

290. The maternity wards in this hospital are in a block separated from the main buildings. There are 59 beds.

291. 3,284 patients were treated and 3,245 were delivered. There were six deaths, two from post-partum haemorrhage and four from eclampsia.

292. 157 children were stillborn.

SECTION VI.

HOSPITALS, INSTITUTES, ETC.

GOVERNMENT INSTITUTIONS.

293. The Government Hospitals are:-The Government Civil Hospital, the Victoria Hospital, the Kowloon Hospital and the Infectious Diseases Hospital. In addition there is the Peak Hospital which is maintained by the Government as a Nursing Home and where patients can be treated by their own doctors. This hospital will be closed as soon as the War Memorial Hospital is ready for admission of patients. The latter hospital will be governed by a Committee and will receive no support from Government funds.

Government Civil Hospital.

294. The Government Civil Hospital, which was built in 1874 and which occupies a site in the middle of the most populous area, is the largest Government hospital in the Colony. It has accommodation for 246 patients, including the 21 maternity beds, which are in a Bungalow separated from the main buildings. The majority of the maternity beds and about

M 64

100 beds in the main building are under the control of the Clinical Professors of the Hong Kong University, who have been appointed respectively Physician, Surgeon, and Obstetric Physician to the hospital and who are responsible to the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services for the duties they perform in the hospital. They have also been appointed consultants to Government. The University Clinic do all the outpatient work except that connected with the Venereal Diseases Clinic which is attended to by the Government Venereal Diseases Specialist.

295. Dr. I. Newton was the Medical Officer in charge during the year. He was assisted by Dr. G. H. Thomas and Dr. T. Z. Bau.

296. The number of inpatients, exclusive of those in the maternity block, was 4,744 (4,788 in 1930), of which 891 were treated by the University staff and 3,853 by the Government Medical Officers.

297. The 891 patients treated by the University staff were made up as follows:-

Medical cases

Surgical cases

Gynaecological cases

410

374

107

298. The daily average number of inpatients was 168, that for the previous year was 184.

299. The nationality of the patients was:

European

Indian

Chinese

Other Asiatics

Total

382

1,057

3,214

91

4,744

300. A large proportion of the total patients receive treat- ment free of charge.

301. There were 356 deaths and of these 197 occurred within 24 hours of admission. The case death rate was 75.04 per mille (66.42 per mille in 1930).

302. 977 major operations were performed (1,022 in 1930). Of these 530 were from the University Surgical Clinic. 88 from the University Gynaecological Clinic and the remaining 359 were performed by the Government Medical Officers.

M 65-

Malaria.

303. There were 220 cases treated (346 in 1930). Of these 158 were benign tertian, 2 quartan, 46 sub-tertian and 14 cachexia. There were six deaths due to sub-tertian and one to cachexia.

Diphtheria.

304. 851 cases were treated with 14 deaths as compared with 26 cases with 9 deaths in 1930.

Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

305. There were 123 cases treated with 23 deaths (137 cases with 40 deaths in 1930).

Venereal Diseases.

306. 102 cases of syphilis were treated as inpatients (104 in 1930). Gonorrhoeal inpatients numbered 109 (142 in 1930).

Accidents.

307. There were 817 accidents of a nature so serious as to require treatment as inpatients (776 in 1930).

The Police Force.

308. The total number of admissions and deaths were as follows:

Admissions.

Deaths.

British

109

1

Russian ship guards

15

0

Indians

469

2

Chinese (Cantonese)

88

Chinese (Wei-hai-wei)

85

Total

766

3

309. The daily average number of Government Servants treated by the Government Medical Officers as outpatients was 25 (34 in 1930).

Outpatients Department.

310. This department is open both morning and afternoon. The number of attendances, exclusive of Venereal Diseases cases, was 43,196 (45,683 in 1930). In addition there were 13,953 attendances for dressings (9,740 in 1930). The number of prescriptions dispensed was 42,111 (35,992 in 1930).

M 66

311. The reports of the Professors in charge of the various University Clinics will be found in the Appendix.

Victoria General and Maternity Hospital.

312. The Victoria Hospital which was originally built for the accommodation of women and children is now a general and maternity institution. Situated in the residential area well above the level of the town it has a clear view across the harbour of the territory on the opposite side. There are 42 general beds. and 32 maternity beds, in separate blocks with entirely separate staff for each building.

313. Dr. D. J. Valentine, M.C., was Medical Officer in charge. Dr. J. E. Dovey was Assistant Medical Officer until April 23rd. when he left on home leave and was relieved by Dr. J. B. Mackie.

314. During the year 645 cases were treated, 530 in the General Block and 115 in the Maternity Block. The patients treated in the General Block were men 123, women 229 and children 178. There were two deaths, one adult from typhoid fever and one child from meningitis.

315. The daily average number of patients exclusive of maternity patients was 19.

316. The nationality of those treated was:

Europeans

Chinese

Other nationalities

Total

425

73

32

530

317. The maternity side of the Institution is described in the section dealing with Maternity and Child Welfare (V).

Kowloon Hospital.

318. This is situated on the mainland and consists of two blocks containing 58 beds. The Maternity Block begun last year is nearing completion and should be ready for the reception of patients in April 1932.

319. Dr. J. T. Smalley, Senior Medical Officer, was in charge during the year, assisted by Dr. K. H Uttley and Dr. P. Court, both of whom had other duties in addition.

320 Dr. A. D. Wong was Chinese Assistant Medical Officer.

321. The total number of cases treated was 1,855 (1.691 in 1930).

M 67

322. The nationalities were made up as follows:-

Males.

Females. Total.

Europeans

355

258

613

Chinese

* 1,058

117

1,175

Other Asiatics

49

18.

67

Total

...... 1,462

393

1,855

323. The deaths numbered 105-82 males and 23 females. ·

324. The daily average number of patients was 53.2 (43.8 in 1930).

325. During the year 604 operations were performed under general anaesthesia (439 in 1930).

326. The number of Police admitted was as follows:

European.

66

Chinese.

276

Indians.

3

Outpatients Department.

327. The number of outpatients' visits recorded as compared with previous years were as follows:-

1929.

1930.

1931.

New cases .... 9,987

9,471.

9,731

Old cases

3,197

3,029

5.333

Dressings

3,086

5,482

6,833

Total

16,270

17,982

21.897

328. In addition 451 vaccinations were performed.

329. The number of prescriptions dispensed during the year was 12,710 (13,521 in 1930).

Government Dispensaries.

330. The Dispensaries maintained by Government during the year under review were the Taipo Dispensary and the Un Long Dispensary.

- M 68

Taipo Dispensary (New Territories).

331. Dr. C. H. Luk was Chinese Medical Officer in charge during the year. The number of visits recorded as compared with previous years were as follows:-

1929.

1930.

1931.

New cases

2.471

2.683

2,523

Old cases

1,988

2,411

2,591

Vaccinations

2,132

1.632

1,286

Total

6,591

6.726

6,400

332. 509 cases of malaria were treated (730 in 1930).

Un Long Dispensary (New Territories).

333. This Dispensary which is in charge of a dresser is visited twice a week by the Chinese Medical Officer. The num- ber of cases treated during the year was 4,261 as compared with 5,012 in 1930. The number of vaccinations was 588 (686 in 1930).

Venereal Diseases Clinics.

334. Dr. J. A. R. Selby has been in charge of the Venereal Diseases Clinics during the year. Dr. (Miss) Lai and Dr. (Miss) Ruttonjee have assisted at the clinics for women. Mr. Collyer, assistant attendant at the Mental Hospital, has acted as Eu ropean orderly at the male clinics.

335. All treatment is given free of charge.

336. Clinics are held daily aa follows:

At the Government Civil Hospital.

Monday and Wednesday...... 10 a.m. for Chinese

Tuesday

Thursday

Friday

10 am. and 5 p.m. for Europeans. 10 a.m. for Indians.

10 a.m. for women only.

At the Kowloon Hospital.

On Tuesday afternoons for males and on Friday afternoons for women.

337. The nationality and sex of those treated at the above clinics were as follows:-

Male

Female

Europeans

138

3

Chinese

1,285

343

Indians

185

Japanese

11

1

Total:

1,619 .

347

M 69

338. The diseases treated were as follows:-

Male Female

Syphilis

896

110

Chancroid

130

2

Gonorrhoea

325

121

Syphilis with Gonorrhoea...

74

57

Chancroid & Gonorrhoea

11

Observation

164

56

Other diseases

19

1

Total:

1,619

347

339. Total cases treated was 1,966.

340. The total number of attendances were 6,392 (3,530 in 1930). Of these male attendances were 5,354 and female 1,038

341. 1,838 specimens of blood were sent to the Bacteriologi- cal Institute for Wassermann test, the results being as follows:

Positive

Doubtful Negative

Total:

1,116

123

599

1,838

342. 3,187 injections of N.A.B. and 27 injections of Bismuth were given to outpatients.

343. 102 cases of gonorrhoea received 563 treatments with diathermy in the Radiological Department with satisfactory results.

Tsan Yuk Hospital V. D. Clinic.

344. A clinic for Chinese women suffering from venereal diseases is held weekly by the Government Lady Doctors, Mrs. McElney, Miss Lai and Miss Ruttonjee.

345. 567 new patients were treated, return visits numbered 1,036, giving a total of 1,603 attendances (887 in 1930).

346. The diseases treated were as follows:-

Syphilis

Syphilis with gonorrhoea Gonorrhoea

Soft Chancre

No apparent disease

82

131

257

96

Total:

567

:

M 70

847. 523 injections of N.A.B. were given.

348. 439 specimens of blood were sent to the Bacteriological Institute for examination with the following results :-

Positive

Negative

Doubtful

Total:

207

193

39

439

349. In addition to the above clinics, venereal cases were seen at the outpatient departments of the various hospitals and dispensaries.

X-Ray Department.

350. Dr. Farr was in charge during the year and had as his assistants Mr. J. Skinner, D.P.A., Kadiographer, and Miss C. S. Mackenzie, X-ray Sister. The massage and electro- therapeutical work was carried out by Miss L. M. Siggins, C.S.M.M.G., B.P.A.

351. Mrs. Smalley acted as part-time assistant from April to November.

352. The department is now fully staffed and equipped and during the year a greatly increased amount of work was done as compared with previous years.

353. As in the previous year, considerable use was made of the radium lent to the hospital by the Committee of the Matilda Hospital.

354. Statistics

Massage and Electrical treatment

Radiological examinations....

Films exposed

Fees paid to Treasury

1930

1931

3,934

6,239

1,902

2,464

3,309

3,653

$ 3,878.50 $ 4,738.50

Value of work done-massage & electrical $14,752.50 $21,782.00

Value of work done-X-ray

$36,534.00 $62,606.00

The greater part of the work is done for patients who are unable to pay any fee.

THE CHINESE HOSPITAL AND DISPENSARIES.

355. The Chinese Hospitals and the Chinese Public Dis- pensaries are institutions which have been established by the Chinese for the benefit of the poor of Chinese nationality.

M 71

356. The hospitals were originally intended to give accom- modation and treatment to those Chinese whose fears and pre- judices against Western medicine prevented their applying for relief at the Government Hospitals. The Tung Wah Hospital situated in the centre of the most thickly populated areas in Victoria was first occupied in 1873. The Kwong Wah Hospital was built in Kowloon in 1911 as an extension of the Tung Wah. The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital another branch of the Tung Wah situated in an open space in the east of Victoria was opened in November, 1929. The Government gave the sites and with grants of money assisted in the erection of the buildings.

357. In administrative control of the three hospitals is the Tung Wah Committee a body of Chinese gentlemen elected each year by the subscribers.

358. The activities of the Chinese Hospitals include:-

(a) The care of the sick and treatmens by Western methods or Chinese methods according to the wish of the patients. (b) Maternity benefits and infant welfare by Western

methods only.

(c) Vaccination.

(d) Health propaganda.



(e) Assistance to the destitute,

(f) The provision of coffins for and the burial of the dead.

359. Much progress has been made in all departments of the hospitals during the last few years. These improvements include:-

(a) The appointment of University graduates as full time

Resident Medical Officers.

(b) The foundation of training schools for female nurses. (c) Extensions and improvements in the male nursing section (d) The establishment of clinical laboratories.

(e) The provision of radiological apparatus.

(f) The establishment of up-to-date operating theatres.

(g) The purchase of motor ambulances.

(h) Improvements in the accommodation for patients.

(i) Improvement in quarters for the staff.

360. Today each of the three Tung Wah Hospitals has a good operating theatre where operations are performed daily, many of which are major in character.

361. In charge of the medical side (Western) of each hospital is a Medical Superintendent, a graduate of the University, whose salary is paid by Government.

M 72

362. The Chinese Public Dispensaries, nine in number, were established for the purpose of supplying medical advice and treatment on Western lines. Situated in the most thickly populated districts they fulfil a most useful purpose, not only in the treatment of disease but also as foci for the spread of knowledge concerning the cause of disease, the means of spread and the value of Western drugs and methods both in prevention and cure.

363. Each Dispensary is controlled by a separate Committee of Chinese gentlemen who work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs. Responsible to the Committee and in direct charge of the Dispensary is a Chinese Medical Practitioner qualified in Western medicine. He is assisted by an English speaking Chinese clerk and there is a staff of dressers and coolies.

364. In addition to the ordinary work of the polyclinic and dispensary these institutions serve as depots where the poor may apply for assistance in matters connected with:-

(a) The removal of patients to hospital.

(b) Certification as to the cause of death.

(c) Removal of corpses to mortuaries.

(d) Supply of coffins and arrangements for burial. (e) The registration of births.

(f) Vaccination.

Visiting Medical Officers for Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries.

365. Both Hospital and Dispensaries are subsidised by Government and are subject to inspection by the Government Medical Department. There are four officers of the Department whose duty it is to visit the various institutions and to give advice and assistance. These officers work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

366. The year has been marked by a general increase in buildings, accommodation, equipment, and in the number of patients treated. There has been progress all round.

367. In the Tung Wah Hospital private wards and second class wards, and wards for 39 Tuberculosis cases, have been opened, as well as new Nurses Quarters with Lecture Room and Dining Room.

368. At the Kwong Wah Hospital a new modern building with 32 beds was opened on the 30th. December by H.E. the Governor. A new Operating Theatre, complete with every modern appliance, will soon be ready to supplement the present

one.

J

M 73

369. Two new wards, each with room for 16 patients, which were formally opened in December 1930, have come into use at the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital: one for Medical cases under Western treatment and the other for Maternity patients.

370. These three large hospitals all supported by Chinese residents in the Colony have each an annual Government grant, and the Senior Chinese Medical Officer in each is paid by the Government.

371. Besides these there are two Maternity Hospitals-the Tsan Yuk, a really model institution in the crowded Western area; and the Eastern, in Wanchai, which this year has been reconstructed and modernised.

372. There are nine Public Dispensaries situated in the populous centres on both sides of the harbour. These are under the control of Chinese Committees and maintained by con- tributions from the Chinese Community assisted by a small Government grant.

373. An enormous and ever-increasing number of sick, too poor to pay for doctor's fees or buy proper medicines, are successfully reached. In the three big hospitals the patient can choose between Western and Chinese methods of treatment; but here, in the Dispensaries, he is treated only by properly qualified Chinese Doctors and with the best drugs procurable bought from the Government Central Medical Stores. Govern- ment Lady doctors treat the gynaecological cases once a week in eight of the Dispensaries.

374. Some of these Dispensarics are housed temporarily in rooms attached to temples, but gradually entirely new and up-to-date buildings are taking the place of these. New Dispensaries at Yaumati and Kowloon City will soon be complete and ready for occupation. The Dispensaries at Shaukiwan and Wanchai are also excellent buildings of their kind. The Central Dispensary has been enlarged. Instruments for small minor operations and tooth forceps are being added to each Dispensary, and each will in time have its own microscope, especially for differentiating the Malarias which form a big percentage of the cases treated.

.

375. Each Dispensary acts as a focus for Propaganda— breaking down prejudices against 'Foreign' Medicines and Methods of Treatment.

376. Each Dispensary has a room attached to it where dead bodies can be received for burial.

377. The Dispensaries undertake the removal also of corpses to mortuaries, and they supply coffins.

378. Sick, too serious for outpatient treatment, are removed by the Dispensaries to hospital,

M 74

The Tung Wah Hospital.

379. There has been a steady and every increasing number of patients in this Hospital and the year 1931 beat all former records in outpatients.

Inpatients (General)

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

1931

1930

1931

1930

1931

1930

5,704

5,296

5,246

5,548

Inpatients (Maternity)

10,950

10,844

Still-births.

1,679

83:

1,928

354

Deaths.

Brought in dead.

2,314

1,618

2,165

1,501

380. There were 900 operations including many major ones.

Outpatients (General)

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

1931

1930

1931

1930

57,063

25,463

184,997

242,060

.202,482

227.945

Eye Clinic.

Baby Clinic.

14,277

1,486

12,262

2,523

381. A great many patients come to the Tung Wah Hospital from outside the Colony attracted by its fame and its unstinted charity.

382. A large proportion of the deaths in the Hospital occur within 24 hours of admission. It is a dumping ground for dying people who wish to avoid postmortems. 388 were brought in moribund.

383. The number of vaccinations does not increase on account of new Vaccination Stations established outside.

384. In spite of some falling off in Inpatients, the Out- patients in 1931 numbered 29,878 more than in 1930.

385. The new Outpatient rooms added in 1931 to the Hospital made no appreciable difference till towards the end of the year when they began to function.

M 75

386. Though the number of patients who choose their own herbalists to treat their complaints is still too large, most of these were not suffering seriously. For anything very important they learn by experience to put themselves in the hands of a scientifically trained doctor.

387. The X-ray Department continues to justify itself and the gross income rose from $1,331.00 in 1930 to $1,688.00 in 1931.

The Kwong Wah Hospital

388. General beds 234. Maternity beds 59. 32 beds in the new Tuberculosis ward.

389. This Hospital does for Kowloon and the Peninsula what the Tung Wah Hospital does for the island of Hong Kong.

390. The Accommodation cannot keep pace with the growth in population. Kowloon has considerably more than doubled itself during the last ten years. No patient is turned away for want of room and in both medical and surgical wards it is common to find two in a bed, and others sleeping on the floor.

391. The staff consists of a Senior Resident Medical Officer (Dr. Cheng Kung San), whose salary is paid by the Government, and two Junior Medical Officers (Dr. Tang Yee Yuen and Dr. Lan Shiu Wah), paid by the Directors.

392. There are also a number of Chinese Herbalists, without any recognised qualification, who practise Chinese medicine and are paid out of Hospital funds.

393. The patients, on admittance, can choose whether they desire treatment on Western or Chinese lines.

Inpatients.

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

1931

1930

8,204 7,026

2,283 2,751

10,487

9,777

(including 3,097

maternity)

Outpatients.

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

1931

51,600

(including 436

gynaecology)

19:30

45,536

90,500

94,755

142,100

140,291

394. Eye cases also markedly increased and these were

cared for by Dr. Basto. There were 3,650.

M 76

395. Vaccinations numbered 1,670.

396. There was an Infant Welfare Clinic every Monday and 948 babies were seen. The Ante-natal Clinic still remains small, only 117 cases. There were 3,245 labours.

397. Major operations under general anaesthesia amounted to 157. In 1930 they were 179.

398. The number of deaths in hospital were 3,060. Figures of deaths in these Chinese Hospitals are apt to be misleading, as many sick are brought in when relatives think death is certain and nothing more can be done for them.

The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

399. This Hospital continues to do very good work. It serves the useful purpose of reminding the older foundation- the Tung Wah-what it is possible for a Chinese Hospital to be. Everything is new and clean and it had the advantage of starting fresh in up-to-date buildings.

400. The staff consists of a Chinese Medical Office paid for by Government, Dr. Phoon Seck Weng, and two Junior Doctors appointed by the Directors of the Tung Wah.

401. The total number of beds is 195.

Inpatients.

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Maternity. Total.

1931

2,185

1930

1,796

1931

1930

1931

1930

1931

1930

1,345

854

Outpatients.

667

4,197

472

3,122

Western treatment. Chinese treatment. Total.

12,471

8,764

45,931

45,436

Major Operations.

Under General Anaesthesia

116

103

Vaccinations.

273

235

58,402

54,200

402. Twelve new nurses in 1931 were enrolled for training

in the Hospital,

-

M 77 -

403. There has been a marked increase in the number of children admitted and a ward of six beds is now set apart as à Children's Ward.

404. There has been a decrease in the number of cases in the Private Wards but this was due to the increase in the charges from $2.50 to $4.00 a day.

405. There is improvement in the health of the general staff, and there are now very few cases of Malaria since prophylactic doses of Quinine were instituted and mosquito nets supplied to the nurses.

406. The deaths in 1931 numbered 827. A large number of these died within 24 hours after admission,

3

SUMMARY OF WORK DONE IN THE DISPENSARIES DURING 1931.

Gynaecolo Vaccina- gical cases

Patients

Certificate

Patients

Dispensaries.

New

Old

of causes

of death.

sent to

Hospital.

cases

cases

Patients Corpses removed to removed to Hospital by Hospital or Ambulance. Mortuary.

Applica-

tion for

coffins.

coffins.

Dead

infants

brought to

Dispensary.

tions.

seen by

Lady

Doctor.

Central

13,483

14.452

14

6

42

Eastern.

9,712

10,290

8

5

18

42

Western

12,866

11,822

36

31

401

401

Harbour & Yaumati

30,427

༄།

40

27

2,600

275

42

274

2,994

669

357

3,400

1,038

30,138

76

17

44

198

196

5,606

2,044

Shaukiwan

27,287

26,507

18

59

5

7

7

193

4,546

1,878

Shamshuipo

10,908

2,750

91

158

153

6,027

781

Hung Hom

11,460

3,360

50

96

43

190

185

2,035

710

Aberdeen

4,773

4,987

36

7

3

233

699

Kowloon City

8,503

5,750

112

57

24

124

105

2,550

Total for 1931.

