Administrative Reports - 1930



ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1930

Table of Contents

0 History and Geography

1 General

2 Finance

3 Production

4 Trade and Economics

5 Communications

6 Justice, Police and Prisons

7 Public Works

8 Public Health

9 Education

10 Lands and Surveys

11 Labour

12 Legislation

13 Miscellaneous

A Financial Returns

A(1) Finances

A(2) Audit office

B Assessment

C Secretariat for Chinese affairs

D Harbour office

E Imports and Exports office

F Royal Observatory

G Supreme Court

G(1) Registrar of Trade Marks

H Police Magistrates' Courts

I Land office

J New Territories

K Police and Fire Brigade

L Prisons

M Medical and Sanitary

M(1) Sanitary

N Botanical and forestry

O Education

P Volunteer Corps (Not Published)

Q Public Works

R Post office

S Railway

 






CONTENTS.

HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY

1. GENERAL

II. FINANCE

III. PRODUCTION

IV. TRADE AND ECONOMICS

V. COMMUNICATIONS

VI. JUSTICE, POLICE AND PRISONS

VII. PUBLIC WORKS

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VIII. PUBLIC HEALTH

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IX.

EDUCATION

X. LANDS AND SURVEY

XI. LABOUR

XII. LEGISLATION

XIII.

MISCELLANEOUS

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27

History and Geography.

The Colony of Hong Kong is situated off the south-eastern coast of China between latitude 22°9′ and 22°17′ N. and longitude 114°5′ and 114°18′ E. The island is about eleven miles long and two to five miles in breadth, its circumference being about 27 miles and its area 28 square miles. It consists of an irregular ridge of lofty hills rising to a height of nearly 2,000 feet above sea level, stretching nearly east and west, with few valleys of any extent and little ground available for cultivation.

The island was ceded to Great Britain in January, 1841, the cession being confirmed by the Treaty of Nanking in August, 1842. The charter bears the date of 5th April, 1843. The Kowloon peninsula and Stonecutter's Island were ceded to Great Britain under the Convention signed at Feking in October, 1860, and under the Convention signed at Peking in June, 1898, the area known as the New Territories including Mirs Bay and Deep Bay was leased to Great Britain by the Government of China for 99 years. The area of the New Territories and Islands is about 345 square miles.

The importance of Hong Kong has grown with the increase of China's trade with foreign countries. It is now in respect of tonnage entered and cleared one of the largest ports in the world. It is the most convenient outlet for the produce of South China as well as for the incessant flow of Chinese emigration to the Netherlands East Indies, Malaya, and elsewhere. It is also the natural dis- tributing centre for imports into China from abroad.

The Colony is not to any extent a manufacturing centre, its most flourishing industries being those connected directly or indirectly with shipping, such as dock and warehouse, banking and insurance undertakings.

The climate of Hong Kong is sub-tropical, the winter being normally cool and dry and the summer hot and humid; the seasons are marked by the prevalence of the S.W. monsoon in summer and the N.E. monsoon in winter. The temperature seldom rises above 95' or falls below 40°. The average rainfall is 83.14 inches, May to September being the wettest months. In spring and summer the humidity of the atmosphere is often very high, at times exceeding 95% with an average over the whole year of 77%. The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period.

The rainfall for 1929 was 69.82 inches and for 1930 96.08 inches of which 28.24 inches fell in September. The mean temperature of the air was 72°4 against an average of 71°9. The maximum wind velocity was 83 m.p.h. from E.S.E. on July 24th, when a typhoon passing near Macao produced a strong gale at Hong Kong.

The currency of the Colony is based on silver and consists of the British dollar of one hundred cents.

Bank notes issued by the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and the Mercantile Bank of India are also in circulation, together with silver subsidiary coinage of the value of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents, and one cent pieces in bronze. The average rate of exchange of the dollar during the year was 1/4.36.

I.-General.

At the close of the year 1929 the accounts of the Colony showed a surplus of $9,662,852 and the balance at the end of 1930 was $9.361,680. Thus the year's working resulted in a deficit of $301,173 which was due to the abnormal financial conditions ruling in 1930. The steady depreciation of the sterling value of the dollar from 1/6.83 in January to 1/1.69 in December added to the difficulties of the situation.

In the neighbouring provinces desultory fighting continued throughout the year between the Cantonese forces with their base at Wuchow and the various Kwangsi factions with their headquarters

The importance of Hong Kong has grown with the increase of China's trade with foreign countries. It is now in respect of tonnage entered and cleared one of the largest ports in the world. It is the most convenient outlet for the produce of South China as well as for the incessant flow of Chinese emigration to the Netherlands East Indies, Malaya, and elsewhere. It is also the natural dis- tributing centre for imports into China from abroad.

The Colony is not to any extent a manufacturing centre, its most flourishing industries being those connected directly or indirectly with shipping, such as dock and warehouse, banking and insurance undertakings.

The climate of Hong Kong is sub-tropical, the winter being normally cool and dry and the summer hot and humid; the seasons are marked by the prevalence of the S.W. monsoon in summer and the N.E. monsoon in winter. The temperature seldom rises above 95' or falls below 40°. The average rainfall is 83.14 inches, May to September being the wettest months. In spring and summer the humidity of the atmosphere is often very high, at times exceeding 95% with an average over the whole year of 77%. The typhoon season may be said to last from June to October though typhoons occasionally occur before and after this period.

The rainfall for 1929 was 69.82 inches and for 1930 96.08 inches of which 28.24 inches fell in September. The mean temperature of the air was 72°4 against an average of 71°9. The maximum wind velocity was 83 m.p.h. from E.S.E. on July 24th, when a typhoon passing near Macao produced a strong gale at Hong Kong.

The currency of the Colony is based on silver and consists of the British dollar of one hundred cents.

Bank notes issued by the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank, the Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China, and the Mercantile Bank of India are also in circulation, together with silver subsidiary coinage of the value of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cents, and one cent pieces in bronze. The average rate of exchange of the dollar during the year was 1/4.36.

I.-General.

At the close of the year 1929 the accounts of the Colony showed a surplus of $9,662,852 and the balance at the end of 1930 was $9.361,680. Thus the year's working resulted in a deficit of $301,173 which was due to the abnormal financial conditions ruling in 1930. The steady depreciation of the sterling value of the dollar from 1/6.83 in January to 1/1.69 in December added to the difficulties of the situation.

In the neighbouring provinces desultory fighting continued throughout the year between the Cantonese forces with their base at Wuchow and the various Kwangsi factions with their headquarters

The Honours conferred by His Majesty the King on residents of Hong Kong included

Vice-Admiral Sir A. K. Waistell, K.C.B.

Mr. D. W. Tratman, C.M.G.

Rear-Admiral R. A. S. Hill, C.B.E.

Mr. R. M. Dyer, C.B.E.

Dr. W. I. Gerrard, O.B.E.

Captain O. H. Farrar, O.B.E.

Mr. R. Perry, O.B.E.

Mrs. L. Morris, M.B.E.

Mr. F. C. Dixon, M.B.E.

Mr. A. D. Johnson, M.B.E.

Lieut. W. R. Stevens, M.B.E. (Military).

Mr. A. de Mello, Honorary M.B.E.

II.-Finance.

The total revenue for the year amounted to $27,818,473 exceeding the Estimate by $5,105,553 and the revenue for 1929 by $4,263,998.

There were increases under all heads over the 1929 collections; the most notable being:-Assessed Taxes $211,164; Liquor Duties $190,954; Tobacco Duties $347,098; Post Office $371,542 and Premia on New Leases $928,726.

Owing to the low exchange Tobacco Duties were raised in June and Postal Rates in August. A tax of 15 cents per gallon was levied on motor spirit in July.

Increased Premia paid and more Land Sales resulted in a total collection under Land Sales of $2,864,897 against $1,936,171 for the year 1929.

The expenditure for the year amounted to $28,119,646 being $851,131 more than the estimate and $6,136,389 more than the expenditure in 1929.

Severai works provided for in the Estimates were postponed or curtailed thereby effecting substantial savings under Public Works Extraordinary, Public Works Recurrent and Kowloon Canton Railway.

On the other hand nearly all other heads of expenditure showed an excess over the estimates mainly as a result of the adoption of the Salaries Commission Report coupled with the fall in the sterling value of the dollar.



5.

The following is a statement of Revenue and Expenditure for the last five years.

Year.

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

Revenue. $21,131,582

21,344,536

24,968,399

23,554,475

27,818,478

Expenditure.

$23,524,716

20,845,065

21,230,242

21,983,257

28,119,646

Public Debt: -The amount of the Public which is repayable in 1932, is $4,927,000. amounted to £75,749.

Works Loan (1927)

The Sinking Fund

The Inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 due for repayment in 1943 stood at £1,485,733 and Sinking Fund at £719,664.

Trade Loan-Further 36 loans amounting to $1,280,842.65 were redeemed during the year thus reducing the number of the loans outstanding on 31st December, 1930, to 32 representing a sum of $2,064,181.75.

A list of the average monthly exchange rates is appended:-

. Month.

Sterling.

Taels.

January February March

April

May

1/6.8376

78.8333

1/6.1698

78.6413

1/5.7762

78.2115

1/6.0534

78.4782

1/5.4123

78.5833

June

1/3.1552

81.3586

July

1/3.1511

82.7307

August

1/3.5718

83.6354

September

1/3.6850

80.4400

October

1/3.5174

80.2870

November

1/3.2955

80.1354

December

1/1.6924

77.7282

III. Production.

FORESTRY, AGRICULTURE AND BOTANY.

Formation of Plantations.--Increased

plantings of

Pinus

Massoniana were again carried on in areas which have been definitely allocated as forestry reserves and water catchment areas. 20,000 more trees were planted than in the previous year.

Insect Pests. Pine Tree Caterpillars (Dendrolimus punctatus) did serious damage in the Pine plantations, chiefly in the New Territories; the total weight of those collected and destroyed amounted to 17,472 pounds.

Protection of Plantations.-No serious fires in planted areas occurred during the year. A number of new fire-barriers were made.

Inspection of Nursery Stock.-158 consignments of Narcissus bulbs (Narcissus Tazetta), dried vegetable products and Sugar Cane were inspected and certified as fit for export to Britain, Holland, Germany, Australia, Canada, United States of America (including Hawaii) and Philippine Islands, Fiji and the Straits Settlements.

Cultivation of Foreign Vegetables.—A slight increase in cultiva- tion of these vegetables, for which there is a steady demand locally, was recorded during the year both on the Island and in the New Territories..

Typhoon Damage. The amount of damage during the year was negligible.

FISHERIES.

A considerable proportion of the boat population of Hong Kong supports itself by deep-sea fishing, in which pursuit a large number of junks are engaged. The villages of Aberdeen, Stanley, Shaukiwan, and also many in the New Territories, are largely dependent upon this industry for their prosperity. Fresh water fish is imported from Canton and the West River. There are oyster beds of considerable value in Deep Bay.

MINING.

A

The mineral resources of the Colony are inconsiderable. little woltramite was produced in 1930 as well as a small quantity of kaolin. Iron, lead and silver mines exist and have been worked from time to time.

MANUFACTURES.

Sugar. Throughout 1930 Hong Kong, as a refining centre, laboured under the same difficulties that beset all holders of sugar stocks, i.e., steadily declining raw sugar markets. On the other hand, China, Hong Kong's biggest market, suffered even more than usual from civil war and communistic outbreaks, with consequent disruption of normal trading conditions. Selling was further rendered difficult by the rapid decline of silver, thereby reducing China's buying capacity through the depreciation of her currency value. Statistics reveal that low prices actually brought about some increase of quantity handled, but many dealers were forced to close their doors. The year closed on સે strong market due to feverish endeavours to anticipate China's new Customs Tariff.

It is anticipated that the new scale of protective duties enforced on sugar as from 1st January, 1931, will adversely affect the volume of imports in this commodity.

Hosiery.--There are established in the Colony over a score of Chinese-owned factories for the knitting of cotton hosiery and singlets. Generally speaking, the turnover in locally manufactured knitted goods is estimated to be similar to that of 1929, and considering the conditions prevailing this can be taken as very satisfactory. The best outlet for the low grade cotton socks is

i

India, and in view of the very disturbed conditions in that market a considerably decreased business was anticipated. The better class socks are mainly used locally and in Java and the Straits. The two last-named markets have been extremely depressed and the outlets up-country, particularly Kuangsi, have been partially closed. The trade in higher grade singlets has been distinctly good and the position leads one to believe that with more normal conditions cf the East generally, this industry should develop appreciably.

Ginger. A dozen ginger-preserving establishments deal with the raw product which is imported from South China and supplied principally to Great Britain. Holland, the U.S.A. and Australia, to the extent of about £300,000 annually. Although the low exchange value of the Hong Kong dollar led to correspondingly low prices in terms of gold, the volume of trade during 1930 was no greater than in normal years, due principally to industrial depression abroad and the accumulation of stocks. An additional adverse factor as regards the London market was the large number of claims on shipments. during the early part of the year.

Rope Making-There was a normal demand for locally manu- factured rope during 1930, no special features being met with in this industry.

SHIPBUILDING.

Four ocean-going vessels, one coasting steamer, one river steamer and seventeen smaller craft were built in local dockyards. during 1930.

IV.--Trade and Economics.

The steady decline in the exchange value of the Hong Kong dollar, due to the drop in silver values. greatly restricted imports in all lines during 1930, particularly during the first six months when demand was principally met by stocks imported during 1929 and earlier at more favourable exchange rates. Carry-over of stocks to next year is therefore negligible.

The buying season for Faney Cotton Piece Goods, which usually opens about April/May was delayed until the end of July when, as exchange showed no sign of improvement, dealers began catering for Spring, 1931, requirements. Notwithstanding the low rate. of exchange, an appreciable business was done, mainly owing to much reduced Lancashire costs offsetting to some extent the low exchange. The volume of business booked in woollens was much smaller than that of previous years, the falling off being most marked in the Shoddy and Mixture (Wool and Cotton) sections.

The decreased purchasing capacity of the individual consumer in China as a result of the decline in silver values has militated against the sale of many.goods of British manufacture which are of better quality but more expensive than those of competitors.

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The value of imports into Hong Kong for the nine months ended 31st December, 1930, (the Statistical Department was reinstituted as from 1st April) totalled $455,464,599 (£29,889,864). Total value of exports amounted to $356,824,278 (£23,416,593). Figures for the corresponding period in 1924 (the latest year in respect of which comparison is possible owing to the closure of the statistical department during the intervening period) are as follows: imports-$443,078,342 (£52,846,323); exports-$380,153,720 (£45,341,251).

The comparison is the more unfavourable if from the 1930 import figures is subtracted the value of imports from South China, Kwong- chowan and Macao (approximately $60,000,000) which were not included in the 1924 figures. On the other hand, there has been a world-wide drop of approximately 25 per cent in wholesale prices, so that the sterling value of imports during 1930 represents a greater quantity of goods than an equivalent sterling sum in 1924.

V. Communications. SHIPPING.

The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1930 amounted to 94,090 vessels of 40,190,612 tons which, compared with the figures of 1929, shows a decrease of 206,487 vessels and a decrease of 4,995,569 tons.

Of the above, 49,609 vessels of 38,511,650 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons in 1929.

There was

a decrease in British Ocean-going shipping of 13 vessels and an increase of 206,453 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels show a decrease of 60 vessels and an increase of 858,613 tons.

British River Steamers showed a decrease of 185 vessels and a decrease of 340,386 tons.

Foreign River Steamers showed an increase of 668 vessels and an increase of 323,848 tons.

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there was a decrease of 1,108 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 6,888 tons.

Junks in Foreign trade showed a decrease of 2,287 vessels and a decrease of 401,139 tons.

In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there was a decrease in Steam Launches of 190,342 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 4,755,085. This is caused by the omission of Ferries plying between Victoria and the mainland.

Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 13,160 vessels and a decrease of 880,985 tons. Conservancy and dustboats were included in 1929 but have been omitted in 1930.

8

The value of imports into Hong Kong for the nine months ended 31st December, 1930, (the Statistical Department was reinstituted as from 1st April) totalled $455,464,599 (£29,889,864). Total value of exports amounted to $356,824,278 (£23,416,593). Figures for the corresponding period in 1924 (the latest year in respect of which comparison is possible owing to the closure of the statistical department during the intervening period) are as follows: imports-$443,078,342 (£52,846,323); exports-$380,153,720 (£45,341,251).

The comparison is the more unfavourable if from the 1930 import figures is subtracted the value of imports from South China, Kwong- chowan and Macao (approximately $60,000,000) which were not included in the 1924 figures. On the other hand, there has been a world-wide drop of approximately 25 per cent in wholesale prices, so that the sterling value of imports during 1930 represents a greater quantity of goods than an equivalent sterling sum in 1924.

V. Communications. SHIPPING.

The total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1930 amounted to 94,090 vessels of 40,190,612 tons which, compared with the figures of 1929, shows a decrease of 206,487 vessels and a decrease of 4,995,569 tons.

Of the above, 49,609 vessels of 38,511,650 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons in 1929.

There was

a decrease in British Ocean-going shipping of 13 vessels and an increase of 206,453 tons.

Foreign Ocean-going vessels show a decrease of 60 vessels and an increase of 858,613 tons.

British River Steamers showed a decrease of 185 vessels and a decrease of 340,386 tons.

Foreign River Steamers showed an increase of 668 vessels and an increase of 323,848 tons.

In Steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in Foreign Trade there was a decrease of 1,108 vessels with a decrease in tonnage of 6,888 tons.

Junks in Foreign trade showed a decrease of 2,287 vessels and a decrease of 401,139 tons.

In Local Trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there was a decrease in Steam Launches of 190,342 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 4,755,085. This is caused by the omission of Ferries plying between Victoria and the mainland.

Junks in Local Trade show a decrease of 13,160 vessels and a decrease of 880,985 tons. Conservancy and dustboats were included in 1929 but have been omitted in 1930.

9

HONG KONG SHIPPING STATISTICS.

Number & Tonnage of Vessels

in Foreign Trade entered &

Total Shipping Entered and Cleared.

cleared.

Year

Number

Total Percentage Tonnage of British Tonnage

British

Total

Tonnage Tonnage

1918

43,486

1919

16,955.332 41,985 21,072,129

41.7

43.0

7,072,021 29,518,189 9,095,805 25,615,169

1920

1921

43,364 52,222 27,852,616

24,194,022

43.8

44.5

11,608,069 40,122,527 12,766,492 43,420,970

1922

50,427

29,543,564 45.4

13,420,118 46,566,764

1923

49,900

35,947,534

47.0

16,920,491 53,402,239

1924

57,765

1925

41,336

38,770,499 47.3 32,179,053

18,369,413 56,731,077

47.6

15,321,935 49,520,523

1926

20,231 28,371,104

51.5

14,730,846| 43,796,436

1927

51,289 36,834,014

45.7

16,960,522|44,127,161

1928

52,278 37,640,694

46.6

17,562,442 44,883,765

1929

1930

52,574 39,871,149 47.5 49,609 38,511,650 48.8

18,961,028 47,186,181 18,827,095 40,190,612

A comparison between the years 1929 and 1930 is given in the following table :-

1929.

1930.

Decrease.

Increase.

Class of Vessels,

No. Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No.

Tonnage.

British Ocean-

going,

4,734

Foreign Ocean

going,

7,809

British River

Steamers,..

7,474

7,809,876| 7,289

Foreign River

Steamers,. 1,601

561,061| 2,289

11,151,152 | 4,721 | 11.357,605

17,131,589 | 7,749 | 17,993,202

7,469,490

884,909

13

60

:

206.453

858,613

185 340,386

668

323,848

Steamships

under 60

tons For-

eign Trade... 7,434

211,067 6,326

204,179 1,108 6,888

:

Trade,

23,522 3,003,404 21,235

Junks. Foreign

Total, Foreign!

Trade,

Steam Laun-!

52,574 | 39,871,149 49,609 | 38,511,650 3.653 748.413 668 1,388,914

2.602,265 2,287 401,139

ches, Local'

Trade........ 214,875 5,560,116 24,533

Junks, Local!

Trade,

805,031 190,342 4,755,085

*33,108 1,754,916 19,948

-873,931 | 13,160 880,985

Grand Total... 300,557 47,186,181 94,090 40,190,612 207,155 6,384,483 668 1,388,914

Net,

206,487 4,995,569| 4,995,569

*

Including 18,012 Conservancy and Dustboats of 1,109,384 Tons.

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VI. Justice, Police and Prisons.

Serious Crime in 1930 showed an increase over 1929-5,691 cases against 5,348. There was an increase of 40 cases in house and godown breaking, 20 burglaries and 341 larcenies. Murders stand the same as for 1929-22 cases. Robberies decreased by 55 cases, 47 in Hong Kong and 8 in the New Territories.

1929.

Minor crime showed an increase-19,250 against 15,792 cases in

Arms.-There were 26 arms seizures during the year, of which 19 were charge cases and seven no-charge cases. The only seizure of note was on board the S.S. "'D'Artagnan' on 15th July, when Revenue Officers seized 168 Automatic Pistols of French make and 18,000 rounds of ammunition.

Communism.-There was a marked increase in the activities of Communists during the year and there were a few occasions, notably Communist Anniversaries, when demonstrations were attempted in the more populous districts of the Colony.

In June, the Siu Yat Po newspaper was suppressed by order of Government owing to its Communistic tendencies.

In December, a Chinese Detective (L.S.C. 384 Tse On) was shot and murdered by Communists in a Restaurant at Yaumati.

Piracy. Two piracies were recorded on steamships, one being on the British S.S. "Helikon" owned by Messrs. Wo Fat Shing & Co., Hong Kong. The pirates boarded the ship as passengers and waited until the snip was about 132 miles south of Hong Kong. The attack was made during the early hours of the morning while all officers with the exception of two on watch, one on the Bridge and one in the Engine Room, were asleep. Resistance was impossible. No guards were carried on board. No shots were fired and no one was injured. The ship was taken to Bias Bay. Considerable cargo was stolen and sixteen persons, including the Compradore, were kidnapped.

The second was on the Norwegian S.S. "Hirundo". As in the first case, pirates boarded the ship as passengers. The attack was made about noon when the ship was about 130 miles south of Hong Kong. All officers were taken by surprise and were unable to offer any resistance. Guards are not carried on this ship. The pirates expected to find bullion on board; being disappointed in this respect they confined themselves to the officers and passengers; the latter being of the poorer class, the pirates' haul was comparatively small. A Chinese saloon waiter was wounded in the shoulder by a shot from a small firearm, and the 1st and 3rd Compradores were kidnapped. The ship was taken to Mirs Bay, and it is believed that the pirates went overland to Bias Bay.

13

Two piracies on junks were reported (one of which was a very doubtful report), against six during 1929. No piracies were reported in the Canton River Delta.

Gaols. The total number of persons committed to Victoria Gaol was 6,493 compared with 5,779 in 1929. Of these 2,334 were com- mitted for criminal offences against 2,056 in 1929. Of committals for non-criminal offences there were 155 more for hawking without a licence, and il more for unlawfully cutting trees, than in 1929.

The daily average of prisoners confined in the Gaols was 1,175, the average for 1929 being 1,075 and the highest previous average being 1,116 in 1925. The percentage of prisoners to population, according to the daily average of the former and the estimated number of the latter was 0.103. The average percentage for the last ten years was 0.121. Owing, however, to the large floating population, which is constantly moving between the Colony and Chinese Territory, the percentage of crime to population does not convey an accurate idea of the comparative criminality of the residents of the Colony. The Victoria Gaol has accommodation for 645 prisoners including patients in Hospital. The Branch Prison at Laichikok has accommodation for 475 prisoners,

The prison discipline, except for two agitations in Victoria Gaol, was satisfactory, the average of punishments per prisoner being 0.33 as compared with 0.46 in 1929 and 0.49 in 1928.

Prisoners are employed at printing, book-binding, tinsmithing, mat-making, tailoring, carpentering, soap-making, gardening, etc. The bulk of the Government printing and book-binding is done in Victoria Gaol.

VII.-Public Works.

The following works were executed during the year 1930:-

BUILDINGS.

COMPLETED-Hong Kong.-In the City the Public Conveniences at the junction of Spring Garden Lane with Cross Street and at the junction of Water Street and Queen's Road West, also one outside the City at Aberdeen. Erection of an additional Transmitting Block at Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station. A new P.W.D. workshop at Wood Road. A new cookhouse at Victoria Gaól. Alterations to Belilios School, Kennedy Town Police Station, and Sailors' Home.

Kowloon-Erection of a garage for motor lorries at the Kowloon Disinfectant Station. Forming and levelling of the site for new Government Store at Hung Hom. Work on the site of the Maternity Block, Kowloon Hospital. New Garage at Kowloon Hospi- tal. Public Latrine & Bathhouse at Hung Hom. Barrack Sheds for Police at Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station and a children's playground.

14

New Kowloon.-Market at Kowloon Tong. Extension to the Kowloon City Market. Public Latrine and Bathhouse at Kowloon City. Alterations to Field Cottage for use by the Flying Club.

UNDER CONSTRUCTION-Hong Kong-Latrines over Bowrington Canal and at Davis Street. New No. 2 Police Station. New Market at Sai Ying Pun. Printing shop at Victoria Gaol.

Kowloon. Erection of new Maternity Block, Kowloon Hospital

New Kowloon.-Site for a Female Prison at Lai Chi Kok. Erec- tion of new Married Quarters for Warders at Lai Chi Kok.

New Territories.-Erection of a new school at Un Long.

COMMUNICATIONS.

COMPLETED-Hong Kong.-Road from Causeway Bay to Quarry Bay. Tai Hang Development Road construction. Barker Road improvements. 1st section of the Path to Cape D'Aguilar. Widening of road connecting Garden Road & Bowen Road with May Road (Aigburth Hall). Widening of lower portion of Garden Road adjoining Murray Barracks. Extension to the Indian Recreation Ground. A new terrace in the Colonial Cemetery for burial purposes. Work of diverting and widening Ewo Street to its approved alignment.

Kowloon.-Boundary Street (section from Nathan Road to No. 8 Railway Bridge). An area cleared and surfaced between Jordan Road, Battery Street and Shanghai Street for Hawkers' stalls.

New Kowloon.-The greater part of Prince Edward Road kerbed and channelled, preparatory to laying improved surfacing for motor traffic. Widening of Nathan Road Extension Northward to Nan Chang Street. Surfacing of the New Castle Peak Road from Nan Chang Street to Wong Uk. Extension of Roads in Kowloon Tong Development area. Widening Castle Peak Road.

New Territories.-Patrol Path from Lin Ma Kok (section from Sha Tau Kok Village to No. 11 Widening Path from Sheung Shui to Ta Ku Ling. Path to Lo Wu Railway Station Block House. between Fan Ling and Sha Tau Kok.

Hang to Sha Tau Boundary Stone). Access and Patrol Widening Road

UNDER CONSTRUCTION-Hong Kong.-Work of erecting new plant and offices at Tsat Tsz Mui Quarry. Surfacing roads on the Praya East Reclamation. Widening Gough Hill Road.

Kowloon.-Chatham Road Extension. Reconditioning and Streng-

thening of Nathan Road with 7′′ reinforced cement concrete. tions to the traffic arrangements at Tsim Sha Tsui.

Altera

New Kowloon.-Access Road to Christian Chinese Cemetery. Kowloon City. Castle Peak Road (section from Cheung Sha Wan to Lai Chi Kok).

15

New Territories.--Patrol Path from Lin Ma Hang to Sha Tau Kok (section from No. 11 Boundary Stone to Lin Ma Hang Village). Reconditioning of New Territory roads.

DRAINAGE.

Hong Kong. New sewers & storm water drains, including sewers on the Praya East Reclamation and one at Deep Water Bay were constructed to a length of 19,603 feet. Existing drains in the Wantsai district were reconstructed to a length of 384 feet. Stream-courses were trained to a length of 3,314 feet

Kowloon. Extension of one side wall and invert of nullah North of Shamshuipo Camp area, length 900 feet. New sewers and storm water drains were constructed to a length of 18,993 feet.

New Kowloon.-New sewers & storm water drains were constructed to a length of 7,038 feet.

New Territories.-Anti-Malarial work was continued.

WATER WORKS.

Hong Kong.-North Point Service Reservoir was completed with a capacity of 1,146 million gallons, excepting connecting main. Bowen Road turbines & pumps were finished and in use. The follow- ing mains were laid, viz:-1,482 feet of 12" in Shaukiwan Road; 1,164 feet of 15" in Ewo Street; 2,060 feet of 18′′ between Monument and Hennessy Road; 270 feet of 8′′ in Shaukiwan Road near Tai Hang, and 2,580 feet of 6′′ and 1,200 feet of 4′′ in. Wongneichong Valley. The Aberdeen Village main was relaid in 4′′ for 1,044 feet. 600 feet of 6′′ main was laid in Kennedy Road East. 72 feet of 10′′ main was laid at junction of Johnston and Hennessy Roads, Praya East Reclamation.

Aberdeen Valley Scheme.--Work on the Upper Dam was con- tinued and by the end of the year concrete had reached 285 A.O.D.

About two thirds of the 18" diam. steel supply main was laid by the end of the year and the tunnel at Sandy Bay Gap was about half completed.

Contracts for the Lower Pumping Station, Fast Gravity Filters at Elliot, and 1st section of the East Catchwater were let and works commenced.

Kowloon.—3,700 feet of 6′′, 1.143 feet of 4′′ and 500 feet of 3′′ mains were laid to keep up with development.

New Kowloon.-626 feet of 10", 1.046 feet of 8", 1,664 feet of 6′′ and 300 feet of 5′′ mains were laid to keep up with development.

New Territories.-Improvements to the Taipo supply main were made.

Shing Mun Valley Scheme.-The Eastern half of the Shek- lapui Service Reservoir was completed and brought into use and the Western half was nearly completed by the end of the year.

16

The 24′′ diam. steel main was completed and connections were made to the Kowloon distribution system at Gascoigne and Salisbury Roads.

The laying of the Cross Harbour Pipe Line was completed and connections made at Hong Kong and Kowloon. The laying of the submarine section took fifty-seven working days. The pipe line was in use throughout the Summer.

Works on the Byewash Reservoir was continued and the level of the concrete had reached 330 A.O.D. by the end of the year.

2nd section.-Surveys and investigations were continued.

RECLAMATIONS.

Hong Kong.-Shaukiwan reclamation, about 2 acres, was com- pleted.

New Kowloon. The covering of refuse dumped at Cheung Sha Wan by the Sanitary Department resulted in the extension of the reclamation by 3.34 acres bringing the total area now reclaimed to 10.7 acres.

The work of bringing the Kai Tak Reclamation to finished levels was continued. The sea wall at Shamshuipo aggregating 1,580 lineal feet in length was completed and work on a further extension of the wall was commenced.

New Territories.--The Standard Oil Company continued with the formation of a site at Lai Chi Kok.

PIERS.

Hong Kong. The construction of a pier 150 feet in length and 50 feet in width was commenced on the sea front near Wilmer Street.

Kowloon. The construction of a pier at Mong Kok Tsui was completed less the roofing over the deck.

New Kowloon.-The construction of a pier at Shanshuipo made similar progress to that at Mong Kok Tsui.

VIII. Public Health.

The estimated population of the Colony is as follows:-

(1) Non Chinese

19,000

(2) Chinese:-

City of Victoria,

592,100

Villages of Hong Kong

47,000

Kowloon (and New Kowloon)

307,250

Population afloat (Junks & Sampans) New Territories

109,050

97,000

Total Chinese population

1,152,400

Total Civil population

1,171,400

16

The 24′′ diam. steel main was completed and connections were made to the Kowloon distribution system at Gascoigne and Salisbury Roads.

The laying of the Cross Harbour Pipe Line was completed and connections made at Hong Kong and Kowloon. The laying of the submarine section took fifty-seven working days. The pipe line was in use throughout the Summer.

Works on the Byewash Reservoir was continued and the level of the concrete had reached 330 A.O.D. by the end of the year.

2nd section.-Surveys and investigations were continued.

RECLAMATIONS.

Hong Kong.-Shaukiwan reclamation, about 2 acres, was com- pleted.

New Kowloon. The covering of refuse dumped at Cheung Sha Wan by the Sanitary Department resulted in the extension of the reclamation by 3.34 acres bringing the total area now reclaimed to 10.7 acres.

The work of bringing the Kai Tak Reclamation to finished levels was continued. The sea wall at Shamshuipo aggregating 1,580 lineal feet in length was completed and work on a further extension of the wall was commenced.

New Territories.--The Standard Oil Company continued with the formation of a site at Lai Chi Kok.

PIERS.

Hong Kong. The construction of a pier 150 feet in length and 50 feet in width was commenced on the sea front near Wilmer Street.

Kowloon. The construction of a pier at Mong Kok Tsui was completed less the roofing over the deck.

New Kowloon.-The construction of a pier at Shanshuipo made similar progress to that at Mong Kok Tsui.

VIII. Public Health.

The estimated population of the Colony is as follows:-

(1) Non Chinese

19,000

(2) Chinese:-

City of Victoria,

592,100

Villages of Hong Kong

47,000

Kowloon (and New Kowloon)

307,250

Population afloat (Junks & Sampans) New Territories

109,050

97,000

Total Chinese population

1,152,400

Total Civil population

1,171,400

17

The population of Hong Kong is a very variable one and, owing to the large unstable, floating population, and

floating population, and to partial birth registration, no reliable means are available for estimation.

For purposes of statistics, the estimated population of the New Territories has been subtracted.

The Crude Birth Rate for the year 1930 was 10.36 per 1,000; 10.19 per 1,000 among the Chinese Community and 19.89 per 1,000 among the non-Chinese.

These figures are very inaccurate and unreliable owing to incom- plete registration of Chinese births (especially females) and immigra- tion. There are signs, however, that registration is increasing among the Chinese Community. The non-Chinese rate is more trustworthy.

The Crude Death Rate was 15.14 per 1,000: 15.51 per 1,000 among the Chinese Community and 9.79 per 1,000 among the non- Chinese. As registration is essential before burial can take place the figures for deaths are much more accurate and reliable than those for births.

The ratio of Infantile Deaths (under 1 year) to total deaths for the year 1930 was 38.16%, the figures for 1929 and 1928 being 38.74% and 29.5% respectively.

The Zymotic Death rate was 0.36 per mille population.

The returns of the 1931 census were not available when these returns were compiled and the figures quoted represent an estimate only.

The deaths from Notifiable Infectious Diseases in order of incidence were as follows:-

Disease.

Chinese

Non- Chinese

Total

1

Small Pox

(Typhoid

249

249

74

5

79

2

Paratyphoid

3 Diphtheria

41

41

4 Cerebro Spinal Fever

11

2

13

5 Puerperal Fever

10

1

11

6 Plague

Total

385

00

393

18

There was an epidemic of Smallpox in the last quarter of the year which is still in progress (February 1930); up to 31st December, 1929, there were 149 cases notified of which 119 or 79% have died.

The deaths from special Diseases and locally important causes were as follows.

Disease.

Chinese

Non- Chinese

Total

Malaria

507

Co

8

515 (1)

Beri-beri

635

1

635 (2)

Respiratory Diseases :--

Tuberculosis (pulmonary)

and Phthisis

1,969

25

1,994

Non-tubercular

4,391

27

4,418 j

(3)

Other forms of Tuberculosis

841

846

Venereal disease (Syphilis)

336

336

Dysentery

209

209

Heart disease & Heart failure...

417

16

433

Infantile enteritis and Gastro-

enteritis (under 1 year) .....

*1,463

3

1,466

(1) Further antimalarial work is needed in the Colony but many of the cases are likely to have been imported from China.

(2) There is considerable doubt as to the accuracy of these figures as the disease is by no means easy to diagnose or differentiate.

(8) The total figure for Respiratory Diseases and Pulmonary Tuberculosis is 6,412. The climate and conditions of the Colony are most inimical to cure.

The deaths reported in the Coroners' Returns (Chinese only) are as follows, classified according to age and sex:--

Age Periods.

Males

Females

1 Under 1 year

2 Over 2 years

2,329

2,613

1,047

493

Total

3,376

3,106

21

IX. Education.

The total numbers of pupils at schools in the Colony, excluding the Police School, are:

Number of Pupils

English

Vernacular

Total

Schools

Schools

Government Schools

4,172

456

4,628

Military Schools

244

244

Excluded Private School

125

125

Grant Schools

4,738

911

5,649

Vernacular Schools, Urban

District

39,152

39,152

Vernacular Schools, Rural

District

4,849

4,849

Private English Schools

6,748

6,748

Technical Institute

798

798

Total

16,825

45,368

62,193

The chief Government Schools are. Queen's College, King's College, and three District Schools for Chinese boys, the Belilios Public School for Chinese girls, the Vernacular Middle School and two Vernacular Normal Schools, and the Ellis Kadoorie School for Indians.

The Central British School and Kowloon Junior, Victoria, and Quarry Bay Schools for children of British parentage have an average attendance of 320. There is also a school for children of the Peak District with an average attendance of 48.

C

There are six Grant-in-Aid Anglo-Chinese Schools for boys nd six for girls, and four Grant-in-Aid Vernacular Schools for girls.

The Hong Kong Technical Institute affords an opportunity for high education of students who have left school. Instruction was given in 1930 in Building Construction, Field Surveying, Chemistry (Practical), Metallurgy, Physics, Electricity, English, Shorthand, Physical Instruction and Seamanship. Classes for men and women teachers, both "English" and "Vernacular" are a feature of the Institute.

The lecturers are recruited from members of the medical and educational professions in the Colony, and from the Department of Public Works, and receive fees for their services. The Institute is furnished with a well equipped chemical laboratory and excellent physical apparatus.

22

The expenditure of the Education Department in 1930 was $1,662,179.55 and the revenue collected from Government School fees was $209,945.02.

THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG.

The University of Hong Kong was incorporated under a local University Ordinance, 1911, and opened in 1912. It is a residential University and open to students of both sexes.

The late Sir Hormusjee Mody bore the entire expense of the erection of the main building and additions have been made through the liberality of benefactors of varied nationality and domicile. The latest addition to the buildings is a workshop built out of a contribution from Sir Robert Ho Tung.

The annual income of the University now amounts to about $892,000 of which about $290,000 comes from endowments and $390,000 from Government. Messrs. Butterfield and Swire gave £40,000 to the original endowment fund and subsequently $100,000 for engineering equipment. The Rockfeller Institution has endowe the University with three chairs in surgery, medicine and obstetrics, the endowment being in each case $250,000.

The Government Grant was increased in 1930 from $90,000 to $390,000 to meet additional Expenditure due mainly to the fall in Exchange.

The annual expenditure now amounts to about $846,000.

The University includes the three Faculties of Medicine, Engineering and Arts. Admission to all faculties is conditional upon passing the matriculation examination of the University or some examination recognised as equivalent thereto.

The Faculty of Medicine provides a six year course of study in the usual pre-medical and medical sciences, leading to the degree. of M.B. and B.S. The degrees of M.D., and M.S., may be obtained for postgraduate work. The degrees above mentioned are recognised by the General Medical Council for registration in Great Britain.

The Faculty of Engineering provides a four year course practical and theoretical engineering, leading to the degree of B.Sc., (Eng.). Fourth year students specialize in civil, mechanical or electrical engineering. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.Sc., (Eng.).

The Faculty of Arts includes departments of pure arts and science, social science, commerce and a department for training teachers. The course is in all cases one of four years and leads to the degree of B.A. The degree for post-graduate work is that of M.A.

With a view to securing the maintenance of the desired standard -which is in all three faculties that of a British University degree- external examiners are, in all faculties, associated with the internal examiners in all annual final examinations. In the Faculty of

23

Engineering, but not in other faculties, degrees with honours are granted, the standard being assessed by special examiners chosen from amongst the external examiners in the University of London.

The degree of LL.D., is granted honoris causa.

The site of the University was given by the Government of Hong Kong. As subsequently enlarged by minor grants and by purchase, the University estate covers an area of about 800,000 sq. ft. The view from the grounds over the harbour is magnificent and the grounds are naturally beautiful.

In the main buildings are housed the chemical and physical laboratories, the University library and portions of the engineering laboratories. They further include the Great Hall, a Senate room and the lecture and class rooms used by the Faculty of Arts and for general purposes.

Special medical buildings include schools of anatomy, physiology. pathology and tropical medicine, erected at the cost of Chinese gentlemen resident in the Colony. Clinical instruction is given at the Government Civil Hospital.

Special engineering buildings include:--

(a) a power station, with internal combustion engines of varied types which are maintained for instructional purposes;

(b) a primemovers (steam) and hydraulics laboratory, at present housed in a converted pumping station, formerly the property of the Government; and.

(c) A workshop, for practical instruction of students.

Electrical machinery, electrical technology, the testing of materials and experimental mechanics are dealt with in the main building.

The larger part of the engineering equipment was the gift of British engineering firms.

Other buildings upon the estate include:

(a) the Vice-Chancellor's Lodge

(b) Staff-quarters

(c) the resident hostels

(d) the University Union Building, and

(c) The School for Chinese Studies, which is in process of construction and will probably be ready for occupation by the end of the year 1931.

24

Unless exempted from residence (such exemption being ordinarily granted on the ground that the student's "manner of life" is not such as is catered for in the hostels), every matriculated student is required to reside either in a University or recognised hostel.

The University hostels are three in number-Lugard Hall, Eliot Hall and May Hall.

Recognised hostels are at present three in number-Morrison Hall, situated immediately above the University grounds and conducted by the London Missionary Society, St. John's Hall, im- mediately opposite the front of the University, conducted by the Church Missionary Society and Ricci Hall which is situated in Pokfulam Road and is conducted by the Irish Jesuits. It was opened in January 1930.

Each student occupies a separate room or cubicle, and there are the usual common rooms. Each University hostel is in charge

of a member of the staff, as resident warden.

No University hostel at present exists for women students-- whose right to admission to the University was first recognised in 1921: but some arrangements for the accommodation of a few women students in a rented building have been made by the authorities of St. Stephen's Girls' College, a Church of England girls' school which is near the University. The nuns of a neighbouring Italian convent are also prepared to house a few women students.

a

The tuition fee is $400--the hostel fee which includes board and lodging is $300. Students who are allowed to live in a hostel during

vacation-some have to because of their work,

e.g. medical students, and others because their homes are too far away-pay at the rate of $8 a week. When a student joins he is required to deposit caution money to the extent of $25, and to pay a registration fee of $5. The annual subscription to the University Union is $20 and this covers the annual subscription to practically all the athletic clubs. The graduation fee is $25. Probably about $1,400 repre- sents the minimum amount which at present prices would cover a student's annual expenses including vacations. It would cost ? Chinese student who goes abroad $4,500 a year at the very least and this would not cover travelling expenses.

Numerous scholarships are available, including the King Edward VII Scholarshins founded by His Majesty's Government.

There are also scholarships provided by the Government of Hong Kong, and by private individuals and firms.

The Union is the centre of the social life of the students. It is at once a Club and a centre of athletics. The Union Committee .contains certain members of the University teaching staff, but its President and Secretary are undergraduates elected by the under- graduates. The undergraduate members of the Committee are also elected by their fellow students. There is a Union magazine with

25

English and Chinese sections. The editors are students, a member of the teaching staff acting as assistant editor. There are forty women students; these women students are all members of the Union.

Students of the University come from Kuangtung, Ho Pe, Hankow, Hupeh, Yunnan, Hunan, Shanghai, Pekin, Fukien, Singapore, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Kedah, Johore, Java, Manila, Burma, Siam, Japan, India, Macao, Harbin, the Philippine Islands and Borneo. The present enrolment is 336 of whom 286 are Chinese and 50 non-Chinese.

The

X.-Lands and Surveys.

LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year 1930 was $2,060,259.06, an increase of $681,957.32 over the

preceding year. The principal items were $109,250 for Inland Lots 3053/4, (Jockey Club Stables); $100,600 for K.I.L. 2372 (an area at Prince Edward Road), and $280,875 for K.M.L. 100 at Tai Wan.

The amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights, in the New Territories during the year 1930, was $795,631.22, being an increase of $247,318.97 over the year 1929. The principal items were $54,100 for N.K.I.L. 1403, $53,500 for N.K.I.L. 1414 and $100,625 for N.K.I.L. 1419.

The foregoing increases indicate that there is still a good demand for building land.

The total area of land leased during the year was 632 acres and 5-9/10 poles which is a considerable increase on the preceding

year.

The total area resumed re-entered and surrendered was 208 acres 2 roods and 31-1/10 poles.

There was an increased demand for shop-building sites at Tai Po and Un Long Markets in the Northern District of the New Territories, but in the former place applications fell through because of formation and levelling difficulties. The demand for land for agricultural purposes in the District steadily increases.

In the Southern District of the New Territories there was an apparent decline in the demand for building sites, but there was a fair demand for agricultural land.

XI. Labour.

During the year the fall in exchange led to a considerable rise in prices of articles imported from countries having a gold standard. Local products were however not affected to any great extent and good harvests helped to maintain the cost of rice at something like

25

English and Chinese sections. The editors are students, a member of the teaching staff acting as assistant editor. There are forty women students; these women students are all members of the Union.

Students of the University come from Kuangtung, Ho Pe, Hankow, Hupeh, Yunnan, Hunan, Shanghai, Pekin, Fukien, Singapore, Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Kedah, Johore, Java, Manila, Burma, Siam, Japan, India, Macao, Harbin, the Philippine Islands and Borneo. The present enrolment is 336 of whom 286 are Chinese and 50 non-Chinese.

The

X.-Lands and Surveys.

LAND GRANTS AND GENERAL VALUE OF LAND.

amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights, exclusive of the New Territories, during the year 1930 was $2,060,259.06, an increase of $681,957.32 over the

preceding year. The principal items were $109,250 for Inland Lots 3053/4, (Jockey Club Stables); $100,600 for K.I.L. 2372 (an area at Prince Edward Road), and $280,875 for K.M.L. 100 at Tai Wan.

The amount of premium received from Sales of Crown Land and Pier Rights, in the New Territories during the year 1930, was $795,631.22, being an increase of $247,318.97 over the year 1929. The principal items were $54,100 for N.K.I.L. 1403, $53,500 for N.K.I.L. 1414 and $100,625 for N.K.I.L. 1419.

The foregoing increases indicate that there is still a good demand for building land.

The total area of land leased during the year was 632 acres and 5-9/10 poles which is a considerable increase on the preceding

year.

The total area resumed re-entered and surrendered was 208 acres 2 roods and 31-1/10 poles.

There was an increased demand for shop-building sites at Tai Po and Un Long Markets in the Northern District of the New Territories, but in the former place applications fell through because of formation and levelling difficulties. The demand for land for agricultural purposes in the District steadily increases.

In the Southern District of the New Territories there was an apparent decline in the demand for building sites, but there was a fair demand for agricultural land.

XI. Labour.

During the year the fall in exchange led to a considerable rise in prices of articles imported from countries having a gold standard. Local products were however not affected to any great extent and good harvests helped to maintain the cost of rice at something like

26

its normal figure. Conditions in most trades remained quiet and the only disputes of importance arose from the attempts made by employers in one or two trades to reduce wages-attempts which were in most cases successfully resisted.

During the year the regulations dealing with the employment of women and children were amended to prohibit the employment of women and young persons in factories between the hours of 9 p.m. and 7 a.m., and the minimum age at which children may be employed was raised from 10 to 12 years.

XII. Legislation.

Thirty-two Ordinances were passed during 1930. They comprised two appropriation, twenty-one amendment or revision, three consolida- tion, two incorporation and two mixed Ordinances as well as two which dealt with subjects which were new to the Colony though obtaining elsewhere.

The Appropriation Ordinance (No. 19) applied a sum not exceeding $23,365,335 to the public service of the year 1931, and Ordinance No. 5 appropriated a supplementary sum of $304,538.83 to defray the charges of the year 1929.

Of the amending Ordinances calling for special remark No. 11 requires newspapers registered under the Printers and Publishers Ordinance, 1927, to deposit $3.000 as security available for the pay- ment of fines and damages for libel. No. 7 makes the 10th October which is observed by the Chinese as their National Day, a permanent general holiday and transfers to the first Monday in September the general holiday previously appointed for the second Monday in October. No. 9 makes provision for connecting the system of the Hong Kong Telephone Company Ltd. with the trunk telephone line which is being laid from Canton to the British border. No. 12 gives conditional legal sanction to the ordinary club sweepstakes on horse and pony races, but prohibits the sale of tickets otherwise than on the course during a race-meeting. Nos. 13 and 14 provide for the continuity of Office of the Registrar of Companies with regard t deposits by Life and Fire Marine Insurance Companies. No. 17 gives the court a discretion as to the accentance of a plea of guilty in capital cases and abolishes the old presumption of law that an offence com- mitted by a wife in the presence of her husband is to be deemed as committed under his coercion. No. 18 lays down rules for the construction of future stairways which will make for safetv in cases of fire. No. 21 gives effect to an arrangement between H.M. Govern- ment and the United States Government to ensure notification of the death of. U.S. citizens to the nearest Consular officer under the Washington Convention. No. 27 simplifies the procedure of resumption of Crown lands. No 30 amends the Stamp Ordinance. 1921. and raises the duty, inter alia, on cheques and receipts from 5 to 10 cents but in the latter case exempts amounts not exceeding $20.

26

its normal figure. Conditions in most trades remained quiet and the only disputes of importance arose from the attempts made by employers in one or two trades to reduce wages-attempts which were in most cases successfully resisted.

During the year the regulations dealing with the employment of women and children were amended to prohibit the employment of women and young persons in factories between the hours of 9 p.m. and 7 a.m., and the minimum age at which children may be employed was raised from 10 to 12 years.

XII. Legislation.

Thirty-two Ordinances were passed during 1930. They comprised two appropriation, twenty-one amendment or revision, three consolida- tion, two incorporation and two mixed Ordinances as well as two which dealt with subjects which were new to the Colony though obtaining elsewhere.

The Appropriation Ordinance (No. 19) applied a sum not exceeding $23,365,335 to the public service of the year 1931, and Ordinance No. 5 appropriated a supplementary sum of $304,538.83 to defray the charges of the year 1929.

Of the amending Ordinances calling for special remark No. 11 requires newspapers registered under the Printers and Publishers Ordinance, 1927, to deposit $3.000 as security available for the pay- ment of fines and damages for libel. No. 7 makes the 10th October which is observed by the Chinese as their National Day, a permanent general holiday and transfers to the first Monday in September the general holiday previously appointed for the second Monday in October. No. 9 makes provision for connecting the system of the Hong Kong Telephone Company Ltd. with the trunk telephone line which is being laid from Canton to the British border. No. 12 gives conditional legal sanction to the ordinary club sweepstakes on horse and pony races, but prohibits the sale of tickets otherwise than on the course during a race-meeting. Nos. 13 and 14 provide for the continuity of Office of the Registrar of Companies with regard t deposits by Life and Fire Marine Insurance Companies. No. 17 gives the court a discretion as to the accentance of a plea of guilty in capital cases and abolishes the old presumption of law that an offence com- mitted by a wife in the presence of her husband is to be deemed as committed under his coercion. No. 18 lays down rules for the construction of future stairways which will make for safetv in cases of fire. No. 21 gives effect to an arrangement between H.M. Govern- ment and the United States Government to ensure notification of the death of. U.S. citizens to the nearest Consular officer under the Washington Convention. No. 27 simplifies the procedure of resumption of Crown lands. No 30 amends the Stamp Ordinance. 1921. and raises the duty, inter alia, on cheques and receipts from 5 to 10 cents but in the latter case exempts amounts not exceeding $20.

27

The Pilots (No. 11), Pawnbrokers (No. 16) and the District Watch Force (No. 23) Ordinances are consolidatory in character; but contain some new provisions. Licensed pilots are in general to be British subjects. Many of the provisions of the Pilots Ordinance are taken from the Pilotage Act, 1931. Provision for charging simple interest only is made in the Pawnbrokers Ordinance. Penalties are provided for the impersonation of members of the District Watch Force.

Ordinance No. 8 incorporates the Committee of the Sailors' Home and Mission to Seamen on the lines usual in such cases. No. 15 in- corporates the Colonial Treasurer to facilitate the taking of securities on behalf of the Government. Nos. 2 and 31 are mixed in character as they respectively incorporate the Trustees of the Church of England in the Diocese of Victoria Hong Kong and the Tung Wah Hospital, repeal previous Ordinances relating to these subjects and establish constitutional regulations for the bodies so incorporated.

The new subjects for legislation were taxation of light hydrocarbon oils dealt with by the Motor Spirit Ordinance (No. 4) and the im position of duties in respect of admission to entertainments (Ordin- ance No. 28).

XIII. Miscellaneous.

EMIGRATION AND IMMIGRATION.

One hundred and eighty eight thousand nine hundred (188,900) Emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1930, of these 93,580 were carried in British ships and 95,320 in Foreign vessels.

Two hundred and twenty-three thousand one hundred and thirty- six (223,136) returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast ports as against 185,390 in 1929. Of these 118.674 were brought in British vessels and 104,462 in Foreign vessels.

Statement of number of emigrants to Straits Settlements 1921- 1930 as compared with total number of emigrants from Hong Kong

Total No. of

To Straits Settlements.

Emigrants.

1921

87,324

156,011

1922

50,356

98,393

1923

65,584

120,224

1924

75,682

129,859

1925

97,552

140,534

1926

157,285

216,527

1927

202,408

285,593

1928

169,741

257,162

1929

146,516

227,523

1930

121,385

188,900

28

INSTITUTIONS.

Among institutions recognised and encouraged, but not to any considerable extent supported by Government may be mentioned the Po Leung Kuk, the Eyre Refuge, the City Hall, and the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, amahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. This Com- mittee meets every evening from Monday to Friday at 7 p.m., the principal meeting of the week being held at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory com- mittee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated mui tsai, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents or relations cannot be traced, the Committee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as con- cubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs; and in every case that officer ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.

In addition to the annual Committee appointed by co-option there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex- officio chairman.

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1930, was 53 and during the year 469 persons were admitted as against 636 in 1929. The existing premises of this institution having become inadequate for the demand made upon it, Government gave a new site in the Eastern part of the town to enable a more commodious building to be erected.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries are institutions maintained in order to provide the Chinese with the services of doctors, whose certificates will be accepted by the Registrar of Deaths, and with

29

the services of interpreters, who can assist the inmates of houses, where a case of infectious disease has occurred. Coolies are engaged and ambulances and dead vans provided in order to remove cases of infectious disease to the Infectious Diseases Hospital and dead bodies to the Mortuary. The Dispensaries receive sick infants and send them to one or other of the Convents and arrange for the buria, of dead infants. Free advice and medicine are given and patients are attended at their houses. There are eight Dispensaries in existence. The Government makes an annual grant of $2,000, and the rest of the cost is cost is defrayed by voluntary subscription. The Dispensaries are conducted by committees under the chairmanship of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

The Tung Wah Hospital, opened in 1872, is mainly supported by the

voluntary subscriptions of Chinese, but receives annuai grants from the Government amounting to $20,500. Only Chinese are treated in this institution. Various other services not appertain- ing to a hospital are performed by the institution, such as the free burial of the poor, the repatriation of destitutes, the maintenance of free vernacular schools, and the organisation of charitable relief in emergencies; Chinese as well as European methods of treatment are employed in accordance with the wishes expressed by the patients or their friends.

The Kwong Wa Hospital, opened in 1912, is situated on the Kowloon peninsula at Yaumati. About 50% of its expenditure is met by grants from Government and the balance by voluntary subscrip- tions.

The Tung Wah Eastern Branch Hospital, erected and equipped at a cost of over $300,000, was opened in November 1929. In 1930 two new wings were added costing $50,000.

These hospitals are now managed by a Joint Committee of Chinese gentlemen annually elected in accordance with the provisions of the Tung Wah Hospital Ordinance of 1920.

:

Appendix A.

FINANCIAL RETURNS FOR

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF THE REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FC

Estimates,

Heads of Revenue.

1930.

Actual Revenue

to 31st December,

1930.

Revenue for

same period

Increase.

Decrease.

Heads of E

of preceding

year.

C.

c.

C.

C.

Light Dues

311,000

329,313.46

319,126.66

10,186.80

Licences and Internal Re-

venue not otherwise specified -

15,403,320

6,169,266.40 14,900,565.03 1,268,701.37

Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reim- bursements in Aid

1,900,900

2,113,862.02 1,864,955.18 248,906.84

Post Office

970,000 1,375,207.08 1,003,664.99

371,542.09

Kowloon-Canton Railway -

949,400

973,128.63

890,744-54

82,384.09

Rent of Government Pro-

perty, Land and Houses

1,408,700

1,541,895.52 1,411,532.69

130,362.83

Interest

H. E. the G Cadet Servic Senior Cleri

counting Junior Cleric Colonial Secr and Legi: Secretariat

Affairs Treasury - Audit Depar District Offic

Do.,

Communicat

(a) Post C (b) Do. Telegra

Imports & Ex Harbour Dep

Do.

Royal Obser Fire Brigade Supreme Cou Attorney Ge Crown Solicit Offical Receiv

223,500

390,799.73 382,837.87

7,961.86

Land Office

Miscellaneous Receipts -

Total (exclusive of Land

Sales)-

546,100 2,060,103.05 844,876.91 1,215,226.14

21,712,920 24,953,575.89 21,618,303.87 3,335,272.02

Land Sales, (Premia on

New Leases)

1,000,000 2,864,897.03 1,936,171.29

928,725-74

TOTAL

*A

22,712,920 27,818,472.92 23,554,475.16 4,263,997.76

Magistracy, F

Do., Police Force- Prisons Depa

Medical Depa

Sanitary Dep Botanical an

Departme Education De Public Wor

ment Public Works

Ex

Dc., Kowloon-Can Defence:

() Volunt

Corps () Hong !

Naval

Reserv (c) Military

tion

Miscellaneous Charitable Se: Charge on

Public De Pensions

-

TOTA

Deduct

Net

$4,263,997.76

Appendix A.

AL RETURNS FOR THE YEAR 1930.

ENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE PERIOD ENDED 31ST DECEMBER,

Estimates,

Decrease.

Heads of Expenditure.

1930.

Actual Expenditure to 31st December,

1930.

1930.

Expenditure for same

period of preceding year.

Increase.

Decrease.



C.

C.

3.80

ᏎᎯ

C.



C.

H. E. the Governor

103,617

150,450.32

102, 148.09

Cadet Service

362,594

517,813.61

316,806.95

C.

48,302.23 201,006.66

C.

Senior Clerical and Ac-

counting Staff -

242,077

323,756.12

205,582.45

118,173.67

Junior Clerical Service

753.895

860,545.52

669.822.54

190,822.98

-37

Colonial Secretary's Office

and Legislature

46.909

68.438.19

40,665.04

27.773.15

Secretariat for Chinese

Affairs

15,382

18,896.25

11,482.94

7,413.31

Treasury -

16,529

34,189.06

15,069.12

19,119.94

.84

Audit Department

49,996

67,919.44

47.193.29

20,726.15

District Office, North -

23,424

24.844.96

20,625.34

4,219.62

Do.,

South -

13,416

13,752.61

8.668.90

5,083.71

Communications :—

8་

.09

(a) Post Office

308,835

353,689.84

289,516.20

64,173.64

(b)

Do. Wireless

Telegraph Services-

120,708

129,997.69

129,997.69

Imports & Exports Office -

866,436

903,181.60

688,566.03

214,615.57

8

.09

Harbour Department -

996,342

999,605.03

757,198.07

242.406.96

Do.

Air

Service

201,080

93,896.70

93,896.70

Royal Observatory-

37,102

54,133.40

35.141.07

18,992.33

Fire Brigade

380,564

315.431.08

232,826.21

82,604.87

_83

Supreme Court -

153,570

173,796.86

133,286.54

40,510.32

Attorney General

34.728

47.400.55

34,689.99

12,710.56

Crown Solicitor's Office

34.918

47,911.93

43,640.30

4,271.63

Offical Receiver-

13,825

23,163.87

10,116.83

13,047.04

.86

Land Office

25,144

38,368.71

26,118.20

12,250.51

Magistracy, Hong Kong

2,289

1,961.55

1,813.86

147.69

Do., Kowloon -

2,118

2,085.55

1,970.90

114.65

Police Force-

2,159,235

2,569,664.42

1,956,798.33

612,866.09

14

Prisons Department

585,684

677,585.16

512,591.65

164,993-51

Medical Department

1,209,611

1,186,249.73

86,,292.50

318,957.23

Sanitary Department

-

791,563

868,949.89

713.184.49

155.765-40

Botanical and Forestry

Department -

107,496

120,191.99

98,412.87

21,779.12

Education Department

1,349,69!

1,662,169.33

1,152,375.18

509,794.15

Public Works Depart-

ment

1,654.477

2,033,300.08

1,873,280.18

160,019.90

Public Works, Recurrent-

1,787,650

1,564,118.43

1,464.558.35

99.560.08

Dc., Extraordinary-

3,840,750

2,850,498.83

2,125.974 96

724.523.87

Kowloon-Canton Railway

1,234,879

826,405.47

656,696.58

169,708.89

Defence:

74

() Volunteer Defence

Corps

107,813

93,842.05

83,757.67

10,084.38

(6) Hong Kong Royal

Naval

Volunteer

Reserve

25.433

(c) Military Contribu-

tion

3,865,560

Miscellaneous Services

1,354-395

Charitable Services

111,704

3,863,769.31 1,733,444.10 135,186.50

3,259,337.65 1,304.714.87 100,079.50

604 431.66

428,729.23

35,107.00

Charge on Account of

Public Debt-

1.364.076

Pensions -

1,588,117.82 913,000 1,080,821.99

1,324.498.97

263,618.85

796.754.06

284,067.93

TOTAL

27.268,515 28,119,645.54 21,983,256.67

6,136,388.87

76

Deduct

Net

$6,136,388.87

Statement of Assets and Liabilities on the 31st December, 1930.

LIABILITIES.

$

C.

ASSETS.

$

C.

Deposits :-

Advances;

Contractors and Officers Deposits.

730,148.68

*On account of Future Loan.....

1,940,386.10

Suitors Fund............

606,433.84

Miscellaneous Deposits

984,532.5+

Purchase of three Locomotives for Chinese Section Kowloon- Canton Railway

House Service Account

17,344.34

Miscellaneous

Postal Agencies

12,043.91

Building Loans..

Suspense Account

929,696.76

Imprest Account

Exchange Adjustment....

757,211.66

Subsidiary Coin

447,722.99

162,761.28

1,065,340.13

6,873.62

1,793,676.78

Trade Loan Reserve......

891,007.32

Investments :

*

Joint Colonial Fund...

2,100,512.82

† Surplus Fund

Fixed Deposits

1,715,849.70

1,700,000.00

Trade Loan Outstanding..

2,064.181.75

Coal Account

4,638.93

Total Liabilities

4,928,419.05

Unallocated Stores, (P.W.D.).

546,579.98

Unallocated Stores, (Railway).

141,811.30

Excess of Assets over Liabilities.. 9,361,679.74

Cash Balance :-

Crown Agents Treasurer

Total

$14,290,098.79

* Joint Colonial Fund £128,000. Os. Od.

f Invested as follows :-

49,617.64 550,145.77

Total

$14,290,098.79

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &c.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE.

MARKET VALUE.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

Natal, (1929-49)

Newcastle Corporation, (1945-55)......4%

.3% Stock.

£7,600. 0. 0

20,000. 0. 0

29,009.16.10

£ 5,646. 7.0 (80) 19,200. 0.0 (98)

28,719.14.11 (763)

£ 6,080. 0. 0

19,600. 0. 0

22,192.10. 7

50,972. 9. 5

3

50,993. 9.11 (102)

51,991.18. 5

Queensland, (1940-60)

.5 %

Treasury Bond, (1932-4)........41 %

€ 107,582. 6. 3 £ 104,559.11.10

£ 99,864. 9. 0

Appendix A (1)

REPORT ON THE FINANCE FOR THE YEAR 1930.

The Revenue for the year amounted to $27,818,473 and the Expenditure was $28,119,646. Expenditure therefore exceeded revenue by $301,173. The approved estimated revenue for the year was $22,712,920 while the revised figure was $24,066,000, an increase of $1,353,080. The actual revenue therefore exceeded the revised estimate by $3,752,473. The approved estimate of expenditure for the year was shown as $27,268,515 and the revised estimate amounted $28,303,500. The actual expenditure was $183,854 short of the revised estimates.

to

The following statement shows the Revenue and Expenditure for each of the years of the last decade:

Year.

Revenue,

Expendi

ture;

Surplus.

Deficit.

$

$

$

$

1922..............

1923...... 24,783,763 21,571,905

1924...... 24,209,640 26,726,423

1925...... 23,244,366 28.266,818

1921...... 17.728,132 15,739,652 1,988,480

22,291,065 18,563,003 3,728,062

3,211,858

2,516,788

5,022,452

1926...... 21,131,582 23,524,716

2,393,131

1927...... 21,844,536 20,845,065

499,471

1928...... 24,968,399 21,230,242 3,788,157

1929...... 23,554,475 21,983,257 1,571,218

1930....

27,818,473 28,119,646

REVENUE.

301.173

The largest individual item of revenue is derived from the assessment tax, the sum of $4,208,277 being collected in 1930. This represents 15.1% of the total revenue or 16.8% of the revenue exclusive of land sales. Stamp duties (including estate duties) follow with $2,910,508.

A (1) 2-

In the following table the actual revenue for the year 1930 is compared with the revenue of the previous year and with the Estimates for 1930.

Heads of Revenue.

Actual

1929

Estimates 1930

Actual

1930

Light Dues

319,126.66 311,000

329,313.46

Licences and Internal Fevenue not

otherwise specified

14,900,565.03

15,103,320 16,169,266,40

Fees of Court or Office, l'ayments for specific purposes, and Reimburse- ments in Aid.........

1,864.955.18

1,900,900 2,113,862,02

Post Office........

1,003,664 99

970,000 1,375,207.08

Kowloon Canton Railway

890,714.54

919,400 973,128.63

Rent of Government Property, Land

and Houses

1,411,532.69

1,408,700 1,541,895 52

Interest

382.837.87

223,500 390,799.73

Miscellaneous Receipts

844,876.91

546,100 2,060,103.05

Total.......

21.618,303.87

21,712,920 24,953,575.89

Land Sales (Premia on New Leases) ... 1,936,171 29 1,000,000 2,864,897,03

Total....

23,554,475.16

22,712,920 27,818.472.92

Each Head of Revenue showed an increase both over the Estimates for 1930 and over the Revenue for 1929. The principal increases over the Estimates were as follows:-

LICENCES AND INTERNAL REVENUE NOT OTHERWISE SPECIFIED.

Vehicle Licences

$ 84,824

(Increase in number of Motor Vehicles)

Liquor Duties

$ 89,948

(More success in the prevention of smuggling)

Opium Monopoly

$135,287

(Increased sales)

Stamp Duties

$110,508

(Increased business in stocks and shares and higher market values)

A (1) 3 —

Tobacco Duties

(Tobacco duties were increased with

$219,912

effect from 12th June, 1930).

$145,528

(New duty of 15 cents per gallon

Motor Spirit Duties ...

as from 1st July, 1930).

FEES OF COURT OR OFFICE, PAYMENTS FOR SPECIFIC PURPOSES,

AND REIMBURSEMENTS IN AID.

Water Excess Supply and Meter Rents.......

(More ineters installed and general building development)

$167,724

Crown Lease Fees

$ 18,462

(Activity in Land transactions).

Deeds Registration

$ 18,993

(Activity in land transactions).

POST OFFICE.

Postages

$132,587

(Postal rates were increased as from 1st August, 1930).

Message Fees

$272,620

(Increased traffic and extension of services).

RENT OF GOVERNMENT PROPERTY LAND

AND HOUSES

$133,195

INTEREST

(More permits for encroachment issued and increase in number of Crown Leases).

$167,300

$1,362,982

MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS

(Both these increases can be attributed to the fall in the sterling value of the dollar. Interest on Sterling investments and ster- ling deposits realized during the year have shown a considerable dollar appreciation).

LAND SALES.

Premia on Leases

$1,864,897

(More sales and increased premia received).

~ A (1) 4 -

EXPENDITURE,

The expenditure for the year amounted to $28,119,646 as against an estimate of $27,268,515, an increase of $851,131. The total sum of $28,119,646 is made up as follows:

Ordinary Expenditure

$25,269,148

Extraordinary Expenditure, Public Works ... 2,850,498

Ordinary expenditure for the year was $25,269,148 against $19,957.282 in the preceeding year, showing an increase of $5,411,866.

The principal heads showing savings were as follows:-

Harbour Department (Air Services)...$107,183

-

Fire Brigade

65,133

Medical Department

23,361

Public Works Recurrent

223,532

Public Works Extraordinary

990,251

Kowloon Canton Railway

408,474

Defence

41,194

Harbour Department (Air Services).-The subsidy of $100,000 for Commercial Aviation was not required.

Fire Brigade. The fire float estimated to be paid for iu 1930 was not delivered, only part payment being made and consequent savings were effected in coal and oil fuel.

Medical Department.-It was decided not to proceed with the dispensary launch for which $50,000 was provided.

Public Works Recurrent.-Work was reduced considerably in accordance with the general policy of economy and with four exceptions savings were effected throughout all the sub-heads.

Public Works Extraordinary.—Many works provided for in the Estimates were not put in hand until late in the year. Others were curtailed and reduced in order to economise.

Kowloon Canton Railway.-The new passenger coaches for which a sum of $330,000 was provided were not ordered. Less coal was consumed than anticipated and lower contract prices obtained.

Defence. The Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve was not formed, the whole provision of $25,433 being saved. The pur- chase of an armoured car estimated at $15,000 has been abandoned.

▲ (1) 5

The principal heads showing excesses were as follows:

H.E. the Governor

$ 46,833

Cadet Service

155,220

Senior Clerical & Accounting Staff

81,679

Junior Clerical Service

106,751

Post Office

44,855

Police Force

410,429

Prisons Department

91,901

Sanitary Department

77,387

Education Department

312,478

Public Works Department

378,823

Miscellaneous Services

379,049

Charges on account of Public Debt

224,042

Pensions

167,822

The excesses in the first ten heads in the above list were almost wholly due to the increase in Personal Emoluments consequent on the adoption of the Salaries Commission Report with effect from the 1st of January, 1930, coupled with the fall in the rate of exchange.

Miscellaneous Services.-Savings of $472,640 including $420,000 provided for High Cost of Living Allowance were offset by the following items :-

Special grant to the University of Hong Kong $300,000; contribution of $300,000 towards the construction of a vertical sea-wall; and an excess of $63,000 on passages for Government servants.

Charges on account of Public Debt.-The whole of this increase is due to the fall in exchange.

Pensions. For the most part this is due to the fall in exchange.

at

Personal Emoluments were estimated for the year $8,511,207, whereas the actual expenditure amounted to $10,785,908, an excess of $2,274,701. The sum of $420,000 provided as a high cost of living allowance under "Miscellaneous Services' was saved. To arrive therefore at the actual increase this amount should be deducted leaving the net extra cost as $1,854,701 for 1930. Of this increase approximately $1,000,000 may be ascribed to the adoption of the Salaries Commission Report for both Dollar and Sterling salaries, the balance being due to the fall in the exchange.

Other Charges were estimated at $5,497,572 whereas the actual expenditure amounted to $4,517,780 a saving of $979,792. This is a considerable achievement the individual savings being spread generally throughout the "other charges" items of the Estimates.

LIABILITIES.

– ▲ (1) 6 –

Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

ASSETS.

Deposits :-

ADVANCES :-

C.

Contractors and

Officers Deposits...

730,148.68

On account of

Future Loan

1,940,386.10

Suitors Fund

606,433.84

Purchase of three

Miscellaneous De-

Locomotives for

posits

984,532.54

Chinese Section

House Service A count

17,344.34

Kowloon Canton

l'ostal Agencies

12,043.91

Railway

447,722.99

Suspense Account

929,696.76

Miscellaneous

162,761.28

Exchange Adjustment..

757,211,66 Building Loans

1,005,340.13

Trade Loan Reserve

891,007.32 Imprest Account....

6,873.62

Subsidiary Coins......

1,793,676.78

INVESTMENTS :

Joint Colonial

Fund.......

Surplus Fund Fixed Deposits

2,100,512.82

1,715,849.70

1,700,000.00

Trade Loan

Out-

standing

2,064,181.75

Coal Account

4,638.93

Unallocated Stores,

Total Liabilities... 4,928,419.05

Excess of Assets over

(P. W. D.),.....

546,579.98

Unallocated Stores,

(Railway)...

141,811.30

CASH BALANCE :

Crown Agents.

49,617.64

Liabilities

......

9,361,679.74

Treasurer

550,145.77

Total......$14,290,098.79

Total $14,290,098.79

The excess of Assets over Liabilities on the 1st January, 1930, was $9,662,852. On the 31st December, 1930, this sum had decreased to $9,361,679; the difference of $301,173 is the excess of expenditure over revenue as recorded in paragraph 1 of this Report.

The cash held by the Crown Agents at the close of the year was £131,023. The balance not required to meet current disbursements was lent to the Joint Colonial Fund and is shown in the above statement as $2,100,512. (£128,000).

C

A (1) 7

The Surplus Fund $1,715,849 was invested as follows:

AMOUNT OF STOCK, &C.

NOMINAL VALUE.

COST PRICE.

MARKET PRICE.

STERLING INVESTMENT.

Natal, (1929-19)

.3 % Stock.

£ 7,600. 0. 0 £ 5,616. 7.0 (80) £6,080. 0. 0

Newcastle Corporation,

(1945-55)

20,000. 0. 0 29,009.16.10

19,200. 0. 0 (98)

50,972. 9. 5

28,719.14.11 (764) 50,993. 9.11 (102)

19,600. 0.0 22,192.10. 7 51,991.18. 5

Queensland, (1940-60) ...5 % Treasury Bond,(1932-34) 41%

£107,582, 6, 3 £104,559,11.10

ADVANCE ON ACCOUNT OF FUTURE LOAN.

This money has been expended as under:

Shing Mun Valley Scheme

Aberdeen Valley Scheme

$

£ 99,864. 9. 0

73.058

1,244,261

Aerodrome

623,067

$1,940,386

During the year the Unallocated stores held by the various departments increased as under :-

Public Works Department......$408,843 Railway

1929.

1930.

$546,580

151,753

141,811

$560,596

$688,391

560,596

Net Increase

$ 127,795

SUBSIDIARY COINS.

The amount shown in the statement was made up as

under:

50 cents

20

10

5 Copper

"

3.924

131,246

1,630,135

20,018

8.355

$1,793,678

The nominal amount of Subsidiary Coin in circulation was $17,914,370 and the market value was practically par.

--

A (1) 8

TRADE LOAN.

The Sterling Loan securing the local overdraft was further reduced during the course of the year and it was decided to pay off the balance due to the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank on the 31st of December from the Government's local surplus cash, instead of placing this surplus on fixed deposit. The net saving in interest charges is from 21% to 44% viz. from $30,000 to $55,000 per annum.

Thirty five loans amounting to $1,280,842.65 were repaid during the year. The proportion of redemptions to the amount outstanding is so far being maintained.

Up to the 31st December, 1930, $13,491,749.29 of the amount of $15,632,343.34 outstanding had been recovered. Loans outstanding at the end of the year, numbering thirty two, amounted to $2,064, 181.75. It was found necessary in certain cases to resort to enforcement of the securities. Power of Sale was exercised in ten instances, and, with one exception. the principal sums lent were fully recovered, overdue interest in some cases being foregone.

The following table shews the position of the Loan as at 31st December, 1930:-

Loans issued since 16th November, 1925 on

approved securities

$15,632,343.34

Less Redemptions effected during the years

1926

$2,604,930.00

1927

4,845,879.76

1928

3,403,560.02

1929

1,356,536.86

1930

1,280,842.65

13,491,749.29

Total ....

$ 2,140,594.05

$

76,412.50

Less amount written off as irrecoverable

Total of Loans

Loans outstanding

on 31st

December, 1930

་ ་ ་ ་ ་ ་ ་

$ 2,064,181.75

A (1) 9

Interest in arrears on 31st December, 1926 ..

"

"

"

""

""

$117,369.42

31st December, 1927

206,818.64

31st December, 1928

321,121.10

31st December, 1929

416,237.93

22

";

31st December, 1930

398,641.94

Total number of Loans issued since 16th November, 1925.... 302 Less number redeemed in 1926....

34

1927.

85

1928..

87

,,

1929...

29

39

""

""

J

22

12

""

1930....

35

270

Number of Loans outstanding on 31st December, 1930....... 32

PUBLIC DEBT.

The inscribed Stock Loans of 1893 and 1906 amounted to £1,485,733 and the Sinking Fund stood at £719,664 being £45,042 more than at the end of 1929.

The Public Works Loan (Ordinance No. 14 of 1927) amount- ed to $4,927,000. $3,000,000 of this loan was issued locally at par on November 1st 1927. The second issue was made on November 1st 1928 at a premium of 3 per cent-Bonds to the nominal value of $1,927,000 being allotted. The Sinking Fund amounted to £75,749 being £24,429 more than at the end of 1929.

NOTE CIRCULATION.

The local circulation of notes and Specie in Reserve of the three banks having authorized issues were as follows on 31st December:--

Notes in Circulation.

Specie in

Reserve.

Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking

Corporation

$104,811,862

$98,600,000

Chartered Bank of India Australia

& China

19,600,942

7,800,000

Mercantile Bank of India Ltd

3,556,567

1,350,000

Total

.$127,469,371

$107,750,000

A (1) 10

www.

The average monthly rates for sterling and Shanghai taels

were as follows:

January

1/6.8376

78.8333

February

1/6.1698

78.6413

March

1/5.7762

78.2115

April May June

1/6.0534

78.4782

1/5.4123

78.5833

1/3.1552

81.3586

July

1/3.1511

82.7307

August

1/3.5718

83.6354

September

1/3.6850

80.4400

October

1/3.5174

80.2870

November

1/8.2955

80.1354

December

1/1.6924

77.7282

GENERAL,

The fall in the sterling value of the dollar was the principal factor in business during 1930. The export trade which is supposed to thrive on a depreciated currency did not flourish to any extent. In this connection it must be noted that Hong Kong is a transit port and depends on the outside world for its well-being. China imposed a higher tariff on imports and that country is still far from settled. Remittances from abroad continued to flow in at an increasing rate to the end of the year. Bankers' fixed deposit rates for 12 months opened in January at 44%. At the end of the year Banks were only accepting new money for deposits at call bearing no interest, while for renewals 2% only was obtainable for 12 months. The Banks' strong rooms are full to overflowing in silver bullion and dollars and it is difficult to lend money on good security. In these circumstances it is not surprising that the purchase of land and building construction should have been turned to as an outlet for money. This resulted in higher prices for land and a small building boom. An additional impetus was given to building by reason of the fact that the price of labour had - not increased. The low valued dollar was able to command as much of the lowest quality of rice, the staple food of the masses, as formerly. This was due to the fall in the world value of this and other commodities. Hong Kong, therefore, has not been affected by the world depression to the extent that other countries have. The revenue has shewn no signs of falling away, on the contrary from the returns a substantial increase is recorded and there is no reason to doubt that having passed through a most difficult year owing to the low price of silver and to the general world depression in trade Hong Kong will be in a strong position to take advantage of any revival when this begins.

THE TREASURY,

Hong Kong, 14th May, 1931.

EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

Appendix A (2).

REPORT TO THE DIRECTOR OF COLONIAL AUDIT ON THE AUDIT OF THE ACCOUNTS OF

HONG KONG.

1930.

Subject to the comments contained in this report the accounts generally have been satisfactorily kept and rendered and the existing regulations appear to provide reasonable account- ing protection against irregularities and fraud.

Over

2. The connection between the excess of assets liabilities of this year and the previous year is established thus:-

Excess 31st December 1929 ......$ 9,662,852.36

Revenue 1930

Expenditure 1930

27.818.472.92

37,481,825.28

28,119,645.54

$ 9,361,679.74

3. The Annual Abstract of Receipts and Expenditure for the year and the Assets and Liabilities Statement on 31st December 1930 were received in this department on 27th April 1981. The annual supporting statements were not received in full from the Treasurer until 30th June 1931 and it has therefore not been possible for this report to reach you within the six months prescribed by regulation.

4. The comparison of the revenue and expenditure for the year with the approved Estimates and with previous years is dealt with fully in the Treasurer's Report (Enclosure M) and in the two detailed statements (Enclosures C and D). No further comment would appear to be necessary.

AUTHORITY FOR EXPENDITURE.

1930.

5. The Estimates for the year received the approval of the Secretary of State in his Despatch of the 17th December 1929 and were passed by the Legislative Council in Ordinance No. 16 of 1929.

A (2) 2

6. Expenditure supplementary to the Estimates, shown as provisionally voted in the Appropriation Account, was submitted in detail to the Finance Committee and duly adopted by the Legislature. With the exception of Nos. 5 and 6 of 1931, still in transit, the Financial Messages showing expenditure fully itemized have been submitted to and received the sanction of the Secretary of State.

The Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance was submitted to the Legislature on the 2nd July 1981.

When the items under submission and the Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance have received approval the Expenditure for 1930 will have been duly sanctioned.

1929.

7. The final formal authority for the 1929 Expenditure was provided by Supplementary Appropriation Ordinance No. 5 of 1930.

1928.

was

S. The formal approval of the Legislative Council obtained, on instruction from the Secretary of State, to certain excess expenditure in the year 1928 reference to which was made in your report on the account for that year.

ESTIMATES.

9. As already reported to you (Letter No. 47/67 of 17th October 1930) the Estimates are not prepared in accordance with Colonial Regulation No. 227 in that they do not show clearly the total estimated cost of the individual departments. They do not in fact show the cost at all. neither is it possible to calculate such cost from the information shown.

10. This is due mainly to the existence of three 'omnibus' heads representing the cost of:---

(a) The Cadet Service, first shown thus in 1921.

(b) The Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff, first shown

thus in 1927.

(c) The Junior Clerical Service, first shown thus in 1926.

The item Personal Emoluments" of any department does not therefore even approximate to the actual cost.

11. The Treasury (Head 7) may be cited as an example. Here $10,879 is estimated under Personal Emoluments and represents only the salary of the Accountant and the wages of the menial staff. The actual expenditure for

for Personal Emoluments of the staff employed in the Treasury during the

A (2) 3

year was over $200,000. The three comprehensive heads do not themselves estimate for the real cost of the section of the Service their titles represent and it is not easy therefore to realise what object is served by the Estimates in their present form.

12. As however they have been accepted by the Secretary of State in this form for some years the question has not been definitely raised with the Government.

STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES.

13. It has hitherto been the local policy that there should be no Sub-Accountants as defined in Colonial Regulation No. 204. Strict adherence to this policy results in certain features of the accounts which have a definite effect on the Balance Sheet upon which it is necessary to comment at some length.

14. The asset "Cash Balance, Treasury $550,145.77* represents only the balance standing in the books of the Hong Kong & Shanghai Banking Corporation to the credit of the Treasurer's Account. There are, however, over thirty Govern- ment Accounts kept by the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank and on 31st December 1930 many of these were in credit.

15. The reasons which allow of the existence of these balances without their being reflected in the Balance Sheet are as follows:-

16. All departments have one or more bank accounts and the Treasurer keeps them in funds by means of cheques corresponding in amount to vouchers submitted to him and the appropriate Votes and Subheads are at this stage debited in the Treasury Account. These cheques are placed to the credit of the department's bank account and the actual disbursement to the firms or individuals are made by the department's cheques. After these disbursements are made the vouchers are returned to the Treasurer and support the charges in his account, control being exercised by a return of “Outstanding Vouchers' which is forwarded fortnightly by all departments. Summarised, this

means that "the date of the record of the charge in the accounts” (Colonial Regulation No. 288) is not the date of payment to the firm or individual but the date on which the Treasury supplied the department with funds.

17. Thus it happens that, to take an actual example, the Education Department books show on 31st December 1930 a bank balance of $28,755, representing money finally charged to Votes in the Treasurer's books but which was not actually disbursed by the Director of Education until the first week of the financial year 1931.

A (2) 4

18. Among the disadvantages of the system are considerable duplication of work and the existence of an unduly large number of Bank Accounts and it is suggested that in view of the bank frauds which have occurred in the past the Government might well consider a reduction in their number.

19. The method in which these departmental bank accounts were kept has, moreover, been far from satisfactory and at the suggestion of this Department the Treasurer has recently issued a circular on the subjeci.

20. Further, there are also certain Government Accounts whose transactions are not incorporated at all in the Treasury books, e.g.,

Companies Liquidation Account.

Balance 31st December 1930...

Official Receiver's Account

$662,581.29

73,080.64

District Officer North, Suitor's Fund Account. District Officer South, Suitor's Fund Account Medical Department, Hospital Patients'

Deposits

841.82

2,304.55

125.00

Special conditions apply to these accounts but as they appear to be funds in the custody of the Government (Colonial Regula- tion No. 325) the question of their future inclusion is now under discussion.

21. Finally, several departments were in possession of actual cash balances on 31st December, 1930 which are not recorded in the Annual Statements. This occurs because revenue col- lected on that day at a time too late to be paid into the Treasury Bank Account is regarded as having been collected on the first day of the following year. Thus it happens that some $20,000 was held in cash in various departments. on the close of business on 31st December 1930 which appears as revenue collected in 1981. As this occurs each year one year counter-balances the other but it is because of this system that an irregularity such as is referred to in paragraph 61 is enabled to occur. It would, it is submitted, not be a difficult matter to arrange for the accounts to be strictly accurate in this direction and the question will be raised with the Treasurer in due course.

ADVANCES.

ON ACCOUNT OF FUTURE LOAN, $1,940,386.10.

22. This item is made up of expenditure on the following works:-

1. Shing Mun Valley Scheme

2. Aberdeen Valley Water Scheme

3. Aerodrome

$

73,058.50

1,244,260.77

623,066,83

A (2) 5

Legislative authority to use surplus balances during 1930 pending the raising of a loan for these works, all of which have received the sanction of the Secretary of State, was obtained by resolution of Council in September 1929.

23. The figures shown against the Shing Mun Valley Scheme and the Aerodrome differ from those shown in the Loan State- ment (Enclosure J) by considerable amounts. Explanation of these differences are contained in the reply of the Treasurer to Audit Query No. 322/1930, copy attached (Enclosure N).

PURCHASE OF THREE LOCOMOTIVES FOR CHINESE SECTION KOWLOON CANTON RAILWAY, $447,722.99.

24. This asset is the outcome of an agreement made in 1929 between the Kwang Tung Provincial Government and the Hong Kong Government. No definite date or manner of repayment is provided for in the agreement but the introductory phrases state that the Hong Kong Government has been requested

"to grant the facilities in that behalf hereinafter "appearing in order that the Kwang Tung Provincial "Government may eventually and as soon as convenient- ly may be pay for, take over and acquire the said "three locomotives.

"3

The agreement, however, provides in the meantime for the payment by the Kwang Tung Government of interest and mileage charges calculated on certain accounts specified in the agreement.

MISCELLANEOUS, $162,761.28

25. With the exception of the $40,160.15 referred to in paragraph 54 these advances are of a routine nature and call for

no comment.

INVESTMENTS.

26. Two small discrepancies occur in the statements of stock certified as held by the Crown Agents and the stocks shown in the printed Financial Statement but the total value of stock held is not affected and correction will be made locally.

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT.

UNALLOCATED STORES.

27. The Balance Sheet of the Public Works Department Unallocated Stores Account is forwarded as Enclosure H and a statement is attached thereto reconciling the closing balance $547,189.03 with the amount shown as the asset $546,579.98.

The fluctuation of the dollar was responsible for this figure being in excess of the authorised Standard Stock and formal application has been made to the Secretary of State for covering authority.

A (2) 6-

28. For reasons explained in paragraph 67 this asset is not supported by the certificate of an independent board of survey. The nearest approach to a board during the year is a return, the compilation of which took several months, of stock handed over by one Store Clerk to another (vide Enclosure ()).

COAL ACCOUNT, $4,638.93

29. This asset should represent the value of coal in hand on 31st December, 1930. The books of the Harbour Department, however, show the value as $3,399.88. The discrepancy is still under query.

30. The remaining assets have been verified, those held by the Crown Agents being supported by the Certificate of the Comptroller and Auditor General.

LIABILITIES.

SUITOR'S FUND, $606,433.84

31. This liability is the balance due to suitors as shown in the books of the Registrar, Supreme Court. There were, how- ever, two further amounts of a similar nature in the hands of the District Officer, North and the District Officer, South but owing to the procedure referred to in paragraph 20 these amounts have not been included in the Assets and Liabilities Statement.

MISCELLANEOUS DEPOSITS, $984,532.54

32. This item includes a balance of $730,148.68 for Mis- cellaneous Deposits Bearing Interest, representing a large number of securities given mainly by firms in respect of their contracts and by officers in respect of their pecuniary liabilities.

The method by which record has been kept of these deposits in the past precludes a definite certificate being given of the correctness of this figure. A copy of the correspondence with the Treasurer is attached (Enclosure P) from which you will observe that a new system is being adopted to account for these deposits but this will take some time to complete. There is no reason to anticipate that any serious discrepancy will arise but the point will be kept in view.

HOUSE SERVICE ACCOUNT, $17,344.34

33. This represents excess of receipts over expenditure of a suspense account created to deal with water connections and installations made by the Public Works Department at the expense of Landlords. The amount is due to revenue and bas been transferred accordingly in the March 1931 account.

-

A (2) 7

SUSPENSE, $929,696.76

34. Practically the whole of this liability is represented by an item "Military Contribution" referred to in paragraphs 45/46.

EXCHANGE ADJUSTMENT, $757,211.66.

35. In view of correspondence in previous years it is perhaps advisable to point out that the liability "Exchange Adjustment' is the same as that previously entitled "Adjustment of Exchange Account" and represents the increase in the dollar equivalent of Sterling Investments and Sterling Funds in the hands of the Crown Agents due to the fall in exchange.

REVENUE.

ASSESSMENT TAX,

36. The question of the method of accounting and audit of this important source of revenue has already been referred to you (Letter No. 50/59 of 8th November 1930). The present position is that certain officers now on leave in England are making enquiries as to systeins in force there for the collection of similar forms of revenue with the object of instituting a method of accounting more satisfactory both for collection and for audit.

CHINA COMPANIES FEES.

37. A local inspection of the books of the Registrar of Com- panies, Shanghai was made during the year and the accounts audited up to 14th October 1930. It was pointed out to the Treasurer that considerable loss to revenue was occurring by reason of exchange, the collection being made in Shanghai dollars.

38. The present is not considered an opportune time for any amendment of the Ordinance but some slight reduction in the loss will result from a recent decision of Government to allow the Registrar in Shanghai to make certain refunds from the monies received by him and to discontinue the practice hitherto in force of sending the refunds from Hong Kong thereby again incurring exchange charges.

39. The estimated revenue from this source for 1930 is $140,000 and as practically no check is possible in Hong Kong the local inspection is one of importance and though it can no longer be combined with the annual local inspection of Weihaiwei Accounts arrangements will be made to continue it.

ARREARS OF REVENUE.

40. The position with regard to Arrears of Revenue is entire- le satisfactory. Of the $406,826 outstanding on 31st December 1930, $395,473 had been collected by 15th May 1931, $1,164 only had to be written off and the remaining $10,189 will present no difficulty in collection.

A (2) 8

EXPENDITURE.

PERSONAL EMOLUMENTS.

41. The Establishment Register kept by the Treasury was not in a form suitable as a basis for audit of Personal Emolu- ments which had therefore to be conducted by the laborious method of frequent reference to the vouchers of earlier months. A new form of register has been opened from 1st January 1931 which should prove more satisfactory.

42. The audit of Personal Emoluments has been rendered more than usually onerous by the adjustment in June and July of the whole of the salaries of the Civil Service consequent on the approval of the Secretary of State of the recommendations of the Salaries Commission appointed in 1928 to consider general- ly certain questions relating to the salaries of the Civil Service.

43. A large number of queries (157) were raised on these adjustments resulting in recoveries of overpayments amounting to over £100 in sterling and $800 in local currency. Apart from arithmetical errors many of these queries were concerned with the interpretation of the Commissioners' recommendations and in certain cases permanent reductions of the actual rate of salary were effected as the result of queries.

44. It was found, however, that the application of the revised salaries scheme presented many individual cases of difficulty and a Committee, on which this department was represented, was appointed to investigate them and in forward- ing their report His Excellency The Governor sought the covering authority of the Secretary of State to their recom- mendations. These included the waiving of many refunds of overpayment which if insisted on would have entailed un- reasonable hardship on individual officers. In his Despatch of 30th April 1931 the Secretary of State approved the action taken by the Governor on the Committee's report.

MILITARY CONTRIBUTION.

45. The details leading to the contribution in respect of the year 1930 are tabulated in Enclosure Q.

From this it will be seen

en that the contribution has not been calculated in accordance with the existing instructions of the Secretary of State.

46. Little object would be served here by recapitulating the various arguments leading to the Secretary of State's decision in 1925, full details of which are doubtless with you, but as no reply has been received to the request made by this Govern- ment in 1929 that the Secretary of State should reconsider his ruling it must for the present be assumed that his instruction- in 1925 still stand. A further despatch has been forwarded (10th June 1981) on the subject.

7

A (2) 9

47. Copies of minutes which have been exchanged locally on this year's contribution are attached to the relevant en- closure.

CONTRACTS FOR PUBLIC WORKS.

48. It was necessary during the year to draw the attention of the Government to certain unsatisfactory features revealed in the audit of payments made for work done under Contract.

As practically the whole of the construction and maintenance of Public Works is performed by contractors the matter is of some importance and laxity in keeping to the terms of a contract has a definite effect on the Colony's finances.

49. These contracts provide that the work should be per- formed in a certain time, that penalties should be enforced if that time is exceeded, that a certain proportion of the amount due should be withheld for a definite period and that security. previously deposited, should be retained pending the final passing of the work.

50. A number of instances were brought to light in audit in which these terms were not adhered to, and in two of those queried fines of $5,000 and $2,850 were imposed.

An extreme instance was one in which there was a delav of 58 weeks on a 6 months contract for approximately $16,000. Here a two weeks penalty of $200 was imposed.

In another case the accounting history of a seven weeks contract, itself not correctly adhered to, extended over sixty weeks from the commencement of the work.