129,419

110,056

300

375

178

1,165

490

1,490

29,991

8,094

M 78

Total for 1930.

122,395

98,385

301

417

301

1,078

391

1,304

25.242

5,966

M 79

Infectious Diseases Hospitals.

407. There are two Infectious Diseases Hospitals-one main- tained by the Government and the other by the Tung Wah Charity. They are situated at the Western end of the City of Victoria in adjoining compounds. There is no Infectious Diseases Hospital in Kowloon.

The Government Infectious Diseases Hospital.

408. This was originally a Police Station, but was adapted as a hospital and has accommodation for 26 beds in six wards.

409. During the year the hospital was under the charge of Dr. S. V. A. Griffith. Except when there are patients occupying it there is only a skeleton staff on the premises.

410. During the year only five patients were treated, two for Smallpox and three for leprosy. There were no deaths.

The Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital.

411. This is an Infectious Diseases Hospital run in connection with the Tung Wah. Practically all the cases who go there, go because they prefer native methods of treatment. The ac- commodation is good, with plenty of room, and the wards detached and connected by covered ways.

412. There are 30 iron beds, but as many more patients could be taken in on bed boards. At present only smallpox cases apply for admission.

413. Nine cases were admitted there in the year. Four died. One case remained over from 1930.

SECTION VII.

PRISONS AND ASYLUMS.

PRISONS.

414. The principal prison of the Colony is situated in Vic- toria, a branch prison being situated at Lai Chi Kok on the Kowloon side of the Harbour. The former has accommodation for 800 prisoners, the latter for about 500. Females are only received at Victoria Gaol,

M 80

415. In 1930 H.E. the Governor appointed a Committee to enquire into the diets appointed for prisoners of all classes in the prisons of the Colony and to make recommendations for any alteration in respect of their nature, quality or quantity that the Committee may think desirable.'

416. As a result of the recommendations the diets have been considerably improved.

417. During 1931 the general health of the prisoners con- tinued to be satisfactory.

418. The total number of admissions to Victoria Gaol was 6,767 (6,493 in 1930) of which 6,096 were males, 622 females and 49 juveniles. 586 of the prisoners admitted were 50 years of age or over.

419. The daily average number of inmates was 717 and the daily average number of sick in hospital was 28.27.

420. The sickness rate was 154.9 per mille and the death rate 1.3 per mille.

421. The daily average number of prisoners at Lai Chi Kok was 385, the total number treated in hospital was 587 and the daily average number in hospital was 10.2.

422. The hospital at Victoria Gaol accommodates thirty patients. During the year thirty nine patients were transferred to the Government Civil Hospital or the Kowloon Hospital, ten for X-ray examination, five maternity patients and the remainder for surgical treatment. Nine prisoners were transferred to the Mental Hospital. There were four births in the female prison. Seventeen prisoners were released on medical grounds, of whom nine were suffering from leprosy.

1

Year.

Prisoners admitted to Victoria

Prison.

Admissions to Victoria Prison

Hospital.

Out-patients.

Total Number of

423. The following statistical Table shows totals, averages and percentages for the ten years 1922-1931 inclusive: STATISTICAL TABLES SHOWING TOTALS, AVERAGES AND PERCENTAGES IN COMPARISON WITH PRECEDING NINE YEARS.

Deaths due to disease at Vic-

toria Prison Hospital.

Prisoners in Lai Chi Kok

Prison.

Prisoners in Victoria Prison.

Daily Average Number of

Sick in Victoria Gaol Hospi-

tal.

1922.

5,014

362

14,911

8

130

657

7.6

40.00

7.22

1923.

1.16

0.16

5,051

327

19,324

10

187

674

7.1

52.90

6.47

1.05

0.20

1924.

7,382

402

16,381

7

228

838

10.1

44.14

5.44

1.20

0.09

1925.

6,339

580

18,603

28

303

813

14.0

50.90

9.15

1.72

0.44

1926.

6,654

585

6,129

10

300

754

19.3

16.78

8.79

2.56

0.15

1927.

7,740

355

7,891

14°

421

774

9.01

21.62

4.59

1.16

0.18*

1928.

5,756

337

13,787

4

329

742

13.43

37.70

5.85

1.81

0.06

1929.

5,779

586

12,678

14

331

744

24.44

1930..

34.73

10.14

3.28

0.23

6,493

892

9,840

10

4.41

734

24.93

26.93

13.79

3.39

0.15

1931.

6,767

1,048

7,989

6

385

714

28.27

21.89

15.49

3.94

0.13

Out-patients.

Rate % of

Admissions

Total

to Hospital to Admissions to Vic-

toria Gaol.

Daily Average in Victoria Gaol Hospital to Daily Average

of Prisoners

Gaol.

Victoria

in

Deaths due to Disease, to

Total Admissions to Victoria

Gaol.

- M 81 -

:

M 82

THE MENTAL HOSPITAL.

424. The Mental Hospital which is an annex to the Govern- ment Civil Hospital has accommodation for fourteen Europeans and eighteen Asiatics.

425. This Institution is intended to be used only as a tem- porary abode for the mentally affected pending arrangements being made for their transfer to Europe or to Canton.

426. The Medical Officer of the Government Civil Hospital is in administrative charge.

Remaining from 1930

Patients.

34

Admissions during the year

288

322

Discharged relieved

Discharged apparently cured.

Transferred to the Mental Hospital, Canton 111

Died

Remaining at the end of 1931.

7

30

322

96

78

Total:-

Daily average number of patients was 39.

SECTION VIII.

METEOROLOGY.

427. Situated just within the northern limits of the tropics occupying an insular position immediately to the south of the great mass of China, Hong Kong's climate is very materially influenced by the direction of the prevailing winds.

428. The North East Monsoon blows from November to May and during this period the weather is dry, cool and invigorating. From May until October, the season of the South West Monsoon. the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot.

429. The mean annual temperature is 72°F. During the summer months the average maximum temperature is 87°F and there is little difference throughout the twenty four hours. Sit- uated on the north side of the Island the City of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze itself which is cut off by the mountain behind the town. During the winter months the range of temperature is from 70°F to 45°F with an average of 66°F.

430. A Table is attached giving the means or totals of the meteorological data for the several months of the year 1931.

* METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

The following Table I. gives the means, totals or extremes of the Meteorological Data for the several months of the year 1931.

- M 83

Temperature.

Humidity.

Wind,

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

Cloudiness Sunshine.

Rain.

Absolute

Mean

Mean.

Mean

Absolute

Rel.

Abs.

Direction.

Velocity

Max.

Max.

Min.

Min.

ins.

O

O

p.c.

ins.

p.c.

hours.

ins.

Points.

Miles p.h.

January

30.15

78.9

66.5

61.4

57.2

40.3

75

February

30.09

77.9

64.7

61.3

58.5

49.8

85

March

30.05

79.7

67.7

63.6

60.5

55.2

80

285

0.43

68

0.47

0.47

888

162.1

0.325

E. by N

11.2

98

28.4

0.550

E

12.4

89

78.1

3.175

16 2

April

29.96

86.0

75.0

70.9

67.8

59.5

87

0.67

91

78.7

8.930

16.3

May

29.84

89.1

80.7

77.0

73.8

68.1

87

0.81

88

112.2

12.000

E

13 4

June

29.75

89.8

85.1

81.4

78.3

72.8

82

0.88

85

133.9

11.600

SSE

13.0

July

29.79

89.9

87.4

82.7

79.0

75.9

81

0.91

74

228.3

9.860

S

7.5

August

29.61.

94.0

87.3

82.7

79.2

74.8

83

0.93

72

206.8

14.270

E

13.4

September

29.82

91.4

85.8

.81.2

77.5

65.5

81

0.86

October

30.01

86.4

79.2

74.4

70.1

62.8

67

0.58

November

30.07

82.1

76.0

70.4

66.1

55.6

66

0.50

December

30.16

75.5

67.7

63.3

59.5

41.7

72

0.43

8855

69

186.7

13.430

E

10.0

50

236.0

0.730

NE

12.8

37

244.1

0.965

ENE

10.4

67

144.3

4.555

ENE

11.7

Mean total

29.94

94.0

76.9

72.5

69.0

40.3

79

0.66

74

1839.6

80.390

E

12.4

or extreme

M 84

SECTION IX.

SCIENTIFIC.

A. BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

431. The activities of the Institute include:

(a) the preparation of vaccine lymph.

(b)

(c)

(d)

sera.

17

''

22

bacterial vaccines.

19

""

>>

rabies vaccine.

"

17

17

(e) examination of pathological material.

(f)

waters, milks, etc., etc.

(g) medical research.

432. The Institute is under the charge of the Government Bacteriologist who is assisted by the Assistant Bacteriologist and four Laboratory Assistants.

433. Particulars of the work done during the year are con- tained in the Annual Report of the Bacteriologist which is appended.

B. THE PUBLIC MORTUARIES.

434. There are two public mortuaries, one being situated in Victoria and the other in Kowloon.

435. At these places for the reception of the dead are re- ceived:

(a) bodies from the Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Public

Dispensaries for diagnosis.

(b) bodies forwarded by Convents which have received them either moribund or dead from relatives and friends. (c) dumped bodies, that is to say, bodies which have been taken from the place of death under cover of the night and dumped in the streets or in the harbour to save the trouble and expense of burial. The great majority of these cases have died a natural death and there is no need for concealment.

(d) bodies sent by the Police for medico-legal examination. (e) bodies sent by the Medical Officer of Health for examina- tion for signs of infectious disease or for simple diagnosis.

436. In all cases where a diagnosis cannot otherwise be made a sectio cadaveris is performed.

437. All dead rats collected by the Sanitary Authorities are taken to the mortuaries for examination with regard to plague.

M 85

438. The Public Mortuary, Victoria, is in charge of the Assistant Bacteriologist, but the Public Mortuary, Kowloon, is under a Medical Officer who has been detailed for th's work in addition to his other duties.

Public Mortuary, Victoria.

439. Report on Post-mortem Examinations 1931.

Number of examinations performed

Male bodies examined

Female bodies examined

Claimed bodies sent from hospitals, etc.

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

Number of Chinese bodies examined

Number of Non-Chinese bodies examined..

440. Bodies were received from the following sources:

Victoria

Harbour Police

Shaukiwan District

Other Villages

Number of rats examined

3,018

1,339

1,679

116

2,902

3,013

5

2,925

10

71

12

86,757

0

Number found plague infected..

Public Mortuary, Kowloon.

441. Report on Post-mortem Examinations 1931.

Number of examinations performed

2.812

Male bodies examined

1,579

Female bodies examined

1,227

Bodies of unknown sex (indistinguishable)

6

Claimed bodies sent from Hospitals, etc.

255

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

2,557

Number of Chinese bodies examined

2,797

21

Number of Non-Chinese bodies examined

442. Bodies were received from the following sources:

Kowloon District

Harbour Police

Number of rats examined

Number found plague infected...

2,495

327

71,091



443. Dr. Uttley who was in charge during part of the year reports that out of 399 consecutive bodies examined 97 or 24.5 per cent had spleens twice the normal size or larger.

444. With regard to fluke diseases out of 252 adult bodies examined 28 or 11.11 per cent had livers containing Clonorchis Sinensis.

M 86

SECTION X.

THE NEW TERRITORIES.

PUBLIC HEALTH AND SANITATION.

445. The New Territories comprise the mainland between Kowloon and the Sham Chun River and a number of islands including Lantau which is larger than Hong Kong. The main- land is so indented by bays, harbours and coves that it may be said to consist of a number of irregular peninsulas many of which are almost islands. Both mainland and islands are of similar geological formation, being barren granite hills or mountains separated by fertile valleys.

446. For administrative purposes the New Territories have been divided into two districts North and South-each under & District Officer. The dividing line is the watershed which separates the waters flowing south into Hong Kong Harbour froin those flowing north into Deep Bay and Tolo Harbour. Each district contains mainland and islands but the Northern is mostly mainland and the Southern mostly island,

447. The area of the Northern District is roughly 200 square miles, that of the Southern District 100 square miles.

448. Two thirds of the Northern District can be reached by rail or road plus walking but the remaining third can only be reached by launch. A great portion of the Southern District is only accessible by boat.

Population and its Distribution.

449. According to the Census 1931 the population of the Northern District was 78,678, that of the Southern District 24,479.

Northern District.

Police District

Population

Pingshan

12,660

Au Tau

12,877

Lok Ma Chau

Sha Tau Kok

Sheung Shiu

4,377

8,941

10,208

Taipo

12,684

Shatin

4,346

Saikung

7,585

Total:

--

73,678

M 87

Southern District.

Police District

Population

Tsun Wan

5,335

Lantau

7,409

Ping Shan

1,713

Cheung Chau

5,477

Lamma Island

1,442

Po T'oi Group & Cheung Kwan O

3,086

Other Islands

17

Total:

24,479

The Villages.

450. The population is grouped into villages situated mostly on the lower levels, the majority being on or near the coast, Some of the people are engaged in agriculture, others in fishing and others in commerce. Some of the villages are easy of access by rail, road or boat, but others are only reached after miles of walking.

451. The layout of the villages varies; in some there are regular streets and lanes, in others the houses are irregularly placed. The houses for the most part are small separate one- storied structures of brick or stone. In the larger villages there are some two-storied buildings.

452. The rules and regulations governing village life are nowhere laid down in print but have been handed down from generation to generation. There are no heads of villages appoint- ed by and responsible to Government for the conduct of village affairs, but there are "Village Elders' who are accepted as arbiters in petty disputes and who have acquired their positions through age, experience, wealth or family rank. These elders have no executive power and are regarded by the villagers and by Government as advisers only.

453. From time to time cooperative efforts are made for the good of the community-some contributing money, some mater. ials and some labour. In this way the paving of streets or paths, the construction of a bridge or the digging of a village well is brought about.

Public Health Laws.

454. There are practically no public health laws in force in the New Territories. The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance. of the Colony does not apply and there is no power to ensure notification, isolation or disinfection of disease cases. The Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance was made applicable in 1911 but has never been enforced. The Vaccination Ordi- nance applies but there has never been any compulsory vaccination.

M 88

Sanitary History.

455. With regard to sanitary measures which are the concern of the District Officers, markets were constructed at Taipo, Cheung Chau and Un Long. In Taipo and Cheung Chau sanitary organisations have been established consisting in the case of the former of a sanitary squad under a contractor, in the latter of a squad under the Market Committee appointed by the Kai Fong. In the other villages sanitary organisations have not yet been brought into being.

Medical History.

Past Medical History.

456. The history of medical efforts is as follows:

1898 Territory taken over by the British.

1900-Dispensary established at Taipo and a Chinese M.O. put

in charge.

1901-Huts for lepers erected at Au Tau. 1911-Leper huts discontinued.

1911-Registration of Births and Deaths Ordinance extended

to New Territories and Police Stations declared to be places for registration. The provisions of the Ordinance. were never enforced.

1914-Government Midwife stationed at Un Long.

1915-

1916-

''

1917-

1920-A

Un Long.

11

""

""

""

"}

,, Taipo.

Tsun Wan.

>>

""

""

Cheung Chau.

non-Government

Chinese Hospital established at

1925-Un Long Dispensary established with a dresser in charge. 1928-European M.O. appointed, with part-time duties in the

New Territories..

1929 The Chinese Hospital no longer receives patients.

Proposals submitted for:-----

(a) Motor Travelling Dispensary for Northern District. (b) Dispensary Launch for the Islands, the boating population and those villages which can only be reached by boat.

Owing to the slump neither of these travelling dis- pensaries was provided. 1930-Government appointed a Committee to make enquiries into the question of Sanitation and Registration of Births and Deaths in the New Territories. The Committee con- sisted of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services (Chairman), the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Head of the Sanitary Department, the District Officer (North), the District Officer (South), and the Assistant Director of Public Works.

M 89

457. Very little information is available concerning either disease incidence or mortality in former years. There have been

no registrations of deaths and no notifications of disease and the only records are those of the two dispensaries mentioned above.

458. The reasons for not taking further action with regard to both prevention and care appear to have been:

(a) lack of information regarding the existance of disease. (b) prevalence of the idea that the people are unwilling to

accept relief in the form of Western medicine.

(c) avoidance of interference with old established customs

and habits.

The Position during 1931.

459. The Committee appointed by Government in the previous year submitted its report.

460. During the year medical relief was distributed by the Medical Department, the St. John Ambulance Brigade and the New Territories Medical Benevolent Society.

461. The Medical Department staff was as follows:-

1 European M.O. (part time), resident at Kowloon. 1 Chinese M.O. resident at Taipo.

Un Long.

1 Dresser

"

1 Midwife

27

"

Tai Po.

1

"

J7

Un Long.

1

Tsun Wan.

"

""

>>

Cheung Chau.

1

462. There is a dispensary at Taipo and another at Un Long in the Northern District. There are no dispensaries in the Southern District.

463. The Medical Officer visited all the villages of any size both in the Northern District and the Southern District to in- vestigate the position obtaining in each and to form an opinion as to the need for medical attention. As a member of the St. John Ambulance Brigade he joined in the work being carried out by that body.

464. The Chinese Medical Officer as in former years confined his attention to dispensary work, only going afield when his services were requested.

465. The midwives, who work under the supervision of the Supervisor of Midwives, performed their duties in their respective districts.

466. The St. John Ambulance Brigade provided a travelling motor dispensary and established two full time first aid stations in the Northern District, one at the ancient walled village of

M 90

Kam Tin and the other at Fanling. A resident uained nurse- inidwife was placed in charge of each. A definite itinery was

worked out and each Sunday seven villages were visited in order. The Government Medical Officer cooperated with the Brigade all through.

467. The Medical Benevolent Society, a board of philan- thropic doctors, arranged for a medical man to visit the territories three times a week for the purpose of offering free advice and medicines to the villagers. This society has done excellent work.

468. The efforts of these two altruistic bodies have proved beyond doubt that a considerable amount of disease is prevalent in the New Territories and that the villagers are only too willing to accept the benefits of Western medicine.

469. The staff of the Malaria Bureau did a considerable amount of investigation in the New Territories, making mosquito surveys, taking spleen census and making blood examinations for the presence of parasites. The reception given to the members of the staff demonstrates that there is no opposition to scientific investigation, provided the people understand the objects aimed at and are treated with ordinary tact and civility. Almost in- variably they showed themselves interested in the proceedings and offered their cooperation.

470. The Medical Officer paid frequent visits to the various Police Stations. During the year there were 148 cases of Malaria as compared with 258 cases in 1930.

471. The attendances at Taipo Dispensary were 6,400 as compared with 6,726 for the previous year. The numbers for Un Long Dispensary were 4,261 as against 5,012 for 1930.

472. In the latter part of the year Government having sanctiontd the purchase of a Motor Travelling Dispensary, the chassis was ordered from England. At the end of the year the vehicle had not been handed over to the Medical Department.

473. The Dispensary Launch, provision for which had ap- peared in the 1930 Estimates but which owing to the slump was not built, was not included in the 1931 Estimates and was not approved for 1932 Estimates.

474. During the year the Chinese Medical Officer paid 80 inspection visits to Police Stations and 71 visits to attend mid- wifery cases, emergencies and calls by Government servants.

A. R. WELLINGTON,

D.M.S.S.

25th April, 1932.

M 91

APPENDIX A.

GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Report for the year 1931.

By A. V. Greaves, M.B., (Tor.), M.C.P.S. (Ont.) D.T.M. (Liverpool).

INTRODUCTORY.

(1) Administrative.-Dr. E. P. Minett, Government Bac- teriologist, proceeded cn leave on August 18th and retired from the Service after the expiration of leave,

Dr. A. V. Greaves, Assistant Government Bacteriologist, was appointed Government Bacteriologist on Nov. 17th 1931. No appointment has yet been made to the post of Assistant Government Bacteriologist.

Dr. Greaves assisted with the teaching in Pathology and Morbid Anatomy at the University during the vacancy of the Chair in Pathology caused by the death of Professor Wang.

(2) Buildings and Equipment.-Repairs to the roof were undertaken for the purpose of renewing rotten beams. Altera- tions were carried out in the animal house so as to furnish extra accommodation for calves for vaccine lymph production. This is referred to later when discussing vaccine lymph work. The financial stringency has prevented us from making any addi- tions, except of a minor nature, to our equipment, but it is hoped that this is only temporary, as any further development of the work of the Institute will demand a certain amount of new apparatus and equipment.

(3) Library. The following additions were made to the library during the year:-

1. Recent Advances in Forensic Medicine, by S. Smith and

J. Glaister, Jr., 1981.

2. Bacteriological Technique, 3rd edition, by J. W. H. Eyre. 3. Medical Research Council Special Report Series No. 149

on Tuberculosis in Man and Lower Animals.'

1. Text Book of Pathology, new 4th edition, by W. G.

MacCallum,

5. Laboratory Methods of the U. S. Army, 3rd edition, by

Charles F. Craig.

(4) Publications.--A paper by Dr. Greaves on "Pellagra in Relation to the Food Supply" was published in the "Transactions of the 8th Congress of the Far Eastern Association of Tropical Medicine,"

M 92

A paper on "The Use of Takayama's Solution in the Identi- fication of Blood Stains" has been prepared for publication by Dr. Greaves and will shortly appear.

(5) General.—The routine work of the Institute continues to increase steadily, as reference to the total number of recorded test will show. The present establishment is only sufficiently adequate for our present needs and continued expansion will require further additions to our staff. The absence on leave of the Bacteriologist during the last four months of the year left the Institute short-handed, the Assistant Bacteriologist carrying on alone. The work of an efficient staff, however, resulted in the routine being carried out without hitch.

During the later months of the year an effort was made to revise the methods of record in the Institute with a view to simplification. Quite apart from any other saving in time and labour it should be possible to get out the figures for the Annual Report without the herculean effort required at present and to accomplish it quickly as well. While only a beginning has been made at this task, already we have reason to be satisfied with the results.

A. PROTOZOOLOGY AND HELMINTHOLOGY.

(1) Blood films for Malaria.-Four hundred and sixty films were examined for the presence of malarial parasites. Both thick and thin preparations are made in practically every case and stained with Giemsa, using buffered distilled water or dilution. The latter point in technique gives improved and consistent results.

The practically equal proportions of benign and malignant tertian parasites found is worthy of note, although the series is far too small from which to draw conclusions.

Most of the diagnoses of malaria in the Colony are made by the private practitioners themselves or the hospital medical officers so that only a small proportion of films reaches us.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD FILMS FOR MALARIA.

PARASITES.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Malignant Tertian.

2

26

32

Benign Tertian

4

30

36

Quartan

2

2

Unclassified

1

16

18

Negative

72

41

259

372

Grand Total ....

81

46

333

460

M 93

(2) Faeces. Two hundred and fourteen samples of faeces were examined for helminths and protozoa. The results are noteworthy in one instance only, i.e. the complete absence of positive findings of E. histolytica, in either vegetative.or cystic. form. While the figures are small nevertheless they are signi- ficant and are rather difficult to explain. Even if one accepts the hypothesis (for the sake of argument only) that natural in- fection is insignificant in the Colony, the question still remains, why is there not a higher rate of infection from the carriers which surround us? A general protozoal survey on a fairly large scale is needed to afford a basis for any conclusions.

B. SEROLOGY.

(1) Serological reaction for Syphilis.-Four thousand two hundred and sixty six sera were subjected to the Wassermann reaction. This number is almost double the total for 1930, due to the establishment of Venereal Disease Clinics in charge of a specialist officer. These figures are steadily growing and this work is now forming a much more important portion of the activities of the Institute than it has done in the past.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SERA FOR SYPHILIS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

M.

F.

M. F.

M.

F.

Strong positive.

33

3

42

1

1,156 431

1,666

Positive

4

1

11

2

108

61

187

Weak positive...

15

21

143

73

255

Doubtful

12

2

44

3

145

114

320

Negative

232

21

166

906 505 1,838

Grand total... 296 28

284

16

2,458 1,184 4,266

(2) Agglutination Tests.-During the writer's visit to the Medical Research Institute of Kuala Lumpur he obtained through the courtesy of Dr. Kingsbury, Director of the Institute and Dr. Martin, Bacteriologist, standard cultures of B. typhosus, B. paratyphosus A. & B. and B. aertrycke (Schutze) with a view to utilizing these for the performance of qualitative receptor analysis according to Felix. A beginning was made towards the end of the year on preparation of the necessary emulsions of the appropriate O and H antigens together with specific antisera. We have already attained a satisfactory measure of success and intend to utilize this method as a routine from the beginning of the coming year.

ORGANISMS.

M 94

AGGLUTINATION TESTS.

EUROPEAN.

INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

Pos. Neg. Pos.

Neg. Pos. Neg.

...

B. Typhosus

37

105

1

28

220

507

898

B. Para. A......

142

29

10

717

898

B. Para. B.

142

29

10

717

898

1

B. Para. C.

B. Dysenteriae..

B. Meletensis B. Abortus

Weil Felix

reaction

:

:

1

:

:

...

:

:

:21

:

3

]

1

Grand Total

38 392

1

86

240 1,941 2,701

C. BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

(1) Faeces.-One hundred and thiry two specimens of faeces were cultured for the presence of pathogenic enteric organisms. No positive culture of cholera was obtained. The results otherwise show that the common infecting dysentery organism in the Colony is of the Flexner type; Shiga infections are decidedly rare. There are also a great number of infections with organisms difficult of classification but nevertheless pathogenic and probably the cause of a good deal of morbidity.

(2) Sputum.-Two hundred and thirty specimens of sputum were examined for the presence of B. tuberculosis. In all cases the anti-foreign concentration method was used and the ordinary Ziehl Neelsen stain made.

EXAMINATION OF SPUTUM FOR B. TUBERCULOSIS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE. Total.

Positive Negative

6

3

36

45

33

18

134

185

Grand Total

39

21

170

230

M 95

(3) Urine.-Culture of urine for pathogenic microorganisms was performed on 67 specimens, in the great majority of cases the B. coli was the suspected organism. In every case а routine examination of the specimen, chemical and microscopic was always carried out as well.

(4) Urethral and cervical smears.-Smears from the male and female urethra or cervix were examined for the presence of the Gonococcus in 300 cases.

(5) Nasal Scrapings.-Stained smears were made of nasal scrapings in 73 cases for the presence of B. lepare. Most of these specimens were forwarded by the medical officers in charge of prisons in Victoria and Kowloon.

(6) Throat Swabs.-The number of examinations carried out under this heading for the year shows a great increase over previous years owing to the epidemic of diphtheria which visited the Colony in December. This necessitated an extensive search for carriers among the dairies quite apart from the routine examination of contacts, convalescents and patients.

THROAT SWABS EXAMINED FOR DIPHTHERIA.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN. CHINESE.

Total.

Positive

149

1

105

255

Negative...

573

14

512

1,099

Grand Total

722

15

617

1,354

(7) Spinal fluids.--Fourteen spinal fluids were cultured for the meningococcus. In every case a test for increase globulin was made and a stained smear made of the centrifugalized deposit for the type of reacting cell.

(8) Pus and miscellaneous material.-Twenty five specimens of pus were cultured for pathogenic organisms. The results call for no comment. Twelve dog's brains were examined for Negri bodies and one positive result recorded.

(9) Plague infected material.-The results under this head- ing are discussed in connection with Anti-plague work elsewhere in this Report.

M 96

D. PREPARATION OF VACCINE LYMPH.

The preparation of vaccine lyniph was carried on as usual during the year. Owing to difficulty in obtaining buffalo calves only 94 were vaccinated during the year.

The amount of glycerinated lymph prepared totalled 8,652 c.c. giving an average yield per calf of 92.04 c.c.

The amount issued was 12,242 c.c.

The amount remaining in stock at the end of the year was 15,085 c.c. a slight reduction from the previous year, but as this amount is in excess of a normal year's requirements it is proposed to favour a slight further reduction during the coming year.

The vaccination activities in the Colony during 1931 con- tinued as usual and the amount of lymph issued was about the average for the past few years.

Increased accommodation for calves at the Institute was provided by converting a portion of the old stables into stalls, thus enabling a total of 19 calves to be vaccinated at one time. These stalls are in the general animal building but entirely separated from it and entered by a separate door. This extra room was considered essential owing to the Irregularity of the calf supply and the fact that some batches occasionally arrive for vaccination before other vaccinated calves are scraped for lymph.

Nc change was made in the method cf production; the vaccine produced gives satisfaction as usual and we have heard no evidence of loss of potency or ill effects from use of it. Passage through rabbits is performed as seldom as possible and the potency of the seed lymph keeps up to standard without excessive passages.

Preparation of lymph is restricted to the cooler months of the year and luring the period May to Septerober production is in abeyance. During these months the yield is apt to be poor, and bacterial growth tends to be excessive.

E. PREPARATION OF VACCINES AND SEra.

The preparation of gonococcus vaccine is the most important activity pursued under this head. Since the organization of the Venereal Disease Clinics on a proper footing the amount issued has inevitably increased tremendously, as may be seen from the following comparative figures:

1929

1930

1931

966 c.c.

2430

3230

堂堂

""

M 97

The indications are that the limit of demand has been by no means reached.

The problem of preparing the vaccine in large quantities at a minimum of cost for media and with the smallest expenditure of labour and time is engaging our attention at present and it is hoped that our present rather slow and difficult method may be replaced by a better.

VACCINE.

Gonococcus Vaccine Staphylococcus Vaccine Plague Vaccine

T. A. B. Vaccine...

Cholera Vaccine

Antogenous Vaccine

AMOUNT ISSUED.

3,230 c.c.

40 23

120

140

">

""

2 doses.

26 vaccines.

During the year 1,800 c.c. of anti-meningococcic serum was prepared, and 4,300 c.c. issued.

The amount remaining on hand is approximately 57,405 c.c. Anti-rabic vaccine was prepared throughout the year as usual, the fixed strain in use being passaged regularly every two weeks through rabbits.

This

One hundred and thirteen courses of treatment were insti- tuted. A glance at the table will show that only slightly more than half the cases completed their course of treatment. is probably at least partly due to the fact that the Colony is known to be practically free from Rabies by the public and therefore the fear of the disease is not so great, and probably partly due to the dog inflicting the bite failing to show symptoms of disease subsequently.

Treatment

Race incidence of cases.

completed.

Treatment not completed.

Chinese

23

41

Indian

2

0

Japanese

4

1

European

30

9

Eurasian

0

1

Unknown (out port cases)...

2

0

Total......

61

52

M 98

F. EXAMINATION OF WATER AND MILK.

(1) Bacteriological analysis of waters.-One thousand four hundred and eighty samples of water were tested bacteriological. ly. With a few exceptions all samples were from the public water supplies of the Colony, which are examined daily in a routine manner,

The analyses show that the usual high standard of purity was fully maintained.

The following table gives the sources from which the sam- ples were obtained :-

Unfiltered raw water

112

Filtered water

114

Water from service taps throughout the Colony (filtered and chlorinated)

1118

Well waters

40

Waters from other than public supplies

96

1480

(2) Bacteriological analysis of milk.-One hundred and two samples of milk were examined at the request of private dairies.

G. MEDICO LEGAL INVESTIGATIONS.

The greater number of specimens received for investigations of a medico-legal nature were articles supposedly containing blood-stains; the remainder being clothing to be examined for seminal matter or gonococcal pus.

Thirty investigations were carried out in 1931.

During the latter part of the year the method in use for the examination of blood-stains was changed. Use was made of Takayama's solution for the production of haemochromogen crystals, and the characteristic spectrum identified microscopi- cally. Other chemical reactions such as the guiac and benzidine tests were abandoned as being of questionable evidential value in support of the first named test which is of an absolutely specific character. A full report of the technique developed for the routine use of this test has been prepared and will shortly be published.

The technique of the precipitin test for human blood was also improved according to suggestions in Smith and Glaister's "Recent Advances in Forensic Medicine" to bring the test up to modern standards.

M 99

H. ANTI PLAGUE WORK.

80,757 rats were examined post mortem for signs of plague during the year and 624 spleen smears stained and examined. No positives were recorded in either instance.

The flea survey was continued as in the previous year, 1465 fleas being identified. The results are as follows:

Types of Fleas found.

No. of

rats.

X. Cheopis.

X. astia.

X. brazi- Ctenoce- Cerato- Leptop-

liensis.

phalus. phyllus.

sylla.

251

1332

0

0

1

127

Cheopis percentage of total fleas 90.92%

General flea index=5.83

Cheopis index=5.30

It will be seen that the cheopis index is high. The exact significance of this in the case of Hong Kong cannot yet be stated owing to the many factors involved and it is hoped to subject the figures obtained during the past two years to an exhaustive analysis in order to arrive at their meaning as related to plague expectancy. The complete absence of X. astia and X. braziliensis over a two years period of survey is also note- worthy. The writer has painstakingly sought them, fully ex- pecting to be rewarded by specimens of the species sooner or later, but so far without success.. A similar experience has been recorded by Hicks of Shanghai (Jr. of Hygiene, Vol. XXVI, 1927).

I. MORBID HISTOLOGY.

The number of specimens dealt with this year was slightly less than last year. As few specimens as possible were taken from post mortem cases at Victoria Mortuary by the Asst. Bacteriologist on account of pressure of other diagnostic work. It is hoped to resume this work as usual next year. Two hundred and seventeen tissue sections were prepared and examined; of these 11 were malignant growths, 6 occurring in Europeans and 5 in Chinese. Sixty eight sections were from cases of non- malignant tumours or inflammatory of other pathologic tissues removed at operation. The remaining 138 sections were from post mortem cases, examined for diagnosis or for general patholo- gic interest.

M 100

Two cases were of especial interest. One case showed amoebic ulceration of the appendix with rupture into the peri- toneal cavity. Stained sections showed numerous amoebae in the wall of the appendix. Such cases proved by finding the parasite in the lesion are decidedly rare. Another case was that The causative

of acute phlegmonous gastritis in a young man. organism was diplostreptococcus. The latter tissue was forward- ed for diagnosis by Dr. K. H. Uttley from Kowloon Mortuary. Reports of both of these cases are being prepared for publication.

A curious case was seen of congenital absence of both arms in a young infant dying of broncho-pneumonia. This was radio- graphed by Dr. Farr of the Government Civil Hospital and the findings are being considered at the present moment. Such a striking anomaly is very rare indeed and is the only case of the kind seen by the writer in a consecutive series of roughly 5000 infants.

A great deal of interesting material comes to hand from. Mortuary cases but the usefulness is somewhat inpaired by the absence of any clinical history whatever, the great majority of the cases being found dead on the street and unidentified; also (and this is especially true in the summer months) the condi- tion of the tissues is spoilt from a histologic standpoint by post mortem change; this is due to the absence of a refrigeration chamber in which to place the bodies on arrival at the Mortuary. The provision of equipment of this nature would be of inestim- able value to the Mortuary, especially considering the importance of preservation of the tissues in cases of a medico-legal nature.

J. MISCELLANEOUS EXAMINATIONS.

Four hundred and sixty five items are included under this head. They do not offer material for comment.

M 101

APPENDIX A.

Table I.

Expenditure for 1930 and 1931.

1930

1931

1. Personal Emoluments

$41,275.25 $44,487.41

Other Charges.

29. Animals and Fodder

7,474.90

4,081.10

30. Anti-rabie Work

356.69

425.35

31. Apparatus & Chemicals.

1,165.99

1,450.84

32. Books and Journals

132.93

143.70

33. Conveyance Allowances

360.00

448.78

34. Fuel and Light

1,223.73

1,439.78

35. Incidental Expenses

983.58

720.05

36. Prep. of Vaccine, Serum etc.

1,769.78

1,878.81

37. Purchase of Horses..

70.00

38. Uniforms

Total

Special Expenditure.

56. Microscope for B. I.

Total

526.96

371.12

$13,964.56 $10,959.53

794.19

$794.19

Total Bact. Institute

$55,239.81 $56.241.13

Revenue for 1930 and 1931.

1930

1931

Bacteriological Examinations

$7,384.03

$7,482.82

Table II.

Expenditure and Revenue for past ten years.

Per. Emols. &

Special

Total

Other Charges.

Expen-

Expen-

Total Revenue.

diture.

diture.

1922

$21,092.07

$701.28

$ 21,793,35

$ 2,274.35

1923

24,772.72

24,772.72

2,939.20

1924

28,644,53

459.29

29,103.82

4,752.12

1925

26,498.47

26,498.47

3,536.40

1926

29.982.11

9.70

29,991.81

7,220.41

1927

27,984.41

436.27

28,421.28

7,664.62

1928

34,643.40

23.37

34.666.77

6.635.23

1929

37,545.96

442.14

37,988.10

8,307.44

1930

55,239.81

55.239.81

7,3×4.03

1931

55,446.94

794.19

56 241.13

7,482.82

M 102

Table III.

Analysis of Clinical and Other Examinations.

Nature of Examination.

Total

Total

for

for

1931.

1930.

r

B. Typhosus

898

753

Faeces

Cultural

Blood

Examina- Smears.

A glutination

Reaction.

Paratyphosus A.

898

753

B

898

753

"

"

C.

1

5

19

"

""

Weil Felix Reaction

B. Dysenteriae

Meletensis

A bortus

Serological Reaction for Syphilis

Malaria Parasites.. Filaria

I

3

1

1

3

1

1

4,266

2,453

460

421

3

I

Blood count etc.,

7

8

Bacillus Diphtheria

1,351

423

tions.

Meningococcus ....

21

Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc.,

132

46

Helminth ova

114

140

Amoeba of Dysentery

100

61

Occult blood

11

3

Tubercule Bacillus.

5

Miscellaneous Examinations.

Tissue Sections....

[Sputa Pus Urine

Smear for Gonococcus

Smear for B. lepræ

27

212

280

157

25

9

67

75

300

221

73

27

Rat smears, spleen, etc., for B.

pestis

621

518

Animals for Rabies

12

7

Medico-legal Examinations

30

33

Bacteriological Examination of Milk

102

207

...

Bacteriological Analysis of Water

1,480

1,742

Rideal Walkers Test of Disinfectants

2

Autogenous Vaccine prepared

26

20

Filter candles sterilized for domestic

filters

363

378

Identification of Rat Fleas.

251

252

Miscellaneous

465

470

Total..

13,432

10.221

M 103

APPENDIX B.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE MALARIA BUREAU FOR THE YEAR 1931.

by

R. B. JACKSON, M.D., D.P.H., MALARIOLOGIST.

Staff.

Dr. R. B. Jackson was absent on leave from 29th April to 11th December during which period Dr. R. S. Begbie acted as Malariologist. The remainder of the Staff consisted of, the Assistant to the Malariologist, four probationer Inspectors, one clerk, and two coolies.

2. The work carried out during the year was included under the following headings.

(a) General mosquito survey of the Colony and New Terri- tory, in order to determine what species exist, and, as far as possible, their life histories, and identifications, in the larval and adult stages.

(b) A general investigation of malaria and other mosquito borne diseases.

(c) The catching of mosquitoes frequenting habitations their identification and the dissections of such Anophelines as were found.

(d) Investigations as to the prevalence of malaria in certain areas with a view to its abolition.

(e) Local mosquito surveys for the abatement of mosquito nuisance.

(f) The teaching of mosquitology, and the instruction of the probationers in this and other subjects.

(g) Co-operation with Government Departments, the Mili- tary, Naval and Air Forces, public companies and private in- dividuals in the investigation and eradication of malaria.

Investigation of species. Anophelines.

In addition to those met with in 1930, namely. A. maculatus, A. hyrcanus, A. minimus, A. karwarı, A. aitkeni, and A. jey- poriensis; pupae of A. tesselatus and of A. maculipalpis were found, during a larval survey of Kowloon Tong towards the end of the year.

Those of A. tesselatus were associated with larvae of A. maculatus and of A. hyrcanus, and found in a ditch with grass growing at the edges. The pupae of A. maculipalpis were met with in a similar situation, accompanied by larvae of A. hyrcanus. The numbers and species of the various larvae collect- ed and examined throughout the year are given in Table V:

M 104

Table VI gives the adult mosquitoes obtained from pupae and large larvae.

As in 1930 A. maculatus was by far the most common species met with. In hilly country the usual situations for its larvae were, seepages, small pools in the rocky beds of streams, the pools being fed by seepages or else connected with the main stream, and the edges of streams with or without vegetation. In flat country, the edges of ditches containing running water with or without vegetation.

met

Larvae of A. minimus were met with in similar situations. Those of A. hyrcanus favoured larger collections of water con- taining vegetation; in the hilly country they were with an grassy seepages, in fair sized pools and along the edges of streams; in flat land, they were found in pools, in ditches and on the edges of swamps. Occasionally these larvae were found in pools in the hill streams without vegetation.

Culicines.

Specimens sent to the British Museum were kindly identified by Mr. Edwards as Culex virgatipes, Culex (Culiciomyia) pallido- thoracis, Culex (Lophoceratomyia) infantulus, Uranotaenia testacea, and certain dark specimens with indistinct bandings of the abdomen as C. fatigans. Larvae submitted were diagnosed as probably those of Rachionotomyia bambusa and a species of Uranotaenia which may be U. testacea but which for certainty requires further investigation. It is believed that U. testacea is a new record for Hong Kong as is also the genus Rachiono- tomyia. Apart from the academical point of view the larvae of Uranotaenia are of interest in as much as they are liable to be mistaken for Anopheline larvac owing to the way in which they lie in the water. Larvae of megarhinus splendens captured in October 1930 and kept in the Laboratory did not develop into inosquitoes until the end of April 1931. As in 1930 larvae of the following Culicines were collected frequently:-

Aedes albopictus, togoi, japonicus, macfarlanei; Culex fati- gans, vishnui, bitaeniorhychus, sitiens, mimeticus, pallidothora- cies; Armigeres obturbans, megarhinus splendens, and species of Lutzia.

Malaria.

From researches made in the Island of Hong Kong during 1930 and 1931, it would appear that the proximity of swamps or paddy cultivation, was not essential for the contraction of malarial infection. In the majority of places investigated, swamps, apart from boggy areas of limited extent caused by hill seepages were conspicuous by their absence, and in one locality with a well deserved reputation for malaria, even such boggy patches were not found. Proximity to hill streams seem to be an important factor for infection as in the Federated Malay States and Philippine Islands. Further investigations are required to ascertain the conditions arising from the neighbourhood of

swamps,

I

M 105

Statistics for 1931 obtained from the M. O. H. show that 452 deaths were ascribed to malaria in the Colony and New Territory, these being 2.4% of the total deaths. The death rate per thousand from malaria is given as .6.

In Table I figures are given regarding hospital admissions to the Government Civil, Kowloon, Victoria, Peak, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok Gaol, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda, and Alice Memorial Hospitals; and their relations to admissions for malaria. The malarial admissions are also arrang- ed according to quarters of year and to species of infection. As malaria is not a notifiable disease rates cannot be given for the general population. The "clinical" diagnosis of malaria is not a satisfactory one.

In order to ascertain the place where the infection was con- tracted, information is required on the lines of the malaria notification cards in use in the Federated Malay States, as to whether the attack was a relapse or infection, and the place or places of residence occupied during the usual incubation period of the disease.

In Table II statistics of cases treated at the following Dis- pensaries are shown, Tai Po, Un Long, Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, East- ern, Yaumati, and Hung Hom.

Table III deals with hospital admissions due to malaria of Government servants excluding coolies.