Copies of minutes passed with regard to these two contracts are attached (Enclosure R).

51. The opinion of the Crown Solicitor was obtained that any important deviation from the terms of a contract should form the basis of a supplementary clause to be drawn up and agreed to by both parties and a form of report has now been adopted by which the various terms of each contract will be watched by the Executive Engineer. A substantial improve- ment in the accounting should result.

TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT.

52. This account has been examined in detail and the securities for outstanding loans inspected.

The following statements are forwarded:

1.

Balance Sheet.

2. Working Account.

.

Statement explaining incorporation of Trade Loan items in the Colony's Statement of Assets and Liabilities.

- A (2) 10

53. In ten instances the Government considered it advisable to exercise their power of sale and with one exception the amount realised was sufficient to cover the principal sum. Under general authority given by the Secretary of State the Governor authorised the write off during the year of $5,000 Principal and $64,844.85 outstanding interest etc.

54. The Bank Overdraft, secured by Sterling Loan, was reduced during the year and finally cleared by an advance from the Colony's Surplus Funds of $1,213,334.58 which transaction was duly reported to the Secretary of State. This payment was. however, in excess by $40,160.15 of what was necessary and this amount is included in the asset "Advances, Miscellaneous".

55. The Trade Loan Account has hitherto been kept separately from the main Treasury accounts but has now been incorporated and the refund on 5th January 1931 of this $40,160.15 closes the separate account.

56. A copy of correspondence with the Government on the subject of Loans still outstanding is attached (Enclosure S).

PRAYA EAST RECLAMATION ACCOUNT.

57. During the year the Reclamation Scheme reached a stage of completion whereby the participants were enabled to obtain Crown Leases for their respective Lots on fulfilment of their obligation to meet the total cost of the Reclamation.

To achieve this object the Government estimated the amount required for contingencies to complete the Scheme, i.e. Drainage. Roads, etc. and the participants were debited with the pro- portionate cost of the liability.

58. The total cost of the Reclamation has now been fully inet, those participants who elected to be financed by the over- draft on the Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank having discharged the liability together with accrued interest. There is thus a balance to the credit of the Praya East Reclamation Accouni at the close of the financial year of $405,634.98 representing the estimated cost of uncompleted work. This amount has in January 1931 been transferred to the Treasury, the Colonial Government accepting the Contingent Liability and this account which also has hitherto been kept entirely separate from the Colonial Accounts will thus become a component part.

PUBLIC WORKS (1927) Loan ACCOUNT.

59. From the Statement of Expenditure (Enclosure J) it will be seen that the loan has been fully expended and additional expenditure has been made by advances from surplus balances which advances are included in the asset $1.940,386.10, "Advances on account of Future Loan

A. (2) li

60. The accounts of the loan have hitherto been kept entirely separate from the general accounts of the Colony. This question formed the subject of your Reference Sheet No. 2/1928.

From 31st December 1930 this practice ceases but in the process of closing the account two irregularities occurred.

61. The Annual Statement shows $88,132.18 as having been refunded by the Loan Account to the Treasury on 31st December 1930 but owing to the system commented on in paragraph 21 does not appear in the Treasury books until 2nd January 1931.

62. Further, a note on the statement shows that on 22nd December 1930 $59,366.52 on the Loan Fund balance was placed on Fixed Deposit for one year the idea being to use it eventually. to increase the sinking fund beyond the statutory amount provided for in the Loan Ordinance (14 of 1927, Section 8). The Loan Fund being incorporated in the Treasury books on 31st December 1930 this Deposit should have been included in the main Treasury Assets. The Treasurer has made the necessary entry in the March 1981 accounts but for the period between the 1st January 1931 and the date of the entry this deposit does not in fact appear in the accounts of the Colony.

Minutes dealing with the point are enclosed (Enclosure T).

KOWLOON-CANTON RAILWAY.

BRITISH SECTION.

63. A copy of the Annual Report of the Railway is forwarded (Enclosure ). Detailed comparisons of the revenue and expenditure with the Estimates and with previous years are contained therein and call for no further comment.

64. Continuous audit has been maintained during the year. Surprise surveys of Station cash etc., were made on twenty seven occasions with satisfactory result.

65. In paragraph 93 of the report particulars of the out- standing claim against the Chinese Section are furnished and in paragraph 24 of this report reference is inade to the $447,722 advanced for purchase of engines.

66. The final division sheets of Through and Joint Sectional Traffic receipts between the two administrations have been certified by this department for the year,

STORE ACCOUNTS.

67. In many respects the store accounting of the Colony and check of actual stock is not carried out in accordance with the general principles in force in other Colonies and the suggestion

A (2) 12

has been made to Government that a small committee be appointed to cuquire into the general question and draw up store regulations for general adoption by departments.

68. Local General Order No. 371 reads:

"The Audit Office will maintain, as far as possible, a

continuous survey of Government Stores...

This is far in excess of the Auditor's duties as defined in Colonial Regulation No. 342 which states:

"He will satisfy himself that adequate regulations exist for the guidance of store accountants and are duly complied with.”

To maintain a continuous survey' would entail a dispro- portionate share of the time of the staff.

69. In addition to the routine inspection of the books of the storekeeping departments tests of the actual stock have, however, been made by this Department in accordance with Departmental Instruction No. 61.

HONG KONG UNIVERSITY.

70. A suggestion was made during the year that in view of the large grants made to the University some measure of Government control of the finances might be exercised through the medium of audit.

It was decided that this Department should confine itself to ascertaining that any conditions attaching to the grants were observed.

A total grant of $350,000 was made on account of 1930 conditional on a modified scheme of revised salaries being introduced. A report to Government by the Registrar shows this condition to have been observed.

CHATER COLLECTION.

71. In 1928 the Auditor made certain enquiries as to the custody and inventory of the Chater Bequest, à collection mainly of pictures which on being bequeathed to the Colony became public property and therefore subject to the usual regulations (Colonial Regulation No. 354).

72. On a second enquiry in January 1930 a board of two officers, including a member of this Departinent, was appointed to check the collection and a detailed report was made to Government. This report was submitted to the Director of Public Works and after an interval of some months a further report by one of his officers was submitted.

A (2) 13

73. This second report differed from the first in so many · essential details that it was considered advisable again to draw the attention of the Government to the matter and arrangements have now been made for the pictures to be placed on proper inventory, to be inspected twice a year and expenditure up to $1,500 has been authorised for certain necessary restorations. Enquiries have also been set in motion with regard to certain pictures that are missing.

74. No further action by this Department would now appear to be necessary.

CESTODIAN OF ENEMY PROPERTY.

75. This account, so far as local transactions are concerned, is now closed and the balance is held by the Crown Agents for ultunate disposal in due course through the recognised channels.

MILITARY LANDS ACCOUNT.

76. Reconciliation of the balances standing in the books of the Colonial Treasurer and of the Command Paymaster was completed as at 31st December 1980. Reference to this account was made in Letter No. 382/79 of 24th March 1931.

SURPRISE SURVEYS.

77. Four hundred and twenty seven surprise surveys of Cash, Stamps, Railway Tickets, Stores, Bonded Warehouses, Opium, etc., were made during the year details of which have been submitted to you in the monthly returns. All observations raised in the course of the surveys have been satisfactorily settled.

QUERIES.

78. Four hundred and fifty seven Queries were raised in the course of the examination of the accounts of which one hundred and thirty five related to revenue and three hundred and twenty two to expenditure or stores. With the exception of the query referred to in paragraph 29 all have been settled.

PROGRAMME OF WORK.

79. During the period covering the latter portion of the year's audit retrenchment in the staff necessitated a reduction in the degree of examination given to the accounts but subject to this the approved programme of work for the year has been carried out. I wish, however, to place on record my opinion that to reduce the staff of this Department further than as was proposed to and recommended by the Retrenchment Committee would be to reduce the audit below the margin of reasonable safety.

A (2) 14

GENERAL.

80. As already reported to you (Letter of 12th February 1981), in ny evidence before the Retrenchment Committee I stated that after a preliminary scrutiny of the departmental accounts of the Colony I was of opinion that in many directions the system of accounting was unnecessarily laborious in procedure. Further personal examination of accounts has not caused me to alter my views and I consider that in several directions, for example, by the introduction of a few sub- accountants, by a reduction in the number of bank accounts and by a general simplification of system much clerical labour and multiplication of entries could be saved which would not in any way effect the control or accuracy of the accounts.

22nd July, 1931.

P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

A (2) 15

Enclosure N.

HONG KONG AUDIT DEPARTMENT.

QUERY NO. 322/15 E, 1930.

TREASURY.

I should be much obliged if I may be furnished with explanation of the following difference between the final figures of the Public Works Loan (1927) Account and the Advances Summary for 1930.

The Loan Statement shows $582,608.17 as advanced from Surplus Balances for expenditure on the Aerodrome, while the summary of Advances shows $623,066.83. This latter figure is quoted in your financial report but, if the Loan Statement is correct, includes $40,458.66 advanced for the Shing Mun Valley Scheme.

Further, in the advances summary $73,058.50 is shown against the Shing Mun Valley Scheme: what do these advances represent, please?

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

3.7.31.

This was fully explained to Mr. Dallin, Asst. Auditor, on Thursday by Mr. Martin of this office and Mr. Badan Singh of the P.W.D. and it was anticipated that he would similarly, if necessary, give you the same explanation as he appeared satisfied. I give it again.

(a) Aerodrome. An incorrect posting which should have been debited to the Shing Mun Valley Scheme-adjusted in March.

(b) Shing Mun Valley Scheme. This

amount was the

balance of this advance account which had been running since December, 1928, and has been adjusted as follows:

Jan. 1931 $1,321.86

Mar. 1931

严重

$71,026,12

$710.52

Aerodrome

Shing Mun Valley Scheme, Harbour Pipes.

A (2) 16

The trouble has arisen through having a separate account at the Bank for the P.W. Loan and to paying into that account advances from surplus balances. As you are aware the account was closed at the end of last year and I hope that no more difficulties will arise. The accounts were made unnecessarily complicated and in closing up, these differences came out. Unfortunately they are at the end of the year and of course are reflected in the annual statements. But by March all adjustments have been made and the advance account from surplus balances pending a future loan is treated in the proper manner. This is a result of what we called in Africa years age "Cigarette tin accounting."

(Sd.)

EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

7.7.31.

Note.

This query looks perhaps a little more serious than actually it is. It does not affect the accuracy of any item in the final Assets and Liabilities Statement but only the details leading up to one item:-Advances “On account of Future Loan.”

2. The Treasurer's view that it is a result of "cigaretie tin accounting" coincides with my own. Among other results of this primitive method of accounting was the inclusion in the previous year's (1929) Assets and Liabilities Statement of the unexpended portion of Loan Funds ($430,001) by mere insertion in the statement without recourse to any

Journal Entry or Ledger Entry in the main Treasury books.

3. In paragraph 52 to 62 of the Annual Report I have referred to this and the other "separate" accounts kept by the Treasury. They are now all closed and the various tangles need not occur again.

4. N.F.P.N. here but the March 1931 Journal Entries must be carefully examined.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON.

Auditor.

17.7.31.

A (2) 17

Enclosure O.

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT UNALLOCATED STORES.

No. 47/48.

From Auditor.

Hong Kong.

30th April, 1931.

To Hon. Treasurer.

Hong Kong.

As a handing over statement between two storemen it may be satisfactory. Its preparation covered six months. But as an independent survey, such as is required by Col. Reg. 355, especially necessary in the case of P.W.D. Stores which form an asset of the Balance Sheet, it is of little use, and cannot be verified with the Ledgers. The fact that a store balance is correct, say, on June 27th, is poor evidence that it will be correct on December 31st. I have made a few tests and have no reason to think it is other than accurate and I agree that approval should be asked to write on and off.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

This refers to so-called survey of P.W.D. Stores, it is unpriced and of no value to audit. A test check with the cards has been made.

(Intd.) P.L.C.

Hon. C.S.

Please see D.P.W.'s and my minute on previous page.

I recommend that approval be given to write on and off these differences.

The question of a Board of Survey at the end of the year can be left in abeyance at the moment. No Board of Survey was taken on 31.12.30. The statement attached is a verifica- tion of stock and it is not a statement of balances on hand.

Auditor.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR.

Treasurer.

2.5.31.

Write on and write off as recommended. Approved by command.

(Sgd.) N. L. SMITH,

p. C.S. 7.5.31

No. 1/24.

Hon. CT.

A (2) 18

Enclosure P.

MISCELLANEOUS DEPOSITS BEARING

INTEREST.

DEPOSITS.

I beg to refer to the system by which record is kept of "Miscellaneous Deposits Bearing Interest."

2. This book is not kept in ledger form and the only check that can be exercised to prove whether a deposit is still in existence is to see whether the column "Date of refund" has been filled in. Many of these deposits being for individual amounts of some thousands of dollars. the check is of some importance.

3. It thus occurred that in examining the securities given by officers in respect of their pecuniary liabilities it was necessary to refer to these books as far back as 1917.

4. A certain amount of risk attaches to using books over 10 years old. You will notice, for instance, that there is a June 1917 deposit, Lam Kwong $50, still held and the pages at that portion of the book are loose. In this particular instance it is noted that eleven payments of interest have had to be entered in an almost impossibly small space.

5. I should be glad to know if there would be any objection to opening personal ledger accounts for these deposits in the orthodox form.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

2.1.31.

A (2) 19

Auditor.

I am adopting a new system by means of cards running numerically and placed in a Steel Cabinet. Deposit receipts will be issued from numbered books in several series.

I hope to have this going by 1.3.31. It depends as to how soon I can get the receipt books and the cards printed. I have bought the cabinet.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR, Treasurer.

27.1.31.

Hon. C. T.

Are these cards available for audit now, please?

As you know, I have to certify the various deposit items. in the Balance Sheet and, if it is possible, I should like to be able to state that the total of the balances on the cards agree with these items.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

27.4.81.

Auditor.

All new deposits are being card indexed.

Old deposits are where possible being recalled, reissued, and card indexed. Over 200 have been done so far.

It will take at least 12 months to complete the whole circuit. All new deposits and all renewals are being registered in new books. The old books are being worked off as deposits are with- drawn and will eventually die naturally.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

20.5.31.

A (2) 20

Enclosure Q.

MILITARY CONTRIBUTION.

Extracts from C.S.O. File 4386/08. Part II.

CALCULATION OF MILITARY CONTRIBUTION IN RESPECT OF 1930.

ACTUAL REVENUE 1930

DEDUCT:

Class 1.

Opium Monopoly

$823,115.54

$27,818,472.92

Class II.

Kowloon Canton Railway

973,128.63

Class IV.

Condemned Stores &c......

34,298.93

Widows' & Orphans' Pensions

Contribution.

320,676.06

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

1,480,590.26

Overpayment (Exchange) in

previous years.

8,544.68

Class V.

Land Sales

2,864,897.03

Interest on 6% Public Works

(1927) Loan

295,620.00

Sinking Fund on above

333,000.00

7,133,871.18

Actual Revenue Assessable to Defence

Contribution 1930.

$20,684,601.79

20% of $20,684,601.79

$4,136,920.36

Actual payment of Defence Contribution on

account of 1930

3,861,861.00

Underpayment to be paid to the Military

Authorities

$ 275,059.36

A (2) 21

Hon. C. S.

I attach a statement showing the Military Contribution calculated in respect of the financial year ended 31st December 1930 $4,136,920.36. In my calculation I have assumed that the profit on exchange and overpayments recovered in respect of previous years will be exempted from Military Contribution.

The total payments made on account of 1930 fall short of the above figure by $275,059.36 and I propose to include this payment in the current monthly remittance on account of 1931 Military Contribution.

The amount provided in the 1931 Estimates for arrears on account of 1930 contribution is $126,751.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

6.5.31

Hon. C. S.

Through Hon. C. T.

Treasurer's minute of 6th May 1931, para.I.

I am afraid I am forced to re-open the question of the profit on exchange as related to the Military Contribution because the Secretary of State's instructions are not being followed.

2. There is deducted from the actual balance liable to Military Contribution the sum of $1,480,590.26 "Other Mis- cellaneous Receipts". This represents mainly the profit by reason of exchange on Sale of Investments &c., during the year less 20% credited to "Suspense Account, Military Contribution".

3. The question has been discussed at some length on previous occasions but it was definitely ruled by the Secretary of State after consultation with the Director of Colonial Audit that all such profits should be carried to revenue and therefore be assessable for Military Contribution.

In his despatch 431 of 26th November 1925 the Secretary of State gives his reasons for this ruling and requested that the suggestions of the Director of Colonial Audit for carrying it out may be adopted.

A (2) 22

4. This however has not yet been done and the practice during the last few years and followed in 1930 has been to deduct such profits from the assessable revenue and credit that portion of it which under the Secretary of State's ruling is due to the Military to a "Suspense Account Military Contribution."

5. An appeal against the ruling was made in Governor's despatch No. 400 dated 10th September 1929 but to this there has been no reply.

6. Owing to the large number of sales of investments in 1930 this liability has risen during this year from $556,129.30 to $926,276.87 and the matter becomes of some importance and in the absence of instructions to the contrary this amount should be paid to the Military.

65

7. With regard to the overpayments recovered in respect of previous years I agree that it is illogical that the Military should profit by accidents of accounting but so long as the law stands as it is and 'gross receipts", with certain specified exceptions, remains the basis of calculation of Military Contribution I do not see how I can pass the exclusion even of these recoveries. I do not think this point has been submitted before but I imagine there would be little difficulty in obtaining authority for the exclusion.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

19.5.31.

Hon. C. S.

I regret I do not agree with Auditor.

2. Para. 5 of his minute gives the position and I do not propose to advise Government to depart from the procedure followed during the last few years pending definite instructions from the S. of S. Our case has been put up, a reply is awaited.

3. Regarding para 7, O.P.R. this question as you will re- member has already been referred to the S. of S. together with other points dealing with the assessment for Military Contribution and may be a reply to all our submissions will come along shortly. In the meantime no action is necessary. I am strongly opposed to making any payment to the Military as the Auditor suggests in his para. 6.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

20.5.31.

No. 274.

A. (2) 23

My Lord,

Government House,

Hong Kong, 10th June, 1931.

I have the honour to invite Your Lordship's attention to Sir Cecil Clementi's despatch No. 400 of September 10th 1929, on the subject of the payment of Military Contribution on profit on exchange to which no reply has been received and to request that I may be favoured with Your Lordship's instructions in the matter.

The Right Honourable.

LORD PASSFIELD

&c., &c., &c.

I have the honour to be,

My Lord,

Your Lordship's most obedient, humble

servant,

(Sgd.) W. FEEL,

Governor, &c.

Hon: C. S.

A (2) 24

Enclosure R.

CONTRACTS FOR PUBLIC WORKS.

Contract No. 16 of 1929.

Extracts from C. S. O. File 1 in 468/29.

Contract No. 66 of 1929.

Extracts from C. S. O. File 58 in 468/29.

CONTRACT No. 16 or 1929.

Mr. Johnley Ching, the Contractor for Contract No. 16 of 1929--Construction of a. 10 feet path to Cape D'Aguilar Wireless Station (1st Section) has applied for the release of his security of $1,250.

2. The work was satisfactorily completed on 20.10.30. The date due for completion was 7.9.30 and the contractor was fined two weeks at $200. The reasons given for delay are as follows:-

1. This work was delayed during the summer of 1929 owing to water shortage and a considerable amount of sickness amongst the workmen. ·

2. Considerable rainstorm damage during the summer of 1930 delayed the completion of the contract.

In view of the above, the fine inflicted was considered sufficient, and in the circumstances, I recommend his application for approval.

Hon. C. T.

(Sgd.) H. E. GOLDSMITH.

p. D.P.W. 5.2.31.

Hon. C. S.

I agree with above.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer. 6. 2. 81.

Auditor,

Release approved by command,

(Sgd.) N. L. SMITH,

9 2.31.

A (2) 25

Hon. C. T.

I do not understand this. The contract was signed on 7/3/29 to be completed within 6 months (vide D.P.W's. minute of 18.3.29 above). In his minute of 5.2.31 the D.P.W. states that the date due for completion was 7/9/30 and calculates the fine on this basis.

Surely there is a mistake somewhere of one whole year.

I do not think the security should be released until this point is cleared up.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

21.2.31.

Hon. D.P.W.

Please explain. The security has already been released.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

23.2.31.

Hon. C. T.

Paragraph 2 of my minute should read "The date due for completion was 7/9/29" but it was not until 20/10/30 that the work was satisfactorily completed. For the reasons given in the minute above referred to only a nominal fine was inflicted.

(Sgd.) H. E. GOLDSMITH,

p. D.P.W.

Auditor.

For information.

7.3.31.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

9.3.31,

Hon. C. S.

A (2) 26

If the Government is satisfied that a two weeks penalty of $200 is sufficient in this case for a delay of 58 weeks on a six months contract for over $16,000 I have nothing more to say. But I should like definite authority to pass this.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

10.3.31.

Hon. C. S.

I fear I was misled (as I think was the Treasurer) by the words

"The date due for completion was 7/9/30" and "The contractor was fined two weeks at $200" at the foot of page 4. The release having been approved and carried through will you approve this retrospectively.

Approved accordingly by command.

(Intd.) N. L. S.

12.3.31.

(Sgd.) E. R. HALLIFAX,

12.3.31

CONTRACT No. 66 of 1929.

Hon. C. S.

Through Hon. Treasurer.

Summarised, the accounting history of this contract is as

follows:

1. Security deposited

2. Work commenced

3. Work completed

4. Bill submitted

5. Amount agreed to

6. First and only payment

7. No retention money held.

22nd November. 1929

18th December, 1929

5th February, 1930

March, 1930

May, 1930 August, 1930

8. Release of security authorised 4th February, 1931 or 60 weeks after the commencement of work on a 7 weeks contract.

A (2) 27

2. In my opinion this is definitely unsatisfactory, equally so with other examples I have brought to notice in C.S.O. 1 in 468/29, 5 in 468/29, 7 in 3245/22 and in several queries.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

23.3.31.

Hon. C. S.

Forwarded. I agree with the Auditor that it is definitely unsatisfactory. These long delays in payment mean in the end extra cost to Government, as contractors knowing the usual delay charge extra in tenders.

Another case that has recently come to my notice over complaints from Mr. Montague Ede of the Excavation Co. is P.W.D. Pay List 208 of March for $18,797.85. Account signed by Mr. Henderson 4/2/31. P.W.D. Accounts section 9/3/31. D.P.W's signature 14/3/31. Received Treasury 16/3/31. Paid 18/3/31. Over a month's delay. Mr. Ede informs me they work on a Bank Overdraft at 61%. This means for a month a loss of $101.

(Sgd.) C. Mcl. MESSER,

Treasurer.

25.5.31.

Hon. D. P. W.

Referred.

(Sgd.) N. L. SMITH,

p. C. S. 27.3.31;

Hon. C. S.

I agree that the cases referred to by the Auditor are entirely unsatisfactory. The explanations in each case have been given and steps are being taken to prevent a recurrence of such

occurrences,

2. With reference to paragraph 2 of Hon. C. T's minute the bill in question was delayed (on Treasury instructions) on account of no funds being available. Advance Warrants were submitted, and though signed were later cancelled. Fresh

À (2) 28 —

Advance Warrants were prepared on 13th February and no advice that they were signed was received until 14th March. The bill was submitted for signature on that date and passed with covering vouchers to Treasury for payment.

(Sgd.) HAROLD T. CREASY,

Hon. C. T.

D. P. W.

2.4.31.

If you wish to continue the discussion on the second case it had better be extracted to another file.

(Sgd.) N. L. SMITH,

p. C. S. 8.4.31.

Hon. C. S.

No. The head of department should see that funds are available.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER.

Treasurer.

Auditor.

To see.

9.4.31.

(Sgd.) N. L. SMITH,

p. C. S. 11.4.31.

Hon. C. S.

Seen. The discussion here and elsewhere has served its purpose by resulting in arrangements being made to control contracts more closely in future. So far as this department is concerned it may be dropped.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

13.4.31.

No. 77.

Hon. C.S.

A (2) 29

Enclosure S.

TRADE LOAN ACCOUNT.

Extracts from C.S.O. File 1047/25 Part III.

Through Hon. C.T.

Trade Loan.

I should be much obliged if I may be informed of the policy of the Government with regard to these loans if such policy has immediate bearing on the Asset "Trade Loan Outstanding".

2. This asset stood on the 31st August, 1930 at $2,376,559.22 or practically one eighth of the whole of the Colony's assets, and includes certain items which from the records at my disposal I am unable to judge as being worth the full value still assigned to them.

3. It may facilitate discussion if I quote instances in which there is in my mind some doubt whether Governnient is actually likely to realise the full value of the asset.

4. Tam Hok Po (Fo. 4 Current Trade Loan Ledger) was in December 1925 advanced $127,000 at varying rates of interest. The repayment of this loan was due on 22nd December, 1927, but not only has no such repayment been made, even in part, but since 28th September, 1927, no interest has been paid and the position to date is that the whole of the principal and $39,203.00 interest is owing to Government.

Is the Government satisfied that this amount $127,000 is actually a tangible and realisable asset?

5. Tsang Hin Ting (Fos. 17 and 110) was in January 1926 advanced $110,000 repayable on 8th January, 1928. The last full payment of interest was in November 1926 and no repay- ment of principal has been made. Some part payments of interest have been made but the position to-day is that principal of $110,739.13 (the slight increase being due to an insurance) and $29,133.43 interest are due to Government.

6. Li Kan Kwong (Fo. 33) was advanced $77,000 in February 1926, repayable on 5th March, 1928.

5th March, 1928. Only $1,250 interest has been received and no portion of the principal repaid and his indebtedness to Government now stands at $77,000 prmeipal and $32,363.11 interest.

A (2) 30

7. I attach a schedule of thirteen of these loans the present position of which does not seem too satisfactory.

8. It will be seen that in addition to the outstanding capital of these particular loans ($1,294,990.13) there is also interest outstanding amounting to $302,890.13. Though under

under the current accounting procedure this amount does not appear as an asset in the Colony's Balance Sheet, yet it undoubtedly is owing to the Government and appears as an asset in the Trade Loan Balance Sheet so that in this case also the Government is concerned with the realisable value of the amount.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

18.12.30.

Principal.

Interest.

Tai Ping Theatre

(1)

140,000.00

20,004.67

Tam Hok Po

(4)

127,000.00

39.203.00

Li Ying Chee

(8)

126,000.00

39,532.52

China Leather Co.

(10)

151,251.00 46,373.36

Tsang Hin Ting

(17)

110,739.13 29,133.43

Lo Tso Sang

(24)

33,000.00

10,918.00

Li Kam Kwong

(33) 77,000.00

32,363.11

Tam Shin Hồng

(35)

25,000.00

4,748.37

Wang Yip & Co.

(36)

52,000.00

10,975.93

Woo Shin Ting

(43)

133,000.00

28,913.13

Lai Wai Chun

(49)

194,000.00

9,290.74

Tai Tak Lam

(54)

66,000.00

14,857.85

Tsang Foo

(75)

50,000.00 16,576.02

$1,294,990.13 302,890.13

Hon. C.S.

The attached letter from the Auditor is forwarded.

At date in question the Trade Loan Suspense Account stood at $883,413.43 and the final result should be a profit to Government of over $500,000.

:

On 13/26.

A (2) 31

The Trade Loan was for the purpose of making loans on security approved by the Governor to merchants and others in the Colony during a certain period of Financial stringency.

The loans were not treated as investments but as assistance to traders. Where it is impossible for borrowers to redeem, the property is disposed of as best opportunity occurs.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

2.1.31.

Hon. C.S.

There is no necessity to go into each case. The Auditor is only asking general questions. The Treasury has files for each case. We must have some bad cases, and in such the only thing is to get rid of them when opportunity arises.

(Sgd.) C. McI. MESSER,

Treasurer.

15.1.31.

Auditor.

Does this satisfy you?

(Sgd.) N. L. Smith.

16.1.31.

Hon. C.S.

The financial side of this question is so closely affected by administrative and political policy that I am willing for the present to accept things as they are but it will be necessary for me to refer in general terms to the whole subject in my Annual Report.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

22.1.31.

- A (2) 32

Hon. C.T.

(1). Have not some of the cases with which Auditor deals been finally dealt with and the Account closed?

(2). What steps are being taken to expedite the closing of the other Accounts in which there is long standing default?

(Sgd.) E. R. HALLIFAX,

Colonial Secretary.

22.1.31.

Hon. C.S.

Spoken with Crown Solicitor.

One case (Tam Shui Hong) has already been dealt with. The principal $25,000-was recovered but we made a loss of $5,173.47 in respect of the interest which was written off- See C.S.O. 1 in 3104/1931.

The Tai Ping Theatre's loan of $140,000 will be cleared off our books on or about 24th May. Negotiations with the borrowers are proceeding and I expect to recover $147.000 This amount will wipe off the principal but we will make a loss on interest of about $13,000.

Every endeavour is being made to clear up the other items as favourable opportunities arise, and without serious loss. meanwhile, I am collecting what I can by way of small monthly payments from certain of the borrowers, and in other cases I am collecting the rents.

I submit herewith, in triplicate, statements of accounts as at 31st December, 1930.

Passed to Crown Solicitor.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

29.4.31

A. (2) 33

Enclosure T.

PUBLIC WORKS (1927) LOAN.

No. 59/61.

From Auditor

To Hon.

Treasurer

Hong Kong

Hong Kong.

2nd June, 1931.

PUBLIC WORKS LOAN 1927.

There are certain points arising from audit of the Public Works Loan Accounts for 1930 upon which I should be glad if I may be given further information.

2. On 31st December 1930 the balance of the Public Works Loan Cash Book is nil and the Pass Book balance is $188,082.53 representing merely outstanding cheques which by January 16th 1931 were all cleared. I take it therefore that it is intended that from January 1st 1931 the Public Works Loan as a separate accounting unit ceases to exist and that in consequence the only item of the Assets and Liabilities Statement on 31st December 1930 which has any bearing on this Loan accounting is $623,066.83 included in the asset 'Advances on account of future Loan. May I be informed please of the position and, if my

view is correct, how it is proposed to incorporate in the Colony's accounts the ledger balances at present shown in the Loan Books as existing on 1st January 1931.

<

3. On 22nd December 1930 $59,366.52 of the Public Works Loan was placed on Fixed Deposit and though it is shown on the Annual Loan Statement for 1930 (increased by a further $1,701.50) as a "Sinking Fund Reserve" it does not appear in the books of the Colony. I am not certain of the object of this account but whatever this may be it would seem that it should be shown in the Colonial Balance Sheet.

4. A cheque for $89,833.68 is shown on the Annual Loan Statement as having been refunded to the Colony on 31st December 1930, the Loan cheque bears that date, as also does the Treasury receipt. Yet the transaction is not included in the Colony's Balance Sheet for the year. This also requires explanation.

(Sgd.) P. L. COLLISSON,

Auditor.

- A (2) 34

Auditor.

With reference to your memo. No. 59/61 dated the 2nd inst., on the subject of the P.W. loan accounts I have the honour to inform you that as from 31st December last this separate unit was closed. My view is that it never should have been divorced from the Colony's accounts in the way it has. *The $623,066.83 is not P.W. Loan but "Advances on account of future loan". The P.W. Loan has been fully expended.

2. The item of $59,366.52 is a reserve set up to increase the sinking fund. Sinking funds are of course not shown as Assets but as this has not been so applied I have, in order to account for it in the books, made an entry in the March Account.

3. The cheque for $89,833.68 should have been credited on 31st December 1930 but by an error was not credited till the first business day of 1931.

(Sgd.) EDWIN TAYLOR,

Treasurer.

15.6.31.

I only said it 'had a bearing' on the Loan.

(Intd.) P. L. C.

B 1.

REPORT ON THE ASSESSMENT FOR THE YEAR 1931-1932.

1. By Order of His Excellency the Governor in Council a new valuation of the whole Colony has been made and the Rateable Value has thereby been increased from $33,069,602 to $35,071,566 an addition of $2,001,964 or 6.04 per cent.

2. The following table gives a comparison of the Assessments for the year 1930-1931 and 1931-1932 :

District.

Valuation 1930-1931.

Valuation 1931-1932.

Increase.

Per cent.

The City of Victoria ...

23,316,978

23,316,978

Hill District

555,375

24,197,119 558,201

24,197,119

$80,141

3.77

Shaukiwan, Saiwanho

and Quarry Bay

624,345

635,673

Hong Kong Villages

1,455,616

2,635,336

1,582,508

2,776,382

141,046

5,35

Kowloon Foint

1,750,345

1,954,054

Yaumati

1,868,604

2,023,647

Mong Kok Tsui

1,417,806

1,750,074

Hung Hom & Hok Un...

652,420

656,760

Kowloon Villages

289,322 5,978,497

New Kowloon

1,138,791

328,255 6,712,790 1,138,791 1,385,275 1,385,275

734,293 12,28 246,484 21.64

Total

33,069,602

35,071,566 2,001,964

6.04

3. The number of tenements reported to be vacant averaged about 132 monthly, as compared with 144 last year.

4. During the year ending 21st May, 1931, 1735 Interim Valuations were made as follows:--

CITY OF VICTORIA.

REST OF COLONY.

No.

Rateable Value.

No.

Rateable Value.

New or rebuilt tenements and

tenements structurally altered... Assessments cancelled, tenements resumed, pulled down or being in other respects not rateable

398

714,067

1,115

966,398

73

135,980

149

94,110

Number and Increase......

471

578,087

1,264

872,288

B 2

5. The following comparative statement shows the Rateable Value of the Colony of Hong Kong from 1921-1922 to 1931-1932 inclusive:

Increase as

Year.

Rateable Value.

compared with previous year.

Percentage of In-

crease in Rateable Value as compared with previous year.

$

%

1921-1922

18,696,660

1922-1923

19,805,929

1,109,269

5.91

1923-1924

21,059,700

1,253,771

6.33

1924-1925

22,147,951

1,088,251

5.16

1925-1926

27,287,862

5,139,911

23.20

1926-1927

27,998,237

710,375

2.60

1927-1928

29,016,439

1,018,202

3.64

1928-1929

30,395,447

1,379,008

4.75

1929-1930

31,617,566

1,222,119

4.02

1930-1931

33,069,602

1,452,036

4.59

1931-1932

35,071,565

2,001,964

6.04

6. In the ten

years from 1921-1922 to 1931-1932 the rateable value of the Colony has increased by $16,384,906 or 87.6 per cent.

7. This being the year of the Census it is interesting to note from the preliminary Census figures, that whilst the population of the Island of Hong Kong has increased in the last ten years by about 22 per cent the assessment of the Island has increased by 68.3 per cent. In Kowloon and New Kowloon the population has increased by about 113 per cent in the last ten years and the assessment by 204 per cent. If the Island of Hong Kong is taken together with Kowloon and New Kowloon the increase in population during the last ten years is about 46 per cent whilst the increase in the assessment is 87.6 per cent.

THE TREASURY,

21st May, 1981.

EDWIN TAYLOR, Treasurer & Assessor.

Appendix C.

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR CHINESE AFFAIRS FOR THE YEAR 1930.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE,

(Tables I and II).

1. The Revenue derived from all sources during the year was $20,176.00 and the Expenditure was $138,372.00.

PROTECTION OF WOMEN AND GIRLS.

(Table III).

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

Ordinance No. 21 of 1929.

Ordinance No. 6 of

1893.

Ordinance No. 1 of

1923.

Ordinance No. 22 of 1929.

2. The number of persons reported to the Po Leung Kuk as missing during the year was 25 of whom 2 were found as compared with 58 and 7 in 1929.

3. Twelve names were added to the list of girls under bond. The number of names on the list on December 31st was 36.

4. Part III of the Female Domestic Service Ordinance was brought into force by proclamation on December 1st, 1929, and a period of six months was allowed for registration of Mui Tsai. The response at first was very slow but a campaign' of advertisement and distribution of many thousands of pamphlets resulted in an ultimate total of 4,299 registrations. The District Watch Committee rendered valuable service in helping this department to attain a result which is considered very satisfactory.

The Ordinance further requires subsequent notification on the occasion not only of the death or disappearance of a muitsai but also of her intended removal from the Colony, change of address or intended marriage. By the end of December this department took note of attrition in the ranks of Hong Kong Mui Tsai to the extent of 206. No new registrations are per- mitted and by degrees the numbers in the colony will be reduced to vanishing point. Although hard cases have occurred, this department has strictly carried out the policy laid down with regard to bringing unregistered muitsai into the colony, and

C 2

cases

invariably prosecutes the offenders who have in many without concealment themselves acquainted us with their offence. In all such cases action is taken in the best interests of the girl. This may take the form of allowing her to remain in a household where she is obviously happy provided the persons concerned leave the colony under official supervision.

During the year 25 prosecutions were brought under the Muitsai Ordinance (1 of 1923) with 22 convictions.

Under the Women and Girls Protection Ordinance (4 ɔf 1897) 16 prosecutions were brought with 14 convictions. These were cases of harbouring or procuring.

Further, under Ordinance 2 of 1865, particularly under the new Section 45 A of Ordinance 2 of 1865, which was passed towards the end of 1929, 22 cases were brought on charges connected with trafficking in minors, and 26 convictions were obtained.

5. For a fuller report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk see Annexe A of this report.

EMIGRATION.

(Ordinance 30 of 1915).

(1)--EMIGRATION OF WOMEN AND CHILDREN.

(Table IV).

6. The number of female and minor passengers examined and allowed to proceed shows a decrease of 4.2% over the figures for 1929. Of the female emigrants 70.5% went with or to join relatives, 21% were maid servants and the remainder consisted of tailoresses, farmers and hairdressers.

36 women were detained for enquires as compared with 131 in 1929. number repatriated during the year was 84.

(ii)-ASSISTED EMIGRATION,

(Table V).

The

7. The figures for the year show a decrease of 51% as compared with 1929.

CHINESE BOARDING HOUSES. ·

(Ordinance 23 of 1917).

(Table VI).

8. During the year 10 convictions were obtained under the ordinance as compared with 12 in 1929. These convictions were mainly for keeping a Boarding House without a licence and for failing to enter names in the register.

C 3

PERMITS.

(Ordinance 3 of 1888).

9. 1,726 permits to fire crackers were issued of which 1,354 were for weddings and the remainder for birthdays, shop open- ings, etc. 89 permits were issued for theatrical performances.

Other permits issued were 24 for religious ceremonies and 5 for processions.

REGISTRATION OF BOOKS.

(Ordinance 2 of 1886).

10. 36 books were registered during the year as compared with 59 in 1929.

REGISTRATION OF NEWSPAPERS.

(Ordinance 25 of 1927 and 1 of 1930).

11. The number of Registered Chinese papers existing on December 31st was 25; of these 9 were registered during the

year.

By Ordinance 1 of 1930 all newspapers seeking registration must deposit a security of $3,000.00 with the Registrar either in cash or by means of a bond. One effect of this provision has been to reduce by 38 the number of small news- papers of the "mosquito" type.

DISTRICT WATCH FORCE.

(Ordinance 23 of 1930). (Table VII).

12. A new ordinance, No. 23 of 1930, was passed, entitled the District Watch Force Ordinance. This Ordinance mainly re-enacts the provisions of the relevant portion of the Regulation of Chinese Ordinance, No. 3 of 1888, which has now been repealed.

13. The District Watch Committee met on 12 occasions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. In addition 4 meetings at which His Excellency the Governor presided were held at Government House. The following gentlemen served on the committee throughout the year:-

Mr. Lei Yau-tsun, C.B.E., Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt.,

Mr. Tong Yat-chun,

Mr. Fung Ping-shan,

Mr. Lo Cheung-shiu, Mr. Wong Iu tung,

Mr. To Sz-tun,

Hon. Dr. R. H. Kotewall,

C.M.G.,

Mr. Li Po-kwai,

Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, 0.B.E.,

Mr. Li Yik-mui,

Mr. Wong Tak-kwong.



גי

C 4

Mr. Wong Kam-fuk, after nearly twenty years of valuable service on the Committee, resigned owing to ill-health in December, and Mr. Wong Tak-kwong was appointed to the vacancy thus created.

Messrs. Tang Shiu-kin and Ma Chui-chiu retired on the expiration of

of their year of office and were succeeded by

Messrs. M. K. Lo and Chan Tin-shan.

14. At the end of the year the District Watch Force con- sisted of 133 men. 15 members of the force were dismissed, 5 resigned, 1 invalided and 2 died; 31 new men were recruited during the year.

Sub-Inspector Carey went on leave on January 4th and Inspector J. Murphy was seconded from the Police Department to take charge of the force from that date. The post is an arduous and responsible one involving as it does the control almost single handed of a considerable body of men, the duties of liaison officer between the Police and District Watch, and the detailed supervision of the activities of the detective branch. Inspector Murphy worthily maintained

worthily maintained the high standard set by his predecessors in this office,

15. The total number of police court cases secured by members of the force was 845 as compared with 737 in 1929. The work of the Force under the able supervision of Inspector Murphy was good. The strength of the Force was increased by 8 and approval was also given of the appointment of a further 8 men for the purpose of extending patrols to Shamshuipo District in 1931. New scales of pay were approved with effect from July 1st, 1930.

TUNG WA HOSPITAL AND MAN MO TEMPLE.

(Table VIII to Table XVIII).

Ordinances 31 of 1930 and 10 of 1908.

16. The following gentlemen served on the Committee for 1930:-

Mr. Leung Pat-yu, Mr. H. Hong Sling, Mr. Yan Tit-yu, Mr. Chiu Chan-yu, Mr. Yu Piu-kwai, Mr. Chan Yee-wan, Mr. Kwok Chan, Mr. Leung Iu-cho, Mr. Wong Yun-tong.

Mr. Chan Hung-leung,

Mr. Au Wui-chun,

Mr. Wong Tai-shan, Mr. Wong Lan-kam, Mr. Chu Pak-fai, Mr. Cheng Shum-chun, Mr. Chan Sik-nin, Mr. Fung Cheuk-hin,

- C 5

17. The number of in-patients treated during 1930 12,223 as against 12,326 in 1929 of whom 6,675 as against 7,107 in 1929 came under Western treatment and 5,548 as against 5,219 in 1929 under native treatment. The number of out-patients was 229,155 as against 207,437 in 1929 of whom 190,220 as against 186,178 in 1929 attended the herbal clinic and 38,935 as against 21,259 in 1929 the Western clinic.

The number of persons temporarily housed and then sent to their homes at the expense of the Hospital was 3,761 as against 1,571 in 1929. This increase was chiefly due to the larger number of repatriates from Malaya.

18. The Directors under the Chairmanship of Mr. Leung Fat-yue showed great enthusiasm and activity in adding to and improving the buildings under the Hospital's control.

On December 16th Lady Peel, on behalf of His Excellency the Governor who was unfortunately prevented by indisposition from being present, opened two new wings at the Tung Wa Eastern Hospital. These fine new wings are part of a plan of gradual enlargement of the Hospital, and were built at a cost of $51,360.00.

Secondly, the Directors put in hand and proceeded with the demolition and reconstruction, at a cost of $36,000.00, of that portion of the Tung Wa Hospital building known as the Yan Yan Fong. The work was almost completed by the end of the year and is a valuable contribution to the improved amenities of the Hospital.

Thirdly, the interest taken by the Hospital in free vernacular education was again manifested. In 1929 a building

had been erected to accommodate the six free schools conducted by the Hospital in the Central District. In 1930 this policy was extended to the Eastern District, and at the end of the year fine new premises in Lockhart Road on the Praya East Reclamation were nearly completed. They will accommodate the pupils of the Hospital's three vernacular free schools in that neighbourhood, and in addition will provide for an increased number of pupils.

19. An event of great importance was the passing of the Tung Wa Hospital Ordinance No. 31 of 1930, by which the Tung Wa, the Kwong Wa and the Tung Wa Eastern Hospital are consolidated in one group with one body of Directors. This consolidation is of great value not only by the gain in uniformity and economy of control, but also by knitting together more closely the interests of all three Hospitals and uniting them in one harmonious whole.

C 6

KWONG WA HOSPITAL,

(Table XIX).

20. The following gentlemen served on the Committee

for 1930:

Mr. Ho Sing-chau,

Mr. Fan Ping-yau, Mr. Chu Shum-wing, Mr. Lau Ping-chai, Mr. Wong Kam-pui, Mr. Tsang Yung,

Mr. Hung Iu-to,

Mr. Chan Kam-chun, Mr. Kwok Tam-wan,

Mr. Ng Kang-yu, Mr. Lui Wai-shun, Mr. Wong Tat-wing.

21. The number of in-patients admitted during the year was 9,586 as against 8,810 in 1929 of whom 7,596 as against 6,915 in 1929 elected to receive Western treatment and 1,990 as against 1,895 in 1929 Native treatment. The number of out- patients was 140,291 as against 135,528 in 1929, 94,755 is against 94,067 in 1929 under Native and 45,536 as against 41,191 in 1929 under Western treatment.

22. In consequence of the passing of the new Tung Wa Hospital Ordinance, this year is the last to see a separate Committee for the Kwong Wa Hospital.

Mr. Ho Sing-chau and his colleagues may well feel proud at handing over to the new consolidated directorate an institution where they and their predecessors during twenty years have steadily worked for expansion and improvement.

23. Statement of accounts and other reports furnished by the Committee of the Tung Wa Hospital are published for general information (Tables X to XVII). Full details of the income and expenditure of the Tung Wa Hospital and Kwong Wa Hospital are to be found in the annual volumes published in Chinese by the two committees. Further information regarding the work of the hospitals will be found in the report of the Medical Department.

NURSES TRAINING SCHOOL.

Chinese Hospitals.

24. Nurses are in training at the Tung Wa, Tung Wa Eastern, Kwong Wa and Tsan Yuk Hospitals.

The value of having nurses in training is very considerable and the influence on the general welfare of the hospital is apparent.

These nurses are trained in general nursing and midwifery. The training is carried out by the Matrons of the hospitals, the Resident Medical Officers, and the staff of the Visiting Medical Officer.

They should prove of considerable value to the health of the Colony.

C 7

CLINICS.

25. Twenty clinics are held in the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries in a week:-

14 Gynaecological clinics.

3 Antenatal clinics.

3 Infant Welfare Clinics.

The clinics held in the various hospitals and dispensaries are increasing in number and size and are advancing according to modern tendencies elsewhere. The separation of certain diseases into clinics is economical and very satisfactory in many other ways. The advantages to the community in general are being felt as one of the outstanding advantages of clinics is either in prevention of disease or treatment in the early stages.

The clinics are run by the resident staff of the various hospitals and dispensaries and by the staff of the Visiting Medical Officer. Much of the success of the clinics is due to the co- operation which exists amongst the various members of the staff.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

(Tables XXI to XXIV)

26. A new dispensary was opened in Aberdeen Village on September 26th, 1930, and is supplying a much needed want in this district. The population consists largely of fisherfolk. It is some considerable distance from any of the hospitals in the Colony.

The total number of new patients treated during the year in the nine dispensaries was 122,395. There were in addition 98,385 visits by old cases the dispensaries and 27,340 attendances for dressings.

Vaccinations:-25,242 vaccinations were performed during

the year.

CHINESE MATERNITY HOSPITALS. (Table XXV).

27. There are two Chinese Maternity Hospitals under the management of the Chinese Dispensaries Committee, and in addition there are maternity wards in each of the hospitals under the management of the Tung Wah Hospital Committee. In all the hospitals maternity patients are treated by Western methods.

(a) THE TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL (60 beds).

28. Two extra beds have been added in the maternity wards. 46 beds are reserved for maternity cases and 14 beds for gynaecological cases,

The Lady Medical Officers conduct four clinics each week at this Hospital, namely; Antenatal, Venereal Diseases, Infant Welfare and Gynaecological.

The total number of deliveries was 1,251 out of a total of 1,326 admissions. 69 children were still born, a decrease of 22 from last year.

There were two maternal deaths.

(b) THE WANCHAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL (22 beds)." 29. This hospital is connected with the Eastern Public Dispensary. A Western trained Chinese Doctor is in charge.

The number of admissions was 827. The number of deliveries was 815 with 35 still-births. There was one maternal death.

(c) TUNG WAHI HOSPITAL MATERNITY WARDS (24 beds).

30. There are 24 beds in the this Hospital for maternity cases. During the year there were 1,929, deliveries, a decrease of 63 from last year. The total number treated was 1,955.

There were no maternal deaths.

(d) KWONG WA HOSPITAL MATERNITY WARDS (57 beds).

31. The maternity block of this Hospital is separate from the main building. 3,097 cases were delivered out of 3,133 admissions. There were 18 maternal deaths.

32. Dr. Ware was appointed to succeed Dr. E. W. Kirk as Visiting Medical Officer for Chinese Hospital and Public Dispensaries. Dr. Ware has been exceedingly helpful, and his co-operation with the management and staffs of the various institutions where he works has been very marked.

33. Dr. (Mrs.) Dovey continued to do valuable work as Assistant Visiting Medical Officer. She was assisted throughout the year by Dr. Lai Po Chun, and also since July by, Dr. Ruttonjee. Both these ladies, Dr. Lai and Dr. Ruttonjee. are graduates of Hong Kong University.

CHINESE PERMANENT CEMETERY.

(Table XXVI).

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

(Table XXVII).

34. This is controlled by a Committee consisting of the Secretary for Chinese Affairs as Chairman and the three Chinese Members of Legislative Council.

A scheme has been under consideration for putting in hand a general reconstruction of the stalls, booths and kitchens and a new lay-out of the ground. The need for this has long been felt but a considerable sum of money will be required to bring it about.

C 9

www..commo

PASSAGE MONEY FUND.

(Table XXVII)..

Translations.

35. The total number of translations made in the depart- ment during 1930 was 1,501 as compared with 1,606 in 1929. 658 of these were from Chinese into English and 843 from English into Chinese. In addition a large number of translations made in other Government departments were sent to this office for revision.

LABOUR.

I. General:

36. The year 1930 saw a certain increase in the number of labour disputes, details of which are given below. It remains true that most of the guilds are financially embarrassed, th hard times through which the workers of the Colony are passing having caused subscriptions to fall into arrears.

A great proportion of the workers in Hong Kong are paid on a piece-work basis, and such categories as regular and casual workers are hardly applicable to conditions in many trades here, where men are engaged and rewarded by curiously com- plicated systems.

Wages have, so far as can be seen, tended downward, trade having been bad for the whole of the period under review. This fact, together with the increasing price of commodities consequent on the low exchange value of the dollar, was the cause of the more serious labour disputes; though the price of the cheaper grades of rice, the staple of the lowest paid section of the population, has not increased in proportion to other commodities. There has been no appreciable movement in house rents.

That there has been much unemployment, especially among unskilled workers, is certain. It has probably been greater than in the immediately preceding years, but figures are impossible to obtain, and it is even doubtful how far the fact is due to the condition of the Colony, and how far to the dis- tracted state of the interior.

II. Disputes and Strikes:

37. In February this office arbitrated in a dispute between the rice coolies and their employers, due to the decision of the latter to reduce wages by one-third. The attitude of the Tung Pak Guild to which the coolies belong was reasonable, and the

ere was eventually settled by a compromise.

C 10

of

The most serious dispute of the year was that of the Scaffold Workers' Guild, which involved some 800 men. It was due to the attempt of the masters to reintroduce the old complicated system of payment which so intensified competition within the shop that the standard of living was seriously lowered. It was peculiarly difficult to effect a settlement but the workers having enlisted the sympathies of the Chinese Chamber of Commerce and of certain prominent Chinese in the Colony, eventually won the day on all points in dispute. It is noteworthy that, despite the large numbers involved and the importation strike-breakers from up country, this office was able to influence the guild to such effect that no violence or intimidation occurred. A strike affecting about 300 workers in the Commercial Press factory was settled by a small concession to the workers. There is some indication that this strike was engineered from outside the Colony. Another strike, in the Nanyang Tobacco Co.'s factory, was demonstrated to be the work of communists from without, who spread false runours and distributed in- flammatory leaflets; the strike lasted only a few hours.

a

At the end of the year a dispute was still going on between the masters of certain wholesale tailoring shops and the workers. who have recently organised a labour guild. It concerns recent reduction in the piece-work rates to which the masters were driven by competition among themselves. There were good prospects of an amicable settlement, the masters being sympathetic with the workers' case.

In connection with the above disputes interesting and important data were gathered regarding wages, hours, and conditions of work and employment generally in the several trades.

III. Cost of living of poorer classes:

38. Since October 1927 this office has made monthly inquiries into the retail costs of a number of commodities essential to the life of the poorer classes, including articles of food and clothing and firewood. The average percentage increase between 1929 and December 1930 was found to be 6.33%, or, excluding firewood, 8.08%.

FACTORIES. (Table XXIX).

Trade continued dull throughout the year and most of the factories in the Colony worked at much below their full capacity. The knitting factories-making hosiery and cotton underwear- are the largest employers of women and girls and the number of these factories is increasing. Perfumery, confectionery and cigarette factories also afford light and congenial employment to large numbers of women. The number of children employed shows no tendency to increase. With trade in an almost

C 11

stagnant condition there is no need to engage new hands, but should trade improve it is to be expected that children would again be taken on as learners. The number of children regularly employed in factories does not exceed 100.

These are mostly working in knitting factories. No European firms employ children under the age of fifteen years.

at

The regulations governing the employment of women night were strengthened during the year by further limiting the hours of employment. Night work, i.e. between the hours of 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. is now prohibited for women and all young persons under the age of eighteen years. This measure did not incet with the approval of certain Chinese owners of knitting factories who petitioned the Government asking that the regulation be relaxed to allow night work in these factories when thought necessary. They claimed that owing to slackness of trade they were unable to maintain a steady output and the uncertainties of exchange made it impossible for them to keep a large stock of goods on hand. Overtime and night work were therefore necessary to enable them to cope with orders as they were received. The petition was not granted. Another change effected during the year was that the minimum age for admission of children to factories was raised from 10 to 12 years. This met with no opposition. These two measures mark an important step forward in local industrial legislation.

Prosecutions.--Seven prosecutions were instituted during the year under the Industrial Employment of Women and Children Ordinance. Five of these were brought by this department against Chinese factory owners for working women at night two were Police cases against Chinese shopkeepers for compelling children to carry unduly heavy loads. Con- victions were obtained in each case with fines ranging from twenty-five to fifty dollars.

Accidents. The total number of accidents in factories was 75 of which 7 were fatal, as compared with 86 (8 fatal) for the preceding year. The majority of accidents occurred in ship- building yards and were chiefly due to falls from staging or into ships holds. Only one accident concerned a woman, this being a welcome change from former years, when before the fencing of machinery was made compulsory, scalping accidents amongst women in factories were frequent.

General. At the request of the Empire Canning Council an investigation was made into the canning industry in this Colony and the possibilities of its expansion on the lines of દી questionnaire sent out by the Council. Hong Kong possesses a small trade in canned goods but caters chiefly for the native market. Any attempt to extend the industry could succeed only if accompanied by modern methods of production and ertified standards of quality and purity. The information gathered during the enquiry was forwarded to the Canning

uncil for their consideration.

Another enquiry made

C 12

was a general survey of labour conditions in the Colony with special regard to wages, hours of work and housing conditions. This was embodied in a report to the Secretary of State.

The import taxes recently imposed by the Government of China may, temporarily at least, have a detrimental effect on some of the local industries which formerly depended on the China market. Goods manufactured in Hong Kong are classed as foreign goods and taxed accordingly. This has practically closed the China trade to local manufacturers and compelled them to seek markets elsewhere, notably in the Straits Settle- ments and the Dutch East Indies. It is too early yet to say what permanent effect the new Chinese tariff will have Hong Kong industries, but one perfumery factory owned by a large Chinese department store, has been transferred to Shanghai leaving only fifty persons working here instead of 400 as formerly.

A

New factories started during the past year include a branch of a wellknown cigarette firm, a lead pencil works, and a ship- yard, all under European supervision. An interesting innovation is the opening of a factory under joint Chinese Japanese management for the manufacture of gramophone records. large coal briquetting plant commenced operations during the year and a brewery is in course of formation. Thus the industrialisation of the Colony is steadily proceeding in spite of the general trade depression, and with a return to normal conditions Hong Kong may expect its share of the trade revival that should follow.

TEMPLES.

(Table XXX).

The following gentlemen served on the Chinese Temple. Committee during the year:—

(a) Hon. Sir Shouson Chow, Kt., Hon. Dr. R. II. Kotewall, c.M.6., Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, 0.1.E., -Chinese members of the Legislative Council.

(b) Mr. Lei Yau-tsun, C.B.E.,-Representative of the

District Watch Committee.

(c) Mr. Wong Kwong-tin, Mr. T. N. Chau,-Chinese

members of the Sanitary Board.

(d) Mr. Leung Pat-yu-Chairman of the Tung Wa

Hospital Committee.

(e) Mr. Chan Tin-sban-Senior member of the Po

Leung Kuk Committee.

(f) Mr. Ho Sing Chau--Chairman of the Kwong Wa

Hospital Committce.

(g) Secretary for Chinese Affairs (Chairman).

C 13

――

Mr. Tam Woon-tong succeeded Mr. Chan Tin-shan in April as the representative of the Po Leung Kuk Committee.

The Committee met on 5 occassions at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

The following contributions were made during 1930:-

$ 2,000.00 to Kwong Wa Hospital in aid of the funds towards the expenses of the Free Maternity Ward,

$ 10,000.00 to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund. $ 15,000.00 to Tung Wa Eastern Hospital.

1,200.00 to Chinese Public Dispensary, Hung-

hom.

The Committee also advanced $8,000.00 to Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund for the reconstruction of

of the Wantsai Maternity Hospital.

Temples taken over and let by tender by the Committee during the year included the following:-

Kwun Yam Temple, Aplichau,

Chuk Leung Temple, Kowloon City, To Shing Wong Temple, Bridges Street, Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung,

Che Kung Temple, Shatin,

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau,

Hung Shing Temple, Cheung Chau.

STAFF.

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Mr. E. R. Hallifax acted as Colonial Secretary from 1st February to 8th May and from 25th June to 31st December. Mr. A. E: Wood acted as Secretary for Chinese Affairs during these periods.

31st March, 1931.

A. E. WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Table I.

Revenue for the years 1929 and 1930.

Heads of Revenue.

Details of Revenue.

Licences and Internal Revenue not other- wise specified,

Chinese Boarding House Licences. Emigration Passage Brokers' Licences. Forfeitures,

Ordinance under which received,

Revenue in Revenue in 1929. 1930.

Increase.

C.

6.

('.

No. 1 of 1889 & No. 4 of 1908. No. 30 of 1915.

15,052.00

17.298.67

1,200,00

1,480.00

2,246.67

200 00

20.00

479.00

459.00

Fees of Court

or

Office, Payments for Specific

Purposes,

and Reimburse-

ments-in-aid,.

Interest,

Bond by Non-resident Householders, Official Signatures,

Interest accrued on official account.

Certificates to Chinese proceeding to foreign countries

No. 6 of 1923.

100.00

450,00

350,00

No. 3 of 1

1888.

No. 14 of 1913.

80.00

90.00

10.00

62.01

62.39

38

Other

Receipts,

Miscellaneous

Permits for Firework Displays,.

314,85

396.00

81 65

Total..

16.828.36

20.176.06

3.347 70

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

-C 14

Table II.

Revere and Expenditure of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs since 1921.

Revenue.

Expenditure.

Year.

Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Total.

Decrease.

Increase.

Percent-

age of

Expen-

diture to

Revenue.

I

('.

('.

(.

C.

C.

%

1921,

15,659.34

2,348.31

18,705.03

39,011.24

102.25

1922,

15,514.50

144.50

21,115.67

2,410.64

136.10

1923,

16,777.69

1,263.19

28,795.63

7,679.96

171.63

1924,

18,716.08

1,938.39

27,612.96

1,282.67

147.00

1925,

16,741,94

2,974.14

29,225.63

1,712.67

185.66

1926,

19,740.62

3,998.68

8,147.42

21,078.21

41.19

1927,

22,318.25

2,577.63

11,533.80

3,386.38

51.68

1928,

20,040,53

2,277.72

78,913.32

67,379.52

393.78

1929,

16,828.36

8,212.17

93,140.47

14,227.15

553.48

1930,

20,176.06

3,347.70

138,372.48

45,232.01

685.82

C 15

Table III.

:

Number of Women and Girls detained in a Place of Refuge by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under Sections 34 and 35 of Ordinance No. 4 of 1897, and arrangements made regarding them in 1930.

Permitted to leave,

Restored to husband,

Sent to native place.

Sent to Refuge or Convent.

Prostitutes.

I

1

37

1

Emigrants.

Total.

1

37

1

Total,

40

40

C 16 —

- C 17

Table IV.

Number of Feinale Passengers and Boys examined and passed before the Secretary for Chinese Affairs under The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance, 1915", during the year 1930.

Women and Children 1930.

Total Women

and Children

Women.

Girls.

Boys.

Total.

1929.

Macassar

467

· 109

331

907

883

Straits Settlements and

F.M.S.

19,061

3,700

4,761

27.522

30.304

Dutch Indies

18

3

13

34

14

Belawan Deli

530

165

234

929

1.205

British North Borneo

1,028

247

360

1,635

1.736

Honolulu

82

38

53

173

135

Central America

28

United States of America..

118

38

168

324

349

South America

2

2

112

Mauritius and Re-Union...

245

58

206

509

357

Australia

7

9

16

35

India

56

South Africa

11

Vancouver

51

725

19

82

134

19

32

58

118

174

93

Batavia

2,478

464

1,775

4,717

3.126

West Indies

Sourabaya

1

Rangoon

138

42

94

274

122

Port Elizabeth

5

5

10

16

Delagoa Bay

Callao

28

37

65

Billiton

2

1

3

Victoria

19

1

48

68

fiel

Seattle

47

15

115

177

121

Manila

24,393

4,894

8,374

37,661

39,32

C 18

Table V.

Number of Assisted Emigrants.

Rejected.

Year. Examined. Passed.

Un- willing,

[Rejected Rejected

at S.C.A.

by Doctor.

Total rejected.

Percentage

of rejection.

1929.

1930...

17.079 16,988

8,413

19

56

16

$1

53

8,316

23

52

22

97

1.15

* This number inclades those who failed to appear for the final examination.

Treatment of Rejected Emigrants for 1930.

Rejected by doctor and sent back to boarding houses to

be cured

Nalice districts of Assisted Emigrants passed.

22

Wost River,

829

East River,

3,904

North River,

98

Canton,

834

Delta,

810

Kwong Sai

927

Southern Districts,

843

Mandarin, (Hunan, Kwong Sai and Kiangsi).

71

Total,

8,316

L



C 19

Table V-Continued.

Destinations of Assisted Emigrants.

Whither bound.

Male Assisted Emigrants.

1929.

1930.

British North Borneo,

Dutch Indies :-

Muntoh,

147

8,141

4,487

Samarinda,

Billiton,

441 2,564

Singkep,

60

Macassar,

63

Belawan Deli,

5,119

2,542

India,

5

Samoa,

270

Ocean Island,

250

385

Nauru,

243

537

Makatea

34

Sydney,

11

1

Kilindini,

4

Total,

16,988

8,316

1198 passenger's passes were issued for 1st and 2nd class Straits Settlements passengers from 1st January to 31st May.

1844 passenger's passes were issued to passengers proceed- ing to India and Burma from 1st January to 31st May.

Classification of the Assisted Emigrants examined, accord- ing to the language spoken gives the following figures:

Cantonese, Hakka,

3,956

1,759

Hoklo,

2,421

Southern Mandarin (mostly froin

Kwong Sai and Hunan),

Hainanese,

127

53

Total,

8,316

Table VI.

Chinese Boarding House Licence Returns under Boarding House Ordinance, No. 23 of 1917.

Class

I II IV V VI VII

No. in existence at beginning of 1930...2 No. in existence at end of 1930 ...... .2

67 16 308 290 94 65 10 269 311 88

C 20

Table VII.

Statement of the Receipts and Expenditure relative to the Hong Kong District Watchmen's Fund for the year 1930.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

c.

C.

C.

3

To Balance,

,, Contributions, (Victoria $53,948.81

and Kowloon $10,295,24) .......

93,064.12

Wages and Salaries :-

Chief District Watchmen,

3.531.00

Assistant Chief District Watch-

64.244.05

men,. Detectives.

1.993.00

7.792.00

1st Class District Watchmen.... 8,240.81

,, Grant by Hong Kong Government,...

2,000.00

2nd 3rd

12.510,81

::

,

1,558.72



Payment for District Watchmen for

Special Services, -

35,626.34

2.009.00

Miscellaneous :--

Cooks..

12

Fines,..

159.00

Coolies.

Messengers,

1,008.00 $40.00 96.00

1,944,00

House Rents,

996.00

Office Staff:--

29

Sale of Unserviceable Store,.....................

38.50

Manager,

Writer,

180.00 132.00

19

Interest on Hong Kong Government

Interpreter,

Clerk,

: Public Works 6% Loan,

2,280.00

Collectors,

""

Interest on Fixed Deposits

1,650.00

Total.....

1.111.00

1,423.00

38,993.34

17

Interest on Current Account,

317.45

Other Charges :—

Allowance to Detectives,

1.812.00

Medal Allowance,

1,308.00

Rent allowance.

2.366.50

Good Conduct Allowance.

346.10

Electric charges,

790.65

Conservancy Allowance..

66.00

Coolie Hire and Conveyance

Allowance,

1,001,55

Stationery and Printing..

153.47

Uniform and Equipment,

1.731.26

Repairs and Fittings,

Rents of Telephone,

41.60 468.00

Crown Rent,

7.00

Premium on Fire Policies.

426.84

Gratuities and Rewards,

2,571.00

Furniture,

Sundries.

12.00 1,055.97

14,487.94

Pensions :-

-

Ex. C.D.W. Fung Foag and others,

4,577.00

Total Expenditure,.........

Balance, ....

58,058.28

108.694.84

Total,

166,753.12

Total,.....$

166,753.

Balance in Colonial Treasury

Hong Kong Government 6% P. W. Loan,...$38.000.00

Cash,...

Fixed Deposits....

Advance to C,D,W,s.

30.534.84 40,000.00

160.00

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

R. A. D. FORREST,

Asst Secretary for Chinese.

KO CHUNG WOON,

Manager, D.W.F.

Hong Kong, 31st December, 1930.

Total,........



108,694.84

Examined and found correct.

Members of

District Watchmen Committee.

Patients.

Table VIII.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Hospital during the year 1930.

on 31st December, 1929.

Remaining in Hospital

Treatment.

Chinese

Treatment.

European

Total.

Admitted.

Total number of pa- tients under treatment.

Discharged.

Deaths.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1930.

Treatment.

Chinese

Out-patients.

Male,

Female,

421 4,603 3,858 8,461,8,882 6,926 1,553

¡ 8,882

403 101,465 17,176 118,641 6,344

128 945 2,817 8.762 3,590.3,082

612

196

88,755 21,759 110,514

uvodoany

Treatment.

Total.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

Destitutes sent home.

Total,..

549 5,548 6,675 12,223 12,772 10,008 | 2,165

599 190,220 38,935 229,155 6,344 1,501 3,761

Total for 1929,

480|5,219 |7,107 12,326 12,806/9,969 |2,288

549 186,178 21,259 |207,437 11,845 1,57!

1,571

959 : 3,761

542

C 21

Male,

Female,

Patients.

Table IX.

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital during the year 1930.

Remaining in Hospital

on 31st December, 1929.

Chinese Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Admitted.

Total Number of pa- tients under treatment,

Discharged.

Deaths.

on 31st December, 1930.

Remaining in Hospital

Chinese

Treatment.

European Treatment.

Total.

Out-patients.

Vaccinations.

Dead bodies brought

to Hospital Mortuary

for burial.

959 1,301 2,260 2,318 | 1,225

324

40 | 18,418 3,574 | 21,992| 136

8971,2592,156 2,179 | 1,201

298

44 27,018 5,190 | 32,208

66

Total,

81

1,856

256|4,416 4,497 | 2,426

622

84 45,436 8,764 5,420 235

51

33

18

-

C 22

Receipts.

-C 23

Table X.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

CASH ACCOUNT 1930.

C.

Expenditure.

C.

Cash account from last year:

Tung Wah Hospital account

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital..............

Kwong Wah Hospital

.$152,610.28

Do.

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern

$63,000.00

83,897.96

Hospital

177,766.08

13,771.65

Do.

Man Mo Temple

94,937.68

Man Mo Temple

50,370.86

Do.

Emergency Fund

191.05

Emergency Fund

92,949.76

Do.

Maternity Hospital

3,799.36

Maternity Hospital

3,147.54

Provisions for staff

17,584.40

$396,748.05

Salaries for staff

56.511.90

·Current account with Tung Wah Eastern

Provisions for sick rooms

40,509.01

Hospital

189,381.32

Sick room sundries

22,063.97

Current account with Kwong Wah Hospital

64,473.20

Hospital sundries

7,415.55

Do.

Man Mo Temple

45,667.10

Chinese drugs

39,440.99

Do.

Maternity Hospital

4,275.54

Western drugs

19,094.01

Do.

Emergency Fund

2,230.79

Repairs

3,740.32

Rents from House property

113,651.00

Destitutes and Fatients' passages

633.20

Subscriptions collected from steamers

7,017.82

Repairs to landed property

1,034.20

Annual subscriptions of Hongs

10,313.50

Lights

9,356.24

Annual subscriptions from wealthy persons

7,600.00

Insurance

1,981.21

Subscriptions and donations

6,755.00

Crown rent and taxes

12,933.37

Subscriptions from charitable persons

13,794.46

Grant to Old Men's Asylum, Kowloon

200.00

Special contributions for supply of medicines,

quilted clothing, coffins and shrouds

4,249.30

Sundries for coffin home and burial ground Building costs

93.72

32,105.01

· Government Grants

8,000.00

Small-pox Hospital expenses

1,066.25

Government Grants for coffins

10,000.00

Stamps, stationery and advertisements

8,055.98

Amount received from Government on account

Grant to Kwong Wah Hospital

2,000.00

of Western medicines

2,500.00

Grant to Fong Pin Hospital

1,000.00

Grant from Man Mo Temple

2,500.00

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah Hospital

3,375.03

· Contributions from Theatres

1,800.00

Coffins for bodies buried by Tung Wah Hospital

6,502.38

Profit from holding special theatrical per-

formances

Burial of bodies by Government Mortuary

2,165.02

1,825.83

Coffins for bodies buried by Government

Subscriptions from coffin home

3,550.00

Mortuary

5,820.13

Interest on loans and deposits

36,299.24

Interest on deposits

5,484.85

Premium on notes and discount on goods

BALANCE

363,885.83

purchased

2,341.15

Fees from Patients

3,496.85

Rents from Coffin home

19,517.80

Sale of medicines and kitchen refuse and

boat-hire

10,338.79

Rent from Yat Pit Ting and Wing Pit Ting Rent from iron burner

1,560.00

1,455.00

Subscriptions collected from house to house

31,905.00

Total

$1,003,246.74

Total

$1,003,246.74

The Balance of $363,885.83 consists of the following credit balances :-

Tung Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

Kwong Wah Hospital

Man Mo Temple

$153,414.28 95,513.20 15,244.85

Emergency Fund

Maternity Hospital

1,100.28 94,989.50

3.623.72

$363,885.83

(FOR PARTICULARS SEE SEPARATE SHEET ATTACHED)

INCOME.

---

- C 24

Table XI.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

INCOME AND EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT.

C.

EXPENDITURE.

CA

C.

Funds brought forward from 1929

ORDINARY

Subscriptions:-

$152,610.28

MAINTENANCE

Provisions:

Food for staff

Food for sick room

$17,584.40 40,509.01

Annual subscriptions of Hongs ...$10,313.50 Subscriptions collected on steamers

Subscriptions from charitable

$58,093.41

7,017.82

Surgery and Dispensary :-

Chinese drugs

39,440.99

persons

13,794.46

Western drugs

19,094.01

Subscriptions from wealthy

58,535.00

persons

7,600.00

Establishments:-

Subscriptions and donations

6,755.00

Light

9,356.24

45,480.78

Insurance

1,981.21

Grants:

Repairs

3,740.32

Government

$,000.00

Repairs to hospital property

1.034.20

Government for coffins

10,000.00

Sick room expenses

22,063.97

Government for western medicines 2,500.00

Small-pox hospital expenses

1,066.25

Man Mo Temple

2,500.00

Coffin home and burying

23,000.00

ground expenses

93.72

Special contributions :

Crown rent and taxes

12,933.37

For Mortuary expenses

3,550.00

52,269.28.

From Theatres

1,800.00

Salaries, wages, &c.:

For suuply of medicines, quilted

Staff salaries

clothing, coffins & shrouds....

4,249.30

Sundries

56,511.90 7,415.55

9,599.30

63,927.45

Investments:-

Appeals, grants, &c. :-

Rents from house property

113,651.00

Destitutes & Patients' passages.

633.20

Rents from coffin home

19,517.80

Rents from Yat Pit Ting and

Old Men's Assylum, Kowloon.... Kwong Wa & Fong Pin Hospitals

200.00

3,000.00

Wing Pit Ting

1,560.00

3,833.20

Rents from iron burner

1,455.00

Miscellaneous:

Interest

36,299.24

Stationery &c.

8,055.98

172,483.04

Burial of bodies by Tung Wah

Other Receipts:—

Hospital

3,375.03

Premium on notes and discount

Coffins for bodies buried by

on goods purchased

2,341.15

Tung Wah Hospital

6.502.38

Fee from Patients

3,496.85

Burial of bodies by Government

Sale of medicines and kitchen refuse and boat-hire

Mortuary

2,165.02

10,338.79

Coffins for bodies buried by

16,176.79

Government

5,320.13

Interest on Deposits

5.484.85

EXTRAORDINARY

30,903.39*

Profit from holding theatrical

performances

EXTRAORDINARY

1,825.83

Subscriptions collected from

Building costs

house to house

31,SJ5.00

33,730.83

BALANCE

Total

$453,081.02

32,105.01

153,414.28

Total

$453,081.02

Table XII.

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1930.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL

in account with Kwong Wah Hospital.

To credit balance brought forward from 1929 $ 13,771.65 13,771.65

>>

amount received during 1930

64,473.20

By amount paid during 1930 Balance

$63,000.00 15,244.85

">

78,244.85

$ 78,244.85

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Man Mo Temple.

To credit balance brought forward from 1929 $ 50,370.86 By payments during 1930 amount received during 1930

,,

45,667.10

$ 96,037.96

Balance

$ 91,937.68

1,100.28

96,037,96

Table XII-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1930.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Emergency Fund.

To credit balance brought forward from 1929 $92,949.76 By payments during 1930 amount received during 1930

2,230.79

$ 95,180.55

Balance

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Malernity Hospital.

191.05

94,989.50

$ 95,180,55

26

To credit balance brought forward from 1929 $

""

amount received during 1930

3,147.54

4,275.54

By payments during 1930 Balance

3,799.36

3,623.72

7,423.08

7,423.08

Table XII-Continued

PARTICULARS AS TO CREDIT BALANCES 1930.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

in account with Tung Wah Eastern Hospital.

|

To credit balance brought forward from 1929 $ 83,897.96 By payments during 1930 amount received during 1930

189,381.32

$ 273,279.28

Balance

}}

The above accounts have been audited and found correct by me,

LAU YUK-WAN,

Auditor,

$ 177,766.08

95,513.20

$273,279.28

LEUNG PAT-YU. II. HONG SLING.

Directors.

C 27

Table XIII.

TUNG WAH WESTERN HOSPITAL CASH ACCOUNT 1930.

Balance from last year's account,.......

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital,

Government Grant,

Grant from Chinese Temples,

Current account with Tung Wah Hospital,. Building cost Hang Sun 1929 account.

Plastering work cost Kung Yick Co., 1929 account, Porcelain portraits and marble work 1929 account, Salaries to staff,

Provisions for staff.

>>

sick room,

Sundry expenses for sickroom,

hospital..

89.216.47

177.766.08

25.000.00

15,000.00

Subscriptions from Hongs,.

50.00

Charitable persons,.

14,162.73

collected from steamers,

91.44

by Directors through sub-

scription books,

22,232.00

Subscriptions collected from wealthy persons, ..................

150,00

Chinese medicine,

Interest on loans and deposits,.

6,582 12

Western medicine.

Premium on notes and discount on goods purchased,

Fees from Patients and rents of rooms.

Sale of kitchen refuse, patients' ricksha hire, &c., Price of land sold to Li Yau Chuen, Deduction from payment Hang Sun Co., Subscriptions for erecting the additional two Wings,

1.056 20

2.953.12 | Stationery, Stamps and Advertisements,

800.00

51,860.72

19,848.63

Repairs &c...

657.03

Lights,

Crown rent,

$ 189,381.32

6.277.22

1.392.41

790 00

21,314.90

6,080.52

10.114.50

4.424.74

3,187.18

15.132 40

6,983,27

5,502,29

3,461.46

1.00

2.463.40

Coffins.

1.144.75

Burial exper ses,

281.05

Water account,

313.25

Coal.

8.181.10

Sundry expenses for branch establishment for giving free medical advice and free medicine,

7.700.48

Cost of acquiring and erecting hospital property, Cost of erecting the two wings,

20.316.50

51,860.72

Procelain protraits of subscribers 1929 account,

1980

863.25

213.00

$ 426,826.54

Balance.

C 28

64.905.83

$ 426,826.54

1

INCOME.

C 29

Table XIV

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL Income and Expenditure Acconut 1930.

EXPENDITURE.

Amount brought forward from 1929

ORDINARY.

$ 173,114.43

ORDINARY.

Maintenance :-

Provisions for staff

Subscriptions:-

sick room....

$6.080.52 10.114.50

"

**

";

""

Subscriptions from Hongs

collected from steamers... from charitable persons... 14,162.73 collected by Directors

through subscription books..

from wealthy persons......

S 50.00

$ 16,195,02

91.44

Surgery and Dispensary —

Chinese drugs

15,132.40

Western drugs

6,983.27

22,115.67

22,232.00

Establishments :-

150.00

Light

3,461.46

36,686,17

Repairs, &c.

5,502.29

Government

Grants :--

Chinese temples

Investments:

Interest

Sick room expenses

4,424.71

25,000.00

Crown rent

1.00

15,000.00

Building cost Hang Sun Co.

6,277.22

40.000.00

Plastering work

1,392.41

21,059.12

6,582.12

Salaries &c. :—

Staff salaries

21,314.90

Other receipts :-

Hospital sundries

3,187.18

Fees from patients and rents of rooms

19,848.63

24,502.08

Premium

on notes and discount on

Miscellaneous :-.

goods purchased

557.03

Sale of kitchen refuse and patients,

Stationery, stamps and advertisements Coffins.....

2,463.40

1.144.75

ricksha hire, &c.

1,056.20

Water

313.25

Amount deducted from payment to

Burial expenses.

381.05

Ilang Sun Co.

800.00

Coal...

3.161.10

22,261.86

l'orcelain portraits of subscribers 1930

EXTRAORDINARY.

ajc

243.00

Porcelain portraits and marble work

Price of land sold to Li Yau Chuen...... 2,953.12 Subscriptions for erecting the two wings 51,360,72

1929 a/c

790.00

54,313.84

Porcelain portraits of subscribers 1929

a/c

$63.25

Branch Establishment for giving

free medical advice and medicine...

9.259.80 7,700.48

Amount received in 1930

Balance

EXTRAORDINARY.

Cost of acquiring hospital property Cost of erecting the 2 wings &c.

20.346.50 31,360.72

Balance

71,707.22 160,419.03

JANUA

$ 332,958.42

332,958.42

TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL In Account with Tung Wah Hospital.

$177,766.08

95,513.20

Balance brought forward from 1929..

Amount collected in 1930 ........

$ 83,897.96

189,381.32

$273,279.28

The above accounts have been audited and found correct by ine.

LAU YUK WAN,

Auditor.

LEUNG PAT YU, H. HONG SLING,

Directors.

$273,279,28

Receipts.

Table XV.

Man Mo Temple Fund Account 1930.

Amount.

ि

C.

Payments.

Amount.

C.

To Balance brought forward from 1929

Rent of propertics

50,370.86

15,748.16

By Donation to Tung Wah Hospital Expenses of Free School

2,500.00

22,066.84

Rent from Caretakers

6,589.92

Government Grant to Schools

6,320.00

Interest on deposits

780.00

Repairs to properties and Schools Crown rent, taxes and Insurance Water Rates

2,915.03

2,135.83

208.50

Crown rent (repaid by other section

Advertisements,

79.50

holders)

14.40

Miscellaneous

1,414,00

Price of land in Hennessy Road sold to Mr. Li Yau Tsun

2,953.12

Price of land in Wanchai Reclamation refunded by Tung Wal Eastern Hospital

13,261.50

Cost of land and work for building three free schools in Lockhart Road Price of laud sold to Mr. Li Yau Tsun paid over to Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

47,403.36

2,953.12

Price of land in Wanchai Reclamation advanced on behalf of Tung Wal Eastern Hospital

13,261.50

Balance

1.100.28

Total,...

3

96,037.96

Total,......

$

96,037.96

Ć 30

Receipts.

Table XVI.

Emergency Fund Account 1930.

Amount.

C.

To Balance brought forward from 1929

92,949.76

Interest on deposits

2,230.79

Payments.

Amount.

By Payments during 1930

Balance

C.

191.05

94,989.50

Total,

95,180.55

Total,

95,180.55

C 31



Table XVII.

Summary of Receipts and Payments of Tsan Yuk Hospital for 1930.

Receipts.

To Balance brought forward from 1929

Rent

Interest

55

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount.

C.

ရာ

C.

3,147.51

By Repairs to properties

43.00

4,200.00

""

Crown rent, taxes and Insurance

556.36

75.54

77

,, Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, rent for the four quarters 1930

3,200.00

Balance,

3,623.72

$

7,423.08

Total,

....

7,423.08

Total,

The above accounts (Tables XV to XVII have been audited and found correct by me.

LAU YUK WAN,

Auditor.

LEUNG PAT YU.

H. HONG SLING,

C 32

Revenue.

C 33

Table XVIII.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE OF THE BREWIN CHARITY DURING THE YEAR 1930.

Amount.

Expenditure.

Amount,

$

$

C.

C.

Hospital

To Balance from 1929

Subscriptions from Directors, Tung Wa

,, Subscriptions from Committee, Po Leung

Kuk

Subscriptions from Directors, Kwong Wa

Hospital

186,661.03

By charity for widows and orphans

subscription to Old Men's Home

10,638.30

2.400.00

1,150.00

17

275.00

180.00

salary for Accountant, Mr. Chun Yik Wan.. salary for Clerk, Mr. Wong Shui Ming stamps

,, conveyance expenses for collecting

interest etc.

100.00

60.00

5.35

11.00

J

Subscriptions from Mr. Kwok Shiu Lau Subscriptions from Mr. Lau Yuk Wan being

50.00

auditor's fee for Mr. Lau Yuk Wan

50.00

"

"

refund of auditor's fee

50.00

printed matters by the Hing Shing balance

12.00

188,965.53

Interest from Mr. Lau Kwai Nam for

mortgage

1,440.00

77

Interest from Mr. Chan Tsat for mortgage Interest from Mr. Li Sze Ngai for mortgage.. Interest from Mr. Lo Wun Ching and others

780.00

780.00

for mortgage

2,340.00

97

Interest from Mr. Kan Iu Cho for mortgage.. Interest from Mr. Tsoi Man Sui for mortgage

Interest from Mr. U Nga Ping for mortgage.

1,456.00

650.00

4,643.74

Interest from Mr. Lo Luk for martgage

Interest on War Bonds of Hong Kong

>"

644.54

600.00

""

Interest on current account with Shanghai

Bank

398.99

Cash from Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

for Shin Siu Sze

84.00

وو

Interest on fixed deposit of Wong Fung Sze

with Shanghai Bank

58.88

Total

$202,242.18

Total

By fixed deposit with Mr Lau Kwai Nam on mortgage of two houses in Temple Street

"

""

23

,

22

Messrs. Chan Tsat and Li Sze Ngai on mortgage of two houses in Temple Street Mr. Lo Wun Ching on mortgage of four houses in Temple Street

22

Mr. Kan Iu Cho on mortgage of house property in Wanchai Road Mr. U Nga Ping on mortgage of house property in Bonham Strand Mr. Lo Luk on mortgage of house property in Whitfield

J

War Bonds of Hong Kong

fixed deposit and interest of Wong Fung Sze with Shanghai Bank

,, deposit of Sat A. Li with Wing Hing Bank (after deducting four dividends amounting to $151.40)

current account deposits with Shanghai Bank

9

݂ܕ

,, deposit with Tung Wah Hospital

$202,242.18

$16,000.00

16,000.00

24,000.00

16,000.00

60,000.00

8,500.00

10,000.00

Total

LEUNG PAT-YU,

1,367.38 168.70 36.547.29

382.16

$188,965.53

H HONG SLING,

Directors, Tung Wah Hospital..

C 34

Table XIX. .

Number of Patients under treatment and other statistics concerning the Kwong Wah Hospital during the year 1930.

Patients.

on 31st December, 1929.

Remaining in Hospital

Admitted.

Out-patients.

Male,

138

1,475 2,717 4,192 4,330 2,770 1,419 141

56,806 22,451 79,257 1,588

495

Female,

101

515 4,879 5,394 | 5,495 | 4,341 |1,014

140

37,949 23,085| 61,034| 1,404

299

Total,....

239

1,990 7,596 9,586 9,825 | 7,111 2,433 281

94,755 45,536 140,291 2,992

794

Total for 1929, 247

1,895 6,915 8,810 9,057 6,484 2,334 239

94,067 41,191 135,258 2,670 698

Destitutes sent home.

:

:

Receipts.

Table XX.

WESTERN MATERNITY HOSPITAL,

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1930.

Expenditure

30

**

C.

To Balance

>>

>>

Grant by Government

Subscription....

Donation from :-

Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund..... Chiuese Recreation Ground Fund.

...

Rent of house purchase with Tung Wah Hospital Jublilee Dona- tion

1,139.92

By Salaries

5,000.00

Drugs

611.00

Instruments

6,313.33

2,767.40

95.70

Furniture

329.50

5,500.00 :

Bedding

102.38

1,200.00;

Food for Patients, pupils and mid-

wives etc.,

5,188.82

Stationery and Printing

152.85

3,200.00

Gas and Electricity

1,340.14

10,511.00

Repairs and Fitting

1,558.00

>>

Fecs paid by patients in the Hospital

Water Account

315.00

6,595.60

Telephone (Sub, Exchange).

10.00

""

Money paid by pupils etc., in the

Washing

1,729.14

Hospital for their food and rents

1,032.00

Mi

laneous

1,429.84

""

Fees paid by patients who had

venereal diseases

419.60

Interest

15.49

15

21,332,10

Balance with Colonial Treasury

3,381.51

Total....

24,713,61

Total.

24,713.61

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

C 35

C 36

Table XXI.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Public Dispensaries: Victoria, Harbour, Shaukiwan, and Kowloon Peninsula

Description.

New Cases,......

Return Cases,

Total,....

Total.

Total in 1930.

Total in

1929.

122,395

98,385

220.780

209,559

Certificates of nature of disease

issued,

Certificates of causes of death,

Patients removed to hospital by

ambulance,

Corpses removed to hospital or

mortuary,

Attendances at cleansing of in-

fected premises,

Compensation claims sent in,

Applications received for coffins,.......

for midwives,

27

Confinement cases in Maternity

Hospital,

Infants brought to Dispensaries,

(dead),

Total,.......

Vaccinations at private houses,

39

""

Dispensaries,

Total,....

:

:

:

:

:

18

12

301

340

201

294

1,078

1,033

46

137

391

453

1,826

957

1,304

1,282

1,304

1

25,242

27.56-1

25,243

Receipts.

CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1930.

C.

C.

Expenditure.

.

C.

C.

C 37

To Balance

>>

35

Grant by Government.

Grant from General Chinese

Charities Fund.

Donation from :-

Tai Ping Theatre

Lee Theatre

Ko Shing Theatre

Subscription, Land

>>

""

>>

Harbour..

Shaukiwan Kowloon City

...

72,683.84

9,500.00

By Maintenance of Dispensaries:-

Victoria

28,180.52

Harbour and Yanmati

7,578.09

10,000.00

Shankiwan

Kowloon City..

10,463.52

4,593.40

1,950.00

150.00

300.00

27

17,138.70

Aberdeen.

Subscription in aid of the Fund

of Maternity

2240.20

53,055.73

Hospital,

10,125.30

Western

5,500.00

1,413.60

Pensions

960.00

""

725.50

Balance :---

""

31,803.10

On Fixed Deposit in Hong

Advance from General Chinese

""

Kong & Shanghai Bank-

Charities Fund for re-con-

ing Corporation

40,000.00

struction of Wanchai Mater-

nity Hospital

8,000.00

On Fixed Deposit in Col- onial Treasury

15,000,00

Refund from Yaumati Public

""

On Hong Kong Government

Square Fund.......

2,500.00

6% Public Works Loan

11,000.00

יי,

Fees from Maternity Hospital

In Cash

18,029.57

in Chinese Public Dispensary

at Wanchai

Interest

1,631.50

Advance to Dispensaries Clerks

120.00

2,546.86

>>

79,149.57

Total

$138,665.30

Total

$138,665.30

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

Table XXIII.

HUNGHOM DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1950.

Receipts.

Expenditure.

C.



C.

To Subscriptions etc..............

1,321.40

Grant from General Chinese Charities Fund.

1,200.00

By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs..

>>

Donation from :-

Payment through Local Committee

2,968.23

3,326.59

Po Hing Theatre,

773.00

Scavenging Contractor,

1,920.00

Balance:-

At Secretariat for Chinese Affairs

995.23

With Local Committee

85.19

Total,..

6,294.82

Total,..

6,294.82

F

CHUNG IU SHAN, Chairman,

LI KIT CHUEN,

Accountant.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 38

Receipts.

Table XXIV.

SHAMSHUIPO DISPENSARY.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1930.

Expenditure.

C.

f

C.

To Balance

4,878.67

Graut by Government.

2,500.00

By Payment through Secretariat for Chinese Affairs.

">

33

Rents from Temple Keepers of Sam Tai Tsz, Pak Tai and Tin Hau Temples

2,626.40

Rents from the eight houses at Shamshuipo,...

2,400,00

"

Payment through Local Committee,

Balance:-

At Colonial Treasury,

With Local Committee,.

2,746.00

2,476.44

1,279.00

5,903.63

Total,

12,405.07

Total

12.405.07

WONG TU TUNG,

Chairman.

AU TO NAM,

Accountant.

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

C 40

Table XXV.

Summary of work done by the Chinese Maternity Hospitals,

Remaining in Hospital on December

31st, 1929...

Tsan

Ianchai

Yuk,

Maternity.

24

18

Admission-Chinese treatment

Admission-Western treatment..

1,541

827

Total treated during the year 1930

1,541

Outpatients-Chinese treatment...

Outpatients-Western treatment

5,805

Total No. of outpatients, year 1930

5,805

10,061

2

Number of deaths

Remaining in Hospital on December

31st, 1930...

Vaccinations..

27

13

2.801

Receipts.

Table AAVI.

Statement of Receipts and Payments of the Chinese Permanent Cemetery for 1930.

Amount.

Payments.

Amount.

$

C.

C.

To Balance,

60,002.13

By Rent of telephone,

189.00

""

Interest from Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank,

"}

Repairs to embankment, and the wharf and supply of 200

537.38

pieces of number stones by Yeung Tam Kee,

13,350.38

Interest from Mr. Ngan Kit

Printed matters by the Shing Fat,.

7.00

77

Hing,

1,050.00

Wages for Ma Shu-hoi & gardeners,..

1,506.00

Wages from Hon. Dr. S. W.

"}

Wages for Pun Yan Chin and Chan Wan Kok,

480.00

Tso for refilling vaults,

296.00

""

Preparing plan by Architect F. Munford,

126.47

>>

Sale of 215 lots,

Stone Embankment,

10,410.00

Flower pots, manure, scythes, bamboo brooms etc,

231.50

3,210.00

"3

Registration book by Ki Nga & Co.,

1.00

دو

Stamps,.

16.00

Reut of wharf,

1.00

""

Crown Rent,..

1.00

"}

Balance,

59,596.16

>>

Total,

75,505.51

Total,...

75,505.51

S. W. TSO, Secretary,

T. N. CHAU, Treasurer.

By deposits with Hong Kong & Shanghai Bank,.........$ 39,410.40 Fixed deposit on mortgage of house No. 237 Nathan

"9

Road,

Cash,

""

20,000.00

185.76

$ 59,596.16

Examined and found correct,

LI PO KWAI, Auditor.

:

To Balance,..

23

Rent of Stalls,

""

Receipts.

Table XXVII.

CHINESE RECREATION GROUND.

Receipts and Expenditure, 1930.

Interest ou money deposited in Treasury,

Payments.

5,672.82

By Wages of Watchmen, etc.,

857.00

Water Account,

243.07

""

3,596.05

>

Consumption of Gas,

270.00

"

Subscription to Western Maternity Hospital,

1,200.00

90.23

23

Lime Washing, -

90.00

>>

Repairs,

56.69

Miscellaneous,

28.11

Balance,

6,614.23

Total,..

9,359.10

Total,..

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

9,359.10

C 42

Table XXVIII.

Statement of Accounts of Passage Money Fund, 1930.

Receipts.

Payments.

C.

To Balance on Fixed Deposit,

in Colonial Treasury,

.$6,250,00

962.46

By Passages to destitutes,.

156.83

Gratuities to destitutes,

78.00

""

>>

7,212.46

>>

Subscription to Alice Memorial Hospital,

50.00

>>

Eyre Diocesan Refuge,

130.00

77

Passage Money received,

198.25

"}

"

Hawker's Licences to destitute persons,

Gifts in aid of repatriation of emigrants,......

22.00

59.50

>>

Balance on Fixed Deposit,

...$6,250.00

""

Miscellaneous Receipts,

11.90

in Colonial Treasury,

952.05

Interest on Fixed Deposit,

""

"}

"

on money deposited in Treasury,

$ 250.00

25.77

7,202.05

276.77

Total,

7,698,38

Total.

7,698,3>

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

C 43

Industry.

C 44

Table XXIX.

Accidents in Factories during 1930.

Accidents due to

Shipbuilding Oil Installations Sugar Refineries Knitting Factories Electric Power

Station

Quarries

Iron Foundry

Cement Works

Machin-

ery.

Falls

etc.

Scalds and

Burus.

18 (2)

30 (5)

6

}

3

G

2

- a

Fatalities.

Total No. of

Accidents.

19

21

Total.......

32

39

4

7

75

The firures in parenthesis denote fatalities and are included in the

F. MEADE.

Inspector of Facturies.

Receipts.

- C 45

Table XXX.

GENERAL CHINESE CHARITIES FUND.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending 31st December, 1930.

$

C.

3



C.

Expenditure.

C.

S

C.

Pak Tai Temple, Wanchai

To Balance,

""

Rent from Temple Keepers of :—

Hau Wong Temple, Kowloon City. Tin Hau Temple, Yaumati

Kwun Yum Temple, Chi Wan Shan.

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

20,880.00 12,700.00

441,00

1,888.00

568.50

Tam Kung Temple, Shaukiwau

Fook Tak Chi Temple, Shaukiwan

1,447.50 237.75

To Ti Temple, Shaukiwan

30.00

Sheung Tai Temple, Ma Tau Chung

384.75

Tam Kung Temple, Sung Wong Toi

202.44

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan

123.75

Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

2,400.00

Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

3.066.00

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichong Tin Hau Temple, Aberdeen .....

595.00

466.00

391.50

491.00

Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hung-

hom....

280.00

Chuk Leung Temple, Kowloon City.

87.75

Che Kung Temple, Shatin

2,945.00

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau

2,400.40

hom

Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichau............... Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung. Hung Shing Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

311,25

30.00

13

60.00

Ping Chau Free School.

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital for

Expenses....

Chinese Public Dispensary, Hang-

Expenses for holding theatrical

performances at :-

117,454.65 | By Maintenance of Chinese Public

Schools in Kowloon City

Grants to:-

>>

Kwong Wah Ho-pital in aid of the funds towards the expenses of

the free Maternity Ward for 1930

The Kai Fong of Hunghom for the expenses of free school in Kwan Yum Temple, Hunghom Ngai Lo Shi (ex-temple keeper of Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay)

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for

1930..

Kwong Wah Hospital for expenses. Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

for expenses

118.75

400.00 25,000.00

17,500,00

Chinese Public Dispensary (Shum-

shuipo)....

2,500.00

150.00

15,000.00

1,200.00

65,068.75

4,585.47

2,000.00

1,200.00

To Shing Wong Temple, Bridges

Street

Kowloon City..

250.00

Ma Tau Chung

52,697.59

Cheung Chau Island

Aplichau

House Rents:

Property of Hau Wong Temple,

Kowloon City............

809.50

Property of Tin Hau Temple,

Shaukiwan

,, Compensation & Resumptions from Public Works Department of :- Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hung-

414.77

1,224.27

""

Shatin

Ping Chau Island

Aberdeen.......

600.00

50.00

1,800.00

600.00

300.00

121.00

300.00

3,771.00

Annual Subscription to Confucius Society for expenses of the Free school at Ynk Hu Kung, Wanchai,.......

520.00

hom

Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon Tong.....

Do.,

Kowloon Tsai

1,440.00 407.09

1,408.40

3,255.49

Grant from Education Department for Chinese Public Schools in

Kowloon City......

1,680.00

>>

Grant by Hong Kong Government.......

35,000.00

Interest :-

""

On Fixed Deposit

Current Account

23

3,275.00 839.83

4,114.83

>>

Repairs to:-

Kwun Yum Temple, Chi Wan Shan. Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay.

80.00

30.00

Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan

40.00

Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi. Tin Hau Temple, Wongueichung...

Advertisement for tender of temple-

6.50

806.00

962.50

keepers

112.21

މލ

Architect fee for preparing a plan

for Chinese Public Dispensary,

Kowloon City.....

500.00

""

Refund to the claimants against ' the fund of Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island......................

2,000.00

""

>>

Yan Wo Company (full settlement of its claim against the Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island)....... Purchase of a fire engine at Cheung

Chau Island

700.00

• 500.00

2,400.00 3.066.00

Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay Tin Hau Temple, Ping Chau Island Tam Kung Temple, Wongneichong Tin Han Temple, Aberdeen

595.00

Tin Hau Temple, To Kwa Wan ... Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

Kwun Yum Temple, Hunghom

123.10

Bay)

Lok Shin Tong, Kowloon City for

1930...

400.00 Kwong Wah Hospital for expenses.] 25,000.00 Chinese Public Dispensaries Fund

466.00

for expenses

17,500,00

391.50

Chinese Public Dispensary (Shum-

491.00

shuipo)....

2,500.00

Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hung-

hom....

280.00

Chuk Leung Temple, Kowloon City Che Kung Temple, Shatin

87.75

2,945.00

Hung Shing Temple, Aplichau Kwun Yum Temple, Aplichan....... Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung. Hung Shing Temple, Cheung Chau

Island

2,400.40

311.25

50.00

دو

60.00

To Shing Wong Temple, Bridges

Street

Ping Chau Free School.....

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital for

Expenses...

Chinese Public Dispensary, Hung-

hom

Expenses for holding theatrical

performances at :-

Kowloon City..

150.00

15,000.00

1,200.00

65,068.75

250.00

Ma Tau Chung

52,697.59

Cheung Chau Island

Aplichau

House Rents:

Property of

lau Wong Temple,

Kowloon City.

809.50

Property of Tin Hau Temple,

Shaukiwan

414.77

1,224.27

Shatin

Ping Chau Island Aberdeen.....

600.00

50.00

1,800.00

600.00

300.00

121.00

300.00

3,771.00

Compensation & Resumptions from

Public Works Department of :- Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hung-

Annual Subscription to Confucius Society for expenses of the Free school at Yuk Hu Kung, Wanchai,.

520.00

hom

1,440.00

כל

Repairs to:--

Tin Hau Temple, Kowloon Tong....

Kowloou Tsai Do.,

407.09

1,408.40

3,255.49

Grant from Education Department for Chinese Public Schools in

Kowloon City.......

Grant by Hong Kong Government.....

Kwun Yum Temple, Chi Wan Shan. Yi Pak Kung Temple, Quarry Bay. Tin Hau Temple, Shaukiwan Tam Kung Temple, Sungwongtoi. Tin Hau Temple, Wongneichung..

80.00

30.00

40.00

6.50

806.00

962.50

nterest:

On Fixed Deposit

>>

Current Account

1,680.00

""

35,000.00

Advertisement for tender of temple-

keepers

112.21

""

Architect fee for preparing a plan for Chinese Public Dispensary, Kowloon City......

500.00

3,275.00 839.83

""

4,114.83

32

"

""

"

Refund to the claimants against

the fund of Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island.................

Yan Wo Company (full settlement of its claim against the Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau Island)... Purchase of a fire engine at Cheung

Chau Island

Lau On Kee (compensation to the loss of money for rebuilding the Pak Tai Temple, Hok Un, Hunghom)

Advance to Chinese Public Dis-

pensaries Fund for. the

2,000.00

700.00

2,500.00

300.00

Total......

245,426.83

reconstruction of the

Wantsai

Maternity Hospital

8,000.00

Compensation to Chan Yuen Po

for the superstructure of a small house on K. I. L. 6270

60.00

,, Expenses for removing the Ping

Chau Free School

65.00

Salaries

665.48

"

>>

Stationery and printing.

28.45

Crown Rents

20.00

""

Water Account

29.25

""

دو

Balance in Treasury :-

Fixed Deposit...........

Current Account..

110,000.00 45,538.72

155,538.72

Total......

245,426.83

A. E. WOOD,

Secretary for Chinese Affairs

C 46

Table XXXI.

Prosecutions under Ordinances No. 3 of 1888, No. 30 of 1915, and No. 4 of 1897.

Offence.

No. of Cases.

Convicted.

Discharged.

Male.

Female.

Male.

Female.

3

2

529

481

3

52

5

2

22-2

Ordinance No, 3 of 1888.

Bills,-Posting without permission,

Fireworks, Discharged without permission, Drums and Gongs,-Night noises by beating, Public meetings held without permission,

Ordinance No. 30 of 1915.

Acting as Passage Broker without a licence from

the S. C. A..................

Failing to furnish return of particulars of emigrants

to the S. C. A.,

Failing to furnish photographs of emigrants to the

S. C. A.,

Ordinance No. 4 of 1897.

10

5

1.3

12

10

5

:

:



12

:

Remarks.

Abduction of girls under 21,

1

Defilement of girls under 12 years of age,.

1

Using premises as a brothel (Sec. 14),

50

8

40

2

Procuring defilement of women,

2

i

1

Detaining, harbouring, or receiving women or girls,..

10

I

Living on earnings of prostitution,................

2

:

Deriving profits from prostitution and trading in

women,

73

10

Carnal knowledge of female,

1

:

Soliciting for immoral purposes,

3

Traffic in women,..

4

Procuring women or girls to be common prostitutes, 7 Permitting defilement of girls,

Decoying women and girls into, or away, from

-32 00

the Colony,

1

2

5

63

1

4

1

3

3

2

1

10

1

1



C 47

Annexe A.

Report on the work of the Po Leung Kuk for the year 1930.

The Po Leung Kuk Society was founded in 1878 to aid in the detection and suppression of kidnapping, especially of girls and women, and to shelter such girls or women as had been kidnapped in the interior and brought to Hong Kong for sale or emigration. Its name means "institution for the protection of good women”. The initiative in its formation came from the Chinese themselves, and ever since by subscription and personal service, they have continued to support it.

There is a paid Chinese staff-matron, a lady teacher, amnahs and nurses, and two clerks who are secretaries to the managing committee. This Committee meets every evening from Mon- day to Friday at 7 p.m. the principal meeting of the week being heid at 12 noon on Sunday. It not only manages the Po Leung Kuk, but acts as an advisory committee to the Secretary for Chinese Affairs, in all cases affecting women and children, and Chinese family life generally, which are often extremely difficult and tedious. It corresponds when necessary with charitable institutions and private persons in various parts of China, traces parents of lost children or ill-treated mui tsai, and shelters for the night any Chinese woman or girl who chooses to go. When parents and relations cannot be traced, the Com- mittee arranges for the girls in its care to be given in marriage (never as concubines) or in adoption, always under bond and always with the consent of this office; and in every case this office ascertains the girl's willingness before giving consent to either adoption or marriage.

In addition to the annual Committee appointed by co- operation there is a Permanent Committee, which serves to maintain continuity of policy, and of which the Secretary for Chinese Affairs is the ex-officio chairman.

The following gentlemen were elected in March to serve as Managing Committee for the year:

Tam Woon-tong,

Au Shiu-cho,

Ho I-cheong,

Chan Tsz-hang,

Lam Kau-mau,

Chan Karn-po,

Lai Tai-kai,

Lam Yam chuen,

Chan Kim-tong,

Ip King-fan,

lu Tak-chung,

Chan Hing-wa.

The number of inmates of the Po Leung Kuk on 1st January, 1930, was 53 and during the year 480 persons were admitted as against 636 in 1929. The circumstances of admission and the action taken in regard to them are set out in Table A.

C 48

61 women and girls were admitted under warrant and 419 were admitted without warrant. 7 were lost children 2 were accompanied by parents or guardians, and I was maid-servant or "mui-tsar" who had left her master or mistress.

to

On leaving the Kuk 229 women and girls were restored to husbands Or other relatives, 24 were sent

charitable institutions in China, 3 were given in adoption, 4 married, 164 released (2 released under bond), 19 sent to Convent or Refuge and 2 died. The number of inmates remaining in the Kuk on December 31st was 35.

The institution was visited monthly by Justices of the Peace, Mr. A. G. Coppin and the Hon. Dr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., who on no occasion found cause for adverse comment. The average monthly number of inmates was 40.

The matron reports favourably on the conduct, health and industry of the inmates during the year. There were 90 cases of sickness of which 84 were sent to the Tung Wa Hospital for treatment and of these 2 died.

Mrs. R. H. Kotewall and Mrs. S. W. Tso paid regular visits of inspection during the year, and took a great interest in the sewing, embroidery and other handiwork of the girls. The development of this line of activity owes a great deal to Mr. Tam Woon-tong and his colleagues on the committee. Mrs. Tam Woon-tong also gave valuable assistance. The interest shown by Lady Peel who paid several visits to the Kuk, has been much appreciated.

March 31st, 1931.

A. E., WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs,

President.

C 49

We, Chan Yee Wan and Au Shiu Cho, members of the Board of Direction of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society do solemnly and sincerely declare that the attached statements of Assets and Liabilities of above Society on the 31st December, 1930, marked "A" and signed with our names on the 5th March, 1931, is a true statement, and we make this solemn declaration conscientiously believing the same to be true and by virtue of the provisions of "The Statutory Declaration Act 1835".

陳倚雲

區紹初

Declared by the declarants, Chan Yee Wan and Au Shiu Cho at Victoria, Hong Kong, the 5th March, 1931, through the interpretation of Luk Yam Ko of Hong Kong the said Luk Yom Ko having also first declared that he had truly, distinctly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document of the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the contents of this document to the said declarants and that he would faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administer- ed unto them.

Before me,

R. A. D. FORREST.

Justice of Peace.

You do solemnly and sincerely declare that you understand the English and Chinese languages, and that you have truly and audibly interpreted the contents of this document to the declarants Chan Yee Wan and Au Shiu Cho and that you will truly and faithfully interpret the declaration about to be administered to them. Declared at the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs, Hong Kong, this 5th March, 1931.

Luk Yam Ko.

Before me,

A. E. WOOD, Secretary for Chinese Affairs

and Justice of Peace.

C 50

Statement "A" of Assets and Liabilities of the Po Leung Kuk Incorporated Society on the 31st December, 1930.

Assets.

Liabilities.

Fixed deposit with Mrs. Li Ho Sze on

mortgage

$20,000.00

Nil.

At current account with the Yik On

and Fuk Wa Banks

4,724.33

$24,724.33

This is the statement 'A" referred to in the Declaration of

Chan Yee Wan and Au Shiu Cho declared before me this 5th

day of March, 1981.

陳倚雲

區紹初

R. A. D. FORREST.

Justice of Peace.

January, 1930, In the Po Leung Kuk on 1st

Admitted during the year,

Total,

Kuk on the 31st Decem-

Remaining in the Po Leung

ber, 1930,

...

:

Table A,

Number of Women and Girls admitted to the Po Leung Kuk during the year 1930 and the

arrangements made regarding them.

Committed under Warrant from the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Committed under Warrant from the Emigration Office. Pending the opening of the Secretariat for Chinese Affairs. Sent with their own consent by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs Sent with their own consent from Singapore and Bangkok.

Sent with their own consent by the Police.

Lost Children.

Accompanying parents or

guardians.

Runaway maid-servants.

Total.

:

3

11

=

61

16

256

29

108

21

t

7 3

-

19

10

53

9

2

13

9 11

9

:

:

Released after enquiry.

Released under bond.

Placed in charge of husband.

Placed in charge of parents

and relatives.

Sent to Charitable Institutions

in China.

Sent to School, Convent,

or Refuge.

Adopted.

Married.

Died.

Cases under consideration.

Total.

480

162

2

25 |194] 24

19

15

65

16

3267

31

129 14

3

533

171

2

37207 33

30

12

14

14

01

1

1

35

00

4

2

35

2

35

533

480

53

C 51

Table B.

Po LEUNG KUK.

Statement of Receipts and Expenditure from 1st January to 31st December, 1930.

RECEIPTS..

Balance from previous year,

Subscriptions:---

Yue Lau Celebrations, West

Point,

$

C.

$

5,952.12

EXPENDITURE.

By the Elected Committee:

Balance:

(see Table Cj,

47

$

(.



10,500.00

1,650.55

Guilds,

4,095.00

Tai Wo & A. Fong Photo-

On Deposit,

2,000.00

graphers,

750.00

Theatres, ......

600 00

At Current Account,

2,724.33

7,095.55

4,724.33

Interest :-

On Mortgage,

On Current Account,

Total............

.$

1.800.00 376.66

2,176.66

15,224.33

Total..........$

Certified by the Statutory Declaration of Chan Yee Wan and Au Shin Cho, Members of the Board of Direction,

15 224.83

C 52

Table C.

Statement showing particulars of Expenditure by the Elected Committee from

1st January to 31st December, 1930.

RECEIPTS.

ਚੰਡ

$

C.

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

A

('.

Balance from previous year,

Received from Permanent Board,

119.11 10,500.00

Miscellaneous Receipts,

27.02

Premium on bank notes,

27.18

Decorations, Food,......

Light and Fire,

Miscellaneous,

Passage Money,

52.00 3,158.00 1,191.91

Petty Expenditure,

716.69

198.45 114.65

C 53

1

www.dc.co

Printing,

249.80

Repairs,.

500 30

Stationery,

140.03

Telephone,

117.00

Insurance,

103.24

Wages,

4,065.70

Balance,

10,667,67 65.64

Total,.........$ 10,673.31

Total,.........

$

10,673.31

REPORT OF THE HARBOUR MASTER FOR THE YEAR 1930.

CONTENTS.

PAGE.

Bunker Coal shipped

5

Crews, Nationality of

4

Emigration and Immigration

10

Examination of Pilots

12

Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers ..

11

Gunpowder Depôt...

19

Junks

6

Launches...

Lighthouses and Signal Stations...

Mercantile Marine Office

Marine Magistrate's Court

Marine Courts of Enquiry

:

Marine Surveyors' Office

Moorings

Outstations

Passenger Trade

Port Facilities...

Registry of Shipping

Revenue and Expenditure

Shipping Report

Sunday Cargo Working

Trade

Yaumati Slipway and Coaling Depôt

:

:

:

:

:

10

13

16

11

11

16

15

:

12

7

46

10

7.

:

:

:

:

3

:

12

5

:..

:

20

D 2-

TABLES.

TABLE.

Arrivals and Departures all Vessels Summary

IX

Boat Licences etc. issued ...

XII

Emigration to Destinations other than China.

XIV

Do.

in quinquennial periods

XV

Do.

in annual periods

XVI

Immigration from countries other than China

XVII

Do.

in quinquennial periods...

XVIII

Do.

in annual periods

XIX

Junks entered

VII

Do. cleared

Launches entered

Do. cleared

Revenue

Revenue and Expenditure comparison

Shipping Total 1911 to 1930

VIII

X

XI

XIII

XXIII

XXIV

Do.

Graph all classes 1911 to 1930

XXV

Do.

do. Ocean Going British and Foreign Vessels

1911 to 1930

XXVI

Do.

do. Ocean Going British Vessels 1911 to 1930

XXVII

Vessels entered showing Number Tonnage and Crews

I

Do. cleared

do.

II

Do. entered at each port

III

Do. cleared

do.

IV

:

Do. of each nation entered...

V

Do.

do.

cleared...

VI

Do. in Foreign Trade comparison of Tonnage 1921 to 1930 XXII

Do. Registered

Do. Struck off the Register...

XX

XXI

D 3

1.

Shipping.

A comparison between the years 1929 and 1930 of all shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony is given in the following table:

1929.

1930.

Decrease.

Increase.

Class of Vessels

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

No.

Tonnage. No. Tonnage.

going,

British Ocean-

Foreign Ocean

going,

British River

7,809 17,134,589|7,749 | 17,993,202 60

4,734 | 11,151,152 | 4,721 | 11,357,605

13

206,453

858,613

Steamers,

7.474

7,809,876 7,289

7,469,490

185 340,386

Foreign River

Steamers, 1,601

561,061 2,289

$84,909

:

668

323,848

Steamships

under 60|

tons For -

eign Trade... 7,434

211,067 6,326

Junks, Foreign

Trade,

23,522 3,003,404 21,235

204,179 1,108

2,602,265 2,287

6,888

401,139

:

Total, Foreign

Trade,

52,57439,871,149 49,609 40,511,650 | 3,653 748,413

668 1,388,914

Steam Laun-

ches, Local

Trade...... 214,875 5,560,116 |24,533

805,031 190,342 4,755,085

Junks, Local

Trade,

*33,108 *1,754,916 19,948

873,931 13,160 880,985

Grand Total...300,557 47,186,181 94,090 40,190,612 207,155 6,384,483 668 1,388,914

Net,

206,487 4,995,569|

* Including 18,012 Conservancy and Dustboats of 1,109,384 Tons.

It will be seen from the above table that the total Shipping entering and clearing Ports in the Colony during the year 1930 amounted to 94,090 vessels of 40,190,612 tons, which compared with the figures of 1929 shows a decrease of 206,487 vessels and a decrease of 4,995,569 tons.

Of the above 49,609 vessels of 38,511,650 tons were engaged in Foreign Trade as compared with 52,574 vessels of 39,871,149 tons, in 1929.

There was a decrease in British ocean-going shipping of 13 ships, and an increase of 206,453 tons.

D 4

Foreign ocean-going vessels show a decrease of 60 ships and an increase of 858,613 tons.

British river steamers show a decrease of 185 ships and a decrease of 340,386 tons.

Foreign river steamers show an increase of 668 ships and an increase of 323,848 tons.

In steamships not exceeding 60 tons employed in foreign trade there is a decrease of 1,108 ships with a decrease in tonnage of 6,888 tons.

Junks in foreign trade show a decrease of 2,287 vessels, and a decrease of 401,139 tons.

In local trade (i.e. between places within the waters of the Colony) there is a decrease in steam-launches of 190,342 vessels and a decrease in tonnage of 4,755,085 tons.

This is caused by the exclusion of Ferries plying between Hong Kong, Yaumati, Mongkok and Shum Sui Po.

Junks in Local trade show a decrease of 13,160 vessels and a decrease of 880,985 tons. Conservancy and Dustboats were included in 1929 figures but have been omitted in 1930.

The Nationalities of the Crews in British and in Foreign Ships entered were as follows:-

VESSELS.

BRITISH

OTHER EURO-

PEANS AND AMERICANS.

ASIATICS.

1929. 1930. 1929. 1930. 1929. 1930. 1929. 1930.

British,..... 6,100 6,012 46,399 53,597 1,838 8,009 423,334418,295

577 1,314 51,920 54,962 245,662 259,499

|

4,7065,016

Foreign,

Total,

10,806 11,028 46,976 54,911 53,758 62,971 668,966677,794

Hence in British ships

D 5

and in Foreign ships:-

1929. 09.08 %

00:29 %

1930. 11.16% of the crews were British. 01.66% of the crews were other Europeans &

1929.

1930.

00:19 %

00-41 % of the crews

were British.

17.41 %

17:40 % of the crews

were other

Europeaus &

Americans.

Americans.

90.63 %

87.18% of the crews

were Asiatics.

82.40% 82.19 % of the crews

were Asiatics.

100·00 % 100.00 %

100.00 % 100·00 %

2.-Trade.

A. Details of vessels of European type of construction, shipping bunker coal and oil fuel are shown below:-

EXPORTS.

1929.

1930.

Class.

No.

Coal Tons.

Oil Tons.

Coal

Oil

No.

Tons.

Tons.

Steamers,

6,269

River Steamers,

312,708 101,174 6,234

4,543 128,366

268,629

99,761

Total,

223 4,786 98,562 3,062

10,812 441,074 101,397 11,020 367,191 102,823

B. The River Steamer Trade compared with 1929 is shown. in the following Table :--

མ་

Year.

Imports. Tons.

Exports. Tons.

Passengers.

1929..

324,127.36

451,698.30 2,530,671

1930....

298,017.00

481,885.00

2,758,306

D 6

JUNKS.

C. The following Tables show the Junk Trade of the Colony for the years 1929 and 1930 :-

IMPORTS.

1929.

1930.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks. Tonnage.

Foreign Trade,...... 11,767

1,496,561

10,562

1,289,693

Local Trade................

7,385

316,628

9,921

438,389

Total,

... 19,152 1,813,189

20,483

1,728,082

Cargo 1930.

Cattle, 2,564 head,

Swine, 29,808 head,

General,..

Tons.

301

1,754

.491,614

Total,....

493,669

EXPORTS.

1929.

1930.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Junks.

Tonnage.

Foreign Trade,.............. 11,755

1,506,843

10,673

1,312,572

Local Trade,......... 7,711

328,904

10,027

435,542

Total,

19,466

1,835,747

20,700

1,748,114

Cargo 1930.

TonsTM

Kerosine, 1,198,382 Cases,

Rice and Paddy,

Coal,

General,

42,971

144,988

...109,635

.535,086

Total,..

832,680

D 7

Passenger Trade of the Port for the year 1930:-

No. of Ships.

Passengers.

Emigrants.

Arrived. Departed. Returned. Departed.

British Ocean-going,

Foreign Ocean-going,

British River Steamers,

Foreign River Steamers,

7.289 1.129,250

2.289

171,616

4,721 320,636 295,896 118,674 93,580 7,749 314,782 277,009 104,162 95,320

1,311,052 146,388

Total,..

22,048 1,936,284 | 2,030,345

223,136

188,900

Steam-launches, Foreign Trade,

Junks, Foreign Trade,

6.326 21,235

562 49,376

709 51,944

Total, Foreign Trade,

49,609 1,986,292 2,082,998

223,136

188,900

Steam-launches, Local Trade,

24,533 341,242

339.834

Junks, Local Trade,...

19,948

6.638

6,980

Total, Local Trade,

Grand Total,..

44,481

847,880

346,814

94,090 | 2,334,102 | 2,429,812 223,136 188,200

3. Revenue and Expenditure.

The total Revenue during the year was $1,020,741.02 as against $1,010,061.97 collected in the previous year showing an increase of $10,679.05 or 1.05%.

Light Dues,

*Light Dues, Special Assessments...

Licences and Internal Revenue,.

Fees of Court or Offices,....

Miscellaneous Receipts,

1929.

1930.

Increase. Decrease.

$144,961.48 $149,956.38 $ 4,994.90

174,165.18 179,357.08 5.191.90

195,271,52 195,709.25

489.710.01 481,341.44

137.73

8,368.57

5,953.78 14,376.87 8,423.09

$1,010,061.97 $1,020,741.02 $19,047.62 $ 8,368.57

* Will appear in future as Light Dues.

D 8

3.-Revenue and Expenditure,-Continued.

The principal individual increases are:-

Light Dues,

*Light Dues, Special Assessments,

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Fines,

Gunpowder Storage,

Official Signatures,

Survey of Steamships,

Sunday Cargo Working Permits,

Sale of Condemned Stores,

$ 4,994.90

5,191.90

4,519.50

1,499.80

4,349.87

1,048.00

9,010.23

3,525.00

9,165.00

The principal individual decreases are :

Boat Licences,

$ 2,404.25

Junk Licences,

1,388.50

Steam Launch Licences,

622.80

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

2,128.71

Medical Examination of Emigrants,

23,624.00

Steam Launch Surveyor's Certificate, Royalties Wireless Telegraphy (Trans-

ferred to Post Office),.

1,230.00

1,400.00

The

Expenditure

excluding Special Expenditure

was

$860,816.06 as against $688,938.40 expended in 1929, showing an increase of $171,877.66. This increase is principally due to lower rate of exchange and stipulated increments.

Special Expenditure included:-

Electrifying Typhoon Signals at Gap Rock and

Waglan,

$

496.55

1 New Motor Launch for Government Marine Surveyor's Department (Final instalment of

1929 Contract),

7,700.00

1 Pressure Gauge Testing Machine

782.77

1 Duplicator,

370.52

1 Fuller Bukewell Spiral Rule,

87.83

2 Reversible A Class Buoys,

4,300.00

1 Safe for Deputy Harbour Master

350.00

Training Expenses of Government Marine

Surveyors in England,

8,511.48

Conversion of Commercial Moorings,

98,599.82

Cust Rock Beacon,

400.00

Repairs to R.T. "Kausing ",...

17,190.00

$ 138,788.97

* Will appear in future as Light Dues.

Light Dues were collected during the year 1930 as follows :—

*

Special Assessment.

No. of

Class of Vessels.

Trips.

Tonnage.

Rate

per ton.

Fees

Collected.

Rate

per tou.

Fees

Collected.

Total Fees

Collected.

D 9-

C.

ረ.

Ocean Vessels,..

6,104

14,629,997

1 cent.

146,299.97

1 cent.

146,299.97

C.

292,599,94

Steam-launches,

2,514

92,920

929.20

1

929.20

1,858.40

River Steamers, (Night),

1,324

818,163

2,727.21

4,090.82

6,818.03

Do.,

(Day),

3,485

3,364,451

Nil.

vako

28,037.09

28,037.09

$149,956.38

* Will appear in future as Light Dues.

Total,..

13,427

18,905,531

:

$179,357.08

$329,313.46

D 10

4. Steam-launches.

On the 31st December, 1930, there were 291 Steam-launches and 170 Motor Boats employed in the Harbour. Of these 295 were licensed for the conveyance of passengers, 29 steam-launches and 14 motor boats belonged to the Colonial Government, 3 steam launches belonged to the Imperial Government, and 15 steam launches and 5 motor boats to the Naval Authorities. In addition there were 7 motor boats privately owned for pleasure and private

purposes.

New licence books for Steam Launches and Motor Boats were issued as follows in three classes during the year 1930, under Regulations, Section 37 of the Merchant Shipping Ordinance, No. 10 of 1899.

Class I......... 20 licences

Class II

13

"

Class III ...... 65

For incompetence or negligence in performing their duties:- 1 coxswain's certificate was cancelled by order of Governor in Council.

6 coxswains' certificates were suspended.

656 engagements and 672 discharges of masters and engineers were recorded during the year.

5.--Emigration and Immigration.

188,900 emigrants left Hong Kong for various places during the year 1930 (227,523 in 1929). Of these 93,580 were carried in British ships and 95,320 in Foreign ships.

223,136 returning emigrants were reported to have been brought to Hong Kong from the several places to which they had emigrated either from this Colony or from Coast Ports, as against 185,390 in 1929. Of these, 118,674 arrived in British ships and 104,462 in Foreign ships.

6. Registry, etc., of Shipping.

During the year, 24 ships were registered under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Acts, and 32 Certificates of Registry.cancelled. 201 documents, etc., were dealt with in con- nection with the Act, the fees on which amounted to $1,526.00 as compared with $2,142.00 in 1929.

-----

D 11

7. Marine Magistrate's Court.

Seven hundred and ninety-two (792) cases were heard in the Marine Magistrate's Court during 1930 (as compared with 477 in 1929).

The principal offences were :

Carrying excess passengers.

Mooring within 100 yards from low water mark in pro-

hibited hours.

Boarding ships without permission.

Breach of condition of Passenger boat licence by carrying

cargo.

Leaving Port without a Clearance.

8.-Marine Courts of Enquiry.

(Under Section 19 of Ordinance 10 of 1899).

During the year 1930 one court was held, viz:-

On the 12th and 13th March, 1930, to enquire into the circumstances attending the collision between the British S.S. "Anking" and the British S.S. "Tanda."

9. (a) Examination of Masters, Mates, and Engineers. (Under Bourd of Trade Regulations.)

The following Tables show the number of Candidates examined under Ordinance No. 10 of 1899 for Certificates of Compe- tency.

Grade.

Passed.

Failed.

Master,

First Mate,

Second Mate,

* Total,

First Class Engineer, ...

Second Class Engineer,

1st Class Motor Endorsement,

† Total,

* Passed 37-21 per cent. † Passed 32-2 per cent.

:

:

10

21

6

6

16

27

17

40

12

22

I

1

30

333

Failed 62 79 per cent. Failed 67·8 per cent.

63

D 12

(b) Examination of Coxswains and Engineers for Steamships. not exceeding 60 tons, under Section 37 of Ordinance 10 of 1899:-

Candidates.

Passed. Failed.

?

Master, Engineer,

Total,...

47

70

22

22

22

117

44

10. Examination of Pilots.

(Under Ordinance No. 3 of 1904.)

Twenty-two licences were renewed during the year. Four candidates presented themselves for examination in 1930 and two only passed.

11. Sunday Cargo-Working.

Under Ordinance No. 7 of 1929, 1,241 permits were issued during the year as compared with 1,159 in 1929.

The Revenue collected under this head amounted to $133,275 as against $129,750 in 1929 showing an increase of $3,525.

12. Harbour Master's Out-Stations.

The Out-stations attached to the Harbour Department issued Licences, etc., as follows:-

1929.

1930.

Shaukiwan,...

4,865

4,624

Aberdeen,

6,827

7,125

Stanley,

681

941

Yaumati,

3,634

4,829

Cheung Chau,

4,013

3,921

Tai O,.......

2,542

2,095

Tai Po,

2,326

2,001

Saikung,

1,009

773

Longket,

839

913

Deep Bay,

771

848

Lantao,

709

758

28,216

28.828

- D 13

The following is a comparative statement showing the amount of fees collected at out-Stations during the years 1929 and 1930.

Station.

1929.

1930. Increase, Decrease.

€0

C. $ C.

$

Shaukiwan,.

19,750.45 *17,545.50

c. $ C.

2,204.95

Aberdeen,

17,657.60

17,633.80

23.80

Stanley,

1,357.30

1,739.10

381.80

Yaumati,

35,417.50

42,469.50

7,052.00

Cheung Chau,

13,273.00

13,378.05

105.05

Tai O,

5,176.00 4,390.75

785.25

Tai Po,

6.105.70

5,620.75

484.95

Saikung,

2,586.25 2,163.75

422.50

Longket,

2,389.00 2,377.45

11.55

Deep Bay, Lantao,

2,191,00

2,489.65

298.65

Total,

1,935.00 2,295.25 360.25

107,838.80 112,103.55 8,197.75 3,933.00

Nett Increase,

4,264.75

*Excluding Dispensary Fees $1,594.60

t

"2

19

""

$4,119.80

13.-Lighthouses and Signal Stations.

GAP ROCK LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1930 a total number of 1,027 vessels were signalled and reported including 219 by Flash lamp.

1,264 messages, including meteorological observations for the Observatory, were sent by telegraph, 236 messages were received including weather reports.

Telegraphic communication was interrupted and W/T commen- ced from April 16th, 3048 messages were sent and 531 received by W/T telegraph.

There were 261 hours and 40 minutes of fog, and fog signals were fired 1,661 times.

The fortnightly reliefs were delayed 7 times owing to bad weather.

D 14

WAGLAN LIGHTHOUSE.

During 1930, 4,073 vessels were signalled and reported in- cluding 1,200 by Flash lamp.

4,220 messages including meteorological observations for the Royal Observatory were sent by telegraph and 93 by wireless.

944 messages were received by telegraph and 19 by wireless including weather reports.

Telegraphic communication was interrupted for 9 days, when W/T was used for that period.

There were 511 hours 40 minutes fog.

The Diaphone fog signal was sounded for 526 hours.

The relief was delayed owing to bad weather on 1 occasion.

GREEN ISLAND LIGHTHOUSE AND SIGNAL STATION.

During 1930, 1,655 vessels were signalled and reported.

380 messages were sent and 58 were received.

Aga lights (including Green Island) are now 17 in number and have worked accurately and continuously throughout the year.

The Beckwith Bell fog signal has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

KAP SING LIGHTHOUSE.

This station has been regularly inspected and has worked satisfactorily throughout the year.

KOWLOON SIGNAL STATION.

At the Signal Hill Station, Kowloon, 4,116 vessels were signalled and reported as entering and 2,680 as leaving the harbour. 108 Typhoon and non-local signals were hoisted.

D 15

14.--Harbour Moorings.

GOVERNMENT MOORINGS.

Government Moorings as detailed below are available for the use of vessels frequenting the Port :--

Daily Rental.

Number Available,

during 1930.

1929.

1930.

A Class for Vessels 450/600

feet long

$8.00

17

19

B Class for Vessels 300/450

feet long

6.00

20

21

C Class for Vessels less than

300 feet long...

4.00

19

0

Total...

56

48

Of the above 48 Moorings there are 15 special Typhoon A Class Moorings.

From the 1st of January to the 3rd of March, 1930, the total number of mooring Buoys was 56 viz:-17 A Class, 20 B Class and 19 C Class.

From the 3rd of March the work on the re-conversion of Harbour Moorings commenced and continued until the 8th of December, 1930, during which time the number of mooring Buoys varied as moorings were discarded and new ones laid down.

On the 31st of December, 1930, the total number of Mooring Buoys available was 48 viz. 19 A Class, 21 B Class and 8 C Class.

A further 8 B Class Moorings will be laid down during the year 1931 and 1932 making a total of 56 Mooring Buoys.

(i) In the aggregate these moorings were in use throughout the year as follows:-

A Class 4,248 days.

B Class 4,519

C Class 4,279

>>

(ii) In addition they were used by Naval Vessels and Transports, for which no charge was made, as follows:-

A Class 15 days.

D 16

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

The gross revenue for the year, including $1,675.00 from Private Buoys, was $79,889.00. (the loss of revenue due to (ii) above amounted to $120) and the expenditure for upkeep was $19,430.64. In addition to this $16,779.90 was expended in providing chain for new moorings, $4,300.00 for two reversible A Class mooring buoys, and $98,599.82 in connection with the re-conversion scheme of Harbour moorings.

PRIVATE BUoys.

Permission was granted for the maintenance of private buoys and moorings to the number of 37, and the total revenue derived from that source was $1,675.00.

15.-Mercantile Marine Office.

37,764 seamen were shipped and 36,802 discharged at the Mercantile Marine Office and on board ships during the year, com- pared with 36,657 shipped and 34,604 discharged during 1929.

43 distressed seamen were received and admitted to Sailors' Home and Boarding Houses; of these 22 were sent to England 1 to Aden, 4 to Calcutta, 1 to Colombo, 2 to Shanghai, 1 remained in Boarding House and 12 obtained employment.

$1,196.80 was expended by the Harbour Master on behalf of the Board of Trade in the relief of these distressed seamen.

16.-Marine Surveyor's Office.

PASSENGER CERTIFICATES.

125 vessels of 366,310 tons, gross, were surveyed for Passenger Certificates during the year, as compared with 126 vessels of 363,960 tons, gross, in 1929; 41 being surveyed at Kowloon Docks, 61 at Taikoo Dockyard, 7 at Cosmopolitan Docks, 15 at Chinese Slipways, and one on a Bottom Certificate issued by the Board of Trade. The following is a comparison of tonnages and nationalities of the various vessels granted Hong Kong Passenger Certificates during 1930-

British, Norwegian, Chinese,

Danish,

103 vessels of 324,730 tons (gross)

10

""

7

""

23,567 6,638 11,375

"

>>

>>

The following is a comparison of the numbers of certificates issued for the various passenger trades during the year :-

Class IA Foreign Going

Class I

...

...10

...

...81

...34

Foreign Going (Coasting and Far

Eastern Trade Class III River Trade

...

...

...

D 17

5 vessels of a total of 62,193 tons, gross, were surveyed and granted Bottom Certificates during the year, as compared with 31 vessels of 10,916 Tons (Gross) in 1929.

EMIGRATION SURVEYS.

109 vessels, of which 47 were British, and 62 foreign, were surveyed for Emigration Licences during the year, as compared with 107 vessels in 1929.

LOADLINE CERTIFICATES.

35 vessels were surveyed for Loadline Certificates during the year, as compared with 32 in 1929. Of this number 20 were British vessels registered in Hong Kong, 14 were Chinese and 1 American.

LIFESAVING APPLIANCES.

45 new Lifeboats and 239 units of Buoyant Apparatus were surveyed during construction, at the makers' works, during the year as compared with 56 Boats and 101 units of Buoyant apparatus in 1929. 29,271 new lifejackets were examined and stamped at the makers' works during the year as compared with 20,363 in 1929.

SURVEYS OF STEAM AND MOTOR LAUNCHES.

During the year 715 surveys were carried out on steam and motor launches as compared with 727 in 1929.

EXAMINATIONS OF ENGINEERS.

During the year 93 Candidates were examined for Board of Trade Certificates of Competency as Engineers as compared with 64 in 1929.

Year.

1928

Comparative Return of Work performed by the Government Marine Surveyor's Department for 3 years ending 31.12.30.

Surveys for

Passenger Certificate

Surveys for Load- line Certificate.

Surveyors for Bottom Certificate.

Surveys for

Emigration Licence. Measurement of

Tonnage for British Registry.

Measurement of Tonnage, not for

British Registry.

Inspection & Certific- ation of Light &

Sound Signals.

Examination of

Boiler Designs.

Surveys of Boilers during Construction.

Surveys of Govern- ment Land Boilers.

Surveys of Launches for plying Licences. Surveys of Govt.

Launches & Harbour Buoys, etc.

Ships' Plans Exam-

ined.

Inclining Experi-

ment

S.

New Lifeboats

Surveyed during construction.

New Buoyant Appar- atus Surveyed during construction.

Life jackets Inspect- ed and Stamped.

Engineers Examined! B. O. T. Certificates,

Engineers Examined Local Certificates.

Estimated Total

Number of Visits in

connection with

134

1929

126

50

38868

32

3

119

11

12

12

18

10

763

1,100

1930

125

35

5

109

15

24

17

17

17

23

715

་-

3

107

20

34

22

20

12

10

727

1,242

260

34

56

101 20,363

64

87

6,560

96

256

12,793

73

101

5,215

956

256

19

45

239 29,271

93

92

7,242

Surveys.

81 Ɑ

D 19

17.-Government Gunpowder Depôt.

During the year 1930 there has been stored in Government Gunpowder Depôt, Green Island:---

No.

Approx- imate

of Cases. Weight,

lb.

1,904 47,802

Gunpowder, privately owned,

Do., Government owned,... Cartridges, privately owned,...

Do., Government owned,.. Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

28

2,327

6,219

613,534

87

11,751

7,882

399,154

Do.,

Government owned,

46

1,580

Non-explosives, privately owned,...

355

91,168

Do.,

Government owned,

34

1,370

Total,

15,745 1,368,686

During the same period there has been delivered out of the Depôt :--

No.

Approxi-

mate

of Cases.

Weight.

lb.

For Sale in the Colony:

Gunpowder, privately owned,

35

1,120

Cartridges, privately owned,..

39

3,302

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,.

2,912

216,990

Non-explosives, privately owned,

4

540

For Export -

Gunpowder, privately owned,

594

28,138

Cartridges,

6,100

603,032

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,..

3,214

270,784

Non-explosives, privately owned,

231

57,028

Government owned :-

Gunpowder,

1

54

11

3,087

5

34

Cartridges,

Explosive Compounds,

Delivered to be destroyed :-

Cartridges,

Explosive Compounds,

Gunpowder,

Non-explosives,

...

Total,...................

13,146 1,184,109

D 20

On the 31st December, 1930, there remained as follows :—

No. of Cases.

Approxi-

mate

Weight.

Ib.

Gunpowder, privately owned,

465

18,544

Do.,

Government owned,

27

2,273

Cartridges, privately owned,

80 7,200

Do.,

Government owned,

76 8,664

Explosive Compounds, privately owned,

1,756 111,380

Do.,

Government owned,

41 1,546

Non-explosives, privately owned,

120

33,600

Do.,

Government owned,

1,370

Total,...

2,599 184,577

18.-Government Coaling Depôt, Yaumati.

Government Launches received coal or oil fuel as required during the year. 9,392 tons of coal was received into the Depôt and 9,220 tons issued to launches. 34,718 gallons of Kerosene and 24,613 gallons of Petrol were received and 33,113 gallons Kerosene and 23,463 gallons Petrol were issued to motor launches. 2,468.45 tons of fuel oil were received and bunkered.

GOVERNMENT SLIPWAY, YAUMATI.

Government launches were slipped, aggregating 97 times at regular intervals during the year and the slip was occupied 318 days.

G. F. HOLE, Harbour Master.

D 21

SHIPPING, 1930.

Table I.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS, OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS ENTERED AT PORTS IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG FROM EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1930.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL,

COUTRIES WHENCE ARRIVED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews. Vessels. Tous.

Crews. Vessels. Tons. Crews.

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand, .

British North Borneo...

33

88,035 3.484

45 108,675 3,666

18

22

56,974

53,390

1,861

51

1,395

67

Canada.

24 262,326 13,197

13,319

961

32

145,009 5,345

162.065 5,061

305,645 14,158

Ceylon,

:

India, including Mauritius,

100 350,796 | 14,796

104

333,691

4.511

204

South Africa,

8,498

Straits Settlements & F.M.S.,

93 1

Unite Kingdom,.....

155

China.

River Steamers,

179,070

808,323

1,338 2,006,328 | 122,634

2,715 2,766.072179,135

298

9,185

16,836

:>

Steamships under 60 tons,

1

Junks, ........

Denmark,

21

51 92,051 4.369

35 194.831 1.202

1,424 1.585,919 70,391

519 303,033 29.404

3,052 99,453 37.149

10,083 1,216,357 | 158,792

107,921 863

147

190

21

684.490 19,340

8.498 298

271,121 13,554

998.157 21.038

2.762 3,592.217 202,025

3,264 3.069,105 208,539

3,052 99,453 37,149

10.083 1,216,357 158,792

107,921 $63

Europe (not specially mentioned),

29,319

692

30

111,755 1.342

36

141,104 2,034

France,

41,105

945

36

238,089 7,241

17

282,194 8,186

Formosa,

4,795

203

161

184,591 8,223

165

189.386 8,426

Germany,

33,402 439

91

419,782 7,491

93

153,181 7,930

Holland,

47.821 1,281

6

354

Italy,

25

French Indo-China,

Japan,

Macao,

*

River Steamers,

4

934

166 206,012 11,338

155 709,878 24,432

2,706 167

966,794 52,532

Steamships under 60 tons,

:

Junks.

>>

Netherland East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

Russia in Asia,

479

27.365

401

194

618,711 16.011

27,954

108,407 1,705

25 108,407 1,705

342 373,050 20,869 508 579,092 32,207

547 1,921,221 40,466 702 2,631,102 64,898

214 30,260 5,102 218 32,966 5,269

594 138,253 22,730 1,528 1,105,047 75,262

102

2,475 984 102

2,475 981

73,336 7.754

73,336 7,751

646,076 16,412

15

75,275 1,635

479

203

26

217,925 8,967

90

566,287 12,390

116

781 212

21.857

6.

32.247

524

10

43,105

473

16

75.852

997

Siam,

85

127,886 7.387

122

140,466 8,896

207

26×352

16,283

South America,

20

91.623 2.091

20

21.623 | 2,094

Sweden,

.......

1.8

United States of America, .

84

399,133 7,362

61.686

281 1,604,577 32,811

587

18

61.686

587

365 2.003,710 40,173

TOTAL,

6,012 9,422,071479,901

18,78210.842,576 | 520,454

24,744 20.264,647 1,000,355

D 22

Table II.-NUMBER, TONNAGE, AND CREWS OF FOREIGN-GOING VESSELS CLEARED IN THE COLONY OF HONG KONG TO EACH COUNTRY IN THE YEAR 1930.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

GRAND TOTAL.

COUNTRIES TO WHICH DEPARTED.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Vessels.

Tons. Crews.

Fuel Oil.

Bunker Coal.

Australia & Pacific Islands including New Zealand

27

81.315 3,185 1.821

2,909

30

97.328 2,429

600 1.417

57

178,643 5,611 2,421 4,326

British North Borneo,.....

48

120,405 3,870 700

2,819

22

54.314

897

963

100

70 174,719 4,767 1,663 2,949

Canada,

21

234,095

11,201 4,760

3

11,089

157

24

:

245,181 11,358 4,760

Ceylon.

:

India including Mauritius,.........................

$3

295,431

11,965

7,220

127

South Africa,

2

6,328

220

12

Straits Settlements & F. M. S.,

111

United Kingdom,..

91

China,........

1,384

2,232,947126,159

""

River Steamers,

2,706

2,769,830 177,868

225,838 11,435 11,183 10,386

519,013 14,112 7,560 3,930

14,344 52,519

374 68,912

19

Steamships under 60 tons,

» Junks,

Denmark,

Europe, (not specially mentioned)

France,

:

:

:

:

421,367

12.981

86 -200,907 5,196

43 229,156 5,305

1,648 2,044,474 91.007

552 305,370 | 30,018

3,071 99,843 37,306

7,650

1.000

2:0

716,798 19,615

8,220

888

14

49,309 1,108

330 8.475

197

132

2,997 41.271

16,817

14,592

:

10,228

1,237,850 160,810

126,745 16,631 11,513 18,861

718,169 19,117 7,560 3,930

3,032 4.277,421 217,166 17,341 93,790

3,258 3,075,200 207,886 374 85,729

3,071 99,813 37,306

10,228 1,237,850 160,810

14,592

14

71,980

539

14

71.980

539

6

29,207

398

6 29,207 398

25

:

183,843

6,255

:

1,095

25

183,843 6,255

:

:

:

Formosa,

Germany,

11,877

20 93,913 1,567

327

140

102

149,990

6.524

30

769

108

161,867 6,851

60

271,534

5.704

530

80

365,447 7,271

1,09

30

909

530

Holland.

3

:

15,143

187

:

:

3

15,143

187

Italy,

26 106,615 1,807

26

106,615 1,807

(Franch), Indo-China,.......

Japan,

Macao,

""

River Steamers,

934

10,801

178 237,133 12,607 384 30,715

393 552,392 22,084 2,550

203 906,630 25,277 8,230 18,180 376 1,428,623 30,923 5,100

3 2,040 133

40 216

33,080 5,163

966,794 52,532

Steamships under 60 tons,

:

:

101

594 138,253 22,730 2,688

2,408

960

32,227

5,336

633

2,162

255

571

789,525 31,691 2,934 62,972

579 2,335,253 56,200

219 35,120 5,296

1,528 1,105,017 75,262

101 2,408 960

13,630 23,516

5

67€

2,688 12,962

255

"

Junks,

445

74,722 6,951

445

74,722 6,951

:

Netherlands East Indies,

Philippine Islands,

Russia in Asia,

Siam,

10 30,555

29 217,206 11,034

6 20,457 289

68 101,990 5,850

468

1,260

140

449,974

208

1,175

144

90

5

7,794

6,652

103

South America,

3,150

55

35

:

Sweden,

12

United States of America.......

67

328,077 6,272 5,750 2,866

247

11,802 1,445

761,945 15,374 3.421

22.728 241

126,628 7,428

169.281 3.935

40,556 401

1,469,995 30,625 17,611 3.194

5,220

1.211

150

173

775 25,190

900

171

43,185

227.018 13,278 8,569 31,842

36 172.434 3,990 900

12 40,556 401

314 1,798,072 36,897 23,361 6,060

480,529 12,270 1.445

6,480

979,151 26,408 3.629 2,38€

530

де

Total,

5,998 9,405,024 | 476,426 63,108 220,674

18,867 10,841.979 | 521,694 | 39,715 161.494

24,865 20,247,003 | 098.120

102,823 | 382,16

D 23

Tabe III.-Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels excluding Steam Launches Entered at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year 1930.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels. Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

234

11,132

234

11,132

Cheung Chau,

560

31,394

560

31,394

Saikung,

48

2,334

48

2,334

Stanley,

Tai O,.....

108

3,187

108

3,187

Tai Po,

48

1,141

48

1,141

Deep Bay,

...

Tsuen Wan,

Victoria,

6,012 9,422,071

354 11,105 24,147 11,118,744

354

11.105

30,159 20,540,815

Total,

6,012 9,422,071

25,499 11.179,037

31,511 20,601,108

Table IV. Total Number and Tonnage of Vessels (excluding Steam Launches)

Cleared at each Port in the Colony of Hong Kong during the Year, 1930.

BRITISH.

FOREIGN.

TOTAL.

STATION.

Vessels. Tonnage.

Vessels.

Tonnage. Vessels. Tonnage.

Aberdeen,

234

11,182

234

11,182

Cheung Chau,

603

45,600

603

45,600

Saikung,

44

1,224

44

1,224

Stanley,

...

Tai O,......

108

3,123

108

3.123

Tai Po,

48

1,153

48

1,153

Deep Bay,

Tsuen Wan,

258

12,439

258

12,439

Victoria,

5,998 | 9,405,024

24,427 11,100,549

30,425 |20,505,573

Total,...

5,998 9,405,024

25,722 11,175,270

31,720 20,580,294

D 24

Table V.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of

FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION ENTERED at PORTS in the

COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1930.

ENTERED.

NATIONALITY,

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,363

5,689,205

248,234

""

River Steamers,

3,649

3,732,866

231,667

American,

336

1,645,809

34,210

Chinese,

787

382,738

32,020

>>

River Steamers,

1,033

410,646

48,312

Junks,

10,562

1,289,693

166,546

Danish,

96

242,788

5,558

Dutch,

289

994,768

27,614

French,

246

605,035

27,393

Italian,

49

211.982

3,378

Japanese,

1,398

3,465,246

90,204

Norwegian,

365

613,623

19,949

Portuguese,

92

57,728

7,352

River Steamers,

110

30,640

3,822

15

German,

170

631,474

14,248

Swedish,

Belgian,

29

101,071

963

11

37,329

547

Panamaniau,.

Steamships

5

10

20,078

205

under 60

tons trading to Ports outside the Colony, ...

3,154

101,928

38,133

TOTAL,

24,744

20,264,647

1,000,355

D 25

Table VI.

NUMBER, TONNAGE, and CREWS of FOREIGN GOING VESSELS of EACH NATION CLEARED at PORTS in the COLONY of HONG KONG in the YEAR 1930.

CLEARED.

NATIONALITY.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crews.

British,

2,358

5,668,400

246,026

"

River Steamers,

3,640

3,736,624

230,400

American,......

342

1,641,862

33,694

Chinese,

799

376,567

32,093

""

River Steamers,

1,035

412,510

49,000

Junks,

10,673

1,312,572

167,761

Danish,.

96

242,788

5,636

Dutch,

285

981,585

25,262

French,

245

603,680

26,475

Italian,

50

215,065

3,381

Japanese,

1,390

3,464,527

92,491

Norwegian,

362

610,708

19,843

Portuguese,

89

55,513

6,877

""

River Steamers,

111

31,113

3,748

German,

173

632,760

15,520

Swedish,

Belgian,

29

101,071

958

11

37,329

507

Panamanian,

5

20,078

182

Steamships under

60

tons trading to Ports

3,172

102,251

38,266

outside the Colony, ..

TOTAL,......

24,865 20,247,003

998,120

Table VII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks (Foreign Trade) Entered in the Colony of Hong Kong, from Ports on the Coast of China and Macao, in the Year 1930.

CARGO.

BALLAST.

TOTAL.

Vessels. Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo, Ves-

Tons. sels.

Tons. Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Cargo,

Tons.

Canton,.

435 84.944 8,795

39,089 1,058 | 232,109 19,910

1,493

317,053 28,705

39.089

West River.

4,028 504,694 70.530

48,900

195,447 1,673 | 209,052

27,871

476

5,701

713.746 98,401 49,376

195,447

Macao,

173

29,825 2,231

East Coast.

2,032

106,016 18,939

17,795 306 43,511 56,772 300 6,565 2,239

5,523

479

73,336 7,751

17,795

2,332

112,581 21,178

56,772

West Coast,

101

10,395 1,749

557

72 977 10,508

1,811

1,811 456 62,582

8.759

Total, 1930,

6,769

735,874 102.244

48,900

310,914 3,793 553,819 64,302

476

10.562

1,289,693 | 166,546

49.376

310.914

Total, 1929,

6,831

800,622 111,991 54,898

354,9084,936 | 695,939

$3,425

470

11,767

1,496,561 | 195,419

55,368 354,908

D 26

Table VIII.

Total Number, Tonnage, Crews, Passengers, and Cargoes of Junks (Foreign Trade) Cleared in the Colony of Hong Kong, for Ports on the Coat of China and Macao, in the Year 1930.

Cargo.

Ballast.

Total.

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Ves-

Cargo,

sels.

tons.

Tons.

Crew.

Passen-

gers.

Passen-

Cargo,

Vessels.

Tons.

Crew.

gers.

tous.

Canton,

West River,

Macao,

East Coast,..

1,861

4,216 561,613 76,273

392 65,571 6,291

1,600 60,883 14,550

361,567 35,318

51,214

369,598

271,635 | 1,257 | 124,294

37 3,284

530

1,898

364,851

35,848

369,598

17,083

730

5,473

685,907 93,356 51,944

271,635

38,268 53 9,151

660

445

74,722 6,951

38,268

West Coast,

507 68,440 9,745

23,047 721 56,083

57,989

6,965

2.321

116,966 21,515

23,047

29 1,686

346

536

70.126 10,091

57,989

Total 1930,

8,576 | 1,118,074 | 142,177

51,214

760,537 2,097 | 194,498

25,581

730

10,673 1,312,572 167,761 51,944

760,537

Total 1929,

9,643 | 1,273,321 | 169,337

62,339

911,001

2,112 | 233,522

27,927

11,755 1,506,843 197,261

62,339

911,001

27

FOREIGN TRADE.

Table IX.

Summary of Arrivals and Departures of all Vessels.

1929.

1930.

NO. OF

VESSELS.

No. of

TONS.

CREWS.

VESSELS.

TONS.

CREWS.

British Ships entered,

6,100

9,462,545

471,571

6,012

9,422,071

479,901

British Ships cleared,

6,108

9,498,483

473,702

5,998

9,405,024

476,426

Foreign Ships entered,

4,706

8,857.177

298,159

5,016

9,450,955

315,775

Foreign Ships cleared,

4,704

8,838,473

294,863

5,022

9,427,156

315,667

Steamships under 60 tons entered,

3,688

105,455

43,870

3,154

101,928

38,133

Steamships under 60 tons cleared,

3,746

105,612

44,013

3,172

102,251

38,266

Junks entered,

11,767

1,496,561

195,419

10,562

1,289,693

166,546

Junks cleared,

11,755

1,506,843

197,264

10,673

1,312,572

167,761

Total of all Vessels entered,

26,261

19,921,738

1,009,019

24,744

20,264,647

1,000,355

Total of all Vessels cleared,..

26,313

19,949,411

ì,009,842

24,865

20,247,003

998,120

Total of all Vessels entered and cleared, iu Foreign Trade,

}

52,574

39,871,149

2,018,861

49,609

40,511,650

1,998,475

LOCAL TRADE.

Steam Launches entered,

D 28

Steam Launches cleared,

1929 Not included.

Do.

12,266

402,532

146,930

12,267

402,499

146,940

Total Launches entered and cleared,

1929 Not included.

24,533

805,031

293,870

Total Junks entered,

Do.

cleared,

Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

Total Foreign Trade entered and cleared, Total Local Trade entered and cleared,

7,385

316,628

75,491

9,921

438,389

100,284

7,711

328,904

76,952

10,027

435,542

100,481

15,096

645,532

152,443

19,948

873,931

200,765

52,574

39,871,149

2,018,861

49,609

40,512,550

1,998,475

15,096

645,532

152,443

44,481

1,678,962

494,635

:

PLACES.

Table X.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Entered in the Colouy of Hong Kong during the year 1930.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING.

TOTAL.

Within the Waters of the Colony, 1929, Do.,

863

23,990

1930,

505

9,415

9,896 150

5,377

106

106,175

11,761

2,799,651 1,138,840 1,492,387 13,522 107,038 2,823,641 1,148,736 1,492,537 13,252 393,117 141,553 341,136 9,034 12,266 402,532 146,930 341,242 9,034

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

Canton,..

265 6,066 3,089

151

West River,

250| 6,851 3,498

Macao,

37

870

380

East Coast,

Other places,

Total,.

108 4,042 1,344

962 40,557 12,619

1,622 58,386 20,930-

:

:.

:..

:

...

:

:

:

:

5,972 | 1,968

89 3,822 1,204;

65 1,605

75 3,197

604

809

1,152 28,946 12,618

1,532 43,542 17,203

:.

416 12,038 5,057

339 10,673 4,702

70 102 2,475 984

:

183 7,239 2,153

562

1,107 2,114 62,503 25,237

562

1,107

562 1,177 3,154 101,928 38,133

562

1,177

:

:.

:

:

:

70

Table XI.

Statement of Licensed Steam-launches Cleared from the Colony of Hong Kong during the year 1930.

PLACES.

TOWING.

NOT TOWING,

TOTAL.

Ton-

Vessels.

Crews.

nage.

Tons.

Passen- Cargo Bunker Vessels. Coal.

gers,

Ton-

nage.

Crews.

gers.

Passen- Bunker Cargo, Vessels. Coal. Tons.

Ton-

nage.

Crew.

Passen- Cargo, Bunker Tons. Coal.

gers.

Within the Waters of theColony, 1929,

1,180

30,492

13,400

Do.,

1930,

1,003

18,888

10,772

218

1,093

973

106,657 | 2,705,983 1,124,755 1,487,666 15,053 8,122 383,611

11,204 339,616 136,168 6,558 4,594

107,837 | 2,736,475

12,267 402,499

1,138,155|1,487,666

8,122

16,146

146,940

339,834

4,594

7,531

...

D 30

Canton,.....

253 5,970 2,968

390

West River,..

252 6,882|8,521

1,363

1,476 4,209

165 6,033 2,082

530 2,768

418 12,003 5,050

3,158 1,893

87 3,803 1,210

125 1,819

Macao,

Fast Coast,

Other places,

Total,

42 977 426

133 5,137 1,606

1,626 |55,529 |19,758

2,306 74,495 28,279

159

59 1,431

534

96

101 2,408

339 10,685 4,731

960

3 3,295 4,334

255

1,086

...

5,731

54 2,200

501 14,289 5,592

569

308

2

187| 7,337| 2,175

2 1,394

698 1,240

185 2,127 69,818 25,350

698

185 6,971

1,866 12,548

866 27,756 9,987

709 2,299 4,774 3,172 102,251 38,266

709| 6,640|14,847

Outside the Waters of the Colony :-

LICENCE DUPLICATE BOAT RE-

LICENCE.

Books,

LICENCE.

PAINTING

SPECIAL

PERMITS.

FEES.

Table XII.

Number of Boat Licences, Permits, etc., issued and Fees collected during the year 1930.

(Under Table U, Section 40, of Ordinance No. 10 of 1899.)

DESCRIPTION.

Licence Books,

Boat Repainting,

Special Permits,

Passenger Boats, Classes A & B,

Lighters, Cargo and Water Boats, Other Boats,

Fish Drying Hulks,

Duplicate Licences,

:

:

....

...

3,185

:

:

:.

:

:

:..

:

:

2,608

2,028

12,959

60

:

31

4,586

1,262

:

:.

:

:

:

:

$ 3,194.00

1,146.50

$15.50

13,919.75

51,273.00

43,749.75

522.00

7.00

4,586

1,262 $114,127.50

:

:

TOTAL,

17,655

3,185

7

D 32

Table XIII.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the years 1929 and 1930.

Sub-head of Revenue.

Amount 1929.

Amount

1930,

1. Light Dues, Ordinance 10 of 1899,

$

C.

144,961.48

$

C.

149,956.38

$ Special Assessment, Ord, 10 of 1899, 174,165.18 179,357.08

27

2. Licences & Internal Revenue not otherwise

specified :--

Boat Licences, Ordinance 10 of 1899, Chinese Passenger Ship Licences, Or-

dinance 1 of 1889,

Fines,

Forfeitures,

Fishing Stake and Station Licences,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

116,604.00 114,199.75

1,545.00

12,849.22

1,605.00 17,368,72

275.00

546.00

64.40

67.40

1,028.70

972.40

Junk Licences, &c., Ord. 10 of 1899, Junk Licences, &c., from the New Ter-

ritories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

38,588.25

37,199.75

11,140.25

11,283.25

Motor Spirit Duties................

33.08

Steam-launch Licences, &c., Ordinance

13,036.70 12,433.90

Fishing Stake and Station Licences, from

the New Territories, Ord. 10 of 1899,

10 of 1899,

3. Fees of Court or Office, Payments for specific purposes, and Reimbursements- in Aid :-

Court Fees,

Engagement and Discharge of Seamen,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Examination of Masters, &c., Ordinance

10 of 1899,

Fees for use of Government Buoys,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.....

Gunpowder, Storage of, Ord, 10 of 1899, Medical Examination of Emigrants, Ord.

1 of 1889,....

Official Signatures, Ordinance 1 of 1889, Printed Forms, Sale of, Ord. 1 of 1889, Registry Fees (Merchant Shipping Act),

Ordinance 10 of 1899,.... Steam-launches, Surveyor's Certificates,

Ordinance 10 of 1899,...

Survey of Steamships, Ordinance 10 of

1899.....

1 of 1891,

9.00

72.74

32,896.20 34,396.00

2,985.00

2,932.50

82,017.71 79,889.00 9,674.60 14,024.47

*152,509.90 †128,885.90

6,966.00 8,014.00 667.00 740.50

2,142.00 1,526.00

13,350.00

12,120,00

56,415.10 65,425.33

Sunday Cargo Working Permits, Ord.

129,750.00 133,275.00

40.00

Interest,

71.00

66,25

Carried forward,...

(*† See next page.)

1,003,731.69 1,006,430.40

Registration of Air-craft,

§ Will appear in future as Light Dues.

D 33

Table XIII,-Continued.

Comparative Statement of Revenue collected in the Harbour Department during the years 1929 and 1930.

Amount

Amount

Sub-head of Revenue.

1929.

1930.

c. $

c.

Brought forward,...................

1,003,731.69 1,006,430.40

4. Miscellaneous Receipts

-

Sale of condemned stores,

4,430.00 13,595.00

Royalties Wireless Telegraphy,

1,450,00

50.00

Widows & Orphans Pension Contribution,

44.36

Other Miscellaneous Receipts :-

Pilot Licences Ord. 3 of 1904,

120.00

230.00

Engagement of Masters and Engineers

of launches Ordinance 10 of 1899,..

327.50

328.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

2.78

63.26

Total,.

* Statement of Emigration Fees,

1,010,061.97|1,020,741.02

1929:

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure incurred by.

Harbour Department,...... $152,509.90

$ 13,300.00 (Estimated.)

Office of Secretary for.

Chinese Affairs,

14,500.00

3,880.00

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health,

12,108.00

Medical Department,......

33,119.81

$ 179,117.90

$50,299.81

Net Revenue................

$128,818.09

† Statement of Emigration Fees, 1930:-

Chinese Affairs,

Stamp Office, on account

of Bill of Health, Medical Department,...........

Revenue collected by.

Expenditure incurred by.

$ 13,300.00 (Estimated.)

2,496.00

Harbour Department,...... $128,885.90

Office of Secretary for

16,740.00

11,292.00

$156,917.90

$ 63,700.83

Net Revenue.

$ 93,217.07

47,904.83-

Adults.

Children,

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

PORTS.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

- D 34 -

Australia,

1,141

1,141

1.141

3

1,144

Africa,

170

39

27

8

244

31

15

15

10

71

201

54

42

18

315

2

2

Bombay, (India)

British Borneo,

2,653

1,027 |

323

232 4,240

2,653 1,027

328

232

4,240

Canada,.

6,181

53

4 6,350

201

27

254

6,382

78

139

5

6,604

་་་་་་

Calcutta,

787

87

31

916

2

3

789

88

31

11

919

Dutch Indies,

24.317 4,471 2,806

1,021 32,615 24,317 | 4,471 | 2.806 1,021

32,615

Dunedin (New Zealand).

20

20

20

20

+

Fiji,

51

53

51

2

53

Honolulu,

:

5,162

109

47

36

5 354; 5,162

109

47

36

5,354

487

12

18

517

487

12

18

517

Mexico,

Mauritius,

433

213

164

42

852

433

213

164

42

852

81

8

Noumea (New Caledonia),

8

Nauru Island,

514

514

514

514

Ocean Island,

355

355

355

355

Portuguese East Africa,

51

11

Panama, (Balboa),

389

13

مرين

70

51

11

70

14

116

389

13

14

416

3

3

Kaboul (New Guinıa),

Rangoon,

733

131

83

35

982

27

36

760

138

85

35

1,018

161

57

27

20

268

164

57

27

20

268

South America,

Samoa Island,

251

251

251

251

Sumatra (Belaw in Deli), Straits Settlements,

Tahiti,

United States of America,

49,851 18,757 | 5,591 | 3,390 77,589 29,264 || 8,981 | 3,792|| 1,759 43,796 79,115 27,738 9,383 | 5,149 | 121,385

51

59

7,296

196

183

36

3.281

543

219

161 4,207 3,284

543

219

161

4,207

51

7

1

7.296

196

36

183

59

7,711

Total 1930,

Total 1929.

63,202 20,314 6,342 | 3,722 93,580 70,677 14.441| 7.156 3,046 95,320 | 133,879 34,755 |13,498 || 6,768188,900 81,955 |21,463 | 7,170 | 3.735 | 114,823 90,799 |13,342 | 6,538| 2,521|113,200 | 172,734 34,80513,708 | 6,256|227 523

Total Passengers by Foreign Ships, Total Passengers by British Ships..

70.680|14,441 | 7.156 | 3,046 |63.202 20,314| 6,342| 3,722

95,323

93,577

Excess of Passengers by Foreign Ships,

1,746

Table XV.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895. 1900. 1905. 1910. 1915. 60,360 66,961 73,105 88,452 109,110

1920. 1925, 84,602 129,004

1930.

235,141

Table XVI.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants from Hong Kong to Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1921 to 1930 inclusive.

- D 35

Whither bound.

1921.

1922. 1923. 1924.

1925, 1926. 1927. 1928.

1929.

1930.

Straits Settlements, Wales.

67,032

Straits Settlements, Females,

20,292

39,616 52,011 58,051 10,740 13,573 17,631

78,505127,863

19,047

158.788129.089 113,036 29,422 43,620 10,652 33,480

88,498

32,887

Total,

87,324

50,356

65,584 | 75,682

97,552 157,285 | 202,403 | 169,741 | 146,516 | 121,385

Other Ports, Males,

64,293

44,109

Other Ports, Females,

4,394

3,928

4,736

48,773 49.427 40,198 54,506 75,003 77,815 73,426 58,879 5,867 4.750 2,784 8.182 9,61.6 7,581 8,636

Total.

68,687

48,037

54,640 54,177 12,982 59,242 83.185

87,421 81.007 67,515

Grand Total,

156,011

98,393 120,224129,859 140,534 216,527 285,593 257,162 | 227,523 188,900

Table XVII.

Summary of Chinese Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in Chiua, during the year 1930.

BRITISH SHIPS.

FOREIGN SHIPS.

GRAND TOTAL.

PORTS.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Adults.

Children.

Total.

Total.

Total.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

D 36

Australia,

1,923

118

76

67

2,184

657

68

59

36

820

2,580

186

135

103

3,001

Africa,

226

25

7

6

264

23

6

3

I

33

249

31

10

297

Bangkok,

1,173

357

242

182

1,954

2,380

723

486

411

4,000

3,553

1,080 728

593

5,951

British Borneo,.

172

60 41

52

625

270

30

38

8

346

742

90

79

60

971

Calcutta.

1,188

283 173

103

1,717

50

28

2

2

82

1,238

311

175

105

1,829

Canada,

6,151

429 349 186

7,115

735

34

32

17

818

6,886

463

381

203

7,933

Continent of Europe,

692

137

$5

44

953

692

137

85

44

958

Dutch Indies,

24.026

2,607

2,060

1,151

29,844

24,026

2,607

2,060 | 1,151

29,844

Honolulu,

1,999

151 111

45

2,306

1,999

151

111

45

2,306

Mexico,

16

B

4

25

16

3

4

2

25

Nauru Island,

718

718

718

718

Rangoon,

966

193 123

72

1,354

966

193

123

72

1,354

Straits Settlements,

72.927

15,449 8,907 4,912

102,195

Sumatra (Belawan Deli),

36,055

9,021

6,731 3,075| 1,868

South America,..

433

United States of America,

501

8

518

4,260

47,729 108,982 1,664 680 428 11,793 9,021 128 38 35 634 368 306 140 5,074

22,180 11,982|6,780 |149,924

1,664

680 428 11,793

433

4,761

128

373

33 35

311 144

634

5,592

Total 1930,

86,245

16,919 9,926 | 5,584 | 118,674

80,617

12,678 |6,9794,188 104,462 166,862

29,597 16,9059,772 | 223,136

Total 1929,

75,184

15,182 8,343 | 4,552 | 103,261

64,731 9,499 5.114 | 2,785 82,129 | 139,915

24,681 13,457 | 7,337 | 185,390

Total Passengers by British Vessels,

86,245

16,919 |9,926 |5,584 | 118,674

"}

*

Foreign

11

80,617

12,678 | 6,9794,188

104,462

Excess of

British

"}

"}

"}

5,628

4,241

2,947 | 1,396

14,212

Table XVIII.

Statement of Average Number of Emigrants Returned to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Quinquennial Periods from 1895 to 1930 inclusive.

1895.

104,118

1900.

109,534

1905.

137,814

1910.

146,585

1915.

151,728

1920.

100,641

1925.

129,106

1930.

181,227

Table XIX.

Number of Male and Female Emigrants Returued to Hong Kong from Ports other than in China, for Ten Years, from 1921 to 1930 inclusive.

D 37 --

Where from.

1921.

1922.

1923. 1924. 1925.

1926. 1927. 1928. 1929,

1930.

Straits Settlements, Males, Straits Settlements, Females,

91,203 74,694 58,800 65,047 52.220 9,490 10,950 7,186 9,216 8,671

72,194 | 113.507 |100,116, 14,761 23,189 20,577

Total,.

100,693 85,644

65,986 74,263 60,891

28,960 86,955 136,696 |120,693 |121,077 | 149,924

97,960 | 120,964

23,117

Other Ports, Males,..

52,429 52,596

Other Ports, Females,

5,942

307

50,374

4,742

51,031 27,888

Total,

58,371

57,903

55,116

4,900 2.343

55,931 30,781

36,886

4.820

38,360 58,515 55,412 62,803 6,044 8,639 8,901 10,409

41,706

44,104 67,151 64.313 73,212

Grand Total,.

159,061

143,547 | 121,102 | 130,194

91,622 | 128,661 | 181,100 187,847 185,390 223.136

Table XX.

Return of Ships Registered at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1930.

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Horse

Fower.

Rig.

Build.

Where an when built.

Remarks.

1. Wo Ping Yat,

154,040

244

None.

In & Out

London

1919 Formerly unregistered vessel as

2. Wo Ping Yee,

154.041

244

1919

Katie

"Madge".

.*

3. Tsinan,

154,012

2,100

N.H.P. 203

"

Schooner.

('linker.

Hong Kong.

1930

4. Kaiapoi,

117,592

1,247

200

F. & A.

Schooner.

Sunderland

1906

First Registry (Now Vessel). Transferred from Dunedin.

5. Kaitangata,

125,625

1,195

200

.1907



55

>>

6. Wanderer,

154,043

10

2.7

Cutter.

"

7. Taikoo No. B4,

154,014

76

None.

Carvel.

Clinker.

Hong Kong.

.1928 | First Registry.

8. Maskee,

154.045

14

Chinese.

Carvel.

Swatow,China...1930

9. Wanhsien,

152.081

473

N.H.P. 170.

Clinker.

10. Wan-Liu,....

142.189

671

124

None.

"

Bong Kong. Shanghai

1930 First Registry (New Vessel).

**

1922 | Transferred from London.

}}

1920

11. Wantung, 12. Suiting,

153,672

558

270

.1921

*

.

15

>>

33

153,705

165

B. H.P. 420

"

Glasgow

1926

19

13. Siushan.

153,704

165

420

1926

:1

"

"

14. Taikoo No. B3,

154,046

76

None.

,1

Hong Kong,

1930

First Registry.

15. Wuhu,.

154,047

1,712

N.H.P. 251

"}

1930

First Registry (New Vessel).

16. Synthonia,

154,048

13

B.H.P. 80

Carvel.

.1930

"

"

17. Echidna,

154,049

180

Clinker.

Shanghai

1930

"

"}

18. Yong Tai Shan,.

154,050

10

N.H.P. 13.23

None.

Carvel.

Hong Kong.

1930

"

19. West Wind,..

154,051

9

.84

Yawl.

Yokohama

19

"

20. Charles Hardouin,.

153,529

1,054

118

Nonc.

Clinker.

Cie Francaise de

Nantes

1903

21. Kamo,

127 814

725

159

22. Coquet,

154,052

29

23. Socony,

154,053

2,128

I.H.P.

24. Wayfoong,

154,054

18

Schooner.

9.8

18.00 None. N.H. P. 16.7

Carvel.

Clinker.

Carvel.

"}

av

France

1912 | First Registry.

Formerly unregistered vessel owned by Por- tuguese Subject and under British Flag as "Charles Hardouin "ex "Wei Shun "

Campbeltown...1913 | Transferred from Wellington.

Hong Kong..... 1930 | First Registry (New Vessel).

Camden, N. J....1913 | Formerly under American Flag as "Socony ". Hong Kong.

1930 First Registry (New Vessel).

·D 38

Table XXI.

Return of Registers of Ships Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the year 1930.

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry.

Rig.

Build.

When and where built.

Reason of Cancellation.

1. Taikoo No. B4,

2. Tsinan,.

3. Age,

4. Amherst,.

127,015

154,042 2,100 151,805 2,864

90,097 241

53

33333

28. 12. 1909.

10. 3. 1930. 9. 4. 1929.

None.

Schooner.

Carvel.

Clinker.

19

}}

16. 7. 1917.

Yawl.

5. Cheung Hing,.

153,504

52

28. 1. 1924.

None.

Carvel.

Canton

Hong Kong .1909 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese)

1930

Sunderland .1922 Port Glasgow...1886 Re-constructed

in Hong Kong.1917

for breaking up. Transferred to London. Transferred to Sydney.

Sold to Foreigner (Portuguese.)

1920| Sold to Foreigner (Chinese).

6. Mun Chuk,

153,509

20

2. 2. 1924.

1915

Do.

**

#

7. Siking..

153,521

35

7.

3. 1924.

1916

Do.

"

多多

8. Sun Shan.

9. Ning Hoi,

.......

153,522

27

7.

3. 1924.

1919

Do.

"

"}

152,445

39

29. 11. 1923,

1922

Do.

}"

}}

10. Shing Ping,

152,446

23

1. 12. 1923.

1923

Do.

};

}}

#

11. Tai Sun.

152,148

27

13, 12. 1923.

1916

Do.

13

12. Poshan.

153,501

32

3. 1. 1924.

1912-

Do.

}}

""

13. Koon Tai,

153,503

19

8. 1. 1924.

1918

Do.

}

>>

14. Lee Nam,

153,536

24

25. 3. 1924.

1914

Do.

;;

15. Hok Shan,

153,539

29

16.

4. 1924.

1913

Do.

}}

- D 39

Table XXI.—Continued,

Return of Registers of Ships Cancelled at the Port of Hong Kong during the Year 1930. – Continued,

Name of Ship.

Official

Number.

Registered

Tonnage.

Date of

Registry,

Rig.

Build.

When and

where built.

Reason of Cancellation.

+

16. Taikoo No. B3,

127,013

87

28. 12. 1909.

None.

Carvel.

Hong Kong

...1909

}

Sold to Foreigner (Chinese). for breaking up.

17. Feathers,.....

154,014

31. 5. 1928.

Yawl.

1912

"}

18. Fayth,

151,425

15

7.

7. 1921.

Ketch.

1921

Sold to Foreigner (German). Sold to Foreigner (American).

,,

19. Gertye,

153.579

21.

1. 1925.

None.

1924

Do.

(Chinese).

>>

""

20. Wuhu,..

154,047

1,712

29.

5. 1980.

Clin ker.

1980

"

21. Wayfoong,

128,696

22

8.

2. 1911.

#

22. Yee Ho,

123,072

188

• 13. 4. 1907.

"}

23. Ming Sang,.

150,114

969

13. 11. 1924.

Schooner.

Carvel.

In & Out.

Transferred to London.

1898 Registry not required.

(Vessel broken up)

1897 Sold to Foreigner (Chinese).

Lubeck

1906

Do.

(American).

24. Yau Lee,

153,576

21

16. 12. 1924.

None.

Carvel.

Hong Kong

1911

Do.

(Chinese).

25. Auster,.

120.971

223

28. 6. 1907.

Clinker.

1897

Do.

(Chinese).

::

26. Euroclydon,

116.057

183

15. 12. 1904.

Pelfast

1900

Do.

(Chinese).

32

27. Boreas,

116,059

333

Hong Kong

1884

Do.

(Chinese).

28. Zephyr,

116,056

173

15. 12. 1904.

1899

Do,

(Chinese).

(Cie Francaise de

Do.

(Portugese).

29. Paul Beau, .

153,506

1,051

29.

1. 1921.

Nav. Nantes

France

1903

Do.

Do.

30. Charles Hardouin,...

153,529

1,054

31. Cabarita,...

32. Hoi Sang,

132,455 2,612 120,992

506

15. 3. 1924.

11. 3. 1929. 18. 8. 1906.

1903

་་

"

Schooner.

Carvel.

Port Glasgow. Hong Kong

1915 Transferred to Port Glasgow. 1906

Sold and converted into a lighter.

— D 40 —

D 41

-

Tabe XXII.

Number and Tonnage of Vessels in Foreign Trade Entered and

YEAR.

Cleared since 1921.

No. of

VESSELS.

TONNAGE.

1921

52,222

27,852,616

1922

50,427

29,543,564

1923

49,300

35,947,534

1924

57,765

38,770,499

1925

41,336

32,179,053

1926

30,231

28,371,104

1927

51,289

36,834,014

1928

52,278

37,640,694

1929

52,574

39,871,149

1930

49,609

38,511,650

Table XXIII.

Revenue and Expenditure of the Harbour Department.

Total Revenue

Year.

of Department.

Total Expenditure of Department Excluding Special Expenditure.

Percentage of Expenditure to Revenue.

C.

$

c.

%

1921,

800,798.13

246,295.53

30.76

1922,

857,576.04

280,625.57

32.72

1923,

925,643.02

300,484.95

32:46

1924,

997,530.74

318,412.04

31.92

1925,

878,118.83

452,106.42

51.48

1926,

820,888.39

534,675.91

65.13

1927,

1,000,229.80

610,480.26

61.03

1928,

973,283.46

648,324.33

66.61

1929,

1,010,061.97

688,938.40

68.21

1930,

1,020,741.02

860,816.06

84.33

D 42

Table XXIV.

Table showing total Shipping of all classes at the Port of Hong Kong during the years 1911 to 1930.

TOTAL TONNAGE

TOTAL TONNAGE TOTAL TONNAGE

YEAR.

ALL CLASSES.

OCEAN GOING

OCEAN GOING

BRITISH

1911

36,179,152

15,507,635

7,589,995

1912

36,735,149

16,372,290

7,779,970

1913

37,742,982

17,722,168

8,449,533

1914

36,756,951

16,913,914

8,321,692

1915

33,884,919

14,381,808

7,358,586

1916

36,381,457

13,728,092

6,868,743

1917

33,827,325

12,289,548

5,168,058

1918

29,518,189

9,745,469

3,627,576

1919

35,615,169

14,467,847

6,842,024

1920

40,122,527

17,574,636

8,351,084

1921

43,420,970

20,064,611

9,247,198

1922

46,566,764

21,971,162

9,688,891

1923

53,402,239

25,894,058

11,222,141

1924

56,731,077

27,874,830

11,844,752

1925

49,520,523

23,653,774

9,866,820

1926

43,796,436

21,314,696

9,257,417

1927

44,127,161

25,700,164

9,660,440

1928

44,883,765

26,894,395

10,792,701

1929

47,186,181

28,285,741

11,151,152

1930

40,190,612

29,350,807

11,357,605

D 43

Table XXV.

DIAGRAM SHEWING TOTAL SHIPPING ALL CLASSES

1911-1930.

Tons.

57,000,000 56,000,000 55,000,000 |

54,000,000

53,000,000!

52.000.000

51,000,000

50,000,000

+9,000,000

+8,000,000

+7,000,000

$6,000,000

45,000,000

$4,000,000

+3,000,000

+2,000,000

+1,000,000

+0,000,000

39,000,000 38,000,000

37,000,000

36,000,000

35,000,000

34,000,000

33,000,000

$2,000,000

31,000,000

30,000,000

29,000,000

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

9161

1917

1918

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

+0,190,612

Tons.

30,000,000

29,000,000!

28,000.000

27,500,000

27,000,000

26,500,000

26,000,000

25.500.000

25,000,000

24,500,000

2.4,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

14,000,000

13,500,000

13,000,000

12,500,000

I2,000,000

11,500,000

I 1,000,000

10,500,000

10,000,000

9,500,000

1161

1912

1913

D 44

Table XXVI.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH AND FOREIGN ENTERED

AND CLEARED 1911-1930.

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

29,350,807

D 45

Table XXVII.

DIAGRAM SHEWING OCEAN GOING SHIPPING BRITISH ONLY, ENTERED AND CLEARED.

Tons.

24,500,000

1911

1912

1913

1914

1915

9161

1917

1918

6161

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

2+,000,000

23,500,000

23,000,000

22,500,000

22,000,000

21,500,000

21,000,000

20,500,000

20,000,000

19,500,000

19,000,000

18,500,000

18,000,000

17,500,000

17,000,000

16,500,000

16,000,000

15,500,000

15,000,000

14,500,000

14,000,000

13,500,000

13,000,000

12,500,000

12,000,000

11,500,000

11,000,000

10,500,000 10,000,000 9,500,000

9,000,000 8,500,000

11,357,605

$,000,000

7,500,000

7,000,000

6,500,000

6,000,000

1.500,000

00,000

,500,000

1,000

3,500,000

D 46.

FACILITIES OF THE PORT OF HONG KONG.

The Harbour of Hong Kong forms a natural anchorage for a great number of vessels. During the typhoon season there are special moorings and anchorages to which vessels can move with. immunity from danger. The Harbour Department operates a thoroughly up-to-date salvage tug, which is always available to assist shipping during typhoon weather. There are available the latest type of steam fire-floats, and the harbour is efficiently patrolled day and night by water police launches. Competent pilots are available to meet vessels at either entrance of the harbour by day or by night.

66

All the Buoys in the Harbour are owned by the Government. There are 48 in all, 19 "A" Class, 21 B Class, and 8 C" Class. The charges are $16, $12 and $8 per day respectively as from 1. 1. 1931.

The wharf and godown companies have berthing accommo- dation for 11 vessels up to 650 feet in length. Maximum depth of water alongside the wharves is 36 feet L.W.O.S.T.

Fresh water pipes are laid alongside and one berth is piped for Oil Fuel,

Three public Warehouse companies have a storage capacity of 500,000 tons, of which 300,000 tons is on the mainland at Kowloon Point, adjacent to wharves, and 200,000 tons in Victoria on the island of Hong Kong, on the Harbour front. There are numerous native-owned warehouses of small capacity in both Kowloon and Hong Kong.

Both groups of wharves at Kowloon Point have Rail connec- tion with the Kowloon-Canton Railway, giving direct Rail commun- ication with Canton. There are daily sailings by coasting Com- panies' ships carrying cargo and passengers to all river and coast ports of Southern China, and to ports in the Far Eastern trade, as well as almost daily departures by ocean steamers to overseas ports.

Ample bunkering facilities are provided by private stocks of Coal averaging 60,000 tons, of which about one third is North China Coal, and the remainder Japanese and Formosan.

The average stock of Fuel Oil for commercial bunkering is 55,000 tons. One Oil Company has berthing facilities for 2 vessels, and another company for 1 vessel alongside the Oil installation, with a water depth of 28 feet and 23 feet L.W.O.S.T. respectively. Delivery can be given up to 600 tons an hour from wharf and 350 tous an hour from lighters.

D 47

There are two large Dock Companies with Dry Docks capable of taking vessels up to 750 feet on the blocks, The Docks have a depth on the sills up to 34 feet 6 inches H.W.O.S.T. In addition, there are five Patent Slipways capable of handling ships up to 325 feet in length and 3,000 tons displacement. There are several smaller yards mostly owned by Chinese, dealing with repairs to small craft and light work.

The principal Dock Companies have adequate facilities for the construction of ships of large tonnage, and for the prompt effecting of extensive repairs. There is also a thoroughly up-to- date salvage plant, and tugs are available.

A Waterboat Company, drawing its water from the Govern- ment reservoirs, has a fleet of 8 vessels carrying from 230 to 270 tons each,

The Harbour has a depth ranging from 24 to 78 feet L. W. O. S. T. The rise of Tide is about 8 feet O. S T.

There are no Tonnage Dues.

The Government imposes Light Dues of 4 cents per Register- ed ton on vessels entering the Port. A charge of $75 to $350 for ships of 400 to 5,000 tons, and over, is made for permission to work cargo on Sundays.

A large number of Motor-boats, Steam Launches and Sam- pans are available for communication between ships at buoys and the shore. A frequent service of Ferry Launches is maintained between Hong Kong Island and all parts of the mainland.

The Government maintains a Commercial Wireless Telegraph Station at Cape D'Aguilar which has an average day range of 350 Miles, and a night range of 700 Miles. Continuous watch is kept..

Appendix E.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF IMPORTS

AND EXPORTS FOR THE YEAR 1930.

I.--LIQUOR.

1. The net revenue collected, including licence fees, was $1,897,990.19 Chinese spirit showed an increase oi $139,552.00. Licence fees in respect of Chinese spirit shops have decreased, chiefly as the result of the closing of several shops which had been dealing in illicit spirits on a large scale.

During the months of June and December there were very heavy withdrawals of spirit from bond due to rumours of an increase in the rates of the duty. This affected more especially foreign spirit.

2. Distilleries.-Frauds on the part of distilleries continued on a large scale. Eight were convicted, and many of these subsequently closed. In most cases information led to a surprise raid by the Monopoly Analyst, who, as the result of an improved technique based on long experience, was enabled to gather conclusive evidence of what was going on. In several cases it was proved that the control exercised over distilleries was not strict enough and steps have been taken to remedy this fault.

(b) The distillery regulations passed in 1927 have again proved their efficacy, and there is no doubt that provided they are enforced conscientiously and strictly cases of fraud on the revenue will be rare.

(c) One distillery which had been unsuccessfully prosecuted on two previous occasions was detected in the possession of forged duty-paid labels and a numbering machine set to give 1 impressions of the serial numbers of the labels in use at the distillery. Examination of their books proved that false state- ments had been made for a long time as to the amount of inolasses received on the premises, and that large quantities of spirits of wine had been smuggled in. Two or three separate sets of books were kept, but although these were not all made up-to-date it was possible to estimate with fair accuracy that the combined set of frauds had cost the revenue some seventy thousand dollars in less than a year. The licensee absconded sooner than face the court for the third time. The distillery was abandoned, but part of the loss to the revenue was recovered by 'distraint.

E 2

(d) Distilleries have been given every chance to prove their good faith and have hitherto been allowed to carry on with their old methods systematised only to further control. The present distillery regulations are based on the old Chinese methods, and would be effective if honestly observed. New and more stringent regulations are now called for, which will prevent the prevailing dishonesty. Such regulations must follow those found effective in other countries, and will prevent distilleries from being run in the haphazard manner so common in the past.

3. Retail Shops.-Several liquor shops were convicted for various offences. One was caught red-handed soaking off duty- paid labels, with the idea of returning them to the distillery which would use them again on spirit which had evaded duty. This practice is very common, and only in cases where the spirit covered by the re-used labels differs in quality or strength from that originally covered is it possible to be sure of a conviction. Damage to labels is always ascribed to the avidity of cockroaches for duty-paid labeis.

Another liquor shop was found to have disposed of 32,000 gallons of spirit which had been obtained from a secret source. Every one connected with this shop disappeared before a case could be brought before the Court.

4. Spirits of Wine.-Smuggling of spirits of wine was very prevalent. This all came from Macau. Spirits of Wine are used extensively in Macau distilleries and shops for the purpose of producing a cheap spirit by blending. Bogus Northern spirits such as Ng Ka Pei are made from spirits of wine in Macau and exported abroad to Malaya and elsewhere.

5. Chinese Liquor.-Smuggling of Chinese spirit continued on a large scale, seizures by Revenue Officers amounting to 6,013 gallons, and by the Folice to 678 gallons. Most of the liquor seized proved to be a mixture of spirits of wine and a little rice spirit. It nearly all originated in Macau, and could be concocted for about 25 cents a gallon. Such an inferior product finds a ready sale amongst the coolie class, who are content with any kind of spirit so long as it is cheap, and has a sharp bite in it.

6. Legislation.-Towards the end of the year the revision of the warehouse regulations mentioned in my report for 1928 received sanction. They were based on the existing local regulations and on those in force in England, and introduced nothing new. The chief effect was to bring the control of general bonded warehouses in line with the practice obtaining in the United Kingdom and to concentrate the storage of dutiable goods in particular portions of the licensed premises in order to facilitate supervisior.

E 3

II. TOBACCO.

1. The net duty collected showed an increase of $245,149. This was due to an increase of duty made in the middle of the year and was in accordance with anticipations. Licence fees

showed a small decrease. Doubtless a year's experience of the higher rates induced a certain number to refrain from renewing in 1930.

2. Smuggling of cigarettes was not very prominent, Macau being the only source from which cigarettes could be obtained.

3. Smuggling of Chinese manufactured tobacco was carried on on an extensive scale especially across the land frontier of the New Territory. The smuggled tobacco emanated from factories at Sham Chun across the border which maintained branch factories at Yuen Long. These factories had been paying very little duty for some years and yet appeared to be doing a good business in manufactured tobacco. It was observed that the bales of raw tobacco leaf on the premises on which duty had been paid seemed to last a miraculously long time, in spite of the brisk business which appeared to be carried on. Finally certain seizures of tobacco in Yaumati led to the exposure of the method by which the smuggling was being conducted. Tobacco was brought to Yuen Long from China by junk without paying duty, and was at once sent in by lorry or sampan to Yaumati, covered by delivery notes from some of the licensed factories at Yuen Long. In one case the persons concerned at Yuen Long absconded, in others it proved impossible to bring the offence home.

4. The Police in the Northern District did specially good work during the year in dealing with tobacco smuggling, and seized 1,958 pounds in all.

5. The factory of the Nanyang Brothers at Wanchai was busily employed during the year, but the effect of the new Chinese tariff on their operations is causing the management some concern at present.

6. The British Cigarette Company opened a factory at Wanchai, but since they had first to train a new staff and to get the machinery in proper working order and properly under- stood by the new staff, operations were necessarily restricted. The most modern machinery has been installed, and there is room for considerable expansion as soon as circumstances demand.

7. The benefits of low exchange and the reduction of the value of the local currency to silver parity do not appear to have had any effect on the demand outside the Colony for the products of the local cigar factories, some of which reach a high standard of quality. It is not yet generally known that a good cigar can be made from selected Manila leaf just as well in Hong Kong as in Manila, and at a lower price.