Table IV is a similar table for the police including water police. Some stations appear to have had no admissions for malaria during the year: Pokfulam, Bay View, Wong Nei Chong Gap, Shaukiwan, Ping Shan, Sai Kung, Ta Ku Ling, Lin Ma Hong. Certain stations are situated in areas where malaria is not likely to be contracted, others in rural areas where night patrol work adds to the risk of infection.

Table VII gives the results of examinations of blood films made from prisoners admitted to Victoria Gaol, and arranged in districts according to addresses supplied. The parasites are not classified as in the great majority of positive findings, the diagnosis could only be made from the thick films supplied, and could not be established from the thin films owing to the scantiness of the infection. The films were obtained through the co-operation of the M. O. Gaol and his staff and were stained in the Laboratory of the Bureau.

318 children were examined on the Island during the year. 73 had enlarged spleens. Spleen rate = 22.95%. In the New Territory 82 children were examined, 23 had enlarged spleens spleen rate 28.05%. Table IX gives details and localities.

Records obtained from the R. A. M. C. authorities regarding incidence of malarial infection amongst the troops, British and Indian, are as follows:-(relapses not being taken into account) British troops, number of cases of malaria contracted during the year forty eight, of which four were in 1st Quarter, six in 2nd Quarter, twenty in 3rd Quarter, and eighteen in 4th Quarter.

M 106

Calculated on an average strength of 2336 the admission rate for the year was 20.55 per 1000. Amongst the Indian troops there were seventy five infections of which fifteen were in 1st Quarter. eighteen in 2nd Quarter, twenty five in 3rd Quarter, and seven- teen in 4th Quarter. These work out for the year as 50.44 per thousand on an average strength of 1487.

Towards the end of December a larval survey was com- inenced on the ravine which runs below the Peak Hotel and Peak Mansions, to Pokfulam Reservoir. This ravine has several tributaries in its upper part, which contains numerous potential breeding places for Anophelines and which flows through or near a populous area. A certain amount of nullah training has been done in a few tributaries especially in the one which flows past Mount Austin Barracks. No complaints have been receiv- ed regarding the contraction of malaria in this neighbourhood cr in the Barracks. In the upper reaches of the ravine including the main stream and its tributaries as far as and including the tributary from Mount Austin Barracks and its branches, only ten Anopheline larvae, one being A. maculatus the other nine A. aitkeni, were found in a careful survey.

Culicine larvae identified as C. vishnui, and Aedes japonicus were found. In some of the pools there were small fish, and various natural enemies of mosquito larvae identified as water bugs, larvae of dragon fly and May fly larvae. This may account for the scarcity of Anopheline larvae. It is proposed to repeat the survey at intervals during the present year to obtain further information regarding this ravine.

Dengue.

Seventy six cases were recorded from the Hospitals in 1931. Aegypti does not appear to be met with often on the Island, but Aedes albopictus is frequently. .

Filaria.

No cases of filarial infection were reported during the year, although C. fatigans and Aedes togoi, in which complete develop- ment of F. bancrofti has been observed, are common species.

Catching of mosquitoes in houses,

With a view to ascertaining what species of mosquitoes could be obtained, and the dissections of such Anophelines found, night catching was commenced at Taikoo on 18th May, 1931 and continued until 3rd July, 1931. An unoccupied bed- room was placed at the disposal of the Staff by arrangement General Manager, Taikoo Dockyard. From 9th September, 1931 until the end of the year the catching was resumed in an empty garage on the outskirts of Wong Chok Hang Village where a spleen rate of 82% has previously been obtained aniongst the children. The investigator slept upon a camp bed protected by a mosquito curtain, outside this was a larger mosquito net supported on four poles. This net had flaps

.

M 107

in the sides weighted by rollers. When in use, the flaps were rolled. At intervals the investigator got up, let down the flaps and searched for mosquitoes with an electric torch. The results are indicated in Table VIII. Considering the proximity to Anopheline breeding grounds and the ease with which numerous larvae could be found therein, the results are not such as would be expected. In the Wong Chok Hang area much better returns were obtained from a number of morning searches in habitations of the matshed type. The reason may be that the Anophelines have a preference for such buildings on account of the dark sheltered hiding places which they afford, in contrast to the garage and the rooms of the Taikoo houses.

No opposition was experienced by the probationers in carry- ing out this work. The inhabitants of the houses evinced great interest in the proceedings and asked numerous questions as to the reasons for them. They offered every assistance and volun- teered suggestions which may be useful in future. Some of these people were using mosquito nets, as a rule these were defective. In the Federated Malay States Chinese coolies in rural areas were seldom found without a mosquito net in good order. No Anophelines were found infected in the course of dissections during the year.

Investigations as to prevalence of malaria in certain areas.

During the year reports upon the surroundings of 180, The Peak, Mr. Y. P. Law's House at Taipo, and Tung Wah Eastern Hospital were completed and recommendations made accord- ingly. No village children were available for spleen examination in the Peak survey, at Taipo only six children were examined in the village owing to the majority of them being at school. A previous spleen census of schools in Taipo taken in July, 1930 gave a spleen rate of 10%. 46 were examined. No enlarged spleens were found amongst 106 school children in the neighbour- hood of Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

Investigations were undertaken and completed at Shouson Hill, the proposed new Govt. Civil Hospital site, Ngau Tau Kok, and Sham Tseng. 62 children were examined in the villages of Wong Chok Hang and Hong Kong Wai, which are situated be- tween Aberdeen and Shouson Hill. 51 children had enlarged spleens or 82%. In the same area 104 blood films were taken and 14 were positive, or 15.5%.

A preliminary survey around the proposed site for the new Govt. Civil Hospital done in April resulted in the finding of larvae of A. maculatus and a few A. minimus. A more com- plete survey was done in July and August, and only larvae of A. maculatus found, and these in abundance. It is remarkable that no complaints have arisen on the score of mosquito nuisance alone. Looking at the map of the larval survey, if the energetic

M 108

and bloodthirsty C. fatigans replaced the ubiquitous A. macula- tus it would be surprising if considerable discomfort was not ex- perienced from a pest of mosquitoes. In this locality out of 150 children, twenty two had enlarged spleens or 14%. Twenty one blood films were taken but no infections found.

At Ngau Tau Kok, 62 children were examined, 8 had enlarged spleens or 13%. Out of 63 blood films taken from local residents, one contained malarial parasites.

At Sham Tseng fourteen children were examined, all had enlarged spleens.

Recommendations were made on the findings in all these places. A larval survey has been completed at Kowloon Tong.

Mosquito nuisance.

Complaints as to mosquito nuisance, were received from Mr. Moss, Royal Air Force, from residents on the Peak, from Matilda Hospital, and from Kowloon Hospital. These were investigated, the chief offender being C. fatigans.

During the year three medical men underwent a course in mosquitology, also a member of the R. A. M. C., who in addi- tion accompanied the Staff on larval surveys. The teaching of the probationers was continued. They are now competent to search for and identify all the common Anopheline and Culicine larvae, to mount these as permanent specimens in various media, according to circumstances. They have a good working know- ledge of the mosquitoes usually met with, and how to identif and preserve them for future reference. All can dissect satis- factorily. They can enlarge maps, insert branches of the main streams as well as other breeding places. They have been taught how to record larval surveys and to stain and examine blood films both thick and thin.

Co-operation with other departments, & etc.

The following places were visited with the Drainage officials of the P. W. D., after investigations had been completed. Branch of ravine below War Memorial Hospital, Taikoo, St. Stephen's College Stanley Peninsula, Repulse Bay area.

At the request of the R. A. M. C. authorities, a partial survey was done at Iyemun, within the area controlled by the military, oiling was very satisfactory and no Anopheline larvae found. A visit was paid to Sham Shui Po camp by request. Stone-cutters' Island, in view of its reputation for freedom from malarial infection was visited in August by the Staff of the Bureau. Likely collections of water were met with, but no Anopheline larvae found although these places were not ciled. It is proposed to pay further visits with the co-operation of the R. A. M: C. authorities during 1932 if time permits, Larvae sent in from military camps from time to time were examined and reported upon.

M 109

Table I.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS, 1931.

Govt. Civil, Kowloon, Victoria, Peak, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok Gaol, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda, and Alice Memorial Hospitals.

Govt. Civil Kowloon Admissions Admissions

Victoria Admissions

Peak Admissions

Nationality

All Mala- All Mala-

causes

ria causes ria

All Mala- All Mala- causes ria causes ria

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

451

15 612 1,064 117 3,163

29

444

13

258

15

1

52 1,176

100

85

Others

110

2

52

;

|Victoria Gaol Admission

Nationality

All Mala causes ria

Lai Chi Kok Gaol Admissions

Tung Wah Admissions

All Mala-

Tung Wah Eastern Admissions

All Mala-

All Mala- cause s ria causes ria causes ria

Europeans

13

Indians

13

Chinese

1,022

35

587 181 10,950

525 4,197 78

Others

Kwong Wah Matilda Admissions Admissions

Alice Memorial Admissions

Nationality

All Mala- All Mala- causes ria causes ria causes ria

All Mala-

Europeans Indians Chinese

328 13

10,585 331

1,936

28

Others......

SUMMARY OF ADMISSIONS.

All causes. Cases of Malaria.

Percentage of admission

for Malaria.

Europeans...

Indians

2,106

1,093

78

3.70

118

10.80

Chinese.... 33,701

1,333

3.96

Others

162

1.85

Total

37,062

1,532

4.13

M 110

MALARIA ADMISSIONS.

As to species.

Diagnosed

Diagnosed

During

microscopically.

clinically.

1st Quarter

310

Benign tertian 286

Benign tertian

341

2nd

358

Sub-tertain

150

Sub-tertain

22

3rd

526

Quartan

2

Quartan

J

4th

338

Type not

12

classified

731

1,532

438

1,094

Table II.

Patients treated at outdoor Dispensaries during 1931 at Tai Po, Un Long, Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, Eastern, Yaumati,

and Hung Hom.

Total

Malaria

Dispensaries.

patients

cases

Percentage of cases of Malaria treated to total

treated.

treated.

cases.

Tai Po

5,114

509

9.95

Un Long

3,673

90

2.45

Western Public

12,866

339

2.63

Kowloon City

8.503

1,559

18.33

Sham Shui Po

19,941

1,334

6.69

Shaukiwan

27,287

737

2.70

Aberdeen

9,760

193

1.98

Central

13,483

217

1,61

Eastern

9,712

317

3.26

Yaumati

60,565

2,400

3.96

Hung Hom

11,460

641

5.59

Total

182,364

8,336

4.57

During

Malaria cases treated,

Diagnosed microscopically. Diagnosed clinically.

As to species.

1st Quarter

1654 Benign tertian 14

Benign tertian 1023

2nd

2085 Sub-tertian

19

Sub-tertian

1262

3rd

4th

2404 Quartan

2193

Quartan

482

Type not

"1

classified 5402

Total

8336

167

8169

- M 111

Table III.

Government Employees Malarial Admissions.

No. of employees.

Malarial admissions of employees.

Malarial admissions

per 1,000.

Europeans

899

28

Indians

1,030

100

25

31

97

Chinese

3,428

100

29

Others

52

Total

5,409

228

42

Malarial admissions.

As to species.

During

Diagnosed microscopically.

Diagnosed clinically.

1st Quarter

2nd

37 Benign tertian 43 Sub-tertian

84

Benign tertian 20 Sub-tertian

69

12

}"

3rd

""

4th

108 Quartan

40

Quartan

و

Type not

classified

43

228

104

124

- M 112

Table IV.

Police Strength Including Water Police & Malarial Admissions to Hospitals, 1931.

Stations.

Average Malarial

Strength.

Admissions.

Central & Guards Office

473

27

[

pper

Level.......

92

9

Gough Hill

39

2

Central Fire

86

1

Sai Ying Pun

96

2

Pokfulam

9

Aberdeen

21

2

Wantsai...

94

1

Bay View

17

Wong Nei Chung.

6

Shaukiwan

18

Stanley

11

Tai Tam Tuk

1

Quarry Bay

20

2

Yaumati

102

7

Sham Shui Po

49

10

Mongkok

46

3

Kowloon Water Works

1

1

Hung Hom

33

4

Kowloon City

54

3

Water Police & Tsim Sha Shui .............

351

32

Tsun Wan...............

12

Cheung Chau

1 £

Tai O..

15

Police Training School

52

7265

Au Tau

16

Castle Peak

10

Lok Ma Chau

14

1

Ping Shan...... Sha Tin...

Sai Kung Sha Tau Kok Sheung Shui...

Tai Po

Ta Ku Ling

13

11

1

11

15

2

18

3

21

1

14

Lin Ma Hang

8

TOTAL......

1,863

146

Nationality.

Europeans

Indians

Chinese

....

M 113

Summary of admissions.

Strength.

Malarial Admissions.

Malarial Admissions

per 1,000

221

12

643

999

51

285

54.30

83

129.08

51.05

Total

1,863

146

78.37

During

Malarial admissions.

Diagnosed microscopically. Diagnosed clinically.

As to species.

1st Quarter

2nd

31

24 Benign tertian 61

Sub-tertian

Benign tertian

12

Sub-tertian

34

7

3rd 4th

68 Quartan

Quartan

""

23

Type not

classified

32

146

73

73

11

Table V.

Anopheline Larvae Examined Microscopically During 1931.

LARVAE

Month.

A.

A.

A.

A.

A.

A. Maculatus. Hyrcanus. Minimus. Karwari. Aitkeni. Jeypori-

Total.

ensis.

January

1,025

26

57

2

1,110

February March

314

5

18

5

22

361

1,023

208

218

20

1,476

April

183

99

6

288

May

415

67

71

556

June

134

21

160

July.

1,147

19

1,166

August

304

40

34

378

September

500

26

15

123

664

October.

1,995

159

179

83

2,420

November

393

386

80

17

16

892

December

221

150

29

31

436

Total

7,651

1,206

710

223

61

56

9,910

Table VI.

ADULT MOSQUITOES HATCHED OUT FROM LARGE LARVAE & PUPAE DURING 1931.

Month.

A.

A.

maculatus.

A.

A.

A.

A.

hyrcanus.

minimus.

karwari.

aitkeni.

jeypori-

A.

maculi-

A.

tesselatus.

ensis.

palpis.

January

29

2

February

32

1

3

4

2

March

92

26

23

21

5

1

April

10

May

22

3

12

June

2

1

July

73

August

23

September

13

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

1

47

:

:

D:.

:

:

F:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

...

:

October

121

12

14

:.

November

75

29

7

2

:

December

9

:

:

I

1

1

2

9

TOTAL

521

62

59

67

7

3

9

M 114 —

J

New Territories.

Total.

Table VII.

RESULTS OF EXAMINATION OF BLOOD FILMS MADE FROM PRISONERS ADMITTED TO VICTORIA GAOL DURING 1931.

Films

Films

Films

Films

Films

Month.

examin-

ed.

examin-

positive.

ed.

positive.

examin-

ed.

examin-

positive.

ed.

positive.

examin-

ed.

positive.

District

according to

address

supplied.

Island of Hong Kong

City of Victoria

(excluding City of Victoria.)

Kowloon.

M 115

www.

January

February.

71

March

133

21

8

1

65

1

7

154

4

11

112

1

11

267

2

April

67

13

87

1

6

173

1

May

128

1

9

83

3

8

228

4

June

119

9

85

16

229

July.

119

15

123

2

12

269

August

97

2

14

110

23

244

September

98

1

16

85

1

11

1

210

October

117

11

121

1

11

260

November

78

1

13

90

1

13

1

194

December

100

24

105

6

12

241

6

Yearly Total..

1,127

143

1

1,066.

21

130

2

2,466

32

Percentage

0.71

0.70

197

1.54

1.30

Taikoo



Places where

Month

during

No. of

nights

which

catching took

when

catching

catching

took

took

place.

place.

place.

Table VIII

RESULT OF NIGHT CATCHES 1931.

Adults

Anophelines.

caught

Culicines.

1

A. hyrcanus

A. minimus

A. jey poriensis

A. maculatus

C. fatigans

C. vishnui

| C. bitaeiorhynchus

| Aedes albopictus

Aedes japonicus

Armigeres obturbans

No. 11, Stanley Terrace.

No. 2, Stanley Terrace.

Cornhill.

At a garage

near

May

June

11

1

15

1

1

""

21

7

1

:

2

30

3

24

:

:

July.

∞0 00

28

3

September

19

October

26

Wong Chok Hang.

November

21

December

17

165:

4

LO SH

23

52

47

1

30 13

::

37

12

332

1

37

1

~: ANG

2

1

9

3

6

4510

Total

7

121

1

12

9

1

226

29 10 126

4

16

- M 116

M 117

Table IX.

Spleen Census of Children, during 1931.

Locality.

No. of children examined.

No. of children found with en- larged spleens.

Percentage.

Remarks.

Tai Po....

London Mission

School..

Kam Ming

School.

1

16.60

35

17

Kim Ling

School

28

Kwong Ming

School..

26

Wong Chok Hang

and Hong Kong

Wai Village

62.

51

82 25

Sham Tseng

Village

14

14

Pokfulam..

150

22

Ngau Tau Kok

62

*28

100.00

14.67

12.90

Total

400

96

24.00

APPENDIX C.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

Report on the work done during the year 1931.

by Mr. E. R. Dovey, A.R.C.Sc.: F.I.C.: F.C.S. Government Analyst.

The number of analyses performed during the year was 2,720 as against 2,888 in 1930. The following Table shows the nature of the work done :—

1931

1930

Chemico-legal examinations..............

166 195

Dangerous Goods

121

115

Foods and Drugs

300

411

Biochemical Examinations

167

99

Water Samples

1,282

1,532

Building Materials

17

9

Oils

114

85

Pharmaceutical Analyses..

17

12

Chemicals

47

37

Metals and Minerals

296

352

Miscellaneous

93

41

Total 2,720 2,888

M 118

CHEMICO-LEGAL AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS.

The chemico-legal and criminal investigations made during the year included the following:-

Toxicological examinations in-

cluding 45 human stomachs

1931 1930

85

72

Articles from fire enquiries

10

7

Articles connected with cor-

rosive fluid throwing

12

Articles for stains..

Counterfeit coin cases

Counterfeiting materials

24

4

Banknotes

2

1

Documents

9

Bombs and explosives

11

Stolen goods

0

Dust

1

0

Other examinations

73

Perhaps the outstanding criminal investigation made was that dealing with the Peking Hotel bomb outrage. Specimens of metallic fragments from the floor of the hotel and of the floor dust were sufficient to enable a scale drawing of the bomb in cross-section to be made, and the nature of the explosive to be determined.

In June, an examination of Chinese joss sticks was made, in connection with the Staunton Street fire. The object was to determine whether the joss-sticks possessed any special degree of inflammability, such as would make the storage of them in a dwelling house a hazardous proceeding.

A number of cases of corrosive fluid throwing occurred during the year in connection with which specimens of suspected liquids were submitted for analysis and a number of garments were examined for traces of corrosive liquids. The liquids used included sulphuric acid, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid and caustic soda solution.

Four samples of asphalt, were examined in March in con- nection with the theft of asphalt from a P.W.D. boiler in Nathan Road. Analysis proved that the material found in possession of the defendant was identical in nature and composition with that from which the stolen material had been taken.

In September, three suspected One Dollar Straits notes were submitted for examination in connection with a police case at Yaumati. One note was found to be a forgery while two were genuine,

M 119

A considerable amount of counterfeiting material was ex. amined during the year in connection with the attempted coun- terfeiting of American Dollar pieces, English shillings, and local ten-cent pieces. The material used for the American coins was unusual in that it contained a proportion of silver instead of the usual tin-lead-antimony mixture.

A number of documents were submitted for examination for secret writing, also others for the presence of alterations and erasures. A considerable number of ten-dollar revenue stamps were examined and found to be forgeries.

Toxicological Examinations.

Among the toxicological examinations made during the year were 65 cases of suspected human poisoning. The results are

given below:

Nature of Poison.

No poison found

Opium found

Arsenic tound

Adalin found

No. of Cases.

25 Cases.

28

32

2

"

4

Amytal found

1

Alcohol found

>>

Potassium cyanide found

1

Carbolic acid found

1

,,

2

Animal toxins found

Total ....

65 Cases.

No outstanding poisoning cases occurred during the year. The greater number of the above cases were undoubtedly cases of suicide. Opium as in previous years, was responsible for more than two-thirds of the cases where the presence of poison was proved. The use of synthetic hypnotics was in evidence, four cases of death from Adelin and one from Amytal being discovered. These may have been either accidental or suicidal.

A case occurred in May of a Chinese male who drank a liquid from a cup thinking it was tea. It proved to be a wood- preserving fluid containing a considerable amount of arsenic, and arsenic in quantity was found in the stomach.

In April, a Chinese died in suspicious circumstances, in Kowloon. Brown stains on the right thumb resembled those of opium. The thumb and also the stomach and intestines were sent for examination and the results showed the stains to be caused by opium, and the latter substance was found in the post-mortem material.

In July, a Chinese passenger on one of the Canton boats was found dead in his cabin. A cup found in the cabin con- tained traces of potassium cyanide and this poison was also found in the contents of the stomach.

M 120

Dangerous Goods.

Seventy samples were submitted for examination under the Dangerous Goods Ordinance during 1931. These included a number of specimens of acid in connection with cases of improper storage. A case of damaged dynamite occurred during the year, the explosive having been soaked in sea-water. It was reported that the material was in a dangerous condition and the consign- ment of 600 cases was dumped in deep water under the super- vision of the Government Analyst.

A number of fireworks were examined in cases where illegal ingredients were suspected and in some cases these were found. Inspections were made of firework factories both in Kowloon and in the New Territory.

The holds and storage tanks of 51 steamers were examined for the presence of inflammable vapour by means of the Clowes- Redwood apparatus.

Food and Drugs.

Three hundred samples of food or drugs were examined during 1931. These comprised samples taken by Inspectors of the Sanitary Dept. under the Food and Drugs Ordinance, also commercial samples and specimens from private persons.