E 4 -

8. Factorics manufacturing Chinese smoking tobacco for export to Malaya maintained their exports at a satisfactory level considering the depressed state of trade in that country. The system of drawbacks worked satisfactorily, and by indenting direct on the Treasury instead of applying via the Treasury to the Secretariat, the procedure in force before, it has proved possible to reduce considerably the time for the meeting of drawback applications. The prompt payment of drawbacks is very important for the Chinese manufacturer,. working as he does on a small capital.

III.--MOTOR SPIRIT DUTIES.

As from July 1st a duty of 15 cents per Imperial gallon was levied on all light hydro-carbon oils which fell within the standard set by certain physical tests of volatility. The definition included more than the substances, of varying com- position, sold for use in internal combustion engines, and is identical with the definition in use in England, which was arrived at after exhaustive experiments. Most of the duty was of course collected on the light oil known as petrol, benzine or gasoline, but turpentine and turpentine substitutes of minerai origin also fall within the taxable category. The collection of duty on the latter has been rendered rather difficult owing to the fact that shipping companies have failed to realise that such goods are dutiable; and in many cases have failed to make the necessary returns.

To facilitate the working of the installations belonging to the large oil companies, and more especially in view of their large export trade, special arrangements have been made, by which approved importers receive "Special" importer's licence, and furnish security for the payment of duty in arrears each month. The arrangement has worked satisfactorily and most of the duty collected is paid monthly by holders of special importer's licences.

The amount of duty collected was $145,528.49, a figure rather under that hoped for. A certain amount of motor spirit was in stock in the hands of garage and private owners at the time the duty was introduced, and this was not taxed. It is difficult to estimate what the yield will be in a full year, butt at least $300,000 can reasonably be expected for 1931, consider- ing that only five monthly payments by the large importer- came to hand during the period under review.

IV. OPIUM.

1. The revenue collected was $2,835,286.90, a slight incr on the previous year. This was entirely due to increased of Kamshan opium in the last three months of the year. price of Kamshan or Grade I opium was raised to $60 per Sael tin in December, and the unusual demand soon

་ ”་

E 5

11

Though enquiries were made no satisfactory explanation was discovered; it may have been due to hoarding against an anticipated increase in price, but the fact that high prices were being offered outside the Colony may have led some of the registered smokers to dispose of their supplies at a profit. is said that there is a regular demand for Kamshan opium every year about 8 months before Chinese New Year for the purpose of blending it with opium prepared outside the Colony for the American New Year market, now that supplies of genuine Indian opium are so difficult to obtain. A strict enquiry into the stand- ing of all registered smokers of Kamshan opium has led to a marked diminution in the number of renewals of pass books in 1931. That a certain number of registered smokers had been in the habit of registering with the idea of obtaining supplies for the consumption of others was proved by the finding of fifteen taels of Kamshan opium, a number of empty tins and three pass books in the possession of a man who was not registered. This man, who was convicted, was conducting a sort of high class divan, in which he used a blend of Kamshan and illicit opium, and was also carrying on a retail trade. The pass books were at once cancelled, but it was found impossible to trace the persons who had originally applied for them.

2. Sources of illicit opium:

(a) (1).--Prepared Opium

(1) Macau took the first place having supplied 60 per cent of all seizures. Practically all this was the well- known led Lion Brand in one tael tins. At the present time this is the best known brand of prepared opium throughout the world, for during the year seizures have been made extensively in Singapore, Java, and the Philippine Islands, and fairly frequently in Australia, U.S.A. and British North Borneo. This brand varies somewhat in quality and colour. Some contains little but Chinese opium and gummy filling material, some of better quality is made from a blend of Persian and Chinese opium, and some contains a large amount of opium dross. This opium is not sold by the official Monopoly for consumption in Macau. It was common in the earlier part of the year to find these brass tins stamped with the name of the firm Wang Kei in green ink, but the address of this firm was unknown until a seizure which included cakes of Persian Opium each bearing the firm's address in Macau was made. Enquiries by the Macau Government proved that the address was that of a licensed retailer of official Monopoly opium, but no evidence was found that the firm was also dealing in another brand of prepared opium. It is significant however that the name of this firm has not been noticed recently on any of the Red Lion Opium seized.

E 6

(ii) Where this Red Lion Opium is actually pre- pared is unknown, but all Chinese know it as Macau opium, and the name of Macau is generally coupled with the name of the brand in the many documents from abroad which have been examined this year. Most of the seizures ascribed to Macau were found in circumstances which proved that the opium must have been placed on the importing ship in Macau.

In a minority of cases only was the assignment of Macau origin due to the mark on the tins coupled with the quality and physical appearance.

(iii) It is unlikely that more than about five per cent of the total imports for local consumption are actually seized in Hong Kong. The low state of the sales of Government Opium alone shows this. This would give some 300,000 taels as the quantity illicitly imported annually into the Colony. It is probably a good deal more, for Red Lion appears to be by far the commonest brand of opium consumed in Hong Kong, and there must be few divans which do not use this brand to a great extent, judging from the number of empty and full tins found therein. If to this figure is added the large amount which is exported in cargo through the Colony to Malaya, Java, the Philippine Islands and other countries, the probable amount of Red Lion prepared opium which was exported from Macau during last year must have reached a figure approaching 800,000 taels.

(iv) This opium comes in by every junk and steamer from Macau and especially by the steamer arriving in the evening. From the latter steamer it is sometimes thrown into the sea attached to floats near Cheung Chow Island to be picked up by specially engaged sampans, but more often it is not discharged until some hours after the steamer has reached her wharf, when the hour of 2 a.m. has been found to be a suitable time.

A net of spies is thrown round the wharf both on land and sea, as soon as everything is reported safe a signal is made to a waiting sampan, motor boat or steam launch which then rushes to the side or stern of the steamer and receives the epium as it passes rapidly by. Officers of the Police and this Department have waited all through the hours of darkness, only in the end to see the opium whisked away right under their noses by a route which had been left momentarily unguarded. Sometimes officers of this Department appear to have helped the delivery of the opium and one Chinese Revenue Officer was convicted of possession of a large quantity of Red Lion Opium of which he had taken delivery from the evening Macau steamer and which he was escorting across the Harbour towards Mongkok.

E 7

(2) The seizure of 1,522 taels of prepared opium on the s.s. Tetsuzan Maru bound for Dutch North Borneo was the first occasion on which Canton Monopoly pre- pared opium has been seized in large quantities. The remainder of the seizures entered in the seizure table (Table XIV) were casual seizures

on board river steamers or in the effects of passengers.

(3) The entries under the head "doubtful" generally relate to prepared opium found in open containers in houses and divans. This opium in most cases was the result of boiling up on the spot Chinese raw opium, a little Red Lion Macau Opium, dross and gum, for use in opium divans, or for retail sale to the lower class coolie population. It is but rarely that prepared opium in closed containers has to be classified thus, for the circumstances of the seizure generally determine the source of the opium even when other facts do not throw any light.

(4) The fall of Wuchow from first to third place is due to the prevalence of military operations beyond that port and the practical blockade of the province of Kwangsi by the Cantonese forces. This led to the cutting off of the supplies of raw and prepared opium which used to reach the Colony direct, without as a rule paying the Kwangtung opium taxes. This blockade did not, however, affect the supplies of opium Canton, and the Colony received more raw opium from Canton instead of the prepared opium direct from Wuchow.

(b) Raw Opium.

in

(1) Chinese raw opium originating in Yunnan was plentiful, and seizures were made on ships arriving from all the usual ports. Quantities continued to be brought down from Canton by Rail. In spite of the fact that military operations were being carried on in Kwangsi, the usual route for Yunnan opium passing to Canton. supplies of raw opium seem to have been specially abundant in Canton. At the beginning of the year the Opium Monopoly in Canton passed into the hands of a new owner, and this was signalised by the introduction of a new revenue label depicting the rebuilt concrete Five- storied Pagoda at Canton From this new label all mention of the Canton provincial treasury Was omitted. Towards the end of the year still another revenue label appeared depicting an express locomotive, while mention of the provincial treasury was restored.

(2) Seizures were made of old Szechuen Opium neatly put up in two tael card-board containers. Each packet had the trademark of a flying stork, very similar

E 8

in design to the stork on the notorious Fujitsuru design commonly found on cocaine seized in Indian ports. The supplier gave his name, address and telephone number in Hankow on each packet, showing that dealing in raw opium was perfectly open at the place of packing, where it is taxed under the style of "Special Merchandise”.

(3) At the beginning of the year seizures of Fersian opium were numerous. As in the previous year most of it could be proved to have come direct from Macau, and seizures followed closely upon the reported arrival at Macau of the Persian opium conveyed by the s.s. Times Maru, although that ship did not actually enter Macau. One seizure of Persian opium in the original one pound cakes bore the name and address of a firm at Macau, which proved on investigation by the authorities there to be that of a licensed retailer of prepared opium. Together with this labelled opium were found a number of tins of Red Lion prepared opium, all marked with the rubber chop of the same retailer; this chop had been frequently observed before on tins of Red Lion prepared opium, but this seizure was the first occasion on which it could be proved that the name referred to a well-known Macau firm.

(4) Indian Opium. There was one small seizure of Malwa opium packed amongst bottles of chutney received from Calcutta; the cases came through forward- ing agents and the actual consignors could not be traced in India.

From time to time information come to hand that Indian opium was being smuggled to Shanghai on ships of the Indo-China S.N. Co., but all searches were unsuccessful.

3. Divans.-It was found necessary to take steps against some of the large divans in order to remind those engaged in this occupation that they are still breaking the law, although the stringent measures formerly taken have been dropped. Several large establishments were broken up. Some of these could ac- commodate over ten smokers at a time, and occupied whole floors of houses, instead of one cubicle as was common in former years. There is no doubt that the number of divans using illicit opium is as great as ever.

4. General. (a) Supplies of illicit opium of all kinds were abundant and sales of the ordinary grade Government Opium remained low. Rather more was heard of exports to U.S.A. but the many attempts made to intercept them were generally abortive. A good deal of attention was devoted to enquiries into the smuggling of Macau Red Lion opium to Singapore, with the result that some syndicates engaged in this business were dispersed.

E 9

(b) A remarkable seizure in March of 66,000 taels of Yunnan raw opium on a launch which had gone ashore on the south side of Lamma Island deserves special mention since it threw a good deal of light on the opium situation in the province of Kwang Tung.

A large launch, owned in Hong Kong but which had by some means come under the control of the official opium transport com- pany, was commissioned at Canton, loaded with opium and placed under the charge of an agent of the transport company and another agent of the opium monopolist. Elaborate printed official passes in respect of the opium were given to the agents in charge, duly stamped with numerous Kwang Tung revenue stamps. These passes were issued by the Opium Suppression Bureau to three private opium merchants in Canton, and covered the removal of the opium to Swatow, where it was to be delivered to a branch opium monopolist who apparently would release the opium on payment of the prescribed fees payable on opium enter- ing the region of his monopoly. It is not quite certain that the launch herself could have got to Swatow, for her boiler was leaking and she could make only five miles per hour; in fact she took 18 hours from Canton to Lamma, and would have required nearly 48 hours more at that speed to have reached Swatow against the North East monsoon.

Each cake of opium bore a purple label depicting the Five- storied Pagoda at Canton, and stamped across the face was the hexagonal chop in blue ink of the Tung Wan Company. This name had been noted on many opium labels before, but the exact position held by the company in the taxation of opium was hitherto unknown. The Company's representative made the position quite clear. His Company held the absolute monopoly for the whole province of Kwang Tung of the transport of raw opium, for which their fee was ten cents a tael payable by the owner of the opium. At their depôt in Canton, where opium merchants had office accommodation, they attended to the proper labelling of all opium on behalf of the Opium Suppression Burcau, guaranteeing that no opium would leave their control until properly labelled. The Company also procured from the Opium Suppression Bureau the necessary removal permits on behalf of the opium merchants desiring to remove opium from one section of the province to another.

The representative of the Opium Suppression Bureau persisted in calling the opium, "Raw Material for the Manu- facture of Medicine for the Cure of Opium Smoking", and this designation was used in all the official correspondence, which ended in the opium being handed back to the Canton Opium Suppression Bureau with the consent of the Central Government in Nanking. A careful analysis, however, proved that the material was Yunnan Opium of excellent quality, containing a percentage nt morphine relatively high for ordinary Yunnan Opium, which is. often extensively adulterated.

V.

10

DANGEROUS DRUGS.

Only one important seizure was made during the year when on information received from the Colonial Office a large con- signment of heroin on its way from Turkey to U.S.A. was intercepted. The packing of some of the drug deserves special notice. Huge cases such as are used for plate glass were made, and filled with cheap broken sheets of glass, the sheets being separated by stout boards. On a superficial examination of the cases no drugs could be found. Careful examination proved that all the dividing boards had been hollowed out forming numerous slots in each board, large enough to conceal a flat tin of heroin. The edges of the boards from which the slots had been excavated were concealed by thin strips of wood, carefully gummed, so that the join was not perceptible.

VI. ARMS.

Little was heard of arms smuggling during the year, but one large seizure of revolvers and ammunition was made in the ceiling of the engineer's workshop of a French Mail Steamer. It is believed that the arms were intended for delivery in Shanghai, where the demand for illicit arms seems to have revived.

VII. TRADE STATISTICS.

The Collection of Trade Statistics was commenced on 1st April, it having proved impossible to start sooner since time was required for a complete revision of the classification list with the help of the General Chamber of Commerce. A publicity campaign was undertaken first; lengthy notices were inserted in the newspapers, individual guilds of Chinese merchants were interviewed, and Chinese ship-owners and junk masters carefully instructed in their obligations.

It was finally decided that a trial should be given to a system which allowed importers and exporters of goods a definite period within which to make the necessary declarations, instead of making it necessary to lodge declarations in full before goods were imported or exported, as was the case before. The advantages of the new system to every one concerned are obvious, but the success of the whole system depends on mer- chants rendering their returns promptly and completely. This unfortunately has not been the case, and a monthly average of 4,000 reminders and queries have had to be sent out. As it takes some time for the failure to make returns to be discovered, and for the correct returns to be received and entered up, it has meant that the figures given in the returns for any month always included a large number of delayed returns which should have been included in the previous month;

No prosecutions have yet been taken for failure to comply, but in the New Year a vigorous campaign of prosecutions will obviously be necessary, if the returns are to be made accurat and of real use,

E 11



One of the greatest failures to report was that of the chief banks, who nearly all failed to make declarations of the large amount of silver bullion received during the last 6 months of the year. Thus the low figures for imports of silver bullion published month by month gave no indication of the fact that silver was piling up in the Colony, and were completely misleading to those merchants outside banking circles who rely on the accuracy of official returns.

I regret to have to report that though in theory merchants. are in favour of the collection of trade statistics, they fail when it comes to assisting in the compilation by making correct and prompt declarations themselves. The Statistical Office has received many very discourteous letters and telephone messages when the failure to make correct declarations has been pointed out.

Seeing that the collection of trade statistics was reinstituted, in spite of great financial stringency, at the direct request of the merchants themselves through their representatives, it is extremely disheartening to the staff to find that their hope of assistance and forbearance during the difficult initial stage has been to a great extent in vain.

Unless great improvement takes place during the next year, only two courses will remain open, the resuscitation of the old and objectionable permit system, or the complete abandonment of all attempts to collect reliable trade statistics.

The prompt publication of the monthly returns proved very difficult at first chiefly owing to printing difficulties. With the co-operation of the Government Printers, however, the initial difficulties have been removed and recently the returns have appeared regularly, well before the expiration of the following month. Each return includes only declarations received up to the end of the month, hence it should include all goods dealt with before the 24th, and a good many of those dealt with after that date.

The staff was mostly recruited outside the service, and consists chiefly of youths who have just left school. On the whole they have learnt the work quickly, and the most un- satisfactory have already been weeded out. As experience is gained many errors which are now overlooked will be detected at once, and the speed at which the work is carried on will be accelerated, but it is unlikely for many reasons that the time required to prepare the returns for publication each month can be reduced appreciably.

VIII. STAFF.

A number of clerks who had had previous experience in -tatistical work were transferred to the new Statistical Office to

E 12

afford the necessary back-bone, and their place was taken by probationer clerks, who soon acquired the necessary proficiency in the keeping of the books on the revenue side of the Department.

The Chief Preventive Officer, Mr. S. J. Clarke, was invalid- ed out of the service, the department thus losing the only remaining officer of those who joined the department at its very start in 1909.

Mr. W. J. Buller, an experienced officer from the United Kingdom Customs and Excise Department was seconded to this office and is now in charge of the outdoor staff.

Severe disciplinary action had to be taken against several Chinese Revenue Officers in connection with the evidence given by them in various cases before the courts.

2nd March, 1931.

J. D. LLOYD,

Superintendent.

E 13

Table I.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

EUROPEAN TYPE LIQUOR.

Class of Liquor.

Gallons.

Amount of duty collected.

$

cts.

Ale, Beer, Cider and Stout

385,238

154,095.20

Brandy

10,728

64,368.00

Whisky

20,627

123,762.00

Gin and Cocktail

9,441

56,646.00

Rum

1,461

8,766.00

Champagne and Sparkling Wine.

2,888

28,880.00

Claret

3,904

11,712.00

Port Wine

5,253

21,012.00

Sherry and Madeira

2,556

10,224.00

Vermouth

5,777

17,331.00

Liqueur

1,610

16,100.00

Spirits of Wine

81

810.00

Miscellaneous

7,020

21,060.00

Difference on over-proof and

fractions

102.07

Total

$534,868.27

Note Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

E 14

Table II.

RETURN OF LIQUOR DUTY COLLECTED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

CHINESE AND JAPANESE LIQUOR.

Native

Spirits

not more than

Liquor Amount of

distilled

locally.

duty collected.

Amount of Imported

Total amount of

liquor.

duty collected.

Jiuty collected.

Gallons.

$ C.

Gallons.

$

C.

25% of alcohol

by weight

487,473

536,316,44

302,626 363,164.34

899,480.78

Native Spirits

over 25% of

alcohol by

weight

Northern Spirits

over 25% of

alcohol by

weight....

Sake

Difference on

over-proof. fractions and

arrears of duty

18,708

26,140.01

70,433

239,467.91

265 607.92

59.586

4,327

5.192.40

5.192.10

:

650.00

Total

16.77

666.77

1,170.947.87

Note:-Fractions of a gallon are not shown in this Table.

Table III.

SUMMARY OF REVENUE COLLECTED FROM LIQUOR DURING

THE YEAR 1930.

Duties on European Type Liquor

Duties on Chinese and Japanese Liquor

Licensed Warehouse Fees

Liquor Dealer's Licence Fees

Distillery Licence Fees.

Chinese Spirits Shop Licence Fees

$ cts.

534,868.27

1,170,947,87

6,000.00

29,250.00

4,050.00 169,466.67

Total

$1,914,582.81

Refund of Licence Fees Refund of Liquor Duties

$

725.00

15,867.62

16,592.62

$16,592.62

Net Total

$1,897,990.19

E 15

Table IV.

RETURN OF DUTY FAID TOBACCO FOR THE YEAR 1930.

Class of Tobacco.

lbs.

Duty.

$

cts.

Cigars

16,068

27,315.60

Cigarettes

1,279,955

1,151,959.50

European Tobacco

14,314

12,882.60

Chinese Prepared Tobacco

47,578

42,820.20

Clean Tobacco Leaf

32,828

26,262.40

Raw Tobacco Leaf

2,895,103

1,781,577.32

Snuff

10

10.00

Total

4,285,856

3,042,828.12

(1) Duty on Tobacco for the year

Miscellaneous fees

$ 3,042,828.12

161.84

Total

.$ 3,042,989.96

Less Drawbacks

422,915.79

Net Revenue

$ 2,620,074.17

(2) Licence fees.

Retailer's

Importer's

Manufacturer's

Licensed Warehouse

Total

41,418.00

4,450.00

684.00

225.00

46,777.00

NOTE:-Fractions of a pound are not shown in this table.

E 16

Table V.

Total Amount of Prepared Opium Sold during the year 1930.

Hong Kong Bengal Opium

Kamshan Bengal Opium

Total

Table VI.

166,388.7 Taels

25,386.0

191,774.7 Taels

STATEMENT OF OPIUM TRANSHIPPED DURING 1930.

From Bombay

To Keelung

Dairen

"

Macao

21

Persian

Total

Chests.

Chests.

1.668

1,668

Total

1,668

1,668

Persian

Total

Chests

Chests.

694

694

510

510

464

464

Total

1,668

1,668

E 17

Table VIA.

Statement of Opium in Transit during 1930.

From Port Said

Total

To Yokohama Dairen

Total

Turkish

Chests.

Total Chests.

64

64

64

64

Turkish

Chests.

Total Chests.

14

14

50

50

64

64

(1) OPIUM.

Prepared

Raw

(2) ARMS.

Revolvers Ammunition

Air Gun

Old Muskets

Table VII.

CONTRABAND SEIZED,

Seizures

17,500 Tacls

384

19,150

146

173]

(3) TOBACCO.

(4) LIQUOR.

Cigarettes

Chinese Tobacco

European Spirit

19,000!

5

1 |

2J

.950,522

33

2,493 lbs.

109

13 Gallons

Spirits of Wine

Chinese Spirit

1,699 6,013

2

117

265-

(5) DANGEROUS Drugs.

Heroin

14,924 oz.

1

Morphine

3 oz.

1

Heroin Pills

50,697

16

(6) MISCELLANEOUS.

Forged Government Opium Labels ...

308

2

Forged Liquor Labels

490

1

Forged $1 Bank Notes

32

1

Lottery Tickets

5.035

2

Small Craft confiscated

17

17

(1) OPIUM.

Possession

Boiling

E 18

Table VIII.

Bail

Arrests. Convictions. Estreated.

1,009

782

156

12

10

4

3

Dealing

(2) ARMS.

Illegal possession

5

5

(3) TOBACCO.

Possession Cigarettes

23

18

3

Chinese Tobacco.

64

56

Unlicensed selling

6.

CO

6

Co

}

(4) LIQUOR.

Spirits of Wine

18

13

Chinese Spirits

50

46

2

Distillery Offences

10

8

Wine and Spirit Shop

Offences

8

CO

6

(5) DANGEROUS DRUGS.

Heroin Pills

Morphine

(6) MISCELLANEOUS.

Forged Government Labels.

Lottery Tickets

30

21

1

1

10

10

5

2

Total

1,247

982

164

E 19

Table IX.

CLASSIFIED LIST OF OPIUM SEIZURES 1930.

Number of

Taels

Seizures.

Seized.

Prepared Opium, Doubtful

330

847.05

Macao

112

19

14,815.30

Wuchow*

63

1,703.65

Canton

24

"

23

1,621.11

22

Kwongchauwan

11

4,396.00

A

Amoy

1

716.00

"

Shanghai

1

265.00

""

Hong Kong

1

15.00

Total Prepared Opium

24,379.00

Opium Dross, all kinds

Dross Opium, all kinds

1.50

Total Dross, all kinds

1.50

Raw Opium, Chinese

272

25,370.45

Persian

14

"

5,797.00

22

Indian (Malwa)

1

953.00

Total Raw Opium

32,120.00

Pints Seized.

Opium Solution

22

2213/20

*Wuchow, a port on the West River. Port of entry for Kwong Sai

Province.

*

Table X.

Fines and Forfeitures collected by the Courts under Opium. Liquor and Tobacco Ordinances.

Hong Kong Magistracy

Kowloon Magistracy

District Office, North

$28,311.10

$10,138.45

$ 1,734.00

District Office, South

$ 4,612.36

Total

$44,795.91

E 20

Table XI.

REWARDS PAID.

For Opium, Drugs, Liquor and Tobacco

.$51,622.95

Table XII.

IMPORTATION OF DANGEROUS DRUGS DURING THE YEAR 1930.

Preparations containing Ethyl Morphine

Hydrochloride

Preparations containing Morphine

Morphine Salts

Cocaine Salts

Nepenthe

Tincture of Opium

Opium (Powdered)

Chlorodyne

Heroin Hydrochloride

lbs.

02.

grs.

13

283

1

9

8

20

10

10

Table XIII.

STAFF CHANGES.

Resigned Dismissed Transferred Invalided Died

Clerks

6

Chief Preventive Officer.

1

Chinese Revenue Officers Messenger

Coolic

6

1

1

STATESTICAL. BRANCH.

Resigned.

Dismissed.

Left Service without permission

Clerks

3

2

1

¿

- E 21 -

Place of Seizure.

Refrigerator, S.S. Changte. S.S. Wing Lee

Table XIV.

CHIEF SEIZURES OF OPIUM, 1980.

Kind of Opium.

Tacls.

Destination.

Prepared Opium (Macao)

1,345

Connaught Road, Central

(Kwongchauwan) (Macao)

520

Australia,

Local.

1,184

Singapore.

Connaught Road, Central

S.S. Dorrey (From Hoihow)

Sampan 1898 V. Yaurati Typhoon Shelter.

S.S. Ixion

S.S. Takliwa

Raw Opium (Persian)

1,358

(Chinese)

2,700

Local.

(Persian)

2,592

Prepared Opium (Kwongchauwan)

500

U. S. A.

Raw Opium (Indian) (Malwa)

953

S.S. Kashgar

Frepared Opium (Macao)

2,500

Local.

Singapore.

Fishing Junk 4817 H, C.

Raw Opium (Chinese)

744

Local.

Sampan Praya West

รง

(Chinese)

570

""

Fishing Boat 4347 W.

Prepared Opium (Macao)

800

Unnumbered Matshed, Tsun Wan Bay

(Amoy)

716

Export.

S.S. President Mackinley

(Kwongchauwan)

2,480

U. S. A.

S.S. Changtu

Raw Opium (Chinese)

1,765

Local.

S.S. Changtu

(Chinese)

2,640

Boat 3849 II, C.

(Chinese)

2,208

21

Sampan Ex. S.S. Sui Tai

Tins on sea bed off Cheung Chau

Coal Bunkers, S.S. Hinsang

S.S. Kong So

Trepared Opium (Macao)

1,820

Raw Opium (Chinese)

8,240

**

Prepared Opium (Macao)

1,700

Sandakan.

Raw Opium (Chinese)

570

Local.

Large Jar sunk in hillside above Shaukiwan

S.S. Timarang

S.S. Telsuzan Maru

> >

(Chinese)

(Persian)

960

580

Prepared Opium (Canton)

1,522

S.S. Menado Maru

3.8. Yuen Sang

Raw Opium (Chinese)

1,860

Netherlands

Indies.

Dutch Borneo.

Local.

S.S. Yuen Sang

Prepared Opium (Macao) (Macao)

1,000

Singapore.

625

Singapore.

Table XV.

RETURN OF SEIZURES UNDER DANGEROUS DRUGS ORDINANCE, No. 23 or 1923, FOR THE YEAR 1930.

Date.

Quantity & Substance,

Origin.

Place of Seizure.

Destination.

Result.

31-12-29.

177 Heroin Pills

4-1-30.

700

23-1-30.

115

23-1-30.

262

"

4-2-30.

59

8-2-30.

470

་,

17-6-30.

2977

8-8-30.

143

4-9-30.

2000

}}

5-9-30.

10000

13

17-9-30.

3000

""

19-9-30.

975

""

''

24-9-30.

20004

> }

2-10-30.

1280

>>

""

7-11-30.

10000

14-11-30.

493

11-12-30.

470

"

8-10-30.

19-12-30.

124 Kilos =14924 Ozs. Heroin

Hydrochloride. tes Morphine hloride.

Unknown

Conviction.

Unknown

Kong Moon

Unknown

ཝཱ

17, Hill Road, 2nd Floor. 19, Tung Street, 1st Floor.

4. Peel Street, 2nd Floor, 250, Queen's Road, C. 2nd Floor. 223, Hollywood Road, 2nd Floor. 7, Tung Lai Lane, 2nd Floor. Ping On Wharf.

2A, Kwong Yuen Street, W. 1st Floor.

Hoi On Wharf.

Connaught Road, C.

S.S. Sun Nam Hoi.

''

>>

107, Wing Lok Street, 3rd Floor. Asia Hotel, Room 204.

1

26, Upper Lascar Row, 3rd Floor. Connaught Road, West. Ping On Wharf,

291, Queen's Road, C. 3rd Floor.

ex S.S. Hilda.

K.C.R. Station.

""

"

"}

11

> "

"}

""

"}

11

No arrest.

Conviction.

No arrest.

Conviction.

Discharged. Conviction.

""

No arrest.

Conviction.

- E 22

E 23

Table XVI.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

LIQUOR.

Dealer's Licence

Licensed Warehouse

30

24

Chinese Wine and Spirit Shop (excluding New Territories)... 301

Distillery Licence :-

(a) Hong Kong and Aplichau

(b) Kowloon, South of Kowloon Hills

(c) N. T. North including Chun Wan and

Hang Hau

(d) Islands of N. T. South

44

12

31

Importer's Licence

Retailer's Licence:

(a) $20.00

(b) $10.00

TOBACCO.

Licensed Warehouse

Manufacturer's Licence

OPIUM.

Retailer's Licence

Table XVII.

MOTOR SPIRIT DUTIES 1930.

Motor Spirit Duties

Licensed Warehouse Licence Fees

Importer's Licence (General) Fees

Importer's Licence (Special) Fees Retailer's Licence Fees

Total

91

1,443

1,445

2,888

3

29

$145,528.49

1,250.00

600.00

300.00

405.00

$148,083.49

MOTOR SPIRIT.

LICENCES ISSUED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

Licenced Warehouse Licences

Importer's Licences (General)

Importer's Licences (Special) Retailer's Licences

3

81

68

E 24

Table XVIII.

SUMMARY OF REVENUE COLLECTED DURING 1930.

Liquor Duties

$1,689,948.52

Liquor Licence Fees

208,041.67

Tobacco Duties

2,619,912.33

Tobacco Licence Fees

46,777.00

Motor Spirit Duties

145,528.49

Motor Spirit Licence Fees

2,555.00

Opium

2,835,286.90

Total

$7,548,049.91

Appendix F

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR

OF THE ROYAL OBSERVATORY, HONG KONG,

FOR THE YEAR 1930.

1:-GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS.

The grounds were kept in order by the Botanical and Forestry Department with the assistance of the Observatory coolies.

Magnetic Station at Au Tau.-The daily range of tempera- ture in the magnetograph house is too great for satisfactory registration of magnetic horizontal force and vertical force. Temperature control apparatus to reduce this range has been ordered from England.

Underground Chamber for Seismographs and Clocks.-The range of temperature in the Undergound Chamber was 11°.6 (F) in 1930, as against 9°.7 (F) in 1929 and 10°.7 (F) in 1928. The relative humidity was usually above 95% between April 18 and September 2. The absolute range during the year was 46% in 1930, as against 45% in 1929 and 45% in 1928.

In the following table the mean monthly temperature and humidity in the Underground Chamber are compared with the temperature and humidity in the Open Air.

F 2

Mean Monthly Temperature and Relative Humidity in the Underground Chamber and in the Open Air

Month

1930.

during the year 1930.

In Underground In the Open Air.

Chamber.

Temper- Relative Temper- Relative

Excess of Under-

ground Chamber over Open Air.

Temper- Relative

ature Humidity ature Humidity ature Humidity

о

January,.. 70.8

February, 68.5

March,...

69.6

%

0000000

54.6

84

60:3

84

6319

April,

741

94

73'5

May,

75'4

96

79°2

June,

775

96

81.9

July...

79:2

August....

80.1

September 79-8

October,

78.6

November,

77.8

December, 75'4

2

min 00

à a aco 00 I

96

8203

18171700 00 00 00

3

95

82 1

2

00

83

82

79°4

82

76-8

73

70'7

70

78

640

Range,.... 116

:

27.7

%

+16:2

+8°2

+37

+ 0.6

81

3.8

+4 3'1

+ + + +

2.0

04

10

ΙΟ

+ 15

+

+ + + +

++++++++

10 00 00 !

tinm

3

II.-METEOROLOGICAL INSTRUMENTS.

All the meteorological instruments were maintained in good order throughout the year.

The thermometers in use were compared with Kew Standard No. 647 in summer and winter.

The working of the electric hammer on the Nakamura Pluviograph was tested daily at 11h.

The Beckley and Dines Baxendell Anemographs were ciled and the orientation of the vanes was checked once a month. The Dines Baxendell instrument continues to work satisfactorily. except at very low velocities when its action is uncertain.

The bearings and helix of the Beckley Anemograph were renewed in July.

F 3

The mean monthly results of comparisons with the records of the Beckley Anemograph from 1910-1929 are given in the following table, together with the results for 1930:-

Factor for converting the actual run of the Beckley Anemograph cups to velocities recorded by the Dines Pressure

Tube Anemograph.

Factor (Dines Beckley).

3

Month.

Mean 1910-1929.

1930.

January,

1'95

2:07

February,

2'00

2.16

March,

2:06

2015

April,..

2:08

2.26

May,

2.19

2.23

June,

2.12

2:26

July,

2.24

2:30

August,...

2.23

2.23

September,

2*21

2:23

October,...

2.13

214

November,

2.03

2.14

December,

2:08

1'95

Year...

2'10

2.19

III. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS AT THE OBSERVATORY.

Automatic records of the temperature of the air and evaporation were obtained with a Richard dry and wet-bulb thermograph, and the direction and velocity of the wind with. a Beckley and a Dines-Baxendell anemograph, modified as described in the report for 1912. The amount of rain is recorded automatically by a Nakamura Pluviograph and the amount of sunshine by two Campbell-Stokes universal sunshine recorders. Eye observations of barometric pressure, temperature of the air and of evaporation and the amount of cloud are made at each hour of Hong Kong Standard Time and of terrestrial radiation at midnight and at 6 a.m. (from 1930, January 1). The character and direction of motion of the clouds are observed every three hours. Daily readings are taken of self-registering maximum and minimum thermometers. Observations of pilot balloons are made with a Watts 14 inch "Coudé" theodolite at about 9h a.m. and 3h. p.m. except when the base of the clouds is lower than Victoria Peak (1800 ft.)

F 4

Principal features of the Weather in 1930:-The principal features of the weather in 1930 were :

(a) A typhoon which passed about 50 miles to the S. W. of Hong Kong in the evening of July 24 on a

N. N. W. track, producing a strong gale at Hong Kong.

(b) abnormally low barometer in July.

(c) abnormally low temperature in January.

(d) abnormally low humidity in March.

(e) abnormally high pressure, heavy rain, high wind velocity, with moderately low temperature, in

September.

Barometric pressure was considerably above normal in June, September and November, and very considerably below normal in July. The mean pressure for the year at station level (109 feet above sea-level) was 29.850 ins., as against 29.845 ins. in 1929 and 29.842 ins. for the past 47 years. The highest pressure was 30.340 ins. at 9h.45m. a.m. on December 24, as against 30.282 ins. in 1929 and 30.509 ins. for the past 47 years. The lowest pressure was 29.175 ins. at 5.30 p.m, on July 24, as against 28.912 ins. in 1929 and 28.590 ins. for the past 47 years.

The temperature of the air was very considerably below normal (the lowest on record) in January, considerably above in April, moderately above in February, May, November and December, and moderately below in September. The mean temperature for the year was 72°.4, as against 72°.6 in 1929 and 71°.9 for the past 47 years. The highest temperature was 92.9 at 0h.40m p.m. on July 1, as against 92°.2 in 1929 and 97°.0 for the past 47 years. The lowest temperature was 41°.2 at 7.10 a.m. on January 8, as against 44°.4 in 1929 and 32°.0 for the past 47 years.

The total rainfall for the year was 96.08 inches, as against 69.82 inches in 1929 and 85.61 inches for the past 47 years. From October 1 to the end of the year only 1.33 inch of rain fell. Heavy rain in September, to the extent of 28.24 inches, probably saved the Colony from another water famine. There was a considerable shortage from April to June and in August. The greatest fall in one civil day was 7.96 inches on September 17, as against 7.15 inches in 1929 and 21.02 inches for the past 47 years. The greatest fall in one hour was 2.36 inches between 8th and 9th. a.m. on August 9, as against 2.73 inch in 1929 and 3.96 inches for the past 47 years.

The wind velocity was considerably below normal from January to March and also in August and October. It was moderately above in September. The mean velocity for the year was 10.9 m.p.h., as against 11.6 m.p.h. in 1929 and 12.4 m.p.h. for the past 47 years. The maximum velocity for one

F 5

hour, as recorded by the Beckley anemograph was 66 m.p.h. at 7 p.m. on July 24, as against 89 miles in 1929 and 108 miles for the past 47 years. The maximum gust velocity, as recorded by the Dines-Baxendell anemograph, was at the rate of 83 m.p.h. from E.S.E. at 9.23 p.m. on July 24, as against 117 m.p.h. in 1929 and 130 m.p.h. for the past 21 years.

The relative humidity was considerably below normal in March, considerably above in December, and moderately above in September. The mean for the year was 78%, as June. and August. The mean for the year was 78%, as against 77% in 1929 and 78% for the past 47 years. It frequently exceeded 95% in spring and summer. The lowest for the year was 29% at Oh. 45m. p.m. on March 13, as against 26% in 1929 and 12% for the past 47 years.

Rainfall at six Stations.In the following table the monthly rainfall for the year 1930 at the Observatory is compared with the fall at the Police Station (Tai Po), the Botanical Gardens (Hong Kong), The Matilda Hospital (Mount Kellet), Fanling and Naval Hospital.

Matilda

Month.

vatory

Obser- (Police Botanical

Station

Hospital

Gardens

(Mount

(Kowloon). Tai po).

(Hong

Kellet,

Fanling.

Naval Hospital.

Kong).

Hong

Kong).

inches. inches. inches.

inches.

inches. inches.

January,... 2.275 2.38 2.43

1-85

2.28

2'00

February,

1*380

2′14

151

1.31

2'15

I'09

March,.....

7*230

IO*II

7.15

7:53

6.09

5.27

April,

2 ICO

2.80

2:26

1*82

2'42

2'04

May,

6.185

4.62 7'99

7.42

6'04

7.29

June,

12 245

11'90

15.00

9'91

9.06

15'35

July,

29*025

24'57

3151

26.30

28.63

25.89

August,...

6.065

482

522

5.90

5'46

3.86

September,. 28.245

32.56 29°40

33°30

24.05

30.50

October,

0'410

0'27

0'02

0'03

0'51

0'31

November, 0'035

0.26 0'07

Ο ΟΙ

0*40

0'02

December, 0.890 1'45

I'23

1'21

156

1.16

Year... 96.085 97.88 103.79

96.59

88-65

94.78

Floods.-Land slides were caused by heavy rains on July

15.20 and September 14 to 25.

:

F 6

A water spout occurred at Cape d'Aguilar on September 29, after a typhoon had passed about 200 miles south and west of Hong Kong. A report on the phenomenon, furnished by the officer in charge of the station (Mr. J. Key) was forwarded to the Editor of the Meteorological Magazine, London.

The heaviest rainfall occurred at the Observatory as follows:

Period 1930.

d. h.

Amount.

Duration.

Greatest fall

in 1 hour.

Amount.

Time.

d.

h.

inches.

hours.

inches.

d. h.

May June

8 1

4

00001960

to

to

to

8 8 8 8 8

to

12 1

4.84

35

2.12

May 8 11

to

10

16

9-10

48

1:33

June..

12

21

0

14.68

57

1.34

July ...19

21

25

13

9.20

28

0.87

July ...25

9

21

18

3.53

10

2.36

Aug. ...21

to

18 7

21.04

86

1.22

Sept....17

22

to 28 13

4.32

2.24

Sept....28

11

..21

July ......14 July ...24 Aug. Sept.......14 Sept.......28

Typhoons. The tracks of 19 typhoons which occurred in the Far East during the year 1930 are given in the Monthly Meteorological Bulletin for December. On July 24 a typhoon passed about 50 miles to the S.W. of Hong Kong on a N.N.W. track, producing a strong gale at the Observatory. The maximum gust velocity was at the rate of 83 m.p.h. from E.S.E. at 9h.23m.p.m. The lowest barometer reading, reduced to sea-level and standard gravity, was 29.288 inches at 5.30 p.m.

IV. PUBLICATIONS.

Daily Weather Report and Map.-A weather map of the Far East, for 6 a.m. of the 120 meridian time, is constructed daily and lithographed at the Observatory. Isotherms have been included since March 6. On the verso of the map is printed the morning weather report, from 40 to 50 stations in China, Indo-China, Japan, Korea, Borneo and the Philippines, and a weather forecast for the following districts:-

1. Formosa Channel.

2.

S.E. Coast of China between Hong Kong and Lamocks.

3. Hong Kong to Gap Rock.

4.

S. Coast of China between Hong Kong and Hainan,

F 7

This publication is exhibited on notice boards at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Ferry Piers, the Harbour Office, at the offices of the Cable Companies and at the General Post Office. It may be purchased by the general public at a subscription rate of $10 per annum. During the year 47 companies etc. subscribed for 57 copies. The weather report and forecast, and all storm warnings, are telephoned to Stonecutters Wireless Station for transmission to H.M. ships on the China Station.

A weather map for 2 p.m. of the 120th. meridian time is also constructed daily. It is not published, but an evening weather report, and forecast based thereon, is sent to the morning papers and exhibited on the notice boards.

Meteorological observations made at the Observatory at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. are published in the local press.

Meteorological observations from 26 stations in the Far East, followed by a weather report and forecast, are broadcast by Cape d'Aguilar (VPS) on a 600 metre spark at 0400 and 1200 G.M.T. A repetition of the 0400 message is made by VPS on 2913 metres I.C.W. at 0500 and the 1200 message on 2913 metres I.C.W. immediately following the 1300 time-signal.

The weather reports and forecasts are also broadcast by the Hong Kong Broadcasting station (ZBW) 355 metres telephony at 0530 and 1300 G.M.T.

Hong Kong storm warnings are broadcast by VPS on a 600 metre spark and by ZBW on 355 metres telephony on receipt and at the two subsequent hours. They are also broadcas as above at every hour when the typhoon is threatening Hong Kong.

Shanghai and Manila warnings are broadcast by VPS on a 600 metre spark on receipt, and repeated after an interval of 10 minutes. They are similarly broadcast by ZBW on 355 metres telephony when the Hong Kong local typhoon signals are displayed.

V.-WEATHER TELEGRAMS, FORECASTS AND STORM WARNINGS.

Daily Weather Telegrams. In addition to the ordinary 6h, and 14h. observations, which the Cable Companies transmit free of charge, the 11h. and 17h. observations were received at half rates from the following stations:-

Shanghai

Gutzlaff

Amoy Macao

F 8

The 0700 and 2300 G.M.T. observations from Fort Bayard, Phu-lien, Tourane, Cape Padaran and Cape St. James, and the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T. observations from the above, and about 12 other stations in Indo-Chine, are received from Phu-lien on short wave. This service is very valuable and ensures the early receipt of the observations, and at regular hours, namely:-at 0115, 0400, 0830 and 1015 G.M.T. It also saves the expense of obtaining the 0300 and 0900 G.M.T, observations by cable.

Other valuable services are the 0600 and 2200 G.M.T. observations on 23 metres S.W. from Yangtze Ports, and several stations in N.E. China and Korea sent personally by Father Gherzi, S.J. of the Zi Ka Wei Observatory, and the 2100 G.M.T. observations from Pelew, Yap, Saipan and Ponape, sent on 1050 metres from the Pelew Observatory at 0200 G.M.T.

Valuable observations from Woody Island, Paracels, were received from May 27 to June 11. The 0600 and 2200 G.M.T. observations from Hoihow are received by wireless telegraphy occasionally,

The Meteorological Authorities at Pratas continue to send, daily, with commendable regularity and promptitude, their 0300, 0600, 0900 and 2200 G.M.T. observations and the 2200 observations from some Philippine stations. They also send hourly observations during the passage of a typhoon.

Extra Weather Telegrams.-The following stations send extra weather telegrams at half rates during typhoons, on receipt of certain code words from Hong Kong:-Amoy, Canton, Macao, Phu-lien, Sharp Peak and Taihoku. The Director of the Philippine Weather Bureau also sends extra telegrams, at his discretion, from Aparri or some other station. nearer the typhoon centre. On request, the Director of the Taihoku Observatory sends extra weather telegrams from the two stations in Formosa nearest to the centre during the passage of a typhoon.

Weather Telegrams from Ships by Radio.-The following table gives the monthly number of ships from which radio meteorological messages have been received, and the number

F 9

of messages received (each arrival and departure is counted separately) :-

Month.

Other

British (including

H.M. Ships).

National- ities.

Total

H.M.S. in Port.

January,

86

146 21

132 54

98 161

376

February,

65

115

25 160

47

77 137

352

March,.

82

151

19 126

54

373

April,

90

160

! I 86

46

324

May,

139

216

29 166

69

123

237

505

June,

126

233

54

760

46

ΙΟΙ 226

1094

July,

175

405

38 1063

80

143 293

August,

176

419

46 844

46

74268

1337

September,

154

October,

156 318

376 45 1256

75

141 274

1773

48 1306

56

94 260

1718

November, December,

160 358 45 1323

67

I 10 272

179:

106

220 33 1242

551

99 194 1561

(1930,

1515

3117 414 8464 695 1234 2624 12815

1929,

.....

794

2549 210 1285 748 1982 1752

5816

Totals

1928,

789

2645 203

588 1893 1580 5740

1927,

544

1802 154 1838 435 1386 1133 5026

It will be seen that the number of British ships sending these messages increased from 1004 in 1929 to 1929 in 1930. This was due to a welcome increase in the meteorological activities of the Navy. The number of ships of other nationalities decreased from 748 to 695.



F 10

Results of Weather Forecasts.-The results of comparison of the daily weather forecasts with the weather subsequently experienced are given below, together with the results for the previous five years:-

Year.

Complete Partial

Partial

Total

Success.

Success. Failure.

Failure.

1928

1920 1930

1925

62

1926

72

1927

66

ale NOVOM

%

31

W NW N N Cu de

%

%

%

466

34

26

26

4

31

28

4

+2

о о о о оо

The forecast comprises wind direction, wind force, and weather. Complete success means correct in three elements. Partial success means correct in only two elements. Partial failure means correct in only one element. Total failure means correct in no element.

The method of analysis is described in the 1918 Report.

Storm Warnings.-The symbols of the China Seas Non-local Storm Signal Code are displayed on Kowloon Signal Hill and on the roof of No. 49 Godown of the Hong Kong & Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co.

The following Ports are warned by a telegraphic adaptation of the code:-Shanghai, Sharp Peak, Swatow, Amoy, Santuao, Macao, Canton, Wuchow, Phu-lien, Taihoku, Manila, Labuan and Singapore. 111 storm warnings were sent in 1930. 113 were received from Manila, and 209 from Zikawei. The corresponding numbers in 1929 were 108, 178 and 261 respectively.

No occasion arose to warn the Central Weather Bureau Poona, of the passage of typhoons across Indo-China in westerly direction.

No alterations in the arrangements for the display and dissemination of local Storm Signals were made during the year.

F 11

In the following table are given the number of times and number of hours the local signals were hoisted in each of the years 1926-1930.

Red Signals.

Black Signals.

Year.

Number of

times.

Number of hours displayed.

Number

Number of times.

of hours displayed.

Bombs.

Number

of times fired.

1926

100

1 335

1927 1928

I

1929 1930

50 169

IO

28

88

44 2 23

103

61

I

I

58 46

I

37

:

The figures in the above table include the number of hours that night signals, corresponding to the day signals, were hoisted.

The red signal indicates that a depression or typhoon exists which may possible cause a gale at Hong Kong within 24 hours. The black signals indicate that a gale is expected at Hong Kong.

Three bombs fired at intervals of 10 seconds indicate that wind of typhoon force is anticipated.

VI. METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS FROM SHIPS. TREATY FORTS, ETC.

Logs received.-In addition to meteorological registers kept at about 40 stations in China, meteorological logs were received from 192 ships operating in the Far East. These logs, representing 10,273 days observations have been utilised for amplifying the weather maps and verifying typhoon tracks. The corresponding figures for the 1929 were 197 and 10,153.

Comparison of Barometers.-The corrections to ships barometers are usually obtained by comparing their readings while at Hong Kong with those of the Observatory Standard. Occasionally ship captains bring their barometers to the Observatory to be compared with the Standard.

VII. MAGNETIC OBSERVATIONS.

From the beginning of 1928 magnetic horizontal force. declination and dip have been determined at the Au Tau Station weekly, when possible. The instruments used are a magnetome- ter by Cook, Troughton & Simms, No. 31, and an earth inductor by the Cambridge Instrument Co. C65818. In the following

F 12

table are given the annual values of the magnetic elements in 1930 as derived from 52 determinations:

Declination (West)

0.43.6

Dip (North)

30.37.3

Horizontal Force (C. G. S. Unit)

0.37485

Vertical Force (C. G. S. Unit)

0.22187

Total Force (C. G. S. Unit).

*0.43559

Photographic registration of magnetic declination, horizontal force and vertical force was maintained throughout the year. except during periods of adjustment. The correct interpretation of the records is doubtful, however, owing to the difficulty of determining the temperature co-efficients of the force variometers accurately, and the instability of the declination base-line. A new mirror for the latter is on order from England, and it is hoped that abnormalities will disappear after its installation..

The records show that the temperature co-efficients of the horizontal and vertical force variometers are considerable, and pending the installation of an efficient temperature regulator. experiments with a control magnet for the horizontal force variometer are in progress.

The following table gives temperature data for the magneto- graph room during the year 1930.

Month.

Temperature.

Absolute.

Daily Range.

Absolute.

Mean.

Mean.

Maximum. Minimum.

Maximum. Minimum,



о

O

о

о

O

O

January,

67.6

54'7 589 2'9

0'7

1'3

February,

74'5

54.8 62.8

2.6

0.4

1.6

March,

75.6

60'9 67.8

4'3

15

April,

83.2

92.1

78.6

2.5

14

May,

87.6

82.0

84'5

2'5

1+

June,

91.5

$1.7

87.4

2.6



17

July,

91.6

84.0

88.0

2.3

0.8 1

1'4

August,

92.5

84.3

89.0

2.3

ΤΟ

1'5

September,

92.0

81.1 85.3

1.8

I'2

October,

854 79'9 82°7

2.3

0.9

1.6

November,

84.3

74'3 76.5

3'3

ΙΟ

1.6

December,

76.6

64*7

70°3

3.7

0'7

1'5

F 13

The following table shows the magnetic character of the year 1930, at Hong Kong.

Month Day.

2

3

I am to 700 a

оо

I

ооо

ооо

OON O O

оо

Jan.

Feb.

March.

April.

May.

June.

July.

Aug.

Sept.

Oct.

Nov.

Dec.

8

9

10

I I

12

13

14

O

2

I

15

I

16

I

17

18

19

20

2 I

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

O O O O

O

0 = calm.

1= disturbed.

=

2 very disturbed.

I

I

2

Ι

I

VIII.-TIME SERVICE.

Time Ball.-The time ball on Kowloon Signal Hill is dropped at 10h. and 16h. daily, except on Saturdays when it is dropped at 10h. and 13h. and on Sundays and Holidays when it is dropped at 10h. only (120th Meridian Time).

F 14

The ball is hoisted half mast at the 55th minute and full mast at the 57th minute. If the ball fails to drop at the correct time it is lowered at 5 minutes past the hour and the ordinary routine repeated at the following hour, if possible.

Time signals are also given at night by means of three white lamps mounted vertically on the Observatory radio mast. The lights are extinguished momentarily every second from 20h. 55m. to 21h. except at the 28th, 29th, 54th, 56th, 57th, 58th and 59th seconds, of each minute. The 21h. signals were repeated at midnight on December 31, the last signal indicating the close of the year 1930. The hours refer to Hong Kong Standard Time (8 hours east of Greenwich).

The timeball was dropped successfully 661 times. There was one failure, on September 4 at 16h, when the ball fell about 21 minutes before 16h, owing to the accidental discharge of the lock from the Observatory. The winding apparatus was damaged considerably, but repairs were expeditiously effected by Messrs. W. S. Bailey & Co. the apparatus being again in action on Sept. The ball was not raised on Dec. 6 at 13h. and Dec. 7. at 10h, owing to electrical defects.

7.

The error of the timeball was Os.4 three times, Os.5 twice, and Os.9 once. On all other occasions the ball fell with error of Os.3 or less.

an

The probable error of the time ball in each month of the past five years is given in the following table.

Probable Error of the Time Ball.

Month.

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

January,

±0.13

±0.14

±0.13

±0.10

+0*10

February,

*18

*12

10

ΙΟ

*13

March,

'I I

*I I

*IO

•10

*12

April......

13.

*10

10

*IO

*16

May,

*IO

14

ΙΟ

*10

*15

June,

*10

13

*20

*10

*14

July,

'10

*10

'I I

ΙΟ

*10

August..

*10

IZ

*20

12

12

September,

'IO

'10

11

*10

'10

October,

*I I

'I I

'I I

'10

'I I

!

November,

10

10

10

*I I

10

December,

*13

13

*12

14

•10

Means,

+0'12

±0.12

+0'12

±0.12

www.

F 15

Time Signals by Radio Telegraphy.-In addition to the time signals given by the time ball, and on the radio mast, signals are broadcast at 10h, and 21h, by radio-telegraphy, via Cape d'Aguilar. Particulars of the programme are given in Government Notification No. 322 of the 1st June, 1928.

Observations of the rhythmic radio time signals emitted by Nauen at 8h. a.m. Hong Kong Standard Time, have been made daily, whenever possible, during the year. The observa- tions have been utilised for clock regulation during cloudy weather.

Transit Instrument.-Routine transit and level observations were made by the Chinese computers throughout the year. The Collimation and Azimuth determinations, and occasional transit observations, were made by the Chief and First Assistants.

The number of observations in the years 1929 and 1930 was as follows:-

1929 1930

Transits

Level determinations

Azimuth determinations (mark)

Azimuth determinations (transit of

circumpolar stars)

.1111

1078

562

546

32

42

271

238

47

Collimation determinations (mark) 35

Clocks. Sidereal Clock, Cottingham and Mercer, No. 507, has been in use as the Observatory Standard throughout the year. Its performance was again marked by a steady increase of losing rate (with superposed fluctuations corresponding to variations of pressure in the clock case, due to temperature changes). This is probably due to an increase of about one inch of barometric pressure within the clock case, caused by gradual leakage during the year. The losing rate of the clock varied from-Os.28 on Feb. 18 to + Os.55 on Dec.. 11.

The Leroy Mean Time Clock, No. 1350, was used for drop- ping the time ball, maintaining the electric time service in the Observatory, and sending hourly signals to the Railway, the Post Office, the Telephone Co. and the Eastern Extension. Telegraph Co. The clock is corrected daily before 10h. and 16h. by the electric regulating apparatus. The daily rate of the pendulum is kept below 0.5s by the addition or withdrawal of weights. The Dent Mean Time Clock, No. 39740, is held in readiness as a substitute for Leroy No. 1350. It was not required for this purpose in 1930.

F 16

IX.-MISCELLANEOUS.

Seismograph. No alterations were made to the seismograph during the year. New needle points were fitted as required. 320 earthquakes were recorded during the year 1930 as against 252 in 1929.

The seismograms have been forwarded to the President of the International Seismological Committee, Oxford, to be dealt with.

Upper Air Research.-325 balloon ascents were made during the year. 34 meteorological flights were made by officers of the R.A.F. before the departure of the carrier, H.M.S. Hermes, on July 28.

The results of the pilot balloon observations have been forwarded monthly to the Secretary of the International Commis- sion for the exploration of the upper air.

The following days were selected by the Internationa! Commission as days for international ascents:-January 13-18. May 13-15 and September 15-20. September was chosen as the "International month". Balloon ascents were made on January 13-14, May 13-15 and Sepetmber 15, 19, and 20.

Special ascents were made at 8.30 a.m. on March 12-14 in connection with R.A.F. bombing practice.

Communication with Stonecutters.-Direct telegraphic com- munication between the Observatory and Stonecutters Wireless Station was restored on February 18. Communication had been by telephone only since 1927, October. For the accurate transmission of weather telegrams telegraphic tape machines are essential.

Course in Meteorology.-Lieut. A. St. J. Edwards, R.N., H.M.S. Hermes, Assistant to Senior Observer, took a course in meteorology at the Observatory from February 24 to March 23.

Short wave experimental emissions.-Watch was kept at the Observatory Wireless Station for the short wave experi- mental emissions from Paris and Lyons on January 11-18. May 31, June 7, 14, 21, 28, November 22, 29, December 6,13.

The signals of the first two series were heard at varying strengths, but those of the third series were not heard at Hong Kong.

-F 17

Ligthographic Work. The following lithographic work was done at the Observatory for other departments :---

(a) 6 plans accompanying the Report of the Playing

Fields Committee.

(b) Map of Hong Kong and New Territories for

Dominions and Colonial Office List.

(c) Map of Hong Kong Stone Quarries.

(d) 6 plans accompanying Report on Shing Mun Water

supply scheme.

(e) Plan of arrangements for Armistice Day celebrations.

Conferences:-The Director attended a Conference held at the Observatory from January 22-24 to consider the meteoro- logical needs of the Navy. Commander E. W. Kitson, R.N. presided, the details and agenda having been planned bv Commander L. G. Garbett, R.N. (Retired) Superintendent of the Navy Services Division, Meteorological Office, London, who came to Hong Kong to attend the Conference.

The recommendations of the Conference, when carried out, should do much to improve the Hong Kong and Malaya Weather Services and prove of great benefit to H.M. Ships on the China Station.

A Conference of Directors of Far Eastern Weather Services was held in the Council Chamber from April 28 to May 2, in accordance with а resolution passed at the International Conference of Directors of Weather Services held at Copenhagen in 1929.

The object of the conference was throughout the Far East in:-

to

secure uniformity

(a) The codes used for local and non-local visual storm

warnings.

(b) The code used for transmitting daily weather

Reports by cable.

The conference was attended by representatives from the following Weather Services:-

Hong Kong

Indo-China

Nanking

Philippines

Pratas

Tsingtao

Zi-ka-wei

F 18

દો

The Conference recommended that the Hong Kong Code of Local Storm Signals, as amended at the Conference, should be adopted by Weather Services in the Far East which use Local Storm Signal, and that the China Seas Storm Signal Code, as revised by the Director of the Royal Observatory, Hong Kong, and amended at the Conference, be adopted by Weather Services in the Far East which use a Non-Local Storm Signal Code. The Conference also recommended that the Six-letter Code for transmission of weather telegrams by cable proposed by the Director of the Royal Observatory, Hong Kong, as amended at the Conference, should be adopted throughout the Far East.

A report on the Conference, including 13 other resolutions adopted, has been printed and circulated to the principal

observatories of the world.

Visitors.—Lieut.-Comdr. H. Huang, C.N. who relieved Lieut.-Comdr. Y. C. Shen રીડ Director of the Pratas Meteorological Station, visited the Observatory on March 29, prior to sailing for Pratas. Commodore R. A. S. Hill, R.N. with Comdrs. Maxwell and Law, on March 31. Lieut-Comdr. Y. C. Shen, Director of the Pratas Meteorological Station on April 9, en route from Pratas to Shanghai. Brig-General Winterbotham, on a tour of Empire Survey inspection, on April 17. Captain Plexton, Commander of the Revenue cutter Pingching, on July 12, en route to Pratas.

Parties of students from St. Stephen's Girls School visited the Observatory on March 12 and 19, from Middle Light School, Canton, on April 15, from the Chu Chih Hsien Memorial School on April 21, and from the Chinese Y.M.C.A. on October 30.

Staff. No change occurred in the European or local staff during the year.

Expenditure. The annual expenditure on the Observatory for the past ten years is as follows:-

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Increase.

Decrease.

C.

$

ር.

C.

1921

32,700.51

6,734.85

1922

38,350.10

5,649.59

1923

38,522.58

172.48

1924

52,638.49

14,115.91

1925

41,955.51

10,682.98

1926

45,158.87

3,203.36

1927

36,664.99

8,493.88

1928

35:434.52

1,230.47

1929

35,141.07

293.45

1930

54.133.40

18,992.33

F 19

Acknowledgements.-Acknowledgements are here made to the Naval Authorities for their co-operation in securing daily observations from H.M. Ships and for meteorological flights by officers of the R.A.F., to the Directors of Weather Services in the Far East, and the Chinese Martime Customs Authorities, for daily observations by cable and radio-telegraphy, and extra observations during typhoon weather, to the Telegraph Com- panies for transmitting the majority of the observations free of charge, to the Commanders of vessels who have furnished meteorological observations by post and by radio-telegraphy, to the Directors of the various Observatories and Institutions, and private persons, who have presented their publications to the Library and to the Observatory staff for the efficient manner in which they have carried out their respective duties.

January, 26, 1930.

T. F. CLAXTON,

Director.

Appendix G.

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF THE SUPREME COURT FOR THE YEAR 1930.

1.—ORIGINAL JURISDICTION.

Two hundred and eighty six (286) actions were instituted in this division of the Court during the year 1930 as against 324 in 1929. One hundred and thirty (130) were disposed of during the year and 63 were settled or withdrawn before trial, as against 169 and 67 respectively in 1929.

The claims amounted $2,377,380.92 in 1929.

to

$4,082,633.31 as against

The debts and damages recovered amounted to $1,783,917.76 as against $997,151.27 in 1929.

The fees collected amounted to $13,532.15 as against $15,407.25 in 1929.

Tables setting out in detail the figures contained in this and the following paragraphs are printed on pages 01, 02, Y2 and Y3 of the Blue Book for the year 1930.

2.-SUMMARY JURISDICTION.

One thousand seven hundred and thirty (1,730) actions were instituted during the year, as against 1979 in 1929.

The cases were disposed of as follows:-Settled or with- drawn 437: Judgment for the Plaintiff 882: Judgment for the Defendant 50; Nonsuit 7; Struck off, Dismissed or Lapsed 61; and Pending 293; as against 459, 1032, 63, 2, 70 and 353 respectively in 1929.

The claims amounted to $481,966.36 as against $578,413.05 in 1929 and the amounts recovered were $243,061.61 as against $318,921.29 in 1929.

The number of Rent Distress Warrants issued was 1,535 representing unpaid rents amounting to $228,175.37, of which $87,150.72 was recovered by enforced sales in 522 Warrants; as against 1,739, $367,696.86 and $53,551.76 respectively in 1920.

Nine hundred and seventy seven (977) Warrants were with- drawn on settlement between the parties, as against 1028 in 1929 and the remaining Warrants were cancelled or otherwise disposed of.

G 2

The fees collected amounted to $20,775.16 as against $24,507.10 in 1929.

3. CRIMINAL JURISDICTION.

There were 53 cases and 78 persons committed for trial at the Criminal Sessions, as against 99 and 140 respectively in 1928.

Of the 78 persons indicted, 35 were convicted, 32 were acquitted and 11 were discharged (case abandoned). In 1929 the figures were respectively 140, 82, 39 and 19.

4.-APPELLATE JURISDICTION.

Three appeals were lodged during the year.

Two were dismissed and the other was allowed.

5.-ADMIRALTY JURISDICTION.

Thirteen actions were instituted during the year.

One case was dismissed, eight were settled or withdrawn and the others are pending.

The fees collected amounted

to

$306.70 as against

$600.50 in 1929.

6.-PROBATE AND ADMINISTRATION,

Three hundred and twelve (312) grants were made by the Court being:—

Probate

Letters of Administration

145

167

312

The figures in 1929 were respectively 120 and 188.

Court fees amounted to $17,367.25 and Official Administra- tor's Commission to $691.45. The figures in

in 1929 were $21,531.80 and $3,447 65 respectively.

During the year there were 68 Deceased Estates Accounts on the Court Books. The cash balance was $8,336.81.

48 Accounts were Accounts were opened. Account.

closed during the year and 37 new No Estate was transferred to Trust

G 3

7.-OFFICIAL TRUSTS.

The number of Trust Estates in the hands of the Official Trustee at the end of the year was 22. The invested funds totalled $199,226.40 and the cash balance $8,537.45. One trust was wound up during the year, and no new trusts were

opened.

The amount of commission collected was $122.40 as against $247.50 in 1929.

8

REGISTRAR OF COMPANIES.

On the 31st December there were 572 companies on the Hong Kong Register, of which 68 were in course of liquidation.

During the year 63 new companies were put on the Register and 37 struck off. Two companies were transferred from the Hong Kong to the Shanghai Register.

The fees collected in respect of "China" companies amount- ed to $125,297.92, and those in respect of other companies to $17,472.60.

Two firms were registered under the Chinese Partnerships Ordinance, 1911, and no firm was registered under the Limited Partnerships Ordinance, 1912.

Deposits to the total value of $3,946,666 have been made by Insurance Companies under the Fire and Marine Insurance Companies Deposit Ordinance, 1917.

9. FEES AND COMMISSION.

The total sum collected during the year by way of fees and commission amounted to $95,560.75 as against $102,876.25 in the previous year.

10. STAFF.

His Honour Sir Henry C. Gollan, Kt., C.B.E., proceeded on leave on 9th. April, prior to retirement on pension. He retired on pension on 1st August.

His Honour Sir Joseph H. Kemp, Kt., C.B.E., acted as Chief Justice from 9th April to 31st July, and was appointed Chief Justice on 1st August.

His Honour Sir Joseph H. Kemp, Kt. C.B.E., was absent on long leave from 30th August to end of year. His Honour Mr. J. R. Wood, Puisne Judge, acted as Chief Justice during this period and Mr. P. Jacks, Land Officer, acted as Puisne Judge.

Tablé showing total number of Cases dealt with and Expenditure and Revenue of the Supreme Court.

(From 1920 to 1930).

Expenditure

Revenue

Total

Number

Year.

of cases

dealt with

Total

Increase

Decrease

Total

Increase Decrease

Percentage

of Revenue

to

Expenditure

$

C.

$

$

c.

C.

%

1920.

872

113,082.79

14,238.56

*55,957.31

5,348.56

49

1921.

851

118,782.72

5,699.93

*58,830.97

2,873.66

49

1922

827

126,424.34

7,641.62

*60,448.59

1,617.62

47

1923

962

128,838,62

2,414.28

*69,955.20

9,506.61

54

1924

1,549

136,136.69

7,298.07

*89,624.99

19,669.79

65

1925

1,908

150,698,14 14,561.45

*121,606.20

31,981.21

80

1926

3,416

133,680.40

17,017.74 *117,252.61

4,353.59

87

1927

2,267 141,493.29

1928

1929

1970

218,933.24

7,812.89 2,330 165,114.93 23,621.64 2,303 167,632.95 6,518.02 2,016

*96,254.96

20,997.65

68

*101,624.20

5,369.24

62

*102,876.25

1,252.05

61

51,300.29

*95,560.75

7,315.50

44

*Not including amounts paid direct to Treasury for fees in respect of Licences to keep Local Registers and China Companies Fees by the Registrar of Companies under the Companies Ordinances, 1911 and 1925.

23rd MARCH, 1981.

E. P. H. LANG, Registrar, Supreme Court.

G 4-

Appendix G (1).

REPORT OF THE OFFICIAL RECEIVER AND

REGISTRAR OF TRADE MARKS AND LETTERS

PATENT FOR THE YEAR 1930.

BANKRUPTCY.

New Business.

1. The number of petitions filed during the year exceeded by five those in 1929. The assets collected were very consider- ably larger, amounting approximately to $830,000.00. This large increase is principally accounted for by sums received in connection with the liquidation of the Industrial and Commercial Bank Limited. This liquidation also accounted for a corres- ponding increase in the estimated amount of liabilities.

Fees.

2. The fees received for Official Receiver's commission amounted approximately to $11,600.00 Fees payable in stamps, which go through the books of the Supreme Court, also increased about 20 per cent.

Bankruptcy Discharges.

3. Six discharges were granted during the year, subject in each case to short suspensions. No applications for discharge. were refused.

Companies Winding-up.

4. One compulsory winding-up order was made during the course of the year.

G (1) 2

5. Comparative figures for the years 1929 and 1930 are

given below:-

COMPANIES LIQUIDATION.

BANKRUPTCY.

Year.

Petitions for

winding up.

Winding up

Orders.

Total Number of Petitions.

Creditors'

Petitions.

Debtors'

Petitions.

Total Number of Receiving Orders.

Public Examina- tions.

Adjudications.

Arrangement.

Schemes of

Petitions

withdrawn.

Petitions

dismissed.

Petitions

consolidated.

1930

1929

1 1

20

14

6 12

αι

12



15

12

3

11

9

14

Ι

Year.

Granted.

Discharges

Receiving Orders rescinded.

Adjudications annulled.

1930

CO

1929

2

1

:

Assets for dis- tribution.

Estimated liabilities.

:

CO

:

:

Fees in Stamps.

Official Receiver's

Com- mission.

Unclaimed balances transferred to General

Revenue.

C.

$ C.

$

C.

$

C.

C.

830,536.39 3,796,001.67

5,225.25

11,651.13

793.92

71,067.15 254,725.41 4,073.25 9,498.27

65,968.39

TRADE MARKS.

Revenue.

6. The revenue derived from the registration of trade marks again showed a slight increase over the preceding year.

Opposed Registrations and Appeals.

Four applications for registration of trade marks were opposed during the year. In two cases the applications to register were withdrawn, in another the opposition succeeded,

G (1) 3

and the fourth case was pending at the end of the year. There were no appeals to the Court from the Registrar's decision.

Total No. of Total No of

Total amount of

fees.

applications for

registration

Year.

Registration of

certificates

trade marks.

granted.

1930

612

432

$11,635.31

1929

492

477

$11,105.00

Registration of Letters Patent.

8. Particulars of the revenue under this heading are given

below:

Year.

1930

1929

Total Number of Patents registered.

Total amount of

fees.

16

40

$140.50

$218.00

Total Revenue and Expenditure.

9. The following are tables of revenue and expenditure for the department for the years 1930 and 1929 respectively. (including salaries of officers met from the Junior Clerical Service

vote): -

Total Revenue.

1930 $23,426.94

1929 $20,821.27

Total Expenditure.

Excess of Revenue.

$36,231.08

$

Excess of Expenditure, $12,804.14

$18,190.67

$2,630.60

$

The increase in expenditure is accounted for by the necessity for providing acting pay, the revision of salaries, and the fall in exchange.

10. The Official Receiver was on leave from the 7th March until the end of the year, and during his absence Mr. E. P. H. Lang, Deputy Registrar, acted in this post.

E. L. AGASSIZ,

Official Receiver and Registrar of Trade Marks and Letters Patent.

Hong Kong, 14th March, 1931.



Appendix H.

REPORT OF THE POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS FOR THE YEAR 1930.

Victoria

Mr. E. W. Hamilton acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st January to 28th February.

Mr. R. E. Lindsell acted as First Police Magistrate and Coroner from the 1st March to the end of the year.

Mr. A. W. G. H.

Grantham acted as Second Police

Magistrate from the 1st January to 15th July.

Mr. H. R. Butters acted as Second Police Magistrate from 16th July to 21st September.

Mr. E. H. Williams acted as Second Police Magistrate from 22nd September to the end of the year.

Major C. Willson O.B.E. went on leave from 29th March and retired on pension from 29th August.

Mr. D. Ogilvie acted as First Clerk from 16th May to 30th September.

Mr. D. A. Rushton acted as First Clerk from the 1st October to the end of the year.

Kowloon

Mr. T. S. Whyte-Smith acted as Police Magistrate from 1st January to 21st September.

Mr. H. R. Butters acted as Police Magistrate from 22nd September to the end of the year.

Mr. D. Ogilvie acted as First Clerk from 1st January to 14th May.

Mr. W. F. Kerr acted as First Clerk from 15th May to the end of the year.

H 2

The number of cases was 38.646 as compared with 31,588 in 1929 and the Revenue was $148,473.82 as compared with $140,810.13 in 1929.

Table I shows the total number of cases tried and the Revenue and Expenditure of the Magistracy for the years 1921- 1930. Since 1921 the salaries of Cadet Officers acting as Police Magistrates have been paid out of the Cadet Service vote, since 1926 the Junior Clerks' salaries from the Junior Clerical Service vote, and since 1927 the First Clerk's salaries from, the Senior Clerical and Accounting Staff Vote; the figures given in the expenditure column of the table include these salaries.

Table II gives a return of Punishments awarded in respect of different classes of offences during the year.

Table III gives an abstract of cases under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the year.

Table IV shows the number of offences under various Ordinances tried during the year.

Table V gives an abstract of cases brought under cognizance of the Police Magistrates' Courts during the last ten years.

9th April, 1931.

W. SCHOFIELD, First Police Magistrate.

Table I.

Table showing total Number of Cases tried in, and Expenditure and Revenue of the Magistracies for the years 1929 to 1930, exclusive of New Territories Courts.

EXPENDITURE.

REVENUE.

YEAR.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total.

Increase.

Decrease.

Total

Number

of Cases

tried.

Percentage of Ex-

penditure to Revenue.



$

$

$

C.

की

C.

$

C.

%

1921.

48,664,59

3,124.65

149,195.72

46,063.21

17,374

32.62

1922

51,880.03

3,215.44

159,928.50

10,832.68

18,221

32.50

1923.

50,158.91

1,721,12

184,926.15 24 998.65

21,811

27.12

1924.

61,364,58

11,205.67

261,372.23

76,446 08

27,877

23.47

1925.

68,548.55

7,183.97

211,227.43

50,144.80

25,989

32.45

1926.

60,794.21

7,754.34

233,529.18

22,301,75

30,516

26.03

1927

64,605.92

3,811.71

223,811.97

9,717.21

32,122

28.86

1928.

65,094.10

488.18

163,216,82

60,595.15

28,468

39.88

1929

60,153.85

4,940,25

140,810,13

22,406.69

31,558

42.72

1930...

89,299.69

-29,145.84

148,473,82

7,663 69

38,017

60.15

H 3

Table II.

HONG KONG, KOWLOON AND NEW TERRITORIES.

RETURN of PUNISHMENTS awarded in respect of CERTAIN CLASSES of OFFENCES, during the Year.

PUNISHMENTS.

Description.

Fines,

Imprisonment in lieu

of fine or security,..

29,250

170

2

1,730

148

2,850

24,349

132

1

1

6

£3

38

Peremptory Imprison-

ment,

5,470

215

14

95

2,073

937

Whipping,

462

13

1

9

174

45

Juvenile Prison,

52

:

1

24

Expelled from the

Colony,

:

:

Sentenced to House of

Detention,

41

་་་

Bound over with or

without Sureties,

462

210

2

36

TOTAL..

35,873

609

22

1,836

2,461

3,919

...

:.

2,136

220

25

— H 4 —

4

41

2

211

2

27,024

CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENCES.

- H 5

Table III.

ABSTRACT OF CASES under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' COURTS during the Year 1930. CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE DEFENDANTS UNDER EACH HEAD.

Ordered to find Security.

WRITS ISSUED BY THE POLICE MAGISTRATES

DURING THE YEAR,

Warrants.

TOTAL NUMBER

OF CASES.

TOTAL NUMBER OF

DEFENDANTS.

Convicted and

Punished.

Discharged.

Committed for Trial

at the Supreme Court.

Committed to Prison

or Detained pending Orders of H.E. the Governor.

To keep the Peace.

F. M. F. M. F M. F.

M. F.

M.

other offences

646

798

337

62 164 16 9

31

39

20

531 2,040 1,810 26

2,948 | 3,106| 2,376

3

14

3

196 8

48

603

29 14

Assaults and against the person, Malicious injuries to property, Gambling,

Offences against property other

than malicious injuries to property or predial larceny, Offences against Revenue Acts, Highway Acts; Health Acts, and other Acts, relating to the social economy of the Colony,

Offences against. Opium Ordin- ances Nos. 30 of 1923, and 7 of 1924

Offences against Masters and. Servants Acts, including Acts, relating to indentured coo- lies,.... Other offences,

2,952) 3,098

2,395 223

445

29

980 1,451

1,210 89

134

17

To be of Good Behaviour.

M.

157

5.33

1

...

:

:

:

:

165 25

326 30

:

:

:

:

10

:

:

:

ごて

:

:

2

ลง

ลง

:

:

:

22

10

11

30,548 31,787 25,238 1576) 4,366|365

22

Total,

38,616 12,325 33,387 2024 5,931 | 464

48

24

2222223

:

To answer

any Charge.

Witnesses punished for preferring False Charge or giving wilful

False Testimony.

Undecided.

F. J.

F.

13 2

1

-:

26

:

:

:

Defendants. Total Number of

M.

k.

M.

F

M.

F.

:

6

CO

Summons for Defendants.

Summons for Witnesses.

Notices of Re-hearing.

Arrest.

Distress.

Search.

For entering

Gambling Houses.

Magistrates Orders.

TOTAL.

96 15,540 | 56 | 2306|52|532 278

708

39

2,006

34

3,028

79

12

2,852

253

1,344

107

41 | 16,807

10

1

:

2

כאן

J

15

60

19

21

30

30

76

:

:

|29,873|1,972

13

95

|39,860|2,542 |15,540 56

2306 52 | 532 278

4116,807

* TOTAL MALES AND FEMALES,

42.402

* Consisting of Offenders not sentenced to Imprisonment.

OFFENCES.

Table IV.

POLICE COURTS.

LIST of OFFENCES TRIED during the year 1930.

NO. OF CASES.

No. of DEFEND-

ANTS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

No. OF

DEFEND-

CASES.

ANTS.

Brought forward

250

311

Accessories and Abettors Ordinance-3 of 1865

Advertisement Regulation Ordinance-19 of 1912

Arms and Ammunition Ordinance-2 of 1900,—

Contraventions of

2

2

Criminal Intimidation Ordinance-13 of 1920.

8

14

1

...

1

Dangerous Goods Ordinance-1 of 1873,—

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder

62

65

50

52

Dangerous Drugs Ordinance-4 of 1928

16

20

Asiatic Emigration Ordinance-30 of 1915

23

22

22

Defence (Sketching Prevention) Ordinance-1 of 1895

2

01

2

I

Bankruptcy Ordinance-7 of 1891

Births and Deaths Ordinance-7 of 1896

10

22

Deportation Ordinance- 25 of 1917

246

253

4

4

Dogs Ordinance-21 of 1927,-

Contraventions of

540

529

H 6 -

Boarding House Ordinance-23 of 1917

14

14

Emergency Regulations Ordinance-5 of 1922

15

22

Chinese Emigration Ordinance-1 of 1889......

3

3

Employers and Servants Ordinance-45 of 1902,—

Chinese Extradition Ordinance-7 of 1889

1

3

Proceedings under

16

15

Chinese Marriage Preservation Ordinance-42 of 1912

14

15

Ferry Ordinance-28 of 1917

2

2

Chinese Temples Ordinance-7 of 1928

3

Female Domestic Service Ordinance-1 of 1923

35

32

Coinage Offences Ordinance-7 of 1865,—

Forest Officers Ordinance-32 of 1923

1

1

Offences relating to the King's gold and silver

coin, (Sections 3-12)

16

15

Forgery Ordinance-11 of 1922—(Sections 4—8)......

Uttering forged bank notes, (Section

19

9).

Common Law Offences

110

155

(

91

10-15)..

23

***

6

2-20

20

7

29

Carried forward

250

311

Carried forwarå

1,241

1,322

OFFENCES.

Table IV,-Continued.

List of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

No. of

CASES.

No OF

DEFEND-

ANTY.

OFFENCES.

NO. OF

CASES.

No. of

DEFEND-

ANTS.

— H 7 —

Brought forward

1,241

1,322

Brought forward

3,765

5,414

Fugitive Offenders Act., 1881

5

5

Gambling Ordinance-2 of 1891,-

Larceny from the person and similar Offences, (Fections 29-37)

286

301

Contraventions of and Offences under

531 2,040

Gunpowder and Fireworks Ordinance-14 of 1901,— Contraventions of and Offences under.

Sacrilege. Burglary and house breaking, (Sections 38-47)

79

85

67

67

Larceny in dwelling houses, (Sections 48-49),

80

93

Importation and Exportation Ordinance-32 of 1915

4

4

}}

in ships, Wharves, &c., (Sections 50-53)

8

00

8

Indecent Exhibition Ordinance-3 of 1918

7

6

"1

Interpretation Ordinance- 31 of 1911

or embezzlement by clerks, servants, &c., (Sections 54-60)

96

98

8

Industrial Employment of Children Ordinance— 22 of 1922

Frauds by bankers, agents, &c., (Sections 62-74)

24

25

88 198

Larceny Ordinance-5 of 1865,-

Obtaining property by false pretences, (Sections 75-78)

74

79

Larceny by Bailee (Section 4)

7

7

Receiving stolen property, (Sections 79–87)..

404

431

Simple Larceny

1,773

1,799

Larceny of cattle and other animals, (Sections 9-17).

Apprehension of Offenders and other procedings, (Sections 91-97)

1

1

16

15

Licensing Ordinance--8 of 1887,-

Contraventions of and Offences under

""

of things attached to or growing on land, (Sections 22-28)

6,269

6,331

100

164

of Regulations made thereunder.

4,192

4,221

Carried forward

3,765

5,444

Carried forward

15,278 17,117

:

OFFENCES.

Brought forward

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

Liquor Licence Ordinance-9 of 1911,- Contraventions of and Offences under Part I,

NUMBER

OF

CASES.

NO. OF

DEFEND.

ANTS,

15,278

17,117

OFFENCES.

Brought forward

Marrried Women (Maintenance in case of desertion) Ordinance-10 of 1905,-

NUMBER

OF

No. of

DEFEND

CASES.

ANTS.

16,701

18,593.

H 8

ww

(Sections 3-10)

170

179

Proceedings under

2

2

Part II, (Sections 41-73)

24

24

Merchant Shipping Ordinance-10 of 1899,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder

45

82

"

III, (

"

71-96)

25

19

Liquor Amendment Ordinance-16 of 1927

112

130

Merchandise Marks Ordinance-4 of 1890.— Contraventions of and Offences under

7

Magistrates Ordinance-3 of 1890,-

Offences under

1,033

1,059

Misdemeanour Punishment Ordinance-1 of 1898,- Offences under ........

66

66

Maintenance Order Ordinance-9 of 1921

1

Malicious Damage Ordinance-6 of 1865.-

New Territories (Regulations) Ordinance-34 of 1910 Obscene Publication Ordinance-15 of 1914

1

1

2

1

Injuries by fire to buildings and goods therein,

(Sections 2-9).

1

Offences against the person Ordinance-2 of 1865,- Homicide, (Sections 2-9)

...

Miscellaneous injuries, (Sections 31-44)

23

29

Acts causing or tending to cause danger to life, &c., (Sections 16-31)

46

65

Injuries by Fire to Buildings and Goods therein, (Sections 10-11)..

6

2

Assaults, (Sections 32-43)

452

571

Forcible taking or detention of persons, (Sections

Injuries to Machinery, etc., (Section 15) Marine Store Protection Ordinance-13 of 1919

1

1

44-45)

77

87

27

27

Amendment, 9 of 1913

1

3

Carried forward

16,701

18,593

Carried forward

17,406

19,484

OFFENCES.

Table IV,-Continued.

LIST of OFFENCES, ETC.,- Continued.

NUMBER

OF

No. of

DEFEND-

CASES.

ANTS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

CASES.

No. of

DEFEND-

ANTS.

# 9

Brought forward

17,406

19,484

Brought forward

18,496

21,027

Opium Ordinance-30 of 1923.–

Contraventions of, Part III, (Sections 9-20)...

717 1,157

Protection of Women and Girls Ordinance-1 of 1897,-Offences under

157

174

Ordinance-7 of 1924 (Raw Opium)

263

294

Public Health and Buildings Ordinance-1 of 1903,- Contraventions of Part I, (Sections 1-7)

8

...

Pawn Brokers Ordinance-1 of 1860,-

Contraventions of

62

50

II, (

8-95)

829

893

Perjury Ordinance-21 of 1922.

2

III, (

96-250)

79

109

Piracy Section 7 Will VI and I Vict. Chap. 88

1

1

11

19

VI, (

255-264)

64

78

19

Place of Public Entertainment-22 of 1919

4

4

Failure to comply with B. A. Notice

44

41

Plant Ordinance-11 of 1920

1

1

S. B.

245

-246

""

";

Police Force Ordinance-11 of 1900,- Offences under

Public Health Ordinance Amendment

1

1

23

17

Police Supervision Ordinance -5 of 1923

1

Public Places Regulation Ordinance-2 of 1870,- Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder

16

35

Post Office Ordinance-7 of 1926,-

Railway Ordinance-21 of 1909

10

Contraventions of and Offences under

11

11

Registration of Persons Ordinance-35 of 1923

16

99

8

14

Prevention of Cirme Ordinance-4 of 1887

Printers and Publishers Ordinance-25 of 1927

Prison Ordinance-15 of 1923,-

Offences under

Carried forward

1

1

Regulation of Chinese Ordinance-3 of 1888,- Offences under Part V, (Sections 22-28).

536

542

11

}}

VII, {

50-51)

3

4

1

18,496

21,027

Carried forward

20,504

23,183

OFFENCES.

Table IV,—Continued.

List of OFFENCES, ETC.,—Continued.

NUMBER

OF

CASES.

No. of

DEFEND-

ANTS.

OFFENCES.

No. of

CASES.

NO. OF

DEFEND-

ANTS.

- 10

Brought forward,

20,504

23,183

Brought forward

29,475

33,038

Rogue and Vagabond 5 Geo. IV, c. 83

17

17

Theatre and Public Performances Ordinance- 18 of 1908

3

3

Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance--8 of 1896

1

1

Tobacco Ordinance-10 of 1916

216

255

Seditious Publication Ordinance-6 of 1914

33

38

Vagrancy Ordinance-9 of 1897,-

Servant Quarters Ordinance-11 of 1903,- Offences under

Proceedings under

51

58

Societies Ordinance-8 of 1920

2

25

of 1912,-

Vehicles and Traffic Regulation Ordinance-40

Contraventions of Regulations made thereunder...

Stamp Ordinance-8 of 1921,— Offences under

and Offences

""

"

14

14

Volunteer Ordinance 2 of 1920

Stowaways Ordinance-5 of 1903.—

Offences under

52

158

Watchman Ordinance-6 of 1928,

7,792

7,879

...

968

972

2

2

6

Summary Offences Ordinance-1 of 1845,-

Water Works Ordinance-16 of 1903,—

Offences under

86

90

Nuisances, Trespasses and Similar Offences, (Sections 3-21)

8,058

8,581

Weights and Measures Ordinance-2 of 1885,~ Contraventions of and Offences under

Offences against good order, (Sections 22-35)...

236

426

Wild Birds and Game preservation Ord.—6 of 1885

Possession of stolen goods, (Sections 36–41) Suppression of Piracy Ordinance-1 of 1868

556

593

Wireless Telegraphy Ordinance-11 of 1926..

1

1

Undecided Cases

6

9

4

92

95

Carried forward

29,475

33,038

TOTAL

38.738

42.417

Year

H 11

Table V.

4.- ABSTRACT of CASES brought under COGNIZANCE of the POLICE MAGISTRATES' Courts during a period of ten years 1921-1930.

CASES, HOW DISPOSED OF, AND THE NUMBER OF MALE AND FEMALE Defendants UNDER EACH HEAD.

Total number

of

cases.

Convicted and punished.

Did

not appear and

absconded.

Discharged.

Commit- ted for trial at

Committed to prison or detained pending or der of His

Supreme Excellency

Court.

the Governor.

Ordered to find security

To keep the

peace, to be of

good beha- viour, and to answer any charge.

Escaped before being

brought

for trial at

the Ma-

gistracy.

Escaped.

Punished for

preferring false charge or giving false testimony.

Undecided.

Total number

of defendants.

1

2

3

5 16

8

10

12 13 14 15

16

17

18

19

20

21

M.

F.

M.

F. 31. F. M. F.

M.

F.

M.

M.

F

M. M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

1921,

17,374

1922, 18,535 18,338 614

18,726 695

2,247

151 85

00

8

2,018

76198

1923,

21,720 22,375 356

3,190

72 246

1924,

27.724 28,708 859

5,154

172 171

6

:

:

:

1925,

25,790 25,896 | 1,595

4,099

242178 2

246

264 17

376 38

323 23

178

30

5

:

Total, 111,143 | 114,643 | 4,119

16,708

718878 16

5

:

1,382 113

Averave Jer Year,

[22,228.6 (22,928-6 | 823·8 | 3,341.6 | 142,6 175-65-2

1

276 4 22-6

31,360 1,379 3,540 149

1926,

30,516

32,122

33,114 | 1,306

1927,

1928, 28,468

33333

83

3,501 160 93

26,1911,005 3,157 222 84

1929,

1930,

31,558

38,646

27,308 1,323 4,872 203 135

33,387 | 2,024

5,931 464

48

408 64

521

49

1

6

575 35

6

461

54

:

لم

5

410 52

:

:



:..

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:



Total... 161,310151,360 |7,037 21,001 1,198 443

17

32,262 30,272 1,407.4 4,200.22396 88.6| +4 3.4

272,453 266,003 11,156 37,709 1,911 1,321 18 22

1473 26,600-3 [1,115 6 3,7709 | 191.1 132.1 1-8 2.2

:

:

2,370 254

00

8

474 50.8 1.6

3,752 367

00

375-2 36 7 .8

CI

1

:

38 5

21,275 864

35

20,835 722

98

5

26,773

450

176

15

34,585 1,090

200

30,096 1,864

1

517

29

134,164 4,990



•2

109-4

5-826,832.8 998

:..

:

123

35,509 | 1,592

100

37,380 1,516

135

30,148 1,263

44

32,832 1,580

95

39,862 2,542

497

175,681|8,493

99.4

35,136.2 1,698,6

1,044

29

309,845 13,483

104.4

2.9

30,984-5 1,348.3

SUPREME COURT AND MAGISTRACY.

COMPARATIVE TABLE showing the Number of Offences, Apprehensions, Couvictions, and Acquittals for the last Four Years.

1927.

1928.

1929

1930.

- H 12

The number of persons apprehended by the Police or summoned before the Police Magistrates

38.746

31,276

34,368

42,325

The number of summary convictions :-

1. For Offences against the person..

398

249

288

399

2. Gambling..

2,140

1,685

1,626

1,836

3. For Offences against the property other than predial larceny

1,713

2,067

2,111

2,424

4. For other Offences

23,409

22,651

23,874

29,453

5. For Opium Offences

6,760

544

732

1,299

The number of persons acquitted in the Inferior Courts

3,661

3,379

5,075

6,395

Appendix I

REPORT OF THE LAND OFFICER FOR THE YEAR 1930.

I.-REGISTRATION.

1.—(1) During the year five thousand five hundred and seventeen (5,517) instruments were registered under the provi- sions of Ordinance No. 1 of 1844,-an increase of 1,267 on the preceding year.

(2) The total number of instruments registered under the provisions of the above mentioned Ordinance (since 1844) to the end of the year 1930 was 122,893.

(3) The number of instruments registered each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

2. The total consideration on sales, mortgages, surrenders and miscellaneous land transactions amounted to $130,058,744.19 particulars of which are shewn in Table II.

II. GRANTS OF LAND.

1. The total area of land leased during the year under review was 632 Acres and 5.9/10 poles, of which 458 Acres, 1 Rood and 23 poles were dealt with by the District Officers.

2. Particulars of grants surrenders and resumptions during the year are shewn on pages W 1 and 2 of the Blue Book for 1930.

III.--SURRENDERS.

Seventy four (74) Surrenders of land required for public. purposes (including Surrenders under Contracts of Exchange) were prepared and registered in the Land Office, the total con- sideration for those required for public purposes amounting to 1,145,705.50.

IV. CROWN LEASES.

1. Eight hundred and seventy four (874) Crown Leases were issued during the year, as against 242 in the previous year-an increase of 632 particulars are set out in Table III.

2. The number of leases issued each year during the last ten years is shewn in Table I.

I 2

V.-FEES.

1. The total amount of fees collected (exclusive of the New Territories) amounted to $116,854.75 being an increase of $40,724.25 on the preceding year. Table IV shews the Monthly Revenue.

2. Land Registration Fees in the New Territories amounted to $7,610.30 and Crown Lease Fees to $90.00.

3. The total fees collected during the past ten years is shewn in Table V.

VI. STAMP DUTIES.

1. Stamp Duties paid on registered documents (exclusive of Probates and Letters of Administration) amounted to $669,124.15.

2. Stamp Duties on Probates and Letters of Administra- tion registered amounted to $509,316.20.

VII.-CROWN RENTS.

1.-(1) The number of lots entered on the Hong Kong and Kowloon Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VI-was 6,521 an increase of 395 on the preceding year.

(2) The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $623,431.66 -an increase on the preceding year of $18,888.04,

2. (1) The number of lots entered on the Village Crown Rent Roll-as shewn in Table VII--was 3,241-the same as the preceding year.

(2) The Crown Rents on this Roll amounted to $1,753.55 the same as in the preceding year.

3.-(1) The total Crown Rents amounted to $625,185.21 an increase of $18,888.04 on the year 1929.

(2) The increase was occasioned by the sale of new lots and revision of Crown Rents.

I 3

་་

VIII. DOCUMENTS.

One thousand seven hundred and forty three (1,743) mis- cellaneous documents were prepared in the Land Office during the year, being an increase of 956 on the year 1929; viz:

(a) Eight hundred and seventy four (874) Crown Leases

(with Counterparts).

(b) Four hundred and ninety six (496) Memorials for the registration of Undertakings relating to Veran- dahs and Balconies over Crown Land.

(c) Seventy four (74) Surrenders of land required for public purposes, street improvements and private Exchanges.

(d) Two (2) Deeds of Covenant relating to Scavenging

Lanes.

(e) Two hundred and eighty (280) Agreements for

leases, exchanges, surrenders and Permits.

(f) Seventeen (17) Memorials of Re-entry.

IX. STAFF.

Mr. P. Jacks was appointed Acting Puisne Judge on 30th August and Lt. Col. F. Eaves acted as Land Officer and Mr. W. J. Lockhart Smith as Assistant Land Officer from that date until 7th November when Mr. T. M. Hazlerigg was appoint- ed Acting Land Officer.

Mr. T. G. Stokes was transfered from the Audit Depart- ment on 13th October to relieve Mr. W. J. Lockhart Smith who proceeded on leave in the middle of January, 1931.

30th January, 1931.

T. M. HAZLERIGG,

Land Officer.

Î 4

Table I.

NUMBER OF INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED AND CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEARS 1921 To 1930.

Year. Instruments registered

Crown Leases granted.

1921

4,466

84

1922

4,146

207

1923

6,837

209

1924

6,000

90

1925

4,226

178

1926

4,360

250

1927

4.628

196

1928

4,798

235

1929

4,250

242

1930

5,517

874

Table II.

CONSIDERATION ON INSTRUMENTS REGISTERED IN THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1930.

No. of Lots

Description of

Instruments.

Number registered.

or portions

of Lots affected.

Total Consideration.

$

e.

Assignments

1,872

2,024

49,092,979.92

Mortgages and Transfer of

Mortgages

1,264

1,684

44,369,654.88

Reassignments and Certi-

ficates of Satisfaction

1,131

1,631

34,767,445.68

Surrenders

74

93

1,145,705.50

Judgments and Orders of

Court

36

62

Miscellaneous Documents

844

1,174

232,459.67 450,498.54

Probates and Letters of)

Administration, (Stamp Duties $509,316.20) ...)

. 116

391

8,208.85

Total

5,517

6,059

130,058,744.19

I 5

Table III.

CROWN LEASES GRANTED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

Hong Kong.

Kowloon.

New Kowloon.

Total.

Marine

Inland

Rural Building

Shaukiwan Inland

Aberdeen Inland

Aplichau Inland

Aplichau Marine

Hunghom Inland

Kowloon Marine

Kowloon Inland

New Kowloon Marine

New Kowloon Inland

New Kowloon Dairy Farm

New Kowloon Pier

Total

23 226 7 1 3

1

4 2 185

1

415

1

874

Table IV.

RETURN OF MONTHLY REVENUE PAID IN STAMPS TO THE LAND OFFICE DURING THE YEAR 1930.

Searches

Registration

Month.

of Deeds.

Copy Documents

Crown

Lease

Total.

and Certi-

Fees:

fications.

C.

$

C

$

C.

$

C.

January

6,524.00

593.00

1,552.00

8,669.00

February

4,299.00

289.00

1,720.00

6,308.00

March

6,275.00

546.75

2,730.00

9,551.75

April

5,291.00

482.00 2,160.00

7,933.00

May

6,559.00

606.00 2,940.00

10,105.00

June

7,353.00

675.50

2,670.00

10,698.50

July

7,394.00

703.00

1,860.00 |

9,957.00

August

7.433.00

541.00

1,740.00

9,714.00

September

8,277.00

747.50

2,070.00

11,094.50

October

9,441.00

667.00 2,550.00

12,658.00

November December

7,323.00

613.00 1,830.00

9,766.00

8,170.00

580.00 1,650.00

10,400.00

Totals:-

-

84,339.00

7,043.75 25,472.00

116,854.75

$116,854.75 76,130.50

1930 Total.

1929 Total.

$ 40,724.25

Increase.

— Í 6 -

Table V.

FEES COLLECTED DURING THE YEARS 1921 to 1930.

Year.

Registration

of Deeds.

Searches

and Copies Grants of

of Docu-

ments.

Leases.

Total.

C.

$

c.

$

C.

$ c.

1921

70,617.00

4,235.00

2,685.00

77,537.00

1922

65,407.00 4,683.50 5,550.00

75,640.00

1923

109,671.00 7,280.00

6,680.00

123,631.00

1924

93,304.00

5,824.25 2,470.00

101,598.25

1925

65,068.00

4,778.75

5,210.00

75,056.75

1926

65,843.00

4,443.00 7,635.00

77,921.00

1927

67,115.00

5,050.50 5,442.00

77,607.50

1928

72.815.00

6,640.00 6,630.00

86,085.00

1929

63,478.00

5,498.50

7,100.00

76,076.50

1930

84,339.00 7,043.75 | 25,472.00

116,854.75

I 7

Table VI.

HONG KONG AND KOWLOON RENT ROLL.

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown Rent.

$

C.

Victoria Marine Lot

385

82,159.34

""

Praya Reclamation Marine

Lot

59

Inland Lot

2,460

5,585.91 236,956.48

Quarry Bay Marine Lot

2

18,458.00

Inland Lot

13

Victoria Farm Lot

8

4,166.00 401.55

Garden Lot

44

Rural Building Lot

215

1,485.00 37,839.58

Aberdeen Marine Lot

5

579.16

Inland Lot

80

1,093.16

Aplichau Marine Lot

24

152.84

Inland Lot

40

263.48

Shaukiwan Marine Lot

10

1,928.00

Inland Lot

221

4,485.43

Stanley Inland Lot

4

4.00

Kowloon Marine Lot

57

48,841.00

Inland Lot

1,483

96,477.23

Garden Lot

11

1

1.00

Hung Hom Marine Lot

Inland Lot

Sheko Inland Lot

Tai Tam Inland Lot Tong Po Inland Lot

New Kowloon Marine Lot

2

6,140.00

153

9,067.00

3

9.00

1

1.00

1

1.00

3

Inland Lot

19

1,199

Farm Lot

Rural Building Lot

Tai Po Inland Lot

4IT245

1

7

2

19,024.00 38,605.00

135.50 42.00 436.00 1,192.00

918.00

Fan Ling Lot

Sheung Shui Lot

Ping Chau Farm Lot

Mining Lot

1

302.00

Tsun Wan Marine Lot

4

4,134.00

Inland Lot

་་

9

1,786.00

New Kowloon Dairy Farm Lot

14

680.00

Tsing T Marine Lot

1

Total

6,521

82.00

623,431.66

I 8

Table VII.

VILLAGE RENT ROLL,

Locality and Description.

No. of Lots.

Total Crown

Rent.

$

C.

Wongneichung

1

Aberdeen

18

1.00 70.50

Pokfulam

24

28.25

Tai Hang

157

633.50

Ah Kung Ngam

25

18.25

Shaukiwan

27

15.00

Ma Tau Wei

81.

150.00

Hau Pui Loong

13

49.50

Wong Tsuk Hang

2

34.50

Tai Hang Stream

16

67.00

Little Hong Kong

1

2.00

Tong Po

1

2.50

Stanley

9

18.00

Tytam

1

3.50

Tvtam Tuk

3

2.50

Shek O

8

23.00

Chung Hom Bay

1

3.00

Chinese Joss House, Bowen Road

Victoria

1

3.00

Aplichau

42

75.00

Telegraph Bay

13

43.50

Little Hong Kong

1,577

280.25

Shek O

315

68.00

Hok Tsui

182

36.00

Chai Wan

723

125.80

Total

3,241

1,753.55

I 9



REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR OF MARRIAGES FOR THE YEAR 1930.

MARRIAGES.

1. The number of Marriages celebrated in the Colony during the year was 187 (of which 85 were between Chinese persons) as compared with 225 (and 94) respectively in 1929-a decrease of 38. Particulars are given in Table I.

FEES.

2. The total amount of Fees received under the Second Schedule of the Marriage Ordinance, 1875, was $2,059 as compared with $2,440.75 in 1929-a decrease of $381.75 Parti- culars are shewn in Table II.

30th January, 1931.

T. M. HAZLERIGG,

Registrar of Marriages.

Table I.

(1) Marriages by SPECIAL LICENCE, 25.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages.

17.

8.

(2). Marriages by REGISTRAR'S CERTIFICATE. 162.

(a) At Licenced Places of

Public Worship.

123.

(b) At the Office of the

Registrar of Marriages.

39.

-I 10

Table II.

FEES RECEIVED DURING 1930.

Fee.

Total Fees.

173 Certificates of Notice

(Registrar's Certificates)

@

$1.00

173.00

5 Searches

@

$1.00

5.00

31 Certified Copies

@

$1.00

31.00

4 Licences to Registrar of Marriages to issue his

@ $10.00

40.00

Certificates

25 Special Licences

$50.00

1,250.00

56 Marriages at the Office of

the Registrar

@ $10.00

560.00

Total

$2,059.00

Appendix J.

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1930.

A. NORTHERN DISTRICT.

I.--STAFF.

Mr. J. A. Fraser went on leave on 15th March. 1930, and his place was taken by Mr. E. I. Wynne-Jones, who was in charge for the remainder of the year.

The system of combined control of Northern and Southern Districts was discontinued as from 18th July, 1930.

II.

MAGISTRACY.

Table A shows the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

The number of Police cases heard increased from 477 in 1929 to 629 in 1930. This is the highest total recorded.

The increase was mostly due to Traffic and Tobacco cases, 61 as against 20 in 1929 of the former and 236 as against 203 in 1929 of the latter.

Most of the Tobacco cases were committed by women of the poorer class, obviously employed by smuggling syndicates in Chinese Territory. 24 women were arrested and convicted; only 6 paid their fine and 18 went to Gaol in lieu thereof. The women were engaged to carry Tobacco into the Territory to evade the new taxes.

Opium cases were 27 as against 17 in 1929. Most of these cases occurred in the first half year and involved large quantities of raw opium thus accounting for the increase of fines inflicted as shewn in the Table.

Of arms cases there were 6 as against 1 in 1929. Five were only minor cases tried summarily, and the offenders fined. But in one case a man who brought a revolver into his house for improper purposes was sentenced to 12 months imprisonment.

Liquor cases increased from 17 in 1929 to 34 in 1930. Among these cases 2 distilleries were summoned for breaking

stillery Regulations and fined $500 each.

M

J 2



There were no armed robbery cases brought before the Police Magistrate, but about the same number of petty larceny cases as in 1929.

Four murder cases were heard, one being dismissed and 3 committed for trial in the Supreme Court all of which were discharged there. Two of the defendants were alleged to have murdered a man who, it is said had improper relations with his daughter-in-law. This being a most serious offence according to Chinese Custom, the man was done to death and his body was buried by the villagers without coffin and face downwards. The Hakka term for such burial is known as "La La Fan

Chong (喇喇翻葬)

In another case a boy aged 16 was alleged to have killed his fellow apprentice carpenter who slept on the same bed on account of a dispute over kitchen duties.

Owing to the recent great demand for sand in Hong Kong many applications for sand permits were received. On one occasion a junk went to Lung Ku Tan to remove sand and the junk people were fired at from shore by local people and one man was wounded. The man who fired the shot was arrested, charged and convicted.

The issue of permits is now restricted to bonâ fide Building Contractors.

Under the Domestic Service-Ordinance 1 of 1923, Registra- tion of Mui Tsai was started in April last. 228 Mui Tsais were registered in this District up to 31st May, 1930. No registration was made after this date. Up to the end of 1930, there were reported 3 deaths of Muitsais, 1 removal from the Colony, 1 handed back to the father and eight married.

Table G. shows serious crimes reported. The number of these cases decreased as 12 against 22 in 1929.

III.-LAND OFFICE,

The number of sales and other transactions affecting land during the year is set out in Table B.

The number of memorials registered was 3,383 against 3,176, and fees received as stamp duty, $4,833.80 against $3,708.40 in 1929.

J 3

IV. REVENUE.

The revenue collected in this office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C. to which should be added the following amounts collected in the district by other depart- ments:-

Crown Rent paid in Land Office

$2,844.00

Mining Licences fees paid in Treasury... 1,000.00

Harbour Dues, Sai Kung

1

13

No. 1 Launch

**

No. 2

No. 4

72

Total

2,163.75

5,620.75

2,489.65

2,377.45

.$16,495.60

Liquor and Tobacco duties collected by Imports and Exports Department are not included.

V.-GENERAL.

Rainfall.-Table F shows the figure of rainfall in Taipo. The average of rainfall for the 5 years from 1925-1929 was 77.90 inches and the figure for 1930 was 97.88 inches as against 56.60 in 1929 the year of prolonged drought. The total rainfall for the years

1925 was 88.65 inches

1926

87.73 "y

17

1927

94.78

>>

1928

61.83

>>

་་

1929

56.60

23

1930

""

97.88

It is to be noted that in 1930, we had the highest figure of rainfall during the past 6 years.

This may account for the two excellent rice crops in the New Territories during the year.

The Shap Pat Heung and Un Long Valleys depend mostly on rain water as the source of the streams is right back in Tai Tong or Tai Po Tsai, amongst the foot hills of the Taí Mo Shan "massif"'.

It is proposed to make the experiment of erecting wind mill pumps to pump water to the higher levels in the Territory during 1931.

J 4

Frontier. Nothing of importance on the border occurred during the past year. The situation in general was normal and remained quiet. Friendly relations were maintained with the Chinese authorities throughout the year.

The number of Small Debt cases decreased from 289 in 1929 to 138 in 1930, and Distress Warrants also dropped from 78 in 1929 to 52 in 1930.

There were less Wui cases in 1930.

There were 26 miscellaneous cases, 25 women and girls cases and 113 cases of all kinds at Ping Shan during the year.

26 cases of deaths were reported to the Police Magistrate and 3 formal enquiries were held.

After protracted negotiations as to new sites and rates of compensation for the move of the Shing Mun Valley villages, building was finally commenced on 9 new sites. These were practically all completed by the end of the year, and the moves of the villagers were carried out without any serious hitch.

The majority of the compensation money was also paid out, and it is to be hoped that these industrious people will bring fresh wealth into the district when they settle down to work in their new surroundings.

His Excellency the Governor Sir William Peel paid three official visits to the District shortly after his arrival and met the Elders at Taipo, Fanling and Un Long.

He was unfortunately prevented by an accident from attending the annual Agricultural Show, held at Sheung Shui on December 23rd but the continued interest of Government in the work of the Association was evinced by the presence of the Hon. Mr. E. R. Hallifax, C.M.G., Acting Colonial Secretary.

Hong Kong, 23rd March, 1931.

E. I. WYNNE-JONES,

District Officer, North.

J 5

M

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

Average from

1930.

1925-1929.

Cases heard

629

385

Persons brought before the P.M.

879

603

Persons convicted and punished

645

386

Fersons bound over

17

65

Persons discharged

214

143

Persons committed

3

9

Persons imprisoned

158

105

Fines inflicted

$24,288.00 $9,582.00

Warrants executed

68

40

SMALL DEBTS COURT.

1930.

Average from 1925-1929.

Cases heard

138

201

Writs of Execution

52

65

Headings.

No. of Sales,

Permits, Li- cences, etc.

No. of Lots.

Table B.

Area in Acres.

Increase of Crown Rent.

Sales of Land for Agriculture

34

55

106.70

112.26

"

Building

86

95

3.69

313.00

Kerosine store

3

3

.03

1.50

""

Threshing floor

18

18

.35

1.90

Orchard

9

12.99

13.30

""

Garden...

1.13

53.50

Brick Kiln

2

,,

.09

.40

C.

C.

12,825.63

8.954.92

214.00

166.23

1,682.00

466.00

31.00

€A-

75

"}

Conversions

Permits to occupy Land for Agriculture

118

3.48

229.00

143.09

27

61

43.23

149.18

305

512

242.58

872 30

"

""

other purposes.

4

36.13

84.10

1

Exchanges

Extensions

4

1.81

4 26

Nil.

75

12

16

.32

9.40

254.00

Re-entries

304

21.32

112.02

Surrenders

63

10.97

63.15

Resumptions

196

45.48

73.18

7,937.93

Stone Quarry Permits

58

606.00

Permits to cut Earth, etc......

239

1,095.00

Matshed Permits

812

9.46

2,323.06

Forestry Licences

557

557 40,613,50

4,061.35

Pine-apple Land Leases

156

156

69.25

207.75

10

Ferry Licences.

5

Grave Certificates

42

Deeds Registered & Stamp Fees

3,383

9.00

21.25

4,833.80

*

Decrease of Crown Rent.

Amount of Premia, Fees, etc.

- J 6-

Amount paid

for Resump- tion of Land.

Term of Years.

J 7

Table C.

Average of

Revenue for Revenue for

1930.

1925-1929.

Crown Rent, (Leased Lands)

$90,617.70

$88,747.76

Kerosene Oil Licences

560.01

490.00

Chinese Wine & Spirit Licences

3,933.33

4,520.40

Pawnbrokers' Licences

1,200.00

1,200.00

Money Changers' Licences

230.00

342.00

Fines

4,651.00

2,238.10

Fines (Land Sales)

30.00

402.00

Fines Reward Fund

1,734.00

807.04

Forfeitures

170.72

233.14

Forfeitures (Land Sales)

54.67

640.14

Distress Warrants (Crown Rent)

974.00

42.00

Distress Warrants (S. D. C.)

52.00

86.00

Arrears of Revenue

822.22

155.60

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

881.53

149.13

Forestry Licences

4,061.35

2,750.15

Permits to Cut Earth &c.

1,095.00

710.60

Grave Certificates

21.25

32.99

Pine-Apple Land Leases

207.75

78.27

Matshed Permits

2,323.06

1,374.30

Permits to occupy Land

1,774.33

1,169.48

Stone Quarry Permits

606.00

315.60

Stone Quarry Leases

Nil

300.00

Ferry Licences

9.00

9.00

Certified Extracts

195.00

175.20

Sunprints

155.00

89.00

Premia on Crown Land

24,736.87

8,024.10

Stamps for Deeds

4,833.80

3,308.80

Boundary Stones

203.00

Deposits Not Available

5,716.10

114.50 1,750.45

Buildings

Crown Leases

107.50

Nil

60.00

24.00

$152,016.20 $120,279.75

Table D.

REVENUE COLLECTED FROM 1921-1930.

1921.

$121,680.38

1926.....

$139.773.95

1922.

159,191.56

1927.

127,251.02

1928.

280,848.64

1928..

118,826.48

1924

209,105.18

1929.

121,902,53

1925.

141,862.65

1930.

152,016.20

J 8

Table E.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1930.

NEW WORKS.

$ c.

Making a bridge at Wo Hang

100.00

Setting in stepping stones at the bed of the stream

at Wang Shan Keuk

30.00

Making a path from Sham Chung to Yung Shu Au....

500.00

Cutting down and clearing off the concrete floor

at the abandoned house site at Tai Po

Erecting a pump for the well below Tai Po Police

120.25

Station

145.00

REPAIRS.

Path from Chung Mi to Tai Mei Tuk

Path from Wu Kau Tan to Kuk Po

Bridge at She Shan

Bund at Shek Tan Ho, Lam Tsun Valley

Path from the main road to Shui Pin Village

Matsheds for the Agricultural Show at Sheung Shui...

Un-expended

435.00

500.00

300.00

50.00

57.50

1,000.00

1.762.25

$5,000.00

Table F.

RAINFALL AT TAIPO POLICE STATION.

1930 Average 1925-1929

Inches.

Inches.

January

February

March

April

May

2.38

1.27

2.14

1.96

10.11

3.67

2.80

7.15

4.62

8.86

June

11.90

11.81

July

24.57

20.88

August

4.82

. 9.56

September

32.56

7.15

October

.27

2.60

November

.26

2.77

December

1.45

22

Total

97.88

77.90

J 9

Table G.

SERIOUS CRIME REPORTED.

Murder

Suspected Murder

ON LAND.

1929.

1930.

4

Murder and Suicide

Armed Robbery and Murder

1

1

Armed Robbery, Murder and Kidnapping.. 1

Attempted Armed Robbery and Murder 1

Armed Robbery and Kidnapping

1

Armed Robbery, Wounding & Kidnapping. 1

Attemped Armed Robbery and Wounding. 1

Armed Robbery

Robbery

Highway Robbery

Attempted Highway Robbery (armed)....

Robbery with violence.

Abduction of a Married Woman

Total

ON WATER.

Attempted Armed Robbery & Wounding...

Kidnapping (suspected)

Total

2

5

2

1

1

21

11

1929.

1930.

1

1

1

1

-

J 10

REPORT ON THE NEW TERRITORIES FOR THE YEAR 1930,

B.-SOUTHERN DISTRICT.

1-STAFF.

Mr. J. A. Fraser continued in charge up to 14th March when he was relieved by Mr. E. I. Wynne-Jones. Mr. J. S. MacLaren continued to act as Assistant District Officer up to 17th July. The system of having one District Officer and an Assistant District Officer for the whole Territories was then discontinued, and on July 18th Mr. W. Schofield was appointed District Officer South. Mr. Schofield remained in charge till the end of the year with the exception of a brief period of absence from 8th to 17th December when Mr. A. W. G. Gran- tham acted as District Officer South.

2. MAGISTRACY,'

Table A shows the number of cases heard by the District Officer sitting as Police Magistrate and as Judge of the Small Debts Court.

There was a slight increase in the number of Police cases in 1930 as compared with 1929, but there were fewer convictions and 49 persons were discharged.

Two cases were committed to the Sessions.

Small Debts cases decreased, the total number

of cases

being 42 against 60 in 1929.

3. LAND OFFICE.

There was an apparent decline in the demand for land for building purposes in 1930, but sales of agricultural land remained about the same figure as last year.

There was again a marked decrease in the number of earth, sand, and stone permits. All the available sand-beaches are in use and permits have had to be further restricted.

The number of memorials registered was 1769 as compared with 1536 in 1929.

There was a corresponding increase in the fees received as stamp duty, the total being $2,776.50 against $2,193.00 in 1929.

Resumptions in connection with the Shing Mun Water Scheme were completed during the year by the resumption of all building lots in Tsun Wan Demarcation Districts Nos. 452, 457, 458, 459, 460 and 466.

J 11

4.-REVENUE.

The revenue collected by the Office is set out under the appropriate heads in Table C totalling $46,715.94. Tables D and E respectively show the revenue collected in the District by Police and other Departments, and Table F gives for pur- poses of comparison the total revenue from all sources for the past three years. These Tables, however, do not show the revenue collected in the District by the Imports and Exports Department.

There was again an increase in the totals collected under these various heads, the grand total being $261,464.86 advance of 25% on last year's figures.

5-GENERAL,

an

1930 was

a prosperous year for the Southern District. There was no drought and no damage was done by rainstorms or typhoons so that paddy, vegetables, and sweet potatoes were everywhere good. Cattle and pigs, too, did well in most places and Tai O and Lamma were able to export considerable numbers for sale in the Hong Kong market. An outbreak of disease among poultry in Lamma did considerable damage, and poultry- breeders in that Island had a bad year.

Fish were again plentiful in Tai O waters, the Wong Fa catch being particularly good. As in past years few fish were caught by the fishing population of Cheung Chau, Lamma, and Tsuen Wan, and the catch of shrimps was everywhere poor.

The health of the District was on the whole good. The question of improved sanitation is receiving attention, and proposals are afoot to introduce some system of Births and Deaths Registration as a first step towards this object. Few ths are at present reported to the police and consequently here is no record of the incidence of disease.

The consolidation of the ferry services under the Hong Kong and New Territories Ferry Company is proving a success, l the Company is to be congratulated on the improved class boats now on the Cheung Chau and Tai O runs. Ferries have been running strictly to time-table and there are now no complaints of irregularity of service. The Tai O time-table presented some difficulties last year but these have been over- and the Ferry now makes two trips per diem to this lying station.

The improvement in communications has had a beneficial effect upon business in the chief centres of the District. Build- ing has been given a new impetus in Cheung Chau and Tai 0. Expensive reclamations however are necessary if the lay-outs

J 12

are to be strictly adhered to. As the collection of the capital necessary for such reclamation schemes has proved an in- superable difficulty in the past, it is satisfactory to relate that the Elders of Cheung Chau are now planning to reclaim a large area between the Government Pier and the Hung Shing Temple. This reclamation, if made, will be a most valuable improvement and will help to relieve the congestion in the business centre of Cheung Chau. In Tai O, new buildings are being erected near the market, and it is probable that some areas will be reclaimed in this neighbourhood during 1981.

The question of fire prevention has advanced a stage, and Cheung Chau is now the proud possessor of a very efficient portable fire-engine, a Lowrev Turbo Trailer Pump supplied by Messrs. Jardine Matheson, & Co. This engine was bought out of the surplus funds of the Pak Tai Temple, Cheung Chau. and was chosen on the advice of the Superintendent of the Fire Brigade as the most suitable type of engine for New Territory work. Tests revealed that the engine is capable of everything claimed for it by the makers; it is easy to manipulate as it is mounted on pneumatic tyres, and it can be transported on a sampan to places which are more accessible by sea than by land. It was hoped that Tai O would follow Cheung Chau's excellent example and buy a similar engine. but efforts to raise the necessary funds have, so far, been unsuccessful.

Road improvements effected during 1930 include two paths in Lantao Island, one from Lantao Plateau to Tung Chung. and the other from Tung Chung to Lantao Peak. These new roads are much appreciated by the Missionary Community who live on the summit of Lantao, and constitute an improvement which should ultimately benefit the whole community by making Lantao more attractive to sight-seers.

There is still a keen demand for bathing-matshed sites and almost every available site is now occupied. The rise in the price of petrol has made the bathing beaches nearest Kowloon more popular than ever.

Tai O.

Business during the year has been good. The following table gives a rough estimate of the fish caught and the prices obtained:

Fish Wong Fa

Piculs

8476

Ma Yau

600

Herrings

1800

Shrimps

500

Price per picul

$15.00

$18.00

$17.50

$14.00

This is a marked improvement on last year's figures!

as a result, prices were slightly lower.

J 13

-

1930 was a good year for salt pan owners, the output of salt being 17,000 piculs against 10,200 piculs in 1929.

A slight increase in the sale of wines is reported by the Kung Yick Distillery which is now the only distillery in Tai 0. The Sui Fung distillery closed down after the owner had been prosecuted for breaches of the liquor regulations.

The inhabitants of Lantao have recently shown more interest in afforestation and new areas have been planted near Tai O and Tung Chung.

Cheung Chau.-This community continues to prosper and shows signs of considerable development in the near future.

1930 was a good year in most respects; vegetable crops were good, distilleries did well, and all the market stalls were occupied.

The quarry opened by Li Shing Kee in the beginning of 1930 has been worked, and stone to the value of $3,000 was quarried during the year.

In the Summer months the houses in the European Reservation were, as usual, fully occupied.

The new electric lighting plant ordered last year has been installed and the service is now satisfactory.

Tsuen Wan.--The agricultural produce for the year showed a steady improvement with the exception of pineapples which are now less plentiful.

The resumption of the lots cultivated by the Shing Mun villagers has dealt a serious blow to the pineapple industry as some of the best fruit was grown in this area.

Distilleries, sandal-wood mills, and lime-kilns showed only average returns. There are now only three distilleries in this locality; the fourth distillery, on Tsing Yi Island, has been closed.

Three enterprises of some magnitude are now established this part of the Territories, and two of them, the Brewery Sham Tseng and the Asia Coal & Briquetting Co.'s works at Yan Kam Tau are making good progress. The third, the Texas ...'s installation at Sam Pak Tsin, should be completed at an arly date. It is now connected by road with the main motor

and will soon have an electric power supply from the China

J 14

Light and Power Co. in Kowloon. This power line can be utilised to supply the villages of the District with electric light and power, if required.

Lamma.-Rice crops were very good and papaya plentiful. Cattle and pigs throve well but there was some disease among poultry. The pine-apples which were planted on this Island have not been a success.

Ping Chau.-There is still little demand for lime and only one lime-kiln appeared to have regular work throughout the year.

26th March, 1931.

J. S. MACLAREN, District Officer, South.

J 15

Table A.

POLICE COURT.

1928.

1929.

1930.

Cases heard,

89

133

197

Persons brought before the

Police Magistrate,

185

230

241

Persons convicted and fined,

120

122

96

Persons bound over,

7

7

9

Persons committed,

1

7

Persons imprisoned,

50

64

80

Persons discharged,

21

37

49

Fines,

$879.46

$3,078.87

$2,586.50

Arms Fines,

20.00

240.16

Forfeitures,

42.37

411.00

225.00

Revenue Reward Fund, ............ 803.43

680.89

4,612.36

SMALL DEBTS Court.

1928.

1929.

1930.

Cases heard,

49

60

42

Writs of Execution,

10

11

1

Table B.

No. of

Amount

Increase

Decrease Amount.

Sales,

Area

of

of

of

Headings.

Permits,

of

in

Crown

Crown

Licences, Lots.

Acres.

Rent.

Rent.

Premia,

Fees, &c.

paid for ! Term Resump-

of

&c.

tion of years

Land.

— J 16 -

+00

C.

C.

Land Sales for Buildings.

55

1.08

1.02

Agriculture...

10

10

3.39

4.15

Threshing Floor

.06

.30

Conversions

.19

20.76

Stone Quarry Leases.

853.70

75

439.25

75

1013

31.50

Permits to occupy Land

Matshed Permits on Crown Land

100

701

ཕྱྀརྱ--

27.37

70.00

809.94

1,565.80

Private Land

115

517.00

་་

יי

,

Earth and Sand Permits.

345

1,432.00

Forestry Licences

116

1,579.78

Pine-apple Licences

338

626,40

Deeds Registered

1,769

2,776.50

Resumptions

290

25.38

302.81

9,287.83

Surrenders

13

.11

19.10

Re-entries

121

8.88

48.18

Reversion

35

2.35

35.00

J 17

Table C.

REVENUE COLLECTED BY THE DISTRICT OFFICER, SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW TERRITORIES.

1929.

1930

Land Sales,

$

909.00

$ 1,324.45

Boundary Stones,

132.00

55.00

Permits to obtain Earth and Stone,...

1,261.00

1,432.00

Forestry Licences,

1,629.72

1,579.78

Forfeitures,

411.00

225.00.

Fines,

3,078.87

2,586.50

Deeds Registration Fees,

2,193.00

2,776.50-

Crown Leases,

30.00

30.00

Legal Costs,

91.00

58.00

Crown Rent,

24,955.65

26,261.14

Matshed Permits on Crown Land,

....

1,321.00

1,565.80

Matshed Permits on Private Land,

365.50

517.00

Permits to occupy land,

751.32

809.94

Pineapple Land Leases,

616.99

626.40

Market Fees,

1,585.12

1,473.92

Leases of Stone Quarries,

292.00

70.00

Interest on Deposit Account,

66.60

215.11

Other Miscellaneous Receipts,

214.59

199.68

Compensation in lieu of Rates,

45.00

297.36

Fines (Reward Fund),

680.89

4,612.36

Arms Fines,

240.16

Total,

$40,870.41

$46,715.94

Table D.

LICENCE FEES COLLECTED BY THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

J 18

Station,

Wine and Kerosene.

Dogs.

Spirit.

Pawn-

brokers.

Money

Changers.

Total.

€A

C.

C.

$ c.

Kowloon City

963.00

4,000.00

4,963,00

Sham Shui Po

804.00

12,000.00

300.00

13,104.00

Tai O

550,00

64.00

400.00

40.00

1,054.00

Cheung Chau

612.50

76.00

800.00

60.00

1,548.50

Tsun Wan

300.00

28.00

328.00

Lamma Island

100.00

100.00

Total

1,562.50

168.00

1,767.00 17,200.00

400.00

21,097.50

J 19

Table E.

REVENUE COLLECTED THROUGH OTHER DEPARTMENTS FROM THE SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW TERRITORIES.

1929.

1930

Treasury, (Village Rates)

11

(Crown Rent for Inland Lots) (Quarries in New Kowloon)... (Eating House Licence Fees)

Police, (Licence Fees) Harbour Office, (Harbour Dues,

Stakenets)

Total,

*See Table D.

$105,333.07 $123,943.26

57,662.68

87,722.64

6,683.15 8,402.41

285.00 15,055.00

235.00 *21,097.50

20,384.00 20,064.05

$205,402.90 $261,464.86

Table F.

TOTAL REVENUE COLLECTED FROM SOUTHERN DISTRICT, NEW TERRITORIES DURING THE LAST THREE YEARS.

1928.

1929.

1930.

By District Office, ...$ 39,279.47 $ 40,870.41 $46,715.94) By Other Departments, 186,916.75

205,402.90*

261,464.86*

$226,196.22 $246,273.31 $308.180.80

Total,

†See Table C.

*See Table E.

Table G.

LOCAL PUBLIC WORKS, 1980.

Improvements and Repairs.

Path from Lantao Plateau to Tung Chung

$1,243.51

Road in Cheung Chau Island

1,163.00

Ma Wan School

217.90

Road within European Reservation, Cheung Chau.... Path from Tung Chung up to Lantao Peak

150.00

150.00

Up-expended

1,075.59

Total,

$4.000.00

..

Appendix K.

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL OF POLICE FOR THE YEAR 1930.

SUMMARY OF CRIME FOR 1930.

The total number of cases reported to the Police during the year 1930, was 24,981 as against 21,140 in 1929, being an increase of 3,791 cases or 11.2%. The average for the last five years is 22,034.

SERIOUS CRIME.

There were 5,681 serious cases in 1930, as against 5,348 in 1929, an increase of 333 cases or 5.8%. House and Godown Breaking showed an increase of 40 cases, Burglaries 20 and Larcenies 341. Robberies showed a decrease of 55 cases, (47 in Hong Kong and 8 in the New Territories). Murders stand the same as for 1929, i.e. 22 cases.

MINOR CRIME. .

There were 19,250 minor cases in 1930, as against 15,792 in 1929, an increase of 3,458 cases or 17.9%. The increase is principally due to offences under the following headings: Hawking, Mendicants, Merchant Shipping, Nuisances, Opium, and Traffic

See Table I.

PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN AND PROPERTY RECOVERED.

The estimated value of property stolen during the year was $1,426,688 as against $566,485 in 1929 an increase of $860,203 or 60.2%.

The average for the last five years is $713,574.00.

The value of property recovered during the vear was $72,640 or 5% of the property stolen as against $67,617 or 11% of the property stolen in 1929 a decrease of 6% in ratio

tween the property stolen and property recovered.

Included in the sum of $1,426,688 shown in the estimated value of property stolen are the following amounts which were embezzled, mis-appropriated, or stolen by clerks or servants of

K 2

banks and business houses, such thefts are classed by the Police as "Unpreventable Crimes":-

Larceny by Servant from

The Eastern Equitable Banking Corporation $884,132.00 Embezzlement, Bank of China.

Embezzlement, Kwong Cheung Hing Lung

$ 24,834.00

Kee Firm, 262 Des Voeux Road Central. $ 40,972.00

Larceny by Bailee, Yuen Yick Cheong Firm,

132 Bonham Strand "E" Larceny by Servant, Leung Kiu Kee Firm,

158 Connaught Road Central

Fraudulent Misappropriation, Ng Chau Bank,

38 Bonham Strand "E”

These amounts total

or 69.2% of the total amount stolen.

PIRACY.

$ 15,500.00

$ 12,500.00

$ 10,000.00 $987,938.00

Two piracies were recorded on steamships, one being on the British ship S.S. "Helikon" owned by Messrs. Wo Fat Shing & Co. Hong Kong, while she was on a voyage from Hong Kong to Saigon on the 21st July, 1930. The pirates boarded the ship as passengers and waited until the ship was about 132 miles South of Hong Kong. The attack was made during the early hours of the morning while all Officers with the exception of two on watch, one on the bridge and one in the engine room, were asleep. Resistance was impossible. No Guards were carried. No shots were fired and no one was injured. The ship was taken to Bias Bay. Considerable cargo was stolen and 16 persons including the Compradore were kidnapped. In this case the owners of the ship postponed the sailing time from 6.00 p.m. on 19th July to 8.30 a.m. on 20th July, without informing the Police, thereby rendering the Folice search ineffective and it was also found that subsequent to the com- pletion of the Police search, passengers were allowed to come on board with their baggage.

The second case was on the Norwegian S.S. "Hirundo" on the 12th November, 1930. As in the first case, pirates boarded the ship as passengers. The attack was made about noon when the ship was 130 miles South of Hong Kong, being then on a voyage from Swatow to Bangkok. All Officers were taken by surprise and were unable to offer any resistance. Guards are not carried on this ship. The pirates expected to find bullion on board. Being disappointed in this respect they confined themselves to Officers and passengers, but the latter being of the poorer class the pirates haul was comparatively small. A Chinese saloon waiter was wounded in the shoulder by a shot from a small fire-urm. The first and third Com- pradores were kidnapped. The ship was taken to MIRS BAY and it is believed that the pirates went overland to Bias Bay.

K 3

Two piracies on junks were reported (one of which is a doubtful report) against six during 1929.

No piracies were reported in the Canton River Delta.

Table II shows the number of piracies committed in adjacent waters during the year. Compared with 1929 there is a decrease of three cases in the number of piracies other than Bias Bay piracies.

There is a decrease of one case compared with 1929 in Bias Bay piracies.

ARMS.

There were 26 arms seizures during the year, of which 19 were charge cases and 7 no charge cases. The only seizure of note was on board the S.S. "D'Artagnan" on 15.7.30 when Revenue Officers seized 168 Automatic Pistols of French make and 18,000 rounds of ammunition.

COMMUNISM.

A note on Communism is included in the Special Events.

DISCHARGED PRISONERS, DEPORTEES AND VAGRANTS. Table III gives the number dealt with by the Records Office during the year 1930.

FINGER PRINT DEPARTMENT.

A Summary of work executed in this Department for the year 1930 is as follows:- ་་

Year.

Number of finger prints examined.

Number of

persons

identified.

Number of records filed.

Number of convictions

Number of convictions

under

Deportation Ordinance.

under Market Ordinance.

1930 1929

14.814

12.138

3.896 2.786

10.826

10,731

237 222

1,575

620

Increase..

2,676

1,110

95

15

955

Overhaul of Finger Print Bureau:---Number of old records destroyed 352.

Approximate number of records on file 127,023.

K 4

PHOTOGRAPHIC SUB-DEPARTMENT.

The total number of photographs taken of scenes of serious crime and accidents throughout the year was 29. The total number of photographs issued was 1,630.

In October, a Photostat apparatus arrived and is in process of installation. The erection of the machine has necessitated slight structural alterations to the Photographic Department Studio.

LOST PROPERTY.

The following is recovered:

a

return showing property lost or

Year.

Articles reported lost.

Value

lost.

Articles re- covered and found but not

Value of

articles

found.

reported lost.

1930

323

$26,460.00

139

$ 3,127.00

1929

338

31,760.00

145

1,597.00

GAMBLING.

There were 119 successful gambling cases for 1930 as against 109 successful cases in 1929.

There were 3 cases in which no conviction was obtained. ̈

There were 60 lottery cases, compared with 71 in 1929.

PASS OFFICE.

During the year 1930, 86 persons of various nationalities, other than Chinese, Indians and Japanese were put before the Courts for the following offences: --

Vagrancy Stowaways

Passport Ordinance

40

35

14

The number of foreign destitutes dealt with during the year was 92.

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION DEPARTMENT.

The strength of the Department on December 31st 1930

was:-

1930

1929

Europeans Chinese

39

38

134

129

Total

173

167

K 5 -

The number of searchers employed on Steamers, Launches and Ferries on December, 31st was:

Europeans

Chinese

Female Searchers

Total

1930

1929

5

7

97

124

21

31

123

162

These figures include both Hong Kong and Kowloon.

As from the 1st December, 1930, the Searching of all inter harbour Ferries was discontinued. This involved a reduction of 27 Constables and 10 female searchers.

The strength of the Water Police Searching Staff was however increased from 16 Constables and 1 female searcher to 22 Constables and 3 female searchers.

MENDICANTS.

During the yeur, nine hundred and seventy-seven

mendicants were arrested and dealt with as follows:-

167 Mendicants charged before the Magistrate.

20

22

2

""

215

""

551

released.

sent to Tung Wa Hospital.

sent to Hon. S. C. A.

sent to Canton.

sent to Deep Bay.

Of the above mendicants sent away, a considerable per- centage were sent out of the Colony on several occasions.

DEAD BODIES.

The following table shows the number of unknown dead bodies found by Police in the Streets and elsewhere during the last five years :·

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

Vietoria,

268

367

358

706

418

Kowloon,

637

801

1,077

1,072

669

Harbour,

110

37

139

164

126

Kisewhere,

99

112

106

91

103

Total,..

1,114

1,317

1,680

2.033

1,316

- K 6

Sex.

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

Male

80

Adults .....

Female...

Unknown

32+

121

137

119

86

10

10

27

33

22

4

1

Male

564

670

855

1,015

643

Children... Female...

420

169

643

807

533

Unknown

36

46

18

29

32

DOGS ORDINANCE.

The muzzling order was cancelled on 30th July and again brought into force with effect from 8th December, 1930.

Three hundred and ninety three dogs were destroyed in 1930 as compared with 868 in 1929.

Dogs Licensed

Dogs Licensed (free)

Dogs Impounded

Dogs Destroyed

Weights and

Measures examined.

Foreign Scales

Chinese Scales

Yard Measures Chinese Foot

Measures.

Total

..

1929

1930

3,533

3,700

37

31

156

79

868

393

WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

1929

1930

Correct.

In- correct.

Total.

Correct.

In-

correct.

Total.

117 1,033

3

120

133

1

134

18

1,051

1.021

10

1,031

421

421

296

296

600

A

600

378

378

2,171

21

2,192

1,828

11

1,839

The

following prosecutions were instituted under the

Weights and Measures Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

Convictions.

7

DANGEROUS GOODS.

Fines.

$160

The following prosecutions were instituted under the

Dangerous Goods Ordinance.

Number of Cases.

18

Convictions.

Fines.

18

$705

K 7

ARMS ORDINANCE.

Table IV(a) shows Arms and Ammunition seized and con- fiscated during the year.

Table IV(b) shows seizures classified according to places of origin.

TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.

The following prosecutions were instituted under the Regulations (Notification No. 377: Government Gazette of the June, 1924)(For the purpose of comparison 1929 figure also inserted).

Year.

Prosecu- Convic- With-

tions. tions.

Dis-

Re-

Resu

drawn.

charged. manded.

1930......

7,310

6,852

205

180

73

$23,94

1929...... 7,567

6,527

779

200

61

$ 27,562

Manslaughter

1930......

1

1929......

1

1

The total number of persons examined as Motor Drivers during the year was 1,401 as against 834 in 1929.

The total number of persons passed as Motor Drivers during the year was 1,152 as against 707 in 1929.

The total number of accidents reported during the year was 1,244 as against 948 in 1929.

The total number of fatal accidents during the year was 59 as against 36 in 1929.

The total number of Public motor vehicles examined and passed fit for public use during the year was 2,729 as against 1,838 in 1929.

The total number of Public motor vehicles examined and found unfit for public use during the year was 691 as against 794 in 1929.

The total number of motor driver's licences suspended during the year was 74 as against 150 in 1929.

The total number of motor driver's licences cancelled during the year was 1 as against 10 in 1929.

-K 8-

LICENCES.

The following licences were issued during the year:-

1929

1930

Public Jinrikshas

1.630

1,398

Private Jinrikshas

831

798

Public Chairs

570

440

Private Chairs

77

76

Drivers and Bearers

15,672

14,980

Truck licences

800

747

Motor cars (Livery)

457

439

Motor cars (Private)

1,462

1,574

Motor Drivers (Cars & Cycles).

3,431

4,157

Motor cycle (Licences)

531

581

Money changers

199

213

Pawnbrokers

125

144

Auctioneer Licences

3

Billiard Tables and Bowling

Alleys

5

Marine Stores

38

38

Game Licences

350

342

Hawkers

13,748

12,498

Dangerous Goods

872

915

Poisons

19

16

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Table showing the Total Strength, Expenditure and Revenue of the Police Department for the years 1921 to 1930:-

Year

Total

Expenditure

Revenue

Strength

1921.....

1,341

$1,443,627

$259,876

1922.

1,381

1,533,772

376,347

1923.

1,589

1,633,847

349,443

1924.

1,774

1,877,948

389.176

1925.

1,965

1,898,823

375,832

1926.

1,994

1,745,085

374,549

1927.

2,026

1,759,132

393,557

1928..

2,042

1,986,105

448,772

1929.

2,054

1,956,798

463,148

1930..

2,054

2,569,664

487.169

- K 9

ESTABLISHMENT Return.

Return showing the Establishment and Casualties in the Force during the year 1930:-

Nationality.

Establishment of the Force.

Enlistments.

Deaths.

Resignations

through

sickness.

Resignations through expiry of terms of service or otherwise.

Dismissals or Desertions.

Total Number

of Casualties.

Europeans... 261 23

2

Indians

750 63

13

Chinese

782 147

Water Police

244

20

1

30 31 20 20

3

5

4

15

38

63

26

40

75

2

8

9

20

Total ...

2,037 253

11

23

48

91 173

This number includes the Police paid by other Departments. also the Engineers, Coxswains, Stokers, and Seamen, but it is exclusive of:

9 Superintendents.

2 Accountants.

3 Storekeepers.

1 Police Secretary.

23 Clerks.

11 Telephone Clerks.

70 Interpreters.

128 Messengers and coolies.

2 Indians and 2 Chinese Constables who are employed

by Private Firms.

2 Shroffs.

ACTUAL STRENGTH ON THE 31ST DECEMBER, 1930.

Euro-

peans.

Indians. Chinese.

Total.

Present

230

691

769

1,690

Sick or Absent on

leave

31

59

6

Excess over Estimates.

10

17

Vacancies

Total...

271

757

782

*Not including Water Police.

K 10

CONDUCT.

"A" Contingent.

The conduct of the European Contingent was good. The total number of reports against them was 111 as against 120 in 1929. There were 5 reports for being drunk or under the influence of drink, the same number as in 1929. There were 23 reports for neglect of duty as against 30 in 1929: for misconduct there were 16 reports as against 14 in 1929.

year.

"B" Contingent.

The conduct of Indian Contingent was good on the whole. There were 1,156 reports as against 1,276 in the preceding For drunkenness there were 28 as against 24 in 1929. For neglect of duty there were 285 as against 263 in 1929. For misconduct there were 284 as against 215. Minor Offences totalled to 559 as against 874 in 1929. 3 men were convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force) 2 for larceny and 1 for receiving a bribe. 298 men had no reports as against 244 in 1929.

"C" Contingent.

There

The behaviour of the Chinese (Cantonese) was fair. were 1,392 reports as against 1,045 in 1929. For drunkenness there was none. For neglect of duty there were 312 as against 200 in 1929, and for misconduct there were 282 as against 198 in 1929. There were 798 Minor Offences. 1 man was convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force) for receiving a bribe. 232 men had no reports as against 240 in 1929.

"D" Contingent.

The behaviour of the Chinese Contingent (W.H.W.) was fair.

There were 665 reports as against 553 in 1929. There were 3 for drunkenness as against 2 in 1929. There were 166 for misconduct as against 94 in 1929 and 154 for neglect of duty as against 90 in 1929. For Minor Offences there were 342 as against 367 in 1929.

2 men were convicted by the Police Magistrate (dismissed from the Force), 1 for possession of duplicate chops and for bribery and 1 for refusing duty. 92 men had no reports as against 39 in 1929.

HEALTH.

Admissions to Hospital during the last three years are as

follows:

1928.

1929.

1930.

Nationality. Establish- Admis

ment.

sions.

Establish- Admis- Establish- Admis-

ment. sions.

ment.

sions.

Europeaus

253

176

253

114

261

167

Indians

75t

479

739

582

750

563

Chinese

756

311

774

357

786

201



K 11

MEDALS AND COMMENDATIONS.

His Majesty the King was graciously pleased to award the King's Police Medal to Mr. Walter Kent, Assistant Superin- tendent of Police.

His Excellency the Governor granted Medals for special service and for long and efficient service and Commendations to the following Police Officers: -

MEDALS.

P.S.C. 345 Shek Tui

.3rd Class Medal.

Inspector C. F. Alexander

.4th

Inspector J. Murphy

.4th

""

P.S.C. 32 Cheng Pak

4th

"

33

P.S.C. 266 Kwong Po ..

.4th

P.S.C. 135 Chui Yung

.4th

L.S.C. 608 Lo Ki

.4th

L.S.C. 384 Tse On

.4th

12

Class II Engineer 9 Kwok Tsun.........4th

Class II Engineer 57 So Shing Shun...4th

COMMENDATIONS.

A. N. Reynolds

Acting Chief Inspector

Acting Sub Inspector

B. Thorpe

L.S.C. 558 Chan Pui

P.C.C. 595 Lau Tang.

77

J

The following Police Officers

Inspector General of Police:

were commended by the

"A" Contingent.

C. I. Grant

Insp. W. Shannon

S. I. Fraser

P.S. A39 Hunt (twice)

A.P.S. A22 Madgwick

L.S. A102 Walsh

- K 12

S. I. Butcher

S. I. Portallion

A. S. I. O'Donovan

A. S. I. Hallam

A. S. I. Hopkins

L.S. A84 Barnicle

L.S. A95 Gardiner

L.S. A184 Humphreys

L.S. A19 Hill

L.S. A52 Williams

"B" Contingent.

P.S. B451 Kaku Singh

P.S. B44 Inder Singh (twice)

L.S. B426 Teja Singh

P.C. B633 Abrahim Khan

P.C. B10 Naiz Mohamed

F.C. B375 Khair Din Khan

P.C. B680 Pole Khan

P.C. B144 Rura Khan

P.C. B522 Hayat Mohamed

P.C. B119 Fatteh Jang

P.C. B595 Allah Din

P.C. B217 Hari Singh

"C" Contingent.

P.C.D. Wong Lau

P.C. C385 Li Shing

P.S. C185 Tang Sang

P.C. C523 Pang Chi

L.S. C69 Mak Wah

P.C. C498 Li Ming

L.S. C58 Cheung Hoi

A

L.S. C315 Ip Chim

P.C. C240 Lok Sui Wai

P.C. C405 Au Shing

P.C. C222 Chang Tung

P.C. C152 Kwok Kam

P.C. C56 Li Shik

P.C. C553 Shum Wai

P.C. C293 Tsang Cheung

P.C. C81 Wong Sik

P.C. C427 Chan Cheuk Lau

"D" Contingent.

P.C. D225 Chiang Hsui Hsin P.C. D80 Ku Yuen Leung

- K 13

SPECIAL MATTERS AND PRINCIPAL EVENTS.

GENERAL.

Increased activity was mainly directed towards suppressing Communism throughout the year. A special note appears below. As in 1929, efforts were again directed towards causing industrial disturbances which were fortunately not of a serious nature. The two most serious events of the year were the murder of Mrs. Madgwick and P.C.B.9 by P.C.B.543, who ran amok for no assigned reason at Lok Ma Chau on 21st July, and then committed suicide. The second event was the murder of Police Detective L.S.C. 384 Tse On at the Nga Lok Restaur- ant, Yaumati, where he was trapped with two Canton Detectives and shot dead on the 8th December. Details of these two cases appear below under the head murder. Actually, the number of murders in 1930 was the same as in 1929 (twenty- two cases). Crime generally showed an increase, particularly minor crime (three thousand five hundred cases) mainly hawkers, mendicants, nuisances and traffic cases. However, armed robberies showed a welcome decrease of fifty-five cases which may be considered eminently satisfactory. The following notes deal with all matters calling for special comment. Full particulars appear also in the main body of the Report. The notes are in alphabetical order..

1.- ANTI-PIRACY GUARDS.

Towards the end of 1929, the Military Authorities notified the various Shipping Companies, i.e.

The Canadian Pacific S.S. Co.

Peninsular & Oriental S.S. Co. British India Steam Navigation Co. Indo-China Steam Navigation Co., Ltd.

China Navigation Co., Ltd

Messrs. Mackinnon, Mackenzie & Co. Messrs. Jardine, Matheson & Co. Ltd. fMessrs. Butterfield } & Swire.

who had been supplied with Military Guards aboard their steamers on the China Coast as a special precaution and protection against pirates (piracies from within the ships) for some two years, that they would be unable to continue supply- ing Guards after March 31st. Negotiations followed as a result of which it was decided that the Hong Kong Government would provide special Police Anti-Piracy Guards and the Military Authorities would continue their Military Guards, on payment of all expenses by the Shipping Companies until such time after 1st April, as the Hong Kong Police could recruit, train and supply the men required. This decision was reached at the end of April and recruiting commenced in May. The Inspector-General personally recruited the Russian and Chinese (Northern) Guards and an Indian Officer was despatched to India to recruit the

K 14

special Indian Guards. Anti-Piracy Police Guards were furnished by degrees to all Shipping Companies concerned commencing in June, and Police Guards had replaced the remaining Military on board the Companies steamers by August. The arrangement come to with the Hong Kong Government was that the whole cost should be borne by the Shipping Companies who would re- imburse the Hong Kong Government monthly for the outlay on the Guards. This arrangement is still in force and has worked very satisfactorily from the start. In accordance with the requirements of the Companies the following men were supplied:

The Canadian Pacific S.S. Co...

Messrs. Mackinnon, Mackenzie

& Co.

Messrs. Jardine, Matheson &

Co., Ltd.

Messrs. Butterfield & Swire ...(a)

1 British N.C.O.

12 Russians.

4

37

"2

36 Indian Guards.

4

(b)

13 Russian

N.C.O.

12 51

78 Chinese (Northern)

Guards.

These Guards have been travelling regularly on the ships for over six months and no attempt at piracy has been made on any ship provided with them, though it will be noted that two foreign ships, which carried no Guards, were pirated, one in July and another in November.

All the Shipping Companies, with possibly one exception, have expressed themselves satisfied with the Guards provided, which they state are efficient and which are certainly very much less costly than the Military Guards. It is however felt by the Police Authorities that this work which the Hong Kong Government has undertaken at the express request of the Home Authorities and at considerable inconvenience and some expense, and which is also entirely outside its normai functions, is not appreciated to the full by all who benefit by it.

2.-COMMUNISM.

During the period under review local Communists attempted to carry out demonstrations on nine occasions between May and October. The places selected were usually in the vicinity of the Central Market in Victoria and occasionally on the New Reclamation in Wanchai, the idea being, apparently, io attract as much attention as possible. In all, twenty-five leading Communists were banished and one local newspaper the "SIU YAT PO" was proscribed by the Governor-in-Council and the Office closed, the Manager and Editor being banished. serious effort at interference in industrial matters was in con- nection with the strike of some six hundred female workers at

A

K 15

A

the Nan Yang Tobacco Co's premises on 16th November. meeting was broken up by the Police and the leaders, all Com- munists, were convicted and subsequently deported. The most serious occurrence however was the murder of L.S.C.384 Tse On, a member of the Police Anti-Communist Squad, who was trapped by Communists in the Nga Lok Restaurant, Yaumati, and shot dead on the 11th December, while attempting to obtain information in connection with a Communist Anniversary. Following his murder considerable further Anti-Communist Police activity ensued, revealing an important organisation within the Colony which has been definitely suppressed for the time being.

3.-EMERGENCY UNIT.

The Emergency Unit, which was organised three years ago, has continued its useful work throughout the year. Consisting of forty men with three British Police in charge, it is divided into five Squads of which three are always available for emergencics and one for paid outside duties. During the year, the Emergency Unit responded to eighty-five calls, fires, outrages and minor disturbances, it earned six thousand dollars For special duties and gave one hundred and sixty Police, i.e., ninety-six Indian Police and sixty-four. Chinese Police, a most useful revision course in their duties, besides training them in special work, such as Riot Drill, Lewis Gunnery, Physical Drill, also Police Regulations and revolver shooting. Police are attached to the Unit for a period of three months following which they return to regular duty.

4.-GAMBLING.

Following on the restrictive measures adopted by the Police during succeeding years since 1928 to prevent the running of irregular lotteries by all and sundry in connection with the local Race Meetings, which had assumed very serious pro- portions, the necessary legislation to enable Police to deal morc effectively with such lotteries was enacted during the year when Ordinance No. 12, amending, the Gambling Ordinance No. 2 of 1891, was passed. The effect has been to reduce such lotteries to more reasonable proportions and to eliminate irregular sweepstakes.

5. HAWKERS.

It was found necessary to reconsider the distribution of stallholder hawkers throughout the City and Kowloon, owing to increasing traffic congestion on the one hand and complaints from the Sanitary Department on the other. A number of stalls had to be cancelled at the annual relicensing in October to meet the first difficulty, and in connection with the latter, it

-K 16-

was decided to enforce more strictly the regulation dealing with the dimensions of the stalls. Incidentally, it was decided to insist that all stalls must be self-contained, particularly the food stalls, to prevent interference with scavenging. Amended Regulations for Hawkers were also drawn up and submitted for consideration to the Governor-in-Council. They have since been approved. The reduction in stalls entailed a reduction in revenue but it has certainly proved satisfactory, as the ever increasing congestion due largely to expanding motor transport of all kinds has been effectively checked in the portion of the City dealt with. The Hawkers Staff on the mainland has been chiefly engaged in collecting hawkers as far as possible on to spaces specially prepared for them, thereby reducing the unsightly appearance of the streets. Such a procedure is, of course, not possible in Victoria as there are no vacant spaces available.

6.-LIFE-SAVING.

During the year Belilios Medals were awarded to eight Chinese employed on Harbour ferries and launches for saving life in the Harbour and one Indian Constable also gained this Medal, P.C.B.107. The special life-saving classes inaugurated in 1929 were continued throughout the year with the result that two Awards of Merit, five Instructor's Certificates and thirty-one Certificates and Bronze Medallions were granted to members of the Tolice Force, European, Indian and Chinese.

7.-MENDICANTS.

Mendicants still continue to give the Police much trouble. Before the boycott of 1925, they were regularly returned to Canton by arrangement with the Canton Police. Since that date, however, when the existing arrangement expired, they have usually been returned to Chinese Territory in the vicinity of Deep Bay. As the figures in the body of the Report show some five hundred and fifty mendicants were sent to Deep Bay during the year. A further two hundred and fifteen were returned to Canton as a result of a new arrangement with the Canton Police. This arrangement is only temporary and it is hoped to replace it in the coming year by a definite agreement under the terms of which local beggars will be returned to Canton to be housed in the Home for the Poor there, which is supported in part by Hong Kong Contributions. This arrange- ment will, it is hoped, also reduce the large number of mendicants charged before the Magistrates, composed of consistent beggars who return to the Colony time after time, as they find it more lucrative to return here than to pursue their vocation in the Rural Districts of the Kwong Tung Province.

K 17

8.-MURDER & AMOK.

The figures for the past year are identical with those of the previous year (1929)-twenty-two cases in all. The most serious case again occurred in the New Territories, where an Indian Policeman, B.543, Dalip Singh, ran amok at Lok Ma Chau Police Station, a border Folice Station with a complement of two Europeans and eleven Indian Police. On the 21st July in the late afternoon acting under the impulse of an imaginary grievance, B.543 took advantage of the absence of both of the Europeans and eleven Indian Police. On the 21st July in the with his service rifle and ammunition with which he opened fire on the Officer in charge as he was coming up the steep path leading to the Station on his return from patrol. The Station Guard, who was armed with a revolver, ran inside and gave the alarm. Meanwhile Constable B.9 Chajja Singh, the caterer, who ran out of the kitchen to ascertain the cause of the firing was shot in the stomach by B.543 who thereupon ran upstairs and shot the wife of the Officer in charge through the head and barricaded himself on the verandah of the top floor. The Station was quickly surrounded by Police summoned from adjoining districts, thus making the escape of the murderer impossible and an entry to the upper floor was eventually effected when it was found that P.C.B. 543 had shot himself with his service rifle on the front verandah. The task of capturing the madman was made more difficult owing to the fact that he had armed himself further with the Lewis gun which is always kept ready for use in the event of an attack on the Station (in the Station Charge Room). Fortunately the gun jammed and he was unable to make use of it, though this was not known until entry to the upper floor was effected.

Details of the murder of Det. Sgt. Tse On by Communists in December have already been given.

9.-MUSKETRY.

During the year in addition to the regular Musketry and Revolver Courses, a special Revolver Course was instituted for the Sharpshooters Company of the Police Reserve. This was later extended to include all Arms Licence holders who hold Revolver Permits. These Licensees are now called upon to fire an annual course unless they are specially exempted. Revolver Courses were fired by all Contingents, (a) European, (h) Indian, e) Cantonese, (d) Northern Chinese, Water Police Seamen and District Watchmen. Full details appear in Table V.

10. PIRACY.

The body of the Report contains details of the two piracies mmitted on steamships, neither of which carried Guards and ne of which was Norwegian owned and the other Chinese owned. Thanks to the provision of Anti-Piracy Guards on Coastal

K 18

steamers in the danger zone which was continued throughout the year, no British steamers were attacked.

It is also very satisfactory to record the serious attention given to Bias Bay and its pirate gangs by the local authorities under Admiral Chan Chak which made piratical expeditions from Bias Bay a dangerous and unprofitable undertaking.

The vigilance of the local authorities coupled with the precautions now taken on all large steamers in the danger zone undoubtedly accounts for the marked improvement in the "piracy" situation in South China. The only radical change in the Piracy precautions during the year was the change over from Military to Police Guards referred to in an earlier paragraph.

11.-REVENUE & EXPENDITURE.

The revenue collected during the year amounted to $487,169 as against $463,148 in 1929. Compared with 1921 when the revenue was $259,876.00, the collections have doubled.

The cost of the Force amounted to $2,007,797.83, as against $1,445,490.72 in 1929. The enhanced figure is due to two causes, firstly the revision of salaries based on the Salaries Commission Report of 1929 which was adopted by the Government and approved by the Secretary of State with effect from 1st January, 1930, and secondly the phenomenal drop in the sterling value of the dollar.

12. TRAFFIC.

The increase in motor traffic which amounted to close on one thousand vehicles during the year is unfortunately also reflected in the number of fatal accidents which show a regretable increase from thirty-six in 1929 to fifty-nine in the year under review. The disregard of motor traffic by pedestrians in the City and Kowloon even where crossings for passengers are marked out in white lines, and the further fact that youngsters are permitted by their parents to indulge unchecked in ball games in motor thoroughfares makes the task of the Police a very arduous one, and accidents are inevitable. The dangerous practice of riding on the sides and tail boards of lorries and standing in lorries also accounts for numerous fatalities. Further "Safety First" propaganda supported by the well-known Chinese Charitable Institutions would do much to reduce the fatalities which are in many cases avoidable.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Inspector General of Police.

15th May, 1931.

K 19

TABLES.

Table 1-Yearly Return of Crime for the whole Colony.

11.-Yearly Return of Piracies reported to Hong Kong

Police.

III.-Annual Report on Records Office.

,, IVA.--Arms and Ammunition Seized and Confiscated during

the year.

IVB-Classification of Seizures of Arms and Ammunition.

V.-Musketry and Revolver Courses.

ANNEXES.

Annexe A.--Details concerning the Water Police.

B.-Details concerning Recruiting, and the Police Training School.

C.-A report on the New Territories (North).

D.-Details concerning the Anti-Piracy and Shore

Guards.

E-A report on the working of the Street Boys' Club,

F-A report on the Hong Kong Police Reserve.

SERIOUS OFFENCES.

K 20

Table I.

-

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1930.

Charged cases.

Cases without charge,

Total cases.

Charged cases.

Cases without charge.

Total cases.

1929.

1930.

% Charge cases to total.

Europeans.

Indians.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

Chinese.

PERSONS DISCHARGED.

:

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

습습

VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN.

VALUE OF

PROPERTY

RECOVERED.

c.

Arms,

48

7

55

35

Assault (Serious),

21

45

co co

6

6

41 85% 51 88%

—-

1

39

...

1

49

Assault with intent to rob,

4

3

3 100%

3

Burglary,

24

54

78

29

69

98 30%

33

1

3

7,221.88

1,188.43

Coinage Offences,

14

14

16

16 100%

12

Deportation,

222

222

238

238 100%

238

...

Embezzlement,

21

66

87

27

56

83 32%

19

House and Godown Breaking, Intimidation and Extortion,. Kidnapping,

37 89

126

48

118

166 28%

:

50

9

9

6

6 100%

6

28

29 44

5

49 90%

:

42

19

Larceny,

Larceny from Dwelling Houses,

Larceny on Ships and Wharf, Manslaughter,

Murder,

1,784 1,602 3,386 2,053 1,674

3,727

55%

2 2,033

8 132,467.06 2 20,481.60

148 1,054,761.25

645.29 1,360.20

...

62 555 617

77 540 617

87%

77

13 148,536.31

64 53

117

77 40

117

65%

79

4. 8,260,00

41,182.84 14,108.82

274.75

6

6

2

3

50%

2

:

10

Murder, Attempted,

Obtaining by False Pretences,

65

ཡཱ༣

12

22

10

12

22 43%

*1



2

1

1 100%

:

90

54

33

87 62%

2

47

Receiving,

158

158

143

143 100%

1

124

41

Robbery,..

29

84

113

8

48

56 14%

10

Women and Girls,...

15

15

21

21 100%

::

28

Other Serious Offences,

170

7

177 123

11

134 91%

.1

1 125

1

:::

13

...

11 17,067.33 251.90

7 33,863.27

Total,..

2,791 2,557 5,348 3,060 2,621 5,681

13

5 3,016

1

r{

761.20

251.90

12,419.03

2

71

3,778.28 448.00

365 1,426,688.88

72,640.46

** Japanese.



MINOR OFFENCES.

- K 21

Table I.-Continued.

YEARLY RETURN OF CRIME FOR THE WHOLE COLONY FOR THE YEAR 1930.

1929.

1930.

PERSONS

CONVICTED.

PERSONS

DISCHARGED.

VALUE OF VALUE OF

PROPERTY

STOLEN.

PROPERTY

RECOVERED

Europeans.

Indians.

Chinese.

Assault,

299

299

357

357 | 100%

Damage to Property,.

17

17

19

19 100%

COGI

1

365

1

60

17

3

...

Dangerous Goods,

36

36

29

29 | 100%

32

Drunkenness,

22

29

25

25 100%

13

2

12

Forestry Offences,

211

211

350

350 100%

507

9

...

Gambling,

327

327

368

368 100%

1,818

96

...

Hawking Offences,.

9,764

9,764 [11,282

11,282 100%

(11,013

425

Lottery Offences,

205

205 223

223 100%

213

35

Mendicants,

19

19

158

158 100%

166

Merchant Shipping Ordinance,

461

461

749

749 100%

N

1,242

20

Morphine,

2

2

2

2 | 100%

1

4

:.

Nuisances,

321

321

647

647 100%

Opium,

787

787

938

938 | 100%

Revenue,

329

329

464

464 100%

NON

2

680

13

...

1,384

1

158

472

I

47

Rogue and Vagabond,

36

36

29

29 100%

30

5

...

Stowaways,

24

24

50

50 100%

36

124

...

Unlawful Possession,

322

322

355

355 | 100%

222

60

:

Vagrants,

27

27

42

42 | 100%

43

Vehicles and Traffic,

1,042

1,042 1,633

1,633 | 100%

1,602

59

Women and Girls,

137

Other Miscellaneous

1,404

137

1,404 1,342

188

188 100%

179

26

1,342 | 100%

31

9] 1,681

I

123

Total,.

15,792

[15,792 19,250 |

19,250

144

2021,860

5

1 1,148

:

Grand Total,.

18,583|2,557|21,140|22,310| 2,621 24,931

.:.

157

25 24,876 1,876

61

2 1,513

...



K 22

Table II.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE during 1930, OTHER THAN BIAS BAY.

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

Place of Occurrence.

Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks.

1930

24th June

Chan Chi Cho, seaman, residing on board Fishing Junk No. 3671 H.C.

Sha Muk Chau, C.T., near Ling Ting Island.

About 12

$155.00 Also junk.

5 Adults &

5 Children

13th October

Leung Yau, residing at Wai Chow, Master of Fishing Junk, Num- ber not known.

Off To Tau, Wai Chow.

About 9 Hoklo.

Junk. Value not

known.

x

One male child shot dead and two persons wounded by pirates Kidnapped persons released 28.6.30. Junk recovered at Tai Ping, 18.8.30.

A very doubtful report.

Date.

Ship, Name and address of Complainant.

1930.

23rd July

:>

S.S. "Helikon Owners-Wo Fat

Shing Company. Master-W. Andersen.

K 23

Table II,-Continued.

PIRACIES REPORTED TO HONG KONG POLICE DURING 1930, BY BIAS BAY PIRATES.

Place of Occurrence.

Estimated No. of Pirates. Dialect spoken.

Estimated Value of Pro- perty Stolen.

132 miles South of Hong Kong.

No. of Persons Kidnapped.

Remarks

About 16 Punti, Hakka and Hoklo.

Cargo

$13,300

From Passen- gers $7,000.

Compradore and about 15 passengers.

1st and 3rd Compradores.

Pirates took ship during early hours of morning when, with exception of officers on duty, every one was sleeping. Resistance was im- possible. No guards carried. No shots fired and no one was injured. The ship was taken to Bias Bay where loot and kid- napped persons were landed.

Ship taken to Mirs Bay. Pirates believed to have gone overland to Bias Bay. Chinese boy shot in shoulder. No cargo stolen. Pirates expected to find bul- lion.

14th November.

S.S. "Hirundo" Norwegian Ship. Master-J. A. Pedersen.

130 miles South of Hong Kong.

About 12

Hakka and

Hoklo.

$4,000.

Decrease

Increase

1929

1930

:

:

:

:

:

:

Year.

Number

of

Persons

Banished.

From Hong Kong,

Persons Discharged from Gaol

dealt with.

K 24 -

Table III.

RECORDS OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT FOR YEAR 1930.

Singapore Banishees Received and

Sent On.

Singapore Vagrants Received and

Sent On.

Rangoon Banishees Received and

Sent On.

Deli Planters Received and Sent

On.

1,176

1,802

1,304

809

95

643

936

3

6

1,355

2,848

1,279

991

47

302

1,285

16

84

Total number of men handled by Records Office. Year 1930=8,207

"

1929-6,774

Dutch East Indies Received and

Sent On.

-

25

48

341

179

1,046

182

349

13

78

Increase 1,433

Sarawak Deportees Received and

Sent On.

Asiatic Petroleum Company.

- K 25

Table IV (A).

ARMS AND AMMUNITION SEIZED AND CONFISCATED DURING THE YEAR 1930.

In Store on Dec. 31st, 1930.

Description of Arms.

Arms Seized.

Ammunition

Seized.

Arms.

Ammunition,

Winchester Rifles

1

237

4

Rifles Various

7

199

30

7,100

German Rifles

2

Mauser Pistols

4

474

17

29,978

Auto Pistols

179

19,608

296

75,478

Revolvers

13

767

20

Luger Pistols

4

2,400

84

20

6,942

15,240

Rifles Winchester

Ammunition

Various

Ammunition

Mauser

Ammunition

K 26

Table IV (B).

ARMS AND AMMUNITION.

Classification of Seizures of Arms and Ammunition according to place of origin.

Spanish.

U.S.A.

French and Belgian.

Austrian. British.

Canadian. German. Unknown.

Total.

1

237

Pistols Mauser

1

2

Ammunition

150

800

"}

Automatic

2

173

Ammunition

211

18,300

""

Luger

1

Ammunition

500

1)

Revolvers

Shot Guns

"

Ammunition

Ammunition

.45 Thompson Machine Gun

Primors

Amtn.

-

6

1

703

1

100

مدينة

2

192

1

15

4

1,080

3

1.900

1 1

1

237

1522

7

7 199

2

24

24

4

474

179

17

19,608

4

2,400

6

13

64

767

1

100

K 27

Table V.

MUSKETRY AND REVOLVER COURSES, 1930.

"A" Contingent (Europeans).

I.-MUSKETRY.

Officers fired their annual musketry course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during December 1930, and are classified as under:

S.I. Carpenter obtained the highest score with 197 out of a possible 200.

Insp. Shaftain was second with a score of 176.

Advanced Course

Classification Part II.

Marksmen

32

1st Class Shots

4

1st Class Shots

41

2nd

19

2

2nd

40

3rd

Nil

J

> J

""

3rd

7

Failures

1

Failures

Nil

Total

.120

Total

24

II.—REVOLVER COURSES.

Each Officer fired three Quarterly Revolver Courses at the Police Range Bowen Road during 1930 as under:-

Possible Score: 110

Points required to qualify: 55 i.e. 50%

Fired in

Superintendents

Other Ranks

March June September

7

8

8

220

208

209

Total Passed

227

216

217

K 28

Table V,-Continued.

"B" Contingent (Indians)

I.-MUSKETRY.

Indians fired their Annual Musketry Course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during January, 1930, and are classified as under.

L.S. B14 obtained the highest score with 109 out of a possible 110.

P.C. B360 was second with a score of 104.

Marksmen

1st Class Shots

2nd

3rd

Failures

33

231

210

22

133

10

Total

617

II. REVOLVER COURSES.

Each Officer fired three Revolver Courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1930 as under:-

Possible 120.

Points required to qualify 60 i.c. 50%

Fired in

Passed

Failed

April

August November

653

677

648

Nil

1

Total

655

677

649

K 29

Table V,-Continued.

"D" Contingent (W.H.W.)

I. MUSKETRY.

Men of the Northern Contingent fired the Annual Musketry Course at Taikoo Rifle Range, Quarry Bay, during January 1931 and are classified as under:

Marksmen

1st Class Shots

2nd

""

97

3rd

Failures

";

7

64

50

28

4

Total fired

153

II. REVOLVER COURSES.

Each Officer fired three Quarterly Revolver Courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1930 as under:

Fossible: 120

Points to qualify: 60 i.e. 50%

Fired in

May

July

October

Passed

181

177

168

Failed

Nil

1

Nil

Total

181

178

168

"C" Contingent (Cantonese).

I. MUSKETRY.

Cantonese Police are not armed with rifles.

K 30

Table V,-Continued.

II. REVOLVER COURSES.

Each Officer fired three Revolver Courses at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1930 as under:-

Possible Score: 120

Points to qualify: 60

Fired in

May July

October

Passed

Failed

557

562

584

Nil

Nil

Nil

Total

557

562

584

Water Police Seamen. (Chinese).

Each seaman fired three Quarterly Revolver Courses Kennedy Road Revolver Range during 1930 as under:

Fired in

Passed

Failed

Total

May

July

October

56

50

54

10

11

66

61

59

at

District Watchmen.

The District Watchmen fired their Annual Revolver Course at Kennedy Road Revolver Range during September, 1930.

Possible Score: 120

Points to qualify: 60

Passed

Failed

80

11

Total

91

-

K 31

Annexe A.

REPORT ON THE WATER POLICE.

Return of Changes in the Establishment in 1930:-

Authorised Establishment

Resigned

Dismissed

Struck off

Invalided

Died

Total

Enlistments

244

8

8

1

2

1

20

22

(including:-1 enlistment to cover 1 vacancy on 31/12/29 and 2 enlistments-additional posts 1930 Estimates.)

Vacancy on 31/12/30

Total

1

23

CONDUCT.

The conduct of the Chinese Staff of the Water Police shows considerable improvement. There were 346 reports in 1930 as compared with 552 in 1929.

List of offences

Class A. Class B.

Sleeping on duty

18

Absent from station or launch and

duty

48

Absence without leave

Corrupt Practice

Careless navigation and damage to

Launches

Damage to Government property

Discreditable Conduct

12

Disobedience of Orders

6

Insubordinate Conduct

5

60

18 1

1

N

K 32

M

LIST OF OFFENCES,—Continued.

Misconduct

Unlawful or unnecessary exercise

of authority

Improperly dressed

Neglect of duty

Disorderly Conduct

Minor offences

Class A Class B.

6

16

27

6

2

120

Total

110

236

Grand Total·

346

There were 95 men against whom no defaulter reports were made during 1930.

1.--CRUISING LAUNCHES.

During the year 1930, all four Cruising Launches have undergone their annual survey and overhaul besides being slipped quarterly when minor repairs were effected.

No. 1 Launch, which is 28 years old and was condemned in 1929 as being no longer fit for the duties she is expected to perform, has been completely overhauled and is now expected. to carry on for several years longer.

2.-MOTOR BOATS.

Motor Boats Nos. 10, 11 and 12 have been overhauled throughout the year. No. 11 Motor Boat, which patrols the Sham Chun River, is unsatisfactory. The other two motor boats are in good condition.

3. SEARCH LIGHTS.

Search Lights on Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8 and 14 Launches have been overhauled and are in good working order.

4.-PULLING BOATS.

Fulling Boats and gear are in good condition. The TAI O boat and one of the pulling boats on No. 4 Launch have each' been equipped with out-board motors.

F

K 33

5.-WIRELESS.

Nos. 2, 3 and 4 Cruising Launches are each fitted with wireless. The wireless service has been most satisfactory.

6.-MUSKETRY.

All Cruising Launches are equipped with Vicker's Guns and quarterly courses have been fired.

The Chinese deck staff of cruising launches are regularly exercised in the use of Winchester Rifles and Revolvers, and fire a quarterly course with revolver as well as a yearly Winchester course.

Nos. 2, 3 and 4 Cruising Launches are equipped with 3 pounder Guns. The European and Chinese gun layers have been through a course of training and regularly practice with the Morris tube and also fire a half-yearly course.

Annexe B.

POLICE TRAINING SCHOOL.

1.-RECRUITING TABLE FROM 1.1.30 To 31.12.30.

Anti Piracy

Guards,

Continuing instruction

from 1929

Recruited

Passed out

Struck off

Dismissed

Died

Resigned...

Continuing Instruction in

1931

European.

Indian.

Cantonese.

W. H. W.

Russian.

Indian.

| W. H. W.

District Watch-

men.

10 44 20 20 23 62 57

90

31

16 40 42

20

43

88

13

3

2

518.212

5

20

23

17

58

19

13

1

Seamen.

K 34

-

II.-EXAMINATIONS.

During the year seven Promotion Examinations were held. The following table shews the number of officers who qualified for the various ranks:

European..

Indian

Cantonese ("C"

Contingent)

W. H. W. (“D” Contingent)

Sub

Ser-

Lance

Inspec-

Ser-

tor.

Inspec- geant.

Ser-

tor.

Major.

geant.

geant.

3

5

11

...

:.

4

...

III. SPECIAL TUITION.

A. During the year twenty W.H.W. Police were specially trained in Traffic Duties. Nineteen qualified and were appointed to the Traffic Staff: one failed to qualify and was returned to regular duty.

B. During the year thirteen Chinese Probationary Detect- ives (one continued from 1929) underwent a special course in Police duties: twelve qualified and were appointed to C.I.D. Staff one continues his training in 1931.

C. Fifteen members of the H.K. Police Reserve were trained in Police Duties.

D. Forty-three "D" Anti-Piracy Guards returned to P.T.S. for Refresher Courses of whom twenty-seven were re-posted for duty on board ships, one resigned, one was not re-engaged, and one convicted for 'Refusal of duty', and awarded 6 weeks H.L. by the Police Magistrate Kowloon on 12.12.30. Thirteen continue their course in 1931.

E. The following list shows the number of inefficient Indian and Chinese regular Police, who were sent back to P.T.S. for special instruction during 1930.

K 35

Cantou-

Indian.

W. H. W

ese.

Continuing Instruction from 1929.. Sent back for instruction 1930

Passed Out

Failed at the end of month and

retired on pension.........

Continuing instruction in 1931

277

1

10 N

1

1

3

F. The following Table shows the number of regular Police officers and recruits, who were trained, and passed or failed in First Aid to the Injured.

Qualified.

Failed.

¡Trained.

1st Cert.

Re- fresher.

1st Cert.

Re- fresher.

Exam. but result not yet Published.

Continu- ing in 1931.

Europeans

76

18

29

Indians

278

164

Cantonese

169

97

W. H. W.

95

79

15 16

19

57

22:

IV. DISCIPLINE.

One Indian recruit was sentenced to 3 months imprison- inent with H L. for Larceny at P.T.S. and was subsequently dismissed. Two Cantonese recruits were dismissed for mis- Conduct. Seven Indian and thirteen Cantonese recruits were struck off as unsuitable. One Cantonese recruit resigned being physically unfit.

Discipline was otherwise satisfactory.

K 36

Annexe C.

REPORT ON NEW TERRITORIES (NORTH) FOR 1930.

1.—ADMINISTRATIVE.

Mr. W. R. Scott transferred to Hong Kong on 1st March and Mr. W. La B. Sparrow had charge of the N.T.N. in addition to his other duties until 23rd October when Mr. Scott resumed charge of N.T.N. and took over N.T.S. in addition.

2.-ESTABLISHMENT.

The following changes in the Police Establishment occurred during the year:-

(a) The strength of Tai Po Station was reduced by

two I.P.Cs.

(b) The strength of Sha Tau Kok was reduced by one

European L.S. and one I.P.C.

(c) The strength of Sheung Shui was reduced by the withdrawal of one European L.S. who had been sent

there temporarily.

(d) The strength of Castle Peak was reduced by

three I.P.Cs.

(e) The strength of Au Tau was increased by three

I.P.C's.

(f) The strength of Lin Ma Hang was increased by

one I.P.C.

3.-CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE.

The conduct of the men in all contingents was good.

4.-HEALTH.

The health of the Police in the New Territory was good. Malaria continues its downward trend. The figures for malaria cases (hospital and sick in station) are:-

1927

1928

1929

1980

333 cases

193

"

186

"

182

""

Nearly half of the cases of malaria in 1930 were in Au Tau

and Sha Tau Kok stations.

K 37

5.—BUILDINGS.

The old Police Station at Un Chau Kok in Sha Tin District was demolished on 30th September.

6.-ACCIDENTS.

(a) Traffic. There were 4 fatal traffic accidents and 28 minor traffic accidents. The figures for 1929 were 4 and 25.

(b) Other fatal accidents-Total 6, caused by drowning, poisoned food, railway and dynamite explosion.

7.--FIRES.

There were 13 fires during 1930. The most important

were:

(a) Yung Wo Shop in Un Long Market on 14.7.30 with

$8,000.00 damage.

(b) Houses in Tai Kiu village, Un Long on 12.3.30

with $3,000.00 damage.

(c) Houses in Tung Tau village, Un Long on 13.1.30

with $1,000.00 damage.

(d) A house in Wo Tze village, Sha Tin on 9.10.30

with $800.00 damage.

8.--CRIME.

There were 24 cases of serious crime in 1930, exclusive of larcenies, of these 24 cases, 5 were murder and 2 were armed robbery.

9. THE FRONTIER.

The police were on friendly terms with the Chinese Authorities throughout the year. British Territory received

little attention from robbers from over the Border.

a

K 38

Annexe D.

POLICE WATCHMEN.

DISTRIBUTION

1929

1930

Dec. 31st. Dec. 31st.

Indian Guards on shore

261

262

15

ships

194

192

27

casual duty

65

27

Chinese Guards on shore

34

30

Joined during the year

66

Resigned Dismissed

83

""

Õ་

14

>"

2:

22

Deserted

Died in G. C. H.

Nil

5

Guards on shore

SPECIAL GUARDS.

DISTRIBUTION

ANTI-PIRACY GUARDS.

DISTRIBUTION,

50

49

Russian Contingent on ships

Nil

14

shore

Nil

15

اور شیر

""

W.H.W.

3

ships

Nil

72

shore

Nil

14

Indian

57

ships

Nil

36

Total

604

879

CONDUCT.

POLICE WATCHMEN.

Discipline throughout the year was fair, there were 390 defaulters of these, 14 were dismissed, 307 were fined and 69 cautioned.

K 39

ANTI-PIRACY & SPECIAL GUARDS.

"E" Contingent 2 dismissed, 7 fined and 3 cautioned.

W.H.W. Contingent 4 deserted, 2 dismissed, 22 fined, 4 cautioned and 1 charged at Police Court and sent to Gaol.

Indian Contingent 11 fined and 10 cautioned.

TRAINING.

All Guards on shore fired a Course with the Winchester Rifle, Greener Gun and Carbine, they also fired Revolver Courses quarterly.

PRIVATE WATCHMEN.

The total number of Private Watchmen registered during the year was 99. 43 resigned (the majority of these returned to India and the remainder left the Colony for employment in Canton, Macao and elsewhere). 4 were charged in Police Court for breaches of their licences.

SPECIAL GUARDS.

From the 1st January until 18th June, 25 Special Guards were attached to the Prison Department for duty at Lai Chi Kok relieving Warders for duty at Victoria Gaol.

ANTI-PIRACY.

During the early part of the year a scheme was formulated whereby the Military who were then acting as Piracy Guards on ships could be replaced by Guards supplied by the Police Department.

For this work Russians, Northern Chinese and Indians were specially recruited. These men after a short course of training were posted to various vessels owned by Shipping Companies taking part in the scheme i.e. Canadian Pacific, Butterfield & Swire, Jardine Matheson and the British India Co. The scheme started during the month of July and was in full working order by October.

REMOVAL OF OFFICE.

On the 29th September the Guards Office removed from Central and occupied the Old No. 7 Police Station.

- K 40

Annexe E.

STREET BOYS CLUB ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1930.

The membership of the Club is now 25 boys as against 26 in January, 1930.

During the year two boys absconded: five who were over age, were permitted to resign by Hon I.G.F. and one boy was turned out, following his conviction for gambling.

During the year seven boys joined the Club. Three boys who were formerly hawkers obtained employment as messengers in Victoria Gaol.

There are now

now seven boys in permanent employment as messengers and a further seven boys are employed selling goods in the streets and held free itinerant licences for that purpose.

Eleven boys are at St. Louis Industrial School.

The funds of the Club on December 31st amounted to $954.53.

Boys employed as messengers are expected to save $2.00 per month out of their pay. Other boys save as their incomes permit.

Total savings during the year amounted to $328.30.

During the summer months weekly bathing parties to Kau Pak Hang Bathing Beach were arranged. At the Police Annual Aquatic Sports held in September at V.R.C. Baths, six members of the Club entered for the messengers Race. The first three places were secured by Club members.

Hot baths are provided for the boys at Police Headquarters during the winter months.

Games, drill and gymnastic classes were held twice a week during the year at Chinese Y.M.C.A., except during the month of September when the classes were suspended for the summer vacation.

Members of the Club now regularly attend the educational classes held 3 times a week at No. 40 Hollywood Road. Their progress is considered very satisfactory by the Teacher.

During the year the 11 boys at St. Louis Industrial School were each supplied with a suit of Winter Uniform and 2 singlets. the cost being paid from the General Fund,

- K 41 -

Several small improvements for the benefit of members of the club have been carried out at the Club Premises which remain at No. 40 Hollywood Road, 3rd ficor. Police Sergeant Fung Kan remains in charge and resides on these premises He maintains discipline and attends to the welfare of the members. The conduct of members remains good.

During the past year the following ladies and gentlemen have visited the Club premises and taken a great interest in the welfare of the boys which they in turn greatly appreciate :- Hon. I. G. F., Mr. T. H. King, Mr. Perdue, Mrs Southorn, Mrs. King, Mrs. Creasy, Mrs. (Dr.) Minett, Dr. Kotewall, Mr. Tang Shiu Kin. Mr. Leung Pat U and Mr. Fung Heung Chun. A large parcel of socks and other articles was given to the Club by Col. Robertson and the articles were issued to the boys as required.

During the yast year the sum of $235.00 accrued from sale of confiscated vegetables. This amount has been paid into General Account for Street Boys Club.

STREET Boy's CLUB.

Statement of Accounts for the year ending December 31st,

1930:-

GENERAL ACCOUNT.

Income.

Expenditure.

Balance Brought

Forward

$3,026.83

St. Louis School Rent of Club

.$1,100.00

720.00

Miscellaneous Re-

Teacher

420.00

ceipts

248.00

Light

28.08

Unclaimed Savings

Clothing

74.00

Account Balance

.20

Furniture

9.40

Interest

35.48

Printing

4.50

Balance in hand

954.53

Total

$3,310.51

Total

$3,310.51

BOYS SAVINGS ACCOUNT.

Balance on Jan. 1st Savings during year.... 328.30

.$439.42

Drawings during year $401.28 General Account

.20

Interest

7.04

Balance Dec. 31st..... 373.28

Total

.$774.76

Total

$774.76

K 42

Annexe F.

HONG KONG POLICE Reserve.

The Hong Kong Police Reserve has been maintained throughout the year on the same basis as before.

STRENGTH.

The strength of the Force shows an increase of eleven members due mainly to the increase in the Sharpshooter Com- pany.

The strength of the Contingent is as follows:

1930

1929

Chinese Company

72

72

Indian Company

48

49

Flying Squad

46

42

Sharpshooter Company

39

31

Total

205

194

Mr. F. C Mow Fung, A.S.P. (R) relinquished command of the Chinese Company with effect from December 31st, 1930 and was appointed to command the Emergency Company, Hong Kong Police Reserve with effect from January 1st, 1931.

LEAVE.

Mr. D. L. King, D.S.P. (R) resumed command on return from leave on 11th February, 1930. Mr. W. Kent, A.S.P. (H.K.P.) acted as Adjutant to the Police Reserve during Mr. King's absence.

COMMENDATIONS.

Four commendations were awarded to members of the Police Reserve during the year: --

Crown Sergeant R407 W. V. Field of the Sharpshooter Company was commended for assisting in the rescue of passen- gers from a Taxi Cab which had fallen into the harbour.

Constable R410 J.C.M. Grenham of the Sharpshooter Com- pany was commended for his prompt action in diving from a Star Ferry and assisting in the rescue of a would-be suicide.

Constable R213 Bhagat Singh of the Indian Company was commended for zeal and alertness in assisting in the arrest of a thief on 9th June and again on 4th September, 1930.

-K 43-

TRAINING.

The attendance for Part 1 (Squad Drill and Rifle Exercises) and Part 11 (Knowledge of Police Duties and Regulations) of Training Courses under P./Sgt. R. J. Hunt and Chief Inspector. Paterson, F.P.T.S. respectively has been satisfactory.

SPECIAL TRAINING.

Special training has

has been continued in Life Saving, Signalling and First Aid to the Injured. Attendance at these courses has been satisfactory.

SPECIAL VOLUNTARY POLICE DUTY.

All Contingents of the Police Reserve have rendered valuable assistance to the Regular Police upon special occasions especially during the arrival of H. E. The Governor on May 9th 1930, King's Birthday June 3rd, and Armistice Day November 11th.

FLYING SQUAD.

Strength. Mr. B. C. Randall, Officer in Charge of the Flying Squad relinquished command as from December 31st, 1930.

Eight recruits joined during the year thus bringing the total strength up to 46--Hong Kong-36 and Kowloon-10.

Patrols. The weekly instructional patrols have been held regularly in Hong Kong and Kowloon and the attendance of the Hong Kong members has been satisfactory.

Promotion.-Constable R333 A. W. Mooney was promoted to the rank of Lance Sergeant.

General. -On frequent occasions the members of the Flying Squad have assisted the Regular Traffic Police in escort and Traffic Duties, especially in connection with Communist activity on May 1st, when 11 men assisted in patrolling the City and outlying Districts, and in suppressing the distribution of seditious literature. Members continue to display great keenness in their work,

SPECIAL CONSTABULARY.

This force is divided into thirteen Contingents according to iir nationalities and the strength on 31.12.30 was 159.

K 44

REPORT OF THE CHIEF OFFICER

HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1930

1. Cost of Fire Brigade.-The cost of the Fire Brigade .for the year 1930 was $315,431.00 including Special expenditure amounting to $99,833.00 on additional equipment as against $232,826 in 1929.

2. Stations and Equipment.-The main item of special expenditure was a new Motor Fire Float costing $163,100 part of which cost remains to be defrayed in 1931. Tenders were called for this float and construction started late in 1930. Delivery is due in May 1931. The new float which is a twin-screw vessel is being equipped with a twin set of 1166 h.p. Gardner petrol- kerosine engines with twin sets of Merryweather fire and salvage pumps, each pump having a delivery of 1,000 gallons per minute at 90 lbs. pressure.

There are six tour-inch deliveries and three monitors. On completion of this float the Brigade will then be equipped with three fire floats as follows:—

No. 1.

No. 2.

Large steam float with two pumps each having a delivery of 2,000 gallons per minute at 150 lbs. pressure and three monitors.

Motor float now under construction.

Each pump

has a pumping capacity of 1,000 gallons per minute at 90 lbs. pressure.

No. 3. Small steam float for duty in outlying districts with pumping capacity of 850 gallons per minute at 100 lbs. pressure.

No Station construction was undertaken during the year owing to lack of funds. The Brigade still occupies temporary premises at all Sub Stations i.e. Wanchai and Kennedy Town in Hong Kong and Mong Kok in Kowloon.

3. Special Occurrences.

(a) Fires, Loss of life and Rescues.-There were fortunately no very serious fires or collapses. Fatalities at fires amounted to twelve in all. Four persons were burned at a fire on board a petrol laden junk in Gin Drinkers Bay, three in matshed fires, and the remaining five were trapped in the top of buildings, three in Hong Kong and two in Kowloon. These buildings in each case were stored with inflammable goods which quickly involved the staircase and cut off all means of escape; in the first case (12 Smithfield, Kennedy Town) the three persons were fatally injured by jumping from the building and in the second, 196 and 198 Shanghai Street, the two persons were burnt to death before the arrival of the Brigade. In this latter fire three persons were rescued by firemen from the roof of No. 198.

(b) Fire Legislation.-On 16th October an Amendment of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance (No. 1 of 1903) was passed which enacted that the main staircases in any building of more than two storeys used as a public building or tenement

K 45-

must be constructed of fire resisting materials and enclosed by walls or partitions constructed of fire resisting materials. This legislation should do much to check the loss of life in tenement house fires which have been too frequent of late years. The legislation refers to new premises only. Unfortunately many old houses still remain which are not covered by this legislation and are veritable death traps.

(c) General.-The Annual Display of the Brigade which included the finals of the Motor Escape, Motor Pump and Despatch Box Competitions took place in the compound of Police Headquarters on the 19th November, was witnessed by a large number of the public including H.E. the Governor and H.E. the Governor of Macao.

4. Ambulance Service.

The work of the Motor Ambulance Service attached to the Fire Brigade continues to increase as the figures in the Super- intendent's report show. The cases attended by the Brigade Ambulances show an increase of 400 as compared with 1929, and this in spite of the fact that the Tung Wa Hospital had an ambulance of their own running during the whole year and a second one during the latter part of 1930. By arrangement their Ambulance was also made available for Brigade use in the event of calls being received when all Brigade appliances were out. Thanks to the assistance and active co-operation of the St. John Ambulance Brigade their Motor Ambulance was placed at the disposal of the Brigade at a time when serious difficulties would have arisen had there been no spare ambulance available. The large Brigade Ambulance met with an unfor- tunate accident which put it out of commission for a considerable time but thanks to the St. John Ambulance Brigade who generously placed their Ambulance at the disposal of the Fire Brigade the Ambulance service was carried on with a full com- plement of machines throughout the year. By using the St. John Brigade Ambulance it was also possible to overhaul all the Brigade Ambulances. This additional ambulance was at the disposal of the Fire Brigade for a period totalling six months during the year. The thanks of the Government no less than the public are due to the St. John Ambulance Brigade and the Tung Wa Hospital Authorities for their public spirit and generosity. It is hoped to secure even closer co-operation and more complete co-ordination of the various motor Ambulance Services in the Colony in the near future.