Of the 162 samples examined under the Ordinance for adulteration, detericration or misbranding, 130 were found to be genuine and 32 to be adulterated. This is shown in the following Table:

Substance.

Number of samples examined

Number Number found found genuine adulterated

Bread

21

21

Butter

2

2

Biscuits

1

1

Cheese

14

11

Chocolates

2

2

Condensed milk

3

Flour

Milk-Fresh

72

53

19

Sugar

9

9

Tea

17

16

Tinned Fish..

11

4

Tinned Chicken

1

0

OOOBONOBOLEL

0

0

0

3

0

1

0

0

1

7

1

Total

162

130

32

1

M 121

The samples of fresh milk which were found to be adulter- ated, had in most cases been diluted with water. The samples of cheese returned as adulterated had been made from other than full-cream milk. The tinned fish samples were contamin- ated with metallic tin in excess of the permitted units.

MINERALOGICAL ANALYSES.

296 samples of metals and minerals were examined during 1931 as against 332 in 1930. The nature of this work is shown below:

Metals

1931 1930

Minerals.

1931 1930

Tin

96

109

Wolfram...

Antimony

2

Manganese-

Gold

Bismuthite.

Aluminium

Molybdenite

Silver

Iron

Chromite Galena

Nickel

Lead

Alloy's

Total ..... 100 118

59

Graphite

Antimonite..

1

Tin...

2

Coal

177

32

Other ores.

13

Total

196

214

The reduced number of samples of tin and wolfram is due to the depressed state of commerce during the year. The increased number of coal samples analysed is due to the chemical control of Government coal purchases introduced during the year. It is reported that this chemical control has resulted in considerable monetary savings since it was introduced.

Water Supplies.

Of the 1348 samples of water examined during the year, 240 were samples of filtered and unfiltered wated taken at the filter plants, and the remaining 1108 were from taps in houses from all parts of Hongkong and Kowloon. In addition to these 24 samples of sewage effluents were examined.

Complaints of a chlorine taste in certain supplies having been made, experiments were made in the Laboratory to ascer- tain the concentration of chlorine necessary to cause a percepti- ble taste. It was found that 0.3 parts per million could be detected in the cold and 0.2 parts if the water were heated. Concentrations of 0.1 per million and under appeared to be undetectable by taste or odour.

M 122

One of the objects in examining the large number of tap samples was to check the chlorination of the water. The bulk of these samples showed no free chlorine which could be detected by the ortho-tolidine test, that is, the concentration in these was less than 0.02 parts per million. The following Table gives the results of these free-chlorine tests on tap samples :-

No free chlorine fluid

(less than 0.01 parts per million)

813 Samples

Between 0.01 and 0.05 parts per million 199

0.05 and 0.10

50

77

""

>>

>"

0.10 and 0.15

20

13

22

}}

""

0.15 and 0.20

19

2 J

27

21

22

Above 0.20 parts per million

Highest figure found

*****

7

0.20

As regards the samples taken at the filter beds, it may be said that the general quality of the water was good. The following Table gives the least satisfactory figures for each of the principal supplies during the year:

Supply.

Colour. *

Trans-

parency.

Free NH

Alb.

NH

Oxygen absorbed

3

Aberdeen

102.0

10 cm

0.0016 0.0061 0.069

Elliot...

30.4

70 cm 0.0011 0.0077 0.047

West Point.....

5.0

100 cm 0.0016 0.0055

0.057

Albany

17.5

80 cm 0.0011 0.0055

0.029

Bowen Road..........

2.8

100 cm 0.0011 0.0055 0.026

Eastern

15.6

Shaukiwan

4.8

90 em 0.0011 0.0044 0.036

100 cm 0.0011 0.0055 0.008

Sai Wan

3.9

100 cm 0.0016 0.0039

0.015

Kowloon

69.0

30 cm

0.0011 0.0069 0.041

Shing Mun

62.6

21 cm 0.0022 0.0083 0.088

*Colour expressed in Lovibond units per 24 inch stratum.

M 123

Biochemical Work.

The 181 biochemical examinations made during the year comprised the following:-

Blood, for presence of sea-water..

1931 1930

0

1

11

for presence of carbon monoxide. chlorides

2

for blood-sugar

42

23

for blood-urea nitrogen

76

17

Ascitic fluid for chloride content..

24

37

Urine

17

15

Human milk

0

2

Othed samples

22

Total

181

99

Research.

The work begun in 1930 by Mr. V. C. Branson on the modified Bolton & Williams heat test for China wood oil was continued with valuable results. The small number of samples examined this year has prevented the collection of sufficient data to establish the method as a commercial test.

A full examination has been carried out of the composition of the coal tar from the local gas works, to ascertain its com- mercial value.

The work on ascitic fluids has been continued in conjunction with Prof. Gerrard of the Hongkong University. Fifty-one sam- ples have now been examined.

Work was carried out in conjunction with the Army Veteri- nary Officers into the calcium content of the blood of army horses and mules.

Investigations have been made into the analysis of Chinese soy, the determination of the viscosity of bird-lime for the Sanitary Department and the gumming of certain types of Naval lubricating oils.

Miscellaneous.

A series of tests has been made on behalf of the Naval Authorities to ascertain the keeping qualities, under tropical conditions of the absorbtion charges used in the Davis Submarine Escape Apparatus, and this work is being carried out monthly,

M 124

An investigation was made into the composition of the smoke from the Green Island Cement Co's works, a complete analysis of the gas being made, also a series of special tests.

At the request of the Cathedral authorities, part of the cathedral records were treated with hydrocyanic acid gas to destroy book worms, etc.

Work was also cairried out on behalf of the Union Water- boat Co. into methods of de-chlorinating water. Special chemi- cal charges were supplied for this purpose, and a test outfit designed and supplied.

Sampling.

The following Table shows the amount of sampling carried out by the Government sampler during the year

Tin

2,326 Tons Anise Oil

783 Cases

Antimony

148 Cases Cassia Oil

257 Cases

Wolfram ore

13 Tons

Limestone

7,700 Tons

Manganese ore

150 Tons

Coal

300 Tons

Lard

Soy

47,238 Cases Firecrackers

100 Casks Water samples. 1,227 Samples

50 Cases

Wood Oil........

897 Tons

Teaseed Oil......

15 Tons

Staff.

Mr. J. L. Tetley joined the staff as Assistant Analyst in February, 1931.

Mr. C. W. Ward died on the 29th November and Mr. D. F. Leonard was appointed sampler in his place.

No other changes occurred during the year.

Revenue.

The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $19,295.50 as against $19,891.50 in 1930. The value of the work done, both Government and commercial, as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No. 439 1931) was $52,610.50 as against $52,751.50 in 1930,

M 125

Expenditure for 1930 and 1931 compared.

1930

1931

Personal Emoluments

$40,615.98 $53,469.30

Other Charges.

Apparatus & Chemicals....

$2,741,45 $2,183.00.

Books & Journals

$169.61

$204.55

Conveyance Allowance

$382.26 $572.33

Fuel and Light

$446.64

$544.59

Incidental Expenses

$244.76

$190.61

Uniforms, etc.

$ 77.25

$176.78

Other Charges, Total...... $4,061.97 $ 3,871.86

Special Expenditure:---

Adjustment & calibration of

instruments

$320.00

nil.

Total Special Expenditure

$320.00

nil.

Revenue for 1930 and 1931 compared.

Head of Revenue.

Analyses

1930

1931

$19,891.50 $19,295.50

Expenditure and Revenue for the Past Ten Years.

Total

Year

Expenditure

Total Revenue

1922

$31,659.35 $21,548.00

1923

$31,132.14 $23,769.87

1924

$30,405.92 $22,616.00

1925

$36,626.43 $23,000.00

1926

$34,776.52

$16,422.50

1927

$37,442.88

$16,146.00

1928

$29,333.98

$15,562.00

1929

$35,290.43

$24,974.00

1930

$44,677,95 $19,891.50

1931

$57,341.16 $19,295.50

M 126

APPENDIX D. .

MEDICAL UNIT, UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG.

Report by the Professor of Medicine.

Number of Inpatients:-

Men

217

Women

93

Children (under 12)

100

Total:

410

Special investigations on Gastro-intestinal disease have been carried out by means of the fractional test meal.

Results:

Duodenal Ulcer 5 cases, Curves showing Hyperchlorhydria.

Gastric Ulcer

2

"

">

Dyspepsia

3

""

21

>>

Dyspepsia of nerv-

ous origin

2

Gall-stones

2

normal curves.

Curves showing Hyperchlorhydria.

Ascariasis Clonor-

chiasis

1

11

17

Amoebiasis

1

Achlorhydria.

The technique of the fractional test meal has been carried cut with remarkable ease and success. This is surprising since the poor inpatients are uneducated and unaccustomed to western methods of clinical investigation.

The incidence of gastric disease is fairly high amongst the poorer classes. The most common etiological factors seem to be constipation and pyorrhoea--the incidence of the latter being very high amongst the inpatients.

Special investigations have been carried out in relation to Renal Disease.

Blood Urea-Estimations have been made.

Blood Creatinine Estimations have been made.

Urea Concentration tests (MacLean's method) have carried out.

M 127

An effort has been made, and is being continued, to find any relationship between the incidence of Nephritis and a previous history of malarial infection.

Nephritis:

(a) Acute co-existing with Subtertian Malaria...... (b) Sub-acute

2 cases

3 cases

(One case co-existing with Quartan Malaria) (c) Chronic Parenchymatous Nephritis

8 cases

(d) Chronic Interstitial Nephritis.

3 cases

One associated with Arterial Hypertension. One associated with Cerebral Haemorrhage.

The results of the urea concentration test in nephritic cases associated with malaria show a definite impairment of renal function. Results in other cases would seem to suggest that a condition of so-called nephrosis is present. They suffer from oedema, urine contains much albumen, and a few hyaline casts and renal function tests give satisfactory results. There is no evidence of cardiovascular disturbances.

Neurological Cases:-

Neurological cases have been fully investigated. Lumber puncture with full examination of Cerebro-spinal fluid and measurement of its pressure has been performed in all cases.

Respiratory Diseases :-

As regards Respiratory Diseases the operation of Pneumo- thorax has been done in only a very small number of cases because it is extremely difficult to get suitable early types of Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

Intra-tracheal injections of lipiodol have been made with a view to demonstrating the nature of the lung lesions in some

cases.

Arterial Hypertension:--

There is a high incidence of this condition amongst the Chinese and special treatment has been and is being used in this state. Continued trial of Angioxyl, a pancreatic extract, and of Hypotensyl, a combination of extract and Gypsine from mistletoe, also of Padutin are being made.

Ascites: --

Many of these cases have an obscure etiology and efforts have been made to further our knowledge of the causation by removing samples of the ascitic fluid and estimating the Sodium Chloride content by means of the Conductivity Method and also by Smirk's chemical method. I am greatly indebted to Mr. E. R. Dovey, Chief Government Analyst, for his help in this direction.

-M 128

Results show a remarkable constancy in the Sodium Chloride. content of the ascitic fluid whatever be the etiological factor involved.

Diphtheria:--

Towards the end of December a small epidemic of Diphtheria broke out. Cases occurred amongst the staff of the G.C.H. At the beginning of the outbreak the acting D.M.S.S., Dr. Valen- tine, requested us to undertake any necessary Schick testing and also immunisation. This is the first occasion on which the Schick Test has been used in this Colony.

Investigations are being carried out with regard to:- (a) Renal Disease and Malaria.

(b) The thrombocytes in Malaria.

(c) Blood Sedimentation rate in various tropical conditions. (d) Haematinics in Ankylostomiasis.

Outpatient Department, Medical Unit Clinics :-

(1) Morning Clinic:-Thursday and Saturdays.

Men, women and children

5,204 cases

(2) Afternoon Clinic:--Mondays and Thursdays

Men, women and children

8,669 cases

(3) Children's Clinic:-Thursday Morning.

1,100 cases

14,973

Dr. T. Y. Lị

Total cases treated by Medical Unit

The children's clinic is rapidly increasing and it is to be regretted that accommodation for sick children in the medical wards is practically non-existent.

Dr. T. Y. Li, assistant to the Medical Unit, has made an analysis of the cases attending the children's clinic. From the figures it is seen that 80 per cent of the cases are children under two years of age.

An analysis of the diseases shows that Respiratory Diseases have the highest incidence-40 per cent of the total.

Next come Gastro-intestinal disorders-20 per cent, a sur- prisingly low figure in comparison with the incidence of the same disorders in cities elsewhere. The explanation probably is that about 50 per cent of the infants are breastfed.

The analysis of the methods of feeding shows 24 per cent are breastfed with, in addition, some supplementary artificial feeds. 23 per cent are fed on artificial food.

M 129

Table VI.

Schick Test, Swabbing and Immunisation Against Diphtheria. Schick Test. Total Individuals Tested......

84

Sisters.....

8

Positive

5

Negative

3

Nurses...

26

Positive

9 (4 Senior, 5 Junior)

Pseudo-Pos.

3

Negative

Dressers

10

14

0

Positive

Pseudo-Pos.

Negative

Medical Officers 5

Positive

Negative

∞ NO

CON

Students......... 35

Positive

12

Pseudo-Pos.

3

Negative

20

Total Positive....

29

Total Cseudo-Pos...

Total Negative

47

84

Swabbing:-

From each case tested both throat and nasal swabs were taken for direct examination and culture. From one of the negative reactors amongst the nurses the nasal swab revealed the direct presence of K.L.B. and on culture whilst the throat swab gave a negative result. No virulence test was done. One pseudo-positive reactor had an attack of Diphtheria two months previously.

Swabbing was done from the point of view of interest rather than in the hope of any practical value from doing so.

It is doubtful if anything is gained by swabbing all contacts or suspected cases. Some carriers will be discovered but many will be missed because of negative cultures.

Many convalescents after an attack of Diphtheria show the presence of the Bacillus even when three previous consecutive swabs have been negative.

M 130

Immunisation.

Antitoxin to produce Passive Immunity during the epidemic was given to the Sisters and Nurses who showed a Positive Schick reaction.

To the medical officers and students showing a Positive Schick reaction toxiod mixture was given for the purpose of conferring Active Immunity.

The toxoid mixture was given as follows:-

0.5 c.c.

1st dose

2nd

3rd

0.5 c.c. 7 days interval. 1 C.c.

do.

As a result of the Toxoid injections no severe reactions occurred. In one or two cases there was some local redness and pain at the site of the injection but general constitutional disturbances and pyrexia were absent.

The results of the Schick Test are interesting. The number of Positive reactors is high for a hospital community most mem- bers of which have been in contact with Diphtheria cases in hospital and elsewhere at one period or another.

This especially holds true in the case of the Sisters who have been much in contact with Diphtheria cases and whose percentage figure is very high. The same applies to the results amongst the nurses, the senior members showing the higher number of positive reactors.

In view of the large number of positive reactors and the dread of contracting Diphtheria which the Chinese Nursing Staff have active immunisation would appear to be a very wise pro- cedure. There is no doubt that only in Active Immunisation do we possess the real means of preventing Diphtheria and the public must be taught so.

OBSTETRICAL AND GYNAECOLOGICAL UNIT, UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG,

Report by the Professor Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

The Department is responsible for the care of patients in the Maternity Bungalow of the Government Civil Hospital, and for the Gynaecological cases in the Women's Ward in this hospital; and also for all the inpatients in the Tsan Yuk Hem for Women (60 beds). The clinical work in the Outpatient De- partment of the Tsan Yuk Hospital is at present being carriesi out by the staff of the Government Visiting Medical Officer Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries, who also conducts As natal, Infant Welfare, and Venereal Diseases Clinics.

M 131

Last year the operation rate in the clinic was :-one opera- tion to every 24.5 patients; major operations such as caesarean section being rarely necessary. During the last seven years the incidence of caesarean section has been less than one in a thousand cases, and for that period the gross mortality rate of the clinic was only 9 per cent in upwards of 10,000 cases treated. One of the causes of the large number of easy deliveries is the scarcity of contracted pelvis among the local Chinese (Cantonese people). Rickets is uncommon, and osteomalacca is extremely rare, if not unknown. Atresia of the vagina, caused by trauma, is an occasional cause of difficult delivery. The trauma or injury has usually been inflicted by a native untrained midwife at a previous labour, in endeavouring to extract the infant with a sharp hook. The ordinary complications of pregnancy, labour, and the puerperium such as the toxaemias, haemorrhage, and sepsis, occur with about the same frequency as elsewhere.

The individual work of each hospital is as follows:-

1. Maternity.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL. HOSPITAL.

Maternity and Gynaecological Wards.

During the year ended December 31st, 1931, there were 719 cases admitted to the Maternity Bungalow, of whom 689 were delivered; 661 infants were born alive. There were five maternal deaths. There are approximately twenty beds, eighteen of which are under the care of the University staff, and the remaining two are reserved for the wives of Government Servants, and are under the case of the Medical Officer in charge of the hospital. Almost all the patients are Asiatics. Europeans are not admitted to this building save under exceptional circum- stances.

Morbidity.-B.M.A. standard approximately 5 per cent.

During the latter part of the year an outbreak of sepsis occurred which necessitated the thorough disinfection of the Bungalow, and in order to facilitate matters the entire building was closed for about a week. During recent years the health of the Maternity wards has shown a steady inprovement, with a lowering of the Morbidity rate; in our opinion largely due to a revision of the details of toilet technique during both labour and the puerperium. The policy of having a permanent day- sister in charge of the Bungalow has yielded excellent results. and Sister Lace has done much for the Department.

Mortality. During the year there were five maternity deaths, giving a mortality rate of 72 per cent.

M 132

The causes of death were as follows:

Case 1-Toxaemia, myocarditis, Pulmonary embolism, rute

oedema of lungs.

""

12

2-Shock,

3-Pulmonary embolism.

4-Acute cystitis, septicaemia, heart failure.

5-Uraemia.

2. Gynaecology.

There were 107 patients admitted to the ward, and 71 operations were performed. Ten patients received radium treat- ment for carcinoma, and we are indebted to Dr. Montgomery and the Board of Governors of the Matilda Hospital for the loan of radium. There were 1,133 attendances at the Outpatient De- partment. There were three gynaecological deaths..

Causes of deaths :-

1 case-Tetanus.

1

-Carcinoma of cervix.

,, -Tuberculous meningitis.

TSAN YUK HOSPITAL.

1. Maternity.

During the year 1,323 cases were admitted to this hospital. Of these 1,248 were delivered, and 1,202 infants were born alive. There were three maternal deaths.

Morbidity rate. B.M.A. Standard approximately 3 per cent.

In this hospital also the general health has greatly im- proved, and likewise the improvement appears to be attributable to revision of technique in the puerperal toilet.

Mortality.

During the year there were three deaths.

Mortality rate-24 per cent.

The causes of death are as follows:-

Case 1-Accidental haemorrhage.

"

22

2-Beri-beri.

3-Septicaemia.

2. Gynaecology.

The total number of admissions was 176. There were 67 operations and 30 patients received radium treatment for car- cinoma. There were three deaths.

j

M 133

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

• HD ESE OSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis-

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end

Remain- ing in Hospital { })d

Yearly Total.

Deaths.

of 1931.

of 1930.

sions.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in

Hospital at end

Deaths

of 1931.

1.-Epidemic, Endemic, and Infectious Diseases.

Enteric Group :—

(a) Typhoid Fever

(b) Paratyphoid A.

: :

Malaria

སྐྱ : :

62

ལུ:

62

5

78

25

83

:

1

: co

:

87

543

150

580

18

(a) Tertain

15

468

483

3

12

363

92

377%

**

9

(b) Quartan

3

(c) Aestivo-autumnal

2

70

6

72

31

11

31

(d) Cachexia

2

26

1

28

1

13

3

13

Smallpox :-

Alastrim

Measles

Whooping Cough Diphtheria

Influenza

Mumps

Cholera

Dysentery-

(a) Amoebic

(b) Bacillary

(c) Undefined or due to other

Leprosy

causes

Erysipelas

Acute Poliomyelitis

::

...



4

1

4

1

13

23

24

3

3

3

4

97

16

101

38

48

1

723

721

4

14

422

10

10

1

I

...

Encephalitis Lethargica

Epidemic Cerebro-spinal Fever

Other Epidemic Diseases :-

(a) Rubeola (German measles)... (b) Dengue...

(e) Yaws

Tetanus

2

57

1

47

:

11

2

15

12110

2 2

59

By

3

48

:

11

17

2

Ι

1

1

9

10

71

71

1

1

5

5

5

:::

14

...

3.

3:

...

49

436

10

41

4

4

146

40

150

10

48

10

48

...

24

404.

115

428

16

3

3

2

:

!

5

58

41

58.

Carried forward......

31

1,713

40

1,744

57

98

2,187

629

2,285

66

M 134

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

Admis-

sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward ......

31

1,713

40

1,744

57

98

2,187

629

2,285

66

I-Epidemic, Endemic, and

Infectious Diseases,-Continued.

Tuberculosis Pulmonary aud

Laryngeal

Tuberculosis of the Meninges or

Central Nervous System

Tuberculosis of the Intestines or

Peritoneum

Tuberculosis of the Vertebral Column Tuberculosis of Bones and Joints..............

Tuberculosis of other organs :---

(a) Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue

(Lupus)

(b) Bones

(c) Lymphatic System

(d) Genito-urinary...

(e) Other organs

Tuberculosis disseminated :—

(a) Acute

(b) Chronic..

Syphilis :-

14

253

37

267

17

100

2,048

981

2,148

97

21

16

21

9

162

136

171

22

:

12

10

9

21

10

1

3

10

62

299

32

62

16

18

i

1

5

326

1

1

18

18

3

28

31

4

1

1

2

1

1

1

7

4

5 44

5

8

4

+

(a) Primary.

(b) Secondary.