5. Superintendent's Report. The report of the Superin- tendent giving full details of the Brigade including staff equip- ment, calls and the general working of the Brigade also a short account of each important fire is attached.

E. D. C. WOLFE, Chief Officer, Fire Brigade.

+

Hong Kong, 20th April, 1931.

REPORT

K 46

OF THE

SUPERINTENDENT

OF THE

HONG KONG FIRE BRIGADE FOR THE YEAR 1930.

Calls -The number of calls received during the year totalled 186. Actual fires 133, chimney fires 16, collapses 5, landslides 5 and false alarms 27.

Compared with the previous year (1929) there is a decrease of 51 calls.

There were ten serious fires, details of which appear in Table III.

Of the false alarms eight were maliciously given, eleven were given with good intent, and eight were due to electrical faults.

How received.-By street Fire Alarm 48; by Telephone 120; from Police 11; from Messengers 7.

LIVES LOST; PERSONS RESCUED.

Twelve persons lost their lives due directly or indirectly to fire. (Six within City limits and six in the New Territories).

Three persons were rescued at fires by means of Fire Brigade appliances.

Six persons lost their lives as a result of collapses and landslides, while three persons were extricated alive by the Brigade from same.

HEALTH OF STAFF.

During the year there were 362 cases of illness, viz., European officers 11, Chinese members 351.

COMMENDATION.

(a) His Excellency the Governor was pleased to commend highly Assistant Station Officer J. W. Woollard for the prompt- ness, courage and resource with which he effected the rescue of three persons from the fire at Shanghai Street, Yaumati, on the 18th March, while the Chief Officer, the Hon. Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe, C.M.G. was pleased to commend Sub-Officer LAM HUNG KEE for the work he performed on the above occasion.

(b) Sub Officer LAU TAK KWONG was highly commended by the Inspector General of Police, Hon. Mr. E. D. C. Wolfe, C.M.G. for his praiseworthy conduct in securing the arrest of two snatch thieves, one on the 18th April and one on the 26th June.

K 47

STRENGTH OF STAFF.

The authorised strength of the Staff for the year 1930 was as follows:-

1 Chief Officer (Hon. I.G.P.)

1 Superintendent

1 Consulting Engineer (Asst: G.M.S.)

1 Inspection Officer

2 Station Officers

4 Asst: Station Officers

1 Mechanical Engineer

1 Asst: Mechanical Engineer

(Chinese)

14 Sub-Officers

5 Foremen

120 Firemen

35 Motor Drivers

16 Ambulance Attendants

3 Clerks

10 Telephone Clerks

79 Other ranks

Total 294

THEATRE AND OTHER DUTIES.

Duties performed by members of the Brigade at public and private entertainments during the year totalled 363. comprising altogether 2,392 hours.

MOTOR AMBULANCE SERVICE.

The number of cases attended during the year by the respective Ambulances is shewn in the following summary :—

Cases.

Total

|Police Private

Distance run, (miles)

No. 1 Ambulance (Kowloon)...

156

127

283

2,997

No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 36

">

(Hong Kong) 162 376

538

2,827

527

638

11

1,165

7,526

(Kowloon)... 483

501

984

53

7,888

Loaned by St.

John Ambulance

Brigade (Hong Kong).

402

337

739

5,053

Totals

1,730

1,979

3,709

26,391

K 48

by the Motor

The yearly increase in cases attended Ambulances is shewn in the following summary :—

Last year 1930

Previous years

1929 1928 1927 1926 1925

Cases attended

3,709 3,289 3.282 3,1872,637 |2,265

REVENUE.

Theatre and Other duties

Motor Ambulance Service

$1,503.00

$4.422.00

$6,925.00

Total

WATER SUPPLY.

The number of Pedestal and Ball Hydrants were increased

by 14 and 22 respectively during the year; total number of hydrants now being 1,289 viz. :

Hong Kong (pedestal hydrants) (including Peak)

Kowloon (pedestal hydrants).

Hong Kong (ball hydrants) (including Peak)

Kowloon (ball hydrants) (including N.T.)

Total

115

87

710

377

.1,289

The above hydrants were regularly inspected every quarter.

GENERAL.

Staff-Assistant Station Officer W. M. Smith returned to duty from vacation leave on the 19th December.

Station Officer G. Saunders went on ten months vacation leave on the 2nd August.

During the year sixteen Chinese members resigned, seven were dismissed, twenty-nine absconded, while the services of five were dispensed with and four were invalided.

Sixty four recruits were enrolled and trained as firemen and passed out of the Drill Class into the Brigade while fifteen men were engaged and appointed to fill vacancies in other ranks of the Department.

Eleven firemen were selected and trained in the Brigade Motor-driving classes during the year; some of these men have already been appointed as Motor Drivers in the Brigade.

K 49

Equipment. The following appliances were supplied during the year and added to the equipment of the Brigade.

3 Pompier Hook Ladders

3 Portable Electric-Acetylene Searchlights.

1 Oxy-Acetylene Cutting Outfit.

1 Dennis Motor Fire Engine, equipped with a 500/600

g.p.m. turbine pump.

1 Foamite Continuous Foam Generator.

The following equipment which had become unserviceable was sold during the year:

1 Merryweather Fire Escape (No. 2).

2 "Gwynne" turbine pumps 400 g.p.m. (replaced by

latest-pattern Dennis turbine pumps 500/600 g.p.m. on Nos. 6 and 8 motor fire engines).

}

Overhauls and tests.-All vehicles and fire floats were satisfactorily overhauled during the year while all other appliances and equipment were examined and tested every month.

Fire Inspection work.-The following inspections were made by the Brigade and reported upon during the year:

Theatres and Cinemas

Hotels and Restaurants

Garages

Petrol Stores

Inflammable Structures

Premises used for offensive trades

122

131

329

29

70

8

Miscellaneous Stores

Premises installed with hydrant services

38

(other than those mentioned above).

37

Schools

21

Factories

26

Total

811

226 Chemical Fire Extinguishers located in various Govern- ment Buildings were tested and recharged by the Brigade during the year.

The thanks of the Brigade are due to the Public, the Police, the members of the St. John Ambulance Brigade and Boy Scouts for the assistance they have rendered the Brigade from time to time during the year.

H. T. BROOKS, Superintendent, Fire Brigade.

20th March, 1931.

N.

N:

- K 50 —

Table I.

Stations and Appliances, 31st December, 1930.

Chemical Extincteurs. |

Branches.

NN

NNTN

WNT

по

1

LO TH

NWTN24

ON

12

তেতে

45

:..

10

N

ww

WN

N

| First Floors

Ladders.

Scaling Ladders.

Hook Ladders.

Despatch Boxes.

"Miller" soda-

66

acid.

Babcock" soda-acid,

Morris "Fire

Snow.

“Foamite

""

"Safoam" units.

Hand Pumps.

“Ajax” diaphram.

"London" hand-

controlled.

Metal (copper).

Standpipes.

Smoke Helmets

(bellows).

"Proto" self-contained

Breathing apparatus.

Peroxide Breath- ing apparatus.

| Hand Lamps (port-

able Acetylene).

Wootton Lamps.

Jumping Sheets.

Large Dams.

Small Dams.

7

2

23

6

2

42

2

::

4

10

24

13

42

17

4

26

3

15

44

20

114

67

2 30

w

~22:

4

col

:

10

15

6

2

CO

Canvas Chutes.

4" Unlined.

Canvas Hose.

23" Unlined.

23" Rubber lined.

Feet.

1,700

Feet.

Feet.

6,500

600

3,200/

1,000

1,200

006

4,400

1,000

2,800

3,000

1,100

1,500

600

1,700

1,200

1,300

7,700

4,400

2,000

1,000

2

24,200

20,100

Central Fire Station

Wanchai Fire Station Kennedy Town Sub Station. Kowloon Fire Station

Mong Kok Fire Station.. No. 1 Fire Float.... No. 3 Fire Float.. Shaukiwan Village Tai Po Village N.T. Un Long Village N.T. Cheung Chau Island. Outlying Stations Store (Central)

Gough Hill Police Station.

Total

:

— K 50 —

Table I.

Stations and Appliances, 31st December, 1930.

| Chemical Extincteurs.

1

}

N

-N

:

1

2

::

2~

:

N

N

ลง

NN:

NNFNA

No:

HHi wan∞

:.

Motor Tenders.

Motor Pumps

Motor Trailer

Pumps.

Motor Turntable

Ladder.

Motor Fire Cycles.

| Motor Ambul-

1

ances.

Steam Fire

Engines

| Manual Fire

Engines.

Hose Reels.

| Fire Floats

(Steam)..

Skiffs.

"Davy" Fire Escapes.

Fire Escapes.

Double Extension

Ladders.

Ladders.

| First Floors

Scaling Ladders.

Hook Ladders.

Despatch Boxes.

"Miller" soda-

66

acid.

soda-acid.

Babcock

"Morris "Fire

Snow.

"Foamite".

1

11

2

2

1

N

4

4

2

سر

:

6

4

CO

2

10

24

13

42 17

42

3

4

4 26



>>

units.

64

Safoam

K 51

Table II.

Summary of Estimated Monetary Loss by Fire for the year 19930.

Not Exceeding

Exceed-

Month

Under $500

ing

Total

$5,000

$750 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000

January..

548 1,100 2,000

62,395

66,913

February..

311

4,000 3,000

10,000 17,311

March

225

:

3,000

41,220

44,445

April

742 500

3,500

65,300

70,012

May

40 1,000 1,000

4,000 7,000

13,040

June

301

301

July.

20

:

:

24,800

August

17

600

:

:

24,820

23,220

23,837

September..

285

4,100

4,385

October

830

800

118,000 119,630

3,400

3,772

November.. 372

December... 1,274 670 1,000 2,500 4,000 28,750 38,194

Total... 4,965 3,870 4,800 9,900 21,600 380,685 425,820

Appendix L.

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF PRISONS

FOR THE YEAR 1930.

1. The number of prisoners received into prison during the year and the corresponding number for 1929 were as follows:-

1929

1930.

Convicted by Ordinary Courts

4,773

5,624

Convicted by High Court Wei-hai-wei... Debtors

7

66

73

On remand or in default of finding surety 933

796

Total

5,779

6,493

There was a decrease in the number of prisoners convicted for larceny during the year under review the number being 1,287 against 1,410 for the previous year.

2. The number of Revenue Grade prisoners admitted to prison was 3,290 made up as follows:

Convicted under the Opium Ordinance

554

J

"J

Gambling Ordinance

86

Arms & Ammunition Ord...

3

1

Vehicle Ordinance

82

"

>"

11

21

Harbour Regulations

34

Water Works Ordinance

4

11

>"

Dangerous Goods Ord....

15

19

Chinese Wine & Spirit Ord.

101

Societies Ordinance

6

17

1

""

1

19

Public Health & Buildings

Ordinance

37

Truck Ordinance

"1

""

2

**

""

12

Women & Girls (Protection)

Ordinance

Tobacco Ordinance

"

Stowaway Ordinance

Offences against the Person

Ordinance

Carried forward

11

104

137

5

1,180

- L 2

Brought forward................................ 1,180

Convicted under the Police Regulations

19

>"

17

33

79

"

19

11

Pawn-Brokers' Ordinance...

Indecent Exhibitions Ord...

Emergency Regulations

Ordinance

Counterfeit Coins Ord....................

breach of Wild Birds Protec-

tion Ordinance

of removing dead body without

permission

LO

2

1

CO

31

committing nuisance. in the

street

1

unlawfully boarding steamers......

28

多多

1>

hawking without a licence

618

"

??

cruelty to animals

รร

keeping house for prostitution

69

drunkenness

4

"

"

trespass

94

79

""

disorderly conduct

8

assault

39

19

obstruction

93

2

11

51

cutting trees

31

15

"

mission

21

""

tickets

"

"

stealing

""

"

''

removing sand without per-

mendicancy

unlawful possession of lottery

unlawful possession

possession of implement fit for

unlawful purpose

offering bribe

obtaining money by false pre-

tences

soliciting in a public thoroughfare

12

for the purpose of prostitu- tion

3

unlawful receiving

16

25

125

13

310

466

4

2

Carried forward

3.167

3,167

6

9

a

28

10

5

2

1

- L 3

Brought forward

,,

19

uttering cries

Convicted of damaging Government property......

99

>>

2"

"}

"

""

""

17

""

""

""

""

"2

""

15

"

obeying a call of nature in

public place

fighting

firing crackers without permission...

felonious intent

keeping a dog without licence...

impersonating police

aiding and abetting to commit an

offence

leaving the Colony without

clearance

exposing person in a public place.... depositing rubbish in public street... warning inmates of brothel of Police

approach

unlawfully picking rubbish in public

place

embezzlement

exhibiting notices without per-

mission

provoking a breach of Peace

being absent from House of

Detention

Total

N

1

21

1

223

1

1

M

3

3,290

3. 59 per cent of the total admissions to prison were Revenue Grade prisoners.

The following table shows the number of prisoners com- mitted to prison without the option of fine and in default of payment of fine :-

In default of payment of fine.

Year.

Without option of fine.

Served

Total.

the imprison-

Paid full

Paid part

fine.

fine.

ment.

1929

2,056

2,357

159

201

4,773

1930

2,334

2,925

120

245

5,624

L 4

4. 44 boys were admitted as Juveniles i.e. under 16 years of age, during the year, with sentences varying from 48 hours detention to 12 months hard labour, but only 19 were treated as Juvenile Offenders; the others in the opinions of the Superinten- dent and Medical Officer being over 16 years of age. In 3 cases corporal punishment was awarded by courts in addition to sentences of imprisonment.

5. The percentage of convicted prisoners admitted to prison with previous convictions recorded against them was 22.8 as compared with 23.8 for 1929.

6. 260 prisoners were convicted by Police Courts in the New Territories, against 126 for the previous year.

7. The following table shows the number of convicts in custody on the 31st December for the past 10 years, and the percentage of the total number of prisoners in custody to the estimated population of Hong Kong:-

Year.

Estimated

population.

Number of

convicts.

Percentage

of

population.

Daily

average number of

prisoners.

to

Precentage

population.

1921

665,350

231

035

764

*115

1922

662,200

259

*039

787

*119

1923

681,800

294

*043

861

*126

1924

799,550

345

*043

1,066

·133

1925

874.420

394

*045

1,116

•128

1926

786,920

409

*052

1,054

•134

1927

890,400

392

*044

1,189

*136

1928

1,075,690

352

*033

1,071

•100

1929

1,075,690

331

•031

1,075

•100

1930

1,143,510

256

*022

1,175

⚫103

VICTORIA GAOL (MALE PRISON)

8. 14,091,535 forms were printed and issued to various Government Departments and 77,701 books bound or repaired. as compared with 15,611,413 forms and 101,884 books in 1929 During the year type to the value of $2,500.00 was cast.

9. A Linotype Machine was installed in October and a most useful addition to the equipment of the Printing Depart- ment.

10. Owing to the demolition of the Printing Shop which was considered unsafe, a temporary shop was erected in one of the Yards. This transfer and the strike referred to in paragraph 15 caused a falling off in the output for the year

- L 5 –

11. Other work done in the Prison included matmaking, tailoring, carpentering, tinsmithing, painting, laundering, shoe- making, soapmaking, netmaking and basketmaking in addition to the necessary upkeep work of cooking, cleaning and minor build- ing repairs.

12. In consequence of the removal of the Printing Depart- ment rearrangement of parties was necessary which added to the congestion in the Yards, and industrial work suffered in consequence.

13. The Gaol was again overcrowded and until a new prison is built it is likely to continue to be overcrowded.

14. In August a European warder was stabbed and severely wounded by a prisoner undergoing a sentence of 12 months. The prisoner was tried at the Supreme Court and sentenced to seven years Hard Labour.

15. A general strike of convicted prisoners occurred on 16th December. Labour was resumed generally on 24th December. A special Committee of unofficials was appointed to act with the Superintendent of Prisons in dealing with five serious cases of insubordination arising out of the strike. The remainder of the strikers were dealt with by the Superintendent under his own powers.

16. Two prisoners escaped on 9th October. They were recaptured.

VICTORIA GAOL. (FEMALE PRISON).

17. This prison was also overcrowded. The ground for a new female prison is being prepared.

18. During the year the working party of English and Chinese resident ladies continued to visit the Prison to instruct the women in sewing raffiawork &c. and to give them elementary education. The prisoners are attentive and appreciative and the results gratifying. Thanks are again due to the visiting ladies for their voluntary and willing efforts.

19. The female prisoners took no part in the strike (see paragraph 15).

LAI CHI KOK PRISON.

20. Garden work continues to give useful employment. Other work done at Lai Chi Kok apart from the necessary upkeep duties of cooking, cleaning, etc. are string and net making, basket and broom making and grass matmaking. During the year coir matmaking was successfully added to this list.

21. Prisoner No. 3225 escaped on 2nd June 1930. He has not been recaptured.

22. The conduct of prisoners generally was very good.

L 6

GENERAL.

23. 388 punishments were awarded for breaches of prison discipline as compared with 493 for the preceding year. Corporal punishment was inflicted in twenty five cases for prison offences.

24. One hundred and sixty six (166) prisoners were whipped by order of courts.

25. There were 16 deaths (14 natural causes and 2 executions).

26. The conduct of the Staff, with some exceptions, was very good.

27. The General health of the Staff was good.

28. Existing fire appliances are in good condition.

29. The rules laid down for the Government of Prisons were complied with.

30. A Food Committee was appointed to enquire into the diet for prisoners and a temporary improved scale of diets was approved as from 7th December pending further consideration of the matter.

31. Captain H. F. Bloxham, Assistant Superintendent of Prisons, was transferred to the Gold Coast on 16th August.

Mr. C. D. Melbourne acted as Superintendent of Prisons from 16th to 26th September during the absence on sick leave of Mr. J. W. Franks.

32. With reference to the Secretary of State despatch of 12th November 1930 enclosing a copy of the resolution of the Colonial Office Conference in regard to Prison Administration and Prison Services and drawing attention to comments in the Com- mittee's report I have the honour to state that

(1) the Police and Prison Departments in this Colony are kept separate as recommended by the Com- mittee.

(2) There is no Discharged Prisoners Aid Society in this Colony. Such an institution might do useful work in assisting recommended cases after discharge.

(3) Given better accommodation educational classes could be held and lectures given but until it is possible to segregate the different classes and to separate the hopeful cases from the habitual, the prospect of reforming the criminal in prison is

remote.

L 7

Schemes are under consideration for the building of a new prison. Until that institution is occupied little or nothing can be done effectively to separate the different classes.

(4) Except in a few cases where unproductive labour is used as a deterrent, every convicted prisoner in Hong Kong is now employed on some form of useful work. Many develop into good tailors, carpenters, mat- makers and printers and with better facilities I am confident better working results would be obtained Fifteen years ago the majority turned the handles of machines known as 'cranks', or carried shot and stone, both forms of labour producing no result except perhaps the development of certain muscles and dull discontent.

(5) This Colony's criminal population is peculiar inas- much as 94% of the prisoners convicted are not British born and 23% are banished for periods. varying from 5 years to life after completing their sentences in prison. It is doubtful whether any system of educational or 'vocational' training would have much value in these cases. The only way to judge would be by the numbers of banishees return- ing to the Colony. A falling off in these numbers might indicate that instruction in prison had enabled them to become useful members of society in their own country-or it might not. The number of banished criminals who return to Hong Kong varies with the conditions in the adjacent Chinese pro- vinces.

33. The usual returns are appended.

14th May, 1931.

J. W. FRANKS, Superintendent of Prisons.

Table I.

Return showing the Expenditure and Income for the year 1930.

EXPENDITURE.

$

C.

INCOME.

Pay and allowance of officers including Uniform, etc.

480,297.21

Earning of prisoners

Debtors' subsistence

Victualling of prisoners.....

79,811,25

Naval subsistence

136,908.08

618.50

41.00

Consulate, Amoy

Fuel, light, soap, and dry earth

45,444.64

Wei-hai-wei Government subsistence

351.40

1,359.75

Military Authorities

28.35

Clothing of prisoners, bedding, and furniture

72,142.06

To Balance

538,278.08

Total

1929

677,585.16

$512,591.65

Total.

Average annual cost per prisoner $460.15, in 1929 $317.43, and in 1928 $303.34.

$677,585.16

- L 8-

L 9

Table II.

Return showing Expenditure and Income for the past 10 years.

Actual cost

Average

Year.

Expenditure. Income.

of prisoners' maintenance.

cost per

prisoner.

$

C.

$ C.

C.

$

C.

1921......

297,970.36

79,635.73

218,334.83

286.78

1922

291,175.12 126,124.62 165,050.50 209.72

1923...... 324,698.26 117,302.22

1924...... 375,158.14

207,396.04 240.88

121,664.03

253,137.11

237.56

1925...... 462,827.14

122,221.20

340,605.84

305.20

1926... 472,337.42

148,667.08

322,640.12

306.11

1927...... 493,398.88 154,929.44

338,469.44

284.67

1928...... 485,147.89

1929...... 512,591.65 171,355.24

160,272.50

324,875.39

303.34

341,236.41

317.43

1930..

677,585.16 136,908.08 540,677.08

460.15

Table III.

Return showing value of Industrial Labour for the year 1930.

1

2

3

Value of

Nature of

Industry.

stock on

Value of

hand

January 1st

1930.

materials

purchased.

Total Dr.

4

Value of

articles

manufactur- ed or work

done on

payment.

5

6

Value of

articles

Value of

stock on

hand

December

Total Cr.

manufactur- ed or work

done for

Gaol or other Departments.

31st, 1930.

8

Value of

earnings

(Difference between

columns

3 and 7.)

C.

€.

C.

C.

c.

C.

Oakum,

...

Coir,

Netmaking,

4,425.94

155.00

5,578.89

363.59

10,004.83

2,635.70

518.59

373.30

4,006.51

175.39

Tailoring,

10,426.83

20,665.53

31,092.36

127.72

25,553.47

5,368.40

195.50

8,476.15

12,010.61

744.19

34,157.34

2,005.78

225.60

3,064.98

Rattan,

210.90

544.50

755.40

4.45

866.40

107.60

977.45

222.05

Tinsmithing,

116.39

1,407.73

1.524.12

161.65

3,667.63

44.05

3,873.33

2,349.21

Carpentering,

2,298.49

4,228.03

6,526.52

477.57

5,940.52

2,066,40

8,484.49

1,957.97

Grass-matting,

1.80

224.00

225.30

570.40

10.40

580.80

355.50

Shoemaking,

503.61

4.972.84

5,176.45

120.69

6,143.47

679.20

6,943.36

1,466.91

Laundry,

5.10

2,084.56

2,089.66

...

12,809.65

247.90

13,057.55

10,967.89,

Printing and

Bookbinding,...

$1,086.90

Photography,

318.50

57,529.71

1,180.92

98,616.61

1,499.42

910.10

2.30

150,039.99

61,767.00

212,717.09

114,100.48

1,388.33

300.50

1,691,13

191.71

Total,..

59,548.96

98,780.30

158,329.26

4,813.48

211,160.76

79,263.10

295,237.34

136,908.08

Paid into Bank during 1930, which sum includes $216.90 for work executed in 1929, $5,243,45. Value of work executed during 1930 for which payment was deferred to 1931, $261.91.

L 10

HONG KONG

MEDICAL & SANITARY

REPORT

FOR THE YEAR 1930

BY

A. R. WELLINGTON

Director of Medicul and Sanitary Services.

SECTION.

M 3

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

PAGE.

7

15

19

19

INTRODUCTION

L-ADMINISTRATION

11.-PUBLIC HEALTH

A. General Remarks

B. Communicable Diseases:

(a) Insect Borne

20

(b) Chronic Infectious Diseases (T. B.

and Leprosy)

22

(c) Acute Infectious Diseases

23

(d) Helminthic Diseases

28

C. Vital Statistics:

(a) General Population

29

(b) Non-Chinese Population

31

(c) European Officials

32

III-HYGIENE AND SANITATION

A. General Remarks-Administration

B. Preventive Measures against:

32

33

(a) Insect-borne diseases

(b) Helminthic diseases

(c) Tuberculosis

(d) Epidemic or acute infectious

34

3.7

37

diseases:

Plague

Small-pox

36

37

Cholera, Dysentery, Enteric

37

1.

M 4

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

SECTION.

PAGE.

C. General Measures of Sanitation:

(a) Domestic cleanliness

38

(b) Scavenging

38

(c) Conservancy and sewerage

38

888

(d) Drainage

39

(e) Clearance of bush and undergrowth..

39

(f) Sanitary inspectors

40

D. School Hygiene

40

E. Labour Conditions

42

F. House and Town Planning

42

G. Food in relation to Health and Diseases :

(a) Inspection and control of food

supplies

(b) Slaughter houses

(c) Markets

(d) Dairies

(e) Deficiency diseases

H. Training of Sanitary Personnel

IV.—PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINIS.

45

46

46

46

45

46

TRATION

47

A. General

47

B. Quarantine

47

C. Emigration

48

D. Vaccination

49

E. Tables I, II, III, IV, and V.

49

:

M 5 -

INDEX.

SECTION.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

V. MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE

53

A. Anti-natal and infant welfare centres ...

B. Midwives

53

53

54

55

56

56

58

59

60

61

3 3 8 3

61

55

C. Maternity Hospital Accommodation:-

(a) Government (G.C.H. and Victoria).......

(b) Chinese (Tung Wah, Kwong Wah

Tung Wah Eastern, Tsan Yuk, Wanchai

VI. HOSPITALS, INSTITUTES, ETC.

A. Government Institutions :-

Government Civil Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Kowloon Hospital

Taipo Dispensary

Venereal Diseases Clinics

Un Long Dispensary

B. Chinese Institutions:

Tung Wah Hospital

Kwong Wah Hospital

Tung Wah Eastern Hospital

Chinese Public Dispensaries (9 in all) ...

Infectious Diseases Hospital

VII. PRISONS AND ASYLUMS

Prisons

Mental Hospital

61

65

66

67

70

71

3 3 3 5 2 2

71

74

SECTION.

VIII-METEOROLOGY

IX.-SCIENTIFIC

M 6

INDEX.

CONTENTS.

A. Bacteriological Institute

B. Public Mortuary, Victoria

C. Public Mortuary, Kowloon

D. Government Analytical Laboratories.

APPENDIX A.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

PAGE.

74

76

76

77

77

78

2 8EE @

MENT BACTERIOLOGIST ..

78

AUPENDIX B.-REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT MALARIALOGIST

89

PIENDIX C.--REPORT OF THE GOVERN-

MENT ANALYST

97

ENDIX D.—MENTAL HOSPITAL-RETURNS

SHOWING DISEASES AND

DEATHS

APPENDIX E.-GOVERNMENT HOSPITAL—

107

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

109

APPENDIX F.-CHINESE HOSPITALS—

RETURN OF DISEASES AND DEATHS

APPENDIX G.-MORTUARIES-RETURN OF

DISEASES

109

121

-

M 7

Appendix M.

ANNUAL MEDICAL REPORT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1930.

INTRODUCTION.

In order to give a clear impression of the Public Health conditions obtaining in Hong Kong it is necessary first t describe the situation of the Colony, its geographical features. its climate, the nature of the population, the housing conditions and the bearing old Chinese traditions, beliefs, and customs have on the question of co-operation with the authorities in the promotion and preservation of the Public Health. It is also desirable to indicate the various organisations which together make up the Public Health machinery.

The Territory under British jurisdiction includes the Colony Proper, namely, the Island of Hong Kong with the Peninsula of Kowloon, and the New Territories. In this Report the term Colony means the Colony Proper. The area of the Island is 32 square miles-that of Kowloon is 2 2/3rd. square miles while the New Territories have approximately 300 square miles.

Situated between 22°-9′ and 22°37′ North Latitude the area under discussion is just within the northern limits of the tropies. It is in fact practically on the same level as Calcutta. It may be said to form the lower extremity of the left bank of the estuary of the Canton River, at the head of which is the city of Canton and on an island in which stands the Portuguese Colony of Macao.

Topographically the Island of Hong Kong and the Peninsula Kowloon may be described as દી series of granite ridges rated by narrow valleys and having here and there flat areas ng the sea. The New Territory is of similar formation with fairly wide valleys towards the north and west. The ares are such that flats suitable for town sites are few in number and limited in extent. In the Island the only level of size is that on which the city of Victoria stands and this

not cover more than one square mile. With regard kostoon, not more than one half is flat and convenient for stros!

tion.

the

of t

Climate.--Situated just within the northern lin. pies and occupying an insular position immediately

great land mass of China, Hong Kong's climate is matr ily influenced by the direction of the prevailing The North East Monsoon blows from November until Apr. dura period the weather is dry and cool and invigor

-

17

M 8 -

From May until October, the season of the South West Monsoon, the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot. muggy and enervating. July, August and September are marked by atmospheric disturbances which now and then cul- minate in typhoons or cyclones accompanied by blinding sheets ot rain.

The mean annual temperature is 72. During the summer months the average temperature is 87 and there is little varia- tion throughout the 24 hours. Situated on the north side of the Island the city of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze, which is cut off by the mountains behind the town. During the winter months the range of temperature is from 70° to 45° with an average of 66° necessitating for comfort the wearing of warm clothes and the provision of fires in the houses. Frost is practically unknown.

The average yearly rainfall is 85.72 inches. As might be expected most of the rain falls in the summer months.

Population and its distribution.-With regard to population there are no accurate statistical figures, the great movement to and from the Colony and the facility with which the border is osed preventing accurate checking Hong Kong being the

pal entrepôt for South China and its harbour one of the est in the world, every day on an average 4,000 to 5,000 viduals pass to and from China by river steamer and by rail, there are others who arrive and depart by junks or smaller els. During times of political unrest in China many thou- nds from the mainland sojourn in the Colony, some of whom turn to their homes when conditions are more settled, others maining attracted by the opportunities offered for employment. It is estimated that the civil population of the Colony is 1,171,400 of which 592,100 reside in the City of Victoria, 310,000 in the Town of Kowloon, over 100,000 on boats in or about the harbour and the remainder in villages. The Chinese outnumber the rest by 50 to 1, the great majority being illiterate working people who reside in Hong Kong because of the facilities for employment but who return to their native towns and villages when too ill or too old for labour. Through this exodus the death rate of the Colony is considerably lower than it otherwise would be. The Chinese of the upper classes, many of whom have received a western education, are mostly engaged in com- merce but there are among them a number of professional men including both lawyers and doctors.

Hong Kong depends for its prosperity on its trade with China and consequently 9/10ths of the population are concen- trated in the cities of Victoria and Kowloon which may justly be described as one city divided into two by the harbour. Out- side this city there is little of commercial importance and Hong Kong as a Colony might almost be termed the city and port of Greater Hong Kong.

M 9

Housing Conditions.-The site on which Victoria stands is a narrow strip of land 4 miles long by 1/5th to 2/5ths of a mile broad lying at the northern foot of the mountain and separating it from the sea. The total area of available space is about one square mile or 1/32nd of that of the whole island. Limited in front by the sea and behind by the steep slopes of the mountain there remams hardly an inch of space which has not been occupied for one purpose or another. The residential portion of the town where the masses live does not exceed 400 acres. In this space 500,000 individuals find accommodation giving a density of 1,250 per acre.

The conformation of the site with its rapid rise of land near the sea-shore led in the early days to the erection of houses on the narrow strip of land near the harbour and extending a little way up the lower slopes of the mountain the houses being separated by narrow lanes and alleyways. When the population was small and the houses only one and two stories in height, the situation was not unsatisfactory. As the population increased the houses were heightened to four and five stories without any corresponding widening of the spaces separating them.

Writing in 1882 when the population was 160,000, the area much the same as it is now and the density 400 per acre— Chadwick stated:--"Overcrowding of houses on the ground occurs to a serious extent and so does overcrowding of houses with humans.” By 1901, when Chadwick again visited, the density had risen to 700 per acre. In his report he said that the housing conditions were rather worse than better than they were in 1882. As regards area per person they were the same but as regards ground area they were worse owing to the large number of lofty houses which had been built during the interval.

Year by year the population continued to increase, immigra- tion being accelerated by unrest in China. Victoria was the centre of trade and therefore the centre of attraction. There was no room to build further accommodation and the newcomers had to squeeze into the already overcrowded premises. Rooms were divided into cubicles which to a certain extent provided privacy but which interfered both with lighting and ventilation.

Year by year the Sanitary Department and the Building Authority made efforts to deal with the situation and with a certain amount of success both as regards palliative and radical treatment. The task almost sisyphean in itself, was rendered more difficult by paucity of water and by opposition put forward hoth by property owners and the occupiers.

The position to-day is that 500,000 people are being accom- mulated in an area not exceding 400 acres in extent where the strects are narrow and the houses four and five stories high. The density is 1.250 to the acre. The people are packed together in the houses like steerage passengers on emigrant ships. In

+

M 10

some cases there are tiers of bunks placed against the walls as in the old fashioned ships, in others the rooms are divided into cubicles or cabins each measuring perhaps eight feet by eight feet and having partitions 6 feet in height. These cabins are not the temporary abodes of persons on a voyage but the more or less permanent homes of the people. There is little or no room for kitchens, and latrine accommodation is limited to pail closets on the roofs of the buildings.

It goes without saying that the maintenance of a satisfactory standard of sanitation under such conditions is a most difficult problem and one which cannot be solved without the willing co-operation of the people. One thing is certain so long as buildings are over-crowded and insanitary no amount of external sanitation will give immunity from disease.

With regard to Kowloon the case is different. This city which is comparatively new has been laid out in accordance with modern town planning principles. It has a density of 300 per acre and the water supply is adequate except in periods of great drought.

Influence of traditional beliefs.-The traditional beliefs of the uneducated Chinese as to the cause of diseases, the means of spread and the factors which affect its course are so at variance with modern teaching, that there is little chance of promoting voluntary co-operation between them and the authorities in the matter of the prevention and control of disease until they can be brought to understand the true nature of the problems and are conscious of the usefulness of the measures advocated. The proximity of China and the constant intercourse makes it harder

to

overcome prejudices than is the case in countries further afield. The greatest hope lies in propaganda and education. However leaders of opinion in China and leaders of Chinese thought in Hong Kong are making vigorous efforts to promote public health and public welfare along lines which have proved successful in the Occident and the outlook is far more hopeful than was the case a few years ago when Chinese thought on matters of health was unduly swayed by old traditions and theories,

Quarantine impractical between Hong Kong and the

River Ports.

So closely related are Hong Kong, Canton, Macao and the River Ports in the matter of trade, and such is the amount of traffic both human and goods which pass between them that. up-to-date, it has been found impossible to devise any system of quarantine which would effectually safeguard one city against introduction of disease from the other and, at the same tim preserve that freedom of commercial movements on which cities depend for prosperity. It has been deemed best to “?

M 11

them as forming one unit, as suburbs the one of the other, and to strive for a working agreement between the various health organizations to the end that some means, other than imposing restrictions against a whole port, may be found to prevent the spread of infection.

The Organization for the promotion and maintenance of the Public Health.

The Colony has no "municipality" in the ordinary accepted sense of the term, the Governor himself being head of the city. and head of the port. A Legislative Council takes the place of a Municipal Council and the Colonial Heads of Department perform the duties which in a municipality would be performed by Municipal Heads of Department.

The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services is the official adviser to Government on all Medical and Sanitary matters and is the Officer responsible to Government for the Public Health of the Colony. Under his direction come the Government Hospital Organisation, the Inspection of Chinese Hospitals and Chinese Dispensaries, the Medical Inspection of Schools, the Bacteriological Institute, the Analytical Laboratory, Anti- malarial Activities, Vaccination and Quarantine and Port Health Work.

The Sanitary Department which is distinct from and in- dependent of the Medical Department has at its head a layman, an Officer of the Cadet Service. This department does the work usually performed by the Health Department of a Municipality and in addition deals with all matters connected with scavenging and conservancy. Attached to this department are Medical Officers of Health who are seconded from the Medical Depart- ment.

There is a Sanitary Board composed of officials and non- officials whose powers and responsibilities are laid down in the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance 1903 and which acts as an advisory body to the Head of the Sanitary Department who is ex-officio chairman of the Board. The Board has no direct control over the Department. The functions and powers of the Board and the Department are limited to the Colony and to that portion of the New Territories adjacent to Kowloon which i- known as New Kowloon,

The present machinery for the promotion of the Public Hh is complex in that responsibility for the organization of ent. both for the cure and the prevention of disease is divided number of units, governmental and non-governmental, wheperate more or less independently of one another. The foll

Table shows the bodies concerned in the various operations for cure and prevention and the authorities in control.

an

Institution.

M 12

CURE OF DISEASE.

Accom-

Authority in Control.

modation.

Government Civil Hospital*

246 beds

Medical Department.

Victoria Hospital

71

Kowloon Hospital

58

21

""

Peak Hospital

20

>>

وو

Infectious Diseases Hospital

26

""

وو

Gaol Hospital

30

">

Alice Memorial and

Affiliated Hospitals

126

23

London Missionary Society

Matilda Hospital

50

2)

The French Hospital

110

The Italian Hospital

18

The Tung Wah Hospital

460

Special Committee.

French Mission.

Canossian Mission.

Tung Wah Committee

(Chinese).

The Tung Wah Eastern

Hospital

195

27

The Kwong Wah Hospital...

250

27

22

21

22

The Tsan Yuk Maternity

Hospital

The Chinese Eastern

57

">

Special Chinese Committee

22

7)

Special Chinese Committee

Maternity Hospital

The Chinese Public Dis-

pensaries: 9 in number ..

Special Chinese Committee

for each.

*100 beds in this Hospital have been placed under the charge of the Clinical Professors of the Hong Kong University. The Out-patients Department is also conducted by them.

M 13

Transport of the sick.--Motor Ambulances, garaged at the Fire Station, are controlled by the Police and Fire Department. Hand Ambulances are operated by the Sanitary Department. The Tung Wah Hospital and the Tung Wah Eastern Hospital each has a motor ambulance of its own and so has the St. John's Ambulance Brigade.

DISEASE PREVENTION.

Activity.

Town Planning

House Construction

Water Supplies

Sewerage and Drainage

Controlling Authority.

Public Works Department.

23

J

22

>>

12

27

Control & protection of food supplies. Sanitary Department.

Registration of Births and Deaths...

Control of epidemic causing diseases.. Collection and disposal of refuse Collection and disposal of night soil...

รา

;"

Quarantine and Port Health Work.... Medical Department.

Vaccination

Bacteriological Activities

Public Mortuary Work

""

""

2

>>

The St John's Ambulance Brigade which holds a strong position in the Colony and which does excellent work both in the training of personnel and in the performance of first aid duties, renders valuable assistance to the authorities.

Progress with regard to Re-organisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services.

In December 1929 the Legislative Council passed an amend- ment to the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance making the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services a member of the Sanitary Board in place of the Medical Officer of Health. The objects and reasons of the Bill were stated as follows:

"With a view to the re-organisation of the Medical and Sanitary Services of the Colony, it is considered desirable to associate the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services more closely with the working of the Sanitary Department, and in order that he may have the opportunity of acquiring first hand knowledge of the working of the Department it has been decided to place him on the Sanitary Board instead of the Medical Officer of Health.

M 14

When the

the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services has replaced the Medical Officer of Health as a member of the Sanitary Board the Govern- ment will await such recommendations from him in the public health administration as his experience of the working of the Sanitary Department inay prompt him to make.”

In January 1930 Sir Cecil Clementi in his farewell address to the Legislative Council said "We need and must have a Sanitary organisation co-extensive with the Colony and its New Territories and reform in this respect is long over due."

In July the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services for- warded to Government his report on the working of the Medical and Sanitary Departments and submitted recommendations for re-organisation.

In October the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services was relieved of his duties as a member of the Sanitary Board and the Medical Officer of Health was re-installed. In the same month the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services paid a visit to Shanghai for the purpose of studying the health system of the International Settlement and that of Greater Shanghai.

In December Government appointed a "Public Health Committee to examine the proposals made for re-organization," which Committee was still sitting at the close of the year.

A factor which very effectually slowed progress in matters connected with re-organization was the decline in value of the local dollar. Owing to the difficulty of balancing the budget hopes of expansion had to be temporarily abandoned and retrenchment seriously considered. Vacancies for a Secretary to the Medical Department, a Dental Surgeon, a Senior Health Officer and two Health Officers were left unfilled and the launch. proposed for dispensing relief to the boat population, was not built.

In June Government appointed a Retrenchment Committee to make enquiries regarding the staff, organization and working of all departments. At the end of the year neither the Medical Department nor the Sanitary Department had been examined by the Committee.

N.B. Since writing the above, the 1931 Census has been taken and the preliminary returns show that the total population of the Colony, exclusive of the Naval, Military and Air Forces, is only about 855,000. As the full figures are not yet available it has not been possible to make the necessary corrections in the Report. Corrected figures will appear in the Report for 1931.

M 15

SECTION I

ADMINISTRATION.

STAFF.

The total authorised establishment of the Medical Depart- ment for 1930 was as follows:-

Head Quarters Staff.

Director of Medical and Sanitary Services ... 1

Deputy Director of Medical and Sanitary

Services

Secretary

1

1*

Health Division.

Senior Health Officer

1*

Health Officers

5+

Chinese Health Officer

1

Medical Officer for Schools

1

Chinese Medical Officer for Schools

School Nurses

Port Health Officers and Inspector of

Emigrants

Chinese Port Health Officers

Vaccinators

1

2 2

12

Medical Division.

Senior Medical Officer

1

Medical Officers

8

Dental Surgeon

1*

Dental Mechanic

1*

Assistant Visiting Medical Officer to Chinese

Hospital and Dispensaries

Part-time Interpreter to Assistant Visiting

Medical Officer to Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries

Chinese Medical Officers

Radiologist

Radiographer

Masseuse

*Posts vacant during the year.

+ 3 Posts vacant.

1

9

1

M 16

Bacteriological Institute and Research

Bacteriologist

Division.

Assistant Bacteriologist

Class I Laboratory Assistant

1

1

1

Class VI Laboratory Assistant

3

Malariologist

1

Assistant to Malariologist

1

Inspector

Probationer Inspectors

AH

1*

4

Division of Chemical Analysts.

Government Analyst

Assistant Analysts

Assistant Analyst (Temporary)

Assistant Analysts Class II

Sampler

1

3+

1

2

1

Apothecaries and Dispensers.

Apothecary

Assistant Apothecaries

Dispensers

Apprentice Dispensers

1 2 5 di

4

Nursing Staff.

Principal Matron

1

Matrons

4

Home Sister

1

Tutor Sister

*I

X-Ray Sister

Nursing Sisters

Charge Nurse

Staff Nurses

Probationer Nurses

Charge Dressers

Staff Dressers

Probationer Dressers

Head Attendant, Mental Hospital

Assistant Attendant, Mental Hospital Female Attendants, Mental Hospital Wardmasters Midwives

* Posts vacant during the year. f 1 Post vacant.

1*

46

1

11

30%

5

2

125

1

1

2

3

7

8 Posts vacant.

4 Posts vacant,

Accountant

Clerk Class II

Clerks Class III

Clerks Class IV*

Clerks Class V

M 17

Clerical Staff.

1

1

2

2

2

Clerks Class VI

12

Clerk Special Class

1

Stenographers

2

Other Officers

Steward

Assistant Steward

Linen Maid

1

1

1

.289

Office Attendants, Messengers, Wardboys,

Amahs, Coolies, etc

Principal Changes in Personnel.

The following were the principal changes which took place during the year:-

Appointments:-Dr. A. V. Greaves was transferred from the Bahamas Medical Service as Assistant Bacteriologist and arrived in the Colony on 27th January, 1930.

Dr. R. B. Jackson was transferred from the Federated Malay States Medical Service as Malariologist and arrived in the Colony on 24th April, 1930.

Dr. W. D. Forrest was appointed Medical Officer on 21st March, 1930 and arrived in the Colony on 24th April, 1930.

Dr. G. V. A. Griffith was appointed Medical Officer on 24th July, 1980 and arrived in the Colony on 28th August, 1930.

Dr. P. F. S. Court was appointed Medical Officer on 13th September, 1930 and arrived in the Colony on 17th October, 1930.

Resignation:-Dr. A. Cannon left on termination of Agree-

ment.

1930.

Invaliding :—Dr. W. D. Forrest was invalided on 30th May,

Chinese Medical Officers.

Dr. D. Laing was appointed on 7th April, 1930.

Dr. (Miss) P. Ruttonjee was appointed on 1st October, 1930.

M 18

Finance.

The amount sanctioned in the Estimates for the Medical Department was $1,209,611.00 and the amount expended was $1,186,249.73.

Revenue received: -

For Medical Treatment

$100,324.23

Medical Certificates

110.00

Bacteriological Examinations

7,384.03

Chemical Analyses

19,891.50

Bill of Health

11,292.00

Medical Examination of Emigrants

128,885.90

TOTAL

$267,887.66

Ratio of expenditure on medical and sanitary services to total revenue from all sources:-Because of the overlapping which occurs when a work serves both a utilitarian and a sanitary service it is impossible to assess exactly the amounts which have been spent for purely medical and sanitary purposes. Including all water works and drainage works as sanitary works the following shows the commitments as laid down in the Estimates for 1930:

Expenditure by Medical Department

$1,209,611.00

""

12

Sanitary Department

791,563.00

"

Public Works Dept

1,000,000.00

>>

Police Department

9,000.00

""

Subsidies to charities...

111,704.00

23

Miscellaneous

11,000.00

TOTAL

$3,132,878.00

Expenditure

3,132,878.00

Ratio=

- 13.75%

Revenue

22.712.920.00

- M 19

SECTION II.

PUBLIC HEALTH.

GENERAL REMARKS.

It is usual to gauge the health of a community by the death rate for a high death rate means a high sickness rate and vice versa. The number of deaths recorded in Hong Kong indicates very correctly the deaths which have taken place in the Colony, but because of the desire of the Chinese to expire in their native towns or villages in the midst of their relations and the con- sequent exodus of many who feel death approaching, the number of deaths recorded is considerably lower than would be the case had all who contracted disease here remained until the end.

Even if the death figures were correct the absence of accurate figures for population makes it impossible to obtain rates which would form useful bases for comparisons.

The state of the public health of the Colony as reflected in the statistics and compared with those of former years was good.

The crude death rate of the Colony as calculated was 15.14 per mille population a decrease of 1.63 per mille on the figures for the previous year and less by 4 per mille than the mean for the last 10 years.

Respiratory diseases accounted for 38.95% of the total deaths, 12.25% of the whole being due to pulmonary tuber- culosis, 12.33% to broncho-pneumonia, 9.31% to bronchitis and 5.06% to pneumonia. The overcrowded, ill-ventilated and badly lighted houses combined with the expectorating habits of the Chinese lower classes furnish sufficient explanation for the prevalence of respiratory troubles.

The following Table gives the principal diseases causing deaths and their death rates:

Death rates per mille

Non-notifiable diseases.

population.

1930

1929

Pulmonary tuberculosis.

1.85

2.06

Broncho-pneumonia

1.86

2.07

Bronchitis

1.41

1.32

Pneumonia

0.76

0.90

Diarrhoea (infantile)

1.36

1.19

Diarrhoea

0.60

0.37

Dysentery

0.19

0.18

Beri Beri

0.59

0.54

Malaria

0.47

0.40

Heart disease and Heart failure... 0.40

0.42

M 20

Notifiable diseases.

Death rates per population.

mille

1930

1929

Small-pox

0.23

0.81

Enteric

0.07

0.05

Diphtheria

0.03

0.06

Cerebro-spinal fever

0.01

0.01

Plague

0.00

0.001

In the New Territories there never has been any registration of deaths and figures for the calculation of rates are not available.

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES.

(A) Mosquito-borne Diseases.-The mosquito borne diseases -malaria, dengue and filariasis not being notifiable incidence figures are not available and the only information obtainable is that put up by certain hospitals and private practitioners.

Malaria.-This disease which in the early days of the Colony was the great cause of death and from which Hong Kong derived its reputation of unhealthiness has now practically disappeared from the populous centres of Victoria and Kowloon, as the result of the destruction of the breeding places of the carriers through efficient drainage. There is still a considerable amount of malaria in the outskirts of the two towns and in the rural areas both of the Island and the mainland. From the general topography of the country, from its geology, from what has already been learned of the mosquito fauna, and from comparison with Malaya, Assam, Sumatra and the Philippines where similar mosquitoes exist one is inclined to suspect that the breeding grounds of the carriers are the small collections of clear water lying in the untrained nullahs and at the hill foots and that the large areas of wet cultivation are not so dangerous as has been supposed. However, much more detailed work will have to be done before the whole truth is brought to light.

An experienced Malariologist and his technical assistant arrived in the Colony in April having been transferred from the Malayan Medical Service. The Report of the Malariologist will be found in the appendix.

M 21

Judging from the Hospital admissions this disease

slightly less prevalent than last year. The cases admitted to the Government Hospitals for the last six years were as follows:-

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1930

1,142

970

670

485

653

535

Of the 535 cases admitted during the year 370 were benign tertian, 163 sub-tertian, 2 quartan.

The incidence among the police in the New Territories for the same period was:---

1925

1926

1927

1928

1929

1980

1,205

877

428

278

265

258

Many of the Police Stations are screened and every man is provided with a mosquito curtain. Prophylactic Quinine is issued and the living rooms are regularly sprayed with an insecticide to repel mosquitoes and to kill those that may be present.

The total number of deaths attributed to Malaria was 515 or 3.1 per cent of the whole: the death rate per mille population was 0.47 as compared with 0.40 for 1929. The lowness of the rate is of course due to the fact that the majority of the popu- lation being outside the zone of the Malaria carrying anophelines are not subject to risks of attack. A number of localities outside the town are reputed to be malarious but at present there are few figures to allow an estimate to be made of amount.

Dengue.--Dengue is endemic in Hong Kong and from time to time reaches epidemic form. There was nothing in the way of an epidemic in 1930.

Filariasis.—The disease probably exists but there are no figures on which to estimate sickness and death rates. Cases of Elephantiasis are rare.

M 22

Tuberculosis.—If one assumes the probability of some of the cases of broncho-pneumonia being tubercular the death figures show that this disease still continues to rank as the chief cause of mortality. Pulmonary tuberculosis is a chronic and debilitating disease and one which unfits the individual from the active exercise of his employment months or even years previous to his death. It is, therefore, most probable that the death figures form only a partial index of the prevalence of the disease in the Colony as many, who would have died here had they remained, returned to their native villages in China there to end their lives among their friends and relatives. If the death figures were multiplied by two the result would be not far from the truth.

There is no sanitorium and no special institute for the care of persons suffering from chronic diseases and the hospital accommodation all told is only one bed per 1,000 population. It is obvious, therefore, that the majority of sufferers from this infectious disease must struggle against the ravages of their affliction in the crowded tenement houses under conditions which leave little hope for their ultimate recovery. It is the custom with the Chinese of to-day, as it was with the English of yesterday, to expectorate anywhere and everywhere and thus each case of tuberculosis is an active focus for the spread of the disease.

There is little hope for improvement under present condi- tions.

Leprosy. The law dealing with Leprosy is the Leprosy Ordinance of 1910 which makes leprosy a notifiable disease and gives power to the Governor-in-Council 'to appoint such places as he shall think fit to be leper asylums for the segregation and treatment of lepers' and power to the Governor to order that a leper be segregated in a leper asylum, or if there be provision for effective isolation and medical treatment in the patient's own home, the conditions under which he may be allowed to remain there.

Since November 1910, when the Au Tau Settlement in the New Territory was destroyed by fire, no place has been 'appointed a leper asylum' and there is now no settlement in either the Colony or New Territories.

Though leprosy is a notifiable disease very few cases are notified. Considering the great interchange between Hong Kong and the neighbouring province of Kwangtung it is not unnatural to suppose that the incidence rate will be much the same in the two places. In Kwangtung the incidence rate has been estimated as one case per thousand population or the same as

M 23

that prevailing in India and Malaya. Assuming the population of the Colony and New Territory to be 1,000,000 the number of lepers is 1,000. It may be that this number is too high but allowing that the number is only half that of Kwangtung the figure is 500 or if one quarter then 250.

Lepers who are not British subjects are prohibited from entering the Colony and any such who find entrance may be deported. Lepers of Chinese nationality are sent to Canton. Lepers who are British subjects may obtain treatment at the Government Hospitals.

It is hoped that it may be arranged for Hong Kong lepers to be received at Sheklung-a leper settlement on Chinese territory controlled by the Roman Catholic Mission.

INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

The infectious diseases of the Colony may for convenience be classified into those which are notifiable under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and those which are not.

non-notifiable

The most important

important of the of the diseases are Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Leprosy.

infectious

The notifiable diseases are Plague, Cholera, Yellow Fever, Small-pox, Typhus Fever, Cerebro-spinal Fever, Enteric Fever, Para-typhoid Fever, Relapsing Fever, Scarlet Fever, Diphtheria, Fuerperal Fever and Rabies (human and animal).

Responsibility for reporting a case of notifiable disease lies with the legally qualified medical practitioner attending the case, or in the absence of such on the occupier or keeper of the premises, or on the nearest male relative living on the premises or in default of such relative on any person in charge of or in attendance on the sick person. Reports are to be made to the Medical Officer of Health or to the Officer in charge of the nearest Police Station.

In actual fact practically the only reports received by the Medical Officer of Health are (a) those from qualified medical practitioners (b) from the medical officers of hospitals and (c) from the medical officers in charge of the Public Mortuaries where bodies dumped in the street by friends or relatives of the deceased have been taken for inspection and disposal.

The Health Authorities, when they do discover a

case of infectious disease, have no power to remove it to hospital unless the patient or his guardian consents or unless a magistrate makes an order for removal,

M 24

The numbers of cases of infectious disease notified during

the year were :—

Bubonic Plague

༤ ༤

Cholera

Small-pox

Diphtheria

Scarlet Fever

Enteric

Para-typhoid

Relapsing Fever

Cerebro-spinal Fever

Typhus

Yellow Fever

Puerperal Fever

Rabies (human)

0

0

270

95

3

221

3

0

20

1

0

15

Rabies (animal)

2

Small-pox.-Every year during the winter months this disease manifests itself in outbreaks which are sometimes sporadic sometimes epidemic. Whatever be the prevalence there is always a tendency for the morbidity rate to decline or disappear with the advent of summer. Considering its high infectivity, its terrible disfigurement and the frequency of fatalities the indifference shown by the Chinese to the presence of cases in their midst is amazing. All Chinese know small-pox and the presence of a case in a crowded tenement house cannot escape the notice of the occupiers but for some obscure psychological reason they refrain from reporting its presence to the authorities, and more often than not the first notification received by the Medical Officer of Health is that from the Mortuary where the body, dumped in the street at night, has been taken for diagnosis. The sole information received by the Health Authorities concerning the case is the sex of the deceased, the apparent age and the diagnosis. The name, the address, the number of contacts and the period during which the case has been a focus of infection are unknown.

After the 1916-1917 epidemic in an endeavour to stop the practice of dumping and to encourage notification of cases, the Sanitary Board passed a resolution-that patients suffering from small-pox be allowed to be treated in their own houses provided that':-

(a) all cases in the district be notified to the Medical

Officer of Health,

(b) all inmates of the houses be vaccinated;

(c)) a notice be posted on the door of the house where

the patient is being treated,

The results did not come up to expectation for the popula ignored the concession and continued their practice of concealing cases and dumping corpses. The practice of allowing case S remain in the crowded tenement houses has been in vogu 12 years and at least 75 per cent still remain concenled and unnotified. The following table shows details regarding cases and notification:---

..

Year.

TABLE SHOWING DATA CONCERNING SMALL-POX CASES.

No. of

deaths

registered.

Total No.

of cases

if the

mortality

be 50%

Percentage of cases notified early, mostly by Private Practitioners.

l'ercentage of cases reported during life includ- ing moribund

cases.

Percentage of cases brought to the notice of the Authorities after death had

occurred.

Percentage of cases which were never reported either before or after death.

Percentage of cases escaping notice of the Authorities before death.

1910..

15

30

58

1911.

198

396

23

++

41

1

42

45

1912.

565

32

1,130

77

20

42

1913.

84

168

38

80

27

39

1914.

91

182

34

73

13

46

!

1915.

29

58

41

87

19

1916.

39

42

81

542

1,084

18

46

1917.

36

82

549

1,098

16

1918.

26

38

46

84

52

19

42

1919.

39

81

M 25 -

15

30

43

46

I I

1920.

21

57

42

2.3

38

1921.

1.62

38

24

62

324

1.8

19

39

42

81

1922.

189

378

1.6

19

36

1923.

1,141

2,282

45

81

1.4

17

4:

1924.

42

83

795

1,590

1.4

13

43

1925

44

+1

82

87

2.4

39

1926.

42

z6

19

61

52

17-3

61

32

1992

136

7

39

252

3.5

18

40

42

82

517

1,034

1.2

13

46

41

f

85+

$7

1,708

2.5

4

42

249

498

44

86

0.7

14

38

45

86

M 26

The total number of cases brought to the notice of the authorities during the year was 270 of which 249 or 92.2 per cent died. 63 cases were admitted to the Tung Wah Hospital for 'Chinese' treatment, which with 10 remaining from the previous year made a total of 73. Of these 25 died making a death rate under Chinese treatment of 34.2 per cent. Altogether 4 cases were treated in the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital of which none died making a death rate of nil per cent under Western or scientific treatment. 86.3 per cent of all the deaths were in children under 5 years of age.

In this epidemic 190 cases or 70% were notified to the Medical Officer of Health for the first time when the Medical Officer in charge of the Mortuary reported the presence of a corpse dead of the disease. The great majority of these were dumped corpses.

The average case mortality rate for all countries in the unvaccinated of all ages is 25 per cent to 35 per cent, and for those of children under 5 years of age not more than 50 per cent. In Hong Kong the percentage of deaths to cases notified was 92.2 which shows that a great number of cases escaped the notice of the authorities altogether. There were 249 deaths and even if it were assumed that all who died were unvaccinated and under 5 years of age the number of cases was not 270 but 249 × 2 or 498 which means that 228 or 45.7 per cent of the whole escaped the notice of the Sanitary Department altogether.

Isolation of the sick, disinfection of premises and sur- veillance of contacts, such as carried out in most countries, being impracticable under the accepted policy, the only means of combating an epidemic was the pushing of vaccination.

Anticipating an epidemic, arrangements were early made with the Assistant Commissioner of St. John's Ambulance Brigade to conduct a vaccination campaign similar to that of the previous year. As before, each member of the Brigade was instructed in vaccination by the Divisional Surgeons and when pronounced efficient his name was gazetted as a public vaccinator for the period of the emergency. Booths were opened in the streets and markets and active propaganda advocating vaccination and revaccination was carried out and altogether excellent work was done. At the same time special efforts were made by the Government Vaccinators and at the hospitals and dispensaries.

Altogether 244,789 persons were vaccinated (as compared with 323,709 in 1929) of which 116,475 were done by the Brigade, 25,242 by the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries and 103,072 by the Government Vaccinators (public vaccinators and hospitals).

M 27

In previous campaigns great difficulty had always been experienced in obtaining permission to vaccinate young children, and this year a special effort was made in this direction. The fact that 86 per cent of the deaths were those of children under 5 years shows the unvaccinated state of the child population.

From the above it will be seen that the St. John's Ambulance Brigade and the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries rendered most valuable assistance in the attempt to control the small-pox epidemic by vaccination alone. During 1929 and 1930 568,498 vaccinations were performed, a total equalling half the population. The constant movement of population into and out of the Colony (some 5,000 per diem) however renders it impossible to maintain a community so immune as to prevent disease spreading when cases are allowed to run their courses in tenement houses and there is no efficient control over the numerous free agents which pass into and out of the premises daily.

In September a Select Committee of the Sanitary Board was appointed to "examine into the history of small-pox in the Colony in recent years and the machinery for its prevention and mitigation and to report to the Board, and to suggest a reply to His Excellency's communication regarding the dumping of the bodies of those dead of small-pox.'

In its Report dated 28th November, 1930, the Committee made the following recommendations:-

1. The trial of house treatment of Small-pox, having failed in its object through non-compliance with the conditions laid down, the rescission of the Resolution of 1918 is advocated.

2. The dumping rate having risen steadily since 1918 steps should be taken to establish a more thorough propaganda system and if necessary more depôts for the receipt of bodies. The services of such Institu- tions as the Dispensaries Committees, the Chinese Hospitals and other Representative Bodies might be utilized for the purpose of such propaganda system.

Plague. No case of human plague or rat plague was report- ed during 1930,

Plague has practically disappeared from Hong Kong and the same may be said of most towns in South China. The disappear- ance in Hong Kong may be and probably is due in some degree. to the sanitary measures which have been and are being taken but this cannot be the case in many of the Chinese towns where the conditions are as they have always been. The fact is that the cause of the rise and fall in plague figures has not yet been

M 28

satisfactorily explained. We know that plague is a disease of rats communicated to man through the medium of the rat flea but we know little of the reason for the rise and fall in the incidence of the disease among rats or what natural causes have an influence on the virulence of the plague bacillus. In spite of the continuous campaign against them, owing to the rapidity with which they multiply, there still is and probably always will be a sufficiency of rodents in the Colony to light up and main- tain an epidemic. The value of a continuous anti-rat campaign lies in the early information it affords of an epizootic.

The cases of Plague recorded in the Colony since the dis- covery of this disease in 1894 are given in the following Table:

Year.

Cases.

Year.

Cases.

1894

5,000

1913

408

1895

44

1914

2,146

1896

1,204

1915

144

1897

21

1916

39

1898

1,320

1917

38

1899

1,486

1918

266

1900

1,087

1919

464

1901

1,651

1920

138

1902

572

1921

150

1903

1,415

1922

1,181

1904

510

1923

148

1905

272

1924

1906

893

1925

1907

240

1926

1908

1,073

1927

1909

135

1928

4

1910

25

1929

2

1911

260

1930

0

1912

1,857

Enteric. The number of cases reported was 221 as compared with 207 for the previous year. All the cases were sporadic and

as is usual in such the source of infection could not be traced. There is no evidence that any case contracted the disease through the public water supply.

Helminthic Disease.-The hospital returns show 31 cases of ankylostomiasis, 3 cases of cestodes and 3 cases of clonorchis and 23 cases of ascaris infection. These figures are of no value in gauging the prevalence of helminthic diseases for they only. represent the cases which were treated for worms alone. It is estimated that 75 per cent of adult Chinese harbour ascaris. It is probable that a considerable number have trematodes.

M 29

VITAL STATISTICS.

The registration of births and deaths is compulsory in the Colony; there is no registration in the New Territories. Births are registered at the Central Office in Victoria, at the Chinese Public Dispensaries and at the Police Stations at Aberdeen and Stanley. Deaths are registered at the Central Office, at the Kowloon Disinfecting Station and at a number of Police Stations.

Death registration being a necessary preliminary to a permit to bury it may be taken for granted that practically all deaths are registered. Bodies found 'dumped' or abandoned in the streets, and they are not a few, are taken to the Public Mortuary where they are examined by the Medical Officer in charge who fills out the necessary certificates and forwards them to the Registrar. All certificates of death are scrutinised by the Medical Officer of Health.

Birth registration is not universal and a considerable number of births, especially those of females, are never reported.

Population. The estimated civilian population for the whole of the territories under British Jurisdiction was 1,171,400; that for the Colony was 1,074,400; and that for the New Territories was 97,000. The distribution was as follows:

Non-Chinese (mostly resident in Hong Kong

Chinese in the City of Victoria

and Kowloon)

19,000

592,100

งว

Villages of Hong Kong

47,000

Kowloon and New Kowloon

37

307,250

"2

Junks and Sampans

109,050

Total civilian population

..

1,074,400

During the year 827,726 persons entered and 683,530 left the Colony by river steamer and by railroad, making a balance of immigrants over emigrants by these routes of 144, 196.

Arrived.

Departed.

River steamer Railway

114,443

129,810

713,283

553,720

Ocean going steamers

635,418

572,905

Total................

.1,463,144

1,256,435

The above does not represent the total movement between Hong Kong and the neighbouring provinces for there are many who arrive and depart by junk or sampan. On an average some 5,000 arrive and 5,000 depart daily.

M 30

BIRTHS.

The births registered as having occurred in the Colony

were:--

Chinese Non-Chinese

10,756 378

Total

11,134

DEATHS.

The deaths registered among the civilian population were 16,268 giving a crude death rate of 15.14 as compared with 16.77 for the previous year:-

Year.

Deaths.

Death rate per mille

population.

1929

Chinese

17,346

16.95

Non-Chinese

219

12.06

1930

Chinese

16,082

15.23

Non-Chinese

186

9.78

The following Table gives the deaths from the principal

diseases causing deaths:

No. of Percentage

Death rate

Non-notifiable diseases.

Deaths.

of total

per mille

deaths.

population.

1930.

1929.

Broncho-pneumonia

2,006

12.33 1.86

2.07

Pulmonary tuberculosis

1,994

12.25 1.85

2.06

Bronchitis

1,515

9.31

1.41

1.32

Pneumonia

824

5.06

0.76

0.90

Diarrhoea (infantile)

1,466

9.01

1.36

1.19

Diarrhoea

653

4.01

0.60

0.37

Dysentery

209

1.28 0.19

0.18

Beri-Beri

€35

3.90

0.59

0.54

Malaria

515

3.16

0.47

0.40

Heart disease and heart

failure

433

2.66

0.40

0.42

No. of Percentage Death rate

Notifiable diseases.

Deaths.

of total

per mille

deaths.

population.

1930.

1929.

Small-pox

249

1.33

0.23

0.81

Enteric

79

0.48

0.07

0.05

Diphtheria

41

0.25

0.03

0.06

Cerebro-spinal fever

13

0.03

0.01

0.01

Plague

0

0.00

0.000

0.001

M 31

Infantile Mortality.--The number of deaths of infants under one year were Chinese 6,180, non-Chinese 28. If the figure for births notified represented the total births in the Colony the infantile mortality figure would be 557.5. This figure is certainly too great but there can be no doubt that the true rate is a high

one.

Death Clock showing percentages of total deaths caused by different diseases:

2.66 1.28 4.01

9.01%

3.16

3.90

5.2%

0%

BERI

BERI

MALARIA

DIARRHOEA

INFANTILE

DIARRHOEA

DYSENTERY

HEART

TUBERCULOSIS

NON-PULMONARY

12-25

PULMONARY

TUBERCULOSIS

5%

12.33%

30.30 %

OTHER DISEASES

PNEUMONIA

SMALL Pox

1.53%

Non-Chinese Population.

BRONCHO PNEUMONIA

BRONCHITIS

5.06%

The number of non-Chinese civilians resident in the Colony is estimated at 19,000. This number includes Europeans, Japanese, Indians and Eurasians.

The majority of Europeans are treated by private practi- tioners during illness and figures are not available for calculating incidence rates.

The number of non-Chinese deaths recorded was 186 giving a death rate of 9.79 per mille.

9.31

M 32

European Officials.

Number of European Officials (excluding

temporary school mistresses)

Average number on leave

Average number resident in the Colony

Number invalided during 1930 :-

(a) when on leave at home

1

(b) in the Colony

Number died during 1930:-

(a) when on leave at home

1

(b) in the Colony

976

173

846

9

10

5

SECTION III.

HYGIENE AND SANITATION.

The principal Ordinances which have effect in matters of Hygiene and Sanitation are:

(a) The Summary Offences Ordinance.

(b) The Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

(c) The Water Works Ordinance.

(d) The Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance.

The Police are responsible for action under (a), the Public Works Department for action under the building sections of (b) and for (c), while the Sanitary Department deals with the public health side of (b) and with (d).

distinct from the

The Sanitary Department, which is Medical Department, has at its head a Senior Cadet Officer whose title is Head of the Sanitary Department (H.S.D.). The staff under his administrative supervision includes:

(1) Two European and one Chinese Health Officer-

(seconded from the Medical Department).

(2) Two Veterinary Surgeons.

(3) Fifty-five European Sanitary Inspectors.

M

M 33

There is a Sanitary Board composed of Officials and non- Officials, whose powers and responsibilities are laid down in the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, which acts as an adviser to the H.S.D. and of which the H.S.D. is the Chair- man. This body has no direct control over the Sanitary Staff.

The functions and control of the Sanitary Board and Sanitary Department as determined by the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance are limited to:-

(a) the Island of Hong Kong, (b) the Peninsula of

Kowloon, and (c) that portion of the New Territories. which is adjacent to Kowloon and which is known as New Kowloon.

The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services, who is adviser to Government on all medical and sanitary matters, confers with the H.S.D. but has no status under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and no authority over any of the staff of the Sanitary Department.

The following general review of work done and progress made in matters of sanitation is so far as the Sanitary Department is concerned-based on facts supplied by the Medical Officer of Health. The Annual Report of the Sanitary Department is issued independently by the Head of the Sanitary Department.

SANITARY ADMINISTRATION.

For purposes of sanitary administration by the Sanitary Department, the Island and the Peninsula have been divided into local sanitary areas, each with a sanitary office, and these in turn have been sub-divided into Health Districts each in charge of a Sanitary Inspector.

The built over portions of Hong Kong constitute only.about 1/30th of the total area. On the North side is the City of Victoria which occupies the flats and lower slopes facing the harbour. Behind and above the City is the Residential area of the Hill District extending up to and including the crest called "the Peak". The great mass of the population, (500,000), which reside in the City, are crowded into an area which does not exceed 400 acres in extent. On the South side and near the sea level are the villages of Aberdeen, Aplichau, Stanley and Tai Tam. The remainder of the Island consists of steep slopes with few or no habitations.

The Peninsula of Kowloon may be described topographically as consisting of a central group of hills surrounded on three sides by flats which intervene between them and the sea coast. The bulk of the population (250,000) live in tenement houses on the flats. New Kowloon is an extension northwards of the flats on the western side.

-

M 34

The City of Victoria including the Peak is divided into four sanitary areas and seventeen health districts. The villages on the south side of the island are in charge of one Inspector. Kowloon Peninsula has three health areas and seven health districts. It is estimated that on an average each Inspector has to deal with a population of 30,000 a very high figure for a tropical city and especially for one so overcrowded as Victoria.

Preventive measures against mosquito and insect-borne diseases.

Anti-mosquito work is divided between the Sanitary Depart- ment, the Public Works Department and the Medical Depart-

ment.

The only law on the subject is the following by-law made under the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

"Prevention of the Dissemination of Disease by

Mosquitoes".

"When larvae of mosquitoes are found on any premises the Board may on the advice of the Medical Officer of Health or any Assistant Medical Officer of Health, give notice to the owner or occupier of such premises to remove all accumulations of water from such premises or to take steps to prevent the recurrence of the breeding places of mosquitoes in any such accumulations of water, and such owner or occupier shall comply with such notice forth- with".

The Sanitary Inspectors are taught to distinguish between anophelines and culicines but progress bevond this elementary stage has not yet been attempted. There are no special mosquito inspectors attached to the Sanitary Department and the anti-mosquito brigade consists of two overseers and a squad of oiling coolies.

The routine work of oiling pools and inspecting premises. for the presence of breeding places was carried out by the district inspectors. The usual cutting of undergrowth in May and October was done in conjunction with the Botanical and Forestry Department as regards Crown lands, and with the Military Authorities on military lands,

The relative importance of the different varieties of water collections in the propagation of malaria carrving anophelines has not been fully worked out. This is a very important matter for on its solution depends, to a great extent, the economies of preventive measures,

M 35

One thing is certain and that is the nullahs with their inverts strewn with granite rocks and boulders and with tiny pools, seepages and small streams are typical breeding grounds for the dangerous malaria carriers A. maculatus and A. minimus. The draining of these nullahs so as to obviate all danger of breeding is a matter which is at the same time difficult and expensive. Every year the Public Works Department insert a sum in the estimates for "the training of Nullahs" and every year work up to the limit of the sum sanctioned is carried out. There can be no doubt that the disappearance of malaria from the populated area is in a large measure the result of the drainage works carried out by this Department.

The Malariological Branch of the Medical Department.

The Malarialogist Dr. Jackson and his assistant Mr. Deb arrived in the Colony on April 24th. on transfer from the Federated Malay States and established the beginnings of a Malaria Bureau in a portion of the Bacteriological Institute placed at their disposed by the Government Bacteriologist. In May a clerk and in November four Chinese probationers were added to the staff.

Since the establishment of the Bureau, investigations have been made and reports issued regarding the malaria situation at Lyemun Barracks, Sun Wai Military Camp, Taikoo Dockyard, Repulse Bay, Tung Wah Eastern Hospital at Sookumpoo and St. Stephens College at Stanley.

Requests for assistance having been received from the Military Authorities, the Police, Kowloon Hospital Authorities and others with respect to mosquito nuisances local larval surveys were done and recommendations made.

Spleen Rates. In many countries the spleen rate of the local children is regarded as a reliable index of the amount of Malaria there existing-but in Hong Kong the results obtained by Dr. Jackson and his staff have been in some cases decidedly puzzling. In certain areas of bad repute such as Taikoo and Lyemun spleen indices were found to be very low despite the fact that mosquito nets are not generally used and the habitations are within easy flying distance of numerous breeding places of Anopheles maculatus mosquitoes, which are potent carriers in Malaya and of A. minimus.

At Stanley peninsula, where in the early days of the Colony Malaria was rife among the troops, there were no enlarged spleens among the 65 children examined.

With regard to the New Territories, where the Malaria situation has so far received little scientific investigation, the few spleen census taken by the Bureau show rates considerably higher than have been found on the Island of Hong Kong. At Taipo Market out of 46 examined 5 or 10.8% had enlarged spleens-In the villages near Sun Wai Military Camp of 33

M 36

children examined 9 or 27% had spleen enlargements. At Yok Chai Village on the Castle Peak Road 10 out of 14 examined had palpable spleens giving a spleen rate of 71%.

No difficulty whatever was experienced in the New Terri- tories in taking spleen rates when the reason was explained to the people.

As

Parasite Rates. In the Repulse Bay area the smears of the blood of 147 Chinese servants were examined and malaria parasites found in 33 giving an infection rate of 22.5%. Out of the 186 servants living here only 4 used mosquito nets. there are numerous breeding places of anopheline mosquitoes in the immediate vicinity the neglect of these people to use nets to protec3 themselves and others increases the risks of spread of malaria.

The Annual Report of the Malarialogist is given in the appendix.

Preventive Measures against Plague.

In the campaign against plague the routine measures which have been in vogue since the disease was at its height were continued. There were:-

(a) periodical cleansing of premises-lime washing.

(b) abolition of rat refuges-such as ceilings, stair

linings and panellings.

(c) destruction of rats.

In the crowded areas the periodical cleansing of premises is a most important factor in the prevention of the spread of disease. Every house is dealt with in its turn at least twice a year. All the furniture is removed from the rooms or cubicles and all floors and woodwork washed down with an emulsion of soap and kerosene oil. This is done either by the sanitary staff or by the occupiers under the general supervision of the district inspector. Altogether 180,952 floors were dealt with.

Thirty members of the cleansing staff were employed in setting traps, bird-liming boards, distributing barium-carbonate baits, and collecting rodents which have been taken living or dead. By far the greatest number of rats were taken dead from the many rat reception bins or tins which have been placed in convenient situations throughout the city. The Chinese object to rats being found in their premises by the sanitary staff and it is not uncommon for them to kill the rodents caught in the Government traps and to throw the carcases into the reception tins. The total number of rats collected was 141,286 of which only 6,756 were taken alive. All rats collected were sent to the Public Mortuaries for examination.

During the year no rats were found to be plague infected.

M 37

Preventive Measures against Small-pox.

Under the Vaccination Ordinance, all Public Vaccinators are under the control of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services who is Superintendent of Vaccination. As Registrar of Births and Deaths the Head of the Sanitary Department is responsible for ensuring the vaccination of all children whose births are registered.

Vaccinations were performed by:

(a) the Public Vaccinators.

(b) the M.O's in charge of Government Hospitals.

(c) the M.O's in charge of Chinese Hospitals.

(d) the M.O's in charge of Chinese Pubiic Dispensaries. (e) the members of the St. John's Ambulance Brigade

under the Assistant Commissioner.

Altogether 244,759 were performed.

Preventive Measures against Cholera, Dysentery, Enteric, etc.

The usual routine measures against the spread of bowel diseases continued to be taken, viz. the purification of the Public Water Supplies, and the closing of wells.

No case of locally acquired cholera has been notified since September 1922.

Preventive Measures against Tuberculosis.

The measures taken against Tuberculosis were :—

(a) The periodical general cleansing of premises. (b) Action taken to prevent the erection of un- authorised cubicles especially those which have defects in the matter of lighting, air space, and ventilation.

(c) Action by the Building Authority to ensure the erection of houses having a proper supply of lighting and ventilation.

The overcrowded condition of the city, its confined area, and the difficulties presented by topographical features together make the question of hygienic housing of the populace one of extreme difficulty. The sanitary staff, (one Inspector to 30,000. people) are working against great odds and they cannot hope to attain results such as are attained in other cities where the task is easier and the personnel larger.

Preventive Measures against Helminthic Diseases.

There never has been any routine campaign against helminthic disease. Whatever be the percentage of population which carry ankylostomes very few cases of ankylostomiasis come under the notice of the hospital authorities.

M 38

GENERAL MEASURES OF SANITATION,

Domestic Cleanliness.

Every domestic building or part of a building occupied by the members of more than one family must, unless specially exempted by the Sanitary Board, be cleansed and lime-washed throughout by the owner, to the satisfaction of the Board, not less than once in every year, and notice in writing that such cleansing and lime-washing has been completed, shall be sent by the owner to the Secretary within three days after the date of completion.

It is the duty of the occupier of any domestic buildings to cause such building to be kept in a cleanly and wholesome condition and to see that the drains, traps, gratings, fall pipes, and sanitary fittings and appliances are kept free from obstruc- tion and in an efficient state of repair.

In Hong Kong there are 13,167 Chinese houses with 43,232 floors; in Kowloon there are 8,588 houses and 24,402 floors. During the year 123,164 floors in Hong Kong and 57,708 floors in Kowloon were cleansed-some were done twice and some three times. During the cleansing process all the furniture is moved and the walls and floors washed down with kerosene oil emulsion.

In some cases the work is carried out by the sanitary staff, in others the occupants are permitted to do the work under the supervision of the inspecting staff. Considering each Inspector has to supervise a district with approximately 30,000 inhabitants, most of whom are ignorant of the rudiments of sanitation the thoroughness of the cleansing operations is remarkable.

Scavenging.

Scavenging which used to be done by contract is now carried out departmentally. There are 20 refuse lorries in use. 14 for Hong Kong and 6 for Kowloon. 448 tons were collected daily and removed to various refuse depôts. The bulk of the refuse was ultimately disposed of by dumping in the sea at a distance from the city and in such a situation where the currents run from the land. Some of the refuse from Kowloon was used to reclaim low lying land near the sea-shore.

Conservancy and sewage disposal.

The collection and disposal of night-soil in the Colony is carried out partly by the bucket system and partly by water carriage. With regard to the bucket system arrangements ar made with a Contractor for the removal and disposal excrement under conditions laid down by the Sanitary Bo Human night-soil is a valuable commodity in China where

M 39

used as a fertiliser for the fields, and there is no difficulty in securing a Contractor who will pay a considerable sum for the sole right of removal. Revenue from this source is gradually diminishing owing to the substitution of water closets for pail closets.

The excrement is removed by night from the latrines to a special fleet of junks which convey it up river to China where it is utilised as manure for the mulberry trees on which the silk worms feed.

Owing to the limitations of the water supply on the Island and the need for economy in the matter of consumption, it is necessary to restrict the number of water closets served by the public mains. Where a sufficiency of water can be obtained from other sources such as wells or nullahs, water closets are allowed. With regard to effluents, some enter the public sewers direct, others pass to biological tank systems to be treated before final discharge.

Drainage. (Subsoil and Surface).—Drainage, both subsoil and surface, is controlled by the Public Works Department.

Water Supplies.-The water supplies of Hong Kong and Kowloon are in charge of the Water Works Branch of the Public Works Department.

All the water is surface water collected from catchment areas which are free from ordinary risks of pollution.

The water, after storage for a longer or shorter period in the impounding reservoirs, is filtered, in some cases by the slow sand system in others by the rapid system and finally chlorinated.

Routine examinations are carried out by the Government Bacteriologist and Government Analyst and the results furnished to the Water Authority. There was no evidence of any disease having been conveyed through the public water supplies.

Clearance of Bush and Undergrowth. Generally speaking, in Hong Kong and the New Territories, bush and undergrowth is little in evidence except in those places where it has been planted and conserved. Routine cutting of superfluous under- growth is carried out in May and October.

M 40

In Hong Kong, as in many other parts of the world, there appears to be a general belief that the cutting of undergrowth and the clearance of bush in some way brings about a diminution in the number of mosquitoes especially the species which carry malaria. Whatever may be the effect on culicines it is a fact that the very potent malaria carriers, Anopheles maculatus and Anopheles minimus breed in water open to the light and shun that shaded by trees or undergrowth. Clearance of bush may, therefore, result in an increase of malaria rather than in a diminution.

Sanitary Inspectors.-During the year the Sanitary Inspec- tors continued their routine visits of inspection. Under their supervision come the domestic houses, common lodging houses, places of common assembly, eating houses, bakeries, etc., etc. As mentioned previously there are approximately 30,000 people per Inspector---and it is physically impossible for any man to carry out the number of inspections nceessary to secure a proper standard of sanitation under the conditions prevailing in this Colony.

SCHOOL HYGIENE.

The School Inspection Branch of the Medical Department consists of one Lady Medical Officer, one Chinese Medical Officer, and two Nurses.

The following information is taken from the Annual Report of the School Medical Officer.

The average number of pupils daily attending Government Schools and Schools which receive Government Grants in Aid was 8,419.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

Type.

Number.

Nationality of Pupils.

Average Attendance.

British

5

European

370

Anglo-Chinese

13

Chinese

3.592

Indian

1

Indian

126

Total

4.088

The non-government schools receiving grants in aid number 16 of which 12 are Anglo-Chinese, and 4 are vernacular schools. The number on roll in the Anglo-Chinese Schools was 4.738 and in the Vernacular Schools the number was 911.

M 41

Not all Grant-in-Aid Schools are inspected. Some have their own doctor e.g. St. Stephen's College and the Diocesan Boys School.

The premises of the majority of the Government and Grant- in-Aid Schools were inspected and attention drawn to defects. Various improvements in sanitation were made during the year chiefly in the direction of lighting, ventilation and air space.

Inspection of the entrant group with re-inspection, repeated if necessary, for those found defective, has again formed the bulk of the year's work.

1927. 1928.

1929. 1930.

Schools inspected

18

17

15

18

Entrants examined

.1,189

1,111

1,153

1,364

Defects found

426

1,616

499

580

Percentage of Defects in

British Schools

37.5

37.08

34.0

Percentage of Defects in.

Anglo-Chinese Schools

39.1

44.41

43.5

Among the 1,364 "entrants" examined 580 defects were found. The principal defects noted were:-Vision 14.9%, other eye troubles 2.4%, heart disease 2.6%, tonsils and adenoids 5.89%, suspected tuberculosis 3.9%, serious dental cases 4.5%. spinal curvature 0.38%, skin diseases 0.61%.

Re-inspection of children found to be Defective: ----

Re-inspected. Improved. Percentage.

British

1929

172

95

55.23%

1930

104

40

38.4%

Anglo-Chinese

1929

1,227

673

54.84%

1930

813

417

51.20%

There are no School Clinics-cases of errors of refraction were seen by Dr. Cogan at his Clinic and examinations made. With regard to other defects, free treatment was offered at the Government Hospitals and at the Chinese Public Dispensaries.

With regard to infectious diseases the M.O.H. notifies the School Medical Officer of any school cases certified by him. Among the pupils there were 16 cases of Chicken-pox, 1 case of Whooping Cough, 3 cases of Diphtheria, 5 cases of Mumps, 2 cases of Enteric, 10 cases of Measles and 1 case of German Measles.

Vernacular Schools are not yet receiving the benefit of medical inspection. Last year there were 195 subsidised Vernacular Schools in Urban Districts and 487 non-subsidised Schools with an enrolment of 40,000 children including 14,000 girls. Besides these there are Vernacular Grant Schools and about 150 Rural District Schools.

M 42

LABOUR CONDITIONS.

The general industrial conditions continued to improve and the labour situation was normal. There are no estates, planta- tions or mines in the Colony. Practically all the labouring class are engaged in matters connected with commerce, shipping or public works.

Labourers find their own accommodation in the many tenements and lodging houses which exist in Hong Kong or Kowloon.

What factory regulations there are, are administered by the Secretary for Chinese Affairs.

There are no special arrangements for the medical care of labourers other than the Government Hospitals, the Chinese Hospitals, the Mission Hospitals and the Chinese Public Dispensaries. The total number of beds available for general diseases is about 1,000 making a proportion of:-

1,000

1,000,000

or 1 to 1,000 approximately.

HOUSE AND TOWN PLANNING.

There is no Town Planning Ordinance and Housing comes under that portion of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance which is administered by the Fublic Works Department. There is little or no zoning and blacksmiths shops or even foundries are to be found in the midst of shop houses and domestic houses.

By inter-departmental arrangements the Medical Officer of Health scrutinises the plans of new buildings, but there is nothing in the law which says that this must be so.

The following List shows some of the work done during the year by the buildings branch of the P.W.D.

Nature of Work.

1. Obstructions removed from open spaces

No. of cases.

120

2. Obstructions to light and ventilation removed... 1,182 3. Rat runs filled in

769

4. Water closets installed in private buildings.............. 2,211

5. Houses demolished (domestic)

50

7. Houses erected (domestic)

6. Houses demolished (non-domestic)

8. Houses erected (non-domestic)

13

983

18

M 43

The City of Victoria is over-housed and over-populated. There is no space to build further houses and the only possible improvement is in the direction of the substitution of unsatis- factory houses by those of model construction. A great deal has already been done by the Building Authority but much still remains to be accomplished. The task is a difficult one and is complicated by the fact that Victoria is the centre of attraction for the stream of immigrants entering the Colony from China. The people must have accommodation and the demolition of each house means an increase of concentration elsewhere-The same applies to eating houses and common lodging houses. One satisfactory feature of the situation is that many of the lots are short and the buildings do not exceed 40 feet in length and ventilation and lighting is therefore a simpler problem than would be the case were the houses 120 feet deep as occurs so often in towns in Malaya.

The following plan shows the dimensions of a modern house and the arrangement of the cubicles. Provided there be sufficient space in front and behind in the way of street and back lanes and provided the occupants co-operate and keep the building clean and well ventilated there is no reason why the occupants should not live a healthy life.

834-

-17-02-

PLAN OF A FLOOR IN A NEW HOUSE

WITH CUBICLES

SCALE 1=8 FT.

M 44

B

M 45

FOOD IN RELATION TO HEALTH AND DISEASE.

Inspection and Control of Food Supplies.-The laws dealing with this subject are the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance and the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance.

The authorities responsible under these Ordinances are the Sanitary Department and the Police Department. The Officers authorised to take samples are, "any sanitary inspector or inspector of weights and measures, or inspector of markets, or any Officer of Police acting under the written instructions of the Secretary of the Sanitary Board, or of the Captain Super- intendent of Police, or of the Medical Officer of Health."

During the year the following samples were taken under the Sale of Food and Drugs Ordinance and analysed :-Milk 53, Cocoa 78, Bread 22, Sugar 34, Coffee 10, Tea 21, Lard 1, Cheese 15, Cream 15, Treacle 14, Jam 13, Flour 34, Tinned Butter 6, Fresh Butter 28. Prosecutions were undertaken in 2 cases where samples failed to satisfy the legal requirements.

In addition the following unsound food was seized and destroyed under Section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance :--Sardines 4,680 tins, Mushrooms 563, Cocoa 947, Cream 331, Water Chestnuts 6, Pears 5 bags, Desiccated Cocoanut 4 cases, one ham, and a quantity of Salt Eggs and Oranges.

Deficiency Diseases.-The only information available regard- ing deficiency diseases is furnished by the returns of the Govern- ment Hospitals and Chinese Hospitals, and the death returns. The Hospitals deal with only a small proportion of the sick and the truth as regards the incidence of disease among the masses cannot be deduced from their returns. The death returns are also misleading in that the majority of cases were not treated by competent physicians prior to death, and the Medical Officer examining the body and forming a diagnosis had no history to assist him in coming to a conclusion as to the cause of death.

Beri-beri.-Despite the fact that the staple food of the masses is polished rice, beri-beri is not epidemic, and the deaths from this disease formed only 3.90 per cent of the total deaths. The death rate as far as it can be ascertained was 0.59 per mille population. The total number of deaths recorded during the year was 635. The total number of cases treated in the Govern- ment Hospitals was 80 only.

M 46

Rickets. No cases were treated in the Government Hospitals. Most Chinese infants are breast fed until they are at least a year old. Rickets is seldom mentioned as a cause of infant death.

Scurvy. No cases were treated in the Government Hospitals.

Markets. The markets come under the Sanitary Depart- ment. The Central and Western Markets are supervised by a special Overseer who is responsible to the Veterinary Surgeon; the other markets are supervised by the District Sanitary Inspectors.

Slaughter Houses.-Slaughter Houses and Animal Depôts are controlled by the Sanitary Department. There is a Govern- ment depôt at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) for the reception of all cattle, sheep, swine and goats brought into the Colony for slaughter. The Government Slaughter Houses are situated at Kennedy Town (Hong Kong) and at Ma Tau Kok (Kowloon). There are Government controlled slaughter houses at Aberdeen and Sai Wan Ho.

The Government depôt and slaughter houses are under the direct charge of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and Assistant Colonial Veterinary Surgeon and a staff of four Inspectors.

Dairies.-There is a model Dairy-farm in Hong Kong where milk is produced by stall fed cattle under hygienic conditions.

TRAINING OF SANITARY FERSONNEL.

The Medical Officers of Health and the Chief Sanitary Inspector hold classes and give lectures but there is as yet no regular school for teaching such as exists in Singapore.

Hong Kong is an examination centre for the Royal Sanitary Institute and every year examinations are held for the Sanitary Inspectors Certificate, for the Sanitary Science Certificate and for the Meat and Food Certificate. Candidates come from as far as Shanghai to take these examinations. The results of the last two tests have, so far as Hong Kong candidates are concern- ed, been decidedly disappointing and one of the reasons for the high percentage of failures is the absence of a proper school of training.

>

M 47

SECTION IV.

PORT HEALTH WORK AND ADMINISTRATION.

Reckoned in terms of shipping-tonnage, Hong Kong is one of the five greatest ports in the world. It is the principal commercial entrepôt of Southern China and it is the terminus of the Steamship Lines running between China, Japan, and North America.

In 1930 4,721 British ocean-going steamers and 7,749 foregin ocean-going steamers entered and cleared the harbour. In addition there were 9,578 river steamers, 6,326 launches, and 21,235 foreign trade junks. The total tonnage of vessels entering and clearing was 38,571,650

The Medical Staff engaged in Port Health duties consists of two European Health Officers and two Chinese Medical Officers.

The work of the department includes.-

(a) Routine inspection of ships.

(b) Quarantine duty.

(c) Duty in connection with emigration. () Vaccination.

The laws dealing with the subject of Quarantine and Port Health are contained in Table L of the Hong Kong Port Regulations, the Asiatic Emigration Ordinance and the Vaccina- tion Ordinance.

During the year 6.236 inward bound ocean-going vessels were boarded by the Health Officers. Of these 2,363 were on the British register and 3,873 on the foreign register.

River steamers from Canton, Macao and West River Ports, also junks and small crafts were only visited when cases of sickness or death were reported.

During the year 165 special visits were made to ships for the purpose of examining persons suffering from infectious but non-quarantinable diseases. 87 permits for the landing of corpses for burial were granted and 42 bodies sent to the mortuary for post-mortem examination. Seven cases of leprosy were detected amongst Chinese passengers. Twenty-four Chinese lunatics and two European lunatics arrived in the Colony during the year. Bills of Health numbering 1,954 were issued.

QUARANTINE.

Hong Kong has no quarantine station for ships' passengers or crews, When segregation is necessary it is carried out on board ship at the quarantine anchorage. A limited number (26) of infectious cases can be accommodated at the Government Infectious Diseases Hospital at Kennedy Town but there is no room for contacts.

M 48

During the year no ships were detained in quarantine.

All vessels arriving from "Infected" ports and those having infectious or suspicious cases on board fly the "Q" flag and go to the quarantine anchorage for examination.

The number of vessels arriving in quarantine was 384 with 45,176 passengers and a crew personnel of 43,176. All were examined and those from small-pox infected ports were vaccinated. Where necessary medical supervision of passengers and crews was carried out before pratique was granted.

The total number of persons medically inspected during 1930 was 343,281 or an average of 940 examinations a day.

One hundred and fifteen vessels were fumigated during the year. Fumigations are carried out by a private company but each operation is supervised by a Health Officer.

EMIGRATION.

The Asiatic Emigration Ordinance No. 30 of 1915 requires that emigrant ships shall have :---

(1) Proper and sufficient living accommodation.

(2) Proper and sufficient sanitary requirements.

(3) Proper and sufficient hospital accommodation. (4) A sufficient supply of drugs, medical equipment

and disinfectants.

It also makes provision for :—

(1) A proper diet scale.

(2) The prevention of the export of the unfit.

(3) The prevention of the export of infectious disease.

The Vaccination Ordinance 1923 requires that all emigrants from the Colony shall be protected against small-pox by vaccination.

The duty of carrying out the sanitary and medical inspec- tion and for vaccinating those who are insufficiently protected falls on the Port Health Authorities.

Emigrants are classified as:—

(a) "Free emigrants" or those who pay their own

passages.

(b) Assisted emigrants or those

whose passages are

paid by their prospective employers.

(c) Women and children.

The total number of emigrants examined during the

was 193,209 of whom 184,934 were free and 8,275 assisted

The number of rejections was 625,

ť

M 49

Owing to the general trade depression in Malaya the Government of that country deemed it advisable to limit the number of Chinese immigrants from China and Hong Kong. From August 1st the shipping companies engaged in that trade were permitted to carry, during each month, 1/10th of the number they had carried on the corresponding month of the previous year.

Owing to the large numbers who left this port previous to August 1st the fall in the total numbers for the year is not so large as it otherwise would have been.

VACCINATION.

The Government Vaccinators are members of the Fort Health Staff and work under the general supervision of the Port Health Officer. They are detailed for work at various centres and they assist where needed.

The number of vaccinations performed by these Officers at the centres was 99,270 of which 11,889 were emigrants.

Table I.

Showing Emigration Passes and Rejections for 1930.

Port of Destination.

Passenger.

Crews.

Rejected.

Straits Settlements

121,419

6,956

407

Canada

6,397

13,322

41

United States of America...

7,922

13,459

42

Honolulu

5.350

5

Dutch East Indies

36,775

10,248

80

British North Borneo

4,240

2,776

17

Shanghai and Japan...

3,955

Australia

1,138

2,740

South Sea Islands.

1,269

258

Manila

35

Peru

817

576

Chile

23

326

Panama

116

India

1,924

1,0371

10

Columbia

2

Mauritius

852

I

South Africa...

414

560

Brazil and Argentine

245

189

Totals

193,209

61,781

625

M 50

Table II.

Showing Monthly Returns of Emigrants, Crews and Rejections.

Months.

Ships Examined.

Pas-

sengers.

Crews.

Rejected.

January

26

13,605

4,035

24

February

20

9,896

3.315

39

March

38

33,756

5,553

81

April....

40

29,187

6,219

50

May

33

24,462

5,074

June

34

18,636

5,619

67

July

34

15,147

5,542

45

August

32

10,109

5,316

29

September.

27

10,131

4,612

61

October

34

10,678

6,055

34

November.

28

8.748

5,073

23

December

32

8,854

5,368

14

Totals.......

378

193.209

61.781

625

Table III.

Showing Causes of Rejection of Emigrants:-

Diseases.

Skin Diseases:

Scabies

Tinea

Favus

Dermatitis

Urticaria

Lupus

Eye Diseases:

Trachoma

Ophthalmia Blindness

Iritis

No. Rejected.

92

10

5

No 19

57

9

5

1

1

1

Infectious Diseases:

Chicken-pox

Measles

M 51

Phthisis

Leprosy

Fever

Pneumonia

Beri-Beri

Gonorrhoea

Syphilis

Tabes Dorsalis

Tuberculosis Spine

Lunacy

Debility

Deformity

Chronic Nephritis

Enlarged Spleen

Enlarged Glands

Carbuncle

Cellulitis

Abscess of Buttock

Tonsillitis

Bronchitis

Parotitis

Gastric Ulcer

Enteritis

Ulcer of Leg

Paraphimosis

Paralysis

Adenoma

Jaundice

3

00 10

5

347

3

1

7

1

1

38

4

1

1

1

1

2

1

1

1

1

1

1

3

TOTAL

625

M 52

Table IV.

Showing number of passengers, crews and ships arriving in Quarantine each month, 1930.

Months.

No. of Passengers.

No. of Crews.

No. of Ships.

January

26

88

I

February

March

8,417

7,019

59

April

9,784

9.600

81

May June

11,265

13,148

102

7,983

7,369

77

July

4,022

2,077

18

August

589

738

14

September

1,683

2,219

23

October

1,070

623

6

November

166

70

I

December

-171

164

N

Totals

45,176

43,115

384

Table V.

Showing Quarantine Notifications issued by the Hong Kong Government for 1930.

Port or Locality.

Disease.

Date and Number of Notification.

Date and Number of Cancellation.

Shanghai

Bankok

Cerebro-

Spinal Meningitis. Cholera.

Saigon

Cholera.

Cebu

Cholera.

Ilo-Ilo

Cholera.

Manila

Cholera.

No. 146 of 10th March, 1930. No. 258 of 30th

April, 1930. No. 272 of 6th

May, 1930. No. 434 of 16th

July, 1930. No. 450 of 25th

July, 1930. No. 565 of 9th September, 1930.

No. 375 of 16th June, 1930. No. 417 of 5th

July, 1930. No. 475 of 31st

July, 1930. No. 582 of 16th September, 1930. No. 622 of 8th October, 1930. No. 623 of 8th October, 1930.

M 53

SECTION V.

MATERNITY AND CHILD WELFARE.

Anti-natal and Infant Welfare Centres.

Tsan Yuk Hospital.-An anti-natal Clinic was started in April. The number of patients treated numbered 124 with 209 attendances. The Infant Welfare Clinic is only for babies born in the hospital. The number of babies brought to the Clinic was 589 (476 in 1929) and the total number of visits 2,394 (2,001 in 1929).

Tung Wah Hospital.-The number of attendances at the Infant Welfare Clinic was 2523 (1704 in 1929).

The Alice Memorial and Affiliated Hospitals.—The number of new cases who attended the Special Anti-natal Clinic was 81, while the number of babies born in the hospital who were brought to the Special Infant Welfare Clinic was 225. A number of Anti-natal cases and infants attended the ordinary afternoon Clinics and are not included in the above totals.

In addition to the above the Chinese Y.W.C.A. maintains an Infant Welfare Centre and the Military Authorities have one for the benefit of the children of the European garrison, to the latter of which is attached a trained European Nursing Sister.

Midwives.

Under the Midwives Ordinance of 1910 "No one whose name is not on the Midwives Register may practice midwifery habitually for gain or describe herself as one specially qualified to carry on the work of a Midwife.

Training Schools for Midwives have been established at the Alice Memoriai, Tsan Yuk, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, and Government Civil Hospitals. The course and study necessary to qualify for examination is two years except for those who have completed a course in general nursing, when it is six months.

During 1930, 23 Candidates out of 25 satisfied the examiners and were registered. In addition one qualified European and one Japanese Midwife were admitted to the Register.

The total number on the Midwives Register at the end of 1980 was 165.

There are seven Midwives on the Government Medical establishment whose services are free to those who cannot afford to pay a fee. Four of these are stationed in the New Territories, and three for duty in connection with the Chinese Public Dis- pensaries. All are supervised by a Government Lady Medical Officer.

During the year 1248 cases (1194 in 1929) were attended by Government Midwives.

M 54

Maternity Hospital Accommodation.

The total hospital accommodation for maternity cases is 255 beds and the number delivered in hospitals was 8866 (8391 in

1929).

Hospital.

Beds. Deliveries.

Government Civil

21

678

Victoria

32

69

Tsan Yuk

46

1,251

Wanchai

22

815

Tung Wah

24

1,929

Tung Wah East

14

472.

Kwong Wah

57

3,097

Alice Memorial

18

437

Matilda

39

Peak

15

St. Paul's (French)

57

Canossa

Total

255

8,866

Maternity Bungalow at the Government Civil Hospital.

The Bungalow has accommodation for 21 patients, and is mainly for the use of Asiatic women. Europeans as a rule find accommodation at the Victoria Hospital.

There are three general wards with a total of 16 beds, two private wards with two beds each and one isolation ward with one bed.

The majority of the patients being non-paying, are under the care of the University Clinic.

The admissions during the year were 755 (790 in 1929) making a total of 760 treated--of these 117 were treated by the Government Medical Officers and 643 by the Professor of Obstetrics and his Assistants.

The nationalities were as follows:-

European

N

Japanese

29

Indians

50

Chinese

674

Eurasian

5

Total

760

M 55

There were six deaths, all Chinese, the causes being: Cardiac failure 3, Chronic Nephritis 1, Puerperal Sepsis 1, Ectopic Gestation 1.

THE VICTORIA MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

The number of beds in this Hospital is 32.

There were 2 mothers and 1 infant remaining in the Hospital at the end of 1929. During the year there were 69 admissions making a total of 71 treated. There were 69 deliveries, the sexes being male 34, female 35.

The daily average of patients was 6, including infants.

The Hospital is available for private patients who wish to be attended by their own doctors. Thirteen patients availed themselves of the privilege.

There were no maternal deaths. One child was stillborn.

Two mothers and one infant remained under treatment at the end of 1930.

CHINESE MATERNITY HOSPITALS.

There are two Chinese Maternity Hospitals under the management of the Chinese Dispensaries Committee, and in addition there are maternity wards in each of the hospitals under the management of the Tung Wah Hospital Committee. In all the hospitals maternity patients are treated by Western methods.

THE TSAN YUK MATERNITY HOSPITAL (60 beds).

The whole of the In-patient work of this Hospital is in the hands of Dr. R. E. Tottenham, Professor of Obstetrics to the University of Hong Kong. During his absence on leave, his assistant Dr. D. K. Pillai was in charge. Both Maternity and Gynaecological patients are admitted, 46 beds being reserved. for the former and 14 for the latter cases.

The total number of deliveries was 1251 (1185 in 1929) out of a total of 1326 admissions (1274 in 1929). There were 2 maternal deaths and 69 children were still-born.

The Clinical work in the out-patient department is at present being carried out by the staff of the Government Visiting Medical Officer for Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries. In addition to the treatment of ordinary Gynaecological cases, special clinics are held for Ante-natal, Infant Welfare and Venereal Diseases

cases.

M 56

THE WANCHAI MATERNITY HOSPITAL. (22 beds).

This Hospital is connected with the Wanchai Public Dispensary. A Western trained Chinese Doctor is in charge.

The number of admissions was 827 (957 in 1929) and the number of deliveries 815 of which 35 were still-births.

There was one death, the cause being puerperal septicaemia.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL MATERNITY WARDS (24 beds).

During the year there were 1929 deliveries out of a total of 1955 cases treated. There were no maternal deaths, but 354 infants were still-born.

TUNG WAH HOSPITAL (EASTERN) MATERNITY WARDS (14 beds).

During the year there were 472 admissions and the same number were delivered with 7 maternal deaths. 26 infants were still-born.

KWONG WAH HOSPITAL MATERNITY WARDS (57 beds).

The total number of patients treated numbered 3,133 of which 3,082 were delivered. There were 18 maternal deaths and 174 still-births.

SECTION VI.

HOSPITALS, INSTITUTES, ETC.

The Government Hospitals are:-The Government Civil Hospital, the Victoria Hospital, Kowloon Hospital and the Infectious Diseases Hospital. The Peak Hospital is an Institution maintained by Government as a Nursing Home where patients can be treated by their own doctors.

During the year Wireless Apparatus was installed in several wards in each of the Government Hospitals and has been greatly appreciated by the patients.

GOVERNMENT CIVIL HOSPITAL.

The Government Civil Hospital which was built in 1874. and which occupies a site in the middle of the most populous area, is the largest government hospital in the Colony. It has accommodation altogether for 246, including 21 maternity beds. 100 of which have been placed under the control of the clinic. i professors of the Hong Kong University who are also in char of the outpatients department. Attached to and adjacent this institution are the Maternity Bungalow and the Mont Hospital.

M 57

Dr. I. Newton was the Medical Officer in charge during the year. He was assisted by Dr. G. H. Thomas and Dr. T. Z. Bau.

The number of in-patients, exclusive of those in the maternity block and mental hospital, was 4,788 (5,108 in 1929), of which 1,124 were treated by the University staff and 3,664 by the Government Medical Officers.

The daily average number of in-patients was 184, that for the previous year was 178.

The nationality of the patients was:—

European

Indian

Chinese

Other Asiaties

Total

470

1,064

3,163

91

4,788

The in-patients treated by the University staff numbered 1,124 made up as follows:-medical cases 568, surgical cases 449 and gynaecological cases 107.

A large proportion of the total patients received treatment free of charge.

There were 318 deaths and of these 128 occurred within 24 hours of admission. The case death rate was 66.42 per mille as compared with 71.66 in 1929.

766.

1,022 major operations were performed. (University Clinic

Government Staff 256).

A detailed list of the number of cases treated and the number of deaths is given in the Appendix.

1929

Malaria.--There were 346 cases as compared with 448 in

Diphtheria.--Out of 26 cases there were 9 deaths (41 cases with 24 deaths in 1929). This high mortality was due to the fact that the majority of cases had the disease well advanced before they were brought for treatment.

Pulmonary Tuberculosis.-There were 137 cases treated with 40 deaths.

Syphilis.--(acquired) accounted for 104 cases as compared with 96 in 1929; Gonorrhoeal cases numbered 142 as compared with 101 in 1929. The figures are too small and the factors too numerous for any useful conclusion to be drawn.

M 58

There were 776 accidents of a nature so serious as to require treatment as in-patients.

The Police Force.-The total number of admissions and death were as follows:-

Admissions.

Deaths.

British

126

3

Russian Ship Guards.

15

0

Indians.

589

2

Chinese (Cantonese)

98

1

Chinese (Wei-hai-wei)

108

0

Total

936

6

Government Servants were attended to daily as out-patients between the hours of 9 a.m. and 10.30 a.m. The daily average was 34.

Out-patient Department.--This department is open both morning and afternoon. The work is entirely in the hands of the University Staff, except for the male V. D. Clinic which is under a Government Medical Officer. The number of attend- ances was 45,682 (52,127 in 1929) exclusive of V. D. cases. In addition 9,740 patients attended for dressings. The Out- patients received medicines and dressings free of charges. Teaching clinics were held at certain hours. The number of prescriptions dispensed was 35,992.

VICTORIA GENERAL AND MATERNITY HOSPITAL.

The Victoria Hospital which was originally built for the accommodation of women and children is now a general and maternity institution. Situated in the residential area well above the level of the town it has દી clear view across the harbour of the territory on the opposite side. There are 42 general beds and 32 maternity beds, in separate blocks with entirely separate staff for each building.

Dr. J. T. Smalley was the medical officer in charge, assisted by Dr. K. H. Uttley, till March 25th when Dr. D. J. Valentine M. C. took over charge assisted by Dr. J. E. Dovey.

The total number of patients treated in the general block was 500, of which 77 were men, 276 women and 147 children.

M 59

The average daily number was 19.

The Nationality of those treated was:-

Europeans

Indians

Japanese

Chinese

Eurasian

Total

448

1

3

38

10

500

There were six deaths, the causes being :-Uraemia 2, Pulmonary Tuberculosis 1, Meningitis 1, Sub-tertian Malaria 1, Prematurity 1.

The maternity side of the Institution is described in the section dealing with Maternity and Child Welfare (V).

KOWLOON HOSPITAL.

This Hospital is situated on the mainland and consists of two Blocks containing 58 beds. There is no accommodation for maternity patients and no general wards for Asiatic women. Such cases, when admitted in emergency, are treated in the private wards.

Work was begun, during the year, on the preparation of a site for a Maternity Block which it is expected will be ready for occupation early in 1932.

Dr. D. J. Valentine, M.C. was in charge till March 25th when he was relieved by Dr. J. T. Smalley. Dr. J. E. Dovey attended the Out-patient Department till March 25th when he was relieved by Dr. K. H. Uttley.

Dr. A. D. Wong was Assistant Medical Officer till October 25th when he was relieved by Dr. P. Court.

1,691 patients were admitted (1,231 in 1929), of which 1,345 were males and 349 females. The nationalities were made up as follows:

Europeans

Chinese

Other Asiatics

Males. Females,

553

313

240

1,076

989

87

65

43

22

Daily average number of patients..... 43.8 (41 in 1929).

M 60

Number of Police admitted :·

Europeans.

81

Chinese.

244

Indians.

1

During the year 439 operations were performed under general anaesthesia (164 in 1929).

Out-patient Department.-The number of out-patients visits recorded as compared with the previous years were as follows.-

1927.

1928. 1929.

1930.

New Cases

6,918

9,626

9,987

9,471

Old Cases

2,067

3,482

3,197

3,029

Dressings

2,129

3,980

3,086

5,482

Total

11,114 17,088 16,270 17,982

The number of prescriptions dispensed in the Out-patient Department was 13,521.

Male patients suffering from active venereal diseases were referred to the Venereal Diseases Clinic at the Government Civil Hospital, and women were referred to the Tsan Yuk and Kwong Wah Hospitals.

GOVERNMENT DISPENSARIES.

The Dispensaries manitained by Government during the year under review were the Taipo Dispensary and the Un Long Dispensary.

TAIPO DISPENSARY-(New Territories).

Dr. C. H. Luk was Chinese Medical Officer in charge till October 25th when he was relieved by Dr. A. D. Wong. The number of visits during the year as compared with 1929 was as follows:

1929.

1930.

New Cases

2,471

2,683

Old Cases

1,988

2,411

Vaccination

2,132

1,632

Total

6,591

6,726

M 61

UN LONG DISPENSARY (New Territories).

This Dispensary--which is in charge of a dresser-is visited twice a week by the Chinese Medical Officer. The number of cases treated during the year was 5,012 as compared with 5,806 in 1929. The number of vaccinations was 686-the number for 1929 was 1,730.

VENEREAL DISEASES CLINICS.

Government Civil Hospital.-A Clinic for males was held at the Government Civil Hospital; from 5 to 7 p.m.; on Tuesdays for Europeans, Wednesdays for Chinese and Thursdays for Indians. This Clinic was under the supervision of a Government Medical Officer; Dr. K. H. Uttley being in charge till April 1st when he was relieved by Dr. J. E. Dovey.

A Clinic for females was held on Fridays from 5 to 7 p.m. by Dr. D. K. Pillai, in connection with the University Clinic.

The following were treated at the male Clinic:--

Europeans

Chinese

Indians

Total

71

494

116

681

The diseases treated were as follows:-

Syphilis

Gonorrhoea

Chancroid

Total

262

267

152

681

578 Specimens of blood were sent to the Government Bacteriologist for examination for the Wassermann reaction.

The total number of attendance was 3,530 (2,907 in 1929).

At the Clinic for females, 366 new cases and 524 old cases were treated.

The total number of bloods examined for the Wassermann reaction was 107, of which 58 were positive, 42 negative and 7 doubtful. All positive cases receive injection of 914 free of charge.

The total number of cases of Gonorrhoea treated was 109, of whom 11 were pregnant.

M 62

Tsan Yuk Hospital.-A Clinic for Chinese women is held weekly by a Government Lady Doctor. 343 patients were treated, with a total of 887 visits to the Clinic.

The diseases treated were as follows:-

Syphilis

Gonorrhoea

Gonorrhoea and Syphilis

65

156

38

9

No appreciable disease

75

Soft Chancre

Total

343

258 specimens of blood were examined for the Wassermann reaction and of these 86 were positive, 152 negative and 15 doubtful.

229 injections of N.A.B. were given.

In addition to the above Clinics, Venereal cases were seen at the Out-patient Departments of the various Hospitals and Dispensaries.

X-RAY DEPARTMENT.

Dr. Farr was in charge during the year assisted by Miss Siggins C.S.M.M.G., B.P.A., as Masseuse Electro-therapist and Mr. J. Skinner B.P.A., as Radiographer.

A considerable amount of new equipment was ordered and some of it was delivered towards the end of the year. It is expected that early next year X-ray, Massage, and Electrical treatment, will be available at each of the Hospitals. In ad- dition to the fixed installations, portable X-ray apparatus has been provided at both the Civil and Kowloon Hospitals.

Radium.-At the suggestion of Dr. J. H. Montgomery, Medical Superintendent of the Matilda Hospital, the Committee of that Institute have purchased a supply of radium and generously made it available for use in all hospitals of the Colony, free of charge. Advantage was taken of this and many cases of cancer were treated, mainly in the University Clinic under the supervision of Professor K. H. Digby. Though many of the cases were far advanced some spectacular results were obtained.

Statistics:

M 63

1930

1929

Massage & Electrical Treatment

3934

3879

Cases for Radiological Examination

1902

1728

Films exposed

3309

3540

Fees paid to the Treasury

$ 3,878.50

$ 3,182.25

Value of work done X-ray

$36,534.00

(no)

Massage & Electrical

$14,752.50

(record)

$51,286.50

Total

The greater part of the work is done for patients who are unable to pay.

THE CHINESE HOSPITALS AND DISPENSARIES.

The Chinese Hospitals (4 in number viz 3 general and 1 for infectious diseases) are Chinese Institutions whose relation to Government has been established by Ordinance. They are subsidised by Government, are subject to inspection by certain Government Officials and each has a Chinese member of the Medical Department on its Resident Staff.

The authority in administrative control is a Committee of Chinese gentlemen elected each year by the subscribers.

These Hospitals were originally established to give ac- commodation to those Chinese whose fears and prejudices against Western Medicine prevented their applying for relief at the Government Hospitals. The Tung Wah Hospital situated in Hong Kong was first occupied in 1873. The Kwong Wah Hospital was built in Kowloon in 1911 as an extension of the Tung Wah. The Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, another branch of the Tung Wah situated in the eastern district of Victoria, was opened on November 27th 1929.

The Government gave the sites free and with grants of monev assisted in the erection of the buildings. In addition both Hospitals and Dispensaries receive yearly grants from Govern- ment funds.

The activities of the Chinese Hospitals include:

(a) The care of the sick and treatment by Western methods or Chinese methods according to the wish. of the patient.

(b) Maternity benefits and infant welfare-by Westera

methods only.

(c) Assistance to the destitute.

(d) The provisions of coffins for, and the burial of the

dead.

(e) Vaccination.

(f) Health propaganda,

M 64

Progress in the Chinese Hospitals.-Much progress has been made in all departments of the Hospitals during the last few years. The improvements include:-

(a) The appointment of University graduates as full-

time Resident Medical Officers.

(b) The foundation of training schools for female

nurses.

(c) Extensions and improvements in the male nursing

section.

(d) The establishment of Clinical laboratories in charge

of full-time laboratory assistants.

(e) The installation of a shadowless scialytic lamp in the

operating theatre.

(f) The provision of X-Ray Apparatus.

(g) The purchase of a motor ambulance.

(h) Improvements in the accommodation for patients.

(i) Improvements in quarters for staff.

The training course for nurses is spread over three years, the first two for general work, the third for obstetrical training.

A few years ago Surgery in the Chinese Hospitals was almost non-existent. In 1930 there were 1343 operations performed many of which belong to the category of major operations. The growth of this side of curative medicine shows the advance which has been made in the campaign against prejudice. This has been brought about by a combination of factors chief among which are the improvements which have been made in Wards and Theatres, the better nursing, the keenness of the Directors and of the Staff, and last but by no means least the stimulating influence of the Government Visiting Medical Officers.

THE TUNG WAH HOSPITAL.

The number of beds in this Hospital is 460 of which 24 are reserved for maternity cases.

The staff consists of a Chinese Government Medical Officer. paid by the Government, and three Resident Medical Officers whose salaries are paid by the Hospital. There are in addition

a number of Chinese Doctors who practise Chinese Medicine for the benefit of those who prefer that treatment.

Dr. Phoon Seck Wah was the Resident Government Medical Officer.

The total number treated during 1930 was 240,717 of which 208,030 were treated by Chinese Methods and 32,687 by Western

M 65

Methods. The number of in-patients was 12,772 including 1,928 maternity patients. Deducting the materity cases, all of whom are treated by Western methods, the general cases numbered 10,844, of which 5,296 or 49 per cent were treated by Western methods.

The number of out-patients was 227,945 of which only 25,463 or 11.1 per cent chose Western treatment.

1,061 operations were performed, many of these being major operations. Included in this figure are 500 operations on the

eye.

Deaths. There were 2,165 deaths, of which 411 occurred within 24 hours of admission.

In addition 1,501 bodies were brought to the hospital for burial.

The Maternity work of this Institution is described in the section dealing with Maternity and Child Welfare (V).

THE KWONG WAH HOSPITAL.

General beds 234. Maternity beds 57.

This hospital is an extension of the Tung Wah Charity. Situated in Kowloon it provides for the Peninsula what the Tung Wah Hospital does for Hong Kong.

The staff consists of a Chinese Government Resident Medical Officer, whose salary is paid by the Government, and two other Resident Medical Officers paid by the Hospital.

Dr. Cheng Kung San was the Resident Government Medical Officer.

There are also a number of Chinese Doctors who practise Chinese Medicine.

The total number of patients treated was 150,068, of which 97,267 were treated by Chinese methods and 52,801 by Western methods.

The number of in-patients was 9,777 including 3,097 maternity cases. Deducting the maternity patients, all of whom are under Western treatment, the general cases numbered 6,680 of which 3,929 or 58.8 per cent were treated by Western methods.

The number of out-patients was 140,291, of which 45,536 31.1 per cent chose Western treatment, and 94,755 Chinese atment.

M 66

179 operations were performed under general anaesthesia.

Deaths. There were 2,458 deaths and of these 885 died within 24 hours of admission,

794 bodies were brought to the hospital for burial.

THE TUNG WAH EASTERN HOSPITAL,

This hospital was opened on November 27th, 1929. It is an extension of the Tung Wah Hospital and is intended to serve the eastern portion of the City of Victoria. The hospital is built on modern lines and has central heating.

During the year an extension of two wings of three floors each was added to the main building and was opened by Lady Peel on the 16th December 1930. The top floor of one wing provides accommodation for the nurses and the top floor of the other wing serves as a Maternity Ward of 14 beds. The other floors provide two male and two female wards, containing 14 beds in each.

The total number of beds in the Hospital is now 195, of which 14 are reserved for Maternity cases.

The staff consists of a Chinese Government Medical Officer. whose salary is paid by Government, and two Resident Medical Officers paid by the Hospital.

Dr. Phoon Seck Weng was the Resident Government Medi- cal Officer.

As in the case of the Tung Wah and Kwong Wah Hospitals. patients may choose either Western or Chinese treatment.

The total number of patients treated was 57,322 of which 46,317 were treated by Chinese methods and 11,005 by Western methods. The number of in-patients was 3,122 including 472 maternity cases. Deducting the maternity cases all of whom are treated by Western methods, of the remaining 2,650 general patients 1,796 or 56.6 per cent were treated by Western methods. The number of out-patients was 54,200 of which 8,764 or 16.17 per cent choose Western treatment.

Deaths. There were 622 deaths in hospital, of which 215 occurred within 24 hours of admission.

103 operations were performed under general anaesthesia.

M 67

THE CHINESE PUBLIC DISPENSARIES.

The Chinese Public Dispensaries, nine in number, were established for the purpose of supplying medical advice and treatment on Western lines. Situated in the most thickly popu- lated districts they fulfil a very useful purpose, not only in the matter of treatment but also as foci for the spread of knowledge concerning the causes of disease, the means of spread and the value of Western drugs and methods both in prevention and

cure.

Each Dispensary is controlled by a separate Committee of Chinese gentlemen who work in close touch with the Secretary for Chinese Affairs and each is in direct charge of a Chinese Medical Practitioner qualified in Western Medicine.

In addition to ordinary work of a dispensary, these Institutions serve as places where the poor may apply for as- sistance in matters connected with:

(a) the removal of patients to hospital.

(b) certification as to causes of death.

(c) removal of corpses to mortuaries. (d) supply of coffins.

The work done by these Dispensaries increases year by year. As only Western treatment is dispensed, it is evident that the Chinese are not adverse to Western treatment where it is easily available.

There are four Officers of the Government Medical Depart- ment whose duty it is to visit the various Chinese Medical Institutions--both hospitals and dispensaries-and to give advice and assistance.

Dr. T. W. Ware was Visiting Officer to the Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries during the year and was assisted by the follow- ing Lady Doctors:·

Dr. (Mrs.) A. L. Dovey, Dr. (Miss) P. C. Lai and

Dr. (Miss) P. Ruttonjee.

On September 26th a Dispensary was opened at Aberdeen, a fishing village of about 5,500 inhabitants, situated on the south side of the Island. During the last three months of the year 1,593 new cases and 1,302 old cases were treated.

Plans have been approved for a new Dispensary at Kowloon City and for enlargement of the Central and Yaumati Dispen- saries.

M 68

During the year a total of 122,395 new cases were treated and in addition there were 98,385 visits from old cases and 27,340 attendances for dressings.

Free vaccination is available at all Dispensaries.

Gynaecological Clinics are held once a week at each Dispen- sary by one of the Lady Assistant Visiting Medical Officers.

The following Table shows the work done during the year:-

SUMMARY OF WORK DONE BY THE CHINESE DISPENSARIES IN VICTORIA AND THE KOWLOON

PENINSULA.

Patients

Certificate Patients

Dispensaries.

New

cases

Old

cases

Patients Corpses of cause sent to removed to removed to of death. Hospital. Hospital by Hospital or Ambulance. Mortuary.

Applica-

tion for

coffins.

Gynaecolo·

Dead

infants

brought to in Dis- Dispensary. pensary.

Vaccina-gical cases tion done seen by Lady

Doctor.

Central

13,832

13,557

Eastern.

10,061

9,566

Western

11,312

11,422

35

Harbour & Yaumati

30,113

30,398

Shaukiwan

25,493

19,289

Shamshuipo

10,892

2,903

Hung Hom

11,030

4,690

55

1932213

40

9

8

22

30

319

73

21

56

221

66

3

34

240

188

29

136

Aberdeen

1,593

1,302

32

7

Kowloon City

8,069

5,258

111

78

45

༄།ཤཱཀྑུ །༄

27

15

2,876

326

41

330

2,810

629

319

272

2,868

1,011

221

5,159

1,411

4

4

138

4,740

1,341

113

2,785

518

131

1,620

679

65

41

98

84

2,319

10

Total 1930,

122,395

98,385

301

417

201

1,078

391

1,304

25,242

5,966

- M 69-

Total 1929

114,630

94,725

340

459

294

1,033

453

1,282

27,564

4,764

M 70

INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITALS.

There are two Infectious Diseases Hospitals-one maintained by the Government and the other by the Tung Wah Charity. They are situated at the Western end of the City of Victoria in adjoining compounds. There is no Infectious Diseases Hos- pital in Kowloon.

THE GOVERNMENT INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL,

This was originally a Police Station, but was adapted as a hospital and has accommodation for 26 beds in six wards.

During the year the hospital was under the charge of Dr. T. W. Ware. Except when there are patients occupying it there is only a skeleton staff on the premises.

During the year only 4 cases of Small-pox were treated and one case of Chicken-pox sent in as suspected Small-pox. In addition one case of Leprosy was treated,

The following Table shows the Nationality and sex of those treated for Small-pox :·

Nationality.

Europeans

Chinese

Remaining

at the

end of

Number treated.

1929.

Died

Male

Female Total

Remaining

૨૫૧ 4%

end of

1930.

0

2

0

0

Nil.

Other Asiatics ...

1

Total......

1

3

0

2

0

O

""

THE TUNG WAH INFECTIOUS DISEASES HOSPITAL.

The Tung Wah Infectious Diseases Hospital, erected by the Tung Wah Charity Organization in 1902, consists of three two- storied blocks of wards and an administrative block all connected on both floors by covered ways. The ground floor wards are divided into four cubicles by partitions six feet high, the top floor wards are open all through.

There is accommodation for sixty beds.

The Institution is under the same management as the Tung Wah Hospital and when occupied is staffed by that Hospital.

M 71

This hospital was built for the purposes of treating Chinese patients who from fear or prejudice objected to entering the Government Hospital. As in the General Hospital under Chinese Management the patients may choose either Eastern or Western Treatment. The majority of patients choose to be treated by the Chinese Herbalist.

During 1930 only Small-pox cases were treated. The num- ber of admissions was 63 making a total of 73 cases treated. The number of deaths was 25 giving a percentage of deaths to treated of 34.2.

It is said that the Chinese believe wind, water and scrutiny by strangers to be detrimental to recovery in cases of Small-pox. Whether this be true or not, the cases are kept carefully wrapped up in their own clothes until death or recovery.

SECTION VII.

PRISONS AND ASYLUMS.

PRISONS.

The principal prison of the Colony is situated in Victoria, a branch prison being situated at Lai Chi Kok on the Kowloon side of the Harbour. The former has accommodation for 800 prisoners, the latter for about 500. Females are only received at Victoria Gaol.

During 1930 the general health of the prisoners continued to be satisfactory.

The total number of admissions to Victoria Gaol was 6,493, of which 5,948 were males and 545 females. The daily average number of inmates was 734, and the daily average number of sick in hospital was 24.98. The sickness rate was 33.9 per mille and the death rate was 15 per mille.

The daily average number of prisoners at Lai Chi Kok was 11: the total number treated in Hospital was 656 and the daily. average number in hospital was 11.

The hospital at Victoria Gaol accommodates 30 patients. During the year 75 prisoners were transferred to the Government Hospital for treatment not available in the prison hospital, of these were maternity cases. These prisoners are returned the Gaol when fit,

M 72

Four prisoners were released on Medical grounds.

There were 13 deaths from natural causes, 11 of which took place in the Gaol Hospital, one at the Government Civil Hospital and one at Lai Chi Kok.

The causes of death were as follows:-

Pulmonary Tuberculosis

----

9

Cerebral Haemorrhage

1

Bacilliary Dysentery

1

Pneumonia

1

General Peritonitis

1

Total

There were two executions.

!

13

Year.

Prisoners admitted to Victoria

Prison.

Admissions to Victoria Prison

Hospital.

Out-patients.

!

Total Number of

The following statistical Table shows totals, averages and percentages for the ten years 1921-1930 inclusive:- STATISTICAL TABLES SHOWING TOTALS, AVERAGES AND PERCENTAGES IN COMPARISON WITH PRECEDING NINE YEARS.

Deaths due to disease at Vic-

toria Prison Hospital.

Prisoners in Lai Chi Kok

Prison.

Prisoners in Victoria Prison.

Daily Average Number of

Sick in Victoria Gaol Hospi-

tal.

1921.

4,900

236

9,298

13

158

606

6.0

25.20

4.82

0.99

0.27

1922.

5,014

362

14,911

8

130

657

7.6

40.00

7.22

1.16

0.16

1923.

5,051

327

19,324

10

187

674

7.1

52.90

6.47

1.05

0.20

1924.

7,382

402

16,381

7

228

838

10.1

44.14

5.44

1.20

0.09

1925.

6,339

580

18,603

28

303

813

14.0

50.90

9.15

1.72

0.44

1926.

6,654

585

6,129

10

1927..

7,740

355

7,891

14

1928.

5,756

337

13,787

1929.

5,779

586

12,678

14

1930.

6,493

892

9,840

10

BRARE

300

754

19.3

16.78

8.79

2.56

0.15

421

774

9.01

21.62

4.59

1.16

0.18

4

329

742

13.43

37.70

5.85

1.81

0.06

331

744

24.44

34.73

10.14

3.28

0.23

441

734

24.93

26.93

13.79

3.39

0.15

Out-patients.

Admissions to Hospital to

Total Admissions to

toria Gaol.

Vic-

Hospital to Daily Average

Daily Average in Victoria Gaol

of

Prisoners

Gaol.

in

Victoria

Rate % of

Total Admissions to Victoria

Deaths due to Disease, to

Gaol.

---

M 73 -

}

M 74

THE MENTAL HOSPITAL.

The Mental Hospital which is an annex to the Government Civil Hospital has accommodation for 14 Europeans and 18 Asiatics.

This Institution is intended to be used only as a temporary abode for the mentally affected pending arrangements being made for their transfer to Europe or to Canton.

The Medical Officer of the Government Civil Hospital is in administrative charge.

Remaining from 1929

Patients.

31

Admissions during the year

293

324

Discharged apparently cured

96

relieved

86

Canton

Died

Transferred to the Mental Hospital,

Remaining at the end of 1930

100

8

34

324

SECTION VIII.

METEOROLOGY.

Situated just within the northern limits of the tropics oc- cupying an insular position immediately to the south of the great mass of China, Hong Kong's Climate is very materially influenced by the direction of the prevailing winds.

The North East Monsoon blows from November to May and during this period the weather is dry, cool and invigorating. From May until October, the season of the South West Monsoon. the air is highly charged with moisture and the climate is hot. muggy and enervating.

The mean annual temperature is 72°. During the summer months the average maximum temperature is 87° and there is little difference throughout the 24 hours. Situated on the North side of the Island the City of Victoria gets all the heat and moisture of the South West Monsoon but not the breeze itself which is cut off by the mountain behind the town. During the Winter months the range of temperature is from 70° to 45° with an average of 66°.

A Table is attached giving the means or totals of the meteorological data for the several months of the year 1980.

METEOROLOGICAL DATA.

The following Table I. gives the means or totals of the Meteorological Data for the several months of the year 1930.

Wind.

Temperature.

Humidity.

Month.

Barometer

at M.S.L.

Cloudiness. Sunshine. Rain.

Direction. Velocity.

Mux.

Mean.

Min.

Rel.

Abs.

ins.

p.c.

ins.

p.c.

hours.

ins.

Points.

Miles p.h.

M 75

January

30.19

59.1

54.6

50.9

75

0.33

85

71.3

2.275

NE by N

8.2

February

30.15

65.0

60.3

56.5

76

S

0.42

63

155.3

1.380

E by N

11.9

March

30.08

68.8

63.9

60.1

76

0.46

81

120.0

7.230

E by N

11.0

April

29.93

77.4

73.5

70.6

87

0.72

80

140.3

2.100

E by S

13.2

May

29.85

83.5

79.2

76.2

82

0.82

72

204.4

6.185

E by S

11.7

June

29.81

86.7

81.9

78.3

81

0.88

73

215.4

12.245

SE

9.9

July

29.61

86.8

82.3

78.5

83

0.91

78

175.2

29.025

SE by S

11.9

August

29.76

86.9

82.1

78.5

82

0.90

58

256.9

6.065

S

6.5

September

29.87.

83.7

79.4

76.4

82

0.82

79

137.0

28.245

E by N

14.3

October

30.01

81.7

76.8

73.1

73

0.67

44

271.3

0.410

E by N

9.8

November

30.16

75.7

70.7

66.7

70

0.53

50

205.5

· 0.035

ENE

10.5

December

30.16

68.2

64.0

60.6

75

0.46

80

120.1

0.890

ENE

11.7

Mean or

29.96

76.9

72.4

68.9

78

0.66

70

172.7

8.005

E

10.9

Total

M 76

SECTION IX.

SCIENTIFIC.

BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

The Activities of the Institute include:-

(a) the preparation of vaccine lymph,

(b)

(c)

(d)

""

""

,, Sera.

21

bacterial vaccines.

rabies vaccine.

(e) examination of pathological material.

(f)

J1

(g) medical research.

waters, milks, etc., etc.,

The Institute is under the charge of the Government Bacteriologist who is assisted by the Assistant Bacteriologist and four unqualified laboratory assistants.

Particulars of the work done during the year are contained in the Annual Report of the Bacteriologist--which is appended.

THE PUBLIC MORTUARIES.

There are two Public Mortuaries, one being in Victoria and the other in Kowloon,

At these places for the reception of the dead are received:- (a) bodies from Chinese Hospitals and Dispensaries for

diagnosis.

(b) "dumped" bodies-that is to say-bodies which have been taken from the place of death under cover of night and dumped in the street to save trouble and expense. The great majority of these have died natural deaths and there is no need for concealment. (c) bodies sent by the Police for medico-legal examina-

tion.

(d) bodies sent by the Medical Officer of Health for examination for signs of infectious disease or for simple diagnosis.

L

M 77

In all cases where diagnosis cannot otherwise be made a sectio cadaveris is performed.

All dead rats collected by the Sanitary Authorities are taken to the Mortuaries for examination with regard to plague. Some of these are caught by the rat catching gang but the majority are taken from the rat boxes or bins placed about the city for the reception of dead rodents.

The Public Mortuary, Victoria, is in charge of the Assistant Bacteriologist, but the Public Mortuary, Kowloon, is under a Medical Officer who has been detailed for that work in addition to other duties.

PUBLIC MORTUARY, VICTORIA,

Report on Post-mortem Examinations, 1930.

Number of post-mortem examinations performed

Male bodies examined

Female bodies examined

Claimed bodies sent from hospitals &c.

Number of Chinese bodies examined

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

17

,, European

Bodies were received from the following sources:-

Victoria District

Harbour Police

Shaukiwan District

Other Villages

Number of rats examined

Number found plague infected

3,127

1,421

1,706

100

3,027

3,124

3,006

21

80

20

87,349

0

PUBLIC MORTUARY, KOWLOON.

Report on Post-Mortem Examinations, 1930.

Number of post-mortem examinations performed

Male bodies examined

Female bodies examined

Claimed bodies sent from hospitals, &c.

Unclaimed bodies mostly abandoned

2,391

1,452

939

215

2,176

Number of Chinese bodies examined

""

>>

European Indian Japanese

Unknown

Bodies were received from the following sources :~~-~-

Kowloon District

Harbour Police

Number of rats examined

Number found plague infected

2,376

N

2,115

276

52,444

Nil.

M 78

J

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

The report of the Government Analyst is given in the Appendix.

APPENDIX A.

GOVERNMENT BACTERIOLOGICAL INSTITUTE.

Report for the year 1930.

By E. P. Minett, M.D., D.P.H., D.T.M. & H., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P.

Government Bacteriologist.

STAFF.

Dr. Greaves was appointed as

Assistant Government

Bacteriologist on 20th December 1929 and arrived in the Colony on 27th January, 1930, to take up his duties.

Dr. Laing, who was employed as Bacteriological Assistant, resigned on 31st January 1930, his temporary appointment having lapsed.

Dr. Minett was on leave from 3rd April to 11th May 1930.

Dr. Greaves was detailed to attend the conference of the Far Eastern Medical Association at Bangkok and was away from 26th November to 28th December 1930.

In October Dr. Greaves was appointed to act as teacher of Morbid Anatomy and Pathology at the University of Hong Kong.

RESEARCH WORK.

An investigation, is at present being carried out, of the Coliform organisms isolated from milk and the local raw water supplies. A paper on the influence of the various organisms present in milk on the Reductase test is in course of preparation by the Government Bacteriologist and Mr. K. T. Leung.

M 79

A paper on the Post-mortem findings in two hundred cases of Tuberculosis amongst Chinese infants, by the Government Bacteriologist, was sent for publication with the consent of the Honourable Director of Medical and Sanitary Services.

A review of the water supplies of Hong Kong by the Govern- ment Bacteriologist, was published in the Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene in April 1930.

A paper was read by the Assistant Government Bacteriologist on "Pellagra in relation to the food supply" at the Conference of the Far Eastern Medical Association at Bangkok, in December 1930.

The Assistant Government Bacteriologist is at present conducting an investigation into the congenital heart conditions. found in Chinese infants at the Victoria Mortuary.

The question of Calf Lymph dilution was worked out during the year on Buffalo Calves. The lymph prepared in the Institute was found to be highly efficient in the following dilutions 1 in 5 with glycerine and normal saline (ordinary strength issued) and also in further dilutions with normal saline of 1 in 10, 1 in 25, up to 1 in 50. Unfortunately it was not possible to carry out further tests on newly born Chinese infants.

A comparison of the Precipitation test for Syphilis used in the Institute, with the Wassermann and Kahn tests was started, but had to be abandoned as regards the Kahn test, owing to pressure of routine work. It is hoped to carry out this investigation later, when the new officer for Venereal Diseases takes up his duties.

PREPARATION OF CALF LYMPH.

The supply of Buffalo calves was much improved this year. The number of calves vaccinated during the year was 218, an increase of 101 over last year.

The average yield per calf, of the finished product, glycer- inated lymph, was about 90 c.c. per calf.

The quantity of lymph issued during the vear was 10,886.Sec. made up as follows ·

Quantity of lymph issued free

8.940.8c.c.

Quantity of lymph issued and paid for... 1,946.00.c.

The value of the free issues was $18,867.40.

M 80

The quantity of lymph in stock at the end of the year was 18,678.6 c.c. estimated to be sufficient to vaccinate 560,358 persons.

The Institute was able to meet the demands from the Naval and Military forces during the year.

VACCINE DEPARTMENT.

The Institute now supplies all the Venereal Diseases Clinics using Anti Gonococcus Vaccine free of cost, this is estimated to be a saving this year to the Government of $6,050.00 as this material had previously to be purchased from outside sources.

No demand was made for Cholera Vaccine this year and very few doses of Plague Vaccine were issued.

The following stock vaccines were issued during the year under review,

Vaccine.

ISSUES.

Value of free issue.

Free

paid for

Total

$

C.

Gonococcus Vaccine... 2,420 cc.

10 cc.

2,430 cc.

6,050.00

Staphylococcus

Vaccine.....

90 cc.

20 ce.

110 cc.

45.00

Anti Meningococcus

Vaccine...

86 cc.

86 ce.

Plague Vaccine

30 cc.

30 cc.

T. A. B. Vaccine....

12 doses.

12 doses.

6.00

Special Autogenous vaccines were prepared for 20 cases. of these 11 were for Government Institutes, the remaining 9 were for private Medical Practitioners.

SERUM DEPARTMENT.

During the year 8,800 c.c. of Anti-meningococcus serum was issued as follows:

-

Quantity issued free

Quantity issued and paid for

Total

100 c.c.

8,700

8,800

M 81

The issue of serum for this year shows an increased output of 3,820 c.c. over last year.

The quantity of Anti-meningococcus serum in stock at the end of the year was 59,905 c.c.

ANTI RABIES TREATMENT.

No new strain of virus has been isolated and fixed during the year, no suitable material being available. During the year 77 persons received Pasteur treatment, exactly the same number as were treated in 1929, when only 30 persons completed the course of treatment. More than half the persons applying, failed to complete the course of treatment as shown on the following Table.

British

Race incidence of cases.

Chinese

American

Danish

Polish

Portuguese

Indian

Total.

Treatment

Treatment

completed. not completed.

6

10

21

31

1

1

2

3

1

30

47

Hempts classification of wounds has been introduced this year in order to estimate the doses required.

The value of the free issue was $1,248.00.

Two dogs were treated, one in Hong Kong and one in Canton, with a preventive vaccine prepared in the Institute.

Examinations of dogs' brains for negri bodies

follows:

Negri bodies present

Negative

Total

2

5

7

were as

M 82

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATION OF WATER SUPPLIES.

The number of samples of water examined during the year was 1,742, a decrease of 49 on last year's figures; this is accounted for by the absence of the public tanks used during the drought.

The following Table gives the samples were obtained:-

sources from which the

123 samples.

131

Unfiltered raw water from filter beds

Water after filtration from filter beds Tap water samples in Victoria & Kowloon 1267 Well waters

Water from other than public supplies

Total

13

39

17

182

.1742

The private water supplies of the Dairy Farm were examined regularly as in former years, the results being forwarded to the Honourable Director of Medical and Sanitary Services,

The public water supplies of Victoria and Kowloon continued to maintain a high standard of purity.

Domestic filter candles were examined and sterilized regularly for various Government and other institutions, the total number dealt with being 378, an increase of 26 over last

year.

BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF MILK.

Samples of both fresh and Pasteurized milk were examined regularly during the year for the information of the Public Health Authority.

The number of samples examined being 207, an increase of 17 over last year.

The specimens were from public supplies and from the Tung Wah Hospital.

EXAMINATION OF DISINFECTANTS.

Two samples of disinfectants were examined by the Rideal Walker test, at the request of the Medical Officer of Health.

MEDICO-LEGAL WORK.

Thirty three articles were examined for Medico-legal purposes during the year at the request of the Criminal Investigation Department.

- M 83

ANTI-PLAGUE WORK.

No cases of plague occurred during the year.

518 smears from rat spleens were examined from the Medical Officer in Charge of Victoria Mortuary, who carries out the daily inspection of rats. No cases occurred in which B. Pestis could be identified.

Local rodents examined were as last year.

Rattus Norvegicus.

Rattus Rattus.

Mus Musculus.

The number of fleas examined and identified during the year was 1,842 obtained from 281 rats caught alive.

year.

The cheopis index was 6.33, an increase of 1.61 over last

The species identified were as follows:-

IDENTIFICATION OF FLEAS.

Rats caught.

FLEAS.

X. Cheopis Ctenocephalus Ctenopsylla

Cheopis Index.

281

1,780

11

51

6.33

CLINICAL AND BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

The total number of examinations carried out was 10,221, being an increase of 809 over last year. Details are shown in appendix A.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SERA FOR SYPHILIS.

This section of the work of the Institute continues to rapidly increase, a total of 2,453 examinations were carried nt during the year, an increase of 712 examinations over 1929.

The following Table shows the results obtained together with the race and sex incidence of persons affected.

M 84

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD SERA FOR SYPHILIS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total.

M. F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

Strong positive..

30

3

26

498

241

798

Positive

Weak positive...

Doubtful

طور حتهم من

4

2

9

89

43

147

4

Ι

2

27

13

47

8

2

11

75 37

133

Negative

162

28

114

590

434 1,328

Grand total... 208 36 162

1,279 768

2,453

The following shows the results of comparative examina- tions of sera by both the Wassermann and Precipitation test for Syphilis used in the Institute.

COMPARISON OF WASSERMANN & PRECIPITATION TEST.

BOTH AGREE.

DISAGREE.

No. of Tests

ful

Posi- Poubt. Nega-

tive

Total

tive

Per- centage

Partial Total

Per- centage

507

134

330

472

93

25

10

7

The majority of the specimens received for examination were from the Venereal Diseases Clinics of the Government Civil Hospital, Kowloon Hospital, Tung Wah Hospital, Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, Tsan Yuk Hospital, Kwong Wah Hospital, Nethersole Hospital and Victoria and Lai Chi Kok Gaol Hospitals. The remainder were investigations carried out at the request of private Medical Practitioners.

AGGLUTINATION TESTS.

This department of the Institute is still increasing owing to the adoption by Chinese Hospitals of modern Western methods of diagnosis. The total number of agglutinations carried out was 2,276.

The following Table shows the routine test applied and race incidence,

ORGANISMS.

B. Typhosus B. Para. A.

B. Para. B. B. Para. C............. B. Dysenteriae.. B. Meletensis B. Abortus

M 85

w

AGGLUTINATION TESTS.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Total,

Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg. Pos.

Neg.

སྐྱུའ -

47 118

1

164

164

4

1

Weil Felix

}

ลง

10

5

16

186

381

753

21

566

753

21

4

563

753

}

1

3

3

Grand Total

50 454

5

58

191 1,518 2,276

Malaria. During the year the following Medical Officers were assisted in the examination of blood films, the Medical Officer of Health, the Medical Officer of Schools and the Medical Officers in Charge of Victoria and Lai Chi Kok Gaols; also the Government Malarialogist was assisted in a special survey at Repulse Bay. Both thin film and Ross's thick film methods were employed.

EXAMINATION OF BLOOD FILMS FOR MALARIA.

PARASITES.

EUROPEAN.

INDIAN.

CHINESE.

TOTAL.

Malignant Tertian.

2

1

28

31

Benign Tertian ...

14

50

66

Quartan

1

1

Unclassified

1

4

17

22

Negative

51

13

237

301

Grand Total

......

69

20

332

421

M 86

Tuberculosis.-The number of specimens examined for B. Tuberculosis shows a falling off from last year. No doubt owing the increasing number of Medical Officers and Private Practitioners who do their own clinical pathology specimens.

BACTERIOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS OF MATERIAL FOR B. TUBERCULOSIS

SPECIMEN.

Sputum

Urine

Cerebro-spinal

Fluid

Faeces

Pas

EUROPEAN. INDIAN.

CHINESE.

Miscellaneous...

Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg. Pos. Neg.

17

Grand Total

18

10

6

13:50

:

Total.

5

16 36 48

157

1

5

12

2

ANI

2

::

1

2103 C

9

5

333333

43

5 23 37

62

188

Diphtheria.--The number of throat swabs examined for B. Diphtheria was approximately the same as last year when 435 specimens were examined.

THROAT SWABS EXAMINED for DiphtherIA.

EUROPEAN. INDIAN. CHINESE.

Total.

Positive

50

4

35

89

Negative.....

222

12

100

334

Grand Total

272

16-

135

423

M 87

Morbid Histology.-During the year 242 sections were prepared for diagnosis, an increase of 179 over last year.

The following Tables give the particulars and diagnosis made.

MALIGNANT TUMOURS.

Nation- ality.

Sex Age

Site of tumour.

Diagnosis.

European M

50

Gland

Chinese F

43

Breast

F

67

Breast

""

Carcinoma.

Columuar cell carcinoma. Encephaloid carcinoma.

M

64

Gland-Liver

Carcinoma.

>>

M

46

Penis

Sarcoma.

""

F

54

Breast

Carcinoma.

22

F

49

Gland

Carcinoma.

29

Indian

F

43

Breast

Chinese F

46

Site unknown

Adeno carcinoma. Sarcoma.

BENIGN TUMOURS.

Nation- ality.

Site of

Sex. Age.

Diagnosis.

tumour.

European F.

39

Breast

Fibro adenoma.

F.

28

Ovary.

Papilloma.

""

F.

Breast

Fibro adenoma.

"

M.

40

"

Finger

Epidermal cyst.

*

F.

Breast

Fibro adenoma.

F.

35

Ovary

F.

26

Thyroid

57

F.

50

Cervix

*Chinese

F.

17

Breast.

M. 67

Elbow

+

F.

26

Breast

""

M.

57

Nasal cavity

27

F.

10

Calf

37

F.

45

Tongue

37

M.

35

Neck

Colloid cyst.

do.

Inflammatory.

Fibro adenoma.

Fibroma.

Fibro adenoma.

Fibroma.

Cavernous haemangioma.

Non-malignant papilloma.

Colloid goitre.

F.

40

Breast

Cystic adenoma.

M.

50

Nose

Nasal polypus:

12

M.

40

Rectum

Papilloma.

>>

F.

58

Nose

29

F.

17

Breast

**

F.

25

17

*

M.

26

Palate

""

Indian

M.

30

Meninges

European M. 32

Site unknown

M. 25

M.

18

F.

40

Chinese

F.

55

27

""

"

Soft fibroma. Fibroma.

步步

Mucous polypus.

Fibro adenoma.

do.

Haemangioma.

Gumma of meninges.

Broken down ulcer.

Gumma.

Capillary augioma.

Tissue Sections for Post-Mortem Diagnosis.-During the

year 205 sections were prepared and examined for the Officer in Charge of Victoria Mortuary for diagnosis.

M 88

APPENDIX A.

ANALYSIS OF CLINICAL AND OTHER EXAMINATIONS.

Total

Total

Nature of Examination.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar. Apr. May June July

Aug.

Sept.

Oct. Nov. Dec.

for

for

1930.

1929.

Cultivation Blood for Widal.

With B. Typhosus, .....

40

""

""

Paratyphosus A.....

B.,...

999

28

37

50

40

28

37

50

40

28

37

50

of of 8

86

77

86

77

86

77

PER

77

$3

C.....

1

1

3

: 888 88

93

S3

93

93

RRR:

73

50

59

753

792

50

59

753

792

50

59

753

792

5

Wassermann Reaction,

183

173

182

211

198

185

217

210

205

286

208

195

2,453

1,741

Malaria Parasites,

31

6

9

19

9

24

125

15

19

54

31

79

421

794

Filaria,

Blood count, etc.,

Bacillus Diphtheria,

51

TOI

Meningococcus,

3

::

...

1

1

38

38

45

23

13

10

2

: : :

1

...

1

I

3

1

8

36

23

28

32

27

37

68

423

435

2

21

28

Typhosus, Paratyphosus,

Cholera, etc.,

1

:

4

9

6

7

Helminth ova.......

Faeces or

stool for

Amoeba of Dysentery,

Occult blood,

Tubercule bacillus,.

Tissue for Section,.

Miscellaneous examinations.

| Sputa,

Pus,

Urine,

Smear for Gonococcus,

Smear for B. lepræ,

Rat smears, spleen etc......................

for B. pestis,

Blood, gland &c., for B.

Pestis,

Animals for Rabies,

Materials for Medico-legal

purposes,..

Weil Felix Reaction for Typhus

fever,

Agglutination Reaction for Ty-

phus fever

Agglutination Reaction for B.

Meletensis

Agglutination Reaction for B.

abortus

-HEN: UNA:

7

5

9

11

28

32

14

3

5

10

7

2

3

21-2

2

9

11

10

7

2

1

1

1

}

1

1

7

11

11

14

31

35

20

31

20

11

25

10

10

5

21

13

9

11

14

15

14

13

2

1

3

1

1

...

3

10

5

4

LO

5

11

5

9

14

19

24

16

14

15

10

23

38

22

5

3

3

2

1

2

ない

2

1

Re: R-ON~

10

22

10

22

2

ONDON :***

46

53

140

240

61

128

3

6

5

10

26 242

63

157

285

9

17

4

75

113

224

151

2

27

37

:

:

:

633

90

90

93

87

95

518

15

}

::

20:

::

CO

3

:

4

1

:

1

1

00

3

:

:

:

1

1

1

:

:.

:

}

:

1

1

}

::

:

:

:

:

6

1

∞o:

3

14

ск

:

6

33

33.

1

1

1

13

1

Bacteriological Examination of

Milk,

20

20

20

25

20

2:

:

:

:

:

4

4

20

25

21

10

8

10

207

190

Bacteriological Analysis of

Water,

142

135 152 132 157

140

159

147

159

151

146

122 1.742

1,791

Rideal Walker's Estimation of

Disinfectants

1

:

2

2

Autogenous Vaccine prepared,

2

I

1

:?!

3

20

15

Freshly prepared vaccine tested

for sterility,

11

15

Filter candles sterilized for

domestic filters,

29

Identification of Rat Fleas

Miscellaneous,

3223

29

16

9

10

15

2336

22

16

16

16

20

2

9

23

16

19

185

219

40

25

36

34

31

42

21

30

17

2828

29

35

23

24

39

282

28

40

30

20

9

28

16

28

18

23

858

29

28

378

352

15

11

252

76

26

32

285

172

Total,

670

600 701 755 885

826

1,063 927

947 1,045 860

942 10,221

9,412

M 89



APPENDIX B.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE WORK OF THE MALARIA BUREAU FOR THE YEAR 1930.

By R. B. JACKSON, M.D., D.P.H., MALARIALOGIST.

STAFF.

Mr. Deb and I arrived in the Colony on transfer from the Federated Malay States on April 24th.

Through the kind co-operation of the Government Bacteriol- ogist, Dr. Minett, half the upper storey of the Bacteriological Institute was occupied as a Malaria Bureau.

In May a clerk was detailed for work at the Bureau and in November four Chinese joined as probationer inspectors. At the end of the year the staff consisted of the Malariologist, the Assistant to the Malariologist, one clerk, four probationer inspectors and two coolies.

The scope of activities of the Bureau includes :-

1.

A general mosquito survey of the Colony and New Territories to determine what species exist and the life history of each.

2. A general survey of malaria.

3. Dissection of mosquitoes with a view to ascertaining

their relation to the spread of disease.

4. Special anopheline surveys in malarious districts to determine the breeding places of those species which carry malaria with a view to their eradication.

5. Local mosquito surveys with a view to abatement of

mosquito nuisances.

6. The teaching of mosquitology.

7. Co-operation with Government Departments, the Military, Naval and Air Forces, public companies and private individuals in the investigation and eradication of Malaria.

M 90

SPECIES INVESTIGATOIN.

ANOPHELINES.-Since August a record has been kept of the Anopheline larvae examined microscopically each month and of the imagines hatched out. As will be seen from attached figures, A. maculatus is most frequently met with, then A. minimus and next A. hyrcanus. Previous to September so very few larvae of A minimus had been encountered that no adults had been hatched out, the only two specimens obtained had been captured in Capt. Moir's House, Castle Peak Road on 4. 6. 30. Larvae of A. aitkeni were found in April and at various times since from the same pool. This species so far as I am aware has not yet been included in the list of Hong Kong Anophelines. Larvae of A. jeyporiensis have been met with both in the Island and in the New Territory. One specimen of A. vagus larva has been found. From Cheung Chau Island, a larva with clypeal hairs resembling A. umbrosus but which had palmate tufts, was obtained, also two larvae which resembled A. punctulata. Unfortunately these specimens were damaged after being mounted and before they could be examined at leisure. Several larvae have been found which closely resemble but which have not got the well developed dorsal plates of A. minimus. No adults have yet been obtained from these.

Larvae of A. maculatus have been found in concrete tanks near Tung Wah Eastern Hospital in the Botanical and Forest Department Gardens, in a wooden tub, in earthern jars, and on several occasions in masonry drains where accumulation of water had collected owing to the drain being obstructed by debris, in some cases the water came from seepages, in one instance it came from a house drain but had filtered through some earth and sand which had been washed into the drain. Close to the Peak Garage, these larvae were found in holes which have been left in the concrete facing of the embankment for the purpose of planting trees. Culicine larvae were found in the same holes, decaying vegetable matter was present in the water. The adults hatched out from these larvae were C. fatigans and C. virgatipes. Larvae of A. maculatus have also been found along with larvae of A. aitkeni.

Larvae of A. minimus were found in association with A. maculatus in a small concrete tank behind an unoccupied house at Taipo.

CULICINES.-Larvae of the following Culicines were

collected :

Aedes albopictus, A. togoi, A. japonicus, A. macfarlanei, A. argenteus, Culex fatigans, C. vishnui, C. bitaeniorhynchus, C. sitiens and C. mimeticus; Armigeres obturbans; Megarhinus splendens; and two species of Lutzia. Very few adult speci- mens of Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia fasciata) were obtained.

M 91

either by catching or by hatching out larvae, but those of Aedes albopictus, (Stegomyia scutellaris) could be obtained without difficulty. In the Philippines, Aedes albopictus has been ex- perimentally infected with dengue fever. The larvae of Three Aedes-togoi, macfarlanei and japonicus possess mouth rakes as well as mouth brushes but whether they are cannibal larvae or not I have not yet been able to ascertain. Aedes togoi has been found in pools in the rocks close to the sea, the other two some distance back from the sea. The principal biting pest is C. fatigans which has been found to carry filarial infection in many parts of the Tropics.

Culicine mosquitoes sent for identification were mainly C. fatigans, Armigeres obturbans, Aedes albopictus.

Mosquito Nuisance Investigation,

Complaints as to mosquito nuisances were received regarding Kowloon Hospital, Major Campell's quarters, Lugard Road, Police Stations in the New Territories, Lyemun Barracks, Mount Austin Barracks, Pokfulum residences, Cheung Chow Police Station, the neighbourhood of the War Memorial Hospital site at the Peak, and the residence of His Excellency the General Officer Commanding who also complained of a pest of sand flies. Visits were paid to these localities, larval surveys done and recommendations made for abatement of nuisances.

MALARIA INVESTIGATIONS.

Investigations regarding the incidence of Malaria and re- commendations bearing on these have been made at the follow- ing places during the year:-Capt. Moir's house, Castle Peak Road, New Territories, Taikoo Dockyard, Lyemun Barracks, St. Stephen's College, Stanley Peninsula, Repulse Bay Hotel. Larval surveys have been made at Taipo, Tung Wah Eastern Hospital, Sun Wai Military Camp and around No. 180 the Peak and it is hoped to have these completed at an early date when some further details have been gone into.

Anopheline mosquitoes caught at Lyemun Barracks, Capt. Moir's house and St. Stephen's College Stanley, were identified as follows:-A. maculatus 16, A. hyrcanus 82, A. minimus 18, most of these were dead on arrival. However, two A. maculatus and ten A. hyrcanus form Stanley were dissected but no infection was found.

In order to obtain information as to infection rates amongst the various Anopheline species, times of feeding, species frequenting houses etc., it will be necessary to train some of the staff to undertake this work,

M 92

SPLEEN RATES,

At Taikoo Dockyard School, 115 Chinese children attending the school were examined, 2 had enlarged spleens, 93 children of the Sugar Refinery Village were examined, 2 had enlarged spleens, 104 children living in the squatter area on the hill side behind the houses occupied by the Dockyard workers were examined, 3 had enlarged spleens. Spleen rate for the neighbour- hood was 2.2%. At Shaukiwan in the vicinity of Lyemun Barracks, 79 children from Man Ling, Cheong Shui Wing, Lam Cheng Hing, Tung Wah Hospital Charity Schools were examined, 2 had enlarged spleens. Spleen rate 2.5%. At Stanley Peninsula, 65 children were examined, no enlarged spleens were encountered. Total number of children examined on the Island was 456, 9 had enlarged spleens. Speen rate 1.97%. In all these localities, there were numerous breeding places of Anophelines mainly A maculatus. In the New Territory, 83 children from the villages of San Uk Tsuen, San Wai, Sui Hang Tsuen, near Sun Wai Military Camp, were examined. 9 had enlarged spleens. Spleen rate 27%. At Yok Chai Village on Castle Peak Road, 10 out of 14 examined had enlarged spleens, a rate of 71%. At Government English School, Taipo Market, 22 children were examined, 3 had enlarged spleens, at Sheung Tah School, Taipo Market, 24 children were examined, 2 had enlarged spleens. Total for Taipo Market, 5 enlarged spleens out of 46 examined, spleen rate 10.8%. Total number of children examined in New Territory, 93, number of enlarged spleens 24, spleen rate 25.8%.

PARASITE RATES.

In the Repulse Bay Area, the smears of the blood of 147 Chinese servants were examined, Malarial parasites were found in 33, an infection rate of 22.5%. Out of 186 servants only 4 used mosquito nets. These people were discharging their routine Numerous breeding places of Anopheline mosquitoes were close by. Further investigations are required regarding infection rates, if feasible they should be combined with spleen rates in the schools.

MALARIA STATISTICS.

Statistics obtained from the M.O.H, indicate that in 1930, 515 deaths were ascribed to Malaria in the Colony, these being 3.16% of the total deaths. The death rate per mille from Malaria is given as 0.47.

In Table 1, figures are given concerning hospital admissions to the following hospitals:-Government Civil, Kowloon, Vic. toria, Peak, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok Gaol, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda and Alice Memorial.

M 93

In Table II, statistics of cases treated at the following Dispensaries are shown:-Taipo, Un Long, Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, Eastern, Harbour and Yaumati, Hung Hom.

Table III deals with hospital admissions due to Malaria of Government servants in the Colony.

Table IV, is a similar table for the Police (including Water Police), some stations appear to have had no admissions for Malaria during the year, namely-Pokfulum, Wong Nei Chong, Tai Tam, Tai O, Lok Ma Chau, Ping Shan, Sha Tin, Tai Po, Tai Ku Ling and Lin Ma Hang.

Figures supplied by Major Harris M.C., R.A.M.C., regard- ing the incidence of Malaria amongst the troops British and Indian are as follows (relapses not being taken into account):- British Troops, number of cases of Malaria contracted during the year 77, of which 9 were in 1st Quarter, 4 in 2nd Quarter, 29 in 3rd Quarter, 35 in 4th Quarter. Calculated on an average strength of 2230, the Malarial admissions for fresh infections were 34.52 per 1,000. Lyemun contributed largely, the average strength being 122 out of which there were 34 admissions (fresh cases), 32 of which were in the 2nd half of the year whereas Stonecutter's Island with an average military strength of 168 did not have a single case of Malaria returned as contracted there. A hyrcanus, I understand, is the only Anopheline found on the Island so far, it is proposed to make investigations in the future with the co-operation of the Military Authorities (promised by Major Harris) as these may throw some light on the pathogenicity and range of flight of A. hyrcanus.

There were 42 fresh cases of fever amongst the Indian troops of which 7 were in 1st Quarter, 14 in 2nd, 28 in 3rd, 25 in 4th. These work out as 31.5 per 1,000 on the average stength of 1,365.

TABLE SHOWING ANOPHELINE LARVAE EXAMINED

MICROSCOPICALLY.

LARVAE.

Month.

A. macul-

A.

A.

A.

A

A.

sin-

min-

kar-

aitkeni jeypor-

atus.

enses

imus

wari

iensis

August

236

2

78

September.

223

2

123

14

October ..... 1,405

137

126

1

November... 750

259

751

December

1.934

60

214

2

Total...... 4,548

458

1,216

95

:

:

...

:

31

107

194

***

138

M 94

M

ADULTS HATCHED OUT,

Month.

A.

A.

A.

A.

A.

A.

macul- sinen-

min-

kar-

aitkeni

atus.

ses.

imus.

wari.

jey por- iensis.

August

September.

16

16

..

16

23

2

October

50

5

6

6

November...

84

14

36

6

December

121

1

3

Total......

287

24

66

18

CO

3

12

Table I.

HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS.

1930.

Government Civil, Kowloon, Victoria, Peak, Victoria Gaol, Lai Chi Kok, Tung Wah, Tung Wah Eastern, Kwong Wah, Matilda and Alice Memorial.

All causes.

Malaria.

Percentage of Malaria.

Europeans

1,961

111

5.7

Chinese

18,146

1,779

9.8

Indians

1,068

196

18.4

Others

159

4

2.5

Total

21,334

2,090

6.9

Malarial Admissions.

1st Quarter

232

Benign Tertian

622

2nd Quarter

419

Sub-Tertian

241

3rd Quarter

664

Quartan

30

4th Quarter

775

Clinically diagnosed

1,197

Total

2,090

2,090

M 95

Table II.

DISPENSARY CASES TREATED.

1930.

Tai Po, Un Long, Western Public, Kowloon City, Sham Shui Po, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Central, Eastern, Harbour

Total cases treated.

138,286

and Yaumati, Hung Hom.

Malaria.

9,300

Percentage

of Malaria. 6.7

Malaria Cases Treated.

1st Quarter

2nd Quarter

1,186

3,164 Benign Tertian

Sub-Tertian

142

13

3rd Quarter

2,070

Quartan

0

4th Quarter

2,880

Clinically diagnosed

9,145

Total

9,300

9,300

Table III.

GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES (excluding coolies).

Malaria Admissions 1930.

Malarial

Admissions.

Europeans

Chinese

Indians

Others

Total

862 49

3,203

115

1,021

167

66

5,152 331

Malarial admis-

sions per 1,000.

57

36

164

0

64

Malaria Admissions.

1st Quarter

89

Benign Tertian

245

2nd Quarter

79

Sub-Tertian

45

3rd Quarter

4th Quarter

100

Quartan

0

113

Clinically diagnosed

41

Total

331

331

M 96

Table IV.

POLICE ESTABLISHMENT (including Water Police).

Malaria Admissions 1930.

Malarial

Malarial Admis-

Establishment.

Admissions.

sions per 1,000.

Europeans Indians

202

19

94

713

123

172

Chinese

906

68

75

Total

1,821

210

115

Malaria Admissions.

1st Quarter

30

Benign Tertian

161

2nd Quarter

52

Sub-Tertian

27

3rd Quarter

60

Quartan

4th Quarter

68

Clinically diagnosed

22

Total

210

210

M 97

APPENDIX C.

ANALYST'S DEPARTMENT.

Report on the work of the Government Laboratory during the year 1930.

By Mr. E. R. Dovey, A.R.C.Sc., F.I.C., F.C.S., Government Analyst,

The number of analyses performed during the year was 2,888 as against 3,710 in 1929. The increased number of samples in 1929 was entirely due to the very large number of water samples examined that year during the period of water shortage.

The following classification shows the nature of the work

done:

*

CHEMICO-LEGAL EXAMINATIONS.

1930 1929

Toxicological Investigations (in-

cluding 36 stomachs)

72

50

Articles for stains

8

Bombs and explosives

9

Coins and coining material

7

Counterfeit banknotes

Material from fire enquiries

Documents

2

Papers for secret writing

9

Residues

5

Powders

15

Food

2

Water

2

Clotted blood

Liquids

Vomit

Medicines

Narcotic drugs

Carbolic acid

Other acids

Cigarette end

Sand

Spirit

Herbs

Tape

Other examinations

37

Dangerous Goods

Fuel Oil

31

16

Kerosene

5

14

Petrol

6

5

Ships for inflammable vapour

73

70

0

0

0

1

2

2

1

HOTOBOOOONOOOONOOOHNN –

12

0

7

0

3

0

0

2

4

Lard

Cheese

Flour

Brandy

Sugar

Whisky

M 98

Food and Drugs.

1930

1929

74

41

15

13

38

36

2

34

Molasses

Milk--Fresh

56

62

Butter-Fresh

28

21

Butter-Tinned

6

Oyster sauce

Ι

Jam

14

0

Treacle

14

Lemon Essence

1

Orange Essence

1

Bread

22

Rice

Ghee

Mustard

Tea

Cocoa

Cream

2

21

27

28

28

Sardines

Brown bread

Other fish

1

Biochemical Examinations.

Blood, for presence of seawater

Carbon monoxide

1

chlorides

1

sugar

23

urea nitrogen

17

0

Ascitic fluid

37

0

Urine

15

3

Human milk

0

Waters.

Public supplies

1,484 2,269

Distilled water

1

2

Well water

4

90

Sea water

49

0

Spring water

1

Other waters

3

Sewage effluents

15

13

Building Materials.

Cement

Lime

Sand

10 00

5

1

3

10 19

9

:

Anise oil Cassia Oil

Wood oil

Peanut oil

Lubricating oil

Castor oil

Roller oil

Vaseline

Other oils

- M 99

Oils.

1930 1929

11

12

17 31

40

100

1

3

1

Pharmacy Ordinance.

Chinese medicines

Atropine solution

Worm cones

10 - 10

5

1

5

Tincture of opium

1

HOOO

1

0

Chemicals.

Sulphuric acid

11

19

Potassium nitrate

2

0

Brom-cresol-purple

1

0

Brom-thymol-blue

1

Magnesium sulphate

1

0

Ferric chloride

1

Ammonium carbonate

2

Copper sulphate

1

Silver nitrate

Glycerine

Aluminium sulphate

3

Ammonium sulphide

1

Calcium hypochlorite

1

Reagents

1

Minerals and Metals.

Metals

118

178

Ores

82

119

Minerals

Coal

132

99

Clinker

Tin slag

Shale

Coke

Coal ash Jade

Ore dust

1

1

0

2

1

2

7

1

Deposit Guano Soil

M 100

Miscellaneous.

Fertilizer

Tar

Book paint

Leather

Stage lashing

Wrapping

Coal tar disinfectants

Wireless valves

Sediment

Clip

Insulating board

AO

0

422

15

0

OOHOO O O O HOO

3

2

1

1

4

1

1

TOXICOLOGICAL EXAMINATIONS.

Among the investigations made during the year were 42 int cases of human poisoning or suspected human poisoning. The following table shows the results:-

Poison

No poison found

Opium found

Arsenic found

Morphine found

Number of cases.

16 cases

11

2

1

11

>>

1

1

Hydrochloric acid found.

Bandolin wood found

Unidentified alkaloids found

Potassium cyanide found

2

Iron and lead found

Lysol found

Other poisons

Total

""

1

>>

1

1

42

One of the cases investigated concerned the death of a coolie who had eaten a piece of bread and butter which had been treated with arsenic for the purpose of destroying rats. Arsenie was found in all parts of the body, and no less than 20.5 grains was separated from the contents of the stomach alone.

Another case concerned a jeweller's assistant who was taken suddenly ill and died on the way to hospital. All the organs were found to be congested and analysis revealed the presence of a considerable amount of potassium cyanide in the contents of the stomach. Police investigations made later revealed evidence of self-administration.

M 101 -

In March, a Chinese woman put poison in a wine bottle used by her mother-in-law. The latter on drinking the liquid found it bitter and reported the matter to the Police. Lysol was found in the liquid.

DANGEROUS Goods.

The Clowes-Redwood apparatus for the detection of in- flammable vapour has been used on 73 ships during the year.

A considerable number of samples of fuel oil have been examined for the Naval Authorities, the determinations required including viscosity @ 32°, 40°, 60°, and 100°F, sulphur content, water content, flash point, ash, hard asphalt content, suspended water and Specific Gravity.

A number of samples have been submitted by the Police Department in connection with fire-crackers and fire-cracker factories. These have included complete crackers, mixed ex- plosives, and ingredients for explosives. In many cases illegal ingredients were found.

FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE.

The following table gives the results of 298 samples of articles of food submitted by the Sanitary Department:-

Substance.

Number Number

Number Examined

found Genuine

found

adulterated

Butter-Fresh

28

27

Butter-Tinned

6

6

Bread

22

22

Cocoa

28

28

Cheese

15

15

Cream

28

27

Flour

35

33

Jam

14

13

Lard

1

1

Milk-Fresh

52

50

Sugar

34

33

Tea

21

18

Treacle

14

14

HOOOOHN HON H∞ ✪

1

0

0

0

0

1

2

1

2

1

3

Total

298

287

11

M 102

MINERALS AND METALS.

The 296 samples of metals and minerals examined during the year comprised the following:-

Metals

1930 1929

Minerals.

1930

1929

Tin

109

174

Wolfram...

59

94

Antimony

2

Manganese

3

6

Gold

Bismuth.....

13

Aluminium

Antimony

5

Silver

Molybdenite

Iron

Tin ......

Graphite

| Other ores

321010

Total

118

178

Total ..... 82 119

The adverse conditions prevailing in the commerce of the Colony during the year accounted for the decreased number of analyses of metals and minerals which the Laboratory was called upon to make.

WATER SUPPLIES.

The

240 samples of water were taken during the year at the various filter installations. Of these half were filtered and half were from unfiltered water. In addition to these, 1,244 samples were taken from taps in all parts of Hong Kong and Kowloon as a control on the water actually reaching the consumers. samples from the filter beds were given a complete examination, whilst in the case of the tap samples, the free ammonia, free chlorine, the electrical conductivity and the hydrogen ion con- centration were determined. Such an examination is designed to indicate merely whether any change has occurred since the water left the filter bed.

The great majority of samples of the raw unfiltered water in Hong Kong are acid, and give a hydrogen ion concentration value pH=6.5 to 6.8. Most of the filtered water is also slightly acid showing a value usually of pH=6.6—6.8.

As regards physical properties, colour and transparency, the water from the Paterson filtration plants at Bowen Road and Shing Mun was excellent, only one of the 24 samples taken showed colour in excess of six Lovibond colour units in a 24 inch stratum, whilst values of from 2 to 3 colour units were usual readings. In all these samples also, except one, the water had the maximum value for transparency, 100, in the case of the September sample from Bowen Road filter, the value fell to 90.

M 103

The following Table gives the least satisfactory figures for some of the principal determinations made on each of the various supplies during the year:-

Free

Alb.

Supply.

Colour.

Trans-

parency.

Oxygen pH.

Am-

Am- monia. monia.

abs.

Value.

Lovibond units

Parts per 100,000

Aberdeen

.90 8

18 cm 0.0022 0.0061

0.073

7.0

Elliot....

35.7

55 cm

0.0011

0.0061

0.035 6.8

West Point....

5.7

100 cm

0.0011

0.0061

0.033 8.5

Albany

33.7

60 cm

0.0016

0.0055 0.026

6.8

Bowen Road...

11.4

90 cm 0.0028

0.0055

0.043

6.9

Eastern

35.5

52 em

0.0055

0.0061

0.039

8.0

Shaukiwan

4.6

100 cm 0.0055

0.0110

0.011 6.8

Chai Wan......

4.1

100 em 0.0033 0.0050 0.060

7.2

Kowloon

4.1

100 cm 0.0011

0.0069 0.035 6.7

Shing Man

5.2

100 cm 0.001T 0.0055 0.015 8.4

In connection with the control of the chlorination of the public supplies and to meet allegations of a chlorine taste re- maining in the water, more than 1,200 samples from taps were taken during the year and the free chlorine determined. In only 31 per cent of these was any chlorine detected, and the highest concentration found in any sample was 0.6 part per million.

CRIMINAL WORK.

The electrical conductivity method has been used in connec tion with several suspected drowning cases during the year. In May a specimen of thoracic fluid from a body at the Kowloon Mortuary showed by this method the presence of 32 per cent of sea-water. In January the dead body of a man was found in a nullah and it was suspected that he might have been either gassel with coal gas or drowned. The conductivity test showed that the blood was normal and that no drowning had taken place and the absence of gassing was proved by the palladium chloride test, an analysis of the blood gases, and a spectrographic examination with the wave-length spectrograph. In another case of drowning at the Kowloon Mortuary, the differential chloride method was used and proved that the drowning had occurred in fresh water and not in sea-water.

M 104. –

In December a sample of suspected food in a case of at- tempted poisoning was found to contain oz. of caustic soda. The taste of the food had proved to be sufficiently unpleasant to deter anyone from partaking of it.

A number of articles were submitted by the Police in March in connection with a case of attempted arson in Yaumati. Traces of kerosene found on many of these substantiated the charge against the defendant. Seven samples of fluid found in a house in Wing Lok Street where arson was suspected, proved on analysis to be a mixture of kerosene and petrol,

Work was done during the year on several cases concerning forged bank-notes, in two of which Straits $1 notes were involved. Microphotographs taken of the suspected and genuine notes, together with micrometric measurements, demonstrated that the former were counterfeit, and that at least two separate sets of plates had been used in the preparation of them.

In December a number of articles were submitted by the Police in connection with a charge of counterfeiting Hong Kong coins. Coin moulds, counterfeit coins together with various chemicals and pieces of metal were examined. The coins were composed of a tin-antimony alloy.

In two cases of corrosive fluid throwing, garments were submitted for the examination of stains. Hydrochloric acid was found in one case and a mixture of hydrochloric and nitric acids was found in the second. A jacket submitted in an alleged pepper-throwing case was examined. The dust from the front and sides of the garment when microscopically examined showed a considerable proportion of pepper.

A number of five cent receipt stamps were submitted in cases where it was alleged that attempts had been made to obliterate the cancellation. In several instances it was demonstrated that attempts to do this had beert made.

RESEARCH WORK.

In connection with the application of electrical conductivity methods to the investigation of cases of drowning, conductivity measurements have been made on a large number of specimens of various bodily fluids. Amongst these were a considerable num- ber of ascitic fluids, the work on which was done in collaboration with Prof. Gerrard of the Hong Kong University. Measurements of the total chloride in terms of sodium chloride, of the electrical conductivity in recipricol megohms and of the total electrolytes calculated from the conductivity were carried out. In some instances this was supplemented by determinations of the blood sugar and blood urea nitrogen from the same cases.

1

- M 105

Work has also been done on the application of direct colour photography to the recording of results of colour tests in toxicological investigations and to other laboratory colour tests. The results so far obtained indicate that this method will prove of very considerable value.

During the year the Police have submitted a number of documents on which invisible secret writing was suspected. Work was done on suitable methods of development and on modifications of existing methods for this work. The ultraviolet light method will be adopted for this work as soon as the necessary apparatus is obtainable.

Methods for the determination of alcohol in urine in cases of alleged drunkeness have been proposed in England and these have been tested out in the Laboratory. Special methods of determination are required in this work owing to the minute quantities of alcohol concerned.

The services of the Laboratory were requested in connection with the corrosion of condenser tubes in a local refrigeration plant. In this connection work was done on the corrosive action of the Hong Kong harbour water on iron and steel in addition to a micrographic examination of the corroded tubes.

Extensive investigations have been carried out on China wood oil. Conditions affecting results given by the proposed Bolton & Williams Heat Test have been investigated and a new procedure is being tested by means of which it is hoped that adulteration with foreign oils in as small a proportion as 1 per cent may be detected with certainty.

SAMPLING.

The following Table shows the amount of sampling carried out by the Government Sampler during the year:

Substances.

1930.

1929.

Tin Wolfram

Manganese ore

Bismuth ore

2,439 tons.

149 700 tons. None.

4,119 tons.

364

None.

Molybdenite

Copper coins

19 bags. None.

2,185 lbs. None.

Lard

38,115 cases

51 tons.

16,145 cases

Wood oil

260 tons.

465 tons.

Paraffin wax

None.

107 bags.

Anise oil

None.

8,000 lbs.

Cassia Oil

5,920 lbs.

Peanut oil

Tea seed oil

Glycerine

210 lbs.

Portland cement

None.

40 tons.

None.

80 tons.

None.

770 lbs.

5,209 lbs. None.

M 106

In addition to the above, the sampler took 1,302 samples of water.

MISCELLANEOUS SERVICES.

In May the Laboratory staff again carried out a treatment of the Colonial Secretary's Office records and Library with hydrocyanic acid gas. 30 grammes of gas per 1,000 cubic feet was supplied for 48 hours and according to reports received later the treatment was quite successful. Two similar treatments were applied to the records contained in the strong-room of one of the local Banks. These records were infested with white ants and in this case it was necessary to use three times the above concentration to effectively deal with the trouble.

The Laboratory was also called upon to investigate the cause of corrosion of some electrical wiring in the British Consulate at Swatow.

REVENUE.

The fees paid into the Treasury during the year amounted to $19,891.50 as against $24,974.00 in 1929. The value of the work done, Government and commercial, as determined from the Tariff of Fees (Government Notification No. 439 of 1918) was $52,751.50 as against $51,659.00 in 1929.

STAFF,

Mr. V. C. Branson, the First Assistant Analyst went on leave on the 23rd April and returned to the Colony on the 8th October.

No other changes have taken place during the year.

R

1

M 107

APPENDIX D.

MENTAL HOSPITAL.

NATIONALITY AND SEX OF ATIENTS TREATED IN 1930.

}

Total

Remaining

Nationality.

Remaining at end of 1929.

Admitted.

Number

Discharged.

Died.

Treated.

ut end of 1930.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F.

M.

F

Europeans

Indians

5

14

19

16

11

11

10

I

15

171

86

186

93

166

85

00

1

12

Chinese

1

1

Japanese

Jews

1

1

Eurasians

Malays

Negroes

1

1

1

1

Total..

20

11

199

94

219 105

193

89

18

16

M 108

Appendix D

MENTAL HOSPITAL ANNUAL REPORT, 1930.

Discharged.

Remaining

Diseases.

in Hospital

at end of 1929.

Admitted during 1930.

Total

cases

treated. Apparently Relieved.

cured.

To Canton Mental Hospital.

Remaining

Died,

in Hospital

at end of 1930.

Errors of Development -

Imbecility Congenital. Imbecility Moral Feeble mindedness Disorders of function

Mania Acute....

Intermittent

2

2

10

91

Chronic

Associated with:-

Epilepsy..

Pregnancy

511

24

29

10

11

11

12

~~2 22

12

14

1

1

1

1

3

6

N 2 CO

12

208

IA

6

1B

1

1

1

1

1

1

Melancholia Acute

9

9

4

1

3

Agitated

1

1

1

Chronic

2

1

3

1

Associated with Lactation

1

1

1

Alternating

Chronic

Intermittent...

Maniacal Depressive Insanity:-

Circular

Stupor Anergie

Onsessional

Delusional Insanity

Acute

Insanity of Infective Toxic, and

other general Conditions, .

Acute Delirium

Insanity Associated with Acute

infective disease:

Febrile

3

3

1

3

1

1

1

1

3

4

1

11-19

2

1

1

1

1

14

15

6

10

5

7

12

1

0010

+

5

1

1

1

1

|

3

100 1

1

1

جر

1

TCO

3

Post Febrile.

Confusional

1

13

14

Syphilitic

2

Q 2 GO

2244

2281

3

1

1 120 1

5

6

1

General Paralysis of the

Insane

1

3

1

1

1c

1

Tabo-paresis

1

1

1

Acute

Chronic

Insanity due to Alcohol :-

Delirium Tremens

Dementia Praecox

7

7

-1

7

1

1

1

5

5

4

29

33

22

9

2

Primary

3

26

29

9

16

4

""

Secondary

12

14

6

6

1D

1

""

Senile

7

7

4

2

""

from Epilepsy

3

3

1

Observation

1

77

78

51

14

4 E, F, G & H

9

Total:-1930.

31

293

324

96

86

100

8

34

Total: 1929.

38

252

290

67

79

93

20

31

A. Septicaemia.

B. Nephritis.

C. General Debility.

D. Pneumonia

E. Pueumonia.

F. Pneumonia.

G. Pneumonia.

H. Malaria Cachescia.

M 109

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Remain-

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

ing in Hospital

at end

of 1929.

I.-Epidemic, Endemic, and Infectious Diseases.

Euterie Group :-

Typhoid Fever

Clinical

Yearly Total.

Total

admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end

Deaths.

of 1930.

35

58

61

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

of 1929.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in

Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

ཋ :

53

25

KA

Si

18

125

55

84

5

Malaria :-

(a) Benign Tertian

9

495

504

15

11

509

102

520

(b) Subtertian

22

696

194

718

(c) Quartan

(a) Cachexia

2

2

(d) Aestivo-autumnal

155

13

159

1

1

55

1

56

27

2

Smallpox.

3

4

10

69

26

Measles

15

15

1

Scarlet Fever

4

4

Whooping Cough

2

Diphtheria

1

35

9

36

4

1

36

20

Influenza

545

1

545

1

1

122

73

Mumps

3

1

:

བ::: ཡ

12

37

79

3

2

1

423

14

:

Dysentery:

(a) Amoebic

(b) Bacillary

(c) Undefined or due to other

Leprosy

Erysipelas

causes

Acute Poliomyelitis

Epidemic Cerebro-spinal Fever

2

75

:.

1

77

2

16

340

126

356

53

1

18

3

18

ลง

2

48

10

50

13

2

18

1♡

3

12835

1210-2

5

126:2

Other Epidemic Diseases:

(~) Varicella (Chicken-pox)................ (Dengue....

38

38

Rabies

6

4

Tetanus

2

1-8862

i

4

co:

21

4

при

:::

28

2223

...

68

68

Carried forward......

24

1,570

42

1,594

31

65

2,383

649

2,448

98

M 110

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

at end Admis- of 1929.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

sions.

at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward ..............

24

1,570

42

1.694

31

65

2,383

649

2,418

98

I.-Epidemic, Endemic, and

Infectious Diseases,-Continued.

Tuberculosis Pulmonary and

Laryngeal

Tuberculosis of the Meninges or

Central Nervous System

Tuberculosis of the Intestines or

Peritoneum

Tuberculosis of the Vertebral Column Tuberculosis of Bones and Joints...... Tuberculosis of other organs :-

(a) Skin or Subcutaneous Tissue

(Lupus)

(b) Bones

(c) Lymphatic System

(d) Genito-urinary.

(e) Other organs

Tuberculosis disseminated :-

(a) Acute

Chronic....

18

224

54

242

11

85

2,300

904

2,385

100.

:

17

17

17

210

148

210

9.

:

1

12

2

13

1!

11

*=

46

32

46

1

7

2

7

: 2

13

15

2

if

3

1 i

I

...

882

...

39

2

41

3

2

2

1

1

1

3

دن

1

1

12:

75



77

4

1

}

2

2 ∞

24

2

:

10

:2

12

33

39

18

71

Syphilis -

(a) Primary

2

64

66

1

2

(b) Secondary.

1

35

36

3

1

17

2

(e) Tertiary

4

26

6

30

1

35

298

72

(d) Hereditary

5

5

17

14

Soft Chancre

27

27

2

Gonorrhoea and its complications

9

146

155

Gonorrhoeal Ophthalmia

5

Gonorrhoeal Arthritis.

3

13

16

1

2

Granuloma Venereum

Septicæmia

2

1

2

4Y ༥?1 22

68

48

࿐ ཥྭཱ 1 ༢T- ༠ c m སྨྱ

2

18

1

27

2

Carried forward......

68

2,222

131

2,290

67

202

5,518

1,899 5,720

242

M 111

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

at end of 1929.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

ing in

Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

Brought forward............

68

2,222

131

2,290

67

202

5,518 1,899 5,720

242

II.-General Diseases not

mentioned above.

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Buccal Cavity... Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Stomach or Liver Cancer or other malignant Tumours of the Peritoneum, Intestines, Rectum

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Female Genital Organs Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Breast

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Skin ....

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of Orgaus not specified

Tumours non-Malignant

34

4

38

6

8

6

00

8

:

:

31

10

31

:

:

::.

:

:

co

00

17

17

19

3

19

12

12

3

:

:

:

28

11

28

7

5

7

I

12

5

12

1

1

..

:

2

2

2

2

2

5

91

5

96

2

20

22

Acute Rheumatism.....

Chronic Rheumatism

6

6

13

13

14

14

11

170

I

181

6.

Beri-Beri

Diabetes (not including Insipidus)

76

3

80

81

1,472

367

1,553

31

5

5

1

I

1

Anæmia :-

(a) Pernicious

4

1

(b) Other Anæmias & Chlorosis

2

39

00 1

4

3

41

Diseases of the Thyroid Gland :—

(a) Exophthalmic Goitre

}

4

5

:.

-:

:

1

1

::

:

4

I

69

1

69

2

I

2

(b) Other diseases of the Thyroid Gland, Myxedema..............

Diseases of the Para-Thyroid Glands

Diseases of the Supra-Renal Glands.. Diseases of the Spleen

Leukæmia:

(a) Leukæmia

(b) Hodgkin's Diseases.

Alcoholism

Chronic poisoning by organic sub-

stances (Morphia, Cocaine, &c.)...

Other General Diseases :-

Purpura Hæmorrhagica..

1

10

~~ : ~~

10

1

1

2

1

-~

2

1

40

1

40

10: 10

1

1

1

2

~

3

87

90.

1

1

2

2

16

130.

54

146

12.

I

Diabetes Insipidus

1



Carried forward......

87 2,706

166

2,793

89

312

7.487

2,357

7,799

344

M 112

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

Remain. ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

of 1929.

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward..........

87

2,706

166

2,793

89

312

7,487 2,357

7,799

344

III.-Affections of the Nervous System and Organs of the Senses.

Encephalitis (not including En-

cephalitis Lethargica)

Meningitis (not including Tuberculous

Meningitis or

Meningitis)

Locomotor Ataxia

Cerebro-spinal

Other affections of the Spinal Cord ...

Apoplexy:

(a) Hæmorrhage

:

6

6

3

4

1

42

N

2

2

:

11

6

11

14

149

85

(6) Embolism....

34

(c) Thrombosis

39

~~: 1960 +

163

39

+91 888

∞ ::

6

Paralysis:-

(a) Hemiplegia

I

5

1

2

140

22

142

15

(b) Other Paralyses

3

14

17

2

1

General Paralysis of the Insane

5

Other forms of Mental Alienation......

10

11

Epilepsy

15

19

1

22301-

1

3

1

Eclampsia, Convulsions (non-puer-

peral) 5 years or over

1

1

Hysteria

1

5

6

1

Neuritis

1

64

65

4

2

77

Neurasthenia

14

14

4

Other affections of the Nervous

Cerebral Softening.

System such as Paralysis Agitans..

*400 21010

6

1

10

1

: : : :

:

79

22024

3

Affections of the Organs of Vision:-

(a) Diseases of the Eye

4

24

28

15

637

652

22

(b) Conjunctivitis

36

36

1

1

27

28

2

(c) Trachoma............

15

15

2

20

20

(d) Tumours of the Eye

2

2

1

1

1

...

(e) Other affections of the Eye... Affections of the Ear or Mastoid Sinus..

27

27

1

55

35

3

29

29

14

1

14

1

Carried forward......

108

3,001

176

3,109

104

347

8,713

2,485

9,060

398

M 113

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Kemain- ing in Hospital at end

Admis- of 1929. sions.

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain-

ing io Hospital

ths.

at i of 1980.

25

4

27

19

245

78

264

24

Brought forward......