(c) Tertiary

(d) Hereditary

I

68

CO -

3

37

1

47

9

(e) Period not indicated

:::

2

Soft Chancre

27

Gonorrhoea and its complications

7

126

Gon rrhoeal Ophthalmia

7

Gonorrhoeal Arthritis

1

7

Granuloma Venereum

Septicemia

:6

6

:

: :

:2

9

1

9

2

57

3

61

6

1

3

3

4

146

833

63

146

2

893

69

I

40

3

00 10

2

5

1

5

48

28

207

49

235

27

9

28

18

38

2

2

:

to

2

133

31@ :◓

27

8

14

14

1

2

2

1

10

10

2

50

32

52

Carried forward......

67

2,415

118 2.482

93

242

4,984

1,955

5,264

234

M 135

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Remain. ing in Hospital

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

at end of 1930.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

Remain-

of 1930.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

ing in

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

67

2,415

118

2,482

93

· 242

4,984

1,955

5,264

234

II.-General Diseases not

Diseases.

mentioned above.

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Buccal Cavity..

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Stomach or Liver Cancer or other malignant Tumours of the Peritoneum Intestines, Rectum

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Female Genital Organs Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Breast

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Skin .....

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of Orgaus not specified

Tumours non-Malignant

6

32

10

38

2

7

Co

3

:

39

26

39

1

3

7

1

14

...

22

20

3

Co

3

៨.

9

15

;

24

2

1226

:

:

:

:

:

20

3

16

16

1

15

6

16

:

:

24

15

24

1

27

2

:

:

:

12

1

12

1

4

1

4

co :

3

77

1

80

3

24

...

:

24

:-

1

Acute Rheumatism....

27

27*

1

14

14

Chronic Rheumatism

15

15

6

131

4

137

Scurvy (including Burlow's Disease). Beri-Beri

1

1

1

3

60

2

63

1

81

1,279

411

1,360

81

:

3

2

4

:::

13

1

2

1

3

29

1

29

...

:

+

5

00:10

:

1

4

1

3

...

5

1

:..

1

82

*N

9

2223

1

:.

:- :

:



:

1

N

Carried forward......

86 2,761

139

2,847

109

332 6,725 2,430 6,995

333

Diabetes (not including Insipidus)

Anæmia:-

(a) Pernicious

(6) Other Anæmias & Chlorosis

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland :- (a) Exophthalmic Goitre

(b) Other diseases of the Thyroid Gland, Myxoedema...........

Diseases of the Supra-Renal Glands.. Diseases of the Spleen

M 136

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS,

Total

Remain- ing in

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1931.

Rėmain- ing in

ospital

Yearly Total

at end of 1930.

Admis-

-ions.

Total Cases Treated.

Leaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

86 2,761

139

2,847

109

332

6,725 2,430

6.995

333

II.—General Diseases not mentioned

above. — l'ontinued.

Leukæmia :-

(4) Leukæmia

1

I

1

1

2

23

23

2

143

(6) Hodgkin's Diseases..

Alcoholism

Chronic poisoning by mineral sub-

stances (lead, mercury, &c.,)...... Chronic poisoning by organic sub- stances (Morphia, Cocaine, &c.)...

Other General Diseases :- Auto-intoxication Hæmophilia.....

III.-Affections of the Nervous System and Organs of the Senses.

Encephalitis (not including En-

cephalitis Lethargica)

Meningitis (not including Tuberculous Meningitis or Cerebro-spinal

Meningitis)

Locomotor Ataxia

Other affections of the Spinal Cord .......

Apoplexy :-

(a) Hæmorrhage

T:

1

4

1

:

1

145

1

12

144

45

156

13

1

...

Ι

:

3

2 00 00

8

:

...

3

:: co

3

36 9

3

9

2

:

2

: ܗ:

:

1

1

218

1

3

3

11

...

1

213

:::

(6) Embolism.

...

(e) Thrombosis

:

18

E::

11

19

6

164

105

170

7

6

}

6

10

3

10

:

...

Paralysis:-

(a) Hemiplegia

1

15

90

ī

105

(b) Other Paralyses

6

1

1

:

General Paralysis of the Insane

5

5

4

Other forms of Mental Alienation......

16

16

7

6-9

Epilepsy

1

20

21

1

Carried forward......

94

3,015

154

3,109

113

366

7,1!1

2,600

7,477 .

358

M 137

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

APPENDIX F.

CHINESE HOSPITALS,

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

of 1930.

Admis- sions.

Deaths.

Total

L'ases Treated.

Remain- ing in

Hospital at eud of 1931.

Brought forward......

94

3,015

154

3,109

113

366

7,111

2,600

7,477

358

III.-Affections of the Nervous

System and Organs of the Senses,→ (Continued.)

Eclampsia, Convulsions (non-puer-

peral) 5 years or over

Infantile Convulsions

1

1

...

Chorea....

Hysteria

Neuritis

Neurasthenia

62 5

Other affectious

of the Nervous

System such as Paralysis Agitans..

1

10

4

1

2

:.

2

2

8

66

3

4

357

103

361

30

3

1

5

I

6

:

:

:

:..

4.

:

...

:

Affections of the Organs of Vision:

(a) Diseases of the Eye

19

19

(6) Conjunctivitis

1

58

(c) Trachoma......

2

13

59 15

(d) Tumours of the Eye

1

2010-

22

429

451

· 17

2

19

21

44

44

2

(e) Other affections of the Eye...

1

10

11

3

21

24

44

44

1

6

7

5

: : පාලා

Affectious of the Ear or Mastoid Sinus..

IV. ~ Affections of the Circulatory System.

Pericarditis

}

2

Acute Endocarditis or Myocarditis

1

5

Other Diseases of the Heart:

(a) Valvular :-

Mitral

Aortic

Pulmonary

(b) Myocarditis

Diseases of the Arteries:-

(a) Aneurism

(b) Arterio-Sclerosis

Embolism or Thrombosis (noncère-

46

::

33

7

33

24

126

52

150

14

9

3

23

26

7

38

176

79

214

35

2

9

1

11

I

2

22

10

22

1

19

65

22

84

25

1

6

6

1

1

2

...

bral).....

...

Carried forward......

112

3,320

172

3,432

133

480

8,404

2,870

8.884

491

M 138

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain-

ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

172

3,432

133

480

8,404

2,870

9,884

491

:::

::

60

a a 8

2

1

23

6

6

24 6

1

:

4

1

1

102

4

1

7

ск

7

:

Brought forward...... 112 3,320

IV. Affections of the Circulatory

Systém,-(Continued.)

Diseases of the Veins :-

Hæmorrhoids

Varicose Veins

Phlebitis

Diseases of the Lymphatic System:--

Lymphangitis....

Lymphadenitis, Bubo (ono-specific)

Hæmorrhage of undetermined cause... Other affections of the Circulatory

System

V.-Affections of the Respiratory System.

Diseases of the Nasal Passages:

Adenoids

Polypus Rhinitis

Coryza....

Affections of the Larynx

Laryngitis

Bronchitis :-

(a) Acute

Chronic....

Broncho-Pneumonia

Pneumonia :-

: ය

1

59

6

2

: : :

:

903

4

99

7.

10

9476

16

5

783

10

9776

16

:

:

2

2

::

5

10

10

3

i co 5 o

5

3

:

5

6

Co

6

:

217

217

10

3

211

2

68

88

52

~~~

2

214

1

19

512

8

531

24

2

70

2

44

925

199

969

58

90

26

1,336

949

1,362

31

2

4

58123 89

15

58

~

1

1

25

3

...

93

2

3::~

18

200

116

218

17

67

39

67

9

3

9

...

2

187

28

189

1214

Carried forward....;

131

4,088 245

4,219

149

591

11,920 4,212

12,511

653

(a) Lobar

(b) Unclassified

Pleurisy, Empyema

Asthma

Diseases.

M 139

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

131

4,088

245

4,219

149

591

11,920

4,212.

12,511

653

VI.— Diseases of the Digestive

System.

Diseases of Teeth or Gums- Caries,

Pyorrhoea, &c.

Other affections of the Mouth:-

Stomatitis

Glossitis, &c.

Affections of the Pharynx or Tonsils:-

Tonsillitis

Pharyngitis

Affections of the Esophagus

Ulcer of the Stomach

Ulcer of the Duodenum..

2

114

1

116

Other affections of the Stomach:

Gastritis

Dyspepsia, &c.

Diarrhoea and Enteritis :-

Under two years

12

56

16

2

172

20

1

23

12

6

18

CO

::

I-

7

:

7

3

-

::

174

6

CO

1

: ܗ: : :

20

3

1

2

25

32333

1

2:28

26

27

1

15

1

13

5

22:00

6

16

6

1

1

$38

64

1

88

~

63

65

89

3888

oo co

281

93

284

183

2

186

76

*00

8

65

1

23

1,110

773

1,133

27

Diarrhoea and Enteritis:

Two years and over

148

1

148

20

732

348

752

23

Colitis

1

39

40

129

55

129

Ulceration

3

21

Sprue

4

4

Ankylostomiasis..

30

32

3

29

22:223

24

29

(a) Cestoda (Tonia)

2

...

(c) Ascaris

1

29

30

2

19

1

21

(e) Other parasites

1

3

4

Appendicitis

6

83

7

89

1

35

13

36

Hernia....

1

35

2

36

1

29

5

30

Affections of the Anus, Fistula, &c.

6

50

56

33

33

:.

Diseases due to Intestinal Parasites.-

322: 2

3

Carried forward......

163

5,089

267

5,252

182

650 14,583 | 5,517

15,234

731

M 140

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

APPENDIX F.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

at end Admis- of 1930.

sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Total

Adinis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in

Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

163

5,089

267

5,252

182

650

14,583 5,517

15,234

731

::

VI.-Diseases of the Digestive System,-(Continued.)

Other

affections of the Intest-

ines :-

Enteroptosis

Constipation

Cirrhosis of the Liver :-

(a) Alcoholic

Biliary Calculus

(b) Other forms

Other affections of the Liver :-

Abscess

Hepatitis....

215

107

2 107

17

1

724

3

IT

3

:: co

3

3

3

81

::

3 84

4

78

28

82

21

14

23

7

7

~::

2

པ T-

42

:

1

3

4

4

17

1

17

654

6

...

1

5

1

4

1

:

33

...

33

:

1

91

12

3

2

2

2

10: 10:

:

91

2། ༠༠

...

12

2

2

1

37

ဒီ ဘ

214

9

40

9

416

58

41

1,059

349

425 1,100

14

43

1

14

15

46

I

46

13

3

1

9

10

::

...

Cholecystitis

Jaundice

Diseases of the Pancreas

Peritonitis (of unknown cause)......

Other affections of the Digestive

System

VII.-Diseases of the Genito- urinary System (non-Venereal).

Acute Nephritis

Chronic

Other affections of the Kidneys,

Pyelitis, &c.

Urinary Calculus,

Diseases of the Bladder :-

Cystitis

Diseases of the Urethra :

15

1

15

:

1

38

7

39

(a) Stricture

() Other

19

1

14

22

14

2273

27

Carried forward......

172

5,446

283

5,618

198

711

16.433

5,988 17,145

797

M 141

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year: 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

at end of 1930.

Admis-

sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain. ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain-

ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

172

5,446

283

5,618

198

711

16,433 5,988

17,145

797

VII. Diseuses of the Genito-urinary

System (non-Venereal),--(Cont.)

Diseases of the Prostate :-

Hypertrophy

Prostatitis

Diseases (non-Venereal) of the Genital

Organs of Man :—

Phimosis

Epididymitis

Orchitis

Hydrocele

Ulcer of Penis

Cysts or other non-malignant Tumours

of the Ovaries.....

co co



3

~:

2

1

6

2

19

19

...

15

15

10

11

33

33

20618

:

1

10

:

11

1

1

ܗ:

2

6

1

8

9

1

1

4

5

:

:.

15

1

15

I

21

:

21

Salpingitis:--

Abscess of the Pelvis.....

3

31

34

1

1

10

5

6

Uterine Tumours (non-malignant)

16

16

Uterine Hæmorrhage (non-puerpera)......

10

10

Metritis

21

21

:

:

1

1

...

Other affections of the Female Genital

Organs......

18

18

1

1

...

Displacements of Uterus

37

37

6

6

Amenorrhoea

7

30

50

2

Dysmenorrhoea

9

1

15

15

Leucorrhoea......

4

4

20

20

Diseases of the Breast (non-

puerperal -

Mastitis

3

Abscess of Breast

11

11

co:

3

9

12

12

177 Carried forward......

5,697

283

5,874

203

717

16,606 5,993

17,324 801

M 142

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Deaths.

of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

177

5,697

283

5,874

203

717

16,606

5,993

17,324

801

VIII. Puerperal State.

Normal Labour

24

711

735

20

86

5,461

5,547

69

(a) Abortion

1

20

*21

40

40

(b) Ectopic Gestation

1

4

1

(e) Other accidents of Preguancy

1

35

Puerperal Hæmorrhage....

32

Other accidents of Parturition

35

Puerperal Septicæmia

Puerperal Eclampsia

Sequela of Labour.....

1

Puerperal affections of the Breast

ANOO &&&

36

53

53

:::

32

1

15

16

1

35

2

1

}

2

IX.-Affections of the Skin and

Cellular Tissues.

Gangrene

Boil

Carbuncle

Abscess

Whitlow

Cellulitis

Tinea

Scabies

4

1

4

2

45

45

2

2

2

7

98

105

3

10

42

3

52

4

60

62.

1

60

1

60

199

3

204

3

541

5

544

23

2

109

111

2

22

402

14

424

12

1

41

42

2

31

255

6

286

25

...

2

2

7

171

178

1

-

:

Other Diseases of the Skin :-

Brythema

1

i

Urticaria

1

10

10

Eczema

39

39

3

18

I

19

Herpes...

1

6

7

1

2

2

Psoriasis

1

1

3

3

Elephantiasis

3

2

Pemphigus

2

1

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

6

6

Uleer

1

Carried forward......

225 7,172

294

7,397

242

878

23,701

6,038

24,580

935

Diseases.

M 143

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS,

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Admis-

sions.

Cases Treated.

Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

225

7,172

294 7,397

242

879

23,701 6,038

24,580

935

22

24

24

15

~:::

2

27

1

1

1

1

25

2

2

33

1

35

17

:

37

O

ลง

2

35

Brought forward......

X.-Diseases of Bones and Organs of Locomotion (other than Tuberculous).

Diseases of Boues :-

Osteitis

Diseases of Joints

Arthritis

Synovitis

Other Diseases of Bones or Organs

of Locomotion......................

XI.-Malformations.

Malformations :--

Hydrocephia

Spina Bifida, &c.

XII.-Diseases of Infancy.

Congenital Debility

Premature Birth.....

::

1

1

1

19

1

19

Other affections of Infancy

Infant neglect (infants of three months

or over)

XIII.-Affections of Old Age.

Senility :-

Senile Dementia.....

XIV.-Affections produced by

External Causes.

Suicide by Poisoning..

Corrosive Poisoning (intentional)......

Suicide by Hanging or Strangulation.

Suicide by Drowning..

5

001 10

:

I

6

∞ 1 ∞

:

::

:.

:

co

3

...

6

42

24

48

1

::

:

6

6

6

26

593

106

619

29

...

1

77

11

78

1

49

49

8.

1

8

1

1

1

1

1

1

...

30

30

...

1

1

1

...

Carried forward.......... 236

7,429

318

7,665

250

912

24,431

6,184 25,344

968

Suicide by Crushing

Other Suicides

M 144

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

at end Admis- of 1930. sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

of 1930.

Adinis-

sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

Brought forward......

236 7,429

318

7,665

250

912

24,431 6,184

25,344

968

-Adections produced by

XIV-X

External Causes,—Continued.

Food Poisoning

Botulism

:

10

:

10

A

Attacks of poisonous animals:

Snake Bite

Insect Bite

Other accidental Poisonings

7

1

4

1

1

Burns (by Fire)

3

41

9

44

34

1

35

Burns (other than by Fire)

1

58

5

59

29

1

29

3.

Drowning (accidental)

17

1

17

Wounds (by Firearms, war excepted)...

1

38

10

39

3

3

Wounds (by cutting or stabbing

Instruments)

8

181

Wounds (by Fail)

110

Wounds (in Mines or Quarries)

Wounds (by Machinery)

Wounds (crushing, e.g. railway

accidents, &c.)

Injuries inflicted by Animals, Bites,

Kicks, &c.

Wounds inflicted on Active Service...

Over fatigue

Exposure to Heat:

5

10 10 2

189

1

13

110

1

5

1

...

23

23

:: co ã

123

11

136

10

3

33

36

2

:

:

165

19

165

7

6:2

2

:

:::



:

5

104

10

4

:

1

1

...

1

1

...

1

19

20

4

10

10

41

41

15

577

592

26

6

307

67

313

16

20

244

2

264

44

587

37

631

10

104

2

104

...

Carried forward......

300

9,044

477

9,344

290

964

25,619

6,205

26,584 1,018

Heatstroke

Lightning Stroke

Dislocation

Sprain ....

Fracture

Other external Injuries

∙M 145-

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1931.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Total

at end of 1930.

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Deaths.

at end of 1931.

at end of 1930.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Brought forward...... 200 9,044

XV.-Ill-Defined Diseases.

Diseases not already specified or ill-

de ned:

Ascites Edema

Asthenia

Hyperpyrexia. Malingering

XVI.—Diseases, the total of which have not caused 10 Deaths.

Observation

In Attendance.........

:

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1931.

477

9,344

290

964

25.619

6,205

26,584

1,018

24

25

22.

2022

15

5

22

NN

2

317

2

15

319

7

TOTAL.....

311

9,410

477

9,721

292

965

25 643 6,205

26,609 1,018

M 146.

APPENDIX G.

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

I.-Epidemie, Endemic, and

Infectious Diseases.

Enteric Group:-

(a) Type not defined

Malaria: -

(a) Tertian

(b) Aestivo-autumnal

(e) Cachexia....

Smallpox .... Measles

Diphtheria..

Dysentery:-

(a) Amoebic

Male.

Female.

6

1

3

32

5

3

2

27

...

1

(b) Bacillary

Leprosy....

Acute Poliomyelitis..

Epidemic Cerebro-spinal Fever

604:0

3

4

1

1

5

Other Epidemic Diseases:-

(a) Varicella (Chicken-pox)

1

Tuberculosis Pulmonary & Laryngeal Tuberculosis of the Meninges or

164

103

Central Nervous System.... Tuberculosis of the Intestines or

Peritoneum

12

16

22

19

20

Tuberculosis of other organs:-

(a) Bones.

(b) Lymphatic System

1

1

...

1

Tuberculosis disseminated:-

Acute

101.

160

Syphilis:-

(a) Tertiary

16

(b) Hereditary

36

43

Septicæmia

6

12

Carried forward.........

426

385

M 147

Mortuaries Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

Male,

Female.

Brought forward.........

426

385

II.-General Diseases not mentioned above.

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Stomach or Liver Cancer or other malignant Tumours of the Peritoneum Intestines, Rectum

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of Organs not specified

Beri-beri

Diseases of the Thymus

Chronic poisoning by organic sub-

stances (Morphia, Cocaine, &c.).

Other General Diseases:-

Purpura Hæmorrhagica

III.--Affections of the Nervous System and Organs of the Senses.

Meningitis not including Tuber- culous Meningitis or Cerebro- spinal Meningitis

Apoplexy:-

Hæmorrhage....

Cerebral Softening

IV.-Affections of the Circulatory System.

Pericarditis

Acute Endocarditis or Myocarditis...

1

2

46

♡ 60 61

3

1

9

2

4

1

12

13

5

10

1

...

3

Carried forward.........

510

414

M 148

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

510

414

1

I

3

12

2371

5

2

Brought forward.........

IV-Affections of the Circulatory

System,—Continued.

Other Diseases of the Heart:

(a) Valvular:

Mitral

Aortic

(b) Myocarditis

Diseases of the Arteries:-

(a) Aneurism

(b) Arterio-Sclerosis

(c) Other diseases

Embolism or Thrombosis (non-cere-

bral)

Hæmorrhage of undetermined cause...

V- Affections of Respiratory

Bronchitis:-

System.

() Acute...... Broncho-Pneumonia

Pneumonia:-

(a) Lobar

Pleurisy, Empyema

Gangrene of the Lungs

VI.--Diseases of the Digestive System.

Other affections of the Mouth:---

Glossitis., &c.

A Ulcer of the Stomach B-Ulcer of the Duodenum

1

:

437

549

700

758

106

117

30

33

1

5

N

62

I

i

Diarrhoea and Enteritis:

Under two years

334

396

Carried forward...................

2,157

2,280

M 149

Mortuaries Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

Brought forward.........

2,157

2,280

VI. -Diseases of the Digestive System, Continued.

Diarrhoea and Enteritis :-

Two years and over..

Appendicitis

B-Other affections of the In-

testines:-

Enteroptosis

25

17

118

3

3

I

3

Cirrhosis of the Liver:-

(a) Other forms

Biliary Calculus

Other affections of the Liver:-

Cholecystitis......

Jaundice

Diseases of the Pancreas...

Peritonitis (of unknown cause)

Other affections of the Digestive

System

VII.--Diseases of the Genito- urinary System (non-Venereal).

Acute Nephritis

Chronic

Salpingitis:-

Abscess of the Pelvis

VIII.- Puerperal State.

Accident of Pregnancy:-

(a) Abortion.... (b) Ectopic Gestation Puerperal Hæmorrhage Puerperal Septicemia Puerperal Eclampsia

1

22:7

:.

}

15

:

1

3

2

3

co:

2

1

1

1

3

1

Carried forward..

2,215

2,322

M 150

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

Brought forward.......

IX-Affe tions of the Skin and "Cellular Tissues.

Abscess

Cellulitis

Other Diseases of the skin:—

Brythema

X.- Diseases of Bones and Organs of Locomotion (other than Tuberculous.)

Other Diseases of Bones or Organs

of Locomotion

XI.-Malformations.

Hydrocephias

Spina Bifida, &c.

XII.— Diseases of Infancy.

Congenital Debility

Premature Birth

Other affections of Infancy.

Male.

Female.

2,215

2,322

1

4

1

1

:..

4

4

3

1

252

200

52

54

85

107

Suicide by Poisoning

XIII.-Affections produced by

External Causes.

Corrosive Poisoning (intentional)

8

12

Suicide by Hanging or Strangulation.

17

Suicide by Drowning

6

2195

Suicide by Firearms...

3

Suicide by cutting or stabbing

Instruments

2

Suicide by jumping from a height...

1

2

Carried forward.......................

2,650

2,722

M 151

Mortuaries Return of Diseases for the year 1931.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

2,650

2,722

219273+*24

25

Brought forward.........

XIII-Affections produced by External Causes,—Continued.

Food Poisoning :—

Botulism

Other accidental Poisonings

Burns (by Fire)

Burns (other than by Fire).

Suffocation (accidental)

Drowning (accidental)..........

Wounds (by Firearms, war excepted)

Wonnds (by Fall).........

Wounds (in Mines or Quarries).....

Wounds (by Machinery).

Wounds (crushing,

accidents, &c,)

e.g. railway

Executions of civilians by belli-

gerents

Hunger or Thirst................

Exposure to Cold, Frost bite, &c. Electric Shock

Murder by cutting or stabbing

Instruments

Fracture

Other external Injuries

XIV-Ill-Defined Diseases.

Sudden Death (cause unknown)..................

Diseases not already specified or ill-

defined :-

Shock

XV.-Diseases, the total of which

have not caused 10 Deaths.

Decomposel

Skeleton

25

2112

15

2

3

23

5

3

6

10

20

1

2

1

155

100

6

Total.......

2,918

2,912

CONTENTS

1. Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department :-

Administration

Annexe

...

Births and Deaths Registration

Cemeteries, Mortuaries, Crematoria Dead Boxes and Ambulances

Departmental Staff

Disinfection at Disinfecting Stations General

...

...

...

Miscellaneous Works at Departmental Works

Night Soil Removal

Public Bath Houses

...

Refuse Collection and Refuse Removal

Registration of Child Vaccination

Revenue and Expenditure

Undertakers. ...

...

...

:

:

:

:

...

:.

.:.

2. Annexe by the Medical Officer of Health :-

Work done under the Food and Drugs Ordinance and Section 82, of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance

Work done under the Public Health and Buildings

Ordinance

3. Annexe by the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon :-

Crematorium .......

Diseases in Depots

General Statistics

Grass

Infectious Diseases in the Colony... Infectious Diseases in Quarantine

Lard Factories.

...

Live Stock in the Colony Quarantine

...

Slaughter House Revenue Staff

...

...

...

:

:



:



:

:

:

.:.

:

:

...

...

:

...

...

...

...

Page

1

4

1

3

10

5

3

3

4

2

5

2

4

11

12

9.

12

13.

12

11.

12

12

6

Appendix M (1).

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

Inspectors :-

DEPARTMENTAL STAFF.

(i) Establishments:-

The establishment was increased by two second class Inspectors. The numbers of Inspectors on duty on 1st January, 1st July and 31st December were 48, 45 and 48 respectively (Senior Inspectors included).

(ii) Qualifications:-

(a) Technical.

i. At an examination held locally on 14th January, 1932, seven Inspectors were recommended for the Royal Sanitary Institute certificates as Sanitary Inspectors.

Every Inspector (with the exception of two recently joined men) now holds this certificate;

ii. On the same date, seven Inspectors (out of seven entrants) were recommended for the Royal Sanitary Institute certificate in Sanitary Science. Including these seven, fifteen Inspectors now hold this certificate.

iii. Five Inspectors hold the Royal Sanitary Institute certificate as Inspectors of Meat and other Foods.

(b) Linguistic.

With three exceptions, all Inspectors possess the 1st certificate in Cantonese colloquial; and with six exceptions (exclusive of three newly joined men) all hold the 2nd certificate. Five hold the 3rd and one holds the 4th.

ADMINISTRATION.

2. The whole of the urban markets were brought under the control of special market Inspectors, one on either side of the harbour, acting under the immediate supervision of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

3. The administrative machinery was otherwise unchanged.

M (1) 2-

4. Preliminary arrangements were made for the carving out of three additional Health Districts (one in the Eastern end of the City and two in the Kowloon Peninsula) with a view to their being established on 1st January, 1932. As from that date, the number of Health Districts becomes :

Hong Kong (including Peak and Aberdeen)...17 Kowloon

9

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,

5. Table I shows the comparative statement of the Depart- ment's expenditure for the years 1930 and 1931.

6. Table II shows under the various heads the revenue collected by the Department during 1931 compared with 1930; and also the revenue paid into the Treasury in respect of contracts.

7. During the year the payments due from the conservancy contractor for Victoria and Kowloon were reduced to nil owing to the opening of Public flush latrines, and the payment due from the contractor for Aberdeen, Fokfulam and Aplichau was reduced by $55.00.

8. Table III gives the comparative statement of revenue and expenditure for the last ten years.

REFUSE COLLECTION, AND REFUSE REMOVAL.

9. (a) Equipment.-The department has, at its disposal for refuse collection and removal, 22 motor lorries, of which 14 are employed in Hong Kong and 8 in Kowloon: 2 towing tugs, 1 steam lighter, 7 deep draft, and 5 light draft lighters and 3 sailing junks.

(b) Refuse Collection.-There

were collected and delivered to the depots from City of Victoria including Hill district and out- lying residences

63,000 tons

(all of which were collected by motor lorry) from Kowloon, including Kowloon Tong and Kowloon City

29,900 tons

(of which 27,500 were collected by motor lorry) making a total of

92,900 tons

(or 254.52 tons per day). was $182,000 or $2.84 a ton. a ton.

The all in cost for Hong Kong For Kowloon $90,000 or $3.00

M (1) 3



The increased cost is chiefly due to the higher cost of petrol. In addition some 2,967 tons of refuse were collected in rural districts (including Shaukiwan), aud burnt in incinerators.

(c) Refuse Removal.-Some 143,600 tons (393 tons a day) were received at the depots. The difference between this figure and the figure shewn under paragraph (b) as collected is due to a large quantity of refuse taken to the depots by private firms and individuals. Practically all the refuse from the City of Victoria was taken to sea by barges and dumped. All the Kowloon refuse, some 45,688 tons, was dumped at Cheung Sha Wan Reclamation.

10. The cost of removal is shewn in Table IV.

11. Table IV (i) shows the gross cost of collection and removal as compared with last year.

NIGHTSOIL REMOVAL.

12. The contractors for the removal of nightsoil from Victoria and the Kowloon Peninsula, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Aplichau, and Stanley and Taitam respectively carried out their work satisfactorily.

DISINFECTION AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

13. Table V shows the number of articles and vehicles disinfected during the year 1931. The figures for 1930 are given for comparison. The use of portable 'Sack' disinfectors

has been continued.

MISCELLANEOUS WORKS AT DEPARTMENTAL WORKS.

14. Miscellaneous repairs and new construction of various articles were done at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Disinfecting Stations to the value of $3,127.13 and $981.63 respectively. At the Central and Kowloon Garages miscellaneous repairs to the value of $5,039.93 were also carried out.

DEAD BOXES AND AMBULANCES.

15. Dead boxes are obtainable at any hour of the day or night at the two Disinfecting Stations and also by day at the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices.

16. The Department maintains a reserve of hand ambulan- ces on behalf of the Public Ambulance Service controlled by the Inspector-General of Police.

17. Table VI shows calls made during the year.

M (1) 4

PUBLIC BATH HOUSES.

18. Table VII shows the number

of men, women and children who used the Bath-Houses during the years 1930 and 1931. The figures for the last three Bath-Houses, all of which are situated in Kowloon, are particularly noteworthy.

CEMETERIES, MORTUARIES, CREMATORIA.

19. Table VIII (1) shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1931.

20. Table VIII (ii) shows the number of general ex- humations carried out at the Public expense, and Table VIII (iii) shows the number of exhumations carried out by relatives of the deceased.

21. Table VIII (iv) gives particulars of cremations, bodies deposited in the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary, and removals from the Colony before burial.

UNDERTAKERS.

22. Four undertaker's licences were issued during the year making a total of 54 on the register.

BIRTHS AND DEATHS REGISTRATION.

23. The following Births and Deaths were registered during the year:

Births. Deaths.

Chinese

Non-Chinese

Total

12,055

388

18,570

227

12,443

18,797

24. The vital statistics will be found in the report of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services.

25. Table IX shows the ratio of Certified and Uncertified deaths. This bears comparison with the equivalent figure for 1922 (when the ratio was first recorded in the Annual Report) namely, Certified 46 35; Uncertified 53.65.

26. The Head of the Sanitary Department ceased to be Registrar of Births and Deaths on 31st December, 1931.

M (1) 5

REGISTRATION OF CHILD VACCINATION.

27. The Vaccination Ordinance No. 12 of 1923 was amended so as to require parents to get their children vaccinated during the summer months equally with the winter and so as to get them vaccinated within six weeks instead of, as hitherto, six months of birth.

28. Table X shows the number of children whose births were registered and the number certified as successfully vaccinated during the year.

GENERAL.

29. (1) Food-preserving Establishments.-The by-laws pass- ed in 1930 requiring registration of Food-preserving Establishments threw additional recurrent duties on the District Staff. During the year under review the non-recurrent task of providing the necessary material for the compilation of the initial register was undertaken. Over 200 premises were reported as liable for registration.

(ii) Tenement Houses.-A new appendix has been added -Table XVI (in the Medical Officer of Health's report) showing the numbers of tenement houses in the several districts erected in conformity to the requirements of Section 175, Section 179, Sec- tion 180 respectively of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

ANNEXE.

30. Reports by the Medical Officer of Health, the Acting Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and the Secretary, Sanitary Board, will be found appended.

17th March, 1932.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

- M (1) 6

ANNEXE BY THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

1.-) WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

1. Sanitary Nuisances and Contraventions of Sanitary By- laws: Table XI shows the total number of nuisances reported, the action taken to obtain compliance and amount of fines. Of the total number of nuisances reported in which action was taken almost 70% were abated after receipt of a letter. In 112 cases a legal notice failed to produce compliance. Of the summonses which followed, 106 secured convictions, 4 were discharged and 2 withdrawn.

2. Table XII shows the nuisances in respect of which action has been taken.

3. Table XIII (i) shows the Health Districts from which these nuisances were reported and Table XIII (ii) gives details of all prosecutions and amount of fines inflicted.

(ii) Building Nuisances:-Table XIII (i) line 1 shows by districts the number of nuisances under Part III of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance reported by the Department to the Building Authority for action. These are additional to those referred to in paragraph (i) above.

(iii) Although Table XIII shows a considerable balance in favour of new domestic premises over similar premises demolished, there is no evidence of any decrease in over- crowding. This is especially true of the central districts in the city of Victoria.

(iv) Miscellaneous improvements:-Table XIII

(i) lines 3, 4, 5 show miscellaneous improvements effected by District Inspectors in their districts. Lines 7, 8, 9, 10 show the num- ber of houses demolished and erected. The great majority of these are tenement houses.

(v) House Cleansing :-The routine work under the by-laws for the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic Diseases was carried out during the year. Table XIV shows the number of floors cleansed in the various districts as compared with the last two years.

House cleansing was carried on continuously on five mornings a week throughout the year by the staff. The privilege of permitting certain occupants of premises to carry out house cleansing at their own convenience was continued and further extendied during the year. The terms and conditions under which this concession was granted were, generally, complied with.

Table XV shows. approximately the total number of Chinese houses liable for cleansing.

M (1) 7

(vi) Limewashing:-The usual limewashing required by the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation By-laws was carried out during the year. Table XVII shows the number of floors limewashed. The difference between this total and the total in Table XV is due partly to exemptions, some floors being new and not requiring limewashing. A certain number has also been carried over into 1932.

Departmental limewashing at the request of owner and where necessary under By-law 4 was carried out throughout the year.

No complaints as to the quality of the work done or of injury to property were received.

(vii) Prevention of Mosquito Breeding :-During the year action was taken in

two hundred and eighty-eight cases of mosquito nuisance or potential mosquito nuisance.

(vii) Licensed Premises :-Four hundred and seventy-nine premises were inspected by officers of the department with a view to the issue of new licences. Routine inspections of two thousand one hundred and seventeen licensed premises were made throughout the year.

(ix) Infectious Diseases :-

4. Small pox:

-On my motion the Board on the 3rd of February. 1931, rescinded its Resolution of 1918 which restricted my discretion to cause the removal to isolation of persons suffering from small-pox.

5. Rat Catching:-Thirty members of the Cleansing Staff were employed during the year setting traps, bird-lime boards and rat poison, also collecting rats from street rat-bins, private premises, etc., and taking them to the Public Mortuary for examination. Special campaigns in March and September were undertaken when rat poison was distributed throughout the urban districts. The total number of rats caught was:

Hong Kong Kowloon

86,737 71,091

Of these none were found to be plague infected,

M (1) 8

2.- WORK DONE UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE AND SECTION 82 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

1. Samples of fresh milk were submitted for analysis under section 12 of the Food and Drugs Ordinance, of which 54 were found to pass the standard and 16 to be below standard.

2. In eight of these cases successful prosecutions followed, in one case a warning was issued, in the remaining seven

cases no action was taken as the amount of adulteration was so slight as to be in all probability due to accidental

contamination.

3. The following samples of Food and Drugs were taken :- Condensed milk 3, Bread 21, Tea 17, Flour 3, Biscuits

1, Sugar 9, Cheese 14, Cream 13, Butter 2, Chocolates 2, Tinned awabi 1, Tinned fish 5, Tinned chadfish 1, Tinned mushroom and Chicken 1, Tinned boiled crab 1 and Shell-fish 3.

Of the above, one sample of tea failed to satisfy the legal requirements.

4. Under Section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance the following foodstuffs were seized and destroyed. Tinned vegetables 126 tins, Tinned sardines four cases,

Tinned fruits for salads one case, Tinned foods two cases, Various meats and fruits 77 tins, Fish three tins, Cheese three cases, Milk seven tins, Pork fat eight baskets, Sausages one basket, Flour three sacks and Biscuits two small baskets.

18th February, 1932.

G. W. POPE, Medical Officer of Health.

M (1) 9

ANNEXE BY THE ACTING COLONIAL VETERINARY

SURGEON.

STAFF.

1. The Assistant Colonial Veterinary Surgeon took over the duties of Colonial Veterinary Surgeon when Mr. W. J. E. Mackenzie went on leave on 31st January, 1931.

GENERAL STATISTICS.

a notable rise in the number of animals

This

2. There was slaughtered at Ma Tau Kok as compared with last year. was due to the growth of population in the Kowloon area.

3. Cattle :-The total number of cattle admitted to Kennedy Town during 1931 was 55,716 against 47,396 in 1930.. At Ma Tau Kok 13,097 were admitted against 10,277 in 1930.

4. Swine.--The total number admitted to Kennedy Town was 311,422 against 307,513 in 1930. The total number admitted at Ma Tau Kok was 128,073 against 124,544 in 1930.

5. Sheep and Goats: The total number admitted to Kennedy Town was 31,983 against 27,131 in 1930.

SLAUGHTER HOUSE REVENUE.

6. Kennedy Town:-

(i) Slaughtered:-

251,262 Swine @ 30 cts. each...$75,378.60 42,167 Cattle @ 40 cts, each... 16,866.80 18,326 Sheep @ 20 cts. each...

286 Cattle at Fairy Farm

(1930)

3,665.20 $95,910.60

$

114.40

1,871 Swine at Dairy Farm

(1930)

561.30

675.70

(ii) Exported:-

11,190 Swine @ 10 cts. each...$ 1,119.00

2,162 Swine @ 40 cts, each.......

864.80

3,269 Cattle @ 50 cts. each...

1,634.50

1,078 Cattle @ 60 cts. each...

646.80

11,103 Sheep @ 10 cts. each....... 2,656 Sheep @ 35 cts, each...

Carried forward

1,110.30

929.60 $ 6,305.00

$102,891.30

M (1) 10

Brought forward

(iii) Transferred to Ma Tau Kok :-

No charge for transfer.

$102,891.30

47,339 Swine

8,987 Cattle

(iv) Use of Motor Vans:-

251,262 Carcases of Pork @ 6

cts. each

$15,075.72

42,167 Carcases of Beef @ 15

cts. each

6,325.05

18,326 Carcases of Mutton @ 5

cts. each

916.30

184 Special trips @ $2.50

per trip

460.00

$22.777.07

TOTAL

$22,777.07

7. Ma Tau Kok :-

(i) Slaughtered:-

13,064 Cattle @ 40 cts. each...$ 5,225.60

127,928 Swine @ 30 cts. each... 38,378.40 $43,604.00

(ii) Use of Motor Vans:

13,064 Cattle @ 15 cts, each...$ 1,959.60

127,928 Swine @ 6 cts. each...

1 Special trip @ $2.50

per trip

TOTAL

7,675.68

2.50

$ 9,637.78

$53.241.78

8. Fees for :-

Export of Hams, Lard, etc....

$ 6,615.50

Crematorium

838.18

$ 7,453.68

9. Contracts :-

Blood & Hair, Kennedy Town..$10,356.00

Blood & Hair, Ma Tau Kok

3,696.00

Slaughtering, Aberdeen

2,664.00

Slaughtering, Sai Wan Ho

4,752.00 $21.468.00

TOTAL

$28,921.08

GRAND TOTAL

$207,831.83

M (1) 11

LARD FACTORIES.

10. The following goods were manufactured and exported to the Philippine Islands, United Kingdom and Australia.

Lard Crackings

Skins

4,754,876 lbs.

315,105

12

422,082

124,215

Sausages and dried meat

11. Raw material received into Lard Factories:

Raw Fat

Lean Meat

12. Food exported from other Firms:-

Tinned food

Food in cold storage

CREMATORIUM.

6,714.801 lbs.

185,220

10,074 lbs. 221,4381

13. Under Government Notification the following fees were

collected:

90 Cattle @ $2.00 each 11 Calves @ $1.00 each 25 Sheep @ 50 cts, each 316 Swine @ 50 cts, each 66 Horses @ $2.00 each

19 Mules @ $2.00 each

68 Loads of paper, etc. from private

firms and Government Offices

2 Cases of canned food (2 gallons of

Kerosene Emulsion)

$180.00

11.00

12.50

158.00

132.00

38.00

176.68

2.50

51 Piculs of Bone Ashes sold @ $2.50 per picul 127.50

Total

$838.18

14. The following were destroyed for which no charges were made:

9,760 lbs. of diseased meat (condemned carcases etc.)

54 Dogs.

5

Ponies.

42 Swine.

1 Monkey.

1 Seal.

3 Cats.

203 tins of condemned meats.

7 tins of milk.

30 tins of condemned mixed foods.

FUEL USED IN CREMATORIUM FOR 1931.

31 tons of coal.

66 tins of kerosene.

118 gallons of kerosene emulsion.

M (1) 12-

DISEASES IN DEPOTS.

15. Swine Fever 26 cases.

GRASS.

16. The total amount of Guinea Grass cut on the cultivated hillside at Kennedy Town was 1,677 piculs.

QUARANTINE.

17. The numbers of animals examined and passed through quarantine during the year were as follows:

Horses

Cattle Dogs

282

153

190

18. The above does not include animals imported for slaughter or consigned to the Military Authority.

19. Imported horses and mules unless accompanied by a satisfactory "Mallein Certificate" are detained until they have passed the "Mallein Test”.

20. Other animals are quarantined for varying periods ac- cording to their place of origin.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN QUARANTINE.

21. Glanders 1 case.

LIVE STOCK IN THE COLONY.

22. The following numbers of Live Stock were in the Districts under the supervision of Sanitary Inspectors on 31st December, 1931.

تم

Ponies

Asses

Cows

Sheep and Goats

In the New Territories:

Ponies

Asses

Cows

Sheep and Goats

374

1,041

111

10

259

71

23. The above figures do not include animals kept by the Military Authority or animals for slaughter in Government Depots. No figures are given for work or store cattle as these fluctuate greatly and would be misleading.

24. No figures are given for swine owing to the difficulty of obtaining a record of sufficient accuracy to be of any value.

M (1) 13

INFECTIOUS DISEASE IN THE COLONY.

25. Rabies:

During the year 161 dogs were placed under observation on account of being suspected of being rabid. They were disposed of as follows:-

Returned to owner

Died

Destroyed

Sent to S.F.C.A. Dogs' Home Remaining under observation

66

9

38

44

4

26. 9 dogs' brains were examined by the Government Bacteriologist for evidence of Rabies with one positive result.

27. The positive result appeared in a dog at Kowloon which had been brought in from the New Territories.

28. When this case occurred, the muzzling order was enforced, and movement of dogs between Kowloon and New Territory and Hong Kong was restricted.

29. Glanders :-

One isolated case occurred during the year. On "Mallein- ing the in-contacts no further infected animals were found. The reactor was slaughtered and the premises disinfected. These measures had the effect of getting rid of the disease.

30. Rinderpest:-

A few cases of a not very virulent type occurred. The affected and in-contact animals were slaughtered and the pre- mises disinfected These measures succeeded in clearing up the disease.

31. Anthrax :-

Three cases occurred; two from Kwong Chau Wan and one from West River.

32. Segregation of in-contacts and disinfection prevented spread of disease.

16th February, 1932.

M. J. REIDY,

Acting Colonial Veterinary Surgeon.

M (1) 14-

ANNEXE BY THE SECRETARY, SANITARY BOARD.

SANITARY BOARD.

1. The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:

President, The Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr.

G. R. Sayer.

Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the

Honourable Mr. H. T. Creasy, C.B.E.

The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr. E. R. Hallifax, C.M.G., C.B.E., for whom Mr. A. E. Wood acted from 1st January to 30th January, from 21st February to 10th May and from 11th September to 8th November and Mr. R. A. C. North from 31st January to 20th February.

The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. G. W. Pope,

L.R.C.P. & S., D.P.H.

Dr. W. V. M. Koch resigned on 18th September. Mr. L. C. F. Bellamy appointed on 19th September

vice Dr. W. V. M. Koch resigned.

Mr. Wong Kwong Tin.

The Honourable Mr. Chau Tsun Nin.

Mr. Lo Man Kam.

Mr. F. C. Hall.

Dr. R. A. de Castro Basto.

Note:-

During the year Mr. J. H. Gelling acted as

Secretary to the Sanitary Board.

During the year Mr. J. Hargreaves acted as Assistant Secretary to the Sanitary Board.

LEGISLATION.

2. The following by-laws were made by the Board:-

By law No. 1 of the By-laws governing Depots for Cattle, Pigs, Sheep and Goats was amended so as to in- crease the fees as follows:

Cattle

Pigs

Sheep and Goats

From

To

50 cents

60 cents

10 cents

40 cents

10 cents 35 cents

This was approved by the Legislative Council on

1st October.

year.

of

M (1) 15

The By-laws governing Eating Houses were amended by the Board on December 8th by the introduction new by-laws prohibiting spitting in Eating Houses. These were approved by the Legislative Council on January 28th, 1932.

MARKETS.

3. One new market at Kowloon Tong was opened during the

PUBLIC LATRINES AND CONVENIENCES.

4. During the year public conveniences were completed and demolished as follows:

Completed:-

One flush closet at Davis Street.

One flush closet at Bowrington Canal.

One flush closet at Fublic Pier near Star Ferry

(Kowloon).

Demolished:

One dry latrine near Bowrington Canal.

One dry latrine near Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen.

One dry latrine in Main Street opposite Aberdeen

market.

One dry latrine at Aberdeen market (converted into a

store).

One flush closet at Rickshaw Shelter near Salisbury

Road.

BATH-HOUSES.

5. No new bath-house was opened during the year.

CEMETERIES.

6. The following cemetery was opened during the year.

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 5. (Urn cemetery for Tung

Wah Hospital).

PREMISES LICENSED OR ADMITTED TO REGISTRATION.

7. Table XVIII shows the number of premises licensed or admitted to registration by the Sanitary Board,

M (1) 16

WATER CLOSETS IN PRIVATE PREMISES.

8. During the year the Board approved the installation of 4,842 water closets, 5 trough closets and 283 urinals in private premises. The distribution of these water closets in districts is shewn in Table XIII (i) (line 6). The number of water closets, trough closets and urinals installed up to 31st December is shewn in Table XIX.

16th February, 1932.

J. H. GELLING, Secretary, Sanitary Board.

M (1) 17

Table I.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, 1930 AND 1931.

Personal Emoluments*

1930.

1931.

$723,785.79 $803,838.45

Other Charges.

Advertisements

938.87

764.48

Ambulances, Coffins, Dead Vans,

and Dead Boxes

403.62

310.07

Bath-houses, Fuel, Light, etc.

2,254.58

2,554.40

Bonuses to Dispensary Licentiates and Clerks for vaccination of Children and Registration of Births

2,711.70

3,326.50

Burial of Infected Bodies

715.00

55.00

Coal for Official Quarters

1,381.24

1,492.98

Conveyance and Motor Allowances..

10,277.82

10,043.95

Disinfectants

8,002.54

17,423.65

Disinfecting and Cleansing

Apparatus

1,899.85

2,539.72

Operating Expenses of Disinfectors.

972.66

852.74

Upkeep of Dust and Water Carts....

268.38

270.19

Exhumation, Recurrent

10,543.74

23,335.35

Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges

171.00

175.50

General Cleansing, Chinese New

Year

587.70

608.90

Head Stones

1,698.52

1,979.12

Incidental Expenses

1,907.71

2,739.26

Light

10,549.36

10,628.52

Motor Lorries, Vans and Cars,

Running Expenses

24,715.14

33,556.84

Nightsoil Receptacles

657.42

636.80

Paint, Turpentine, &c.

1,174.77

1,331.97

Rat Poison. Rat Traps, &c.

2,315.39

2,910.78

Rent of Quarters for Inspectors

and Sanitary Offices

1,008.00

1,658.00

Rent of Quarters for Scavenging

Coolies

3,458.00 3,681.00

Carried forward

$812,398.80 $926,714.17

M (1) 18-

Table 1,-Continued.

1930.

1931.

Brought forward

$812,398.80 $926,714.17

Scavenging Villages

734.91

747.00

Scavenging Gear

8,765.20

8,560.63

Transport

1,721.65

1,643.83

Uniform for Staff

11,369.97

12,005.58

Workshop Apparatus

109.76

128.26

Animal Depots and Slaughter

Houses, Fuel

4,988.73

4,875.75

Animal Depots and Slaughter

Houses, Incidental Expenses

1,167,52

1,415.46

Animal Depots and Slaughter

Houses, Light

896.51

896.11

Animal Depots and Slaughter

Houses, Motor Meat Van: Running Expenses

6,267.38

12,250.57

Cattle Crematorium and Refuse

Destructor

407.57

484.75

Total Fersonal Emoluments &

Other Charges

$848,828.00 $969,722.11

Special Expenditure.

Launch to replace S.D. 3

$ 39,230.00

4 Light Draft Lighters

6,200.00

2 Refuse Barges (Replacements)

27,500.00

2 Sailing Junks

3,800.00

8 Motor Lorries

62,043.38

2 Filing Cabinets

450.00

New Boiler for Hong Kong

Disinfecting Station

3,000.00

Conversion of 2 chassis into

Water Wagons

1,143.65

Total Special Expenditure

Total Sanitary Department

*

Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. & A. S., & J. C. Service".

$131,773.38 $ 11,593.65 $980,601.38 $981,315.76

- M (1) 19

Table II.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE, 1930 AND 1931.

1930.

Chinese Undertakers' Licences

$ 1,020.00

1931.

$ 1,080.00

Forfeitures

5.41

7.71

Motor Spirit Duties

305.56

745.65

Special Food Licences

14,153.46

13,729.32

Ambulance and Cremation Fees

780.00

548.00

Births and Deaths Registration...

3,785.20

4,864.40

Chinese Cemetery Fees

4,471.00

4,972.00

Official Certificates

4,630.00

6,615.50

Use of Motor Vans

24,422.00

32,577.95

Lands Not Leased

180.00

180.00

Laundries

3,000.00

3,000.00

Markets

295,428.60

299,213.40

Slaughter House, Kennedy Town...

97,052.00

103,501.50

Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok

41,557.00

43,788.20

Interest

18.09

Condemned Stores, &c.

874.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

3,102.02

5,361.44

Scavenging City, Villages and

Hill District

2,215.08

2,416.92

Overpayments in Previous Years....

469.44

Total

$496,999.42 $523,071.43

REVENUE FROM CONTRACTS.

Conservancy Contract, Shaukiwan Conservancy Contract, Aberdeen

Pokfulam and Aplichau

Blood and Hair, Kennedy Town... Plood and Hair, Ma Tau Kok Slaughtering Contract, Sai Wan Ho Slaughtering Contract, Aberdeen

Deduction.

1930.

1931.

$ 1,038.00 $ 1,038.00

..60.00 55.00

5.00

10,356.00

60.00

8,064.00

3,696.00 2,904,00

4,752.00

4,260.00

2,664.00 2,304.00

Total

$22,511.00 $18,630.00

M (1) 20

Table III.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE FOR

LAST TEN YEARS.

Personal *

Emoluments

and Other

Charges.

Special Expenditure.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.

1922

516,980,75

41,756.31

558,737.06

321,774.95

1923

556,517.80

79,886.66

636,404.46

353,095.97

1924

617,862.37

72.415.97

690,278.34

385,885.93

1925

623,516.95

37,586.43

661,103,38

368,828.34

1926

625,280.42

9,805.74

635,086.16

360,235.35

1927

€58,887.40

17,909.14

676,796,54

401,700.74

1928

648,223.33

11.304.61

659.527.94

422,958.55

1929

661,629.77

125,590.94

787,220.71

469,617.92

1930

848,828.00

131,773.38

980,601,38

496,999.42

1931

969,722.11

11,593.65

981,315.76

523,071.43

* Includes officers of Cadet, S. C. and A. S., and J. C. Services

attached to department.

Table IV.

Cost of Refuse Removal.

Hong Kong Kowloon

Total

Salary of Bargemen,.

$ 18,259.85 $ 9,137.68 $ 27,397.53

Salary of Crews,.......

7,954.71

Repairs, Stores and Coal for

Launches and Barges,.....

48,539.33

Total......$ 18,259.85 $ 9,137.68 $ 83,891.57

M (1) 21

Table IV (i).

Comparative Table for 2 years.

1930.

1931.

City Scavenging,

Kowloon Scavenging,

Removal,............

$ 169,397.38 $182,253.37

80.395.36 90,558.99

78,720.58 83,891.57

Table V.

DISINFECTION AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

1930.

1931.

M (1) 22

Eastern Western

Eastern

Western

Hong Kong Kowloon

Disinfect. Disinfect-

District

Office.

District Hong Kong Kowloon Office.

District

District

Disinfect- Disinfect-

Office.

Office.

ing

ing

ing

ing

Station.

Station.

Portable Sack

Station.

Station.

Portable Sack

Disinfectors.

Disinfectors.

Number of Articles disinfected..

14,121

4,364

1,474

215

7,420

3,315

358

174

*875

*322

Number of Public Vehicles disinfected

164

315

159

275

Number of Days Disinfecting Apparatus in use

92

171

38

11

83

210

31

11

*62

*45

*40

*26

Number of Articles washed after disinfecting

60

127

*Portable Sack Disinfector.

M (1) 23

Table VI.

CALLS MADE FOR DEAD BOXES AND AMBULANCES.

Ambulances,

European

Ambulances,

Chinese

Hong Kong Kowloon

Disinfect- Disinfect-

ing

Eastern Western

ing

District

District

Station. Station.

Office.

Office.

118

53

48

35

Dead Boxes

213

2,911

227

535

Table VII.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

1930.

1931.

Men.

Women.

Children.

Men.

Women.

Children.

M (1) 24

Wanchai Cross Lane Bath-house.

151,536

106,370

81,915

146,091

109,804

78,777

Second Street Bath-house

319,793

217,608 125,057

246,151

166,589

85,242

Pakhoi Street Bath-house

71,097

16,568

34,228

67,475

20,935

27,514

Pound Lane Bath-house

144,688

44,556

27,836

187,700

53,700

39,239

Boundary Street Bath-house

75,847

38,203

87,037

118,426

45,114

108,749

Dyer Avenue Bath-house

25,783

4,090

9,000

34,949

5,588

10,086

Sai Kung Road Bath-house.

10,031

3,239

14,612

48,006

14,576

39,955

M (1) 25

Table VIII (1).

INTERMENTS.

The following table shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1931.

Public.

Colonial

Private.

65 Roman Catholic, Happy

Valley

171

Mt. Caroline

1,116 Mohammedan,

Happy

Valley

62

Kaj Lung Wan East......

926 Jewish, Happy Valley....

2

Kai

Lung

Lung Wan Chiu

Chow

34

Parses, Happy Valley

Chai Wan

229

Malay, Happy Valley

1

Chai Wan, Christian

6 Chinese Roman Catholic,

Sokonpo

1,850

Shum Wan

168 Tung Wah Hospital, Kai Lung Wan

5,705

Tung Tau Chau

21 Tung Wah Hospital, Mt.

Caroline

671

Shek O

3 Tung Wah Hospital, Chai

Wan

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 4 (Sai Yu Shek)

226

Chinese Permanent

78

123

Kowloon Cemetery No. 2 6,374 Chinese Protestant, Mt.

(Ho Man Tin)

Davis

92

Kowloon Cemetery No. 3... 5

(Mohammedan)

New Kowloon Cemetery

No. 1.....

90

(Kowloon Christian)

New Kowloon Cemetery

No. 3 (Cheung Sha Wan)

Roman Catholic, Kowloon... 1 Cemetery No. 1 (European)

9,348

New Kowloon Cemetery,

174

Eurasian (Ho Tung)

4

No. 2.......

8,849

M (1) 26.



Table VIII (II).

GENERAL EXHUMATION.

Kai Lung Wan West

Kai Lung Wan East

Mount Caroline Ho Man Tin

Chai Wan....

3,716

203

546

7,275

948

12,688

Table VIII (III).

Exhumations were carried out by relatives as follows:-

Aberdeen (Shum Wan)...

Cheung Sha Wan

Chinese Permanent

Chai Wan

Colonial

Hau Pui Lung

27

8

10

67

4

136

Ho Man Tin

467

Kai Lung Wan

353

Kowloon Tong

7

Kowloon Tong, Christian

12

Mount Caroline

438

Protestant, Pokfulam

6

Roman Catholic

31

Roman Catholic, Sokonpo

1

New Sai Yu Shek

233

Old Sai Yu Shek

Stanley (Tung Tau Chau)....

Tung Wah Hospital

Mount Davis

Kennedy Town, Plague..

2

2

72

11

1

1,888

Table VIII (IV).

CREMATIONS.

28 bodies were cremated at the Japanese Crematorium and 16 at the Sikh Temple.

MORTUARIES.

83 bodies are awaiting at the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary in 1931.

REMOVALS.

418 bodies were removed from the Colony before burial.

M (1) 27

Table IX.

RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

5

6

7

8

Certified Deaths.

CHINESE.

9

Uncertified Deaths.

10

11

I.

Percentage

certified.

HongKong. Chinese Percentage uncertified. deaths.

Kowloon.

Total.

T.W.H.

&

K.W.H.

Medical

Reference.

Medical

Coroner.

T.W.E.H.

Practi-

tioners.

Percentage

certified.

Percentage

uncertified.

90.3

9.7

18,570

6,894

4,005

10,899

1,524

142

195

5,810

58.7

41.3

91.8

8.2

16,082

5,308

3,340

8,648

1,534

119

247

5,502

53.7

46.2

1 has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered Medical Practitioner or Licentiate who has attended the case before death.

I

2

3

NON-CHINESE.

M (1) 27

Table IX.

RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

4

5

6

7

8

Uncertified Deaths.

Certified Deaths.

CHINESE.

9

Uncertified

Non- Number

By

Medical

Year.

Chinese certified. Medical deaths. Practi-

Reference.

By

Coroner.

Percentage certified,

Percentage uncertified.

Chinese HongKong. Kowloon. deaths.

Total.

T.W.H.

&

K.W.H.

Medi

Refere

T.W.E.H.

tioners.

1931

227

205

1930

208

191

3

19.

90.3

9.7

18,570

6,894

4,005

10,899

1,524

142

1

16

91.8

8.2

16,082

5,308

3,340

8,648

1,534

119

24

N.B.-"Certified" signifies a death the cause of which has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered Medical Practitioner or Licentiate who has atter

Registry.

Births and Deaths (Non-Chinese) Births and Deaths (Chinese)

Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary.

Shamshuipo Chinese Public Dispensary.

Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary Central Chinese Public Dispensary... Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary Western Chinese Public Dispensary. Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary Aberdeen Chinese Public Dispensary

Total...

M (1) 28

Table X.

VACCINATION RETURN FOR 1931.

B. F.

New Total Vaccin-

Dead.

Unvac-

cinated.

births. liable. ated.

Left

Colony.

Cannot Had be Small- found. pox.

Unsus-

ceptible.

Unfit.

189

379 568

357

86

53

2,343

1,0073,350

732

180

144

201 415 619

197

24

53

293

299 9411,240 1,2601,939 | 3,199 2,244 | 4,475 | 6,719 360 687 1,047

775

4

3

69

802

128

632

586

4,234

70

42

841

436

26

118

324

10

74 84 32

2

14

1,855 1,898|3,753 |1,442 221

1

118

390 611 138

42

10

292

209 209 59

16

15 78

при со

LO

Total

C. F.

Total.

12

57

4|2,286

1

568

3,350

51

619

384

1,240

1,051

3,199

361,496

6,719

1

142

1,047

28

84

2,192

3,753

20

109

611

1

41 209

8,985 12,414 21,399 9,204

3191,141 2,812

12 747,837 21,399

M (1) 29

Table XI.

RETURN FOR THE YEAR OF 1931.

Outstanding (31st December, 1930)....

No. of nuisances reported

No. of nuisances reported in which

no action taken

No. of first letters sent

17,137

No. of first letters withdrawn

50

Compliance on first letters.

16,057

No. of legal notices sent sections

29 and 30

6,913

No. of legal notices withdrawn

section 31

10

No. of legal notices modified section 31

No. of legal notices time extended

section 31

Compliance on legal notices

No. of summonses applied for

section 32

No. of summonses refused

No. of summonses withdrawn

No. of cases discharged

No. of cases abandoned through

defendant absconding

No. of Magistrate's order section 33... Compliance after. Magistrate's order

(including compliance after sum- monses) Fines $1,618

No. of re-summonses for failure to

comply section 35

No. of re-summonses withdrawn

19

6,786

112

40

195

24

104

1

Compliance after re-summonses

Fines $50

1

Nuisances abated by the Sanitary

Department section 35

Expenses of abating $

Outstanding

235

23,015

235

23,250 23,250

- M (1) 30-

Table XII.

CLASSIFICATION OF NUISANCES REPORTED, 1931.

1. Defective wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves

gutters, etc.

3,367

2. Defective gratings

3,346

3. Illegal cubicles

2,669

4. No dust bins

2,018

5. Choked wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves

gutters etc.

1,636

6. Accumulations of refuse.

1,635

7. Defective floor surfaces

8. Missing gratings

9. Rat runs filled in

10. Defective cement rendering 11. Gratings not properly fixed 12. Illegal height of cubicles

13. Obstructions of verandahs

1,110

1.105

1,026

770

717

601

489

14. Dirty condition of premises

358

15. Obstructions of windows, doors, ventilating

openings etc

325

16. Dirty condition of water closets, urinals and latrines.

315

17. Obstructions of yards

294

18. No receptacles to latrines

188

19. Use of verandahs for cooking and for sleeping purposes

177

20. Breeding of mosquitoes

147

21. Accumulation of stagnant water

141

22. Use of yards for cooking purposes

94

23. Use of basements for habitation, as workshops, etc.

75

24. Use of kitchens for sleeping purposes

50

25. Illegal wooden partitions

42

26. Offensive trades (Rag-storing, feather-storing,

soap-boiling etc.)

34

27. Illegal wooden bunks and beds in excess

33

28. Illegal wooden covers over cubicles

32

29. No cement rendering

30

30. Use of cocklofts, bridges, bathrooms, latrines,

etc. as kitchens

24

Carried forward

22,848

M (1) 31-

Brought forward

31. Use of rooms without windows openings into

external air for sleeping purposes

32. No water supply to water closets and urinals 33. Discharge of sullage water, urine and excreta 34. Keeping of cattle and swine without licence 35. No fly-proof covers to receptacles of latrines 36. Illegal showcases

22,848

22

21

17

17

13

10

37. Bamboo scaffolding with cavities capable of holding

water

10

38. Obstructions of lanes

40. Insufficient glazed area to windows openings

No co co co co co » - ∞☎

3

2

.9

7

39. Eating houses without licences

41. Bakehouses without licences

42. Breeding of flies

43. Illegal urinals

44. Laundries without licences

45. No urinal accommodation

46. Depositing of excreta and urine etc.

47. Exposing of fruit, vegetable, etc. for sale without

licence

48. Dirty barrcis for the storage of drinking water

49. Obstructions of thoroughfare of markets

50. Unwholesome water in the well

51. Accumulation of undergrowth 52. Defective urinal basin

53. Illegal wooden lining to the wall

54. Use of space beneath staircase for sleeping purposes. 55. Urinals or water closets constructed without per-

mission of the Board and the consent of the Colonial Secretary

56. Premises being used for sleeping purposes are

prejudicial to the health of inmates

57. Storage of urine.

58. Occupying of bakehouse by more than one person

between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.

2 2 21

I

1

1

1

1

1

1

59. Black smoke issuing from chimneys, funnels,

furnaces, etc.

1

60. Ground surface not rendered smooth and impervious. 61. Illegal wooden floorings

1

62. Use of space in which water closet is constructed

as a storeroom

1

63. Illegal fireplace

Total

23,015

}

M (1) 32-

Table XIII (1).

ONSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS, 1931.

6a &

4

5

7

9

10

10a

11

12

Shau-

A ber-

13

14

15

16

17

Peak.

Τα

kiwan.

deen.

Total.

123

95

70

53

30

32

44

25

22

53

157

78

75

47

61

100

16

32

4

1,283

1,399

779 1,279

1,113

1,232

1,069

1,606

952

646

1,123

2,374

1,783

955

1,108

1,317

1,596

541

40

23,015

3

5

4

10

...

29

26

43

3

54

122

I

305

11

16

42

31

34

22

98

27

36

21

78

91

59

30

88

97

51

42

116

113

96

34

88

36

31

38

45

34

22

23

56

c

:

:.

:

814

44

35

:

1,026

39

CO

46

81

277

67

15

1

:.

16

8

00

14

8

KO

CO

11

580

271

94

54

81

4,842

48

26



...

1

1

:.

...

...

:

3

2

:

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:..

...

:

:

:

:

T:

:

:

:.

58

14

23

383

39

15

17

71

64

12

...

10

7

+-

10

73

13

51

4 3

43

340

146

58

40

34

34

254

52

2223

155

116

1,087

472

I

1

:

...

11

:

45

:

:

:

:

2

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

3

:

:

:

:

:

155

12

368

26

3

1,258

90

4,421

11

1

:

3.

12

4

:

10

:

:

21

4

2

...

59:

M (1) 32

Table XIII (1).

CONSPE