108

3,001

176

3,109

104

347

8,713 2,483

9,060

398

1

12

27

~~ :*

38

12

20

1

...

::

46

3

~i co

Ι

65

222

22

39

12

21

22:2

::

+

+ 6

10 00

:

2:2

24

248

149

272

4

4



13

112

12

125

19

3

3

1

1

68

1

22

3

::

7

95

102

...

2



3

2

7

:

:

IV.-Affections of the Circulatory System.

Pericarditis

Acute Endocarditis or Myocarditis Other Diseases of the Heart :-

(a) Valvular :—

Mitral

Aortic

Tricuspid...

(b) Myocarditis

Diseases of the Arteries :—

(a) Aneurism

(4) Arterio-Sclerosis

Diseases of the Veins:

Hæmorrhoids

Varicose Veins

Phlebitis

...

Diseases of the Lymphatic System:--

Lymphangitis....

Lymphadenitis, Bubo

(non-specific)

Hæmorrhage of undetermined cause... Other affections of the Circulatory

System

V.-Affections of the Respiratory System.

...

::

:

26

26

2

:

1

6

© 2

:

1

62

:23

:

:

1

:

1

Diseases of the Nasal Passages :-

Adenoids

5

5

1

1

Polypus

12

12

2

3

3

Rhinitis

3

3

Coryza...

11

11

Affections of the Larynx :-

Laryngitis

00

8

4

4

:

:

Carried forward...... 121

3,326 162

3,447

118

403 9,396 2,732 9,799

483

M 114

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Disenses.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

Total

Remain- ing in

at end of 1929.

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward......

121

3,326

192

3,447

118

403

9,396

2,732

9,799

483

V.-Affection of the Respiratory

Syste-Continued.

Bronchitis :-

(a) Acre

(b) Chonic.....

Broncho-Peumonia. Pneumoni:

(a) obar

(b)Unclassified

Pleuriss Empyema

Asthod

Pulpnary Emphysema

Or affectious of the Lungs :- Pulmonary Spirochæosis

VI.-Diseases of the Digestive System.

Diseases of Teeth or Gums-Caries,

Pyorrhoea, &c.

Other affections of the Mouth:-

Other affections of the Month Stomatitis

Glossitis, &c.

Affections of the Pharynx or Tonsils:-

Tonsillitis

187

191

95

2

76

40

1

51

23

40

3

94

102

2:2

98

79

CON 2

3

2

CON

27

255

34

282

19

39

613

125

652

44

40

1,362

682

1,402

26

52

608

166

608

18

18

15

18

42

2

4

4

4

12

88

14

100

2

:

1

...

4

:

:

4

:

:

...

85

1

87

2

:

}

...

9

10

9

10

22:

3

4

1

...

1

ลง

2

173

175

Pharyngitis

19

Affections of the Esophagus

2

Ulcer of the Stomach

19

c::

19

2

3

20

~::~

17

17

F

1

1

2

20

1

20

1

Ulcer of the Duodenum....

3

11

14

1

5

:

5

Other affections of the Stomach :-

Gastritis

2

81

83

I

112

9

113

Dyspepsia, &c.

58

::

58

1

:

...

101

1

101

0000

3

Diarrhoea and Enteritis :-

Under two years

23

3

23

2

7

718

123

725

23

Diarrhoea and Enteritis :—

Two years and over

201

10

202

37

645

281

682

20

Colitis

33

33

29

19

29

Ulceration

5

5

Sprue

2

2

Ankylostomiasis..

3

28

31

2

Carried forwurd....... 156

4,627

270

4,783

148

566

14,011

4,509

14,577

647

+

M 115

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPEN DIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

at end of 1929.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end

Yearly Total.

Total

Cases

of 1929.

Admis- sions.

Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

156

4,627 270

4,783

148

566

14,011

4,509

14,577

647

Brought forward......

VI.-Diseases of the Digestive

System, Continued.

Diseases due to Intestinal Parasites:-

(a) Cestoda (Tænia)

(b) Trematoda (Flukes)

(c) Nematoda

(other than

Ankylostoma).

Ascaris

(d) Other paras tes

(e) Unclassified

Appendicitis

Hernia.....

Affections of the Anus, Fistula, &c.

Other affections

ines

Enteroptosis Constipation

of the Intest-

Cirrhosis of the Liver :-

(a) Alcoholic

& Alcoholic...

Biliary Calculus

Other affections of the Liver

-

Abscess

::

co co

3

co co

...

::

...

...

a:

2211:

:

21

...

23

:

4

1

5

1

87

6

89

41

...

41

1

6

58

64

6

-8822

23

63

26

29

26

--822

23

2

63

29

26

2

2

...

2

155

2

13

...

2 155

107

107

3.

231

2

6

13

1

6:

258

8888

59

264

i ai

6.

7

:-

1

17

::

1726to co

18

12

1

12

1



2

22276 CO

3

Hepatitis...

Cholecystitis

Jaundice

Diseases of the Pancreas

Peritonitis (of unknown cause).........................

Other affections of the Digestive

System

VII.-Disenses of the Genito-

urinary System (non-Venereal).

43

:

...

44

:

...

:

24

6

5

I

:

5

4

1

cr: 10

24

:

1.

:

Acute Nephritis.

Chronic Nephritis

x:

16

8995

23

12

22

2

16

31

13

36

888

13

311

991

376

3775

45

324

9

1,027

41

Other affections of the Kidneys,

Pyelitis, &c.

1

6

Urinary Calculus

1

42

7 43

1

I

182 Carried forward..............

5,198

308

5,380

169

621

15.865 5,027

16,486

711

M 116

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Total

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total Cases

ing in

Hospital

Admis-

sions.

Treated.

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

Brought forward......

182

5,198

308

5,380

169

621

15,865 5,027

16,486

711

VII.-Diseases of the Genito-urinary System (non-Venereal),-Continued.

Diseases of the Bladder :—

Cystitis

Diseases of the Urethra :—

(a) Stricture

Other

Diseases of the Prostate :-

Hypertrophy

Prostatitis

Diseases (non-Venereal) of the Genital

Organs of Man :-

Epididymitis

...

19

24

1

4

Q

::

19

24

5

]

4

i co

3

::

:

::

17

1

17

1

22

1

22

3

3

1

...

:

Orchitis

Hydrocele

7

7

17

17

Ulcer of Penis

Phimosis

Cysts or other non-malignant Tumours

of the Ovaries....

Salpingitis:-

Abscess of the Pelvis........

11

11

1

14

15

1

9

9

1

1

16

16

:

...

22

:

22

3

CO

:

:

1

29

I

30

3

2

Uterine Tumours (non-malignant)

14

14

...

-

10 7

1

Uterine Hæmorrhage (non-puerperal)

8

8

Metritis

1

19

20

...

Other affections of the Female Genital

Organs.......

24

26

...

Displacements of Uterus

39

41

15

15

Amenorrhoea

Dysmenorrhoea

Leucorrhoea......

Diseases of the Breast (non-

puerperal :-

Mastitis

Abscess of Breast

3

3

40

40

7

28

28

Ι

42

42

::

12

1

19

2

2

13

::

20

13

: co

3

Carried forward................

188 5,479 311

5,667

177

625 16,108 5,029 16,733

718

Diseases.

M 117

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain. ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward......

188

5,479 311

5,667

177

625

16,108 5,029

16,733

718

VIII. Puerperal State.

Normal Labour

Accidents of Pregnancy

(a) Abortion

(b) Ectopic Gestation

(c) Other accidents of Pregnancy

Puerperal Hæmorrhage......

Other accidents of Parturition

Puerperal Septicæmia

Puerperal Eclampsia

Sequela of Labour...

IX.-Affections of the Skin and

Cellular Tissues.

Gangrene

Boil:-

Carbuncle

Abscess :-

Whitlow

Cellulitis

"Tinea

Scabies

Other Diseases of the Skin :-

Brythema

Erythema

Urticaria

Eczema

Herpes......

Elephantiasis

Keloid

Pemphigus

Ulcer

J

736

1

743

24

63

5,497

5,560

85

6

6

15

15

34

34

14

14

14

2

14

...

26

26

1

...

1

5

4

5

1

2

19

6

19

6

2

6

::

1

...

1

...

3

9

12

2

...

:

2

206

208

100

10

107

10

ဘတ

286

294

7

95

95

3

105

2

114

2

49

1,217

15

1,266

22

22

1

9

9

8888

3:

53

86

86

7

LO

5

5

::

9

65

65

1

Ni ai

20

4

4

1

12

2

6

6.

20

1

į

2

:6

...

1

1

...

...

4

4

2

1

...

Carried forward............. 217 7,032 322

7,249

225

744

23,188 5,062 23,932

878

M 118

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Diseases.

Remain- ing in Hospital

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

at end of 1929.

Admis- sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in Hospital

Deaths.

at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Admis-

sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Remain- ing in

Deaths.

Hospital. at end of 1930.

217

7,032

322

7,249

225

744

23,188

5,062

23,932

878

27

3

31

:

19

56

Brought forward......

X.-Diseases of Bones and Organs of Locomotion (other than Tuberculous).

Diseases of Bones :-

Osteitis

Diseases of Joints :--

Arthritis

Synovitis

Other Diseases of Bones or Organs

of Locomotion................

XI.-Malformations.

Malformations :-

Hydrocephalus

Spina Bifida, &c.

XII.-Diseases of Infancy.

Congenital Debility

Premature Birth..

:

29

m

34

1

19

2

...

56

2

1

26

1

26

1

အသ

18

3

1

12

1

:

:

00

:

1

1

40

2

40

2

:

::

To co xx

18

3

13

1

3

:

:

:

1

1

:

:

:



79

6.

108

39

108

79

28

18

10

22: 2

...

27

317

112

344

26

27

00

...

68

10

...

1

:00 00

68

1

23

3

10

1

3

3

40

1

40

1

1

1

:

:

Other affections of Infancy

Infant neglect (infants of three months

or over)

XIII.-Affections of Old Age.

Senility :-

Senile Dementia...

XIV. Affections produced by External Causes.

Suicide by Poisoning..

Corrosive Poisoning (intentional)...

Suicide by Gas Poisoning.....

Suicide by Hanging or Strangulation.

Suicide by Drowning....

Suicide by cutting or stabbing Ins-

truments

:

...

23

...

Carried forward......

223

7,356

346

7,579 235

771 23,755 5,254 24,546

912

Diseases.

M 119

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1930.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

Remain- ing in Hospital

at end of 1929.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

Yearly Total.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Admis- sions.

Total

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Remain-

Total

ing in

Admis- sions.

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward......

223

7,356

346 7,579

235

771

2,3775

5,254

24,546

912

XIV.-Affections produced by External Causes,-Continued.

Other Suicides

6

6

1

Burns (other than by Fire)

Food Poisoning:-

Botulism

Attacks of poisonous animals :-

Snake Bite

Insect Bite

Other accidental Poisonings

Burns (by Fire)

Suffocation (accidental).

Poisoning by Gas (accidental)

Drowning (accidental)

Wounds (by Firearms, war excepted)...

Wounds (by cutting or stabbing

Instruments)

Wounds (by Fall)

Wounds (in Mines or Quarries)

Wounds (by Machinery)

Wounds (crushing, e.g. railway

accidents, &c.)

Injuries inflicted by Animals, Bites,

Kicks, &c.

Wounds inflicted on Active Service...

Hunger or Thirst

Exposure to Heat:—

Heatstroke

23

23

:།:

2

::

10 0

6

2

2

18

18

3

39

4

42

3

39

32

1

32

1

11

1

13

21 2

نت

177

146

2

32

104

9.

3.

31

0 -1

7

179

12

91

3

148

36

3

33

1

:

107

:

:

広告に

40

1

41

1

13



2

103

: : :

13

9

36

1

10

3:

13

31

2

10:

2

3

1

1

Lightning Stroke

2

Dislocation

15

15

-::

5

5

Sprain....

60

61

32

137

469

15

Fracture

18

247

67

265

6

343

354

20

Other external Injuries

2

422

20

424

44

51

51

10

41

Carried forward................

260

8,736

452

8,996

300

841

24,885

5,270 25,726

964

M 120

P

Return of Diseases and Deaths (In-Patients) for the Year 1939.

APPENDIX E.

APPENDIX F.

GOVERNMENT HOSPITALS.

CHINESE HOSPITALS.

Diseases.

Kemain- ing in Hospital

Yearly Total.

at end Admis- of 1929. sions.

Total Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1929.

Yearly Total.

Admis- sions.

Total

Cases Treated.

Deaths.

Remain- ing in Hospital at end of 1930.

Brought forward......

260

8,736

452

8,996

300

841

24,885

5,270

25,726

964

XV.-Ill-Defined Diseases.

Diseases not already specified or ill-

de'ined :-

Pyrexia of nknown Origin.......

Ascites

Edema

Asthenia

Hyperpyrexia

Malingering

XVI.--Diseases, the total of which

have not caused 10 Deaths.

Observation

In Attendance

10

10

34

35

1

1

44

16.

9

6585

18

18

}

45

18

9

1

280 17

281 17

01 2

TOTAL..

265

9,147

452 9,412

311

841

1:

24,903 5,270 25,744 965

1.

M 121

APPENDIX G.

Mortuaries Return of Discases for the year 1930.

Diseases.

I.-Epidemic, Endemic, and

Infectious Diseases.

Enteric Group:-

(a) Type not defined

Malaria:

(a) Quartain

Smallpox

Measles

Diphtheria....

Dysentery:-

>

(a) Amoebic

(b) Bacillary

Epidemic Cerebro-spinal Fever ...... Tuberculosis Pulmonary and Laryn-

geal

Male.

Female.

9

64

101

28

29

96

1

1

1

CO N

3

2

2

10

5

296

309

Tuberculosis of the Meninges or

Central Nervous System.....



7

6

Tuberculosis of the Intestines or

Peritoneum

Tuberculosis of Bones and Joints

Tuberculosis disseminated:

27

14

3

I

Aente

Syphilis:

(a) Tertiary

(b) Hereditary

Septicemia

106

136

2

53

74

4

3

Carried forward...

681

685

M 122

Mortuaries Return of Discases for the

year 1930.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

Brought forward.........

681

685

II.-General Diseases not mentioned above.

Cancer or other malignant Tumours

of the Stomach or Liver Cancer or other malignant Tumours of the Peritoneum Intestines, Rectum

Beri-beri

Rickets

Diseases of the Thymus

Diseases of the Spleen.....

Chronic poisoning by organic sub- stances (Morphia, Cocaine, &c.)

III-Affections of the Nervous System and Organs of the Senses.

Meningitis not including Tuber-

culous Meningitis or Cerebro- spinal Meningitis

Apoplexy:-

Hæmorrhage.......

IV-Affections of the Circulatory System.

Pericarditis

Acute Endocarditis or Myocarditis ...

11

6

3

1

43

9

1

30.00

1

4

Iz

}

Carried forward...........

763

716

2

1

"

T

M 123

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1930,

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

Brought forward.........

763

716

IV. Affections of the Circulatory

System, Continued.

Other Diseases of the Heart:-

() Valvular:

Mitral

Aortic

() Myocarditis

Diseases of the Arteries:

(a) Aneurism

(b) Arterio-Sclerosis

(* Other diseases

Embolism on Thrombosis (non-cere-

bral

Diseases of the Veins :-

Varicose Veins...

1- Affections of Respiratory

System.

Bronchitis:

(a) Acute..

(4) Chronic

Broncho-Pneumonia

Pneumonia:-

(a) Lobar

361

(6) Unclassified

Pleurisy, Empyema

Gangrene of the Lungs

Pulmonary Emphysema

Other affections of the Lungs-

Pulmonary Spirochaetosis

19

4

1

1

:

:

265

323

1

559

528

69

40

28

20

1

Carried forward.........................

1,730

1,631

-

M 124

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1930.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

Brought forward.........

1,730

1,631

VI. –Diseases of the Digestire System.

A - Uleer of the Stomach

B-Ulcer of the Duodenum

Other affections of the Stomach

Gastritis

Diarrhoea and Enteritis:

-

100

3

4

2

:

Under two years

454

471

Diarrhoea and Enteritis :-

Two years and over....... Ulceration...

Diseases due to Intestinal Parasites:-

(a) Trematoda (Flukes) (b) Other parasites

...

Appendicitis.

Hernia

Acute Yellow Atrophy of the Liver..

Cirrhosis of the Liver: -

-

(a) Other forms

Biliary Calculus

Other affections of the Liver:

Abscess

Jaundice

Peritonitis (of unknown cause)

Other affections of the Digestive

System

VII.--Diseases of the Genito- urinary System (non-Venereal).

26

25

3

1

1

1

1

3

1

139

7

172

3

دت

Acute Nephritis

CO

3

Chronic

17

co co

3

3

Carried forward.........................

2,286

2,152

M 125

Mortuaries-Return of Diseases for the year 1930.

Diseases.

Male.

Female.

Brought forward.........

2,286

2,152

VIII.—Puerperal State. -

Accident of Pregnancy:-

Abortion

Puerperal Septicæmia

IX.-Affe tions of the Skin and Cellular Tissues.

Gangrene

X.- Discuses of Bones and Organs of Locomotion (other than Tuberculosis.)

Other Diseases of Bones or Orgaus

of Locomotion

XI.-Malformations,

Spina Bifida, &c.

XII.- Diseases of Infancy.

Congenital Debility

Premature Birth

Other affections of Infancy..

XIII.-Affections of Old Age.

1

1

1

:

12

11

157

204

39

44

15

4

Senility:-

Senile Dementia

1

Carried forward.........................

2,512

2,417

CONTENTS.

1. Report of the Head of the Sanitary Department:-

Sanitary Board Members

...

Legislation

Page

4

4

5

6

6

6

6

Staff

Administration

Refuse Collection and Removal

Nightsoil Removal...

Disinfection at Disinfecting Stations

Miscellaneous Works at Departmental Works

Dead Boxes and Ambulances

Public Bath Houses

...

Water Closets and Public Conveniences

Markets and Special Food Licences Offensive Trades

Cemeteries, Mortuaries, Crematoria Births and Deaths Registration Registration of Child Vaccination. Revenue and Expenditure ...

2. Report of the Medical Officer of Health :-

:

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Work done under the Public Health & Buildings

Ordinance

7



9

10

...

Work done under the Food and Drugs Ordinance and

Sec. 82, P. H. & B. O. ...

11

3. Report of the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon:-

Staff

General Statistics

Slaughter houses Revenue

Lard Factories

Crematorium ...

Diseases in Depots...

Grass Quarantine Live Stock

...

...

:

Infectious Disease in the Colony...

:

:

36.

36

37

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

38

38

39

39

39

40

40

CONTENTS,—Continued.

4. Appendices (H. S. D.'s Report):-

Appendix A Cost of Refuse Removal

15

B. Disinfection at Disinfecting Stations C. Calls made for Dead Boxes and

Ambulances

D. Public Bath-houses

...

...

E. Water-Closets and Urinals Installed up

to the 31st December, 1930 ...

F.

Markets

""

""

G.

Burial space in Cemeteries ...

4.9

H.

(i) Interments

(ii) General Exhumation

(iii) Private Exhumation. (iv) Cremations

I. Certified and Uncertified deaths

J. Vaccination



K. Revenue...

17

L. Expenditure

...

...

Page

13

14

...

...

250

15

16

...

17

18

19

20

21

21

21

22

...

23

24

25

5. Tables (M. O. H.'s Report):-

M. Nuisances reported

classified

by Health Districts

>>

N.

>>

29

"

0. (i)

"3

P. House Cleansing

9.5

""

(ii) Prosecutions

27

28

...

30

31

32

33

34

...

35

Q. (i) Number of Chinese Houses, Hong Kong

(ii)

دو

R. Houses limewashed

Kowloon...

Appendix M (1)

REPORT OF THE HEAD OF THE SANITARY DEPARTMENT.

1. SANITARY BOARD.

The following were members of the Sanitary Board during the year:

President, the Head of the Sanitary Department, Mr.

W. J. Carrie from 1st to 2nd January and Mr. G. R. Sayer from 3rd January to 31st December. Vice-President, the Director of Public Works, the

Honourable Mr. H. T. Creasy, C.B.E.

The Secretary for Chinese Affairs, the Honourable Mr. E. R. Hallifax, C.M.G., C.B.E. for whom Mr. A. E. Wood acted from 1st February to 8th May and from 25th June to 31st December.

The Director of Medical and Sanitary Services, the Honourable Mr. A. R. Wellington, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., D.T.M. & H., D.P.H. from 1st January to 16th October.

The Medical Officer of Health, Mr. G. W. Pope, L.R.C.P. & S., D.P.H., took the place of the Director of Medical and Sanitary Services from 17th October to 31st December.

Dr. W. V. M. Koch.

Mr. Wong Kwong Tin.

The Honourable Mr. J. P. Braga resigned on expiry of

term of office on 7th December.

Mr. Chau Tsun Nin.

Mr. Lo Man Kam.

Major D. G. Cheyne, o.B.E., M.C., R.A.M.C. from 1st January to 27th February, when he resigned. Lieutenant-Colonel C. D. Myles, 0.B.E., R.A.M.C. ap- pointed on 28th February, vice Major D. G. Cheyne, O.B.E., M.C., R.A.M.C. Lieutenant-Colonel C. D. Myles resigned on 22nd May.

Mr. F. C. Hall appointed on 23rd May, vice Lieutenant-

Colonel C. D. Myles, 0.B.E., R.A.M.C.

Dr. R. A. de Castro Basto elected on 8th December,

vice the Honourable Mr. J. P. Braga.

M (1) 4.

Note:

Mr. J. H. Gelling was appointed Secretary, Sanitary Board on 21st August vice Mr. J. Watson trans- ferred.

Mr. J. Hargreaves was appointed Assistant Secretary on 7th November, vice Mr. D. A. Rushton trans- ferred.

2.-LEGISLATION.

The following by-laws were made by the Board:-

The Food-preserving Establishments By-laws for the regulation of food-preserving establishments, made by the Board on 25th August, 1925, were approved by the Legislative Council on 31st July.

The Eating-house By-laws for the licensing and regula- tion of eating houses were made by the Board and approved by

by the Legislative Council on 4th September..

The Offensive Trades By-laws were amended so as to increase the minimum age for the employment of children in any offensive trade classified as such by the Offensive Trade By-laws, from ten years to twelve years. This amendment was approved by Legislative Council on 2nd October, 1930.

3.-DEPARTMENTAL STAFF.

Inspectors:-

The establishment was increased by one First Class and one Second Class Inspector. The numbers of Inspectors on duty on 1st January, 1st July and 31st December were 51, 46 and 46 respectively (Senior Inspectors included).

Clerical Staff:-

The Establishment was increased by one Interpreter.

4.--ÅDMINISTRATION.

The administrative machinery as described in previous reports remained unchanged except for an experimental regrouping of certain Health Districts in Hong Kong involving two additional Inspectors.

M (1) 5

5.-REFUSE COLLECTION AND REFUSE REMOVAL.

There are now twenty refuse lorries in use, fourteen in Hong Kong and six in Kowloon. In addition a one ton Ford truck was put into use at Kennedy Town Slaughter House to replace the Buffalo cart. There was a drop of over 3000 tons of refuse collected in Hong Kong and an increase of over 3000 tons in Kowloon,

(a) Collection.-There were collected and delivered to the depots from City of Victoria including Hill district and outlying residences

64,500 tons

(of which 63,000 were collected by motor lorry) from Kowloon, including Kowloon Tong and Kowloon City

32,500 tons

(of which 27,000 were collected by motor lorry) making a total of

97,000 tons

(or 265.75 tons per day.)

The all in cost for Hong Kong was $170,000 or $2.60 a ton. For Kowloon $80,000 or $2.44 a ton.

In addition some 5,330 tons of refuse was collected in rural districts (including Shaukiwan), and burnt in incinerators.

(b) Refuse Removal.-Some 163,500 tons (448 tons a day) was received at the depots. The difference between this figure and the figure shewn under paragraph (a) as collected is due to a large quantity of refuse taken to the depots by private firms and individuals. Practically all the refuse from the City of Victoria was taken to sea by barges and dumped. All the Kowloon refuse, some 46,374 tons, was dumped at Cheung Sha Wan Reclamation.

The cost is shewn in Appendix A.

The barges were delayed on two occasions by weather conditions.

(c) Appendix A (i) shows the gross cost of collection and removal as compared with last year.

6. NIGHTSOIL REMOVAL.

The contractors for the removal of nightsoil from Victoria and the Kowloon Peninsula, Shaukiwan, Aberdeen, Pokfulam and Aplichau, and Stanley and Taitam respectively carried out their work satisfactorily.

During the year the monthly payment due from the contractor was reduced by $431.25 in respect of flush closets opened in Victoria and $93.75 in respect of flush closets opened in Kowloon. The total deduction for the year amounted to $4,332.00 for Victoria and $3,355.40 for Kowloon.

M (1) 6

The contract for the removal of nightsoil from Shaukiwan for three years from 1st January was signed. The sum payable monthly to the revenue under the contract is $86.50.

7.-DISINFECTION AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

Appendix B shows the number of articles and vehicles disinfected during the year 1930. The figures for 1929 are given for comparison. The use of portable 'Sack' disinfectors has been continued.

8. MISCELLANEOUS WORKS AT DEPARTMENTAL WORKS.

Miscellaneous repairs and new construction of various articles were done at the Hong Kong and Kowloon Disinfecting Stations to the value of $3,314.78 and $1,067.12 respectively. At the Central and Kowloon Garages miscellaneous repairs to the value of $3,648.42 were also carried out.

9.-DEAD BOXES AND AMBULANCES.

Dead boxes are obtainable at any hour of the day or night at the two Disinfecting Stations and also by day at the Eastern and Western District Sanitary Offices.

The Department maintains a reserve of hand ambulances on behalf of the Public Ambulance Service controlled by the Inspector-General of Police.

Appendix C shows calls made during the year.

10.-PUBLIC BATH HOUSES.

Bath houses were opened in Dyer Avenue and Sai Kung Road during the year.

Appendix D shows the number of men, women and children who used the Bath-Houses during the years 1929 and 1930.

11.-WATER CLOSETS AND PUBLIC CONVENIENCES.

During the year public conveniences were completed and demolished as follows:

Completed:

One flush closet at Dyer Avenue.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.

Kowloon Tong Market.

Sai Kung Road.

rear of 70 & 72 Nathan`

Road

rear of 58 & 60 Nathan

Road

on permit

Tung Shing Road, Aberdeen. Spring Garden Lane.

Water Street.

One dry latrine at Shek O Village.

Demolished:

M (1) 7

One dry latrine at Dock Lane.

The Board approved the installation of 2,211 water closets, 4 trough closets and 135 urinals. on private premises. The distribution of these water closets in districts is shown in Appendix O (i). The number of water closets and urinals in- stalled up to 31st December is shown in Appendix E.

12. MARKETS AND SPECIAL FOOD LICENCES.

No new market was opened during the year.

70 additional food licences were issued under section 78 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance.

Appendix F gives revenue from letting of stalls in the various markets.

13.-OFFENSIVE TRADES.

Offensive trades are controlled by the Board under section 42 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance, No. 1 of 1903.

Specific areas for these trades are set aside in Hong Kong and are situated at the extreme west and east of the town, well removed from the thickly populated areas.

Several areas are also set aside in Kowloon and offensive trades are confined within the limits of these areas.

The following is a list of offensive trades showing the num- ber of licences issued in Hong Kong and Kowloon:-

Hong Kong Kowloon

2

Trade

Bone-boiling

Bone-storing

Drying fish guts, scales

and

scraping

1

Fat-boiling

18

4

Feather-drying

1

Feather-sorting

1

Feather-cleansing

1

1

3

Feather-storing

Feather-storing and cleansing

Feather-sorting and storing

Feather-cleaning, sorting and

packing

Carried forward

1

35

13

M (1) 8

Brought forward

Trade

Hong Kong Kowloon

35

13

1

1

Feather-sorting, packing & storing

Feather and bone-storing

Feather-cutting, tearing & storing 1

Hair-drying

Hair-sorting

1

1

Hair-sorting and storing

Hair-combing, sorting & packing..

1

1

Lard-boiling

4

Lard Factory

1

Pig-roasting

16

18

Rag-picking and storing

:

1

Rag-picking

1

Rag-sorting and storing

Rag-storing

Soap-boiling

Soap Factory

Scales-drying...

Tannery

5

1

1

5

68

56

2 2 10

10

14.--CEMETERIES, MORTUARIES, CREMATORIA.

The following cemetery was opened during the year:--

Kowloon Cemetery No. 1 (European Protestant Ceme-

tery) Fo Pang.

Appendix G shows the approximate burial space in the main cemeteries and the net available space on 31st December, 1930.

Appendix H (i) shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year, 1930.

Appendix H (ii) shows the number of general exhumations carried out at the Public expense, and Appendix H (iii) shows the number of exhumations carried out by relatives of the deceased.

Appendix H (iv) gives particulars of cremations. bodies deposited in the Tung Wah Hospital Mortuary, and removals from the Colony before burial.

M (1) 9-

15. BIRTHS AND DEATHS REGISTRATION,

The Head of the Sanitary Department is Registrar of Births and Deaths.

year:

The following Births and Deaths were registered during the

Chinese

Non-Chinese

Total

Births

Deaths

11,134

16,082

378

208

11,512

16,290

The vital statistics will be found in the report of the DirectOV of Medical and Sanitary Services.

Appendix I shows the ratio of Certified and Uncertified

deaths.

16.

REGISTRATION OF CHILD VACCINATION.

The Head of the Sanitary Department is Registrar of child vaccination under the Vaccination Ordinance No. 12 of 1923.

Appendix J shows the number of children whose births were registered and the number certified as successfully vaccinated during the year.

17. REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Appendix K shows under the various heads the revenue collected by the Department during 1930 and also the revenue paid into the Treasury in respect of the Department's contracts. As regards the former, markets show an increase.

Revenue from contracts again shows a decrease on account of the reductions allowed to the Conservancy Contractors.

Appendix L shows the Department's expenditure for the year 1930.

18.

Reports by the Medical Officer of Health and the Colonial Veterinary Surgeon will be found appended .

28th February, 1931.

G. R. SAYER,

Head of the Sanitary Department.

M (1) 10

ANNEXE BY THE MEDICAL OFFICER OF HEALTH.

1.-(i) WORK DONE UNDER THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

Sanitary Nuisances and Contraventions of Sanitary By- laws : Appendix M shows the total number of nuisances re- ported, the action taken to obtain compliance and amount of fines. Of the total number of nuisances reported in which action was taken 63% were abated after receipt of a letter. This is a small but welcome improvement over the corresponding figure (58%) for last year. In 248 cases a legal notice failed to produce compliance. Of the summonses which followed 21 secured convictions, 8 were discharged, 6 withdrawn and 3 abandoned.

It is a matter for regret that these figures for legal notices and summonses show an increase over 1929 in that they are index of the number of failures to get works carried out by peaceful persuasion rather than resort to law.

It should be remembered that each inspector has for supervision a district, with approximately 25,000 inhabitants, most of whom are ignorant of the rudiments of sanitation.

Appendix N shows the nuisances in respect of which action has been taken.

Appendix O (i) shows the Health Districts from which these nuisances were reported and Appendix O (ii) gives details of all prosecutions and amount of fines inflicted.

(ii) Building Nuisances :-Appendix O (i) line 1 shows by districts the number of nuisances under Part III of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance reported by the Department to the Building Authority for action. These

These are additional to those referred to in paragraph (i) above.

(ii) Although Appendix O shows a considerable balance in favour of new domestic premises over similar premises. demolished, there is no evidence of any decrease in overcrowding. This is especially true of the central districts in the City of Victoria.

It has, up to the present, been found quite impractical to enforce strictly Sections 153 and 154 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordinance. Much time is therefore taken up in the consideration of applications for modifications of these sections.

(in) Miscellaneous improvements:-Appendix O (i) lines 3, 4, 5 show miscellaneous improvements effected by District Inspectors in their districts. Lines 7, 8, 9, 10 show the number of houses demolished and erected. The great majority of these

are tenement houses.

M (1) 11

(v) House Cleansing :-The routine work under the by- laws for the Prevention and Mitigation of Epidemic Disease was carried out during the year. Appendix P shows the num- ber of floors cleansed in the various districts and as compared with the last two years.

House cleansing was carried on continuously on five mornings a week throughout the year by the staff. The privilege of permitting certain occupants of premises to carry out house cleansing at their own convenience was continued and further extended during the year. The terms and con- ditions under which this concession was granted were, generally, complied with.

Appendix Q shows approximately the total number of Chinese houses liable for cleansing.

(vi) Limewashing :-The usual limewashing required by the Domestic Cleanliness and Ventilation By-laws was carried out during the year. Appendix R shows the number of floors lime- washed. The difference between this total and the total in Appendix Q is due partly to exemptions, some floors being new and not requiring limewashing. A certain number has also been carried over into 1931.

Departmental limewashing at the request of owner and where necessary under By-law 4 was carried out throughout the year. No complaints as to the quality of the work done or of injury to property were received.

(vii) Rat Catching :-Thirty members of the Cleansing Staff were employed during the year setting traps, bird-lime boards and rat poison, also collecting rats from street rat-bins, private premises, etc., and taking them to the Public Mortuary for examination. Special campaigns in March and September were undertaken when rat poison was distributed throughout the urban districts. The total number of rats caught was:

Hong Kong

Kowloon

88,842

52,444

Of these none were found to be plague infected.

2. WORK DONE UNDER THE FOOD AND DRUGS ORDINANCE AND

SECTION 82 OF THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND BUILDINGS ORDINANCE.

Samples of fresh milk were submitted for analysis under section 12 of the Food and Drugs Ordinance, of which 51 were found to pass the standard and 2 to be below standard

M (1) 12

In addition the following samples of Food and Drugs were taken:

Cocoa 28, Tinned butter 6, Cheese. 15, Tea 21, Cream 15, Treacle 14, Jam 13, Bread 22, Lard 1, Butter 28, Sugar 34 and Flour 34.

Of the above, three samples of Tea, 1 of Butter and 1 of Sugar failed to satisfy the legal requirements.

Under Section 82 of the Public Health and Buildings Ordine the following foodstuffs were seized and destroyed by order of the Head of the Sanitary Department.

tins,

Sardines 4,680 tins, Mushroom 563 tins, Cocoa 947 Cream 331 tins, Water chestnuts 6 tins, Fears 5 bags, Ham 1, Tinned bacon 4 cases, Desiccated Cocoanut 1 case and a quantity of Salt eggs and Oranges.

G. W. POPE,

Medical Officer of Health.

M (1) 13

Appendix A.

Cost of Refuse Removal.

Hong Kong Kowloon. Total.

Salary of Bargemen,.

$ 17,900.10 $ 8,944.54 $ 26,844.64

Salary of Crews,.....

6,747.96

Repairs, Stores and Coal for

Launches and Barges,......

45,127.98

Totals......$ 17,900.10 $ 8,944 54 $ 78,720.58

Appendix A (i).

Comparative Table for 2 years.

1929.

1930.

City Scavenging,

$146,401.19

$ 169,397.38

Kowloon Scavenging,

66,919.95

80,385.36

Removal,.....

77,655.02

78,720.58

$

Appendix B.

DISINFECTION AT DISINFECTING STATIONS.

- M (1) 14

1929.

1930.

Eastern Western

Eastern

Western

Hong Kong Kowloon

District

District

Hong Kong Kowloon

District

District

Disinfect- Disinfect-

Office.

Office.

Disinfect- Disinfect-

Office.

Office.

ing

ing

ing

ing

Station.

Station.

Portable Sack

Station.

Station.

Disinfectors.

Portable Sack Disinfectors.

Number of articles disinfected...

14,802

10,324

1,860

831

14,121

4,364

1,474

215

Number of Public Vehicles disinfected

136

354

164

315

Number of Days Disinfecting

Apparatus in use

106

317

58

41

92

171

38

11

*47

*30

*62

*45

Number of Articles washed after disinfecting

121

60

*Portable Sack Disinfector.



- M (1) 15-

Appendix C.

CALLS MADE FOR DEAD BOXES AND AMBULANCES.

Hong Kong Kowloon

Disinfect- Disinfect-

ing Station. Station.

Eastern Western

ing

District

District

Office.

Office.

i

Ambulances,

European

3

Ambulances,

Chinese

1

115

78

23

48

Dead Boxes

247

1,937

264

536

Appendix D.

PUBLIC BATH-HOUSES.

1929.

1930.

Men.

Women. Children.

Men.

Women.

Children.

M

Wanchai, Cross Lane Bath-house

187,014

112,515

84,344

151,536 106,370

81,915

Second Street Bath-house

256,520

181,006 158,450

319,793

217,608

125,057

Pakhoi Street Bath-house

52,917

18,275

27,528

71,097

16,568

34,228

Pound Lane Bath-house

129,053

61,888

35,588

144,688

44,556

27,836

Boundary Street Bath-house

24,783

13,334

34,174

75,847

38,203

87,037

Dyer Avenue Bath-house

From May to December

25,783

4,090

9,000

Sai Kung Road Bath-house

From September to December

10,031

3,239

14,612

Sea Water Supply.

Main Water Supply.

Nullah Supply & Streams.

*Well Supply and other Private Supplies.

Total.

Appendix E.

WATER-CLOSETS AND URINALS INSTALLED UP TO THE 31st DECEMBER, 1930.

HONG KONG

KOWLOON.

Hong Kong

No. of Premises.

& Kowloon.

Water-Closets...

370

783

30 |

Urinals

1,659 | 3,737 | 6,549

13 | 152 |

*Other private supplies - Taikoo Reservoir,

130

963

| 1,158 |

45

...

Sea Water Supply.

Main Water Supply.

Nullah Supply and Streams.

Well Supply and other

Private Supplies.

Total.

† Installed at Kwong Wah Hospital.

Grand Total.

311 2,607 | 3,059

| 3,059

9,608

1,186

172

1

217

1,375

Hong Kong.

Kowloon.

|

697 | 1,893

1,89

Total.

M (1) 17 —

M (1) 18

Appendix F.

MARKETS.

The following statement shows the Revenue derived from Markets:

Markets.

1917-1926 (average for 10 years).

1927.

1928.

1929.

1930.

C.

f.

$

C.

$

Central

64,783.78

62,614.80

62,794.80

75,656.00

“.

73,363.40

C.

Hung Hom

4,483.26

7,930.00

6,780.40

6,771.40

6,805.60

Mong Kok Tsui.

3,238.74

11,118.20

11,073.60

16,175.00

16,183.80

Sai Wan Ho

2,015.60

2,854.80

2,854.80

1.053.50

4,015.50

Sai Ying Pun..........

16,485.40

16,525.20

16,525.20

20.787.20

20,821.20

Shaukiwan

Shek Tong Tsui So Kon Po

Tai Kok Tsui

Tsim Sha Tsui

Wanchai

2,108.04

2,132.40

2,132.40

2,512,30

2,566.20

924.00

964.00

1,008.00

1,411.50

1,762.50

1,822.04

2,911.50

3,025.50

2.859.10

2,863.70

791.37

872.40

872.40

872.40

994.40

4,688.86

5,408.00

5,546.90

6,928.50

7,049.80

3,887.80

4,910.40

4,910.40

5,979.60

5,979.60

Western (North Block)

21,284.37

25,626.80

25,478.30

82,078.20

32,174.10

Western (South Block)

32,541.25

32,906.40

32,921.40

40,530.60

39,994.50

Yaumati

14,539.53

19,272.40

21,258.20

28,347.60

27,027,30

Aberdeen

512.23

852.00

1,011.60

1,422.00

1,646.00

Canal Road

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

516.00

Praya East (pulled down October 1926)..

531.07

Reclamation Street

3,054.99

3,289.50

3,295.20

4,155,20

Staunton Street

946.91

955.50

963.60

963.60

4,972.10 963.60

Tai Hang

594.46

565.20

846.00

891.50

967.20

Sham Shui Po

3,216.70

2,974.80

3,409.30

4,888.40

9,393.40

Kowloon City (1/1/22 & 1/4/28) opened....

286.18

254.40

2,476.70

3,092.40

4,476.50

Reclamation Street, (Poultry) 1/6/22 opened

1,402.45

1,454.40

1,454.40

1,978.80

1,978.80

Monmouth Path 1/1/24 opened

2,013.53

1,765.20

1,749.00

1,725.90

1,583.40

Wong Nei Chong 1/1/24 opened

2,322.00

2,322.00

2,322.00

2.322.00

2,322.00

Quarry Bay 1/7/24 opened

2,240.80

1.861.90

1,104.10

913.10

Whitfield 1/10/24 opened

8,199.53

5,524.70

5,652.60

5,669.30

727.00 5,544.50

Waterloo Road 1/10/24 opened.........

996.00

Kun Chung 1/2/25 opened...

Cheung Sha Wan 1/4/28 opened.

15,679.15

984.00 13,839,90

984.00 13,861.80

981.00

1,068.00

14,040.60

14,924.60

To Kwa Wan 1,428 opened

1,436.40 912.30

1,706.60

1,571.00

959.20

880.70

Total,............$

213,124.04

233.206.80

239,177.30

291,191.50

295,136.40

- M (1) 19-

Appendix G. 1930.

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7)

Cemeteries

Approxi-

mate

burial space.

Available

space as on

31/12/29.

Subsequent Exhumation.

Private.

Public.

Gross

available

space.

Burial

since

31/12/29.

Net

available

(8)

Average

burials

(9)

Average

(10)

private

exhumation

space on

31/12/30.

for last

10 years.

for last

Last previous

General

Exhumation.

10 years.

Colonial

19,200

1,090

1,090

62

1,028

66

2

1917

288

1923 765

Roman Catholic

8,000

1,352

31

1,383

126

1,257

144

33

Mohammedan

3,500

186

186

49

137

61

Parsee

200

99

99

99

1

Mount Caroline

8,653

1,287

435

413

2,135

1,034

1,101

969

265

1929

584

Chinese Protestant,

1,800

238

238

83

155

73

Eurasian (Ho Tung)

200

172

172

2

170

3

Kai Lung Wan East

14,000

4,450

344

1,345

6,139

1,137

5,002

1,368

207

1929 1,052

Kai Lung Wan West (Tung

Wah)

53,486

2,589

175

3,563

6,327

5,327

1,000

5,070

70

1929 1,700

Kowloon Cemetery No. 3 (Ho

Mun Tin) (Mohammedan)...

300

294

294

2

292

2

New Kowloon Cemetery No.

4 (Sai Yu Shek)

5,400

4,544

16

Chai Wan (Shaukiwan)

6,700

1,395

61

25

94

4,654

190

4,464

182

1,456

225

1,231

266

142

28

1928

1927 1,046

169

Chai Wan (Christian)

185

57

57

6

51

5

...

Stanley (Tung Tau Chau).

1,090

337

I

338

15

323

21

1927 100

Roman Catholic So Kon Po...

20,000

7,211

~

2

610

7,823

1,522

6,301

1,455

2

1929

100

Shum Wan (Aberdeen)..

2,000

850

22

872

148

724

194

32

1927

200

Jewish

250

107

107

2

105

2

1

Shek O

996

996

996

...

Malay

100

98

98

98

1

Kowloon Cemetery No. 2 (Ho

Mun Tin) (Chinese)

53,400

10,067

566

10,633

5,268

5,365

4,555

218

Chinese Permanent.

14

152

93

7

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 3 (Cheung Sha Wan).. Kowloon Cemetery No. 1 (Fo Pang) (European Protestant) Roman Catholic, (Ho Mun Tin) New Kowloon Cemetery No. 1 (Kowloon Christian)

......

8,909

8,830

8,835

161

8,674

115

5

⠀ ⠀

...

71

:

:

...

:

:

:

:

M (1) 20

Appendix H (i).

INTERMENTS.

1. The following table shows the number of interments at the various cemeteries during the year 1930.

Public.

Private.

Colonial

62

Roman Catholic, Happy Valley

126

Mount Caroline

1,034

Kai Lung Wan East .... 1,137

Mohammedan, Happy Valley

49

Kai Lung Wan East, Chiu Chow

Jewish, Happy Valley..

2

38

Parsce, Happy Valley...

Chai Wan

225

Malay, Happy Valley...

Chai Wan, Christian

6

Chinese Roman

Shum Wan

148

Catholic, Sookunpo. 1,522

Tung Tau Chau

15

Tung Wah Hospital, Kai Lung Wan

5,327

Shck O

New Kowloon Cemetery

No. 4 (Sai Yu Shek) 190

Kowloon Cemetery No. 2. (Ho Mun Tin) Chinese 5,268

Tung Wah Hospital, Eastern Extension

315

Chinese Permanent

152

Chinese Protestant

83

Kowloon Cemetery No. 3. (Ho Mun Tin) Mohammedan

2

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 1 (Chinese Christian)

71

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 3 (Cheung Sha Wan)

Eurasian (Ho Tung)

2

161

New Kowloon Cemetery No. 2

8,286

7,649

M (1) 22

Appendix I.

RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

CHINESE.

5

LO

6

7

8

Certified Deaths.

9

Uncertified Deaths.

10

11

Ler.

Percentage certified.

Chinese HongKong. Percentage

Kowloon.

Total.

uncertified. deaths.

T.W.H.

&

K.W.H.

Medical

Reference.

Medical

Practi-

Coroner.

Percentage

Percentage

certified. uncertified.

T.W.E.H.

tioners.

91.8

8.2

16,082

5,308

3,340

8,648

1,534

119

247

5 502

53.7

46.2

5.9

17,346

5,628

3,423

9,051

1,571

80

152

5

6,487

52.7

47.8

94

a has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered Medical Practitioner or Licentiate who has attended the case before death.

1

2

3

NON-CHINESE.

4

Uncertified Deaths.

M (1) 22

Appendix I.

RETURN OF CERTIFIED AND UNCERTIFIED DEATHS.

СЛ

5

6

7

8

Certified Deaths.

CHINI

Unc

Year.

Non-

Chinese

deaths.

Number

By

certified. Medical

Medical

Reference.

Coroner. Percentage certified.

uncertified.

Percentage Chinese Hong Kong. Kowloon, deaths.

Total.

T W.H.

&

T.W.E.H.

K.W.H.

Practi-

tioners.

1930

208

191

***

1

16

91.8

8.2

16,082

5,308

3,340

8,648

1,534

119

1929

219

206

...

:.

13

91

5.9

17,346

5,628

3,423

9,051

1,571

80

N.B.-"Certified" signifies a death the cause of which has been certified on Form 16 of Ordinance No. 7 of 1896 by a registered Medical Practitioner or Licentiate who

l

M (1) 21



Appendix H (ii).

2. General Exhumations.

Kai Lung Wan West

Kai Lung Wan East

Mount Caroline

Sai Yu Shek

Ma Tau Wei

3,563

1,345

413

94

4,801

10,216

Appendix H (iii).

Exhumations were carried out by relatives as follows:

Aberdeen

Cheung Sha Wan

Chinese Permanent

Chai Wan

22

5

14

61

Colonial

Hau Pui Lung

169

Ho Mun Tin

566

Kai Lung Wan east

344

Kowloon Tong

19

Mt. Caroline

435

Ma Tau Wei

9

Roman Catholic

31

Roman Catholic Sokonpo

2

Sai Yu Shek

16

Stanlev

1

Tung Wah Hospital

175

Mount Davis

11

Kowloon Tong Christian

17

Unauthorised cemeteries

1

1,898

3. Cremations.

Appendix H (iv).

33 bodies were cremated at the Japanese Crematorium and

26 at the Sikh Temple.

4. Mortuaries.

96 bodies were awaiting burial at the Tung Wah Hospital

Mortuary in 1930.

5. Removals.

392 bodies were removed from the Colony before burial.

Registry.

Appendix J.

VACCINATION RETURN FOR 1930.

B. F.

Unvac-

New

births.

Total Vaccin- liable. ated.

Loft

Dead.

Colony.

Cannot Had be Small-

found.

Insus-

ceptible.

Unfit.

Total

C. F.

Total.

pox.

cinated.

M (1) 23

217 374 591

293

14

56

29

1:

189

591

2,1371,143 3,280

558

8

181

183

5 2,343

3,280

884 2,042 2,926

571

118 499

478

1,260

2,926

1,536 | 1,257 | 2,793

702

1

5

230

1,855

2,793

207

682

889

382

187

169

151

889

245 404

649

146

42

232

221

649

1,5974,183 | 5,780

2,765

44

45

665

17 2,244

5,780

42

20

62

25

2

170

321

491

109

10

18

18

22

12

62

150

204

491

255

689

944

626

20

298

944

...

Births and Deaths (Non-Chinese) Births and Deaths (Chinese) Eastern Chinese Public Dispensary Western Chinese Public Dispensary Central Chinese Public Dispensary... Shaukiwan Chinese Public Dispensary Yaumati Chinese Public Dispensary Hunghom Chinese Public Dispensary Kowloon City Chinese Public Dispensary. Shamshuipo Chinese Public Dispensary...

Total...

7,290 11,11518,405 6,177

2391,000 2,178

1

3

|

30 8,7778,405

M (1) 24

Appendix K.

REVENUE FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1930.

$ c.

Chinese Undertakers' Licences

1,020.00

Forfeitures

5.41

Motor Spirit Duties

305.56

Special Food Licences

14,153.46

Ambulance and Cremation Fees

780.00

Births and Deaths Registration

3,785.20

Chinese Cemetery Fees

4,471.00

Official Certificates

4,630.00

Use of Motor Vans

24,422.00

Lands Not Leased

180.00

Laundries

3,000.00

Markets

295,428.60

Slaughter House, Kennedy Town

97,052.00

Slaughter House, Ma Tau Kok

Interest

Condemned Stores, &c.

41,557.00

18.09

874.00

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

3,102.02

Scavenging City, Villages and Hill District

2,215.08

Total

$496,999.42

1329

.$469,617.92

Revenue from Contracts.

Deduction.

Conservancy Contract, Victoria... $6,600.00 $4,332.00 $2,268.00

Conservancy Contract, Kowloon.. 5,520.00 3,355.40

2,164.60

Conservancy Contract, Shaukiwan

1,038.00

Conservancy Contract, Aberdeen, Pokfulam and

Aplichau

60.00

Blood and Hair, Kennedy Town

8,064.00

Blood and Hair, Ma Tau Kok

2,904.00

Slaughtering Contract, Sai Wan Ho

4,260.00

Slaughtering Contract, Aberdeen

2,304.00

Total

$23,062.60

M (1) 25

Appendix L.

EXPENDITURE FROM JANUARY TO DECEMBER, 1930.

S.H.

$

C.

1. Personal Emoluments

608,943.82

2. Advertisements

938.87

3. Ambulances, Coffins, Dead Vans, and Dead

Boxes

403.62

4. Bath-houses, Fuel, Light, etc.

2,254.58

5. Bonuses to Dispensary Licentiates and Clerks

for vaccination of Children and Registration

of Births

2,711.70

6. Burial of Infected Bodies

715.00

7. Coal for Official Quarters

1,381.24

8. Conveyance and Motor Allowances

10,277.82

9. Disinfectants

8,002.54

10. Disinfecting and Cleansing Apparatus

1,899.85

11. Operating expenses of disinfectors

972.66

12. Upkeep of Dust and Water Carts

268.38

13.

Exhumation, Recurrent

10,543.74

14.

Fuel for Blacksmith's Forges

171.00

15. General Cleansing, Chinese New Year

587.70

16. Head Stones

1,698.52

17. Incidental Expenses

1,907.71

18. Light

10,549.36

19. Motor Lorries, Vans and Cars, Running

Expenses

24,715.14

20. Nightsoil Receptacles

657.42

21. Paint, Turpentine, &c.

1,174.77

1

22. Rat Poison, Rat Traps, &c.

2,315.39

Carried forward

.$693,090.83

M (1) 26-

S.H.

23.

Brought forward

Rent of Quarters for Inspectors and Sanitary

Offices

24.

Rent of Quarters for Scavenging Coolies

CA

C.

$ $693,090.83

1,008.00

3,458.00

25. Scavenging Villages

784.91

26. Scavenging Gear

8,765.20

27. Transport

1,721.65

28.

Uniforms for Staff

11,369.97

29. Workshop Apparatus

109.76

30. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Fuel.....

4,988.73

31. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses,

Incidental Expenses

1,167.52

32.

Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Light...

896.51

33. Animal Depots and Slaughter Houses, Motor

Meat Vans Running Expenses

6,267.38

34. Cattle Crematorium and Refuse Destructor

407.57

Total

$733.986.03

1929

$580,598.93

Crown Agents' a/c for November and December are excluded

as they have not yet arrived.

SPECIAL EXPENDITURE.

C.

35. Launch to replace S.D. 3

39,230.00

36. 2 Refuse Barges (Replacements)

27.500.00

$7.

8 Motor Lorries

62,043.38

38. New Boiler for Hong Kong Disinfecting Station

3,000.00

Total

.$131.773.38

$125.590.94

1929

Crown Agents' a/c for November and December are ex-

cluded as they have not yet arrived.

- M (1) 27

Appendix M.

No. of nuisances reported

RETURN FOR THE YEAR, 1930.

Outstanding (31st December, 1929)

No. of nuisances reported in which no

action taken

No. of first letters sent

15,529

No. of first letters withdrawn

70

Compliance on first letters

13,933

No. of legal notices sent sections

29 and 30

8,034

No. of legal notices withdrawn section

31.

27

No. of legal notices modified section 31

No. of legal notices time extended

section 31

Compliance on legal notices

15

7,793

No. of summonses applied for section 32

248

No. of summonses refused

No. of summonses withdrawn

No. of cases discharged

CO

No. of cases abandoned through

defendant absconding

00

No. of Magistrate's order section 33...

128

Compliance after Magistrate's order

(including compliance after

summonses) Fines $3,689

No. of re-summonses for failure to

comply section 35

Compliance after re-summonses

Fines $205

No. of further re-summonses

Compliance after further re-suinmonses

Fines $25

Nuisances abated by the Sanitary

Department section 35

Expenses of abating $

Outstanding

215

16

15

1

1

226

22.077

235

Total

22,306 22.306

- M (1) 28

Appendix N.

CLASSIFICATION OF NUISANCES REPORTED, 1930.

Defective wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves gutters, etc. 3,811

Defective gratings

Illegal cubicles

3,216

2,484

1,91

No dust bins

Choked wastepipes, rain water pipes, eaves gutters, etc... 1.454

Missing gratings

1,075

Accumulation of refuse

Defective floor surfaces

956

832

Rat runs filled in

769

Illegal height of cubicles

650

Obstructions of verandahs

621

Obstructions of windows, doors, ventilating openings, etc.

501

Gratings not properly fixed

Defective cement rendering

190

Use of basement for habitation, as workshops, ete.

328

Dirty condition of water closets, latrines, urinals, etc........

297

Breeding of mosquitoes

286

Dirty condition of premises

255

Use of verandahs for cooking and sleeping purposes

244

No receptacles to latrines

237

Accumulation of stagnant water

206

Illegal wooden bunks and beds in excess

197

Obstructions of yards

119

Use of yards for cooking purposes

77

Use of rooms without windows openings into external air

for sleeping purposes

71

Use of kitchens for sleeping purposes

No cement rendering

Carried forward

M (1) 29

Brought forward

.21.762

No fly-proof covers to receptacles of latrines

46

Illegal wooden partitions

illegal showcases

44

28

Water closets not maintained in thoroughly efficient and

cleanly condition

27

Use of latrines for cooking purposes

22

Offensive trades (Rag-storing, feather-storing, soap- boil-

ing etc).

21

Insufficient glazed area to windows openings.

17

Bake-houses without licences

13

No urinal accommodation

13

Accumulation of undergrowth

11

Dark and ill-ventilated premises for sleeping purposes

10

Storage of urine

10

Discharge of sullage water, urine, excreta, etc. heeping of cattle and swine without licences Illegal wooden covers over cubicles

9

7

7

4

Urinals or water closets constructed without permission of the Board and the consent of the Colonial Secretary. Occupying of bake-houses by more than one person

between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Exposing of articles for sale in a part of the market not

appropriated for the sale of such articles

Premises being used for sleeping purposes whilst used as

garages

Use of dairy for sleeping purposes

Bamboo scaffolding with cavities capable of holding water. Exposing of fruit, vegetable, etc. for sale without licences. Use of cockloft for cooking purposes

Food preserving establishment not having been registered

at the Office of Sanitary Department

Laundries without licences

Untrapped illegal wash basin

Illegal shade in the yard ......

No water supply to water closet No flue to stove

Eating house without licence

N

2 2 2

1

1

1

1

1

Total..

.22,077

M (1) 30

Appendix O (i).

CONSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS, 1930.

6a &

4

работа

5

6

7

8

9

10

10′′

12

B

14

15

16

17

Peak.

τα

Shau- Aber- kiwan. deen.

Total.

85

32535

322

247

64

58

36

66

66

46

31

71

153

99

42

79

78

43

12

41

7

1,917

'17

1,779

986

1,222

1,095

1,059

725

1,605

998

593

972

1,919

1,116

828

801

806

706

141

487

66

22,077

12

29

2

1

I

I

13

31

119

13

48

49

16

38

36

42

143

48

58

54

98

93

84

33

121

50

:

:

2

:

:

1,182

14

68

54

6 8

89

72

81

43

82

37

29

11

15

CO

32

3

تت

25

33

1

2

769

74

3

18

4

15



32

191

15

368

115

17

2

226

17

50

216

146

2,211

انت

3

I

11

2

2

50

:

:

:

:

30

12

w

21

4

130

:

:

10

:

:

:

:

:

3

11

12

1

1

:

I

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

...

:

:

4

:

:

:

:

:

12

1

50

27

22

34

62

348

95

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

91

62

112

182

1,105

293

4

:..

:

:

:

10

2

:

3

:

:

1

5

9

12

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

14

983

41

13

3,373

2

13

3

26

2

:

:

18

4

I

35

M (1) 30

Appendix O (i).

CONSPECTUS OF WORK DONE IN THE SEVERAL HEALTH DISTRICTS, 1930.

1a &

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

2a

6a &

Τα

8

9

10

10%

Applications for B.A. Notices,

52

53

66

185

322

. 247

64

58

36

66

66

46

31

71

...

Applications for S B. Notices,

719

942

1,295

1,217 1,779

986

1,222

1,095

1,059

725

1,605

998

593

972

Obstructions removed from open space,

9

13

I

12

29

2

1

1

1

...

Obstructions to light and ventilation removed,

20

57

55

13

48

49

16

38

36

42

143

48

58

54

3

Rat runs filled in,

6

17

18

44

68

54

89

72

81

43

82

37

29

Water closets installed in private Buildings,

206

386

3

174

تت

18

4

15

32

222

191

15

368

Houses demolished and No. of floors (Domestic Buildings),

Houses

1

10

5

ات

1

...

Floors

2

24

14

3.

:

:

:

1

:

:.

Honses

64

56

234

3

Houses erected and No. of floors (Domestic Buildings),

Floors

230

227

935

11

:

:

:

F

:

:

9

3

:

Houses demolished and No. of floors (Non Domestic Buildings),...

Houses

10

Į

11

...

Floors

Houses crected and No. of floors (Non Domestic Buildings',...

Honses

Floors

:

:

:

12

I

1

2

:

:

:

1

1

4

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

10

1

12

50

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

Nature of Offence.

1

1A &

· 2A

-

M (1) 31 -

Appendix O

PROSECUTIONS CLASSIFIED BY H

6A &

ลง

2

3

5

6

7

8

7A

5.

10

14

Dumping rubbish, nightsoil etc. Committing a nuisance in a public

place

Exposing for sale skimmed con- densed milk not properly labelled printed in English and Chinese the word 'This is skimmed milk'. Exposing for sale fruit, vegetable, pork, beef, etc. in a place which was not a public market and without S.B. Licence

Exposing for sale vegetable, meat, fish, etc. in a part of the market other than that which is appro- priated for the sale of such articles. Failing to notify a case of Small-pox.. Causing obstruction to scavenging... Failing to comply with the Magis-

trate's Order

Obstruction of avenues in markets,etc Carrying on an eating house busi- ness without permission from the Board

Using and permitting basements to

be used for habitation, workshop, preparation & storage of food, etc. Overcrowding of Basement Hawking fish, shrimps and vegeta- bles, etc. without S.B. Licence Trespassing on Government Property Dirty condition of Bakehouses,

market stalls, etc.................

Stealing wooden posts from the

Colonial Cemetery

Carrying Night-soil during pro-

hibited hours

Illegal obstruction of yard by a

portable boiler

Illegal obstruction of verandah by glazed and wooden structure...... Using premises for Offensive trade

without S.B. Licence...... Having in his possession on the premises a carcase of a pig which was unfit for food

Having in his possession on the premises Lungs of a pig which was unfit for food

Prosecutions on S.B.Nuisance Notices

:.

:

1

1

3

CO

8

15

3

3

2

...

1

...

Ι

N

:

1

1

1

...

:

3

...

:

3

ор

8

2

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

::

:

:

:

:

2

CO

6

00

11

1

:.

:

:

:

:..

:

1

:



:

1

11

1

NW

3

Co

6

:.

:

:.

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

-

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

':

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

:

P:

:

...

:

:

:

:

1

...

15

30

7 28

995

46

Ni

2 34

4

7

1

Total

23 40

21 46 55

7 34

6 17 18 32

18

In 7 cases summons withdrawn, 22 cases defendants discharged, 4 cases defendants absconded, 23 cases de 11 cases bail of $10 estreated, 1 case bail of $20 estreated, 2 cases imprisoned for 3 months, 1 case 2 1 case 5 days, 1 case 4 days.

2

136



$562.00

14

:

26.00

...

8 ५

10 10A 11 12

13

14

15

16

17 Peak.

Shau- Aber- kiwan.

deen.

Total No. of cases.

Total amount

of Fines.

- M (1) 31

Appendix O (ii).

CLASSIFIED BY HEALTH DISTRICTS 1930.

1

6

11

26

16

6

6

2

11

6

1

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

...

1

:

:

:

:

7

1

1

9

4

:

...

:

00

8

4

...

...

:

5

::

:

:

:

IN W

2

3

1

1

11

:

:

...

:

:

:

75.00

14

103.00

...

35

346.00

1

20.00

1

1

25.00

3

...

10.00

...

...

...

....

:

:

:

:

::

...

...

::

:

:

3

1

:

7

1

...

*

...

...

1

...

...

30.00

22

229.00

2

......

19

66.00

14

20.00

4

70.00

2

3

17.00

1

5.00

1

10.00

1

50.00

...

...

...

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

:

:

:.

1

:

:

:..

:

:

...

:

1

1

:

:

:

:

:

:

1

:

:

:

:

:

T:

:

:

:

1

1

50.00

130

:9

5

4

6 12 10

1

18

265

3,919.00

18 32 18

4

45 33

26

14 14 18 33 10

11

24

549

$5,633.00

conded, 23 cases defendants cautioned, 1 case bail of $3 estreated, 1 case bail of $4 estreated, 7 cases bail of $5 estreated, - 3 months, 1 case 2 months, 1 case 3 weeks, 1 case 18 days, 1 case 10 days, 8 cases 14 days, 1 case 8 days, 14 cases 7 days,

:

:

:.

:

:

:

:..

:

:.

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:

:.

...

:

:

7

1

-:

:

2

:7

:~

2

: *

- M (1) 32

Appendix P.

HOUSE CLEANSING RETURN.

Floors Cleansed.

1928

1929

1930

Eastern Districts (Shaukiwan

1, la and 2a and 2)

26,026

28,768

32,647

:

Central Districts (3, 4 and 5)........

22,966

21,633

31,995

Western Central Districts

(6, 6a and 7a and 7)

20,168

20,714

23,393

Western Districts (8, 9, 10

and 10a)

25,115

24,005

32,410

Aberdeen and Aplichau

2,600

2,572

2,719

TOTAL

96,875

97,692

123,164

Kowloon (11, 12, 13, 14, 15,

16 and 17)

55,710

55,070

57,788

*

Shaukiwan, Nos. 8, 13, 14, 15, 16 and 17 were cleansed

twice.

Nos. 1, la and 2a, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 10, 10a, 11 and 12 were

cleansed three times.

Nos. 6, 7, 6a, and 7a, and Aberdeen and Aplichau were

cleansed four times.

Appendix N.

HONG KONG.

REPORT ON THE BOTANICAL AND FORESTRY DEPARTMENT FOR THE YEAR 1930.

GENERAL REMARKS.

The weather, throughout the whole year, was generally favourable, to both gardening and forestry operations.

The rainfall for the year was 103.79 inches in 135 days as against 71.16 inches in 128 days in the preceding year. During July rain fell on 24 days and the total recorded for the month was 31.51 inches..

The typhoon which passed close to the Colony on July 24th blew down over 2,000 roadside shade trees, most damage being done between Castle Peak and Au Tau. Typhoon signals were hoisted on five occasions.

GARDENS, PARKS AND GROUNDS.

7

un-

Botanic Gardens.-A portion of the Old Garden, immediate- ly adjoining Garden Road, had to be given up, in order to allow of the widening of the road referred to, the area of ground lost was small, but the removal of the following trees was fortunately necessary, 1 Lagerstroemia flos-reginae, 3 Jacaranda mimosaefolia, 1 Paulounia Fortunei, 1 Eugenia myriophylla, 1 Garcinia xanthochymus, 1 Crataeva religiosa and 1 Adenanthera pavonina.

Grass Caterpillars (Thialle ta signifera) made their appear- ance in very small numbers only, and the amount of damage done by them was negligible.

The tree of Aleurites montana, on the upper terrace in the Old Garden, flowered and produced a heavy crop of seeds; this tree has been blown down and damaged, once or more, in every year since it was planted.

Four young trees were added to the row of Araucaria Cunninghamii on the north boundary of the Old Garden.

The number of trees, shrubs and pot plants sold during the year was 2,422.

N 2

Government House Grounds.—A portion of the long bed on the north-east side of the grounds was cleared of small trees and old flowering shrubs and refilled with a selection of young flowering shrubs, Roses and annuals; the old specimens of Araucaria Bidwillii which had stood in this bed for many years and had been stripped of the majority of branches by storms, were removed.

Flower beds were formed on the grass banks on the north- east side of the house and the small grass plots in front of the house, all were planted with Roses and annuals.

The interior of the house was decorated with pot plants as required.

Mountain Lodge Grounds.-The young trees of Cupressus macrocarpa and Casuarina equisetifolia, on both sides of the valley and the seedling trees of Pinus Massoniana, which were sown on the banks above the path leading from the main entrance to the house, made fair progress.

Undergrowth in the valley and other parts of the grounds was cleared as required; tennis lawns, golf greens, and other turfed areas were kept in good order generally.

Colonial Cemetery.-A number of large Banians (Ficus retusa) were removed from the burial areas, in order to prevent further damage to graves and headstones, which in many cases were being forced out of position by the roots of these very old trees.

A line of Phoenix Roebeleni was planted in the turfed areas on either side of the lower entrance.

All turfed areas were given such attention as they required, banks and outlying areas were cleared of undesirable under- growth.

Kowloon Hospital Grounds.-Large number of Cockchafer grubs made their appearance in various parts of the grounds and caused extensive damage to the turf.

Most of the flowering shrubs and Palms have died out owing to the force of the prevailing wind, and a belt of young Pinus Massoniana was planted on the south side of the grounds to form a wind break.

The extensive turfed areas were regularly weeded, cut, roll- ed and given such other attention as they required.

Parade Ground, Volunteer Headquarters.-The whole of this area was reconditioned and relaid with turf.

{

!

N 3

Blake Garden, West End Park, King's Park, Civil Hospital, Mental Hospital, Senior Officers' Quarters, Leighton Hill, Indian School, Statue Square Plots, Victoria Hospital, Home- stead Quarters, Government Pavilions and Villas, Royal Observatory, Kowloon Magistracy, Colonial Secretary's Resi- dence, Government offices, The Eyrie and Queen's Gardens.- The grounds of all the places mentioned were kept in order during the year, undesirable undergrowth was removed, storm damaged trees were removed and replaced and grass lawns, banks, trees, shrubs and other plants were given such attention as they required.

HERBARIUM AND LIBRARY.

Plant specimens of botanical interest were identified for local collectors and institutions in the Colony and elsewhere.

During the year 7 new books and 712 bulletins, pamphlets and other publications were added to the Library.

Facilities for study and research work were afforded to botanists passing through the Colony.

FORESTRY.

Formation of Pine Tree Plantations.-Increased areas were dealt with during the year, the number of sowings in situ of seed of Pinus Massoniana amounted to 277,193 as against 250,480 in the preceding year; the areas dealt with were Mount Collinson, Stanley Catchwater, Shek Li Pui Reservoir, Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve, hills in rear of Kowloon and Kowloon Bay, Tai Shu Wan, Deep Water Bay and Mount Cameron, the three last areas were formerly covered by trees which were destroyed by forest fires.

On suitable grassy areas, 2,018 pounds of seeds of Pinus Massoniana mixed with 200 pounds of locally collected Leucaena glauca seeds, were sown by the broadcast method.

Broad-leaved Trees Planted.-Groups of the following trees were planted in reserves, Pine Plantations and suitable sheltered areas, in all parts of the Colony, Celtis sinensis, Casuarina cquisetifolia, Cinnamomum Camphora, Crataeva religiosa, Tristania conferta, Sterculia lanceolata, Aleurites Fordii, Aleurites montana, Bischofia javanica, Acacia confusa and Acacia pennata.

Aleurites montana planted on roadsides and other areas at Fan Ling, flowered very freely and over 100 trees each produced a small crop of seeds.

Aleurites Fordi at Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve, flowered and produced a very small number of seeds.

N 4

were

Camphor Plantation, Tai Wo Po.-A large number of mature Pines, among which the young Camphor trees originally planted, were removed, also all wild trees, creepers and undergrowth were cleared away; 548 young Camphors were added to the existing plantation,

Insect Pests.-Pine Tree Caterpillars (Dendrolimus punc- tatus) appeared in plantations in large numbers, early in January. Their progress was apparently checked, and large num bers were killed, by the cold weather which lasted until the middle of February, when collection and destruction was com- menced. Over 17 tons were so dealt with.

In accordance with advice received from the Imperial Bureau of Entomology, Kew, the caterpillars were not destroyed immediately after collection, but were left alive, in shallow pits, under conditions that prevented the ultimate emergence of the moths, and at the same time allowed of the escape of parasites and other enemies of the caterpillars.

Trees Felled.-Very large areas were cleared of Pines and indigenous trees in the Aberdeen Valley and at Shek Li Pui :: connection with the construction of the new reservoir and catch- ment areas,

Increased motor traffic and road widening necessitated the removal of 95 roadside shade trees. Among this number were some of the oldest and largest trees in the Colony, the areas from which they were removed were as follows; Wong Nei Chong, Tai Hang, Causeway Bay, Stanley, Taipo Market, Whit- field, Queen's Road, Garden Road and Bonham Road.

Protection of Plantations.-All fire barriers and forestry paths were cleared and repaired, over 40 miles of forestry paths, 34 miles of fire barriers ten feet in breadth and 6 miles twenty feet in breadth were dealt with.

In Mount Collinson Prohibited Area a new forestry service path, 4,000 feet in length, was constructed.

A total of 24 fires occurred during the year as against 116 in 1929; the most serious of such fires was in a licensed plantation in Sha Tin District, where over 4,000 Pines were destroyed and 3,000 badly damaged.

On the Ching Ming and Chung Yeung Festivals no fires broke out; with the exception of the times when heavy rain has fallen on the festival days referred to, this is a record in the history of the Department. This fortunate state of affairs was largely due to the distribution of posters and handbills warning people against causing damage by fire, combined with a close watch kept by all members of the staff in the vicinity of cemeteries and isolated graves in hill districts.

N 5

Taipo Kau Forestry Reserve.-The service path was com- pleted during the year and one new fire barrier was constructed.

were

The swampy areas were planted with Salix babylonica and three varieties of this species; in the upper portion of the reserve small groups of Populus nigra and Populus tomentosa established. A row of seedling "Moreton Bay Chestnut” (Castanospermum australe) was planted by the side of the new portion of the service path,

Artocarpus integrifolia, raised from seeds sown in situ were again badly damaged by rodents.

Forest Guards Service.-The year was remarkably free from serious raids on plantations. Heavier penalties are now in force, and the imposition from time to time of more severe sentences appears to have had a salutary effect.

The total number of persons arrested and charged with forestry offences by Forest Guards was 234, of these 219 were fined or imprisoned, 6 received strokes, 5 were cautioned and 4 discharged. Eight persistent offenders were banished.

The Police Department arrested and charged 256 persons with forestry offences, of these 211 were fined or imprisoned, 3 had bail estreated and 42 were discharged.

Full particulars of the cases are given in Tables I and II,

Undergrowth Clearing.-Anti-malarial undergrowth clearing was carried out in Hong Kong and the New Territories, throughout the year, the total area so dealt with was 3,539,523 square feet.

In connection with surveys, nullah training and general public improvements, the area cleared amounted to 2,331,365 square feet.

AGRICULTURE, ETC.

The New Territories Agricultural Show was held at Shek Wu Hui on December 27th and 28th; exhibits of native vegetables and general field crops were better than those of the preceding year, in the foreign vegetable division there were a small number of very good exhibits, but on the whole the exhibits were much poorer in quality than those produced in 1929.

A general exhibit of foreign vegetables, grown in the experimental garden at Sheung Shui, was staged on both days.

The experimental garden was enlarged by the appropriation of a large area of grass land on the east side of the existing cultivated area; the ground was trenched, drained and generally prepared for the planting of Citrus and other fruits in 1931, double hedge of Livistona chinensis and Agave horrida was planted along the south boundary.

3

N 6

Inspection of Nursery Stock and Vegetable Products.- Seventeen consignments of Narcissus Tazetta containing 335,994 bulbs and 4 consignments of various Lilium Spp. containing 5,325 bubs were inspected and certified as fit for export to Great Britain, United States of America and other countries where plant quarantine regulations are in force.

One hundred and twenty-three consignments of fresh and dried vegetable products were examined and passed for export to the Philippine Islands.

Sugar Cane consigned to Straits Settlements and Federated Malay States must now be accompanied by a certificate of fitness for export; three consignments containing 28,500 pieces: were dealt with.

SEED COLLECTION.

Seeds of the following were collected for local use and for the purpose of exchange:-Artocarpus hypargyrea, Liquidambar Chinensis, Strychnos angustifolia, Eucalyptus tereticornis, Celtis sinensis, Melaleuca leucadendron, Albizzia Lebbek, Bischofia javanica, Castanospermum australe, Ardisia crispa, Atalantia Hindsii, Garcinia oblongifolia, Acacia pennata, Leucaena glauca, Cassia fistula, Sapium sebiferum, Sapium discolor, Melia Azedarach, Pinus Massoniana, Callistemon rigidus, Cinnamomum Camphora, Aleurites montana, Aleurites triloba, Aleurites Fordii, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cunninghamia sinensis, Glyptostrobus heterophyllus, Bauhinia variegata, Tristania conferta, Sterculia lanceolata, Ficus retusa, Callistemon lanceolata, Poinciana regia, Paulownia Fortunei, Evodia triphylla and Tutcheria spectabilis.

EXCHANGE OF SEEDS, ETC.

The Department is indebted to the following donors of seeds, plants, etc.-Curator, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh; Director, Horticultural Section, Giza, Egypt; Superintendent, La Mortola, Italy; Director, Department of Agriculture. Bermuda; Experiment Station, Hawaiian Sugar Planters Association, Board of Agriculture and Forestry, Honolulu; The Laynitz Nurseries, Victoria, B.C.; Arnold Arboretum, Harvard University, Mass.; His Excellency the Governor General of the Philippine Islands; Professor Woon-yung Chun, Hon. Mr. W. E. L. Shenton; Hon. Mr. J. J. Paterson; Messrs. H. Hum- phreys, J. E. P. Walker, Dr. Lyon (Honolulu); J. F. Grose; P. C. Yieh (Nanking); D. V. Steavenson; G. H. Gandy; W. Dixson (Syney) and L. W. Bryan (Honolulu).

The following were the principal recipients:-Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew; Superintendent, Agricultural Department, St. Lucia, B. W. I.; Conservator of Forests, Sandakan; Director, Agricultural Station, Paget East, Bermuda;

N 7

Director, Horticultural Section, Giza, Egypt; Bureau of Introduc- tion, Institute of Applied Botany and Cultures, Leningrad; His Excellency the Governor General of the Philippine Islands; His Excellency General Sandilands; H. B. M. Consul General, Canton; Mrs. R. M. Dyer; Rev. W. E. L. Martin; Sir Shou Son Chow; General Li Fuk Lam; Messrs. H. Humphreys; Bernard E. Rees (Peiping); G. S. Hugh-Jones; J. Caerhays Williams (Cornwall); Knowles A. Ryerson (Washington); L. W. Bryan (Honolulu).

Motor Car.-A car and driver were provided early in the year, a portion of the store in Macdonnell Road being altered to form a garage. The provision of this car has greatly assisted the work of the Department, Forest Guards have been able to carry out numerous extra and more effective patrols, hill and forest fires have been quickly dealt with by day and night, and much more supervision has been given to work in outlying districts.

REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE.

Statements of Revenue collected by the Department and comparison of Revenue and Expenditure are given in Tables III and IV.

30th March, 1981.

H. GREEN,

Superintendent.

Table I.

FOREST GUARDS' SERVICE: OFFENCE.

Forest

Cattle Trespassing Assault on grazing in upon stealing. plantation. plantation.

Guards.

Report of:

Village or

District.

Block

Pine tree

stealing.

Pine tree

branch

stealing.

Wild

Brushwood Barking flower

Tree root

stealing. trees.

stealing.

Victoria Wongneichong

Shaukiwan

Tytam

Stanley

1234 LO

6

4

1

1

1

Aberdeen

11

4

Pokfulam

7

3

10

2

Kowloon

8

1

2

2

Harbour Belt

9

10

35

124

Cheungshawan.

10

Kang Hau

11

New Territories.)

12

3

1

3

10

5

1

2

4

2

66

1

8

Total for 1980

40

7

67

2

14

103

1

Total for 1929

19

10

43°

1

2

4

77

- N 8-

N 9

Table II.

POLICE COURT RESULTS.

Case.

1930.

1929.

و,

$1 to $5 fine

$ 6 $10

58

25

21

$11

$25

""

22

72

14

15

$26

$50

1

1 to 7 days' imprisonment

18

10

8

14

13

40

38

3 weeks'

4

6

10

1 month's

35

13

7

}

6

1

7

10

4

1

"

3

2

21

12

Discharges

Cautions

4

2

5

18

Forfeiture of Bail

4

Received Strokes

6

Cases withdrawn

2

Bound over

1

Total

234

156

Revenue.

Timber Sales

Plant Sales

Loan of Plants

Forestry Licences

N 10

Table III.

REVENUE.

Other Miscellaneous Receipts

Interest, ou Current Account

Total

1930

1929

$

4,121.39

4.102.25

1,002.30

797.35

169.30

346.18

* 5,641.13

5,232.93

¡ 1,421.96

1,383.48

20.38

23.78

12.376.46

11,885.97

*Collected by District Officer.

+Including $1,295 for Inspection of Nursery Stork as against $1,360

in 1929.

Table IV.

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE FOR THE YEARS 1921-1930.

Year.

Total Expenditure.

Total Revenue.% of Revenue

to Expenditure.

$

1921

61,428.11

10,657.86

17.35

1922

71,223.47

12,464.32

17.50

1923

77,157.40

15,848.76

20.54

1924

86,516.80

13,038.79

15.07

1925

96.371.63

9,806.95

10.18

1926

87.642.19

10,798.95

12.32

1927

98,289.09

7,861.76

8.43

1928

96,597.70

8,849.35

9.16

1929

98.412.87

11,883.97

12.78

1930

120,191.99

12,376.46

10.30

Appendix 0.

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION

FOR THE YEAR 1930

Chapter 1-Preface.

SUMMARY OF CONTENTS.

Chapter 2-Review of Year.

Chapter 3-Report by the Inspectors of English Schools. Chapter 4--Report by the Inspectors of Vernacular Schools. Chapter 5-Report by the Director of the Technical Institute.

Tables I & II.-General Tables of Schools and Scholars. Table III.-Government Schools.

Table IV.-Controlled Schools in receipt of a Grant under the

Grant Code.

Table V.-Amount of Fees remitted in Government Schools in

1930.

Table VI.-Graph showing numbers of scholars between 1913

and 1930.

Chapter I.-Preface.

1.-CLASSIFICATION OF SCHOOLS.

At the end of 1930 a departmental committee of the Board of Education (England) was surveying the present position of schools which have hitherto escaped the attentions both of the Board of Education and of the Local Education Authorities and it is not unlikely that the committee may recommend legislative

action to bring all schools within official control.

Similar action was taken in Hong Kong in 1913 under the Education Ordinance of that year which brought all schools into the control of the Education Department. A school was then defined as a place where ten or more persons are being habitually taught".

Of the 1024 schools controlled by the Education Depart- ment in 1930 twenty are provided schools. The cost of their equipment and maintenance is a charge on the colonial revenues and except for a few temporary appointments the teachers are civil servants on the permanent establishment of the colony.

0 2

305 unprovided schools are partly dependent on assistance from public funds.

There are also 699 other unprovided schools subject to registration and inspection but receiving no financial assistance from funds at the disposal of the Director of Education.

2.-GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

These are either schools where the medium of instruction is English or mostly English or schools where the medium of instruction is Chinese.

The former, sixteen in number, are known as "English" schools, the latter of which there are three as "Vernacular" schools.

Of the four English schools, classed as "secondary" schools in Table II, two are Anglo-Chinese schools for boys and one is for girls. These three schools have primary departments. The fourth school, the Central British School which is a mixed school, has no primary department.

Of the twelve English schools, classed as "primary" schools in Table II, four are mixed schools preparing for the Central British School. In this group are also four "District" schools, including one for Indian boys and four "Lower Grade” schools three of which are in rural districts.

In those English schools which are attended by Chinese the study of English and of Chinese are carried on side by side, the pari passu system requiring that promotion shall depend on proficiency in both languages.

Of the three Government Vernacular schools one has a seven years course and includes a Normal department. There is also a Normal school for Women teachers and a Normal school on the mainland which aims at providing Vernacular teachers for rural schools.

The Technical Institute, classed in Table II as “vocational” is attended by persons desirous of receiving instruction for the most part germane to their daytime occupations.

3.-GRANT IN AID AND SUBSIDISED SCHOOLS.

There are twelve Grant in Aid English Schools.

There are four Grant in Aid Vernacular Schools.

Of the former six are schools for boys and six are for girls.

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One English school for boys and one for girls have primary departments only. The remaining ten, classed in Table II as "secondary" schools have primary departments as well as the upper classes.

The Vernacular Grant in Aid Schools are schools for girls and are classed in the Table as "secondary" schools.

The 288 subsidised schools are all Vernacular schools.

4.-UNAIDED SCHOOLS.

In 1930 there were 564 unaided Vernacular schools with 26,834 children.

In 1930 there were 138 unaided English schools with 7,113 children.

Chapter II.

REVIEW OF YEAR.

STAFF.

Under this head the chief event of the year was the retire- ment on pension of Mr. E. Ralphs, Inspector of English Schools and, at the date of his retirement, Acting Director of Education. Mr. Ralphs was appointed an assistant master at Queen's College in 1898 and thus had 32 years service when he retired. He held successively the posts of Assistant Master, Normal Master at Queen's College, Director of the Technical Institute and Second Master Queen's College. He had acted as Head Master of Queen's College before he was appointed Inspector of English Schools in 1913, since which date he has acted several times as Director of Education.

At the Seventy Third Meeting of the Board of Education held in June last year the following resolution proposed by Hon. Mr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., LL.D. and seconded by Mr. B. Wylie was carried unanimously:--

"The Board desires to record in the Minutes of this Meet- ing its keen appreciation of the service rendered by Mr. Ralphs to Education in the Colony".

Mr. A. R. Sutherland, M.A. has succeeded Mr. Ralphs as Inspector of English Schools.

In July, 1930, Mr. A. H. Crook, O.B.E., M.A., Head Master of Queen's College retired on pension. Mr. Crook, who joined the staff of Queen's College in 1903, was promoted Second Master Queen's College in 1918 and, with the exception of

0 4

a short period as Head Master of Yaumati School, spent the whole of his service at the former school. Mr. Crook, who was a member of the Court of the University of Hong Kong, received the O.B.E. decoration in January last year.

In addition to their educational work both these officers distinguished themselves in other fields of activity and are followed into retirement by the good wishes of their many friends within and beyond the Education Department.

Mr. F. J. de Rome, M.B.E., B.Sc., has succeeded Mr. Crook as Head Master of Queen's College.

The inclusion of Mrs. Morris, M.B.E., Senior Mistress at King's College, in the June Honours was a great pleasure to her colleagues as well as to her past and present pupils.

Two additional Senior Masterships and four new senior posts for Mistresses were created in 1930. These new posts do not add to the total establishment.

Four new Masters arrived from England and at the end of the year there were 27 of these officers on the establishment out of the 31 provided for in the 1930 Estimates.

One European Mistress was transferred to the temporary establishment on marriage: one resigned and has not been replaced.

Of 22 Government students in residence at the University at the beginning of the year two failed to keep their student- ships. Of the four who passed their final degree examinations at the end of the year three received appointments as University Trained Teachers and one was permitted to postpone service on account of ill health.

I regret to have to record the death of Mr. Ng Wan To after nine years efficient service as Vernacular Master at Yau- mati School.

BOARD OF EDUCATION.

The Board of Education met five times during the year.

Mr. H. K. Woo, Rev. A. D. Stewart, Mr. H. B. L. Dow. biggin and Rev. F. Short whose terms of office had expir i were re-appointed.

In October Mr. W. W. Hornell, C.I.E. (now Sir Wil Hornell) Vice Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong appointed a Member of the Board.

Rev. Fr. Macdonald, S.J. joined the Board durin absence on leave of Rev. Fr. Byrne. S.J.

0 5

The Members of the Board during 1930 were :-

Director of Education, Chairman.

Senior Inspector of English Schools.

Senior Inspector of Vernacular Schools.

Chev. J. M. Alves.

Mr. A, el Arculli.

Rev. Fr. Byrne, S.J.

Captain E. B. Deakin, D.S.O., M.C.

Mr. H. B. L. Dowbiggin.

Mr. W. W. Hornell, C.I.E.

Rev. F. Short.

Rev. A. D. Stewart.

Hon. Mr. S. W. Tso, O.B.E., LL.D.

Mr. H. K. Woo.

Mr. B. Wylie.

Mr. A. R. Sutherland, Secretary.

GOVERNMENT SCHOOLS.

British Schools:-The total number of pupils enrolled in the nve (mixed) schools was 458 in 1930 compared with 466 in 1929. The Junior schools continue to work in co-operation with each other and with the Head Master of the Central British School. It has again been a cause of satisfaction to learn from examination results and otherwise that children proceeding to Europe from these schools are held to be well up to the standard of their age.

English Schools:-The total number of pupils enrolled in 1930 was 3,666 compared with 3,554 in 1929.

The course in these schools is eight years though only three of them have both primary and secondary departments.

Candidates for admission to Class 8, where the study of English is begun, are required to pass an examination in Chinese. The upper age limit is at present 12 plus. There is a tendency to regard this as a lower limit also. There is no lower age limit and it is hoped that parents will see the advisability of sending boys at 11 or 10 years of age, i.e. as soon as they can pass the entrance examination.

Queen's College, King's College and Belilios Public School for Girls have both primary and secondary departments.

Ellis Kadoorie School, Yaumati School, Wantsai School and the Indian School, all known as "District Schools", have 110 class above 4 from which, in these schools and the

0 6

corresponding classes in Queen's College and King's College, there is an annual examination for entrance to Class 3 in one or other of the two senior schools.

Gap Road, Tai Po, Un Long and Cheung Chau schools are "Lower Grade" schools with classes 8 to 6. Gap Road boys usually go on to Wantsai School and those Tai Po boys who continue usually do so at Yaumati School.

The attendance at these schools is ordinarily good, but the Head Master of Queen's College found it necessary at the annual prize-giving to warn parents of the harm done by with- drawing boys temporarily for trivial reasons.

During the year the syllabus of the District Schools, which is the same for the Remove and Lower classes at Queen's College and King's College, was revised by a Departmental Committee consisting of the Inspector of English Schools and the six head masters concerned. It was to come into force in January, 1931, and will reduce the number of new subjects to be encountered in Class 3.

A revision of the Vernacular syllabus in English schools. was under consideration but as this had not been completed at the end of the year it does not fall within the scope of this report.

Vernacular Schools:-There was an increase in numbers at the Vernacular Middle School: two new masters joined the staff: two new classrooms were added, unfortunately restricting the already insufficient playing area attached to this school. The attendance in the Higher Primary, Normal and Middle School classes were respectively 125, 30 and 68.

The examiners at the final Normal examination report that work in general has improved "though there is still room for improvement in the syllabus of Chinese Classics and Litera- ture".

Numbers at the Vernacular Normal School for Women showed a slight increase.

The results at the final Normal examination were dis- appointing. Premature promotion must be avoided.

The Normal school for rural teachers at Tai Po suffers from poor material.

Technical Institute :-The number on the roll was 798 an increase of 200 on the previous year. The numbers attending the Vernacular and English Teachers classes were respectively 223 and 53. These classes are a not unsuccessful attemp:

women

provide assistance and encouragement for men and teachers who have to teach in the daytime and attend these classes with the praiseworthy object of improving themselves and the quality of their teaching.

The annual examination conducted by outside examiners is exacting. In the final year in the Men's Vernacular Classes, of seven candidates none were considered good enough to pass, though one got over 50% of the maximum and all but one more than 34%. In the second year, of nine men sitting for the terminal examination, four only were allowed to pass on to the Third Year Class. In the two First Year divisions for men only one out of 36 was allowed promotion and six of the failures were advised not to continue in the classes.

Of the Third Year Women 3 passed out of 9: in the Second Year four out of fourteen and in the First Year 10 out of 38 were allowed to go on, while 16 out of 41 in the Preparatory Divisions gained promotion.

The pass mark is high and, of the 114 candidates who failed, 40 gained 50% and 66 34% of the possible maximum of marks.

Of 46 English teachers sitting for First, Second and Third Year examinations 39 passed, two of them with distinction.

Details of other classes will be found in Chapter V.

It is clear from the attendance and the increasing numbers on roll that the Technical Institute is supplying a demand on the part of adult persons who are occupied in the daytime.

AIDED SCHOOLS,

There were 911 girls in attendance at the four Vernacular Grant Schools.

There were 4,826 boys and girls in attendance at the twelve English Schools.

Code Article 21 requires a school to have met 370 times in the year in order to qualify for a grant. This condition will be rigorously observed in future and I do not propose to re- commend for a full grant any school which has less than the required number of meetings.

St. Joseph's Junior School and St. Francis' School continue without secondary departments. It is unfortunate that there are difficulties in the way of extending the system of "feeder" schools. It makes for economy and facilitates concentration of staff and equipment.

- 08

The Upper Classes at Queen's College and King's College are fed by promotion from their own remove and lower classes as well as from those of four "District Schools", the latter in turn being "fed" by promotion from their own lower classes and from those of the "Lower Grade" Schools.

The Upper Classes of Queen's College and King's College are thus pyramided on ten schools, while, with the exception of St. Joseph's Junior School and St. Francis' School, each Grant in Aid School has an upper school of its own.

The Girls' Schools are happily circumstanced but, though small classes are educationally desirable they are a luxury for schools which find it difficult to maintain upper school staffs and the half-empty first classes in the attached table indicate, as I pointed out in my report for 1929, that there is no need for any increase in the secondary departments in English Schools.

Table showing Classes 1 and 2 in November 1930.

Diocesan Boys School

Class 1 Class 2 Total.

17

34

51

St. Joseph's College.

33

95

128

St. Paul's College

12

30

42

Wah Yan College

26

56

82

Wah Yan Branch School

0

18

18

Diocesan Girls School

11

17

28

French Convent School

.10

20

30

Italian Convent School

14

19

33

St. Mary's School

11

10

21

St. Stephen's College for Girls

14

17

31

Queen's College

33

80

113

King's College

23

52

75

Belilios Public School

13

18

31

To efficient Vernacular schools managed by charitable bodies, where education is free or fees nominal, subsidies are paid on the dollar for dollar basis. In rural districts schools established by the village elders are similarly assisted.

To efficient proprietary schools financial assistance is given in cases where otherwise the teacher will not realise a reasonable income.

Of the 688 Vernacular schools on the urban register in 1930 195 were subsidised and there were 93 subsidised schools out of the total of 169 in the rural districts.

0 9

Two schools call for special mention. The Salesian In- dustrial School provides elementary education in conjunction with vocational training for orphans and other poor children. At present the trades taught are shoe-making, tailoring, printing and carpentry. The school is equipped with machinery for a mechanical workshop but the present premises are too restricted for the purpose.

This efficient and useful institution will in the near future move into more commodious premises and will be able to extend the scope of its activities and accommodate a considerably greater number of young people.

In High Street there is a subsidised Vernacular School with about 60 pupils who divide their time between ordinary school subjects and practical work in weaving and basket making for which a special instructor is provided.

UNAIDED SCHOOLS.

The 702 unaided schools include three uncontrolled schools, 135 English schools and 564 Vernacular schools.

The total number of the English schools appears stationary though in the course of the year ten ceased to exist and eleven new ones were registered. Most of these schools, though by no means all, are comparatively cheap. Others admit pupils who are

over age for Government schools or who for other reasons cannot gain admittance to Government or Grant in Aid schools.

When circumstances permit I hope that it will be possible to bring a larger number of the unaided Vernacular schools within the subsidy system. These schools would seem to have a prior, though less articulate claim on assistance from public funds.

SCHOOLS FOR GIRLS.

י

Out of 62,297 children under instruction in the schools of the Colony during 1930, 18,136, or 29% were girls. The proportion of girls to total number of pupils on roll in urban districts was double that in rural districts.

Girls attending schools were distributed as under:

(a) in Government Schools

in Aided Schools.

in Unaided Schools

1,225

9,470

7,441

18,136

(b) in Vernacular Schools

14,806

in English Schools

3,330

18,136

O 10

Of the 1,225 girls attending Government schools 264 were in the mixed schools for British children: the Technical Institute accounted for 185, and of these 138 were teachers: the remainder were attending Belilios Public School and the Vernacular Normal